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Sample records for bacteria controls coagulation

  1. Bacteria under stress by complement and coagulation.

    PubMed

    Berends, Evelien T M; Kuipers, Annemarie; Ravesloot, Marietta M; Urbanus, Rolf T; Rooijakkers, Suzan H M

    2014-11-01

    The complement and coagulation systems are two related protein cascades in plasma that serve important roles in host defense and hemostasis, respectively. Complement activation on bacteria supports cellular immune responses and leads to direct killing of bacteria via assembly of the Membrane Attack Complex (MAC). Recent studies have indicated that the coagulation system also contributes to mammalian innate defense since coagulation factors can entrap bacteria inside clots and generate small antibacterial peptides. In this review, we will provide detailed insights into the molecular interplay between these protein cascades and bacteria. We take a closer look at how these pathways are activated on bacterial surfaces and discuss the mechanisms by which they directly cause stress to bacterial cells. The poorly understood mechanism for bacterial killing by the MAC will be reevaluated in light of recent structural insights. Finally, we highlight the strategies used by pathogenic bacteria to modulate these protein networks. Overall, these insights will contribute to a better understanding of the host defense roles of complement and coagulation against bacteria. PMID:25065463

  2. Fibrinolysis and the control of blood coagulation

    PubMed Central

    Chapin, John C.; Hajjar, Katherine A.

    2014-01-01

    Fibrin plays an essential role in hemostasis as both the primary product of the coagulation cascade and the ultimate substrate for fibrinolysis. Fibrinolysis efficiency is greatly influenced by clot structure, fibrinogen isoforms and polymorphisms, the rate of thrombin generation, the reactivity of thrombus-associated cells such as platelets, and the overall biochemical environment. Regulation of the fibrinolytic system, like that of the coagulation cascade, is accomplished by a wide array of cofactors, receptors, and inhibitors. Fibrinolytic activity can be generated either on the surface of a fibrin-containing thrombus, or on cells that express profibrinolytic receptors. In a widening spectrum of clinical disorders, acquired and congenital defects in fibrinolysis contribute to disease morbidity, and new assays of global fibrinolysis now have potential predictive value in multiple clinical settings. Here, we summarize the basic elements of the fibrinolytic system, points of interaction with the coagulation pathway, and some recent clinical advances. PMID:25294122

  3. Nitrogen control in bacteria.

    PubMed Central

    Merrick, M J; Edwards, R A

    1995-01-01

    Nitrogen metabolism in prokaryotes involves the coordinated expression of a large number of enzymes concerned with both utilization of extracellular nitrogen sources and intracellular biosynthesis of nitrogen-containing compounds. The control of this expression is determined by the availability of fixed nitrogen to the cell and is effected by complex regulatory networks involving regulation at both the transcriptional and posttranslational levels. While the most detailed studies to date have been carried out with enteric bacteria, there is a considerable body of evidence to show that the nitrogen regulation (ntr) systems described in the enterics extend to many other genera. Furthermore, as the range of bacteria in which the phenomenon of nitrogen control is examined is being extended, new regulatory mechanisms are also being discovered. In this review, we have attempted to summarize recent research in prokaryotic nitrogen control; to show the ubiquity of the ntr system, at least in gram-negative organisms; and to identify those areas and groups of organisms about which there is much still to learn. PMID:8531888

  4. Reduction of Acid-Fast and Non-Acid-Fast Bacteria by Point of Use Coagulation-Flocculation-Disinfection

    PubMed Central

    Casanova, Lisa M.; Sobsey, Mark D.

    2015-01-01

    Point of use (POU) household water treatment is increasingly being adopted as a solution for access to safe water. Non-tuberculous Mycobacteria (NTM) are found in water, but there is little research on whether NTM survive POU treatment. Mycobacteria may be removed by multi-barrier treatment systems that combine processes such as coagulation, settling and disinfection. This work evaluated removal of a non-tuberculous Mycobacterium (Mycobaterium terrae) and a Gram-negative non-acid-fast environmental bacterium (Aeromonas hydrophila) by combined coagulation-flocculation disinfection POU treatment. Aeromonas hydrophila showed 7.7 log10 reduction in demand free buffer, 6.8 log10 in natural surface water, and 4 log10 reduction in fecally contaminated surface water. Turbidity after treatment was <1 NTU. There was almost no reduction in levels of viable M. terrae by coagulant-flocculant-disinfectant in natural water after 30 minutes. The lack of Mycobacteria reduction was similar for both combined coagulant-flocculant-disinfectant and hypochlorite alone. A POU coagulant-flocculant-disinfectant treatment effectively reduced A. hydrophila from natural surface waters but not Mycobacteria. These results reinforce previous findings that POU coagulation-flocculation-disinfection is effective against gram-negative enteric bacteria. POU treatment and safe storage interventions may need to take into account risks from viable NTM in treated stored water and consider alternative treatment processes to achieve NTM reductions. PMID:26580632

  5. Reduction of Acid-Fast and Non-Acid-Fast Bacteria by Point of Use Coagulation-Flocculation-Disinfection.

    PubMed

    Casanova, Lisa M; Sobsey, Mark D

    2015-11-01

    Point of use (POU) household water treatment is increasingly being adopted as a solution for access to safe water. Non-tuberculous Mycobacteria (NTM) are found in water, but there is little research on whether NTM survive POU treatment. Mycobacteria may be removed by multi-barrier treatment systems that combine processes such as coagulation, settling and disinfection. This work evaluated removal of a non-tuberculous Mycobacterium (Mycobaterium terrae) and a Gram-negative non-acid-fast environmental bacterium (Aeromonas hydrophila) by combined coagulation-flocculation disinfection POU treatment. Aeromonas hydrophila showed 7.7 log10 reduction in demand free buffer, 6.8 log10 in natural surface water, and 4 log10 reduction in fecally contaminated surface water. Turbidity after treatment was <1 NTU. There was almost no reduction in levels of viable M. terrae by coagulant-flocculant-disinfectant in natural water after 30 minutes. The lack of Mycobacteria reduction was similar for both combined coagulant-flocculant-disinfectant and hypochlorite alone. A POU coagulant-flocculant-disinfectant treatment effectively reduced A. hydrophila from natural surface waters but not Mycobacteria. These results reinforce previous findings that POU coagulation-flocculation-disinfection is effective against gram-negative enteric bacteria. POU treatment and safe storage interventions may need to take into account risks from viable NTM in treated stored water and consider alternative treatment processes to achieve NTM reductions. PMID:26580632

  6. Dose control for noncontact laser coagulation of tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roggan, Andre; Albrecht, Hansjoerg; Bocher, Thomas; Rygiel, Reiner; Winter, Harald; Mueller, Gerhard J.

    1995-01-01

    Nd:YAG lasers emitting at 1064 nm are often used for coagulation of tissue in a non-contact mode, i.e. the treatment of verrucae, endometriosis, tumor coagulation and hemostasis. During this process an uncontrolled temperature rise of the irradiated area leads to vaporization and, finally, to a carbonization of the tissue surface. To prevent this, a dose controlled system was developed using an on-line regulation of the output laser power. The change of the backscattered intensity (remission) of the primary beam was used as a dose dependent feedback parameter. Its dependence on the temperature was determined with a double integrating sphere system and Monte-Carlo simulations. The remission of the tissue was calculated in slab geometry from diffusion theory and Monte-Carlo simulations. The laser control was realized with a PD-circuit and an A/D-converter, enabling the direct connection to the internal bus of the laser system. Preliminary studies with various tissues revealed the practicability of the system.

  7. Chemical feed control using coagulation computer models and a streaming current detector.

    PubMed

    Yavich, Alex A; Van De Wege, Jim

    2013-01-01

    This paper describes the use of both the streaming current detector (SCD) and coagulation computer models to provide real-time data for required coagulant feed rates. The method for computer modeling of coagulation and other water treatment processes/operations was originally developed for Lake Michigan Filtration Plant in Grand Rapids, Michigan (MI). Since the initial implementation, a number of water treatment plants (WTPs) in the United States have begun routinely utilizing computer models for chemical feed control and process performance optimization. One plant, Holland WTP in Holland, MI, currently employs both an SCD and a coagulation computer model for chemical feed control. Case studies presented in this paper compare the performance of coagulation computer models and the SCD in full-scale operation. PMID:23787322

  8. Optoacoustic temperature determination and automatic coagulation control in rabbits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlott, Kerstin; Koinzer, Stefan; Ptaszynski, Lars; Luft, Susanne; Baade, Alex; Bever, Marco; Roider, Johann; Birngruber, Reginald; Brinkmann, Ralf

    2011-03-01

    Retinal laser photocoagulation is an established treatment method for many retinal diseases like macula edema or diabetic retinopathy. The selection of the laser parameters is so far based on post treatment evaluation of the lesion size and strength. Due to local pigment variations in the fundus and individual transmission the same laser parameters often lead to an overtreatment. Optoacoustic allows a non invasive monitoring of the retinal temperature increase during retinal laser irradiation by measuring the temperature dependent pressure amplitudes, which are induced by short probe laser pulses. A 75 ns/ 523 nm Nd:YLF was used as a probe laser at a repetition rate of 1 kHz, and a cw / 532 nm treatment laser for heating. A contact lens was modified with a ring-shaped ultrasonic transducer to detect the pressure waves at the cornea. Temperatures were collected for irradiations leading to soft or invisible lesions. Based on this data the threshold for denaturation was found. By analyzing the initial temperature increase, the further temperature development during irradiation could be predicted. An algorithm was found to calculate the irradiation time, which is needed for a soft lesion formation, from the temperature curve. By this it was possible to provide a real-time dosimetry by automatically switching off the treatment laser after the calculated irradiation time. Automatically controlled coagulations appear softer and more uniformly.

  9. Recombinant bacteria for mosquito control.

    PubMed

    Federici, B A; Park, H-W; Bideshi, D K; Wirth, M C; Johnson, J J

    2003-11-01

    Bacterial insecticides have been used for the control of nuisance and vector mosquitoes for more than two decades. Nevertheless, due primarily to their high cost and often only moderate efficacy, these insecticides remain of limited use in tropical countries where mosquito-borne diseases are prevalent. Recently, however, recombinant DNA techniques have been used to improve bacterial insecticide efficacy by markedly increasing the synthesis of mosquitocidal proteins and by enabling new endotoxin combinations from different bacteria to be produced within single strains. These new strains combine mosquitocidal Cry and Cyt proteins of Bacillus thuringiensis with the binary toxin of Bacillus sphaericus, improving efficacy against Culex species by 10-fold and greatly reducing the potential for resistance through the presence of Cyt1A. Moreover, although intensive use of B. sphaericus against Culex populations in the field can result in high levels of resistance, most of this can be suppressed by combining this bacterial species with Cyt1A; the latter enables the binary toxin of this species to enter midgut epithelial cells via the microvillar membrane in the absence of a midgut receptor. The availability of these novel strains and newly discovered mosquitocidal proteins, such as the Mtx toxins of B. sphaericus, offers the potential for constructing a range of recombinant bacterial insecticides for more effective control of the mosquito vectors of filariasis, Dengue fever and malaria. PMID:14506223

  10. Coagulation of humic waters for diffused pollution control and the influence of coagulant type on DOC fractions removed.

    PubMed

    Heiderscheidt, Elisangela; Leiviskä, Tiina; Kløve, Bjørn

    2016-10-01

    This study examined the suitability of organic coagulants for treatment of typically humic peat extraction runoff water by comparing their performance with that of ferric sulphate (FS). The influence of coagulant type on dissolved organic carbon (DOC) fractions removed was analysed in detail using LC-OCD-OND (size exclusion liquid chromatography coupled with organic carbon and organic nitrogen detection) fractionation techniques. In general, lower coagulant dosage was needed under acidic (pH 4.5) than neutral (pH 6.5) conditions. Chitosan (Chit) and poly (diallyldimethyl) ammonium chloride (pDMAC) required significantly lower dosage (40-55%) than FS for acceptable purification, while a tannin-based coagulant (Tan2) required substantially higher dosage (55-75%) independent of water pH. FS demonstrated the best removal of DOC (<81%) and phosphorus (<93%) followed by pDMAC, while Chit and Tan2 achieved the highest removal of suspended solids (SS) (<58%), with flocs formed by Tan2 presenting the best settling properties. Higher molecular weight (MW) DOC fractions were more efficiently removed by all coagulants, with FS being the most efficient (biopolymers 69% and humic substances 91%), followed by Tan2. FS also displayed satisfactory removal of lower MW fractions (building blocks ∼46% and low MW neutrals 62%). Overall, FS was the best performing coagulant. Nevertheless, the organic polymers demonstrated satisfactory overall performance, achieving purification rates mostly inside the requirements set by Finnish environmental authorities. PMID:27401835

  11. Physiological levels of blood coagulation factors IX and X control coagulation kinetics in an in vitro model of circulating tissue factor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tormoen, Garth W.; Khader, Ayesha; Gruber, András; McCarty, Owen J. T.

    2013-06-01

    Thrombosis significantly contributes to cancer morbidity and mortality. The mechanism behind thrombosis in cancer may be circulating tissue factor (TF), as levels of circulating TF are associated with thrombosis. However, circulating TF antigen level alone has failed to predict thrombosis in patients with cancer. We hypothesize that coagulation factor levels regulate the kinetics of circulating TF-induced thrombosis. Coagulation kinetics were measured as a function of individual coagulation factor levels and TF particle concentration. Clotting times increased when pooled plasma was mixed at or above a ratio of 4:6 with PBS. Clotting times increased when pooled plasma was mixed at or above a ratio of 8:2 with factor VII-depleted plasma, 7:3 with factor IX- or factor X-depleted plasmas, or 2:8 with factor II-, V- or VIII-depleted plasmas. Addition of coagulation factors VII, X, IX, V and II to depleted plasmas shortened clotting and enzyme initiation times, and increased enzyme generation rates in a concentration-dependent manner. Only additions of factors IX and X from low-normal to high-normal levels shortened clotting times and increased enzyme generation rates. Our results demonstrate that coagulation kinetics for TF particles are controlled by factor IX and X levels within the normal physiological range. We hypothesize that individual patient factor IX and X levels may be prognostic for susceptibility to circulating TF-induced thrombosis.

  12. How three adventitious lactic acid bacteria affect proteolysis and organic acid production in model Portuguese cheeses manufactured from several milk sources and two alternative coagulants.

    PubMed

    Pereira, C I; Neto, D M; Capucho, J C; Gião, M S; Gomes, A M P; Malcata, F X

    2010-04-01

    Model cheeses were manufactured according to a full factorial experimental design to help shed light on the individual and combined roles played by 3 native lactic acid bacteria (Lactococcus lactis ssp. lactis, Lactobacillus brevis, and Lactobacillus plantarum) upon proteolysis and organic acid evolution in cheese. The model cheeses were manufactured according to a generally representative Portuguese artisanal protocol, but the (ubiquitous) adventitious microflora in the cheesemaking milk were removed via sterilization before manufacture; therefore, the specific effects of only those lactic acid bacteria selected were monitored. In addition, 2 types of coagulant (animal and plant) and 3 types of cheesemaking milk (cow, sheep, and goat) were assessed to determine their influence on the final characteristics of the model cheeses. The nature of the coagulant appeared to be essential during the first stage of proteolysis as expected, whereas the contribution of those bacteria to the pools of total free AA and organic acids was crucial afterward. This was especially so in terms of the differences observed in the metabolisms of lactic acid (in the case of Lactococcus spp.) as well as acetic and citric acids (in the case of Lactobacillus spp.). PMID:20338410

  13. Coagulation of human prostate volumes with MRI-controlled transurethral ultrasound therapy: Results in gel phantoms

    PubMed Central

    N’Djin, William Apoutou; Burtnyk, Mathieu; Kobelevskiy, Ilya; Hadjis, Stefan; Bronskill, Michael; Chopra, Rajiv

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The feasibility and safety of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-controlled transurethral ultrasound therapy were demonstrated recently in a preliminary human study in which a small subvolume of prostate tissue was treated prior to radical prostatectomy. Translation of this technology to full clinical use, however, requires the capability to generate thermal coagulation in a volume up to that of the prostate gland itself. The aim of this study was to investigate the parameters required to treat a full 3D human prostate accurately with a multi-element transurethral applicator and multiplanar MR temperature control. Methods: The approach was a combination of simulations (to select appropriate parameters) followed by experimental confirmation in tissue-mimicking phantoms. A ten-channel, MRI-compatible transurethral ultrasound therapy system was evaluated using six human prostate models (average volume: 36 cm3) obtained from the preliminary human feasibility study. Real-time multiplanar MR thermometry at 3 T was used to control the spatial heating pattern in up to nine planes simultaneously. Treatment strategies incorporated both single (4.6 or 8.1 MHz) and dual (4.6 and 14.4 MHz) frequencies, as well as maximum acoustic surface powers of 10 or 20 W cm−2. Results: Treatments at 4.6 MHz were capable of coagulating a volume equivalent to 97% of the prostate. Increasing power from 10 to 20 W cm−2 reduced treatment times by approximately 50% with full treatments taking 26 ± 3 min at a coagulation rate of 1.8 ± 0.4 cm3 min−1. A dual-frequency 4.6/14.4 MHz treatment strategy was shown to be the most effective configuration for achieving full human prostate treatment while maintaining good treatment accuracy for small treatment radii. The dual-frequency approach reduced overtreatment close to the prostate base and apex, confirming the simulations. Conclusions: This study reinforces the capability of MRI-controlled transurethral ultrasound therapy to treat

  14. Coagulation factor concentrate-based therapy for remote damage control resuscitation (RDCR): a reasonable alternative?

    PubMed

    Maegele, Marc

    2016-04-01

    The concept of remote damage control resuscitation (RDCR) is still in its infancy and there is significant work to be done to improve outcomes for patients with life-threatening bleeding secondary to injury. The prehospital phase of resuscitation is critical and if shock and coagulopathy can be rapidly minimized before hospital admission this will very likely reduce morbidity and mortality. The optimum transfusion strategy for these patients is still highly debated and the potential implications of the recently published pragmatic, randomize, optimal platelet, and plasma ratios trial (PROPPR) for RDCR have been reviewed. Identifying the appropriate transfusion strategy is mandatory before adopting prehospital hemostatic resuscitation strategies. An alternative approach is based on the early administration of coagulation factor concentrates combined with the antifibrinolytic tranexamic acid (TXA). The three major components to this approach in the context of RDCR target the following steps to achieve hemostasis: 1) stop (hyper)fibrinolysis; 2) support clot formation; and 3) increase thrombin generation. Strong evidence exists for the use of TXA. The data from the prospective fibrinogen in trauma induced coagulopathy (FIinTIC) study will inform on the prehospital use of fibrinogen in bleeding trauma patients. Deficits in thrombin generation may be addressed by the administration of prothrombin complex concentrates. Handheld point-of-care devices may be able to support and guide the prehospital and remote use of intravenous hemostatic agents including coagulation factor concentrates along with clinical presentation, assessment, and the extent of bleeding. Combinations may even be more effective for bleeding control. More studies are urgently needed. PMID:27100752

  15. Combining Coagulation/MIEX with Biological Activated Carbon Treatment to Control Organic Fouling in the Microfiltration of Secondary Effluent.

    PubMed

    Pramanik, Biplob Kumar; Roddick, Felicity A; Fan, Linhua

    2016-01-01

    Coagulation, magnetic ion exchange resin (MIEX) and biological activated carbon (BAC) were examined at lab scale as standalone, and sequential pre-treatments for controlling the organic fouling of a microfiltration membrane by biologically treated secondary effluent (BTSE) using a multi-cycle approach. MIEX gave slightly greater enhancement in flux than coagulation due to greater removal of high molecular weight (MW) humic substances, although it was unable to remove high MW biopolymers. BAC treatment was considerably more effective for improving the flux than coagulation or MIEX. This was due to the biodegradation of biopolymers and/or their adsorption by the biofilm, and adsorption of humic substances by the activated carbon, as indicated by size exclusion chromatography. Coagulation or MIEX followed by BAC treatment further reduced the problematic foulants and significantly improved the flux performance. The unified membrane fouling index showed that the reduction of membrane fouling by standalone BAC treatment was 42%. This improved to 65%, 70%, and 93% for alum, ferric chloride and MIEX pre-treatment, respectively, when followed by BAC treatment. This study showed the potential of sequential MIEX and BAC pre-treatment for controlling organic fouling and thus enhancing the performance of microfiltration in the reclamation of BTSE. PMID:27483327

  16. Two-wavelength approach for control of coagulation depth during laser tissue soldering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wehner, Martin; Aden, Mirko; Toedter, Nina; Rosenkranz, Beate

    2015-03-01

    In laser tissue soldering (LTS) protein solutions are used for closing of incisions or fixation of wound dressings. During coagulation and thermal denaturation of the protein solutions their morphology changes significantly such that light is strongly scattered. When scattering becomes major component extinction increases and the optical penetration depth shrinks which could lead to unsufficient coagulation and bonding. For adaption of extinction during coagulation we are investigating a two-wavelength approach. A strongly absorbed laser wavelength (1540 nm) and weakly absorbed wavelength (980 nm) can be applied simultaneously. Simulation of beam propagation is performed in natural and coagulated state of the solder. The model describes a three-layer system consisting of membrane, solder and phantom. The optical properties are determined by spectrometric measurements both in natural and coagulated state. The absorption coefficient μa, scattering coefficient μs and anisotropy factor γ are determined by numerical analysis from the spectrometric data. Beam propagation is simulated for 980 nm and 1540 nm radiation with ZEMAX® software based on the Monte Carlo method. For both wavelengths the beginning of the process with a clear solder layer, and the final state characterized by a coagulated solder layer are examined. The optical penetration depth depends mainly on the optical properties of the solder, which change in the course of coagulation process. The coagulation depth can be varied between 1.5 mm to 3.5 mm by changing the proportion of both laser sources. This leads to concepts for minimizing heat input while maintaining a constant coagulation depth.

  17. Changes in coagulation and fibrinolytic indices in women with polycystic ovarian syndrome undergoing controlled ovarian hyperstimulation.

    PubMed

    Huang, Ying; Zhao, Yong; Yan, Ling; Chuai, Yun-Hai; Liu, Ling-Ling; Chen, Yi; Li, Min; Wang, Ai-Ming

    2014-01-01

    Background. Polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS) women undergoing in vitro fertilization and embryo transfer (IVF-ET) treatment always attain a low cumulative pregnancy rate disaccording with the satisfactory number of oocytes. Objective. We aim to evaluate the status of coagulation and fibrinolytic system in PCOS patients undergoing controlled ovarian hyperstimulation (COH) process. Method. Of the 97 women, 30 patients with PCOS composed the study group; 67 women of child-bearing age with normal endocrine function composed the control group. All participants underwent GnRH agonist standard long protocol, and plasma HCY, FVIII, FX, and D-dimer levels as well as hormone parameters were measured at day of full downregulation, hCG priming, and embryos transfer. Results. On day of full downregulation, FX levels were significantly higher in PCOS group (P < 0.01). On hCG priming day, FX and estrogen levels in PCOS group were higher than in the control group and FVIII levels were significantly lower on day of embryos transfer whereas FX and E2 levels were significantly higher in PCOS group. Conclusion. Hypercoagulable state during peri-implantation phase would probably lead to poor microcirculation of endometrium and be one of the most important disadvantages of successful implantation and subsequent clinical pregnancy. PMID:25374601

  18. Size sensors in bacteria, cell cycle control, and size control

    PubMed Central

    Robert, Lydia

    2015-01-01

    Bacteria proliferate by repetitive cycles of cellular growth and division. The progression into the cell cycle is admitted to be under the control of cell size. However, the molecular basis of this regulation is still unclear. Here I will discuss which mechanisms could allow coupling growth and division by sensing size and transmitting this information to the division machinery. Size sensors could act at different stages of the cell cycle. During septum formation, mechanisms controlling the formation of the Z ring, such as MinCD inhibition or Nucleoid Occlusion (NO) could participate in the size-dependence of the division process. In addition or alternatively, the coupling of growth and division may occur indirectly through the control of DNA replication initiation. The relative importance of these different size-sensing mechanisms could depend on the environmental and genetic context. The recent demonstration of an incremental strategy of size control in bacteria, suggests that DnaA-dependent control of replication initiation could be the major size control mechanism limiting cell size variation. PMID:26074903

  19. Coagulation and oxidation for controlling ultrafiltration membrane fouling in drinking water treatment: Application of ozone at low dose in submerged membrane tank.

    PubMed

    Yu, Wenzheng; Graham, Nigel J D; Fowler, Geoffrey D

    2016-05-15

    Coagulation prior to ultrafiltration (UF) is widely applied for treating contaminated surface water sources for potable supply. While beneficial, coagulation alone is unable to control membrane fouling effectively in many cases, and there is continuing interest in the use of additional, complementary methods such as oxidation in the pre-treatment of raw water prior to UF. In this study, the application of ozone at low dose in the membrane tank immediately following coagulation has been evaluated at laboratory-scale employing model raw water. In parallel tests with and without the application of ozone, the impact of applied ozone doses of 0.5 mg L(-1) and 1.5 mg L(-1) (approximately 0.18 mg L(-1) and 0.54 mg L(-1) consumed ozone, respectively) on the increase of trans-membrane pressure (TMP) was evaluated and correlated with the quantity and nature of membrane deposits, both as a cake layer and within membrane pores. The results showed that a dose of 0.5 mgO3 L(-1) gave a membrane fouling rate that was substantially lower than without ozone addition, while a dose of 1.5 mgO3 L(-1) was able to prevent fouling effects significantly (no increase in TMP). Ozone was found to decrease the concentration of bacteria (especially the concentration of bacteria per suspended solid) in the membrane tank, and to alter the nature of dissolved organic matter by increasing the proportion of hydrophilic substances. Ozone decreased the concentration of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS), such as polysaccharides and proteins, in the membrane cake layer; the reduced EPS and bacterial concentrations resulted in a much thinner cake layer, although the suspended solids concentration was much higher in the ozone added membrane tank. Ozone also decreased the accumulation and hydrophobicity of organic matter within the membrane pores, leading to minimal irreversible fouling. Therefore, the application of low-dose ozone within the UF membrane tank is a potentially important

  20. A simple method for estimation of coagulation efficiency in mixed aerosols. [environmental pollution control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dimmick, R. L.; Boyd, A.; Wolochow, H.

    1975-01-01

    Aerosols of KBr and AgNO3 were mixed, exposed to light in a glass tube and collected in the dark. About 15% of the collected material was reduced to silver upon development. Thus, two aerosols of particles that react to form a photo-reducible compound can be used to measure coagulation efficiency.

  1. Thermal control of virulence factors in bacteria: A hot topic

    PubMed Central

    Lam, Oliver; Wheeler, Jun; Tang, Christoph M

    2014-01-01

    Pathogenic bacteria sense environmental cues, including the local temperature, to control the production of key virulence factors. Thermal regulation can be achieved at the level of DNA, RNA or protein and although many virulence factors are subject to thermal regulation, the exact mechanisms of control are yet to be elucidated in many instances. Understanding how virulence factors are regulated by temperature presents a significant challenge, as gene expression and protein production are often influenced by complex regulatory networks involving multiple transcription factors in bacteria. Here we highlight some recent insights into thermal regulation of virulence in pathogenic bacteria. We focus on bacteria which cause disease in mammalian hosts, which are at a significantly higher temperature than the outside environment. We outline the mechanisms of thermal regulation and how understanding this fundamental aspect of the biology of bacteria has implications for pathogenesis and human health. PMID:25494856

  2. Membrane fouling controlled by coagulation/adsorption during direct sewage membrane filtration (DSMF) for organic matter concentration.

    PubMed

    Gong, Hui; Jin, Zhengyu; Wang, Xian; Wang, Kaijun

    2015-06-01

    Unlike the role of the membrane in a membrane bioreactor, which is designed to replace a sediment tank, direct sewage membrane filtration (DSMF), with the goal of concentrating organic matters, is proposed as a pretreatment process in a novel sewage treatment concept. The concept of membrane-based pretreatment is proposed to divide raw sewage into a concentrated part retaining most organics and a filtered part with less pollutant remaining, so that energy recovery and water reuse, respectively, could be realized by post-treatment. A pilot-scale experiment was carried out to verify the feasibility of coagulant/adsorbent addition for membrane fouling control, which has been the main issue during this DSMF process. The results showed that continuous coagulant addition successfully slowed down the increase in filtration resistance, with the resistance maintained below 1.0×10(13) m(-1) in the first 70 hr before a jump occurred. Furthermore, the adsorbent addition contributed to retarding the occurrence of the filtration resistance jump, achieving simultaneous fouling control and chemical oxygen demand (COD) concentration improvement. The final concentrated COD amounted to 7500 mg/L after 6 days of operation. PMID:26040725

  3. Fouling of microfiltration membranes by organic polymer coagulants and flocculants: controlling factors and mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Wang, Sen; Liu, Charles; Li, Qilin

    2011-01-01

    Organic polymers are commonly used as coagulants or flocculants in pretreatment for microfiltration (MF). These high molecular weight compounds are potential membrane foulants when carried over to the MF filters. This study examined fouling of three MF membranes of different materials by three commonly used water treatment polymers: poly(diallyldimethylammonium) chloride (pDADMAC), polyacrylamide (PAM), and poly(acrylic acid-co-acrylamide (PACA) with a wide range of molecular weights. The effects of polymer molecular characteristics, membrane surface properties, solution condition and polymer concentration on membrane fouling were investigated. Results showed severe fouling of microfiltration membranes at very low polymer concentrations, suggesting that residual polymers carried over from the coagulation/flocculation basin can contribute significantly to membrane fouling. The interactions between polymers and membranes depended strongly on the molecular size and charge of the polymer. High molecular weight, positively charged polymers caused the greatest fouling. Blockage of membrane pore openings was identified as the main fouling mechanism with no detectable internal fouling in spite of the small molecular size of the polymers relative to the membrane pore size. Solution conditions (e.g., pH and calcium concentration) that led to larger polymer molecular or aggregate sizes resulted in greater fouling. PMID:20828779

  4. Coagulant modulates the hypocholesterolemic effect of tofu (coagulated soymilk).

    PubMed

    Oboh, Ganiyu

    2007-06-01

    The recent increase in soymilk and tofu (coagulated soymilk) consumption, especially in Western countries, is due to the recognition of the health benefits of soy foods; consumption of soybean would prevent heart diseases. Since the amount and the type of coagulated biomolecules (such as isoflavones) will vary with the type of coagulant, this will inevitably alter their biological activity. This study sought to assess the effect of some coagulants (calcium chloride, alum, and steep water from pap production) commonly used in the production of tofu in Nigeria on the serum cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein (HDL), and low-density lipoprotein (LDL) levels in albino rats fed tofu for 14 days. The results of this study revealed that there was a significant difference (P < .05) in the total phenol [calcium chloride (0.9%), alum (0.8%), and steep water (1.2%)] content of all the tofu produced. Furthermore, feeding albino rats with tofu and water ad libitum for 14 days caused a significant decrease (P < .05) in serum cholesterol and LDL when compared with the control. Conversely, there was a significant increase (P < .05) in serum HDL when compared with the control. However, rats fed steep water-coagulated tofu had the lowest serum levels of cholesterol and LDL, followed by those fed alum- and calcium chloride-coagulated tofu, respectively, while those fed with alum-coagulated tofu had the highest serum HDL level, closely followed by those fed steep water-coagulated tofu. It was therefore concluded that of all the coagulants, steep water appeared to be the most promising coagulant with regard to the production of tofu with a high hypocholesterolemic effect based on the low serum cholesterol and LDL levels and high HDL level. PMID:17651081

  5. Cell size control and homeostasis in bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bradde, Serena; Taheri, Sattar; Sauls, John; Hill, Nobert; Levine, Petra; Paulsson, Johan; Vergassola, Massimo; Jun, Suckjoon

    2015-03-01

    How cells control their size is a fundamental question in biology. The mechanisms for sensing size, time, or a combination of the two are not supported by experimental evidence. By analysing distributions of size at division at birth and generation time of hundreds of thousands of Gram-negative E. coli and Gram-positive B. subtilis cells under a wide range of tightly controlled steady-state growth conditions, we are now in the position to validate different theoretical models. In this talk I will present all possible models in details and present a general mechanism that quantitatively explains all measurable aspects of growth and cell division at both population and single-cell levels.

  6. ENGINEERING OF PEPTIDOGLYCAN HYDROLASES FOR CONTROL OF PATHOGENIC BACTERIA

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Bacteriophages are viruses exclusively infecting bacteria and therefore offer suitable tools for their detection and control. At the end of their multiplication cycle, most phages lyse their hosts from within by means of an endolysin (peptidoglycan hydrolase), thereby enabling release of the phage p...

  7. Coagulation abnormalities in sepsis.

    PubMed

    Tsao, Cheng-Ming; Ho, Shung-Tai; Wu, Chin-Chen

    2015-03-01

    Although the pathophysiology of sepsis has been elucidated with the passage of time, sepsis may be regarded as an uncontrolled inflammatory and procoagulant response to infection. The hemostatic changes in sepsis range from subclinical activation of blood coagulation to acute disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC). DIC is characterized by widespread microvascular thrombosis, which contributes to multiple organ dysfunction/failure, and subsequent consumption of platelets and coagulation factors, eventually causing bleeding manifestations. The diagnosis of DIC can be made using routinely available laboratory tests, scoring algorithms, and thromboelastography. In this cascade of events, the inhibition of coagulation activation and platelet function is conjectured as a useful tool for attenuating inflammatory response and improving outcomes in sepsis. A number of clinical trials of anticoagulants were performed, but none of them have been recognized as a standard therapy because recombinant activated protein C was withdrawn from the market owing to its insufficient efficacy in a randomized controlled trial. However, these subgroup analyses of activated protein C, antithrombin, and thrombomodulin trials show that overt coagulation activation is strongly associated with the best therapeutic effect of the inhibitor. In addition, antiplatelet drugs, including acetylsalicylic acid, P2Y12 inhibitors, and glycoprotein IIb/IIIa antagonists, may reduce organ failure and mortality in the experimental model of sepsis without a concomitant increased bleeding risk, which should be supported by solid clinical data. For a state-of-the-art treatment of sepsis, the efficacy of anticoagulant and antiplatelet agents needs to be proved in further large-scale prospective, interventional, randomized validation trials. PMID:25544351

  8. Acute effects of calcium supplements on blood pressure and blood coagulation: secondary analysis of a randomised controlled trial in post-menopausal women.

    PubMed

    Bristow, Sarah M; Gamble, Greg D; Stewart, Angela; Horne, Anne M; Reid, Ian R

    2015-12-14

    Recent evidence suggests that Ca supplements increase the risk of cardiovascular events, but the mechanism(s) by which this occurs is uncertain. In a study primarily assessing the effects of various Ca supplements on blood Ca levels, we also investigated the effects of Ca supplements on blood pressure and their acute effects on blood coagulation. We randomised 100 post-menopausal women to 1 g/d of Ca or a placebo containing no Ca. Blood pressure was measured at baseline and every 2 h up to 8 h after their first dose and after 3 months of supplementation. Blood coagulation was measured by thromboelastography (TEG) in a subgroup of participants (n 40) up to 8 h only. Blood pressure declined over 8 h in both the groups, consistent with its normal diurnal rhythm. The reduction in systolic blood pressure was smaller in the Ca group compared with the control group by >5 mmHg between 2 and 6 h (P≤0·02), and the reduction in diastolic blood pressure was smaller at 2 h (between-groups difference 4·5 mmHg, P=0·004). Blood coagulability, assessed by TEG, increased from baseline over 8 h in the calcium citrate and control groups. At 4 h, the increase in the coagulation index was greater in the calcium citrate group compared with the control group (P=0·03), which appeared to be due to a greater reduction in the time to clot initiation. These data suggest that Ca supplements may acutely influence blood pressure and blood coagulation. Further investigation of this possibility is required. PMID:26420590

  9. Toward a better understanding of coagulation for dissolved organic nitrogen using polymeric zinc-iron-phosphate coagulant.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Guocheng; Wang, Qian; Yin, Jun; Li, Zhongwu; Zhang, Peng; Ren, Bozhi; Fan, Gongduan; Wan, Peng

    2016-09-01

    The increase of agricultural related activities and the lack of effective waste control has led to an increase of organic nitrogen in water. The development of coagulants to effectively remove dissolved organic nitrogen (DON) is a high priority in the water treatment industry. We developed a polymeric zinc-iron-phosphate (ZnFeP) coagulant and investigated its coagulation effect on DON removal. Optimum coagulant for coagulation for DON and TDN removals was characterized by the dense convex-concave packing structure differing from other zinc-based coagulant, polycrystalline structure and high content colloidal species, which could account up to 87% of the total colloidal species. Coagulation experiments showed the DON removal rate to vary greatly depending on principal components and their interaction with metals, phosphate and hydroxyl. DON removal efficiency increased with the increase of colloidal species. The coagulation was also dependent on coagulant dosage and water quality parameters: Coagulation efficiency increased with coagulant dosage in the investigated range of 1-16 mg/l, and a pH of 6 was found to be superior for the coagulation. DON removal efficiency was also higher than and linearly correlated with total dissolved nitrogen (TDN) removal, which implies that an effective coagulation for TDN is also effective for DON. The findings in this study indicate that coagulation of DON is largely influenced by coagulant composition and species. We also found the removal of DON by our newly developed polymeric ZnFeP coagulant to be effective. PMID:27192355

  10. Disseminated intravascular coagulation.

    PubMed

    Gando, Satoshi; Levi, Marcel; Toh, Cheng-Hock

    2016-01-01

    Disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC) is an acquired syndrome characterized by widespread intravascular activation of coagulation that can be caused by infectious insults (such as sepsis) and non-infectious insults (such as trauma). The main pathophysiological mechanisms of DIC are inflammatory cytokine-initiated activation of tissue factor-dependent coagulation, insufficient control of anticoagulant pathways and plasminogen activator inhibitor 1-mediated suppression of fibrinolysis. Together, these changes give rise to endothelial dysfunction and microvascular thrombosis, which can cause organ dysfunction and seriously affect patient prognosis. Recent observations have pointed to an important role for extracellular DNA and DNA-binding proteins, such as histones, in the pathogenesis of DIC. The International Society on Thrombosis and Haemostasis (ISTH) established a DIC diagnostic scoring system consisting of global haemostatic test parameters. This scoring system has now been well validated in diverse clinical settings. The theoretical cornerstone of DIC management is the specific and vigorous treatment of the underlying conditions, and DIC should be simultaneously managed to improve patient outcomes. The ISTH guidance for the treatment of DIC recommends treatment strategies that are based on current evidence. In this Primer, we provide an updated overview of the pathophysiology, diagnosis and management of DIC and discuss the future directions of basic and clinical research in this field. PMID:27250996

  11. Virus inactivation in aluminum and polyaluminum coagulation.

    PubMed

    Matsui, Yoshihiko; Matsushita, Taku; Sakuma, Satoru; Gojo, Takahito; Mamiya, Teppei; Suzuoki, Hiroshi; Inoue, Takanobu

    2003-11-15

    Inorganic aluminum salts, such as aluminum sulfate, are coagulants that cause small particles, such as bacteria and viruses as well as inorganic particles, to destabilize and combine into larger aggregates. In this investigation, batch coagulation treatments of water samples spiked with Qbeta, MS2, T4, and P1 viruses were conducted with four different aluminum coagulants. The total infectious virus concentration in the suspension of floc particles that eventually formed by dosing with coagulant was measured after the floc particles were dissolved by raising the pH with an alkaline beef extract solution. The virus concentrations were extremely reduced after the water samples were dosed with aluminum coagulants. Viruses mixed with and adsorbed onto preformed aluminum hydroxide floc were, however, completely recovered after the floc dissolution. These results indicated that the aluminum coagulation process inactivates viruses. Virucidal activity was most prominent with the prehydrolyzed aluminum salt coagulant, polyaluminum chloride (PACl). Virucidal activity was lower in river water than in ultrapure water--natural organic matter in the river water depressed the virucidal activity. Mechanisms and kinetics of the virus inactivation were discussed. Our results suggest that intermediate polymers formed during hydrolysis of the aluminum coagulants sorbed strongly to viruses, either rendering them inactive or preventing infectivity. PMID:14655704

  12. Controlling weeds with fungi, bacteria and viruses: a review.

    PubMed

    Harding, Dylan P; Raizada, Manish N

    2015-01-01

    Weeds are a nuisance in a variety of land uses. The increasing prevalence of both herbicide resistant weeds and bans on cosmetic pesticide use has created a strong impetus to develop novel strategies for controlling weeds. The application of bacteria, fungi and viruses to achieving this goal has received increasingly great attention over the last three decades. Proposed benefits to this strategy include reduced environmental impact, increased target specificity, reduced development costs compared to conventional herbicides and the identification of novel herbicidal mechanisms. This review focuses on examples from North America. Among fungi, the prominent genera to receive attention as bioherbicide candidates include Colletotrichum, Phoma, and Sclerotinia. Among bacteria, Xanthomonas and Pseudomonas share this distinction. The available reports on the application of viruses to controlling weeds are also reviewed. Focus is given to the phytotoxic mechanisms associated with bioherbicide candidates. Achieving consistent suppression of weeds in field conditions is a common challenge to this control strategy, as the efficacy of a bioherbicide candidate is generally more sensitive to environmental variation than a conventional herbicide. Common themes and lessons emerging from the available literature in regard to this challenge are presented. Additionally, future directions for this crop protection strategy are suggested. PMID:26379687

  13. Controlling weeds with fungi, bacteria and viruses: a review

    PubMed Central

    Harding, Dylan P.; Raizada, Manish N.

    2015-01-01

    Weeds are a nuisance in a variety of land uses. The increasing prevalence of both herbicide resistant weeds and bans on cosmetic pesticide use has created a strong impetus to develop novel strategies for controlling weeds. The application of bacteria, fungi and viruses to achieving this goal has received increasingly great attention over the last three decades. Proposed benefits to this strategy include reduced environmental impact, increased target specificity, reduced development costs compared to conventional herbicides and the identification of novel herbicidal mechanisms. This review focuses on examples from North America. Among fungi, the prominent genera to receive attention as bioherbicide candidates include Colletotrichum, Phoma, and Sclerotinia. Among bacteria, Xanthomonas and Pseudomonas share this distinction. The available reports on the application of viruses to controlling weeds are also reviewed. Focus is given to the phytotoxic mechanisms associated with bioherbicide candidates. Achieving consistent suppression of weeds in field conditions is a common challenge to this control strategy, as the efficacy of a bioherbicide candidate is generally more sensitive to environmental variation than a conventional herbicide. Common themes and lessons emerging from the available literature in regard to this challenge are presented. Additionally, future directions for this crop protection strategy are suggested. PMID:26379687

  14. Fabrication and magnetic control of bacteria-inspired robotic microswimmers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheang, U. Kei; Roy, Dheeraj; Lee, Jun Hee; Kim, Min Jun

    2010-11-01

    A biomimetic, microscale system using the mechanics of swimming bacteria has been fabricated and controlled in a low Reynolds number fluidic environment. The microswimmer consists of a polystyrene microbead conjugated to a magnetic nanoparticle via a flagellar filament using avidin-biotin linkages. The flagellar filaments were isolated from the bacterium, Salmonella typhimurium. Propulsion energy was supplied by an external rotating magnetic field designed in an approximate Helmholtz configuration. Further, the finite element analysis software, COMSOL MULTIPHYSICS, was used to develop a simulation of the robotic devices within the magnetic controller. The robotic microswimmers exhibited flagellar propulsion in two-dimensional magnetic fields, which demonstrate controllability of the biomimetically designed devices for future biomedical applications.

  15. Ultrasound for noninvasive control of laser-induced tissue heating and coagulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kleffner, Bernhard; Kriegerowski, Martin; Oltrup, Theo; Bende, Thomas; Jean, Benedikt J.

    1996-05-01

    The application of lasers to achieve localized thermal tissue damage is a common technique in minimally invasive surgery. Currently, there is no control during these treatments. In glaucoma therapy the laser energy applied and the beam direction are estimated prior to treatment, according to clinical experience and anatomic norm values. This lack of on-line control may limit success and lead to side effects. Precision and efficiency of treatment could be improved markedly by analysis of spatially resolved, temperature-dependent data obtained by Ultrasound Reflectometry. Thermally induced changes, as well as their localization were detected qualitatively in B-scan. Quantification was achieved by integration of high frequency RF-signals with the following resolution: spatial 50 micrometers , temporal 200 microsecond(s) , temperature 0.5 degree(s). The presented method is suitable for a non-invasive on-line therapy control.

  16. Issues involved with non-characterized control of methanotrophic bacteria

    SciTech Connect

    Stoner, D.L.; Tolle, C.R.; Noah, K.S.; Davis, D.A.; Miller, K.S.; Fife, D.J.

    1998-05-11

    Methane-utilizing bacteria, methanotrophs, have application as biocatalysts in the commodity chemical production, waste treatment and environmental remediation industries. Methanotrophs have the ability to oxidize many chemical compounds into more desired products, such as the production of propylene oxide. Methanotrophs can also degrade toxic compounds such as trichloroethylene. However, there are many physical, chemical and biological problems associated with the continuous oxidation of chemicals. These include, low mass transfer of methane, oxygen and propylene; toxicity of substrates and degradation products, and competition between the growth substrate, i.e., methane and chemical feed stock, e.g., propylene for the biocatalyst. To supervise methanotrophic bioprocesses, an intelligent control system must accommodate any biological limitations, e.g., toxicity, and mitigate the impact of the physical and chemical limitations, e.g., mass transfer of methane and the solubility of propylene. The intelligent control system must have the capability to assess the current conditions and metabolic state of the bacteria; recognize and diagnose instrument faults; and select and maintain sets of parameters that will result in high production and growth.

  17. Disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC)

    MedlinePlus

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000573.htm Disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC) To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Disseminated intravascular coagulation is a serious disorder in which the proteins ...

  18. Probiotic Bacteria as Biological Control Agents in Aquaculture

    PubMed Central

    Verschuere, Laurent; Rombaut, Geert; Sorgeloos, Patrick; Verstraete, Willy

    2000-01-01

    There is an urgent need in aquaculture to develop microbial control strategies, since disease outbreaks are recognized as important constraints to aquaculture production and trade and since the development of antibiotic resistance has become a matter of growing concern. One of the alternatives to antimicrobials in disease control could be the use of probiotic bacteria as microbial control agents. This review describes the state of the art of probiotic research in the culture of fish, crustaceans, mollusks, and live food, with an evaluation of the results obtained so far. A new definition of probiotics, also applicable to aquatic environments, is proposed, and a detailed description is given of their possible modes of action, i.e., production of compounds that are inhibitory toward pathogens, competition with harmful microorganisms for nutrients and energy, competition with deleterious species for adhesion sites, enhancement of the immune response of the animal, improvement of water quality, and interaction with phytoplankton. A rationale is proposed for the multistep and multidisciplinary process required for the development of effective and safe probiotics for commercial application in aquaculture. Finally, directions for further research are discussed. PMID:11104813

  19. Probiotic bacteria as biological control agents in aquaculture.

    PubMed

    Verschuere, L; Rombaut, G; Sorgeloos, P; Verstraete, W

    2000-12-01

    There is an urgent need in aquaculture to develop microbial control strategies, since disease outbreaks are recognized as important constraints to aquaculture production and trade and since the development of antibiotic resistance has become a matter of growing concern. One of the alternatives to antimicrobials in disease control could be the use of probiotic bacteria as microbial control agents. This review describes the state of the art of probiotic research in the culture of fish, crustaceans, mollusks, and live food, with an evaluation of the results obtained so far. A new definition of probiotics, also applicable to aquatic environments, is proposed, and a detailed description is given of their possible modes of action, i.e., production of compounds that are inhibitory toward pathogens, competition with harmful microorganisms for nutrients and energy, competition with deleterious species for adhesion sites, enhancement of the immune response of the animal, improvement of water quality, and interaction with phytoplankton. A rationale is proposed for the multistep and multidisciplinary process required for the development of effective and safe probiotics for commercial application in aquaculture. Finally, directions for further research are discussed. PMID:11104813

  20. Efficacy of burning, tillage, and biocides in controlling bacteria released at field sites and effects on indigenous bacteria and fungi.

    PubMed

    Donegan, K; Fieland, V; Fowles, N; Ganio, L; Seidler, R

    1992-04-01

    Decontamination treatments of burning and biocide application, alone and in combination with tillage, were evaluated for their ability to reduce populations of bacteria applied to the leaves of plants in field plots. In addition, the effects of these control methods on indigenous leaf and soil bacteria and fungi were assessed. Field plots of bush beans (Phaseolus vulgaris), sprayed with the bacterium Pseudomonas syringae, Pseudomonas fluorescens, or Erwinia herbicola, received the following treatments: (i) control, (ii) tillage, (iii) burning, (iv) burning plus tillage (burn-tillage), (v) Kocide (cupric hydroxide), (vi) Kocide plus tillage, (vii) Agri-Strep (streptomycin sulfate), and (viii) Agri-Strep plus tillage. Leaves and soil from the plots were sampled at 1 day before and at 1, 3, 7, 10, 14, 21, and 30 days after application of the decontamination treatments. The burn and burn-tillage treatments produced the most significant reductions in bacterial populations. The Agri-Strep treatment was more effective than the Kocide treatment in eliminating applied bacteria, but neither biocide produced consistent or persistent control. In contrast, the tillage treatment, alone or in combination with the Agri-Strep or Kocide treatments, had a short-term stimulatory effect and increased populations of applied bacteria and also levels of indigenous fungi and bacteria. Agri-Strep and Kocide treatments caused significant reductions in indigenous bacterial populations up to 14 days after application and in indigenous fungal populations on day 7 after application. Our results suggest that conventional plant disease control methods may not provide satisfactory control of genetically engineered microorganisms and indicate a need for further development of effective and selective methods to control release microorganisms at field sites. PMID:1599240

  1. Efficacy of burning, tillage, and biocides in controlling bacteria released at field sites and effects on indigenous bacteria and fungi.

    PubMed Central

    Donegan, K; Fieland, V; Fowles, N; Ganio, L; Seidler, R

    1992-01-01

    Decontamination treatments of burning and biocide application, alone and in combination with tillage, were evaluated for their ability to reduce populations of bacteria applied to the leaves of plants in field plots. In addition, the effects of these control methods on indigenous leaf and soil bacteria and fungi were assessed. Field plots of bush beans (Phaseolus vulgaris), sprayed with the bacterium Pseudomonas syringae, Pseudomonas fluorescens, or Erwinia herbicola, received the following treatments: (i) control, (ii) tillage, (iii) burning, (iv) burning plus tillage (burn-tillage), (v) Kocide (cupric hydroxide), (vi) Kocide plus tillage, (vii) Agri-Strep (streptomycin sulfate), and (viii) Agri-Strep plus tillage. Leaves and soil from the plots were sampled at 1 day before and at 1, 3, 7, 10, 14, 21, and 30 days after application of the decontamination treatments. The burn and burn-tillage treatments produced the most significant reductions in bacterial populations. The Agri-Strep treatment was more effective than the Kocide treatment in eliminating applied bacteria, but neither biocide produced consistent or persistent control. In contrast, the tillage treatment, alone or in combination with the Agri-Strep or Kocide treatments, had a short-term stimulatory effect and increased populations of applied bacteria and also levels of indigenous fungi and bacteria. Agri-Strep and Kocide treatments caused significant reductions in indigenous bacterial populations up to 14 days after application and in indigenous fungal populations on day 7 after application. Our results suggest that conventional plant disease control methods may not provide satisfactory control of genetically engineered microorganisms and indicate a need for further development of effective and selective methods to control release microorganisms at field sites. PMID:1599240

  2. The use of bacteria in conformance control - Initial studies

    SciTech Connect

    MacLeod, F.A.; Lappin-Scott, H.M.; Cusack, F.; Costerton, J.W.

    1988-05-01

    Bacteria respond to nutrient starvation by reducing in size to form ultramicrobacteria (UMB) less than 0.3 ..mu..m in diameter. Work in the authors' laboratory has established that two bacteria, Klebsiella pneumoniae and a Psuedomonas species, isolated from oilwell waters decreased in size when deprived of nutrients. Subsequent restoration of nutrients resulted in the resuscitation of the UMB and they returned to normal size. When injected into model rock cores, the UMB penetrated deeper than the full-sized bacteria. Higher counts of bacteria and carbohydrate production were found around the core inlet with the full-sized bacteria. However, the UMB were located throughout the entire core. This work demonstrates that UMB may provide a new selective plugging technique by virtue of their superior penetration properties throughout solid matrices.

  3. Control of bleeding by silk ligation and diathermy coagulation during tonsillectomy: A comparison of efficacy of the two techniques in the first 24 hours after surgery

    PubMed Central

    Anwar, Khurshid; Ahmad, Rafiq; Khan, Muneeb

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To assess and compare the relative efficacy of silk ligation and diathermy coagulation techniques in controlling bleeding during tonsillectomy in the first 24 hours. Methods: This prospective study was conducted at the Department of ENT, Khalifa Gul Nawaz Teaching Hospital, Bannu and this department related consultants’ private clinics from January 1, 2012 to December 31, 2014. The study included 180 cases. All patients included were having history of recurrent, acute tonsillitis, with more than 6–7 episodes in one year, five episodes per year for two years, or three episodes per year for three years. All the surgeries were performed by dissection method. Haemostasis during the procedure was secured by either ligation with silk 1 or using diathermy. The results were analyzed using SPSS 16.0 for windows. Results: A total of180 cases were included in the study. The ages of the patients ranged from 5 to 40 years with the mean age of 15.56 years and a std.deviation of +/- 8.24. The male to female ratio was 1.25:1. The number of hemorrhages occurring was greater in the ‘diathermy coagulation’ group as compared to the ‘silk ligation’ group. However, the observed difference was statistically insignificant (p >.05). Conclusion: Primary haemorrhage occurring during tonsillectomy is a serious threat and control of bleeding during the procedure should therefore be meticulous. Both suture ligation and coagulation diathermy for control of bleeders during the procedure by dissection method are equally effective. PMID:26430438

  4. Botanicals to control soft rot bacteria of potato.

    PubMed

    Rahman, M M; Khan, A A; Ali, M E; Mian, I H; Akanda, A M; Abd Hamid, S B

    2012-01-01

    Extracts from eleven different plant species such as jute (Corchorus capsularis L.), cheerota (Swertia chiraita Ham.), chatim (Alstonia scholaris L.), mander (Erythrina variegata), bael (Aegle marmelos L.), marigold (Tagetes erecta), onion (Allium cepa), garlic (Allium sativum L.), neem (Azadiracta indica), lime (Citrus aurantifolia), and turmeric (Curcuma longa L.) were tested for antibacterial activity against potato soft rot bacteria, E. carotovora subsp. carotovora (Ecc) P-138, under in vitro and storage conditions. Previously, Ecc P-138 was identified as the most aggressive soft rot bacterium in Bangladeshi potatoes. Of the 11 different plant extracts, only extracts from dried jute leaves and cheerota significantly inhibited growth of Ecc P-138 in vitro. Finally, both plant extracts were tested to control the soft rot disease of potato tuber under storage conditions. In a 22-week storage condition, the treated potatoes were significantly more protected against the soft rot infection than those of untreated samples in terms of infection rate and weight loss. The jute leaf extracts showed more pronounced inhibitory effects on Ecc-138 growth both in in vitro and storage experiments. PMID:22701096

  5. Efficacy of entomopathogenic bacteria for control of Musca domestica.

    PubMed

    Zimmer, Cristine R; Dias de Castro, Luciana L; Pires, Sabrina M; Delgado Menezes, Adriane M; Ribeiro, Paulo B; Leivas Leite, Fábio P

    2013-11-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the larvicidal activity, and sub lethal effects of entomopathogenic bacteria Brevibacillus laterosporus, Bacillus thuringiensis var. israelensis, B. thuringiensis var. kurstaki, and a commercial formulation of Bacillus sphaericus on Musca domestica. Bacterial suspensions were prepared in different concentrations and added to the diet of newly-hatched larvae which were monitored until the adult stage. The larvae were susceptible to the B. laterosporus, B. thuringiensis var. israelensis, and B. thuringiensis var. kurstaki bacteria in varied concentration levels. These bacteria have larvicidal and sub lethal effects on the development of flies, reducing both adult size, and impairing the reproductive performance of the species. PMID:24018169

  6. Development of the selective coagulation process

    SciTech Connect

    Yoon, R.H.; Luttrell, G.H.

    1991-01-01

    Recent studies have resulted in the development of a novel agglomeration process for upgrading ultrafine coal. This process, which is known as selective hydrophobic coagulation (SHC), is based on the new finding that hydrophobic coal particles can be selectively coagulated in the presence of dispersed mineral matter. The driving force for the coagulation is believed to be due to the structural arrangement of water molecules near the coal surface. In most cases, simple pH control is all that is required to (1) induce the coagulation of the coal particles and (2) effectively disperse the particles of mineral matter. During the past quarter, several important aspects of the SHC process were examined. Direct measurements of the surface forces which control the selective coagulation process were conducted using a Mark 4 surface force apparatus. These preliminary measurements have provided irrefutable evidence for the existence of the hydrophobic force. Key expressions have been presented for a population balance model describing the hydrophobic coagulation process. In order to validate this model, experimental measurements of the size distributions of coal coagulation have been initiated. The liberation characteristics of samples obtained from the Elkhorn No. 3 and Pittsburgh No. 8 coal seams were determined using a SEM-IPS image processing system. Mixing studies were carried out to determine the effects of mixer-impeller configurations on the coagula size distributions. Bench-scale continuous testing has also been initiated during the past quarter using a rotating drum screen and sedimentation tank. 25 figs., 8 tabs.

  7. Dissolved organic matter kinetically controls mercury bioavailability to bacteria.

    PubMed

    Chiasson-Gould, Sophie A; Blais, Jules M; Poulain, Alexandre J

    2014-03-18

    Predicting the bioavailability of inorganic mercury (Hg) to bacteria that produce the potent bioaccumulative neurotoxin monomethylmercury remains one of the greatest challenges in predicting the environmental fate and transport of Hg. Dissolved organic matter (DOM) affects mercury methylation due to its influence on cell physiology (as a potential nutrient) and its influence on Hg(II) speciation in solution (as a complexing agent), therefore controlling Hg bioavailability. We assessed the role of DOM on Hg(II) bioavailability to a gram-negative bacterium bioreporter under oxic pseudo- and nonequilibrium conditions, using defined media and field samples spanning a wide range of DOM levels. Our results showed that Hg(II) was considerably more bioavailable under nonequilibrium conditions than when DOM was absent or when Hg(II) and DOM had reached pseudoequilibrium (24 h) prior to cell exposure. Under these enhanced uptake conditions, Hg(II) bioavailability followed a bell shaped curve as DOM concentrations increased, both for defined media and natural water samples, consistent with bioaccumulation results in a companion paper (this issue) observed for amphipods. Experiments also suggest that DOM may not only provide shuttle molecules facilitating Hg uptake, but also alter cell wall properties to facilitate the first steps toward Hg(II) internalization. We propose the existence of a short-lived yet critical time window (<24 h) during which DOM facilitates the entry of newly deposited Hg(II) into aquatic food webs, suggesting that the bulk of mercury incorporation in aquatic food webs would occur within hours following its deposition from the atmosphere. PMID:24524696

  8. Polyphosphate, Platelets, and Coagulation

    PubMed Central

    Travers, Richard J.; Smith, Stephanie A.; Morrissey, James H.

    2015-01-01

    While we have understood the basic outline of the enzymes and reactions that make up the traditional blood coagulation cascade for many years, recently our appreciation of the complexity of these interactions has greatly increased. This has resulted in unofficial “revisions” of the coagulation cascade to include new amplification pathways and connections between the standard coagulation cascade enzymes, as well as the identification of extensive connections between the immune system and the coagulation cascade. The discovery that polyphosphate is stored in platelet dense granules and is secreted during platelet activation has resulted in a recent burst of interest in the role of this ancient molecule in human biology. Here we review the increasingly complex role of platelet polyphosphate in hemostasis, thrombosis, and inflammation that has been uncovered in recent years, as well as novel therapeutics centered on modulating polyphosphate’s roles in coagulation and inflammation. PMID:25976958

  9. Intranuclear bacteria: inside the cellular control center of eukaryotes.

    PubMed

    Schulz, Frederik; Horn, Matthias

    2015-06-01

    Intracellular bacteria including major pathogens live in the cytoplasm or in cytoplasmic vacuoles within their host cell. However, some can invade more unusual intracellular niches such as the eukaryotic nucleus. Phylogenetically diverse intranuclear bacteria have been discovered in various protist, arthropod, marine invertebrate, and mammalian hosts. Although targeting the same cellular compartment, they have apparently developed fundamentally-different infection strategies. The nucleus provides a rich pool of nutrients and protection against host cytoplasmic defense mechanisms; intranuclear bacteria can directly manipulate the host by interfering with nuclear processes. The impact on their host cells ranges from stable associations with a neutral or beneficial effect on host fitness to rapid host lysis. The analysis of the intranuclear lifestyle will extend our current framework for understanding host-pathogen interactions. PMID:25680230

  10. Bacteria clustering by polymers induces the expression of quorum sense controlled phenotypes

    PubMed Central

    Lui, Leong T.; Xue, Xuan; Sui, Cheng; Brown, Alan; Pritchard, David I.; Halliday, Nigel; Winzer, Klaus; Howdle, Steven M.; Fernandez-Trillo, Francisco; Krasnogor, Natalio; Alexander, Cameron

    2014-01-01

    Bacteria deploy a range of chemistries to regulate their behaviour and respond to their environment. Quorum sensing is one mean by which bacteria use chemical reactions to modulate pre-infection behaviour such as surface attachment. Polymers that can interfere with bacterial adhesion or the chemical reactions used for quorum sensing are thus a potential means to control bacterial population responses. Here we report how polymeric “bacteria sequestrants”, designed to bind to bacteria through electrostatic interactions and thus inhibit bacterial adhesion to surfaces, induce the expression of quorum sensing controlled phenotypes as a consequence of cell clustering. A combination of polymer and analytical chemistry, biological assays and computational modelling has been used to characterise the feedback between bacteria clustering and quorum sensing signaling. We have also derived design principles and chemical strategies for controlling bacterial behaviour at the population level. PMID:24256871

  11. Controlling Magnetotactic Bacteria through an Integrated Nanofabricated Metallic Island and Optical Microscope Approach

    PubMed Central

    González, Lina M.; Ruder, Warren C.; Leduc, Philip R.; Messner, William C.

    2014-01-01

    Herein, we demonstrate the control of magnetotactic bacteria through the application of magnetic field gradients with real-time visualization. We accomplish this control by integrating a pair of macroscale Helmholtz coils and lithographically fabricated nanoscale islands composed of permalloy (Ni80Fe20). This system enabled us to guide and steer amphitrichous Magnetospirillum magneticum strain AMB-1 to specific location via magnetic islands. The geometries of the islands allowed us to have control over the specific magnetic field gradients on the bacteria. We estimate that magnetotactic bacteria located less than 1 μm from the edge of a diamond shaped island experience a maximum force of approximately 34 pN, which engages the bacteria without trapping them. Our system could be useful for a variety of applications including magnetic fabrication, self-assembly, and probing the sensing apparatus of magnetotactic bacteria. PMID:24553101

  12. Bacteria clustering by polymers induces the expression of quorum-sensing-controlled phenotypes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lui, Leong T.; Xue, Xuan; Sui, Cheng; Brown, Alan; Pritchard, David I.; Halliday, Nigel; Winzer, Klaus; Howdle, Steven M.; Fernandez-Trillo, Francisco; Krasnogor, Natalio; Alexander, Cameron

    2013-12-01

    Bacteria deploy a range of chemistries to regulate their behaviour and respond to their environment. Quorum sensing is one method by which bacteria use chemical reactions to modulate pre-infection behaviour such as surface attachment. Polymers that can interfere with bacterial adhesion or the chemical reactions used for quorum sensing are therefore a potential means to control bacterial population responses. Here, we report how polymeric ‘bacteria sequestrants’, designed to bind to bacteria through electrostatic interactions and therefore inhibit bacterial adhesion to surfaces, induce the expression of quorum-sensing-controlled phenotypes as a consequence of cell clustering. A combination of polymer and analytical chemistry, biological assays and computational modelling has been used to characterize the feedback between bacteria clustering and quorum sensing signalling. We have also derived design principles and chemical strategies for controlling bacterial behaviour at the population level.

  13. Dust coagulation in ISM

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chokshi, Arati; Tielens, Alexander G. G. M.; Hollenbach, David

    1989-01-01

    Coagulation is an important mechanism in the growth of interstellar and interplanetary dust particles. The microphysics of the coagulation process was theoretically analyzed as a function of the physical properties of the coagulating grains, i.e., their size, relative velocities, temperature, elastic properties, and the van der Waal interaction. Numerical calculations of collisions between linear chains provide the wave energy in individual particles and the spectrum of the mechanical vibrations set up in colliding particles. Sticking probabilities are then calculated using simple estimates for elastic deformation energies and for the attenuation of the wave energy due to absorption and scattering processes.

  14. The Mechanisms of Coagulation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kurtz, Richard; Jesty, Jolyon

    1994-01-01

    Several topics such as heart disease, strokes, biochemical reactions, blood components, and genetics can be related to blood clotting. Introduces a simple, safe and inexpensive hands-on demonstration using bovine (cattle) blood plasma of normal and abnormal coagulation. (ZWH)

  15. Disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Jr, Silberstein LE, et al, eds. Hematology: Basic Principles and Practice . 6th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2013:chap 141. Thachil J, Toh CH. Current concepts in the management of disseminated intravascular coagulation. Thromb Res . 2012;129 ...

  16. Biological control of potato black scurf by rhizosphere associated bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Tariq, Mohsin; Yasmin, Sumera; Hafeez, Fauzia Y.

    2010-01-01

    The present work was carried out to study the potential of plant rhizosphere associated bacteria for the biocontrol of potato black scurf disease caused by Rhizoctonia solani Khun AG-3. A total of twenty-eight bacteria isolated from diseased and healthy potato plants grown in the soil of Naran and Faisalabad, Pakistan were evaluated for their antagonistic potential. Nine bacterial strains were found to be antagonistic in vitro, reduced the fungal growth and caused the lysis of sclerotia of R. solani in dual culture assay as well as in extracellular metabolite efficacy test. The selected antagonistic strains were further tested for the production and efficacy of volatile and diffusible antibiotics, lytic enzymes and siderophores against R. solani. Selected antagonistic bacteria were also characterized for growth promoting attributes i.e., phosphate solubilization, nitrogen fixation and indole acetic acid production. Biocontrol efficacy and percent yield increase by these antagonists was estimated in greenhouse experiment. Statistical analysis showed that two Pseudomonas spp. StT2 and StS3 were the most effective with 65.1 and 73.9 percent biocontrol efficacy, as well as 87.3 and 98.3 percent yield increase, respectively. Potential antagonistic bacterial strain StS3 showed maximum homology to Pseudomonas sp. as determined by 16S rRNA gene sequencing. These results suggest that bacterial isolates StS3 and StT2 have excellent potential to be used as effective biocontrol agents promoting plant growth with reduced disease incidence. PMID:24031515

  17. Corrosion control in the presence of sulfate-reducing bacteria

    SciTech Connect

    Schick, G. )

    1990-07-01

    Impressed current and magnesium anode-type cathodic protection usually provide appreciable protection to the buried and underground telephone plant. However, in the laboratory, a medium containing sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) strongly reduces the output current from the magnesium anode. This explains the lack of success with magnesium anodes in the field where the ratio of protected surface area to current output is orders of magnitude higher than in the laboratory test. Low concentrations of sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl) additive to the solution provide minimal protection. However, high concentrations and/or aeration can eliminate the high concentration of SRB in the aqueous medium.

  18. Immune control of phagosomal bacteria by p47 GTPases.

    PubMed

    MacMicking, John D

    2005-02-01

    Sequestered from the action of complement, antibody and lytic peptides, phagosomal pathogens pose a unique problem for the innate immune system both in terms of detection and disposal. An immunologically induced 47-kDa (p47) GTPase family recruited to nascent phagosomes (PGs) has provided new insights into how vertebrates deal with facultative bacteria occupying a vacuolar niche. Research over the past 2 years in particular has identified several molecular determinants that underlie the membrane trafficking functions of LRG-47 and other p47 GTPases as part of a PG remodeling program. When coupled to signals issuing from pathogen-specific Toll-like receptors, the p47 proteins may constitute a novel sensory system enlisted by mammals, birds and fish to decode the language of immune recognition against this particular class of infectious agents. PMID:15694860

  19. Probiotic bacteria and biosurfactants for nosocomial infection control: a hypothesis.

    PubMed

    Falagas, M E; Makris, G C

    2009-04-01

    The adaptation of strict hygienic practices by healthcare personnel as well as the implementation of appropriate cleaning and disinfection measures form the basis of infection control policies. However, nosocomial infections constitute a considerable problem even in hospitals with meticulous infection control programmes. This should prompt biomedical researchers to evaluate the efficacy and safety of novel infection control measures. There is preliminary evidence that probiotic type micro-organisms may antagonise the growth of nosocomial pathogens on inanimate surfaces. We therefore propose the hypothesis that environmental probiotic organisms may represent a safe and effective intervention for infection control purposes. We suggest that probiotics or their products (biosurfactants), could be applied to patient care equipment, such as tubes or catheters, with the aim of decreasing colonisation of sites by nosocomial pathogens. This could potentially impede a central step in the pathogenesis of nosocomial infections. PMID:19201053

  20. Identification and disruption of bacteria associated with sheep scab mites-novel means of control?

    PubMed

    Hall, S A; Mack, K; Blackwell, A; Evans, K A

    2015-10-01

    Psoroptes ovis mites, which cause psoroptic mange (sheep scab), were investigated to identify potential bacterial targets for endosymbiont control of sheep scab. In addition, transmission of bacteria to the sheep skin was investigated through the characterisation of bacteria present in P. ovis faecal trails and on the fleece environment by internal transcribed spacer (ITS) sequencing. A diverse range of bacteria was identified in addition to a potential endosymbiont candidate, Comamonas sp, which was detected in P. ovis by both ITS PCR and endosymbiont-specific PCR. Disruption of these bacteria within P. ovis, through the use of antibiotics, was explored; with significant reduction in mean mite survival when administered antibiotic diets compared with controls (LR4 = 23.12, P < 0.001). The antibiotic treatments also significantly affected the bacterial density (CFU/mite) within P. ovis, indicating that mite survival may be linked to the bacterial communities that they harbour. Although antibiotics are not suitable for practical application, these results suggest disrupting bacteria associated with P. ovis should be further investigated for novel control. PMID:26219201

  1. Combined dielectrophoretic and impedance system for on-chip controlled bacteria concentration: Application to Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Del Moral-Zamora, Beatriz; Punter-Villagrassa, Jaime; Oliva-Brañas, Ana M; Álvarez-Azpeitia, Juan Manuel; Colomer-Farrarons, Jordi; Samitier, Josep; Homs-Corbera, Antoni; Miribel-Català, Pere Ll

    2015-05-01

    The present paper reports a bacteria autonomous controlled concentrator prototype with a user-friendly interface for bench-top applications. It is based on a microfluidic lab-on-a-chip and its associated custom instrumentation, which consists of a dielectrophoretic actuator, to preconcentrate the sample, and an impedance analyzer, to measure concentrated bacteria levels. The system is composed of a single microfluidic chamber with interdigitated electrodes and an instrumentation with custom electronics. The prototype is supported by a real-time platform connected to a remote computer, which automatically controls the system and displays impedance data used to monitor the status of bacteria accumulation on-chip. The system automates the whole concentrating operation. Performance has been studied for controlled volumes of Escherichia coli samples injected into the microfluidic chip at constant flow rate of 10 μL/min. A media conductivity correcting protocol has been developed, as the preliminary results showed distortion of the impedance analyzer measurement produced by bacterial media conductivity variations through time. With the correcting protocol, the measured impedance values were related to the quantity of bacteria concentrated with a correlation of 0.988 and a coefficient of variation of 3.1%. Feasibility of E. coli on-chip automated concentration, using the miniaturized system, has been demonstrated. Furthermore, the impedance monitoring protocol had been adjusted and optimized, to handle changes in the electrical properties of the bacteria media over time. PMID:25752513

  2. Cell-size control and homeostasis in bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Sauls, John T.; Hill, Norbert S.; Levin, Petra A.; Paulsson, Johan; Vergassola, Massimo; Jun, Suckjoon

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY How cells control their size and maintain size homeostasis is a fundamental open question. Cell-size homeostasis has been discussed in the context of two major paradigms: sizer, in which the cell actively monitors its size and triggers the cell cycle once it reaches a critical size, and timer, in which the cell attempts to grow for a specific amount of time before division. These paradigms, in conjunction with the “growth law” [1] and the quantitative bacterial cell cycle model [2], inspired numerous theoretical models [3-9] and experimental investigations from growth [10,11] to cell cycle and size control [12–15]. However, experimental evidence involved difficult-to-verify assumptions or population-averaged data, which allowed different interpretations [1–5,16–20] or limited conclusions [4–9]. In particular, population-averaged data and correlations are inconclusive as the averaging process masks causal effects at the cellular level. In this work, we extended a microfluidic “mother machine” [21] and monitored hundreds of thousands of Gram-negative Escherichia coli and Gram-positive Bacillus subtilis cells under a wide range of steady-state growth conditions. Our combined experimental results and quantitative analysis demonstrate that cells add a constant volume each generation irrespective of their newborn sizes, conclusively supporting the so-called constant Δ model. This model was introduced for E. coli [6,7] and recently revisited [9], but experimental evidence was limited to correlations. This “adder” principle quantitatively explains experimental data at both the population and single-cell levels, including the origin and the hierarchy of variability in the size-control mechanisms, and how cells maintain size homeostasis. PMID:25544609

  3. Cell-size control and homeostasis in bacteria.

    PubMed

    Taheri-Araghi, Sattar; Bradde, Serena; Sauls, John T; Hill, Norbert S; Levin, Petra Anne; Paulsson, Johan; Vergassola, Massimo; Jun, Suckjoon

    2015-02-01

    How cells control their size and maintain size homeostasis is a fundamental open question. Cell-size homeostasis has been discussed in the context of two major paradigms: "sizer," in which the cell actively monitors its size and triggers the cell cycle once it reaches a critical size, and "timer," in which the cell attempts to grow for a specific amount of time before division. These paradigms, in conjunction with the "growth law" [1] and the quantitative bacterial cell-cycle model [2], inspired numerous theoretical models [3-9] and experimental investigations, from growth [10, 11] to cell cycle and size control [12-15]. However, experimental evidence involved difficult-to-verify assumptions or population-averaged data, which allowed different interpretations [1-5, 16-20] or limited conclusions [4-9]. In particular, population-averaged data and correlations are inconclusive as the averaging process masks causal effects at the cellular level. In this work, we extended a microfluidic "mother machine" [21] and monitored hundreds of thousands of Gram-negative Escherichia coli and Gram-positive Bacillus subtilis cells under a wide range of steady-state growth conditions. Our combined experimental results and quantitative analysis demonstrate that cells add a constant volume each generation, irrespective of their newborn sizes, conclusively supporting the so-called constant Δ model. This model was introduced for E. coli [6, 7] and recently revisited [9], but experimental evidence was limited to correlations. This "adder" principle quantitatively explains experimental data at both the population and single-cell levels, including the origin and the hierarchy of variability in the size-control mechanisms and how cells maintain size homeostasis. PMID:25544609

  4. Growth laws and mechanisms of global control in bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scott, Matthew

    2009-03-01

    The growth laws of Schaechter, Maaløe and Kjeldgaard are among the most striking discoveries in bacterial growth physiology: cell composition (mass/cell, RNA/cell, etc.) is a simple function of growth rate alone -- irrespective of how that growth rate is established. I will review the growth laws, and discuss recent experiments that have uncovered new laws. A systems-level mathematical model is developed that suggests the growth laws arise from the partitioning of the protein synthesizing machinery of the cell (the ribosomes), and furthermore indicates a deep connection between growth rate control and central metabolism.

  5. INTERNAL AMPLIFICATION CONTROL FOR USE IN QUANTITATIVE POLYMERASE CHAIN REACTION FECAL INDICATOR BACTERIA ASSAYS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Quantitative polymerase chain reaction (QPCR) can be used as a rapid method for detecting fecal indicator bacteria. Because false negative results can be caused by PCR inhibitors that co-extract with the DNA samples, an internal amplification control (IAC) should be run with eac...

  6. Mine Waste Technology Program. In Situ Source Control Of Acid Generation Using Sulfate-Reducing Bacteria

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report summarizes the results of the Mine Waste Technology Program (MWTP) Activity III, Project 3, In Situ Source Control of Acid Generation Using Sulfate-Reducing Bacteria, funded by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and jointly administered by EPA and the U.S....

  7. [Effects of Interaction of Ozonation and Coagulation on Coagulation Results].

    PubMed

    Liu, Hai-long; Guo, Xue-feng; Wang, Min-hui; Jiao, Ru-yuan; Shi, Jian

    2015-09-01

    Two strategies, ozonation-coagulation combination (OCC, ozone and coagulant dosed at meantime) and preozonation coagulation (PC, coagulant dosed after ozone died away) were used to treat synthesized water. Different effects of oxidation and coagulation, disinfection by-products formation potentials (DBPFP) in the same water were detected in order to study the influence of interaction of ozonation and coagulation (IOC) on treated water characteristics. Results show that there are remarkable differences between OCC and PC. IOC effects take place during OCC process, which results in variations of the distribution of hydrolyzed species of coagulant. And this is an important reason which impairs efficiency of coagulation. Turbidity after OCC was higher than that of PC. One of the main reasons is that ozone reduced the content of Alb species which was built during coagulant hydrolyzation. Cl-DBPFP in OCC outlet water were lower than those in PC because oxidized destruction of DBP precursors were enhanced by catalyzed ozonation by AlCl3 along with its other hydrolyzed species. Removals of MCAA and CF formation potentials by OCC were significantly higher than those by PC, MCAAFP were 5. 6 µg . L-1 and 16. 9 µg . L-1 respectively, and CFFP were 12. 5 µg . L-1 and 24. 1 µg . L-1 respectively. Coagulation results and DBP formations are significantly affected by interaction of ozonation and coagulation; and it should be a noticeable point of water safety if ozonation and coagulation are employed together. Thus times and spots between ozone and coagulant should be defined clearly in correlational researches and water treatment application. PMID:26717689

  8. The efficacy and safety of different anticoagulants on patients with severe sepsis and derangement of coagulation: a protocol for network meta-analysis of randomised controlled trials

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Libing; Jiang, Shouyin; Feng, Xia; Ma, Yuefeng; Zhang, Mao

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Sepsis is the leading cause of mortality in non-cardiological critically ill patients. There are as many as 20 million cases of sepsis annually worldwide, with a mortality rate of around 35%. It has been reported that the dysregulation of haemostatic system due to the interaction between coagulation system and inflammatory response is a strong predictor of mortality in patients with severe sepsis. In this context, several anticoagulants have been evaluated in recent years. However, the results of these studies were inconsistent and even contradictory. In addition, there is insufficient evidence comparing the efficacy and safety of different anticoagulants. The purpose of our study is to carry out a systematic review and network meta-analysis comparing the efficacy and safety of different anticoagulants for severe sepsis based on existing randomised controlled trials (RCTs) and ranking these anticoagulants for practical consideration. Methods and analysis PubMed, EMBASE and Cochrane Library databases will be systematically searched for eligible studies. Randomised controlled trials (RCT) on anticoagulant therapy for severe sepsis with multiple outcome measures will be included. The Cochrane Risk of Bias Tool will be used to assess the quality of included studies. The primary outcomes are mortality and bleeding events. The secondary outcomes include the length of intensive care stay, the length of hospital stay and duration of mechanical ventilation. Direct pairwise meta-analysis (DMA), indirect treatment comparison meta-analysis (ITC) and network meta-analysis (NMA) will be conducted to compare different anticoagulants. Ethics and dissemination Ethical approval is not required given that this is a protocol for a systematic review. The protocol of this systematic review will be disseminated in a peer-reviewed journal and presented at a relevant conference. Trial registration number This protocol has been registered in PROSPERO (http

  9. [Samples in Coagulation Test].

    PubMed

    Komiyama, Yutaka

    2015-12-01

    An understanding and ability to develop a strategy to prevent pre-analytical errors of laboratory tests in the hemostasis area are two of the most important skills of medical technologists and related doctors. Recently, the working group for standardization of sampling in coagulation tests is working towards a consensus. This article reviews a summary of the consensus: (1) The anticoagulant for coagulation tests is 3.13-3.2% sodium citrate at a ratio of 1:9 to whole blood and the accuracy of the ratio is within 10%. (2) Blood sampling is achieved with the use of a 21-23G needle and coagulation. Blood sampling can be achieved by both a syringe and vacuum tube system. After taking blood, laboratory tests such as of the prothrombin time (PT) and activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT) should be completed within one hour and the storage temperature should be at room temperature, not ice-cold conditions. 3) To prepare a plasma sample, citrated blood is centrifuged at 1,500 x g for 15 min at room temperature to minimize the remaining platelets in plasma (below 10,000/microL at least). PMID:27089656

  10. Application of bacteriophages in post-harvest control of human pathogenic and food spoiling bacteria.

    PubMed

    Pérez Pulido, Rubén; Grande Burgos, Maria José; Gálvez, Antonio; Lucas López, Rosario

    2016-10-01

    Bacteriophages have attracted great attention for application in food biopreservation. Lytic bacteriophages specific for human pathogenic bacteria can be isolated from natural sources such as animal feces or industrial wastes where the target bacteria inhabit. Lytic bacteriophages have been tested in different food systems for inactivation of main food-borne pathogens including Listeria monocytogenes, Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli O157:H7, Salmonella enterica, Shigella spp., Campylobacter jejuni and Cronobacter sakazkii, and also for control of spoilage bacteria. Application of lytic bacteriophages could selectively control host populations of concern without interfering with the remaining food microbiota. Bacteriophages could also be applied for inactivation of bacteria attached to food contact surfaces or grown as biofilms. Bacteriophages may receive a generally recognized as safe status based on their lack of toxicity and other detrimental effects to human health. Phage preparations specific for L. monocytogenes, E. coli O157:H7 and S. enterica serotypes have been commercialized and approved for application in foods or as part of surface decontamination protocols. Phage endolysins have a broader host specificity compared to lytic bacteriophages. Cloned endolysins could be used as natural preservatives, singly or in combination with other antimicrobials such as bacteriocins. PMID:26042353

  11. Arsenic removal by coagulation

    SciTech Connect

    Scott, K.N.; Green, J.F.; Do, H.D.; McLean, S.J.

    1995-04-01

    This study evaluated the removal of naturally occurring arsenic in a full-scale (106-mgd) conventional treatment plant. When the source water was treated with 3--10 mg/L of ferric chloride or 6, 10, or 20 mg/L of alum, arsenic removal was 81--96% (ferric chloride) and 23--71% (alum). Metal concentrations in the sludge produced during this study were below the state`s current hazardous waste levels at all coagulant dosages. No operational difficulties were encountered.

  12. Thermophoretically Dominated Aerosol Coagulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosner, Daniel E.; Arias-Zugasti, Manuel

    2011-01-01

    A theory of aerosol coagulation due to size-dependent thermophoresis is presented. This previously overlooked effect is important when local temperature gradients are large, the sol population is composed of particles of much greater thermal conductivity than the carrier gas, with mean diameters much greater than the prevailing gas mean free path, and an adequate “spread” in sizes (as in metallurgical mists or fumes). We illustrate this via a population-balance analysis of the evolution of an initially log-normal distribution when this mechanism dominates ordinary Brownian diffusion.

  13. Control of magnetite nanocrystal morphology in magnetotactic bacteria by regulation of mms7 gene expression.

    PubMed

    Yamagishi, Ayana; Tanaka, Masayoshi; Lenders, Jos J M; Thiesbrummel, Jarla; Sommerdijk, Nico A J M; Matsunaga, Tadashi; Arakaki, Atsushi

    2016-01-01

    Living organisms can produce inorganic materials with unique structure and properties. The biomineralization process is of great interest as it forms a source of inspiration for the development of methods for production of diverse inorganic materials under mild conditions. Nonetheless, regulation of biomineralization is still a challenging task. Magnetotactic bacteria produce chains of a prokaryotic organelle comprising a membrane-enveloped single-crystal magnetite with species-specific morphology. Here, we describe regulation of magnetite biomineralization through controlled expression of the mms7 gene, which plays key roles in the control of crystal growth and morphology of magnetite crystals in magnetotactic bacteria. Regulation of the expression level of Mms7 in bacterial cells enables switching of the crystal shape from dumbbell-like to spherical. The successful regulation of magnetite biomineralization opens the door to production of magnetite nanocrystals of desired size and morphology. PMID:27417732

  14. Control of magnetite nanocrystal morphology in magnetotactic bacteria by regulation of mms7 gene expression

    PubMed Central

    Yamagishi, Ayana; Tanaka, Masayoshi; Lenders, Jos J. M.; Thiesbrummel, Jarla; Sommerdijk, Nico A. J. M.; Matsunaga, Tadashi; Arakaki, Atsushi

    2016-01-01

    Living organisms can produce inorganic materials with unique structure and properties. The biomineralization process is of great interest as it forms a source of inspiration for the development of methods for production of diverse inorganic materials under mild conditions. Nonetheless, regulation of biomineralization is still a challenging task. Magnetotactic bacteria produce chains of a prokaryotic organelle comprising a membrane-enveloped single-crystal magnetite with species-specific morphology. Here, we describe regulation of magnetite biomineralization through controlled expression of the mms7 gene, which plays key roles in the control of crystal growth and morphology of magnetite crystals in magnetotactic bacteria. Regulation of the expression level of Mms7 in bacterial cells enables switching of the crystal shape from dumbbell-like to spherical. The successful regulation of magnetite biomineralization opens the door to production of magnetite nanocrystals of desired size and morphology. PMID:27417732

  15. Fate of Antibiotic Resistant Bacteria and Genes during Wastewater Chlorination: Implication for Antibiotic Resistance Control

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Qing-Bin; Guo, Mei-Ting; Yang, Jian

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated fates of nine antibiotic-resistant bacteria as well as two series of antibiotic resistance genes in wastewater treated by various doses of chlorine (0, 15, 30, 60, 150 and 300 mg Cl2 min/L). The results indicated that chlorination was effective in inactivating antibiotic-resistant bacteria. Most bacteria were inactivated completely at the lowest dose (15 mg Cl2 min/L). By comparison, sulfadiazine- and erythromycin-resistant bacteria exhibited tolerance to low chlorine dose (up to 60 mg Cl2 min/L). However, quantitative real-time PCRs revealed that chlorination decreased limited erythromycin or tetracycline resistance genes, with the removal levels of overall erythromycin and tetracycline resistance genes at 0.42 ± 0.12 log and 0.10 ± 0.02 log, respectively. About 40% of erythromycin-resistance genes and 80% of tetracycline resistance genes could not be removed by chlorination. Chlorination was considered not effective in controlling antimicrobial resistance. More concern needs to be paid to the potential risk of antibiotic resistance genes in the wastewater after chlorination. PMID:25738838

  16. Cable Bacteria Control Iron-Phosphorus Dynamics in Sediments of a Coastal Hypoxic Basin.

    PubMed

    Sulu-Gambari, Fatimah; Seitaj, Dorina; Meysman, Filip J R; Schauer, Regina; Polerecky, Lubos; Slomp, Caroline P

    2016-02-01

    Phosphorus is an essential nutrient for life. The release of phosphorus from sediments is critical in sustaining phytoplankton growth in many aquatic systems and is pivotal to eutrophication and the development of bottom water hypoxia. Conventionally, sediment phosphorus release is thought to be controlled by changes in iron oxide reduction driven by variations in external environmental factors, such as organic matter input and bottom water oxygen. Here, we show that internal shifts in microbial communities, and specifically the population dynamics of cable bacteria, can also induce strong seasonality in sedimentary iron-phosphorus dynamics. Field observations in a seasonally hypoxic coastal basin demonstrate that the long-range electrogenic metabolism of cable bacteria leads to a dissolution of iron sulfides in winter and spring. Subsequent oxidation of the mobilized ferrous iron with manganese oxides results in a large stock of iron-oxide-bound phosphorus below the oxic zone. In summer, when bottom water hypoxia develops and cable bacteria are undetectable, the phosphorus associated with these iron oxides is released, strongly increasing phosphorus availability in the water column. Future research should elucidate whether formation of iron-oxide-bound phosphorus driven by cable bacteria, as observed in this study, contributes to the seasonality in iron-phosphorus cycling in aquatic sediments worldwide. PMID:26720721

  17. Development of the selective hydrophobic coagulation process

    SciTech Connect

    Yoon, R.H.; Luttrell, G.H.

    1992-01-01

    A novel technique for selectively coagulating and separating coal from dispersed mineral matter has been developed at Virginia Tech. The process, Selective Hydrophobic Coagulation (SHC), has been studied since 1986 under the sponsorship of the US Department of Energy. The SHC process differs from oil agglomeration, shear or polymer flocculation, and electrolytic coagulation processes in that it does not require reagents or additives to induce the formation of coagula. In most cases, simple pH control is all that is required to (i) induce the coagulation of coal particles and (ii) effectively disperse particles of mineral matter. If the coal is oxidized, a small dosage of reagents can be used to enhance the process. The technical work program was initiated on July 1, 1992. Force-distance curves were generated for DDOA Br-coated mica surfaces in water and used to calculate hydrophobicity constants and decay lengths for this system; and a new device for the measurement of water contact angles, similar to the Wilhelmy plate balance, has been built 225 kg samples of Pittsburgh No. 8 and Elkhom No. 3 seam coals were obtained; a static mixer test facility for the study of coagula growth was set up and was undergoing shakedown tests at the end of the quarter; a bench-scale lamella thickener was being constructed; and preliminary coagula/ mineral separation tests were being conducted in a bench-scale continuous drum filter.

  18. Development of the Selective Hydrophobic Coagulation process

    SciTech Connect

    Yoon, R.H.; Luttrell, G.H.

    1992-01-01

    A novel technique for selectively coagulating and separating coal from dispersed mineral matter has been developed at Virginia Tech. The process, Selective Hydrophobic Coagulation (SHC), has been studied since 1986 under the sponsorship of the US Department of Energy (Contracts AC22-86PC91221 and AC22-90PC90174). The SHC process differs from oil agglomeration, shear or polymer flocculation, and electrolytic coagulation processes in that it does not require reagents or additives to induce the formation of coagula. In most cases, simple pH control is all that is required to (1) induce the coagulation of coal particles and (2) effectively disperse particles of mineral matter. If the coal is oxidized, a small dosage of reagents can be used to enhance the process. During the quarter, the Anutech Mark IV surface force apparatus was used to generate surface force-distance data for the mica/dodecylamine hydrochloride system (Task 2.1.1). Work to characterize the hydrophobicity of this system and the mica/DDOA[sup [minus

  19. Putative periodontopathic bacteria and herpesviruses in pregnant women: a case-control study

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Haixia; Zhu, Ce; Li, Fei; Xu, Wei; Tao, Danying; Feng, Xiping

    2016-01-01

    Little is known about herpesvirus and putative periodontopathic bacteria in maternal chronic periodontitis. The present case-control study aimed to explore the potential relationship between putative periodontopathic bacteria and herpesviruses in maternal chronic periodontitis.Saliva samples were collected from 36 pregnant women with chronic periodontitis (cases) and 36 pregnant women with healthy periodontal status (controls). Six putative periodontopathic bacteria (Porphyromonas gingivalis [Pg], Aggregatibacer actinomycetemcomitans [Aa], Fusobacterium nucleatum [Fn], Prevotella intermedia [Pi], Tannerella forsythia [Tf], and Treponema denticola [Td]) and three herpesviruses (Epstein-Barr virus [EBV], human cytomegalovirus [HCMV], and herpes simplex virus [HSV]) were detected. Socio-demographic data and oral health related behaviors, and salivary estradiol and progesterone levels were also collected. The results showed no significant differences in socio-demographic background, oral health related behaviors, and salivary estradiol and progesterone levels between the two groups (all P > 0.05). The detection rates of included periodontopathic microorganisms were not significantly different between the two groups (all P > 0.05), but the coinfection rate of EBV and Pg was significantly higher in the case group than in the control group (P = 0.028). EBV and Pg coinfection may promote the development of chronic periodontitis among pregnant women. PMID:27301874

  20. [Should we screen for colonization to control the spread of multidrug resistant bacteria?].

    PubMed

    Lepelletier, D; Perron, S; Huguenin, H; Picard, M; Bemer, P; Caillon, J; Juvin, M-E; Drugeon, H

    2003-10-01

    Should we screen for colonization to control the spread of multidrug-resistant bacteria? A multidrug-resistant bacteria surveillance program was performed in 1999 at Laënnec Hospital (Nantes, France). After a 3-year period, the results permit us to determine the strategy to strengthen their spread. In 2001, Staphylococcus aureus resistant to methicillin represented 45% of the 202 multidrug-resistant bacteria isolated. The global incidence rate per 100 admissions remained stable between 1999 and 2001 (0.42%), but those of infections acquired in our institution decreased significantly from 0.27% in 1999 to 0.18% in 2001 (P < 0.05), particularly in medical care units (P < 0.04). In spite of this surveillance program and hygiene trainings, the global incidence remained stable during the study period, even if our action contributed to decrease the incidence of S. aureus resistant to methicillin acquired in our institution. Isolation precautions and screening for colonization policy in intensive care units are not sufficient to control the spread of MRB at hospital level. They should be strengthened by procedures for the transfer of infected or colonized patients and by antibiotic use control. PMID:14568591

  1. Putative periodontopathic bacteria and herpesviruses in pregnant women: a case-control study.

    PubMed

    Lu, Haixia; Zhu, Ce; Li, Fei; Xu, Wei; Tao, Danying; Feng, Xiping

    2016-01-01

    Little is known about herpesvirus and putative periodontopathic bacteria in maternal chronic periodontitis. The present case-control study aimed to explore the potential relationship between putative periodontopathic bacteria and herpesviruses in maternal chronic periodontitis.Saliva samples were collected from 36 pregnant women with chronic periodontitis (cases) and 36 pregnant women with healthy periodontal status (controls). Six putative periodontopathic bacteria (Porphyromonas gingivalis [Pg], Aggregatibacer actinomycetemcomitans [Aa], Fusobacterium nucleatum [Fn], Prevotella intermedia [Pi], Tannerella forsythia [Tf], and Treponema denticola [Td]) and three herpesviruses (Epstein-Barr virus [EBV], human cytomegalovirus [HCMV], and herpes simplex virus [HSV]) were detected. Socio-demographic data and oral health related behaviors, and salivary estradiol and progesterone levels were also collected. The results showed no significant differences in socio-demographic background, oral health related behaviors, and salivary estradiol and progesterone levels between the two groups (all P > 0.05). The detection rates of included periodontopathic microorganisms were not significantly different between the two groups (all P > 0.05), but the coinfection rate of EBV and Pg was significantly higher in the case group than in the control group (P = 0.028). EBV and Pg coinfection may promote the development of chronic periodontitis among pregnant women. PMID:27301874

  2. A Legume Genetic Framework Controls Infection of Nodules by Symbiotic and Endophytic Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Zgadzaj, Rafal; James, Euan K.; Kelly, Simon; Kawaharada, Yasuyuki; de Jonge, Nadieh; Jensen, Dorthe B.; Madsen, Lene H.; Radutoiu, Simona

    2015-01-01

    Legumes have an intrinsic capacity to accommodate both symbiotic and endophytic bacteria within root nodules. For the symbionts, a complex genetic mechanism that allows mutual recognition and plant infection has emerged from genetic studies under axenic conditions. In contrast, little is known about the mechanisms controlling the endophytic infection. Here we investigate the contribution of both the host and the symbiotic microbe to endophyte infection and development of mixed colonised nodules in Lotus japonicus. We found that infection threads initiated by Mesorhizobium loti, the natural symbiont of Lotus, can selectively guide endophytic bacteria towards nodule primordia, where competent strains multiply and colonise the nodule together with the nitrogen-fixing symbiotic partner. Further co-inoculation studies with the competent coloniser, Rhizobium mesosinicum strain KAW12, show that endophytic nodule infection depends on functional and efficient M. loti-driven Nod factor signalling. KAW12 exopolysaccharide (EPS) enabled endophyte nodule infection whilst compatible M. loti EPS restricted it. Analysis of plant mutants that control different stages of the symbiotic infection showed that both symbiont and endophyte accommodation within nodules is under host genetic control. This demonstrates that when legume plants are exposed to complex communities they selectively regulate access and accommodation of bacteria occupying this specialized environmental niche, the root nodule. PMID:26042417

  3. How Is Disseminated Intravascular Coagulation Treated?

    MedlinePlus

    ... the NHLBI on Twitter. How Is Disseminated Intravascular Coagulation Treated? Treatment for disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC) depends ... and treat the underlying cause. Acute Disseminated Intravascular Coagulation People who have acute DIC may have severe ...

  4. Randomized controlled study of endoscopic band ligation and argon plasma coagulation in the treatment of gastric antral and fundal vascular ectasia

    PubMed Central

    Mosaad, Samah; Alkhalawany, Walaa; Abo-Ali, Lobna; Enaba, Mohamed; Elsaka, Aymen; Elfert, Asem A

    2015-01-01

    Background Gastric antral vascular ectasia (GAVE) is characterized by mucosal and submucosal vascular ectasia causing recurrent hemorrhage and thus, chronic anemia, in patients with cirrhosis. Treatment with argon plasma coagulation (APC) is an effective and safe method, but requires multiple sessions of endoscopic therapy. Endoscopic band ligation (EBL) was found to be a good alternative for APC as a treatment for GAVE, especially in refractory cases. The aim of this prospective randomized controlled study was to evaluate the safety and efficacy of EBL, as compared to APC, in the treatment of GAVE and gastric fundal vascular ectasia (GFVE). Patients and methods A total of 88 cirrhotic patients with GAVE were prospectively randomized to endoscopic treatment with either EBL or APC, every 2 weeks until complete obliteration was accomplished; then they were followed up endoscopically after 6 months, plus they had monthly measurement of hemoglobin levels during that period. Results We describe the presence of mucosal and submucosal lesions in the gastric fundal area that were similar to those found in GAVE in 13 patients (29.5%) of the EBL group and 9 patients (20.5%) of the APC group; we named this GFVE. In these cases, we treated the fundal lesions with the same techniques we had used for treating GAVE, according to the randomization. We found that EBL significantly decreased the number of sessions required for complete obliteration of the lesions (2.98 sessions compared to 3.48 sessions in the APC group (p < 0.05)). Hemoglobin levels increased significantly after obliteration of the lesions in both groups, compared to pretreatment values (p < 0.05), but with no significant difference between the two groups (p > 0.05); however, the EBL group of patients required a significantly smaller number of units of blood transfusion than the APC group of patients (p < 0.05). There were no significant differences in adverse events nor complications between the

  5. Comparative genomics of metabolic capacities of regulons controlled by cis-regulatory RNA motifs in bacteria

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background In silico comparative genomics approaches have been efficiently used for functional prediction and reconstruction of metabolic and regulatory networks. Riboswitches are metabolite-sensing structures often found in bacterial mRNA leaders controlling gene expression on transcriptional or translational levels. An increasing number of riboswitches and other cis-regulatory RNAs have been recently classified into numerous RNA families in the Rfam database. High conservation of these RNA motifs provides a unique advantage for their genomic identification and comparative analysis. Results A comparative genomics approach implemented in the RegPredict tool was used for reconstruction and functional annotation of regulons controlled by RNAs from 43 Rfam families in diverse taxonomic groups of Bacteria. The inferred regulons include ~5200 cis-regulatory RNAs and more than 12000 target genes in 255 microbial genomes. All predicted RNA-regulated genes were classified into specific and overall functional categories. Analysis of taxonomic distribution of these categories allowed us to establish major functional preferences for each analyzed cis-regulatory RNA motif family. Overall, most RNA motif regulons showed predictable functional content in accordance with their experimentally established effector ligands. Our results suggest that some RNA motifs (including thiamin pyrophosphate and cobalamin riboswitches that control the cofactor metabolism) are widespread and likely originated from the last common ancestor of all bacteria. However, many more analyzed RNA motifs are restricted to a narrow taxonomic group of bacteria and likely represent more recent evolutionary innovations. Conclusions The reconstructed regulatory networks for major known RNA motifs substantially expand the existing knowledge of transcriptional regulation in bacteria. The inferred regulons can be used for genetic experiments, functional annotations of genes, metabolic reconstruction and

  6. Theoretical analysis of the light interaction with coagulated tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jerath, Maya R.; Welch, Ashley J.

    1992-08-01

    During laser treatment, coagulation affects the optical properties of the tissue. In particular, the formation of a white lesion increases the scattering coefficient significantly. This change in the optical properties in turn affects the laser light distribution in the tissue. For example, what is the effect of the white lesion formed during photocoagulation of the retina upon reflection and fluence rate? This problem was simulated on a model medium consisting of a thin absorbing black paint layer covered with a 1 cm thick layer of fresh egg white. The egg white layer was subdivided into coagulated (white) and uncoagulated (clear) layers. The optical properties of coagulated and uncoagulated egg white were determined. These values were used to model light distribution in the medium for varying thicknesses of the coagulated egg white layer using the one dimensional Adding Doubling method. Our results show that the fluence reaching the paint layer increase until the coagulated layer reaches 100 micrometers , after which it falls off exponentially. It was also found that the total reflected light increases almost linearly at first as the coagulated layer thickens, and then begins to level off to an R(infinity ) at a coagulation thickness of 2 mm. Experimental measurements of reflection from a lesion with a CCD camera confirm the computed trends. These results provide a theoretical foundation for control of lesion thickness using reflectance images.

  7. Coagulation products and their uses.

    PubMed

    Shord, S S; Lindley, C M

    2000-08-01

    The indications, pharmacokinetics, and therapeutic guidelines for available coagulation products are reviewed. Patients with hemophilia, von Willebrand's disease (VWD), or acquired inhibitors to antihemophilic factor (AHF) cannot spontaneously stop an acute hemorrhage. Coagulation products used to manage bleeding in patients with these disorders include AHF concentrates, factor IX concentrates, factor VIIa concentrate, factor IX complexes, anti-inhibitor coagulant complexes, and desmopressin acetate. Typically, these commercially available products are used to manage acute bleeding or to prevent excessive bleeding during surgery. The dosage of the coagulation products and the duration of therapy depend on many variables, including the severity of the hemorrhage, the pharmacokinetics of the coagulation products, and patient-specific factors. Product purity and viral attenuation are also important considerations in determining an appropriate dosage regimen. Recombinant versions of some coagulant factors are available and can eliminate the risk of viral transmission. A thorough understanding of each coagulation product can guide product selection, dosing, and treatment duration and can reduce the risk of viral transmission. PMID:10938981

  8. Use of an intelligent control system To evaluate multiparametric effects on iron oxidation by thermophilic bacteria

    PubMed

    Stoner; Miller; Fife; Larsen; Tolle; Johnson

    1998-11-01

    A learning-based intelligent control system, the BioExpert, was developed and applied to the evaluation of multiparametric effects on iron oxidation by enrichment cultures of moderately thermophilic, acidophilic mining bacteria. The control system acquired and analyzed the data and then selected and maintained the sets of conditions that were evaluated. Through multiple iterations, the BioExpert selected sets of conditions that resulted in improved iron oxidation rates. The results obtained with the BioExpert suggested that temperature and pH were coupled, or interactive, parameters. Elevated temperatures (51.5 degreesC) in combination with a moderately high pH (pH 1.84) impaired the growth of and iron oxidation by the enrichment culture. Moderate-to-high oxidation rates were achieved with a relatively high pH in combination with a relatively low temperature or, conversely, with a relatively low pH in combination with a relatively high temperature. The interactive effect of pH and temperature was not apparent from the results obtained in an experiment in which temperature was the only parameter that was varied. When the BioExpert was applied to a mixed culture containing mesophilic and thermophilic bacteria, the computer "learned" that pH 1.8, 45 degreesC, and an inlet iron concentration from 30 to 35 mM were most favorable for iron oxidation. In conclusion, this study demonstrated that the learning-based intelligent control system BioExpert was an effective experimental tool that can be used to examine multiparametric effects on the growth and metabolic activity of mining bacteria. PMID:9797322

  9. Use of an Intelligent Control System To Evaluate Multiparametric Effects on Iron Oxidation by Thermophilic Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Stoner, Daphne L.; Miller, Karen S.; Fife, Dee Jay; Larsen, Eric D.; Tolle, Charles R.; Johnson, John A.

    1998-01-01

    A learning-based intelligent control system, the BioExpert, was developed and applied to the evaluation of multiparametric effects on iron oxidation by enrichment cultures of moderately thermophilic, acidophilic mining bacteria. The control system acquired and analyzed the data and then selected and maintained the sets of conditions that were evaluated. Through multiple iterations, the BioExpert selected sets of conditions that resulted in improved iron oxidation rates. The results obtained with the BioExpert suggested that temperature and pH were coupled, or interactive, parameters. Elevated temperatures (51.5°C) in combination with a moderately high pH (pH 1.84) impaired the growth of and iron oxidation by the enrichment culture. Moderate-to-high oxidation rates were achieved with a relatively high pH in combination with a relatively low temperature or, conversely, with a relatively low pH in combination with a relatively high temperature. The interactive effect of pH and temperature was not apparent from the results obtained in an experiment in which temperature was the only parameter that was varied. When the BioExpert was applied to a mixed culture containing mesophilic and thermophilic bacteria, the computer “learned” that pH 1.8, 45°C, and an inlet iron concentration from 30 to 35 mM were most favorable for iron oxidation. In conclusion, this study demonstrated that the learning-based intelligent control system BioExpert was an effective experimental tool that can be used to examine multiparametric effects on the growth and metabolic activity of mining bacteria. PMID:9797322

  10. The Prevalence and Control of Bacillus and Related Spore-Forming Bacteria in the Dairy Industry

    PubMed Central

    Gopal, Nidhi; Hill, Colin; Ross, Paul R.; Beresford, Tom P.; Fenelon, Mark A.; Cotter, Paul D.

    2015-01-01

    Milk produced in udder cells is sterile but due to its high nutrient content, it can be a good growth substrate for contaminating bacteria. The quality of milk is monitored via somatic cell counts and total bacterial counts, with prescribed regulatory limits to ensure quality and safety. Bacterial contaminants can cause disease, or spoilage of milk and its secondary products. Aerobic spore-forming bacteria, such as those from the genera Sporosarcina, Paenisporosarcina, Brevibacillus, Paenibacillus, Geobacillus and Bacillus, are a particular concern in this regard as they are able to survive industrial pasteurization and form biofilms within pipes and stainless steel equipment. These single or multiple-species biofilms become a reservoir of spoilage microorganisms and a cycle of contamination can be initiated. Indeed, previous studies have highlighted that these microorganisms are highly prevalent in dead ends, corners, cracks, crevices, gaskets, valves and the joints of stainless steel equipment used in the dairy manufacturing plants. Hence, adequate monitoring and control measures are essential to prevent spoilage and ensure consumer safety. Common controlling approaches include specific cleaning-in-place processes, chemical and biological biocides and other novel methods. In this review, we highlight the problems caused by these microorganisms, and discuss issues relating to their prevalence, monitoring thereof and control with respect to the dairy industry. PMID:26733963

  11. The Prevalence and Control of Bacillus and Related Spore-Forming Bacteria in the Dairy Industry.

    PubMed

    Gopal, Nidhi; Hill, Colin; Ross, Paul R; Beresford, Tom P; Fenelon, Mark A; Cotter, Paul D

    2015-01-01

    Milk produced in udder cells is sterile but due to its high nutrient content, it can be a good growth substrate for contaminating bacteria. The quality of milk is monitored via somatic cell counts and total bacterial counts, with prescribed regulatory limits to ensure quality and safety. Bacterial contaminants can cause disease, or spoilage of milk and its secondary products. Aerobic spore-forming bacteria, such as those from the genera Sporosarcina, Paenisporosarcina, Brevibacillus, Paenibacillus, Geobacillus and Bacillus, are a particular concern in this regard as they are able to survive industrial pasteurization and form biofilms within pipes and stainless steel equipment. These single or multiple-species biofilms become a reservoir of spoilage microorganisms and a cycle of contamination can be initiated. Indeed, previous studies have highlighted that these microorganisms are highly prevalent in dead ends, corners, cracks, crevices, gaskets, valves and the joints of stainless steel equipment used in the dairy manufacturing plants. Hence, adequate monitoring and control measures are essential to prevent spoilage and ensure consumer safety. Common controlling approaches include specific cleaning-in-place processes, chemical and biological biocides and other novel methods. In this review, we highlight the problems caused by these microorganisms, and discuss issues relating to their prevalence, monitoring thereof and control with respect to the dairy industry. PMID:26733963

  12. Indirect and suboptimal control of gene expression is widespread in bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Price, Morgan N; Deutschbauer, Adam M; Skerker, Jeffrey M; Wetmore, Kelly M; Ruths, Troy; Mar, Jordan S; Kuehl, Jennifer V; Shao, Wenjun; Arkin, Adam P

    2013-01-01

    Gene regulation in bacteria is usually described as an adaptive response to an environmental change so that genes are expressed when they are required. We instead propose that most genes are under indirect control: their expression responds to signal(s) that are not directly related to the genes' function. Indirect control should perform poorly in artificial conditions, and we show that gene regulation is often maladaptive in the laboratory. In Shewanella oneidensis MR-1, 24% of genes are detrimental to fitness in some conditions, and detrimental genes tend to be highly expressed instead of being repressed when not needed. In diverse bacteria, there is little correlation between when genes are important for optimal growth or fitness and when those genes are upregulated. Two common types of indirect control are constitutive expression and regulation by growth rate; these occur for genes with diverse functions and often seem to be suboptimal. Because genes that have closely related functions can have dissimilar expression patterns, regulation may be suboptimal in the wild as well as in the laboratory. PMID:23591776

  13. Coagulant Activity of Leukocytes. TISSUE FACTOR ACTIVITY

    PubMed Central

    Niemetz, J.

    1972-01-01

    Peritoneal leukocytes harvested from rabbits which have received two spaced doses of endotoxin have significantly greater (10-fold) coagulant activity than leukocytes from control rabbits. The coagulant activity accelerates the clotting of normal plasma and activates factor X in the presence of factor VII and calcium and is therefore regarded as tissue factor. A total of 40-80 mg tissue factor activity was obtained from the peritoneal cavity of single endotoxin-treated rabbits. In leukocyte subcellular fractions, separated by centrifugation, the specific tissue factor activity sedimented mainly at 14,500 g and above. The procoagulant activity was destroyed after heating for 10 min at 65°C but was preserved at lower temperatures. Polymyxin B, when given with the first dose of endotoxin, reduced both the number of peritoneal leukocytes and their tissue factor activity by two-thirds. When given immediately before the second dose of endotoxin, polymyxin B had no inhibitory effect. PMID:4333021

  14. Promoting fertilizer use via controlled release of a bacteria-encapsulated film bag.

    PubMed

    Wu, Chin-San

    2010-05-26

    A phosphate-solubilizing bacterium ( Burkholderia cepacia isolate) encapsulated in maleic anhydride (MA) grafted onto poly(butylene succinate adipate) (PBSA) and then combined with starch as film bag material (PBSA-g-MA/starch) incubated in a saline solution required approximately 20 days to deplete the starch in the film bags. Thereafter, the cell concentration in the saline solution increased significantly because of the release of cells from the severely destroyed film bags and also their growth by use of depolymerized PBSA-g-MA fragments as a substrate. The incubation proceeded for 60 days, by which time the PBSA-g-MA/starch composite had suffered a >80% weight loss. For practical application, effectiveness of the above-mentioned film bags was demonstrated because it could improve the absorbability of a fertilizer for plants and promote the growth of plants. As a result, it can avoid the accumulation of the phosphate in excess fertilizer that lead to the phenomenon of poor soils. These results demonstrate that PBSA-g-MA/starch can be used to encapsulate cells of an indigenous phosphate-solubilizing bacterium ( B. cepacia isolate) to form a controlled release of bacteria-encapsulated film bag (BEFB). The B. cepacia isolate was able to degrade the film bags material, causing cell release. Biodegradability of the film bags depended upon the type of material used, because the PBSA film bags were also degraded but to a lesser degree. The addition of starch made the film bags more biodegradable. The decrease in intrinsic viscosity was also higher for the starch composite, suggesting a strong connection between the biodegradability and these characteristics. The results suggest that the release of fertilizer-promoted bacteria might be controllable via a suitable film bag material formulation. In addition, this work adopted live bacteria to promote the absorption of phosphate, which is superior to the phosphate used in the traditional way. PMID:20420423

  15. Powdered activated carbon coupled with enhanced coagulation for natural organic matter removal and disinfection by-product control: application in a Western Australian water treatment plant.

    PubMed

    Kristiana, Ina; Joll, Cynthia; Heitz, Anna

    2011-04-01

    The removal of organic precursors of disinfection by-products (DBPs), i.e. natural organic matter (NOM), prior to disinfection and distribution is considered as the most effective approach to minimise the formation of DBPs. This study investigated the impact of the addition of powdered activated carbon (PAC) to an enhanced coagulation treatment process at an existing water treatment plant on the efficiency of NOM removal, the disinfection behaviour of the treated water, and the water quality in the distribution system. This is the first comprehensive assessment of the efficacy of plant-scale application of PAC combined with enhanced coagulation on an Australian source water. As a result of the PAC addition, the removal of NOM improved by 70%, which led to a significant reduction (80-95%) in the formation of DBPs. The water quality in the distribution system also improved, indicated by lower concentrations of DBPs in the distribution system and better maintenance of disinfectant residual at the extremities of the distribution system. The efficacy of the PAC treatment for NOM removal was shown to be a function of the characteristics of the NOM and the quality of the source water, as well as the PAC dose. PAC treatment did not have the capacity to remove bromide ion, resulting in the formation of more brominated DBPs. Since brominated DBPs have been found to be more toxic than their chlorinated analogues, their preferential formation upon PAC addition must be considered, especially in source waters containing high concentrations of bromide. PMID:21353285

  16. Thermodynamic and Probabilistic Metabolic Control Analysis of Riboflavin (Vitamin B₂) Biosynthesis in Bacteria.

    PubMed

    Birkenmeier, Markus; Mack, Matthias; Röder, Thorsten

    2015-10-01

    In this study, we applied a coupled in silico thermodynamic and probabilistic metabolic control analysis methodology to investigate the control mechanisms of the commercially relevant riboflavin biosynthetic pathway in bacteria. Under the investigated steady-state conditions, we found that several enzyme reactions of the pathway operate far from thermodynamic equilibrium (transformed Gibbs energies of reaction below about -17 kJ mol(-1)). Using the obtained thermodynamic information and applying enzyme elasticity sampling, we calculated the distributions of the scaled concentration control coefficients (CCCs) and scaled flux control coefficients (FCCs). From the statistical analysis of the calculated distributions, we inferred that the control over the riboflavin producing flux is shared among several enzyme activities and mostly resides in the initial reactions of the pathway. More precisely, the guanosine triphosphate (GTP) cyclohydrolase II activity, and therefore the bifunctional RibA protein of Bacillus subtilis because it catalyzes this activity, appears to mainly control the riboflavin producing flux (mean FCCs = 0.45 and 0.55, respectively). The GTP cyclohydrolase II activity and RibA also exert a high positive control over the riboflavin concentration (mean CCCs = 2.43 and 2.91, respectively). This prediction is consistent with previous findings for microbial riboflavin overproducing strains. PMID:26280801

  17. Inflammation and the coagulation system in tuberculosis: Tissue Factor leads the dance.

    PubMed

    Caccamo, Nadia; Dieli, Francesco

    2016-02-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the causative agent of tuberculosis, drives the formation of granulomas, structures in which both immune cells and the bacterial pathogen cohabit. The most abundant cells in granulomas are macrophages, which contribute as both cells with bactericidal activity and as targets for M. tuberculosis infection and proliferation during the entire course of infection. The mechanisms and factors involved in the regulation and control of macrophage microenvironment-specific polarization and plasticity are not well understood, as some granulomas are able to control bacteria growth and others fail to do so, permitting bacterial spread. In this issue of the European Journal of Immunology, Venkatasubramanian et al. [Eur. J. Immunol. 2016. 46: 464-479] show that mice lacking the tissue factor gene in myeloid cells have augmented M. tuberculosis growth and increased inflammation in the lungs. This suggests that tissue factor, an initiator of coagulation, is important for the generation of fibrin, which supports granuloma formation. This article demonstrates for the first time the involvement of tissue factor in inducing effective immunity against M. tuberculosis, and sheds new lights on the complex interplay between host inflammatory response, the coagulation system, and the control of M. tuberculosis infection. PMID:26763085

  18. Global coagulation in myeloproliferative neoplasms.

    PubMed

    Tripodi, Armando; Chantarangkul, Veena; Gianniello, Francesca; Clerici, Marigrazia; Lemma, Laura; Padovan, Lidia; Gatti, Loredana; Mannucci, Pier Mannuccio; Peyvandi, Flora

    2013-12-01

    In spite of their recognized risk of thrombosis, patients with myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPN) show little or no abnormalities of traditional coagulation tests, perhaps because these are unable to represent the balance between pro- and anticoagulants nor the effect of platelets and blood cells. We investigated whether global tests such as thrombin generation in platelet-rich plasma (PRP) or thromboelastometry in whole blood were able to detect signs of procoagulant imbalance in MPN. The endogenous thrombin potential (ETP) of 111 patients and 89 controls was measured in PRP with platelet count adjusted to the original patient- or control-count. Testing was performed with and without thrombomodulin (the physiological protein C activator) and results were expressed as ETP ratios (with/without thrombomodulin). High ETP ratios reflect resistance to thrombomodulin and were taken as indexes of procoagulant imbalance. Patients were also investigated by thromboelastometry that provides such parameters as the clot formation time (CFT) and maximal clot firmness (MCF). Short CFT or high MCF were taken as indexes of procoagulant imbalance. ETP ratios were higher in patients than in controls and were directly correlated with platelet counts and inversely with the plasma levels of free protein S, protein C and antithrombin. Patients on hydroxyurea had lower ETP ratios than those on other treatments. CFT was shorter and MCF was greater in patients than controls; CFT and MCF were correlated with platelet counts. In conclusion, patients with MPN display a procoagulant imbalance detectable by thrombin generation and thromboelastometry. These tests might be useful in the frame of clinical trials to assess their association with the occurrence of thrombosis and with the effect of therapeutic strategies in MPN. PMID:23820940

  19. Removal of Arsenic from Drinking Water by Adsorption and Coagulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, M.; Sugita, H.; Hara, J.; Takahashi, S.

    2013-12-01

    Removal of arsenic from drinking water has been an important issue worldwide, which has attracted greater attentions in recent years especially for supplying safe drinking water in developing countries. Although many kinds of treatment approaches that are available or applicable both in principle and practice, such as adsorption, coagulation, membrane filtration, ion exchange, biological process, electrocoagulation and so on, the first 2 approaches (i.e., adsorption and coagulation) are most promising due to the low-cost, high-efficiency, simplicity of treating systems, and thus can be practically used in developing countries. In this study, a literature survey on water quality in Bangladesh was performed to understand the ranges of arsenic concentration and pH of groundwater in Bangladesh. A series of tests were then organized and performed to investigate the effects of arsenic concentration, arsenic forms, pH, chemical compositions of the materials used for adsorption and coagulation, particle size distribution and treatment time on quality of treated water. The experimental results obtained in the study illustrated that both adsorption and coagulation can be used to effectively reduce the concentrations of either arsenic (V) or arsenic (III) from the contaminated water. Coagulation of arsenic with a magnesium-based material developed in this study can be very effective to remove arsenic, especially arsenic (V), from contaminated water with a concentration of 10 ppm to an undetectable level of 0.002 ppm by ICP analyses. Compared to arsenic (III), arsenic (V) is easier to be removed. The materials used for adsorption and coagulation in this study can remove arsenic (V) up to 9 mg/g and 6 mg/g, and arsenic (III) up to 4 mg/g and 3 mg/g, respectively, depending on test conditions and compositions of the materials being used. The control of pH during treatment can be a challenging technical issue for developing both adsorbent and coagulant. Keywords: Water Treatment

  20. Development of the selective coagulation process

    SciTech Connect

    Yoon, R.H.; Luttrell, G.H.

    1992-07-01

    The selective hydrophobic coagulation (SHC) process is based on the recent finding that hydrophobic particles can be selectively coagulated without using traditional agglomerating agents or flocculants. The driving force for the coagulation is the attractive energy between hydrophobic surfaces, an interaction that has been overlooked in classical colloid chemistry. In most cases, selective separations can be achieved using simple pH control to disperse the mineral matter, followed by recovery of the coal coagula using techniques that take advantage of the size enlargement. In the present work, studies have been carried out to further investigate the fundamental mechanisms of the SHC process and the parameters that affect the process of separating coal from the ash-forming minerals and pyritic sulfur. Studies have included direct force measurements of the attractive interaction between model hydrophobic surfaces, in-situ measurements of the size distributions of coagula formed under a variety of operating conditions, and development of a population balance model to describe the coagulation process. An extended DLVO colloid stability model which includes a hydrophobic interaction energy term has also been developed to explain the findings obtained from the experimental studies. In addition to the fundamental studies, bench-scale process development test work has been performed to establish the best possible method of separating the coagula from dispersed mineral matter. Two types of separators, i.e., a sedimentation tank and a rotating drum screen, were examined in this study. The sedimentation tank proved to be the more efficient unit, achieving ash reductions as high as 60% in a single pass while recovering more than 90% of the combustible material. This device, which minimizes turbulence and coagula breakage, was used in subsequent test work to optimize design and operating parameters.

  1. The activity of ferulic and gallic acids in biofilm prevention and control of pathogenic bacteria.

    PubMed

    Borges, Anabela; Saavedra, Maria J; Simões, Manuel

    2012-01-01

    The activity of two phenolic acids, gallic acid (GA) and ferulic acid (FA) at 1000 μg ml(-1), was evaluated on the prevention and control of biofilms formed by Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Staphylococcus aureus and Listeria monocytogenes. In addition, the effect of the two phenolic acids was tested on planktonic cell susceptibility, bacterial motility and adhesion. Biofilm prevention and control were tested using a microtiter plate assay and the effect of the phenolic acids was assessed on biofilm mass (crystal violet staining) and on the quantification of metabolic activity (alamar blue assay). The minimum bactericidal concentration for P. aeruginosa was 500 μg ml(-1) (for both phenolic acids), whilst for E. coli it was 2500 μg ml(-1) (FA) and 5000 μg ml(-1) (GA), for L. monocytogenes it was >5000 μg ml(-1) (for both phenolic acids), and for S. aureus it was 5000 μg ml(-1) (FA) and >5000 μg ml(-1) (GA). GA caused total inhibition of swimming (L. monocytogenes) and swarming (L. monocytogenes and E. coli) motilities. FA caused total inhibition of swimming (L. monocytogenes) and swarming (L. monocytogenes and E. coli) motilities. Colony spreading of S. aureus was completely inhibited by FA. The interference of GA and FA with bacterial adhesion was evaluated by the determination of the free energy of adhesion. Adhesion was less favorable when the bacteria were exposed to GA (P. aeruginosa, S. aureus and L. monocytogenes) and FA (P. aeruginosa and S. aureus). Both phenolics had preventive action on biofilm formation and showed a higher potential to reduce the mass of biofilms formed by the Gram-negative bacteria. GA and FA promoted reductions in biofilm activity >70% for all the biofilms tested. The two phenolic acids demonstrated the potential to inhibit bacterial motility and to prevent and control biofilms of four important human pathogenic bacteria. This study also emphasizes the potential of phytochemicals as an emergent source of biofilm

  2. Evaluation of native bacteria and manganese phosphite for alternative control of charcoal root rot of soybean.

    PubMed

    Simonetti, Ester; Viso, Natalia Pin; Montecchia, Marcela; Zilli, Carla; Balestrasse, Karina; Carmona, Marcelo

    2015-11-01

    Plant growth promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR) are potential agents to control plant pathogens and their combined use with biopesticides such as phosphites may constitute a novel strategy to incorporate in disease management programs. In the present study, 11 bacterial isolates were selected on the basis of their antagonistic activity against Macrophomina phaseolina in dual-culture tests, and their plant growth promoting traits. Selected isolates were characterised on the basis of auxin and siderophore production, phosphate solubilisation and rep-PCR genomic fingerprinting. Two of these isolates, identified as Pseudomonas fluorescens 9 and Bacillus subtilis 54, were further evaluated for their inhibitory capacity against M. phaseolina using in vitro (on soybean seeds) and in vivo (greenhouse assay) tests. Both bacteria were applied individually as well as in combined treatment with manganese phosphite as seed treatments. Damage severity on soybean seeds was significantly reduced, compared with the untreated control, by both bacterial strains; however, the individual application of phosphite showed to be least effective in controlling M. phaseolina. Interestingly, the phosphite treatment improved its performance under greenhouse conditions compared to the results from the in vitro assays. In the greenhouse trials, the greatest reductions in disease severity were achieved when strain P. fluorescens 9 was applied singly or when strain B. subtilis 54 was combined with manganese phosphite, achieving 82% of control in both cases. This work is the first to report the control of M. phaseolina using combined treatment with PGPR and phosphite under greenhouse conditions. PMID:26505310

  3. Ice-nucleating bacteria control the order and dynamics of interfacial water

    PubMed Central

    Pandey, Ravindra; Usui, Kota; Livingstone, Ruth A.; Fischer, Sean A.; Pfaendtner, Jim; Backus, Ellen H. G.; Nagata, Yuki; Fröhlich-Nowoisky, Janine; Schmüser, Lars; Mauri, Sergio; Scheel, Jan F.; Knopf, Daniel A.; Pöschl, Ulrich; Bonn, Mischa; Weidner, Tobias

    2016-01-01

    Ice-nucleating organisms play important roles in the environment. With their ability to induce ice formation at temperatures just below the ice melting point, bacteria such as Pseudomonas syringae attack plants through frost damage using specialized ice-nucleating proteins. Besides the impact on agriculture and microbial ecology, airborne P. syringae can affect atmospheric glaciation processes, with consequences for cloud evolution, precipitation, and climate. Biogenic ice nucleation is also relevant for artificial snow production and for biomimetic materials for controlled interfacial freezing. We use interface-specific sum frequency generation (SFG) spectroscopy to show that hydrogen bonding at the water-bacteria contact imposes structural ordering on the adjacent water network. Experimental SFG data and molecular dynamics simulations demonstrate that ice-active sites within P. syringae feature unique hydrophilic-hydrophobic patterns to enhance ice nucleation. The freezing transition is further facilitated by the highly effective removal of latent heat from the nucleation site, as apparent from time-resolved SFG spectroscopy. PMID:27152346

  4. Ice-nucleating bacteria control the order and dynamics of interfacial water.

    PubMed

    Pandey, Ravindra; Usui, Kota; Livingstone, Ruth A; Fischer, Sean A; Pfaendtner, Jim; Backus, Ellen H G; Nagata, Yuki; Fröhlich-Nowoisky, Janine; Schmüser, Lars; Mauri, Sergio; Scheel, Jan F; Knopf, Daniel A; Pöschl, Ulrich; Bonn, Mischa; Weidner, Tobias

    2016-04-01

    Ice-nucleating organisms play important roles in the environment. With their ability to induce ice formation at temperatures just below the ice melting point, bacteria such as Pseudomonas syringae attack plants through frost damage using specialized ice-nucleating proteins. Besides the impact on agriculture and microbial ecology, airborne P. syringae can affect atmospheric glaciation processes, with consequences for cloud evolution, precipitation, and climate. Biogenic ice nucleation is also relevant for artificial snow production and for biomimetic materials for controlled interfacial freezing. We use interface-specific sum frequency generation (SFG) spectroscopy to show that hydrogen bonding at the water-bacteria contact imposes structural ordering on the adjacent water network. Experimental SFG data and molecular dynamics simulations demonstrate that ice-active sites within P. syringae feature unique hydrophilic-hydrophobic patterns to enhance ice nucleation. The freezing transition is further facilitated by the highly effective removal of latent heat from the nucleation site, as apparent from time-resolved SFG spectroscopy. PMID:27152346

  5. EFFICACY OF BURNING, TILLAGE, AND BIOCIDES IN CONTROLLING BACTERIA RELEASED AT FIELD SITES AND EFFECTS ON INDIGENOUS BACTERIA AND FUNGI

    EPA Science Inventory

    The environmental use of genetically engineered microorganisms (GEMS) must include risk control methods that are effective and also safe to non-target organisms. n important component of risk control is the decontamination of field release sites of GEMS after their function is co...

  6. Platelets and coagulation in infection

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Rachelle P; Miller-Dorey, Sarah; Jenne, Craig N

    2016-01-01

    Disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC) is a frequent complication in sepsis that is associated with worse outcomes and higher mortality in patients. In addition to the uncontrolled generation of thrombi throughout the patient's vasculature, DIC often consumes large quantities of clotting factors leaving the patient susceptible to hemorrhaging. Owing to these complications, patients often receive anticoagulants to treat the uncontrolled clotting, often with mixed outcomes. This lack of success with the current array of anticoagulants can be partly explained by the fact that during sepsis clotting is often initiated by the immune system. Systemic inflammation has the capacity to activate and amplify coagulation and, as such, potential therapies for the treatment of sepsis-associated DIC need to address the interaction between inflammation and coagulation. Recent studies have suggested that platelets and neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) are the key mediators of infection-induced coagulation. This review explores current anticoagulant therapies and discusses the development of future therapies to target platelet and NET-mediated coagulation. PMID:27525062

  7. Ultrasonic measurement of milk coagulation time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bakkali, F.; Moudden, A.; Faiz, B.; Amghar, A.; Maze, G.; Montero de Espinosa, F.; Akhnak, M.

    2001-12-01

    Using a pulse reflection technique an ultrasonic system has been developed to monitor in situ the coagulation process of rennetted milk. The velocity and attenuation of ultrasonic waves through coagulating milk were continuously monitored. The observed changes in ultrasonic velocity during coagulation were used to predict the coagulation time. The coagulation time is indicative of the transition from the enzymatic phase to the physicochemical phase. The determination of coagulation time has a decisive role in determining the qualities of the end product in cheesemaking.

  8. Microbial control of the production of hydrogen sulfide by sulfate-reducing bacteria.

    PubMed

    Montgomery, A D; McLnerney, M J; Sublette, K L

    1990-03-01

    A sulfide-resistant ctrain of Thiobacillus denitrificans, strain F, prevented the accumulation of sulfide by Desulfovibrio desulfuricans when both organisms were grown in liquid medium or in Berea sandstone cores. The wild-type strain of T. denitrificans did not prevent the accumulation of sulfide produced by D. desulfuricans. Strain F also prevented the accumulation of sulfide by a mixed population of sulfate-reducing bacteria enriched from an oil field brine. Fermentation balances showed that strain F stoichiometrically oxidized the sulfide produced by D. desulfuricans and the oil field brine enrichment to sulfate. These data suggest that strain F would be effective in controlling sulfide production in oil reservoirs and other environments. PMID:18592547

  9. A gut-vascular barrier controls the systemic dissemination of bacteria.

    PubMed

    Spadoni, Ilaria; Zagato, Elena; Bertocchi, Alice; Paolinelli, Roberta; Hot, Edina; Di Sabatino, Antonio; Caprioli, Flavio; Bottiglieri, Luca; Oldani, Amanda; Viale, Giuseppe; Penna, Giuseppe; Dejana, Elisabetta; Rescigno, Maria

    2015-11-13

    In healthy individuals, the intestinal microbiota cannot access the liver, spleen, or other peripheral tissues. Some pathogenic bacteria can reach these sites, however, and can induce a systemic immune response. How such compartmentalization is achieved is unknown. We identify a gut-vascular barrier (GVB) in mice and humans that controls the translocation of antigens into the blood stream and prohibits entry of the microbiota. Salmonella typhimurium can penetrate the GVB in a manner dependent on its pathogenicity island (Spi) 2-encoded type III secretion system and on decreased β-catenin-dependent signaling in gut endothelial cells. The GVB is modified in celiac disease patients with elevated serum transaminases, which indicates that GVB dismantling may be responsible for liver damage in these patients. Understanding the GVB may provide new insights into the regulation of the gut-liver axis. PMID:26564856

  10. Controlled bacteria-gold nanorod interactions for enhancement of optoacoustic contrast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liopo, Anton; Derry, Paul J.; Ermolinsky, Boris; Su, Richard; Conjusteau, André; Ermilov, Sergey; Zubarev, Eugene R.; Oraevsky, Alexander

    2014-03-01

    Gold-based contrast agents, gold nanorod (GNR), were designed for the enhancement of optoacoustic signal. After synthesis, the GNR-CTAB complexes were modified by pegylation (PEG), or replacement of CTAB (cetyl trimethylammonium bromide) with MTAB (16-mercaptohexadecyl trimethylammonium bromide) for coverage of gold nanorods with heparin (GNR-HP). Modified GNR are purified through centrifugation and filtration. GNRCTAB can be used as a model of positively charged gold surface for quantitative optoacoustic sensing in GNRbacteria interactions, whereas GNR-PEG and GNR-HP can be used as negatively charged gold surface models. We studied controlled agglomeration of contrast agents with the bacteria E.Coli and Vibrio Cholerae. For bacterial sensing, the localized plasmon resonance peak shifts as a function of electrostatic binding, which was detected with two different wavelengths through 3D optoacoustic imaging.

  11. Enhanced coagulation for arsenic removal

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, R.C.; Liang, S.; Wang, H.C.; Beuhler, M.D. )

    1994-09-01

    The possible use of enhanced coagulation for arsenic removal was examined at the facilities of a California utility in 1992 and 1993. The tests were conducted at bench, pilot, and demonstration scales, with two source waters. Alum and ferric chloride, with cationic polymer, were investigated at various influence arsenic concentrations. The investigators concluded that for the source waters tested, enhanced coagulation could be effective for arsenic removal and that less ferric chloride than alum, on a weight basis, is needed to achieve the same removal.

  12. Signal transduction and transcriptional and posttranscriptional control of iron-regulated genes in bacteria.

    PubMed

    Crosa, J H

    1997-09-01

    Iron is an essential element for nearly all living cells. Thus, the ability of bacteria to utilize iron is a crucial survival mechanism independent of the ecological niche in which the microorganism lives, because iron is scarce both in potential biological hosts, where it is bound by high-affinity iron-binding proteins, and in the environment, where it is present as part of insoluble complex hydroxides. Therefore, pathogens attempting to establish an infection and environmental microorganisms must all be able to utilize the otherwise unavailable iron. One of the strategies to perform this task is the possession of siderophore-mediated iron uptake systems that are capable of scavenging the hoarded iron. This metal is, however, a double-edged sword for the cell because it can catalyze the production of deadly free hydroxyl radicals, which are harmful to the cells. It is therefore imperative for the cell to control the concentration of iron at levels that permit key metabolic steps to occur without becoming a messenger of cell death. Early work identified a repressor, Fur, which as a complex with iron repressed the expression of most iron uptake systems as well as other iron-regulated genes when the iron concentration reached a certain level. However, later work demonstrated that this regulation by Fur was not the only answer under low-iron conditions, there was a need for activation of iron uptake genes as well as siderophore biosynthetic genes. Furthermore, it was also realized that in some instances the actual ferric iron-siderophore complex induced the transcription of the cognate receptor and transport genes. It became evident that control of the expression of iron-regulated genes was more complex than originally envisioned. In this review, I analyze the processes of signal transduction, transcriptional control, and posttranscriptional control of iron-regulated genes as reported for the ferric dicitrate system in Escherichia coli; the pyochelin, pyoverdin, and

  13. Magnetic bacteria against MIC

    SciTech Connect

    Javaherdashti, R.

    1997-12-01

    In this article, it is suggested to use the sensitivity of magnetotactic bacteria to changes of magnetic field direction and the natural ability of this bacteria in rapid growth during relatively short time intervals against corrosion-enhancing bacteria and especially sulfate-reducing bacteria. If colonies of sulfate-reducing bacteria could be packed among magnetotactic bacteria, then, by applying sufficiently powerful magnetic field (about 0.5 gauss), all of these bacteria (magnetic and non-magnetic) will be oriented towards an Anti-bacteria agent (oxygen or biocide). So, Microbiologically-Influenced Corrosion in the system would be controlled to a large extent.

  14. Disseminated intravascular coagulation in cattle with abomasal displacement.

    PubMed

    Irmak, K; Turgut, K

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to evaluate haemostatic function in cattle with abomasal displacement (AD) and to reflect the occurrence of disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC). Ten adult cattle with left displacement of abomasum (LDA) (group I), 10 adult cattle with right displacement of abomasum with volvulus (RDA) (group II) and 10 clinically healthy adult cattle (control group) were used as material. Numbers of platelets (PLT) and coagulation tests (activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT), prothrombin time (PT), thrombin time (TT), serum fibrin/fibrinogen degradation products (FDPs), fibrinogen) were measured before the surgical treatment of cattle with LDA and RDA. APTT was prolonged only in group II compared with the control and group I (p<0.05). However, when the individual values of coagulation profiles of each cow were evaluated, two cattle in group I and three cattle in group II had at least three abnormal coagulation profiles, which reflect the occurrence of DIC. These cattle died after surgical treatment. The two cattle with LDA had abnormal APTT, FDPs and PLT values; three cattle with RDA had abnormal APTT, PT, TT, FDPs and PLT values. APTT (5 cases), FDPs (5 cases) and thrombocytopenia (5 cases) were the three most common abnormal tests on coagulation profile in the cattle with LDA and RDA. The results of the study indicate that cattle with AD had a spectrum of haemostatic dysfunction and that DIC was a significant risk factor for mortality. PMID:15727292

  15. Quorum quenching bacteria isolated from the sludge of a wastewater treatment plant and their application for controlling biofilm formation.

    PubMed

    Kim, A-Leum; Park, Son-Young; Lee, Chi-Ho; Lee, Chung-Hak; Lee, Jung-Kee

    2014-11-28

    Bacteria recognize changes in their population density by sensing the concentration of signal molecules, N-acyl-homoserine lactones (AHLs). AHL-mediated quorum sensing (QS) plays a key role in biofilm formation, so the interference of QS, referred to as quorum quenching (QQ), has received a great deal of attention. A QQ strategy can be applied to membrane bioreactors (MBRs) for advanced wastewater treatment to control biofouling. To isolate QQ bacteria that can inhibit biofilm formation, we isolated diverse AHL-degrading bacteria from a laboratory-scale MBR and sludge from real wastewater treatment plants. A total of 225 AHLdegrading bacteria were isolated from the sludge sample by enrichment culture. To identify the enzyme responsible for AHL degradation in QQ bacteria, AHL-degrading activities were analyzed using cell-free lysate, culture supernatant, and whole cells. Afipia sp. and Acinetobacter sp. strains produced the intracellular QQ enzyme, whereas Pseudomonas sp. and Micrococcus sp. produced the extracellular QQ enzyme that was most likely to produce AHLacylase. AHL-degrading activity was observed in whole-cell assay with the Microbacterium sp. and Rhodococcus sp. strains. There has been no report for AHL-degrading capability in the case of Streptococcus sp. and Afipia sp. strains. Finally, inhibition of biofilm formation by isolated QQ bacteria or enzymes was observed on glass slides and 96-well microtiter plates using crystal violet staining. QQ strains or enzymes not only inhibited initial biofilm development but also reduced established biofilms. PMID:25112313

  16. Effect of Selected Polysaccharide-Producing Soil Bacteria on Hyperhydricity Control in Oregano Tissue Cultures

    PubMed Central

    Ueno, K.; Shetty, K.

    1997-01-01

    Hyperhydricity, or vitrification, is a physiological malformation affecting tissue culture-generated plants. This malformation is associated with excessive hydration and poor lignification and results in poor regeneration of plants. We have tested hyperhydricity prevention in oregano by several nonspecific polysaccharide-producing rhizosphere bacteria. Among these bacteria, Pseudomonas mucidolens and another Pseudomonas sp. prevented hyperhydricity and improved acclimation of oregano clones. These two bacteria have more advantages for commercial applications than Pseudomonas strains isolated previously from oregano. PMID:16535525

  17. [Grupo Colaborativo de Resistencia Bacteriana, Chile: recommendations 2014 towards the control of bacteria resistance].

    PubMed

    Cifuentes, Marcela; Silva, Francisco; Arancibia, J Miguel; Rosales, Ruth; Ajenjo, M Cristina; Riedel, Gisela; Camponovo, Rossana; Labarca, Jaime

    2015-06-01

    Five issues were reviewed in depth at the 2014 annual meeting of Colaborative Group Against Bacterial Resistance and the antecedents and conclusions are detailed in this document. I.- News in CLSI 2014: the difficulties and implications on its implementation at the local level were reviewed and recommendations were set. II.- Criteria for determining the incidence of multi-resistant microorganism in critical care units where indicators and monitoring methodology for better quantification of microorganisms were defined. III.- Quality requirements were established to be considered by the professionals involved in the selection of antimicrobials in the hospital. IV.- Transfer policies, screening and contact precautions for the control of transmission of multiresistant bacteria. V.- Recommendations for health facilities when a carbapenemase producing enterobacteriacea is detected, in a checklist format for rapid deployment in hospitals without endemia of these agents. These are suggestions that arise from the joint work of specialists from many hospitals that do not represent consensus or recommendation, but may help to control the resistance level of each health facility in the country. PMID:26230437

  18. CONTROL OF LATE BLIGHT (PHYTOPHTHORA CAPSICI) IN PEPPER PLANT WITH A COMPOST CONTAINING MULTITUDE OF CHITINASE-PRODUCING BACTERIA

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Compost sustaining a multitude of chitinase-producing bacteria was evaluated in a greenhouse study as a soil amendment for the control of late blight (Phytophthora capsici L.) in pepper (Capsicum annuum L.). Microbial population and exogenous enzyme activity were measured in the rhizosphere and corr...

  19. Principles of dielectric blood coagulometry as a comprehensive coagulation test.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Yoshihito; Brun, Marc-Aurèle; Machida, Kenzo; Nagasawa, Masayuki

    2015-10-01

    Dielectric blood coagulometry (DBCM) is intended to support hemostasis management by providing comprehensive information on blood coagulation from automated, time-dependent measurements of whole blood dielectric spectra. We discuss the relationship between the series of blood coagulation reactions, especially the aggregation and deformation of erythrocytes, and the dielectric response with the help of clot structure electron microscope observations. Dielectric response to the spontaneous coagulation after recalcification presented three distinct phases that correspond to (P1) rouleau formation before the onset of clotting, (P2) erythrocyte aggregation and reconstitution of aggregates accompanying early fibrin formation, and (P3) erythrocyte shape transformation and/or structure changes within aggregates after the stable fibrin network is formed and platelet contraction occurs. Disappearance of the second phase was observed upon addition of tissue factor and ellagic acid for activation of extrinsic and intrinsic pathways, respectively, which is attributable to accelerated thrombin generation. A series of control experiments revealed that the amplitude and/or quickness of dielectric response reflect platelet function, fibrin polymerization, fibrinolysis activity, and heparin activity. Therefore, DBCM sensitively measures blood coagulation via erythrocytes aggregation and shape changes and their impact on the dielectric permittivity, making possible the development of the battery of assays needed for comprehensive coagulation testing. PMID:26368847

  20. Coagulants modulate the antioxidant properties & hypocholesterolemic effect of tofu (curdled soymilk).

    PubMed

    Oboh, G; Ekperigin, M M; Akindahunsi, A A

    2007-01-01

    The recent increase in Soymilk and tofu (coagulated soymilk) consumption especially in Western Country is due to the recognition of the health benefits of soy foods; consumption of soybean would prevent heart diseases. In Nigeria Calcium salt, alum and steep water from pap production are usually used as coagulant in tofu production. The effect of those coagulants on the antioxidant properties of tofu and serum cholesterol, high-density lipoproteins (HDL) and low-density lipoproteins (LDL) level of albino rats fed tofu for 14 days is been assessed. The result of the study revealed that there was no significant difference (P > 0.05) in the tofu yield (17.6-18.3%), however steep water coagulated tofu had a significantly higher (P < 0.05) total phenol (12.0 g/kg) content, reducing power (0.6 OD700) and DPPH free radical scavenging ability (69.1%) than tofu produced using other coagulants. Furthermore, feeding albino rats with tofu and water ad libitum for 14 days caused a significant decrease (P < 0.05) in the serum cholesterol and low-density lipoproteins when compared with the control, while there was no significant difference (P > 0.05) in the average daily feed intake of the rats. Conversely, there was a significant increase (P < 0.05) in the serum high-density lipoproteins when compared with the control. However, rats fed steep water coagulated tofu had the lowest serum level of cholesterol and LDL level followed by those fed CaCl2 and alum coagulated tofu respectively, while those fed with calcium chloride coagulated tofu had the highest serum HDL level, and closely followed by those fed steep water coagulated tofu. It was therefore concluded that of all the coagulant, steep water appeared to be the most promising coagulant with regard to the production of tofu with higher antioxidant and hypocholesterolemic effect. PMID:18087868

  1. Coagulation parameters in inflammatory bowel disease

    PubMed Central

    Dolapcioglu, Can; Soylu, Aliye; Kendir, Tulin; Ince, Ali Tuzun; Dolapcioglu, Hatice; Purisa, Sevim; Bolukbas, Cengiz; Sokmen, Haci Mehmet; Dalay, Remzi; Ovunc, Oya

    2014-01-01

    Thromboembolic events represent a major cause of morbidity and mortality in patients with inflammatory bowel disease and they may occur both at the gastrointestinal tract and at extraintestinal sites. This study aimed to examine the alterations in coagulation parameters involved at different steps of hemostasis in patients with Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis, in comparison with healthy individuals. Fifty-one patients with inflammatory bowel disease and 26 healthy controls were included in this study. Plasma levels of PT, APTT, AT III, plasminogen, fibrinogen, D-dimer, factor V, factor VIII, protein C, protein S, and APCR were measured and factor V Leiden mutation was examined in both patients and controls. Two patients with ulcerative colitis had a history of previous thromboembolic event. Inflammatory bowel disease was associated with significantly higher levels of fibrinogen, PT, factor V, factor VIII, plasminogen and thrombocyte. Protein S, fibrinogen, plasminogen and thrombocyte levels were associated with disease activity, depending on the type of the disease (Crohn’s disease or ulcerative colitis). The coagulation abnormalities detected in this study seems to be a secondary phenomena resulting from the disease process, which is more likely to be associated with a multitude of factors rather than a single abnormality. PMID:24995109

  2. Sulfide controls on mercury speciation and bioavailability to methylating bacteria in sediment pore waters

    SciTech Connect

    Benoit, J.M.; Gilmour, C.C.; Heyes, A.; Mason, R.P.

    1999-03-15

    A chemical equilibrium model for Hg complexation in sediments with sulfidic pore waters is presented. The purpose of the model was to explain observed relationships between pore water sulfide, dissolved inorganic Hg (Hg{sub D}), and bulk methylmercury (MeHg) in surficial sediments of two biogeochemically different ecosystems, the Florida Everglades and Patuxent River, MD. The model was constructed to test the hypothesis that the availability of Hg for methylation in sediments is a function of the concentration of neutral dissolved Hg complexes rather than Hg{sup 2+} or total Hg{sub D}. The model included interaction of mercury with solids containing one or two sulfide groups, and it was able to reproduce observed Hg{sub D} and bulk MeHg trends in the two ecosystems. The model is consistent with HgS{sup 0} as the dominant neutral Hg complex and the form of Hg accumulated by methylating bacteria in sulfidic pore waters. The model-estimated decline in HgS{sup 0} with increasing sulfide was consistent with the observed decline in bulk sediments MeHg. Since bacterial Hg uptake rate is one of the factors affecting methylation rate, Hg complexation models such as the one presented are helpful in understanding the factors that control MeHg production and accumulation in aquatic ecosystems.

  3. Isolation and evaluation of bacteria and fungi as biological control agents against Rhizoctonia solani.

    PubMed

    Lahlali, R; Bajii, M; Jijakli, M H

    2007-01-01

    Rhizoctonia solani is one of the most important limiting factors for potato production and storage in Belgium and worldwide. Its management is still strongly dependent on chemical treatments. The aim of this work was to evaluate the possibility of exploiting bacteria and fungi in order to control this pathogen. Among a collection of 220 bacterial strains isolated from different organs of healthy potato plants and rhizospheric soils, 25 isolates were selected using screening methods based on in vitro dual culture assays. The mycelial growth inhibition rate of the pathogen was ranged from 59.4 to 95.0%. Also seven fungal strains isolated from the rhizospheric soil and potato roots showed a highly mycelial growth inhibition of R. solani. The mycelial growth inhibition rate obtained with these fungi was included between 60.0 and 99.4%. From this preliminary study, the further investigations will be planned to determine the bacterial isolates systematic, species of fungal strains by using molecular tools and to assess their efficacy against R. solani in greenhouse trials. PMID:18396837

  4. Characteristics of meso-particles formed in coagulation process causing irreversible membrane fouling in the coagulation-microfiltration water treatment.

    PubMed

    Ding, Q; Yamamura, H; Murata, N; Aoki, N; Yonekawa, H; Hafuka, A; Watanabe, Y

    2016-09-15

    In coagulation-membrane filtration water treatment processes, it is still difficult to determine the optimal coagulation condition to minimize irreversible membrane fouling. In microfiltration (MF), meso-particles (i.e., 20 nm-0.5 μm) are thought to play an important role in irreversible membrane fouling, especially their characteristics of particle number (PN) and zeta potential (ZP). In this study, a new nanoparticle tracker combined a high-output violet laser with a microscope was developed to identify the physicochemical characteristics of these microscopic and widely dispersed meso-particles. The effects of pH and coagulant dose on ZP and PN of micro-particles (i.e., >0.5 μm) and meso-particles were investigated, and then coagulation-MF tests were conducted. As the result, irreversible membrane fouling was best controlled for both types of membranes, while meso-particle ZP approached zero at around pH 5.5 for both types of natural water. Since PN was greatest under these conditions, ZP is more important in determining the extent of irreversible membrane fouling than PN. However, the acidic condition to neutralize meso-particles is not suitable for actual operation, as considering residual aluminum concentration, pipe corrosion, and chlorination efficiency. It is therefore necessary to investigate coagulants or other methods for the appropriate modification of meso-particle characteristics. PMID:27262117

  5. An Eye to a Kill: Using Predatory Bacteria to Control Gram-Negative Pathogens Associated with Ocular Infections

    PubMed Central

    Shanks, Robert M. Q.; Davra, Viral R.; Romanowski, Eric G.; Brothers, Kimberly M.; Stella, Nicholas A.; Godboley, Dipti; Kadouri, Daniel E.

    2013-01-01

    Ocular infections are a leading cause of vision loss. It has been previously suggested that predatory prokaryotes might be used as live antibiotics to control infections. In this study, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Serratia marcescens ocular isolates were exposed to the predatory bacteria Micavibrio aeruginosavorus and Bdellovibrio bacteriovorus. All tested S. marcescens isolates were susceptible to predation by B. bacteriovorus strains 109J and HD100. Seven of the 10 P. aeruginosa isolates were susceptible to predation by B. bacteriovorus 109J with 80% being attacked by M. aeruginosavorus. All of the 19 tested isolates were found to be sensitive to at least one predator. To further investigate the effect of the predators on eukaryotic cells, human corneal-limbal epithelial (HCLE) cells were exposed to high concentrations of the predators. Cytotoxicity assays demonstrated that predatory bacteria do not damage ocular surface cells in vitro whereas the P. aeruginosa used as a positive control was highly toxic. Furthermore, no increase in the production of the proinflammatory cytokines IL-8 and TNF-alpha was measured in HCLE cells after exposure to the predators. Finally, injection of high concentration of predatory bacteria into the hemocoel of Galleria mellonella, an established model system used to study microbial pathogenesis, did not result in any measurable negative effect to the host. Our results suggest that predatory bacteria could be considered in the near future as a safe topical bio-control agent to treat ocular infections. PMID:23824756

  6. Effectiveness of Active Packaging on Control of Escherichia Coli O157:H7 and Total Aerobic Bacteria on Iceberg Lettuce.

    PubMed

    Lu, Haixia; Zhu, Junli; Li, Jianrong; Chen, Jinru

    2015-06-01

    Contaminated leafy green vegetables have been linked to several outbreaks of human gastrointestinal infections. Antimicrobial interventions that are adoptable by the fresh produce industry for control of pathogen contamination are in great demand. This study was undertaken to evaluate the efficacy of sustained active packaging on control of Escherichia coli O157:H7 and total aerobic bacteria on lettuce. Commercial Iceberg lettuce was inoculated with a 3-strain mixture of E. coli O157:H7 at 10(2) or 10(4) CFU/g. The contaminated lettuce and un-inoculated controls were placed respectively in 5 different active packaging structures. Traditional, nonactive packaging structure was included as controls. Packaged lettuce was stored at 4, 10, or 22 °C for 3 wk and sampled weekly for the population of E. coli O157:H7 and total aerobic bacteria. Results showed that packaging structures with ClO2 generator, CO2 generator, or one of the O2 scavengers effectively controlled the growth of E. coli O157:H7 and total aerobic bacteria under all storage conditions. Packaging structure with the ClO2 generator was most effective and no E. coli O157:H7 was detected in samples packaged in this structure except for those that were inoculated with 4 log CFU/g of E. coli O157:H7 and stored at 22 °C. Packaging structures with an oxygen scavenger and the allyl isothiocyanate generator were mostly ineffective in control of the growth of the bacteria on Iceberg lettuce. The research suggests that some of the packaging structures evaluated in the study can be used to control the presence of foodborne pathogens on leafy green vegetables. PMID:25974213

  7. Gene Therapy for Coagulation Disorders.

    PubMed

    Swystun, Laura L; Lillicrap, David

    2016-04-29

    Molecular genetic details of the human coagulation system were among the first successes of the genetic revolution in the 1980s. This information led to new molecular diagnostic strategies for inherited disorders of hemostasis and the development of recombinant clotting factors for the treatment of the common inherited bleeding disorders. A longer term goal of this knowledge has been the establishment of gene transfer to provide continuing access to missing or defective hemostatic proteins. Because of the relative infrequency of inherited coagulation factor disorders and the availability of safe and effective alternative means of management, the application of gene therapy for these conditions has been slow to realize clinical application. Nevertheless, the tools for effective and safe gene transfer are now much improved, and we have started to see examples of clinical gene therapy successes. Leading the way has been the use of adeno-associated virus-based strategies for factor IX gene transfer in hemophilia B. Several small phase 1/2 clinical studies using this approach have shown prolonged expression of therapeutically beneficial levels of factor IX. Nevertheless, before the application of gene therapy for coagulation disorders becomes widespread, several obstacles need to be overcome. Immunologic responses to the vector and transgenic protein need to be mitigated, and production strategies for clinical grade vectors require enhancements. There is little doubt that with the development of more efficient and facile strategies for genome editing and the application of other nucleic acid-based approaches to influence the coagulation system, the future of genetic therapies for hemostasis is bright. PMID:27126652

  8. Common Virulence Factors and Tissue Targets of Entomopathogenic Bacteria for Biological Control of Lepidopteran Pests

    PubMed Central

    Castagnola, Anaïs; Stock, S. Patricia

    2014-01-01

    This review focuses on common insecticidal virulence factors from entomopathogenic bacteria with special emphasis on two insect pathogenic bacteria Photorhabdus (Proteobacteria: Enterobacteriaceae) and Bacillus (Firmicutes: Bacillaceae). Insect pathogenic bacteria of diverse taxonomic groups and phylogenetic origin have been shown to have striking similarities in the virulence factors they produce. It has been suggested that the detection of phage elements surrounding toxin genes, horizontal and lateral gene transfer events, and plasmid shuffling occurrences may be some of the reasons that virulence factor genes have so many analogs throughout the bacterial kingdom. Comparison of virulence factors of Photorhabdus, and Bacillus, two bacteria with dissimilar life styles opens the possibility of re-examining newly discovered toxins for novel tissue targets. For example, nematodes residing in the hemolymph may release bacteria with virulence factors targeting neurons or neuromuscular junctions. The first section of this review focuses on toxins and their context in agriculture. The second describes the mode of action of toxins from common entomopathogens and the third draws comparisons between Gram positive and Gram negative bacteria. The fourth section reviews the implications of the nervous system in biocontrol. PMID:24634779

  9. Disseminated Intravascular Coagulation Syndromes in Obstetrics.

    PubMed

    Cunningham, F Gary; Nelson, David B

    2015-11-01

    Disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC) is a syndrome that can be initiated by a myriad of medical, surgical, and obstetric disorders. Also known as consumptive coagulopathy, DIC is a common contributor to maternal morbidity and mortality and is associated with up to 25% of maternal deaths. The etiopathogenesis of DIC is complex and currently thought to be initiated by tissue factor or thromboplastin, which is released from trophoblastic or fetal tissue, or maternal decidua or endothelium. Tissue factor activates the coagulation sequence to cause fibrin clotting and its dissolution by the fibrinolysin system. The result of this process can range from mild, clinically insignificant laboratory derangements to marked coagulopathy with bleeding at sites of minimal trauma. Although clinical recognition varies by disease severity, several organizations have attempted to standardize the diagnosis through development of scoring systems. Several important--albeit not necessarily common--obstetric disorders associated with DIC include placental abruption, amniotic fluid embolism, sepsis syndrome, and acute fatty liver of pregnancy. More common disorders include severe preeclampsia, hemolysis, elevated liver enzymes, and low platelet count syndrome, and massive obstetric hemorrhage. Importantly, many of these disorders either cause or are associated with substantive obstetric hemorrhage. Treatment of DIC is centered on two principles. The first is identification and treatment of the underlying disorder. Because many women with consumptive coagulopathy also have massive hemorrhage, the second tenet of treatment is that obstetric complications such as uterine atony or lacerations must be controlled simultaneously with prompt blood and component replacement for a salutary outcome. PMID:26444122

  10. More Efficient Media Design for Enhanced Biofouling Control in a Membrane Bioreactor: Quorum Quenching Bacteria Entrapping Hollow Cylinder.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sang H; Lee, Seonki; Lee, Kibaek; Nahm, Chang H; Kwon, Hyeokpil; Oh, Hyun-Suk; Won, Young-June; Choo, Kwang-Ho; Lee, Chung-Hak; Park, Pyung-Kyu

    2016-08-16

    Recently, membrane bioreactors (MBRs) with quorum quenching (QQ) bacteria entrapping beads have been reported as a new paradigm in biofouling control because, unlike conventional post-biofilm control methods, bacterial QQ can inhibit biofilm formation through its combined effects of physical scouring of the membrane and inhibition of quorum sensing (QS). In this study, using a special reporter strain (Escherichia coli JB525), the interaction between QS signal molecules and quorum quenching bacteria entrapping beads (QQ-beads) was elucidated through visualization of the QS signal molecules within a QQ-bead using a fluorescence microscope. As a result, under the conditions considered in this study, the surface area of QQ-media was likely to be a dominant parameter in enhancing QQ activity over total mass of entrapped QQ bacteria because QQ bacteria located near the core of a QQ-bead were unable to display their QQ activities. On the basis of this information, a more efficient QQ-medium, a QQ hollow cylinder (QQ-HC), was designed and prepared. In batch experiments, QQ-HCs showed greater QQ activity than QQ-beads as a result of their higher surface area and enhanced physical washing effect because of their larger impact area against the membrane surface. Furthermore, it was shown that such advantages of QQ-HCs resulted in more effective mitigation of membrane fouling than from QQ-beads in lab-scale continuous MBRs. PMID:27415662

  11. Comparison of coagulation performance and floc properties using a novel zirconium coagulant against traditional ferric and alum coagulants.

    PubMed

    Jarvis, Peter; Sharp, Emma; Pidou, Marc; Molinder, Roger; Parsons, Simon A; Jefferson, Bruce

    2012-09-01

    Coagulation in drinking water treatment has relied upon iron (Fe) and aluminium (Al) salts throughout the last century to provide the bulk removal of contaminants from source waters containing natural organic matter (NOM). However, there is now a need for improved treatment of these waters as their quality deteriorates and water quality standards become more difficult to achieve. Alternative coagulant chemicals offer a simple and inexpensive way of doing this. In this work a novel zirconium (Zr) coagulant was compared against traditional Fe and Al coagulants. The Zr coagulant was able to provide between 46 and 150% lower dissolved organic carbon (DOC) residual in comparison to the best traditional coagulant (Fe). In addition floc properties were significantly improved with larger and stronger flocs forming when the Zr coagulant was used with the median floc sizes being 930 μm for Zr; 710 μm for Fe and 450 μm for Al. In pilot scale experiments, a similar improved NOM and particle removal was observed. The results show that when optimised for combined DOC removal and low residual turbidity, the Zr coagulant out-performed the other coagulants tested at both bench and pilot scale. PMID:22627114

  12. [Cellular model of blood coagulation process].

    PubMed

    Bijak, Michał; Rzeźnicka, Paulina; Saluk, Joanna; Nowak, Paweł

    2015-07-01

    Blood coagulation is a process which main objective is the prevention of blood loss when the integrity of the blood vessel is damaged. Over the years, have been presented a number of concepts characterizing the mechanism of thrombus formation. Since the 60s of last century was current cascade model of the coagulation wherein forming of the fibrin clot is determined by two pathways called extrinsic and intrinsic pathways. In the nineties of the last century Monroe and Hoffman presented his concept of blood coagulation process which complement the currently valid model of cells participation especially of blood platelets which aim is to provide a negatively charged phospholipid surface and thereby allow the coagulation enzymatic complexes formation. Developed conception they called cellular model of coagulation. The aim of this work was to present in details of this blood coagulation, including descriptions of its various phases. PMID:26277170

  13. A `triangle' of interconnected coagulation models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubovski, P. B.

    1999-02-01

    A number of new coagulation models depending on a parameter is derived. The dependence is considered in two different ways. If the parameter takes its maximal value then in the first case we obtain a new discrete kinetic equation. We demonstrate that its continuous version is simply the Oort-Hulst's coagulation model. In the second case, the maximum of the corresponding parameter yields the Smoluchowski coagulation equation. At the minimal values of both parameters we arrive at another new kinetic equation. These three models form a `triangle' connecting the two known coagulation equations `situated' in its vertexes (Smoluchowski and Oort-Hulst equations) via an alteration of the parameters. Also, a comparative analysis of these three models is presented. As an advantage of the Oort-Hulst approach we compute the coagulation front and establish a connection between the infringement of the mass conservation law and convergence of the coagulation front to infinity.

  14. The role of coagulation/fibrinolysis during Streptococcus pyogenes infection

    PubMed Central

    Loof, Torsten G.; Deicke, Christin; Medina, Eva

    2014-01-01

    The hemostatic system comprises platelet aggregation, coagulation and fibrinolysis and is a host defense mechanism that protects the integrity of the vascular system after tissue injury. During bacterial infections, the coagulation system cooperates with the inflammatory system to eliminate the invading pathogens. However, pathogenic bacteria have frequently evolved mechanisms to exploit the hemostatic system components for their own benefit. Streptococcus pyogenes, also known as Group A Streptococcus, provides a remarkable example of the extraordinary capacity of pathogens to exploit the host hemostatic system to support microbial survival and dissemination. The coagulation cascade comprises the contact system (also known as the intrinsic pathway) and the tissue factor pathway (also known as the extrinsic pathway), both leading to fibrin formation. During the early phase of S. pyogenes infection, the activation of the contact system eventually leads to bacterial entrapment within a fibrin clot, where S. pyogenes is immobilized and killed. However, entrapped S. pyogenes can circumvent the antimicrobial effect of the clot by sequestering host plasminogen on the bacterial cell surface that, after conversion into its active proteolytic form, plasmin, degrades the fibrin network and facilitates the liberation of S. pyogenes from the clot. Furthermore, the surface-localized fibrinolytic activity also cleaves a variety of extracellular matrix proteins, thereby enabling S. pyogenes to migrate across barriers and disseminate within the host. This review summarizes the knowledge gained during the last two decades on the role of coagulation/fibrinolysis in host defense against S. pyogenes as well as the strategies developed by this pathogen to evade and exploit these host mechanisms for its own benefit. PMID:25309880

  15. Resident bacteria of plums and their potential for controlling brown rot after harvest

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Fruit microflora has been the richest source of antagonists against fruit decays and the active ingredient in all currently available commercial biocontrol products. A comprehensive evaluation of plum bacteria for biocontrol activity against Monilinia fructicola, causing brown rot of stone fruit, w...

  16. Characterization of the Pseudomonas genus of bacteria for plant-parasitic nematode control

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Plant-parasitic nematodes are among the most destructive plant pests, causing substantial economic losses to agronomic crops worldwide. Current methods of using bacteria as biocontrol agents for plant-parasitic nematodes have met with limited success in part due to limited knowledge about mechanism...

  17. Culturable bacteria from plum fruit surfaces and their potential for controlling brown rot after harvest

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Fruit microflora has been the richest source of antagonists against fruit decays and the active ingredient in all currently available commercial biocontrol products. A comprehensive evaluation of plum bacteria for biocontrol activity against Monilinia fructicola, causing brown rot of stone fruit, w...

  18. Quantifying viruses and bacteria in wastewater - results, quality control, and interpretation methods

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Membrane bioreactors (MBR), used for wastewater treatment in Ohio and elsewhere in the United States, have pore sizes large enough to theoretically reduce concentrations of protozoa and bacteria, but not viruses. Sampling for viruses in wastewater is seldom done and not required. Instead, the bac...

  19. Blood coagulation and platelet adhesion on polyaniline films.

    PubMed

    Humpolíček, Petr; Kuceková, Zdenka; Kašpárková, Věra; Pelková, Jana; Modic, Martina; Junkar, Ita; Trchová, Miroslava; Bober, Patrycja; Stejskal, Jaroslav; Lehocký, Marián

    2015-09-01

    Polyaniline is a promising conducting polymer with still increasing application potential in biomedicine. Its surface modification can be an efficient way how to introduce desired functional groups and to control its properties while keeping the bulk characteristics of the material unchanged. The purpose of the study was to synthetize thin films of pristine conducting polyaniline hydrochloride, non-conducting polyaniline base and polyaniline modified with poly(2-acrylamido-2-methyl-1-propanesulfonic acid) (PAMPSA) and investigate chosen parameters of their hemocompatibility. The modification was performed either by introduction of PAMPSA during the synthesis or by reprotonation of polyaniline base. The polyaniline hydrochloride and polyaniline base had no impact on blood coagulation and platelet adhesion. By contrast, the polyaniline reprotonated with PAMPSA completely hindered coagulation thanks to its interaction with coagulation factors Xa, Va and IIa. The significantly lower platelets adhesion was also found on this surface. Moreover, this film maintains its conductivity at pH of 6, which is an improvement in comparison with standard polyaniline hydrochloride losing most of its conductivity at pH of 4. Polyaniline film with PAMPSA introduced during synthesis had an impact on platelet adhesion but not on coagulation. The combined conductivity, anticoagulation activity, low platelet adhesion and improved conductivity at pH closer to physiological, open up new possibilities for application of polyaniline reprotonated by PAMPSA in blood-contacting devices, such as catheters or blood vessel grafts. PMID:26119372

  20. Fragmentation and Coagulation in Supramolecular (Co)polymerization Kinetics

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The self-assembly of molecular building blocks into one-dimensional supramolecular architectures has opened up new frontiers in materials science. Due to the noncovalent interactions between the monomeric units, these architectures are intrinsically dynamic, and understanding their kinetic driving forces is key to rationally programming their morphology and function. To understand the self-assembly dynamics of supramolecular polymerizations (SP), kinetic models based on aggregate growth by sequential monomer association and dissociation have been analyzed. However, fragmentation and coagulation events can also play a role, as evident from studies on peptide self-assembly and the fact that aggregations can be sensitive to mechanical agitations. Here, we analyze how fragmentation and coagulation events influence SP kinetics by theoretical analysis of self-assembling systems of increasing complexity. Our analysis starts with single-component systems in which aggregates are able to grow via an isodesmic or cooperative nucleation–elongation mechanism. Subsequently, equilibration dynamics in cooperative two-component supramolecular copolymerizations are investigated. In the final part, we reveal how aggregate growth in the presence of competing, kinetically controlled pathways is influenced by fragmentation and coagulation reactions and reveal how seed-induced growth can give rise to block copolymers. Our analysis shows how fragmentation and coagulation reactions are able to modulate SP kinetics in ways that are highly system dependent. PMID:27163054

  1. CHAPTER IV-2 BACTERIA

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Entomopathogenic bacteria provide an alternative to chemical pesticides used in insect control programs. Today, the principal microbial insecticides utilize spore forming bacteria or toxins produced by these bacteria as their active ingredients, either in formulations or by incorporation of toxin g...

  2. Quantifying viruses and bacteria in wastewater—Results, interpretation methods, and quality control

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Francy, Donna S.; Stelzer, Erin A.; Bushon, Rebecca N.; Brady, Amie M.G.; Mailot, Brian E.; Spencer, Susan K.; Borchardt, Mark A.; Elber, Ashley G.; Riddell, Kimberly R.; Gellner, Terry M.

    2011-01-01

    Membrane bioreactors (MBR), used for wastewater treatment in Ohio and elsewhere in the United States, have pore sizes small enough to theoretically reduce concentrations of protozoa and bacteria, but not viruses. Sampling for viruses in wastewater is seldom done and not required. Instead, the bacterial indicators Escherichia coli (E. coli) and fecal coliforms are the required microbial measures of effluents for wastewater-discharge permits. Information is needed on the effectiveness of MBRs in removing human enteric viruses from wastewaters, particularly as compared to conventional wastewater treatment before and after disinfection. A total of 73 regular and 28 quality-control (QC) samples were collected at three MBR and two conventional wastewater plants in Ohio during 23 regular and 3 QC sampling trips in 2008-10. Samples were collected at various stages in the treatment processes and analyzed for bacterial indicators E. coli, fecal coliforms, and enterococci by membrane filtration; somatic and F-specific coliphage by the single agar layer (SAL) method; adenovirus, enterovirus, norovirus GI and GII, rotavirus, and hepatitis A virus by molecular methods; and viruses by cell culture. While addressing the main objective of the study-comparing removal of viruses and bacterial indicators in MBR and conventional plants-it was realized that work was needed to identify data analysis and quantification methods for interpreting enteric virus and QC data. Therefore, methods for quantifying viruses, qualifying results, and applying QC data to interpretations are described in this report. During each regular sampling trip, samples were collected (1) before conventional or MBR treatment (post-preliminary), (2) after secondary or MBR treatment (post-secondary or post-MBR), (3) after tertiary treatment (one conventional plant only), and (4) after disinfection (post-disinfection). Glass-wool fiber filtration was used to concentrate enteric viruses from large volumes, and small

  3. 21 CFR 864.5400 - Coagulation instrument.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Automated and Semi-Automated Hematology Devices § 864.5400 Coagulation instrument. (a) Identification. A coagulation instrument is an automated...

  4. 21 CFR 864.5400 - Coagulation instrument.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Automated and Semi-Automated Hematology Devices § 864.5400 Coagulation instrument. (a) Identification. A coagulation instrument is an automated...

  5. 21 CFR 864.5400 - Coagulation instrument.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Automated and Semi-Automated Hematology Devices § 864.5400 Coagulation instrument. (a) Identification. A coagulation instrument is an automated...

  6. 21 CFR 864.5400 - Coagulation instrument.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Automated and Semi-Automated Hematology Devices § 864.5400 Coagulation instrument. (a) Identification. A coagulation instrument is an automated...

  7. Textile wastewater purification through natural coagulants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beltrán-Heredia, J.; Sánchez-Martín, J.; Rodríguez-Sánchez, M. T.

    2011-09-01

    A new coagulant obtained through polymerization of Acacia mearnsii de Wild tannin extract has been characterized in the removal of two dangerous dye pollutants: Alizarin Violet 3R and Palatine Fast Black WAN. This coagulant is lab-synthesized according to the etherification of tannins with glycidyltrimethylammonium chloride and formaldehyde and its performance in dye removal in terms of efficiency was high. Reasonably low coagulant dosages (ca. 50 mg L-1) reaches high capacity levels (around 0.8 for Alizarin Violet 3R and 1.6 for Palatine Fast Black WAN mg dye mg-1 of coagulant) and pH and temperature are not extremely affecting variables. The systems coagulant dyes were successfully modeled by applying the Langmuir hypothesis. q max and b parameters were obtained with an adjusted correlation factor ( r 2) above 0.8.

  8. Interstitial laser coagulation of the prostate: experimental studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McNicholas, Thomas A.; Steger, Adrian C.; Bown, Stephen G.; O'Donoghue, Neil

    1991-07-01

    A percutaneous, low power, interstitial method of controlled tissue coagulation by laser light has been developed and assessed as a possible alternative to existing therapy for benign and malignant prostatic disease. For prostate cancer this technique may be of importance when the tumor volume is small and well defined, particularly as these tumors can increasingly be identified by transrectal ultrasound (TRUS) and are unlikely to have metastasised. The possibility therefore arises of destruction of such small lesions in situ, thereby avoiding the need for radical surgery or radiotherapy. Using the male beagle prostate model, one or more 150-400 micron fibers was implanted within the substance of the prostate through which a Yttrium Aluminum Garnet (YAG) laser energy could be transmitted. Using long exposures and lower powers than used in routine endoscopic laser therapy, well-defined areas of coagulative necrosis could be created without extensive tissue charring or damage to the fiber. For an energy dose of 1000J a lesion approximately 1 cm in diameter results at four days. The ultrasound scanning methods can detect the fiber(s) and the area(s) of coagulation. At 6/52 months following treatment, healing was by fibrosis or cystic degeneration. There were no ill effects on the subjects following coagulation of the prostate. Multiple fiber experiments produced larger volume lesions relevant to more extensive cancer or for the coagulation of benign adenomatous hyperplasia causing outflow symptoms. Ultrasound guided clinical treatments in patients with cutaneous metastases or hepatic and pancreatic tumors have confirmed the experimental results so far obtained. The technique may prove of value for the destruction of early, small, focal tumors of the prostate and for the treatment of moderate benign enlargement. Clinical trial for both benign and malignant disease has commenced.

  9. Potential use of Bacillus thuringiensis bacteriocins to control antibiotic-resistant bacteria associated with mastitis in dairy goats.

    PubMed

    Gutiérrez-Chávez, A J; Martínez-Ortega, E A; Valencia-Posadas, M; León-Galván, M F; de la Fuente-Salcido, N M; Bideshi, D K; Barboza-Corona, J E

    2016-01-01

    Mastitis caused by microbial infections in dairy goats reduces milk yield, modifies milk composition, and potentially contributes to morbidity in herds and consumers of dairy products. Microorganisms associated with mastitis in dairy goats are commonly controlled with antibiotics, but it is known that continued use of these chemical agents promotes antibiotic resistance among bacterial populations. Recently, it has been shown that bacteriocins of Bacillus thuringiensis inhibit growth of food-borne pathogens and also bacteria associated with bovine mastitis. However, there is no report on their ability to inhibit microorganisms linked to mastitis in dairy goats. In this study, using 16S rDNA and ITS regions of rDNA, we identified nine bacterial isolates and an encapsulated yeast associated with mastitis in dairy goats. Enterococcus durans, Brevibacillus sp., and Staphylococcus epidermidis 2 were resistant to, respectively, 75, ~67, ~42, and ~42 % of the antibiotics screened. In addition, 60 % of the bacterial isolates were resistant to penicillin, ampicillin, vancomycin, and dicloxacillin. Importantly, 60 % of the isolates were inhibited by the bacteriocins, but S. epidermidis 1, Enterobacter sp., Escherichia vulneris, and Cryptococcus neoformans were not susceptible to these antimicrobial peptides. Using Brevibacillus sp. and Staphylococcus chromogenes as indicator bacteria, we show that peptides of ~10 kDa that correspond to the molecular mass of bacteriocins used in this study are responsible for the inhibitory activity. Our results demonstrate that multiple antibiotic-resistant bacteria associated with subclinical mastitis in dairy goats from Guanajuato, Mexico, are susceptible to bacteriocins produced by B. thuringiensis. PMID:26022411

  10. Interstitial laser coagulation therapy for benign prostatic hyperplasia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McNicholas, Thomas A.; Alsudani, Mohammed

    1996-05-01

    Alternatives to the side-firing laser method include controlled destruction of prostatic adenoma by an atraumatic saline cooled laser fiber introduced endoscopically into the prostate under visual and transrectal ultrasound (TRUS) control. Laser light produces intense heating and interstitial laser coagulation (ILC) occurs with characteristic TRUS changes which are used to control the volume of tissue destruction. The prostatic urethral lining is preserved which may reduce laser side effects). Thirty-six men with symptomatic BPH were treated by ILC between April 1994 and September 1995. All were discharged home on the first post-operative day and reviewed periodically to 12 months post-treatment with measurement of IPSS, flow rate (FR), residual volume, complications, potency and TRUS. Seventeen men (47%) voided immediately, 15 (42%) performed intermittent self-catheterization (ISC) for 3.5 days (2 - 5). Four men (11%) required catheterization for 1/52. Thirty-five men tolerated the treatment well, requiring only mild oral analgesia. One man developed dysuria and required early transurethral resection revealing a large volume of coagulative necrosis. Improvement in symptoms and flow rate developed from 1 - 30 days later. There were no significant complications. Hyperechoic and cystic zones developed at the ILC site which persisted to 12 months. This clinical study indicates the feasibility and safety of intense heating by ILC with visible and ultrasound control to coagulate the adenoma while preserving the urethra. Changes are easily seen on TRUS, symptomatic improvement is good and there have been minimal urethral symptoms or complications.

  11. Coagulation problems in human pregnancy.

    PubMed Central

    Redman, C. W.

    1979-01-01

    Coagulation problems in pregnancy are primarily associated with overactivity of the intrinsic clotting system. This accounts for the increased incidence of thrombo-embolism during pregnancy. Where specific obstetric complications cause clotting problems the common underlying feature is usually placental pathology as in abruptio placentae, pre-eclampsia or hydatidiform mole. Abnormal activation of the clotting system is an early, and occasionally the first detectable feature of pre-eclampsia, but there is no evidence that this is a primary change. Therefore the role of anticoagulant treatment in the management of pre-eclampsia remains questionable. A new test for estimating factor VIII consumption is proving to be a sensitive index of early activation of the clotting system and can be used for the diagnosis of early pre-eclampsia. PMID:382170

  12. Isolating the effects of storm events on arctic aquatic bacteria: temperature, nutrients, and community composition as controls on bacterial productivity

    PubMed Central

    Adams, Heather E.; Crump, Byron C.; Kling, George W.

    2015-01-01

    Storm events can pulse nutrients and carbon from soils and provide an important subsidy to food webs in oligotrophic streams and lakes. Bacterial nutrient limitation and the potential response of stream aquatic bacteria to storm events was investigated in arctic tundra environments by manipulating both water temperature and inorganic nutrient concentrations in short (up to 4 days) and long duration (up to 2 weeks) laboratory mesocosm experiments. Inorganic N and P additions increased bacterial production (14C-labeled leucine uptake) up to seven times over controls, and warmer incubation temperatures increased the speed of this response to added nutrients. Bacterial cell numbers also increased in response to temperature and nutrient additions with cell-specific carbon uptake initially increasing and then declining after 2 days. Bacterial community composition (BCC; determined by means of 16S denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis fingerprinting) shifted rapidly in response to changes in incubation temperature and the addition of nutrients, within 2 days in some cases. While the bacteria in these habitats responded to nutrient additions with rapid changes in productivity and community composition, water temperature controlled the speed of the metabolic response and affected the resultant change in bacterial community structure, constraining the potential responses to pulsed nutrient subsidies associated with storm events. In all cases, at higher nutrient levels and temperatures the effect of initial BCC on bacterial activity was muted, suggesting a consistent, robust interaction of temperature, and nutrients controlling activity in these aquatic systems. PMID:25873916

  13. Effect of microparticulated whey proteins on milk coagulation properties.

    PubMed

    Sturaro, A; Penasa, M; Cassandro, M; Varotto, A; De Marchi, M

    2014-11-01

    The enhancement of milk coagulation properties (MCP) and the reuse of whey produced by the dairy industry are of great interest to improve the efficiency of the cheese-making process. Native whey proteins (WP) can be aggregated and denatured to obtain colloidal microparticulated WP (MWP). The objective of this study was to assess the effect of MWP on MCP; namely, rennet coagulation time (RCT), curd-firming time, and curd firmness 30 min after rennet addition. Six concentrations of MWP (vol/vol; 1.5, 3.0, 4.5, 6.0, 7.5, and 9.0%) were added to 3 bulk milk samples (collected and analyzed during 3 d), and a sample without MWP was used as control. Within each day of analysis, 6 replicates of MCP for each treatment were obtained, changing the position of the treatment in the rack. For control samples, 2 replicates per day were performed. In addition to MCP, WP fractions were measured on each treatment during the 3 d of analysis. Milk coagulation properties were measured on 144 samples by using a Formagraph (Foss Electric, Hillerød, Denmark). Increasing the amount of MWP added to milk led to a longer RCT. In particular, significant differences were found between RCT of the control samples (13.5 min) and RCT of samples with 3.0% (14.6 min) or more MWP. A similar trend was observed for curd-firming time, which was shortest in the control samples and longest in samples with 9.0% MWP (21.4 min). No significant differences were detected for curd firmness at 30 min across concentrations of MWP. Adjustments in cheese processing should be made when recycling MWP, in particular during the coagulation process, by prolonging the time of rennet activity before cutting the curd. PMID:25151883

  14. Enhanced coagulation for high alkalinity and micro-polluted water: the third way through coagulant optimization.

    PubMed

    Yan, Mingquan; Wang, Dongsheng; Qu, Jiuhui; Ni, Jinren; Chow, Christopher W K

    2008-04-01

    Conventional coagulation is not an effective treatment option to remove natural organic matter (NOM) in water with high alkalinity/pH. For this type of water, enhanced coagulation is currently proposed as one of the available treatment options and is implemented by acidifying the raw water and applying increased doses of hydrolyzing coagulants. Both of these methods have some disadvantages such as increasing the corrosive tendency of water and increasing cost of treatment. In this paper, an improved version of enhanced coagulation through coagulant optimization to treat this kind of water is demonstrated. A novel coagulant, a composite polyaluminum chloride (HPAC), was developed with both the advantages of polyaluminum chloride (PACl) and the additive coagulant aids: PACl contains significant amounts of highly charged and stable polynuclear aluminum hydrolysis products, which is less affected by the pH of the raw water than traditional coagulants (alum and ferric salts); the additives can enhance both the charge neutralization and bridging abilities of PACl. HPAC exhibited 30% more efficiency than alum and ferric salts in dissolved organic carbon (DOC) removal and was very effective in turbidity removal. This result was confirmed by pilot-scale testing, where particles and organic matter were removed synergistically with HPAC as coagulant by sequential water treatment steps including pre-ozonation, coagulation, flotation and sand filtration. PMID:18206207

  15. Bacteria Counter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    Science Applications, Inc.'s ATP Photometer makes a rapid and accurate count of the bacteria in a body fluid sample. Instrument provides information on the presence and quantity of bacteria by measuring the amount of light emitted by the reaction between two substances. Substances are ATP adenosine triphosphate and luciferase. The reactants are applied to a human body sample and the ATP Photometer observes the intensity of the light emitted displaying its findings in a numerical output. Total time lapse is usually less than 10 minutes, which represents a significant time savings in comparison of other techniques. Other applications are measuring organisms in fresh and ocean waters, determining bacterial contamination of foodstuffs, biological process control in the beverage industry, and in assay of activated sewage sludge.

  16. Transfusion and coagulation management in liver transplantation.

    PubMed

    Clevenger, Ben; Mallett, Susan V

    2014-05-28

    There is wide variation in the management of coagulation and blood transfusion practice in liver transplantation. The use of blood products intraoperatively is declining and transfusion free transplantations take place ever more frequently. Allogenic blood products have been shown to increase morbidity and mortality. Primary haemostasis, coagulation and fibrinolysis are altered by liver disease. This, combined with intraoperative disturbances of coagulation, increases the risk of bleeding. Meanwhile, the rebalancing of coagulation homeostasis can put patients at risk of hypercoagulability and thrombosis. The application of the principles of patient blood management to transplantation can reduce the risk of transfusion. This includes: preoperative recognition and treatment of anaemia, reduction of perioperative blood loss and the use of restrictive haemoglobin based transfusion triggers. The use of point of care coagulation monitoring using whole blood viscoelastic testing provides a picture of the complete coagulation process by which to guide and direct coagulation management. Pharmacological methods to reduce blood loss include the use of anti-fibrinolytic drugs to reduce fibrinolysis, and rarely, the use of recombinant factor VIIa. Factor concentrates are increasingly used; fibrinogen concentrates to improve clot strength and stability, and prothrombin complex concentrates to improve thrombin generation. Non-pharmacological methods to reduce blood loss include surgical utilisation of the piggyback technique and maintenance of a low central venous pressure. The use of intraoperative cell salvage and normovolaemic haemodilution reduces allogenic blood transfusion. Further research into methods of decreasing blood loss and alternatives to blood transfusion remains necessary to continue to improve outcomes after transplantation. PMID:24876736

  17. Resection of meningiomas with implantable microwave coagulation

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, X.P.; Xie, Q.L.; Liu, J.M.; Yue, Z.J.; Cai, K.H.

    1996-05-01

    Implantable microwave coagulation was used to perform resection on 62 patients that had intracranial meningiomas. When 20--60 W microwave power was applied for 15 s, the temperature at the center of the tumor tissue was 43--63 C; 30 mm from the center, the temperature was under 40 C. Histological changes in the center of the tumor showed coagulative necrosis, diminished nuclei, and obliterated blood vessels. The changes at 10--20 mm from the center of the tumor showed coagulative necrosis and degeneration and, 30--50 mm from the center of the tumor, showed normal cell morphology after microwave coagulation. The thermal field in brain tumor has an effective diameter of about 40 mm. No side effects on the normal brain tissues were observed. The amount of blood loss during the operation was minimal while the meningioma was coagulated, especially when the meningioma was located at the skull base or in the parasagittal or cerebral convexity region. After microwave coagulation, the entire tumor could easily be removed. Among the 62 surgically treated cases, gross total tumor excision was 85%. No postoperative complications occurred after microwave coagulation, and there was no operative mortality in the series. The authors believe that this new technique has the advantage of simplicity, less blood loss, and smooth postoperative procedures. Hemostatic effects during the operation are satisfactory, and blood transfusion can be reduced by 50--60%.

  18. Gut Microbiota-Induced Immunoglobulin G Controls Systemic Infection by Symbiotic Bacteria and Pathogens.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Melody Y; Cisalpino, Daniel; Varadarajan, Saranyaraajan; Hellman, Judith; Warren, H Shaw; Cascalho, Marilia; Inohara, Naohiro; Núñez, Gabriel

    2016-03-15

    The gut microbiota is compartmentalized in the intestinal lumen and induces local immune responses, but it remains unknown whether the gut microbiota can induce systemic response and contribute to systemic immunity. We report that selective gut symbiotic gram-negative bacteria were able to disseminate systemically to induce immunoglobulin G (IgG) response, which primarily targeted gram-negative bacterial antigens and conferred protection against systemic infections by E. coli and Salmonella by directly coating bacteria to promote killing by phagocytes. T cells and Toll-like receptor 4 on B cells were important in the generation of microbiota-specific IgG. We identified murein lipoprotein (MLP), a highly conserved gram-negative outer membrane protein, as a major antigen that induced systemic IgG homeostatically in both mice and humans. Administration of anti-MLP IgG conferred crucial protection against systemic Salmonella infection. Thus, our findings reveal an important function for the gut microbiota in combating systemic infection through the induction of protective IgG. PMID:26944199

  19. Anaerobic bacteria

    MedlinePlus

    Anaerobic bacteria are bacteria that do not live or grow when oxygen is present. In humans, these ... Goldstein EJ. Diseases caused by non-spore forming anaerobic bacteria. In: Goldman L, Schafer AI, eds. Goldman's ...

  20. The singular coagulation equation with multiple fragmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saha, Jitraj; Kumar, Jitendra

    2015-06-01

    In this paper, we prove the global existence and uniqueness of the solutions to the initial-value problem for the coagulation-fragmentation equation with singular coagulation kernel and multiple fragmentation kernel. The solution obtained in this case also satisfies the mass conservation law. The proof is based on strong convergence methods applied to suitably chosen unbounded coagulation kernels having singularities in both the coordinate axes and satisfying certain growth conditions, which can possibly reach up to a quadratic growth at infinity, and the fragmentation kernel covers a very large class of unbounded functions.

  1. Coagulation and fragmentation with discrete mass loss

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blair, Pamela N.; Lamb, Wilson; Stewart, Iain W.

    2007-05-01

    A nonlinear integro-differential equation that models a coagulation and multiple fragmentation process in which discrete fragmentation mass loss can occur is examined using the theory of strongly continuous semigroups of operators. Under the assumptions that the coagulation kernel is bounded and the fragmentation rate function a satisfies a linear growth condition, global existence and uniqueness of solutions that lose mass in accordance with the model are established. In the case when no coagulation is present and the fragmentation process is governed by power-law kernels, an explicit formula is given for the substochastic semigroup associated with the resulting mass-loss fragmentation equation.

  2. Acute Disseminated Intravascular Coagulation in Neuroendocrine Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Teh, Ru-Wen; Tsoi, Daphne T.

    2012-01-01

    Malignancy is a common cause of disseminated intravascular coagulation and usually presents as a chronic disorder in solid organ tumours. We present a rare case of recurrent acute disseminated intravascular coagulation in neuroendocrine carcinoma after manipulation, firstly, by core biopsy and, later, by cytotoxic therapy causing a release of procoagulants and cytokines from lysed tumour cells. This is reminiscent of tumour lysis syndrome where massive quantities of intracellular electrolytes and nucleic acid are released, causing acute metabolic imbalance and renal failure. This case highlights the potential complication of acute disseminated intravascular coagulation after trauma to malignant cells. PMID:23139666

  3. Intercellular and intracellular signalling systems that globally control the expression of virulence genes in plant pathogenic bacteria.

    PubMed

    Ham, Jong Hyun

    2013-04-01

    Plant pathogenic bacteria utilize complex signalling systems to control the expression of virulence genes at the cellular level and within populations. Quorum sensing (QS), an important intercellular communication mechanism, is mediated by different types of small molecules, including N-acyl homoserine lactones (AHLs), fatty acids and small proteins. AHL-mediated signalling systems dependent on the LuxI and LuxR family proteins play critical roles in the virulence of a wide range of Gram-negative plant pathogenic bacteria belonging to the Alphaproteobacteria, Betaproteobacteria and Gammaproteobacteria. Xanthomonas spp. and Xylella fastidiosa, members of the Gammaproteobacteria, however, possess QS systems that are mediated by fatty acid-type diffusible signal factors (DSFs). Recent studies have demonstrated that Ax21, a 194-amino-acid protein in Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae, plays dual functions in activating a rice innate immune pathway through binding to the rice XA21 pattern recognition receptor and in regulating bacterial virulence and biofilm formation as a QS signal molecule. In xanthomonads, DSF-mediated QS systems are connected with the signalling pathways mediated by cyclic diguanosine monophosphate (c-di-GMP), which functions as a second messenger for the control of virulence gene expression in these bacterial pathogens. PMID:23186372

  4. Review of Coagulation Technology for Removal of Arsenic: Case of Chile

    PubMed Central

    2006-01-01

    Coagulation technology has been used since 1970 in northern Chile for removing arsenic from drinking-water. This experience suggests that coagulation is an effective technology for the removal of arsenic. It is currently possible to reduce arsenic from 400 μg/L to 10 μg/L at a rate of 500 L/sec, assuming pH, oxidizing and coagulation agents are strictly controlled. The Chilean experience with the removal of arsenic demonstrates that the water matrix dictates the selection of the arsenic-removal process. This paper presents a summary of the process, concepts, and operational considerations for the use of coagulation technology for removal of arsenic in Chile. PMID:17366767

  5. Proteins, Platelets, and Blood Coagulation at Biomaterial Interfaces

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Li-Chong; Bauer, James; Siedlecki, Christopher A.

    2015-01-01

    Blood coagulation and platelet adhesion remain major impediments to the use of biomaterials in implantable medical devices. There is still significant controversy and question in the field regarding the role that surfaces play in this process. This manuscript addresses this topic area and reports on state of the art in the field. Particular emphasis is placed on the subject of surface engineering and surface measurements that allow for control and observation of surface-mediated biological responses in blood and test solutions. Appropriate use of surface texturing and chemical patterning methodologies allow for reduction of both blood coagulation and platelet adhesion, and new methods of surface interrogation at high resolution allow for measurement of the relevant biological factors. PMID:25448722

  6. Thrombin-Responsive Gated Silica Mesoporous Nanoparticles As Coagulation Regulators.

    PubMed

    Bhat, Ravishankar; Ribes, Àngela; Mas, Núria; Aznar, Elena; Sancenón, Félix; Marcos, M Dolores; Murguía, Jose R; Venkataraman, Abbaraju; Martínez-Máñez, Ramón

    2016-02-01

    The possibility of achieving sophisticated actions in complex biological environments using gated nanoparticles is an exciting prospect with much potential. We herein describe new gated mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSN) loaded with an anticoagulant drug and capped with a peptide containing a thrombin-specific cleavage site. When the coagulation cascade was triggered, active thrombin degraded the capping peptidic sequence and induced the release of anticoagulant drugs to delay the clotting process. The thrombin-dependent response was assessed and a significant increase in coagulation time in plasma from 2.6 min to 5 min was found. This work broadens the application of gated silica nanoparticles and demonstrates their ability to act as controllers in a complex scenario such as hemostasis. PMID:26794474

  7. Optical coherence tomography-guided laser microsurgery for blood coagulation with continuous-wave laser diode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Feng-Yu; Tsai, Meng-Tsan; Wang, Zu-Yi; Chi, Chun-Kai; Lee, Cheng-Kuang; Yang, Chih-Hsun; Chan, Ming-Che; Lee, Ya-Ju

    2015-11-01

    Blood coagulation is the clotting and subsequent dissolution of the clot following repair to the damaged tissue. However, inducing blood coagulation is difficult for some patients with homeostasis dysfunction or during surgery. In this study, we proposed a method to develop an integrated system that combines optical coherence tomography (OCT) and laser microsurgery for blood coagulation. Also, an algorithm for positioning of the treatment location from OCT images was developed. With OCT scanning, 2D/3D OCT images and angiography of tissue can be obtained simultaneously, enabling to noninvasively reconstruct the morphological and microvascular structures for real-time monitoring of changes in biological tissues during laser microsurgery. Instead of high-cost pulsed lasers, continuous-wave laser diodes (CW-LDs) with the central wavelengths of 450 nm and 532 nm are used for blood coagulation, corresponding to higher absorption coefficients of oxyhemoglobin and deoxyhemoglobin. Experimental results showed that the location of laser exposure can be accurately controlled with the proposed approach of imaging-based feedback positioning. Moreover, blood coagulation can be efficiently induced by CW-LDs and the coagulation process can be monitored in real-time with OCT. This technology enables to potentially provide accurate positioning for laser microsurgery and control the laser exposure to avoid extra damage by real-time OCT imaging.

  8. Chemistry of arsenic removal during coagulation and Fe-Mn oxidation

    SciTech Connect

    Edwards, M. . Dept. of Civil Engineering)

    1994-09-01

    Arsenic removal during coagulation or Fe-Mn oxidation is examined to aid utilities that desire to improve arsenic removal. Fundamental mechanisms of arsenic removal are discussed, optimization strategies are forwarded, and some new insights are provided to guide future research. Specifically, As(III) removals by coagulation are primarily controlled by coagulant dose and relatively unaffected by solution pH, whereas the converse is true for As(V). When compared on the basis of moles iron or aluminum hydroxide solid formed during coagulation, iron and aluminum coagulants are of demonstrably equal effectiveness in removing As(V) at pH < 7.5. However, iron-based coagulants are advantageous if soluble metal residuals are problematic, if pH is > 7.5, or if the raw water contains As(III). Arsenic removal during Fe-Mn oxidation is controlled by the quantity of iron removed [Fe(OH)[sub 3] formed] and is relatively independent of the quantity of manganese removed (MnOOH formed). 63 refs.

  9. Optical coherence tomography-guided laser microsurgery for blood coagulation with continuous-wave laser diode

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Feng-Yu; Tsai, Meng-Tsan; Wang, Zu-Yi; Chi, Chun-Kai; Lee, Cheng-Kuang; Yang, Chih-Hsun; Chan, Ming-Che; Lee, Ya-Ju

    2015-01-01

    Blood coagulation is the clotting and subsequent dissolution of the clot following repair to the damaged tissue. However, inducing blood coagulation is difficult for some patients with homeostasis dysfunction or during surgery. In this study, we proposed a method to develop an integrated system that combines optical coherence tomography (OCT) and laser microsurgery for blood coagulation. Also, an algorithm for positioning of the treatment location from OCT images was developed. With OCT scanning, 2D/3D OCT images and angiography of tissue can be obtained simultaneously, enabling to noninvasively reconstruct the morphological and microvascular structures for real-time monitoring of changes in biological tissues during laser microsurgery. Instead of high-cost pulsed lasers, continuous-wave laser diodes (CW-LDs) with the central wavelengths of 450 nm and 532 nm are used for blood coagulation, corresponding to higher absorption coefficients of oxyhemoglobin and deoxyhemoglobin. Experimental results showed that the location of laser exposure can be accurately controlled with the proposed approach of imaging-based feedback positioning. Moreover, blood coagulation can be efficiently induced by CW-LDs and the coagulation process can be monitored in real-time with OCT. This technology enables to potentially provide accurate positioning for laser microsurgery and control the laser exposure to avoid extra damage by real-time OCT imaging. PMID:26568136

  10. Effects of Al-coagulant sludge characteristics on the efficiency of coagulants recovery by acidification.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yi-Jui; Wang, Wen-May; Wei, Ming-Jun; Chen, Jiann-Long; He, Ju-Liang; Chiang, Kung-Yuh; Wu, Chih-Chao

    2012-12-01

    This study evaluated the effects of Al-coagulant sludge characteristics on the efficiency ofcoagulant recovery by acidification with H2SO4. Two sludge characteristics were studied: types of coagulant and textures of the suspended solid in raw water. The coagulant types are aluminium sulphate and polyaluminium chloride (PACl); the textures of the suspended solid are sand-based and clay-based. Efficiency of aluminium recovery at a pH of 2 was compared for different sludges obtained from water treatment plants in Taiwan. The results showed that efficiency of aluminium recovery from sludge containing clayey particles was higher than that from sludge containing sandy particles. As for the effect of coagulant types, the aluminium recovery efficiency for sludge using PACl ranged between 77% and 100%, whereas it ranged between 65% and 72% for sludge using aluminium sulphate as the coagulant. This means using PACl as the coagulant could result in higher recovery efficiency of coagulant and be beneficial for water treatment plants where renewable materials and waste reduction as the factors for making decisions regarding plant operations. However, other metals, such as manganese, could be released with aluminium during the acidification process and limit the use of the recovered coagulants. It is suggested that the recovered coagulants be used in wastewater treatment processes. PMID:23437650

  11. Disseminated intravascular coagulation after multiple honeybee stings.

    PubMed

    V, Dharma Rao; Bodepudi, Sravan Kumar; Krishna, Murali

    2014-01-01

    Honeybee venom contains apitoxin which can cause anaphylaxis, cardiovascular collapse and death. Disseminated intravascular coagulation is rare following honeybee stings. We describe the case of a farmer who developed this complication. PMID:25668084

  12. ARSENIC REMOVAL BY SOFTENING AND COAGULATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Drinking water regulations for arsenic (As) and disinfection by-product precursor materials (measured as TOC) are becoming increasingly stringent. Among the modifications to conventional treatment that can improve removal of As and TOC, precipitative softening and coagulation are...

  13. Comparative assessment of water treatment using polymeric and inorganic coagulants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manda, Innocent K. M.; Chidya, Russel C. G.; Saka, John D. K.; Biswick, Timothy T.

    2016-06-01

    Portable water plays a vital role in improving human life, particularly in controlling the spread of diseases. However, problems associated with lack of potable water are still common especially in developing countries including Malawi. Until now little information exists on the effectiveness of available commercial coagulants used by national water boards in Malawi. Therefore, this study was undertaken in Southern Region Water Board (SRWB) to investigate the efficiency of polymeric coagulants (sufdfloc 3850 and algaefloc 19s) in turbidity reduction comparative with inorganic coagulant (aluminium sulphate) at Zomba, Liwonde, Mangochi, Chikwawa and Mulanje Treatment plants. The jar test method was used to determine the effectiveness of the water coagulants. The results revealed that sudfloc 3850 was most effective in reducing turbidity at Mangochi (99.4 ± 0.06%) and Liwonde (97.2 ± 0.04%) using 0.4 mg L-1 flocculant dose. The Zomba, Mulanje and Chikwawa plants gave 19.56 ± 0.03%, 29.23 ± 0.02% and 9.43 ± 0.02% total reductions respectively. Algaefloc 19s afforded the highest turbidity reduction at Liwonde and Mangochi plants (98.66 ± 0.06 and 97.48 ± 0.05% at a dose of 0.4 and 0.6 mg L-1 respectively), while Chikwawa provided the lowest (9.52 ± 0.01%). At the Zomba and Mulanje plants 20.5 ± 0.03% and 28.4 ± 0.04% reductions were obtained respectively. The inorganic flocculant, alum provided a 99.0 ± 0.05% and 98.6 ± 0.04% reduction at a dose of 4.0 mg L-1 and 6.0 mg L-1 at Zomba and Liwonde plants respectively. The lowest reductions in turbidity were achieved at Chikwawa (7.50 ± 0.01%), Mangochi (12.97 ± 0.02%) and Mulanje (25.00 ± 0.02). The best and optimum pH ranges for polymeric and inorganic coagulants were 7.20-7.80 and 7.35 to 7.57 respectively. The results further revealed that sudfloc 3850 and algaefloc 19s achieved faster formation of heavy flocs than alum. At 0.4 mg L-1 flocculant dosage sudfloc 3850 and algaefloc 19s required ten times

  14. Control of tyramine and histamine accumulation by lactic acid bacteria using bacteriocin forming lactococci.

    PubMed

    Tabanelli, Giulia; Montanari, Chiara; Bargossi, Eleonora; Lanciotti, Rosalba; Gatto, Veronica; Felis, Giovanna; Torriani, Sandra; Gardini, Fausto

    2014-11-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the competitive effects of three bacteriocin producing strains of Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis against two aminobiogenic lactic acid bacteria, i.e. the tyramine producing strain Enterococcus faecalis EF37 and the histamine producing strain Streptococcus thermophilus PRI60, inoculated at different initial concentrations (from 2 to 6 log cfu/ml). The results showed that the three L. lactis subsp. lactis strains were able to produce bacteriocins: in particular, L. lactis subsp. lactis VR84 and EG46 produced, respectively, nisin Z and lacticin 481, while for the strains CG27 the bacteriocin has not been yet identified, even if its peptidic nature has been demonstrated. The co-culture of E. faecalis EF37 in combination with lactococci significantly reduced the growth potential of this aminobiogenic strain, both in terms of growth rate and maximum cell concentration, depending on the initial inoculum level of E. faecalis. Tyramine accumulation was strongly reduced when E. faecalis EF37 was inoculated at 2 log cfu/ml and, to a lesser extent, at 3 log cfu/ml, as a result of a lower cell load of the aminobiogenic strain. All the lactococci were more efficient in inhibiting streptococci in comparison with E. faecalis EF37; in particular, L. lactis subsp. lactis VR84 induced the death of S. thermophilus PRI60 and allowed the detection of histamine traces only at higher streptococci inoculum levels (5-6 log cfu/ml). The other two lactococcal strains did not show a lethal action against S. thermophilus PRI60, but were able to reduce its growth extent and histamine accumulation, even if L. lactis subsp. lactis EG46 was less effective when the initial streptococci concentration was 5 and 6 log cfu/ml. This preliminary study has clarified some aspects regarding the ratio between bacteriocinogenic strains and aminobiogenic strains with respect to the possibility to accumulate BA and has also showed that different bacteriocins can have

  15. Dust Coagulation in Protoplanetary Accretion Disks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmitt, W.; Henning, Th.; Mucha, R.

    1996-01-01

    The time evolution of dust particles in circumstellar disk-like structures around protostars and young stellar objects is discussed. In particular, we consider the coagulation of grains due to collisional aggregation. The coagulation of the particles is calculated by solving numerically the non-linear Smoluchowski equation. The different physical processes leading to relative velocities between the grains are investigated. The relative velocities may be induced by Brownian motion, turbulence and drift motion. Starting from different regimes which can be identified during the grain growth we also discuss the evolution of dust opacities. These opacities are important for both the derivation of the circumstellar dust mass from submillimeter/millimeter continuum observations and the dynamical behavior of the disks. We present results of our numerical studies of the coagulation of dust grains in a turbulent protoplanetary accretion disk described by a time-dependent one-dimensional (radial) alpha-model. For several periods and disk radii, mass distributions of coagulated grains have been calculated. From these mass spectra, we determined the corresponding Rosseland mean dust opacities. The influence of grain opacity changes due to dust coagulation on the dynamical evolution of a protostellar disk is considered. Significant changes in the thermal structure of the protoplanetary nebula are observed. A 'gap' in the accretion disk forms at the very frontier of the coagulation, i.e., behind the sublimation boundary in the region between 1 and 5 AU.

  16. Perioperatively acquired disorders of coagulation

    PubMed Central

    Grottke, Oliver; Fries, Dietmar; Nascimento, Bartolomeu

    2015-01-01

    Purpose of review To provide an overview of acquired coagulopathies that can occur in various perioperative clinical settings. Also described are coagulation disturbances linked to antithrombotic medications and currently available strategies to reverse their antithrombotic effects in situations of severe hemorrhage. Recent findings Recent studies highlight the link between low fibrinogen and decreased fibrin polymerization in the development of acquired coagulopathy. Particularly, fibrin(ogen) deficits are observable after cardiopulmonary bypass in cardiac surgery, on arrival at the emergency room in trauma patients, and with ongoing bleeding after child birth. Regarding antithrombotic therapy, although new oral anticoagulants offer the possibility of efficacy and relative safety compared with vitamin K antagonists, reversal of their anticoagulant effect with nonspecific agents, including prothrombin complex concentrate, has provided conflicting results. Specific antidotes, currently being developed, are not yet licensed for clinical use, but initial results are promising. Summary Targeted hemostatic therapy aims to correct coagulopathies in specific clinical settings, and reduce the need for allogeneic transfusions, thus preventing massive transfusion and its deleterious outcomes. Although there are specific guidelines for reversing anticoagulation in patients treated with antiplatelet agents or warfarin, there is currently little evidence to advocate comprehensive recommendations to treat drug-induced coagulopathy associated with new oral anticoagulants. PMID:25734869

  17. Coagulation algorithms with size binning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Statton, David M.; Gans, Jason; Williams, Eric

    1994-01-01

    The Smoluchowski equation describes the time evolution of an aerosol particle size distribution due to aggregation or coagulation. Any algorithm for computerized solution of this equation requires a scheme for describing the continuum of aerosol particle sizes as a discrete set. One standard form of the Smoluchowski equation accomplishes this by restricting the particle sizes to integer multiples of a basic unit particle size (the monomer size). This can be inefficient when particle concentrations over a large range of particle sizes must be calculated. Two algorithms employing a geometric size binning convention are examined: the first assumes that the aerosol particle concentration as a function of size can be considered constant within each size bin; the second approximates the concentration as a linear function of particle size within each size bin. The output of each algorithm is compared to an analytical solution in a special case of the Smoluchowski equation for which an exact solution is known . The range of parameters more appropriate for each algorithm is examined.

  18. Control of spoilage fungi by protective lactic acid bacteria displaying probiotic properties.

    PubMed

    Varsha, Kontham Kulangara; Priya, Sulochana; Devendra, Leena; Nampoothiri, Kesavan Madhavan

    2014-04-01

    Thirty-six lactic acid bacteria belong to Lactococcus, Lactobacillus, Enterococcus, and Pediococcus were isolated, and the spectrum of antifungal activity was verified against Fusarium oxysporum (KACC 42109), Aspergillus niger (KACC 42589), Fusarium moniliforme (KACC 08141), Penicillium chrysogenum (NII 08137), and the yeast Candida albicans (MTCC 3017). Three isolates, identified as Pediococcus pentosaceus (TG2), Lactobacillus casei (DY2), and Lactococcus (BSN) were selected further, and their antifungal compounds were identified by ESI-MS and HPLC analysis as a range of carboxylic acids along with some unidentified, higher molecular weight compounds. An attempt to check out the shelf life extension of wheat bread without fungal spoilage was performed by fermenting the dough with the Lactococcus isolate. Apart from growth in low pH and tolerance to bile salts, probiotic potential of these three isolates was further substantiated by in vitro screening methods that include transit tolerance to the conditions in the upper human gastrointestinal tract and bacterial adhesion capacity to human intestinal cell lines. PMID:24532445

  19. Potential application of Northern Argentine propolis to control some phytopathogenic bacteria.

    PubMed

    Ordóñez, R M; Zampini, I C; Moreno, M I Nieva; Isla, M I

    2011-10-20

    The antimicrobial activity of samples of Northern Argentine propolis (Tucumán, Santiago del Estero and Chaco) against phytopathogenic bacteria was assessed and the most active samples were identified. Minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) values were determined by agar macrodilution and broth microdilution assays. Strong antibacterial activity was detected against Erwinia carotovora spp carotovora CECT 225, Pseudomonas syringae pvar tomato CECT 126, Pseudomonas corrugata CECT 124 and Xanthomonas campestris pvar vesicatoria CECT 792. The most active propolis extract (Tucumán, T1) was selected to bioguide isolation and identified for antimicrobial compound (2',4'-dihydroxychalcone). The antibacterial chalcone was more active than the propolis ethanolic extract (MIC values of 0.5-1 μg ml(-1) and 9.5-15 μg ml(-1), respectively). Phytotoxicity assays were realized and the propolis extracts did not retard germination of lettuce seeds or the growth of onion roots. Propolis solutions applied as sprays on tomato fruits infected with P. syringae reduced the severity of disease. Application of the Argentine propolis extracts diluted with water may be promising for the management of post harvest diseases of fruits. PMID:21237629

  20. Nitrate-dependent anaerobic ferrous oxidation (NAFO) by denitrifying bacteria: a perspective autotrophic nitrogen pollution control technology.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Meng; Zheng, Ping; Wang, Ru; Li, Wei; Lu, Huifeng; Zhang, Jiqiang

    2014-12-01

    The nitrate-dependent anaerobic ferrous oxidation (NAFO) is an important discovery in the fields of microbiology and geology, which is a valuable biological reaction since it can convert nitrate into nitrogen gas, removing nitrogen from wastewater. The research on NAFO can promote the development of novel autotrophic biotechnologies for nitrogen pollution control and get a deep insight into the biogeochemical cycles. In this work, batch experiments were conducted with denitrifying bacteria as biocatalyst to investigate the performance of nitrogen removal by NAFO. The results showed that the denitrifying bacteria were capable of chemolithotrophic denitrification with ferrous salt as electron donor, namely NAFO. And the maximum nitrate conversion rates (qmax) reached 57.89 mg (g VSS d)−1, which was the rate-limiting step in NAFO. Fe/N ratio, temperature and initial pH had significant influences on nitrogen removal by NAFO process, and their optimal values were 2.0 °C, 30.15 °C and 8.0 °C, respectively. PMID:25461924

  1. Effect of biochar amendment on the control of soil sulfonamides, antibiotic-resistant bacteria, and gene enrichment in lettuce tissues.

    PubMed

    Ye, Mao; Sun, Mingming; Feng, Yanfang; Wan, Jinzhong; Xie, Shanni; Tian, Da; Zhao, Yu; Wu, Jun; Hu, Feng; Li, Huixin; Jiang, Xin

    2016-05-15

    Considering the potential threat of vegetables growing in antibiotic-polluted soil with high abundance of antibiotic-resistant genes (ARGs) against human health through the food chain, it is thus urgent to develop novel control technology to ensure vegetable safety. In the present work, pot experiments were conducted in lettuce cultivation to assess the impedance effect of biochar amendment on soil sulfonamides (SAs), antibiotic-resistant bacteria (ARB), and ARG enrichment in lettuce tissues. After 100 days of cultivation, lettuce cultivation with biochar amendment exhibited the greatest soil SA dissipation as well as the significant improvement of lettuce growth indices, with residual soil SAs mainly existing as the tightly bound fraction. Moreover, the SA contents in roots and new/old leaves were reduced by one to two orders of magnitude compared to those without biochar amendment. In addition, isolate counts for SA-resistant bacterial endophytes in old leaves and sul gene abundances in roots and old leaves also decreased significantly after biochar application. However, neither SA resistant bacteria nor sul genes were detected in new leaves. It was the first study to demonstrate that biochar amendment can be a practical strategy to protect lettuce safety growing in SA-polluted soil with rich ARB and ARGs. PMID:26896719

  2. Growth control of Listeria innocua 2030c on vacuum-packaged cold-smoked salmon by lactic acid bacteria.

    PubMed

    Tomé, Elisabetta; Gibbs, Paul A; Teixeira, Paula C

    2008-02-10

    Five bacteriocin-producing lactic acid bacteria (LAB): Enterococcus faecium ET05, Lactobacillus curvatus ET06, L. curvatus ET30, L. deldrueckii ET32 and Pediococcus acidilactici ET34, selected by their capacity for growth and producing inhibition in vitro at high salt-on-water content, low temperature and anaerobic atmosphere, conditions simulating cold-smoked fish, were inoculated onto salmon fillets, in co-culture with Listeria innocua 2030c, and cold-smoked processed (dry salted for 6 h; drying for 6 h; smoke for 2 h). The finished product was then packed under vacuum and stored at 5 degrees C. Enumeration of LAB and L. innocua was performed during storage. Results showed that strain E. faecium ET05 was the best biopreservative candidate for controlling L. innocua growth in vacuum-packaged cold-smoked salmon (CSS) processed under the salting/drying/smoking parameters referred above. L. curvatus ET30 and L. delbrueckii ET32 also showed a good biopreservation potential for CSS although they were less effective than the former. L. curvatus ET06 and P. acidilactici ET34 showed a bacteriostatic mode of action against the target bacteria in vitro as well as when inoculated into the salmon fillets. This study describes a potential application of five different LAB in the biopreservation of Listeria in CSS. PMID:18068846

  3. Engineered, Robust Polyelectrolyte Multilayers by Precise Control of Surface Potential for Designer Protein, Cell, and Bacteria Adsorption.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Xiaoying; Guo, Shifeng; He, Tao; Jiang, Shan; Jańczewski, Dominik; Vancso, G Julius

    2016-02-01

    Cross-linked layer-by-layer (LbL) assemblies with a precisely tuned surface ζ-potential were fabricated to control the adsorption of proteins, mammalian cells, and bacteria for different biomedical applications. Two weak polyions including a synthesized polyanion and polyethylenimine were assembled under controlled conditions and cross-linked to prepare three robust LbL films as model surfaces with similar roughness and water affinity but displaying negative, zero, and positive net charges at the physiological pH (7.4). These surfaces were tested for their abilities to adsorb proteins, including bovine serum albumin (BSA) and lysozyme (LYZ). In the adsorption tests, the LbL films bind more proteins with opposite charges but less of those with like charges, indicating that electrostatic interactions play a major role in protein adsorption. However, LYZ showed higher nonspecific adsorption than BSA, because of the specific behavior of LYZ molecules, such as stacked multilayer formation during adsorption. To exclude such stacking effects from experiments, protein molecules were covalently immobilized on AFM colloidal probes to measure the adhesion forces against the model surfaces utilizing direct protein molecule-surface contacts. The results confirmed the dominating role of electrostatic forces in protein adhesion. In fibroblast cell and bacteria adhesion tests, similar trends (high adhesion on positively charged surfaces, but much lower on neutral and negatively charged surfaces) were observed because the fibroblast cell and bacterial surfaces studied possess negative potentials. The cross-linked LbL films with improved stability and engineered surface charge described in this study provide an excellent platform to control the behavior of different charged objects and can be utilized in practical biomedical applications. PMID:26756285

  4. A PARAFAC-based long-term assessment of DOM in a multi-coagulant drinking water treatment scheme.

    PubMed

    Sanchez, Nancy P; Skeriotis, Andrew T; Miller, Christopher M

    2014-01-01

    A parallel factor (PARAFAC) analysis approach was used to study the character and composition of dissolved organic matter (DOM) in a multicoagulant (two aluminum-based coagulants) full scale drinking water treatment plant. A three year, long-term assessment was conducted based on deconstruction of the excitation-emission matrices (EEM) of over 1000 water samples collected before and after parallel coagulation treatment basins. Two humic moieties and a protein-like group were identified in the raw and treated waters. Apportionment of fluorophores was established using a novel approach based on the overall fluorescence intensity (OFI) of PARAFAC components. Uncorrected matrix correlation (UMC) revealed minimal changes of the fluorescence moieties after treatment (UMC > 0.98), and a comparable effect of both coagulants on the structure (UMC > 0.99) and distribution of these groups. Coagulation increased the proportion of the protein-like fluorophore and preferentially removed a humic-like group irrespective of the coagulant. Preference for this moiety was supported by a coagulant-affinity factor derived from the association between PARAFAC components after treatment. The suitability of a PARAFAC-based approach for coagulant evaluation/selection was demonstrated when compared to a dissolved organic carbon (DOC)-based criterion. This paper contributes to the understanding of the behavior of PARAFAC components in water treatment processes and presents several approaches for the future monitoring and control of coagulation at full scale treatment facilities. PMID:24417368

  5. Magnetic Control of Potential Microrobotic Drug Delivery Systems: Nanoparticles, Magnetotactic Bacteria and Self-Propelled Microjets

    PubMed Central

    Khalil, Islam S. M.; Magdanz, Veronika; Sanchez, Samuel; Schmidt, Oliver G.; Abelmann, Leon; Misra, Sarthak

    2013-01-01

    Development of targeted drug delivery systems using magnetic microrobots increases the therapeutic indices of drugs. These systems have to be incorporated with precise motion controllers. We demonstrate closed-loop motion control of microrobots under the influence of controlled magnetic fields. Point-to-point motion control of a cluster of iron oxide nanoparticles (diameter of 250 nm) is achieved by pulling the cluster towards a reference position using magnetic field gradients. Magnetotactic bacterium (MTB) is controlled by orienting the magnetic fields towards a reference position. MTB with membrane length of 5 μm moves towards the reference position using the propulsion force generated by its flagella. Similarly, self-propelled microjet with length of 50 μm is controlled by directing the microjet towards a reference position by external magnetic torque. The microjet moves along the field lines using the thrust force generated by the ejecting oxygen bubbles from one of its ends. Our control system positions the cluster of nanoparticles, an MTB and a microjet at an average velocity of 190 μm/s, 28 μm/s, 90 μm/s and within an average region-of-convergence of 132 μm, 40 μm, 235 μm, respectively. PMID:24110932

  6. Development of the selective coagulation process. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Yoon, R.H.; Luttrell, G.H.

    1992-07-01

    The selective hydrophobic coagulation (SHC) process is based on the recent finding that hydrophobic particles can be selectively coagulated without using traditional agglomerating agents or flocculants. The driving force for the coagulation is the attractive energy between hydrophobic surfaces, an interaction that has been overlooked in classical colloid chemistry. In most cases, selective separations can be achieved using simple pH control to disperse the mineral matter, followed by recovery of the coal coagula using techniques that take advantage of the size enlargement. In the present work, studies have been carried out to further investigate the fundamental mechanisms of the SHC process and the parameters that affect the process of separating coal from the ash-forming minerals and pyritic sulfur. Studies have included direct force measurements of the attractive interaction between model hydrophobic surfaces, in-situ measurements of the size distributions of coagula formed under a variety of operating conditions, and development of a population balance model to describe the coagulation process. An extended DLVO colloid stability model which includes a hydrophobic interaction energy term has also been developed to explain the findings obtained from the experimental studies. In addition to the fundamental studies, bench-scale process development test work has been performed to establish the best possible method of separating the coagula from dispersed mineral matter. Two types of separators, i.e., a sedimentation tank and a rotating drum screen, were examined in this study. The sedimentation tank proved to be the more efficient unit, achieving ash reductions as high as 60% in a single pass while recovering more than 90% of the combustible material. This device, which minimizes turbulence and coagula breakage, was used in subsequent test work to optimize design and operating parameters.

  7. Lithotrophic iron-oxidizing bacteria produce organic stalks to control mineral growth: implications for biosignature formation

    SciTech Connect

    Chan, Clara S; Fakra, Sirine C; Emerson, David; Fleming, Emily J; Edwards, Katrina J

    2011-07-01

    Neutrophilic Fe-oxidizing bacteria (FeOB) are often identified by their distinctive morphologies, such as the extracellular twisted ribbon-like stalks formed by Gallionella ferruginea or Mariprofundus ferrooxydans. Similar filaments preserved in silica are often identified as FeOB fossils in rocks. Although it is assumed that twisted iron stalks are indicative of FeOB, the stalk's metabolic role has not been established. To this end, we studied the marine FeOB M. ferrooxydans by light, X-ray and electron microscopy. Using time-lapse light microscopy, we observed cells excreting stalks during growth (averaging 2.2 {micro}m h(-1)). Scanning transmission X-ray microscopy and near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) spectroscopy show that stalks are Fe(III)-rich, whereas cells are low in Fe. Transmission electron microscopy reveals that stalks are composed of several fibrils, which contain few-nanometer-sized iron oxyhydroxide crystals. Lepidocrocite crystals that nucleated on the fibril surface are much larger ({approx}100 nm), suggesting that mineral growth within fibrils is retarded, relative to sites surrounding fibrils. C and N 1s NEXAFS spectroscopy and fluorescence probing show that stalks primarily contain carboxyl-rich polysaccharides. On the basis of these results, we suggest a physiological model for Fe oxidation in which cells excrete oxidized Fe bound to organic polymers. These organic molecules retard mineral growth, preventing cell encrustation. This model describes an essential role for stalk formation in FeOB growth. We suggest that stalk-like morphologies observed in modern and ancient samples may be correlated confidently with the Fe-oxidizing metabolism as a robust biosignature.

  8. [Development of the Selective Hydrophobic Coagulation process]. [Quarterly report, January 1, 1993--March 31, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-08-01

    A novel technique for selectively coagulating and separating mineral matter has been developed at Virginia Tech. The process, known as Selective Hydrophobic Coagulation (SHC), has been studied under the sponsorship of the US Department of Energy since 1986 (Contracts DE-AC22-86PC91221 and DE-AC22-90PC90174). The SHC process differs from oil agglomeration, shear flocculation, polymer flocculation, and electrolytic coagulation processes in that it does not require reagents or additives to induce the formation of coagula. Often, simple pH control is all that is required to (1) induce the coagulation of coal particles and (2) effectively disperse particles of mineral matter. When the coal is superficially oxidized, a small dosage of reagents may be used to promote coagulation. During the last quarter, work was completed on the collection of the surface force and hydrophobicity data required for the estimation of the parameters in the hydrophobic interaction energy function. The estimation of these parameters will be completed in May, and the development of the extended DLVO equation for coal should be completed by the end of the next quarter. In Task 3, the mixing/coagulation characteristics of in-line mixers have been established and work with the ultrasonic horn has begun. The study of the recovery of coagula by column flotation will be completed in early May, and work on the remaining sub-tasks of Advanced Separation Methods has been accelerated in an effort to complete this task on schedule.

  9. Blood coagulation reactions on nanoscale membrane surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pureza, Vincent S.

    Blood coagulation requires the assembly of several membrane-bound protein complexes composed of regulatory and catalytic subunits. The biomembranes involved in these reactions not only provide a platform for these procoagulant proteins, but can also affect their function. Increased exposure of acidic phospholipids on the outer leaflet of the plasma membrane can dramatically modulate the catalytic efficiencies of such membrane-bound enzymes. Under physiologic conditions, however, these phospholipids spontaneously cluster into a patchwork of membrane microdomains upon which membrane binding proteins may preferentially assemble. As a result, the membrane composition surrounding these proteins is largely unknown. Through the development and use of a nanometer-scale bilayer system that provides rigorous control of the phospholipid membrane environment, I investigated the role of phosphatidylserine, an acidic phospholipid, in the direct vicinity (within nanometers) of two critical membrane-bound procoagulant protein complexes and their respective natural substrates. Here, I present how the assembly and function of the tissue factor˙factor VIIa and factor Va˙factor Xa complexes, the first and final cofactor˙enzyme complexes of the blood clotting cascade, respectively, are mediated by changes in their immediate phospholipid environments.

  10. Control of infection with multiple antibiotic resistant bacteria in a hospital renal unit: the value of plasmid characterization.

    PubMed Central

    Reed, C. S.; Barrett, S. P.; Threlfall, E. J.; Cheasty, T.

    1995-01-01

    An outbreak of infections due to multiple antibiotic-resistant bacteria took place over a period of approximately 18 months in a renal unit. Strains of Escherichia coli, Enterobacter aerogenes, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Citrobacter spp. and Pseudomonas spp. were involved, and a variety of antibiotic resistances was encountered. Closely related plasmids encoding resistance to aztreonam, ceftazidime and piperacillin, possibly derived from an archetypal plasmid of 105 kb were found in the majority of isolates examined. After limiting the use of aztreonam the incidence of new patient isolates of multiple-resistant organisms was greatly reduced. This study demonstrated how molecular studies can contribute to the control of an outbreak situation in a hospital unit by providing an impetus to reduce the use of specific antibiotics. Images Fig. 2 PMID:7641839

  11. Influence of coagulation mechanisms on the residual aluminum--the roles of coagulant species and MW of organic matter.

    PubMed

    Jiao, Ruyuan; Xu, Hui; Xu, Weiying; Yang, Xiaofang; Wang, Dongsheng

    2015-06-15

    Aluminum (Al) based coagulants are widely used in coagulation process to enhance the removal of turbidity and dissolved substances in the drinking water treatment. However, it raised more concerns due to the increase of residual aluminum in treated water, which can cause even more issues. In this study, the effects of organic matter molecular weight and coagulants species on the concentration and aluminum distribution in residual aluminum were investigated. The residual aluminum concentration decreases as the organic matter (OM) molecular weight (MW) rises. Charge neutralization mechanism was found to be the most important factor that determines the residual aluminum concentration directly. Basically, higher Ala percentage leads to lower residual Al concentration at acidic conditions, and Alb/Alc plays an important role in controlling the residual Al concentration at neutral and alkaline condition. The flocs structures formed by charge neutralization mechanism will be more compact for the mid and high MW OM, and fractal dimension (Df) was important to reflect the dissolved residual aluminum rather than the flocs size. The total dissolved residual aluminum concentration of Al13 and Al30 was mainly contributed by the fractions with low and/or high MW, especially by the fraction with MW range of 0-1 kDa. PMID:25731148

  12. Transparent exopolymer particles (TEP) removal efficiency by a combination of coagulation and ultrafiltration to minimize SWRO membrane fouling.

    PubMed

    Li, Sheng; Lee, Shang-Tse; Sinha, Shahnawaz; Leiknes, TorOve; Amy, Gary L; Ghaffour, Noreddine

    2016-10-01

    This study investigated the impact of coagulation on the transformation between colloidal and particulate transparent exopolymer particles (TEP) in seawater; and the effectiveness of a combined pretreatment consisting of coagulation and UF on minimizing TEP fouling of seawater reverse osmosis (SWRO) membranes. Coagulation with ferric chloride at pH 5 substantially transformed colloidal TEP (0.1-0.4) into particulate TEP (>0.4) leading to a better membrane fouling control. Both 50 and 100 kDa molecular weight cut-off (MWCO) UF membranes removed most of particulate and colloidal TEP without the assistance of coagulation, but coagulation is still necessary for better UF fouling control. The improvement of combined SWRO pretreatment with coagulation and 50 kDa UF membranes was not that much significant compared to UF pretreatment with 50 KDa alone. Therefore, the minimal coagulant dosage for seawater containing TEP should be based on the UF fouling control requirements rather than removal efficiency. PMID:27403871

  13. BIOLOGICAL CONTROL OF RICE BACTERIAL BLIGHT BY PLANT-ASSOCIATED BACTERIA PRODUCING 2,4-DIACETYLPHLOROGLUCINOL.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Certain plant-associated strains of fluorescent Pseudomonas spp. are known to produce the antimicrobial antibiotic 2,4-diacetylphloroglucinol (DAPG). It has antibacterial, antifungal, antiviral, and antihelminthic properties and has played a significant role in the biological control of tobacco, whe...

  14. Characterizing culturable microflora of nectarines: bacteria and their potential for biological control of postharvest fruit decay

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Microorganisms isolated from fruit surfaces have been used to control postharvest decays of fruit. However, there is little information on microflora colonizing surfaces of fruits other than grapes, apples, and citrus. We characterized bacterial microflora on nectarine fruit surfaces during fruit ...

  15. Coagulation Factor XIIIa Substrates in Human Plasma

    PubMed Central

    Nikolajsen, Camilla Lund; Dyrlund, Thomas F.; Poulsen, Ebbe Toftgaard; Enghild, Jan J.; Scavenius, Carsten

    2014-01-01

    Coagulation factor XIII (FXIII) is a transglutaminase with a well defined role in the final stages of blood coagulation. Active FXIII (FXIIIa) catalyzes the formation of ϵ-(γ-glutamyl)lysine isopeptide bonds between specific Gln and Lys residues. The primary physiological outcome of this catalytic activity is stabilization of the fibrin clot during coagulation. The stabilization is achieved through the introduction of cross-links between fibrin monomers and through cross-linking of proteins with anti-fibrinolytic activity to fibrin. FXIIIa additionally cross-links several proteins with other functionalities to the clot. Cross-linking of proteins to the clot is generally believed to modify clot characteristics such as proteolytic susceptibility and hereby affect the outcome of tissue damage. In the present study, we use a proteomic approach in combination with transglutaminase-specific labeling to identify FXIIIa plasma protein substrates and their reactive residues. The results revealed a total of 147 FXIIIa substrates, of which 132 have not previously been described. We confirm that 48 of the FXIIIa substrates were indeed incorporated into the insoluble fibrin clot during the coagulation of plasma. The identified substrates are involved in, among other activities, complement activation, coagulation, inflammatory and immune responses, and extracellular matrix organization. PMID:24443567

  16. Magnetic particle imaging of blood coagulation

    SciTech Connect

    Murase, Kenya Song, Ruixiao; Hiratsuka, Samu

    2014-06-23

    We investigated the feasibility of visualizing blood coagulation using a system for magnetic particle imaging (MPI). A magnetic field-free line is generated using two opposing neodymium magnets and transverse images are reconstructed from the third-harmonic signals received by a gradiometer coil, using the maximum likelihood-expectation maximization algorithm. Our MPI system was used to image the blood coagulation induced by adding CaCl{sub 2} to whole sheep blood mixed with magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs). The “MPI value” was defined as the pixel value of the transverse image reconstructed from the third-harmonic signals. MPI values were significantly smaller for coagulated blood samples than those without coagulation. We confirmed the rationale of these results by calculating the third-harmonic signals for the measured viscosities of samples, with an assumption that the magnetization and particle size distribution of MNPs obey the Langevin equation and log-normal distribution, respectively. We concluded that MPI can be useful for visualizing blood coagulation.

  17. Magnetic particle imaging of blood coagulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murase, Kenya; Song, Ruixiao; Hiratsuka, Samu

    2014-06-01

    We investigated the feasibility of visualizing blood coagulation using a system for magnetic particle imaging (MPI). A magnetic field-free line is generated using two opposing neodymium magnets and transverse images are reconstructed from the third-harmonic signals received by a gradiometer coil, using the maximum likelihood-expectation maximization algorithm. Our MPI system was used to image the blood coagulation induced by adding CaCl2 to whole sheep blood mixed with magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs). The "MPI value" was defined as the pixel value of the transverse image reconstructed from the third-harmonic signals. MPI values were significantly smaller for coagulated blood samples than those without coagulation. We confirmed the rationale of these results by calculating the third-harmonic signals for the measured viscosities of samples, with an assumption that the magnetization and particle size distribution of MNPs obey the Langevin equation and log-normal distribution, respectively. We concluded that MPI can be useful for visualizing blood coagulation.

  18. Impacts of coagulation on the adsorption of organic micropollutants onto powdered activated carbon in treated domestic wastewater.

    PubMed

    Altmann, Johannes; Zietzschmann, Frederik; Geiling, Eva-Linde; Ruhl, Aki Sebastian; Sperlich, Alexander; Jekel, Martin

    2015-04-01

    The application of powdered activated carbon (PAC) as an advanced wastewater treatment step for the removal of organic micropollutants (OMP) necessitates complete separation of the PAC particles, e.g. by coagulation. In this study, potential positive or negative indirect or direct effects of coagulation on the adsorption of OMPs onto PAC in treated wastewater were investigated. Although the concentration of dissolved organic matter (DOM) was significantly reduced by coagulation, the selective removal of mainly larger DOM components such as biopolymers and humic substances did not improve subsequent OMP adsorption onto PAC, demonstrating that coagulation has minor effects on DOM constituents that are relevant for direct competition or pore blocking. The combination of coagulation and adsorption yielded the sum of the individual removals, as adsorption predominantly affected smaller compounds. While the formation of flocs led to visible incorporation of PAC particles, no significant mass transfer limitations impeded the OMP adsorption. As a result, the dosing sequence of coagulant and PAC is not critical for efficient adsorption of OMPs onto PAC. The relationships between adsorptive OMP removal and corresponding reduction of UV absorption at 254 nm (UVA254) as a promising surrogate correlation for the real-time monitoring and PAC adjustment were affected by coagulation, leading to individual correlations depending on the water composition. Correcting for UVA254 reduction by coagulation produces adsorptive UVA254 removal, which correlates highly with OMP removal for different WWTP effluents and varying coagulant doses and can be applied in combined adsorption/coagulation processes to predict OMP removal and control PAC dosing. PMID:25582393

  19. Alterations in coagulation following major liver resection.

    PubMed

    Mallett, S V; Sugavanam, A; Krzanicki, D A; Patel, S; Broomhead, R H; Davidson, B R; Riddell, A; Gatt, A; Chowdary, P

    2016-06-01

    The international normalised ratio is frequently raised in patients who have undergone major liver resection, and is assumed to represent a potential bleeding risk. However, these patients have an increased risk of venous thromboembolic events, despite conventional coagulation tests indicating hypocoagulability. This prospective, observational study of patients undergoing major hepatic resection analysed the serial changes in coagulation in the early postoperative period. Thrombin generation parameters and viscoelastic tests of coagulation (thromboelastometry) remained within normal ranges throughout the study period. Levels of the procoagulant factors II, V, VII and X initially fell, but V and X returned to or exceeded normal range by postoperative day five. Levels of factor VIII and Von Willebrand factor were significantly elevated from postoperative day one (p < 0.01). Levels of the anticoagulants, protein C and antithrombin remained significantly depressed on postoperative day five (p = 0.01). Overall, the imbalance between pro- and anticoagulant factors suggested a prothrombotic environment in the early postoperative period. PMID:27030945

  20. Coagulation-membrane filtration of Chlorella vulgaris.

    PubMed

    Lee, Duu-Jong; Liao, Guan-Yu; Chang, Yin-Ru; Chang, Jo-Shu

    2012-03-01

    Filtration-based separation of Chlorella vulgaris, a species with excellent potential for CO(2) capture and lipid production, was investigated using a surface-modified hydrophilic polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) membrane. Coagulation using polyaluminum chloride (PACl) attained maximum turbidity removal at 200 mg L(-1) as Al(2)O(3). The membrane filtration flux at 1 bar increased as the PACl dose increased, regardless of overdosing in the coagulation stage. The filtered cake at the end of filtration tests peaked in solid content at 10 mg L(-1) as Al(2)O(3), reaching 34% w/w, roughly two times that of the original suspension. Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) tests demonstrate that the cake with minimum water-solid binding strength produced the driest filter cake. Coagulation using 10 mg L(-1) PACl as Al(2)O(3), followed by PTFE membrane filtration at 1 bar, is an effective process for harvesting C. vulgaris from algal froth. PMID:22261659

  1. Coagulation, Protease Activated Receptors and Viral Myocarditis

    PubMed Central

    Antoniak, Silvio; Mackman, Nigel

    2013-01-01

    The coagulation protease cascade plays an essential role in hemostasis. In addition, a clot contributes to host defense by limiting the spread of pathogens. Coagulation proteases induce intracellular signaling by cleavage of cell surface receptors called protease-activated receptors (PARs). These receptors allow cells to sense changes in the extracellular environment, such as infection. Viruses activate the coagulation cascade by inducing tissue factor expression and by disrupting the endothelium. Virus infection of the heart can cause myocarditis, cardiac remodeling and heart failure. Recent studies using a mouse model have shown that tissue factor, thrombin and PAR-1 signaling all positively regulate the innate immune during viral myocarditis. In contrast, PAR-2 signaling was found to inhibit interferon-β expression and the innate immune response. These observations suggest that anticoagulants may impair the innate immune response to viral infection and that inhibition of PAR-2 may be a new target to reduce viral myocarditis.. PMID:24203054

  2. Metabolic engineering of lactic acid bacteria, the combined approach: kinetic modelling, metabolic control and experimental analysis.

    PubMed

    Hoefnagel, Marcel H N; Starrenburg, Marjo J C; Martens, Dirk E; Hugenholtz, Jeroen; Kleerebezem, Michiel; Van Swam, Iris I; Bongers, Roger; Westerhoff, Hans V; Snoep, Jacky L

    2002-04-01

    Everyone who has ever tried to radically change metabolic fluxes knows that it is often harder to determine which enzymes have to be modified than it is to actually implement these changes. In the more traditional genetic engineering approaches 'bottle-necks' are pinpointed using qualitative, intuitive approaches, but the alleviation of suspected 'rate-limiting' steps has not often been successful. Here the authors demonstrate that a model of pyruvate distribution in Lactococcus lactis based on enzyme kinetics in combination with metabolic control analysis clearly indicates the key control points in the flux to acetoin and diacetyl, important flavour compounds. The model presented here (available at http://jjj.biochem.sun.ac.za/wcfs.html) showed that the enzymes with the greatest effect on this flux resided outside the acetolactate synthase branch itself. Experiments confirmed the predictions of the model, i.e. knocking out lactate dehydrogenase and overexpressing NADH oxidase increased the flux through the acetolactate synthase branch from 0 to 75% of measured product formation rates. PMID:11932446

  3. Post-treatment of sanitary landfill leachate by coagulation-flocculation using chitosan as primary coagulant.

    PubMed

    Nascimento, Inara Oliveira do Carmo; Guedes, Ana Rosa Pinto; Perelo, Louisa Wessels; Queiroz, Luciano Matos

    2016-01-01

    Chitosan was chosen as an alternative primary coagulant in a complementary coagulation-flocculation treatment of sanitary landfill leachate with the aim of removing recalcitrant organic matter. In order to optimize the process conditions, central composite design and response surface methodology were applied. To evaluate the performance of the process using chitosan, we also carried out tests with aluminium sulphate (Al(2) (SO(4))(3).14 H(2)O) as coagulant. In addition, acute toxicity tests were carried using the duckweed Lemna minor and the guppy fish Poecilia reticulata as test organisms. The analytic hierarchy process was employed for selecting the most appropriate coagulant. Mean values of true colour removal efficiency of 80% and turbidity removal efficiency of 91.4% were reached at chitosan dosages of 960 mg L(-1) at pH 8.5. The acute toxicity tests showed that organisms were sensitive to all samples, mainly after coagulation-flocculation using chitosan. CE(50) for L. minor was not determined because there was no inhibition of the average growth rate and biomass production; LC(50) for P. reticulata was 23% (v v(-1)). Multi-criteria analysis showed that alum was the most appropriate coagulant. Therefore, chitosan as primary coagulant was not considered to be a viable alternative in the post-treatment of landfill leachate. PMID:27387003

  4. Coagulation characteristics of titanium (Ti) salt coagulant compared with aluminum (Al) and iron (Fe) salts.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Y X; Gao, B Y; Shon, H K; Cao, B C; Kim, J-H

    2011-01-30

    In this study, the performance of titanium tetrachloride (TiCl(4)) coagulation and flocculation is compared with commonly used coagulants such as aluminum sulfate (Al(2)(SO(4))(3)), polyaluminum chloride (PACl), iron chloride (FeCl(3)), and polyferric sulfate (PFS) in terms of water quality parameters and floc properties. TiCl(4) flocculation achieved higher removal of UV(254) (98%), dissolved organic carbon (DOC) (84%) and turbidity (93%) than other conventional coagulants. Charge neutralization and physical entrapment of colloids within coagulant precipitates and adsorption, seemed to play a significant role during TiCl(4) flocculation, while the main mechanism for conventional coagulants was bridge-aggregation and adsorption. The aggregated flocs after TiCl(4) flocculation showed the fastest growth rate compared to the other coagulants, with the largest floc size (801 μm) occurring within 8 min. The floc strength factor of PACl, Al(2)(SO(4))(3), PFS, FeCl(3) and TiCl(4) was 34, 30, 29, 26 and 29, respectively, while the floc recovery factor of the TiCl(4) coagulant was the lowest. Based on the results of the above study, it is concluded that the TiCl(4) flocculation can reduce the hydraulic retention time of slow and rapid mixing, however, careful handling of sludge is required due to the low recoverability of the aggregated floc. PMID:21075521

  5. Application of psyllium husk as coagulant and coagulant aid in semi-aerobic landfill leachate treatment.

    PubMed

    Al-Hamadani, Yasir A J; Yusoff, Mohd Suffian; Umar, Muhammad; Bashir, Mohammed J K; Adlan, Mohd Nordin

    2011-06-15

    Landfill leachate is a heavily polluted and a likely hazardous liquid that is produced as a result of water infiltration through solid wastes generated industrially and domestically. This study investigates the potential of using psyllium husk as coagulant and coagulant aid for the treatment of landfill leachate. Psyllium husk has been tested as primary coagulant and as coagulant aid with poly-aluminum chloride (PACl) and aluminum sulfate (alum). As primary coagulant, the optimum dosage and pH for PACl were 7.2 and 7.5 g/L, respectively, with removal efficiencies of 55, 80 and 95% for COD, color and TSS, respectively. For alum, the optimum conditions were 11 g/L alum dosage and pH 6.5 with removal efficiencies of 58, 79 and 78% for COD, color and TSS, respectively. The maximum removal efficiencies of COD, color and TSS were 64, 90 and 96%, respectively, when psyllium husk was used as coagulant aid with PACl. Based on the results, psyllium husk was found to be more effective as coagulant aid with PACl in the removal of COD, color and TSS as compared to alum. Zeta potential test was carried out for leachate, PACl, alum and psyllium husk before and after running the jar test to enhance the results of the jar test experiments. PMID:21507572

  6. [Relationship among coagulation effect of Al-based coagulant, content and speciation of residual aluminum].

    PubMed

    Yang, Zhong-Lian; Gao, Bao-Yu; Yue, Qin-Yan; Jiang, Yi-Shuai

    2010-06-01

    The application of AlCl3, Al2 (SO4)3 and poly-aluminum chloride (PAC) in humic acid-kaolin simulated water was studied in this article. It is intended to discuss the relationship among coagulation effect of Al-based coagulants in humic acid-kaolin simulated water and content and speciation of residual aluminum. It was found that, the turbidity removal efficiency and UV254 removal efficiency could reach about 90% at the tested dosage. At higher dosage, PAC gave better coagulation effect. The residual total aluminum content and residual aluminum ratio of PAC, which was 0.9 mg/L and - 3.0% or so respectively, were greatly lower than those of AlCl3 and Al2 (SO4)3. The residual total dissolved aluminum was the predominant content in the effluent after coagulation and sedimentation by the three Al-based coagulants. For the total dissolved aluminum, the proportion of dissolved organic aluminum was significantly higher than that of other aluminum speciation. With respect to humic acid-kaolin simulated water, the content of residual total aluminum in the effluent after coagulation and sedimentation by PAC decreased obviously compared to AlCl3 and Al2 (SO4)3. PAC could effectively decrease the content of residual dissolved aluminum speciation which has higher toxicity. The content of residual total dissolved aluminum in the effluent after coagulation and sedimentation by PAC was about 0.6 mg/L. PMID:20698270

  7. Control of growth and adaptation to nutritional shifts for bacteria exposed to amino acid-limiting environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mateescu, Eduard M.; Hwa, Terence

    2007-03-01

    In order to grow at the highest rate sustainable by the environment, bacteria turn on different metabolic pathways and utilize a myriad of adaptive strategies. The macromolecular composition (RNA, DNA, protein) and overall cell size (mass) can be very different in different environments. Surprisingly however, these differences appear to depend only on the growth rate and not on the growth medium itself. As the nutritional environment changes in time, the cells quickly adapt their composition to the one corresponding to the new conditions. Here, we propose a phenomenological model of growth and adaptation control for the bacterial cell, based on a simplified formulation of the central dogma and a simplified implementation of the stringent response. The core model contains no free parameters and provides a simple intuitive understanding of cell growth control. The results generated by the model, physiological state of the cell as well as the characteristics of the transition between optimized states of growth, are in qualitative and semi-quantitative agreement (i.e. within a factor of 2) with the experimental observations.

  8. Lipopolysaccharide deacylation by an endogenous lipase controls innate antibody responses to Gram-negative bacteria.

    PubMed

    Lu, Mingfang; Zhang, Mei; Takashima, Akira; Weiss, Jerrold; Apicella, Michael A; Li, Xiang-Hong; Yuan, Dorothy; Munford, Robert S

    2005-10-01

    T cell-independent type 1 agonists such as Gram-negative bacterial lipopolysaccharides can stimulate B lymphocytes to proliferate and produce antibodies by signaling through Toll-like receptors. This phenomenon is well established in vitro, yet polyclonal B cell responses after bacterial infection in vivo are often weak and short-lived. We show here that B cell proliferation and polyclonal antibody production in response to Gram-negative bacterial infection are modulated by acyloxyacyl hydrolase, a host enzyme that deacylates bacterial lipopolysaccharides. Deacylation of lipopolysaccharide occurred over several days, allowing lipopolysaccharide to act as an innate immune stimulant yet limiting the eventual amount of B cell proliferation and polyclonal antibody production. Control of lipopolysaccharide activation by acyloxyacyl hydrolase indicates that mammals can regulate immune responses to bacterial infection by chemical modification of a Toll-like receptor agonist. PMID:16155573

  9. Development of the selective coagulation process

    SciTech Connect

    Yoon, R.H.; Luttrell, G.H.

    1991-01-01

    The aim of this project is to develop an economical method for producing low-sulfur and low-ash coals using the selective hydrophobic coagulation (SHC) process. This work has been divided into three tasks: (1) project planning and sample acquisition; (2) studies of the fundamental mechanism(s) of the selective coagulation process and the parameters that affect the process of separating coal from both the ash-forming minerals and pyritic sulfur; and (3) bench-scale process development test work to establish the best possible method(s) of separating the hydrophobic and coagula from the dispersed mineral matter.

  10. Effects of dimethylformamide (DMF) on coagulation and platelet activity

    SciTech Connect

    Imbriani, M.; Ghittori, S.; Prestinoni, A.; Longoni, P.; Cascone, G.; Gamba, G.

    1986-03-01

    The effects of dimethylformamide (DMF) on hemostatic functions, especially on platelet activity, were examined both in vitro and in vivo in 15 workers exposed to DMF (27 mg/m3, median value). Twenty-eight control subjects who were not exposed to DMF, but comparable for age, anthropometric data, and smoking habits, were also studied. Workers exposed to DMF showed a decrease in the number of platelets and had longer coagulation times, probably due to a change caused by DMF on the membrane receptor of platelets and on the phospholipid components of the clotting system.

  11. Cell cycle control in bacteria and yeast: a case of convergent evolution?

    PubMed

    Brazhnik, Paul; Tyson, John J

    2006-03-01

    Superficially similar traits in phylogenetically unrelated species often result from adaptation to common selection pressures. Examples of convergent evolution are known at the levels of whole organisms, organ systems, gene networks and specific proteins. The phenotypic properties of living things, on the other hand, are determined in large part by complex networks of interacting proteins. Here we present a mathematical model of the network of proteins that controls DNA synthesis and cell division in the alpha-proteobacterium, Caulobacter crescentus. By comparing the protein regulatory circuits for cell reproduction in Caulobacter with that in budding yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae), we suggest that convergent evolution may have created similar molecular reaction networks in order to accomplish the same purpose of coordinating DNA synthesis to cell division. Although the genes and proteins involved in cell cycle regulation in prokaryotes and eukaryotes are very different and (apparently) phylogenetically unrelated, they seem to be wired together in similar regulatory networks, which coordinate cell cycle events by identical dynamical principles. PMID:16552176

  12. Characterization of rhizosphere bacteria for control of phytopathogenic fungi of tomato.

    PubMed

    Pastor, Nicolás; Carlier, Evelin; Andrés, Javier; Rosas, Susana B; Rovera, Marisa

    2012-03-01

    Fluorescent Pseudomonas spp., isolated from rhizosphere soil of tomato and pepper plants, were evaluated in vitro as potential antagonists of fungal pathogens. Strains were characterized using the API 20NE biochemical system, and tested against the causal agents of stem canker and leaf blight (Alternaria alternata f. sp. lycopersici), southern blight (Sclerotium rolfsii Sacc.), and root rot (Fusarium solani). To this end, dual culture antagonism assays were carried out on 25% Tryptic Soy Agar, King B medium, and Potato Dextrose Agar to determine the effect of the strains on mycelial growth of the pathogens. The effect of two concentrations of FeCl(3) on antagonism against Alternaria alternata f. sp. lycopersici was also tested. In addition, strains were screened for ability to produce exoenzymes and siderophores. Finally, the selected Pseudomonas strain, PCI2, was evaluated for effect on tomato seedling development and as a potential candidate for controlling tomato damping-off caused by Sclerotium rolfsii Sacc., under growth chamber conditions. All strains significantly inhibited Alternaria alternata f. sp. lycopersici, particularly in 25% TSA medium. Antagonistic effect on Sclerotium rolfsii Sacc. and Fusarium solani was greater on King B medium. Protease was produced by 30% of the strains, but no strains produced cellulase or chitinase. Growth chamber studies resulted in significant increases in plant stand as well as in root dry weight. PCI2 was able to establish and survive in tomato plants rhizosphere after 40 days following planting of bacterized seeds. PMID:21507555

  13. BIOLOGICAL CONTROL OF WHEAT TAKE-ALL DISEASE: II – RAPID SELECTION OF BACTERIA SUPPRESSIVE TO GAEUMANNOMYCES GRAMINIS VAR. TRITICI IN LABORATORY WITH GREENHOUSE AND FIELD CONFIRMATION TRIALS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Screening large collections of bacteria for potential biological control activity on economically important diseases is often difficult. A quick test tube assay was developed to rapidly screen selected bacterial isolates for their ability to suppress take-all disease of wheat, caused by Gaeumannomyc...

  14. Which strategies follow from the surveillance of multidrug-resistant bacteria to strengthen the control of their spread? A French experience.

    PubMed

    Lepelletier, Didier; Perron, Stéphanie; Huguenin, Hélène; Picard, Monique; Bemer, Pascale; Caillon, Jocelyne; Juvin, Marie-Emmanuelle; Drugeon, Henri Bernard

    2004-02-01

    Efforts to enhance standard precautions and to isolate patients with positive routine clinical cultures during 3 years were insufficient to decrease multidrug-resistant bacteria infection rates. Routine screening for carriage in high-risk patients may be necessary to halt transmission and control the hospital reservoir. PMID:14994943

  15. Nanoparticle coagulation in fractionally charged and charge fluctuating dusty plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Nunomura, Shota; Kondo, Michio; Shiratani, Masaharu; Koga, Kazunori; Watanabe, Yukio

    2008-08-15

    The kinetics of nanoparticle coagulation has been studied in fractionally charged and charge fluctuating dusty plasmas. The coagulation occurs when the mutual collision frequency among nanoparticles exceeds their charging and decharging/neutralization frequency. Interestingly, the coagulation is suppressed while a fraction (several percent) of nanoparticles are negatively charged in a plasma, in which stochastic charging plays an important role. A model is developed to predict a phase diagram of the coagulation and its suppression.

  16. Hypothesis: Disseminated Intravascular Inflammation as the Inflammatory Counterpart to Disseminated Intravascular Coagulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bull, Brian S.; Bull, Maureen H.

    1994-08-01

    We have identified a leukocyte activation syndrome that is occasionally associated with the transfusion of intraoperatively recovered erythrocytes. This syndrome appears to result from intravascular damage caused by leukocytes activated during the erythrocyte salvage process. We hypothesize that this syndrome is part of a larger disease grouping: disseminated intravascular inflammation (DII). DII is the analog of the coagulation disorder disseminated intravascular coagulation. In disseminated intravascular coagulation, the organ damage results from uncontrolled activation of the clotting pathway; in DII the damage is caused by leukocytes that have become activated by direct contact with bacteria or in rare instances-such as erythrocyte salvage-in the absence of bacteria and bacterial products. Recent studies of the hazards associated with intraoperative blood salvage indicate that activation of leukocytes can be achieved by exposure to activated platelets alone. If such activated leukocytes are reinfused along with the washed erythrocytes, widespread organ damage may result. The lung is the organ most severely affected by activated leukocytes. Adult respiratory distress syndrome is one outcome. It is likely that DII is a presently unrecognized pathophysiological process that complicates a variety of primary disease states and increases their lethality.

  17. Hypothesis: disseminated intravascular inflammation as the inflammatory counterpart to disseminated intravascular coagulation.

    PubMed Central

    Bull, B S; Bull, M H

    1994-01-01

    We have identified a leukocyte activation syndrome that is occasionally associated with the transfusion of intraoperatively recovered erythrocytes. This syndrome appears to result from intravascular damage caused by leukocytes activated during the erythrocyte salvage process. We hypothesize that this syndrome is part of a larger disease grouping: disseminated intravascular inflammation (DII). DII is the analog of the coagulation disorder disseminated intravascular coagulation. In disseminated intravascular coagulation, the organ damage results from uncontrolled activation of the clotting pathway; in DII the damage is caused by leukocytes that have become activated by direct contact with bacteria or in rare instances--such as erythrocyte salvage--in the absence of bacteria and bacterial products. Recent studies of the hazards associated with intraoperative blood salvage indicate that activation of leukocytes can be achieved by exposure to activated platelets alone. If such activated leukocytes are reinfused along with the washed erythrocytes, widespread organ damage may result. The lung is the organ most severely affected by activated leukocytes. Adult respiratory distress syndrome is one outcome. It is likely that DII is a presently unrecognized pathophysiological process that complicates a variety of primary disease states and increases their lethality. Images PMID:8058778

  18. Hi-tech of the prostate: interstitial laser coagulation of benign prostatic hypertrophy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muschter, Rolf; Hofstetter, Alfons G.; Hessel, Stefan F. F.; Keiditsch, Ernst; Rothenberger, Karl-Heinz; Schneede, Peter; Frank, Klaus H.

    1992-06-01

    We report on the new technique of interstitial laser coagulation of the prostate (ILCP) in the treatment of benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH). Basic experiments by use of a Nd:YAG laser in combination with a newly designed fiber tip homogeneously distributing the laser irradiation have been performed in potato, muscle, liver, and surgically removed human BPH-tissue to determine the volume of coagulation. The coagulation zone surrounding the probe was well defined and homogeneous. The size was dependent on laser power and irradiation time. Carbonization was never present except in darker tissues irradiated with high energy. Volume and time resolved measurements correlated well with the size of coagulation. 10 W and 5 minutes, for example, resulted in a coagulation zone of 17 X 15 mm. Comparable results have been seen in in-vivo experiments in surgically exposed canine prostates. Specimen for macroscopic and microscopic examination were taken immediately after treatment and after 5 and 35 days. The well demarked coagulation necrosis of the early stage resulted in cystic degeneration and fibrosis in the later stages. This was combined with shrinkage and reduction in volume. The urothelium of the urethra, the external sphincter and the rectum showed no damage. Until now, 15 patients suffering from obstructive symptoms due to BPH have been treated with interstitial laser coagulation. The probes were inserted from the perineum into the center of each lateral lobe of the prostate by transrectal ultrasound guidance, while the median lobe was treated by urethroscopic guidance, while the median lobe was treated by urethroscopic control. Dependent on the size of the prostate irradiation, time was 5 to 10 minutes per lobe at a power setting of 5 to 10 W.

  19. Weak solutions to the continuous coagulation equation with multiple fragmentation

    PubMed Central

    Giri, Ankik Kumar; Laurençot, Philippe; Warnecke, Gerald

    2012-01-01

    The existence of weak solutions to the continuous coagulation equation with multiple fragmentation is shown for a class of unbounded coagulation and fragmentation kernels, the fragmentation kernel having possibly a singularity at the origin. This result extends previous ones where either boundedness of the coagulation kernel or no singularity at the origin for the fragmentation kernel was assumed. PMID:22389550

  20. Gelation and mass conservation in coagulation-fragmentation models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Escobedo, M.; Laurençot, Ph.; Mischler, S.; Perthame, B.

    The occurrence of gelation and the existence of mass-conserving solutions to the continuous coagulation-fragmentation equation are investigated under various assumptions on the coagulation and fragmentation rates, thereby completing the already known results. A non-uniqueness result is also established and a connection to the modified coagulation model of Flory is made.

  1. Chronic Rhinosinusitis and the Coagulation System.

    PubMed

    Kim, Dong Young; Cho, Seong H; Takabayashi, Tetsuji; Schleimer, Robert P

    2015-09-01

    Chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS) is one of the most common chronic diseases in adults and severely affects quality of life in patients. Although various etiologic and pathogenic mechanisms of CRS have been proposed, the causes of CRS remain uncertain. Abnormalities in the coagulation cascade may play an etiologic role in many diseases, such as asthma and other inflammatory conditions. While studies on the relationship between asthma and dysregulated coagulation have been reported, the role of the coagulation system in the pathogenesis of CRS has only been considered following recent reports. Excessive fibrin deposition is seen in nasal polyp (NP) tissue from patients with chronic rhinosinusitis with nasal polyp (CRSwNP) and is associated with activation of thrombin, reduction of tissue plasminogen activator (t-PA) and upregulation of coagulation factor XIII-A (FXIII-A), all events that can contribute to fibrin deposition and crosslinking. These findings were reproduced in a murine model of NP that was recently established. Elucidation of the mechanisms of fibrin deposition may enhance our understanding of tissue remodeling in the pathophysiology of NP and provide new targets for the treatment of CRSwNP. PMID:26122502

  2. Chronic Rhinosinusitis and the Coagulation System

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Dong-Young; Cho, Seong H.; Takabayashi, Tetsuji

    2015-01-01

    Chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS) is one of the most common chronic diseases in adults and severely affects quality of life in patients. Although various etiologic and pathogenic mechanisms of CRS have been proposed, the causes of CRS remain uncertain. Abnormalities in the coagulation cascade may play an etiologic role in many diseases, such as asthma and other inflammatory conditions. While studies on the relationship between asthma and dysregulated coagulation have been reported, the role of the coagulation system in the pathogenesis of CRS has only been considered following recent reports. Excessive fibrin deposition is seen in nasal polyp (NP) tissue from patients with chronic rhinosinusitis with nasal polyp (CRSwNP) and is associated with activation of thrombin, reduction of tissue plasminogen activator (t-PA) and upregulation of coagulation factor XIII-A (FXIII-A), all events that can contribute to fibrin deposition and crosslinking. These findings were reproduced in a murine model of NP that was recently established. Elucidation of the mechanisms of fibrin deposition may enhance our understanding of tissue remodeling in the pathophysiology of NP and provide new targets for the treatment of CRSwNP. PMID:26122502

  3. Roles for vitamin K beyond coagulation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Recent interest in vitamin K has been motivated by evidence of physiological roles beyond that of coagulation. Vitamin K and vitamin K-dependent proteins may be involved in regulation of calcification, energy metabolism, and inflammation. However, the evidence for many of these proposed roles in the...

  4. 21 CFR 864.5400 - Coagulation instrument.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Coagulation instrument. 864.5400 Section 864.5400 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Automated and Semi-Automated Hematology Devices §...

  5. Point of Care Assessment of Coagulation.

    PubMed

    Hyatt, Clare E; Brainard, Benjamin M

    2016-03-01

    Disorders of hemostasis can be difficult to fully elucidate but can severely affect patient outcome. The optimal therapy for coagulopathies is also not always clear. Point of care (POC) testing in veterinary medicine can assist in the diagnosis of hemostatic disorders and also direct treatment. Advantages of POC testing include rapid turnaround times, ease of use, and proximity to the patient. Disadvantages include differences in analytic performance compared with reference laboratory devices, the potential for operator error, and limited test options per device. Conventional coagulation tests such as prothrombin time, activated partial thromboplastin time, and activated clotting time can be measured by POC devices and can accurately diagnose hypocoagulability, but they cannot detect hypercoagulability or disorders of fibrinolysis. Viscoelastic POC coagulation testing more accurately evaluates in vivo coagulation, and can detect hypocoagulability, hypercoagulability, and alterations in fibrinolysis. POC platelet function testing methodologies can detect platelet adhesion abnormalities including von Willebrand disease, and can be used to monitor the efficacy of antiplatelet drugs. It is unlikely that a single test would be ideal for assessing the complete coagulation status of all patients; therefore, the ideal combination of tests for a specific patient needs to be determined based on an understanding of the underlying disease, and protocols must be standardized to minimize interoperator and interinstitutional variability. PMID:27451044

  6. Polyether ionophores: broad-spectrum and promising biologically active molecules for the control of drug-resistant bacteria and parasites

    PubMed Central

    Kevin, Dion A; Meujo, Damaris AF; Hamann, Mark T

    2016-01-01

    Background As multidrug-resistant (MDR) pathogens continue to emerge, there is a substantial amount of pressure to identify new drug candidates. Carboxyl polyethers, also referred to as polyether antibiotics, are a unique class of compounds with outstanding potency against a variety of critical infectious disease targets including protozoa, bacteria and viruses. The characteristics of these molecules that are of key interest are their selectivity and high potency against several MDR etiological agents. Objective Although many studies have been published about carboxyl polyether antibiotics, there are no recent reviews of this class of drugs. The purpose of this review is to provide the reader with an overview of the spectrum of activity of polyether antibiotics, their mechanism of action, toxicity and potential as drug candidates to combat drug-resistant infectious diseases. Conclusion Polyether ionophores show a high degree of promise for the potential control of drug-resistant bacterial and parasitic infections. Despite the long history of use of this class of drugs, very limited medicinal chemistry and drug optimization studies have been reported, thus leaving the door open to these opportunities in the future. Scifinder and PubMed were the main search engines used to locate articles relevant to the topic presented in the present review. Keywords used in our search were specific names of each of the 88 compounds presented in the review as well as more general terms such as polyethers, ionophores, carboxylic polyethers and polyether antibiotics. PMID:23480512

  7. Could light meal jeopardize laboratory coagulation tests?

    PubMed Central

    Lima-Oliveira, Gabriel; Salvagno, Gian Luca; Lippi, Giuseppe; Danese, Elisa; Gelati, Matteo; Montagnana, Martina; Picheth, Geraldo; Guidi, Gian Cesare

    2014-01-01

    Background: Presently the necessity of fasting time for coagulation tests is not standardized. Our hypothesis is that this can harm patient safety. This study is aimed at evaluating whether a light meal (i.e. breakfast) can jeopardize laboratory coagulation tests. Materials and methods: A blood sample was firstly collected from 17 fasting volunteers (12 h). Immediately after blood collection, the volunteers consumed a light meal. Then samples were collected at 1, 2 and 4 h after the meal. Coagulation tests included: activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT), prothrombin time (PT), fibrinogen (Fbg), antithrombin III (AT), protein C (PC) and protein S (PS). Differences between samples were assessed by Wilcoxon ranked-pairs test. The level of statistical significance was set at P < 0.05. Mean % differences were determined and differences between and baseline and 1, 2 and 4h samples were compared with reference change value (RCV). Results: A significantly higher % activity of AT was observed at 1 h and 4 h after meal vs. baseline specimen [113 (104–117) and 111 (107–120) vs. 109 (102–118), respectively; P = 0.029 and P = 0.016]. APTT at 2 h was found significantly lower than baseline samples [32.0 (29.9–34.8) vs. 34.1 (32.2–35.2), respectively; P = 0.041]. The results of both Fbg and PS tests were not influenced by a light meal. Furthermore, no coagulation tests had significant variation after comparison with RCV. Conclusion: A light meal does not influence the laboratory coagulation tests we assessed, but we suggest that the laboratory quality managers standardize the fasting time for all blood tests at 12 hours, to completely metabolize the lipids intake. PMID:25351352

  8. Relation of thromboelastography parameters to conventional coagulation tests used to evaluate the hypercoagulable state of aged fracture patients.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chen; Guan, Zhao; Xu, Qinzhu; Zhao, Lei; Song, Ying; Wang, Hui

    2016-06-01

    Fractures are common among aged people, and rapid assessment of the coagulation status is important. The thromboelastography (TEG) test can give a series of coagulation parameters and has been widely used in clinics. In this research, we looked at fracture patients over 60 and compared their TEG results with those of healthy controls. Since there is a paucity of studies comparing TEG assessments with conventional coagulation tests, we aim to clarify the relationship between TEG values and the values given by conventional coagulation tests.Forty fracture patients (27 femur and 13 humerus) over 60 years old were included in the study. The change in their coagulation status was evaluated by TEG before surgery within 4 hours after the fracture. Changes in TEG parameters were analyzed compared with controls. Conventional coagulation test results for the patients, including activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT), international normalized ratio (INR), fibrinogen, and platelets, were also acquired, and correlation analysis was done with TEG parameters, measuring similar aspects of the coagulation cascade. In addition, the sensitivity and specificity of TEG parameters for detecting raised fibrinogen levels were also analyzed.The K (time to 20 mm clot amplitude) and R (reaction time) values of aged fracture patients were lower than controls. The values for angle, maximal amplitude (MA), and coagulation index (CI) were raised compared with controls, indicating a hypercoagulable state. Correlation analysis showed that there were significant positive correlations between fibrinogen and MA/angle, between platelets and MA, and between APTT and R as well. There was significant negative correlation between fibrinogen and K. In addition, K values have better sensitivity and specificity for detecting elevated fibrinogen concentration than angle and MA values.Aged fracture patients tend to be in a hypercoagulable state, and this could be effectively reflected by a TEG test

  9. Novel Ion-Exchange Coagulants Remove More Low Molecular Weight Organics than Traditional Coagulants.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Huazhang; Wang, Lei; Hanigan, David; Westerhoff, Paul; Ni, Jinren

    2016-04-01

    Low molecular weight (MW) charged organic matter is poorly removed by conventional coagulants but contributes to disinfection byproduct formation during chlorination of drinking waters. We hypothesized that CIEX, a new Al-based hybrid coagulant with ion-exchange functional groups, would be new mechanistic approach to remove low MW organic matter during coagulation and would perform better than polyaluminum chloride (PACl) or metal-salt based coagulants. We measured coagulation performance using dissolved organic carbon (DOC) in a high hardness surface water. CIEX achieved excellent turbidity removal and removed 20% to 46% more DOC than FeCl3, Al2(SO4)3, or PACl, depending on dose. The improved DOC removal was attributable to better removal of low MW organic matter (<2 kDa). We further studied removal mechanisms in a model water containing a low MW organic acid (salicylic acid (SA)). CIEX achieved high removal of organic acids (>90% of SA) independent of pH, whereas removal by metal salts was lower (<15%) and was strongly pH dependent. CIEX ion-exchange capability is facilitated by its covalently bound quaternary ammonium group, which conventional coagulants lack. Plus, unlike other cationic polymers that react with chloramines to form N-nitrosodimethylamine (NDMA), CIEX has a low molar yield (9.3 × 10(-7) mol NDMA per mol CIEX-N). PMID:26974542

  10. Racemization in Reverse: Evidence that D-Amino Acid Toxicity on Earth Is Controlled by Bacteria with Racemases

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Gaosen; Sun, Henry J.

    2014-01-01

    D-amino acids are toxic for life on Earth. Yet, they form constantly due to geochemical racemization and bacterial growth (the cell walls of which contain D-amino acids), raising the fundamental question of how they ultimately are recycled. This study provides evidence that bacteria use D-amino acids as a source of nitrogen by running enzymatic racemization in reverse. Consequently, when soils are inundated with racemic amino acids, resident bacteria consume D- as well as L-enantiomers, either simultaneously or sequentially depending on the level of their racemase activity. Bacteria thus protect life on Earth by keeping environments D-amino acid free. PMID:24647559

  11. Application of antimicrobial-producing lactic acid bacteria to control pathogens in ready-to-use vegetables.

    PubMed

    Vescovo, M; Torriani, S; Orsi, C; Macchiarolo, F; Scolari, G

    1996-08-01

    Five psychrotrophic strains of lactic acid bacteria (Lactobacillus casei, Lact. plantarum and Pediococcus spp.) were isolated from 22 samples of commercial salads. These strains were shown to inhibit Aeromonas hydrophila, Listeria monocytogenes, Salmonella typhimurium and Staphylococcus aureus on MRS agar, in salads and in juice prepared from vegetable salads. Lactobacillus casei IMPCLC34 was most effective in reducing total mesophilic bacteria and the coliform group; Aer. hydrophila, Salm. typhimurium and Staph. aureus disappeared after 6 d of storage, while the counts for L. monocytogenes remained constant. The potential application of antimicrobial-producing lactic acid bacteria as biopreservatives of ready-to-use vegetables is suggested. PMID:8760320

  12. Effect of pre-coagulation on mitigating irreversible fouling during ultrafiltration of a surface water.

    PubMed

    Kimura, K; Hane, Y; Watanabe, Y

    2005-01-01

    Membrane fouling can be divided into two types: reversible fouling and irreversible fouling. The former can be easily canceled by physical cleaning (e.g., backwashing) while the latter needs chemical cleaning to be mitigated. For more efficient use of membranes, the control of irreversible membrane fouling is of importance. In this study, the effectiveness of pre-coagulation/sedimentation on irreversible membrane fouling was investigated, based on the pilot-scale operation of the membrane unit installed at an existing water purification plant. The membrane employed was a low-pressure ultrafiltration (UF) membrane made of polysulfone and having a molecular weight cut-off of 750,000 daltons. Although pre-coagulation/ sedimentation significantly mitigated membrane fouling mainly through the reduction of reversible membrane fouling, the degree of irreversible fouling was not reduced by the pre-treatment. This was because the irreversible fouling observed during this study was mainly attributed to polysaccharides/protein like fractions of organic substances that cannot be efficiently removed by coagulation/sedimentation. Aluminium used as coagulant was thought to cause irreversible fouling to some extent but did not in the pilot operation, which could probable be explained by the fact that coagulation was conducted at relatively high pH (7.0) in this study. PMID:16003966

  13. Endosulfan activates the extrinsic coagulation pathway by inducing endothelial cell injury in rats.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lianshuang; Wei, Jialiu; Guo, Fangzi; Duan, Junchao; Li, Yanbo; Shi, Zhixiong; Yang, Yumei; Zhou, Xianqing; Sun, Zhiwei

    2015-10-01

    Endosulfan, a persistent organic pollutant, is widely used in agriculture as a pesticide. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the blood toxicity of different doses of endosulfan in Wistar rats. The experimental sample was composed of four groups, a control group that did not receive endosulfan and three endosulfan-exposed groups that respectively received 1, 5, or 10 mg/kg/day (doses below LD50), of endosulfan for 21 days. The results showed that endosulfan significantly decreased the prothrombin time (PT) and upregulated the activated coagulation factors VIIa, Xa, and XIIIa; thrombin-antithrombin complex (TAT); and P-selectin. Plasma levels of tissue factor (TF) and malondialdehyde (MDA) were increased in the endosulfan groups. The activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT) and the level of activated coagulation factor IXa showed no obvious changes. Immunohistochemical results showed increased expression of von Willebrand factor (vWF) and the inflammatory cytokine interleukin (IL)-1β in the groups exposed to endosulfan. The pathology and electron microscopy results showed impaired vascular tissue accompanied by the exfoliation of endothelial cells and mitochondrial damage in the endosulfan-exposed groups. In summary, our results suggest that endosulfan damages endothelial cells via oxidative stress and the inflammatory response, leading to the release of TF and vWF into the blood. The TF and vWF in the blood may activate extrinsic coagulation factors and platelets, thus triggering the extrinsic coagulation pathway. There were no obvious effects on the intrinsic coagulation pathway. PMID:26028348

  14. What Is Disseminated Intravascular Coagulation?

    MedlinePlus

    ... bleeding. Clotting factors are proteins needed for normal blood clotting. With fewer platelets and clotting factors in the ... DIC, it helps to understand the body's normal blood clotting process. Your body has a system to control ...

  15. Neprilysin Inhibits Coagulation through Proteolytic Inactivation of Fibrinogen.

    PubMed

    Burrell, Matthew; Henderson, Simon J; Ravnefjord, Anna; Schweikart, Fritz; Fowler, Susan B; Witt, Susanne; Hansson, Kenny M; Webster, Carl I

    2016-01-01

    Neprilysin (NEP) is an endogenous protease that degrades a wide range of peptides including amyloid beta (Aβ), the main pathological component of Alzheimer's disease (AD). We have engineered NEP as a potential therapeutic for AD but found in pre-clinical safety testing that this variant increased prothrombin time (PT) and activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT). The objective of the current study was to investigate the effect of wild type NEP and the engineered variant on coagulation and define the mechanism by which this effect is mediated. PT and APTT were measured in cynomolgus monkeys and rats dosed with a human serum albumin fusion with an engineered variant of NEP (HSA-NEPv) as well as in control plasma spiked with wild type or variant enzyme. The coagulation factor targeted by NEP was determined using in vitro prothrombinase, calibrated automated thrombogram (CAT) and fibrin formation assays as well as N-terminal sequencing of fibrinogen treated with the enzyme. We demonstrate that HSA-NEP wild type and HSA-NEPv unexpectedly impaired coagulation, increasing PT and APTT in plasma samples and abolishing fibrin formation from fibrinogen. This effect was mediated through cleavage of the N-termini of the Aα- and Bβ-chains of fibrinogen thereby significantly impairing initiation of fibrin formation by thrombin. Fibrinogen has therefore been identified for the first time as a substrate for NEP wild type suggesting that the enzyme may have a role in regulating fibrin formation. Reductions in NEP levels observed in AD and cerebral amyloid angiopathy may contribute to neurovascular degeneration observed in these conditions. PMID:27437944

  16. Neprilysin Inhibits Coagulation through Proteolytic Inactivation of Fibrinogen

    PubMed Central

    Burrell, Matthew; Henderson, Simon J.; Ravnefjord, Anna; Schweikart, Fritz; Fowler, Susan B.; Witt, Susanne; Hansson, Kenny M.; Webster, Carl I.

    2016-01-01

    Neprilysin (NEP) is an endogenous protease that degrades a wide range of peptides including amyloid beta (Aβ), the main pathological component of Alzheimer’s disease (AD). We have engineered NEP as a potential therapeutic for AD but found in pre-clinical safety testing that this variant increased prothrombin time (PT) and activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT). The objective of the current study was to investigate the effect of wild type NEP and the engineered variant on coagulation and define the mechanism by which this effect is mediated. PT and APTT were measured in cynomolgus monkeys and rats dosed with a human serum albumin fusion with an engineered variant of NEP (HSA-NEPv) as well as in control plasma spiked with wild type or variant enzyme. The coagulation factor targeted by NEP was determined using in vitro prothrombinase, calibrated automated thrombogram (CAT) and fibrin formation assays as well as N-terminal sequencing of fibrinogen treated with the enzyme. We demonstrate that HSA-NEP wild type and HSA-NEPv unexpectedly impaired coagulation, increasing PT and APTT in plasma samples and abolishing fibrin formation from fibrinogen. This effect was mediated through cleavage of the N-termini of the Aα- and Bβ-chains of fibrinogen thereby significantly impairing initiation of fibrin formation by thrombin. Fibrinogen has therefore been identified for the first time as a substrate for NEP wild type suggesting that the enzyme may have a role in regulating fibrin formation. Reductions in NEP levels observed in AD and cerebral amyloid angiopathy may contribute to neurovascular degeneration observed in these conditions. PMID:27437944

  17. Effect of soybean aging on the quality of soymilk, firmness of tofu and optimum coagulant concentration.

    PubMed

    Kamizake, N K K; Silva, L C P; Prudencio, S H

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated the influence of soybean aging (cultivars Coodetec 214 and BRS 267) on the physicochemical properties of soymilk and tofu. Two aging conditions were adopted: accelerated aging (84% relative humidity and 30 °C, up to 9 months) and natural aging (ambient temperature and relative humidity, up to 18 months) and a control condition (47% relative humidity, -20 °C). Tofu was coagulated with MgSO4. Optimum coagulant concentration (OCC) decreased with increasing coagulation temperature and soybean aging time. OCC showed positive correlation with total solids, protein, ash, Ca, Mg and P contents of soymilk. The products showed, in general, reduced color parameters (L(∗) and h°), proteins, lipids, carbohydrates, ash, Ca, Mg, P and total solids (except in the tofu) and firmness (tofu) with increasing aging time. Tofu yields decreased with accelerated aging time. PMID:26212945

  18. The removal of anionic surfactants from water in coagulation process.

    PubMed

    Kaleta, Jadwiga; Elektorowicz, Maria

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents the results of a laboratory study on the effectiveness of the coagulation process in removing surfactants from water. The application of traditional coagulants (aluminium sulfate and iron chlorides) has not brought satisfactory results, the reduction in anionic surfactant (AS) content reached 7.6% and 10%, respectively. Adding cationic polyelectrolyte (Zetag-50) increased the removal efficiency to 24%. Coagulation using a polyelectrolyte alone proved to be more efficient, the reduction in surfactant content fluctuated at a level of about 50%. Complete surfactant removal was obtained when powdered activated carbon was added 5 minutes before the basic coagulant to the coagulation process. The efficiency of surfactant coagulation also increased after the application of powdered clinoptilolite, but to a smaller degree. Then the removal of AS was found to be improved by dosing powdered clinoptilolite simultaneously or with short delay after the addition of the basic coagulant. PMID:23837351

  19. MF/UF performance with and without coagulation

    SciTech Connect

    Robert, C.; Taylor, J.S.; Reiss, C.R.

    1999-07-01

    Although size-exclusion membrane processes produce superior water quality relative to conventional surface water treatment, fouling can significantly limit the use of these membrane processes. Coagulation can reduce organic, particulate and biological fouling, and was investigated as a pretreatment process to microfiltration (MF) and ultrafiltration (UF) membrane processes. Varying coagulants, coagulant pH and dose and variation of conventional coagulation pretreatment processes including coagulation-sedimentation-filtration (CSF), coagulation-sedimentation (CS) and in-line coagulation (ILC) for varying dose and pH were investigated. The Hillsborough River, a highly organic productive subtropical surface water in Tampa, Florida and the Maumee River, a moderately productive northern US surface water were used as water sources for this study.

  20. N-Acyl Homoserine Lactone-Mediated Quorum Sensing with Special Reference to Use of Quorum Quenching Bacteria in Membrane Biofouling Control

    PubMed Central

    Paul, Diby

    2014-01-01

    Membrane biofouling remains a severe problem to be addressed in wastewater treatment systems affecting reactor performance and economy. The finding that many wastewater bacteria rely on N-acyl homoserine lactone-mediated quorum sensing to synchronize their activities essential for biofilm formations; the quenching bacterial quorum sensing suggests a promising approach for control of membrane biofouling. A variety of quorum quenching compounds of both synthetic and natural origin have been identified and found effective in inhibition of membrane biofouling with much less environmental impact than traditional antimicrobials. Work over the past few years has demonstrated that enzymatic quorum quenching mechanisms are widely conserved in several prokaryotic organisms and can be utilized as a potent tool for inhibition of membrane biofouling. Such naturally occurring bacterial quorum quenching mechanisms also play important roles in microbe-microbe interactions and have been used to develop sustainable nonantibiotic antifouling strategies. Advances in membrane fabrication and bacteria entrapment techniques have allowed the implication of such quorum quenching bacteria for better design of membrane bioreactor with improved antibiofouling efficacies. In view of this, the present paper is designed to review and discuss the recent developments in control of membrane biofouling with special emphasis on quorum quenching bacteria that are applied in membrane bioreactors. PMID:25147787

  1. Coagulation Activation in Children with Sickle Cell Disease Is Associated with Cerebral Small Vessel Vasculopathy

    PubMed Central

    Colombatti, Raffaella; De Bon, Emiliano; Bertomoro, Antonella; Casonato, Alessandra; Pontara, Elena; Omenetto, Elisabetta; Saggiorato, Graziella; Steffan, Agostino; Damian, Tamara; Cella, Giuseppe; Teso, Simone; Manara, Renzo; Rampazzo, Patrizia; Meneghetti, Giorgio; Basso, Giuseppe; Sartori, Maria Teresa; Sainati, Laura

    2013-01-01

    Background Thrombotic complications in Sickle Cell Disease (SCD) arise since infancy, but the role of the coagulation system in children has been poorly explored. To determine its role in the development of clinical complications in childhood we measured coagulation and endothelial parameters in children with SCD at steady state. Methods Markers of thrombin generation, fibrin dissolution and endothelial activation were evaluated in 38 children with SS-Sβ°, 6 with SC disease and 50 age and blood group matched controls. Coagulation variables were correlated with markers of hemolysis and inflammation, with the presence of cerebral and lung vasculopathy and with the frequency of clinical complications. Results SS-Sβ° patients presented higher levels of factor VIII, von Willebrand factor antigen (VWF:Ag) and collagen binding activity, tissue plasminogen activator antigen (t-PA:Ag), D-dimer, p-selectin, prothrombin fragment1+2 (F1+2) and lower ADAMTS-13:activity/VWF:Ag (p<0.05) compared to controls and SC patients. In SS-Sβ° patients coagulation variables correlated positively with markers of inflammation, hemolysis, and negatively with HbF (p<0.05). Patients with cerebral silent infarcts showed significant decrease in t-PA:Ag and ADAMTS-13 Antigen and a tendency toward higher D-dimer, F1+2, TAT compared to patients without them. D-dimer was associated with a six fold increased risk of cerebral silent infarcts. No correlation was found between coagulation activation and large vessel vasculopathy or other clinical events except for decreased t-PA:Ag in patients with tricuspid Rigurgitant Velocity >2.5m/sec. Conclusions SS-Sβ° disease is associated with extensive activation of the coagulation system at steady state since young age. ADAMTS-13 and t-PA:Ag are involved in the development of cerebral silent infarcts. PMID:24205317

  2. The coagulation characteristics of humic acid by using acid-soluble chitosan, water-soluble chitosan, and chitosan coagulant mixtures.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chih-Yu; Wu, Chung-Yu; Chung, Ying-Chien

    2015-01-01

    Chitosan is a potential substitute for traditional aluminium salts in water treatment systems. This study compared the characteristics of humic acid (HA) removal by using acid-soluble chitosan, water-soluble chitosan, and coagulant mixtures of chitosan with aluminium sulphate (alum) or polyaluminium chloride (PACl). In addition, we evaluated their respective coagulation efficiencies at various coagulant concentrations, pH values, turbidities, and hardness levels. Furthermore, we determined the size and settling velocity of flocs formed by these coagulants to identify the major factors affecting HA coagulation. The coagulation efficiency of acid- and water-soluble chitosan for 15 mg/l of HA was 74.4% and 87.5%, respectively. The optimal coagulation range of water-soluble chitosan (9-20 mg/l) was broader than that of acid-soluble chitosan (4-8 mg/l). Notably, acid-soluble chitosan/PACl and water-soluble chitosan/alum coagulant mixtures exhibited a higher coagulation efficiency for HA than for PACl or alum alone. Furthermore, these coagulant mixtures yielded an acceptable floc settling velocity and savings in both installation and operational expenses. Based on these results, we confidently assert that coagulant mixtures with a 1:1 mass ratio of acid-soluble chitosan/PACl and water-soluble chitosan/alum provide a substantially more cost-effective alternative to using chitosan alone for removing HA from water. PMID:25362971

  3. Coagulation of dust particles in a plasma

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horanyi, M.; Goertz, C. K.

    1990-01-01

    The electrostatic charge of small dust grains in a plasma in which the temperature varies in time is discussed, pointing out that secondary electron emission might introduce charge separation. If the sign of the charge on small grains is opposite to that on big ones, enhanced coagulation can occur which will affect the size distribution of grains in a plasma. Two scenarios where this process might be relevant are considered: a hot plasma environment with temperature fluctuations and a cold plasma environment with transient heating events. The importance of the enhanced coagulation is uncertain, because the plasma parameters in grain-producing environments such as a molecular cloud or a protoplanetary disk are not known. It is possible, however, that this process is the most efficient mechanism for the growth of grains in the size range of 0.1-500 microns.

  4. Disseminated Intravascular Coagulation Induced with Leukocyte Procoagulant

    PubMed Central

    Kociba, Gary J.; Griesemer, Richard A.

    1972-01-01

    The procoagulant activity of rabbit peritoneal leukocytes significantly increased when the leukocytes were incubated in suspension cultures at 37 C for 24 hours. Intravenous infusions of Iysates of 232 × 106 rabbit leukocytes which had been incubated in cultures at 37 C for 24 hours produced disseminated intravascular coagulation and vasculitis involving the pulmonary arteries in normal rabbits. Intraaortic infusions of lysates of 230 × 106 similarly incubated leukocytes produced renal thrombosis and renal cortical necrosis in normal rabbits. These observations suggest that the procoagulant of granulocytic leukocytes could play a role in the generalized Shwartzman reaction and other syndromes of disseminated intravascular coagulation. ImagesFig 3Fig 4Fig 5Fig 6Fig 7Fig 1Fig 2 PMID:5086898

  5. Casting uniform ceramics with direct coagulation

    SciTech Connect

    Graule, T.J.; Baader, F.H.; Gauckler, L.J.

    1995-06-01

    Today complex-shaped ceramic parts are mass fabricated by many different methods, two of which are slip casting and injection molding. The selection of the appropriate technique is governed by the geometric shape, the number of pieces to be manufactured, and the chemistry of the ceramic. Both slip casting and injection molding introduce imperfections in the green part, which lead to inhomogeneous microstructures in the sintered parts. A new fabrication method, direct coagulation casting (DCC), may be suitable for the mass production of complex ceramic parts with high strength and reliability. In DCC, an aqueous suspension is coagulated by a change in pH or an increase in ionic strength after casting, producing a rigid green body. The use of DCC can avoid most of the limitations of conventional shaping techniques, and it can be applied to a large variety of ceramic powders, sols, and polymers, alone or in combination.

  6. [Interstitial laser coagulation of benign prostatic hyperplasia].

    PubMed

    Muschter, R; Hessel, S; Hofstetter, A; Keiditsch, E; Rothenberger, K H; Schneede, P; Frank, F

    1993-07-01

    We report on the new method of interstitial laser coagulation for the treatment of benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH). The procedure is based on the interstitial application of Nd:YAG laser irradiation, delivered through a new light guide system. Such light applicators coagulate constant tissue volumes in a homogeneous manner, as proven by in vitro studies in different tissues, including surgically removed prostate adenoma. The extent of the coagulation is determined by laser power and irradiation time. At 5 W, for example, and during a 10-min period, this zone reached a diameter of up to 20 mm. Temperatures generated in the process were over 100 degrees C, as measured by time/space resolution. These results were confirmed by in vivo studies in canine prostates. In the course of 7 weeks, the coagulated areas formed scars with degeneration and fibrosis, accompanied by marked shrinking. Neighbouring organs were not affected. The method was successfully transferred to clinical practice. The application of the light guides to the lateral lobes was performed percutaneously from the perineum under transrectal ultrasound guidance. The median lobe was punctured transurethrally under direct vision. Twenty-seven patients with an average age of 67.7 years were treated between July 1991 and March 1992. At the time of evaluation 15 patients had a follow-up of more than 2 months. They experienced a mean increase of peak flow rate from 6.6 to 15.2 ml/s and a mean decrease of residual volume from 206 to 38 ml. This was accompanied by a marked lessening of symptoms. The average prostate weight decreased from 63 to 44 g. Sexually active patients did not experience retrograde ejaculation.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7690498

  7. Toward an Integrated Linkage Map of Common Bean. III. Mapping Genetic Factors Controlling Host-Bacteria Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Nodari, R. O.; Tsai, S. M.; Guzman, P.; Gilbertson, R. L.; Gepts, P.

    1993-01-01

    Restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP)-based genetic linkage maps allow us to dissect the genetic control of quantitative traits (QT) by locating individual quantitative trait loci (QTLs) on the linkage map and determining their type of gene action and the magnitude of their contribution to the phenotype of the QT. We have performed such an analysis for two traits in common bean, involving interactions between the plant host and bacteria, namely Rhizobium nodule number (NN) and resistance to common bacterial blight (CBB) caused by Xanthomonas campestris pv. phaseoli. Analyses were conducted in the progeny of a cross between BAT93 (fewer nodules; moderately resistant to CBB) and Jalo EEP558 (more nodules; susceptible to CBB). An RFLP-based linkage map for common bean based on 152 markers had previously been derived in the F(2) of this cross. Seventy F(2)-derived F(3) families were inoculated in separate greenhouse experiments with Rhizobium tropici strain UMR1899 or X. c. pv. phaseoli isolate isolate W18. Regression and interval mapping analyses were used to identify genomic regions involved in the genetic control of these traits. These two methods identified the same genomic regions for each trait, with a few exceptions. For each trait, at least four putative QTLs were identified, which accounted for approximately 50% and 75% of the phenotypic variation in NN and CBB resistance, respectively. A chromosome region on linkage group D7 carried factor(s) influencing both traits. In all other cases, the putative QTLs affecting NN and CBB were located in different linkage groups or in the same linkage group, but far apart (more than 50 cM). Both BAT93 and Jalo EEP558 contributed alleles associated with higher NN, whereas CBB resistance was always associated with BAT93 alleles. Further investigations are needed to determine whether the QTLs for NN and CBB on linkage group D7 represent linked genes or the same gene with pleiotropic effects. Identification of the

  8. Electrocoagulation versus chemical coagulation: coagulation/flocculation mechanisms and resulting floc characteristics.

    PubMed

    Harif, Tali; Khai, Moti; Adin, Avner

    2012-06-15

    Electrocoagulation (EC) and chemical coagulation (CC) are employed in water treatment for particle removal. Although both are used for similar purposes, they differ in their dosing method - in EC the coagulant is added by electrolytic oxidation of an appropriate anode material, while in CC dissolution of a chemical coagulant is used. These different methods in fact induce different chemical environments, which should impact coagulation/flocculation mechanisms and subsequent floc formation. Hence, the process implications when choosing which to apply should be significant. This study elucidates differences in coagulation/flocculation mechanisms in EC versus CC and their subsequent effect on floc growth kinetics and structural evolution. A buffered kaolin suspension served as a representative solution that underwent EC and CC by applying aluminum via additive dosing regime in batch mode. In EC an aluminum anode generated the active species while in CC, commercial alum was used. Aluminum equivalent doses were applied, at initial pH values of 5, 6.5 and 8, while samples were taken over pre-determined time intervals, and analyzed for pH, particle size distribution, ζ potential, and structural properties. EC generated fragile flocs, compared to CC, over a wider pH range, at a substantially higher growth rate, that were prone to restructuring and compaction. The results suggest that the flocculation mechanism governing EC in sweep floc conditions is of Diffusion Limited Cluster Aggregation (DCLA) nature, versus a Reaction Limited Cluster Aggregation (RLCA) type in CC. The implications of these differences are discussed. PMID:22525456

  9. A novel coagulation inhibitor from Schistosoma japonicum.

    PubMed

    Ranasinghe, Shiwanthi L; Fischer, Katja; Gobert, Geoffrey N; McManus, Donald P

    2015-12-01

    Little is known about the molecular mechanisms whereby the human blood fluke Schistosoma japonicum is able to survive in the host venous blood system. Protease inhibitors are likely released by the parasite enabling it to avoid attack by host proteolytic enzymes and coagulation factors. Interrogation of the S. japonicum genomic sequence identified a gene, SjKI-1, homologous to that encoding a single domain Kunitz protein (Sjp_0020270) which we expressed in recombinant form in Escherichia coli and purified. SjKI-1 is highly transcribed in adult worms and eggs but its expression was very low in cercariae and schistosomula. In situ immunolocalization with anti-SjKI-1 rabbit antibodies showed the protein was present in eggs trapped in the infected mouse intestinal wall. In functional assays, SjKI-1 inhibited trypsin in the picomolar range and chymotrypsin, neutrophil elastase, FXa and plasma kallikrein in the nanomolar range. Furthermore, SjKI-1, at a concentration of 7·5 µ m, prolonged 2-fold activated partial thromboplastin time of human blood coagulation. We also demonstrate that SjKI-1 has the ability to bind Ca(++). We present, therefore, characterization of the first Kunitz protein from S. japonicum which we show has an anti-coagulant properties. In addition, its inhibition of neutrophil elastase indicates SjKI-1 have an anti-inflammatory role. Having anti-thrombotic properties, SjKI-1 may point the way towards novel treatment for hemostatic disorders. PMID:26463744

  10. Arsenic removal from drinking water during coagulation

    SciTech Connect

    Hering, J.G.; Chen, P.Y.; Wilkie, J.A.; Elimelech, M.

    1997-08-01

    The efficiency of arsenic removal from source waters and artificial freshwaters during coagulation with ferric chloride and alum was examined in bench-scale studies. Arsenic(V) removal by either ferric chloride or alum was relatively insensitive to variations in source water composition below pH 8. At pH 8 and 9, the efficiency of arsenic(V) removal by ferric chloride was decreased in the presence of natural organic matter. The pH range for arsenic(V) removal with alum was more restricted than with ferric chloride. For source waters spiked with 20 {micro}g/L arsenic(V), final dissolved arsenic(V) concentrations in the product water of less than 2 {micro}g/L were achieved with both coagulants at neutral pH. Removal of arsenic(III) from source waters by ferric chloride was both less efficient and more strongly influenced by source water composition than removal of arsenic(V). The presence of sulfate (at pH 4 and 5) and natural organic matter (at pH 4 through 9) adversely affected the efficiency of arsenic(III) removal by ferric chloride. Arsenic(III) could not be removed from source waters by coagulation with alum.

  11. The Effects of Exogenous Administration of Human Coagulation Factors Following Pig-to-Baboon Liver Xenotransplantation.

    PubMed

    Navarro-Alvarez, N; Shah, J A; Zhu, A; Ligocka, J; Yeh, H; Elias, N; Rosales, I; Colvin, R; Cosimi, A B; Markmann, J F; Hertl, M; Sachs, D H; Vagefi, P A

    2016-06-01

    We sought to determine the effects of exogenous administration of human coagulation factors following pig-to-baboon liver xenotransplantation (LXT) using GalT-KO swine donors. After LXT, baboons received no coagulation factors (historical control, n = 1), bolus administration of a human prothrombin concentrate complex (hPCC; 2.5 mL/kg, n = 2), continuous infusion of hPCC (1.0 mL/h, n = 1) or continuous infusion of human recombinant factor VIIa (1 µg/kg per hour, n = 3). The historical control recipient demonstrated persistent thrombocytopenia despite platelet administration after transplant, along with widespread thrombotic microangiopathy (TMA). In contrast, platelet levels were maintained in bolus hPCC recipients; however, these animals quickly developed large-vessel thrombosis and TMA, leading to graft failure with shortened survival. Recipients of continuous coagulation factor administration experienced either stabilization or an increase in their circulating platelets with escalating doses. Furthermore, transfusion requirements were decreased, and hepatic TMA was noticeably absent in recipients of continuous coagulation factor infusions compared with the historical control and bolus hPCC recipients. This effect was most profound with a continuous, escalating dose of factor VIIa. Further studies are warranted because this regimen may allow for prolonged survival following LXT. PMID:26613235

  12. Minimizing residual aluminum concentration in treated water by tailoring properties of polyaluminum coagulants.

    PubMed

    Kimura, Masaoki; Matsui, Yoshihiko; Kondo, Kenta; Ishikawa, Tairyo B; Matsushita, Taku; Shirasaki, Nobutaka

    2013-04-15

    Aluminum coagulants are widely used in water treatment plants to remove turbidity and dissolved substances. However, because high aluminum concentrations in treated water are associated with increased turbidity and because aluminum exerts undeniable human health effects, its concentration should be controlled in water treatment plants, especially in plants that use aluminum coagulants. In this study, the effect of polyaluminum chloride (PACl) coagulant characteristics on dissolved residual aluminum concentrations after coagulation and filtration was investigated. The dissolved residual aluminum concentrations at a given coagulation pH differed among the PACls tested. Very-high-basicity PACl yielded low dissolved residual aluminum concentrations and higher natural organic matter (NOM) removal. The low residual aluminum concentrations were related to the low content of monomeric aluminum (Ala) in the PACl. Polymeric (Alb)/colloidal (Alc) ratio in PACl did not greatly influence residual aluminum concentration. The presence of sulfate in PACl contributed to lower residual aluminum concentration only when coagulation was performed at around pH 6.5 or lower. At a wide pH range (6.5-8.5), residual aluminum concentrations <0.02 mg/L were attained by tailoring PACl properties (Ala percentage ≤0.5%, basicity ≥85%). The dissolved residual aluminum concentrations did not increase with increasing the dosage of high-basicity PACl, but did increase with increasing the dosage of normal-basicity PACl. We inferred that increasing the basicity of PACl afforded lower dissolved residual aluminum concentrations partly because the high-basicity PACls could have a small percentage of Ala, which tends to form soluble aluminum-NOM complexes with molecular weights of 100 kDa-0.45 μm. PMID:23422138

  13. Magnetic Bacteria.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nelson, Jane Bray; Nelson, Jim

    1992-01-01

    Describes the history of Richard Blakemore's discovery of magnetotaxic organisms. Discusses possible reasons why the magnetic response in bacteria developed. Proposes research experiments integrating biology and physics in which students investigate problems using cultures of magnetotaxic organisms. (MDH)

  14. Anaerobic bacteria

    MedlinePlus

    Brook I, Goldstein EJ. Diseases caused by non-spore forming anaerobic bacteria. In: Goldman L, Schafer AI, eds. Goldman's Cecil Medicine . 25th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2015:chap 297. Stedman's Online ...

  15. Protein corona changes mediated by surface modification of amorphous silica nanoparticles suppress acute toxicity and activation of intrinsic coagulation cascade in mice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshida, Tokuyuki; Yoshioka, Yasuo; Morishita, Yuki; Aoyama, Michihiko; Tochigi, Saeko; Hirai, Toshiro; Tanaka, Kota; Nagano, Kazuya; Kamada, Haruhiko; Tsunoda, Shin-ichi; Nabeshi, Hiromi; Yoshikawa, Tomoaki; Higashisaka, Kazuma; Tsutsumi, Yasuo

    2015-06-01

    Recently, nanomaterial-mediated biological effects have been shown to be governed by the interaction of nanomaterials with some kinds of proteins in biological fluids, and the physical characteristics of the nanomaterials determine the extent and type of their interactions with proteins. Here, we examined the relationships between the surface properties of amorphous silica nanoparticles with diameters of 70 nm (nSP70), their interactions with some proteins in biological fluids, and their toxicity in mice after intravenous administration. The surface modification of nSP70 with amino groups (nSP70-N) prevented acute lethality and abnormal activation of the coagulation cascade found in the nSP70-treated group of mice. Since our previous study showed that coagulation factor XII played a role in the nSP70-mediated abnormal activation of the coagulation cascade, we examined the interaction of nSP70 and nSP70-N with coagulation factor XII. Coagulation factor XII bonded to the surface of nSP70 to a greater extent than that observed for nSP70-N, and consequently more activation of coagulation factor XII was observed for nSP70 than for nSP70-N. Collectively, our results suggest that controlling the interaction of nSP70 with blood coagulation factor XII by modifying the surface properties would help to inhibit the nSP70-mediated abnormal activation of the blood coagulation cascade.

  16. Fates of Microcystis aeruginosa Cells and Associated Microcystins in Sediment and the Effect of Coagulation Process on Them

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xiaoguo; Xiang, Huiyi; Hu, Yue; Zhang, Yang; Ouyang, Liao; Gao, Meiying

    2013-01-01

    During toxic Microcystis aeruginosa blooms, large amounts of cells can enter sediment through natural settlement, and coagulation treatment used to control water blooms can enhance the accumulation of cells. However, the current understanding of the fates of these cells and associated microcystins (MCs), as well as the effect of coagulation treatment on these factors, is limited. The results of the present study show that Microcystis aeruginosa cells in sediment were steadily decomposed under experimental conditions, and that they completely disappeared within 28 days. The major MCs released from settled cells were immediately degraded in sediment, and microbial degradation may be the main mechanism involved in this process. Coagulation treatment with PAC (polyaluminium chloride) + sepiolite can efficiently remove Microcystis aeruginosa cells from the water column and prevent their re-invasion. Furthermore, coagulation treatment with PAC + sepiolite had no significant effect on the release and decomposition of MCs and, thus, will not enhance the MCs pollution. However, coagulation treatment can accelerate the nutrient cycle by enhancing the settlement of cells. More attention should be paid to the effect on nutrient cycle when coagulation treatment is used for restoration of aquatic ecosystems. PMID:24380974

  17. Effects of different antibiotic classes on airway bacteria in stable COPD using culture and molecular techniques: a randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Brill, Simon E; Law, Martin; El-Emir, Ethaar; Allinson, James P; James, Phillip; Maddox, Victoria; Donaldson, Gavin C; McHugh, Timothy D; Cookson, William O; Moffatt, Miriam F; Nazareth, Irwin; Hurst, John R; Calverley, Peter M A; Sweeting, Michael J; Wedzicha, Jadwiga A

    2015-01-01

    Background Long-term antibiotic therapy is used to prevent exacerbations of COPD but there is uncertainty over whether this reduces airway bacteria. The optimum antibiotic choice remains unknown. We conducted an exploratory trial in stable patients with COPD comparing three antibiotic regimens against placebo. Methods This was a single-centre, single-blind, randomised placebo-controlled trial. Patients aged ≥45 years with COPD, FEV1<80% predicted and chronic productive cough were randomised to receive either moxifloxacin 400 mg daily for 5 days every 4 weeks, doxycycline 100 mg/day, azithromycin 250 mg 3 times a week or one placebo tablet daily for 13 weeks. The primary outcome was the change in total cultured bacterial load in sputum from baseline; secondary outcomes included bacterial load by 16S quantitative PCR (qPCR), sputum inflammation and antibiotic resistance. Results 99 patients were randomised; 86 completed follow-up, were able to expectorate sputum and were analysed. After adjustment, there was a non-significant reduction in bacterial load of 0.42 log10 cfu/mL (95% CI −0.08 to 0.91, p=0.10) with moxifloxacin, 0.11 (−0.33 to 0.55, p=0.62) with doxycycline and 0.08 (−0.38 to 0.54, p=0.73) with azithromycin from placebo, respectively. There were also no significant changes in bacterial load measured by 16S qPCR or in airway inflammation. More treatment-related adverse events occurred with moxifloxacin. Of note, mean inhibitory concentrations of cultured isolates increased by at least three times over placebo in all treatment arms. Conclusions Total airway bacterial load did not decrease significantly after 3 months of antibiotic therapy. Large increases in antibiotic resistance were seen in all treatment groups and this has important implications for future studies. Trial registration number clinicaltrials.gov (NCT01398072). PMID:26179246

  18. Evaluation of the contribution of isolation precautions in prevention and control of multi-resistant bacteria in a teaching hospital.

    PubMed

    Eveillard, M; Eb, F; Tramier, B; Schmit, J L; Lescure, F X; Biendo, M; Canarelli, B; Daoudi, F; Laurans, G; Rousseau, F; Thomas, D

    2001-02-01

    From February 1999 to January 2000, a control programme to prevent the spread multi-resistant bacteria (MRB) was implemented in a French teaching hospital. This programme focused on methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and Enterobacteriaceae producing extended-spectrum beta-lactamases (ESBL), and was based on the application of barrier precautions (washing hands with antiseptic soaps, wearing disposable gloves and gowns, identifying MRB carriers). No changes in antibiotic policy occurred during the year. Our aim was to conduct an evaluation of this programme by measuring incidence rates. Concurrently, the effect of barrier precautions was estimated in an indirect way, by documenting the availability of barrier precautions in MRB carriers' rooms and by analysing the monthly correlation between the supply of such material and the theoretical cumulated length of MRB carriers' isolation in six randomized wards. All MRB isolated in hospitalized patients were recorded, and differentiated between acquisition in our hospital or from elsewhere. For the analysis of trends, the year was divided in three periods of four months. Over the year, the global MRB incidence was 1.26 per 1000 patient-days (PD) [95% confidence interval (95%CI)=1.16-1.36]. The MRSA incidence was 0.89 per 1000 PD (95%CI=0.81- 0.97) and the ESBL incidence was 0.38 per 1000 PD (95% CI=0.33-0.43). The MRB incidence decreased significantly in all types of specialties except for surgical wards. The incidence decreased by 17.9% for MRSA, 54.9% for ESBL and 34.8% for both MRB. Concurrently, the proportion of strains acquired in our hospital decreased for MRSA (P for trend > or = 0.05) and ESBL (P for trend > or = 0.01), whereas the incidence of imported strains increased slightly. The proportion of multiresistant strains in S. aureus (36.8%) and Enterobacter aerogenes (37.0%) remained similar throughout the year. Thus, the decrease of the incidence concerned both resistant and susceptible strains

  19. Differential activity of autochthonous bacteria in controlling drought stress in native Lavandula and Salvia plants species under drought conditions in natural arid soil.

    PubMed

    Armada, Elisabeth; Roldán, Antonio; Azcon, Rosario

    2014-02-01

    The effectiveness of autochthonous plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria was studied in Lavandula dentata and Salvia officinalis growing in a natural arid Mediterranean soil under drought conditions. These bacteria identified as Bacillus megaterium (Bm), Enterobacter sp. (E), Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt), and Bacillus sp. (Bsp). Each bacteria has different potential to meliorate water limitation and alleviating drought stress in these two plant species. B. thuringiensis promoted growth and drought avoidance in Lavandula by increasing K content, by depressing stomatal conductance, and it controlled shoot proline accumulation. This bacterial effect on increasing drought tolerance was related to the decrease of glutathione reductase (GR) and ascorbate peroxidase (APX) that resulted sensitive indexes of lower cellular oxidative damage involved in the adaptative drought response in B. thuringiensis-inoculated Lavandula plants. In contrast, in Salvia, having intrinsic lower shoot/root ratio, higher stomatal conductance and lower APX and GR activities than Lavandula, the bacterial effects on nutritional, physiological and antioxidant enzymatic systems were lower. The benefit of bacteria depended on intrinsic stress tolerance of plant involved. Lavadula demonstrated a greater benefit than Salvia to control drought stress when inoculated with B. thuringiensis. The bacterial drought tolerance assessed as survival, proline, and indolacetic acid production showed the potential of this bacteria to help plants to grow under drought conditions. B. thuringiensis may be used for Lavandula plant establishment in arid environments. Particular characteristic of the plant species as low shoot/root ratio and high stomatal conductance are important factors controlling the bacterial effectiveness improving nutritional, physiological, and metabolic plant activities. PMID:24337805

  20. Novel pod for chlorine dioxide generation and delivery to control aerobic bacteria on the inner surface of floor drains

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Floor drains in poultry processing and further processing plants are a harborage site for bacteria both free swimming and in biofilms. This population can include Listeria monocytogenes which has been shown to have potential for airborne spreading from mishandled open drains. Chlorine dioxide (ClO...

  1. Control of foodborne pathogens and soft-rot bacteria on bell pepper by three strains of bacterial antagonists

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Forty-two representative strains of native bacteria associated with fresh peeled baby carrots were isolated and characterized. Two of them identified as Pseudomonas fluorescens AG3A (Pf AG3A) and Bacillus YD1 were evaluated in conjunction with another known antagonist, P. fluorescens 2-79 (Pf 2-79)...

  2. Isolation of endophytic endospore-forming bacteria from Theobroma cacao as potential biological control agents of cacao dieseases

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Endospore-forming bacterial endophytes were isolated from Theobroma cacao to access the present and diversity of endospore-forming bacteria in cacao. Cacao leaves, pods, branches, and flower cushions were removed from cacao trees escaping disease on INIAP’s Tropical Research Station in Pichilingue, ...

  3. Inactivation of biofilm bacteria.

    PubMed Central

    LeChevallier, M W; Cawthon, C D; Lee, R G

    1988-01-01

    The current project was developed to examine inactivation of biofilm bacteria and to characterize the interaction of biocides with pipe surfaces. Unattached bacteria were quite susceptible to the variety of disinfectants tested. Viable bacterial counts were reduced 99% by exposure to 0.08 mg of hypochlorous acid (pH 7.0) per liter (1 to 2 degrees C) for 1 min. For monochloramine, 94 mg/liter was required to kill 99% of the bacteria within 1 min. These results were consistent with those found by other investigators. Biofilm bacteria grown on the surfaces of granular activated carbon particles, metal coupons, or glass microscope slides were 150 to more than 3,000 times more resistant to hypochlorous acid (free chlorine, pH 7.0) than were unattached cells. In contrast, resistance of biofilm bacteria to monochloramine disinfection ranged from 2- to 100-fold more than that of unattached cells. The results suggested that, relative to inactivation of unattached bacteria, monochloramine was better able to penetrate and kill biofilm bacteria than free chlorine. For free chlorine, the data indicated that transport of the disinfectant into the biofilm was a major rate-limiting factor. Because of this phenomenon, increasing the level of free chlorine did not increase disinfection efficiency. Experiments where equal weights of disinfectants were used suggested that the greater penetrating power of monochloramine compensated for its limited disinfection activity. These studies showed that monochloramine was as effective as free chlorine for inactivation of biofilm bacteria. The research provides important insights into strategies for control of biofilm bacteria. Images PMID:2849380

  4. Is ingestion of milk-associated bacteria by premature infants fed raw human milk controlled by routine bacteriologic screening?

    PubMed Central

    Law, B J; Urias, B A; Lertzman, J; Robson, D; Romance, L

    1989-01-01

    Expressed human milk is often used to feed premature infants. Raw milk contains bacteria which may be a source of infection. Milk banks have developed screening programs which combine periodic quantitative milk cultures with arbitrary rules specifying limits of bacterial concentration. It is unknown whether such programs succeed in preventing infants from being fed milk containing bacteria. At the Health Sciences Centre (Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada), milk is screened once weekly. When a woman's milk is found to have excess bacteria, it is discarded only if she is an unrelated donor (as opposed to an infant's mother). To assess the effectiveness of this screening program, we determined the frequency at which infants fed raw human milk were exposed to milk-associated bacteria and compared the bacterial contents of donor and maternal milk. From February 1986 to April 1987, all human milk fed to 98 premature infants during the first 2 weeks of feeding (n = 10,128 feeds) was cultured quantitatively. Among study infants, 100% were exposed at least once to coagulase-negative staphylococci, 41% were exposed to Staphylococcus aureus, and 64% were exposed to gram-negative bacilli. The proportions of feeds containing bacteria and the quantities (log10 CFU [mean +/- standard deviation]) ingested per positive feed were: 39% and 5.9 +/- 0.5 for coagulase-negative staphylococci; 2.4% and 5.1 +/- 1.0 for S. aureus; and 5.2% and 4.8 +/- 1.1 for gram-negative bacilli. There were no adverse events attributable to ingestion of milk-associated bacteria. Milk coagulase-negative staphylococcal isolates were multiply antibiotic susceptible, whereas infant isolates were antibiotic resistant. Donor milk was significantly less likely than maternal milk to contain coagulase-negative staphylococcal species in any quantity (40 versus 93% of samples, respectively [P < 0.001]) or in concentrations exceeding 10(8) CFU/liter (3 versus 27% of samples, respectively [P < 0.0001]). There was no

  5. Decrease in antithrombin III and prothrombin serum levels contribute to coagulation disorders during leptospirosis.

    PubMed

    Fernandes, Luis G V; Filho, Antonio F S; Souza, Gisele O; Vasconcellos, Silvio A; Romero, Eliete C; Nascimento, Ana L T O

    2016-08-01

    Pathogenic bacteria of the genus Leptospira are the causative agent of leptospirosis, an emergent infectious disease that affects humans and animals worldwide. Severe forms of the disease in humans include jaundice, multiple organ failure and intense haemorrhage. Up to now, mechanisms associated with the haemorrhage foci are poorly understood. We report in this work that, despite the low levels of antithrombin III in convalescent human serum samples, virulent, culture-attenuated and saprophyte strains of Leptospira are unable to bind and/or degrade this thrombin inhibitor, suggesting an indirect mechanism of pathogenesis. Lower levels of prothrombin were found in serum samples at the onset and convalescent phase of the disease when compared to normal human sera. The concomitant decreased levels of antithrombin III and prothrombin suggest a process of stimulated coagulation, which is corroborated by the increase of prothrombin fragment F1+2 in the serum samples. Data obtained with hamsters experimentally infected with virulent Leptospira interrogans serovars Kennewicki and Canicola strongly point out that haemorrhage is correlated with decreased levels of thrombin inhibitors and prothrombin. Activated coagulation might lead to an overconsumption of coagulation factors ultimately leading to bleeding and organ failure. PMID:27260249

  6. Coagulation of Dust Particles in Argon Plasma of RF Discharge

    SciTech Connect

    Mankelevich, Yu. A.; Olevanov, M. A.; Pal, A. F.; Rakhimova, T. V.; Ryabinkin, A. N.; Serov, A. O.; Filippov, A. V.

    2008-09-07

    The experiments on coagulation of poly-disperse particles with various size distributions injected into the argon plasma of the magnetron radio-frequency discharge are discussed. The experiments were carried out under the conditions similar to those using dusty plasma for technology applications. Within the created theory the threshold behavior of the coagulation process was explained for the first time, the estimation of the critical particle size for onset of a fast coagulation was made, and the analytical calculation of the coagulation rate of dust particles was performed. The proposed coagulation mechanism makes it possible to describe the typical features of coagulation processes observed in experiments and to explain the effects of attraction and coalescence of highly negatively charged microns size particles.

  7. Application of the precipitation-charge neutralization model of coagulation

    SciTech Connect

    Dentel, S.K.

    1988-07-01

    A quantitative model is considered that develops predictions of suspension stability on the basis of electrokinetic characteristics of colloid material prior to and following coagulation. The model is applied in this paper to coagulation with aluminum sulfate and other aluminum salts. The effect of increasing particle surface area on coagulation is first modeled for a system containing particulate silica, but of varying size and concentration. Experimental results show a correlation of turbidity removal to attainment of near neutral zeta potential in zone 2 coagulation, and the calibrated model successfully predicts this zone. The model is then used to describe the coagulation of waters containing humic substances by considering them as small colloids with a substantial contribution to surface area in the system. Finally, it is shown that the model can be employed to describe the performance of polyaluminum coagulants as well.

  8. A comprehensive model for the humoral coagulation network in humans.

    PubMed

    Wajima, T; Isbister, G K; Duffull, S B

    2009-09-01

    Coagulation is an important process in hemostasis and comprises a complicated interaction of multiple enzymes and proteins. We have developed a mechanistic quantitative model of the coagulation network. The model accurately describes the time courses of coagulation factors following in vivo activation as well as in vitro blood coagulation tests of prothrombin time (PT, often reported as international normalized ratio (INR)) and activated partial thromboplastin time (aPTT). The model predicts the concentration-time and time-effect profiles of warfarin, heparins, and vitamin K in humans. The model can be applied to predict the time courses of coagulation kinetics in clinical situations (e.g., hemophilia) and for biomarker identification during drug development. The model developed in this study is the first quantitative description of the comprehensive coagulation network. PMID:19516255

  9. [Progress in research of the blood coagulation system].

    PubMed

    Urano, H; Karasaki, Y; Shirahata, A

    1999-09-01

    Blood coagulation is an amplification system consisting of reactions between enzymes and zymogens. It has been illustrated as a cascade model. However, the exact mechanism by which haemostasis is achieved under physiological conditions remains to be clarified. The solving of structure-function relation of each coagulation factor, analysis of the enzymological characteristics of each reaction, analysis of the regulation mechanism of the reactions and identification of novel factors involved in coagulation reactions contribute to the understanding of this complex system. Based on these findings, some new conceptions of blood coagulation are proposed. In the model introduced in this review, the extrinsic pathway and the intrinsic pathway of the 'classical' cascade model of the blood coagulation system could not be separated, and the suppression of fibrinolysis by TAFI (thrombin activatable fibrinolysis inhibitor) during coagulation reactions is thought to be a critical process for effective haemostasis. PMID:10589463

  10. Comparison of coagulation behavior and floc structure characteristic of different polyferric-cationic polymer dual-coagulants in humic acid solution.

    PubMed

    Wei, Jincheng; Gao, Baoyu; Yue, Qinyan; Wang, Yan; Li, Weiwei; Zhu, Xiaobiao

    2009-02-01

    Three polyferric-cationic polymer dual-coagulants were comparatively evaluated in terms of coagulation behavior and floc structure characteristic in the coagulation of humic acid (HA) solution. The first dual-coagulant, PFC-PDADMAC, was prepared by premixing of polyferric chloride (PFC) and polydiallyldimethylammonium (PDADMAC) before dosing. The other two were achieved by dosing PFC and PDADMAC in different order. For the given neutral condition, all three dual-coagulants gave similar HA removal before reaching optimal dosage. The strongest charge neutralization and narrowest effective coagulation dosage range were obtained when PFC was dosed firstly. While the weakest charge neutralization and the broadest effective coagulation dosage were obtained when PDADMAC was used as the primary coagulant. The HA removal of all three dual-coagulants was slightly pH dependent for optimum coagulant doses. Fe(III) hydrolysis species distributions of the dual-coagulants in coagulation process were measured by ferron method. PFC-PDADMAC gave the highest content of active Fe(III) coagulating species which is responsible for the coagulation performance of ferric coagulant. The evolution of floc size and floc fractal dimension (Df) in coagulation process was measured under optimum dose and neutral condition by laser diffraction instrument and small-angle laser light scattering (SALLS), respectively. All three dual-coagulants gave similar final floc size but different floc growth rate and floc structure. Both the growth rate and Df were in the same order: PFC dosed firstly>PDADMAC dosed firstly>PFC-PDADMAC. PMID:19046756

  11. Improving the efficiency of clarifiers for coagulation treatment of water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vinogradov, V. N.; Smirnov, B. A.; Zhadan, A. V.; Avan, V. K.

    2010-08-01

    Technological and design possibilities of improving clarifiers for coagulation treatment of water are considered. The results obtained from implementing these possibilities in real devices are presented.

  12. Sulfato/thiosulfato reducing bacteria characterization by FT-IR spectroscopy: a new approach to biocorrosion control.

    PubMed

    Rubio, Celine; Ott, Christelle; Amiel, Caroline; Dupont-Moral, Isabelle; Travert, Josette; Mariey, Laurence

    2006-03-01

    Sulfato and Thiosulfato Reducing Bacteria (SRB, TRB) can induce corrosion process on steel immersed in seawater. This phenomenon, called biocorrosion, costs approximatively 5 billion euros in France each year. We provide the first evidence that Fourier Transformed InfraRed (FTIR) spectroscopy is a competitive technique to evaluate the sulfurogen flora involved in biocorrosion in comparison with time consuming classical identification methods or PCR analyses. A great discrimination was obtained between SRB, TRB and some contamination bacteria known to be present in seawater and seem to be able to reduce sulfate under particular conditions. Moreover, this preliminary study demonstrates that FTIR spectroscopic and genotypic results present a good correlation (these results are confirmed by other data obtained before or later, data not shown here). The advantages gained by FTIR spectroscopy are to give information on strain phenotype and bacterial metabolism which are of great importance in corrosion processes. PMID:16176842

  13. Study on coagulation property of metal-polysilicate coagulants in low turbidity water treatment.

    PubMed

    Yang, Hai-yan; Cui, Fu-yi; Zhao, Qing-liang; Ma, Chao

    2004-06-01

    In order to remove the low turbidity present in surface water, a novel metal-polysilicate coagulant was used to treat the raw water taken from Tanjiang River in Guangdong Province. This study on the effects of Al/Fe molar ratio on the performance of a complex compound formed by polysilicic acid, aluminium and ferric salt (PAFS) showed that PAFS with Al/Fe ratio of 10:3 seemed to have the best coagulation performance in removing turbidity and color. Experimental results showed that under the conditions of polymerization time of 15 d, sedimentation time of 12 min, and pH of 6-8, PAFS with Al/Fe molar ratio of 10:3 had the best coagulation efficiency and lowest residual Al concentration. The turbidity decreased from 23.8 NTU to 3.23 NTU and the residual Al concentration was only 0.165 mg/L in the product water. It could be speculated that colloidal impurities and particulate Al were removed by adsorption bridging and electrical neutralization of long chain inorganic polymer coagulants. PMID:15101109

  14. Research on orthogonal coagulated setting and coagulation-flotation test of tannery wastewater.

    PubMed

    Xu, Zhi; Fei, Qingzhi; Zhong, Weilei

    2009-01-01

    The treatment of the tannery wastewater was studied by orthogonal test of beaker coagulation. FeSO4 and alkaline sodium aluminum waste liquid contained NaOH-NaAlO2 were used as flocculants, with polyacrylamide (PAM) as coagulation. When the dosage of FeSO4 was 2.66 g/L (pH 5.5), the wastewater pH value of adding alkaline sodium aluminum waste liquid was 8, and the dosage of PAM was 1 mg/L, the optimum result was obtained. A test device of co-coagulation flotation reactor was designed on the basis of the conglutination of bubble, flocci and turbulent flotation theory. In the device, the gas-1iuid mixed pump substituted the air compressor and the pressure releaser. The combination of coagulation and air flotation were realized. The pump is a new kind of air saturation equipment. The air compressor and the pressure releaser were used commonly in traditional air flotation device. The results of treatment of the tannery wastewater showed a stable state, when the operating pressure was 5×10(5) Pa, circumfluence ratio was 225%. PMID:25084418

  15. Coagulation disorders and their cutaneous presentations: Pathophysiology.

    PubMed

    Chang, Yunyoung; Dabiri, Ganary; Damstetter, Elizabeth; Baiyee Ebot, Emily; Powers, Jennifer Gloeckner; Phillips, Tania

    2016-05-01

    Hypercoagulable states are inherited or acquired predispositions to venous or arterial thromboses that are best understood in the context of the coagulation cascade. Dermatologists can play a critical role in diagnosing and treating patients with hypercoagulable states because cutaneous symptoms may be a presenting manifestation, thereby reducing morbidity and mortality related to these conditions. This review focuses on the epidemiology and pathophysiology of hypercoagulable states, while the accompanying article iterates the basic clinical features, diagnostic testing, and management of patients who have these conditions. PMID:27085225

  16. Platelet and coagulation factors in proliferative diabetic retinopathy.

    PubMed Central

    Borsey, D Q; Prowse, C V; Gray, R S; Dawes, J; James, K; Elton, R A; Clarke, B F

    1984-01-01

    Plasma beta-thromboglobulin, platelet factor 4, fibrinogen, fibrinopeptide A, antithrombin III, factor VIII related antigen, alpha 2-macroglobulin, platelet count, and total glycosylated haemoglobin were measured in three well matched groups of subjects: non-diabetic controls, diabetics without retinopathy, and diabetics with proliferative retinopathy. beta-thromboglobulin and platelet factor 4 concentrations were significantly higher in the diabetics with retinopathy than in the controls and platelet factor 4 was also increased in the diabetics without retinopathy compared with controls. Fibrinogen concentration was raised in diabetics without retinopathy compared with controls, diabetics with retinopathy compared with controls, and diabetics with retinopathy compared with those without. Fibrinopeptide A concentration did not differ significantly between groups. Antithrombin III levels were increased in diabetics with retinopathy compared with controls, and in diabetics with retinopathy compared with those without. Factor VIII related antigen values were higher in both the diabetic groups when compared with the controls. Fibrinopeptide A concentration correlated with both beta-thromboglobulin and platelet factor 4 in each of the three groups. Haemostatic abnormalities in diabetes have been shown, although a hypercoagulable state has not been confirmed. These changes in platelet and coagulation function may be secondary to the development of microvascular disease and their role in the pathogenesis of retinopathy remains uncertain. PMID:6202721

  17. Methanotrophic bacteria.

    PubMed Central

    Hanson, R S; Hanson, T E

    1996-01-01

    Methane-utilizing bacteria (methanotrophs) are a diverse group of gram-negative bacteria that are related to other members of the Proteobacteria. These bacteria are classified into three groups based on the pathways used for assimilation of formaldehyde, the major source of cell carbon, and other physiological and morphological features. The type I and type X methanotrophs are found within the gamma subdivision of the Proteobacteria and employ the ribulose monophosphate pathway for formaldehyde assimilation, whereas type II methanotrophs, which employ the serine pathway for formaldehyde assimilation, form a coherent cluster within the beta subdivision of the Proteobacteria. Methanotrophic bacteria are ubiquitous. The growth of type II bacteria appears to be favored in environments that contain relatively high levels of methane, low levels of dissolved oxygen, and limiting concentrations of combined nitrogen and/or copper. Type I methanotrophs appear to be dominant in environments in which methane is limiting and combined nitrogen and copper levels are relatively high. These bacteria serve as biofilters for the oxidation of methane produced in anaerobic environments, and when oxygen is present in soils, atmospheric methane is oxidized. Their activities in nature are greatly influenced by agricultural practices and other human activities. Recent evidence indicates that naturally occurring, uncultured methanotrophs represent new genera. Methanotrophs that are capable of oxidizing methane at atmospheric levels exhibit methane oxidation kinetics different from those of methanotrophs available in pure cultures. A limited number of methanotrophs have the genetic capacity to synthesize a soluble methane monooxygenase which catalyzes the rapid oxidation of environmental pollutants including trichloroethylene. PMID:8801441

  18. Preparation and coagulation efficiency of polyaluminium ferric silicate chloride composite coagulant from wastewater of high-purity graphite production.

    PubMed

    Niu, Xiaoxia; Li, Xili; Zhao, Jihong; Ren, Yigang; Yang, Yanqin

    2011-01-01

    The aim of the present work was to produce a polyaluminium ferric silicate chloride (PAFSiC) coagulant from acidic and alkaline wastewater of purifying graphite by roasting, and subsequently to evaluate coagulation efficiency of the reagent by treating surface water from the Yellow River as well as municipal wastewater in comparison with the conventional coagulant polyaluminium chloride (PAC). The PAFSiC coagulant was prepared by co-polymerization. The effects of (Al+Fe)/Si molar ratio, OH/(Al+Fe) molar ratio (i.e., y value), coagulant dosage and pH value of test suspension on the coagulation behavior of FAFSiC and the stability of the PAFSiC were also examined. Results showed that PAFSiC performed more efficiently than PAC in removing turbidity, chemical oxygen demand (COD), and total phosphate (TP). The PAFSiC with a y value of 2.0 and (Al+Fe)/Si ratio of 5 (PAFSiC 2.0/5) showed excellent coagulation effect for both turbidity and COD, while PAFSiC 1.0/5 was the best for TP. The optimum coagulation pH range of PAFSiC 2.0/5 was 5.0-9.0, slightly wider than that of PAC (6.0-8.0). The process can be easily incorporated into high-purity graphite production plants, thereby reducing wastewater pollution and producing a valuable coagulant. PMID:22125904

  19. Polyphenoloxidase Silencing Affects Latex Coagulation in Taraxacum Species1[W

    PubMed Central

    Wahler, Daniela; Gronover, Christian Schulze; Richter, Carolin; Foucu, Florence; Twyman, Richard M.; Moerschbacher, Bruno M.; Fischer, Rainer; Muth, Jost; Prüfer, Dirk

    2009-01-01

    Latex is the milky sap that is found in many different plants. It is produced by specialized cells known as laticifers and can comprise a mixture of proteins, carbohydrates, oils, secondary metabolites, and rubber that may help to prevent herbivory and protect wound sites against infection. The wound-induced browning of latex suggests that it contains one or more phenol-oxidizing enzymes. Here, we present a comprehensive analysis of the major latex proteins from two dandelion species, Taraxacum officinale and Taraxacum kok-saghyz, and enzymatic studies showing that polyphenoloxidase (PPO) is responsible for latex browning. Electrophoretic analysis and amino-terminal sequencing of the most abundant proteins in the aqueous latex fraction revealed the presence of three PPO-related proteins generated by the proteolytic cleavage of a single precursor (pre-PPO). The laticifer-specific pre-PPO protein contains a transit peptide that can target reporter proteins into chloroplasts when constitutively expressed in dandelion protoplasts, perhaps indicating the presence of structures similar to plastids in laticifers, which lack genuine chloroplasts. Silencing the PPO gene by constitutive RNA interference in transgenic plants reduced PPO activity compared with wild-type controls, allowing T. kok-saghyz RNA interference lines to expel four to five times more latex than controls. Latex fluidity analysis in silenced plants showed a strong correlation between residual PPO activity and the coagulation rate, indicating that laticifer-specific PPO plays a major role in latex coagulation and wound sealing in dandelions. In contrast, very little PPO activity is found in the latex of the rubber tree Hevea brasiliensis, suggesting functional divergence of latex proteins during plant evolution. PMID:19605551

  20. A new approach using coagulation rate constant for evaluation of turbidity removal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Sameraiy, Mukheled

    2015-09-01

    Coagulation-flocculation-sedimentation processes for treating three levels of bentonite synthetic turbid water using date seeds (DS) and alum (A) coagulants were investigated in the previous research work. In the current research, the same experimental results were used to adopt a new approach on a basis of using coagulation rate constant as an investigating parameter to identify optimum doses of these coagulants. Moreover, the performance of these coagulants to meet (WHO) turbidity standard was assessed by introducing a new evaluating criterion in terms of critical coagulation rate constant (kc). Coagulation rate constants (k2) were mathematically calculated in second order form of coagulation process for each coagulant. The maximum (k2) values corresponded to doses, which were obviously to be considered as optimum doses. The proposed criterion to assess the performance of coagulation process of these coagulants was based on the mathematical representation of (WHO) turbidity guidelines in second order form of coagulation process stated that (k2) for each coagulant should be ≥ (kc) for each level of synthetic turbid water. For all tested turbid water, DS coagulant could not satisfy it. While, A coagulant could satisfy it. The results obtained in the present research are exactly in agreement with the previous published results in terms of finding optimum doses for each coagulant and assessing their performances. On the whole, it is recommended considering coagulation rate constant to be a new approach as an indicator for investigating optimum doses and critical coagulation rate constant to be a new evaluating criterion to assess coagulants' performance.

  1. Effect of Crocus sativus L. (saffron) on coagulation and anticoagulation systems in healthy volunteers.

    PubMed

    Ayatollahi, Hossein; Javan, Atefeh Ordoei; Khajedaluee, Mohammad; Shahroodian, Masood; Hosseinzadeh, Hossein

    2014-04-01

    Saffron showed some effects on blood coagulation and platelet aggregation in in vitro and in vivo studies. In a clinical trial with a limited number volunteers, saffron tablets influenced on bleeding time. In this study, the effect of saffron on plasma level of fibrinogen, factor VII (as coagulant agent), C and S protein (as anti-coagulant agent), PT and PTT in a larger sample size was evaluated. The study was a double-blind, placebo-controlled study consisting of 1 week treatment with 200 mg and 400 mg saffron tablets. Sixty healthy volunteers (age range 20-50 years) were selected for the study. The volunteers were divided into three groups of 20 each. Group 1 received placebo; Groups 2 and 3 received 200 mg and 400 mg saffron tablets, respectively, for 7 days (1 tablet per day). Before and after 7 days treatment and also 1 month after that, blood samples were taken. The plasma levels of fibrinogen, factor VII, C and S protein, PT and PTT were evaluated. Statistical analysis showed no difference between groups for any of evaluated factors. This study rejected any effect of saffron with dose of 200 and 400 mg for 1 week on coagulant and anticoagulant system. PMID:23733488

  2. Single-Species Aerosol Coagulation and Deposition with Arbitrary Size Resolution.

    SciTech Connect

    SAJO, ERNO

    2012-07-31

    Version 00 SAEROSA solves the dynamic aerosol coagulation and deposition problem with arbitrary computational precision under a variety of conditions. The code includes numerous user-selectable coagulation kernels, alone or in combinations, and permits an arbitrary initial size distribution. Many parameter combinations and what-if scenarios under user control are possible. The output gives the particle size distribution suspended in the carrier fluid initially and after the desired aerosol aging time in terms of both differential and integral aerosol volume concentrations. An auxiliary routine designed for the Mac OSX environment provides plotting capability. The output can be further processed by e.g., spreadsheets. The code has been benchmarked against three computer models, including MAEROS, and analytical models with excellent agreement. The test cases also included scenarios where previously published computational coagulation models lack capabilities or exhibit numerical instabilities. These included narrow, delta function, and non-lognormal initial size distributions, and further conditions, such as the presence of simultaneous coagulation mechanisms, including electrostatic effects, spanning multiple flow-regimes.

  3. Single-Species Aerosol Coagulation and Deposition with Arbitrary Size Resolution.

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2012-07-31

    Version 00 SAEROSA solves the dynamic aerosol coagulation and deposition problem with arbitrary computational precision under a variety of conditions. The code includes numerous user-selectable coagulation kernels, alone or in combinations, and permits an arbitrary initial size distribution. Many parameter combinations and what-if scenarios under user control are possible. The output gives the particle size distribution suspended in the carrier fluid initially and after the desired aerosol aging time in terms of both differential andmore » integral aerosol volume concentrations. An auxiliary routine designed for the Mac OSX environment provides plotting capability. The output can be further processed by e.g., spreadsheets. The code has been benchmarked against three computer models, including MAEROS, and analytical models with excellent agreement. The test cases also included scenarios where previously published computational coagulation models lack capabilities or exhibit numerical instabilities. These included narrow, delta function, and non-lognormal initial size distributions, and further conditions, such as the presence of simultaneous coagulation mechanisms, including electrostatic effects, spanning multiple flow-regimes.« less

  4. The susceptibility of plasma coagulation factor XI to nitration and peroxynitrite action.

    PubMed

    Ponczek, Michał Błażej

    2016-10-01

    Coagulation factor XI is present in blood plasma as the zymogen, like other serine proteases of hemostatic system, but as the only coagulation factor forms 140-160kDa homodimers. Its activation is induced by thrombin, and a positive feedback increases the generation of the extra thrombin. Experimental and clinical observations confirm protective roles of factor XI deficiencies in certain types of thromboembolic disorders. Thromboembolism still causes serious problems for modern civilization. Diseases associated with the blood coagulation system are often associated with inflammation and oxidative stress. Peroxynitrite is produced from nitric oxide and superoxide in inflammatory diseases. The aim of the current study is to evaluate effects of nitrative stress triggered by peroxynitrite on coagulation factor XI in human plasma employing biochemical and bioinformatic methods. The amidolytic assay shows increase in factor XI activity triggered by peroxynitrite. Peroxynitrite interferes factor XI by nitration and fragmentation, which is demonstrated by immunoprecipitation followed by western blotting. Nitrated factor XI is even present in control blood plasma. The results suggest possible modifications of factor XI on the molecular level. Computer simulations show tyrosine residues as targets of peroxynitrite action. The modifications induced by peroxynitrite in factor XI might be important in thrombotic disorders. PMID:27268383

  5. Coagulative and ablative characteristics of a novel diode laser system (1470nm) for endonasal applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Betz, C. S.; Havel, M.; Janda, P.; Leunig, A.; Sroka, R.

    2008-02-01

    Introduction: Being practical, efficient and inexpensive, fibre guided diode laser systems are preferable over others for endonasal applications. A new medical 1470 nm diode laser system is expected to offer good ablative and coagulative tissue effects. Methods: The new 1470 nm diode laser system was compared to a conventional 940 nm system with regards to laser tissue effects (ablation, coagulation, carbonization zones) in an ex vivo setup using fresh liver and muscle tissue. The laser fibres were fixed to a computer controlled stepper motor, and the light was applied using comparable power settings and a reproducible procedure under constant conditions. Clinical efficacy and postoperative morbidity was evaluated in two groups of 10 patients undergoing laser coagulation therapy of hyperplastic nasal turbinates. Results: In the experimental setup, the 1470 nm laser diode system proved to be more efficient in inducing tissue effects with an energy factor of 2-3 for highly perfused hepatic tissue to 30 for muscular tissue. In the clinical case series, the higher efficacy of the 1470 nm diode laser system led to reduced energy settings as compared to the conventional system with comparable clinical results. Postoperative crusting was less pronounced in the 1470 nm laser group. Conclusion: The 1470 nm diode laser system offers a highly efficient alternative to conventional diode laser systems for the coagulation of hyperplastic nasal turbinates. According to the experimental results it can be furthermore expected that it disposes of an excellent surgical potential with regards to its cutting abilities.

  6. Histology assessment of bipolar coagulation and argon plasma coagulation on digestive tract

    PubMed Central

    Garrido, Teresa; Baba, Elisa R; Wodak, Stephanie; Sakai, Paulo; Cecconello, Ivan; Maluf-Filho, Fauze

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To analyze the effect of bipolar electrocoagulation and argon plasma coagulation on fresh specimens of gastrointestinal tract. METHODS: An experimental evaluation was performed at Hospital das Clinicas of the University of São Paulo, on 31 fresh surgical specimens using argon plasma coagulation and bipolar electrocoagulation at different time intervals. The depth of tissue damage was histopathologically analyzed by single senior pathologist unaware of the coagulation method and power setting applied. To analyze the results, the mucosa was divided in superficial mucosa (epithelial layer of the esophagus and superficial portion of the glandular layer of the stomach and colon) intermediate mucosa (until the lamina propria of the esophagus and until the bottom of the glandular layer of the stomach and colon) and muscularis mucosa. Necrosis involvement of the layers was compared in several combinations of power and time interval. RESULTS: Involvement of the intermediate mucosa of the stomach and of the muscularis mucosa of the three organs was more frequent when higher amounts of energy were used with argon plasma. In the esophagus and in the colon, injury of the intermediate mucosa was frequent, even when small amounts of energy were used. The use of bipolar electrocoagulation resulted in more frequent involvement of the intermediate mucosa and of the muscularis mucosa of the esophagus and of the colon when higher amounts of energy were used. In the stomach, these involvements were rare. The risk of injury of the muscularis propria was significant only in the colon when argon plasma coagulation was employed. CONCLUSION: Tissue damage after argon plasma coagulation is deeper than bipolar electrocoagulation. Both of them depend on the amount of energy used. PMID:25031789

  7. Thymoquinone Modulates Blood Coagulation in Vitro via Its Effects on Inflammatory and Coagulation Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Muralidharan-Chari, Vandhana; Kim, Jaehan; Abuawad, Ahlam; Naeem, Mubeena; Cui, Huadong; Mousa, Shaker A.

    2016-01-01

    Thymoquinone (THQ) is a major component of black seeds. Given that both THQ and black seeds exhibit anti-cancer and anti-inflammatory activities, we hypothesized that THQ will affect cancer-associated thrombosis (CAT), which is primarily triggered by tissue factor (TF) and inflammation. The effect of both black seed-extracted and purchased (“pure”) THQ on normal blood coagulation was tested with in vitro thromboelastography (TEG) and activated partial thromboplastin time (aPTT) coagulation assays. The effect of pure THQ on CAT was tested with aPTT assay using pancreatic cancer cell lines that are either positive or negative for TF, and with TEG assay using lipopolysaccharide as an inflammatory trigger. Additionally, the direct effect of THQ on the inactivation of factors IIa and Xa was assessed. Since TNF-α facilitates crosstalk between inflammation and thrombosis by triggering the NF-κB pathway, we tested THQ’s ability to interfere with this communication with a luciferase assay. Both extracted and pure THQ had minimal effects on normal blood coagulation. Pure THQ reversed CAT initiated by both TF and inflammation to basal levels (p < 0.001). Mechanistically, while THQ had minimal to no effect on factor IIa and Xa inactivation, it strongly reduced the effects of TNF-α on NF-κB elements (p < 0.001). THQ has a minimal effect on basal coagulation and can reverse CAT in vitro, possibly by interfering with the crosstalk between inflammation and coagulation. This study suggests the utility of THQ as a preventative anticoagulant and/or as a supplement to existing chemotherapies and anticoagulant therapies. PMID:27043539

  8. Coagulant recovery and reuse for drinking water treatment.

    PubMed

    Keeley, James; Jarvis, Peter; Smith, Andrea D; Judd, Simon J

    2016-01-01

    Coagulant recovery and reuse from waterworks sludge has the potential to significantly reduce waste disposal and chemicals usage for water treatment. Drinking water regulations demand purification of recovered coagulant before they can be safely reused, due to the risk of disinfection by-product precursors being recovered from waterworks sludge alongside coagulant metals. While several full-scale separation technologies have proven effective for coagulant purification, none have matched virgin coagulant treatment performance. This study examines the individual and successive separation performance of several novel and existing ferric coagulant recovery purification technologies to attain virgin coagulant purity levels. The new suggested approach of alkali extraction of dissolved organic compounds (DOC) from waterworks sludge prior to acidic solubilisation of ferric coagulants provided the same 14:1 selectivity ratio (874 mg/L Fe vs. 61 mg/L DOC) to the more established size separation using ultrafiltration (1285 mg/L Fe vs. 91 mg/L DOC). Cation exchange Donnan membranes were also examined: while highly selective (2555 mg/L Fe vs. 29 mg/L DOC, 88:1 selectivity), the low pH of the recovered ferric solution impaired subsequent treatment performance. The application of powdered activated carbon (PAC) to ultrafiltration or alkali pre-treated sludge, dosed at 80 mg/mg DOC, reduced recovered ferric DOC contamination to <1 mg/L but in practice, this option would incur significant costs. The treatment performance of the purified recovered coagulants was compared to that of virgin reagent with reference to key water quality parameters. Several PAC-polished recovered coagulants provided the same or improved DOC and turbidity removal as virgin coagulant, as well as demonstrating the potential to reduce disinfection byproducts and regulated metals to levels comparable to that attained from virgin material. PMID:26521220

  9. A novel control method for nitritation: The domination of ammonia-oxidizing bacteria by high concentrations of inorganic carbon in an airlift-fluidized bed reactor.

    PubMed

    Tokutomi, Takaaki; Shibayama, Chizu; Soda, Satoshi; Ike, Michihiko

    2010-07-01

    A novel nitritation method based on the addition of inorganic carbon (IC) was verified using an airlift-fluidized bed reactor packed with sponge cubes. A continuous-treatment experiment demonstrated that the type of nitrification-nitrite or nitrate accumulation-could be controlled by the addition of different alkalinity sources (NaHCO(3) or NaOH, respectively). The maximum rate of ammonia oxidation at 30 degrees C was 2.47kg-N/(m(3) d), with nitrate formation of less than 0.5% of the converted ammonia. Nitrite accumulation of over 90% was maintained stably over 250 days at 30 degrees C and was achieved even at 19 degrees C. Qualitative and quantitative shifts of nitrifying bacteria in the biofilm were monitored by real-time PCR and T-RFLP analysis. Ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) were dominant but nitrite-oxidizing bacteria (NOB) were eliminated in the reactor when NaHCO(3) was used as the alkalinity source. From the kinetic data, we inferred that high IC concentrations drive stable nitritation by promoting a higher growth rate for AOB than for NOB. PMID:20554306

  10. Tissue Factor in Coagulation: Which? Where? When?

    PubMed Central

    Butenas, Saulius; Orfeo, Thomas; Mann, Kenneth G.

    2009-01-01

    Tissue factor (TF) is an integral membrane protein, normally separated from the blood by the vascular endothelium, which plays a key role in the initiation of blood coagulation. With a perforating vascular injury, TF becomes exposed to blood and binds plasma factor VIIa. The resulting complex initiates a series of enzymatic reactions leading to clot formation and vascular sealing. In some pathologic states, circulating blood cells express TF as a result of exposure to an inflammatory stimulus leading to intravascular clotting, vessel occlusion and thrombotic pathology. Numerous controversies have arisen related to the influence of structural features of TF, its presentation and its function. There are contradictory reports about the synthesis and presentation of TF on blood cells and the presence (or absence) of functionally active TF circulating in normal blood either on microparticles or as a soluble protein. In this review we discuss TF structure-function relationships and the role of TF during various phases of the blood coagulation process. We also highlight controversies concerning the expression/presence of TF on various cells and in blood in normal and pathologic states. PMID:19592470

  11. Contact Activation of Blood Plasma Coagulation

    PubMed Central

    Vogler, Erwin A.; Siedlecki, Christopher A.

    2009-01-01

    This opinion identifies inconsistencies in the generally-accepted surface biophysics involved in contact activation of blood-plasma coagulation, reviews recent experimental work aimed at resolving inconsistencies, and concludes that this standard paradigm requires substantial revision to accommodate new experimental observations. Foremost among these new findings is that surface-catalyzed conversion of the blood zymogen factor XII (FXII, Hageman factor) to the enzyme FXIIa ( FXII→surfaceFXIIa, a.k.a. autoactivation) is not specific for anionic surfaces, as proposed by the standard paradigm. Furthermore, it is found that surface activation is moderated by the protein composition of the fluid phase in which FXII autoactivation occurs by what appears to be a protein adsorption-competition effect. Both of these findings argue against the standard view that contact activation of plasma coagulation is potentiated by assembly of activation-complex proteins (FXII, FXI, prekallikrein, and high-molecular-weight kininogen) directly onto activating surfaces (procoagulants) through specific protein/surface interactions. These new findings supplement the observation that adsorption behavior of FXII and FXIIa is not remarkably different from a wide variety of other blood proteins surveyed. Similarity in adsorption properties further undermines the idea that FXII and/or FXIIa are distinguished from other blood proteins by unusual adsorption properties resulting in chemically-specific interactions with activating anionic surfaces. PMID:19168215

  12. Cosmic dust synthesis by accretion and coagulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Praburam, G.; Goree, J.

    1995-01-01

    The morphology of grains grown by accretion and coagulation is revaled by a new laboratory method of synthesizing cosmic dust analogs. Submicron carbon particles, grown by accretion of carbon atoms from a gas, have a spherical shape with a cauliflower-like surface and an internal micro-structure of radial columns. This shape is probably common for grains grown by accretion at a temperature well below the melting point. Coagulated grains, consisting of spheres that collided to form irregular strings, were also synthesized. Another shape we produced had a bumpy non- spherical morphology, like an interplanetary particle collected in the terrestrial stratosphere. Besides these isolated grains, large spongy aggregates of nanometer-size particles were also found for various experimental conditions. Grains were synthesized using ions to sputter a solid target, producing an atomic vapor at a low temperature. The ions were provided by a plasma, which also provided electrostatic levitation of the grains during their growth. The temporal development of grain growth was studied by extinguishing the plasma after various intervals.

  13. Evaluation of natural coagulants for direct filtration.

    PubMed

    Mandloi, M; Chaudhari, S; Folkard, G K

    2004-04-01

    In the present study surjana (Moringa oleifera) seed, maize (Zea mays) and chitosan were used in direct filtration of Bilaoli lake water and evaluated for their efficiency in removing turbidity and microorganisms from water. The experiments with these natural coagulants gave filtered water turbidity less than or almost equal to 1NTU and thereby met the turbidity criteria for drinking water as per WHO guidelines. Bilaoli lake water had low ionic strength and low turbidity which represents one of the most difficult raw waters to treat, but natural coagulants in direct filtration achieved good filtrate quality. The head loss development across the filter bed with chitosan was more than that of alum, while with maize it was comparable to that of alum. With M. oleifera seeds the head loss was much less in comparison to alum. The average most probable number (MPN) reductions obtained with M. oleifera seeds, maize and chitosan were 97.35%, 95.4% and 87.1% respectively, whereas, with alum it was only 7.7%. PMID:15214453

  14. Perioperative coagulation management--fresh frozen plasma.

    PubMed

    Kor, Daryl J; Stubbs, James R; Gajic, Ognjen

    2010-03-01

    Clinical studies support the use of perioperative fresh frozen plasma (FFP) in patients who are actively bleeding with multiple coagulation factor deficiencies and for the prevention of dilutional coagulopathy in patients with major trauma and/or massive haemorrhage. In these settings, current FFP dosing recommendations may be inadequate. However, a substantial proportion of FFP is transfused in non-bleeding patients with mild elevations in coagulation screening tests. This practice is not supported by the literature, is unlikely to be of benefit and unnecessarily exposes patients to the risks of FFP. The role of FFP in reversing the effects of warfarin anticoagulation is dependent on the clinical context and availability of alternative agents. Although FFP is commonly transfused in patients with liver disease, this practice needs broad reconsideration. Adverse effects of FFP include febrile and allergic reactions, transfusion-associated circulatory overload and transfusion-related acute lung injury. The latter is the most serious complication, being less common with the preferential use of non-alloimmunised, male-donor predominant plasma. FP24 and thawed plasma are alternatives to FFP with similar indications for administration. Both provide an opportunity for increasing the safe plasma donor pool. Although prothrombin complex concentrates and factor VIIa may be used as alternatives to FFP in a variety of specific clinical contexts, additional study is needed. PMID:20402170

  15. Chemical composition and inhibitory parameters of essential oil and extracts of Nandina domestica Thunb. to control food-borne pathogenic and spoilage bacteria.

    PubMed

    Bajpai, Vivek K; Rahman, Atiqur; Kang, Sun Chul

    2008-07-15

    The aim of this study was to examine the chemical composition of the essential oil isolated from the floral parts of Nandina domestica Thunb. by hydrodistillation, and to test the efficacy of essential oil and various organic extracts against a panel of food-borne pathogenic and spoilage bacteria such as Bacillus subtilis ATCC6633, Listeria monocytogenes ATCC19166, Staphylococcus aureus KCTC1916, S. aureus ATCC6538, Pseudomonas aeruginosa KCTC2004, Salmonella typhimurium KCTC2515, Salmonella enteridis KCCM12021, Escherichia coli 0157-Human, E. coli ATCC8739, E. coli 057:H7 ATCC43888 and Enterobacter aerognes KCTC2190. The chemical composition of essential oil was analysed by GC-MS. It was determined that 79 compounds, which represented 87.06% of total oil, were present in the oil. The oil contained mainly 1-indolizino carbazole (19.65%), 2-pentanone (16.4%), mono phenol (12.1%), aziridine (9.01%), methylcarbinol (4.6%), ethanone (3.3%), furfural (2.96%), 3,5-dimethylpyrazole (1.29%) and 2(5H)-furanone (1.32%). The oil (1000 ppm/disc), and various organic extracts of hexane, chloroform, ethyl acetate and methanol (1500 ppm/disc) exhibited promising antibacterial effect as a diameter of zones of inhibition (9-18 and 7-13 mm) and MIC values (62.5 to 1000 and 250 to 2000 microg/ml), respectively against the tested bacteria. Also the oil had strong detrimental effect on the viable count of the tested bacteria. These results indicate the potential efficacy of plant-based natural products such as essential oil and organic extracts of N. domestica to control food-borne pathogenic and spoilage bacteria. PMID:18541324

  16. Coagulation chemistries for silica removal from cooling tower water.

    SciTech Connect

    Nyman, May Devan; Altman, Susan Jeanne; Stewart, Tom

    2010-02-01

    The formation of silica scale is a problem for thermoelectric power generating facilities, and this study investigated the potential for removal of silica by means of chemical coagulation from source water before it is subjected to mineral concentration in cooling towers. In Phase I, a screening of many typical as well as novel coagulants was carried out using concentrated cooling tower water, with and without flocculation aids, at concentrations typical for water purification with limited results. In Phase II, it was decided that treatment of source or make up water was more appropriate, and that higher dosing with coagulants delivered promising results. In fact, the less exotic coagulants proved to be more efficacious for reasons not yet fully determined. Some analysis was made of the molecular nature of the precipitated floc, which may aid in process improvements. In Phase III, more detailed study of process conditions for aluminum chloride coagulation was undertaken. Lime-soda water softening and the precipitation of magnesium hydroxide were shown to be too limited in terms of effectiveness, speed, and energy consumption to be considered further for the present application. In Phase IV, sodium aluminate emerged as an effective coagulant for silica, and the most attractive of those tested to date because of its availability, ease of use, and low requirement for additional chemicals. Some process optimization was performed for coagulant concentration and operational pH. It is concluded that silica coagulation with simple aluminum-based agents is effective, simple, and compatible with other industrial processes.

  17. Analysis and optimization of coagulation and flocculation process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saritha, V.; Srinivas, N.; Srikanth Vuppala, N. V.

    2015-02-01

    Natural coagulants have been the focus of research of many investigators through the last decade owing to the problems caused by the chemical coagulants. Optimization of process parameters is vital for the effectiveness of coagulation process. In the present study optimization of parameters like pH, dose of coagulant and mixing speed were studied using natural coagulants sago and chitin in comparison with alum. Jar test apparatus was used to perform the coagulation. The results showed that the removal of turbidity was up to 99 % by both alum and chitin at lower doses of coagulant, i.e., 0.1-0.3 g/L, whereas sago has shown a reduction of 70-100 % at doses of 0.1 and 0.2 g/L. The optimum conditions observed for sago were 6 and 7 whereas chitin was stable at all pH ranges, lower coagulant doses, i.e., 0.1-0.3 g/L and mixing speed—rapid mixing at 100 rpm for 10 min and slow mixing 20 rpm for 20 min. Hence, it can be concluded that sago and chitin can be used for treating water even with large seasonal variation in turbidity.

  18. Assessment of Coagulation and Fibrinolysis in Pre-eclampsia

    PubMed Central

    Wood, S. M.; Burnett, D.; Picken, A. M.; Farrell, G. W.; Wolf, P.

    1974-01-01

    A method is described for distinguishing coagulation from fibrinolysis by three estimates of fibrinogen. This “fibrinogen series” together with plasma antithrombin and urinary urokinase have been compared in pregnant patients with venous thrombosis and pre-eclampsia. Evidence is presented for active coagulation during deterioration of the pre-eclampsia state and for enhanced fibrinolysis during improvement. PMID:4596483

  19. Characteristics of particle coagulation in an underground parking lot.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yu; Kato, Shinsuke; Zhao, Jianing

    2015-12-01

    Particles in vehicle exhaust plumes in underground parking lots have adverse health effects due to the enclosed environment in which they are released and the temperature difference between the tailpipe and ambient environment; at the same time, particle coagulation might be obvious near the tailpipe in an underground parking lot. In the present study, airflow and temperature fields were calculated using the Realizable k-ε model, and the Eulerian particle transport model was selected in the numerical simulation of particle concentration dispersion. Polydisperse thermal coagulation due to Brownian collisions was employed to calculate the particle coagulation. The results show that particle coagulation rate and half-time were significant within 1 m from the tailpipe. The variations in the particle coagulation rate and half-time were similar, but their directions were opposite. Air exhaust time was nearly four times longer than averaged half-time and 40 times longer than minimum half-time. The peak particle diameter increased approximately 1.43 times due to coagulation. A double particle concentration at the tailpipe caused the fourfold rise in the particle coagulation rate in the distance ranging less than 1 m from the tailpipe. An increase in exhaust velocity at the tailpipe could shorten the obvious range of particle coagulation along the centerline of the tailpipe from 1 to 0.8 m in the study. PMID:26490941

  20. Metals in airpollution particles decrease whole blood coagulation time

    EPA Science Inventory

    The mechanism underlying the pro-coagulative effect of air pollution particle exposure is not known. We tested the postulate that 1) the soluble fraction ofan air pollution particle can affect whole blood coagulation time and 2) metals included in the soluble fraction are respons...

  1. Performance and characterization of a new tannin-based coagulant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beltrán-Heredia, J.; Sánchez-Martín, J.; Gómez-Muñoz, C.

    2012-09-01

    Diethanolamine and formaldehyde were employed to cationize tannins from black wattle. This novel coagulant called CDF was functionally characterized in removing sodium dodecylbenzene sulfonate (anionic surfactant) and Palatine Fast Black WAN (azoic dye). Refined tannin-derived commercial coagulants exhibited similar efficiency, while CDF presented higher coagulant ability than alum, a usual coagulant agent. Low doses of CDF (ca. 100 mg L-1) were able to remove more than 70 % of surfactant and more than 85 % of dye (initial pollutant concentration of ca. 100 mg L-1) and it presented no temperature affection and worked at a relatively wide pH range. Surfactant and dye removal responded to the classical coagulant-and-adsorption models, such as Frumkin-Fowler-Guggenheim or Gu and Zhu in the case of surfactant, and Langmuir and Freundlich in the case of dye.

  2. Analysis of Coagulation Processes for the Groundwater Treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albrektiene, Ramune; Rimeika, Mindaugas; Jurkiene, Anzelika

    2013-06-01

    Coagulation process is widely used for removal of natural organic matters (NOM) and for water color intensity reduction. The efficiency of coagulation process depends on many different factors. Aim of this research is to investigate coagulation process under different conditions. During the research coagulation process was held at different pH values (5.5; 6.0; 6.5), at different water alkalinity and at different water turbidity. It was found that removal of NOM and water color intensity reduction is most effective at pH values from 5.5 to 6.0. At these conditions water color intensity reduction is most efficient, but removal of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) is the lowest. During the research it was also found that different water alkalinity and turbidity do not make significant influence on efficiency of coagulation process.

  3. The Immediate and Late Effects of Thyroid Hormone (Triiodothyronine) on Murine Coagulation Gene Transcription

    PubMed Central

    Salloum-Asfar, Salam; Boelen, Anita; Reitsma, Pieter H.; van Vlijmen, Bart J. M.

    2015-01-01

    Thyroid dysfunction is associated with changes in coagulation. The aim of our study was to gain more insight into the role of thyroid hormone in coagulation control. C57Black/6J mice received a low-iodine diet and drinking water supplemented with perchlorate to suppress endogenous triiodothyronine (T3) and thyroxine (T4) production. Under these conditions, the impact of exogenous T3 on plasma coagulation, and hepatic and vessel-wall-associated coagulation gene transcription was studied in a short- (4 hours) and long-term (14 days) setting. Comparing euthyroid conditions (normal mice), with hypothyroidism (conditions of a shortage of thyroid hormone) and those with replacement by incremental doses of T3, dosages of 0 and 0.5 μg T3/mouse/day were selected to study the impact of T3 on coagulation gene transcription. Under these conditions, a single injection of T3 injection increased strongly hepatic transcript levels of the well-characterized T3-responsive genes deiodinase type 1 (Dio1) and Spot14 within 4 hours. This coincided with significantly reduced mRNA levels of Fgg, Serpinc1, Proc, Proz, and Serpin10, and the reduction of the latter three persisted upon daily treatment with T3 for 14 days. Prolonged T3 treatment induced a significant down-regulation in factor (F) 2, F9 and F10 transcript levels, while F11 and F12 levels increased. Activity levels in plasma largely paralleled these mRNA changes. Thbd transcript levels in the lung (vessel-wall-associated coagulation) were significantly up-regulated after a single T3 injection, and persisted upon prolonged T3 exposure. Two-week T3 administration also resulted in increased Vwf and Tfpi mRNA levels, whereas Tf levels decreased. These data showed that T3 has specific effects on coagulation, with Fgg, Serpinc1, Proc, Proz, Serpin10 and Thbd responding rapidly, making these likely direct thyroid hormone receptor targets. F2, F9, F10, F11, F12, Vwf, Tf and Tfpi are late responding genes and probably indirectly

  4. Enhanced arsenite removal through surface-catalyzed oxidative coagulation treatment.

    PubMed

    Li, Yue; Bland, Garret D; Yan, Weile

    2016-05-01

    Arsenic being a naturally-occurring groundwater contaminant is subject to stringent water quality regulations. Coagulation and adsorption are widely used methods to treat arsenic-contaminated water, however, these treatments have been reported to be less efficient for the removal of arsenite (As(III)) than arsenate (As(V)). In this study, the feasibility of in situ oxidation of As(III) during coagulation was investigated in two systems: Fe(II) or H2O2-assisted oxidative coagulation treatment using ferric chloride as the coagulant. This setup exploits the catalytic property of the fresh formed Fe(III) hydroxide colloids in coagulation suspension to mediate the production of reactive oxidants capable of As(III) oxidation. Fe(II)-assisted coagulation brought about small improvements in As(III) removal compared to treatment with Fe(III) coagulant alone, however, its arsenic removal efficiency is strongly dependent on pH (observed optimal pH = 7-9). Addition of H2O2 together with ferric chloride led to a significant enhancement in arsenic retention at pH 6-8, with final arsenic concentrations well below the U.S.EPA regulatory limit (10 μg/L). H2O2-assisted oxidative coagulation can attain reliable As(III) removal over a broad pH range of 4-9. Radical quenching experiments reveal the participation of superoxide radical in As(III) removal in the oxidative coagulation systems. Phosphate (at > 0.1 mM) strongly suppresses As(III) removal efficiency, whereas carbonate and humic acid pose a minor impact. Overall, the results suggest that a low dose addition of H2O2 along with ferric coagulant is a feasible method for the existing water treatment facilities to achieve improved As(III) removal efficiency. PMID:26897520

  5. Cytokine Response after Stimulation with Key Commensal Bacteria Differ in Post-Infectious Irritable Bowel Syndrome (PI-IBS) Patients Compared to Healthy Controls

    PubMed Central

    Sundin, Johanna; Rangel, Ignacio; Repsilber, Dirk; Brummer, Robert-Jan

    2015-01-01

    Background Microbial dysbiosis and prolonged immune activation resulting in low-grade inflammation and intestinal barrier dysfunction have been suggested to be underlying causes of post-infectious irritable bowel syndrome (PI-IBS). The aim of this study was to evaluate the difference in cytokine response between mucosal specimens of PI-IBS patients and healthy controls (HC) after ex vivo stimulation with key anaerobic bacteria. Methods Colonic biopsies from 11 PI-IBS patients and 10 HC were stimulated ex vivo with the commensal bacteria Bacteroides ovatus, Ruminococcus gnavus, Akkermansia muciniphila, Subdoligranulum variabile and Eubacterium limosum, respectively. The cytokine release (IL-1β, IL-2, IL-8, IL-10, IL-13, IL-17, TNF-α and IFN-γ) in stimulation supernatants was analyzed using the LUMINEX assay. Comparison of cytokine release between PI-IBS patients and healthy controls was performed taking both unstimulated and bacterially stimulated mucosal specimens into account. Key Results IL-13 release from mucosal specimens without bacterial stimulation was significantly lower in PI-IBS patients compared to HC (p < 0.05). After stimulation with Subdoligranulum variabile, IL-1β release from PI-IBS patients was significantly increased compared to HC (p < 0.05). Stimulation with Eubacterium limosum resulted in a significantly decreased IL-10 release in HC compared to PI-IBS patients (p < 0.05) and a tendency to decreased IL-13 release in HC compared to PI-IBS patients (p = 0.07). Conclusions & Inferences PI-IBS patients differ from HC with regard to cytokine release ex vivo after stimulation with selected commensal bacteria. Hence, our results support that the pathogenesis of PI-IBS comprises an altered immune response against commensal gut microbes. PMID:26366730

  6. Stop the Spread of Superbugs: Help Fight Drug Resistant Bacteria

    MedlinePlus

    ... the Spread of Superbugs Help Fight Drug-Resistant Bacteria For nearly a century, bacteria-fighting drugs known as antibiotics have helped to control and destroy many of the harmful bacteria that can make us sick. But in recent ...

  7. Evaluation of some coagulation parameters in hepatic coccidiosis experimentally induced with Eimeria stiedai in rabbits.

    PubMed

    Cam, Y; Cetin, E; Iça, A; Atalay, O; Cetin, N

    2006-05-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate some coagulation parameters in hepatic coccidiosis experimentally induced with Eimeria stiedai in rabbits. Fourteen healthy New Zealand rabbits were equally divided into two groups. One group received no treatment, the other group was orally inoculated with 40 000 sporulated oocysts of E. stiedai in a 1 ml inoculum using a catheter. At day 24 after inoculation, blood samples were collected into sodium citrate-containing tubes to evaluate some coagulation parameters. Although statistically not significant, infected rabbits had prolonged prothrombin time and activated partial thromboplastin time compared with rabbits in the control group. A significant reduction (P < 0.05) was observed in the level of fibrinogen of infected rabbits compared with that of the controls. A slight decrease in thrombocyte counts of infected rabbits was not statistically significant. PMID:16629990

  8. Survival of Antibiotic Resistant Bacteria and Horizontal Gene Transfer Control Antibiotic Resistance Gene Content in Anaerobic Digesters

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Jennifer H.; Novak, John T.; Knocke, William R.; Pruden, Amy

    2016-01-01

    Understanding fate of antibiotic resistant bacteria (ARB) vs. their antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs) during wastewater sludge treatment is critical in order to reduce the spread of antibiotic resistance through process optimization. Here, we spiked high concentrations of tetracycline-resistant bacteria, isolated from mesophilic (Iso M1-1—a Pseudomonas sp.) and thermophilic (Iso T10—a Bacillus sp.) anaerobic digested sludge, into batch digesters and monitored their fate by plate counts and quantitative polymerase chain reaction (QPCR) of their corresponding tetracycline ARGs. In batch studies, spiked ARB plate counts returned to baseline (thermophilic) or 1-log above baseline (mesophilic) while levels of the ARG present in the spiked isolate [tet(G)] remained high in mesophilic batch reactors. To compare results under semi-continuous flow conditions with natural influent variation, tet(O), tet(W), and sul1 ARGs, along with the intI1 integrase gene, were monitored over a 9-month period in the raw feed sludge and effluent sludge of lab-scale thermophilic and mesophilic anaerobic digesters. sul1 and intI1 in mesophilic and thermophilic digesters correlated positively (Spearman rho = 0.457–0.829, P < 0.05) with the raw feed sludge. There was no correlation in tet(O) or tet(W) ratios in raw sludge and mesophilic digested sludge or thermophilic digested sludge (Spearman rho = 0.130–0.486, P = 0.075–0.612). However, in the thermophilic digester, the tet(O) and tet(W) ratios remained consistently low over the entire monitoring period. We conclude that the influent sludge microbial composition can influence the ARG content of a digester, apparently as a result of differential survival or death of ARBs or horizontal gene transfer of genes between raw sludge ARBs and the digester microbial community. Notably, mesophilic digestion was more susceptible to ARG intrusion than thermophilic digestion, which may be attributed to a higher rate of ARB survival and

  9. Survival of Antibiotic Resistant Bacteria and Horizontal Gene Transfer Control Antibiotic Resistance Gene Content in Anaerobic Digesters.

    PubMed

    Miller, Jennifer H; Novak, John T; Knocke, William R; Pruden, Amy

    2016-01-01

    Understanding fate of antibiotic resistant bacteria (ARB) vs. their antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs) during wastewater sludge treatment is critical in order to reduce the spread of antibiotic resistance through process optimization. Here, we spiked high concentrations of tetracycline-resistant bacteria, isolated from mesophilic (Iso M1-1-a Pseudomonas sp.) and thermophilic (Iso T10-a Bacillus sp.) anaerobic digested sludge, into batch digesters and monitored their fate by plate counts and quantitative polymerase chain reaction (QPCR) of their corresponding tetracycline ARGs. In batch studies, spiked ARB plate counts returned to baseline (thermophilic) or 1-log above baseline (mesophilic) while levels of the ARG present in the spiked isolate [tet(G)] remained high in mesophilic batch reactors. To compare results under semi-continuous flow conditions with natural influent variation, tet(O), tet(W), and sul1 ARGs, along with the intI1 integrase gene, were monitored over a 9-month period in the raw feed sludge and effluent sludge of lab-scale thermophilic and mesophilic anaerobic digesters. sul1 and intI1 in mesophilic and thermophilic digesters correlated positively (Spearman rho = 0.457-0.829, P < 0.05) with the raw feed sludge. There was no correlation in tet(O) or tet(W) ratios in raw sludge and mesophilic digested sludge or thermophilic digested sludge (Spearman rho = 0.130-0.486, P = 0.075-0.612). However, in the thermophilic digester, the tet(O) and tet(W) ratios remained consistently low over the entire monitoring period. We conclude that the influent sludge microbial composition can influence the ARG content of a digester, apparently as a result of differential survival or death of ARBs or horizontal gene transfer of genes between raw sludge ARBs and the digester microbial community. Notably, mesophilic digestion was more susceptible to ARG intrusion than thermophilic digestion, which may be attributed to a higher rate of ARB survival and/or horizontal gene

  10. Quinine-Induced Disseminated Intravascular Coagulation

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Every drug comes with some side effect. It is the benefit/risk ratio that determines the medical use of the drug. Quinine, a known antimalarial drug, has been used for nocturnal leg cramps since the 1930s; it is associated with severe life-threatening hematological and cardiovascular side effects. Disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC), albeit rare, is a known coagulopathy associated with Quinine. It is imperative to inquire about the Quinine intake in medication history in patients with coagulopathy, as most patients still consider it a harmless home remedy for nocturnal leg cramps. In this report, we present a case of coagulopathy in a middle-aged woman, who gave a history of taking Quinine for nocturnal leg cramps, as her home remedy. Early identification of the offending agent led to the diagnosis, prompt discontinuation of the medication, and complete recovery and prevented the future possibility of recurrence. PMID:27293443

  11. Quinine-Induced Disseminated Intravascular Coagulation.

    PubMed

    Abed, Firas; Baniya, Ramkaji; Bachuwa, Ghassan

    2016-01-01

    Every drug comes with some side effect. It is the benefit/risk ratio that determines the medical use of the drug. Quinine, a known antimalarial drug, has been used for nocturnal leg cramps since the 1930s; it is associated with severe life-threatening hematological and cardiovascular side effects. Disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC), albeit rare, is a known coagulopathy associated with Quinine. It is imperative to inquire about the Quinine intake in medication history in patients with coagulopathy, as most patients still consider it a harmless home remedy for nocturnal leg cramps. In this report, we present a case of coagulopathy in a middle-aged woman, who gave a history of taking Quinine for nocturnal leg cramps, as her home remedy. Early identification of the offending agent led to the diagnosis, prompt discontinuation of the medication, and complete recovery and prevented the future possibility of recurrence. PMID:27293443

  12. Application of enzyme immunoassays to coagulation testing.

    PubMed

    Amiral, J; Adalbert, B; Adam, M

    1984-09-01

    Enzyme immunoassays are very useful for the detection of low concentrations of coagulation proteins and pathological markers in plasma. Analytes in the ng/mL range are measurable with good reproducibility with intra- and interassay CVs of less than 5% to 10%. "Sandwich" methods have been developed for von Willebrand factor (plasma concentration about 8 micrograms/mL, Factor IX (5 micrograms/mL), protein C (4 micrograms/mL), and Factor X (10 micrograms/mL). However, this technique is only suitable for macromolecules; for low-molecular-mass peptides such as fibrinopeptide A a competitive method is used. Normal concentrations of fibrinopeptide A are below 3 ng/mL, with greater values suggesting in vivo generation of thrombin; thus this test is quite useful in detecting thrombosis. Reagents for both the sandwich and competitive methods are commercially available and cost effective, and have a longer shelf-life than those for radioimmunoassays. PMID:6380814

  13. Optimized alumina coagulants for water treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Nyman, May D.; Stewart, Thomas A.

    2012-02-21

    Substitution of a single Ga-atom or single Ge-atom (GaAl.sub.12 and GeAl.sub.12 respectively) into the center of an aluminum Keggin polycation (Al.sub.13) produces an optimal water-treatment product for neutralization and coagulation of anionic contaminants in water. GaAl.sub.12 consistently shows .about.1 order of magnitude increase in pathogen reduction, compared to Al.sub.13. At a concentration of 2 ppm, GaAl.sub.12 performs equivalently to 40 ppm alum, removing .about.90% of the dissolved organic material. The substituted GaAl.sub.12 product also offers extended shelf-life and consistent performance. We also synthesized a related polyaluminum chloride compound made of pre-hydrolyzed dissolved alumina clusters of [GaO.sub.4Al.sub.12(OH).sub.24(H.sub.2O).sub.12].sup.7+.

  14. Contact activation of blood-plasma coagulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golas, Avantika

    Surface engineering of biomaterials with improved hemocompatibility is an imperative, given the widespread global need for cardiovascular devices. Research summarized in this dissertation focuses on contact activation of FXII in buffer and blood plasma frequently referred to as autoactivation. The extant theory of contact activation imparts FXII autoactivation ability to negatively charged, hydrophilic surfaces. According to this theory, contact activation of plasma involves assembly of proteins comprising an "activation complex" on activating surfaces mediated by specific chemical interactions between complex proteins and the surface. This work has made key discoveries that significantly improve our core understanding of contact activation and unravel the existing paradigm of plasma coagulation. It is shown herein that contact activation of blood factor XII (FXII, Hageman factor) in neat-buffer solution exhibits a parabolic profile when scaled as a function of silanized-glass-particle activator surface energy (measured as advancing water adhesion tension t°a=g° Iv costheta in dyne/cm, where g°Iv is water interfacial tension in dyne/cm and theta is the advancing contact angle). Nearly equal activation is observed at the extremes of activator water-wetting properties --36 < t°a < 72 dyne/cm (O° ≤ theta < 120°), falling sharply through a broad minimum within the 20 < t°a < 40 dyne/cm (55° < theta < 75°). Furthermore, contact activation of FXII in buffer solution produces an ensemble of protein fragments exhibiting either procoagulant properties in plasma (proteolysis of blood factor XI or prekallikrein), amidolytic properties (cleavage of s-2302 chromogen), or the ability to suppress autoactivation through currently unknown biochemistry. The relative proportions of these fragments depend on activator surface chemistry/energy. We have also discovered that contact activation is moderated by adsorption of plasma proteins unrelated to coagulation through an

  15. Field-theory methods in coagulation theory

    SciTech Connect

    Lushnikov, A. A.

    2011-08-15

    Coagulating systems are systems of chaotically moving particles that collide and coalesce, producing daughter particles of mass equal to the sum of the masses involved in the respective collision event. The present article puts forth basic ideas underlying the application of methods of quantum-field theory to the theory of coagulating systems. Instead of the generally accepted treatment based on the use of a standard kinetic equation that describes the time evolution of concentrations of particles consisting of a preset number of identical objects (monomers in the following), one introduces the probability W(Q, t) to find the system in some state Q at an instant t for a specific rate of transitions between various states. Each state Q is characterized by a set of occupation numbers Q = (n{sub 1}, n{sub 2}, ..., n{sub g}, ...), where n{sub g} is the total number of particles containing precisely g monomers. Thereupon, one introduces the generating functional {Psi} for the probability W(Q, t). The time evolution of {Psi} is described by an equation that is similar to the Schroedinger equation for a one-dimensional Bose field. This equation is solved exactly for transition rates proportional to the product of the masses of colliding particles. It is shown that, within a finite time interval, which is independent of the total mass of the entire system, a giant particle of mass about the mass of the entire system may appear in this system. The particle in question is unobservable in the thermodynamic limit, and this explains the well-known paradox of mass-concentration nonconservation in classical kinetic theory. The theory described in the present article is successfully applied in studying the time evolution of random graphs.

  16. Coagulation factor XII protease domain crystal structure

    PubMed Central

    Pathak, M; Wilmann, P; Awford, J; Li, C; Hamad, BK; Fischer, PM; Dreveny, I; Dekker, LV; Emsley, J

    2015-01-01

    Background Coagulation factor XII is a serine protease that is important for kinin generation and blood coagulation, cleaving the substrates plasma kallikrein and FXI. Objective To investigate FXII zymogen activation and substrate recognition by determining the crystal structure of the FXII protease domain. Methods and results A series of recombinant FXII protease constructs were characterized by measurement of cleavage of chromogenic peptide and plasma kallikrein protein substrates. This revealed that the FXII protease construct spanning the light chain has unexpectedly weak proteolytic activity compared to β-FXIIa, which has an additional nine amino acid remnant of the heavy chain present. Consistent with these data, the crystal structure of the light chain protease reveals a zymogen conformation for active site residues Gly193 and Ser195, where the oxyanion hole is absent. The Asp194 side chain salt bridge to Arg73 constitutes an atypical conformation of the 70-loop. In one crystal form, the S1 pocket loops are partially flexible, which is typical of a zymogen. In a second crystal form of the deglycosylated light chain, the S1 pocket loops are ordered, and a short α-helix in the 180-loop of the structure results in an enlarged and distorted S1 pocket with a buried conformation of Asp189, which is critical for P1 Arg substrate recognition. The FXII structures define patches of negative charge surrounding the active site cleft that may be critical for interactions with inhibitors and substrates. Conclusions These data provide the first structural basis for understanding FXII substrate recognition and zymogen activation. PMID:25604127

  17. Field-theory methods in coagulation theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lushnikov, A. A.

    2011-08-01

    Coagulating systems are systems of chaotically moving particles that collide and coalesce, producing daughter particles of mass equal to the sum of the masses involved in the respective collision event. The present article puts forth basic ideas underlying the application of methods of quantum-field theory to the theory of coagulating systems. Instead of the generally accepted treatment based on the use of a standard kinetic equation that describes the time evolution of concentrations of particles consisting of a preset number of identical objects (monomers in the following), one introduces the probability W( Q, t) to find the system in some state Q at an instant t for a specific rate of transitions between various states. Each state Q is characterized by a set of occupation numbers Q = { n 1, n 2, ..., n g , ...}, where n g is the total number of particles containing precisely g monomers. Thereupon, one introduces the generating functional Ψ for the probability W( Q, t). The time evolution of Ψ is described by an equation that is similar to the Schrödinger equation for a one-dimensional Bose field. This equation is solved exactly for transition rates proportional to the product of the masses of colliding particles. It is shown that, within a finite time interval, which is independent of the total mass of the entire system, a giant particle of mass about the mass of the entire system may appear in this system. The particle in question is unobservable in the thermodynamic limit, and this explains the well-known paradox of mass-concentration nonconservation in classical kinetic theory. The theory described in the present article is successfully applied in studying the time evolution of random graphs.

  18. Wastewater treatment using flocculation, coagulation, and flotation. (Latest citations from the NTIS bibliographic database). Published Search

    SciTech Connect

    1995-12-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning the design, development, and evaluation of flocculation coagulation and flotation processes for the treatment of sewage and industrial wastes. Citations examine technology requirements and limitations, activated sludge and anaerobic processes, chlorination, runoff pollution control, wastewater recycling and reuse, and materials recovery.(Contains 50-250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.) (Copyright NERAC, Inc. 1995)

  19. Wastewater treatment using flocculation, coagulation, and flotation. (Latest citations from the NTIS bibliographic database). Published Search

    SciTech Connect

    1996-11-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning the design, development, and evaluation of flocculation coagulation and flotation processes for the treatment of sewage and industrial wastes. Citations examine technology requirements and limitations, activated sludge and anaerobic processes, chlorination, runoff pollution control, wastewater recycling and reuse, and materials recovery.(Contains 50-250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.) (Copyright NERAC, Inc. 1995)

  20. Assessing the application and downstream effects of pulsed mode ultrasound as a pre-treatment for alum coagulation.

    PubMed

    Al-Juboori, Raed A; Aravinthan, Vasantha; Yusaf, Talal; Bowtell, Leslie

    2016-07-01

    The application of pulsed mode ultrasound (PMU) as a pre-treatment for alum coagulation was investigated at various alum dosages and pH levels. The effects of the treatments on turbidity and dissolved organic carbon (DOC) removal and residual Al were evaluated. Response surface methodology (RSM) was utilized to optimize the operating conditions of the applied treatments. The results showed that PMU pre-treatment increased turbidity and DOC removal percentages from maximum of 96.6% and 43% to 98.8% and 52%, respectively. It also helped decrease the minimum residual Al from 0.100 to 0.094 ppm. The multiple response optimization was carried out using the desirability function. A desirability value of >0.97 estimated respective turbidity removal, DOC removal and Al residual of 89.24%, 45.66% and ∼ 0.1 ppm for coagulation (control) and 90.61%, >55% and ∼ 0 for coagulation preceded by PMU. These figures were validated via confirmatory experiments. PMU pre-treatment increased total coliform removal from 80% to >98% and decreased trihalomethane formation potential (THMFP) from 250 to 200 ppb CH3Cl. Additionally, PMU application prior to coagulation improved the settleability of sludge due to the degassing effects. The results of this study confirms that PMU pre-treatment can significantly improve coagulation performance. PMID:26964919

  1. Multiple response optimization of the coagulation process for upgrading the quality of effluent from municipal wastewater treatment plant

    PubMed Central

    Li, Na; Hu, Yi; Lu, Yong-Ze; Zeng, Raymond J.; Sheng, Guo-Ping

    2016-01-01

    To meet the high quality standard of receiving water, the coagulation process using polyferric chloride (PFC) was used to further improve the water quality of effluent from wastewater treatment plants. Uniform design (UD) coupled with response surface methodology (RSM) was adopted to assess the effects of the main influence factors: coagulant dosage, pH and basicity, on the removal of total organic carbon (TOC), NH4+-N and PO43−-P. A desirability function approach was used to effectively optimize the coagulation process for the comprehensive removal of TOC, NH4+-N and PO43−-P to upgrade the effluent quality in practical application. The optimized operating conditions were: dosage 28 mg/L, pH 8.5 and basicity 0.001. The corresponding removal efficiencies for TOC, NH4+-N and PO43−-P were 77.2%, 94.6% and 20.8%, respectively. More importantly, the effluent quality could upgrade to surface water Class V of China through coagulation under optimal region. In addition, grey relational analysis (GRA) prioritized these three factors as: pH > basicity > dosage (for TOC), basicity > dosage > pH (for NH4+-N), pH > dosage > basicity (for PO43−-P), which would help identify the most important factor to control the treatment efficiency of various effluent quality indexes by PFC coagulation. PMID:27189652

  2. Multiple response optimization of the coagulation process for upgrading the quality of effluent from municipal wastewater treatment plant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Na; Hu, Yi; Lu, Yong-Ze; Zeng, Raymond J.; Sheng, Guo-Ping

    2016-05-01

    To meet the high quality standard of receiving water, the coagulation process using polyferric chloride (PFC) was used to further improve the water quality of effluent from wastewater treatment plants. Uniform design (UD) coupled with response surface methodology (RSM) was adopted to assess the effects of the main influence factors: coagulant dosage, pH and basicity, on the removal of total organic carbon (TOC), NH4+-N and PO43‑-P. A desirability function approach was used to effectively optimize the coagulation process for the comprehensive removal of TOC, NH4+-N and PO43‑-P to upgrade the effluent quality in practical application. The optimized operating conditions were: dosage 28 mg/L, pH 8.5 and basicity 0.001. The corresponding removal efficiencies for TOC, NH4+-N and PO43‑-P were 77.2%, 94.6% and 20.8%, respectively. More importantly, the effluent quality could upgrade to surface water Class V of China through coagulation under optimal region. In addition, grey relational analysis (GRA) prioritized these three factors as: pH > basicity > dosage (for TOC), basicity > dosage > pH (for NH4+-N), pH > dosage > basicity (for PO43‑-P), which would help identify the most important factor to control the treatment efficiency of various effluent quality indexes by PFC coagulation.

  3. Development of the Selective Hydrophobic Coagulation process. Seventh quarterly technical progress report, April 1, 1993--June 30, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Yoon, R.H.; Luttrell, G.H.

    1993-11-01

    A novel technique for selectively coagulating and separating coal from dispersed mineral matter has been developed at Virginia Tech. The process, known as Selective Hydrophobic Coagulation (SHC), has been studied under the sponsorship of the US Department of Energy since 1986 (Contracts DE-AC22-86PC91221 and DE-AC22-90PC90174). The SHC process differs from oil agglomeration, shear flocculation, polymer flocculation, and electrolytic coagulation processes in that it does not require reagents or additives to induce the formation of coagula. Often, simple pH control is all that is required to (i) induce the coagulation of coal particles, and (ii) effectively disperse particles of mineral matter. When the coal is superficially oxidized, a small dosage of reagents may be used to promote coagulation. During the quarter, work was completed on the development of the hydrophobic interaction energy function (Subtask 2.1) and the extended DLVO equation (Subtask 2.2.). Work to predict optimum operating conditions using the extended DLVO equation (Subtask 2.3) is underway. In Task 3 -- Process Development, work was completed on the study to determine the effect of mixing on coagula growth (Subtask 3.2) and on the use of column flotation for the recovery of coal coagula (subtask 3.3.4). Work is underway on the use of the lamella thickener and filter for the recovery of coagula (Subtasks 3.3.1 and 3.3.2).

  4. Multiple response optimization of the coagulation process for upgrading the quality of effluent from municipal wastewater treatment plant.

    PubMed

    Li, Na; Hu, Yi; Lu, Yong-Ze; Zeng, Raymond J; Sheng, Guo-Ping

    2016-01-01

    To meet the high quality standard of receiving water, the coagulation process using polyferric chloride (PFC) was used to further improve the water quality of effluent from wastewater treatment plants. Uniform design (UD) coupled with response surface methodology (RSM) was adopted to assess the effects of the main influence factors: coagulant dosage, pH and basicity, on the removal of total organic carbon (TOC), NH4(+)-N and PO4(3-)-P. A desirability function approach was used to effectively optimize the coagulation process for the comprehensive removal of TOC, NH4(+)-N and PO4(3-)-P to upgrade the effluent quality in practical application. The optimized operating conditions were: dosage 28 mg/L, pH 8.5 and basicity 0.001. The corresponding removal efficiencies for TOC, NH4(+)-N and PO4(3-)-P were 77.2%, 94.6% and 20.8%, respectively. More importantly, the effluent quality could upgrade to surface water Class V of China through coagulation under optimal region. In addition, grey relational analysis (GRA) prioritized these three factors as: pH > basicity > dosage (for TOC), basicity > dosage > pH (for NH4(+)-N), pH > dosage > basicity (for PO4(3-)-P), which would help identify the most important factor to control the treatment efficiency of various effluent quality indexes by PFC coagulation. PMID:27189652

  5. Development of the Selective Hydrophobic Coagulation process. Fifth quarterly technical progress report, October 1, 1992--December 30, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Yoon, R.H.; Luttrell, G.H.

    1992-12-31

    A novel technique for selectively coagulating and separating coal from dispersed mineral matter has been developed at Virginia Tech. The process, Selective Hydrophobic Coagulation (SHC), has been studied since 1986 under the sponsorship of the US Department of Energy (Contracts AC22-86PC91221 and AC22-90PC90174). The SHC process differs from oil agglomeration, shear or polymer flocculation, and electrolytic coagulation processes in that it does not require reagents or additives to induce the formation of coagula. In most cases, simple pH control is all that is required to (1) induce the coagulation of coal particles and (2) effectively disperse particles of mineral matter. If the coal is oxidized, a small dosage of reagents can be used to enhance the process. During the quarter, the Anutech Mark IV surface force apparatus was used to generate surface force-distance data for the mica/dodecylamine hydrochloride system (Task 2.1.1). Work to characterize the hydrophobicity of this system and the mica/DDOA{sup {minus}} system was also initiated (Task 2.1.2). In Task 3, the mixing/coagulation characteristics of a small Kenics static mixer/agitation system have been investigated (Task 3.2.1), a lamella thickener for the recovery of coagula has been built (Task 3.3.1), and the test program for the recovery of coagula by column flotation has been initiated (Task 3.3.4).

  6. Effects of three additives on the removal of perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) by coagulation using ferric chloride or aluminum sulfate.

    PubMed

    Kishimoto, Naoyuki; Kobayashi, Masanori

    2016-01-01

    Perfluorooctanesulfonic acid and its salts (PFOS) are emerging contaminants with long half-lives in water and human bodies. Accordingly, PFOS removal from water streams is required for controlling the PFOS pollution. To provide a simple PFOS separation technology, effects of three additives, powdered activated carbon (PAC), gelatin, and cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB), on the PFOS removal by coagulation with ferric chloride or aluminum sulfate were investigated in this study. As a result, coagulation with PAC or CTAB addition was effective in the PFOS removal, though the conventional coagulation and coagulation with gelatin addition were ineffective. A PFOS removal efficiency of over 90% was observed for the CTAB dose of over 1.6 μM (0.58 mg/L) and for the PAC dose of over 40 mg/L, and that of over 95% was achieved by the CTAB dose of over 2.4 μM (0.87 mg/L), when the initial PFOS concentration was 1.84 μM. The positive effect of CTAB would be caused by micelle formation, which was enhanced by both the association of hydrophobic tails and the electrostatic attraction of hydrophilic heads of PFOS and CTAB. Thus, a linear cationic surfactant of CTAB was concluded to be an effective additive for the PFOS removal by coagulation. PMID:27332843

  7. Chemical behavior of different species of phosphorus in coagulation.

    PubMed

    Park, Taejun; Ampunan, Vanvimol; Lee, Sanghyup; Chung, Eunhyea

    2016-02-01

    Phosphorus is one of the elements that have a significant impact on such environmental problems as eutrophication or algal bloom. Phosphorus compounds in water can be hydrolyzed to orthophosphate that is the only form of phosphorus that algae can assimilate. In this study, phosphorus removal in terms of orthophosphate and total phosphorus from wastewater was studied using alum or ferric ions as coagulants. It was observed that alum shows higher phosphorus removal efficiency than ferric ions in the same mole ratio concentrations. The proportion of orthophosphate among total phosphorus did not change significantly during coagulation process when the coagulant concentration is low. However, the proportion becomes gradually decreased as the coagulant concentration increases. Not only the electrolyte concentration difference in solution, but the characteristics of orthophosphate and polyphosphate such as reactivity and ionic size might also cause the differences in the removal rate. Orthophosphate that has greater reactivity than other phosphorus species would be involved in chemical reactions dominantly when large amounts of coagulants are applied. However, the effect of reactivity was diminished due to the large ionic size of polyphosphate and low concentration of electrolyte in low coagulant concentration during the coagulation process. PMID:26598995

  8. Systemic blood coagulation activation in acute coronary syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Undas, Anetta; Szułdrzyński, Konstanty; Brummel-Ziedins, Kathleen E.; Tracz, Wiesława; Zmudka, Krzysztof

    2009-01-01

    We evaluated systemic alterations to the blood coagulation system that occur during a coronary thrombotic event. Peripheral blood coagulation in patients with acute coronary thrombosis was compared with that in people with stable coronary artery disease (CAD). Blood coagulation and platelet activation at the microvascular injury site were assessed using immunochemistry in 28 non-anticoagulated patients with acute myocardial infarction (AMI) versus 28 stable CAD patients matched for age, sex, risk factors, and medications. AMI was associated with increased maximum rates of thrombin-antithrombin complex generation (by 93.8%; P < .001), thrombin B-chain formation (by 57.1%; P < .001), prothrombin consumption (by 27.9%; P = .012), fibrinogen consumption (by 27.0%; P = .02), factor (f) Va light chain generation (by 44.2%; P = .003), and accelerated fVa inactivation (by 76.1%; P < .001), and with enhanced release of platelet-derived soluble CD40 ligand (by 44.4%; P < .001). FVa heavy chain availability was similar in both groups because of enhanced formation and activated protein C (APC)–mediated destruction. The velocity of coagulant reactions in AMI patients showed positive correlations with interleukin-6. Heparin treatment led to dampening of coagulant reactions with profiles similar to those for stable CAD. AMI-induced systemic activation of blood coagulation markedly modifies the pattern of coagulant reactions at the site of injury in peripheral vessels compared with that in stable CAD patients. PMID:18931343

  9. Seawater pretreatment for reverse osmosis: chemistry, contaminants, and coagulation.

    PubMed

    Edzwald, James K; Haarhoff, Johannes

    2011-11-01

    The paper addresses the effects of salinity and temperature on the chemistry of important parameters affecting coagulation pretreatment including the ion product of water, acid-base chemistry, dissolved metal speciation, and precipitation reactions for aluminum and iron coagulants. The ion product of seawater is greater than for freshwaters and affects chemical hydrolysis and metal-hydroxide solubility reactions. Inorganic carbon is the main cause of seawater alkalinity and buffer intensity but borate B(OH)(4)(1-) also contributes. Buffer intensity is an important parameter in assessing coagulation pH adjustment. Mineral particles are relatively unstable in seawater from electrical double layer compression, and when present these particles are easily coagulated. Algal-particle stability is affected by steric effects and algal motility. Dissolved natural organic matter from algae and humic substances causes fouling of RO membranes and pretreatment removal is essential. Aluminum coagulants are not recommended, and not used, because they are too soluble in seawater. Ferric coagulants are preferred and used. The equilibrium solubility of Fe with amorphous ferric hydroxide in seawater is low over a wide range of pH and temperature conditions. Ferric chloride dosing guidelines are presented for various raw seawater quality characteristics. The effect of pH on coagulant dose and the role of buffer intensity are addressed. A dual coagulation strategy is recommended for treating seawater with moderate to high concentrations of algae or seawater with humic matter. This involves a low and constant dose with high charge-density cationic polymers using Fe as the main coagulant where it is varied in response to raw water quality changes. PMID:21907384

  10. Practical applications of sulfate-reducing bacteria to control acid mine drainage at the Lilly/Orphan Boy Mine near Elliston, Montana

    SciTech Connect

    Canty, M.

    1994-12-31

    The overall purpose of this document is to provide a detailed technical description of a technology, biological sulfate reduction, which is being demonstrated under the Mine Waste Technology Pilot Program, and provide the technology evaluation process undertaken to select this technology for demonstration. In addition, this document will link the use of the selected technology to an application at a specific site. The purpose of this project is to develop technical information on the ability of biological sulfate reduction to slow the process of acid generation and, thus, improve water quality at a remote mine site. Several technologies are screened for their potential to treat acid mine water and to function as a source control for a specific acid-generating situation: a mine shaft and associated underground workings flooded with acid mine water and discharging a small flow from a mine opening. The preferred technology is the use of biological sulfate reduction. Sulfate-reducing bacteria are capable of reducing sulfate to sulfide, as well as increasing the pH and alkalinity of water affected by acid generation. Soluble sulfide reacts with the soluble metals in solution to form insoluble metal sulfides. The environment needed for efficient sulfate-reducing bacteria growth decreases acid production by reducing the dissolved oxygen in water and increasing pH. A detailed technical description of the sulfate-reducing bacteria technology, based on an extensive review of the technical literature, is presented. The field demonstration of this technology to be performed at the Lilly/Orphan Boy Mine is also described. Finally, additional in situ applications of biological sulfate reduction are presented.

  11. Oil Field Souring Control by Nitrate-Reducing Sulfurospirillum spp. That Outcompete Sulfate-Reducing Bacteria for Organic Electron Donors▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Hubert, Casey; Voordouw, Gerrit

    2007-01-01

    Nitrate injection into oil reservoirs can prevent and remediate souring, the production of hydrogen sulfide by sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB). Nitrate stimulates nitrate-reducing, sulfide-oxidizing bacteria (NR-SOB) and heterotrophic nitrate-reducing bacteria (hNRB) that compete with SRB for degradable oil organics. Up-flow, packed-bed bioreactors inoculated with water produced from an oil field and injected with lactate, sulfate, and nitrate served as sources for isolating several NRB, including Sulfurospirillum and Thauera spp. The former coupled reduction of nitrate to nitrite and ammonia with oxidation of either lactate (hNRB activity) or sulfide (NR-SOB activity). Souring control in a bioreactor receiving 12.5 mM lactate and 6, 2, 0.75, or 0.013 mM sulfate always required injection of 10 mM nitrate, irrespective of the sulfate concentration. Community analysis revealed that at all but the lowest sulfate concentration (0.013 mM), significant SRB were present. At 0.013 mM sulfate, direct hNRB-mediated oxidation of lactate by nitrate appeared to be the dominant mechanism. The absence of significant SRB indicated that sulfur cycling does not occur at such low sulfate concentrations. The metabolically versatile Sulfurospirillum spp. were dominant when nitrate was present in the bioreactor. Analysis of cocultures of Desulfovibrio sp. strain Lac3, Lac6, or Lac15 and Sulfurospirillum sp. strain KW indicated its hNRB activity and ability to produce inhibitory concentrations of nitrite to be key factors for it to successfully outcompete oil field SRB. PMID:17308184

  12. Electrochemical Genosensor To Detect Pathogenic Bacteria (Escherichia coli O157:H7) As Applied in Real Food Samples (Fresh Beef) To Improve Food Safety and Quality Control.

    PubMed

    Abdalhai, Mandour H; Fernandes, António Maximiano; Xia, Xiaofeng; Musa, Abubakr; Ji, Jian; Sun, Xiulan

    2015-05-27

    The electrochemical genosensor is one of the most promising methods for the rapid and reliable detection of pathogenic bacteria. In a previous work, we performed an efficient electrochemical genosensor detection of Staphylococcus aureus by using lead sulfide nanoparticles (PbSNPs). As a continuation of this study, in the present work, the electrochemical genosensor was used to detect Escherichia coli O157:H7. The primer and probes were designed using NCBI database and Sigma-Aldrich primer and probe software. The capture and signalizing probes were modified by thiol (SH) and amine (NH2), respectively. Then, the signalizing probe was connected using cadmium sulfide nanoparticles (CdSNPs), which showed well-defined peaks after electrochemical detection. The genosensor was prepared by immobilization of complementary DNA on the gold electrode surface, which hybridizes with a specific fragment gene from pathogenic to make a sandwich structure. The conductivity and sensitivity of the sensor were increased by using multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT) that had been modified using chitosan deposited as a thin layer on the glass carbon electrode (GCE) surface, followed by a deposit of bismuth. The peak currents of E. coli O157:H7 correlated in a linear fashion with the concentration of tDNA. The detection limit was 1.97 × 10(-14) M, and the correlation coefficient was 0.989. A poorly defined current response was observed as the negative control and baseline. Our results showed high sensitivity and selectivity of the electrochemical DNA biosensor to the pathogenic bacteria E. coli O157:H7. The biosensor was also used to evaluate the detection of pathogen in real beef samples contaminated artificially. Compared with other electrochemical DNA biosensors, we conclude that this genosensor provides for very efficient detection of pathogenic bacteria. Therefore, this method may have potential application in food safety and related fields. PMID:25965077

  13. Impact of Albumin on Coagulation Competence and Hemorrhage During Major Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Rasmussen, Kirsten C.; Højskov, Michael; Johansson, Pär I.; Kridina, Irina; Kistorp, Thomas; Salling, Lisbeth; Nielsen, Henning B.; Ruhnau, Birgitte; Pedersen, Tom; Secher, Niels H.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract For patients exposed to a massive blood loss during surgery, maintained coagulation competence is important. It is less obvious whether coagulation competence influences bleeding during elective surgery where patients are exposed to infusion of a crystalloid or a colloid. This randomized controlled trial evaluates whether administration of 5% human albumin (HA) or lactated Ringer solution (LR) affects coagulation competence and in turn blood loss during cystectomy due to bladder cancer. Forty patients undergoing radical cystectomy were included to receive either 5% HA (n = 20) or LR (n = 20). Nineteen patients were analyzed in the HA group and 20 patients in the lactated Ringer group. Blinded determination of the blood loss was similar in the 2 groups of patients: 1658 (800–3300) mL with the use of HA and 1472 (700–4330) mL in the lactated Ringer group (P = 0.45). Yet, by thrombelastography (TEG) evaluated coagulation competence, albumin affected clot growth (TEG-angle 69 ± 5 vs 74° ± 3°, P < 0.01) and strength (TEG-MA: 59 ± 6 vs 67 ± 6 mm, P < 0.001) more than LR. Furthermore, by multivariate linear regression analyses reduced TEG-MA was independently associated with the blood loss (P = 0.042) while administration of albumin was related to the changes in TEG-MA (P = 0.029), aPPT (P < 0.022), and INR (P < 0.033). This randomized controlled trial demonstrates that administration of HA does not affect the blood loss as compared to infusion of LR. Also the use of HA did not affect the need for blood transfusion, the incidence of postoperative complications, or the hospital in-stay. Yet, albumin decreases coagulation competence during major surgery and the blood loss is related to TEG-MA rather than to plasma coagulation variables. PMID:26945358

  14. Changes in the human blood coagulating system during prolonged hypokinesia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Filatova, L. M.; Anashkin, O. D.

    1978-01-01

    Changes in the coagulating system of the blood were studied in six subjects during prolonged hypokinesia. Thrombogenic properties of the blood rose in all cases on the 8th day. These changes are explained by stress reaction due to unusual conditions for a healthy person. Changes in the blood coagulating system in the group subjected to physical exercise and without it ran a practically parallel course. Apparently physical exercise is insufficient to prevent such changes that appear in the coagulating system of the blood during prolonged hypokinesia.

  15. Development of the selective hydrophobic coagulation process. Technical progress report for the ninth quarter, October 1--December 31, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Yoon, R.H.; Luttrell, G.H.

    1994-07-01

    A novel technique for selectively coagulating and separating coal from dispersed mineral matter has been developed at Virginia Tech. The process, known as Selective Hydrophobic Coagulation (SHC), has been studied under the sponsorship of the U.S. Department of Energy since 1986 (Contracts DE-AC22-86PC91221 & DE-AC22- 9OPC90174). The SHC process differs from oil agglomeration, shear flocculation, polymer flocculation, and electrolytic coagulation processes in that it does not require reagents or additives to induce the formation of coagula. Often, simple pH control is all that is required to (i) induce the coagulation of coal particles, and (ii) effectively disperse particles of mineral matter. When the coal is superficially oxidized, a small dosage of reagents may be used to promote coagulation. During the past quarter, stability calculations were carried out to develop a better understanding of the selective coagulation of fine coal and associated mineral matter. The calculations were performed for interactions involving coal, silica and clay particles. The analyses suggest that the heterocoagulation of the edges of clay particles with coal particles controls the overall selectivity of the SHC process. In Subtask 3.3, froth flotation was explored as a possible technique for recovering hydrophobic coagula. Experimental test data obtained using this technique were analyzed using a statistical regression program. The analyses indicate that froth flotation can be used to successfully recover hydrophobic coagula provided that adequate precautions are taken to minimize coagula breakage due to turbulence. Recommendations include the use of low aeration rates and little or no additions of wash water.

  16. Reduced efficacy of marine cloud brightening geoengineering due to in-plume aerosol coagulation: parameterization and global implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stuart, G. S.; Stevens, R. G.; Partanen, A.-I.; Jenkins, A. K. L.; Korhonen, H.; Forster, P. M.; Spracklen, D. V.; Pierce, J. R.

    2013-10-01

    The intentional enhancement of cloud albedo via controlled sea-spray injection from ships (marine cloud brightening) has been proposed as a possible method to control anthropogenic global warming; however, there remains significant uncertainty in the efficacy of this method due to, amongst other factors, uncertainties in aerosol and cloud microphysics. A major assumption used in recent cloud- and climate-modeling studies is that all sea spray was emitted uniformly into some oceanic grid boxes, and thus these studies did not account for subgrid aerosol coagulation within the sea-spray plumes. We explore the evolution of these sea-salt plumes using a multi-shelled Gaussian plume model with size-resolved aerosol coagulation. We determine how the final number of particles depends on meteorological conditions, including wind speed and boundary-layer stability, as well as the emission rate and size distribution of aerosol emitted. Under previously proposed injection rates and typical marine conditions, we find that the number of aerosol particles is reduced by over 50%, but this reduction varies from under 10% to over 90% depending on the conditions. We provide a computationally efficient parameterization for cloud-resolving and global-scale models to account for subgrid-scale coagulation, and we implement this parameterization in a global-scale aerosol-climate model. While designed to address subgrid-scale coagulation of sea-salt particles, the parameterization is generally applicable for coagulation of subgrid-scale aerosol from point sources. We find that accounting for this subgrid-scale coagulation reduces cloud droplet number concentrations by 46% over emission regions, and reduces the global mean radiative flux perturbation from -1.5 W m-2 to -0.8 W m-2.

  17. Controlling Persister and Biofilm Cells of Gram-Negative Bacteria with a New 1,3,5-Triazine Derivative

    PubMed Central

    Bahar, Ali Adem; Liu, Zhigang; Garafalo, Meagan; Kallenbach, Neville; Ren, Dacheng

    2015-01-01

    Infections caused by multidrug-resistant bacteria have been on the rise. This important issue presents a great challenge to the healthcare system and creates an urgent need for alternative therapeutic agents. As a potential solution to this problem, antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) have attracted increasing attention due to their broad spectrum of targeted microbes. However, most AMPs are expensive to synthesize, have relatively high cytotoxicity to mammalian cells, and are susceptible to proteolytic degradation. In order to overcome these limitations, novel synthetic AMPs are desired. Using 1,3,5-triazine (TN) as a template, several combinatorial libraries with varying cationic charge and lipophilicity were designed and screened by the Kallenbach lab. From this screening, TN-5 was identified as a potent lead. In the present study, this compound was tested for its antimicrobial activities on Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. In addition to regular planktonic cells, the effects on biofilms and persister cells (metabolically inactive and antibiotic tolerant subpopulation) were also investigated. TN-5 was found to have a minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of 12.8 µM for both species and kill regular planktonic cells of both species dose dependently. TN-5 is also effective against persister cells of both E. coli and P. aeruginosa. The killing of biofilm cells of the mucoid P. aeruginosa PDO300 was enhanced by alginate lyase. PMID:26473884

  18. Controlling Persister and Biofilm Cells of Gram-Negative Bacteria with a New 1,3,5-Triazine Derivative.

    PubMed

    Bahar, Ali Adem; Liu, Zhigang; Garafalo, Meagan; Kallenbach, Neville; Ren, Dacheng

    2015-01-01

    Infections caused by multidrug-resistant bacteria have been on the rise. This important issue presents a great challenge to the healthcare system and creates an urgent need for alternative therapeutic agents. As a potential solution to this problem, antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) have attracted increasing attention due to their broad spectrum of targeted microbes. However, most AMPs are expensive to synthesize, have relatively high cytotoxicity to mammalian cells, and are susceptible to proteolytic degradation. In order to overcome these limitations, novel synthetic AMPs are desired. Using 1,3,5-triazine (TN) as a template, several combinatorial libraries with varying cationic charge and lipophilicity were designed and screened by the Kallenbach lab. From this screening, TN-5 was identified as a potent lead. In the present study, this compound was tested for its antimicrobial activities on Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. In addition to regular planktonic cells, the effects on biofilms and persister cells (metabolically inactive and antibiotic tolerant subpopulation) were also investigated. TN-5 was found to have a minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of 12.8 μM for both species and kill regular planktonic cells of both species dose dependently. TN-5 is also effective against persister cells of both E. coli and P. aeruginosa. The killing of biofilm cells of the mucoid P. aeruginosa PDO300 was enhanced by alginate lyase. PMID:26473884

  19. Development of a real-time PCR assay with an internal amplification control for detection of Gram-negative histamine-producing bacteria in fish.

    PubMed

    Bjornsdottir-Butler, Kristin; Jones, Jessica L; Benner, Ronald; Burkhardt, William

    2011-05-01

    Prompt detection of bacteria that contribute to scombrotoxin (histamine) fish poisoning can aid in the detection of potentially toxic fish products and prevent the occurrence of illness. We report development of the first real-time PCR method for rapid detection of Gram-negative histamine-producing bacteria (HPB) in fish. The real-time PCR assay was 100% inclusive for detecting high-histamine producing isolates and did not detect any of the low- or non-histamine producing isolates. The efficiency of the assay with/without internal amplification control ranged from 96-104% and in the presence of background flora and inhibitory matrices was 92/100% and 73-96%, respectively. This assay was used to detect HPB from naturally contaminated yellowfin tuna, bluefish, and false albacore samples. Photobacterium damselae (8), Plesiomonas shigelloides (2), Shewanella sp. (1), and Morganella morganii (1) were subsequently isolated from the real-time PCR positive fish samples. These results indicate that the real-time PCR assay developed in this study is a rapid and sensitive method for detecting high-HPB. The assay may be adapted for quantification of HPB, either directly or with an MPN-PCR method. PMID:21356438

  20. Control of Salmonella on sprouting mung bean and alfalfa seeds by using a biocontrol preparation based on antagonistic bacteria and lytic bacteriophages.

    PubMed

    Ye, Jianxiong; Kostrzynska, Magdalaena; Dunfield, Kari; Warriner, Keith

    2010-01-01

    The following reports on the application of a combination of antagonistic bacteria and lytic bacteriophages to control the growth of Salmonella on sprouting mung beans and alfalfa seeds. Antagonistic bacteria were isolated from mung bean sprouts and tomatoes by using the deferred plate assay to assess anti-Salmonella activity. From the isolates screened, an Enterobacter asburiae strain (labeled "JX1") exhibited stable antagonistic activity against a broad range of Salmonella serovars (Agona, Berta, Enteritidis, Hadar, Heidelberg, Javiana, Montevideo, Muenchen, Newport, Saint Paul, and Typhimurium). Lytic bacteriophages against Salmonella were isolated from pig or cattle manure effluent. A bacteriophage cocktail prepared from six isolates was coinoculated with E. asburiae JX1 along with Salmonella in broth culture. The combination of E. asburiae JX1 and bacteriophage cocktail reduced the levels of Salmonella by 5.7 to 6.4 log CFU/ml. Mung beans inoculated with Salmonella and sprouted over a 4-day period attained levels of 6.72 + or - 0.78 log CFU/g. In contrast, levels of Salmonella were reduced to 3.31 + or - 2.48 or 1.16 + or - 2.14 log CFU/g when the pathogen was coinoculated with bacteriophages or E. asburiae JX1, respectively. However, by using a combination of E. asburiae JX1 and bacteriophages, the levels of Salmonella associated with mung bean sprouts were only detected by enrichment. The biocontrol preparation was effective at controlling the growth of Salmonella under a range of sprouting temperatures (20 to 30 degrees Celsius) and was equally effective at suppressing the growth of Salmonella on sprouting alfalfa seeds. The combination of E. asburiae JX1 and bacteriophages represents a promising, chemical-free approach for controlling the growth of Salmonella on sprouting seeds. PMID:20051198

  1. Wastewater treatment using flocculation, coagulation, and flotation. (Latest citations from the NTIS bibliographic database). NewSearch

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-10-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning the design, development, and evaluation of flocculation coagulation and flotation processes for the treatment of sewage and industrial wastes. Citations examine technology requirements and limitations, activated sludge and anaerobic processes, chlorination, runoff pollution control, wastewater recycling and reuse, and materials recovery. (Contains 250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  2. Effect of infused volatile fatty acids and caseinate on milk composition and coagulation in dairy cows.

    PubMed

    Hurtaud, C; Rulquin, H; Verite, R

    1993-10-01

    Milk protein secretion is changed by increasing the proportion of energy, mainly as propionic acid, or the availability of AA. Whether associative effects exist between energy nature and protein amounts is unknown. Therefore, ruminal isoenergetic infusions of low or high propionate mixtures were combined factorially with duodenal infusion of sodium caseinate or control. Four ruminally and duodenally fistulated Holstein cows were used. The diet was limited and consisted of 70% forage and 30% concentrate. Caseinate infusion increased milk yield and protein and casein contents and decreased milk fat content; curd yields and coagulation properties of milk were improved. The infusion of propionic acid caused a large increase in rumen propionate. Milk yield tended to decrease, and milk fat decreased, but protein, casein, and curd yields were unchanged; milk-coagulating properties were improved. No interaction existed between energy and protein amounts. Alteration of VFA had little effect on milk composition, but increasing the protein supply to the duodenum increased milk protein. PMID:8227627

  3. Impacts of epichlorohydrin-dimethylamine on coagulation performance and membrane fouling in coagulation/ultrafiltration combined process with different Al-based coagulants.

    PubMed

    Bu, Fan; Gao, Baoyu; Li, Ruihua; Sun, Shenglei; Yue, Qinyan

    2016-09-01

    Two kinds of aluminum-based coagulants and epichlorohydrin-dimethylamine (DAM-ECH) were used in the treatment of humic acid-kaolin simulated water by coagulation-ultrafiltration (C-UF) hybrid process. Coagulation performance, floc characteristics, including floc size, compact degree, and strength were investigated in this study. Ultrafiltration experiments were conducted by a dead-end batch unit to implement the resistance analyses to explore the membrane fouling mechanisms. Results showed that DAM-ECH aid significantly increased the UV254 and DOC removal efficiencies and contributed to the formation of larger and stronger flocs with a looser structure. Aluminum chloride (Al) gave rise to better coagulation performance with DAM-ECH compared with poly aluminum chloride (PACl). The consequences of ultrafiltration experiments showed that DAM-ECH aid could reduce the membrane fouling mainly by decreasing the cake layer resistance. The flux reductions for PACl, Al/DAM-ECH (dosing both Al and DAM-ECH) and PACl/DAM-ECH (dosing both PACl and DAM-ECH) were 62%, 56% and 44%, respectively. Results of this study would be beneficial for the application of PACl/DAM-ECH and Al/DAM-ECH composite coagulants in water treatment processes. PMID:27295439

  4. Links between coagulation, inflammation, regeneration, and fibrosis in kidney pathology.

    PubMed

    Suárez-Álvarez, Beatriz; Liapis, Helen; Anders, Hans-Joachim

    2016-04-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) involves nephron injury leading to irreversible nephron loss, ie, chronic kidney disease (CKD). Both AKI and CKD are associated with distinct histological patterns of tissue injury, but kidney atrophy in CKD involves tissue remodeling with interstitial inflammation and scarring. No doubt, nephron atrophy, inflammation, fibrosis, and renal dysfunction are associated with each other, but their hierarchical relationships remain speculative. To better understand the pathophysiology, we provide an overview of the fundamental danger response programs that assure host survival upon traumatic injury from as early as the first multicellular organisms, ie, bleeding control by coagulation, infection control by inflammation, epithelial barrier restoration by re-epithelialization, and tissue stabilization by mesenchymal repair. Although these processes assure survival in the majority of the populations, their dysregulation causes kidney disease in a minority. We discuss how, in genetically heterogeneous population, genetic variants shift balances and modulate danger responses toward kidney disease. We further discuss how classic kidney disease entities develop from an insufficient or overshooting activation of these danger response programs. Finally, we discuss molecular pathways linking, for example, inflammation and regeneration or inflammation and fibrosis. Understanding the causative and hierarchical relationships and the molecular links between the danger response programs should help to identify molecular targets to modulate kidney injury and to improve outcomes for kidney disease patients. PMID:26752746

  5. Coagulation activation in sickle cell trait: an exploratory study

    PubMed Central

    Amin, Chirag; Adam, Soheir; Mooberry, Micah J.; Kutlar, Abdullah; Kutlar, Ferdane; Esserman, Denise; Brittain, Julia E.; Ataga, Kenneth I.; Chang, Jen-Yea; Wolberg, Alisa S.; Key, Nigel S.

    2016-01-01

    Summary Recent epidemiologic data suggest that sickle cell trait (HbAS; AS) is a risk factor for venous thromboembolism. We conducted an exploratory study of healthy subjects with AS under baseline conditions to determine whether a chronic basal hyperactivation of coagulation exists, and if so, what mechanism(s) contribute to this state. Eighteen healthy AS individuals were compared to 22 African-American controls with a normal haemoglobin profile (HbAA; AA) and 17 patients with sickle cell disease (HbSS; SS). Plasma thrombin-antithrombin complexes and D-dimer levels were elevated in AS relative to AA patients (P = 0.0385 and P = 0.017, respectively), and as expected, were much higher in SS versus AA (P < 0.0001 for both). Thrombin generation in platelet poor plasma was indistinguishable between AA and AS subjects, whereas a paradoxical decrease in endogenous thrombin potential was observed in SS (P ≤ 0.0001). Whole blood tissue factor was elevated in SS compared to AA (P = 0.005), but did not differ between AA and AS. Plasma microparticle tissue factor activity was non-significantly elevated in AS (P = 0.051), but was clearly elevated in SS patients (P = 0.004) when compared to AA controls. Further studies in larger cohorts of subjects with sickle cell trait are needed to confirm the results of this preliminary investigation. PMID:26511074

  6. Bak-Sneppen Type Models and Coagulation-Fragmentation Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grinfeld, M.

    2008-09-01

    We suggest a construction that allows us to bring methods of denumerable Markov chain theory and coagulation-fragmentation processes to bear on the question of locating the threshold in Bak-Sneppen type models.

  7. Carbon dioxide pressure-induced coagulation of microalgae.

    PubMed

    Lee, Roland; Jessop, Philip G; Champagne, Pascale

    2015-12-28

    The move to a low-carbon economy has generated renewed interest in microalgae for the production of biofuels with the potential mutual benefit of wastewater treatment. However, harvesting has been identified as a limiting factor to the economic viability of this process. This paper explores the harvesting of microalgae using high-pressure gas without the addition of coagulants. Coagulation of microalgae under high-pressure gas was found to be an efficient method to separate algae from suspension. The critical coagulation pressures (CCPs) for H(2) and CO(2) were determined to be 6.1 and 6.2 MPa, respectively. The CO(2)-induced decrease in solution pH positively influenced coagulation rates, without appearing to affect the CCP. This approach could be beneficial for the economic removal of microalgae from solution for the production of both biofuels and biomedical compounds without the addition of non-environmentally friendly chemicals. PMID:26574522

  8. CARDIOVASCULAR AND BLOOD COAGULATION EFFECTS OF PULMONARY ZINC EXPOSURE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Cardiovascular damage induced by pulmonary exposure to environmental chemicals can result from direct action or, secondarily, from pulmonary injury. We have developed a rat model of pulmonary exposure to zinc to demonstrate cardiac, coagulative, and fibrinolytic alterations. Mal...

  9. Electro-coagulation treatment of oily wastewater with sludge analysis.

    PubMed

    Ibrahim, Dhorgham Skban; Sakthipriya, N; Balasubramanian, N

    2012-01-01

    Experiments were carried out in a batch reactor to treat the oily effluent by electro-coagulation. The influence of operating parameters such as applied current, type of electrode and electrolysis time on electro-coagulation efficiency has been critically examined. The maximum percentage removal of chemical oxygen demand (COD) was 94% under optimum experimental conditions of pH 6.7, current density 6 mA/cm², electrolysis time 40 min, and using mild steel as anode. The remaining sludge in the reactor was analyzed by energy disperse analysis of X-rays (EDAX) and scanning electron microscope (SEM) analysis. The analysis confirms that the oily pollutant was removed by electroflotation and adsorption of the oily particles of precipitate during the electro-coagulation process. Electro-coagulation can be used as an efficient treatment technique for oily wastewater. PMID:23109567

  10. Moringa coagulant as a stabilizer for amorphous solids: Part I.

    PubMed

    Bhende, Santosh; Jadhav, Namdeo

    2012-06-01

    Stabilization of amorphous state is a focal area for formulators to reap benefits related with solubility and consequently bioavailability of poorly soluble drugs. In the present work, an attempt has been made to explore the potential of moringa coagulant as an amorphous state stabilizer by investigating its role in stabilization of spray-dried (amorphous) ibuprofen, meloxicam and felodipine. Thermal studies like glass forming ability, glass transition temperature, hot stage microscopy and DSC were carried out for understanding thermodynamic stabilization of drugs. PXRD and dissolution studies were performed to support contribution of moringa coagulant. Studies showed that hydrogen bonding and electrostatic interactions between drug and moringa coagulant are responsible for amorphous state stabilization as explored by ATR-FTIR and molecular docking. Especially, H-bonding was found to be predominant mechanism for drug stabilization. Therein, arginine (basic amino acid in coagulant) exhibited various interactions and played important role in stabilization of aforesaid amorphous drugs. PMID:22359158

  11. Argon beam coagulation in foot and ankle surgery.

    PubMed

    Adams, Melissa L; Steinberg, John S

    2011-01-01

    In this brief report, we introduce the principles, indications, advantages, disadvantages, and surgical techniques involved in the use of argon beam coagulation in foot and ankle surgery. PMID:21907597

  12. Complement-coagulation crosstalk on cellular and artificial surfaces.

    PubMed

    Wiegner, Rebecca; Chakraborty, Shinjini; Huber-Lang, Markus

    2016-10-01

    The humoral serine proteases of the complement system and the coagulation system play central roles during the events of an inflammatory response. While the complement system confers immunoprotective and -regulatory functions, the coagulation cascade is responsible to ensure hemostatic maintenance. Although these two systems individually unfold during inflammation, several studies have reported on the "crosstalk" between components of the complement and the coagulation system in the fluid phase. However, both cascades are usually initiated on or in close proximity to foreign or activated surfaces, and there is increasing evidence for interacting complement and coagulation proteins on various superficial areas on endothelium, circulating entities like platelets, leukocytes, microparticles and pathogens, and even on artificial surfaces. This review aims at summarizing these interactions to complete the picture. PMID:27371975

  13. A cartridge based sensor array platform for multiple coagulation measurements from plasma.

    PubMed

    Cakmak, O; Ermek, E; Kilinc, N; Bulut, S; Baris, I; Kavakli, I H; Yaralioglu, G G; Urey, Hakan

    2015-01-01

    This paper proposes a MEMS-based sensor array enabling multiple clot-time tests for plasma in one disposable microfluidic cartridge. The versatile LoC (Lab-on-Chip) platform technology is demonstrated here for real-time coagulation tests (activated Partial Thromboplastin Time (aPTT) and Prothrombin Time (PT)). The system has a reader unit and a disposable cartridge. The reader has no electrical connections to the cartridge. This enables simple and low-cost cartridge designs and avoids reliability problems associated with electrical connections. The cartridge consists of microfluidic channels and MEMS microcantilevers placed in each channel. The microcantilevers are made of electroplated nickel. They are actuated remotely using an external electro-coil and the read-out is also conducted remotely using a laser. The phase difference between the cantilever oscillation and the coil drive is monitored in real time. During coagulation, the viscosity of the blood plasma increases resulting in a change in the phase read-out. The proposed assay was tested on human and control plasma samples for PT and aPTT measurements. PT and aPTT measurements from control plasma samples are comparable with the manufacturer's datasheet and the commercial reference device. The measurement system has an overall 7.28% and 6.33% CV for PT and aPTT, respectively. For further implementation, the microfluidic channels of the cartridge were functionalized for PT and aPTT tests by drying specific reagents in each channel. Since simultaneous PT and aPTT measurements are needed in order to properly evaluate the coagulation system, one of the most prominent features of the proposed assay is enabling parallel measurement of different coagulation parameters. Additionally, the design of the cartridge and the read-out system as well as the obtained reproducible results with 10 μl of the plasma samples suggest an opportunity for a possible point-of-care application. PMID:25353144

  14. Reducing surface water total and methyl mercury concentrations and bioavailability using a coagulation-wetland system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kraus, T. E.; Fleck, J.; Henneberry, Y. K.; Stumpner, E. B.; Krabbenhoft, D. P.; Bachand, P.; Randall, P.

    2013-12-01

    With the recent passage of laws regulating concentrations and loads of mercury (Hg) in surface waters, there is a need to develop management practices that will reduce the export of Hg from both point and non-point sources. Coagulation with metal based salts to remove particles and dissolved organic matter (DOM) from solution is a practice commonly employed by drinking water utilities. Because dissolved Hg is associated with particles and DOM, it follows that Hg should also be removed during the coagulation process and end up associated with the organo-metal precipitate, termed flocculate (floc). The effectiveness of iron- and aluminum-based coagulants for removing both inorganic and methyl mercury (IHg and MeHg, respectively) from solution was demonstrated in laboratory studies conducted on agricultural drainage waters of the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta: dissolved concentrations of MeHg decreased by 80% while IHg decreased by 97% following coagulation. To test the field application of this technology, samples were collected from the inflows and outflows of wetland treatment cells constructed in the central Delta of California. This replicated field experiment includes three replicates each of three inflow waters treatments: (1) iron sulfate addition, (2) polyaluminum chloride addition, and (3) untreated controls. Water entering and exiting the nine treatment cells was sampled approximately monthly over a 1-year period for total Hg and MeHg in both the dissolved and particulate aqueous phases. Initial results confirm that coagulant addition is removing Hg (total and methyl, particulate and dissolved) from solution and sequestering it in the floc. Seasonal effects on DOM concentration and other factors appear to effect whether passage through the wetland cells alters surface water dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and Hg concentrations. Related studies will examine whether the presence of the floc affects the production and fate of MeHg within the wetland cells. If

  15. Rope-Producing Strains of Bacillus spp. from Wheat Bread and Strategy for Their Control by Lactic Acid Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Pepe, Olimpia; Blaiotta, Giuseppe; Moschetti, Giancarlo; Greco, Teresa; Villani, Francesco

    2003-01-01

    Two types of white wheat bread (high- and low-type loaves) were investigated for rope spoilage. Thirty of the 56 breads tested developed rope spoilage within 5 days; the high-type loaves were affected by rope spoilage more than the low-type loaves. Sixty-one Bacillus strains were isolated from ropy breads and were characterized on the basis of their phenotypic and genotypic traits. All of the isolates were identified as Bacillus subtilis by biochemical tests, but molecular assays (randomly amplified polymorphic DNA PCR assay, denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis analysis, and sequencing of the V3 region of 16S ribosomal DNA) revealed greater Bacillus species variety in ropy breads. In fact, besides strains of B. subtilis, Bacillus licheniformis, Bacillus cereus, and isolates of Bacillus clausii and Bacillus firmus were also identified. All of the ropy Bacillus isolates exhibited amylase activity, whereas only 32.4% of these isolates were able to produce ropiness in bread slices after treatment at 96°C for 10 min. Strains of lactic acid bacteria previously isolated from sourdough were first selected for antirope activity on bread slices and then used as starters for bread-making experiments. Prevention of growth of approximately 104 rope-producing B. subtilis G1 spores per cm2 on bread slices for more than 15 days was observed when heat-treated cultures of Lactobacillus plantarum E5 and Leuconostoc mesenteroides A27 were added. Growth of B. subtilis G1 occurred after 7 days in breads started with Saccharomyces cerevisiae T22, L. plantarum E5, and L. mesenteroides A27. PMID:12676716

  16. Rope-producing strains of Bacillus spp. from wheat bread and strategy for their control by lactic acid bacteria.

    PubMed

    Pepe, Olimpia; Blaiotta, Giuseppe; Moschetti, Giancarlo; Greco, Teresa; Villani, Francesco

    2003-04-01

    Two types of white wheat bread (high- and low-type loaves) were investigated for rope spoilage. Thirty of the 56 breads tested developed rope spoilage within 5 days; the high-type loaves were affected by rope spoilage more than the low-type loaves. Sixty-one Bacillus strains were isolated from ropy breads and were characterized on the basis of their phenotypic and genotypic traits. All of the isolates were identified as Bacillus subtilis by biochemical tests, but molecular assays (randomly amplified polymorphic DNA PCR assay, denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis analysis, and sequencing of the V3 region of 16S ribosomal DNA) revealed greater Bacillus species variety in ropy breads. In fact, besides strains of B. subtilis, Bacillus licheniformis, Bacillus cereus, and isolates of Bacillus clausii and Bacillus firmus were also identified. All of the ropy Bacillus isolates exhibited amylase activity, whereas only 32.4% of these isolates were able to produce ropiness in bread slices after treatment at 96 degrees C for 10 min. Strains of lactic acid bacteria previously isolated from sourdough were first selected for antirope activity on bread slices and then used as starters for bread-making experiments. Prevention of growth of approximately 10(4) rope-producing B. subtilis G1 spores per cm(2) on bread slices for more than 15 days was observed when heat-treated cultures of Lactobacillus plantarum E5 and Leuconostoc mesenteroides A27 were added. Growth of B. subtilis G1 occurred after 7 days in breads started with Saccharomyces cerevisiae T22, L. plantarum E5, and L. mesenteroides A27. PMID:12676716

  17. The Continuous Coagulation-FragmentationEquations with Diffusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laurençot, Philippe; Mischler, Stéphane

    Existence of global weak solutions to the continuous coagulation-fragmentation equations with diffusion is investigated when the kinetic coefficients satisfy a detailed balance condition or the coagulation coefficient enjoys a monotonicity condition. Our approach relies on weak and strong compactness methods in L1 in the spirit of the DiPerna-Lions theory for the Boltzmann equation. Under the detailed balance condition the large-time behaviour is also studied.

  18. Disseminated intravascular coagulation and hepatocellular necrosis due to clove oil.

    PubMed

    Brown, S A; Biggerstaff, J; Savidge, G F

    1992-10-01

    We describe the case of a 2-year-old child who suffered from disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC) and hepatocellular necrosis, following ingestion of clove oil. The patient was treated with heparin and fresh frozen plasma, and, following specific haemostasis assays, with appropriate coagulation factor and inhibitor concentrates. The case demonstrates how this approach can be successfully used in the management of DIC with coexisting liver failure. PMID:1450336

  19. Gastric explosion induced by argon plasma coagulation and prevention strategies.

    PubMed

    Freiman, John Saul; Hampe, Toni

    2014-12-01

    We describe the occurrence of an iatrogenic explosion induced by argon plasma coagulation in a 70-year-old man undergoing gastroscopy. Combustible gases in the stomach may have been released by bacterial overgrowth as a result of partial gastric outlet obstruction (caused by a gastric tumor) and reduced acidity (from proton pump inhibitor therapy). We propose a stepwise process during upper endoscopy to prevent this devastating complication, comprising aspiration, preinsufflation with CO2, and then coagulation. PMID:25041867

  20. Removal of dispersant-stabilized carbon nanotubes by regular coagulants.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ni; Liu, Changli; Zhang, Jing; Lin, Daohui

    2012-01-01

    Coagulation followed by sedimentation, as a conventional technique in the water treatment plant, can be the first line of defense against exposures of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) to aquatic organisms and human beings, which has been rarely documented. This study investigated the removal of dispersant-stabilized CNT suspensions by poly aluminum chloride (PACl) and KAl(SO4)2 x 12H2O (alum), with a focus on the effects of dispersant type, coagulant type and dosage. PACl performed better than alum in the removal of tannic acid-, humic acid-, and sodium dodecyl benzenesulfonate-stabilized CNTs, but worse for polyethylene glycol octylphenyl ether (TX100)-stabilized CNTs. Neither coagulant could effectively precipitate cetyltrimethyl ammonium bromide-stabilized CNTs. The removal by PACl first increased up to a plateau and then decreased with the continued increase of coagulant dosage. However, the removal rates leveled off but did not decrease after achieving their highest level with the continued addition of alum. The coagulation and flocculation of the CNT suspensions by PACl could be regulated mainly by the mechanism of adsorption charge neutralization, whereas the coagulation by alum mainly involved electrical double-layer compression. PMID:23513676

  1. Coagulation-flocculation in leachate treatment using modified micro sand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thaldiri, Nur Hanani; Halim, Azhar Abdul

    2013-11-01

    Sanitary landfill leachate is considered as highly polluted wastewater, without any treatment, discharging into water system will cause underground water and surface water pollutions. This study was to investigate the treatability of the semi-aerobic landfill leachate via coagulation-flocculation using poly-aluminum chloride (PAC), cationic polymer, and modified micro sand. Leachate was collected from Pulau Burung Sanitary Landfill (PBSL) located in Penang, Malaysia. Coagulation-flocculation was performed by using jar test equipment and the effect of pH, dose of coagulant and dose of polymer toward removal of chemical oxygen demand (COD), color and suspended solid (SS) were examined. Micro sand was also used in this study to compare settling time of coagulation-flocculation process. The optimum pH, dose of coagulant (PAC) and dose of polymer (cationic) achieved were 7.0, 1000 mg/L and 8 mg/L, respectively. The dose of micro sand used for the settling time process was 300 mg/L. Results showed that 52.66% removal of COD, 97.16% removal of SS and 96.44% removal of color were achieved under optimum condition. The settling times for the settling down of the sludge or particles that formed during coagulation-flocculation process were 1 min with modified sand, 20 min with raw micro sand and 45 min without micro sand.

  2. Planetesimal formation by sweep-up coagulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Windmark, Fredrik; Birnstiel, Til; Ormel, Chris W.; Dullemond, Cornelis P.

    2013-07-01

    The formation of planetesimals is often accredited to collisional sticking of dust grains in the protoplanetary disk. The exact process is however unknown, as collisions between larger aggregates tend to lead to fragmentation or bouncing rather than sticking. These growth barriers tend to halt the dust growth already at millimeters or centimeters in size, which is far below the kilometer-sizes that are needed for gravity to aid in the accretion. To study how far dust coagulation can proceed, we have developed a new collision model based on the latest laboratory experiments, and have used it together with a dust-size evolution code capable of resolving all grain interactions in the protoplanetary disk. We find that for the general dust population, bouncing and fragmenting collisions prevent the growth above millimeter-sizes. However, a small number of lucky particles can grow larger than the rest by only interacting at low, sticky velocities. As they grow, they become increasingly resilient to fragmentation caused by the small grains. In this way, two populations are formed: One which remains small due to the collisional barriers, and one that continues to grow by sweeping up the smaller grains around them.

  3. Oxidation inhibits iron-induced blood coagulation.

    PubMed

    Pretorius, Etheresia; Bester, Janette; Vermeulen, Natasha; Lipinski, Boguslaw

    2013-01-01

    Blood coagulation under physiological conditions is activated by thrombin, which converts soluble plasma fibrinogen (FBG) into an insoluble clot. The structure of the enzymatically-generated clot is very characteristic being composed of thick fibrin fibers susceptible to the fibrinolytic degradation. However, in chronic degenerative diseases, such as atherosclerosis, diabetes mellitus, cancer, and neurological disorders, fibrin clots are very different forming dense matted deposits (DMD) that are not effectively removed and thus create a condition known as thrombosis. We have recently shown that trivalent iron (ferric ions) generates hydroxyl radicals, which subsequently convert FBG into abnormal fibrin clots in the form of DMDs. A characteristic feature of DMDs is their remarkable and permanent resistance to the enzymatic degradation. Therefore, in order to prevent thrombotic incidences in the degenerative diseases it is essential to inhibit the iron-induced generation of hydroxyl radicals. This can be achieved by the pretreatment with a direct free radical scavenger (e.g. salicylate), and as shown in this paper by the treatment with oxidizing agents such as hydrogen peroxide, methylene blue, and sodium selenite. Although the actual mechanism of this phenomenon is not yet known, it is possible that hydroxyl radicals are neutralized by their conversion to the molecular oxygen and water, thus inhibiting the formation of dense matted fibrin deposits in human blood. PMID:23170793

  4. Influence of blood coagulability after spinal surgeries

    PubMed Central

    Matsumoto, Marcelo Hide; Rodrigues, Luiz Claudio Lacerda; Batalini, Luiz Gustavo da silva; Fonteles, Thales Arcanjo; Bortoletto, Adalberto

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To verify whether spinal surgery causes relevant changes in the blood clotting process and define which factors have the greatest influence on changes found. Method: This is a not randomized, cross-sectional study, Forty seven patients were evaluated between August 2011 and February 2013, whose clinical, surgical, laboratory and image daata were collected. The data obtained were crossed with the epidemiological data of each patient in a moment prior to and another after surgery searching which variables have been directly influenced. Result: Our analysis showed that the most important changes occurred in patients with BMI classified, according to the World Health Organization (WHO) as out of healthy range. Other smaller correlations were also found. Another important consideration was the tendency to observe hypercoagulability in smoker patients, a fact that is not influenced by spinal procedures. Conclusion: We concluded that spinal surgeries cause few relevant changes in the blood clotting process and that among the factors studied, BMI (when out of the healthy range, according to the WHO classification) showed closer relationship with changes in laboratory coagulation tests. Level of Evidence III, Cross-Sectional Study. PMID:25328429

  5. Disseminated intravascular coagulation following administration of sunitinib

    PubMed Central

    OLIVO, ANAËLLE; NOËL, NICOLAS; BESSE, BENJAMIN; TABURET, ANNE-MARIE; LAMBOTTE, OLIVIER

    2016-01-01

    Sunitinib is an increasingly used, orally administered targeted therapy, approved by the European Medicines Agency for the treatment of various types of cancer, including gastrointestinal stromal tumor unresectable or metastatic disease, following disease progression or intolerance to imatinib, and advanced or metastatic renal cell carcinoma, progressive well-differentiated pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors in patients with unresectable, locally advanced or metastatic disease. Sunitinib inhibits several tyrosine kinases, including the vascular endothelial growth factor receptor and the platelet-derived growth factor receptor. Tyrosine kinases inhibitor therapies are generally well-tolerated; nonetheless, they are not void of side effects. The majority of patients reported are grade 1 or 2, and include common and unspecific adverse events, including fatigue, gastrointestinal disorders, skin discoloration, altered taste, cough and dyspnea. Grade 3 or 4 adverse events, including bleeding and hemorrhage, are less frequent. The present study presented the first case of disseminated intravascular coagulation associated with the administration of sunitinib, shortly following the increase of sunitinib dosage. PMID:27330781

  6. Experimental dosing of wetlands with coagulants removes mercury from surface water and decreases mercury bioaccumulation in fish.

    PubMed

    Ackerman, Joshua T; Kraus, Tamara E C; Fleck, Jacob A; Krabbenhoft, David P; Horwath, William R; Bachand, Sandra M; Herzog, Mark P; Hartman, C Alex; Bachand, Philip A M

    2015-05-19

    Mercury pollution is widespread globally, and strategies for managing mercury contamination in aquatic environments are necessary. We tested whether coagulation with metal-based salts could remove mercury from wetland surface waters and decrease mercury bioaccumulation in fish. In a complete randomized block design, we constructed nine experimental wetlands in California's Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta, stocked them with mosquitofish (Gambusia affinis), and then continuously applied agricultural drainage water that was either untreated (control), or treated with polyaluminum chloride or ferric sulfate coagulants. Total mercury and methylmercury concentrations in surface waters were decreased by 62% and 63% in polyaluminum chloride treated wetlands and 50% and 76% in ferric sulfate treated wetlands compared to control wetlands. Specifically, following coagulation, mercury was transferred from the filtered fraction of water into the particulate fraction of water which then settled within the wetland. Mosquitofish mercury concentrations were decreased by 35% in ferric sulfate treated wetlands compared to control wetlands. There was no reduction in mosquitofish mercury concentrations within the polyaluminum chloride treated wetlands, which may have been caused by production of bioavailable methylmercury within those wetlands. Coagulation may be an effective management strategy for reducing mercury contamination within wetlands, but further studies should explore potential effects on wetland ecosystems. PMID:25893963

  7. Experimental dosing of wetlands with coagulants removes mercury from surface water and decreases mercury bioaccumulation in fish

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ackerman, Joshua T.; Kraus, Tamara E.C.; Fleck, Jacob A.; Krabbenhoft, David P.; Horwarth, William R.; Bachand, Sandra M.; Herzog, Mark; Hartman, Christopher; Bachand, Philip A.M.

    2015-01-01

    Mercury pollution is widespread globally, and strategies for managing mercury contamination in aquatic environments are necessary. We tested whether coagulation with metal-based salts could remove mercury from wetland surface waters and decrease mercury bioaccumulation in fish. In a complete randomized block design, we constructed nine experimental wetlands in California's Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta, stocked them with mosquitofish (Gambusia affinis), and then continuously applied agricultural drainage water that was either untreated (control), or treated with polyaluminum chloride or ferric sulfate coagulants. Total mercury and methylmercury concentrations in surface waters were decreased by 62% and 63% in polyaluminum chloride treated wetlands and 50% and 76% in ferric sulfate treated wetlands compared to control wetlands. Specifically, following coagulation, mercury was transferred from the filtered fraction of water into the particulate fraction of water which then settled within the wetland. Mosquitofish mercury concentrations were decreased by 35% in ferric sulfate treated wetlands compared to control wetlands. There was no reduction in mosquitofish mercury concentrations within the polyaluminum chloride treated wetlands, which may have been caused by production of bioavailable methylmercury within those wetlands. Coagulation may be an effective management strategy for reducing mercury contamination within wetlands, but further studies should explore potential effects on wetland ecosystems.

  8. Evaluation of the treatment of reverse osmosis concentrates from municipal wastewater reclamation by coagulation and granular activated carbon adsorption.

    PubMed

    Sun, Ying-Xue; Yang, Zhe; Ye, Tao; Shi, Na; Tian, Yuan

    2016-07-01

    Reverse osmosis concentrate (ROC) from municipal wastewater reclamation reverse osmosis (mWRRO) contains elevated concentrations of contaminants which pose potential risks to aquatic environment. The treatment of ROC from an mWRRO using granular activated carbon (GAC) combined pretreatment of coagulation was optimized and evaluated. Among the three coagulants tested, ferric chloride (FeCl3) presented relatively higher DOC removal efficiency than polyaluminium chloride and lime at the same dosage and coagulation conditions. The removal efficiency of DOC, genotoxicity, and antiestrogenic activity concentration of the ROC could achieve 16.9, 18.9, and 39.7 %, respectively, by FeCl3 coagulation (with FeCl3 dosage of 180.22 mg/L), which can hardly reduce UV254 and genotoxicity normalized by DOC of the DOM with MW <5 kDa. However, the post-GAC adsorption column (with filtration velocity of 5.7 m/h, breakthrough point adsorption capacity of 0.22 mg DOC/g GAC) exhibited excellent removal efficiency on the dominant DOM fraction of MW <5 kDa in the ROC. The removal efficiency of DOC, UV254, and TDS in the ROC was up to 91.8, 96, and 76.5 %, respectively, by the FeCl3 coagulation and post-GAC adsorption. Also, the DOM with both genotoxicity and antiestrogenic activity were completely eliminated by the GAC adsorption. The results suggest that GAC adsorption combined pretreatment of FeCl3 coagulation as an efficient method to control organics, genotoxicity, and antiestrogenic activity in the ROC from mWRRO system. PMID:27032632

  9. Control of Listeria spp. by Competitive-Exclusion Bacteria in Floor Drains of a Poultry Processing Plant

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Tong; Podtburg, Teresa C.; Zhao, Ping; Schmidt, Bruce E.; Baker, David A.; Cords, Bruce; Doyle, Michael P.

    2006-01-01

    In previous studies workers determined that two lactic acid bacterium isolates, Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis C-1-92 and Enterococcus durans 152 (competitive-exclusion bacteria [CE]), which were originally obtained from biofilms in floor drains, are bactericidal to Listeria monocytogenes or inhibit the growth of L. monocytogenes both in vitro and in biofilms at 4 to 37°C. We evaluated the efficacy of these isolates for reducing Listeria spp. contamination of floor drains of a plant in which fresh poultry is processed. Baseline assays revealed that the mean numbers of Listeria sp. cells in floor drains sampled on six different dates (at approximately biweekly intervals) were 7.5 log10 CFU/100 cm2 for drain 8, 4.9 log10 CFU/100 cm2 for drain 3, 4.4 log10 CFU/100 cm2 for drain 2, 4.1 log10 CFU/100 cm2 for drain 4, 3.7 log10 CFU/100 cm2 for drain 1, and 3.6 log10 CFU/100 cm2 for drain 6. The drains were then treated with 107 CE/ml in an enzyme-foam-based cleaning agent four times in 1 week and twice a week for the following 3 weeks. In samples collected 1 week after CE treatments were applied Listeria sp. cells were not detectable (samples were negative as determined by selective enrichment culture) for drains 4 and 6 (reductions of 4.1 and 3.6 log10 CFU/100 cm2, respectively), and the mean numbers of Listeria sp. cells were 3.7 log10 CFU/100 cm2 for drain 8 (a reduction of 3.8 log10 CFU/100 cm2), <1.7 log10 CFU/100 cm2 for drain 1 (detectable only by selective enrichment culture; a reduction of 3.3 log10 CFU/100 cm2), and 2.6 log10 CFU/100 cm2 for drain 3 (a reduction of 2.3 log10 CFU/100 cm2). However, the aerobic plate counts for samples collected from floor drains before, during, and after CE treatment remained approximately the same. The results indicate that application of the two CE can greatly reduce the number of Listeria sp. cells in floor drains at 3 to 26°C in a facility in which fresh poultry is processed. PMID:16672472

  10. Entomopathogenic Nematodes and Bacteria Applications for Control of the Pecan Root-Knot Nematode, Meloidogyne partityla, in the Greenhouse.

    PubMed

    Shapiro-Ilan, David I; Nyczepir, Andrew P; Lewis, Edwin E

    2006-12-01

    Meloidogyne partityla is a parasite of pecan and walnut. Our objective was to determine interactions between the entomopathogenic nematode-bacterium complex and M. partityla. Specifically, we investigated suppressive effects of Steinernema feltiae (strain SN) and S. riobrave (strain 7-12) applied as infective juveniles and in infected host insects, as well as application of S. feltiae's bacterial symbiont Xenorhabdus bovienii on M. partityla. In two separate greenhouse trials, the treatments were applied to pecan seedlings that were simultaneously infested with M. partityla eggs; controls received only water and M. partityla eggs. Additionally, all treatment applications were re-applied (without M. partityla eggs) two months later. Four months after initial treatment, plants were assessed for number of galls per root system, number of egg masses per root system, number of eggs per root system, number of eggs per egg mass, number of eggs per gram dry root weight, dry shoot weight, and final population density of M. partityla second-stage juveniles (J2). In the first trial, the number of egg masses per plant was lower in the S. riobrave-infected host treatment than in the control (by approximately 18%). In the second trial, dry root weight was higher in the S. feltiae-infected host treatment than in the control (approximately 80% increase). No other treatment effects were detected. The marginal and inconsistent effects observed in our experiments indicate that the treatments we applied are not sufficient for controlling M. partityla. PMID:19259462

  11. Floc characterization and membrane fouling of polyferric-polymer dual/composite coagulants in coagulation/ultrafiltration hybrid process.

    PubMed

    Rong, Hongyan; Gao, Baoyu; Li, Junchao; Zhang, Bei; Sun, Shenglei; Wang, Yan; Yue, Qinyan; Li, Qian

    2013-12-15

    Papermaking sludge and spent pickling liquor were recycled to synthesize a macromolecular lignin-acrylamide polymer (LA) and polyferric chloride (PFC), respectively. The dual-coagulant PFC-LA (PFC and LA were dosed orderly), composite coagulant PFCLA (PFC and LA premixed before dosed) and PFC were used in coagulation/ultrafiltration hybrid process in surface water treatment. The objectives of this paper are to comparatively investigate final water quality after coagulation and coagulation/ultrafiltration process and floc properties, including floc size, strength, recoverability and floc structure, with or without LA addition. Additionally, the relationship between membrane fouling and floc characteristics was discussed. The results showed that best final water quality was obtained by PFC-LA, sequentially followed by PFCLA and PFC. Floc size, growth rate, strength and recoverability as well as fractal dimension were also in the order of PFC-LA>PFCLA>PFC. The maximum permeate fluxes before and after backwash operation were obtained by PFC-LA, which gave the largest and most compact flocs. Coagulation suspension after breakage resulted in much more serious membrane fouling for PFC, whereas permeate flux slightly decreased when LA was used in combination with PFC. PMID:24144372

  12. A single-dose of oral nattokinase potentiates thrombolysis and anti-coagulation profiles.

    PubMed

    Kurosawa, Yuko; Nirengi, Shinsuke; Homma, Toshiyuki; Esaki, Kazuki; Ohta, Mitsuhiro; Clark, Joseph F; Hamaoka, Takafumi

    2015-01-01

    Our aim was to determine the quantitative effects of a single-dose of Nattokinase (NK) administration on coagulation/fibrinolysis parameters comprehensively in healthy male subjects. A double-blind, placebo-controlled cross-over NK intervention study was carried out in 12 healthy young males. Following the baseline blood draw, each subject was randomized to receive either a single-dose of 2,000 FU NK (NSK-SD, Japan Bio Science Laboratory Co., Ltd) or placebo with subsequent cross-over of the groups. Subjects donated blood samples at 2, 4, 6 and 8 hours following administration for analysis of coagulation/fibrinolysis parameters. As a result, D-dimer concentrations at 6, and 8 hours, and blood fibrin/fibrinogen degradation products at 4 hours after NK administration elevated significantly (p < 0.05, respectively). Factor VIII activity declined at 4 and 6 hours (p < 0.05, respectively), blood antithrombin concentration was higher at 2 and 4 hours (p < 0.05, respectively), and the activated partial thromboplastin time prolonged significantly at 2 and 4 hours following NK administration (p < 0.05 and p < 0.01, respectively). All the changes, however, were within the normal range. In conclusion, thus, a single-dose of NK administration appears enhancing fibrinolysis and anti-coagulation via several different pathways simultaneously. PMID:26109079

  13. Coagulant and anticoagulant activities of Bothrops lanceolatus (Fer de lance) venom.

    PubMed

    Lôbo de Araújo, A; Kamiguti, A; Bon, C

    2001-01-01

    Bothrops lanceolatus venom contains caseinolytic, phospholipase, esterase and haemorrhagic activities. We have investigated the coagulant and anticoagulant actions of B. lanceolatus venom on human citrated plasma and on purified plasma components. Although B. lanceolatus venom up to 50 microg/ml was unable to clot citrated plasma, at concentrations > or = 5 microg/ml the venom dose-dependently clotted purified human fibrinogen, indicating the presence of a thrombin-like enzyme. Human plasma (final concentration > or = 12.5%) dose-dependently inhibited the venom-induced fibrinogen clotting. This finding suggested that endogenous plasma protease inhibitors can affect the venom's action on fibrinogen. To investigate this possibility, B. lanceolatus venom was incubated with different plasma protease inhibitors and the activity on fibrinogen tested. alpha(2)-Macroglobulin and alpha(1)-antitrypsin did not interfere with the coagulant activity of the venom whereas the antithrombin-III/heparin complex partially inhibited this activity. A non-toxic, acidic phospholipase A(2) purified from B. lanceolatus venom prolonged the activated partial thromboplastin time in human plasma from 39.7+/-0.5 s (control with saline) to 60.2+/-0.9 s with 50 microg of PLA(2) (p<0.001), suggesting an anticoagulant activity associated with this enzyme. This anticoagulant activity may account for some of the effects of the venom on blood coagulation. PMID:10978756

  14. A single-dose of oral nattokinase potentiates thrombolysis and anti-coagulation profiles

    PubMed Central

    Kurosawa, Yuko; Nirengi, Shinsuke; Homma, Toshiyuki; Esaki, Kazuki; Ohta, Mitsuhiro; Clark, Joseph F.; Hamaoka, Takafumi

    2015-01-01

    Our aim was to determine the quantitative effects of a single-dose of Nattokinase (NK) administration on coagulation/fibrinolysis parameters comprehensively in healthy male subjects. A double-blind, placebo-controlled cross-over NK intervention study was carried out in 12 healthy young males. Following the baseline blood draw, each subject was randomized to receive either a single-dose of 2,000 FU NK (NSK-SD, Japan Bio Science Laboratory Co., Ltd) or placebo with subsequent cross-over of the groups. Subjects donated blood samples at 2, 4, 6 and 8 hours following administration for analysis of coagulation/fibrinolysis parameters. As a result, D-dimer concentrations at 6, and 8 hours, and blood fibrin/fibrinogen degradation products at 4 hours after NK administration elevated significantly (p < 0.05, respectively). Factor VIII activity declined at 4 and 6 hours (p < 0.05, respectively), blood antithrombin concentration was higher at 2 and 4 hours (p < 0.05, respectively), and the activated partial thromboplastin time prolonged significantly at 2 and 4 hours following NK administration (p < 0.05 and p < 0.01, respectively). All the changes, however, were within the normal range. In conclusion, thus, a single-dose of NK administration appears enhancing fibrinolysis and anti-coagulation via several different pathways simultaneously. PMID:26109079

  15. Effects of ozonation and coagulation on effluent organic matter characteristics and ultrafiltration membrane fouling.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Kwon; Lee, Dae-Sung; Kim, Do-Gun; Ko, Seok-Oh

    2014-06-01

    Effluent organic matter (EfOM) is the major cause of fouling in the low pressure membranes process for wastewater reuse. Coagulation and oxidation of biological wastewater treatment effluent have been applied for the fouling control of microfiltration membranes. However, the change in EfOM structure by pre-treatments has not been clearly identified. The changes of EfOM characteristics induced by coagulation and ozonation were investigated through size exclusion chromatography, UV/Vis spectrophotometry, fluorescence spectrophotometry and titrimetric analysis to identify the mechanisms in the reduction of ultrafiltration (UF) membrane fouling. The results indicated that reduction of flux decline by coagulation was due to modified characteristics of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) content. Total concentration of DOC was not reduced by ozonation. However, the mass fraction of the molecules with molecular weight larger than 5 kDa, fluorescence intensity, aromaticity, highly condensed chromophores, average molecular weight and soluble microbial byproducts decreased greatly after ozonation. These results indicated that EfOM was partially oxidized by ozonation to low molecular weight, highly charged compounds with abundant electron-withdrawing functional groups, which are favourable for alleviating UF membrane flux decline. PMID:25079844

  16. Local hemostasis, immunothrombosis, and systemic disseminated intravascular coagulation in trauma and traumatic shock.

    PubMed

    Gando, Satoshi; Otomo, Yasuhiro

    2015-01-01

    Knowing the pathophysiology of trauma-induced coagulopathy is important for the management of severely injured trauma patients. The aims of this review are to provide a summary of the recent advances in our understanding of thrombosis and hemostasis following trauma and to discuss the pathogenesis of disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC) at an early stage of trauma. Local hemostasis and thrombosis respectively act to induce physiological wound healing of injuries and innate immune responses to damaged-self following trauma. However, if overwhelmed by systemic inflammation caused by extensive tissue damage and tissue hypoperfusion, both of these processes foster systemic DIC associated with pathological fibrin(ogen)olysis. This is called DIC with the fibrinolytic phenotype, which is characterized by the activation of coagulation, consumption coagulopathy, insufficient control of coagulation, and increased fibrin(ogen)olysis. Irrespective of microvascular thrombosis, the condition shows systemic thrombin generation as well as its activation in the circulation and extensive damage to the microvasculature endothelium. DIC with the fibrinolytic phenotype gives rise to oozing-type non-surgical bleeding and greatly affects the prognosis of trauma patients. The coexistences of hypothermia, acidosis, and dilution aggravate DIC and lead to so-called trauma-induced coagulopathy. He that would know what shall be must consider what has been. The Analects of Confucius. PMID:25886801

  17. [Successful treatment with recombinant thrombomodulin for disseminated intravascular coagulation complicated with hemophagocytic syndrome].

    PubMed

    Yamazaki, Hiroyuki; Kondo, Tadakazu; Tatsumi, Goichi; Kotani, Shin-Ichi; Arai, Yasuyuki; Shirakawa, Kotaro; Kitano, Toshiyuki; Hishizawa, Masakatsu; Kadowaki, Norimitsu; Takaori-Kondo, Akifumi

    2015-03-01

    Recombinant human thrombomodulin (rTM) improves the blood coagulation disorder characteristic of disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC) as well as, or even better than, other anti-DIC drugs. On post-marketing surveillance, its effectiveness has been recognized for hematologic disorders, sepsis and solid tumor subgroups. However, the effect on hemophagocytic syndrome (HPS) complicated by DIC remains unclear. We treated three HPS patients with rTM in addition to chemotherapy for the underlying diseases including nasal NK/T cell lymphoma, angioimmunoblastic T-cell lymphoma and refractory acute myeloid leukemia post cord blood transplantation. Although being refractory to medical management was suspected in our cases, clinical status rapidly came under control including not only amelioration of the blood coagulation disorder but also inflammatory reactions, such as serum ferritin and lactic acid dehydrogenase abnormalities, which represent HPS activity. These observations suggest that rTM might exert marked synergistic effects on HPS with DIC. Given the results obtained in these three cases, administration of rTM appears to offer a promising method of treating HPS complicated by DIC. PMID:25876785

  18. MRI-based Medical Nanorobotic Platform for the Control of Magnetic Nanoparticles and Flagellated Bacteria for Target Interventions in Human Capillaries

    PubMed Central

    Martel, Sylvain; Felfoul, Ouajdi; Mathieu, Jean-Baptiste; Chanu, Arnaud; Tamaz, Samer; Mohammadi, Mahmood; Mankiewicz, Martin; Tabatabaei, Nasr

    2009-01-01

    Medical nanorobotics exploits nanometer-scale components and phenomena with robotics to provide new medical diagnostic and interventional tools. Here, the architecture and main specifications of a novel medical interventional platform based on nanorobotics and nanomedicine, and suited to target regions inaccessible to catheterization are described. The robotic platform uses magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for feeding back information to a controller responsible for the real-time control and navigation along pre-planned paths in the blood vessels of untethered magnetic carriers, nanorobots, and/or magnetotactic bacteria (MTB) loaded with sensory or therapeutic agents acting like a wireless robotic arm, manipulator, or other extensions necessary to perform specific remote tasks. Unlike known magnetic targeting methods, the present platform allows us to reach locations deep in the human body while enhancing targeting efficacy using real-time navigational or trajectory control. The paper describes several versions of the platform upgraded through additional software and hardware modules allowing enhanced targeting efficacy and operations in very difficult locations such as tumoral lesions only accessible through complex microvasculature networks. PMID:19890446

  19. Disequilibrium of Blood Coagulation and Fibrinolytic System in Patients With Coronary Artery Ectasia

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Wei; Liu, Ruifeng; Chen, Lianfeng; Chen, Houzao; Zhang, Shuyang

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Thrombus formation and myocardial infarction are not uncommon in patients with coronary artery ectasia (CAE). In light of this, the present study aims to systemically evaluate the blood coagulation and fibrinolytic systems in CAE patients. In this study, we enrolled 30 patients with CAE, 30 patients with coronary atherosclerosis disease (CAD), and 29 subjects with normal coronary arteries (control). The coagulation system was evaluated using a routine coagulation function test performed in the hospital laboratory before coronary angiography, and measurements included prothrombin time, international normalized ratio, activated partial thromboplastin time, fibrinogen time, and thrombin time. The evaluation of the fibrinolytic system included measurements of D-dimer, euglobulin lysis time, plasminogen activator inhibitor 1, plasminogen, plasminogen activity assay, α1-antitrypsin (α1-AT), α2 plasmin inhibitor (α2-PI), and α2-macroglobulin (α2-MG). Alpha1-AT, α2-PI, and α2-MG also inhibit activities of 3 neutrophil serine proteases, namely human neutrophil elastase (HNE), cathepsin G (CG), and proteinase 3 (PR3); therefore, the plasma levels of these 3 proteinases were also evaluated. In CAE patients, the circulating coagulation system was normal. For the fibrinolytic system, a decrease of plasminogen activity was observed (P = 0.029) when compared with CAD patients, and the concentrations of α1-AT (both P < 0.001), α2-PI (P = 0.002 and P = 0.025), and α2-MG (P = 0.034 and P < 0.001) were significantly elevated when compared with CAD patients and normal controls. Moreover, the plasma levels of HNE (both P < 0.001) and CG (P = 0.027 and 0.016) in CAE patients were also significantly higher than those of the CAD and control groups. There was no difference in plasma PR3 concentration among these 3 groups. Disequilibrium of the coagulation/fibrinolytic system may contribute to thrombus formation and clinical coronary

  20. The impact of schistosomes and schistosomiasis on murine blood coagulation and fibrinolysis as determined by thromboelastography (TEG).

    PubMed

    Da'dara, Akram A; de Laforcade, Armelle M; Skelly, Patrick J

    2016-05-01

    Schistosomes are parasitic platyhelminths that currently infect over 200 million people and cause the chronic debilitating disease schistosomiasis. While these large intravascular parasites can disturb blood flow, surprisingly they do not appear to provoke thrombus formation around them in vivo. In order to determine if the worms can alter their local environment to impede coagulation, we incubated adult worms (50 pairs) in murine blood (500 µl) for 1 h at 37 °C and, using thromboelastography (TEG), we compared the coagulation profile of the blood with control blood that never contained worms. Substantial differences were apparent between the two profiles. Blood that had been exposed to schistosomes clotted more slowly and yielded relatively poor, though stable, thrombi; all TEG measures of blood coagulation (R, K, α-angle, MA, G and TMA) differed significantly between conditions. No fibrinolysis (as determined by LY30 and LY60 values) was detected in either case. The observed TEG profile suggests that the worms are acting as local anti-coagulants. Blood recovered from schistosome-infected mice, however, does not behave in this way. At an early time point post infection (4-weeks), the TEG profile of infected murine blood is essentially the same as that of control blood. However at a later time point (7-weeks) infected murine blood clots significantly faster than control blood but these clots also break down faster. The R, K, α-angle, and TMA measures of coagulation are all significantly different between the control versus infected mice as are the LY30 and LY60 values. This profile is indicative of a hypercoagulable state with fibrinolysis and is akin to that seen in human patients with advanced schistosomiasis. PMID:26573180

  1. Development and experimental in-vivo evaluation of mathematical modeling of coagulation by laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beacco, Claire; Mordon, Serge R.; Brunetaud, Jean Marc

    1992-08-01

    Most clinical procedures using lasers are based on thermal laser-tissue interactions resulting in tissue damage. A mathematical model allowing temperature and damage prediction would be a useful tool to choose laser parameters able to produce the damage required. This study aimed at the development of a model called HELIOS. The capability of the model to predict thermal coagulation was evaluated by comparison with experimental in-vivo results. Conversion of laser light in tissue was studied using a beam broadening model, which is typically a modification of Beer-Lambert's law and takes into account scattering of light in tissue. HELIOS was validated making experimental studied in-vivo on liver (homogeneous tissue) of rats using a CW Nd:YAG laser, a CO2 laser, and an Argon laser. For a given set of laser parameters, temperature measurements were performed using an infrared camera (Agema, Sweden). The histological examination was carried out on samples to quantify the depth of coagulation necrosis. Experimental data obtained in-vivo were compared with those calculated previously using HELIOS and similar sets of parameters. The difference between the predicted temperature evolution on tissue surface and that measured by the infrared camera was less than 5 degree(s)C in all cases. The difference between the predicted coagulation necrosis depth and the corresponding experimental one was less than 10%. In conclusion, HELIOS allows good prediction of tissue temperature and coagulation necrosis. This model appears sufficiently precise for clinical applications and so should be well adapted to control thermal action of lasers in biological tissues.

  2. Seawater Immersion Aggravates Burn Injury Causing Severe Blood Coagulation Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Hong; Mao, Qingxiang; Ma, Yongda; Wang, Li; Chen, Xian; Hu, Yi; Ge, Hengjiang

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the endothelial function in a canine model of burn injury combined with seawater immersion. The model of burn injury was established. The dogs were randomly divided into four groups including dogs with burn injury (B group), or burn injury combined with seawater immersion (BI group), or only immersion in seawater (I group), or control animals with no injury or immersion (C group). The circulating endothelial cell (CEC) count and coagulation-fibrinolysis parameters were measured. The CEC count in B group increased at 4 h, 7 h, and 10 h after injury and then reduced, whereas it continuously increased to a greater extent in BI group (P < 0.05). The von Willebrand factor (vWF) activity, plasminogen activator inhibitor (PAI-1), and the ratio of thromboxane B2 (TXB2) to 6-keto-prostaglandin F1α (6-K-PGF1α) in BI group had a marked increase after injury, and the tissue-type plasminogen activator (tPA) in the BI group decreased. Microscope observations revealed thrombus formation in lungs of the animals in BI group, but not in C, I, or B groups. Burn injury causes endothelial dysfunction, and seawater immersion lastingly aggravates this injury, leading to a higher risk of developing thrombosis. PMID:26885523

  3. Identification of gram-negative bacteria from critical control points of raw and pasteurized cow milk consumed at Gondar town and its suburbs, Ethiopia

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Milk is highly prone to contamination and can serve as an efficient vehicle for human transmission of foodborne pathogens, especially gram-negative bacteria, as these are widely distributed in the environment. Methods This cross-sectional study of gram-negative staining bacterial contamination of milk meant for human consumption was carried out from October 2010 to May 2011 in Gondar town, Ethiopia. Milk samples were collected from critical control points, from production to consumption, that were hypothesized to be a source of potential contamination. Milk sampling points included smallholder’s milk producers, dairy co-operatives, a milk processing plant, and supermarkets. The hygienic procedures applied during milking, milk collection, transportation, pasteurization, and postpasteurization storage conditions at these specified critical control points were evaluated. Standard bacteriological cultivation and biochemical assays were used to isolate and identify bacterial pathogens in the milk samples. Results The results of the current study showed that conditions for contamination of raw milk at different critical points were due to less hygienic practices in pre-milking udder preparation, sub-optimal hygiene of milk handlers, and poor sanitation practices associated with milking and storage equipments. Among all critical control points considered, transportation containers at milk collection centers and at processing plants were found to be the most heavily contaminated with gram-negative staining bacterial species. Overall, 54 different bacterial species were indentified, and Escherichia coli (29.6%), Pseudomonas aeruginosa (18.5%), and Klebsiella pneumoniae (16.7%), were the most commonly identified gram-negative staining bacterial pathogens. Of particular interest was that no gram-negative staining bacteria were isolated from pasteurized milk samples with varying shelf life. Conclusion This study showed the presence of diverse pathogenic gram

  4. Nosocomial Outbreak of New Delhi Metallo-β-Lactamase-1-Producing Gram-Negative Bacteria in South Africa: A Case-Control Study

    PubMed Central

    de Jager, Pieter; Chirwa, Tobias; Naidoo, Shan; Perovic, Olga; Thomas, Juno

    2015-01-01

    Objective New Delhi metallo-β-lactamase (NDM)-producing Gram-negative bacteria have spread globally and pose a significant public health threat. There is a need to better define risk factors and outcomes of NDM-1 clinical infection. We assessed risk factors for nosocomial infection with NDM-1-producers and associated in-hospital mortality. Methods A matched case-control study was conducted during a nosocomial outbreak of NDM-1-producers in an adult intensive care unit (ICU) in South Africa. All patients from whom NDM-1-producers were identified were considered (n=105). Cases included patients admitted during the study period in whom NDM-1 producing Gram-negative bacteria were isolated from clinical specimens collected ≥48 hours after admission, and where surveillance definitions for healthcare-associated infections were met. Controls were matched for age, sex, date of hospital admission and intensive-care admission. Conditional logistic regression was used to identify risk factors for NDM-1 clinical infection and associated in-hospital mortality. Findings 38 cases and 68 controls were included. Klebsiella pneumoniae was the most common NDM-1-producer (28/38, 74%). Cases had longer mean hospital stays (44.0 vs. 13.3 days; P < 0.001) and ICU stays (32.5 vs. 8.3 days; P < 0.001). Adjusting for co-morbid disease, the in-hospital mortality of cases was significantly higher than controls (55.3% vs. 14.7%; AOR, 11.29; P < 0.001). Higher Charlson co-morbidity index score (5.2 vs. 4.1; AOR, 1.59; P = 0.005), mechanical ventilation days (7.47 vs. 0.94 days; AOR, 1.32; P = 0.003) and piperacillin/tazobactam exposure (11.03 vs. 1.05 doses; AOR, 1.08; P = 0.013) were identified as risk factors on multivariate analysis. Cases had a significantly higher likelihood of in-hospital mortality when the NDM-1-producer was Klebsiella pneumoniae (AOR, 16.57; P = 0.007), or when they had a bloodstream infection (AOR, 8.84; P = 0.041). Conclusion NDM-1 infection is associated with

  5. Flagellated Magnetotactic Bacteria as Controlled MRI-trackable Propulsion and Steering Systems for Medical Nanorobots Operating in the Human Microvasculature

    PubMed Central

    Martel, Sylvain; Mohammadi, Mahmood; Felfoul, Ouajdi; Lu, Zhao; Pouponneau, Pierre

    2009-01-01

    Although nanorobots may play critical roles for many applications in the human body such as targeting tumoral lesions for therapeutic purposes, miniaturization of the power source with an effective onboard controllable propulsion and steering system have prevented the implementation of such mobile robots. Here, we show that the flagellated nanomotors combined with the nanometer-sized magnetosomes of a single Magnetotactic Bacterium (MTB) can be used as an effective integrated propulsion and steering system for devices such as nanorobots designed for targeting locations only accessible through the smallest capillaries in humans while being visible for tracking and monitoring purposes using modern medical imaging modalities such as Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI). Through directional and magnetic field intensities, the displacement speeds, directions, and behaviors of swarms of these bacterial actuators can be controlled from an external computer. PMID:19890435

  6. The effect of a new impregnated gauze containing bentonite and halloysite minerals on blood coagulation and wound healing.

    PubMed

    Alavi, Mehrosadat; Totonchi, Alireza; Okhovat, Mohammad Ali; Motazedian, Motahareh; Rezaei, Peyman; Atefi, Mohammad

    2014-12-01

    In recent years, a wide variety of research has been carried out in the field of novel technologies to stop severe bleeding. In several studies, coagulation properties of minerals such as zeolite, bentonite and halloysite have been proven. In this study, the effect of a new impregnated sterile gauze containing bentonite and halloysite minerals was studied on blood coagulation and wound healing rate in male Wistar rats. Initially, impregnated sterile gauze was prepared from the mixture of bentonite and halloysite minerals and petroleum jelly (Vaseline). Then, the effect of gauze was studied on the blood coagulation time and wound healing process in 40 Wistar rats. SPSS software was used for data analysis and P values less than 0.05 were considered significant. The coagulation time of 81.10 ± 2.532 s in the control group and 33.00 ± 1.214 s in the study group (bentonite-halloysite treated) were reported (P < 0.0005). Time for complete wound healing in the group, which is treated with impregnated sterile pads, was calculated approximately from 10 to 12 days. However, in the control group, there was no complete wound healing (P < 0.0005). According to the results of the present study, topical application of the bentonite-halloysite impregnated sterile gauze significantly decreases the clotting time and increase the wound healing rate. PMID:25004023

  7. Acetoin metabolism in bacteria.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Zijun; Xu, Ping

    2007-01-01

    Acetoin is an important physiological metabolite excreted by many microorganisms. The excretion of acetoin, which can be diagnosed by the Voges Proskauer test and serves as a microbial classification marker, has its vital physiological meanings to these microbes mainly including avoiding acification, participating in the regulation of NAD/NADH ratio, and storaging carbon. The well-known anabolism of acetoin involves alpha-acetolactat synthase and alpha-acetolactate decarboxylase; yet its catabolism still contains some differing views, although much attention has been focused on it and great advances have been achieved. Current findings in catabolite control protein A (CcpA) mediated carbon catabolite repression may provide a fuller understanding of the control mechanism in bacteria. In this review, we first examine the acetoin synthesis pathways and its physiological meanings and relevancies; then we discuss the relationship between the two conflicting acetoin cleavage pathways, the enzymes of the acetoin dehydrogenase enzyme system, major genes involved in acetoin degradation, and the CcpA mediated acetoin catabolite repression pathway; in the end we discuss the genetic engineering progresses concerning applications. To date, this is the first integrated review on acetoin metabolism in bacteria, especially with regard to catabolic aspects. The apperception of the generation and dissimilation of acetoin in bacteria will help provide a better understanding of microbial strategies in the struggle for resources, which will consequently better serve the utilization of these microbes. PMID:17558661

  8. Evaluation and control of the risk of foodborne pathogens and spoilage bacteria present in Awa-Uirou, a sticky rice cake containing sweet red bean paste.

    PubMed

    Okahisa, Naoki; Inatsu, Yasuhiro; Juneja, Vijay K; Kawamoto, Shinichi

    2008-06-01

    The risk of food poisoning and growth of spoilage bacteria in Awa-Uirou, a sticky rice cake containing sweet red bean paste, was evaluated. Toxin-producing bacteria such as Staphylococcus aureus and Bacillus cereus are the main causes of food poisoning linked to this kind of food. The water activity in this product is in the range suitable for growth of S. aureus, B. cereus, and B. subtilis. The viable count of S. aureus or B. cereus spore cocktail was significantly reduced to 2.3 log colony-forming units (CFU)/g after 70 minutes steaming treatment at 100 degrees C. However, the heat-resistant endospores of B. subtilis germinated during storage at 30 degrees C to cause appreciable syneresis of the starch gel matrix in 4 days. The addition of 0.5% glycine before steaming treatment was found to effectively suppress the growth of B. cereus but was not effective in controlling S. aureus throughout the 7 days incubation period at 30 degrees C. On the other hand, S. aureus and B. cereus could grow > 5.0 log CFU/g in an inoculated sample without glycine within 3 days when stored at 30 degrees C. Moreover, addition of 0.5% glycine before the steaming process did not have any significant effect on color, texture, or taste of sticky rice cake. Therefore, results of this study demonstrated that the addition of 0.5% glycine before the steaming process could inhibit B. cereus and B. subtilis multiplication in the steamed rice confection which in turn may help reduce the risk of food poisoning or quality loss. PMID:18564913

  9. Efficacy and safety of a vaginal medicinal product containing three strains of probiotic bacteria: a multicenter, randomized, double-blind, and placebo-controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Tomusiak, Anna; Strus, Magdalena; Heczko, Piotr B; Adamski, Paweł; Stefański, Grzegorz; Mikołajczyk-Cichońska, Aleksandra; Suda-Szczurek, Magdalena

    2015-01-01

    Objective The main objective of this study was to evaluate whether vaginal administration of probiotic Lactobacillus results in their colonization and persistence in the vagina and whether Lactobacillus colonization promotes normalization and maintenance of pH and Nugent score. Patients and methods The study was a multicenter, randomized, double-blind, and placebo-controlled trial. Altogether, 376 women were assessed for eligibility, and signed informed consent. One hundred and sixty eligible women with abnormal, also called intermediate, vaginal microflora, as indicated by a Nugent score of 4–6 and pH >4.5 and zero or low Lactobacillus count, were randomized. Each participant was examined four times during the study. Women were randomly allocated to receive either the probiotic preparation inVag®, or a placebo (one capsule for seven consecutive days vaginally). The product inVag includes the probiotic strains Lactobacillus fermentum 57A, Lactobacillus plantarum 57B, and Lactobacillus gasseri 57C. We took vaginal swabs during visits I, III, and IV to determine the presence and abundance of bacteria from the Lactobacillus genus, measure the pH, and estimate the Nugent score. Drug safety evaluation was based on analysis of the types and occurrence of adverse events. Results Administration of inVag contributed to a significant decrease (between visits) in both vaginal pH (P<0.05) and Nugent score (P<0.05), and a significant increase in the abundance of Lactobacillus between visit I and visits III and IV (P<0.05). Molecular typing revealed the presence of Lactobacillus strains originating from inVag in 82% of women taking the drug at visit III, and 47.5% at visit IV. There was no serious adverse event related to inVag administration during the study. Conclusion The probiotic inVag is safe for administration to sustainably restore the healthy vaginal microbiota, as demonstrated by predominance of the Lactobacillus bacteria in vaginal microbiota. PMID:26451088

  10. Effect of nano-scale curvature on the intrinsic blood coagulation system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kushida, Takashi; Saha, Krishnendu; Subramani, Chandramouleeswaran; Nandwana, Vikas; Rotello, Vincent M.

    2014-11-01

    The intrinsic coagulation activity of silica nanoparticles strongly depends on their surface curvature. Nanoparticles with higher surface curvature do not denature blood coagulation factor XII on its surface, providing a coagulation `silent' surface, while nanoparticles with lower surface curvature show denaturation and concomitant coagulation.The intrinsic coagulation activity of silica nanoparticles strongly depends on their surface curvature. Nanoparticles with higher surface curvature do not denature blood coagulation factor XII on its surface, providing a coagulation `silent' surface, while nanoparticles with lower surface curvature show denaturation and concomitant coagulation. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Physical properties and scanning electron micrographs (SEM) of silica NPs, intrinsic coagulation activity after 3 h. See DOI: 10.1039/c4nr04128c

  11. A quantitative comparison between electrocoagulation and chemical coagulation for boron removal from boron-containing solution.

    PubMed

    Yilmaz, A Erdem; Boncukcuoğlu, Recep; Kocakerim, M Muhtar

    2007-10-22

    This paper provides a quantitative comparison of electrocoagulation and chemical coagulation approaches based on boron removal. Electrocoagulation process delivers the coagulant in situ as the sacrificial anode corrodes, due to a fixed current density, while the simultaneous evolution of hydrogen at the cathode allows for pollutant removal by flotation. By comparison, conventional chemical coagulation typically adds a salt of the coagulant, with settling providing the primary pollutant removal path. Chemical coagulation was carried out via jar tests using aluminum chloride. Comparison was done with the same amount of coagulant between electrocoagulation and chemical coagulation processes. Boron removal obtained was higher with electrocoagulation process. In addition, it was seen that chemical coagulation has any effect for boron removal from boron-containing solution. At optimum conditions (e.g. pH 8.0 and aluminum dose of 7.45 g/L), boron removal efficiencies for electrocoagulation and chemical coagulation were 94.0% and 24.0%, respectively. PMID:17524554

  12. Effects of dabigatran on the cellular and protein phase of coagulation in patients with coronary artery disease on dual antiplatelet therapy with aspirin and clopidogrel. Results from a prospective, randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled study.

    PubMed

    Franchi, Francesco; Rollini, Fabiana; Cho, Jung Rae; King, Rhodri; Phoenix, Fladia; Bhatti, Mona; DeGroat, Christopher; Tello-Montoliu, Antonio; Zenni, Martin M; Guzman, Luis A; Bass, Theodore A; Ajjan, Ramzi A; Angiolillo, Dominick J

    2016-03-01

    There is growing interest in understanding the effects of adding an oral anticoagulant in patients on dual antiplatelet therapy (DAPT). Vitamin K antagonists (VKAs) and clopidogrel represent the most broadly utilised oral anticoagulant and P2Y12 receptor inhibitor, respectively. However, VKAs can interfere with clopidogrel metabolism via the cytochrome P450 (CYP) system which in turn may result in an increase in platelet reactivity. Dabigatran is a direct acting (anti-II) oral anticoagulant which does not interfere with CYP and has favourable safety and efficacy profiles compared with VKAs. The pharmacodynamic (PD) effects on platelet reactivity and clot kinetic of adjunctive dabigatran therapy in patients on DAPT are poorly explored. In this prospective, randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled PD study, patients (n=30) on maintenance DAPT with aspirin and clopidogrel were randomised to either dabigatran 150 mg bid or placebo for seven days. PD testing was performed before and after treatment using four different assays exploring multiple pathways of platelet aggregation and fibrin clot kinetics: light transmittance aggregometry (LTA), multiple electrode aggregometry (MEA), kaolin-activated thromboelastography (TEG) and turbidimetric assays. There were no differences in multiple measures of platelet reactivity investigating purinergic and non-purinergic signaling pathways assessed by LTA, MEA and TEG platelet mapping. Dabigatran significantly increased parameters related to thrombin activity and thrombus generation, and delayed fibrin clot formation, without affecting clot structure or fibrinolysis. In conclusion, in patients on DAPT with aspirin and clopidogrel, adjunctive dabigatran therapy is not associated with modulation of profiles of platelet reactivity as determined by several assays assessing multiple platelet signalling pathways. However, dabigatran significantly interferes with parameters related to thrombin activity and delays fibrin clot formation

  13. Homologous metalloregulatory proteins from both gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria control transcription of mercury resistance operons

    SciTech Connect

    Helmann, J.D.; Walsh, C.T. ); Wang, Ying; Mahler, I. )

    1989-01-01

    The authors report the overexpression, purification, and properties of the regulatory protein, MerR, for a chromosomally encoded mercury resistance determinant from Bacillus strain RC607. This protein is similar in sequence to the metalloregulatory proteins encoded by gram-negative resistance determinants found on transposons Tn21 and Tn501 and to a predicted gene product of a Staphylococcus aureus resistance determinant. In vitro DNA-binding and transcription experiments were used to demonstrate those purified Bacillus MerR protein controls transcription from a promoter-operator site similar in sequence to that found in the transposon resistance determinants. The Bacillus MerR protein bound in vitro to its promoter-operator region in both the presence and absence of mercuric ion and functioned as a negative and positive regulator of transcription. The MerR protein bound less tightly to its operator region (ca. 50- to 100-fold) in the presence of mercuric ion; this reduced affinity was largely accounted for by an increased rate of dissociation of the MerR protein from the DNA. Despite this reduced DNA-binding affinity, genetic and biochemical evidence support a model in which the MerR protein-mercuric ion complex is a positive regulator of operon transcription. Although the Bacillus MerR protein bound only weakly to the heterologous Tn501 operator region, the Tn501 and Tn21 MerR proteins bound with high affinity to the Bacillus promoter-operator region and exhibited negative, but not positive, transcriptional control.

  14. Evaluation of bacteria isolated from rice rhizosphere for biological control of charcoal rot of sorghum caused by Macrophomina phaseolina (Tassi) Goid.

    PubMed

    Gopalakrishnan, Subramaniam; Humayun, Pagidi; Kiran, Bandru Keerthi; Kannan, Iyer Girish Kumar; Vidya, Meesala Sree; Deepthi, Kanala; Rupela, Om

    2011-06-01

    A total of 360 bacteria, isolated from the rhizospheres of a system of rice intensification (SRI) fields, were characterized for the production of siderophore, fluorescence, indole acetic acid (IAA), hydrocyanic acid (HCN) and solubilization of phosphorus. Of them, seven most promising isolates (SRI-156, -158, -178, -211, -229, -305 and -360) were screened for their antagonistic potential against Macrophomina phaseolina (causes charcoal rot in sorghum) by dual culture assay, blotter paper assay and in greenhouse. All the seven isolates inhibited M. phaseolina in dual culture assay, whereas six isolates solubilized phosphorous (except SRI-360), all seven produced siderophore, four produced fluorescence (except SRI-178, -229 and -305), six produced IAA (except SRI-305) and five produced HCN (except SRI-158 and -305). In the blotter paper assay, no charcoal rot infection was observed in SRI-156-treated sorghum roots, indicating complete inhibition of the pathogen, while the roots treated with the other isolates showed 49-76% lesser charcoal rot infection compared to the control. In the antifungal activity test (in green house on sorghum), all the isolates increased shoot dry mass by 15-23% and root dry mass by 15-20% (except SRI-158 and -360), over the control. In order to confirm the plant growth-promoting (PGP) traits of the isolates, the green house experiment was repeated but, in the absence of M. phaseolina. The results further confirmed the PGP traits of the isolates as evidenced by increases in shoot and root dry mass, 22-100% and 5-20%, respectively, over the control. The sequences of 16S rDNA gene of the isolates SRI-156, -158, -178, -211, -229, -305 and -360 were matched with Pseudomonas plecoglossicida, Brevibacterium antiquum, Bacillus altitudinis, Enterobacter ludwigii, E. ludwigii, Acinetobacter tandoii and P. monteilii, respectively in BLAST analysis. This study indicates that the selected bacterial isolates have the potential for PGP and control of

  15. Effects of Erwinia-asparaginase on the coagulation system.

    PubMed

    Carlsson, H; Stockelberg, D; Tengborn, L; Braide, I; Carneskog, J; Kutti, J

    1995-11-01

    L-Asparaginase treatment during induction therapy in acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL) is known to be frequently complicated by thromboembolic events. It was recently suggested that L-asparaginase derived from Erwinia chrysanthemi alters the coagulation system less severely than does Escherichia coli asparaginase. In a series of 11 adult patients with ALL, we investigated some parameters of the coagulation system during treatment with Erwinia asparaginase. The doses employed were rather high; all patients below the age of 60 years received 15,000 U/m2 daily over 14 days. In accordance with what is known from treatment with E. coli asparaginase, we observed significant lowering of antithrombin as well as of fibrinogen. However, as to fibrinogen indeed a significant decrease had occurred prior to the institution of Erwinia asparaginase treatment. The most striking observation in the present study was that the levels of prothrombin complex, reflecting the function of K-vitamin dependent coagulation factors II, VII and X, remained within normal ranges during treatment. This indicates that these coagulation factors were not affected by Erwinia asparaginase, an observation at variance with several reports where E. coli asparaginase was investigated. This latter observation was the only finding which could lend support to the view that Erwinia asparaginase affects the coagulation system less than E. coli asparaginase. Finally, one of our patients developed a sinus thrombosis, a severe thrombotic complication. PMID:7493674

  16. The effects of NOM and coagulation on copper corrosion

    SciTech Connect

    Rehring, J.P.; Edwards, M.

    1994-12-31

    Copper corrosion was examined in solutions containing natural organic matter (NOM) and in situations where NOM was removed by enhanced coagulation with alum or ferric chloride. Electrochemical methods were used to evaluate the long-term effects of each water quality on copper corrosion. In experiments exploring the role of NOM in copper corrosion, corrosion rates increased with NOM concentration at pH 6, whereas at pH 7.5 and 9 the NOM had less significant effects. Waters treated by enhanced alum coagulation had higher corrosion rates than untreated waters, but enhanced ferric chloride coagulation had the opposite effect. This difference was attributed to the relative effects of added sulfate via alum coagulation versus added chloride via ferric chloride coagulation. Compliance with the EPA Lead and Copper Rule and disinfection byproduct regulations may require that utilities address both regulations simultaneously. That is, water treatment processes, NOM concentration, and copper corrosion behavior are clearly interdependent and should be considered when contemplating changes to meet DBP regulations.

  17. A mini review of preoxidation to improve coagulation.

    PubMed

    Xie, Pengchao; Chen, Yiqun; Ma, Jun; Zhang, Xiang; Zou, Jing; Wang, Zongping

    2016-07-01

    Preoxidation has attracted people's attention due to its effectiveness in enhancing coagulation. The mechanisms, drawbacks and applications in the improvement of coagulation were summarized in this work. Preoxidation can destroy the organic coating on the surface of particles to change the zeta potential, which is the vital reason for improving coagulation. Co-existing metallic ions, such as calcium, iron and manganese, play important roles in the improvement of coagulation due to the formation of metal-humate complexes or the in situ formed coagulant. However, preoxidation could degrade organic matter from high molecular weight to low molecular weight and damage cell membrane of algae, causing intracellular algal organic matter to release outside and producing hydrophilic functional groups to some extent, which has the potential to deteriorate the water quality. Additionally, disinfection byproduct formation is also affected significantly through changing the characteristics of the organic and inorganic precursors. Based on the recent publications, some future developments of preoxidation process were suggested in this study. PMID:27153238

  18. Removal of perfluorooctanoate from surface water by polyaluminium chloride coagulation.

    PubMed

    Deng, Shubo; Zhou, Qin; Yu, Gang; Huang, Jun; Fan, Qing

    2011-02-01

    Perfluorooctanoate (PFOA) has been detected in surface water all over the world, and little is known of its removal by coagulation in water treatment plants. In this study, polyaluminium chloride (PACl) was used to remove PFOA from surface water, and the effects of coagulant dose, solution pH, temperature, and initial turbidity on the removal of both PFOA and suspended solids (SS) from water were investigated. Since the SS had high sorption affinity for PFOA, most PFOA was adsorbed on the particles and removed via the SS removal in the coagulation process. PFOA concentrations in aqueous phase decreased with increasing initial turbidity and PACl dose, while they increased with increasing solution pH and temperature. Other perfluorinated compounds (PFCs) with different C-F chain lengths and functional groups were also compared with PFOA. It was proved that hydrophobic interaction played an important role in the adsorption of PFOA on the SS. The addition of powdered activated carbon (PAC) before the coagulation process significantly enhanced the removal efficiency of PFOA in water, and the residual PFOA concentrations in water were less than 1 μg/L after the addition of 1-16 mg/L PAC and subsequent coagulation when the initial PFOA concentrations were in the range of 0.5-3 mg/L. PMID:21163511

  19. Clay-catalyzed reactions of coagulant polymers during water chlorination

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lee, J.-F.; Liao, P.-M.; Lee, C.-K.; Chao, H.-P.; Peng, C.-L.; Chiou, C.T.

    2004-01-01

    The influence of suspended clay/solid particles on organic-coagulant reactions during water chlorination was investigated by analyses of total product formation potential (TPFP) and disinfection by-product (DBP) distribution as a function of exchanged clay cation, coagulant organic polymer, and reaction time. Montmorillonite clays appeared to act as a catalytic center where the reaction between adsorbed polymer and disinfectant (chlorine) was mediated closely by the exchanged clay cation. The transition-metal cations in clays catalyzed more effectively than other cations the reactions between a coagulant polymer and chlorine, forming a large number of volatile DBPs. The relative catalytic effects of clays/solids followed the order Ti-Mont > Fe-Mont > Cu-Mont > Mn-Mont > Ca-Mont > Na-Mont > quartz > talc. The effects of coagulant polymers on TPFP follow the order nonionic polymer > anionic polymer > cationic polymer. The catalytic role of the clay cation was further confirmed by the observed inhibition in DBP formation when strong chelating agents (o-phenanthroline and ethylenediamine) were added to the clay suspension. Moreover, in the presence of clays, total DBPs increased appreciably when either the reaction time or the amount of the added clay or coagulant polymer increased. For volatile DBPs, the formation of halogenated methanes was usually time-dependent, with chloroform and dichloromethane showing the greatest dependence. ?? 2003 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Polymorphisms of the coagulation system and risk of cancer.

    PubMed

    Tinholt, Mari; Sandset, Per Morten; Iversen, Nina

    2016-04-01

    Hypercoagulability is a frequently finding in patients with cancer, and is associated with an increased risk of venous thrombosis (VT). Cancer-associated VT is associated with poor prognosis and represents the leading non-cancer cause of death among these patients. Conversely, patients experiencing VT are at increased risk of subsequent cancer, suggesting an epidemiological bidirectional link between cancer and hemostasis, and indicating a role of the hemostatic system in cancer development. How the coagulation system relates to cancer etiology at the genetic level is largely unexplored. Data on the association of polymorphisms in genes involved in coagulation with cancer development is important to clarify the role of the coagulation system in cancer pathogenesis. Effects of coagulation-related gene polymorphisms on cancer risk may possibly be translated into novel treatment- and prevention strategies of cancer-associated thrombosis and the cancer itself. This article reviews the current knowledge of the relation between polymorphisms in genes involved in coagulation and cancer risk in solid tumors. PMID:27067978

  1. Back To Bacteria.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flannery, Maura C.

    1997-01-01

    Explores new research about bacteria. Discusses bacterial genomes, archaea, unusual environments, evolution, pathogens, bacterial movement, biofilms, bacteria in the body, and a bacterial obsession. Contains 29 references. (JRH)

  2. Comparison of Moringa stenopetala seed extract as a clean coagulant with Alum and Moringa stenopetala-Alum hybrid coagulant to remove direct dye from Textile Wastewater.

    PubMed

    Dalvand, Arash; Gholibegloo, Elham; Ganjali, Mohammad Reza; Golchinpoor, Najmeh; Khazaei, Mohammad; Kamani, Hossein; Hosseini, Sara Sadat; Mahvi, Amir Hossein

    2016-08-01

    In this study, the efficiency of Moringa stenopetala seed extract was compared with alum and M. stenopetala-alum hybrid coagulant to remove Direct Red 23 azo dye from textile wastewater. The effects of parameters such as pH, coagulant dose, type of salt used for the extraction of coagulant and initial dye concentration on dye removal efficiency were investigated. Moreover, the existing functional groups on the structure of M. stenopetala coagulant (MSC) were determined by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, and the morphology of sludge produced by MSC, alum, and hybrid coagulant was characterized by scanning electron microscopy. Ninhydrin test was also used to determine the quantity of primary amines in the MSC and Moringa oleifera coagulant (MOC). According to the results, with increasing the coagulant dose and decreasing the initial dye concentration, dye removal efficiency has increased. The maximum dye removal of 98.5, 98.2, and 98.3 % were obtained by using 240, 120, and 80 mg/L MSC, alum and hybrid coagulant at pH 7, respectively. The results also showed MSC was much more effective than MOC for dye removal. The volume of sludge produced by MSC was one fourth and half of those produced by alum and hybrid coagulant, respectively. Based on the results, hybrid coagulant was the most efficient coagulant for direct dye removal from colored wastewater. PMID:27164876

  3. [Backup support from the independent laboratory to the hospital for infection control of antimicrobial agent-resistant bacteria].

    PubMed

    Komatsu, Masaru

    2012-10-01

    Because commercial laboratories have far less opportunity for direct communication with clinicians in comparison with hospitals, they need to maintain closer contact regarding the evaluation of prophlogistic bacterial isolates through such communication tools as the telephone, and need to include more comments in reports to avoid misunderstandings by clinicians. Commercial laboratories handle enormous numbers of strains of microorganisms that have been isolated from various regions and, therefore, they have a great deal of information important for public health that relates to pathogens causing community-acquired and healthcare associated infection. Returning such information to society provides useful data for selecting antibacterial agents and taking measures against healthcare-associated infection. Many medical facilities that outsource microorganism tests to commercial laboratories do not have a resident specialist in clinical microbiology, and it is difficult for such facilities to centrally manage test data within the facility, possibly causing increased incidents of delay in the early detection of a mass outbreak of healthcare-associated infection; therefore, commercial laboratories should immediately develop a resource of experts in their organization. Although there are professional certification systems in Japan such as the Infection Control Microbiological Technologist (ICMT) and over 500 technicians are certified, the majority of these technicians belong to hospitals. In the future, support of the clinical education of technicians working in laboratories should be considered at the society level. PMID:23323460

  4. Consumption of cranberry beverage improved endogenous antioxidant status and protected against bacteria adhesion in healthy humans: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Mathison, Bridget D; Kimble, Lindsey L; Kaspar, Kerrie L; Khoo, Christina; Chew, Boon P

    2014-05-01

    Consumption of polyphenol-rich foods is associated with lower risk from many chronic diseases. We hypothesized that a single dose of cranberry beverage would improve indices of oxidative stress, inflammation, and urinary antibacterial adhesion activity in healthy humans. Six males and 6 females (18-35 years; body mass index, 19-25 kg/m(2)) consumed placebo, cranberry leaf extract beverage, or low-calorie cranberry juice cocktail (LCJC) once in a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled cross-over experimental design trial. The washout period between beverages was 1 week. Blood was collected 0, 2, 4, 8, and 24 hours after beverage consumption for measuring oxidative and inflammatory biomarkers. Urine was collected at 0, 0 to 3, 3 to 6, 6 to 9, 9 to 12, and 24 hours postintervention to assess antibacterial adhesion activity. Consumption of cranberry leaf extract beverage elevated (P < .05) blood glutathione peroxidase activity, whereas LCJC consumption increased (P < .05) glutathione concentrations and superoxide dismutase activity compared with placebo. Cranberry leaf extract beverage and LCJC consumption had no effect on the inflammatory biomarkers measured as compared with placebo. At 0 to 3 hours postconsumption, urine from participants who consumed cranberry beverages had higher (P < .05) ex vivo antiadhesion activity against P-fimbriated Escherichia coli compared with placebo. An acute dose of cranberry beverages improved biomarkers of antioxidant status and inhibition of bacterial adhesion in urine. PMID:24916555

  5. A vital stain for studying membrane dynamics in bacteria: a novel mechanism controlling septation during Bacillus subtilis sporulation.

    PubMed

    Pogliano, J; Osborne, N; Sharp, M D; Abanes-De Mello, A; Perez, A; Sun, Y L; Pogliano, K

    1999-02-01

    At the onset of sporulation in Bacillus subtilis, two potential division sites are assembled at each pole, one of which will be used to synthesize the asymmetrically positioned sporulation septum. Using the vital stain FM 4-64 to label the plasma membrane of living cells, we examined the fate of these potential division sites in wild-type cells and found that, immediately after the formation of the sporulation septum, a partial septum was frequently synthesized within the mother cell at the second potential division site. Using time-lapse deconvolution microscopy, we were able to watch these partial septa first appear and then disappear during sporulation. Septal dissolution was dependent on sigma E activity and was partially inhibited in mutants lacking the sigma E-controlled proteins SpoIID, SpoIIM and SpoIIP, which may play a role in mediating the degradation of septal peptidoglycan. Our results support a model in which sigma E inhibits division at the second potential division site by two distinct mechanisms: inhibition of septal biogenesis and the degradation of partial septa formed before sigma E activation. PMID:10096082

  6. Evolutionary and tissue-specific control of expression of multiple acyl-carrier protein isoforms in plants and bacteria.

    PubMed

    Battey, J F; Ohlrogge, J B

    1990-02-01

    We have examined the occurrence of multiple acyl-carrier protein (ACP), isoforms in evolutionarily diverse species of higher and lower plants. Isoforms were resolved by native polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE), and were detected by Western blotting or fluorography of [(3)H]-palmitate-labelled ACPs. Multiple isoforms of ACP were found in leaf tissue of the monocotyledons Avena sativa and Hordeum vulgare and dicotyledons Arabidopsis thaliana, Cuphea wrightii, and Brassica napus. Lower vascular plants including the lycopod Selaginella krausseriana, the gymnosperms Ephedra sp. and Dioon edule, the ferns Davallia feejensis and Marsilea sp. and the most primitive known extant vascular plant, Psilotum nudum, were all found to have multiple ACP isoforms, as were the nonvascular liverworts, Lunularia sp. and Marchantia sp. and the moss, Polytrichum sp. Therefore, the development of ACP isoforms appears to have occurred early in plant evolution. However, we could detect only a single electrophoretic form of ACP in the unicellular algae Chlamydomonas reinhardtii and Dunaliella tertiolecta and the photosynthetic cyanobacteria Synechocystis strain 6803 and Agmnellum quadruplicatum. Thus, multiple forms of ACP do not occur in all photosynthetic organisms but may be associated with multicellular plants. We have also examined tissue specificity and light control over the expression of ACP isoforms. The relative abundance of multiple forms of ACP in leaf of Spinacia and Avena was altered very little by light. Rather, the different patterns of ACP isoforms were primarily dependent on the tissue type. PMID:24202013

  7. Exploring the use of natural antimicrobial agents and pulsed electric fields to control spoilage bacteria during a beer production process.

    PubMed

    Galvagno, M A; Gil, G R; Iannone, L J; Cerrutti, P

    2007-01-01

    Different natural antimicrobials affected viability of bacterial contaminants isolated at critical steps during a beer production process. In the presence of 1 mg/ml chitosan and 0.3 mg/ml hops, the viability of Escherichia coli in an all malt barley extract wort could be reduced to 0.7 and 0.1% respectively after 2 hour- incubation at 4 degrees C. The addition of 0.0002 mg/ml nisin, 0.1 mg/ml chitosan or 0.3 mg/ml hops, selectively inhibited growth of Pediococcus sp. in more than 10,000 times with respect to brewing yeast in a mixed culture. In the presence of 0.1 mg ml chitosan in beer, no viable cells of the thermoresistant strain Bacillus megaterium were detected. Nisin, chitosan and hops increased microbiological stability during storage of a local commercial beer inoculated with Lactobacillus plantarum or Pediococcus sp. isolated from wort. Pulsed Electric Field (PEF) (8 kV/cm, 3 pulses) application enhanced antibacterial activity of nisin and hops but not that of chitosan. The results herein obtained suggest that the use of these antimicrobial compounds in isolation or in combination with PEF would be effective to control bacterial contamination during beer production and storage. PMID:17987854

  8. Direct numerical simulation of turbulent aerosol coagulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reade, Walter Caswell

    There are numerous systems-including both industrial applications and natural occurring phenomena-in which the collision/coagulation rates of aerosols are of significant interest. Two examples are the production of fine powders (such as titanium dioxide) and the formation of rain drops in the atmosphere. During the last decade, it has become apparent that dense aerosol particles behave much differently in a turbulent fluid than has been previously assumed. Particles with a response time on the order of the small-scale fluid time scale tend to collect in regions of low vorticity. The result is a particle concentration field that can be highly non-uniform. Sundaram and Collins (1997) recently demonstrated the effect that turbulence can have on the particle collision rate of a monodisperse system. The collision rates of finite-inertia particles can be as much as two orders of magnitude greater than particles that precisely follow the fluid streamlines. Sundaram and Collins derived a general collision expression that explicitly accounted for the two phenomena that affect the collision rate-changes in the particle concentration field and changes in the particle relative velocities. The result of Sundaram and Collins has generated further interest in the turbulent-aerosol problem. This thesis shows that, in addition to changing the rate that an aerosol size distribution might form, turbulence has the potential of dramatically changing the shape of the distribution. This result is demonstrated using direct numerical simulation of a turbulent-aerosol system over a wide range of particle parameters, and a moderate range of turbulence levels. Results show that particles with a small (but finite) initial inertia have the greatest potential of forming broad size distributions. The shape of the resulting size distribution is also affected by the initial size of the particles. Observations are explained using the statistics identified by Sundaram and Collins (1997). A major

  9. Use of Potential Probiotic Lactic Acid Bacteria (LAB) Biofilms for the Control of Listeria monocytogenes, Salmonella Typhimurium, and Escherichia coli O157:H7 Biofilms Formation

    PubMed Central

    Gómez, Natacha C.; Ramiro, Juan M. P.; Quecan, Beatriz X. V.; de Melo Franco, Bernadette D. G.

    2016-01-01

    resistance to antibiotics was species and strain dependent. In the protective biofilm assays, strains L. lactis 368 (bac-), Lactobacillus curvatus MBSa3 (bac+), and Lactobacillus sakei MBSa1 (bac+) resulted in more than six log reductions in the pathogens counts when compared to the controls. This effect could not be attributed to bacteriocin production. These results suggest that these potential probiotic strains can be used as alternatives for control of biofilm formation by pathogenic bacteria in the food industry, without conferring a risk to the consumers. PMID:27375584

  10. Use of Potential Probiotic Lactic Acid Bacteria (LAB) Biofilms for the Control of Listeria monocytogenes, Salmonella Typhimurium, and Escherichia coli O157:H7 Biofilms Formation.

    PubMed

    Gómez, Natacha C; Ramiro, Juan M P; Quecan, Beatriz X V; de Melo Franco, Bernadette D G

    2016-01-01

    to antibiotics was species and strain dependent. In the protective biofilm assays, strains L. lactis 368 (bac-), Lactobacillus curvatus MBSa3 (bac+), and Lactobacillus sakei MBSa1 (bac+) resulted in more than six log reductions in the pathogens counts when compared to the controls. This effect could not be attributed to bacteriocin production. These results suggest that these potential probiotic strains can be used as alternatives for control of biofilm formation by pathogenic bacteria in the food industry, without conferring a risk to the consumers. PMID:27375584

  11. Coagulation profile, gene expression and bioinformatics characterization of coagulation factor X of striped murrel Channa striatus.

    PubMed

    Arasu, Abirami; Kumaresan, Venkatesh; Sathyamoorthi, Akila; Arasu, Mariadhas Valan; Al-Dhabi, Naif Abdullah; Arockiaraj, Jesu

    2016-08-01

    A transcriptome wide analysis of the constructed cDNA library of snakehead murrel Channa striatus revealed a full length cDNA sequence of coagulation factor X. Sequence analysis of C. striatus coagulation factor X (CsFX) showed that the cDNA contained 1232 base pairs (bp) comprising 1209 bp open reading frame (ORF). The ORF region encodes 424 amino acids with a molecular mass of 59 kDa. The polypeptide contains γ-carboxyglutamic acid (GLA) rich domain and two epidermal growth factor (EGF) like domains including EGF-CA domain and serine proteases trypsin signature profile. CsFX exhibited the maximum similarity with fish species such as Stegastes partitus (78%), Poecilia formosa (76%) and Cynoglossus semilaevis (74%). Phylogenetically, CsFX is clustered together with the fish group belonging to Actinopterygii. Secondary structure of factor X includes alpha helix 28.54%, extended strand 20.75%, beta turn 7.78% and random coil 42.92%. A predicted 3D model of CsFX revealed a short α-helix and a Ca(2+) (Gla domain) binding site in the coil. Four disulfide bridges were found in serine protease trypsin profile. Obviously, the highest gene expression (P < 0.05) was noticed in blood. Further, the changes in expression of CsFX was observed after inducing with bacterial (Aeromonas hydrophila) and fungal (Aphanomyces invadans) infections and other synthetic immune stimulants. Variation in blood clotting time (CT), prothrombin time (PT) and activated prothromboplastin time (APTT) was analyzed and compared between healthy and bacterial infected fishes. During infection, PT and APTT showed a declined clotting time due to the raised level of thrombocytes. PMID:27235370

  12. Comparison of nitroethane, 2-nitro-1-propanol, lauric acid, Lauricidin and the Hawaiian marine algae, Chaetoceros, for potential broad-spectrum control of anaerobically grown lactic acid bacteria

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The gastrointestinal tract of bovines often contains bacteria that contribute to disorders of the rumen and may also contain foodborne or opportunistic human pathogens as well as bacteria capable of causing mastitis in cows. Thus, there is a need to develop broad-spectrum therapies that are effecti...

  13. Development of the selective hydrophobic coagulation process. Fourth quarterly technical progress report, July 1, 1992--September 30, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Yoon, R.H.; Luttrell, G.H.

    1992-12-31

    A novel technique for selectively coagulating and separating coal from dispersed mineral matter has been developed at Virginia Tech. The process, Selective Hydrophobic Coagulation (SHC), has been studied since 1986 under the sponsorship of the US Department of Energy. The SHC process differs from oil agglomeration, shear or polymer flocculation, and electrolytic coagulation processes in that it does not require reagents or additives to induce the formation of coagula. In most cases, simple pH control is all that is required to (i) induce the coagulation of coal particles and (ii) effectively disperse particles of mineral matter. If the coal is oxidized, a small dosage of reagents can be used to enhance the process. The technical work program was initiated on July 1, 1992. Force-distance curves were generated for DDOA Br-coated mica surfaces in water and used to calculate hydrophobicity constants and decay lengths for this system; and a new device for the measurement of water contact angles, similar to the Wilhelmy plate balance, has been built 225 kg samples of Pittsburgh No. 8 and Elkhom No. 3 seam coals were obtained; a static mixer test facility for the study of coagula growth was set up and was undergoing shakedown tests at the end of the quarter; a bench-scale lamella thickener was being constructed; and preliminary coagula/ mineral separation tests were being conducted in a bench-scale continuous drum filter.

  14. Inhibition of coagulation activation and inflammation by a novel Factor Xa inhibitor synthesized from the earthworm Eisenia andrei.

    PubMed

    Joo, Seong Soo; Won, Tae Joon; Kim, Jong Sung; Yoo, Yeong Min; Tak, Eun Sik; Park, So-Young; Park, Hee Yong; Hwang, Kwang Woo; Park, Soon Cheol; Lee, Do Ik

    2009-02-01

    We have cloned an earthworm-derived Factor Xa (FXa) inhibitor, with an excellent inhibitory specificity from the midgut of the Eisenia andrei. We designate this inhibitor eisenstasin. An eisenstasin-derived small peptide (ESP) was synthesized and we examined whether ESP played an essential role in FXa inhibition. Compared to antistasin-derived small peptides (ASP) originating from leech, ESP primarily exhibited a high level of FXa inhibition in chromogenic peptide substrate assays and revealed an approximately 2-fold greater inhibition of FXa cleavage of a target protein than ASP. This suggests that ESP could be an effective anti-coagulant that targets FXa during the propagation step of coagulation. ESP also inhibited proteinase-activated receptor 2-mediated FXa activation, which may trigger endothelial inflammation. Endothelial nitric oxide (NO) was significantly reduced by ESP (p<0.0001), indicating that protease-activated receptor-2 (PAR-2) was effectively inactivated. We also found that ESP reduced the expressions of pro-inflammatory cytokines (IL-1alpha, IL-1beta, IL-8, IL-16, MCP-1, MIP-1alpha and MIP-1beta) by cultured cells treated with both ESP and FXa. Our results provide the first evidence that ESP might interrupt coagulation cascades by inhibiting FXa, and thereby may effectively control the bidirectional alternation between coagulation and inflammation. PMID:19182385

  15. Using coagulation to restrict microbial re-growth in tap water by phosphate limitation in water treatment.

    PubMed

    Wen, Gang; Ma, Jun; Huang, Ting-Lin; Egli, Thomas

    2014-09-15

    Extensive microbial re-growth in a drinking water distribution system can deteriorate water quality. The limiting factor for microbial re-growth in a tap water produced by a conventional drinking water treatment plant in China was identified by determining the microbial re-growth potential (MRP) by adding different nutrients to stimulate growth of a natural microbial consortium as inoculum and flow-cytometric enumeration. No obvious change of MRP was found in tap water after addition of carbon, whereas, a 1- to 2-fold increase of MRP was observed after addition of phosphate (P). This clearly demonstrated that microbial re-growth in this tap water was limited by P. Most of the re-grown microbial flora (>85%) consisted of high nucleic acid content cells. A subsequent investigation of the MRP in the actual water treatment plant demonstrated that coagulation was the crucial step for decreasing MRP and producing P-limited water. Therefore, a comparison concerning the control of MRP by three different coagulants was conducted. It showed that all the three coagulants efficiently reduced the MRP and shifted the limitation regime from C to P, but the required dose was different. The study shows that it is feasible to restrict microbial re-growth by P limitation using coagulation in water treatment. PMID:25179107

  16. Biopreservation by lactic acid bacteria.

    PubMed

    Stiles, M E

    1996-10-01

    Biopreservation refers to extended storage life and enhanced safety of foods using the natural microflora and (or) their antibacterial products. Lactic acid bacteria have a major potential for use in biopreservation because they are safe to consume and during storage they naturally dominate the microflora of many foods. In milk, brined vegetables, many cereal products and meats with added carbohydrate, the growth of lactic acid bacteria produces a new food product. In raw meats and fish that are chill stored under vacuum or in an environment with elevated carbon dioxide concentration, the lactic acid bacteria become the dominant population and preserve the meat with a "hidden' fermentation. The same applies to processed meats provided that the lactic acid bacteria survive the heat treatment or they are inoculated onto the product after heat treatment. This paper reviews the current status and potential for controlled biopreservation of foods. PMID:8879414

  17. Anti-coagulant therapy with dabigatran for cystic fibrosis patients.

    PubMed

    Bansal, Manvi; Ren, Clement L

    2016-08-01

    Patients with cystic fibrosis (CF) are at increased risk of venous thromboembolism, especially in association with central venous catheter use. Coumarin drugs and low molecular weight heparin are frequently used for anti-coagulant therapy, but are more challenging to administer in CF patients. Dabigatran, an oral thrombin antagonist, is an alternative anti-coagulant medication, but its use in CF has not been reported. We describe our experience in successfully using dabigatran for long-term anti-coagulation therapy in two CF patients. Our experience suggests that dabigatran can serve as an option for anticoagulation therapy in CF. Pediatr Pulmonol. 2016;51:E29-E30. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27128852

  18. Mathematical Modeling of Intravascular Blood Coagulation under Wall Shear Stress

    PubMed Central

    Rukhlenko, Oleksii S.; Dudchenko, Olga A.; Zlobina, Ksenia E.; Guria, Georgy Th.

    2015-01-01

    Increased shear stress such as observed at local stenosis may cause drastic changes in the permeability of the vessel wall to procoagulants and thus initiate intravascular blood coagulation. In this paper we suggest a mathematical model to investigate how shear stress-induced permeability influences the thrombogenic potential of atherosclerotic plaques. Numerical analysis of the model reveals the existence of two hydrodynamic thresholds for activation of blood coagulation in the system and unveils typical scenarios of thrombus formation. The dependence of blood coagulation development on the intensity of blood flow, as well as on geometrical parameters of atherosclerotic plaque is described. Relevant parametric diagrams are drawn. The results suggest a previously unrecognized role of relatively small plaques (resulting in less than 50% of the lumen area reduction) in atherothrombosis and have important implications for the existing stenting guidelines. PMID:26222505

  19. Multifrequency acoustics as a probe of mesoscopic blood coagulation dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganesan, Adarsh; Rajendran, Gokulnath; Ercole, Ari; Seshia, Ashwin

    2016-08-01

    Coagulation is a complex enzymatic polymerisation cascade. Disordered coagulation is common in medicine and may be life-threatening yet clinical assays are typically bulky and/or provide an incomplete picture of clot mechanical evolution. We present the adaptation of an in-plane acoustic wave device: quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation at multiple harmonics to determine the time-evolution of mesoscale mechanical properties of clot formation in vitro. This approach is sensitive to changes in surface and bulk clot structure in various models of induced coagulopathy. Furthermore, we are able to show that clot formation at surfaces has different kinetics and mechanical strength to that in the bulk, which may have implications for the design of bioprosthetic materials. The "Multifrequency acoustics" approach thus enables unique capability to portray biological processes concerning blood coagulation.

  20. Properties and coagulation performance of coagulant poly-aluminum-ferric-silicate-chloride in water and wastewater treatment.

    PubMed

    Gao, Bao-yu; Yue, Qin-yan; Wang, Bing-jian

    2006-01-01

    An efficient inorganic polymer coagulant, poly-aluminum-ferric-silicate-chloride (PAFSC), was developed using two approaches: (i) hydroxylation of the mixture of AlCl3, FeCl3 and fresh polysilicic acid in different Al/Fe/Si molar ratios to obtain PAFSCc and (ii) hydroxylated poly-aluminum-iron-chloride (PAFC) combined with aged polysilicic acid in different Al/Fe/Si ratios to produce PAFSCm. The properties of PAFSC in comparison with polyaluminum silicate chloride (PASC) and polyferric silicate chloride (PAFC) were characterized by various experimental methods. The effect of Al/Fe/Si molar ratio on the hydrolysis-polymerization process of Al (III) and Fe (III) in PAFSC solutions was examined by pH titration, and the effect of Al/Fe/Si molar ratio on electrokinetic mobility of PAFSC was studied by Zeta potential measurement. The laboratory experiments were performed to evaluate the PAFSC in comparison with polyaluminum chloride (PAC) for the coagulation of synthetic water samples, actual surface water and wastewater. The results show that interactions exist among aluminum species, ferric species and polysilicic acid, and the Al/Fe/Si molar ratio affects the Zeta potential of the hydrolyzate and the coagulating performance. PAFSC achieved a better water treatment result than PAC. At the same basicity (B) value and Al/Fe/Si ratio, PAFSCc has better coagulation performance than PAFSCm. PAFSC is a new type and high efficiency composite inorganic polymer coagulant. PMID:16854802

  1. Chitosan Coagulation to Improve Microbial and Turbidity Removal by Ceramic Water Filtration for Household Drinking Water Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Abebe, Lydia S.; Chen, Xinyu; Sobsey, Mark D.

    2016-01-01

    The use of porous ceramic filters is promoted globally for household water treatment, but these filters are ineffective in removing viruses from water. In order to increase virus removal, we combine a promising natural coagulant, chitosan, as a pretreatment for ceramic water filters (CWFs) and evaluate the performance of this dual barrier water treatment system. Chitosan is a non-toxic and biodegradable organic polymer derived by simple chemical treatments from chitin, a major source of which is the leftover shells of crustacean seafoods, such as shrimp, prawns, crabs, and lobsters. To determine the effectiveness of chitosan, model test water was contaminated with Escherichia coli K011 and coliphage MS2 as a model enteric bacterium and virus, respectively. Kaolinite clay was used to model turbidity. Coagulation effectiveness of three types of modified chitosans was determine at various doses ranging from 5 to 30 mg/L, followed by flocculation and sedimentation. The pre-treated supernatant water was then decanted into the CWF for further treatment by filtration. There were appreciable microbial removals by chitosan HCl, acetate, and lactate pretreatment followed by CWF treatment, with mean reductions (95% CI) between 4.7 (±1.56) and 7.5 (±0.02) log10 for Escherichia coli, and between 2.8 (±0.10) and 4.5 (±1.04) log10 for MS2. Turbidity reduction with chitosan treatment and filtration consistently resulted in turbidities < 1 NTU, which meet turbidity standards of the US EPA and guidance by the World Health Organization (WHO). According to WHO health-based microbial removal targets for household water treatment technology, chitosan coagulation achieved health protective targets for both viruses and bacteria. Therefore, the results of this study support the use of chitosan to improve household drinking water filtration processes by increasing virus and bacteria reductions. PMID:26927152

  2. Chitosan Coagulation to Improve Microbial and Turbidity Removal by Ceramic Water Filtration for Household Drinking Water Treatment.

    PubMed

    Abebe, Lydia S; Chen, Xinyu; Sobsey, Mark D

    2016-03-01

    The use of porous ceramic filters is promoted globally for household water treatment, but these filters are ineffective in removing viruses from water. In order to increase virus removal, we combine a promising natural coagulant, chitosan, as a pretreatment for ceramic water filters (CWFs) and evaluate the performance of this dual barrier water treatment system. Chitosan is a non-toxic and biodegradable organic polymer derived by simple chemical treatments from chitin, a major source of which is the leftover shells of crustacean seafoods, such as shrimp, prawns, crabs, and lobsters. To determine the effectiveness of chitosan, model test water was contaminated with Escherichia coli K011 and coliphage MS2 as a model enteric bacterium and virus, respectively. Kaolinite clay was used to model turbidity. Coagulation effectiveness of three types of modified chitosans was determine at various doses ranging from 5 to 30 mg/L, followed by flocculation and sedimentation. The pre-treated supernatant water was then decanted into the CWF for further treatment by filtration. There were appreciable microbial removals by chitosan HCl, acetate, and lactate pretreatment followed by CWF treatment, with mean reductions (95% CI) between 4.7 (± 1.56) and 7.5 (± 0.02) log10 for Escherichia coli, and between 2.8 (± 0.10) and 4.5 (± 1.04) log10 for MS2. Turbidity reduction with chitosan treatment and filtration consistently resulted in turbidities < 1 NTU, which meet turbidity standards of the US EPA and guidance by the World Health Organization (WHO). According to WHO health-based microbial removal targets for household water treatment technology, chitosan coagulation achieved health protective targets for both viruses and bacteria. Therefore, the results of this study support the use of chitosan to improve household drinking water filtration processes by increasing virus and bacteria reductions. PMID:26927152

  3. Tunable protein degradation in bacteria.

    PubMed

    Cameron, D Ewen; Collins, James J

    2014-12-01

    Tunable control of protein degradation in bacteria would provide a powerful research tool. Here we use components of the Mesoplasma florum transfer-messenger RNA system to create a synthetic degradation system that provides both independent control of steady-state protein level and inducible degradation of targeted proteins in Escherichia coli. We demonstrate application of this system in synthetic circuit development and control of core bacterial processes and antibacterial targets, and we transfer the system to Lactococcus lactis to establish its broad functionality in bacteria. We create a 238-member library of tagged essential proteins in E. coli that can serve as both a research tool to study essential gene function and an applied system for antibiotic discovery. Our synthetic protein degradation system is modular, does not require disruption of host systems and can be transferred to diverse bacteria with minimal modification. PMID:25402616

  4. Effect of perioperative crystalloid or colloid fluid therapy on hemorrhage, coagulation competence, and outcome

    PubMed Central

    Rasmussen, Kirsten C.; Secher, Niels H.; Pedersen, Tom

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: A meta-analysis concerning perioperative coagulation competence, hemorrhage, and outcome was conducted including the use of hydroxyethyl starches (HESs), dextran, or albumin versus administration of a crystalloid as control to assess the efficacy and safety of colloids and crystalloids for fluid administration during major elective surgery. Surgery was restricted to cardiovascular and noncardiovascular surgery, and HESs were stratified to HES 130/0.4 and HES 200/0.5. Methods: We searched Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, MEDLINE, ISI Web of Science, EMBASE, conference proceedings, reference lists, and databases of ongoing trials. Results: Thirty one primary clinical randomized controlled trials included 2287 patients undergoing major surgery from January 2000 to August 2015. The perioperative changes in coagulation competence were measured by thromboelastography (TEG) maximum amplitude (MA) in 9 studies administering crystalloids versus HES and in 4 studies administering albumin versus HES. All studies but 1 disclosed increased reduction in TEG-MA following HES administration (P = 0.0001 and 0.0002). The total loss of blood was reported in 17 studies in which crystalloids were compared to HES and 12 studies reported increased blood loss after administration of HES (P < 0.003). When administering albumin versus HES, 6 studies reported reduced hemorrhage associated with albumin administration (P = 0.005). Reoperation was not significantly reduced by the use of crystalloids, but may be more frequent after HESs compared to albumin (P < 0.03). In this analysis, more patients admitted to administration of HESs were exposed to decrease coagulation competence, compared to perioperative crystalloids and albumin administration. Conclusion: This stratified meta-analysis showed that increased blood loss was found in noncardiovascular surgery among patients receiving HES compared with crystalloids, followed by a marked

  5. Sex Differences in Stroke: The Contribution of Coagulation

    PubMed Central

    Roy-O’Reilly, Meaghan; McCullough, Louise D.

    2014-01-01

    Stroke is now the leading cause of adult disability in the United States. Women are disproportionately affected by stroke. Women increasingly outnumber men in the elderly population, the period of highest risk for stroke. However, there is also a growing recognition that fundamental sex differences are present that contribute to differential ischemic sensitivity. In addition, gonadal hormone exposure can impact coagulation and fibrinolysis, key factors in the initiation of thrombosis. In this review we will discuss sex differences in stroke, with a focus on platelets, vascular reactivity and coagulation. PMID:24560819

  6. Sonoclot(®)-based method to detect iron enhanced coagulation.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, Vance G; Henderson, Jon

    2016-07-01

    Thrombelastographic methods have been recently introduced to detect iron mediated hypercoagulability in settings such as sickle cell disease, hemodialysis, mechanical circulatory support, and neuroinflammation. However, these inflammatory situations may have heme oxygenase-derived, coexistent carbon monoxide present, which also enhances coagulation as assessed by the same thrombelastographic variables that are affected by iron. This brief report presents a novel, Sonoclot-based method to detect iron enhanced coagulation that is independent of carbon monoxide influence. Future investigation will be required to assess the sensitivity of this new method to detect iron mediated hypercoagulability in clinical settings compared to results obtained with thrombelastographic techniques. PMID:26497986

  7. Two solvable systems of coagulation equations with limited aggregations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertoin, Jean

    2009-11-01

    We consider two simple models for the formation of polymers where at the initial time, each monomer has a certain number of potential links (called arms in the text) that are consumed when aggregations occur. Loosely speaking, this imposes restrictions on the number of aggregations. The dynamics of concentrations are governed by modifications of Smoluchowski's coagulation equations. Applying classical techniques based on generating functions, resolution of quasi-linear PDE's, and Lagrange inversion formula, we obtain explicit solutions to these non-linear systems of ODE's. We also discuss the asymptotic behavior of the solutions and point at some connexions with certain known solutions to Smoluchowski's coagulation equations with additive or multiplicative kernels.

  8. A review of research on nanoparticulate flow undergoing coagulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Jianzhong; Huo, Linlin

    2015-06-01

    Nanoparticulate flows occur in a wide range of natural phenomena and engineering applications and, hence, have attracted much attention. The purpose of the present paper is to provide a review of the research conducted over the last decade. The research covered relates to the Brownian coagulation of monodisperse and polydisperse particles, the Taylor-series expansion method of moment, and nanoparticle distributions due to coagulation in pipe and channel flow, jet flow, and the mixing layer and in the process of flame synthesis and deposition.

  9. Relationships between milk coagulation property traits analyzed with different methodologies.

    PubMed

    Pretto, D; Kaart, T; Vallas, M; Jõudu, I; Henno, M; Ancilotto, L; Cassandro, M; Pärna, E

    2011-09-01

    Milk coagulation properties (MCP) analysis is performed using a wide range of methodologies in different countries and laboratories, using different instruments, coagulant activity in the milk, and type of coagulant. This makes it difficult to compare results and data from different research. The aims of this study were to propose a method for the transformation of values of rennet coagulation time (RCT) and curd firmness (a(30)) and to predict the noncoagulation (NC) probability of milk samples analyzed using different methodologies. Individual milk samples were collected during the morning milking in October 2010 from each of 165 Holstein-Friesian dairy cows in 2 freestall barns in Italy, and sent to 3 laboratories for MCP analysis. For each laboratory, MCP analysis was performed using a different methodology: A, with a computerized renneting meter instrument using 0.051 international milk clotting units (IMCU)/mL of coagulant activity; B, with a Lattodinamografo (Foss-Italia, Padova, Italy) using 0.051 IMCU/mL of coagulant activity; and C, with an Optigraph (Ysebaert, Frépillon, France) using 0.120 IMCU/mL of coagulant activity. The relationships between MCP traits were analyzed with correlation and regression analyses for each pair of methodologies. For each MCP trait, 2 regression models were applied: model 1 was a single regression model, where the dependent and independent variables were the same MCP trait determined by 2 different methodologies; in model 2, both a(30) and RCT were included as independent variables. The NC probabilities for laboratories with the highest number of NC samples were predicted based on the RCT and a(30) values measured in the laboratories with lower number of NC samples using logistic regression and receiver operating characteristic analysis. The percentages of NC samples were 4.2, 11.5, and 0.6% for A, B, and C, respectively. The transformation of MCP traits was more precise with model 1 for RCT (R(2): 0.77-0.82) than for a(30

  10. Reincarnation of ancient links between coagulation and complement.

    PubMed

    Conway, E M

    2015-06-01

    Throughout evolution, organisms have developed means to contain wounds by simultaneously limiting bleeding and eliminating pathogens and damaged host cells via the recruitment of innate defense mechanisms. Disease emerges when there is unchecked activation of innate immune and/or coagulation responses. A key component of innate immunity is the complement system. Concurrent excess activation of coagulation and complement - two major blood-borne proteolytic pathways - is evident in numerous diseases, including atherosclerosis, diabetes, venous thromboembolic disease, thrombotic microangiopathies, arthritis, cancer, and infectious diseases. Delineating the cross-talk between these two cascades will uncover novel therapeutic insights. PMID:26149013

  11. Incorporation of nisI-mediated nisin immunity improves vector-based nisin-controlled gene expression in lactic acid bacteria.

    PubMed

    Oddone, Gian M; Mills, David A; Block, David E

    2009-05-01

    Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) have been used successfully to express a wide variety of recombinant proteins, ranging from flavor-active proteins to antibiotic peptides and oral vaccines. The nisin-controlled expression (NICE) system is the most prevalent of the systems for production of heterologous proteins in LAB. Previous optimization of the NICE system has revealed a strong limit on the concentration of the inducer nisin that can be tolerated by the culture of host cells. In this work, the nisin immunity gene, nisI, has been inserted into the recently reported pMSP3535H2 vector that contains the complete NICE system on a high-copy Escherichia coli-LAB shuttle vector. Fed-batch fermentation data show that Lactococcus lactis IL1403 cells transformed with the new vector, pMSP3535H3, tolerate a 5-fold increase in the concentration of the inducer nisin, and, at this elevated concentration, produce a 1.8-fold increased level of green fluorescent protein (GFP), a model recombinant protein. Therefore, the incorporation of nisI in the pMSP3535H3 NICE system described here unveils new ranges of induction parameters to be studied in the course of optimizing recombinant protein expression in LAB. PMID:19141301

  12. The Coagulant Type Influence on Removal Efficiency of 5- and 6-Ring Pahs During Water Coagulation Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nowacka, Anna; Włodarczyk-Makuła, Maria

    2014-12-01

    The article presents results on investigation of the removal efficiency of selected 5- and 6-ring polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (benzo[a]pyrene, benzo[b]fluoranthene, benzo[k]fluoranthene, benzo[j]fluoranthene, benzo[g,h,i]perylene, indeno[1,2,3-cd]pyrene, dibenzo[a,h]anthracene) from water during coagulation and sedimentation process. Two pre-hydrolyzed aluminum coagulants: PAX XL 19H and FLOKOR 105V were chosen for research. Process was carried out at optimum process parameters: rapid-mixing - 3 min at the rotational speed of 200 rpm, slow mixing - 10 min at 30 rpm, sedimentation - 60 min. The removal effectiveness was dependant on coagulant type and its composition. Better results in the removal of 5-and 6-ring PAHs were obtained after application of FLOKOR 105V (lower aluminum content) than after using PAX XL 19H.

  13. Prostate Cancer-Associated Disseminated Intravascular Coagulation with Excessive Fibrinolysis Treated with Degarelix

    PubMed Central

    Ong, Shawn Y.; Taverna, Josephine; Jokerst, Clint; Enzler, Thomas; Hammode, Emad; Rogowitz, Elisa; Green, Myke R.; Babiker, Hani M.

    2015-01-01

    Disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC) with excessive fibrinolysis (XFL) is a rare and acute life-threatening variant of DIC in patients with prostate cancer. Patients present with coagulopathy, hypofibrinogenemia, and systemic bleeding. We describe a case of DIC XFL caused by prostate cancer (PC) successfully treated with a single injection of degarelix, a gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) receptor antagonist. This led to prompt control of the patient's coagulopathy within ten days of treatment. Our case highlights features of this rare and devastating hemorrhagic complication of PC along with a fast-acting and effective therapeutic drug option. PMID:26613055

  14. Effects of a mouthwash with chlorine dioxide on oral malodor and salivary bacteria: a randomized placebo-controlled 7-day trial

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Previous research has shown the oxidizing properties and microbiological efficacies of chlorine dioxide (ClO2). Its clinical efficacies on oral malodor have been evaluated and reported only in short duration trials, moreover, no clinical studies have investigated its microbiological efficacies on periodontal and malodorous bacteria. Thus, the aim of this study was to assess the inhibitory effects of a mouthwash containing ClO2 used for 7 days on morning oral malodor and on salivary periodontal and malodorous bacteria. Methods/Design A randomized, double blind, crossover, placebo-controlled trial was conducted among 15 healthy male volunteers, who were divided into 2 groups. Subjects were instructed to rinse with the experimental mouthwash containing ClO2 or the placebo mouthwash, without ClO2, twice per day for 7 days. After a one week washout period, each group then used the opposite mouthwash for 7 days. At baseline and after 7 days, oral malodor was evaluated with Organoleptic measurement (OM), and analyzed the concentrations of hydrogen sulfide (H2S), methyl mercaptan (CH3SH) and dimethyl sulfide ((CH3)2S), the main VSCs of human oral malodor, were assessed by gas chromatography (GC). Clinical outcome variables included plaque and gingival indices, and tongue coating index. The samples of saliva were microbiologically investigated. Quantitative and qualitative analyses were performed using the polymerase chain reaction-Invader method. Results and Discussion The baseline oral condition in healthy subjects in the 2 groups did not differ significantly. After rinsing with the mouthwash containing ClO2 for 7 days, morning bad breath decreased as measured by the OM and reduced the concentrations of H2S, CH3SH and (CH3)2S measured by GC, were found. Moreover ClO2 mouthwash used over a 7-day period appeared effective in reducing plaque, tongue coating accumulation and the counts of Fusobacterium nucleatum in saliva. Future research is needed to examine long

  15. Influence of NaCl Concentrations on Coagulation, Temperature, and Electrical Conductivity Using a Perfusion Radiofrequency Ablation System: An Ex Vivo Experimental Study

    SciTech Connect

    Aube, Christophe Schmidt, Diethard; Brieger, Jens; Schenk, Martin; Kroeber, Stefan; Vielle, Bruno; Claussen, Claus D.; Goldberg, S. Nahum; Pereira, Philippe L.

    2007-02-15

    Purpose. To determine, by means of an ex vivo study, the effect of different NaCl concentrations on the extent of coagulation obtained during radiofrequency (RF) ablation performed using a digitally controlled perfusion device. Method. Twenty-eight RF ablations were performed with 40 W for 10 min using continuous NaCl infusion in fresh excised bovine liver. For perfusion, NaCl concentrations ranging from 0 (demineralized water) to 25% were used. Temperature, the amount of energy, and the dimensions of thermal-induced white coagulation were assessed for each ablation. These parameters were compared using the nonparametric Mann-Whitney test. Correlations were calculated according to the Spearman test. Results. RF ablation performed with 0.9% to 25% concentrations of NaCl produced a mean volume of coagulation of 30.7 {+-} 3.8 cm{sup 3}, with a mean short-axis diameter of 3.6 {+-} 0.2 cm. The mean amount of energy was 21,895 {+-} 1,674 W and the mean temperature was 85.4 {+-} 12.8 deg. C. Volume of coagulation, short-axis diameter, and amount of energy did not differ significantly among NaCl concentrations (p > 0.5). A correlation was found between the NaCl concentration and the short-axis diameter of coagulation (r = 0.64) and between the NaCl concentration and the mean temperature (r = 0.67), but not between the NaCl concentration and volume of coagulation. Conclusion. In an ex vivo model, continuous perfusion with high NaCl concentrations does not significantly improve the volume of thermal-induced coagulation. This may be because the use of a low-power generator cannot sufficiently exploit the potential advantage of better tissue conductivity provided by NaCl perfusion.

  16. Demonstration of the Coagulation and Diffusion of Homemade Slime Prepared under Acidic Conditions without Borate

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Isokawa, Naho; Fueda, Kazuki; Miyagawa, Korin; Kanno, Kenichi

    2015-01-01

    Poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) precipitates in many kinds of aqueous salt solutions. While sodium sulfate, a coagulant for PVA fiber, precipitates PVA to yield a white rigid gel, coagulation of PVA with aluminum sulfate, a coagulant for water treatment, yields a slime-like viscoelastic fluid. One type of homemade slime is prepared under basic…

  17. 21 CFR 878.4400 - Electrosurgical cutting and coagulation device and accessories.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Electrosurgical cutting and coagulation device and....4400 Electrosurgical cutting and coagulation device and accessories. (a) Identification. An electrosurgical cutting and coagulation device and accessories is a device intended to remove tissue and...

  18. 21 CFR 878.4400 - Electrosurgical cutting and coagulation device and accessories.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Electrosurgical cutting and coagulation device and....4400 Electrosurgical cutting and coagulation device and accessories. (a) Identification. An electrosurgical cutting and coagulation device and accessories is a device intended to remove tissue and...

  19. 21 CFR 878.4400 - Electrosurgical cutting and coagulation device and accessories.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Electrosurgical cutting and coagulation device and....4400 Electrosurgical cutting and coagulation device and accessories. (a) Identification. An electrosurgical cutting and coagulation device and accessories is a device intended to remove tissue and...

  20. 21 CFR 878.4400 - Electrosurgical cutting and coagulation device and accessories.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Electrosurgical cutting and coagulation device and....4400 Electrosurgical cutting and coagulation device and accessories. (a) Identification. An electrosurgical cutting and coagulation device and accessories is a device intended to remove tissue and...

  1. 21 CFR 878.4400 - Electrosurgical cutting and coagulation device and accessories.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Electrosurgical cutting and coagulation device and....4400 Electrosurgical cutting and coagulation device and accessories. (a) Identification. An electrosurgical cutting and coagulation device and accessories is a device intended to remove tissue and...

  2. Treatment of melanoidin wastewater by anaerobic digestion and coagulation.

    PubMed

    Arimi, Milton M; Zhang, Yongjun; Götz, Gesine; Geißen, Sven-Uwe

    2015-01-01

    Melanoidins are dark-coloured recalcitrant pollutants found in many industrial wastewaters including coffee-manufacturing effluent, molasses distillery wastewater (MDWW) and other wastewater with molasses as the raw material. The wastewaters are mostly treated with anaerobic digestion after some dilution to minimize the inhibition effect. However, the dark colour and recalcitrant dissolved organic carbon (DOC) mainly caused by melanoidin are not effectively removed. The aim of this study was to investigate the removal of colour and remnant DOC by different coagulants from anaerobically digested MDWW. From the six coagulants tested, ferric chloride had the highest melanoidin (48%), colour (92.7%) and DOC (63.3%) removal at pH 5 and a dosage of 1.6 g/l. Both polymer and inorganic salt coagulants tested had optimal colour, melanoidin and DOC removal at acidic pH. The molecular size distribution of synthetic melanoidins by liquid chromatography-organic carbon detection indicated a preferential removal of high-molecular-weight melanoidins over low weight melanoidins by the coagulation. Further studies should focus on how to improve biodegradability of the treated effluent for it to be reused as dilution water for anaerobic digestion. PMID:25799161

  3. Nanofiltration based water reclamation from tannery effluent following coagulation pretreatment.

    PubMed

    Dasgupta, J; Mondal, D; Chakraborty, S; Sikder, J; Curcio, S; Arafat, H A

    2015-11-01

    Coagulation-nanofiltration based integrated treatment scheme was employed in the present study to maximize the removal of toxic Cr(VI) species from tannery effluents. The coagulation pretreatment step using aluminium sulphate hexadecahydrate (alum) was optimized by response surface methodology (RSM). A nanofiltration unit was integrated with this coagulation pre-treatment unit and the resulting flux decline and permeate quality were investigated. Herein, the coagulation was conducted under response surface-optimized operating conditions. The hybrid process demonstrated high chromium(VI) removal efficiency over 98%. Besides, fouling of two of the tested nanofiltration membranes (NF1 and NF3) was relatively mitigated after feed pretreatment. Nanofiltration permeation fluxes as high as 80-100L/m(2)h were thereby obtained. The resulting permeate stream quality post nanofiltration (NF3) was found to be suitable for effective reuse in tanneries, keeping the Cr(VI) concentration (0.13mg/L), Biochemical Oxygen Demand (BOD) (65mg/L), Chemical Oxygen Demand (COD) (142mg/L), Total Dissolved Solids (TDS) (108mg/L), Total Solids (TS) (86mg/L) and conductivity levels (14mho/cm) in perspective. The process water reclaiming ability of nanofiltration was thereby substantiated and the effectiveness of the proposed hybrid system was thus affirmed. PMID:26188702

  4. Electrosurgical device for both mechanical cutting and coagulation of bleeding

    DOEpatents

    Doss, J.D.; McCabe, C.W.

    1985-02-08

    Bipolar electrical coagulation of tissue using radiofrequency energy is combined with the functions of conventional surgical pressure tissue cutting instruments without significant modification thereof in a single instrument with the result that a surgeon can perform both procedures without having to redirect his attention from the area of the surgery. 4 figs.

  5. Electrosurgical device for both mechanical cutting and coagulation of bleeding

    DOEpatents

    Doss, James D.; McCabe, Charles W.

    1987-01-01

    Bipolar electrical coagulation of tissue using radio-frequency energy is combined with the functions of conventional surgical pressure tissue cutting instruments without significant modification thereof in a single instrument with the result that a surgeon can perform both procedures without having to redirect his attention from the area of the surgery.

  6. Removal and Transformation of Estrogens During the Coagulation Process

    EPA Science Inventory

    Estrogenic compounds have been shown to be present in surface waters, leading to concerns over the possible presence of endocrine disrupting compounds in finished drinking waters. Bench-scale studies (jar tests) simulating coagulation were conducted to evaluate the ability of tw...

  7. Removal of sulfide, sulfate and sulfite ions by electro coagulation.

    PubMed

    Murugananthan, M; Raju, G Bhaskar; Prabhakar, S

    2004-06-18

    The removal of various species of sulfur from beamhouse of tannery wastewater and also from synthetic samples was studied by electro-flotation technique. Consumable anodes of iron and aluminum and insoluble anode of titanium were tested as anodes. It was found that iron and aluminum anodes were effective for the removal of suspended solids, sulfide, sulfite and sulfate. Progress of simultaneous coagulation of suspended solids during electro-flotation was measured using particle size analysis. Coagulation was found to be essential for effective flotation of suspended solids. Metal ions generated in situ by electrolytic oxidation of anode were found to react with dissolved sulfide ions. Metal sulfides thus formed as colloidal suspension were coagulated and floated simultaneously by hydrogen bubbles generated from cathode. Simultaneous occurrence of precipitation, coagulation and flotation was observed during electro-flotation. X-ray diffraction studies were conducted to identify the nature of sulfide phase formed during electrolytic precipitation. The effect of pH, current density and initial concentration of pollutants was studied and the results are discussed. The removal of sulfite and sulfate ions is explained by zeta-potential measurements. PMID:15177743

  8. Application performance of a new coagulant in wastewater reuse.

    PubMed

    Fu, Ying; Wang, Jingzhi; Wang, Yanzheng; Lu, Ningning

    2016-01-01

    Ultraviolet (UV) absorption characteristics of poly-Al-Zn-Fe (PAZF), a polymerized coagulant containing three kinds of metallic elements prepared from a galvanized-aluminum slag, was analyzed by UV-visible spectrophotometry during its polymerization process. Pollutant removal by PAZF in treating various wastewaters was investigated, in comparison with that of polyaluminum chloride (PAC). The results showed that PAZF can be applied to different wastewaters and had excellent coagulation behavior due to its special internal composition. Various complicated substances having different absorption wavelengths and polymeric properties were produced during the PAZF polymerization process, and the structures of these complicated substances were adjusted continuously with the increasing of the polymerization time. PAZF posed better turbidity and organic matter (chemical oxygen demand, COD(Cr)) removal than PAC for different wastewaters, and the required dosage of PAZF was far lower than that of PAC when achieving the same coagulation performance. For pharmaceutical, sugar, dyeing, simulated pesticide and landscape wastewaters, PAZF gave higher removal of turbidity or COD(Cr) than PAC, by up to 79.5% (coagulant dose: 74 mg/L) or 16% (148 mg/L), 13.4% (111 mg/L) or 10% (185 mg/L), 26.5% (148 mg/L) or 8.1% (18.5 mg/L), 40% (18.5 mg/L) or 13.4% (111 mg/L), and 5% (70 mg/L) or 5% (70 mg/L), respectively. PMID:27148711

  9. Blood coagulation using High Intensity Focused Ultrasound (HIFU)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Phuc V.; Oh, Junghwan; Kang, Hyun Wook

    2014-03-01

    High Intensity Focused Ultrasound (HIFU) technology provides a feasible method of achieving thermal coagulation during surgical procedures. One of the potential clinical benefits of HIFU can induce immediate hemostasis without suturing. The objective of this study was to investigate the efficiency of a HIFU system for blood coagulation on severe vascular injury. ngHIFU treatment was implemented immediately after bleeding in artery. The ultrasound probe was made of piezoelectric material, generating a central frequency of 2.0 MHz as well as an ellipsoidal focal spot of 2 mm in lateral dimension and 10 mm in axial dimension. Acoustic coagulation was employed on a perfused chicken artery model in vitro. A surgical incision (1 to 2 mm long) was made with a scapel on the arterial wall, and heparinized autologous blood was made to leak out from the incision with a syringe pump. A total of 5 femoral artery incisions was treated with the HIFU beam. The intensity of 4500 W/cm2 at the focus was applied for all treatments. Complete hemostasis was achieved in all treatments, along with the treatment times of 25 to 50 seconds. The estimated intraoperative blood loss was from 2 to 5 mL. The proposed HIFU system may provide an effective method for immediate blood coagulation for arteries and veins in clinical applications.

  10. Dust Coagulation in Infalling Protostellar Envelopes I. Compact Grains

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yorke, H.; Lin, D.; Suttner, G.

    1999-01-01

    Dust plays a key role in the optical, thermodynamic and gas dynamical behavior of collapsing molecular cores. Because of relative velocities of the individual dust grains, coagulation and shattering can modify the grain size distribution and -- due to corresponding changes in the medium's opacity significantly -- influence the evolution during early phases of star formation.

  11. Dust Coagulation in Infalling Protostellar Envelopes I. Compact Grains

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yorke, H.; Suttner, G.; Lin, D.

    1999-01-01

    Dust plays a key role in the optical, thermodynamic and gas dynamical behavior of collapsing molecular cores. Because of relative velocities of the individual dust grains, coagulation and shattering can modify the grain size distribution and due to corresponding changes in the medium's opacity significantly influence the evolution during early phase of star formation.

  12. Reduction of Turbidity of Water Using Locally Available Natural Coagulants

    PubMed Central

    Asrafuzzaman, Md.; Fakhruddin, A. N. M.; Hossain, Md. Alamgir

    2011-01-01

    Turbidity imparts a great problem in water treatment. Moringa oleifera, Cicer arietinum, and Dolichos lablab were used as locally available natural coagulants in this study to reduce turbidity of synthetic water. The tests were carried out, using artificial turbid water with conventional jar test apparatus. Optimum mixing intensity and duration were determined. After dosing water-soluble extracts of Moringa oleifera, Cicer arietinum, and Dolichos lablab reduced turbidity to 5.9, 3.9, and 11.1 nephelometric turbidity unit (NTU), respectively, from 100 NTU and 5, 3.3, and 9.5, NTU, respectively, after dosing and filtration. Natural coagulants worked better with high, turbid, water compare to medium, or low, turbid, water. Highest turbidity reduction efficiency (95.89%) was found with Cicer arietinum. About 89 to 96% total coliform reduction were also found with natural coagulant treatment of turbid water. Using locally available natural coagulants, suitable, easier, and environment friendly options for water treatment were observed. PMID:23724307

  13. Coagulation disorders in severely and critically injured patients.

    PubMed

    Avikainen, V

    1977-01-01

    Forty-five patients with multiple injuries treated at an intensive care unit were studied prospectively. The patients were divided into two groups: the severely injured (no mortality) and critically injured (56% mortality). Treatment was started within two hours from the accident in all cases. The following coagulation parameters were measured for eight days: euglobulin lysis time (ELT), thromboelastography (TEG), vecalcification time (RECA), partial thromboplastin time (PTT), factor V, factor VIII, Normotest, Thrombotest, thrombin time, fibrinogen and platelets. Severe coagulation disorders were observed in one-third of the patients 12-48 hours after trauma. The abnormalities were more pronounced in patients who had sustained very severe injuries and arrived in a state of shock. The ELT was shortened 0-6 hours after the accident and accelerated coagulation was indicated simultaneously by decreased PTT, RECA, and r-values as well as by elevated Thrombotest and factor VIII values. The factor V and fibrinogen levels were initially lowered. Low platelet values at 2-4 days, prolonged thrombin and r-times, secondary decrease of fibrinogen FV, FVIII, and low Thrombotest values suggested disseminated intravascular coagulation associated with complications, such as fat embolism and "shock lung" syndromes. General bleeding tendency with high mortality was observed in 16% of the patients. PMID:603216

  14. On the Fundamental Solution of a Linearized Homogeneous Coagulation Equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Escobedo, Miguel; Velázquez, J. J. L.

    2010-08-01

    We describe the fundamental solution of the equation that is obtained by linearization of the coagulation equation with kernel K( x, y) = ( xy)λ/2, around the steady state f( x) = x -(3+λ)/2 with {λ in (1, 2)} . Detailed estimates on its asymptotics are obtained. Some consequences are deduced for the flux properties of the particles distributions described by such models.

  15. Removal of THM precursors by coagulation or ion exchange.

    PubMed

    Bolto, Brian; Dixon, David; Eldridge, Rob; King, Simon

    2002-12-01

    The removal of natural organic matter (NOM) from drinking water supplies can be achieved by different processes, among them coagulation and adsorption. Synthetic waters made from concentrates of humic substances from reservoir and river waters were tested in the laboratory for ease of removAl of NOM by coagulation with cationic organic polymers and with alum, and by adsorption on anion exchangers. For polymers such as high molecular weight polydiallyldimethylammonium chloride (polyDADMAC) and cationic polyacrylamides of high charge, performance was nearly as effective as alum, with colour removals 86-100% of those obtained for alum. Ion exchange using the best commercially available resins designed for this purpose, a gel polystyrene and a macroporous acrylic resin, was more effective than alum treatment for two of the natural waters studied, but inferior for a third. The resins were overall superior to cationic polymers. The NOM was separated into four fractions based on hydrophobic and hydrophilic properties. Alum was not as effective as ion exchange for the elimination of individual ionic NOM fractions. It was better than cationic polymers for removal of humic and fulvic acids, although polyDADMAC was as good for one water. For the removal of charged compounds alum then polyDADMAC were the best performers for that water. Unequivocal evidence was obtained that coagulants remove material that is not adsorbed by resins, and vice versa. A combination of coagulation with a cationic polymer and adsorption by an anion exchanger removed essentially all of the NOM. The preference of the coagulants was for the larger, more hydrophobic molecules, and of resins for smaller highly charged hydrophilic molecules. Each fraction had trihalomethane formation potentials in the range 11-24 microg/mg, except for one water that was more reactive. Hence, the actual amount of each fraction in the original water becomes a crucial factor. PMID:12448555

  16. Application' and validation of autochthonous lactic acid bacteria starter cultures for controlled leek fermentations and their influence on the antioxidant properties of leek.

    PubMed

    Wouters, D; Bernaert, N; Anno, N; Van Droogenbroeck, B; De Loose, M; Van Bockstaele, E; De Vuyst, L

    2013-07-15

    Leek (Allium ampeloprasum var. porrum) is one of Belgium's most important outdoor vegetables, mainly cultivated for its white shaft. Fermentation of leek offers opportunities in view of biomass valorization and product diversification. This study deals with the implementation and validation of starter cultures to perform controlled leek fermentations and to ensure a high quality of the end-products. Therefore, a thorough study of the fermentation microbiology and the influence of three starter culture strains (Lactobacillus plantarum IMDO 788, Lactobacillus sakei IMDO 1358, and Leuconostoc mesenteroides IMDO 1347) on the metabolite kinetics of leek fermentation and antioxidant properties of leek was performed. Overall, the application of lactic acid bacteria starter cultures resulted in a fast prevalence of the species involved, coupled to an accelerated acidification. Of the three starter cultures tested, the mixed starter culture of L. plantarum IMDO 788 and L. mesenteroides IMDO 1347 was most promising, as its application resulted in fermented leek of good microbiological quality and in a more extensive carbohydrate consumption, whereby diverse end-metabolites were produced. However, high residual fructose concentrations allowed yeast outgrowth, resulting in increased ethanol and glycerol concentrations, and indicated the lack of a prevailing strictly heterofermentative LAB species. The antioxidant capacity of fermented leek samples, as measured with the oxygen radical absorbance capacity assay, increased when starter cultures were used, whereas with regard to 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl free radical scavenging activity, only leek fermented with L. sakei IMDO 1358 scored higher than spontaneously fermented leek. The total phenolic content was not influenced by the use of starter cultures, while the S-alk(en)yl-L-cysteine sulfoxides content decreased strongly. A preliminary sensory analysis revealed that the spontaneously fermented leek and the one obtained

  17. Reversible Control by Vitamin D of Granulocytes and Bacteria in the Lungs of Mice: An Ovalbumin-Induced Model of Allergic Airway Disease

    PubMed Central

    Gorman, Shelley; Weeden, Clare E.; Tan, Daryl H. W.; Scott, Naomi M.; Hart, Julie; Foong, Rachel E.; Mok, Danny; Stephens, Nahiid; Zosky, Graeme; Hart, Prue H.

    2013-01-01

    Vitamin D may be essential for restricting the development and severity of allergic diseases and asthma, but a direct causal link between vitamin D deficiency and asthma has yet to be established. We have developed a ‘low dose’ model of allergic airway disease induced by intraperitoneal injection with ovalbumin (1 µg) and aluminium hydroxide (0.2 mg) in which characteristics of atopic asthma are recapitulated, including airway hyperresponsiveness, antigen-specific immunoglobulin type-E and lung inflammation. We assessed the effects of vitamin D deficiency throughout life (from conception until adulthood) on the severity of ovalbumin-induced allergic airway disease in vitamin D-replete and -deficient BALB/c mice using this model. Vitamin D had protective effects such that deficiency significantly enhanced eosinophil and neutrophil numbers in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid of male but not female mice. Vitamin D also suppressed the proliferation and T helper cell type-2 cytokine-secreting capacity of airway-draining lymph node cells from both male and female mice. Supplementation of initially vitamin D-deficient mice with vitamin D for four weeks returned serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D to levels observed in initially vitamin D-replete mice, and also suppressed eosinophil and neutrophil numbers in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid of male mice. Using generic 16 S rRNA primers, increased bacterial levels were detected in the lungs of initially vitamin D-deficient male mice, which were also reduced by vitamin D supplementation. These results indicate that vitamin D controls granulocyte levels in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid in an allergen-sensitive manner, and may contribute towards the severity of asthma in a gender-specific fashion through regulation of respiratory bacteria. PMID:23826346

  18. Development of the selective hydrophobic coagulation process. Technical progess report for the eighth quarter, 1 July 1993--30 September 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Yoon, R.H.; Luttrell, G.H.

    1993-12-31

    A novel technique for selectively coagulating and separating coal from dispersed mineral matter has been developed at Virginia Tech. The process, known as Selective Hydrophobic Coagulation (SHC), has been studied under the sponsorship of the U.S. Department of Energy since 1986. The SHC process differs from oil agglomeration, shear flocculation, polymer flocculation, and electrolytic coagulation processes in that it does not require reagents or additives to induce the formation of coagula. Often, simple pH control is all that is required to (i) induce the coagulation of coal particles, and (ii) effectively disperse particles of mineral matter. When the coal is superficially oxidized, a small dosage of reagents may be used to promote coagulation. During the past quarter, work was completed on the prediction of optimum conditions for the SHC process using the extended DLVO equation (Subtask 2.3). In addition, the evaluation of the lamella thickener for separating hydrophobic coagula from dispersed mineral matter was completed. Work is now underway to complete the evaluation of other separation devices including a vacuum filter, flotation column and centrifuge (Subtask 3.3).

  19. Enhanced Coagulation-Flocculation Performance of Iron-Based Coagulants: Effects of PO43- and SiO32- Modifiers

    PubMed Central

    Teng, Houkai; Wang, Yili; Zhang, Yuxin; Zhao, Chuanliang; Liao, Yong

    2015-01-01

    PO43- and SiO32- are often used as modifier to improve stability and aggregating ability of the iron-base coagulants, however, there are few reports about their detailed comparison between the coagulation performance and mechanisms. In this study, three coagulants—polyferric phosphoric sulfate (PFPS), polysilicon ferric sulfate (PFSS), and polyferric sulfate (PFS) were synthesized; their structure and morphology were characterized by Fourier transformed infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Scanning electron microscope (SEM). Alkali titration and Ferron species analysis were employed to investigate the hydrolysis performance and species distribution. Jar test was conducted to measure their coagulation behaviors at different dosage, pH, and temperatures in which the flocs properties were measured. The results showed that a number of new compounds were formed due to the presence of PO43- and SiO32-. Moreover, PFPS and PFSS had similar level in Fea as well as Feb. Among them, PFPS produced more multi-core iron atoms polymer and content of Feb, and the formed flocs were larger and denser. It exhibited superior coagulation performance in terms of turbidity reduction, UV254 removal and residual ferric concentration. Jar test and floc breakage/regrowth experiments indicated other than charge neutrality, the dominated mechanism involved in PFSS was the adsorption between polysilicic acid and solution particle, while PFPS was sweeping, entrapment/adsorption resulting from larger polymer colloid of Fe-P chemistry bond. PMID:26339902

  20. Bacteria isolated from amoebae/bacteria consortium

    DOEpatents

    Tyndall, Richard L.

    1995-01-01

    New protozoan derived microbial consortia and method for their isolation are provided. Consortia and bacteria isolated therefrom are useful for treating wastes such as trichloroethylene and trinitrotoluene. Consortia, bacteria isolated therefrom, and dispersants isolated therefrom are useful for dispersing hydrocarbons such as oil, creosote, wax, and grease.

  1. Bacteria isolated from amoebae/bacteria consortium

    DOEpatents

    Tyndall, R.L.

    1995-05-30

    New protozoan derived microbial consortia and method for their isolation are provided. Consortia and bacteria isolated therefrom are useful for treating wastes such as trichloroethylene and trinitrotoluene. Consortia, bacteria isolated therefrom, and dispersants isolated therefrom are useful for dispersing hydrocarbons such as oil, creosote, wax, and grease.

  2. Coagulation sensors based on magnetostrictive delay lines for biomedical and chemical engineering applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maliaritsi, E.; Zoumpoulakis, L.; Simitzis, J.; Vassiliou, P.; Hristoforou, E.

    2006-04-01

    Coagulation sensors based on the magnetostrictive delay line technique are presented in this paper. They are based on magnetostrictive ribbons and are used for measuring the coagulation, curing or solidification time of different liquids. Experimental results indicate that the presented sensing elements can determine the blood coagulation with remarkable repeatability, thus allowing their use as blood coagulation sensors. Additionally, results indicate that they can also measure curing time of resins, solidification of fluids and coagulation of chemical substances, therefore allowing their implementation in chemical engineering applications.

  3. Fibrinogen Availability and Coagulation Function after Hemorrhage and Resuscitation in Pigs

    PubMed Central

    Martini, Wenjun Z

    2011-01-01

    Hemorrhagic coagulopathy (without neurological injuries) constitutes 40% of injury-related death in civilian hospitals and on the battlefield, and the underlying contributing mechanisms remain unclear. The purpose of this study is to investigate the effects of fibrinogen availability on coagulation function after hemorrhage in pigs. Sixteen crossbred commercial Yorkshire swine were randomized into the control group (group C) (n = 8) and hemorrhage group (group H) (n = 8). Hemorrhage was induced in group H by bleeding 35% of the estimated total blood volume, followed by resuscitation with lactated Ringer solution at three times the bled volume. Pigs in group C were not hemorrhaged or resuscitated. Blood samples were withdrawn at baseline, 15 min, 3 h, 6 h, and 24 h after hemorrhage and lactated Ringer (LR) resuscitation (H–LR). Coagulation was assessed by using thrombelastography. All baseline measurements were similar between groups C and H. Hemorrhage caused a decrease in mean arterial pressure and an increase in heart rate in group H, but LR resuscitation corrected these changes within 1 h. Compared to baseline values, fibrinogen concentrations in group H decreased at 15 min, 3 h and 6 h after H–LR, but increased to double that of the baseline value at 24 h; platelet counts decreased throughout the study; clot strength was decreased at 15 min, 3 h and 6 h, but returned to baseline value at 24 h after H–LR. Hemorrhage caused decreases in fibrinogen and platelets, and compromised clot strength. The rebound of fibrinogen at 24 h restored clot strength despite platelet deficit. These data suggest the potential compensatory role of fibrinogen in restoring coagulation function in vivo after hemorrhagic shock. PMID:21327301

  4. Effect of ribs in HIFU beam path on formation of coagulative necrosis in goat liver

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Faqi; Gong, Xiaobo; Hu, Kai; Li, Chongyan; Wang, Zhibiao

    2006-05-01

    The motives of the work are to explore the effect of ribs in HIFU beam path on HIFU ablation goat liver. A model-JC Focused Ultrasound Tumor Therapeutic System was used. A 0.75 MHz focused transducer with 150mm aperture and 120mm focal length was used in all experiment. Acoustical power can be adjusted. 30 goats were divided into control group (HIFU beam through rib cage, HIFU alone), experiment group 1(HIFU beam through rib cage, HIFU combined with microbubble) and experiment group 2(Ribs in HIFU beam path were surgically removed, HIFU alone). 20 targeted regions at 5cm away from skin surface were applied for creating necrosis with linear scanning of 15mm length using HIFU in 3 groups. All animals were sacrificed two days later and exposed organs were dissected. After obtaining the maximal section, the volumes of the necrotic regions were measured, then to calculate Energy Efficiency Factor (EEF). Researched results showed that Ribs in HIFU beam path affected the formation of coagulative necrosis and enhanced EEF in control group. HIFU combined with microbubble could enhance the formation of coagulative necrosis and decrease EEF.

  5. The histological features of microwave coagulation therapy: an assessment of a new applicator design

    PubMed Central

    Swift, Benjamin; Strickland, Andrew; West, Kevin; Clegg, Peter; Cronin, Nigel; Lloyd, David

    2003-01-01

    Microwave ablation of tumours within the liver may become an adjunct or alternative to resection in patients with primary or secondary cancers. This technique combines the benefits of a large, localized coagulative effect with a single insertion of the applicator, in a significantly shorter time than comparable treatments. A new range of microwave applicators were developed and tested in animal models and both ex-vivo and in-vivo specimens of human liver at resection. At laparotomy, the applicator tip was inserted into normal liver parenchyma and tumours, with each specimen subjected to irradiation for 180 s or more and at varying power outputs. On sectioning an area of spherical blanching was observed around the applicator cavity. Microscopically a zone of coagulative necrosis was seen adjacent to the site of probe insertion. Damage to blood vessels and bile ducts occurred distal to the probe cavity suggesting the passage of heated fluid, a finding that was diminished by temporary occlusion of the hepatic vasculature (a Pringle manoeuvre). Ultra-structural damage was confirmed within the burn zone and selected liver enzymes were shown to be functioning beyond this region. We suggest this indicates the surrounding liver parenchyma is functioning normally and therefore the volume of microwave-induced damage is controllable. We are confident that the new applicator design will allow the effective treatment of larger tumours in a safe and controlled manner with a single application of energy. PMID:12694484

  6. Effect of two-stage coagulant addition on coagulation-ultrafiltration process for treatment of humic-rich water.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ting; Chen, Zhong-lin; Yu, Wen-zheng; Shen, Ji-min; Gregory, John

    2011-08-01

    A novel two-stage coagulant addition strategy applied in a coagulation-ultrafiltration (UF) process for treatment of humic-rich water at neutral pH was investigated in this study. When aluminum sulfate (alum) doses were set at a ratio of 3:1 added during rapid mix stage and half way through flocculation stage, the integrated process of two-stage alum addition achieved almost the same organic matter removal as that of conventional one-stage alum addition at the same overall dose. Whereas membrane fouling could be effectively mitigated by the two-stage addition exhibited by trans-membrane pressure (TMP) developments. The TMP developments were found to be primarily attributed to external fouling on membrane surface, which was closely associated with floc characteristics. The results of jar tests indicated that the average size of flocs formed in two-stage addition mode roughly reached one half larger than that in one-stage addition mode, which implied a beneficial effect on membrane fouling reduction. Moreover, the flocs with more irregular structure and lower effective density resulted from the two-stage alum addition, which caused higher porosity of cake layer formed by such flocs on membrane surface. Microscopic observations of membrane surface demonstrated that internal fouling in membrane pores could be also remarkably limited by two-stage alum addition. It is likely that the freshly formed hydroxide precipitates were distinct in surface characteristics from the aged precipitates due to formation of more active groups or adsorption of more labile aluminum species. Consequently, the flocs could further connect and aggregate to contribute to preferable properties for filtration performance of the coagulation-UF process. As a simple and efficient approach, two-stage coagulant addition strategy could have great practical significance in coagulation-membrane processes. PMID:21704354

  7. Obstetric hemorrhage and coagulation: an update. Thromboelastography, thromboelastometry, and conventional coagulation tests in the diagnosis and prediction of postpartum hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    de Lange, Natascha M; Lancé, Marcus D; de Groot, Reneé; Beckers, Erik A M; Henskens, Yvonne M; Scheepers, Hubertina C J

    2012-07-01

    Globally, postpartum hemorrhage (PPH) is the leading cause of maternal morbidity and mortality. In the current treatment of severe PPH, first-line therapy includes transfusion of packed cells and fresh-frozen plasma in addition to uterotonic medical management and surgical interventions. In persistent PPH, tranexamic acid, fibrinogen, and coagulation factors are often administered. Secondary coagulopathy due to PPH or its treatment is often underestimated and therefore remains untreated, potentially causing progression to even more severe PPH. In most cases, medical and transfusion therapy is not based on the actual coagulation state because conventional laboratory test results are usually not available for 45 to 60 minutes. Thromboelastography and rotational thromboelastometry are point-of-care coagulation tests. A good correlation has been shown between thromboelastometric and conventional coagulation tests, and the use of these in massive bleeding in nonobstetric patients is widely practiced and it has been proven to be cost-effective. As with conventional laboratory tests, there is an influence of fluid dilution on coagulation test results, which is more pronounced with colloid fluids. Fibrinogen seems to play a major role in the course of PPH and can be an early predictor of the severity of PPH. The FIBTEM values (in thromboelastometry, reagent specific for the fibrin polymerization process) decline even more rapidly than fibrinogen levels and can be useful for early guidance of interventions. Data on thromboelastography and thromboelastometry in pregnant women are limited, particularly during the peripartum period and in women with PPH, so more research in this field is needed. PMID:22926249

  8. Core-shell-shell nanorods for controlled release of silver that can serve as a nanoheater for photothermal treatment on bacteria.

    PubMed

    Hu, Bo; Wang, Ning; Han, Lu; Chen, Ming-Li; Wang, Jian-Hua

    2015-01-01

    A novel bactericidal material comprising rod-shaped core-shell-shell Au-Ag-Au nanorods is constructed as a nanoheater in the near-infrared (NIR) region. The outer Au shell melts under laser irradiation and results in exposure of the inner Ag shell, facilitating the controlled release of the antibacterial Ag shell/layer or Ag(+). This results in the Au-Ag-Au nanorods having a favorable bactericidal ability as it combines the features of physical photothermal ablation sterilization of the outer Au shell and the antibacterial effect of the inner Ag shell or Ag(+) to the surrounding bacteria. The sterilizing ability of Au-Ag-Au nanorods is investigated with Escherichia coli O157:H7 as a model bacterial strain. Under low-power NIR laser irradiation (785 nm, 50 mW cm(-2)), the Au-Ag-Au nanoheater exhibits a higher photothermal conversion efficiency (with a solution temperature of 44°C) with respect to that for the Au-Ag nanorods (39°C). Meanwhile, a much improved stability with respect to Au-Ag nanorods is observed, i.e., 16 successive days of monitoring reveal virtually no change in the ultraviolet-visible spectrum of Au-Ag-Au nanorods, while a significant drop in absorption along with a 92 nm red shift of Localized Surface Plasmon Resonance is recorded for the Au-Ag nanorods. This brings an increasing bactericidal efficiency and long-term stability for the Au-Ag-Au nanorods. At a dosage of 10 μg ml(-1), a killing rate of 100% is reached for the E. coli O157:H7 cells under 20 min of irradiation. The use of Au-Ag-Au nanorods avoids the abuse of broad-spectrum antibiotics and reduces the damage of tissues by alleviating the toxicity of silver under controlled release and by the use of low-power laser irradiation. These features could make the bimetallic core-shell-shell nanorods a favorable nanoheater for in vivo biomedical applications. PMID:25219350

  9. New method for detection of blood coagulation using fiber-optic sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fediay, Sergey G.; Kuznetzov, Alexsey V.

    1991-07-01

    The detection of blood coagulation is very important in therapeutics and surgery. It is necessary to determine the overall time taken for blood clotting, production rate of thrombin, presence or absence of blood coagulation factors, etc. In this paper a new method for detection of blood coagulation is presented. This method is based on the fiber-optic sensor and allows for the study of different ways of blood clotting (such as blood coagulation and platelets aggregation) separately, thus enhancing the precision of determination. The method for determining the blood coagulation presented possesses high precision in monitoring the process of coagulation. An elaborate mathematical model of the process of blood coagulation has been developed to help the computer handle obtained data.

  10. Mechanisms during suspended solids and phosphate concentration variations in wastewater coagulation process.

    PubMed

    Manamperuma, Lelum Duminda; Ratnaweera, Harsha Chandima; Martsul, A

    2016-10-01

    Coagulation-flocculation process is one of the most commonly used treatment process in water and wastewater treatment. Particles (PA) and phosphates (P) removal are the main objectives in wastewater coagulation. There is a general agreement on the dominant mechanism of PA and P removal during coagulation. While it is agreed that the PA and P removal reactions are competitive and takes place simultaneously, there is no clear understanding on the ratio of distribution of coagulants among the PA and P removal. The ratio can be significantly influenced by the content of PA and P, in addition to other water and coagulant quality factors. This paper attempts to provide a qualitative ratio of coagulant distribution based on PA:P proportion in raw water and OH:Al ratio in coagulants. PMID:26857441

  11. Bacteria Inactivation During Lithotripsy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    del Sol Quintero, María; Mora, Ulises; Gutiérrez, Jorge; Mues, Enrique; Castaño, Eduardo; Fernández, Francisco; Loske, Achim M.

    2006-09-01

    The influence of extracorporeal and intracorporeal lithotripsy on the viability of bacteria contained inside artificial kidney stones was investigated in vitro. Two different bacteria were exposed to the action of one extracorporeal shock wave generator and four intracorporeal lithotripters.

  12. Endophytic bacteria from Piper tuberculatum Jacq.: isolation, molecular characterization, and in vitro screening for the control of Fusarium solani f. sp piperis, the causal agent of root rot disease in black pepper (Piper nigrum L.).

    PubMed

    Nascimento, S B; Lima, A M; Borges, B N; de Souza, C R B

    2015-01-01

    Endophytic bacteria have been found to colonize internal tissues in many different plants, where they can have several beneficial effects, including defense against pathogens. In this study, we aimed to identify endophytic bacteria associated with roots of the tropical piperaceae Piper tuberculatum, which is known for its resistance to infection by Fusarium solani f. sp piperis, the causal agent of black pepper (Piper nigrum) root rot disease in the Amazon region. Based on 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis, we isolated endophytes belonging to 13 genera: Bacillus, Paenibacillus, Pseudomonas, Enterobacter, Rhizobium, Sinorhizobium, Agrobacterium, Ralstonia, Serratia, Cupriavidus, Mitsuaria, Pantoea, and Staphylococcus. The results showed that 56.52% of isolates were associated with the phylum Proteobacteria, which comprised α, β, and γ classes. Other bacteria were related to the phylum Firmicutes, including Bacillus, which was the most abundant genus among all isolates. Antagonistic assays revealed that Pt12 and Pt13 isolates, identified as Pseudomonas putida and Pseudomonas sp, respectively, were able to inhibit F. solani f. sp piperis growth in vitro. We describe, for the first time, the molecular identification of 23 endophytic bacteria from P. tuberculatum, among which two Pseudomonas species have the potential to control the pathogen responsible for root rot disease in black pepper in the Amazon region. PMID:26214435

  13. The effects of 7.5% NaCl/6% dextran 70 on coagulation and platelet aggregation in humans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hess, J. R.; Dubick, M. A.; Summary, J. J.; Bangal, N. R.; Wade, C. E.

    1992-01-01

    The combination solution of 7.5% NaCl/6% dextran 70 (HSD) administered IV gives hemodynamic improvement in the treatment of hemorrhagic hypotension. Since earlier dextran solutions were reported to interfere with blood coagulation, the effects of HSD on the prothrombin time (PT), the activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT), platelet aggregation, and platelet concentration were studied. The HSD mixed with human plasma (1:5 and 1:10) slightly prolonged PT, but had no effect on the APTT, compared with saline controls. The HSD also decreased human platelet aggregation at the 1:5 dilution. In separate mixing studies, the hypertonic saline component of HSD was associated with the prolongation of PT and decreased platelet aggregation. The data from these studies indicate that at its proposed therapeutic dose, HSD is expected to have minimal effect on blood coagulation.

  14. Potential role of bacteria packaging by protozoa in the persistence and transmission of pathogenic bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Denoncourt, Alix M.; Paquet, Valérie E.; Charette, Steve J.

    2014-01-01

    Many pathogenic bacteria live in close association with protozoa. These unicellular eukaryotic microorganisms are ubiquitous in various environments. A number of protozoa such as amoebae and ciliates ingest pathogenic bacteria, package them usually in membrane structures, and then release them into the environment. Packaged bacteria are more resistant to various stresses and are more apt to survive than free bacteria. New evidence indicates that protozoa and not bacteria control the packaging process. It is possible that packaging is more common than suspected and may play a major role in the persistence and transmission of pathogenic bacteria. To confirm the role of packaging in the propagation of infections, it is vital that the molecular mechanisms governing the packaging of bacteria by protozoa be identified as well as elements related to the ecology of this process in order to determine whether packaging acts as a Trojan Horse. PMID:24904553

  15. Effects of Two Application Methods of Plantaricin BM-1 on Control of Listeria monocytogenes and Background Spoilage Bacteria in Sliced Vacuum-Packaged Cooked Ham Stored at 4°C.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Huimin; Xie, Yuanhong; Liu, Hui; Jin, Junhua; Duan, Huixia; Zhang, Hongxing

    2015-10-01

    Two application methods were used to investigate the effect of plantaricin BM-1 on the control of Listeria monocytogenes and background spoilage bacteria in sliced vacuum-packaged cooked ham without the addition of any chemical preservatives, including sodium nitrite, during 35 days of storage at 4°C. Regardless of the application method, plantaricin BM-1 treatment (320, 640, or 1,280 arbitrary units [AU]/g of sliced cooked ham) significantly (P < 0.05) reduced the survival of L. monocytogenes (inoculated at 4 log CFU/g of sliced ham) compared with its survival in the control during the first 21 days of storage at 4°C. The inhibitory effect of plantaricin applied to the surface of the ham was significantly better than the same concentration of plantaricin incorporated into the cooked ham (P < 0.0001) during storage. Even 320 AU/g plantaricin applied to the surface exhibited greater inhibition of L. monocytogenes than 1,280 AU/g plantaricin incorporated into the cooked ham on days 1, 14, and 28. A level of 1,280 AU/g plantaricin applied to the surface of the ham reduced L. monocytogenes counts to below the detection limit from the 1st to the 21st day of storage at 4°C. Afterwards, L. monocytogenes was able to regrow, and the viable counts of L. monocytogenes at the end of storage reached 2.76 log CFU/g (6.11 log CFU/g lower than in the control). In the control ham, the counts of background spoilage bacteria increased gradually and surpassed the microbiological spoilage limitation level on the 21st day of storage. However, plantaricin BM-1 treatment significantly (P < 0.05) reduced the survival of background spoilage bacteria in ham compared with their survival in the control from day 21 to 35 of storage at 4°C. A level of 1,280 AU/g plantaricin incorporated into cooked ham was the most effective, reducing the count of background spoilage bacteria count from an initial 2.0 log CFU/g to 1.5 log CFU/g on day 7. This was then maintained for another 14 days and

  16. Reduced efficacy of marine cloud brightening geoengineering due to in-plume aerosol coagulation: parameterization and global implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stuart, G. S.; Stevens, R. G.; Partanen, A.-I.; Jenkins, A. K. L.; Korhonen, H.; Forster, P. M.; Spracklen, D. V.; Pierce, J. R.

    2013-07-01

    The intentional enhancement of cloud albedo via controlled sea-spray injection from ships (Marine Cloud Brightening) has been proposed as a possible method to control anthropogenic global warming; however, there remains significant uncertainty in the efficacy of this method due to, amongst other factors, uncertainties in aerosol and cloud microphysics. A major assumption used in recent cloud- and climate-modeling studies is that all sea spray was emitted uniformly into some oceanic grid boxes, and thus these studies did not account for sub-grid aerosol coagulation within the sea-spray plumes. We explore the evolution of these sea-salt plumes using a multi-shelled Gaussian plume model with size-resolved aerosol coagulation. We determine how the final number of particles depends on meteorological conditions, including wind speed and boundary-layer stability, as well as the emission rate and size distribution of aerosol emitted. Under previously proposed injection rates and typical marine conditions, we find that the number of aerosol particles is reduced by over 50%, but this reduction varies from under 10% to over 90% depending on the conditions. We provide a computationally efficient parameterization for cloud-resolving and global-scale models to account for sub-grid scale coagulation, and we implement this parameterization in a global-scale aerosol-climate model. We find that accounting for this sub-grid scale coagulation reduces cloud droplet number concentrations by 46% over emission regions, and reduces the global mean radiative flux perturbation from -1.5 W m-2 to -0.8 W m-2.

  17. Weighted Flow Algorithms (WFA) for stochastic particle coagulation

    SciTech Connect

    DeVille, R.E.L.; Riemer, N.; West, M.

    2011-09-20

    Stochastic particle-resolved methods are a useful way to compute the time evolution of the multi-dimensional size distribution of atmospheric aerosol particles. An effective approach to improve the efficiency of such models is the use of weighted computational particles. Here we introduce particle weighting functions that are power laws in particle size to the recently-developed particle-resolved model PartMC-MOSAIC and present the mathematical formalism of these Weighted Flow Algorithms (WFA) for particle coagulation and growth. We apply this to an urban plume scenario that simulates a particle population undergoing emission of different particle types, dilution, coagulation and aerosol chemistry along a Lagrangian trajectory. We quantify the performance of the Weighted Flow Algorithm for number and mass-based quantities of relevance for atmospheric sciences applications.

  18. Coagulation of grains in static and collapsing protostellar clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weidenschilling, S. J.; Ruzmaikina, T. V.

    1993-01-01

    The wavelength dependence of extinction in the diffuse interstellar medium implies that it is produced by particles of dominant size of approximately 10(exp -5) cm. There is some indication that in the cores of dense molecular clouds, sub-micron grains can coagulate to form larger particles; this process is probably driven by turbulence. The most primitive meteorites (carbonaceous chondrites) are composed of particles with a bimodal size distribution with peaks near 1 micron (matrix) and 1 mm (chondrules). Models for chondrule formation that involve processing of presolar material by chemical reactions or through an accretion shock during infall assume that aggregates of the requisite mass could form before or during collapse. The effectiveness of coagulation during collapse has been disputed; it appears to depend on specific assumptions. The first results of detailed numerical modeling of spatial and temporal variations of particle sizes in presolar clouds, both static and collapsing, is reported in this article.

  19. Examining coagulation-complement crosstalk: complement activation and thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Foley, Jonathan H

    2016-05-01

    The coagulation and complement systems are ancestrally related enzymatic cascades of the blood. Although their primary purposes have diverged over the past few hundred million years, they remain inextricably connected. Both complement and coagulation systems limit infection by pathogens through innate immune mechanisms. Recently, it has been shown that hyperactive complement (in particular, elevated C5a/C5b-9) is involved in the pathogenesis (including thrombosis) of diseases such as paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria, atypical haemolytic uremic syndrome, antiphospholipid syndrome and bacteremia. Although these diseases together account for many thrombosis cases, there are many more where complement activation is not considered a causative factor leading to thrombosis. To better understand what role complement may play in the pathogenesis of thrombosis a better understanding of the mechanisms that cause over-active complement in thrombotic disease is required. PMID:27207425

  20. Evaluation and control of the risk of food borne pathogens and spoilage bacteria present in “Awa-Uirou”, a sticky rice cake containing sweet red bean paste

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The potential for growth of food poisoning or spoilage bacteria in “Awa-Uirou”, a sticky rice cake containing sweet red bean paste was evaluated. The water activity (aw 0.92) was in the range suitable for the growth of Staphylococcus aureus, Bacillus cereus and Bacillus subtilis. The viable cell cou...

  1. Influences of sample interference and interference controls on quantification of enterococci fecal indicator bacteria in surface water samples by the qPCR method

    EPA Science Inventory

    A quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) method for the detection of entercocci fecal indicator bacteria has been shown to be generally applicable for the analysis of temperate fresh (Great Lakes) and marine coastal waters and for providing risk-based determinations of wat...

  2. Gut bacteria of the Pacific coast wireworm, Limonius canus, inferred from 16s rDNA sequences and their implications for control.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A multitude of bacteria have been isolated from the guts of several insect species. Some of these have been modified to interfere with the development of the host insect or interfere with the development and transmission of plant and animal pathogens transmitted by the host insect. A survey of the g...

  3. Protein composition affects variation in coagulation properties of buffalo milk.

    PubMed

    Bonfatti, V; Gervaso, M; Rostellato, R; Coletta, A; Carnier, P

    2013-07-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effects exerted by the content of casein and whey protein fractions on variation of pH, rennet-coagulation time (RCT), curd-firming time (K20), and curd firmness of Mediterranean buffalo individual milk. Measures of milk protein composition and assessment of genotypes at CSN1S1 and CSN3 were obtained by reversed-phase HPLC analysis of 621 individual milk samples. Increased content of αS1-casein (CN) was associated with delayed coagulation onset and increased K20, whereas average pH, RCT, and K20 decreased when β-CN content increased. Milk with low κ-CN content exhibited low pH and RCT relative to milk with high content of κ-CN. Increased content of glycosylated κ-CN was associated with unfavorable effects on RCT. Effects of milk protein composition on curd firmness were less important than those on pH, RCT, and K20. Likely, this occurred as a consequence of the very short RCT of buffalo milk, which guaranteed a complete strengthening of the curd even in the restricted 31 min time of analysis of coagulation properties and for samples initially showing soft curds. Effects of CSN1S1-CSN3 genotypes on coagulation properties were not to be entirely ascribed to existing variation in milk protein composition associated with polymorphisms at CSN1S1 and CSN3 genes. Although the role of detailed milk protein composition in variation of cheese yield needs to be further investigated, findings of this study suggest that modification of the relative content of specific CN fractions can relevantly influence the behavior of buffalo milk during processing. PMID:23684020

  4. Interaction between Cryptosporidium oocysts and water treatment coagulants.

    PubMed

    Bustamante, H A; Shanker, S R; Pashley, R M; Karaman, M E

    2001-09-01

    The electrokinetic properties of gamma-irradiated Cryptosporidium oocysts in the presence of coagulants (ferric chloride and alum) and coagulant aids (DADMAC based cationic polyelectrolytes) have been studied. The zeta potential of the oocysts was unaffected by the addition of ferric chloride at all pH values (3-10) studied. Addition of alum resulted in reversal of the oocysts charge, which suggests that the initial stage in the coagulation process leading to floc formation proceeds via the adsorption of hydrolysed aluminium species. The cationic polyelectrolyte Magnafloc LT35 was adsorbed onto iron flocs at doses of 0.1 mg/L even against an electrostatic barrier. The cationic polyelectrolyte only adsorbed and caused charge reversal at the oocyst surface at around 0.4 mg/L, suggesting a lower affinity for this surface. These results indicate that the oocysts, unlike inorganic colloidal materials such as metal oxides, appear to possess a lower surface density of active or charged sites. The lower density of sites, combined with the rapid precipitation of iron salts, may be responsible for the lack of specific adsorption of either hydroxylated ferric species or primary iron hydroxide particles on the oocysts. Further, this suggests that a process of sweep flocculation, where oocysts are engulfed in flocs during coagulation and floc formation, is the more likely mechanism involved. By comparison, it is likely that the specific interaction of hydrolysed aluminium species with the oocysts surface would result in a stronger link at the oocyst-floc interface and that the flocculation process may initially proceed via charge neutralisation. PMID:11487115

  5. Blood viscosity during coagulation at different shear rates

    PubMed Central

    Ranucci, Marco; Laddomada, Tommaso; Ranucci, Matteo; Baryshnikova, Ekaterina

    2014-01-01

    Abstract During the coagulation process, blood changes from a liquid to a solid gel phase. These changes are reflected by changes in blood viscosity; however, blood viscosity at different shear rates (SR) has not been previously explored during the coagulation process. In this study, we investigated the viscosity changes of whole blood in 10 subjects with a normal coagulation profile, using a cone‐on‐plate viscosimeter. For each subject, three consecutive measurements were performed, at a SR of 20, 40, 80 sec−1. On the basis of the time‐dependent changes in blood viscosity, we identified the gel point (GP), the time‐to‐gel point (TGP), the maximum clot viscosity (MCV), and the clot lysis half‐time (CLH). The TGP significantly (P = 0.0023) shortened for increasing SR, and was significantly associated with the activated partial thromboplastin time at a SR of 20 sec−1 (P = 0.038) and 80 sec−1 (P = 0.019). The MCV was significantly lower at a SR of 80 sec−1 versus 40 sec−1 (P = 0.027) and the CLH significantly (P = 0.048) increased for increasing SR. These results demonstrate that measurement of blood viscosity during the coagulation process offers a number of potentially useful parameters. In particular, the association between the TGP and the activated partial thromboplastin time is an expression of the clotting time (intrinsic and common pathway), and its shortening for increasing SR may be interpreted the well‐known activating effects of SR on platelet activation and thrombin generation. Further studies focused on the TGP under conditions of hypo‐ or hypercoagulability are required to confirm its role in the clinical practice. PMID:24994896

  6. The influence of riboflavin photochemistry on plasma coagulation factors

    PubMed Central

    Larrea, Luis; Calabuig, María; Roldán, Vanesa; Rivera, José; Tsai, Han-Mou; Vicente, Vicente; Roig, Roberto

    2011-01-01

    Studies with riboflavin in the 1960s showed that it could be effective at inactivating pathogens when exposed to light. The principal mode of action is through electron transfer reactions, most importantly in nucleic acids. This suggested that it could act as a photosensitizer useful in the inactivation of pathogens found in blood products. Objective To study the influence of photo-inactivation with riboflavin on the coagulation factors of plasma. Methods The photo-inactivation procedure of riboflavin plus light was applied. Fifty isogroup pools of two plasmas were made from 100 U of plasma that were derived from whole blood products that had previously been held overnight. Pools were split into two bags. One of them was photo-inactivated, and post inactivation samples were obtained. The second bag was not photo-inactivated and samples were taken. Total protein, fibrinogen, FII, FV, FVII, FVIII, FIX, FX, FXI, FXIII, antithrombin III, PC, PS, α-2 antiplasmin and vWF:Ag, the multimeric structure of vWF and ADAMTS-13 were analyzed. Results In plasma, the proteins most sensitive to photo-inactivation were fibrinogen, FXI, FVIII, FV, and FIX (33%, 32%, 30%, 18% and 18% loss, respectively). Coagulation inhibitors, PS, antithrombin III and PC showed little decrease (all 2%). Retention of vWF and ADAMTS-13 were 99% and 88%, respectively. Conclusions As with other pathogen reduction procedures for plasma products, treatment with riboflavin and UV light resulted in reduction in the activity levels of several pro-coagulant factors. Coagulation inhibitors are well preserved. PMID:19782644

  7. Commonly Used Dietary Supplements on Coagulation Function during Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Chong-Zhi; Moss, Jonathan; Yuan, Chun-Su

    2015-01-01

    Background Patients who undergo surgery appear to use dietary supplements significantly more frequently than the general population. Because they contain pharmacologically active compounds, dietary supplements may affect coagulation and platelet function during the perioperative period through direct effects, pharmacodynamic interactions, and pharmacokinetic interactions. However, in this regard, limited studies have been conducted that address the pharmacological interactions of dietary supplements. To avoid possible bleeding risks during surgery, information of potential complications of dietary supplements during perioperative management is important for physicians. Methods Through a systematic database search of all available years, articles were identified in this review if they included dietary supplements and coagulation/platelet function, while special attention was paid to studies published after 1990. Results Safety concerns are reported in commercially available dietary supplements. Effects of the most commonly used natural products on blood coagulation and platelet function are systematically reviewed, including 11 herbal medicines (echinacea, ephedra, garlic, ginger, ginkgo, ginseng, green tea, kava, saw palmetto, St John’s wort, and valerian) and 4 other dietary supplements (coenzyme Q10, glucosamine and chondroitin sulfate, fish oil, and vitamins). Bleeding risks of garlic, ginkgo, ginseng, green tea, saw palmetto, St John’s wort, and fish oil are reported. Cardiovascular instability was observed with ephedra, ginseng, and kava. Pharmacodynamic and pharmacokinetic interactions between dietary supplements and drugs used in the perioperative period are discussed. Conclusions To prevent potential problems associated with the use of dietary supplements, physicians should be familiar with the perioperative effects of commonly used dietary supplements. Since the effects of dietary supplements on coagulation and platelet function are difficult to

  8. Routine coagulation testing: do we need a discard tube?

    PubMed

    Masih, Markas; Kakkar, Naveen

    2014-12-01

    When coagulation tests are performed, the recommended guideline is that a discard tube be used and the coagulation testing should be done only on the second tube. This guideline is however inconsistently enforced and most laboratories follow a single tube draw for routine coagulation testing. Few studies have however, challenged this guideline and have shown that comparable results can be obtained in both tubes when a two tube draw is used. This prospective study was done over a 3 months period in the hematology laboratory under the Clinical Hematology unit of a tertiary care teaching institution in North India. Fifty-six paired specimens were drawn from healthy volunteers following the prescribed "two tube draw" method. Prothrombin time (PT) and activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT) were performed within 1 h of sample collection on a fully automated photo-optical coagulation instrument (Ceveron-Alpha). Paired results for PT and APTT were compared using Bland-Altman plots for method comparison. There was good correlation between the PT, INR and APTT of the first and second tubes with bias of 0.09, -0.05 and 0.3 respectively). Bland-Altman plots showed acceptable agreement between the two values with 95 % confidence interval ranging from -0.62 to 0.79 for PT, -0.05 to 0.06 for INR and -3.9 to 4.6 for APTT. Our study has shown no significant difference between PT and APTT values for the first and second tubes. Hence the use of a discard tube is not required. PMID:25435740

  9. Dust to planetesimals - Settling and coagulation in the solar nebula

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weidenschilling, S. J.

    1980-01-01

    The behavior of solid particles in a low-mass solar nebula during settling to the central plane and the formation of planetesimals is discussed. The gravitational instability in a dust layer and collisional accretion are examined as possible mechanisms of planetesimal formation. The shear between the gas and a dust layer is considered along with the differences in the planetesimal formation mechanisms between the inner and outer nebula. A numerical model for computing simultaneous coagulation and settling is described.

  10. Effect of Dust Coagulation Dynamics on the Geometry of Aggregates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nakamura, R.

    1996-01-01

    Master equation gives a more fundamental description of stochastic coagulation processes rather than popular Smoluchowski's equation. In order to examine the effect of the dynamics on the geometry of resulting aggregates, we study Master equation with a rigorous Monte Carlo algorithm. It is found that Cluster-Cluster aggregation model is a good approximation of orderly growth and the aggregates have fluffy structures with a fractal dimension approx. 2. A scaling analysis of Smoluchowski's equation also supports this conclusion.

  11. Human plasma kallikrein releases neutrophil elastase during blood coagulation.

    PubMed Central

    Wachtfogel, Y T; Kucich, U; James, H L; Scott, C F; Schapira, M; Zimmerman, M; Cohen, A B; Colman, R W

    1983-01-01

    Elastase is released from human neutrophils during the early events of blood coagulation. Human plasma kallikrein has been shown to stimulate neutrophil chemotaxis, aggregation, and oxygen consumption. Therefore, the ability of kallikrein to release neutrophil elastase was investigated. Neutrophils were isolated by dextran sedimentation, and elastase release was measured by both an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, and an enzymatic assay using t-butoxy-carbonyl-Ala-Ala-Pro-Val-amino methyl coumarin as the substrate. Kallikrein, 0.1-1.0 U/ml, (0.045-0.45 microM), was incubated with neutrophils that were preincubated with cytochalasin B (5 micrograms/ml). The release of elastase was found to be proportional to the kallikrein concentration. Kallikrein released a maximum of 34% of the total elastase content, as measured by solubilizing the neutrophils in the nonionic detergent Triton X-100. A series of experiments was carried out to determine if kallikrein was a major enzyme involved in neutrophil elastase release during blood coagulation. When 10 million neutrophils were incubated in 1 ml of normal plasma in the presence of 30 mM CaCl2 for 90 min, 2.75 micrograms of elastase was released. In contrast, neutrophils incubated in prekallikrein-deficient or Factor XII-deficient plasma released less than half of the elastase, as compared with normal plasma. The addition of purified prekallikrein to prekallikrein-deficient plasma restored neutrophil elastase release to normal levels. Moreover, release of elastase was enhanced in plasma deficient in C1-inhibitor, the major plasma inhibitor of kallikrein. This release was not dependent upon further steps in the coagulation pathway, or on C5a, since levels of elastase, released in Factor XI- or C5-deficient plasma, were similar to that in normal plasma, and an antibody to C5 failed to inhibit elastase release. These data suggest that kallikrein may be a major enzyme responsible for the release of elastase during blood

  12. Coagulation Changes During Graded Orhostatic Stress and Recovery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goswami, Nandu; Cvirn, Gerhard; Schlagenhauf, Aaxel; Leschnik, Bettina; Koestenberger, Martin; Roessler, Andreas; Jantscher, Andreas; Waha, James Elvis; Wolf, Sabine; Vrecko, Karoline; Juergens, Guenther; Hinghofer-Szalkay, Helmut

    2013-02-01

    Background: Orthostatic stress has been introduced as a novel paradigm for activating the coagulation system. We examined whether graded orthostatic stress (using head up tilt, HUT + lower body negative pressure, LBNP) until presyncope leads to anti / pro-coagulatory changes and how rapidly they return to baseline during recovery. Methodology: Eight male subjects were enrolled in this study. Presyncopal runs were carried out using HUT + LBNP. At minute zero, the tilt table was brought from 0° (supine) to 70 ° head-up position for 4 min, after which pressure in the LBNP chamber was reduced to -15, -30, and -45 mm Hg every 4 min. At presyncope, the subjects were returned to supine position. Coagulatory responses and plasma mass density (for volume changes) were measured before, during and 20 min after the orthostatic stress. Whole blood coagulation was examined by means of thrombelastometry. Platelet aggregation in whole blood was examined by using impedance aggregometry. Thrombin generation parameters, prothrombin levels, and markers of endothelial activation were measured in plasma samples. Results: At presyncope, plasma volume was 20 % below the initial supine value. Blood cell counts, prothrombin levels, thrombin peak, endogenous thrombin potential (ETP), and tissue factor pathway inhibitor (TFPI) levels increased during the protocol, commensurate with hemoconcentration. The markers of endothelial activation (tissue factor, TF, tissue plasminogen activator, t-PA) and the markers of thrombin generation (Prothrombin fragments 1 and 2, F1+2, and thrombin-antithrombin complex, TAT) increased significantly. During recovery, all the coagulation parameters returned to initial supine values except F1 +2 and TAT. Conclusion: Head-up tilt/LBNP leads to activation of the coagulation system. Some of the markers of thrombin formation are still at higher than supine levels during recovery.

  13. [The coagulation characteristics of human oxyhemoglobin in the presence of a mercury (II) ion in a neutral phosphate buffer].

    PubMed

    Bogdanova, L D; Myshkin, A E

    1990-01-01

    The kinetics of human oxyhemoglobin coagulation in neutral phosphate buffer in the presence of mercury acetate at 20 degrees has been studied using turbidimetric methods. The addition of small amounts of concentrated Hg2+ solution leads to rapid local protein coagulation with subsequent dissolution of the formed coagulate. Coagulation can be inhibited by addition of Tris that binds to mercury ions. The pattern of oxyhemoglobin coagulation is determined by molar Hg2+/protein ration rather than by total Hg2+ concentration. PMID:2362035

  14. Application of an optical clearing agent during noninvasive laser coagulation of the canine vas deferens

    PubMed Central

    Cilip, Christopher M.; Ross, Ashley E.; Jarow, Jonathan P.; Fried, Nathaniel M.

    2010-01-01

    Development of a noninvasive vasectomy technique may eliminate male fear of complications and result in a more popular procedure. This study explores application of an optical clearing agent (OCA) to scrotal skin to reduce laser power necessary for successful noninvasive laser vasectomy and eliminate scrotal skin burns. A mixture of dimethyl sulfoxide and glycerol was noninvasively delivered into scrotal skin using a pneumatic jet device. Near-infrared laser radiation was delivered in conjunction with cryogen spray cooling to the skin surface in a canine model, ex vivo and in vivo. Burst pressure (BP) measurements were conducted to quantify strength of vas closure. A 30-min application of OCA improved skin transparency by 26±3%, reducing average power necessary for successful noninvasive laser vasectomy from 9.2 W without OCA (BP=291±31 mmHg) to 7.0 W with OCA (BP=292±19 mmHg). Control studies without OCA at 7.0 W failed to coagulate the vas with burst pressures (82±28 mmHg) significantly below typical ejaculation pressures (136±29 mmHg). Application of an OCA reduced the laser power necessary for successful noninvasive thermal coagulation of the vas by ∼25%. This technique may result in use of a less expensive laser and eliminate the formation of scrotal skin burns during the procedure. PMID:20799844

  15. Inhibitors of propagation of coagulation (factors VIII, IX and XI): a review of current therapeutic practice

    PubMed Central

    Franchini, Massimo; Mannucci, Pier Mannuccio

    2011-01-01

    The management of patients with congenital haemophilia who develop alloantibodies against factors of the propagation phase of blood coagulation, commonly known as inhibitors, is the most important challenge facing haemophilia caregivers at present, as this complication not only compromises the efficacy of replacement therapy but also consumes an enormous amount of economic resources. Development of inhibitors further complicates the clinical course of severe haemophilia, with a prevalence of up to 30% in patients with haemophilia A (factor VIII deficiency) and up to 5% in those with haemophilia B (factor IX deficiency) and haemophilia C (factor XI deficiency). While the short-term goal of treatment of patients who develop alloantibodies is the control of bleeding, the eradication of the inhibitor is the main long-term goal. The management of severe bleeding episodes and the eradication of the autoantibody are also the mainstays of treatment of patients with acquired haemophilia, a rare but life-threatening haemorrhagic condition characterized by the development of inhibitory autoantibodies against coagulation factor VIII. The most recent options available for treating patients with congenital haemophilia complicated by inhibitors and acquired haemophilia because of autoantibodies against factor VIII are summarized in this review article. PMID:21204915

  16. Application of an optical clearing agent during noninvasive laser coagulation of the canine vas deferens.

    PubMed

    Cilip, Christopher M; Ross, Ashley E; Jarow, Jonathan P; Fried, Nathaniel M

    2010-01-01

    Development of a noninvasive vasectomy technique may eliminate male fear of complications and result in a more popular procedure. This study explores application of an optical clearing agent (OCA) to scrotal skin to reduce laser power necessary for successful noninvasive laser vasectomy and eliminate scrotal skin burns. A mixture of dimethyl sulfoxide and glycerol was noninvasively delivered into scrotal skin using a pneumatic jet device. Near-infrared laser radiation was delivered in conjunction with cryogen spray cooling to the skin surface in a canine model, ex vivo and in vivo. Burst pressure (BP) measurements were conducted to quantify strength of vas closure. A 30-min application of OCA improved skin transparency by 26+/-3%, reducing average power necessary for successful noninvasive laser vasectomy from 9.2 W without OCA (BP=291+/-31 mmHg) to 7.0 W with OCA (BP=292+/-19 mmHg). Control studies without OCA at 7.0 W failed to coagulate the vas with burst pressures (82+/-28 mmHg) significantly below typical ejaculation pressures (136+/-29 mmHg). Application of an OCA reduced the laser power necessary for successful noninvasive thermal coagulation of the vas by approximately 25%. This technique may result in use of a less expensive laser and eliminate the formation of scrotal skin burns during the procedure. PMID:20799844

  17. The effects of Hespan on serum and lymphatic albumin, globulin, and coagulant protein.

    PubMed Central

    Lucas, C E; Denis, R; Ledgerwood, A M; Grabow, D

    1988-01-01

    The effects of hydroxyethyl starch (Hespan) resuscitation on serum and lymphatic proteins following hemorrhagic shock were studied in 34 splenectomized dogs. Following shock, five randomly assigned treatment groups received the shed blood plus 50 mL/kg of salt solution (RL) or RL with varying concentrations (0.22-1.5 gm/kg) of Hespan. Each dog received 50 ml/kg/d of the test solution for three days after shock. Prothrombin time, partial thromboplastin time, thrombin time, total serum protein, albumin, globulin, and coagulant protein activity of fibrinogen, prothrombin, and factor VIII were measured before shock, at the end of shock, following resuscitation, and on day 3; thoracic duct lymph values were obtained on day 3. Hespan-supplemented resuscitation lowered all serum proteins including albumin, globulin and coagulant proteins; concomitantly, the lymph protein rose after Hespan resuscitation. This decrease in serum proteins and rise in lymph proteins parallels similar results after albumin resuscitation in man and animals and suggests that Hespan induces an oncotically controlled extravascular protein relocation. Further studies on the significance of these findings need to be conducted. PMID:2451485

  18. Application of an optical clearing agent during noninvasive laser coagulation of the canine vas deferens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cilip, Christopher M.; Ross, Ashley E.; Jarow, Jonathan P.; Fried, Nathaniel M.

    2010-07-01

    Development of a noninvasive vasectomy technique may eliminate male fear of complications and result in a more popular procedure. This study explores application of an optical clearing agent (OCA) to scrotal skin to reduce laser power necessary for successful noninvasive laser vasectomy and eliminate scrotal skin burns. A mixture of dimethyl sulfoxide and glycerol was noninvasively delivered into scrotal skin using a pneumatic jet device. Near-infrared laser radiation was delivered in conjunction with cryogen spray cooling to the skin surface in a canine model, ex vivo and in vivo. Burst pressure (BP) measurements were conducted to quantify strength of vas closure. A 30-min application of OCA improved skin transparency by 26+/-3%, reducing average power necessary for successful noninvasive laser vasectomy from 9.2 W without OCA (BP=291+/-31 mmHg) to 7.0 W with OCA (BP=292+/-19 mmHg). Control studies without OCA at 7.0 W failed to coagulate the vas with burst pressures (82+/-28 mmHg) significantly below typical ejaculation pressures (136+/-29 mmHg). Application of an OCA reduced the laser power necessary for successful noninvasive thermal coagulation of the vas by ~25%. This technique may result in use of a less expensive laser and eliminate the formation of scrotal skin burns during the procedure.

  19. Protease-activated receptors mediate crosstalk between coagulation and fibrinolysis.

    PubMed

    McEachron, Troy A; Pawlinski, Rafal; Richards, Kristy L; Church, Frank C; Mackman, Nigel

    2010-12-01

    The coagulation and fibrinolytic systems contribute to malignancy by increasing angiogenesis, tumor growth, tumor invasion, and tumor metastasis. Oncogenic transformation increases the expression of tissue factor (TF) that results in local generation of coagulation proteases and activation of protease-activated receptor (PAR)-1 and PAR-2. We compared the PAR-dependent expression of urokinase plasminogen activator (uPA) and plasminogen activator inhibitor (PAI)-1 in 2 murine mammary adencocarcinoma cell lines: metastatic 4T1 cells and nonmetastatic 67NR cells. 4T1 cells expressed TF, PAR-1 and PAR-2 whereas 67NR cells expressed TF and PAR-1. We also silenced PAR-1 or PAR-2 expression in the 4T1 cells. We discovered 2 distinct mechanisms for PAR-dependent expression of uPA and PAI-1. First, we found that factor Xa or thrombin activation of PAR-1 led to a rapid release of stored intracellular uPA into the culture supernatant. Second, thrombin transactivation of a PAR-1/PAR-2 complex resulted in increases in PAI-1 mRNA and protein expression. Cells lacking PAR-2 failed to express PAI-1 in response to thrombin and factor Xa did not activate the PAR-1/PAR-2 complex. Our results reveal how PAR-1 and PAR-2 on tumor cells mediate crosstalk between coagulation and fibrinolysis. PMID:20736455

  20. Dust grain coagulation modelling : From discrete to continuous

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paruta, P.; Hendrix, T.; Keppens, R.

    2016-07-01

    In molecular clouds, stars are formed from a mixture of gas, plasma and dust particles. The dynamics of this formation is still actively investigated and a study of dust coagulation can help to shed light on this process. Starting from a pre-existing discrete coagulation model, this work aims to mathematically explore its properties and its suitability for numerical validation. The crucial step is in our reinterpretation from its original discrete to a well-defined continuous form, which results in the well-known Smoluchowski coagulation equation. This opens up the possibility of exploiting previous results in order to prove the existence and uniqueness of a mass conserving solution for the evolution of dust grain size distribution. Ultimately, to allow for a more flexible numerical implementation, the problem is rewritten as a non-linear hyperbolic integro-differential equation and solved using a finite volume discretisation. It is demonstrated that there is an exact numerical agreement with the initial discrete model, with improved accuracy. This is of interest for further work on dynamically coupled gas with dust simulations.