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Sample records for bacteria causing acute

  1. [Non-clostridial anaerobic bacteria can cause acute pyelonephritis (an experimental trial)].

    PubMed

    Kogan, M I; Pasechnik, D G; Naboka, Iu L; Ibishev, Kh S; Gazaev, Z I; Gudima, I A

    2012-01-01

    Acute obstructive pyelonephritis (PN) caused by Peptococcus niger (Pn), E. coli and mixed infection (Pn + E. coli) was modeled in rabbits. Morphologic examination showed that in animals with peptococcal infection renal lesions were identical to those in escherichial PN. Hemorrhagic infarctions and vasculitis develop in animals with mixed infection. These morphological findings were confirmed bacteriologically. The experimental trial confirms the role of Pn in development of acute obstructive PN in animals. PMID:22876624

  2. The causes of acute leukemia.

    PubMed

    Severson, R K; Ross, J A

    1999-01-01

    Although impressive biologic advances have increased understanding of leukemogenesis, we know little about the causes of the acute leukemias. Epidemiologic studies have focused primarily on children. Higher birth weight is associated with an increased risk of childhood acute leukemia. Several theories have been advanced that may account for these observations, and additional biologic studies are needed. Some epidemiologic studies suggest that the acute leukemias in children may have an infectious component. Again, further work, especially in the area of specific causative agents, is necessary. Another area for future epidemiologic study includes investigation of exposure to natural and synthetic DNA topoisomerase II inhibitors. Preliminary evidence suggests that exposure to these agents, which are found in certain foods and medications, may be related to the subsequent development of acute leukemia in infants. PMID:9914873

  3. Causes of acute bronchitis (image)

    MedlinePLUS

    ... of the bronchial tubes, the part of the respiratory system that leads into the lungs. Acute bronchitis has a sudden onset and usually appears after a respiratory infection, such as a cold, and can be ...

  4. [Rare causes of acute gastric hemorrhage].

    PubMed

    Petrova, N N

    1975-06-01

    According to the author's findings rare causes of acute gastric hemorrhages (the Mallory-Weiss syndrome, cancerous lesions of the gastrointestinal organs, excluding the stomach, esophageal and duodenal diverticulum, prolapse of gastric mucosa into the duodenum, necrosis of the gastric wall, its traumatic rupture, the Rendu-Osler disease, rupture of the renal artery aneurysm) made 3.2% of other causes. Profuse hemorrhage was noted in 12 of 32 patients under consideration. In 8 of 32 patients (25%) the diagnosis was established only at autopsy. In other more frequent causes of acute gastric hemorrhage the diagnosis proved to be feasible in 90-95% of cases. PMID:1080309

  5. Nontoxigenic Vibrio parahaemolyticus Strains Causing Acute Gastroenteritis

    PubMed Central

    Leoni, Francesca; Serra, Roberto; Serracca, Laura; Decastelli, Lucia; Rocchegiani, Elena; Masini, Laura; Canonico, Cristina; Talevi, Giulia; Carraturo, Antonio

    2012-01-01

    We investigated the virulence properties of four Vibrio parahaemolyticus strains causing acute gastroenteritis following consumption of indigenous mussels in Italy. The isolated strains were cytotoxic and adhesive but, surprisingly, lacked tdh, trh, and type three secretion system 2 (T3SS2) genes. We emphasize that nontoxigenic V. parahaemolyticus can induce acute gastroenteritis, highlighting the need for more investigation of the pathogenicity of this microorganism. PMID:23052317

  6. Acute kidney injury: A rare cause.

    PubMed

    Mendonca, Satish; Barki, Satish; Mishra, Mayank; Kumar, R S V; Gupta, Devika; Gupta, Pooja

    2015-09-01

    We present a young lady who consumed hair dye, which contained paraphenylene diamine (PPD), as a means of deliberate self-harm. This resulted in severe angio-neurotic edema for which she had to be ventilated, and thereafter developed rhabdomyolysis leading to acute kidney injury (AKI). The unusual aspect was that the patient continued to have flaccid quadriparesis and inability to regain kidney function. Renal biopsy performed 10 weeks after the dye consumption revealed severe acute tubular necrosis with myoglobin pigment casts. This suggests that PPD has a long-term effect leading to ongoing myoglobinuria, causing flaccid paralysis to persist and preventing the recovery of AKI. In such instances, timely treatment to prevent AKI in the form alkalinization of urine should be initiated promptly. Secondly, because PPD is a nondialyzable toxin, and its long-term effect necessitates its speedy removal, hemoperfusion might be helpful and is worth considering. PMID:26354573

  7. Acute appendicitis caused by foreign body ingestion

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Joo Heung; Lee, Dae Sup

    2015-01-01

    Foreign bodies usually do not cause complications and pass through the gastrointestinal tract spontaneously. Usually endoscopic intervention is recommended within 24 hours. Cases of acute appendicitis caused by foreign bodies are very rare. In our case, we experienced successful endoscopic and surgical treatment of a patient with ingestion of razor blade and some unrecognizable foreign bodies. A 22-year-old soldier was admitted with a small quantity of hematemesis and epigastric pain. We performed emergent endoscopy and successfully removed several foreign bodies. After 17 days, we performed appendectomy to remove the remaining foreign body and to relieve the symptoms. There is no doubt that endoscopic intervention is definitely useful method to remove foreign bodies. If there is no spontaneous drainage of the foreign body from the appendix, an appendectomy must be considered to remove the foreign body and prevent surgical complications such as appendicitis, periappendiceal abscess, and perforation. PMID:26366386

  8. Endometriosis causing acute appendicitis complicated with hemoperitoneum

    PubMed Central

    Curbelo-Peña, Yuhamy; Guedes-De la Puente, Xavier; Saladich-Cubero, Maria; Molinas-Bruguera, Joan; Molineros, Jose; De Caralt-Mestres, Enric

    2015-01-01

    Endometriosis is a painful disorder characterized by endometrial tissue outside the uterine cavity. It usually affects the pelvis, but in rare cases it might extend to other parts of the body. The report is based on a case of a 39-year-old woman, who presented symptoms of acute appendicitis and diagnosis confirmed with ultrasonography and a computed tomography scan procedures. Laparoscopic appendicectomy was performed. After entering the abdominal cavity, hemoperitoneum was discovered with no associated pelvic or abdominal lesions. Biopsy confirmed acute appendicitis with endometrial glands and stroma infiltrating its muscular tissue. Patient recovered without complications and was discharged 48 h after surgery. The appendix is rarely affected by endometrial infiltration. The literature describes an incidence of 0.8%, just a few cases have been associated with acute appendicitis; however, none of them are described to present hemoperitoneum, being our patient the first one reported with such complication. PMID:26253154

  9. Acute apnea caused by an epiglottic cyst.

    PubMed

    Dahm, M C; Panning, B; Lenarz, T

    1998-01-01

    A life threatening complication in the course of routine sedation in a 5 year old child is reported in a case study. A retention cyst of the epiglottis was found to be responsible for obstruction of the larynx leading to acute apnea. The patient history revealed recurrent episodes of stridor previously diagnosed and treated as acute laryngotracheobronchitis as well as border line psychomotoric retardation. Cerebral magnetic resonance imaging was performed for neuroradiological evaluation. After administration of sedation the child presented with stridor and acute apnea. Emergency orotracheal intubation could prevent tracheotomy but was complicated by the unexpected presence of a tumor at the base of the tongue. Further evaluation revealed a large epiglottic cyst. After endoscopic removal of the cyst no further episodes of apnea or stridor were noted. PMID:9466231

  10. Acute respiratory distress caused by Neosartorya udagawae

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We describe the first reported case of acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) attributed to Neosartorya infection. The mold grew rapidly in culture of both sputum and bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid from a previously healthy 43-year-old woman with ARDS, which developed as the culmination of a...

  11. [Acute kidney injury caused by hantavirus in the Netherlands].

    PubMed

    de Weerd, Esther C; Douma, Caroline E; Wattel-Louis, Hanke W

    2015-01-01

    Although unusual in the Netherlands, acute kidney injury is sometimes caused by infection with Hantavirus, a zoonosis transmitted by rodents. Hantavirus infections can cause a syndrome known as 'haemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome', characterized by fever, acute kidney injury and thrombocytopenia. Recovery is spontaneous and treatment is mostly supportive. We describe two cases of otherwise healthy men presenting with fever and acute kidney injury. Laboratory tests revealed raised inflammatory parameters and thrombocytopenia. Urine analysis revealed proteinuria, microscopic haematuria and cell casts. Despite treatment with fluids, renal function declined and oliguria and fluid retention developed in one patient. Dialysis could be avoided, with spontaneous recovery of renal function in both cases. Serological testing revealed acute Hantavirus infection. Acute kidney injury caused by Hantavirus infections is rare in the Netherlands, but should be suspected in any patient presenting with renal failure and a history of viral infection. PMID:25650030

  12. Agraphia caused by acute right parietal infarction.

    PubMed

    Lee, Manyong; Suh, Mee Kyung; Lee, Myung Hyun; Lee, Jin Soo; Moon, So Young

    2015-04-01

    Injury in the dominant language hemisphere typically leads to agraphia, however we report a patient with agraphia after injury to the right angular gyrus. A 71-year-old Korean woman presented with the complaint of an inability to write for the last 7 days. The patient had been illiterate for most of her life, but had started learning to write Hangul, the Korean alphabet, at a welfare center 3 years ago. On language screening she was unable to write although she could read, and other language functions showed no abnormalities. Brain MRI showed acute infarction in the right angular gyrus. Her writing patterns displayed features of surface agraphia, indicative of phoneme-to-grapheme conversion with phonetic writing of targets. Additionally, she manifested visual errors. A functional MRI indicated that her left hemisphere was language dominant. This patient experienced agraphia resulting from pure impairment of visuo-constructive function after acute infarction in the right angular gyrus. PMID:25564267

  13. Pancreatic herniation: a rare cause of acute pancreatitis?

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Prashant; Turp, Matthew; Fellows, Sarah; Ellis, Jonathan

    2013-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis is a common and potentially fatal condition, with several well-known causes including gallstones, excessive alcohol consumption and specific medications. We report a case of an 89-year-old man presenting with acute pancreatitis, which we believe to be secondary to a diaphragmatic herniation of the pancreas. This extremely rare anatomical abnormality can be found incidentally in the asymptomatic patient or may present with a variety of acute symptoms. However, there have been only isolated reports of these cases presenting as acute pancreatitis. While the majority of acute pancreatitis cases can be explained by common causes, it is important that clinicians be aware of and should consider investigating for other more unusual possibilities, such as pancreatic herniation, before labelling an episode as ‘idiopathic’. PMID:24343805

  14. Is mad cow disease caused by a bacteria?

    PubMed

    Broxmeyer, L

    2004-01-01

    Transmissible spongioform enchephalopathies (TSE's), include bovine spongiform encephalopathy (also called BSE or "mad cow disease"), Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD) in humans, and scrapie in sheep. They remain a mystery, their cause hotly debated. But between 1994 and 1996, 12 people in England came down with CJD, the human form of mad cow, and all had eaten beef from suspect cows. Current mad cow diagnosis lies solely in the detection of late appearing "prions", an acronym for hypothesized, gene-less, misfolded proteins, somehow claimed to cause the disease. Yet laboratory preparations of prions contain other things, which could include unidentified bacteria or viruses. Furthermore, the rigors of prion purification alone, might, in and of themselves, have killed the causative virus or bacteria. Therefore, even if samples appear to infect animals, it is impossible to prove that prions are causative. Manuelidis found viral-like particles, which even when separated from prions, were responsible for spongiform STE's. Subsequently, Lasmezas's study showed that 55% of mice injected with cattle BSE, and who came down with disease, had no detectable prions. Still, incredibly, prions, are held as existing TSE dogma and Heino Dringer, who did pioneer work on their nature, candidly predicts "it will turn out that the prion concept is wrong." Many animals that die of spongiform TSE's never show evidence of misfolded proteins, and Dr. Frank Bastian, of Tulane, an authority, thinks the disorder is caused by the bacterial DNA he found in this group of diseases. Recently, Roels and Walravens isolated Mycobacterium bovis it from the brain of a cow with the clinical and histopathological signs of mad cow. Moreover, epidemiologic maps of the origins and peak incidence of BSE in the UK, suggestively match those of England's areas of highest bovine tuberculosis, the Southwest, where Britain's mad cow epidemic began. The neurotoxic potential for cow tuberculosis was shown in pre-1960 England, where one quarter of all tuberculous meningitis victims suffered from Mycobacterium bovis infection. And Harley's study showed pathology identical to "mad cow" from systemic M. bovis in cattle, causing a tuberculous spongiform encephalitis. In addition to M. bovis, Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis (fowl tuberculosis) causes Johne's disease, a problem known and neglected in cattle and sheep for almost a century, and rapidly emerging as the disease of the new millennium. Not only has M. paratuberculosis been found in human Crohn's disease, but both Crohn's and Johne's both cross-react with the antigens of cattle paratuberculosis. Furthermore, central neurologic manifestations of Crohn's disease are not unknown. There is no known disease which better fits into what is occurring in Mad Cow and the spongiform enchephalopathies than bovine tuberculosis and its blood-brain barrier penetrating, virus-like, cell-wall-deficient forms. It is for these reasons that future research needs to be aimed in this direction. PMID:15325025

  15. The Most Common Detected Bacteria in Sputum of Patients with the Acute Exacerbation of COPD

    PubMed Central

    Cukic, Vesna

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: Acute exacerbation of COPD (AECOPD) may be triggered by infection with bacteria or viruses or by environmental pollutants; the cause of about one-third of exacerbations cannot be identified. Objective: To determine the most common bacteria in sputum culture of patients with AECOPD hospitalized in Intensive care unit of Clinic for pulmonary disease and TB “Podhrastovi” in the 2012. Material and methods: This is a retrospective analysis of sputum bacterial cultures of patients with AECOPD treated in the Intensive care unit of Clinic for pulmonary disease and TB “Podhrastovi” during 2012 .year. Each patient was required to give two sputum for bacterial examination. Each patient was treated with antibiotics prior to admission in Clinic “Podhrastovi”. The results of sputum bacterial culture findings are expressed in absolute number and percentage of examined patients. Results: In 2012, 75 patients with AECOPD were treated in Intensive care unit of Clinic for pulmonary disease and TB“Podhrastovi”. 44 (58.66%) of patients had normal –nonpathogenic – usual bacterial flora isolated in sputum cultures, 31 (41.34%) had a pathogen bacteria in sputum culture as follows: 7 had Streptoccocus pneumoniae, 8 had Klebsiella pneumoniae (2 with Streptococcus pneumoniae, one with Acinetobacter baumani) ,4 Escherichia colli, others are one or two cases with other bacteria. Conclusion: Bacterial airway infections play a great role in many, but not in all, of cases of AECOPD. So there is the need to do a sputum bacterial culture examination in each patient with AECOPD and with appropriate antibiotics to contribute to curing of them. PMID:24511262

  16. A Rare Cause of Acute Pancreatitis: Intramural Duodenal Hematoma

    PubMed Central

    Goyal, Hemant; Singla, Umesh; Agrawal, Roli R.

    2012-01-01

    We describe an interesting case of intramural duodenal hematoma in an otherwise healthy male who presented to emergency room with gradually progressive abdominal pain, nausea, and vomiting. This condition was missed on initial evaluation and patient was discharged from emergency room with diagnosis of acute gastritis. After 3 days, patient came back to emergency room and abdominal imaging studies were conducted which showed that patient had intramural duodenal hematoma associated with gastric outlet obstruction and pancreatitis. Hematoma was the cause of acute pancreatitis as pancreatic enzymes levels were normal at the time of first presentation, but later as the hematoma grew in size, it caused compression of pancreas and subsequent elevation of pancreatic enzymes. We experienced a case of pancreatitis which was caused by intramural duodenal hematoma. This case was missed on initial evaluation. We suggest that physicians should be more vigilant about this condition. PMID:23091743

  17. Hydatidosis as a cause of acute appendicitis: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Hajizadeh, Maryam; Ahmadpour, Ehsan; Sadat, Amir Taher Eftekhar; Spotin, Adel

    2013-01-01

    Acute appendicitis is considered the most common cause of emergency surgery in children and young adults. The association between parasitic infections and appendicitis has been widely investigated. Hydatidosis, a zoonotic helminthic disease caused by the larval stage of the Echinococcus granulosus, may cause illness in intermediate hosts, generally human and herbivorous animals. This disease is considered hyper endemic in northwest of Iran and is a serious public health problem. Hydatidosis predominantly is located in internal organs especially liver and lung but is considered a rare cause of acute appendicitis. Our aim was to study hydatid cyst that causes appendicitis. In this retrospective descriptive, 275 appendectomies performed during the years 2007-2012 in Tabriz Emam Reza hospital. Depending on the clinical notes, serological method, laboratory, surgical findings and attention to the histopathologic results, we found a patient with appendiceal hydatidosis. Acute appendicitis of hydatidosis origin is not seen frequently even in the hyper endemic area. Therefore, described an unusual cases of hydatidosis, should be considered in the differential diagnoses of appendicitis also education on how to prevent hydatidosis and eradication of stray dogs should be included in training programs to avoid and decrease the appendectomy operations.

  18. Thermophilic bacteria: a new cause of human disease.

    PubMed Central

    Rabkin, C S; Galaid, E I; Hollis, D G; Weaver, R E; Dees, S B; Kai, A; Moss, C W; Sandhu, K K; Broome, C V

    1985-01-01

    We studied a group of 31 bacterial isolates from clinical specimens, received by the Centers for Disease Control since 1961, which have been denoted thermophilic for their unusual ability to grow at 50 degrees C. Microbiological characteristics were determined for the group, and an assessment of their clinical significance was made based on retrospective chart review. These bacteria are all gram-negative, nonfermentative, nonsporulating rods, most of which grow better at 42 or 50 degrees C than at 35 degrees C. Some of the bacteria could be implicated as the etiological agents for meningitis, endocarditis, and septicemia. Thermophilic bacteria should be considered potential pathogens when isolated from appropriate clinical specimens. PMID:3988899

  19. Scrotoschisis: A rare cause of acute scrotum in neonates

    PubMed Central

    Pujar, Vijay C.; Joshi, Shirin S.; Singh, Dinesh R.

    2015-01-01

    Spontaneous extrusion of the testis from the scrotum is a very rare cause of acute scrotum in neonates. It has been described as scrotoschisis in few case reports. The exact etiology of this condition is not known. Replacing the testes and repair of scrotum is needed and associated with good prognosis. We report two cases that presented in a short interval to us with a review of the literature. PMID:26166976

  20. Acute Unilateral Vestibular Failure Does Not Cause Spatial Hemineglect

    PubMed Central

    Conrad, Julian; Habs, Maximilian; Brandt, Thomas; Dieterich, Marianne

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Visuo-spatial neglect and vestibular disorders have common clinical findings and involve the same cortical areas. We questioned (1) whether visuo-spatial hemineglect is not only a disorder of spatial attention but may also reflect a disorder of higher cortical vestibular function and (2) whether a vestibular tone imbalance due to an acute peripheral dysfunction can also cause symptoms of neglect or extinction. Therefore, patients with an acute unilateral peripheral vestibular failure (VF) were tested for symptoms of hemineglect. Methods Twenty-eight patients with acute VF were assessed for signs of vestibular deficits and spatial neglect using clinical measures and various common standardized paper-pencil tests. Neglect severity was evaluated further with the Center of Cancellation method. Pathological neglect test scores were correlated with the degree of vestibular dysfunction determined by the subjective visual vertical and caloric testing. Results Three patients showed isolated pathological scores in one or the other neglect test, either ipsilesionally or contralesionally to the VF. None of the patients fulfilled the diagnostic criteria of spatial hemineglect or extinction. Conclusions A vestibular tone imbalance due to unilateral failure of the vestibular endorgan does not cause spatial hemineglect, but evidence indicates it causes mild attentional deficits in both visual hemifields. PMID:26247469

  1. Metabolic profiling of biofilm bacteria known to cause microbial influenced corrosion.

    PubMed

    Beale, D J; Morrison, P D; Key, C; Palombo, E A

    2014-01-01

    This study builds upon previous research that demonstrated the simplicity of obtaining metabolite profiles of bacteria in urban water networks, by using the metabolic profile of bacteria extracted from a reticulation pipe biofilm, which is known to cause microbial influenced corrosion (MIC). The extracellular metabolites of the isolated bacteria, and those bacteria in consortium, were analysed in isolation, and after exposure to low levels of copper. Applying chemometric analytical methodologies to the metabolomic data, we were able to better understand the profile of the isolated biofilm bacteria, which were differentiated according to their activity and copper exposure. It was found that the metabolic activity of the isolated bacteria and the bacteria in consortium varied according to the bacterium's ability to metabolise copper. This demonstrates the power of metabolomic techniques for the discrimination of water reticulation biofilms comprising similar bacteria in consortium, but undergoing different physico-chemical activities, such as corrosion and corrosion inhibition. PMID:24434961

  2. Fluid overload and acute kidney injury: cause or consequence?

    PubMed

    Ostermann, Marlies; Straaten, Heleen M Oudemans-van; Forni, Lui G

    2015-01-01

    There is increasing evidence that fluid overload and acute kidney injury (AKI) are associated but the exact cause-effect relationship remains unclear. Wang and colleagues analysed patients admitted to 30 intensive care units in China and found that fluid accumulation was independently associated with an increased risk of AKI and mortality. This commentary focuses on the close pathophysiological link between AKI and fluid overload and discusses the implications for clinical practice. It outlines some of the challenges, including the difficulty in diagnosing fluid overload reliably with current methods, and stresses the importance of personalised fluid therapy with physiological end-points to avoid the deleterious effects of fluid overload. PMID:26707872

  3. Patho-epigenetics of Infectious Diseases Caused by Intracellular Bacteria.

    PubMed

    Niller, Hans Helmut; Minarovits, Janos

    2016-01-01

    In multicellular eukaryotes including plants, animals and humans, epigenetic reprogramming may play a role in the pathogenesis of a wide variety of diseases. Recent studies revealed that in addition to viruses, pathogenic bacteria are also capable to dysregulate the epigenetic machinery of their target cells. In this chapter we focus on epigenetic alterations induced by bacteria infecting humans. Most of them are obligate or facultative intracellular bacteria that produce either bacterial toxins and surface proteins targeting the host cell membrane, or synthesise effector proteins entering the host cell nucleus. These bacterial products typically elicit histone modifications, i.e. alter the "histone code". Bacterial pathogens are capable to induce alterations of host cell DNA methylation patterns, too. Such changes in the host cell epigenotype and gene expression pattern may hinder the antibacterial immune response and create favourable conditions for bacterial colonization, growth, or spread. Epigenetic dysregulation mediated by bacterial products may also facilitate the production of inflammatory cytokines and other inflammatory mediators affecting the epigenotype of their target cells. Such indirect epigenetic changes as well as direct interference with the epigenetic machinery of the host cells may contribute to the initiation and progression of malignant tumors associated with distinct bacterial infections. PMID:26659266

  4. A rare cause of acute flaccid paralysis: Human coronaviruses

    PubMed Central

    Turgay, Cokyaman; Emine, Tekin; Ozlem, Koken; Muhammet, S. Paksu; Haydar, A. Tasdemir

    2015-01-01

    Acute flaccid paralysis (AFP) is a life-threatening clinical entity characterized by weakness in the whole body muscles often accompanied by respiratory and bulbar paralysis. The most common cause is Gullian–Barre syndrome, but infections, spinal cord diseases, neuromuscular diseases such as myasthenia gravis, drugs and toxins, periodic hypokalemic paralysis, electrolyte disturbances, and botulism should be considered as in the differential diagnosis. Human coronaviruses (HCoVs) cause common cold, upper and lower respiratory tract disease, but in the literature presentation with the lower respiratory tract infection and AFP has not been reported previously. In this study, pediatric case admitted with lower respiratory tract infection and AFP, who detected for HCoV 229E and OC43 co-infection by the real-time polymerase chain reaction, has been reported for the first time. PMID:26557177

  5. A rare cause of acute flaccid paralysis: Human coronaviruses.

    PubMed

    Turgay, Cokyaman; Emine, Tekin; Ozlem, Koken; Muhammet, S Paksu; Haydar, A Tasdemir

    2015-01-01

    Acute flaccid paralysis (AFP) is a life-threatening clinical entity characterized by weakness in the whole body muscles often accompanied by respiratory and bulbar paralysis. The most common cause is Gullian-Barre syndrome, but infections, spinal cord diseases, neuromuscular diseases such as myasthenia gravis, drugs and toxins, periodic hypokalemic paralysis, electrolyte disturbances, and botulism should be considered as in the differential diagnosis. Human coronaviruses (HCoVs) cause common cold, upper and lower respiratory tract disease, but in the literature presentation with the lower respiratory tract infection and AFP has not been reported previously. In this study, pediatric case admitted with lower respiratory tract infection and AFP, who detected for HCoV 229E and OC43 co-infection by the real-time polymerase chain reaction, has been reported for the first time. PMID:26557177

  6. Chronic Recurrent Multifocal Osteomyelitis Causing an Acute Scoliosis

    PubMed Central

    Upadhyay, Neil; Pryce, Damian

    2013-01-01

    Study Design. A Case Report. Objective. We present a 15-year-old girl with an acute atypical scoliosis secondary to chronic recurrent multifocal osteomyelitis (CRMO). Summary of Background Data. CRMO is a rare nonpyogenic inflammatory bone condition with unclear aetiology. CRMO mainly affects the metaphyses of long bones, the pelvis, shoulder girdle, and less commonly the spine. Methods. Our case presented with a 6-month history of worsening thoracic back pain, asymmetry of her shoulders and abnormal posture. Whole spine radiographs revealed a right atypical thoracic scoliosis. Magnetic Resonance Imaging showed abnormal signal on the short TI inversion recovery (STIR) sequences in multiple vertebrae. A bone biopsy demonstrated evidence of fibrosis and chronic inflammatory changes. Interval MRI scans revealed new oedematous lesions and disappearance of old lesions. Symptoms improved. Results. It is important to consider CRMO as an acute cause of atypical scoliosis. Malignancy, pyogenic infections and atypical presentations of juvenile arthritis need excluding. Conclusion. This 24-month follow-up describes a rare cause of an atypical scoliosis and fortifies the small amount of the currently available literature. The case highlights the relapsing and remitting nature of CRMO with new lesions developing and older lesions burning out. We advise close radiological surveillance and symptomatic management. PMID:23997974

  7. Acute gastroenteritis outbreak caused by a GII.6 norovirus

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Ling-Fei; Qiao, Kun; Wang, Xiao-Guang; Ding, Ke-Ying; Su, Hua-Ling; Li, Cui-Zhen; Yan, Hong-Jing

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To report an acute gastroenteritis outbreak caused by a genogroup 2 genotype 6 (GII.6) strain norovirus in Shanghai, China. METHODS: Noroviruses are responsible for approximately half of all reported gastroenteritis outbreaks in many countries. Genogroup 2 genotype 4 strains are the most prevalent. Rare outbreaks caused by GII.6 strains have been reported. An acute gastroenteritis outbreak occurred in an elementary school in Shanghai in December of 2013. Field and molecular epidemiologic investigations were conducted. RESULTS: The outbreak was limited to one class in an elementary school located in southwest Shanghai. The age of the students ranged from 9 to 10 years. The first case emerged on December 10, 2013, and the last case emerged on December 14, 2013. The cases peaked on December 11, 2013, with 21 new cases. Of 45 students in the class, 32 were affected. The main symptom was gastroenteritis, and 15.6% (5/32) of the cases exhibited a fever. A field epidemiologic investigation showed the pathogen may have been transmitted to the elementary school from employees in a delicatessen via the first case student, who had eaten food from the delicatessen one day before the gastroenteritis episodes began. A molecular epidemiologic investigation identified the cause of the gastroenteritis as norovirus strain GII.6; the viral sequence of the student cases showed 100% homology with that of the shop employees. Genetic relatedness analyses showed that the new viral strain is closely related to previously reported GII.6 sequences, especially to a strain reported in Japan. CONCLUSION: This is the first report to show that norovirus strain GII.6 can cause a gastroenteritis outbreak. Thus, the prevalence of GII.6 noroviruses requires attention. PMID:25954103

  8. Wound Infections Caused by Vibrio vulnificus and Other Marine Bacteria Author(s): J. D. Oliver

    E-print Network

    Fernandez, Eduardo

    Wound Infections Caused by Vibrio vulnificus and Other Marine Bacteria Author(s): J. D. Oliver by other marine vibrios, and the increasingly reportedwound/skin infections caused by Mycobacterium marinum,Erysipelothrixrhusiopathiae,and Aeromonashydrophila. WOUND INFECTIONS CAUSED BY MARINE VIBRIO SPECIES Almost all persons who develop vibrio wound in

  9. Acute myocardial infarction caused by blast injury of the chest.

    PubMed Central

    Keren, A; Stessman, J; Tzivoni, D

    1981-01-01

    A 51-year-old healthy man was hit in the chest by the shock-waves generated by an explosion, without being injured by any physical object. He felt immediate chest pain, but, in spite of electrocardiographic tracings highly suspicious for an acute anteroseptal infarction in the emergency room, he was discharged from hospital. The electrocardiogram recorded three weeks later was pathognomonic of anteroseptal infarction. Coronary arteriography performed four months later showed a complete obstruction of the left anterior descending coronary artery, with retrograde filling from the right coronary artery. It is assumed that the myocardial infarction was caused by the blast injury which induced an intimal tear and/or a subintimal haemorrhage in the left anterior descending artery with subsequent thrombosis. The lack of atherosclerosis in any other coronary arteries in this patient is noteworthy. Images PMID:7295443

  10. Omental torsion, a rare cause of acute abdomen.

    PubMed

    Joshi, Shivani; Cuthbert, Gary Andrew; Kerwat, Rajab

    2016-01-01

    Omental torsion is a rare cause of acute abdominal pain. We report a case of omental torsion in a 7-year-old girl, who presented with right iliac fossa pain. The patient underwent an open appendicectomy, during which a normal appendix was identified and a diagnosis of omental torsion was made. The affected segment of omentum was resected along with the appendix. The patient made an uncomplicated recovery and was discharged on day 1 postoperatively. A normal appendix in the presence of omental torsion is found in 0.1% of all appendicectomies in children. We suggest routine visualisation of the omentum in the presence of a normal appendix during appendicectomy. PMID:26733432

  11. Acute Liver Failure Caused by Amanita phalloides Poisoning

    PubMed Central

    Santi, Luca; Maggioli, Caterina; Mastroroberto, Marianna; Tufoni, Manuel; Napoli, Lucia; Caraceni, Paolo

    2012-01-01

    Mushroom poisoning is a relatively rare cause of acute liver failure (ALF). The present paper analyzes the pathogenesis, clinical features, prognostic indicators, and therapeutic strategies of ALF secondary to ingestion of Amanita phalloides, which represents the most common and deadly cause of mushroom poisoning. Liver damage from Amanita phalloides is related to the amanitins, powerful toxins that inhibit RNA polymerase II resulting in a deficient protein synthesis and cell necrosis. After an asymptomatic lag phase, the clinical picture is characterized by gastrointestinal symptoms, followed by the liver and kidney involvement. Amatoxin poisoning may progress into ALF and eventually death if liver transplantation is not performed. The mortality rate after Amanita phalloides poisoning ranges from 10 to 20%. The management of amatoxin poisoning consists of preliminary medical care, supportive measures, detoxification therapies, and orthotopic liver transplantation. The clinical efficacy of any modality of treatment is difficult to demonstrate since randomized, controlled clinical trials have not been reported. The use of extracorporeal liver assist devices as well as auxiliary liver transplantation may represent additional therapeutic options. PMID:22811920

  12. Acute Liver Failure Caused by Amanita phalloides Poisoning.

    PubMed

    Santi, Luca; Maggioli, Caterina; Mastroroberto, Marianna; Tufoni, Manuel; Napoli, Lucia; Caraceni, Paolo

    2012-01-01

    Mushroom poisoning is a relatively rare cause of acute liver failure (ALF). The present paper analyzes the pathogenesis, clinical features, prognostic indicators, and therapeutic strategies of ALF secondary to ingestion of Amanita phalloides, which represents the most common and deadly cause of mushroom poisoning. Liver damage from Amanita phalloides is related to the amanitins, powerful toxins that inhibit RNA polymerase II resulting in a deficient protein synthesis and cell necrosis. After an asymptomatic lag phase, the clinical picture is characterized by gastrointestinal symptoms, followed by the liver and kidney involvement. Amatoxin poisoning may progress into ALF and eventually death if liver transplantation is not performed. The mortality rate after Amanita phalloides poisoning ranges from 10 to 20%. The management of amatoxin poisoning consists of preliminary medical care, supportive measures, detoxification therapies, and orthotopic liver transplantation. The clinical efficacy of any modality of treatment is difficult to demonstrate since randomized, controlled clinical trials have not been reported. The use of extracorporeal liver assist devices as well as auxiliary liver transplantation may represent additional therapeutic options. PMID:22811920

  13. Acute toxicity assessment of ANAMMOX substrates and antibiotics by luminescent bacteria test.

    PubMed

    Ding, Shuang; Wu, Junwei; Zhang, Meng; Lu, Huifeng; Mahmood, Qaisar; Zheng, Ping

    2015-12-01

    Acute toxicities of anaerobic ammonia oxidation (ANAMMOX) substrates and four antibiotics from pharmaceutical wastewaters on ANAMMOX process were reported. Individual and joint acute toxicity assays were performed using 50% inhibitory concentration (IC50). Results showed that IC50 values and their 95% confidence interval of ammonium chloride (A), sodium nitrite (B), penicillin G-Na (C), polymyxin B sulfate (D), chloramphenicol (E) and kanamycin sulfate (F) were 2708.9 (2247.9-3169.9), 1475.4 (1269.9-1680.9), 5114.4 (4946.4-5282.4), 10.2 (1.8-18.6), 409.9 (333.7-486.1) and 5254.1 (3934.4-6573.8) mgL(-1) respectively, suggesting toxicities were in the order of D>E>B>A>C>F. Joint acute toxicities of bicomponent mixtures A and B, C and D, C and F, D and F were independent; D and E, E and F were additive while C and E were synergistic. Joint acute toxicities of multicomponent mixtures were synergistic or additive. Luminescent bacteria test is an easy and robust method for forecasting the feasibility of ANAMMOX process for pharmaceutical wastewater treatment. PMID:25912634

  14. Common atrium: a rare cause of acute decompensated heart failure.

    PubMed

    Karaye, K M; Balarabe, S A; Yakasai, M M; Suleiman, I M; Saidu, H; Bonny, Aimé

    2015-01-01

    We report a rare case of common atrium and acute decompensated heart failure most likely precipitated by acute bacterial pericarditis leading to premature death, in a 25-year-old male footballer. The silent course of the disease for decades as well as the diagnostic and management pitfalls of this case illustrates the importance of early detection by echocardiography and urgent appropriate treatment in intensive care settings to limit the poor prognosis of the condition. PMID:25763071

  15. Common Atrium: A Rare Cause of Acute Decompensated Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Karaye, K. M.; Balarabe, S. A.; Yakasai, M. M.; Suleiman, I. M.; Saidu, H.; Bonny, Aimé

    2015-01-01

    We report a rare case of common atrium and acute decompensated heart failure most likely precipitated by acute bacterial pericarditis leading to premature death, in a 25-year-old male footballer. The silent course of the disease for decades as well as the diagnostic and management pitfalls of this case illustrates the importance of early detection by echocardiography and urgent appropriate treatment in intensive care settings to limit the poor prognosis of the condition. PMID:25763071

  16. A case of life-threatening acute kidney injury with toxic encephalopathy caused by Dioscorea quinqueloba.

    PubMed

    Kang, Kyung-Sik; Heo, Sang Taek

    2015-01-01

    Some herbal medications induce acute kidney injury. The acute kidney injuries caused by herbal medications are mild and commonly treated by palliative care. A 51-years-old man who drank the juice squeezed from the raw tubers of Dioscorea quinqueloba (D. quinqueloba) was admitted with nausea, vomiting and chilling. He developed a seizure with decreased level of consciousness. He was diagnosed with acute kidney injury, which was cured by continuous venovenous hemodialfiltration. Non-detoxified D. quinqueloba can cause severe acute kidney injury with toxic encephalopathy. It is critical to inform possible adverse effects of the medicinal herbs and to implement more strict regulation of these products. PMID:25510780

  17. Acute pulmonary hypertension caused by tumor embolism: a report of two cases

    PubMed Central

    Mury, Caroline; Nobile, Antoine; Rotman, Samuel; Liaudet, Lucas

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Acute pulmonary hypertension leading to right ventricular failure and circulatory collapse is usually caused by thromboembolic obstruction of the pulmonary circulation. However, in rare instances, other causes can be associated with a similar clinical presentation. We present and discuss the clinical histories of two patients with acute right ventricular failure due to an atypical cause of pulmonary hypertension, disseminated pulmonary tumor embolism. PMID:26401259

  18. Bath Salts: A Newly Recognized Cause of Acute Kidney Injury

    PubMed Central

    McNeely, Jonathan; Parikh, Samir; Valentine, Christopher; Haddad, Nabil; Shidham, Ganesh; Rovin, Brad; Hebert, Lee; Agarwal, Anil

    2012-01-01

    Bath salts are substance of abuse that are becoming more common and are difficult to recognize due to negative toxicology screening. Acute kidney injury due to bath salt use has not previously been described. We present the case of a previously healthy male who developed acute kidney injury and dialysis dependence after bath salt ingestion and insufflation. This was self-reported with negative toxicology screening. Clinical course was marked by severe hyperthermia, hyperkalemia, rhabdomyolysis, disseminated intravascular coagulation, oliguria, and sepsis. We discuss signs and symptoms, differential diagnoses, potential mechanisms of injury, management, and review of the literature related to bath salt toxicity. PMID:24555135

  19. In vitro growth inhibition of mastitis causing bacteria by phenolics and metal chelators

    SciTech Connect

    Chew, B.P.; Tjoelker, L.W.; Tanaka, T.S.

    1985-11-01

    Antimicrobial activities of three phenolic compounds and four metal chelators were tested at 0, 250, 500, and 1000 ppm in vitro against four major mastitis-causing bacteria, Streptococcus agalactiae, Staphylococcus aureus, Klebsiella pnuemoniae, and Escherichia coli. Overall, butylated hydroxyanisole and tert-butylhydroquinone showed the greatest antimicrobial activity. These phenolics were bactericidal at 250 to 500 ppm against all four bacteria tested. The butylated hydroxytoluene was bactericidal against the gram-positive bacteria but was ineffective against the coliforms. At 250 ppm, disodium ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid was bactericidal against the gram-positive bacteria but much less effective against the gram-negatives. However, diethylene-triaminepentaacetic acid was more growth inhibitory than ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid against the gram-negative bacteria and especially against Escherichia coli. All other compounds were generally much less effective or ineffective against all four microorganisms. Therefore, butylated hydroxyanisole, butylated hydroxytoluene, tert-butylhydroquinone, ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid, and diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid may have practical implications in the prevention or treatment of bovine mastitis.

  20. Ectopic mediastinal parathyroid adenoma: a cause of acute pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Imachi, Hitomi; Murao, Koji; Kontani, Keiichi; Yokomise, Hiroyasu; Miyai, Yumi; Yamamoto, Yuka; Kushida, Yoshio; Haba, Reiji; Ishida, Toshihiko

    2009-10-01

    A 38-year-old male was admitted to our hospital with epigastric pain, and he was confirmed to have acute exudative pancreatitis. After the episode of acute pancreatitis subsided, laboratory investigation revealed increased serum calcium (12.0 mg/dl), decreased serum phosphorus (2.7 mg/dl), and increased serum parathyroid hormone (intact) levels (131 pg/ml). A computed tomography (CT) scan of the neck did not reveal any mass lesions in the parathyroid gland. However, (99m)Tc sestamibi scintigraphy revealed that there was one functioning parathyroid gland in the upper mediastinum. Combined (99m)Tc sestamibi scintigraphy and CT scan confirmed the diagnosis of primary hyperparathyroidism in the mediastinum. Microscopic examination revealed the presence of a parathyroid adenoma (1.3 x 0.4 cm(2)) adjacent to the atrophic parathyroid gland in right thymus gland. We report the case of a patient diagnosed with primary hyperparathyroidism due to an ectopic mediastinal parathyroid adenoma. An ectopic mediastinal parathyroid adenoma may manifest as an episode of acute pancreatitis. Preoperative investigation to determine the exact location of an adenoma should include two types of imaging studies, preferably (99m)Tc sestamibi scintigraphy and CT of the neck and chest. PMID:19598003

  1. Surgical and interventional management of complications caused by acute pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Karakayali, Feza Y

    2014-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis is one of the most common gastrointestinal disorders worldwide. It requires acute hospitalization, with a reported annual incidence of 13 to 45 cases per 100000 persons. In severe cases there is persistent organ failure and a mortality rate of 15% to 30%, whereas mortality of mild pancreatitis is only 0% to 1%. Treatment principles of necrotizing pancreatitis and the role of surgery are still controversial. Despite surgery being effective for infected pancreatic necrosis, it carries the risk of long-term endocrine and exocrine deficiency and a morbidity and mortality rate of between 10% to 40%. Considering high morbidity and mortality rates of operative necrosectomy, minimally invasive strategies are being explored by gastrointestinal surgeons, radiologists, and gastroenterologists. Since 1999, several other minimally invasive surgical, endoscopic, and radiologic approaches to drain and debride pancreatic necrosis have been described. In patients who do not improve after technically adequate drainage, necrosectomy should be performed. When minimal invasive management is unsuccessful or necrosis has spread to locations not accessible by endoscopy, open abdominal surgery is recommended. Additionally, surgery is recognized as a major determinant of outcomes for acute pancreatitis, and there is general agreement that patients should undergo surgery in the late phase of the disease. It is important to consider multidisciplinary management, considering the clinical situation and the comorbidity of the patient, as well as the surgeons experience. PMID:25309073

  2. Ileo-ileal knotting as an uncommon cause of acute intestinal obstruction

    PubMed Central

    Abebe, Engida; Asmare, Biruhtesfa; Addise, Abebe

    2015-01-01

    Small bowel obstruction (SBO) is one of the most common acute surgical conditions that require urgent evaluation and treatment. Several common causes are known in the general surgical practice, and the causes are different in the developing and developed world. In this article, we present a case of an acute SBO secondary to ileo-ileal knotting in a 50 years old Ethiopian female patient. The diagnostic difficulty and the need for urgent treatment of the condition are discussed. PMID:26251466

  3. Löffler endocarditis: a rare cause of acute cardiac failure.

    PubMed

    Niemeijer, Nicolasine D; van Daele, Paul L A; Caliskan, Kadir; Oei, Frans B S; Loosveld, Olaf J L; van der Meer, Nardo J M

    2012-01-01

    We describe a patient with acute cardiogenic shock due to cardiac involvement in idiopathic hypereosinophilic syndrome (Löffler endocarditis). At the echocardiography, there was a huge mass in the left ventricular cavity, resulting in inflow- and outflow tract obstruction. The posterior leaflet of the mitral valve apparatus was completely embedded in a big (organized) thrombus mass. The patient was treated with high dose corticosteroids, however without effect. Partial remission was achieved after treatment with hydroxycarbamide. He was also treated with anticoagulants and high dose beta-blockers. The patient's condition improved remarkably after correction of the mitral valve insufficiency by a mitral valve bioprosthesis. PMID:23046536

  4. Unusual cause of acute mitral regurgitation: idiopathic hypereosinophilic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Madhwal, Surabhi; Goldberg, Jonathan; Barcena, Julio; Guha, Avirup; Gogate, Prema; Cmolik, Brian; Elgudin, Yakov

    2012-03-01

    Idiopathic hypereosinophilic syndrome (HES) is a rare multisystem condition characterized by dysregulated overproduction of eosinophils. Cardiac involvement in HES is characterized by necrosis from infiltration of eosinophils and thrombus formation and, in the late stage, by fibrosis and chronic valvular regurgitation. We report a very unusual presentation of idiopathic HES with acute mitral regurgitation due to papillary muscle rupture. The transesophageal echocardiogram was suggestive of a flail posterior leaflet and suspicious for endocarditis. Intraoperatively, papillary muscle rupture was seen and the patient underwent mitral valve replacement. The pathologic examination of the valve revealed eosinophilic infiltration of the papillary muscle. The patient was treated with steroids and responded well clinically. PMID:22364989

  5. Acute Compartment Syndrome in Orthopedics: Causes, Diagnosis, and Management

    PubMed Central

    Raza, Hasnain; Mahapatra, Anant

    2015-01-01

    Almost all orthopaedic surgeons come across acute compartment syndrome (ACS) in their clinical practice. Diagnosis of ACS mostly relies on clinical findings. If the diagnosis is missed and left untreated, it can lead to serious consequences which can endanger limb and life of the patient and also risk the clinician to face lawsuits. This review article highlights the characteristic features of ACS which will help an orthopaedic surgeon to understand the pathophysiology, natural history, high risk patients, diagnosis, and surgical management of the condition. PMID:25688303

  6. Factors promoting acute and chronic diseases caused by yersiniae.

    PubMed Central

    Brubaker, R R

    1991-01-01

    The experimental system constructed with the medically significant yersiniae provides a powerful basic model for comparative study of factors required for expression of acute versus chronic disease. The system exploits the close genetic similarity between Yersinia pestis, the etiological agent of bubonic plague, and enteropathogenic Yersinia pseudotuberculosis and Yersinia enterocolitica. Y. pestis possesses three plasmids, of which one, shared by the enteropathogenic species, mediates a number of virulence factors that directly or indirectly promote survival within macrophages and immunosuppression. The two remaining plasmids are unique and encode functions that promote acute disease by enhancing bacterial dissemination in tissues and resistance to phagocytosis by neutrophils and monocytes. These properties are replaced in the enteropathogenic yersiniae by host cell invasins and an adhesin which promote chronic disease; the latter are cryptic in Y. pestis. Additional distinctions include specific mutational losses in Y. pestis which result in loss of fitness in natural environments plus gain of properties that facilitate transmission and infection via fleabite. Images PMID:1889045

  7. Neutrophil extracellular traps formation by bacteria causing endometritis in the mare.

    PubMed

    Rebordão, M R; Carneiro, C; Alexandre-Pires, G; Brito, P; Pereira, C; Nunes, T; Galvão, A; Leitão, A; Vilela, C; Ferreira-Dias, G

    2014-12-01

    Besides the classical functions, neutrophils (PMNs) are able to release DNA in response to infectious stimuli, forming neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) and killing pathogens. The pathogenesis of endometritis in the mare is not completely understood. The aim was to evaluate the in vitro capacity of equine PMNs to secrete NETs by chemical activation, or stimulated with Streptococcus equi subspecies zooepidemicus (Szoo), Escherichia coli (Ecoli) or Staphylococcus capitis (Scap) strains obtained from mares with endometritis. Ex vivo endometrial mucus from mares with bacterial endometritis were evaluated for the presence of NETs. Equine blood PMNs were used either without or with stimulation by phorbol-myristate-acetate (PMA), a strong inducer of NETs, for 1-3h. To evaluate PMN ability to produce NETs when phagocytosis was impaired, the phagocytosis inhibitor cytochalasin (Cyt) was added after PMA. After the addition of bacteria, a subsequent 1-h incubation was carried out in seven groups. NETs were visualized by 4',6-diamidino-2-phenylindole (DAPI) and anti-histone. Ex vivo samples were immunostained for myeloperoxidase and neutrophil elastase. A 3-h incubation period of PMN + PMA increased NETs (p < 0.05). Bacteria + 25 nM PMA and bacteria + PMA + Cyt increased NETs (p<0.05). Szoo induced fewer NETs than Ecoli or Scap (p < 0.05). Ex vivo NETs were present in mares with endometritis. Scanning electron microscopy showed the spread of NETs formed by smooth fibers and globules that can be aggregated in thick bundles. Formation of NETs and the subsequent entanglement of bacteria suggest that equine NETs might be a complementary mechanism in fighting some of the bacteria causing endometritis in the mare. PMID:25218891

  8. [Acute lung injury caused by inhalation of waterproofing spray].

    PubMed

    Tagawa, Akihiro; Ikehara, Kunihiko; Tsuburai, Takahiro; Nishiyama, Harumi; Miyazawa, Naoki; Hashiba, Tomonori; Suzuki, Motoyoshi; Suzuki, Shunsuke; Ishigatsubo, Yoshiaki

    2003-02-01

    A 55-year-old man was admitted to our hospital because of severe dyspnea 30 minutes after inhalation of waterproofing spray. He had used the spray outdoors and had then smoked a cigarette with spray-contaminated fingers. Chest radiography and computed tomography (CT) revealed diffuse ground glass opacities in both lungs. In pulmonary function tests, the lungs showed a moderately decreased diffusing capacity and there was slight hypoxemia. Transbronchial lung biopsy specimens demonstrated extensive alveolitis and marked eosinophil migration. Without any specific treatment, the patient recovered clinically in 4 days. We speculated that acute lung injury in this patient may have been induced by not only direct inhalation of the waterproofing spray itself, but also by inhalation of spray by-products resulting from decomposition due to heat. When waterproofing spray is used, precautions should be taken to avoid both inhalation and heating of the fumes. PMID:12722332

  9. Acute radiation syndrome caused by accidental radiation exposure - therapeutic principles

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Fortunately radiation accidents are infrequent occurrences, but since they have the potential of large scale events like the nuclear accidents of Chernobyl and Fukushima, preparatory planning of the medical management of radiation accident victims is very important. Radiation accidents can result in different types of radiation exposure for which the diagnostic and therapeutic measures, as well as the outcomes, differ. The clinical course of acute radiation syndrome depends on the absorbed radiation dose and its distribution. Multi-organ-involvement and multi-organ-failure need be taken into account. The most vulnerable organ system to radiation exposure is the hematopoietic system. In addition to hematopoietic syndrome, radiation induced damage to the skin plays an important role in diagnostics and the treatment of radiation accident victims. The most important therapeutic principles with special reference to hematopoietic syndrome and cutaneous radiation syndrome are reviewed. PMID:22114866

  10. [An unusual cause of acute pyelonephritis: the retrocaval ureter].

    PubMed

    Rossi, Luigi; Lisi, Piero; Vigo, Valentina; Lomonte, Carlo; Basile, Carlo

    2015-01-01

    Retrocaval ureter is a rare congenital malformation in which the proximal right ureter courses toward the midline on the posterior aspect of the inferior vena cava before emerging medial and anterior to this structure and then descending into the pelvis. This anatomical anomaly may be asymptomatic or manifest clinically, usually starting from the fourth decade of life, with flank pain, pyelonephritis, gross hematuria or other rarer signs. We describe the case of a young woman being hospitalized because of acute pyelonephritis; she had previously complained of flank pain associated with episodes of high fever. Computed tomography of the abdomen identified the malformation. The patient underwent surgical correction by laparoscopy and, at one year of follow-up, did not show any further clinical problem. PMID:26252261

  11. Do We Know What Causes Acute Myeloid Leukemia?

    MedlinePLUS

    ... cancer. Scientists have learned how certain changes in DNA can cause normal bone marrow cells to become ... each cell’s chromosomes. Chromosomes are long strands of DNA in each cell. The DNA inside our cells ...

  12. Draft Genome Sequence of Vibrio owensii Strain SH-14, Which Causes Shrimp Acute Hepatopancreatic Necrosis Disease

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Liyuan; Xiao, Jinzhou; Xia, Xiaoming; Pan, Yingjie; Yan, Shuling

    2015-01-01

    We sequenced Vibrio owensii strain SH-14, which causes serious acute hepatopancreatic necrosis disease (AHPND) in shrimp. Sequence analysis showed a large extrachromosomal plasmid, which encoded pir toxin genes and shared highly sequence similarity with the one observed in AHPND-causing Vibrio parahaemolyticus strains. The results suggest that this plasmid appears to play an important role in shrimp AHPND. PMID:26634753

  13. Bath salt intoxication causing acute kidney injury requiring hemodialysis.

    PubMed

    Regunath, Hariharan; Ariyamuthu, Venkatesh Kumar; Dalal, Pranavkumar; Misra, Madhukar

    2012-10-01

    Traditional bath salts contain a combination of inorganic salts like Epsom salts, table salt, baking soda, sodium metaphosphate, and borax that have cleansing properties. Since 2010, there have been rising concerns about a new type of substance abuse in the name of "bath salts." They are beta-ketone amphetamine analogs and are derivates of cathinone, a naturally occurring amphetamine analog found in the "khat" plant (Catha edulis). Effects reported with intake included increased energy, empathy, openness, and increased libido. Serious adverse effects reported with intoxication included cardiac, psychiatric, and neurological signs and symptoms. Not much is known about the toxicology and metabolism of these compounds. They inhibit monoamine reuptake (dopamine, nor epinephrine, etc.) and act as central nervous system stimulants with high additive and abuse potential because of their clinical and biochemical similarities to effects from use of cocaine, amphetamine, and 3,4-methylenedioxy-N-methylamphetamine. Deaths associated with use of these compounds have also been reported. We report a case of acute kidney injury associated with the use of "bath salt" pills that improved with hemodialysis. PMID:23036036

  14. Extraordinary cause of acute gastric dilatation and hepatic portal venous gas: Chronic use of synthetic cannabinoid

    PubMed Central

    Sevinc, Mert Mahsuni; Kinaci, Erdem; Bayrak, Savas; Yardimci, Aytul Hande; Cakar, Ekrem; Bekta?, Hasan

    2015-01-01

    Addiction to synthetic cannabinoids (SCs) is a growing social and health problem worldwide. Chronic use of SCs may cause adverse effects in the gastrointestinal system. We describe a very rare case of acute gastric dilatation (AGD) and hepatic portal venous gas (HPVG), with findings of acute abdomen resulting from chronic use of a SC, Bonzai. AGD and HPVG were detected by computerized tomography examination. Patchy mucosal ischemia was seen in endoscopic examination. Despite the findings of an acute abdomen, a non-surgical approach with nasogastric decompression, antibiotic therapy, and close radiologic and endoscopic follow-up was preferred in the presented case. Clinical and radiologic findings decreased dramatically on the first day, and endoscopic findings gradually disappeared over 7 d. In conclusion, this case shows that chronic use of a SC may cause AGD and accompanying HPVG, which can be managed non-surgically despite the findings of acute abdomen. PMID:26457032

  15. Palatal tremor as a manifestation of epilepsia partialis continua caused by acute precentral gyral infarction.

    PubMed

    Jung, Hyun-Jung; Choi, Seong-Min; Lee, Jong-Kyung; Lee, Seung-Han; Kim, Byeong C

    2013-10-01

    We describe a patient with palatal tremor (PT) as a manifestation of focal seizure caused by acute cortical infarction. Brain MRI showed acute infarction in the left precentral gyrus without evidence of brainstem lesions or hypertrophy of the inferior olivary nucleus. We discuss the differences between our patient and previous reports of symptomatic PT and the mechanisms involved in the development of PT associated with cortical lesions. PMID:23647708

  16. [Myocardial involvement in rhabdomyolysis caused by acute heroin intoxication].

    PubMed

    Melandri, R; De Tommaso, I; Zele, I; Rizzoli, D; Rapezzi, C; Pezzilli, R; Re, G; Fontana, G

    1991-06-01

    It is well known that heroin overdose may cause rhabdomyolysis. Sometimes a myocardial involvement complicates its course. We report a case of heroin intoxication followed by rhabdomyolysis associated with myocardial injury, with symptoms, laboratory findings, ECG and echocardiography features of non-Q wave infarction. However, a 201 Tl myocardial scintigraphy, performed after patient discharging, did not show any abnormality. We think that heroin has a direct myotoxic effect on both myocardium and skeletal muscle. Yet we cannot exclude that hypoxia, acidosis, vasoconstrictive substances released by muscle necrosis, or hypersensitivity reactions associated with heroin or some of its adulterants are involved in myocardial injury. PMID:1924987

  17. Subcutaneous Emphysema in Acute Asthma: A Cause for Concern?

    PubMed

    Mitchell, Patrick D; King, Thomas J; O'Shea, Donal B

    2015-08-01

    Pneumomediastinum has been described in patients with asthma. In this case report, we describe a young patient who presented to our medical assessment unit with an asthma exacerbation and progressive dyspnea. The patient developed pneumomediastinum, a rare complication of an asthma exacerbation. Pneumomediastinum is usually characterized by chest pain, dyspnea, and neck swelling caused by subcutaneous emphysema. Although the condition is usually benign and treatment is primarily supportive, surgical intervention may be needed if the patient develops hemodynamic compromise or respiratory failure through mechanisms similar to those seen in a tension pneumothorax. PMID:25605959

  18. White Band Disease (type I) of Endangered Caribbean Acroporid Corals is Caused by Pathogenic Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Kline, David I.; Vollmer, Steven V.

    2011-01-01

    Diseases affecting coral reefs have increased exponentially over the last three decades and contributed to their decline, particularly in the Caribbean. In most cases, the responsible pathogens have not been isolated, often due to the difficulty in isolating and culturing marine bacteria. White Band Disease (WBD) has caused unprecedented declines in the Caribbean acroporid corals, resulting in their listings as threatened on the US Threatened and Endangered Species List and critically endangered on the IUCN Red List. Yet, despite the importance of WBD, the probable pathogen(s) have not yet been determined. Here we present in situ transmission data from a series of filtrate and antibiotic treatments of disease tissue that indicate that WBD is contagious and caused by bacterial pathogen(s). Additionally our data suggest that Ampicillin could be considered as a treatment for WBD (type I). PMID:22355526

  19. Binding to histo-blood group antigen-expressing bacteria protects human norovirus from acute heat stress

    PubMed Central

    Li, Dan; Breiman, Adrien; le Pendu, Jacques; Uyttendaele, Mieke

    2015-01-01

    This study aims to investigate if histo-blood group antigen (HBGA) expressing bacteria have any protective role on human norovirus (NoV) from acute heat stress. Eleven bacterial strains were included, belonging to Escherichia coli, Enterobacter cloacae, Enterobacter aerogenes, Clostridium difficile, Bifidobacterium adolescentis, and B. longum. HBGA expression of the bacteria as well as binding of human NoV virus-like particles (VLPs, GI.1, and GII.4 strains) to the bacteria were detected by flow cytometry. NoV VLPs pre-incubated with HBGA expressing or non-HBGA expressing bacteria were heated and detected by both direct ELISA and porcine gastric mucin-binding assay. The NoV-binding abilities of the bacteria correlated well with their HBGA expression profiles. Two HBGA expressing E. coli (LMG8223 and LFMFP861, both GI.1 and GII.4 binders) and one non-HBGA expressing E. coli (ATCC8739, neither GI.1 nor GII.4 binder) were selected for the heat treatment test with NoV VLPs. Compared with the same cell numbers of non-HBGA expressing E. coli, the presence of HBGA-expressing E. coli could always maintain higher antigen integrity, as well as mucin-binding ability of NoV VLPs of both GI.1 and GII.4 after heat-treatment at 90°C for 2 min. These results indicate that HBGA-expressing bacteria may protect NoVs during the food processing treatments, thereby facilitating their transmission. PMID:26191052

  20. Binding to histo-blood group antigen-expressing bacteria protects human norovirus from acute heat stress.

    PubMed

    Li, Dan; Breiman, Adrien; le Pendu, Jacques; Uyttendaele, Mieke

    2015-01-01

    This study aims to investigate if histo-blood group antigen (HBGA) expressing bacteria have any protective role on human norovirus (NoV) from acute heat stress. Eleven bacterial strains were included, belonging to Escherichia coli, Enterobacter cloacae, Enterobacter aerogenes, Clostridium difficile, Bifidobacterium adolescentis, and B. longum. HBGA expression of the bacteria as well as binding of human NoV virus-like particles (VLPs, GI.1, and GII.4 strains) to the bacteria were detected by flow cytometry. NoV VLPs pre-incubated with HBGA expressing or non-HBGA expressing bacteria were heated and detected by both direct ELISA and porcine gastric mucin-binding assay. The NoV-binding abilities of the bacteria correlated well with their HBGA expression profiles. Two HBGA expressing E. coli (LMG8223 and LFMFP861, both GI.1 and GII.4 binders) and one non-HBGA expressing E. coli (ATCC8739, neither GI.1 nor GII.4 binder) were selected for the heat treatment test with NoV VLPs. Compared with the same cell numbers of non-HBGA expressing E. coli, the presence of HBGA-expressing E. coli could always maintain higher antigen integrity, as well as mucin-binding ability of NoV VLPs of both GI.1 and GII.4 after heat-treatment at 90°C for 2 min. These results indicate that HBGA-expressing bacteria may protect NoVs during the food processing treatments, thereby facilitating their transmission. PMID:26191052

  1. Ultrasonography of adnexal causes of acute pelvic pain in pre-menopausal non-pregnant women

    PubMed Central

    Dupuis, Carolyn S.; Kim, Young H.

    2015-01-01

    Acute-onset pelvic pain is an extremely common symptom in premenopausal women presenting to the emergency department. After excluding pregnancy in reproductive-age women, ultrasonography plays a major role in the prompt and accurate diagnosis of adnexal causes of acute pelvic pain, such as hemorrhagic ovarian cysts, endometriosis, ovarian torsion, and tubo-ovarian abscess. Its availability, relatively low cost, and lack of ionizing radiation make ultrasonography an ideal imaging modality in women of reproductive age. The primary goal of imaging in these patients is to distinguish between adnexal causes of acute pelvic pain that may be managed conservatively or medically, and those requiring emergency/urgent surgical or percutaneous intervention. PMID:26062637

  2. Duodenal obstruction following acute pancreatitis caused by a large duodenal diverticular bezoar.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ji Hun; Chang, Jae Hyuck; Nam, Sung Min; Lee, Mi Jeong; Maeng, Il Ho; Park, Jin Young; Im, Yun Sun; Kim, Tae Ho; Park, Il Young; Han, Sok Won

    2012-10-14

    Bezoars are concretions of indigestible materials in the gastrointestinal tract. It generally develops in patients with previous gastric surgery or patients with delayed gastric emptying. Cases of periampullary duodenal divericular bezoar are rare. Clinical manifestations by a bezoar vary from no symptom to acute abdominal syndrome depending on the location of the bezoar. Biliary obstruction or acute pancreatitis caused by a bezoar has been rarely reported. Small bowel obstruction by a bezoar is also rare, but it is a complication that requires surgery. This is a case of acute pancreatitis and subsequent duodenal obstruction caused by a large duodenal bezoar migrating from a periampullary diverticulum to the duodenal lumen, which mimicked pancreatic abscess or microperforation on abdominal computerized tomography. The patient underwent surgical removal of the bezoar and recovered completely. PMID:23082068

  3. Clinical Characteristics and Risk Factors of Pyogenic Spondylitis Caused by Gram-Negative Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Seung-Ji; Jang, Hee-Chang; Jung, Sook-In; Choe, Pyoeng Gyun; Park, Wan Beom; Kim, Chung-Jong; Song, Kyoung-Ho; Kim, Eu Suk; Kim, Hong Bin; Oh, Myoung-don

    2015-01-01

    Background There are limited data describing the clinical characteristics of pyogenic spondylitis caused by Gram-negative bacteria (GNB). The aim of this study was to investigate the predisposing factors and clinical characteristics of pyogenic spondylitis caused by GNB compared to Gram-positive cocci (GPC). Methods We performed a retrospective review of medical records from patients with culture-confirmed pyogenic spondylitis at four tertiary teaching hospitals over an 8-year period. Results A total of 344 patients with culture-confirmed pyogenic spondylitis were evaluated. There were 62 patients (18.0%) with pyogenic spondylitis caused by GNB and the most common organism was Escherichia coli (n = 35, 10.2%), followed by Pseudomonas aeruginosa (n = 10, 2.9%). Pyogenic spondylitis caused by GNB was more frequently associated with the female gender (64.5 vs. 35.5%, P <0.01), preexisting or synchronous genitourinary tract infection (32.3 vs. 2.1%, P< 0.01), and intra-abdominal infection (12.9 vs. 0.4%, P< 0.01) compared to patients with GPC. Although pyogenic spondylitis caused by GNB presented with severe sepsis more frequently (24.2 vs. 11.3%, P = 0.01), the mortality rate (6.0 vs. 5.2%) and the proportion of patients with residual disability (6.0 vs. 9.0%), defined as grade 3 or 4 (P = 0.78) 3 months after completion of treatment, were not significantly different compared to GPC patients. Conclusion GNB should be considered as the etiologic organism when infectious spondylitis develops in a patient with preexisting or synchronous genitourinary tract and intra-abdominal infection. In addition, the mortality rate and clinical outcomes are not significantly different between pyogenic spondylitis caused by GNB and GPC. PMID:25978839

  4. Seasonality of Antibiotic-Resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae That Causes Acute Otitis Media

    E-print Network

    Cohen, Ted

    Seasonality of Antibiotic-Resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae That Causes Acute Otitis Media: A Clue is observed yearly in children during the warm season, is associated with a reduction in antibiotic resistance years) in southern Israel. Associations were assessed using seasonally clustered logistic regression

  5. [Forensic medical identification of the immediate causes of death from acute radiation injury].

    PubMed

    Glazunov, A G; Klevno, V A; Bogomolov, D V; Sakharov, A I; Kireeva, E A

    2009-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to perform retrospective thanatological analysis of reports on acute radiation disease in liquidators of the consequences of the accident at the Chernobyl nuclear power plant. It is shown that hemorrhagic syndrome was the main cause of death among the liquidators exposed to ionizing radiation. PMID:20088132

  6. Pulmonary Zygomycosis caused by Cunninghamella bertholletiae in a child with acute lymphoblastic leukemia*

    PubMed Central

    Bibashi, E; Sidi, V; Kotsiou, M; Makrigiannaki, E; Koliouskas, D

    2008-01-01

    Zygomycosis is an invasive mycotic disease caused by fungi of the class Zygomycetes. Infections caused by zygomycetes, are known for their difficulty of diagnosis and treatment. Cunninghamella bertholletiae (Cb), is a saprobic fungus commonly found in the soil of temperate climates. Pulmonary infections caused by Cb are being identified with increasing frequency among patients on immunosuppressive therapy, and these infections usually have a fatal outcome. We present a rare case of pulmonary zygomycosis caused by Cb in a 10 year old male child with acute lymphoblastic leukemia. In spite of intensive antifungal chemotherapy (iv liposomal amphotericin B 7 mg/Kg once daily) following clinical diagnosis, he died of pulmonary failure. PMID:18923760

  7. Evaluation of the antibacterial potential of Petroselinum crispum and Rosmarinus officinalis against bacteria that cause urinary tract infections

    PubMed Central

    Petrolini, Fernanda Villas Boas; Lucarini, Rodrigo; de Souza, Maria Gorete Mendes; Pires, Regina Helena; Cunha, Wilson Roberto; Martins, Carlos Henrique Gomes

    2013-01-01

    In this study we evaluated the antibacterial activity of the crude hydroalcoholic extracts, fractions, and compounds of two plant species, namely Rosmarinus officinalis and Petroselinum crispum, against the bacteria that cause urinary tract infection. The microdilution method was used for determination of the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) and minimum bactericidal concentration (MBC). The crude hydroalcoholic extract of R. officinalis displayed in vitro activity against Gram-positive bacteria, with satisfactory MBC for the clinical isolate S. saprophyticus. The fractions and the pure compound rosmarinic acid did not furnish promising results for Gram-negative bacteria, whereas fractions 2, 3, and 4 gave encouraging results for Gram-positive bacteria and acted as bactericide against S. epidermidis as well as E. faecalis (ATCC 29212) and its clinical isolate. R. officinalis led to promising results in the case of Gram-positive bacteria, resulting in a considerable interest in the development of reliable alternatives for the treatment of urinary infections. PMID:24516424

  8. Unsuspected Leptospirosis Is a Cause of Acute Febrile Illness in Nicaragua

    PubMed Central

    Reller, Megan E.; Wunder, Elsio A.; Miles, Jeremy J.; Flom, Judith E.; Mayorga, Orlando; Woods, Christopher W.; Ko, Albert I.; Dumler, J. Stephen; Matute, Armando J.

    2014-01-01

    Background Epidemic severe leptospirosis was recognized in Nicaragua in 1995, but unrecognized epidemic and endemic disease remains unstudied. Methodology/Principal Findings To determine the burden of and risk factors associated with symptomatic leptospirosis in Nicaragua, we prospectively studied patients presenting with fever at a large teaching hospital. Epidemiologic and clinical features were systematically recorded, and paired sera tested by IgM-ELISA to identify patients with probable and possible acute leptospirosis. Microscopic Agglutination Test and PCR were used to confirm acute leptospirosis. Among 704 patients with paired sera tested by MAT, 44 had acute leptospirosis. Patients with acute leptospirosis were more likely to present during rainy months and to report rural residence and fresh water exposure. The sensitivity of clinical impression and acute-phase IgM detected by ELISA were poor. Conclusions/Significance Leptospirosis is a common (6.3%) but unrecognized cause of acute febrile illness in Nicaragua. Rapid point-of-care tests to support early diagnosis and treatment as well as tests to support population-based studies to delineate the epidemiology, incidence, and clinical spectrum of leptospirosis, both ideally pathogen-based, are needed. PMID:25058149

  9. Cefotaxime-Resistant Bacteria Colonizing Older People Admitted to an Acute Care Hospital

    PubMed Central

    Bonomo, Robert A.; Donskey, Curtis J.; Blumer, Jeffery L.; Hujer, Andrea M.; Hoyenm, Claudia K.; Jacobs, Michael R.; Whalen, Christopher C.; Salata, Robert A.

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVES To determine the frequency of fecal colonization by cefotaxime-resistant gram-negative bacilli in older patients living in the community and in long-term care facilities (LTCFs) admitted to an acute care hospital. DESIGN Case-control, point prevalence study. SETTING Hospital. PARTICIPANTS One hundred forty-three patients aged 65 and older. MEASUREMENTS Rectal swab cultures, antibiotic drug sensitivity, beta lactamase isolation, and clonal identity. RESULTS Of the 190 surveillance cultures obtained from 143 patients, 26 cefotaxime-resistant gram-negative isolates from 22 patients were recovered. The prevalence rate of cefotaxime-resistant isolates on admission was 13.3% (19/143). A logistic regression model using cefotaxime colonization as the dependent variable found that multiple comorbidities, admission to a surgical service, and having a diagnosis of infection on presentation and a transfusion history were factors associated with the presence of colonization. These four clinical items accurately classified 74% of patients colonized. Antibiotic use and nursing home residence were not associated with the presence of colonization by cefotaxime-resistant organisms. Twelve of the cefotaxime-resistant isolates (46%) were identified as Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and 14 (54%) were other gram-negative bacilli. In six of the 14 isolates that were not P. aeruginosa (36%), it was possible to demonstrate the presence of an AmpC ?-lactamase related to the CMY-2 ?-lactamase, a plasmid-borne cephalosporinase. CONCLUSION These data raise awareness that there are community- and LTCF-dwelling older patients colonized with gram-negative enteric bacilli resistant to third-generation cephalosporins on admission to the hospital. The “reservoir of resistant bacteria” in older people is no longer confined to LTCFs. PMID:12657072

  10. The Mckittrick-Wheelock Syndrome: A Rare Cause of Severe Hydroelectrolyte Disorders and Acute Renal Failure

    PubMed Central

    Bruno, Andrea; Chimienti, Domenico; Montanaro, Alda; Prete, Fernando; Libutti, Pasquale; Lisi, Piero; Basile, Carlo

    2011-01-01

    The McKittrick-Wheelock syndrome is a rare cause of severe hydroelectrolyte disorders and fluid depletion as a result of rectal tumor hypersecretion, which can lead to acute renal failure. We report the case of a 70-year-old female who presented with hyponatremia, hypokalemia, hypochloremia, and acute renal failure, due to a watery, mucinous diarrhea. A large rectal villous adenoma was discovered on ileocolonoscopy, and definitive management was achieved by removal of the tumor. In conclusion, reversal of the biochemical derangement is the cornerstone of successful management of the McKittrick-Wheelock syndrome. Then, immediate surgical resection of the tumor is the treatment of choice. PMID:24533197

  11. Life-threatening Cerebral Edema Caused by Acute Occlusion of a Superior Vena Cava Stent

    SciTech Connect

    Sofue, Keitaro Takeuchi, Yoshito Arai, Yasuaki; Sugimura, Kazuro

    2013-02-15

    A71-year-old man with advanced lung cancer developed a life-threatening cerebral edema caused by the acute occlusion of a superior vena cava (SVC) stent and was successfully treated by an additional stent placement. Although stent occlusion is a common early complication, no life-threatening situations have been reported until now. Our experience highlights the fact that acute stent occlusion can potentially lead to the complete venous shutdown of the SVC, resulting in life-threatening cerebral edema, after SVC stent placement. Immediate diagnosis and countermeasures are required.

  12. Bilateral renal artery thrombosis in inherited thrombophilia: a rare cause of acute kidney injury

    PubMed Central

    Wiles, Kate S; Hastings, Laura; Muthuppalaniappan, Vasantha Muthu; Hanif, Muhammad; Abeygunasekara, Sumith

    2014-01-01

    We describe the case of a 47-year-old man who developed significant acute, and subsequently chronic, kidney injury due to bilateral renal infarction. This occurred in the context of a combined inherited thrombophilia including antithrombin III deficiency and a prothrombin gene mutation. Bilateral renal artery thrombosis developed despite prophylactic treatment for thromboembolism. Arterial thrombosis is rare in the context of inherited thrombophilia and bilateral renal infarction is an unusual cause of acute kidney injury. Bilateral renal infarction due to primary renal artery thrombosis has not been previously described in antithrombin III deficiency, either as an isolated defect or in combination with other hereditary thrombophilia. PMID:24465133

  13. Bilateral stones as a cause of acute renal failure in the emergency department

    PubMed Central

    Alonso, Joaquín V.; cachinero, Pedro L.; Ubeda, Fran R.; Ruiz, Daniel J. L.; Blanco, Alfredo

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Acute renal failure (ARF) due to obstructive uropathy is a urological emergency. The standard radiological investigations in the emergency setting include X-ray, ultrasonography and computed tomography. But occasionally the cause of obstruction may be elusive. METHODS: We present a case of obstructive uropathy due to bilateral stones presenting as acute renal failure. The patient underwent successful shock wave lithotripsy (SWL) for dissolution of calculi. RESULTS: The patient was successfully treated, and reported asymptomatic in a follow-up. CONCLUSION: Close collaboration between nephrological, urological, and radiological services is required. PMID:25215151

  14. The inhibitory effect of Zingiber corallinum Hance essential oil on drug-resistant bacteria and evaluation of its acute toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Ce; Zhou, Lin-Lin; Wang, Hai-Yan; Huang, Su-Na; Liu, Qing; Hu, Shi-Lin; Li, Ting-Rong; Chen, Yan-Bing; Jiang, Jian-Xin

    2011-01-01

    Summary Background The excessive and irregular use of antibiotics could result in the generation and diffusion of drug-resistant bacteria. The aim of this study was to investigate the inhibitory effect of Zingiber corallinum Hance essential oil (ZCHO) on drug-resistant bacteria, especially on drug-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii. Material/Methods Susceptibility testing was used to evaluate the effect of ZCHO on growth inhibition of drug-resistant bacteria by paper disk method. Mice orally administered with ZCHO were used to observe acute toxicity and to determine median lethal dose (LD50) of ZCHO. Broth dilution method was used to determine minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) and minimum bactericidal concentration (MBC) of ZCHO on drug-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii. Results ZCHO exhibited an obvious inhibitory effect not only on gram-negative drug-resistant bacteria including Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Enterobacter cloacae and Acinetobacter baumannii, but also on gram-positive drug-resistant bacteria including Staphylococcus aureus, Staphylococcus epidermidis and Staphylococcus haemolyticus. The ZCHO containing 79% terpinen-4-ol revealed better bacteriostatic effect than ZCHO with 34% terpinen-4-ol. The LD50 of ZCHO was 1790.427 mg/kg. The MIC and MBC of ZCHO on drug-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii were 1457.81 mg/L. Conclusions ZCHO has obvious bacteriostasis and bactericidal effects, especially against drug-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii. Therefore, ZCHO is a promising natural bioactive component with antibacterial effect and satisfactory safety due to its low toxicity. PMID:21525802

  15. Infections caused by Gram-positive bacteria: a review of the global challenge.

    PubMed

    Woodford, Neil; Livermore, David M

    2009-09-01

    Infections caused by multidrug-resistant Gram-positive bacteria represent a major public health burden, not just in terms of morbidity and mortality, but also in terms of increased expenditure on patient management and implementation of infection control measures. Staphylococcus aureus and Enterococcus spp. are established pathogens in the hospital environment, and their frequent multidrug resistance complicates therapy. The archetypal hospital "superbug", methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA), regularly attracts mass-media interest and, in many countries, there is political pressure to reduce MRSA infection rates, with some progress now being made in the United Kingdom and the United States. To compound these established problems, we have witnessed the emergence and spread of virulent clones of MRSA in the community, and of Clostridium difficile in hospitals. Multidrug-resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae clones are major community pathogens in many parts of the world, but are now being challenged by new conjugate vaccines. Using combinations of molecular epidemiological tools, which characterize the resistant isolates and their resistance determinants, scientists can track highly successful bacterial strains at local, national, and international levels. These methods have provided new insights into the evolution of key pathogens, and this information may aid the design of control strategies and vaccines. In addition, the development of new antimicrobials including oxazolidinones, lipopeptides, glycylcyclines, ketolides, and new generations of fluoroquinolones, antistaphylococcal b-lactams, and glycopeptides must remain a high priority for the continued effective treatment of infections caused by resistant strains. So far, resistance to these newer agents is identified rarely in surveillance programs, but occasional reports of resistance causing therapeutic failure (e.g., with linezolid, daptomycin, telithromycin, or newer fluoroquinolones) give cause for concern. The emergence of antibiotic resistance is inevitable, but we must seek to decrease its impact and prolong the effectiveness of the agents available to us. PMID:19766888

  16. Bacteria causing important diseases of citrus utilise distinct modes of pathogenesis to attack a common host.

    PubMed

    Vojnov, Adrián Alberto; do Amaral, Alexandre Morais; Dow, John Maxwell; Castagnaro, Atilio Pedro; Marano, Marìa Rosa

    2010-06-01

    In this review, we summarise the current knowledge on three pathogens that exhibit distinct tissue specificity and modes of pathogenesis in citrus plants. Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. citri causes canker disease and invades the host leaf mesophyll tissue through natural openings and can also survive as an epiphyte. Xylella fastidiosa and Candidatus Liberibacter are vectored by insects and proliferate in the vascular system of the host, either in the phloem (Candidatus Liberibacter) or xylem (X. fastidiosa) causing variegated chlorosis and huanglongbing diseases, respectively. Candidatus Liberibacter can be found within host cells and is thus unique as an intracellular phytopathogenic bacterium. Genome sequence comparisons have identified groups of species-specific genes that may be associated with the particular lifestyle, mode of transmission or symptoms produced by each phytopathogen. In addition, components that are conserved amongst bacteria may have diverse regulatory actions underpinning the different bacterial lifestyles; one example is the divergent role of the Rpf/DSF cell-cell signalling system in X. citri and X. fastidiosa. Biofilm plays a key role in epiphytic fitness and canker development in X. citri and in the symptoms produced by X. fastidiosa. Bacterial aggregation may be associated with vascular occlusion of the xylem vessels and symptomatology of variegated chlorosis. PMID:20449739

  17. A suggestion about the cause of inflammation in acute atherosis complicating poor placentation in preeclampsia.

    PubMed

    Eggers, Arnold E

    2015-12-01

    The hypothesis is set forth that maternal release of epinephrine in the adrenal medulla causes systemic platelet activation (SPA) which, in turn, initiates coagulation via the intrinsic pathway and leads to thrombin generation. Thrombin causes inflammation, which is the underlying cause of acute atherosis in preeclampsia (PE). Each step of this cascade is examined in detail and supporting literature documented. SPA is associated with migraine headaches, which are a prominent clinical feature of PE and may help explain why PE is a risk factor for future maternal cardiovascular disease. PMID:26527498

  18. Partially reversible bortezomib-induced cardiotoxicity: an unusual cause of acute cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Meseeha, Marcelle G.; Kolade, Victor O.; Attia, Maximos N.

    2015-01-01

    Chemotherapy-associated cardiotoxicity can present as a spectrum from arrhythmia to acute congestive heart failure. Unlike anthracyclines, proteasome inhibitors – for example, bortezomib – are not notorious for causing cardiotoxicity in absence of pre-existing cardiac dysfunction or without concomitant use of other cardiotoxic agents. We describe a 66-year-old woman with end-stage renal disease who developed acute dyspnea hours after a third treatment with bortezomib for IgG kappa myeloma. The Naranjo adverse drug reaction probability scale indicated a probable relationship (score of 5) between bortezomib and acute left ventricular dysfunction. Patients receiving proteasome inhibitors should be closely monitored for evidence of cardiac dysfunction during treatment. PMID:26653686

  19. Infections Caused by Resistant Gram-Negative Bacteria: Epidemiology and Management.

    PubMed

    Kaye, Keith S; Pogue, Jason M

    2015-10-01

    Infections caused by resistant gram-negative bacteria are becoming increasingly prevalent and now constitute a serious threat to public health worldwide because they are difficult to treat and are associated with high morbidity and mortality rates. In the United States, there has been a steady increase since 2000 in rates of extended-spectrum ?-lactamase-producing Enterobacteriaceae, carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae, and multidrug-resistant strains of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Acinetobacter baumannii, particularly among hospitalized patients with intraabdominal infections, urinary tract infections, ventilator-associated pneumonia, and bacteremia. Colonization with resistant gram-negative bacteria is common among residents in long-term care facilities (particularly those residents with an indwelling device), and these facilities are considered important originating sources of such strains for hospitals. Antibiotic resistance is associated with a substantial clinical and economic burden, including increased mortality, greater hospital and antibiotic costs, and longer stays in hospitals and intensive care units. Control of resistant gram-negative infections requires a comprehensive approach, including strategies for risk factor identification, detection and identification of resistant organisms, and implementation of infection-control and prevention strategies. In treating resistant gram-negative infections, a review of surveillance data and hospital-specific antibiograms, including resistance patterns within local institutions, and consideration of patient characteristics are helpful in guiding the choice of empiric therapy. Although only a few agents are available with activity against resistant gram-negative organisms, two recently released ?-lactam/?-lactamase inhibitor combinations - ceftolozane/tazobactam and ceftazidime/avibactam - have promising activity against these organisms. In this article, we review the epidemiology, risk factors, and antibiotic resistance mechanisms of gram-negative organisms. In addition, an overview of treatment options for patients with these infections is provided. PMID:26497481

  20. Infusion of glucose and lipids at physiological rates causes acute endoplasmic reticulum stress in rat liver.

    PubMed

    Boden, Guenther; Song, Weiwei; Duan, Xunbao; Cheung, Peter; Kresge, Karen; Barrero, Carlos; Merali, Salim

    2011-07-01

    Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress has recently been implicated as a cause for obesity-related insulin resistance; however, what causes ER stress in obesity has remained uncertain. Here, we have tested the hypothesis that macronutrients can cause acute (ER) stress in rat liver. Examined were the effects of intravenously infused glucose and/or lipids on proximal ER stress sensor activation (PERK, eIF2-?, ATF4, Xbox protein 1 (XBP1s)), unfolded protein response (UPR) proteins (GRP78, calnexin, calreticulin, protein disulphide isomerase (PDI), stress kinases (JNK, p38 MAPK) and insulin signaling (insulin/receptor substrate (IRS) 1/2 associated phosphoinositol-3-kinase (PI3K)) in rat liver. Glucose and/or lipid infusions, ranging from 23.8 to 69.5 kJ/4 h (equivalent to between ~17% and ~50% of normal daily energy intake), activated the proximal ER stress sensor PERK and ATF6 increased the protein abundance of calnexin, calreticulin and PDI and increased two GRP78 isoforms. Glucose and glucose plus lipid infusions induced comparable degrees of ER stress, but only infusions containing lipid activated stress kinases (JNK and p38 MAPK) and inhibited insulin signaling (PI3K). In summary, physiologic amounts of both glucose and lipids acutely increased ER stress in livers 12-h fasted rats and dependent on the presence of fat, caused insulin resistance. We conclude that this type of acute ER stress is likely to occur during normal daily nutrient intake. PMID:21475143

  1. Acute-Onset Vitreous Hemorrhage of Unknown Origin before Vitrectomy: Causes and Prognosis

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Dong Yoon; Joe, Soo Geun; Baek, Seunghee; Kim, June-Gone; Yoon, Young Hee; Lee, Joo Yong

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. To analyze causes and prognosis of acute-onset preoperatively unknown origin vitreous hemorrhage (VH). Methods. This study included patients who underwent vitrectomy for acute-onset preoperatively unknown origin VH. The underlying causes of VH, which were identified after vitrectomy, were analyzed. And overall visual prognosis of unknown origin VH was analyzed. Risk scoring system was developed to predict visual prognosis after vitrectomy. Results. 169 eyes were included. Among these, retinal vein occlusion (RVO), retinal break, and age-related macular degeneration (AMD) were identified in 74 (43.8%), 50 (29.6%), and 21 (12.4%) patients, respectively. After vitrectomy, logMAR BCVA significantly improved from 1.93 ± 0.59 to 0.47 ± 0.71. However, postoperative BCVA in AMD eyes were significantly poorer than others. Poor visual prognosis after vitrectomy was associated with old age, poor preoperative vision in both eyes, and drusen in the fellow eye. Conclusions. RVO, retinal break, and AMD are the most common causes of acute-onset preoperatively unknown origin VH and the most common causes of VH change with age. The visual prognosis of unknown origin VH is relatively good, except among AMD patients. Older patients with poor preoperative BCVA in both eyes and patients with AMD in the fellow eye are at a higher risk of poor visual prognosis following vitrectomy. PMID:26504593

  2. Increased size of a gas-filled intradural cyst causing acute foot drop: a case report.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Chang-Hoon; Park, Jeong-Uk; Choo, Ho-Sik; Chung, Nam-Su

    2013-12-01

    We describe the case of a 76-year-old man presenting with a gas-filled intradural cyst that increased in size over a 10-month period and caused acute bilateral foot drop. The gas-filled intradural cyst was resected from the adherent cauda equina, and histopathological examination identified cystic tissue with degenerated fibrocartilage. Leg pain disappeared immediately following surgery, and the bilateral foot drop resolved within 8 months. PMID:23793353

  3. [Bacterial tracheitis as the cause of acute respiratory insufficiency in 2 teenagers].

    PubMed

    Kamerbeek, A; Kneyber, M C J; Efthymiou, K M; Rinkel, R N P M; Plötz, F B

    2006-02-25

    A 13-year-old girl and a 12-year-old boy developed acute respiratory insufficiency caused by an upper airway obstruction, which necessitated intubation and mechanical ventilation. Cultures from throat swabs from the girl and boy yielded Haemophilus parainfluenzae and Streptococcus pneumoniae, respectively. Diagnoses of bacterial tracheitis were confirmed by tracheoscopy and both children were treated with antibiotics. After 11 and 4 days of mechanical ventilation, respectively, they were successfully extubated. No further complications were encountered. Bacterial tracheitis is a rare but significant cause of upper airway obstruction in children. PMID:16538845

  4. Histopathological Studies on Rabbits Infected by Bacteria Causing Infectious Keratitis in Human through Eye Inoculation

    PubMed Central

    Aldebasi, Yousef H.; Mohamed, Hala A.; Aly, Salah M.

    2014-01-01

    Aim This study aimed to investigate the pathogenic effect of bacteria causing infectious keratitis among patients through experimental study conducted on rabbits’ eyes with the aid of histopathology as eye infection is a common disease in developing countries that may complicate to loss of vision. Methodology 100 swab samples were collected from human infected eyes, at Qassim region during 2012, for the isolation of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus aureus. The isolated pathogenic bacteria were tested to various antibiotics using some selected antibiotics discs through agar-well diffusion method. Then, experimental study conducted on 27 rabbits. The rabbits were divided randomly into three equal groups, each containing 9 rabbits. Rabbits of group (1) served as control group (Negative Control) and their eyes were inoculated with the buffer only. Rabbits of group (2) were inoculated through eyes with the isolated Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Rabbits of group (3) were inoculated through eyes with the isolated Staphylococcus aureus. Results Out of 100 collected swab samples from human infected eyes, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus aureus were isolated with a total percentage of 25.21% and 15.65%; respectively and used in this study. Both bacterial isolates were sensitive to Gentamicin and Cefuroxime. Clinically, experimentally infected rabbits by Pseudomonas aeruginosa, revealed varying degree corneal abrasions, corneal abscess and dense corneal opacity. Histopathologically, at 3rd day post-infection (PI), the cornea revealed polymorpho-nuclear cells infiltration with loss of the outer epithelial lining. At 7th day PI, neutrophils were seen in the stroma. At 15th day PI, proliferation of fibroblasts and new vascularisation were seen in the stroma. Clinically, rabbits experimentally infected with Staphylococcus aureus, revealed corneal ulcers and focal abscesses. Histopathologically, at 3rd and 7th day PI, the cornea revealed edema and infiltration of leukocytes. At 15th day PI, hyperplasia of corneal epithelium and proliferation of keratocytes were evident. The liver and kidneys of experimented rabbits revealed no remarkable histopathological alterations along the period of experiment. Conclusion Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus aureus are common eye infection in human, both induced severe lesions in the eyes of rabbits that could interfere with vision, therefore, strict measures to control these infections in human is recommended. PMID:25505861

  5. Appropriateness of empirical treatment and outcome in bacteremia caused by extended-spectrum-?-lactamase-producing bacteria.

    PubMed

    Frakking, Florine N J; Rottier, Wouter C; Dorigo-Zetsma, J Wendelien; van Hattem, Jarne M; van Hees, Babette C; Kluytmans, Jan A J W; Lutgens, Suzanne P M; Prins, Jan M; Thijsen, Steven F T; Verbon, Annelies; Vlaminckx, Bart J M; Cohen Stuart, James W; Leverstein-van Hall, Maurine A; Bonten, Marc J M

    2013-07-01

    We studied clinical characteristics, appropriateness of initial antibiotic treatment, and other factors associated with day 30 mortality in patients with bacteremia caused by extended-spectrum-?-lactamase (ESBL)-producing bacteria in eight Dutch hospitals. Retrospectively, information was collected from 232 consecutive patients with ESBL bacteremia (due to Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae, and Enterobacter cloacae) between 2008 and 2010. In this cohort (median age of 65 years; 24 patients were <18 years of age), many had comorbidities, such as malignancy (34%) or recurrent urinary tract infection (UTI) (15%). One hundred forty episodes (60%) were nosocomial, 54 (23%) were otherwise health care associated, and 38 (16%) were community acquired. The most frequent sources of infection were UTI (42%) and intra-abdominal infection (28%). Appropriate therapy within 24 h after bacteremia onset was prescribed to 37% of all patients and to 54% of known ESBL carriers. The day 30 mortality rate was 20%. In a multivariable analysis, a Charlson comorbidity index of ? 3, an age of ? 75 years, intensive care unit (ICU) stay at bacteremia onset, a non-UTI bacteremia source, and presentation with severe sepsis, but not inappropriate therapy within <24 h (adjusted odds ratio [OR], 1.53; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.68 to 3.45), were associated with day 30 mortality. Further assessment of confounding and a stratified analysis for patients with UTI and non-UTI origins of infection did not reveal a statistically significant effect of inappropriate therapy on day 30 mortality, and these results were insensitive to the possible misclassification of patients who had received ?-lactam-?-lactamase inhibitor combinations or ceftazidime as initial treatment. In conclusion, ESBL bacteremia occurs mostly in patients with comorbidities requiring frequent hospitalization, and 84% of episodes were health care associated. Factors other than inappropriate therapy within <24 h determined day 30 mortality. PMID:23612198

  6. Clinical course of acute chemical lung injury caused by 3-chloropentafluoropene.

    PubMed

    Morita, Satomu; Takimoto, Takayuki; Kawahara, Kunimitsu; Nishi, Katsuji; lino, Morio

    2013-01-01

    Perfluoroallyl chloride (PFAC), a fluorine-containing compound, has very severe toxicity, but this toxicity is not well characterised. We report a fatal case of acute chemical lung injury caused by the inhalation of PFAC. A 39-year-old man, working at a chemical factory, inhaled PFAC gas and died 16 days later of acute lung injury with severe pneumothorax. We present his clinical course together with thoracic CT findings, autopsy and analysis of PFAC in blood and urine samples with gas chromatograph-mass spectrometry. Previously, a fatal case of PFAC was reported in 1981 but PFAC was not identified in any of the patient's samples. In our patient, we identified PFAC in both blood and urine samples. Our toxicological analysis may be used as a reference to detect PFAC toxicity in the future. Our study should be helpful for diagnosing lung injury induced by a highly toxic gas, such as PFAC. PMID:24311414

  7. Case Report: Human Bocavirus Associated Pneumonia as Cause of Acute Injury, Cologne, Germany

    PubMed Central

    Krakau, Michael; Gerbershagen, Kathrin; Frost, Ulrich; Hinzke, Markus; Brockmann, Michael; Schildgen, Verena; Goßmann, Axel; Limmroth, Volker; Dormann, Arno; Schildgen, Oliver

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Although the human bocavirus (HBoV) is known since a decade, limited information about its pathogenesis is available due to the lack of an animal model. Thus, clinical cases and studies are the major source of novel information about the course of infection and the related pathophysiology. In this context, a clinical case of an adult patient suffering from severe HBoV-pneumonia is described that was associated with loss of consciousness followed by acute rib fracture and subsequent neurological disorder. Following initial global respiratory dysfunction the clinical respiratory symptoms recovered but the neurological symptoms maintained after weaning and intensive care in the stroke unit. During the initial phase, an acute active HBoV infection was confirmed by positive polymerase chain reactions from bronchoalveolar lavage fluid and serum. The case further demonstrates that HBoV can cause severe pneumonia, induce secondary disease also in adults, and may be associated with neurological symptoms as previously assumed. PMID:26496262

  8. Mechanisms of acute increases in airway responsiveness caused by environmental chemicals

    SciTech Connect

    Sheppard, D.

    1988-01-01

    Inhalation of inhaled environmental chemicals has long been recognized as a cause of acute increases in airway responsiveness. Extensive studies of the mechanisms of action of two of these chemicals, ozone and toluene diisocyanate, have been conducted during the past decade. The results of these studies suggest that acute airway inflammation plays an important role in the effect of inhaled chemicals but that the specific aspects of the inflammatory response that lead to the development of airway hyperresponsiveness are different for different stimuli and among different mammalian species. These observations suggest that in vivo airway hyperresponsiveness can arise via several different mechanisms and is thus not likely to reflect a single underlying defect. 24 references.

  9. Post-operative acute circulatory collapse following craniofacial surgery: Rare event and rarer cause

    PubMed Central

    Mohanty, Sujata; Dabas, Jitender; Tandon, Monica S.; Singh, Daljit; Gulati, Ujjwal

    2015-01-01

    We are presenting a case of a 13-year-old female patient diagnosed and operated for maxillary odontogenic myxoma extending to the anterior cranial base. The postoperative complication occurred in the form of acute circulatory collapse. The patient was bailed out with cardiopulmonary resuscitation and return of spontaneous circulation occurred. Investigations into the cause of the event led to the finding of an uncommon syndrome. Meigs syndrome is a triad of ovarian tumor mass, pleural effusion and ascites. It has been the topic of interest for the gynecologic fraternity since 1934, when the first case was reported by J. V. Meigs. According to the best of our knowledge, this is the first case report of an acute circulatory collapse due to Meigs syndrome in a maxillofacial patient. PMID:26668462

  10. Lung postmortem autopsy revealing extramedullary involvement in multiple myeloma causing acute respiratory distress syndrome.

    PubMed

    Ravinet, Aurélie; Perbet, Sébastien; Guièze, Romain; Lemal, Richard; Guérin, Renaud; Gayraud, Guillaume; Aliane, Jugurtha; Tremblay, Aymeric; Pascal, Julien; Ledoux, Albane; Chaleteix, Carine; Dechelotte, Pierre; Bay, Jacques-Olivier; Bazin, Jean-Etienne; Constantin, Jean-Michel

    2014-01-01

    Pulmonary involvement with multiple myeloma is rare. We report the case of a 61-year-old man with past medical history of chronic respiratory failure with emphysema, and a known multiple myeloma (Durie and Salmon stage III B and t(4;14) translocation). Six months after diagnosis and first line of treatment, he presented acute dyspnea with interstitial lung disease. Computed tomography showed severe bullous emphysema and diffuse, patchy, multifocal infiltrations bilaterally with nodular character, small bilateral pleural effusions, mediastinal lymphadenopathy, and a known lytic lesion of the 12th vertebra. He was treated with piperacillin-tazobactam, amikacin, oseltamivir, and methylprednisolone. Finally, outcome was unfavourable. Postmortem analysis revealed diffuse and nodular infracentimetric infiltration of the lung parenchyma by neoplastic plasma cells. Physicians should be aware that acute respiratory distress syndrome not responding to treatment of common causes could be a manifestation of the disease, even with negative BAL or biopsy and could be promptly treated with salvage therapy. PMID:25165587

  11. Lung Postmortem Autopsy Revealing Extramedullary Involvement in Multiple Myeloma Causing Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Ravinet, Aurélie; Perbet, Sébastien; Guièze, Romain; Guérin, Renaud; Gayraud, Guillaume; Aliane, Jugurtha; Tremblay, Aymeric; Pascal, Julien; Ledoux, Albane; Chaleteix, Carine; Dechelotte, Pierre; Bay, Jacques-Olivier; Bazin, Jean-Etienne; Constantin, Jean-Michel

    2014-01-01

    Pulmonary involvement with multiple myeloma is rare. We report the case of a 61-year-old man with past medical history of chronic respiratory failure with emphysema, and a known multiple myeloma (Durie and Salmon stage III B and t(4;14) translocation). Six months after diagnosis and first line of treatment, he presented acute dyspnea with interstitial lung disease. Computed tomography showed severe bullous emphysema and diffuse, patchy, multifocal infiltrations bilaterally with nodular character, small bilateral pleural effusions, mediastinal lymphadenopathy, and a known lytic lesion of the 12th vertebra. He was treated with piperacillin-tazobactam, amikacin, oseltamivir, and methylprednisolone. Finally, outcome was unfavourable. Postmortem analysis revealed diffuse and nodular infracentimetric infiltration of the lung parenchyma by neoplastic plasma cells. Physicians should be aware that acute respiratory distress syndrome not responding to treatment of common causes could be a manifestation of the disease, even with negative BAL or biopsy and could be promptly treated with salvage therapy. PMID:25165587

  12. Development and evaluation of a safe and effective sugar-free herbal lollipop that kills cavity-causing bacteria.

    PubMed

    Hu, Chu-Hong; He, Jian; Eckert, Randal; Wu, Xiao-Yang; Li, Li-Na; Tian, Yan; Lux, Renate; Shuffer, Justin A; Gelman, Faina; Mentes, Janet; Spackman, Sue; Bauer, Janet; Anderson, Maxwell H; Shi, Wen-Yuan

    2011-01-01

    Dental caries (tooth decay) is caused by a specific group of cariogenic bacteria, like Streptococcus mutans, which convert dietary sugars into acids that dissolve the mineral in tooth structure. Killing cariogenic bacteria is an effective way to control or prevent tooth decay. In a previous study, we discovered a novel compound (Glycyrrhizol A), from the extraction of licorice roots, with strong antimicrobial activity against cariogenic bacteria. In the current study, we developed a method to produce these specific herbal extracts in large quantities, and then used these extracts to develop a sugar-free lollipop that effectively kills cariogenic bacteria like Streptococcus mutans. Further studies showed that these sugar-free lollipops are safe and their antimicrobial activity is stable. Two pilot human studies indicate that a brief application of these lollipops (twice a day for ten days) led to a marked reduction of cariogenic bacteria in oral cavity among most human subjects tested. This herbal lollipop could be a novel tool to promote oral health through functional foods. PMID:21449211

  13. Development and evaluation of a safe and effective sugar-free herbal lollipop that kills cavity-causing bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Chu-hong; He, Jian; Eckert, Randal; Wu, Xiao-yang; Li, Li-na; Tian, Yan; Lux, Renate; Shuffer, Justin A; Gelman, Faina; Mentes, Janet; Spackman, Sue; Bauer, Janet; Anderson, Maxwell H; Shi, Wen-yuan

    2011-01-01

    Dental caries (tooth decay) is caused by a specific group of cariogenic bacteria, like Streptococcus mutans, which convert dietary sugars into acids that dissolve the mineral in tooth structure. Killing cariogenic bacteria is an effective way to control or prevent tooth decay. In a previous study, we discovered a novel compound (Glycyrrhizol A), from the extraction of licorice roots, with strong antimicrobial activity against cariogenic bacteria. In the current study, we developed a method to produce these specific herbal extracts in large quantities, and then used these extracts to develop a sugar-free lollipop that effectively kills cariogenic bacteria like Streptococcus mutans. Further studies showed that these sugar-free lollipops are safe and their antimicrobial activity is stable. Two pilot human studies indicate that a brief application of these lollipops (twice a day for ten days) led to a marked reduction of cariogenic bacteria in oral cavity among most human subjects tested. This herbal lollipop could be a novel tool to promote oral health through functional foods. PMID:21449211

  14. Disseminated Fusariosis Caused by Fusarium verticillioides in an Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia Patient after Allogeneic Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation?

    PubMed Central

    Tezcan, Gulsum; Ozhak-Baysan, Betil; Alastruey-Izquierdo, Ana; Ogunc, Dilara; Ongut, Gozde; Y?ld?ran, Sinasi Taner; Hazar, Volkan; Cuenca-Estrella, Manuel; Rodriguez-Tudela, Juan Luis

    2009-01-01

    Fusarium species are saprophytic molds which cause disseminated or localized infections in humans. Disseminated Fusarium infection can cause significant morbidity and mortality in immunocompromised patients. We present a case of disseminated fusariosis caused by Fusarium verticillioides in a patient with acute lymphoblastic leukemia and successfully treated using both liposomal amphotericin B and voriconazole. PMID:19005150

  15. Clinical characteristics, causes and outcomes of acute interstitial nephritis in the elderly.

    PubMed

    Muriithi, Angela K; Leung, Nelson; Valeri, Anthony M; Cornell, Lynn D; Sethi, Sanjeev; Fidler, Mary E; Nasr, Samih H

    2015-02-01

    Acute interstitial nephritis (AIN) is an important cause of acute kidney injury (AKI), and its prevalence in the elderly may be increasing. It is largely unknown whether AIN in the elderly is similar to that in younger adults; therefore, we investigated the causes and characteristics of AIN in 45 elderly patients (65 years and older) and in 88 younger adults (18-64 years old). Compared with younger patients, the elderly had significantly more drug-induced AIN (87 vs. 64%), proton pump inhibitor-induced AIN (18 vs. 6%), but significantly less AIN due to autoimmune or systemic causes (7 vs. 27%). The two most common culprit drugs in the elderly were penicillin and omeprazole. Compared with younger patients, the elderly had higher prevalence of baseline CKD, higher peak creatinine, and more need for dialysis, all of which were significant. Among the elderly, 86% showed partial or complete recovery within 6 months. Significantly shorter delays in initiation of steroids correlated with recovery at 6 months. Lack of early recovery tended to correlate with progressive CKD. Compared with antibiotic-induced AIN, proton pump inhibitor-induced AIN had less severe AKI, but a longer duration of drug exposure, and was less likely to recover by 6 months, all significant. Thus, the vast majority of AIN cases in the elderly are due to drugs, primarily owing to proton pump inhibitors and antibiotics, while AIN of autoimmune or systemic origin is uncommon. PMID:25185078

  16. Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency: an unusual cause of acute jaundice after paracetamol overdose.

    PubMed

    Phillpotts, Simon; Tash, Elliot; Sen, Sambit

    2014-11-01

    Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency is the commonest human enzyme defect causing haemolytic anaemia after exposure to specific triggers. Paracetamol-induced haemolysis in G6PD deficiency is a rare complication and mostly reported in children. We report the first case (to the best of our knowledge) of acute jaundice without overt clinical features of a haemolytic crisis, in an otherwise healthy adult female following paracetamol overdose, due to previously undiagnosed G6PD deficiency. It is important that clinicians consider this condition when a patient presents following a paracetamol overdose with significant and disproportionate jaundice, without transaminitis or coagulopathy. PMID:24684729

  17. Not without cause: Vibrio parahaemolyticus induces acute autophagy and cell death.

    PubMed

    Burdette, Dara L; Yarbrough, Melanie L; Orth, Kim

    2009-01-01

    Vibrio parahaemolyticus (V. parahaemolyticus) is a gram-negative halophillic bacterium that causes worldwide seafood-borne gastroenteritis. The prevalence of V. parahaemolyticus in the environment and incidence of infection have been linked to rising water temperatures caused by global warming. Among its virulence factors, V. parahaemolyticus harbors two type III secretion systems (T3SS). Recently, we have shown that T3SS1 induces rapid cellular death that initiates with acute autophagy, as measured by LC3 lipidation and accumulation of early autophagosomal vesicles. While not the first characterized pathogen to usurp autophagy, this is the first example of an extracellular pathogen that exploits this pathway for its own benefit. Here we discuss possible roles for the induction of autophagy during infection and discuss how V. parahaemolyticus-induced autophagy provides insight into key regulatory steps that govern the decision between apoptosis and autophagy. PMID:19011375

  18. [Analysis of the structure and causes of acute poisoning of chemical etiology in the Northern Fleet].

    PubMed

    Khankevich, Iu R; Askerko, I V; Myznikov, I L; Domashov, V I

    2012-02-01

    Data for the incidence of acute poisoning among the personnel of the Northern Fleet in 2002-2010 is analyzed, its dynamics and proportion of primary morbidity of sailors. In the class of clinical entity of "injury, poisoning and certain other consequences of external causes" proportion of poisoning in servicemen of different categories was ranging from 0.5 to 1.8%. Deaths occurred in 23.4% of cases of poisoning. Among the causes of poisoning major were--failure to comply with requirements to ensure safe conditions of military service and safe conduct of work, personal indiscipline of injured. Proposals for the prevention of poisoning in the current conditions of service in the Navy are suggested. PMID:22558853

  19. Benign acute childhood myositis--a rare cause of abnormal gait.

    PubMed

    Hall, Gregory; Schranz, Craig I

    2014-02-01

    Benign acute childhood myositis is a rare postviral myositis seen in school-aged children after a common upper respiratory infection (URI), most commonly caused by influenza [J Microbiol Immunol Infect 2004;37:95-98]. Predominantly seen in boys, this condition causes bilateral calf tenderness and pain with ambulation, often presenting as a refusal to bear weight. To avoid activation within the gastroc-soleus complex, the child will frequently compensate with a “Frankenstein gait,” described as a stiff-legged posture with shuffling gait [CMAJ 2009;181:711-713]. The child may also walk on his toes or refuse to walk at all. This refusal to bear weight can be alarming to both providers and parents, resulting in extensive workups. We present the case of a 5-year-old boy who presented to the emergency department with a chief complaint of leg pain and refusal to walk. Further history revealed a resolved URI approximately 5 days prior. He was noted to have an elevated creatinine kinase with no evidence of renal insufficiency. He had no progression or complications, and his symptoms resolved spontaneously with minimal supportive treatment. Benign acute childhood myositis should be considered within the broad differential that surrounds a limping child or one who refuses to bear weight. Having insight into the condition with its characteristic gait abnormalities and associated URI history can often prevent extensive workups and be treated supportively in the outpatient setting. PMID:24126025

  20. [Acute myocardial infarct as a result of external compression caused by an expanding pulmonary adenocarcinoma].

    PubMed

    Bulava, A; Skvarilová, M; Marek, D; Kociánová, E; Lukl, J

    2004-04-01

    The case report describes a rare cause of acute myocardial infarction. 68-years old man with the cancer triplicity (follicular and papillar carcinoma of the thyroid gland, Grawitz tumor, bronchogenic carcinoma with generalization) was admitted to the intensive care unit for the sudden onset of chest pain, positivity of cardioselective enzymes and signs of cardiogenic shock. Echocardiographic examination proved diaphragmatic akinesis with low left ventricular ejection fraction about 30%. The acute coronary angiogram revealed unimportant atherosclerotic narrowing of the left coronary artery and a long significant stenosis in the proximal portion of the right coronary artery untypical for atherosclerotic lesion suspicious of extramural compression. A pathological vascularization to the extramyocardial region was documented during right coronary angiogram. The patient was treated conservatively and finally transferred to the pulmonary disease department, where he died of progression of the cancer disease two months later. Postmortem examination found spreading of the bronchogenic adenocarcinoma to the pericardium along the course of the right coronary artery, but neither direct infiltration of the vessel wall by the tumor nor atherosclerotic disease of the proximal portion of the right coronary artery were proved. These findings together with the coronary angiogram demonstrate a rare cause of the myocardial infarction due to the extramural compression by the malignant tumor. PMID:15214305

  1. Control filamentous bulking caused by chlorine-resistant Type 021N bacteria through adding a biocide CTAB.

    PubMed

    Guo, Jianhua; Peng, Yongzhen; Wang, Zhongwei; Yuan, Zhiguo; Yang, Xiong; Wang, Shuying

    2012-12-01

    Filamentous bulking sludge due to excessive growth of filamentous bacteria is a serious operational problem in activated sludge plants. The addition of chemicals is one of widespread ways to control filamentous bulking. In this study, filamentous bulking in a continuous activated sludge system was found to be mainly caused by Eikelboom Type 021N filamentous bacteria likely due to low substrate concentration gradients. These Type 021N bacteria were found to be resistant to chlorination, maintaining cell integrity at a dosage of up to 80 mg Cl/gSS. An alternative biocidal agent, cetyltrimethyl ammonium bromide (CTAB), exhibited a much stronger biocidal effect on these filaments, which significantly improved sludge settleability. Type 021N with filamentous index of 5 was selectively killed, but floc-formers recovery their activity after CTAB termination. The study implied that CTAB might have more penetration capacity to cell wall of chlorine-resistant Type 021N bacteria. We therefore suggest the penetration property of filament cell wall should be considered or tested before the selection of biocide type in practice. PMID:23079128

  2. ACUTE TOXICITY OF HEAVY METALS TO ACETATE-UTILIZING MIXED CULTURES OF SULFATE-REDUCING BACTERIA: EC100 AND EC50

    EPA Science Inventory

    Acid mine drainage (AMD) from abandoned mines and acid mine pitlakes is an important environmental contaminant concern and usually contains appreciable concentrations of heavy metals. Since sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) are involved in the treatment of AMD, knowledge of acute m...

  3. Use of a low nutrient culture medium for the identification of bacteria causing severe ocular infection.

    PubMed

    Horgan, S E; Matheson, M M; McLoughlin-Borlace, L; Dart, J K

    1999-07-01

    A low nutrient culture medium was used to identify the pathogens in four cases of persisting ocular infection. Bacto R2A agar was used in addition to conventional liquid- and solid-phase media to culture pathogenic bacteria from one case of recurrent keratitis, one case of suture-related keratitis with endophthalmitis and two eyes (two patients) with post-operative endophthalmitis. In each case, a pathogen was identified solely with R2A agar after culture for 6 days. Species isolated were Pseudomonas aeruginosa (one), Propionibacterium acnes (two) and Staphylococcus aureus (one). Antibiotic therapy was tailored to conform to the sensitivity of the cultured organism in each case. The use of Bacto R2A low nutrient agar should be considered in culture negative eyes not showing clinical improvement, or for chronic cases where bacteria may have become adapted to more stringent ocular environments. PMID:10403423

  4. Plasma needle treatment of bacteria known to cause infections of the soft tissue of the oral region and bones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maletic, Dejan; Lazovic, Sasa; Puac, Nevena; Malovic, Gordana; Petrovic, Zoran Lj.; Miletic, Maja P.; Pavlica, Dusan B.; Jovanovic, Milena Z.; Milenkovic, Pavle

    2009-10-01

    Plasma needle can be used for non-contact disinfection of dental cavities and wounds, minimum-destructive precise treatment, as well as the removal of damaged tissue. The effect of bacterial deactivation is probably caused by reactive oxygen species while nitric oxide provided by plasma plays major role in many processes in the organism. Mass spectrometry was done to provide better insight into plasma-cell interactions. Our measurements were performed on a plasma needle that we originally used for the treatment of plant cells.Our research was done on species that are known to cause primary and secondary infections of the soft tissue of the oral region, as well as bones. The bacteria cultures used are bacterial reference culture species Staphylococcus aureus ATCC 25923, Enterococcus faecalis ATCC 29212, Pseudomonas aeruginosa ATCC 27853, and Escherichia coli ATCC 25922. We investigated the effect of the plasma needle discharge on different concentration of bacteria using several exposure times and power transmitted to the plasma. It was found that excellent removal of this and other bacteria may be achieved by the plasma needle treatment.

  5. Interactions between amphibians' symbiotic bacteria cause the production of emergent anti-fungal metabolites

    PubMed Central

    Loudon, Andrew H.; Holland, Jessica A.; Umile, Thomas P.; Burzynski, Elizabeth A.; Minbiole, Kevin P. C.; Harris, Reid N.

    2014-01-01

    Amphibians possess beneficial skin bacteria that protect against the disease chytridiomycosis by producing secondary metabolites that inhibit the pathogen Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis (Bd). Metabolite production may be a mechanism of competition between bacterial species that results in host protection as a by-product. We expect that some co-cultures of bacterial species or strains will result in greater Bd inhibition than mono-cultures. To test this, we cultured four bacterial isolates (Bacillus sp., Janthinobacterium sp., Pseudomonas sp. and Chitinophaga arvensicola) from red-backed salamanders (Plethodon cinereus) and cultured isolates both alone and together to collect their cell-free supernatants (CFS). We challenged Bd with CFSs from four bacterial species in varying combinations. This resulted in three experimental treatments: (1) CFSs of single isolates; (2) combined CFSs of two isolates; and (3) CFSs from co-cultures. Pair-wise combinations of four bacterial isolates CFSs were assayed against Bd and revealed additive Bd inhibition in 42.2% of trials, synergistic inhibition in 42.2% and no effect in 16.6% of trials. When bacteria isolates were grown in co-cultures, complete Bd inhibition was generally observed, and synergistic inhibition occurred in four out of six trials. A metabolite profile of the most potent co-culture, Bacillus sp. and Chitinophaga arvensicola, was determined with LC-MS and compared with the profiles of each isolate in mono-culture. Emergent metabolites appearing in the co-culture were inhibitory to Bd, and the most potent inhibitor was identified as tryptophol. Thus mono-cultures of bacteria cultured from red-backed salamanders interacted synergistically and additively to inhibit Bd, and such bacteria produced emergent metabolites when cultured together, with even greater pathogen inhibition. Knowledge of how bacterial species interact to inhibit Bd can be used to select probiotics to provide amphibians with protection against Bd. PMID:25191317

  6. Weakening Effect of Cell Permeabilizers on Gram-Negative Bacteria Causing Biodeterioration

    PubMed Central

    Alakomi, H.-L.; Paananen, A.; Suihko, M.-L.; Helander, I. M.; Saarela, M.

    2006-01-01

    Gram-negative bacteria play an important role in the formation and stabilization of biofilm structures on stone surfaces. Therefore, the control of growth of gram-negative bacteria offers a way to diminish biodeterioration of stone materials. The effect of potential permeabilizers on the outer membrane (OM) properties of gram-negative bacteria was investigated and further characterized. In addition, efficacy of the agents in enhancing the activity of a biocide (benzalkonium chloride) was assessed. EDTA, polyethylenimine (PEI), and succimer (meso-2,3-dimercaptosuccinic) were shown to be efficient permeabilizers of the members of Pseudomonas and Stenotrophomonas genera, as indicated by an increase in the uptake of a hydrophobic probe (1-N-phenylnaphthylamine) and sensitization to hydrophobic antibiotics. Visualization of Pseudomonas cells treated with EDTA or PEI by atomic force microscopy revealed damage in the outer membrane structure. PEI especially increased the surface area and bulges of the cells. Topographic images of EDTA-treated cells were compatible with events assigned for the effect of EDTA on outer membranes, i.e., release of lipopolysaccharide and disintegration of OM structure. In addition, the effect of EDTA treatment was visualized in phase-contrast images as large areas with varying hydrophilicity on cell surfaces. In liquid culture tests, EDTA and PEI supplementation enhanced the activity of benzalkonium chloride toward the target strains. Use of permeabilizers in biocide formulations would enable the use of decreased concentrations of the active biocide ingredient, thereby providing environmentally friendlier products. PMID:16820461

  7. Infection related renal impairment: a major cause of acute allograft dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Nampoory, Mangalathillam R N; Johny, Kaivilayil V; Costandy, Jamal N; Nair, Madhavan P; Said, Tarek; Homoud, Hani; Al-Muzairai, Ibrahim; Samhan, Mohmoud; Al-Moussawi, Mustafa

    2003-06-01

    We prospectively analyzed the impact of post-transplant infections on the renal function in 532 stable renal transplant recipients (M=340; F=192) over a period of 5 years. Their age ranged from 3-75 years (40+14 years). During the follow-up period, 52 patients expired and 64 lost on followup. We defined renal impairment (RI) as a persistent rise in serum creatinine above 20% from baseline value. 495 episodes of RI occurred in 269 recipients. This included 180-36% episodes of acute rejection, 53-10.7% Cyclosporine toxicity, 236-47.7% infection related renal impairment [IRRI] and 26-5.3% others. The severity of renal failure is less in IRRI (100+90.2) than that of acute rejection (166+127.1), but was more than that in cyclosporine toxicity (50+42.2). Sites of infection in IRRI were urinary (33%), respiratory (26.3%), septicemia (15.7%) and others (25.4%). Episode of IRRI occurred more frequently in LURD (159-67.4%) compared to LRD-RTR (50-21.2%). Occurrence of IRRI is more significantly higher in patients on triple drug immunosuppression (IS) (34.3%) than those on two drug IS (13.2%) (P=or<0.01). Ecoli (23.1%), Pseudomonas (11.1%), Salmonella (8.8%), Klebsiella (8.8%) and Staphylococai (8.3%) were the major organisms producing IRRI. IRRI is frequent (27.8%) during the first six months. Present study denotes that IRRI is a major cause of acute failure in RTR. PMID:15859909

  8. Outbreak of acute fluoride poisoning caused by a fluoride overfeed, Mississippi, 1993.

    PubMed Central

    Penman, A D; Brackin, B T; Embrey, R

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine the extent and confirm the cause of an August 1993 outbreak of acute fluoride poisoning in a small Mississippi community, thought to result from excess fluoride in the public water supply. METHODS: State health department investigators interviewed patrons of a restaurant where the outbreak first became manifest and obtained blood and urine samples for measurement of fluoride levels. State health department staff conducted a random sample telephone survey of community households. Public health environmentalists obtained water and ice samples from the restaurant and tap water samples from a household close to one of the town's water treatment plant for analysis. Health department investigators and town water department officials inspected the fluoridation system at the town's main water treatment plant. RESULTS: Thirty-four of 62 restaurant patrons reported acute gastrointestinal illness over a 24-hour period. Twenty of 61 households that used the community water supply reported one or more residents with acute gastrointestinal illness over a four-day period, compared with 3 of 13 households that did not use the community water supply. Restaurant water and ice samples contained more than 40 milligrams of fluoride per liter (mg/L), more than 20 times the recommended limit, and a tap water sample from a house located near the main treatment plant contained 200 mg/l of fluoride. An investigation determined that a faulty feed pump at one of the town's two treatment plants had allowed saturated fluoride solution to siphon from the saturator tank into the ground reservoir and that a large bolus of this overfluoridated water had been pumped accidentally into the town system. CONCLUSIONS: Correct installation and regular inspection and maintenance of fluoridation systems are needed to prevent such incidents. PMID:9323392

  9. Case Report: Human Bocavirus Associated Pneumonia as Cause of Acute Injury, Cologne, Germany.

    PubMed

    Krakau, Michael; Gerbershagen, Kathrin; Frost, Ulrich; Hinzke, Markus; Brockmann, Michael; Schildgen, Verena; Gomann, Axel; Limmroth, Volker; Dormann, Arno; Schildgen, Oliver

    2015-10-01

    Although the human bocavirus (HBoV) is known since a decade, limited information about its pathogenesis is available due to the lack of an animal model. Thus, clinical cases and studies are the major source of novel information about the course of infection and the related pathophysiology.In this context, a clinical case of an adult patient suffering from severe HBoV-pneumonia is described that was associated with loss of consciousness followed by acute rib fracture and subsequent neurological disorder.Following initial global respiratory dysfunction the clinical respiratory symptoms recovered but the neurological symptoms maintained after weaning and intensive care in the stroke unit. During the initial phase, an acute active HBoV infection was confirmed by positive polymerase chain reactions from bronchoalveolar lavage fluid and serum.The case further demonstrates that HBoV can cause severe pneumonia, induce secondary disease also in adults, and may be associated with neurological symptoms as previously assumed. PMID:26496262

  10. Splenic infarction – A rare cause of acute abdominal pain following gastric surgery: A case series

    PubMed Central

    Yazici, Pinar; Kaya, Cemal; Isil, Gurhan; Bozkurt, Emre; Mihmanli, Mehmet

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The dissection of splenic hilar lymph nodes in gastric cancer surgery is indispensable for treating gastric cancers located in the proximal third of the stomach. Splenic vascular injury is a matter of debate resulting on time or delayed splenectomy. We aimed to share our experience and plausible mechanisms causing this complication in two case reports. Case presentations Two male patients with gastric cancer were diagnosed with acute splenic infarction following gastric surgery in the early postoperative period. Both underwent emergent exploratory laparotomy. Splenectomy was performed due to splenic infarction. Discussion Because we observed this rare complication in recent patients whose surgery was performed using vessel-sealing device for splenic hilar dissection, we suggested that extensive mobilization of the surrounding tissues of splenic vascular structures hilum using the vessel sealer could be the reason. Conclusion In case of acute abdominal pain radiating to left shoulder, splenic complications should be taken into consideration in gastric cancer patients performed radical gastrectomy. Meticulous dissection of splenic hilar lymph nodes should be carried out to avoid any splenic vascular injury. PMID:25818369

  11. Corticosteroids prevent acute lung dysfunction caused by thoracic irradiation in unanesthetized sheep

    SciTech Connect

    Loyd, J.E.; Bolds, J.M.; Wickersham, N.; Malcolm, A.W.; Brigham, K.L.

    1988-11-01

    We sought to determine the effect of corticosteroid therapy in a new acute model of oxidant lung injury, thoracic irradiation in awake sheep. Sheep were irradiated with 1,500 rads to the whole chest except for blocking the heart and adjacent ventral lung. Seven experimental sheep were given methylprednisolone (1 g intravenously every 6 h for four doses) and thoracic irradiation; control sheep received only irradiation. In irradiated control sheep, lung lymph flow increased from baseline (7.6 ml/h) to peak at 3 h (13.2), and lung lymph protein clearance increased from 5.1 to 9.7 ml/h. Mean pulmonary artery pressure increased in the irradiated control sheep from 19 to 32.4 cm H/sub 2/O, whereas the lung lymph thromboxane concentration increased from 0.09 to 6.51 ng/ml at 3 h. Arterial oxygen tension in irradiated control sheep fell gradually from 86 mm Hg at baseline to 65 mm Hg at 8 h. Methylprednisolone administration significantly prevented the increase in lung lymph protein clearance, mean pulmonary artery pressure, and lung lymph thromboxane concentration. Methylprednisolone also prevented the fall in arterial oxygen tension after thoracic irradiation, but did not prevent a further decrease in lymphocytes in blood or lung lymph after radiation. We conclude that corticosteroid therapy prevents most of the acute physiologic changes caused by thoracic irradiation in awake sheep.

  12. Alcohol increases circulatory disease mortality in Russia: acute and chronic effects or misattribution of cause?

    PubMed Central

    Leon, David A; Shkolnikov, Vladimir M; McKee, Martin; Kiryanov, Nikolay; Andreev, Evgueny

    2010-01-01

    Background There is a consensus that the large fluctuations in mortality seen in Russia in the past two decades can be attributed to trends in alcohol consumption. However, the precise mechanisms linking alcohol to mortality from circulatory disease remain unclear. It has recently been argued that a substantial number of such deaths currently ascribed to cardiovascular disorders are misclassified cases of acute alcohol poisoning. Methods Analysis of routine mortality data and of a case–control study of mortality among working-age (25–54 years) men occurring in the Russian city of Izhevsk, west of the Ural mountains, 2003–05. Interviews were carried out with proxy informants for both the dead cases (N?=?1750) and the controls (N?=?1750) selected at random from a population register. Mortality was analysed according to indicators of alcohol problems. Results Hazardous drinking was associated with an increased risk of death from circulatory diseases as a whole [odds ratio (OR)?=?4.14, 95% confidence interval (CI) 3.23, 5.31] adjusted for age, smoking and education. The association with alcoholic cardiomyopathy was particularly strong (OR?=?15.7, 95% CI 9.5, 25.9). Although there was no association with deaths from myocardial infarction (MI; OR?=?1.17, 95% CI 0.59, 2.32), there was a strong association with the aggregate of all other ischaemic heart disease (IHD; OR?=?4.04, 95% CI 2.79, 5.84). Stronger associations for each of these causes (other than MI) were seen with whether or not the man had drunk very heavily in the previous week. However, associations also remained when analyses were restricted to subjects with no evidence of recent heavy drinking, suggesting that misclassification of acute alcohol poisonings is unlikely to explain these overall associations. Conclusion Taken as a whole, the available evidence suggests that the positive association of alcohol with increased cardiovascular disease mortality may be best explained as being the result of a combination of chronic and acute alcohol consumption resulting in alcohol-related cardiac disorders, especially cardiomyopathy, rather than being due to misclassification of acute alcohol poisoning. Further work is required to understand the mechanisms underlying the link between heavy alcohol consumption and deaths classified as being due to IHD (other than MI). PMID:20591986

  13. Understanding the Acute Skin Injury Mechanism Caused by Player-Surface Contact During Soccer

    PubMed Central

    van den Eijnde, Wilbert A.J.; Peppelman, Malou; Lamers, Edwin A.D.; van de Kerkhof, Peter C.M.; van Erp, Piet E.J.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Superficial skin injuries are considered minor, and their incidence is probably underestimated. Insight into the incidence and mechanism of acute skin injury can be helpful in developing suitable preventive measures and safer playing surfaces for soccer and other field sports. Purpose: To gain insight into the incidence and severity of skin injuries related to soccer and to describe the skin injury mechanism due to player-surface contact. Study Design: Systematic review; Level of evidence, 4. Methods: The prevention model by van Mechelen et al (1992) combined with the injury causation model of Bahr and Krosshaug (2005) were used as a framework for the survey to describe the skin injury incidence and mechanism caused by player-surface contact. Results: The reviewed literature showed that common injury reporting methods are mainly based on time lost from participation or the need for medical attention. Because skin abrasions seldom lead to absence or medical attention, they are often not reported. When reported, the incidence of abrasion/laceration injuries varies from 0.8 to 6.1 injuries per 1000 player-hours. Wound assessment techniques such as the Skin Damage Area and Severity Index can be a valuable tool to obtain a more accurate estimation of the incidence and severity of acute skin injuries. Conclusion: The use of protective equipment, a skin lubricant, or wet surface conditions has a positive effect on preventing abrasion-type injuries from artificial turf surfaces. The literature also shows that essential biomechanical information of the sliding event is lacking, such as how energy is transferred to the area of contact. From a clinical and histological perspective, there are strong indications that a sliding-induced skin lesion is caused by mechanical rather than thermal injury to the skin. PMID:26535330

  14. Acute upregulation of hedgehog signaling in mice causes differential effects on cranial morphology

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Nandini; Dutka, Tara; Devenney, Benjamin M.; Kawasaki, Kazuhiko; Reeves, Roger H.; Richtsmeier, Joan T.

    2015-01-01

    Hedgehog (HH) signaling, and particularly signaling by sonic hedgehog (SHH), is implicated in several essential activities during morphogenesis, and its misexpression causes a number of developmental disorders in humans. In particular, a reduced mitogenic response of cerebellar granule cell precursors to SHH signaling in a mouse model for Down syndrome (DS), Ts65Dn, is substantially responsible for reduced cerebellar size. A single treatment of newborn trisomic mice with an agonist of the SHH pathway (SAG) normalizes cerebellar morphology and restores some cognitive deficits, suggesting a possible therapeutic application of SAG for treating the cognitive impairments of DS. Although the beneficial effects on the cerebellum are compelling, inappropriate activation of the HH pathway causes anomalies elsewhere in the head, particularly in the formation and patterning of the craniofacial skeleton. To determine whether an acute treatment of SAG has an effect on craniofacial morphology, we quantitatively analyzed the cranial form of adult euploid and Ts65Dn mice that were injected with either SAG or vehicle at birth. We found significant deformation of adult craniofacial shape in some animals that had received SAG at birth. The most pronounced differences between the treated and untreated mice were in the midline structures of the facial skeleton. The SAG-driven craniofacial dysmorphogenesis was dose-dependent and possibly incompletely penetrant at lower concentrations. Our findings illustrate that activation of HH signaling, even with an acute postnatal stimulation, can lead to localized dysmorphology of the skull by generating modular shape changes in the facial skeleton. These observations have important implications for translating HH-agonist-based treatments for DS. PMID:25540129

  15. The Active Oxygen Response of Cell Suspensions to Incompatible Bacteria Is Not Sufficient to Cause Hypersensitive Cell Death.

    PubMed Central

    Glazener, J. A.; Orlandi, E. W.; Baker, C. J.

    1996-01-01

    The inoculation of tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L.) suspension cells with bacterial pathogens that elicit the hypersensitive response (HR) in leaves has been shown to elicit production of active oxygen. This response occurs in two phases, the second of which occurs 1 to 3 h after bacterial addition and is unique to HR-causing interactions. The relationship between the phase II active oxygen response and the HR was characterized using Pseudomonas syringae pv syringae and P. fluorescens (pHIR11), which contains a cosmid clone of the hrp/hrm region from P. syringae pv syringae. TnphoA mutations in complementation groups II through XIII of the hrp cluster blocked the phase II active oxygen response, whereas mutations in the group I hrmA locus did not affect phase II. Despite the normal active oxygen response, bacteria with mutations in the hrmA region did not cause the HR in intact tobacco leaves nor did they induce hypersensitive cell death in cell suspensions. The data indicate that the bacteria do not require the hrmA region to elicit active oxygen production, but a full and intact hrp/hrm region is required to elicit hypersensitive cell death. Therefore, the phase II active oxygen response does not directly cause hypersensitive cell death nor is the response itself sufficient to trigger the HR. PMID:12226215

  16. Sensor Node for Remote Monitoring of Waterborne Disease-Causing Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Kyukwang; Myung, Hyun

    2015-01-01

    A sensor node for sampling water and checking for the presence of harmful bacteria such as E. coli in water sources was developed in this research. A chromogenic enzyme substrate assay method was used to easily detect coliform bacteria by monitoring the color change of the sampled water mixed with a reagent. Live webcam image streaming to the web browser of the end user with a Wi-Fi connected sensor node shows the water color changes in real time. The liquid can be manipulated on the web-based user interface, and also can be observed by webcam feeds. Image streaming and web console servers run on an embedded processor with an expansion board. The UART channel of the expansion board is connected to an external Arduino board and a motor driver to control self-priming water pumps to sample the water, mix the reagent, and remove the water sample after the test is completed. The sensor node can repeat water testing until the test reagent is depleted. The authors anticipate that the use of the sensor node developed in this research can decrease the cost and required labor for testing samples in a factory environment and checking the water quality of local water sources in developing countries. PMID:25951340

  17. Sensor node for remote monitoring of waterborne disease-causing bacteria.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kyukwang; Myung, Hyun

    2015-01-01

    A sensor node for sampling water and checking for the presence of harmful bacteria such as E. coli in water sources was developed in this research. A chromogenic enzyme substrate assay method was used to easily detect coliform bacteria by monitoring the color change of the sampled water mixed with a reagent. Live webcam image streaming to the web browser of the end user with a Wi-Fi connected sensor node shows the water color changes in real time. The liquid can be manipulated on the web-based user interface, and also can be observed by webcam feeds. Image streaming and web console servers run on an embedded processor with an expansion board. The UART channel of the expansion board is connected to an external Arduino board and a motor driver to control self-priming water pumps to sample the water, mix the reagent, and remove the water sample after the test is completed. The sensor node can repeat water testing until the test reagent is depleted. The authors anticipate that the use of the sensor node developed in this research can decrease the cost and required labor for testing samples in a factory environment and checking the water quality of local water sources in developing countries. PMID:25951340

  18. Characterization of Vibrio parahaemolyticus causing acute hepatopancreatic necrosis disease in southern Thailand.

    PubMed

    Kongrueng, J; Yingkajorn, M; Bunpa, S; Sermwittayawong, N; Singkhamanan, K; Vuddhakul, V

    2015-11-01

    Vibrio parahaemolyticus was isolated from shrimp of five farms located in the Pattani and Songkhla provinces of southern Thailand. Using a PCR method targeted to the unique DNA sequences derived from the plasmid (AP2 primers) and the toxin gene (AP3 primers) of V. parahaemolyticus that caused acute hepatopancreatic necrosis disease (AHPND), a total of 33 of 108 isolates were positive. In contrast, all 63 and 66 isolates of clinical and environmental V. parahaemolyticus, respectively, obtained previously from 2008 to 2014 from the same area were negative. This implied that these strains were likely to be the cause of the outbreak of AHPND in this area. Intestinal samples proved to be a better source for the isolation of V. parahaemolyticus AHPND than the hepatopancreas. All isolates were investigated for haemolytic activity, virulence genes, serotypes, genotypes and antibiotic susceptibility. All the AHPND isolates had a unique O antigen, but small variations of the K antigens were detected from different farms. In addition, the DNA profiles of V. parahaemolyticus AHPND isolates were similar, but distinct from those clinical and environmental isolates. It is postulated that the causative agent of AHPND might have originated from one clone and then slightly different serotypes subsequently developed. PMID:25287127

  19. Acute liver failure caused by mushroom poisoning: a case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Erden, Abdulsamet; Esmeray, Kübra; Karagöz, Hatice; Karahan, Samet; Gümü?çü, Hasan Hüseyin; Ba?ak, Mustafa; Cetinkaya, Ali; Avc?, Deniz; Poyrazo?lu, Orhan Kür?at

    2013-01-01

    It is estimated that there are over 5,000 species of mushrooms worldwide. Some of them are edible and some are poisonous due to containing significant toxins. In more than 95% of mushroom toxicity cases, poisoning occurs as a result of misidentification of the mushroom by an amateur mushroom hunter. The severity of mushroom poisoning may vary, depending on the geographic location where the mushroom is grown, growth conditions, the amount of toxin delivered, and the genetic characteristics of the mushroom. Amanita phalloides is the most common and fatal cause of mushroom poisoning. This mushroom contains amanitins, which are powerful hepatotoxins that inhibit RNA polymerase II in liver. Mushroom poisoning is a relatively rare cause of acute liver failure. A 63-year-old male patient was admitted to the emergency room with weakness, nausea, vomiting, and diarrhea. He reported ingesting several wild mushrooms about 36 hours earlier. In this article we report a case of lethal Amanita phalloides intoxication from stored mushrooms. PMID:24294010

  20. Acute liver failure caused by mushroom poisoning: a case report and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Erden, Abdulsamet; Esmeray, Kübra; Karagöz, Hatice; Karahan, Samet; Gümü?çü, Hasan Hüseyin; Ba?ak, Mustafa; Çetinkaya, Ali; Avc?, Deniz; Poyrazo?lu, Orhan Kür?at

    2013-01-01

    It is estimated that there are over 5,000 species of mushrooms worldwide. Some of them are edible and some are poisonous due to containing significant toxins. In more than 95% of mushroom toxicity cases, poisoning occurs as a result of misidentification of the mushroom by an amateur mushroom hunter. The severity of mushroom poisoning may vary, depending on the geographic location where the mushroom is grown, growth conditions, the amount of toxin delivered, and the genetic characteristics of the mushroom. Amanita phalloides is the most common and fatal cause of mushroom poisoning. This mushroom contains amanitins, which are powerful hepatotoxins that inhibit RNA polymerase II in liver. Mushroom poisoning is a relatively rare cause of acute liver failure. A 63-year-old male patient was admitted to the emergency room with weakness, nausea, vomiting, and diarrhea. He reported ingesting several wild mushrooms about 36 hours earlier. In this article we report a case of lethal Amanita phalloides intoxication from stored mushrooms. PMID:24294010

  1. The Role of Adipose Tissue and Obesity in Causing Treatment Resistance of Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Sheng, Xia; Mittelman, Steven D.

    2014-01-01

    Obesity is responsible for ~90,000 cancer deaths/year, increasing cancer incidence and impairing its treatment. Obesity has also been shown to impact hematological malignancies, through as yet unknown mechanisms. Adipocytes are present in bone marrow and the microenvironments of many types of cancer, and have been found to promote cancer cell survival. In this review, we explore several ways in which obesity might cause leukemia treatment resistance. Obese patients may be at a treatment disadvantage due to altered pharmacokinetics of chemotherapy and dosage “capping” based on ideal body weight. The adipose tissue provides fuel to cancer cells in the form of amino acids and free fatty acids. Adipocytes have been shown to cause cancer cells to resist chemotherapy-induced apoptosis. In addition, obese adipose tissue is phenotypically altered, producing a milieu of pro-inflammatory adipokines and cytokines, some of which have been linked to cancer progression. Given the prevalence of obesity, understanding its role and adipose tissue in acute lymphoblastic leukemia treatment is necessary for evaluating current treatment regimen and revealing new therapeutic targets. PMID:24926474

  2. Genotyping of virulence plasmid from Vibrio parahaemolyticus isolates causing acute hepatopancreatic necrosis disease in shrimp.

    PubMed

    Han, Jee Eun; Tang, Kathy F J; Lightner, Donald V

    2015-08-20

    Acute hepatopancreatic necrosis disease (AHPND) has caused severe mortalities in farmed penaeid shrimp throughout SE Asia and Mexico. The causative agent of AHPND is the marine bacterium Vibrio parahaemolyticus, which secretes PirA- and PirB-like binary toxin that caused deterioration in the hepatopancreas of infected shrimp. The genes responsible for the production of this toxin are located in a large plasmid residing within the bacterial cells. We analyzed the plasmid sequence from the whole genome sequences of AHPND-V. parahaemolyticus isolates and identified 2 regions that exhibit a clear geographical variation: a 4243-bp Tn3-like transposon and a 9-bp small sequence repeat (SSR). The Tn3-like transposon was only found in the isolates from Mexico and 2 unspecified Central American countries, but not in SE Asian isolates from China, Vietnam, and Thailand. We developed PCR methods to characterize AHPND-V. parahaemolyticus isolates as either Mexican-type or SE Asian-type based on the presence of the Tn3-like transposon. The SSR is found within the coding region of a hypothetical protein and has either 4, 5, or 6 repeat units. SSRs with 4 repeat units were found in isolates from Vietnam, China, and Thailand. SSRs with 5 repeat units were found in some Vietnamese isolates, and SSRs with 6 repeat units were only found in the Mexican isolates. PMID:26290509

  3. Severe acute otitis media caused by mucoid Streptococcus pyogenes in a previously healthy adult.

    PubMed

    Kakuta, Risako; Yano, Hisakazu; Hidaka, Hiroshi; Miyazaki, Hiromitsu; Irimada, Mihoko; Oda, Kiyoshi; Arai, Kazuaki; Ozawa, Daiki; Takahashi, Takashi; Kaku, Mitsuo; Katori, Yukio

    2014-01-01

    Streptococcus (S.) pyogenes is well recognized as the most common pathogen causing pharyngotonsillitis in school-age children. In Japan, mucoid Streptococcus pneumoniae is well known as a causative agent of severe acute otitis media (AOM); however, mucoid S. pyogenes has rarely been reported. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of an AOM patient caused by mucoid S. pyogenes in Japan. A 36-year-old previously healthy female was referred to our hospital with suspicion of cerebrospinal otorrhea due to increasing otalgia accompanied by headache following myringotomy. Bacterial cultures of middle ear secretions were performed, and mucoid-form colonies surrounded by zones of complete ?-hemolysis were produced on sheep's blood agar. Antigen-agglutination test results were positive for S. pyogenes, and thus the patient received treatment with panipenem-betamipron 2.0 g/day for 10 days, which resolved nearly all symptoms. The bacteriological features of this strain were then investigated. The M-protein genotype encoded by the emm gene, the major virulence factor of S. pyogenes, was determined to be emm75. Generally, S. pyogenes forms colonies having non-mucoid matt appearances based on ?-hemolysis of sheep's blood agar. The mucoid phenotype results from abundant production of hyaluronic acid capsular polysaccharide, a key virulence determinant. emm75 is common in noninvasive, but less common in invasive disease. In conclusion, mucoid S. pyogenes can cause severe infection even in previously healthy persons. Emergence of mucoid S. pyogenes and drug resistance trends should be monitored in the future. PMID:24727832

  4. Isolation and Molecular Detection of Gram Negative Bacteria Causing Urinary Tract Infection in Patients Referred to Shahrekord Hospitals, Iran

    PubMed Central

    Tajbakhsh, Elahe; Tajbakhsh, Sara; Khamesipour, Faham

    2015-01-01

    Background: Urinary Tract Infections (UTI), and their complications, cause serious health problems, which affect millions of people every year. Infections of the urinary tract are the second most common type of infection in the body and approximately 20% of women are especially prone to UTIs for reasons not yet well understood. Urinary Tract Infections in men are not as common as in women yet can be very serious when they do occur. Accurate identification of bacterial isolates is an essential task of the clinical microbiology laboratory. Objectives: The purpose of this study was to determine the incidence and variety of the causative microbial agents of UTIs in patients who had referred to a medical laboratory of Kashani and Hajar hospital in Shahrekord, Iran. Patients and Methods: In this cross-sectional study 147 urine samples of patients (urine test results were positive for UTIs) were examined during April to September 2013. A total of 147 urine samples of patients with clinical symptoms of UTI who had been referred to a medical laboratory of Kashani and Hajar hospital in Shahrekord (Iran), were collected and processed immediately for laboratory analysis. Results: Escherichia coli was identified as the most common causative agent of UTIs (51.70% of total isolates in both sexes), followed by Klebsiella pneumoniae (K. Pneumoniae) (16.32%). Frequency of Proteus spp., Acinetobacter spp., Entrobacter spp., Citrobacter spp., Pseudomonas aeruginosa (P. aeruginosa) and Providencia spp. was 10.88%, 6.12%, 5.44%, 4.08%, 3.40% and 2.04%, respectively. Statistical analysis by Fisher exact test showed that there was no significant relationship between the type of bacteria and gender (P > 0.05). Chi square test showed that there was no significant relationship between the type of bacteria and the use of catheter and age group (P > 0.05). However, there was a significant relationship between the type of bacteria and the history of hospitalization (P > 0.05). Conclusions: Our findings implied that a wide range of bacteria could be involved in creating urinary tract infection in patients referred to a medical laboratory of Kashani and Hajar hospital in Shahrekord, Iran. Regardless of age, sex and the use of catheter, a wide range of bacteria could be involved in urinary tract infections. PMID:26082853

  5. Programmed Allee effect in bacteria causes a tradeoff between population spread and survival.

    PubMed

    Smith, Robert; Tan, Cheemeng; Srimani, Jaydeep K; Pai, Anand; Riccione, Katherine A; Song, Hao; You, Lingchong

    2014-02-01

    Dispersal is necessary for spread into new habitats, but it has also been shown to inhibit spread. Theoretical studies have suggested that the presence of a strong Allee effect may account for these counterintuitive observations. Experimental demonstration of this notion is lacking due to the difficulty in quantitative analysis of such phenomena in a natural setting. We engineered Escherichia coli to exhibit a strong Allee effect and examined how the Allee effect would affect the spread of the engineered bacteria. We showed that the Allee effect led to a biphasic dependence of bacterial spread on the dispersal rate: spread is promoted for intermediate dispersal rates but inhibited at low or high dispersal rates. The shape of this dependence is contingent upon the initial density of the source population. Moreover, the Allee effect led to a tradeoff between effectiveness of population spread and survival: increasing the number of target patches during dispersal allows more effective spread, but it simultaneously increases the risk of failing to invade or of going extinct. We also observed that total population growth is transiently maximized at an intermediate number of target patches. Finally, we demonstrate that fluctuations in cell growth may contribute to the paradoxical relationship between dispersal and spread. Our results provide direct experimental evidence that the Allee effect can explain the apparently paradoxical effects of dispersal on spread and have implications for guiding the spread of cooperative organisms. PMID:24449896

  6. Molecular Identification of Rhizomucor pusillus as a Cause of Sinus-Orbital Zygomycosis in a Patient with Acute Myelogenous Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Iwen, Peter C.; Freifeld, Alison G.; Sigler, Lynne; Tarantolo, Stefano R.

    2005-01-01

    Sinus-orbital zygomycosis caused by Rhizomucor pusillus in a patient with acute myelogenous leukemia is described. Identification was achieved by sequencing of the internal transcribed spacer (ITS) regions of the rRNA gene and by expression of zygospores in mating. This report highlights the value of ITS sequencing as a diagnostic tool for the identification of R. pusillus and expands the understanding of infection types caused by this zygomycete. PMID:16272531

  7. Marine sulfate-reducing bacteria cause serious corrosion of iron under electroconductive biogenic mineral crust

    PubMed Central

    Enning, Dennis; Venzlaff, Hendrik; Garrelfs, Julia; Dinh, Hang T; Meyer, Volker; Mayrhofer, Karl; Hassel, Achim W; Stratmann, Martin; Widdel, Friedrich

    2012-01-01

    Iron (Fe0) corrosion in anoxic environments (e.g. inside pipelines), a process entailing considerable economic costs, is largely influenced by microorganisms, in particular sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB). The process is characterized by formation of black crusts and metal pitting. The mechanism is usually explained by the corrosiveness of formed H2S, and scavenge of ‘cathodic’ H2 from chemical reaction of Fe0 with H2O. Here we studied peculiar marine SRB that grew lithotrophically with metallic iron as the only electron donor. They degraded up to 72% of iron coupons (10 mm × 10 mm × 1 mm) within five months, which is a technologically highly relevant corrosion rate (0.7 mm Fe0 year?1), while conventional H2-scavenging control strains were not corrosive. The black, hard mineral crust (FeS, FeCO3, Mg/CaCO3) deposited on the corroding metal exhibited electrical conductivity (50 S m?1). This was sufficient to explain the corrosion rate by electron flow from the metal (4Fe0 ? 4Fe2+ + 8e?) through semiconductive sulfides to the crust-colonizing cells reducing sulfate (8e? + SO42? + 9H+ ? HS? + 4H2O). Hence, anaerobic microbial iron corrosion obviously bypasses H2 rather than depends on it. SRB with such corrosive potential were revealed at naturally high numbers at a coastal marine sediment site. Iron coupons buried there were corroded and covered by the characteristic mineral crust. It is speculated that anaerobic biocorrosion is due to the promiscuous use of an ecophysiologically relevant catabolic trait for uptake of external electrons from abiotic or biotic sources in sediments. PMID:22616633

  8. Bacteria Etiological Agents Causing Lower Respiratory Tract Infections and Their Resistance Patterns

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Salman; Priti, Singh; Ankit, Sachan

    2015-01-01

    Background: Lower respiratory tract infections (LTRIs) are among the most common infectious diseases with potential life-threatening complications. Methods: The study consisted of 426 patients with suspected LTRIs from mid and far western region of Nepal between September 2011 and July 2014. The specimens were collected and processed according to the standard microbiological methods at the Central Laboratory of Microbiology of Nepalgunj Medical College, Nepal. Results: Among the isolated Gram-positive organisms, Streptococcus pneumonia (n = 30, 51.7%) was the most predominant pathogen, followed by Staphylococcus aureus (n = 28, 48.3%). Among the isolated Gram-negative organisms, Pseudomonas aeruginosa (n = 71, 35.32%) was the most predominant pathogen, followed by Haemophilus influenzae (n = 68, 33.83%), Klebsiella pneumonia (n = 36, 17.19%), and Escherichia coli (n = 26, 12.94%). The pattern of resistance varied regarding the bacteria species, and there were multi-resistant isolates. Also, a significant difference (P < 0.05) was observed between males and females for each type of bacterial species. Among 259 isolates, 86 (33.20%) were from children aged 1-10 years, which were statistically significant (P < 0.05) compared to the other age groups. Conclusions: P. aeruginosa and H. influenzae (Gram-negative) and S. pnemoniae (Gram-positive) were the most common bacterial isolates recovered from LTRIs. Age group of 1-10 years old was at a higher risk. Many isolates showed appreciable levels of antibiotic resistance due to antibiotic abuse. There is a need to increase surveillance and develop better strategies to curb the increasing prevalence of LRTI in this region of Nepal. PMID:26220641

  9. [Prevalence of the bacteria causing diarrea in a Rosario Hospital, Argentina].

    PubMed

    Gambandé, Telma; Damiano, Mario; Borda, Noemí; Notario, Rodolfo; Aita, José

    2006-01-01

    Bacterial agents causing diarrea in patients attended in a hospital of Rosario, Argentina. The frequency of bacterial agents causing diarrhea can vary in patients of different areas, and through the time. In an epidemiological surveillance we studied 304 patients with diarrheal diseases looking for Salmonella enterica, Shigella spp, Campylobacter spp, Aeromonas spp, Yersinia enterocolitica, and diarrheogenic Escherichia coli. C. jejuni was isolated in 30 patients (9,9 %), Salmonella in 18 (5,9 %), and enteropathogenic E. coli (EPEC) in 7 (2,3 %). Most cases due ton C. jejuni had mucus and/or blood in their feces. Unexpectedly we didn't fine any cases due to Shigella spp. There was much less cases due to EPEC than in our previous studies, and occurred only in children of less than 5 years old. It is necesary to take in consideration that C. jejuni cause nearly all the cases of diarrhea in patients with mucus and blood in their feces actually in our region. PMID:17639815

  10. NPMc+ cooperates with Flt3/ITD mutations to cause acute leukemia recapitulating human disease

    PubMed Central

    Rau, Rachel; Magoon, Daniel; Greenblatt, Sarah; Li, Li; Annesley, Colleen; Duffield, Amy S.; Huso, David; McIntyre, Emily; Clohessy, John G.; Reschke, Markus; Pandolfi, Pier Paolo; Small, Donald; Brown, Patrick

    2013-01-01

    Cytoplasmic nucleophosmin (NPMc+) mutations and FMS-like tyrosine kinase 3 (FLT3) internal tandem duplication (ITD) mutations are two of the most common known molecular alterations in acute myeloid leukemia (AML), and they frequently occur together suggesting cooperative leukemogenesis. To explore the specific relationship between NPMc+ and FLT3/ITD in vivo, we crossed Flt3/ITD knock-in mice with transgenic NPMc+ mice. Mice with both mutations develop a transplantable leukemia of either myeloid or lymphoid lineage, definitively demonstrating cooperation between Flt3/ITD and NPMc+. In mice with myeloid leukemia, functionally significant loss of heterozygosity of the wild-type Flt3 allele is common, similar to what is observed in human FLT3/ITD+ AML, providing further in vivo evidence of the importance of loss of wild-type FLT3 in leukemic initiation and progression. Additionally, in vitro clonogenic assays reveal that the combination of Flt3/ITD and NPMc+ mutations causes a profound monocytic expansion, in excess of that seen with either mutation alone consistent with the predominance of myelomonocytic phenotype in human FLT3/ITD+/NPMc+ AML. This in vivo model of Flt3/ITD+/NPMc+ leukemia closely recapitulates human disease and will therefore serve as a tool for the investigation of the biology of this common disease entity. PMID:24184354

  11. Pathogenesis of acute and chronic diseases caused by cyprinid herpesvirus-3.

    PubMed

    Miwa, S; Kiryu, I; Yuasa, K; Ito, T; Kaneko, T

    2015-08-01

    The pathogenesis of cyprinid herpesvirus-3 (CyHV-3) was studied using different lineages of carp/koi. After exposure to the virus, infected cells were first found in the skin by histopathology and by in situ hybridization. The epidermis of the skin was most severely damaged and often sloughed off in the fish sampled on days 5 through 8, and the fish that were highly sensitive to the virus died within 8 or 10 days after infection. Serum osmolality of the infected fish, particularly just before death, was significantly lower, suggesting that the osmotic shock consequent on the damage to the skin was the direct cause of the acute deaths. On the other hand, clinical and histopathological observations indicate that the carp of a less sensitive lineage most probably died of viral encephalitis around 3 weeks after infection. For these fish, the largest number of infected cells was found in the central nervous system (CNS) sampled on day 12. A substantial amount of viral genome was found in the CNS of carp surviving more than 1 year after the infection. Thus, the CNS is probably a major target for CyHV-3, and the virus can persistently infect the CNS, presumably establishing latency. PMID:25073413

  12. From the nephrologist's point of view: diversity of causes and clinical features of acute kidney injury

    PubMed Central

    Bienholz, Anja; Wilde, Benjamin; Kribben, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is a clinical syndrome with multiple entities. Although AKI implies renal damage, functional impairment or both, diagnosis is solely based on the functional parameters of serum creatinine and urine output. The latest definition was provided by the Kidney Disease Improving Global Outcomes (KDIGO) working group in 2012. Independent of the underlying disease, and even in the case of full recovery, AKI is associated with an increased morbidity and mortality. Awareness of the patient's individual risk profile and the diversity of causes and clinical features of AKI is pivotal for optimization of prophylaxes, diagnosis and therapy of each form of AKI. A differentiated and individualized approach is required to improve patient mortality, morbidity, long-term kidney function and eventually the quality of life. In this review, we provide an overview of the different clinical settings in which specific forms of AKI may occur and point out possible diagnostic as well as therapeutic approaches. Secifically AKI is discussed in the context of non-kidney organ failure, organ transplantation, sepsis, malignancy and autoimmune disease. PMID:26251707

  13. Intestinal Amebiasis: A Concerning Cause of Acute Gastroenteritis Among Hospitalized Lebanese Children

    PubMed Central

    Naous, Amal; Naja, Ziad; Zaatari, Nour; Kamel, Raymond; Rajab, Mariam

    2013-01-01

    Background: Intestinal amebiasis is an important public health problem worldwide. More severe disease is associated with young age, malnutrition and immunosuppression. Aim: The aim of this study is to evaluate the prevalence and characteristic nature of intestinal amebiasis among pediatric population, and compare it with other causes of gastroenteritis. Materials and Methods: This is a retrospective comparative study conducted at Makassed General Hospital between January 2008 and December 2012, including all pediatric patients between birth and 15 years of age, who presented with symptoms of acute gastroenteritis. Results: One thousand three hundred ninety-five patients were included in the study, and were divided into four groups: Group I (Entameba histolytica group = 311 cases, 22.3%), group II (Rotavirus group = 427 cases, 30.6%), group III (bacterial group = 107 cases, 7.7%), group IV (unidentified group = 550 cases, 39.4%). Significant leukocytosis, neutrophilia and positive C-reactive protein were found among more than 50% of admitted Entemaba histolytica cases with a picture of severe invasive disease in young infants. Conclusion: Entameba histolytica can be an emerging serious infection, especially when it finds suitable environmental conditions and host factors, so we should be ready to face it with effective preventive measures. PMID:24404551

  14. Optical Tweezers Cause Physiological Damage to Escherichia coli and Listeria Bacteria?

    PubMed Central

    Rasmussen, M. B.; Oddershede, L. B.; Siegumfeldt, H.

    2008-01-01

    We investigated the degree of physiological damage to bacterial cells caused by optical trapping using a 1,064-nm laser. The physiological condition of the cells was determined by their ability to maintain a pH gradient across the cell wall; healthy cells are able to maintain a pH gradient over the cell wall, whereas compromised cells are less efficient, thus giving rise to a diminished pH gradient. The pH gradient was measured by fluorescence ratio imaging microscopy by incorporating a pH-sensitive fluorescent probe, green fluorescent protein or 5(6)-carboxyfluorescein diacetate succinimidyl ester, inside the bacterial cells. We used the gram-negative species Escherichia coli and three gram-positive species, Listeria monocytogenes, Listeria innocua, and Bacillus subtilis. All cells exhibited some degree of physiological damage, but optically trapped E. coli and L. innocua cells and a subpopulation of L. monocytogenes cells, all grown with shaking, showed only a small decrease in pH gradient across the cell wall when trapped by 6 mW of laser power for 60 min. However, another subpopulation of Listeria monocytogenes cells exhibited signs of physiological damage even while trapped at 6 mW, as did B. subtilis cells. Increasing the laser power to 18 mW caused the pH gradient of both Listeria and E. coli cells to decrease within minutes. Moreover, both species of Listeria exhibited more-pronounced physiological damage when grown without shaking than was seen in cells grown with shaking, and the degree of damage is therefore also dependent on the growth conditions. PMID:18310432

  15. Antibacterial activity of leaves extracts of Trifolium alexandrinum Linn. against pathogenic bacteria causing tropical diseases

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Abdul Viqar; Ahmed, Qamar Uddin; Shukla, Indu; Khan, Athar Ali

    2012-01-01

    Objective To investigate antibacterial potential of Trifolium alexandrinum (T. alexandrinum) Linn. against seven gram positive and eleven gram negative hospital isolated human pathogenic bacterial strains responsible for many tropical diseases. Methods Non-polar and polar extracts of the leaves of T. alexandrinum i.e., hexane, dichloromethane (DCM), ethyl acetate (EtOAc), methanol (MeOH) and aqueous (AQ) extracts at five different concentrations (1, 2, 5, 10 and 15 mg/mL) were prepared to evaluate their antibacterial value. NCCL standards were strictly followed to perform antimicrobial disc susceptibility test using disc diffusion method. Results Polar extracts demonstrated significant antibacterial activity against tested pathogens. EtOAc and MeOH extracts showed maximum antibacterial activity with higher inhibition zone and were found effective against seventeen of the tested pathogens. While AQ plant extract inhibited the growth of sixteen of the test strains. EtOAc and MeOH plant extracts inhibited the growth of all seven gram positive and ten of the gram negative bacterial strains. Conclusions The present study strongly confirms the effectiveness of crude leaves extracts against tested human pathogenic bacterial strains causing several tropical diseases. Since Egyptian clover is used as a fodder plant, it could be helpful in controlling various infectious diseases associated with cattle as well. PMID:23569896

  16. Embolization followed by surgery for treatment of perimedullary arteriovenous fistula causing acute myelopathy

    PubMed Central

    Hsiao, I-Han; Lee, Han-Chung; Yen, Pao-Sheng; Cho, Der-Yang

    2015-01-01

    Background: Perimedullary arteriovenous fistula (AVF) is rare. There are three subtypes, and the treatment strategies for each are different. Subtype B (multiple fistulas) can be treated by either embolization or surgery. On the basis of a case from our treatment experience, we propose a method for achieving optimal outcome while minimizing nerve injury. Case Description: A 51-year-old female was admitted to our hospital with acute myelopathy caused by a perimedullary AVF. Initially, we treated her by embolization using the chemical agent Onyx. Her symptoms improved immediately but gradually returned beginning 1 week later. Two months later, the symptoms had returned to pretreatment status, so we removed the fistulas surgically. Severe adhesions between nerve and occult venous varices were noted during the operation. Afterward, the patient's symptoms improved significantly. Histopathological sections showed an inflammatory reaction around the varices. Conclusions: We initially considered several possible reasons for the return of symptoms: (a) Hypoperfusion of the spinal cord; (b) mass effect of the occult vein varices; (c) residual AVF or vascular remodeling resulting in recurrent cord hypertension; (d) Onyx-induced perivascular inflammation resulting in nerves adhering to each other and to occult venous varices. Clinical, surgical, and pathological findings ruled out the first three, leaving Onyx-induced perivascular inflammation as the probable reason. Given our treatment experience and the pros and cons of the two methods, we propose that initial embolization followed by surgery after 5 days to remove occult venous varices is the ideal strategy for treating perimedullary AVF of subtype B. PMID:26069849

  17. Acute cerebellar dysfunction with neuromuscular manifestations after scorpionism presumably caused by Tityus obscurus in Santarém, Pará / Brazil.

    PubMed

    Torrez, Pasesa P Q; Quiroga, Mariana M M; Abati, Paulo A M; Mascheretti, Melissa; Costa, Walter Silva; Campos, Luciana P; França, Francisco O S

    2015-03-01

    Scorpionism is a public health problem in many tropical countries, especially in North Africa, South India, Latin America and the Middle East. In Brazil, patients with severe scorpion envenoming have mainly cardiovascular events, including acute heart failure, acute respiratory distress syndrome and shock, death is rare. We described 58 accidents presumably caused by Tityus obscurus in Brazilian Amazonia. Patients reported a sensation of "electric shocks" which could last hours. The vast majority of patients presented a clinical picture compatible with acute cerebellar dysfunction, beginning minutes and lasting up to 2 days after the accident. They presented cerebellar ataxia, dysdiadochokinesia, dysmetry, dysarthria, dyslalia, nausea and vomiting. Besides, some patients presented myoclonus and fasciculation which can also be attributed to cerebellar dysfunction or maybe the result of direct action on skeletal muscle. Two patients had evidence of intense rhabdomyolysis and acute kidney injury. The clinical picture in this scorpion envenoming is mainly characterized by an acute dysfunction of cerebellar activities and abnormal neuromuscular manifestations and in some cases muscle injury which are not described in any other region of the world. This work presents clinical, epidemiologic, laboratory and treatment aspects of this unmatched scorpion envenoming in the state of Pará, northern Brazil. PMID:25549940

  18. Dengue and Other Common Causes of Acute Febrile Illness in Asia: An Active Surveillance Study in Children

    PubMed Central

    Capeding, Maria Rosario; Chua, Mary Noreen; Hadinegoro, Sri Rezeki; Hussain, Ismail I. H. M.; Nallusamy, Revathy; Pitisuttithum, Punnee; Rusmil, Kusnandi; Thisyakorn, Usa; Thomas, Stephen J.; Huu Tran, Ngoc; Wirawan, Dewa Nyoman; Yoon, In-Kyu; Bouckenooghe, Alain; Hutagalung, Yanee; Laot, Thelma; Wartel, Tram Anh

    2013-01-01

    Background Common causes of acute febrile illness in tropical countries have similar symptoms, which often mimic those of dengue. Accurate clinical diagnosis can be difficult without laboratory confirmation and disease burden is generally under-reported. Accurate, population-based, laboratory-confirmed incidence data on dengue and other causes of acute fever in dengue-endemic Asian countries are needed. Methods and principal findings This prospective, multicenter, active fever surveillance, cohort study was conducted in selected centers in Indonesia, Malaysia, Philippines, Thailand and Vietnam to determine the incidence density of acute febrile episodes (?38°C for ?2 days) in 1,500 healthy children aged 2–14 years, followed for a mean 237 days. Causes of fever were assessed by testing acute and convalescent sera from febrile participants for dengue, chikungunya, hepatitis A, influenza A, leptospirosis, rickettsia, and Salmonella Typhi. Overall, 289 participants had acute fever, an incidence density of 33.6 per 100 person-years (95% CI: 30.0; 37.8); 57% were IgM-positive for at least one of these diseases. The most common causes of fever by IgM ELISA were chikungunya (in 35.0% of in febrile participants) and S. Typhi (in 29.4%). The overall incidence density of dengue per 100 person-years was 3.4 by nonstructural protein 1 (NS1) antigen positivity (95% CI: 2.4; 4.8) and 7.3 (95% CI: 5.7; 9.2) by serology. Dengue was diagnosed in 11.4% (95% CI: 8.0; 15.7) and 23.9% (95% CI: 19.1; 29.2) of febrile participants by NS1 positivity and serology, respectively. Of the febrile episodes not clinically diagnosed as dengue, 5.3% were dengue-positive by NS1 antigen testing and 16.0% were dengue-positive by serology. Conclusions During the study period, the most common identified causes of pediatric acute febrile illness among the seven tested for were chikungunya, S. Typhi and dengue. Not all dengue cases were clinically diagnosed; laboratory confirmation is essential to refine disease burden estimates. PMID:23936565

  19. Acute infarcts cause focal thinning in remote cortex via degeneration of connecting fiber tracts

    PubMed Central

    Duering, Marco; Righart, Ruthger; Wollenweber, Frank Arne; Zietemann, Vera; Gesierich, Benno

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To study remote effects distant from acute ischemic infarcts by measuring longitudinal changes of cortical thickness in connected brain regions as well as changes in microstructural integrity in connecting fiber tracts. Methods: Thirty-two patients (mean age 71 years) underwent a standardized protocol including multimodal MRI and clinical assessment both at stroke onset and 6 months after the event. Cortex connected to acute infarcts was identified by probabilistic diffusion tensor tractography starting from the acute lesion. Changes of cortical thickness were measured using the longitudinal stream of FreeSurfer. Microstructural damage in white matter tracts was assessed by changes of mean diffusivity. Results: We found focal cortical thinning specifically in areas connected to acute infarcts (p < 0.001). Thinning was more pronounced in regions showing a high probability of connectivity to infarcts. Microstructural damage in white matter tracts connecting acute infarcts with distant cortex significantly correlated with thickness changes in that region (? = ?0.39, p = 0.028). There was no indication of an influence of cavitation status or infarct etiology on the observed changes in cortex and white matter. Conclusions: These findings identify secondary degeneration of connected white matter tracts and remote cortex as key features of acute ischemic infarcts. Our observations may have implications for the understanding of structural and functional reorganization after stroke. PMID:25809303

  20. Topical diclofenac epolamine patch 1.3% for treatment of acute pain caused by soft tissue injury

    PubMed Central

    McCarberg, B H; Argoff, C E

    2010-01-01

    Acute pain caused by musculoskeletal disorders is very common and has a significant negative impact on quality-of-life and societal costs. Many types of acute pain have been managed with traditional oral non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) and selective cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitors (coxibs). Data from prospective, randomised controlled clinical trials and postmarketing surveillance indicate that use of oral traditional NSAIDs and coxibs is associated with an elevated risk of developing gastrointestinal, renovascular and/or cardiovascular adverse events (AEs). Increasing awareness of the AEs associated with NSAID therapy, including coxibs, has led many physicians and patients to reconsider use of these drugs and look for alternative treatment options. Treatment with NSAIDs via the topical route of administration has been shown to provide clinically effective analgesia at the site of application while minimising systemic absorption. The anti-inflammatory and analgesic potency of the traditional oral NSAID diclofenac, along with its physicochemical properties, makes it well suited for topical delivery. Several topical formulations of diclofenac have been developed. A topical patch containing diclofenac epolamine 1.3% (DETP, FLECTOR® Patch), approved for use in Europe in 1993, has recently been approved for use in the United States and is indicated for the treatment of acute pain caused by minor strains, sprains and contusions. In this article, we review the available clinical trial data for this product in the treatment of pain caused by soft tissue injury. PMID:20666849

  1. Esculentin 1-21: a linear antimicrobial peptide from frog skin with inhibitory effect on bovine mastitis-causing bacteria.

    PubMed

    Islas-Rodrìguez, Alfonso Enrique; Marcellini, Ludovica; Orioni, Barbara; Barra, Donatella; Stella, Lorenzo; Mangoni, Maria Luisa

    2009-09-01

    Mastitis, or inflammation of the mammary gland, is the most common and expensive illness of dairy cows throughout the world. Although stress and physical injuries may give rise to inflammation of the udders, infections by bacteria or other microorganisms remain the major cause, and infusion of antibiotics is the main treatment approach. However, the increased emergence of multidrug-resistant pathogens and the production of milk contaminated with antibiotics has become a serious threat in the livestock. Hence, there is an urgent need for the discovery of new therapeutic agents with a new mode of action. Gene-encoded AMPs, which represent the first line of defence in all living organisms, are considered as promising candidates for the development of new anti-infective agents. This paper reports on the antibacterial activities in vitro and in an animal model, of the frog skin AMP esculentin 1-21 [Esc(1-21)], along with a plausible mode of action. Our data revealed that this peptide (i) is highly potent against the most common mastitis-causing microbes (e.g. Streptococcus agalactiae); and (ii) is active in vivo, causing a visible regression of the clinical stage of mastitis in dairy cows, after 1 week of peptide treatment. Biophysical characterisation revealed that the peptide adopts an alpha-helical structure in microbial mimicking membranes and is able to permeate the membrane of S. agalactiae in a dose-dependent manner. Overall, these data suggest Esc(1-21) as an attractive AMP for the future design of new antibiotics to cure mastitis in cattle. PMID:19507197

  2. Acute Cholecystitis Caused by Malignant Cystic Duct Obstruction: Treatment with Metallic Stent Placement

    SciTech Connect

    Miyayama, Shiro Yamashiro, Masashi; Takeda, Taro; Aburano, Hiroyuki; Komatsu, Tetsuya; Sanada, Taku; Kosaka, Shotaro; Toya, Daisyu; Matsui, Osamu

    2008-07-15

    We report the successful management of acute cholecystitis using cystic duct stent placement in 3 patients with inoperable malignant cystic duct obstruction (2 cholangiocarcinoma and 1 pancreatic carcinoma). All patients underwent stent placement in the bile duct, using an uncovered stent in 2 and a covered stent in 1, to relieve jaundice occurring 8-184 days (mean 120 days) before the development of acute cholecystitis. The occluded cystic duct was traversed by a microcatheter and a stent was implanted 4-17 days (mean 12 days) after cholecystostomy. Acute cholecystitis was improved after the procedure in all patients. Two patients died 3 and 10 months later, while 1 has survived without cholecystitis for 22 months after the procedure to date.

  3. Melioidosis as a Cause of Acute Abdomen in Immuno-Competent Male from Eastern India

    PubMed Central

    Karuna, Tadepalli; Khadanga, Sagar; Dugar, Dharmendra; Sau, Biyanka; Bhoi, Priyadarshini

    2015-01-01

    Though melioidosis is rare in India, it has gained importance as one of the most potent emerging infections. In India, the cases have been under-reported because of the lack of awareness. The majority of cases present with multifocal pyogenic infections with septicemia. We present an unusual case of melioidosis presenting as acute intestinal perforation. The organism was ceftazidime resistant, and we successfully treated the case with imipenem and doxycyclin. This case highlights ruling out the possibility of melioidosis in acute abdomen and existence of ceftazidime resistant cases in India. PMID:25949062

  4. Torsion of a wandering spleen. A rare cause of acute abdomen.

    PubMed

    Jude, Nwashilli N; Onochie, Nwajei C

    2015-12-01

    Wandering spleen is a rare condition that accounts for less than 0.25% of all indications for splenectomy. It is characterized by ectopic localization of the spleen owing to the lack or weakening of its ligaments. Torsion is the most common complication due to its long pedicle and high mobility, which may result in acute abdomen. We report a case of torsion in a wandering spleen in a 28-year-old male presenting with an acute abdomen that was treated by splenectomy. PMID:26620993

  5. Acute Rheumatic Carditis: A Rare Cause for Reversible Complete Heart Block

    PubMed Central

    Singh, David

    2015-01-01

    Abstract A previously healthy 18-year-old man presented to the emergency department with weakness, fever, and joint pains and was found to have complete heart block with transient asystole requiring urgent transvenous pacing. After further workup, the patient was found to have complete heart block secondary to acute rheumatic carditis. The conduction system recovered in a step-wise fashion following treatment with Penicillin, and high dose Aspirin, without the need for permanent pacemaker placement. This case illustrates that acute rheumatic carditis, although rare, can present with advanced conduction system involvement, which is reversible if treatment is initiated. PMID:26535164

  6. Acute pyelonephritis can have serious complications.

    PubMed

    Shields, Joanne; Maxwell, Alexander P

    2010-04-01

    Urinary tract infection (UTI) may predominantly involve the lower urinary tract, i.e. acute cystitis, or upper urinary tract consisting of the renal pelvis and kidney,, i.e. acute pyelonephritis The incidence of acute pyelonephritis is higher in young women than in men but the incidence in men over 65 is similar to that in older women. Women have up to a 10% risk of recurrent acute pyelonephritis in the year following a first acute episode. The equivalent risk in men is 6%. Acute pyelonephritis may be uncomplicated and resolve without serious sequelae. A minority of episodes may be complicated by acute kidney injury, papillary necrosis, renal or perinephric abscess or the development of emphysematous pyelonephritis. Acute pyelonephritis is generally caused by microorganisms ascending from the urethra via the bladder into the upper urinary tract. Rarely the kidney may be seeded by blood-borne infection. Ecoli is the most common uropathogen causing pyelonephritis accounting for 70-90% of infections. Species of Enterococci, Klebsiella, Pseudomonas, Proteus and Staphylococci are responsible for the remaining infections. There is a rising incidence in the community of UTI with bacteria that produce extended spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL) enzymes. These ESBL bacteria have developed resistance to antibiotics such as penicillin, cephalosporins and increasingly to quinolones. Risk factors for uncomplicated acute pyelonephritis include recent sexual intercourse, acute cystitis, stress incontinence and diabetes and for complicated acute pyelonephritis include pregnancy, diabetes, anatomical abnormalities of the urinary tract and renal calculi. PMID:20486480

  7. Bovine CCL28 Mediates Chemotaxis via CCR10 and Demonstrates Direct Antimicrobial Activity against Mastitis Causing Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Pallister, Kyler B.; Mason, Sara; Nygaard, Tyler K.; Liu, Bin; Griffith, Shannon; Jones, Jennifer; Linderman, Susanne; Hughes, Melissa; Erickson, David; Voyich, Jovanka M.; Davis, Mary F.; Wilson, Eric

    2015-01-01

    In addition to the well characterized function of chemokines in mediating the homing and accumulation of leukocytes to tissues, some chemokines also exhibit potent antimicrobial activity. Little is known of the potential role of chemokines in bovine mammary gland health and disease. The chemokine CCL28 has previously been shown to play a key role in the homing and accumulation of IgA antibody secreting cells to the lactating murine mammary gland. CCL28 has also been shown to act as an antimicrobial peptide with activity demonstrated against a wide range of pathogens including bacteria, fungi and protozoans. Here we describe the cloning and function of bovine CCL28 and document the concentration of this chemokine in bovine milk. Bovine CCL28 was shown to mediate cellular chemotaxis via the CCR10 chemokine receptor and exhibited antimicrobial activity against a variety of bovine mastitis causing organisms. The concentration of bovine CCL28 in milk was found to be highly correlated with the lactation cycle. Highest concentrations of CCL28 were observed soon after parturition, with levels decreasing over time. These results suggest a potential role for CCL28 in the prevention/resolution of bovine mastitis. PMID:26359669

  8. Endogenous Stress Caused by Faulty Oxidation Reactions Fosters Evolution of 2,4-Dinitrotoluene-Degrading Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Chavarría, Max; de Lorenzo, Víctor

    2013-01-01

    Environmental strain Burkholderia sp. DNT mineralizes the xenobiotic compound 2,4-dinitrotoluene (DNT) owing to the catabolic dnt genes borne by plasmid DNT, but the process fails to promote significant growth. To investigate this lack of physiological return of such an otherwise complete metabolic route, cells were exposed to DNT under various growth conditions and the endogenous formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) monitored in single bacteria. These tests revealed the buildup of a strong oxidative stress in the population exposed to DNT. By either curing the DNT plasmid or by overproducing the second activity of the biodegradation route (DntB) we could trace a large share of ROS production to the first reaction of the route, which is executed by the multicomponent dioxygenase encoded by the dntA gene cluster. Naphthalene, the ancestral substrate of the dioxygenase from which DntA has evolved, also caused significant ROS formation. That both the old and the new substrate brought about a considerable cellular stress was indicative of a still-evolving DntA enzyme which is neither optimal any longer for naphthalene nor entirely advantageous yet for growth of the host strain on DNT. We could associate endogenous production of ROS with likely error-prone repair mechanisms of DNA damage, and the ensuing stress-induced mutagenesis in cells exposed to DNT. It is thus plausible that the evolutionary roadmap for biodegradation of xenobiotic compounds like DNT was largely elicited by mutagenic oxidative stress caused by faulty reactions of precursor enzymes with novel but structurally related substrates-to-be. PMID:24009532

  9. Cutaneous Infection Caused by Macrophomina phaseolina in a Child with Acute Myeloid Leukemia?

    PubMed Central

    Srinivasan, Ashok; Wickes, Brian L.; Romanelli, Anna M.; Debelenko, Larisa; Rubnitz, Jeffrey E.; Sutton, Deanna A.; Thompson, Elizabeth H.; Fothergill, Annette W.; Rinaldi, Michael G.; Hayden, Randall T.; Shenep, Jerry L.

    2009-01-01

    We report a case of Macrophomina phaseolina skin infection in an immunocompromised child with acute myeloid leukemia, which was treated successfully with posaconazole without recurrence after a hematopoietic stem cell transplant. The fungus was identified by DNA sequencing using both the internal transcribed spacer and D1/D2 region of the 28S ribosomal DNA gene. PMID:19386841

  10. Acute Cortisol Elevations Cause Heightened Arousal Ratings of Objectively Nonarousing Stimuli

    E-print Network

    Wisconsin at Madison, University of

    -related processes in animals are often assessed by the acoustic startle reflex. Anxiogenics and fear states enhance the startle reflex but anxiolytics reduce the startle reflex. In rats, acute elevations of corticosterone have been found to reduce the ampli- tude of the startle reflex (Sandi, Venero, & Guaza, 1996), whereas

  11. Acute focal myositis causing significant radiological and histological abnormality settles spontaneously with expectant management

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Afsha; Herdman, Gareth; Srinivasan, Usha

    2013-01-01

    We discuss two cases of reactive focal myositis that had different clinical presentations but responded well to conservative management. These cases demonstrate that reactive myositis can present acutely but resolves quickly with expectant treatment and has a favourable prognosis. PMID:24336581

  12. Chronic treatment with olanzapine increases adiposity by changing fuel substrate and causes desensitization of the acute metabolic side effects.

    PubMed

    Girault, Elodie M; Guigas, Bruno; Alkemade, Anneke; Foppen, Ewout; Ackermans, Mariëtte T; la Fleur, Susanne E; Fliers, Eric; Kalsbeek, Andries

    2014-02-01

    Atypical antipsychotic drugs such as olanzapine induce weight gain and metabolic changes associated with the development of type 2 diabetes. The mechanisms underlying these metabolic side-effects are unknown at the moment. In this study, we investigated the metabolic changes induced by a chronic treatment, as well as the influence of a preceding chronic treatment on the acute effects of olanzapine on glucose metabolism. The effect of chronic olanzapine treatment (±6.5 mg/kg/day, administered via drinking water) on body weight, locomotor activity, body temperature, fat distribution and energy expenditure was investigated in male rats. After 5 weeks, the animals received an acute olanzapine challenge (intragastric, IG) at 3 mg/kg/h during 160 min to investigate the acute effects of olanzapine on glucose metabolism. Chronic olanzapine-treated animals showed a slight decrease in nocturnal body temperature, and increased perirenal fat pad weights as well as plasma leptin. In addition, chronic olanzapine-treated animals showed hyperinsulinaemia with unchanged blood glucose concentrations. The acute challenge with IG olanzapine elevated blood glucose levels and endogenous glucose production in control animals, but not in chronic olanzapine-pre-treated rats. Chronic olanzapine-treated animals also showed reduced locomotor activity and a higher respiratory exchange ratio. Thus, chronic treatment with olanzapine in rats causes desensitization to its acute effects on glucose metabolism but promotes adiposity probably due to a shift from lipids to carbohydrates as an energy source. Chronic exposure to olanzapine changes body fat distribution and insulin sensitivity in an unfavourable direction, but it is still unclear what the primary mechanism is. PMID:24190543

  13. Intralesional hemorrhage and thrombosis without rupture in a pure spinal epidural cavernous angioma: a rare cause of acute lumbal radiculopathy.

    PubMed

    Floeth, Frank; Riemenschneider, Markus; Herdmann, Jörg

    2010-07-01

    Pure spinal epidural cavernous angiomas are extremely rare lesions, and their normal shape is that of a fusiform mass in the dorsal aspects of the spinal canal. We report a case of a lumbo-sacral epidural cavernous vascular malformation presenting with acute onset of right-sided S1 radiculopathy. Clinical aspects, imaging, intraoperative findings, and histology are demonstrated. The patient, a 27-year-old man presented with acute onset of pain, paraesthesia, and numbness within the right leg corresponding to the S1 segment. An acute lumbosacral disc herniation was suspected, but MRI revealed a cystic lesion with the shape of a balloon, a fluid level and a thickened contrast-enhancing wall. Intraoperatively, a purple-blue tumor with fibrous adhesions was located between the right S1 and S2 nerve roots. Macroscopically, no signs of epidural bleedings could be denoted. After coagulation of a reticular venous feeder network and dissection of the adhesions the rubber ball-like lesion was resected in total. Histology revealed a prominent venous vessel with a pathologically thickened, amuscular wall surrounded by smaller, hyalinized, venous vessels arranged in a back-to-back position typical for the diagnosis of a cavernous angioma. Lumina were partially occluded by thrombi. The surrounding fibrotic tissue showed signs of recurrent bleedings. There was no obvious mass hemorrhage into the surrounding tissue. In this unique case, the pathologic mechanism was not the usual rupture of the cavernous angioma with subsequent intraspinal hemorrhage, but acute mass effect by intralesional bleedings and thrombosis with subsequent increase of volume leading to nerve root compression. Thus, even without a sudden intraspinal hemorrhage a spinal cavernous malformation can cause acute symptoms identical to the clinical features of a soft disc herniation. PMID:20213297

  14. Inhibiting Polo-like kinase 1 causes growth reduction and apoptosis in pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia cells

    PubMed Central

    Hartsink-Segers, Stefanie A.; Exalto, Carla; Allen, Matthew; Williamson, Daniel; Clifford, Steven C.; Horstmann, Martin; Caron, Huib N.; Pieters, Rob; Den Boer, Monique L.

    2013-01-01

    This study investigated Polo-like kinase 1, a mitotic regulator often over-expressed in solid tumors and adult hematopoietic malignancies, as a potential new target in the treatment of pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Polo-like kinase 1 protein and Thr210 phosphorylation levels were higher in pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia (n=172) than in normal bone marrow mononuclear cells (n=10) (P<0.0001). High Polo-like kinase 1 protein phosphorylation, but not expression, was associated with a lower probability of event-free survival (P=0.042) and was a borderline significant prognostic factor (P=0.065) in a multivariate analysis including age and initial white blood cell count. Polo-like kinase 1 was necessary for leukemic cell survival, since short hairpin-mediated Polo-like kinase 1 knockdown in acute lymphoblastic leukemia cell lines inhibited cell proliferation by G2/M cell cycle arrest and induced apoptosis through caspase-3 and poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase cleavage. Primary patient cells with a high Polo-like kinase 1 protein expression were sensitive to the Polo-like kinase 1-specific inhibitor NMS-P937 in vitro, whereas cells with a low expression and normal bone marrow cells were resistant. This sensitivity was likely not caused by Polo-like kinase 1 mutations, since only one new mutation (Ser335Arg) was found by 454-sequencing of 38 pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia cases. This mutation did not affect Polo-like kinase 1 expression or NMS-P937 sensitivity. Together, these results indicate a pivotal role for Polo-like kinase 1 in pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia and show potential for Polo-like kinase 1-inhibiting drugs as an addition to current treatment strategies for cases expressing high Polo-like kinase 1 levels. PMID:23753023

  15. Invasive fungal infection caused by geotrichum capitatum in patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia: a case study and literature review

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Guang-Xun; Tang, Hai-Long; Zhang, Xuan; Xin, Xiao-Li; Feng, Juan; Chen, Xie-Qun

    2015-01-01

    Geotrichum capitatum infection has a very low incidence rate with atypical clinical symptoms, making diagnosis difficult, and it has a poor prognosis. The incidence is even more rare in China. This paper reports the first case of infection caused by G. capitatum during bone marrow suppression after chemotherapy in a Chinese patient with acute lymphoblastic leukemia. In addition, it reports a systematic literature review of diagnosis and treatment. The patient with acute lymphoblastic leukemia was confirmed to be infected with G. capitatum, involving lung, liver and skin, through a blood culture test. Caspofungin, amphotericin B loposome, and a combination therapy of amphotericin B liposome and voriconazole were used in succession for treatment. Despite normal body temperature and a slight improvement of clinical symptoms with the combination therapy treatment, the patient died 40 days after chemotherapy due to heart and lung failure. PMID:26550401

  16. [Acute renal failure, intravascular hemolysis and toxic hepatitis caused by repeated use of rifampicin (case report)].

    PubMed

    Sefer, S; Ivanusa, M; Kes, P; Ratkovi?-Gusi?, I; Vasilj, D

    1999-01-01

    We report the case of a 57-year-old man treated with interrupted rifampicin therapy for urinary tract tuberculosis who experienced acute renal failure, intravascular hemolysis and toxic hepatitis. This combined adverse reactions are rare. Supportive treatment with dialysis and withdrawal of rifampicin result with complete recovery. Interrupted and intermittent therapy with rifampicin should be avoided and noncompliant patients should be given alternative treatment when possible. PMID:10437356

  17. Sodium bicarbonate treatment prevents gastric emptying delay caused by acute exercise in awake rats.

    PubMed

    Silva, Moisés T B; Palheta-Junior, Raimundo C; Sousa, Daniel F; Fonseca-Magalhães, Patrícia A; Okoba, Willy; Campos, Caio P S; Oliveira, Ricardo B; Magalhães, Pedro J C; Santos, Armenio A

    2014-05-01

    Physical exercise, mainly after vigorous activity, may induce gastrointestinal dysmotility whose mechanisms are still unknown. We hypothesized that physical exercise and ensuing lactate-related acidemia alter gastrointestinal motor behavior. In the present study, we evaluated the effects of short-term exercise on gastric emptying rate in awake rats subjected to 15-min swimming sessions against a load equivalent to 5% of their body weight. After 0, 10, or 20 min of exercise testing, the rats were gavage fed with 1.5 ml of a liquid test meal (0.5 mg/ml of phenol red in 5% glucose solution) and euthanized 10 min postprandially to measure fractional gastric dye recovery. In addition to inducing acidemia and increasing blood lactate levels, acute exercise increased (P < 0.05) gastric retention. Such a phenomenon presented a positive correlation (P < 0.001) between blood lactate levels and fractional gastric dye recovery. Gastric retention and other acidbase-related changes were all prevented by NaHCO3 pretreatment. Additionally, exercise enhanced (P < 0.05) the marker's progression through the small intestine. In anesthetized rats, exercise increased (P < 0.05) gastric volume, measured by a balloon catheter in a barostat system. Compared with sedentary control rats, acute exercise also inhibited (P < 0.05) the contractility of gastric fundus strips in vitro. In conclusion, acute exercise delayed the gastric emptying of a liquid test meal by interfering with the acid-base balance. PMID:24557800

  18. [Endoscopic treatment of a pediatric patient with acute pancreatitis caused by anomalous union of pancreaticobiliary duct combined with incomplete pancreatic divisum].

    PubMed

    Park, Jun Beom; Seo, Joo Hee; Park, Jung Yeup; Park, Seung Woo; Song, Si Young; Chung, Jae Bock; Bang, Seungmin

    2009-11-01

    The most common causes of acute pancreatitis are microlithiasis and alcohol. In pediatrics, anomalies in pancreaticobiliary system should be considered as possible causes. Among many anomalies, pancreas divisum associated with anomalous pancreaticobiliary ductal union (APBDU) is very rare. APBDU is associated with acute pancreatitis, choledochal cyst, and gallbladder cancer. Pancreas divisum is also a well known cause of acute recurrent pancreatitis. In adult cases with such conditions, the role of endoscopic management including sphincterotomy or stenting through the Santorini duct is well documented. However, it is still controversial to perform endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography in pediatrics. Herein, we experienced a case of 4 year 7 month old female patient suffered from recurrent attacks of acute pancreatitis, which were caused by APBDU and incomplete pancreas divisum. She was treated by endoscopic sphincterectomy of both openings to the Santorinis and Wirsungs ducts. Thus, we report this interesting case with literature review. PMID:19934615

  19. ACUTE TOXICITY, SUBLETHAL EFFECTS AND BIOCONCENTRATION OF CHLORINATION PRODUCTS, VIRUSES, AND BACTERIA IN EDIBLE SHELLFISH: A REVIEW

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report identifies, synthesizes, and summarizes published scientific data concerning toxicity, sublethal physiological effects, and uptake/depuration rates of chlorine, viruses, and bacteria in edible marine shellfish of the United States. The summary may provide environmental...

  20. Cellular correlates of enhanced anxiety caused by acute treatment with the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor fluoxetine in rats.

    PubMed

    Ravinder, Shilpa; Pillai, Anup G; Chattarji, Sumantra

    2011-01-01

    Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) are used extensively in the treatment of depression and anxiety disorders. The therapeutic benefits of SSRIs typically require several weeks of continuous treatment. Intriguingly, according to clinical reports, symptoms of anxiety may actually increase during the early stages of treatment although more prolonged treatment alleviates affective symptoms. Consistent with earlier studies that have used animal models to capture this paradoxical effect of SSRIs, we find that rats exhibit enhanced anxiety-like behavior on the elevated plus-maze 1?h after a single injection of the SSRI fluoxetine. Next we investigated the potential neural substrates underlying the acute anxiogenic effects by analyzing the morphological and physiological impact of acute fluoxetine treatment on principal neurons of the basolateral amygdala (BLA), a brain area that plays a pivotal role in fear and anxiety. Although earlier studies have shown that behavioral or genetic perturbations that are anxiogenic for rodents also increase dendritic spine density in the BLA, we find that a single injection of fluoxetine does not cause spinogenesis on proximal apical dendritic segments on BLA principal neurons an hour later. However, at the same time point when a single dose of fluoxetine caused enhanced anxiety, it also enhanced action potential firing in BLA neurons in ex vivo slices. Consistent with this finding, in vitro bath application of fluoxetine caused higher spiking frequency and this increase in excitability was correlated with an increase in the input resistance of these neurons. Our results suggest that enhanced excitability of amygdala neurons may contribute to the increase in anxiety-like behavior observed following acute fluoxetine treatment. PMID:22232580

  1. Pyomyositis Causing Temporary Quadriparesis During Induction Therapy for Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia: Case Report and Review of the Literature.

    PubMed

    Montazeri, Nazanin; Athale, Uma H; Fulford, Martha; Tarnopolsky, Mark A

    2015-04-01

    Pyomyositis (PM) is a purulent infection of skeletal muscle. It is often associated with immunosuppression in temperate climates. Herein, we report a case of PM causing temporary quadriparesis in a 14-year-old girl undergoing induction therapy for acute lymphoblastic leukemia and we review the reported pediatric cases associated with induction therapy for hematologic malignancies. Early symptoms of PM can be mistaken for the side effects of chemotherapeutic agents. Greater awareness of the clinical picture of PM will aid in early diagnosis and treatment. With appropriate medical therapy and timely abscess drainage, morbidity and mortality is greatly reduced. PMID:24755835

  2. Spectrum of glomerular diseases causing acute kidney injury; 25 years experience from a single center

    PubMed Central

    Naqvi, Rubina; Mubarak, Muhammed; Ahmed, Ejaz; Akhtar, Fazal; Bhatti, Sajid; Naqvi, Anwar; Rizvi, Adib

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Acute kidney injury (AKI) is common in nephro-urological practice. Its incidence, prevalence and etiology vary widely, mainly due to variations in the definitions of AKI. Objectives: We aim to report the spectrum of glomerular diseases presenting as AKI at a kidney referral center in Pakistan. Patients and Methods: An observational cohort of patients identified as having AKI which was defined according to RIFLE criteria, with normal size, non-obstructed kidneys on ultrasonography, along with active urine sediment, edema and new onset hypertension. Results: From 1990 to 2014, 236 cases of AKI secondary to acute glomerulonephritis (AGN) registered at this institution. Mean age of patients was 27.94± 12.79 years and M:F ratio was 0.77:1. Thirty percent patients revealed crescents on renal biopsy. AGN without crescents was seen in 33.05% of cases. Postinfectious GN was found in 14.4%, lupus nephritis in 8.5% and mesangiocapillary GN in 3.4% cases. Renal replacement therapy (RRT) required in 75.84% patients. Pulse steroids were given in 45.33% cases followed by oral steroids. Pulse cyclophoshphamide was given in 23.7% cases and plasmapheresis was used in 3.38% cases. Complete recovery was seen in 44%, while 11.44% died during acute phase of illness. About 19.49 % developed chronic kidney disease (CKD) and 25.84% were lost to long- term follow-up. Conclusion: Although glomerular diseases contribute only 4.19 % of total AKI at this center, morbidity associated with illness and its treatment is more marked than other AKI groups. Another notable factor is late referral of these patients to specialized centers resulting in undesirable outcome. PMID:26693497

  3. Industrial halide wastes cause acute mortality of snow geese in Oklahoma

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Andreasen, J.K.; Stroud, Richard K.

    1987-01-01

    An examination of 97 dead migratory waterfowl collected at an industrial facility showed that the birds had had severe gastric and intestinal hemorrhaging. Water samples taken at on-site waste lagoons contained 6,750 mg/L fluoride, 4,500 mg/L bromine and 1,500 mg/L boron. Brain and liver tissues contained high levels of fluoride, as compared with tissues of birds collected at a control site. From the necropsy results, the high concentration of fluoride in the water samples and the elevated tissue residues, we conclude that the birds died from acute fluoride poisoning.

  4. Biliary Cystadenoma: An Unusual Cause of Acute Pancreatitis and Indication for Mesohepatectomy

    PubMed Central

    Munir, Bilal; Meschino, Michael; Mercado, Ashley; Hernandez-Alejandro, Roberto

    2014-01-01

    The classic presentation of cystic hepatobiliary lesions is usually nonspecific and often identified incidentally. Here we describe the case of a patient presenting with acute pancreatitis resulting from a large centrally located biliary cystadenoma compressing the pancreas. Determination of the origin of the cystic lesion was difficult on imaging studies. Due to the difficult location of the lesion, a complete surgical resection was achieved with mesohepatectomy and the suspected diagnosis confirmed by pathology. The patient continues to do well 2 years post-op with no signs of recurrence. PMID:25506000

  5. Epidemic outbreak of acute haemorrhagic conjunctivitis caused by coxsackievirus A24 in Thailand, 2014.

    PubMed

    Chansaenroj, J; Vongpunsawad, S; Puenpa, J; Theamboonlers, A; Vuthitanachot, V; Chattakul, P; Areechokchai, D; Poovorawan, Y

    2015-10-01

    Acute haemorrhagic conjunctivitis outbreaks are often attributed to viral infection. In 2014, an unprecedented nationwide outbreak of infectious conjunctivitis occurred in Thailand, which affected >300 000 individuals over 3 months. To identify and characterize the virus responsible for the epidemic, eye swab specimens from 119 patients were randomly collected from five different provinces. Conserved regions in the enteroviral 5'-UTR and adenovirus hexon gene were analysed. Enterovirus was identified in 71·43% (85/119) of the samples, while no adenovirus was detected. From enterovirus-positive samples, the coxsackievirus A24 variant (70·59%, 84/119) and echovirus (0·84%, 1/119) were identified. Additional sequencing of full-length VP1 and 3C genes and subsequent phylogenetic analysis revealed that these clinical isolates form a new lineage cluster related to genotype IV-C5. In summary, the coxsackievirus A24 variant was identified as an aetiological agent for the recent acute haemorrhagic conjunctivitis outbreak in Thailand. PMID:25824006

  6. Acute Anticholinesterase Pesticide Poisoning Caused a Long-Term Mortality Increase

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Hung-Sheng; Hsu, Chien-Chin; Weng, Shih-Feng; Lin, Hung-Jung; Wang, Jhi-Joung; Su, Shih-Bin; Huang, Chien-Cheng; Guo, How-Ran

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Acute anticholinesterase pesticide (organophosphate and carbamate) poisoning (ACPP) often produces severe complications, and sometimes death. We investigated the long-term mortality of patients with ACPP because it is not sufficiently understood. In this retrospective nationwide population-based cohort study, 818 patients with ACPP and 16,360 healthy comparisons from 1999 to 2010 were selected from Taiwan's National Health Insurance Research Database. They were followed until 2011. Ninety-four (11.5%) ACPP patients and 793 (4.9%) comparisons died (P?acute treatment, comorbidity control and socioeconomic assistance are needed for patients with ACPP. PMID:26222853

  7. Hepatic lipid peroxidation: caused by acute drug intoxication, prevented by liposomal glutathione.

    PubMed

    Wendel, A

    1983-01-01

    Acute intoxication of mice with high doses of paracetamol (acetaminophen, 4-hydroxyacetanilide) led to a dose-dependent lipid peroxidation (LPO) measured in vivo by ethane exhalation and in vitro by malondialdehyde formation and glutathione depletion. Induction of microsomal enzymes enhanced LPO, inhibition of the monooxygenase systems totally suppressed it. Other drugs activated in phase I, i.e., furosemide, ethylmorphine or aminopyrine acted similarly if the phase II conjugation to glutathione was paralysed by glutathione depletion with diethylmaleate. The concept of lipid peroxidation being an early causal event in hepatocellular destruction was further examined experimentally: 1) Animals with alimentary selenium deficiency lacking liver selenium-dependent glutathione peroxidase activity were much more susceptible to paracetamol-induced liver necrosis and LPO. 2) Normally fed animals were totally resistant when pretreated by intravenous liposomally entrapped glutathione. Administration of free glutathione led to a similar increase in hepatic glutathione content but the animals were much less protected. 3) Isolated perfused mouse liver released quantitatively similar amounts of ethane upon perfusion of paracetamol. The hydrocarbon evolution was reversible and preceded cell disintegration monitored by release of lactate dehydrogenase. 4) The few human data available indicate that man has a much lower activity of hydroperoxide metabolizing enzymes and much less glutathione. The results suggest an involvement of lipid peroxidation in acute chemical primary lesions. A general pathogenic mechanism for liver injury cannot be derived at present from the data available. PMID:6678834

  8. Vaccines for viral and bacterial pathogens causing acute gastroenteritis: Part I: Overview, vaccines for enteric viruses and Vibrio cholerae.

    PubMed

    O'Ryan, Miguel; Vidal, Roberto; del Canto, Felipe; Salazar, Juan Carlos; Montero, David

    2015-01-01

    Efforts to develop vaccines for prevention of acute diarrhea have been going on for more than 40 y with partial success. The myriad of pathogens, more than 20, that have been identified as a cause of acute diarrhea throughout the years pose a significant challenge for selecting and further developing the most relevant vaccine candidates. Based on pathogen distribution as identified in epidemiological studies performed mostly in low-resource countries, rotavirus, Cryptosporidium, Shigella, diarrheogenic E. coli and V. cholerae are predominant, and thus the main targets for vaccine development and implementation. Vaccination against norovirus is most relevant in middle/high-income countries and possibly in resource-deprived countries, pending a more precise characterization of disease impact. Only a few licensed vaccines are currently available, of which rotavirus vaccines have been the most outstanding in demonstrating a significant impact in a short time period. This is a comprehensive review, divided into 2 articles, of nearly 50 vaccine candidates against the most relevant viral and bacterial pathogens that cause acute gastroenteritis. In order to facilitate reading, sections for each pathogen are organized as follows: i) a discussion of the main epidemiological and pathogenic features; and ii) a discussion of vaccines based on their stage of development, moving from current licensed vaccines to vaccines in advanced stage of development (in phase IIb or III trials) to vaccines in early stages of clinical development (in phase I/II) or preclinical development in animal models. In this first article we discuss rotavirus, norovirus and Vibrio cholerae. In the following article we will discuss Shigella, Salmonella (non-typhoidal), diarrheogenic E. coli (enterotoxigenic and enterohemorragic), and Campylobacter jejuni. PMID:25715048

  9. Acute hepatitis B caused by a vaccine-escape HBV strain in vaccinated subject: sequence analysis and therapeutic strategy.

    PubMed

    Luongo, Monica; Critelli, Rosina; Grottola, Antonella; Gitto, Stefano; Bernabucci, Veronica; Bevini, Mirco; Vecchi, Chiara; Montagnani, Giuliano; Villa, Erica

    2015-01-01

    HBV vaccine contains the 'a' determinant region, the major immune-target of antibodies (anti-HBs). Failure of immunization may be caused by vaccine-induced or spontaneous 'a' determinant surface gene mutants. Here, we evaluate the possible lack of protection by HBV vaccine, describing the case of an acute hepatitis B diagnosed in a 55-year-old Caucasian male unpaid blood donor, vaccinated against HBV. Sequencing data for preS-S region revealed multiple point mutations. Of all the substitutions found, Q129H, located in the "a" determinant region of HBsAg, can alter antigenicity, leading to mutants. This mutant may cause vaccine failure especially when associated with high viremia of infecting source. PMID:25542480

  10. Real-Time PCR Threshold Cycle Cutoffs Help To Identify Agents Causing Acute Childhood Diarrhea in Zanzibar

    PubMed Central

    Andersson, Maria; Msellem, Mwinyi I.; Welinder-Olsson, Christina; Petzold, Max; Björkman, Anders; Trollfors, Birger; Mårtensson, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    Molecular assays might improve the identification of causes of acute diarrheal disease but might lead to more frequent detection of asymptomatic infections. In the present study, real-time PCR targeting 14 pathogens was applied to rectal swabs from 330 children aged 2 to 59 months in Zanzibar, including 165 patients with acute diarrhea and 165 asymptomatic control subjects. At least one pathogen was detected for 94% of the patients and 84% of the controls, with higher rates among patients for norovirus genogroup II (20% versus 2.4%; P < 0.0001), rotavirus (10% versus 1.8%; P = 0.003), and Cryptosporidium (30% versus 11%; P < 0.0001). Detection rates did not differ significantly for enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC)-estA (33% versus 24%), ETEC-eltB (44% versus 46%), Shigella (35% versus 33%), and Campylobacter (35% versus 33%), but for these agents threshold cycle (CT) values were lower (pathogen loads were higher) in sick children than in controls. In a multivariate analysis, CT values for norovirus genogroup II, rotavirus, Cryptosporidium, ETEC-estA, and Shigella were independently associated with diarrhea. We conclude that this real-time PCR allows convenient detection of essentially all diarrheagenic agents and provides CT values that may be critical for the interpretation of results for pathogens with similar detection rates in patients and controls. The results indicate that the assessment of pathogen loads may improve the identification of agents causing gastroenteritis in children. PMID:24403298

  11. Non-administration of thrombolytic agents in acute myocardial infarction patients in Hajar hospital, Shahrekord, Iran: prevalence rate and causes

    PubMed Central

    Samieinasab, Mohammadreza; Shirani, Shahin; Hashemi, Sayyed Mohammad; Pourmoghaddas, Ali; Hekmat, Mostafa

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND Cardiovascular diseases are the major causes of mortality worldwide and acute myocardial infarction (AMI) is the leading cause of mortality among cardiovascular diseases. Thrombolytic therapies, especially during the first few hours after the disease onset, can significantly reduce AMI-related mortality. METHODS The current study aimed to determine the prevalence and causes of non-administration of thrombolytic therapy for AMI patients admitted to Hajar Hospital, Shahrekord, Iran, from May until November 2000. Non-probability convenient sampling method was used to select 106 subjects with Q-wave AMI. Data was collected by completing a questionnaire, reviewing medical records, and interviewing with patients. SPSS7.5 was for data analysis. RESULTS A total number of 106 AMI patients were studied among whom 62 (59%) individuals received thrombolytic therapy. Delayed referral to the hospital was the major cause of failure to provide thrombolytic therapy. The cause of non-treatment could not be identified in 15 (19.5%) subjects eligible to receive therapy. CONCLUSION Training general practitioners and individuals involved in this regard along with accelerating the process of patient referral to hospitals can reduce AMI-related mortality. PMID:23696767

  12. An Unusual Cause of Acute-Onset Chest Pain: Spontaneous Pneumomediastinum.

    PubMed

    Berger, Natalie; Nichols, Julianne; Yap, Vanessa; Datta, Debapriya

    2015-04-01

    Spontaneous pneumomediastinum (SPM) is the presence of air in the mediastinum without any precipitating factor or predisposing disease. It is an uncommon, usually benign condition predominantly seen in young males. It typically presents with chest pain or dyspnea. It occurs after intrathoracic pressure changes leads to alveolar rupture and dissection of air along the tracheobronchial tree. It is reported to occur in 1/30,000 to 1/40,000 hospital admissions. Despite its low incidence, SPM should be considered in the differential diagnosis of acute chest pain or dyspnea in young patients. Diagnosis requires a high index of suspicion, as evidence of its occurrence may not be present on examination or chest X-ray. Patients with SPM respond well to medical treatment, with no recurrence in the majority of cases. We report a case of a young healthy male who developed a spontaneous pneumomediastinum and pneumopericardium while playing volleyball and did well with conservative management. PMID:26259296

  13. Severe acute abdomen caused by symptomatic Meckel's diverticulum in three children with trisomy 18.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Anri; Kumada, Tomohiro; Furukawa, Oki; Nozaki, Fumihito; Hiejima, Ikuko; Shibata, Minoru; Kusunoki, Takashi; Fujii, Tatsuya

    2015-10-01

    Meckel's diverticulum (MD) is the most prevalent congenital anomaly of the gastrointestinal tract and often presents a diagnostic challenge. Patients with trisomy 18 frequently have MD, but the poor prognosis and lack of consensus regarding management for neonates has meant that precise information on the clinical manifestations in infants and children with MD is lacking. We describe the cases of three children with trisomy 18 who developed symptomatic MD. Intussusception was diagnosed in Patient 1, intestinal volvulus in Patient 2, and gastrointestinal bleeding in Patient 3. All three patients underwent surgical treatment and only the Patient 1 died due to pulmonary hypertensive crisis. The other two patients experienced no further episodes of abdominal symptoms. In patients with trisomy 18, although consideration of postoperative complications and prognosis after surgical treatment is necessary, symptomatic MD should carry a high index of suspicion in patients presenting with acute abdomen. PMID:25847166

  14. Genotoxic Evaluation of Mikania laevigata Extract on DNA Damage Caused by Acute Coal Dust Exposure

    SciTech Connect

    Freitas, T.P.; Heuser, V.D.; Tavares, P.; Leffa, D.D.; da Silva, G.A.; Citadini-Zanette, V.; Romao, P.R.T.; Pinho, R.A.; Streck, E.L.; Andrade,V.M.

    2009-06-15

    We report data on the possible antigenotoxic activity of Mikania laevigata extract (MLE) after acute intratracheal instillation of coal dust using the comet assay in peripheral blood, bone marrow, and liver cells and the micronucleus test in peripheral blood of Wistar rats. The animals were pretreated for 2 weeks with saline solution (groups 1 and 2) or MLE (100 mg/kg) (groups 3 and 4). On day 15, the animals were anesthetized with ketamine (80 mg/kg) and xylazine (20 mg/kg), and gross mineral coal dust (3 mg/0.3 mL saline) (groups 2 and 4) or saline solution (0.3 mL) (groups 1 and 3) was administered directly in the lung by intratracheal administration. Fifteen days after coal dust or saline instillation, the animals were sacrificed, and the femur, liver, and peripheral blood were removed. The results showed a general increase in the DNA damage values at 8 hours for all treatment groups, probably related to surgical procedures that had stressed the animals. Also, liver cells from rats treated with coal dust, pretreated or not with MLE, showed statistically higher comet assay values compared to the control group at 14 days after exposure. These results could be expected because the liver metabolizes a variety of organic compounds to more polar by-products. On the other hand, the micronucleus assay results did not show significant differences among groups. Therefore, our data do not support the antimutagenic activity of M. laevigata as a modulator of DNA damage after acute coal dust instillation.

  15. Bacteria that are resistant to current antibiotics have wreaked havoc in the clinic and are a primary cause of

    E-print Network

    Marshall, Garland R.

    Bacteria that are resistant to current antibiotics have wreaked havoc in the clinic of weeks. Moreover, as most bacterial strains are becoming resistant to multiple antibiotics, including resistant, and up to 50% are resistant to stronger drugs, such as meticillin3 . Meticillin-resistant S

  16. Esophageal Perforation and Acute Bacterial Mediastinitis: Other Causes of Chest Pain That Can Be Easily Missed.

    PubMed

    Cross, Madeline R; Greenwald, Miles F; Dahhan, Ali

    2015-08-01

    Esophageal perforation is a rare condition that is commonly missed. Male gender and alcohol use are predisposing risk factors. Most of the cases are iatrogenic or traumatic; nonetheless, spontaneous cases are not uncommon. It typically occurs after vomiting or straining as the increased intra-abdominal pressure transmits into the esophagus and results in the tear. One of the main complications is acute bacterial mediastinitis from contamination with esophageal flora. This condition can be life-threatening because it is very frequently misdiagnosed and appropriate management is often delayed.A 49-year-old man presented with worsening sudden-onset interscapular back pain that then changed to chest pain with odynophagia and was found to have fever and leukocytosis.Chest computed tomography revealed signs of mediastinitis with possible esophageal perforation. He reported symptoms started 2 days ago after lifting of heavy objects. Empiric antimicrobial was begun with conservative management and avoidance of oral intake. Barium esophagram and esophagogastroduodenoscopy revealed no signs of perforation or inflammation. His symptoms resolved and he gradually resumed oral intake. Blood cultures grew Methicillin-sensitive Staphylococcus aureus and he was discharged on appropriate antibiotics for 4 weeks. He did well on follow-up 3 months after hospitalization.The case highlights the importance of considering esophageal etiologies of chest pain. PMID:26266352

  17. [A Case of Wernicke's Encephalopathy Presenting with Acute Deterioration of Consciousness Caused by Peripheral Parenteral Nutrition].

    PubMed

    Akiyama, Hideyuki; Saito, Minoru; Ohtsuka, Yoshihisa

    2015-12-01

    We report the case of a 67-year-old woman with Wernicke's encephalopathy(WE), who had been suffering from repeated vomiting and poor oral intake due to both reflux esophagitis and atrophic gastritis. She presented with altered of consciousness, horizontal nystagmus, and gait disturbance, and acute deterioration of consciousness was observed after starting peripheral parenteral nutrition(PPN). Brain MRI showed bilateral high intensity lesions in the medial thalamus and the dorsal midbrain on FLAIR and T2-weighted images. Although brain MRI characteristics are useful for diagnosing WE, it is possible that there are no abnormal MRI findings in its early stages. In addition, only 10-20% of WE cases present with the classical clinical triad of confusion, ophthalmoplegia, and ataxia. Therefore, confirming the diagnosis can be challenging. In general, rapid improvement of symptoms is observed with prompt vitamin B1 supplementation. However, delays in treatment can result in irreversible amnesia and ataxia. Furthermore, in the state of vitamin B1 deficiency, even PPN, not just total parenteral nutrition, can worsen symptoms, and this deterioration is attributed to the glucose load. PMID:26646178

  18. Selective BCL-2 Inhibition by ABT-199 Causes On Target Cell Death in Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Rongqing; Hogdal, Leah J.; Benito, Juliana M; Bucci, Donna; Han, Lina; Borthakur, Gautam; Cortes, Jorge; DeAngelo, Daniel J.; Debose, LaKeisha; Mu, Hong; Döhner, Hartmut; Gaidzik, Verena I.; Galinsky, Ilene; Golfman, Leonard S.; Haferlach, Torsten; Harutyunyan, Karine G.; Hu, Jianhua; Leverson, Joel D; Marcucci, Guido; Müschen, Markus; Newman, Rachel; Park, Eugene; Ruvolo, Peter P.; Ruvolo, Vivian; Ryan, Jeremy; Schindela, Sonja; Zweidler-McKay, Patrick; Stone, Richard M.; Kantarjian, Hagop; Andreeff, Michael; Konopleva, Marina; Letai, Anthony G.

    2014-01-01

    B-cell leukemia/lymphoma 2 (BCL-2) prevents commitment to programmed cell death at the mitochondrion. It remains a challenge to identify those tumors that are best treated by inhibition of BCL-2. Here we demonstrate that acute myeloid leukemia (AML) cell lines, primary patient samples, and murine primary xenografts are very sensitive to treatment with the selective BCL-2 antagonist ABT-199. In primary patient cells, the median IC50 was approximately 10 nM, and cell death occurred within 2 h. Our ex vivo sensitivity results compare favorably with those observed for chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL), a disease for which ABT-199 has demonstrated consistent activity in clinical trials. Moreover, mitochondrial studies using BH3 profiling demonstrate activity at the mitochondrion that correlates well with cytotoxicity, supporting an on target mitochondrial mechanism of action. Our protein and BH3 profiling studies provide promising tools that can be tested as predictive biomarkers in any clinical trial of ABT-199 in AML. PMID:24346116

  19. Acute mass burns caused by o-chlorobenzylidene malononitrile (CS) tear gas.

    PubMed

    Zekri, A M; King, W W; Yeung, R; Taylor, W R

    1995-12-01

    The use of tear gas in controlling riots has been an accepted practice in many countries for the past four decades. In a recent event, a large quantity of tear-gas canisters were used during a situation of unrest in a Hong Kong Refugees' Detention Centre. We report 96 cases of acute burn injury as an unpredicted side effect of o-chlorobenzylidene malononitrile (CS) tear gas. There were 47 females and 49 males with an age ranging between < 1 to 51 years. These burns were categorized as minor burns, with the total body surface area (TBSA) ranging from 1 to 8 per cent with mean percentage of 3. Most of the patients sustained superficial or partial-skin thickness injuries. Only two patients were admitted to the Prince of Wales Hospital Burns Centre because of deeper burns; debridement and skin grafting was required in one of them. The mechanism of burn injury was due to the flame generated from the grenade explosion, direct contact between the hot canister and the victim's skin, and the effect of the chemical powder inside the canisters when it splashed onto the victim's body. We suggest that the noxious transient effects of tear gas are underestimated, furthermore varying cutaneous effects and deep burns may result from its uncontrolled use during riots. There is a continuing need to reassess the potential toxic effects of CS tear gas as a riot control agent and to debate whether its future use can be condoned under any circumstances. PMID:8747730

  20. Analysis of bacterial pathogens causing acute diarrhea on the basis of sentinel surveillance in Shanghai, China, 2006-2011.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yinghua; Zhao, Yanping; Ding, Keying; Wang, Xiaoguang; Chen, Xiuhua; Liu, Yun; Chen, Yue

    2014-01-01

    Acute diarrhea is the most common infectious disease worldwide and its causes vary from one region to another. We aimed to analyze the spectrum and epidemiological characteristics of pathogens from 22,386 outpatients with acute diarrhea on the basis of surveillance data from Shanghai, China, during 2006-2011. The following 8 pathogens were isolated and identified using standard methods: Salmonella, Shigella, Vibrio cholerae, V. parahaemolyticus, enteropathogenic Escherichia coli, enterotoxigenic E. coli, enteroinvasive E. coli, and enterohemorrhagic E. coli. In total, 2,234 strains of pathogens were obtained and the overall isolation rate of these 8 pathogens gradually decreased from 17.1% in 2006 to 7.4% in 2011. V. parahaemolyticus was the most frequently identified pathogen, followed by Shigella and Salmonella. The isolation rate of V. parahaemolyticus notably varied by season, whereas Salmonella and Shigella infections showed little seasonal variation. Age-related variation was also observed. V. parahaemolyticus infection occurred more often in patients aged 20-40 years. S. enterica serovar Enteritidis and S. flexneri were the most common serotypes of Salmonella and Shigella, respectively. The descending trend observed in the isolation rate of pathogens from the current surveillance suggests an urgent requirement or improvement. PMID:25056071

  1. Efficacy of enrofloxacin for the treatment of acute clinical mastitis caused by Escherichia coli in dairy cows.

    PubMed

    Persson, Y; Katholm, J; Landin, H; Mörk, M J

    2015-06-27

    Evidence for the efficacy of antimicrobial treatments in Escherichia coli mastitis is limited. The aim of this double-blinded field trial was to investigate the efficacy of enrofloxacin compared with placebo, with a special focus on survival, in dairy cows with acute clinical mastitis caused by E. coli. Dairy cows (n=116) with acute clinical mastitis were included in the study. A clinical examination was performed and a milk sample from the affected udder quarter was collected for investigation of somatic cell count (SCC) and bacteriology on the first day of treatment (day 0) and at day 3 (clinical examination only), day 22 and day 28. Data regarding culled cows, SCC and daily milk yield were retrieved from monthly milk recording each month until 180?days after treatment. All cows were treated with either enrofloxacin or placebo once a day for three days, starting at day 0. After culturing, 56 cows with confirmed E. coli mastitis remained in the study. Nine (16 per cent) of them died within the first week. Enrofloxacin-treated cows had lower SCC compared with placebo-treated cows at first monthly milk recordings after being treated for mastitis. Treatment with enrofloxacin did not result in a higher probability of survival compared with placebo. PMID:25724541

  2. Clinical efficacy of Colgate Total Advanced Fresh and a commercially available breath-freshening dentifrice in reducing mouth-odor-causing bacteria.

    PubMed

    Vazquez, Joe; Pilch, Shira; Williams, Malcolm I; Cummins, Diane

    2003-09-01

    The objective of this double-blind clinical study was to compare the long-lasting overnight (10- to 12-hour) and 4-hour effects of Colgate Total Advanced Fresh toothpaste to a commercial fluoridated breath-freshening dentifrice in controlling the level of mouth-odor-causing bacteria. Thirty-two adult men and women from New Jersey participated in the randomized, crossover design clinical study. After a 1-week "washout" period of brushing with a regular fluoride dentifrice, subjects refrained from dental hygiene, eating, and drinking in preparation for the morning visit. After providing a baseline salivary sample, subjects were issued a soft-bristled toothbrush and instructed to brush their teeth twice a day (once in the morning and once before bed) for 1 minute with the assigned test dentifrice. After a 7-day product use cycle, the subjects returned to the test site, having refrained from dental hygiene, eating, and drinking. Subjects provided an overnight salivary sample (10 to 12 hours postbrushing). Subjects then ate, brushed for 1 minute with the assigned dentifrice, and returned for 2- and 4-hour postbrushing evaluations. Subjects refrained from dental hygiene, eating, or drinking during the 4-hour evaluation period. To collect the oral microflora samples, subjects rinsed with 10 mL of sterile water for 10 seconds and deposited their samples into sterile tubes. Each collected sample was serially diluted in sterile phosphate-buffered saline and duplicate-plated onto lead acetate agar. When plated onto this medium, mouth-odor-causing bacteria that produce hydrogen sulfide appear as dark pigmented colonies. After 96 hours of incubation, hydrogen-sulfide-producing bacteria were counted, expressed as log colony-forming units per milliliter, and reduction from baseline was calculated. The results of this clinical study support the conclusion that Colgate Total Advanced Fresh provides a significantly greater reduction in mouth-odor-causing bacteria than a commercial fluoridated breath-freshening dentifrice (P < or = 0.05). PMID:14692208

  3. Heme oxygenase-1 expression protects the heart from acute injury caused by inducible Cre recombinase

    PubMed Central

    Hull, Travis D.; Bolisetty, Subashini; DeAlmeida, Angela; Litovsky, Silvio H.; Prabhu, Sumanth D.; Agarwal, Anupam; George, James F.

    2013-01-01

    The protective effect of heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) expression in cardiovascular disease has been previously demonstrated using transgenic animal models in which HO-1 is constitutively overexpressed in the heart. However, the temporal requirements for protection by HO-1 induction relative to injury have not been investigated, but are essential to employ HO-1 as a therapeutic strategy in human cardiovascular disease states. Therefore, we generated mice with cardiac-specific, tamoxifen (TAM)-inducible overexpression of a human HO-1 (hHO-1) transgene (MHC-HO-1 mice) by breeding mice with cardiac-specific expression of a TAM-inducible Cre recombinase (MHC-Cre mice) with mice containing an hHO-1 transgene preceded by a floxed stop signal (CBA-flox mice). MHC-HO-1 overexpress the HO-1 gene and enzymatically protein following TAM administration (40 mg/kg body weight on two consecutive days). In MHC-Cre controls, TAM administration leads to severe, acute cardiac toxicity, cardiomyocyte necrosis, and 80% mortality by day 3. This cardiac toxicity is accompanied by a significant increase in inflammatory cells in the heart that are predominantly neutrophils. In MHC-HO-1 mice, HO-1 overexpression ameliorates the depression of cardiac function and high mortality rate observed in MHC-Cre mice following TAM administration and attenuates cardiomyocyte necrosis and neutrophil infiltration. These results highlight that HO-1 induction is sufficient to prevent the depression of cardiac function observed in mice with TAM-inducible Cre recombinase expression by protecting the heart from necrosis and neutrophil infiltration. These findings are important because MHC-Cre mice are widely used in cardiovascular research despite the limitations imposed by Cre-induced cardiac toxicity and also because inflammation is an important pathological component of many human cardiovascular diseases. PMID:23732814

  4. Heme oxygenase-1 expression protects the heart from acute injury caused by inducible Cre recombinase.

    PubMed

    Hull, Travis D; Bolisetty, Subhashini; DeAlmeida, Angela C; Litovsky, Silvio H; Prabhu, Sumanth D; Agarwal, Anupam; George, James F

    2013-08-01

    The protective effect of heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) expression in cardiovascular disease has been previously demonstrated using transgenic animal models in which HO-1 is constitutively overexpressed in the heart. However, the temporal requirements for protection by HO-1 induction relative to injury have not been investigated, but are essential to employ HO-1 as a therapeutic strategy in human cardiovascular disease states. Therefore, we generated mice with cardiac-specific, tamoxifen (TAM)-inducible overexpression of a human HO-1 (hHO-1) transgene (myosin heavy chain (MHC)-HO-1 mice) by breeding mice with cardiac-specific expression of a TAM-inducible Cre recombinase (MHC-Cre mice), with mice containing an hHO-1 transgene preceded by a floxed-stop signal. MHC-HO-1 mice overexpress HO-1 mRNA and the enzymatically active protein following TAM administration (40?mg/kg body weight on 2 consecutive days). In MHC-Cre controls, TAM administration leads to severe, acute cardiac toxicity, cardiomyocyte necrosis, and 80% mortality by day 3. This cardiac toxicity is accompanied by a significant increase in inflammatory cells in the heart that are predominantly neutrophils. In MHC-HO-1 mice, HO-1 overexpression ameliorates the depression of cardiac function and high mortality rate observed in MHC-Cre mice following TAM administration and attenuates cardiomyocyte necrosis and neutrophil infiltration. These results highlight that HO-1 induction is sufficient to prevent the depression of cardiac function observed in mice with TAM-inducible Cre recombinase expression by protecting the heart from necrosis and neutrophil infiltration. These findings are important because MHC-Cre mice are widely used in cardiovascular research despite the limitations imposed by Cre-induced cardiac toxicity, and also because inflammation is an important pathological component of many human cardiovascular diseases. PMID:23732814

  5. Acute Gastric Dilatation: A Transient Cause of Hepatic Portal Venous Gas—Case Report and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Allaparthi, Satya B.; Anand, Curuchi P.

    2013-01-01

    Gastric pneumatosis (GP) and hepatic portal venous gas (HPVG) have typically been thought of as an ominous radiological sign associated with a grave prognosis, and the observation of HPVG on plain abdominal radiography, ultrasonography, or computed tomography is viewed as a significant finding. It is often associated with severe or potentially lethal conditions warranting urgent diagnosis and possible surgical intervention. Early studies of HPVG based on plain abdominal radiography found an associated mortality rate of 75% primarily due to ischemic bowel. However, modern abdominal computed tomography (CT) has resulted in the detection of HPVG in an increased proportion of nonfatal and benign conditions. We report a nonfatal case of HPVG in a patient with Noonan's syndrome due to acute gastric dilatation in the setting of gastric outlet obstruction caused by a congenital band that is extremely rare in adults. PMID:23819076

  6. Infective endocarditis caused by Scedosporium prolificans infection in a patient with acute myeloid leukemia undergoing induction chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Ochi, Yotaro; Hiramoto, Nobuhiro; Takegawa, Hiroshi; Yonetani, Noboru; Doi, Asako; Ichikawa, Chihiro; Imai, Yukihiro; Ishikawa, Takayuki

    2015-06-01

    Disseminated Scedosporium prolificans infection occurs mainly in immunocompromised patients. The mortality rate is high, as the fungus is resistant to most antifungal agents. Here, we present the case of a 66-year-old female with acute myeloid leukemia who developed infective endocarditis caused by S. prolificans infection during induction chemotherapy. Her 1,3-?-D-glucan levels were elevated and computed tomography revealed bilateral sinusitis and disseminated small nodular masses within the lungs and spleen; it nonetheless took 6 days to identify S. prolificans by blood culture. The patient died of multi-organ failure despite the combined use of voriconazole and terbinafine. Autopsy revealed numerous mycotic emboli within multiple organs (caused by mitral valve vegetation) and endocarditis (caused by S. prolificans). The geographic distribution of this infection is limited to Australia, the United States, and southern Europe, particularly Spain. The first Japanese case was reported in 2011, and four cases have been reported to date, including this one. Recently, the incidence of S. prolificans-disseminated infection in immunocompromised patients has increased in Japan. Therefore, clinicians should consider S. prolificans infection as a differential diagnosis when immunocompromised patients suffer disseminated infections with elevated 1,3-?-D-glucan levels. PMID:25630434

  7. Recurrent gain-of-function mutation in PRKG1 causes thoracic aortic aneurysms and acute aortic dissections.

    PubMed

    Guo, Dong-chuan; Regalado, Ellen; Casteel, Darren E; Santos-Cortez, Regie L; Gong, Limin; Kim, Jeong Joo; Dyack, Sarah; Horne, S Gabrielle; Chang, Guijuan; Jondeau, Guillaume; Boileau, Catherine; Coselli, Joseph S; Li, Zhenyu; Leal, Suzanne M; Shendure, Jay; Rieder, Mark J; Bamshad, Michael J; Nickerson, Deborah A; Kim, Choel; Milewicz, Dianna M

    2013-08-01

    Gene mutations that lead to decreased contraction of vascular smooth-muscle cells (SMCs) can cause inherited thoracic aortic aneurysms and dissections. Exome sequencing of distant relatives affected by thoracic aortic disease and subsequent Sanger sequencing of additional probands with familial thoracic aortic disease identified the same rare variant, PRKG1 c.530G>A (p.Arg177Gln), in four families. This mutation segregated with aortic disease in these families with a combined two-point LOD score of 7.88. The majority of affected individuals presented with acute aortic dissections (63%) at relatively young ages (mean 31 years, range 17-51 years). PRKG1 encodes type I cGMP-dependent protein kinase (PKG-1), which is activated upon binding of cGMP and controls SMC relaxation. Although the p.Arg177Gln alteration disrupts binding to the high-affinity cGMP binding site within the regulatory domain, the altered PKG-1 is constitutively active even in the absence of cGMP. The increased PKG-1 activity leads to decreased phosphorylation of the myosin regulatory light chain in fibroblasts and is predicted to cause decreased contraction of vascular SMCs. Thus, identification of a gain-of-function mutation in PRKG1 as a cause of thoracic aortic disease provides further evidence that proper SMC contractile function is critical for maintaining the integrity of the thoracic aorta throughout a lifetime. PMID:23910461

  8. Acute sodium bicarbonate loading has negligible effects on resting and exercise blood pressure but causes gastrointestinal distress

    PubMed Central

    Kahle, Laura E.; Kelly, Patrick V.; Eliot, Kathrin A.; Weiss, Edward P.

    2013-01-01

    Oral ingestion of sodium bicarbonate (bicarbonate loading) has acute ergogenic effects on short-duration, high-intensity exercise. Because sodium bicarbonate is 27% sodium, ergogenic doses (i.e. 300 mg·kg?1) result in sodium intakes well above the Dietary Reference Intakes upper limit of 2300 mg/day. Therefore, it is conceivable that bicarbonate loading could have hypertensive effects. Therefore, we performed a double-blind cross-over trial to evaluate the hypothesis that bicarbonate loading increases resting and exercise blood pressure (BP). A secondary hypothesis was that bicarbonate loading causes gastrointestinal distress. Eleven endurance-trained men and women (exercise frequency, 4.6±0.4 sessions/wk; duration, 65±6 min/session) underwent testing on two occasions in random sequence: once after bicarbonate loading (300 mg·kg?1) and once after placebo ingestion. BP and heart rate (HR) were measured before bicarbonate or placebo consumption, 30 minutes after consumption, during 20 min of steady state submaximal cycling exercise, and during recovery. Bicarbonate loading did not affect systolic BP during rest, exercise, or recovery (p=0.38 for main treatment effect). However, it resulted in modestly higher diastolic BP (main treatment effect, +3.3±1.1 mmHg, p=0.01) and higher HR (main treatment effect, +10.1±2.4 bpm, p=0.002). Global ratings of gastrointestinal distress severity (0–10 scale) were greater after bicarbonate ingestion (5.1±0.5 vs. 0.5±0.2, p<0.0001). Furthermore, 10 of the 11 subjects (91%) experienced diarrhea, 64% experience bloating and thirst, and 45% experienced nausea after bicarbonate loading. In conclusion, although a single, ergogenic dose of sodium bicarbonate does not appear to have acute, clinically important effects on resting or exercise BP, it does cause substantial GI distress. PMID:23746564

  9. Attitudes of clinical staff toward the causes and management of aggression in acute old age psychiatry inpatient units

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background In psychiatry, most of the focus on patient aggression has been in adolescent and adult inpatient settings. This behaviour is also common in elderly people with mental illness, but little research has been conducted into this problem in old age psychiatry settings. The attitudes of clinical staff toward aggression may affect the way they manage this behaviour. The purpose of this study was to examine the attitudes of clinical staff toward the causes and management of aggression in acute old age psychiatry inpatient settings. Methods A convenience sample of clinical staff were recruited from three locked acute old age psychiatry inpatient units in Melbourne, Australia. They completed the Management of Aggression and Violence Scale, which assessed the causes and managment of aggression in psychiatric settings. Results Eighty-five staff completed the questionnaire, comprising registered nurses (61.1%, n?=?52), enrolled nurses (27.1%, n?=?23) and medical and allied health staff (11.8%, n?=?10). A range of causative factors contributed to aggression. The respondents had a tendency to disagree that factors directly related to the patient contributed to this behaviour. They agreed patients were aggressive because of the environment they were in, other people contributed to them becoming aggressive, and patients from certain cultural groups were prone to these behaviours. However, there were mixed views about whether patient aggression could be prevented, and this type of behaviour took place because staff did not listen to patients. There was agreement medication was a valuable approach for the management of aggression, negotiation could be used more effectively in such challenging behaviour, and seclusion and physical restraint were sometimes used more than necessary. However, there was disagreement about whether the practice of secluding patients should be discontinued. Conclusions Aggression in acute old age psychiatry inpatient units occurs occasionally and is problematic. A range of causative factors contribute to the onset of this behaviour. Attitudes toward the management of aggression are complex and somewhat contradictory and can affect the way staff manage this behaviour; therefore, wide-ranging initiatives are needed to prevent and deal with this type of challenging behaviour. PMID:24642026

  10. Inhibition of Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis Caused by Bacteria Isolated from the Skin of Boreal Toads, Anaxyrus (Bufo) boreas boreas, from Grand Teton National Park, Wyoming, USA

    PubMed Central

    Park, Shawna T; Collingwood, Amanda M; St-Hilaire, Sophie; Sheridan, Peter P

    2014-01-01

    The chytrid fungus Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis is a significant cause of the worldwide decline in amphibian populations; however, various amphibian species are capable of coexisting with B. dendrobatidis. Among them are boreal toads (Anaxyrus (Bufo) boreas boreas) located in Grand Teton National Park (GTNP) in Wyoming, USA. The purpose of this study was to identify cultivable bacterial isolates from the skin microbiota of boreal toads from GTNP and determine if they were capable of inhibiting B. dendrobatidis in vitro, and therefore might be a factor in the toad’s coexistence with this pathogen. Isolates from 6 of 21 genera tested were found to inhibit the growth of B. dendrobatidis. These bacteria represent diverse lineages such as the Gammaproteobacteria, the Betaproteobacteria, and the Bacteroidetes/Chlorobium groups. We propose that these bacteria compete via microbial antagonism with B. dendrobatidis. PMID:24826077

  11. Acute exposure to hair bleach causes airway hyperresponsiveness in a rabbit model.

    PubMed

    Mensing, T; Marek, W; Raulf-Heimsoth, M; Baur, X

    1998-12-01

    Ammonium persulphate (APS) and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) are used as oxidants in many industrial processes and are the main constituents of standard hair bleaching products. In a previous study, it was demonstrated that aerosols of APS induce alterations in airway responsiveness. The present study examined whether exposure for 4 h to a hair bleach composition (containing APS, potassium persulphate and H2O2) or H2O2 could induce airway hyperresponsiveness and/or an obstructive ventilation pattern in a rabbit model. Exposure to the aerosols altered neither baseline airway resistance, dynamic elastance, slope of inspiratory pressure generation nor arterial blood pressure and blood gas measurements. Similarly to APS, hair bleach aerosols containing > or =10.9 mg x m(-3) persulphate (ammonium and potassium salt) in air and > or =1.36 mg x m(-3) H2O2 in air caused airway hyperresponsiveness to acetylcholine after 4 h of exposure. Aerosolized H2O2 (> or =37 mg x m(-3) in air) did not influence airway responsiveness to acetylcholine. The results demonstrate that hair bleaching products containing persulphates dissolved in H2O2 cause airway hyperresponsiveness to acetylcholine in rabbits. PMID:9877493

  12. Acute liver failure caused by ‘fat burners’ and dietary supplements: A case report and literature review

    PubMed Central

    Radha Krishna, Y; Mittal, V; Grewal, P; Fiel, MI; Schiano, T

    2011-01-01

    Globally, people are struggling with obesity. Many effective, non-conventional methods of weight reduction, such as herbal and natural dietary supplements, are increasingly being sought. Fat burners are believed to raise metabolism, burn more calories and hasten fat loss. Despite patient perceptions that herbal remedies are free of adverse effects, some supplements are associated with severe hepatotoxicity. The present report describes a young healthy woman who presented with fulminant hepatic failure requiring emergent liver transplantation caused by a dietary supplement and fat burner containing usnic acid, green tea and guggul tree extracts. Thorough investigation, including histopathological examination, revealed no other cause of hepatotoxicity. The present case adds to the increasing number of reports of hepatotoxicity associated with dietary supplements containing usnic acid, and highlights that herbal extracts from green tea or guggul tree may not be free of adverse effects. Until these products are more closely regulated and their advertising better scrutinized, physicians and patients should become more familiar with herbal products that are commonly used as weight loss supplements and recognize those that are potentially harmful. PMID:21499580

  13. Development of acute pancreatitis caused by sodium valproate in a patient with bipolar disorder on hemodialysis for chronic renal failure: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Cases of acute pancreatitis caused by sodium valproate (VPA) have been reported by many authors thus far. However, most of these were cases with epilepsy. Chronic renal failure is also regarded as a risk factor for acute pancreatitis. Here, we report a case of acute pancreatitis development due to VPA in a patient with bipolar disorder on hemodialysis for chronic renal failure. Case presentation The patient was a 52-year-old Japanese male who was diagnosed as bipolar disorder on hemodialysis for renal failure. He was treated with VPA and manic symptoms gradually stabilized. However, the patient complained of severe abdominal pain. Blood amylase was found to be markedly high, and computed tomography revealed pancreatomegaly and an increased amount of peripancreatic fat. Hence, we diagnosed the case as acute pancreatitis caused by VPA. We discontinued oral medication, and he was started on a pancreatic enzyme inhibitor, antibiotics, and transfusion, and he showed improvement. Conclusion It has been reported that acute pancreatitis induced by VPA is caused by intermediate metabolites of VPA. We consider that patients with renal failure are prone to pancreatitis caused by VPA because of the accumulation of these intermediate metabolites. We need close monitoring for serious adverse effects such as pancreatitis when we prescribe VPA to patients with bipolar disorder on hemodialysis for chronic renal failure, although VPA is safer than other mood stabilizers. PMID:24679075

  14. Protective effect of white tea extract against acute oxidative injury caused by adriamycin in different tissues.

    PubMed

    Espinosa, Cristóbal; López-Jiménez, José Ángel; Cabrera, Lorena; Larqué, Elvira; Almajano, María Pilar; Arnao, Marino B; Zamora, Salvador; Pérez-Llamas, Francisca

    2012-10-15

    Adriamycin (ADR) is an anticancer agent that increases oxidative stress in cells. We evaluated the protective effect of the long term consumption of white tea at two different doses against this drug. For this purpose rats were given distilled water (controls), 0.15 mg (Dose 1) or 0.45 mg (Dose 2) of solid tea extract/kg body weight for 12 months. All the animals received an injection of ADR, except half of the control group, which were given an injection of saline solution. This gave four experimental groups: Control (C), C+ADR, Dose 1+ADR, and Dose 2+ADR. The antioxidant activity (in liver, heart and brain microsomes) was analysed. White tea consumption for 12 months, at a non-pharmacological dose, reversed the oxidative damage caused by ADR, on both protein and lipid levels in all three organs. The heart recovered its antioxidant activity only at the highest dose of tea. PMID:23442621

  15. [Rare cause of acute pancreatitis: phytobezoar in an intraluminal diverticulum in type I duodenal atresia, intestinal malrotation and rudimentary pancreas anulare].

    PubMed

    Kestel, W; Fischbach, W; Wilhelm, A

    1998-04-01

    A 28-year-old woman was hospitalized because of the third episode of acute pancreatitis. No hint for an extrinsic cause was evident. Under conservative treatment pancreatitis and signs of intestinal obstruction were persisting. Imaging procedures showed an undefinite mass in the neighbourhood of the pancreatic caput. Endoscopy revealed a phytobezoar in a wind sock web, a special form of congenital duodenal atresia. Obstructing the papilla of Vater the bezoar had caused acute pancreatitis. After endoscopical removal the symptoms of pancreatitis disappeared immediately. Web excision and duodenoduodenostomy were performed. At operation further anomalies of the gastrointestinal tract frequently associated with duodenenal atresia were found. PMID:9612927

  16. ACUTE KIDNEY INJURY CAUSED BY Crotalus AND Bothrops SNAKE VENOM: A REVIEW OF EPIDEMIOLOGY, CLINICAL MANIFESTATIONS AND TREATMENT

    PubMed Central

    Albuquerque, Polianna L.M.M.; Jacinto, Camilla N.; Silva, Geraldo B.; Lima, Juliana B.; Veras, Maria do Socorro B.; Daher, Elizabeth F.

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY Ophidic accidents are an important public health problem due to their incidence, morbidity and mortality. An increasing number of cases have been registered in Brazil in the last few years. Several studies point to the importance of knowing the clinical complications and adequate approach in these accidents. However, knowledge about the risk factors is not enough and there are an increasing number of deaths due to these accidents in Brazil. In this context, acute kidney injury (AKI) appears as one of the main causes of death and consequences for these victims, which are mainly young males working in rural areas. Snakes of the Bothrops and Crotalus genera are the main responsible for renal involvement in ophidic accidents in South America. The present study is a literature review of AKI caused by Bothrops and Crotalus snake venom regarding diverse characteristics, emphasizing the most appropriate therapeutic approach for these cases. Recent studies have been carried out searching for complementary therapies for the treatment of ophidic accidents, including the use of lipoic acid, simvastatin and allopurinol. Some plants, such as Apocynaceae, Lamiaceae and Rubiaceae seem to have a beneficial role in the treatment of this type of envenomation. Future studies will certainly find new therapeutic measures for ophidic accidents. PMID:24037282

  17. Gastrointestinal mucormycosis causing an acute abdomen in the immunocompromised pediatric patient--three cases.

    PubMed

    Vadeboncoeur, C; Walton, J M; Raisen, J; Soucy, P; Lau, H; Rubin, S

    1994-09-01

    Mucormycosis is an infection caused by a ubiquitous fungus in immunocompromised individuals. Typically, it invades blood vessels, producing thrombosis and tissue infarction. This infection spans all pediatric age groups and can lead to hollow viscus perforation and bowel obstruction. A 30-month old male with large cell anaplastic lymphoma had a bowel obstruction. During emergency laparotomy, an ileoileal intussusception was identified, which required resection and anastomosis. In the pathological specimen, fungi of the Mucorales order were found to be associated with tissue necrosis. On the eighth day of life, a premature infant had abdominal distension secondary to bowel perforation. Partial gastric resection and multiple intestinal stomas were performed. Death occurred soon after, secondary to multiorgan failure. The autopsy and surgical specimens showed widespread mucormycosis. An adolescent had meningococcemia-induced septic shock. During recovery, hemorrhagic colitis developed, which led to perforation. The subtotal colectomy specimen showed widespread mucormycosis. The laparotomy findings are typical (black necrotic tissue involving the bowel), and when seen in the immunocompromised patient, should make one suspect gastrointestinal mucormycosis. Aggressive surgical debridement of devitalized tissue augmented by intravenous antifungal medication is the mainstay of treatment. PMID:7807359

  18. A Rare Case of Toxic Myocarditis Caused by Bacterial Liver Abscess Mimicking Acute Myocardial Infarction.

    PubMed

    Zou, Yuhai; Lin, Lin; Xiao, Hua; Xiang, Dingcheng

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Chills, high fever, right upper abdomen pain, and increased white blood cell count are the main and common clinical features of bacterial liver abscess. It is rare to see bacterial liver abscess present symptoms of myocardial injury first, and this can lead to misdiagnosis. CASE REPORT We report a case of toxic myocarditis caused by bacterial liver abscess. The patient first presented with chest pain, ST segment elevation, and elevated TNI, which misled us to diagnose myocardial infarction, but the coronary artery had no stenosis or obstructive lesions after emergency coronary angiography. Then we modified the diagnosis to toxic myocarditis. Bacterial liver abscess was the proposed etiology after a series of auxiliary examinations. Finally, antibiotics and percutaneous liver puncture catheter drainage were used to improve the clinical outcome. CONCLUSIONS It is rare that patients with bacterial liver abscess first present symptoms of myocardial injury. Differential diagnosis between myocarditis and myocardial infarction should be careful, as myocarditis is a diagnosis of exclusion, and coronary angiography is necessary to confirm coronary disease. Percutaneous liver puncture catheter drainage can effectively cure bacterial liver abscess. PMID:26726772

  19. Excessive caloric intake acutely causes oxidative stress, GLUT4 carbonylation, and insulin resistance in healthy men.

    PubMed

    Boden, Guenther; Homko, Carol; Barrero, Carlos A; Stein, T Peter; Chen, Xinhua; Cheung, Peter; Fecchio, Chiara; Koller, Sarah; Merali, Salim

    2015-09-01

    Obesity-linked insulin resistance greatly increases the risk for type 2 diabetes, hypertension, dyslipidemia, and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, together known as the metabolic or insulin resistance syndrome. How obesity promotes insulin resistance remains incompletely understood. Plasma concentrations of free fatty acids and proinflammatory cytokines, endoplasmic reticulum ( ER) stress, and oxidative stress are all elevated in obesity and have been shown to induce insulin resistance. However, they may be late events that only develop after chronic excessive nutrient intake. The nature of the initial event that produces insulin resistance at the beginning of excess caloric intake and weight gain remains unknown. We show that feeding healthy men with ~6000 kcal/day of the common U.S. diet [~50% carbohydrate (CHO), ~ 35% fat, and ~15% protein] for 1 week produced a rapid weight gain of 3.5 kg and the rapid onset (after 2 to 3 days) of systemic and adipose tissue insulin resistance and oxidative stress but no inflammatory or ER stress. In adipose tissue, the oxidative stress resulted in extensive oxidation and carbonylation of numerous proteins, including carbonylation of GLUT4 near the glucose transport channel, which likely resulted in loss of GLUT4 activity. These results suggest that the initial event caused by overnutrition may be oxidative stress, which produces insulin resistance, at least in part, via carbonylation and oxidation-induced inactivation of GLUT4. PMID:26355033

  20. Tuberculosis (TB) is caused by gram-positive bac-teria known as the Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex

    E-print Network

    Tuberculosis (TB) is caused by gram-positive bac- teria known as the Mycobacterium tuberculosis and, more rarely, wild animal species. We report an M. tuberculosis strain isolated from a wild of the biology and evolutionary history of this widespread infectious disease. Tuberculosis (TB) is caused

  1. Oral clindamycin causing acute cholestatic hepatitis without ductopenia: a brief review of idiosyncratic drug-induced liver injury and a case report

    PubMed Central

    Moole, Harsha; Ahmed, Zohair; Saxena, Nibha; Puli, Srinivas R.; Dhillon, Sonu

    2015-01-01

    Clindamycin is a lincosamide antibiotic active against most of the anaerobes, protozoans, and Gram-positive bacteria, including community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus. Its use has increased greatly in the recent past due to wide spectrum of activity and good bioavailability in oral form. Close to 20% of the patients taking clindamycin experience diarrhea as the most common side effect. Hepatotoxicity is a rare side effect. Systemic clindamycin therapy has been linked to two forms of hepatotoxicity: transient serum aminotransferase elevation and an acute idiosyncratic liver injury that occurs 1–3 weeks after starting therapy. This article is a case report of oral clindamycin induced acute symptomatic cholestatic hepatitis and a brief review of the topic. PMID:26486111

  2. Molecular identification of bacteria by total sequence screening: determining the cause of death in ancient human subjects.

    PubMed

    Thèves, Catherine; Senescau, Alice; Vanin, Stefano; Keyser, Christine; Ricaut, François Xavier; Alekseev, Anatoly N; Dabernat, Henri; Ludes, Bertrand; Fabre, Richard; Crubézy, Eric

    2011-01-01

    Research of ancient pathogens in ancient human skeletons has been mainly carried out on the basis of one essential historical or archaeological observation, permitting specific pathogens to be targeted. Detection of ancient human pathogens without such evidence is more difficult, since the quantity and quality of ancient DNA, as well as the environmental bacteria potentially present in the sample, limit the analyses possible. Using human lung tissue and/or teeth samples from burials in eastern Siberia, dating from the end of 17(th) to the 19(th) century, we propose a methodology that includes the: 1) amplification of all 16S rDNA gene sequences present in each sample; 2) identification of all bacterial DNA sequences with a degree of identity ? 95%, according to quality criteria; 3) identification and confirmation of bacterial pathogens by the amplification of the rpoB gene; and 4) establishment of authenticity criteria for ancient DNA. This study demonstrates that from teeth samples originating from ancient human subjects, we can realise: 1) the correct identification of bacterial molecular sequence signatures by quality criteria; 2) the separation of environmental and pathogenic bacterial 16S rDNA sequences; 3) the distribution of bacterial species for each subject and for each burial; and 4) the characterisation of bacteria specific to the permafrost. Moreover, we identified three pathogens in different teeth samples by 16S rDNA sequence amplification: Bordetella sp., Streptococcus pneumoniae and Shigella dysenteriae. We tested for the presence of these pathogens by amplifying the rpoB gene. For the first time, we confirmed sequences from Bordetella pertussis in the lungs of an ancient male Siberian subject, whose grave dated from the end of the 17(th) century to the early 18(th) century. PMID:21765907

  3. Bacteria May Cope Differently from Similar Membrane Damage Caused by the Australian Tree Frog Antimicrobial Peptide Maculatin 1.1.

    PubMed

    Sani, Marc-Antoine; Henriques, Sónia Troeira; Weber, Daniel; Separovic, Frances

    2015-08-01

    Maculatin 1.1 (Mac1) is an antimicrobial peptide from the skin of Australian tree frogs and is known to possess selectivity toward Gram-positive bacteria. Although Mac1 has membrane disrupting activity, it is not known how Mac1 selectively targets Gram-positive over Gram-negative bacteria. The interaction of Mac1 with Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus, and human red blood cells (hRBC) and with their mimetic model membranes is here reported. The peptide showed a 16-fold greater growth inhibition activity against S. aureus (4 ?M) than against E. coli (64 ?M) and an intermediate cytotoxicity against hRBC (30 ?M). Surprisingly, Sytox Green uptake monitored by flow cytometry showed that Mac1 compromised both bacterial membranes with similar efficiency at ?20-fold lower concentration than the reported minimum inhibition concentration against S. aureus. Mac1 also reduced the negative potential of S. aureus and E. coli membrane with similar efficacy. Furthermore, liposomes mimicking the cell membrane of S. aureus (POPG/TOCL) and E. coli (POPE/POPG) were lysed at similar concentrations, whereas hRBC-like vesicles (POPC/SM/Chol) remained mostly intact in the presence of Mac1. Remarkably, when POPG/TOCL and POPE/POPG liposomes were co-incubated, Mac1 did not induce leakage from POPE/POPG liposomes, suggesting a preference toward POPG/TOCL membranes that was supported by surface plasma resonance assays. Interestingly, circular dichroism spectroscopy showed a similar helical conformation in the presence of the anionic liposomes but not the hRBC mimics. Overall, the study showed that Mac1 disrupts bacterial membranes in a similar fashion before cell death events and would preferentially target S. aureus over E. coli or hRBC membranes. PMID:26100634

  4. Relationship between two signaling systems: Calcium and Cyclic nucleotide Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic human pathogen causing severe acute and chronic

    E-print Network

    levels in human body are imbalanced in response to infection or disease. Such Ca2+ imbalances mayRelationship between two signaling systems: Calcium and Cyclic nucleotide Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic human pathogen causing severe acute and chronic infections, which are difficult to treat because

  5. Percutaneous endoscopic lumbar discectomy for a huge herniated disc causing acute cauda equina syndrome: a case report.

    PubMed

    Jha, Subash C; Tonogai, Ichiro; Takata, Yoichiro; Sakai, Toshinori; Higashino, Kosaku; Matsuura, Tetsuya; Suzue, Naoto; Hamada, Daisuke; Goto, Tomohiro; Nishisho, Toshihiko; Tsutsui, Takahiko; Goda, Yuichiro; Abe, Mitsunobu; Mineta, Kazuaki; Kimura, Tetsuya; Nitta, Akihiro; Hama, Shingo; Higuchi, Tadahiro; Fukuta, Shoji; Sairyo, Koichi

    2015-01-01

    Microsurgery for lumbar disc herniation that requires surgical intervention has been well described. The methods vary from traditional open discectomy to minimally invasive techniques. All need adequate preanesthetic preparation of patients as general anesthesia is required for the procedure, and nerve monitoring is necessary to prevent iatrogenic nerve injury. Conventional surgical techniques sometimes require the removal of the corresponding lamina to assess the nerve root and herniated disc, and this may increase the risk for posterior instability of the vertebral body. Should this occur, fusion surgery may be needed, further increasing morbidity and cost. We present here a case of lumbar herniated disc fragments causing acute cauda equina syndrome that were endoscopically resected through a transforaminal approach in an awake patient under local anesthesia. Percutaneous endoscopic discectomy under local anesthesia proved to be a better alternative to open back surgery as it made immediate intervention possible, was associated with fewer perioperative complications and morbidity, minimized soft tissue damage, and allowed early rehabilitation with a better outcome and greater patient satisfaction. In addition to these advantages, percutaneous endoscopic discectomy protects other approaches that may be needed in subsequent surgeries, whether open or minimally invasive. PMID:25817294

  6. Hypothyroidism minimizes the effects of acute hepatic failure caused by endoplasmic reticulum stress and redox environment alterations in rats.

    PubMed

    Blas-Valdivia, Vanessa; Cano-Europa, Edgar; Martinez-Perez, Yoalli; Lezama-Palacios, Ruth; Franco-Colin, Margarita; Ortiz-Butron, Rocio

    2015-10-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate if a protective effect from hypothyroidism in acute liver failure resulted from reduced endoplasmic reticulum stress and changes to the redox environment. Twenty male Sprague-Dawley rats were divided in four groups: (1) euthyroid (sham surgery), (2) hypothyroid, (3) euthyroid (sham surgery)+thioacetamide and (4) hypothyroid+thioacetamide. Hypothyroidism was confirmed two weeks after thyroidectomy, and thioacetamide (TAA) (400mg/kg, ip) was administrated to the appropriate groups for three days with supportive therapy. Grades of encephalopathy in all animals were determined using behavioral tests. Animals were decapitated and their blood was obtained to assess liver function. The liver was dissected: the left lobe was used for histology and the right lobe was frozen for biochemical assays. Body weight, rectal temperature and T4 concentration were lower in hypothyroid groups. When measurements of oxidative stress markers, redox environment, ?-glutamylcysteine synthetase and glutathione-S-transferase were determined, we observed that hypothyroid animals with TAA compensated better with oxidative damage than euthyroid animals treated with TAA. Furthermore, we measured reduced expressions of GADD34, caspase-12 and GRP78 and subsequently less hypothyroidism-induced cellular damage in hypothyroid animals. We conclude that hypothyroidism protects against hepatic damage caused by TAA because it reduces endoplasmic reticulum stress and changes to the redox environment. PMID:26238033

  7. Cutaneous and renal glomerular vasculopathy as a cause of acute kidney injury in dogs in the UK

    PubMed Central

    Hawkins, I.; Robin, C.; Newton, R. J.; Jepson, R.; Stanzani, G.; McMahon, L. A.; Pesavento, P.; Carr, T.; Cogan, T.; Couto, C. G.; Cianciolo, R.; Walker, D. J.

    2015-01-01

    To describe the signalment, clinicopathological findings and outcome in dogs presenting with acute kidney injury (AKI) and skin lesions between November 2012 and March 2014, in whom cutaneous and renal glomerular vasculopathy (CRGV) was suspected and renal thrombotic microangiopathy (TMA) was histopathologically confirmed. The medical records of dogs with skin lesions and AKI, with histopathologically confirmed renal TMA, were retrospectively reviewed. Thirty dogs from across the UK were identified with clinicopathological findings compatible with CRGV. These findings included the following: skin lesions, predominantly affecting the distal extremities; AKI; and variably, anaemia, thrombocytopaenia and hyperbilirubinaemia. Known causes of AKI were excluded. The major renal histopathogical finding was TMA. All thirty dogs died or were euthanised. Shiga toxin was not identified in the kidneys of affected dogs. Escherichia coli genes encoding shiga toxin were not identified in faeces from affected dogs. CRGV has previously been reported in greyhounds in the USA, a greyhound in the UK, without renal involvement, and a Great Dane in Germany. This is the first report of a series of non-greyhound dogs with CRGV and AKI in the UK. CRGV is a disease of unknown aetiology carrying a poor prognosis when azotaemia develops. PMID:25802439

  8. Time Trends in Incidence and Mortality of Acute Myocardial Infarction, and All-Cause Mortality following a Cardiovascular Prevention Program in Sweden

    PubMed Central

    Journath, Gunilla; Hammar, Niklas; Elofsson, Stig; Linnersjö, Anette; Vikström, Max; Walldius, Göran; Krakau, Ingvar; Lindgren, Peter; de Faire, Ulf; Hellénius, Mai-Lis

    2015-01-01

    Background In 1988, a cardiovascular prevention program which combined an individual and a population-based strategy was launched within primary health-care in Sollentuna, a municipality in Stockholm County. The aim of this study was to investigate time trends in the incidence of and mortality from acute myocardial infarction and all-cause mortality in Sollentuna compared with the rest of Stockholm County during a period of two decades following the implementation of a cardiovascular prevention program. Materials and Methods The average population in Sollentuna was 56,589 (49% men) and in Stockholm County (Sollentuna included) 1,795,504 (49% men) during the study period of 1987–2010. Cases of hospitalized acute myocardial infarction and death were obtained for the population of Sollentuna and the rest of Stockholm County using national registries of hospital discharges and deaths. Acute myocardial infarction incidence and mortality were estimated using the average population of Sollentuna and Stockholm in 1987–2010. Results During the observation period, the incidence of acute myocardial infarction decreased more in Sollentuna compared with the rest of Stockholm County in women (-22% vs. -7%; for difference in slope <0.05). There was a trend towards a greater decline in Sollentuna compared to the rest of Stockholm County in the incidence of acute myocardial infarction (in men), acute myocardial mortality, and all-cause mortality but the differences were not significant. Conclusion During a period of steep decline in acute myocardial infarction incidence and mortality in Stockholm County the municipality of Sollentuna showed a stronger trend in women possibly compatible with favorable influence of a cardiovascular prevention program. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT02212145 PMID:26580968

  9. Acute cerebellar ataxia

    MedlinePLUS

    Cerebellar ataxia; Ataxia - acute cerebellar; Cerebellitis; Post-varicella acute cerebellar ataxia; PVACA ... Acute cerebellar ataxia in children, especially younger than age 3, may occur several weeks after an illness caused by a virus. ...

  10. Acute abdomen due to ovarian congestion caused by coiling of the fallopian tube accompanied by paratubal cyst around the utero-ovarian ligament

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Juyoung; Park, Daehyun; Han, Won Bo; Jeong, Hyangjin

    2014-01-01

    Torsion of uterine adnexa is an important cause of acute abdominal pain in females. The main organ which can cause torsion is the ovaries, but torsions of the fallopian tube, subserosal myoma, paratubal cyst, and even the uterine body have been reported. The incidence of isolated fallopian tubal torsion is very rare. Even more rarely, it can coil around nearby organs such as the utero-ovarian ligament, showing similar clinical manifestations with those of adnexal torsion. We experienced an extremely rare case of acute abdomen induced by ovarian congestion triggered by the fallopian tube accompanying a paratubal cyst coiling around the utero-ovarian ligament. The right paratubal cyst was misinterpreted as being part of a cystic component of the left ovary on preoperative sonographic examination, and the coiling of the right fallopian tube accompanying the paratubal cyst was misdiagnosed as torsion of the right ovary. We report this rare case with a brief literature review. PMID:25105111

  11. The development of a German language (Berne) pain questionnaire and its application in a situation causing acute pain.

    PubMed

    Radvila, A; Adler, R H; Galeazzi, R L; Vorkauf, H

    1987-02-01

    The adjectives used in the McGill Pain Questionnaire were translated into German. Nine of the 76 adjectives could not be translated satisfactorily. Accordingly, 10 new German adjectives were added by 22 physicians and psychologists, who were also asked to judge the grouping of the words and how adequately they express pain. Concordance of grouping was reached by more than 82% of the raters. The adjectives were assigned to 20 groups. In a next step 80 subjects assessed the words in each group on a visual analogue scale (VAS) with respect to intensity: for 3 of the 20 groups we found no difference in intensity between the adjectives within a group. They were not retained in the final version tested. Additionally each group was reduced to 3 adjectives by dropping the least discriminating words of each group; 17 groups of 3 words each were retained. In a third step a comparably composed group of 82 subjects rated the words in each group on VAS with respect to intensity: for each of the 17 triads there was a significant overall difference between the 3 adjectives on the VAS. In all but 4 of the 17 triads all 3 possible pairwise differences were significant as well. In spite of the significant differences of mean values there was considerable disagreement in individual intensity rankings of the 3 adjectives within the 17 groups. The validity of the German language (Berne) pain questionnaire (BPQ) was tested together with a verbal rating scale (VRS) and a VAS in a double-blind, complete cross-over study. A low osmolar (LO), a high osmolar (conventional) (HO) compound and 0.9% NaCl (placebo) (PL) were injected intra-arterially in patients with arteriovascular disease. We expected the LO compound to cause much less pain than the HO compound. The 3 conditions HO, LO and PL had significantly different effects on all 4 scales: VAS, VRS, RaW (scale of rank of words), and NoW (scale of number of words). The pairwise comparisons of PL with HO and LO resulted in significant differences also. The square of the correlation r for VAS/VRS was 0.64, for RaW/NoW 0.61, all other possible correlations were not significant. Our conclusions are: the translation of the MPQ into German was successful, and its validity could be shown. In our experiment, it differentiated acute, short lasting pain as well as the visual analogue and the verbal rating scales. The BPQ is a tool worth being examined in the laboratory and in studies of clinical pain syndromes. PMID:3822503

  12. Meat Processing Plant Microbiome and Contamination Patterns of Cold-Tolerant Bacteria Causing Food Safety and Spoilage Risks in the Manufacture of Vacuum-Packaged Cooked Sausages.

    PubMed

    Hultman, Jenni; Rahkila, Riitta; Ali, Javeria; Rousu, Juho; Björkroth, K Johanna

    2015-10-01

    Refrigerated food processing facilities are specific man-made niches likely to harbor cold-tolerant bacteria. To characterize this type of microbiota and study the link between processing plant and product microbiomes, we followed and compared microbiota associated with the raw materials and processing stages of a vacuum-packaged, cooked sausage product affected by a prolonged quality fluctuation with occasional spoilage manifestations during shelf life. A total of 195 samples were subjected to culturing and amplicon sequence analyses. Abundant mesophilic psychrotrophs were detected within the microbiomes throughout the different compartments of the production plant environment. However, each of the main genera of food safety and quality interest, e.g., Leuconostoc, Brochothrix, and Yersinia, had their own characteristic patterns of contamination. Bacteria from the genus Leuconostoc, commonly causing spoilage of cold-stored, modified-atmosphere-packaged foods, were detected in high abundance (up to >98%) in the sausages studied. The same operational taxonomic units (OTUs) were, however, detected in lower abundances in raw meat and emulsion (average relative abundance of 2%±5%), as well as on the processing plant surfaces (<4%). A completely different abundance profile was found for OTUs phylogenetically close to the species Yersinia pseudotuberculosis. These OTUs were detected in high abundance (up to 28%) on the processing plant surfaces but to a lesser extent (<1%) in raw meat, sausage emulsion, and sausages. The fact that Yersinia-like OTUs were found on the surfaces of a high-hygiene packaging compartment raises food safety concerns related to their resilient existence on surfaces. PMID:26231646

  13. Diarrheal Diseases - Acute and Chronic

    MedlinePLUS

    ... greasy or very bad smelling stools. CausesAcute Diarrhea Most cases of acute, watery diarrhea are caused ... a common cause of traveler’s diarrhea. Causes – Chronic Diarrhea Chronic diarrhea is classified as fatty or malabsorption, ...

  14. ‘Not Just Another Appendicitis!’ – A Case Report of Acute Abdominal Pain Caused by Splenic Rupture Secondary to Isolated Splenic Peliosis

    PubMed Central

    Qureshi, Samrina; Choong, Andrew MTL; Tadrous, Paul J; Bhutiani, Rajinder P

    2009-01-01

    We present the case of a 31-year-old man admitted with acute abdominal pain who was subsequently found to have a ruptured spleen. A splenectomy was performed as an emergency and he was discharged from hospital 4 days later. Histological analysis revealed isolated splenic peliosis as the underlying condition predisposing to his splenic rupture. PMID:19909606

  15. Outbreak of acute respiratory disease caused by Mycoplasma pneumoniae on board a deployed U.S. navy ship.

    PubMed

    Sliman, Joseph A; Metzgar, David; Asseff, David C; Coon, Robert G; Faix, Dennis J; Lizewski, Stephen

    2009-12-01

    We identified 179 cases of acute respiratory illness including 50 cases of radiographically confirmed pneumonia over the course of 4 months on a deployed U.S. Navy vessel. Laboratory tests showed Mycoplasma pneumoniae to be the etiological agent. This report represents the first published description of a shipboard outbreak of this pathogen. PMID:19846632

  16. Intraventricular or intrathecal colistin for the treatment of central nervous system infections caused by multidrug-resistant Gram-negative bacteria.

    PubMed

    Imberti, Roberto; Iotti, Giorgio Antonio; Regazzi, Mario

    2014-04-01

    Central nervous system infections caused by Gram-negative bacteria susceptible only to colistin are rare but life-threatening and increasing in prevalence. Given the current antibiotic development pipeline it is likely that the paucity of therapeutic options will continue for the next years. Colistin is an amphipathic bactericidal antibiotic which is administered systemically as colistin methanesulfonate (also known as colistimethate sodium). Colistin methanesulfonate is the inactive prodrug, and in cerebrospinal fluid undergoes spontaneous hydrolysis to colistin (the active form with antimicrobial activity). In this review, we describe and evaluate the clinical and experimental data supporting the use of intraventricular (IVT) or intrathecal (IT) colistin against multidrug-resistant Gram-negative infections of the central nervous system, describe the permeability of the blood-brain barrier to colistin, the pharmacokinetics of colistin after IVT administration of colistin methanesulfonate, its anti-endotoxin activity, discuss the opportunity to administer colistin intraventricularly or intrathecally and the dose regimen, and provide recommendations based on the available evidence. PMID:24597575

  17. Acute right ventricular failure caused by concomitant coronary and pulmonary embolism: successful treatment with endovascular coronary and pulmonary thrombectomy

    PubMed Central

    Koul, Sasha; Roijer, Anders; Holmqvist, Jasminka; Keussen, Inger; Cwikiel, Wojciech; Öhlin, Bertil; Erlinge, David

    2013-01-01

    Patent foramen ovale (PFO) is present in approximately 25% of the general population. PFO is characterized by intermittent shunting of blood from the right to the left atrium, especially in the context of increased right-sided filling pressures, with risk of paradoxical embolism. We describe a 69-year-old woman presenting with acute chest pain, severe dyspnoea, and acute inferolateral ST-segment elevation on the electrocardiogram. The patient was diagnosed with myocardial infarction and failure of the right cardiac ventricle, which was considered to be secondary to extensive pulmonary embolism leading to increased filling pressures and paradoxical coronary embolism. The patient underwent emergent percutaneous interventions with coronary thrombus extraction and pulmonary thrombus fragmentation and local thrombolysis. The patient was free of symptoms at follow up 6 months later and echocardiography showed substantially improved right ventricular function. We discuss issues related to the diagnosis, treatment, and secondary prevention for patients with concomitant pulmonary and coronary arterial thrombosis. PMID:24222822

  18. Systemic air embolism causing acute stroke and myocardial infarction after percutaneous transthoracic lung biopsy-a case report.

    PubMed

    Hung, Wei-Heng; Chang, Chun-Chi; Ho, Shang-Yun; Liao, Chiung-Ying; Wang, Bing-Yen

    2015-01-01

    Computed tomography (CT)-guided transthoracic lung biopsy is a common procedure for the diagnosis of pulmonary lesion. Pneumothorax, pulmonary hemorrhage and hemoptysis are the most common complications of the procedure. Air embolism is a rare serious complication. We reported a case with air embolism related acute ischemic stroke and non-ST elevation myocardial infarction (NSTEMI) simultaneously after percutaneous transthoracic lung biopsy. PMID:26374639

  19. Differential diagnosis of pelvic cystic lesions caused by hemorrhage from inflammatory abscess using CT attenuation in women with acute abdomen.

    PubMed

    Sato, Kazuko; Kajihara, Takeshi; Miki, Akinori; Hirabayashi, Eriko; Shintani, Daisuke; Niitsu, Mamoru; Ishihara, Osamu; Itakura, Atsuo

    2015-11-01

    To determine the efficacy of computed tomography (CT) attenuation of cystic lesions measured on an image browsing system to distinguish abscess from hematoma in women with acute abdomen. The medical records of female patients of reproductive age with acute abdomen who were treated over a 7-year period in a single center and who had undergone laparotomy or laparoscopic surgery and preoperative pelvic CT scanning were retrospectively analyzed to identify those with hematoma or abscess cyst formation. Nineteen patients with tubo-ovarian abscess (abscess group) and six patients with hematoma (hematoma group) formation in the pelvis were included in the analysis. The preoperative CT images of the tubo-ovarian cyst were retrospectively investigated on the basis of cyst attenuation. CT attenuation of the cyst measured by both two gynecologists could be used to clearly distinguish inflammatory disease with abscess formation from bleeding disease with hematoma. CT attenuation on a picture archiving and communication system can distinguish hematoma from abscess in women with acute abdomen. This may significantly contribute to making differential diagnosis without interpretation by a medical radiologist. PMID:26663935

  20. Differential diagnosis of pelvic cystic lesions caused by hemorrhage from inflammatory abscess using CT attenuation in women with acute abdomen

    PubMed Central

    Sato, Kazuko; Kajihara, Takeshi; Miki, Akinori; Hirabayashi, Eriko; Shintani, Daisuke; Niitsu, Mamoru; Ishihara, Osamu; Itakura, Atsuo

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT To determine the efficacy of computed tomography (CT) attenuation of cystic lesions measured on an image browsing system to distinguish abscess from hematoma in women with acute abdomen. The medical records of female patients of reproductive age with acute abdomen who were treated over a 7-year period in a single center and who had undergone laparotomy or laparoscopic surgery and preoperative pelvic CT scanning were retrospectively analyzed to identify those with hematoma or abscess cyst formation. Nineteen patients with tubo-ovarian abscess (abscess group) and six patients with hematoma (hematoma group) formation in the pelvis were included in the analysis. The preoperative CT images of the tubo-ovarian cyst were retrospectively investigated on the basis of cyst attenuation. CT attenuation of the cyst measured by both two gynecologists could be used to clearly distinguish inflammatory disease with abscess formation from bleeding disease with hematoma. CT attenuation on a picture archiving and communication system can distinguish hematoma from abscess in women with acute abdomen. This may significantly contribute to making differential diagnosis without interpretation by a medical radiologist.

  1. Detection and characterization of respiratory viruses causing acute respiratory illness and asthma exacerbation in children during three different seasons (2011–2014) in Mexico City

    PubMed Central

    Moreno-Valencia, Yazmin; Hernandez-Hernandez, Victor A; Romero-Espinoza, Jose A I; Coronel-Tellez, Rodrigo H; Castillejos-Lopez, Manuel; Hernandez, Andres; Perez-Padilla, Rogelio; Alejandre-Garcia, Alejandro; de la Rosa-Zamboni, Daniela; Ormsby, Christopher E; Vazquez-Perez, Joel A

    2015-01-01

    Background Viral infections play a significant role in causing acute respiratory infections (ARIs) and exacerbations of chronic diseases. Acute respiratory infections are now the leading cause of mortality in children worldwide, especially in developing countries. Recently, human rhinovirus (HRV) infection has been emerged as an important cause of pneumonia and asthma exacerbation. Objectives To determine the role of several viral agents principally, respiratory syncytial virus, and HRV in children with ARIs and their relationship with asthma exacerbation and pneumonia. Methods Between October 2011 and March 2014, 432 nasopharyngeal samples of children <15 years of age with ARI hospitalized at a referral hospital for respiratory diseases were tested for the presence of respiratory viruses using a multiplex RT-qPCR. Clinical, epidemiological, and demographic data were collected and associated with symptomatology and viral infections. Results Viral infections were detected in at least 59·7% of the enrolled patients, with HRV (26·6%) being the most frequently detected. HRV infections were associated with clinical features of asthma and difficulty in breathing such as wheezing (P = 0·0003), supraesternal (P = 0·046), and xiphoid retraction (P = 0·030). HRV subtype C (HRV-C) infections were associated with asthma (P = 0·02). Conclusions Human rhinovirus was the virus most commonly detected in pediatric patients with ARI. There is also an association of HRV-C infection with asthma exacerbation, emphasizing the relevance of this virus in severe pediatric respiratory disease. PMID:26289993

  2. Secondary histiocytic sarcoma may cause apparent persistence or recurrence of minimal residual disease in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Alten, Julia; Klapper, Wolfram; Leuschner, Ivo; Eckert, Cornelia; Beier, Rita; Vallo, Elisabeth; Krause, Martin; Claviez, Alexander; Vieth, Simon; Bleckmann, Kirsten; Möricke, Anja; Schrappe, Martin; Cario, Gunnar

    2015-09-01

    Histiocytic sarcoma (HS) is a rare disease with poor prognosis which may develop subsequent to acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). Here we report two children treated within the AIEOP-BFM ALL 2009 trial: one patient succumbed to fulminant hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis triggered by HS during ALL maintenance therapy, the other patient had a smoldering course of HS for over 2 years, and subsequently died after allogeneic stem cell transplantation. In both cases, HS and ALL were clonally related and apparent return of minimal residual disease (MRD) was detected by qPCR in bone marrow. Thus, HS should be considered in ALL when MRD appears to persist or reappear. PMID:25833113

  3. Laparoscopic Excision of a Pedunculated Uterine Leiomyoma in Torsion as a Cause of Acute Abdomen at 10 Weeks of Pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Kosmidis, Christophoros; Pantos, George; Efthimiadis, Christopher; Gkoutziomitrou, Ioanna; Georgakoudi, Eleni; Anthimidis, George

    2015-01-01

    Patient: Female, 31 Final Diagnosis: Acute abdomen due to pedunculated uterine leiomyoma in torsion Symptoms: Abdominal pain • vomiting Medication: Cefoxitin 2gr Clinical Procedure: Laparoscopic excision of the pendunculated uterine leiomyoma – laparoscopic appedicectomy Specialty: Surgery Objective: Unusual clinical course Background: Pregnancy outcomes after laparoscopic myomectomy are generally favorable, with a pregnancy rate that is comparable to or even higher than the rate associated with abdominal myomectomy. The purpose of this article is to present the case of a pregnant patient at 10 weeks of gestation who was submitted to successful laparoscopic myomectomy of a twisted pedunculated uterine leiomyoma. Case Report: A 31 year-old Greek pregnant woman complaining about acute abdominal pain was submitted to diagnostic laparoscopy which revealed a huge twisted uterine leiomyoma. Subsequently laparoscopic myomectomy was successfully carried out. Conclusions: Laparoscopic myomectomy is a technically challenging procedure with surgeon-specific limitations. Laparoscopy during pregnancy should be performed with utmost care and it proves to be a safe and effective procedure in hands of clinicians with sufficient experience in laparoscopic surgery. PMID:26227425

  4. Acute Anticholinesterase Pesticide Poisoning Caused a Long-Term Mortality Increase: A Nationwide Population-Based Cohort Study.

    PubMed

    Huang, Hung-Sheng; Hsu, Chien-Chin; Weng, Shih-Feng; Lin, Hung-Jung; Wang, Jhi-Joung; Su, Shih-Bin; Huang, Chien-Cheng; Guo, How-Ran

    2015-07-01

    Acute anticholinesterase pesticide (organophosphate and carbamate) poisoning (ACPP) often produces severe complications, and sometimes death. We investigated the long-term mortality of patients with ACPP because it is not sufficiently understood. In this retrospective nationwide population-based cohort study, 818 patients with ACPP and 16,360 healthy comparisons from 1999 to 2010 were selected from Taiwan's National Health Insurance Research Database. They were followed until 2011. Ninety-four (11.5%) ACPP patients and 793 (4.9%) comparisons died (P < 0.01) during follow-up. The incidence rate ratios (IRRs) of death were 2.5 times higher in ACPP patients than in comparisons (P < 0.01). The risk of death was particularly high in the first month after ACPP (IRR: 92.7; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 45.0-191.0) and still high for ~6 months (IRR: 3.8; 95% CI: 1.9-7.4). After adjusting for age, gender, selected comorbidities, geographic area, and monthly income, the hazard ratio of death for ACPP patients was still 2.4 times higher than for comparisons. Older age (?35 years), male gender, diabetes mellitus, coronary artery disease, hypertension, stroke, mental disorder, and lower monthly income also predicted death. ACPP significantly increased long-term mortality. In addition to early follow-up after acute treatment, comorbidity control and socioeconomic assistance are needed for patients with ACPP. PMID:26222853

  5. Population Pharmacokinetic Analysis of Colistin Methanesulfonate and Colistin after Intravenous Administration in Critically Ill Patients with Infections Caused by Gram-Negative Bacteria? †

    PubMed Central

    Plachouras, D.; Karvanen, M.; Friberg, L. E.; Papadomichelakis, E.; Antoniadou, A.; Tsangaris, I.; Karaiskos, I.; Poulakou, G.; Kontopidou, F.; Armaganidis, A.; Cars, O.; Giamarellou, H.

    2009-01-01

    Colistin is used to treat infections caused by multidrug-resistant gram-negative bacteria (MDR-GNB). It is administered intravenously in the form of colistin methanesulfonate (CMS), which is hydrolyzed in vivo to the active drug. However, pharmacokinetic data are limited. The aim of the present study was to characterize the pharmacokinetics of CMS and colistin in a population of critically ill patients. Patients receiving colistin for the treatment of infections caused by MDR-GNB were enrolled in the study; however, patients receiving a renal replacement therapy were excluded. CMS was administered at a dose of 3 million units (240 mg) every 8 h. Venous blood was collected immediately before and at multiple occasions after the first and the fourth infusions. Plasma CMS and colistin concentrations were determined by a novel liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry method after a rapid precipitation step that avoids the significant degradation of CMS and colistin. Population pharmacokinetic analysis was performed with the NONMEM program. Eighteen patients (6 females; mean age, 63.6 years; mean creatinine clearance, 82.3 ml/min) were included in the study. For CMS, a two-compartment model best described the pharmacokinetics, and the half-lives of the two phases were estimated to be 0.046 h and 2.3 h, respectively. The clearance of CMS was 13.7 liters/h. For colistin, a one-compartment model was sufficient to describe the data, and the estimated half-life was 14.4 h. The predicted maximum concentrations of drug in plasma were 0.60 mg/liter and 2.3 mg/liter for the first dose and at steady state, respectively. Colistin displayed a half-life that was significantly long in relation to the dosing interval. The implications of these findings are that the plasma colistin concentrations are insufficient before steady state and raise the question of whether the administration of a loading dose would benefit critically ill patients. PMID:19433570

  6. David Davies, an associate professor of biology at Binghamton University, has isolated a compound that will cause biofilm colonies to disperse, thus leaving individual bacteria up

    E-print Network

    Zhang, Zhongfei "Mark"

    -corrosion ADVANTAGES Active againstavariety of microorganisms (gram-negative bacteria, gram- positivebacteria altered resistance tobiocides,antibioticsandthe humanimmune system. The current invention developed be treated using standard drugs. Inclusion of the agent with known antibiotics has been shown to increase

  7. Depth-Related Changes in Community Structure of Culturable Mineral Weathering Bacteria and in Weathering Patterns Caused by Them along Two Contrasting Soil Profiles

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Jing; Xi, Jun; Huang, Zhi; Wang, Qi; Zhang, Zhen-Dong

    2014-01-01

    Bacteria play important roles in mineral weathering and soil formation. However, few reports of mineral weathering bacteria inhabiting subsurfaces of soil profiles have been published, raising the question of whether the subsurface weathering bacteria are fundamentally distinct from those in surface communities. To address this question, we isolated and characterized mineral weathering bacteria from two contrasting soil profiles with respect to their role in the weathering pattern evolution, their place in the community structure, and their depth-related changes in these two soil profiles. The effectiveness and pattern of bacterial mineral weathering were different in the two profiles and among the horizons within the respective profiles. The abundance of highly effective mineral weathering bacteria in the Changshu profile was significantly greater in the deepest horizon than in the upper horizons, whereas in the Yanting profile it was significantly greater in the upper horizons than in the deeper horizons. Most of the mineral weathering bacteria from the upper horizons of the Changshu profile and from the deeper horizons of the Yanting profile significantly acidified the culture media in the mineral weathering process. The proportion of siderophore-producing bacteria in the Changshu profile was similar in all horizons except in the Bg2 horizon, whereas the proportion of siderophore-producing bacteria in the Yanting profile was higher in the upper horizons than in the deeper horizons. Both profiles existed in different highly depth-specific culturable mineral weathering community structures. The depth-related changes in culturable weathering communities were primarily attributable to minor bacterial groups rather than to a change in the major population structure. PMID:24077700

  8. Notes from the field: acute hemorrhagic conjunctivitis outbreaks caused by coxsackievirus A24v --- Uganda and southern Sudan, 2010.

    PubMed

    2010-08-20

    CDC was contacted on June 22, 2010, by the Ugandan Ministry of Health (MoH)/Uganda Virus Research Institute and on July 11 by the Government of Southern Sudan (GOSS) via the CDC Global Disease Detection Regional Center in Kenya to perform diagnostic laboratory testing on conjunctival swabs from persons with "red eye syndrome." Widespread, ongoing outbreaks of acute hemorrhagic conjunctivitis (AHC) have been observed in Uganda and Southern Sudan since spring 2010. AHC becomes a reportable condition in outbreak settings. Case numbers were estimated in Uganda after MoH confirmation of reported cases from district health facilities and, in Southern Sudan, after a medical record review in six health facilities. To date, 6,818 cases from 26 districts in Uganda, and 428 cases in Juba, Southern Sudan, have been counted; however, because most cases are not reported, these totals are considered underestimates. PMID:20724969

  9. Unlimited access to low-energy diet causes acute malnutrition in dams and alters biometric and biochemical parameters in offspring.

    PubMed

    do Nascimento, E; de Santana Muniz, G; das Graças de Santana Muniz, M; de Souza Alexandre, L; da Rocha, L S; Leandro, C G; de Castro, R M; Bolaños-Jimenez, F

    2014-02-01

    Here we analyze the outcomes of unlimited access to a low-energy (LE) diet in dams and their offspring. At 3 weeks' gestation, pregnant Wistar rats were divided into two groups: (1) the control group received a normoenergetic diet; and (2) the experimental group received the LE diet. In dams, lactation outcomes, food intake, body weight, plasma IGF-1, prealbumin, transferrin and retinol-binding protein levels were evaluated; in offspring, biometric and biochemical parameters and food intake were evaluated. No differences were observed during pregnancy. However, after lactation, dams that received the LE diet demonstrated significant reductions in body weight (P<0.05), plasma IGF-1 (P=0.01), prealbumin and visceral fat (P<0.001). Pups born to dams that received the LE diet demonstrated reduced body length and weight at weaning (P<0.001) and were lighter than the control animals at the end of the experimental period. Pups also demonstrated reduced plasma, low-density lipoprotein (P=0.04), triglycerides (P=0.002) and glucose levels (P<0.05), and differences were noted in visceral fat. These results indicate that feeding dams with LE diet during the reproductive period induces acute malnutrition and impairs the growth and development of offspring, as well as certain metabolic parameters. PMID:24847690

  10. Selective BCL-2 inhibition by ABT-199 causes on-target cell death in acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Pan, Rongqing; Hogdal, Leah J; Benito, Juliana M; Bucci, Donna; Han, Lina; Borthakur, Gautam; Cortes, Jorge; DeAngelo, Daniel J; Debose, Lakeisha; Mu, Hong; Döhner, Hartmut; Gaidzik, Verena I; Galinsky, Ilene; Golfman, Leonard S; Haferlach, Torsten; Harutyunyan, Karine G; Hu, Jianhua; Leverson, Joel D; Marcucci, Guido; Müschen, Markus; Newman, Rachel; Park, Eugene; Ruvolo, Peter P; Ruvolo, Vivian; Ryan, Jeremy; Schindela, Sonja; Zweidler-McKay, Patrick; Stone, Richard M; Kantarjian, Hagop; Andreeff, Michael; Konopleva, Marina; Letai, Anthony G

    2014-03-01

    B-cell leukemia/lymphoma 2 (BCL-2) prevents commitment to programmed cell death at the mitochondrion. It remains a challenge to identify those tumors that are best treated by inhibition of BCL-2. Here, we demonstrate that acute myeloid leukemia (AML) cell lines, primary patient samples, and murine primary xenografts are very sensitive to treatment with the selective BCL-2 antagonist ABT-199. In primary patient cells, the median IC50 was approximately 10 nmol/L, and cell death occurred within 2 hours. Our ex vivo sensitivity results compare favorably with those observed for chronic lymphocytic leukemia, a disease for which ABT-199 has demonstrated consistent activity in clinical trials. Moreover, mitochondrial studies using BH3 profiling demonstrate activity at the mitochondrion that correlates well with cytotoxicity, supporting an on-target mitochondrial mechanism of action. Our protein and BH3 profiling studies provide promising tools that can be tested as predictive biomarkers in any clinical trial of ABT-199 in AML. PMID:24346116

  11. Comparative effects of disulfiram and diethyldithiocarbamate against testicular toxicity in rats caused by acute exposure to cadmium

    SciTech Connect

    Ono, Hiroshige; Funakoshi, Takayuki; Shimada, Hideaki; Kojima, Shoji

    1997-03-01

    Disulfiram (DSF) and diethyldithiocarbamate (DED) were compared for their protective effects against the testicular toxicity induced by acute exposure to cadmium (Cd) in rats. Rats were injected subcutaneously with CdCl{sub 2} [26.7 {mu}mol (3 mg) Cd/kg], and 30 min later they were injected intraperitoneally with DSF (0.05-0.5 mmol/kg) or DED (0.1-1 mmol/kg). The treatment with DSF at dose levels of 0.1-0.5 mmol/kg prevented the increases in testicular lipid peroxidation and calcium (Ca) concentrations and the decreases in testicular weight that were observed at 7 d after Cd injection. DED at dosage levels of 0.2-1 mmol/kg likewise reduced Cd-induced testicular toxicity. An increase in testicular iron (Fe) concentrations at 7 d and sterility at 59 d after Cd injection were almost completely blocked by treatment with DSF or DED at the highest doses, but lower doses of DSF or DED were ineffective. These results indicated that DSF, which is metabolized to DED, had a protective effect against Cd-induced testicular toxicity nearly equivalent to DED at approximately one-half the dose. 37 refs., 6 tabs.

  12. Acute otitis externa

    PubMed Central

    Hui, Charles PS

    2013-01-01

    Acute otitis externa, also known as ‘swimmer’s ear’, is a common disease of children, adolescents and adults. While chronic suppurative otitis media or acute otitis media with tympanostomy tubes or a perforation can cause acute otitis externa, both the infecting organisms and management protocol are different. This practice point focuses solely on managing acute otitis externa, without acute otitis media, tympanostomy tubes or a perforation being present. PMID:24421666

  13. Acute kidney failure

    MedlinePLUS

    Kidney failure; Renal failure; Renal failure - acute; ARF; Kidney injury - acute ... There are many possible causes of kidney damage. They include: ... cholesterol (cholesterol emboli) Decreased blood flow due to very ...

  14. SPRED1, a RAS MAPK pathway inhibitor that causes Legius syndrome, is a tumour suppressor downregulated in paediatric acute myeloblastic leukaemia.

    PubMed

    Pasmant, E; Gilbert-Dussardier, B; Petit, A; de Laval, B; Luscan, A; Gruber, A; Lapillonne, H; Deswarte, C; Goussard, P; Laurendeau, I; Uzan, B; Pflumio, F; Brizard, F; Vabres, P; Naguibvena, I; Fasola, S; Millot, F; Porteu, F; Vidaud, D; Landman-Parker, J; Ballerini, P

    2015-01-29

    Constitutional dominant loss-of-function mutations in the SPRED1 gene cause a rare phenotype referred as neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1)-like syndrome or Legius syndrome, consisted of multiple café-au-lait macules, axillary freckling, learning disabilities and macrocephaly. SPRED1 is a negative regulator of the RAS MAPK pathway and can interact with neurofibromin, the NF1 gene product. Individuals with NF1 have a higher risk of haematological malignancies. SPRED1 is highly expressed in haematopoietic cells and negatively regulates haematopoiesis. SPRED1 seemed to be a good candidate for leukaemia predisposition or transformation. We performed SPRED1 mutation screening and expression status in 230 paediatric lymphoblastic and acute myeloblastic leukaemias (AMLs). We found a loss-of-function frameshift SPRED1 mutation in a patient with Legius syndrome. In this patient, the leukaemia blasts karyotype showed a SPRED1 loss of heterozygosity, confirming SPRED1 as a tumour suppressor. Our observation confirmed that acute leukaemias are rare complications of the Legius syndrome. Moreover, SPRED1 was significantly decreased at RNA and protein levels in the majority of AMLs at diagnosis compared with normal or paired complete remission bone marrows. SPRED1 decreased expression correlated with genetic features of AML. Our study reveals a new mechanism which contributes to deregulate RAS MAPK pathway in the vast majority of paediatric AMLs. PMID:24469042

  15. Acute colic possibly caused by phytobezoar derived from napier grass in 5 Japanese black cows reared in the same farm.

    PubMed

    Hasunuma, Hiroshi; Matsumoto, Daisaku; Kirino, Yumi; Sasa, Takafumi; Fushimi, Yasuo; Ikeda, Teppei; Tshering, Chenga; Takagi, Mitsuhiro

    2011-08-01

    For 6 years, 5 Japanese Black cows of the same herd showed anorexia, depression, and dehydration with no feces in the rectum. Biomedical examination of 3 animals showed severe hypokalemia and hypochloremia. Although the first 3 animals died or were slaughtered (causes unknown), necropsy results showed that the cow in case 4 had intestinal obstruction due to phytobezoar derived from napier grass, fed mainly to the cattle as roughage. Therefore, farmers were recommended to avoid the hard root-stem portion of napier grass as roughage. Consequently, less phytobezoar was recovered from the fifth cow, and no similar clinical case of intestinal obstruction was observed thereafter. This is the first report on intestinal obstruction caused by phytobezoars derived from napier grass. PMID:21498963

  16. Acute Erythemal Ultraviolet Radiation Causes Systemic Immunosuppression in the Absence of Increased 25-Hydroxyvitamin D3 Levels in Male Mice

    PubMed Central

    Gorman, Shelley; Scott, Naomi M.; Tan, Daryl H. W.; Weeden, Clare E.; Tuckey, Robert C.; Bisley, Jacqueline L.; Grimbaldeston, Michele A.; Hart, Prue H.

    2012-01-01

    Vitamin D is synthesised by ultraviolet (UV) irradiation of skin and is hypothesized to be a direct mediator of the immunosuppression that occurs following UV radiation (UVR) exposure. Both UVR and vitamin D drive immune responses towards tolerance by ultimately increasing the suppressive activities of regulatory T cells. To examine a role for UVR-induced vitamin D, vitamin D3-deficient mice were established by dietary vitamin D3 restriction. In comparison to vitamin D3-replete mice, vitamin D3-deficient mice had significantly reduced serum levels of 25-hydroxyvitamin D3 (25(OH)D3, <20 nmol.L?1) and 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 (1,25(OH)2D3, <20 pmol.L?1). Following either acute erythemal UVR, or chronic sub-erythemal UVR (8 exposures over 4 weeks) treatment, serum 25(OH)D3 levels significantly increased in vitamin D3-deficient female but not male mice. To determine if UVR-induced vitamin D was a mediator of UVR-induced systemic immunosuppression, responses were measured in mice that were able (female) or unable (male) to increase systemic levels of 25(OH)D3 after UVR. Erythemal UVR (?4 kJ/m2) suppressed contact hypersensitivity responses (T helper type-1 or -17), aspects of allergic airway disease (T helper type-2) and also the in vivo priming capacity of bone marrow-derived dendritic cells to a similar degree in female and male vitamin D3-deficient mice. Thus, in male mice, UVR-induced 25(OH)D3 is not essential for mediating the immunosuppressive effects of erythemal UVR. PMID:23049920

  17. Trypanosoma cruzi IV Causing Outbreaks of Acute Chagas Disease and Infections by Different Haplotypes in the Western Brazilian Amazonia

    PubMed Central

    Monteiro, Wuelton Marcelo; Magalhães, Laylah Kelre Costa; de Sá, Amanda Regina Nichi; Gomes, Mônica Lúcia; Toledo, Max Jean de Ornelas; Borges, Lara; Pires, Isa; de Oliveira Guerra, Jorge Augusto; Silveira, Henrique; Barbosa, Maria das Graças Vale

    2012-01-01

    Background Chagas disease is an emergent tropical disease in the Brazilian Amazon Region, with an increasing number of cases in recent decades. In this region, the sylvatic cycle of Trypanosoma cruzi transmission, which constitutes a reservoir of parasites that might be associated with specific molecular, epidemiological and clinical traits, has been little explored. The objective of this work is to genetically characterize stocks of T. cruzi from human cases, triatomines and reservoir mammals in the State of Amazonas, in the Western Brazilian Amazon. Methodology/Principal Findings We analyzed 96 T. cruzi samples from four municipalities in distant locations of the State of Amazonas. Molecular characterization of isolated parasites from cultures in LIT medium or directly from vectors or whole human blood was performed by PCR of the non-transcribed spacer of the mini-exon and of the 24 S alfa ribosomal RNA gene, RFLP and sequencing of the mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase subunit II (COII) gene, and by sequencing of the glucose-phosphate isomerase gene. The T. cruzi parasites from two outbreaks of acute disease were all typed as TcIV. One of the outbreaks was triggered by several haplotypes of the same DTU. TcIV also occurred in isolated cases and in Rhodnius robustus. Incongruence between mitochondrial and nuclear phylogenies is likely to be indicative of historical genetic exchange events resulting in mitochondrial introgression between TcIII and TcIV DTUs from Western Brazilian Amazon. TcI predominated among triatomines and was the unique DTU infecting marsupials. Conclusion/Significance DTU TcIV, rarely associated with human Chagas disease in other areas of the Amazon basin, is the major strain responsible for the human infections in the Western Brazilian Amazon, occurring in outbreaks as single or mixed infections by different haplotypes. PMID:22848457

  18. Report of Acute Hepatic Necrosis caused by Salmonella serotype I 4, 5, 12:-:1,2 in a Dog

    E-print Network

    Giuliano, Antonio; Meiring, Thelma; Grant, Andrew J.; Watson, Penny J.

    2015-08-19

    possible cause of intoxications. The owner confirmed that 47 there was no possibility of mushroom ingestion and the dog was walked daily by a beach. The 48 possibility of intoxication with green-blue algae (Microcystic aeruginosa) was ruled out 49... not 138 have a garden, and living by the sea, the daily walk was beside the beach. Considering the 139 hostile environment of the beach by the sea for mushroom growth, the presence of toxic 140 mushroom ingestion was considered very improbable...

  19. Acute respiratory infection and bacteraemia as causes of non-malarial febrile illness in African children: a narrative review

    PubMed Central

    Muro, Florida; Reyburn, Rita; Reyburn, Hugh

    2015-01-01

    The replacement of “presumptive treatment for malaria” by “test before treat” strategies for the management of febrile illness is raising awareness of the importance of knowing more about the causes of illness in children who are suspected to have malaria but return a negative parasitological test. The most common cause of non-malarial febrile illness (NMFI) in African children is respiratory tract infection. Whilst the bacterial causes of NMFI are well known, the increasing use of sensitive techniques such as polymerase chain reaction (PCR) tests is revealing large numbers of viruses that are potential respiratory pathogens. However, many of these organisms are commonly present in the respiratory tract of healthy children so causality and risk factors for pneumonia remain poorly understood. Infection with a combination of viral and bacterial pathogens is increasingly recognised as important in the pathogenesis of pneumonia. Similarly, blood stream infections with organisms typically grown by aerobic culture are well known but a growing number of organisms that can be identified only by PCR, viral culture, or serology are now recognised to be common pathogens in African children. The high mortality of hospitalised children on the first or second day of admission suggests that, unless results are rapidly available, diagnostic tests to identify specific causes of illness will still be of limited use in guiding the potentially life saving decisions relating to initial treatment of children admitted to district hospitals in Africa with severe febrile illness and a negative test for malaria. Malaria control and the introduction of vaccines against Haemophilus influenzae type b and pneumococcal disease are contributing to improved child survival in Africa. However, increased parasitological testing for malaria is associated with increased use of antibiotics to which resistance is already high.

  20. Prevention of acute malnutrition: distribution of special nutritious foods and cash, and addressing underlying causes--what to recommend when, where, for whom, and how.

    PubMed

    de Pee, Saskia; Grais, Rebecca; Fenn, Bridget; Brown, Rebecca; Briend, André; Frize, Jacqueline; Shoham, Jeremy; Kiess, Lynnda

    2015-03-01

    Acute malnutrition is associated with increased morbidity and mortality risk. When episodes are prolonged or frequent, acute malnutrition is also associated with poor growth and development, which contributes to stunting Nutrition-specific and nutrition-sensitive strategies to prevent undernutrition during the first 1,000 days from conception to 24 months of age can reduce the risks of wasting, stunting, and micronutrient deficiencies. Under circumstances that exacerbate the underlying causes of undernutrition and increase the incidence of wasting, such as food insecurity related to lean seasons or emergencies, or increased incidence of illness, such as diarrhea or measles, additional efforts are required to prevent and treat wasting. Special nutritious foods directly meet the increased nutrient requirements of children at risk for wasting; assistance to vulnerable households, in the form of cash or food, enables households to better meet the food, health, and other needs of household members and may increase resilience; water, sanitation, and hygiene (WASH) and health interventions help prevent and address illness and hence reduce wasting risk. The contributions of specific interventions to reducing the incidence of wasting are difficult to assess under emergency conditions, due to ethical constraints and to the fact that multiple strategies are implemented at the same time. However, pragmatic studies under real-life circumstances, using different designs, e.g., including a group receiving "best possible" treatment, can provide evidence about what works, to what extent, at what cost, and under which circumstances. Programs should address the most important causes in given contexts, be feasible to implement at scale, and assess implementation, coverage, and outcomes. PMID:25902611

  1. Worsening of Renal Function During 1 Year After Hospital Discharge Is a Strong and Independent Predictor of All?Cause Mortality in Acute Decompensated Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Ueda, Tomoya; Kawakami, Rika; Sugawara, Yu; Okada, Sadanori; Nishida, Taku; Onoue, Kenji; Soeda, Tsunenari; Okayama, Satoshi; Takeda, Yukiji; Watanabe, Makoto; Kawata, Hiroyuki; Uemura, Shiro; Saito, Yoshihiko

    2014-01-01

    Background Renal impairment is a common comorbidity and the strongest risk factor for poor prognosis in acute decompensated heart failure (ADHF). In clinical practice, renal function is labile during episodes of ADHF, and often worsens after discharge. The significance of worsening of renal function (WRF) after discharge has not been investigated as extensively as baseline renal function at admission or WRF during hospitalization. Methods and Results Among 611 consecutive patients with ADHF emergently admitted to our hospital, 233 patients with 3 measurements of serum creatinine (SCr) level measurements (on admission, at discharge, and 1 year after discharge) were included in the present study. Patients were divided into 2 groups according to the presence or absence of WRF at 1 year after discharge (1y?WRF), defined as an absolute increase in SCr >0.3 mg/dL (>26.5 ?mol/L) plus a ?25% increase in SCr at 1 year after discharge compared to the SCr value at discharge. All?cause and cardiovascular mortality were assessed as adverse outcomes. During a mean follow?up of 35.4 months, 1y?WRF occurred in 48 of 233 patients. There were 66 deaths from all causes. All?cause and cardiovascular mortality were significantly higher in patients with 1y?WRF (log?rank P<0.0001 and P<0.0001, respectively) according to Kaplan–Meier analysis. In a multivariate Cox proportional hazards model, 1y?WRF was a strong and independent predictor of all?cause and cardiovascular mortality. Hemoglobin and B?type natriuretic peptide at discharge, as well as left ventricular ejection fraction <50%, were independent predictors of 1y?WRF. Conclusions In patients with ADHF, 1y?WRF is a strong predictor of all?cause and cardiovascular mortality. PMID:25370599

  2. Atypical radiological and intraoperative findings of acute cerebral hemorrhage caused by ruptured cerebral aneurysm in a patient with severe chronic anemia.

    PubMed

    Matano, Fumihiro; Murai, Yasuo; Nakagawa, Shunsuke; Kato, Taisei; Kitamura, Takayuki; Sekine, Tetsuro; Takagi, Ryo; Teramoto, Akira

    2014-01-01

    Acute intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) associated with mild anemia is commonly observed on radiological examination, and there are several reports of ruptured aneurysms occurring with ICH but without accompanying subarachnoid hemorrhage. However, the relationship among computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and intraoperative findings of ICH caused by ruptured cerebral aneurysm in patients with severe chronic anemia has been rarely reported and is poorly understood. Here, we report atypical radiological and intraoperative findings of acute ICH caused by ruptured cerebral aneurysm in a patient with severe chronic anemia. A 64-year-old man with anemia was admitted to our hospital after he experienced left hemiparesis and a disturbance of consciousness. At a referring institution, he showed evidence of macrocytic anemia (white blood cell count, 9,000/?L; red blood cell count, 104×10(4)/?L; hemoglobin, 4.0 g/dL; hematocrit, 12.2%; and platelet count, 26.6×10(4)/?L). Both CT and MRI showed a right frontal ICH. The outer ring of the hematoma appeared as low-density area on CT, a low-intensity area on T1-weighted MRI, and a high-intensity area on T2-weighted MRI with a serous component. The patient received a blood transfusion and underwent surgical removal of the hematoma the following day. The white serous effusion visualized with CT and MRI was identified as a blood clot in the hematoma cavity. The blood that leaks from blood vessels appears as a high-intensity area on CT because it undergoes plasma absorption in a solidification shrinkage process, and is, therefore, concentrated. Although we did not examine the white effusion to determine if serous components were present, we speculated that the effusion may have contained serous components. Therefore, we removed the part of the effusion that appeared as a low-density area on CT. The presence of ICH without subarachnoid hemorrhage suggested the possible adhesion and rupture of a previous aneurysm. Therefore, ICH appeared as a mixed density area on CT because bleeding may have occurred several times. Because radiological findings of ICH caused by ruptured cerebral aneurysm in patients with severe chronic anemia are similar to those of ICH and cerebral edema, we suggest that the atypical radiological findings of ICH caused by ruptured cerebral aneurysm in patients with severe chronic anemia should be carefully evaluated, especially when surgery is indicated. PMID:25186580

  3. Nongenomic effects of estrogen mediate the dose-related myocardial oxidative stress and dysfunction caused by acute ethanol in female rats.

    PubMed

    El-Mas, Mahmoud M; Abdel-Rahman, Abdel A

    2014-04-01

    Acute ethanol lowers blood pressure (BP) and cardiac output in proestrus and after chronic estrogen (E2) replacement in ovariectomized (OVX) female rats. However, whether rapid nongenomic effects of estrogen mediate these hemodynamic effects of ethanol remains unanswered. To test this hypothesis, we investigated the effect of ethanol (0.5 or 1.5 g/kg iv) on left ventricular (LV) function and oxidative markers in OVX rats pretreated 30 min earlier with 1 ?g/kg E2 (OVXE2) or vehicle (OVX) and in proestrus sham-operated (SO) rats. In SO rats, ethanol caused significant and dose-related reductions in BP, rate of rise in LV pressure (LV dP/dtmax), and LV developed pressure (LVDP). These effects of ethanol disappeared in OVX rats and were restored in OVXE2 rats, suggesting rapid estrogen receptor signaling mediates the detrimental effects of ethanol on LV function. Ex vivo studies revealed that the estrogen-dependent myocardial dysfunction caused by ethanol was coupled with higher LV 1) generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), 2) expression of malondialdehyde and 4-hydroxynonenal protein adducts, 3) phosphorylation of protein kinase B (Akt) and extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERK1/2), and 4) catalase activity. ERK1/2 inhibition by PD-98059 (1 mg/kg iv) abrogated the myocardial dysfunction, hypotension, and the elevation in myocardial ROS generation caused by ethanol. We conclude that rapid estrogen receptor signaling is implicated in cellular events that lead to the generation of aldehyde protein adducts and Akt/ERK1/2 phosphorylation, which ultimately mediate the estrogen-dependent LV oxidative stress and dysfunction caused by ethanol in female rats. PMID:24368668

  4. Bacteriology of aspiration pneumonia in patients with acute coma.

    PubMed

    Lauterbach, Enise; Voss, Frederik; Gerigk, Roland; Lauterbach, Michael

    2014-12-01

    Loss of protective airway reflexes in patients with acute coma puts these patients at risk of aspiration pneumonia complicating the course of the primary disease. Available data vary considerably with regard to bacteriology, role of anaerobic bacteria, and antibiotic treatment. Our objective was to research the bacteriology of aspiration pneumonia in acute coma patients who were not pre-treated with antibiotics or hospitalized within 30 days prior to the event. We prospectively analyzed 127 patient records from adult patients admitted, intubated and ventilated to a tertiary medical intensive care unit with acute coma. Bacteriology and antibiotic resistance testing from tracheal aspirate sampled within 24 h after admission, blood cultures, ICU scores (APACHE II, SOFA), hematology, and clinical chemistry were assessed. Patients were followed up until death or hospital discharge. The majority of patients with acute coma suffered from acute cardiovascular disorders, predominantly myocardial infarction, followed by poisonings, and coma of unknown cause. In a majority of our patients, microaspiration resulted in overt infection. Most frequently S. aureus, H. influenzae, and S. pneumoniae were isolated. Anaerobic bacteria (Bacteroides spec., Fusobacteria, Prevotella spec.) were isolated from tracheal aspirate in a minority of patients, and predominantly as part of a mixed infection. Antibiotic monotherapy with a 2nd generation cephalosporin, or a 3rd generation gyrase inhibitor, was most effective in our patients regardless of the presence of anaerobic bacteria. PMID:25164409

  5. Acute chylous ascites mimicking acute appendicitis in a patient with pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Emily K; Ek, Edmund; Croagh, Daniel; Spain, Lavinia A; Farrell, Stephen

    2009-01-01

    We report a case of acute chylous peritonitis mimicking acute appendicitis in a man with acute on chronic pancreatitis. Pancreatitis, both acute and chronic, causing the development of acute chylous ascites and peritonitis has rarely been reported in the English literature. This is the fourth published case of acute chylous ascites mimicking acute appendicitis in the literature. PMID:19824123

  6. Plasma from stored packed red blood cells and MHC class I antibodies causes acute lung injury in a 2-event in vivo rat model

    PubMed Central

    Kelher, Marguerite R.; Masuno, Tomhiko; Moore, Ernest E.; Damle, Sagar; Meng, Xianzhong; Song, Yong; Liang, Xiayuan; Niedzinski, Jerry; Geier, Steven S.; Khan, Samina Y.; Gamboni-Robertson, Fabia

    2009-01-01

    Transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI) is the leading cause of transfusion death. We hypothesize that TRALI requires 2 events: (1) the clinical condition of the patient and (2) the infusion of antibodies against MHC class I antigens or the plasma from stored blood. A 2-event rat model was developed with saline (NS) or endotoxin (LPS) as the first event and the infusion of plasma from packed red blood cells (PRBCs) or antibodies (OX18 and OX27) against MHC class I antigens as the second event. ALI was determined by Evans blue dye leak from the plasma to the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF), protein and CINC-1 concentrations in the BALF, and the lung histology. NS-treated rats did not evidence ALI with any second events, and LPS did not cause ALI. LPS-treated animals demonstrated ALI in response to plasma from stored PRBCs, both prestorage leukoreduced and unmodified, and to OX18 and OX27, all in a concentration-dependent fashion. ALI was neutrophil (PMN) dependent, and OX18/OX27 localized to the PMN surface in vivo and primed the oxidase of rat PMNs. We conclude that TRALI is the result of 2 events with the second events consisting of the plasma from stored blood and antibodies that prime PMNs. PMID:19131548

  7. Re-emergent Human Adenovirus Genome Type 7d Caused an Acute Respiratory Disease Outbreak in Southern China After a Twenty-one Year Absence

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Suhui; Wan, Chengsong; Ke, Changwen; Seto, Jason; Dehghan, Shoaleh; Zou, Lirong; Zhou, Jie; Cheng, Zetao; Jing, Shuping; Zeng, Zhiwei; Zhang, Jing; Wan, Xuan; Wu, Xianbo; Zhao, Wei; Zhu, Li; Seto, Donald; Zhang, Qiwei

    2014-01-01

    Human adenoviruses (HAdVs) are highly contagious pathogens causing acute respiratory disease (ARD), among other illnesses. Of the ARD genotypes, HAdV-7 presents with more severe morbidity and higher mortality than the others. We report the isolation and identification of a genome type HAdV-7d (DG01_2011) from a recent outbreak in Southern China. Genome sequencing, phylogenetic analysis, and restriction endonuclease analysis (REA) comparisons with past pathogens indicate HAdV-7d has re-emerged in Southern China after an absence of twenty-one years. Recombination analysis reveals this genome differs from the 1950s-era prototype and vaccine strains by a lateral gene transfer, substituting the coding region for the L1 52/55?kDa DNA packaging protein from HAdV-16. DG01_2011 descends from both a strain circulating in Southwestern China (2010) and a strain from Shaanxi causing a fatality and outbreak (Northwestern China; 2009). Due to the higher morbidity and mortality rates associated with HAdV-7, the surveillance, identification, and characterization of these strains in population-dense China by REA and/or whole genome sequencing are strongly indicated. With these accurate identifications of specific HAdV types and an epidemiological database of regional HAdV pathogens, along with the HAdV genome stability noted across time and space, the development, availability, and deployment of appropriate vaccines are needed. PMID:25482188

  8. Acute abdomen due to group A streptococcus bacteremia caused by an isolate with a mutation in the csrS gene.

    PubMed

    Kaneko, Masahiko; Maruta, Masaki; Shikata, Hisaharu; Hanayama, Masakazu; Ikebe, Tadayoshi

    2015-11-01

    Streptococcus pyogenes (group A streptococcus) is an aerobic gram-positive coccus that causes infections ranging from non-invasive pharyngitis to severely invasive necrotizing fasciitis. Mutations in csrS/csrR and rgg, negative regulator genes of group A streptococcus, are crucial factors in the pathogenesis of streptococcal toxic shock syndrome, which is a severe, invasive infection characterized by sudden onset of shock and multiorgan failure, resulting in a high mortality rate. Here we present a case of group A streptococcal bacteremia in a 28-year-old Japanese woman with no relevant previous medical history. The patient developed progressive abdominal symptoms that may have been due to spontaneous bacterial peritonitis, followed by a state of shock, which did not fulfill the proposed criteria for streptococcal toxic shock. The isolate was found to harbor a mutation in the negative regulator csrS gene, whereas the csrR and rgg genes were intact. It was noteworthy that this strain carrying a csrS mutation had caused group A streptococcal bacteremia characterized by acute abdomen as the presenting symptom in a young individual who had been previously healthy. This case indicates that group A streptococcus with csrS mutations has potential virulence factors that are associated with the onset of group A streptococcal bacteremia that does not meet the diagnostic criteria for streptococcal toxic shock syndrome. PMID:26231317

  9. Usefulness of Beta2-Microglobulin as a Predictor of All-Cause and Nonculprit Lesion-Related Cardiovascular Events in Acute Coronary Syndromes (from the PROSPECT Study).

    PubMed

    Möckel, Martin; Muller, Reinhold; Searle, Julia; Slagman, Anna; De Bruyne, Bernard; Serruys, Patrick; Weisz, Giora; Xu, Ke; Holert, Fabian; Müller, Christian; Maehara, Akiko; Stone, Gregg W

    2015-10-01

    In the Providing Regional Observations to Study Predictors of Events in the Coronary Tree (PROSPECT) study, plaque burden, plaque composition, and minimal luminal area were associated with an increased risk of adverse cardiovascular events arising from untreated atherosclerotic lesions (vulnerable plaques) in patients with acute coronary syndromes (ACS). We sought to evaluate the utility of biomarker profiling and clinical risk factors to predict 3-year all-cause and nonculprit lesion-related major adverse cardiac events (MACEs). Of 697 patients who underwent successful percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) for ACS, an array of 28 baseline biomarkers was analyzed. Median follow-up was 3.4 years. Beta2-microglobulin displayed the strongest predictive power of all variables assessed for all-cause and nonculprit lesion-related MACE. In a classification and regression tree analysis, patients with beta2-microglobulin >1.92 mg/L had an estimated 28.7% 3-year incidence of all-cause MACE; C-peptide <1.32 ng/ml was associated with a further increase in MACE to 51.2%. In a classification and regression tree analysis for untreated nonculprit lesion-related MACE, beta2-microglobulin >1.92 mg/L identified a cohort with a 3-year rate of 18.5%, and C-peptide <2.22 ng/ml was associated with a further increase to 25.5%. By multivariable analysis, beta2-microglobulin was the strongest predictor of all-cause and nonculprit MACE during follow-up. High-density lipoprotein (HDL), transferrin, and history of angina pectoris were also independent predictors of all-cause MACE, and HDL was an independent predictor of nonculprit MACE. In conclusion, in the PROSPECT study, beta2-microglobulin strongly predicted all-cause and nonculprit lesion-related MACE within 3 years after PCI in ACS. C-peptide and HDL provided further risk stratification to identify angiographically mild nonculprit lesions prone to future MACE. PMID:26254706

  10. Mortality from heart failure, acute myocardial infarction and other ischaemic heart disease in England and Oxford: a trend study of multiple-cause-coded death certification

    PubMed Central

    Rahimi, Kazem; Duncan, Marie; Pitcher, Alex; Emdin, Connor A; Goldacre, Michael J

    2015-01-01

    Background Age-standardised death rates from acute myocardial infarction (AMI) and ischaemic heart disease (IHD) have been declining in most developed countries. However, the magnitude of such reductions and how they impact on death from heart failure are less certain. We sought to assess and compare temporal trends in mortality from heart failure, AMI and non-AMI IHD over a 30-year period in England. Methods We analysed death registration data for multiple-cause-coded mortality for all deaths in people aged 35?years and over in England from 1995 to 2010, population 52 million, and in a regional population (Oxford region) from 1981 to 2010, population 2.5 million, for which data on all causes of death were available. Results Considering all ages and both sexes combined, during the 30-year observation period, age-standardised and sex-standardised mortality rates based on all certified causes of death declined by 60% for heart failure, 80% for AMI and 46% for non-AMI IHD. These longer term trends observed in the Oxford region were consistent with those for the whole of England from 1995 to 2010, with no evidence of a plateau in recent years. Although proportional reductions in rates differed by age and sex, even in those aged 85?years or more, there were substantial reductions in mortality rates in the all-England data set (50%, 66% and 20% for heart failure, AMI and non-AMI IHD, respectively). Conclusions This study shows large and sustained reductions in age-specific and sex-specific and standardised death rates from heart failure, as well as from AMI and non-AMI IHD, over a 30-year period in England. PMID:26136081

  11. Rapid evaluation by lung-cardiac-inferior vena cava (LCI) integrated ultrasound for differentiating heart failure from pulmonary disease as the cause of acute dyspnea in the emergency setting

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Rapid and accurate diagnosis and management can be lifesaving for patients with acute dyspnea. However, making a differential diagnosis and selecting early treatment for patients with acute dyspnea in the emergency setting is a clinical challenge that requires complex decision-making in order to achieve hemodynamic balance, improve functional capacity, and decrease mortality. In the present study, we examined the screening potential of rapid evaluation by lung-cardiac-inferior vena cava (LCI) integrated ultrasound for differentiating acute heart failure syndromes (AHFS) from primary pulmonary disease in patients with acute dyspnea in the emergency setting. Methods Between March 2011 and March 2012, 90 consecutive patients (45 women, 78.1?±?9.9?years) admitted to the emergency room of our hospital for acute dyspnea were enrolled. Within 30?minutes of admission, all patients underwent conventional physical examination, rapid ultrasound (lung-cardiac-inferior vena cava [LCI] integrated ultrasound) examination with a hand-held device, routine laboratory tests, measurement of brain natriuretic peptide, and chest X-ray in the emergency room. Results The final diagnosis was acute dyspnea due to AHFS in 53 patients, acute dyspnea due to pulmonary disease despite a history of heart failure in 18 patients, and acute dyspnea due to pulmonary disease in 19 patients. Lung ultrasound alone showed a sensitivity, specificity, negative predictive value, and positive predictive value of 96.2, 54.0, 90.9, and 75.0%, respectively, for differentiating AHFS from pulmonary disease. On the other hand, LCI integrated ultrasound had a sensitivity, specificity, negative predictive value, and positive predictive value of 94.3, 91.9, 91.9, and 94.3%, respectively. Conclusions Our study demonstrated that rapid evaluation by LCI integrated ultrasound is extremely accurate for differentiating acute dyspnea due to AHFS from that caused by primary pulmonary disease in the emergency setting. PMID:23210515

  12. The Difference between Anxiolytic and Anxiogenic Effects Induced by Acute and Chronic Alcohol Exposure and Changes in Associative Learning and Memory Based on Color Preference and the Cause of Parkinson-Like Behaviors in Zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yuan; Chen, Di; Sun, Ming-Zhu; Zhao, Xin; Chen, Dong-Yan; Feng, Xi-Zeng

    2015-01-01

    We describe an interdisciplinary comparison of the effects of acute and chronic alcohol exposure in terms of their disturbance of light, dark and color preferences and the occurrence of Parkinson-like behavior in zebrafish through computer visual tracking, data mining, and behavioral and physiological analyses. We found that zebrafish in anxiolytic and anxious states, which are induced by acute and chronic repeated alcohol exposure, respectively, display distinct emotional reactions in light/dark preference tests as well as distinct learning and memory abilities in color-enhanced conditional place preference (CPP) tests. Additionally, compared with the chronic alcohol (1.0%) treatment, acute alcohol exposure had a significant, dose-dependent effect on anxiety, learning and memory (color preference) as well as locomotive activities. Acute exposure doses (0.5%, 1.0%, and 1.5%) generated an “inverted V” dose-dependent pattern in all of the behavioral parameters, with 1.0% having the greatest effect, while the chronic treatment had a moderate effect. Furthermore, by measuring locomotive activity, learning and memory performance, the number of dopaminergic neurons, tyrosine hydroxylase expression, and the change in the photoreceptors in the retina, we found that acute and chronic alcohol exposure induced varying degrees of Parkinson-like symptoms in zebrafish. Taken together, these results illuminated the behavioral and physiological mechanisms underlying the changes associated with learning and memory and the cause of potential Parkinson-like behaviors in zebrafish due to acute and chronic alcohol exposure. PMID:26558894

  13. Early administration of therapeutic anticoagulation following intravenous thrombolysis for acute cardiogenic embolic stroke caused by left ventricular thrombus: case report and topic review.

    PubMed

    Gill, Rick; Donahey, Elisabeth; Ruland, Sean

    2015-01-01

    Cardiogenic cerebral embolism represents 20% of all acute ischemic strokes (AISs) with one-third of these being caused by left ventricular thrombus (LVT). LVT is not a contraindication for treatment with intravenous recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (IV rtPA) for AIS. However, the subsequent treatment of a potentially unstable LVT is contraindicated for 24?h following the use of IV rtPA according to current guidelines. We present a 66-year-old man with AIS treated with IV rtPA. Echocardiogram shortly after treatment demonstrated both a large apical and septal thrombus in the left ventricle and at 12?h post IV rtPA infusion, therapeutic anticoagulation with heparin was started without complication. In practice, the action of IV rtPA outlasts its apparent half-life because of thrombin-binding and the prolonged effects and longer half-life of its product, plasmin; however, the pharmacokinetics do not warrant prolonged avoidance of therapeutic anticoagulation when clinically indicated. Our case demonstrates that anticoagulation for potentially unstable LVT can be safely initiated at 12?h following IV rtPA treatment for AIS. PMID:25699011

  14. Early Administration of Therapeutic Anticoagulation Following Intravenous Thrombolysis for Acute Cardiogenic Embolic Stroke Caused by Left Ventricular Thrombus: Case Report and Topic Review

    PubMed Central

    Gill, Rick; Donahey, Elisabeth; Ruland, Sean

    2015-01-01

    Cardiogenic cerebral embolism represents 20% of all acute ischemic strokes (AISs) with one-third of these being caused by left ventricular thrombus (LVT). LVT is not a contraindication for treatment with intravenous recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (IV rtPA) for AIS. However, the subsequent treatment of a potentially unstable LVT is contraindicated for 24?h following the use of IV rtPA according to current guidelines. We present a 66-year-old man with AIS treated with IV rtPA. Echocardiogram shortly after treatment demonstrated both a large apical and septal thrombus in the left ventricle and at 12?h post IV rtPA infusion, therapeutic anticoagulation with heparin was started without complication. In practice, the action of IV rtPA outlasts its apparent half-life because of thrombin-binding and the prolonged effects and longer half-life of its product, plasmin; however, the pharmacokinetics do not warrant prolonged avoidance of therapeutic anticoagulation when clinically indicated. Our case demonstrates that anticoagulation for potentially unstable LVT can be safely initiated at 12?h following IV rtPA treatment for AIS. PMID:25699011

  15. Effects of Mikania glomerata Spreng. and Mikania laevigata Schultz Bip. ex Baker (Asteraceae) extracts on pulmonary inflammation and oxidative stress caused by acute coal dust exposure

    SciTech Connect

    Freitas, T.P.; Silveira, P.C.; Rocha, L.G.; Rezin, G.T.; Rocha, J.; Citadini-Zanette, V.; Romao, P.T.; Dal-Pizzol, F.; Pinho, R.A.; Andrade, V.M.; Streck, E.L.

    2008-12-15

    Several studies have reported biological effects of Mikania glomerata and Mikania laevigata, used in Brazilian folk medicine for respiratory diseases. Pneumoconiosis is characterized by pulmonary inflammation caused by coal dust exposure. In this work, we evaluated the effect of pretreatment with M. glomerata and M. laevigata extracts (MGE and MLE, respectively) (100 mg/kg, s.c.) on inflammatory and oxidative stress parameters in lung of rats subjected to a single coal dust intratracheal instillation. Rats were pretreated for 2 weeks with saline solution, MGE, or MLE. On day 15, the animals were anesthetized, and gross mineral coal dust or saline solutions were administered directly in the lung by intratracheal instillation. Fifteen days after coal dust instillation, the animals were killed. Bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) was obtained; total cell count and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) activity were determined. In the lung, myeloperoxidase activity, thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances (TBARS) level, and protein carbonyl and sulfhydryl contents were evaluated. In BAL of treated animals, we verified an increased total cell count and LDH activity. MGE and MLE prevented the increase in cell count, but only MLE prevented the increase in LDH. Myeloperoxidase and TBARS levels were not affected, protein carbonylation was increased, and the protein thiol levels were decreased by acute coal dust intratracheal administration. The findings also suggest that both extracts present an important protective effect on the oxidation of thiol groups. Moreover, pretreatment with MGE and MLE also diminished lung inflammatory infiltration induced by coal dust, as assessed by histopathologic analyses.

  16. In Vitro Antibacterial Efficacy of 21 Indian Timber-Yielding Plants Against Multidrug-Resistant Bacteria Causing Urinary Tract Infection

    PubMed Central

    Mishra, Monali P.; Padhy, Rabindra N.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives To screen methanolic leaf extracts of 21 timber-yielding plants for antibacterial activity against nine species of uropathogenic bacteria isolated from clinical samples of a hospital (Enterococcus faecalis, Staphylococcus aureus, Acinetobacter baumannii, Citrobacter freundii, Enterobacter aerogenes, Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Proteus mirabilis, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa). Methods Bacterial strains were subjected to antibiotic sensitivity tests by the Kirby–Bauer's disc diffusion method. The antibacterial potentiality of leaf extracts was monitored by the agar-well diffusion method with multidrug-resistant (MDR) strains of nine uropathogens. Results Two Gram-positive isolates, E. faecalis and S. aureus, were resistant to 14 of the 18 antibiotics used. Gram-negative isolates A. baumannii, C. freundii, E. aerogenes, E. coli, K. pneumoniae, P. mirabilis, and P. aeruginosa were resistant to 10, 12, 9, 11, 11, 10, and 11 antibiotics, respectively, of the 14 antibiotics used. Methanolic leaf extracts of Anogeissus acuminata had the maximum zone of inhibition size—29 mm against S. aureus and 28 mm against E. faecalis and P. aeruginosa. Cassia tora had 29 mm as the zone of inhibition size for E. faecalis, E. aerogenes, and P. aeruginosa. Based on the minimum inhibitory concentration and minimum bactericidal concentration values, the most effective 10 plants against uropathogens could be arranged in decreasing order as follows: C. tora > A. acuminata > Schleichera oleosa > Pterocarpus santalinus > Eugenia jambolana > Bridelia retusa > Mimusops elengi > Stereospermum kunthianum > Tectona grandis > Anthocephalus cadamba. The following eight plants had moderate control capacity: Artocarpus heterophyllus, Azadirachta indica, Dalbergia latifolia, Eucalyptus citriodora, Gmelina arborea, Pongamia pinnata, Pterocarpus marsupium, and Shorea robusta. E. coli, followed by A. baumannii, C. freundii, E. aerogenes, P. mirabilis, and P. aeruginosa were controlled by higher amounts/levels of leaf extracts. Phytochemicals of all plants were qualitatively estimated. Conclusions A majority of timber-yielding plants studied had in vitro control capacity against MDR uropathogenic bacteria. PMID:24524024

  17. Dynamic obstruction induced by systolic anterior motion of the mitral valve in a volume-depleted left ventricle: an unexpected cause of acute heart failure in a patient with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Suji; Kim, So Jeong; Kim, Jina; Yoon, Phillhoon; Park, Jeongwoong

    2015-01-01

    Systolic anterior motion (SAM) of the mitral valve (MV) and left ventricular outflow tract (LVOT) dynamic obstruction (DO) typically occur in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy; however, they can appear in an apparently normal heart in association with changes in cardiac loading conditions and/or hyperdynamic left ventricular (LV) performance. Meanwhile, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) can impair LV filling by elevating pulmonary vascular resistance. The authors report a case of transient acute heart failure caused by LVOT DO resulting from SAM of the MV in a severely volume-depleted LV in a patient with acute COPD exacerbation.

  18. Interaction of aflatoxin B1 and fumonisin B1 in mice causes immunotoxicity and oxidative stress: Possible protective role using lactic acid bacteria.

    PubMed

    Abbès, Samir; Ben Salah-Abbès, Jalila; Jebali, Rania; Younes, Ridha Ben; Oueslati, Ridha

    2016-01-01

    Aflatoxins (AF) are important foodborne mycotoxins implicated in human health and have immunocytotoxic effects. The aims of this study were to evaluate a new aflatoxin B1 (AFB1) and fumonisin B1 (FB1)-binding/degrading micro-organism for biological detoxification, to examine its ability to degrade AFB1 and FB1 in liquid medium, and to evaluate its potential in vivo protective role against any combined effects from AFB1 and FB1 on host splenocyte caspase-3 activity (reflecting DNA damage/cell death) and mRNA levels of select inflammation-regulating cytokines. Balb/c mice were divided into groups (10/group) and treated daily for 2 weeks by oral gavage with AFB1 (80?µg/kg BW), FB1 (100?µg/kg), AFB1?+?FB1, or lactic acid bacteria (Lactobacillus paracasei BEJ01, 2?×?10(9)?CFU/L, ?2?mg/kg) - alone or in combination with the AFB1 and/or FB1. After the exposures, spleens were collected for measures of caspase-3 activity, lipid peroxidation (LP), and glutathione (GSH) content, expression of anti-oxidation protective enzymes (GPx and SOD), and mRNA levels of inflammation-regulating cytokines (e.g. IL-10, IL-4, IFN?, TNF?). Thymii were also removed for analysis of apoptosis. The results indicated that, in the spleen, exposure to the mycotoxins led to increased caspase-3 activity, LP, and IL-10 and IL-4 mRNA levels, but decreased GSH content and down-regulated expression of GPx and SOD, and of IFN? and TNF? mRNA. Co-treatment using Lactic Acid Bacteria (LAB) with AFB1 or FB1 suppressed levels of DNA fragmentation, normalized splenic LP and increased GSH levels, up-regulated expression of GPx and SOD, and normalized mRNA levels of the analyzed cytokines. It is concluded that AFB1 and FB1 might have combinational (synergistic moreso than additive) toxic effects in situ. Further, it can be seen that use of LAB induced protective effects against the oxidative stress and (immuno)toxicity of these agents in part through adhesion (and so likely diminished bioavalability). PMID:25585958

  19. Microbiology and Treatment of Acute Apical Abscesses

    PubMed Central

    Rôças, Isabela N.

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY Acute apical abscess is the most common form of dental abscess and is caused by infection of the root canal of the tooth. It is usually localized intraorally, but in some cases the apical abscess may spread and result in severe complications or even mortality. The reasons why dental root canal infections can become symptomatic and evolve to severe spreading and sometimes life-threatening abscesses remain elusive. Studies using culture and advanced molecular microbiology methods for microbial identification in apical abscesses have demonstrated a multispecies community conspicuously dominated by anaerobic bacteria. Species/phylotypes commonly found in these infections belong to the genera Fusobacterium, Parvimonas, Prevotella, Porphyromonas, Dialister, Streptococcus, and Treponema. Advances in DNA sequencing technologies and computational biology have substantially enhanced the knowledge of the microbiota associated with acute apical abscesses and shed some light on the etiopathogeny of this disease. Species richness and abundance and the resulting network of interactions among community members may affect the collective pathogenicity and contribute to the development of acute infections. Disease modifiers, including transient or permanent host-related factors, may also influence the development and severity of acute abscesses. This review focuses on the current evidence about the etiology and treatment of acute apical abscesses and how the process is influenced by host-related factors and proposes future directions in research, diagnosis, and therapeutic approaches to deal with this disease. PMID:23554416

  20. Seasonal Behavior of Xylella fastidiosa Causing Almond Leaf Scorch Disease Under Field Conditions and Improved Detection of the Bacteria by Means of Array-PCR

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Almond leaf scorch disease (ALSD) caused by Xylella fastidiosa is potentially a serious threat to the almond industry in San Joaquin Valley of California. Knowledge of X. fastidiosa behavior in the plant host under field conditions is important for disease control and this issue is being addressed i...

  1. Seasonal Behavior of Xylella fastidiosa Causing Almond Leaf Scorch Under Field Conditions and Detection of the Bacteria by Means of Array-PCR

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Diseases caused by Xylella fastidiosa have re-emerged as a serious threat to several economically important crops, such as grape and almond, in the San Joaquin Valley of California. Knowledge of bacterial behavior in plant hosts under field condition is important for disease control. This research c...

  2. Aquatic Bacteria Samples

    USGS Multimedia Gallery

    On April 20, 2010, the BP Deepwater Horizon drilling platform collapsed and sank in the Gulf of Mexico, causing one of the largest oil spills in history. One of the big dilemmas in responding to the oil spil is how to clean up the oil itself. One way currently under research is to use bacteria that ...

  3. Prevalence of Device-associated Nosocomial Infections Caused By Gram-negative Bacteria in a Trauma Intensive Care Unit in Libya

    PubMed Central

    Zorgani, Abdulaziz; Abofayed, Atef; Glia, Abdulhakim; Albarbar, Ashrf; Hanish, Sami

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Device-associated nosocomial infections (DANIs) have a major impact on patient morbidity and mortality. Our study aimed to determine the distribution rate of DANIs and causative agents and patterns of antibiotic resistance in the trauma-surgical intensive care unit (ICU).? Methods Our study was conducted at Abusalim Trauma Hospital in Tripoli, Libya. All devices associated with nosocomial infections, including central venous catheters (CVC), endotracheal tubes (ETT), Foley’s urinary catheters, chest tubes, nasogastric tubes (NGT), and tracheostomy tubes, were removed aseptically and examined for Gram-negative bacteria (GNB).? Results During a one-year study period, 363 patients were hospitalized; the overall mortality rate was 29%. A total of 79 DANIs were identified, the most common site of infection was ETT (39.2%), followed by urinary catheters (19%), NGTs (18%), tracheostomy tubes (11%), CVCs (10%), and chest tubes (3%). The most frequently isolated organisms were Klebsiella pneumonia, Acinetobacter baumannii, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa (30%, 20%, and 14%, respectively). Extremely high resistance rates were observed among GNB to ampicillin (99%), cefuroxime (95%), amoxicillin-clavulante (92%), and nitrofurantoin (91%). Lower levels of resistance were exhibited to amikacin (38%), imipenem (38%), and colistin (29%). About 39% of the isolates were defined as multi-drug resistant (MDR). Overall, extended spectrum ?-lactmase producers were expressed in 39% of isolates mainly among K. pneumonia (88%). A. baumannii isolates exhibited extremely high levels of resistance to all antibiotics except colistin (100% sensitive). In addition, 56.3% of A. baumannii isolates were found to be MDR. P. aeruginosa isolates showed 46%–55% effectiveness to anti-pseudomonas antibiotics.? Conclusion High rates of DANI’s and the emergence of MDR organisms poses a serious threat to patients. There is a need to strengthen infection control within the ICU environment, introduce surveillance systems, and implement evidence-based preventive strategies. PMID:26366261

  4. Kocuria kristinae infection associated with acute cholecystitis

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Edmond SK; Wong, Chris LP; Lai, Kristi TW; Chan, Edmond CH; Yam, WC; Chan, Angus CW

    2005-01-01

    Background Kocuria, previously classified into the genus of Micrococcus, is commonly found on human skin. Two species, K. rosea and K. kristinae, are etiologically associated with catheter-related bacteremia. Case presentation We describe the first case of K. kristinae infection associated with acute cholecystitis. The microorganism was isolated from the bile of a 56-year old Chinese man who underwent laparoscopic cholecystectomy. He developed post-operative fever that resolved readily after levofloxacin treatment. Conclusion Our report of K. kristinae infection associated with acute cholecystitis expands the clinical spectrum of infections caused by this group of bacteria. With increasing number of recent reports describing the association between Kocuria spp. and infectious diseases, the significance of their isolation from clinical specimens cannot be underestimated. A complete picture of infections related to Kocuria spp. will have to await the documentation of more clinical cases. PMID:16029488

  5. Two-photon excited endogenous fluorescence for label-free in vivo imaging ingestion of disease-causing bacteria by human leukocytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Yan; Yan, Bo; Sun, Qiqi; Teh, Seng Khoon; Zhang, Wei; Wen, Zilong; Qu, Jianan Y.

    2013-02-01

    Real time and in vivo monitoring leukocyte behavior provides unique information to understand the physiological and pathological process of infection. In this study, we demonstrate that two-photon excited reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH) fluorescence provides imaging contrast to distinguish granulocyte and agranulocyte. By using spectral and time-resolved NADH fluorescence, we study the immune response of human neutrophils against bacterial infection (Escherichia coli). The two-photon excited NADH fluorescence images clearly review the morphological changes from resting neutrophils (round shape) to activated neutrophils (ruffle shape) during phagocytosis. The free-tobound NADH ratio of neutrophils decreases after ingesting disease-causing pathogen: Escherichia coli. This finding may provide a new optical tool to investigate inflammatory processes by using NADH fluorescence in vivo.

  6. Ice-Nucleating Bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Obata, Hitoshi

    Since the discovery of ice-nucleating bacteria in 1974 by Maki et al., a large number of studies on the biological characteristics, ice-nucleating substance, ice nucleation gene and frost damage etc. of the bacteria have been carried out. Ice-nucleating bacteria can cause the freezing of water at relatively warm temperature (-2.3°C). Tween 20 was good substrates for ice-nucleating activity of Pseudomonas fluorescens KUIN-1. Major fatty acids of Isolate (Pseudomonas fluorescens) W-11 grown at 30°C were palmitic, cis-9-hexadecenoic and cis-11-octadecenoic which amounted to 90% of the total fatty acids. Sequence analysis shows that an ice nucleation gene from Pseudomonas fluorescens is related to the gene of Pseudomonas syringae.

  7. Acute Vision Loss.

    PubMed

    Bagheri, Nika; Mehta, Sonia

    2015-09-01

    Acute vision loss can be transient (lasting <24 hours) or persistent (lasting >24 hours). When patients present with acute vision loss, it is important to ascertain the duration of vision loss and whether it is a unilateral process affecting one eye or a bilateral process affecting both eyes. This article focuses on causes of acute vision loss in the nontraumatic setting and provides management pearls to help health care providers better triage these patients. PMID:26319342

  8. Methanotrophic bacteria.

    PubMed Central

    Hanson, R S; Hanson, T E

    1996-01-01

    Methane-utilizing bacteria (methanotrophs) are a diverse group of gram-negative bacteria that are related to other members of the Proteobacteria. These bacteria are classified into three groups based on the pathways used for assimilation of formaldehyde, the major source of cell carbon, and other physiological and morphological features. The type I and type X methanotrophs are found within the gamma subdivision of the Proteobacteria and employ the ribulose monophosphate pathway for formaldehyde assimilation, whereas type II methanotrophs, which employ the serine pathway for formaldehyde assimilation, form a coherent cluster within the beta subdivision of the Proteobacteria. Methanotrophic bacteria are ubiquitous. The growth of type II bacteria appears to be favored in environments that contain relatively high levels of methane, low levels of dissolved oxygen, and limiting concentrations of combined nitrogen and/or copper. Type I methanotrophs appear to be dominant in environments in which methane is limiting and combined nitrogen and copper levels are relatively high. These bacteria serve as biofilters for the oxidation of methane produced in anaerobic environments, and when oxygen is present in soils, atmospheric methane is oxidized. Their activities in nature are greatly influenced by agricultural practices and other human activities. Recent evidence indicates that naturally occurring, uncultured methanotrophs represent new genera. Methanotrophs that are capable of oxidizing methane at atmospheric levels exhibit methane oxidation kinetics different from those of methanotrophs available in pure cultures. A limited number of methanotrophs have the genetic capacity to synthesize a soluble methane monooxygenase which catalyzes the rapid oxidation of environmental pollutants including trichloroethylene. PMID:8801441

  9. Acute Coronary Syndrome

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Take note of these common signs of an acute coronary syndrome: Chest pain or discomfort, which may involve pressure, tightness ... 9-1-1. They’re not being alarmist.” Chest pain caused by acute coronary syndromes can come on suddenly, as is the case ...

  10. Swimming bacteria in liquid crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sokolov, Andrey; Zhou, Shuang; Aranson, Igor; Lavrentovich, Oleg

    2014-03-01

    Dynamics of swimming bacteria can be very complex due to the interaction between the bacteria and the fluid, especially when the suspending fluid is non-Newtonian. Placement of swimming bacteria in lyotropic liquid crystal produces a new class of active materials by combining features of two seemingly incompatible constituents: self-propelled live bacteria and ordered liquid crystals. Here we present fundamentally new phenomena caused by the coupling between direction of bacterial swimming, bacteria-triggered flows and director orientations. Locomotion of bacteria may locally reduce the degree of order in liquid crystal or even trigger nematic-isotropic phase transition. Microscopic flows generated by bacterial flagella disturb director orientation. Emerged birefringence patterns allow direct optical observation and quantitative characterization of flagella dynamics. At high concentration of bacteria we observed the emergence of self-organized periodic texture caused by bacteria swimming. Our work sheds new light on self-organization in hybrid bio-mechanical systems and can lead to valuable biomedical applications. Was supported by the US DOE, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Division of Materials Science and Engineering, under the Contract No. DE AC02-06CH11357.

  11. Re-engineering bacteria for ethanol production

    SciTech Connect

    Yomano, Lorraine P; York, Sean W; Zhou, Shengde; Shanmugam, Keelnatham; Ingram, Lonnie O

    2014-05-06

    The invention provides recombinant bacteria, which comprise a full complement of heterologous ethanol production genes. Expression of the full complement of heterologous ethanol production genes causes the recombinant bacteria to produce ethanol as the primary fermentation product when grown in mineral salts medium, without the addition of complex nutrients. Methods for producing the recombinant bacteria and methods for producing ethanol using the recombinant bacteria are also disclosed.

  12. ACUTE LEUKEMIAS ACUTE MYELOGENOUS

    E-print Network

    Trisomy 8(+8), t(9;22), t(6;9) 90% myeloblasts AML-M2 Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia with Maturation Black B, & Choloacetate Esterase t(8;21) #12;9/16/2013 4 AML-M3 Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia between chromosomes 8 and 21 AML with a translocation or inversion in chromosome 16 AML with changes

  13. Third generation cephalosporin resistant Enterobacteriaceae and multidrug resistant gram-negative bacteria causing bacteremia in febrile neutropenia adult cancer patients in Lebanon, broad spectrum antibiotics use as a major risk factor, and correlation with poor prognosis

    PubMed Central

    Moghnieh, Rima; Estaitieh, Nour; Mugharbil, Anas; Jisr, Tamima; Abdallah, Dania I.; Ziade, Fouad; Sinno, Loubna; Ibrahim, Ahmad

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Bacteremia remains a major cause of life-threatening complications in patients receiving anticancer chemotherapy. The spectrum and susceptibility profiles of causative microorganisms differ with time and place. Data from Lebanon are scarce. We aim at evaluating the epidemiology of bacteremia in cancer patients in a university hospital in Lebanon, emphasizing antibiotic resistance and risk factors of multi-drug resistant organism (MDRO)-associated bacteremia. Materials and Methods: This is a retrospective study of 75 episodes of bacteremia occurring in febrile neutropenic patients admitted to the hematology-oncology unit at Makassed General Hospital, Lebanon, from October 2009-January 2012. It corresponds to epidemiological data on bacteremia episodes in febrile neutropenic cancer patients including antimicrobial resistance and identification of risk factors associated with third generation cephalosporin resistance (3GCR) and MDRO-associated bacteremia. Results: Out of 75 bacteremias, 42.7% were gram-positive (GP), and 57.3% were gram-negative (GN). GP bacteremias were mostly due to methicillin-resistant coagulase negative staphylococci (28% of total bacteremias and 66% of GP bacteremias). Among the GN bacteremias, Escherichia coli (22.7% of total, 39.5% of GN organisms) and Klebsiella pneumoniae(13.3% of total, 23.3% of GN organisms) were the most important causative agents. GN bacteremia due to 3GC sensitive (3GCS) bacteria represented 28% of total bacteremias, while 29% were due to 3GCR bacteria and 9% were due to carbapenem-resistant organisms. There was a significant correlation between bacteremia with MDRO and subsequent intubation, sepsis and mortality. Among potential risk factors, only broad spectrum antibiotic intake >4 days before bacteremia was found to be statistically significant for acquisition of 3GCR bacteria. Using carbapenems or piperacillin/tazobactam>4 days before bacteremia was significantly associated with the emergence of MDRO (p < 0.05). Conclusion: Our findings have major implications for the management of febrile neutropenia, especially in breakthrough bacteremia and fever when patients are already on broadspectrum antibiotics. Emergence of resistance to 3GCs and, to a lesser extent, to carbapenems in GN isolates has to be considered seriously in our local guidelines for empiric treatment of febrile neutropenia, especially given that their occurrence was proven to be associated with poorer outcomes. PMID:25729741

  14. Acute mountain sickness

    MedlinePLUS

    High altitude cerebral edema; Altitude anoxia; Altitude sickness; Mountain sickness; High altitude pulmonary edema ... Acute mountain sickness is caused by reduced air pressure and lower oxygen levels at high altitudes. The faster you ...

  15. Acute stress causes rapid synaptic insertion of Ca2+-permeable AMPA receptors to facilitate long-term potentiation in the hippocampus

    PubMed Central

    Jo, Jihoon; Hogg, Ellen L.; Piers, Thomas; Kim, Dong-Hyun; Seaton, Gillian; Seok, Heon; Bru-Mercier, Gilles; Son, Gi Hoon; Regan, Philip; Hildebrandt, Lars; Waite, Eleanor; Kim, Byeong-Chae; Kerrigan, Talitha L.; Kim, Kyungjin; Whitcomb, Daniel J.; Lightman, Stafford L.

    2013-01-01

    The neuroendocrine response to episodes of acute stress is crucial for survival whereas the prolonged response to chronic stress can be detrimental. Learning and memory are particularly susceptible to stress with cognitive deficits being well characterized consequences of chronic stress. Although there is good evidence that acute stress can enhance cognitive performance, the mechanism(s) for this are unclear. We find that hippocampal slices, either prepared from rats following 30 min restraint stress or directly exposed to glucocorticoids, exhibit an N-methyl-d-aspartic acid receptor-independent form of long-term potentiation. We demonstrate that the mechanism involves an NMDA receptor and PKA-dependent insertion of Ca2+-permeable AMPA receptors into synapses. These then trigger the additional NMDA receptor-independent form of LTP during high frequency stimulation. PMID:24271563

  16. Acute pancreatitis complicated by acute myocardial infarction – A rare association

    PubMed Central

    Vasantha Kumar, Allam; Mohan Reddy, G.; Anirudh Kumar, A.

    2013-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis complicated by acute myocardial infarction has been reported very rarely. The exact mechanism of the cause of myocardial injury is not known. We report a case of 36 year old male presenting with acute pancreatitis complicated by ST elevation acute myocardial infarction (AMI). The administration of thrombolytic therapy in such patients can have deleterious effects. We report successful performance of primary angioplasty in this complicated patient. PMID:23993014

  17. Acute pancreatitis complicated by acute myocardial infarction - a rare association.

    PubMed

    Vasantha Kumar, Allam; Mohan Reddy, G; Anirudh Kumar, A

    2013-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis complicated by acute myocardial infarction has been reported very rarely. The exact mechanism of the cause of myocardial injury is not known. We report a case of 36 year old male presenting with acute pancreatitis complicated by ST elevation acute myocardial infarction (AMI). The administration of thrombolytic therapy in such patients can have deleterious effects. We report successful performance of primary angioplasty in this complicated patient. PMID:23993014

  18. Bacteria Counter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    Science Applications, Inc.'s ATP Photometer makes a rapid and accurate count of the bacteria in a body fluid sample. Instrument provides information on the presence and quantity of bacteria by measuring the amount of light emitted by the reaction between two substances. Substances are ATP adenosine triphosphate and luciferase. The reactants are applied to a human body sample and the ATP Photometer observes the intensity of the light emitted displaying its findings in a numerical output. Total time lapse is usually less than 10 minutes, which represents a significant time savings in comparison of other techniques. Other applications are measuring organisms in fresh and ocean waters, determining bacterial contamination of foodstuffs, biological process control in the beverage industry, and in assay of activated sewage sludge.

  19. Detection of human leptospirosis as a cause of acute fever by capture ELISA using a Leptospira interrogans serovar Copenhageni (M20) derived antigen

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Leptospirosis is a potentially lethal zoonosis mainly affecting low-resource tropical countries, including Peru and its neighbouring countries. Timely diagnosis of leptospirosis is critical but may be challenging in the regions where it is most prevalent. The serodiagnostic gold standard microagglutination test (MAT) may be technically prohibitive. Our objective in this study was to assess the sensitivity, specificity, and predictive value of an IgM antibody capture enzyme-linked immunoassay (MAC-ELISA) derived from the M20 strain of Leptospira interrogans serovar Copenhageni (M20) by comparison to MAT, which was used as the gold standard method of diagnosis. Methods Acute and convalescent sera from participants participating in a passive febrile surveillance study in multiple regions of Peru were tested by both IgM MAC-ELISA and MAT. The sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive value (PPV, NPV) of the MAC-ELISA assay for acute, convalescent and paired sera by comparison to MAT were calculated. Results The sensitivity, specificity, PPV and NPV of the MAC-ELISA assay for acute sera were 92.3%, 56.0%, 35.3% and 96.6% respectively. For convalescent sera, the sensitivity, specificity, PPV and NPV of the MAC-ELISA assay were 93.3%, 51.5%, 63.6% and 89.5% respectively. For paired sera, the sensitivity, specificity, PPV and NPV of the MAC-ELISA assay were 93.6%, 37.5%, 59.2%, 85.7% respectively. Conclusions The M20 MAC-ELISA assay performed with a high sensitivity and low specificity in the acute phase of illness. Sensitivity was similar as compared with MAT in the convalescent phase and specificity remained low. Paired sera were the most sensitive but least specific by comparison to MAT serodiagnosis. NPV for acute, convalescent and paired sera was high. The limited specificity and high sensitivity of the MAC-ELISA IgM suggests that it would be most valuable to exclude leptospirosis in low-resource regions that lack immediate access to definitive reference laboratory techniques such as MAT. PMID:24053555

  20. Comparing the Similarity of Different Groups of Bacteria to the Human Proteome

    PubMed Central

    Trost, Brett; Pajon, Rolando; Jayaprakash, Teenus; Kusalik, Anthony

    2012-01-01

    Numerous aspects of the relationship between bacteria and human have been investigated. One aspect that has recently received attention is sequence overlap at the proteomic level. However, there has not yet been a study that comprehensively characterizes the level of sequence overlap between bacteria and human, especially as it relates to bacterial characteristics like pathogenicity, G-C content, and proteome size. In this study, we began by performing a general characterization of the range of bacteria-human similarity at the proteomic level, and identified characteristics of the most- and least-similar bacterial species. We then examined the relationship between proteomic similarity and numerous other variables. While pathogens and nonpathogens had comparable similarity to the human proteome, pathogens causing chronic infections were found to be more similar to the human proteome than those causing acute infections. Although no general correspondence between a bacterium’s proteome size and its similarity to the human proteome was noted, no bacteria with small proteomes had high similarity to the human proteome. Finally, we discovered an interesting relationship between similarity and a bacterium’s G-C content. While the relationship between bacteria and human has been studied from many angles, their proteomic similarity still needs to be examined in more detail. This paper sheds further light on this relationship, particularly with respect to immunity and pathogenicity. PMID:22558081

  1. Acute intermittent porphyria: identification and expression of exonic mutations in the hydroxymethylbilane synthase gene. An initiation codon missense mutation in the housekeeping transcript causes "variant acute intermittent porphyria" with normal expression of the erythroid-specific enzyme.

    PubMed Central

    Chen, C H; Astrin, K H; Lee, G; Anderson, K E; Desnick, R J

    1994-01-01

    Acute intermittent porphyria (AIP), an autosomal dominant inborn error, results from the half-normal activity of the heme biosynthetic enzyme, hydroxymethylbilane synthase (EC 4.3.1.8). Diagnosis of AIP heterozygotes is essential to prevent acute, life-threatening neurologic attacks by avoiding various precipitating factors. Since biochemical diagnosis is problematic, the identification of hydroxymethylbilane synthase mutations has facilitated the detection of AIP heterozygotes. Molecular analyses of unrelated AIP patients revealed six exonic mutations: an initiating methionine to isoleucine substitution (M1I) in a patient with variant AIP, which precluded translation of the housekeeping, but not the erythroid-specific isozyme; four missense mutations in classical AIP patients, V93F, R116W, R201W, C247F; and a nonsense mutation W283X in a classical AIP patient, which truncated the housekeeping and erythroid-specific isozymes. Each mutation was confirmed in genomic DNA from family members. The W283X lesion was found in another unrelated AIP family. Expression of each mutation in Escherichia coli revealed that R201W, C247F, and W283X had residual activity. In vitro transcription/translation studies indicated that the M1I allele produced only the erythroid-specific enzyme, while the other mutant alleles encoded both isozymes. These mutations provide insight into the molecular pathology of classic and variant AIP and facilitate molecular diagnosis in AIP families. Images PMID:7962538

  2. Cystitis - acute

    MedlinePLUS

    Uncomplicated urinary tract infection; UTI - acute; Acute bladder infection; Acute bacterial cystitis ... control. Menopause also increases the risk for a urinary tract infection. The following also increase your chances of having ...

  3. Acute hyperextension/valgus trauma to the elbow in top-level adult male water polo goalkeepers: a cause of osteochondritis disecans of the capitellum?

    PubMed

    Rod, Eduard; Ivkovic, Alan; Boric, Igor; Jankovic, Sasa; Radic, Andrej; Hudetz, Damir

    2013-09-01

    We report on 2 cases of hyperextension/valgus elbow injuries in two adult male national team water polo goalkeepers. Both were healthy and had never sustained any major injuries of the elbow. Mechanism and type of injury in both of them was identical. Different medical treatment protocols of these injuries possibly have led to different outcomes, with one of them developing osteochondritis dissecans (OCD). Inadequate medical treatment of acute impact elbow injuries could lead to osteochondritis disecans of the elbow in top-level adult male water polo goalkeepers. PMID:24060018

  4. A Novel Cause of Acute Coronary Syndrome Due to Dynamic Extrinsic Coronary Artery Compression by a Rib Exostosis: Multimodality Imaging Diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, Jonathan C L; Mathias, Helen C; Lyen, Stephen M; Mcalindon, Elisa; Bucciarelli-Ducci, Chiara; Batchelor, Timothy J P; Hamilton, Mark C K; Manghat, Nathan E

    2015-10-01

    We report a case of acute coronary syndrome secondary to intermittent extrinsic compression of the left anterior descending coronary artery by inward-pointing rib exostosis in an 18-year-old woman during forceful repeated expiration in labour. The diagnosis was achieved using multimodality noninvasive cardiac imaging. In particular, we demonstrated the novel role of expiratory-phase cardiac computed tomography in confirming the anatomical relationship of the bony exostosis to the left anterior descending coronary artery. The case reminds us the heart and mediastinum move dynamically, relative to the bony thorax, throughout the respiratory cycle, and that changes in cardiac physiology in pregnancy may become pathological. PMID:26255213

  5. An unusual cause of ankle pain: fracture of a talocalcaneal coalition as a differential diagnosis in an acute ankle sprain: a case report and literature review

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The acute ankle sprain is one of the most common injuries seen in trauma departments. Ankle sprains have an incidence of about one injury per 10 000 people a day. In contrast tarsal coalition is a rare condition occurring in not more than one percent of the population. Case presentation We present the case of a 23 year old male patient with pain and local swelling after an acute ankle sprain. Initial clinical and radiological examination showed no pathologies. Due to prolonged pain, swelling and the inability of the patient to weight bear one week after trauma further diagnostics was performed. Imaging studies (MRI and CT) revealed a fracture of a talocalcaneal coalition. To the knowledge of the authors no fracture of a coalition was reported so far. Conclusion This report highlights the presentation of symptomatic coalitions following trauma and furthermore, it points out the difficulties in the diagnosis and treatment of a rare entity after a common injury. A diagnostic algorithm has been developed to ensure not to miss a severe injury. PMID:23530869

  6. Antibiotic treatment in acute pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Uomo, G

    2005-01-01

    Severe acute pancreatitis is characterized by a poor prognosis with local and systemic complications, high morbidity and mortality. From the morphological standpoint, almost all patients suffering from severe forms of acute pancreatitis present various degree of pancreatic necrosis. In these patients the occurrence of infection of pancreatic necrosis certainly represents a very important prognostic factor as it has worldwide accepted as the leading cause of death. In addition, the discovery of an infected necrosis represents a crucial point in the treatment of these patients as it is the only clear-cut shift from medical to surgical treatment in necrotizing pancreatitis. Over the last years, earlier and more precise identification of pancreatic necrosis together with availability of new classes of antibiotics with documented activity against the most commonly involved bacteria and able to reach in therapeutic concentration the pancreatic necrosis give us the opportunity to perform some important controlled clinical trials on antibiotic prophylaxis in necrotizing acute pancreatitis. The great majority of these studies showed the usefulness of a prophylactic regimen (using antibiotics such as fluoroquinolones and carbapenems) in terms of reduction of pancreatic and extrapancreatic infections in comparison with untreated controls. Nevertheless, some questions on this topic still present controversial aspects such as the antibiotic of choice, the duration of treatment, the possible opportunistic infections with fungi and/or resistant strains. Antibiotics may prove very useful in patients with documented infected necrosis and high anaesthesiological risk unfit for surgical debridement and drainage; some initial experiences show the possibility that antibiotic treatment may be curative without surgery in these selected cases. PMID:16358949

  7. Yersinia enterocolitica infection--an unrecognized cause of acute and chronic neurological disease? A 10-year follow-up study on 458 hospitalized patients.

    PubMed

    Saebø, A; Nyland, H; Lassen, J

    1993-09-01

    The purpose of the present study was to obtain further information about nervous system involvement associated with Yersinia enterocolitica infection. During the period 1974-1983, the infection was diagnosed by antibody response (agglutination titer or ELISA) and/or isolation of the microorganism in 458 hospitalized patients. 2 patients presented with acute symptoms of the peripheral nervous system, and 6 with symptoms of the central nervous system. The 458 patients were followed for 4-14 years (until 1987). During the follow-up period another 6 patients developed chronic neurological conditions; 4 with peripheral symptoms, and 2 with central symptoms. 11 of the 14 patients experienced persistent complaints. In 1991 (10-17 years after the diagnosis of yersiniosis), 6 patients still had significant antibody response (ELISA). The possibility that the immunologically competent Yersinia enterocolitica might have initiated the chronic neurological disease in these patients should not be disregarded. PMID:8259092

  8. Can thromboembolism be the result, rather than the inciting cause, of acute vascular events such as stroke, pulmonary embolism, mesenteric ischemia, and venous thrombosis?: a maladaptation of the prehistoric trauma response.

    PubMed

    Yun, Anthony J; Lee, Patrick Y; Bazar, Kimberly A

    2005-01-01

    Thromboembolism is considered the inciting cause of many vascular disorders including acute coronary syndrome (ACS), ischemic stroke, pulmonary embolism (PE), deep vein thrombosis (DVT), and mesenteric ischemia. Adrenergia and inflammation are known to accompany these conditions, particularly among arterial thromboembolic disorders, but the teleologic basis of these associations remains poorly understood. We argue that thromboembolism may sometimes be the result, rather than the cause, of acute vascular events, and may be precipitated by underlying adrenergia. Thromboembolic events are most prone to occur during parts of the circadian, seasonal, lifespan, and reproductive cycles with sympathetic dominance, as well as during behavioral, exertional, physiologic, and iatrogenic activation of sympathetic stress. Molecular evidence suggests that adrenergia and inflammation can promote coagulation and lead to co-activation of the pathways. Acute vascular events that occur without angiographic evidence of occlusion suggest that some infarcts may be attributable to adrenergia alone. "Embolic" disorders may represent asynchronous systemic phenomena rather than clot migration. During acute thromboembolism, downstream tissue hypoxia can activate maladaptive self-propelling cycles of sympathetic bias, inflammation, and coagulation. The counterproductive co-activation of these pathways may reflect a maladaptive interlink forged during the primordial evolution of trauma physiology. Their rapid co-mobilization enables rapid control of hemorrhage, microbial defense, and perfusion maintenance during trauma, but the pathways may behave maladaptively in the setting of modern diseases where endothelial injury may be more often precipitated by smoking, diabetes, dyslipidemia, or hypertension. Sympathetic blockade is already employed in ACS, and beta-blockers are used as antihypertensives to prevent stroke. Our hypothesis suggests that the benefits of beta-blockers in stroke may be independent of antihypertensive effects, and that adrenergia may represent a target for managing all thromboembolic disorders, independent of anti-coagulative and thrombolytic therapies. Perhaps reducing adrenergia, rather than maintaining high cerebral perfusion pressure, may represent a counterintuitive strategy for treating stroke and for reducing reperfusion injury. Plausible mechanisms by which autonomic dysfunction may induce venous thrombosis are discussed, especially in those with baroreceptor dysfunction, immobilization, or dehydration. Unexplained hypercoagulability of cancer may also operate through tumor-induced adrenergia and inflammation. PMID:15694686

  9. A Nonpancreatic Source of the Proteolytic-enzyme Amidase and Bacteriology in Experimental Acute Pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Keynes, W. Milo

    1980-01-01

    In previous studies of human and experimental acute pancreatitis, three main assumptions have been made. First, that the disease is due to activation of pancreatic proteolytic enzymes in the pancreas with resulting “autodigestion” of the gland. Second, that interstitial pancreatitis is a mild form of hemorrhagic pancreatitis into which it may progress, and third, that bacteria play little part, if any, in the initiation of the disease. These assumptions are now questioned. In the present study in dogs, levels of proteolytic enzymes in blood, thoracicduct lymph and peritoneal fluid were measured using benzoylarginine amide. Raised levels of amidase were found in hemorrhagic, but not with interstitial, pancreatitis, and biochemical examination of amidase suggested it was not a pancreatic protease, but with its broad specificity and stability derived from bacteria. Addition of antibiotic to the blind duodenal loop in hemorrhagic pancreatitis reduced the level of blood amidase, but Trasylol given intravenously did not, nor did it inhibit amidase in vitro. In all animals, histological examination was made of the pancreas at time of death. On bacteriology, it is concluded that experimental interstitial pancreatitis results from damage to the pancreatic duct system without infection, and haemorrhagic pancreatitis mainly from reflux of bacteria into the pancreatic ducts from the duodenum. Only bacteria such as Escherichia coli and Clostridium welchii that produce proteolytic enzymes and cytotoxins appear to be able to cause haemorrhagic pancreatitis, and these bacteria may explain the release of vasoactive polypeptides and the vascular effects. In hemorrhagic pancreatitis such bacteria were found in the pancreas, but none in interstitial pancreatitis. Evidence is given to suggest that pancreatic proteolytic enzymes are unlikely to cause the cell necrosis which is a pathological feature of hemorrhagic pancreatitis, and that “autodigestion” is likewise unlikely to be a cause of this condition. An extrapancreatic source of proteolytic enzymes from bacteria is now suggested in haemorrhagic pancreatitis, and more attention to bacteriology in human acute pancreatitis is urgently needed. Amidase levels were highest in peritoneal fluid, suggesting a rationale for peritoneal lavage in the treatment of acute pancreatitis, and it is unlikely that Trasylol can give any benefit. The assessment of treatment of acute pancreatitis will be unsatisfactory as long as the proportion of haemorrhagic to interstitial pancreatitis in any series is not known accurately. PMID:6987958

  10. Acute Limonene Toxicity in Escherichia coli Is Caused by Limonene Hydroperoxide and Alleviated by a Point Mutation in Alkyl Hydroperoxidase AhpC

    PubMed Central

    Chubukov, Victor; Mingardon, Florence; Schackwitz, Wendy; Baidoo, Edward E. K.; Alonso-Gutierrez, Jorge; Hu, Qijun; Lee, Taek Soon; Keasling, Jay D.

    2015-01-01

    Limonene, a major component of citrus peel oil, has a number of applications related to microbiology. The antimicrobial properties of limonene make it a popular disinfectant and food preservative, while its potential as a biofuel component has made it the target of renewable production efforts through microbial metabolic engineering. For both applications, an understanding of microbial sensitivity or tolerance to limonene is crucial, but the mechanism of limonene toxicity remains enigmatic. In this study, we characterized a limonene-tolerant strain of Escherichia coli and found a mutation in ahpC, encoding alkyl hydroperoxidase, which alleviated limonene toxicity. We show that the acute toxicity previously attributed to limonene is largely due to the common oxidation product limonene hydroperoxide, which forms spontaneously in aerobic environments. The mutant AhpC protein with an L-to-Q change at position 177 (AhpCL177Q) was able to alleviate this toxicity by reducing the hydroperoxide to a more benign compound. We show that the degree of limonene toxicity is a function of its oxidation level and that nonoxidized limonene has relatively little toxicity to wild-type E. coli cells. Our results have implications for both the renewable production of limonene and the applications of limonene as an antimicrobial. PMID:25934627

  11. Acute Lung Failure

    PubMed Central

    Mac Sweeney, Rob; McAuley, Daniel F.; Matthay, Michael A.

    2013-01-01

    Lung failure is the most common organ failure seen in the intensive care unit. The pathogenesis of acute respiratory failure (ARF) can be classified as (1) neuromuscular in origin, (2) secondary to acute and chronic obstructive airway diseases, (3) alveolar processes such as cardiogenic and noncardiogenic pulmonary edema and pneumonia, and (4) vascular diseases such as acute or chronic pulmonary embolism. This article reviews the more common causes of ARF from each group, including the pathological mechanisms and the principles of critical care management, focusing on the supportive, specific, and adjunctive therapies for each condition. PMID:21989697

  12. What Causes Pericarditis?

    MedlinePLUS

    ... cases, the cause of pericarditis (both acute and chronic) is unknown. Viral infections are likely a common cause of pericarditis, although the virus may never be found. Pericarditis often occurs after a respiratory ... cases of chronic, or recurring, pericarditis are thought to be the ...

  13. Acute Myeloid Leukemia (AML) (For Parents)

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Robert Irvine Pregnant? What to Expect Acute Myeloid Leukemia (AML) KidsHealth > Parents > Diseases & Conditions > Cancer & Tumors > Acute ... Causes Signs and Symptoms Diagnosis Treatment Coping About Leukemia Leukemia is a type of cancer that affects ...

  14. Acute Pancreatitis and Pregnancy

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Acute Pancreatitis > Acute Pancreatitis and Pregnancy test Acute Pancreatitis and Pregnancy Timothy Gardner, MD Acute pancreatitis is ... of acute pancreatitis in pregnancy. Reasons for Acute Pancreatitis and Pregnancy While acute pancreatitis is responsible for ...

  15. Acute chylous peritonitis due to acute pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Georgiou, Georgios K; Harissis, Haralampos; Mitsis, Michalis; Batsis, Haralampos; Fatouros, Michalis

    2012-01-01

    We report a case of acute chylous ascites formation presenting as peritonitis (acute chylous peritonitis) in a patient suffering from acute pancreatitis due to hypertriglyceridemia and alcohol abuse. The development of chylous ascites is usually a chronic process mostly involving malignancy, trauma or surgery, and symptoms arise as a result of progressive abdominal distention. However, when accumulation of “chyle” occurs rapidly, the patient may present with signs of peritonitis. Preoperative diagnosis is difficult since the clinical picture usually suggests hollow organ perforation, appendicitis or visceral ischemia. Less than 100 cases of acute chylous peritonitis have been reported. Pancreatitis is a rare cause of chyloperitoneum and in almost all of the cases chylous ascites is discovered some days (or even weeks) after the onset of symptoms of pancreatitis. This is the second case in the literature where the patient presented with acute chylous peritonitis due to acute pancreatitis, and the presence of chyle within the abdominal cavity was discovered simultaneously with the establishment of the diagnosis of pancreatitis. The patient underwent an exploratory laparotomy for suspected perforated duodenal ulcer, since, due to hypertriglyceridemia, serum amylase values appeared within the normal range. Moreover, abdominal computed tomography imaging was not diagnostic for pancreatitis. Following abdominal lavage and drainage, the patient was successfully treated with total parenteral nutrition and octreotide. PMID:22563182

  16. Back To Bacteria.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flannery, Maura C.

    1997-01-01

    Explores new research about bacteria. Discusses bacterial genomes, archaea, unusual environments, evolution, pathogens, bacterial movement, biofilms, bacteria in the body, and a bacterial obsession. Contains 29 references. (JRH)

  17. Acute Raoultella planticola cystitis in a child with rhabdomyosarcoma of the bladder neck.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Jong Hyung; Ahn, Yo Han; Chun, Jong In; Park, Hyeon Jin; Park, Byung-Kiu

    2015-10-01

    Raoultella planticola is a Gram-negative, non-motile, aerobic bacillus. It is an environmental bacteria found in soil and water, and a very rare cause of local or systemic infection in humans. Although some adult cases of R. planticola infection have been reported, childhood local or systemic infection caused by R. planticola is very rare. Reported herein is a rare case of acute cystitis due to R. planticola in a 16-month-old boy with rhabdomyosarcoma of the bladder neck, and a review of the literature. PMID:26508180

  18. The Impact of Different Antibiotic Regimens on the Emergence of Antimicrobial-Resistant Bacteria

    E-print Network

    Ruan, Shigui

    The Impact of Different Antibiotic Regimens on the Emergence of Antimicrobial-Resistant Bacteria-resistant bacteria is a major public health threat. Infections caused by antimicrobial-resistant bacteria by antimicrobial-susceptible bacteria. The emergence and spread of these bacteria is complex and requires

  19. Acute Inflammation

    MedlinePLUS

    The official consumer website of: Visit ACFAS.org | About ACFAS | Información en Español Advanced Search Home » Foot & Ankle Conditions » Acute Inflammation Text Size Print Bookmark Acute Inflammation What Is Acute Inflammation? Inflammation is the body’s normal protective response to an injury, irritation, ...

  20. Acute Urinary Tract Disorders.

    PubMed

    Goel, Rakhee H; Unnikrishnan, Raman; Remer, Erick M

    2015-11-01

    Acute urinary tract disorders often manifest as flank pain and are a common complaint of patients who present to the emergency department. The pain is often a vague, poorly localized sensation that may have a variety of causes. Laboratory and clinical findings, such as hematuria, are neither sensitive nor specific for determining the cause of the flank pain. Accordingly, imaging is an important tool in determining a diagnosis and management plan. Patients with acute urinary tract disorders who present with pain include those with calculi as well as renal infection, vascular disorders, and hemorrhage. PMID:26526438

  1. Acute Hepatic Porphyria

    PubMed Central

    Bissell, D. Montgomery; Wang, Bruce

    2015-01-01

    The porphyrias comprise a set of diseases, each representing an individual defect in one of the eight enzymes mediating the pathway of heme synthesis. The diseases are genetically distinct but have in common the overproduction of heme precursors. In the case of the acute (neurologic) porphyrias, the cause of symptoms appears to be overproduction of a neurotoxic precursor. For the cutaneous porphyrias, it is photosensitizing porphyrins. Some types have both acute and cutaneous manifestations. The clinical presentation of acute porphyria consists of abdominal pain, nausea, and occasionally seizures. Only a small minority of those who carry a mutation for acute porphyria have pain attacks. The triggers for an acute attack encompass certain medications and severely decreased caloric intake. The propensity of females to acute attacks has been linked to internal changes in ovarian physiology. Symptoms are accompanied by large increases in delta-aminolevulinic acid and porphobilinogen in plasma and urine. Treatment of an acute attack centers initially on pain relief and elimination of inducing factors such as medications; glucose is administered to reverse the fasting state. The only specific treatment is administration of intravenous hemin. An important goal of treatment is preventing progression of the symptoms to a neurological crisis. Patients who progress despite hemin administration have undergone liver transplantation with complete resolution of symptoms. A current issue is the unavailability of a rapid test for urine porphobilinogen in the urgent-care setting. PMID:26357631

  2. Bioelectricity Aware of bacteria

    E-print Network

    Lovley, Derek

    Bioelectricity Aware of bacteria Bacteria of the genus Geobacter carry out anaerobic respiration the mechanism that makes these bacteria conductors of electricity. Researchers have studied this for a population of G. sulfurreducens, endowed with bacteria nanometric filaments (pili) that enable them

  3. Acute genital ulcers.

    PubMed

    Delgado-García, Silvia; Palacios-Marqués, Ana; Martínez-Escoriza, Juan Carlos; Martín-Bayón, Tina-Aurora

    2014-01-01

    Acute genital ulcers, also known as acute vulvar ulcers, ulcus vulvae acutum or Lipschütz ulcers, refer to an ulceration of the vulva or lower vagina of non-venereal origin that usually presents in young women, predominantly virgins. Although its incidence is unknown, it seems a rare entity, with few cases reported in the literature. Their aetiology and pathogenesis are still unknown. The disease is characterised by an acute onset of flu-like symptoms with single or multiple painful ulcers on the vulva. Diagnosis is mainly clinical, after exclusion of other causes of vulvar ulcers. The treatment is mainly symptomatic, with spontaneous resolution in 2 weeks and without recurrences in most cases. We present a case report of a 13-year-old girl with two episodes of acute ulcers that fit the clinical criteria for Lipschütz ulcers. PMID:24473429

  4. Acute Exposure to Tris(1,3-dichloro-2-propyl) Phosphate (TDCIPP) Causes Hepatic Inflammation and Leads to Hepatotoxicity in Zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chunsheng; Su, Guanyong; Giesy, John P; Letcher, Robert J; Li, Guangyu; Agrawal, Ira; Li, Jing; Yu, Liqin; Wang, Jianghua; Gong, Zhiyuan

    2016-01-01

    Tris(1,3-dichloro-2-propyl) phosphate (TDCIPP) has been frequently detected in environmental media and has adverse health effect on wildlife and humans. It has been implicated to have hepatotoxicity, but its molecular mechanisms remain unclear. In the present study, adult male zebrafish were exposed to TDCIPP and global hepatic gene expression was examined by RNA-Seq and RT-qPCR in order to understand the molecular mechanisms of TDCIPP-induced hepatotoxicity. Our results indicated that TDCIPP exposure significantly up-regulated the expression of genes involved in endoplasmic reticulum stress and Toll-like receptor (TLR) pathway, implying an inflammatory response, which was supported by up-regulation of inflammation-related biomaker genes. Hepatic inflammation was further confirmed by histological observation of increase of infiltrated neutrophils and direct observation of liver recruitment of neutrophils labeled with Ds-Red fluorescent protein of Tg(lysC:DsRed) zebrafish upon TDCIPP exposure. To further characterize the hepatotoxicity of TDCIPP, the expression of hepatotoxicity biomarker genes, liver histopathology and morphology were examined. The exposure to TDCIPP significantly up-regulated the expression of several biomarker genes for hepatotoxicity (gck, gsr and nqo1) and caused hepatic vacuolization and apoptosis as well as increase of the liver size. Collectively, our results suggest that exposure to TDCIPP induces hepatic inflammation and leads to hepatotoxicity in zebrafish. PMID:26743178

  5. Pathogenesis of acute hepatopancreatic necrosis disease (AHPND) in shrimp.

    PubMed

    Lai, Hung-Chiao; Ng, Tze Hann; Ando, Masahiro; Lee, Chung-Te; Chen, I-Tung; Chuang, Jie-Cheng; Mavichak, Rapeepat; Chang, Sheng-Hsiung; Yeh, Mi-De; Chiang, Yi-An; Takeyama, Haruko; Hamaguchi, Hiro-O; Lo, Chu-Fang; Aoki, Takashi; Wang, Han-Ching

    2015-12-01

    Acute hepatopancreatic necrosis disease (AHPND), also called early mortality syndrome (EMS), is a recently emergent shrimp bacterial disease that has resulted in substantial economic losses since 2009. AHPND is known to be caused by strains of Vibrio parahaemolyticus that contain a unique virulence plasmid, but the pathology of the disease is still unclear. In this study, we show that AHPND-causing strains of V. parahaemolyticus secrete the plasmid-encoded binary toxin PirAB(vp) into the culture medium. We further determined that, after shrimp were challenged with AHPND-causing bacteria, the bacteria initially colonized the stomach, where they started to produce PirAB(vp) toxin. At the same early time point (6 hpi), PirB(vp) toxin, but not PirA(vp) toxin, was detected in the hepatopancreas, and the characteristic histopathological signs of AHPND, including sloughing of the epithelial cells of the hepatopancreatic tubules, were also seen. Although some previous studies have found that both components of the binary PirAB(vp) toxin are necessary to induce a toxic effect, our present results are consistent with other studies which have suggested that PirB(vp) alone may be sufficient to cause cellular damage. At later time points, the bacteria and PirA(vp) and PirB(vp) toxins were all detected in the hepatopancreas. We also show that Raman spectroscopy "Whole organism fingerprints" were unable to distinguish between AHPND-causing and non-AHPND causing strains. Lastly, by using minimum inhibitory concentrations, we found that both virulent and non-virulent V. parahaemolyticus strains were resistant to several antibiotics, suggesting that the use of antibiotics in shrimp culture should be more strictly regulated. PMID:26549178

  6. Sarcocystis nesbitti Causes Acute, Relapsing Febrile Myositis with a High Attack Rate: Description of a Large Outbreak of Muscular Sarcocystosis in Pangkor Island, Malaysia, 2012

    PubMed Central

    Italiano, Claire M.; Wong, Kum Thong; AbuBakar, Sazaly; Lau, Yee Ling; Ramli, Norlisah; Syed Omar, Sharifah Faridah; Kahar Bador, Maria; Tan, Chong Tin

    2014-01-01

    Background From the 17th to 19th January 2012, a group of 92 college students and teachers attended a retreat in a hotel located on Pangkor Island, off the west coast of Peninsular Malaysia. Following the onset of symptoms in many participants who presented to our institute, an investigation was undertaken which ultimately identified Sarcocystis nesbitti as the cause of this outbreak. Methodology/Principal Findings All retreat participants were identified, and clinical and epidemiological information was obtained via clinical review and self-reported answers to a structured questionnaire. Laboratory, imaging and muscle biopsy results were evaluated and possible sources of exposure, in particular water supply, were investigated. At an average of 9–11 days upon return from the retreat, 89 (97%) of the participants became ill. A vast majority of 94% had fever with 57% of these persons experiencing relapsing fever. Myalgia was present in 91% of patients. Facial swelling from myositis of jaw muscles occurred in 9 (10%) patients. The median duration of symptoms was 17 days (IQR 7 to 30 days; range 3 to 112). Out of 4 muscle biopsies, sarcocysts were identified in 3. S. nesbitti was identified by PCR in 3 of the 4 biopsies including one biopsy without observed sarcocyst. Non-Malaysians had a median duration of symptoms longer than that of Malaysians (27.5 days vs. 14 days, p?=?0.001) and were more likely to experience moderate or severe myalgia compared to mild myalgia (83.3% vs. 40.0%, p?=?0.002). Conclusions/Significance The similarity of the symptoms and clustered time of onset suggests that all affected persons had muscular sarcocystosis. This is the largest human outbreak of sarcocystosis ever reported, with the specific Sarcocystis species identified. The largely non-specific clinical features of this illness suggest that S. nesbitti may be an under diagnosed infection in the tropics. PMID:24854350

  7. The identification and biogeochemical interpretation of fossil magnetotactic bacteria

    E-print Network

    Kirschvink, Joseph L.

    The identification and biogeochemical interpretation of fossil magnetotactic bacteria Robert E. Available online 14 August 2007. Abstract Magnetotactic bacteria, which most commonly live within the oxic, specifically magnetite or greigite. The crystals cause the bacteria to orient themselves passively with respect

  8. NOAAINMFS Developments Marine Bacteria Seen as Precipitation Key

    E-print Network

    NOAAINMFS Developments Marine Bacteria Seen as Precipitation Key Oceanic bacteria may be the marine to produce precipitation. The bacteria live in association with marine phytoplankton according to Schnell cause particles of supercooled fog in the chamber to freeze, grow into snow crystals, and fall

  9. Monika Weber, Yale University Screen fast and cheap bacteria detection

    E-print Network

    Reed, Mark

    for bacteria to grow detectable colonies. This time is too long for most applications in the foodMonika Weber, Yale University Screen fast and cheap bacteria detection Every year food-borne bacteria cause thousands of infections in humans and animals. Outbreaks of E.Coli and Salmonella commonly

  10. Acute bronchial asthma.

    PubMed

    Grover, Sudhanshu; Jindal, Atul; Bansal, Arun; Singhi, Sunit C

    2011-11-01

    Acute asthma is the third commonest cause of pediatric emergency visits at PGIMER. Typically, it presents with acute onset respiratory distress and wheeze in a patient with past or family history of similar episodes. The severity of the acute episode of asthma is judged clinically and categorized as mild, moderate and severe. The initial therapy consists of oxygen, inhaled beta-2 agonists (salbutamol or terbutaline), inhaled budesonide (three doses over 1 h, at 20 min interval) in all and ipratropium bromide and systemic steroids (hydrocortisone or methylprednisolone) in acute severe asthma. Other causes of acute onset wheeze and breathing difficulty such as pneumonia, foreign body, cardiac failure etc. should be ruled out with help of chest radiography and appropriate laboratory investigations in first time wheezers and those not responding to 1 h of inhaled therapy. In case of inadequate response or worsening, intravenous infusion of magnesium sulphate, terbutaline or aminophylline may be used. Magnesium sulphate is the safest and most effective alternative among these. Severe cases may need ICU care and rarely, ventilatory support. PMID:21769523

  11. Bacteria isolated from amoebae/bacteria consortium

    DOEpatents

    Tyndall, Richard L. (Clinton, TN)

    1995-01-01

    New protozoan derived microbial consortia and method for their isolation are provided. Consortia and bacteria isolated therefrom are useful for treating wastes such as trichloroethylene and trinitrotoluene. Consortia, bacteria isolated therefrom, and dispersants isolated therefrom are useful for dispersing hydrocarbons such as oil, creosote, wax, and grease.

  12. Bacteria isolated from amoebae/bacteria consortium

    DOEpatents

    Tyndall, R.L.

    1995-05-30

    New protozoan derived microbial consortia and method for their isolation are provided. Consortia and bacteria isolated therefrom are useful for treating wastes such as trichloroethylene and trinitrotoluene. Consortia, bacteria isolated therefrom, and dispersants isolated therefrom are useful for dispersing hydrocarbons such as oil, creosote, wax, and grease.

  13. Profile of oritavancin and its potential in the treatment of acute bacterial skin structure infections

    PubMed Central

    Mitra, Subhashis; Saeed, Usman; Havlichek, Daniel H; Stein, Gary E

    2015-01-01

    Oritavancin, a semisynthetic derivative of the glycopeptide antibiotic chloroeremomycin, received the US Food and Drug Administration approval for the treatment of acute bacterial skin and skin structure infections caused by susceptible Gram-positive bacteria in adults in August 2014. This novel second-generation semisynthetic lipoglycopeptide antibiotic has activity against a broad spectrum of Gram-positive bacteria, including methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), vancomycin-intermediate S. aureus (VISA), and vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus. Oritavancin inhibits bacterial cell wall synthesis and is rapidly bactericidal against many Gram-positive pathogens. The long half-life of this drug enables a single-dose administration. Oritavancin is not metabolized in the body, and the unchanged drug is slowly excreted by the kidneys. In two large Phase III randomized, double-blind, clinical trials, oritavancin was found to be non-inferior to vancomycin in achieving the primary composite end point in the treatment of acute Gram-positive skin and skin structure infections. Adverse effects noted were mostly mild with nausea, headache, and vomiting being the most common reported side effects. Oritavancin has emerged as another useful antimicrobial agent for treatment of acute Gram-positive skin and skin structure infections, including those caused by MRSA and VISA. PMID:26185459

  14. Optical diagnosis of acute scrotum in children

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shadgan, Babak; Macnab, Andrew; Stothers, Lynn; Nigro, Mark; Afshar, Kourosh; Kajbafzadeh, A. M.

    2015-03-01

    Acute scrotum is a urologic condition defined by scrotal pain, swelling, and redness of acute onset. Prompt diagnosis and treatment are necessary to preserve testicular viability. The history and clinical symptoms reported are key to diagnosis and proper treatment, but are not always readily obtained in children, in whom common causes of acute scrotum include testicular torsion, torsion of the appendix testis, and epididymitis. These acute conditions have different causal pathology that mandate specific treatment, hence the importance of early and accurate diagnosis.

  15. Prevalence of gene rearrangements in Mexican children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia: a population study-report from the Mexican Interinstitutional Group for the identification of the causes of childhood leukemia.

    PubMed

    Bekker-Méndez, Vilma Carolina; Miranda-Peralta, Enrique; Núñez-Enríquez, Juan Carlos; Olarte-Carrillo, Irma; Guerra-Castillo, Francisco Xavier; Pompa-Mera, Ericka Nelly; Ocaña-Mondragón, Alicia; Rangel-López, Angélica; Bernáldez-Ríos, Roberto; Medina-Sanson, Aurora; Jiménez-Hernández, Elva; Amador-Sánchez, Raquel; Peñaloza-González, José Gabriel; de Diego Flores-Chapa, José; Fajardo-Gutiérrez, Arturo; Flores-Lujano, Janet; Rodríguez-Zepeda, María Del Carmen; Dorantes-Acosta, Elisa María; Bolea-Murga, Victoria; Núñez-Villegas, Nancy; Velázquez-Aviña, Martha Margarita; Torres-Nava, José Refugio; Reyes-Zepeda, Nancy Carolina; González-Bonilla, Cesar; Mejía-Aranguré, Juan Manuel

    2014-01-01

    Mexico has one of the highest incidences of childhood leukemia worldwide and significantly higher mortality rates for this disease compared with other countries. One possible cause is the high prevalence of gene rearrangements associated with the etiology or with a poor prognosis of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). The aims of this multicenter study were to determine the prevalence of the four most common gene rearrangements [ETV6-RUNX1, TCF3-PBX1, BCR-ABL1, and MLL rearrangements] and to explore their relationship with mortality rates during the first year of treatment in ALL children from Mexico City. Patients were recruited from eight public hospitals during 2010-2012. A total of 282 bone marrow samples were obtained at each child's diagnosis for screening by conventional and multiplex reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction to determine the gene rearrangements. Gene rearrangements were detected in 50 (17.7%) patients. ETV6-RUNX1 was detected in 21 (7.4%) patients, TCF3-PBX1 in 20 (7.1%) patients, BCR-ABL1 in 5 (1.8%) patients, and MLL rearrangements in 4 (1.4%) patients. The earliest deaths occurred at months 1, 2, and 3 after diagnosis in patients with MLL, ETV6-RUNX1, and BCR-ABL1 gene rearrangements, respectively. Gene rearrangements could be related to the aggressiveness of leukemia observed in Mexican children. PMID:25692130

  16. Prevalence of Gene Rearrangements in Mexican Children with Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia: A Population Study—Report from the Mexican Interinstitutional Group for the Identification of the Causes of Childhood Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Bekker-Méndez, Vilma Carolina; Miranda-Peralta, Enrique; Núñez-Enríquez, Juan Carlos; Olarte-Carrillo, Irma; Guerra-Castillo, Francisco Xavier; Pompa-Mera, Ericka Nelly; Ocaña-Mondragón, Alicia; Bernáldez-Ríos, Roberto; Medina-Sanson, Aurora; Jiménez-Hernández, Elva; Amador-Sánchez, Raquel; Peñaloza-González, José Gabriel; de Diego Flores-Chapa, José; Fajardo-Gutiérrez, Arturo; Flores-Lujano, Janet; Rodríguez-Zepeda, María del Carmen; Dorantes-Acosta, Elisa María; Bolea-Murga, Victoria; Núñez-Villegas, Nancy; Velázquez-Aviña, Martha Margarita; Torres-Nava, José Refugio; Reyes-Zepeda, Nancy Carolina; González-Bonilla, Cesar; Mejía-Aranguré, Juan Manuel

    2014-01-01

    Mexico has one of the highest incidences of childhood leukemia worldwide and significantly higher mortality rates for this disease compared with other countries. One possible cause is the high prevalence of gene rearrangements associated with the etiology or with a poor prognosis of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). The aims of this multicenter study were to determine the prevalence of the four most common gene rearrangements [ETV6-RUNX1, TCF3-PBX1, BCR-ABL1, and MLL rearrangements] and to explore their relationship with mortality rates during the first year of treatment in ALL children from Mexico City. Patients were recruited from eight public hospitals during 2010–2012. A total of 282 bone marrow samples were obtained at each child's diagnosis for screening by conventional and multiplex reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction to determine the gene rearrangements. Gene rearrangements were detected in 50 (17.7%) patients. ETV6-RUNX1 was detected in 21 (7.4%) patients, TCF3-PBX1 in 20 (7.1%) patients, BCR-ABL1 in 5 (1.8%) patients, and MLL rearrangements in 4 (1.4%) patients. The earliest deaths occurred at months 1, 2, and 3 after diagnosis in patients with MLL, ETV6-RUNX1, and BCR-ABL1 gene rearrangements, respectively. Gene rearrangements could be related to the aggressiveness of leukemia observed in Mexican children. PMID:25692130

  17. CHAPTER IV-2 BACTERIA

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Entomopathogenic bacteria provide an alternative to chemical pesticides used in insect control programs. Today, the principal microbial insecticides utilize spore forming bacteria or toxins produced by these bacteria as their active ingredients, either in formulations or by incorporation of toxin g...

  18. [Acute liver failure].

    PubMed

    Alberto, Sara Folgado; Pires, S Sousa; Figueiredo, A; Deus, J Ramos de

    2009-01-01

    Acute liver failure refers to the rapid development of severe acute liver injury with impaired synthetic function in a patient who previously had a normal liver or a well compensated liver disease. Its aetiology is diversified and it provides one of the best indicators of prognosis thus being crucial its quick identification. Because it can progress to multiple organ failure syndrome these patients should be managed in an Intensive Care Unit. The first therapeutic approach consists of intensive care support until treatment for specific aetiologies can be started. Besides encephalopathy, many other complications can develop causing the high rates of morbidity and mortality of acute liver failure and so they need tight surveillance and treatment. Liver support systems are therapeutic options still in study and without proven success in a long term period which makes hepatic transplantation the final therapeutic. Given the wide limitations of hepatic transplantation the final decision is based on a correct diagnosis and prognostic scoring systems. PMID:20350465

  19. [Infections of finger and toe nails due to fungi and bacteria].

    PubMed

    Nenoff, P; Paasch, U; Handrick, W

    2014-04-01

    Infections of the finger and the toe nails are most frequently caused by fungi, primarily dermatophytes. Causative agents of tinea unguium are mostly anthropophilic dermatophytes. Both in Germany, and worldwide, Trichophyton rubrum represents the main important causative agent of onychomycoses. Yeasts are isolated from fungal nail infections, both paronychia and onychomycosis far more often than generally expected. This can represent either saprophytic colonization as well as acute or chronic infection of the nail organ. The main yeasts causing nail infections are Candida parapsilosis, and Candida guilliermondii; Candida albicans is only in third place. Onychomycosis due to molds, or so called non-dermatophyte molds (NDM), are being increasingly detected. Molds as cause of an onychomycosis are considered as emerging pathogens. Fusarium species are the most common cause of NDM onychomycosis; however, rare molds like Onychocola canadensis may be found. Bacterial infections of the nails are caused by gram negative bacteria, usually Pseudomonas aeruginosa (recognizable because of green or black coloration of the nails) but also Klebsiella spp. and gram positive bacteria like Staphylococcus aureus. Treatment of onychomycosis includes application of topical antifungal agents (amorolfine, ciclopirox). If more than 50?% of the nail plate is affected or if more than three out of ten nails are affected by the fungal infection, oral treatment using terbinafine (in case of dermatophyte infection), fluconazole (for yeast infections), or alternatively itraconazole are recommended. Bacterial infections are treated topically with antiseptic agents (octenidine), and in some cases with topical antibiotics (nadifloxacin, gentamicin). Pseudomonas infections of the nail organ are treated by ciprofloxacin; other bacteria are treated according to the results of culture and sensitivity testing. PMID:24718510

  20. Acute Bronchitis

    MedlinePLUS

    ... acute bronchitis can include: Sore throat Fever A cough that may bring up clear, yellow or green ... your doctor if: You continue to wheeze and cough for more than 2 weeks, especially at night ...

  1. Bronchitis - acute

    MedlinePLUS

    ... to breathe. Another symptom of bronchitis is a cough. Acute means the symptoms have been present only ... diagnosed with chronic bronchitis, you must have a cough with mucus on most days for at least ...

  2. What Causes Heart Valve Disease?

    MedlinePLUS

    ... this page from the NHLBI on Twitter. What Causes Heart Valve Disease? Heart conditions and other disorders, age-related changes, ... strep bacteria that progress to rheumatic fever can cause heart valve disease. When the body tries to fight the strep ...

  3. Acute myocarditis triggering coronary spasm and mimicking acute myocardial infarction

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Andreas; Bagur, Rodrigo; Béliveau, Patrick; Potvin, Jean-Michel; Levesque, Pierre; Fillion, Nancy; Tremblay, Benoit; Larose, Éric; Gaudreault, Valérie

    2014-01-01

    A 24-year-old healthy man consulted to our center because of typical on-and-off chest-pain and an electrocardiogram showing ST-segment elevation in inferior leads. An urgent coronary angiography showed angiographically normal coronary arteries. Cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging confirmed acute myocarditis. Although acute myocarditis triggering coronary spasm is an uncommon association, it is important to recognize it, particularly for the management for those patients presenting with ST-segment elevation and suspect myocardial infarction and angiographically normal coronary arteries. The present report highlights the role of cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging to identify acute myocarditis as the underlying cause. PMID:25276306

  4. Swimming bacteria at complex interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopez, Diego; Lauga, Eric

    2013-11-01

    Swimming microorganisms such as bacteria often move in confined geometries. Such confinement can be caused by the presence of solid boundaries, free surfaces, or liquid interfaces. It is well established that confinement affects significantly locomotion, generating additional forces and torques on the bacteria. In the presence of a solid boundary (imposing a no-slip condition), microorganisms using helical propulsion undergo circular motion (clockwise in the case of E. coli). Conversely, close to a free (no-shear) surface the circular motion is reversed. However, realistic interfaces are complex, and experimental results do not always agree with theoretical predictions. In this work, we show, using analytical modeling, how different complex interfaces affect a nearby bacterium and modify its swimming kinematics. IUSTI UMR 7343, Polytech Marseille, France.

  5. Acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) - children

    MedlinePLUS

    Acute myelogenous leukemia - children; AML; Acute myeloid leukemia - children; Acute granulocytic leukemia - children; Acute myeloblastic leukemia - children; Acute non-lymphocytic leukemia (ANLL) - children

  6. Genomics of Probiotic Bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Flaherty, Sarah; Goh, Yong Jun; Klaenhammer, Todd R.

    Probiotic bacteria from the Lactobacillus and Bifidobacterium species belong to the Firmicutes and the Actinobacteria phylum, respectively. Lactobacilli are members of the lactic acid bacteria (LAB) group, a broadly defined family of microorganisms that ferment various hexoses into primarily lactic acid. Lactobacilli are typically low G + C gram-positive species which are phylogenetically diverse, with over 100 species documented to date. Bifidobacteria are heterofermentative, high G + C content bacteria with about 30 species of bifidobacteria described to date.

  7. BdlA, DipA and Induced Dispersion Contribute to Acute Virulence and Chronic Persistence of Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yi; Petrova, Olga E.; Su, Shengchang; Lau, Gee W.; Panmanee, Warunya; Na, Renuka; Hassett, Daniel J.; Davies, David G.; Sauer, Karin

    2014-01-01

    The human pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa is capable of causing both acute and chronic infections. Differences in virulence are attributable to the mode of growth: bacteria growing planktonically cause acute infections, while bacteria growing in matrix-enclosed aggregates known as biofilms are associated with chronic, persistent infections. While the contribution of the planktonic and biofilm modes of growth to virulence is now widely accepted, little is known about the role of dispersion in virulence, the active process by which biofilm bacteria switch back to the planktonic mode of growth. Here, we demonstrate that P. aeruginosa dispersed cells display a virulence phenotype distinct from those of planktonic and biofilm cells. While the highest activity of cytotoxic and degradative enzymes capable of breaking down polymeric matrix components was detected in supernatants of planktonic cells, the enzymatic activity of dispersed cell supernatants was similar to that of biofilm supernatants. Supernatants of non-dispersing ?bdlA biofilms were characterized by a lack of many of the degradative activities. Expression of genes contributing to the virulence of P. aeruginosa was nearly 30-fold reduced in biofilm cells relative to planktonic cells. Gene expression analysis indicated dispersed cells, while dispersing from a biofilm and returning to the single cell lifestyle, to be distinct from both biofilm and planktonic cells, with virulence transcript levels being reduced up to 150-fold compared to planktonic cells. In contrast, virulence gene transcript levels were significantly increased in non-dispersing ?bdlA and ?dipA biofilms compared to wild-type planktonic cells. Despite this, bdlA and dipA inactivation, resulting in an inability to disperse in vitro, correlated with reduced pathogenicity and competitiveness in cross-phylum acute virulence models. In contrast, bdlA inactivation rendered P. aeruginosa more persistent upon chronic colonization of the murine lung, overall indicating that dispersion may contribute to both acute and chronic infections. PMID:24901523

  8. Acute primary herpetic gingivostomatitis

    PubMed Central

    Mohan, Ravi Prakash Sasankoti; Verma, Sankalp; Singh, Udita; Agarwal, Neha

    2013-01-01

    Herpes simplex virus (HSV) is a double-stranded virus belonging to human herpes virus family. Although it exists in eight various forms, HSV-1 causes most of the oral infections. Since dentists are more likely to be consulted in the case of oral infections, familiarity with these lesions becomes mandatory. It is more commonly reported in children and rarely in adults. This article presents an acute episode of primary herpetic gingivostomatitis in a 32-year-old male patient. PMID:23839615

  9. An inhalation model of acute Q fever in guinea pigs 

    E-print Network

    Russell-Lodrigue, Kasi Elizabeth

    2009-05-15

    Coxiella burnetii is an intracellular pathogen that can cause both acute and chronic disease (Q fever) in humans and infects many animals with varying clinical illness and persistence. A guinea pig aerosol-challenge model of acute Q fever...

  10. Airborne bacteria and viruses.

    PubMed

    Cox, C S

    1989-01-01

    Coughing, sneezing, talking, bed-making, turning pages of books, etc. all generate microbial aerosols which are carried and dispersed by air movements. Inhalation of these particles may cause allergic responses but whether or not infectious disease ensues depends in part on the viability and infectivity of the inhaled microbes and their landing sites. Desiccation is experienced by all airborne microbes; gram-negative bacteria and lipid-containing viruses demonstrate phase changes in their outer phospholipid bilayer membranes owing to concomitant changes in water content and/or temperature. These changes most likely lead to cross-linking reactions of associated protein moieties principally at mid to high relative humidity (RH). For lipid-free viruses these reactions of their surface protein moieties occur most rapidly at low RH. Radiation, oxygen, ozone and its reaction products and various pollutants also decrease viability and infectivity through chemical, physical and biological modification to phospholipid, protein and nucleic acid moieties. The extent of damage and the degree of repair together with the efficacy of host defence mechanisms largely controls whether the causative microbes take hold and spread disease via the airborne route. At least indoors, where desiccation is the predominant stress, the general reversibility of membrane-phase changes by vapour-phase rehydration when coupled with efficacious microbial enzymatic repair mechanisms under genetic control, virtually ensures the spread of disease by the aerobiological pathway. PMID:2699673

  11. Acute childhood diarrhoea in northern Ghana: epidemiological, clinical and microbiological characteristics

    PubMed Central

    Reither, Klaus; Ignatius, Ralf; Weitzel, Thomas; Seidu-Korkor, Andrew; Anyidoho, Louis; Saad, Eiman; Djie-Maletz, Andrea; Ziniel, Peter; Amoo-Sakyi, Felicia; Danikuu, Francis; Danour, Stephen; Otchwemah, Rowland N; Schreier, Eckart; Bienzle, Ulrich; Stark, Klaus; Mockenhaupt, Frank P

    2007-01-01

    Background Acute diarrhoea is a major cause of childhood morbidity and mortality in sub-Saharan Africa. Its microbiological causes and clinico-epidemiological aspects were examined during the dry season 2005/6 in Tamale, urban northern Ghana. Methods Stool specimens of 243 children with acute diarrhoea and of 124 control children were collected. Patients were clinically examined, and malaria and anaemia were assessed. Rota-, astro-, noro- and adenoviruses were identified by (RT-) PCR assays. Intestinal parasites were diagnosed by microscopy, stool antigen assays and PCR, and bacteria by culturing methods. Results Watery stools, fever, weakness, and sunken eyes were the most common symptoms in patients (mean age, 10 months). Malaria occurred in 15% and anaemia in 91%; underweight (22%) and wasting (19%) were frequent. Intestinal micro-organisms were isolated from 77% of patients and 53% of controls (P < 0.0001). The most common pathogens in patients were rotavirus (55%), adenovirus (28%) and norovirus (10%); intestinal parasites (5%) and bacteria (5%) were rare. Rotavirus was the only pathogen found significantly more frequently in patients than in controls (odds ratio 7.7; 95%CI, 4.2–14.2), and was associated with young age, fever and watery stools. Patients without an identified cause of diarrhoea more frequently had symptomatic malaria (25%) than those with diagnosed intestinal pathogens (12%, P = 0.02). Conclusion Rotavirus-infection is the predominant cause of acute childhood diarrhoea in urban northern Ghana. The abundance of putative enteropathogens among controls may indicate prolonged excretion or limited pathogenicity. In this population with a high burden of diarrhoeal and other diseases, sanitation, health education, and rotavirus-vaccination can be expected to have substantial impact on childhood morbidity. PMID:17822541

  12. Intracellular bacteria and adverse pregnancy outcomes.

    PubMed

    Baud, D; Greub, G

    2011-09-01

    This review considers the role of intracellular bacteria in adverse pregnancy outcomes, such as miscarriage, stillbirths, and preterm labour. The cause of miscarriage, stillbirth and preterm labour often remains unexplained. Intracellular bacteria that grow either poorly or not at all on media used routinely to detect human pathogens could be the aetiological agents of these obstetric conditions. For example, Listeria monocytogenes and Coxiella burnetti are intracellular bacteria that have a predilection for the fetomaternal unit and may induce fatal disease in the mother and/or fetus. Both are important foodborne or zoonotic pathogens in pregnancy. Preventive measures, diagnostic tools and treatment will be reviewed. Moreover, we will also address the importance in adverse pregnancy outcomes of other intracellular bacteria, including Brucella abortus and various members of the order Chlamydiales. Indeed, there is growing evidence that Chlamydia trachomatis, Chlamydia abortus and Chlamydia pneumoniae infections may also result in adverse pregnancy outcomes in humans and/or animals. Moreover, newly discovered Chlamydia-like organisms have recently emerged as new pathogens of both animals and humans. For example, Waddlia chondrophila, a Chlamydia-related bacterium isolated from aborted bovine fetuses, has also been implicated in human miscarriages. Future research should help us to better understand the pathophysiology of adverse pregnancy outcomes caused by intracellular bacteria and to determine the precise mode of transmission of newly identified bacteria, such as Waddlia and Parachlamydia. These emerging pathogens may represent the tip of the iceberg of a large number of as yet unknown intracellular pathogenic agents. PMID:21884294

  13. Role of bacteria in oral carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Khajuria, Nidhi; Metgud, Rashmi

    2015-01-01

    Oral cancer appears to be increasing in incidence, and mortality has hardly improved over the past 25 years. Better understanding of the etiopathogenesis should lead to more accurate and earlier diagnosis and more effective treatments with fewer adverse effects. Despite increasing interest in the possible relationships between bacteria and the different stages of cancer development, the association of bacteria with cancer of the oral cavity has yet to be adequately examined. Different bacteria have been proposed to induce carcinogenesis, either through induction of chronic inflammation or by interference, either directly or indirectly, with eukaryotic cell cycle and signaling pathways or by metabolism of potentially carcinogenic substances like acetaldehyde, causing mutagenesis. This review presents the possible carcinogenesis pathway involved in bacterial carcinogenesis, commonly implicated bacteria in oral carcinogenesis and their role in cancer therapeutics as well. PMID:25767359

  14. Bacteria turn tiny gears

    SciTech Connect

    2009-01-01

    Swarms of bacteria turn two 380-micron long gears, opening the possibility of building hybrid biological machines at the microscopic scale. Read more at Wired: http://www.wired.com/wiredscience/2009/12/bacterial-micro-machine/#more-15684 or Scientific American: http://www.scientificamerican.com/article.cfm?id=brownian-motion-bacteria

  15. Bleach vs. Bacteria

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Inside Life Science > Bleach vs. Bacteria Inside Life Science View All Articles | Inside Life Science Home Page Bleach vs. Bacteria By Sharon Reynolds ... For Proteins, Form Shapes Function This Inside Life Science article also appears on LiveScience . Learn about related ...

  16. CTX-M ?-lactamases and associated integrons: their dissemination in Gram-negative bacteria 

    E-print Network

    Dimude, Juachi Uzochukwu

    2013-06-29

    Gram-negative bacteria are able to cause many infections including blood stream infections (BSI).These bacteria may become resistant to antibiotics, often by acquiring genes in the presence of antibiotic selection pressure. ...

  17. Acute mercurial pneumonitis

    PubMed Central

    Milne, James; Christophers, Allen; Silva, Pamela De

    1970-01-01

    Milne, J., Christophers, A., and de Silva, Pamela (1970).Brit. J. industr. Med.,27, 334-338. Acute mercurial pneumonitis. Mercury vapour has been shown to cause acute effects on the lung when inhaled in high concentrations. Four men, exposed to mercury inside a tank, developed, hours later, signs and symptoms of an acute febrile illness with severe pulmonary irritation, characterized by fever, rigors, cough, dyspnoea, and tightness in the chest. A review of the literature revealed that this syndrome had been described and investigated previously in fewer than 20 cases during the past 40 years, and is apparently little known. Fatalities have been described, particularly in children, and necropsy evidence has consistently revealed the pattern of an acute diffuse interstitial pneumonitis, accompanied by profuse fibrinous exudation and erosion of the bronchial and bronchiolar lining. The two common features in all reports are the heating of mercury or the entering into a confined space, or both. Adequate respiratory protection by an efficient air-supplied respirator is mandatory in industrial circumstances of the kind described in this report. PMID:5488692

  18. Stenting in Acute Lower Limb Arterial Occlusions

    SciTech Connect

    Raja, Jowad; Munneke, Graham; Morgan, Robert; Belli, Anna-Maria

    2008-07-15

    Management of critical limb ischemia of acute onset includes surgical embolectomy, bypass grafting, aspiration thrombectomy, thrombolysis, and mechanical thrombectomy followed by treatment of the underlying cause. We present our experience with the use of stents to treat acute embolic/thrombotic occlusions in one iliac and three femoropopliteal arteries. Although this is a small case series, excellent immediate and midterm results suggest that stenting of acute occlusions of the iliac, superficial femoral, and popliteal arteries is a safe and effective treatment option.

  19. Acute Pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Geokas, Michael C.

    1972-01-01

    For many decades two types of acute pancreatitis have been recognized: the edematous or interstitial and the hemorrhagic or necrotic. In most cases acute pancreatitis is associated with alcoholism or biliary tract disease. Elevated serum or urinary ?-amylase is the most important finding in diagnosis. The presence of methemalbumin in serum and in peritoneal or pleural fluid supports the diagnosis of the hemorrhagic form of the disease in patients with a history and enzyme studies suggestive of pancreatitis. There is no characteristic clinical picture in acute pancreatitis, and its complications are legion. Pancreatic pseudocyst is probably the most common and pancreatic abscess is the most serious complication. The pathogenetic principle is autodigestion, but the precise sequence of biochemical events is unclear, especially the mode of trypsinogen activation and the role of lysosomal hydrolases. A host of metabolic derangements have been identified in acute pancreatitis, involving lipid, glucose, calcium and magnesium metabolism and changes of the blood clotting mechanism, to name but a few. Medical treatment includes intestinal decompression, analgesics, correction of hypovolemia and other supportive and protective measures. Surgical exploration is advisable in selected cases, when the diagnosis is in doubt, and is considered imperative in the presence of certain complications, especially pancreatic abscess. PMID:4559467

  20. Acute visceral obstruction

    PubMed Central

    Mabbutt, Sarah Elizabeth; Burdall, Oliver Charles; Kariyawasam, Sanjeeva

    2013-01-01

    Gastric volvulus is a rare cause for acute visceral obstruction, with a high mortality rate that rises with delay in definitive treatment. A 33-year-old woman with a rare chromosomal mutation (46,XX,del(6)(q25.1q25.3)) presented with evidence of acute visceral obstruction. Diagnostic difficulties delayed treatment and she clinically deteriorated. Urgent CT imaging revealed acute mesentero-axial gastric volvulus. At laparotomy, global failure of colonic and splenic fixation was found. The viscera were de-rotated, the stomach salvaged and gastropexy and colopexy were performed. This is the first report of gastric volvulus secondary to congenital absence of colonic and splenic ligamentous attachments occurring in a patient over 30?years of age. This case is interesting not only due to unique pathology, but also highlights that general surgeons must be aware of the possibility of unusual causes for intestinal obstruction in patients with recognised genetic abnormalities, even in adult cases, to avoid harmful diagnostic delay. PMID:23853188

  1. Initial clinical presentation of children with acute and chronic versus acute subdural hemorrhage resulting from abusive head trauma.

    PubMed

    Feldman, Kenneth W; Sugar, Naomi F; Browd, Samuel R

    2015-08-01

    OBJECT At presentation, children who have experienced abusive head trauma (AHT) often have subdural hemorrhage (SDH) that is acute, chronic, or both. Controversy exists whether the acute SDH associated with chronic SDH results from trauma or from spontaneous rebleeding. The authors compared the clinical presentations of children with AHT and acute SDH with those having acute and chronic SDH (acute/chronic SDH). METHODS The study was a multicenter retrospective review of children who had experienced AHT during 2004-2009. The authors compared the clinical and radiological characteristics of children with acute SDH to those of children with acute/chronic SDH. RESULTS The study included 383 children with AHT and either acute SDH (n = 291) or acute/chronic SDH (n = 92). The children with acute/chronic SDH were younger, had higher initial Glasgow Coma Scale scores, fewer deaths, fewer skull fractures, less parenchymal brain injury, and fewer acute noncranial fractures than did children with acute SDH. No between-group differences were found for the proportion with retinal hemorrhages, healing noncranial fractures, or acute abusive bruises. A similar proportion (approximately 80%) of children with acute/chronic SDH and with acute SDH had retinal hemorrhages or acute or healing extracranial injures. Of children with acute/chronic SDH, 20% were neurologically asymptomatic at presentation; almost half of these children were seen for macrocephaly, and for all of them, the acute SDH was completely within the area of the chronic SDH. CONCLUSIONS Overall, the presenting clinical and radiological characteristics of children with acute SDH and acute/chronic SDH caused by AHT did not differ, suggesting that repeated abuse, rather than spontaneous rebleeding, is the etiology of most acute SDH in children with chronic SDH. However, more severe neurological symptoms were more common among children with acute SDH. Children with acute/chronic SDH and asymptomatic macrocephaly have unique risks and distinct radiological and clinical characteristics. PMID:25932780

  2. Multidrug Resistance in Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Nikaido, Hiroshi

    2010-01-01

    Large amounts of antibiotics used for human therapy, as well as for farm animals and even for fish in aquaculture, resulted in the selection of pathogenic bacteria resistant to multiple drugs. Multidrug resistance in bacteria may be generated by one of two mechanisms. First, these bacteria may accumulate multiple genes, each coding for resistance to a single drug, within a single cell. This accumulation occurs typically on resistance (R) plasmids. Second, multidrug resistance may also occur by the increased expression of genes that code for multidrug efflux pumps, extruding a wide range of drugs. This review discusses our current knowledge on the molecular mechanisms involved in both types of resistance. PMID:19231985

  3. Bacteria TMDL Projects 

    E-print Network

    Wythe, Kathy

    2007-01-01

    stream_source_info Bacteria TMDL projects.pdf.txt stream_content_type text/plain stream_size 2550 Content-Encoding ISO-8859-1 stream_name Bacteria TMDL projects.pdf.txt Content-Type text/plain; charset=ISO-8859-1 tx H2O... of the projects are listed below. ? Peach CreekWater Quality Improvement Project ? Monitoring and Educational Programs Focused on Bacteria and Nutrient Runoff on Dairy Operations in the LeonWatershed ? Development of the Plum CreekWPP ? Impact of Proper...

  4. Bacteria in shear flow

    E-print Network

    Marcos, Ph.D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2011-01-01

    Bacteria are ubiquitous and play a critical role in many contexts. Their environment is nearly always dynamic due to the prevalence of fluid flow: creeping flow in soil, highly sheared flow in bodily conduits, and turbulent ...

  5. Indicator For Pseudomonas Bacteria

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Margalit, Ruth

    1990-01-01

    Characteristic protein extracted and detected. Natural protein marker found in Pseudomonas bacteria. Azurin, protein containing copper readily extracted, purified, and used to prepare antibodies. Possible to develop simple, fast, and accurate test for marker carried out in doctor's office.

  6. Prevalence of cryptosporidiosis in renal transplant recipients presenting with acute diarrhea at a single center in Pakistan

    PubMed Central

    Raja, Kapeel; Abbas, Zaigham; Hassan, Syed Mujahid; Luck, Nasir Hassan; Aziz, Tahir; Mubarak, Muhammed

    2014-01-01

    Background: Cryptosporidium is an intracellular protozoan organism which causes diarrhea, both in immunocompetent and immunocompromised hosts. Renal transplant recipients are prone to develop a variety of infections including protozoal infections. Objectives: The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of cryptosporidiosis in our renal transplant recipients presenting with acute diarrhea. Patients and Methods: During six months of the study, 644 renal transplant recipients presented with acute diarrhea. Single stool sample was obtained for detailed analysis including gross and microscopic examination for red blood cells, pus cells, ova, cysts, and protozoa. The modified Ziehl-Neelsen (ZN) staining was done to identify the oocysts of cryptosporidia. Results: Out of 644 renal transplant patients, oocysts of cryptosporidia were identified in 343 patients (53%). Detailed stool analysis of these patients showed the presence of numerous pus cells in 27 (7.9%) patients, co-infection with giardia intestinalis cysts in 15 (4.3%), and entamoeba histolytica cysts in 10 (2.9%). In all, out of 343 patients, 43 (12.5%) had dual infection with bacteria and protozoa in addition to cryptosporidiosis. Conclusions: Cryptosporidium is an important pathogen causing acute diarrhea in renal transplant recipients in our set up. Stool examination is usually negative for pus cells. It is recommended that in all transplant recipients presenting with acute diarrhea modified ZN staining should be done to rule out cryptosporidiosis in highly endemic areas like Pakistan. PMID:25374881

  7. A Rare Cause of Reversible Renal Hemosiderosis

    PubMed Central

    Abou Arkoub, Rima; Wang, Don; Zimmerman, Deborah

    2015-01-01

    Kidney failure secondary to renal hemosiderosis has been reported in diseases with intravascular hemolysis, like paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria, and valvular heart diseases. We present here a case of hemosiderin induced acute tubular necrosis secondary to intravascular hemolysis from Clostridium difficile infection with possible role of supratherapeutic INR. We discuss the pathophysiology, causes, and prognosis of acute tubular injury from hemosiderosis. PMID:26491580

  8. Genetically engineered acidophilic heterotrophic bacteria by bacteriophage transduction

    SciTech Connect

    Ward, T.E.; Bruhn, D.F.; Bulmer, D.F.

    1989-05-10

    A bacteriophage capable of infecting acidophilic heterotrophic bacteria and processes for genetically engineering acidophilic bacteria for biomining or sulfur removal from coal are disclosed. The bacteriophage is capable of growth in cells existing at pH at or below 3.0. Lytic forms of the phage introduced into areas experiencing acid drainage kill the bacteria causing such drainage. Lysogenic forms of the phage having genes for selective removal of metallic or nonmetallic elements can be introduced into acidophilic bacteria to effect removal of the desired element from ore or coal. 1 fig., 1 tab.

  9. Gut Bacteria Tied to Asthma Risk in Kids

    MedlinePLUS

    ... not prove cause and effect. Whether giving kids probiotics -- good bacteria -- might reduce asthma risk isn't known, the researchers said. Turvey said the probiotics available in over-the-counter forms do not ...

  10. The Use of Bacteria for Remediation of Mercury Contaminated Groundwater

    EPA Science Inventory

    Many processes of mercury transformation in the environment are bacteria mediated. Mercury properties cause some difficulties of remediation of mercury contaminated environment. Despite the significance of the problem of mercury pollution, methods of large scale bioremediation ...

  11. Severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS)

    MedlinePLUS

    Severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) is a serious form of pneumonia . It is caused by a virus that was first identified ... chap 366. McIntosh K, Perlman S. Coronaviruses, including severe ... syndrome (SARS)and Middle East respiratory syndrome (MERS). In: ...

  12. The fecal bacteria

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sadowsky, Michael J., (Edited By); Whitman, Richard L.

    2011-01-01

    The Fecal Bacteria offers a balanced, integrated discussion of fecal bacteria and their presence and ecology in the intestinal tract of mammals, in the environment, and in the food supply. This volume covers their use in examining and assessing water quality in order to offer protection from illnesses related to swimming in or ingesting contaminated water, in addition to discussing their use in engineering considerations of water quality, modeling, monitoring, and regulations. Fecal bacteria are additionally used as indicators of contamination of ready-to-eat foods and fresh produce. The intestinal environment, the microbial community structure of the gut microbiota, and the physiology and genomics of this broad group of microorganisms are explored in the book. With contributions from an internationally recognized group of experts, the book integrates medicine, public health, environmental, and microbiological topics in order to provide a unique, holistic understanding of fecal bacteria. Moreover, it shows how the latest basic science and applied research findings are helping to solve problems and develop effective management strategies. For example, readers will discover how the latest tools and molecular approaches have led to our current understanding of fecal bacteria and enabled us to improve human health and water quality. The Fecal Bacteria is recommended for microbiologists, clinicians, animal scientists, engineers, environmental scientists, food safety experts, water quality managers, and students. It will help them better understand fecal bacteria and use their knowledge to protect human and environmental health. They can also apply many of the techniques and molecular tools discussed in this book to the study of a broad range of microorganisms in a variety of habitats.

  13. Drug induced acute pancreatitis: Does it exist?

    PubMed Central

    Tenner, Scott

    2014-01-01

    As the incidence of acute pancreatitis continues to rise, establishing the etiology in order to prevent recurrence is important. Although the etiology of acute pancreatitis is not difficult in the majority of patients, almost a quarter of patients are initially labeled as having idiopathic acute pancreatitis. When confronted with a patient with acute pancreatitis and no clear etiology defined as an absence alcoholism, gallstones (ultrasound and/or MRI), a normal triglyceride level, and absence of tumor, it often appears reasonable to consider a drug as the cause of acute pancreatitis. Over 100 drugs have been implicated by case reports as causing acute pancreatitis. While some of these case reports are well written, many case reports represent poorly written experiences of the clinician simply implicating a drug without a careful evaluation. Over-reliance on case reports while ignoring randomized clinical trials and large pharmacoepidemiologic surveys has led to confusion about drug induced acute pancreatitis. This review will explain that drug induced acute pancreatitis does occur, but it is rare, and over diagnosis leads to misconceptions about the disease resulting in inappropriate patient care, increased litigation and a failure to address the true entity: idiopathic acute pancreatitis. PMID:25469020

  14. Measuring chronic toxicity using luminescent bacteria

    SciTech Connect

    Huynh, H.; Bulich, A.

    1994-12-31

    Bioassays using luminescent bacteria are routinely used to assess the acute toxicity of environmental samples. Two physiological characteristics of these test organisms, a short division cycle and the inducible luciferase pathway, provide functional attributes for measuring chronic toxicity. Freeze-dried luminescent bacteria, following inoculation into appropriate growth medium, initiate a series of reproductive cycles while inducing a complex series of metabolic pathways resulting in production of bioluminescence. Toxic chemicals or samples which inhibit any aspect of this reproductive cycle or induction of light production are detected in low concentrations. The development of this bioassay is based upon a detailed understanding of the growth requirements and biochemistry of this organism and the genetics of luciferase induction. A defined growth medium was developed which supports the necessary cell growth and luciferase induction, yet which does not mask the presence of toxic substances. To perform the assay, the test organisms are inoculated into a series of cuvettes containing growth medium and dilutions of the sample. After 18 hrs incubation at 27 C, control cuvettes show high light levels while sample dilutions containing toxic materials show decreasing light levels. Details of the test protocol and reproducibility are presented. Sensitivity data from this chronic toxicity test are summarized and compared with the Microtox{reg_sign} acute test and the Ceriodaphnia dubia chronic toxicity test method. This test method is about 20 times more sensitive than Microtox and exhibits sensitivity similar to C. dubia for tested metals and organic compounds.

  15. Chapter A7. Section 7.1. Fecal Indicator Bacteria

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Myers, Donna N.; Sylvester, Marc A.

    1997-01-01

    Fecal indicator bacteria are used to assess the microbiological quality of water because, although not typically disease causing, they are correlated with the presence of several waterborne disease-causing organisms. The concentration of indicator bacteria is a measure of water safety for body-contact recreation or for consumption. This report provides information on the equipment, sampling protocols, and identification, enumeration, and calculation procedures that are in standard use by U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) personnel for the collection of data on fecal indicator bacteria.

  16. INTER-SPECIES MODELS FOR ACUTE AQUATIC TOXICITY BASED ON MECHANISM OF ACTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    This presentation will provide interspecies QSARs for acute toxicity to 17 aquatic species, such as fish, snail, tadpole, hydrozoan, crustacean, insect larvae, and bacteria developed using 5,000 toxic effect results for approximately 2400 chemicals.

  17. Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia (ALL)

    MedlinePLUS

    ... this page Print this page Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is a fast-growing cancer of a type ... that your body needs. Tweet Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia (ALL) Transplant outcomes for ALL Initial treatment of ALL ...

  18. Acute and Genetic Toxicity of Municipal Landfill Leachate 

    E-print Network

    Brown, K.W.; Schrab, G.E.; Donnelly, K.C.

    1991-01-01

    sample to induce mutations in bacteria, bind to microbial DNA, or cause chromosome damage in diploid fungi. Genetically toxic chemicals may cause cancer, genetic disease, sterility, abortions, heart disease or a variety of other chronic effects...

  19. The acute respiratory distress syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Pooja

    2015-01-01

    The acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is a major cause of acute respiratory failure. Its development leads to high rates of mortality, as well as short- and long-term complications, such as physical and cognitive impairment. Therefore, early recognition of this syndrome and application of demonstrated therapeutic interventions are essential to change the natural course of this devastating entity. In this review article, we describe updated concepts in ARDS. Specifically, we discuss the new definition of ARDS, its risk factors and pathophysiology, and current evidence regarding ventilation management, adjunctive therapies, and intervention required in refractory hypoxemia. PMID:25829644

  20. Sildenafil Induced Acute Interstitial Nephritis

    PubMed Central

    Burkhart, Ryan; Shah, Nina; Lewin, Matthew

    2015-01-01

    Acute interstitial nephritis (AIN) is characterized by inflammation of the renal interstitium and usually occurs in a temporal relationship with the medication. We present a case of an Asian male who had nephrotic range proteinuria and presented with acute kidney injury. The patient reported an acute change in physical appearance and symptomatology after the ingestion of a single dose of sildenafil. Renal biopsy was notable for minimal change disease (MCD) with acute and chronic interstitial nephritis. Renal replacement and glucocorticoid therapy were initiated. Renal recovery within six weeks permitted discontinuation of dialysis. AIN superimposed on MCD is a known association of NSAID induced nephropathy. The temporal association and the absence of any new drugs suggest that the AIN was most likely due to the sildenafil. NSAIDs are less likely to have caused the AIN given their remote use. The ease of steroid responsiveness would also suggest another cause as NSAID induced AIN is often steroid resistant. The MCD was most likely idiopathic given the lack of temporal association with a secondary cause. As the number of sildenafil prescriptions increases, more cases of AIN may be identified and physician awareness for this potential drug disease association is necessary. PMID:26491581

  1. Acute Inhalation Injury

    PubMed Central

    Gorguner, Metin; Akgun, Metin

    2010-01-01

    Inhaled substances may cause injury in pulmonary epithelium at various levels of respiratory tract, leading from simple symptoms to severe disease. Acute inhalation injury (AII) is not uncommon condition. There are certain high risk groups but AII may occur at various places including home or workplace. Environmental exposure is also possible. In addition to individual susceptibility, the characteristics of inhaled substances such as water solubility, size of substances and chemical properties may affect disease severity as well as its location. Although AII cases may recover in a few days but AII may cause long-term complications, even death. We aimed to discuss the effects of short-term exposures (minutes to hours) to toxic substances on the lungs. PMID:25610115

  2. Acute compartment syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Via, Alessio Giai; Oliva, Francesco; Spoliti, Marco; Maffulli, Nicola

    2015-01-01

    Summary Background: acute compartment syndrome (ACS) is one of the few true emergencies in orthopedics and traumatology. It is a painful condition caused by the increase interstitial pressure (intracompart-mental pressure – ICP) within a closed osteofascial compartment which impair local circulation. It occurs most often in the legs, but it can affects also the arms, hands, feet, and buttocks. It usually develops after a severe injury such as fractures or crush injury, but it can also occurs after a relatively minor injury and it may be iatrogenic. Uncommon causes of ACS have been also described, that suggest surgeons to pay great attention to this serious complication. Diagnosing ACS is difficult in clinical practice, even among expert surgeons. Currently, the diagnosis is made on the basis of physical examination and repeated ICP measures. ICP higher than 30 mmHg of diastolic blood pressure is significant of compartment syndrome. Once diagnosis is made, fasciotomy to release the affected compartment should be performed as early as possible because delayed decompression would lead to irreversible ischemic damage to muscles and peripheral nerves. Conclusion: acute compartment syndrome is a surgical emergency. There is still little consensus among authors about diagnosis and treatment of these serious condition, in particular about the ICP at which fasciotomy is absolutely indicated and the timing of wound closure. New investigations are needed in order to improve diagnosis and treatment of ACS. PMID:25878982

  3. NSAID enteropathy and bacteria: a complicated relationship.

    PubMed

    Syer, Stephanie D; Blackler, Rory W; Martin, Rebeca; de Palma, Giada; Rossi, Laura; Verdu, Elena; Bercik, Premek; Surette, Michael G; Aucouturier, Anne; Langella, Philippe; Wallace, John L

    2015-04-01

    The clinical significance of small intestinal damage caused by nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) remains under-appreciated. It occurs with greater frequency than the damage caused by these drugs in the upper gastrointestinal tract, but is much more difficult to diagnose and treat. Although the pathogenesis of NSAID enteropathy remains incompletely understood, it is clear that bacteria, bile, and the enterohepatic circulation of NSAIDs are all important factors. However, they are also interrelated with one another. Bacterial enzymes can affect the cytotoxicity of bile and are essential for enterohepatic circulation of NSAIDs. Gram-negative bacteria appear to be particularly important in the pathogenesis of NSAID enteropathy, possibly through release of endotoxin. Inhibitors of gastric acid secretion significantly aggravate NSAID enteropathy, and this effect is due to significant changes in the intestinal microbiome. Treatment with antibiotics can, in some circumstances, reduce the severity of NSAID enteropathy, but published results are inconsistent. Specific antibiotic-induced changes in the microbiota have not been causally linked to prevention of intestinal damage. Treatment with probiotics, particularly Bifidobacterium, Lactobacillus, and Faecalibacteriaum prausnitzii, has shown promising effects in animal models. Our studies suggest that these beneficial effects are due to colonization by the bacteria, rather than to products released by the bacteria. PMID:25572030

  4. Corals diseases are a major cause of coral death

    EPA Science Inventory

    Corals, like humans, are susceptible to diseases. Some coral diseases are associated with pathogenic bacteria; however, the causes of most remain unknown. Some diseases trigger rapid and extensive mortality, while others slowly cause localized color changes or injure coral tiss...

  5. PATHOGENICITY OF BIOFILM BACTERIA

    EPA Science Inventory

    There is a paucity of information concerning any link between the microorganisms commonly found in biofilms of drinking water systems and their impacts on human health. For bacteria, culture-based techniques detect only a limited number of the total microorganisms associated wit...

  6. Culture of Bacteria 

    E-print Network

    Unknown

    2011-08-17

    site located in the lungs of an animal model, thereby enabling detection of fluorescent bacteria during the early stages of infection. In this thesis, I present a contact probe fiber bundle fluorescence micro-endoscope with a range of LED based...

  7. Antibiotic-Resistant Bacteria.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Longenecker, Nevin E.; Oppenheimer, Dan

    1982-01-01

    A study conducted by high school advanced bacteriology students appears to confirm the hypothesis that the incremental administration of antibiotics on several species of bacteria (Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus epidermis, Bacillus sublitus, Bacillus megaterium) will allow for the development of antibiotic-resistant strains. (PEB)

  8. Bacteria-surface interactions

    PubMed Central

    Tuson, Hannah H.; Weibel, Douglas B.

    2013-01-01

    The interaction of bacteria with surfaces has important implications in a range of areas, including bioenergy, biofouling, biofilm formation, and the infection of plants and animals. Many of the interactions of bacteria with surfaces produce changes in the expression of genes that influence cell morphology and behavior, including genes essential for motility and surface attachment. Despite the attention that these phenotypes have garnered, the bacterial systems used for sensing and responding to surfaces are still not well understood. An understanding of these mechanisms will guide the development of new classes of materials that inhibit and promote cell growth, and complement studies of the physiology of bacteria in contact with surfaces. Recent studies from a range of fields in science and engineering are poised to guide future investigations in this area. This review summarizes recent studies on bacteria-surface interactions, discusses mechanisms of surface sensing and consequences of cell attachment, provides an overview of surfaces that have been used in bacterial studies, and highlights unanswered questions in this field. PMID:23930134

  9. NSAIDs and Acute Pancreatitis: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Pezzilli, Raffaele; Morselli-Labate, Antonio Maria; Corinaldesi, Roberto

    2010-01-01

    The resulting pain is the main symptom of acute pancreatitis and it should be alleviated as soon as possible. NSAIDs are the first line therapy for pain and they are generally administered to acute pancreatitis patients upon admission to the hospital. In addition, these drugs have also been used to prevent post-endoscopic cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) acute pancreatitis. On the other hand, there are several reports indicating that NSAIDs may be the actual cause of acute pancreatitis. We carried out a literature search on PubMed/MEDLINE; all full text papers published in from January 1966 to November 2009 on the use of NSAIDs in acute pancreatitis were collected; the literature search was also supplemented by a review of the bibliographies of the papers evaluated. Thus, in this article, we will systematically review the current literature in order to better illustrate the role of NSAIDs in acute pancreatitis, in particular: i) NSAIDs as a cause of acute pancreatitis; ii) their use to prevent post-retrograde ERCP pancreatitis and iii) their efficacy for pain relief in the acute illness of the pancreas.

  10. Acute hepatitis after amiodarone infusion

    PubMed Central

    Fonseca, Paulo; Dias, Adelaide; Gonçalves, Helena; Albuquerque, Aníbal; Gama, Vasco

    2015-01-01

    Acute hepatitis is a very rare, but potentially fatal, adverse effect of intravenous amiodarone. We present a case of an 88-year-old man with history of ischemic dilated cardiomyopathy and severely depressed left ventricular function that was admitted to our coronary care unit with diagnosis of decompensated heart failure and non-sustained ventricular tachycardia. A few hours after the beginning of intravenous amiodarone he developed an acute hepatitis. There was a completely recovery within the next days after amiodarone withdrawn and other causes of acute hepatitis have been ruled out. This case highlights the need for close monitoring of hepatic function during amiodarone infusion in order to identify any potential hepatotoxicity and prevent a fatal outcome. Oral amiodarone is, apparently, a safe option in these patients. PMID:26488027

  11. Acute hepatitis after amiodarone infusion.

    PubMed

    Fonseca, Paulo; Dias, Adelaide; Gonçalves, Helena; Albuquerque, Aníbal; Gama, Vasco

    2015-10-16

    Acute hepatitis is a very rare, but potentially fatal, adverse effect of intravenous amiodarone. We present a case of an 88-year-old man with history of ischemic dilated cardiomyopathy and severely depressed left ventricular function that was admitted to our coronary care unit with diagnosis of decompensated heart failure and non-sustained ventricular tachycardia. A few hours after the beginning of intravenous amiodarone he developed an acute hepatitis. There was a completely recovery within the next days after amiodarone withdrawn and other causes of acute hepatitis have been ruled out. This case highlights the need for close monitoring of hepatic function during amiodarone infusion in order to identify any potential hepatotoxicity and prevent a fatal outcome. Oral amiodarone is, apparently, a safe option in these patients. PMID:26488027

  12. Pathogenicity of Bacteria Contaminating Blood Products

    PubMed Central

    Gatermann, Sören G.

    2011-01-01

    Summary Bacterial contaminations of blood products often originate from the flora of the donor. Normally, components of the skin flora less frequently give rise to severe or complicated infections, although their participation in such conditions has been described. In contrast, bacteria that can cause infections in immunocompetent persons may give rise to life-threatening infections when present in blood products. The latter microorganisms are well-equipped with a variety of virulence factors that contribute to their pathogenicity. PMID:22016692

  13. STORMWATER MANAGEMENT MEASURES AND FECAL INDICATOR BACTERIA

    E-print Network

    STORMWATER MANAGEMENT MEASURES AND FECAL INDICATOR BACTERIA BY ROBERT A. WILDEY BA, New College............................................................................................................. 1 Regulatory Limits for Indicator Bacteria................................................................ 2 Indicator Bacteria in the Environment

  14. Acute Phase Proteins and Their Role in Periodontitis: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Moogala, Srinivas; Boggarapu, Shalini; Pesala, Divya Sai; Palagi, Firoz Babu

    2015-01-01

    Acute phase proteins are a class of proteins whose plasma concentration increase (positive acute phase proteins) or decrease (negative acute phase proteins) in response to inflammation. This response is called as the acute phase reaction, also called as acute phase response, which occurs approximately 90 minutes after the onset of a systemic inflammatory reaction. In Periodontitis endotoxins released from gram negative organisms present in the sub gingival plaque samples interact with Toll- like receptors (TLR) that are expressed on the surface of Polymorphonuclear leucocytes (PMNs) and monocytes which are in abundance in periodontal inflammation. The complex formed due to interaction of Endotoxins and TLR activates the Signal transduction pathway in both innate and adaptive immunity resulting in production of Cytokines that co- ordinate the local and systemic inflammatory response. The pro inflammatory cytokines originating at the diseased site activates the liver cells to produce acute phase proteins as a part of non specific response. The production of Acute phase proteins is regulated to a great extent by Cytokines such as IL-1, IL-6, IL-8, TNF-? and to a lesser extent by Glucocorticoid hormones. These proteins bind to bacteria leading to activation of complement proteins that destroys pathogenic organisms. Studies have shown that levels of acute phase proteins are increased in otherwise healthy adults with poor periodontal status. This article highlights about the synthesis, structure, types and function of acute phase proteins and the associated relation of acute phase proteins in Periodontitis. PMID:26674303

  15. News and Research Good Bacteria

    E-print Network

    West, Stuart

    News and Research Good Bacteria Part 2 Article 13 Click here for Probiotics Basics Cooperation Is A No-brainer For Symbiotic Bacteria 9-4-2003 Humans may learn cooperation in kindergarten, but what about bacteria, whose behavior is preprogrammed by their DNA? Some legume plants, which rely

  16. Enteropathogens Associated with Acute Diarrhea in Children from Households with High Socioeconomic Level in Uruguay

    PubMed Central

    Batthyány, Lara; Bianco, María Noel; Pérez, Walter; Pardo, Lorena; Algorta, Gabriela; Robino, Luciana; Suárez, Ramón; Navarro, Armando; Pírez, María Catalina; Schelotto, Felipe

    2015-01-01

    Infectious diarrhea, a common disease of children, deserves permanent monitoring in all social groups. To know the etiology and clinical manifestations of acute diarrhea in children up to 5 years of age from high socioeconomic level households, we conducted a descriptive, microbiological, and clinical study. Stools from 59 children with acute community-acquired diarrhea were examined, and their parents were interviewed concerning symptoms and signs. Rotavirus, adenovirus, and norovirus were detected by commercially available qualitative immunochromatographic lateral flow rapid tests. Salmonella, Campylobacter, Yersinia, and Shigella were investigated by standard bacteriological methods and diarrheagenic E. coli by PCR assays. We identified a potential enteric pathogen in 30 children. The most frequent causes of diarrhea were enteropathogenic E. coli (EPEC), viruses, Campylobacter, Salmonella, and Shiga-toxin-producing E. coli (STEC). Only 2 patients showed mixed infections. Our data suggest that children with viral or Campylobacter diarrhea were taken to the hospital earlier than those infected with EPEC. One child infected with STEC O26 developed “complete” HUS. The microbiological results highlight the importance of zoonotic bacteria such as atypical EPEC, Campylobacter, STEC, and Salmonella as pathogens associated with acute diarrhea in these children. The findings also reinforce our previous communications about the regional importance of non-O157 STEC strains in severe infant food-borne diseases. PMID:25861274

  17. Lipoprotein sorting in bacteria.

    PubMed

    Okuda, Suguru; Tokuda, Hajime

    2011-01-01

    Bacterial lipoproteins are synthesized as precursors in the cytoplasm and processed into mature forms on the cytoplasmic membrane. A lipid moiety attached to the N terminus anchors these proteins to the membrane surface. Many bacteria are predicted to express more than 100 lipoproteins, which play diverse functions on the cell surface. The Lol system, composed of five proteins, catalyzes the localization of Escherichia coli lipoproteins to the outer membrane. Some lipoproteins play vital roles in the sorting of other lipoproteins, lipopolysaccharides, and ?-barrel proteins to the outer membrane. On the basis of results from biochemical, genetic, and structural studies, we discuss the biogenesis of lipoproteins in bacteria, their importance in cellular functions, and the molecular mechanisms underlying efficient sorting of hydrophobic lipoproteins to the outer membrane through the hydrophilic periplasm. PMID:21663440

  18. Manufacture of Probiotic Bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muller, J. A.; Ross, R. P.; Fitzgerald, G. F.; Stanton, C.

    Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) have been used for many years as natural biopreservatives in fermented foods. A small group of LAB are also believed to have beneficial health effects on the host, so called probiotic bacteria. Probiotics have emerged from the niche industry from Asia into European and American markets. Functional foods are one of the fastest growing markets today, with estimated growth to 20 billion dollars worldwide by 2010 (GIA, 2008). The increasing demand for probiotics and the new food markets where probiotics are introduced, challenges the industry to produce high quantities of probiotic cultures in a viable and stable form. Dried concentrated probiotic cultures are the most convenient form for incorporation into functional foods, given the ease of storage, handling and transport, especially for shelf-stable functional products. This chapter will discuss various aspects of the challenges associated with the manufacturing of probiotic cultures.

  19. Reanimation of Ancient Bacteria

    SciTech Connect

    Vreeland, Russell H.

    2009-01-09

    Recent highly publicized experiments conducted on salt crystals taken from the Permian Salado Formation in Southeastern New Mexico have shown that some ancient crystals contain viable microorganisms trapped within fluid inclusions. Stringent geological and microbiological selection criteria were used to select crystals and conduct all sampling. This talk will focus on how each of these lines of data support the conclusion that such isolated bacteria are as old as the rock in which they are trapped. In this case, the isolated microbes are salt tolerant bacilli that grow best in media containing 8% NaCl, and respond to concentrated brines by forming spores. One of the organisms is phylogenetically related to several bacilli, but does have several unique characteristics. This talk will trace the interdisciplinary data and procedures supporting these discoveries, and describe the various isolated bacteria.

  20. Siboglinid-bacteria endosymbiosis

    PubMed Central

    Fielman, Kevin T; Santos, Scott R; Halanych, Kenneth M

    2008-01-01

    Siboglinid worms are a group of gutless marine annelids which are nutritionally dependent upon endosymbiotic bacteria.1,2 Four major groups of siboglinids are known including vestimentiferans, Osedax spp., frenulates and moniliferans.3–5 Very little is known about the diversity of bacterial endosymbionts associated with frenulate or monoliferan siboglinids. This lack of knowledge is surprising considering the global distribution of siboglinids; this system is likely among the most common symbioses in the deep sea. At least three distinct clades of endosymbiotic ?-proteobacteria associate with siboglinid annelids.6 Frenulates harbor a clade of ?-proteobacteria that are divergent from both the thiotrophic bacteria of vestimentiferans and monoliferans as well as the heterotrophic bacteria of Osedax spp.6,7 We also discuss priorities for future siboglinid research and the need to move beyond descriptive studies. A promising new method, laser-capture microdissection (LCM), allows for the precise excision of tissue regions of interest.8 This method, when used in concert with molecular and genomic techniques, such as Expressed Sequence Tag (EST) surveys using pyrosequencing technology, will likely enable investigations into physiological processes and mechanisms in these symbioses. Furthermore, adopting a comparative approach using different siboglinid groups, such as worms harboring thiotrophic versus methanotrophic endosymbionts, may yield considerable insight into the ecology and evolution of the Siboglinidae. PMID:19704881

  1. Acute vs. chronic pain.

    PubMed

    Auvenshine, R C

    2000-07-01

    The differences between acute and chronic pain are many and varied. They are so different from one another that they must be considered separate entities. The chronic pain patient does not fit the traditional acute illness model as conceptualized by patients and healthcare providers. Because of the complex nature of the pain mechanism as a protective "reflex" and the fact that the pain response gets caught up in emotional expression, pain becomes a learned behavior pattern. When the patient who presents to the dental office suffering from pain is found not to respond to conventional methods of treatment, the dentist should first consider the nature of the pain response and the fact that the patient may not meet all the requirements for the acute illness model. The manner in which the patient describes his or her pain can be a major clue as to the temporal classification of the pain, thus allowing the dentist the advantage of better decision-making. Great discernment on the part of the dental practitioner must be exercised in order to provide the optimum care for the patient. It is important for the dentist to consider the fact that there may be no underlying cause for the pain and it may be necessary to make proper referrals for management of this type of patient. At a more practical and human level, patients want to know if their pain will ever completely go away. Patients are frightened that their pain is attributable to some unrecognized pathology (catastrophic thinking). This drives them to search for the ultimate cure. Going from practitioner to practitioner worsens the confusion as the patient hopes that someone will be able to illuminate the problem. By being able to classify the pain into a recognizable and explainable syndrome, the pain practitioner is often able to offer hope to the patient. Although treatment often does not yield a completely pain-free state, understanding the basis for the pain can provide significant relief through proper management. PMID:11858059

  2. [Ultrasonography in acute pelvic pain].

    PubMed

    Kupesi?, Sanja; Aksamija, Alenka; Vuci?, Niksa; Tripalo, Ana; Kurjak, Asim

    2002-01-01

    Acute pelvic pain may be the manifestation of various gynecologic and non-gynecologic disorders from less alarming rupture of the follicular cyst to life threatening conditions such as rupture of ectopic pregnancy or perforation of inflamed appendix. In order to construct an algorithm for differential diagnosis we divide acute pelvic pain into gynecologic and non-gynecologic etiology, which is than subdivided into gastrointestinal and urinary causes. Appendicitis is the most common surgical emergency and should always be considered in differential diagnosis if appendix has not been removed. Apart of clinical examination and laboratory tests, an ultrasound examination is sensitive up to 90% and specific up to 95% if graded compression technique is used. Still it is user-depended and requires considerable experience in order to perform it reliably. Meckel's diverticulitis, acute terminal ileitis, mesenteric lymphadenitis and functional bowel disease are conditions that should be differentiated from other causes of low abdominal pain by clinical presentation, laboratory and imaging tests. Dilatation of renal pelvis and ureter are typical signs of obstructive uropathy and may be efficiently detected by ultrasound. Additional thinning of renal parenchyma suggests long-term obstructive uropathy. Ruptured ectopic pregnancy, salpingitis and hemorrhagic ovarian cysts are three most commonly diagnosed gynecologic conditions presenting as an acute abdomen. Degenerating leiomyomas and adnexal torsion occur less frequently. For better systematization, gynecologic causes of acute pelvic pain could be divided into conditions with negative pregnancy test and conditions with positive pregnancy test. Pelvic inflammatory disease may be ultrasonically presented with numerous signs such as thickening of the tubal wall, incomplete septa within the dilated tube, demonstration of hyperechoic mural nodules, free fluid in the "cul-de-sac" etc. Color Doppler ultrasound contributes to more accurate diagnosis of this entity since it enables differentiation between acute and chronic stages based on analysis of the vascular resistance. Hemorrhagic ovarian cysts may be presented by variety of ultrasound findings since intracystic echoes depend upon the quality and quantity of the blood clots. Color Doppler investigation demonstrates moderate to low vascular resistance typical of luteal flow. Leiomyomas undergoing degenerative changes are another cause of acute pelvic pain commonly present in patients of reproductive age. Color flow detects regularly separated vessels at the periphery of the leiomyoma, which exhibit moderate vascular resistance. Although the classic symptom of endometriosis is chronic pelvic pain, in some patients acute pelvic pain does occur. Most of these patients demonstrate an endometrioma or "chocolate" cyst containing diffuse carpet-like echoes. Sometimes, solid components may indicate even ovarian malignancy, but if color Doppler ultrasound is applied it is less likely to obtain false positive results. One should be aware that pericystic and/or hillar type of ovarian endometrioma vascularization facilitate correct recognition of this entity. Pelvic congestion syndrome is another condition that can cause an attack of acute pelvic pain. It is usually consequence of dilatation of venous plexuses, arteries or both systems. By switching color Doppler gynecologist can differentiate pelvic congestion syndrome from multilocular cysts, pelvic inflammatory disease or adenomyosis. Ovarian vein thrombosis is a potentially fatal disorder occurring most often in the early postpartal period. Hypercoagulability, infection and stasis are main etiologic factors, and transvaginal color Doppler ultrasound is an excellent diagnostic tool to diagnose it. Acute pelvic pain may occur even in normal intrauterine pregnancy. This may be explained by hormonal changes, rapid growth of the uterus and increased blood flow. Ultrasound is mandatory for distinguishing normal intrauterine pregnancy from threatened or spontaneous abortion, ectop

  3. Quantification and qualification of bacteria trapped in chewed gum.

    PubMed

    Wessel, Stefan W; van der Mei, Henny C; Morando, David; Slomp, Anje M; van de Belt-Gritter, Betsy; Maitra, Amarnath; Busscher, Henk J

    2015-01-01

    Chewing of gum contributes to the maintenance of oral health. Many oral diseases, including caries and periodontal disease, are caused by bacteria. However, it is unknown whether chewing of gum can remove bacteria from the oral cavity. Here, we hypothesize that chewing of gum can trap bacteria and remove them from the oral cavity. To test this hypothesis, we developed two methods to quantify numbers of bacteria trapped in chewed gum. In the first method, known numbers of bacteria were finger-chewed into gum and chewed gums were molded to standard dimensions, sonicated and plated to determine numbers of colony-forming-units incorporated, yielding calibration curves of colony-forming-units retrieved versus finger-chewed in. In a second method, calibration curves were created by finger-chewing known numbers of bacteria into gum and subsequently dissolving the gum in a mixture of chloroform and tris-ethylenediaminetetraacetic-acid (TE)-buffer. The TE-buffer was analyzed using quantitative Polymerase-Chain-Reaction (qPCR), yielding calibration curves of total numbers of bacteria versus finger-chewed in. Next, five volunteers were requested to chew gum up to 10 min after which numbers of colony-forming-units and total numbers of bacteria trapped in chewed gum were determined using the above methods. The qPCR method, involving both dead and live bacteria yielded higher numbers of retrieved bacteria than plating, involving only viable bacteria. Numbers of trapped bacteria were maximal during initial chewing after which a slow decrease over time up to 10 min was observed. Around 10(8) bacteria were detected per gum piece depending on the method and gum considered. The number of species trapped in chewed gum increased with chewing time. Trapped bacteria were clearly visualized in chewed gum using scanning-electron-microscopy. Summarizing, using novel methods to quantify and qualify oral bacteria trapped in chewed gum, the hypothesis is confirmed that chewing of gum can trap and remove bacteria from the oral cavity. PMID:25602256

  4. Quantification and Qualification of Bacteria Trapped in Chewed Gum

    PubMed Central

    Wessel, Stefan W.; van der Mei, Henny C.; Morando, David; Slomp, Anje M.; van de Belt-Gritter, Betsy; Maitra, Amarnath; Busscher, Henk J.

    2015-01-01

    Chewing of gum contributes to the maintenance of oral health. Many oral diseases, including caries and periodontal disease, are caused by bacteria. However, it is unknown whether chewing of gum can remove bacteria from the oral cavity. Here, we hypothesize that chewing of gum can trap bacteria and remove them from the oral cavity. To test this hypothesis, we developed two methods to quantify numbers of bacteria trapped in chewed gum. In the first method, known numbers of bacteria were finger-chewed into gum and chewed gums were molded to standard dimensions, sonicated and plated to determine numbers of colony-forming-units incorporated, yielding calibration curves of colony-forming-units retrieved versus finger-chewed in. In a second method, calibration curves were created by finger-chewing known numbers of bacteria into gum and subsequently dissolving the gum in a mixture of chloroform and tris-ethylenediaminetetraacetic-acid (TE)-buffer. The TE-buffer was analyzed using quantitative Polymerase-Chain-Reaction (qPCR), yielding calibration curves of total numbers of bacteria versus finger-chewed in. Next, five volunteers were requested to chew gum up to 10 min after which numbers of colony-forming-units and total numbers of bacteria trapped in chewed gum were determined using the above methods. The qPCR method, involving both dead and live bacteria yielded higher numbers of retrieved bacteria than plating, involving only viable bacteria. Numbers of trapped bacteria were maximal during initial chewing after which a slow decrease over time up to 10 min was observed. Around 108 bacteria were detected per gum piece depending on the method and gum considered. The number of species trapped in chewed gum increased with chewing time. Trapped bacteria were clearly visualized in chewed gum using scanning-electron-microscopy. Summarizing, using novel methods to quantify and qualify oral bacteria trapped in chewed gum, the hypothesis is confirmed that chewing of gum can trap and remove bacteria from the oral cavity. PMID:25602256

  5. Inhibition of lipopolysaccharide induced acute inflammation in lung by chlorination.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jinshan; Xue, Jinling; Xu, Bi; Xie, Jiani; Qiao, Juan; Lu, Yun

    2016-02-13

    Lipopolysaccharide (LPS, also called endotoxin) is a pro-inflammatory constituent of gram negative bacteria and cyanobacteria, which causes a potential health risk in the process of routine urban application of reclaimed water, such as car wash, irrigation, scenic water refilling, etc. Previous studies indicated that the common disinfection treatment, chlorination, has little effect on endotoxin activity removal measured by Limulus amebocyte lysate (LAL) assay. However, in this study, significant decrease of acute inflammatory effects was observed in mouse lung, while LAL assay still presented a moderate increase of endotoxin activity. To explore the possible mechanisms, the nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) results showed the chlorination happened in alkyl chain of LPS molecules, which could affect the interaction between LPS and LPS-binding protein. Also the size of LPS aggregates was found to drop significantly after treatment, which could be another results of chlorination caused polarity change. In conclusion, our observation demonstrated that chlorination is effective to reduce the LPS induced inflammation in lung, and it is recommended to use health effect-based methods to assess risk removal of water treatment technologies. PMID:26530889

  6. SUBCHRONIC ENDOTOXIN INHALATION CAUSES PERSISTENT AIRWAY DISEASE

    EPA Science Inventory

    ABSTRACT

    The endotoxin component of organic dusts causes acute reversible airflow obstruction and airway inflammation. To test the hypothesis that endotoxin alone causes airway remodeling, we have compared the response of two inbred mouse strains to subchronic endotoxin ...

  7. Biotechnological potential of sponge-associated bacteria.

    PubMed

    Santos-Gandelman, Juliana F; Giambiagi-deMarval, Marcia; Oelemann, Walter M R; Laport, Marinella S

    2014-01-01

    As sessile and filter-feeding metazoans, marine sponges represent an ecologically important and highly diverse component of marine benthic communities throughout the world. It has been suggested that marine sponges are hosts to many microorganisms which can constitute up to 40-60% of its biomass. Recently, sponges have attracted a high interest from scientific community because two important factors. First there is the fact that sponges have a wide range of associated bacteria; and, second, they are a rich source of bioactive substances. Since 1950, a number of bioactive substances with various pharmacological functions have been isolated from marine sponges. However, many of these substances were subsequently shown to be actually synthesized by sponge-associated bacteria. Bacteria associated with marine sponges constitute an interesting source of novel bioactive compounds with biotechnological potential such as antimicrobial substances, enzymes and surfactants. In addition, these bacteria may be biofilm forming and can act as bioindicators in bioremediation processes of environmental pollution caused by oil and heavy metals. This review focuses on the biotechnological applications of these microorganisms. PMID:25022270

  8. Phenytoin-induced acute hypersensitivity pneumonitis

    PubMed Central

    Periwal, Pallavi; Joshi, Sharad; Gothi, Rajesh; Talwar, Deepak

    2015-01-01

    Lungs are target organs for toxic effects of various drugs due to many reasons. Diphenylhydantoin (DPH) is reported to have many extrapulmonary side effects. We are presenting a case of acute hypersensitivity pneumonitis (HP) secondary to DPH, presenting with respiratory failure. Acute HP with respiratory failure is an uncommon drug side effect of the DPH therapy and is a diagnosis of exclusion. It requires detailed workup and exclusion of other causes along with evidence of improvement in the patient's condition after withholding DPH.

  9. [Pregnancy-induced hypertension complicated by acute pancreatitis].

    PubMed

    Bahloul, M; Ayedi, M; Dammak, H; Trabelsi, K; Bouaziz, M

    2004-03-01

    The acute pancreatitis is a rare complication during the pregnancy. Causes are dominated by the gallstones and hyperlipidemia. This case report describes a 35-year-old pregnant woman who developed acute pancreatitis while suffering from a severe pre-eclampsia syndrome. Since she had no gallstones or other known aetiological factors of acute pancreatitis, the possibility of an etiologic role of pancreatic ischaemic changes associated with eclampsia is discussed. Evolution was marked with multi-organ system failure and poor outcome. Our experience and the previously reported case suggest that pre-eclampsia could be added to the list of causes of the acute pancreatitis. PMID:15030867

  10. Acute pancreatitis in children and adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Mitsuyoshi; Sai, Jin Kan; Shimizu, Toshiaki

    2014-01-01

    In this Topic Highlight, the causes, diagnosis, and treatment of acute pancreatitis in children are discussed. Acute pancreatitis should be considered during the differential diagnosis of abdominal pain in children and requires prompt treatment because it may become life-threatening. The etiology, clinical manifestations, and course of acute pancreatitis in children are often different than in adults. Therefore, the specific features of acute pancreatitis in children must be considered. The etiology of acute pancreatitis in children is often drugs, infections, trauma, or anatomic abnormalities. Diagnosis is based on clinical symptoms (such as abdominal pain and vomiting), serum pancreatic enzyme levels, and imaging studies. Several scoring systems have been proposed for the assessment of severity, which is useful for selecting treatments and predicting prognosis. The basic pathogenesis of acute pancreatitis does not greatly differ between adults and children, and the treatments for adults and children are similar. In large part, our understanding of the pathology, optimal treatment, assessment of severity, and outcome of acute pancreatitis in children is taken from the adult literature. However, we often find that the common management of adult pancreatitis is difficult to apply to children. With advances in diagnostic techniques and treatment methods, severe acute pancreatitis in children is becoming better understood and more controllable. PMID:25400985

  11. [Acute respiratory distress syndrome].

    PubMed

    Gaudry, Stéphane; Ricard, Jean-Damien; Dreyfuss, Didier

    2012-11-01

    Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is a permeability pulmonary edema due to lung injury from various causes. In 2012, a new definition, taking into account the degree of hypoxemia and the level of positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP), was published. In addition to progress in the support of organ failures in intensive care, mortality in patients suffering from ARDS has decreased significantly. This improved prognosis is also due to the advent of protective mechanical ventilation that has limited ventilator-induced lung injury (VILI). The treatment of ARDS consists on causative treatment and a strategy of protective ventilation associated with a PEEP level between 10 and 15 cm H20 and the use of prone position or inhaled nitric oxide in the severest cases. The role of extracorporeal membrane oxygenation as adjuvant therapy in ARDS remains unclear. PMID:23272466

  12. Acute kidney injury.

    PubMed

    Connell, Alistair; Laing, Chris

    2015-12-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) - an abrupt deterioration in renal function - causes a rise in serum creatinine (SCr) or fall in urine output. It is common, occurring in up to 20% of hospital admissions. Importantly, even small rises in SCr are associated with increased risk of death and longer hospital stays. A 2009 National Confidential Enquiry into Patient Outcome and Death report found that a proportion of AKI in secondary care was avoidable. In addition, management of established AKI was 'good' less than half the time. In practice, AKI represents a heterogeneous group of conditions, encompassing impairments in both kidney structure and function. Delivering disease-specific treatment early in the course of AKI may improve outcomes. The provision of best-practice care for all will rely on a better understanding of risk, and frameworks of care that can be applied across a diverse patient group. PMID:26621953

  13. Acute otitis externa: an update.

    PubMed

    Schaefer, Paul; Baugh, Reginald F

    2012-12-01

    Acute otitis externa is a common condition involving inflammation of the ear canal. The acute form is caused primarily by bacterial infection, with Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus aureus the most common pathogens. Acute otitis externa presents with the rapid onset of ear canal inflammation, resulting in otalgia, itching, canal edema, canal erythema, and otorrhea, and often occurs following swimming or minor trauma from inappropriate cleaning. Tenderness with movement of the tragus or pinna is a classic finding. Topical antimicrobials or antibiotics such as acetic acid, aminoglycosides, polymyxin B, and quinolones are the treatment of choice in uncomplicated cases. These agents come in preparations with or without topical corticosteroids; the addition of corticosteroids may help resolve symptoms more quickly. However, there is no good evidence that any one antimicrobial or antibiotic preparation is clinically superior to another. The choice of treatment is based on a number of factors, including tympanic membrane status, adverse effect profiles, adherence issues, and cost. Neomycin/polymyxin B/hydrocortisone preparations are a reasonable first-line therapy when the tympanic membrane is intact. Oral antibiotics are reserved for cases in which the infection has spread beyond the ear canal or in patients at risk of a rapidly progressing infection. Chronic otitis externa is often caused by allergies or underlying inflammatory dermatologic conditions, and is treated by addressing the underlying causes. PMID:23198673

  14. Oxygen Sensing Strategies in Mammals and Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Taabazuing, Cornelius Y.; Hangasky, John A.; Knapp, Michael J.

    2014-01-01

    The ability to sense and adapt to changes in pO2 is crucial for basic metabolism in most organisms, leading to elaborate pathways for sensing hypoxia (low pO2). This review focuses on the mechanisms utilized by mammals and bacteria to sense hypoxia. While responses to acute hypoxia in mammalian tissues lead to altered vascular tension, the molecular mechanism of signal transduction is not well understood. In contrast, chronic hypoxia evokes cellular responses that lead to transcriptional changes mediated by the hypoxia inducible factor (HIF), which is directly controlled by post-translational hydroxylation of HIF by the non-heme Fe(II)/?KG-dependent enzymes FIH and PHD2. Research on PHD2 and FIH is focused on developing inhibitors and understanding the links between HIF binding and the O2 reaction in these enzymes. Sulfur speciation is a putative mechanism for acute O2-sensing, with special focus on the role of H2S. This sulfur-centered model is discussed, as are some of the directions for further refinement of this model. In contrast to mammals, bacterial O2-sensing relies on protein cofactors that either bind O2 or oxidatively decompose. The sensing modality for bacterial O2-sensors is either via altered DNA binding affinity of the sensory protein, or else due to the actions of a two-component signaling cascade. Emerging data suggests that proteins containing a hemerythrin-domain, such as FBXL5, may serve to connect iron sensing to O2-sensing in both bacteria and humans. As specific molecular machinery becomes identified, these hypoxia sensing pathways present therapeutic targets for diseases including ischemia, cancer, or bacterial infection. PMID:24468676

  15. Surface layers of bacteria.

    PubMed Central

    Beveridge, T J; Graham, L L

    1991-01-01

    Since bacteria are so small, microscopy has traditionally been used to study them as individual cells. To this end, electron microscopy has been a most powerful tool for studying bacterial surfaces; the viewing of macromolecular arrangements of some surfaces is now possible. This review compares older conventional electron-microscopic methods with new cryotechniques currently available and the results each has produced. Emphasis is not placed on the methodology but, rather, on the importance of the results in terms of our perception of the makeup and function of bacterial surfaces and their interaction with the surrounding environment. Images PMID:1723487

  16. Bacteria in Solitary Confinement

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Even in clonal bacterial cultures, individual bacteria can show substantial stochastic variation, leading to pitfalls in the interpretation of data derived from millions of cells in a culture. In this issue of the Journal of Bacteriology, as part of their study on osmoadaptation in a cyanobacterium, Nanatani et al. describe employing an ingenious microfluidic device that gently cages individual cells (J Bacteriol 197:676–687, 2015, http://dx.doi.org/10.1128/JB.02276-14). The device is a welcome addition to the toolkit available to probe the responses of individual cells to environmental cues. PMID:25488297

  17. Rotating Bacteria Aggregate into Active Crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petroff, A. P.; Wu, X. L.; Libchaber, A.

    2014-12-01

    The dynamics of many microbial ecosystems are determined not only by the response of individual bacteria to their chemical and physical environments but also the dynamics that emerge from interactions between cells. Here we investigate collective dynamics displayed by communities of Thiovulum majus, one of the fastest known bacteria. We observe that when these bacteria swim close to a microscope cover slip, the cells spontaneously aggregate into a visually-striking, two-dimensional hexagonal lattice of rotating cells. Each cell in an aggregate rotates its flagella, exerting a force that pushes the cell into the cover slip and a torque that causes the cell to rotate. As cells rotate against their neighbors, they exert forces and torques on the aggregate that cause the crystal to move and cells to hop to new positions in the lattice. We show how these dynamics arise from hydrodynamic and surface forces between cells. We derive the equations of motion for an aggregate, show that this model reproduces many aspects of the observed dynamics, and discuss the stability of these and similar active crystals. Finally, we discuss the ecological significance of this behavior to understand how the ability to aggregate into these communities may have evolved.

  18. Particles causing lung disease

    SciTech Connect

    Kilburn, K.H.

    1984-04-01

    The lung has a limited number of patterns of reaction to inhaled particles. The disease observed depends upon the location: conducting airways, terminal bronchioles and alveoli, and upon the nature of inflammation induced: acute, subacute or chronic. Many different agents cause narrowing of conducting airways (asthma) and some of these cause permanent distortion or obliteration of airways as well. Terminal bronchioles appear to be particularly susceptible to particles which cause goblet cell metaplasia, mucous plugging and ultimately peribronchiolar fibrosis. Cancer is the last outcome at the bronchial level and appears to depend upon continuous exposure to or retention of an agent in the airway and failure of the affected cells to be exfoliated which may be due to squamous metaplasia. Alveoli are populated by endothelial cells, Type I or pavement epithelial cells and metabolically active cuboidal Type II cells that produce the lungs specific surfactant, dipalmytol lecithin. Disturbances of surfactant lead to edema in distal lung while laryngeal edema due to anaphylaxis or fumes may produce asphyxia. Physical retention of indigestible particles or retention by immune memory responses may provoke hyaline membranes, stimulate alveolar lipoproteinosis and finally fibrosis. This later exuberant deposition of connective tissue has been best studied in the occupational pneumoconioses especially silicosis and asbestosis. In contrast emphysema a catabolic response appears frequently to result from leakage or release of lysosomal proteases into the lung during processing of cigarette smoke particles. 164 references, 1 figure, 2 tables.

  19. Can entropy save bacteria?

    E-print Network

    Suckjoon Jun

    2008-08-29

    This article presents a physical biology approach to understanding organization and segregation of bacterial chromosomes. The author uses a "piston" analogy for bacterial chromosomes in a cell, which leads to a phase diagram for the organization of two athermal chains confined in a closed geometry characterized by two length scales (length and width). When applied to rod-shaped bacteria such as Escherichia coli, this phase diagram predicts that, despite strong confinement, duplicated chromosomes will demix, i.e., there exists a primordial physical driving force for chromosome segregation. The author discusses segregation of duplicating chromosomes using the concentric-shell model, which predicts that newly synthesized DNA will be found in the periphery of the chromosome during replication. In contrast to chromosomes, these results suggest that most plasmids will be randomly distributed inside the cell because of their small sizes. An active partitioning system is therefore required for accurate segregation of low-copy number plasmids. Implications of these results are also sketched, e.g., on the role of proteins, segregation mechanisms for bacteria of diverse shapes, cell cycle of an artificial cell, and evolution.

  20. Sulfur-oxidizing bacteria in environmental technology.

    PubMed

    Pokorna, Dana; Zabranska, Jana

    2015-11-01

    Hydrogen sulfide is widely known as the most undesirable component of biogas that caused not only serious sensoric and toxic problems, but also corrosion of concrete and steel structures. Many agricultural and industrial waste used in biogas production, may contain a large amount of substances that serve as direct precursors to the formation of sulfide sulfur-sources of hydrogen sulfide in the biogas. Biological desulfurization methods are currently promoted to abiotic methods because they are less expensive and do not produce undesirable materials which must be disposed of. The final products of oxidation of sulfides are no longer hazardous. Biological removal of sulfide from a liquid or gaseous phase is based on the activity of sulfur-oxidizing bacteria. They need an oxidizing agent such as an acceptor of electrons released during the oxidation of sulfides-atmospheric oxygen or oxidized forms of nitrogen. Different genera of sulfur-oxidizing bacteria and their technological application are discussed. PMID:25701621

  1. Superparamagnetic iron oxide polyacrylic acid coated ?-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanoparticles do not affect kidney function but cause acute effect on the cardiovascular function in healthy mice

    SciTech Connect

    Iversen, Nina K.; Frische, Sebastian; Thomsen, Karen; Laustsen, Christoffer; Pedersen, Michael; Hansen, Pernille B.L.; Bie, Peter; Fresnais, Jérome; Berret, Jean-Francois; Baatrup, Erik; Interdisciplinary Nanoscience Center, Aarhus University ; Wang, Tobias

    2013-01-15

    This study describes the distribution of intravenously injected polyacrylic acid (PAA) coated ?-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} NPs (10 mg kg{sup ?1}) at the organ, cellular and subcellular levels in healthy BALB/cJ mice and in parallel addresses the effects of NP injection on kidney function, blood pressure and vascular contractility. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) showed accumulation of NPs in the liver within 1 h after intravenous infusion, accommodated by intracellular uptake in endothelial and Kupffer cells with subsequent intracellular uptake in renal cells, particularly the cytoplasm of the proximal tubule, in podocytes and mesangial cells. The renofunctional effects of NPs were evaluated by arterial acid–base status and measurements of glomerular filtration rate (GFR) after instrumentation with chronically indwelling catheters. Arterial pH was 7.46 ± 0.02 and 7.41 ± 0.02 in mice 0.5 h after injections of saline or NP, and did not change over the next 12 h. In addition, the injections of NP did not affect arterial PCO{sub 2} or [HCO{sub 3}{sup ?}] either. Twenty-four and 96 h after NP injections, the GFR averaged 0.35 ± 0.04 and 0.35 ± 0.01 ml min{sup ?1} g{sup ?1}, respectively, values which were statistically comparable with controls (0.29 ± 0.02 and 0.33 ± 0.1 ml{sup –1} min{sup –1} 25 g{sup –1}). Mean arterial blood pressure (MAP) decreased 12–24 h after NP injections (111.1 ± 11.5 vs 123.0 ± 6.1 min{sup ?1}) associated with a decreased contractility of small mesenteric arteries revealed by myography to characterize endothelial function. In conclusion, our study demonstrates that accumulation of superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles does not affect kidney function in healthy mice but temporarily decreases blood pressure. -- Highlights: ? PAA coated ?-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanoparticles were injected intravenously into healthy mice. ? We examine the distribution and physiological effects of nanoparticle accumulation. ? No effects of accumulation in kidney on acid-base status or GFR. ? Acute hypotension associated with decreased contractility of small vessels. ? We demonstrate physiological effects of PAA ?-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} NP for medical purposes.

  2. Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia

    MedlinePLUS

    ... hard for blood to do its work. In acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL), also called acute lymphoblastic leukemia, there are too ... of white blood cells called lymphocytes or lymphoblasts. ALL is the most common type of cancer in ...

  3. Acute tubular necrosis

    MedlinePLUS

    ... MR, Friedewald JJ, Eustace JA, Rabb H. Acute kidney injury. In: Brenner BM, ed. Brenner and Rector's The ... Saunders Elsevier; 2007:chap 29. Molitoris BA. Acute kidney injury. In: Goldman L, Ausiello D, eds. Cecil Medicine . ...

  4. [Management of acute complications in sickle cell disease ].

    PubMed

    Gellen-Dautremer, Justine; Brousse, Valentine; Arlet, Jean-Benoît

    2014-10-01

    Acute complications in sickle cell disease are a major and life-long cause for hospital referral. The most frequent events are painful acute vaso-occlusive crisis involving the limbs and back, and acute chest syndrome. Acute vaso-occlusive crisis is a therapeutic emergency because of the very high level of pain. Acute chest syndrome may be potentially fatal and must be adequately searched for and treated. Sickle cell patients are susceptible to pneumococcal infections notably, but any infection may favour vaso-occlusive crisis. Triggers of sickle cell vase occlusion must be tracked and corrected, if possible. Moderate crisis can be managed at home, but referral is necessary as soon as opiates are needed and/or if acute chest syndrome is suspected. Additional treatments besides opiates include co analgesics, oxygen, hydration, physiotherapy. Blood transfusion may be required but is not systematic. Acute spleen sequestration occurs in young children and requires immediate hospital referral for transfusion. PMID:25510139

  5. Phenotypic switching in bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merrin, Jack

    Living matter is a non-equilibrium system in which many components work in parallel to perpetuate themselves through a fluctuating environment. Physiological states or functionalities revealed by a particular environment are called phenotypes. Transitions between phenotypes may occur either spontaneously or via interaction with the environment. Even in the same environment, genetically identical bacteria can exhibit different phenotypes of a continuous or discrete nature. In this thesis, we pursued three lines of investigation into discrete phenotypic heterogeneity in bacterial populations: the quantitative characterization of the so-called bacterial persistence, a theoretical model of phenotypic switching based on those measurements, and the design of artificial genetic networks which implement this model. Persistence is the phenotype of a subpopulation of bacteria with a reduced sensitivity to antibiotics. We developed a microfluidic apparatus, which allowed us to monitor the growth rates of individual cells while applying repeated cycles of antibiotic treatments. We were able to identify distinct phenotypes (normal and persistent) and characterize the stochastic transitions between them. We also found that phenotypic heterogeneity was present prior to any environmental cue such as antibiotic exposure. Motivated by the experiments with persisters, we formulated a theoretical model describing the dynamic behavior of several discrete phenotypes in a periodically varying environment. This theoretical framework allowed us to quantitatively predict the fitness of dynamic populations and to compare survival strategies according to environmental time-symmetries. These calculations suggested that persistence is a strategy used by bacterial populations to adapt to fluctuating environments. Knowledge of the phenotypic transition rates for persistence may provide statistical information about the typical environments of bacteria. We also describe a design of artificial genetic networks that would implement a more general theoretical model of phenotypic switching. We will use a new cloning strategy in order to systematically assemble a large number of genetic features, such as site-specific recombination components from the R64 plasmid, which invert several coexisting DNA segments. The inversion of these segments would lead to discrete phenotypic transitions inside a living cell. These artificial phenotypic switches can be controlled precisely in experiments and may serve as a benchmark for their natural counterparts.

  6. Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    Cancer.gov

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is a cancer of the blood and bone marrow. An acute leukemia can become worse quickly if it is not treated and can result in death within months. AML is the most common type of acute leukemia in American adults and the average age of a patient with AML is 67.

  7. Acute pancreatitis and its association with diabetes mellitus in children.

    PubMed

    Shenoy, S D; Cody, D; Rickett, A B; Swift, P G F

    2004-12-01

    Acute pancreatitis is more common in childhood than has been appreciated previously. During acute attacks of pancreatitis, hyperglycaemia and glycosuria are not uncommon but permanent diabetes mellitus is rare. Acute pancreatitis can also be associated with diabetic ketoacidosis and the association between these two is of a two-way cause and effect relationship. Early imaging of the pancreas is recommended in children with severe prolonged abdominal pain. PMID:15645701

  8. Acute kidney injury due to decompression illness

    PubMed Central

    Viecelli, Andrea; Jamboti, Jagadish; Waring, Andrew; Banham, Neil; Ferrari, Paolo

    2014-01-01

    Decompression illness is a rare but serious complication of diving caused by intravascular or extravascular gas bubble formation. We report the first case of acute kidney injury in a 27-year-old diver following three rapid ascents. He presented with transient neurological symptoms and abdominal pain followed by rapidly progressive acute kidney injury (creatinine peak 1210 µmol/L) due to arterial air emboli. He received supportive care and 100% oxygen followed by hyperbaric therapy and recovered fully. Arterial air emboli caused by rapid decompression can affect multiple organs including the kidneys. Early transfer to a hyperbaric unit is important as complications may present delayed. PMID:25852912

  9. Chemotherapy Induced Acute Pericarditis in a Child.

    PubMed

    Khan, Muhammad Arif; Rahman, Abdul; Almoukirish, S; Jadoon, Shehla; Momenah, Tarek S

    2015-10-01

    A9 years boy diagnosed with nasopharyngeal carcinoma was started on chemotherapy protocol including 5-fluorouracil. After 90 hours of 5-fluorouracil infusion, he developed severe retrosternal chest pain. Electrocardiography showed signs of acute pericarditis and was managed with ibuprofen and 5-fluorouracil was discontinued. The 5-fluorouracil rarely causes cardiac complications such as angina pectoris and pericarditis in adult patients. We report acute myopericarditis in a child caused by 5-fluorouracil, which is a very rare complication of 5-fluorouracil in pediatric age group. PMID:26522211

  10. Immunology Taught by Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Introduction It has been proposed that the innate immune system might discriminate living and virulent pathogens from dead or harmless microbes, but the molecular mechanisms by which this discrimination could occur remain unclear. Although studies of model antigens and adjuvants have illuminated important principles underlying immune responses, the specific immune responses made to living, virulent pathogens can only be discovered by studies of the living, virulent pathogens themselves. Methods and Findings Here, I review what one particular bacterium, Legionella pneumophila, has taught us about the innate immune response. Pathogens differ greatly in the mechanisms they use to invade, replicate within, and transmit among their hosts. However, a theme that emerges is that the pathogenic activities sensed by host cells are conserved among multiple pathogenic bacteria. Conclusion Thus, immunology taught by L. pneumophila may lead to a more general understanding of the host response to infection. PMID:20373001

  11. Delayed Pneumoperitoneum and Acute Pulmonary Edema Secondary to Acute Gastric Dilatation

    PubMed Central

    Ahn, Jae Yun; Kim, Jong Kun

    2015-01-01

    Pneumoperitoneum caused by acute gastric dilatation (AGD) is a very rare complication. We report a case of pneumoperitoneum and acute pulmonary edema caused by AGD in a patient with Parkinson’s disease. A 78-year-old woman presented with pneumonia and AGD. We inserted a nasogastric tube and administered empirical antibiotics. We performed an endoscopy, and perforation or necrosis of the stomach and pyloric stenosis were not observed. Thirty-six hours after admission, the patient suddenly developed dyspnea and shock, and eventually died. We suspected the cause of death was pneumoperitoneum and acute pulmonary edema caused by AGD during the conservative treatment period. Immunocompromised patients with chronic illness require close observation even if they do not show any symptoms suggestive of complications. Even if the initial endoscopic or abdominal radiologic findings do not show gastric necrosis or perforation, follow-up with endoscopy is essential to recognize complications of AGD early. PMID:26668807

  12. The aerobic activity of metronidazole against anaerobic bacteria.

    PubMed

    Dione, Niokhor; Khelaifia, Saber; Lagier, Jean-Christophe; Raoult, Didier

    2015-05-01

    Recently, the aerobic growth of strictly anaerobic bacteria was demonstrated using antioxidants. Metronidazole is frequently used to treat infections caused by anaerobic bacteria; however, to date its antibacterial activity was only tested in anaerobic conditions. Here we aerobically tested using antioxidants the in vitro activities of metronidazole, gentamicin, doxycycline and imipenem against 10 common anaerobic and aerobic bacteria. In vitro susceptibility testing was performed by the disk diffusion method, and minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) were determined by Etest. Aerobic culture of the bacteria was performed at 37°C using Schaedler agar medium supplemented with 1mg/mL ascorbic acid and 0.1mg/mL glutathione; the pH was adjusted to 7.2 by 10M KOH. Growth of anaerobic bacteria cultured aerobically using antioxidants was inhibited by metronidazole after 72h of incubation at 37°C, with a mean inhibition diameter of 37.76mm and an MIC of 1?g/mL; however, strains remained non-sensitive to gentamicin. No growth inhibition of aerobic bacteria was observed after 24h of incubation at 37°C with metronidazole; however, inhibition was observed with doxycycline and imipenem used as controls. These results indicate that bacterial sensitivity to metronidazole is not related to the oxygen tension but is a result of the sensitivity of the micro-organism. In future, both culture and antibiotic susceptibility testing of strictly anaerobic bacteria will be performed in an aerobic atmosphere using antioxidants in clinical microbiology laboratories. PMID:25813393

  13. High abundance of virulence gene homologues in marine bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Persson, Olof P; Pinhassi, Jarone; Riemann, Lasse; Marklund, Britt-Inger; Rhen, Mikael; Normark, Staffan; González, José M; Hagström, Åke

    2009-01-01

    Marine bacteria can cause harm to single-celled and multicellular eukaryotes. However, relatively little is known about the underlying genetic basis for marine bacterial interactions with higher organisms. We examined whole-genome sequences from a large number of marine bacteria for the prevalence of homologues to virulence genes and pathogenicity islands known from bacteria that are pathogenic to terrestrial animals and plants. As many as 60 out of 119 genomes of marine bacteria, with no known association to infectious disease, harboured genes of virulence-associated types III, IV, V and VI protein secretion systems. Type III secretion was relatively uncommon, while type IV was widespread among alphaproteobacteria (particularly among roseobacters) and type VI was primarily found among gammaproteobacteria. Other examples included homologues of the Yersinia murine toxin and a phage-related ‘antifeeding’ island. Analysis of the Global Ocean Sampling metagenomic data indicated that virulence genes were present in up to 8% of the planktonic bacteria, with highest values in productive waters. From a marine ecology perspective, expression of these widely distributed genes would indicate that some bacteria infect or even consume live cells, that is, generate a previously unrecognized flow of organic matter and nutrients directly from eukaryotes to bacteria. PMID:19207573

  14. Amoeba-resisting bacteria and ventilator-associated pneumonia.

    PubMed

    La Scola, Bernard; Boyadjiev, Ioanna; Greub, Gilbert; Khamis, Atieh; Martin, Claude; Raoult, Didier

    2003-07-01

    To evaluate the role of amoeba-associated bacteria as agents of ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP), we tested the water from an intensive care unit (ICU) every week for 6 months for such bacteria isolates; serum samples and bronchoalveolar lavage samples (BAL) were also obtained from 30 ICU patients. BAL samples were examined for amoeba-associated bacteria DNA by suicide-polymerase chain reaction, and serum samples were tested against ICU amoeba-associated bacteria. A total of 310 amoeba-associated bacteria from 10 species were isolated. Twelve of 30 serum samples seroconverted to one amoeba-associated bacterium isolated in the ICU, mainly Legionella anisa and Bosea massiliensis, the most common isolates from water (p=0.021). Amoeba-associated bacteria DNA was detected in BAL samples from two patients whose samples later seroconverted. Seroconversion was significantly associated with VAP and systemic inflammatory response syndrome, especially in patients for whom no etiologic agent was found by usual microbiologic investigations. Amoeba-associated bacteria might be a cause of VAP in ICUs, especially when microbiologic investigations are negative. PMID:12890321

  15. Differentiating the growth phases of single bacteria using Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strola, S. A.; Marcoux, P. R.; Schultz, E.; Perenon, R.; Simon, A.-C.; Espagnon, I.; Allier, C. P.; Dinten, J.-M.

    2014-03-01

    In this paper we present a longitudinal study of bacteria metabolism performed with a novel Raman spectrometer system. Longitudinal study is possible with our Raman setup since the overall procedure to localize a single bacterium and collect a Raman spectrum lasts only 1 minute. Localization and detection of single bacteria are performed by means of lensfree imaging, whereas Raman signal (from 600 to 3200 cm-1) is collected into a prototype spectrometer that allows high light throughput (HTVS technology, Tornado Spectral System). Accomplishing time-lapse Raman spectrometry during growth of bacteria, we observed variation in the net intensities for some band groups, e.g. amides and proteins. The obtained results on two different bacteria species, i.e. Escherichia coli and Bacillus subtilis clearly indicate that growth affects the Raman chemical signature. We performed a first analysis to check spectral differences and similarities. It allows distinguishing between lag, exponential and stationary growth phases. And the assignment of interest bands to vibration modes of covalent bonds enables the monitoring of metabolic changes in bacteria caused by growth and aging. Following the spectra analysis, a SVM (support vector machine) classification of the different growth phases is presented. In sum this longitudinal study by means of a compact and low-cost Raman setup is a proof of principle for routine analysis of bacteria, in a real-time and non-destructive way. Real-time Raman studies on metabolism and viability of bacteria pave the way for future antibiotic susceptibility testing.

  16. [Acute pancreatitis: an overview of the management].

    PubMed

    Rebours, V

    2014-10-01

    Over the past decades, the incidence and the number of hospital admissions for acute pancreatitis have increased in the Western countries. The two most common etiological factors of acute pancreatitis are gallstones (including small gallstones or microlithiasis) and alcohol abuse. Acute pancreatitis is associated with a significant mortality (4-10%) and 25% in case of pancreatic necrosis, especially. Edematous pancreatitis is benign and oral feeding can be restarted once abdominal pain is decreasing and inflammatory markers are improving. Enteral tube feeding should be the primary therapy in patients with predicted severe acute pancreatitis who require nutritional support. Enteral nutrition in acute pancreatitis can be administered via either the nasojejunal or nasogastric route. In case of necrosis, preventive antibiotics are not recommended. The single indication is infected necrosis confirmed by fine needle aspiration. The incidence trends of acute pancreatitis possibly reflect a change in the prevalence of main etiological factors (e.g. gallstones and alcohol consumption) and cofactors such as tobacco, obesity and genetic susceptibility. Priority is to search for associated causes, especially in cases with atypical symptoms. In case of first acute pancreatitis in patients older than 50 years, the presence of a tumor (benign or malignant) has to be specifically ruled out, using CT-scan, MRI and endoscopic ultrasound. PMID:24837648

  17. Prucalopride-associated acute tubular necrosis

    PubMed Central

    Sivabalasundaram, Vithika; Habal, Flavio; Cherney, David

    2014-01-01

    We report the first case of acute renal failure secondary to prucalopride, a novel agent for the treatment of chronic constipation. The 75 years old male patient was initiated on prucalopride after many failed treatments for constipation following a Whipple’s procedure for pancreatic cancer. Within four months of treatment his creatinine rose from 103 to 285 ?mol/L (eGFR 61 decrease to 19 mL/min per 1.73 m2). He was initially treated with prednisone for presumed acute interstitial nephritis as white blood casts were seen on urine microscopy. When no improvement was detected, a core biopsy was performed and revealed interstitial fibrosis and tubular atrophy. The presence of oxalate and calcium phosphate crystals were also noted. These findings suggest acute tubular necrosis which may have been secondary to acute interstitial nephritis or hemodynamic insult. The use of prednisone may have suppressed signs of inflammation and therefore the clinical diagnosis was deemed acute interstitial nephritis causing acute tubular necrosis. There are no previous reports of prucalopride associated with acute renal failure from the literature, including previous Phase II and III trials. PMID:25133152

  18. Acute cough in the elderly: aetiology, diagnosis and therapy.

    PubMed

    Widdicombe, John; Kamath, Shankar

    2004-01-01

    Although the frequency of physician consultations and the sale of over-the-counter remedies establish the high prevalence of acute cough in the elderly, epidemiological studies have tended to be imprecise. However, respiratory tract infections in nose, larynx and/or bronchi, either viral or bacterial or both, are by far the commonest cause of acute cough. These are especially frequent and hazardous in the elderly, and community living and institutionalisation may aggravate this problem. A variety of viruses and bacteria have been incriminated, with rhinovirus, influenza and respiratory syncytial viruses, and Streptococcus pneumoniae, Haemophilus influenza and Bordetella pertussis being especially important. Viral infections can readily lead to community-acquired pneumonia. Successful diagnosis should point to successful treatment, and in this respect clinical examination and patient history are paramount, supplemented by chest X-ray, viral and bacterial culture and serological testing. Depending on the results of these tests, specific antibacterial therapy may be called for, although there is dispute as to the merits of antibacterial therapy in cases of uncertain diagnosis. Prevention and prophylaxis for influenza and S. pneumoniae infections are now commendably routine in the elderly, especially those in communities. Treatment, as well as the use of antibacterials, may also be directed against the inflammatory and infective processes in the airways. Non-specific antitussive therapy is common and usually highly desirable to prevent the adverse effects of repeated coughing. There have been few advances in antitussive therapy in recent years, opioids and dextromethorphan being the most commonly used agents; they act centrally on the brainstem, but also have a large placebo effect. However they work, they are much appreciated by patients and their partners. Moreover, striking advances in our understanding of the peripheral sensory and central nervous pathways of the cough reflex in recent years should soon lead to a new and more specific choice of agents to inhibit cough. PMID:15012170

  19. Impacts of Gut Bacteria on Human Health and Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yu-Jie; Li, Sha; Gan, Ren-You; Zhou, Tong; Xu, Dong-Ping; Li, Hua-Bin

    2015-01-01

    Gut bacteria are an important component of the microbiota ecosystem in the human gut, which is colonized by 1014 microbes, ten times more than the human cells. Gut bacteria play an important role in human health, such as supplying essential nutrients, synthesizing vitamin K, aiding in the digestion of cellulose, and promoting angiogenesis and enteric nerve function. However, they can also be potentially harmful due to the change of their composition when the gut ecosystem undergoes abnormal changes in the light of the use of antibiotics, illness, stress, aging, bad dietary habits, and lifestyle. Dysbiosis of the gut bacteria communities can cause many chronic diseases, such as inflammatory bowel disease, obesity, cancer, and autism. This review summarizes and discusses the roles and potential mechanisms of gut bacteria in human health and diseases. PMID:25849657

  20. Acute gastroenteritis: from guidelines to real life

    PubMed Central

    Chow, Chung M; Leung, Alexander KC; Hon, Kam L

    2010-01-01

    Acute gastroenteritis is a very common disease. It causes significant mortality in developing countries and significant economic burden to developed countries. Viruses are responsible for approximately 70% of episodes of acute gastroenteritis in children and rotavirus is one of the best studied of these viruses. Oral rehydration therapy is as effective as intravenous therapy in treating mild to moderate dehydration in acute gastroenteritis and is strongly recommended as the first line therapy. However, the oral rehydration solution is described as an underused simple solution. Vomiting is one of the main reasons to explain the underuse of oral rehydration therapy. Antiemetics are not routinely recommended in treating acute gastroenteritis, though they are still commonly prescribed. Ondansetron is one of the best studied antiemetics and its role in enhancing the compliance of oral rehydration therapy and decreasing the rate of hospitalization has been proved recently. The guidelines regarding the recommendation on antiemetics have been changed according to the evidence of these recent studies. PMID:21694853

  1. The pathophysiology of hypertensive acute heart failure.

    PubMed

    Viau, David M; Sala-Mercado, Javier A; Spranger, Marty D; O'Leary, Donal S; Levy, Phillip D

    2015-12-01

    While acute heart failure (AHF) is often regarded as a single disorder, an evolving understanding recognises the existence of multiple phenotypes with varied pathophysiological alterations. Herein we discuss hypertensive AHF and provide insight into a mechanism where acute fluid redistribution is caused by a disturbance in the ventricular-vascular coupling relationship. In this relationship, acute alterations in vascular elasticity, vasoconstriction and reflected pulse waves lead to increases in cardiac work and contribute to decompensated LV function with associated subendocardial ischaemia and end-organ damage. Chronic predisposing factors (neurohormonal activity, nitric oxide insensitivity, arterial stiffening) and physiological stressors (sympathetic surge, volume overload, physical exertion) that are causally linked to acute symptom onset are discussed. Lastly, we review treatment options including both nitrovasodilators and promising novel therapeutics, and discuss future directions in the management of this phenotypic variant. PMID:26123135

  2. Acute Salpingitis in a Nonsexually Active Adolescent.

    PubMed

    Fein, Daniel M; Sellinger, Catherine; Fagan, Michele J

    2015-12-01

    Acute salpingitis is an uncommon cause of an acute surgical abdomen, especially in an adolescent who is not sexually active. The following is a case of a 12-year-old girl who denied sexual activity, had a remote history of an appendectomy, and a recent diagnosis of a large, right-sided ovarian cyst, who presented with acute abdominal pain, urinary symptoms, and fever. The patient was ill-appearing and progressed to uncompensated septic shock in the emergency department despite aggressive fluid resuscitation and empiric antibiotics. She ultimately underwent an exploratory laparotomy and was diagnosed with acute bilateral salpingitis. This case highlights the diagnostic dilemmas facing those caring for an adolescent girl with abdominal pain and presents an extremely rare etiology for abdominal pain in a nonsexually active adolescent. PMID:26626893

  3. A Population-Based Acute Meningitis and Encephalitis Syndromes Surveillance in Guangxi, China, May 2007- June 2012

    PubMed Central

    Chongsuvivatwong, Virasakdi; Wu, Xinghua; Bi, Fuyin; Hadler, Stephen C.; Jiraphongsa, Chuleeporn; Sornsrivichai, Vorasith; Lin, Mei; Quan, Yi

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Acute meningitis and encephalitis (AME) are common diseases with the main pathogens being viruses and bacteria. As specific treatments are different, it is important to develop clinical prediction rules to distinguish aseptic from bacterial or fungal infection. In this study we evaluated the incidence rates, seasonal variety and the main etiologic agents of AME, and identified factors that could be used to predict the etiologic agents. Methods A population-based AME syndrome surveillance system was set up in Guigang City, Guangxi, involving 12 hospitals serving the study communities. All patients meeting the case definition were investigated. Blood and/or cerebrospinal fluid were tested for bacterial pathogens using culture or RT-PCR and serological tests for viruses using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays. Laboratory testing variables were grouped using factor analysis. Multinomial logistic regression was used to predict the etiology of AME. Results From May 2007 to June 2012, the annual incidence rate of AME syndrome, and disease specifically caused by Japanese encephalitis (JE), other viruses, bacteria and fungi were 12.55, 0.58, 4.57, 0.45 and 0.14 per 100,000 population, respectively. The top three identified viral etiologic agents were enterovirus, mumps virus, and JE virus, and for bacteria/fungi were Streptococcus sp., Cryptococcus neoformans and Staphylococcus sp. The incidence of JE and other viruses affected younger populations and peaked from April to August. Alteration of consciousness and leukocytosis were more likely to be caused by JE, bacteria and fungi whereas CSF inflammation was associated with bacterial/fungal infection. Conclusions With limited predictive validity of symptoms and signs and routine laboratory tests, specific tests for JE virus, mumps virus and enteroviruses are required to evaluate the immunization impact and plan for further intervention. CSF bacterial culture cannot be omitted in guiding clinical decisions regarding patient treatment. PMID:26633824

  4. [Acute Mitral Regurgitation in Infant].

    PubMed

    Hirata, Yasutaka

    2015-07-01

    The acute mitral regurgitation of the infants are believed to be very rare until recently. However, there have been increasing number of reports of acute massive mitral regurgitation attributable to rupture of the chordae tendaniae escecially in Japan. If undiagnosed or the optimal treatment including surgery is delayed, it may cause cardiogenic shock and death in infants. Thus pediatricians, pediatric cardiologists and pediatric caridiac surgeons should consider this diagnosis when previously healthy infant suddenly develop cardiorespiratory collapse. It is very important to diagnose early and if there is over moderate mitral regurgitation, the 1st choice will be the mitral valve repair if possible. Pediatric cardiac suregon should be skilled at the mitral valve repair and mitral valve replacement. There are several techniques which are different from the adult operation, so pediatric cardiac surgeon also has to be prepared for these techniques including supraannular mitral valve replacement. PMID:26197907

  5. Biomarkers in Acute Lung Injury

    PubMed Central

    Bhargava, Maneesh; Wendt, Chris

    2015-01-01

    Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome (ARDS) and Acute Lung Injury (ALI) result in high permeability pulmonary edema causing hypoxic respiratory failure with high morbidity and mortality. As the population ages, the incidence of ALI is expected to rise. Over the last decade, several studies have identified biomarkers in plasma and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid providing important insights into the mechanisms involved in the pathophysiology of ALI. Several biomarkers have been validated in subjects from the large, multicenter ARDS clinical trials network. Despite these studies, no single or group of biomarkers has made it into routine clinical practice. New high throughput ‘omics’ techniques promise improved understanding of the biologic processes in the pathogenesis in ALI and possibly new biomarkers that predict disease and outcomes. In this article we review the current knowledge on biomarkers in ALI. PMID:22424425

  6. Decitabine in Treating Children With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia or Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-22

    Childhood Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Childhood Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (M3); Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  7. Prevention of contrast-induced acute kidney injury.

    PubMed

    Malik, Abid

    2015-12-01

    The number of interventional and diagnostic contrast procedures has increased year on year and contrast-induced acute kidney injury has become a leading cause of inpatient mortality and morbidity. This article summarizes how to identify the high-risk patient and gives a systematic approach to prevent contrast-induced acute kidney injury. PMID:26646329

  8. Microbes in Molecular Biology I. BACTERIA

    E-print Network

    Dever, Jennifer A.

    Acid) Agar selective for Gram-positive bacteria growing bacteria under condi@ons where only4/29/15 1 Microbes in Molecular Biology I. BACTERIA A. Intro B. Pla viruses I. BACTERIA A. introduc@on/overview #12;4/29/15 2 · Bacteria can be grown

  9. Predictors of acute kidney injury associated with intravenous colistin treatment.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Jeong-Ah; Lee, Jung Eun; Huh, Wooseong; Peck, Kyong Ran; Kim, Yoon-Goo; Kim, Dae Joong; Oh, Ha Young

    2010-05-01

    Colistimethate sodium (CMS) was recently re-introduced into clinical practice as a last resort for the treatment of nosocomial infections caused by multiresistant bacteria. This retrospective cohort study was designed to identify predictors of acute kidney injury (AKI) associated with intravenous (i.v.) CMS treatment. From March 2007 to July 2008, 71 adult patients receiving CMS for > or = 72h were enrolled. AKI was defined using Risk, Injury, Failure, Loss and End-stage kidney disease (RIFLE) criteria according to serum creatinine. The median total dose of CMS was 54.3mg/kg (range 27.5-94.5mg/kg). AKI developed in 38 patients (53.5%). Cox regression analysis based of cumulative CMS dose (mg/kg) identified four independent predictors of AKI: male sex [hazard ratio (HR)=3.55, 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.47-8.55]; concomitant use of a calcineurin inhibitor (HR=6.74, 95% CI 2.49-18.24); hypoalbuminaemia (serum albumin level <2.0g/dL) (HR=6.29, 95% CI 2.04-19.39); and hyperbilirubinaemia (total bilirubin level >5mg/dL) (HR=3.53, 95% CI 1.17-10.71). In conclusion, AKI was a common complication of i.v. CMS treatment. Male sex, concomitant use of calcineurin inhibitors, hypoalbuminaemia and hyperbilirubinaemia were independent predictors of AKI. The effect of AKI on patient outcomes was not determined. PMID:20089383

  10. Bacteria-Targeting Nanoparticles for Managing Infections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radovic-Moreno, Aleksandar Filip

    Bacterial infections continue to be a significant concern particularly in healthcare settings and in the developing world. Current challenges include the increasing spread of drug resistant (DR) organisms, the side effects of antibiotic therapy, the negative consequences of clearing the commensal bacterial flora, and difficulties in developing prophylactic vaccines. This thesis was an investigation of the potential of a class of polymeric nanoparticles (NP) to contribute to the management of bacterial infections. More specifically, steps were taken towards using these NPs (1) to achieve greater spatiotemporal control over drug therapy by more targeted antibiotic delivery to bacteria, and (2) to develop a prophylactic vaccine formulation against the common bacterial sexually transmitted disease (STD) caused by Chlamydia trachomatis. In the first part, we synthesized polymeric NPs containing poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid)-block-poly(L-histidine)-block-poly(ethylene glycol) (PLGA-PLH-PEG). We show that these NPs are able to bind to bacteria under model acidic infection conditions and are able to encapsulate and deliver vancomycin to inhibit the growth of Staphylococcus aureus bacteria in vitro. Further work showed that the PLGA-PLH-PEG-based NPs demonstrated the potential for competition for binding bacteria at a site of infection from soluble protein and model phagocytic and tissue-resident cells in a NP composition dependent manner. The NPs demonstrated low toxicity in vitro, were well tolerated by mice in vivo, and circulated in the blood on timescales comparable to control PLGA-PEG NPs. In the second part, we used PLGA-PLH-PEG-based NPs to design a prophylactic vaccine against the obligate intracellular bacterium Chlamydia trachomatis, the most common cause of bacterial STD in the world. Currently, no vaccines against this pathogen are approved for use in humans. We first formulated NPs encapsulating the TLR7 agonist R848 conjugated to poly(lactic acid) (R848-PLA) in PLGA-PLH-PEG-based NPs, then incubated these R848-NPs with UV-inactivated C. trachomatis bacteria in acidity, forming a construct. Mice immunized with this vaccine via genital or intranasal routes demonstrated protection from genital infection post immunization in a primarily CD4+ T cell-dependent manner. These results may suggest avenues for future work in designing and developing more targeted drug therapies or vaccine formulations for managing bacterial infections using polymeric nanoparticles. (Copies available exclusively from MIT Libraries, libraries.mit.edu/docs - docs mit.edu)

  11. Enumeration of indicator bacteria exposed to chlorine.

    PubMed

    McFeters, G A; Camper, A K

    1983-01-01

    Stress resulting from a variety of chemical and physical environments has been recognized in indicator bacteria. A review by Busta (1976) summarizes the extensive work that has been carried out to describe indicator microorganisms sublethally impaired due to a variety of causes associated with foods. Workers in the area of water microbiology are also gaining an appreciation of the importance of these stressed cells in the assessment of water quality using bacterial indicators. Chemical agents, including chlorine, that are employed in water disinfection processes are important causes of bacterial stress injury. As a result, a significant portion of the total population of indicator bacteria in water might not be enumerated (using the selective procedures that are currently employed) and inaccurate water quality determinations could result. Alternative water disinfection agents that are being suggested, such as ozone, chlorine dioxide, and ultraviolet irradiation, will also probably lead to the same result. In addition, heat from thermal pollution and interactions with other microorganisms or chemicals (including disinfectants and metals) also exert stress that could further debilitate indicator bacteria in various waters and effluents. A need for improved enumeration procedures has accompanied the recognition of injured indicator bacteria in chlorinated waters and wastewaters. This movement has also stimulated interest in the underlying mechanism of cellular damage that is responsible for the submaximal recovery of coliforms from disinfected waters. Various groups have reported that a number of biochemical, genetic, and physiological processes are impaired by chlorine exposure under differing conditions. Evidence from our laboratory and elsewhere implicates functions associated with the cell envelope, i.e., the uptake of extracellular organic substrates, as the primary cellular target of chlorine under conditions that are similar to those in the field. Additional data from our group indicate that sublethal damage from chlorine can be reversed under suitable nonselective conditions. Recent efforts have led to the development of new methods to enumerate injured fecal streptococcus, total and fecal coliform bacteria from chlorinated waters and wastewater. These procedures each yield data that are comparable with that obtained using the more cumbersome MPN method. As a result, the best characteristics of both methods may now be found in three relatively simple MF procedures. Some of these advances have been described in a new section (#921) of the fifteenth edition of "Standard Methods for the Examination of Water and Wastewater" entitled "Stressed Organisms" (APHA, 1981). However, it is anticipated that new and better water quality assessment methodologies will emerge from the growing literature concerning the physiological and biochemical behavior of indicator microorganisms in water and wastewater.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 400 WORDS) PMID:6650262

  12. Isolation and characterization of pigmented algicidal bacteria from seawater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaima, A.; Gires, U.; Asmat, A.

    2014-09-01

    Some dinoflagellate species are toxic and widely distributed in Malaysian marines ecosystems. They can cause many problems to aquatic life due to the production of various potential and natural toxins that accumulate in filter feeding shellfish and cause food poisoning to human. In recent decades, bacteria have been widely used as a biological control against these harmful algae. In the present study, pigmented bacteria isolated from marine water of Port Dickson beach was studied for their anti-algal activity towards toxic dinoflagellate Alexandrium minutum. Four isolates were studied and only one was capable of inhibiting algal growth when treated with bacterial culture. The algilytic effect on dinoflagellate was evaluated based on direct cell count under the microscope. Results showed that only isolate Sdpd-310 with orange colour has an inhibitory effect on A. minutum growth. This study demonstrated the rapid algicidal activity of a marine pigmented bacteria against the toxic dinoflagellate A. minutum.

  13. Hydrogen Sulfide in Drinking Water: Causes and Treatment Alternatives 

    E-print Network

    McFarland, Mark L.; Provin, Tony

    1999-06-15

    and the plumbing system. Chlorine, if used in sufficient concentration and with adequate contact time, is an excellent disinfectant that kills most disease-causing bacteria, viruses and cysts of protozoans. It also kills nonpathogenic iron, manga- nese and sulfur...

  14. [Acute Sensory Neuropathies and Acute Autonomic Neuropathies].

    PubMed

    Koike, Haruki

    2015-11-01

    From the perspective of neuropathies with an acute onset mimicking that of Guillain-Barr? syndrome (GBS), cases with profound sensory and/or autonomic impairment without any significant weakness have been reported. Although the possibility of infectious or toxic etiologies should be carefully excluded, immune mechanisms similar to those in GBS are suggested to be involved in these so-called acute sensory neuropathies and acute autonomic neuropathies. The types of neuropathy include those with predominant sensory manifestations, predominant autonomic manifestations such as autoimmune autonomic ganglionopathy, and both sensory and autonomic manifestations such as acute autonomic and sensory neuropathy. Neuronopathy in the sensory and/or autonomic ganglia (i.e., ganglionopathy) has been commonly suggested in patients with these types of neuropathies. The presence of Anti-GD1b antibodies has been reported in some of the patients with acute sensory neuropathy with deep sensory impairment, whereas anti-ganglionic acetylcholine receptor antibodies are reported to be present in half of the patients with autoimmune autonomic ganglionopathy. The discovery of anti-ganglionic acetylcholine receptor antibodies significantly expanded the spectrum of autoimmune autonomic ganglionopathy. This is because some of the patients with chronic progression mimicking neurodegenerative diseases such as pure autonomic failure were positive for these antibodies. In contrast, pathologically significant autoantibodies have not been identified in acute autonomic and sensory neuropathy. Further studies are needed to clarify the pathogenesis and the spectrum of these types of neuropathies. PMID:26560953

  15. Magnetic Microstructure of Magnetotactic Bacteria by

    E-print Network

    Dunin-Borkowski, Rafal E.

    Magnetic Microstructure of Magnetotactic Bacteria by Electron Holography Rafal E. Dunin microstructure of magnetite nanocrys- tals in magnetotactic bacteria. The magnetite crystals were all single). For example, magnetotactic bacteria contain magnetosomes, which are intracellular, ferri- magnetic crystals

  16. Role of the macrophage in acute kidney injury 

    E-print Network

    Ferenbach, David Arthur

    2010-01-01

    Ischaemia/Reperfusion Injury (IRI) is the most common cause of acute kidney injury- a devastating clinical problem lacking any specific treatments to promote renal recovery. Macrophages (M?) are pleiotropic cells of ...

  17. Interactions between Diatoms and Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Amin, Shady A.; Parker, Micaela S.

    2012-01-01

    Summary: Diatoms and bacteria have cooccurred in common habitats for hundreds of millions of years, thus fostering specific associations and interactions with global biogeochemical consequences. Diatoms are responsible for one-fifth of the photosynthesis on Earth, while bacteria remineralize a large portion of this fixed carbon in the oceans. Through their coexistence, diatoms and bacteria cycle nutrients between oxidized and reduced states, impacting bioavailability and ultimately feeding higher trophic levels. Here we present an overview of how diatoms and bacteria interact and the implications of these interactions. We emphasize that heterotrophic bacteria in the oceans that are consistently associated with diatoms are confined to two phyla. These consistent bacterial associations result from encounter mechanisms that occur within a microscale environment surrounding a diatom cell. We review signaling mechanisms that occur in this microenvironment to pave the way for specific interactions. Finally, we discuss known interactions between diatoms and bacteria and exciting new directions and research opportunities in this field. Throughout the review, we emphasize new technological advances that will help in the discovery of new interactions. Deciphering the languages of diatoms and bacteria and how they interact will inform our understanding of the role these organisms have in shaping the ocean and how these interactions may change in future oceans. PMID:22933565

  18. Particles causing lung disease.

    PubMed Central

    Kilburn, K H

    1984-01-01

    The lung has a limited number of patterns of reaction to inhaled particles. The disease observed depends upon the location: conducting airways, terminal bronchioles and alveoli, and upon the nature of inflammation induced: acute, subacute or chronic. Many different agents cause narrowing of conducting airways (asthma) and some of these cause permanent distortion or obliteration of airways as well. Terminal bronchioles appear to be particularly susceptible to particles which cause goblet cell metaplasia, mucous plugging and ultimately peribronchiolar fibrosis. Cancer is the last outcome at the bronchial level and appears to depend upon continuous exposure to or retention of an agent in the airway and failure of the affected cells to be exfoliated which may be due to squamous metaplasia. Alveoli are populated by endothelial cells, Type I or pavement epithelial cells and metabolically active cuboidal Type II cells that produce the lungs specific surfactant, dipalmytol lecithin. Disturbances of surfactant lead to edema in distal lung while laryngeal edema due to anaphylaxis or fumes may produce asphyxia. Physical retention of indigestible particles or retention by immune memory responses may provoke hyaline membranes, stimulate alveolar lipoproteinosis and finally fibrosis. This later exuberant deposition of connective tissue has been best studied in the occupational pneumoconioses especially silicosis and asbestosis. In contrast emphysema a catabolic response, appears frequently to result from leakage or release of lysosomal proteases into the lung during processing of cigarette smoke particles. The insidious and probably most important human lung disease due to particles is bronchiolar obstruction and obliteration, producing progressive impairment of air flow. The responsible particle is the complex combination of poorly digestive lipids and complex carbohydrates with active chemicals which we call cigarette smoke. More research is needed to perfect, correct and quantify our preliminary picture of the pathogenesis of lung disease by particles, but a useful start has been made. Images FIGURE 1. PMID:6376114

  19. Toxicity Evaluation of Pig Slurry Using Luminescent Bacteria and Zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Wenyan; Cai, Qiang; Zhao, Yuan; Zheng, Guojuan; Liang, Yuting

    2014-01-01

    Biogas slurry has become a serious pollution problem and anaerobic digestion is widely applied to pig manure treatment for environmental protection and energy recovery. To evaluate environmental risk of the emission of biogas slurry, luminescent bacteria (Vibrio fischeri), larvae and embryos of zebrafish (Danio rerio) were used to detect the acute and development toxicity of digested and post-treated slurry. Then the ability of treatment process was evaluated. The results showed that digested slurry displayed strong toxicity to both zebrafish and luminescent bacteria, while the EC50 for luminescent bacteria and the LC50 for larvae were only 6.81% (v/v) and 1.95% (v/v) respectively, and embryonic development was inhibited at just 1% (v/v). Slurry still maintained a high level of toxicity although it had been treated by membrane bioreactor (MBR), while the LC50 of larvae was 75.23% (v/v) and there was a little effect on the development of embryos and V. fischeri; the results also revealed that the zebrafish larvae are more sensitive than embryos and luminescent bacteria to pig slurry. Finally, we also found the toxicity removal rate was higher than 90% after the treatment of MBR according to toxicity tests. In conclusion, further treatment should be used in pig slurry disposal or reused of final effluent. PMID:24995598

  20. Magnetotactic Bacteria from Extreme Environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bazylinski, Dennis A.; Lefère, Christopher T.

    2013-03-01

    Magnetotactic bacteria (MTB) represent a diverse collection of motile prokaryotes that biomineralize intracellular, membrane-bounded, tens-of-nanometer-sized crystals of a magnetic mineral called magnetosomes. Magnetosome minerals consist of either magnetite (Fe3O4) or greigite (Fe3S4) and cause cells to align along the Earth's geomagnetic field lines as they swim, a trait called magnetotaxis. MTB are known to mainly inhabit the oxic-anoxic interface (OAI) in water columns or sediments of aquatic habitats and it is currently thought that magnetosomes function as a means of making chemotaxis more efficient in locating and maintaining an optimal position for growth and survival at the OAI. Known cultured and uncultured MTB are phylogenetically associated with the Alpha-, Gamma- and Deltaproteobacteria classes of the phylum Proteobacteria, the Nitrospirae phylum and the candidate division OP3, part of the Planctomycetes-Verrucomicrobia-Chlamydiae (PVC) bacterial superphylum. MTB are generally thought to be ubiquitous in aquatic environments as they are cosmopolitan in distribution and have been found in every continent although for years MTB were thought to be restricted to habitats with pH values near neutral and at ambient temperature. Recently, however, moderate thermophilic and alkaliphilic MTB have been described including: an uncultured, moderately thermophilic magnetotactic bacterium present in hot springs in northern Nevada with a probable upper growth limit of about 63 °C; and several strains of obligately alkaliphilic MTB isolated in pure culture from different aquatic habitats in California, including the hypersaline, extremely alkaline Mono Lake, with an optimal growth pH of >9.0.

  1. Magnetotactic Bacteria from Extreme Environments

    PubMed Central

    Bazylinski, Dennis A.; Lefèvre, Christopher T.

    2013-01-01

    Magnetotactic bacteria (MTB) represent a diverse collection of motile prokaryotes that biomineralize intracellular, membrane-bounded, tens-of-nanometer-sized crystals of a magnetic mineral called magnetosomes. Magnetosome minerals consist of either magnetite (Fe3O4) or greigite (Fe3S4) and cause cells to align along the Earth’s geomagnetic field lines as they swim, a trait called magnetotaxis. MTB are known to mainly inhabit the oxic–anoxic interface (OAI) in water columns or sediments of aquatic habitats and it is currently thought that magnetosomes function as a means of making chemotaxis more efficient in locating and maintaining an optimal position for growth and survival at the OAI. Known cultured and uncultured MTB are phylogenetically associated with the Alpha-, Gamma- and Deltaproteobacteria classes of the phylum Proteobacteria, the Nitrospirae phylum and the candidate division OP3, part of the Planctomycetes-Verrucomicrobia-Chlamydiae (PVC) bacterial superphylum. MTB are generally thought to be ubiquitous in aquatic environments as they are cosmopolitan in distribution and have been found in every continent although for years MTB were thought to be restricted to habitats with pH values near neutral and at ambient temperature. Recently, however, moderate thermophilic and alkaliphilic MTB have been described including: an uncultured, moderately thermophilic magnetotactic bacterium present in hot springs in northern Nevada with a probable upper growth limit of about 63 °C; and several strains of obligately alkaliphilic MTB isolated in pure culture from different aquatic habitats in California, including the hypersaline, extremely alkaline Mono Lake, with an optimal growth pH of >9.0. PMID:25369742

  2. TSSWCB Bacteria-Related Projects 

    E-print Network

    Wythe, Kathy

    2007-01-01

    stream_source_info TSSWCB bacteria-related projects.pdf.txt stream_content_type text/plain stream_size 2550 Content-Encoding ISO-8859-1 stream_name TSSWCB bacteria-related projects.pdf.txt Content-Type text/plain; charset=ISO-8859... of the projects are listed below. ? Peach CreekWater Quality Improvement Project ? Monitoring and Educational Programs Focused on Bacteria and Nutrient Runoff on Dairy Operations in the LeonWatershed ? Development of the Plum CreekWPP ? Impact of Proper...

  3. [Acute kidney injury in children].

    PubMed

    Amira-Peco-Anti?; Paripovi?, Dusan

    2014-01-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is a clinical condition considered to be the consequence of a sudden decrease (> 25%) or discontinuation of renal function. The term AKI is used instead of the previous term acute renal failure, because it has been demonstrated that even minor renal lesions may cause far-reaching consequences on human health. Contemporary classifications of AKI (RIFLE and AKIN) are based on the change of serum creatinine and urinary output. In the developed countries, AKI is most often caused by renal ischemia, nephrotoxins and sepsis, rather than a (primary) diffuse renal disease, such as glomerulonephritis, interstitial nephritis, renovascular disorder and thrombotic microangiopathy. The main risk factors for hospital AKI are mechanical ventilation, use of vasoactive drugs, stem cell transplantation and diuretic-resistant hypervolemia. Prerenal and parenchymal AKI (previously known as acute tubular necrosis) jointly account for 2/3 of all AKI causes. Diuresis and serum creatinine concentration are not early diagnostic markers of AKI. Potential early biomarkers of AKI are neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin (NGAL), cystatin C, kidney injury molecule-1 (KIM-1), interleukins 6, 8 and 18, and liver-type fatty acid-binding protein (L-FABP). Early detection of kidney impairment, before the increase of serum creatinine, is important for timely initiated therapy and recovery. The goal of AKI treatment is to normalize the fluid and electrolyte status, as well as the correction of acidosis and blood pressure. Since a severe fluid overload resistant to diuretics and inotropic agents is associated with a poor outcome, the initiation of dialysis should not be delayed. The mortality rate of AKI is highest in critically ill children with multiple organ failure and hemodynamically unstable patients. PMID:25033598

  4. COMPOSITE SAMPLING FOR DETECTION OF COLIFORM BACTERIA IN WATER SUPPLY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Low densities of coliform bacteria introduced into distribution systems may survive in protected habitats. These organisms may interfere with and cause confusion in the use of the coliforms as indicators of sewage contamination of drinking water. Methods of increasing the probabi...

  5. Antibacterial activity of plant extracts on foodborne bacterial pathogens and food spoilage bacteria

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Bacterial foodborne diseases are caused by consumption of foods contaminated with bacteria and/or their toxins. In this study, we evaluated antibacterial properties of twelve different extracts including turmeric, lemon and different kinds of teas against four major pathogenic foodborne bacteria inc...

  6. EXPERIMENTAL CHLORATE PRODUCT TREATMENT TO REDUCE FOOD BORNE PATHOGENIC BACTERIA IN RUMINANT AND MONOGASTRIC FOOD ANIMALS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Pathogenic bacteria that cause human food borne illness can live within the gastrointestinal tract of food animals. Many of these bacteria do not affect animal production, but do pose a threat to consumers via meat and dairy products. Over 76 million cases of food borne illness occur each year in ...

  7. Acute myocardial involvement after heroin inhalation.

    PubMed

    Karoli, Ritu; Fatima, J; Singh, Pushker; Kazmi, Khursheed I

    2012-07-01

    Amongst the illicit drugs cocaine, amphetamines and cannabis have been studied and documented well to cause myocardial infarction by different mechanisms but there is very sparse data available on myocardial involvement after heroin abuse. We report a young man who developed acute myocardial injury after heroin inhalation and alcohol binge drinking. Heroin induced cardio toxic effect and vasospasm compounded by alcohol were suspected to be the cause of this. PMID:23129970

  8. Survival after left ventricular free wall rupture due to acute myocardial infarction

    PubMed Central

    Hosseinzadeh-Maleki, Mahmood; Valizadeh, Niloufar; Rafatpanah, Niloofar; Moezi, Seyed Ali

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND Left ventricular free wall rupture is a frequent catastrophic complication of acute myocardial infarction (AMI) and occurs in 1-3% of patients with acute myocardial infarction; it is the third most common cause of death caused by acute myocardial infarction, too. CASE REPORT We describe acute left ventricular free wall rupture due to acute myocardial infarction in a 60-year-old man. He was survived after urgent surgical intervention. CONCLUSION The long-term survivors of free wall rupture repair have not been extensively reported; early diagnosis is very critical and immediate surgical repair is the treatment of choice. PMID:26715937

  9. Antibiotic resistance in food lactic acid bacteria--a review.

    PubMed

    Mathur, Shalini; Singh, Rameshwar

    2005-12-15

    Antibiotics are a major tool utilized by the health care industry to fight bacterial infections; however, bacteria are highly adaptable creatures and are capable of developing resistance to antibiotics. Consequently, decades of antibiotic use, or rather misuse, have resulted in bacterial resistance to many modern antibiotics. This antibiotic resistance can cause significant danger and suffering for many people with common bacterial infections, those once easily treated with antibiotics. For several decades studies on selection and dissemination of antibiotic resistance have focused mainly on clinically relevant species. However, recently many investigators have speculated that commensal bacteria including lactic acid bacteria (LAB) may act as reservoirs of antibiotic resistance genes similar to those found in human pathogens. The main threat associated with these bacteria is that they can transfer resistance genes to pathogenic bacteria. Genes conferring resistance to tetracycline, erythromycin and vancomycin have been detected and characterized in Lactococcus lactis, Enterococci and, recently, in Lactobacillus species isolated from fermented meat and milk products. A number of initiatives have been recently launched by various organizations across the globe to address the biosafety concerns of starter cultures and probiotic microorganisms. The studies can lead to better understanding of the role played by the dairy starter microorganisms in horizontal transfer of antibiotic resistance genes to intestinal microorganisms and food-associated pathogenic bacteria. PMID:16289406

  10. Acute upper gastrointestinal bleeding (UGIB) - initial evaluation and management.

    PubMed

    Khamaysi, Iyad; Gralnek, Ian M

    2013-10-01

    Acute upper gastrointestinal bleeding (UGIB) is the most common reason that the 'on-call' gastroenterologist is consulted. Despite the diagnostic and therapeutic capabilities of upper endoscopy, there is still significant associated morbidity and mortality in patients experiencing acute UGIB, thus this is a true GI emergency. Acute UGIB is divided into non-variceal and variceal causes. The most common type of acute UGIB is 'non-variceal' and includes diagnoses such as peptic ulcer (gastric and duodenal), gastroduodenal erosions, Mallory-Weiss tears, erosive oesophagitis, arterio-venous malformations, Dieulafoy's lesion, and upper GI tract tumours and malignancies. This article focuses exclusively on initial management strategies for acute upper GI bleeding. We discuss up to date and evidence-based strategies for patient risk stratification, initial patient management prior to endoscopy, potential causes of UGIB, role of proton pump inhibitors, prokinetic agents, prophylactic antibiotics, vasoactive pharmacotherapies, and timing of endoscopy. PMID:24160923

  11. Microbiology of acute mastoiditis and complicated or refractory acute otitis media among hospitalized children in the postvaccination era.

    PubMed

    Giannakopoulos, Polyvios; Chrysovergis, Aristeidis; Xirogianni, Athanasia; Nikolopoulos, Thomas P; Radiotis, Alexandros; Lebessi, Evangelia; Tsakanikos, Michail; Tzanakaki, Georgina; Tsolia, Maria N

    2014-01-01

    In the post-heptavalent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine era, Streptococcus pneumoniae remains the leading cause of acute mastoiditis and other complicated or refractory acute otitis media among hospitalized children in our settings. Serotype 19A is predominant, invasive and multidrug resistant causing more than half of all mastoiditis cases, two-thirds of cases with subperiosteal abscess and all those requiring mastoidectomy. Continuous surveillance is required. PMID:23897291

  12. Clinical microbiology of coryneform bacteria.

    PubMed Central

    Funke, G; von Graevenitz, A; Clarridge, J E; Bernard, K A

    1997-01-01

    Coryneform bacteria are aerobically growing, asporogenous, non-partially-acid-fast, gram-positive rods of irregular morphology. Within the last few years, there has been a massive increase in the number of publications related to all aspects of their clinical microbiology. Clinical microbiologists are often confronted with making identifications within this heterogeneous group as well as with considerations of the clinical significance of such isolates. This review provides comprehensive information on the identification of coryneform bacteria and outlines recent changes in taxonomy. The following genera are covered: Corynebacterium, Turicella, Arthrobacter, Brevibacterium, Dermabacter. Propionibacterium, Rothia, Exiguobacterium, Oerskovia, Cellulomonas, Sanguibacter, Microbacterium, Aureobacterium, "Corynebacterium aquaticum," Arcanobacterium, and Actinomyces. Case reports claiming disease associations of coryneform bacteria are critically reviewed. Minimal microbiological requirements for publications on disease associations of coryneform bacteria are proposed. PMID:8993861

  13. Geobiology of marine magnetotactic bacteria

    E-print Network

    Simmons, Sheri Lynn

    2006-01-01

    Magnetotactic bacteria (MTB) biomineralize intracellular membrane-bound crystals of magnetite (Fe3O4) or greigite (Fe3S4), and are abundant in the suboxic to anoxic zones of stratified marine environments worldwide. Their ...

  14. Environmental sources of fecal bacteria

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Byappanahalli, Muruleedhara N.; Ishii, Satoshi

    2011-01-01

    This chapter provides a review of the research on environmental occurrences of faecal indicator bacteria in a variety of terrestrial and aquatic habitats under different geographic and climatic conditions, and discusses how these external sources may affect surface water quality.

  15. Comparative virulence of porcine Haemophilus bacteria.

    PubMed Central

    Rosendal, S; Boyd, D A; Gilbride, K A

    1985-01-01

    The virulence of strains of Haemophilus pleuropneumoniae serotype 1, 2, 3, 7 and strains of the "minor-group" and Haemophilus parasuis were compared by inoculating specific pathogen-free pigs into the lower airways with specified doses of bacteria. Haemophilus pleuropneumoniae, strain W, serotype 1, given in 1 X 10(8) colony-forming units, produced a lethal acute pleuropneumonia in four pigs. Nonlethal localized pulmonary necrosis was induced in four groups of two pigs given 1 X 10(7), 1 X 10(6), 1 X 10(5) and 1 X 10(4) respectively of the same strain. Two groups of four pigs developed chronic lesions when inoculated with 1 X 10(7) colony-forming units of H. pleuropneumoniae, strain Shope 4074, serotype 1 and 1 X 10(7) colony-forming units of H. pleuropneumoniae, strain WF83, serotype 7, respectively. Of 20 pigs given 1 X 10(8) colony-forming units of strain 1536, serotype 2, two died of acute pleuropneumonia and 18 had lesions of pulmonary necrosis or abscessation and pleuritis. A dose of 4 X 10(9) colony-forming units of strain BC181, serotype 3, induced pulmonary necrosis similar to the lesions in pigs given 10(7) colony-forming units or less of strain W, serotype 1, suggesting that the serotype 3 strain is less virulent. No clinical signs, but focal areas of pulmonary fibrosis and pleural adhesions were induced in four pigs inoculated with 4 X 10(9) colony-forming units of the "minor-group" strain 7ATS. Similarly, four pigs inoculated with "minor-group" strain 33PN did not show clinical signs, but had focal necrotic and fibrotic pulmonary lesions and pleural adhesions.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. Fig. 3. PMID:3986682

  16. The mechanical world of bacteria.

    PubMed

    Persat, Alexandre; Nadell, Carey D; Kim, Minyoung Kevin; Ingremeau, Francois; Siryaporn, Albert; Drescher, Knut; Wingreen, Ned S; Bassler, Bonnie L; Gitai, Zemer; Stone, Howard A

    2015-05-21

    In the wild, bacteria are predominantly associated with surfaces as opposed to existing as free-swimming, isolated organisms. They are thus subject to surface-specific mechanics, including hydrodynamic forces, adhesive forces, the rheology of their surroundings, and transport rules that define their encounters with nutrients and signaling molecules. Here, we highlight the effects of mechanics on bacterial behaviors on surfaces at multiple length scales, from single bacteria to the development of multicellular bacterial communities such as biofilms. PMID:26000479

  17. B-mode sonography in acute renal failure.

    PubMed

    O'Neill, W Charles

    2006-01-01

    B-mode sonography is an extremely useful and cost-effective method to eliminate urinary obstruction as a cause of acute renal failure and should be performed on all patients in whom obstruction is likely or in whom the cause of renal failure is not apparent. The threshold should be reduced in patients with solitary kidneys and sonography is probably indicated in all transplant patients. Sonography has very little utility in the management of other patients with acute renal failure. Although sonographic changes do occur in acute tubular necrosis, they are difficult to detect in the absence of baseline studies and are nonspecific. PMID:16543751

  18. CT findings in acute peritonitis: a pattern-based approach

    PubMed Central

    Filippone, Antonella; Cianci, Roberta; Pizzi, Andrea Delli; Esposito, Gianluigi; Pulsone, Pierluigi; Tavoletta, Alessandra; Timpani, Mauro; Cotroneo, Antonio Raffaele

    2015-01-01

    Many inflammatory and infectious entities may acutely affect the peritoneum causing a thickening of its layers. Unfortunately, several acute peritoneal diseases can have overlapping features, both clinically and at imaging. Therefore, the awareness of the clinical context, although useful, may be sometimes insufficient to identify the underlying cause. This article provides a specific computed tomography-based approach including morphologic characteristics of peritoneal thickening (e.g., smooth, irregular, or nodular) and ancillary findings to narrow the differential diagnosis of acute peritonitis. PMID:26359872

  19. Cable Bacteria in Freshwater Sediments

    PubMed Central

    Kristiansen, Michael; Frederiksen, Rasmus B.; Dittmer, Anders Lindequist; Bjerg, Jesper Tataru; Trojan, Daniela; Schreiber, Lars; Damgaard, Lars Riis; Schramm, Andreas; Nielsen, Lars Peter

    2015-01-01

    In marine sediments cathodic oxygen reduction at the sediment surface can be coupled to anodic sulfide oxidation in deeper anoxic layers through electrical currents mediated by filamentous, multicellular bacteria of the Desulfobulbaceae family, the so-called cable bacteria. Until now, cable bacteria have only been reported from marine environments. In this study, we demonstrate that cable bacteria also occur in freshwater sediments. In a first step, homogenized sediment collected from the freshwater stream Giber Å, Denmark, was incubated in the laboratory. After 2 weeks, pH signatures and electric fields indicated electron transfer between vertically separated anodic and cathodic half-reactions. Fluorescence in situ hybridization revealed the presence of Desulfobulbaceae filaments. In addition, in situ measurements of oxygen, pH, and electric potential distributions in the waterlogged banks of Giber Å demonstrated the presence of distant electric redox coupling in naturally occurring freshwater sediment. At the same site, filamentous Desulfobulbaceae with cable bacterium morphology were found to be present. Their 16S rRNA gene sequence placed them as a distinct sister group to the known marine cable bacteria, with the genus Desulfobulbus as the closest cultured lineage. The results of the present study indicate that electric currents mediated by cable bacteria could be important for the biogeochemistry in many more environments than anticipated thus far and suggest a common evolutionary origin of the cable phenotype within Desulfobulbaceae with subsequent diversification into a freshwater and a marine lineage. PMID:26116678

  20. Cable Bacteria in Freshwater Sediments.

    PubMed

    Risgaard-Petersen, Nils; Kristiansen, Michael; Frederiksen, Rasmus B; Dittmer, Anders Lindequist; Bjerg, Jesper Tataru; Trojan, Daniela; Schreiber, Lars; Damgaard, Lars Riis; Schramm, Andreas; Nielsen, Lars Peter

    2015-09-01

    In marine sediments cathodic oxygen reduction at the sediment surface can be coupled to anodic sulfide oxidation in deeper anoxic layers through electrical currents mediated by filamentous, multicellular bacteria of the Desulfobulbaceae family, the so-called cable bacteria. Until now, cable bacteria have only been reported from marine environments. In this study, we demonstrate that cable bacteria also occur in freshwater sediments. In a first step, homogenized sediment collected from the freshwater stream Giber Å, Denmark, was incubated in the laboratory. After 2 weeks, pH signatures and electric fields indicated electron transfer between vertically separated anodic and cathodic half-reactions. Fluorescence in situ hybridization revealed the presence of Desulfobulbaceae filaments. In addition, in situ measurements of oxygen, pH, and electric potential distributions in the waterlogged banks of Giber Å demonstrated the presence of distant electric redox coupling in naturally occurring freshwater sediment. At the same site, filamentous Desulfobulbaceae with cable bacterium morphology were found to be present. Their 16S rRNA gene sequence placed them as a distinct sister group to the known marine cable bacteria, with the genus Desulfobulbus as the closest cultured lineage. The results of the present study indicate that electric currents mediated by cable bacteria could be important for the biogeochemistry in many more environments than anticipated thus far and suggest a common evolutionary origin of the cable phenotype within Desulfobulbaceae with subsequent diversification into a freshwater and a marine lineage. PMID:26116678

  1. Bioreporter bacteria for landmine detection

    SciTech Connect

    Burlage, R.S.; Youngblood, T.; Lamothe, D.

    1998-04-01

    Landmines (and other UXO) gradually leak explosive chemicals into the soil at significant concentrations. Bacteria, which have adapted to scavenge low concentrations of nutrients, can detect these explosive chemicals. Uptake of these chemicals results in the triggering of specific bacterial genes. The authors have created genetically recombinant bioreporter bacteria that detect small concentrations of energetic chemicals. These bacteria are genetically engineered to produce a bioluminescent signal when they contact specific explosives. A gene for a brightly fluorescent compound can be substituted for increased sensitivity. By finding the fluorescent bacteria, you find the landmine. Detection might be accomplished using stand-off illumination of the minefield and GPS technology, which would result in greatly reduced risk to the deminers. Bioreporter technology has been proven at the laboratory scale, and will be tested under field conditions in the near future. They have created a bacterial strain that detects sub-micromolar concentrations of o- and p-nitrotoluene. Related bacterial strains were produced using standard laboratory protocols, and bioreporters of dinitrotoluene and trinitrotoluene were produced, screening for activity with the explosive compounds. Response time is dependent on the growth rate of the bacteria. Although frill signal production may require several hours, the bacteria can be applied over vast areas and scanned quickly, producing an equivalent detection speed that is very fast. This technology may be applicable to other needs, such as locating buried explosives at military and ordnance/explosive manufacturing facilities.

  2. Filtrating forms of soil bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van'kova, A. A.; Ivanov, P. I.; Emtsev, V. T.

    2013-03-01

    Filtrating (ultramicroscopic) forms (FF) of bacteria were studied in a soddy-podzolic soil and the root zone of alfalfa plants as part of populations of the most widespread physiological groups of soil bacteria. FF were obtained by filtering soil solutions through membrane filters with a pore diameter of 0.22 ?m. It was established that the greater part of the bacteria in the soil and in the root zone of the plants has an ultramicroscopic size: the average diameter of the cells is 0.3 ?m, and their length is 0.6 ?m, which is significantly less than the cell size of banal bacteria. The number of FF varies within a wide range depending on the physicochemical conditions of the habitat. The FF number's dynamics in the soil is of a seasonal nature; i.e., the number of bacteria found increases in the summer and fall and decreases in the winter-spring period. In the rhizosphere of the alfalfa, over the vegetation period, the number of FF and their fraction in the total mass of the bacteria increase. A reverse tendency is observed in the rhizoplane. The morphological particularities (identified by an electron microscopy) and the nature of the FF indicate their physiological activity.

  3. Tension Pneumoperitoneum Caused by Obstipation

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Emergency physicians are often required to evaluate and treat undifferentiated patients suffering acute hemodynamic compromise (AHC). It is helpful to apply a structured approach based on a differential diagnosis including all causes of AHC that can be identified and treated during a primary assessment. Tension pneumoperitoneum (TP) is an uncommon condition with the potential to be rapidly fatal. It is amenable to prompt diagnosis and stabilization in the emergency department. We present a case of a 16-year-old boy with TP to demonstrate how TP should be incorporated into a differential diagnosis when evaluating an undifferentiated patient with AHC. PMID:26587109

  4. Detection of bacterial aggregation in cell suspensions treated with pathogenic bacteria

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The early interaction between plant cells and pathogenic bacteria were studied using tobacco cell suspensions treated with pathogenic and nonpathogenic Pseudomonas species. Previous studies of this system have documented that interactions with pathogens that cause a hypersensitive response on whole...

  5. Enhanced killing of antibiotic-resistant bacteria enabled by massively parallel combinatorial genetics

    E-print Network

    Ding, Huiming

    New therapeutic strategies are needed to treat infections caused by drug-resistant bacteria, which constitute a major growing threat to human health. Here, we use a high-throughput technology to identify combinatorial ...

  6. ANIMAL STUDIES FOR USE IN DETERMINING VIRULENCE IN BACTERIA ISOLATED FROM POTABLE WATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    The heterotrophic bacteria that are indigenous to potable water are normally not a threat to the healthy population. However, some strains of Aeromonas hydrophila, Legionella pneumophila and the nontuberculous mycobacteria are opportunistic pathogens that can cause illness and ...

  7. Lactic Acid Bacteria as an Intervention Against Shiga Toxin-Producing Escherichia coli in Beef 

    E-print Network

    Kirsch, Katie Rose

    2015-08-07

    Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) are Gram-negative bacteria that are able to cause disease in humans and animals. Beef is a significant transmission vehicle of foodborne outbreaks of STEC, which are commensal inhabitants...

  8. Beyond Bacteria: A Study of the Enteric Microbial Consortium in Extremely Low Birth Weight Infants

    E-print Network

    Jackson, Robert B.

    characterized. We used deep pyrosequencing to examine the gut- associated microbiome of 11 ELBW infants microbial diversity in ELBW enteric microbiota dominated bytypes of bacteria known to cause invasive disease

  9. Acute toxicity of lead, chromium, and other heavy metals to ciliates from activated sludge plants

    SciTech Connect

    Madoni, P.; Gorbi, G. ); Davoli, D. )

    1994-09-01

    Numerous papers deal with the occurrence of heavy metals in the various components of freshwater ecosystems and sewage treatment systems. However, few papers refer to the presence and effect of heavy metals in populations of aquatic cilated protozoa. In particular, the lethal concentrations (LC50) of heavy metals in ciliate populations that colonize the activated sludge or the biofilm of waste treatment plants. Ciliated protozoa are very numerous in all types of aerobic biological-treatment systems. They play an important role in the purification process removing, through predation, the major part of dispersed bacteria that cause high turbidity in the final effluent. Changes in the community structure and types of ciliate species may affect the food web of these artifical ecosystems, and may also influence the biological performance of plants. Heavy metals can limit growth of protozoa in aquatic environments. The toxicity of heavy metals in biological treatment depends mainly upon two factors, namely, metal species and concentration. Although the resistance of biological systems to metal toxicity may be enhanced greatly by proper acclimatization, a too-high metal concentration may cause serious upsets in the system. It is important to determine the concentrations of heavy metals causing lethal effects on ciliates. Madoni recently studied the acute toxicity of cadmium, copper, mercury, and zinc on six species of ciliated protozoa from activated sludge plants. The present paper describes the toxic effects of lead and chromium (VI) on 6 cilate species. The acute toxicity of Cd, Cr, Cu, Hg, Pb, and Zn on two other ciliates (Drepanomonas revoluta and Spirostomum teres) is also reported. 18 refs., 4 tabs.

  10. [Non-ST acute coronary syndromes].

    PubMed

    Collet, J Ph; Choussat, R; Montalescot, G

    2002-11-01

    Acute coronary syndromes are the first cause of death in France. Unstable angina is the most frequent acute coronary syndrome. Risk stratification to predict morbimortality and the risk of major hemorrhage is the key step of the medical approach. Combined antithrombotic therapy (aspirine + clopidogrel + LMWH) has led to a substantial reduction of major coronary events with a good tolerance because of the short duration of such aggressive strategy. This combined antithrombotic also allowed to increase the benefit of an early invasive strategy including coronary angiogram with stent percutaneous coronary intervention. PMID:12500603

  11. [INTENSIVE CARE OF COMPLICATED ACUTE PORPHYRIA].

    PubMed

    Yatskovi, K V; Gorodetskiy, V M; Shulutko, E M; Glukhova, T E; Pusqtovoit, Ya S

    2015-01-01

    The experience of anesthesia and intensive care departments of Hematological center Russia for intensive care management in 13 patients with acute porphyria, from 1996 till 2013 was summarized ion this pape4: Main causes of life-threatening complications of acute porphyria and its frequency were revealed Advantages of mechanical lung ventilation in respiratory failure, algorithms of clinical nutrition, correction of water-electrolyte disorders were represented. Importance of kinesiotherapy in successful treatment in these category of patients was revealed. It is shown that the whole complex of intensive care methods with the specific pathogenetical therapy brings success in 84,6 % of patients. PMID:26596031

  12. Diagnostic markers of acute myocardial infarction

    PubMed Central

    MYTHILI, SABESAN; MALATHI, NARASIMHAN

    2015-01-01

    Acute myocardial infarction (AMI) is a major cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. The highest risk of fatality occurs within the initial hours of onset of AMI. Thus, early diagnosis of cardiac ischemia is critical for the effective management of patients with AMI. Improper diagnosis of patients with chest pain often leads to inappropriate admission of patients without AMI and vice versa. In addition to clinical history, physical examination, accurate electrocardiogram findings and assessment of cardiac biomarkers have an important role in the early diagnosis of acute ischemia. The present review discusses in detail the various cardiac biomarkers released during the event of an AMI.

  13. [Prolonged acute pancreatitis after bone marrow transplantation].

    PubMed

    De Singly, B; Simon, M; Bennani, J; Wittnebel, S; Zagadanski, A-M; Pacault, V; Gornet, J-M; Allez, M; Lémann, M

    2008-04-01

    Acute pancreatitis is not infrequent after allogenic marrow transplantation. Several causes can predispose to pancreatitis, including Graft-Versus-Host Disease (GVHD), a condition which is probably underestimated. In the literature, few description of pancreatic GVHD can be found. Pancreatic GVHD diagnosis can be difficult if pancreatic involvement occurs without other typical manifestations of GVHD. We report the case of a woman, 54 years old, suffering from prolonged, painful pancreatitis two months after allogenic bone marrow transplantation for acute myeloid leucemia. Pancreatic GVHD diagnosis was performed after five weeks on duodenal biopsies despite the absence of diarrheoa. The patient dramatically improved within few days on corticosteroids. PMID:18378104

  14. Incidence, causes, severity and treatment of throat discomfort: a four-region online questionnaire survey

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Acute sore throat is commonly associated with viral infections. Consumers typically rely on over-the-counter treatments and other remedies to treat symptoms; however, limited information is available regarding consumer perceptions of sore throat or treatment needs. The aim of this study was to investigate perceptions of throat discomfort and how these influence attitudes and consumer behaviour with regard to treatment. Methods Online consumer surveys were completed by participants invited by email between 2003 and 2004 in four markets: the UK, France, Poland, and Malaysia. The questionnaire consisted of 24 questions that covered key issues surrounding throat discomfort including incidence in the past 12 months, causes, severity, effects on functionality and quality of life, actions taken to relieve throat discomfort, the efficacy of these approaches and the reasons behind using specific products. Results In total, 6465 men and women aged ?18 years were surveyed, identifying 3514 participants who had suffered throat discomfort/irritation in the past 12 months (response rate of 54%). These participants completed the full survey. The breakdown of throat discomfort sufferers was: UK, 912; France, 899; Poland, 871; Malaysia, 832. A high proportion of respondents experienced one or more instances of throat discomfort in the previous 12 months, with an overall incidence of 54%. Infections including the common cold/influenza and other bacteria/viruses were commonly perceived causes of throat discomfort (72% and 46%, respectively). Physical and environmental factors were also perceived to be causative, including airborne pollution (28%), smoking (23%), and air conditioning (31%). Symptoms perceived to be caused by an infection were associated with a higher degree of suffering (mean degree of suffering for bacteria/virus and common cold/influenza; 3.4 and 3.0, respectively). Medicinal products were used for all perceived causes, but more commonly for sore throats thought to be caused by infections. Cold drinks were used more often for symptoms thought to be due to physical and environmental causes. Conclusions Not all throat discomfort is the same, as demonstrated by the range of perceived causes and the emotional and physical symptoms experienced. Patient expectations regarding treatment of throat discomfort differs and treatments should be tailored by pharmacists to suit the cause. PMID:22883470

  15. “Burnt out” dilated hypertrophic cardiomyopathy causing acute LVAD thrombosis

    PubMed Central

    Sivathasan, Cumaraswamy; Tan, Teing E E; Sim, David; Kerk, Ka Lee

    2015-01-01

    Key Clinical Message Case report illustrates obstruction encountered in a patient with end-stage dilated hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) who underwent LVAD implantation. The morphology reversed in early postoperative period to HCM. Pump replacement required coring of the ventricular muscle. Dilated end-stage hypertrophic cardiomyopathy can revert back to the original morphology on decompression. PMID:26185632

  16. An interesting cause of pulmonary emboli: Acute carbon monoxide poisoning

    SciTech Connect

    Sevinc, A.; Savli, H.; Atmaca, H.

    2005-07-01

    Carbon monoxide poisoning, a public health problem of considerable significance, is a relatively frequent event today, resulting in thousands of hospitalizations annually. A 70-year-old lady was seen in the emergency department with a provisional diagnosis of carbon monoxide poisoning. The previous night, she slept in a tightly closed room heated with coal ember. She was found unconscious in the morning with poor ventilation. She had a rare presentation of popliteal vein thrombosis, pulmonary emboli, and possible tissue necrosis with carbon monoxide poisoning. Oxygen treatment with low-molecular-weight heparin (nadroparine) and warfarin therapy resulted in an improvement in both popliteal and pulmonary circulations. In conclusion, the presence of pulmonary emboli should be sought in patients with carbon monoxide poisoning.

  17. Evaluation of acute toxicity and genotoxicity of liquid products from pyrolysis of Eucalyptus grandis wood.

    PubMed

    Pimenta, A S; Bayona, J M; García, M T; Solanas, A M

    2000-02-01

    Slow pyrolysis of Eucalyptus grandis wood was performed in an oven laboratory, and smoke was trapped and condensed to yield liquid products. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and phenolic fractions were isolated from the former liquid products using adsorption column chromatography (ACC) and identified by GC/MS. Concentrations of PAH and phenolic fractions in total pyrolysis liquids were respectively 48.9 microg/g and 8.59% (w/w). Acute toxicity of total samples of pyrolysis liquids and the phenolic fraction was evaluated by means of two bioassays, namely, 24-h immobilization bioassay with Daphnia magna and Microtox bioassays, the latter employing the luminescent bacteria Photobacterium phosphoreum. Total pyrolysis liquids and the PAH fraction were evaluated for genotoxicity by the Microtox bioassay conducted using rehydrated freeze-dried dark mutant of the luminescent bacteria Vibrio fisheri strain M169. Total pyrolysis liquids and the phenolic fraction, respectively, in concentrations of 170 and 68 mg/L were able to immobilize 50% (EC(50)) of the D. magna population following 24-h exposure. Concentrations of 19 and 6 mg/L, respectively, for total pyrolysis liquids and phenolic fraction were the effective concentrations that resulted in a 50% (EC(50)) reduction in light produced by bacteria in the Microtox bioassay. Accordingly, the Microtox bioassay was more sensitive to toxic effects of both kind of samples than the D. magna bioassay, particularly for the phenolic fraction. Regarding to the genotoxicity evaluation, the results achieved by Microtox bioassay showed that total pyrolysis liquids had no genotoxic effects with and without exogenous metabolic activation using rat liver homogenate (S9). However, the PAH fraction showed toxic effects with rat liver activation and had a dose-response number (DRN) equal to 1.6, being in this way suspected genotoxic. The lowest detected concentration (LDC) of the PAH fraction able to cause genotoxic effects was 375 microg/L. PMID:10629278

  18. Aerobic Bacteriological Study of Acute Exacerbations of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Background The natural history of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease is characterized by frequent exacerbations. Majority of exacerbations are infectious and bacteria responsible for 30-50% of these cases. The purpose of this study was to determine the bacteriology of acute exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease in hospitalized patients in our institution and their antibiotic susceptibility pattern to formulate cost effective antibiotic strategy and reducing the emergence of drug resistance. Materials and Methods One hundred and seven clinically diagnosed cases of acute exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease admitted in medicine, tuberculosis and chest wards were selected for the study. Direct gram stain was done for all sputum samples. The suitable sputum samples were cultured. Identification of organism and antimicrobial susceptibility testing was done by standard microbiological techniques. Results Our study showed growth of pathogenic organisms in 41.12% cases. Males (67.29%) are more affected than females (32.71%). Gram negative bacilli were more isolated than gram positive cocci. The commonest isolate was Klebsiella pneumoniae 15 (38.46%), followed by Staphylococcus aureus 9 (23.08%), Streptococcus species 6 (15.39%), Pseudomonas aeruginosa 4 (10.26%), E.coli 2 (5.13%), Acinetobacter species 2 (5.13%) and Enterobacter species 1(2.56%). The antibiotic susceptibility reveals that vancomycin, linezolid, azithromycin and clarithromycin were most effective drugs for gram positive cocci, meropenem & piperacillin-tazobactam for gram negative bacilli and amikacin & levofloxacin for both gram positive cocci & gram negative bacilli. Conclusion In developing country like India acute exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease is common in adults more than 50 years of age due to smoking habits and high indoor pollution. This leads to a major impact on the quality of life of patients with the condition. They are a major cause of hospital admission and health care utilization. PMID:26435942

  19. Recurrent acute inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy following R-CHOP treatment for non-Hodgkin lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Preet P.; Witzig, Thomas E.

    2013-01-01

    Acute flaccid paralysis following chemotherapy has a wide differential diagnosis, including drug toxicity, acute inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy (AIDP), and malignant nerve infiltration. We present a case of recurrent acute quadriparesis due to AIDP following chemotherapy for non-Hodgkin lymphoma, which resolved each time following administration of intravenous immunoglobulin. Although many chemotherapeutic agents can cause neurologic side effects, such as peripheral neuropathy, drug toxicity as a cause is a diagnosis of exclusion. PMID:23543974

  20. [Genetic resources of nodule bacteria].

    PubMed

    Rumiantseva, M L

    2009-09-01

    Nodule bacteria (rhizobia) form highly specific symbiosis with leguminous plants. The efficiency of accumulation of biological nitrogen depends on molecular-genetic interaction between the host plant and rhizobia. Genetic characteristics of microsymbiotic strains are crucial in developing highly productive and stress-resistant symbiotic pairs: rhizobium strain-host plant cultivar (species). The present review considers the issue of studying genetic resources of nodule bacteria to identify genes and their blocks, responsible for the ability of rhizobia to form highly effective symbiosis in various agroecological conditions. The main approaches to investigation of intraspecific and interspecific genetic and genomic diversity of nodule bacteria are considered, from MLEE analysis to the recent methods of genomic DNA analysis using biochips. The data are presented showing that gene centers of host plants are centers of genetic diversification of nodule bacteria, because the intraspecific polymorphism of genetic markers of the core and the accessory rhizobial genomes is extremely high in them. Genotypic features of trapped and nodule subpopulations of alfalfa nodule bacteria are discussed. A survey of literature showed that the genomes of natural strains in alfalfa gene centers exhibit significant differences in genes involved in control of metabolism, replication, recombination, and the formation of defense response (hsd genes). Natural populations of rhizobia are regarded as a huge gene pool serving as a source of evolutionary innovations. PMID:19824536

  1. Biosynthesis of phosphatidylcholine in bacteria.

    PubMed

    Sohlenkamp, Christian; López-Lara, Isabel M; Geiger, Otto

    2003-03-01

    Phosphatidylcholine (PC) is the major membrane-forming phospholipid in eukaryotes and can be synthesized by either of two pathways, the methylation pathway or the CDP-choline pathway. Many prokaryotes lack PC, but it can be found in significant amounts in membranes of rather diverse bacteria and based on genomic data, we estimate that more than 10% of all bacteria possess PC. Enzymatic methylation of phosphatidylethanolamine via the methylation pathway was thought to be the only biosynthetic pathway to yield PC in bacteria. However, a choline-dependent pathway for PC biosynthesis has been discovered in Sinorhizobium meliloti. In this pathway, PC synthase, condenses choline directly with CDP-diacylglyceride to form PC in one step. A number of symbiotic (Rhizobium leguminosarum, Mesorhizobium loti) and pathogenic (Agrobacterium tumefaciens, Brucella melitensis, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Borrelia burgdorferi and Legionella pneumophila) bacteria seem to possess the PC synthase pathway and we suggest that the respective eukaryotic host functions as the provider of choline for this pathway. Pathogens entering their hosts through epithelia (Streptococcus pneumoniae, Haemophilus influenzae) require phosphocholine substitutions on their cell surface components that are biosynthetically also derived from choline supplied by the host. However, the incorporation of choline in these latter cases proceeds via choline phosphate and CDP-choline as intermediates. The occurrence of two intermediates in prokaryotes usually found as intermediates in the eukaryotic CDP-choline pathway for PC biosynthesis raises the question whether some bacteria might form PC via a CDP-choline pathway. PMID:12547654

  2. [Effect of photosynthetic bacteria and compost on degradation of petroleum products in soil].

    PubMed

    Mun, T Kh; Kirienko, O A; Imranova, E L

    2004-01-01

    Addition of diesel fuel and waste engine oil to soil was found to cause biostimulation of hydrocarbon-oxidizing microorganisms. Corynebacteria constitute a large group of hydrocarbon-oxidizing microorganisms. Addition of a liquid culture of photosynthetic bacteria to soil not only facilitates degradation of petroleum products, but also stimulates growth of hydrocarbon-oxidizing microorganisms. Combined addition of photosynthetic bacteria and compost to soil polluted with petroleum products causes even a more significant increase in the count of hydrocarbon-oxidizing bacteria and substantially increases the rate of pollutant degradation. PMID:15125200

  3. Clay-Bacteria Systems and Biofilm Production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steiner, J.; Alimova, A.; Katz, A.; Steiner, N.; Rudolph, E.; Gottlieb, P.

    2007-12-01

    Soil clots and the aerosol transport of bacteria and spores are promoted by the formation of biofilms (bacteria cells in an extracellular polymeric matrix). Biofilms protect microorganisms by promoting adhesion to both organic and inorganic surfaces. Time series experiments on bacteria-clay suspensions demonstrate that biofilm growth is catalyzed by the presence of hectorite in minimal growth media for the studied species: Gram negatives (Pseudomonas syringae and Escherichia coli,) and Gram positives (Staphylococcus aureus and Bacillus subtilis). Soil organisms (P. syringae, B. subtilis) and organisms found in the human population (E. coli, S. aureus) are both used to demonstrate the general applicability of clay involvement. Fluorescent images of the biofilms are acquired by staining with propidium iodide, a component of the BacLightTM Live/Dead bacterial viability staining kit (Molecular Probes, Eugene, OR). The evolving polysaccharide-rich biofilm reacts with the clay interlayer site causing a complex substitution of the two-water hectorite interlayer with polysaccharide. The result is often a three-peak composite of the (001) x-ray diffraction maxima resulting from polysaccharide-expanded clays and an organic-driven contraction of a subset of the clays in the reaction medium. X-ray diffractograms reveal that the expanded set creates a broad maximum with clay subsets at 1.84 nm and 1.41 nm interlayer spacings as approximated by a least squares double Lorentzian fit, and a smaller shoulder at larger 2q, deriving from a contraction of the interlayer spacing. Washing with chlorox removes organic material from the contracted clay and creates a 1-water hectorite single peak in place of the double peak. The clay response can be used as an indirect indicator of biofilm in an environmental system.

  4. Removal of Cholera Toxin from Aqueous Solution by Probiotic Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Heikkilä, Jari E.; Nybom, Sonja M. K.; Salminen, Seppo J.; Meriluoto, Jussi A. O.

    2012-01-01

    Cholera remains a serious health problem, especially in developing countries where basic hygiene standards are not met. The symptoms of cholera are caused by cholera toxin, an enterotoxin, which is produced by the bacterium Vibrio cholerae. We have recently shown that human probiotic bacteria are capable of removing cyanobacterial toxins from aqueous solutions. In the present study we investigate the ability of the human probiotic bacteria, Lactobacillus rhamnosus strain GG (ATCC 53103) and Bifidobacteriumlongum 46 (DSM 14583), to remove cholera toxin from solution in vitro. Lactobacillus rhamnosus strain GG and Bifidobacteriumlongum 46 were able to remove 68% and 59% of cholera toxin from aqueous solutions during 18 h of incubation at 37 °C, respectively. The effect was dependent on bacterial concentration and L. rhamnosus GG was more effective at lower bacterial concentrations. No significant effect on cholera toxin concentration was observed when nonviable bacteria or bacterial supernatant was used. PMID:24281668

  5. Genetic transfer in acidophilic bacteria

    SciTech Connect

    Roberto, F.F.; Glenn, A.W.; Bulmer, D.; Ward, T.E.

    1990-01-01

    There is increasing interest in the use of microorganisms to recover metals from ores, as well as to remove sulfur from coal. These so-called bioleaching processes are mediated by a number of bacteria. The best-studied of these organisms are acidophiles including Thiobacillus and Acidiphilium species. Our laboratory has focused on developing genetic strategies to allow the manipulation of acidophilic bacteria to improve and augment their utility in large scale operations. We have recently been successful in employing conjugation for interbacterial transfer of genetic information, as well as in directly transforming Acidiphilium by use of electroporation. We are now testing the properties of IncPl, IncW and IncQ plasmid vectors in Acidiphilium to determine their relative usefulness in routine manipulation of acidophiles and transfer between organisms. This study also allows us to determine the natural ability of these bacteria to transfer genetic material amongst themselves in their particular environment. 21 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  6. Recording acute poisoning deaths.

    PubMed

    Flanagan, R J; Rooney, C

    2002-08-14

    Recording deaths from acute poisoning/substance abuse is not straightforward. The International Classification of Diseases (ICD), used to code mortality statistics, is aimed towards recording the underlying cause of death such as suicide or drug dependence rather than gathering data on poisoning per se. Despite the inherent difficulties clear trends can be observed from the data available for England and Wales. There have been marked changes in the compounds featuring in suicidal poisoning in the last 35 years reflecting changes in the availability of poisons, notably carbon monoxide and prescription barbiturates. However, although the number of poisoning suicides has decreased in the recent years, suicides from other means have increased in males (suicides in 1999, 75% male), hence there has been little change in the annual total of suicides. There are also striking differences in drug abuse- and volatile substance abuse (VSA)-related deaths between males and females. Drug abuse-related fatal poisoning (83% male, 1979-1999, European Monitoring Centre for Drugs and Drug Addiction (EMCDDA) definition which does not include suicide), largely attributable to heroin and methadone, increased markedly during the 1990s, with a sharp rise in deaths attributed to accidental poisoning, although deaths involving methadone are now declining. VSA-related deaths (90% male, 1971-1999, almost entirely accidental deaths), nowadays predominantly from abuse of fuel gases (liquefied petroleum gas, LPG) from, for example, cigarette lighter refills, have declined from a peak in the early 1990s and are now becoming manifest in an older age group. These two latter instances especially provide examples where ICD-derived fatal poisoning data are inadequate and a 'poisons oriented' approach to data collection and analysis is necessary. PMID:12208016

  7. Hyperoxic Acute Lung Injury

    PubMed Central

    Kallet, Richard H; Matthay, Michael A

    2013-01-01

    Prolonged breathing of very high FIO2 (FIO2 ? 0.9) uniformly causes severe hyperoxic acute lung injury (HALI) and, without a reduction of FIO2, is usually fatal. The severity of HALI is directly proportional to PO2 (particularly above 450 mm Hg, or an FIO2 of 0.6) and exposure duration. Hyperoxia produces extraordinary amounts of reactive O2 species that overwhelms natural antioxidant defenses and destroys cellular structures through several pathways. Genetic predisposition has been shown to play an important role in HALI among animals, and some genetics-based epidemiologic research suggests that this may be true for humans as well. Clinically, the risk of HALI likely occurs when FIO2exceeds 0.7, and may become problematic when FIO2 exceeds 0.8 for an extended period of time. Both high-stretch mechanical ventilation and hyperoxia potentiate lung injury and may promote pulmonary infection. During the 1960s, confusion regarding the incidence and relevance of HALI largely reflected such issues as the primitive control of FIO2, the absence of PEEP, and the fact that at the time both ALI and ventilator-induced lung injury were unknown. The advent of PEEP and precise control over FIO2, as well as lung-protective ventilation, and other adjunctive therapies for severe hypoxemia, has greatly reduced the risk of HALI for the vast majority of patients requiring mechanical ventilation in the 21st century. However, a subset of patients with very severe ARDS requiring hyperoxic therapy is at substantial risk for developing HALI, therefore justifying the use of such adjunctive therapies. PMID:23271823

  8. Non-capsulated and capsulated Haemophilus influenzae in children with acute otitis media in Venezuela: a prospective epidemiological study

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Non-typeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHi) and Streptococcus pneumoniae are major causes of bacterial acute otitis media (AOM). Data regarding AOM are limited in Latin America. This is the first active surveillance in a private setting in Venezuela to characterize the bacterial etiology of AOM in children < 5 years of age. Methods Between December 2008 and December 2009, 91 AOM episodes (including sporadic, recurrent and treatment failures) were studied in 87 children enrolled into a medical center in Caracas, Venezuela. Middle ear fluid samples were collected either by tympanocentesis or spontaneous otorrhea swab sampling method. Standard laboratory and microbiological techniques were used to identify bacteria and test for antimicrobial resistance. The results were interpreted according to Clinical Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI) 2009 for non-meningitis isolates. All statistical analyses were performed using SAS 9.1 and Microsoft Excel (for graphical purposes). Results Overall, bacteria were cultured from 69.2% (63 of the 91 episodes); at least one pathogen (S. pneumoniae, H. influenzae, S. pyogenes or M. catarrhalis) was cultured from 65.9% (60/91) of episodes. H. influenzae (55.5%; 35/63 episodes) and S. pneumoniae (34.9%; 22/63 episodes) were the most frequently reported bacteria. Among H. influenzae isolates, 62.9% (22/35 episodes) were non-capsulated (NTHi) and 31.4% (11/35 episodes) were capsulated including types d, a, c and f, across all age groups. Low antibiotic resistance for H. influenzae was observed to amoxicillin/ampicillin (5.7%; 2/35 samples). NTHi was isolated in four of the six H. influenzae positive samples (66.7%) from recurrent episodes. Conclusions We found H. influenzae and S. pneumoniae to be the main pathogens causing AOM in Venezuela. Pneumococcal conjugate vaccines with efficacy against these bacterial pathogens may have the potential to maximize protection against AOM. PMID:22335965

  9. Cyanobacterial Toxin Degrading Bacteria: Who Are They?

    PubMed Central

    Kormas, Konstantinos Ar.; Lymperopoulou, Despoina S.

    2013-01-01

    Cyanobacteria are ubiquitous in nature and are both beneficial and detrimental to humans. Benefits include being food supplements and producing bioactive compounds, like antimicrobial and anticancer substances, while their detrimental effects are evident by toxin production, causing major ecological problems at the ecosystem level. To date, there are several ways to degrade or transform these toxins by chemical methods, while the biodegradation of these compounds is understudied. In this paper, we present a meta-analysis of the currently available 16S rRNA and mlrA (microcystinase) genes diversity of isolates known to degrade cyanobacterial toxins. The available data revealed that these bacteria belong primarily to the Proteobacteria, with several strains from the sphingomonads, and one from each of the Methylobacillus and Paucibacter genera. Other strains belonged to the genera Arthrobacter, Bacillus, and Lactobacillus. By combining the ecological knowledge on the distribution, abundance, and ecophysiology of the bacteria that cooccur with toxic cyanobacterial blooms and newly developed molecular approaches, it is possible not only to discover more strains with cyanobacterial toxin degradation abilities, but also to reveal the genes associated with the degradation of these toxins. PMID:23841072

  10. Lipopolysaccharides and plant responses to phytopathogenic bacteria.

    PubMed

    Newman, M A; von Roepenack, E; Daniels, M; Dow, M

    2000-01-01

    Abstract Treatment of the leaves of pepper (Capsicum annuum) cv. ECW10R with lipopolysaccharides (LPS) from both plant pathogenic and enteric bacteria alters several aspects of the plant response to subsequent inoculation with phytopathogenic xanthomonads. LPS pre-treatment prevents the hypersensitive reaction caused by strains of Xanthomonas campestris pv. vesicatoria carrying the avirulence gene avrBs1 (a gene-for-gene interaction) and by X. campestris pv. campestris (a non-host interaction). Associated with this effect are the earlier synthesis of feruloyl- and coumaroyl-tyramine, phenolic conjugates that are potentially antimicrobial, and alterations in the expression patterns of genes for some pathogenesis-related (PR) proteins. Similar effects on the timing of phenolic conjugate synthesis are also seen in the compatible interaction with X. campestris pv. vesicatoria, although the level of the response is lower. Recognition of LPS by plants may allow expression of resistance in the absence of catastrophic tissue damage. However phytopathogenic bacteria may have evolved mechanisms to suppress the effects of LPS (and of other non-specific bacterial elicitors) on plant cells. PMID:20572947

  11. Sampling for Bacteria in Wells 

    E-print Network

    Lesikar, Bruce J.

    2001-11-15

    stream_source_info pdf_1539.pdf.txt stream_content_type text/plain stream_size 2257 Content-Encoding ISO-8859-1 stream_name pdf_1539.pdf.txt Content-Type text/plain; charset=ISO-8859-1 Sampling for Bacteria in Wells E...-126 11/01 Water samples for bacteria tests must always be col- lected in a sterile container. The procedure for collect- ing a water sample is as follows: 1. Obtain a sterile container from a Health Department Laboratory or contact your local Extension...

  12. Corticosteroids in the treatment of acute asthma

    PubMed Central

    Alangari, Abdullah A.

    2014-01-01

    Asthma is a prevalent chronic disease of the respiratory system and acute asthma exacerbations are among the most common causes of presentation to the emergency department (ED) and admission to hospital particularly in children. Bronchial airways inflammation is the most prominent pathological feature of asthma. Inhaled corticosteroids (ICS), through their anti-inflammatory effects have been the mainstay of treatment of asthma for many years. Systemic and ICS are also used in the treatment of acute asthma exacerbations. Several international asthma management guidelines recommend the use of systemic corticosteroids in the management of moderate to severe acute asthma early upon presentation to the ED. On the other hand, ICS use in the management acute asthma has been studied in different contexts with encouraging results in some and negative in others. This review sheds some light on the role of systemic and ICS in the management of acute asthma and discusses the current evidence behind their different ways of application particularly in relation to new developments in the field. PMID:25276236

  13. [Multidetector computed tomography in acute abdomen].

    PubMed

    Carreras Aja, M; Arrieta Artieda, I; Borruel Nacenta, S

    2011-10-01

    MDCT has become a fundamental tool for determining the causes of acute abdomen. CT is considered the imaging technique of choice in the diagnostic workup of both localized and diffuse acute abdomen, except in patients in whom acute cholecystitis or acute gynecological disease is suspected and in children, adolescents, and pregnant patients, in whom ultrasonography is the imaging technique of choice. Plain-film X-ray examination has been relegated to the initial management of renal colic, suspected foreign bodies, and intestinal obstruction. One of the drawbacks of MDCT is its use of ionizing radiation, which makes it necessary to filter and direct the examinations as well as to ensure that the most appropriate protocols are used. For this reason, low dose protocols have been developed so that diagnostic studies can be performed with doses of radiation between 2 and 3 mSv; these are normally used in the diagnosis of renal colic and can also be used in selected patients with suspected appendicitis and acute diverticulitis. PMID:21742357

  14. Acute kidney injury in the pregnant patient.

    PubMed

    Nwoko, Rosemary; Plecas, Darko; Garovic, Vesna D

    2012-12-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is costly and is associated with increased mortality and morbidity. An understanding of the renal physiologic changes that occur during pregnancy is essential for proper evaluation, diagnosis, and management of AKI. As in the general population, AKI can occur from prerenal, intrinsic, and post-renal causes. Major causes of pre-renal azotemia include hyperemesis gravidarum and uterine hemorrhage in the setting of placental abruption. Intrinsic etiologies include infections from acute pyelonephritis and septic abortion, bilateral cortical necrosis, and acute tubular necrosis. Particular attention should be paid to specific conditions that lead to AKI during the second and third trimesters, such as preeclampsia, HELLP syndrome, acute fatty liver of pregnancy, and TTP-HUS. For each of these disorders, delivery of the fetus is the recommended therapeutic option, with additional therapies indicated for each specific disease entity. An understanding of the various etiologies of AKI in the pregnant patient is key to the appropriate clinical management, prevention of adverse maternal outcomes, and safe delivery of the fetus. In pregnant women with pre-existing kidney disease, the degree of renal dysfunction is the major determining factor of pregnancy outcomes, which may further be complicated by a prior history of hypertension. PMID:23164415

  15. Drug Treatment of Acute Ischemic Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Bansal, Sameer; Sangha, Kiranpal S.; Khatri, Pooja

    2013-01-01

    Acute ischemic stroke (AIS) is the fourth leading cause of death and the leading cause of adult disability in the USA. AIS most commonly occurs when a blood vessel is obstructed leading to irreversible brain injury and subsequent focal neurologic deficits. Drug treatment of AIS involves intravenous thrombolysis with alteplase (recombinant tissue plasminogen activator [rtPA]). Intravenous alteplase promotes thrombolysis by hydrolyzing plasminogen to form the proteolytic enzyme plasmin. Plasmin targets the blood clot with limited systemic thrombolytic effects. Alteplase must be administered within a short time window to appropriate patients to optimize its therapeutic efficacy. Recent trials have shown this time window may be extended from 3 to 4.5 hours in select patients. Other acute supportive interventions for AIS include maintaining normoglycemia, euthermia and treating severe hypertension. Urgent anticoagulation for AIS has generally not shown benefits that exceed the hemorrhage risks in the acute setting. Urgent antiplatelet use for AIS has limited benefits and should only promptly be initiated if alteplase was not administered, or after 24 hours if alteplase was administered. The majority of AIS patients do not receive thrombolytic therapy due to late arrival to emergency departments and currently there is a paucity of acute interventions for them. Ongoing clinical trials may lead to further medical breakthroughs to limit the damage inflicted by this devastating disease. PMID:23381911

  16. Weight Loss & Acute Porphyria

    MedlinePLUS

    ... porphyrias because reducing the intakes of carbohydrate and energy in an effort to lose weight can worsen ... attempted to lose weight rapidly with very low energy diets. Patients with acute Porphyria should avoid very ...

  17. Ear infection - acute

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Risk factors for acute ear infections include: Attending day care (especially those with more than 6 children) Changes ... hands and toys often. If possible, choose a day care that has 6 or fewer children. This can ...

  18. [Acute postinfectious glomerulonephritis].

    PubMed

    Ramdani, Benyounès; Zamd, Mohamed; Hachim, Khadija; Soulami, Kenza; Ezzahidy, Madiha; Souiri, Malika; Fadili, Wafaa; Lahboub, Assia; Hanafi, Leila; Boujida, Meryem; Squalli, Saida; Benkirane, Amal; Benghanem, Mohamed Gharbi; Medkouri, Ghizlane

    2012-07-01

    Acute postinfectious glomerulonephritis are defined by an acute nonsuppurative inflammatory insult predominantly glomerular. Its current incidence is uncertain because of the frequency of subclinical forms. The most common infectious agent involved is beta hemolytic streptococcus group A. Acute postinfectious glomerulonephritis is uncommon in adults, and its incidence is progressively declining in developed countries. Humoral immunity plays a key role in the pathogenesis of kidney damage. Complement activation by the alternative pathway is the dominant mechanism, but a third way (lectin pathway) has been recently identified. The classic clinical presentation is sudden onset of acute nephritic syndrome after a free interval from a streptococcal infection. Treatment is essentially symptomatic and prevention is possible through improved hygiene and early treatment of infections. PMID:22483748

  19. Acute arterial occlusion - kidney

    MedlinePLUS

    Acute arterial occlusion of the kidney is a sudden, severe blockage of the artery that supplies blood to the kidney. ... The kidneys need a good blood supply. The main artery to the kidney is called the renal artery. Reduced ...

  20. Acute coronary syndrome

    MedlinePLUS

    Heart attack-ACS; Myocardial infarction-ACS; MI-ACS; Acute MI-ACS; ST-elevation myocardial infarction-ACS; Non-ST-elevation myocardial infarction-ACS; Unstable angina-ACS; Accelerating angina-ACS; New- ...