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Sample records for bacteria causing acute

  1. Acute Postoperative Endophthalmitis Caused by Staphylococcus lugdunensis▿

    PubMed Central

    Chiquet, C.; Pechinot, A.; Creuzot-Garcher, C.; Benito, Y.; Croize, J.; Boisset, S.; Romanet, J. P.; Lina, G.; Vandenesch, F.

    2007-01-01

    Acute postoperative endophthalmitis caused by Staphylococcus lugdunensis is infrequently reported in clinical studies. Five cases of acute postcataract surgery endophthalmitis caused by S. lugdunensis were taken from a multicenter prospective study conducted in four university-affiliated hospitals in France (2004 to 2005). These cases were characterized by severe ocular inflammation occurring with a mean delay of 7.6 days after cataract surgery, severe visual loss (hand motions or less in three cases), and dense infiltration of the vitreous. Each of these patients was initially treated by using a standard protocol with intravitreal (vancomycin and ceftazidime), systemic, and topical antibiotics. Given the severity of the endophthalmitis, even though bacteria were sensitive to intravitreal antibiotics, pars plana vitrectomy was needed in four cases. The final visual prognosis was complicated by severe retinal detachment in three cases. The microbiological diagnosis was reached by using conventional cultures with specific biochemical tests and eubacterial PCR amplification followed by direct sequencing. PMID:17392442

  2. Causes of acute bronchitis (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... of the bronchial tubes, the part of the respiratory system that leads into the lungs. Acute bronchitis has a sudden onset and usually appears after a respiratory infection, such as a cold, and can be ...

  3. Acute esophageal necrosis caused by alcohol abuse

    PubMed Central

    Endo, Tetsu; Sakamoto, Juichi; Sato, Ken; Takimoto, Miyako; Shimaya, Koji; Mikami, Tatsuya; Munakata, Akihiro; Shimoyama, Tadashi; Fukuda, Shinsaku

    2005-01-01

    Acute esophageal necrosis (AEN) is extremely rare and the pathogenesis of this is still unknown. We report a case of AEN caused by alcohol abuse. In our case, the main pathogenesis could be accounted for low systemic perfusion caused by severe alcoholic lactic acidosis. After the healing of AEN, balloon dilatation was effective to manage the stricture. PMID:16222758

  4. Nontoxigenic Vibrio parahaemolyticus Strains Causing Acute Gastroenteritis

    PubMed Central

    Leoni, Francesca; Serra, Roberto; Serracca, Laura; Decastelli, Lucia; Rocchegiani, Elena; Masini, Laura; Canonico, Cristina; Talevi, Giulia; Carraturo, Antonio

    2012-01-01

    We investigated the virulence properties of four Vibrio parahaemolyticus strains causing acute gastroenteritis following consumption of indigenous mussels in Italy. The isolated strains were cytotoxic and adhesive but, surprisingly, lacked tdh, trh, and type three secretion system 2 (T3SS2) genes. We emphasize that nontoxigenic V. parahaemolyticus can induce acute gastroenteritis, highlighting the need for more investigation of the pathogenicity of this microorganism. PMID:23052317

  5. Codfish may cause acute abdomen?

    PubMed Central

    Costa Almeida, Carlos E.; Rainho, Rui; Gouveia, Antnio

    2013-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Foreign bodies ingestion is frequent and can cause several complications. Perforation is rare but can occur in any segment of the gastrointestinal tract. Fish bones are one of the most frequent objects responsible. PRESENTATION OF CASE A 77-year-old patient resorted to emergency room for severe abdominal pain with 5 days of evolution. A CT scan showed an undefined liquid collection involving a linear image with 25mm, suggestive of a foreign body. On laparotomy an abscess was resected with a fish bone inside. DISCUSSION Bowel perforation by foreign bodies can mimic other abdominal emergency conditions. Since fish bone ingestion is usually not remembered, diagnosis can be late. Surgery is the treatment of choice and is most commonly performed by laparotomy. CONCLUSION A low threshold of suspicion along with a good clinical history and radiological studies is extremely important in order to make a correct diagnosis. PMID:24055920

  6. Acute Abdomen Caused by Brucellar Hepatic Abscess.

    PubMed

    Koca, Yavuz Savas; Barut, Ibrahim; Koca, Tugba; Kaya, Onur; Aktas, Recep Aykut

    2016-01-01

    Brucellosis, a zoonosis that is common worldwide, is endemic in many countries, primarily those of the Mediterranean region (including Turkey). Human brucellosis is a systemic infection with a wide clinical spectrum. Although hepatic involvement is very common during the course of chronic brucellosis, hepatic abscess is a very rare complication of Brucella spp. infection. We present a case of hepatic abscess caused by Brucella melitensis, which resembled the clinical presentation of surgical acute abdomen. PMID:26526924

  7. [Frovatriptan possibly causing acute myocardial infarction].

    PubMed

    Møller-Helgestad, Ole Kristian; Kaltoft, Anne Kjer; Kasch, Helge

    2015-03-23

    Globally migraine affects more than 10% of the adult population and it is treated with simple analgesics, combined with a triptan for a stronger treatment effect. Triptans cause arterial vasoconstriction, and this is a case report of vasospasm-induced acute myocardial infarction in a 61-year-old woman with frequent episodic migraine attacks treated with triptans. She was possibly also suffering from medication overuse headache. We suggest that regular frovatriptan use may have contributed to the myocardial infarction and that long-term triptan use may have caused the medication overuse headache. PMID:25822816

  8. Does noncomplicated acute appendicitis cause bacterial translocation?

    PubMed

    Aslan, Adnan; Karaveli, Cagdas; Ogunc, Dilara; Elpek, Ozlem; Karaguzel, Gungor; Melikoglu, Mustafa

    2007-06-01

    It is unknown whether noncomplicated acute appendicitis cause bacterial translocation. In this study, we aimed to test development of the bacterial translocation in the patients who were operated for acute appendicitis. In this prospective study, 10 control patients who underwent elective operations because of other reasons, and 18 patients with noncomplicated acute appendicitis were evaluated. No patients took prophylactic antibiotic. After laparotomy, samples were obtained from peritoneal leaf just close to wound edge, and peritoneal swab culture from right paracolic region. Before appendectomy, a mesenteric lymph node (MLN) adjacent to the terminal ileum was taken out. Tissue samples were placed in a sterile container for microbiological analysis, and 10% formalin for histopathological analysis. Control samples had no bacterial translocation. Only 3 of 18 (16.6%) patients with appendicitis included bacterial translocation to MLN. There was no significant difference between both groups. No bacterial colonization was detected in the peritoneal tissue and peritoneal swab culture. Peritoneal tissue injury score was 2 +/- 1.4 in controls and 2.8 +/- 1.7 in the patients with appendicitis (P>0.05). MLN injury score was 2.5 +/- 1.3 in controls and 3.2 +/- 1.5 in the patients with appendicitis (P>0.05). No patient developed wound and systemic infection. No significant bacterial translocation frequency and tissue injury score was identified in the children with noncomplicated acute appendicitis. This result suggests that antibiotic prophylaxis may be unnecessary in such patients. PMID:17340160

  9. Acute kidney injury: A rare cause.

    PubMed

    Mendonca, Satish; Barki, Satish; Mishra, Mayank; Kumar, R S V; Gupta, Devika; Gupta, Pooja

    2015-09-01

    We present a young lady who consumed hair dye, which contained paraphenylene diamine (PPD), as a means of deliberate self-harm. This resulted in severe angio-neurotic edema for which she had to be ventilated, and thereafter developed rhabdomyolysis leading to acute kidney injury (AKI). The unusual aspect was that the patient continued to have flaccid quadriparesis and inability to regain kidney function. Renal biopsy performed 10 weeks after the dye consumption revealed severe acute tubular necrosis with myoglobin pigment casts. This suggests that PPD has a long-term effect leading to ongoing myoglobinuria, causing flaccid paralysis to persist and preventing the recovery of AKI. In such instances, timely treatment to prevent AKI in the form alkalinization of urine should be initiated promptly. Secondly, because PPD is a nondialyzable toxin, and its long-term effect necessitates its speedy removal, hemoperfusion might be helpful and is worth considering. PMID:26354573

  10. Acute abdomen caused by brucellar hepatic abscess.

    PubMed

    Ibis, Cem; Sezer, Atakan; Batman, Ali K; Baydar, Serkan; Eker, Alper; Unlu, Ercument; Kuloglu, Figen; Cakir, Bilge; Coskun, Irfan

    2007-10-01

    Brucellosis is a zoonotic infection that is transmitted from animals to humans by ingestion of infected food products, direct contact with an infected animal, or aerosol inhalation. The disease is endemic in many countries, including the Mediterranean basin, the Middle East, India, Mexico, Central and South America and, central and southwest Asia. Human brucellosis is a systemic infection with a wide clinical spectrum. Although hepatic involvement is very common during the course of chronic brucellosis, hepatic abscess is a very rare complication of Brucella infection. We present a case of hepatic abscess caused by Brucella, which resembled the clinical presentation of surgical acute abdomen. PMID:17962133

  11. Tamoxifen-induced hypertriglyceridemia causing acute pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Hemant Kumar; Prasad, Mahendranath S.; Kandasamy, Arun K.; Dharanipragada, Kadambari

    2016-01-01

    Tamoxifen has both antagonistic and agonistic tissue-specific actions. It can have a paradoxical estrogenic effect on lipid metabolism resulting in elevated triglyceride and chylomicron levels. This can cause life-threatening complications like acute pancreatitis. To our knowledge, very few cases of tamoxifen-induced pancreatitis have been reported in the literature. We report a case of severe hypertriglyceridemia and acute pancreatitis following tamoxifen use. A 50-year-old diabetic lady was on tamoxifen (20mg/day) hormonal therapy for breast cancer. Within 3 months of starting therapy, she developed hypertriglyceridemia and acute pancreatitis. Laboratory values include: Serum amylase 778 IU/L, total cholesterol 785 mg/dL, triglycerides 4568 mg/dL and high-density lipoproteins (HDL) 12 mg/dL. Tamoxifen was substituted with letrozole and atorvastatin started. There was a prompt reversal of the adverse effects. Effects on lipid profile must be considered while initiating tamoxifen in predisposed individuals as the consequences are life threatening.

  12. Tamoxifen-induced hypertriglyceridemia causing acute pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Singh, Hemant Kumar; Prasad, Mahendranath S; Kandasamy, Arun K; Dharanipragada, Kadambari

    2016-01-01

    Tamoxifen has both antagonistic and agonistic tissue-specific actions. It can have a paradoxical estrogenic effect on lipid metabolism resulting in elevated triglyceride and chylomicron levels. This can cause life-threatening complications like acute pancreatitis. To our knowledge, very few cases of tamoxifen-induced pancreatitis have been reported in the literature. We report a case of severe hypertriglyceridemia and acute pancreatitis following tamoxifen use. A 50-year-old diabetic lady was on tamoxifen (20mg/day) hormonal therapy for breast cancer. Within 3 months of starting therapy, she developed hypertriglyceridemia and acute pancreatitis. Laboratory values include: Serum amylase 778 IU/L, total cholesterol 785 mg/dL, triglycerides 4568 mg/dL and high-density lipoproteins (HDL) 12 mg/dL. Tamoxifen was substituted with letrozole and atorvastatin started. There was a prompt reversal of the adverse effects. Effects on lipid profile must be considered while initiating tamoxifen in predisposed individuals as the consequences are life threatening. PMID:27127396

  13. Acute Pancreatitis Caused By Mushroom Poisoning

    PubMed Central

    Karahan, Samet; Erden, Abdulsamet; Cetinkaya, Ali; Avci, Deniz; Ortakoyluoglu, Adile Irfan; Karagoz, Hatice; Bulut, Kadir; Basak, Mustafa

    2016-01-01

    Of the more than 5000 species of mushrooms known, 100 types are toxic and approximately 10% of these toxic types can cause fatal toxicity. A type of mushroom called Amanita phalloides is responsible for 95% of toxic mushroom poisonings. In this article, we report 2 cases of mushroom poisonings caused by Lactarius volemus, known as Tirmit by the local people. The patient and his wife were admitted to the emergency room with abdominal pain, nausea, and vomiting 20 hours after consuming Lactarius volemus, an edible type of mushroom. The patients reported that they had been collecting this mushroom from the mountains and eating them for several years but had never developed any clinicopathology to date. Further examination of the patients revealed a very rare case of acute pancreatitis due to mushroom intoxication. The male patient was admitted to the intensive care unit while his wife was followed in the internal medicine service, because of her relative mild clinical symptoms. Both patients recovered without sequelae and were discharged. In this article, we aimed to emphasize that gastrointestinal symptoms are often observed in mushroom intoxications and can be confused with acute pancreatitis, thus leading to misdiagnosis of patients. Early diagnosis and appropriate treatment can improve patients’ prognosis and prevent the development of complications. PMID:26835473

  14. Accidental and iatrogenic causes of acute kidney injury

    PubMed Central

    Twombley, Katherine; Baum, Michel; Gattineni, Jyothsna

    2014-01-01

    Purpose of review Ingestions and iatrogenic administration of drugs are all too common causes of acute kidney injury. This review will discuss these preventable causes of acute kidney injury. Recent findings Recent studies have examined the pathophysiology of acute kidney injury by several commonly used drugs. These studies have shown that drugs and toxins can cause acute kidney injury by altering renal hemodynamics, direct tubular injury or causing renal tubular obstruction. Summary Knowledge of the drugs that cause acute kidney injury and how this injury is manifested can lead to improved diagnosis and treatment with the ultimate goal of prevention. PMID:21293274

  15. Quetiapine-induced hypertriglyceridaemia causing acute pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Franco, John Mark; Vallabhajosyula, Saraschandra; Griffin, Timothy John

    2015-01-01

    Second-generation antipsychotics have well-known metabolic side effects such as hyperlipidaemia and hyperglycaemia. A middle-aged man presented with epigastric and flank pain associated with nausea, and was noted to have elevated triglycerides (3590 mg/dL or 40.53 mmol/L), lipase and glucose. Haematological parameters revealed neutropenia with pancytopaenia. The patient was started on conservative management for acute pancreatitis, and on intravenous insulin and oral gemfibrozil for lowering of his triglycerides. He gradually improved and was transitioned to oral atorvastatin and fenofibrate. His triglycerides, glucose and leucocyte counts normalised at discharge and he was transitioned to ziprasidone. The combination of hypertriglyceridaemia, worsening hyperglycaemia and neutropenia made us suspect quetiapine as the causative agent. Medications cause only 0.1-7% of acute pancreatitis cases, with quetiapine implicated in only five-reported cases. Hypertriglyceridaemia (>600 mg/dL or 6.77 mmol/L) is frequently reported with quetiapine use, but severe hypertriglyceridaemia (>1000 mg/dL or 11.29 mmol/L) has been reported in <10 patients. PMID:25976202

  16. Do Cinnamon Supplements Cause Acute Hepatitis?

    PubMed Central

    Brancheau, Daniel; Patel, Brijesh; Zughaib, Marcel

    2015-01-01

    Patient: Female, 73 Final Diagnosis: Drug induced acute hepatitis Symptoms: Abdominal pain • diarrhea • vomiting Medication: — Clinical Procedure: — Specialty: Gastroenterology and Hepatology Objective: Unusual or unexpected effect of treatment Background: The use of herbal medications to treat various diseases is on the rise. Cinnamon has been reported to improve glycolated hemoglobin and serum glucose levels. When patients consider the benefit of such substances, they are often not aware of potential adverse effects and drug interactions. Cinnamon, via coumarin, can cause liver toxicity. Therefore, its concomitant use with hepatotoxic drugs should be avoided. Case Report: A 73-year-old woman was seen in the Emergency Department complaining of abdominal pain associated with vomiting and diarrhea after she started taking cinnamon supplements for about 1 week. The patient had been taking statin for coronary artery disease for many months. The laboratory workup and imaging studies confirmed the diagnosis of hepatitis. The detail workup did not reveal any specific cause. Cinnamon and statin were held. A few weeks after discharge, the statin was resumed without any further complications. This led to a diagnosis of cinnamon-statin combination-induced hepatitis. Conclusions: A combination of cinnamon supplement and statin can cause hepatitis, and it should be discouraged. PMID:25923145

  17. Acute Conditions Caused by Infectious Aortitis

    PubMed Central

    Molacek, Jiri; Treska, Vladislav; Baxa, Jan; Certik, Bohuslav; Houdek, Karel

    2014-01-01

    Infection of the aorta is rare but potentially very dangerous. Under normal circumstances the aorta is very resistant to infections. Following some afflictions, the infection can pass to the aorta from blood or the surrounding tissues. The authors present their 5-year experience with therapy of various types of infections of the abdominal aorta. Methods: In the 5-year period between January 2008 and December 2012, the Surgical Clinic of the University Hospital in Pilsen treated 17 patients with acute infection of the abdominal aorta. They included 9 males and 8 females. The mean age was 73.05 years (58-90). The most common pathogens were Salmonella (7), Staphylococcus aureus (2), Klebsiella pneumoniae (1), Listeria monocytogenes (1), and Candida albicans (1). Two cases included mixed bacteria and no infectious agent was cultured in three cases. In 14 cases (82.6%) we decided on an open surgical solution, i.e., resection of the affected abdominal aorta, extensive debridement, and vascular reconstruction. In all of these 14 cases we decided on in situ reconstruction. Twelve cases were treated using silver-impregnated prostheses. An antibiotic impregnated graft was used in one case and fresh aortic allograft in one case. In one case (5.9%) we decided on an endovascular solution, i.e., insertion of a bifurcation stent graft and prolonged antibiotic therapy. In two cases (11.8%) we decided on conservative treatment, as both patients refused any surgical therapy. Results: Morbidity was 47.2% (8 patients). In one case we had to perform reoperation of a patient on the 15th postoperative day to evacuate the postoperative hematoma. The 30-day mortality was 5.9% (1 patient). The hospital mortality was 11.8% (2 patients). One patient died on the 42nd postoperative day due to multiorgan failure following resection of perforated aortitis. During follow-up (average 3.5 years), we had no case of infection or thrombosis of the vascular prosthesis. Conclusion: Patients with mycotic aneurysms or acute aortitides face a high risk of death. One can legitimately expect an increase of aortic infections to parallel the increase of immunocompromised individuals. Surgical procedures for infectious aortitis are always demanding and require excellent interdisciplinary cooperation, but, as this experience shows, can lead to midterm survival. PMID:26798723

  18. Spatio-temporal patterns of bacteria caused by collective motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitsunezaki, So

    2006-04-01

    In incubation experiments on bacterial colonies of Proteus mirabilis, collective motion of bacteria is found to generate macroscopic turbulent patterns on the surface of agar media. We propose a mathematical model to describe the time evolution of the positional and directional distributions of motile bacteria in such systems, and investigate this model both numerically and analytically. It is shown that as the average density of bacteria increases, nonuniform swarming patterns emerge from a uniform stationary state. For a sufficient large density, we find that spiral patterns are caused by interactions between the local bacteria densities and the rotational mode of the collective motion. Unidirectional spiral patterns similar to those observed in experiments appear in the case in which the equilibrium directional distribution is asymmetric.

  19. Endometriosis causing acute appendicitis complicated with hemoperitoneum.

    PubMed

    Curbelo-Peña, Yuhamy; Guedes-De la Puente, Xavier; Saladich-Cubero, Maria; Molinas-Bruguera, Joan; Molineros, Jose; De Caralt-Mestres, Enric

    2015-01-01

    Endometriosis is a painful disorder characterized by endometrial tissue outside the uterine cavity. It usually affects the pelvis, but in rare cases it might extend to other parts of the body. The report is based on a case of a 39-year-old woman, who presented symptoms of acute appendicitis and diagnosis confirmed with ultrasonography and a computed tomography scan procedures. Laparoscopic appendicectomy was performed. After entering the abdominal cavity, hemoperitoneum was discovered with no associated pelvic or abdominal lesions. Biopsy confirmed acute appendicitis with endometrial glands and stroma infiltrating its muscular tissue. Patient recovered without complications and was discharged 48 h after surgery. The appendix is rarely affected by endometrial infiltration. The literature describes an incidence of 0.8%, just a few cases have been associated with acute appendicitis; however, none of them are described to present hemoperitoneum, being our patient the first one reported with such complication. PMID:26253154

  20. Bacteria and cancer: cause, coincidence or cure? A review

    PubMed Central

    Mager, DL

    2006-01-01

    Research has found that certain bacteria are associated with human cancers. Their role, however, is still unclear. Convincing evidence links some species to carcinogenesis while others appear promising in the diagnosis, prevention or treatment of cancers. The complex relationship between bacteria and humans is demonstrated by Helicobacter pylori and Salmonella typhi infections. Research has shown that H. pylori can cause gastric cancer or MALT lymphoma in some individuals. In contrast, exposure to H. pylori appears to reduce the risk of esophageal cancer in others. Salmonella typhi infection has been associated with the development of gallbladder cancer; however S. typhi is a promising carrier of therapeutic agents for melanoma, colon and bladder cancers. Thus bacterial species and their roles in particular cancers appear to differ among different individuals. Many species, however, share an important characteristic: highly site-specific colonization. This critical factor may lead to the development of non-invasive diagnostic tests, innovative treatments and cancer vaccines. PMID:16566840

  1. Acute respiratory distress caused by Neosartorya udagawae

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We describe the first reported case of acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) attributed to Neosartorya infection. The mold grew rapidly in culture of both sputum and bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid from a previously healthy 43-year-old woman with ARDS, which developed as the culmination of a...

  2. Agraphia caused by acute right parietal infarction.

    PubMed

    Lee, Manyong; Suh, Mee Kyung; Lee, Myung Hyun; Lee, Jin Soo; Moon, So Young

    2015-04-01

    Injury in the dominant language hemisphere typically leads to agraphia, however we report a patient with agraphia after injury to the right angular gyrus. A 71-year-old Korean woman presented with the complaint of an inability to write for the last 7 days. The patient had been illiterate for most of her life, but had started learning to write Hangul, the Korean alphabet, at a welfare center 3 years ago. On language screening she was unable to write although she could read, and other language functions showed no abnormalities. Brain MRI showed acute infarction in the right angular gyrus. Her writing patterns displayed features of surface agraphia, indicative of phoneme-to-grapheme conversion with phonetic writing of targets. Additionally, she manifested visual errors. A functional MRI indicated that her left hemisphere was language dominant. This patient experienced agraphia resulting from pure impairment of visuo-constructive function after acute infarction in the right angular gyrus. PMID:25564267

  3. Acute Symptomatic Seizures Caused by Electrolyte Disturbances

    PubMed Central

    Nardone, Raffaele; Brigo, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    In this narrative review we focus on acute symptomatic seizures occurring in subjects with electrolyte disturbances. Quite surprisingly, despite its clinical relevance, this issue has received very little attention in the scientific literature. Electrolyte abnormalities are commonly encountered in clinical daily practice, and their diagnosis relies on routine laboratory findings. Acute and severe electrolyte imbalances can manifest with seizures, which may be the sole presenting symptom. Seizures are more frequently observed in patients with sodium disorders (especially hyponatremia), hypocalcemia, and hypomagnesemia. They do not entail a diagnosis of epilepsy, but are classified as acute symptomatic seizures. EEG has little specificity in differentiating between various electrolyte disturbances. The prominent EEG feature is slowing of the normal background activity, although other EEG findings, including various epileptiform abnormalities may occur. An accurate and prompt diagnosis should be established for a successful management of seizures, as rapid identification and correction of the underlying electrolyte disturbance (rather than an antiepileptic treatment) are of crucial importance in the control of seizures and prevention of permanent brain damage. PMID:26754778

  4. Clinical review: Bacteremia caused by anaerobic bacteria in children

    PubMed Central

    Brook, Itzhak

    2002-01-01

    This review describes the microbiology, diagnosis and management of bacteremia caused by anaerobic bacteria in children. Bacteroides fragilis, Peptostreptococcus sp., Clostridium sp., and Fusobacterium sp. were the most common clinically significant anaerobic isolates. The strains of anaerobic organisms found depended, to a large extent, on the portal of entry and the underlying disease. Predisposing conditions include: malignant neoplasms, immunodeficiencies, chronic renal insufficiency, decubitus ulcers, perforation of viscus and appendicitis, and neonatal age. Organisms identical to those causing anaerobic bacteremia can often be recovered from other infected sites that may have served as a source of persistent bacteremia. When anaerobes resistant to penicillin are suspected or isolated, antimicrobial drugs such as clindamycin, chloramphenicol, metronidazole, cefoxitin, a carbapenem, or the combination of a beta-lactamase inhibitor and a penicillin should be administered. The early recognition of anaerobic bacteremia and administration of appropriate antimicrobial and surgical therapy play a significant role in preventing mortality and morbidity in pediatric patients. PMID:12133179

  5. Acute Myopericarditis caused by Human Metapneumovirus

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Min Joo; Yang, Tae Un; Jeon, Ji Ho; Noh, Ji Yun; Hong, Kyung Wook; Cheong, Hee Jin; Kim, Woo Joo

    2016-01-01

    Human metapneumovirus is known to be similar to respiratory syncytial virus. Because of an incomplete protective immune response to new genotypes, re-infection occurs frequently, especially in the elderly. However, the clinical manifestations of human metapneumovirus need to be further characterized in adults. A 73-year-old woman presented to the emergency room with acute dyspnea, chest discomfort and influenza-like illness. The patient was diagnosed with human metapneumovirus infection, complicated by pneumonia and myopericarditis. With supportive care including oxygen supplementation, the patient recovered completely without any serious sequelae. Human metapneumovirus infection may contribute to the development of cardiovascular manifestations, particularly in the elderly population. PMID:27104014

  6. Acute Myopericarditis caused by Human Metapneumovirus.

    PubMed

    Choi, Min Joo; Song, Joon Young; Yang, Tae Un; Jeon, Ji Ho; Noh, Ji Yun; Hong, Kyung Wook; Cheong, Hee Jin; Kim, Woo Joo

    2016-03-01

    Human metapneumovirus is known to be similar to respiratory syncytial virus. Because of an incomplete protective immune response to new genotypes, re-infection occurs frequently, especially in the elderly. However, the clinical manifestations of human metapneumovirus need to be further characterized in adults. A 73-year-old woman presented to the emergency room with acute dyspnea, chest discomfort and influenza-like illness. The patient was diagnosed with human metapneumovirus infection, complicated by pneumonia and myopericarditis. With supportive care including oxygen supplementation, the patient recovered completely without any serious sequelae. Human metapneumovirus infection may contribute to the development of cardiovascular manifestations, particularly in the elderly population. PMID:27104014

  7. Hypertriglyceridemia-induced acute pancreatitis in pregnancy causing maternal death

    PubMed Central

    Jeon, Hae Rin; Cho, Yoon Jin; Chon, Seung Joo

    2016-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis in pregnancy is rare and occurs in approximately 3 in 10,000 pregnancies. It rarely complicates pregnancy, and can occur during any trimester, however over half (52%) of cases occur during the third trimester and during the post-partum period. Gallstones are the most common cause of acute pancreatitis. On the other hand, acute pancreatitis caused by hypertriglyceridemia due to increase of estrogen during the gestational period is very unusual, but complication carries a higher risk of morbidity and mortality for both the mother and the fetus. We experienced a case of pregnant woman who died of acute exacerbation of hypertriglyceridemia-induced acute pancreatitis at 23 weeks of gestation. We report on progress and management of this case along with literature reviews. PMID:27004207

  8. Candida: an unexpected cause of the acute abdomen

    PubMed Central

    Thrumurthy, Sri Ganeshamurthy; Tiew, Stephenie; Wood, Nicholas; Bhowmick, Arnab

    2010-01-01

    The infected intrauterine contraceptive device (IUCD) is a well-described cause of the acute abdomen. However, severe pelvic infection from Candida is an extremely rare complication of the IUCD. We present the first reported description of a Candida-infected IUCD manifesting as an acute abdomen where the degree of infection precluded a conclusive diagnostic workup and necessitated multiple laparotomies. This case highlights the importance for the clinicians to thoroughly exclude such causes of acute sepsis even after exclusion in the presenting history. PMID:22802468

  9. Acute epiploic appendagitis: A rare cause of acute abdomen and a diagnostic dilemma

    PubMed Central

    Almuhanna, Afnan F.; Alghamdi, Zeead M.; Alshammari, Eiman

    2016-01-01

    Acute epiploic appendagitis is a relatively rare cause of lower abdominal pain that clinically mimics other acute abdomen conditions that require surgery such as acute diverticulitis or appendicitis. Here, we report a case of a 50-year-old lady who presented with an unusual lower abdominal pain. Awareness of such a clinical condition with its characteristic imaging findings is important to avoid costly hospitalization, unnecessary antibiotic courses, and the morbidity and mortality associated with surgical procedures. PMID:26929730

  10. Acute epiploic appendagitis: A rare cause of acute abdomen and a diagnostic dilemma.

    PubMed

    Almuhanna, Afnan F; Alghamdi, Zeead M; Alshammari, Eiman

    2016-01-01

    Acute epiploic appendagitis is a relatively rare cause of lower abdominal pain that clinically mimics other acute abdomen conditions that require surgery such as acute diverticulitis or appendicitis. Here, we report a case of a 50-year-old lady who presented with an unusual lower abdominal pain. Awareness of such a clinical condition with its characteristic imaging findings is important to avoid costly hospitalization, unnecessary antibiotic courses, and the morbidity and mortality associated with surgical procedures. PMID:26929730

  11. [Parvovirus B19 as a cause of acute arthritis].

    PubMed

    Trøseid, M; Gerlyng, P

    1999-09-30

    Parvovirus B19 is known to cause erythema infection (fifth disease), acute and chronic arthritis, aplastic crises in chronic hemolytic anemia, chronic anemia in the immunocompromised host and hydrops fetalis. We present two patients with acute arthritis due to parvovirus infection. Both had symmetrical synovitis in wrists and ankles. Patient 1 presented with fever and rash before joint symptoms occurred; patient 2 had joint symptoms only. Arthritis due to parvovirus is usually self-limited, but may develop into a chronic disease similar to rheumatoid arthritis. Parvovirus should be considered one of the differential diagnoses while dealing with acute or chronic arthritis. PMID:10553337

  12. Endometrial decidualization: a rare cause of acute appendicitis during pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Skyle J; Kaur, Anupinder; Wullschleger, Martin E

    2016-01-01

    Appendicular endometriosis is a rare and poorly understood pathology that affects women in their reproductive years. In the gravid woman, ectopic endometrial tissue undergoes decidualization. This physiological process can result in acute appendicitis in exceptional cases. Here we describe a patient in her second trimester of pregnancy who presented with right iliac fossa pain and clinical, laboratory and imaging findings consistent with acute appendicitis. A laparoscopic appendectomy was performed with intraoperative findings suspicious for malignancy. Histological analysis made the surprising diagnosis of decidualized endometriosis causing luminal constriction resulting in acute appendicitis. We also detail the challenging diagnostic and management issues faced by clinicians in such cases. PMID:27106612

  13. Endometrial decidualization: a rare cause of acute appendicitis during pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Murphy, Skyle J.; Kaur, Anupinder; Wullschleger, Martin E.

    2016-01-01

    Appendicular endometriosis is a rare and poorly understood pathology that affects women in their reproductive years. In the gravid woman, ectopic endometrial tissue undergoes decidualization. This physiological process can result in acute appendicitis in exceptional cases. Here we describe a patient in her second trimester of pregnancy who presented with right iliac fossa pain and clinical, laboratory and imaging findings consistent with acute appendicitis. A laparoscopic appendectomy was performed with intraoperative findings suspicious for malignancy. Histological analysis made the surprising diagnosis of decidualized endometriosis causing luminal constriction resulting in acute appendicitis. We also detail the challenging diagnostic and management issues faced by clinicians in such cases. PMID:27106612

  14. A rare cause for acute cor pulmonale.

    PubMed

    Rajasekharan, C; Ganga, V

    2011-05-01

    A number of diseases may cause right atrial mass. Primary cardiac tumors range from 0.002 to 0.25%. Intracardiac manifestation and pulmonary embolism of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is a very rare finding and uncommon even at autopsy. Here we describe the case of a 32-year-old Asian man who was referred for shortness of breath lasting for a month, along with unproductive cough. He was a manual laborer with a history of diabetes, alcoholism, and smoking. Clinically he was diagnosed as having pulmonary embolism. Echocardiogram showed a mass in the right atrium. Magnetic resonance imaging showed that he had a large mass in the right atrium extending down into the inferior vena cava. Further evaluation showed that he had chronic liver disease with portal hypertension and was hepatitis B surface antigen-positive, indicating hepatitis B infection. He underwent excision of the mass, and the pathological report showed metastasis of HCC with multiple vascular emboli in the lungs. As this is the second reported case of this kind in the literature, we highlight the need of screening at least 6-monthly all patients with chronic liver disease, hepatitis B and C virus infection for the early detection of HCC. PMID:21712949

  15. Is mad cow disease caused by a bacteria?

    PubMed

    Broxmeyer, L

    2004-01-01

    Transmissible spongioform enchephalopathies (TSE's), include bovine spongiform encephalopathy (also called BSE or "mad cow disease"), Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD) in humans, and scrapie in sheep. They remain a mystery, their cause hotly debated. But between 1994 and 1996, 12 people in England came down with CJD, the human form of mad cow, and all had eaten beef from suspect cows. Current mad cow diagnosis lies solely in the detection of late appearing "prions", an acronym for hypothesized, gene-less, misfolded proteins, somehow claimed to cause the disease. Yet laboratory preparations of prions contain other things, which could include unidentified bacteria or viruses. Furthermore, the rigors of prion purification alone, might, in and of themselves, have killed the causative virus or bacteria. Therefore, even if samples appear to infect animals, it is impossible to prove that prions are causative. Manuelidis found viral-like particles, which even when separated from prions, were responsible for spongiform STE's. Subsequently, Lasmezas's study showed that 55% of mice injected with cattle BSE, and who came down with disease, had no detectable prions. Still, incredibly, prions, are held as existing TSE dogma and Heino Dringer, who did pioneer work on their nature, candidly predicts "it will turn out that the prion concept is wrong." Many animals that die of spongiform TSE's never show evidence of misfolded proteins, and Dr. Frank Bastian, of Tulane, an authority, thinks the disorder is caused by the bacterial DNA he found in this group of diseases. Recently, Roels and Walravens isolated Mycobacterium bovis it from the brain of a cow with the clinical and histopathological signs of mad cow. Moreover, epidemiologic maps of the origins and peak incidence of BSE in the UK, suggestively match those of England's areas of highest bovine tuberculosis, the Southwest, where Britain's mad cow epidemic began. The neurotoxic potential for cow tuberculosis was shown in pre-1960 England, where one quarter of all tuberculous meningitis victims suffered from Mycobacterium bovis infection. And Harley's study showed pathology identical to "mad cow" from systemic M. bovis in cattle, causing a tuberculous spongiform encephalitis. In addition to M. bovis, Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis (fowl tuberculosis) causes Johne's disease, a problem known and neglected in cattle and sheep for almost a century, and rapidly emerging as the disease of the new millennium. Not only has M. paratuberculosis been found in human Crohn's disease, but both Crohn's and Johne's both cross-react with the antigens of cattle paratuberculosis. Furthermore, central neurologic manifestations of Crohn's disease are not unknown. There is no known disease which better fits into what is occurring in Mad Cow and the spongiform enchephalopathies than bovine tuberculosis and its blood-brain barrier penetrating, virus-like, cell-wall-deficient forms. It is for these reasons that future research needs to be aimed in this direction. PMID:15325025

  16. Hiatus Hernia: A Rare Cause of Acute Pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Shruti; Jawairia, Mahreema; Subramani, Krishnaiyer; Mustacchia, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Hiatal hernia (HH) is the herniation of elements of the abdominal cavity through the esophageal hiatus of the diaphragm. A giant HH with pancreatic prolapse is very rare and its causing pancreatitis is an even more extraordinary condition. We describe a case of a 65-year-old man diagnosed with acute pancreatitis secondary to pancreatic herniation. In these cases, acute pancreatitis may be caused by the diaphragmatic crura impinging upon the pancreas and leading to repetitive trauma as it crosses the hernia; intermittent folding of the main pancreatic duct; ischemia associated with stretching at its vascular pedicle; or total pancreatic incarceration. Asymptomatic hernia may not require any treatment, while multiple studies have supported the recommendation of early elective repair as a safer route in symptomatic patients. In summary, though rare, pancreatic herniation should be considered as a cause of acute pancreatitis. A high index of suspicion for complications is warranted in cases like these. PMID:27066077

  17. Viruses and bacteria in acute asthma exacerbations--a GA² LEN-DARE systematic review.

    PubMed

    Papadopoulos, N G; Christodoulou, I; Rohde, G; Agache, I; Almqvist, C; Bruno, A; Bonini, S; Bont, L; Bossios, A; Bousquet, J; Braido, F; Brusselle, G; Canonica, G W; Carlsen, K H; Chanez, P; Fokkens, W J; Garcia-Garcia, M; Gjomarkaj, M; Haahtela, T; Holgate, S T; Johnston, S L; Konstantinou, G; Kowalski, M; Lewandowska-Polak, A; Lødrup-Carlsen, K; Mäkelä, M; Malkusova, I; Mullol, J; Nieto, A; Eller, E; Ozdemir, C; Panzner, P; Popov, T; Psarras, S; Roumpedaki, E; Rukhadze, M; Stipic-Markovic, A; Todo Bom, A; Toskala, E; van Cauwenberge, P; van Drunen, C; Watelet, J B; Xatzipsalti, M; Xepapadaki, P; Zuberbier, T

    2011-04-01

    A major part of the burden of asthma is caused by acute exacerbations. Exacerbations have been strongly and consistently associated with respiratory infections. Respiratory viruses and bacteria are therefore possible treatment targets. To have a reasonable estimate of the burden of disease induced by such infectious agents on asthmatic patients, it is necessary to understand their nature and be able to identify them in clinical samples by employing accurate and sensitive methodologies. This systematic review summarizes current knowledge and developments in infection epidemiology of acute asthma in children and adults, describing the known impact for each individual agent and highlighting knowledge gaps. Among infectious agents, human rhinoviruses are the most prevalent in regard to asthma exacerbations. The newly identified type-C rhinoviruses may prove to be particularly relevant. Respiratory syncytial virus and metapneumovirus are important in infants, while influenza viruses seem to induce severe exacerbations mostly in adults. Other agents are relatively less or not clearly associated. Mycoplasma and Chlamydophila pneumoniae seem to be involved more with asthma persistence rather than with disease exacerbations. Recent data suggest that common bacteria may also be involved, but this should be confirmed. Although current information is considerable, improvements in detection methodologies, as well as the wide variation in respect to location, time and populations, underline the need for additional studies that should also take into account interacting factors. PMID:21087215

  18. Comparative Pathogenomics of Bacteria Causing Infectious Diseases in Fish

    PubMed Central

    Sudheesh, Ponnerassery S.; Al-Ghabshi, Aliya; Al-Mazrooei, Nashwa; Al-Habsi, Saoud

    2012-01-01

    Fish living in the wild as well as reared in the aquaculture facilities are susceptible to infectious diseases caused by a phylogenetically diverse collection of bacterial pathogens. Control and treatment options using vaccines and drugs are either inadequate, inefficient, or impracticable. The classical approach in studying fish bacterial pathogens has been looking at individual or few virulence factors. Recently, genome sequencing of a number of bacterial fish pathogens has tremendously increased our understanding of the biology, host adaptation, and virulence factors of these important pathogens. This paper attempts to compile the scattered literature on genome sequence information of fish pathogenic bacteria published and available to date. The genome sequencing has uncovered several complex adaptive evolutionary strategies mediated by horizontal gene transfer, insertion sequence elements, mutations and prophage sequences operating in fish pathogens, and how their genomes evolved from generalist environmental strains to highly virulent obligatory pathogens. In addition, the comparative genomics has allowed the identification of unique pathogen-specific gene clusters. The paper focuses on the comparative analysis of the virulogenomes of important fish bacterial pathogens, and the genes involved in their evolutionary adaptation to different ecological niches. The paper also proposes some new directions on finding novel vaccine and chemotherapeutic targets in the genomes of bacterial pathogens of fish. PMID:22675651

  19. Acute Right-Sided Heart Failure Caused by Neisseria meningitidis

    PubMed Central

    Taldir, Guillaume; Parize, Perrine; Arvis, Philippe

    2013-01-01

    Meningococcal myocarditis is a rarely diagnosed infection and could be the consequence of primary invasive infection or late immunologic complications. An unusual presentation of meningococcemia in an immunocompetent adult is described, with Neisseria meningitidis identified as the cause of selective right-sided heart failure in a case of acute myocarditis. PMID:23115261

  20. Chylous ascites caused by acute pancreatitis with portal vein thrombosis

    PubMed Central

    Park, Dong Eun

    2011-01-01

    Chylous ascites is defined as the accumulation of chyle in the peritoneum due to obstruction or rupture of the peritoneal or retroperitoneal lymphatic glands. Chylous ascites that arises from acute pancreatitis with portal vein thrombosis is very rare. We report here on a case of chylous ascite that was caused by acute pancreatitis with portal vein thrombosis, in which the patient showed an impressive response to conservative therapy with total parenteral nutrition and octerotide. We also review the relevant literature about chylous ascites with particular reference to the management of this rare disease. PMID:22319743

  1. Graves’ disease as an uncommon cause of acute pericarditis

    PubMed Central

    Kortekaas, Kirsten; van der Lienden, Bas; Jong, Simone; Riezebos, Robert

    2014-01-01

    Acute pericarditis is either dry, fibrinous or effusive, independent of its aetiology. A case is presented involving a 44-year-old man with acute pericarditis. The cause was established to be an aggravation of Graves’ disease due to non-compliance with treatment. Pericarditis is an uncommon cardiac complication of Graves’ disease and is associated with more recurrent episodes when not detected. Pharmacological treatment should include anti-inflammatory drugs in combination with treatment for hyperthyroidism. The specific pathophysiological link between the two conditions is still to be elucidated. PMID:24769665

  2. Acute Myelopathy Caused by a Cervical Synovial Cyst

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Dong Shin; Cho, Yong Jun; Kang, Suk Hyung

    2014-01-01

    Synovial cysts of the cervical spine, although they occur infrequently, may cause acute radiculopathy or myelopathy. Here, we report a case of a cervical synovial cyst presenting as acute myelopathy after manual stretching. A 68-year-old man presented with gait disturbance, decreased touch senses, and increased sensitivity to pain below T12 level. These symptoms developed after manual stretching 3 days prior. Computed tomography scanning and magnetic resonance imaging revealed a 1-cm, small multilocular cystic lesion in the spinal canal with cord compression at the C7-T1 level. We performed a left partial laminectomy of C7 and T1 using a posterior approach and completely removed the cystic mass. Histological examination of the resected mass revealed fibrous tissue fragments with amorphous materials and granulation tissue compatible with a synovial cyst. The patient's symptoms resolved after surgery. We describe a case of acute myelopathy caused by a cervical synovial cyst that was treated by surgical excision. Although cervical synovial cysts are often associated with degenerative facet joints, clinicians should be aware of the possibility that these cysts can cause acute neurologic symptoms. PMID:25289127

  3. Cecocolic Intussusception in Adult Caused by Acute Appendicitis

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Kang Young; Sohn, Seung-Kook

    2014-01-01

    Intussusception in adult is rare. The etiology is different from that of childhood. The most common cause of intussusception in adult is known as malignancy. When dealing with adult intussusception, surgical resection is usually warranted for correct diagnosis and proper treatment. This is a case report of cecocolic intussusception caused by an acute appendicitis in adult. The causes of cecocolic intussusception were reported as appendiceal adenocarcinoma, appendiceal mucocele, appendiceal adenoma, or idiopathic. Although this patient underwent laparoscopic right hemicolectomy under suspicion of malignancy at cecum base, final pathologic diagnosis revealed only acute appendicitis. Thus, the present case emphasizes the importance of prior thorough examinations including colonoscopy when we encounter this rare kind of intussusception in adult. PMID:24826358

  4. The Most Common Detected Bacteria in Sputum of Patients with the Acute Exacerbation of COPD

    PubMed Central

    Cukic, Vesna

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: Acute exacerbation of COPD (AECOPD) may be triggered by infection with bacteria or viruses or by environmental pollutants; the cause of about one-third of exacerbations cannot be identified. Objective: To determine the most common bacteria in sputum culture of patients with AECOPD hospitalized in Intensive care unit of Clinic for pulmonary disease and TB “Podhrastovi” in the 2012. Material and methods: This is a retrospective analysis of sputum bacterial cultures of patients with AECOPD treated in the Intensive care unit of Clinic for pulmonary disease and TB “Podhrastovi” during 2012 .year. Each patient was required to give two sputum for bacterial examination. Each patient was treated with antibiotics prior to admission in Clinic “Podhrastovi”. The results of sputum bacterial culture findings are expressed in absolute number and percentage of examined patients. Results: In 2012, 75 patients with AECOPD were treated in Intensive care unit of Clinic for pulmonary disease and TB“Podhrastovi”. 44 (58.66%) of patients had normal –nonpathogenic – usual bacterial flora isolated in sputum cultures, 31 (41.34%) had a pathogen bacteria in sputum culture as follows: 7 had Streptoccocus pneumoniae, 8 had Klebsiella pneumoniae (2 with Streptococcus pneumoniae, one with Acinetobacter baumani) ,4 Escherichia colli, others are one or two cases with other bacteria. Conclusion: Bacterial airway infections play a great role in many, but not in all, of cases of AECOPD. So there is the need to do a sputum bacterial culture examination in each patient with AECOPD and with appropriate antibiotics to contribute to curing of them. PMID:24511262

  5. The Chemotherapy of Infectious Diseases caused by Protozoa and Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Hörlein, H.

    1936-01-01

    The possibility of combating infectious diseases with chemotherapeutically active substances depends to a large extent on the structure of the pathogenic organism. Apart from the cure of contagious pleuro-pneumonia in horses with neosalvarsan, we have, as yet, no chemotherapeutic substance which is active in virus diseases. The position is scarcely better when we turn to bacterial infections due to cocci and bacilli. These two types of infective organisms occupy the lowest level in the scale of micro-organisms. On the other hand, the spirochætes, which also belong to the bacteria group, and, still more so, those causal organisms belonging to the protozoa, represent relatively highly differentiated species, and the more highly developed a pathogenic organism is, the more points for attack it appears to offer to the action of chemotherapeutic substances. It is, therefore, not to be wondered at that the best results with chemotherapeutically active substances have been obtained in spirochætal diseases (syphilis, relapsing fever, frambœsia, etc.), and above all, in protozoal diseases. There is scarcely a protozoal disease of man which cannot be cured nowadays by early treatment with the appropriate synthetic drug. (Sleeping sickness, malaria, amœbic dysentery, leishmaniasis.) Epizootics resembling human diseases, as for example, trypanoses, are also relatively easily dealt with by the same drugs as have been found of value in the treatment of disease in man. On the other hand, there has been a lack of success, up to the present, in the treatment of those diseases of animals which are not generally related to the tropical diseases of man. The most important of these epizootics are the piroplasmoses, which are caused by babesiæ and theileriæ and which are found, not only in tropical and subtropical regions, but also in temperate zones. In this paper the discovery of a new remedy against piroplasmosis will be reported (acaprin). Further, advice will be given of a new class of substances, which have an actual chemotherapeutic action in streptococcal infections (prontosil, prontosil S), so that one can hope to be able in the future also to attack bacterial infections due to cocci chemotherapeutically. PMID:19990605

  6. Uncommon Causes of Acute Abdominal Pain – A Pictorial Essay

    PubMed Central

    Hariharan, Mahesh; Balasubramaniam, Rajan; Shetty, Sharath Kumar; Yadavalli, Shanthala; Ahetasham, Mohammed; Devarapalli, Sravya

    2016-01-01

    Acute abdomen is one of the most common clinical conditions requiring a radiological investigation. Ultrasound is the primary modality of choice which can diagnose some of the common causes of acute abdomen. However, sometimes the underlying cause for the pain is far more complicated than expected mandating a high degree of suspicion to suggest further investigation with contrast enhanced computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging. Here, we have compiled a comprehensive series of selected cases to highlight the conditions which can be easily overlooked unless carefully sought for. This article also emphasizes the importance of multimodality approach to arrive at the final diagnosis with an increased overall diagnostic accuracy which in turn improves patient management and prognosis. PMID:27014500

  7. Ammonium dichromate poisoning: A rare cause of acute kidney injury.

    PubMed

    Radhakrishnan, H; Gopi, M; Arumugam, A

    2014-11-01

    Ammonium dichromate is an inorganic compound frequently used in screen and color printing. Being a strong oxidizing agent, it causes oxygen free radical injury resulting in organ failure. We report a 25-year-old female who presented with acute kidney injury after consumption of ammonium dichromate. She was managed successfully with hemodialysis and supportive measures. This case is reported to highlight the toxicity of ammonium dichromate. PMID:25484533

  8. Ammonium dichromate poisoning: A rare cause of acute kidney injury

    PubMed Central

    Radhakrishnan, H.; Gopi, M.; Arumugam, A.

    2014-01-01

    Ammonium dichromate is an inorganic compound frequently used in screen and color printing. Being a strong oxidizing agent, it causes oxygen free radical injury resulting in organ failure. We report a 25-year-old female who presented with acute kidney injury after consumption of ammonium dichromate. She was managed successfully with hemodialysis and supportive measures. This case is reported to highlight the toxicity of ammonium dichromate. PMID:25484533

  9. Metabolic profiling of biofilm bacteria known to cause microbial influenced corrosion.

    PubMed

    Beale, D J; Morrison, P D; Key, C; Palombo, E A

    2014-01-01

    This study builds upon previous research that demonstrated the simplicity of obtaining metabolite profiles of bacteria in urban water networks, by using the metabolic profile of bacteria extracted from a reticulation pipe biofilm, which is known to cause microbial influenced corrosion (MIC). The extracellular metabolites of the isolated bacteria, and those bacteria in consortium, were analysed in isolation, and after exposure to low levels of copper. Applying chemometric analytical methodologies to the metabolomic data, we were able to better understand the profile of the isolated biofilm bacteria, which were differentiated according to their activity and copper exposure. It was found that the metabolic activity of the isolated bacteria and the bacteria in consortium varied according to the bacterium's ability to metabolise copper. This demonstrates the power of metabolomic techniques for the discrimination of water reticulation biofilms comprising similar bacteria in consortium, but undergoing different physico-chemical activities, such as corrosion and corrosion inhibition. PMID:24434961

  10. Acute Unilateral Vestibular Failure Does Not Cause Spatial Hemineglect

    PubMed Central

    Conrad, Julian; Habs, Maximilian; Brandt, Thomas; Dieterich, Marianne

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Visuo-spatial neglect and vestibular disorders have common clinical findings and involve the same cortical areas. We questioned (1) whether visuo-spatial hemineglect is not only a disorder of spatial attention but may also reflect a disorder of higher cortical vestibular function and (2) whether a vestibular tone imbalance due to an acute peripheral dysfunction can also cause symptoms of neglect or extinction. Therefore, patients with an acute unilateral peripheral vestibular failure (VF) were tested for symptoms of hemineglect. Methods Twenty-eight patients with acute VF were assessed for signs of vestibular deficits and spatial neglect using clinical measures and various common standardized paper-pencil tests. Neglect severity was evaluated further with the Center of Cancellation method. Pathological neglect test scores were correlated with the degree of vestibular dysfunction determined by the subjective visual vertical and caloric testing. Results Three patients showed isolated pathological scores in one or the other neglect test, either ipsilesionally or contralesionally to the VF. None of the patients fulfilled the diagnostic criteria of spatial hemineglect or extinction. Conclusions A vestibular tone imbalance due to unilateral failure of the vestibular endorgan does not cause spatial hemineglect, but evidence indicates it causes mild attentional deficits in both visual hemifields. PMID:26247469

  11. [A case of acute pancreatitis and acute hepatitis caused by ingestion of Ceramium kondoi].

    PubMed

    Kim, Da-bin; Cho, Yoo-Kyung; Song, Hyun Joo; Song, Byung-Cheol

    2013-11-01

    In Korea, the use of herbal remedies is a common cause of drug-induced liver injury. However, the occurrence of both acute pancreatitis and acute hepatitis after taking herbal remedies has rarely been reported. Herein, we report a case of concurrent acute pancreatitis and acute hepatitis associated with Ceramium kondoi ingestion. A 58-year-old woman was diagnosed with advanced gastric cancer 7 months ago. Total gastrectomy and adjuvant chemotherapy was performed without complications. The patient had been well until recently, when she presented with severe abdominal pain after ingestion of Ceramium kondoifor 4 weeks. The laboratory findings demonstrated elevated liver enzymes and lipase, and abdominal computed tomography revealed pancreas swelling with fat infiltration. The diagnosis was made based on the diagnostic criteria for drug induced pancreatitis and the Russel Uclaf Causality Assessment Method scale for drug-induced liver injury. After cessation of Ceramium kondoi, she showed clinical and biochemical improvement. PMID:24262598

  12. Does virus-bacteria coinfection increase the clinical severity of acute respiratory infection?

    PubMed

    Damasio, Guilherme A C; Pereira, Luciane A; Moreira, Suzana D R; Duarte dos Santos, Claudia N; Dalla-Costa, Libera M; Raboni, Sonia M

    2015-09-01

    This retrospective cohort study investigated the presence of bacteria in respiratory secretions of patients hospitalized with acute respiratory infections and analyzed the impact of viral and bacterial coinfection on severity and the mortality rate. A total of 169 patients with acute respiratory infections were included, viruses and bacteria in respiratory samples were detected using molecular methods. Among all samples, 73.3% and 59.7% were positive for viruses and bacteria, respectively; 45% contained both virus and bacteria. Bacterial coinfection was more frequent in patients infected by community respiratory viruses than influenza A H1N1pdm (83.3% vs. 40.6%). The most frequently bacteria detected were Streptococcus pneumoniae and Haemophilus influenzae. Both species were co-detected in 54 patients and identified alone in 22 and 21 patients, respectively. Overall, there were no significant differences in the period of hospitalization, severity, or mortality rate between patients infected with respiratory viruses alone and those coinfected by viruses and bacteria. The detection of mixed respiratory pathogens is frequent in hospitalized patients with acute respiratory infections, but its impact on the clinical outcome does not appear substantial. However, it should be noted that most of the patients received broad-spectrum antibiotic therapy, which may have contributed to this favorable outcome. PMID:25976175

  13. Uncommon cause of acute pelvic pain: isolated torsion of hydrosalpinx.

    PubMed

    Ait Benkaddour, Y; Bennani, R; Aboulfalah, A; Abbassi, H

    2009-12-01

    Isolated torsion of hydrosalpinx is a rare cause of acute pelvic pain. Pre-operative diagnosis is very difficult because of non specific clinical presentation. Definitive diagnosis is always made at surgical exploration performed for suspected adnexal torsion and salpingectomy is performed in the majority of cases. A 34-year-old woman was admitted for acute pelvic pain with nausea and vomiting. Vaginal examination revealed a right adnexal tender mass and ultrasound revealed a well circumscribed right adnexal cystic mass. Surgical exploration has revealed torsion of a right hydrosalpinx and right salpingectomy was performed. Differential diagnosis between adnexal and tubal torsion is very difficult, however both should be managed by rapid surgical exploration which an allow precocious diagnosis and conservative treatment. PMID:20690282

  14. Artifacts in dilution pharmacokinetic models caused by adherent bacteria.

    PubMed Central

    Haag, R; Lexa, P; Werkhäuser, I

    1986-01-01

    Liquid cultures of a Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain in Mueller-Hinton broth diluted at rates higher than the bacterial growth rate showed the expected decrease in CFU only for 1 to 2 h. Later the CFU started to increase. This phenomenon can be explained by a hypothesis that assumes that the bacteria multiply in two different compartments. From the first compartment, which comprises bacteria homogeneously distributed in the broth, cells are eliminated at a rate that is dependent on the dilution and growth rates. Concomitantly, the second compartment is formed as a nondilutable adherent population on the surface of the culture vessel. Eventually, only cells stemming from that population appeared in the medium and were subsequently diluted. This hypothesis can be described mathematically by a linear combination of two exponential functions. The calculated values fit the experimental data well. Because similar CFU versus time curves were also found with other strains, care should be taken in interpreting results of experiments performed in liquid cultures and evaluated in terms of CFU. One should bear in mind that within a liquid culture an adherent population may exist, which differs in size according to selective influences (dilution, addition of antibiotics, etc.). This may give rise to artificial and unexpected results. PMID:3089140

  15. Fluid overload and acute kidney injury: cause or consequence?

    PubMed

    Ostermann, Marlies; Straaten, Heleen M Oudemans-van; Forni, Lui G

    2015-01-01

    There is increasing evidence that fluid overload and acute kidney injury (AKI) are associated but the exact cause-effect relationship remains unclear. Wang and colleagues analysed patients admitted to 30 intensive care units in China and found that fluid accumulation was independently associated with an increased risk of AKI and mortality. This commentary focuses on the close pathophysiological link between AKI and fluid overload and discusses the implications for clinical practice. It outlines some of the challenges, including the difficulty in diagnosing fluid overload reliably with current methods, and stresses the importance of personalised fluid therapy with physiological end-points to avoid the deleterious effects of fluid overload. PMID:26707872

  16. Plasmodium Vivax causing acute kidney injury: A foe less addressed

    PubMed Central

    Naqvi, Rubina

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To report patients developing acute kidney injury (AKI) after Vivax malaria. Methods: An observational cohort of patients identified as having acute kidney injury (AKI) after Plasmodium vivax infection. AKI was defined according to RIFLE criteria with sudden rise in creatinine or decline in urine output or both. All patients had normal size non obstructed kidneys on ultrasonography, with no previous co morbids. Malarial parasite Vivax was seen on blood peripheral film in all patients. Results: From January 1990 – December 2014, total 5623 patients with AKI were registered in our institute, of these 671 (11.93%) developed AKI in association with malarial infection, furthermore, Vivax was species in 109 patients. Average age of patients was 33.49±14.67 (range 8-78 years) with 66 male and 43 female. Oligo-anuria and vomiting were most common associated symptoms with fever. Renal replacement therapy required in 82 (75.22%) patients. Complete recovery was seen in 69 (63.30%), while 14 (12.84%) expired during acute phase of illness. Jaundice, thrombocytopenia, central nervous system involvement, mechanical ventilation requirement and hematuria were the factors significantly associated with high mortality. Conclusion: Malaria still causing significant morbidity and mortality in our part of world. Vivax malaria can present with hemolysis, thrombocytopenia and kidney failure in remarkable number of patients. PMID:26870118

  17. Mechanistic modeling of biocorrosion caused by biofilms of sulfate reducing bacteria and acid producing bacteria.

    PubMed

    Xu, Dake; Li, Yingchao; Gu, Tingyue

    2016-08-01

    Biocorrosion is also known as microbiologically influenced corrosion (MIC). Most anaerobic MIC cases can be classified into two major types. Type I MIC involves non-oxygen oxidants such as sulfate and nitrate that require biocatalysis for their reduction in the cytoplasm of microbes such as sulfate reducing bacteria (SRB) and nitrate reducing bacteria (NRB). This means that the extracellular electrons from the oxidation of metal such as iron must be transported across cell walls into the cytoplasm. Type II MIC involves oxidants such as protons that are secreted by microbes such as acid producing bacteria (APB). The biofilms in this case supply the locally high concentrations of oxidants that are corrosive without biocatalysis. This work describes a mechanistic model that is based on the biocatalytic cathodic sulfate reduction (BCSR) theory. The model utilizes charge transfer and mass transfer concepts to describe the SRB biocorrosion process. The model also includes a mechanism to describe APB attack based on the local acidic pH at a pit bottom. A pitting prediction software package has been created based on the mechanisms. It predicts long-term pitting rates and worst-case scenarios after calibration using SRB short-term pit depth data. Various parameters can be investigated through computer simulation. PMID:27071053

  18. Extended Spectrum-β-Lactamase or Carbapenemase Producing Bacteria Isolated from Patients with Acute Cholangitis

    PubMed Central

    Goo, Ja Chung; Seong, Mun Hyuk; Shim, Young Kwang; Lee, Hee Seung; Han, Jung-Ho; Shin, Kyeong Seob; Choi, Jae-Woon; Youn, Sei Jin

    2012-01-01

    Background/Aims This study assessed the antibiotic resistance organisms isolated from the blood and bile of acute cholangitis and evaluated risk factors associated with them and their impact on clinical outcomes. Methods The identities and antibiotic resistance profiles of bacteria isolated from 433 cases of acute cholangitis from 346 patients were analyzed. Risk factors and the outcomes of patients infected with them were assessed. Results Microorganisms were isolated from 266 of 419 blood cultures and 256 of 260 bile cultures. Isolates from bile and blood were identical in 71% of the cases. A total of 20 extended spectrum-β-lactamase (ESBL)-producers and 4 carbapenemase-producing organisms were isolated from blood, and 34 ESBL-producers and 13 carbapenemase-producers were isolated from bile. Sixty-four (14.8%) cases were infected with any one of these bacteria isolated from blood or bile. Risk factors associated with them in blood were nosocomial infection and prior biliary intervention. In bile, indwelling biliary device was a risk factor associated with them. Antibiotic-resistant bacteria were associated with mortality, independent of other prognostic factors. Conclusions ESBL or carbapenemase-producing bacteria were frequently isolated in acute cholangitis patients especially with prior biliary intervention and nosocomial infection. Isolation of antibiotic-resistant bacteria was an independent risk factor of mortality. PMID:22866257

  19. A rare cause of acute flaccid paralysis: Human coronaviruses

    PubMed Central

    Turgay, Cokyaman; Emine, Tekin; Ozlem, Koken; Muhammet, S. Paksu; Haydar, A. Tasdemir

    2015-01-01

    Acute flaccid paralysis (AFP) is a life-threatening clinical entity characterized by weakness in the whole body muscles often accompanied by respiratory and bulbar paralysis. The most common cause is GullianBarre syndrome, but infections, spinal cord diseases, neuromuscular diseases such as myasthenia gravis, drugs and toxins, periodic hypokalemic paralysis, electrolyte disturbances, and botulism should be considered as in the differential diagnosis. Human coronaviruses (HCoVs) cause common cold, upper and lower respiratory tract disease, but in the literature presentation with the lower respiratory tract infection and AFP has not been reported previously. In this study, pediatric case admitted with lower respiratory tract infection and AFP, who detected for HCoV 229E and OC43 co-infection by the real-time polymerase chain reaction, has been reported for the first time. PMID:26557177

  20. A rare cause of acute flaccid paralysis: Human coronaviruses.

    PubMed

    Turgay, Cokyaman; Emine, Tekin; Ozlem, Koken; Muhammet, S Paksu; Haydar, A Tasdemir

    2015-01-01

    Acute flaccid paralysis (AFP) is a life-threatening clinical entity characterized by weakness in the whole body muscles often accompanied by respiratory and bulbar paralysis. The most common cause is Gullian-Barre syndrome, but infections, spinal cord diseases, neuromuscular diseases such as myasthenia gravis, drugs and toxins, periodic hypokalemic paralysis, electrolyte disturbances, and botulism should be considered as in the differential diagnosis. Human coronaviruses (HCoVs) cause common cold, upper and lower respiratory tract disease, but in the literature presentation with the lower respiratory tract infection and AFP has not been reported previously. In this study, pediatric case admitted with lower respiratory tract infection and AFP, who detected for HCoV 229E and OC43 co-infection by the real-time polymerase chain reaction, has been reported for the first time. PMID:26557177

  1. Acute blindness in a dog caused by an explosive blast.

    PubMed

    Shelah, Michal; Weinberger, Dov; Ofri, Ron

    2007-01-01

    A 3-year-old, intact male, mixed breed dog was presented with a complaint of acute blindness. Ten days previously, the area where the dog was walking came under a rocket attack, and a rocket landed and exploded 300 meters away from the dog. Physical examination was unremarkable. Ophthalmoscopic examination revealed posterior segment fibrin clots and extensive vitreal hemorrhage in the right eye. A total retinal detachment (360 degrees retinal dialysis) with no evidence of hemorrhage was noted in the left eye. There was no sign of any penetrating ocular trauma, and it was assumed that the posterior segment findings were primary injuries caused by the blast wave itself. Following anti-inflammatory treatment, partial vision was restored in the right eye. Surgical re-attachment of the retina was discussed and declined by the owner. This report describes, for the first time, vitreal hemorrhage and retinal detachment as the sole injuries caused by an explosive blast wave. PMID:17445083

  2. Chronic recurrent multifocal osteomyelitis causing an acute scoliosis.

    PubMed

    Armstrong, Alexander; Upadhyay, Neil; Saxby, Edward; Pryce, Damian; Steele, Nick

    2013-01-01

    Study Design. A Case Report. Objective. We present a 15-year-old girl with an acute atypical scoliosis secondary to chronic recurrent multifocal osteomyelitis (CRMO). Summary of Background Data. CRMO is a rare nonpyogenic inflammatory bone condition with unclear aetiology. CRMO mainly affects the metaphyses of long bones, the pelvis, shoulder girdle, and less commonly the spine. Methods. Our case presented with a 6-month history of worsening thoracic back pain, asymmetry of her shoulders and abnormal posture. Whole spine radiographs revealed a right atypical thoracic scoliosis. Magnetic Resonance Imaging showed abnormal signal on the short TI inversion recovery (STIR) sequences in multiple vertebrae. A bone biopsy demonstrated evidence of fibrosis and chronic inflammatory changes. Interval MRI scans revealed new oedematous lesions and disappearance of old lesions. Symptoms improved. Results. It is important to consider CRMO as an acute cause of atypical scoliosis. Malignancy, pyogenic infections and atypical presentations of juvenile arthritis need excluding. Conclusion. This 24-month follow-up describes a rare cause of an atypical scoliosis and fortifies the small amount of the currently available literature. The case highlights the relapsing and remitting nature of CRMO with new lesions developing and older lesions burning out. We advise close radiological surveillance and symptomatic management. PMID:23997974

  3. Acute gastroenteritis outbreak caused by a GII.6 norovirus

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Ling-Fei; Qiao, Kun; Wang, Xiao-Guang; Ding, Ke-Ying; Su, Hua-Ling; Li, Cui-Zhen; Yan, Hong-Jing

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To report an acute gastroenteritis outbreak caused by a genogroup 2 genotype 6 (GII.6) strain norovirus in Shanghai, China. METHODS: Noroviruses are responsible for approximately half of all reported gastroenteritis outbreaks in many countries. Genogroup 2 genotype 4 strains are the most prevalent. Rare outbreaks caused by GII.6 strains have been reported. An acute gastroenteritis outbreak occurred in an elementary school in Shanghai in December of 2013. Field and molecular epidemiologic investigations were conducted. RESULTS: The outbreak was limited to one class in an elementary school located in southwest Shanghai. The age of the students ranged from 9 to 10 years. The first case emerged on December 10, 2013, and the last case emerged on December 14, 2013. The cases peaked on December 11, 2013, with 21 new cases. Of 45 students in the class, 32 were affected. The main symptom was gastroenteritis, and 15.6% (5/32) of the cases exhibited a fever. A field epidemiologic investigation showed the pathogen may have been transmitted to the elementary school from employees in a delicatessen via the first case student, who had eaten food from the delicatessen one day before the gastroenteritis episodes began. A molecular epidemiologic investigation identified the cause of the gastroenteritis as norovirus strain GII.6; the viral sequence of the student cases showed 100% homology with that of the shop employees. Genetic relatedness analyses showed that the new viral strain is closely related to previously reported GII.6 sequences, especially to a strain reported in Japan. CONCLUSION: This is the first report to show that norovirus strain GII.6 can cause a gastroenteritis outbreak. Thus, the prevalence of GII.6 noroviruses requires attention. PMID:25954103

  4. [Prevalence of enteropathogenic bacteria in children with acute bloody diarrhea].

    PubMed

    Suárez-Hoil, G J; Flores-Abuxapqui, J J; Heredia-Navarrete, M R; Puc-Franco, M A; Franco-Monsreal, J

    1993-03-01

    Between January to October 1991, were studied 148 samples of feces corresponding to the same number of children with acute diarrhea. In 41 (27.7%) samples, were found macroscopic or microscopic blood. At least one associated bacterial pathogen capable to produce bloody diarrhea was isolated from 22 (53.7%) of these samples. Were isolated five (12.2%) Salmonella strains, all of them were S. enteritidis; nine (22.0%) Shigella: seven S. flexneri, one S. boydii, and other one S. sonnei; two (4.9%) enteroinvasive Escherichia coli strains, and six (14.6%) Campylobacter jejuni strains. A single associated invasive bacterial pathogen was isolated in 13 (31.7%) children. Mixed culture were found in nine children: five (12.2%) children had invasive pathogens association, and four (9.8%) children had invasive and no invasive pathogens association. PMID:8442878

  5. Wallenberg Syndrome: An Exceptional Cause of Acute Vertigo in Children.

    PubMed

    Ehresmann, Aude Ménétrey; Van, Hélène Cao; Merlini, Laura; Fluss, Joel

    2016-01-01

    The assessment of acute vertigo in childhood is often challenging, but fortunately a central cause is rarely identified. We present the case of a 7-year-old boy who developed, after a mild head trauma, a rotary vertigo associated with nausea and vomiting. A posttraumatic peripheral vestibular dysfunction was first suspected but not confirmed by an otoneurological evaluation. When subtle neurological signs were elicited, a brain magnetic resonance imaging was promptly requested. This showed a small infarct on the lateral posterior left part of the medulla oblongata of the brainstem, typical of Wallenberg syndrome. Vascular imaging was normal and no defined etiology was found. The child was started on prophylactic acetylsalicylic acid. The rapid disappearance of vertigo was noted. On follow-up at 6 months, there has been no recurrence and neurological examination was fully normal. Our case extends the differential diagnosis of acute vertigo in childhood that rarely includes the possibility of a brainstem infarct whose recognition through appropriate clinical examination is nevertheless capital for appropriate investigations and management. PMID:26569158

  6. A surprising cause of acute right upper quadrant pain.

    PubMed

    Stitt, Rodger Scott; Greenwood, Robert; Laczek, Jeffrey

    2014-01-01

    A 42 year-old African-American woman was admitted for severe acute right upper quadrant pain. Her liver function tests showed a cholestatic pattern of hepatitis. She had no known history of liver disease or sarcoidosis. Imaging of her liver and biliary tree did not reveal any apparent cause for her right upper quadrant pain. A liver biopsy was performed which showed granulomatous disease. This prompted a CT chest that showed mediastinal lymphadenopathy. Biopsy of the mediastinal lymphnode revealed non-caseating granulomas. Despite having no pulmonary symptoms or history of pulmonary sarcoidosis, she was diagnosed with systemic pulmonary sarcoidosis. She was treated with corticosteroids and had complete resolution of symptoms over the next several weeks. PMID:25103316

  7. First Report of Acute Postoperative Endophthalmitis Caused by Rothia Mucilaginosa after Phacoemulsification.

    PubMed

    Álvarez-Ramos, Pablo; Del Moral-Ariza, Amparo; Alonso-Maroto, José M; Marín-Casanova, Pilar; Calandria-Amigueti, José M; Rodríguez-Iglesias, Manuel; Rodríguez de la Rúa, Enrique

    2016-03-21

    We aimed at reporting the first case of rapidly progressive acute postoperative endophthalmitis after phacoemulsification cataract surgery in an immunocompetent patient caused by Rothia mucilaginosa. An immunocompetent patient manifested endophthalmitis signs 48 hours after an uncomplicated cataract surgery by phacoemulsification. A bacteria of the family Micrococcaceae was cultured in the vitreous biopsy, namely R. mucilaginosa. The patient did not show a favorable clinical response after vitrectomy and systemic, intravitreal, and topical fortified antibiotics. The patient's eye was very painful, and consequently, it deemed necessary to perform an evisceration. R. mucilaginosa may be an aggressive etiologic agent for postoperative endophthalmitis. Although the isolated R. mucilaginosa was susceptible to empirical treatment, it was impossible to control the infection with standard treatment, probably due to its ability to create a biofilm around the intraocular lens. PMID:27103973

  8. First Report of Acute Postoperative Endophthalmitis Caused by Rothia Mucilaginosa after Phacoemulsification

    PubMed Central

    Álvarez-Ramos, Pablo; Del Moral-Ariza, Amparo; Alonso-Maroto, José M.; Marín-Casanova, Pilar; Calandria-Amigueti, José M.; Rodríguez-Iglesias, Manuel

    2016-01-01

    We aimed at reporting the first case of rapidly progressive acute postoperative endophthalmitis after phacoemulsification cataract surgery in an immunocompetent patient caused by Rothia mucilaginosa. An immunocompetent patient manifested endophthalmitis signs 48 hours after an uncomplicated cataract surgery by phacoemulsification. A bacteria of the family Micrococcaceae was cultured in the vitreous biopsy, namely R. mucilaginosa. The patient did not show a favorable clinical response after vitrectomy and systemic, intravitreal, and topical fortified antibiotics. The patient’s eye was very painful, and consequently, it deemed necessary to perform an evisceration. R. mucilaginosa may be an aggressive etiologic agent for postoperative endophthalmitis. Although the isolated R. mucilaginosa was susceptible to empirical treatment, it was impossible to control the infection with standard treatment, probably due to its ability to create a biofilm around the intraocular lens. PMID:27103973

  9. An unusual cause of acute abdominal pain in dengue fever.

    PubMed

    Waseem, Tariq; Latif, Hina; Shabbir, Bilquis

    2014-07-01

    Dengue fever is an acute febrile viral disease caused by the bite of Aedes aegypti mosquito. It is a major health problem especially in tropical and subtropical areas including South East Asia and Pakistan. In the past few years, dengue fever has been endemic in Northern Punjab. Physicians managing dengue fever come across varied and uncommon complications of dengue fever. We report a case of dengue fever that developed severe right upper quadrant abdominal pain and induration after extreme retching and vomiting for 2 days. A rectus sheath hematoma was confirmed on noncontrast computed tomography (CT). Rectus sheath hematoma as a complication of dengue fever has rarely been reported before and never from this part of the world. Rectus sheath hematoma is an uncommon and often clinically misdiagnosed cause of abdominal pain. It is the result of bleeding into the rectus sheath from damage to the superior or inferior epigastric artery or their branches or from a direct tear of the rectus muscle. It can mimic almost any abdominal condition (See Fig.) (See Table). PMID:24560393

  10. Uncommon cause of acute encephalopathy in liver cirrhosis.

    PubMed

    Dieuvil, Monique; Malaty, John

    2016-01-01

    A 49-year-old woman with a medical history of alcoholic cirrhosis status post-transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt (post-TIPS) in 2012, and ongoing alcohol abuse, presented to the hospital, with haematuria. CT intravenous pyelogram (IVP) was normal except for 'a large intrahepatic cystic mass adjacent to the TIPS, causing intrahepatic biliary duct dilation'. The patient also presented with acute encephalopathy, jaundice, right upper quadrant abdominal pain and hyperbilirubinaemia (total bilirubin of 8.1 mg/dL with direct bilirubin of 3.0 mg/dL). She remained encephalopathic despite adequate treatment for alcohol withdrawal, hepatic encephalopathy and enterococcus urinary tract infection. MRI of the abdomen later confirmed presence of an obstructing biloma. The biloma, drained by CT-guided percutaneous drains, demonstrated an Escherichia coli and ESBL Klebsiella infection. The patient's encephalopathy completely resolved after treatment of the infected biloma. With adequate drainage, her hyperbilirubinaemia resolved to her post-TIPS baseline (total bilirubin of 3.7 mg/dL with direct bilirubin of 3.3 mg/dL). PMID:27194673

  11. [Case of acute generalized exanthematous pustulosis caused by Kerorin].

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Yukie; Murayama, Naoya

    2007-10-01

    A 78-year-old woman visited a local clinic because of cough and fever, and was prescribed levofloxacin, carbocisteine, and cold medicine (salicylamide, acetaminophen, anhydrous caffeine, promethazine methylene disalicylate). The following day, erythema appeared on the trunk, and spread. Multiple pustules independent of hair follicles developed on the erythema mainly in the skin folds. Histopathological examination revealed subcorneal pustular dermatosis. The clinical course and characteristics of the rashes led to a diagnosis of acute generalized exanthematous pustulosis (AGEP). Although the administration on levofloxacin, carbocisteine, and cold medicine were discontinued, the rashes recurred. We reviewed the patient's history, and found that she had a history of taking the over-the-counter drug Kerorin, and had taken a dose of Kerorin on the day before the first examination and before the recurrence. The ingestion of Kerorin was regarded as an incidental oral administration test, which was positive. Thus, oral administration tests with Kerorin and its ingredients acetylsalicylic acid and anhydrous caffeine were positive, leading to a diagnosis of AGEP caused by Kerorin. PMID:17982292

  12. Drug Resistance Mechanisms in Bacteria Causing Sexually Transmitted Diseases and Associated with Vaginosis

    PubMed Central

    Shaskolskiy, Boris; Dementieva, Ekaterina; Leinsoo, Arvo; Runina, Anastassia; Vorobyev, Denis; Plakhova, Xenia; Kubanov, Alexey; Deryabin, Dmitrii; Gryadunov, Dmitry

    2016-01-01

    Here, we review sexually transmitted diseases (STDs) caused by pathogenic bacteria and vaginal infections which result from an overgrowth of opportunistic bacterial microflora. First, we describe the STDs, the corresponding pathogens and the antimicrobials used for their treatment. In addition to the well-known diseases caused by single pathogens (i.e., syphilis, gonococcal infections, and chlamydiosis), we consider polymicrobial reproductive tract infections (especially those that are difficult to effectively clinically manage). Then, we summarize the biochemical mechanisms that lead to antimicrobial resistance and the most recent data on the emergence of drug resistance in STD pathogens and bacteria associated with vaginosis. A large amount of research performed in the last 10–15 years has shed light on the enormous diversity of mechanisms of resistance developed by bacteria. A detailed understanding of the mechanisms of antimicrobials action and the emergence of resistance is necessary to modify existing drugs and to develop new ones directed against new targets.

  13. Acute abdominal aortic thrombosis caused by paroxysmal atrial fibrillation.

    PubMed

    Riccioni, G; Bucciarelli, V; Bisceglia, N; Totaro, G; Scotti, L; Aceto, A; Martini, F; Gallina, S; Bucciarelli, T; Macarini, L

    2013-01-01

    Acute abdominal aortic thrombosis is a rare and potential fatal event, which occurs in adult subjects. We present the case of a 72-year-old-man, who referred to the emergency Department of our hospital because of persistent severe abdominal and perineal pain. Doppler ultrasounds and computerized tomography angiography revealed the acute thrombosis of the abdominal aorta. Immediate revascularization through aortic thrombo-endoarterectomy resolved the disease. PMID:23830410

  14. Acute liver failure caused by severe acute hepatitis B: a case series from a multi-center investigation

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Few data can be available regarding acute liver failure (ALF) caused by severe acute hepatitis B up to now. This study aims to report such cases from China. Findings We conducted a multi-center investigation on ALF from 7 tertiary hospitals in different areas of China. A total of 11 patients with ALF caused by severe acute hepatitis B were finally identified. In these patients, there were 10 male and 1 female patients. As a serious complication, apparent hemorrhage occurred in 9 patients. Eventually, in these 11 patients, 4 survived and 7 died. 4 died of heavy bleeding, 2 died of systemic inflammatory response syndrome and 1 died of irreversible coma. No patients received liver transplantation. Conclusions ALF caused by severe acute hepatitis B is worthy of formal studies based on its rarity and severity. PMID:24958233

  15. Acute toxicity assessment of ANAMMOX substrates and antibiotics by luminescent bacteria test.

    PubMed

    Ding, Shuang; Wu, Junwei; Zhang, Meng; Lu, Huifeng; Mahmood, Qaisar; Zheng, Ping

    2015-12-01

    Acute toxicities of anaerobic ammonia oxidation (ANAMMOX) substrates and four antibiotics from pharmaceutical wastewaters on ANAMMOX process were reported. Individual and joint acute toxicity assays were performed using 50% inhibitory concentration (IC50). Results showed that IC50 values and their 95% confidence interval of ammonium chloride (A), sodium nitrite (B), penicillin G-Na (C), polymyxin B sulfate (D), chloramphenicol (E) and kanamycin sulfate (F) were 2708.9 (2247.9-3169.9), 1475.4 (1269.9-1680.9), 5114.4 (4946.4-5282.4), 10.2 (1.8-18.6), 409.9 (333.7-486.1) and 5254.1 (3934.4-6573.8) mgL(-1) respectively, suggesting toxicities were in the order of D>E>B>A>C>F. Joint acute toxicities of bicomponent mixtures A and B, C and D, C and F, D and F were independent; D and E, E and F were additive while C and E were synergistic. Joint acute toxicities of multicomponent mixtures were synergistic or additive. Luminescent bacteria test is an easy and robust method for forecasting the feasibility of ANAMMOX process for pharmaceutical wastewater treatment. PMID:25912634

  16. In vitro growth inhibition of mastitis causing bacteria by phenolics and metal chelators

    SciTech Connect

    Chew, B.P.; Tjoelker, L.W.; Tanaka, T.S.

    1985-11-01

    Antimicrobial activities of three phenolic compounds and four metal chelators were tested at 0, 250, 500, and 1000 ppm in vitro against four major mastitis-causing bacteria, Streptococcus agalactiae, Staphylococcus aureus, Klebsiella pnuemoniae, and Escherichia coli. Overall, butylated hydroxyanisole and tert-butylhydroquinone showed the greatest antimicrobial activity. These phenolics were bactericidal at 250 to 500 ppm against all four bacteria tested. The butylated hydroxytoluene was bactericidal against the gram-positive bacteria but was ineffective against the coliforms. At 250 ppm, disodium ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid was bactericidal against the gram-positive bacteria but much less effective against the gram-negatives. However, diethylene-triaminepentaacetic acid was more growth inhibitory than ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid against the gram-negative bacteria and especially against Escherichia coli. All other compounds were generally much less effective or ineffective against all four microorganisms. Therefore, butylated hydroxyanisole, butylated hydroxytoluene, tert-butylhydroquinone, ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid, and diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid may have practical implications in the prevention or treatment of bovine mastitis.

  17. In vitro suppression of fungi caused by combinations of apparently non-antagonistic soil bacteria.

    PubMed

    de Boer, Wietse; Wagenaar, Anne-Marieke; Klein Gunnewiek, Paulien J A; van Veen, Johannes A

    2007-01-01

    We hypothesized that apparently non-antagonistic soil bacteria may contribute to suppression of fungi during competitive interactions with other bacteria. Four soil bacteria (Brevundimonas sp., Luteibacter sp., Pedobacter sp. and Pseudomonas sp.) that exhibited little or no visible antifungal activity on different agar media were prescribed. Single and mixed strains of these species were tested for antagonism on a nutrient-poor agar medium against the plant pathogenic fungi Fusarium culmorum and Rhizoctonia solani and the saprotrophic fungus Trichoderma harzianum. Single bacterial strains caused little to moderate growth reduction of fungi (quantified as ergosterol), most probably due to nutrient withdrawal from the media. Growth reduction of fungi by the bacterial mixture was much stronger than that by the single strains. This appeared to be mostly due to competitive interactions between the Pseudomonas and Pedobacter strains. We argue that cohabitation of these strains triggered antibiotic production via interspecific interactions and that the growth reduction of fungi was a side-effect caused by the sensitivity of the fungi to bacterial secondary metabolites. Induction of gliding behavior in the Pedobacter strain by other strains was also observed. Our results indicate that apparently non-antagonistic soil bacteria may be important contributors to soil suppressiveness and fungistasis when in a community context. PMID:17233750

  18. High cytokine levels in perforated acute otitis media exudates containing live bacteria.

    PubMed

    Skovbjerg, S; Roos, K; Nowrouzian, F; Lindh, M; Holm, S E; Adlerberth, I; Olofsson, S; Wold, A E

    2010-09-01

    Acute otitis media (AOM) is an inflammatory response to microbes in the middle ear, sometimes associated with rupture of the tympanic membrane. Human leukocytes produce different patterns of inflammatory mediators in vitro when stimulated with Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria, respectively. Here, we investigated the cytokine and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) responses in middle ear fluids (MEFs) from children with spontaneously perforated AOM, and related the mediator levels to the presence of pathogens detected by culture (live) or PCR (live or dead). Furthermore, the in vivo cytokine pattern was compared with that induced in leukocytes stimulated by dead bacteria in vitro. MEFs with culturable pathogenic bacteria contained more interleukin (IL)-1β (median: 110 μg/L vs. <7.5 μg/L), tumour necrosis factor (TNF) (6.3 μg/L vs. <2.5 μg/L), IL-8 (410 μg/L vs. 38 μg/L) and IL-10 (0.48 μg/L vs. <0.30 μg/L) than culture-negative fluids, irrespective of PCR findings. IL-6 and PGE2 were equally abundant (69-110 μg/L) in effusions with live, dead or undetectable bacteria. Cytokine levels were unrelated to bacterial species and to the presence or absence of virus. Similar levels of TNF and IL-6 as found in the MEFs were obtained by in vitro stimulation of leukocytes, whereas 11 times more IL-1β and 3.5 times more IL-8 were produced in vivo, and 22 times more IL-10 was produced in vitro. Vigorous production of proinflammatory cytokines accompanies AOM with membrane rupture, regardless of the causative agent, but the production seems to cease rapidly once the bacteria are killed and fragmented. IL-6 and PGE2, however, remain after bacterial disintegration, and may play a role in the resolution phase. PMID:19832705

  19. [ACUTE ABDOMEN CAUSED BY COMPLICATED FIBROID IN PREGNANCY. CASE REPORT].

    PubMed

    Atanasova, V; Petrakieva, N; Markov, P; Raycheva, I; Nikolov, A

    2015-01-01

    With the advancing maternal age the rate of fibroids in pregnancy is also growing. A small part of fibroids in pregnancy are complicated and in about 2.6% necessitate urgent surgical treatment. We present a clinical case of subserose fibroid at 20 gestational weeks complicated with acute abdomen treated urgently with normal continuation of pregnancy. PMID:26863797

  20. Blastomyces gilchristii as Cause of Fatal Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Rothstein, Aaron; Spinato, Joanna; Escott, Nicholas; Kus, Julianne V.

    2016-01-01

    Since the 2013 description of Blastomyces gilchristii, research describing the virulence or clinical outcome of B. gilchristii infection has been lacking. We report molecular evidence of B. gilchristii as an etiologic agent of fatal acute respiratory distress syndrome. B. gilchristii infection was confirmed by PCR and sequence analysis. PMID:26812599

  1. An unusual cause of acute cor pulmonale--significance of the 'continuous diaphragm sign'.

    PubMed

    Mohanan, Sandeep; Sajeev, C G; Muneer, Kader; Rajesh, G; Krishnan, M N; Pillai, Vivek

    2014-01-01

    A patient presented with chest pain and clinical features of acute right heart failure. Initial work up revealed the presence of severe PAH. Acute pulmonary embolism is the commonest and most life-threatening cause for acute cor pulmonale. Even though the clinical picture suggested pulmonary embolism, a subtle sign was missed from the first chest X-ray taken in the emergency department. However on reanalysis the 'continuous diaphragm sign' later guided us towards the diagnosis. Our case represents one of the first reports of a rare etiology for acute cor pulmonale--hypersensitivity pneumonitis. Right ventricular dysfunction was caused by an acute rise in pulmonary artery pressures as well as by the compressive effects of pneumomediastinum. We emphasize the role played by a good quality chest X-ray early in the management of acute chest pain syndromes. However pulmonary embolism should be ruled out conclusively before redirecting attention to less malignant conditions. PMID:25443610

  2. [Mitotane as possible cause of acute intermittent porphyria].

    PubMed

    von Eyben, Finn Edler

    2011-09-12

    A 54 year-old woman with acute intermittent porphyria (AIP) developed an attack of porphyria after 156 days of treatment with mitotane following a non-radical adrenalectomy for adrenocortical carcinoma. Mitotane therapy was discontinued but the attack of porphyria persisted for more than four months and included episodes with severe metabolic and neurologic toxicities. Mitotane is probably porphyrinogenic for patients with AIP. PMID:21917227

  3. Sulfasalazine: A rare cause of acute eosinophilic pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    Nadarajan, P.; Fabre, A.; Kelly, E.

    2016-01-01

    Sulfasalazine is a compound of 5-aminosalicylic acid (5-ASA) and sulfapyridine joined by an azo bond. It is a widely used drug in the treatment of chronic inflammatory bowel disease. Fatal toxicity of sulfasalazine arises from its effects on the bone marrow and the resulting blood dyscrasias. Pulmonary toxicity from sulfasalazine is a rather rare finding. Here, we present the case of a patient who developed acute eosinophilic pneumonia with sulfasalazine use.

  4. Surgical and interventional management of complications caused by acute pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Karakayali, Feza Y

    2014-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis is one of the most common gastrointestinal disorders worldwide. It requires acute hospitalization, with a reported annual incidence of 13 to 45 cases per 100000 persons. In severe cases there is persistent organ failure and a mortality rate of 15% to 30%, whereas mortality of mild pancreatitis is only 0% to 1%. Treatment principles of necrotizing pancreatitis and the role of surgery are still controversial. Despite surgery being effective for infected pancreatic necrosis, it carries the risk of long-term endocrine and exocrine deficiency and a morbidity and mortality rate of between 10% to 40%. Considering high morbidity and mortality rates of operative necrosectomy, minimally invasive strategies are being explored by gastrointestinal surgeons, radiologists, and gastroenterologists. Since 1999, several other minimally invasive surgical, endoscopic, and radiologic approaches to drain and debride pancreatic necrosis have been described. In patients who do not improve after technically adequate drainage, necrosectomy should be performed. When minimal invasive management is unsuccessful or necrosis has spread to locations not accessible by endoscopy, open abdominal surgery is recommended. Additionally, surgery is recognized as a major determinant of outcomes for acute pancreatitis, and there is general agreement that patients should undergo surgery in the late phase of the disease. It is important to consider multidisciplinary management, considering the clinical situation and the comorbidity of the patient, as well as the surgeons experience. PMID:25309073

  5. Spontaneous coronary artery dissection: a rare cause of acute coronary syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Junpaparp, Parichart; Romero-Corral, Abel; Lee, Seung Yoon Celine; Witzke, Christian

    2014-01-01

    Spontaneous coronary artery dissection (SCAD) is a rare cause of acute myocardial infarction, which should always be included in differential diagnoses of acute coronary syndrome among young patients without known atherosclerotic risk. Although, it is commonly observed in young women during postpartum period, there were cases reported in connective tissue disorders, eosinophilic arteritis, contraception use, cocaine abuse and repetitive chest trauma. We report a case of SCAD, presenting with acute ST-elevation myocardial infarction, which was successfully treated conservatively. PMID:24632904

  6. Organ distribution of gut-derived bacteria caused by bowel manipulation or ischemia

    SciTech Connect

    Redan, J.A.; Rush, B.F. Jr.; Lysz, T.W.; Smith, S.; Machiedo, G.W. )

    1990-01-01

    Translocation of carbon-14-labeled Escherichia coli from the gut was studied at the specified times in the following groups of rats: Group 1, 5 hours after ligation of the superior mesenteric artery; Group 2, 5 hours after laparotomy and exposure of the superior mesenteric artery with gentle removal and replacement of the intestines; and Group 3, 5 hours after handling but no surgical manipulation. Both living and dead bacteria were administered by means of gavage, and the effect of viability, intestinal ischemia without reperfusion, and bowel manipulation on the translocation of enteric bacteria was assessed. We demonstrated that (1) even gentle bowel manipulation causes bacteremia as great as that associated with ligation of the superior mesenteric artery; (2) dead E. coli are absorbed into the blood in the presence of bowel manipulation or ischemia but less effectively than are live E. coli; (3) live bacteria are found in highest concentration in the lung and in descending order in the liver, kidney, heart, and spleen; (4) dead bacteria absorbed from the gut are found in highest concentration in the kidney and the liver. Lesser amounts are found in the lung, spleen, and heart.

  7. Bilateral ureteric stones: an unusual cause of acute kidney injury.

    PubMed

    Sumner, Daniel; Rehnberg, Lucas; Kler, Aaron

    2016-01-01

    A 49-year-old man presented to the accident and emergency department, with a short history of vague abdominal pain, abdominal distension and two episodes of frank haematuria. A plain chest film showed dilated loops of large bowel and blood results on admission showed an acute kidney injury (stage 3). A diagnosis of bowel obstruction was made initially but a CT scan of the abdomen showed bilateral obstructing calculi. After initial resuscitation, the patient had bilateral ultrasound-guided nephrostomies and haemofiltration. He later underwent bilateral antegrade ureteric stenting. A decision will later be made on whether or not he is fit enough to undergo ureteroscopy and laser stone fragmentation. PMID:27030462

  8. Do We Know What Causes Acute Myeloid Leukemia?

    MedlinePlus

    ... cancer. Scientists have learned how certain changes in DNA can cause normal bone marrow cells to become ... each cell’s chromosomes. Chromosomes are long strands of DNA in each cell. The DNA inside our cells ...

  9. The effect of Lactobacillus bacteria supplement on sepsis and its complications in patients with acute burns.

    PubMed

    Koren, Lior; Gurfinkel, Reuven; Glezinger, Ronen; Perry, Zvi Howard; Lev-Ari, Sandra; Rosenberg, Lior

    2007-08-01

    Sepsis as a result of bacterial translocation from the gastrointestinal tract (GIT) is a known associate of morbidity and mortality in patients with severe burns. This translocation is influenced by the GIT flora. Oral consumption of Lactobacillus bacteria was previously shown to reduce translocation. We conducted a retrospective cohort study on a series of 56 patients with burns admitted to Soroka University Medical Center in Beer-Sheva, Israel. Those 56 patients included 28 who were given lactobacillus supplements and 28 who were not. The parameters that were compared between the groups evaluated the level of sepsis and its complications. The parameters of morbidity during hospitalization were significantly higher in the treatment group; however, their mortality was lower. That difference in mortality between the groups was not significant as a whole (p=0.071), but it was significant in the subgroup analysis of 41-70% total body surface area burned. In that subgroup there were zero cases of death in the treatment group versus five cases in the control group (p=0.005). Our findings suggest that in acute burns, lactobacillus bacteria food additives may be clinically beneficial in patients with total burned body surface area of 41-70%. PMID:17482370

  10. Gram-Negative Bacteria That Produce Carbapenemases Causing Death Attributed to Recent Foreign Hospitalization

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed-Bentley, Jasmine; Chandran, A. Uma; Joffe, A. Mark; French, Desiree; Peirano, Gisele

    2013-01-01

    Overseas travel, as a risk factor for the acquisition of infections due to antimicrobial-resistant organisms, has recently been linked to carbapenemase-producing Gram-negative bacteria. Multiresistant Klebsiella pneumoniae, Escherichia coli, and Acinetobacter baumannii strains were isolated from a wound of a Canadian patient with a recent history of hospitalization in India. This resulted in the initiation of outbreak management that included surveillance cultures. Epidemiological and molecular investigations showed that NDM-1-producing K. pneumoniae ST16 and OXA-23-producing A. baumannii ST10 strains were transmitted to 5 other patients, resulting in the colonization of 4 patients and the death of 1 patient due to septic shock caused by the OXA-23-producing A. baumannii strain. The high rate of false positivity of the screening cultures resulted in additional workloads and increased costs for infection control and clinical laboratory work. We believe that this is the first report of an infection with carbapenemase-producing Gram-negative bacteria resulting in death attributed to a patient with recent foreign hospitalization. We recommend routine rectal and wound screening for colonization with multiresistant bacteria for patients who have recently been admitted to hospitals outside Canada. PMID:23612195

  11. Laryngeal lipoma: a rare cause of acute intermittent airway obstruction.

    PubMed

    Deutsch, Peter George; O'Connell, Janet

    2016-01-01

    We present a case of a 62-year-old man with a lipoma in the exceedingly rare location of the larynx, causing intermittent airway obstruction and dysphagia. The lipoma was excised endoscopically with complete resolution of symptoms. Lipomas are relatively common, accounting for 4-5% of all benign tumours in the body. They traditionally occur in areas of large depositions of subcutaneous fat, most frequently the trunk and limbs. They are recognised to occur in the head and neck but these only represent 13-15% of all lipomas. Lipomas are typically asymptomatic unless their impingement of nearby structures causes symptoms. PMID:27107059

  12. Bath salt intoxication causing acute kidney injury requiring hemodialysis.

    PubMed

    Regunath, Hariharan; Ariyamuthu, Venkatesh Kumar; Dalal, Pranavkumar; Misra, Madhukar

    2012-10-01

    Traditional bath salts contain a combination of inorganic salts like Epsom salts, table salt, baking soda, sodium metaphosphate, and borax that have cleansing properties. Since 2010, there have been rising concerns about a new type of substance abuse in the name of "bath salts." They are beta-ketone amphetamine analogs and are derivates of cathinone, a naturally occurring amphetamine analog found in the "khat" plant (Catha edulis). Effects reported with intake included increased energy, empathy, openness, and increased libido. Serious adverse effects reported with intoxication included cardiac, psychiatric, and neurological signs and symptoms. Not much is known about the toxicology and metabolism of these compounds. They inhibit monoamine reuptake (dopamine, nor epinephrine, etc.) and act as central nervous system stimulants with high additive and abuse potential because of their clinical and biochemical similarities to effects from use of cocaine, amphetamine, and 3,4-methylenedioxy-N-methylamphetamine. Deaths associated with use of these compounds have also been reported. We report a case of acute kidney injury associated with the use of "bath salt" pills that improved with hemodialysis. PMID:23036036

  13. Tinea corporis with acute inflammation caused by Trichophyton tonsurans.

    PubMed

    Ohno, Sayoko; Tanabe, Hiroshi; Kawasaki, Masako; Horiguchi, Yuji

    2008-09-01

    A 13-year-old Japanese boy presented with acute skin inflammation on the extremities. He belonged to a judo club of a junior high school in which club tinea capitis and tinea corporis seemed to be prevalent. Vesicles and pustules appeared on his right forearm and right leg. They increased in numbers and formed annular lesions. Pruritic erythema appeared surrounding these lesions. Direct microscopic examination of the lesions detected hyphae, and culture for the fungi yielded yellowish colonies. The result of culture from pustules revealed Staphylococcus aureus. At first, a topical antifungal drug and systemic antibiotics seemed to cure annular lesions, but pustules arose again. A large surrounding erythema was cured by topical treatment with a steroid agent. A biopsy specimen from a pustule showed hyphae of fungi within a hair shaft and in the bulb. The restriction fragment length polymorphism in the internal transcribed spacer regions of the ribosomal gene (polymerase chain reaction restriction fragment length polymorphism) revealed a banding pattern compatible with Trichophyton tonsurans. Treatment with systemic itraconazole was begun and lesions disappeared immediately. Systemic antifungal therapy was needed in our case. Tinea corporis with inflammation necessitates systemic antifungal therapy. PMID:18837705

  14. Chikungunya as a Cause of Acute Febrile Illness in Southern Sri Lanka

    PubMed Central

    Reller, Megan E.; Akoroda, Ufuoma; Nagahawatte, Ajith; Devasiri, Vasantha; Kodikaarachchi, Wasantha; Strouse, John J.; Chua, Robert; Hou, Yan'an; Chow, Angelia; Sessions, October M.; Østbye, Truls; Gubler, Duane J.; Woods, Christopher W.; Bodinayake, Champica

    2013-01-01

    Background Chikungunya virus (CHIKV) re-emerged in Sri Lanka in late 2006 after a 40-year hiatus. We sought to identify and characterize acute chikungunya infection (CHIK) in patients presenting with acute undifferentiated febrile illness in unstudied rural and semi-urban southern Sri Lanka in 2007. Methodology/Principal Findings We enrolled febrile patients ≥ 2 years of age, collected uniform epidemiologic and clinical data, and obtained serum samples for serology, virus isolation, and real-time reverse-transcriptase PCR (RT-PCR). Serology on paired acute and convalescent samples identified acute chikungunya infection in 3.5% (28/797) patients without acute dengue virus (DENV) infection, 64.3% (18/28) of which were confirmed by viral isolation and/or real-time RT-PCR. No CHIKV/DENV co-infections were detected among 54 patients with confirmed acute DENV. Sequencing of the E1 coding region of six temporally distinct CHIKV isolates (April through October 2007) showed that all isolates posessed the E1-226A residue and were most closely related to Sri Lankan and Indian isolates from the same time period. Except for more frequent and persistent musculoskeletal symptoms, acute chikungunya infections mimicked DENV and other acute febrile illnesses. Only 12/797 (1.5%) patients had serological evidence of past chikungunya infection. Conclusions/Significance Our findings suggest CHIKV is a prominent cause of non-specific acute febrile illness in southern Sri Lanka. PMID:24312651

  15. Acute exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: causes and impacts.

    PubMed

    Chhabra, Sunil K; Dash, Devi Jyoti

    2014-01-01

    Acute exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (AECOPD) are recognised clinically as episodes of increased breathlessness and productive cough requiring a more intensive treatment. A subset of patients with this disease is especially prone to such exacerbations. These patients are labelled as 'frequent exacerbators'. Though yet poorly characterised in terms of host characteristics, including any genetic basis, these patients are believed to represent a distinct phenotype as they have a different natural history with a more progressive disease and a poorer prognosis than those who get exacerbations infrequently. Most exacerbations appear to be associated with infective triggers, either bacterial or viral, although 'non-infective' agents, such as air pollution and other irritants may also be important. Susceptibility to exacerbations is determined by multiple factors. Several risk factors have been identified, some of which are modifiable. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) exacerbations are major drivers of health status and patient-centered outcomes, and are a major reason for health care utilisation including hospitalisations and intensive care admissions. These are associated with considerable morbidity and mortality, both immediate and long-term. These episodes have a negative impact on the patient and the disease including high economic burden, increased mortality, worsening of health status, limitation of activity, and aggravation of comorbidities including cardiovascular disease, osteoporosis and neuro-psychiatric complications. Exacerbations also increase the rate of progression of disease, increasing the annual decline in lung function and leading to a poorer prognosis. Evaluation of risk of exacerbations is now included as a major component of the initial assessment of a patient with COPD in addition to the traditionally used lung function parameter, forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1). Decreasing the risk of exacerbations and their prevention is a major therapeutic goal of management in COPD. PMID:25230550

  16. Mutations in LPIN1 Cause Recurrent Acute Myoglobinuria in Childhood

    PubMed Central

    Zeharia, Avraham; Shaag, Avraham; Houtkooper, Riekelt H.; Hindi, Tareq; de Lonlay, Pascale; Erez, Gilli; Hubert, Laurence; Saada, Ann; de Keyzer, Yves; Eshel, Gideon; Vaz, Frédéric M.; Pines, Ophry; Elpeleg, Orly

    2008-01-01

    Recurrent episodes of life-threatening myoglobinuria in childhood are caused by inborn errors of glycogenolysis, mitochondrial fatty acid beta-oxidation, and oxidative phosphorylation. Nonetheless, approximately half of the patients do not suffer from a defect in any of these pathways. Using homozygosity mapping, we identified six deleterious mutations in the LPIN1 gene in patients who presented at 2–7 years of age with recurrent, massive rhabdomyolysis. The LPIN1 gene encodes the muscle-specific phosphatidic acid phosphatase, a key enzyme in triglyceride and membrane phospholipid biosynthesis. Of six individuals who developed statin-induced myopathy, one was a carrier for Glu769Gly, a pathogenic mutation in the LPIN1 gene. Analysis of phospholipid content disclosed accumulation of phosphatidic acid and lysophospholipids in muscle tissue of the more severe genotype. Mutations in the LPIN1 gene cause recurrent rhabdomyolysis in childhood, and a carrier state may predispose for statin-induced myopathy. PMID:18817903

  17. Mutations in LPIN1 cause recurrent acute myoglobinuria in childhood.

    PubMed

    Zeharia, Avraham; Shaag, Avraham; Houtkooper, Riekelt H; Hindi, Tareq; de Lonlay, Pascale; Erez, Gilli; Hubert, Laurence; Saada, Ann; de Keyzer, Yves; Eshel, Gideon; Vaz, Frédéric M; Pines, Ophry; Elpeleg, Orly

    2008-10-01

    Recurrent episodes of life-threatening myoglobinuria in childhood are caused by inborn errors of glycogenolysis, mitochondrial fatty acid beta-oxidation, and oxidative phosphorylation. Nonetheless, approximately half of the patients do not suffer from a defect in any of these pathways. Using homozygosity mapping, we identified six deleterious mutations in the LPIN1 gene in patients who presented at 2-7 years of age with recurrent, massive rhabdomyolysis. The LPIN1 gene encodes the muscle-specific phosphatidic acid phosphatase, a key enzyme in triglyceride and membrane phospholipid biosynthesis. Of six individuals who developed statin-induced myopathy, one was a carrier for Glu769Gly, a pathogenic mutation in the LPIN1 gene. Analysis of phospholipid content disclosed accumulation of phosphatidic acid and lysophospholipids in muscle tissue of the more severe genotype. Mutations in the LPIN1 gene cause recurrent rhabdomyolysis in childhood, and a carrier state may predispose for statin-induced myopathy. PMID:18817903

  18. Hantavirus infection: an emerging infectious disease causing acute renal failure.

    PubMed

    Krautkrämer, Ellen; Zeier, Martin; Plyusnin, Alexander

    2013-01-01

    The function of the kidney with its highly differentiated and specialized cell types is affected by infection with several viruses. Viral infections of the kidney have a negative impact not only on patients undergoing renal transplantation and immunosuppression. Besides the increasing number of patients suffering from HIV-associated nephropathy, another group of viruses infects immunocompetent patients and induces renal failure. Hantaviruses belong nowadays to the emerging zoonoses that increase in number and geographic distribution. The viruses are distributed worldwide in endemic areas and distribution seems to expand. Together with the increase in the number of cases in the last few years, the understanding of epidemiology and pathology has deepened and some concepts had to be changed. Symptoms and mortality vary between species. The classification refers to geographical distribution: New World hantaviruses causing hantavirus cardiopulmonary syndrome (HCPS) and Old World hantaviruses causing hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome (HFRS). Indeed, in most HFRS cases, the kidney is mainly affected and HCPS is characterized by cardiopulmonary involvement. But the picture of strict organ tropism is changing and reports of pulmonary findings and nonrenal manifestations in infections with Old World hantaviruses are increasing. However, the overall symptoms-vascular alterations and leakage-that are responsible for organ failure are characteristic for all diseases caused by hantaviruses. PMID:23151954

  19. An unusual cause of acute kidney injury due to oxalate nephropathy in systemic scleroderma.

    PubMed

    Mascio, Heather M; Joya, Christie A; Plasse, Richard A; Baker, Thomas P; Flessner, Michael F; Nee, Robert

    2015-08-01

    Oxalate nephropathy is an uncommon cause of acute kidney injury. Far rarer is its association with scleroderma, with only one other published case report in the literature. We report a case of a 75-year-old African-American female with a history of systemic scleroderma manifested by chronic pseudo-obstruction and small intestinal bacterial overgrowth (SIBO) treated with rifaximin, who presented with acute kidney injury with normal blood pressure. A renal biopsy demonstrated extensive acute tubular injury with numerous intratubular birefringent crystals, consistent with oxalate nephropathy. We hypothesize that her recent treatment with rifaximin for SIBO and decreased intestinal transit time in pseudo-obstruction may have significantly increased intestinal oxalate absorption, leading to acute kidney injury. Oxalate nephropathy should be considered in the differential diagnosis of acute kidney injury in scleroderma with normotension, and subsequent evaluation should be focused on bowel function to include alterations in gut flora due to antibiotic administration. PMID:25500295

  20. Omental infarct in a hernia: an unusual cause of paediatric acute scrotum

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Ramnik V; Dawrant, Michael; Scott, Victoria; Fisher, Ross

    2014-01-01

    We report a case of paediatric acute scrotum due to segmental haemorrhagic infarct of the omentum secondary to strangulation in the left inguinal hernia in a toddler as initial presentation after hernia being noticed by mother once earlier. A 4-year-old boy with non-traumatic acute left scrotum who had a history of left inguinal swelling once earlier presented with massively swollen, painful and discoloured left hemiscrotum extending into the groin simulating acute testicular torsion. Interestingly, there was a segmental omental infarct which precipitated the emergency and had ipsilateral testicular ascent and atrophy as long-term sequelae. Strangulated segmental omental infarct is a rare cause of acute abdomen/scrotum in children. Omentum is a very rare content of inguinal hernia in a toddler and infarct is exceptional. The diagnosis is usually not established before surgery in children. It should be included in the differential diagnoses of acute scrotum, especially in patients with untreated inguinal hernia. PMID:24632908

  1. [A case of successful treatment of portal venous gas caused by acute pancreatitis].

    PubMed

    Dong, Shi Heon; Cho, Hyeon Geun; Baek, Jeong Hoon; Kang, Beo Deul; Kim, Mi Sung; Cho, Jae Hee; Lee, Jeong Hoon; Chun, Song Wook

    2013-03-25

    Hepatic portal venous gas (HPVG) has been considered a rare entity associated with a poor prognosis. Portal vein gas is most commonly caused by mesenteric ischemia but may have a variety other causes. HPVG can be associated with ischemic bowel disease, inflammatory bowel disease, intra-abdominal abscess, small bowel obstruction, acute pancreatitis, and gastric ulcer. Because of high mortality rate, most HPVG requires emergent surgical interventions and intensive medical management. We experienced a case of hepatic portal venous gas caused by acute pancreatitis and successfully treated with medical management. PMID:23575237

  2. Subcutaneous Emphysema in Acute Asthma: A Cause for Concern?

    PubMed

    Mitchell, Patrick D; King, Thomas J; O'Shea, Donal B

    2015-08-01

    Pneumomediastinum has been described in patients with asthma. In this case report, we describe a young patient who presented to our medical assessment unit with an asthma exacerbation and progressive dyspnea. The patient developed pneumomediastinum, a rare complication of an asthma exacerbation. Pneumomediastinum is usually characterized by chest pain, dyspnea, and neck swelling caused by subcutaneous emphysema. Although the condition is usually benign and treatment is primarily supportive, surgical intervention may be needed if the patient develops hemodynamic compromise or respiratory failure through mechanisms similar to those seen in a tension pneumothorax. PMID:25605959

  3. Acute aortic dissection caused by Clostridium septicum aortitis.

    PubMed

    Eplinius, Franziska; Hädrich, Carsten

    2014-11-01

    Clostridium septicum aortitis is a rare cause of aortic dissection. So far, only 28 cases have been described in literature before. Most of these cases occurred in elderly patients and an association to colonic neoplasms and/or atherosclerosis has been witnessed frequently. Here we report the case of a 32-year-old man with fatal aortic dissection due to aortic infection with C. septicum. Beside a case of a 22-year-old man who died of aortic dissection due to C. septicum aortitis this is the second case of C. septicum aortitis in a young individual with no signs of colonic neoplasms or atherosclerosis. PMID:25242573

  4. Apophysomyces elegans causing acute otogenic cervicofacial zygomycosis involving salivary glands.

    PubMed

    Goyal, Amit; Tyagi, Isha; Syal, Rajan; Marak, R S K; Singh, Jagdeep

    2007-08-01

    Zygomycosis is an invasive, life threatening fungal infection that usually affects immunocompromised hosts. In the head and neck region, rhino-orbito-cerebral zygomycosis is more common than the cervicofacial variety. We report the first case of otogenic cervicofacial zygomycosis caused by Apophysomyces elegans involving the salivary glands, an uncommon site of infection. The case began after a trivial trauma in a diabetic patient and despite surgical debridement and liposomal amphotericin B therapy, the patient died due to extensive involvement and metabolic/hemodynamic complications. PMID:17654273

  5. Acute pyelonephritis and secondary bacteraemia caused by Veillonella during pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Yagihashi, Yusuke; Arakaki, Yoshitaka

    2012-01-01

    We report a case of pyelonephritis and secondary bacteraemia caused by Veillonella species during pregnancy. Veillonella is part of the normal flora from the oral cavity, gut and vagina. However, because Veillonella is usually isolated from cultures of clinical specimens as part of commensal flora, it is frequently regarded as a contaminant. In the present case, Veillonella was isolated from the patient's urine and blood samples that showed evidence of pyelonephritis and secondary bacteraemia. We found that ureteral stenting is an extremely effective therapeutic option for pregnant woman with hydronephrosis and clear signs and symptoms of urosepsis. PMID:23125301

  6. Draft Genome Sequence of Vibrio owensii Strain SH-14, Which Causes Shrimp Acute Hepatopancreatic Necrosis Disease

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Liyuan; Xiao, Jinzhou; Xia, Xiaoming; Pan, Yingjie; Yan, Shuling

    2015-01-01

    We sequenced Vibrio owensii strain SH-14, which causes serious acute hepatopancreatic necrosis disease (AHPND) in shrimp. Sequence analysis showed a large extrachromosomal plasmid, which encoded pir toxin genes and shared highly sequence similarity with the one observed in AHPND-causing Vibrio parahaemolyticus strains. The results suggest that this plasmid appears to play an important role in shrimp AHPND. PMID:26634753

  7. Draft Genome Sequence of Vibrio owensii Strain SH-14, Which Causes Shrimp Acute Hepatopancreatic Necrosis Disease.

    PubMed

    Liu, Liyuan; Xiao, Jinzhou; Xia, Xiaoming; Pan, Yingjie; Yan, Shuling; Wang, Yongjie

    2015-01-01

    We sequenced Vibrio owensii strain SH-14, which causes serious acute hepatopancreatic necrosis disease (AHPND) in shrimp. Sequence analysis showed a large extrachromosomal plasmid, which encoded pir toxin genes and shared highly sequence similarity with the one observed in AHPND-causing Vibrio parahaemolyticus strains. The results suggest that this plasmid appears to play an important role in shrimp AHPND. PMID:26634753

  8. The use of rotifers for limiting filamentous bacteria Type 021N, a bacteria causing activated sludge bulking.

    PubMed

    Kocerba-Soroka, Wioleta; Fiałkowska, Edyta; Pajdak-Stós, Agnieszka; Klimek, Beata; Kowalska, Ewa; Drzewicki, Adam; Salvadó, Humbert; Fyda, Janusz

    2013-01-01

    The excessive growth of filamentous bacteria and the resultant bulking of activated sludge constitute a serious problem in numerous wastewater treatment plants. Lecane inermis rotifers were previously shown to be capable of reducing the abundance of Microthrix parvicella and Nostocoida limicola in activated sludge. In the present study, the effectiveness of four Lecane clones in reducing the abundance of Type 021N filamentous bacteria was investigated. Three independent experiments were carried out on activated sludge from three different treatment plants. We found that Lecane rotifers are efficient consumers of Type 021N filaments. PMID:23552245

  9. Extraordinary cause of acute gastric dilatation and hepatic portal venous gas: Chronic use of synthetic cannabinoid

    PubMed Central

    Sevinc, Mert Mahsuni; Kinaci, Erdem; Bayrak, Savas; Yardimci, Aytul Hande; Cakar, Ekrem; Bektaş, Hasan

    2015-01-01

    Addiction to synthetic cannabinoids (SCs) is a growing social and health problem worldwide. Chronic use of SCs may cause adverse effects in the gastrointestinal system. We describe a very rare case of acute gastric dilatation (AGD) and hepatic portal venous gas (HPVG), with findings of acute abdomen resulting from chronic use of a SC, Bonzai. AGD and HPVG were detected by computerized tomography examination. Patchy mucosal ischemia was seen in endoscopic examination. Despite the findings of an acute abdomen, a non-surgical approach with nasogastric decompression, antibiotic therapy, and close radiologic and endoscopic follow-up was preferred in the presented case. Clinical and radiologic findings decreased dramatically on the first day, and endoscopic findings gradually disappeared over 7 d. In conclusion, this case shows that chronic use of a SC may cause AGD and accompanying HPVG, which can be managed non-surgically despite the findings of acute abdomen. PMID:26457032

  10. Hepatitis E virus is the leading cause of acute viral hepatitis in Lothian, Scotland

    PubMed Central

    Kokki, I.; Smith, D.; Simmonds, P.; Ramalingam, S.; Wellington, L.; Willocks, L.; Johannessen, I.; Harvala, H.

    2015-01-01

    Acute viral hepatitis affects all ages worldwide. Hepatitis E virus (HEV) is increasingly recognized as a major cause of acute hepatitis in Europe. Because knowledge of its characteristics is limited, we conducted a retrospective study to outline demographic and clinical features of acute HEV in comparison to hepatitis A, B and C in Lothian over 28 months (January 2012 to April 2014). A total of 3204 blood samples from patients with suspected acute hepatitis were screened for hepatitis A, B and C virus; 913 of these samples were also screened for HEV. Demographic and clinical information on patients with positive samples was gathered from electronic patient records. Confirmed HEV samples were genotyped. Of 82 patients with confirmed viral hepatitis, 48 (59%) had acute HEV. These patients were older than those infected by hepatitis A, B or C viruses, were more often male and typically presented with jaundice, nausea, vomiting and/or malaise. Most HEV cases (70%) had eaten pork or game meat in the few months before infection, and 14 HEV patients (29%) had a recent history of foreign travel. The majority of samples were HEV genotype 3 (27/30, 90%); three were genotype 1. Acute HEV infection is currently the predominant cause of acute viral hepatitis in Lothian and presents clinically in older men. Most of these infections are autochthonous, and further studies confirming the sources of infection (i.e. food or blood transfusion) are required. PMID:26904201

  11. Hepatitis E virus is the leading cause of acute viral hepatitis in Lothian, Scotland.

    PubMed

    Kokki, I; Smith, D; Simmonds, P; Ramalingam, S; Wellington, L; Willocks, L; Johannessen, I; Harvala, H

    2016-03-01

    Acute viral hepatitis affects all ages worldwide. Hepatitis E virus (HEV) is increasingly recognized as a major cause of acute hepatitis in Europe. Because knowledge of its characteristics is limited, we conducted a retrospective study to outline demographic and clinical features of acute HEV in comparison to hepatitis A, B and C in Lothian over 28 months (January 2012 to April 2014). A total of 3204 blood samples from patients with suspected acute hepatitis were screened for hepatitis A, B and C virus; 913 of these samples were also screened for HEV. Demographic and clinical information on patients with positive samples was gathered from electronic patient records. Confirmed HEV samples were genotyped. Of 82 patients with confirmed viral hepatitis, 48 (59%) had acute HEV. These patients were older than those infected by hepatitis A, B or C viruses, were more often male and typically presented with jaundice, nausea, vomiting and/or malaise. Most HEV cases (70%) had eaten pork or game meat in the few months before infection, and 14 HEV patients (29%) had a recent history of foreign travel. The majority of samples were HEV genotype 3 (27/30, 90%); three were genotype 1. Acute HEV infection is currently the predominant cause of acute viral hepatitis in Lothian and presents clinically in older men. Most of these infections are autochthonous, and further studies confirming the sources of infection (i.e. food or blood transfusion) are required. PMID:26904201

  12. Recurrent Acute Decompensated Heart Failure Owing to Severe Iron Deficiency Anemia Caused by Inappropriate Habitual Bloodletting

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Woo-Hyun; Kim, Hack-Lyoung; Kim, Ki-Hwan; Na, Sang Hoon; Lee, Hyun-Jung; Kang, Eun Gyu; Seo, Jae-Bin; Chung, Woo-Young; Zo, Joo-Hee; Hong, Jung Ae; Kim, Kwangyoun; Kim, Myung-A

    2015-01-01

    A 68-year-old woman visited the emergency department twice with symptoms of acute heart failure including shortness of breath, general weakness, and abdominal distension. Laboratory findings showed extremely low level of serum hemoglobin at 1.4 g/dL. Echocardiographic examination demonstrated dilated left ventricular cavity with systolic dysfunction and moderate amount of pericardial effusion. In this patient, acute heart failure due to severe iron deficiency anemia was caused by inappropriate habitual bloodletting. PMID:26755934

  13. Perforated Duodenal Ulcer –A Rare Cause of Acute Abdomen in Pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Rani, Jyotsna; Huria, Anju; Gupta, Pratiksha; Dalal, Usha

    2014-01-01

    Acute abdomen during pregnancy is a medico-surgical emergency demanding concerted, synchronized specialties approach of obstetrician, surgeon and gastroenterologist. Duodenal perforation is one of the rarer causes of acute abdomen in pregnancy. Here, we report a case of duodenal perforation with peritonitis in third trimester of pregnancy requiring surgical management. Our aim of reporting this case is to stress the physicians to keep the differential of duodenal perforation also in mind while dealing with cases of acute abdomen in pregnancy and to proceed with multidisciplinary approach for better feto-maternal outcome. PMID:25386494

  14. Acute Intoxication Caused by a Synthetic Cannabinoid in Two Adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Heath, Travis S.; Burroughs, Zachary; Thompson, A. Jill; Tecklenburg, Frederick W.

    2012-01-01

    Illicit drug use continues to be a common problem among pediatric patients. Daily marijuana use among high school seniors is currently at a 30-year high. Marijuana use in adults has rarely been associated with cardiovascular adverse effects, including hypertension, tachycardia, arrhythmia, and myocardial infarction. Recently, abuse of synthetic cannabinoids, such as the incense “K2” or “Spice,” has been increasingly reported in the lay press and medical literature. Overdose and chronic use of these substances may cause adverse effects including altered mental status, tachycardia, and loss of consciousness. Overdoses in adult patients have been described; however, limited reports in the pediatric population have been documented. A recent case series describes myocardial infarctions in pediatric patients, associated with synthetic cannabinoid use. In this report, we describe two adolescent patients admitted after they inhaled “K2,” resulting in loss of consciousness, tachycardia, and diffuse pain. PMID:23118671

  15. Acute Pelvic Pain: A Ball Pen May Be a Cause?

    PubMed Central

    Rai, Garjesh Singh; Roshan, Rakesh; Vyas, Mahendra Mohan; Goel, Deepak

    2014-01-01

    Chronic Urinary tract infection (UTI) is a common problem in women and can be seen without any significant anatomical and functional pathology. Foreign bodies within the urinary bladder are not rare and should be considered as a cause of chronic and recurrent UTI. Intravesical foreign bodies can be self inflicted, iatrogenic or migration from adjacent organs. History in these cases is often misleading and presentation of foreign body mostly becomes apparent as suprapubic pain, dysuria with or without hematuria. We present a case of self-inflicted foreign body within the bladder of a young female who presented with recurrent urinary tract infections for six months that did not respond to medical treatment. PMID:25654009

  16. Acute cholestatic hepatitis caused by amoxicillin/clavulanate.

    PubMed

    Beraldo, Daniel Oliveira; Melo, Joanderson Fernandes; Bonfim, Alexandre Vidal; Teixeira, Andrei Alkmim; Teixeira, Ricardo Alkmim; Duarte, André Loyola

    2013-12-14

    Amoxicillin/clavulanate is a synthetic penicillin that is currently commonly used, especially for the treatment of respiratory and cutaneous infections. In general, it is a well-tolerated oral antibiotic. However, amoxicillin/clavulanate can cause adverse effects, mainly cutaneous, gastrointestinal, hepatic and hematologic, in some cases. Presented here is a case report of a 63-year-old male patient who developed cholestatic hepatitis after recent use of amoxicillin/clavulanate. After 6 wk of prolonged use of the drug, he began to show signs of cholestatic icterus and developed severe hyperbilirubinemia (total bilirubin > 300 mg/L). Diagnostic investigation was conducted by ultrasonography of the upper abdomen, serum tests for infection history, laboratory screening of autoimmune diseases, nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) of the abdomen with bile duct-NMR and transcutaneous liver biopsy guided by ultrasound. The duration of disease was approximately 4 mo, with complete resolution of symptoms and laboratory changes at the end of that time period. Specific treatment was not instituted, only a combination of anti-emetic (metoclopramide) and cholestyramine for pruritus. PMID:24379601

  17. Clinical Characteristics and Risk Factors of Pyogenic Spondylitis Caused by Gram-Negative Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Seung-Ji; Jang, Hee-Chang; Jung, Sook-In; Choe, Pyoeng Gyun; Park, Wan Beom; Kim, Chung-Jong; Song, Kyoung-Ho; Kim, Eu Suk; Kim, Hong Bin; Oh, Myoung-don

    2015-01-01

    Background There are limited data describing the clinical characteristics of pyogenic spondylitis caused by Gram-negative bacteria (GNB). The aim of this study was to investigate the predisposing factors and clinical characteristics of pyogenic spondylitis caused by GNB compared to Gram-positive cocci (GPC). Methods We performed a retrospective review of medical records from patients with culture-confirmed pyogenic spondylitis at four tertiary teaching hospitals over an 8-year period. Results A total of 344 patients with culture-confirmed pyogenic spondylitis were evaluated. There were 62 patients (18.0%) with pyogenic spondylitis caused by GNB and the most common organism was Escherichia coli (n = 35, 10.2%), followed by Pseudomonas aeruginosa (n = 10, 2.9%). Pyogenic spondylitis caused by GNB was more frequently associated with the female gender (64.5 vs. 35.5%, P <0.01), preexisting or synchronous genitourinary tract infection (32.3 vs. 2.1%, P< 0.01), and intra-abdominal infection (12.9 vs. 0.4%, P< 0.01) compared to patients with GPC. Although pyogenic spondylitis caused by GNB presented with severe sepsis more frequently (24.2 vs. 11.3%, P = 0.01), the mortality rate (6.0 vs. 5.2%) and the proportion of patients with residual disability (6.0 vs. 9.0%), defined as grade 3 or 4 (P = 0.78) 3 months after completion of treatment, were not significantly different compared to GPC patients. Conclusion GNB should be considered as the etiologic organism when infectious spondylitis develops in a patient with preexisting or synchronous genitourinary tract and intra-abdominal infection. In addition, the mortality rate and clinical outcomes are not significantly different between pyogenic spondylitis caused by GNB and GPC. PMID:25978839

  18. A Case of Acute Pyogenic Sacroiliitis and Bacteremia Caused by Community-Acquired Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Suyoung; Lee, Kang Lock; Baek, Hae Lim; Jang, Seung Jun; Moon, Song Mi

    2013-01-01

    Pyogenic sacroiliitis is a rare osteoarticular infection, occurring most frequently in children and young adults. Diagnosis of the disease is challenging because of a general lack of awareness of the disease and its nonspecific signs and symptoms. Staphylococcus aureus is the most common causative bacteria in pyogenic sacroiliitis. Methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) has typically been considered a hospital-associated pathogen; however, community-acquired (CA)-MRSA infections are becoming increasingly common in Korea. We report the first domestic case of acute pyogenic sacroiliitis with abscess and bacteremia caused by CA-MRSA. The pathogen carried the type IV-A staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec (SCCmec) without the Panton-Valentine leukocidin (PVL) gene, and was identified as sequence type (ST) 72 by multilocus sequence typing. PMID:24475359

  19. Prevalence and susceptibility patterns of bacteria causing respiratory tract infections in North Waziristan, Pakistan.

    PubMed

    Shah, Said Nasir; Ullah, Bait; Basit, Abdul; Begum, Asia; Tabassum, Anum; Zafar, Shaista; Saleha, Shamim

    2016-03-01

    Respiratory tract infections (RTIs) are the most common infectious diseases in humans and are the major cause of mortality and morbidity in Pakistan. These infections are the leading causes of consultations in primary care in Pakistan. Therefore, this study was aimed at determining bacterial pathogens of respiratory tract infections and the susceptibility patterns of bacterial isolates to antibiotics. The study was conducted between February, 2013 and March, 2014 in North Waziristan region of Pakistan. Sputum specimens were collected aseptically from 227 patients and cultured on the appropriate bacteriological media. Bacterial isolates were identified by biochemical tests and their antibiotics susceptibility patterns were determined by standard methods. Out of 227, various species of bacteria were isolated from 152 (75%) specimens. The prevalence of bacteria species isolated were as follows Pseudomonas aeruginosa (42.8%), Streptococcus pneumoniae (26.7%), Corynebacterium diphtheria (10.6%), Staphylococcus aureus (5.9%), Proteus vulgaris (4.6%), Micrococcus species (3.3%), Klebsiella pneumoniae (2.6%) and Bacillus species (2.6%). The susceptibility patterns varied among bacterial species depending on the antibiotics. For the susceptibility test 11 commercially available antibiotics against bacterial isolates were used. The results revealed that generally the bacterial isolates were susceptible to gentamicin (80.9%), meropenem (75 %), ceftazidime (62.5%), cefotaxime (57.9%) and ceftriazone (57.9%) and resistant to penicillin (84.9%) and doxycycline (78.9%). The antibiotics gentamicin (100%) meropenem (100%), ceftriaxone (58.5%), ciprofloxacin (60%) trimethoprim (60%), ceftazidime (66.2%) and cefotaxime (64.6%) were observed effective against the P. aeruginosa isolates. The findings of our study provide significant information for empiric therapy of patients with RTIs in North Waziristan region of Pakistan. PMID:27113300

  20. Evaluation of the antibacterial potential of Petroselinum crispum and Rosmarinus officinalis against bacteria that cause urinary tract infections

    PubMed Central

    Petrolini, Fernanda Villas Boas; Lucarini, Rodrigo; de Souza, Maria Gorete Mendes; Pires, Regina Helena; Cunha, Wilson Roberto; Martins, Carlos Henrique Gomes

    2013-01-01

    In this study we evaluated the antibacterial activity of the crude hydroalcoholic extracts, fractions, and compounds of two plant species, namely Rosmarinus officinalis and Petroselinum crispum, against the bacteria that cause urinary tract infection. The microdilution method was used for determination of the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) and minimum bactericidal concentration (MBC). The crude hydroalcoholic extract of R. officinalis displayed in vitro activity against Gram-positive bacteria, with satisfactory MBC for the clinical isolate S. saprophyticus. The fractions and the pure compound rosmarinic acid did not furnish promising results for Gram-negative bacteria, whereas fractions 2, 3, and 4 gave encouraging results for Gram-positive bacteria and acted as bactericide against S. epidermidis as well as E. faecalis (ATCC 29212) and its clinical isolate. R. officinalis led to promising results in the case of Gram-positive bacteria, resulting in a considerable interest in the development of reliable alternatives for the treatment of urinary infections. PMID:24516424

  1. Leptospirosis as Frequent Cause of Acute Febrile Illness in Southern Sri Lanka

    PubMed Central

    Bodinayake, Champika; Nagahawatte, Ajith; Devasiri, Vasantha; Kodikara-Arachichi, Wasantha; Strouse, John J.; Flom, Judith E.; Dumler, J. Stephen; Woods, Christopher W.

    2011-01-01

    To determine the proportion of fevers caused by leptospirosis, we obtained serum specimens and epidemiologic and clinical data from patients in Galle, Sri Lanka, March–October 2007. Immunoglobulin M ELISA was performed on paired serum specimens to diagnose acute (seroconversion or 4-fold titer rise) or past (titer without rise) leptospirosis and seroprevalence (acute). We compared (individually) the diagnostic yield of acute-phase specimens and clinical impression with paired specimens for acute leptospirosis. Of 889 patients with paired specimens, 120 had acute leptosoirosis and 241 had past leptospirosis. The sensitivity and specificity of acute-phase serum specimens were 17.5% (95% confidence interval [CI] 11.2%–25.5%) and 69.2% (95% CI 65.5%–72.7%), respectively, and of clinical impression 22.9% (95% CI 15.4%–32.0%) and 91.7% (95% CI 89.2%–93.8%), respectively. For identifying acute leptospirosis, clinical impression is insensitive, and immunoglobulin M results are more insensitive and costly. Rapid, pathogen-based tests for early diagnosis are needed. PMID:21888794

  2. Comment on "The hologenomic basis of speciation: Gut bacteria cause lethality in the genus Nasonia"

    PubMed Central

    Chandler, James Angus; Turelli, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Brucker and Bordenstein (9 August 2013) claim that adaptive co-divergence of gut bacteria with hosts contributes to hybrid lethality. Yet, they provide no evidence for coadaptation of bacteria and Nasonia hosts. Their data on hybrid viability suggest that bacteria contribute to inviability only because intrinsic hybrid dysfunction increases susceptibility to free-living bacteria. Hologenomic speciation remains testable speculation without experimental support. PMID:25170144

  3. Binding to histo-blood group antigen-expressing bacteria protects human norovirus from acute heat stress.

    PubMed

    Li, Dan; Breiman, Adrien; le Pendu, Jacques; Uyttendaele, Mieke

    2015-01-01

    This study aims to investigate if histo-blood group antigen (HBGA) expressing bacteria have any protective role on human norovirus (NoV) from acute heat stress. Eleven bacterial strains were included, belonging to Escherichia coli, Enterobacter cloacae, Enterobacter aerogenes, Clostridium difficile, Bifidobacterium adolescentis, and B. longum. HBGA expression of the bacteria as well as binding of human NoV virus-like particles (VLPs, GI.1, and GII.4 strains) to the bacteria were detected by flow cytometry. NoV VLPs pre-incubated with HBGA expressing or non-HBGA expressing bacteria were heated and detected by both direct ELISA and porcine gastric mucin-binding assay. The NoV-binding abilities of the bacteria correlated well with their HBGA expression profiles. Two HBGA expressing E. coli (LMG8223 and LFMFP861, both GI.1 and GII.4 binders) and one non-HBGA expressing E. coli (ATCC8739, neither GI.1 nor GII.4 binder) were selected for the heat treatment test with NoV VLPs. Compared with the same cell numbers of non-HBGA expressing E. coli, the presence of HBGA-expressing E. coli could always maintain higher antigen integrity, as well as mucin-binding ability of NoV VLPs of both GI.1 and GII.4 after heat-treatment at 90°C for 2 min. These results indicate that HBGA-expressing bacteria may protect NoVs during the food processing treatments, thereby facilitating their transmission. PMID:26191052

  4. Binding to histo-blood group antigen-expressing bacteria protects human norovirus from acute heat stress

    PubMed Central

    Li, Dan; Breiman, Adrien; le Pendu, Jacques; Uyttendaele, Mieke

    2015-01-01

    This study aims to investigate if histo-blood group antigen (HBGA) expressing bacteria have any protective role on human norovirus (NoV) from acute heat stress. Eleven bacterial strains were included, belonging to Escherichia coli, Enterobacter cloacae, Enterobacter aerogenes, Clostridium difficile, Bifidobacterium adolescentis, and B. longum. HBGA expression of the bacteria as well as binding of human NoV virus-like particles (VLPs, GI.1, and GII.4 strains) to the bacteria were detected by flow cytometry. NoV VLPs pre-incubated with HBGA expressing or non-HBGA expressing bacteria were heated and detected by both direct ELISA and porcine gastric mucin-binding assay. The NoV-binding abilities of the bacteria correlated well with their HBGA expression profiles. Two HBGA expressing E. coli (LMG8223 and LFMFP861, both GI.1 and GII.4 binders) and one non-HBGA expressing E. coli (ATCC8739, neither GI.1 nor GII.4 binder) were selected for the heat treatment test with NoV VLPs. Compared with the same cell numbers of non-HBGA expressing E. coli, the presence of HBGA-expressing E. coli could always maintain higher antigen integrity, as well as mucin-binding ability of NoV VLPs of both GI.1 and GII.4 after heat-treatment at 90°C for 2 min. These results indicate that HBGA-expressing bacteria may protect NoVs during the food processing treatments, thereby facilitating their transmission. PMID:26191052

  5. Biallelic Mutations in NBAS Cause Recurrent Acute Liver Failure with Onset in Infancy

    PubMed Central

    Haack, Tobias B.; Staufner, Christian; Köpke, Marlies G.; Straub, Beate K.; Kölker, Stefan; Thiel, Christian; Freisinger, Peter; Baric, Ivo; McKiernan, Patrick J.; Dikow, Nicola; Harting, Inga; Beisse, Flemming; Burgard, Peter; Kotzaeridou, Urania; Kühr, Joachim; Himbert, Urban; Taylor, Robert W.; Distelmaier, Felix; Vockley, Jerry; Ghaloul-Gonzalez, Lina; Zschocke, Johannes; Kremer, Laura S.; Graf, Elisabeth; Schwarzmayr, Thomas; Bader, Daniel M.; Gagneur, Julien; Wieland, Thomas; Terrile, Caterina; Strom, Tim M.; Meitinger, Thomas; Hoffmann, Georg F.; Prokisch, Holger

    2015-01-01

    Acute liver failure (ALF) in infancy and childhood is a life-threatening emergency. Few conditions are known to cause recurrent acute liver failure (RALF), and in about 50% of cases, the underlying molecular cause remains unresolved. Exome sequencing in five unrelated individuals with fever-dependent RALF revealed biallelic mutations in NBAS. Subsequent Sanger sequencing of NBAS in 15 additional unrelated individuals with RALF or ALF identified compound heterozygous mutations in an additional six individuals from five families. Immunoblot analysis of mutant fibroblasts showed reduced protein levels of NBAS and its proposed interaction partner p31, both involved in retrograde transport between endoplasmic reticulum and Golgi. We recommend NBAS analysis in individuals with acute infantile liver failure, especially if triggered by fever. PMID:26073778

  6. Ultrasonography of adnexal causes of acute pelvic pain in pre-menopausal non-pregnant women

    PubMed Central

    Dupuis, Carolyn S.; Kim, Young H.

    2015-01-01

    Acute-onset pelvic pain is an extremely common symptom in premenopausal women presenting to the emergency department. After excluding pregnancy in reproductive-age women, ultrasonography plays a major role in the prompt and accurate diagnosis of adnexal causes of acute pelvic pain, such as hemorrhagic ovarian cysts, endometriosis, ovarian torsion, and tubo-ovarian abscess. Its availability, relatively low cost, and lack of ionizing radiation make ultrasonography an ideal imaging modality in women of reproductive age. The primary goal of imaging in these patients is to distinguish between adnexal causes of acute pelvic pain that may be managed conservatively or medically, and those requiring emergency/urgent surgical or percutaneous intervention. PMID:26062637

  7. Infections Caused by Resistant Gram-Negative Bacteria: Epidemiology and Management.

    PubMed

    Kaye, Keith S; Pogue, Jason M

    2015-10-01

    Infections caused by resistant gram-negative bacteria are becoming increasingly prevalent and now constitute a serious threat to public health worldwide because they are difficult to treat and are associated with high morbidity and mortality rates. In the United States, there has been a steady increase since 2000 in rates of extended-spectrum β-lactamase-producing Enterobacteriaceae, carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae, and multidrug-resistant strains of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Acinetobacter baumannii, particularly among hospitalized patients with intraabdominal infections, urinary tract infections, ventilator-associated pneumonia, and bacteremia. Colonization with resistant gram-negative bacteria is common among residents in long-term care facilities (particularly those residents with an indwelling device), and these facilities are considered important originating sources of such strains for hospitals. Antibiotic resistance is associated with a substantial clinical and economic burden, including increased mortality, greater hospital and antibiotic costs, and longer stays in hospitals and intensive care units. Control of resistant gram-negative infections requires a comprehensive approach, including strategies for risk factor identification, detection and identification of resistant organisms, and implementation of infection-control and prevention strategies. In treating resistant gram-negative infections, a review of surveillance data and hospital-specific antibiograms, including resistance patterns within local institutions, and consideration of patient characteristics are helpful in guiding the choice of empiric therapy. Although only a few agents are available with activity against resistant gram-negative organisms, two recently released β-lactam/β-lactamase inhibitor combinations - ceftolozane/tazobactam and ceftazidime/avibactam - have promising activity against these organisms. In this article, we review the epidemiology, risk factors, and antibiotic resistance mechanisms of gram-negative organisms. In addition, an overview of treatment options for patients with these infections is provided. PMID:26497481

  8. Does aspirin cause acute or chronic renal failure in experimental animals and in humans?

    PubMed

    D'Agati, V

    1996-07-01

    There are conflicting reports on the ability of aspirin as a single agent to cause acute or chronic renal failure in experimental animals. Chronic administration of aspirin alone over 18 to 68 weeks in doses of 120 to 500 mg/kg/d has been reported to cause renal papillary necrosis in rats. However, some investigators have been unable to produce renal papillary necrosis in other species or in rats given lower divided doses comparable to therapeutic doses used in humans. In a variety of rat strains, aspirin administered as a single high dose intravenously or by oral gavage produces acute tubular necrosis of proximal tubules, rarely accompanied by renal papillary necrosis in susceptible strains. Several human studies have addressed the chronic nephrotoxicity of aspirin alone or relative risk of end-stage renal disease in association with aspirin use after correction for other analgesics. With the exception of one case control study demonstrating a low, but statistically significant risk of end-stage renal disease in association with aspirin use, all other case control studies and several prospective studies have been unable to identify a significant risk of chronic renal failure in patients using aspirin alone in therapeutic doses. In healthy adults, short-term aspirin administration in therapeutic doses has no effect on creatinine clearance, urine volume, osmolar clearance, or sodium and potassium excretion. However, in predisposed individuals with glomerulonephritis, cirrhosis, and chronic renal insufficiency, and in children with congestive heart failure, short-term aspirin use in therapeutic doses may precipitate reversible acute renal failure. Acute aspirin intoxication (>300 mg/kg) frequently causes acute renal failure and doses of 500 mg/kg may be lethal. Chronic salicylate intoxication has been reported to cause reversible or irreversible acute renal failure in association with a pseudosepsis syndrome. PMID:8669425

  9. Disseminated Infection Caused by Scedosporium prolificans in a Patient with Acute Multilineal Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    de Batlle, J.; Motjé, M.; Balanzà, R.; Guardia, R.; Ortiz, R.

    2000-01-01

    In this report, we describe a case of disseminated infection caused by Scedosporium prolificans (S. inflatum) in a patient affected by chemotherapy-induced acute multilineal leukemia and neutropenia. For the fungus isolated in four blood cultures, high MICs of currently available antifungal agents were found. Postmortem examination revealed multiorgan involvement. PMID:10747173

  10. [Acute respiratory distress syndrome caused by tropical eosinophilic lung disease: a case in Gabon].

    PubMed

    Chani, M; Iken, M; Eljahiri, Y; Nzenze, J R; Mion, G

    2011-04-01

    The purpose of this report is to describe the case of a 28-year-old woman in whom acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) following cholecystectomy led to the discovery of eosinophilic lung disease. Outcome was favorable after oxygenotherapy and medical treatment using ivermectin and corticosteroids. The case shows that hypereosinophilic syndrome can be the underlying cause of ARDS. PMID:21695880

  11. [Contortion of an accessory lobe of the liver causing acute abdominal distress (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Peter, H; Strohm, W D

    1980-08-01

    Contortion of an accessory lobe of the liver occurred in a 23 year old female patient while jumping the trampoline, causing immediately the classical symptoms of acute abdominal distress. Diagnosis was established and therapy performed by surgery. Variability of liver lobes is discussed as well as therapeutic steps to be taken eventually in these cases. PMID:7453471

  12. Neurologic Melioidosis: Case Report of a Rare Cause of Acute Flaccid Paralysis.

    PubMed

    Andersen, Erik W; Mackay, Mark T; Ryan, Monique M

    2016-03-01

    Acute flaccid paralysis is associated with inflammation, infection, or tumors in the spinal cord or peripheral nerves. Melioidosis (Burkholderia pseudomallei infection) can rarely cause this presentation. We describe a case of spinal melioidosis in a 4-year-old boy presenting with flaccid paralysis, and review the literature on this rare disease. PMID:26778096

  13. Unsuspected Leptospirosis Is a Cause of Acute Febrile Illness in Nicaragua

    PubMed Central

    Reller, Megan E.; Wunder, Elsio A.; Miles, Jeremy J.; Flom, Judith E.; Mayorga, Orlando; Woods, Christopher W.; Ko, Albert I.; Dumler, J. Stephen; Matute, Armando J.

    2014-01-01

    Background Epidemic severe leptospirosis was recognized in Nicaragua in 1995, but unrecognized epidemic and endemic disease remains unstudied. Methodology/Principal Findings To determine the burden of and risk factors associated with symptomatic leptospirosis in Nicaragua, we prospectively studied patients presenting with fever at a large teaching hospital. Epidemiologic and clinical features were systematically recorded, and paired sera tested by IgM-ELISA to identify patients with probable and possible acute leptospirosis. Microscopic Agglutination Test and PCR were used to confirm acute leptospirosis. Among 704 patients with paired sera tested by MAT, 44 had acute leptospirosis. Patients with acute leptospirosis were more likely to present during rainy months and to report rural residence and fresh water exposure. The sensitivity of clinical impression and acute-phase IgM detected by ELISA were poor. Conclusions/Significance Leptospirosis is a common (6.3%) but unrecognized cause of acute febrile illness in Nicaragua. Rapid point-of-care tests to support early diagnosis and treatment as well as tests to support population-based studies to delineate the epidemiology, incidence, and clinical spectrum of leptospirosis, both ideally pathogen-based, are needed. PMID:25058149

  14. Myocardial bridging as a cause of acute myocardial infarction: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Akdemir, Ramazan; Gunduz, Huseyin; Emiroglu, Yunus; Uyan, Cihangir

    2002-01-01

    Background Systolic compression of a coronary artery by overlying myocardial tissue is termed myocardial bridging. Myocardial bridging usually has a benign prognosis, but some cases resulting in myocardial ischemia, infarction and sudden cardiac death have been reported. We are reporting a case of myocardial bridging which was complicated with acute myocardial infarction associated with inappropriate blood donation. Case presentation A 33 year-old-man was admitted to our emergency with acute anteroseptal myocardial infarction after a blood donation. The electrocardiography showed sinus rhythm and was consistent with an acute anteroseptal myocardial infarction. We decided to perform primary percutanous intervention (PCI). Myocardial bridging was observed in the mid segment of the left anterior descending coronary artery on coronary angiogram. PCI was canceled and medical follow up was decided. Blood transfusion was made because he had a deep anemia. A normal hemaglobin level and clinical reperfusion was achieved after ten hours by blood transfusion. At the one year follow up visit, our patient was healthy and had no cardiac complaints. Conclusions Myocardial bridging may cause acute myocardial infarction in various clinical conditions. Although the condition in this case caused profound anemia related acute myocardial infarction, its treatment and management was unusual. PMID:12243650

  15. Enteritis caused by Campylobacter jejuni followed by acute motor axonal neuropathy: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Introduction Campylobacter species represent the main cause of bacterial diarrhea in developed countries and one of the most frequent causes of enterocolitis in developing ones. In some patients, Campylobacter jejuni infection of the gastrointestinal tract has been observed as an antecedent illness of acute motor axonal neuropathy, a variant of Guillain-Barré syndrome. Case presentation We present a case of acute motor axonal neuropathy following infection with Campylobacter jejuni subspecies jejuni, biotype II, heat stable serotype O:19. A 46-year-old Caucasian man developed acute motor neuropathy 10 days after mild intestinal infection. The proximal and distal muscle weakness of his upper and lower extremities was associated with serum antibodies to Campylobacter jejuni and antibodies to ganglioside GM1. The electromyographic signs of neuropathic muscle action potentials with almost normal nerve conduction velocities indicated axonal neuropathy. Our patient's clinical and electrophysiological features fulfilled criteria for the diagnosis of an acute motor axonal neuropathy, a subtype of Guillain-Barré syndrome. Conclusion As this is the first case of acute motor axonal neuropathy following infection with Campylobacter jejuni subspecies jejuni reported from the Balkan area, the present findings indicate the need for systematic studies and further clinical, epidemiological and microbiological investigations on the prevalence of Campylobacter jejuni and its heat stable serotypes in the etiology of Guillain-Barré syndrome and other post-infectious sequelae. PMID:20356396

  16. Non Obstetric Causes and Presentation of Acute Abdomen among the Pregnant Women

    PubMed Central

    Haque, Monoarul; Kamal, Farah; Chowdhury, Shahanaz; Uzzaman, Monir; Aziz, Itrat

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To identify the non-obstetric causes and presentation of acute abdomen among pregnant women. Materials and methods: This was a cross sectional hospital-based study among 128 pregnant women by face to face interview using a semi-structured questionnaire. This study was conducted at the Gynecology & Obstetric Ward of 250 Bed General Hospital, Noakhali, Bangladesh, from January to August 2013. Data were analyzed by a software package used for statistical analysis (SPSS) version 11.5 (SPSS, Inc., Chicago, IL, USA). Results: Mean age of participants was 25±4 years. Our findings showed that 81% were Muslim, 67% were lower middle income group, as well as 47% completed primary level of education. The results revealed that 28% had biliary ascariasis, 24% had peptic ulcer disease and 10% had lower urinary tract infection. We also found that 6% had acute pyelonephritis, 6% had acute gastroenteritis, 6% had acute cholecystitis, 6% had acute appendicitis, 2% had acute pancreatitis, 3% had choledocolithiasis, 2% had ovarian solid mass, 2% had twisted ovarian cyst, 4% had renal colic, and 1% had renal calculus. In non-obstetrical presentation of acute abdomen, the study found that 84% of respondents complained their pain lasting more than 24 hours. Besides, half of respondents felt pain in epigastrium and right hypochondrium. Cramping, prickling and aching type of pain were more, while 66% suffered from continuous pain. Our results also showed that 73% did not explain any aggravating factor and relieving factor, and the rest said food, fasting state and position change aggravated pain as well as relieved pain. Conclusion: The study concludes that precise diagnosis of the acute abdomen in pregnant women by continual updating of abdominal assessment knowledge, and clinical skills is necessary in the management of abdominal pain in obstetric settings. PMID:25628721

  17. The molecular mechanism of acute lung injury caused by Pseudomonas aeruginosa: from bacterial pathogenesis to host response.

    PubMed

    Sawa, Teiji

    2014-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is the most common gram-negative pathogen causing pneumonia in immunocompromised patients. Acute lung injury induced by bacterial exoproducts is associated with a poor outcome in P. aeruginosa pneumonia. The major pathogenic toxins among the exoproducts of P. aeruginosa and the mechanism by which they cause acute lung injury have been investigated: exoenzyme S and co-regulated toxins were found to contribute to acute lung injury. P. aeruginosa secretes these toxins through the recently defined type III secretion system (TTSS), by which gram-negative bacteria directly translocate toxins into the cytosol of target eukaryotic cells. TTSS comprises the secretion apparatus (termed the injectisome), translocators, secreted toxins, and regulatory components. In the P. aeruginosa genome, a pathogenic gene cluster, the exoenzyme S regulon, encodes genes underlying the regulation, secretion, and translocation of TTSS. Four type III secretory toxins, namely ExoS, ExoT, ExoU, and ExoY, have been identified in P. aeruginosa. ExoS is a 49-kDa form of exoenzyme S, a bifunctional toxin that exerts ADP-ribosyltransferase and GTPase-activating protein (GAP) activity to disrupt endocytosis, the actin cytoskeleton, and cell proliferation. ExoT, a 53-kDa form of exoenzyme S with 75% sequence homology to ExoS, also exerts GAP activity to interfere with cell morphology and motility. ExoY is a nucleotidal cyclase that increases the intracellular levels of cyclic adenosine and guanosine monophosphates, resulting in edema formation. ExoU, which exhibits phospholipase A2 activity activated by host cell ubiquitination after translocation, is a major pathogenic cytotoxin that causes alveolar epithelial injury and macrophage necrosis. Approximately 20% of clinical isolates also secrete ExoU, a gene encoded within an insertional pathogenic gene cluster named P. aeruginosa pathogenicity island-2. The ExoU secretory phenotype is associated with a poor clinical outcome in P. aeruginosa pneumonia. Blockade of translocation by TTSS or inhibition of the enzymatic activity of translocated toxins has the potential to decrease acute lung injury and improve clinical outcome. PMID:25520826

  18. Bilateral stones as a cause of acute renal failure in the emergency department

    PubMed Central

    Alonso, Joaquín V.; cachinero, Pedro L.; Ubeda, Fran R.; Ruiz, Daniel J. L.; Blanco, Alfredo

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Acute renal failure (ARF) due to obstructive uropathy is a urological emergency. The standard radiological investigations in the emergency setting include X-ray, ultrasonography and computed tomography. But occasionally the cause of obstruction may be elusive. METHODS: We present a case of obstructive uropathy due to bilateral stones presenting as acute renal failure. The patient underwent successful shock wave lithotripsy (SWL) for dissolution of calculi. RESULTS: The patient was successfully treated, and reported asymptomatic in a follow-up. CONCLUSION: Close collaboration between nephrological, urological, and radiological services is required. PMID:25215151

  19. Life-threatening Cerebral Edema Caused by Acute Occlusion of a Superior Vena Cava Stent

    SciTech Connect

    Sofue, Keitaro Takeuchi, Yoshito Arai, Yasuaki; Sugimura, Kazuro

    2013-02-15

    A71-year-old man with advanced lung cancer developed a life-threatening cerebral edema caused by the acute occlusion of a superior vena cava (SVC) stent and was successfully treated by an additional stent placement. Although stent occlusion is a common early complication, no life-threatening situations have been reported until now. Our experience highlights the fact that acute stent occlusion can potentially lead to the complete venous shutdown of the SVC, resulting in life-threatening cerebral edema, after SVC stent placement. Immediate diagnosis and countermeasures are required.

  20. Distinguishing the Causes of Pulmonary Infiltrates in Patients With Acute Leukemia.

    PubMed

    Nucci, Marcio; Nouér, Simone A; Anaissie, Elias

    2015-06-01

    Pulmonary infiltrates are commonly observed in patients with acute leukemia (AL), particularly acute myeloid leukemia, who undergo remission induction therapy. The mortality rate is unacceptably high and depends on 3 factors: the host (performance status, comorbidities, and frailty), the etiology of the infiltrates and the type of response to antileukemic therapy. The approach to the diagnosis of pulmonary infiltrates in patients with AL includes a medical history, thorough physical examination, radiologic pattern of the infiltrates (focal vs. diffuse), and timing of their appearance in relation to the start of antileukemic therapy (early, ie, within the first 2 weeks or late). Localized infiltrates are most commonly caused by bacterial (early) and fungal infections (late). Diffuse early infiltrates might be caused by leukemic infiltration of the lungs, pulmonary hemorrhage and/or edema, diffuse alveolar damage, viral pneumonia, and rarely transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI) or the differentiation syndrome. Similar to the early phase, pulmonary edema, viral pneumonia, and rarely TRALI might cause diffuse infiltrates during the late phase, in addition to immune reconstitution and pneumocystosis, particularly among patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Diagnostic tests, invasive and noninvasive, can be particularly useful to establish the diagnosis. Early intervention is critical and is based on the most likely diagnosis with modification when the etiology is confirmed. PMID:26297289

  1. Understanding the patterns of antibiotic susceptibility of bacteria causing urinary tract infection in West Bengal, India

    PubMed Central

    Saha, Sunayana; Nayak, Sridhara; Bhattacharyya, Indrani; Saha, Suman; Mandal, Amit K.; Chakraborty, Subhanil; Bhattacharyya, Rabindranath; Chakraborty, Ranadhir; Franco, Octavio L.; Mandal, Santi M.; Basak, Amit

    2014-01-01

    Urinary tract infection (UTI) is one of the most common infectious diseases at the community level. In order to assess the adequacy of empirical therapy, the susceptibility of antibiotics and resistance pattern of bacteria responsible for UTI in West Bengal, India, were evaluated throughout the period of 20082013. The infection reports belonging to all age groups and both sexes were considered. Escherichia coli was the most abundant uropathogen with a prevalence rate of 67.1%, followed by Klebsiella spp. (22%) and Pseudomonas spp. (6%). Penicillin was least effective against UTI-causing E. coli and maximum susceptibility was recorded for the drugs belonging to fourth generation cephalosporins. Other abundant uropathogens, Klebsiella spp., were maximally resistant to broad-spectrum penicillin, followed by aminoglycosides and third generation cephalosporin. The antibiotic resistance pattern of two principal UTI pathogens, E. coli and Klebsiella spp. in West Bengal, appears in general to be similar to that found in other parts of the Globe. Higher than 50% resistance were observed for broad-spectrum penicillin. Fourth generation cephalosporin and macrolides seems to be the choice of drug in treating UTIs in Eastern India. Furthermore, improved maintenance of infection incident logs is needed in Eastern Indian hospitals in order to facilitate regular surveillance of the occurrence of antibiotic resistance patterns, since such levels continue to change. PMID:25278932

  2. [Qualitative and quantitative analysis by analytical instruments of compounds causing acute poisoning].

    PubMed

    Fuke, Chiaki

    2008-04-01

    In generally, the results of screening drugs or poisons by simple analytical techniques or screening kits show the possibility that the group of compounds detected is contained in the specimen. Then, qualitative and quantitative analyses by analytical instruments are required to identify the compound which is the cause of acute poisoning. Gas chromatograph-equipped electron ionization mass spectrometer is the most reliable apparatus of all analytical instruments. When the retention time and EI-mass spectrum of the detected peak by GC/MS analysis coincide with those of the reference standard and the blood level is abnormal, the compound is concluded to be the subject of the cause of acute poisoning. If we do not use GC/MS, we use two or more different analytical instruments or different analytical methods, and then we consider the overall results obtained from each analysis totally to identify the compound. In order to analyze drugs or poisons in biological materials using these instruments, pretreatment procedures are indispensable to identify the compound. The appropriate procedures increase sensitivity and specificity. When treating an acute poisoned patient, the use of analytical instruments tends to be avoided because it requires rapid investigation into the cause of acute poisoning. If the operator is proficient in using analytical instruments and the cause of acute poisoning is the compound that has been analyzed before, results using analytical instruments could give more useful information than using simple but rapid analytical techniques or screening kits. For this purpose, it is important to understand well the characteristics of the equipment to collect many reference standards, and to prepare for emergency analysis. PMID:18516967

  3. Duodenal Obstruction Caused by Acute Appendicitis with Intestinal Malrotation in a Child

    PubMed Central

    Biçer, Şenol; Çelik, Ali

    2015-01-01

    Patient: Male, 14 Final Diagnosis: Duodenal obstruction Symptoms: Bilious vomiting Medication: None Clinical Procedure: Laparotomy Specialty: Surgery Objective: Rare disease Background: In patients with intestinal malrotation, the diagnosis of acute appendicitis can be difficult due to atypical presentation. Duodenal obstruction caused by acute appendicitis with the presence of malrotation has rarely been reported in children. Case Report: We report the case of a 14-year-old male patient with bilious vomiting and abdominal distension. A diagnosis could not be made by computed tomography, ultrasonography, or endoscopy. We observed a dilated stomach and malrotation in laparotomy. The caecum was in the right upper quadrant, and an inflamed appendix was located in the subhepatic region. After the appendectomy, the cecum was mobilized and fixed in the right lower quadrant. Conclusions: In children with intestinal malrotation, acute appendicitis can present as duodenal obstruction without abdominal pain, and standard imaging methods can miss the correct diagnosis. PMID:26317163

  4. Acute respiratory distress syndrome caused by Mycoplasma pneumoniae without elevated pulmonary vascular permeability: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Takahashi, Naoki; Oi, Rie; Ota, Muneyuki; Toriumi, Shinichi; Ogushi, Fumitaka

    2016-01-01

    Sporadic patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) caused by Mycoplasma pneumoniae have been reported. However, knowledge about the pathophysiology and pharmacological treatment of this condition is insufficient. Moreover, the pulmonary vascular permeability in ARDS related to M. pneumoniae infection has not been reported. We report a case of ARDS caused by Mycoplasma pneumoniae without elevated pulmonary vascular permeability, which was successfully treated using low-dose short-term hydrocortisone, suggesting that pulmonary infiltration in ARDS caused by Mycoplasma pneumoniae does not match the criteria of permeability edema observed in typical ARDS. PMID:27162691

  5. Acute acalculous cholecystitis caused by Hepatitis C: A rare case report

    PubMed Central

    Omar, Ahmed; Osman, Medhet; Bonnet, Gerard; Ghamri, Nafiz

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Acute acalculous cholecystitis (AAC) is rarely encountered in clinical practice and has a high morbidity and mortality. AAC caused by viral hepatitis, with hepatitis A, B and EBV infections are rare, but well documented in the literature. Hepatitis C virus has not been reported as cause of AAC. This case report documents the first case of AAC associated with Acute Hepatitis C. Presenting concerns We present a 40 years old female with abdominal pain. She has a history of previous HCV infection. Her liver function tests were markedly deranged with elevated inflammatory markers. USS scan showed rather a very unusual appearance of an inflamed gallbladder with no gallstones and associated acute hepatitis, confirmed by an abdominal CT scan. HCV RNA PCR confirms flair up of the virus. The patient was managed conservatively in the hospital with follow up USS scan and Liver function tests showed complete recovery. Follow up HCV RNA PCR also returned to an undetectable level. The patient recovered completely with no adverse outcomes. Conclusion This case report is to the first to document the association between acute HCV and AAC. Despite being uncommon in western countries, viral hepatitis should be suspected as a causative agent of AAC, particularly when there is abnormal liver function test and no biliary obstruction. PMID:26722714

  6. Endoscopic Management of Acute Cholecystitis and Cholangitis Caused by Limy Bile

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sang Heon; Choi, Hyun Jong; Kim, Hyung Ki; Cho, Young Deok; Lee, Moon Sung; Shim, Chan Sup

    2009-01-01

    Limy bile is a relatively rare condition in which a radiopaque material is visible in the gallbladder, extending rarely into the bile duct, on plain radiography. Acute cholangitis or cholecystitis caused by limy bile is a very rare condition. There are no definite treatment guidelines for limy bile, but in most cases with cholangitis or cholecystitis, laparoscopic cholecystectomy has been the preferred treatment. We report a case of limy bile with biliary symptoms that was treated only with an endoscopic procedure. PMID:20431775

  7. Hepatitis E virus as a Cause of Acute Hepatitis in The Netherlands

    PubMed Central

    Tholen, Aletta T. R.; Schinkel, Janke; Molenkamp, Richard; Ang, C. Wim

    2016-01-01

    Background Recent studies indicate that 27% of Dutch blood donors have evidence of past infection with HEV. However, the low number of diagnosed HEV infections indicates either an asymptomatic course or under diagnosis. Objectives We investigated whether HEV is a cause of acute hepatitis in Dutch patients and which diagnostic modality (serology or PCR) should be used for optimal detection. Study design Serum samples were retrospectively selected from non-severely immuno-compromised patients from a university hospital population, suspected of having an infectious hepatitis. Criteria were: elevated alanine aminotransferase (ALT> 34 U/l) and request for antibody testing for CMV, EBV or Hepatitis A (HAV). Results All samples were tested for HEV using ELISA and PCR. Ninety patients/sera were tested, of which 22% were HEV IgG positive. Only one serum was IgM positive. HEV PCR was positive in two patients: one patient was both HEV IgM and IgG positive, the other patient was only IgG positive. Both HEV RNA positive samples belonged to genotype 3. Evidence of recent infection with CMV, EBV and HAV was found in 13%, 10% and 3% respectively. Conclusions Although our study is limited by small numbers, we conclude that HEV is a cause of acute hepatitis in hospital associated patients in The Netherlands. Moreover, in our study population the prevalence of acute HAV (3%) was almost similar to acute HEV (2%). We propose to incorporate HEV testing in panels for acute infectious hepatitis. Negative results obtained for HEV IgM in a HEV PCR positive patient, indicates that antibody testing alone may not be sufficient and argues for PCR as a primary diagnostic tool in hospital associated patients. The high percentage of HEV IgG seropositivity confirms earlier epidemiological studies. PMID:26840767

  8. Acute urinary retention caused by seminoma in a case of persistent Mullerian duct syndrome.

    PubMed

    Modi, Jayesh; Modi, Deepika; Bachani, Lira

    2015-01-01

    Urinary symptoms have been described secondary to a pelvic mass originating from the ovary, uterus, cervix, prostate, or rectum. Persistent Mullerian duct syndrome is a rare form of intersex disorder, characterized by the presence of uterus and fallopian tubes in an otherwise 46 XY male. We report an adult male with bilateral cryptorchidism and a pelvic mass, who presented with acute urinary retention, and was diagnosed with a seminoma of the right testis, intratubular germ cell neoplasia of the left testis with the presence of Mullerian remnants. Pelvic mass was caused due to seminoma is a rare cause of urinary retention. PMID:25673601

  9. Identifying the major bacteria causing intramammary infections in individual milk samples of sheep and goats using traditional bacteria culturing and real-time polymerase chain reaction.

    PubMed

    Rovai, M; Caja, G; Salama, A A K; Jubert, A; Lázaro, B; Lázaro, M; Leitner, G

    2014-09-01

    Use of DNA-based methods, such as real-time PCR, has increased the sensitivity and shortened the time for bacterial identification, compared with traditional bacteriology; however, results should be interpreted carefully because a positive PCR result does not necessarily mean that an infection exists. One hundred eight lactating dairy ewes (56 Manchega and 52 Lacaune) and 24 Murciano-Granadina dairy goats were used for identifying the main bacteria causing intramammary infections (IMI) using traditional bacterial culturing and real-time PCR and their effects on milk performance. Udder-half milk samples were taken for bacterial culturing and somatic cell count (SCC) 3 times throughout lactation. Intramammary infections were assessed based on bacteria isolated in ≥2 samplings accompanied by increased SCC. Prevalence of subclinical IMI was 42.9% in Manchega and 50.0% in Lacaune ewes and 41.7% in goats, with the estimated milk yield loss being 13.1, 17.9, and 18.0%, respectively. According to bacteriology results, 87% of the identified single bacteria species (with more than 3 colonies/plate) or culture-negative growth were identical throughout samplings, which agreed 98.9% with the PCR results. Nevertheless, the study emphasized that 1 sampling may not be sufficient to determine IMI and, therefore, other inflammatory responses such as increased SCC should be monitored to identify true infections. Moreover, when PCR methodology is used, aseptic and precise milk sampling procedures are key for avoiding false-positive amplifications. In conclusion, both PCR and bacterial culture methods proved to have similar accuracy for identifying infective bacteria in sheep and goats. The final choice will depend on their response time and cost analysis, according to the requirements and farm management strategy. PMID:24996276

  10. Acute and chronic fentanyl administration causes hyperalgesia independently of opioid receptor activity in mice.

    PubMed

    Waxman, Amanda R; Arout, Caroline; Caldwell, Megan; Dahan, Albert; Kest, Benjamin

    2009-10-01

    Although mu-receptor opioids are clinically important analgesics, they can also paradoxically cause hyperalgesia independently of opioid receptor activity, presumably via the action of neuroexcitatory glucoronide metabolites. However, it is unknown whether the commonly used mu-receptor opioid analgesic fentanyl, which is not subject to glucuronidation, can also induce hyperalgesia independently of opioid receptor activity. Thus, here we examined whether fentanyl increases nociception on the tail-withdrawal test in CD-1 mice concurrently treated with the opioid receptor antagonist naltrexone or in opioid receptor triple knock-out mice lacking mu, delta, and kappa opioid receptors. For both groups, an acute fentanyl bolus dose (0.25mg/kg, s.c.) and continuous fentanyl infusion (cumulative daily dose: 10mg/kg) did not cause analgesia at any time. Instead, fentanyl significantly decreased withdrawal latencies relative to pre-drug values for the next 15-60 min and for six days, respectively. MK-801 blocked and reversed hyperalgesia caused by the acute injection and continuous infusion of fentanyl, respectively, in naltrexone-treated CD-1 mice, indicating the contribution of NMDA receptors to fentanyl hyperalgesia. These data show that the synthetic opioid fentanyl causes hyperalgesia independently of prior or concurrent opioid receptor activity or analgesia. Since the biotransformation of fentanyl does not yield any known pronociceptive metabolites, these data challenge assumptions regarding the role of neuroexcitatory metabolites in opioid-induced hyperalgesia. PMID:19559072

  11. CSWS Versus SIADH as the Probable Causes of Hyponatremia in Children With Acute CNS Disorders

    PubMed Central

    SORKHI, Hadi; SALEHI OMRAN, Mohammad Reza; BARARI SAVADKOOHI, Rahim; BAGHDADI, Farkhondeh; NAKHJAVANI, Naeemeh; BIJANI, Ali

    2013-01-01

    Objective There is a major problem about the incidence, diagnosis, and differentiation of cerebral salt wasting syndrome (CSWS) and syndrome of inappropriate secretion of antidiuretic hormone (SIADH) in patients with acute central nervous system (CNS) disorders. According to rare reports of these cases, this study was performed in children with acute CNS disorders for diagnosis of CSWS versus SIADH. Materials & Methods This prospective study was done on children with acute CNS disorders. The definition of CSWS was hyponatremia (serum sodium ≤130 mEq/L), urine volume output ≥3 ml/kg/hr, urine specific gravity ≥1020 and urinary sodium concentration ≥100 mEq/L. Also, patients with hyponatremia (serum sodium ≤130 mEq/L), urine output < 3 ml/kg/hr, urine specific gravity ≥1020, and urinary sodium concentration >20 mEq/L were considered to have SIADH. Results Out of 102 patients with acute CNS disorders, 62 (60.8%) children were male with mean age of 60.47±42.39 months. Among nine children with hyponatremia (serum sodium ≥130 mEq/L), 4 children had CSWS and 3 patients had SIADH. In 2 cases, the cause of hyponatremia was not determined. The mean day of hyponatremia after admission was 5.11±3.31 days. It was 5.25±2.75 and 5.66±7.23 days in children with CSWS and SIADH, respectively. Also, the urine sodium (mEq/L) was 190.5±73.3 and 58.7±43.8 in patients with CSWS and SIADH, respectively. Conclusion According to the results of this study, the incidence of CSWS was more than SIADH in children with acute CNS disorders. So, more attention is needed to differentiate CSWS versus SIADH in order to their different management. PMID:24665304

  12. Lemierre syndrome caused by acute isolated sphenoid sinusitis and its intracranial complications.

    PubMed

    Lim, Sang-Chul; Lee, Sung-Su; Yoon, Tae-Mi; Lee, Joon-Kyoo

    2010-02-01

    Classically, Lemierre syndrome is a rare clinical entity in which acute oropharyngeal infection causes septic internal jugular vein thrombosis and leads to septic lesions to distant organs, such as the lung. Lemierre syndrome also presents with odontogenic infections, mastoiditis, parotitis, and sinusitis. We report the first case of Lemierre syndrome following acute isolated sphenoid sinusitis that was complicated with cavernous sinus thrombophlebitis and bilateral infectious aneurysms of the intracavernous internal carotid artery. Treatment with endoscopic sphenoidotomy, culture-directed antibiotics, heparinization, and endovascular GDC coiling were performed and the patient recovered without major neurologic morbidity. Immediate and intensive treatment with careful evaluation to localize the primary infectious focus of the head and neck, including the paranasal sinus, improves the prognosis of patients with rhinogenic Lemierre syndrome. PMID:19410401

  13. Clinical course of acute chemical lung injury caused by 3-chloropentafluoropene.

    PubMed

    Morita, Satomu; Takimoto, Takayuki; Kawahara, Kunimitsu; Nishi, Katsuji; lino, Morio

    2013-01-01

    Perfluoroallyl chloride (PFAC), a fluorine-containing compound, has very severe toxicity, but this toxicity is not well characterised. We report a fatal case of acute chemical lung injury caused by the inhalation of PFAC. A 39-year-old man, working at a chemical factory, inhaled PFAC gas and died 16 days later of acute lung injury with severe pneumothorax. We present his clinical course together with thoracic CT findings, autopsy and analysis of PFAC in blood and urine samples with gas chromatograph-mass spectrometry. Previously, a fatal case of PFAC was reported in 1981 but PFAC was not identified in any of the patient's samples. In our patient, we identified PFAC in both blood and urine samples. Our toxicological analysis may be used as a reference to detect PFAC toxicity in the future. Our study should be helpful for diagnosing lung injury induced by a highly toxic gas, such as PFAC. PMID:24311414

  14. Predation as a cause of neurologic signs and acute mortality in a pheasant flock.

    PubMed

    Martin, M P; Anderson, C M; Johnson, B; Wakenell, P S

    2006-09-01

    A flock of approximately 15,000 ring-necked pheasants (Phasianus colchicus) was evaluated for a sudden increase in mortality and acute neurological signs after having been previously diagnosed 3 wk earlier with a chronic respiratory disease of undetermined etiology. Approximately 25 live birds were displaying neurological signs including circling, ataxia, and obtunded behavior and 50 birds were dead. Three birds with neurological signs were submitted for evaluation. Extensive subcutaneous hemorrhage over the head and penetrating puncture wounds through the skull and into the brain were found. Trauma from a wild predatory mammal, most likely the long-tailed weasel (Mustela frenata) that had invaded the pheasant house and expressed surplus killing behavior was determined to be the cause of the acute neurological signs and mortality. The relationship of the chronic respiratory disease to the predation episode was not determined but it is possible that pheasants with severe respiratory disease may have had increased susceptibility to predation. PMID:17039853

  15. Solitary C1 spinal osteochondroma causing vertebral artery compression and acute cerebellar infarct.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yaxia; Ilaslan, Hakan; Hussain, Muhammad S; Bain, Mark; Bauer, Thomas W

    2015-02-01

    Osteochondroma is a common benign bone lesion, usually involving the long bones. Spinal involvement is rare. The clinical presentation of spinal osteochondroma varies according to the site of the lesion. The most common reported clinical presentation is secondary to encroachment of the lesion on the spinal canal or nerve roots. Less common presentations such as a palpable neck mass, dysphagia, sleep apnea, paralysis of left vocal cord or acute respiratory distress have been reported when the lesions compress the anatomic structures anteriorly. We describe a rare case of a young patient who presented with an emergent critical condition of acute cerebellar infarct as a result of vertebral artery compression caused by a solitary C1 spinal osteochondroma. PMID:25109381

  16. Lung Postmortem Autopsy Revealing Extramedullary Involvement in Multiple Myeloma Causing Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Ravinet, Aurélie; Perbet, Sébastien; Guièze, Romain; Guérin, Renaud; Gayraud, Guillaume; Aliane, Jugurtha; Tremblay, Aymeric; Pascal, Julien; Ledoux, Albane; Chaleteix, Carine; Dechelotte, Pierre; Bay, Jacques-Olivier; Bazin, Jean-Etienne; Constantin, Jean-Michel

    2014-01-01

    Pulmonary involvement with multiple myeloma is rare. We report the case of a 61-year-old man with past medical history of chronic respiratory failure with emphysema, and a known multiple myeloma (Durie and Salmon stage III B and t(4;14) translocation). Six months after diagnosis and first line of treatment, he presented acute dyspnea with interstitial lung disease. Computed tomography showed severe bullous emphysema and diffuse, patchy, multifocal infiltrations bilaterally with nodular character, small bilateral pleural effusions, mediastinal lymphadenopathy, and a known lytic lesion of the 12th vertebra. He was treated with piperacillin-tazobactam, amikacin, oseltamivir, and methylprednisolone. Finally, outcome was unfavourable. Postmortem analysis revealed diffuse and nodular infracentimetric infiltration of the lung parenchyma by neoplastic plasma cells. Physicians should be aware that acute respiratory distress syndrome not responding to treatment of common causes could be a manifestation of the disease, even with negative BAL or biopsy and could be promptly treated with salvage therapy. PMID:25165587

  17. Acute Hepatic Necrosis Caused by Salmonella enterica Serotype I 4,5,12:−:1,2 in a Dog

    PubMed Central

    Meiring, Thelma; Grant, Andrew J.; Watson, Penny J.

    2015-01-01

    Acute hepatic necrosis was diagnosed in a dog. Gram staining and fluorescence in situ hybridization identified Salmonella enterica in the liver, subsequently confirmed as S. enterica serotype I 4,5,12:−:1,2. This is the first report of acute hepatic necrosis with liver failure caused by Salmonella in a dog. PMID:26292301

  18. Histological alterations in gills of Astyanax aff. bimaculatus caused by acute exposition to zinc.

    PubMed

    dos Santos, Daiane Cristina Marques; da Matta, Sérgio Luis Pinto; de Oliveira, Juraci Alves; dos Santos, Jorge Abdala Dergam

    2012-11-01

    Increasing contamination of aquatic ecosystems by metals has caused various morphological, physiological and biochemical changes in aquatic organisms, and the gills of fish are recognized as indicators of environmental quality. In this context, the present work proposed to study the effects of different concentrations of zinc (Zn) in the histology of gills of yellow tail lambari (Astyanax aff. bimaculatus) after acute exposure. Seventy-two adult males of A. aff. bimaculatus were used, the treatments were six concentrations of Zn: 0; 3; 5; 10; 15; and 20 mg/L of water, by 96 h, and gills, muscle and bone fragments were removed. Fragments of gills were fixed and included, sectioned in a rotary microtome and stained with toluidin blue. Fragments of bone, muscle and gills were dehydrated and digested to quantify the absorption of Zn. The median lethal concentration (LC(50)) 96 h after Zn acute exposure was 10 mg/L of water. Noteworthy, Zn was highly toxic in acute exposure trials starting at the concentration 5 mg/L. The exposure of fish to the metal caused branchial histopathological changes correlated with increasing concentration, caused the death of fish at concentrations of 10, 15 and 20 mg/L. The histological alterations observed in the gills were hyperplasia, lamellar fusion, aneurysm, destruction of the lamellar epithelium, rupture of membrane, deletion of secondary lamellar high, which presented more severity in treatments exposed to the highest concentrations. In conclusion, gills of A. aff. bimaculatus presented profound histological alterations as a result of Zn exposure, and hence, proved to be excellent indicators of environmental contamination. PMID:21478002

  19. Role of special pathogenicity versus prevalence theory in pathogenesis of acute cystitis caused by Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Srivastava, Richa; Agarwal, Jyotsna; Srivastava, Sugandha; Mishra, Bharti

    2014-08-01

    Escherichia coli is the most common pathogen causing acute cystitis in sexually active women. Human faeces are generally considered the primary reservoir for infection and the faecal-perineal-urethral pathway is the accepted route of infection. Two theories have been proposed for the pathogenesis of acute cystitis: (1) special pathogenicity, where uropathogenic E. coli (UPEC) encoding special virulence factors causes infection; and (2) prevalence, wherein ordinary faecal E. coli causes infection by simple mass action. The aim of this study was to compare concurrent urinary E. coli isolates from women with acute cystitis with their own dominant faecal, vaginal E. coli isolates; thus, these patients served as their own control. E. coli isolates from 80 women were analysed by phylotyping, virulence profiling (for 15 putative virulence genes) and enterobacterial repetitive intergenic consensus (ERIC) PCR. A virulence score was calculated for each isolate based on the number of virulence genes detected. Four host ecological groups of E. coli were created on the basis of ERIC PCR: group UVF, where vaginal and faecal isolates yielded the infecting urine clone; group UV, where only vaginal isolates yielded the infecting urine clone; group UF, where faecal isolates yielded the infecting urine clone; and group U, where the infecting urine clone was distinct. In the majority of cases the infecting E. coli clone from urine was also the dominant faecal clone (56.3%; groups UVF and UF possessing high virulence scores of 4.6 and 3.9, respectively), indicating that both mechanisms play a role in pathogenesis. Non-dominant yet virulent faecal clones or an external source of E. coli seems a possibility in the UV group (13.7%, VF score 4.8). In 30% of patients (U group) the infecting urine clone was non-dominant and possessed a low virulence score (2.7); suggesting a possible role for host factors in establishing infection. PMID:24899598

  20. Are heat stroke and physical exhaustion underestimated causes of acute hepatic failure?

    PubMed Central

    Weigand, Kilian; Riediger, Carina; Stremmel, Wolfgang; Flechtenmacher, Christa; Encke, Jens

    2007-01-01

    While cardiopulmonary symptoms are common in patients undergoing classical or, due to physical exercise, exertional heat stroke, the failure of other organs is a rarely described phenomenon. Here we present two cases of acute hepatic failure, one due to classic heat shock, while the other occurred while the patient was doing a marathon-type running. Both cases presented with very high transaminases and significantly elevated international normalized ratio (INR). No other causes for liver failure could be identified but physical exhaustion and hyperthermia. PMID:17226914

  1. Methemoglobinemia due to quinine causing severe acute kidney injury in a child

    PubMed Central

    Kudale, S.; Sethi, S. K.; Dhaliwal, M.; Kher, V.

    2014-01-01

    Congenital methemoglobinemia is a rare condition resulting from a deficiency of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide-cytochrome b5 reductase. Acquired methemoglobinemia may result due to certain drugs, chemicals and food items. Information on epidemiological determinants from India is sparse. This report describes methemoglobinemia in a 4-year-old child after parenteral administration of quinine causing acute kidney injury. This case emphasizes the need of awareness of potential adverse events of antimalarial drugs. Prompt management of methemoglobinemia is essential to avoid potential life-threatening complications. PMID:25484537

  2. RESPIRATORY SYNCYTIAL VIRUS: AN IMPORTANT CAUSE OF ACUTE RESPIRATORY ILLNESS AMONG YOUNG ADULTS UNDERGOING MILITARY TRAINING

    PubMed Central

    O’Shea, Matthew K.; Pipkin, Christopher; Cane, Patricia A.; Gray, Gregory C.

    2008-01-01

    SUMMARY Background Military recruits receiving training are vulnerable to acute respiratory disease and a significant proportion of illness is due to unidentified pathogens. While some countries use surveillance programs to monitor such illness, few data exist for recruits of the British Armed Forces. Objectives Through active surveillance of approximately 1000 Royal Navy trainees during 2001, we sought to describe and determine the aetiology of acute respiratory illness. Methods Standard viral culture was used together with serology and a novel highly sensitive real-time PCR and molecular beacon probe assay for RSV detection. Results Among 54 Royal Navy recruits with respiratory symptoms adenovirus was identified in 35%, influenza viruses in 19% and RSV in 14% of this group. All of the recruits were absent from training for almost a week, most of whom were confined to the sickbay. Conclusions This study is the first to document adenovirus and RSV as important causes of acute respiratory illness among Royal Navy trainees. The study findings demonstrate the clinical significance and challenges of diagnosing RSV infection in young adults. PMID:18846262

  3. Interactions between amphibians' symbiotic bacteria cause the production of emergent anti-fungal metabolites.

    PubMed

    Loudon, Andrew H; Holland, Jessica A; Umile, Thomas P; Burzynski, Elizabeth A; Minbiole, Kevin P C; Harris, Reid N

    2014-01-01

    Amphibians possess beneficial skin bacteria that protect against the disease chytridiomycosis by producing secondary metabolites that inhibit the pathogen Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis (Bd). Metabolite production may be a mechanism of competition between bacterial species that results in host protection as a by-product. We expect that some co-cultures of bacterial species or strains will result in greater Bd inhibition than mono-cultures. To test this, we cultured four bacterial isolates (Bacillus sp., Janthinobacterium sp., Pseudomonas sp. and Chitinophaga arvensicola) from red-backed salamanders (Plethodon cinereus) and cultured isolates both alone and together to collect their cell-free supernatants (CFS). We challenged Bd with CFSs from four bacterial species in varying combinations. This resulted in three experimental treatments: (1) CFSs of single isolates; (2) combined CFSs of two isolates; and (3) CFSs from co-cultures. Pair-wise combinations of four bacterial isolates CFSs were assayed against Bd and revealed additive Bd inhibition in 42.2% of trials, synergistic inhibition in 42.2% and no effect in 16.6% of trials. When bacteria isolates were grown in co-cultures, complete Bd inhibition was generally observed, and synergistic inhibition occurred in four out of six trials. A metabolite profile of the most potent co-culture, Bacillus sp. and Chitinophaga arvensicola, was determined with LC-MS and compared with the profiles of each isolate in mono-culture. Emergent metabolites appearing in the co-culture were inhibitory to Bd, and the most potent inhibitor was identified as tryptophol. Thus mono-cultures of bacteria cultured from red-backed salamanders interacted synergistically and additively to inhibit Bd, and such bacteria produced emergent metabolites when cultured together, with even greater pathogen inhibition. Knowledge of how bacterial species interact to inhibit Bd can be used to select probiotics to provide amphibians with protection against Bd. PMID:25191317

  4. Interactions between amphibians' symbiotic bacteria cause the production of emergent anti-fungal metabolites

    PubMed Central

    Loudon, Andrew H.; Holland, Jessica A.; Umile, Thomas P.; Burzynski, Elizabeth A.; Minbiole, Kevin P. C.; Harris, Reid N.

    2014-01-01

    Amphibians possess beneficial skin bacteria that protect against the disease chytridiomycosis by producing secondary metabolites that inhibit the pathogen Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis (Bd). Metabolite production may be a mechanism of competition between bacterial species that results in host protection as a by-product. We expect that some co-cultures of bacterial species or strains will result in greater Bd inhibition than mono-cultures. To test this, we cultured four bacterial isolates (Bacillus sp., Janthinobacterium sp., Pseudomonas sp. and Chitinophaga arvensicola) from red-backed salamanders (Plethodon cinereus) and cultured isolates both alone and together to collect their cell-free supernatants (CFS). We challenged Bd with CFSs from four bacterial species in varying combinations. This resulted in three experimental treatments: (1) CFSs of single isolates; (2) combined CFSs of two isolates; and (3) CFSs from co-cultures. Pair-wise combinations of four bacterial isolates CFSs were assayed against Bd and revealed additive Bd inhibition in 42.2% of trials, synergistic inhibition in 42.2% and no effect in 16.6% of trials. When bacteria isolates were grown in co-cultures, complete Bd inhibition was generally observed, and synergistic inhibition occurred in four out of six trials. A metabolite profile of the most potent co-culture, Bacillus sp. and Chitinophaga arvensicola, was determined with LC-MS and compared with the profiles of each isolate in mono-culture. Emergent metabolites appearing in the co-culture were inhibitory to Bd, and the most potent inhibitor was identified as tryptophol. Thus mono-cultures of bacteria cultured from red-backed salamanders interacted synergistically and additively to inhibit Bd, and such bacteria produced emergent metabolites when cultured together, with even greater pathogen inhibition. Knowledge of how bacterial species interact to inhibit Bd can be used to select probiotics to provide amphibians with protection against Bd. PMID:25191317

  5. Acute malnutrition among under-five children in Faryab, Afghanistan: prevalence and causes.

    PubMed

    Frozanfar, Muhammad Kamel; Yoshida, Yoshitoku; Yamamoto, Eiko; Reyer, Joshua A; Dalil, Suraya; Rahimzad, Abdullah Darman; Hamajima, Nobuyuki

    2016-02-01

    Acute malnutrition affects more than 50 million under-five (U5) children, causing 8.0% of global child deaths annually. The prevalence of acute malnutrition (wasting) among U5 children in Afghanistan was 9.5% nationally and 3.7% in Faryab province in 2013. A cross-sectional study was conducted for 600 households in Faryab to find the prevalence and causes of acute malnutrition. Odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were estimated using a logistic model. Demographic results of this study showed that 54.0% of the household heads and 92.3% of the mothers had no education. Three-fourths of households had a monthly income ≤ 250 USD. According to the measurement of weight for height Z-score (WHZ), 35.0% (210/600) of the children had acute malnutrition (wasting, WHZ < -2). In more than half of the households, water, sanitation, and hygiene (WASH) conditions were poor. When adjusted, a significant association of acute malnutrition among U5 children was found with the education level of household heads (OR=1.49; 95% CI, 1.02-2.17), age of household heads (OR=2.01; 95% CI, 1.21-3.35), income (OR=1.66; 95% CI, 1.04-2.27), education level of mothers (OR=2.21; 95% CI, 1.00-4.88), age of children (OR=1.99; 95% CI, 1.32-2.93), history of children with diarrhea in the last two weeks of data collection (OR=1.57; 95% CI, 1.10-2.27), feeding frequency (OR=3.01; 95% CI, 1.21-7.46), water sources (OR=1.89; 95% CI, 1.26-2.83), and iodized salt (OR=0.59; 95% CI, 0.39-0.88). The present study indicated that an increase in education level of parents, household income, and quality of WASH would result in a significant decrease in prevalence of wasting among U5 children. PMID:27019527

  6. Acute malnutrition among under-five children in Faryab, Afghanistan: prevalence and causes

    PubMed Central

    Frozanfar, Muhammad Kamel; Yoshida, Yoshitoku; Yamamoto, Eiko; Reyer, Joshua A.; Dalil, Suraya; Rahimzad, Abdullah Darman; Hamajima, Nobuyuki

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Acute malnutrition affects more than 50 million under-five (U5) children, causing 8.0% of global child deaths annually. The prevalence of acute malnutrition (wasting) among U5 children in Afghanistan was 9.5% nationally and 3.7% in Faryab province in 2013. A cross-sectional study was conducted for 600 households in Faryab to find the prevalence and causes of acute malnutrition. Odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were estimated using a logistic model. Demographic results of this study showed that 54.0% of the household heads and 92.3% of the mothers had no education. Three-fourths of households had a monthly income ≤ 250 USD. According to the measurement of weight for height Z-score (WHZ), 35.0% (210/600) of the children had acute malnutrition (wasting, WHZ < −2). In more than half of the households, water, sanitation, and hygiene (WASH) conditions were poor. When adjusted, a significant association of acute malnutrition among U5 children was found with the education level of household heads (OR=1.49; 95% CI, 1.02–2.17), age of household heads (OR=2.01; 95% CI, 1.21–3.35), income (OR=1.66; 95% CI, 1.04–2.27), education level of mothers (OR=2.21; 95% CI, 1.00–4.88), age of children (OR=1.99; 95% CI, 1.32–2.93), history of children with diarrhea in the last two weeks of data collection (OR=1.57; 95% CI, 1.10–2.27), feeding frequency (OR=3.01; 95% CI, 1.21–7.46), water sources (OR=1.89; 95% CI, 1.26–2.83), and iodized salt (OR=0.59; 95% CI, 0.39–0.88). The present study indicated that an increase in education level of parents, household income, and quality of WASH would result in a significant decrease in prevalence of wasting among U5 children. PMID:27019527

  7. Plasma needle treatment of bacteria known to cause infections of the soft tissue of the oral region and bones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maletic, Dejan; Lazovic, Sasa; Puac, Nevena; Malovic, Gordana; Petrovic, Zoran Lj.; Miletic, Maja P.; Pavlica, Dusan B.; Jovanovic, Milena Z.; Milenkovic, Pavle

    2009-10-01

    Plasma needle can be used for non-contact disinfection of dental cavities and wounds, minimum-destructive precise treatment, as well as the removal of damaged tissue. The effect of bacterial deactivation is probably caused by reactive oxygen species while nitric oxide provided by plasma plays major role in many processes in the organism. Mass spectrometry was done to provide better insight into plasma-cell interactions. Our measurements were performed on a plasma needle that we originally used for the treatment of plant cells.Our research was done on species that are known to cause primary and secondary infections of the soft tissue of the oral region, as well as bones. The bacteria cultures used are bacterial reference culture species Staphylococcus aureus ATCC 25923, Enterococcus faecalis ATCC 29212, Pseudomonas aeruginosa ATCC 27853, and Escherichia coli ATCC 25922. We investigated the effect of the plasma needle discharge on different concentration of bacteria using several exposure times and power transmitted to the plasma. It was found that excellent removal of this and other bacteria may be achieved by the plasma needle treatment.

  8. Not without cause: Vibrio parahaemolyticus induces acute autophagy and cell death.

    PubMed

    Burdette, Dara L; Yarbrough, Melanie L; Orth, Kim

    2009-01-01

    Vibrio parahaemolyticus (V. parahaemolyticus) is a gram-negative halophillic bacterium that causes worldwide seafood-borne gastroenteritis. The prevalence of V. parahaemolyticus in the environment and incidence of infection have been linked to rising water temperatures caused by global warming. Among its virulence factors, V. parahaemolyticus harbors two type III secretion systems (T3SS). Recently, we have shown that T3SS1 induces rapid cellular death that initiates with acute autophagy, as measured by LC3 lipidation and accumulation of early autophagosomal vesicles. While not the first characterized pathogen to usurp autophagy, this is the first example of an extracellular pathogen that exploits this pathway for its own benefit. Here we discuss possible roles for the induction of autophagy during infection and discuss how V. parahaemolyticus-induced autophagy provides insight into key regulatory steps that govern the decision between apoptosis and autophagy. PMID:19011375

  9. Inguinal hernia containing bladder and ureteroneocystostomy: a rare cause for acute renal graft dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Coelho, Hugo; Nunes, Pedro; Canhoto, Carolina; Temido, Paulo

    2016-01-01

    A 77-year-old man presented with acute graft dysfunction 25 years after a renal transplant in the left iliac fossa. He also had an asymptomatic left inguinal hernia. Renal ultrasound showed a significant pyelocalicial dilation of the kidney graft and the patient was submitted to a percutaneous nephrostomy. An antegrade nephrostogram was performed, which showed a dilated ureter and the bladder included in the left inguinal hernia that caused the obstructive uropathy. Concomitant retrograde cystography also showed a significant portion of the bladder in the hernia sac. The patient was submitted to inguinal hernia repair, which resolved the obstruction. We present a rare and potentially curable cause of obstructive uropathy in a transplant recipient; it is possible to revert graft dysfunction and prevent graft loss if the condition is recognised early. PMID:26912768

  10. Benign acute childhood myositis--a rare cause of abnormal gait.

    PubMed

    Hall, Gregory; Schranz, Craig I

    2014-02-01

    Benign acute childhood myositis is a rare postviral myositis seen in school-aged children after a common upper respiratory infection (URI), most commonly caused by influenza [J Microbiol Immunol Infect 2004;37:95-98]. Predominantly seen in boys, this condition causes bilateral calf tenderness and pain with ambulation, often presenting as a refusal to bear weight. To avoid activation within the gastroc-soleus complex, the child will frequently compensate with a “Frankenstein gait,” described as a stiff-legged posture with shuffling gait [CMAJ 2009;181:711-713]. The child may also walk on his toes or refuse to walk at all. This refusal to bear weight can be alarming to both providers and parents, resulting in extensive workups. We present the case of a 5-year-old boy who presented to the emergency department with a chief complaint of leg pain and refusal to walk. Further history revealed a resolved URI approximately 5 days prior. He was noted to have an elevated creatinine kinase with no evidence of renal insufficiency. He had no progression or complications, and his symptoms resolved spontaneously with minimal supportive treatment. Benign acute childhood myositis should be considered within the broad differential that surrounds a limping child or one who refuses to bear weight. Having insight into the condition with its characteristic gait abnormalities and associated URI history can often prevent extensive workups and be treated supportively in the outpatient setting. PMID:24126025

  11. Pathophysiology of acute meningitis caused by Streptococcus pneumoniae and adjunctive therapy approaches.

    PubMed

    Barichello, Tatiana; Generoso, Jaqueline S; Collodel, Allan; Moreira, Ana Paula; Almeida, Sérgio Monteiro de

    2012-05-01

    Pneumococcal meningitis is a life-threatening disease characterized by an acute purulent infection affecting piamater, arachnoid and the subarachnoid space. The intense inflammatory host's response is potentially fatal and contributes to the neurological sequelae. Streptococcus pneumoniae colonizes the nasopharynx, followed by bacteremia, microbial invasion and blood-brain barrier traversal. S. pneumoniae is recognized by antigen-presenting cells through the binding of Toll-like receptors inducing the activation of factor nuclear kappa B or mitogen-activated protein kinase pathways and subsequent up-regulation of lymphocyte populations and expression of numerous proteins involved in inflammation and immune response. Many brain cells can produce cytokines, chemokines and others pro-inflammatory molecules in response to bacteria stimuli, as consequence, polymorphonuclear are attracted, activated and released in large amounts of superoxide anion and nitric oxide, leading to the peroxynitrite formation, generating oxidative stress. This cascade leads to lipid peroxidation, mitochondrial damage, blood-brain barrier breakdown contributing to cell injury during pneumococcal meningitis. PMID:22618789

  12. Risk of hypertension and reduced kidney function after acute gastroenteritis from bacteria-contaminated drinking water

    PubMed Central

    Garg, Amit X.; Moist, Louise; Matsell, Douglas; Thiessen-Philbrook, Heather R.; Haynes, R. Brian; Suri, Rita S.; Salvadori, Marina; Ray, Joel; Clark, William F.

    2005-01-01

    Background The long-term health consequences of acute bacterial gastroenteritis remain uncertain. We studied the risk of hypertension and reduced kidney function after an outbreak of acute gastroenteritis due to contamination of a regional drinking water supply with Escherichia coli O157:H7 and Campylobacter species. Methods A total of 1958 adults with no known history of hypertension or kidney disease before the outbreak participated in a long-term follow-up study. Of the participants, 675 had been asymptomatic during the outbreak, 909 had had moderate symptoms of acute self-limited gastroenteritis, and 374 had had severe symptoms that necessitated medical attention. The outcomes of interest were a diagnosis of hypertension or the presence of reduced kidney function and albuminuria during the follow-up period. Results After a mean follow-up of 3.7 years after the outbreak, hypertension was diagnosed in 27.0% of participants who had been asymptomatic during the outbreak and in 32.3% and 35.9% of those who had had moderate and severe symptoms of acute gastroenteritis respectively (trend p = 0.009). Compared with the asymptomatic participants, those with moderate and severe symptoms of gastroenteritis had an adjusted relative risk of hypertension of 1.15 (95% confidence interval [CI] 0.97–1.35) and 1.28 (95% CI 1.04–1.56) respectively. A similar graded association was seen for reduced kidney function, defined as the presence of an estimated glomerular filtration rate below 60 mL/min per 1.73 m2 (trend p = 0.03). No association was observed between gastroenteritis and the subsequent risk of albuminuria. Interpretation Acute bacterial gastroenteritis necessitating medical attention was associated with an increased risk of hypertension and reduced kidney function 4 years after infection. Maintaining safe drinking water remains essential to human health, as transient bacterial contaminations may have implications well beyond a period of acute self-limited illness. PMID:15923490

  13. Sensor Node for Remote Monitoring of Waterborne Disease-Causing Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Kyukwang; Myung, Hyun

    2015-01-01

    A sensor node for sampling water and checking for the presence of harmful bacteria such as E. coli in water sources was developed in this research. A chromogenic enzyme substrate assay method was used to easily detect coliform bacteria by monitoring the color change of the sampled water mixed with a reagent. Live webcam image streaming to the web browser of the end user with a Wi-Fi connected sensor node shows the water color changes in real time. The liquid can be manipulated on the web-based user interface, and also can be observed by webcam feeds. Image streaming and web console servers run on an embedded processor with an expansion board. The UART channel of the expansion board is connected to an external Arduino board and a motor driver to control self-priming water pumps to sample the water, mix the reagent, and remove the water sample after the test is completed. The sensor node can repeat water testing until the test reagent is depleted. The authors anticipate that the use of the sensor node developed in this research can decrease the cost and required labor for testing samples in a factory environment and checking the water quality of local water sources in developing countries. PMID:25951340

  14. Sensor node for remote monitoring of waterborne disease-causing bacteria.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kyukwang; Myung, Hyun

    2015-01-01

    A sensor node for sampling water and checking for the presence of harmful bacteria such as E. coli in water sources was developed in this research. A chromogenic enzyme substrate assay method was used to easily detect coliform bacteria by monitoring the color change of the sampled water mixed with a reagent. Live webcam image streaming to the web browser of the end user with a Wi-Fi connected sensor node shows the water color changes in real time. The liquid can be manipulated on the web-based user interface, and also can be observed by webcam feeds. Image streaming and web console servers run on an embedded processor with an expansion board. The UART channel of the expansion board is connected to an external Arduino board and a motor driver to control self-priming water pumps to sample the water, mix the reagent, and remove the water sample after the test is completed. The sensor node can repeat water testing until the test reagent is depleted. The authors anticipate that the use of the sensor node developed in this research can decrease the cost and required labor for testing samples in a factory environment and checking the water quality of local water sources in developing countries. PMID:25951340

  15. Prospective evaluation of the cause of acute pancreatitis, with special attention to medicines

    PubMed Central

    Rashidi, Mitra; Røkke, Ola

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the cause of acute pancreatitis (AP) by conducting a thorough investigation of drugs and their possible etiological role. METHODS: We investigated the cause of AP in a large retrospective cohort of 613 adult patients admitted with AP at the Akershus University Hospital, Norway, from 2000 until 2009, who were evaluated with standard ward investigations. This group was compared with a prospectively evaluated group (n = 57) admitted from January 2010 until September 2010 who investigated more extensively using medical history and radiological assessment. RESULTS: The groups were comparable with regards to gender, age, comorbidity and severity. The most common etiology was bile stones and alcohol, occurring in 60% in both groups. The prospective group was examined more thoroughly with regards to the use of alcohol and medicines. An increased number of radiological investigations during hospital stay and at follow-up were also performed. A more extensive use of radiological evaluation did not increase the detection frequency of bile stones. In the prospective group, more than half of the patients had two or more possible causes of pancreatitis, being mostly a combination of bile stones and drugs. No possible cause was found in only 3.5% of these patients, compared with 29.7% in the retrospective group. CONCLUSION: A detailed medical history and extensive radiological evaluation may determine a possible etiology in almost all cases of AP. Many patients have several possible risk factors, and uncertainty remains in establishing the definitive etiology. PMID:26877614

  16. Acute nephritic syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    Glomerulonephritis - acute; Acute glomerulonephritis; Nephritis syndrome - acute ... Acute nephritic syndrome is often caused by an immune response triggered by an infection or other disease. Common causes ...

  17. ?-Blockers and All-Cause Mortality in Adults with Episodes of Acute Bronchitis: An Observational Study

    PubMed Central

    Rutten, Frans H.; Groenwold, Rolf H. H.; Sachs, Alfred P. E.; Grobbee, Diederick E.; Hoes, Arno W.

    2013-01-01

    Background Recent observational studies suggest that ?-blockers may improve long-term prognosis in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). We assessed whether ?-blocker use improves all-cause mortality in patients with episodes of acute bronchitis. Methods An observational cohort study using data from the electronic medical records of 23 general practices in the Netherlands. The data included standardized information about daily patient contacts, diagnoses, and drug prescriptions. Cox regression was applied with time-varying treatment and covariates. Results The study included 4,493 patients aged 45 years and older, with at least one episode of acute bronchitis between 1996 and 2006. The mean (SD) age of the patients was 66.9 (11.7) years, and 41.9% were male. During a mean (SD) follow up period of 7.7 (2.5) years, 20.4% developed COPD. In total, 22.7% had cardiovascular comorbidities, resulting in significant higher mortality rates than those without (51.7% vs. 12.0%, p<0.001). The adjusted hazard ratio of cardioselective ?-blocker use for mortality was 0.62 (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.500.77), and 1.01 (95% CI 0.751.36) for non-selective ones. Some other cardiovascular drugs also reduced the risk of mortality, with adjusted HRs of 0.60 (95% CI 0.460.79) for calcium channel blockers, 0.88 (95% CI 0.731.06) for ACE inhibitors/angiotensin receptor blockers, and 0.42 (95% CI 0.310.57) for statins, respectively. Conclusion Cardiovascular comorbidities are common and increase the risk of mortality in adults with episodes of acute bronchitis. Cardioselective ?-blockers, but also calcium channel blockers and statins may reduce mortality, possibly as a result of cardiovascular protective properties. PMID:23840599

  18. ACUTE TOXICITY OF HEAVY METALS TO ACETATE-UTILIZING MIXED CULTURES OF SULFATE-REDUCING BACTERIA: EC100 AND EC50

    EPA Science Inventory

    Acid mine drainage (AMD) from abandoned mines and acid mine pitlakes is an important environmental contaminant concern and usually contains appreciable concentrations of heavy metals. Since sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) are involved in the treatment of AMD, knowledge of acute m...

  19. Case Report: Human Bocavirus Associated Pneumonia as Cause of Acute Injury, Cologne, Germany.

    PubMed

    Krakau, Michael; Gerbershagen, Kathrin; Frost, Ulrich; Hinzke, Markus; Brockmann, Michael; Schildgen, Verena; Gomann, Axel; Limmroth, Volker; Dormann, Arno; Schildgen, Oliver

    2015-10-01

    Although the human bocavirus (HBoV) is known since a decade, limited information about its pathogenesis is available due to the lack of an animal model. Thus, clinical cases and studies are the major source of novel information about the course of infection and the related pathophysiology.In this context, a clinical case of an adult patient suffering from severe HBoV-pneumonia is described that was associated with loss of consciousness followed by acute rib fracture and subsequent neurological disorder.Following initial global respiratory dysfunction the clinical respiratory symptoms recovered but the neurological symptoms maintained after weaning and intensive care in the stroke unit. During the initial phase, an acute active HBoV infection was confirmed by positive polymerase chain reactions from bronchoalveolar lavage fluid and serum.The case further demonstrates that HBoV can cause severe pneumonia, induce secondary disease also in adults, and may be associated with neurological symptoms as previously assumed. PMID:26496262

  20. Amoebic liver abscess – a cause of acute respiratory distress in an infant: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Introduction The usual presentation of amebic liver abscess in children is extremely variable and unpredictable. It presents with a picture of common pediatric illness that is fever, lethargy, and abdominal pain, and can go on to develop into a rare complication of rupture into the pleura to cause acute respiratory distress, which is another common pediatric illness. In our patient, diagnosis was not made or suspected in these two stages. Case presentation This is the report of a 2-year-old male infant who presented with a 2-week history of anorexia, fever, and abdominal pain. A few hours after admission, he suddenly developed acute respiratory distress; chest X-ray demonstrated massive right pleural effusion that failed to response to tube thoracostomy. Limited thoracotomy revealed a ruptured amebic liver abscess through the right cupola of the diaphragm. The content of the abscess was evacuated from the pleural cavity, which was drained with two large chest tubes. Serological examination confirmed the diagnosis of ruptured amebic liver abscess. Postoperative treatment with antibiotics including metronidazole continued until full recovery. Conclusion Diagnosis of such a rare disease requires a high degree of suspicion. In this patient, the diagnosis was only made postoperatively. The delay in presentation and the sudden onset of respiratory distress must be emphasized for all those physicians who care for children. PMID:19192277

  1. Corticosteroids prevent acute lung dysfunction caused by thoracic irradiation in unanesthetized sheep

    SciTech Connect

    Loyd, J.E.; Bolds, J.M.; Wickersham, N.; Malcolm, A.W.; Brigham, K.L.

    1988-11-01

    We sought to determine the effect of corticosteroid therapy in a new acute model of oxidant lung injury, thoracic irradiation in awake sheep. Sheep were irradiated with 1,500 rads to the whole chest except for blocking the heart and adjacent ventral lung. Seven experimental sheep were given methylprednisolone (1 g intravenously every 6 h for four doses) and thoracic irradiation; control sheep received only irradiation. In irradiated control sheep, lung lymph flow increased from baseline (7.6 ml/h) to peak at 3 h (13.2), and lung lymph protein clearance increased from 5.1 to 9.7 ml/h. Mean pulmonary artery pressure increased in the irradiated control sheep from 19 to 32.4 cm H/sub 2/O, whereas the lung lymph thromboxane concentration increased from 0.09 to 6.51 ng/ml at 3 h. Arterial oxygen tension in irradiated control sheep fell gradually from 86 mm Hg at baseline to 65 mm Hg at 8 h. Methylprednisolone administration significantly prevented the increase in lung lymph protein clearance, mean pulmonary artery pressure, and lung lymph thromboxane concentration. Methylprednisolone also prevented the fall in arterial oxygen tension after thoracic irradiation, but did not prevent a further decrease in lymphocytes in blood or lung lymph after radiation. We conclude that corticosteroid therapy prevents most of the acute physiologic changes caused by thoracic irradiation in awake sheep.

  2. Spontaneous coronary artery dissection: a neglected cause of acute myocardial ischaemia and sudden death.

    PubMed Central

    Basso, C.; Morgagni, G. L.; Thiene, G.

    1996-01-01

    Spontaneous coronary artery dissection is a rare cause of acute myocardial ischaemia. Eight consecutive fatal cases which occurred in women aged 34-54 years (mean 43) are described. The dissection involved the left anterior descending coronary artery in four, the left main trunk in two, the right coronary artery in one, and both left anterior descending and circumflex arteries in one. The clinical presentation was sudden death in six cases, and acute myocardial infarction in two. Diagnosis was made at necropsy in every case but one, in which coronary dissection was diagnosed during life by selective coronary angiography. The only ascertained risk factor was hypertension in one patient; none of the women was in the puerperium, and Marfan syndrome was excluded in all. Histology showed a haematoma between the coronary tunica media and adventitia, that flattened and occluded the lumen; a coronary intimal tear was detected in only two cases. Unusual histological findings were cystic medial necrosis in one case, eosinophilic inflammatory infiltrates in four, and angiomatosis of the tunica adventitia in one. Patients dying of spontaneous coronary dissection are usually middle aged women, with no coronary atherosclerosis and apparently no risk factors. Spontaneous coronary artery dissection is unpredictable, and sudden death is the usual mode of clinical presentation. Prompt diagnosis and life saving treatment is far from being achieved. Images PMID:8665336

  3. Splenic infarction – A rare cause of acute abdominal pain following gastric surgery: A case series

    PubMed Central

    Yazici, Pinar; Kaya, Cemal; Isil, Gurhan; Bozkurt, Emre; Mihmanli, Mehmet

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The dissection of splenic hilar lymph nodes in gastric cancer surgery is indispensable for treating gastric cancers located in the proximal third of the stomach. Splenic vascular injury is a matter of debate resulting on time or delayed splenectomy. We aimed to share our experience and plausible mechanisms causing this complication in two case reports. Case presentations Two male patients with gastric cancer were diagnosed with acute splenic infarction following gastric surgery in the early postoperative period. Both underwent emergent exploratory laparotomy. Splenectomy was performed due to splenic infarction. Discussion Because we observed this rare complication in recent patients whose surgery was performed using vessel-sealing device for splenic hilar dissection, we suggested that extensive mobilization of the surrounding tissues of splenic vascular structures hilum using the vessel sealer could be the reason. Conclusion In case of acute abdominal pain radiating to left shoulder, splenic complications should be taken into consideration in gastric cancer patients performed radical gastrectomy. Meticulous dissection of splenic hilar lymph nodes should be carried out to avoid any splenic vascular injury. PMID:25818369

  4. Multiple Stent Fractures After Everolimus-Eluting Stent Implantation Causing Acute Myocardial Infarction

    PubMed Central

    Ji, Eun Young; Park, Gyung-Min; Kim, Dae Won; Kim, Tae-Seok; Kim, Chan Joon; Cho, Jung Sun; Park, Mahn-Won; Her, Sung Ho

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Stent fracture is an uncommon complication of drug-eluting stent implantation, but it has a clinical significance because of its potential association with adverse cardiac events such as in-stent restenosis, target lesion revascularization, and stent thrombosis. Multiple stent fractures account for a small proportion, but they may lead to more serious complications. Newer generation drug-eluting stents are designed for improved safety and efficacy compared with early generation drug-eluting stents. Multiple stent fractures after newer generation drug-eluting stent implantation are a rare case. We report a case of 25-year-old male who presented with acute myocardial infarction caused by multiple stent fractures after everolimus-eluting stents implantation and was treated by balloon angioplasty. Physicians should be aware of the possibility of multiple stent fractures even after newer generation drug-eluting stent implantation. PMID:26871806

  5. Multiple Stent Fractures After Everolimus-Eluting Stent Implantation Causing Acute Myocardial Infarction: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Ji, Eun Young; Park, Gyung-Min; Kim, Dae Won; Kim, Tae-Seok; Kim, Chan Joon; Cho, Jung Sun; Park, Mahn-Won; Her, Sung Ho

    2016-02-01

    Stent fracture is an uncommon complication of drug-eluting stent implantation, but it has a clinical significance because of its potential association with adverse cardiac events such as in-stent restenosis, target lesion revascularization, and stent thrombosis. Multiple stent fractures account for a small proportion, but they may lead to more serious complications. Newer generation drug-eluting stents are designed for improved safety and efficacy compared with early generation drug-eluting stents. Multiple stent fractures after newer generation drug-eluting stent implantation are a rare case.We report a case of 25-year-old male who presented with acute myocardial infarction caused by multiple stent fractures after everolimus-eluting stents implantation and was treated by balloon angioplasty.Physicians should be aware of the possibility of multiple stent fractures even after newer generation drug-eluting stent implantation. PMID:26871806

  6. Acute mental disturbance caused by synthetic cannabinoid: a potential emerging substance of abuse in Hong Kong.

    PubMed

    Tung, C K; Chiang, T P; Lam, M

    2012-03-01

    Synthetic cannabinoids are hybrid herbal/chemical products which mimic the effects of cannabis. They are usually marketed as incense or 'herbal smoking blend', and best known by the brand names 'K2' and 'Spice'. Their popularity among recreational drug abusers has grown rapidly due to their easy availability, relatively low cost, non-detection by conventional drug tests, and ease of concealing their use from family and authorities. They took Europe and later North America by storm in the late 2000s, yet limited medical literature exists detailing their adverse effects. They began to emerge in the Hong Kong drug scene in 2009. We report on a man who developed acute mental disturbance after 4 weeks of daily K2 abuse. This is the first case report of mental disorder caused by synthetic cannabinoid abuse in a Chinese. PMID:22447803

  7. Acute upregulation of hedgehog signaling in mice causes differential effects on cranial morphology

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Nandini; Dutka, Tara; Devenney, Benjamin M.; Kawasaki, Kazuhiko; Reeves, Roger H.; Richtsmeier, Joan T.

    2015-01-01

    Hedgehog (HH) signaling, and particularly signaling by sonic hedgehog (SHH), is implicated in several essential activities during morphogenesis, and its misexpression causes a number of developmental disorders in humans. In particular, a reduced mitogenic response of cerebellar granule cell precursors to SHH signaling in a mouse model for Down syndrome (DS), Ts65Dn, is substantially responsible for reduced cerebellar size. A single treatment of newborn trisomic mice with an agonist of the SHH pathway (SAG) normalizes cerebellar morphology and restores some cognitive deficits, suggesting a possible therapeutic application of SAG for treating the cognitive impairments of DS. Although the beneficial effects on the cerebellum are compelling, inappropriate activation of the HH pathway causes anomalies elsewhere in the head, particularly in the formation and patterning of the craniofacial skeleton. To determine whether an acute treatment of SAG has an effect on craniofacial morphology, we quantitatively analyzed the cranial form of adult euploid and Ts65Dn mice that were injected with either SAG or vehicle at birth. We found significant deformation of adult craniofacial shape in some animals that had received SAG at birth. The most pronounced differences between the treated and untreated mice were in the midline structures of the facial skeleton. The SAG-driven craniofacial dysmorphogenesis was dose-dependent and possibly incompletely penetrant at lower concentrations. Our findings illustrate that activation of HH signaling, even with an acute postnatal stimulation, can lead to localized dysmorphology of the skull by generating modular shape changes in the facial skeleton. These observations have important implications for translating HH-agonist-based treatments for DS. PMID:25540129

  8. Understanding the Acute Skin Injury Mechanism Caused by Player-Surface Contact During Soccer

    PubMed Central

    van den Eijnde, Wilbert A.J.; Peppelman, Malou; Lamers, Edwin A.D.; van de Kerkhof, Peter C.M.; van Erp, Piet E.J.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Superficial skin injuries are considered minor, and their incidence is probably underestimated. Insight into the incidence and mechanism of acute skin injury can be helpful in developing suitable preventive measures and safer playing surfaces for soccer and other field sports. Purpose: To gain insight into the incidence and severity of skin injuries related to soccer and to describe the skin injury mechanism due to player-surface contact. Study Design: Systematic review; Level of evidence, 4. Methods: The prevention model by van Mechelen et al (1992) combined with the injury causation model of Bahr and Krosshaug (2005) were used as a framework for the survey to describe the skin injury incidence and mechanism caused by player-surface contact. Results: The reviewed literature showed that common injury reporting methods are mainly based on time lost from participation or the need for medical attention. Because skin abrasions seldom lead to absence or medical attention, they are often not reported. When reported, the incidence of abrasion/laceration injuries varies from 0.8 to 6.1 injuries per 1000 player-hours. Wound assessment techniques such as the Skin Damage Area and Severity Index can be a valuable tool to obtain a more accurate estimation of the incidence and severity of acute skin injuries. Conclusion: The use of protective equipment, a skin lubricant, or wet surface conditions has a positive effect on preventing abrasion-type injuries from artificial turf surfaces. The literature also shows that essential biomechanical information of the sliding event is lacking, such as how energy is transferred to the area of contact. From a clinical and histological perspective, there are strong indications that a sliding-induced skin lesion is caused by mechanical rather than thermal injury to the skin. PMID:26535330

  9. Programmed Allee effect in bacteria causes a tradeoff between population spread and survival

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Robert; Tan, Cheemeng; Srimani, Jaydeep K.; Pai, Anand; Riccione, Katherine A.; Song, Hao; You, Lingchong

    2014-01-01

    Dispersal is necessary for spread into new habitats, but it has also been shown to inhibit spread. Theoretical studies have suggested that the presence of a strong Allee effect may account for these counterintuitive observations. Experimental demonstration of this notion is lacking due to the difficulty in quantitative analysis of such phenomena in a natural setting. We engineered Escherichia coli to exhibit a strong Allee effect and examined how the Allee effect would affect the spread of the engineered bacteria. We showed that the Allee effect led to a biphasic dependence of bacterial spread on the dispersal rate: spread is promoted for intermediate dispersal rates but inhibited at low or high dispersal rates. The shape of this dependence is contingent upon the initial density of the source population. Moreover, the Allee effect led to a tradeoff between effectiveness of population spread and survival: increasing the number of target patches during dispersal allows more effective spread, but it simultaneously increases the risk of failing to invade or of going extinct. We also observed that total population growth is transiently maximized at an intermediate number of target patches. Finally, we demonstrate that fluctuations in cell growth may contribute to the paradoxical relationship between dispersal and spread. Our results provide direct experimental evidence that the Allee effect can explain the apparently paradoxical effects of dispersal on spread and have implications for guiding the spread of cooperative organisms. PMID:24449896

  10. Association between infections caused by multidrug-resistant gram-negative bacteria and mortality in critically ill patients

    PubMed Central

    Paramythiotou, Elisabeth; Routsi, Christina

    2016-01-01

    The incidence of gram-negative multidrug-resistant (MDR) bacterial pathogens is increasing in hospitals and particularly in the intensive care unit (ICU) setting. The clinical consequences of infections caused by MDR pathogens remain controversial. The purpose of this review is to summarize the available data concerning the impact of these infections on mortality in ICU patients. Twenty-four studies, conducted exclusively in ICU patients, were identified through PubMed search over the years 2000-2015. Bloodstream infection was the only infection examined in eight studies, respiratory infections in four and variable infections in others. Comparative data on the appropriateness of empirical antibiotic treatment were provided by only seven studies. In ten studies the presence of antimicrobial resistance was not associated with increased mortality; on the contrary, in other studies a significant impact of antibiotic resistance on mortality was found, though, sometimes, mediated by inappropriate antimicrobial treatment. Therefore, a direct association between infections due to gram-negative MDR bacteria and mortality in ICU patients cannot be confirmed. Sample size, presence of multiple confounders and other methodological issues may influence the results. These data support the need for further studies to elucidate the real impact of infections caused by resistant bacteria in ICU patients. PMID:27152254

  11. Association between infections caused by multidrug-resistant gram-negative bacteria and mortality in critically ill patients.

    PubMed

    Paramythiotou, Elisabeth; Routsi, Christina

    2016-05-01

    The incidence of gram-negative multidrug-resistant (MDR) bacterial pathogens is increasing in hospitals and particularly in the intensive care unit (ICU) setting. The clinical consequences of infections caused by MDR pathogens remain controversial. The purpose of this review is to summarize the available data concerning the impact of these infections on mortality in ICU patients. Twenty-four studies, conducted exclusively in ICU patients, were identified through PubMed search over the years 2000-2015. Bloodstream infection was the only infection examined in eight studies, respiratory infections in four and variable infections in others. Comparative data on the appropriateness of empirical antibiotic treatment were provided by only seven studies. In ten studies the presence of antimicrobial resistance was not associated with increased mortality; on the contrary, in other studies a significant impact of antibiotic resistance on mortality was found, though, sometimes, mediated by inappropriate antimicrobial treatment. Therefore, a direct association between infections due to gram-negative MDR bacteria and mortality in ICU patients cannot be confirmed. Sample size, presence of multiple confounders and other methodological issues may influence the results. These data support the need for further studies to elucidate the real impact of infections caused by resistant bacteria in ICU patients. PMID:27152254

  12. [Allergic alveolitis in agricultural workers, caused by thermophilic bacteria or fungi].

    PubMed

    Barzó, P; Molnár, L; Csokonay, L

    1989-01-01

    Between 1976-1986 fifty-seven patients with farmer's lung have been diagnosed in Hungary on the basis of data obtained from public institutes for tuberculosis. That are 0.08% of the 744,300 manual workers employed in agriculture and forestry. In the counties of Borsod and Szolnok the rate was 0.5% (referred to 62,900 and 36,000 individuals, respectively). Regional accumulation of the different provoking agent's and variation of disease prevalence seem to be in correlation with geographical, climatic, meteorological, economical and occupational factors, showing a declining tendency in recent years. Antibodies of the Thermoactinomyces vulgaris antigen could be detected most frequently. In the biopsy material of 17 patients obtained by Klassen biopsy were fibrosing and not fibrosing desquamative alveolitis, granulomas similar to sarcoidosis, bronchiolitis with peribronchial fibrosis observed. Mostly focal, rarely subpleural deficiencies were detected by lung-scintigraphy, their dimension in acute cases being greater than the extent of radiological lesions. On the basis of 5 Coombs positive cases authors consider conceivable that sometimes cytotoxic allergic reaction type II participates in the pathogenesis of farmer's lung. PMID:2686222

  13. Hypertonic Saline Therapy in Cystic Fibrosis: Do Population Shifts Caused by the Osmotic Sensitivity of Infecting Bacteria Explain the Effectiveness of this Treatment?

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Huw D.; Behrends, Volker; Bundy, Jacob G.; Ryall, Ben; Zlosnik, James E. A.

    2010-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is caused by a defect in the CF transmembrane regulator that leads to depletion and dehydration of the airway surface liquid (ASL) of the lung epithelium, providing an environment that can be infected by bacteria leading to increased morbidity and mortality. Pseudomonas aeruginosa chronically infects more than 80% of CF patients and one hallmark of infection is the emergence of a mucoid phenotype associated with a worsening prognosis and more rapid decline in lung function. Hypertonic saline (HS) is a clinically proven treatment that improves mucociliary clearance through partial rehydration of the ASL of the lung. Strikingly, while HS therapy does not alter the prevalence of P. aeruginosa in the CF lung it does decrease the frequency of episodes of acute, severe illness known as infective exacerbations among CF patients. In this article, we propose a hypothesis whereby the positive clinical effects of HS treatment are explained by the osmotic sensitivity of the mucoid sub-population of P. aeruginosa in the CF lung leading to selection against this group in favor of the osmotically resistant non-mucoid variants. PMID:21687721

  14. Marine sulfate-reducing bacteria cause serious corrosion of iron under electroconductive biogenic mineral crust

    PubMed Central

    Enning, Dennis; Venzlaff, Hendrik; Garrelfs, Julia; Dinh, Hang T; Meyer, Volker; Mayrhofer, Karl; Hassel, Achim W; Stratmann, Martin; Widdel, Friedrich

    2012-01-01

    Iron (Fe0) corrosion in anoxic environments (e.g. inside pipelines), a process entailing considerable economic costs, is largely influenced by microorganisms, in particular sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB). The process is characterized by formation of black crusts and metal pitting. The mechanism is usually explained by the corrosiveness of formed H2S, and scavenge of ‘cathodic’ H2 from chemical reaction of Fe0 with H2O. Here we studied peculiar marine SRB that grew lithotrophically with metallic iron as the only electron donor. They degraded up to 72% of iron coupons (10 mm × 10 mm × 1 mm) within five months, which is a technologically highly relevant corrosion rate (0.7 mm Fe0 year−1), while conventional H2-scavenging control strains were not corrosive. The black, hard mineral crust (FeS, FeCO3, Mg/CaCO3) deposited on the corroding metal exhibited electrical conductivity (50 S m−1). This was sufficient to explain the corrosion rate by electron flow from the metal (4Fe0 → 4Fe2+ + 8e−) through semiconductive sulfides to the crust-colonizing cells reducing sulfate (8e− + SO42− + 9H+ → HS− + 4H2O). Hence, anaerobic microbial iron corrosion obviously bypasses H2 rather than depends on it. SRB with such corrosive potential were revealed at naturally high numbers at a coastal marine sediment site. Iron coupons buried there were corroded and covered by the characteristic mineral crust. It is speculated that anaerobic biocorrosion is due to the promiscuous use of an ecophysiologically relevant catabolic trait for uptake of external electrons from abiotic or biotic sources in sediments. PMID:22616633

  15. Recovery of nonpathogenic mutant bacteria from tumors caused by several Agrobacterium tumefaciens strains: a frequent event?

    PubMed

    Llop, Pablo; Murillo, Jesús; Lastra, Beatriz; López, María M

    2009-10-01

    We have evaluated the interaction that bacterial genotypes and plant hosts have with the loss of pathogenicity in tumors, using seven Agrobacterium tumefaciens strains inoculated on 12 herbaceous and woody hosts. We performed a screening of the agrobacteria present inside the tumors, looking for nonpathogenic strains, and found a high variability of those strains in this niche. To verify the origin of the putative nonpathogenic mutant bacteria, we applied an efficient, reproducible, and specific randomly amplified polymorphic DNA analysis method. In contrast with previous studies, we recovered a very small percentage (0.01%) of nonpathogenic strains that can be considered true mutants. Of 5,419 agrobacterial isolates examined, 662 were nonpathogenic in tomato, although only 7 (from pepper and tomato tumors induced by two A. tumefaciens strains) could be considered to derive from the inoculated strain. Six mutants were affected in the transferred DNA (T-DNA) region; one of them contained IS426 inserted into the iaaM gene, whereas the whole T-DNA region was apparently deleted in three other mutants, and the virulence of the remaining two mutants was fully restored with the T-DNA genes as well. The plasmid profile was altered in six of the mutants, with changes in the size of the Ti plasmid or other plasmids and/or the acquisition of new plasmids. Our results also suggest that the frequent occurrence of nonpathogenic clones in the tumors is probably due to the preferential growth of nonpathogenic agrobacteria, of either endophytic or environmental origin, but different from the bacterial strain inducing the tumor. PMID:19700547

  16. Acute respiratory infections are the leading cause of death in children in developing countries.

    PubMed

    Denny, F W; Loda, F A

    1986-01-01

    A paper by Hazlett et al. is of particular importance because it addresses the question of the role of acute respiratory infections (ARI) as a cause of morbidity and especially mortality in 3rd world children. Diarrheal disease and malnutrition are generally thought to be the major killers of these children, and until recently little attention was paid to ARI. Recent data suggest that ARI are more important than realized previously and almost certainly are the leading cause of death in children in developing countries. It is estimated that each year more than 15 million children less than 5 years old die, obviously most in socially and economically deprived countries. Since death usually is due to a combination of social, economic, and medical factors, it is impossible to obtain precise data on the causes of death. It has been estimated that 5 million of the deaths are due to diarrhea, over 3 million due to pneumonia, 2 million to measles, 1.5 million to pertussis, 1 million to tetanus, and the other 2.5 million or less to other causes. Since pertussis is an acute respiratory infection and measles deaths frequently are due to infections of the respiratory tract, it is becoming clear that ARI are associated with more deaths than any other single cause. The significance of this is emphasized when the mortality rates from ARI in developed and underdeveloped nations are compared. Depending on the countries compared, age group, and other factors, increases of 5-10-fold have been reported. These factors raise the question of why respiratory infections are so lethal for 3rd world children. The severity of pneumonia, which is the cause of most ARI deaths, seems to be the big difference. Data are accumulating which show that bacterial infections are associated with the majority of severe infections and "Streptococcus pneumoniae" and "Haemophilus influenzae," infrequent causes of pneumonia in developed world children, are the microorganisms incriminated in a large proportion of cases. The increase in severity of ARI in 3rd world children has been associated, at least in port, with malnutrition, diarrheal diseases, an increased parasite load, and more recently with air pollution. Crowding and other factors associated with poverty doubtless also play a role. How these various factors contribute to increased severity and lethality is not well understood. The increasing recognition of the important role played by ARI as causes of mortality in 3rd world children is encouraging. The UN International Children's Emergency Fund (UNICEF) has joined the World Health Organization in the battle against ARI in developing countries, and the 2 organizations recently issued a joint statement on the subject in which they pledged to collaborate to integrate an ARI component into the primary health care program. PMID:3946732

  17. Piscirickettsia-like organisms as a cause of acute necrotic lesions in Colombian tilapia larvae.

    PubMed

    Iregui, Carlos A; Vasquez, Gersson M; Rey, Alba L; Verjan, Noel

    2011-01-01

    Rickettsial organisms are well-known fish pathogens in both natural and culture environments. This study reports an outbreak of disease in red tilapia larvae caused by piscirickettsia-like organisms (PLOs), which lasted from June until October 2009. Severe mortality was recorded almost exclusively in larvae and postlarvae aged 1-22 days old. Although clinical or gross findings were not evident in diseased fish, histopathology revealed severe necrosis of the epidermis and gill epithelium, with concomitant changes in the underlying skeletal muscle as being the most relevant microscopic lesions. Although PLOs were visible with the routine hematoxylin eosin technique, they were better observed with Giemsa and toluidine blue stains. Transmission electron microscopy revealed that the bacterium was located within the cytoplasm and phagolysosoma-like structures of epithelial cells from the gills and the skin. The bacteria measured 0.9 ± 0.2 µm × 2.1 ± 0.6 µm and had a double cell membrane (the outer one having undulating projections), with variable electron-dense and electron-lucent areas. Ultrastructurally, abundant myelin figures surrounded the microorganisms within host cell cytoplasm. Results indicated that Piscirickettsia-like organisms can cause massive epithelial cell damage associated with concomitant alteration of the electrolyte balance. PMID:21217048

  18. [Prevalence of the bacteria causing diarrea in a Rosario Hospital, Argentina].

    PubMed

    Gambandé, Telma; Damiano, Mario; Borda, Noemí; Notario, Rodolfo; Aita, José

    2006-01-01

    Bacterial agents causing diarrea in patients attended in a hospital of Rosario, Argentina. The frequency of bacterial agents causing diarrhea can vary in patients of different areas, and through the time. In an epidemiological surveillance we studied 304 patients with diarrheal diseases looking for Salmonella enterica, Shigella spp, Campylobacter spp, Aeromonas spp, Yersinia enterocolitica, and diarrheogenic Escherichia coli. C. jejuni was isolated in 30 patients (9,9 %), Salmonella in 18 (5,9 %), and enteropathogenic E. coli (EPEC) in 7 (2,3 %). Most cases due ton C. jejuni had mucus and/or blood in their feces. Unexpectedly we didn't fine any cases due to Shigella spp. There was much less cases due to EPEC than in our previous studies, and occurred only in children of less than 5 years old. It is necesary to take in consideration that C. jejuni cause nearly all the cases of diarrhea in patients with mucus and blood in their feces actually in our region. PMID:17639815

  19. Genotyping of virulence plasmid from Vibrio parahaemolyticus isolates causing acute hepatopancreatic necrosis disease in shrimp.

    PubMed

    Han, Jee Eun; Tang, Kathy F J; Lightner, Donald V

    2015-08-20

    Acute hepatopancreatic necrosis disease (AHPND) has caused severe mortalities in farmed penaeid shrimp throughout SE Asia and Mexico. The causative agent of AHPND is the marine bacterium Vibrio parahaemolyticus, which secretes PirA- and PirB-like binary toxin that caused deterioration in the hepatopancreas of infected shrimp. The genes responsible for the production of this toxin are located in a large plasmid residing within the bacterial cells. We analyzed the plasmid sequence from the whole genome sequences of AHPND-V. parahaemolyticus isolates and identified 2 regions that exhibit a clear geographical variation: a 4243-bp Tn3-like transposon and a 9-bp small sequence repeat (SSR). The Tn3-like transposon was only found in the isolates from Mexico and 2 unspecified Central American countries, but not in SE Asian isolates from China, Vietnam, and Thailand. We developed PCR methods to characterize AHPND-V. parahaemolyticus isolates as either Mexican-type or SE Asian-type based on the presence of the Tn3-like transposon. The SSR is found within the coding region of a hypothetical protein and has either 4, 5, or 6 repeat units. SSRs with 4 repeat units were found in isolates from Vietnam, China, and Thailand. SSRs with 5 repeat units were found in some Vietnamese isolates, and SSRs with 6 repeat units were only found in the Mexican isolates. PMID:26290509

  20. Characterization of Vibrio parahaemolyticus causing acute hepatopancreatic necrosis disease in southern Thailand.

    PubMed

    Kongrueng, J; Yingkajorn, M; Bunpa, S; Sermwittayawong, N; Singkhamanan, K; Vuddhakul, V

    2015-11-01

    Vibrio parahaemolyticus was isolated from shrimp of five farms located in the Pattani and Songkhla provinces of southern Thailand. Using a PCR method targeted to the unique DNA sequences derived from the plasmid (AP2 primers) and the toxin gene (AP3 primers) of V. parahaemolyticus that caused acute hepatopancreatic necrosis disease (AHPND), a total of 33 of 108 isolates were positive. In contrast, all 63 and 66 isolates of clinical and environmental V. parahaemolyticus, respectively, obtained previously from 2008 to 2014 from the same area were negative. This implied that these strains were likely to be the cause of the outbreak of AHPND in this area. Intestinal samples proved to be a better source for the isolation of V. parahaemolyticus AHPND than the hepatopancreas. All isolates were investigated for haemolytic activity, virulence genes, serotypes, genotypes and antibiotic susceptibility. All the AHPND isolates had a unique O antigen, but small variations of the K antigens were detected from different farms. In addition, the DNA profiles of V. parahaemolyticus AHPND isolates were similar, but distinct from those clinical and environmental isolates. It is postulated that the causative agent of AHPND might have originated from one clone and then slightly different serotypes subsequently developed. PMID:25287127

  1. Acute liver failure caused by mushroom poisoning: a case report and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Erden, Abdulsamet; Esmeray, Kübra; Karagöz, Hatice; Karahan, Samet; Gümüşçü, Hasan Hüseyin; Başak, Mustafa; Çetinkaya, Ali; Avcı, Deniz; Poyrazoğlu, Orhan Kürşat

    2013-01-01

    It is estimated that there are over 5,000 species of mushrooms worldwide. Some of them are edible and some are poisonous due to containing significant toxins. In more than 95% of mushroom toxicity cases, poisoning occurs as a result of misidentification of the mushroom by an amateur mushroom hunter. The severity of mushroom poisoning may vary, depending on the geographic location where the mushroom is grown, growth conditions, the amount of toxin delivered, and the genetic characteristics of the mushroom. Amanita phalloides is the most common and fatal cause of mushroom poisoning. This mushroom contains amanitins, which are powerful hepatotoxins that inhibit RNA polymerase II in liver. Mushroom poisoning is a relatively rare cause of acute liver failure. A 63-year-old male patient was admitted to the emergency room with weakness, nausea, vomiting, and diarrhea. He reported ingesting several wild mushrooms about 36 hours earlier. In this article we report a case of lethal Amanita phalloides intoxication from stored mushrooms. PMID:24294010

  2. Acute liver failure caused by mushroom poisoning: a case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Erden, Abdulsamet; Esmeray, Kübra; Karagöz, Hatice; Karahan, Samet; Gümüşçü, Hasan Hüseyin; Başak, Mustafa; Cetinkaya, Ali; Avcı, Deniz; Poyrazoğlu, Orhan Kürşat

    2013-01-01

    It is estimated that there are over 5,000 species of mushrooms worldwide. Some of them are edible and some are poisonous due to containing significant toxins. In more than 95% of mushroom toxicity cases, poisoning occurs as a result of misidentification of the mushroom by an amateur mushroom hunter. The severity of mushroom poisoning may vary, depending on the geographic location where the mushroom is grown, growth conditions, the amount of toxin delivered, and the genetic characteristics of the mushroom. Amanita phalloides is the most common and fatal cause of mushroom poisoning. This mushroom contains amanitins, which are powerful hepatotoxins that inhibit RNA polymerase II in liver. Mushroom poisoning is a relatively rare cause of acute liver failure. A 63-year-old male patient was admitted to the emergency room with weakness, nausea, vomiting, and diarrhea. He reported ingesting several wild mushrooms about 36 hours earlier. In this article we report a case of lethal Amanita phalloides intoxication from stored mushrooms. PMID:24294010

  3. A Therapeutic Dose of Ketoprofen Causes Acute Gastrointestinal Bleeding, Erosions, and Ulcers in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Shientag, Lisa J; Wheeler, Suzanne M; Garlick, David S; Maranda, Louise S

    2012-01-01

    Perioperative treatment of several rats in our facility with ketoprofen (5 mg/kg SC) resulted in blood loss, peritonitis, and death within a day to a little more than a week after surgery that was not related to the gastrointestinal tract. Published reports have established the 5-mg/kg dose as safe and effective for rats. Because ketoprofen is a nonselective nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drug that can damage the gastrointestinal tract, the putative diagnosis for these morbidities and mortalities was gastrointestinal toxicity caused by ketoprofen (5 mg/kg). We conducted a prospective study evaluating the effect of this therapeutic dose of ketoprofen on the rat gastrointestinal tract within 24 h. Ketoprofen (5 mg/kg SC) was administered to one group of rats that then received gas anesthesia for 30 min and to another group without subsequent anesthesia. A third group was injected with saline followed by 30 min of gas anesthesia. Our primary hypothesis was that noteworthy gastrointestinal bleeding and lesions would occur in both groups treated with ketoprofen but not in rats that received saline and anesthesia. Our results showed marked gastrointestinal bleeding, erosions, and small intestinal ulcers in the ketoprofen-treated rats and minimal damages in the saline-treated group. The combination of ketoprofen and anesthesia resulted in worse clinical signs than did ketoprofen alone. We conclude that a single 5-mg/kg dose of ketoprofen causes acute mucosal damage to the rat small intestine. PMID:23294892

  4. Dengue fever causing febrile neutropenia in children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia: an unknown entity.

    PubMed

    Ramzan, Mohammed; Yadav, Satya Prakash; Dinand, Veronique; Sachdeva, Anupam

    2013-06-01

    Dengue fever is endemic in many parts of the world but it has not been described as a cause of febrile neutropenia. We describe here clinical features, laboratory values and outcome in 10 children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) and with dengue fever as a cause of febrile neutropenia. These data are compared to an age-matched control population of 22 children with proven dengue infection without ALL. Except for fever in all patients and plethoric face in one patient, typical symptoms of dengue such as abdominal pain, myalgias, and headaches, were absent. Mean duration of hospital stay was 6.3±2.0 days in ALL patients vs. 5.0±2.0 in controls (p=0.096). Median platelet count was 13,000/cmm (range 1000-28,000) in cases vs. 31,500 (range 13,000-150,000) in controls (p=0.018). Mean time for recovery for platelet was 6.0±1.3days in ALL patients vs. 2.5±0.9days in controls (p<0.001). All 10 patients survived. In endemic areas, high suspicion of dengue fever should be maintained in children with ALL and febrile neutropenia although typical symptoms may be lacking. Platelet recovery may be significantly delayed. PMID:23756720

  5. Excessive ?-tocopherol exacerbates microglial activation and brain injury caused by acute ischemic stroke

    PubMed Central

    Khanna, Savita; Heigel, Mallory; Weist, Jessica; Gnyawali, Surya; Teplitsky, Seth; Roy, Sashwati; Sen, Chandan K.; Rink, Cameron

    2015-01-01

    The vitamin E family includes both tocopherols and tocotrienols, where ?-tocopherol (?TOC) is the most bioavailable form. Clinical trials testing the therapeutic efficacy of high-dose ?TOC against stroke have largely failed or reported negative outcomes when a more is better approach to supplementation (>400 IU/d) was used. This work addresses mechanisms by which supraphysiologic ?TOC may contribute to stroke-induced brain injury. Ischemic stroke injury and the neuroinflammatory response were studied in tocopherol transfer protein-deficient mice maintained on a diet containing ?TOC vitamin E at the equivalent human dose of 1680 IU/d. Ischemic stroke-induced brain injury was exacerbated in the presence of supraphysiologic brain ?TOC levels. At 48 h after stroke, S100B and RAGE expression was increased in stroke-affected cortex of mice with elevated brain ?TOC levels. Such increases were concomitant with aggravated microglial activation and neuroinflammatory signaling. A poststroke increase in markers of oxidative injury and neurodegeneration in the presence of elevated brain ?TOC establish that at supraphysiologic levels, ?TOC potentiates neuroinflammatory responses to acute ischemic stroke. Exacerbation of microglial activation by excessive ?TOC likely depends on its unique cell signaling regulatory properties independent of antioxidant function. Against the background of clinical failure for high-dose ?TOC, outcomes of this work identify risk for exacerbating stroke-induced brain injury as a result of supplementing diet with excessive levels of ?TOC.Khanna, S., Heigel,M., Weist, J., Gnyawali, S., Teplitsky, S., Roy, S., Sen, C. K., Rink, C. Excessive ?-tocopherol exacerbates microglial activation and brain injury caused by acute ischemic stroke. PMID:25411436

  6. Outbreak of acute respiratory disease in China caused by B2 species of adenovirus type 11.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Zhen; Zhang, Yong; Xu, Songtao; Yu, Pengbo; Tian, Xiaoping; Wang, Li; Liu, Zhonghua; Tang, Liuying; Mao, Naiying; Ji, Yixin; Li, Chongshan; Yang, Zhaohui; Wang, Shiwen; Wang, Jingjun; Li, Dexin; Xu, Wenbo

    2009-03-01

    An outbreak of acute respiratory tract infection occurred in Shanxi Province, China, from March to April 2006. Of the 254 patients affected by this outbreak, 247 patients were students of a senior high school; 1 of these patients died during the outbreak. Serological tests and blood culture revealed no evidence of bacterial infection. The results of direct reverse transcription-PCR or PCR performed with clinical specimens collected from the patients, including the sole patient who died, were positive for human adenoviruses (HAdVs) but negative for influenza virus, measles virus, rubella virus, mumps virus, parainfluenza virus, respiratory syncytial virus, and human enteroviruses. These findings were confirmed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for HAdV immunoglobulin A, the conventional neutralization test, and viral isolation and identification. Sequencing of the entire hexon gene revealed that HdAV type 11a (HAdV-11a) belonging to the B2 species of HAdV was the etiological agent responsible for the outbreak. However, both the analysis of the phylogenetic relationship and the similarity plot indicated that the sequence of the 3' end of the hexon gene outside the hypervariable regions the HAdV-11a strain isolated in this outbreak may be a recombinant with the sequence of the HAdV-14 strain of species B2. Although isolates of HAdV species B2 seldom cause respiratory infections, they may pose a new global challenge with regard to acute respiratory diseases; this possibility cannot be overlooked and should be carefully considered. Hence, the need to establish and improve both epidemiological and virological surveillance of HAdV infections in China should be emphasized. PMID:19109466

  7. Acute toxicity test of leachates from traditional and sustainable landfills using luminescent bacteria

    SciTech Connect

    Pivato, Alberto . E-mail: alberto.pivato@libero.it; Gaspari, Lorenzo

    2006-07-01

    Landfilling is a fundamental step in any waste management strategy, but it can constitute a hazard for the environment for a long time. The need to protect the environment from potential landfill emissions makes risk assessment a decision tool of extreme necessity. The heterogeneity of wastes and the complexity of physical, chemical and biological processes that occur in the body of a landfill need specific procedures in order to evaluate the groundwater risk for the environment. Given the complexity of the composition of landfill leachates, the exact contribution of each potential toxic substance cannot be known precisely. Some reference contaminants that constitute the hazard (toxicity) of leachate have to be found to perform the risk assessment. A preliminary ecotoxicological investigation with luminescent bacteria has been carried out on different leachates from traditional and sustainable landfills in order to rank the chemicals that better characterize the leachate (heavy metals, ammonia and dissolved organic content). The attention has been focused on ammonia because it is present in high concentration and can last for centuries and can seriously contaminate the groundwater. The results showed that the toxicity of the leachate might reliably depend on the ammonia concentration and that the leachate toxicity is considerably lower in sustainable landfills where the ammonia had been degraded. This has an important consequence because if the containment system fails (as usually occur within 30-50 yr), the risk of groundwater contamination will be calculated easier only in terms of the probability that the ammonia concentration is higher than a reference concentration.

  8. Anthrax Lethal Toxin Disrupts Intestinal Barrier Function and Causes Systemic Infections with Enteric Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Chen; Fang, Hui; Xie, Tao; Auth, Roger D.; Patel, Nayana; Murray, Patrick R.; Frucht, David M.

    2012-01-01

    A variety of intestinal pathogens have virulence factors that target mitogen activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling pathways, including Bacillus anthracis. Anthrax lethal toxin (LT) has specific proteolytic activity against the upstream regulators of MAPKs, the MAPK kinases (MKKs). Using a murine model of intoxication, we show that LT causes the dose-dependent disruption of intestinal epithelial integrity, characterized by mucosal erosion, ulceration, and bleeding. This pathology correlates with an LT-dependent blockade of intestinal crypt cell proliferation, accompanied by marked apoptosis in the villus tips. C57BL/6J mice treated with intravenous LT nearly uniformly develop systemic infections with commensal enteric organisms within 72 hours of administration. LT-dependent intestinal pathology depends upon its proteolytic activity and is partially attenuated by co-administration of broad spectrum antibiotics, indicating that it is both a cause and an effect of infection. These findings indicate that targeting of MAPK signaling pathways by anthrax LT compromises the structural integrity of the mucosal layer, serving to undermine the effectiveness of the intestinal barrier. Combined with the well-described immunosuppressive effects of LT, this disruption of the intestinal barrier provides a potential mechanism for host invasion via the enteric route, a common portal of entry during the natural infection cycle of Bacillus anthracis. PMID:22438953

  9. Anthrax lethal toxin disrupts intestinal barrier function and causes systemic infections with enteric bacteria.

    PubMed

    Sun, Chen; Fang, Hui; Xie, Tao; Auth, Roger D; Patel, Nayana; Murray, Patrick R; Snoy, Philip J; Frucht, David M

    2012-01-01

    A variety of intestinal pathogens have virulence factors that target mitogen activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling pathways, including Bacillus anthracis. Anthrax lethal toxin (LT) has specific proteolytic activity against the upstream regulators of MAPKs, the MAPK kinases (MKKs). Using a murine model of intoxication, we show that LT causes the dose-dependent disruption of intestinal epithelial integrity, characterized by mucosal erosion, ulceration, and bleeding. This pathology correlates with an LT-dependent blockade of intestinal crypt cell proliferation, accompanied by marked apoptosis in the villus tips. C57BL/6J mice treated with intravenous LT nearly uniformly develop systemic infections with commensal enteric organisms within 72 hours of administration. LT-dependent intestinal pathology depends upon its proteolytic activity and is partially attenuated by co-administration of broad spectrum antibiotics, indicating that it is both a cause and an effect of infection. These findings indicate that targeting of MAPK signaling pathways by anthrax LT compromises the structural integrity of the mucosal layer, serving to undermine the effectiveness of the intestinal barrier. Combined with the well-described immunosuppressive effects of LT, this disruption of the intestinal barrier provides a potential mechanism for host invasion via the enteric route, a common portal of entry during the natural infection cycle of Bacillus anthracis. PMID:22438953

  10. Management and Outcomes of Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome Caused by Blastomycosis: A Retrospective Case Series.

    PubMed

    Schwartz, Ilan S; Embil, John M; Sharma, Atul; Goulet, Stephen; Light, R Bruce

    2016-05-01

    Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is an uncommon, highly fatal, and poorly understood manifestation of blastomycosis. Optimal management remains unknown, including the roles of adjunctive corticosteroids and extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO).We conducted a retrospective chart review of patients with ARDS caused by blastomycosis, managed in intensive care units in Manitoba, Canada, from 1992 to 2014. ARDS was defined using the Berlin definition. Corticosteroid therapy was defined as ≥150 mg cortisol equivalent in 24 hours. Logistic regression was used to identify determinants of a fatal outcome, and bootstrap resampling was used to assess sample size requirements.Forty-three patients with ARDS caused by blastomycosis were identified. ARDS was mild, moderate, and severe in 2 (5%), 12 (28%), and 29 (67%) patients, respectively. Management included amphotericin B (n = 42, 98%), vasopressors (n = 36, 84%), corticosteroids (n = 22, 51%), renal replacement (n = 13, 30%), and ECMO (n = 4, 11%). Seventeen patients (40%) died. All patients treated with ECMO survived (P = 0.14). Corticosteroids were not associated with survival benefit in univariate (P = 0.43) or multivariate analyses (odds ratio 0.52, 95% confidence interval 0.11-2.34). Bootstrap studies indicated that almost 500 patients would be needed to confirm a significant reduction in mortality from corticosteroids (type I error = 0.05, power = 80%).Blastomycosis is an uncommon, albeit important, cause of ARDS in this geographic area. Given the rarity of disease and the large cohort needed to demonstrate mortality benefit, the role of adjunctive therapies, including corticosteroids and ECMO, may remain unconfirmed, and clinical judgment should guide management decisions. PMID:27149459

  11. Emergence of colistin-resistant bacteria in humans without colistin usage: a new worry and cause for vigilance.

    PubMed

    Olaitan, Abiola Olumuyiwa; Morand, Serge; Rolain, Jean-Marc

    2016-01-01

    Colistin is currently regarded as one of the 'last-resort' antibiotics used for the treatment of critical infections caused by multidrug-resistant Gram-negative pathogens. There have been numerous reports of the emergence of colistin resistance in patients, most of whom had previously received colistin therapy or with acquisition via nosocomial transmission. However, there are also ample reports of colistin resistance in humans who have not received the drug previously or without nosocomial transmission. We have also observed a similar occurrence in our study involving colistin resistance from several countries along with a similar phenomenon being reported by researchers. The observation of colistin resistance in humans without prior colistin exposure is of particularly great clinical importance and concern because of the current importance of colistin in clinical medicine. Colistin use and colistin-resistant bacteria in animals have been recently reported, suggesting that animals could also be a source of transmission of colistin-resistant bacteria to humans. This is a real worry and calls for clinicians to be aware and vigilant of this phenomenon and of the possibility of independent resistance to colistin in some patients. PMID:26712133

  12. Sepsis From the Gut: The Enteric Habitat of Bacteria That Cause Late-Onset Neonatal Bloodstream Infections

    PubMed Central

    Carl, Mike A.; Ndao, I. Malick; Springman, A. Cody; Manning, Shannon D.; Johnson, James R.; Johnston, Brian D.; Burnham, Carey-Ann D.; Weinstock, Erica Sodergren; Weinstock, George M.; Wylie, Todd N.; Mitreva, Makedonka; Abubucker, Sahar; Zhou, Yanjiao; Stevens, Harold J.; Hall-Moore, Carla; Julian, Samuel; Shaikh, Nurmohammad; Warner, Barbara B.; Tarr, Phillip I.

    2014-01-01

    Background. Late-onset sepsis is a major problem in neonatology, but the habitat of the pathogens before bloodstream invasion occurs is not well established. Methods. We examined prospectively collected stools from premature infants with sepsis to find pathogens that subsequently invaded their bloodstreams, and sought the same organisms in stools of infants without sepsis. Culture-based techniques were used to isolate stool bacteria that provisionally matched the bloodstream organisms, which were then genome sequenced to confirm or refute commonality. Results. Of 11 children with late-onset neonatal bloodstream infections, 7 produced at least 1 stool that contained group B Streptococcus (GBS), Serratia marcescens, or Escherichia coli before their sepsis episode with provisionally matching organisms. Of 96 overlap comparison subjects without sepsis temporally associated with these cases, 4 were colonized with provisionally matching GBS or S. marcescens. Of 175 comparisons of stools from randomly selected infants without sepsis, 1 contained a GBS (this infant had also served as an overlap comparison subject and both specimens contained provisionally matching GBS). Genome sequencing confirmed common origin of provisionally matching fecal and blood isolates. The invasive E. coli were present in all presepticemic stools since birth, but gut colonization with GBS and S. marcescens occurred closer to time of bloodstream infection. Conclusions. The neonatal gut harbors sepsis-causing pathogens, but such organisms are not inevitable members of the normal microbiota. Surveillance microbiology, decolonization, and augmented hygiene might prevent dissemination of invasive bacteria between and within premature infants. PMID:24647013

  13. Antibacterial activity of silver nanoparticle-coated fabric and leather against odor and skin infection causing bacteria.

    PubMed

    Velmurugan, Palanivel; Lee, Sang-Myeong; Cho, Min; Park, Jung-Hee; Seo, Sang-Ki; Myung, Hyun; Bang, Keuk-Soo; Oh, Byung-Taek

    2014-10-01

    We present a simple, eco-friendly synthesis of silver and gold nanoparticles using a natural polymer pine gum solution as the reducing and capping agent. The pine gum solution was combined with silver nitrate (AgNO3) or a chloroauric acid (HAuCl4) solution to produce silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) and gold nanoparticles (AuNPs), respectively. The reaction process was simple; formation of the nanoparticles was achieved by autoclaving the silver and gold ions with the pine gum. UV-Vis spectra showed surface plasmon resonance (SPR) for silver and gold nanoparticles at 432 and 539 nm, respectively. The elemental forms of AgNPs and AuNPs were confirmed by energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX). Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) showed the biomolecules present in the pine gum, AgNPs, and AuNPs. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) images showed the shape and size of AgNPs and AuNPs. The crystalline nature of synthesized AgNPs and AuNPs was confirmed by X-ray crystallography [X-ray diffraction (XRD)]. Application of synthesized AgNPs onto cotton fabrics and leather, in order to evaluate their antibacterial properties against odor- or skin infection-causing bacteria, is also discussed. Among the four tested bacteria, AgNP-coated cotton fabric and leather samples displayed excellent antibacterial activity against Brevibacterium linens. PMID:25073519

  14. Antibacterial activity of leaves extracts of Trifolium alexandrinum Linn. against pathogenic bacteria causing tropical diseases

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Abdul Viqar; Ahmed, Qamar Uddin; Shukla, Indu; Khan, Athar Ali

    2012-01-01

    Objective To investigate antibacterial potential of Trifolium alexandrinum (T. alexandrinum) Linn. against seven gram positive and eleven gram negative hospital isolated human pathogenic bacterial strains responsible for many tropical diseases. Methods Non-polar and polar extracts of the leaves of T. alexandrinum i.e., hexane, dichloromethane (DCM), ethyl acetate (EtOAc), methanol (MeOH) and aqueous (AQ) extracts at five different concentrations (1, 2, 5, 10 and 15 mg/mL) were prepared to evaluate their antibacterial value. NCCL standards were strictly followed to perform antimicrobial disc susceptibility test using disc diffusion method. Results Polar extracts demonstrated significant antibacterial activity against tested pathogens. EtOAc and MeOH extracts showed maximum antibacterial activity with higher inhibition zone and were found effective against seventeen of the tested pathogens. While AQ plant extract inhibited the growth of sixteen of the test strains. EtOAc and MeOH plant extracts inhibited the growth of all seven gram positive and ten of the gram negative bacterial strains. Conclusions The present study strongly confirms the effectiveness of crude leaves extracts against tested human pathogenic bacterial strains causing several tropical diseases. Since Egyptian clover is used as a fodder plant, it could be helpful in controlling various infectious diseases associated with cattle as well. PMID:23569896

  15. Increased acute toxicity to fish caused by pharmaceuticals in hospital effluents in a pharmaceutical mixture and after solar irradiation.

    PubMed

    Li, Shih-Wei; Lin, Angela Yu-Chen

    2015-11-01

    Hospital effluents are an important source of residual drugs and other classes of pharmaceuticals in aquatic environments. The raw wastewater from the studied hospital exhibited acute toxicity to vertebrate organisms, and Cyprinus carpio was the most sensitive organism tested. A mixture of 19 commonly used pharmaceuticals caused acute toxicity to C. carpio with an LC50 value of 60.68mgL(-1) after 96h. This study demonstrated that irradiation for 1-5days significantly increased the acute toxicity of the pharmaceuticals to fish, leading to increased mortality after a 2-h exposure and approximately 40% of the surviving fish died within 28days. The pre-irradiated pharmaceutical mixture also induced strange behaviors in the fish that survived the test. The synergistic increase in toxicity caused by the photolysis and mixing of pharmaceuticals cannot be ignored and warrants further examination. PMID:26121604

  16. From the nephrologist's point of view: diversity of causes and clinical features of acute kidney injury

    PubMed Central

    Bienholz, Anja; Wilde, Benjamin; Kribben, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is a clinical syndrome with multiple entities. Although AKI implies renal damage, functional impairment or both, diagnosis is solely based on the functional parameters of serum creatinine and urine output. The latest definition was provided by the Kidney Disease Improving Global Outcomes (KDIGO) working group in 2012. Independent of the underlying disease, and even in the case of full recovery, AKI is associated with an increased morbidity and mortality. Awareness of the patient's individual risk profile and the diversity of causes and clinical features of AKI is pivotal for optimization of prophylaxes, diagnosis and therapy of each form of AKI. A differentiated and individualized approach is required to improve patient mortality, morbidity, long-term kidney function and eventually the quality of life. In this review, we provide an overview of the different clinical settings in which specific forms of AKI may occur and point out possible diagnostic as well as therapeutic approaches. Secifically AKI is discussed in the context of non-kidney organ failure, organ transplantation, sepsis, malignancy and autoimmune disease. PMID:26251707

  17. An autopsy case of cardiac tamponade caused by a ruptured ventricular aneurysm associated with acute myocarditis.

    PubMed

    Kondo, Takeshi; Nagasaki, Yasushi; Takahashi, Motonori; Nakagawa, Kanako; Kuse, Azumi; Morichika, Mai; Sakurada, Makoto; Asano, Migiwa; Ueno, Yasuhiro

    2016-01-01

    We report an autopsy case of hemopericardium caused by rupture of a ventricular aneurysm associated with acute myocarditis in an infant boy aged 2 years and 10 months. Three days before his death, the patient developed fever. On the day of death, he described an urge to defecate and attempted to do so in an upright position. While straining to defecate without success for a prolonged period, he stopped breathing and collapsed. On autopsy, his heart weighed 91.7 g and cardiac tamponade was evident, the pericardial cavity being filled with 140 mL of blood that had come from a 1.5-cm-long rupture in a 2.7×1.5 cm ventricular aneurysm in the posterior left ventricular wall. Patchy grayish-white discoloration was noted in the myocardium. Histologically, CD3-positive T lymphocytic infiltration accompanied by pronounced macrophage infiltration was observed in the myocardium. Hemorrhagic necrosis was detected in the area of the ventricular aneurysm. Staining for matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) expression revealed abundant MMP-2, MMP-7, and MMP-9. Polymerase chain reaction to detect viruses failed to identify any specific causative viruses in the myocardium. In this case of lymphocytic (viral) and histiocytic myocarditis with pronounced macrophage infiltration and upregulation of MMP expression, myocardial remodeling and associated wall weakening had resulted in formation and rupture of an aneurysm. PMID:26832375

  18. Spontaneous recovery of cochlear fibrocytes after severe degeneration caused by acute energy failure.

    PubMed

    Mizutari, Kunio

    2014-01-01

    Cochlear fibrocytes in the lateral wall region play a critical role in the regulation of inner ear ion and fluid homeostasis, although these are non-sensory cells. Along with other non-sensory cells, fibrocytes in the spiral ligament have been reported to repopulate themselves after damage. However, the studies of regeneration of cochlear fibrocytes have been difficult because a suitable fibrocyte-specific degeneration model did not exist. Therefore, we analyzed cochlear fibrocytes using a rat model of acute cochlear energy failure induced by a mitochondrial toxin. This model is unique because hearing loss is caused by apoptosis of fibrocytes in the cochlear lateral wall not by damage to sensory cells. Although this model involves severe damage to the cochlear lateral wall, delayed spontaneous regeneration occurs without any treatment. Moreover, partial hearing recovery is accompanied by morphological remodeling of the cochlear lateral wall. Two hypotheses are conceivable regarding this spontaneous recovery of cochlear fibrocytes. One is that residual cochlear fibrocytes proliferate spontaneously, followed by remodeling of the functional region of the lateral wall. Another is that some foreign cells such as bone marrow-derived cells promote morphological and functional recovery of the lateral wall. Acceleration of the lateral wall recovery promoted by these mechanisms may be a new therapeutic strategy against hearing loss. PMID:25206337

  19. NPMc+ cooperates with Flt3/ITD mutations to cause acute leukemia recapitulating human disease

    PubMed Central

    Rau, Rachel; Magoon, Daniel; Greenblatt, Sarah; Li, Li; Annesley, Colleen; Duffield, Amy S.; Huso, David; McIntyre, Emily; Clohessy, John G.; Reschke, Markus; Pandolfi, Pier Paolo; Small, Donald; Brown, Patrick

    2013-01-01

    Cytoplasmic nucleophosmin (NPMc+) mutations and FMS-like tyrosine kinase 3 (FLT3) internal tandem duplication (ITD) mutations are two of the most common known molecular alterations in acute myeloid leukemia (AML), and they frequently occur together suggesting cooperative leukemogenesis. To explore the specific relationship between NPMc+ and FLT3/ITD in vivo, we crossed Flt3/ITD knock-in mice with transgenic NPMc+ mice. Mice with both mutations develop a transplantable leukemia of either myeloid or lymphoid lineage, definitively demonstrating cooperation between Flt3/ITD and NPMc+. In mice with myeloid leukemia, functionally significant loss of heterozygosity of the wild-type Flt3 allele is common, similar to what is observed in human FLT3/ITD+ AML, providing further in vivo evidence of the importance of loss of wild-type FLT3 in leukemic initiation and progression. Additionally, in vitro clonogenic assays reveal that the combination of Flt3/ITD and NPMc+ mutations causes a profound monocytic expansion, in excess of that seen with either mutation alone consistent with the predominance of myelomonocytic phenotype in human FLT3/ITD+/NPMc+ AML. This in vivo model of Flt3/ITD+/NPMc+ leukemia closely recapitulates human disease and will therefore serve as a tool for the investigation of the biology of this common disease entity. PMID:24184354

  20. Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome Caused by Influenza B Virus Infection in a Patient with Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Ñamendys-Silva, Silvio A.; González-Herrera, María O.; Texcocano-Becerra, Julia; Herrera-Gómez, Angel

    2011-01-01

    Influenza B virus infections are less common than infections caused by influenza A virus in critically ill patients, but similar mortality rates have been observed for both influenza types. Pneumonia caused by influenza B virus is uncommon and has been reported in pediatric patients and previously healthy adults. Critically ill patients with pneumonia caused by influenza virus may develop acute respiratory distress syndrome. We describe the clinical course of a critically ill patient with diffuse large B-cell lymphoma nongerminal center B-cell phenotype who developed acute respiratory distress syndrome caused by influenza B virus infection. This paper emphasizes the need to suspect influenza B virus infection in critically ill immunocompromised patients with progressive deterioration of cardiopulmonary function despite treatment with antibiotics. Early initiation of neuraminidase inhibitor and the implementation of guidelines for management of severe sepsis and septic shock should be considered. PMID:22110513

  1. Acute ocular injuries caused by 60-Ghz millimeter-wave exposure.

    PubMed

    Kojima, Masami; Hanazawa, Masahiro; Yamashiro, Yoko; Sasaki, Hiroshi; Watanabe, Soichi; Taki, Masao; Suzuki, Yukihisa; Hirata, Akimasa; Kamimura, Yoshitsugu; Sasaki, Kazuyuki

    2009-09-01

    The goal of this study was to examine the clinical course of 60-GHz millimeter-wave induced damages to the rabbit eye and to report experimental conditions that allow reproducible induction of these injuries. The eyes of pigmented rabbits (total number was 40) were irradiated with 60-GHz millimeter-waves using either a horn antenna or one of two lens antennas (6 and 9 mm diameter; phi6, phi9) Morphological changes were assessed by slit-lamp microscopy. Additional assessments included corneal fluorescein staining, iris fluorescein angiography, and lens epithelium light microscopy. Under the standardized eye-antenna positioning, the three antennas caused varying damages to the eyelids or eyeglobes. The most reproducible injuries without concurrent eyelid edema and corneal desiccation were achieved using the phi6 lens antenna: irradiation for 6 min led to an elevation of the corneal surface temperature (reaching 54.2 +/- 0.9 degrees C) plus corneal edema and epithelial cell loss. Furthermore, mitotic cells appeared in the pupillary area of the lens epithelium. Anterior uveitis also occurred resulting in acute miosis (from 6.6 +/- 1.4 to 2.2 +/- 1.4 mm), an increase in flares (from 6.7 +/- 0.9 to 334.3 +/- 130.8 photons per second), and iris vasodilation or vessel leakage. These findings indicate that the three types of millimeter-wave antennas can cause thermal injuries of varying types and levels. The thermal effects induced by millimeter-waves can apparently penetrate below the surface of the eye. PMID:19667804

  2. Acute Bronchitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... of bronchitis: acute and chronic. Most cases of acute bronchitis get better within several days. But your cough ... that cause colds and the flu often cause acute bronchitis. These viruses spread through the air when people ...

  3. Cannabinoid HU210 protects isolated rat stomach against impairment caused by serum of rats with experimental acute pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Cao, Ming-hua; Li, Yong-yu; Xu, Jing; Feng, Ya-jing; Lin, Xu-hong; Li, Kun; Han, Tong; Chen, Chang-jie

    2012-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis (AP), especially severe acute pancreatitis often causes extra-pancreatic complications, such as acute gastrointestinal mucosal lesion (AGML) which is accompanied by a considerably high mortality, yet the pathogenesis of AP-induced AGML is still not fully understood. In this report, we investigated the alterations of serum components and gastric endocrine and exocrine functions in rats with experimental acute pancreatitis, and studied the possible contributions of these alterations in the pathogenesis of AGML. In addition, we explored the intervention effects of cannabinoid receptor agonist HU210 and antagonist AM251 on isolated and serum-perfused rat stomach. Our results showed that the AGML occurred after 5 h of AP replication, and the body homeostasis was disturbed in AP rat, with increased levels of pancreatic enzymes, lipopolysaccharide (LPS), proinflammtory cytokines and chemokines in the blood, and an imbalance of the gastric secretion function. Perfusing the isolated rat stomach with the AP rat serum caused morphological changes in the stomach, accompanied with a significant increment of pepsin and [H+] release, and increased gastrin and decreased somatostatin secretion. HU210 reversed the AP-serum-induced rat pathological alterations, including the reversal of transformation of the gastric morphology to certain degree. The results from this study prove that the inflammatory responses and the imbalance of the gastric secretion during the development of AP are responsible for the pathogenesis of AGML, and suggest the therapeutic potential of HU210 for AGML associated with acute pancreatitis. PMID:23285225

  4. [Acute encephalopathy caused by cyanogenic fungi in 2004, and magic mushroom regulation in Japan].

    PubMed

    Gonmori, Kunio; Yokoyama, Kazumasa

    2009-03-01

    Two topics, related to mushroom poisoning of recent interest in Japan, have been presented. In autumn 2004, 59 cases of acute encephalopathy were reported across 9 prefectures in Japan (24 from Akita Prefecture with 8 deaths; age 48-93, average 70; female 14, male 10). Of 24 cases, 20 had kidney dysfunction. Four poisoned subjects showed no kidney trouble. Of the 24 poisoning cases, 23 people ate Pleurocybella porrigens, and one ate Grifola frondosa. The latter subject (female, late 40's) was receiving dialysis for more than 35 years. In August, she felt dizziness, headache and tinnitus. She visited hospital and asked to stay there. In the hospital she ate 5g of stewed G. frondosa and 10g of the same fungus boiled with chicken and taro on different days. Fourteen to 18 days after the eatings, she developed cramps and lost consciousness, and fell into a coma. Her cramp and coma continued for about 10 days almost until her death. Her symptoms caused by G. frondosa were similar to those observed for the above 23 cases of P. porrigens ingestion. Therefore, we concluded that encephalopathy experienced in Akita Prefecture caused by was the cyanogenic fungi such as P. porrigens , G. frondosa, Pleurotus eringii etc. Although the amounts of mushrooms eaten by poisoned subjects were not so clear, we estimated that the amounts of hydrogen cyanide (HCN) taken into human bodies exceeded the detoxication limit of HCN, resulting in HCN poisoning. However, it has not been proved that the encephalopathy is directly or indirectly caused by the HCN poisoning. Many typhoons came across Japan and landed 10 times in 2004, and mushroom size was larger than usual one, and HCN contents in fruit-bodies seemed to be increased especially in the late-stage of their growth. Thirteen species of magic mushrooms were prohibited by the law from 2002 in Japan. They include Copelandia (Panaeolus) cyanescens, Panaeolus papilionaceus, Panaeolus sphinctrinus, Panaeolus subbalteatus, Psilocybe argentipes, Psilocybe cubensis, Psilocybe fasciata, Psilocybe lonchophorus, Psilocybe subaeruginascens, Psilocybe subcaerulipes, Psilocybe subcubensis, Psilocybe tampanensis, and Psilocybe venenata. PMID:19344063

  5. Acute nontraumatic splenic infarctions at a tertiary-care center: causes and predisposing factors in 123 patients.

    PubMed

    Cox, Mougnyan; Li, Zhenteng; Desai, Vishal; Brown, Lauren; Deshmukh, Sandeep; Roth, Christopher G; Needleman, Laurence

    2016-04-01

    Acute splenic infarcts classically present with left upper quadrant pain, but may be discovered incidentally in many hospitalized patients with otherwise vague complaints. The purpose of our study was to document causes or predisposing conditions in patients found to have acute splenic infarctions on imaging. Following IRB approval, a retrospective review of an imaging database from May 2008 to May 2015 was performed for cases of acute splenic infarctions. The electronic medical record was then reviewed for potential predisposing factors or known causes. Specific note was made of cases with active malignancy, vascular disorders, or inflammatory conditions with an increased risk of vasculopathy. Echocardiogram and electrocardiogram results were reviewed when available. One hundred twenty-three patients with acute splenic infarcts were identified, 65 female and 58 male. The average age was 57 years (range of 22 to 88). Active malignancy was present in 40 patients or 33 %. The most common malignancy in patient with nontraumatic splenic infarctions was pancreatic cancer, present in 16 patients (13 %). In these patients, splenic infarction was due to direct invasion of vessels in the splenic hilum. Acute pancreatitis (severe) was directly responsible for splenic infarction in seven additional cases (6 %). Additional visceral infarcts were present in 18 patients (15 %), most commonly concomitant hepatic or renal infarcts. Documented atrial fibrillation was present in 12 patients, but only 2 cases of left-sided cardiac thrombi were seen on CT (1 atrial, and 1 ventricular thrombus). Eight cases of endocarditis with valvular vegetations were documented on echocardiography (7 %). Splenomegaly was present in 32 patients (26 %) with acute splenic infarction. In patients with nontraumatic splenic infarctions, there appears to be a relatively high association with active malignancy (up to a third of patients). Pancreatic disorders, malignant and inflammatory, also appear to be an important cause of splenic infarction, presumably due to the close proximity of the pancreas to the splenic vessels. PMID:26797023

  6. Acute intermittent porphyria causes hepatic mitochondrial energetic failure in a mouse model.

    PubMed

    Homedan, Chadi; Laafi, Jihane; Schmitt, Caroline; Gueguen, Naïg; Lefebvre, Thibaud; Karim, Zoubida; Desquiret-Dumas, Valérie; Wetterwald, Céline; Deybach, Jean-Charles; Gouya, Laurent; Puy, Hervé; Reynier, Pascal; Malthièry, Yves

    2014-06-01

    Acute intermittent porphyria (AIP), an inherited hepatic disorder, is due to a defect of hydroxymethylbilane synthase (HMBS), an enzyme involved in heme biosynthesis. AIP is characterized by recurrent, life-threatening attacks at least partly due to the increased hepatic production of 5-aminolaevulinic acid (ALA). Both the mitochondrial enzyme, ALA synthase (ALAS) 1, involved in the first step of heme biosynthesis, which is closely linked to mitochondrial bioenergetic pathways, and the promise of an ALAS1 siRNA hepatic therapy in humans, led us to investigate hepatic energetic metabolism in Hmbs KO mice treated with phenobarbital. The mitochondrial respiratory chain (RC) and the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle were explored in the Hmbs(-/-) mouse model. RC and TCA cycle were significantly affected in comparison to controls in mice treated with phenobarbital with decreased activities of RC complexes I (-52%, (**)p<0.01), II (-50%, (**)p<0.01) and III (-55%, (*)p<0.05), and decreased activity of α-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase (-64%, (*)p<0.05), citrate synthase (-48%, (**)p<0.01) and succinate dehydrogenase (-53%, (*)p<0.05). Complex II-driven succinate respiration was also significantly affected. Most of these metabolic alterations were at least partially restored after the phenobarbital arrest and heme arginate administration. These results suggest a cataplerosis of the TCA cycle induced by phenobarbital, caused by the massive withdrawal of succinyl-CoA by ALAS induction, such that the TCA cycle is unable to supply the reduced cofactors to the RC. This profound and reversible impact of AIP on mitochondrial energetic metabolism offers new insights into the beneficial effect of heme, glucose and ALAS1 siRNA treatments by limiting the cataplerosis of TCA cycle. PMID:24727425

  7. Intrathecal Clonidine Pump Failure Causing Acute Withdrawal Syndrome With 'Stress-Induced' Cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hwee Min D; Ruggoo, Varuna; Graudins, Andis

    2016-03-01

    Clonidine is a central alpha(2)-agonist antihypertensive used widely for opioid/alcohol withdrawal, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder and chronic pain management. We describe a case of clonidine withdrawal causing life-threatening hypertensive crisis and stress-induced cardiomyopathy. A 47-year-old man with chronic back pain, treated with clonidine for many years via intrathecal pump (550 mcg/24 h), presented following a collapse and complaining of sudden worsening of back pain, severe headache, diaphoresis, nausea and vomiting. A few hours prior to presentation, his subcutaneous pump malfunctioned. On presentation, vital signs included pulse 100 bpm, BP 176/103 mmHg, temperature 37.8 °C and O2 saturation 100 % (room air). Acute clonidine withdrawal with hypertensive crisis was suspected. Intravenous clonidine loading dose and a 50 mcg/h infusion were commenced. Five hours later, severe chest pain, dyspnoea, tachycardia, hypoxia, with BP 180/120 mmHg and pulmonary edema ensued. ECG showed sinus tachycardia with no ST elevation. Repeated intravenous clonidine doses were given (25 mcg every 5-10 min), with ongoing clonidine infusion to control blood pressure. Glyceryl trinitrate infusion, positive pressure ventilation and intravenous benzodiazepines were added. Bedside echocardiogram showed stress-induced cardiomyopathy pattern. Serum troponin-I was markedly elevated. His coronary angiography showed minor irregularities in the major vessels. Over the next 3 days in the ICU, drug infusions were weaned. Discharge was 12 days later on oral clonidine, metoprolol, perindopril, aspirin and oxycodone-SR. Two months later, his echocardiogram was normal. The intrathecal pump was removed. We report a case of stress-induced cardiomyopathy resulting from the sudden cessation of long-term intrathecal clonidine. This was managed by re-institution of clonidine and targeted organ-specific therapies. PMID:26370679

  8. Global Metabolomic Profiling of Acute Myocarditis Caused by Trypanosoma cruzi Infection

    PubMed Central

    Gironès, Núria; Carbajosa, Sofía; Guerrero, Néstor A.; Poveda, Cristina; Chillón-Marinas, Carlos; Fresno, Manuel

    2014-01-01

    Chagas disease is caused by Trypanosoma cruzi infection, being cardiomyopathy the more frequent manifestation. New chemotherapeutic drugs are needed but there are no good biomarkers for monitoring treatment efficacy. There is growing evidence linking immune response and metabolism in inflammatory processes and specifically in Chagas disease. Thus, some metabolites are able to enhance and/or inhibit the immune response. Metabolite levels found in the host during an ongoing infection could provide valuable information on the pathogenesis and/or identify deregulated metabolic pathway that can be potential candidates for treatment and being potential specific biomarkers of the disease. To gain more insight into those aspects in Chagas disease, we performed an unprecedented metabolomic analysis in heart and plasma of mice infected with T. cruzi. Many metabolic pathways were profoundly affected by T. cruzi infection, such as glucose uptake, sorbitol pathway, fatty acid and phospholipid synthesis that were increased in heart tissue but decreased in plasma. Tricarboxylic acid cycle was decreased in heart tissue and plasma whereas reactive oxygen species production and uric acid formation were also deeply increased in infected hearts suggesting a stressful condition in the heart. While specific metabolites allantoin, kynurenine and p-cresol sulfate, resulting from nucleotide, tryptophan and phenylalanine/tyrosine metabolism, respectively, were increased in heart tissue and also in plasma. These results provide new valuable information on the pathogenesis of acute Chagas disease, unravel several new metabolic pathways susceptible of clinical management and identify metabolites useful as potential specific biomarkers for monitoring treatment and clinical severity in patients. PMID:25412247

  9. Ethanol Potentiates the Acute Fatty Infiltration of Liver Caused by Burn Injury: Prevention by Insulin Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Emanuele, Nicholas V.; Emanuele, Mary Ann; Morgan, Michelle O.; Sulo, Denise; Yong, Sheri; Kovacs, Elizabeth J.; Himes, Ryan D.; Callaci, John J.

    2011-01-01

    Burn injury is a significant and severe representation of critical illness. Nearly, 50% of patients admitted to hospitals for burn injuries have detectable levels of ethanol in their circulations and these patients have poorer clinical outcomes than burned individuals without measurable circulating ethanol. We report here data on a clinically relevant form of hepatic injury, the development of microvesicular steatosis, in a murine model wherein animals were either given ethanol or saline, and were subjected to burn or sham injury. Because better glycemic control with insulin has been shown in clinical studies to impart major clinical benefit, an additional group of burn ethanol animals were treated with insulin. Insulin significantly reduced blood glucose in injured animals to levels no different from those seen in animals that were neither ethanol exposed nor burned. A single intraperitoneal injection of ethanol was insufficient to raise blood alanine aminotransferase (ALT), measured as an index of liver injury. However, burn injury led to significant increases in ALT at 24 and 48 hours, which had returned to preinjury levels by 7 days. This ALT rise was completely prevented with insulin treatment. A single injection of ethanol did not evoke increased microvesicular steatosis but did potentiate the ability of burn to do so at 24 hours after injury. The burn induced increase in microvesicular steatosis was also seen at 48 hours, but had subsided by 7 days. The increased microvesicular steatosis was prevented by insulin therapy. Thus, ethanol potentiates the ability of burn to cause acute liver injury, which is completely preventable by insulin therapy. These findings may have substantial clinical significance and suggest this model may be useful for the study of the mechanisms of hepatic injury as well as the mechanisms, probably multiple, of insulin action in this setting. PMID:19349879

  10. Global metabolomic profiling of acute myocarditis caused by Trypanosoma cruzi infection.

    PubMed

    Gironès, Núria; Carbajosa, Sofía; Guerrero, Néstor A; Poveda, Cristina; Chillón-Marinas, Carlos; Fresno, Manuel

    2014-11-01

    Chagas disease is caused by Trypanosoma cruzi infection, being cardiomyopathy the more frequent manifestation. New chemotherapeutic drugs are needed but there are no good biomarkers for monitoring treatment efficacy. There is growing evidence linking immune response and metabolism in inflammatory processes and specifically in Chagas disease. Thus, some metabolites are able to enhance and/or inhibit the immune response. Metabolite levels found in the host during an ongoing infection could provide valuable information on the pathogenesis and/or identify deregulated metabolic pathway that can be potential candidates for treatment and being potential specific biomarkers of the disease. To gain more insight into those aspects in Chagas disease, we performed an unprecedented metabolomic analysis in heart and plasma of mice infected with T. cruzi. Many metabolic pathways were profoundly affected by T. cruzi infection, such as glucose uptake, sorbitol pathway, fatty acid and phospholipid synthesis that were increased in heart tissue but decreased in plasma. Tricarboxylic acid cycle was decreased in heart tissue and plasma whereas reactive oxygen species production and uric acid formation were also deeply increased in infected hearts suggesting a stressful condition in the heart. While specific metabolites allantoin, kynurenine and p-cresol sulfate, resulting from nucleotide, tryptophan and phenylalanine/tyrosine metabolism, respectively, were increased in heart tissue and also in plasma. These results provide new valuable information on the pathogenesis of acute Chagas disease, unravel several new metabolic pathways susceptible of clinical management and identify metabolites useful as potential specific biomarkers for monitoring treatment and clinical severity in patients. PMID:25412247

  11. Safety of immediate endoscopic sphincterotomy in acute suppurative cholangitis caused by choledocholithiasis

    PubMed Central

    Ito, Tomoyasu; Sai, Jin Kan; Okubo, Hironao; Saito, Hiroaki; Ishii, Shigeto; Kanazawa, Ryo; Tomishima, Ko; Watanabe, Sumio; Shiina, Shuichiro

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To examine the safety of immediate endoscopic sphincterotomy (EST) in patients with acute suppurative cholangitis (ASC) caused by choledocholithiasis, as compared with elective EST. METHODS: Patients with ASC due to choledocholithiasis were allocated to two groups: Those who underwent EST immediately and those who underwent EBD followed by EST 1 wk later because they were under anticoagulant therapy, had a coagulopathy (international normalized ratio > 1.3, partial thromboplastin time greater than twice that of control), or had a platelet count < 50000 × 103/μL. One of four trainees [200-400 cases of endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP)] supervised by a specialist (> 10000 cases of ERCP) performed the procedures. The success and complication rates associated with EST in each group were examined. RESULTS: Of the 87 patients with ASC, 59 were in the immediate EST group and 28 in the elective EST group. EST was successful in all patients in both groups. There were no complications associated with EST in either group of patients, although white blood cell count, C-reactive protein, total bilirubin, and serum concentrations of liver enzymes just before EST were significantly higher in the immediate EST group than in the elective EST group. CONCLUSION: Immediate EST can be as safe as elective EST for patients with ASC associated with choledocholithiasis provided they are not under anticoagulant therapy, or do not have a coagulopathy or a platelet count < 50000 × 103/μL. Moreover, the procedure was safely performed by a trainee under the supervision of an experienced specialist. PMID:26862368

  12. Successful treatment of acute, severe aortic regurgitation caused by Takayasu's arteritis: a case report.

    PubMed

    Nakano, T; Isaka, N; Takezawa, H; Kusagawa, M

    1986-07-01

    Acute, severe aortic regurgitation due to dilatation of the aortic root was studied in a 16-year-old Japanese female with Takayasu's arteritis. The patient was admitted because of acute pulmonary edema followed by systemic illness characterized by fever, anorexia, and general fatigue. The echocardiogram and aortogram demonstrated acute, severe aortic regurgitation due to dilation of the aortic root. She was successfully treated with aortic valve replacement and steroid. Microscopic examination of the aortic wall demonstrated granulomatous lesions with multinucleated giant cells. Now, three years later, she remains asymptomatic and hemodynamically stable. PMID:2873765

  13. Pseudogout: A Rare Cause of Acute Arthritis Following Arthroscopic Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Zaman, Mahvash; Sabir, Numaera; Charalambous, Charalambos P.

    2015-01-01

    We report a case of an acute pseudogout attack following single-bundle anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction in a 35-year-old man. At the initial reconstruction surgery, he was found to have early degenerative changes mainly in the lateral compartment. He presented with acute onset pain and swelling following reconstruction of the ACL. Arthroscopic irrigation was performed and the synovial fluid was positive for calcium pyrophosphate crystals. A pseudogout attack must be considered in the differential diagnosis in cases of acute onset pain and swelling after arthroscopic surgery, especially with the background of degenerative knee changes, and this may signify a poorer long-term outcome. PMID:26389074

  14. Pseudogout: A Rare Cause of Acute Arthritis Following Arthroscopic Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Zaman, Mahvash; Sabir, Numaera; Mills, Simon Peter; Charalambous, Charalambos P

    2015-09-01

    We report a case of an acute pseudogout attack following single-bundle anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction in a 35-year-old man. At the initial reconstruction surgery, he was found to have early degenerative changes mainly in the lateral compartment. He presented with acute onset pain and swelling following reconstruction of the ACL. Arthroscopic irrigation was performed and the synovial fluid was positive for calcium pyrophosphate crystals. A pseudogout attack must be considered in the differential diagnosis in cases of acute onset pain and swelling after arthroscopic surgery, especially with the background of degenerative knee changes, and this may signify a poorer long-term outcome. PMID:26389074

  15. An unexpected cause of an acute hypersensitivity reaction during recovery from anaesthesia.

    PubMed

    Thong, C L; Lambros, M; Stewart, M G; Kam, P C A

    2005-08-01

    Acute hypersensitivity reactions to chlorhexidine in the operating room are probably more likely to occur during the early phases of anaesthesia because chlorhexidine is often used for cleaning the surgical field or during placement of indwelling catheters. We report a case of an acute hypersensitivity reaction that occurred in the post anaesthetic care unit. Subsequent skin testing suggested sensitivity to chlorhexidine, which had been applied over the vaginal mucosa at the end of surgery. Relevant issues in the investigation of acute hypersensitivity reactions in the post anaesthetic period are discussed. PMID:16119497

  16. Acute intermittent porphyria caused by novel mutation in HMBS gene, misdiagnosed as cholecystitis

    PubMed Central

    Alfadhel, Majid; Saleh, Neam; Alenazi, Helal; Baffoe-Bonnie, Henry

    2014-01-01

    Background Acute intermittent porphyria (AIP) is an autosomal dominant neurovisceral inherited disorder due to a defect in the heme biosynthesis pathway. Misdiagnosis of the porphyrias is not uncommon. Case report We present a case of a 26-year-old female with suspected acute cholecystitis, mental status changes, and seizures. Biochemical and molecular investigations confirmed the diagnosis of AIP by findings of elevated urinary porphobilinogen, 5-aminolevulinic acid, and total porphyrins. DNA molecular testing showed a novel heterozygous mutation (c. 760delC p.L254X) in the exon11 of the HMBS gene. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of a misdiagnosis of AIP presenting with acute cholecystitis. Conclusion Clinicians are alerted to consider the possibility of AIP in an adult presenting with an acute abdomen, features of cholecystitis, and neuropsychiatric manifestations. PMID:25419136

  17. Acute isoniazid intoxication: an uncommon cause of convulsion, coma and acidosis.

    PubMed

    Uzman, Sinan; Uludağ Yanaral, Tümay; Toptaş, Mehmet; Koç, Alparslan; Taş, Aytül; Bican, Gülşen

    2013-01-01

    Despite the widespread use, suicidal ingestion of isoniazid is a rare condition in Turkey. We reported a case of acute isoniazid intoxication associated with alcohol intake presenting with convulsion, coma and metabolic acidosis. The patient was treated successfully with intravenous pyridoxine administration. Early recognation and appropriate treatment in the intensive care unit is very important to prevent mortality in patients with acute isoniazid toxicity. PMID:23581267

  18. Venomous bites to the external genitalia: an unusual cause of acute scrotum.

    PubMed

    Moran, M E; Ehreth, J T; Drach, G W

    1992-04-01

    The acute scrotum generates a long list of differential diagnoses. An unusual etiology includes insect envenomation, which typically is an acute process with rapid onset of symptomatologies. Two patients with genital envenomation are reported. We review the reported cases at our institution with all types of bites and stings. Symptoms of pain and pruritus, and signs of ecchymosis and edema preceding exfoliating dermatitis were evident in both cases. Mild analgesics and antihistamines promoted resolution in each instance. PMID:1552590

  19. Acute infarcts cause focal thinning in remote cortex via degeneration of connecting fiber tracts

    PubMed Central

    Duering, Marco; Righart, Ruthger; Wollenweber, Frank Arne; Zietemann, Vera; Gesierich, Benno

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To study remote effects distant from acute ischemic infarcts by measuring longitudinal changes of cortical thickness in connected brain regions as well as changes in microstructural integrity in connecting fiber tracts. Methods: Thirty-two patients (mean age 71 years) underwent a standardized protocol including multimodal MRI and clinical assessment both at stroke onset and 6 months after the event. Cortex connected to acute infarcts was identified by probabilistic diffusion tensor tractography starting from the acute lesion. Changes of cortical thickness were measured using the longitudinal stream of FreeSurfer. Microstructural damage in white matter tracts was assessed by changes of mean diffusivity. Results: We found focal cortical thinning specifically in areas connected to acute infarcts (p < 0.001). Thinning was more pronounced in regions showing a high probability of connectivity to infarcts. Microstructural damage in white matter tracts connecting acute infarcts with distant cortex significantly correlated with thickness changes in that region (? = ?0.39, p = 0.028). There was no indication of an influence of cavitation status or infarct etiology on the observed changes in cortex and white matter. Conclusions: These findings identify secondary degeneration of connected white matter tracts and remote cortex as key features of acute ischemic infarcts. Our observations may have implications for the understanding of structural and functional reorganization after stroke. PMID:25809303

  20. Soft tissue infections caused by spore-forming bacteria in injecting drug users in the United Kingdom.

    PubMed Central

    Brett, M. M.; Hood, J.; Brazier, J. S.; Duerden, B. I.; Hahné, S. J. M.

    2005-01-01

    From 2000 to May 2004 there has been a marked increase in illness resulting from spore-forming bacteria in injecting heroin users in the United Kingdom. Clostridium novyi caused 63 cases of severe illness in 2000 and seven further cases from 2001. Wound botulism first occurred in 2000 (six cases) with 51 further cases to March 2004. Tetanus occurred in 20 cases between late 2003 and March 2004. Infections with C. histolyticum (nine cases), C. sordellii (one case) and Bacillus cereus (one case) were also reported. The reasons for the increase in illness are unclear. The major risk factor was skin- or muscle-popping. The problem appears to be here to stay. This review describes the causative organisms, pathogenesis, clinical presentation, epidemiology and treatment of cases. Clinical vigilance and a high standard of anaerobic microbiology are essential. Clinicians and laboratories must report such cases (or likely cases) rapidly so that clusters can be rapidly identified, in order to control disease. Prevention relies on tetanus immunization. PMID:16050501

  1. Endogenous Stress Caused by Faulty Oxidation Reactions Fosters Evolution of 2,4-Dinitrotoluene-Degrading Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Chavarría, Max; de Lorenzo, Víctor

    2013-01-01

    Environmental strain Burkholderia sp. DNT mineralizes the xenobiotic compound 2,4-dinitrotoluene (DNT) owing to the catabolic dnt genes borne by plasmid DNT, but the process fails to promote significant growth. To investigate this lack of physiological return of such an otherwise complete metabolic route, cells were exposed to DNT under various growth conditions and the endogenous formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) monitored in single bacteria. These tests revealed the buildup of a strong oxidative stress in the population exposed to DNT. By either curing the DNT plasmid or by overproducing the second activity of the biodegradation route (DntB) we could trace a large share of ROS production to the first reaction of the route, which is executed by the multicomponent dioxygenase encoded by the dntA gene cluster. Naphthalene, the ancestral substrate of the dioxygenase from which DntA has evolved, also caused significant ROS formation. That both the old and the new substrate brought about a considerable cellular stress was indicative of a still-evolving DntA enzyme which is neither optimal any longer for naphthalene nor entirely advantageous yet for growth of the host strain on DNT. We could associate endogenous production of ROS with likely error-prone repair mechanisms of DNA damage, and the ensuing stress-induced mutagenesis in cells exposed to DNT. It is thus plausible that the evolutionary roadmap for biodegradation of xenobiotic compounds like DNT was largely elicited by mutagenic oxidative stress caused by faulty reactions of precursor enzymes with novel but structurally related substrates-to-be. PMID:24009532

  2. Ureases display biological effects independent of enzymatic activity: is there a connection to diseases caused by urease-producing bacteria?

    PubMed

    Olivera-Severo, D; Wassermann, G E; Carlini, C R

    2006-07-01

    Ureases are enzymes from plants, fungi and bacteria that catalyze the hydrolysis of urea to form ammonia and carbon dioxide. While fungal and plant ureases are homo-oligomers of 90-kDa subunits, bacterial ureases are multimers of two or three subunit complexes. We showed that some isoforms of jack bean urease, canatoxin and the classical urease, bind to glycoconjugates and induce platelet aggregation. Canatoxin also promotes release of histamine from mast cells, insulin from pancreatic cells and neurotransmitters from brain synaptosomes. In vivo it induces rat paw edema and neutrophil chemotaxis. These effects are independent of ureolytic activity and require activation of eicosanoid metabolism and calcium channels. Helicobacter pylori, a Gram-negative bacterium that colonizes the human stomach mucosa, causes gastric ulcers and cancer by a mechanism that is not understood. H. pylori produces factors that damage gastric epithelial cells, such as the vacuolating cytotoxin VacA, the cytotoxin-associated protein CagA, and a urease (up to 10% of bacterial protein) that neutralizes the acidic medium permitting its survival in the stomach. H. pylori whole cells or extracts of its water-soluble proteins promote inflammation, activate neutrophils and induce the release of cytokines. In this paper we review data from the literature suggesting that H. pylori urease displays many of the biological activities observed for jack bean ureases and show that bacterial ureases have a secretagogue effect modulated by eicosanoid metabolites through lipoxygenase pathways. These findings could be relevant to the elucidation of the role of urease in the pathogenesis of the gastrointestinal disease caused by H. pylori. PMID:16862275

  3. Dengue and Other Common Causes of Acute Febrile Illness in Asia: An Active Surveillance Study in Children

    PubMed Central

    Capeding, Maria Rosario; Chua, Mary Noreen; Hadinegoro, Sri Rezeki; Hussain, Ismail I. H. M.; Nallusamy, Revathy; Pitisuttithum, Punnee; Rusmil, Kusnandi; Thisyakorn, Usa; Thomas, Stephen J.; Huu Tran, Ngoc; Wirawan, Dewa Nyoman; Yoon, In-Kyu; Bouckenooghe, Alain; Hutagalung, Yanee; Laot, Thelma; Wartel, Tram Anh

    2013-01-01

    Background Common causes of acute febrile illness in tropical countries have similar symptoms, which often mimic those of dengue. Accurate clinical diagnosis can be difficult without laboratory confirmation and disease burden is generally under-reported. Accurate, population-based, laboratory-confirmed incidence data on dengue and other causes of acute fever in dengue-endemic Asian countries are needed. Methods and principal findings This prospective, multicenter, active fever surveillance, cohort study was conducted in selected centers in Indonesia, Malaysia, Philippines, Thailand and Vietnam to determine the incidence density of acute febrile episodes (≥38°C for ≥2 days) in 1,500 healthy children aged 2–14 years, followed for a mean 237 days. Causes of fever were assessed by testing acute and convalescent sera from febrile participants for dengue, chikungunya, hepatitis A, influenza A, leptospirosis, rickettsia, and Salmonella Typhi. Overall, 289 participants had acute fever, an incidence density of 33.6 per 100 person-years (95% CI: 30.0; 37.8); 57% were IgM-positive for at least one of these diseases. The most common causes of fever by IgM ELISA were chikungunya (in 35.0% of in febrile participants) and S. Typhi (in 29.4%). The overall incidence density of dengue per 100 person-years was 3.4 by nonstructural protein 1 (NS1) antigen positivity (95% CI: 2.4; 4.8) and 7.3 (95% CI: 5.7; 9.2) by serology. Dengue was diagnosed in 11.4% (95% CI: 8.0; 15.7) and 23.9% (95% CI: 19.1; 29.2) of febrile participants by NS1 positivity and serology, respectively. Of the febrile episodes not clinically diagnosed as dengue, 5.3% were dengue-positive by NS1 antigen testing and 16.0% were dengue-positive by serology. Conclusions During the study period, the most common identified causes of pediatric acute febrile illness among the seven tested for were chikungunya, S. Typhi and dengue. Not all dengue cases were clinically diagnosed; laboratory confirmation is essential to refine disease burden estimates. PMID:23936565

  4. Fatal acute necrohaemorrhagic pancreatitis with massive intraperitoneal and retroperitoneal bleeding: a rare cause of exsanguination.

    PubMed

    Querido, Sara; Carvalho, Ins; Moleiro, Filipa; Pvoa, Pedro

    2016-01-01

    An otherwise healthy 37-year-old man was admitted to hospital with uncontrollable vomiting and abdominal pain. Lithiasic acute pancreatitis was diagnosed on the basis of clinical symptoms along with raised serum amylase levels and compatible findings in ultrasonography and CT scan. Two Ranson criteria (lactate dehydrogenase over 350?U/L and aspartate aminotransferase over 250?U/L) were present at admission. The patient was transferred to an intensive care unit (ICU); intravenous crystalloids were prescribed and analgaesics were administered for pain relief. Unexpectedly, 10?h after ICU admission, he presented a cardiac arrest with a non-defibrillate rhythm and died after 40?min of advanced life support. An autopsy was performed and revealed acute necrohaemorrhagic pancreatitis with massive intraperitoneal and retroperitoneal haemorrhage. This case report summarises the epidemiology, pathophysiology and risk factors for fatal bleeding acute pancreatitis. PMID:26791128

  5. Acute Cholecystitis Caused by Malignant Cystic Duct Obstruction: Treatment with Metallic Stent Placement

    SciTech Connect

    Miyayama, Shiro Yamashiro, Masashi; Takeda, Taro; Aburano, Hiroyuki; Komatsu, Tetsuya; Sanada, Taku; Kosaka, Shotaro; Toya, Daisyu; Matsui, Osamu

    2008-07-15

    We report the successful management of acute cholecystitis using cystic duct stent placement in 3 patients with inoperable malignant cystic duct obstruction (2 cholangiocarcinoma and 1 pancreatic carcinoma). All patients underwent stent placement in the bile duct, using an uncovered stent in 2 and a covered stent in 1, to relieve jaundice occurring 8-184 days (mean 120 days) before the development of acute cholecystitis. The occluded cystic duct was traversed by a microcatheter and a stent was implanted 4-17 days (mean 12 days) after cholecystostomy. Acute cholecystitis was improved after the procedure in all patients. Two patients died 3 and 10 months later, while 1 has survived without cholecystitis for 22 months after the procedure to date.

  6. Clinical application of lung ultrasound in patients with acute dyspnea: differential diagnosis between cardiogenic and pulmonary causes.

    PubMed

    Cardinale, L; Volpicelli, G; Binello, F; Garofalo, G; Priola, S M; Veltri, A; Fava, C

    2009-10-01

    This review discusses the usefulness of bedside lung ultrasound in the diagnostic distinction between the various causes of acute dyspnoea in the emergency department, with special attention to the differential diagnosis of pulmonary oedema and exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). This is made possible by using mid- to low-end scanners and simple acquisition techniques accessible to both radiologists and clinicians. Major advantages include ready availability at the bedside, the absence of ionising radiation, high reproducibility and cost efficiency. The technique is based on the recognition and analysis of sonographic artefacts rather than direct visualisation of the pulmonary structures. These artefacts are caused by the interaction of water-rich structures and air, called comet tails or B-lines. When such artefacts are widely detected on anterolateral transthoracic lung scans, diffuse alveolar-interstitial syndrome can be diagnosed, which is often a sign of acute pulmonary oedema. This condition rules out exacerbation of COPD as the main cause of acute dyspnoea. PMID:19697100

  7. Topical diclofenac epolamine patch 1.3% for treatment of acute pain caused by soft tissue injury

    PubMed Central

    McCarberg, B H; Argoff, C E

    2010-01-01

    Acute pain caused by musculoskeletal disorders is very common and has a significant negative impact on quality-of-life and societal costs. Many types of acute pain have been managed with traditional oral non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) and selective cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitors (coxibs). Data from prospective, randomised controlled clinical trials and postmarketing surveillance indicate that use of oral traditional NSAIDs and coxibs is associated with an elevated risk of developing gastrointestinal, renovascular and/or cardiovascular adverse events (AEs). Increasing awareness of the AEs associated with NSAID therapy, including coxibs, has led many physicians and patients to reconsider use of these drugs and look for alternative treatment options. Treatment with NSAIDs via the topical route of administration has been shown to provide clinically effective analgesia at the site of application while minimising systemic absorption. The anti-inflammatory and analgesic potency of the traditional oral NSAID diclofenac, along with its physicochemical properties, makes it well suited for topical delivery. Several topical formulations of diclofenac have been developed. A topical patch containing diclofenac epolamine 1.3% (DETP, FLECTOR® Patch), approved for use in Europe in 1993, has recently been approved for use in the United States and is indicated for the treatment of acute pain caused by minor strains, sprains and contusions. In this article, we review the available clinical trial data for this product in the treatment of pain caused by soft tissue injury. PMID:20666849

  8. Acute forearm compartment syndrome in a newborn caused by reperfusion after spontaneous axillary artery thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Bekmez, Senol; Beken, Serdar; Mermerkaya, Musa Ugur; Ozkan, Mehpare; Okumus, Nurullah

    2015-11-01

    Acute compartment syndrome of the forearm in newborns is often misdiagnosed and can be disastrous if left untreated. Here, we report a full-term infant of a diabetic mother with underlying heterozygosity for MTHFR C677T and A1298C alleles. A spontaneous thrombosis occurred in the left axillary artery immediately after birth. The patient responded well to anticoagulant (heparin) and thrombolytic (tissue plasminogen activator) agents. After reperfusion of the extremity, acute compartment syndrome developed. Emergent fasciotomy was performed. In this case, effective collaboration between pediatricians and orthopedic surgeons resulted in salvage of the extremity, with good clinical and functional results. PMID:26237661

  9. Ingested Sharp Bone Fragment: An Unusual Cause of Acute Bowel Obstruction- Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Badai, Samit Kumar; Urugesan, Sadyojata M; Singh, Chabungbam Gyan; Singh, Haobam Manihar

    2016-01-01

    Acute bowel obstruction due to ingested foreign body (FB) like sharp bone fragment is a rare entity. As preoperative diagnosis was uncertain due to lack of proper history, diagnosis is usually done intraoperatively. Even though it is rare, we should consider it as differential diagnosis in patients with recent dietary history. Herein, we are reporting a 38-year-old man, without any psychiatric illness or previous surgery presenting to emergency department with the features of acute bowel obstruction. CT scan shows high density object in ileum suspicious of foreign body. Patient underwent exploratory laparatomy which reveals dilated small bowel with sharp bony object in ileum, which was retrieved with enterotomy. PMID:27042531

  10. Melioidosis as a Cause of Acute Abdomen in Immuno-Competent Male from Eastern India

    PubMed Central

    Karuna, Tadepalli; Khadanga, Sagar; Dugar, Dharmendra; Sau, Biyanka; Bhoi, Priyadarshini

    2015-01-01

    Though melioidosis is rare in India, it has gained importance as one of the most potent emerging infections. In India, the cases have been under-reported because of the lack of awareness. The majority of cases present with multifocal pyogenic infections with septicemia. We present an unusual case of melioidosis presenting as acute intestinal perforation. The organism was ceftazidime resistant, and we successfully treated the case with imipenem and doxycyclin. This case highlights ruling out the possibility of melioidosis in acute abdomen and existence of ceftazidime resistant cases in India. PMID:25949062

  11. Acute renal infarct without apparent cause: A case report and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Decoste, Ryan; Himmelman, Jeffrey G.; Grantmyre, John

    2015-01-01

    Acute renal infarction is a rare clinical entity most commonly occurring as a result of a thromboembolic event in patients with predisposing risk factors. Its non-specific presentation can lead to delayed or missed diagnosis. However, modern imaging technology has allowed for the diagnosis of renal infarction to be made earlier in its clinical course. Due to its rare nature, treatment guidelines do not exist. We report a case of acute renal infarction identified on computed tomography scan in a patient with no known predisposing factors to thromboembolism that was treated through suction thrombectomy. PMID:26085895

  12. Procidentia as a Cause of Obstructive Uropathy and Acute Kidney Injury

    PubMed Central

    Dubowitch, Elliot; Cahn, David; Ross, Curtis; Husain, Ali; Harkaway, Richard; Metro, Michael; Ginsberg, Philip

    2014-01-01

    Pelvic organ prolapse can affect urinary tract function by reducing flow rates and increasing post void residual urine volumes secondary to outlet obstruction. If the diagnosis is missed or left untreated, pelvic organ prolapse can lead to acute renal injury, chronic renal failure or even end stage renal disease. Herein, we present a case of a patient who presented to Albert Einstein Medical Center in Philadelphia, PA with urinary retention and acute kidney injury secondary to complete uterine prolapse, also referred to as procidentia. PMID:26195953

  13. Unsuccessful tissue plasminogen activator treatment of acute stroke caused by a calcific embolus.

    PubMed

    Halloran, John I; Bekavac, Ivo

    2004-10-01

    Intravenous (IV) administration of tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) given to patients during acute cerebral ischemia according to National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS) guidelines improves clinical outcome by 11% to 14%. The success of IV tPA stroke therapy is dependent on several previously reported factors. The authors suggest that the presence of calcification within an embolus may represent an additional important factor. This report describes a patient with an acute stroke secondary to a spontaneous calcific cerebral embolus who had a negative outcome despite receiving proper thrombolytic therapy. PMID:15358964

  14. Acute Rheumatic Carditis: A Rare Cause for Reversible Complete Heart Block

    PubMed Central

    Singh, David

    2015-01-01

    Abstract A previously healthy 18-year-old man presented to the emergency department with weakness, fever, and joint pains and was found to have complete heart block with transient asystole requiring urgent transvenous pacing. After further workup, the patient was found to have complete heart block secondary to acute rheumatic carditis. The conduction system recovered in a step-wise fashion following treatment with Penicillin, and high dose Aspirin, without the need for permanent pacemaker placement. This case illustrates that acute rheumatic carditis, although rare, can present with advanced conduction system involvement, which is reversible if treatment is initiated. PMID:26535164

  15. Perforated Jejunal Diverticula Secondary to a Large Faecolith: A Rare Cause of the Acute Abdomen

    PubMed Central

    Webster, Peter John; Hyland, Abigail; Bilkhu, Amarvir; Hanavadi, Satheesh; Sharma, Narinder

    2014-01-01

    Jejunal diverticula are uncommon and usually asymptomatic. Very rarely, they can lead to acute complications such as bleeding, obstruction, and perforation. This report describes our experience of a case of jejunal diverticula perforation secondary to a large faecolith, with particular focus on the aetiology and management of this rare condition. PMID:25614847

  16. First Report of Acute Cholecystitis with Sepsis Caused by Cellulomonas denverensis▿

    PubMed Central

    Ohtaki, Hirofumi; Ohkusu, Kiyofumi; Sawamura, Haruki; Ohta, Hirotoshi; Inoue, Rina; Iwasa, Junpei; Ito, Hiroyasu; Murakami, Nobuo; Ezaki, Takayuki; Moriwaki, Hisataka; Seishima, Mitsuru

    2009-01-01

    Cellulomonas denverensis is a small and thin gram-positive rod-shaped bacterium that was proposed as a new species in 2005. Here we report a female case of acute cholecystitis and sepsis in which C. denverensis was determined to be causative. PMID:19656981

  17. Multiple Lung Abscesses Caused by Actinomyces graevenitzii Mimicking Acute Pulmonary Coccidioidomycosis

    PubMed Central

    Nagaoka, Kentaro; Yamamoto, Yoshihiro; Yanagihara, Katsunori; Ohkusu, Kiyofumi; Kohno, Shigeru

    2012-01-01

    Actinomyces graevenitzii is a newly recognized Actinomyces species that is seldom isolated from clinical specimens. A case of multiple pulmonary abscesses mimicking acute pulmonary coccidioidomycosis is described in this study, and the findings indicate that this organism is an opportunistic human pathogen. PMID:22760049

  18. Venous congestion, endothelial and neurohormonal activation in acute decompensated heart failure: cause or effect?

    PubMed

    Colombo, Paolo C; Doran, Amanda C; Onat, Duygu; Wong, Ka Yuk; Ahmad, Myra; Sabbah, Hani N; Demmer, Ryan T

    2015-06-01

    Venous congestion and endothelial and neurohormonal activation are known to occur in acute decompensated heart failure (ADHF), yet the temporal role of these processes in the pathophysiology of decompensation is not fully understood. Conventional wisdom presumes congestion to be a consequence of worsening cardiovascular function; however, the biomechanically driven effects of venous congestion are biologically plausible contributors to ADHF that remain largely unexplored in vivo. Recent experimental evidence from human models suggests that fluid accumulation and venous congestion are not simply consequences of poor cardiovascular function, but rather are fundamental pro-oxidant, pro-inflammatory, and hemodynamic stimuli that contribute to acute decompensation. The latest advances in the monitoring of volume status using implantable devices allow for the detection of venous congestion before symptoms arise. This may ultimately lead to improved treatment strategies including not only diuretics, but also specific, adjuvant interventions to counteract endothelial and neurohormonal activation during early preclinical decompensation. PMID:25740404

  19. Inhibiting Polo-like kinase 1 causes growth reduction and apoptosis in pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia cells

    PubMed Central

    Hartsink-Segers, Stefanie A.; Exalto, Carla; Allen, Matthew; Williamson, Daniel; Clifford, Steven C.; Horstmann, Martin; Caron, Huib N.; Pieters, Rob; Den Boer, Monique L.

    2013-01-01

    This study investigated Polo-like kinase 1, a mitotic regulator often over-expressed in solid tumors and adult hematopoietic malignancies, as a potential new target in the treatment of pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Polo-like kinase 1 protein and Thr210 phosphorylation levels were higher in pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia (n=172) than in normal bone marrow mononuclear cells (n=10) (P<0.0001). High Polo-like kinase 1 protein phosphorylation, but not expression, was associated with a lower probability of event-free survival (P=0.042) and was a borderline significant prognostic factor (P=0.065) in a multivariate analysis including age and initial white blood cell count. Polo-like kinase 1 was necessary for leukemic cell survival, since short hairpin-mediated Polo-like kinase 1 knockdown in acute lymphoblastic leukemia cell lines inhibited cell proliferation by G2/M cell cycle arrest and induced apoptosis through caspase-3 and poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase cleavage. Primary patient cells with a high Polo-like kinase 1 protein expression were sensitive to the Polo-like kinase 1-specific inhibitor NMS-P937 in vitro, whereas cells with a low expression and normal bone marrow cells were resistant. This sensitivity was likely not caused by Polo-like kinase 1 mutations, since only one new mutation (Ser335Arg) was found by 454-sequencing of 38 pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia cases. This mutation did not affect Polo-like kinase 1 expression or NMS-P937 sensitivity. Together, these results indicate a pivotal role for Polo-like kinase 1 in pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia and show potential for Polo-like kinase 1-inhibiting drugs as an addition to current treatment strategies for cases expressing high Polo-like kinase 1 levels. PMID:23753023

  20. Invasive fungal infection caused by geotrichum capitatum in patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia: a case study and literature review

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Guang-Xun; Tang, Hai-Long; Zhang, Xuan; Xin, Xiao-Li; Feng, Juan; Chen, Xie-Qun

    2015-01-01

    Geotrichum capitatum infection has a very low incidence rate with atypical clinical symptoms, making diagnosis difficult, and it has a poor prognosis. The incidence is even more rare in China. This paper reports the first case of infection caused by G. capitatum during bone marrow suppression after chemotherapy in a Chinese patient with acute lymphoblastic leukemia. In addition, it reports a systematic literature review of diagnosis and treatment. The patient with acute lymphoblastic leukemia was confirmed to be infected with G. capitatum, involving lung, liver and skin, through a blood culture test. Caspofungin, amphotericin B loposome, and a combination therapy of amphotericin B liposome and voriconazole were used in succession for treatment. Despite normal body temperature and a slight improvement of clinical symptoms with the combination therapy treatment, the patient died 40 days after chemotherapy due to heart and lung failure. PMID:26550401

  1. Sodium bicarbonate treatment prevents gastric emptying delay caused by acute exercise in awake rats.

    PubMed

    Silva, Moisés T B; Palheta-Junior, Raimundo C; Sousa, Daniel F; Fonseca-Magalhães, Patrícia A; Okoba, Willy; Campos, Caio P S; Oliveira, Ricardo B; Magalhães, Pedro J C; Santos, Armenio A

    2014-05-01

    Physical exercise, mainly after vigorous activity, may induce gastrointestinal dysmotility whose mechanisms are still unknown. We hypothesized that physical exercise and ensuing lactate-related acidemia alter gastrointestinal motor behavior. In the present study, we evaluated the effects of short-term exercise on gastric emptying rate in awake rats subjected to 15-min swimming sessions against a load equivalent to 5% of their body weight. After 0, 10, or 20 min of exercise testing, the rats were gavage fed with 1.5 ml of a liquid test meal (0.5 mg/ml of phenol red in 5% glucose solution) and euthanized 10 min postprandially to measure fractional gastric dye recovery. In addition to inducing acidemia and increasing blood lactate levels, acute exercise increased (P < 0.05) gastric retention. Such a phenomenon presented a positive correlation (P < 0.001) between blood lactate levels and fractional gastric dye recovery. Gastric retention and other acidbase-related changes were all prevented by NaHCO3 pretreatment. Additionally, exercise enhanced (P < 0.05) the marker's progression through the small intestine. In anesthetized rats, exercise increased (P < 0.05) gastric volume, measured by a balloon catheter in a barostat system. Compared with sedentary control rats, acute exercise also inhibited (P < 0.05) the contractility of gastric fundus strips in vitro. In conclusion, acute exercise delayed the gastric emptying of a liquid test meal by interfering with the acid-base balance. PMID:24557800

  2. [Acute effects of alcohol and chronic alcoholism as causes of violent crime].

    PubMed

    Pillmann, F; Ullrich, S; Draba, S; Sannemüller, U; Marneros, A

    2000-09-01

    To study the influence of alcohol and psychosocial variables on delinquent behavior, we coded data from the psychiatric evaluation of 254 defendants using a standardized score sheet, analyzing correlations between acute intoxication at the time of the crime (ICD 10:F10.0), diagnosis of alcohol dependency according to ICD 10 (F10.2), psycho-biographical variables, criminal history, and parameters relating to the index offence. We found that 64.6% of all defendants studied were intoxicated when committing the crime and 25.6% suffered from alcohol dependency. Alcohol intoxication correlated to occurrence of violent crime, cruelty in committing the index offence, and earlier convictions. Logistic regression, with demographic and psychosocial variables entered as covariables, revealed acute alcohol intoxication but not alcohol dependency as a predictor of violent crime (odds ratio 2.3, P = 0.02). Alcohol intoxication and dependency were also independent predictors of earlier convictions (intoxication, odds ratio 4.4, P = 0.0001; dependency, odds ratio 3.6, P = 0.003). Our findings support the hypothesis that acute alcohol intoxication, not dependency, influences violent crime in a direct manner. However, alcohol dependency predicts criminal recidivism. PMID:11042866

  3. Acute Infective Endocarditis Caused by Delftia acidovorans, a Rare Pathogen Complicating Intravenous Drug Use

    PubMed Central

    Mahmood, Saima; Taylor, Kent E.; McCormick, Malkanthie I.

    2012-01-01

    Gram-negative bacilli causing infective endocarditis (IE) is rare, even in intravenous drug users. This case report underscores several clinically important aspects of Delftia acidovorans IE: the organism's ability to cause rapid destruction of normal native valves and to cause embolic occlusion of large arteries and its resistance to all aminoglycosides. PMID:22933597

  4. Does acute alcohol intoxication cause transaminase elevations in children and adolescents?

    PubMed

    Binder, Christoph; Knibbe, Karoline; Kreissl, Alexandra; Repa, Andreas; Thanhaeuser, Margarita; Greber-Platzer, Susanne; Berger, Angelika; Jilma, Bernd; Haiden, Nadja

    2016-03-01

    Several long-term effects of alcohol abuse in children and adolescents are well described. Alcohol abuse has severe effects on neurodevelopmental outcome, such as learning disabilities, memory deficits, and decreased cognitive performance. Additionally, chronic alcohol intake is associated with chronic liver disease. However, the effects of acute alcohol intoxication on liver function in children and adolescents are not well characterized. The aim of this study was to determine if a single event of acute alcohol intoxication has short-term effects on liver function and metabolism. All children and adolescents admitted to the Department of Pediatrics and Adolescent Medicine between 2004 and 2011 with the diagnosis "acute alcohol intoxication" were included in this retrospective analysis. Clinical records were evaluated for age, gender, alcohol consumption, blood alcohol concentration, symptoms, and therapy. Blood values of the liver parameters, CK, creatinine, LDH, AP, and the values of the blood gas analysis were analyzed. During the 8-year study period, 249 children and adolescents with the diagnosis "acute alcohol intoxication" were admitted, 132 (53%) girls and 117 (47%) boys. The mean age was 15.3 ± 1.2 years and the mean blood alcohol concentration was 0.201 ± 0.049%. Girls consumed significantly less alcohol than boys (64 g vs. 90 g), but reached the same blood alcohol concentration (girls: 0.199 ± 0.049%; boys: 0.204 ± 0.049%). The mean values of liver parameters were in normal ranges, but AST was increased in 9.1%, ALT in 3.9%, and γGT in 1.4%. In contrast, the mean value of AST/ALT ratio was increased and the ratio was elevated in 92.6% of all patients. Data of the present study showed significant differences in the AST/ALT ratio (p < 0.01) in comparison to a control group. Data of the present study indicate that there might be an effect of acute alcohol intoxication on transaminase levels. The AST/ALT ratio seems to reflect the damage in hepatocytes after intensive alcohol consumption. The present study indicates a sex-specific difference in alcohol metabolism and effects between girls and boys: girls need less alcohol than boys to achieve the same blood alcohol levels than boys, and are more prone to loss of consciousness. PMID:26992701

  5. Characterization and PCR Detection Of Binary, Pir-Like Toxins from Vibrio parahaemolyticus Isolates that Cause Acute Hepatopancreatic Necrosis Disease (AHPND) in Shrimp

    PubMed Central

    Sirikharin, Ratchanok; Taengchaiyaphum, Suparat; Sanguanrut, Piyachat; Chi, Thanh Duong; Mavichak, Rapeepat; Proespraiwong, Porranee; Nuangsaeng, Bunlung; Thitamadee, Siripong; Flegel, Timothy W.; Sritunyalucksana, Kallaya

    2015-01-01

    Unique isolates of Vibrio parahaemolyticus (VPAHPND) have previously been identified as the causative agent of acute hepatopancreatic necrosis disease (AHPND) in shrimp. AHPND is characterized by massive sloughing of tubule epithelial cells of the hepatopancreas (HP), proposed to be induced by soluble toxins released from VPAHPND that colonize the shrimp stomach. Since these toxins (produced in broth culture) have been reported to cause AHPND pathology in reverse gavage bioassays with shrimp, we used ammonium sulfate precipitation to prepare protein fractions from broth cultures of VPAHPND isolates for screening by reverse gavage assays. The dialyzed 60% ammonium sulfate fraction caused high mortality within 24–48 hours post-administration, and histological analysis of the moribund shrimp showed typical massive sloughing of hepatopancreatic tubule epithelial cells characteristic of AHPND. Analysis of the active fraction by SDS-PAGE revealed two major bands at marker levels of approximately 16 kDa (ToxA) and 50 kDa (ToxB). Mass spectrometry analysis followed by MASCOT analysis revealed that both proteins had similarity to hypothetical proteins of V. parahaemolyticus M0605 (contig034 GenBank accession no. JALL01000066.1) and similarity to known binary insecticidal toxins called 'Photorhabdus insect related' proteins A and B (Pir-A and Pir-B), respectively, produced by the symbiotic, nematode bacterium Photorhabdus luminescens. In in vivo tests, it was shown that recombinant ToxA and ToxB were both required in a dose dependent manner to cause AHPND pathology, indicating further similarity to Pir-A and -B. A single-step PCR method was designed for detection of the ToxA gene and was validated using 104 bacterial isolates consisting of 51 VPAHPND isolates, 34 non-AHPND VP isolates and 19 other isolates of bacteria commonly found in shrimp ponds (including other species of Vibrio and Photobacterium). The results showed 100% specificity and sensitivity for detection of VPAHPND isolates in the test set. PMID:26017673

  6. Transcriptome analysis of the initial stage of acute WSSV infection caused by temperature change.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yumiao; Li, Fuhua; Sun, Zheng; Zhang, Xiaojun; Li, Shihao; Zhang, Chengsong; Xiang, Jianhai

    2014-01-01

    White spot syndrome virus (WSSV) is the most devastating virosis threatening the shrimp culture industry worldwide. Variations of environmental factors in shrimp culture ponds usually lead to the outbreak of white spot syndrome (WSS). In order to know the molecular mechanisms of WSS outbreak induced by temperature variation and the biological changes of the host at the initial stage of WSSV acute infection, RNA-Seq technology was used to analyze the differentially expressed genes (DEGs) in shrimp with a certain amount of WSSV cultured at 18°C and shrimp whose culture temperature were raised to 25°C. To analyze whether the expression changes of the DEGs were due to temperature rising or WSSV proliferation, the expression of selected DEGs was analyzed by real-time PCR with another shrimp group, namely Group T, as control. Group T didn't suffer WSSV infection but was subjected to temperature rising in parallel. At the initial stage of WSSV acute infection, DEGs related to energy production were up-regulated, whereas most DEGs related to cell cycle and positive regulation of cell death and were down-regulated. Triose phosphate isomerase, enolase and alcohol dehydrogenase involved in glycosis were up-regulated, while pyruvate dehydrogenase, citrate synthase and isocitrate dehydrogenase with NAD as the coenzyme involved in TCA pathway were down-regulated. Also genes involved in host DNA replication, including DNA primase, DNA topoisomerase and DNA polymerase showed down-regulated expression. Several interesting genes including crustin genes, acting binding or inhibiting protein genes, a disintegrin and metalloproteinase domain-containing protein 9 (ADAM9) gene and a GRP 78 gene were also analyzed. Understanding the interactions between hosts and WSSV at the initial stage of acute infection will not only help to get a deep insight into the pathogenesis of WSSV but also provide clues for therapies. PMID:24595043

  7. Acute paraspinal compartment syndrome as a rare cause of loin pain.

    PubMed

    Hoyle, A; Tang, V; Baker, A; Blades, R

    2015-03-01

    A significant proportion of emergency urological admissions are comprised of ureteric colic presenting as loin pain. A variety of alternative pathologies present in this manner and should be considered during systematic assessment. We report the case of a patient admitted with severe unilateral back and flank pain after strenuous deadlift exercise. Clinical examination and subsequent investigation following a significant delay demonstrated acute paraspinal compartment syndrome (PCS) after an initial misdiagnosis of ureteric colic. The patient was managed conservatively. We review the current literature surrounding the rare diagnosis of PCS and discuss the management options. PMID:25723672

  8. Industrial halide wastes cause acute mortality of snow geese in Oklahoma

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Andreasen, J.K.; Stroud, Richard K.

    1987-01-01

    An examination of 97 dead migratory waterfowl collected at an industrial facility showed that the birds had had severe gastric and intestinal hemorrhaging. Water samples taken at on-site waste lagoons contained 6,750 mg/L fluoride, 4,500 mg/L bromine and 1,500 mg/L boron. Brain and liver tissues contained high levels of fluoride, as compared with tissues of birds collected at a control site. From the necropsy results, the high concentration of fluoride in the water samples and the elevated tissue residues, we conclude that the birds died from acute fluoride poisoning.

  9. Varicella zoster virus: a rare cause of acute pancreatitis in an immunocompetent child.

    PubMed

    Kulasegaran, Suheelan; Wilson, Elizabeth Jane; Vasquez, Leon; Hulme-Moir, Mike

    2016-01-01

    A 15-year-old girl with a diagnosis of varicella zoster virus (VZV) presented to hospital with severe abdominal pain. This patient was immunocompetent and found to have acute pancreatitis in association with VZV. She responded well to intravenous acyclovir and supportive treatment. A review of the literature for the management of pancreatitis associated with VZV suggests treatment with acyclovir, as it appears to reduce hospital stay and symptoms. The exact benefit is yet to be quantified. Importantly, this diagnosis should be considered in children who have VZV associated with abdominal pain. PMID:26762351

  10. Acute angle-closure glaucoma caused by vitreous prolapse after neodymium:YAG posterior capsulotomy.

    PubMed

    Mihora, Lisa D; Bowers, Patrick J; Blank, Nancy M

    2004-11-01

    We report the second known case of acute angle-closure glaucoma from vitreous prolapse after neodymium:YAG (Nd:YAG) laser posterior capsulotomy in a patient with a posterior chamber intraocular lens (IOL). This is the first reported case to result in corneal decompensation that required penetrating keratoplasty. The rare complication of vitreous prolapse was unusual in this patient because of the presence of a posterior chamber IOL, a small 4.0 mm capsulotomy opening, and low (26 mJ) Nd:YAG laser energy. PMID:15519106

  11. Acute diarrhea and metabolic acidosis caused by tuberculous vesico-rectal fistula

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Xiu-Qing; Zou, Yan; Wu, Zhi-E; Abassa, Kodjo-Kunale; Mao, Wei; Tao, Jin; Kang, Zhuang; Wen, Zhuo-Fu; Wu, Bin

    2014-01-01

    Acquired vesico-rectal fistula is an uncommon complication of pelvic malignant tumors, surgical injury, inflammatory disorders such as tuberculosis infection, radiotherapy and less commonly diverticulum of the urinary tract. The fistula is often identified by urinary tract abnormalities such as dysuria, recurrent urinary tract infection, pneumaturia, and fecaluria. Here, we report an unusual case of a patient with a vesico-rectal fistula of tuberculous origin, presenting with severe acute diarrhea, metabolic acidosis, hyperchloremia and hypokalemia while with only mild urinary tract symptoms. The patient was cured by tuberculostatic therapy. PMID:25386096

  12. Cellular Correlates of Enhanced Anxiety Caused by Acute Treatment with the Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitor Fluoxetine in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Ravinder, Shilpa; Pillai, Anup G.; Chattarji, Sumantra

    2011-01-01

    Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) are used extensively in the treatment of depression and anxiety disorders. The therapeutic benefits of SSRIs typically require several weeks of continuous treatment. Intriguingly, according to clinical reports, symptoms of anxiety may actually increase during the early stages of treatment although more prolonged treatment alleviates affective symptoms. Consistent with earlier studies that have used animal models to capture this paradoxical effect of SSRIs, we find that rats exhibit enhanced anxiety-like behavior on the elevated plus-maze 1 h after a single injection of the SSRI fluoxetine. Next we investigated the potential neural substrates underlying the acute anxiogenic effects by analyzing the morphological and physiological impact of acute fluoxetine treatment on principal neurons of the basolateral amygdala (BLA), a brain area that plays a pivotal role in fear and anxiety. Although earlier studies have shown that behavioral or genetic perturbations that are anxiogenic for rodents also increase dendritic spine density in the BLA, we find that a single injection of fluoxetine does not cause spinogenesis on proximal apical dendritic segments on BLA principal neurons an hour later. However, at the same time point when a single dose of fluoxetine caused enhanced anxiety, it also enhanced action potential firing in BLA neurons in ex vivo slices. Consistent with this finding, in vitro bath application of fluoxetine caused higher spiking frequency and this increase in excitability was correlated with an increase in the input resistance of these neurons. Our results suggest that enhanced excitability of amygdala neurons may contribute to the increase in anxiety-like behavior observed following acute fluoxetine treatment. PMID:22232580

  13. An unexpected cause of acute kidney injury in a patient with ANCA associated vasculitis.

    PubMed

    Choudhry, Wajid M; Nori, Uday S; Nadasdy, Tibor; Satoskar, Anjali A

    2016-05-01

    Diagnostic kidney biopsies sometimes yield clinically unsuspected diagnoses. We present a case of a 69-year-old woman with established ANCA-associated vasculitis (AAV) of 4 years duration who was in clinical remission following cytotoxic therapy and was on maintenance immunosuppression. She presented to the hospital with acute kidney injury (AKI), symptoms suggestive of a systemic vasculitis, and in addition had hypercalcemia, metabolic alkalosis. A relapse in the AAV was suspected but a diagnostic kidney biopsy showed acute tubular necrosis, patchy interstitial inflammation, and calcium phosphate deposits. It was found that the patient recently started consuming large doses of over-the-counter calcium-containing antacids and vitamin Dcontaining multivitamin supplements. Cessation of these drugs led to improvement of renal function to baseline. This case highlights several teaching points: (1) the kidney biopsy can prove to be critically important even in cases where there appears to be a more obvious clinical diagnosis, (2) AK due to calcium-alkali syndrome has characteristic histopathological changes, and (3) that the triad of hypercalcemia, metabolic alkalosis, and AKI is exclusively associated with the ingestion of excessive quantities of calcium-containing antacids. The physician should keep this in mind, and pro-actively seek pertinent medication history from the patient. A brief review of calcium-alkali syndrome is given. PMID:26932179

  14. Acute Anticholinesterase Pesticide Poisoning Caused a Long-Term Mortality Increase

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Hung-Sheng; Hsu, Chien-Chin; Weng, Shih-Feng; Lin, Hung-Jung; Wang, Jhi-Joung; Su, Shih-Bin; Huang, Chien-Cheng; Guo, How-Ran

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Acute anticholinesterase pesticide (organophosphate and carbamate) poisoning (ACPP) often produces severe complications, and sometimes death. We investigated the long-term mortality of patients with ACPP because it is not sufficiently understood. In this retrospective nationwide population-based cohort study, 818 patients with ACPP and 16,360 healthy comparisons from 1999 to 2010 were selected from Taiwan's National Health Insurance Research Database. They were followed until 2011. Ninety-four (11.5%) ACPP patients and 793 (4.9%) comparisons died (P < 0.01) during follow-up. The incidence rate ratios (IRRs) of death were 2.5 times higher in ACPP patients than in comparisons (P < 0.01). The risk of death was particularly high in the first month after ACPP (IRR: 92.7; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 45.0–191.0) and still high for ∼6 months (IRR: 3.8; 95% CI: 1.9–7.4). After adjusting for age, gender, selected comorbidities, geographic area, and monthly income, the hazard ratio of death for ACPP patients was still 2.4 times higher than for comparisons. Older age (≥35 years), male gender, diabetes mellitus, coronary artery disease, hypertension, stroke, mental disorder, and lower monthly income also predicted death. ACPP significantly increased long-term mortality. In addition to early follow-up after acute treatment, comorbidity control and socioeconomic assistance are needed for patients with ACPP. PMID:26222853

  15. Acute postinfectious glomerulonephritis with a large number of crescents caused by Mycoplasma pneumoniae.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xinghua; Xu, Wanwen; Du, Juan; Wang, Huiming

    2015-01-01

    Mycoplasma pneumoniae-induced acute postinfectious glomerulonephritis has various pathological changes and relatively poor prognosis. It often occurs in children, barely in adults. Currently, no clear treatment guidelines have been established for its treatment using glucocorticoid and immunosuppressive. In this study, we report an adult who admitted to our hospital due to fever and gross hematuria. The patient presented with nephritic syndrome and renal failure and confirmed to have M. pneumoniae infection by serum detection and acute postinfectious glomerulonephritis with a large number of crescents by renal biopsy. He was given glucocorticoid, immunosuppressive agent combined with hemodialysis as well as other supportive treatment. Three months later, his renal function became normal, urine protein level decreased to 0.4 g/24 h, and the C3 complement increased to normal level. In conclusion, glucocorticoid and immunosuppressive treatment should be given to patients with M. pneumoniae-infection induced glomerulonephritis after confirmed to have a large number of crescents by renal biopsy and the treatment could improve the prognosis. PMID:26275270

  16. Epidemic outbreak of acute haemorrhagic conjunctivitis caused by coxsackievirus A24 in Thailand, 2014.

    PubMed

    Chansaenroj, J; Vongpunsawad, S; Puenpa, J; Theamboonlers, A; Vuthitanachot, V; Chattakul, P; Areechokchai, D; Poovorawan, Y

    2015-10-01

    Acute haemorrhagic conjunctivitis outbreaks are often attributed to viral infection. In 2014, an unprecedented nationwide outbreak of infectious conjunctivitis occurred in Thailand, which affected >300 000 individuals over 3 months. To identify and characterize the virus responsible for the epidemic, eye swab specimens from 119 patients were randomly collected from five different provinces. Conserved regions in the enteroviral 5'-UTR and adenovirus hexon gene were analysed. Enterovirus was identified in 71·43% (85/119) of the samples, while no adenovirus was detected. From enterovirus-positive samples, the coxsackievirus A24 variant (70·59%, 84/119) and echovirus (0·84%, 1/119) were identified. Additional sequencing of full-length VP1 and 3C genes and subsequent phylogenetic analysis revealed that these clinical isolates form a new lineage cluster related to genotype IV-C5. In summary, the coxsackievirus A24 variant was identified as an aetiological agent for the recent acute haemorrhagic conjunctivitis outbreak in Thailand. PMID:25824006

  17. An unusual cause of chest pain: Acute coronary syndrome following administration of ergotamine tartrate.

    PubMed

    Okutucu, Sercan; Karakulak, Ugur Nadir; Kabakcı, Giray; Aytemir, Kudret

    2012-01-01

    For many years, ergotamine has been used for the acute treatment of migraine. Ergotamine may produce coronary vasospasm, which is often associated with ischemic electrocardiography changes and angina pectoris. A 62-year-old woman who was admitted to the emergency department because of chest pain is described. She had a history of severe migraine attacks and started to use ergotamine tartrate 0.75 mg daily the day before. Electrocardiography revealed sinus tachycardia with left anterior hemiblock and T wave inversion in the precordial leads. Cardiac biomarker levels were elevated. After discontinuation of the drug and initiation of vasodilator treatment, her chest pain resolved. Patients with migraine may have an underlying vasospastic disorder predisposing them to coronary artery spasm. Physicians should be alerted to potential cardiac vasospastic effects of low-dose ergotamine in the treatment of migraine. PMID:23204901

  18. Chemical pneumonitis and acute lung injury caused by inhalation of nickel fumes.

    PubMed

    Kunimasa, Kei; Arita, Machiko; Tachibana, Hiromasa; Tsubouchi, Kazuya; Konishi, Satoshi; Korogi, Yohei; Nishiyama, Akihiro; Ishida, Tadashi

    2011-01-01

    A 50-year-old man with a 30-year occupational history of welding presented with low-grade fever, fatigue and persistent dry cough. Computed tomography (CT) of the chest revealed interlobular septal thickening and bilateral non-segmental patchy ground-glass opacities except in the sub-pleural zone. He revealed that he had inhaled nickel fumes 3 days previously at work. These findings suggested a diagnosis of pneumonitis induced by inhalation of nickel fumes. Fewer reports describe pneumonitis associated with the inhalation of nickel compared with zinc fumes. Although nickel compounds are particularly pernicious among the transition metals and more toxic than zinc compounds, nickel fume inhalation rarely induces lethal acute respiratory distress syndrome. Our patient was successfully treated with corticosteroid. PMID:21921392

  19. Can a polymorphism in the thalassemia gene and a heterozygote CFTR mutation cause acute pancreatitis?

    PubMed

    Löhr, J-Matthias; Haas, Stephan

    2014-03-16

    The case of a 32-year-old black woman of African descent who suffered from repeated episodes of acute pancreatitis, initially triggered when flying on airplanes, is reported. She did not drink alcohol or smoke. Genetic analysis was negative for cationic trypsinogen, serine protease inhibitor Kazal type 1 and chymotrypsin C. However, hemoglobin F was elevated. Sequencing of the thalassemia gene revealed a novel alteration in the 5' region indicative of a functional abnormality of the molecule. Sequencing the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene revealed a heterozygote sequence variant. The combination of a hemoglobin gene mutation known for thalassemia in conjunction with the hitherto undescribed CFTR mutation is suggested to pave the road for initial and repetitive pancreatitis attacks. This will be discussed. PMID:24653987

  20. Can a polymorphism in the thalassemia gene and a heterozygote CFTR mutation cause acute pancreatitis?

    PubMed Central

    Löhr, J-Matthias; Haas, Stephan

    2014-01-01

    The case of a 32-year-old black woman of African descent who suffered from repeated episodes of acute pancreatitis, initially triggered when flying on airplanes, is reported. She did not drink alcohol or smoke. Genetic analysis was negative for cationic trypsinogen, serine protease inhibitor Kazal type 1 and chymotrypsin C. However, hemoglobin F was elevated. Sequencing of the thalassemia gene revealed a novel alteration in the 5’ region indicative of a functional abnormality of the molecule. Sequencing the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene revealed a heterozygote sequence variant. The combination of a hemoglobin gene mutation known for thalassemia in conjunction with the hitherto undescribed CFTR mutation is suggested to pave the road for initial and repetitive pancreatitis attacks. This will be discussed. PMID:24653987

  1. Plasmodium vivax infection causes acute respiratory distress syndrome: a case report.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Himanshu; Afsal, Mohammed P; Shetty, Seema M; Satyamoorthy, Kapaettu; Umakanth, Shashikiran

    2015-08-01

    Plasmodium falciparum (Pf) is associated with numerous complications and high mortality, whereas Plasmodium vivax (Pv) infection is generally considered to be benign. However, severe complications, such as acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) in Pv infection, are emerging. This case report highlights the complication of ARDS during the course of Pv infection in a 60-year-old woman. The diagnosis of the patient was made using microscopy, immunochromatography, and polymerase chain reaction assays for Pf and Pv species. The data indicated the presence of mono-Pv infection in the patient's blood, and Pf infection was specifically ruled out. The patient was discharged after intensive supportive care and antimalarial treatment. Pv infection is associated with ARDS and other complications such as sepsis and multi-organ dysfunction syndrome; this enhanced severity of Pv infection, if unrecognized, can lead to more deaths in malaria-endemic areas. PMID:26322886

  2. Intra-Abdominal Hypertension and Abdominal Compartment Syndrome: An Underappreciated Cause of Acute Kidney Injury.

    PubMed

    Patel, Deepa M; Connor, Michael J

    2016-05-01

    Intra-abdominal hypertension (IAH) and abdominal compartment syndrome are increasingly recognized in both medical and surgical critically ill patients and are predictive of death and the development of acute kidney injury. Although there are many risk factors for the development of IAH, in the era of goal-directed therapy for shock, brisk volume resuscitation and volume overload are the most common contributors. Abdominal examination is an unreliable predictor of intra-abdominal pressure (IAP), but IAP can be easily measured in a reproducible and reliable manner by a number of simple bedside techniques. Prompt recognition and intervention to decrease IAP and improve vital organ perfusion are essential to minimize the negative effects of IAH on somatic and visceral organ functions. PMID:27113692

  3. Genotoxic Evaluation of Mikania laevigata Extract on DNA Damage Caused by Acute Coal Dust Exposure

    SciTech Connect

    Freitas, T.P.; Heuser, V.D.; Tavares, P.; Leffa, D.D.; da Silva, G.A.; Citadini-Zanette, V.; Romao, P.R.T.; Pinho, R.A.; Streck, E.L.; Andrade,V.M.

    2009-06-15

    We report data on the possible antigenotoxic activity of Mikania laevigata extract (MLE) after acute intratracheal instillation of coal dust using the comet assay in peripheral blood, bone marrow, and liver cells and the micronucleus test in peripheral blood of Wistar rats. The animals were pretreated for 2 weeks with saline solution (groups 1 and 2) or MLE (100 mg/kg) (groups 3 and 4). On day 15, the animals were anesthetized with ketamine (80 mg/kg) and xylazine (20 mg/kg), and gross mineral coal dust (3 mg/0.3 mL saline) (groups 2 and 4) or saline solution (0.3 mL) (groups 1 and 3) was administered directly in the lung by intratracheal administration. Fifteen days after coal dust or saline instillation, the animals were sacrificed, and the femur, liver, and peripheral blood were removed. The results showed a general increase in the DNA damage values at 8 hours for all treatment groups, probably related to surgical procedures that had stressed the animals. Also, liver cells from rats treated with coal dust, pretreated or not with MLE, showed statistically higher comet assay values compared to the control group at 14 days after exposure. These results could be expected because the liver metabolizes a variety of organic compounds to more polar by-products. On the other hand, the micronucleus assay results did not show significant differences among groups. Therefore, our data do not support the antimutagenic activity of M. laevigata as a modulator of DNA damage after acute coal dust instillation.

  4. Does elevated intra-abdominal pressure during laparoscopic colorectal surgery cause acute gastrointestinal injury?

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Zhenghao; Malbrain, Manu L.N.G.; Sun, Jing; Pan, Ruijun; Ma, Junjun; Feng, Bo; Dong, Feng

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The incidence of acute gastrointestinal injury (AGI) after colorectal surgery is low when laparoscopic techniques are used. While elevated intra-abdominal pressure (IAP) and intra-abdominal hypertension (IAH) are associated with AGI grade II, little is known about the relation between increased IAP during laparoscopy and subsequent AGI. Aim To assess the impact of increased IAP during laparoscopic colorectal surgery on the incidence of postoperative AGI. Material and methods Sixty-six patients (41 men and 25 women) with colorectal cancer undergoing elective laparoscopic colorectal surgery were randomized into 3 groups, according to different IAP levels during CO2 pneumoperitoneum (10 mm Hg, 12 mm Hg and 15 mm Hg). We recorded the incidence of AGI after surgery by assessing the following parameters: time to first flatus/defecation, time to first bowel movement, time to tolerance of semi-liquid food and the occurrence of vomiting/diarrhea. Moreover, inflammatory mediators were measured before the induction of CO2 pneumoperitoneum and on postoperative day 1. Results Acute gastrointestinal injury occurred in 15 (27.3%) patients. In all 3 study groups, the elevation of IAP during CO2 pneumoperitoneum did not significantly increase the occurrence of symptoms of AGI, vomiting or diarrhea. Lower IAP levels did not significantly accelerate recovery of gastrointestinal function or shorten postoperative hospital stay. The changes in serum IL-6 after surgery did not correlate with the value of IAP. Conclusions The level of IAP elevation during laparoscopic colorectal surgery does not increase the occurrence of AGI after surgery. PMID:26240615

  5. Acute Inhalation Exposure to Vaporized Methamphetamine Causes Lung Injury in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Wells, Sandra M.; Buford, Mary C.; Braseth, Sarah N.; Hutchison, James D.; Holian, Andrij

    2009-01-01

    Methamphetamine (MA) is currently the most widespread illegally used stimulant in the United States. Use of MA by smoking is the fastest growing mode of administration, which increases concerns about potential pulmonary and other medical complications. A murine exposure system was developed to study the pulmonary affects of inhaled MA. Mice were exposed to 25–100 mg vaporized MA and assessments were made 3 h following initiation of exposure to model acute lung injury. Inhalation of MA vapor resulted in dose-dependent increases in MA plasma levels that were in the range of those experienced by MA users. At the highest MA dose, histological changes were observed in the lung and small but significant increases in lung wet weight to body weight ratios (5.656 ± 0.176 mg/g for the controls vs. 6.706± 0.135 mg/g for the 100 mg MA-exposed mice) were found. In addition, there was 53% increase in total protein in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid, greater than 20% increase in albumin levels in the BAL fluid, greater than 2.5-fold increase in lactate dehydrogenase levels in the BAL fluid, and reduced total BAL cell numbers (approximately 77% of controls). Levels of the early response cytokines tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α and interleukin (IL)-6 were dose-dependently increased in BAL fluid of MA-exposed mice. Exposure to 100 mg MA significantly increased free radical generation in the BAL cells to 107–146% of controls and to approximately 135% of the controls in lung tissue in situ. Together, these data show that acute inhalation exposure to relevant doses of volatilized MA is associated with elevated free radical formation and significant lung injury. PMID:18645723

  6. The novel marker LTBP2 predicts all-cause and pulmonary death in patients with acute dyspnoea.

    PubMed

    Breidthardt, Tobias; Vanpoucke, Griet; Potocki, Mihael; Mosimann, Tamina; Ziller, Ronny; Thomas, Gregoire; Laroy, Wouter; Moerman, Piet; Socrates, Thenral; Drexler, Beatrice; Mebazaa, Alexandre; Kas, Koen; Mueller, Christian

    2012-11-01

    The risk stratification in patients presenting with acute dyspnoea remains a challenge. We therefore conducted a prospective, observational cohort study enrolling 292 patients presenting to the emergency department with acute dyspnoea. A proteomic approach for antibody-free targeted protein quantification based on high-end MS was used to measure LTBP2 [latent TGF (transforming growth factor)-binding protein 2] levels. Final diagnosis and death during follow-up were adjudicated blinded to LTBP2 levels. AHF (acute heart failure) was the final diagnosis in 54% of patients. In both AHF (P<0.001) and non-AHF (P=0.015) patients, LTBP2 levels at presentation were significantly higher in non-survivors compared with survivors with differences on median levels being 2.2- and 1.5-fold respectively. When assessing the cause of death, LTBP2 levels were significantly higher in patients dying from pulmonary causes (P=0.0005). Overall, LTBP2 powerfully predicted early pulmonary death {AUC (area under the curve), 0.95 [95% CI (confidence interval), 0.91-0.98]}. In ROC (receiver operating characteristic) curve analyses for the prediction of 1-year mortality LTBP2 achieved an AUC of 0.77 (95% CI, 0.71-0.84); comparable with the predictive potential of NT-proBNP [N-terminal pro-B-type natriuruetic peptide; 0.77 (95% CI, 0.72-0.82)]. Importantly, the predictive potential of LTBP2 persisted in patients with AHF as the cause of dypnea (AUC 0.78) and was independent of renal dysfunction (AUC 0.77). In a multivariate Cox regression analysis, LTBP2 was the strongest independent predictor of death [HR (hazard ratio), 3.76 (95% CI, 2.13-6.64); P<0.0001]. In conclusion, plasma levels of LTBP2 present a novel and powerful predictor of all-cause mortality, and particularly pulmonary death. Cause-specific prediction of death would enable targeted prevention, e.g. with pre-emptive antibiotic therapy. PMID:22587491

  7. Vaccines for viral and bacterial pathogens causing acute gastroenteritis: Part I: Overview, vaccines for enteric viruses and Vibrio cholerae.

    PubMed

    O'Ryan, Miguel; Vidal, Roberto; del Canto, Felipe; Salazar, Juan Carlos; Montero, David

    2015-01-01

    Efforts to develop vaccines for prevention of acute diarrhea have been going on for more than 40 y with partial success. The myriad of pathogens, more than 20, that have been identified as a cause of acute diarrhea throughout the years pose a significant challenge for selecting and further developing the most relevant vaccine candidates. Based on pathogen distribution as identified in epidemiological studies performed mostly in low-resource countries, rotavirus, Cryptosporidium, Shigella, diarrheogenic E. coli and V. cholerae are predominant, and thus the main targets for vaccine development and implementation. Vaccination against norovirus is most relevant in middle/high-income countries and possibly in resource-deprived countries, pending a more precise characterization of disease impact. Only a few licensed vaccines are currently available, of which rotavirus vaccines have been the most outstanding in demonstrating a significant impact in a short time period. This is a comprehensive review, divided into 2 articles, of nearly 50 vaccine candidates against the most relevant viral and bacterial pathogens that cause acute gastroenteritis. In order to facilitate reading, sections for each pathogen are organized as follows: i) a discussion of the main epidemiological and pathogenic features; and ii) a discussion of vaccines based on their stage of development, moving from current licensed vaccines to vaccines in advanced stage of development (in phase IIb or III trials) to vaccines in early stages of clinical development (in phase I/II) or preclinical development in animal models. In this first article we discuss rotavirus, norovirus and Vibrio cholerae. In the following article we will discuss Shigella, Salmonella (non-typhoidal), diarrheogenic E. coli (enterotoxigenic and enterohemorragic), and Campylobacter jejuni. PMID:25715048

  8. Vaccines for viral and bacterial pathogens causing acute gastroenteritis: Part I: Overview, vaccines for enteric viruses and Vibrio cholerae

    PubMed Central

    O’Ryan, Miguel; Vidal, Roberto; del Canto, Felipe; Salazar, Juan Carlos; Montero, David

    2015-01-01

    Efforts to develop vaccines for prevention of acute diarrhea have been going on for more than 40 y with partial success. The myriad of pathogens, more than 20, that have been identified as a cause of acute diarrhea throughout the years pose a significant challenge for selecting and further developing the most relevant vaccine candidates. Based on pathogen distribution as identified in epidemiological studies performed mostly in low-resource countries, rotavirus, Cryptosporidium, Shigella, diarrheogenic E. coli and V. cholerae are predominant, and thus the main targets for vaccine development and implementation. Vaccination against norovirus is most relevant in middle/high-income countries and possibly in resource-deprived countries, pending a more precise characterization of disease impact. Only a few licensed vaccines are currently available, of which rotavirus vaccines have been the most outstanding in demonstrating a significant impact in a short time period. This is a comprehensive review, divided into 2 articles, of nearly 50 vaccine candidates against the most relevant viral and bacterial pathogens that cause acute gastroenteritis. In order to facilitate reading, sections for each pathogen are organized as follows: i) a discussion of the main epidemiological and pathogenic features; and ii) a discussion of vaccines based on their stage of development, moving from current licensed vaccines to vaccines in advanced stage of development (in phase IIb or III trials) to vaccines in early stages of clinical development (in phase I/II) or preclinical development in animal models. In this first article we discuss rotavirus, norovirus and Vibrio cholerae. In the following article we will discuss Shigella, Salmonella (non-typhoidal), diarrheogenic E. coli (enterotoxigenic and enterohemorragic), and Campylobacter jejuni. PMID:25715048

  9. Mycobacterium marinum causes both long-term subclinical infection and acute disease in the leopard frog (Rana pipiens).

    PubMed Central

    Ramakrishnan, L; Valdivia, R H; McKerrow, J H; Falkow, S

    1997-01-01

    Mycobacterium marinum grows at an optimal temperature of 33 degrees C, far lower than that for M. tuberculosis. Consequently, M. marinum infection of mammals is restricted largely to the cooler surfaces of the body, such as the extremities, but it causes a systemic infection in a large number of poikilothermic animals. Here, we describe a laboratory animal model for M. marinum disease in the leopard frog (Rana pipiens), a natural host species. M. marinum causes a chronic granulomatous, nonlethal disease in immunocompetent frogs. Immunosuppression of the frogs with hydrocortisone results in an acute, fulminant, lethal disease. This animal model, in which a spectrum of tuberculosis-like disease can be produced, will be useful for the dissection of the genetic basis of mycobacterial pathogenesis. PMID:9009340

  10. Acute free-floating carotid artery thrombus causing stroke in a young patient: unique etiology and management using endovascular approach.

    PubMed

    Tan, Ai Peng; Taneja, Manish; Seah, Boon Heng; Leong, Hoe Nam; Venketasubramanian, Narayanaswamy

    2014-01-01

    Atherosclerotic disease accounts for 20%-30% of strokes in the general population. In young adults, it is an unexpected event and its causes involve diverse pathologies. Herein, we describe a unique case of acute embolic stroke in a young adult patient due to the presence of a large clot in the right common and internal carotid arteries, as a result of an extrinsic cause. Surgical clot retrieval was considered unsafe at that point in time in view of the active inflammatory changes surrounding the affected vessels. This was eventually treated with a novel endovascular technique, a unique alternative to open surgery, with excellent clinical outcome. To our knowledge, the penumbra system has never been used for thrombus removal in a nonacute setting. PMID:25440371

  11. Enteric bacteria isolated from acute diarrheal patients in the Republic of Korea between the year 2004 and 2006.

    PubMed

    Cho, Seung-Hak; Shin, Hyun-Ho; Choi, Yeon-Hwa; Park, Mi-Sun; Lee, Bok-Kwon

    2008-06-01

    In an epidemiological survey of human enterobacterial infections in the Republic of Korea during three years from 2004 to 2006, we isolated 1,784 (6.2%, isolation rate of enteropathogens from stool samples) in 2004, 2,547 (9.5%) in 2005 and 3,506 bacteria (12.3%) from people who visited clinics. Among the isolated bacteria, pathogenic Escherichia coli, especially, EAEC was the most frequently identified pathogen in both urban and rural regions followed by Staphylococcus aureus, Salmonella species, Bacillus cereus, Vibrio parahaemolyticus, Campylobacter jejuni, Clostridium perfringens, and Shigella species. Distinct seasonality was found in V. parahaemolyticus species, while this pathogen showed no age-specific patterns. However, other bacteria, i.e., pathogenic E. coli, S. aureus, Salmonella spp., and B. cereus showed similar seasonality throughout the year, showing a slight increase in the infection rate during the summer months and high prevalence among children under 10 years of age and elder-age people. The antibiotic susceptibility patterns of pathogenic E. coli, Salmonella spp., and S. aureus showed high resistance to penicillins. However, both pathogenic E. coli and Salmonella spp. were susceptible to several cephems, imipenem, and amikacin. Moreover, S. aureus strains resistant to vancomycin were not found. In conclusion, these surveillances can play an important role for the control and prevention to the diseases originated by enteritis bacteria. PMID:18604503

  12. Esophageal Perforation and Acute Bacterial Mediastinitis: Other Causes of Chest Pain That Can Be Easily Missed

    PubMed Central

    Cross, Madeline R.; Greenwald, Miles F.; Dahhan, Ali

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Esophageal perforation is a rare condition that is commonly missed. Male gender and alcohol use are predisposing risk factors. Most of the cases are iatrogenic or traumatic; nonetheless, spontaneous cases are not uncommon. It typically occurs after vomiting or straining as the increased intra-abdominal pressure transmits into the esophagus and results in the tear. One of the main complications is acute bacterial mediastinitis from contamination with esophageal flora. This condition can be life-threatening because it is very frequently misdiagnosed and appropriate management is often delayed. A 49-year-old man presented with worsening sudden-onset interscapular back pain that then changed to chest pain with odynophagia and was found to have fever and leukocytosis. Chest computed tomography revealed signs of mediastinitis with possible esophageal perforation. He reported symptoms started 2 days ago after lifting of heavy objects. Empiric antimicrobial was begun with conservative management and avoidance of oral intake. Barium esophagram and esophagogastroduodenoscopy revealed no signs of perforation or inflammation. His symptoms resolved and he gradually resumed oral intake. Blood cultures grew Methicillin-sensitive Staphylococcus aureus and he was discharged on appropriate antibiotics for 4 weeks. He did well on follow-up 3 months after hospitalization. The case highlights the importance of considering esophageal etiologies of chest pain. PMID:26266352

  13. [A Case of Wernicke's Encephalopathy Presenting with Acute Deterioration of Consciousness Caused by Peripheral Parenteral Nutrition].

    PubMed

    Akiyama, Hideyuki; Saito, Minoru; Ohtsuka, Yoshihisa

    2015-12-01

    We report the case of a 67-year-old woman with Wernicke's encephalopathy(WE), who had been suffering from repeated vomiting and poor oral intake due to both reflux esophagitis and atrophic gastritis. She presented with altered of consciousness, horizontal nystagmus, and gait disturbance, and acute deterioration of consciousness was observed after starting peripheral parenteral nutrition (PPN). Brain MRI showed bilateral high intensity lesions in the medial thalamus and the dorsal midbrain on FLAIR and T2-weighted images. Although brain MRI characteristics are useful for diagnosing WE, it is possible that there are no abnormal MRI findings in its early stages. In addition, only 10-20% of WE cases present with the classical clinical triad of confusion, ophthalmoplegia, and ataxia. Therefore, confirming the diagnosis can be challenging. In general, rapid improvement of symptoms is observed with prompt vitamin B1 supplementation. However, delays in treatment can result in irreversible amnesia and ataxia. Furthermore, in the state of vitamin B1 deficiency, even PPN, not just total parenteral nutrition, can worsen symptoms, and this deterioration is attributed to the glucose load. PMID:26646178

  14. Subserous lymphangioma of the sigmoid colon: an uncommon cause of acute abdomen in pediatric patients.

    PubMed

    Fernandes, Bianca Furlan; Moraes, Érika Neves de Souza; de Oliveira, Francini Rossetto; Benevides, Gabriel Núncio; Felipe-Silva, Aloísio; Ferreira, Cristiane Rúbia; de Alcântara, Paulo Sérgio Martins; Tokeshi, Flavio; Martinês, João Augusto Dos Santos; Ferronato, Ângela Espósito

    2015-01-01

    Lymphangioma is a rare, benign lesion derived from a malformation of the lymphatic system, which is more frequently found in the head, neck, and axilla. However, it may be present anywhere in the body, and the diagnosis involves adults as children with some distinct clinical features among them. In pediatric patients, abdominal cystic lymphangioma occurs mostly in the mesentery presenting abdominal pain, intestinal obstruction, or, more rarely, hemorrhage. The authors report the case of a child with a short-course history of fever, abdominal pain, and constipation. The physical examination disclosed the presence of an abdominal mass and signs of peritoneal irritation. Imaging was consistent with a cystic lesion compressing the sigmoid colon and laterally displacing the remaining loops. Exploratory laparotomy was undertaken, and a sigmoidectomy, followed by Hartman's colostomy, was performed. Histological examination revealed the nature of the lesion as a cystic lymphangioma. The authors highlight the clinical features of this entity and call attention to this disease in the differential diagnosis of acute abdomen or abdominal pain, mainly in pediatric patients. PMID:26894047

  15. Metabolomic Characterizations of Liver Injury Caused by Acute Arsenic Toxicity in Zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Li, Caixia; Li, Ping; Tan, Yee Min; Lam, Siew Hong; Chan, Eric C. Y.; Gong, Zhiyuan

    2016-01-01

    Arsenic is one of the most common metalloid contaminants in groundwater and it has both acute and chronic toxicity affecting multiple organs. Details of the mechanism of arsenic toxicity are still lacking and profile studies at metabolic level are very limited. Using gas chromatography coupled with mass spectroscopy (GC/MS), we first generated metabolomic profiles from the livers of arsenic-treated zebrafish and identified 34 significantly altered metabolite peaks as potential markers, including four prominent ones: cholic acid, glycylglycine, glycine and hypotaurine. Combined results from GC/MS, histological examination and pathway analyses suggested a series of alterations, including apoptosis, glycogenolysis, changes in amino acid metabolism and fatty acid composition, accumulation of bile acids and fats, and disturbance in glycolysis related energy metabolism. The alterations in glycolysis partially resemble Warburg effect commonly observed in many cancer cells. However, cellular damages were not reflected in two conventional liver function tests performed, Bilirubin assay and alanine aminotransferase (ALT) assay, probably because the short arsenate exposure was insufficient to induce detectable damage. This study demonstrated that metabolic changes could reflect mild liver impairments induced by arsenic exposure, which underscored their potential in reporting early liver injury. PMID:26967897

  16. Subserous lymphangioma of the sigmoid colon: an uncommon cause of acute abdomen in pediatric patients

    PubMed Central

    Fernandes, Bianca Furlan; Moraes, Érika Neves de Souza; de Oliveira, Francini Rossetto; Felipe-Silva, Aloísio; Ferreira, Cristiane Rúbia; de Alcântara, Paulo Sérgio Martins; Tokeshi, Flavio; Martinês, João Augusto dos Santos; Ferronato, Ângela Espósito

    2015-01-01

    Lymphangioma is a rare, benign lesion derived from a malformation of the lymphatic system, which is more frequently found in the head, neck, and axilla. However, it may be present anywhere in the body, and the diagnosis involves adults as children with some distinct clinical features among them. In pediatric patients, abdominal cystic lymphangioma occurs mostly in the mesentery presenting abdominal pain, intestinal obstruction, or, more rarely, hemorrhage. The authors report the case of a child with a short-course history of fever, abdominal pain, and constipation. The physical examination disclosed the presence of an abdominal mass and signs of peritoneal irritation. Imaging was consistent with a cystic lesion compressing the sigmoid colon and laterally displacing the remaining loops. Exploratory laparotomy was undertaken, and a sigmoidectomy, followed by Hartman’s colostomy, was performed. Histological examination revealed the nature of the lesion as a cystic lymphangioma. The authors highlight the clinical features of this entity and call attention to this disease in the differential diagnosis of acute abdomen or abdominal pain, mainly in pediatric patients. PMID:26894047

  17. Central nervous system haemorrhage causing early death in acute promyelocytic leukaemia.

    PubMed

    Borowska, Anna; Stelmaszczyk-Emmel, Anna; Pawelec, Katarzyna

    2016-01-01

    Acute promyelocytic leukaemia (APL) is a rare type of paediatric leukaemia characterised by a specific genetic mutation and life-threatening coagulopathy. The discovery of all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA), which acts directly on promyelocytic locus-retinoic acid receptor α (PML-RARα) gene product, brought a revolution to the therapy of this disorder. Unfortunately, despite an improvement in the complete remission rate, the early death (ED) rate has not changed significantly, and the haemorrhages remain a major problem. The most common bleeding site, which accounts for about 65-80% of haemorrhages, is the central nervous system. Second in line are pulmonary haemorrhages (32%), while gastrointestinal bleedings are relatively rare. Haemorrhages result from thrombocytopaenia, disseminated intravascular coagulopathy (DIC), and systemic fibrinolysis. Herein we present a boy aged one year and nine months with APL. The patient was not eligible for ATRA administration due to poor clinical condition. He developed bleeding diathesis that presented as disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC) and led to intracranial haemorrhage, which resulted in the patient's death. PMID:26862315

  18. Metabolomic Characterizations of Liver Injury Caused by Acute Arsenic Toxicity in Zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Li, Caixia; Li, Ping; Tan, Yee Min; Lam, Siew Hong; Chan, Eric C Y; Gong, Zhiyuan

    2016-01-01

    Arsenic is one of the most common metalloid contaminants in groundwater and it has both acute and chronic toxicity affecting multiple organs. Details of the mechanism of arsenic toxicity are still lacking and profile studies at metabolic level are very limited. Using gas chromatography coupled with mass spectroscopy (GC/MS), we first generated metabolomic profiles from the livers of arsenic-treated zebrafish and identified 34 significantly altered metabolite peaks as potential markers, including four prominent ones: cholic acid, glycylglycine, glycine and hypotaurine. Combined results from GC/MS, histological examination and pathway analyses suggested a series of alterations, including apoptosis, glycogenolysis, changes in amino acid metabolism and fatty acid composition, accumulation of bile acids and fats, and disturbance in glycolysis related energy metabolism. The alterations in glycolysis partially resemble Warburg effect commonly observed in many cancer cells. However, cellular damages were not reflected in two conventional liver function tests performed, Bilirubin assay and alanine aminotransferase (ALT) assay, probably because the short arsenate exposure was insufficient to induce detectable damage. This study demonstrated that metabolic changes could reflect mild liver impairments induced by arsenic exposure, which underscored their potential in reporting early liver injury. PMID:26967897

  19. Regression of long standing anorexia nervosa following acute renal failure caused by gentamicin intoxication.

    PubMed

    Chodorowski, Zygmunt; Rutkowski, Bolesław; Sein Anand, Jacek; Rutkowski, Przemysław

    2005-01-01

    A female patient aged 22 with fully developed symptoms of anorexia nervosa presented the following metabolic disturbances: persistent hyperuricemia, hyponatruria, (sometimes with sodium lack in urine) as well as frequent hyponatremia and hyper-uricosuria. The patient's low arterial blood pressure (70/40 mm Hg on average) was not improved by pharmacological treatment, and only high oral doses of table salt (20-70 g/24 h) did prove effective in the therapy. The subject passed seven renal calculi composed of sodium urate and uric acid. Numerous urinalyses did not reveal any changes, and bacterial cultures of the urine were also negative. After 14 years of anorexia nervosa, the patient was treated for pneumonia with gentamicin at doses of 2 x 80 mg/24 h. Following third dose of the antibiotic, the patient developed acute renal failure and was treated by haemodialysis for six weeks. The renal function came gradually to the norm. Simultaneously, all the anorexia nervosa symptoms subsided along with sodium metabolism disturbances, while purine metabolism disorders got considerably alleviated. The patient started to have her menstrual cycles again, gained 12 kg in body weight, and one year afterwards bore a son. A further 10-year follow-up period was free of any pathological changes except for a slight hyperuricemia. To the best of our knowledge, the similar case has not been reported in the medical literature and electronic data bases. PMID:16225114

  20. Central nervous system haemorrhage causing early death in acute promyelocytic leukaemia

    PubMed Central

    Borowska, Anna; Stelmaszczyk-Emmel, Anna

    2016-01-01

    Acute promyelocytic leukaemia (APL) is a rare type of paediatric leukaemia characterised by a specific genetic mutation and life-threatening coagulopathy. The discovery of all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA), which acts directly on promyelocytic locus-retinoic acid receptor α (PML-RARα) gene product, brought a revolution to the therapy of this disorder. Unfortunately, despite an improvement in the complete remission rate, the early death (ED) rate has not changed significantly, and the haemorrhages remain a major problem. The most common bleeding site, which accounts for about 65-80% of haemorrhages, is the central nervous system. Second in line are pulmonary haemorrhages (32%), while gastrointestinal bleedings are relatively rare. Haemorrhages result from thrombocytopaenia, disseminated intravascular coagulopathy (DIC), and systemic fibrinolysis. Herein we present a boy aged one year and nine months with APL. The patient was not eligible for ATRA administration due to poor clinical condition. He developed bleeding diathesis that presented as disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC) and led to intracranial haemorrhage, which resulted in the patient's death. PMID:26862315

  1. Weekly oral azithromycin as prophylaxis for agents causing acute respiratory disease.

    PubMed

    Gray, G C; McPhate, D C; Leinonen, M; Cassell, G H; Deperalta, E P; Putnam, S D; Karcher, J A; Sawyer, M H; Laurila, A; Connor, J D

    1998-01-01

    Since the 1950s the U.S. military has used intramuscular injections of benzathine penicillin G (BPG) to control outbreaks of respiratory disease. In an effort to find an alternative prophylaxis, a randomized field trial was conducted among 1,016 male U.S. Marine trainee volunteers at high risk for respiratory disease. Participants were evaluated for evidence of acute respiratory infection by serological tests on pretraining and posttraining sera (63 days apart). Oral azithromycin prophylaxis (500 mg/w) outperformed BPG, preventing infection from Streptococcus pyogenes (Efficacy [E] = 84%; 95% confidence interval [CI], 63%-93%), Streptococcus pneumoniae (E = 80%; 95% CI, 50%-92%), Mycoplasma pneumoniae (E = 64%; 95% CI, 25%-83%), and Chlamydia pneumoniae (E = 58%; 95% CI, 15%-79%) in comparison with results in a no-treatment group. Azithromycin group subjects reported few side effects and less respiratory symptoms than the BPG and no-treatment groups. According to serological tests, oral azithromycin is an effective alternative prophylaxis to BPG for military populations. PMID:9455517

  2. Hematogenously Disseminated Skin Disease Caused by Mucor velutinosus in a Patient with Acute Myeloid Leukemia▿

    PubMed Central

    Sugui, Janyce A.; Christensen, Jesica A.; Bennett, John E.; Zelazny, Adrian M.; Kwon-Chung, Kyung J.

    2011-01-01

    We report here a case of disseminated skin infection caused by Mucor velutinosus, a recently described new species. We believe this to be the first published report of a clinical case of mucormycosis due to M. velutinosus, as well as a rare case of dissemination from a deep site to skin. PMID:21543575

  3. A single sea lamprey attack causes acute anemia and mortality in lake sturgeon.

    PubMed

    Sepúlveda, Maria S; Patrick, Holly K; Sutton, Trent M

    2012-06-01

    The effects of sea lamprey Petromyzon marinus parasitism on hematological variables have not been quantified for lake sturgeon Acipenser fulvescens. Our study objectives were to (1) assess changes in lake sturgeon hematology immediately after a single sea lamprey attack and after a 2-week recovery period and (2) assess changes in the histological condition of major hematopoietic organs. Lake sturgeon from four size-groups (470-570, 570-650, 650-760, and 950-1,500 mm fork length) were individually subjected to a sea lamprey attack in a series of 55 experimental trials. Survival of lake sturgeon after a single sea lamprey attack was size dependent, with fish in smaller size-groups exhibiting higher direct and indirect mortality than individuals in larger size-classes. The most sensitive blood chemistry variable was hematocrit: each 1% decline in hematocrit resulted in a 5.1% increase in mortality risk. Other important variables were plasma protein level, with a 10-g/dL decline resulting in a 4.2% increase in mortality risk; and hemoglobin, with a 1-g/dL decline resulting in a 2.9% increase in mortality risk. Most of the surviving lake sturgeon were unable to restore hemoglobin, hematocrit, and plasma protein to pre-attack levels by the end of the 2-week recovery period. We developed an index of histological spleen condition, which indicated that short-duration (< 5-d) sea lamprey attachments depleted red blood cell reserves faster than longer-duration attacks. Our study results indicate that sea lamprey parasitism has the potential to induce acute anemia in lake sturgeon and that nonlethal attacks on smaller (< 760-mm) fish can have serious physiological implications. PMID:22838079

  4. Excessive α-tocopherol exacerbates microglial activation and brain injury caused by acute ischemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Khanna, Savita; Heigel, Mallory; Weist, Jessica; Gnyawali, Surya; Teplitsky, Seth; Roy, Sashwati; Sen, Chandan K; Rink, Cameron

    2015-03-01

    The vitamin E family includes both tocopherols and tocotrienols, where α-tocopherol (αTOC) is the most bioavailable form. Clinical trials testing the therapeutic efficacy of high-dose αTOC against stroke have largely failed or reported negative outcomes when a "more is better" approach to supplementation (>400 IU/d) was used. This work addresses mechanisms by which supraphysiologic αTOC may contribute to stroke-induced brain injury. Ischemic stroke injury and the neuroinflammatory response were studied in tocopherol transfer protein-deficient mice maintained on a diet containing αTOC vitamin E at the equivalent human dose of 1680 IU/d. Ischemic stroke-induced brain injury was exacerbated in the presence of supraphysiologic brain αTOC levels. At 48 h after stroke, S100B and RAGE expression was increased in stroke-affected cortex of mice with elevated brain αTOC levels. Such increases were concomitant with aggravated microglial activation and neuroinflammatory signaling. A poststroke increase in markers of oxidative injury and neurodegeneration in the presence of elevated brain αTOC establish that at supraphysiologic levels, αTOC potentiates neuroinflammatory responses to acute ischemic stroke. Exacerbation of microglial activation by excessive αTOC likely depends on its unique cell signaling regulatory properties independent of antioxidant function. Against the background of clinical failure for high-dose αTOC, outcomes of this work identify risk for exacerbating stroke-induced brain injury as a result of supplementing diet with excessive levels of αTOC. PMID:25411436

  5. Acute Abdominal Pain Caused by an Infected Mesenteric Cyst in a 24-Year-Old Female

    PubMed Central

    Ponten, Joep B.; Zijta, Frank M.

    2016-01-01

    A mesenteric cyst is a rare cause for abdominal pain. This umbrella term includes cystic entities which reside in the mesentery. We present a case of an infected false mesenteric cyst in a 24-year-old female patient without prior surgery or known trauma. Mainstay of treatment involves surgical resection, although less invasive treatments have been described. Prognosis depends on the origin of the cyst. PMID:27190668

  6. Inhibition of Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis Caused by Bacteria Isolated from the Skin of Boreal Toads, Anaxyrus (Bufo) boreas boreas, from Grand Teton National Park, Wyoming, USA

    PubMed Central

    Park, Shawna T; Collingwood, Amanda M; St-Hilaire, Sophie; Sheridan, Peter P

    2014-01-01

    The chytrid fungus Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis is a significant cause of the worldwide decline in amphibian populations; however, various amphibian species are capable of coexisting with B. dendrobatidis. Among them are boreal toads (Anaxyrus (Bufo) boreas boreas) located in Grand Teton National Park (GTNP) in Wyoming, USA. The purpose of this study was to identify cultivable bacterial isolates from the skin microbiota of boreal toads from GTNP and determine if they were capable of inhibiting B. dendrobatidis in vitro, and therefore might be a factor in the toad’s coexistence with this pathogen. Isolates from 6 of 21 genera tested were found to inhibit the growth of B. dendrobatidis. These bacteria represent diverse lineages such as the Gammaproteobacteria, the Betaproteobacteria, and the Bacteroidetes/Chlorobium groups. We propose that these bacteria compete via microbial antagonism with B. dendrobatidis. PMID:24826077

  7. Solitary Cecal Diverticulitis: An Unusual Cause of Acute Right Iliac Fossa PainA Case Report and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Mudatsakis, Nikolaos; Andreadakis, Emmanouil

    2014-01-01

    Solitary cecal diverticulitis is a rare cause of acute abdominal pain in the Western world. Its clinical presentation, in most cases, mimics acute appendicitis. A 38-year-old Caucasian man presented with acute abdomen and clinical signs of acute appendicitis. Laparotomy was performed and revealed an inflammatory, solitary diverticulum of the cecum. A typical appendectomy was performed and a catheter was inserted for draining percutaneously the inflamed diverticulum of the cecum. The patient had an uneventful recovery and was discharged on the 4th postoperative day. This frequently misdiagnosed condition, in most cases, is being suspected and identified intraoperatively as acute appendicitis. The aim of this study is to review the available different surgical management options and to present an alternative therapeutic approach that may be valuable under specific circumstances. PMID:25506025

  8. Calcific emboli originating from the brachiocephalic trunk causing acute cerebral infarction and worm-like calcification in the right middle cerebral artery.

    PubMed

    Deng, Qiuqiong; Zhang, Yue; Ding, Hongyan; Dong, Qiang; Fu, Jianhui

    2015-05-01

    We report, to our knowledge, the first patient with brachiocephalic trunk calcified plaque causing the 'salted pretzel sign' and worm-like calcification. Arterial stenosis or occlusion caused by atherosclerosis and thrombosis are responsible for the majority of cases of cerebral infarction. However, there are a number of other causes. Interestingly, these findings were not observed on a CT scan 10 days before the stroke. Acute cerebral infarction with calcifications on unenhanced head CT scans should raise suspicion for disease in the carotid system. Identification of subtle findings of acute ischemic stroke on CT scans is important for early diagnosis and treatment. PMID:25769256

  9. Acute Pyelonephritis with Bacteremia Caused by Enterococcus hirae: A Rare Infection in Humans

    PubMed Central

    Pãosinho, Ana; Azevedo, Telma; Alves, João V.; Costa, Isabel A.; Carvalho, Gustavo; Peres, Susana R.; Baptista, Teresa; Borges, Fernando; Mansinho, Kamal

    2016-01-01

    Enterococci are one of the usual residents of the microflora in humans. In the last decade this genus has been reported as the third most common cause of bacteremia. We present the case of a 78-year-old female who was admitted to the emergency room because of nausea, lipothymia, and weakness. She was diagnosed with a pyelonephritis with bacteremia, with the isolation in blood and urine cultures of Escherichia coli and Enterococcus hirae. This last microorganism is a rarely isolated pathogen in humans. Currently it is estimated to represent 1–3% of all enterococcal species isolated in clinical practice. PMID:27127665

  10. Acute suppurative parotitis caused by Streptococcus pneumoniae in an HIV-infected man.

    PubMed

    Guzman Vinasco, Luis; Bares, Sara; Sandkovsky, Uriel

    2015-01-01

    We report a case of a 32-year-old man who presented with progressive unilateral parotid gland enlargement and subsequently tested positive for HIV. A CT scan of the neck performed with contrast showed a phlegmon in the region of the right parotid tail measuring approximately 2.5×2.4 cm. Cultures of the aspirated fluid grew Streptococcus pneumoniae and the S. pneumoniae urinary antigen test was also positive. The patient underwent surgical debridement and received antimicrobial therapy with complete resolution of the parotitis. Parotitis caused by S. pneumoniae is rare, and HIV infection should be suspected in any case of invasive pneumococcal disease. PMID:25733094

  11. An uncommon cause of visceral arterial embolism in patients presenting with acute abdominal pain: a report of 2 cases.

    PubMed

    Ulenaers, M; Buchel, O C; Van Olmen, A; Moons, V; D'Haens, G; Christiaens, P

    2010-01-01

    We report on 2 cases of visceral arterial embolism presenting with acute abdominal pain. In neither patient a cause could be established on initial clinical, laboratory, echographic or radiological investigation. Both patients were subsequently found to have a mural thrombus in the thoracic aorta, with visceral arterial embolism. Each underwent a successful operative thrombectomy. Both patients had a normal underlying aortic intima at inspection. The first patient was a young male with no known diseases. He regularly used cannabis and tested positive on admission, an association not yet reported with aortic mural thrombus. He was found to have a slightly reduced protein C. The second patient was a middle aged man with non-insulin dependent diabetes, hyperlipidaemia, arterial hypertension and hyperthyroidism. He was found to have an underlying adenocarcinoma of the lung and received chemotherapy. He died due to his cancer, 4 months after first presentation. PMID:20458852

  12. Thromboembolism as a Cause of Renal Artery Occlusion and Acute Kidney Injury: The Recovery of Kidney Function after Two Weeks

    PubMed Central

    Koivuviita, Niina; Tertti, Risto; Heiro, Maija; Manner, Ilkka; Metsrinne, Kaj

    2014-01-01

    Thromboembolic occlusion is a rare cause of acute kidney injury (AKI). It may lead to permanent loss of renal function. Our patient, who had dilated cardiomyopathy and prosthetic aortic valve, presented with AKI due to thromboembolic arterial occlusion of a solitary functioning kidney. After 2 weeks delay, local intra-arterial thrombolytic treatment with recombinant tissue plasminogen activator was performed without sufficient effect. However, a subsequent percutaneous transluminal angioplasty with stenting was successful. Diuresis began immediately, and renal function was fully recovered after 2 weeks. Although there had been no evident arterial circulation in the kidney, we think that minor flow through subtotal occlusion of the main renal artery made the hibernation of kidney tissue possible and contributed to the recovery. Thus, even after prolonged ischemia, revascularization can be useful. PMID:24847350

  13. Acute liver failure caused by 'fat burners' and dietary supplements: a case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Yellapu, Radha K; Mittal, Vivek; Grewal, Priya; Fiel, Mariaisabel; Schiano, Thomas

    2011-03-01

    Globally, people are struggling with obesity. Many effective, nonconventional methods of weight reduction, such as herbal and natural dietary supplements, are increasingly being sought. Fat burners are believed to raise metabolism, burn more calories and hasten fat loss. Despite patient perceptions that herbal remedies are free of adverse effects, some supplements are associated with severe hepatotoxicity. The present report describes a young healthy woman who presented with fulminant hepatic failure requiring emergent liver transplantation caused by a dietary supplement and fat burner containing usnic acid, green tea and guggul tree extracts. Thorough investigation, including histopathological examination, revealed no other cause of hepatotoxicity. The present case adds to the increasing number of reports of hepatotoxicity associated with dietary supplements containing usnic acid, and highlights that herbal extracts from green tea or guggul tree may not be free of adverse effects. Until these products are more closely regulated and their advertising better scrutinized, physicians and patients should become more familiar with herbal products that are commonly used as weight loss supplements and recognize those that are potentially harmful. PMID:21499580

  14. Recurrent gain-of-function mutation in PRKG1 causes thoracic aortic aneurysms and acute aortic dissections.

    PubMed

    Guo, Dong-chuan; Regalado, Ellen; Casteel, Darren E; Santos-Cortez, Regie L; Gong, Limin; Kim, Jeong Joo; Dyack, Sarah; Horne, S Gabrielle; Chang, Guijuan; Jondeau, Guillaume; Boileau, Catherine; Coselli, Joseph S; Li, Zhenyu; Leal, Suzanne M; Shendure, Jay; Rieder, Mark J; Bamshad, Michael J; Nickerson, Deborah A; Kim, Choel; Milewicz, Dianna M

    2013-08-01

    Gene mutations that lead to decreased contraction of vascular smooth-muscle cells (SMCs) can cause inherited thoracic aortic aneurysms and dissections. Exome sequencing of distant relatives affected by thoracic aortic disease and subsequent Sanger sequencing of additional probands with familial thoracic aortic disease identified the same rare variant, PRKG1 c.530G>A (p.Arg177Gln), in four families. This mutation segregated with aortic disease in these families with a combined two-point LOD score of 7.88. The majority of affected individuals presented with acute aortic dissections (63%) at relatively young ages (mean 31 years, range 17-51 years). PRKG1 encodes type I cGMP-dependent protein kinase (PKG-1), which is activated upon binding of cGMP and controls SMC relaxation. Although the p.Arg177Gln alteration disrupts binding to the high-affinity cGMP binding site within the regulatory domain, the altered PKG-1 is constitutively active even in the absence of cGMP. The increased PKG-1 activity leads to decreased phosphorylation of the myosin regulatory light chain in fibroblasts and is predicted to cause decreased contraction of vascular SMCs. Thus, identification of a gain-of-function mutation in PRKG1 as a cause of thoracic aortic disease provides further evidence that proper SMC contractile function is critical for maintaining the integrity of the thoracic aorta throughout a lifetime. PMID:23910461

  15. Acute sodium bicarbonate loading has negligible effects on resting and exercise blood pressure but causes gastrointestinal distress

    PubMed Central

    Kahle, Laura E.; Kelly, Patrick V.; Eliot, Kathrin A.; Weiss, Edward P.

    2013-01-01

    Oral ingestion of sodium bicarbonate (bicarbonate loading) has acute ergogenic effects on short-duration, high-intensity exercise. Because sodium bicarbonate is 27% sodium, ergogenic doses (i.e. 300 mg·kg−1) result in sodium intakes well above the Dietary Reference Intakes upper limit of 2300 mg/day. Therefore, it is conceivable that bicarbonate loading could have hypertensive effects. Therefore, we performed a double-blind cross-over trial to evaluate the hypothesis that bicarbonate loading increases resting and exercise blood pressure (BP). A secondary hypothesis was that bicarbonate loading causes gastrointestinal distress. Eleven endurance-trained men and women (exercise frequency, 4.6±0.4 sessions/wk; duration, 65±6 min/session) underwent testing on two occasions in random sequence: once after bicarbonate loading (300 mg·kg−1) and once after placebo ingestion. BP and heart rate (HR) were measured before bicarbonate or placebo consumption, 30 minutes after consumption, during 20 min of steady state submaximal cycling exercise, and during recovery. Bicarbonate loading did not affect systolic BP during rest, exercise, or recovery (p=0.38 for main treatment effect). However, it resulted in modestly higher diastolic BP (main treatment effect, +3.3±1.1 mmHg, p=0.01) and higher HR (main treatment effect, +10.1±2.4 bpm, p=0.002). Global ratings of gastrointestinal distress severity (0–10 scale) were greater after bicarbonate ingestion (5.1±0.5 vs. 0.5±0.2, p<0.0001). Furthermore, 10 of the 11 subjects (91%) experienced diarrhea, 64% experience bloating and thirst, and 45% experienced nausea after bicarbonate loading. In conclusion, although a single, ergogenic dose of sodium bicarbonate does not appear to have acute, clinically important effects on resting or exercise BP, it does cause substantial GI distress. PMID:23746564

  16. Acute heart failure caused by a giant hepatocellular metastatic tumor of the right atrium

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    We present a symptomatic 40-year-old cirrhotic man who presented with sudden onsets of syncope. Echocardiography revealed right ventricular outflow track obstruction caused by a huge right atrial mass. The tumor was surgically excised under cardiopulmonary bypass. Although no primary cancerous lesion in the liver was detected, histopathology revealed that the mass was a metastatic hepatocellular carcinoma. The aim of this report is to show the value of urgent preoperative computed tomography and its contribution in the operative strategy. The importance of urgent surgical treatment with tricuspid valve sparing tumor resection is emphasized even though the prognosis for such patients is dismal. We also discuss the further management options of such rare cases PMID:21867564

  17. Acute myocardial infarction caused by embolisation of an intra-cardiac tumour.

    PubMed

    Mostafa, Ashraf; Briasoulis, Alexandros; Schreiber, Theodore

    2016-02-01

    This report describes a rare case of left main coronary artery occlusion caused by embolisation of an intra-cardiac tumour in an 11-year-old patient. The patient presented with severe chest pain with ST-segment depression in the inferolateral leads with evidence of decreased left ventricular function, anterior-apical hypokinesis, and a pedunculated mass attached to the mitral valve. An urgent cardiac catheterisation was performed, which revealed near-complete obstruction of the left anterior descending coronary artery. Transcatheter aspiration of the embolic material was successfully performed. The final pathological examination revealed an inflammatory myofibroblastic tumour, which is a rare benign tumour, characterised by the proliferation of myofibroblasts and inflammatory cell infiltration. PMID:26095876

  18. Acute septic arthritis of the acromioclavicular joint caused by Haemophilus parainfluenzae: a rare causative origin.

    PubMed

    Hong, Myong-Joo; Kim, Yeon-Dong; Ham, Hyang-Do

    2015-04-01

    Septic arthritis of the acromioclavicular (AC) joint is a rare entity with symptoms that include erythema, swelling, and tenderness over the AC joint, fever, and limitation of shoulder motion with pain. In previous reports, Staphylococcus and Streptococcus species have been mentioned as common causative organisms. Haemophilus parainfluenzae is a normal inhabitant of the oral cavity, respiratory tract, gastrointestinal tract, and urogenital tract. However, it sometimes causes opportunistic infections leading to septic arthritis and osteomyelitis. AC joint infection associated with H.parainfluenzae is very rare, and only one case has been reported in the literature. Moreover, septic arthritis in immunocompetent patients is also very rare. Here, we report the case of a healthy patient with H. parainfluenzae-related septic arthritis of the AC joint. PMID:24584486

  19. Attitudes of clinical staff toward the causes and management of aggression in acute old age psychiatry inpatient units

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background In psychiatry, most of the focus on patient aggression has been in adolescent and adult inpatient settings. This behaviour is also common in elderly people with mental illness, but little research has been conducted into this problem in old age psychiatry settings. The attitudes of clinical staff toward aggression may affect the way they manage this behaviour. The purpose of this study was to examine the attitudes of clinical staff toward the causes and management of aggression in acute old age psychiatry inpatient settings. Methods A convenience sample of clinical staff were recruited from three locked acute old age psychiatry inpatient units in Melbourne, Australia. They completed the Management of Aggression and Violence Scale, which assessed the causes and managment of aggression in psychiatric settings. Results Eighty-five staff completed the questionnaire, comprising registered nurses (61.1%, n = 52), enrolled nurses (27.1%, n = 23) and medical and allied health staff (11.8%, n = 10). A range of causative factors contributed to aggression. The respondents had a tendency to disagree that factors directly related to the patient contributed to this behaviour. They agreed patients were aggressive because of the environment they were in, other people contributed to them becoming aggressive, and patients from certain cultural groups were prone to these behaviours. However, there were mixed views about whether patient aggression could be prevented, and this type of behaviour took place because staff did not listen to patients. There was agreement medication was a valuable approach for the management of aggression, negotiation could be used more effectively in such challenging behaviour, and seclusion and physical restraint were sometimes used more than necessary. However, there was disagreement about whether the practice of secluding patients should be discontinued. Conclusions Aggression in acute old age psychiatry inpatient units occurs occasionally and is problematic. A range of causative factors contribute to the onset of this behaviour. Attitudes toward the management of aggression are complex and somewhat contradictory and can affect the way staff manage this behaviour; therefore, wide-ranging initiatives are needed to prevent and deal with this type of challenging behaviour. PMID:24642026

  20. Bacteria May Cope Differently from Similar Membrane Damage Caused by the Australian Tree Frog Antimicrobial Peptide Maculatin 1.1.

    PubMed

    Sani, Marc-Antoine; Henriques, Sónia Troeira; Weber, Daniel; Separovic, Frances

    2015-08-01

    Maculatin 1.1 (Mac1) is an antimicrobial peptide from the skin of Australian tree frogs and is known to possess selectivity toward Gram-positive bacteria. Although Mac1 has membrane disrupting activity, it is not known how Mac1 selectively targets Gram-positive over Gram-negative bacteria. The interaction of Mac1 with Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus, and human red blood cells (hRBC) and with their mimetic model membranes is here reported. The peptide showed a 16-fold greater growth inhibition activity against S. aureus (4 μM) than against E. coli (64 μM) and an intermediate cytotoxicity against hRBC (30 μM). Surprisingly, Sytox Green uptake monitored by flow cytometry showed that Mac1 compromised both bacterial membranes with similar efficiency at ∼20-fold lower concentration than the reported minimum inhibition concentration against S. aureus. Mac1 also reduced the negative potential of S. aureus and E. coli membrane with similar efficacy. Furthermore, liposomes mimicking the cell membrane of S. aureus (POPG/TOCL) and E. coli (POPE/POPG) were lysed at similar concentrations, whereas hRBC-like vesicles (POPC/SM/Chol) remained mostly intact in the presence of Mac1. Remarkably, when POPG/TOCL and POPE/POPG liposomes were co-incubated, Mac1 did not induce leakage from POPE/POPG liposomes, suggesting a preference toward POPG/TOCL membranes that was supported by surface plasma resonance assays. Interestingly, circular dichroism spectroscopy showed a similar helical conformation in the presence of the anionic liposomes but not the hRBC mimics. Overall, the study showed that Mac1 disrupts bacterial membranes in a similar fashion before cell death events and would preferentially target S. aureus over E. coli or hRBC membranes. PMID:26100634

  1. An imbalance in mucosal cytokine profile causes transient intestinal inflammation following an animal's first exposure to faecal bacteria and antigens.

    PubMed

    Sydora, B C; MacFarlane, S M; Lupicki, M; Dmytrash, A L; Dieleman, L A; Fedorak, R N

    2010-07-01

    Intestinal microflora play a critical role in the initiation and perpetuation of chronic inflammatory bowel diseases. In genetically susceptible hosts, bacterial colonization results in rapid-onset chronic intestinal inflammation. Nevertheless, the intestinal and systemic immune response to faecal bacteria and antigen exposure into a sterile intestinal lumen of a post-weaned animal with a mature immune system are not understood clearly. This study examined the effects of faecal bacteria and antigen exposure on the intestinal mucosal and systemic immune system in healthy axenic mice. Axenic wild-type mice were inoculated orally with a crude faecal slurry solution derived from conventionally raised mice and were analysed prior to and then at days 3, 7, 14 and 28 post-treatment. Ingestion of faecal slurry resulted in a transient, early onset of proinflammatory interferon (IFN)-gamma, tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha and interleukin (IL)-17 response that was maximal at day 3. In contrast, the transient release of the anti-inflammatory cytokines IL-10 and IL-4 occurred later and was maximal at day 7. Both responses subsided by day 14. This early cytokine imbalance was associated with a brief rise in colonic and caecal histopathological injury score at day 7. The bacterial antigen-specific systemic response was found to follow the intestinal immune response with a maximal release of both pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines at day 7. Thus, first exposure of healthy axenic wild-type mice to normal faecal flora and antigens results in an early proinflammatory cytokine response and transient colonic inflammation that then resolves in conjunction with a subsequent anti-inflammatory cytokine profile. PMID:20345974

  2. An imbalance in mucosal cytokine profile causes transient intestinal inflammation following an animal's first exposure to faecal bacteria and antigens

    PubMed Central

    Sydora, B C; MacFarlane, S M; Lupicki, M; Dmytrash, A L; Dieleman, L A; Fedorak, R N

    2010-01-01

    Intestinal microflora play a critical role in the initiation and perpetuation of chronic inflammatory bowel diseases. In genetically susceptible hosts, bacterial colonization results in rapid-onset chronic intestinal inflammation. Nevertheless, the intestinal and systemic immune response to faecal bacteria and antigen exposure into a sterile intestinal lumen of a post-weaned animal with a mature immune system are not understood clearly. This study examined the effects of faecal bacteria and antigen exposure on the intestinal mucosal and systemic immune system in healthy axenic mice. Axenic wild-type mice were inoculated orally with a crude faecal slurry solution derived from conventionally raised mice and were analysed prior to and then at days 3, 7, 14 and 28 post-treatment. Ingestion of faecal slurry resulted in a transient, early onset of proinflammatory interferon (IFN)-γ, tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-α and interleukin (IL)-17 response that was maximal at day 3. In contrast, the transient release of the anti-inflammatory cytokines IL-10 and IL-4 occurred later and was maximal at day 7. Both responses subsided by day 14. This early cytokine imbalance was associated with a brief rise in colonic and caecal histopathological injury score at day 7. The bacterial antigen-specific systemic response was found to follow the intestinal immune response with a maximal release of both pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines at day 7. Thus, first exposure of healthy axenic wild-type mice to normal faecal flora and antigens results in an early proinflammatory cytokine response and transient colonic inflammation that then resolves in conjunction with a subsequent anti-inflammatory cytokine profile. PMID:20345974

  3. Acute cigarette smoke exposure causes lung injury in rabbits treated with ibuprofen

    SciTech Connect

    Witten, M.L.; Lemen, R.J.; Quan, S.F.; Sobonya, R.E.; Magarelli, J.L.; Bruck, D.C.

    1987-01-01

    We studied lung clearance of aerosolized technetium-labeled diethylenetriamine pentaacetic acid (/sup 99m/TcDTPA), plasma concentrations of 6-keto-PGF1 alpha and thromboxane B2, and pulmonary edema as indices of lung injury in rabbits exposed to cigarette smoke (CSE). Forty-six rabbits were randomly assigned to 4 groups: control sham smoke exposure (SS, N = 9), sham smoke exposure ibuprofen-pretreated (SS-I, N = 10), CSE (N = 9), sham smoke exposure ibuprofen-pretreated (SS-I, N = 10), CSE (N = 9), and CSE ibuprofen-pretreated (CSE-I, N = 19). Ibuprofen (cyclooxygenase eicosanoid inhibitor) was administered as a single daily intramuscular injection (25 mg/kg) for 7 days before the experiment. Cigarette or sham smoke was delivered by syringe in a series of 5, 10, 20, and 30 tidal volume breaths with a 15-min counting period between each subset of breaths to determine /sup 99m/TcDTPA biological half-life (T1/2). In the ibuprofen pretreated group, CSE caused significant decreases in /sup 99m/TcDTPA T1/2 and dynamic lung compliance. Furthermore, these changes in lung function were accompanied by severe injury to type I alveolar cell epithelium, pulmonary edema, and frequently death of the rabbits. These findings suggest that inhibition of the cyclooxygenase pathway before CSE exacerbates lung injury in rabbits.

  4. A Rare Case of Toxic Myocarditis Caused by Bacterial Liver Abscess Mimicking Acute Myocardial Infarction

    PubMed Central

    Zou, Yuhai; Lin, Lin; Xiao, Hua; Xiang, Dingcheng

    2016-01-01

    Patient: Male, 66 Final Diagnosis: Toxic myocarditis Symptoms: — Medication: — Clinical Procedure: Emergency Specialty: Cardiology Objective: Rare disease Background: Chills, high fever, right upper abdomen pain, and increased white blood cell count are the main and common clinical features of bacterial liver abscess. It is rare to see bacterial liver abscess present symptoms of myocardial injury first, and this can lead to misdiagnosis. Case Report: We report a case of toxic myocarditis caused by bacterial liver abscess. The patient first presented with chest pain, ST segment elevation, and elevated TNI, which misled us to diagnose myocardial infarction, but the coronary artery had no stenosis or obstructive lesions after emergency coronary angiography. Then we modified the diagnosis to toxic myocarditis. Bacterial liver abscess was the proposed etiology after a series of auxiliary examinations. Finally, antibiotics and percutaneous liver puncture catheter drainage were used to improve the clinical outcome. Conclusions: It is rare that patients with bacterial liver abscess first present symptoms of myocardial injury. Differential diagnosis between myocarditis and myocardial infarction should be careful, as myocarditis is a diagnosis of exclusion, and coronary angiography is necessary to confirm coronary disease. Percutaneous liver puncture catheter drainage can effectively cure bacterial liver abscess. PMID:26726772

  5. A Rare Case of Toxic Myocarditis Caused by Bacterial Liver Abscess Mimicking Acute Myocardial Infarction.

    PubMed

    Zou, Yuhai; Lin, Lin; Xiao, Hua; Xiang, Dingcheng

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Chills, high fever, right upper abdomen pain, and increased white blood cell count are the main and common clinical features of bacterial liver abscess. It is rare to see bacterial liver abscess present symptoms of myocardial injury first, and this can lead to misdiagnosis. CASE REPORT We report a case of toxic myocarditis caused by bacterial liver abscess. The patient first presented with chest pain, ST segment elevation, and elevated TNI, which misled us to diagnose myocardial infarction, but the coronary artery had no stenosis or obstructive lesions after emergency coronary angiography. Then we modified the diagnosis to toxic myocarditis. Bacterial liver abscess was the proposed etiology after a series of auxiliary examinations. Finally, antibiotics and percutaneous liver puncture catheter drainage were used to improve the clinical outcome. CONCLUSIONS It is rare that patients with bacterial liver abscess first present symptoms of myocardial injury. Differential diagnosis between myocarditis and myocardial infarction should be careful, as myocarditis is a diagnosis of exclusion, and coronary angiography is necessary to confirm coronary disease. Percutaneous liver puncture catheter drainage can effectively cure bacterial liver abscess. PMID:26726772

  6. ACUTE KIDNEY INJURY CAUSED BY Crotalus AND Bothrops SNAKE VENOM: A REVIEW OF EPIDEMIOLOGY, CLINICAL MANIFESTATIONS AND TREATMENT

    PubMed Central

    Albuquerque, Polianna L.M.M.; Jacinto, Camilla N.; Silva, Geraldo B.; Lima, Juliana B.; Veras, Maria do Socorro B.; Daher, Elizabeth F.

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY Ophidic accidents are an important public health problem due to their incidence, morbidity and mortality. An increasing number of cases have been registered in Brazil in the last few years. Several studies point to the importance of knowing the clinical complications and adequate approach in these accidents. However, knowledge about the risk factors is not enough and there are an increasing number of deaths due to these accidents in Brazil. In this context, acute kidney injury (AKI) appears as one of the main causes of death and consequences for these victims, which are mainly young males working in rural areas. Snakes of the Bothrops and Crotalus genera are the main responsible for renal involvement in ophidic accidents in South America. The present study is a literature review of AKI caused by Bothrops and Crotalus snake venom regarding diverse characteristics, emphasizing the most appropriate therapeutic approach for these cases. Recent studies have been carried out searching for complementary therapies for the treatment of ophidic accidents, including the use of lipoic acid, simvastatin and allopurinol. Some plants, such as Apocynaceae, Lamiaceae and Rubiaceae seem to have a beneficial role in the treatment of this type of envenomation. Future studies will certainly find new therapeutic measures for ophidic accidents. PMID:24037282

  7. Toxic myopathy and acute hepatic necrosis in cattle caused by ingestion of Senna obtusifolia (sicklepod; coffee senna) in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Furlan, Fernando Henrique; Zanata, Carina; Damasceno, Everson Dos Santos; de Oliveira, Leonardo Pintar; da Silva, Leilane Aparecida; Colodel, Edson Moleta; Riet-Correa, Franklin

    2014-12-15

    The epidemiological, clinical and pathological findings of field and experimental Senna obtusifolia (sicklepod; coffee senna) poisoning in cattle are described. The low availability of good quality forage and high rate of infestation of pastures by S. obtusifolia were the factors that led to poisonous plant ingestion. In this study, the morbidity ranged between 2% and 27.9%, and the lethality was 100%. For the experimental study, six cattle were fed with the aerial parts of S. obtusifolia collected in three different seasons at 9%-38% of the animal's body weight. The experimental and field diseases were similar. The main clinical signs were diarrhea, reluctance to move, muscular weakness and recumbency. The gross findings included pale discoloration of the skeletal muscle. Microscopically, the affected cattle showed degeneration and necrosis of the skeletal muscles and occasionally of the cardiac muscles. Additionally, two cattle showed centrilobular hepatic necrosis. In this study, S. obtusifolia collected from the same farm showed seasonal variation in toxicity. Poisoning by S. obtusifolia is an important cause of death of cattle in the Central Western region of Brazil. The toxicosis caused by this plant is similar to S. occidentalis poisoning; however, in S. obtusifolia poisoning, acute hepatic necrosis is sometimes present. PMID:25255730

  8. Acute and sub-lethal exposure to copper oxide nanoparticles causes oxidative stress and teratogenicity in zebrafish embryos.

    PubMed

    Ganesan, Santhanamari; Anaimalai Thirumurthi, Naveenkumar; Raghunath, Azhwar; Vijayakumar, Savitha; Perumal, Ekambaram

    2016-04-01

    Nano-copper oxides are a versatile inorganic material. As a result of their versatility, the immense applications and usage end up in the environment causing a concern for the lifespan of various beings. The ambiguities surround globally on the toxic effects of copper oxide nanoparticles (CuO-NPs). Hence, the present study endeavored to study the sub-lethal acute exposure effects on the developing zebrafish embryos. The 48 hpf LC50 value was about 64 ppm. Therefore, we have chosen the sub-lethal dose of 40 and 60 ppm for the study. Accumulation of CuO-NPs was evidenced from the SEM-EDS and AAS analyzes. The alterations in the AChE and Na(+) /K(+) -ATPase activities disrupted the development process. An increment in the levels of oxidants with a concomitant decrease in the antioxidant enzymes confirmed the induction of oxidative stress. Oxidative stress triggered apoptosis in the exposed embryos. Developmental anomalies were observed with CuO-NPs exposure in addition to oxidative stress in the developing embryos. Decreased heart rate and hatching delay hindered the normal developmental processes. Our work has offered valuable data on the connection between oxidative stress and teratogenicity leading to lethality caused by CuO-NPs. A further molecular mechanism unraveling the uncharted connection between oxidative stress and teratogenicity will aid in the safe use of CuO-NPs. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:26493272

  9. Serological cross reactivity to CMV and EBV causes problems in the diagnosis of acute hepatitis E virus infection.

    PubMed

    Hyams, Catherine; Mabayoje, Diana A; Copping, Ruth; Maranao, Desmond; Patel, Mauli; Labbett, Wendy; Haque, Tanzina; Webster, Daniel P

    2014-03-01

    Hepatitis E virus (HEV) infection is an important public health concern as a major cause of enterically-transmitted hepatitis worldwide. The detectable window of viraemia is narrow, and HEV IgM and IgG rise simultaneously in acute infection. Furthermore, previous investigators have shown HEV IgM false positive reactions occur against EBV, CMV and potentially hepatitis A. A retrospective analysis of HEV serology testing was performed at a London tertiary referral hospital over a 3-year period. A thousand four hundred and twenty three serum samples were tested for HEV serology, with 33 samples HEV IgM positive and 28 HEV IgM equivocal. One hundred and eleven samples were HEV IgG positive but IgM negative suggesting past infection. No patients with HEV IgM positivity had false positive reactions against hepatitis A. A high degree of EBV and CMV cross reactivity was noted, with 33.3% and 24.2% of HEV IgM positive samples also testing positive for EBV and CMV IgM, respectively. HEV RNA was detected in four HEV IgM positive samples, indicating true positivity, although three demonstrated cross reactivity against EBV. Only 13.3% of samples with positive HEV IgM were HEV PCR positive, highlighting a low positive predictive value of serology testing. Overall a high level of HEV, EBV and CMV IgM cross reactivity was demonstrated, indicating that serology is unreliable in the diagnosis of acute viral hepatitis. It is concluded that that the diagnosis of viral hepatitis should be based on clinical features, raised transaminases, serology, and confirmatory PCR testing. PMID:24402843

  10. Does intravenous contrast-enhanced computed tomography cause acute kidney injury? Protocol of a systematic review of the evidence

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Contrast-induced acute kidney injury is a common cause of iatrogenic acute kidney injury (AKI). Most of the published estimates of AKI after contrast use originate from the cardiac catheterization literature despite contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CT) scans being the more common setting for contrast use. This systematic review aims to summarize the current evidence about (1)the risk of AKI following intravenous (IV) contrast-enhanced CT scans and(2) the risk of clinical outcomes (i.e. death, hospitalization and need for renal replacement therapy) due to IV contrast-enhanced CT scans. Methods/Design A systematic literature search for published studies will be performed using MEDLINE, EMBASE and The COCHRANE Library databases. Unpublished studies will be identified by searching through grey literature. No language restriction will be applied. The review will consider all studies that have examined the association between IV contrast media and AKI. To be selected, the study should include two arms: one group of exposed patients who received IV contrast material before CT scans and one group of unexposed group who did not receive contrast material before CT scans. Two authors will independently screen titles and abstracts obtained from electronic databases, extract data and will assess the quality of the studies selected using the Cochrane's ‘Risk of Bias’ assessment tool for randomized trials and the Newcastle-Ottawa Scale for observational studies. A random-effects meta-analysis will be performed if there is no remarkable heterogeneity between studies. Discussion This systematic review will provide synthesis of current evidence around the effect of IV contrast material on AKI and other clinical outcomes. Results will be helpful for making evidence-based recommendations and guidelines for clinical and radiologic settings. Systematic review registration PROSPERO CRD42013003799. PMID:25148933

  11. Risk factors for hospital-acquired pneumonia caused by carbapenem-resistant Gram-negative bacteria in critically ill patients: a multicenter study in Korea.

    PubMed

    Kim, Tark; Chong, Yong Pil; Park, Seong Yeon; Jeon, Min-Hyok; Choo, Eun Joo; Chung, Jin-Won; Lee, Hyun Kyung; Moon, Chisook; Kim, Dong-Min; Peck, Kyong Ran; Kim, Yang Soo

    2014-04-01

    We performed a case-control study to identify risk factors of carbapenem-resistant Gram-negative bacteria (CRGNB) as an increasing cause of hospital-acquired pneumonia (HAP). The study included critically ill adult patients with HAP whose microbial etiology was identified at eight tertiary centers in Korea between June 2008 and December 2009. Eighty two patients with 86 isolates of CRGNB (62 Acinetobacter baumannii, 14 Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and 10 Stenotrophomonas maltophilia) were included in the case group, and 122 patients with carbapenem-susceptible Gram-negative bacteria were included in the control group. Diabetes mellitus (adjusted odds ratio [aOR] 2.82, 95% confidence interval [95% CI] 1.25-6.38), radiologic score ≥5 (aOR 4.56, 95% CI 2.36-8.81), prior fluoroquinolone (aOR 2.39. 95% CI = 1.07-5.35), or carbapenem usage (aOR 2.82, 95% CI 1.75-17.83) were found to be independent risk factors. Fluoroquinolone and carbapenem should be cautiously used to avoid HAP caused by CRGNB. PMID:24462178

  12. Intestinal Infarction Caused by Thrombophlebitis of the Portomesenteric Veins as a Complication of Acute Gangrenous Appendicitis After Appendectomy: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Tang, Rui; Tian, Xiaodong; Xie, Xuehai; Yang, Yinmo

    2015-06-01

    The clinical symptoms of pylephlebitis caused by acute appendicitis are varied and atypical, which leads to delayed diagnosis and poor outcomes. Here, we report a case of intestinal necrosis caused by thrombophlebitis of the portomesenteric veins as a complication of acute appendicitis after appendectomy. The patient had acute abdominal pain with tenderness and melena on the 3rd day after appendectomy for the treatment of gangrenous appendicitis. He was diagnosed with intestinal infarction caused by thrombophlebitis of the portomesenteric veins based on enhanced CT and diagnostic abdominal paracentesis. The patient was treated by bowel excision anastomosis and thrombectomy. After postoperative antibiotic and anticoagulation treatments, the patient recovered well and was discharged 22 days after the 2nd operation. A follow-up CT scan showed no recurrence of portomesenteric veins thrombosis 3 months later. Thrombophlebitis of the portomesenteric veins is a rare but fatal complication of acute appendicitis. For all the cases with acute abdominal pain, the possibility of thrombophlebitis should be considered as a differential diagnosis. Once pylephlebitis is suspected, enhanced CT scan is helpful for early diagnosis, and sufficient control of inflammation as well as anticoagulant therapy should be performed. PMID:26091450

  13. Oral clindamycin causing acute cholestatic hepatitis without ductopenia: a brief review of idiosyncratic drug-induced liver injury and a case report

    PubMed Central

    Moole, Harsha; Ahmed, Zohair; Saxena, Nibha; Puli, Srinivas R.; Dhillon, Sonu

    2015-01-01

    Clindamycin is a lincosamide antibiotic active against most of the anaerobes, protozoans, and Gram-positive bacteria, including community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus. Its use has increased greatly in the recent past due to wide spectrum of activity and good bioavailability in oral form. Close to 20% of the patients taking clindamycin experience diarrhea as the most common side effect. Hepatotoxicity is a rare side effect. Systemic clindamycin therapy has been linked to two forms of hepatotoxicity: transient serum aminotransferase elevation and an acute idiosyncratic liver injury that occurs 1–3 weeks after starting therapy. This article is a case report of oral clindamycin induced acute symptomatic cholestatic hepatitis and a brief review of the topic. PMID:26486111

  14. Hypothyroidism minimizes the effects of acute hepatic failure caused by endoplasmic reticulum stress and redox environment alterations in rats.

    PubMed

    Blas-Valdivia, Vanessa; Cano-Europa, Edgar; Martinez-Perez, Yoalli; Lezama-Palacios, Ruth; Franco-Colin, Margarita; Ortiz-Butron, Rocio

    2015-10-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate if a protective effect from hypothyroidism in acute liver failure resulted from reduced endoplasmic reticulum stress and changes to the redox environment. Twenty male Sprague-Dawley rats were divided in four groups: (1) euthyroid (sham surgery), (2) hypothyroid, (3) euthyroid (sham surgery)+thioacetamide and (4) hypothyroid+thioacetamide. Hypothyroidism was confirmed two weeks after thyroidectomy, and thioacetamide (TAA) (400mg/kg, ip) was administrated to the appropriate groups for three days with supportive therapy. Grades of encephalopathy in all animals were determined using behavioral tests. Animals were decapitated and their blood was obtained to assess liver function. The liver was dissected: the left lobe was used for histology and the right lobe was frozen for biochemical assays. Body weight, rectal temperature and T4 concentration were lower in hypothyroid groups. When measurements of oxidative stress markers, redox environment, γ-glutamylcysteine synthetase and glutathione-S-transferase were determined, we observed that hypothyroid animals with TAA compensated better with oxidative damage than euthyroid animals treated with TAA. Furthermore, we measured reduced expressions of GADD34, caspase-12 and GRP78 and subsequently less hypothyroidism-induced cellular damage in hypothyroid animals. We conclude that hypothyroidism protects against hepatic damage caused by TAA because it reduces endoplasmic reticulum stress and changes to the redox environment. PMID:26238033

  15. Studies on the sequential development of acute interstitial pneumonia caused by Aleutian disease virus in mink kits.

    PubMed Central

    Alexandersen, S; Bloom, M E

    1987-01-01

    We studied different parameters during the development of acute interstitial pneumonia in mink kits caused by neonatal infection with Aleutian disease virus (ADV). When histological lesions, presence of intranuclear inclusion bodies, and intranuclearly localized ADV antigen were correlated with levels of single-stranded virion and duplex replicative forms of ADV DNA in the different tissues, it was concluded that the lung, probably alveolar type II cells, is the major primary target for viral replication and cytopathology. The presence of the duplex dimeric replicative-form DNA, a strong marker of parvovirus replication, was also observed in low amount in the mesenteric lymph node, suggesting replication of ADV in this organ, although no viral cytopathology could be demonstrated. Moreover, a few intranuclear inclusion bodies were demonstrated in kidney and liver from affected kits, but intranuclearly localized ADV antigen could not be demonstrated in liver sections, and neither could duplex dimer replicative-form DNA, suggesting that these organs are nevertheless not a major site of ADV replication. When the data were compared with results previously reported for ADV-infected adult mink and ADV-infected permissive cell cultures, the data suggested that the pattern of ADV replication in alveolar type II cells is similar to that seen in infected cell cultures but that the replication in the other kit organs resembles the restricted pattern seen in adult mink. Images PMID:3023709

  16. Cutaneous and renal glomerular vasculopathy as a cause of acute kidney injury in dogs in the UK

    PubMed Central

    Hawkins, I.; Robin, C.; Newton, R. J.; Jepson, R.; Stanzani, G.; McMahon, L. A.; Pesavento, P.; Carr, T.; Cogan, T.; Couto, C. G.; Cianciolo, R.; Walker, D. J.

    2015-01-01

    To describe the signalment, clinicopathological findings and outcome in dogs presenting with acute kidney injury (AKI) and skin lesions between November 2012 and March 2014, in whom cutaneous and renal glomerular vasculopathy (CRGV) was suspected and renal thrombotic microangiopathy (TMA) was histopathologically confirmed. The medical records of dogs with skin lesions and AKI, with histopathologically confirmed renal TMA, were retrospectively reviewed. Thirty dogs from across the UK were identified with clinicopathological findings compatible with CRGV. These findings included the following: skin lesions, predominantly affecting the distal extremities; AKI; and variably, anaemia, thrombocytopaenia and hyperbilirubinaemia. Known causes of AKI were excluded. The major renal histopathogical finding was TMA. All thirty dogs died or were euthanised. Shiga toxin was not identified in the kidneys of affected dogs. Escherichia coli genes encoding shiga toxin were not identified in faeces from affected dogs. CRGV has previously been reported in greyhounds in the USA, a greyhound in the UK, without renal involvement, and a Great Dane in Germany. This is the first report of a series of non-greyhound dogs with CRGV and AKI in the UK. CRGV is a disease of unknown aetiology carrying a poor prognosis when azotaemia develops. PMID:25802439

  17. Typhoid fever associated with acute appendicitis caused by an H1-j strain of Salmonella enterica serotype Typhi.

    PubMed

    Lau, Susanna K P; Woo, Patrick C Y; Chan, Clair Y F; Woo, Wai-Lan; Woo, Gibson K S; Yuen, Kwok-Yung

    2005-03-01

    While most strains of Salmonella enterica serotype Typhi, the etiologic agent of typhoid fever, have only a phase 1 flagellar antigen, H1-d, variations of the flagellar antigen have been observed. Although H1-j strains (one of the flagellar antigen variants) account for 10 to 50% of S. enterica serotype Typhi strains found in Indonesia, there have been no published data to suggest its existence in other parts of the world. We describe a case of typhoid fever associated with acute appendicitis caused by an S. enterica serotype Typhi H1-j strain in a Chinese woman in Hong Kong. A gram-negative, motile rod was recovered from her blood and stool cultures. Conventional biochemical tests and the Vitek system (GNI+) showed that the bacterium was S. enterica serotype Typhi. The isolate agglutinated with poly(O), 9O, Vi and H1-j Salmonella antisera but not with poly(H) antisera. The patient developed antibodies against only S. enterica serotype Typhi O antigens but not against H1-d antigen by the Widal test. Flagellin C gene (fliC) sequencing showed a 261-bp deletion in the fliC gene of the isolate, confirming that the isolate possessed the H1-j antigen. The patient had no past history of travel to Indonesia or personal contact with any Indonesian. She recovered with appendectomy and antibiotic treatment. Further studies should be performed to determine the prevalence of this unusual S. enterica serotype Typhi strain in our locality. PMID:15750137

  18. von Frey anesthesiometry to assess sensory impairment after acute spinal cord injury caused by thoracolumbar intervertebral disc extrusion in dogs.

    PubMed

    Song, R B; Basso, D M; da Costa, R C; Fisher, L C; Mo, X; Moore, S A

    2016-03-01

    Sensory threshold (ST) was measured using an electric von Frey anesthesiometer (VFA) in all limbs of 20 normal dogs and 29 dogs with acute thoracolumbar spinal cord injury (SCI) caused by spontaneous intervertebral disc extrusion. ST values were measured at three separate time points in normal dogs and on days 3, 10 and 30 following decompressive surgery in dogs with SCI. ST values were compared between groups and correlated with locomotor recovery in SCI-affected dogs. ST values were significantly higher (consistent with hypoalgesia) in the pelvic limbs of SCI-affected dogs at day 3, day 10 and day 30 when compared to normal dogs (P <0.05), while no significant difference in thoracic limb ST values was observed between groups. A progressive decrease in pelvic limb ST values occurred in SCI-affected dogs over time, consistent with improvement toward normal sensation or development of allodynia. This finding correlated inversely with locomotor score at 3 and 10 days after surgery. A significant decline in ST values across testing sessions was observed for all limbs of normal and SCI-affected dogs and may be related to patient acclimation, operator training effect, or effect of analgesic medications. This study supports the feasibility of VFA to assess differences in ST between normal and SCI-affected dogs. However, future studies must focus on techniques to minimize or compensate for clinical, environmental and behavioral factors which may impact ST values in the clinical setting. PMID:26832808

  19. All-cause mortality and use of antithrombotics within 90 days of discharge in acutely ill medical patients.

    PubMed

    Mahan, Charles E; Fields, Larry E; Mills, Roger M; Stephenson, Judith J; Fu, An-Chen; Fisher, Maxine D; Spyropoulos, Alex C

    2015-10-01

    Conflicting evidence exists regarding predictors of and antithrombotic benefit on mortality in hospitalised acutely-ill medical patients. We compared mortality risk within 90 days post-discharge among medically ill patients who did and did not receive antithrombotics. This retrospective claims analysis included patients ≥ 40 years with nonsurgical hospitalisation ≥ 2 days between 2005 and 2009 using the HealthCore Integrated Research Database. Antithrombotic use (i.e. anticoagulants and antiplatelets) post-discharge was captured from pharmacy claims. All-cause mortality was determined from Social Security Death Index; cause of death was identified from National Death Index database. Kaplan-Meier survival curves were generated and hazard ratios (HR) for mortality risk were estimated using Cox proportional hazards models. Patients prescribed anticoagulants or antiplatelets post-discharge had lower risk of short-term mortality. For the anticoagulant model, the most significant predictors of mortality were malignant/benign neoplasms (hazard ratio [HR] 1.6, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.5-1.7), liver disease (HR 1.6, 95% CI 1.5-1.7), anticoagulant omission (HR 1.6, 95% CI 1.4-1.8), gastrointestinal or respiratory tract intubations (HR 1.5, 95% CI 1.3-1.7), and blood dyscrasias (HR 1.4, 95% CI 1.4-1.5). For the antiplatelet model, the most significant predictors of mortality were antiplatelet omission (HR 3.7, 95% CI 3.3-4.1), liver disease (HR 1.6, 95% CI 1.4-1.7), malignant/benign neoplasms (HR 1.6, 95% CI 1.5-1.6), gastrointestinal or respiratory tract intubations (HR 1.5, 95% CI 1.3-1.7), and blood dyscrasias (HR 1.4, 95% CI 1.4-1.5). These mortality risk factors may guide future studies assessing potential benefits of antithrombotics in specific subsets of patients. PMID:26202514

  20. Efficacy of 5-day parenteral versus intramammary benzylpenicillin for treatment of clinical mastitis caused by gram-positive bacteria susceptible to penicillin in vitro.

    PubMed

    Kalmus, P; Simojoki, H; Orro, T; Taponen, S; Mustonen, K; Holopainen, J; Pyörälä, S

    2014-01-01

    The efficacy of parenteral (intramuscular) or intramammary (IMM) benzylpenicillin treatment for clinical mastitis caused by gram-positive bacteria susceptible to penicillin in vitro was investigated. Cows with clinical mastitis in 1 udder quarter were randomly placed into 2 treatment groups. The preliminary bacteriological diagnosis of intramammary infection (IMI) was based on on-farm culturing, and the bacteriological diagnoses were later confirmed by a quantitative PCR assay. Clinical mastitis caused by gram-positive bacteria susceptible to benzylpenicillin was treated with penicillin via either the parenteral route (20mg/kg) or IMM route (600mg) once per day for 5d. The outcome of the treatment was evaluated 3 to 4wk after the onset of the treatment. The affected quarter was examined to assess the clinical cure, and milk samples were collected from the affected quarter to determine the bacteriological cure and milk N-acetyl-β-d-glucosaminidase activity. The survival and the composite milk somatic cell counts of the treated cows were followed up for 6 and 3mo after treatment, respectively. A total of 140 cows with clinical mastitis were included in the study, 61 being treated with benzylpenicillin parenterally and 79 via the IMM route. From all quarters treated, 108 of 140 (77.1%) were cured clinically and 77 of 140 (55.0%) were cured bacteriologically. The route of treatment did not significantly affect the outcome of the treatment; 80.3% of the quarters with parenteral treatment and 74.7% of the quarters with IMM treatment showed a clinical cure, and 54.1 and 55.7% a bacteriological cure, respectively. The milk N-acetyl-β-d-glucosaminidase activity was significantly lower in the quarters with a clinical or bacteriological cure than in the quarters with no cure. The 6-mo survival and the proportion of cows with composite milk somatic cell counts <200,000/mL among the treated cows during the 3-mo follow-up period did not significantly differ between the treatment groups. In conclusion, the outcome of either parenteral or IMM benzylpenicillin treatment of clinical mastitis caused by penicillin-susceptible bacteria was similar. PMID:24485692

  1. Time Trends in Incidence and Mortality of Acute Myocardial Infarction, and All-Cause Mortality following a Cardiovascular Prevention Program in Sweden

    PubMed Central

    Journath, Gunilla; Hammar, Niklas; Elofsson, Stig; Linnersjö, Anette; Vikström, Max; Walldius, Göran; Krakau, Ingvar; Lindgren, Peter; de Faire, Ulf; Hellénius, Mai-Lis

    2015-01-01

    Background In 1988, a cardiovascular prevention program which combined an individual and a population-based strategy was launched within primary health-care in Sollentuna, a municipality in Stockholm County. The aim of this study was to investigate time trends in the incidence of and mortality from acute myocardial infarction and all-cause mortality in Sollentuna compared with the rest of Stockholm County during a period of two decades following the implementation of a cardiovascular prevention program. Materials and Methods The average population in Sollentuna was 56,589 (49% men) and in Stockholm County (Sollentuna included) 1,795,504 (49% men) during the study period of 1987–2010. Cases of hospitalized acute myocardial infarction and death were obtained for the population of Sollentuna and the rest of Stockholm County using national registries of hospital discharges and deaths. Acute myocardial infarction incidence and mortality were estimated using the average population of Sollentuna and Stockholm in 1987–2010. Results During the observation period, the incidence of acute myocardial infarction decreased more in Sollentuna compared with the rest of Stockholm County in women (-22% vs. -7%; for difference in slope <0.05). There was a trend towards a greater decline in Sollentuna compared to the rest of Stockholm County in the incidence of acute myocardial infarction (in men), acute myocardial mortality, and all-cause mortality but the differences were not significant. Conclusion During a period of steep decline in acute myocardial infarction incidence and mortality in Stockholm County the municipality of Sollentuna showed a stronger trend in women possibly compatible with favorable influence of a cardiovascular prevention program. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT02212145 PMID:26580968

  2. Predictors and outcome of patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome caused by miliary tuberculosis: a retrospective study in Chongqing, China

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Miliary tuberculosis (TB) is an uncommon cause of acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) with a high mortality. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the clinical characteristics, predictors and outcome of patients with ARDS caused by miliary TB. Methods A retrospective study was conducted among patients with a diagnosis of ARDS with miliary TB in four hospitals from 2006 to 2010. Medical records and laboratory examinations of these patients were taken during the first 24 h of admission. Results Eighty-five patients with miliary TB developed ARDS, 45 of whom survived (52.9%). The median age was 36.6 ± 12.5 years with 38 males (44.7%). Diabetes mellitus (DM) was the most common underlying disease (18.8%).ICU mortality was 47.1%. The time from admission to anti-tuberculosis therapy was 4.5 ± 2.0 days. Mean duration of mechanical ventilation was 8.5 ± 3.0 days in all patients. Duration of time to diagnosis, time from diagnosis to mechanical ventilation, and time to anti-tuberculosis therapy were significantly shorter in survivors than those in non-survivors. Diabetes mellitus (OR 5.431, 95%CI 1.471-20.049; P = 0.005), ALT (70-100U/L, OR 10.029, 95%CI 2.764-36.389; P = 0.001), AST (>94U/L,OR 8.034, 95%CI 2.200-29.341; P = 0.002), D-dimer (>1.6mg/L, OR 3.167, 95%CI 0.896-11.187; P = 0.042), hemoglobin (<90g/L, OR 14.824, 95%CI 3.713-59.179; P = 0.001), albumin (<25g/L, OR 15.896, 95%CI 3.975-63.566; P = 0.001) were independent predictors of ARDS development in the setting of miliary TB. Conclusions Accurate diagnosis, early initiation of anti-tuberculosis therapy and mechanical ventilation are important for the outcome of patients with ARDS caused by miliary TB. DM, ALT, AST, D-dimer, hemoglobin, and albumin are independent predictors of ARDS development in patients with miliary TB. PMID:22607610

  3. [Decreased synthetic activity as a possible cause of the death of Escherichia coli bacteria during amino acid starvation].

    PubMed

    Rybkin, A I; Ravin, V K

    1987-01-01

    The work is concerned with studying the breakdown of proteins and RNA when a polyauxotrophic Escherichia coli strain is incubated in a salt solution without amino acids, phosphorus, nitrogen and glucose at 43 degrees C as well as the ability of starving bacterial cells to recommence protein and RNA synthesis (also in the course of phage T4 infection) and to reproduce bacteriophages T4, lambda and MS2. Within the first two hours of the incubation, 12% of proteins and 40% of RNA break down to acid-soluble fragments. Then protein degradation stops while RNA decomposition goes on, but at a lower rate. Within 4-6 h of starvation, the rate of protein and RNA synthesis drops down 4-5 times and the survival rate equals 40-60% when the cells are transferred onto a complete medium. The quantitative characteristics of phages T4, lambda and MS2 reproduction fall down in prestarved cells. The authors speculate that E. coli cells die off in the course of starvation not because some unique structure is destroyed, but owing to the fact that the activity of enzymes and ribosomes gradually declines. As a result, the synthetic activity of the cell drops down abruptly and irreversibly because the enzymes are inactivated and RNA breaks down, which eventually causes cell death. PMID:2441235

  4.  Liver transplantation followed by autologous stem cell transplantation for acute liver failure caused by AL amyloidosis. Case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Elnegouly, Mayada; Specht, Katja; Zoller, Heinz; Matevossian, Edouard; Bassermann, Florian; Umgelter, Andreas

    2016-01-01

     Hepatic involvement in AL amyloidosis may present as acute liver failure. Historically, liver transplantation in these cases has achieved poor outcomes due to progress of amyloidosis and non-hepatic organ damage. In the era of bortezomib treatment, the prognosis of AL amyloidosis has been markedly improved and may also result in better post-transplant outcomes. We present a case of isolated acute liver failure caused by AL amyloidosis, bridged to transplantation with bortezomib and treated with sequential orthotopic liver transplantation (OLT) and autologous stem cell transplantation. The patient is in stable remission 3 years after OLT. PMID:27236160

  5. Use of cefuroxime for women with community-onset acute pyelonephritis caused by cefuroxime-susceptible or -resistant Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Chang, U-Im; Kim, Hyung Wook; Wie, Seong-Heon

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aims: Efforts to decrease the use of extended-spectrum cephalosporins are required to prevent the selection and transmission of multi-drug resistant pathogens, such as extended-spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL)-producing Enterobacteriaceae. The objectives of this study were to assess the clinical efficacy of intravenous cefuroxime as an empirical antibiotic for the treatment of hospitalized women with acute pyelonephritis (APN) caused by Escherichia coli. Methods: We analyzed the clinical and microbiologic database of 328 hospitalized women with community-onset APN. Results: Of 328 women with APN, 22 patients had cefuroxime-resistant E. coli APN, and 306 patients had cefuroxime-susceptible E. coli APN. The early clinical success rates were significantly higher (p = 0.001) in the cefuroxime-susceptible group (90.8%, 278/306) than in the cefuroxime-resistant group (68.2%, 15/22) at 72 hours. The clinical cure rates at 4 to 14 days after completing antimicrobial therapy were not significantly different in the cefuroxime-resistant or -susceptible groups, with 88.2% (15/17) and 97.8% (223/228; p = 0.078), respectively. The microbiological cure rates were not significantly different and were 90.9% (10/11) and 93.4% (128/137), respectively (p =0.550). The median duration of hospitalization in the cefuroxime-resistant and -susceptible groups was 10 days (interquartile range [IQR], 8 to 13) and 10 days (IQR, 8 to 14), respectively (p =0.319). Conclusions: Cefuroxime, a second-generation cephalosporin, can be used for the initial empirical therapy of community-onset APN if tailored according to uropathogen identification and susceptibility results, especially in areas where the prevalence rate of ESBL-producing uropathogens is low. PMID:26767868

  6. Acute Tumor Lysis Syndrome Caused by Transcatheter Oily Chemoembolization in a Patient with a Large Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Sakamoto, Noriaki Monzawa, Shuichi; Nagano, Hidenobu; Nishizaki, Hogara; Arai, Yasuaki; Sugimura, Kazuro

    2007-06-15

    Acute tumor lysis syndrome results from a sudden and rapid release of products of cellular breakdown after anticancer therapy. Severe alterations of metabolic profile might occur and result in acute renal failure. We present a patient with a large hepatocellular carcinoma who received transcatheter oily chemoembolization and died subsequently of this syndrome. To our knowledge, there has been only one report of this syndrome induced by chemoembolization for hepatocellular carcinoma. This case illustrates the need to anticipate the development of acute tumor lysis syndrome when chemoembolization is planned for a large hepatocellular carcinoma.

  7. Acute cerebellar dysfunction with neuromuscular manifestations after scorpionism presumably caused by Tityus obscurus in Santarém, Pará / Brazil.

    PubMed

    Torrez, Pasesa P Q; Quiroga, Mariana M M; Abati, Paulo A M; Mascheretti, Melissa; Costa, Walter Silva; Campos, Luciana P; França, Francisco O S

    2015-03-01

    Scorpionism is a public health problem in many tropical countries, especially in North Africa, South India, Latin America and the Middle East. In Brazil, patients with severe scorpion envenoming have mainly cardiovascular events, including acute heart failure, acute respiratory distress syndrome and shock, death is rare. We described 58 accidents presumably caused by Tityus obscurus in Brazilian Amazonia. Patients reported a sensation of "electric shocks" which could last hours. The vast majority of patients presented a clinical picture compatible with acute cerebellar dysfunction, beginning minutes and lasting up to 2 days after the accident. They presented cerebellar ataxia, dysdiadochokinesia, dysmetry, dysarthria, dyslalia, nausea and vomiting. Besides, some patients presented myoclonus and fasciculation which can also be attributed to cerebellar dysfunction or maybe the result of direct action on skeletal muscle. Two patients had evidence of intense rhabdomyolysis and acute kidney injury. The clinical picture in this scorpion envenoming is mainly characterized by an acute dysfunction of cerebellar activities and abnormal neuromuscular manifestations and in some cases muscle injury which are not described in any other region of the world. This work presents clinical, epidemiologic, laboratory and treatment aspects of this unmatched scorpion envenoming in the state of Pará, northern Brazil. PMID:25549940

  8. Meat Processing Plant Microbiome and Contamination Patterns of Cold-Tolerant Bacteria Causing Food Safety and Spoilage Risks in the Manufacture of Vacuum-Packaged Cooked Sausages.

    PubMed

    Hultman, Jenni; Rahkila, Riitta; Ali, Javeria; Rousu, Juho; Björkroth, K Johanna

    2015-10-01

    Refrigerated food processing facilities are specific man-made niches likely to harbor cold-tolerant bacteria. To characterize this type of microbiota and study the link between processing plant and product microbiomes, we followed and compared microbiota associated with the raw materials and processing stages of a vacuum-packaged, cooked sausage product affected by a prolonged quality fluctuation with occasional spoilage manifestations during shelf life. A total of 195 samples were subjected to culturing and amplicon sequence analyses. Abundant mesophilic psychrotrophs were detected within the microbiomes throughout the different compartments of the production plant environment. However, each of the main genera of food safety and quality interest, e.g., Leuconostoc, Brochothrix, and Yersinia, had their own characteristic patterns of contamination. Bacteria from the genus Leuconostoc, commonly causing spoilage of cold-stored, modified-atmosphere-packaged foods, were detected in high abundance (up to >98%) in the sausages studied. The same operational taxonomic units (OTUs) were, however, detected in lower abundances in raw meat and emulsion (average relative abundance of 2%±5%), as well as on the processing plant surfaces (<4%). A completely different abundance profile was found for OTUs phylogenetically close to the species Yersinia pseudotuberculosis. These OTUs were detected in high abundance (up to 28%) on the processing plant surfaces but to a lesser extent (<1%) in raw meat, sausage emulsion, and sausages. The fact that Yersinia-like OTUs were found on the surfaces of a high-hygiene packaging compartment raises food safety concerns related to their resilient existence on surfaces. PMID:26231646

  9. Meat Processing Plant Microbiome and Contamination Patterns of Cold-Tolerant Bacteria Causing Food Safety and Spoilage Risks in the Manufacture of Vacuum-Packaged Cooked Sausages

    PubMed Central

    Rahkila, Riitta; Ali, Javeria; Rousu, Juho; Björkroth, K. Johanna

    2015-01-01

    Refrigerated food processing facilities are specific man-made niches likely to harbor cold-tolerant bacteria. To characterize this type of microbiota and study the link between processing plant and product microbiomes, we followed and compared microbiota associated with the raw materials and processing stages of a vacuum-packaged, cooked sausage product affected by a prolonged quality fluctuation with occasional spoilage manifestations during shelf life. A total of 195 samples were subjected to culturing and amplicon sequence analyses. Abundant mesophilic psychrotrophs were detected within the microbiomes throughout the different compartments of the production plant environment. However, each of the main genera of food safety and quality interest, e.g., Leuconostoc, Brochothrix, and Yersinia, had their own characteristic patterns of contamination. Bacteria from the genus Leuconostoc, commonly causing spoilage of cold-stored, modified-atmosphere-packaged foods, were detected in high abundance (up to >98%) in the sausages studied. The same operational taxonomic units (OTUs) were, however, detected in lower abundances in raw meat and emulsion (average relative abundance of 2% ± 5%), as well as on the processing plant surfaces (<4%). A completely different abundance profile was found for OTUs phylogenetically close to the species Yersinia pseudotuberculosis. These OTUs were detected in high abundance (up to 28%) on the processing plant surfaces but to a lesser extent (<1%) in raw meat, sausage emulsion, and sausages. The fact that Yersinia-like OTUs were found on the surfaces of a high-hygiene packaging compartment raises food safety concerns related to their resilient existence on surfaces. PMID:26231646

  10. Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease Is Associated With Higher 1-year All-Cause Rehospitalization Rates in Patients Admitted for Acute Heart Failure.

    PubMed

    Valbusa, Filippo; Bonapace, Stefano; Grillo, Cristina; Scala, Luca; Chiampan, Andrea; Rossi, Andrea; Zoppini, Giacomo; Lonardo, Amedeo; Arcaro, Guido; Byrne, Christopher D; Targher, Giovanni

    2016-02-01

    Repeat hospitalization due to acute heart failure (HF) is a global public health problem that markedly impacts on health resource use. Identifying novel predictors of rehospitalization would help physicians to determine the optimal postdischarge plan for preventing HF rehospitalization. Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is an emerging risk factor for many heart diseases, including HF. We assessed whether NAFLD at hospital admission predicts 1-year all-cause rehospitalization in patients with acute HF.We enrolled all patients consecutively admitted for acute HF to our General Medicine Division, from January 2013 to April 2014, after excluding patients with acute myocardial infarction, severe heart valve diseases, malignancy, known liver diseases, and those with volume overload related to extracardiac causes. NAFLD was diagnosed by ultrasonography and exclusion of competing etiologies. The primary outcome of the study was the 1-year all-cause rehospitalization rate.Among the 107 patients enrolled in the study, the cumulative rehospitalization rate was 12.1% at 1 month, 25.2% at 3 months, 29.9% at 6 months, and 38.3% at 1 year. Patients with NAFLD had markedly higher 1-year rehospitalization rates than those without NAFLD (58% vs 21% at 1 y; P?acute HF. PMID:26886619

  11. Determinants of Noninvasive Ventilation Outcomes during an Episode of Acute Hypercapnic Respiratory Failure in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease: The Effects of Comorbidities and Causes of Respiratory Failure

    PubMed Central

    Pacilli, Angela Maria Grazia; Valentini, Ilaria; Carbonara, Paolo; Marchetti, Antonio; Nava, Stefano

    2014-01-01

    Objectives. To investigate the effect of the cause of acute respiratory failure and the role of comorbidities both acute and chronic on the outcome of COPD patients admitted to Respiratory Intensive Care Unit (RICU) with acute respiratory failure and treated with NIV. Design. Observational prospective study. Patients and Methods. 176 COPD patients consecutively admitted to our RICU over a period of 3 years and treated with NIV were evaluated. In all patients demographic, clinical, and functional parameters were recorded including the cause of acute respiratory failure, SAPS II score, Charlson comorbidity index, and further comorbidities not listed in the Charlson index. NIV success was defined as clinical improvement leading to discharge to regular ward, while exitus or need for endotracheal intubation was considered failure. Results. NIV outcome was successful in 134 patients while 42 underwent failure. Univariate analysis showed significantly higher SAP II score, Charlson index, prevalence of pneumonia, and lower serum albumin level in the failure group. Multivariate analysis confirmed a significant predictive value for pneumonia and albumin. Conclusions. The most important determinants of NIV outcome in COPD patients are the presence of pneumonia and the level of serum albumin as an indicator of the patient nutritional status. PMID:24563868

  12. Fibrolipomatous hamartoma of the median nerve: A cause of acute bilateral carpal tunnel syndrome in a three-year-old child: A case report and comprehensive literature review

    PubMed Central

    Senger, Jenna-Lynn; Classen, Dale; Bruce, Garth; Kanthan, Rani

    2014-01-01

    A three-year-old boy was investigated for inexplicable incessant crying. On examination, his left wrist was mildly swollen (three to four months) and sensitive. Exploration and carpal tunnel decompression of the left wrist with incisional biopsy was performed for the presence of a fusiform swelling intimately associated with the median nerve. Histopathology revealed the presence of enlarged nerve bundles admixed with mature fat cells and diffuse fibroblastic proliferation. Three months later, he underwent urgent contralateral carpal tunnel decompression for a similar presentation. The final diagnosis was bilateral fibrolipomatous hamartoma (FLH) of the median nerves causing acute bilateral compression neuropathy. FLH of the median nerve is an extremely unusual cause of acute bilateral carpal tunnel syndrome in a young child presenting with ‘incessant crying’. A comprehensive review of FLH including epidemiology, etiology, clinical presentation, differential diagnosis, imaging, pathology, treatment and prognosis is discussed. PMID:25332651

  13. Draft Genome Sequences of Four Strains of Vibrio parahaemolyticus, Three of Which Cause Early Mortality Syndrome/Acute Hepatopancreatic Necrosis Disease in Shrimp in China and Thailand

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yi-Ting; Chen, I-Tung; Lee, Chung-Te; Chen, Chien-Yu; Lin, Shih-Shun; Hor, Lien-I; Tseng, Ta-Chien; Huang, Yun-Tzu; Sritunyalucksana, Kallaya; Thitamadee, Siripong; Wang, Han-Ching

    2014-01-01

    We sequenced four Vibrio parahaemolyticus strains, three of which caused serious acute hepatopancreatic necrosis disease. Sequence analysis of the virulent strains revealed not only genes related to cholera toxin and the type IV pilus/type IV secretion system but also a unique, previously unreported, large extrachromosomal plasmid that encodes a homolog to the insecticidal Photorhabdus insect-related binary toxin PirAB. PMID:25189578

  14. Acute Exposure to Di(2-Ethylhexyl) Phthalate in Adulthood Causes Adverse Reproductive Outcomes Later in Life and Accelerates Reproductive Aging in Female Mice.

    PubMed

    Hannon, Patrick R; Niermann, Sarah; Flaws, Jodi A

    2016-03-01

    Humans are ubiquitously exposed to di(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (DEHP), which is an environmental toxicant incorporated in consumer products. Studies have shown that DEHP targets the ovary to disrupt essential processes required for reproductive and nonreproductive health. Specifically, 10-day exposure to DEHP accelerates primordial follicle recruitment and disrupts estrous cyclicity in adult mice. However, it is unknown if these effects on folliculogenesis and cyclicity following acute DEHP exposure can have permanent effects on reproductive outcomes. Further, the premature depletion of primordial follicles can cause early reproductive senescence, and it is unknown if acute DEHP exposure accelerates reproductive aging. This study tested the hypothesis that acute DEHP exposure causes infertility, disrupts estrous cyclicity, alters hormone levels, and depletes follicle numbers by inducing atresia later in life, leading to accelerated reproductive aging. Adult CD-1 mice were orally dosed with vehicle or DEHP (20 μg/kg/day-500 mg/kg/day) daily for 10 days, and reproductive outcomes were assessed at 6 and 9 months postdosing. Acute DEHP exposure significantly altered estrous cyclicity compared to controls at 6 and 9 months postdosing by increasing the percentage of days the mice were in estrus and metestrus/diestrus, respectively. DEHP also significantly decreased inhibin B levels compared to controls at 9 months postdosing. Further, DEHP significantly increased the BAX/BCL2 ratio in primordial follicles leading to a significant decrease in primordial and total follicle numbers compared to controls at 9 months postdosing. Collectively, the adverse effects present following acute DEHP exposure persist later in life and are consistent with accelerated reproductive aging. PMID:26678702

  15. Intraventricular or intrathecal colistin for the treatment of central nervous system infections caused by multidrug-resistant Gram-negative bacteria.

    PubMed

    Imberti, Roberto; Iotti, Giorgio Antonio; Regazzi, Mario

    2014-04-01

    Central nervous system infections caused by Gram-negative bacteria susceptible only to colistin are rare but life-threatening and increasing in prevalence. Given the current antibiotic development pipeline it is likely that the paucity of therapeutic options will continue for the next years. Colistin is an amphipathic bactericidal antibiotic which is administered systemically as colistin methanesulfonate (also known as colistimethate sodium). Colistin methanesulfonate is the inactive prodrug, and in cerebrospinal fluid undergoes spontaneous hydrolysis to colistin (the active form with antimicrobial activity). In this review, we describe and evaluate the clinical and experimental data supporting the use of intraventricular (IVT) or intrathecal (IT) colistin against multidrug-resistant Gram-negative infections of the central nervous system, describe the permeability of the blood-brain barrier to colistin, the pharmacokinetics of colistin after IVT administration of colistin methanesulfonate, its anti-endotoxin activity, discuss the opportunity to administer colistin intraventricularly or intrathecally and the dose regimen, and provide recommendations based on the available evidence. PMID:24597575

  16. Acute periodontal lesions.

    PubMed

    Herrera, David; Alonso, Bettina; de Arriba, Lorenzo; Santa Cruz, Isabel; Serrano, Cristina; Sanz, Mariano

    2014-06-01

    This review provides updates on acute conditions affecting the periodontal tissues, including abscesses in the periodontium, necrotizing periodontal diseases and other acute conditions that cause gingival lesions with acute presentation, such as infectious processes not associated with oral bacterial biofilms, mucocutaneous disorders and traumatic and allergic lesions. A periodontal abscess is clinically important because it is a relatively frequent dental emergency, it can compromise the periodontal prognosis of the affected tooth and bacteria within the abscess can spread and cause infections in other body sites. Different types of abscesses have been identified, mainly classified by their etiology, and there are clear differences between those affecting a pre-existing periodontal pocket and those affecting healthy sites. Therapy for this acute condition consists of drainage and tissue debridement, while an evaluation of the need for systemic antimicrobial therapy will be made for each case, based on local and systemic factors. The definitive treatment of the pre-existing condition should be accomplished after the acute phase is controlled. Necrotizing periodontal diseases present three typical clinical features: papilla necrosis, gingival bleeding and pain. Although the prevalence of these diseases is not high, their importance is clear because they represent the most severe conditions associated with the dental biofilm, with very rapid tissue destruction. In addition to bacteria, the etiology of necrotizing periodontal disease includes numerous factors that alter the host response and predispose to these diseases, namely HIV infection, malnutrition, stress or tobacco smoking. The treatment consists of superficial debridement, careful mechanical oral hygiene, rinsing with chlorhexidine and daily re-evaluation. Systemic antimicrobials may be used adjunctively in severe cases or in nonresponding conditions, being the first option metronidazole. Once the acute disease is under control, definitive treatment should be provided, including appropriate therapy for the pre-existing gingivitis or periodontitis. Among other acute conditions affecting the periodontal tissues, but not caused by the microorganisms present in oral biofilms, infectious diseases, mucocutaneous diseases and traumatic or allergic lesions can be listed. In most cases, the gingival involvement is not severe; however, these conditions are common and may prompt an emergency dental visit. These conditions may have the appearance of an erythematous lesion, which is sometimes erosive. Erosive lesions may be the direct result of trauma or a consequence of the breaking of vesicles and bullae. A proper differential diagnosis is important for adequate management of the case. PMID:24738591

  17. Rapid and Reversible Impairments of Short- and Long-Term Social Recognition Memory Are Caused by Acute Isolation of Adult Rats via Distinct Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Shahar-Gold, Hadar; Gur, Rotem; Wagner, Shlomo

    2013-01-01

    Mammalian social organizations require the ability to recognize and remember individual conspecifics. This social recognition memory (SRM) can be examined in rodents using their innate tendency to investigate novel conspecifics more persistently than familiar ones. Here we used the SRM paradigm to examine the influence of housing conditions on the social memory of adult rats. We found that acute social isolation caused within few days a significant impairment in acquisition of short-term SRM of male and female rats. Moreover, SRM consolidation into long-term memory was blocked following only one day of social isolation. Both impairments were reversible, but with different time courses. Furthermore, only the impairment in SRM consolidation was reversed by systemic administration of arginine-vasopressin (AVP). In contrast to SRM, object recognition memory was not affected by social isolation. We conclude that acute social isolation rapidly induces reversible changes in the brain neuronal and molecular mechanisms underlying SRM, which hamper its acquisition and completely block its consolidation. These changes occur via distinct, AVP sensitive and insensitive mechanisms. Thus, acute social isolation of rats swiftly causes changes in their brain and interferes with their normal social behavior. PMID:23741464

  18. Topiramate as a rare cause of reversible Fanconi syndrome and acute kidney injury: a case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Meseeha, Marcelle G; Attia, Maximos N; Kolade, Victor O

    2016-01-01

    Topiramate (TPM) is a sulfa-derivative monosaccharide that has been used for multiple indications in the last several years. We describe a 53-year-old woman with known chronic kidney disease stage 2 and baseline creatinine of 1 mg/dL who developed acute kidney injury and proximal renal tubular dysfunction while on TPM for depression. The Naranjo Adverse Drug Reaction Probability Scale indicated a probable relationship (score of 6) between TPM and acute kidney injury as well as proximal tubular dysfunction; these renal conditions resolved on withdrawal of TPM. To our knowledge, this is the first report of such a scenario. Patients receiving TPM therapy should be closely monitored for evidence of kidney dysfunction and electrolyte abnormalities. PMID:26908388

  19. Topiramate as a rare cause of reversible Fanconi syndrome and acute kidney injury: a case report and literature review

    PubMed Central

    Meseeha, Marcelle G.; Attia, Maximos N.; Kolade, Victor O.

    2016-01-01

    Topiramate (TPM) is a sulfa-derivative monosaccharide that has been used for multiple indications in the last several years. We describe a 53-year-old woman with known chronic kidney disease stage 2 and baseline creatinine of 1 mg/dL who developed acute kidney injury and proximal renal tubular dysfunction while on TPM for depression. The Naranjo Adverse Drug Reaction Probability Scale indicated a probable relationship (score of 6) between TPM and acute kidney injury as well as proximal tubular dysfunction; these renal conditions resolved on withdrawal of TPM. To our knowledge, this is the first report of such a scenario. Patients receiving TPM therapy should be closely monitored for evidence of kidney dysfunction and electrolyte abnormalities. PMID:26908388

  20. Acute hemorrhagic and necrotizing pneumonia, splenitis, and dermatitis in a pet rabbit caused by a novel herpesvirus (leporid herpesvirus-4)

    PubMed Central

    Brash, Marina L.; Nagy, Éva; Pei, Yanlong; Carman, Susy; Emery, Susan; Smith, Alec E.; Turner, Patricia V.

    2010-01-01

    A 1.5-year-old female rabbit (doe) was presented with a 3-day history of lethargy, anorexia, and mild facial swelling. The animal died shortly after examination and severe, acute hemorrhagic pneumonia was noted grossly. An alphaherpesvirus consistent with leporid herpesvirus-4 was isolated and characterized from this animal. This is the first confirmed report of the disease in Canada. PMID:21358932

  1. Non-Necrotizing Streptococcal Cellulitis as a Cause of Acute, Atraumatic Compartment Syndrome of the Foot: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Toney, James; Donovan, Stephanie; Adelman, Vanessa; Adelman, Ronald

    2016-01-01

    Acute compartment syndrome is widely accepted as a surgical emergency. Most cases of acute compartment syndrome occur after high-energy trauma, especially crush injuries. We present a unique case of acute, atraumatic compartment syndrome of the foot associated with infectious cellulitis. A 53-year-old male, with a medical history significant for human immunodeficiency virus, presented to the emergency department secondary to an insidious onset of intense foot pain, swelling, and an inability to bear weight on the affected extremity. He had no history of recent trauma. He was admitted to the hospital because of a suspected infection and subsequently was given intravenous antibiotics. During the admission, he developed a severe infection, and blood cultures demonstrated growth of group A streptococcus. No abscess or hematoma was identified on magnetic resonance imaging or during exploratory surgery. The findings from intraoperative cultures were negative. Despite proper medical care for his infection, the lower extremity pain worsened; therefore, compartmental pressures were obtained at the bedside. Multiple compartment pressures were measured and were >40 mm Hg. Compartment syndrome was diagnosed, and the patient was taken to the operating room for emergent fasciotomies. Surgical release of the medial, lateral, interosseous, and adductor compartments revealed copious amounts of serosanguinous drainage. Again, no definitive hematoma or purulence was identified. The patient's symptoms resolved after the fasciotomies, and he healed uneventfully. Our case highlights the need to consider acute compartment syndrome in the differential diagnosis for pain out of proportion to the clinical situation, even when a traditional etiology is absent. PMID:25981442

  2. Depth-Related Changes in Community Structure of Culturable Mineral Weathering Bacteria and in Weathering Patterns Caused by Them along Two Contrasting Soil Profiles

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Jing; Xi, Jun; Huang, Zhi; Wang, Qi; Zhang, Zhen-Dong

    2014-01-01

    Bacteria play important roles in mineral weathering and soil formation. However, few reports of mineral weathering bacteria inhabiting subsurfaces of soil profiles have been published, raising the question of whether the subsurface weathering bacteria are fundamentally distinct from those in surface communities. To address this question, we isolated and characterized mineral weathering bacteria from two contrasting soil profiles with respect to their role in the weathering pattern evolution, their place in the community structure, and their depth-related changes in these two soil profiles. The effectiveness and pattern of bacterial mineral weathering were different in the two profiles and among the horizons within the respective profiles. The abundance of highly effective mineral weathering bacteria in the Changshu profile was significantly greater in the deepest horizon than in the upper horizons, whereas in the Yanting profile it was significantly greater in the upper horizons than in the deeper horizons. Most of the mineral weathering bacteria from the upper horizons of the Changshu profile and from the deeper horizons of the Yanting profile significantly acidified the culture media in the mineral weathering process. The proportion of siderophore-producing bacteria in the Changshu profile was similar in all horizons except in the Bg2 horizon, whereas the proportion of siderophore-producing bacteria in the Yanting profile was higher in the upper horizons than in the deeper horizons. Both profiles existed in different highly depth-specific culturable mineral weathering community structures. The depth-related changes in culturable weathering communities were primarily attributable to minor bacterial groups rather than to a change in the major population structure. PMID:24077700

  3. Detection and characterization of respiratory viruses causing acute respiratory illness and asthma exacerbation in children during three different seasons (2011–2014) in Mexico City

    PubMed Central

    Moreno-Valencia, Yazmin; Hernandez-Hernandez, Victor A; Romero-Espinoza, Jose A I; Coronel-Tellez, Rodrigo H; Castillejos-Lopez, Manuel; Hernandez, Andres; Perez-Padilla, Rogelio; Alejandre-Garcia, Alejandro; de la Rosa-Zamboni, Daniela; Ormsby, Christopher E; Vazquez-Perez, Joel A

    2015-01-01

    Background Viral infections play a significant role in causing acute respiratory infections (ARIs) and exacerbations of chronic diseases. Acute respiratory infections are now the leading cause of mortality in children worldwide, especially in developing countries. Recently, human rhinovirus (HRV) infection has been emerged as an important cause of pneumonia and asthma exacerbation. Objectives To determine the role of several viral agents principally, respiratory syncytial virus, and HRV in children with ARIs and their relationship with asthma exacerbation and pneumonia. Methods Between October 2011 and March 2014, 432 nasopharyngeal samples of children <15 years of age with ARI hospitalized at a referral hospital for respiratory diseases were tested for the presence of respiratory viruses using a multiplex RT-qPCR. Clinical, epidemiological, and demographic data were collected and associated with symptomatology and viral infections. Results Viral infections were detected in at least 59·7% of the enrolled patients, with HRV (26·6%) being the most frequently detected. HRV infections were associated with clinical features of asthma and difficulty in breathing such as wheezing (P = 0·0003), supraesternal (P = 0·046), and xiphoid retraction (P = 0·030). HRV subtype C (HRV-C) infections were associated with asthma (P = 0·02). Conclusions Human rhinovirus was the virus most commonly detected in pediatric patients with ARI. There is also an association of HRV-C infection with asthma exacerbation, emphasizing the relevance of this virus in severe pediatric respiratory disease. PMID:26289993

  4. [Acute form of eexogenous lipoid pneumonia caused by inhalation of liquid paraffin in a fire-eater].

    PubMed

    Yokohori, Naoko; Taira, Manako; Kameyama, Shinkichi; Kanemura, Toshinori; Kondo, Mituko; Tamaoki, Jun; Nagai, Atsushi

    2002-07-01

    We report a case of acute exogenous lipoid pneumonia in a 34-year-old-fire-eater. Six hours after inhalation of liquid paraffin, dyspnea, cough, fever, hemoptysis, and chest pain developed in this patient. Chest computed tomography showed nodular infiltrations with ground glass opacities (GGO) in the right middle lobes, GGO alone in the right lower lobes, and consolidations with GGO in the left lower lobes. Lipid-laden alveolar macrophages in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid were detected by lipid staining (Sudan III stain, oil-red-O stain) and transmission electron microscopy. The symptoms and lung infiltrations were improved by treatment with predonisolone, together with antibiotics and urinastatin. PMID:12382424

  5. PTEN microdeletions in T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia are caused by illegitimate RAG-mediated recombination events.

    PubMed

    Mendes, Rui D; Sarmento, Leonor M; Canté-Barrett, Kirsten; Zuurbier, Linda; Buijs-Gladdines, Jessica G C A M; Póvoa, Vanda; Smits, Willem K; Abecasis, Miguel; Yunes, J Andres; Sonneveld, Edwin; Horstmann, Martin A; Pieters, Rob; Barata, João T; Meijerink, Jules P P

    2014-07-24

    Phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN)-inactivating mutations and/or deletions are an independent risk factor for relapse of T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL) patients treated on Dutch Childhood Oncology Group or German Cooperative Study Group for Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia protocols. Some monoallelic mutated or PTEN wild-type patients lack PTEN protein, implying that additional PTEN inactivation mechanisms exist. We show that PTEN is inactivated by small deletions affecting a few exons in 8% of pediatric T-ALL patients. These microdeletions were clonal in 3% and subclonal in 5% of patients. Conserved deletion breakpoints are flanked by cryptic recombination signal sequences (cRSSs) and frequently have non-template-derived nucleotides inserted in between breakpoints, pointing to an illegitimate RAG recombination-driven activity. Identified cRSSs drive RAG-dependent recombination in a reporter system as efficiently as bona fide RSSs that flank gene segments of the T-cell receptor locus. Remarkably, equivalent microdeletions were detected in thymocytes of healthy individuals. Microdeletions strongly associate with the TALLMO subtype characterized by TAL1 or LMO2 rearrangements. Primary and secondary xenotransplantation of TAL1-rearranged leukemia allowed development of leukemic subclones with newly acquired PTEN microdeletions. Ongoing RAG activity may therefore actively contribute to the acquisition of preleukemic hits, clonal diversification, and disease progression. PMID:24904117

  6. Depletion of Phagocytic Cells during Nonlethal Plasmodium yoelii Infection Causes Severe Malaria Characterized by Acute Renal Failure in Mice.

    PubMed

    Terkawi, Mohamad Alaa; Nishimura, Maki; Furuoka, Hidefumi; Nishikawa, Yoshifumi

    2016-01-01

    In the current study, we examined the effects of depletion of phagocytes on the progression of Plasmodium yoelii 17XNL infection in mice. Strikingly, the depletion of phagocytic cells, including macrophages, with clodronate in the acute phase of infection significantly reduced peripheral parasitemia but increased mortality. Moribund mice displayed severe pathological damage, including coagulative necrosis in liver and thrombi in the glomeruli, fibrin deposition, and tubular necrosis in kidney. The severity of infection was coincident with the increased sequestration of parasitized erythrocytes, the systematic upregulation of inflammation and coagulation, and the disruption of endothelial integrity in the liver and kidney. Aspirin was administered to the mice to minimize the risk of excessive activation of the coagulation response and fibrin deposition in the renal tissue. Interestingly, treatment with aspirin reduced the parasite burden and pathological lesions in the renal tissue and improved survival of phagocyte-depleted mice. Our data imply that the depletion of phagocytic cells, including macrophages, in the acute phase of infection increases the severity of malarial infection, typified by multiorgan failure and high mortality. PMID:26755155

  7. An unusual case of intraabdominal abscess and acute abdomen caused by axial torsion of a Meckel's diverticulum

    PubMed Central

    Yıldız, İhsan; Koca, Yavuz Savaş; Barut, İbrahim

    2016-01-01

    Background Meckel's diverticulum (MD), the most common congenital anomaly of the gastrointestinal tract, is a true diverticulum. MD is mostly seen in pediatric age groups but may be seen in adults as well. Is twice common in men than women. Surgical treatment is required in symptomatic MD patients. We present a 21-year-old female patient who was admitted with acute abdomen and underwent diverticulectomy with diagnosis of Meckel's diverticulum. Presentation of case The 21-year-old female patient was admitted to emergency service with abdominal pain, nausea and vomiting. Physical examination revealed abdominal distention, rebound tenderness and defense. Abdominal radiography revealed air-fluid levels. White blood cell count was high. In the exploration, torsion of MD was observed and diverticulectomy was performed. Histopathologic analysis indicated the presence of MD. The patient recovered without complication, and was uneventfully discharged. Discussion MD is found in 2% of the general population. Common complications of MD include gastrointestinal bleeding, intestinal obstruction, perforation and diverticulitis. However, axial torsion of MD is a rare complication. Simple diverticulectomy is sufficient in the treatment of most MD cases; however, ileal resection may be required in some cases. Diagnosis of MD is established by histopathologic analysis. Conclusion Although MD is known as a pediatric disease, it is likely to occur in adults as well. Axial torsion of Meckel's diverticulum should be kept in mind the adults presenting with symptoms of acute abdomen. PMID:26955478

  8. Acute Anticholinesterase Pesticide Poisoning Caused a Long-Term Mortality Increase: A Nationwide Population-Based Cohort Study.

    PubMed

    Huang, Hung-Sheng; Hsu, Chien-Chin; Weng, Shih-Feng; Lin, Hung-Jung; Wang, Jhi-Joung; Su, Shih-Bin; Huang, Chien-Cheng; Guo, How-Ran

    2015-07-01

    Acute anticholinesterase pesticide (organophosphate and carbamate) poisoning (ACPP) often produces severe complications, and sometimes death. We investigated the long-term mortality of patients with ACPP because it is not sufficiently understood. In this retrospective nationwide population-based cohort study, 818 patients with ACPP and 16,360 healthy comparisons from 1999 to 2010 were selected from Taiwan's National Health Insurance Research Database. They were followed until 2011. Ninety-four (11.5%) ACPP patients and 793 (4.9%) comparisons died (P < 0.01) during follow-up. The incidence rate ratios (IRRs) of death were 2.5 times higher in ACPP patients than in comparisons (P < 0.01). The risk of death was particularly high in the first month after ACPP (IRR: 92.7; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 45.0-191.0) and still high for ~6 months (IRR: 3.8; 95% CI: 1.9-7.4). After adjusting for age, gender, selected comorbidities, geographic area, and monthly income, the hazard ratio of death for ACPP patients was still 2.4 times higher than for comparisons. Older age (≥35 years), male gender, diabetes mellitus, coronary artery disease, hypertension, stroke, mental disorder, and lower monthly income also predicted death. ACPP significantly increased long-term mortality. In addition to early follow-up after acute treatment, comorbidity control and socioeconomic assistance are needed for patients with ACPP. PMID:26222853

  9. Diarrheal Diseases - Acute and Chronic

    MedlinePlus

    ... greasy or very bad smelling stools. CausesAcute Diarrhea Most cases of acute, watery diarrhea are caused ... a common cause of traveler’s diarrhea. Causes – Chronic Diarrhea Chronic diarrhea is classified as fatty or malabsorption, ...

  10. Calmodulin kinase II inhibitor regulates calcium homeostasis changes caused by acute β-adrenergic receptor agonist stimulation in mouse ventricular myocytes.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yan; Liu, Tao; Wang, Dandan; Wang, Xin; Li, Ran; Chen, Yuting; Tang, Yanhong; Wang, Teng; Huang, Congxin

    2016-02-01

    Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent kinase II (CaMKII) is an important regulatory molecule under chronic β-adrenergic receptor agonist stimulation but cardiac diseases also occur when β-adrenergic elevated acutely in the circulation, of which the most harmful is lethal arrhythmia. The purpose of this study was to explore the effects of acute isoproterenol (ISO) stimulation on intracellular calcium handling and evaluate whether CaMKII inhibitor may change the effects caused by isoproterenol. Mouse ventricular myocytes were acutely isolated by enzymatic method and divided into four groups: control group, ISO group, KN-93 group, ISO + KN-93 group. The whole-cell patch clamp was used to study the effect of ISO and KN-93 on L-type calcium current (IL-Ca) in isolated ventricular myocytes. The technology of laser scanning confocal microscopy was used to record cardiomyocyte calcium transients after ISO and KN-93 were used. ISO significantly increased current density of IL-Ca (p < 0.01) and decreased the half activation voltage (p < 0.01), half inactivation voltage (p < 0.01), and the recovery time constant (p < 0.01). In the presence of CaMKII inhibitor, KN-93 decreased the increased current density of IL-Ca (p < 0.05), increased the reduced half activation voltage caused by ISO (p < 0.01), and prolonged the shortened recovery time constant caused by ISO (p < 0.01). In addition, KN-93 alone can change the activation, inactivation, and recovery kinetics of L-type calcium channels. Moreover, ISO significantly increased the Ca(2+) transient amplitude during both stimulation frequencies (0.5 Hz: p < 0.01, 1 Hz: p < 0.01) and was easy to induce calcium disorders; in the presence of KN-93, these changes were weakened (0.5 Hz: p < 0.05, 1 Hz: p < 0.05). Therefore, changes of the calcium homeostasis in cardiomyocytes caused by ISO can be adjusted by KN-93, thus KN-93 plays a vital role in regulating calcium homeostasis changes caused by ISO. PMID:26542171

  11. Caffeine has greater potency and efficacy than theophylline to reverse the motor impairment caused by chronic but not acute interruption of striatal dopaminergic transmission in rats.

    PubMed

    Acuña-Lizama, Miguel M; Bata-García, José L; Alvarez-Cervera, Fernando J; Góngora-Alfaro, José L

    2013-07-01

    In order to assess whether caffeine and theophylline have the same potency and efficacy to reverse the impairment of motor function caused by acute or chronic interruption of striatal dopamine transmission, a comparison of their dose-response relationship was made in the acute model of haloperidol-induced catalepsy, and the chronic model of unilateral lesion of the dopamine nigrostriatal pathway with 6-hydroxydopamine. At equimolar doses, both drugs reduced catalepsy intensity and increased its onset latency in a dose-dependent fashion, showing comparable potencies and attaining the maximal effect at similar doses. Catalepsy intensity: caffeine ED₅₀ = 24.1 μmol/kg [95% CI, 18.4-31.5]; theophylline ED₅₀ = 22.0 μmol/kg [95% CI, 17.0-28.4]. Catalepsy latency: caffeine ED₅₀ = 27.0 μmol/kg [95% CI, 21.1-34.6]; theophylline ED₅₀ = 28.8 μmol/kg [95% CI, 22.5-36.7]. In one group of hemiparkinsonian rats (n = 5), caffeine caused a dose-dependent recovery of the contralateral forepaw stepping: ED₅₀ = 2.4 μmol/kg/day [95% CI, 1.9-3.1]), reaching its maximum at the dose of 5.15 μmol/kg/day. When the treatment of these same rats was switched to 5.15 μmol/kg/day of theophylline, the stepping recovery was only 51 ± 12% of that induced by caffeine. Assessing the dose-response relationship of theophylline in another group of hemiparkinsonian rats (n = 7) revealed that it caused stepping recovery in an all-or-none fashion. Thus, the three lower doses had no effect, but at the dose of 5.15 μmol/kg/day theophylline suddenly increased the stepping to 56 ± 5% of the maximal effect observed when the treatment of these same rats was switched to an equimolar dose of caffeine. Increasing the dose of theophylline up to 15.45 μmol/kg/day caused no further stepping improvement since it was only 41 ± 6% of the maximal effect produced by caffeine at the dose of 5.15 μmol/kg/day. Given that theophylline showed less potency and efficacy than caffeine to reverse the motor impairment caused by chronic, but not acute, interruption of striatal dopaminergic transmission in rats, it is suggested that caffeine would provide more benefits than theophylline to improve the motor function in patients with Parkinson's disease. PMID:23321687

  12. Incidence, causes and predictors of neurological deterioration occurring within 24 h following acute ischaemic stroke: a systematic review with pathophysiological implications.

    PubMed

    Seners, Pierre; Turc, Guillaume; Oppenheim, Catherine; Baron, Jean-Claude

    2015-01-01

    Early neurological deterioration (END) following ischaemic stroke is a serious event with manageable causes in only a fraction of patients. The incidence, causes and predictors of END occurring within 24 h of acute ischaemic stroke (END24) have not been systematically reviewed. We systematically reviewed Medline and Embase from January 1990 to April 2013 for all studies on END24 following acute ischaemic stroke (<8 h from onset). We recorded the incidence and presumed causes of and factors associated with END24. Thirty-six studies were included. Depending on the definition used, the incidence of END24 markedly varied among studies. Using the most widely used change in National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale ≥4 definition, the pooled incidence was 13.8% following thrombolysis, ascribed to intracranial haemorrhage and malignant oedema each in ∼20% of these. As other mechanisms were rarely reported, in the majority no clear cause was identified. Few data on END24 occurring in non-thrombolysed patients were available. Across thrombolysed and non-thrombolysed samples, the strongest and most consistent admission predictors were hyperglycaemia, no prior aspirin use, prior transient ischaemic attacks, proximal arterial occlusion and presence of early CT changes, and the most consistent 24 h follow-up associated factors were no recanalisation/reocclusion, large infarcts and intracranial haemorrhage. Finally, END24 was strongly predictive of poor outcome. The above findings are discussed with emphasis on END without a clear mechanism. Data on incidence and predictors of the latter subtype is scarce, and future studies using systematic imaging protocols should address its underlying pathophysiology. This may in turn lead to rational preventative and therapeutic measures for this ominous event. PMID:24970907

  13. Acute exposure to methylmercury causes Ca2+ dysregulation and neuronal death in rat cerebellar granule cells through an M3 muscarinic receptor-linked pathway.

    PubMed

    Limke, Tobi L; Bearss, Jeremy J; Atchison, William D

    2004-07-01

    Acute exposure to low concentrations of methylmercury (MeHg) causes a severe loss of intracellular calcium (Ca2+(i)) homeostasis, which apparently contributes to neuronal death of cerebellar granule cells in culture. We examined the role of muscarinic receptors in MeHg-induced Ca2+ dysregulation and cell death in rat cerebellar granule cells in vitro using fura-2 single-cell microfluorimetry and viability assays, respectively. The nonspecific muscarinic receptor antagonist atropine significantly delayed the onset of MeHg-induced Ca2+ elevations and reduced the amount of Ca2+ released into the cytosol. Depletion of the smooth endoplasmic reticulum (SER) Ca2+ pool with thapsigargin or down-regulation of muscarinic receptors and inositol-1,3,4-triphosphate (IP3) receptors with bethanechol (BCh) caused similar reductions in the amplitude of the MeHg-induced Ca2+ increase, suggesting that MeHg interacts with muscarinic receptors to cause Ca2+ release from the SER through activation of the IP3 receptors. To determine whether this Ca2+ release plays a role in MeHg-induced cell death, cells were exposed to MeHg in the presence of specific muscarinic receptor inhibitors. Acute exposure to increasing concentrations of MeHg (0.2-1.0 microM) caused a corresponding increase in cell death at 24.5 h post-exposure. Prior down-regulation of muscarinic and IP3receptors with BCh protected against cell death. Protection was ablated by atropine and the M3 receptor antagonist 4-diphenylacetoxyl-N-methylpiperidine methiodide (DAMP), but not by the neuronal nicotinic receptor antagonist dihydro-beta-erythroidine hydrobromide (DHE). Thus activation of M3 muscarinic receptors with subsequent generation of IP3 evidently contributes to elevated [Ca2+]i and subsequent cytotoxicity of cerebellar granule cells by MeHg. PMID:15141107

  14. Hyperbaric oxygen treatment of dogs has no effect on red cell deformability but causes an acute fluid shift.

    PubMed

    Martindale, V E; McKay, K

    1995-01-01

    Red blood cells respond to a number of perturbations, including hypoxia, with a reduction in deformability. Local hypoxia may become self-reinforcing, as hypoxic cells block capillaries preventing perfusion by oxygenated cells. Hyperbaric oxygen (HBO) is frequently used to treat conditions involving some degree of local hypoxia, but does it have a direct effect on deformability? To investigate this, 12 normal dogs received a 10 week "clinical" course of HBO: one 90 min treatment per weekday at 2.4 ATA (243 kPa), 100% O2. On Mondays and Fridays, a blood sample was drawn into EDTA, centrifuged, and the packed red blood cells resuspended in medium to a dilution of 2 x 10(6) to 5 x 10(6) cells/ml, and filtered under constant of 1.08 kPa through a precalibrated Nucleopore Hemafil Polycarbonate membrane. Filtrate was collected for one minute and weighed, and the red blood cell "incremental volume" calculated according to Engstrom (Engstrom and Ohlsson, Pediatric Res. 27:220-226, 1990). No significant change was seen in filtration rates, indicating that HBO itself neither improves nor impairs dog red blood cell deformability. Changes in other commonly measured blood parameters remained within clinical norms. An acute fluid shift out of red blood cells and into plasma was indicated. PMID:7617744

  15. Comparative effects of disulfiram and diethyldithiocarbamate against testicular toxicity in rats caused by acute exposure to cadmium

    SciTech Connect

    Ono, Hiroshige; Funakoshi, Takayuki; Shimada, Hideaki; Kojima, Shoji

    1997-03-01

    Disulfiram (DSF) and diethyldithiocarbamate (DED) were compared for their protective effects against the testicular toxicity induced by acute exposure to cadmium (Cd) in rats. Rats were injected subcutaneously with CdCl{sub 2} [26.7 {mu}mol (3 mg) Cd/kg], and 30 min later they were injected intraperitoneally with DSF (0.05-0.5 mmol/kg) or DED (0.1-1 mmol/kg). The treatment with DSF at dose levels of 0.1-0.5 mmol/kg prevented the increases in testicular lipid peroxidation and calcium (Ca) concentrations and the decreases in testicular weight that were observed at 7 d after Cd injection. DED at dosage levels of 0.2-1 mmol/kg likewise reduced Cd-induced testicular toxicity. An increase in testicular iron (Fe) concentrations at 7 d and sterility at 59 d after Cd injection were almost completely blocked by treatment with DSF or DED at the highest doses, but lower doses of DSF or DED were ineffective. These results indicated that DSF, which is metabolized to DED, had a protective effect against Cd-induced testicular toxicity nearly equivalent to DED at approximately one-half the dose. 37 refs., 6 tabs.

  16. Ablation of huntingtin in adult neurons is nondeleterious but its depletion in young mice causes acute pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Guohao; Liu, Xudong; Gaertig, Marta A; Li, Shihua; Li, Xiao-Jiang

    2016-03-22

    The Huntington's disease (HD) protein, huntingtin (HTT), is essential for early development. Because suppressing the expression of mutantHTTis an important approach to treat the disease, we must first understand the normal function of Htt in adults versus younger animals. Using inducibleHttknockout mice, we found thatHttdepletion does not lead to adult neurodegeneration or animal death at >4 mo of age, which was also verified by selectively depletingHttin neurons. On the other hand, young Htt KO mice die at 2 mo of age of acute pancreatitis due to the degeneration of pancreatic acinar cells. Importantly, Htt interacts with the trypsin inhibitor, serine protease inhibitor Kazal-type 3 (Spink3), to inhibit activation of digestive enzymes in acinar cells in young mice, and transgenicHTTcan rescue the early death of Htt KO mice. These findings point out age- and cell type-dependent vital functions of Htt and the safety of knocking down neuronal Htt expression in adult brains as a treatment. PMID:26951659

  17. Implementing hospital-based surveillance for severe acute respiratory infections caused by influenza and other respiratory pathogens in New Zealand

    PubMed Central

    Baker, Michael; McArthur, Colin; Roberts, Sally; Williamson, Deborah; Grant, Cameron; Trenholme, Adrian; Wong, Conroy; Taylor, Susan; LeComte, Lyndsay; Mackereth, Graham; Bandaranayake, Don; Wood, Tim; Bissielo, Ange; Se, Ruth; Turner, Nikki; Pierse, Nevil; Thomas, Paul; Webby, Richard; Gross, Diane; Duque, Jazmin; Thompson, Mark; Widdowson, Marc-Alain

    2014-01-01

    Background Recent experience with pandemic influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 highlighted the importance of global surveillance for severe respiratory disease to support pandemic preparedness and seasonal influenza control. Improved surveillance in the southern hemisphere is needed to provide critical data on influenza epidemiology, disease burden, circulating strains and effectiveness of influenza prevention and control measures. Hospital-based surveillance for severe acute respiratory infection (SARI) cases was established in New Zealand on 30 April 2012. The aims were to measure incidence, prevalence, risk factors, clinical spectrum and outcomes for SARI and associated influenza and other respiratory pathogen cases as well as to understand influenza contribution to patients not meeting SARI case definition. Methods/Design All inpatients with suspected respiratory infections who were admitted overnight to the study hospitals were screened daily. If a patient met the World Health Organization’s SARI case definition, a respiratory specimen was tested for influenza and other respiratory pathogens. A case report form captured demographics, history of presenting illness, co-morbidities, disease course and outcome and risk factors. These data were supplemented from electronic clinical records and other linked data sources. Discussion Hospital-based SARI surveillance has been implemented and is fully functioning in New Zealand. Active, prospective, continuous, hospital-based SARI surveillance is useful in supporting pandemic preparedness for emerging influenza A(H7N9) virus infections and seasonal influenza prevention and control. PMID:25077034

  18. Higher Levels of Mucosal Antibody to Pneumococcal Vaccine Candidate Proteins Are Associated with Reduced Acute Otitis Media Caused by Streptococcus pneumoniae in Young Children

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Qingfu; Casey, Janet R.; Pichichero, Michael E.

    2015-01-01

    Mucosal immunity plays a crucial role in controlling human respiratory tract infections. This study characterizes the naturally acquired mucosal antibody levels to three Streptococcus pneumoniae (Spn) protein antigens, pneumococcal histidine triad protein D (PhtD), pneumococcal choline binding protein A (PcpA), and pneumolysin (Ply), and assesses the association of the mucosal antibody levels with occurrence of acute otitis media (AOM) caused by Spn. Both nasophargyeal (NP) IgG and IgA levels to all three proteins slightly decreased in children from 6 to 9 months of age and then gradually increased through 24 months of age. Spn NP colonization was associated with higher mucosal antibody levels to all three proteins. However, children with Spn AOM had 5-8 fold lower IgG and 3-6 fold lower IgA levels to the three proteins than children without AOM but asymptomatically colonized with Spn. Antigen-specific antibody levels in the middle ear fluid (MEF) were correlated with antibody levels in the NP. Children with AOM caused by Spn had lower antibody levels in both the MEF and NP than children with AOM caused by other pathogens. These results indicate that higher naturally acquired mucosal antibody levels to PhtD, PcpA and Ply are associated with reduced AOM caused by Spn. PMID:25648056

  19. Phylogenetic evidence for intratypic recombinant events in a novel human adenovirus C that causes severe acute respiratory infection in children

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yanqun; Li, Yamin; Lu, Roujian; Zhao, Yanjie; Xie, Zhengde; Shen, Jun; Tan, Wenjie

    2016-01-01

    Human adenoviruses (HAdVs) are prevalent in hospitalized children with severe acute respiratory infection (SARI). Here, we report a unique recombinant HAdV strain (CBJ113) isolated from a HAdV-positive child with SARI. The whole-genome sequence was determined using Sanger sequencing and high-throughput sequencing. A phylogenetic analysis of the complete genome indicated that the CBJ113 strain shares a common origin with HAdV-C2, HAdV-C6, HAdV-C1, HAdV-C5, and HAdV-C57 and formed a novel subclade on the same branch as other HAdV-C subtypes. BootScan and single nucleotide polymorphism analyses showed that the CBJ113 genome has an intra-subtype recombinant structure and comprises gene regions mainly originating from two circulating viral strains: HAdV-1 and HAdV-2. The parental penton base, pVI, and DBP genes of the recombinant strain clustered with the HAdV-1 prototype strain, and the E1B, hexon, fiber, and 100 K genes of the recombinant clustered within the HAdV-2 subtype, meanwhile the E4orf1 and DNA polymerase genes of the recombinant shared the greatest similarity with those of HAdV-5 and HAdV-6, respectively. All of these findings provide insight into our understanding of the dynamics of the complexity of the HAdV-C epidemic. More extensive studies should address the pathogenicity and clinical characteristics of the novel recombinant. PMID:26960434

  20. Phylogenetic evidence for intratypic recombinant events in a novel human adenovirus C that causes severe acute respiratory infection in children.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yanqun; Li, Yamin; Lu, Roujian; Zhao, Yanjie; Xie, Zhengde; Shen, Jun; Tan, Wenjie

    2016-01-01

    Human adenoviruses (HAdVs) are prevalent in hospitalized children with severe acute respiratory infection (SARI). Here, we report a unique recombinant HAdV strain (CBJ113) isolated from a HAdV-positive child with SARI. The whole-genome sequence was determined using Sanger sequencing and high-throughput sequencing. A phylogenetic analysis of the complete genome indicated that the CBJ113 strain shares a common origin with HAdV-C2, HAdV-C6, HAdV-C1, HAdV-C5, and HAdV-C57 and formed a novel subclade on the same branch as other HAdV-C subtypes. BootScan and single nucleotide polymorphism analyses showed that the CBJ113 genome has an intra-subtype recombinant structure and comprises gene regions mainly originating from two circulating viral strains: HAdV-1 and HAdV-2. The parental penton base, pVI, and DBP genes of the recombinant strain clustered with the HAdV-1 prototype strain, and the E1B, hexon, fiber, and 100 K genes of the recombinant clustered within the HAdV-2 subtype, meanwhile the E4orf1 and DNA polymerase genes of the recombinant shared the greatest similarity with those of HAdV-5 and HAdV-6, respectively. All of these findings provide insight into our understanding of the dynamics of the complexity of the HAdV-C epidemic. More extensive studies should address the pathogenicity and clinical characteristics of the novel recombinant. PMID:26960434

  1. Acute colic possibly caused by phytobezoar derived from napier grass in 5 Japanese black cows reared in the same farm.

    PubMed

    Hasunuma, Hiroshi; Matsumoto, Daisaku; Kirino, Yumi; Sasa, Takafumi; Fushimi, Yasuo; Ikeda, Teppei; Tshering, Chenga; Takagi, Mitsuhiro

    2011-08-01

    For 6 years, 5 Japanese Black cows of the same herd showed anorexia, depression, and dehydration with no feces in the rectum. Biomedical examination of 3 animals showed severe hypokalemia and hypochloremia. Although the first 3 animals died or were slaughtered (causes unknown), necropsy results showed that the cow in case 4 had intestinal obstruction due to phytobezoar derived from napier grass, fed mainly to the cattle as roughage. Therefore, farmers were recommended to avoid the hard root-stem portion of napier grass as roughage. Consequently, less phytobezoar was recovered from the fifth cow, and no similar clinical case of intestinal obstruction was observed thereafter. This is the first report on intestinal obstruction caused by phytobezoars derived from napier grass. PMID:21498963

  2. Acute respiratory infection and bacteraemia as causes of non-malarial febrile illness in African children: a narrative review

    PubMed Central

    Muro, Florida; Reyburn, Rita; Reyburn, Hugh

    2015-01-01

    The replacement of “presumptive treatment for malaria” by “test before treat” strategies for the management of febrile illness is raising awareness of the importance of knowing more about the causes of illness in children who are suspected to have malaria but return a negative parasitological test. The most common cause of non-malarial febrile illness (NMFI) in African children is respiratory tract infection. Whilst the bacterial causes of NMFI are well known, the increasing use of sensitive techniques such as polymerase chain reaction (PCR) tests is revealing large numbers of viruses that are potential respiratory pathogens. However, many of these organisms are commonly present in the respiratory tract of healthy children so causality and risk factors for pneumonia remain poorly understood. Infection with a combination of viral and bacterial pathogens is increasingly recognised as important in the pathogenesis of pneumonia. Similarly, blood stream infections with organisms typically grown by aerobic culture are well known but a growing number of organisms that can be identified only by PCR, viral culture, or serology are now recognised to be common pathogens in African children. The high mortality of hospitalised children on the first or second day of admission suggests that, unless results are rapidly available, diagnostic tests to identify specific causes of illness will still be of limited use in guiding the potentially life saving decisions relating to initial treatment of children admitted to district hospitals in Africa with severe febrile illness and a negative test for malaria. Malaria control and the introduction of vaccines against Haemophilus influenzae type b and pneumococcal disease are contributing to improved child survival in Africa. However, increased parasitological testing for malaria is associated with increased use of antibiotics to which resistance is already high. PMID:26594615

  3. Analysis of Antiviral Properties of Hexoral In Vitro against Some Viruses that Cause Acute Respiratory Infections and Herpes.

    PubMed

    Deryabin, P G; Galegov, G A; Andronova, V A; Botikov, A G

    2016-01-01

    Antiviral properties of Hexoral (0.1% solution and 0.2% aerosol for local application) and its constituent hexetidine against viruses causing human respiratory tract infections and herpes virus were studied in vitro. It was found that non-cytotoxic concentrations of hexetidine (alone and as a component of Hexoral) attenuated infectious properties of highly virulent influenza virus A/H5N1, pandemic influenza virus A/H1N1pdm, respiratory syncytial virus, and herpes simplex virus type 1 after a short-term exposure (30 sec) by 100 or more times. It was found that hexidine mostly contributes to the virucidal effect of Hexoral. PMID:26750930

  4. [Neonatal hemochromatosis: Another entity that is no longer orphan. Advances in the diagnosis and management of the main cause of neonatal acute liver failure].

    PubMed

    Molera Busoms, C; Quintero Bernabeu, J; Martín de Carpi, J

    2015-09-01

    Neonatal hemochromatosis is the most common cause of acute liver failure in the neonatal period. It is associated with high morbidity and mortality due to iron overload in hepatic and extra-hepatic tissues. New evidence has emerged during the last few years as regards its alloimmune etiology, which have had an important repercussion on the diagnosis, treatment and prognosis of these patients. Treatment with immunoglobulins and exchange transfusions has radically changed the prognosis without liver transplant. Another great success has been the preventive use of immunoglobulin in pregnant women with a past history of neonatal hemochromatosis, thus decreasing the rate of disease recurrence up to 70%. This new paradigm has led to an entity with a poor prognosis becoming a curable disease if diagnosed and treated early. Nevertheless, a large widespread ignorance of the disease persists, with medical implications that result in significant health problems, due to the delayed referral of these patients to specialized centers. PMID:25801288

  5. Acute liver failure caused by ‘fat burners’ and dietary supplements: A case report and literature review

    PubMed Central

    Radha Krishna, Y; Mittal, V; Grewal, P; Fiel, MI; Schiano, T

    2011-01-01

    Globally, people are struggling with obesity. Many effective, non-conventional methods of weight reduction, such as herbal and natural dietary supplements, are increasingly being sought. Fat burners are believed to raise metabolism, burn more calories and hasten fat loss. Despite patient perceptions that herbal remedies are free of adverse effects, some supplements are associated with severe hepatotoxicity. The present report describes a young healthy woman who presented with fulminant hepatic failure requiring emergent liver transplantation caused by a dietary supplement and fat burner containing usnic acid, green tea and guggul tree extracts. Thorough investigation, including histopathological examination, revealed no other cause of hepatotoxicity. The present case adds to the increasing number of reports of hepatotoxicity associated with dietary supplements containing usnic acid, and highlights that herbal extracts from green tea or guggul tree may not be free of adverse effects. Until these products are more closely regulated and their advertising better scrutinized, physicians and patients should become more familiar with herbal products that are commonly used as weight loss supplements and recognize those that are potentially harmful. PMID:21499580

  6. Prevention of acute malnutrition: distribution of special nutritious foods and cash, and addressing underlying causes--what to recommend when, where, for whom, and how.

    PubMed

    de Pee, Saskia; Grais, Rebecca; Fenn, Bridget; Brown, Rebecca; Briend, Andr; Frize, Jacqueline; Shoham, Jeremy; Kiess, Lynnda

    2015-03-01

    Acute malnutrition is associated with increased morbidity and mortality risk. When episodes are prolonged or frequent, acute malnutrition is also associated with poor growth and development, which contributes to stunting Nutrition-specific and nutrition-sensitive strategies to prevent undernutrition during the first 1,000 days from conception to 24 months of age can reduce the risks of wasting, stunting, and micronutrient deficiencies. Under circumstances that exacerbate the underlying causes of undernutrition and increase the incidence of wasting, such as food insecurity related to lean seasons or emergencies, or increased incidence of illness, such as diarrhea or measles, additional efforts are required to prevent and treat wasting. Special nutritious foods directly meet the increased nutrient requirements of children at risk for wasting; assistance to vulnerable households, in the form of cash or food, enables households to better meet the food, health, and other needs of household members and may increase resilience; water, sanitation, and hygiene (WASH) and health interventions help prevent and address illness and hence reduce wasting risk. The contributions of specific interventions to reducing the incidence of wasting are difficult to assess under emergency conditions, due to ethical constraints and to the fact that multiple strategies are implemented at the same time. However, pragmatic studies under real-life circumstances, using different designs, e.g., including a group receiving "best possible" treatment, can provide evidence about what works, to what extent, at what cost, and under which circumstances. Programs should address the most important causes in given contexts, be feasible to implement at scale, and assess implementation, coverage, and outcomes. PMID:25902611

  7. Does Staphylococcus Saprophyticus Cause Acute Cystitis only in Young Females, or is there more to the Story? A One-Year Comprehensive Study Done in Budapest, Hungary.

    PubMed

    Adeghate, Jennifer; Juhász, Emese; Pongrácz, Júlia; Rimanóczy, Éva; Kristóf, Katalin

    2016-03-01

    Staphylococcus saprophyticus is a well-known urinary pathogen in acute cystitis in young females. We completed a retrospective overview of the distribution of urinary tract infections (UTIs) occurring in 2014, at Semmelweis University hospitals and at Heim Pál Children's Hospital. Six age-groups (ages 0-100) were examined, with the frequency of S. saprophyticus in females being: 0.1% (0-4), 0.7%, (5-15), 7.4% (16-24), 1.2% (25-39), 0.4% (40-59) and 0.1% (60-100), and S. saprophyticus being the 3(rd) most common pathogen in females aged 16-24. In males, S. saprophyticus was only isolated from those aged 5-15. Seasonal distribution of UTIs caused by S. saprophyticus showed that most infections occurred during the months of January, June, August and November. Antibiotic-resistance rates of amoxicillin, clindamycin, doxycycline, erythromycin, gentamicin and sulfamethoxazole- trimethoprim varied as follows: 0.9%, 32.7%, 19.6%, 34.6%, 0.9% and 0.9%, respectively. Thirty randomly selected samples were analysed by pulsed-field gelelectrophoresis, and 28 different genotypes were identified. S. saprophyticus is involved in the pathogenesis of acute cystitis not only in young females, but also in other age-groups, and in young males as well. We did not find any significant seasonal occurrence in S. saprophyticus-caused UTIs. The infective strains were genetically diverse. Antibiotic-resistance does not pose any issue as of yet. PMID:27020869

  8. Higher serum levels of interleukin 10 occur at onset of acute otitis media caused by Streptococcus pneumoniae compared to Haemophilus influenzae and Moraxella catarrhalis

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Keyi; Kaur, Ravinder; Almudevar, Anthony; Pichichero, Michael E.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Acute otitis media (AOM) involves an inflammatory response to microbes in the middle ear that facilitates clearance of otopathogens. Clinically, Streptococcus pneumoniae (Spn) infections of the respiratory tract are characterized by greater inflammatory responses than nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHi) and Moraxella catarrhalis (Mcat). Interleukin 10 (IL-10) plays an important role in down-regulating the inflammatory response. We compared serum IL-10 levels in children before onset, at onset and after recovery from AOM caused by Spn, NTHi, and Mcat. We sought to determine if IL-10 could serve as a biomarker to distinguish AOM caused by Spn versus NTHi and Mcat. Study Design Prospective, longitudinal study in a primary care pediatric practice in Rochester, NY. Methods Participants were 54 children 6 to 30 months of age. Outcomes measured were serum IL-10 levels when healthy, at onset of AOM and after recovery from AOM. Results Serum IL-10 was elevated when children developed AOM (p=0.013) due to infections caused by Spn (p= 0.011) but not AOM caused by NTHi or Mcat. Middle ear fluid levels of IL-10 mirrored those seen in serum but were 10-fold higher (p=0.02). Other effector cytokines in serum: IL-4, IFN-γ and TNF-alpha, did not show the same increases as IL-10 at onset of AOM. Conclusion Our study indicates that AOM caused by Spn elicits a significantly higher IL-10 response compared to NTHi and Mcat and may prove to be a biomarker of AOM infections by Spn. PMID:23404508

  9. Acute temporal lobe infarction in a young patient associated with marijuana abuse: An unusual cause of stroke

    PubMed Central

    Inal, Taylan; Köse, Ataman; Köksal, Özlem; Armagan, Erol; Aydın, Sule A.; Ozdemir, Fatma

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Cardiovascular or cerebrovascular events associated with drug abuse have been frequently reported, particularly in young patients. The drugs include generally cocaine, heroin, and amphetamines. Although marijuana is among the widely used narcotics in the world, stroke associated with the marijuana use is infrequently reported. METHODS: Stroke caused by the use of marijuana was investigated in a 23-year-old man and the importance of inquiry of drug abuse in case of stroke was emphasized. RESULTS: The patient was treated for 7 days in a follow-up, but he was not recovered. The patient was discharged in his existing condition and was directed for physiotherapy and rehabilitation. CONCLUSION: Ischemic stroke is associated with drug abuse and/or substance use, mainly cannabinoids and amphetamines, particularly in young patients. PMID:25215152

  10. Streptococcal acute pharyngitis.

    PubMed

    Anjos, Lais Martins Moreira; Marcondes, Mariana Barros; Lima, Mariana Ferreira; Mondelli, Alessandro Lia; Okoshi, Marina Politi

    2014-07-01

    Acute pharyngitis/tonsillitis, which is characterized by inflammation of the posterior pharynx and tonsils, is a common disease. Several viruses and bacteria can cause acute pharyngitis; however, Streptococcus pyogenes (also known as Lancefield group A β-hemolytic streptococci) is the only agent that requires an etiologic diagnosis and specific treatment. S. pyogenes is of major clinical importance because it can trigger post-infection systemic complications, acute rheumatic fever, and post-streptococcal glomerulonephritis. Symptom onset in streptococcal infection is usually abrupt and includes intense sore throat, fever, chills, malaise, headache, tender enlarged anterior cervical lymph nodes, and pharyngeal or tonsillar exudate. Cough, coryza, conjunctivitis, and diarrhea are uncommon, and their presence suggests a viral cause. A diagnosis of pharyngitis is supported by the patient's history and by the physical examination. Throat culture is the gold standard for diagnosing streptococcus pharyngitis. However, it has been underused in public health services because of its low availability and because of the 1- to 2-day delay in obtaining results. Rapid antigen detection tests have been used to detect S. pyogenes directly from throat swabs within minutes. Clinical scoring systems have been developed to predict the risk of S. pyogenes infection. The most commonly used scoring system is the modified Centor score. Acute S. pyogenes pharyngitis is often a self-limiting disease. Penicillins are the first-choice treatment. For patients with penicillin allergy, cephalosporins can be an acceptable alternative, although primary hypersensitivity to cephalosporins can occur. Another drug option is the macrolides. Future perspectives to prevent streptococcal pharyngitis and post-infection systemic complications include the development of an anti-Streptococcus pyogenes vaccine. PMID:25229278

  11. Application of loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) assay for the rapid diagnosis of pathogenic bacteria in clinical sputum specimens of acute exacerbation of COPD (AECOPD)

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Wei; Chen, Chuanhui; Cui, Jian; Bai, Wei; Zhou, Jing

    2015-01-01

    The present study explores the application of LAMP for rapid diagnosis of pathogenic bacteria in clinical sputum specimens of AECOPD as compared with conventional sputum culturing method. 120 sputum specimens of AECOPD patients, 46 sputum specimens of healthy controls, as well as 166 serum specimens as negative controls, were evaluated by LAMP assay using primers of eight typical respiratory pathogens. No cross-reactivity was observed in these negative control species using LAMP assay. The lower detection limit of LAMP assay was approximately 103 copies. 25 cases (20.8%) were detected at least one positive bacteria species by conventional sputum culturing method, while 73 cases (60.8%) were tested positive in LAMP assay. Moreover, compared with sputum culture, bacterial titers results of LAMP assay were more consistent with FEV1/FVC value of AECOPD patients. These results indicated that the sensitivity of LAMP assay was significantly higher than that of sputum culturing method. PMID:26221344

  12. The mitochondrial DNA 10197 G > A mutation causes MELAS/Leigh overlap syndrome presenting with acute auditory agnosia.

    PubMed

    Leng, Yinglin; Liu, Yuhe; Fang, Xiaojing; Li, Yao; Yu, Lei; Yuan, Yun; Wang, Zhaoxia

    2015-04-01

    Mitochondrial encephalomyopathy with lactic acidosis and stroke-like episodes/Leigh (MELAS/LS) overlap syndrome is a mitochondrial disorder subtype with clinical and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) features that are characteristic of both MELAS and Leigh syndrome (LS). Here, we report an MELAS/LS case presenting with cortical deafness and seizures. Cranial MRI revealed multiple lesions involving bilateral temporal lobes, the basal ganglia and the brainstem, which conformed to neuroimaging features of both MELAS and LS. Whole mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) sequencing and PCR-RFLP revealed a de novo heteroplasmic m.10197 G > A mutation in the NADH dehydrogenase subunit 3 gene (ND3), which was predicted to cause an alanine to threonine substitution at amino acid 47. Although the mtDNA m.10197 G > A mutation has been reported in association with LS, Leber hereditary optic neuropathy and dystonia, it has never been linked with MELAS/LS overlap syndrome. Our patient therefore expands the phenotypic spectrum of the mtDNA m.10197 G > A mutation. PMID:24708134

  13. Nongenomic effects of estrogen mediate the dose-related myocardial oxidative stress and dysfunction caused by acute ethanol in female rats

    PubMed Central

    El-Mas, Mahmoud M.

    2013-01-01

    Acute ethanol lowers blood pressure (BP) and cardiac output in proestrus and after chronic estrogen (E2) replacement in ovariectomized (OVX) female rats. However, whether rapid nongenomic effects of estrogen mediate these hemodynamic effects of ethanol remains unanswered. To test this hypothesis, we investigated the effect of ethanol (0.5 or 1.5 g/kg iv) on left ventricular (LV) function and oxidative markers in OVX rats pretreated 30 min earlier with 1 μg/kg E2 (OVXE2) or vehicle (OVX) and in proestrus sham-operated (SO) rats. In SO rats, ethanol caused significant and dose-related reductions in BP, rate of rise in LV pressure (LV dP/dtmax), and LV developed pressure (LVDP). These effects of ethanol disappeared in OVX rats and were restored in OVXE2 rats, suggesting rapid estrogen receptor signaling mediates the detrimental effects of ethanol on LV function. Ex vivo studies revealed that the estrogen-dependent myocardial dysfunction caused by ethanol was coupled with higher LV 1) generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), 2) expression of malondialdehyde and 4-hydroxynonenal protein adducts, 3) phosphorylation of protein kinase B (Akt) and extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERK1/2), and 4) catalase activity. ERK1/2 inhibition by PD-98059 (1 mg/kg iv) abrogated the myocardial dysfunction, hypotension, and the elevation in myocardial ROS generation caused by ethanol. We conclude that rapid estrogen receptor signaling is implicated in cellular events that lead to the generation of aldehyde protein adducts and Akt/ERK1/2 phosphorylation, which ultimately mediate the estrogen-dependent LV oxidative stress and dysfunction caused by ethanol in female rats. PMID:24368668

  14. Acute sacroiliitis.

    PubMed

    Slobodin, Gleb; Rimar, Doron; Boulman, Nina; Kaly, Lisa; Rozenbaum, Michael; Rosner, Itzhak; Odeh, Majed

    2016-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to review the data on the etiology, risk factors, clinical presentations, and diagnosis of acute sacroiliitis. A Pubmed search utilizing the indexing term "acute sacroiliitis" was conducted and the data pertinent to the aim of the review was extracted and organized in accordance with the preplanned structure of the manuscript. The diagnosis of acute sacroiliitis is often challenging because of both the relative rarity of this presentation and diverse character of acute sacroiliac pain, frequently mimicking other, more prevalent disorders. Technetium bone scintigraphy can localize the disease process to the sacroiliac joint, while computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging can be used for the detailed characterization and the extent of the disease as well as the diagnosis of complications. Pyogenic sacroiliitis is by far the most common cause of acute sacroiliitis. Brucellosis, acute sacroiliitis in the course of reactive arthritis, and crystalline-induced sacroiliitis frequently imitate pyogenic sacroiliitis. Acute sacroiliitis can rarely be also related to hematological malignancies or treatment with isotretinoin. Awareness to the possibility of acute sacroiliitis and a thorough physical examination are the necessary prerequisites to its timely diagnosis, while the appropriate laboratory and imaging studies should confirm the precise diagnosis and direct the appropriate treatment strategy. PMID:26847855

  15. Acute abdomen due to group A streptococcus bacteremia caused by an isolate with a mutation in the csrS gene.

    PubMed

    Kaneko, Masahiko; Maruta, Masaki; Shikata, Hisaharu; Hanayama, Masakazu; Ikebe, Tadayoshi

    2015-11-01

    Streptococcus pyogenes (group A streptococcus) is an aerobic gram-positive coccus that causes infections ranging from non-invasive pharyngitis to severely invasive necrotizing fasciitis. Mutations in csrS/csrR and rgg, negative regulator genes of group A streptococcus, are crucial factors in the pathogenesis of streptococcal toxic shock syndrome, which is a severe, invasive infection characterized by sudden onset of shock and multiorgan failure, resulting in a high mortality rate. Here we present a case of group A streptococcal bacteremia in a 28-year-old Japanese woman with no relevant previous medical history. The patient developed progressive abdominal symptoms that may have been due to spontaneous bacterial peritonitis, followed by a state of shock, which did not fulfill the proposed criteria for streptococcal toxic shock. The isolate was found to harbor a mutation in the negative regulator csrS gene, whereas the csrR and rgg genes were intact. It was noteworthy that this strain carrying a csrS mutation had caused group A streptococcal bacteremia characterized by acute abdomen as the presenting symptom in a young individual who had been previously healthy. This case indicates that group A streptococcus with csrS mutations has potential virulence factors that are associated with the onset of group A streptococcal bacteremia that does not meet the diagnostic criteria for streptococcal toxic shock syndrome. PMID:26231317

  16. What Causes Pericarditis?

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page from the NHLBI on Twitter. What Causes Pericarditis? In many cases, the cause of pericarditis (both acute and chronic) is unknown. Viral infections are likely a common cause of pericarditis, although the virus may never be ...

  17. mTOR inhibition with temsirolimus causes acute increases in glomerular permeability, but inhibits the dynamic permeability actions of puromycin aminonucleoside.

    PubMed

    Axelsson, Josefin; Rippe, Anna; Rippe, Bengt

    2015-05-15

    Inhibitors of the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTORi) can produce de novo proteinuria in kidney transplant patients. On the other hand, mTORi has been shown to suppress disease progression in several animal models of kidney disease. In the present study, we investigated whether glomerular permeability can be acutely altered by the mTORi temsirolimus and whether mTORi can affect acute puromycin aminonucleoside (PAN) or angiotensin II (ANG II)-induced glomerular hyperpermeability. In anesthetized Wistar rats, the left ureter was cannulated for urine collection, while simultaneously blood access was achieved. Temsirolimus was administered as a single intravenous dose 30 min before the start of the experiments in animals infused with PAN or ANG II or in nonexposed animals. Polydispersed FITC-Ficoll-70/400 (molecular radius 10-80 Å) and (51)Cr-EDTA infusion was given during the whole experiment. Measurements of Ficoll in plasma and urine were performed sequentially before the temsirolimus injection (baseline) and at 5, 15, 30, 60, and 120 min after the start of the experiments. Urine and plasma samples were analyzed by high-performance size-exclusion chromatography (HPSEC) to assess glomerular sieving coefficients (θ) for Ficoll10-80Å. Temsirolimus per se increased baseline glomerular permeability to Ficoll50-80Å 45 min after its administration, a reactive oxygen species (ROS)-dependent phenomenon. PAN caused a rapid and reversible increase in glomerular permeability, peaking at 5 min, and again at 60-120 min, which could be blocked by the ROS scavenger tempol. mTORi abrogated the second permeability peak induced by PAN. However, it had no effect on the immediate ANG II- or PAN-induced increases in glomerular permeability. PMID:25740597

  18. Acute 7,12-dimethylbenz[a]anthracene exposure causes differential concentration-dependent follicle depletion and gene expression in neonatal rat ovaries

    SciTech Connect

    Madden, Jill A.; Hoyer, Patricia B.; Devine, Patrick J.; Keating, Aileen F.

    2014-05-01

    Chronic exposure to the polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon 7,12-dimethylbenz[a]anthracene (DMBA), generated during combustion of organic matter including cigarette smoke, depletes all ovarian follicle types in the mouse and rat, and in vitro models mimic this effect. To investigate the mechanisms involved in follicular depletion during acute DMBA exposure, two concentrations of DMBA at which follicle depletion has (75 nM) and has not (12.5 nM) been observed were investigated. Postnatal day four F344 rat ovaries were maintained in culture for four days before a single exposure to vehicle control (1% DMSO; CT) or DMBA (12 nM; low-concentration or 75 nM; high-concentration). After four or eight additional days of culture, DMBA-induced follicle depletion was evaluated via follicle enumeration. Relative to control, DMBA did not affect follicle numbers after 4 days of exposure, but induced large primary follicle loss at both concentrations after 8 days; while, the low-concentration DMBA also caused secondary follicle depletion. Neither concentration affected primordial or small primary follicle number. RNA was isolated and quantitative RT-PCR performed prior to follicle loss to measure mRNA levels of genes involved in xenobiotic metabolism (Cyp2e1, Gstmu, Gstpi, Ephx1), autophagy (Atg7, Becn1), oxidative stress response (Sod1, Sod2) and the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) pathway (Kitlg, cKit, Akt1) 1, 2 and 4 days after exposure. With the exception of Atg7 and cKit, DMBA increased (P < 0.05) expression of all genes investigated. Also, BECN1 and pAKT{sup Thr308} protein levels were increased while cKIT was decreased by DMBA exposure. Taken together, these results suggest an increase in DMBA bioactivation, add to the mechanistic understanding of DMBA-induced ovotoxicity and raise concern regarding female low concentration DMBA exposures. - Highlights: • Acute DMBA exposures induce large primary and/or secondary follicle loss. • Acute DMBA exposure did not impact primordial and small primary follicle number. • Altered ovarian gene expression was observed due to DMBA exposure.

  19. Patients with left ventricular ejection fraction greater than 58 % have fewer incidences of future acute decompensated heart failure admission and all-cause mortality.

    PubMed

    Goto, Toshihiko; Wakami, Kazuaki; Fukuta, Hidekatsu; Fujita, Hiroshi; Tani, Tomomitsu; Ohte, Nobuyuki

    2016-05-01

    Based on our previous observation, inertia stress (IS) of late systolic aortic flow was often observed in left ventricles with relatively higher left ventricular (LV) ejection fraction (EF). Most left ventricles with relatively lower LVEF did not have IS. Accordingly, lack of IS may correlate with LV diastolic dysfunction through the loss of LV elastic recoil and may contribute to the pathogenesis of heart failure (HF) and reduced survival. We enrolled 144 consecutive patients that underwent cardiac catheterization for the diagnosis of coronary artery disease. Left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) was obtained from left ventriculography. The IS was calculated from the LV pressure (P)-dP/dt relation. The study endpoint of this retrospective outcome-observational study was combined subsequent acute decompensated heart failure (ADHF) and all-cause mortality. During the follow-up period (median 6.1 years), seven unscheduled hospitalizations for ADHF and nine all-cause deaths were observed. The event-free survival rate was significantly higher among patients with IS than among patients without IS (log-rank, p = 0.001). On a multivariate Cox regression analysis, lack of IS was a prime predictor of the endpoint during follow-up (hazard ratio: 6.98; 95 % confidence interval: 1.48-33.03; p = 0.01). An LVEF ≥ 58 % was a surrogate indicator for the presence of IS, and patients with LVEF ≥ 58 % had fewer incidences of the endpoint than patients with LVEF < 58 %. In conclusion, lack of IS or LVEF < 58 % should be a predictor of future ADHF and all-cause mortality. PMID:25771802

  20. [Molecular Identification and Phylogenetic Analyses of Coxsackievirus A24v Causing an Outbreak of Acute Hemorrhagic Conjunctivitis in Jiangxi, China, in 2010].

    PubMed

    Yan, Dongmei; Xiong, Ying; Zhang, Yang; Yang, Qiai; Zhang, Shuxia; Gong, Tian; Zhu, Tian; Wang, Donavan; Zhu, Hui; Xu, Wenbo

    2015-05-01

    To identify the cause of an outbreak of acute hemorrhagic conjunctivitis (AHC) in Jiangxi (China) in 2010, 20 eye conjunctival swabs were first collected from AHC patients. Then, viruses were isola- ted and tested for human enterovirus 70, coxsackievirus A24 variant (CV-A24v) and adenovirus using the polymerase chain reaction. All CV-A24v isolates underwent sequencing of 3C and VP1 coding regions. Then, a phylogenetic tree was constructed for Jiangxi CV-A24v and worldwide CV-A24v based on,3C and VP1 regions, respectively. Ten out of 20 specimens were positive for CV-A24v, implying that the outbreak was caused by CV-A24v. The phylogenetic tree based on the 3C region showed that Jiangxi CV- A24v belonged to cluster 5 in genotype IV (GIV-C5) with strains isolated throughout the world after 2010, and were divided further into A and B lineages. Phylogenetic analyses of the VP1 region showed that all of the worldwide CV-A24v strains isolated after 2000 could be divided into five groups (1-5). Jiangxi CV-A24v was classified into group 5 and also divided further into A and B lineages upon analyses of the 3C region. These data suggested that CV-A24v causing AHC outbreaks in China in 2010 belonged to GIV-C3 and GIV-C5. At least two transmission lineages were circulated in Jiangxi in 2010. The classification of CV-A24v isolated after 2010 worldwide using the phylogenetic tree based on the VP1 region was almost consistent with that based on the 3C region and also had significant chronological clustering. PMID:26470530

  1. Examination of hospital length of stay in Canada among patients with acute bacterial skin and skin structure infection caused by methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus

    PubMed Central

    Potashman, Michele H; Stokes, Michael; Liu, Jieruo; Lawrence, Robin; Harris, Linda

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Skin infections, particularly those caused by resistant pathogens, represent a clinical burden. Hospitalization associated with acute bacterial skin and skin structure infections (ABSSSI) caused by methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is a major contributor to the economic burden of the disease. This study was conducted to provide current, real-world data on hospitalization patterns for patients with ABSSSI caused by MRSA across multiple geographic regions in Canada. Patients and methods This retrospective cohort study evaluated length of stay (LOS) for hospitalized patients with ABSSSI due to MRSA diagnosis across four Canadian geographic regions using the Discharge Abstract Database. Patients with ICD-10-CA diagnosis consistent with ABSSSI caused by MRSA between January 2008 and December 2014 were selected and assigned a primary or secondary diagnosis based on a prespecified ICD-10-CA code algorithm. Results Among 6,719 patients, 3,273 (48.7%) and 3,446 (51.3%) had a primary and secondary diagnosis, respectively. Among patients with a primary or secondary diagnosis, the cellulitis/erysipelas subtype was most common. The majority of patients presented with 0 or 1 comorbid condition; the most common comorbidity was diabetes. The mean LOS over the study period varied by geographic region and year; in 2014 (the most recent year analyzed), LOS ranged from 7.7 days in Ontario to 13.4 days in the Canadian Prairie for a primary diagnosis and from 18.2 days in Ontario to 25.2 days in Atlantic Canada for a secondary diagnosis. A secondary diagnosis was associated with higher rates of continuing care compared with a primary diagnosis (10.6%–24.2% vs 4.6%–12.1%). Conclusion This study demonstrated that the mean LOS associated with ABSSSI due to MRSA in Canada was minimally 7 days. Clinical management strategies, including medication management, which might facilitate hospital discharge, have the potential to reduce hospital LOS and related economic burden associated with ABSSSI caused by MRSA. PMID:26869806

  2. Interaction of aflatoxin B1 and fumonisin B1 in mice causes immunotoxicity and oxidative stress: Possible protective role using lactic acid bacteria.

    PubMed

    Abbès, Samir; Ben Salah-Abbès, Jalila; Jebali, Rania; Younes, Ridha Ben; Oueslati, Ridha

    2016-01-01

    Aflatoxins (AF) are important foodborne mycotoxins implicated in human health and have immunocytotoxic effects. The aims of this study were to evaluate a new aflatoxin B1 (AFB1) and fumonisin B1 (FB1)-binding/degrading micro-organism for biological detoxification, to examine its ability to degrade AFB1 and FB1 in liquid medium, and to evaluate its potential in vivo protective role against any combined effects from AFB1 and FB1 on host splenocyte caspase-3 activity (reflecting DNA damage/cell death) and mRNA levels of select inflammation-regulating cytokines. Balb/c mice were divided into groups (10/group) and treated daily for 2 weeks by oral gavage with AFB1 (80 µg/kg BW), FB1 (100 µg/kg), AFB1 + FB1, or lactic acid bacteria (Lactobacillus paracasei BEJ01, 2 × 10(9) CFU/L, ∼2 mg/kg) - alone or in combination with the AFB1 and/or FB1. After the exposures, spleens were collected for measures of caspase-3 activity, lipid peroxidation (LP), and glutathione (GSH) content, expression of anti-oxidation protective enzymes (GPx and SOD), and mRNA levels of inflammation-regulating cytokines (e.g. IL-10, IL-4, IFNγ, TNFα). Thymii were also removed for analysis of apoptosis. The results indicated that, in the spleen, exposure to the mycotoxins led to increased caspase-3 activity, LP, and IL-10 and IL-4 mRNA levels, but decreased GSH content and down-regulated expression of GPx and SOD, and of IFNγ and TNFα mRNA. Co-treatment using Lactic Acid Bacteria (LAB) with AFB1 or FB1 suppressed levels of DNA fragmentation, normalized splenic LP and increased GSH levels, up-regulated expression of GPx and SOD, and normalized mRNA levels of the analyzed cytokines. It is concluded that AFB1 and FB1 might have combinational (synergistic moreso than additive) toxic effects in situ. Further, it can be seen that use of LAB induced protective effects against the oxidative stress and (immuno)toxicity of these agents in part through adhesion (and so likely diminished bioavalability). PMID:25585958

  3. In Vitro Antibacterial Efficacy of 21 Indian Timber-Yielding Plants Against Multidrug-Resistant Bacteria Causing Urinary Tract Infection

    PubMed Central

    Mishra, Monali P.; Padhy, Rabindra N.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives To screen methanolic leaf extracts of 21 timber-yielding plants for antibacterial activity against nine species of uropathogenic bacteria isolated from clinical samples of a hospital (Enterococcus faecalis, Staphylococcus aureus, Acinetobacter baumannii, Citrobacter freundii, Enterobacter aerogenes, Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Proteus mirabilis, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa). Methods Bacterial strains were subjected to antibiotic sensitivity tests by the Kirby–Bauer's disc diffusion method. The antibacterial potentiality of leaf extracts was monitored by the agar-well diffusion method with multidrug-resistant (MDR) strains of nine uropathogens. Results Two Gram-positive isolates, E. faecalis and S. aureus, were resistant to 14 of the 18 antibiotics used. Gram-negative isolates A. baumannii, C. freundii, E. aerogenes, E. coli, K. pneumoniae, P. mirabilis, and P. aeruginosa were resistant to 10, 12, 9, 11, 11, 10, and 11 antibiotics, respectively, of the 14 antibiotics used. Methanolic leaf extracts of Anogeissus acuminata had the maximum zone of inhibition size—29 mm against S. aureus and 28 mm against E. faecalis and P. aeruginosa. Cassia tora had 29 mm as the zone of inhibition size for E. faecalis, E. aerogenes, and P. aeruginosa. Based on the minimum inhibitory concentration and minimum bactericidal concentration values, the most effective 10 plants against uropathogens could be arranged in decreasing order as follows: C. tora > A. acuminata > Schleichera oleosa > Pterocarpus santalinus > Eugenia jambolana > Bridelia retusa > Mimusops elengi > Stereospermum kunthianum > Tectona grandis > Anthocephalus cadamba. The following eight plants had moderate control capacity: Artocarpus heterophyllus, Azadirachta indica, Dalbergia latifolia, Eucalyptus citriodora, Gmelina arborea, Pongamia pinnata, Pterocarpus marsupium, and Shorea robusta. E. coli, followed by A. baumannii, C. freundii, E. aerogenes, P. mirabilis, and P. aeruginosa were controlled by higher amounts/levels of leaf extracts. Phytochemicals of all plants were qualitatively estimated. Conclusions A majority of timber-yielding plants studied had in vitro control capacity against MDR uropathogenic bacteria. PMID:24524024

  4. The Clinical Efficacy and Safety of Ertapenem for the Treatment of Complicated Urinary Tract Infections Caused by ESBL-Producing Bacteria in Children.

    PubMed

    Karaaslan, Ayse; Kadayifci, Eda Kepenekli; Atici, Serkan; Akkoc, Gulsen; Yakut, Nurhayat; Öcal Demir, Sevliya; Soysal, Ahmet; Bakir, Mustafa

    2015-01-01

    Background. Urinary tract infections (UTIs) are common and important clinical problem in childhood, and extended-spectrum-beta-lactamase- (ESBL-) producing organisms are the leading cause of healthcare-related UTIs. In this study, we aimed to evaluate the clinical efficacy and safety of ertapenem therapy in children with complicated UTIs caused by ESBL-producing organisms. Methods. Seventy-seven children with complicated UTIs caused by ESBL-producing organisms were included in this retrospective study, and all had been treated with ertapenem between January 2013 and June 2014. Results. Sixty-one (79%) females and sixteen (21%) males with a mean ± standard deviation (SD) age of 76.6 ± 52 months (range 3-204, median 72 months) were enrolled in this study. Escherichia coli (E. coli) (n = 67; 87%) was the most common bacterial cause of the UTIs followed by Klebsiella pneumoniae (K. pneumoniae) (n = 9; 11.7%) and Enterobacter cloacae (E. cloacae) (n = 1; 1.3%). The mean duration of the ertapenem therapy was 8.9 ± 1.6 days (range 4-11). No serious drug-related clinical or laboratory adverse effects were observed, and the ertapenem therapy was found to be safe and well tolerated in the children in our study. Conclusion. Ertapenem is a newer carbapenem with the advantage of once-daily dosing and is highly effective for treating UTIs caused by ESBL-producing microorganisms. PMID:26106487

  5. The Clinical Efficacy and Safety of Ertapenem for the Treatment of Complicated Urinary Tract Infections Caused by ESBL-Producing Bacteria in Children

    PubMed Central

    Karaaslan, Ayse; Atici, Serkan; Akkoc, Gulsen; Yakut, Nurhayat; Öcal Demir, Sevliya; Soysal, Ahmet; Bakir, Mustafa

    2015-01-01

    Background. Urinary tract infections (UTIs) are common and important clinical problem in childhood, and extended-spectrum-beta-lactamase- (ESBL-) producing organisms are the leading cause of healthcare-related UTIs. In this study, we aimed to evaluate the clinical efficacy and safety of ertapenem therapy in children with complicated UTIs caused by ESBL-producing organisms. Methods. Seventy-seven children with complicated UTIs caused by ESBL-producing organisms were included in this retrospective study, and all had been treated with ertapenem between January 2013 and June 2014. Results. Sixty-one (79%) females and sixteen (21%) males with a mean ± standard deviation (SD) age of 76.6 ± 52 months (range 3–204, median 72 months) were enrolled in this study. Escherichia coli (E. coli) (n = 67; 87%) was the most common bacterial cause of the UTIs followed by Klebsiella pneumoniae (K. pneumoniae) (n = 9; 11.7%) and Enterobacter cloacae (E. cloacae) (n = 1; 1.3%). The mean duration of the ertapenem therapy was 8.9 ± 1.6 days (range 4–11). No serious drug-related clinical or laboratory adverse effects were observed, and the ertapenem therapy was found to be safe and well tolerated in the children in our study. Conclusion. Ertapenem is a newer carbapenem with the advantage of once-daily dosing and is highly effective for treating UTIs caused by ESBL-producing microorganisms. PMID:26106487

  6. Effects of Mikania glomerata Spreng. and Mikania laevigata Schultz Bip. ex Baker (Asteraceae) extracts on pulmonary inflammation and oxidative stress caused by acute coal dust exposure

    SciTech Connect

    Freitas, T.P.; Silveira, P.C.; Rocha, L.G.; Rezin, G.T.; Rocha, J.; Citadini-Zanette, V.; Romao, P.T.; Dal-Pizzol, F.; Pinho, R.A.; Andrade, V.M.; Streck, E.L.

    2008-12-15

    Several studies have reported biological effects of Mikania glomerata and Mikania laevigata, used in Brazilian folk medicine for respiratory diseases. Pneumoconiosis is characterized by pulmonary inflammation caused by coal dust exposure. In this work, we evaluated the effect of pretreatment with M. glomerata and M. laevigata extracts (MGE and MLE, respectively) (100 mg/kg, s.c.) on inflammatory and oxidative stress parameters in lung of rats subjected to a single coal dust intratracheal instillation. Rats were pretreated for 2 weeks with saline solution, MGE, or MLE. On day 15, the animals were anesthetized, and gross mineral coal dust or saline solutions were administered directly in the lung by intratracheal instillation. Fifteen days after coal dust instillation, the animals were killed. Bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) was obtained; total cell count and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) activity were determined. In the lung, myeloperoxidase activity, thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances (TBARS) level, and protein carbonyl and sulfhydryl contents were evaluated. In BAL of treated animals, we verified an increased total cell count and LDH activity. MGE and MLE prevented the increase in cell count, but only MLE prevented the increase in LDH. Myeloperoxidase and TBARS levels were not affected, protein carbonylation was increased, and the protein thiol levels were decreased by acute coal dust intratracheal administration. The findings also suggest that both extracts present an important protective effect on the oxidation of thiol groups. Moreover, pretreatment with MGE and MLE also diminished lung inflammatory infiltration induced by coal dust, as assessed by histopathologic analyses.

  7. TGFB2 loss of function mutations cause familial thoracic aortic aneurysms and acute aortic dissections associated with mild systemic features of the Marfan syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Boileau, Catherine; Guo, Dong-Chuan; Hanna, Nadine; Regalado, Ellen S.; Detaint, Delphine; Gong, Limin; Varret, Mathilde; Prakash, Siddharth; Li, Alexander H.; d’Indy, Hyacintha; Braverman, Alan C.; Grandchamp, Bernard; Kwartler, Callie S.; Gouya, Laurent; Santos-Cortez, Regie Lyn P.; Abifadel, Marianne; Leal, Suzanne M.; Muti, Christine; Shendure, Jay; Gross, Marie-Sylvie; Rieder, Mark J.; Vahanian, Alec; Nickerson, Deborah A.; Michel, Jean Baptiste; Jondeau, Guillaume; Milewicz, Dianna M.

    2014-01-01

    A predisposition for thoracic aortic aneurysms leading to acute aortic dissections can be inherited in families in an autosomal dominant manner. Genome-wide linkage analysis of two large unrelated families with thoracic aortic disease, followed by whole exome sequencing of affected relatives, identified causative mutations in TGFB2. These mutations, a frameshift mutation in exon 6 and a nonsense mutation in exon 4, segregated with disease with a combined LOD score of 7.7. Sanger sequencing of 276 probands from families with inherited thoracic aortic disease identified two additional TGFB2 mutations. TGFB2 encodes the transforming growth factor beta-2 (TGF-β2) and the mutations are predicted to cause haploinsufficiency for TGFB2, but aortic tissue from cases paradoxically shows increased TGF-β2 expression and immunostaining. Thus, haploinsufficiency of TGFB2 predisposes to thoracic aortic disease, suggesting the initial pathway driving disease is decreased cellular TGF-β2 levels leading to a secondary increase in TGF-β2 production in the diseased aorta. PMID:22772371

  8. A simplified method of walking track analysis to assess short-term locomotor recovery after acute spinal cord injury caused by thoracolumbar intervertebral disc extrusion in dogs.

    PubMed

    Song, R B; Oldach, M S; Basso, D M; da Costa, R C; Fisher, L C; Mo, X; Moore, S A

    2016-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate a simplified method of walking track analysis to assess treatment outcome in canine spinal cord injury. Measurements of stride length (SL) and base of support (BS) were made using a 'finger painting' technique for footprint analysis in all limbs of 20 normal dogs and 27 dogs with 28 episodes of acute thoracolumbar spinal cord injury (SCI) caused by spontaneous intervertebral disc extrusion. Measurements were determined at three separate time points in normal dogs and on days 3, 10 and 30 following decompressive surgery in dogs with SCI. Values for SL, BS and coefficient of variance (COV) for each parameter were compared between groups at each time point. Mean SL was significantly shorter in all four limbs of SCI-affected dogs at days 3, 10, and 30 compared to normal dogs. SL gradually increased toward normal in the 30 days following surgery. As measured by this technique, the COV-SL was significantly higher in SCI-affected dogs than normal dogs in both thoracic limbs (TL) and pelvic limbs (PL) only at day 3 after surgery. BS-TL was significantly wider in SCI-affected dogs at days 3, 10 and 30 following surgery compared to normal dogs. These findings support the use of footprint parameters to compare locomotor differences between normal and SCI-affected dogs, and to assess recovery from SCI. Additionally, our results underscore important changes in TL locomotion in thoracolumbar SCI-affected dogs. PMID:26900008

  9. Anaemia only causes a small reduction in the upper critical temperature of sea bass: is oxygen delivery the limiting factor for tolerance of acute warming in fishes?

    PubMed

    Wang, Tobias; Lefevre, Sjannie; Iversen, Nina K; Findorf, Inge; Buchanan, Rasmus; McKenzie, David J

    2014-12-15

    To address how the capacity for oxygen transport influences tolerance of acute warming in fishes, we investigated whether a reduction in haematocrit, by means of intra-peritoneal injection of the haemolytic agent phenylhydrazine, lowered the upper critical temperature of sea bass. A reduction in haematocrit from 42±2% to 20±3% (mean ± s.e.m.) caused a significant but minor reduction in upper critical temperature, from 35.8±0.1 to 35.1±0.2°C, with no correlation between individual values for haematocrit and upper thermal limit. Anaemia did not influence the rise in oxygen uptake between 25 and 33°C, because the anaemic fish were able to compensate for reduced blood oxygen carrying capacity with a significant increase in cardiac output. Therefore, in sea bass the upper critical temperature, at which they lost equilibrium, was not determined by an inability of the cardio-respiratory system to meet the thermal acceleration of metabolic demands. PMID:25394629

  10. Molecular epidemiology of a post-influenza pandemic outbreak of acute respiratory infections in Korea caused by human adenovirus type 3.

    PubMed

    Lee, Wan-Ji; Jung, Hee-Dong; Cheong, Hyang-Min; Kim, Kisoon

    2015-01-01

    An outbreak of upper respiratory tract infections associated with human adenovirus (HAdV) occurred on a national scale in Korea from September to December 2010, following a major H1N1 influenza pandemic. Data from the Korea Influenza and Respiratory Surveillance System (KINRESS) showed an unusually high positive rate accounting for up to 20% of all diagnosed cases. To determine the principal cause of the outbreak, direct polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification followed by sequence analysis targeting parts of the hexon gene of HAdV was performed. Serotypes of 1,007 PCR-diagnosed HAdV-positive samples from patients with an acute upper respiratory tract illness were determined and epidemiological characteristics including major aged group and clinical symptoms were analyzed. The principal symptom of HAdV infections was fever and the vulnerable aged group was 1-5 years old. Based on sequence analysis, HAdV-3 was the predominant serotype in the outbreak, with an incidence of 74.3%. From the beginning of 2010 until May, the major serotypes were HAdV-1, 2, and 5 (70-100%) in any given period. However, an outbreak dominated by HAdV-3 started between July and August and peaked in September. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that there was no genetic variation in HAdV-3. The results demonstrated that an outbreak of upper respiratory illness followed by H1N1 influenza pandemic in Korea was caused mainly by emerged HAdV-3. J. PMID:24889391

  11. Seasonal Behavior of Xylella fastidiosa Causing Almond Leaf Scorch Under Field Conditions and Detection of the Bacteria by Means of Array-PCR

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Diseases caused by Xylella fastidiosa have re-emerged as a serious threat to several economically important crops, such as grape and almond, in the San Joaquin Valley of California. Knowledge of bacterial behavior in plant hosts under field condition is important for disease control. This research c...

  12. Seasonal Behavior of Xylella fastidiosa Causing Almond Leaf Scorch Disease Under Field Conditions and Improved Detection of the Bacteria by Means of Array-PCR

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Almond leaf scorch disease (ALSD) caused by Xylella fastidiosa is potentially a serious threat to the almond industry in San Joaquin Valley of California. Knowledge of X. fastidiosa behavior in the plant host under field conditions is important for disease control and this issue is being addressed i...

  13. Prevalence of Device-associated Nosocomial Infections Caused By Gram-negative Bacteria in a Trauma Intensive Care Unit in Libya

    PubMed Central

    Zorgani, Abdulaziz; Abofayed, Atef; Glia, Abdulhakim; Albarbar, Ashrf; Hanish, Sami

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Device-associated nosocomial infections (DANIs) have a major impact on patient morbidity and mortality. Our study aimed to determine the distribution rate of DANIs and causative agents and patterns of antibiotic resistance in the trauma-surgical intensive care unit (ICU).  Methods Our study was conducted at Abusalim Trauma Hospital in Tripoli, Libya. All devices associated with nosocomial infections, including central venous catheters (CVC), endotracheal tubes (ETT), Foley’s urinary catheters, chest tubes, nasogastric tubes (NGT), and tracheostomy tubes, were removed aseptically and examined for Gram-negative bacteria (GNB).  Results During a one-year study period, 363 patients were hospitalized; the overall mortality rate was 29%. A total of 79 DANIs were identified, the most common site of infection was ETT (39.2%), followed by urinary catheters (19%), NGTs (18%), tracheostomy tubes (11%), CVCs (10%), and chest tubes (3%). The most frequently isolated organisms were Klebsiella pneumonia, Acinetobacter baumannii, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa (30%, 20%, and 14%, respectively). Extremely high resistance rates were observed among GNB to ampicillin (99%), cefuroxime (95%), amoxicillin-clavulante (92%), and nitrofurantoin (91%). Lower levels of resistance were exhibited to amikacin (38%), imipenem (38%), and colistin (29%). About 39% of the isolates were defined as multi-drug resistant (MDR). Overall, extended spectrum β-lactmase producers were expressed in 39% of isolates mainly among K. pneumonia (88%). A. baumannii isolates exhibited extremely high levels of resistance to all antibiotics except colistin (100% sensitive). In addition, 56.3% of A. baumannii isolates were found to be MDR. P. aeruginosa isolates showed 46%–55% effectiveness to anti-pseudomonas antibiotics.  Conclusion High rates of DANI’s and the emergence of MDR organisms poses a serious threat to patients. There is a need to strengthen infection control within the ICU environment, introduce surveillance systems, and implement evidence-based preventive strategies. PMID:26366261

  14. Characterization of Damage to Bacteria and Bio-macromolecules Caused by (V)UV Radiation and Particles Generated by a Microscale Atmospheric Pressure Plasma Jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lackmann, Jan-Wilm; Schneider, Simon; Narberhaus, Franz; Benedikt, Jan; Bandow, Julia E.

    Atmospheric pressure plasma jets effectively inactivate bacteria on ­surfaces including infected tissues. This is due to the combined effects of (V)UV radiation, reactive oxygen and nitrogen species, ions, and high electric fields. A well-characterized microscale atmospheric pressure plasma jet (μ-APPJ) operated with He/O2 gas mixture has been modified so that (V)UV radiation and heavy reactive particles (mainly O3 molecules and O atoms) emitted from the plasma source can be separated effectively. The separation is achieved by an additional lateral He flow, which diverts the heavy particles from the jet axis. The new jet geometry is called X-Jet. Separation of different plasma components allows studying their effects on living cells and bio-macromolecules separately. First, the effectiveness of the separation of different plasma components was demonstrated by treatment of monolayers of vegetative Bacillus subtilis cells. To characterize effects on nucleic acids, dried plasmid DNA and total cellular RNA were treated with the separated plasma components. Dried bovine serum albumin was used to study etching effects of (V)UV radiation and heavy particles on proteins. We found that heavy particles emitted from the X-Jet kill vegetative cells more effectively than the (V)UV radiation from this type of plasma source. All bio-macromolecules investigated, DNA, RNA, and proteins, are affected by plasma treatment. DNA exposed to the (V)UV-channel of the jet seems to be prone to thymine dimer formation not only in vitro but also in vivo as indicated by induction of the photolyase in Escherichia coli, while DNA strand breaks occur under both jet channels. Heavy particles seem more effective in degrading RNA and in etching protein in vitro.

  15. The Difference between Anxiolytic and Anxiogenic Effects Induced by Acute and Chronic Alcohol Exposure and Changes in Associative Learning and Memory Based on Color Preference and the Cause of Parkinson-Like Behaviors in Zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yuan; Chen, Di; Sun, Ming-Zhu; Zhao, Xin; Chen, Dong-Yan; Feng, Xi-Zeng

    2015-01-01

    We describe an interdisciplinary comparison of the effects of acute and chronic alcohol exposure in terms of their disturbance of light, dark and color preferences and the occurrence of Parkinson-like behavior in zebrafish through computer visual tracking, data mining, and behavioral and physiological analyses. We found that zebrafish in anxiolytic and anxious states, which are induced by acute and chronic repeated alcohol exposure, respectively, display distinct emotional reactions in light/dark preference tests as well as distinct learning and memory abilities in color-enhanced conditional place preference (CPP) tests. Additionally, compared with the chronic alcohol (1.0%) treatment, acute alcohol exposure had a significant, dose-dependent effect on anxiety, learning and memory (color preference) as well as locomotive activities. Acute exposure doses (0.5%, 1.0%, and 1.5%) generated an “inverted V” dose-dependent pattern in all of the behavioral parameters, with 1.0% having the greatest effect, while the chronic treatment had a moderate effect. Furthermore, by measuring locomotive activity, learning and memory performance, the number of dopaminergic neurons, tyrosine hydroxylase expression, and the change in the photoreceptors in the retina, we found that acute and chronic alcohol exposure induced varying degrees of Parkinson-like symptoms in zebrafish. Taken together, these results illuminated the behavioral and physiological mechanisms underlying the changes associated with learning and memory and the cause of potential Parkinson-like behaviors in zebrafish due to acute and chronic alcohol exposure. PMID:26558894

  16. Acute toxicity screening of reservoir water and sediment using rotifers (Rotox{reg_sign}) and light emitting bacteria (Microtox{reg_sign}), reservoir vital signs monitoring, 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Moses, J.; Wade, D.C.

    1992-03-01

    Toxicological screening of reservoir sediments (porewater or interstitial water) and reservoir water (collected three meters above the sediments) was initiated in fourteen Tennessee River mainstem impoundments during the summer of 1990 as part of TVA`s Reservoir Vital Signs monitoring. Twenty-four stations representing transition-zone and forebay reservoir habitats were identified for study. Toxicity test methods evaluated acute response of the freshwater rotifer Brachionus calyciflorus (Rotox{trademark}) and the light emitting bacterium Photobacterium phosphoreum (Microtox{trademark}). The second series of Vital Signstoxicity biomonitoring tests was conducted during the summer of 1991. Results of this study indicated toxicity at several locations. The Vital Signs Reservoir Monitoring project allows several years of testing to establish toxicity baseline data and identify trends. Comparison of results from the first two years of testing show that Wilson Reservoir forebay (TRM 260.8) and Nickajack Reservoir forebay (TRM 425.5) bothexhibited mild toxicity to Microtox{trademark} in 1990 and toxicity to rotifers in 1991. No other stations exhibited toxicity both years.

  17. Acute toxicity screening of reservoir water and sediment using rotifers (Rotox[reg sign]) and light emitting bacteria (Microtox[reg sign]), reservoir vital signs monitoring, 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Moses, J.; Wade, D.C.

    1992-03-01

    Toxicological screening of reservoir sediments (porewater or interstitial water) and reservoir water (collected three meters above the sediments) was initiated in fourteen Tennessee River mainstem impoundments during the summer of 1990 as part of TVA's Reservoir Vital Signs monitoring. Twenty-four stations representing transition-zone and forebay reservoir habitats were identified for study. Toxicity test methods evaluated acute response of the freshwater rotifer Brachionus calyciflorus (Rotox[trademark]) and the light emitting bacterium Photobacterium phosphoreum (Microtox[trademark]). The second series of Vital Signstoxicity biomonitoring tests was conducted during the summer of 1991. Results of this study indicated toxicity at several locations. The Vital Signs Reservoir Monitoring project allows several years of testing to establish toxicity baseline data and identify trends. Comparison of results from the first two years of testing show that Wilson Reservoir forebay (TRM 260.8) and Nickajack Reservoir forebay (TRM 425.5) bothexhibited mild toxicity to Microtox[trademark] in 1990 and toxicity to rotifers in 1991. No other stations exhibited toxicity both years.

  18. Dynamic obstruction induced by systolic anterior motion of the mitral valve in a volume-depleted left ventricle: an unexpected cause of acute heart failure in a patient with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Suji; Kim, So Jeong; Kim, Jina; Yoon, Phillhoon; Park, Jeongwoong

    2015-01-01

    Systolic anterior motion (SAM) of the mitral valve (MV) and left ventricular outflow tract (LVOT) dynamic obstruction (DO) typically occur in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy; however, they can appear in an apparently normal heart in association with changes in cardiac loading conditions and/or hyperdynamic left ventricular (LV) performance. Meanwhile, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) can impair LV filling by elevating pulmonary vascular resistance. The authors report a case of transient acute heart failure caused by LVOT DO resulting from SAM of the MV in a severely volume-depleted LV in a patient with acute COPD exacerbation. PMID:26623139

  19. Magnetic Bacteria.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nelson, Jane Bray; Nelson, Jim

    1992-01-01

    Describes the history of Richard Blakemore's discovery of magnetotaxic organisms. Discusses possible reasons why the magnetic response in bacteria developed. Proposes research experiments integrating biology and physics in which students investigate problems using cultures of magnetotaxic organisms. (MDH)

  20. Acute 7,12-dimethylbenz[a]anthracene exposure causes differential concentration-dependent follicle depletion and gene expression in neonatal rat ovaries

    PubMed Central

    Madden, Jill A.; Hoyer, Patricia B.; Devine, Patrick J.; Keating, Aileen F.

    2014-01-01

    Chronic exposure to the polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon 7,12-dimethylbenz[a]anthracene (DMBA), generated during combustion of organic matter including cigarette smoke, depletes all ovarian follicle types in the mouse and rat, and in vitro models mimic this effect. To investigate the mechanisms involved in follicular depletion during acute DMBA exposure, two concentrations of DMBA at which follicle depletion has (75 nM) and has not (12.5 nM) been observed were investigated. Postnatal day four F344 rat ovaries were maintained in culture for four days before a single exposure to vehicle control (1% DMSO; CT) or DMBA (12 nM; low-concentration or 75 nM; high-concentration). After four or eight additional days of culture, DMBA-induced follicle depletion was evaluated via follicle enumeration. Relative to control, DMBA did not affect follicle numbers after 4 days of exposure, but induced large primary follicle loss at both concentrations after 8 days; while, the low-concentration DMBA also caused secondary follicle depletion. Neither concentration affected primordial or small primary follicle number. RNA was isolated and quantitative RT-PCR performed prior to follicle loss to measure mRNA levels of genes involved in xenobiotic metabolism (Cyp2e1, Gstmu, Gstpi, Ephx1), autophagy (Atg7, Becn1), oxidative stress response (Sod1, Sod2) and the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) pathway (Kitlg, cKit, Akt1) 1, 2 and 4 days after exposure. With the exception of Atg7 and cKit, DMBA increased (P < 0.05) expression of all genes investigated. Also, BECN1 and pAKTThr308 protein levels were increased while cKIT was decreased by DMBA exposure. Taken together, these results suggest an increase in DMBA bioactivation, add to the mechanistic understanding of DMBA-induced ovotoxicity and raise concern regarding female low concentration DMBA exposures. PMID:24576726

  1. Two-photon excited endogenous fluorescence for label-free in vivo imaging ingestion of disease-causing bacteria by human leukocytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Yan; Yan, Bo; Sun, Qiqi; Teh, Seng Khoon; Zhang, Wei; Wen, Zilong; Qu, Jianan Y.

    2013-02-01

    Real time and in vivo monitoring leukocyte behavior provides unique information to understand the physiological and pathological process of infection. In this study, we demonstrate that two-photon excited reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH) fluorescence provides imaging contrast to distinguish granulocyte and agranulocyte. By using spectral and time-resolved NADH fluorescence, we study the immune response of human neutrophils against bacterial infection (Escherichia coli). The two-photon excited NADH fluorescence images clearly review the morphological changes from resting neutrophils (round shape) to activated neutrophils (ruffle shape) during phagocytosis. The free-tobound NADH ratio of neutrophils decreases after ingesting disease-causing pathogen: Escherichia coli. This finding may provide a new optical tool to investigate inflammatory processes by using NADH fluorescence in vivo.

  2. The Value of Combining Blood Culture and SeptiFast Data for Predicting Complicated Bloodstream Infections Caused by Gram-Positive Bacteria or Candida Species

    PubMed Central

    Marín, Mercedes; Kestler, Martha; Alcalá, Luis; Rodriguez-Créixems, Marta; Bouza, Emilio

    2013-01-01

    Management of complicated bloodstream infections requires more aggressive treatment than uncomplicated bloodstream infections. We assessed the value of follow-up blood culture in bloodstream infections caused by Staphylococcus aureus, Enterococcus spp., Streptococcus spp., and Candida spp. and studied the value of persistence of DNA in blood (using SeptiFast) for predicting complicated bloodstream infections. Patients with bloodstream infections caused by these microorganisms were enrolled prospectively. After the first positive blood culture, samples were obtained every third day to perform blood culture and SeptiFast analyses simultaneously. Patients were followed to detect complicated bloodstream infection. The study sample comprised 119 patients. One-third of the patients developed complicated bloodstream infections. The values of persistently positive tests to predict complicated bloodstream infections were as follows: SeptiFast positive samples (sensitivity, 56%; specificity, 79.5%; positive predictive value, 54%; negative predictive value, 80.5%; accuracy, 72.3%) and positive blood cultures (sensitivity, 30.5%; specificity, 92.8%; positive predictive value, 64%; negative predictive value, 75.5%; accuracy, 73.9%). Multivariate analysis showed that patients with a positive SeptiFast result between days 3 and 7 had an almost 8-fold-higher risk of developing a complicated bloodstream infection. In S. aureus, the combination of both techniques to exclude endovascular complications was significantly better than the use of blood culture alone. We obtained a score with variables selected by the multivariate model. With a cutoff of 7, the negative predictive value for complicated bloodstream infection was 96.6%. Patients with a positive SeptiFast result between days 3 and 7 after a positive blood culture have an almost 8-fold-higher risk of developing complicated bloodstream infections. A score combining clinical data with the SeptiFast result may improve the exclusion of complicated bloodstream infections. PMID:23363819

  3. Aquatic Bacteria Samples

    On April 20, 2010, the BP Deepwater Horizon drilling platform collapsed and sank in the Gulf of Mexico, causing one of the largest oil spills in history. One of the big dilemmas in responding to the oil spil is how to clean up the oil itself. One way currently under research is to use bacteria that ...

  4. Acute Pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Arshad, Hammad; Fasanya, Adebayo; Cheema, Tariq; Singh, Anil C

    2016-01-01

    Acute pneumonia is an active infection of the lungs that results when an individual at risk gets exposed to a particular microbiological pathogen. Acute pneumonia is the leading cause of death in the United States that is attributable to an infection. The risk factors, pathogenesis, and microbiological organisms involved differ if the pneumonia develops in the community versus health care-associated environment. The development of concise and comprehensive guidelines has led to an improvement in the management of the problem. However, the emergence of multidrug-resistant organisms and the increase in the percentage of elderly population keep mortality risk very substantial. PMID:26919676

  5. Epiploic Appendagitis: A Rare Cause of Acute Abdominal Pain in Children. Report of a Case and Review of the Pediatric Literature.

    PubMed

    Redmond, Paul; Sawaya, David E; Miller, Kristen H; Nowicki, Michael J

    2015-10-01

    A 9-year-old boy presented with acute onset of abdominal pain and vomiting. History, physical examination, and initial laboratory testing failed to provide a diagnosis. A computed tomography scan revealed the rare finding of epiploic appendagitis. We review the literature of this rare, but increasingly recognized, condition that mimics appendicitis and needs to be considered in the child with acute abdominal pain. PMID:26427946

  6. Methanotrophic bacteria.

    PubMed Central

    Hanson, R S; Hanson, T E

    1996-01-01

    Methane-utilizing bacteria (methanotrophs) are a diverse group of gram-negative bacteria that are related to other members of the Proteobacteria. These bacteria are classified into three groups based on the pathways used for assimilation of formaldehyde, the major source of cell carbon, and other physiological and morphological features. The type I and type X methanotrophs are found within the gamma subdivision of the Proteobacteria and employ the ribulose monophosphate pathway for formaldehyde assimilation, whereas type II methanotrophs, which employ the serine pathway for formaldehyde assimilation, form a coherent cluster within the beta subdivision of the Proteobacteria. Methanotrophic bacteria are ubiquitous. The growth of type II bacteria appears to be favored in environments that contain relatively high levels of methane, low levels of dissolved oxygen, and limiting concentrations of combined nitrogen and/or copper. Type I methanotrophs appear to be dominant in environments in which methane is limiting and combined nitrogen and copper levels are relatively high. These bacteria serve as biofilters for the oxidation of methane produced in anaerobic environments, and when oxygen is present in soils, atmospheric methane is oxidized. Their activities in nature are greatly influenced by agricultural practices and other human activities. Recent evidence indicates that naturally occurring, uncultured methanotrophs represent new genera. Methanotrophs that are capable of oxidizing methane at atmospheric levels exhibit methane oxidation kinetics different from those of methanotrophs available in pure cultures. A limited number of methanotrophs have the genetic capacity to synthesize a soluble methane monooxygenase which catalyzes the rapid oxidation of environmental pollutants including trichloroethylene. PMID:8801441

  7. Acute Bacterial Prostatitis: Diagnosis and Management.

    PubMed

    Coker, Timothy J; Dierfeldt, Daniel M

    2016-01-15

    Acute bacterial prostatitis is an acute infection of the prostate gland that causes pelvic pain and urinary tract symptoms, such as dysuria, urinary frequency, and urinary retention, and may lead to systemic symptoms, such as fevers, chills, nausea, emesis, and malaise. Although the true incidence is unknown, acute bacterial prostatitis is estimated to comprise approximately 10% of all cases of prostatitis. Most acute bacterial prostatitis infections are community acquired, but some occur after transurethral manipulation procedures, such as urethral catheterization and cystoscopy, or after transrectal prostate biopsy. The physical examination should include abdominal, genital, and digital rectal examination to assess for a tender, enlarged, or boggy prostate. Diagnosis is predominantly made based on history and physical examination, but may be aided by urinalysis. Urine cultures should be obtained in all patients who are suspected of having acute bacterial prostatitis to determine the responsible bacteria and its antibiotic sensitivity pattern. Additional laboratory studies can be obtained based on risk factors and severity of illness. Radiography is typically unnecessary. Most patients can be treated as outpatients with oral antibiotics and supportive measures. Hospitalization and broad-spectrum intravenous antibiotics should be considered in patients who are systemically ill, unable to voluntarily urinate, unable to tolerate oral intake, or have risk factors for antibiotic resistance. Typical antibiotic regimens include ceftriaxone and doxycycline, ciprofloxacin, and piperacillin/tazobactam. The risk of nosocomial bacterial prostatitis can be reduced by using antibiotics, such as ciprofloxacin, before transrectal prostate biopsy. PMID:26926407

  8. Microbiology and Treatment of Acute Apical Abscesses

    PubMed Central

    Rôças, Isabela N.

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY Acute apical abscess is the most common form of dental abscess and is caused by infection of the root canal of the tooth. It is usually localized intraorally, but in some cases the apical abscess may spread and result in severe complications or even mortality. The reasons why dental root canal infections can become symptomatic and evolve to severe spreading and sometimes life-threatening abscesses remain elusive. Studies using culture and advanced molecular microbiology methods for microbial identification in apical abscesses have demonstrated a multispecies community conspicuously dominated by anaerobic bacteria. Species/phylotypes commonly found in these infections belong to the genera Fusobacterium, Parvimonas, Prevotella, Porphyromonas, Dialister, Streptococcus, and Treponema. Advances in DNA sequencing technologies and computational biology have substantially enhanced the knowledge of the microbiota associated with acute apical abscesses and shed some light on the etiopathogeny of this disease. Species richness and abundance and the resulting network of interactions among community members may affect the collective pathogenicity and contribute to the development of acute infections. Disease modifiers, including transient or permanent host-related factors, may also influence the development and severity of acute abscesses. This review focuses on the current evidence about the etiology and treatment of acute apical abscesses and how the process is influenced by host-related factors and proposes future directions in research, diagnosis, and therapeutic approaches to deal with this disease. PMID:23554416

  9. Incidence of Norovirus and Other Viral Pathogens That Cause Acute Gastroenteritis (AGE) among Kaiser Permanente Member Populations in the United States, 2012–2013

    PubMed Central

    Grytdal, Scott P.; Biggs, Christianne; Cameron, Miriam; Schmidt, Mark; Parashar, Umesh D.; Hall, Aron J.

    2016-01-01

    Noroviruses and other viral pathogens are increasingly recognized as frequent causes of acute gastroenteritis (AGE). However, few laboratory-based data are available on the incidence of AGE caused by viral pathogens in the U.S. This study examined stool specimens submitted for routine clinical diagnostics from patients enrolled in Kaiser Permanente (KP) health plans in metro Portland, OR, and the Maryland, District of Columbia, and northern Virginia geographic areas to estimate the incidence of viral enteropathogens in these populations. Over a one-year study period, participating laboratories randomly selected stools submitted for routine clinical diagnostics for inclusion in the study along with accompanying demographic and clinical data. Selected stools were tested for norovirus, rotavirus, sapovirus, and astrovirus using standardized real-time RT-PCR protocols. Each KP site provided administrative data which were used in conjunction with previously published data on healthcare utilization to extrapolate pathogen detection rates into population-based incidence rates. A total of 1,099 specimens collected during August 2012 to September 2013 were included. Mean age of patients providing stool specimens was 46 years (range: 0–98 years). Noroviruses were the most common viral pathogen identified among patients with AGE (n = 63 specimens, 6% of specimens tested). In addition, 22 (2%) of specimens were positive for rotavirus; 19 (2%) were positive for sapovirus; and 7 (1%) were positive for astrovirus. Incidence of norovirus-associated outpatient visits was 5.6 per 1,000 person-years; incidence of norovirus disease in the community was estimated to be 69.5 per 1,000 person-years. Norovirus incidence was highest among children <5 years of age (outpatient incidence = 25.6 per 1,000 person-years; community incidence = 152.2 per 1,000 person-years), followed by older adults aged >65 years (outpatient incidence = 7.8 per 1,000 person-years; community incidence = 75.8 per 1,000 person-years). Outpatient incidence rates of rotavirus, sapovirus, and astrovirus were 2.0, 1.6, 0.6 per 1,000 person-years, respectively; community incidence rates for these viruses were 23.4, 22.5, and 8.5 per 1,000 person-years, respectively. This study provides the first age-group specific laboratory-based community and outpatient incidence rates for norovirus AGE in the U.S. Norovirus was the most frequently detected viral enteropathogen across the age spectrum with the highest rates of norovirus disease observed among young children and, to a lesser extent, the elderly. These data provide a better understanding of the norovirus disease burden in the United States, including variations within different age groups, which can help inform the development, targeting, and future impacts of interventions, including vaccines. PMID:27115485

  10. Third generation cephalosporin resistant Enterobacteriaceae and multidrug resistant gram-negative bacteria causing bacteremia in febrile neutropenia adult cancer patients in Lebanon, broad spectrum antibiotics use as a major risk factor, and correlation with poor prognosis

    PubMed Central

    Moghnieh, Rima; Estaitieh, Nour; Mugharbil, Anas; Jisr, Tamima; Abdallah, Dania I.; Ziade, Fouad; Sinno, Loubna; Ibrahim, Ahmad

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Bacteremia remains a major cause of life-threatening complications in patients receiving anticancer chemotherapy. The spectrum and susceptibility profiles of causative microorganisms differ with time and place. Data from Lebanon are scarce. We aim at evaluating the epidemiology of bacteremia in cancer patients in a university hospital in Lebanon, emphasizing antibiotic resistance and risk factors of multi-drug resistant organism (MDRO)-associated bacteremia. Materials and Methods: This is a retrospective study of 75 episodes of bacteremia occurring in febrile neutropenic patients admitted to the hematology-oncology unit at Makassed General Hospital, Lebanon, from October 2009-January 2012. It corresponds to epidemiological data on bacteremia episodes in febrile neutropenic cancer patients including antimicrobial resistance and identification of risk factors associated with third generation cephalosporin resistance (3GCR) and MDRO-associated bacteremia. Results: Out of 75 bacteremias, 42.7% were gram-positive (GP), and 57.3% were gram-negative (GN). GP bacteremias were mostly due to methicillin-resistant coagulase negative staphylococci (28% of total bacteremias and 66% of GP bacteremias). Among the GN bacteremias, Escherichia coli (22.7% of total, 39.5% of GN organisms) and Klebsiella pneumoniae(13.3% of total, 23.3% of GN organisms) were the most important causative agents. GN bacteremia due to 3GC sensitive (3GCS) bacteria represented 28% of total bacteremias, while 29% were due to 3GCR bacteria and 9% were due to carbapenem-resistant organisms. There was a significant correlation between bacteremia with MDRO and subsequent intubation, sepsis and mortality. Among potential risk factors, only broad spectrum antibiotic intake >4 days before bacteremia was found to be statistically significant for acquisition of 3GCR bacteria. Using carbapenems or piperacillin/tazobactam>4 days before bacteremia was significantly associated with the emergence of MDRO (p < 0.05). Conclusion: Our findings have major implications for the management of febrile neutropenia, especially in breakthrough bacteremia and fever when patients are already on broadspectrum antibiotics. Emergence of resistance to 3GCs and, to a lesser extent, to carbapenems in GN isolates has to be considered seriously in our local guidelines for empiric treatment of febrile neutropenia, especially given that their occurrence was proven to be associated with poorer outcomes. PMID:25729741

  11. Is it possible to distinguish testicular torsion from other causes of acute scrotum in patients who underwent scrotal exploration? A multi-center clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    Umul, Mehmet; Altok, Muammer; Akyz, Mehmet; ??o?lu, Cemal Seluk; Uru, Fatih; Aras, Bekir; Sertkaya, Zlf; rkmez, Ahmet; Ba?, Ercan; Kele?, Muzaffer O?uz

    2015-01-01

    Introduction To assess the clinical presentation of patients who underwent surgical exploration for acute scrotum and to investigate the potentially related factors for differential dignosis. Material and methods We retrospectively analyzed the medical records of 97 patients who underwent surgical exploration for acute scrotum between May 2007 and July 2013. The patients were divided into two groups as follows: Group1 included patients with testicular torsion (TT) and Group 2 contained patients with acute scrotal pathologies other than TT, including torsion of the testicular appendage, epididymo-orchitis, trauma and Henoch-Schnlein purpura. The physical examination findings, colour Doppler ultrasound (CDUS) and laboratory findings for the groups were compared. Results In total, 97 scrotal explorations were carried out for acute scrotum. Group 1 included 72 patients (74.2%) and Group 2 included 25 patients (25.8%). Group 2 was comprised of patients with torsion of the testicular appendage (n = 13), epididymo-orchitis (n = 8), testicular trauma (n = 2) and Henoch-Schnlein purpura (n = 2). In Group 1, 32 cases (44.4%) presented to a hospital less than 6 hours after onset of pain. More than half (64%) of Group 2's cases presented more than 24 hours after pain onset. Fever and pyuria appeared more frequently in Group 2 than in Group 1 and the results reached statistical significance (p = 0.001 and p = 0.044, respectively). Group 1 had more testicular tenderness than Group 2 (p <0.001). Our testicular salvage rate was 59.7%, and 40.3% of patients underwent orchiectomy. Conclusions CDUS predicted the diagnosis of TT (sensitivity 98.6%). Furthermore, clinical findings may also play a substantial role in the differential diagnosis of acute scrotum. PMID:26251755

  12. Swimming bacteria in liquid crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sokolov, Andrey; Zhou, Shuang; Aranson, Igor; Lavrentovich, Oleg

    2014-03-01

    Dynamics of swimming bacteria can be very complex due to the interaction between the bacteria and the fluid, especially when the suspending fluid is non-Newtonian. Placement of swimming bacteria in lyotropic liquid crystal produces a new class of active materials by combining features of two seemingly incompatible constituents: self-propelled live bacteria and ordered liquid crystals. Here we present fundamentally new phenomena caused by the coupling between direction of bacterial swimming, bacteria-triggered flows and director orientations. Locomotion of bacteria may locally reduce the degree of order in liquid crystal or even trigger nematic-isotropic phase transition. Microscopic flows generated by bacterial flagella disturb director orientation. Emerged birefringence patterns allow direct optical observation and quantitative characterization of flagella dynamics. At high concentration of bacteria we observed the emergence of self-organized periodic texture caused by bacteria swimming. Our work sheds new light on self-organization in hybrid bio-mechanical systems and can lead to valuable biomedical applications. Was supported by the US DOE, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Division of Materials Science and Engineering, under the Contract No. DE AC02-06CH11357.

  13. Kocuria kristinae infection associated with acute cholecystitis

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Edmond SK; Wong, Chris LP; Lai, Kristi TW; Chan, Edmond CH; Yam, WC; Chan, Angus CW

    2005-01-01

    Background Kocuria, previously classified into the genus of Micrococcus, is commonly found on human skin. Two species, K. rosea and K. kristinae, are etiologically associated with catheter-related bacteremia. Case presentation We describe the first case of K. kristinae infection associated with acute cholecystitis. The microorganism was isolated from the bile of a 56-year old Chinese man who underwent laparoscopic cholecystectomy. He developed post-operative fever that resolved readily after levofloxacin treatment. Conclusion Our report of K. kristinae infection associated with acute cholecystitis expands the clinical spectrum of infections caused by this group of bacteria. With increasing number of recent reports describing the association between Kocuria spp. and infectious diseases, the significance of their isolation from clinical specimens cannot be underestimated. A complete picture of infections related to Kocuria spp. will have to await the documentation of more clinical cases. PMID:16029488

  14. Bacteria Counter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    Science Applications, Inc.'s ATP Photometer makes a rapid and accurate count of the bacteria in a body fluid sample. Instrument provides information on the presence and quantity of bacteria by measuring the amount of light emitted by the reaction between two substances. Substances are ATP adenosine triphosphate and luciferase. The reactants are applied to a human body sample and the ATP Photometer observes the intensity of the light emitted displaying its findings in a numerical output. Total time lapse is usually less than 10 minutes, which represents a significant time savings in comparison of other techniques. Other applications are measuring organisms in fresh and ocean waters, determining bacterial contamination of foodstuffs, biological process control in the beverage industry, and in assay of activated sewage sludge.

  15. Re-engineering bacteria for ethanol production

    DOEpatents

    Yomano, Lorraine P; York, Sean W; Zhou, Shengde; Shanmugam, Keelnatham; Ingram, Lonnie O

    2014-05-06

    The invention provides recombinant bacteria, which comprise a full complement of heterologous ethanol production genes. Expression of the full complement of heterologous ethanol production genes causes the recombinant bacteria to produce ethanol as the primary fermentation product when grown in mineral salts medium, without the addition of complex nutrients. Methods for producing the recombinant bacteria and methods for producing ethanol using the recombinant bacteria are also disclosed.

  16. Acute pancreatitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... of acute pancreatitis may include: Acute kidney failure Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) Buildup of fluid in the abdomen ( ascites ) Cysts or abscesses in the pancreas Heart failure Low blood pressure Repeat episodes of acute ...

  17. Dysbiotic Bacteria Translocate in Progressive SIV Infection

    PubMed Central

    Klase, Zachary; Ortiz, Alexandra; Deleage, Claire; Mudd, Joseph C.; Quiñones, Mariam; Schwartzman, Elias; Klatt, Nichole R.; Canary, Lauren; Estes, Jacob D.; Brenchley, Jason M.

    2014-01-01

    Infection of gut-resident CD4+ memory T-cells during acute HIV and SIV infection is associated with rapid loss of these cells and damage to the epithelial barrier. Damage to the epithelial barrier allows translocation of microbial products from the intestinal lumen into the body. Immune activation caused by these microbial products has been associated with disease progression. Although microbial translocation has been demonstrated in SIV-infected nonhuman primates, the identity of translocating bacteria has not been determined. In this study we examined the communities of bacteria both within the GI tract and systemic tissues of both healthy and experimentally SIV-infected Asian macaques. While there were only modest changes in the GI tract-associated microbiome resulting from infection, there is substantial dysbiosis after administration of antiretrovirals. Analysis of bacterial DNA isolated from tissues of infected animals revealed a preference for the phylum Proteobacteria, suggesting that they preferentially translocate. Consistent with this finding, we observed increased metabolic activity of Proteobacterial species within the colonic lumen of SIV-infected animals. Overall these data provide insights into disease progression and suggest that therapies aimed at altering the composition and metabolic activity of the GI tract microbiome could benefit chronically-HIV infected individuals particularly those on antiretroviral therapies. PMID:25586559

  18. Acute exacerbations in COPD and their control with oral immunization with non-typeable haemophilus influenzae.

    PubMed

    Clancy, Robert L; Dunkley, Margaret

    2011-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) a term based on the demonstration of irreversible airways obstruction, introduced to unify a range of chronic progressive diseases of the airways consequent upon inhalation of toxins. While disease is initiated and progressed by inhaled toxins, an additional pathway of damage has emerged, with particular relevance to acute exacerbations. Exacerbations of disease due to an increase in the level of intrabronchial inflammation have taken on a new significance as their role in determining both acute and chronic outcomes is better understood. This "second pathway" of disease is a consequence of bacterial colonization of damaged airways. Although bacteria have been linked to acute episodes in COPD over 50 years, only recently has quality data on antibiotic usage and the detection of "exacerbation isolates" of non-typeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHi) provided strong argument in support of a pathogenic role. Yet a poor correlation between detection of colonizing bacteria and clinical status remained a concern in attempts to explain a role for bacteria in a classical infection model. This presentation discusses a hypothesis that acute exacerbations reflect a T cell-dependent hypersensitivity response to colonizing bacteria, with IL-17 dependent accumulation of neutrophils within the bronchus, as the main outcome measure. Critical protection against exacerbations following oral administration of NTHi, an immunotherapy that drives a TH17 T cell response from Peyer's patches, reduces the load of intrabronchial bacteria while preventing access of inhaled bacteria into small airways. Immunotherapy augments a physiological "loop" based on aspiration of bronchus content into the gut. A second "hypersensitivity" mechanism may cause bronchospasm - in both COPD and treatment-resistant asthma - due to specific IgE antibody directed against colonizing bacteria, as oral NTHi abrogates wheeze in subjects with recurrent "wheezy bronchitis." PMID:22566798

  19. Acute Vision Loss.

    PubMed

    Bagheri, Nika; Mehta, Sonia

    2015-09-01

    Acute vision loss can be transient (lasting <24 hours) or persistent (lasting >24 hours). When patients present with acute vision loss, it is important to ascertain the duration of vision loss and whether it is a unilateral process affecting one eye or a bilateral process affecting both eyes. This article focuses on causes of acute vision loss in the nontraumatic setting and provides management pearls to help health care providers better triage these patients. PMID:26319342

  20. Acute and Impaired Wound Healing: Pathophysiology and Current Methods for Drug Delivery, Part 1: Normal and Chronic Wounds: Biology, Causes, and Approaches to Care

    PubMed Central

    Demidova-Rice, Tatiana N.; Hamblin, Michael R.; Herman, Ira M.

    2012-01-01

    This is the first installment of 2 articles that discuss the biology and pathophysiology of wound healing, review the role that growth factors play in this process, and describe current ways of growth factor delivery into the wound bed. Part 1 discusses the latest advances in clinicians’ understanding of the control points that regulate wound healing. Importantly, biological similarities and differences between acute and chronic wounds are considered, including the signaling pathways that initiate cellular and tissue responses after injury, which may be impeded during chronic wound healing. PMID:22713781

  1. Acute intermittent porphyria: identification and expression of exonic mutations in the hydroxymethylbilane synthase gene. An initiation codon missense mutation in the housekeeping transcript causes "variant acute intermittent porphyria" with normal expression of the erythroid-specific enzyme.

    PubMed Central

    Chen, C H; Astrin, K H; Lee, G; Anderson, K E; Desnick, R J

    1994-01-01

    Acute intermittent porphyria (AIP), an autosomal dominant inborn error, results from the half-normal activity of the heme biosynthetic enzyme, hydroxymethylbilane synthase (EC 4.3.1.8). Diagnosis of AIP heterozygotes is essential to prevent acute, life-threatening neurologic attacks by avoiding various precipitating factors. Since biochemical diagnosis is problematic, the identification of hydroxymethylbilane synthase mutations has facilitated the detection of AIP heterozygotes. Molecular analyses of unrelated AIP patients revealed six exonic mutations: an initiating methionine to isoleucine substitution (M1I) in a patient with variant AIP, which precluded translation of the housekeeping, but not the erythroid-specific isozyme; four missense mutations in classical AIP patients, V93F, R116W, R201W, C247F; and a nonsense mutation W283X in a classical AIP patient, which truncated the housekeeping and erythroid-specific isozymes. Each mutation was confirmed in genomic DNA from family members. The W283X lesion was found in another unrelated AIP family. Expression of each mutation in Escherichia coli revealed that R201W, C247F, and W283X had residual activity. In vitro transcription/translation studies indicated that the M1I allele produced only the erythroid-specific enzyme, while the other mutant alleles encoded both isozymes. These mutations provide insight into the molecular pathology of classic and variant AIP and facilitate molecular diagnosis in AIP families. Images PMID:7962538

  2. Portomesenteric venous thrombosis as a rare cause of acute abdomen in a young patient: What should be the process of diagnosis and management?

    PubMed Central

    İnan, Mehmet; Sarıoğlu, Tansel; Serhat, Tülay Hakkı

    2013-01-01

    This report aimed to discuss indications for radiological evaluation, laboratory investigation for thrombophilic risk factors, and the duration of anticoagulation therapy in porto-mesenteric venous thrombosis, based on a young patient who presented with acute abdomen and ascites. We investigated the acquired and genetic thrombophilic risk factors and the diagnostic process. Abdominal CT and Doppler US were found to be useful radiological tools in both diagnosis and follow-up of portomesenteric thrombosis. The investigated thrombophilic factors, PT G20210A, MTHFR C677T and MTHFR A1298C, were positive for heterozygous mutations and high levels of lupus anticoagulant and factor VIII were detected. Rapid ascites resolution and an improvement in abdominal pain after meals were observed following anticoagulation. Follow-up examination after six months showed that the portomesenteric thrombosis had completely resolved. Evaluation by CT is recommended for patients with acute abdomen and ascites, especially if ultrasonography failed to show any specific pathology. Several acquired or genetic thrombophilic factors were identified in a patient in whom local precipitating factors were absent. For patients with genetic thrombophilic risk factors and thrombosis at an uncommon site in the body, lifelong treatment with anticoagulants is recommended. PMID:25931853

  3. Cows' milk protein-sensitive enteropathy: an important contributing cause of secondary sugar intolerance in young infants with acute infective enteritis.

    PubMed Central

    Iyngkaran, N; Davis, K; Robinson, M J; Boey, C G; Sumithran, E; Yadav, M; Lam, S K; Puthucheary, S D

    1979-01-01

    The effect of cows' milk protein (CMP) on the mucosal disaccharidases was investigated in 23 infants with acute infective enteritis. Jejunal biopsies performed before and after cows' milk provocation were subjected to histological examination and to mucosal disaccharidase enzyme (lactase, sucrase, and maltase) analyses. After milk challenge, changes in mucosal histology were observed in 18 infants, in 17 of them the levels of all 3 mucosal disaccharidases were much reduced. 10 of these infants developed diarrhoea and, in 6, the stools were positive for reducing sugar. It is concluded that CMP has a deleterious effect on the jejunal mucosa of young infants recovering from infective enteritis, so that in the management of young infants with sugar intolerance secondary to infective enteritis, CMP and lactose should be excluded from the diet. PMID:570376

  4. Bilateral diaphragmatic paralysis--a rare cause of acute respiratory failure managed with nasal mask bilevel positive airway pressure (BiPAP) ventilation.

    PubMed

    Lin, M C; Liaw, M Y; Huang, C C; Chuang, M L; Tsai, Y H

    1997-08-01

    A 68 yr old woman presented with acute respiratory failure. She was suspected of having a phrenic-diaphragmatic impairment, without evidence of an intrinsic lung disease or generalized neuromuscular disorder, after 3 weeks of prolonged mechanical ventilation. A series of studies, including fluoroscopy, phrenic nerve stimulation test and diaphragmatic electromyography, was performed before the diagnosis of bilateral diaphragmatic paralysis (BDP) was confirmed. The patient was successfully weaned from the conventional mechanical ventilator, and was placed on nasal mask bi-level positive airway pressure (BiPAP) ventilation. A high degree of clinical suspicion of bilateral diaphragmatic paralysis should always be raised in patients suffering respiratory failure without definite predisposing factors. Weaning with noninvasive nasal mask ventilation should be tried first instead of direct tracheostomy. PMID:9272940

  5. Comparing the Similarity of Different Groups of Bacteria to the Human Proteome

    PubMed Central

    Trost, Brett; Pajon, Rolando; Jayaprakash, Teenus; Kusalik, Anthony

    2012-01-01

    Numerous aspects of the relationship between bacteria and human have been investigated. One aspect that has recently received attention is sequence overlap at the proteomic level. However, there has not yet been a study that comprehensively characterizes the level of sequence overlap between bacteria and human, especially as it relates to bacterial characteristics like pathogenicity, G-C content, and proteome size. In this study, we began by performing a general characterization of the range of bacteria-human similarity at the proteomic level, and identified characteristics of the most- and least-similar bacterial species. We then examined the relationship between proteomic similarity and numerous other variables. While pathogens and nonpathogens had comparable similarity to the human proteome, pathogens causing chronic infections were found to be more similar to the human proteome than those causing acute infections. Although no general correspondence between a bacteriums proteome size and its similarity to the human proteome was noted, no bacteria with small proteomes had high similarity to the human proteome. Finally, we discovered an interesting relationship between similarity and a bacteriums G-C content. While the relationship between bacteria and human has been studied from many angles, their proteomic similarity still needs to be examined in more detail. This paper sheds further light on this relationship, particularly with respect to immunity and pathogenicity. PMID:22558081

  6. Acute mountain sickness

    MedlinePlus

    High altitude cerebral edema; Altitude anoxia; Altitude sickness; Mountain sickness; High altitude pulmonary edema ... Acute mountain sickness is caused by reduced air pressure and lower oxygen levels at high altitudes. The faster you ...

  7. Acute Pancreatitis (Beyond the Basics)

    MedlinePlus

    ... pancreatitis. (See "Patient information: Gallstones (Beyond the Basics)" .) Alcoholic pancreatitis — Alcohol is a common cause of acute pancreatitis. Alcoholic pancreatitis is more common in individuals who have ...

  8. What Causes the Symptoms of Sinusitis?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Content Marketing Share this: Main Content Area Sinusitis Cause Colds, bacterial infections, allergies, asthma, and other health conditions can cause sinusitis, or inflammation of the paranasal sinuses. Acute ...

  9. Bronchitis (acute)

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Acute bronchitis affects over 40/1000 adults a year in the UK. The causes are usually considered to be infective, but only around half of people have identifiable pathogens. The role of smoking or of environmental tobacco smoke inhalation in predisposing to acute bronchitis is unclear. One third of people may have longer-term symptoms or recurrence. Methods and outcomes We conducted a systematic review and aimed to answer the following clinical question: What are the effects of treatments for acute bronchitis in people without chronic respiratory disease? We searched: Medline, Embase, The Cochrane Library, and other important databases up to March 2010 (Clinical Evidence reviews are updated periodically; please check our website for the most up-to-date version of this review). We included harms alerts from relevant organisations such as the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the UK Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA). Results We found 21 systematic reviews, RCTs, or observational studies that met our inclusion criteria. We performed a GRADE evaluation of the quality of evidence for interventions. Conclusions In this systematic review we present information relating to the effectiveness and safety of the following interventions: analgesics, antibiotics (macrolides, tetracyclines, cephalosporins, penicillins, or trimethoprim–sulfamethoxazole [co-trimoxazole]), antihistamines, antitussives, beta2 agonists (inhaled or oral), and expectorants/mucolytics. PMID:21711957

  10. Cystitis - acute

    MedlinePlus

    Uncomplicated urinary tract infection; UTI - acute; Acute bladder infection; Acute bacterial cystitis ... control. Menopause also increases the risk for a urinary tract infection. The following also increase your chances of having ...

  11. The effect of alteplase within 6 hours of acute ischemic stroke on all-cause mortality (3rd International Stroke Trial)

    PubMed Central

    Whiteley, William N.; Thompson, Douglas; Murray, Gordon; Cohen, Geoff; Lindley, Richard I.; Wardlaw, Joanna; Sandercock, Peter

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND & PURPOSE Prompt thrombolytic therapy with intravenous alteplase reduces disability after acute ischemic stroke. In an exploratory analysis we examined whether long-term survival varied by baseline characteristics after alteplase. METHODS In this open-treatment, international, randomized, controlled trial, ischemic stroke patients were randomly allocated <6h of onset to intravenous alteplase (0·9 mg/kg) plus standard care (n=1515) or standard care alone (n=1520). We followed patients to death, censoring when last known to be alive. We grouped patients by delay to randomization, and ‘good’ or ‘poor’ predicted prognosis (calculated from baseline NIHS score and age). We present absolute mortality differences between treated and control groups at 7 days, 6 months and 18 months post stroke. RESULTS Alteplase was not associated with a significant increase in mortality within 18 months [0.6% (95%CI:−2.9% to +4.2) P=0.72] in all patients with complete vital status (99.9%, 3034/3035). In patients randomized <3 hrs of stroke, 18 month mortality was lower in the alteplase treated group than the control group [40.6%(95%CI:42.6–52.7) vs 47.8%(95%CI:35.5–45.3)P=0.0434].The difference in 18 month mortality between alteplase-treated and control patients was greater in patients who were randomized early (<3h) compared to late (3-6h) [+9%(95%CI:1–17)P=0.0317]. Alteplase led to a greater improvement in 18 month survival in patients with a poor prognosis than in patients with a good prognosis [+8% (95%CI: 2–14)P=0.0091]. CONCLUSIONS These exploratory analyses of the IST-3 trial support improving acute stroke patients’ access to earlier alteplase treatment; treatment of patients with poor prognosis; and further randomized controlled trials in minor stroke to replicate these findings. CLINICAL TRIAL REGISTRATION www.controlled-trials.com. Unique identifier: ISRCTN25765518 PMID:25370587

  12. Acute Limonene Toxicity in Escherichia coli Is Caused by Limonene Hydroperoxide and Alleviated by a Point Mutation in Alkyl Hydroperoxidase AhpC.

    PubMed

    Chubukov, Victor; Mingardon, Florence; Schackwitz, Wendy; Baidoo, Edward E K; Alonso-Gutierrez, Jorge; Hu, Qijun; Lee, Taek Soon; Keasling, Jay D; Mukhopadhyay, Aindrila

    2015-07-01

    Limonene, a major component of citrus peel oil, has a number of applications related to microbiology. The antimicrobial properties of limonene make it a popular disinfectant and food preservative, while its potential as a biofuel component has made it the target of renewable production efforts through microbial metabolic engineering. For both applications, an understanding of microbial sensitivity or tolerance to limonene is crucial, but the mechanism of limonene toxicity remains enigmatic. In this study, we characterized a limonene-tolerant strain of Escherichia coli and found a mutation in ahpC, encoding alkyl hydroperoxidase, which alleviated limonene toxicity. We show that the acute toxicity previously attributed to limonene is largely due to the common oxidation product limonene hydroperoxide, which forms spontaneously in aerobic environments. The mutant AhpC protein with an L-to-Q change at position 177 (AhpC(L177Q)) was able to alleviate this toxicity by reducing the hydroperoxide to a more benign compound. We show that the degree of limonene toxicity is a function of its oxidation level and that nonoxidized limonene has relatively little toxicity to wild-type E. coli cells. Our results have implications for both the renewable production of limonene and the applications of limonene as an antimicrobial. PMID:25934627

  13. Acute Limonene Toxicity in Escherichia coli Is Caused by Limonene Hydroperoxide and Alleviated by a Point Mutation in Alkyl Hydroperoxidase AhpC

    PubMed Central

    Chubukov, Victor; Mingardon, Florence; Schackwitz, Wendy; Baidoo, Edward E. K.; Alonso-Gutierrez, Jorge; Hu, Qijun; Lee, Taek Soon; Keasling, Jay D.

    2015-01-01

    Limonene, a major component of citrus peel oil, has a number of applications related to microbiology. The antimicrobial properties of limonene make it a popular disinfectant and food preservative, while its potential as a biofuel component has made it the target of renewable production efforts through microbial metabolic engineering. For both applications, an understanding of microbial sensitivity or tolerance to limonene is crucial, but the mechanism of limonene toxicity remains enigmatic. In this study, we characterized a limonene-tolerant strain of Escherichia coli and found a mutation in ahpC, encoding alkyl hydroperoxidase, which alleviated limonene toxicity. We show that the acute toxicity previously attributed to limonene is largely due to the common oxidation product limonene hydroperoxide, which forms spontaneously in aerobic environments. The mutant AhpC protein with an L-to-Q change at position 177 (AhpCL177Q) was able to alleviate this toxicity by reducing the hydroperoxide to a more benign compound. We show that the degree of limonene toxicity is a function of its oxidation level and that nonoxidized limonene has relatively little toxicity to wild-type E. coli cells. Our results have implications for both the renewable production of limonene and the applications of limonene as an antimicrobial. PMID:25934627

  14. Cynomolgus monkeys (Macaca fascicularis) experimentally infected with B19V and hepatitis A virus: no evidence of the co-infection as a cause of acute liver failure

    PubMed Central

    Leon, Luciane Almeida Amado; Marchevsky, Renato Sergio; Gaspar, Ana Maria Coimbra; Garcia, Rita de Cassia Nasser Cubel; de Almeida, Adilson José; Pelajo-Machado, Marcelo; de Castro, Tatiana Xavier; do Nascimento, Jussara Pereira; Brown, Kevin E; Pinto, Marcelo Alves

    2016-01-01

    This study was conducted to analyse the course and the outcome of the liver disease in the co-infected animals in order to evaluate a possible synergic effect of human parvovirus B19 (B19V) and hepatitis A virus (HAV) co-infection. Nine adult cynomolgus monkeys were inoculated with serum obtained from a fatal case of B19V infection and/or a faecal suspension of acute HAV. The presence of specific antibodies to HAV and B19V, liver enzyme levels, viraemia, haematological changes, and necroinflammatory liver lesions were used for monitoring the infections. Seroconversion was confirmed in all infected groups. A similar pattern of B19V infection to human disease was observed, which was characterised by high and persistent viraemia in association with reticulocytopenia and mild to moderate anaemia during the period of investigation (59 days). Additionally, the intranuclear inclusion bodies were observed in pro-erythroblast cell from an infected cynomolgus and B19V Ag in hepatocytes. The erythroid hypoplasia and decrease in lymphocyte counts were more evident in the co-infected group. The present results demonstrated, for the first time, the susceptibility of cynomolgus to B19V infection, but it did not show a worsening of liver histopathology in the co-infected group. PMID:27074255

  15. Infection-Triggered Familial or Recurrent Cases of Acute Necrotizing Encephalopathy Caused by Mutations in a Component of the Nuclear Pore, RANBP2

    PubMed Central

    Neilson, Derek E.; Adams, Mark D.; Orr, Caitlin M.D.; Schelling, Deborah K.; Eiben, Robert M.; Kerr, Douglas S.; Anderson, Jane; Bassuk, Alexander G.; Bye, Ann M.; Childs, Anne-Marie; Clarke, Antonia; Crow, Yanick J.; Di Rocco, Maja; Dohna-Schwake, Christian; Dueckers, Gregor; Fasano, Alfonso E.; Gika, Artemis D.; Gionnis, Dimitris; Gorman, Mark P.; Grattan-Smith, Padraic J.; Hackenberg, Annette; Kuster, Alice; Lentschig, Markus G.; Lopez-Laso, Eduardo; Marco, Elysa J.; Mastroyianni, Sotiria; Perrier, Julie; Schmitt-Mechelke, Thomas; Servidei, Serenella; Skardoutsou, Angeliki; Uldall, Peter; van der Knaap, Marjo S.; Goglin, Karrie C.; Tefft, David L.; Aubin, Cristin; de Jager, Philip; Hafler, David; Warman, Matthew L.

    2009-01-01

    Acute necrotizing encephalopathy (ANE) is a rapidly progressive encephalopathy that can occur in otherwise healthy children after common viral infections such as influenza and parainfluenza. Most ANE is sporadic and nonrecurrent (isolated ANE). However, we identified a 7 Mb interval containing a susceptibility locus (ANE1) in a family segregating recurrent ANE as an incompletely penetrant, autosomal-dominant trait. We now report that all affected individuals and obligate carriers in this family are heterozygous for a missense mutation (c.1880C→T, p.Thr585Met) in the gene encoding the nuclear pore protein Ran Binding Protein 2 (RANBP2). To determine whether this mutation is the susceptibility allele, we screened controls and other patients with ANE who are unrelated to the index family. Patients from 9 of 15 additional kindreds with familial or recurrent ANE had the identical mutation. It arose de novo in two families and independently in several other families. Two other patients with familial ANE had different RANBP2 missense mutations that altered conserved residues. None of the three RANBP2 missense mutations were found in 19 patients with isolated ANE or in unaffected controls. We conclude that missense mutations in RANBP2 are susceptibility alleles for familial and recurrent cases of ANE. PMID:19118815

  16. Cynomolgus monkeys (Macaca fascicularis) experimentally infected with B19V and hepatitis A virus: no evidence of the co-infection as a cause of acute liver failure.

    PubMed

    Leon, Luciane Almeida Amado; Marchevsky, Renato Sergio; Gaspar, Ana Maria Coimbra; Garcia, Rita de Cassia Nasser Cubel; Almeida, Adilson José de; Pelajo-Machado, Marcelo; Castro, Tatiana Xavier de; Nascimento, Jussara Pereira do; Brown, Kevin E; Pinto, Marcelo Alves

    2016-04-01

    This study was conducted to analyse the course and the outcome of the liver disease in the co-infected animals in order to evaluate a possible synergic effect of human parvovirus B19 (B19V) and hepatitis A virus (HAV) co-infection. Nine adult cynomolgus monkeys were inoculated with serum obtained from a fatal case of B19V infection and/or a faecal suspension of acute HAV. The presence of specific antibodies to HAV and B19V, liver enzyme levels, viraemia, haematological changes, and necroinflammatory liver lesions were used for monitoring the infections. Seroconversion was confirmed in all infected groups. A similar pattern of B19V infection to human disease was observed, which was characterised by high and persistent viraemia in association with reticulocytopenia and mild to moderate anaemia during the period of investigation (59 days). Additionally, the intranuclear inclusion bodies were observed in pro-erythroblast cell from an infected cynomolgus and B19V Ag in hepatocytes. The erythroid hypoplasia and decrease in lymphocyte counts were more evident in the co-infected group. The present results demonstrated, for the first time, the susceptibility of cynomolgus to B19V infection, but it did not show a worsening of liver histopathology in the co-infected group. PMID:27074255

  17. Prevalence of contagious and environmental mastitis-causing bacteria in bulk tank milk and its relationships with milking practices of dairy cattle herds in São Miguel Island (Azores).

    PubMed

    Azevedo, Carla; Pacheco, Diana; Soares, Luísa; Romão, Ricardo; Moitoso, Mónica; Maldonado, Jaime; Guix, Roger; Simões, João

    2016-02-01

    This study aimed to assess the degree of contamination of bulk tank milk (BTM) by Staphylococcus spp. and coliform bacteria and to identify major milking practices that help perpetuate them in dairy cattle herds in São Miguel Island. In July 2014, BTM was sampled and a survey concerning local milking practices was conducted on 100 herds. Semi quantitative multiplex polymerase chain reaction detected coagulase-negative staphylococci, Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus, and other coliform bacteria (Klebsiella oxytoca, Klebsiella pneumoniae, and Serratia marcescens) in 100, 75, 59, and 35 % of BTM, respectively. According to multivariable univariate models, on herds not using hot water for cleaning the milking machine and teat liners, there was at least 3.4 more odds (P < 0.01) to have S. aureus or coliform bacteria contamination in BTM. The likelihood of finding S. aureus in BTM was higher (P < 0.001) on herds without high hygiene during milking, when milking mastitic cows at the end, on abrupt cessation of milking at dry-off, and official milk control implementation. The glove use also favored (odds ratio (OR) 5.8; P < 0.01) the detection of coliform bacteria in BTM. Poor milking practices identified in this study should be avoided in order to decrease S. aureus and coliform bacteria contamination of BTM. Other factors associated with milk quality in São Miguel Island also should be further investigated. PMID:26719295

  18. Genetically modified bacteria in agriculture.

    PubMed

    Amarger, N

    2002-11-01

    Certain bacteria isolated from soils possess properties that allow them to exert beneficial effects on plants either by enhancing crop nutrition or by reducing damages caused by pathogens or pests. Some of them, such as rhizobia, azospirilla, and agrobacteria, have been traditionally released in fields as seed inoculants and they often lead to increases in the yield of different crops while the application of others, such as pseudomonads, often fails to give the expected results. Bacteria genetically modified to be easily traceable and/or to be improved in their expression of beneficial traits have been constructed and released with plants in a number of experimental field plots. With these releases, it has been possible to monitor the modified inoculant bacteria after their introduction in field ecosystems and to assess their impact on the resident microflora. Local environmental factors appeared as playing a crucial role in the survival and persistence of bacteria once released in fields and in the expression of the beneficial traits whether improved or not. The spread of inoculant bacteria from their point of dissemination was limited. Transient shifts in favour of the released bacteria and in disfavour of some members of the bacterial and fungal populations present in the plant rhizosphere might occur with certain released bacteria. The changes observed were, however, less important than those observed under usual agricultural practices. Gene transfer from resident population to introduced bacteria was detected in one case. The transconjugants were found only transiently in the phytosphere of plants but not in soils. No differences between the survival, spread, persistence in field and ecological impacts of genetically modified bacteria and of the corresponding unmodified parent strain could be detected. PMID:12595134

  19. The effect of recurrent episodes of clinical mastitis caused by gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria and other organisms on mortality and culling in Holstein dairy cows.

    PubMed

    Hertl, J A; Schukken, Y H; Bar, D; Bennett, G J; González, R N; Rauch, B J; Welcome, F L; Tauer, L W; Gröhn, Y T

    2011-10-01

    The objective of this study was to estimate the effects of recurrent episodes of different types of clinical mastitis (CM) caused by gram-positive (Streptococcus spp., Staphylococcus aureus, Staphylococcus spp.) and gram-negative (Escherichia coli, Klebsiella, Citrobacter, Enterobacter, Pseudomonas) bacteria, and other organisms (Arcanobacterium pyogenes, Mycoplasma, Corynebacterium bovis, yeast, miscellaneous) on the probability of mortality and culling in Holstein dairy cows. Data from 30,233 lactations in cows of 7 dairy farms in New York State were analyzed. Cows were followed for the first 10 mo in lactation, or until death or culling occurred, or until the end of our study period. Generalized linear mixed models with a Poisson error distribution were used to study the effects of recurrent cases of the different types of CM and several other factors (herd, parity, month of lactation, current year and season, profitability, net replacement cost, other diseases) on cows' probability of death (model 1) or being culled (model 2). Primiparous and multiparous cows were modeled separately because they had different risks of mortality and culling and potentially different CM effects on mortality and culling. Approximately 30% of multiparous cows had at least one case of CM in lactation compared with 16.6% of primiparous cows. Multipara also had higher lactational incidence risks of second (10.7%) and third (4.4%) cases than primipara (3.7% and 1.1%, respectively). For primipara, CM increased the probability of death, with each successive case occurring in a month being increasingly lethal. In multipara, gram-negative CM increased the probability of death, especially when the gram-negative case was the first or second CM case in lactation. Primiparous cows with CM were more likely to be culled after CM than if they did not have CM, particularly after a second or third case. In multipara, any type of CM increased the probability of being culled. Gram-negative CM cases were associated with the numerically highest risk of culling. PMID:21943738

  20. Sustained Oxidative Stress Causes Late Acute Renal Failure via Duplex Regulation on p38 MAPK and Akt Phosphorylation in Severely Burned Rats

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Xiaoqing; Wang, Dexin; Wu, Kaimin; Chen, Hongli; Li, Jia; Lei, Wei

    2013-01-01

    Background Clinical evidence indicates that late acute renal failure (ARF) predicts high mortality in severely burned patients but the pathophysiology of late ARF remains undefined. This study was designed to test the hypothesis that sustained reactive oxygen species (ROS) induced late ARF in a severely burned rat model and to investigate the signaling mechanisms involved. Materials and Methods Rats were exposed to 100°C bath for 15 s to induce severe burn injury (40% of total body surface area). Renal function, ROS generation, tubular necrosis and apoptosis, and phosphorylation of MAPK and Akt were measured during 72 hours after burn. Results Renal function as assessed by serum creatinine and blood urea nitrogen deteriorated significantly at 3 h after burn, alleviated at 6 h but worsened at 48 h and 72 h, indicating a late ARF was induced. Apoptotic cells and cleavage caspase-3 in the kidney went up slowly and turned into significant at 48 h and 72 h. Tubular cell ROS production shot up at 6 h and continuously rose during the 72-h experiment. Scavenging ROS with tempol markedly attenuated tubular apoptosis and renal dysfunction at 72 h after burn. Interestingly, renal p38 MAPK phosphorylation elevated in a time dependent manner whereas Akt phosphorylation increased during the first 24 h but decreased at 48 h after burn. The p38 MAPK specific inhibitor SB203580 alleviated whereas Akt inhibitor exacerbated burn-induced tubular apoptosis and renal dysfunction. Furthermore, tempol treatment exerted a duplex regulation through inhibiting p38 MAPK phosphorylation but further increasing Akt phosphorylation at 72 h postburn. Conclusions These results demonstrate that sustained renal ROS overproduction induces continuous tubular cell apoptosis and thus a late ARF at 72 h after burn in severely burned rats, which may result from ROS-mediated activation of p38 MAPK but a late inhibition of Akt phosphorylation. PMID:23349934

  1. Epidemiology of Acute Gastroenteritis Outbreaks Caused by Human Calicivirus (Norovirus and Sapovirus) in Catalonia: A Two Year Prospective Study, 2010-2011

    PubMed Central

    Martinez, Ana; Moreno, Antonio; Camps, Neus

    2016-01-01

    Background The epidemiology of cases of acute gastroenteritis (AGE) of viral etiology is a relevant public health issue. Due to underreporting, the study of outbreaks is an accepted approach to investigate their epidemiology. The objective of this study was to investigate the epidemiological characteristics of AGE outbreaks due to norovirus (NoV) and sapovirus (SV) in Catalonia. Material and Methods Prospective study of AGE outbreaks of possible viral etiology notified during two years in Catalonia. NoV and SV were detected by real time reverse transcription polymerase (RT-PCR). Results A total of 101 outbreaks were registered affecting a total of 2756 persons and 12 hospitalizations (hospitalization rate: 0.8x1,000,000 persons-year); 49.5% of outbreaks were foodborne, 45.5% person to person and 5% waterborne. The distribution of outbreaks according to the setting showed a predominance of catering services (39.6%), nursing homes and long term care facilities (26.8%) and schools (11.9%). The median number of cases per outbreak was 17 (range 2–191). The total Incidence rate (IR) was 18.3 per 100,000 persons-years (95%CI: 17.6–19.0). The highest IR was in persons aged ≥65 years (43.6x100,000 (95% CI: 41.0–46.2)) (p<0.001). A total of 1065 samples were analyzed with a positivity rate of 60.8%. 98% of positive samples were NoV (GII 56.3%; GI 4.2%; GII+GI 4.2%; non- typable 33.0%). SV was identified in two person-to-person transmission outbreaks in children. Conclusions These results confirm the relevance of viral AGE outbreaks, both foodborne and person-to-person, especially in institutionalized persons. SV should be taken into account when investigating viral AGE outbreaks. PMID:27120472

  2. Biochemical responses of Mytilus galloprovincialis as biomarkers of acute environmental pollution caused by the Don Pedro oil spill (Eivissa Island, Spain).

    PubMed

    Sureda, Antoni; Box, Antonio; Tejada, Silvia; Blanco, Andreu; Caixach, Josep; Deudero, Salud

    2011-02-01

    In the present work, the potential use of several antioxidant and detoxification biomarkers in the digestive gland of wild mussels (Mytilus galloprovincialis) for biomonitoring the marine pollution induced by the Don Pedro oil spill has been investigated. Two locations from the East to South-East of Eivissa (Ibiza) and Formentera islands were selected, one extensively affected by the oil spill and the other one not affected and considered as the control area. Mussels were sampled one, two and six months after the Don Pedro accident. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) levels were significantly increased in the soft tissues of mussels in the affected area one month after the disaster, returning to normal values after six months. Markers of oxidative damage in lipids--malondialdehyde, and in proteins--carbonyl derivates, and antioxidant enzyme--catalase, superoxide dismutase and glutathione peroxidase, activities significantly increased as result of the spill oil after one month, returning to basal values at two month sampling time. Glutathione/glutathione disulfide ratio (GSH/GSSG), as a marker of the redox status, was reduced after one and two months indicating a more oxidized situation. Markers of detoxification--glutathione-S-transferase and cytochrome P4501A activities and metallothionein gene expression--were significantly increased by the oil spill one month after the accident, returning to the basal values at two month sampling time. In conclusion, the Don Pedro accident induced a transient situation of PAHs pollution resulting in enhanced antioxidant and detoxification defense systems in the wild mussel M. galloprovincialis returning to normal levels six months from the spill. The selected biomarkers are a useful tool for biomonitoring the response to acute exposure to pollutants in marine mussels. PMID:21276480

  3. Comparison of the early host immune response to two widely diverse virulent strains of Burkholderia pseudomallei that cause acute or chronic infections in BALB/c mice.

    PubMed

    Amemiya, Kei; Dankmeyer, Jennifer L; Fetterer, David P; Worsham, Patricia L; Welkos, Susan L; Cote, Christopher K

    2015-09-01

    Burkholderia pseudomallei is the etiologic agent of melioidosis, which is endemic in Southeast Asia and Northern Australia. We previously found by the intraperitoneal (IP) route that we could discern differences in virulence in mice amongst different strains of B. pseudomallei. We report an early immune response study comparing two strains in our collection which represent the least, B. pseudomallei 1106a, and one of the most, HBPUB10134a, virulent strains in BALB/c mice. B. pseudomallei HBPUB10134a infected mouse spleens contained a 2-3 log higher bacterial burden than mice infected with B. pseudomallei 1106a 3 days post-infection (PI). More and higher amounts of inflammatory cytokines/chemokines were detected in sera and spleen extracts from B. pseudomallei HBPUB10134a than B. pseudomallei 1106a infected mice. The most prominent were IFNγ, IL-1α, IL-1β, IL-6, IL-10, IP-10, and MIG. After 7 days PI, there was a decrease in bacterial burden in spleens from 1106a infected mice and a decrease in cytokines/chemokines in sera and spleen extracts from both sets of mice. By day 14 PI we saw an increase in monocytes/macrophages, NK cells, and granulocytes in spleens from both sets of mice. No B. pseudomallei HBPUB10134a infected mice survived after this time. In summary, B. pseudomallei HBPUB10134a was more virulent and induced host innate immune responses typical of a more acute-type infection than did B. pseudomallei 1106a which produced a more chronic infection in mice. PMID:26162294

  4. A comparative hospital-based observational study of mono- and co-infections of malaria, dengue virus and scrub typhus causing acute undifferentiated fever.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, S; Dhar, M; Mittal, G; Bhat, N K; Shirazi, N; Kalra, V; Sati, H C; Gupta, V

    2016-04-01

    Positive serology for dengue and/or scrub typhus infection with/without positive malarial smear (designated as mixed or co-infection) is being increasingly observed during epidemics of acute undifferentiated febrile illnesses (AUFIs). We planned to study the clinical and biochemical spectrum of co-infections with Plasmodium sp., dengue virus and scrub typhus and compare these with mono-infection by the same organisms. During the period from December 2012 to December 2013, all cases presenting with AUFIs to a single medical unit of a referral centre in Garhwal region of the north Indian state of Uttarakhand were retrospectively selected and categorised aetiologically as co-infections, malaria, dengue or scrub typhus. The groups thus created were compared in terms of demographic, clinical, biochemical and outcome parameters. The co-infection group (n = 49) was associated with milder clinical manifestations, fewer, milder and non-progressive organ dysfunction, and lesser need for intensive care, mechanical ventilation and dialysis as compared to mono-infections. When co-infections were sub-grouped and compared with the relevant mono-infections, there were differences in certain haematological and biochemical parameters; however, this difference did not translate into differential outcomes. Scrub typhus mono-infection was associated with severe disease in terms of both morbidity and mortality. Malaria, dengue and scrub typhus should be routinely tested in all patients with AUFIs. Co-infections, whether true or due to serological cross-reactivity, appear to be a separate entity so far as presentation and morbidity is concerned. Further insight is needed into the mechanism and identification of the protective infection. PMID:26851948

  5. Back To Bacteria.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flannery, Maura C.

    1997-01-01

    Explores new research about bacteria. Discusses bacterial genomes, archaea, unusual environments, evolution, pathogens, bacterial movement, biofilms, bacteria in the body, and a bacterial obsession. Contains 29 references. (JRH)

  6. Effect of Abnormal Fasting Plasma Glucose Level on All-Cause Mortality in Older Patients With Acute Myocardial Infarction: Results From the Beijing Elderly Acute Myocardial Infarction Study (BEAMIS)

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Shi-Wei; Zhou, Yu-Jie; Nie, Xiao-Min; Liu, Yu-Yang; Du, Jie; Hu, Da-Yi; Jia, De-An; Gao, Fei; Hu, Bin; Fang, Zhe; Han, Hong-Ya; Liu, Xiao-Li; Yan, Zhen-Xian; Wang, Jian-Long; Hua, Qi; Shi, Yu-Jie; Li, Hong-Wei

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess whether the relationship between abnormal fasting plasma glucose (FPG) levels and patient outcomes holds for both older men and older women with acute myocardial infarction (AMI). PATIENTS AND METHODS: From April 1, 2004, to October 31, 2006, a total of 2016 consecutive older patients (age ≥65 years) presenting with AMI were screened. Of these patients, 1854 were consecutively enrolled in the study. Patients were categorized into 4 groups: the hypoglycemic group (FPG, ≤90.0 mg/dL [to convert to mmol/L, multiply by 0.0555]; n=443, 23.9%), the euglycemic group (FPG, 90.1-126.0 mg/dL; n=812, 43.8%), the mildly hyperglycemic group (FPG, 126.1-162.0 mg/dL; n=308, 16.6%), and the severely hyperglycemic group (FPG, ≥162.1 mg/dL; n=291, 15.7%). The primary outcomes were rates of in-hospital and 3-year mortality. RESULTS: Female patients were older and had a higher incidence of diabetes mellitus but lower rates of smoking and use of invasive therapy. Men tended to have a higher frequency of hypoglycemia, whereas women tended to have a higher frequency of hyperglycemia. No significant difference was found in in-hospital (10.9% vs 9.1%; P=.36) or 3-year (24.5% vs 24.5%; P=.99) mortality between male and female patients, and FPG-associated mortality did not vary significantly by sex. CONCLUSION: An increased FPG level was associated with a relatively higher risk of in-hospital mortality in men but not in women. Nonetheless, increased and decreased FPG levels at admission could predict higher mortality rates regardless of sex. There was a striking U-shaped relationship between FPG levels and in-hospital and 3-year mortality. The effect of abnormal FPG level on outcomes among older patients with AMI did not vary significantly by sex. PMID:21282483

  7. New Lyme Disease Bacteria Discovered in Upper Midwest: CDC

    MedlinePlus

    ... nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/news/fullstory_157157.html New Lyme Disease Bacteria Discovered in Upper Midwest: CDC ... 2016 TUESDAY, Feb. 9, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- A new Lyme disease-causing bacteria has been identified in ...

  8. Sampling bacteria with a laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwarzwälder, Kordula; Rutschmann, Peter

    2014-05-01

    Water quality is a topic of high interest and it's getting more and more important due to climate change and the implementation of European Water Framework Directive (WFD). One point of interest here is the inflow of bacteria into a river caused by combined sewer overflows which lead untreated wastewater including bacteria directly into a river. These bacteria remain in the river for a certain time, they settle down and can be remobilised again. In our study we want to investigate these processes of sedimentation and resuspension and use the results for the development of a software module coupled with the software Flow3D. Thereby we should be able to simulate and therefore predict the water quality influenced by combined sewer overflows. Hence we need to get information about the bacteria transport and fate. We need to know about the size of the bacteria or of the bacteria clumps and the size of the particles the bacteria are attached to. The agglomerates lead to different characteristics and velocities of settlement. The timespan during this bacteria can be detected in the bulk phase depends on many factors like the intensity of UV light, turbidity of the water, the temperature of the water, if there are grazers and a lot more. The size, density and composition of the agglomerates is just a part of all these influencing factors, but it is extremely difficult to differ between the other effects if we have no information about the simple sedimentation in default of these basic information. However we have a big problem getting the data. The chaining between bacteria or bacteria and particles is not too strong, so filtering the water to get a sieving curve may destroy these connections. We did some experiments similar to PIV (particle image velocimetry) measurements and evaluated the pictures with a macro written for the software ImageJ. Doing so we were able to get the concentration of bacteria in the water and collect information about the size of the bacteria. We also compared these data to samples of usual collection and filtering. The results of these laser measurements are very promising.

  9. Lateral fluid percussion injury in the developing rat causes an acute, mild behavioral dysfunction in the absence of significant cell death.

    PubMed

    Gurkoff, Gene G; Giza, Christopher C; Hovda, David A

    2006-03-10

    Lateral fluid percussion injury (LFP), a model of mild-moderate concussion, leads to the temporary loss of the capacity for experience-dependent plasticity in developing rats. To determine if this injury-induced loss in capacity for plasticity is due to cell death, we conducted stereological measurements within the cerebral cortex and CA3 of the hippocampus 2 weeks following mild, moderate or severe LFP in the post-natal day 19 (P19) rat. Results indicated that there was no significant change in the absolute number of neurons, regardless of injury severity, in either the ipsilateral cortex (sham = 10.6 +/- 1.7, mild = 11.5 +/- 2.1, moderate = 10.0 +/- 1.0, severe = 10.9 +/- 1.3 million neurons) or CA3 region of the hippocampus (sham = 251 +/- 38, mild = 289 +/- 2, moderate = 245 +/- 48, severe = 255 +/- 62 thousand neurons). Even though there was no evidence of a significant degree of injury-induced cell death, animals exhibited cognitive deficits as revealed in a Morris water maze task (MWM). The MWM results indicated that regardless of injury severity, P19-injured rats exhibited a significant increase in escape latency compared to age-matched shams (injury by day; P < 0.001) and a significant increase in the number of trials needed to reach criterion (P < 0.05). Analysis of a probe trial one week post-MWM training, however, indicated that there was no deficit in storage or recall of the learned behavior as analyzed by platform hits (sham = 2.9 +/- 0.37, mild = 2.0 +/- 0.40, moderate = 1 +/- 0, severe = 2.8 +/- 0.62) or percent time spent in, or immediately surrounding, the platform area (sham = 13.5 +/- 1.71, mild = 10.8 +/- 2.32, moderate = 12.7 +/- 0, severe = 13.5 +/- 1.69). Taken together, these results indicate that while LFP in P19-injured animals does not lead to significant cell death, it does generate acute, mild deficits in MWM performance. PMID:16490184

  10. Compositional characterisation of soluble apple polysaccharides, and their antioxidant and hepatoprotective effects on acute CCl4-caused liver damage in mice.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xingbin; Yang, Su; Guo, Yurong; Jiao, Yadong; Zhao, Yan

    2013-06-01

    Water-soluble apple peel polysaccharides (APP) and apple flesh polysaccharides (AFP) were isolated from Pink Lady fruits, and their in vitro antioxidant capacities were characterised by DPPH(), HO(), and O(2)(-) systems, and ferric-reducing antioxidant power assay. Oral administration of APP at 250 and 500 mg/kg bw in mice was shown to be as effective as AFP in lowering the CCl(4)-caused increases of serum alanine aminotransferase, aspartate aminotransferase and lactic dehydrogenase activities, and hepatic malondialdehyde level, and antagonising the decreases in antioxidant superoxide dismutase and glutathione peroxidase activities caused by CCl(4) (p<0.05). Histopathological examinations further confirmed that both APP and AFP could protect the liver from CCl(4)-induced histological alteration. HPLC analysis also showed similar profiles of monosaccharide composition for APP and AFP with arabinose, galactose and galacturonic acid being main component monosaccharides. All of these findings demonstrate that the extracts of both APP and AFP possess antioxidant and hepatoprotective potential. PMID:23411241

  11. [Urease activity of bacteria in urine].

    PubMed

    Arai, Y; Takeuchi, H; Tomoyoshi, T; Tatewaki, K

    1989-02-01

    Urea splitting bacteria are related to the formation of struvite or apatite. We investigated the urease activity of bacteria by two methods; the direct measurement of urease activity of viable bacteria and sonicated bacteria from amounts of ammonia by the indophenol method, and the measurement of urease activity by alkalization of infected urine. Proteus mirabilis and Pseudomonas aeruginosa had moderate activity of urease, and Morganella morganii and Staphylococcus epidermidis had the most powerful activity. P. mirabilis caused the strongest alkalization in infected urine. PMID:2500012

  12. Can Acute Myeloid Leukemia Be Prevented?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Can acute myeloid leukemia be found early? Can acute myeloid leukemia be prevented? It’s not clear what causes most ... 2016 Back to top » Guide Topics What Is Leukemia - Acute Myeloid (AML)? Causes, Risk Factors, and Prevention Early Detection, ...

  13. Acute Exposure to Tris(1,3-dichloro-2-propyl) Phosphate (TDCIPP) Causes Hepatic Inflammation and Leads to Hepatotoxicity in Zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Chunsheng; Su, Guanyong; Giesy, John P.; Letcher, Robert J.; Li, Guangyu; Agrawal, Ira; Li, Jing; Yu, Liqin; Wang, Jianghua; Gong, Zhiyuan

    2016-01-01

    Tris(1,3-dichloro-2-propyl) phosphate (TDCIPP) has been frequently detected in environmental media and has adverse health effect on wildlife and humans. It has been implicated to have hepatotoxicity, but its molecular mechanisms remain unclear. In the present study, adult male zebrafish were exposed to TDCIPP and global hepatic gene expression was examined by RNA-Seq and RT-qPCR in order to understand the molecular mechanisms of TDCIPP-induced hepatotoxicity. Our results indicated that TDCIPP exposure significantly up-regulated the expression of genes involved in endoplasmic reticulum stress and Toll-like receptor (TLR) pathway, implying an inflammatory response, which was supported by up-regulation of inflammation-related biomaker genes. Hepatic inflammation was further confirmed by histological observation of increase of infiltrated neutrophils and direct observation of liver recruitment of neutrophils labeled with Ds-Red fluorescent protein of Tg(lysC:DsRed) zebrafish upon TDCIPP exposure. To further characterize the hepatotoxicity of TDCIPP, the expression of hepatotoxicity biomarker genes, liver histopathology and morphology were examined. The exposure to TDCIPP significantly up-regulated the expression of several biomarker genes for hepatotoxicity (gck, gsr and nqo1) and caused hepatic vacuolization and apoptosis as well as increase of the liver size. Collectively, our results suggest that exposure to TDCIPP induces hepatic inflammation and leads to hepatotoxicity in zebrafish. PMID:26743178

  14. Acute Exposure to Tris(1,3-dichloro-2-propyl) Phosphate (TDCIPP) Causes Hepatic Inflammation and Leads to Hepatotoxicity in Zebrafish

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Chunsheng; Su, Guanyong; Giesy, John P.; Letcher, Robert J.; Li, Guangyu; Agrawal, Ira; Li, Jing; Yu, Liqin; Wang, Jianghua; Gong, Zhiyuan

    2016-01-01

    Tris(1,3-dichloro-2-propyl) phosphate (TDCIPP) has been frequently detected in environmental media and has adverse health effect on wildlife and humans. It has been implicated to have hepatotoxicity, but its molecular mechanisms remain unclear. In the present study, adult male zebrafish were exposed to TDCIPP and global hepatic gene expression was examined by RNA-Seq and RT-qPCR in order to understand the molecular mechanisms of TDCIPP-induced hepatotoxicity. Our results indicated that TDCIPP exposure significantly up-regulated the expression of genes involved in endoplasmic reticulum stress and Toll-like receptor (TLR) pathway, implying an inflammatory response, which was supported by up-regulation of inflammation-related biomaker genes. Hepatic inflammation was further confirmed by histological observation of increase of infiltrated neutrophils and direct observation of liver recruitment of neutrophils labeled with Ds-Red fluorescent protein of Tg(lysC:DsRed) zebrafish upon TDCIPP exposure. To further characterize the hepatotoxicity of TDCIPP, the expression of hepatotoxicity biomarker genes, liver histopathology and morphology were examined. The exposure to TDCIPP significantly up-regulated the expression of several biomarker genes for hepatotoxicity (gck, gsr and nqo1) and caused hepatic vacuolization and apoptosis as well as increase of the liver size. Collectively, our results suggest that exposure to TDCIPP induces hepatic inflammation and leads to hepatotoxicity in zebrafish.

  15. Acute Exposure to Tris(1,3-dichloro-2-propyl) Phosphate (TDCIPP) Causes Hepatic Inflammation and Leads to Hepatotoxicity in Zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chunsheng; Su, Guanyong; Giesy, John P; Letcher, Robert J; Li, Guangyu; Agrawal, Ira; Li, Jing; Yu, Liqin; Wang, Jianghua; Gong, Zhiyuan

    2016-01-01

    Tris(1,3-dichloro-2-propyl) phosphate (TDCIPP) has been frequently detected in environmental media and has adverse health effect on wildlife and humans. It has been implicated to have hepatotoxicity, but its molecular mechanisms remain unclear. In the present study, adult male zebrafish were exposed to TDCIPP and global hepatic gene expression was examined by RNA-Seq and RT-qPCR in order to understand the molecular mechanisms of TDCIPP-induced hepatotoxicity. Our results indicated that TDCIPP exposure significantly up-regulated the expression of genes involved in endoplasmic reticulum stress and Toll-like receptor (TLR) pathway, implying an inflammatory response, which was supported by up-regulation of inflammation-related biomaker genes. Hepatic inflammation was further confirmed by histological observation of increase of infiltrated neutrophils and direct observation of liver recruitment of neutrophils labeled with Ds-Red fluorescent protein of Tg(lysC:DsRed) zebrafish upon TDCIPP exposure. To further characterize the hepatotoxicity of TDCIPP, the expression of hepatotoxicity biomarker genes, liver histopathology and morphology were examined. The exposure to TDCIPP significantly up-regulated the expression of several biomarker genes for hepatotoxicity (gck, gsr and nqo1) and caused hepatic vacuolization and apoptosis as well as increase of the liver size. Collectively, our results suggest that exposure to TDCIPP induces hepatic inflammation and leads to hepatotoxicity in zebrafish. PMID:26743178

  16. Acute Lung Failure

    PubMed Central

    Mac Sweeney, Rob; McAuley, Daniel F.; Matthay, Michael A.

    2013-01-01

    Lung failure is the most common organ failure seen in the intensive care unit. The pathogenesis of acute respiratory failure (ARF) can be classified as (1) neuromuscular in origin, (2) secondary to acute and chronic obstructive airway diseases, (3) alveolar processes such as cardiogenic and noncardiogenic pulmonary edema and pneumonia, and (4) vascular diseases such as acute or chronic pulmonary embolism. This article reviews the more common causes of ARF from each group, including the pathological mechanisms and the principles of critical care management, focusing on the supportive, specific, and adjunctive therapies for each condition. PMID:21989697

  17. Sarcocystis nesbitti Causes Acute, Relapsing Febrile Myositis with a High Attack Rate: Description of a Large Outbreak of Muscular Sarcocystosis in Pangkor Island, Malaysia, 2012

    PubMed Central

    Italiano, Claire M.; Wong, Kum Thong; AbuBakar, Sazaly; Lau, Yee Ling; Ramli, Norlisah; Syed Omar, Sharifah Faridah; Kahar Bador, Maria; Tan, Chong Tin

    2014-01-01

    Background From the 17th to 19th January 2012, a group of 92 college students and teachers attended a retreat in a hotel located on Pangkor Island, off the west coast of Peninsular Malaysia. Following the onset of symptoms in many participants who presented to our institute, an investigation was undertaken which ultimately identified Sarcocystis nesbitti as the cause of this outbreak. Methodology/Principal Findings All retreat participants were identified, and clinical and epidemiological information was obtained via clinical review and self-reported answers to a structured questionnaire. Laboratory, imaging and muscle biopsy results were evaluated and possible sources of exposure, in particular water supply, were investigated. At an average of 9–11 days upon return from the retreat, 89 (97%) of the participants became ill. A vast majority of 94% had fever with 57% of these persons experiencing relapsing fever. Myalgia was present in 91% of patients. Facial swelling from myositis of jaw muscles occurred in 9 (10%) patients. The median duration of symptoms was 17 days (IQR 7 to 30 days; range 3 to 112). Out of 4 muscle biopsies, sarcocysts were identified in 3. S. nesbitti was identified by PCR in 3 of the 4 biopsies including one biopsy without observed sarcocyst. Non-Malaysians had a median duration of symptoms longer than that of Malaysians (27.5 days vs. 14 days, p = 0.001) and were more likely to experience moderate or severe myalgia compared to mild myalgia (83.3% vs. 40.0%, p = 0.002). Conclusions/Significance The similarity of the symptoms and clustered time of onset suggests that all affected persons had muscular sarcocystosis. This is the largest human outbreak of sarcocystosis ever reported, with the specific Sarcocystis species identified. The largely non-specific clinical features of this illness suggest that S. nesbitti may be an under diagnosed infection in the tropics. PMID:24854350

  18. Acute chylous peritonitis due to acute pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Georgiou, Georgios K; Harissis, Haralampos; Mitsis, Michalis; Batsis, Haralampos; Fatouros, Michalis

    2012-04-28

    We report a case of acute chylous ascites formation presenting as peritonitis (acute chylous peritonitis) in a patient suffering from acute pancreatitis due to hypertriglyceridemia and alcohol abuse. The development of chylous ascites is usually a chronic process mostly involving malignancy, trauma or surgery, and symptoms arise as a result of progressive abdominal distention. However, when accumulation of "chyle" occurs rapidly, the patient may present with signs of peritonitis. Preoperative diagnosis is difficult since the clinical picture usually suggests hollow organ perforation, appendicitis or visceral ischemia. Less than 100 cases of acute chylous peritonitis have been reported. Pancreatitis is a rare cause of chyloperitoneum and in almost all of the cases chylous ascites is discovered some days (or even weeks) after the onset of symptoms of pancreatitis. This is the second case in the literature where the patient presented with acute chylous peritonitis due to acute pancreatitis, and the presence of chyle within the abdominal cavity was discovered simultaneously with the establishment of the diagnosis of pancreatitis. The patient underwent an exploratory laparotomy for suspected perforated duodenal ulcer, since, due to hypertriglyceridemia, serum amylase values appeared within the normal range. Moreover, abdominal computed tomography imaging was not diagnostic for pancreatitis. Following abdominal lavage and drainage, the patient was successfully treated with total parenteral nutrition and octreotide. PMID:22563182

  19. Bronchitis - acute

    MedlinePlus

    Acute bronchitis is swelling and inflammation in the main passages that carry air to the lungs. The swelling ... When acute bronchitis occurs, it almost always comes after having a cold or flu-like illness. The bronchitis infection is ...

  20. Interactions between nitrifying bacteria and hydrocarbon-degrading bacteria during detoxification of oil sands process affected water

    SciTech Connect

    Sobolewski, A.; MacKinnon, M.

    1995-12-31

    Large quantities of process water are produced during the extraction of bitumen from oil sands by the Syncrude and Suncor operations in northern Alberta. Freshly produced tailings water is acutely toxic, but it has been shown to slowly detoxify over time. As detoxification proceeds, there is also a precipitous decrease in ammonia concentrations. The present study examines these two microbially-mediated processes in relation to levels of bacteria and toxicants in mixtures of fresh and aged (detoxified) tailings water. Detoxification of tailings water was greatly accelerated when equal volumes of fresh and detoxified (natural aging for one year) tailings water were mixed. Addition of phosphorus further stimulated detoxification, causing levels of ammonia and naphthenic acids (toxic organic acids leached during bitumen extraction) to decrease to those of detoxified water within two months. Such changes were not observed when phosphorus was not added, or when it was added to less diluted (10-.1 or 3-.1) fresh tailings water. Populations of nitrifying bacteria and naphthenic acid degraders increased markedly in the phosphorus-amended mixtures, but not in its absence. Addition of CS{sub 2} (a specific inhibitor of nitrification) to these mixtures prevented ammonia oxidation. Surprisingly, it also prevented the increase in naphthenic acid-degraders and retarded the loss of naphthenic acids. These results suggest the existence of interactions in fresh tailings water between nitrifying bacteria, naphthenic acid degraders and toxicants. The activity of naphthenic acid-degraders apparently remains low until ammonia is oxidized, whereas that of nitrifying bacteria remains low until concentrations of naphthenic acids or other toxicants decrease below some threshold level. Understanding these interactions may lead to more efficient and effective processes to detoxify oil sands process water.

  1. Bacteria isolated from amoebae/bacteria consortium

    DOEpatents

    Tyndall, R.L.

    1995-05-30

    New protozoan derived microbial consortia and method for their isolation are provided. Consortia and bacteria isolated therefrom are useful for treating wastes such as trichloroethylene and trinitrotoluene. Consortia, bacteria isolated therefrom, and dispersants isolated therefrom are useful for dispersing hydrocarbons such as oil, creosote, wax, and grease.

  2. Bacteria isolated from amoebae/bacteria consortium

    DOEpatents

    Tyndall, Richard L.

    1995-01-01

    New protozoan derived microbial consortia and method for their isolation are provided. Consortia and bacteria isolated therefrom are useful for treating wastes such as trichloroethylene and trinitrotoluene. Consortia, bacteria isolated therefrom, and dispersants isolated therefrom are useful for dispersing hydrocarbons such as oil, creosote, wax, and grease.

  3. Randomized comparative study of amoxicillin-clavulanic acid and co-trimoxazole in the treatment of acute urinary tract infections in adults.

    PubMed Central

    Karachalios, G N

    1985-01-01

    The efficacy and safety of amoxicillin-clavulanic acid were compared with those of co-trimoxazole in the treatment of acute urinary tract infections. A total of 104 patients (mean age, 52 years) with clinical and laboratory evidence of acute urinary tract infection were enrolled in the study. Characteristics and infecting organisms were equivalent in both groups of patients. Escherichia coli was the predominant bacteria pathogen in both groups. Both drugs resulted in clinical improvement in 100% of the patients; bacteriological cure after the termination of therapy was 95% with amoxicillin-clavulanic acid and 83% with co-trimoxazole (P less than 0.001). Side effects were not severe enough to necessitate discontinuation of the antimicrobial agents. Amoxicillin-clavulanic acid is effective and safe therapy for acute urinary tract infections caused by susceptible bacteria. PMID:3911880

  4. Acute Hepatic Porphyria

    PubMed Central

    Bissell, D. Montgomery; Wang, Bruce

    2015-01-01

    The porphyrias comprise a set of diseases, each representing an individual defect in one of the eight enzymes mediating the pathway of heme synthesis. The diseases are genetically distinct but have in common the overproduction of heme precursors. In the case of the acute (neurologic) porphyrias, the cause of symptoms appears to be overproduction of a neurotoxic precursor. For the cutaneous porphyrias, it is photosensitizing porphyrins. Some types have both acute and cutaneous manifestations. The clinical presentation of acute porphyria consists of abdominal pain, nausea, and occasionally seizures. Only a small minority of those who carry a mutation for acute porphyria have pain attacks. The triggers for an acute attack encompass certain medications and severely decreased caloric intake. The propensity of females to acute attacks has been linked to internal changes in ovarian physiology. Symptoms are accompanied by large increases in delta-aminolevulinic acid and porphobilinogen in plasma and urine. Treatment of an acute attack centers initially on pain relief and elimination of inducing factors such as medications; glucose is administered to reverse the fasting state. The only specific treatment is administration of intravenous hemin. An important goal of treatment is preventing progression of the symptoms to a neurological crisis. Patients who progress despite hemin administration have undergone liver transplantation with complete resolution of symptoms. A current issue is the unavailability of a rapid test for urine porphobilinogen in the urgent-care setting. PMID:26357631

  5. CHAPTER IV-2 BACTERIA

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Entomopathogenic bacteria provide an alternative to chemical pesticides used in insect control programs. Today, the principal microbial insecticides utilize spore forming bacteria or toxins produced by these bacteria as their active ingredients, either in formulations or by incorporation of toxin g...

  6. Acute genital ulcers.

    PubMed

    Delgado-García, Silvia; Palacios-Marqués, Ana; Martínez-Escoriza, Juan Carlos; Martín-Bayón, Tina-Aurora

    2014-01-01

    Acute genital ulcers, also known as acute vulvar ulcers, ulcus vulvae acutum or Lipschütz ulcers, refer to an ulceration of the vulva or lower vagina of non-venereal origin that usually presents in young women, predominantly virgins. Although its incidence is unknown, it seems a rare entity, with few cases reported in the literature. Their aetiology and pathogenesis are still unknown. The disease is characterised by an acute onset of flu-like symptoms with single or multiple painful ulcers on the vulva. Diagnosis is mainly clinical, after exclusion of other causes of vulvar ulcers. The treatment is mainly symptomatic, with spontaneous resolution in 2 weeks and without recurrences in most cases. We present a case report of a 13-year-old girl with two episodes of acute ulcers that fit the clinical criteria for Lipschütz ulcers. PMID:24473429

  7. Prevalence of Gene Rearrangements in Mexican Children with Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia: A Population Study—Report from the Mexican Interinstitutional Group for the Identification of the Causes of Childhood Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Bekker-Méndez, Vilma Carolina; Miranda-Peralta, Enrique; Núñez-Enríquez, Juan Carlos; Olarte-Carrillo, Irma; Guerra-Castillo, Francisco Xavier; Pompa-Mera, Ericka Nelly; Ocaña-Mondragón, Alicia; Bernáldez-Ríos, Roberto; Medina-Sanson, Aurora; Jiménez-Hernández, Elva; Amador-Sánchez, Raquel; Peñaloza-González, José Gabriel; de Diego Flores-Chapa, José; Fajardo-Gutiérrez, Arturo; Flores-Lujano, Janet; Rodríguez-Zepeda, María del Carmen; Dorantes-Acosta, Elisa María; Bolea-Murga, Victoria; Núñez-Villegas, Nancy; Velázquez-Aviña, Martha Margarita; Torres-Nava, José Refugio; Reyes-Zepeda, Nancy Carolina; González-Bonilla, Cesar; Mejía-Aranguré, Juan Manuel

    2014-01-01

    Mexico has one of the highest incidences of childhood leukemia worldwide and significantly higher mortality rates for this disease compared with other countries. One possible cause is the high prevalence of gene rearrangements associated with the etiology or with a poor prognosis of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). The aims of this multicenter study were to determine the prevalence of the four most common gene rearrangements [ETV6-RUNX1, TCF3-PBX1, BCR-ABL1, and MLL rearrangements] and to explore their relationship with mortality rates during the first year of treatment in ALL children from Mexico City. Patients were recruited from eight public hospitals during 2010–2012. A total of 282 bone marrow samples were obtained at each child's diagnosis for screening by conventional and multiplex reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction to determine the gene rearrangements. Gene rearrangements were detected in 50 (17.7%) patients. ETV6-RUNX1 was detected in 21 (7.4%) patients, TCF3-PBX1 in 20 (7.1%) patients, BCR-ABL1 in 5 (1.8%) patients, and MLL rearrangements in 4 (1.4%) patients. The earliest deaths occurred at months 1, 2, and 3 after diagnosis in patients with MLL, ETV6-RUNX1, and BCR-ABL1 gene rearrangements, respectively. Gene rearrangements could be related to the aggressiveness of leukemia observed in Mexican children. PMID:25692130

  8. Prevalence of gene rearrangements in Mexican children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia: a population study-report from the Mexican Interinstitutional Group for the identification of the causes of childhood leukemia.

    PubMed

    Bekker-Méndez, Vilma Carolina; Miranda-Peralta, Enrique; Núñez-Enríquez, Juan Carlos; Olarte-Carrillo, Irma; Guerra-Castillo, Francisco Xavier; Pompa-Mera, Ericka Nelly; Ocaña-Mondragón, Alicia; Rangel-López, Angélica; Bernáldez-Ríos, Roberto; Medina-Sanson, Aurora; Jiménez-Hernández, Elva; Amador-Sánchez, Raquel; Peñaloza-González, José Gabriel; de Diego Flores-Chapa, José; Fajardo-Gutiérrez, Arturo; Flores-Lujano, Janet; Rodríguez-Zepeda, María Del Carmen; Dorantes-Acosta, Elisa María; Bolea-Murga, Victoria; Núñez-Villegas, Nancy; Velázquez-Aviña, Martha Margarita; Torres-Nava, José Refugio; Reyes-Zepeda, Nancy Carolina; González-Bonilla, Cesar; Mejía-Aranguré, Juan Manuel

    2014-01-01

    Mexico has one of the highest incidences of childhood leukemia worldwide and significantly higher mortality rates for this disease compared with other countries. One possible cause is the high prevalence of gene rearrangements associated with the etiology or with a poor prognosis of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). The aims of this multicenter study were to determine the prevalence of the four most common gene rearrangements [ETV6-RUNX1, TCF3-PBX1, BCR-ABL1, and MLL rearrangements] and to explore their relationship with mortality rates during the first year of treatment in ALL children from Mexico City. Patients were recruited from eight public hospitals during 2010-2012. A total of 282 bone marrow samples were obtained at each child's diagnosis for screening by conventional and multiplex reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction to determine the gene rearrangements. Gene rearrangements were detected in 50 (17.7%) patients. ETV6-RUNX1 was detected in 21 (7.4%) patients, TCF3-PBX1 in 20 (7.1%) patients, BCR-ABL1 in 5 (1.8%) patients, and MLL rearrangements in 4 (1.4%) patients. The earliest deaths occurred at months 1, 2, and 3 after diagnosis in patients with MLL, ETV6-RUNX1, and BCR-ABL1 gene rearrangements, respectively. Gene rearrangements could be related to the aggressiveness of leukemia observed in Mexican children. PMID:25692130

  9. Short term chronic and acute toxicity screening of water and sediment using fathead minnows, daphnids, rotifers (Rotox[reg sign]) and light emitting bacteria (Microtox[reg sign]), Ambient Stream Monitoring, summers of 1990 and 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Moses, J.; Wade, D.C.

    1992-07-01

    Toxicological evaluation of water column and sediment samples from six locations in the Ambient Stream Monitoring fixed station network was initiated in 1986 using short-term chronic bioassay methods. Toxicological evaluation of six additional stations was initiated in 1990. Chronic studies were conducted at one of these new stations and acute screening methods were used at all twelve locations now included in the activity. This report provides results from studies conducted during the summers of 1990 and 1991. The 1990--91 studies evaluated toxicity of stream water and porewater extracted from sediments as test media, whereas previous studies evaluated water and sediment elutriate samples.

  10. Pathogenesis of acute hepatopancreatic necrosis disease (AHPND) in shrimp.

    PubMed

    Lai, Hung-Chiao; Ng, Tze Hann; Ando, Masahiro; Lee, Chung-Te; Chen, I-Tung; Chuang, Jie-Cheng; Mavichak, Rapeepat; Chang, Sheng-Hsiung; Yeh, Mi-De; Chiang, Yi-An; Takeyama, Haruko; Hamaguchi, Hiro-o; Lo, Chu-Fang; Aoki, Takashi; Wang, Han-Ching

    2015-12-01

    Acute hepatopancreatic necrosis disease (AHPND), also called early mortality syndrome (EMS), is a recently emergent shrimp bacterial disease that has resulted in substantial economic losses since 2009. AHPND is known to be caused by strains of Vibrio parahaemolyticus that contain a unique virulence plasmid, but the pathology of the disease is still unclear. In this study, we show that AHPND-causing strains of V. parahaemolyticus secrete the plasmid-encoded binary toxin PirAB(vp) into the culture medium. We further determined that, after shrimp were challenged with AHPND-causing bacteria, the bacteria initially colonized the stomach, where they started to produce PirAB(vp) toxin. At the same early time point (6 hpi), PirB(vp) toxin, but not PirA(vp) toxin, was detected in the hepatopancreas, and the characteristic histopathological signs of AHPND, including sloughing of the epithelial cells of the hepatopancreatic tubules, were also seen. Although some previous studies have found that both components of the binary PirAB(vp) toxin are necessary to induce a toxic effect, our present results are consistent with other studies which have suggested that PirB(vp) alone may be sufficient to cause cellular damage. At later time points, the bacteria and PirA(vp) and PirB(vp) toxins were all detected in the hepatopancreas. We also show that Raman spectroscopy "Whole organism fingerprints" were unable to distinguish between AHPND-causing and non-AHPND causing strains. Lastly, by using minimum inhibitory concentrations, we found that both virulent and non-virulent V. parahaemolyticus strains were resistant to several antibiotics, suggesting that the use of antibiotics in shrimp culture should be more strictly regulated. PMID:26549178

  11. Acute polyhydramnios after maternal status epilepticus

    PubMed Central

    Shindo, Ryosuke; Aoki, Shigeru; Kasai, Michi; Takahashi, Tsuneo; Hirahara, Fumiki

    2015-01-01

    Key Clinical Message Maternal status epilepticus can cause fetal hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy that in turn results in acute polyhydramnios caused by fetal dysphagia; thus, acute polyhydramnios is a symptom that should lead to a suspicion of fetal dysphagia caused by hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy. PMID:26331018

  12. Acute and Chronic Pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Berenson; Wyllie

    1995-10-01

    Pancreatitis, once thought to be almost exclusively a disease of adults, is increasingly being found as the cause of abdominal pain in adolescents. The authors review the pathophysiology, diagnosis, managment, and complications of acute and chronic pancreatitis, noting that a high index of suspicion is needed to properly diagnose and provide optimal care to these patients. PMID:10358323

  13. The passage of bacteria through surgical drapes.

    PubMed Central

    Blom, A.; Estela, C.; Bowker, K.; MacGowan, A.; Hardy, J. R.

    2000-01-01

    The passage of bacteria through surgical drapes is a potential cause of wound infection. Previous studies have shown that liquids and human albumin penetrate certain types of drapes. We studied the passage of bacteria through seven different types of surgical drape and an operating tray. Bacteria easily penetrated all the woven re-usable fabrics within 30 min. The disposable non-woven drapes proved to be impermeable, as did the operating tray. We recommend the use of non-woven disposable drapes or woven drapes with an impermeable operating tray in all surgical cases. PMID:11103158

  14. Bacteria make gasohol from corn stalk wastes

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-11-03

    Scientists at MIT have developed two strains of bacteria that convert corn stalks into ethanol. The bacteria, isolated from the first compartment of the cows rumen, were chemically treated to cause genetic mutations that could tolerate higher concentrations of alcohol and produce little lactic acid. The bacterial methods end product is a fuel that consists of 4% ethanol and 96% water, and by the fermentation of cellulose, rather than starch, the hydrolyzation step is eliminated.

  15. Acute bronchial asthma.

    PubMed

    Grover, Sudhanshu; Jindal, Atul; Bansal, Arun; Singhi, Sunit C

    2011-11-01

    Acute asthma is the third commonest cause of pediatric emergency visits at PGIMER. Typically, it presents with acute onset respiratory distress and wheeze in a patient with past or family history of similar episodes. The severity of the acute episode of asthma is judged clinically and categorized as mild, moderate and severe. The initial therapy consists of oxygen, inhaled beta-2 agonists (salbutamol or terbutaline), inhaled budesonide (three doses over 1 h, at 20 min interval) in all and ipratropium bromide and systemic steroids (hydrocortisone or methylprednisolone) in acute severe asthma. Other causes of acute onset wheeze and breathing difficulty such as pneumonia, foreign body, cardiac failure etc. should be ruled out with help of chest radiography and appropriate laboratory investigations in first time wheezers and those not responding to 1 h of inhaled therapy. In case of inadequate response or worsening, intravenous infusion of magnesium sulphate, terbutaline or aminophylline may be used. Magnesium sulphate is the safest and most effective alternative among these. Severe cases may need ICU care and rarely, ventilatory support. PMID:21769523

  16. A single-center evaluation of the risk for colonization or bacteremia with piperacillin-tazobactam- and cefepime-resistant bacteria in patients with acute leukemia receiving fluoroquinolone prophylaxis.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, A D; Heil, E L; Patel, N K; Duffy, A; Gilmore, S

    2016-04-01

    Fluoroquinolone prophylaxis is indicated to prevent neutropenic fever in patients with acute leukemia. However, fluoroquinolone use has been associated with development of multi-drug-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa and extended spectrum β-lactamase producing gram-negative bacilli. Due to a presumed risk of multi-drug resistance associated with fluoroquinolone prophylaxis, patients admitted to our hospital with neutropenic fever receive empiric carbapenem therapy until cultures are negative for 72 h or identification of an organism. Our study seeks to identify the incidence of multi-drug-resistant organism colonization and bacteremia among patients who receive fluoroquinolone prophylaxis and to evaluate duration of empiric carbapenem therapy. A retrospective review of adult patients with acute leukemia receiving a fluoroquinolone as outpatient infection prophylaxis, admitted to our tertiary cancer center for treatment of neutropenic fever was completed. Surveillance and blood cultures were reviewed for antibiotic resistance. Duration of empiric carbapenem therapy was reviewed. One hundred patients and 177 admissions for neutropenic fever were included. Six patients harbored a piperacillin-tazobactam-resistant organism found during routine surveillance. Among these patients, two bacteremias were identified, one of which was a piperacillin-tazobactam-resistant organism. Five bacteremias were identified among 83 patients with negative surveillance cultures. Among the bloodstream infections, five organisms isolated were fluoroquinolone resistant. No cefepime-resistant organism was isolated on surveillance or bloodstream cultures. Adherence to the institution guideline of narrowing antibiotics after 72 h of negative cultures occurred in only 13% of neutropenic fever cases. The average duration of carbapenem therapy in 177 neutropenic fever episodes was 4.4 days. Our findings show that among our patient population, there is a low risk of bacteremia with a piperacillin-tazobactam-resistant or cefepime-resistant organism. However, prompt de-escalation of carbapenem therapy needs to be reiterated within hospital practice. PMID:25567517

  17. AIDS: "it's the bacteria, stupid!".

    PubMed

    Broxmeyer, Lawrence; Cantwell, Alan

    2008-11-01

    Acid-fast tuberculous mycobacterial infections are common in AIDS and are regarded as secondary "opportunistic infections." According to the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, TB is the major attributable cause of death in AIDS patients. Could such bacteria play a primary or causative role in AIDS? Certainly, In screening tests for HIV, there is frequent, up to 70%, cross-reactivity, between the gag and pol proteins of HIV and patients with mycobacterial infections such as tuberculosis. By 1972, five years before gays started dying in the U.S., Rolland wrote Genital Tuberculosis, a Forgotten Disease? And ironically, in 1979, on the eve of AIDS recognition, Gondzik and Jasiewicz showed that even in the laboratory, genitally infected tubercular male guinea pigs could infect healthy females through their semen by an HIV-compatible ratio of 1 in 6 or 17%, prompting him to warn his patients that not only was tuberculosis a sexually transmitted disease, but also the necessity of the application of suitable contraceptives, such as condoms, to avoid it. Gondzik's solution and date of publication are chilling; his findings significant. Since 1982 Cantwell et al found acid-fast bacteria closely related to tuberculosis (TB) and atypical tuberculosis in AIDS tissue. On the other hand molecular biologist and virologist Duesberg, who originally defined retroviral ultrastructure, has made it clear that HIV is not the cause of AIDS and that the so-called AIDS retrovirus has never been isolated in its pure state. Dr. Etienne de Harven, first to examine retroviruses under the electron, agrees. In 1993 HIV co-discoverer Luc Montagnier reported on cell-wall-deficient (CWD) bacteria which he called "mycoplasma" in AIDS tissue. He suspected these as a necessary "co-factor" for AIDS. Remarkably, Montagnier remained silent on Cantwell's reports of acid-fast bacteria which could simulate "mycoplasma" in AIDS tissue. Mattman makes clear that the differentiation between mycoplasma and CWD bacteria is difficult at best and cites Pachas's 1985 study wherein one mycoplasma was actually mistaken for a CWD form of a bacterium closely related to the mycobacteria. It is important to realize that the statement "HIV is the sole cause of AIDS" is just a hypothesis. There are unanswered questions and controversy concerning the role of HIV "as the sole cause of AIDS." And until they are resolved, a cure is not possible. This paper explores the possible role of acid-fast tuberculous mycobacteria as "primary agents" in AIDS. PMID:18691828

  18. Genomics of Probiotic Bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Flaherty, Sarah; Goh, Yong Jun; Klaenhammer, Todd R.

    Probiotic bacteria from the Lactobacillus and Bifidobacterium species belong to the Firmicutes and the Actinobacteria phylum, respectively. Lactobacilli are members of the lactic acid bacteria (LAB) group, a broadly defined family of microorganisms that ferment various hexoses into primarily lactic acid. Lactobacilli are typically low G + C gram-positive species which are phylogenetically diverse, with over 100 species documented to date. Bifidobacteria are heterofermentative, high G + C content bacteria with about 30 species of bifidobacteria described to date.

  19. Profile of oritavancin and its potential in the treatment of acute bacterial skin structure infections

    PubMed Central

    Mitra, Subhashis; Saeed, Usman; Havlichek, Daniel H; Stein, Gary E

    2015-01-01

    Oritavancin, a semisynthetic derivative of the glycopeptide antibiotic chloroeremomycin, received the US Food and Drug Administration approval for the treatment of acute bacterial skin and skin structure infections caused by susceptible Gram-positive bacteria in adults in August 2014. This novel second-generation semisynthetic lipoglycopeptide antibiotic has activity against a broad spectrum of Gram-positive bacteria, including methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), vancomycin-intermediate S. aureus (VISA), and vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus. Oritavancin inhibits bacterial cell wall synthesis and is rapidly bactericidal against many Gram-positive pathogens. The long half-life of this drug enables a single-dose administration. Oritavancin is not metabolized in the body, and the unchanged drug is slowly excreted by the kidneys. In two large Phase III randomized, double-blind, clinical trials, oritavancin was found to be non-inferior to vancomycin in achieving the primary composite end point in the treatment of acute Gram-positive skin and skin structure infections. Adverse effects noted were mostly mild with nausea, headache, and vomiting being the most common reported side effects. Oritavancin has emerged as another useful antimicrobial agent for treatment of acute Gram-positive skin and skin structure infections, including those caused by MRSA and VISA. PMID:26185459

  20. [Acute non-traumatic myelopathy in children and adolescents].

    PubMed

    Arroyo, Hugo A

    2013-09-01

    The term 'acute myelopathies'--referred to a spinal cord dysfunction--represent a heterogeneous group of disorders with distinct etiologies, clinical and radiologic features, and prognoses. The objective of this review is to discuss the non-traumatic acute myelopathies. Acute myelopathy can be due to several causes as infective agents or inflammatory processes, such as in acute myelitis, compressive lesions, vascular lesions, etc. The clinical presentation is often dramatic with tetraparesis or paraparesis, sensory disturbances and bladder and/or bowel dysfunction. History and physical examination are used to localize the lesion to the root or specific level of the cord, which can guide imaging. Different syndromes are recognized: complete transverse lesion, central grey matter syndrome, anterior horn syndrome, anterior spinal artery syndrome, etc). The first priority is to rule out a compressive lesion. If a myelopathy is suspected, a gadolinium-enhanced MRI of the spinal cord should be obtained as soon as possible. If there is no structural lesion such as epidural blood or a spinal mass, then the presence or absence of spinal cord inflammation should be documented with a lumbar puncture. The absence of pleocytosis would lead to consideration of non inflammatory causes of myelopathy such as arteriovenous malformations, fibrocartilaginous embolism, or possibly early inflammatory myelopathy. In the presence of an inflammatory process (defined by gadolinium enhancement, cerebrospinal fluid pleocytosis, or elevated cerebrospinal fluid immunoglobulin index), one should determine whether there is an inflammatory or an infectious cause. Different virus, bacterias, parasites and fungi have to be considered as autoimmune and inflammatory diseases that involve the central nervous system. PMID:23897140