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Sample records for bacteria gram-positive bacteria

  1. Transformation of gram positive bacteria by sonoporation

    DOEpatents

    Yang, Yunfeng; Li, Yongchao

    2014-03-11

    The present invention provides a sonoporation-based method that can be universally applied for delivery of compounds into Gram positive bacteria. Gram positive bacteria which can be transformed by sonoporation include, for example, Bacillus, Streptococcus, Acetobacterium, and Clostridium. Compounds which can be delivered into Gram positive bacteria via sonoporation include nucleic acids (DNA or RNA), proteins, lipids, carbohydrates, viruses, small organic and inorganic molecules, and nano-particles.

  2. Peptide conversations in Gram-positive bacteria.

    PubMed

    Monnet, Véronique; Juillard, Vincent; Gardan, Rozenn

    2014-09-01

    Abstract Within Gram-positive bacteria, the expression of target genes is controlled at the population level via signaling peptides, also known as pheromones. Pheromones control a wide range of functions, including competence, virulence, and others that remain unknown. Until now, their role in bacterial gene regulation has probably been underestimated; indeed, bacteria are able to produce, by ribosomal synthesis or surface protein degradation, an extraordinary variety of peptides which are released outside bacteria and among which, some are pheromones that mediate cell-to-cell communication. The review aims at giving an updated overview of these peptide-dependant communication pathways. More specifically, it follows the whole peptide circuit from the peptide production and secretion in the extracellular medium to its interaction with sensors at bacterial surface or re-import into the bacteria where it plays its regulation role. In recent years, as we have accumulated more knowledge about these systems, it has become apparent that they are more complex than they first appeared. For this reason, more research on peptide-dependant pathways is needed to develop new strategies for controlling functions of interest in Gram-positive bacteria. In particular, such research could lead to alternatives to the use of antibiotics against pathogenic bacteria. In perspective, the review identifies new research questions that emerge in this field and that have to be addressed. PMID:25198780

  3. Bacteriocins of gram-positive bacteria.

    PubMed Central

    Jack, R W; Tagg, J R; Ray, B

    1995-01-01

    In recent years, a group of antibacterial proteins produced by gram-positive bacteria have attracted great interest in their potential use as food preservatives and as antibacterial agents to combat certain infections due to gram-positive pathogenic bacteria. They are ribosomally synthesized peptides of 30 to less than 60 amino acids, with a narrow to wide antibacterial spectrum against gram-positive bacteria; the antibacterial property is heat stable, and a producer strain displays a degree of specific self-protection against its own antibacterial peptide. In many respects, these proteins are quite different from the colicins and other bacteriocins produced by gram-negative bacteria, yet customarily they also are grouped as bacteriocins. Although a large number of these bacteriocins (or bacteriocin-like inhibitory substances) have been reported, only a few have been studied in detail for their mode of action, amino acid sequence, genetic characteristics, and biosynthesis mechanisms. Nevertheless, in general, they appear to be translated as inactive prepeptides containing an N-terminal leader sequence and a C-terminal propeptide component. During posttranslational modifications, the leader peptide is removed. In addition, depending on the particular type, some amino acids in the propeptide components may undergo either dehydration and thioether ring formation to produce lanthionine and beta-methyl lanthionine (as in lantibiotics) or thio ester ring formation to form cystine (as in thiolbiotics). Some of these steps, as well as the translocation of the molecules through the cytoplasmic membrane and producer self-protection against the homologous bacteriocin, are mediated through specific proteins (enzymes). Limited genetic studies have shown that the structural gene for such a bacteriocin and the genes encoding proteins associated with immunity, translocation, and processing are present in a cluster in either a plasmid, the chromosome, or a transposon. Following posttranslational modification and depending on the pH, the molecules may either be released into the environment or remain bound to the cell wall. The antibacterial action against a sensitive cell of a gram-positive strain is produced principally by destabilization of membrane functions. Under certain conditions, gram-negative bacterial cells can also be sensitive to some of these molecules. By application of site-specific mutagenesis, bacteriocin variants which may differ in their antimicrobial spectrum and physicochemical characteristics can be produced. Research activity in this field has grown remarkably but sometimes with an undisciplined regard for conformity in the definition, naming, and categorization of these molecules and their genetic effectors. Some suggestions for improved standardization of nomenclature are offered. PMID:7603408

  4. Conjugation in Gram-Positive Bacteria.

    PubMed

    Goessweiner-Mohr, Nikolaus; Arends, Karsten; Keller, Walter; Grohmann, Elisabeth

    2014-08-01

    Conjugative transfer is the most important means of spreading antibiotic resistance and virulence factors among bacteria. The key vehicles of this horizontal gene transfer are a group of mobile genetic elements, termed conjugative plasmids. Conjugative plasmids contain as minimum instrumentation an origin of transfer (oriT), DNA-processing factors (a relaxase and accessory proteins), as well as proteins that constitute the trans-envelope transport channel, the so-called mating pair formation (Mpf) proteins. All these protein factors are encoded by one or more transfer (tra) operons that together form the DNA transport machinery, the Gram-positive type IV secretion system. However, multicellular Gram-positive bacteria belonging to the streptomycetes appear to have evolved another mechanism for conjugative plasmid spread reminiscent of the machinery involved in bacterial cell division and sporulation, which transports double-stranded DNA from donor to recipient cells. Here, we focus on the protein key players involved in the plasmid spread through the two different modes and present a new secondary structure homology-based classification system for type IV secretion protein families. Moreover, we discuss the relevance of conjugative plasmid transfer in the environment and summarize novel techniques to visualize and quantify conjugative transfer in situ. PMID:26104193

  5. Mismatch repair in Gram-positive bacteria.

    PubMed

    Lenhart, Justin S; Pillon, Monica C; Guarn, Alba; Biteen, Julie S; Simmons, Lyle A

    2016-01-01

    DNA mismatch repair (MMR) is responsible for correcting errors formed during DNA replication. DNA polymerase errors include base mismatches and extra helical nucleotides referred to as insertion and deletion loops. In bacteria, MMR increases the fidelity of the chromosomal DNA replication pathway approximately 100-fold. MMR defects in bacteria reduce replication fidelity and have the potential to affect fitness. In mammals, MMR defects are characterized by an increase in mutation rate and by microsatellite instability. In this review, we discuss current advances in understanding how MMR functions in bacteria lacking the MutH and Dam methylase-dependent MMR pathway. PMID:26343983

  6. Methods for targetted mutagenesis in gram-positive bacteria

    DOEpatents

    Yang, Yunfeng

    2014-05-27

    The present invention provides a method of targeted mutagenesis in Gram-positive bacteria. In particular, the present invention provides a method that effectively integrates a suicide integrative vector into a target gene in the chromosome of a Gram-positive bacterium, resulting in inactivation of the target gene.

  7. Antimicrobial Peptide Resistance Mechanisms of Gram-Positive Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    McBride, Shonna M.

    2014-01-01

    Antimicrobial peptides, or AMPs, play a significant role in many environments as a tool to remove competing organisms. In response, many bacteria have evolved mechanisms to resist these peptides and prevent AMP-mediated killing. The development of AMP resistance mechanisms is driven by direct competition between bacterial species, as well as host and pathogen interactions. Akin to the number of different AMPs found in nature, resistance mechanisms that have evolved are just as varied and may confer broad-range resistance or specific resistance to AMPs. Specific mechanisms of AMP resistance prevent AMP-mediated killing against a single type of AMP, while broad resistance mechanisms often lead to a global change in the bacterial cell surface and protect the bacterium from a large group of AMPs that have similar characteristics. AMP resistance mechanisms can be found in many species of bacteria and can provide a competitive edge against other bacterial species or a host immune response. Gram-positive bacteria are one of the largest AMP producing groups, but characterization of Gram-positive AMP resistance mechanisms lags behind that of Gram-negative species. In this review we present a summary of the AMP resistance mechanisms that have been identified and characterized in Gram-positive bacteria. Understanding the mechanisms of AMP resistance in Gram-positive species can provide guidelines in developing and applying AMPs as therapeutics, and offer insight into the role of resistance in bacterial pathogenesis. PMID:25419466

  8. Protein secretion and surface display in Gram-positive bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Schneewind, Olaf; Missiakas, Dominique M.

    2012-01-01

    The cell wall peptidoglycan of Gram-positive bacteria functions as a surface organelle for the transport and assembly of proteins that interact with the environment, in particular, the tissues of an infected host. Signal peptide-bearing precursor proteins are secreted across the plasma membrane of Gram-positive bacteria. Some precursors carry C-terminal sorting signals with unique sequence motifs that are cleaved by sortase enzymes and linked to the cell wall peptidoglycan of vegetative forms or spores. The sorting signals of pilin precursors are cleaved by pilus-specific sortases, which generate covalent bonds between proteins leading to the assembly of fimbrial structures. Other precursors harbour surface (S)-layer homology domains (SLH), which fold into a three-pronged spindle structure and bind secondary cell wall polysaccharides, thereby associating with the surface of specific Gram-positive microbes. Type VII secretion is a non-canonical secretion pathway for WXG100 family proteins in mycobacteria. Gram-positive bacteria also secrete WXG100 proteins and carry unique genes that either contribute to discrete steps in secretion or represent distinctive substrates for protein transport reactions. PMID:22411983

  9. Wall Teichoic Acids of Gram-Positive Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Stephanie; Santa Maria, John P.; Walker, Suzanne

    2013-01-01

    The peptidoglycan layers of many gram-positive bacteria are densely functionalized with anionic glycopolymers called wall teichoic acids (WTAs). These polymers play crucial roles in cell shape determination, regulation of cell division, and other fundamental aspects of gram-positive bacterial physiology. Additionally, WTAs are important in pathogenesis and play key roles in antibiotic resistance. We provide an overview of WTA structure and biosynthesis, review recent studies on the biological roles of these polymers, and highlight remaining questions. We also discuss prospects for exploiting WTA biosynthesis as a target for new therapies to overcome resistant infections. PMID:24024634

  10. Wall teichoic acids of gram-positive bacteria.

    PubMed

    Brown, Stephanie; Santa Maria, John P; Walker, Suzanne

    2013-01-01

    The peptidoglycan layers of many gram-positive bacteria are densely functionalized with anionic glycopolymers known as wall teichoic acids (WTAs). These polymers play crucial roles in cell shape determination, regulation of cell division, and other fundamental aspects of gram-positive bacterial physiology. Additionally, WTAs are important in pathogenesis and play key roles in antibiotic resistance. We provide an overview of WTA structure and biosynthesis, review recent studies on the biological roles of these polymers, and highlight remaining questions. We also discuss prospects for exploiting WTA biosynthesis as a target for new therapies to overcome resistant infections. PMID:24024634

  11. Pilins in gram-positive bacteria: A structural perspective.

    PubMed

    Krishnan, Vengadesan

    2015-07-01

    Pilins or fimbrilins are a class of proteins found in bacterial surface pilus, a hair-like surface appendage. Both the Gram-negative and -positive bacteria produce pilins to assemble pili on their cell-surface for different purposes including adherence, twitching motility, conjugation, immunomodulation, biofilm formation, and electron transfer. Immunogenic properties of the pilins make them attractive vaccine candidates. The polymerized pilins play a key role in the initiation of host adhesion, which is a critical step for bacterial colonization and infection. Because of their key role in adhesion and exposure on the cell surface, targeting the pilins-mediated adhesion (anti-adhesion therapy) is also seen as a promising alternative approach for preventing and treating bacterial infections, one that may overcome their ever-increasing repertoires of resistance mechanisms. Individual pilins interact with each other non-covalently to assemble the pilus fiber with the help of associated proteins like chaperones and Usher in Gram-negative bacteria. In contrast, the pilins in Gram-positive bacteria often connect with each other covalently, with the help of sortases. Certain unique structural features present on the pilins distinguish them from one another across different bacterial strains, and these dictate their cellular targets and functions. While the structure of pilins has been extensively studied in Gram-negative pathogenic bacteria, the pilins in Gram-positive pathogenic bacteria have been in only during the last decade. Recently, the discovery of pilins in non-pathogenic bacteria, such as Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG, has received great attention, though traditionally the attention was on pathogenic bacteria. This review summarizes and discusses the current structural knowledge of pilins in Gram-positive bacteria with emphasis on those pilins which are sortase substrates. PMID:26178080

  12. Conjugative type IV secretion systems in Gram-positive bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Goessweiner-Mohr, Nikolaus; Arends, Karsten; Keller, Walter; Grohmann, Elisabeth

    2013-01-01

    Bacterial conjugation presents the most important means to spread antibiotic resistance and virulence factors among closely and distantly related bacteria. Conjugative plasmids are the mobile genetic elements mainly responsible for this task. All the genetic information required for the horizontal transmission is encoded on the conjugative plasmids themselves. Two distinct concepts for horizontal plasmid transfer in Gram-positive bacteria exist, the most prominent one transports single stranded plasmid DNA via a multi-protein complex, termed type IV secretion system, across the Gram-positive cell envelope. Type IV secretion systems have been found in virtually all unicellular Gram-positive bacteria, whereas multicellular Streptomycetes seem to have developed a specialized system more closely related to the machinery involved in bacterial cell division and sporulation, which transports double stranded DNA from donor to recipient cells. This review intends to summarize the state of the art of prototype systems belonging to the two distinct concepts; it focuses on protein key players identified so far and gives future directions for research in this emerging field of promiscuous interbacterial transport. PMID:24129002

  13. Pili of gram-positive bacteria: roles in host colonization.

    PubMed

    Danne, Camille; Dramsi, Shaynoor

    2012-01-01

    In the last decade, pili, which are encoded within pathogenicity islands, have been found in many Gram-positive bacteria, including the major streptococcal and enterococcal pathogens. These long proteinaceous polymers extending from the bacterial surface are constituted of covalently linked pilin subunits, which play major roles in adhesion and host colonization. They are also involved in biofilm formation, a characteristic life-style of the bacteria constituting the oral flora. Pili are highly immunogenic structures that are under the selective pressure of host immune responses. Indeed, pilus expression was found to be heterogeneous in several bacteria with the co-existence of two subpopulations expressing various levels of pili. The molecular mechanisms underlying this complex regulation are poorly characterized except for Streptococcus pneumoniae. In this review, we will discuss the roles of Gram-positive bacteria pili in adhesion to host extracellular matrix proteins, tissue tropism, biofilm formation, modulation of innate immune responses and their contribution to virulence, and in a second part the regulation of their expression. This overview should help to understand the rise of pili as an intensive field of investigation and pinpoints the areas that need further study. PMID:23116627

  14. The Tat system of Gram-positive bacteria.

    PubMed

    Goosens, Vivianne J; Monteferrante, Carmine G; van Dijl, Jan Maarten

    2014-08-01

    The twin-arginine protein translocation (Tat) system has a unique ability to translocate folded and co-factor-containing proteins across lipid bilayers. The Tat pathway is present in bacteria, archaea and in the thylakoid membranes of chloroplasts and, depending on the organism and environmental conditions, it can be deemed important for cell survival, virulence or bioproduction. This review provides an overview of the current understanding of the Tat system with specific focus on Gram-positive bacteria. The 'universal minimal Tat system' is composed of a TatA and a TatC protein. However, this pathway is more commonly composed of two TatA-like proteins and one TatC protein. Often the TatA-like proteins have diverged to have two different functions and, in this case, the second TatA-like protein is usually referred to as TatB. The correct folding and/or incorporation of co-factors are requirements for translocation, and the known quality control mechanisms are examined in this review. A number of examples of crosstalk between the Tat system and other protein transport systems, such as the Sec-YidC translocon and signal peptidases or sheddases are also discussed. Further, an overview of specific Gram-positive bacterial Tat systems found in monoderm and diderm species is detailed. Altogether, this review highlights the unique features of Gram-positive bacterial Tat systems and pinpoints key questions that remain to be addressed in future research. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Protein trafficking and secretion in bacteria. Guest Editors: Anastassios Economou and Ross Dalbey. PMID:24140208

  15. Current and novel antibiotics against resistant Gram-positive bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Perez, Federico; Salata, Robert A; Bonomo, Robert A

    2008-01-01

    The challenge posed by resistance among Gram-positive bacteria, epitomized by methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus (VRE) and vancomycin-intermediate and -resistant S. aureus (VISA and VRSA) is being met by a new generation of antimicrobials. This review focuses on the new ?-lactams with activity against MRSA (ceftobiprole and ceftaroline) and on the new glycopeptides (oritavancin, dalbavancin, and telavancin). It will also consider the role of vancomycin in an era of existing alternatives such as linezolid, daptomycin and tigecycline. Finally, compounds in early development are described, such as iclaprim, friulimicin, and retapamulin, among others. PMID:21694878

  16. Lipoteichoic acid synthesis and function in gram-positive bacteria.

    PubMed

    Percy, Matthew G; Gründling, Angelika

    2014-01-01

    Lipoteichoic acid (LTA) is an important cell wall polymer found in gram-positive bacteria. Although the exact role of LTA is unknown, mutants display significant growth and physiological defects. Additionally, modification of the LTA backbone structure can provide protection against cationic antimicrobial peptides. This review provides an overview of the different LTA types and their chemical structures and synthesis pathways. The occurrence and mechanisms of LTA modifications with D-alanyl, glycosyl, and phosphocholine residues will be discussed along with their functions. Similarities between the production of type I LTA and osmoregulated periplasmic glucans in gram-negative bacteria are highlighted, indicating that LTA should perhaps be compared to these polymers rather than lipopolysaccharide, as is presently the case. Lastly, current efforts to use LTAs as vaccine candidates, synthesis proteins as novel antimicrobial targets, and LTA mutant strains as improved probiotics are highlighted. PMID:24819367

  17. Type IV Pili in Gram-Positive Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Craig, Lisa

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY Type IV pili (T4P) are surface-exposed fibers that mediate many functions in bacteria, including locomotion, adherence to host cells, DNA uptake (competence), and protein secretion and that can act as nanowires carrying electric current. T4P are composed of a polymerized protein, pilin, and their assembly apparatuses share protein homologs with type II secretion systems in eubacteria and the flagella of archaea. T4P are found throughout Gram-negative bacterial families and have been studied most extensively in certain model Gram-negative species. Recently, it was discovered that T4P systems are also widespread among Gram-positive species, in particular the clostridia. Since Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria have many differences in cell wall architecture and other features, it is remarkable how similar the T4P core proteins are between these organisms, yet there are many key and interesting differences to be found as well. In this review, we compare the two T4P systems and identify and discuss the features they have in common and where they differ to provide a very broad-based view of T4P systems across all eubacterial species. PMID:24006467

  18. Cell envelope stress response in Gram-positive bacteria.

    PubMed

    Jordan, Sina; Hutchings, Matthew I; Mascher, Thorsten

    2008-01-01

    The bacterial cell envelope is the first and major line of defence against threats from the environment. It is an essential and yet vulnerable structure that gives the cell its shape and counteracts the high internal osmotic pressure. It also provides an important sensory interface and molecular sieve, mediating both information flow and the controlled transport of solutes. The cell envelope is also the target for numerous antibiotics. Therefore, the monitoring and maintenance of cell envelope integrity in the presence of envelope perturbating agents and conditions is crucial for survival. The underlying signal transduction is mediated by two regulatory principles, two-component systems and extracytoplasmic function sigma factors, in both the Firmicutes (low-GC) and Actinobacteria (high-GC) branches of Gram-positive bacteria. This study presents a comprehensive overview of cell envelope stress-sensing regulatory systems. This knowledge will then be applied for in-depth comparative genomics analyses to emphasize the distribution and conservation of cell envelope stress-sensing systems. Finally, the cell envelope stress response will be placed in the context of the overall cellular physiology, demonstrating that its regulatory systems are linked not only to other stress responses but also to the overall homeostasis and lifestyle of Gram-positive bacteria. PMID:18173394

  19. Regulation of Apoptosis by Gram-Positive Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Ulett, Glen C.; Adderson, Elisabeth E.

    2008-01-01

    Apoptosis, or programmed cell death (PCD), is an important physiological mechanism, through which the human immune system regulates homeostasis and responds to diverse forms of cellular damage. PCD may also be involved in immune counteraction to microbial infection. Over the past decade, the amount of research on bacteria-induced PCD has grown tremendously, and the implications of this mechanism on immunity are being elucidated. Some pathogenic bacteria actively trigger the suicide response in critical lineages of leukocytes that orchestrate both the innate and adaptive immune responses; other bacteria proactively prevent PCD to benefit their own survival and persistence. Currently, the microbial virulence factors, which represent the keys to unlocking the suicide response in host cells, are a primary focus of this field. In this review, we discuss these bacterial “apoptosis regulatory molecules” and the apoptotic events they either trigger or prevent, the host target cells of this regulatory activity, and the possible ramifications for immunity to infection. Gram-positive pathogens including Staphylococcus, Streptococcus, Bacillus, Listeria, and Clostridia species are discussed as important agents of human infection that modulate PCD pathways in eukaryotic cells. PMID:19081777

  20. Photodynamic inactivation of Gram-positive bacteria employing natural resources.

    PubMed

    Mamone, L; Di Venosa, G; Gndara, L; Senz, D; Vallecorsa, P; Schickinger, S; Rossetti, M V; Batlle, A; Buzzola, F; Casas, A

    2014-04-01

    The aim of this paper was to investigate a collection of plant extracts from Argentina as a source of new natural photosensitizers (PS) to be used in Photodynamic Inactivation (PDI) of bacteria. A collection of plants were screened for phototoxicity upon the Gram-positive species Staphylococcus epidermidis. Three extracts turned out to be photoactive: Solanum verbascifolium flower, Tecoma stans flower and Cissus verticillata root. Upon exposure to a light dose of 55J/cm(2), they induced 4, 2 and 3logs decrease in bacterial survival, respectively. Photochemical characterisation of S. verbascifolium extract was carried out. PDI reaction was dependent mainly on singlet oxygen and to a lesser extent, on hydroxyl radicals, through type II and I reactions. Photodegradation experiments revealed that the active principle of the extract was not particularly photolabile. It is noticeable that S. verbascifolium -PDI was more efficient under sunlight as compared to artificial light (total eradication vs. 4 logs decrease upon 120min of sunlight). The balance between oxidant and antioxidant compounds is likely to be masking or unmasking potential PS of plant extracts, but employing the crude extract, the level of photoactivity of S. verbascifolium is similar to some artificial PS upon exposure to sunlight, demonstrating that natural resources can be employed in PDI of bacteria. PMID:24705374

  1. Resistance to bacteriocins produced by Gram-positive bacteria.

    PubMed

    Bastos, Maria do Carmo de Freire; Coelho, Marcus Lvio Varella; Santos, Olinda Cabral da Silva

    2015-04-01

    Bacteriocins are prokaryotic proteins or peptides with antimicrobial activity. Most of them exhibit a broad spectrum of activity, inhibiting micro-organisms belonging to different genera and species, including many bacterial pathogens which cause human, animal or plant infections. Therefore, these substances have potential biotechnological applications in either food preservation or prevention and control of bacterial infectious diseases. However, there is concern that continuous exposure of bacteria to bacteriocins may select cells resistant to them, as observed for conventional antimicrobials. Based on the models already investigated, bacteriocin resistance may be either innate or acquired and seems to be a complex phenomenon, arising at different frequencies (generally from 10(-9) to 10(-2)) and by different mechanisms, even amongst strains of the same bacterial species. In the present review, we discuss the prevalence, development and molecular mechanisms involved in resistance to bacteriocins produced by Gram-positive bacteria. These mechanisms generally involve changes in the bacterial cell envelope, which result in (i) reduction or loss of bacteriocin binding or insertion, (ii) bacteriocin sequestering, (iii) bacteriocin efflux pumping (export) and (iv) bacteriocin degradation, amongst others. Strategies that can be used to overcome this resistance are also addressed. PMID:25406453

  2. Discovery of a potent phenolic N1-benzylidene-pyridinecarboxamidrazone selective against Gram-positive bacteria.

    PubMed

    Rathbone, Daniel L; Parker, Katy J; Coleman, Michael D; Lambert, Peter A; Billington, David C

    2006-02-15

    As part of a study into antimycobacterial compounds a set of phenolic N1-benzylidene-pyridinecarboxamidrazones was prepared and evaluated. This report describes the unexpected discovery of a potent compound with a pronounced selectivity for Gram-positive bacteria over Gram-negative micro-organisms. In addition, this compound is active against various drug-resistant Gram-positive bacteria. PMID:16298528

  3. Isolating "Unknown" Bacteria in the Introductory Microbiology Laboratory: A New Selective Medium for Gram-Positives.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McKillip, John L.; Drake, MaryAnne

    1999-01-01

    Describes the development, preparation, and use of a medium that can select against a wide variety of Gram-negative bacteria while still allowing growth and differentiation of a wide range of Gram-positives. (WRM)

  4. Acquired inducible antimicrobial resistance in Gram-positive bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Chancey, Scott T; Zhner, Dorothea; Stephens, David S

    2012-01-01

    A major contributor to the emergence of antibiotic resistance in Gram-positive bacterial pathogens is the expansion of acquired, inducible genetic elements. Although acquired, inducible antibiotic resistance is not new, the interest in its molecular basis has been accelerated by the widening distribution and often silent spread of the elements responsible, the diagnostic challenges of such resistance and the mounting limitations of available agents to treat Gram-positive infections. Acquired, inducible antibiotic resistance elements belong to the accessory genome of a species and are horizontally acquired by transformation/recombination or through the transfer of mobile DNA elements. The two key, but mechanistically very different, induction mechanisms are: ribosome-sensed induction, characteristic of the macrolidelincosamidestreptogramin B antibiotics and tetracycline resistance, leading to ribosomal modifications or efflux pump activation; and resistance by cell surface-associated sensing of ?-lactams (e.g., oxacillin), glycopeptides (e.g., vancomycin) and the polypeptide bacitracin, leading to drug inactivation or resistance due to cell wall alterations. PMID:22913355

  5. σECF factors of gram-positive bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Souza, Bianca Mendes; Castro, Thiago Luiz de Paula; Carvalho, Rodrigo Dias de Oliveira; Seyffert, Nubia; Silva, Artur; Miyoshi, Anderson; Azevedo, Vasco

    2014-01-01

    The survival of bacteria to different environmental conditions depends on the activation of adaptive mechanisms, which are intricately driven through gene regulation. Because transcriptional initiation is considered to be the major step in the control of bacterial genes, we discuss the characteristics and roles of the sigma factors, addressing (1) their structural, functional and phylogenetic classification; (2) how their activity is regulated; and (3) the promoters recognized by these factors. Finally, we focus on a specific group of alternative sigma factors, the so-called σECF factors, in Bacillus subtilis and some of the main species that comprise the CMNR group, providing information on the roles they play in the microorganisms’ physiology and indicating some of the genes whose transcription they regulate. PMID:24921931

  6. Pili in Gram-positive bacteria: assembly, involvement in colonization and biofilm development

    PubMed Central

    Mandlik, Anjali; Swierczynski, Arlene; Das, Asis; Ton-That, Hung

    2010-01-01

    Various cell-surface multisubunit protein polymers, known as pili or fimbriae, have a pivotal role in the colonization of specific host tissues by many pathogenic bacteria. In contrast to Gram-negative bacteria, Gram-positive bacteria assemble pili by a distinct mechanism involving a transpeptidase called sortase. Sortase crosslinks individual pilin monomers and ultimately joins the resulting covalent polymer to the cell-wall peptidoglycan. Here we review current knowledge of this mechanism and the roles of Gram-positive pili in the colonization of specific host tissues, modulation of host immune responses and the development of bacterial biofilms. PMID:18083568

  7. Pili in Gram-positive bacteria: assembly, involvement in colonization and biofilm development.

    PubMed

    Mandlik, Anjali; Swierczynski, Arlene; Das, Asis; Ton-That, Hung

    2008-01-01

    Various cell-surface multisubunit protein polymers, known as pili or fimbriae, have a pivotal role in the colonization of specific host tissues by many pathogenic bacteria. In contrast to Gram-negative bacteria, Gram-positive bacteria assemble pili by a distinct mechanism involving a transpeptidase called sortase. Sortase crosslinks individual pilin monomers and ultimately joins the resulting covalent polymer to the cell-wall peptidoglycan. Here we review current knowledge of this mechanism and the roles of Gram-positive pili in the colonization of specific host tissues, modulation of host immune responses and the development of bacterial biofilms. PMID:18083568

  8. Purification Techniques of Bacteriocins from Lactic Acid Bacteria and Other Gram-Positive Bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saavedra, Lucila; Sesma, Fernando

    The search for new antimicrobial peptides produced by lactic acid bacteria and other Gram-positive microorganisms has become an interesting field of research in the past decades. The fact that bacteriocins are active against numerous foodborne and human pathogens, are produced by generally regarded as safe (GRAS) microorganisms, and are readily degraded by proteolytic host systems makes them attractive candidates for biotechnological applications. However, before suggesting or choosing a new bacteriocin for future technology developments, it is necessary to elucidate its biochemical structure and its mode of action, which may be carried out once the bacteriocin is purified to homogeneity. This chapter focuses on describing the main strategies used for the purification of numerous bacteriocins.

  9. Nucleotide sequence alignment of hdcA from Gram-positive bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Diaz, Maria; Ladero, Victor; Redruello, Begoña; Sanchez-Llana, Esther; del Rio, Beatriz; Fernandez, Maria; Martin, Maria Cruz; Alvarez, Miguel A.

    2016-01-01

    The decarboxylation of histidine -carried out mainly by some gram-positive bacteria- yields the toxic dietary biogenic amine histamine (Ladero et al. 2010 〈10.2174/157340110791233256〉 [1], Linares et al. 2016 〈http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.foodchem.2015.11.013〉〉 [2]). The reaction is catalyzed by a pyruvoyl-dependent histidine decarboxylase (Linares et al. 2011 〈10.1080/10408398.2011.582813〉 [3]), which is encoded by the gene hdcA. In order to locate conserved regions in the hdcA gene of Gram-positive bacteria, this article provides a nucleotide sequence alignment of all the hdcA sequences from Gram-positive bacteria present in databases. For further utility and discussion, see 〈http://dx.doi.org/ 10.1016/j.foodcont.2015.11.035〉〉 [4].

  10. Nucleotide sequence alignment of hdcA from Gram-positive bacteria.

    PubMed

    Diaz, Maria; Ladero, Victor; Redruello, Begoña; Sanchez-Llana, Esther; Del Rio, Beatriz; Fernandez, Maria; Martin, Maria Cruz; Alvarez, Miguel A

    2016-03-01

    The decarboxylation of histidine -carried out mainly by some gram-positive bacteria- yields the toxic dietary biogenic amine histamine (Ladero et al. 2010 〈10.2174/157340110791233256〉 [1], Linares et al. 2016 〈http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.foodchem.2015.11.013〉〉 [2]). The reaction is catalyzed by a pyruvoyl-dependent histidine decarboxylase (Linares et al. 2011 〈10.1080/10408398.2011.582813〉 [3]), which is encoded by the gene hdcA. In order to locate conserved regions in the hdcA gene of Gram-positive bacteria, this article provides a nucleotide sequence alignment of all the hdcA sequences from Gram-positive bacteria present in databases. For further utility and discussion, see 〈http://dx.doi.org/ 10.1016/j.foodcont.2015.11.035〉〉 [4]. PMID:26958625

  11. Rose Bengal-decorated silica nanoparticles as photosensitizers for inactivation of gram-positive bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Yanyan; Rogelj, Snezna; Zhang, Peng

    2010-02-01

    A new type of photosensitizer, made from Rose Bengal (RB)-decorated silica (SiO2-NH2-RB) nanoparticles, was developed to inactivate gram-positive bacteria, including Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), with high efficiency through photodynamic action. The nanoparticles were characterized microscopically and spectroscopically to confirm their structures. The characterization of singlet oxygen generated by RB, both free and immobilized on a nanoparticle surface, was performed in the presence of anthracene-9,10-dipropionic acid. The capability of SiO2-NH2-RB nanoparticles to inactivate bacteria was tested in vitro on both gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria. The results showed that RB-decorated silica nanoparticles can inactivate MRSA and Staphylococcus epidermidis (both gram-positive) very effectively (up to eight-orders-of-magnitude reduction). Photosensitizers of such design should have good potential as antibacterial agents through a photodynamic mechanism.

  12. The use of lysozyme modified with fluorescein for the detection of Gram-positive bacteria.

    PubMed

    Arabski, Micha?; Konieczna, Iwona; Tusi?ska, Ewa; W?sik, S?awomir; Relich, Inga; Zaj?c, Krzysztof; Kami?ski, Zbigniew J; Kaca, Wies?aw

    2015-01-01

    Lysozyme (1,4-?-N-acetylmuramidase) is commonly applied in the food, medical, and pharmaceutical industries. In this study, we tested a novel application of fluorescein-modified lysozyme (using carboxyfluorescein with a triazine-based coupling reagent) as a new tool for the detection of Gram-positive soil bacteria. The results, obtained by cultivation methods, fluorescence analysis, and laser interferometry, showed that, after optimization, fluorescein-modified lysozyme could be used to evaluate the prevalence of Gram-positive bacteria essential in bioremediation of soils with low pH, such as those degraded by sulfur. PMID:24916601

  13. Class D β-lactamases do exist in Gram-positive bacteria.

    PubMed

    Toth, Marta; Antunes, Nuno Tiago; Stewart, Nichole K; Frase, Hilary; Bhattacharya, Monolekha; Smith, Clyde A; Vakulenko, Sergei B

    2016-01-01

    Production of β-lactamases of one of four molecular classes (A, B, C and D) is the major mechanism of bacterial resistance to β-lactams, the largest class of antibiotics, which have saved countless lives since their inception 70 years ago. Although several hundred efficient class D enzymes have been identified in Gram-negative pathogens over the last four decades, none have been reported in Gram-positive bacteria. Here we demonstrate that efficient class D β-lactamases capable of hydrolyzing a wide array of β-lactam substrates are widely disseminated in various species of environmental Gram-positive organisms. Class D enzymes of Gram-positive bacteria have a distinct structural architecture and employ a unique substrate-binding mode that is quite different from that of all currently known class A, C and D β-lactamases. These enzymes thus constitute a previously unknown reservoir of novel antibiotic-resistance enzymes. PMID:26551395

  14. Diversity of pigmented Gram-positive bacteria associated with marine macroalgae from Antarctica.

    PubMed

    Leiva, Sergio; Alvarado, Pamela; Huang, Ying; Wang, Jian; Garrido, Ignacio

    2015-12-01

    Little is known about the diversity and roles of Gram-positive and pigmented bacteria in Antarctic environments, especially those associated with marine macroorganisms. This work is the first study about the diversity and antimicrobial activity of culturable pigmented Gram-positive bacteria associated with marine Antarctic macroalgae. A total of 31 pigmented Gram-positive strains were isolated from the surface of six species of macroalgae collected in the King George Island, South Shetland Islands. On the basis of 16S rRNA gene sequence similarities ≥99%, 18 phylotypes were defined, which were clustered into 11 genera of Actinobacteria (Agrococcus, Arthrobacter, Brachybacterium, Citricoccus, Kocuria, Labedella, Microbacterium, Micrococcus, Rhodococcus, Salinibacterium and Sanguibacter) and one genus of the Firmicutes (Staphylococcus). It was found that five isolates displayed antimicrobial activity against a set of macroalgae-associated bacteria. The active isolates were phylogenetically related to Agrococcus baldri, Brachybacterium rhamnosum, Citricoccus zhacaiensis and Kocuria palustris. The results indicate that a diverse community of pigmented Gram-positive bacteria is associated with Antartic macroalgae and suggest its potential as a promising source of antimicrobial and pigmented natural compounds. PMID:26507390

  15. Impedimetric detection of pathogenic Gram-positive bacteria using an antimicrobial peptide from class IIa bacteriocins.

    PubMed

    Etayash, Hashem; Jiang, Keren; Thundat, Thomas; Kaur, Kamaljit

    2014-02-01

    Real-time, label-free detection of Gram-positive bacteria with high selectivity and sensitivity is demonstrated using an interdigitated impedimetric array functionalized with naturally produced antimicrobial peptide from class IIa bacteriocins. The antimicrobial peptide, leucocin A, was chemically synthesized and covalently immobilized on interdigitated gold microelectrodes via the interaction between the C-terminal carboxylic acid of the peptide and free amines of a preattached thiolated linker. Exposing the peptide sensor to various concentrations of Gram-positive bacteria generated reproducible impedance spectra that detected peptide-bacteria interactions at a concentration of 1 cell/μL. The peptide sensor also selectively detected Listeria monocytogenes from other Gram-positive strains at a concentration of 10(3) cfu mL(-1). The study highlights that short peptide ligands from bacteriocin class offer high selectivity in bacterial detection and can be used in developing a robust, portable biosensor device to efficiently detect pathogenic Gram-positive bacteria in food samples. PMID:24400685

  16. Employing carbon dots modified with vancomycin for assaying Gram-positive bacteria like Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Dan; Zhuo, Yan; Feng, Yuanjiao; Yang, Xiaoming

    2015-12-15

    By employing attractive performance of fluorescent carbon dots, we herein successfully established an assay for analyzing bacteria firstly. Specifically, carbon dots with blue fluorescence were initially synthesized according to a previous report, and modified with vancomycin on their surfaces. Subsequently, the prepared carbon dots were applied to detect Staphylococcus aureus accompanied with a linear range of 3.18×10(5)-1.59×10(8) cfu/mL as well as a detection limit of 9.40×10(4) cfu/mL. Compared with other regular methods, our method is more rapid and convenient in term of methodology. Meanwhile, the current strategy was applied for detection of other bacteria including Bacillus subtilis, Listeria monocytogenes, Salmonella, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Escherichia coli, and the modified carbon dots showed obvious affinity with Gram-positive bacteria owing to the ligand-receptor interactions between vancomycin and the cell walls, suggesting its value for detecting Gram-positive bacteria. Additionally, the practicability of this sensing approach was validated by recovery experiments conducted in orange juice, confirming its potential to broaden avenues for detection of Gram-positive bacteria. PMID:26188677

  17. Common patterns - unique features: nitrogen metabolism and regulation in Gram-positive bacteria.

    PubMed

    Amon, Johannes; Titgemeyer, Fritz; Burkovski, Andreas

    2010-07-01

    Gram-positive bacteria have developed elaborate mechanisms to control ammonium assimilation, at the levels of both transcription and enzyme activity. In this review, the common and specific mechanisms of nitrogen assimilation and regulation in Gram-positive bacteria are summarized and compared for the genera Bacillus, Clostridium, Streptomyces, Mycobacterium and Corynebacterium, with emphasis on the high G+C genera. Furthermore, the importance of nitrogen metabolism and control for the pathogenic lifestyle and virulence is discussed. In summary, the regulation of nitrogen metabolism in prokaryotes shows an impressive diversity. Virtually every phylum of bacteria evolved its own strategy to react to the changing conditions of nitrogen supply. Not only do the transcription factors differ between the phyla and sometimes even between families, but the genetic targets of a given regulon can also differ between closely related species. PMID:20337720

  18. Protein cell surface display in Gram-positive bacteria: from single protein to macromolecular protein structure.

    PubMed

    Desvaux, Mickal; Dumas, Emilie; Chafsey, Ingrid; Hbraud, Michel

    2006-03-01

    In the course of evolution, Gram-positive bacteria, defined here as prokaryotes from the domain Bacteria with a cell envelope composed of one biological membrane (monodermita) and a cell wall composed at least of peptidoglycan and covalently linked teichoic acids, have developed several mechanisms permitting to a cytoplasmic synthesized protein to be present on the bacterial cell surface. Four major types of cell surface displayed proteins are currently recognized: (i) transmembrane proteins, (ii) lipoproteins, (iii) LPXTG-like proteins and (iv) cell wall binding proteins. The subset of proteins exposed on the bacterial cell surface, and thus interacting with extracellular milieu, constitutes the surfaceome. Here, we review exhaustively the current molecular mechanisms involved in protein attachment within the cell envelope of Gram-positive bacteria, from single protein to macromolecular protein structure. PMID:16487313

  19. From environmental signals to regulators: modulation of biofilm development in Gram-positive bacteria.

    PubMed

    Mhatre, Eisha; Monterrosa, Ramses Gallegos; Kovács, Akos T

    2014-07-01

    Bacterial lifestyle is influenced by environmental signals, and many differentiation processes in bacteria are governed by the threshold concentrations of molecules present in their niche. Biofilm is one such example where bacteria in their sessile state adapt to a lifestyle that causes several adaptive alterations in the population. Here, a brief overview is given on a variety of environmental signals that bias biofilm development in Gram-positive bacteria, including nutrient conditions, self- and heterologously produced substances, like quorum sensing and host produced molecules. The Gram-positive model organism, Bacillus subtilis is a superb example to illustrate how distinct signals activate sensor proteins that integrate the environmental signals towards global regulators related to biofilm formation. The role of reduced oxygen level, polyketides, antimicrobials, plant secreted carbohydrates, plant cell derived polymers, glycerol, and osmotic conditions are discussed during the transcriptional activation of biofilm related genes in B. subtilis. PMID:24771632

  20. Multiple Responses of Gram-Positive and Gram-Negative Bacteria to Mixture of Hydrocarbons

    PubMed Central

    Marilena L?z?roaie, Mihaela

    2010-01-01

    Most of our knowledge about pollutants and the way they are biodegraded in the environment has previously been shaped by laboratory studies using hydrocarbon-degrading bacterial strains isolated from polluted sites. In present study Gram-positive (Mycobacterium sp. IBBPo1, Oerskovia sp. IBBPo2, Corynebacterium sp. IBBPo3) and Gram-negative (Chryseomonas sp. IBBPo7, Pseudomonas sp. IBBPo10, Burkholderia sp. IBBPo12) bacteria, isolated from oily sludge, were found to be able to tolerate pure and mixture of saturated hydrocarbons, as well as pure and mixture of monoaromatic and polyaromatic hydrocarbons. Isolated Gram-negative bacteria were more tolerant to mixture of saturated (n-hexane, n-hexadecane, cyclohexane), monoaromatic (benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene) and polyaromatic (naphthalene, 2-methylnaphthalene, fluorene) hydrocarbons than Gram-positive bacteria. There were observed cellular and molecular modifications induced by mixture of saturated, monoaromatic and polyaromatic hydrocarbons to Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. These modifications differ from one strain to another and even for the same bacterial strain, according to the nature of hydrophobic substrate. PMID:24031541

  1. Mid-infrared spectroscopic assessment of nanotoxicity in gram-negative vs. gram-positive bacteria.

    PubMed

    Heys, Kelly A; Riding, Matthew J; Strong, Rebecca J; Shore, Richard F; Pereira, M Glria; Jones, Kevin C; Semple, Kirk T; Martin, Francis L

    2014-03-01

    Nanoparticles appear to induce toxic effects through a variety of mechanisms including generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), physical contact with the cell membrane and indirect catalysis due to remnants from manufacture. The development and subsequent increasing usage of nanomaterials has highlighted a growing need to characterize and assess the toxicity of nanoparticles, particularly those that may have detrimental health effects such as carbon-based nanomaterials (CBNs). Due to interactions of nanoparticles with some reagents, many traditional toxicity tests are unsuitable for use with CBNs. Infrared (IR) spectroscopy is a non-destructive, high throughput technique, which is unhindered by such problems. We explored the application of IR spectroscopy to investigate the effects of CBNs on Gram-negative (Pseudomonas fluorescens) and Gram-positive (Mycobacterium vanbaalenii PYR-1) bacteria. Two types of IR spectroscopy were compared: attenuated total reflection Fourier-transform infrared (ATR-FTIR) and synchrotron radiation-based FTIR (SR-FTIR) spectroscopy. This showed that Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria exhibit differing alterations when exposed to CBNs. Gram-positive bacteria appear more resistant to these agents and this may be due to the protection afforded by their more sturdy cell wall. Markers of exposure also vary according to Gram status; Amide II was consistently altered in Gram-negative bacteria and carbohydrate altered in Gram-positive bacteria. ATR-FTIR and SR-FTIR spectroscopy could both be applied to extract biochemical alterations induced by each CBN that were consistent across the two bacterial species; these may represent potential biomarkers of nanoparticle-induced alterations. Vibrational spectroscopy approaches may provide a novel means of fingerprinting the effects of CBNs in target cells. PMID:24162371

  2. Identification of Surprisingly Diverse Type IV Pili, across a Broad Range of Gram-Positive Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Roos, David S.; Pohlschrder, Mechthild

    2011-01-01

    Background In Gram-negative bacteria, type IV pili (TFP) have long been known to play important roles in such diverse biological phenomena as surface adhesion, motility, and DNA transfer, with significant consequences for pathogenicity. More recently it became apparent that Gram-positive bacteria also express type IV pili; however, little is known about the diversity and abundance of these structures in Gram-positives. Computational tools for automated identification of type IV pilins are not currently available. Results To assess TFP diversity in Gram-positive bacteria and facilitate pilin identification, we compiled a comprehensive list of putative Gram-positive pilins encoded by operons containing highly conserved pilus biosynthetic genes (pilB, pilC). A surprisingly large number of species were found to contain multiple TFP operons (pil, com and/or tad). The N-terminal sequences of predicted pilins were exploited to develop PilFind, a rule-based algorithm for genome-wide identification of otherwise poorly conserved type IV pilins in any species, regardless of their association with TFP biosynthetic operons (http://signalfind.org). Using PilFind to scan 53 Gram-positive genomes (encoding >187,000 proteins), we identified 286 candidate pilins, including 214 in operons containing TFP biosynthetic genes (TBG+ operons). Although trained on Gram-positive pilins, PilFind identified 55 of 58 manually curated Gram-negative pilins in TBG+ operons, as well as 53 additional pilin candidates in operons lacking biosynthetic genes in ten species (>38,000 proteins), including 27 of 29 experimentally verified pilins. False positive rates appear to be low, as PilFind predicted only four pilin candidates in eleven bacterial species (>13,000 proteins) lacking TFP biosynthetic genes. Conclusions We have shown that Gram-positive bacteria contain a highly diverse set of type IV pili. PilFind can be an invaluable tool to study bacterial cellular processes known to involve type IV pilus-like structures. Its use in combination with other currently available computational tools should improve the accuracy of predicting the subcellular localization of bacterial proteins. PMID:22216142

  3. Oligopolyphenylenevinylene-conjugated oligoelectrolyte membrane insertion molecules selectively disrupt cell envelopes of Gram-positive bacteria.

    PubMed

    Hinks, Jamie; Poh, Wee Han; Chu, Justin Jang Hann; Loo, Joachim Say Chye; Bazan, Guillermo C; Hancock, Lynn E; Wuertz, Stefan

    2015-03-01

    The modification of microbial membranes to achieve biotechnological strain improvement with exogenous small molecules, such as oligopolyphenylenevinylene-conjugated oligoelectrolyte (OPV-COE) membrane insertion molecules (MIMs), is an emerging biotechnological field. Little is known about the interactions of OPV-COEs with their target, the bacterial envelope. We studied the toxicity of three previously reported OPV-COEs with a selection of Gram-negative and Gram-positive organisms and demonstrated that Gram-positive bacteria are more sensitive to OPV-COEs than Gram-negative bacteria. Transmission electron microscopy demonstrated that these MIMs disrupt microbial membranes and that this occurred to a much greater degree in Gram-positive organisms. We used a number of mutants to probe the nature of MIM interactions with the microbial envelope but were unable to align the membrane perturbation effects of these compounds to previously reported membrane disruption mechanisms of, for example, cationic antimicrobial peptides. Instead, the data support the notion that OPV-COEs disrupt microbial membranes through a suspected interaction with diphosphatidylglycerol (DPG), a major component of Gram-positive membranes. The integrity of model membranes containing elevated amounts of DPG was disrupted to a greater extent by MIMs than those prepared from Escherichia coli total lipid extracts alone. PMID:25576607

  4. Oligopolyphenylenevinylene-Conjugated Oligoelectrolyte Membrane Insertion Molecules Selectively Disrupt Cell Envelopes of Gram-Positive Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Poh, Wee Han; Chu, Justin Jang Hann; Loo, Joachim Say Chye; Bazan, Guillermo C.; Hancock, Lynn E.

    2015-01-01

    The modification of microbial membranes to achieve biotechnological strain improvement with exogenous small molecules, such as oligopolyphenylenevinylene-conjugated oligoelectrolyte (OPV-COE) membrane insertion molecules (MIMs), is an emerging biotechnological field. Little is known about the interactions of OPV-COEs with their target, the bacterial envelope. We studied the toxicity of three previously reported OPV-COEs with a selection of Gram-negative and Gram-positive organisms and demonstrated that Gram-positive bacteria are more sensitive to OPV-COEs than Gram-negative bacteria. Transmission electron microscopy demonstrated that these MIMs disrupt microbial membranes and that this occurred to a much greater degree in Gram-positive organisms. We used a number of mutants to probe the nature of MIM interactions with the microbial envelope but were unable to align the membrane perturbation effects of these compounds to previously reported membrane disruption mechanisms of, for example, cationic antimicrobial peptides. Instead, the data support the notion that OPV-COEs disrupt microbial membranes through a suspected interaction with diphosphatidylglycerol (DPG), a major component of Gram-positive membranes. The integrity of model membranes containing elevated amounts of DPG was disrupted to a greater extent by MIMs than those prepared from Escherichia coli total lipid extracts alone. PMID:25576607

  5. When Ribonucleases Come into Play in Pathogens: A Survey of Gram-Positive Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Jester, Brian C.; Romby, Pascale; Lioliou, Efthimia

    2012-01-01

    It is widely acknowledged that RNA stability plays critical roles in bacterial adaptation and survival in different environments like those encountered when bacteria infect a host. Bacterial ribonucleases acting alone or in concert with regulatory RNAs or RNA binding proteins are the mediators of the regulatory outcome on RNA stability. We will give a current update of what is known about ribonucleases in the model Gram-positive organism Bacillus subtilis and will describe their established roles in virulence in several Gram-positive pathogenic bacteria that are imposing major health concerns worldwide. Implications on bacterial evolution through stabilization/transfer of genetic material (phage or plasmid DNA) as a result of ribonucleases' functions will be covered. The role of ribonucleases in emergence of antibiotic resistance and new concepts in drug design will additionally be discussed. PMID:22550495

  6. Protein transport across the cell wall of monoderm Gram-positive bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Forster, Brian M.; Marquis, Hlne

    2012-01-01

    Summary In monoderm (single membrane) Gram-positive bacteria, the majority of secreted proteins are first translocated across the cytoplasmic membrane into the inner wall zone. For a subset of these proteins, final destination is within the cell envelope either as membrane-anchored or cell wall-anchored proteins, whereas another subset of proteins is destined to be transported across the cell wall into the extracellular milieu. Although the cell wall is a porous structure, there is evidence that, for some proteins, transport is a regulated process. This review aims at describing what is known about the mechanisms that regulate the transport of proteins across the cell wall of monoderm Gram-positive bacteria. PMID:22471582

  7. Lipoteichoic Acids, Phosphate-Containing Polymers in the Envelope of Gram-Positive Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Schneewind, Olaf

    2014-01-01

    Lipoteichoic acids (LTA) are polymers of alternating units of a polyhydroxy alkane, including glycerol and ribitol, and phosphoric acid, joined to form phosphodiester units that are found in the envelope of Gram-positive bacteria. Here we review four different types of LTA that can be distinguished on the basis of their chemical structure and describe recent advances in the biosynthesis pathway for type I LTA, d-alanylated polyglycerol-phosphate linked to di-glucosyl-diacylglycerol. The physiological functions of type I LTA are discussed in the context of inhibitors that block their synthesis and of mutants with discrete synthesis defects. Research on LTA structure and function represents a large frontier that has been investigated in only few Gram-positive bacteria. PMID:24415723

  8. Small regulatory RNAs from low-GC Gram-positive bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Brantl, Sabine; Brückner, Reinhold

    2014-01-01

    Small regulatory RNAs (sRNAs) that act by base-pairing were first discovered in so-called accessory DNA elements—plasmids, phages, and transposons—where they control replication, maintenance, and transposition. Since 2001, a huge body of work has been performed to predict and identify sRNAs in a multitude of bacterial genomes. The majority of chromosome-encoded sRNAs have been investigated in E. coli and other Gram-negative bacteria. However, during the past five years an increasing number of sRNAs were found in Gram-positive bacteria. Here, we outline our current knowledge on chromosome-encoded sRNAs from low-GC Gram-positive species that act by base-pairing, i.e., an antisense mechanism. We will focus on sRNAs with known targets and defined regulatory mechanisms with special emphasis on Bacillus subtilis. PMID:24576839

  9. Synthetic Teichoic Acid Conjugate Vaccine against Nosocomial Gram-Positive Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Laverde, Diana; Wobser, Dominique; Romero-Saavedra, Felipe; Hogendorf, Wouter; van der Marel, Gijsbert; Berthold, Martin; Kropec, Andrea; Codee, Jeroen; Huebner, Johannes

    2014-01-01

    Lipoteichoic acids (LTA) are amphiphilic polymers that are important constituents of the cell wall of many Gram-positive bacteria. The chemical structures of LTA vary among organisms, albeit in the majority of Gram-positive bacteria the LTAs feature a common poly-1,3-(glycerolphosphate) backbone. Previously, the specificity of opsonic antibodies for this backbone present in some Gram-positive bacteria has been demonstrated, suggesting that this minimal structure may be sufficient for vaccine development. In the present work, we studied a well-defined synthetic LTA-fragment, which is able to inhibit opsonic killing of polyclonal rabbit sera raised against native LTA from Enterococcus faecalis 12030. This promising compound was conjugated with BSA and used to raise rabbit polyclonal antibodies. Subsequently, the opsonic activity of this serum was tested in an opsonophagocytic assay and specificity was confirmed by an opsonophagocytic inhibition assay. The conjugated LTA-fragment was able to induce specific opsonic antibodies that mediate killing of the clinical strains E. faecalis 12030, Enterococcus faecium E1162, and community-acquired Staphylococcus aureus strain MW2 (USA400). Prophylactic immunization with the teichoic acid conjugate and with the rabbit serum raised against this compound was evaluated in active and passive immunization studies in mice, and in an enterococcal endocarditis rat model. In all animal models, a statistically significant reduction of colony counts was observed indicating that the novel synthetic LTA-fragment conjugate is a promising vaccine candidate for active or passive immunotherapy against E. faecalis and other Gram-positive bacteria. PMID:25333799

  10. Problems associated with the direct viable count procedure applied to gram-positive bacteria.

    PubMed

    Regnault, B; Martin-Delautre, S; Grimont, P A

    2000-04-10

    Despite the numerous advantages of fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) for identifying a single bacterial cell with 16S rRNA probes, problems are encountered with starving bacteria in natural samples. The original direct viable count procedure (DVC) includes a revivification step in the presence of an antibiotic inhibiting cell division. Cells elongate and accumulate ribosomes. This results in a natural amplification of 16S rRNA molecules (target of FISH). However, it is limited to gram-negative bacteria which are sensitive to nalidixic acid. The objective of this study was to develop a procedure for estimating the number of metabolically active gram-positive Staphylococcus aureus and Enterococcus faecalis cells by the use of a method which combines the number of substrate-responsive cells and their identification by FISH. It was observed that no single published DVC method could apply to taxonomically different gram-positive bacteria. Since cells were not counted, the revivification step in presence of nalidixic acid will be referred to as revivification without cell division. For each species, different low-nutrient media and complex media, different fluoroquinolones and beta-lactam antibiotics, concentrations of antibiotics, combinations of antibiotics, temperature and time were evaluated using bacteria in different physiological states and in natural samples. Enumeration of bacteria by plate counts and direct FISH were compared. The improved procedure should yield information about the physiological state, the taxonomic identity, and the enumeration of viable gram-positive bacteria. The application of DVC to an entire ecosystem is presently still a challenge. PMID:10791758

  11. Widespread Abundance of Functional Bacterial Amyloid in Mycolata and Other Gram-Positive Bacteria?

    PubMed Central

    Jordal, Peter Bruun; Dueholm, Morten Simonsen; Larsen, Poul; Petersen, Steen Vang; Enghild, Jan Johannes; Christiansen, Gunna; Hjrup, Peter; Nielsen, Per Halkjr; Otzen, Daniel Erik

    2009-01-01

    Until recently, extracellular functional bacterial amyloid (FuBA) has been detected and characterized in only a few bacterial species, including Escherichia coli, Salmonella, and the gram-positive organism Streptomyces coelicolor. Here we probed gram-positive bacteria with conformationally specific antibodies and revealed the existence of FuBA in 12 of 14 examined mycolata species, as well as six other distantly related species examined belonging to the phyla Actinobacteria and Firmicutes. Most of the bacteria produced extracellular fimbriae, sometimes copious amounts of them, and in two cases large extracellular fibrils were also produced. In three cases, FuBA was revealed only after extensive removal of extracellular material by saponification, indicating that there is integrated attachment within the cellular envelope. Spores of species in the genera Streptomyces, Bacillus, and Nocardia were all coated with amyloids. FuBA was purified from Gordonia amarae (from the cell envelope) and Geodermatophilus obscurus, and they had the morphology, tinctorial properties, and ?-rich structure typical of amyloid. The presence of approximately 9-nm-wide amyloids in the cell envelope of G. amarae was visualized by transmission electron microscopy analysis. We conclude that amyloid is widespread among gram-positive bacteria and may in many species constitute a hitherto overlooked integral part of the spore and the cellular envelope. PMID:19395568

  12. Regulating the Intersection of Metabolism and Pathogenesis in Gram-positive Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    RICHARDSON, ANTHONY R.; SOMERVILLE, GREG A.; SONENSHEIN, ABRAHAM L.

    2015-01-01

    Pathogenic bacteria must contend with immune systems that actively restrict the availability of nutrients and cofactors, and create a hostile growth environment. To deal with these hostile environments, pathogenic bacteria have evolved or acquired virulence determinants that aid in the acquisition of nutrients. This connection between pathogenesis and nutrition may explain why regulators of metabolism in nonpathogenic bacteria are used by pathogenic bacteria to regulate both metabolism and virulence. Such coordinated regulation is presumably advantageous because it conserves carbon and energy by aligning synthesis of virulence determinants with the nutritional environment. In Gram-positive bacterial pathogens, at least three metabolite-responsive global regulators, CcpA, CodY, and Rex, have been shown to coordinate the expression of metabolism and virulence genes. In this chapter, we discuss how environmental challenges alter metabolism, the regulators that respond to this altered metabolism, and how these regulators influence the host-pathogen interaction. PMID:26185086

  13. Cell to cell communication by autoinducing peptides in gram-positive bacteria.

    PubMed

    Sturme, Mark H J; Kleerebezem, Michiel; Nakayama, Jiro; Akkermans, Antoon D L; Vaugha, Elaine E; de Vos, Willem M

    2002-08-01

    While intercellular communication systems in Gram-negative bacteria are often based on homoserine lactones as signalling molecules, it has been shown that autoinducing peptides are involved in intercellular communication in Gram-positive bacteria. Many of these peptides are exported by dedicated systems, posttranslationally modified in various ways, and finally sensed by other cells via membrane-located receptors that are part of two-component regulatory systems. In this way the expression of a variety of functions including virulence, genetic competence and the production of antimicrobial compounds can be modulated in a co-ordinated and cell density- and growth phase-dependent manner. Occasionally the autoinducing peptide has a dual function, such as in the case of nisin that is both a signalling pheromone involved in quorum sensing and an antimicrobial peptide. Moreover, biochemical, genetic and genomic studies have shown that bacteria may contain multiple quorum sensing systems, underlining the importance of intercellular communication. Finally, in some cases different peptides may be recognised by the same receptor, while also hybrid receptors have been constructed that respond to new peptides or show novel responses. This paper provides an overview of the characteristics of autoinducing peptide-based quorum sensing systems, their application in various gram-positive bacteria, and the discovery of new systems in natural and engineered ecosystems. PMID:12448722

  14. Critical cell wall hole size for lysis in Gram-positive bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitchell, Gabriel; Wiesenfeld, Kurt; Nelson, Daniel; Weitz, Joshua

    2013-03-01

    Gram-positive bacteria transport molecules necessary for their survival through holes in their cell wall. The holes in cell walls need to be large enough to let critical nutrients pass through. However, the cell wall must also function to prevent the bacteria's membrane from protruding through a large hole into the environment and lysing the cell. As such, we hypothesize that there exists a range of cell wall hole sizes that allow for molecule transport but prevent membrane protrusion. Here we develop and analyze a biophysical theory of the response of a Gram-positive cell's membrane to the formation of a hole in the cell wall. We predict a critical hole size in the range 15-24nm beyond which lysis occurs. To test our theory, we measured hole sizes in Streptococcus pyogenes cells undergoing enzymatic lysis via transmission electron microscopy. The measured hole sizes are in strong agreement with our theoretical prediction. Together, the theory and experiments provide a means to quantify the mechanisms of death of Gram-positive cells via enzymatically mediated lysis and provides insight into the range of cell wall hole sizes compatible with bacterial homeostasis.

  15. Thiol-disulphide oxidoreductase modules in the low-GC Gram-positive bacteria.

    PubMed

    Kouwen, Thijs R H M; van der Goot, Annemieke; Dorenbos, Ronald; Winter, Theresa; Antelmann, Haike; Plaisier, Marie-Claire; Quax, Wim J; van Dijl, January Maarten; Dubois, Jean-Yves F

    2007-05-01

    Disulphide bond formation catalysed by thiol-disulphide oxidoreductases (TDORs) is a universally conserved mechanism for stabilizing extracytoplasmic proteins. In Escherichia coli, disulphide bond formation requires a concerted action of distinct TDORs in thiol oxidation and subsequent quinone reduction. TDOR function in other bacteria has remained largely unexplored. Here we focus on TDORs of low-GC Gram-positive bacteria, in particular DsbA of Staphylococcus aureus and BdbA-D of Bacillus subtilis. Phylogenetic analyses reveal that the homologues DsbA and BdbD cluster in distinct groups typical for Staphylococcus and Bacillus species respectively. To compare the function of these TDORs, DsbA was produced in various bdb mutants of B. subtilis. Next, we assessed the ability of DsbA to sustain different TDOR-dependent processes, including heterologous secretion of E. coli PhoA, competence development and bacteriocin (sublancin 168) production. The results show that DsbA can function in all three processes. While BdbD needs a quinone oxidoreductase for activity, DsbA activity appears to depend on redox-active medium components. Unexpectedly, both quinone oxidoreductases of B. subtilis are sufficient to sustain production of sublancin. Moreover, DsbA can functionally replace these quinone oxidoreductases in sublancin production. Taken together, our unprecedented findings imply that TDOR systems of low-GC Gram-positive bacteria have a modular composition. PMID:17501922

  16. Fluorescence studies of gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blust, Brittni

    2012-02-01

    Autofluorescence is a relatively unexplored technique for identification. It is nondestructive, noncontact, fast, and has the potential to be integrated in small handheld devices. On the other hand, the autofluorescent signal is sometimes very week, or it can be overwhelmed by the emission of a surrounding medium. We are exploring the possibility to develop an optical method for identification of the Gram-type of bacterial cultures based on the autofluorescence. We have enhanced the detectivity of a standard fluorimeter using combination of bandpass and long pass filters. In this particular study, we are investigating if the previously observed difference in the autofluorescent spectra of Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria is dependent on the age of the culture. We have selected two types of bacteria, Kocuria rhizophila and Alcagenes faecalis, and we have monitored in equal time intervals of their development the autofluorescence spectra. The stages of development were monitored separately by measuring the turbidity and creating a growth curve. The goal of this study is to find out if the previously observed difference in the autofluorescence spectra of Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria is dependent on the stage of the development of the bacterial culture.

  17. A rapid procedure for isolating chromosomal DNA from Lactobacillus species and other Gram-positive bacteria.

    PubMed

    Ulrich, R L; Hughes, T A

    2001-01-01

    This study describes a rapid procedure for the isolation of genomic DNA from various Gram-positive bacteria. Species tested included Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. lactis ATCC 4797, Lact. acidophilus N2, Staphylococcus aureus, Staph. epidermidis, Propionibacterium jensenii P126, Bacillus pumilus and Enterococcus faecalis. Our technique for chromosomal DNA isolation circumvents the need for phenol-chloroform extractions and caesium chloride gradients. Isolated DNA is consistently greater than 25 kb in size and can be used directly for subcloning, polymerase chain reaction amplification, restriction digestions and library construction. PMID:11169042

  18. Sonodynamic excitation of Rose Bengal for eradication of gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria.

    PubMed

    Nakonechny, Faina; Nisnevitch, Michael; Nitzan, Yeshayahu; Nisnevitch, Marina

    2013-01-01

    Photodynamic antimicrobial chemotherapy based on photosensitizers activated by illumination is limited by poor penetration of visible light through skin and tissues. In order to overcome this problem, Rose Bengal was excited in the dark by 28?kHz ultrasound and was applied for inactivation of bacteria. It is demonstrated, for the first time, that the sonodynamic technique is effective for eradication of gram-positive Staphylococcus aureus and gram-negative Escherichia coli. The net sonodynamic effect was calculated as a 3-4 log10 reduction in bacteria concentration, depending on the cell and the Rose Bengal concentration and the treatment time. Sonodynamic treatment may become a novel and effective form of antimicrobial therapy and can be used for low-temperature sterilization of medical instruments and surgical accessories. PMID:23509759

  19. Surviving the Acid Test: Responses of Gram-Positive Bacteria to Low pH

    PubMed Central

    Cotter, Paul D.; Hill, Colin

    2003-01-01

    Gram-positive bacteria possess a myriad of acid resistance systems that can help them to overcome the challenge posed by different acidic environments. In this review the most common mechanisms are described: i.e., the use of proton pumps, the protection or repair of macromolecules, cell membrane changes, production of alkali, induction of pathways by transcriptional regulators, alteration of metabolism, and the role of cell density and cell signaling. We also discuss the reponses of Listeria monocytogenes, Rhodococcus, Mycobacterium, Clostridium perfringens, Staphylococcus aureus, Bacillus cereus, oral streptococci, and lactic acid bacteria to acidic environments and outline ways in which this knowledge has been or may be used to either aid or prevent bacterial survival in low-pH environments. PMID:12966143

  20. Penetration into tissues of various drugs active against gram-positive bacteria.

    PubMed

    Kropec, A; Daschner, F D

    1991-04-01

    Gram-positive bacteria are the most important pathogens causing hospital- and community-acquired infections. We therefore reviewed the penetration of various antibiotics active against Gram-positive bacteria including methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus into tissues, where staphylococcal infections are common. Rifampicin reaches heart valve concentrations of 65% of the simultaneous serum levels. At 8 h after administration blood and tissues concentrations of rifampicin exceeded the MIC90 values for S. aureus as well as for S. epidermidis. After a 2-g intravenous bolus injection of flucloxacillin heart valve concentrations exceeded MIC values for staphylococci for more than 8 h whereas subcutaneous and muscle concentrations declined within the same time to undetectable levels. The MIC90 values of vancomycin for S. epidermidis and Enterococcus faecalis are 2.0 and 4.0 mg/l respectively and for S. aureus 1.0 mg/l. This concentration is reached in subcutaneous tissue, heart valves and muscle for at least 4-6 h after administration of 15 mg/kg, however the corresponding value for Enterococcus faecalis in heart valve is maintained only for 3-4 h. After two and three dose regimens of teicoplanin serum and bone levels were significantly higher than fat levels, exceeding the MIC90 values for S. aureus, S. epidermidis and E. faecalis. The ratio of tissue concentration of teicoplanin to serum concentrations was 11% for fat and 65% for bone. PMID:2055819

  1. Peptidoglycan Architecture of Gram-positive Bacteria by Solid-State NMR

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sung Joon; Chang, James; Singh, Manmilan

    2014-01-01

    Peptidoglycan is an essential component of cell wall in Gram-positive bacteria with unknown architecture. In this review, we summarize solid-state NMR approaches to address some of the unknowns in the Gram-positive bacteria peptidoglycan architecture: 1) peptidoglycan backbone conformation, 2) PG-lattice structure, 3) variations in the peptidoglycan architecture and composition, 4) the effects of peptidoglycan bridge-length on the peptidoglycan architecture in Fem mutants, 5) the orientation of glycan strands respect to the membrane, and 6) the relationship between the peptidoglycan structure and the glycopeptide antibiotic mode of action. Solid-state NMR analyses of S. aureus cell wall show that peptidoglycan chains are surprisingly ordered and densely packed. The peptidoglycan disaccharide backbone adopts 4-fold screw helical symmetry with the disaccharide unit periodicity of 40 . Peptidoglycan lattice in S. aureus cell wall is formed by cross-linked PG stems that have parallel orientations. The structural characterization of Fem-mutants of S. aureus with varying lengths of bridge structures suggests that the PG-bridge length is an important determining factor for the PG architecture. PMID:24915020

  2. Optimization of Fluorescent Tools for Cell Biology Studies in Gram-Positive Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Henriques, Mafalda X.; Gomes, Joo Paulo; Filipe, Srgio R.

    2014-01-01

    The understanding of how Gram-positive bacteria divide and ensure the correct localization of different molecular machineries, such as those involved in the synthesis of the bacterial cell surface, is crucial to design strategies to fight bacterial infections. In order to determine the correct subcellular localization of fluorescent proteins in Streptococcus pneumoniae, we have previously described tools to express derivatives of four fluorescent proteins, mCherry, Citrine, CFP and GFP, to levels that allow visualization by fluorescence microscopy, by fusing the first ten amino acids of the S. pneumoniae protein Wze (the i-tag), upstream of the fluorescent protein. Here, we report that these tools can also be used in other Gram-positive bacteria, namely Lactococcus lactis, Staphylococcus aureus and Bacillus subtilis, possibly due to optimized translation rates. Additionally, we have optimized the i-tag by testing the effect of the first ten amino acids of other pneumococcal proteins in the increased expression of the fluorescent protein Citrine. We found that manipulating the structure and stability of the 5? end of the mRNA molecule, which may influence the accessibility of the ribosome, is determinant to ensure the expression of a strong fluorescent signal. PMID:25464377

  3. Small things considered: the small accessory subunits of RNA polymerase in Gram-positive bacteria.

    PubMed

    Weiss, Andy; Shaw, Lindsey N

    2015-07-01

    The DNA-dependent RNA polymerase core enzyme in Gram-positive bacteria consists of seven subunits. Whilst four of them (α2ββ(')) are essential, three smaller subunits, δ, ε and ω (∼9-21.5 kDa), are considered accessory. Both δ and ω have been viewed as integral components of RNAP for several decades; however, ε has only recently been described. Functionally these three small subunits carry out a variety of tasks, imparting important, supportive effects on the transcriptional process of Gram-positive bacteria. While ω is thought to have a wide range of roles, reaching from maintaining structural integrity of RNAP to σ factor recruitment, the only suggested function for ε thus far is in protecting cells from phage infection. The third subunit, δ, has been shown to have distinct influences in maintaining transcriptional specificity, and thus has a key role in cellular fitness. Collectively, all three accessory subunits, although dispensable under laboratory conditions, are often thought to be crucial for proper RNAP function. Herein we provide an overview of the available literature on each subunit, summarizing landmark findings that have deepened our understanding of these proteins and their function, and outline future challenges in understanding the role of these small subunits in the transcriptional process. PMID:25878038

  4. Isolation and identification of membrane vesicle-associated proteins in Gram-positive bacteria and mycobacteria

    PubMed Central

    Prados-Rosales, Rafael; Brown, Lisa; Casadevall, Arturo; Montalvo-Quirs, Sandra; Luque-Garcia, Jose L.

    2014-01-01

    Many intracellular bacterial pathogens naturally release membrane vesicles (MVs) under a variety of growth environments. For pathogenic bacteria there are strong evidences that released MVs are a delivery mechanism for the release of immunologically active molecules that contribute to virulence. Identification of membrane vesicle-associated proteins that can act as immunological modulators is crucial for opening up new horizons for understanding the pathogenesis of certain bacteria and for developing novel vaccines. In this protocol, we provide all the details for isolating MVs secreted by either mycobacteria or Gram-positive bacteria and for the subsequent identification of the protein content of the MVs by mass spectrometry. The protocol is adapted from Gram-negative bacteria and involves four main steps: (1) isolation of MVs from the culture media; (2) purification of MVs by density gradient ultrucentrifugation; (3) acetone precipitation of the MVs protein content and in-solution trypsin digestion and (4) mass spectrometry analysis of the generated peptides and protein identification. Our modifications are:Growing Mycobacteria in a chemically defined media to reduce the number of unrelated bacterial components in the supernatant.The use of an ultrafiltration system, which allows concentrating larger volumes.In solution digestion of proteins followed by peptides purification by ziptip. PMID:26150943

  5. Positive selection, cloning vectors for gram-positive bacteria based on a restriction endonuclease cassette.

    PubMed

    Djordjevic, G M; Klaenhammer, T R

    1996-01-01

    Lactococcus lactis contains numerous restriction and modification (R/M) systems of different specificities. A novel IIS type R/M system encoded by the LlaI operon has previously been characterized from the L. lactis conjugative plasmid pTR2030. The LlaI operon is composed of six genes: First, a small regulatory gene llaIC precedes the methylase gene llaIM. The following three genes, llaI.1, llaI.2, llaI.3, are all essential for restriction endonuclease activity and are designed as the restriction cassette llaIR. The forth open reading frame of unknown function follows the llaIR gene cassette. We have successfully subcloned the three llaIR genes, llaI.1, llaI.2, and llaI.3, without llaIM, as a suicide cassette into the three shuttle vectors pTRKL2, pTRKH2, and pBV5030. A promoter (P6) from Lactobacillus acidophilus ATCC4356, which is functional in E. coli, lactococci, and lactobacilli (Djordjevic and Topisirovic, unpublished) was cloned upstream of the three gene cassette. Restriction activity was evaluated in Escherichia coli and several gram-positive bacteria. The llaIR restriction cassette was not functional in E. coli, but its presence was lethal to L. lactis, Lactobacillus gasseri, Lactobacillus plantarum, Lactobacillus johnsonii, Lactobacillus acidophilus, Carnobacterium pisicola, Enterococcus faecalis, Bacillus subtilis, and Leuconostoc gelidum. Several novel, positive selection cloning vectors were developed that can exploit unique cloning sites within the llaIR cassette. Insertions in llaI.1 resulted in complete inactivation of restriction activity and provided unconditional selection for recombinant plasmids in surviving transformants. These positive selection cloning vectors are the first for gram-positive bacteria that are based on a restriction endonuclease cassette. Functional activity of the llaIR genes in various gram-positive bacteria would also enable use of these cloning vectors for positive selection of promoters, terminators, and regulatory sequences across these genera. PMID:8693025

  6. Interfacial charge transfer between CdTe quantum dots and Gram negative vs. Gram positive bacteria.

    SciTech Connect

    Dumas, E.; Gao, C.; Suffern, D.; Bradforth, S. E.; Dimitrejevic, N. M.; Nadeau, J. L.; McGill Univ.; Univ. of Southern California

    2010-01-01

    Oxidative toxicity of semiconductor and metal nanomaterials to cells has been well established. However, it may result from many different mechanisms, some requiring direct cell contact and others resulting from the diffusion of reactive species in solution. Published results are contradictory due to differences in particle preparation, bacterial strain, and experimental conditions. It has been recently found that C{sub 60} nanoparticles can cause direct oxidative damage to bacterial proteins and membranes, including causing a loss of cell membrane potential (depolarization). However, this did not correlate with toxicity. In this study we perform a similar analysis using fluorescent CdTe quantum dots, adapting our tools to make use of the particles fluorescence. We find that two Gram positive strains show direct electron transfer to CdTe, resulting in changes in CdTe fluorescence lifetimes. These two strains also show changes in membrane potential upon nanoparticle binding. Two Gram negative strains do not show these effects - nevertheless, they are over 10-fold more sensitive to CdTe than the Gram positives. We find subtoxic levels of Cd{sup 2+} release from the particles upon irradiation of the particles, but significant production of hydroxyl radicals, suggesting that the latter is a major source of toxicity. These results help establish mechanisms of toxicity and also provide caveats for use of certain reporter dyes with fluorescent nanoparticles which will be of use to anyone performing these assays. The findings also suggest future avenues of inquiry into electron transfer processes between nanomaterials and bacteria.

  7. Tribolium castaneum defensins are primarily active against Gram-positive bacteria.

    PubMed

    Tonk, Miray; Knorr, Eileen; Cabezas-Cruz, Alejandro; Valdés, James J; Kollewe, Christian; Vilcinskas, Andreas

    2015-11-01

    The red flour beetle Tribolium castaneum is a destructive insect pest of stored food and feed products, and a model organism for development, evolutionary biology and immunity. The insect innate immune system includes antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) with a wide spectrum of targets including viruses, bacteria, fungi and parasites. Defensins are an evolutionarily-conserved class of AMPs and a potential new source of antimicrobial agents. In this context, we report the antimicrobial activity, phylogenetic and structural properties of three T. castaneum defensins (Def1, Def2 and Def3) and their relevance in the immunity of T. castaneum against bacterial pathogens. All three recombinant defensins showed bactericidal activity against Micrococcus luteus and Bacillus thuringiensis serovar tolworthi, but only Def1 and Def2 showed a bacteriostatic effect against Staphylococcus epidermidis. None of the defensins showed activity against the Gram-negative bacteria Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas entomophila or against the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. All three defensins were transcriptionally upregulated following a bacterial challenge, suggesting a key role in the immunity of T. castaneum against bacterial pathogens. Phylogenetic analysis showed that defensins from T. castaneum, mealworms, Udo longhorn beetle and houseflies cluster within a well-defined clade of insect defensins. We conclude that T. castaneum defensins are primarily active against Gram-positive bacteria and that other AMPs may play a more prominent role against Gram-negative species. PMID:26522790

  8. An overview of RNAs with regulatory functions in gram-positive bacteria.

    PubMed

    Romby, Pascale; Charpentier, Emmanuelle

    2010-01-01

    During the last decade, RNA molecules with regulatory functions on gene expression have benefited from a renewed interest. In bacteria, recent high throughput computational and experimental approaches have led to the discovery that 10-20% of all genes code for RNAs with critical regulatory roles in metabolic, physiological and pathogenic processes. The trans-acting RNAs comprise the noncoding RNAs, RNAs with a short open reading frame and antisense RNAs. Many of these RNAs act through binding to their target mRNAs while others modulate protein activity or target DNA. The cis-acting RNAs include regulatory regions of mRNAs that can respond to various signals. These RNAs often provide the missing link between sensing changing conditions in the environment and fine-tuning the subsequent biological responses. Information on their various functions and modes of action has been well documented for gram-negative bacteria. Here, we summarize the current knowledge of regulatory RNAs in gram-positive bacteria. PMID:19859665

  9. sRNA and mRNA turnover in Gram-positive bacteria.

    PubMed

    Durand, Sylvain; Tomasini, Arnaud; Braun, Frédérique; Condon, Ciarán; Romby, Pascale

    2015-05-01

    It is widely recognized that RNA degradation plays a critical role in gene regulation when fast adaptation of cell growth is required to respond to stress and changing environmental conditions. Bacterial ribonucleases acting alone or in concert with various trans-acting regulatory factors are important mediators of RNA degradation. Here, we will give an overview of what is known about ribonucleases in several Gram-positive bacteria, their specificities and mechanisms of action. In addition, we will illustrate how sRNAs act in a coordinated manner with ribonucleases to regulate the turnover of particular mRNA targets, and the complex interplay existing between the ribosome, the ribonucleases and RNAs. PMID:25934118

  10. The immune response after stimulation with wall components of gram-positive bacteria and fungi.

    PubMed

    Tsigou, Evdoxia; Aloizos, Stavros; Stavros, Aloizos; Myrianthefs, Pavlos; Pavlos, Myrianthefs; Gourgiotis, Stavros; Stavros, Gourgiotis; Tsakris, Athanassios; Athanassios, Tsakris; Baltopoulos, George; George, Baltopoulos

    2014-01-01

    Although several components of the microbial wall of gram-positive bacteria and fungi possess immunostimulatory properties, their pathogenetic role remains incompletely evaluated. The purpose of this study was to assess the basic immune status of patients susceptible to infections and their capability for cytokine production after stimulation with wall components of gram-positive bacteria and fungi. We measured serum cytokine levels as well as cytokine production after ex vivo lipoteichoic acid (LTA) and mannan stimulation of whole blood. The blood was taken from 10 healthy volunteers, 10 patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD), 10 patients with diabetes mellitus (DM), and 10 patients on their 2nd day of stay in the Intensive Care Unit (ICU), who suffered from non septic systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) and had an APACHE II score ≥25. We used 1 μg/ml LTA and 100 μg/ml mannan for an incubation period of 8 h to stimulate 100 μl aliquots of whole blood. All patient groups had higher baseline values of TNF-α, IL-6, IL-1β, and IL-10 compared to the control group, but only for ICU patients the difference was statistically significant. The ratio IL-10/IL-6 was found 0.33, 0.22, and 0.96 in healthy persons, ESRD, and DM patients respectively, and 1.32 in ICU patients. In all examined groups, the levels of cytokines significantly increased after stimulation by LTA and mannan, although in severely ill patients this change was considerably smaller, possibly reflecting a state of monocytes' depression and relative hyporesponsiveness. No significant differences between the LTA and the mannan stimulation were observed. PMID:24440200

  11. Sortases and the Art of Anchoring Proteins to the Envelopes of Gram-Positive Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Marraffini, Luciano A.; DeDent, Andrea C.; Schneewind, Olaf

    2006-01-01

    The cell wall envelopes of gram-positive bacteria represent a surface organelle that not only functions as a cytoskeletal element but also promotes interactions between bacteria and their environment. Cell wall peptidoglycan is covalently and noncovalently decorated with teichoic acids, polysaccharides, and proteins. The sum of these molecular decorations provides bacterial envelopes with species- and strain-specific properties that are ultimately responsible for bacterial virulence, interactions with host immune systems, and the development of disease symptoms or successful outcomes of infections. Surface proteins typically carry two topogenic sequences, i.e., N-terminal signal peptides and C-terminal sorting signals. Sortases catalyze a transpeptidation reaction by first cleaving a surface protein substrate at the cell wall sorting signal. The resulting acyl enzyme intermediates between sortases and their substrates are then resolved by the nucleophilic attack of amino groups, typically provided by the cell wall cross bridges of peptidoglycan precursors. The surface protein linked to peptidoglycan is then incorporated into the envelope and displayed on the microbial surface. This review focuses on the mechanisms of surface protein anchoring to the cell wall envelope by sortases and the role that these enzymes play in bacterial physiology and pathogenesis. PMID:16524923

  12. Culture media for non-sporulating gram-positive food spoilage bacteria.

    PubMed

    Holzapfel, W H

    1992-10-01

    The spoilage association especially of protein-rich foods can be dominated by Gram-positive bacteria, notably lactic acid bacteria (LAB) which affect vacuum packaged refrigerated processed meats and some dairy products. New food ecosystems are being created by novel packaging and processing technologies, resulting in spoilage associations differing from those previously reported. In addition, improvement in identification methods, allow the detection and isolation of 'novel' bacterial groups, e.g., Carnobacterium spp. This review considers the genera Aerococcus, Brevibacterium, Brochothrix, Carnobacterium, Kurthia, Lactobacillus, Leuconostoc, Microbacterium, Micrococcus, Pediococcus and Propionibacterium. Strictly selective procedures, including incubation temperature and atmosphere, are not yet available for the genera Aerococcus, Brevibacterium, Microbacterium and Micrococcus, and only with some limitations for Kurthia and Propionibacterium. On the other hand, a causative role in food spoilage has not been established clearly for all those groups, some of which may be 'opportunistic' in their behaviour. The LAB groups Lactobacillus, Leuconostoc and Pediococcus ('LLP-Group') often share similar habitats and show similar physiological behaviour on a number of elective and selective media. Modifications to increase selectivity have been based mainly on de Man, Rogosa and Sharpe (MRS) or Rogosa agar, and include pH reduction, supplementation with chemical preservatives (e.g., sorbic acid and nitrate) and the use of reduced atmospheres or suboptimal incubation temperatures. Carnobacteria differ from other LAB in their non-aciduric nature, and selective plating procedures use high-pH media (pH 8-9) by which competitors (mainly lactobacilli) are eliminated. PMID:1486021

  13. ?, a New Subunit of RNA Polymerase Found in Gram-Positive Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Keller, Andrew N.; Yang, Xiao; Wiedermannov, Jana; Delumeau, Olivier; Krsn, Libor

    2014-01-01

    RNA polymerase in bacteria is a multisubunit protein complex that is essential for gene expression. We have identified a new subunit of RNA polymerase present in the high-A+T Firmicutes phylum of Gram-positive bacteria and have named it ?. Previously ? had been identified as a small protein (?1) that copurified with RNA polymerase. We have solved the structure of ? by X-ray crystallography and show that it is not an ? subunit. Rather, ? bears remarkable similarity to the Gp2 family of phage proteins involved in the inhibition of host cell transcription following infection. Deletion of ? shows no phenotype and has no effect on the transcriptional profile of the cell. Determination of the location of ? within the assembly of RNA polymerase core by single-particle analysis suggests that it binds toward the downstream side of the DNA binding cleft. Due to the structural similarity of ? with Gp2 and the fact they bind similar regions of RNA polymerase, we hypothesize that ? may serve a role in protection from phage infection. PMID:25092033

  14. Rapid methods for differentiating gram-positive from gram-negative aerobic and facultative anaerobic bacteria.

    PubMed

    Manafi, M; Kneifel, W

    1990-12-01

    Different tests based on lysis by KOH and on reaction with fluorogenic and chromogenic substrates, L-alanine-4-nitroanilide (LANA); L-alanine-4-methoxy- beta-naphthylamide (MNA); 4-alanine-2-amidoacridone (AAA); L-alanine-7-amido- 4-methylcoumarin (AAMC); 8-anilino-1-naphthalene-sulphonic acid (ANS) were compared for their suitability to distinguish Gram-positive from Gram-negative bacteria. A concentration of 100 micrograms/ml was chosen for incorporating LANA, AAA, AAMC and ANS into the growth medium, based on sensitivity tests. MNA did not show any detectable reaction over a concentration range from 50 to 200 micrograms/ml, and led to inhibition of all bacteria at 200 micrograms/ml. In the examination of a total of 146 bacterial strains, including Yersinia enterocolitica, Bacillus cereus, and B. subtilis the KOH test was not comparable with the Gram staining. A good correlation with Gram staining was found between LANA, AAA and AAMC added to plate count agar on one hand, and LANA and AAMC impregnated paper strips on the other hand, thereby utilizing the aminopeptidase activity. Agar containing ANS showed detectable fluorescence with all Gram-negative strains, but with Staphylococcus aureus and Staph. epidermidis a weak reaction was also observed. AAMC was selected for a rapid paper strip test. With this substrate a pronounced blue fluorescence was obtained with Gram-negative colonies. PMID:2286581

  15. In vitro activities of two ketolides, HMR 3647 and HMR 3004, against gram-positive bacteria.

    PubMed

    Malathum, K; Coque, T M; Singh, K V; Murray, B E

    1999-04-01

    The in vitro activities of two new ketolides, HMR 3647 and HMR 3004, were tested by the agar dilution method against 280 strains of gram-positive bacteria with different antibiotic susceptibility profiles, including Staphylococcus aureus, Enterococcus faecalis, Enterococcus faecium, Streptococcus spp. (group A streptococci, group B streptococci, Streptococcus pneumoniae, and alpha-hemolytic streptococci). Seventeen erythromycin-susceptible (EMs), methicillin-susceptible S. aureus strains were found to have HMR 3647 and HMR 3004 MICs 4- to 16-fold lower than those of erythromycin (MIC at which 50% of isolates were inhibited [MIC50] [HMR 3647 and HMR 3004], 0.03 microgram/ml; range, 0.03 to 0.06 microgram/ml; MIC50 [erythromycin], 0.25 microgram/ml; range, 0.25 to 0.5 microgram/ml). All methicillin-resistant S. aureus strains tested were resistant to erythromycin and had HMR 3647 and HMR 3004 MICs of > 64 micrograms/ml. The ketolides were slightly more active against E. faecalis than against E. faecium, and MICs for individual strains varied with erythromycin susceptibility. The MIC50s of HMR 3647 and HMR 3004 against Ems enterococci (MIC < or = 0.5 microgram/ml) and those enterococcal isolates with erythromycin MICs of 1 to 16 micrograms/ml were 0.015 microgram/ml. E. faecalis strains that had erythromycin MICs of 128 to > 512 micrograms/ml showed HMR 3647 MICs in the range of 0.03 to 16 micrograms/ml and HMR 3004 MICs in the range of 0.03 to 64 micrograms/ml. In the group of E. faecium strains for which MICs of erythromycin were > or = 512 micrograms/ml, MICs of both ketolides were in the range of 1 to 64 micrograms/ml, with almost all isolates showing ketolide MICs of < or = 16 micrograms/ml. The ketolides were also more active than erythromycin against group A streptococci, group B streptococci, S. pneumoniae, rhodococci, leuconostocs, pediococci, lactobacilli, and diphtheroids. Time-kill studies showed bactericidal activity against one strain of S. aureus among the four strains tested. The increased activity of ketolides against gram-positive bacteria suggests that further study of these agents for possible efficacy against infections caused by these bacteria is warranted. PMID:10103202

  16. Isolation of Highly Active Monoclonal Antibodies against Multiresistant Gram-Positive Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Rossmann, Friederike S.; Laverde, Diana; Kropec, Andrea; Romero-Saavedra, Felipe; Meyer-Buehn, Melanie; Huebner, Johannes

    2015-01-01

    Multiresistant nosocomial pathogens often cause life-threatening infections that are sometimes untreatable with currently available antibiotics. Staphylococci and enterococci are the predominant Gram-positive species associated with hospital-acquired infections. These infections often lead to extended hospital stay and excess mortality. In this study, a panel of fully human monoclonal antibodies was isolated from a healthy individual by selection of B-cells producing antibodies with high opsonic killing against E. faecalis 12030. Variable domains (VH and VL) of these immunoglobulin genes were amplified by PCR and cloned into an eukaryotic expression vector containing the constant domains of a human IgG1 molecule and the human lambda constant domain. These constructs were transfected into CHO cells and culture supernatants were collected and tested by opsonophagocytic assay against E. faecalis and S. aureus strains (including MRSA). At concentrations of 600 pg/ml, opsonic killing was between 40% and 70% against all strains tested. Monoclonal antibodies were also evaluated in a mouse sepsis model (using S. aureus LAC and E. faecium), a mouse peritonitis model (using S. aureus Newman and LAC) and a rat endocarditis model (using E. faecalis 12030) and were shown to provide protection in all models at a concentration of 4 ?g/kg per animal. Here we present a method to produce fully human IgG1 monoclonal antibodies that are opsonic in vitro and protective in vivo against several multiresistant Gram-positive bacteria. The monoclonal antibodies presented in this study are significantly more effective compared to another monoclonal antibody currently in clinical trials. PMID:25706415

  17. Isolation and Characterization of Gram-Positive Piezophilic Bacteria from Deep Marine Subsurface Sediment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Runko, G. M.; Fang, J.; Kato, C.

    2014-12-01

    The marine deep biosphere remains as the least studied of all of Earth's habitats and is inadequately understood, but is extremely important to understand the impacts that microbes have on global biogeochemical cycles. Sediment samples were obtained during IODP Expedition 337 in the western Pacific Ocean, from 1,498 meters below the seafloor (mbsf; samples 6R3), 1,951-1,999 mbsf (19R1), and 2,406 mbsf (29R7). These samples were initially mixed with marine broth and cultivated under anaerobic conditions at pressure of 35 MPa (megapascal) and temperatures of 35° C, 45° C, and 55° C for 3 months on board the Chikyu. Single colonies were isolated via plating on marine broth. Then, six strains of bacteria were identified, 6R3-1, 6R3-15, 19R1-5, 29R7-12B, 29R7-12M, and 29R7-12S. The six strains were then examined for optimal growth temperature and pressure. These organisms are Gram-positive, spore-forming, facultative anaerobic piezophilic bacteria. Major fatty acids are anteiso-15:0, anteiso-17:0 and iso-15:0. Phylogenetic analysis of 16S rRNA gene sequences revealed that the isolates are closely related to Virgibacillus pantothenticus, Robinsoniella peoriensis, and Bacillus subtilis. Because of their abundance in the deep marine subsurface, these microorganisms likely play an important role in sustaining the deep microbial ecosystem and influencing biogeochemical cycles in the deep biosphere.

  18. Cultivation of aerobic chemoorganotrophic proteobacteria and gram-positive bacteria from a hot spring microbial mat.

    PubMed Central

    Nold, S C; Kopczynski, E D; Ward, D M

    1996-01-01

    The diversity of aerobic chemoorganotrophic bacteria inhabiting the Octopus Spring cyanobacterial mat community (Yellowstone National Park) was examined by using serial-dilution enrichment culture and a variety of enrichment conditions to cultivate the numerically significant microbial populations. The most abundant bacterial populations cultivated from dilutions to extinction were obtained from enrichment flasks which contained 9.0 x 10(2) primary producer (Synechococcus spp.) cells in the inoculum. Two isolates exhibited 16S rRNA nucleotide sequences typical of beta-proteobacteria. One of these isolates contained a 16S rRNA sequence identical to a sequence type previously observed in the mat by molecular retrieval techniques. Both are distantly related to a new sequence directly retrieved from the mat and contributed by a beta-proteobacterial community member. Phenotypically diverse gram-positive isolates genetically similar to Bacillus flavothermus were obtained from a variety of dilutions and enrichment types. These isolates exhibited identical 16S rRNA nucleotide sequences through a variable region of the molecule. Of the three unique sequences observed, only one had been previously retrieved from the mat, illustrating both the inability of the cultivation methods to describe the composition of a microbial community and the limitations of the ability of molecular retrieval techniques to describe populations which may be less abundant in microbial communities. PMID:8899976

  19. Quorum-sensing regulators in Gram-positive bacteria: 'cherchez le peptide'.

    PubMed

    Monnet, V; Gardan, R

    2015-07-01

    Gram-positive bacteria can regulate gene expression at the population level via a mechanism known as quorum sensing. Oligopeptides serve as the signaling molecules; they are secreted and then are either detected at the bacterial surface by two-component systems or reinternalized via an oligopeptide transport system. In the latter case, imported peptides interact with cognate regulators (phosphatases or transcriptional regulators) that modulate the expression of target genes. These regulators help control crucial functions such as virulence, persistence, conjugation and competence and have been reported in bacilli, enterococci and streptococci. They form the rapidly growing RRNPP group. In this issue of Molecular?Microbiology, Hoover et?al. (2015) highlight the group's importance: they have identified a new family of regulators, Tprs (Transcription factor regulated by a Phr peptide), which work with internalized Phr-like peptides. The mechanisms underlying the expression of the genes that encode these internalized peptides are poorly documented. However, Hoover et?al. (2015) have provided a new insight: an environmental molecule, glucose, can inhibit expression of the Phr-like peptide gene via catabolic repression. This previously undescribed regulatory pathway, controlling the production of a bacteriocin, might influence Streptococcus pneumonia's fitness in the nasopharynx, where galactose is present. PMID:25988215

  20. Effect of betamethasone in combination with antibiotics on gram positive and gram negative bacteria.

    PubMed

    Artini, M; Papa, R; Cellini, A; Tilotta, M; Barbato, G; Koverech, A; Selan, L

    2014-01-01

    Betamethasone is an anti-inflammatory steroid drug used in cases of anaphylactic and allergic reactions, of Alzheimer and Addison diseases and in soft tissue injuries. It modulates gene expression for anti-inflammatory activity suppressing the immune system response. This latter effect might decrease the effectiveness of immune system response against microbial infections. Corticosteroids, in fact, mask some symptoms of infection and during their use superimposed infections may occur. Thus, the use of glucocorticoids in patients with sepsis remains extremely controversial. In this study we analyzed the in vitro effect of a commercial formulation of betamethasone (Bentelan) on several Gram positive and Gram negative bacteria of clinical relevance. It was found to be an inhibitor of the growth of most of the strains examined. Also the effect of betamethasone in combination with some classes of antibiotics was evaluated. Antibiotic-steroid combination therapy is, in such cases, superior to antibiotic-alone treatment to impair bacterial growths. Such effect was essentially not at all observable on Staphylococcus aureus or Coagulase Negative Staphylococci (CoNS). PMID:25572750

  1. Dustborne and Airborne Gram-Positive and Gram-Negative Bacteria in High versus Low ERMI Homes

    PubMed Central

    Adhikari, Atin; Kettleson, Eric M.; Vesper, Stephen; Kumar, Sudhir; Popham, David L.; Schaffer, Christopher; Indugula, Reshmi; Chatterjee, Kanistha; Allam, Karteek K.; Grinshpun, Sergey A.; Reponen, Tiina

    2014-01-01

    The study aimed at investigating Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria in moldy and non-moldy homes, as defined by the homes Environmental Relative Moldiness Index (ERMI) value. The ERMI values were determined from floor dust samples in 2010 and 2011 and homes were classified into low (<5) and high (>5) ERMI groups based on the average ERMI values as well as 2011 ERMI values. Dust and air samples were collected from the homes in 2011 and all samples were analyzed for Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria using QPCR assays, endotoxin by the LAL assay, and N-acetyl-muramic acid using HPLC. In addition, air samples were analyzed for culturable bacteria. When average ERMI values were considered, the concentration and load of Gram-positive bacteria determined with QPCR in house dust, but not air, were significantly greater in high ERMI homes than in low ERMI homes. Furthermore, the concentration of endotoxin, but not muramic acid, in the dust was significantly greater in high ERMI than in low ERMI homes. In contrast, when ERMI values of 2011 were considered, Gram-negative bacteria determined with QPCR in air, endotoxin in air, and muramic acid in dust were significantly greater in high ERMI homes. The results suggest that both short-term and long-term mold contamination in homes could be linked with the bacterial concentrations in house dust, however, only the current mold status was associated with bacterial concentrations in air. Although correlations were found between endotoxin and Gram-negative bacteria as well as between muramic acid and Gram-positive bacteria in the entire data set, diverging associations were observed between the different measures of bacteria and the home moldiness. It is likely that concentrations of cells obtained by QPCR and concentrations of cell wall components are not equivalent and represent too broad categories to understand the bacterial composition and sources of the home microbiota. PMID:24642096

  2. Trans-generational Immune Priming Protects the Eggs Only against Gram-Positive Bacteria in the Mealworm Beetle

    PubMed Central

    Dubuffet, Aurore; Zanchi, Caroline; Boutet, Gwendoline; Moreau, Jérôme; Teixeira, Maria; Moret, Yannick

    2015-01-01

    In many vertebrates and invertebrates, offspring whose mothers have been exposed to pathogens can exhibit increased levels of immune activity and/or increased survival to infection. Such phenomena, called “Trans-generational immune priming” (TGIP) are expected to provide immune protection to the offspring. As the offspring and their mother may share the same environment, and consequently similar microbial threats, we expect the immune molecules present in the progeny to be specific to the microbes that immune challenged the mother. We provide evidence in the mealworm beetle Tenebrio molitor that the antimicrobial activity found in the eggs is only active against Gram-positive bacteria, even when females were exposed to Gram-negative bacteria or fungi. Fungi were weak inducers of TGIP while we obtained similar levels of anti-Gram-positive activity using different bacteria for the maternal challenge. Furthermore, we have identified an antibacterial peptide from the defensin family, the tenecin 1, which spectrum of activity is exclusively directed toward Gram-positive bacteria as potential contributor to this antimicrobial activity. We conclude that maternal transfer of antimicrobial activity in the eggs of T. molitor might have evolved from persistent Gram-positive bacterial pathogens between insect generations. PMID:26430786

  3. Trans-generational Immune Priming Protects the Eggs Only against Gram-Positive Bacteria in the Mealworm Beetle.

    PubMed

    Dubuffet, Aurore; Zanchi, Caroline; Boutet, Gwendoline; Moreau, Jrme; Teixeira, Maria; Moret, Yannick

    2015-10-01

    In many vertebrates and invertebrates, offspring whose mothers have been exposed to pathogens can exhibit increased levels of immune activity and/or increased survival to infection. Such phenomena, called "Trans-generational immune priming" (TGIP) are expected to provide immune protection to the offspring. As the offspring and their mother may share the same environment, and consequently similar microbial threats, we expect the immune molecules present in the progeny to be specific to the microbes that immune challenged the mother. We provide evidence in the mealworm beetle Tenebrio molitor that the antimicrobial activity found in the eggs is only active against Gram-positive bacteria, even when females were exposed to Gram-negative bacteria or fungi. Fungi were weak inducers of TGIP while we obtained similar levels of anti-Gram-positive activity using different bacteria for the maternal challenge. Furthermore, we have identified an antibacterial peptide from the defensin family, the tenecin 1, which spectrum of activity is exclusively directed toward Gram-positive bacteria as potential contributor to this antimicrobial activity. We conclude that maternal transfer of antimicrobial activity in the eggs of T. molitor might have evolved from persistent Gram-positive bacterial pathogens between insect generations. PMID:26430786

  4. Dustborne and airborne gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria in high versus low ERMI homes

    EPA Science Inventory

    The study aimed at investigating Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria in moldy and non-moldy homes, as defined by the home's Environmental Relative Moldiness Index (ERMI) value. The ERMI values were determined from floor dust samples in 2010 and 2011 and homes were classified...

  5. Infections caused by Gram-positive bacteria: a review of the global challenge.

    PubMed

    Woodford, Neil; Livermore, David M

    2009-09-01

    Infections caused by multidrug-resistant Gram-positive bacteria represent a major public health burden, not just in terms of morbidity and mortality, but also in terms of increased expenditure on patient management and implementation of infection control measures. Staphylococcus aureus and Enterococcus spp. are established pathogens in the hospital environment, and their frequent multidrug resistance complicates therapy. The archetypal hospital "superbug", methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA), regularly attracts mass-media interest and, in many countries, there is political pressure to reduce MRSA infection rates, with some progress now being made in the United Kingdom and the United States. To compound these established problems, we have witnessed the emergence and spread of virulent clones of MRSA in the community, and of Clostridium difficile in hospitals. Multidrug-resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae clones are major community pathogens in many parts of the world, but are now being challenged by new conjugate vaccines. Using combinations of molecular epidemiological tools, which characterize the resistant isolates and their resistance determinants, scientists can track highly successful bacterial strains at local, national, and international levels. These methods have provided new insights into the evolution of key pathogens, and this information may aid the design of control strategies and vaccines. In addition, the development of new antimicrobials including oxazolidinones, lipopeptides, glycylcyclines, ketolides, and new generations of fluoroquinolones, antistaphylococcal b-lactams, and glycopeptides must remain a high priority for the continued effective treatment of infections caused by resistant strains. So far, resistance to these newer agents is identified rarely in surveillance programs, but occasional reports of resistance causing therapeutic failure (e.g., with linezolid, daptomycin, telithromycin, or newer fluoroquinolones) give cause for concern. The emergence of antibiotic resistance is inevitable, but we must seek to decrease its impact and prolong the effectiveness of the agents available to us. PMID:19766888

  6. Acyl Enzyme Intermediates in Sortase-Catalyzed Pilus Morphogenesis in Gram-Positive Bacteria?

    PubMed Central

    Guttilla, Irene K.; Gaspar, Andrew H.; Swierczynski, Arlene; Swaminathan, Anu; Dwivedi, Prabhat; Das, Asis; Ton-That, Hung

    2009-01-01

    In gram-positive bacteria, covalently linked pilus polymers are assembled by a specific transpeptidase enzyme called pilus-specific sortase. This sortase is postulated to cleave the LPXTG motif of a pilin precursor between threonine and glycine and to form an acyl enzyme intermediate with the substrate. Pilus polymerization is believed to occur through the resolution of this intermediate upon specific nucleophilic attack by the conserved lysine located within the pilin motif of another pilin monomer, which joins two pilins with an isopeptide bond formed between threonine and lysine. Here, we present evidence for sortase reaction intermediates in Corynebacterium diphtheriae. We show that truncated SrtA mutants that are loosely bound to the cytoplasmic membrane form high-molecular-weight complexes with SpaA polymers secreted into the extracellular milieu. These complexes are not formed with SpaA pilin mutants that have alanine substitutions in place of threonine in the LPXTG motif or lysine in the pilin motif. The same phenotype is observed with alanine substitutions of either the conserved cysteine or histidine residue of SrtA known to be required for catalysis. Remarkably, the assembly of SpaA pili, or the formation of intermediates, is abolished with a SrtA mutant missing the membrane-anchoring domain. We infer that pilus polymerization involves the formation of covalent pilin-sortase intermediates, which occurs within a molecular platform on the exoplasmic face of the cytoplasmic membrane that brings together both sortase and its cognate substrates in close proximity to each other, likely surrounding a secretion apparatus. We present electron microscopic data in support of this picture. PMID:19592583

  7. Pili in Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria - structure, assembly and their role in disease.

    PubMed

    Proft, T; Baker, E N

    2009-02-01

    Many bacterial species possess long filamentous structures known as pili or fimbriae extending from their surfaces. Despite the diversity in pilus structure and biogenesis, pili in Gram-negative bacteria are typically formed by non-covalent homopolymerization of major pilus subunit proteins (pilins), which generates the pilus shaft. Additional pilins may be added to the fiber and often function as host cell adhesins. Some pili are also involved in biofilm formation, phage transduction, DNA uptake and a special form of bacterial cell movement, known as 'twitching motility'. In contrast, the more recently discovered pili in Gram-positive bacteria are formed by covalent polymerization of pilin subunits in a process that requires a dedicated sortase enzyme. Minor pilins are added to the fiber and play a major role in host cell colonization.This review gives an overview of the structure, assembly and function of the best-characterized pili of both Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria. PMID:18953686

  8. Relevance of GC content to the conservation of DNA polymerase III/mismatch repair system in Gram-positive bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Akashi, Motohiro; Yoshikawa, Hirofumi

    2013-01-01

    The mechanism of DNA replication is one of the driving forces of genome evolution. Bacterial DNA polymerase III, the primary complex of DNA replication, consists of PolC and DnaE. PolC is conserved in Gram-positive bacteria, especially in the Firmicutes with low GC content, whereas DnaE is widely conserved in most Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria. PolC contains two domains, the 3?-5?exonuclease domain and the polymerase domain, while DnaE only possesses the polymerase domain. Accordingly, DnaE does not have the proofreading function; in Escherichia coli, another enzyme DnaQ performs this function. In most bacteria, the fidelity of DNA replication is maintained by 3?-5? exonuclease and a mismatch repair (MMR) system. However, we found that most Actinobacteria (a group of Gram-positive bacteria with high GC content) appear to have lost the MMR system and chromosomes may be replicated by DnaE-type DNA polymerase III with DnaQ-like 3?-5? exonuclease. We tested the mutation bias of Bacillus subtilis, which belongs to the Firmicutes and found that the wild type strain is AT-biased while the mutS-deletant strain is remarkably GC-biased. If we presume that DnaE tends to make mistakes that increase GC content, these results can be explained by the mutS deletion (i.e., deletion of the MMR system). Thus, we propose that GC content is regulated by DNA polymerase and MMR system, and the absence of polC genes, which participate in the MMR system, may be the reason for the increase of GC content in Gram-positive bacteria such as Actinobacteria. PMID:24062730

  9. Genetic determinants of antimicrobial resistance in Gram positive bacteria from organic foods.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Fuentes, Miguel Angel; Abriouel, Hikmate; Ortega Morente, Elena; Pérez Pulido, Rubén; Gálvez, Antonio

    2014-02-17

    Bacterial biocide resistance is becoming a matter of concern. In the present study, a collection of biocide-resistant, Gram-positive bacteria from organic foods (including 11 isolates from genus Bacillus, 25 from Enterococcus and 10 from Staphylococcus) were analyzed for genes associated to biocide resistance efflux pumps and antibiotic resistance. The only qac-genes detected were qacA/B (one Bacillus cereus isolate) and smr (one B. cereus and two Staphylococcus saprophyticus isolates). Efflux pump genes efrA and efrB genes were detected in Staphylococcus (60% of isolates), Bacillus (54.54%) and Enterococcus (24%); sugE was detected in Enterococcus (20%) and in one Bacillus licheniformis; mepA was detected in Staphylococcus (60%) and in one Enterococcus isolate (which also carried mdeA), and norE gene was detected only in one Enterococcus faecium and one S. saprophyticus isolate. An amplicon for acrB efflux pump was detected in all but one isolate. When minimal inhibitory concentrations (MICs) were determined, it was found that the addition of reserpine reduced the MICs by eight fold for most of the biocides and isolates, corroborating the role of efflux pumps in biocide resistance. Erythromycin resistance gene ermB was detected in 90% of Bacillus isolates, and in one Staphylococcus, while ereA was detected only in one Bacillus and one Staphyloccus, and ereB only in one Staphylococcus. The ATP-dependent msrA gene (which confers resistance to macrolides, lincosamides and type B streptogramins) was detected in 60% of Bacillus isolates and in all staphylococci, which in addition carried msrB. The lincosamide and streptogramin A resistance gene lsa was detected in Staphylococcus (40%), Bacillus (27.27%) and Enterococcus (8%) isolates. The aminoglycoside resistance determinant aph (3_)-IIIa was detected in Staphylococcus (40%) and Bacillus (one isolate), aph(2_)-1d in Bacillus (27.27%) and Enterococcus (8%), aph(2_)-Ib in Bacillus (one isolate), and the bifunctional aac(6_)1e-aph(2_)-Ia in Staphylococcus (20%), Enterococcus (8%) and Bacillus (one isolate). Chloramphenicol resistance cat gene was detected in Enterococcus (8%) and Staphylococcus (20%), and blaZ only in Staphylococcus (20%). All other antibiotic or biocide resistance genes investigated were not detected in any isolate. Isolates carrying multiple biocide and antibiotic determinants were frequent among Bacillus (36.36%) and Staphylococcus (50%), but not Enterococcus. These results suggest that biocide and antibiotic determinants may be co-selected. PMID:24361832

  10. Specificity of L,D-transpeptidases from gram-positive bacteria producing different peptidoglycan chemotypes.

    PubMed

    Magnet, Sophie; Arbeloa, Ana; Mainardi, Jean-Luc; Hugonnet, Jean-Emmanuel; Fourgeaud, Martine; Dubost, Lionel; Marie, Arul; Delfosse, Vanessa; Mayer, Claudine; Rice, Louis B; Arthur, Michel

    2007-05-01

    We report here the first direct assessment of the specificity of a class of peptidoglycan cross-linking enzymes, the L,D-transpeptidases, for the highly diverse structure of peptidoglycan precursors of Gram-positive bacteria. The lone functionally characterized member of this new family of active site cysteine peptidases, Ldt(fm) from Enterococcus faecium, was previously shown to bypass the D,D-transpeptidase activity of the classical penicillin-binding proteins leading to high level cross-resistance to glycopeptide and beta-lactam antibiotics. Ldt(fm) homologues from Bacillus subtilis (Ldt(Bs)) and E. faecalis (Ldt(fs)) were found here to cross-link their cognate disaccharide-peptide subunits containing meso-diaminopimelic acid (mesoDAP(3)) and L-Lys(3)-L-Ala-L-Ala at the third position of the stem peptide, respectively, instead of L-Lys(3)-d-iAsn in E. faecium. Ldt(fs) differed from Ldt(fm) and Ldt(Bs) by its capacity to hydrolyze the L-Lys(3)-D-Ala(4) bond of tetrapeptide (L,D-carboxypeptidase activity) and pentapeptide (L,D-endopeptidase activity) stems, in addition to the common cross-linking activity. The three enzymes were specific for their cognate acyl acceptors in the cross-linking reaction. In contrast to Ldt(fs), which was also specific for its cognate acyl donor, Ldt(fm) tolerated substitution of L-Lys(3)-D-iAsn by L-Lys(3)-L-Ala-L-Ala. Likewise, Ldt(Bs) tolerated substitution of mesoDAP(3) by L-Lys(3)-D-iAsn and L-Lys(3)-L-Ala-L-Ala in the acyl donor. Thus, diversification of the structure of peptidoglycan precursors associated with speciation has led to a parallel evolution of the substrate specificity of the L,D-transpeptidases affecting mainly the recognition of the acyl acceptor. Blocking the assembly of the side chain could therefore be used to combat antibiotic resistance involving L,D-transpeptidases. PMID:17311917

  11. Antimicrobial Activities of Leaf Extracts of Guava (Psidium guajava L.) on Two Gram-Negative and Gram-Positive Bacteria.

    PubMed

    Biswas, Bipul; Rogers, Kimberly; McLaughlin, Fredrick; Daniels, Dwayne; Yadav, Anand

    2013-01-01

    Aim. To determine the antimicrobial potential of guava (Psidium guajava) leaf extracts against two gram-negative bacteria (Escherichia coli and Salmonella enteritidis) and two gram-positive bacteria (Staphylococcus aureus and Bacillus cereus) which are some of foodborne and spoilage bacteria. The guava leaves were extracted in four different solvents of increasing polarities (hexane, methanol, ethanol, and water). The efficacy of these extracts was tested against those bacteria through a well-diffusion method employing 50  μ L leaf-extract solution per well. According to the findings of the antibacterial assay, the methanol and ethanol extracts of the guava leaves showed inhibitory activity against gram-positive bacteria, whereas the gram-negative bacteria were resistant to all the solvent extracts. The methanol extract had an antibacterial activity with mean zones of inhibition of 8.27 and 12.3 mm, and the ethanol extract had a mean zone of inhibition of 6.11 and 11.0 mm against B. cereus and S. aureus, respectively. On the basis of the present finding, guava leaf-extract might be a good candidate in the search for a natural antimicrobial agent. This study provides scientific understanding to further determine the antimicrobial values and investigate other pharmacological properties. PMID:24223039

  12. Antimicrobial Activities of Leaf Extracts of Guava (Psidium guajava L.) on Two Gram-Negative and Gram-Positive Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Biswas, Bipul; Rogers, Kimberly; McLaughlin, Fredrick; Yadav, Anand

    2013-01-01

    Aim. To determine the antimicrobial potential of guava (Psidium guajava) leaf extracts against two gram-negative bacteria (Escherichia coli and Salmonella enteritidis) and two gram-positive bacteria (Staphylococcus aureus and Bacillus cereus) which are some of foodborne and spoilage bacteria. The guava leaves were extracted in four different solvents of increasing polarities (hexane, methanol, ethanol, and water). The efficacy of these extracts was tested against those bacteria through a well-diffusion method employing 50 μL leaf-extract solution per well. According to the findings of the antibacterial assay, the methanol and ethanol extracts of the guava leaves showed inhibitory activity against gram-positive bacteria, whereas the gram-negative bacteria were resistant to all the solvent extracts. The methanol extract had an antibacterial activity with mean zones of inhibition of 8.27 and 12.3 mm, and the ethanol extract had a mean zone of inhibition of 6.11 and 11.0 mm against B. cereus and S. aureus, respectively. On the basis of the present finding, guava leaf-extract might be a good candidate in the search for a natural antimicrobial agent. This study provides scientific understanding to further determine the antimicrobial values and investigate other pharmacological properties. PMID:24223039

  13. Intersection of the stringent response and the CodY regulon in low GC Gram-positive bacteria.

    PubMed

    Geiger, Tobias; Wolz, Christiane

    2014-03-01

    Bacteria adapt efficiently to a wide range of nutritional environments. Therefore, they possess overlapping regulatory systems that detect intracellular pools of key metabolites. In low GC Gram-positive bacteria, two global regulators, the stringent response and the CodY repressor, respond to an intracellular decrease in amino acid content. Amino acid limitation leads to rapid synthesis of the alarmones pppGpp and ppGpp through the stringent response and inactivates the CodY repressor. Two cofactors, branched chain amino acids (BCAA) and GTP, are ligands for CodY and facilitate binding to the target DNA. Because (p)ppGpp synthesis and accumulation evidentially reduce the intracellular GTP pool, CodY is released from the DNA, and transcription of target genes is altered. Here, we focus on this intimate link between the stringent response and CodY regulation in different Gram-positive species. PMID:24462007

  14. In Vitro Activity of Ozenoxacin against Quinolone-Susceptible and Quinolone-Resistant Gram-Positive Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Lpez, Y.; Tato, M.; Espinal, P.; Garcia-Alonso, F.; Gargallo-Viola, D.; Cantn, R.

    2013-01-01

    In vitro activity of ozenoxacin, a novel nonfluorinated topical (L. D. Saravolatz and J. Leggett, Clin. Infect. Dis. 37:12101215, 2003) quinolone, was compared with the activities of other quinolones against well-characterized quinolone-susceptible and quinolone-resistant Gram-positive bacteria. Ozenoxacin was 3-fold to 321-fold more active than other quinolones. Ozenoxacin could represent a first-in-class nonfluorinated quinolone for the topical treatment of a broad range of dermatological infections. PMID:24080666

  15. Secretory phospholipase A2 in dromedary tears: a host defense against staphylococci and other gram-positive bacteria.

    PubMed

    Ben Bacha, Abir; Abid, Islem

    2013-03-01

    The best known physiologic function of secreted phospholipase A2 (sPLA2) group IIA (sPLA2-IIA) is defense against bacterial infection through hydrolytic degradation of bacterial membrane phospholipids. In fact, sPLA2-IIA effectively kills Gram-positive bacteria and to a lesser extent Gram-negative bacteria and is considered a major component of the eye's innate immune defense system. The antibacterial properties of sPLA2 have been demonstrated in rabbit and human tears. In this report, we have analyzed the bactericidal activity of dromedary tears and the subsequently purified sPLA2 on several Gram-positive bacteria. Our results showed that the sPLA2 displays a potent bactericidal activity against all the tested bacteria particularly against the Staphylococcus strains when tested in the ionic environment of tears. There is a synergic action of the sPLA2 with lysozyme when added to the bacteria culture prior to sPLA2. Interestingly, lysozyme purified from dromedary tears showed a significant bactericidal activity against Listeria monocytogene and Staphylococcus epidermidis, whereas the one purified from human tears displayed no activity against these two strains. We have also demonstrated that Ca(2+) is crucial for the activity of dromedary tear sPLA2 and to a less extent Mg(2+) ions. Given the presence of sPLA2 in tears and intestinal secretions, this enzyme may play a substantial role in innate mucosal and systemic bactericidal defenses against Gram-positive bacteria. PMID:23344945

  16. Pseudomonas quinolone signal affects membrane vesicle production in not only gram-negative but also gram-positive bacteria.

    PubMed

    Tashiro, Yosuke; Ichikawa, Sosaku; Nakajima-Kambe, Toshiaki; Uchiyama, Hiroo; Nomura, Nobuhiko

    2010-01-01

    Many Gram-negative bacteria naturally produce membrane vesicles (MVs) to the extracellular milieu. The Pseudomonas quinolone signal (PQS), a quorum-sensing signal of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, is a positive regulator of MV production. In this study, we investigated its effects on MV production in other Gram-negative and -positive bacterial species. The addition of PQS to an Escherichia coli K12 culture resulted in increased MV production and enlarged MVs. An excessive amount of MgCl(2) repressed E. coli MV production either with or without PQS, suggesting that an anionic repulsion of cellular surfaces increases MV production. PQS was found in the cellular membrane and MVs in E. coli. The enhancement of MV production by PQS occurred in other Gram-negative bacteria, including Burkholderia and Pseudomonas species. Moreover, PQS induced MV production in a Gram-positive bacterium, Bacillus subtilis 168, which does not normally produce MV under laboratory conditions. An excessive amount of MgCl(2) did not repress B. subtilis MV production in the presence of PQS, suggesting the production mechanism to be different from that in Gram-negative bacteria. Together, these results indicated that PQS enhances MV production in Gram-negative bacteria and induces it in Gram-positive bacteria. PMID:21576862

  17. Evaluation of resistance mechanism against antimicrobial factors in gram positive bacteria.

    PubMed

    Kawada-Matsuo, Miki

    2015-01-01

    It is known that various antibacterial agents are observed in human for preventing bacterial infection. In this study, in order to elucidate the resistance mechanism against antimicrobial agents derived of human and bacteriocins derived of commensal bacteria, we systematically evaluated the roles of the bacteria-specific two-component systems of Staphylococcus aureus and Streptococcus mutans which colonize to different sites. Two-component systems (TCSs) are specific regulatory systems in bacteria that play an important role in sensing and adapting to the environment. As the result, four TCSs of S. aureus and three TCSs of S. mutans were associated with resistance against defensin and LL37 as antimaicrobial peptides and nisin A and nukacin ISK-1 as bacteriocins. Two TCSs that are individually associated with resistance against the bacteriocins nisin A (class I type A[I]) and nukacin ISK-1 (class I type A[II]) were identified in S. mutans, whereas one TCS is associated with main resistance against the both of nisin A and nukacin ISK-1. This result suggested that TCSs play important roles on acquisition of human- and bacteria-derived antibacterial agents. However, the resistance mechanism via TCS in S. aureus is quite different from that of in S. mutans. Additional evidence suggests that these TCSs are required for co-existence with other bacteria producing to nisin A or nukacin ISK-1, meaning that the roles of bacteriocins in the interactions between different species of commensal bacteria and the importance of TCSs in this process. Our results will highlight the roles of bacterial colonization in human being are constituted on the adaptation against antibacterial agents derived from human and commensal bacteria via TCSs. PMID:26632219

  18. Antimicrobial and efflux pump inhibitory activity of caffeoylquinic acids from Artemisia absinthium against gram-positive pathogenic bacteria.

    TOXLINE Toxicology Bibliographic Information

    Fiamegos YC; Kastritis PL; Exarchou V; Han H; Bonvin AM; Vervoort J; Lewis K; Hamblin MR; Tegos GP

    1812-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Traditional antibiotics are increasingly suffering from the emergence of multidrug resistance amongst pathogenic bacteria leading to a range of novel approaches to control microbial infections being investigated as potential alternative treatments. One plausible antimicrobial alternative could be the combination of conventional antimicrobial agents/antibiotics with small molecules which block multidrug efflux systems known as efflux pump inhibitors. Bioassay-driven purification and structural determination of compounds from plant sources have yielded a number of pump inhibitors which acted against gram positive bacteria.METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In this study we report the identification and characterization of 4',5'-O-dicaffeoylquinic acid (4',5'-ODCQA) from Artemisia absinthium as a pump inhibitor with a potential of targeting efflux systems in a wide panel of gram-positive human pathogenic bacteria. Separation and identification of phenolic compounds (chlorogenic acid, 3',5'-ODCQA, 4',5'-ODCQA) was based on hyphenated chromatographic techniques such as liquid chromatography with post column solid-phase extraction coupled with nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and mass spectroscopy. Microbial susceptibility testing and potentiation of well know pump substrates revealed at least two active compounds; chlorogenic acid with weak antimicrobial activity and 4',5'-ODCQA with pump inhibitory activity whereas 3',5'-ODCQA was ineffective. These initial findings were further validated with checkerboard, berberine accumulation efflux assays using efflux-related phenotypes and clinical isolates as well as molecular modeling methodology.CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These techniques facilitated the direct analysis of the active components from plant extracts, as well as dramatically reduced the time needed to analyze the compounds, without the need for prior isolation. The calculated energetics of the docking poses supported the biological information for the inhibitory capabilities of 4',5'-ODCQA and furthermore contributed evidence that CQAs show a preferential binding to Major Facilitator Super family efflux systems, a key multidrug resistance determinant in gram-positive bacteria.

  19. Functionalized magnetic iron oxide (Fe3O4) nanoparticles for capturing gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria.

    PubMed

    Reddy, P Muralidhar; Chang, Kai-Chih; Liu, Zhen-Jun; Chen, Cheng-Tung; Ho, Yen-Peng

    2014-08-01

    The development of nanotechnology in biology and medicine has raised the need for conjugation of nanoparticles (NPs) to biomolecules. In this study, magnetic and functionalized magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles were synthesized and used as affinity probes to capture Gram-positive/negative bacteria. The morphology and properties of the magnetic NPs were examined by transmission electron microscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, and zeta potential measurements. Furthermore, this study investigated the interaction between functionalized magnetic nanoparticles and Gram positive/negative bacteria. The positively and negatively charged magnetic nanoparticles include functionalities of Fe3O4, SiO2, TiO2, ZrO2, poly ethyleneimine (PEI) and poly acrylic acid. Their capture efficiencies for bacteria were investigated based on factors such as zeta potential, concentration and pH value. PEI particles carry a positive charge over a range of pH values from 3 to 10, and the particles were found to be an excellent candidate for capturing bacteria over such pH range. Since the binding force is mainly electrostatic, the architecture and orientation of the functional groups on the NP surface are not critical. Finally the captured bacteria were analyzed using matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry. The minimum detection limit was 10(4) CFU/mL and the analysis time was reduced to be less than 1 hour. In addition, the detection limit could be reduced to an extremely low concentration of 50 CFU/mL when captured bacteria were cultivated. PMID:25016643

  20. Hyperspectral microscope imaging methods to classify gram-positive and gram-negative foodborne pathogenic bacteria

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    An acousto-optic tunable filter-based hyperspectral microscope imaging method has potential for identification of foodborne pathogenic bacteria from microcolony rapidly with a single cell level. We have successfully developed the method to acquire quality hyperspectral microscopic images from variou...

  1. Classification of gram-positive and gram-negative foodborne pathogenic bacteria with hyperspectral microscope imaging

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Optical method with hyperspectral microscope imaging (HMI) has potential for identification of foodborne pathogenic bacteria from microcolonies rapidly with a cell level. A HMI system that provides both spatial and spectral information could be an effective tool for analyzing spectral characteristic...

  2. Labeling and Selective Inactivation of Gram-Positive Bacteria Employing Bimodal Photoprobes with Dual Readouts.

    PubMed

    Galstyan, Anzhela; Block, Desiree; Niemann, Silke; Grüner, Malte C; Abbruzzetti, Stefania; Oneto, Michele; Daniliuc, Constantin G; Hermann, Sven; Viappiani, Cristiano; Schäfers, Michael; Löffler, Bettina; Strassert, Cristian A; Faust, Andreas

    2016-04-01

    Carbohydrate-conjugated silicon(IV) phthalocyanines with bimodal photoactivity were developed as probes with both fluorescent labeling and photosensitizing capabilities, and the concomitant fluorescent labeling and photoinduced inactivation of Gram-positive and Gram-negative models was explored. The maltohexaose-conjugated photoprobe provides a dual readout to distinguish between both groups of pathogens, as only the Gram-positive species was inactivated, even though both appeared labeled with near-infrared luminescence. Antibiotic resistance did not hinder the phototoxic effect, as even the methicillin-resistant pathogen Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) was completely photoinactivated. Time-resolved confocal fluorescence microscopy analysis suggests that the photoprobe sticks onto the outer rim of the microorganisms, explaining the resistance of Gram-negative species on the basis of their membrane constitution. The mannose-conjugated photoprobe yields a different readout because it is able to label and to inactivate only the Gram-positive strain. PMID:26929124

  3. The resemblance of clinical attributes between mastitic cows with no growth on bacterial milk cultures and those with gram-positive bacteria cultured.

    PubMed Central

    White, M E; Montgomery, M E

    1987-01-01

    The clinical attributes of 40 dairy cows which had mastitis but no growth of bacteria from the milk were analyzed and compared to the attributes in 102 cows with only gram-positive and 61 cows with only gram-negative bacteria cultured from the milk. Cows with no bacteria cultured from the milk did not differ significantly from cows with gram-positive bacteria cultured, but 9 of 12 attributes were significantly different between cows with no bacteria cultured and cows with gram-negative bacteria cultured. Discriminant analysis was used to classify cows as members of the gram-positive or gram-negative culture groups. The discriminant equation was then applied to the cows with no bacteria cultured, and 78% of cows with no bacteria cultured were classified as members of the gram-positive group. Most mastitis in cows with no bacteria grown from the milk was probably due to gram-positive bacteria. If antibiotic therapy is used in cows with persistent mastitis and a negative culture in the belief that the culture is a false negative, treatment with antibiotics effective only against gram-negative organisms would not be appropriate. PMID:3300920

  4. Genome-Wide Gene Order Distances Support a United Gram-Positive Bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    House, C. H.; Fitz-Gibbon, S. T.

    2010-04-01

    We have attempted to use a Monte Carlo approach to look for small genome-wide instances of gene order conservation. Our trees show the actinobacteria as a sister group to the bulk of the firmicutes. The results are supportive of a single origin for the gram-positive cell.

  5. Recent Advances in Multi-Drug Resistance (MDR) Efflux Pump Inhibitors of Gram-Positive Bacteria S. aureus

    PubMed Central

    Handzlik, Jadwiga; Matys, Anna; Kieć-Kononowicz, Katarzyna

    2013-01-01

    The paper focuses on recent achievements in the search for new chemical compounds able to inhibit multidrug resistance (MDR) mechanisms in Gram-positive pathogens. An analysis of the results of the search for new efflux pump inhibitors (EPIs) for Gram-positive bacteria, which have been performed over the last decade, indicates that almost all efforts are focused on the NorA (MFS) efflux pump in S. aureus. Considering the chemical structures of the NorA EPIs that have been identified, it can be observed that the most active agents belong to the families of compounds possessing conjugated double bonds, e.g., chalcones, piperine-like compounds, N-cinnamoylphenalkylamides or citral amide derivatives. Indole-, dihydronaphthyl-, 2-chloro-5-bromo-phenyl- or piperidine moieties seem to be profitable for the EPI properties, as well. These results, together with an increasing knowledge about a variety of efflux pumps that are involved in MDR of Gram-positive pathogens underline that further search for new EPIs should pay more attention to develop MDR efflux protein targets, including SMR, MATE, ABC or other members of the MFS family.

  6. Inhibition of various gram-positive and gram- negative bacteria growth on selenium nanoparticle coated paper towels

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Qi; Larese-Casanova, Philip; Webster, Thomas J

    2015-01-01

    There are wide spread bacterial contamination issues on various paper products, such as paper towels hanging in sink splash zones or those used to clean surfaces, filter papers used in water and air purifying systems, and wrappings used in the food industry; such contamination may lead to the potential spread of bacteria and consequent severe health concerns. In this study, selenium nanoparticles were coated on normal paper towel surfaces through a quick precipitation method, introducing antibacterial properties to the paper towels in a healthy way. Their effectiveness at preventing biofilm formation was tested in bacterial assays involving Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Escherichia coli, and Staphylococcus epidermidis. The results showed significant and continuous bacteria inhibition with about a 90% reduction from 24 to 72 hours for gram-positive bacteria including S. aureus and S. epidermidis. The selenium coated paper towels also showed significant inhibition of gram-negative bacteria like P. aeruginosa and E. coli growth at about 57% and 84%, respectively, after 72 hours of treatment. Therefore, this study established a promising selenium-based antibacterial strategy to prevent bacterial growth on paper products, which may lead to the avoidance of bacteria spreading and consequent severe health concerns. PMID:25926733

  7. Inhibition of various gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria growth on selenium nanoparticle coated paper towels.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qi; Larese-Casanova, Philip; Webster, Thomas J

    2015-01-01

    There are wide spread bacterial contamination issues on various paper products, such as paper towels hanging in sink splash zones or those used to clean surfaces, filter papers used in water and air purifying systems, and wrappings used in the food industry; such contamination may lead to the potential spread of bacteria and consequent severe health concerns. In this study, selenium nanoparticles were coated on normal paper towel surfaces through a quick precipitation method, introducing antibacterial properties to the paper towels in a healthy way. Their effectiveness at preventing biofilm formation was tested in bacterial assays involving Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Escherichia coli, and Staphylococcus epidermidis. The results showed significant and continuous bacteria inhibition with about a 90% reduction from 24 to 72 hours for gram-positive bacteria including S. aureus and S. epidermidis. The selenium coated paper towels also showed significant inhibition of gram-negative bacteria like P. aeruginosa and E. coli growth at about 57% and 84%, respectively, after 72 hours of treatment. Therefore, this study established a promising selenium-based antibacterial strategy to prevent bacterial growth on paper products, which may lead to the avoidance of bacteria spreading and consequent severe health concerns. PMID:25926733

  8. Production of a bacteriocin by a poultry derived Campylobacter jejuni isolate with antimicrobial activity against Clostridium perfringens and other Gram positive bacteria.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We have purified a bacteriocin peptide (termed CUV-3), produced by a poultry cecal isolate of Campylobacter jejuni (strain CUV-3) with inhibitory activity against Gram positive bacteria including Clostridium perfringens (38 strains), Staphylococcus aureus, Staphylococcus epidermidis and Listeria mon...

  9. Novel antimicrobial agents against multi-drug-resistant gram-positive bacteria: an overview.

    PubMed

    Giannakaki, Venetia; Miyakis, Spiros

    2012-12-01

    Antimicrobial resistance threatens to compromise the treatment of bacterial infectious diseases. Strains resistant to most (if not all) antibiotics available have emerged. Gram-positive such representatives include strains of Methicillinresistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), Vancomycin-resistant Enterococci (VRE) and highly-resistant to penicillin Streptococcus pneumoniae. Although the phenomenon of antimicrobial drug resistance is expanding, limited number of new antibiotics has been successfully developed in the last few decades. Several novel antimicrobial agents, however, are currently in diverse phases of development and undergoing clinical trials. This review will summarize the main candidates for novel antibacterial agents active against Gram-positive multi-resistant pathogens along with the discussion of some patents relevant to the topic. PMID:23016758

  10. Plants used in Guatemala for the treatment of respiratory diseases. 1. Screening of 68 plants against gram-positive bacteria.

    PubMed

    Caceres, A; Alvarez, A V; Ovando, A E; Samayoa, B E

    1991-02-01

    Respiratory ailments are important causes of morbidity and mortality in developing countries. Ethnobotanical surveys and literature reviews conducted in Guatemala during 1986-88 showed that 234 plants from 75 families, most of them of American origin, have been used for the treatment of respiratory ailments. Three Gram-positive bacteria causing respiratory infections (Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus pneumoniae and Streptococcus pyogenes) were used to screen 68 of the most commonly used plants for activity. Twenty-eight of these (41.2%) inhibited the growth of one or more of the bacteria tested. Staphylococcus aureus was inhibited by 18 of the plant extracts, while 7 extracts were effective against Streptococcus pyogenes. Plants of American origin which exhibited antibacterial activity were: Gnaphalium viscosum, Lippia alba, Lippia dulcis, Physalis philadelphica, Satureja brownei, Solanum nigrescens and Tagetes lucida. These preliminary in vitro results provide scientific basis for the use of these plants against bacterial respiratory infections. PMID:2023428

  11. Structure of PlcR: Insights into virulence regulation and evolution of quorum sensing in Gram-positive bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Declerck, Nathalie; Bouillaut, Laurent; Chaix, Denis; Rugani, Nathalie; Slamti, Leyla; Hoh, François; Lereclus, Didier; Arold, Stefan T.

    2007-01-01

    Gram-positive bacteria use a wealth of extracellular signaling peptides, so-called autoinducers, to regulate gene expression according to population densities. These “quorum sensing” systems control vital processes such as virulence, sporulation, and gene transfer. Using x-ray analysis, we determined the structure of PlcR, the major virulence regulator of the Bacillus cereus group, and obtained mechanistic insights into the effects of autoinducer binding. Our structural and phylogenetic analysis further suggests that all of those quorum sensors that bind directly to their autoinducer peptide derive from a common ancestor and form a single family (the RNPP family, for Rap/NprR/PlcR/PrgX) with conserved features. As a consequence, fundamentally different processes in different bacterial genera appear regulated by essentially the same autoinducer recognition mechanism. Our results shed light on virulence control by PlcR and elucidate origin and evolution of multicellular behavior in bacteria. PMID:17998541

  12. Mechanism of Action of Recombinant Acc-Royalisin from Royal Jelly of Asian Honeybee against Gram-Positive Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Lirong; Liu, Dandan; Li, Meilu; Jin, Feng; Din, Meihui; Parnell, Laurence D.; Lai, Chao-Qiang

    2012-01-01

    The antibacterial activity of royalisin, an antimicrobial peptide from the royal jelly produced by honeybees, has been addressed extensively. However, its mechanism of action remains unclear. In this study, a recombinant royalisin, RAcc-royalisin from the royal jelly of Asian honeybee Apis cerana cerana, was expressed by fusing with glutathione S-transferase (GST) in Escherichia coli BL21, isolated and purified. The agar dilution assays with inhibition zone showed that RAcc-royalisin, similar to nisin, inhibits the growth of Gram-positive bacteria. The antibacterial activity of RAcc-royalisin was associated with its concentration, and was weakened by heat treatment ranging from 55°C to 85°C for 15 min. Both RAcc-royalisin and nisin exhibited the minimum inhibitory concentrations (MIC) of 62.5 µg/ml, 125 µg/ml, and 250 µg/ml against Gram-positive bacterial strains, Bacillus subtilis and Micrococcus flavus and Staphyloccocus aureus in the microplate assay, respectively. However, RAcc-royalisin did not show antimicrobial activity against tested Gram-negative bacterial and fungal strains. The antibacterial activity of RAcc-royalisin agrees well with the decrease in bacterial cell hydrophobicity, the leakage of 260-nm absorbing materials, and the observation by transmission electron microscopy, all indicating that RAcc-royalisin induced the disruption and dysfunction of cell walls and membranes. This is the first report detailing the antibacterial mechanism of royalisin against Gram-positive bacteria, and provides insight into the application of recombinant royalisin in food and pharmaceutical industries as an antimicrobial agent. PMID:23056609

  13. Surface Proteins of Gram-Positive Bacteria and Mechanisms of Their Targeting to the Cell Wall Envelope

    PubMed Central

    Navarre, William Wiley; Schneewind, Olaf

    1999-01-01

    The cell wall envelope of gram-positive bacteria is a macromolecular, exoskeletal organelle that is assembled and turned over at designated sites. The cell wall also functions as a surface organelle that allows gram-positive pathogens to interact with their environment, in particular the tissues of the infected host. All of these functions require that surface proteins and enzymes be properly targeted to the cell wall envelope. Two basic mechanisms, cell wall sorting and targeting, have been identified. Cell well sorting is the covalent attachment of surface proteins to the peptidoglycan via a C-terminal sorting signal that contains a consensus LPXTG sequence. More than 100 proteins that possess cell wall-sorting signals, including the M proteins of Streptococcus pyogenes, protein A of Staphylococcus aureus, and several internalins of Listeria monocytogenes, have been identified. Cell wall targeting involves the noncovalent attachment of proteins to the cell surface via specialized binding domains. Several of these wall-binding domains appear to interact with secondary wall polymers that are associated with the peptidoglycan, for example teichoic acids and polysaccharides. Proteins that are targeted to the cell surface include muralytic enzymes such as autolysins, lysostaphin, and phage lytic enzymes. Other examples for targeted proteins are the surface S-layer proteins of bacilli and clostridia, as well as virulence factors required for the pathogenesis of L. monocytogenes (internalin B) and Streptococcus pneumoniae (PspA) infections. In this review we describe the mechanisms for both sorting and targeting of proteins to the envelope of gram-positive bacteria and review the functions of known surface proteins. PMID:10066836

  14. Performances of VITEK 2 Colorimetric Cards for Identification of Gram-Positive and Gram-Negative Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Wallet, Frédéric; Loïez, Caroline; Renaux, Emilie; Lemaitre, Nadine; Courcol, René J.

    2005-01-01

    Thepurpose of this study was to evaluate the new VITEK 2 identification cards that use colorimetric reading to identify gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria (GP and GN cards, respectively) in comparison to fluorimetric cards (ID-GPC and ID-GNB, respectively). A total of 580 clinical isolates and stock collection strains belonging to 116 taxa were included in the study. Of the 249 gram-positive strains tested with both the ID-GPC and GP cards, 218 (87.5%) and 235 (94.4%) strains were correctly identified (to the genus and species level), respectively. Of the 331 gram-negative strains tested with the ID-GNB and GN cards, 295 (89.1%) and 321 (97%) strains were correctly identified, respectively. Another focus of the study was to apply the percentages of correct identifications obtained in this study to the list of bacteria isolated in our laboratory (32,739 isolates) in the year 2004. We obtained 97.9% correct identifications with the colorimetric cards and 93.9% with fluorescent cards. PMID:16145083

  15. A super-family of transcriptional activators regulates bacteriophage packaging and lysis in Gram-positive bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Quiles-Puchalt, Nuria; Tormo-Ms, Mara ngeles; Campoy, Susana; Toledo-Arana, Alejandro; Monedero, Vicente; Lasa, igo; Novick, Richard P.; Christie, Gail E.; Penads, Jos R.

    2013-01-01

    The propagation of bacteriophages and other mobile genetic elements requires exploitation of the phage mechanisms involved in virion assembly and DNA packaging. Here, we identified and characterized four different families of phage-encoded proteins that function as activators required for transcription of the late operons (morphogenetic and lysis genes) in a large group of phages infecting Gram-positive bacteria. These regulators constitute a super-family of proteins, here named late transcriptional regulators (Ltr), which share common structural, biochemical and functional characteristics and are unique to this group of phages. They are all small basic proteins, encoded by genes present at the end of the early gene cluster in their respective phage genomes and expressed under cI repressor control. To control expression of the late operon, the Ltr proteins bind to a DNA repeat region situated upstream of the terS gene, activating its transcription. This involves the C-terminal part of the Ltr proteins, which control specificity for the DNA repeat region. Finally, we show that the Ltr proteins are the only phage-encoded proteins required for the activation of the packaging and lysis modules. In summary, we provide evidence that phage packaging and lysis is a conserved mechanism in Siphoviridae infecting a wide variety of Gram-positive bacteria. PMID:23771138

  16. A super-family of transcriptional activators regulates bacteriophage packaging and lysis in Gram-positive bacteria.

    PubMed

    Quiles-Puchalt, Nuria; Tormo-Ms, Mara ngeles; Campoy, Susana; Toledo-Arana, Alejandro; Monedero, Vicente; Lasa, Iigo; Novick, Richard P; Christie, Gail E; Penads, Jos R

    2013-08-01

    The propagation of bacteriophages and other mobile genetic elements requires exploitation of the phage mechanisms involved in virion assembly and DNA packaging. Here, we identified and characterized four different families of phage-encoded proteins that function as activators required for transcription of the late operons (morphogenetic and lysis genes) in a large group of phages infecting Gram-positive bacteria. These regulators constitute a super-family of proteins, here named late transcriptional regulators (Ltr), which share common structural, biochemical and functional characteristics and are unique to this group of phages. They are all small basic proteins, encoded by genes present at the end of the early gene cluster in their respective phage genomes and expressed under cI repressor control. To control expression of the late operon, the Ltr proteins bind to a DNA repeat region situated upstream of the terS gene, activating its transcription. This involves the C-terminal part of the Ltr proteins, which control specificity for the DNA repeat region. Finally, we show that the Ltr proteins are the only phage-encoded proteins required for the activation of the packaging and lysis modules. In summary, we provide evidence that phage packaging and lysis is a conserved mechanism in Siphoviridae infecting a wide variety of Gram-positive bacteria. PMID:23771138

  17. Desulfotomaculum spp. and related gram-positive sulfate-reducing bacteria in deep subsurface environments

    PubMed Central

    Aüllo, Thomas; Ranchou-Peyruse, Anthony; Ollivier, Bernard; Magot, Michel

    2013-01-01

    Gram-positive spore-forming sulfate reducers and particularly members of the genus Desulfotomaculum are commonly found in the subsurface biosphere by culture based and molecular approaches. Due to their metabolic versatility and their ability to persist as endospores. Desulfotomaculum spp. are well-adapted for colonizing environments through a slow sedimentation process. Because of their ability to grow autotrophically (H2/CO2) and produce sulfide or acetate, these microorganisms may play key roles in deep lithoautotrophic microbial communities. Available data about Desulfotomaculum spp. and related species from studies carried out from deep freshwater lakes, marine sediments, oligotrophic and organic rich deep geological settings are discussed in this review. PMID:24348471

  18. Invariant natural killer T cells recognize glycolipids from pathogenic Gram-positive bacteria.

    PubMed

    Kinjo, Yuki; Illarionov, Petr; Vela, Jos Luis; Pei, Bo; Girardi, Enrico; Li, Xiangming; Li, Yali; Imamura, Masakazu; Kaneko, Yukihiro; Okawara, Akiko; Miyazaki, Yoshitsugu; Gmez-Velasco, Anaximandro; Rogers, Paul; Dahesh, Samira; Uchiyama, Satoshi; Khurana, Archana; Kawahara, Kazuyoshi; Yesilkaya, Hasan; Andrew, Peter W; Wong, Chi-Huey; Kawakami, Kazuyoshi; Nizet, Victor; Besra, Gurdyal S; Tsuji, Moriya; Zajonc, Dirk M; Kronenberg, Mitchell

    2011-10-01

    Natural killer T cells (NKT cells) recognize glycolipid antigens presented by CD1d. These cells express an evolutionarily conserved, invariant T cell antigen receptor (TCR), but the forces that drive TCR conservation have remained uncertain. Here we show that NKT cells recognized diacylglycerol-containing glycolipids from Streptococcus pneumoniae, the leading cause of community-acquired pneumonia, and group B Streptococcus, which causes neonatal sepsis and meningitis. Furthermore, CD1d-dependent responses by NKT cells were required for activation and host protection. The glycolipid response was dependent on vaccenic acid, which is present in low concentrations in mammalian cells. Our results show how microbial lipids position the sugar for recognition by the invariant TCR and, most notably, extend the range of microbes recognized by this conserved TCR to several clinically important bacteria. PMID:21892173

  19. Invariant NKT cells recognize glycolipids from pathogenic Gram-positive bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Kinjo, Yuki; Illarionov, Petr; Vela, Jos Luis; Pei, Bo; Girardi, Enrico; Li, Xiangming; Li, Yali; Imamura, Masakazu; Kaneko, Yukihiro; Okawara, Akiko; Miyazaki, Yoshitsugu; Gmez-Velasco, Anaximandro; Rogers, Paul; Dahesh, Samira; Uchiyama, Satoshi; Khurana, Archana; Kawahara, Kazuyoshi; Yesilkaya, Hasan; Andrew, Peter W.; Wong, Chi-Huey; Kawakami, Kazuyoshi; Nizet, Victor; Besra, Gurdyal S.; Tsuji, Moriya; Zajonc, Dirk M.; Kronenberg, Mitchell

    2011-01-01

    Natural killer T (NKT) cells recognize glycolipid antigens presented by CD1d. These cells express an evolutionarily conserved, invariant T cell receptor (TCR), but the forces driving TCR conservation have remained uncertain. Here we show that NKT cells recognize diacylglycerol-containing glycolipids from Streptococcus pneumoniae, the leading cause of community-acquired pneumonia, and group B Streptococcus, which causes neonatal sepsis and meningitis. Furthermore, CD1d-dependent responses by NKT cells are required for activation and host protection. The glycolipid response was dependent on vaccenic acid, which is found at a low level in mammalian cells. Our results show how microbial lipids position the sugar for recognition by the invariant TCR, and most important, they extend the range of microbes recognized by this conserved TCR to several clinically important bacteria. PMID:21892173

  20. Lantibiotics: biosynthesis and biological activities of uniquely modified peptides from gram-positive bacteria.

    PubMed

    Sahl, H G; Bierbaum, G

    1998-01-01

    A plethora of novel gene-encoded antimicrobial peptides from animals, plants and bacteria has been described during the last decade. Many of the bacterial peptides possess modified building blocks such as thioethers and thiazoles or unsaturated and stereoinverted amino acids, which are unique among ribosomally made peptides. Genetic and biochemical studies of many of these peptides, mostly the so-called lantibiotics, have revealed the degree to which cells are capable of transforming peptides by posttranslational modification. The biosynthesis follows a general scheme: Precursor peptides are first modified and then proteolytically activated; the latter may occur prior to, concomitantly with or after export from the cell. The genes for the biosynthetic machinery are organized in clusters and include information for the antibiotic prepeptide, the modification enzymes and accessory functions such as dedicated proteases and ABC transporters as well as immunity factors and regulatory proteins. These fundamental aspects are discussed along with the biotechnological potential of the peptides and of the biosynthesis enzymes, which could be used for construction of novel, peptide-based biomedical effector molecules. PMID:9891793

  1. Surface multiheme c-type cytochromes from Thermincola potens and implications for respiratory metal reduction by Gram-positive bacteria.

    PubMed

    Carlson, Hans K; Iavarone, Anthony T; Gorur, Amita; Yeo, Boon Siang; Tran, Rosalie; Melnyk, Ryan A; Mathies, Richard A; Auer, Manfred; Coates, John D

    2012-01-31

    Almost nothing is known about the mechanisms of dissimilatory metal reduction by Gram-positive bacteria, although they may be the dominant species in some environments. Thermincola potens strain JR was isolated from the anode of a microbial fuel cell inoculated with anaerobic digester sludge and operated at 55 C. Preliminary characterization revealed that T. potens coupled acetate oxidation to the reduction of hydrous ferric oxides (HFO) or anthraquinone-2,6-disulfonate (AQDS), an analog of the redox active components of humic substances. The genome of T. potens was recently sequenced, and the abundance of multiheme c-type cytochromes (MHCs) is unusual for a Gram-positive bacterium. We present evidence from trypsin-shaving LC-MS/MS experiments and surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) that indicates the expression of a number of MHCs during T. potens growth on either HFO or AQDS, and that several MHCs are localized to the cell wall or cell surface. Furthermore, one of the MHCs can be extracted from cells with low pH or denaturants, suggesting a loose association with the cell wall or cell surface. Electron microscopy does not reveal an S-layer, and the precipitation of silver metal on the cell surface is inhibited by cyanide, supporting the involvement of surface-localized redox-active heme proteins in dissimilatory metal reduction. These results provide unique direct evidence for cell wall-associated cytochromes and support MHC involvement in conducting electrons across the cell envelope of a Gram-positive bacterium. PMID:22307634

  2. Surface multiheme c-type cytochromes from Thermincola potens: Implications for dissimilatory metal reduction by Gram-positive bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlson, H. K.; Iavarone, A. T.; Gorur, A.; Yeo, B. S.; Tran, R.; Melnyk, R. A.; Mathies, R. A.; Auer, M.; Coates, J. D.

    2011-12-01

    Almost nothing is known about the mechanisms of dissimilatory metal reduction by Gram-positive bacteria, although they have been shown to be the dominant species in some environments. Thermincola potens strain JR was isolated from the anode of a microbial fuel cell inoculated with anaerobic digester sludge and operated at 55 °C. Preliminary characterization revealed that T. potens coupled acetate oxidation to the reduction of hydrous ferric oxides (HFO) or the humic substances analog, anthraquinone-2,6-disulfonate (AQDS). The genome of T. potens was recently sequenced, and the abundance of multiheme c-type cytochromes (MHCs) is unusual for a Gram-positive bacterium. We present evidence from trypsin shaving LC-MS/MS experiments and surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) that indicates the expression of a number of MHCs during T. potens growth on either HFO or AQDS and that several MHCs are localized to the cell wall or cell surface of T. potens. Furthermore, one of the MHCs can be extracted from cells with low pH or denaturants suggesting a loose association with the cell wall or cell surface. Electron microscopy does not reveal an S-layer, and the precipitation of silver metal on the cell surface is inhibited by cyanide, supporting the involvement of surface-localized redox-active heme proteins in dissimilatory metal reduction. These results are the first direct evidence for cell-wall associated cytochromes and MHC involvement in conducting electrons across the cell envelope of a Gram-positive bacterium.

  3. In vitro pyrogenicity of Gram-positive bacteria--validation of the kit using fresh human whole blood.

    PubMed

    Franois, C; Neveu, J; Sauvaire, D; Bonnet, P A; Tissier, M H

    2006-08-01

    The two conventional tests to detect pyrogen contaminants in injectable pharmaceutical drugs are the Rabbit Model and the Limulus amoebocyte lysate (LAL) test. To replace these models, a new system on human whole blood is developed, using the release of Interleukin 1 beta (IL1beta) after cell stimulation with gram-positive and gram negative pyrogens. The purpose of this study was to validate the ENDOSAFE-IPT kit using the quantitative ELISA enzyme immunoassay. The assay is divided into two parts: blood cell stimulation with Lipopolysaccharides (LPS) and Lipoteichoic acid (LTA) and quantitation of IL1beta using the ELISA method. In each assay, blood from a particular donor were stimulated with the Endotoxin Standard, and with a sample of a commercial antibiotic preparation (Clavulanic acid/Ticarcillin) spiked with the Endotoxin Standard. LTA from Bacillus subtilis and a sample of diphtheria toxoid were also used. At least, six assays were tested. A polynomial regression of the Endotoxin Standard series showed a correlation coefficient greater than 0.99. The spiked antibiotic sample recoveries were 50-121%. The LTA quantitation limit was 0.1 microg/ml and the range of detection of pyrogens from Gram positive diphtheria toxoid was 0.77 to 2.5 EEU/ml. The IL1beta production varied markedly between donors. However the coefficient of variation was less than 20 % intra-assay. In conclusion, the ENDOSAFE-IPT kit can be used for the quantitative and qualitative detection of pyrogens from Gram negative and Gram positive bacteria. PMID:17694641

  4. Antibacterial properties of biosurfactants against selected Gram-positive and -negative bacteria.

    PubMed

    Díaz De Rienzo, Mayri A; Stevenson, Paul; Marchant, Roger; Banat, Ibrahim M

    2016-01-01

    The antibacterial properties and ability to disrupt biofilms of biosurfactants (rhamnolipids, sophorolipids) and sodium dodecyl sulphate (SDS) in the presence and absence of selected organic acids were investigated. Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 was inhibited by sophorolipids and SDS at concentrations >5% v/v, and the growth of Escherichia coli NCTC 10418 was also inhibited by sophorolipids and SDS at concentrations >5% and 0.1% v/v, respectively. Bacillus subtilis NCTC 10400 was inhibited by rhamnolipids, sophorolipids and SDS at concentrations >0.5% v/v of all three; the same effect was observed with Staphylococcus aureus ATCC 9144. The ability to attach to surfaces and biofilm formation of P. aeruginosa PAO1, E. coli NCTC 10418 and B. subtilis NCTC 10400 was inhibited by sophorolipids (1% v/v) in the presence of caprylic acid (0.8% v/v). In the case of S. aureus ATCC 9144, the best results were obtained using caprylic acid on its own. It was concluded that sophorolipids are promising compounds for the inhibition/disruption of biofilms formed by Gram-positive and Gram-negative microorganisms and this activity can be enhanced by the presence of booster compounds such as caprylic acid. PMID:26598715

  5. Production of acylated homoserine lactone by gram-positive bacteria isolated from marine water.

    PubMed

    Biswa, Pramal; Doble, Mukesh

    2013-06-01

    Acylated homoserine lactone (AHL)-based quorum sensing (QS) has been reported to be present only in Gram-negative microorganisms. Isolation of a novel Gram-positive microorganism from sea water, capable of producing AHL, is reported here. The isolate (GenBank: JF915892, designated as MPO) belonging to the Exiguobacterium genera is capable of inducing the AHL bioreporters, namely Chromobacterium violaceum CV026, Agrobacterium tumefaceins A136, and E. coli JM 109(psb1075). This inducer is characterized as C3-oxo-octanoyl homoserine lactone (OOHL), and its production reaches a maximum of 15.6 ?g L(-1), during the stationary growth phase of the organism. MPO extract when exogenously added inhibits the formation of biofilm for the same organism and lowers the extracellular polymeric substances, indicating an AHL-associated phenotypic trait. The isolated sequence of a probable LuxR homolog from MPO (designated as ExgR) shows similar functional domains and contains conserved residues in LuxR from other known bacterial QS LuxR regulators. Also present immediately downstream to ExgR was found a sequence showing homology to known LuxI synthase of Pseudomonas putida. qPCR analysis suggests an increment in exgR mRNA on addition of AHL, further proving the role of ExgR as a QS regulator. PMID:23489290

  6. Antibacterial activity of oregano (Origanum vulgare Linn.) against gram positive bacteria.

    PubMed

    Saeed, Sabahat; Tariq, Perween

    2009-10-01

    The present investigation is focused on antibacterial potential of infusion, decoction and essential oil of oregano (Origanum vulgare) against 111 Gram-positive bacterial isolates belonging to 23 different species related to 3 genera. Infusion and essential oil exhibited antibacterial activity against Staphylococcus saprophyticus, S. aureus, Micrococcus roseus, M. kristinae, M. nishinomiyaensis, M. lylae, M. luteus, M. sedentarius, M. varians, Bacillus megaterium, B. thuringiensis, B. alvei, B. circulans, B. brevis, B. coagulans, B. pumilus, B. laterosporus, B. polymyxa, B. macerans, B. subtilis, B. firmus, B. cereus and B. lichiniformis. The infusion exhibited maximum activity against B. laterosporus (17.5 mm mean zone of inhibition+/-1.5 Standard deviation) followed by B. polymyxa (17.0 mm+/-2.0 SD) and essential oil of oregano exhibited maximum activity against S. saprophyticus (16.8 mm+/-1.8 SD) followed by B. circulans (14.5 mm+/-0.5 SD). While all these tested isolates were found resistant to decoction of oregano. PMID:19783523

  7. Tryptophan-containing lipopeptide antibiotics derived from polymyxin B with activity against Gram positive and Gram negative bacteria.

    PubMed

    Grau-Campistany, Ariadna; Manresa, Ángeles; Pujol, Montserrat; Rabanal, Francesc; Cajal, Yolanda

    2016-02-01

    Resistance to all known antibiotics is a growing concern worldwide, and has renewed the interest in antimicrobial peptides, a structurally diverse class of amphipathic molecules that essentially act on the bacterial membrane. Propelled by the antimicrobial potential of this compound class, we have designed three new lipopeptides derived from polymyxin B, sp-34, sp-96 and sp-100, with potent antimicrobial activity against both Gram positive and Gram negative bacteria. The three peptides bind with high affinity to lipopolysaccharide as demonstrated by monolayer penetration and dansyl-displacement. The interaction with the cytoplasmic membrane has been elucidated by biophysical experiments with model membranes of POPG or POPE/POPG (6:4), mimicking the Gram positive and Gram negative bacterial membrane. Trp-based fluorescence experiments including steady-state, quenching, anisotropy and FRET, reveal selectivity for anionic phospholipids and deep insertion into the membrane. All three lipopeptides induce membrane fusion and leakage from anionic vesicles, a process that is favored by the presence of POPE. The molecules bind to zwitterionic POPC vesicles, a model of the eukaryotic membrane, but in a different way, with lower affinity, less penetration into the bilayer and no fusion or permeabilization of the membrane. Results in model membranes are consistent with flow cytometry experiments in Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus using a membrane potential sensitive dye (bis-oxonol) and a nucleic acid dye (propidium iodide), suggesting that the mechanism of action is based on membrane binding and collapse of membrane integrity by depolarization and permeabilization. PMID:26607008

  8. Antibacterial activity of sphingoid bases and fatty acids against Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Carol L; Drake, David R; Dawson, Deborah V; Blanchette, Derek R; Brogden, Kim A; Wertz, Philip W

    2012-03-01

    There is growing evidence that the role of lipids in innate immunity is more important than previously realized. How lipids interact with bacteria to achieve a level of protection, however, is still poorly understood. To begin to address the mechanisms of antibacterial activity, we determined MICs and minimum bactericidal concentrations (MBCs) of lipids common to the skin and oral cavity--the sphingoid bases D-sphingosine, phytosphingosine, and dihydrosphingosine and the fatty acids sapienic acid and lauric acid--against four Gram-negative bacteria and seven Gram-positive bacteria. Exact Kruskal-Wallis tests of these values showed differences among lipid treatments (P < 0.0001) for each bacterial species except Serratia marcescens and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. D-sphingosine (MBC range, 0.3 to 19.6 μg/ml), dihydrosphingosine (MBC range, 0.6 to 39.1 μg/ml), and phytosphingosine (MBC range, 3.3 to 62.5 μg/ml) were active against all bacteria except S. marcescens and P. aeruginosa (MBC > 500 μg/ml). Sapienic acid (MBC range, 31.3 to 375.0 μg/ml) was active against Streptococcus sanguinis, Streptococcus mitis, and Fusobacterium nucleatum but not active against Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus, S. marcescens, P. aeruginosa, Corynebacterium bovis, Corynebacterium striatum, and Corynebacterium jeikeium (MBC > 500 μg/ml). Lauric acid (MBC range, 6.8 to 375.0 μg/ml) was active against all bacteria except E. coli, S. marcescens, and P. aeruginosa (MBC > 500 μg/ml). Complete killing was achieved as early as 0.5 h for some lipids but took as long as 24 h for others. Hence, sphingoid bases and fatty acids have different antibacterial activities and may have potential for prophylactic or therapeutic intervention in infection. PMID:22155833

  9. Amplifiable DNA from Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria by a low strength pulsed electric field method

    PubMed Central

    Vitzthum, Frank; Geiger, Georg; Bisswanger, Hans; Elkine, Bentsian; Brunner, Herwig; Bernhagen, Jürgen

    2000-01-01

    An efficient electric field-based procedure for cell disruption and DNA isolation is described. Isoosmotic suspensions of Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria were treated with pulsed electric fields of <60 V/cm. Pulses had an exponential decay waveform with a time constant of 3.4 µs. DNA yield was linearly dependent on time or pulse number, with several thousand pulses needed. Electrochemical side-effects and electrophoresis were minimal. The lysates contained non-fragmented DNA which was readily amplifiable by PCR. As the method was not limited to samples of high specific resistance, it should be applicable to physiological fluids and be useful for genomic and DNA diagnostic applications. PMID:10734214

  10. Antimicrobial Growth Promoters Used in Animal Feed: Effects of Less Well Known Antibiotics on Gram-Positive Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Butaye, Patrick; Devriese, Luc A.; Haesebrouck, Freddy

    2003-01-01

    There are not many data available on antibiotics used solely in animals and almost exclusively for growth promotion. These products include bambermycin, avilamycin, efrotomycin, and the ionophore antibiotics (monensin, salinomycin, narasin, and lasalocid). Information is also scarce for bacitracin used only marginally in human and veterinary medicine and for streptogramin antibiotics. The mechanisms of action of and resistance mechanisms against these antibiotics are described. Special emphasis is given to the prevalence of resistance among gram-positive bacteria isolated from animals and humans. Since no susceptibility breakpoints are available for most of the antibiotics discussed, an alternative approach to the interpretation of MICs is presented. Also, some pharmacokinetic data and information on the influence of these products on the intestinal flora are presented. PMID:12692092

  11. Nanoemulsion Therapy for Burn Wounds Is Effective as a Topical Antimicrobial Against Gram-Negative and Gram-Positive Bacteria.

    PubMed

    Dolgachev, Vladislav A; Ciotti, Susan M; Eisma, Rone; Gracon, Stephen; Wilkinson, J Erby; Baker, James R; Hemmila, Mark R

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the antimicrobial efficacy of two different nanoemulsion (NE) formulations against Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria in an in vivo rodent scald burn model. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were anesthetized and received a partial-thickness scald burn. Eight hours after burn injury, the wound was inoculated with 1 × 10 colony-forming units of Pseudomonas aeruginosa or Staphylococcus aureus. Treatment groups consisted of two different NE formulations (NB-201 and NB-402), NE vehicle, or saline. Topical application of the treatment was performed at 16 and 24 hours after burn injury. Animals were killed 32 hours after burn injury, and skin samples were obtained for quantitative wound culture and determination of dermal inflammation markers. In a separate set of experiments, burn wound progression was measured histologically after 72 hours of treatment. Both NE formulations (NB-201 and NB-402) significantly reduced burn wound infections with either P. aeruginosa or S. aureus and decreased median bacterial counts at least three logs when compared with animals with saline applications (p < .0001). NB-201 and NB-402 also decreased dermal neutrophil recruitment and sequestration into the wound as measured by myeloperoxidase (MPO) assay and histopathology (p < .05). In addition, there was a decrease in the proinflammatory dermal cytokines (interleukin 1-beta [IL-1β], IL-6, and tumor necrosis factor alpha [TNF-α]) and the neutrophil chemoattractants CXCL1 and CXCL2. Using histologic examination, it was found that both NB-201 and NB-402 appeared to suppress burn wound progression 72 hours after injury. Topically applied NB-201 and NB-402 are effective in decreasing Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria growth in burn wounds, reducing inflammation, and abrogating burn wound progression. PMID:26182074

  12. Genome-wide gene order distances support clustering the gram-positive bacteria

    PubMed Central

    House, Christopher H.; Pellegrini, Matteo; Fitz-Gibbon, Sorel T.

    2015-01-01

    Initially using 143 genomes, we developed a method for calculating the pair-wise distance between prokaryotic genomes using a Monte Carlo method to estimate the conservation of gene order. The method was based on repeatedly selecting five or six non-adjacent random orthologs from each of two genomes and determining if the chosen orthologs were in the same order. The raw distances were then corrected for gene order convergence using an adaptation of the Jukes-Cantor model, as well as using the common distance correction D′ = −ln(1-D). First, we compared the distances found via the order of six orthologs to distances found based on ortholog gene content and small subunit rRNA sequences. The Jukes-Cantor gene order distances are reasonably well correlated with the divergence of rRNA (R2 = 0.24), especially at rRNA Jukes-Cantor distances of less than 0.2 (R2 = 0.52). Gene content is only weakly correlated with rRNA divergence (R2 = 0.04) over all distances, however, it is especially strongly correlated at rRNA Jukes-Cantor distances of less than 0.1 (R2 = 0.67). This initial work suggests that gene order may be useful in conjunction with other methods to help understand the relatedness of genomes. Using the gene order distances in 143 genomes, the relations of prokaryotes were studied using neighbor joining and agreement subtrees. We then repeated our study of the relations of prokaryotes using gene order in 172 complete genomes better representing a wider-diversity of prokaryotes. Consistently, our trees show the Actinobacteria as a sister group to the bulk of the Firmicutes. In fact, the robustness of gene order support was found to be considerably greater for uniting these two phyla than for uniting any of the proteobacterial classes together. The results are supportive of the idea that Actinobacteria and Firmicutes are closely related, which in turn implies a single origin for the gram-positive cell. PMID:25653643

  13. Enhanced antibacterial and anti-biofilm activities of silver nanoparticles against Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gurunathan, Sangiliyandi; Han, Jae Woong; Kwon, Deug-Nam; Kim, Jin-Hoi

    2014-07-01

    Silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) have been used as antibacterial, antifungal, antiviral, anti-inflammtory, and antiangiogenic due to its unique properties such as physical, chemical, and biological properties. The present study was aimed to investigate antibacterial and anti-biofilm activities of silver nanoparticles alone and in combination with conventional antibiotics against various human pathogenic bacteria. Here, we show that a simple, reliable, cost effective and green method for the synthesis of AgNPs by treating silver ions with leaf extract of Allophylus cobbe. The A. cobbe-mediated synthesis of AgNPs (AgNPs) was characterized by ultraviolet-visible absorption spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), dynamic light scattering (DLS), and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Furthermore, the antibacterial and anti-biofilm activity of antibiotics or AgNPs, or combinations of AgNPs with an antibiotic was evaluated using a series of assays: such as in vitro killing assay, disc diffusion assay, biofilm inhibition, and reactive oxygen species generation in Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Shigella flexneri, Staphylococcus aureus, and Streptococcus pneumonia. The results suggest that, in combination with antibiotics, there were significant antimicrobial and anti-biofilm effects at lowest concentration of AgNPs using a novel plant extract of A. cobbe, otherwise sublethal concentrations of the antibiotics. The significant enhancing effects were observed for ampicillin and vancomycin against Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria, respectively. These data suggest that combining antibiotics and biogenic AgNPs can be used therapeutically for the treatment of infectious diseases caused by bacteria. This study presented evidence of antibacterial and anti-biofilm effects of A. cobbe-mediated synthesis of AgNPs and their enhanced capacity against various human pathogenic bacteria. These results suggest that AgNPs could be used as an adjuvant for the treatment of infectious diseases.

  14. Enhanced antibacterial and anti-biofilm activities of silver nanoparticles against Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) have been used as antibacterial, antifungal, antiviral, anti-inflammtory, and antiangiogenic due to its unique properties such as physical, chemical, and biological properties. The present study was aimed to investigate antibacterial and anti-biofilm activities of silver nanoparticles alone and in combination with conventional antibiotics against various human pathogenic bacteria. Here, we show that a simple, reliable, cost effective and green method for the synthesis of AgNPs by treating silver ions with leaf extract of Allophylus cobbe. The A. cobbe-mediated synthesis of AgNPs (AgNPs) was characterized by ultraviolet-visible absorption spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), dynamic light scattering (DLS), and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Furthermore, the antibacterial and anti-biofilm activity of antibiotics or AgNPs, or combinations of AgNPs with an antibiotic was evaluated using a series of assays: such as in vitro killing assay, disc diffusion assay, biofilm inhibition, and reactive oxygen species generation in Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Shigella flexneri, Staphylococcus aureus, and Streptococcus pneumonia. The results suggest that, in combination with antibiotics, there were significant antimicrobial and anti-biofilm effects at lowest concentration of AgNPs using a novel plant extract of A. cobbe, otherwise sublethal concentrations of the antibiotics. The significant enhancing effects were observed for ampicillin and vancomycin against Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria, respectively. These data suggest that combining antibiotics and biogenic AgNPs can be used therapeutically for the treatment of infectious diseases caused by bacteria. This study presented evidence of antibacterial and anti-biofilm effects of A. cobbe-mediated synthesis of AgNPs and their enhanced capacity against various human pathogenic bacteria. These results suggest that AgNPs could be used as an adjuvant for the treatment of infectious diseases. PMID:25136281

  15. Green Fluorescent Protein-Labeled Monitoring Tool To Quantify Conjugative Plasmid Transfer between Gram-Positive and Gram-Negative Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Arends, Karsten; Schiwon, Katarzyna; Sakinc, Türkan; Hübner, Johannes

    2012-01-01

    On the basis of pIP501, a green fluorescent protein (GFP)-tagged monitoring tool was constructed for quantifying plasmid mobilization among Gram-positive bacteria and between Gram-positive Enterococcus faecalis and Gram-negative Escherichia coli. Furthermore, retromobilization of the GFP-tagged monitoring tool was shown from E. faecalis OG1X into the clinical isolate E. faecalis T9. PMID:22138997

  16. Mobilizable Rolling-Circle Replicating Plasmids from Gram-Positive Bacteria: A Low-Cost Conjugative Transfer

    PubMed Central

    Fernández-López, Cris; Bravo, Alicia; Ruiz-Cruz, Sofía; Solano-Collado, Virtu; Garsin, Danielle A.; Lorenzo-Díaz, Fabián; Espinosa, Manuel

    2014-01-01

    Chapter summary Conjugation is a key mechanism for horizontal gene transfer in bacteria. Some plasmids are not self-transmissible but can be mobilized by functions encoded in trans provided by other auxiliary conjugative elements. Although the transfer efficiency of mobilizable plasmids is usually lower than that of conjugative elements, mobilizable plasmidsare more frequently found in nature. In this sense, replication and mobilization can be considered as important mechanisms influencing plasmid promiscuity. Here we review the present available information on two families of small mobilizable plasmids from Gram-positive bacteria that replicate via the rolling-circle mechanism. One of these families, represented by the streptococcal plasmid pMV158, is an interesting model since it contains a specific mobilization module (MOBV) that is widely distributed among mobilizable plasmids. We discuss a mechanism in which the promiscuity of the pMV158 replicon is based on the presence of two origins of lagging strand synthesis. The current strategies to assess plasmid transfer efficiency as well as to inhibit conjugative plasmid transfer are presented. Some applications of these plasmids as biotechnological tools are also reviewed. PMID:25606350

  17. Antibacterial Activity of Stenotrophomonas maltophilia Endolysin P28 against both Gram-positive and Gram-negative Bacteria.

    PubMed

    Dong, Hongling; Zhu, Chaoyang; Chen, Jingyi; Ye, Xing; Huang, Yu-Ping

    2015-01-01

    Maltocin P28 is a phage-tail like bacteriocin produced by Stenotrophomonas maltophilia P28. The ORF8 of maltocin P28 gene cluster is predicted to encode an endolysin and we name it endolysin P28. Sequence analysis revealed that it contains the lysozyme_like superfamily conserved domain. Endolysin P28 has the four consensus motifs as that of Escherichia coli phage lambda gpR. In this study, endolysin P28 was expressed in E. coli BL21 (DE3) and purified with a C-terminal oligo-histidine tag. The antibacterial activity of endolysin P28 increased as the temperature rose from 25 to 45C. Thermostability assays showed that endolysin P28 was stable up to 50C, while its residual activity was reduced by 55% after treatment at 70C for 30 min. Acidity and high salinity could enhance its antibacterial activity. Endolysin P28 exhibited a broad antibacterial activity against 14 out of 16 tested Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria besides S. maltophilia. Moreover, it could effectively lyse intact Gram-negative bacteria in the absence of ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid as an outer membrane permeabilizer. Therefore, the characteristics of endolysin P28 make it a potential therapeutic agent against multi-drug-resistant pathogens. PMID:26635765

  18. Antibacterial Activity of Stenotrophomonas maltophilia Endolysin P28 against both Gram-positive and Gram-negative Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Hongling; Zhu, Chaoyang; Chen, Jingyi; Ye, Xing; Huang, Yu-Ping

    2015-01-01

    Maltocin P28 is a phage-tail like bacteriocin produced by Stenotrophomonas maltophilia P28. The ORF8 of maltocin P28 gene cluster is predicted to encode an endolysin and we name it endolysin P28. Sequence analysis revealed that it contains the lysozyme_like superfamily conserved domain. Endolysin P28 has the four consensus motifs as that of Escherichia coli phage lambda gpR. In this study, endolysin P28 was expressed in E. coli BL21 (DE3) and purified with a C-terminal oligo-histidine tag. The antibacterial activity of endolysin P28 increased as the temperature rose from 25 to 45°C. Thermostability assays showed that endolysin P28 was stable up to 50°C, while its residual activity was reduced by 55% after treatment at 70°C for 30 min. Acidity and high salinity could enhance its antibacterial activity. Endolysin P28 exhibited a broad antibacterial activity against 14 out of 16 tested Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria besides S. maltophilia. Moreover, it could effectively lyse intact Gram-negative bacteria in the absence of ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid as an outer membrane permeabilizer. Therefore, the characteristics of endolysin P28 make it a potential therapeutic agent against multi-drug-resistant pathogens. PMID:26635765

  19. Gramicidin A Mutants with Antibiotic Activity against Both Gram-Positive and Gram-Negative Bacteria.

    PubMed

    Zerfas, Breanna L; Joo, Yechaan; Gao, Jianmin

    2016-03-17

    Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) have shown potential as alternatives to traditional antibiotics for fighting infections caused by antibiotic-resistant bacteria. One promising example of this is gramicidin A (gA). In its wild-type sequence, gA is active by permeating the plasma membrane of Gram-positive bacteria. However, gA is toxic to human red blood cells at similar concentrations to those required for it to exert its antimicrobial effects. Installing cationic side chains into gA has been shown to lower its hemolytic activity while maintaining the antimicrobial potency. In this study, we present the synthesis and the antibiotic activity of a new series of gA mutants that display cationic side chains. Specifically, by synthesizing alkylated lysine derivatives through reductive amination, we were able to create a broad selection of structures with varied activities towards Staphylococcus aureus and methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA). Importantly, some of the new mutants were observed to have an unprecedented activity towards important Gram-negative pathogens, including Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae and Psuedomonas aeruginosa. PMID:26918268

  20. The effect of Indomethacin and Betamethasone on the cytokine response of human neonatal mononuclear cells to gram-positive bacteria.

    PubMed

    Ernst, Wolfgang; Kusi, Evelyn; Fill Malfertheiner, Sara; Reuschel, Edith; Deml, Ludwig; Seelbach-Gbel, Birgit

    2015-05-01

    Intrauterine infections with gram-positive bacteria pose a serious threat to neonates since they can result in neonatal sepsis, induce a fetal inflammatory response and also cause preterm birth. Despite intensive care, prematurity remains a leading cause of neonatal death, and is often accompanied by a number of morbidities. In order to prevent premature birth, tocolytic agents like Indomethacin are administered. Betamethasone is used to promote lung maturation and prevent respiratory distress syndrome. A combination of both drugs is assumed to prevent premature delivery while simultaneously facilitating lung maturation. This study investigates the effect of Betamethasone, Indomethacin and a combination of both on the cytokine production of neonatal cord blood mononuclear cells (CBMC) after stimulation with lysates of the gram-positive pathogens Streptococcus agalactiae and Enterococcus faecalis. The aim of the study is to determine the impact of these drugs on the function of the neonatal immune system which should aid clinicians in choosing the optimal therapy in case of preterm birth associated with intrauterine infection. Betamethasone reduced the production of the pro-inflammatory cytokines IL-6, IL-12p40, MIP-1? and TNF and increased the expression of the anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10, depending on the pathogen used for stimulation. In contrast to Betamethasone, Indomethacin almost exclusively increased IL-10 production. The combination of both drugs decreased the expression of IL-6, IL-12p40, MIP-1? and TNF while increasing IL-10 production, depending on the concentration of Indomethacin and the pathogen used for stimulation. Based on our results, the combination therapy with Indomethacin and Betamethasone has a similar effect on cytokine production as Betamethasone alone, which is generally administered in case of impending preterm birth. However, the combination therapy has the advantage of promoting lung maturation while simultaneously blocking preterm labor effectively. PMID:25743243

  1. Type I and Type II mechanisms of antimicrobial photodynamic therapy: An in vitro study on Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Liyi; Xuan, Yi; Koide, Yuichiro; Zhiyentayev, Timur; Tanaka, Masamitsu; Hamblin, Michael R.

    2012-01-01

    Background and Objectives Antimicrobial photodynamic therapy (APDT) employs a nontoxic photosensitizer (PS) and visible light, which in the presence of oxygen produce reactive oxygen species (ROS), such as singlet oxygen (1O2, produced via Type II mechanism) and hydroxyl radical (HO, produced via Type I mechanism). This study examined the relative contributions of 1O2 and HO to APDT killing of Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. Study Design/Materials and Methods Fluorescence probes, 3'-(p-hydroxyphenyl)-fluorescein (HPF) and singlet oxygen sensor green reagent (SOSG) were used to determine HO and 1O2 produced by illumination of two PS: tris-cationic-buckminsterfullerene (BB6) and a conjugate between polyethylenimine and chlorin(e6) (PEIce6). Dimethylthiourea is a HO scavenger, while sodium azide (NaN3) is a quencher of 1O2. Both APDT and killing by Fenton reaction (chemical generation of HO) were carried out on Gram-positive bacteria (Staphylococcus aureus and Enteroccoccus fecalis) and Gram-negative bacteria (Escherichia coli, Proteus mirabilis and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Results Conjugate PEI-ce6 mainly produced 1O2 (quenched by NaN3), while BB6 produced HO in addition to 1O2 when NaN3 potentiated probe activation. NaN3 also potentiated HPF activation by Fenton reagent. All bacteria were killed by Fenton reagent but Gram-positive bacteria needed a higher concentration than Gram-negatives. NaN3 potentiated Fenton-mediated killing of all bacteria. The ratio of APDT killing between Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria was 2 or 4:1 for BB6 and 25:1 for conjugate PEI-ce6. There was a NaN3 dose dependent inhibition of APDT killing using both PEI-ce6 and BB6 against Gram-negative bacteria while NaN3 almost failed to inhibit killing of Gram-positive bacteria. Conclusion Azidyl radicals may be formed from NaN3 and HO. It may be that Gram-negative bacteria are more susceptible to HO while Gram-positive bacteria are more susceptible to 1O2. The differences in NaN3 inhibition may reflect differences in the extent of PS binding to bacteria (microenvironment) or differences in penetration of NaN3 into cell walls of bacteria. PMID:22760848

  2. ZL-2, a cathelicidin-derived antimicrobial peptide, has a broad antimicrobial activity against gram-positive bacteria and gram-negative bacteria in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Tu, Jiancheng; Wu, Geping; Zuo, Yun; Zhao, Lei; Wang, Shusheng

    2015-10-01

    Alloferons are a group of naturally occurring peptides primarily isolated from insects that are capable of stimulating mouse and human NK cell cytotoxicity toward cancer cells. In this study, we found that a modified antibacterial peptide had a broad range of action against both gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria. A time-course experiment showed that CFU counts rapidly decreased after ZL-2 treatment, with the bacteria nearly eliminated within 4 h. We also examined the synergy between the peptide and antibiotics. The peptide ZL-2 resulted in a significant synergistic improvement in the potencies of ampicillin, erythromycin and ceftazidime against methicillin-resistant bacteria. In addition, ZL-2 had no detectable cytotoxicity in mouse spleen cells or a mouse animal model. In the mouse model by i.p. inoculation with Escherichia coli, timely treatment of i.p. injection with ZL-2 resulted in 100-fold reduction in bacteria load in blood as well as 80% protection from death in the inoculated animals. In conclusion, we successfully identified a modified peptide with maximal bactericidal activity. This study also provides a potential therapeutic for the treatment of E. coli septicemia by increasing the activity of antimicrobials. PMID:25636224

  3. Flow cytometric evaluation of physico-chemical impact on Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Fröhling, Antje; Schlüter, Oliver

    2015-01-01

    Since heat sensitivity of fruits and vegetables limits the application of thermal inactivation processes, new emerging inactivation technologies have to be established to fulfill the requirements of food safety without affecting the produce quality. The efficiency of inactivation treatments has to be ensured and monitored. Monitoring of inactivation effects is commonly performed using traditional cultivation methods which have the disadvantage of the time span needed to obtain results. The aim of this study was to compare the inactivation effects of peracetic acid (PAA), ozonated water (O3), and cold atmospheric pressure plasma (CAPP) on Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria using flow cytometric methods. E. coli cells were completely depolarized after treatment (15 s) with 0.25% PAA at 10°C, and after treatment (10 s) with 3.8 mg l−1 O3 at 12°C. The membrane potential of CAPP treated cells remained almost constant at an operating power of 20 W over a time period of 3 min, and subsequently decreased within 30 s of further treatment. Complete membrane permeabilization was observed after 10 s O3 treatment, but treatment with PAA and CAPP did not completely permeabilize the cells within 2 and 4 min, respectively. Similar results were obtained for esterase activity. O3 inactivates cellular esterase but esterase activity was detected after 4 min CAPP treatment and 2 min PAA treatment. L. innocua cells and P. carotovorum cells were also permeabilized instantaneously by O3 treatment at concentrations of 3.8 ± 1 mg l−1. However, higher membrane permeabilization of L. innocua and P. carotovorum than of E. coli was observed at CAPP treatment of 20 W. The degree of bacterial damage due to the inactivation processes is highly dependent on treatment parameters as well as on treated bacteria. Important information regarding the inactivation mechanisms can be obtained by flow cytometric measurements and this enables the definition of critical process parameters. PMID:26441874

  4. Flow cytometric evaluation of physico-chemical impact on Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria.

    PubMed

    Fröhling, Antje; Schlüter, Oliver

    2015-01-01

    Since heat sensitivity of fruits and vegetables limits the application of thermal inactivation processes, new emerging inactivation technologies have to be established to fulfill the requirements of food safety without affecting the produce quality. The efficiency of inactivation treatments has to be ensured and monitored. Monitoring of inactivation effects is commonly performed using traditional cultivation methods which have the disadvantage of the time span needed to obtain results. The aim of this study was to compare the inactivation effects of peracetic acid (PAA), ozonated water (O3), and cold atmospheric pressure plasma (CAPP) on Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria using flow cytometric methods. E. coli cells were completely depolarized after treatment (15 s) with 0.25% PAA at 10°C, and after treatment (10 s) with 3.8 mg l(-1) O3 at 12°C. The membrane potential of CAPP treated cells remained almost constant at an operating power of 20 W over a time period of 3 min, and subsequently decreased within 30 s of further treatment. Complete membrane permeabilization was observed after 10 s O3 treatment, but treatment with PAA and CAPP did not completely permeabilize the cells within 2 and 4 min, respectively. Similar results were obtained for esterase activity. O3 inactivates cellular esterase but esterase activity was detected after 4 min CAPP treatment and 2 min PAA treatment. L. innocua cells and P. carotovorum cells were also permeabilized instantaneously by O3 treatment at concentrations of 3.8 ± 1 mg l(-1). However, higher membrane permeabilization of L. innocua and P. carotovorum than of E. coli was observed at CAPP treatment of 20 W. The degree of bacterial damage due to the inactivation processes is highly dependent on treatment parameters as well as on treated bacteria. Important information regarding the inactivation mechanisms can be obtained by flow cytometric measurements and this enables the definition of critical process parameters. PMID:26441874

  5. The molecular switch that activates the cell wall anchoring step of pilus assembly in gram-positive bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Mandlik, Anjali; Das, Asis; Ton-That, Hung

    2008-01-01

    Cell surface pili in Gram-positive bacteria orchestrate the colonization of host tissues, evasion of immunity, and the development of biofilms. Recent work revealed that pilus assembly is a biphasic process wherein pilus polymerization is catalyzed by a pilus-specific sortase followed by cell wall anchoring of the pilus that is promoted by the housekeeping sortase. Here, we present molecular genetic and biochemical studies of a heterotrimeric pilus in Corynebacterium diphtheriae, uncovering the molecular switch that terminates pilus polymerization in favor of cell wall anchoring. The prototype pilus contains a major pilin (SpaA) forming the shaft, a tip pilin (SpaC), and another minor pilin (SpaB). Cells lacking SpaB form pilus fibers, but they are largely secreted in the medium, a phenotype also observed when cells lack the housekeeping sortase. Furthermore, the average pilus length is greatly increased in the absence of SpaB. Remarkably, a SpaB mutant that lacks the cell wall sorting signal but contains a critical lysine residue is incorporated in the pilus. However, the resulting pili fail to anchor to the cell wall. We propose that a specific minor pilin acts as the terminal subunit in pilus assembly. Cell wall anchoring ensues when the pilus polymer assembled on the pilus-specific sortase is transferred to the minor pilin presented by the housekeeping sortase via lysine-mediated transpeptidation. PMID:18779588

  6. The molecular switch that activates the cell wall anchoring step of pilus assembly in gram-positive bacteria.

    PubMed

    Mandlik, Anjali; Das, Asis; Ton-That, Hung

    2008-09-16

    Cell surface pili in gram-positive bacteria orchestrate the colonization of host tissues, evasion of immunity, and the development of biofilms. Recent work revealed that pilus assembly is a biphasic process wherein pilus polymerization is catalyzed by a pilus-specific sortase followed by cell wall anchoring of the pilus that is promoted by the housekeeping sortase. Here, we present molecular genetic and biochemical studies of a heterotrimeric pilus in Corynebacterium diphtheriae, uncovering the molecular switch that terminates pilus polymerization in favor of cell wall anchoring. The prototype pilus contains a major pilin (SpaA) forming the shaft, a tip pilin (SpaC), and another minor pilin (SpaB). Cells lacking SpaB form pilus fibers, but they are largely secreted in the medium, a phenotype also observed when cells lack the housekeeping sortase. Furthermore, the average pilus length is greatly increased in the absence of SpaB. Remarkably, a SpaB mutant that lacks the cell wall sorting signal but contains a critical lysine residue is incorporated in the pilus. However, the resulting pili fail to anchor to the cell wall. We propose that a specific minor pilin acts as the terminal subunit in pilus assembly. Cell wall anchoring ensues when the pilus polymer assembled on the pilus-specific sortase is transferred to the minor pilin presented by the housekeeping sortase via lysine-mediated transpeptidation. PMID:18779588

  7. Identification and characterization of a new xylanase from Gram-positive bacteria isolated from termite gut (Reticulitermes santonensis).

    PubMed

    Mattotti, Christel; Bauwens, Julien; Brasseur, Catherine; Tarayre, Cdric; Thonart, Philippe; Destain, Jacqueline; Francis, Frdric; Haubruge, Eric; De Pauw, Edwin; Portetelle, Daniel; Vandenbol, Micheline

    2012-06-01

    Termites are world champions at digesting lignocellulosic compounds, thanks to cooperation between their own enzymes and exogenous enzymes from microorganisms. Prokaryotic cells are responsible for a large part of this lignocellulolytic activity. Bacterial enzyme activities have been demonstrated in the higher and the lower termite gut. From five clones of Gram-positive bacteria isolated and identified in a previous work, we constructed a genomic DNA library and performed functional screening for alpha-amylase, beta-glucosidase, and xylanase activities. One candidate, Xyl8B8, showed xylanase activity. Sequence analysis of the genomic insert revealed five complete ORFs on the cloned DNA (5746bp). Among the encoded proteins were a putative endo-1,4-beta-xylanase (XylB8) belonging to glycoside hydrolase family 11 (GH11). On the basis of sequence analyses, genomic DNA organization, and phylogenetic analysis, the insert was shown to come from an actinobacterium. The mature xylanase (mXylB8) was expressed in Escherichia coli and purified by affinity chromatography and detected by zymogram analysis after renaturing. It showed maximal xylanase activity in sodium acetate buffer, pH 5.0 at 55 C. Its activity was increased by reducing agents and decreased by Cu(2+), some detergents, and chelating agents. Its substrate specificity appeared limited to xylan. PMID:22487213

  8. Silver-doped manganese dioxide and trioxide nanoparticles inhibit both gram positive and gram negative pathogenic bacteria.

    PubMed

    Kunkalekar, R K; Prabhu, M S; Naik, M M; Salker, A V

    2014-01-01

    Palladium, ruthenium and silver-doped MnO2 and silver doped Mn2O3 nanoparticles were synthesized by simple co-precipitation technique. SEM-TEM analysis revealed the nano-size of these synthesized samples. XPS data illustrates that Mn is present in 4+ and 3+ oxidation states in MnO2 and Mn2O3 respectively. Thermal analysis gave significant evidence for the phase changes with increasing temperature. Antibacterial activity of these synthesized nanoparticles on three Gram positive bacterial cultures (Staphylococcus aureus ATCC 6538, Streptococcus epidermis ATCC 12228, Bacillus subtilis ATCC 6633) and three Gram negative cultures (Escherichia coli ATCC 8739, Salmonella abony NCTC 6017 and Klebsiella pneumoniae ATCC 1003) was investigated using a disc diffusion method and live/dead assay. Only Ag-doped MnO2 and Ag-doped Mn2O3 nanoparticles showed antibacterial property against all six-test bacteria but Ag-doped MnO2 was found to be more effective than Ag-doped Mn2O3. PMID:24140741

  9. In Vitro Activity of Tedizolid Against Gram-Positive Bacteria in Patients With Skin and Skin Structure Infections and Hospital-Acquired Pneumonia: A Korean Multicenter Study

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Yangsoon; Hong, Sung Kuk; Choi, SungHak; Im, Weonbin; Yong, Dongeun

    2015-01-01

    We compared the activities of tedizolid to those of linezolid and other commonly used antimicrobial agents against gram-positive cocci recovered from patients with skin and skin structure infections (SSSIs) and hospital-acquired pneumonia (HAP) in Korean hospitals. Gram-positive isolates were collected from 356 patients with SSSIs and 144 patients with HAP at eight hospitals in Korea from 2011 to 2014. SSSIs included impetigo, cellulitis, erysipelas, furuncles, abscesses, and infected burns. Antimicrobial susceptibility was tested by using the CLSI agar dilution method. All of the gram-positive isolates were inhibited by ≤1 µg/mL tedizolid. The minimum inhibitory concentration [MIC]90 of tedizolid was 0.5 µg/mL for methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, which was 4-fold lower than that of linezolid. Tedizolid may become a useful option for the treatment of SSSIs and HAP caused by gram-positive bacteria. PMID:26206690

  10. In vitro activity of tedizolid against gram-positive bacteria in patients with skin and skin structure infections and hospital-acquired pneumonia: a Korean multicenter study.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yangsoon; Hong, Sung Kuk; Choi, Sunghak; Im, Weonbin; Yong, Dongeun; Lee, Kyungwon

    2015-09-01

    We compared the activities of tedizolid to those of linezolid and other commonly used antimicrobial agents against gram-positive cocci recovered from patients with skin and skin structure infections (SSSIs) and hospital-acquired pneumonia (HAP) in Korean hospitals. Gram-positive isolates were collected from 356 patients with SSSIs and 144 patients with HAP at eight hospitals in Korea from 2011 to 2014. SSSIs included impetigo, cellulitis, erysipelas, furuncles, abscesses, and infected burns. Antimicrobial susceptibility was tested by using the CLSI agar dilution method. All of the gram-positive isolates were inhibited by ≤1 μg/mL tedizolid. The minimum inhibitory concentration [MIC]₉₀ of tedizolid was 0.5 μg/mL for methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, which was 4-fold lower than that of linezolid. Tedizolid may become a useful option for the treatment of SSSIs and HAP caused by gram-positive bacteria. PMID:26206690

  11. Distinctive Binding of Avibactam to Penicillin-Binding Proteins of Gram-Negative and Gram-Positive Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Asli, Abdelhamid; Brouillette, Eric; Krause, Kevin M.; Nichols, Wright W.

    2015-01-01

    Avibactam is a novel non-β-lactam β-lactamase inhibitor that covalently acylates a variety of β-lactamases, causing inhibition. Although avibactam presents limited antibacterial activity, its acylation ability toward bacterial penicillin-binding proteins (PBPs) was investigated. Staphylococcus aureus was of particular interest due to the reported β-lactamase activity of PBP4. The binding of avibactam to PBPs was measured by adding increasing concentrations to membrane preparations of a variety of Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria prior to addition of the fluorescent reagent Bocillin FL. Relative binding (measured here as the 50% inhibitory concentration [IC50]) to PBPs was estimated by quantification of fluorescence after gel electrophoresis. Avibactam was found to selectively bind to some PBPs. In Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Haemophilus influenzae, and S. aureus, avibactam primarily bound to PBP2, with IC50s of 0.92, 1.1, 3.0, and 51 μg/ml, respectively, whereas binding to PBP3 was observed in Streptococcus pneumoniae (IC50, 8.1 μg/ml). Interestingly, avibactam was able to significantly enhance labeling of S. aureus PBP4 by Bocillin FL. In PBP competition assays with S. aureus, where avibactam was used at a fixed concentration in combination with varied amounts of ceftazidime, the apparent IC50 of ceftazidime was found to be very similar to that determined for ceftazidime when used alone. In conclusion, avibactam is able to covalently bind to some bacterial PBPs. Identification of those PBP targets may allow the development of new diazabicyclooctane derivatives with improved affinity for PBPs or new combination therapies that act on multiple PBP targets. PMID:26574008

  12. Efficient enzymatic systems for synthesis of novel ?-mangostin glycosides exhibiting antibacterial activity against Gram-positive bacteria.

    PubMed

    Le, Tuoi Thi; Pandey, Ramesh Prasad; Gurung, Rit Bahadur; Dhakal, Dipesh; Sohng, Jae Kyung

    2014-10-01

    Two enzymatic systems were developed for the efficient synthesis of glycoside products of ?-mangostin, a natural xanthonoid exhibiting anti-oxidant, antibacterial, anti-inflammatory, and anticancer activities. In these systems, one-pot reactions for the synthesis of UDP-?-D-glucose and UDP-?-D-2-deoxyglucose were modified and combined with a glycosyltransferase (GT) from Bacillus licheniformis DSM-13 to afford C-3 and C-6 position modified glucose and 2-deoxyglucose conjugated novel ?-mangostin derivatives. ?-Mangostin 3-O-?-D-glucopyranoside, ?-mangostin 6-O-?-D-glucopyranoside, ?-mangostin 3,6-di-O-?-D-glucopyranoside, ?-mangostin 3-O-?-D-2-deoxyglucopyranoside, ?-mangostin 6-O-?-D-2-deoxyglucopyranoside, and ?-mangostin 3,6-di-O-?-D-2-deoxyglucopyranoside were successfully produced in practical quantities and characterized by high-resolution quadruple time-of-flight electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry (HR-QTOF ESI/MS), (1)H and (13)C NMR analyses. In excess of the substrate, the maximum productions of three ?-mangostin glucopyranosides (4.8 mg/mL, 86.5 % overall conversion of ?-mangostin) and three ?-mangostin 2-deoxyglucopyronosides (4.0 mg/mL, 79 % overall conversion of ?-mangostin) were achieved at 4-h incubation period. All the ?-mangostin glycosides exhibited improved water solubility, and their antibacterial activity against three Gram-positive bacteria Micrococcus luteus, Bacillus subtilis, and Staphylococcus aureus was drastically enhanced by the glucosylation at C-3 position. In this study, diverse glycosylated ?-mangostin were produced in significant quantities by using inexpensive starting materials and recycling co-factors within a reaction vessel without use of expensive NDP-sugars in the glycosylation reactions. PMID:25038930

  13. Identification of a structural determinant for resistance to beta-lactam antibiotics in Gram-positive bacteria.

    PubMed

    Mouz, N; Gordon, E; Di Guilmi, A M; Petit, I; Ptillot, Y; Dupont, Y; Hakenbeck, R; Vernet, T; Dideberg, O

    1998-11-10

    Streptococcus pneumoniae is the main causal agent of pathologies that are increasingly resistant to antibiotic treatment. Clinical resistance of S. pneumoniae to beta-lactam antibiotics is linked to multiple mutations of high molecular mass penicillin-binding proteins (H-PBPs), essential enzymes involved in the final steps of bacterial cell wall synthesis. H-PBPs from resistant bacteria have a reduced affinity for beta-lactam and a decreased hydrolytic activity on substrate analogues. In S. pneumoniae, the gene coding for one of these H-PBPs, PBP2x, is located in the cell division cluster (DCW). We present here structural evidence linking multiple beta-lactam resistance to amino acid substitutions in PBP2x within a buried cavity near the catalytic site that contains a structural water molecule. Site-directed mutation of amino acids in contact with this water molecule in the "sensitive" form of PBP2x produces mutants similar, in terms of beta-lactam affinity and substrate hydrolysis, to altered PBP2x produced in resistant clinical isolates. A reverse mutation in a PBP2x variant from a clinically important resistant clone increases the acylation efficiency for beta-lactams and substrate analogues. Furthermore, amino acid residues in contact with the structural water molecule are conserved in the equivalent H-PBPs of pathogenic Gram-positive cocci. We suggest that, probably via a local structural modification, the partial or complete loss of this water molecule reduces the acylation efficiency of PBP2x substrates to a point at which cell wall synthesis still occurs, but the sensitivity to therapeutic concentrations of beta-lactam antibiotics is lost. PMID:9811812

  14. Quantification of Gram-positive bacteria: adaptation and evaluation of a preparation strategy using high amounts of clinical tissue

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background A preparation method for quantification of bacteria in tissues is obligatory to reduce tissue mass, concentrate the target, purify, remove inhibitory substances and to achieve constant target recovery rates. No preparation method has been available until now for a high mass of tissue applicable for routine use and analytical veterinary diagnostics. Results This study describes an easy-to-use tissue preparation protocol to quantify Gram-positive bacteria from a large volume of tissue matrix. A previously published sample preparation method (Matrix-Lysis) from food science was successfully adapted for clinical use on tissues from pigs, including cerebrum, spinal cord, lung, liver, ileum, colon, caecum, kidney and muscle tissue. This tissue preparation method now permits quantification of pathogens from 5g of organic matrix, which is a 20200 fold increase by weight compared to other methods. It is based on solubilization of the sample matrix with either a chaotrope plus detergent or divalent salts as solubilization agents. The method was designed as a modular system, offering the possibility to change lysis buffers, according to tissue solubilization characteristics and the intended detection method (molecular or culture). Using Listeria monocytogenes as model organism, viable cell quantification or DNA extraction and quantitative real-time PCR were performed after Matrix-Lysis to determine recovery rates and detection limit (LOD). The adapted Matrix-Lysis protocol resulted in high recovery rates (mean value: 76%??39%) for all tested organs, except kidney, and recovery was constant over 5 log scales for all tested buffer systems. The LOD for Matrix-Lysis with subsequent plate count method (PCM) was as low as 1CFU/5g, while for qPCR based detection the LOD was 102 bacterial cell equivalents (BCE)/5g for two buffer systems. Conclusions This tissue preparation is inexpensive and can be easily used for routine and analytical veterinary diagnostics. Inoculation studies or hazard assessments can profit from this tissue preparation method and it is anticipated that this study will be a valuable source for further research on tissue preparation strategies. PMID:24589061

  15. Expanding the Use of a Fluorogenic Method to Determine Activity and Mode of Action of Bacillus thuringiensis Bacteriocins Against Gram-Positive and Gram-Negative Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    de la Fuente-Salcido, Norma M.; Barboza-Corona, J. Eleazar; Espino Monzón, A. N.; Pacheco Cano, R. D.; Balagurusamy, N.; Bideshi, Dennis K.; Salcedo-Hernández, Rubén

    2012-01-01

    Previously we described a rapid fluorogenic method to measure the activity of five bacteriocins produced by Mexican strains of Bacillus thuringiensis against B. cereus 183. Here we standardize this method to efficiently determine the activity of bacteriocins against both Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. It was determined that the crucial parameter required to obtain reproducible results was the number of cells used in the assay, that is, ~4 × 108 cell/mL and ~7 × 108 cell/mL, respectively, for target Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. Comparative analyses of the fluorogenic and traditional well-diffusion assays showed correlation coefficients of 0.88 to 0.99 and 0.83 to 0.99, respectively, for Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. The fluorogenic method demonstrated that the five bacteriocins of B. thuringiensis have bacteriolytic and bacteriostatic activities against all microorganisms tested, including clinically significant bacteria such as Listeria monocytogenes, Proteus vulgaris, and Shigella flexneri reported previously to be resistant to the antimicrobials as determined using the well-diffusion protocol. These results demonstrate that the fluorogenic assay is a more sensitive, reliable, and rapid method when compared with the well-diffusion method and can easily be adapted in screening protocols for bacteriocin production by other microorganisms. PMID:22919330

  16. Multiplex Identification of Gram-Positive Bacteria and Resistance Determinants Directly from Positive Blood Culture Broths: Evaluation of an Automated Microarray-Based Nucleic Acid Test

    PubMed Central

    Buchan, Blake W.; Ginocchio, Christine C.; Manii, Ryhana; Cavagnolo, Robert; Pancholi, Preeti; Swyers, Lettie; Thomson, Richard B.; Anderson, Christopher; Kaul, Karen; Ledeboer, Nathan A.

    2013-01-01

    Background A multicenter study was conducted to evaluate the diagnostic accuracy (sensitivity and specificity) of the Verigene Gram-Positive Blood Culture Test (BC-GP) test to identify 12 Gram-positive bacterial gene targets and three genetic resistance determinants directly from positive blood culture broths containing Gram-positive bacteria. Methods and Findings 1,252 blood cultures containing Gram-positive bacteria were prospectively collected and tested at five clinical centers between April, 2011 and January, 2012. An additional 387 contrived blood cultures containing uncommon targets (e.g., Listeria spp., S. lugdunensis, vanB-positive Enterococci) were included to fully evaluate the performance of the BC-GP test. Sensitivity and specificity for the 12 specific genus or species targets identified by the BC-GP test ranged from 92.6%100% and 95.4%100%, respectively. Identification of the mecA gene in 599 cultures containing S. aureus or S. epidermidis was 98.6% sensitive and 94.3% specific compared to cefoxitin disk method. Identification of the vanA gene in 81 cultures containing Enterococcus faecium or E. faecalis was 100% sensitive and specific. Approximately 7.5% (87/1,157) of single-organism cultures contained Gram-positive bacteria not present on the BC-GP test panel. In 95 cultures containing multiple organisms the BC-GP test was in 71.6% (68/95) agreement with culture results. Retrospective analysis of 107 separate blood cultures demonstrated that identification of methicillin resistant S. aureus and vancomycin resistant Enterococcus spp. was completed an average of 41.8 to 42.4 h earlier using the BC-GP test compared to routine culture methods. The BC-GP test was unable to assign mecA to a specific organism in cultures containing more than one Staphylococcus isolate and does not identify common blood culture contaminants such as Micrococcus, Corynebacterium, and Bacillus. Conclusions The BC-GP test is a multiplex test capable of detecting most leading causes of Gram-positive bacterial blood stream infections as well as genetic markers of methicillin and vancomycin resistance directly from positive blood cultures. Please see later in the article for the Editors' Summary PMID:23843749

  17. Novel ferulate esterase from Gram-positive lactic acid bacteria and analyses of the recombinant enzyme produced in E. coli

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Using a plate containing ethyl ferulate as sole carbon source, various bacteria cultures were screened for ferulate esterase (FAE). Among a dozen of species showing positive FAE, one Lactobacillus fermentum strain NRRL 1932 demonstrated the strongest activity. Using a published sequence of ferulate ...

  18. Potentiation of photoinactivation of Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria mediated by six phenothiazinium dyes by addition of azide ion

    PubMed Central

    Kasimova, Kamola R; Sadasivam, Magesh; Landi, Giacomo; Sarna, Tadeusz; Hamblin, Michael R.

    2014-01-01

    Antimicrobial photodynamic inactivation (APDI) using phenothiazinium dyes is mediated by reactive oxygen species consisting of a combination of singlet oxygen (quenched by azide), hydroxyl radicals and other reactive oxygen species. We recently showed that addition of sodium azide paradoxically potentiated APDI of Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria using methylene blue as the photosensitizer, and this was due to electron transfer to the dye triplet state from azide anion, producing azidyl radical. Here we compare this effect using six different homologous phenothiazinium dyes: methylene blue, toluidine blue O, new methylene blue, dimethylmethylene blue, azure A, and azure B. We found both significant potentiation (up to 2 logs) and also significant inhibition (>3 logs) of killing by adding 10 mM azide depending on Gram classification, washing the dye from the cells, and dye structure. Killing of E. coli was potentiated with all 6 dyes after a wash, while S. aureus killing was only potentiated by MB and TBO with a wash and DMMB with no wash. More lipophilic dyes (higher log P value, such as DMMB) were more likely to show potentiation. We conclude that the Type I photochemical mechanism (potentiation with azide) likely depends on the microenvironment, i.e. higher binding of dye to bacteria. Bacterial dye-binding is thought to be higher with Gram-negative compared to Gram-positive bacteria, when unbound dye has been washed away, and with more lipophilic dyes. PMID:25177833

  19. Potentiation of photoinactivation of Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria mediated by six phenothiazinium dyes by addition of azide ion.

    PubMed

    Kasimova, Kamola R; Sadasivam, Magesh; Landi, Giacomo; Sarna, Tadeusz; Hamblin, Michael R

    2014-11-01

    Antimicrobial photodynamic inactivation (APDI) using phenothiazinium dyes is mediated by reactive oxygen species consisting of a combination of singlet oxygen (quenched by azide), hydroxyl radicals and other reactive oxygen species. We recently showed that addition of sodium azide paradoxically potentiated APDI of Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria using methylene blue as the photosensitizer, and this was due to electron transfer to the dye triplet state from azide anion, producing azidyl radical. Here we compare this effect using six different homologous phenothiazinium dyes: methylene blue, toluidine blue O, new methylene blue, dimethylmethylene blue, azure A, and azure B. We found both significant potentiation (up to 2 logs) and also significant inhibition (>3 logs) of killing by adding 10 mM azide depending on Gram classification, washing the dye from the cells, and dye structure. Killing of E. coli was potentiated with all 6 dyes after a wash, while S. aureus killing was only potentiated by MB and TBO with a wash and DMMB with no wash. More lipophilic dyes (higher log P value, such as DMMB) were more likely to show potentiation. We conclude that the Type I photochemical mechanism (potentiation with azide) likely depends on the microenvironment, i.e. higher binding of dye to bacteria. Bacterial dye-binding is thought to be higher with Gram-negative compared to Gram-positive bacteria, when unbound dye has been washed away, and with more lipophilic dyes. PMID:25177833

  20. Alternating electric fields combined with activated carbon for disinfection of Gram negative and Gram positive bacteria in fluidized bed electrode system.

    PubMed

    Racyte, Justina; Bernard, Sverine; Paulitsch-Fuchs, Astrid H; Yntema, Doekle R; Bruning, Harry; Rijnaarts, Huub H M

    2013-10-15

    Strong electric fields for disinfection of wastewaters have been employed already for several decades. An innovative approach combining low strength (7 V/cm) alternating electric fields with a granular activated carbon fluidized bed electrode (FBE) for disinfection was presented recently. For disinfection performance of FBE several pure microbial cultures were tested: Bacillus subtilis, Bacillus subtilis subsp. subtilis, Enterococcus faecalis as representatives from Gram positive bacteria and Erwinia carotovora, Pseudomonas luteola, Pseudomonas fluorescens and Escherichia coli YMc10 as representatives from Gram negative bacteria. The alternating electric field amplitude and shape were kept constant. Only the effect of alternating electric field frequency on disinfection performance was investigated. From the bacteria tested, the Gram negative strains were more susceptible and the Gram positive microorganisms were more resistant to FBE disinfection. The collected data indicate that the efficiency of disinfection is frequency and strain dependent. During 6 h of disinfection, the decrease above 2 Log units was achieved with P. luteola and E. coli at 10 kHz and at dual frequency shift keying (FSK) modulated signal with frequencies of 10 kHz and 140 kHz. FBE technology appears to offer a new way for selective bacterial disinfection, however further optimizations are needed on treatment duration, and energy input, to improve effectiveness. PMID:24012021

  1. Facile synthesis of gold nanoparticles on propylamine functionalized SBA-15 and effect of surface functionality of its enhanced bactericidal activity against gram positive bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhuyan, Diganta; Gogoi, Animesh; Saikia, Mrinal; Saikia, Ratul; Saikia, Lakshi

    2015-07-01

    The facile synthesis of an SBA-15-pr-+NH3.Au0 nano-hybrid material by spontaneous autoreduction of aqueous chloroaurate anions on propylamine functionalized SBA-15 was successfully demonstrated. The as-synthesized SBA-15-pr-+NH3.Au0 nano-hybrid material was well characterized using low and wide angle x-ray diffraction (XRD), N2 adsorption-desorption isotherms, Fourier transform infrared (FTIR), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), scanning electron microscopy-energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (SEM-EDX), x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), UV-Visible spectroscopy and atomic absorption spectroscopy (AAS). The activity of the nano-hybrid material as a potent bactericidal agent was successfully tested against Gram positive/negative bacteria viz. Bacillus subtilis, Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The colony killing percentage of Gram positive bacteria was found to be higher than Gram negative bacteria due to the stronger electrostatic interaction between the positively-charged amine functionality of SBA-15 and the negatively charged functionality of the bacterial cell wall.

  2. Systematic Review of Membrane Components of Gram-Positive Bacteria Responsible as Pyrogens for Inducing Human Monocyte/Macrophage Cytokine Release

    PubMed Central

    Rockel, Christoph; Hartung, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    Fifty years after the elucidation of lipopolysaccharides (LPS, endotoxin) as the principal structure of Gram-negative bacteria activating the human immune system, its Gram-positive counterpart is still under debate. Pyrogen tests based on the human monocyte activation have been validated for LPS detection as an alternative to the rabbit test and, increasingly, the limulus amebocyte lysate test. For full replacement, international validations with non-endotoxin pyrogens are in preparation. Following evidence-based medicine approaches, a systematic review of existing evidence as to the structural nature of the Gram-positive pyrogen was undertaken. For the three major constituents suggested, i.e., peptidoglycan, lipoteichoic acids (LTA), and bacterial lipoproteins (LP), the questions to be answered and a search strategy for relevant literature was developed, starting in MedLine. The evaluation was based on the KochDale criteria for a mediator of an effect. A total of 380 articles for peptidoglycan, 391 for LP, and 285 for LTA were retrieved of which 12, 8, and 24, respectively, fulfilled inclusion criteria. The compiled data suggest that for peptidoglycan two KochDale criteria are fulfilled, four for LTA, and two for bacterial LP. In conclusion, based on the best currently available evidence, LTA is the only substance that fulfills all criteria. LTA has been isolated from a large number of bacteria, results in cytokine release patterns inducible also with synthetic LTA. Reduction in bacterial cytokine induction with an inhibitor for LTA was shown. However, this systematic review cannot exclude the possibility that other stimulatory compounds complement or substitute for LTA in being the counterpart to LPS in some Gram-positive bacteria. PMID:22529809

  3. Physico-Chemical-Managed Killing of Penicillin-Resistant Static and Growing Gram-Positive and Gram-Negative Vegetative Bacteria

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richmond, Robert Chaffee (Inventor); Schramm, Jr., Harry F. (Inventor); Defalco, Francis G. (Inventor); Farris, III, Alex F. (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    Systems and methods for the use of compounds from the Hofmeister series coupled with specific pH and temperature to provide rapid physico-chemical-managed killing of penicillin-resistant static and growing Gram-positive and Gram-negative vegetative bacteria. The systems and methods represent the more general physico-chemical enhancement of susceptibility for a wide range of pathological macromolecular targets to clinical management by establishing the reactivity of those targets to topically applied drugs or anti-toxins.

  4. Effects on Gram-Negative and Gram-Positive Bacteria Mediated by 5-Aminolevulinic Acid and 5-Aminolevulinic Acid Derivatives?

    PubMed Central

    Fotinos, Nicolas; Convert, Maruska; Piffaretti, Jean-Claude; Gurny, Robert; Lange, Norbert

    2008-01-01

    Due mainly to the extensive use of antibiotics, the spread of multiresistant bacterial strains is one of the most worrying threats to public health. One strategy that can be used to overcome potential shortcomings might be the inactivation of these microorganisms by 5-aminolevulinic acid (5-ALA) or 5-ALA derivative-mediated photodynamic therapy (PDT). 5-ALA has no photoactive properties, but when it is given exogenously, it acts as a precursor of photosensitive porphyrins predominantly in tissues or organisms that are characterized by a high metabolic turnover, such as tumors, macrophages, and bacteria. However, the weak ability of 5-ALA to cross biological barriers has led to the introduction of more lipophilic derivatives, such as methyl aminolevulinate or hexyl aminolevulinate, which display improved capacities to reach the cytoplasm. Starting from the hypothesis that more lipophilic compounds carrying only a permanent positive charge under physiological conditions may more easily cross the bacterial multilayer barrier, we have tested the efficacies of some 5-ALA n-alkyl esters for the inactivation of bacteria. For this purpose, different bacterial strains were incubated with 5-ALA or its corresponding esters of different lipophilicities. Then, the bacteria were irradiated with light and the numbers of CFU post-PDT were counted and compared to those for the controls, which were kept in the dark. Furthermore, the total amount of accumulated porphyrins was quantified by high-pressure liquid chromatography analysis. In our studies, analysis of the bacterial extracts revealed the presence of all the porphyrins involved in heme biosynthesis, from uroporphyrin to protoporphyin IX. The efficacy of bacterial inactivation was a function of the total amount of porphyrins produced, independently of their nature. The 5-ALA methyl and butyl esters were the most effective compounds with respect to the photodynamic inactivation of bacteria. We observed significant differences in terms of the optimal drug concentration, bactericidal activities, and porphyrin production. PMID:18195063

  5. Occurrence of ferredoxin:NAD(+) oxidoreductase activity and its ion specificity in several Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria.

    PubMed

    Hess, Verena; Gallegos, Rene; Jones, J Andrew; Barquera, Blanca; Malamy, Michael H; Mller, Volker

    2016-01-01

    A ferredoxin:NAD(+) oxidoreductase was recently discovered as a redox-driven ion pump in the anaerobic, acetogenic bacterium Acetobacterium woodii. The enzyme is assumed to be encoded by the rnf genes. Since these genes are present in the genomes of many bacteria, we tested for ferredoxin:NAD(+) oxidoreductase activity in cytoplasmic membranes from several different Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria that have annotated rnf genes. We found this activity in Clostridium tetanomorphum, Clostridium ljungdahlii, Bacteroides fragilis, and Vibrio cholerae but not in Escherichia coli and Rhodobacter capsulatus. As in A. woodii, the activity was Na(+)-dependent in C. tetanomorphum and B. fragilis but Na(+)-independent in C. ljungdahlii and V. cholerae. We deleted the rnf genes from B. fragilis and demonstrated that the mutant has greatly reduced ferredoxin:NAD(+) oxidoreductase activity. This is the first genetic proof that the rnf genes indeed encode the reduced ferredoxin:NAD(+) oxidoreductase activity. PMID:26793417

  6. Occurrence of ferredoxin:NAD+ oxidoreductase activity and its ion specificity in several Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Hess, Verena; Gallegos, Rene; Jones, J Andrew; Barquera, Blanca; Malamy, Michael H

    2016-01-01

    A ferredoxin:NAD+ oxidoreductase was recently discovered as a redox-driven ion pump in the anaerobic, acetogenic bacterium Acetobacterium woodii. The enzyme is assumed to be encoded by the rnf genes. Since these genes are present in the genomes of many bacteria, we tested for ferredoxin:NAD+ oxidoreductase activity in cytoplasmic membranes from several different Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria that have annotated rnf genes. We found this activity in Clostridium tetanomorphum, Clostridium ljungdahlii, Bacteroides fragilis, and Vibrio cholerae but not in Escherichia coli and Rhodobacter capsulatus. As in A. woodii, the activity was Na+-dependent in C. tetanomorphum and B. fragilis but Na+-independent in C. ljungdahlii and V. cholerae. We deleted the rnf genes from B. fragilis and demonstrated that the mutant has greatly reduced ferredoxin:NAD+ oxidoreductase activity. This is the first genetic proof that the rnf genes indeed encode the reduced ferredoxin:NAD+ oxidoreductase activity. PMID:26793417

  7. The Effect of Bicarbonate on the Microbial Dissolution of Autunite Mineral in the Presence of Gram-Positive Bacteria

    SciTech Connect

    Sepulveda-Medina, Paola; Katsenovich, Yelena; Wellman, Dawn M.; Lagos, Leonel

    2015-06-01

    Bacteria are key players in the processes that govern fate and transport of contaminants. The uranium release from Na and Ca-autunite by Arthrobacter oxydans strain G968 was evaluated in the presence of bicarbonate ions. This bacterium was previously isolated from Hanford Site soil and in earlier prescreening tests demonstrated low tolerance to U(VI) toxicity compared to other A.oxydans isolates. Experiments were conducted using glass serum bottles as mixed bioreactors and sterile 6-well cell culture plates with inserts separating bacteria cells from mineral solids. Reactors containing phosphorus-limiting media were amended with bicarbonate ranging between 0-10 mM and metaautunite solids to provide a U(VI) concentration of 4.4 mmol/L. Results showed that in the presence of bicarbonate, A.oxydans G968 was able to enhance the release of U(VI) from Na and Ca autunite at the same capacity as other A.oxydans isolates with relatively high tolerance to U(VI). The effect of bacterial strains on autunite dissolution decreases as the concentration of bicarbonate increases. The results illustrate that direct interaction between the bacteria and the mineral is not necessary to result in U (VI) biorelease from autunite. The formation of secondary calcium-phosphate mineral phases on the surface of the mineral during the dissolution can ultimately reduce the natural autunite mineral contact area, which bacterial cells can access. This thereby reduces the concentration of uranium released into the solution. This study provides a better understanding of the interactions between meta-autunite and microbes in conditions mimicking arid and semiarid subsurface environments of western U.S.

  8. Comparison of killing of gram-negative and gram-positive bacteria by pure singlet oxygen. [Salmonella typhimurium; Escherichia coli; Sarcina lutea; Staphylococcus aureus; Streptococcus lactis; Streptococcus faecalis

    SciTech Connect

    Dahl, T.A.; Midden, W.R. ); Hartman, P.E. )

    1989-04-01

    Gram-negative and gram-positive bacteria were found to display different sensitivities to pure singlet oxygen generated outside of cells. Killing curves for Salmonella typhimurium and Escherichia coli strains were indicative of multihit killing, whereas curves for Sarcina lutea, Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus lactis, and Streptococcus faecalis exhibited single-hit kinetics. The S. typhimurium deep rough strain TA1975, which lacks nearly all of the cell wall lipopolysaccharide coat and manifests concomitant enhancement of penetration by some exogenous substances, responded to singlet oxygen with initially faster inactivation than did the S. typhimurium wild-type strain, although the maximum rates of killing appeared to be quite similar. The structure of the cell wall thus plays an important role in susceptibility to singlet oxygen. The outer membrane-lipopolysaccharide portion of the gram-negative cell wall initially protects the bacteria from extracellular singlet oxygen, although it may also serve as a source for secondary reaction products which accentuate the rates of cell killing. S. typhimurium and E. coli strains lacking the cellular antioxidant, glutathione, showed no difference from strains containing glutathione in response to the toxic effects of singlet oxygen. Strains of Sarcina lutea and Staphylococcus aureus that contained carotenoids, however, were far more resistant to singlet oxygen lethality than were both carotenoidless mutants of the same species and other gram-positive species lacking high levels of protective carotenoids.

  9. The RepA_N replicons of Gram-positive bacteria: a family of broadly distributed but narrow host range plasmids

    PubMed Central

    Weaver, Keith E.; Kwong, Stephen M.; Firth, Neville; Francia, Maria Victoria

    2009-01-01

    The pheromone-responsive conjugative plasmids of Enterococcus faecalis and the multi-resistance plasmids pSK1 and pSK41 of Staphylococcus aureus are among the best studied plasmids native to Gram-positive bacteria. Although these plasmids seem largely restricted to their native hosts, protein sequence comparison of their replication initiator proteins indicates that they are clearly related. Homology searches indicate that these replicons are representatives of a large family of plasmids and a few phage that are widespread among the low G+C Gram-positive bacteria. We propose to name this family the RepA_N family of replicons after the annotated conserved domain that the initiator protein contains. Detailed sequence comparisons indicate that the initiator protein phylogeny is largely congruent with that of the host, suggesting that the replicons have evolved along with their current hosts and that intergeneric transfer has been rare. However, related proteins were identified on chromosomal regions bearing characteristics indicative of ICE elements, and the phylogeny of these proteins displayed evidence of more frequent intergeneric transfer. Comparison of stability determinants associated with the RepA_N replicons suggests that they have a modular evolution as has been observed in other plasmid families. PMID:19100285

  10. The potent antimicrobial properties of cell penetrating peptide-conjugated silver nanoparticles with excellent selectivity for Gram-positive bacteria over erythrocytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Lihong; Yang, Jun; Xie, Jianping; Luo, Zhentao; Jiang, Jiang; Yang, Yi Yan; Liu, Shaomin

    2013-04-01

    Silver nanoparticles are of great interest for use as antimicrobial agents. Studies aimed at producing potent nano-silver biocides have focused on manipulation of particle size, shape, composition and surface charge. Here, we report the cell penetrating peptide catalyzed formation of antimicrobial silver nanoparticles in N,N-dimethylformamide. The novel nano-composite demonstrated a distinctly enhanced biocidal effect toward bacteria (Gram-positive Bacillus subtilis, Gram-negative Escherichia coli) and pathogenic yeast (Candida albicans), as compared to triangular and extremely small silver nanoparticles. In addition, a satisfactory biocompatibility was verified by a haemolysis test. Our results provide a paradigm in developing strategies that can maximize the silver nanoparticle application potentials while minimizing the toxic effects.Silver nanoparticles are of great interest for use as antimicrobial agents. Studies aimed at producing potent nano-silver biocides have focused on manipulation of particle size, shape, composition and surface charge. Here, we report the cell penetrating peptide catalyzed formation of antimicrobial silver nanoparticles in N,N-dimethylformamide. The novel nano-composite demonstrated a distinctly enhanced biocidal effect toward bacteria (Gram-positive Bacillus subtilis, Gram-negative Escherichia coli) and pathogenic yeast (Candida albicans), as compared to triangular and extremely small silver nanoparticles. In addition, a satisfactory biocompatibility was verified by a haemolysis test. Our results provide a paradigm in developing strategies that can maximize the silver nanoparticle application potentials while minimizing the toxic effects. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c3nr34254a

  11. Design of a Nanostructured Active Surface against Gram-Positive and Gram-Negative Bacteria through Plasma Activation and in Situ Silver Reduction.

    PubMed

    Gilabert-Porres, Joan; Martí, Sara; Calatayud, Laura; Ramos, Victor; Rosell, Antoni; Borrós, Salvador

    2016-01-13

    Nowadays there is an increasing focus for avoiding bacterial colonization in a medical device after implantation. Bacterial infection associated with prosthesis implantation, or even along the lifetime of the implanted prosthesis, entails a serious problem, emphasized with immunocompromised patients. This work shows a new methodology to create highly hydrophobic micro-/nanostructured silver antibacterial surfaces against Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria, using low-pressure plasma. PDMS (polydimethylsiloxane) samples, typically used in tracheal prosthesis, are coated with PFM (pentafluorophenyl methacrylate) through PECVD (plasma enhance chemical vapor deposition) technique. PFM thin films offer highly reactive ester groups that allow them to react preferably with amine bearing molecules, such as amine sugar, to create controlled reductive surfaces capable of reducing silver salts to a nanostructured metallic silver. This micro-/nanostructured silver coating shows interesting antibacterial properties combined with an antifouling behavior causing a reduction of Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria viability. In addition, these types of silver-coated samples show no apparent cytotoxicity against COS-7 cells. PMID:26593038

  12. Unravelling a vicious circle: animal feed marketed in Costa Rica contains irregular concentrations of tetracyclines and abundant oxytetracycline-resistant Gram-positive bacteria.

    PubMed

    Granados-Chinchilla, Fabio; Alfaro, Margarita; Chavarría, Guadalupe; Rodríguez, César

    2014-01-01

    Diverse tetracyclines are used to prevent and control bacterial infections in livestock and farmed fish. These drugs are administered through the diet, but farmers seldom check whether feed contains antibiotic-resistant bacteria that may colonise their crops or transfer their resistance traits to species of veterinary relevance. To examine whether antibiotic dosage defines the abundance of antibiotic-resistant bacteria in animal feed, we determined the concentration of parental compounds and epimers of oxytetracycline (OTC), doxycycline, tetracycline and chlortetracycline, as well as the abundance and resistance level of OTC-resistant bacteria in samples of fish (n = 21), poultry (n = 21), swine (n = 21), and shrimp feed (n = 21) marketed in Costa Rica. Fish feed contained the highest amounts of tetracyclines (119-8365 mg kg(-1)) and the largest proportion of bacteria resistant to 10 μg ml(-1) (1.8-92.4%) or 100 μg ml(-1) of OTC (12.5-63.8%). Poultry (78-438 mg kg(-1)) and swine (41-1076 mg kg(-1)) feed had intermediate concentrations of tetracyclines and OTC-resistant bacteria (0.2-66% and 0.3-49%, respectively), whereas shrimp feed showed the lowest amounts of tetracyclines (21.5-50.3 mg kg(-1)), no OTC and no culturable OTC-resistant bacteria. In line with these results, the MIC50 of OTC for 150 isolates from fish and poultry feed was > 256 µg ml(-1), while that of 150 bacteria isolated from swine feed was 192 µg ml(-1). Phenotypic tests, fatty acid profiles and proteotypic analyses by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionisation-time of flight mass-spectroscopy revealed that most OTC-resistant isolates were Gram-positive bacteria of low G+C% content from the genera Staphylococcus and Bacillus. Clear correlations between OTC dosage and feed colonisation with OTC-resistant bacteria were seen in medicated feed for fish (r = 0.179-0.651). Nonetheless, some unmedicated feed for fish, swine and poultry contained large populations of OTC-resistant bacteria, suggesting that raw materials and manufacturing processes may also influence carriage of OTC-resistant bacteria in animal feed. PMID:24660748

  13. Quantitative proteomic view associated with resistance to clinically important antibiotics in Gram-positive bacteria: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Chang-Ro; Lee, Jung Hun; Park, Kwang Seung; Jeong, Byeong Chul; Lee, Sang Hee

    2015-01-01

    The increase of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus (VRE) poses a worldwide and serious health threat. Although new antibiotics, such as daptomycin and linezolid, have been developed for the treatment of infections of Gram-positive pathogens, the emergence of daptomycin-resistant and linezolid-resistant strains during therapy has now increased clinical treatment failures. In the past few years, studies using quantitative proteomic methods have provided a considerable progress in understanding antibiotic resistance mechanisms. In this review, to understand the resistance mechanisms to four clinically important antibiotics (methicillin, vancomycin, linezolid, and daptomycin) used in the treatment of Gram-positive pathogens, we summarize recent advances in studies on resistance mechanisms using quantitative proteomic methods, and also examine proteins playing an important role in the bacterial mechanisms of resistance to the four antibiotics. Proteomic researches can identify proteins whose expression levels are changed in the resistance mechanism to only one antibiotic, such as LiaH in daptomycin resistance and PrsA in vancomycin resistance, and many proteins simultaneously involved in resistance mechanisms to various antibiotics. Most of resistance-related proteins, which are simultaneously associated with resistance mechanisms to several antibiotics, play important roles in regulating bacterial envelope biogenesis, or compensating for the fitness cost of antibiotic resistance. Therefore, proteomic data confirm that antibiotic resistance requires the fitness cost and the bacterial envelope is an important factor in antibiotic resistance. PMID:26322035

  14. Anti-bacterial performance of azithromycin nanoparticles as colloidal drug delivery system against different gram-negative and gram-positive bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Azhdarzadeh, Morteza; Lotfipour, Farzaneh; Zakeri-Milani, Parvin; Mohammadi, Ghobad; Valizadeh, Hadi

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Azithromycin (AZI) is a new macrolide antibiotic with a better activity against intracellular gram negative bacteria in comparison with Erythromycin. The purpose of this research was to prepare AZI nanoparticles (NPs) using PLGA polymer and to compare the effectiveness of prepared nanoparticles with untreated AZI solution. Methods: AZI NPs were prepared by Modified Quasi-Emulsion Solvent Diffusion method. The antibacterial activities of prepared NPs in comparison with AZI solution were assayed against indicator bacteria of Escherichia coli (PTCC 1330), Haemophilus influenzae (PTCC 1623) and Streptococcus pneumoniae (PTCC 1240) using agar well diffusion. Inhibition zone diameters (IZD) of nano-formulation were compared to the corresponding untreated AZI. Mean Inhibitory Concentration (MIC) values of AZI were also determined using serial dilution method in nutrient broth medium. Results: Mean IZD of nano-formulations for all indicator bacteria were significantly higher than that of untreated AZI (P<0.01). The enhanced antibacterial efficacy was more dominant in the gram positive species. The MIC values of NPs against the tested bacteria were reduced 8 times in comparison to those of untreated AZI. Conclusion: These results indicated an improved potency of AZI NPs which could be attributed to the modified surface characteristics as well as increased drug adsorption and uptake. PMID:24312766

  15. Another turn of the screw in shaving Gram-positive bacteria: Optimization of proteomics surface protein identification in Streptococcus pneumoniae.

    PubMed

    Olaya-Abril, Alfonso; Gmez-Gascn, Lidia; Jimnez-Mungua, Irene; Obando, Ignacio; Rodrguez-Ortega, Manuel J

    2012-06-27

    Bacterial surface proteins are of outmost importance as they play critical roles in the interaction between cells and their environment. In addition, they can be targets of either vaccines or antibodies. Proteomic analysis through "shaving" live cells with proteases has become a successful approach for a fast and reliable identification of surface proteins. However, this protocol has not been able to reach the goal of excluding cytoplasmic contamination, as cell lysis is an inherent process during culture and experimental manipulation. In this work, we carried out the optimization of the "shaving" strategy for the Gram-positive human pathogen Streptococcus pneumoniae, a bacterium highly susceptible to autolysis, and set up the conditions for maximizing the identification of surface proteins containing sorting or exporting signals, and for minimizing cytoplasmic contamination. We also demonstrate that cell lysis is an inherent process during culture and experimental manipulation, and that a low level of lysis is enough to contaminate a "surfome" preparation with peptides derived from cytoplasmic proteins. When the optimized conditions were applied to several clinical isolates, we found the majority of the proteins described to induce protection against pneumococcal infection. In addition, we found other proteins whose protection capacity has not been yet tested. In addition, we show the utility of this approach for providing antigens that can be used in serological tests for the diagnosis of pneumococcal disease. PMID:22575384

  16. End group modification: Efficient tool for improving activity of antimicrobial peptide analogues towards Gram-positive bacteria.

    PubMed

    Jahnsen, Rasmus O; Sandberg-Schaal, Anne; Frimodt-Møller, Niels; Nielsen, Hanne Mørck; Franzyk, Henrik

    2015-09-01

    Increased incidence of infections with multidrug-resistant bacterial strains warrants an intensive search for novel potential antimicrobial agents. Here, an antimicrobial peptide analogue with a cationic/hydrophobic alternating design displaying only moderate activity against Gram-positive pathogens was optimized. Generally, introduction of hydrophobic moieties at the N-terminus resulted in analogues with remarkably increased activity against multidrug-resistant Staphylococcus aureus and Enterococcus faecium. Interestingly, the potency against Escherichia coli strains was unaffected, whereas modification with hydrophobic moieties led to increased activity towards the Gram-negative Acinetobacter baumannii. Despite increased cytotoxicity against murine fibroblasts and human umbilical vein endothelial cells, the optimized peptide analogues exhibited significantly improved cell selectivity. Overall, the most favorable hydrophobic activity-inducing moieties were found to be cyclohexylacetyl and pentafluorophenylacetyl groups, while the presence of a short PEG-like chain had no significant effect on activity. Introduction of cationic moieties conferred no effect or merely a moderate activity-promoting effect to the analogues. PMID:25622790

  17. An unusual class of anthracyclines potentiate Gram-positive antibiotics in intrinsically resistant Gram-negative bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Cox, Georgina; Koteva, Kalinka; Wright, Gerard D.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives An orthogonal approach taken towards novel antibacterial drug discovery involves the identification of small molecules that potentiate or enhance the activity of existing antibacterial agents. This study aimed to identify natural-product rifampicin adjuvants in the intrinsically resistant organism Escherichia coli. Methods E. coli BW25113 was screened against 1120 actinomycete fermentation extracts in the presence of subinhibitory (2 mg/L) concentrations of rifampicin. The active molecule exhibiting the greatest rifampicin potentiation was isolated using activity-guided methods and identified using mass and NMR spectroscopy. Susceptibility testing and biochemical assays were used to determine the mechanism of antibiotic potentiation. Results The anthracycline Antibiotic 301A1 was isolated from the fermentation broth of a strain of Streptomyces (WAC450); the molecule was shown to be highly synergistic with rifampicin (fractional inhibitory concentration index?=?0.156) and moderately synergistic with linezolid (FIC index?=?0.25) in both E. coli and Acinetobacter baumannii. Activity was associated with inhibition of efflux and the synergistic phenotype was lost when tested against E. coli harbouring mutations within the rpoB gene. Structureactivity relationship studies revealed that other anthracyclines do not synergize with rifampicin and removal of the sugar moiety of Antibiotic 301A1 abolishes activity. Conclusions Screening only a subsection of our natural product library identified a small-molecule antibiotic adjuvant capable of sensitizing Gram-negative bacteria to antibiotics to which they are ordinarily intrinsically resistant. This result demonstrates the great potential of this approach in expanding antibiotic effectiveness in the face of the growing challenge of resistance in Gram-negatives. PMID:24627312

  18. Crystal Structure of DsbA from Corynebacterium diphtheriae and Its Functional Implications for CueP in Gram-Positive Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Um, Si-Hyeon; Kim, Jin-Sik; Song, Saemee; Kim, Nam Ah; Jeong, Seong Hoon; Ha, Nam-Chul

    2015-01-01

    In Gram-negative bacteria in the periplasmic space, the dimeric thioredoxin-fold protein DsbC isomerizes and reduces incorrect disulfide bonds of unfolded proteins, while the monomeric thioredoxin-fold protein DsbA introduces disulfide bonds in folding proteins. In the Gram-negative bacteria Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium, the reduced form of CueP scavenges the production of hydroxyl radicals in the copper-mediated Fenton reaction, and DsbC is responsible for keeping CueP in the reduced, active form. Some DsbA proteins fulfill the functions of DsbCs, which are not present in Gram-positive bacteria. In this study, we identified a DsbA homologous protein (CdDsbA) in the Corynebacterium diphtheriae genome and determined its crystal structure in the reduced condition at 1.5 Å resolution. CdDsbA consists of a monomeric thioredoxin-like fold with an inserted helical domain and unique N-terminal extended region. We confirmed that CdDsbA has disulfide bond isomerase/reductase activity, and we present evidence that the N-terminal extended region is not required for this activity and folding of the core DsbA-like domain. Furthermore, we found that CdDsbA could reduce CueP from C. diphtheriae. PMID:26082031

  19. Antimicrobial Effect of the Triterpene 3?,6?,16?-Trihydroxylup-20(29)-ene on Planktonic Cells and Biofilms from Gram Positive and Gram Negative Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Evaristo, Francisco Flvio Vasconcelos; Albuquerque, Maria Rose Jane R.; dos Santos, Hlcio Silva; Bandeira, Paulo Nogueira; vila, Fbio do Nascimento; da Silva, Bruno Rocha; Vasconcelos, Ariana Azevedo; Rabelo, rica de Menezes; Nascimento-Neto, Luiz Gonzaga; Arruda, Francisco Vassiliepe Sousa; Vasconcelos, Mayron Alves; Carneiro, Victor Alves; Cavada, Benildo Sousa; Teixeira, Edson Holanda

    2014-01-01

    This study evaluated the antimicrobial effect of 3?,6?,16?-trihydroxylup-20(29)-ene (CLF1), a triterpene isolated from Combretum leprosum Mart., in inhibiting the planktonic growth and biofilms of Gram positive bacteria Streptococcus mutans and S. mitis. The antimicrobial activity was assessed by determining the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) and minimum bactericidal concentration (MBC). The antibiofilm potential was determined by quantifying total biomass and enumerating biofilm-entrapped viable bacteria. In addition, the acute toxicity of CLF1 on Artemia sp. nauplii was also determined. The results showed that CLF1 was able in inhibiting the growth of S. mutans and S. mitis with MIC and MBC of 7.8??g/mL and 15.6??g/mL, respectively. CLF1 was highly effective on biofilms of both bacteria. Only 7.8??g/mL CLF1 was enough to inhibit by 97% and 90% biomass production of S. mutans and S. mitis, respectively. On the other hand, such effects were not evident on Gram negative Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Klebsiella oxytoca. The toxicity tests showed that the LC50 of CLF1 was 98.19??g/mL. Therefore, CLF1 isolated from C. leprosum may constitute an important natural agent for the development of new therapies for caries and other infectious diseases caused by S. mutans and S. mitis. PMID:25093179

  20. Transcriptional attenuation controls macrolide inducible efflux and resistance in Streptococcus pneumoniae and in other Gram-positive bacteria containing mef/mel(msr(D)) elements.

    PubMed

    Chancey, Scott T; Bai, Xianhe; Kumar, Nikhil; Drabek, Elliott F; Daugherty, Sean C; Colon, Thomas; Ott, Sandra; Sengamalay, Naomi; Sadzewicz, Lisa; Tallon, Luke J; Fraser, Claire M; Tettelin, Herv; Stephens, David S

    2015-01-01

    Macrolide resistance, emerging in Streptococcus pneumoniae and other Gram-positive bacteria, is increasingly due to efflux pumps encoded by mef/mel(msr) operons found on discrete mobile genetic elements. The regulation of mef/mel(msr) in these elements is not well understood. We identified the mef(E)/mel transcriptional start, localized the mef(E)/mel promoter, and demonstrated attenuation of transcription as a mechanism of regulation of macrolide-inducible mef-mediated macrolide resistance in S. pneumoniae. The mef(E)/mel transcriptional start site was a guanine 327 bp upstream of mef(E). Consensus pneumococcal promoter -10 (5'-TATACT-3') and -35 (5'-TTGAAC-3') boxes separated by 17 bp were identified 7 bp upstream of the start site. Analysis of the predicted secondary structure of the 327 5' region identified four pairs of inverted repeats R1-R8 predicted to fold into stem-loops, a small leader peptide [MTASMRLR, (Mef(E)L)] required for macrolide induction and a Rho-independent transcription terminator. RNA-seq analyses provided confirmation of transcriptional attenuation. In addition, expression of mef(E)L was also influenced by mef(E)L-dependent mRNA stability. The regulatory region 5' of mef(E) was highly conserved in other mef/mel(msr)-containing elements including Tn1207.1 and the 5612IQ complex in pneumococci and Tn1207.3 in Group A streptococci, indicating a regulatory mechanism common to a wide variety of Gram-positive bacteria containing mef/mel(msr) elements. PMID:25695510

  1. Multicenter Evaluation of the Vitek MS Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption IonizationTime of Flight Mass Spectrometry System for Identification of Gram-Positive Aerobic Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Burnham, Carey-Ann D.; Bythrow, Maureen; Garner, Omai B.; Ginocchio, Christine C.; Jennemann, Rebecca; Lewinski, Michael A.; Manji, Ryhana; Mochon, A. Brian; Procop, Gary W.; Richter, Sandra S.; Sercia, Linda; Westblade, Lars F.; Ferraro, Mary Jane; Branda, John A.

    2013-01-01

    Matrix-assisted laser desorption ionizationtime of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF) is gaining momentum as a tool for bacterial identification in the clinical microbiology laboratory. Compared with conventional methods, this technology can more readily and conveniently identify a wide range of organisms. Here, we report the findings from a multicenter study to evaluate the Vitek MS v2.0 system (bioMrieux, Inc.) for the identification of aerobic Gram-positive bacteria. A total of 1,146 unique isolates, representing 13 genera and 42 species, were analyzed, and results were compared to those obtained by nucleic acid sequence-based identification as the reference method. For 1,063 of 1,146 isolates (92.8%), the Vitek MS provided a single identification that was accurate to the species level. For an additional 31 isolates (2.7%), multiple possible identifications were provided, all correct at the genus level. Mixed-genus or single-choice incorrect identifications were provided for 18 isolates (1.6%). Although no identification was obtained for 33 isolates (2.9%), there was no specific bacterial species for which the Vitek MS consistently failed to provide identification. In a subset of 463 isolates representing commonly encountered important pathogens, 95% were accurately identified to the species level and there were no misidentifications. Also, in all but one instance, the Vitek MS correctly differentiated Streptococcus pneumoniae from other viridans group streptococci. The findings demonstrate that the Vitek MS system is highly accurate for the identification of Gram-positive aerobic bacteria in the clinical laboratory setting. PMID:23658261

  2. Transcriptional Attenuation Controls Macrolide Inducible Efflux and Resistance in Streptococcus pneumoniae and in Other Gram-Positive Bacteria Containing mef/mel(msr(D)) Elements

    PubMed Central

    Chancey, Scott T.; Bai, Xianhe; Kumar, Nikhil; Drabek, Elliott F.; Daugherty, Sean C.; Colon, Thomas; Ott, Sandra; Sengamalay, Naomi; Sadzewicz, Lisa; Tallon, Luke J.; Fraser, Claire M.; Tettelin, Hervé; Stephens, David S.

    2015-01-01

    Macrolide resistance, emerging in Streptococcus pneumoniae and other Gram-positive bacteria, is increasingly due to efflux pumps encoded by mef/mel(msr) operons found on discrete mobile genetic elements. The regulation of mef/mel(msr) in these elements is not well understood. We identified the mef(E)/mel transcriptional start, localized the mef(E)/mel promoter, and demonstrated attenuation of transcription as a mechanism of regulation of macrolide-inducible mef-mediated macrolide resistance in S. pneumoniae. The mef(E)/mel transcriptional start site was a guanine 327 bp upstream of mef(E). Consensus pneumococcal promoter -10 (5′-TATACT-3′) and -35 (5′-TTGAAC-3′) boxes separated by 17 bp were identified 7 bp upstream of the start site. Analysis of the predicted secondary structure of the 327 5’ region identified four pairs of inverted repeats R1-R8 predicted to fold into stem-loops, a small leader peptide [MTASMRLR, (Mef(E)L)] required for macrolide induction and a Rho-independent transcription terminator. RNA-seq analyses provided confirmation of transcriptional attenuation. In addition, expression of mef(E)L was also influenced by mef(E)L-dependent mRNA stability. The regulatory region 5’ of mef(E) was highly conserved in other mef/mel(msr)-containing elements including Tn1207.1 and the 5612IQ complex in pneumococci and Tn1207.3 in Group A streptococci, indicating a regulatory mechanism common to a wide variety of Gram-positive bacteria containing mef/mel(msr) elements. PMID:25695510

  3. Armadillidin: a novel glycine-rich antibacterial peptide directed against gram-positive bacteria in the woodlouse Armadillidium vulgare (Terrestrial Isopod, Crustacean).

    PubMed

    Herbinière, Juline; Braquart-Varnier, Christine; Grève, Pierre; Strub, Jean-Marc; Frère, Jacques; Van Dorsselaer, Alain; Martin, Gilbert

    2005-01-01

    We report the isolation and the characterization of a novel antibacterial peptide from hemocytes of the woodlouse Armadillidium vulgare, naturally infected or uninfected by Wolbachia, an intracellular Gram-negative bacterium. This molecule displays antibacterial activity against Gram-positive bacteria despite its composition which classes it into the glycine-rich antibacterial peptide family, usually directed against fungi and Gram-negative bacteria. The complete sequence was determined by a combination of Edman degradation, mass spectrometry and cDNA cloning using a hemocyte library. The mature peptide (53 residues) has a 5259 Da molecular mass and is post-translationally modified by a C-terminal amidation. This peptide is characterized by a high level of glycine (47%) and a fivefold repeated motif GGGFH(R/S). As no evident sequence homology to other hitherto described antibacterial peptides has been found out, this antibacterial peptide was named armadillidin. Armadillidin is constitutively expressed in hemocytes and appears to be specific of A. vulgare. PMID:15752546

  4. Biotransformation of 4-sec-butylphenol by Gram-positive bacteria of the genera Mycobacterium and Nocardia including modifications on the alkyl chain and the hydroxyl group.

    PubMed

    Hahn, Veronika; Snwoldt, Katharina; Mikolasch, Annett; Schauer, Frieder

    2013-09-01

    The environmental pollutant 4-sec-butylphenol (4-sec-BP) which possesses estrogenic properties was transformed by the aerobic Gram-positive bacteria Mycobacterium neoaurum and Nocardia cyriacigeorgica into three main products (P1-P3) which were isolated and structurally characterized in detail. Two of them were products of a process resembling anaerobic metabolism of alkylphenols based on modifications of the alkyl side chain of 4-sec-BP. The first product (P1) was identified as 4-(2-hydroxy-1-methylpropyl)-phenol. The second product P2 was isolated as a mixture of at least four structures which could be identified as I 4-sec-butylidenecyclohexa-2,5-dienone; II 4-(1-methylenepropyl)-phenol; III 4-(1-methylpropenyl)-phenol; and IV 4-(1-methylallyl)-phenol. In contrast to P1 and P2, the third product (P3) resulted from a modification of the hydroxyl group of 4-sec-BP. This product was only formed by M. neoaurum and was identified as the glucoside conjugate 4-sec-butylphenol-?-D-glucopyranoside. Since in general, fungi synthesize sugar conjugates to detoxify hazardous pollutants, the formation of this conjugate is a peculiarity of M. neoaurum. Thus, altogether, six products were formed from 4-sec-BP and different transformation pathways are introduced. The hydroxylating and glucosylating capacity of the characterized bacteria open up applications in environmental protection. PMID:23912120

  5. Efficacy of 5-day parenteral versus intramammary benzylpenicillin for treatment of clinical mastitis caused by gram-positive bacteria susceptible to penicillin in vitro.

    PubMed

    Kalmus, P; Simojoki, H; Orro, T; Taponen, S; Mustonen, K; Holopainen, J; Pyörälä, S

    2014-01-01

    The efficacy of parenteral (intramuscular) or intramammary (IMM) benzylpenicillin treatment for clinical mastitis caused by gram-positive bacteria susceptible to penicillin in vitro was investigated. Cows with clinical mastitis in 1 udder quarter were randomly placed into 2 treatment groups. The preliminary bacteriological diagnosis of intramammary infection (IMI) was based on on-farm culturing, and the bacteriological diagnoses were later confirmed by a quantitative PCR assay. Clinical mastitis caused by gram-positive bacteria susceptible to benzylpenicillin was treated with penicillin via either the parenteral route (20mg/kg) or IMM route (600mg) once per day for 5d. The outcome of the treatment was evaluated 3 to 4wk after the onset of the treatment. The affected quarter was examined to assess the clinical cure, and milk samples were collected from the affected quarter to determine the bacteriological cure and milk N-acetyl-β-d-glucosaminidase activity. The survival and the composite milk somatic cell counts of the treated cows were followed up for 6 and 3mo after treatment, respectively. A total of 140 cows with clinical mastitis were included in the study, 61 being treated with benzylpenicillin parenterally and 79 via the IMM route. From all quarters treated, 108 of 140 (77.1%) were cured clinically and 77 of 140 (55.0%) were cured bacteriologically. The route of treatment did not significantly affect the outcome of the treatment; 80.3% of the quarters with parenteral treatment and 74.7% of the quarters with IMM treatment showed a clinical cure, and 54.1 and 55.7% a bacteriological cure, respectively. The milk N-acetyl-β-d-glucosaminidase activity was significantly lower in the quarters with a clinical or bacteriological cure than in the quarters with no cure. The 6-mo survival and the proportion of cows with composite milk somatic cell counts <200,000/mL among the treated cows during the 3-mo follow-up period did not significantly differ between the treatment groups. In conclusion, the outcome of either parenteral or IMM benzylpenicillin treatment of clinical mastitis caused by penicillin-susceptible bacteria was similar. PMID:24485692

  6. Silver nanocrystallites: Facile biofabrication using Shewanella oneidensis, and an evaluation of their comparative toxicity on Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria

    SciTech Connect

    Suresh, Anil K; Wang, Wei; Pelletier, Dale A; Moon, Ji Won; Gu, Baohua; Mortensen, Ninell P; Allison, David P; Joy, David Charles; Phelps, Tommy Joe; Doktycz, Mitchel John

    2010-01-01

    Microorganisms have long been known to develop resistance to metal ions either by sequestering metals inside the cell or by effluxing them into the extracellular media. Here we report the biosynthesis of extracellular silver based single nanocrystallites of well-defined composition and homogeneous morphology utilizing the -proteobacterium, Shewanella oneidensis strain MR-1, upon incubation with an aqueous solution of silver nitrate. Further characterization of these particles revealed that the crystals consist of small, reasonably monodispersed spheres in the size range 2 11 nm (with an average of 4 1.5 nm). The bactericidal effect of these biologically synthesized silver nanoparticles (biogenic-Ag) are compared to similar chemically synthesized nanoparticles (colloidal silver [colloidal-Ag] and oleate capped silver [oleate-Ag]). The determination of the bactericidal effect of these different silver nanoparticles was assessed using both Gram-negative (E. coli) and Gram-positive (B. subtilis) bacteria and based on the diameter of the inhibition zone in disc diffusion tests, minimum inhibitory concentrations, Live/Dead staining assays, and atomic force microscopy. From a toxicity perspective, a clear synthesis procedure, and a surface coat- and strain-dependent inhibition were observed for silver nanoparticles. Biogenic-Ag was found to be of higher toxicity when compared to colloidal-Ag for both E. coli and B. subtilis. E. coli was found to be more resistant to either of these nanoparticles than B. subtilis. In contrast, Oleate-Ag was not toxic to either of the bacteria. These findings have important implications for the potential uses of Ag nanomaterials and for their fate in biological and environmental systems.

  7. Adsorption on stainless steel surfaces of biosurfactants produced by gram-negative and gram-positive bacteria: consequence on the bioadhesive behavior of Listeria monocytogenes.

    PubMed

    Meylheuc, Thierry; Methivier, Christophe; Renault, Margareth; Herry, Jean-Marie; Pradier, Claire-Marie; Bellon-Fontaine, Marie Nolle

    2006-10-01

    The ability of adsorbed biosurfactants (Pf and Lb) obtained from gram-negative bacterium (Pseudomonas fluorescens) or gram-positive bacterium (Lactobacillus helveticus) to inhibit adhesion of four listerial strains to stainless steel was investigated. These metallic surfaces were characterized using the following complementary analytical techniques: contact-angle measurements (CAM), atomic force microscopy (AFM), polarization modulation-infrared reflection-adsorption spectroscopy (PM-IRRAS) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Contact-angles with polar liquids (water and formamide) indicated that the stainless steel surface covered with adsorbed biosurfactant was more hydrophilic and electron-donating than bare stainless steel. The surface characterization by XPS and PM-IRRAS revealed that conditioning the stainless steel changes the substrate in two ways, by modifying the surface alloy composition and by leaving an thin adsorbed organic layer. AFM observations enabled to say that the layer covered entirely the surface and was probably thicker (with patches) in the case of Pf-conditioned surfaces compared to the Lb-conditioned ones, which seemed to be less homogeneous. Though the added layer was thin, significant chemical changes were observed that can account for drastic modifications in the surface adhesive properties. As a matter of fact, adhesion tests showed that both used biosurfactants were effective by decreasing strongly the level of contamination of stainless steel surfaces by the four strains of Listeria monocytogenes. The more important decrease concerned the CIP104794 and CIP103573 strains (>99.7%) on surface conditioned by L. helveticus biosurfactant. A less reduced phenomenon (75.2%) for the CIP103574 strain on stainless steel with absorbed biosurfactant from P. fluorescens was observed. Whatever the strain of L. monocytogenes and the biosurfactant used, this antiadhesive biologic coating reduced both total adhering flora and viable and cultivable adherent bacteria on stainless steel surfaces. This study confirms that biosurfactants constitute an effective strategy to prevent microbial colonization of metallic surfaces by pathogenic bacteria like the food-borne pathogen L. monocytogenes. PMID:16781848

  8. Sulfoxides, Analogues of L-Methionine and L-Cysteine As Pro-Drugs against Gram-Positive and Gram-Negative Bacteria.

    PubMed

    Anufrieva, N V; Morozova, E A; Kulikova, V V; Bazhulina, N P; Manukhov, I V; Degtev, D I; Gnuchikh, E Yu; Rodionov, A N; Zavilgelsky, G B; Demidkina, T V

    2015-01-01

    The problem of resistance to antibiotics requires the development of new classes of broad-spectrum antimicrobial drugs. The concept of pro-drugs allows researchers to look for new approaches to obtain effective drugs with improved pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic properties. Thiosulfinates, formed enzymatically from amino acid sulfoxides upon crushing cells of genus Allium plants, are known as antimicrobial compounds. The instability and high reactivity of thiosulfinates complicate their use as individual antimicrobial compounds. We propose a pharmacologically complementary pair: an amino acid sulfoxide pro-drug and vitamin B6 - dependent methionine ?-lyase, which metabolizes it in the patient's body. The enzyme catalyzes the ?- and ?-elimination reactions of sulfoxides, analogues of L-methionine and L-cysteine, which leads to the formation of thiosulfinates. In the present work, we cloned the enzyme gene from Clostridium sporogenes. Ionic and tautomeric forms of the internal aldimine were determined by lognormal deconvolution of the holoenzyme spectrum and the catalytic parameters of the recombinant enzyme in the ?- and ?-elimination reactions of amino acids, and some sulfoxides of amino acids were obtained. For the first time, the possibility of usage of the enzyme for effective conversion of sulfoxides was established and the antimicrobial activity of thiosulfinates against Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria in situ was shown. PMID:26798500

  9. Sulfoxides, Analogues of L-Methionine and L-Cysteine As Pro-Drugs against Gram-Positive and Gram-Negative Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Anufrieva, N. V.; Morozova, E. A.; Kulikova, V. V.; Bazhulina, N. P.; Manukhov, I. V.; Degtev, D. I.; Gnuchikh, E. Yu.; Rodionov, A. N.; Zavilgelsky, G. B.; Demidkina, T. V.

    2015-01-01

    The problem of resistance to antibiotics requires the development of new classes of broad-spectrum antimicrobial drugs. The concept of pro-drugs allows researchers to look for new approaches to obtain effective drugs with improved pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic properties. Thiosulfinates, formed enzymatically from amino acid sulfoxides upon crushing cells of genus Allium plants, are known as antimicrobial compounds. The instability and high reactivity of thiosulfinates complicate their use as individual antimicrobial compounds. We propose a pharmacologically complementary pair: an amino acid sulfoxide pro-drug and vitamin B6 dependent methionine ?-lyase, which metabolizes it in the patients body. The enzyme catalyzes the ?- and ?-elimination reactions of sulfoxides, analogues of L-methionine and L-cysteine, which leads to the formation of thiosulfinates. In the present work, we cloned the enzyme gene from Clostridium sporogenes. Ionic and tautomeric forms of the internal aldimine were determined by lognormal deconvolution of the holoenzyme spectrum and the catalytic parameters of the recombinant enzyme in the ?- and ?-elimination reactions of amino acids, and some sulfoxides of amino acids were obtained. For the first time, the possibility of usage of the enzyme for effective conversion of sulfoxides was established and the antimicrobial activity of thiosulfinates against Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria in situ was shown. PMID:26798500

  10. Classification of a bacterial isolate, from pozol, exhibiting antimicrobial activity against several gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria, yeasts, and molds.

    PubMed

    Ray, P; Sanchez, C; O'Sullivan, D J; McKay, L L

    2000-08-01

    A bacterial isolate, designated CS93, capable of producing a broad-spectrum antimicrobial compound(s) effective against gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria, yeasts, and molds was isolated from pozol, a fermented maize product. This strain was phenotypically similar to another pozol isolate that was previously designated as Agrobacterium azotophilium by other investigators. By using biochemical, phenotypic, and 16S rRNA sequence analysis, both pozol isolates were identified as members of the genus Bacillus, possibly a variant of Bacillus subtilis. While the antimicrobial compound(s) was initially produced only on a solid medium, parameters were identified for production in broth. The compound(s) was heat stable (121 degrees C for 15 min), exhibited activity over a wide pH range (pH 3 to pH 11), and was inactivated by pronase E. The antimicrobial compound(s) was bactericidal and bacteriolytic against Escherichia coli V517, bacteriostatic against Micrococcus luteus, and fungistatic against Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The inhibitory compound(s) could possibly serve as a food biopreservative. PMID:10945591

  11. Structural Basis for the De-N-acetylation of Poly-?-1,6-N-acetyl-d-glucosamine in Gram-positive Bacteria*

    PubMed Central

    Little, Dustin J.; Bamford, Natalie C.; Pokrovskaya, Varvara; Robinson, Howard; Nitz, Mark; Howell, P. Lynne

    2014-01-01

    Exopolysaccharides are required for the development and integrity of biofilms produced by a wide variety of bacteria. In staphylococci, partial de-N-acetylation of the exopolysaccharide poly-?-1,6-N-acetyl-d-glucosamine (PNAG) by the extracellular protein IcaB is required for biofilm formation. To understand the molecular basis for PNAG de-N-acetylation, the structure of IcaB from Ammonifex degensii (IcaBAd) has been determined to 1.7 ? resolution. The structure of IcaBAd reveals a (?/?)7 barrel common to the family four carbohydrate esterases (CE4s) with the canonical motifs circularly permuted. The metal dependence of IcaBAd is similar to most CE4s showing the maximum rates of de-N-acetylation with Ni2+, Co2+, and Zn2+. From docking studies with ?-1,6-GlcNAc oligomers and structural comparison to PgaB from Escherichia coli, the Gram-negative homologue of IcaB, we identify Arg-45, Tyr-67, and Trp-180 as key residues for PNAG binding during catalysis. The absence of these residues in PgaB provides a rationale for the requirement of a C-terminal domain for efficient deacetylation of PNAG in Gram-negative species. Mutational analysis of conserved active site residues suggests that IcaB uses an altered catalytic mechanism in comparison to other characterized CE4 members. Furthermore, we identified a conserved surface-exposed hydrophobic loop found only in Gram-positive homologues of IcaB. Our data suggest that this loop is required for membrane association and likely anchors IcaB to the membrane during polysaccharide biosynthesis. The work presented herein will help guide the design of IcaB inhibitors to combat biofilm formation by staphylococci. PMID:25359777

  12. Identification of a new family of enzymes with potential O-acetylpeptidoglycan esterase activity in both Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Weadge, Joel T; Pfeffer, John M; Clarke, Anthony J

    2005-01-01

    Background The metabolism of the rigid bacterial cell wall heteropolymer peptidoglycan is a dynamic process requiring continuous biosynthesis and maintenance involving the coordination of both lytic and synthetic enzymes. The O-acetylation of peptidoglycan has been proposed to provide one level of control on these activities as this modification inhibits the action of the major endogenous lytic enzymes, the lytic transglycosylases. The O-acetylation of peptidoglycan also inhibits the activity of the lysozymes which serve as the first line of defense of host cells against the invasion of bacterial pathogens. Despite this central importance, there is a dearth of information regarding peptidoglycan O-acetylation and nothing has previously been reported on its de-acetylation. Results Homology searches of the genome databases have permitted this first report on the identification of a potential family of O-Acetylpeptidoglycan esterases (Ape). These proteins encoded in the genomes of a variety of both Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria, including a number of important human pathogens such as species of Neisseria, Helicobacter, Campylobacter, and Bacillus anthracis, have been organized into three families based on amino acid sequence similarities with family 1 being further divided into three sub-families. The genes encoding these proteins are shown to be clustered with Peptidoglycan O-acetyltransferases (Pat) and in some cases, together with other genes involved in cell wall metabolism. Representative bacteria that encode the Ape proteins were experimentally shown to produce O-acetylated peptidoglycan. Conclusion The hypothetical proteins encoded by the pat and ape genes have been organized into families based on sequence similarities. The Pat proteins have sequence similarity to Pseudomonas aeruginosa AlgI, an integral membrane protein known to participate in the O-acetylation of the exopolysaccaride, alginate. As none of the bacteria that harbor the pat genes produce alginate, we propose that the Pat proteins serve to O-acetylate peptidoglycan which is known to be a maturation event occurring in the periplasm. The Ape sequences have amino acid sequence similarity to the CAZy CE 3 carbohydrate esterases, a family previously known to be composed of only O-acetylxylan esterases. They are predicted to contain the ?/? hydrolase fold associated with the GDSL and TesA hydrolases and they possess the signature motifs associated with the catalytic residues of the CE3 esterases. Specific signature sequence motifs were identified for the Ape proteins which led to their organization into distinct families. We propose that by expressing both Pat and Ape enzymes, bacteria would be able to obtain a high level of localized control over the degradation of peptidoglycan through the attachment and removal of O-linked acetate. This would facilitate the efficient insertion of pores and flagella, localize spore formation, and control the level of general peptidoglycan turnover. PMID:16111493

  13. Covalent structure, synthesis, and structure-function studies of mesentericin Y 105(37), a defensive peptide from gram-positive bacteria Leuconostoc mesenteroides.

    PubMed

    Fleury, Y; Dayem, M A; Montagne, J J; Chaboisseau, E; Le Caer, J P; Nicolas, P; Delfour, A

    1996-06-14

    A 37-residue cationic antimicrobial peptide named mesentericin Y 105(37) was purified to homogeneity from cell-free culture supernatant of the Gram-positive bacterium Leuconostoc mesenteroides. The complete amino acid sequence of the peptide, KYYGNGVHCTKSGCSVNWGEAASAGIHRLANGGNGFW, has been established by automated Edman degradation, mass spectrometry, and solid phase synthesis. Mesentericin Y 105(37) contains a single intramolecular disulfide bond that forms a 6-membered ring within the molecule. Mesentericin Y 105(37) was synthesized by the solid phase method. The synthetic replicate was shown to be indistinguishable from the natural peptide with respect to electrophoretic and chromatographic properties, mass spectrometry analysis, automated amino acid sequence determination, and antimicrobial properties. At nanomolar concentrations, synthetic mesentericin Y 105(37) is active against Gram+ bacteria in the genera Lactobacillus and Carnobacterium. Most interestingly, the peptide is inhibitory to the growth of the food-borne pathogen Listeria. CD spectra of mesentericin Y 105(37) in low polarity medium, which mimic the lipophilicity of the membrane of target organisms, indicated 30-40% alpha-helical conformation, and predictions of secondary structure suggested that the peptide can be configured as an amphipathic helix spanning over residues 17-31. To reveal the molecular basis of the specificity of mesentericin Y 105(37) targetting and mode of action, NH2- or COOH-terminally truncated analogs together with point-substituted analogs were synthesized and evaluated for their ability to inhibit the growth of Listeria ivanovii. In sharp contrast with broad spectrum alpha-helical antimicrobial peptides from vertebrate animals, which can be shortened to 14-18 residues without deleterious effect on potency, molecular elements responsible for anti-Listeria activity of mesentericin Y 105(37) are to be traced at once to the NH2-terminal tripeptide KYY, the disulfide bridge, the putative alpha-helical domain 17-31, and the COOH-terminal tryptophan residue of the molecule. It is proposed that the amphipathic helical domain of the peptide interacts with lipid bilayers, leading subsequently to alteration of the membrane functions, whereas residues 1-14 form part of a recognition structure for a membrane-bound receptor, which may be critical for peptide targetting. Because mesentericin Y 105(37) is easy to synthesize at low cost, it may represent a useful and tractable tool as a starting point for the design of more potent analogs that may be of potential applicability in foods preservation. PMID:8662868

  14. In-Vitro, Anti-Bacterial Activities of Aqueous Extracts of Acacia catechu (L.F.)Willd, Castanea sativa, Ephedra sinica stapf and shilajita mumiyo Against Gram Positive and Gram Negative Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Dashtdar, Mehrab; Dashtdar, Mohammad Reza; Dashtdar, Babak; shirazi, Mohammad khabaz; Khan, Saeed Ahmad

    2013-01-01

    Objective: Evaluations of the in-vitro anti-bacterial activities of aqueous extracts of Acacia catechu (L.F.)Willd, Castanea sativa, Ephedra sinica stapf and Shilajita mumiyo against gram-positive bacteria (Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus pneumonia) and gram-negative bacteria (Escherichia coli, klebsiella pneumoniae, Proteus mirabilis, Pseudomonas aeruginosa) are reasonable since these ethnomedicinal plants have been used in Persian folk medicine for treating skin diseases, venereal diseases, respiratory problems and nervous disorders for ages. Methods: The well diffusion method (KB testing) with a concentration of 250 ?g/disc was used for evaluating the minimal inhibitory concentrations (MIC). Maximum synergistic effects of different combinations of components were also observed. Results: A particular combination of Acacia catechu (L.F.) Willd, Castanea sativa, Ephedra sinica stapf and shilajita mumiyo extracts possesses an outstanding anti-bacterial activity. It's inhibiting effect on microorganisms is significant when compared to the control group (P< 0.05). Staphylococcus aureus was the most sensitive microorganism. The highest antibacterial activity against gram-positive bacteria (Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus pneumonia) or gram-negative bacteria (Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumonia, Proteus mirabilis and Pseudomonas aeruginosa) was exerted by formula number 2 (Table1). Conclusion: The results reveal the presence of antibacterial activities of Acacia catechu, Castanea sativa husk, Ephedra sp. and Mumiyo against gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria. Synergistic effects in a combined formula, especially in formula number 2 (ASLAN?) can lead to potential sources of new antiseptic agents for treatment of acute or chronic skin ulcers. These results considering the significant antibacterial effect of the present formulation, support ethno-pharmacological uses against diarrheal and venereal diseases and demonstrate use of these plants to treat infectious diseases. PMID:25780663

  15. Performance Evaluation of the Verigene Gram-Positive and Gram-Negative Blood Culture Test for Direct Identification of Bacteria and Their Resistance Determinants from Positive Blood Cultures in Hong Kong

    PubMed Central

    Siu, Gilman K. H.; Chen, Jonathan H. K.; Ng, T. K.; Lee, Rodney A.; Fung, Kitty S. C.; To, Sabrina W. C.; Wong, Barry K. C.; Cheung, Sherman; Wong, Ivan W. F.; Tam, Marble M. P.; Lee, Swing S. W.; Yam, W. C.

    2015-01-01

    Background A multicenter study was conducted to evaluate the diagnostic performance and the time to identifcation of the Verigene Blood Culture Test, the BC-GP and BC-GN assays, to identify both Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria and their drug resistance determinants directly from positive blood cultures collected in Hong Kong. Methods and Results A total of 364 blood cultures were prospectively collected from four public hospitals, in which 114 and 250 cultures yielded Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria, and were tested with the BC-GP and BC-GN assay respectively. The overall identification agreement for Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria were 89.6% and 90.5% in monomicrobial cultures and 62.5% and 53.6% in polymicrobial cultures, respectively. The sensitivities for most genus/species achieved at least 80% except Enterococcus spp. (60%), K.oxytoca (0%), K.pneumoniae (69.2%), whereas the specificities for all targets ranged from 98.9% to 100%. Of note, 50% (7/14) cultures containing K.pneumoniae that were missed by the BC-GN assay were subsequently identified as K.variicola. Approximately 5.5% (20/364) cultures contained non-target organisms, of which Aeromonas spp. accounted for 25% and are of particular concern. For drug resistance determination, the Verigene test showed 100% sensitivity for identification of MRSA, VRE and carbapenem resistant Acinetobacter, and 84.4% for ESBL-producing Enterobacteriaceae based on the positive detection of mecA, vanA, blaOXA and blaCTXM respectively. Conclusion Overall, the Verigene test provided acceptable accuracy for identification of bacteria and resistance markers with a range of turnaround time 40.5 to 99.2 h faster than conventional methods in our region. PMID:26431434

  16. Susceptibilities of 428 gram-positive and -negative anaerobic bacteria to Bay y3118 compared with their susceptibilities to ciprofloxacin, clindamycin, metronidazole, piperacillin, piperacillin-tazobactam, and cefoxitin.

    PubMed

    Pankuch, G A; Jacobs, M R; Appelbaum, P C

    1993-08-01

    The susceptibilities of 428 gram-negative and gram-positive anaerobes (including selected cefoxitin-resistant strains) to Bay y3118 (a new fluoroquinolone), ciprofloxacin, clindamycin, metronidazole, cefoxitin, piperacillin, and piperacillin-tazobactam were tested. Organisms comprised 115 Bacteroides fragilis group, 116 non-B. fragilis Bacteroides, Prevotella, and Porphyromonas spp., 40 fusobacteria, 58 peptostreptococci, 48 gram-positive non-spore-forming rods, and 51 clostridia. beta-Lactamase production was demonstrated in 87% of the gram-negative rods but in none of the gram-positive organisms. Overall, Bay y3118 was the most active agent, with all organisms inhibited at an MIC of < or = 2.0 micrograms/ml (MICs for 50% [MIC50] and 90% [MIC90] of strains tested, 0.125 and 0.5 microgram/ml, respectively). By contrast, ciprofloxacin was much less active, with only 42% of strains susceptible at a breakpoint of 2.0 micrograms/ml (MIC50, 4.0 micrograms/ml; MIC90, 16.0 micrograms/ml). Metronidazole was active against all gram-negative rods, but 7% of peptostreptococci, 83% of gram-positive non-spore-forming rods, and 4% of non-Clostridium perfringens, non-Clostridium difficile clostridia were resistant to this agent (MICs, > 16.0 micrograms/ml). Clindamycin was active against 94% of Bacteroides, Prevotella, and Porphyromonas spp., 91% of peptostreptococci, and 100% of gram-positive non-spore-forming rods, but was active against only 70% of fusobacteria and 53% of clostridia. Cefoxitin was active against > or = 90% of all groups except the B. fragilis group and non-Propionibacterium acnes gram-positive non-spore-forming rods (both 85%) and C. difficile (20%). Significant enhancement of piperacillin by tazobactam was seen in all beta-lactamase-positive strains (99% susceptible; MIC90, 8.0 micrograms/ml), and all beta-lactamase-negative strains were susceptible to piperacillin (MIC90, 8.0 micrograms/ml). Clinical studies are required to delineate the role of Bay y3118 in the treatment of anaerobic infections. PMID:8215278

  17. MiniUIB, a Novel Minitransposon-Based System for Stable Insertion of Foreign DNA into the Genomes of Gram-Negative and Gram-Positive Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Christie-Oleza, Joseph Alexander; Brunet-Galmés, Isabel; Lalucat, Jorge; Nogales, Balbina

    2013-01-01

    Transposition of the insertion sequence (IS) ISPpu12 is actively induced after conjugative interaction. The transposase of this IS can act in trans on structures flanked by inverted repeats similar to those of the transposon. Based on that fact, an ISPpu12-based minitransposon, miniUIB, has been constructed in order to biotechnologically exploit the self-regulation of ISPpu12 and its increased activity after conjugative interaction. Mobilization of the miniUIB structure into the genome of Pseudomonas stutzeri AN10 after conjugative interaction was demonstrated. A single gene, i.e., the kanamycin resistance determinant, or large genetic structures of >12 kb, i.e., alkBFGHJKL and alkST operons of Pseudomonas putida TF4-1L (GPo1), have been easily integrated in P. stutzeri AN10 by an RP4-based delivery system. Therefore, the integration of the alk determinants by use of the miniUIB system has extended the biodegradation capabilities of this strain. Plasmid pJOC100, containing the transposase and regulator genes of ISPpu12 adjacent to the miniUIB structure, was constructed in order to extend the host range of this biotechnologically useful genetic tool to other model and real-world bacteria. The effectiveness of the system for random mutagenesis in a phylogenetic wide range of bacteria and for the insertion of novel functions has been demonstrated, even in successive steps. PMID:23275505

  18. Three novel B-type mannose-specific lectins of Cynoglossus semilaevis possess varied antibacterial activities against Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yuan-Yuan; Liu, Li; Li, Jun; Sun, Li

    2016-02-01

    Lectins are a group of sugar-binding proteins that are important factors of the innate immune system. In this study, we examined, in a comparative manner, the expression and function of three Bulb-type (B-type) mannose-specific lectins (named CsBML1, CsBML2, and CsBML3) from tongue sole. All three lectins possess three repeats of the conserved mannose binding motif QXDXNXVXY. Expression of CsBML1, CsBML2, and CsBML3 was most abundant in liver and upregulated by bacterial infection. Recombinant (r) CsBML1, CsBML2, and CsBML3 bound to a wide arrange of bacteria in a dose-dependent manner and with different affinities. All three lectins displayed mannose-specific and calcium-dependent agglutinating capacities but differed in agglutinating profiles. rCsBML1 and rCsBML2, but not rCsBML3, killed target bacteria invitro and inhibited bacterial dissemination in fish tissues invivo. These results indicate for the first time that in teleost, different members of B-type mannose-specific lectins likely play different roles in antibacterial immunity. PMID:26455466

  19. Biogenic amine production by Gram-positive bacteria isolated from Spanish dry-cured "chorizo" sausage treated with high pressure and kept in chilled storage.

    PubMed

    de Las Rivas, B; Ruiz-Capillas, C; Carrascosa, A V; Curiel, J A; Jiménez-Colmenero, F; Muñoz, R

    2008-10-01

    We studied the production of biogenic amines by 200 strains of lactic acid bacteria and staphylococci isolated during chilled storage from samples of Spanish dry-cured "chorizo" sausage treated with high-pressure. The presence of biogenic amines in a decarboxylase synthetic broth was confirmed by ion-exchange chromatography. β-phenylethylamine was the biogenic amine more frequently produced (22.5%), followed by tyramine (7.5%). In tyramine producer-strains the presence of a tyrosine decarboxylase gene was confirmed by PCR. Among lactic acid bacteria, the production of tyramine was mainly related to the species Lactobacillus curvatus. Most of the L. curvatus strains were also β-phenylethylamine-producers. In relation to staphylococci, tyramine-production was mainly associated to Staphylococcus carnosus strains. The S. carnosus strains analysed in this study produced β-phenylethylamine or β-phenylethylamine and tyramine simultaneously. RAPD-PCR results indicated that the biogenic amine-producer S. carnosus population changes along storage independently of the high-pressure treatment. PMID:22063331

  20. Antimicrobial Activities of Methanol, Ethanol and Supercritical CO2 Extracts of Philippine Piper betle L. on Clinical Isolates of Gram Positive and Gram Negative Bacteria with Transferable Multiple Drug Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Valle, Demetrio L.; Cabrera, Esperanza C.; Puzon, Juliana Janet M.; Rivera, Windell L.

    2016-01-01

    Piper betle L. has traditionally been used in alternative medicine in different countries for various therapeutic purposes, including as an anti-infective agent. However, studies reported in the literature are mainly on its activities on drug susceptible bacterial strains. This study determined the antimicrobial activities of its ethanol, methanol, and supercritical CO2 extracts on clinical isolates of multiple drug resistant bacteria which have been identified by the Infectious Disease Society of America as among the currently more challenging strains in clinical management. Assay methods included the standard disc diffusion method and the broth microdilution method for the determination of the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) and the minimum bactericidal concentrations (MBC) of the extracts for the test microorganisms. This study revealed the bactericidal activities of all the P. betle leaf crude extracts on methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus (VRE), extended spectrum β-lactamase-producing Enterobacteriaceae, carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae, and metallo-β-lactamase-producing Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Acinetobacter baumannii, with minimum bactericidal concentrations that ranged from 19μg/ml to 1250 μg/ml. The extracts proved to be more potent against the Gram positive MRSA and VRE than for the Gram negative test bacteria. VRE isolates were more susceptible to all the extracts than the MRSA isolates. Generally, the ethanol extracts proved to be more potent than the methanol extracts and supercritical CO2 extracts as shown by their lower MICs for both the Gram positive and Gram negative MDRs. MTT cytotoxicity assay showed that the highest concentration (100 μg/ml) of P. betle ethanol extract tested was not toxic to normal human dermal fibroblasts (HDFn). Data from the study firmly established P. betle as an alternative source of anti-infectives against multiple drug resistant bacteria. PMID:26741962

  1. Antimicrobial Activities of Methanol, Ethanol and Supercritical CO2 Extracts of Philippine Piper betle L. on Clinical Isolates of Gram Positive and Gram Negative Bacteria with Transferable Multiple Drug Resistance.

    PubMed

    Valle, Demetrio L; Cabrera, Esperanza C; Puzon, Juliana Janet M; Rivera, Windell L

    2016-01-01

    Piper betle L. has traditionally been used in alternative medicine in different countries for various therapeutic purposes, including as an anti-infective agent. However, studies reported in the literature are mainly on its activities on drug susceptible bacterial strains. This study determined the antimicrobial activities of its ethanol, methanol, and supercritical CO2 extracts on clinical isolates of multiple drug resistant bacteria which have been identified by the Infectious Disease Society of America as among the currently more challenging strains in clinical management. Assay methods included the standard disc diffusion method and the broth microdilution method for the determination of the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) and the minimum bactericidal concentrations (MBC) of the extracts for the test microorganisms. This study revealed the bactericidal activities of all the P. betle leaf crude extracts on methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus (VRE), extended spectrum β-lactamase-producing Enterobacteriaceae, carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae, and metallo-β-lactamase-producing Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Acinetobacter baumannii, with minimum bactericidal concentrations that ranged from 19μg/ml to 1250 μg/ml. The extracts proved to be more potent against the Gram positive MRSA and VRE than for the Gram negative test bacteria. VRE isolates were more susceptible to all the extracts than the MRSA isolates. Generally, the ethanol extracts proved to be more potent than the methanol extracts and supercritical CO2 extracts as shown by their lower MICs for both the Gram positive and Gram negative MDRs. MTT cytotoxicity assay showed that the highest concentration (100 μg/ml) of P. betle ethanol extract tested was not toxic to normal human dermal fibroblasts (HDFn). Data from the study firmly established P. betle as an alternative source of anti-infectives against multiple drug resistant bacteria. PMID:26741962

  2. Characterization of a 3944 Da bacteriocin, produced by Enterococcus mundtii ST15, with activity against Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria.

    PubMed

    De Kwaadsteniet, M; Todorov, S D; Knoetze, H; Dicks, L M T

    2005-12-15

    Strain ST15, isolated from soy beans, and identified as Enterococcus mundtii, produces a 3944 Da bacteriocin that inhibits the growth of Lactobacillus sakei, Enterococcus faecalis, Bacillus cereus, Propionibacterium sp., Clostridium tyrobutyricum, Acinetobacter baumanii, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus pneumoniae and Streptococcus caprinus. Bacteriocin ST15 is inactivated by proteinase K, pronase, pepsin, protease and Triton X-114, but not when treated with catalase, alpha-amylase, Triton X-100, SDS, Tween 20, Tween 80, urea and EDTA. No change in activity was recorded after 2 h at pH values between 2.0 and 12.0, and after treatment at 100 degrees C for 90 min. Activity was, however, lost after treatment at 121 degrees C for 20 min. The mode of activity is bactericidal. The highest level of activity (51200 AU ml(-1)) was recorded when cells were grown in MRS broth, pH 6.5. Bacteriocin ST15 differs from other broad-spectrum bacteriocins described for Enterococcus spp. by being active against Gram-negative bacteria and by being smaller. PMID:16102864

  3. Bacillus subtilis subsp. subtilis CBMDC3f with antimicrobial activity against Gram-positive foodborne pathogenic bacteria: UV-MALDI-TOF MS analysis of its bioactive compounds.

    PubMed

    Torres, M J; Petroselli, G; Daz, M; Erra-Balsells, R; Audisio, M C

    2015-06-01

    In this work a new Bacillus sp. strain, isolated from honey, was characterized phylogenetically. Its antibacterial activity against three relevant foodborne pathogenic bacteria was studied; the main bioactive metabolites were analyzed using ultraviolet matrix assisted laser desorption-ionization mass spectrometry (UV-MALDI MS). Bacillus CBMDC3f was phylogenetically characterized as Bacillus subtilis subsp. subtilis after rRNA analysis of the 16S subunit and the gyrA gene (access codes Genbank JX120508 and JX120516, respectively). Its antibacterial potential was evaluated against Listeria monocytogenes (9 strains), B. cereus (3 strains) and Staphylococcus aureus ATCC29213. Its cell suspension and cell-free supernatant (CFS) exerted significant anti-Listeria and anti-S. aureus activities, while the lipopeptides fraction (LF) also showed anti-B. cereus effect. The UV-MALDI-MS analysis revealed surfactin, iturin and fengycin in the CFS, whereas surfactin predominated in the LF. The CFS from CBMDC3f contained surfactin, iturin and fengycin with four, two and four homologues per family, respectively, whereas four surfactin, one iturin and one fengycin homologues were identified in the LF. For some surfactin homologues, their UV-MALDI-TOF/TOF (MS/MS; Laser Induced Decomposition method, LID) spectra were also obtained. Mass spectrometry analysis contributed with relevant information about the type of lipopeptides that Bacillus strains can synthesize. From our results, surfactin would be the main metabolite responsible for the antibacterial effect. PMID:25820813

  4. Significance of postgrowth processing of ZnO nanostructures on antibacterial activity against gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Mehmood, Shahid; Rehman, Malik A; Ismail, Hammad; Mirza, Bushra; Bhatti, Arshad S

    2015-01-01

    In this work, we highlighted the effect of surface modifications of one-dimensional (1D) ZnO nanostructures (NSs) grown by the vapor–solid mechanism on their antibacterial activity. Two sets of ZnO NSs were modified separately – one set was modified by annealing in an Ar environment, and the second set was modified in O2 plasma. Annealing in Ar below 800°C resulted in a compressed lattice, which was due to removal of Zn interstitials and increased O vacancies. Annealing above 1,000°C caused the formation of a new prominent phase, Zn2SiO4. Plasma oxidation of the ZnO NSs caused an expansion in the lattice due to the removal of O vacancies and incorporation of excess O. Photoluminescence (PL) spectroscopy was employed for the quantification of defects associated with Zn and O in the as-grown and processed ZnO NS. Two distinct bands were observed, one in the ultraviolet (UV) region, due to interband transitions, and other in the visible region, due to defects associated with Zn and O. PL confirmed the surface modification of ZnO NS, as substantial decrease in intensities of visible band was observed. Antibacterial activity of the modified ZnO NSs demonstrated that the surface modifications by Ar annealing limited the antibacterial characteristics of ZnO NS against Staphylococcus aureus. However, ZnO NSs annealed at 1,000°C or higher showed a remarkable antibacterial activity against Escherichia coli. O2 plasma–treated NS showed appreciable antibacterial activity against both E. coli and S. aureus. The minimum inhibition concentration was determined to be 0.5 mg/mL and 1 mg/mL for Ar-annealed and plasma-oxidized ZnO NS, respectively. It was thus proved that the O content at the surface of the ZnO NS was crucial to tune the antibacterial activity against both selected gram-negative (E. coli) and gram-positive (S. aureus) bacterial species. PMID:26213466

  5. The effect of recurrent episodes of clinical mastitis caused by gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria and other organisms on mortality and culling in Holstein dairy cows.

    PubMed

    Hertl, J A; Schukken, Y H; Bar, D; Bennett, G J; González, R N; Rauch, B J; Welcome, F L; Tauer, L W; Gröhn, Y T

    2011-10-01

    The objective of this study was to estimate the effects of recurrent episodes of different types of clinical mastitis (CM) caused by gram-positive (Streptococcus spp., Staphylococcus aureus, Staphylococcus spp.) and gram-negative (Escherichia coli, Klebsiella, Citrobacter, Enterobacter, Pseudomonas) bacteria, and other organisms (Arcanobacterium pyogenes, Mycoplasma, Corynebacterium bovis, yeast, miscellaneous) on the probability of mortality and culling in Holstein dairy cows. Data from 30,233 lactations in cows of 7 dairy farms in New York State were analyzed. Cows were followed for the first 10 mo in lactation, or until death or culling occurred, or until the end of our study period. Generalized linear mixed models with a Poisson error distribution were used to study the effects of recurrent cases of the different types of CM and several other factors (herd, parity, month of lactation, current year and season, profitability, net replacement cost, other diseases) on cows' probability of death (model 1) or being culled (model 2). Primiparous and multiparous cows were modeled separately because they had different risks of mortality and culling and potentially different CM effects on mortality and culling. Approximately 30% of multiparous cows had at least one case of CM in lactation compared with 16.6% of primiparous cows. Multipara also had higher lactational incidence risks of second (10.7%) and third (4.4%) cases than primipara (3.7% and 1.1%, respectively). For primipara, CM increased the probability of death, with each successive case occurring in a month being increasingly lethal. In multipara, gram-negative CM increased the probability of death, especially when the gram-negative case was the first or second CM case in lactation. Primiparous cows with CM were more likely to be culled after CM than if they did not have CM, particularly after a second or third case. In multipara, any type of CM increased the probability of being culled. Gram-negative CM cases were associated with the numerically highest risk of culling. PMID:21943738

  6. Use of the pre-pro part of Staphylococcus hyicus lipase as a carrier for secretion of Escherichia coli outer membrane protein A (OmpA) prevents proteolytic degradation of OmpA by cell-associated protease(s) in two different gram-positive bacteria.

    PubMed Central

    Meens, J; Herbort, M; Klein, M; Freudl, R

    1997-01-01

    Heterologous protein secretion was studied in the gram-positive bacteria Bacillus subtilis and Staphylococcus carnosus by using the Escherichia coli outer membrane protein OmpA as a model protein. The OmpA protein was found to be translocated across the plasma membrane of both microorganisms. However, the majority of the translocated OmpA was similarly degraded in B. subtilis and S. carnosus despite the fact that the latter organism does not secrete soluble exoproteases into the culture medium. The finding that purified OmpA, which was added externally to the culture medium of growing S. carnosus cells, remained intact indicates that newly synthesized and exported OmpA is degraded by one or more cell-associated proteases rather than by a soluble exoprotease. Fusion of the mature part of OmpA to the pre-pro part of a lipase from Staphylococcus hyicus allowed the efficient release of the corresponding propeptide-OmpA hybrid protein into the supernatant and completely prevented the cell-associated proteolytic degradation of the mature OmpA, most likely reflecting an important function of the propeptide during secretion of its natural mature lipase moiety. The relevance of our findings for the biotechnological use of gram-positive bacteria as host organisms for the secretory production of heterologous proteins is discussed. PMID:9212429

  7. Genomics of Probiotic Bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Flaherty, Sarah; Goh, Yong Jun; Klaenhammer, Todd R.

    Probiotic bacteria from the Lactobacillus and Bifidobacterium species belong to the Firmicutes and the Actinobacteria phylum, respectively. Lactobacilli are members of the lactic acid bacteria (LAB) group, a broadly defined family of microorganisms that ferment various hexoses into primarily lactic acid. Lactobacilli are typically low G + C gram-positive species which are phylogenetically diverse, with over 100 species documented to date. Bifidobacteria are heterofermentative, high G + C content bacteria with about 30 species of bifidobacteria described to date.

  8. In Vitro Antibacterial Activity of AZD0914, a New Spiropyrimidinetrione DNA Gyrase/Topoisomerase Inhibitor with Potent Activity against Gram-Positive, Fastidious Gram-Negative, and Atypical Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Bradford, Patricia A.; Otterson, Linda G.; Basarab, Gregory S.; Kutschke, Amy C.; Giacobbe, Robert A.; Patey, Sara A.; Alm, Richard A.; Johnstone, Michele R.; Potter, Marie E.; Miller, Paul F.; Mueller, John P.

    2014-01-01

    AZD0914 is a new spiropyrimidinetrione bacterial DNA gyrase/topoisomerase inhibitor with potent in vitro antibacterial activity against key Gram-positive (Staphylococcus aureus, Staphylococcus epidermidis, Streptococcus pneumoniae, Streptococcus pyogenes, and Streptococcus agalactiae), fastidious Gram-negative (Haemophilus influenzae and Neisseria gonorrhoeae), atypical (Legionella pneumophila), and anaerobic (Clostridium difficile) bacterial species, including isolates with known resistance to fluoroquinolones. AZD0914 works via inhibition of DNA biosynthesis and accumulation of double-strand cleavages; this mechanism of inhibition differs from those of other marketed antibacterial compounds. AZD0914 stabilizes and arrests the cleaved covalent complex of gyrase with double-strand broken DNA under permissive conditions and thus blocks religation of the double-strand cleaved DNA to form fused circular DNA. Whereas this mechanism is similar to that seen with fluoroquinolones, it is mechanistically distinct. AZD0914 exhibited low frequencies of spontaneous resistance in S. aureus, and if mutants were obtained, the mutations mapped to gyrB. Additionally, no cross-resistance was observed for AZD0914 against recent bacterial clinical isolates demonstrating resistance to fluoroquinolones or other drug classes, including macrolides, ?-lactams, glycopeptides, and oxazolidinones. AZD0914 was bactericidal in both minimum bactericidal concentration and in vitro time-kill studies. In in vitro checkerboard/synergy testing with 17 comparator antibacterials, only additivity/indifference was observed. The potent in vitro antibacterial activity (including activity against fluoroquinolone-resistant isolates), low frequency of resistance, lack of cross-resistance, and bactericidal activity of AZD0914 support its continued development. PMID:25385112

  9. RX-P873, a Novel Protein Synthesis Inhibitor, Accumulates in Human THP-1 Monocytes and Is Active against Intracellular Infections by Gram-Positive (Staphylococcus aureus) and Gram-Negative (Pseudomonas aeruginosa) Bacteria.

    PubMed

    Buyck, Julien M; Peyrusson, Frdric; Tulkens, Paul M; Van Bambeke, Franoise

    2015-08-01

    The pyrrolocytosine RX-P873, a new broad-spectrum antibiotic in preclinical development, inhibits protein synthesis at the translation step. The aims of this work were to study RX-P873's ability to accumulate in eukaryotic cells, together with its activity against extracellular and intracellular forms of infection by Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa, using a pharmacodynamic approach allowing the determination of maximal relative efficacies (Emax values) and bacteriostatic concentrations (Cs values) on the basis of Hill equations of the concentration-response curves. RX-P873's apparent concentration in human THP-1 monocytes was about 6-fold higher than the extracellular one. In broth, MICs ranged from 0.125 to 0.5 mg/liter (S. aureus) and 2 to 8 mg/liter (P. aeruginosa), with no significant shift in these values against strains resistant to currently used antibiotics being noted. In concentration-dependent experiments, the pharmacodynamic profile of RX-P873 was not influenced by the resistance phenotype of the strains. Emax values (expressed as the decrease in the number of CFU from that in the initial inoculum) against S. aureus and P. aeruginosa reached more than 4 log units and 5 log units in broth, respectively, and 0.7 log unit and 2.7 log units in infected THP-1 cells, respectively, after 24 h. Cs values remained close to the MIC in all cases, making RX-P873 more potent than antibiotics to which the strains were resistant (moxifloxacin, vancomycin, and daptomycin for S. aureus; ciprofloxacin and ceftazidime for P. aeruginosa). Kill curves in broth showed that RX-P873 was more rapidly bactericidal against P. aeruginosa than against S. aureus. Taken together, these data suggest that RX-P873 may constitute a useful alternative for infections involving intracellular bacteria, especially Gram-negative species. PMID:26014952

  10. RX-P873, a Novel Protein Synthesis Inhibitor, Accumulates in Human THP-1 Monocytes and Is Active against Intracellular Infections by Gram-Positive (Staphylococcus aureus) and Gram-Negative (Pseudomonas aeruginosa) Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Buyck, Julien M.; Peyrusson, Frédéric; Tulkens, Paul M.

    2015-01-01

    The pyrrolocytosine RX-P873, a new broad-spectrum antibiotic in preclinical development, inhibits protein synthesis at the translation step. The aims of this work were to study RX-P873's ability to accumulate in eukaryotic cells, together with its activity against extracellular and intracellular forms of infection by Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa, using a pharmacodynamic approach allowing the determination of maximal relative efficacies (Emax values) and bacteriostatic concentrations (Cs values) on the basis of Hill equations of the concentration-response curves. RX-P873's apparent concentration in human THP-1 monocytes was about 6-fold higher than the extracellular one. In broth, MICs ranged from 0.125 to 0.5 mg/liter (S. aureus) and 2 to 8 mg/liter (P. aeruginosa), with no significant shift in these values against strains resistant to currently used antibiotics being noted. In concentration-dependent experiments, the pharmacodynamic profile of RX-P873 was not influenced by the resistance phenotype of the strains. Emax values (expressed as the decrease in the number of CFU from that in the initial inoculum) against S. aureus and P. aeruginosa reached more than 4 log units and 5 log units in broth, respectively, and 0.7 log unit and 2.7 log units in infected THP-1 cells, respectively, after 24 h. Cs values remained close to the MIC in all cases, making RX-P873 more potent than antibiotics to which the strains were resistant (moxifloxacin, vancomycin, and daptomycin for S. aureus; ciprofloxacin and ceftazidime for P. aeruginosa). Kill curves in broth showed that RX-P873 was more rapidly bactericidal against P. aeruginosa than against S. aureus. Taken together, these data suggest that RX-P873 may constitute a useful alternative for infections involving intracellular bacteria, especially Gram-negative species. PMID:26014952

  11. Ethanol production in Gram-positive microbes

    DOEpatents

    Ingram, L.O.; Barbosa-Alleyne, M.D.F.

    1999-06-29

    The subject invention concerns the transformation of Gram-positive bacteria with heterologous genes which confer upon these microbes the ability to produce ethanol as a fermentation product. Specifically exemplified is the transformation of bacteria with genes, obtainable from Zymomonas mobilis, which encode pyruvate decarboxylase and alcohol dehydrogenase. 2 figs.

  12. Ethanol production in Gram-positive microbes

    DOEpatents

    Ingram, L.O.; Barbosa-Alleyne, M.D.F.

    1996-01-09

    The subject invention concerns the transformation of Gram-positive bacteria with heterologous genes which confer upon these microbes the ability to produce ethanol as a fermentation product. Specifically exemplified is the transformation of bacteria with genes, obtainable from Zymomonas mobilis, which encode pyruvate decarboxylase and alcohol dehydrogenase. 2 figs.

  13. Ethanol production in gram-positive microbes

    DOEpatents

    Ingram, Lonnie O'Neal (Gainesville, FL); Barbosa-Alleyne, Maria D. F. (Gainesville, FL)

    1999-01-01

    The subject invention concerns the transformation of Gram-positive bacteria with heterologous genes which confer upon these microbes the ability to produce ethanol as a fermentation product. Specifically exemplified is the transformation of bacteria with genes, obtainable from Zymomonas mobilis, which encode pyruvate decarboxylase and alcohol dehydrogenase.

  14. Ethanol production in Gram-positive microbes

    DOEpatents

    Ingram, Lonnie O'Neal (Gainesville, FL); Barbosa-Alleyne, Maria D. F. (Gainesville, FL)

    1996-01-01

    The subject invention concerns the transformation of Gram-positive bacteria with heterologous genes which confer upon these microbes the ability to produce ethanol as a fermentation product. Specifically exemplified is the transformation of bacteria with genes, obtainable from Zymomonas mobilis, which encode pyruvate decarboxylase and alcohol dehydrogenase.

  15. Differential staining of bacteria: acid fast stain.

    PubMed

    Reynolds, Jackie; Moyes, Rita B; Breakwell, Donald P

    2009-11-01

    Acid-fastness is an uncommon characteristic shared by the genera Mycobacterium (Section 10A) and Nocardia. Because of this feature, this stain is extremely helpful in identification of these bacteria. Although Gram positive, acid-fast bacteria do not take the crystal violet into the wall well, appearing very light purple rather than the deep purple of normal Gram-positive bacteria. PMID:19885935

  16. The Gram-positive side of plant-microbe interactions.

    PubMed

    Francis, Isolde; Holsters, Marcelle; Vereecke, Danny

    2010-01-01

    Plant growth and development are significantly influenced by the presence and activity of microorganisms. To date, the best-studied plant-interacting microbes are Gram-negative bacteria, but many representatives of both the high and low G+C Gram-positives have excellent biocontrol, plant growth-promoting and bioremediation activities. Moreover, actinorhizal symbioses largely contribute to the global biological nitrogen fixation and many Gram-positive bacteria promote other types of symbioses in tripartite interactions. Finally, several prominent and devastating phytopathogens are Gram-positive. We summarize the present knowledge of the beneficial and detrimental interactions of Gram-positive bacteria with plants to underline the importance of this particular group of bacteria. PMID:19624707

  17. Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacterial extracellular vesicles.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ji Hyun; Lee, Jaewook; Park, Jaesung; Gho, Yong Song

    2015-04-01

    Like mammalian cells, Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria release nano-sized membrane vesicles into the extracellular environment either in a constitutive manner or in a regulated manner. These bacterial extracellular vesicles are spherical bilayered proteolipids enriched with bioactive proteins, lipids, nucleic acids, and virulence factors. Recent progress in this field supports the critical pathophysiological functions of these vesicles in both bacteria-bacteria and bacteria-host interactions. This review provides an overview of the current understanding on Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacterial extracellular vesicles, especially regarding the biogenesis, components, and functions in poly-species communities. We hope that this review will stimulate additional research in this emerging field of bacterial extracellular vesicles and contribute to the development of extracellular vesicle-based diagnostic tools and effective vaccines against pathogenic Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria. PMID:25704309

  18. New drugs for Gram-positive uropathogens.

    PubMed

    Wagenlehner, F M E; Naber, K G

    2004-09-01

    Complicated urinary tract infections (UTIs) are frequent nosocomial infections. The bacterial spectrum encompasses Gram-negative but also Gram-positive pathogens in up to 30-40%. The existing treatment for Gram-positive pathogens is not always optimal. Antimicrobials for the treatment of Gram-positive uropathogens comprise older agents, such as aminopenicillins with or without beta-lactamase inhibitors and vancomycin, as well as newer fluoroquinolones, such as levofloxacin or gatifloxacin. However, resistant bacteria such as vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VRE) or methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) (except vancomycin-resistant) are generally also not susceptible to the fluoroquinolones. Therefore new agents need to be assessed in the treatment of UTI. Daptomycin and linezolid are new antimicrobial agents with good efficacy against Gram-positive uropathogens as shown by their minimal inhibitory concentrations. In a phase II study the urinary bactericidal activity of linezolid versus ciprofloxacin in volunteers showed comparable activity of both drugs against fluoroquinolone susceptible Gram-positive uropathogens, whereas linezolid was also as active against fluoroquinolone resistant ones. The pharmacokinetics and the mode of action of these two antibiotics are discussed together with some clinical data in the context of therapeutic use in patients with complicated UTIs. PMID:15364305

  19. Iron acquisition by Gram-positive bacterial pathogens.

    PubMed

    Brown, Jeremy S; Holden, David W

    2002-09-01

    For the majority of bacterial pathogens, acquisition of iron from host proteins is a prerequisite for growth during infection. The mechanisms by which Gram-negative bacteria obtain iron from host proteins have been well described, but only recently has substantial progress been made in identifying these mechanisms for Gram-positive bacterial pathogens. This review provides an overview of the existing knowledge on the genetic basis of iron transport for important Gram-positive pathogens. PMID:12361915

  20. Methanotrophic bacteria.

    PubMed Central

    Hanson, R S; Hanson, T E

    1996-01-01

    Methane-utilizing bacteria (methanotrophs) are a diverse group of gram-negative bacteria that are related to other members of the Proteobacteria. These bacteria are classified into three groups based on the pathways used for assimilation of formaldehyde, the major source of cell carbon, and other physiological and morphological features. The type I and type X methanotrophs are found within the gamma subdivision of the Proteobacteria and employ the ribulose monophosphate pathway for formaldehyde assimilation, whereas type II methanotrophs, which employ the serine pathway for formaldehyde assimilation, form a coherent cluster within the beta subdivision of the Proteobacteria. Methanotrophic bacteria are ubiquitous. The growth of type II bacteria appears to be favored in environments that contain relatively high levels of methane, low levels of dissolved oxygen, and limiting concentrations of combined nitrogen and/or copper. Type I methanotrophs appear to be dominant in environments in which methane is limiting and combined nitrogen and copper levels are relatively high. These bacteria serve as biofilters for the oxidation of methane produced in anaerobic environments, and when oxygen is present in soils, atmospheric methane is oxidized. Their activities in nature are greatly influenced by agricultural practices and other human activities. Recent evidence indicates that naturally occurring, uncultured methanotrophs represent new genera. Methanotrophs that are capable of oxidizing methane at atmospheric levels exhibit methane oxidation kinetics different from those of methanotrophs available in pure cultures. A limited number of methanotrophs have the genetic capacity to synthesize a soluble methane monooxygenase which catalyzes the rapid oxidation of environmental pollutants including trichloroethylene. PMID:8801441

  1. Clinical microbiology of coryneform bacteria.

    PubMed Central

    Funke, G; von Graevenitz, A; Clarridge, J E; Bernard, K A

    1997-01-01

    Coryneform bacteria are aerobically growing, asporogenous, non-partially-acid-fast, gram-positive rods of irregular morphology. Within the last few years, there has been a massive increase in the number of publications related to all aspects of their clinical microbiology. Clinical microbiologists are often confronted with making identifications within this heterogeneous group as well as with considerations of the clinical significance of such isolates. This review provides comprehensive information on the identification of coryneform bacteria and outlines recent changes in taxonomy. The following genera are covered: Corynebacterium, Turicella, Arthrobacter, Brevibacterium, Dermabacter. Propionibacterium, Rothia, Exiguobacterium, Oerskovia, Cellulomonas, Sanguibacter, Microbacterium, Aureobacterium, "Corynebacterium aquaticum," Arcanobacterium, and Actinomyces. Case reports claiming disease associations of coryneform bacteria are critically reviewed. Minimal microbiological requirements for publications on disease associations of coryneform bacteria are proposed. PMID:8993861

  2. Bacteria Counter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    Science Applications, Inc.'s ATP Photometer makes a rapid and accurate count of the bacteria in a body fluid sample. Instrument provides information on the presence and quantity of bacteria by measuring the amount of light emitted by the reaction between two substances. Substances are ATP adenosine triphosphate and luciferase. The reactants are applied to a human body sample and the ATP Photometer observes the intensity of the light emitted displaying its findings in a numerical output. Total time lapse is usually less than 10 minutes, which represents a significant time savings in comparison of other techniques. Other applications are measuring organisms in fresh and ocean waters, determining bacterial contamination of foodstuffs, biological process control in the beverage industry, and in assay of activated sewage sludge.

  3. Platinum electrodes for electrochemical detection of bacteria

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilkins, J. R.

    1979-01-01

    Bacteria is detected electro-chemically by measuring evolution of hydrogen in test system with platinum and reference electrode. Using system, electrodes of platinum are used to detect and enumerate varieties of gram-positive and gram-negative organisms compared in different media.

  4. Why engineering lactic acid bacteria for biobutanol

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Gram-positive Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) are considered attractive biocatalysts for biomass to biofuels for several reasons. They have GRAS (Generally Recognized As Safe) status that are acceptable in food, feed, and medical applications. LAB are fermentative: selected strains are capable of f...

  5. New antibiotics against gram-positives: present and future indications.

    PubMed

    Morata, Laura; Mensa, Josep; Soriano, Alex

    2015-10-01

    Gram-positive cocci are the most frequent aetiology of community and nosocomially bacterial acquired infections. The prevalence of multidrug-resistant gram-positive bacteria is increasing and is associated with high morbidity and mortality. New antibiotics will be available in the European market during the next months. This revision is focused on lipoglycopeptides, new cephalosporins active against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and the new oxazolidinone, tedizolid. The purpose of this review is to describe their in vitro activity, pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic characteristics, and experience from clinical trials. PMID:26232669

  6. Production of Value-added Products by Lactic Acid Bacteria

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) are a group of facultative anaerobic, catalase negative, nonmotile and nonsporeforming–Gram positive bacteria. Most LAB utilize high energy C sources including monomer sugars to produce energy to maintain cellular structure and function. This anaerobic fermentation proce...

  7. Effect of Lactose Monolaurate on Pathogenic and Nonpathogenic Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Wagh, Ashwini; Shen, Shujie; Shen, Fen Ann; Miller, Charles D.

    2012-01-01

    The antimicrobial activities of sucrose monolaurate and a novel ester, lactose monolaurate (LML), were tested. Gram-positive bacteria were more susceptible than Gram-negative bacteria to both esters. The minimal bactericidal concentrations of LML were 5 to 9.5 mM for Listeria monocytogenes isolates and 0.2 to 2 mM for Mycobacterium isolates. PMID:22344640

  8. Evaluation of a fluorescent lectin-based staining technique for some acidophilic mining bacteria

    SciTech Connect

    Fife, D.J.; Bruhn, D.F.; Miller, K.S.; Stoner, D.L.

    2000-05-01

    A fluorescence-labeled wheat germ agglutinin staining technique was modified and found to be effective for staining gram-positive, acidophilic mining bacteria. Bacteria identified by others as being gram positive through 16S rRNA sequence analyses, yet clustering near the divergence of that group, stained weakly. Gram-negative bacteria did not stain. Background staining of environmental samples was negligible, and pyrite and soil particles in the samples did not interfere with the staining procedure.

  9. Back To Bacteria.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flannery, Maura C.

    1997-01-01

    Explores new research about bacteria. Discusses bacterial genomes, archaea, unusual environments, evolution, pathogens, bacterial movement, biofilms, bacteria in the body, and a bacterial obsession. Contains 29 references. (JRH)

  10. Magnetic bacteria against MIC

    SciTech Connect

    Javaherdashti, R.

    1997-12-01

    In this article, it is suggested to use the sensitivity of magnetotactic bacteria to changes of magnetic field direction and the natural ability of this bacteria in rapid growth during relatively short time intervals against corrosion-enhancing bacteria and especially sulfate-reducing bacteria. If colonies of sulfate-reducing bacteria could be packed among magnetotactic bacteria, then, by applying sufficiently powerful magnetic field (about 0.5 gauss), all of these bacteria (magnetic and non-magnetic) will be oriented towards an Anti-bacteria agent (oxygen or biocide). So, Microbiologically-Influenced Corrosion in the system would be controlled to a large extent.

  11. Virulence Plasmids of Nonsporulating Gram-Positive Pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Van Tyne, Daria; Gilmore, Michael S.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Gram-positive bacteria are leading causes of many types of human infection, including pneumonia, skin and nasopharyngeal infections, as well as urinary tract and surgical wound infections among hospitalized patients. These infections have become particularly problematic because many of the species causing them have become highly resistant to antibiotics. The role of mobile genetic elements, such as plasmids, in the dissemination of antibiotic resistance among Gram-positive bacteria has been well studied; less well understood is the role of mobile elements in the evolution and spread of virulence traits among these pathogens. While these organisms are leading agents of infection, they are also prominent members of the human commensal ecology. It appears that these bacteria are able to take advantage of the intimate association between host and commensal, via virulence traits that exacerbate infection and cause disease. However, evolution into an obligate pathogen has not occurred, presumably because it would lead to rejection of pathogenic organisms from the host ecology. Instead, in organisms that exist as both commensal and pathogen, selection has favored the development of mechanisms for variability. As a result, many virulence traits are localized on mobile genetic elements, such as virulence plasmids and pathogenicity islands. Virulence traits may occur within a minority of isolates of a given species, but these minority populations have nonetheless emerged as a leading problem in infectious disease. This chapter reviews virulence plasmids in nonsporulating Gram-positive bacteria, and examines their contribution to disease pathogenesis. PMID:25544937

  12. Gram-positive bacteria as biocatalysts to convert biomass derived sugars into biofuel and chemicals

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The microbial fermentation of biomass derived sugar mixtures is one of the barriers to the overall economic conversion process from lignocellulosic biomass to fuels and chemicals. Although the supply and characteristics of feedstocks vary, biomass hydrolysates usually contain mixed sugars, organic ...

  13. The phage-related chromosomal islands of Gram-positive bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Novick, Richard P.; Christie, Gail E.; Penads, Jose R.

    2012-01-01

    The phage-related chromosomal islands (PRCIs) were first identified in Staphylococcus aureus as highly mobile, superantigen-encoding genetic elements known as the S. aureus pathogenicity islands (SaPIs). These elements are characterized by a specific set of phage-related functions that enable them to use the phage reproduction cycle for their own transduction and inhibit phage reproduction in the process. SaPIs produce many phage-like infectious particles; their streptococcal counterparts have a role in gene regulation but may not be infectious. These elements therefore represent phage satellites or parasites, not defective phages. In this Review, we discuss the shared genetic content of PRCIs, their life cycle and their ability to be transferred across large phylogenetic distances. PMID:20634809

  14. Bacteria isolated from amoebae/bacteria consortium

    DOEpatents

    Tyndall, R.L.

    1995-05-30

    New protozoan derived microbial consortia and method for their isolation are provided. Consortia and bacteria isolated therefrom are useful for treating wastes such as trichloroethylene and trinitrotoluene. Consortia, bacteria isolated therefrom, and dispersants isolated therefrom are useful for dispersing hydrocarbons such as oil, creosote, wax, and grease.

  15. Bacteria isolated from amoebae/bacteria consortium

    DOEpatents

    Tyndall, Richard L. (Clinton, TN)

    1995-01-01

    New protozoan derived microbial consortia and method for their isolation are provided. Consortia and bacteria isolated therefrom are useful for treating wastes such as trichloroethylene and trinitrotoluene. Consortia, bacteria isolated therefrom, and dispersants isolated therefrom are useful for dispersing hydrocarbons such as oil, creosote, wax, and grease.

  16. ?Hall chip for sensitive detection of bacteria.

    PubMed

    Issadore, David; Chung, Hyun Jung; Chung, Jaehoon; Budin, Ghyslain; Weissleder, Ralph; Lee, Hakho

    2013-09-01

    Sensitive, rapid and phenotype-specific enumeration of pathogens is essential for the diagnosis of infectious disease, monitoring of food chains, and for defense against bioterrorism. Microbiological culture and genotyping, techniques that sensitively and selectively detect bacteria in laboratory settings, have limited application in clinical environments due to high cost, slow response times, and the need for specially trained staff and laboratory infrastructure. To address these challenges, we developed a microfluidic chip-based micro-Hall (?Hall) platform capable of measuring single, magnetically tagged bacteria directly in clinical specimens with minimal sample processing. We demonstrated the clinical utility of the ?Hall chip by enumerating Gram-positive bacteria. The overall detection limit of the system was similar to that of culture tests (~10 bacteria), but the assay time was 50-times faster. This low-cost, single-cell analytical technique is especially well-suited to diagnose infectious diseases in resource-limited clinical settings. PMID:23495188

  17. [Viable non-culturable bacteria].

    PubMed

    Năşcuţiu, Alexandra-Maria

    2010-01-01

    Viable but non-culturable cells (VBNC) are defined as live bacteria, but which do not either grow or divide. Such bacteria cannot be cultivated on conventional media (they do not form colonies on solid media, they do not change broth appearance), but their existence can be proved using other methods. The switch to the VBNC stage has been described and documented for several bacterial species: Vibrio spp. (cholerae, vulnificus and other species), Escherichia coli (including EHEC), Campylobacter jejuni, Helicobacter pylori, Salmonella spp., Listeria monocytogenes, Yersinia enterocolytica, Shigella spp., Klebsiella spp., Enterobacter spp., Cronobacter spp., Staphylococcus aureus, Providencia spp., Morganella spp., Pseudomonas spp., Mycobacterium tuberculosis, Enterococcus spp. The capacity of both Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria to enter the VBNC stage started to concern microbiologists in the field of food industry (food and water safety) and pharmaceutical industry. Many studies have shown that processes meant to achieve bactericidal effects can favour bacterial switch to VBNC. Viable but non-culturable stage is reversible. Concerns are due to the capacity of VBNC, especially of potentially pathogen cells, to switch to the infectious stage once in the host organism. PMID:21038700

  18. Bleach vs. Bacteria

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Articles | Inside Life Science Home Page Bleach vs. Bacteria By Sharon Reynolds Posted April 2, 2014 Your ... hypochlorous acid to help kill invading microbes, including bacteria. Researchers funded by the National Institutes of Health ...

  19. Cell Size Regulation in Bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amir, Ariel

    2014-05-01

    Various bacteria such as the canonical gram negative Escherichia coli or the well-studied gram positive Bacillus subtilis divide symmetrically after they approximately double their volume. Their size at division is not constant, but is typically distributed over a narrow range. Here, we propose an analytically tractable model for cell size control, and calculate the cell size and interdivision time distributions, as well as the correlations between these variables. We suggest ways of extracting the model parameters from experimental data, and show that existing data for E. coli supports partial size control, and a particular explanation: a cell attempts to add a constant volume from the time of initiation of DNA replication to the next initiation event. This hypothesis accounts for the experimentally observed correlations between mother and daughter cells as well as the exponential dependence of size on growth rate.

  20. CHAPTER IV-2 BACTERIA

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Entomopathogenic bacteria provide an alternative to chemical pesticides used in insect control programs. Today, the principal microbial insecticides utilize spore forming bacteria or toxins produced by these bacteria as their active ingredients, either in formulations or by incorporation of toxin g...

  1. Heme uptake and metabolism in bacteria.

    PubMed

    Benson, David R; Rivera, Mario

    2013-01-01

    All but a few bacterial species have an absolute need for heme, and most are able to synthesize it via a pathway that is highly conserved among all life domains. Because heme is a rich source for iron, many pathogenic bacteria have also evolved processes for sequestering heme from their hosts. The heme biosynthesis pathways are well understood at the genetic and structural biology levels. In comparison, much less is known about the heme acquisition, trafficking, and degradation processes in bacteria. Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria have evolved similar strategies but different tactics for importing and degrading heme, likely as a consequence of their different cellular architectures. The differences are manifested in distinct structures for molecules that perform similar functions. Consequently, the aim of this chapter is to provide an overview of the structural biology of proteins and protein-protein interactions that enable Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria to sequester heme from the extracellular milieu, import it to the cytosol, and degrade it to mine iron. PMID:23595676

  2. Phylogenetic analysis on the soil bacteria distributed in karst forest

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, JunPei; Huang, Ying; Mo, MingHe

    2009-01-01

    Phylogenetic composition of bacterial community in soil of a karst forest was analyzed by culture-independent molecular approach. The bacterial 16S rRNA gene was amplified directly from soil DNA and cloned to generate a library. After screening the clone library by RFLP, 16S rRNA genes of representative clones were sequenced and the bacterial community was analyzed phylogenetically. The 16S rRNA gene inserts of 190 clones randomly selected were analyzed by RFLP and generated 126 different RFLP types. After sequencing, 126 non-chimeric sequences were obtained, generating 113 phylotypes. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that the bacteria distributed in soil of the karst forest included the members assigning into Proteobacteria, Acidobacteria, Planctomycetes, Chloroflexi (Green nonsulfur bacteria), Bacteroidetes, Verrucomicrobia, Nitrospirae, Actinobacteria (High G+C Gram-positive bacteria), Firmicutes (Low G+C Gram-positive bacteria) and candidate divisions (including the SPAM and GN08). PMID:24031430

  3. Desorption electrospray ionization mass spectrometry of intact bacteria

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Desorption electrospray ionization (DESI) mass spectrometry (MS) was used to differentiate 7 bacterial species based on their measured DESI-mass spectral profile. Both Gram positive and Gram negative bacteria were tested and included Escherichia coli, Staphyloccocus aureus, Enterococcus sp., Bordete...

  4. Culturable airborne bacteria in outdoor poultry-slaughtering facility.

    PubMed

    Liang, Ruiping; Xiao, Peng; She, Ruiping; Han, Shiguo; Chang, Lingling; Zheng, Lingxiao

    2013-01-01

    Airborne bacteria are important biological components of the aerosols and have a close relationship with human health as they can have adverse effects through infection and toxicity; higher concentrations can result in various microbial diseases. Moreover, they have a great influence on air quality in Beijing. In this study, a systematic survey on culturable airborne bacteria was carried out for 1 year at a slaughtering plant in Beijing. Bacterial samples were collected with FA-1 sampler for 3 min, three times each day, for three consecutive days of each month from three sampling sites using BIOLOG identification technology. Results showed that Gram-positive bacteria contributed 80%-85% and were much more prevalent than Gram-negative bacteria. Amongst 47 genera of bacteria, including 31 Gram-positive bacteria and 16 Gram-negative bacteria, Micrococcus, Staphylococcus, Bacillus, Corynebacterium, and Pseudomonas were dominant, and Micrococcus, which contributed 20%-30%, was the most dominant genus. The concentration of airborne bacteria was significantly higher in shed used to stay chicken waiting for slaughtering (SSC) and entrances to personnel and transport vehicles with products (EPV) than in green belt (GB). During the year, bacterial concentrations in summer and autumn were much higher than in winter and spring in SSC and EPV, and there were no significant variations in bacterial concentrations in GB. In different periods, a lower concentration of airborne bacteria was found at 13:00. PMID:23474646

  5. [Community composition and dynamics of airborne bacteria in Beijing].

    PubMed

    Fang, Zhi-guo; Ouyang, Zhi-yun; Zhao, Jing-zhu; Wang, Xiao-ke; Zheng, Hua

    2006-08-01

    Airborne bacteria are important biological components of the aerosol. They have a close relation with human health. The much higher concentrations can result in kinds of microbial disease. Using BIOLOG identification technology, the study on the community structure and dynamics of airborne bacteria was carried out in three typical functional areas in Beijing by systemic site sampling. Results show that the gram positive bacteria contributing 80%-85% were much more than the gram negative bacteria. Amongst 47 genera of bacteria including 31 Gram positive bacteria and 16 Gram negative bacteria, Micrococcus, Staphylococcus, Bacillus, Corynebacterium, and Pseudomonas were dominant, and Micrococcus contributing 20%-30% was the most dominant genus. The concentration of airborne bacteria was significant lower in GGR than in CER and MTL. In a year, the bacterial concentrations of summer and autumn were much more than those of winter and spring in CER and MTL, and there were no significant variations of bacterial concentrations in GGR. In different periods, the lower concentration of airborne bacteria was exhibited at 13:00. PMID:17037066

  6. Culturable Airborne Bacteria in Outdoor Poultry-Slaughtering Facility

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Ruiping; Xiao, Peng; She, Ruiping; Han, Shiguo; Chang, Lingling; Zheng, Lingxiao

    2013-01-01

    Airborne bacteria are important biological components of the aerosols and have a close relationship with human health as they can have adverse effects through infection and toxicity; higher concentrations can result in various microbial diseases. Moreover, they have a great influence on air quality in Beijing. In this study, a systematic survey on culturable airborne bacteria was carried out for 1 year at a slaughtering plant in Beijing. Bacterial samples were collected with FA-1 sampler for 3 min, three times each day, for three consecutive days of each month from three sampling sites using BIOLOG identification technology. Results showed that Gram-positive bacteria contributed 80%85% and were much more prevalent than Gram-negative bacteria. Amongst 47 genera of bacteria, including 31 Gram-positive bacteria and 16 Gram-negative bacteria, Micrococcus, Staphylococcus, Bacillus, Corynebacterium, and Pseudomonas were dominant, and Micrococcus, which contributed 20%30%, was the most dominant genus. The concentration of airborne bacteria was significantly higher in shed used to stay chicken waiting for slaughtering (SSC) and entrances to personnel and transport vehicles with products (EPV) than in green belt (GB). During the year, bacterial concentrations in summer and autumn were much higher than in winter and spring in SSC and EPV, and there were no significant variations in bacterial concentrations in GB. In different periods, a lower concentration of airborne bacteria was found at 13:00. PMID:23474646

  7. Antibiotic-resistant bacteria in drinking water.

    PubMed Central

    Armstrong, J L; Shigeno, D S; Calomiris, J J; Seidler, R J

    1981-01-01

    We analyzed drinking water from seven communities for multiply antibiotic-resistant (MAR) bacteria (bacteria resistant to two or more antibiotics) and screened the MAR bacterial isolates obtained against five antibiotics by replica plating. Overall, 33.9% of 2,653 standard plate count bacteria from treated drinking waters were MAR. Two different raw water supplies for two communities carried MAR standard plate count bacteria at frequencies of 20.4 and 18.6%, whereas 36.7 and 67.8% of the standard plate count populations from sites within the respective distribution systems were MAR. Isolate identification revealed that MAR gram-positive cocci (Staphylococcus) and MAR gram-negative, nonfermentative rods (Pseudomonas, Alcaligenes, Moraxella-like group M, and Acinetobacter) were more common in drinking waters than in untreated source waters. Site-to-site variations in generic types and differences in the incidences of MAR organisms indicated that shedding of MAR bacteria living in pipelines may have contributed to the MAR populations in tap water. We conclude that the treatment of raw water and its subsequent distribution select for standard plate count bacteria exhibiting the MAR phenotype. PMID:7283426

  8. First Report of Human Infection by Agromyces mediolanus, a Gram-Positive Organism Found in Soil.

    PubMed

    Sridhar, Siddharth; Wang, Angela Y M; Chan, Jasper F W; Yip, Cyril C Y; Lau, Susanna K P; Woo, Patrick C Y; Yuen, Kwok-Yung

    2015-10-01

    We report the first human infection by a member of the Agromyces genus, a group of Gram-positive bacteria found in soil. A patient with a long-term venous catheter developed bacteremia due to a non-vancomycin-susceptible isolate of Agromyces mediolanus. Rapid identification was possible by matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry. PMID:26202108

  9. Native and heterologous production of bacteriocins from gram-positive microorganisms.

    PubMed

    Muñoz, Mabel; Jaramillo, Diana; Melendez, Adelina Del Pilar; J Alméciga-Diaz, Carlos; Sánchez, Oscar F

    2011-12-01

    In nature, microorganisms can present several mechanisms for setting intercommunication and defense. One of these mechanisms is related to the production of bacteriocins, which are peptides with antimicrobial activity. Bacteriocins can be found in Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. Nevertheless, bacteriocins produced by Gram-positive bacteria are of particular interest due to the industrial use of several strains that belong to this group, especially lactic acid bacteria (LAB), which have the status of generally recognized as safe (GRAS) microorganisms. In this work, we will review recent tendencies in the field of invention and state of art related to bacteriocin production by Gram-positive microorganism. Hundred-eight patents related to Gram-positive bacteriocin producers have been disclosed since 1965, from which 57% are related bacteriocins derived from Lactococcus, Lactobacillus, Streptococcus, and Pediococcus strains. Surprisingly, patents regarding heterologous bacteriocins production were mainly presented just in the last decade. Although the major application of bacteriocins is concerned to food industry to control spoilage and foodborne bacteria, during the last years bacteriocin applications have been displacing to the diagnosis and treatment of cancer, and plant disease resistance and growth promotion. PMID:22360468

  10. Native and heterologous production of bacteriocins from gram-positive microorganisms.

    TOXLINE Toxicology Bibliographic Information

    Muñoz M; Jaramillo D; Melendez Adel P; J Alméciga-Diaz C; Sánchez OF

    2011-12-01

    In nature, microorganisms can present several mechanisms for setting intercommunication and defense. One of these mechanisms is related to the production of bacteriocins, which are peptides with antimicrobial activity. Bacteriocins can be found in Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. Nevertheless, bacteriocins produced by Gram-positive bacteria are of particular interest due to the industrial use of several strains that belong to this group, especially lactic acid bacteria (LAB), which have the status of generally recognized as safe (GRAS) microorganisms. In this work, we will review recent tendencies in the field of invention and state of art related to bacteriocin production by Gram-positive microorganism. Hundred-eight patents related to Gram-positive bacteriocin producers have been disclosed since 1965, from which 57% are related bacteriocins derived from Lactococcus, Lactobacillus, Streptococcus, and Pediococcus strains. Surprisingly, patents regarding heterologous bacteriocins production were mainly presented just in the last decade. Although the major application of bacteriocins is concerned to food industry to control spoilage and foodborne bacteria, during the last years bacteriocin applications have been displacing to the diagnosis and treatment of cancer, and plant disease resistance and growth promotion.

  11. Bacteria turn tiny gears

    SciTech Connect

    2009-01-01

    Swarms of bacteria turn two 380-micron long gears, opening the possibility of building hybrid biological machines at the microscopic scale. Read more at Wired: http://www.wired.com/wiredscience/2009/12/bacterial-micro-machine/#more-15684 or Scientific American: http://www.scientificamerican.com/article.cfm?id=brownian-motion-bacteria

  12. Bleach vs. Bacteria

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Inside Life Science > Bleach vs. Bacteria Inside Life Science View All Articles | Inside Life Science Home Page Bleach vs. Bacteria By Sharon Reynolds ... For Proteins, Form Shapes Function This Inside Life Science article also appears on LiveScience . Learn about related ...

  13. The effect of nutrient media water purity on LIBS based identification of bacteria

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Single pulse laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) is used as the basis for discrimination between 3 genera of Gram-negative bacteria and 2 genera of gram-positive bacteria representing pathogenic threats commonly found in poultry processing rinse waters. Because LIBS-based discrimination reli...

  14. Clinical update on linezolid in the treatment of Gram-positive bacterial infections

    PubMed Central

    Ager, Sally; Gould, Kate

    2012-01-01

    Gram-positive pathogens are a significant cause of morbidity and mortality in both community and health care settings. Glycopeptides have traditionally been the antibiotics of choice for multiresistant Gram-positive pathogens but there are problems with their use, including the emergence of glycopeptide-resistant strains, tissue penetration, and achieving and monitoring adequate serum levels. Newer antibiotics such as linezolid, a synthetic oxazolidinone, are available for the treatment of resistant Gram-positive bacteria. Linezolid is active against a wide range of Gram-positive bacteria and has been generally available for the treatment of Gram-positive infections since 2000. There are potential problems with linezolid use, including its bacteriostatic action and the relatively high incidence of reported adverse effects, particularly with long-term use. Long-term use may also be complicated by the development of resistance. However, linezolid has been shown to be clinically useful in the treatment of several serious infections where traditionally bacteriocidal agents have been required and many of its adverse effects are reversible on cessation. It has also been shown to be a cost-effective treatment option in several studies, with its high oral bioavailability allowing an early change from intravenous to oral formulations with consequent earlier patient discharge and lower inpatient costs. PMID:22787406

  15. Photobiosensors containing luminescent bacteria.

    PubMed

    Ismailov, A D; Aleskerova, L E

    2015-06-01

    The scientific basis for producing luminescent biosensors containing free and immobilized luminescent bacteria is discussed. Modern technologies for engineering target objects, procedures used to immobilize bacteria in different carriers, as well as procedures for integral and specific biodetection of toxins are presented. Data regarding generation and application of biomonitoring for ecotoxicants derived from natural and genetically engineered photobacterial strains are analyzed. Special attention is given to immobilization of photobacteria in polyvinyl alcohol-containing cryogel. The main physicochemical, biochemical, and technological parameters for stabilizing luminescence in immobilized bacteria are described. Results of the application of immobilized photobacterial preparations both during discrete and continuous biomonitoring for different classes of ecotoxicants are presented. PMID:26531018

  16. Interspecies communication in bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Federle, Michael J.; Bassler, Bonnie L.

    2003-01-01

    Until recently, bacteria were considered to live rather asocial, reclusive lives. New research shows that, in fact, bacteria have elaborate chemical signaling systems that enable them to communicate within and between species. One signal, termed AI-2, appears to be universal and facilitates interspecies communication. Many processes, including virulence factor production, biofilm formation, and motility, are controlled by AI-2. Strategies that interfere with communication in bacteria are being explored in the biotechnology industry with the aim of developing novel antimicrobials. AI-2 is a particularly attractive candidate for such studies because of its widespread use in the microbial kingdom. PMID:14597753

  17. Multidrug Resistance in Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Nikaido, Hiroshi

    2010-01-01

    Large amounts of antibiotics used for human therapy, as well as for farm animals and even for fish in aquaculture, resulted in the selection of pathogenic bacteria resistant to multiple drugs. Multidrug resistance in bacteria may be generated by one of two mechanisms. First, these bacteria may accumulate multiple genes, each coding for resistance to a single drug, within a single cell. This accumulation occurs typically on resistance (R) plasmids. Second, multidrug resistance may also occur by the increased expression of genes that code for multidrug efflux pumps, extruding a wide range of drugs. This review discusses our current knowledge on the molecular mechanisms involved in both types of resistance. PMID:19231985

  18. Indicator For Pseudomonas Bacteria

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Margalit, Ruth

    1990-01-01

    Characteristic protein extracted and detected. Natural protein marker found in Pseudomonas bacteria. Azurin, protein containing copper readily extracted, purified, and used to prepare antibodies. Possible to develop simple, fast, and accurate test for marker carried out in doctor's office.

  19. Aerobic Anoxygenic Phototrophic Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Yurkov, Vladimir V.; Beatty, J. Thomas

    1998-01-01

    The aerobic anoxygenic phototrophic bacteria are a relatively recently discovered bacterial group. Although taxonomically and phylogenetically heterogeneous, these bacteria share the following distinguishing features: the presence of bacteriochlorophyll a incorporated into reaction center and light-harvesting complexes, low levels of the photosynthetic unit in cells, an abundance of carotenoids, a strong inhibition by light of bacteriochlorophyll synthesis, and the inability to grow photosynthetically under anaerobic conditions. Aerobic anoxygenic phototrophic bacteria are classified in two marine (Erythrobacter and Roseobacter) and six freshwater (Acidiphilium, Erythromicrobium, Erythromonas, Porphyrobacter, Roseococcus, and Sandaracinobacter) genera, which phylogenetically belong to the α-1, α-3, and α-4 subclasses of the class Proteobacteria. Despite this phylogenetic information, the evolution and ancestry of their photosynthetic properties are unclear. We discuss several current proposals for the evolutionary origin of aerobic phototrophic bacteria. The closest phylogenetic relatives of aerobic phototrophic bacteria include facultatively anaerobic purple nonsulfur phototrophic bacteria. Since these two bacterial groups share many properties, yet have significant differences, we compare and contrast their physiology, with an emphasis on morphology and photosynthetic and other metabolic processes. PMID:9729607

  20. Lipopolysaccharides in diazotrophic bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Serrato, Rodrigo V.

    2014-01-01

    Biological nitrogen fixation (BNF) is a process in which the atmospheric nitrogen (N2) is transformed into ammonia (NH3) by a select group of nitrogen-fixing organisms, or diazotrophic bacteria. In order to furnish the biologically useful nitrogen to plants, these bacteria must be in constant molecular communication with their host plants. Some of these molecular plant-microbe interactions are very specific, resulting in a symbiotic relationship between the diazotroph and the host. Others are found between associative diazotrophs and plants, resulting in plant infection and colonization of internal tissues. Independent of the type of ecological interaction, glycans, and glycoconjugates produced by these bacteria play an important role in the molecular communication prior and during colonization. Even though exopolysaccharides (EPS) and lipochitooligosaccharides (LCO) produced by diazotrophic bacteria and released onto the environment have their importance in the microbe-plant interaction, it is the lipopolysaccharides (LPS), anchored on the external membrane of these bacteria, that mediates the direct contact of the diazotroph with the host cells. These molecules are extremely variable among the several species of nitrogen fixing-bacteria, and there are evidences of the mechanisms of infection being closely related to their structure. PMID:25232535

  1. Aerobic Heterotrophic Bacteria Indigenous to pH 2.8 Acid Mine Water: Predominant Slime-Producing Bacteria in Acid Streamers

    PubMed Central

    Dugan, Patrick R.; MacMillan, Carol B.; Pfister, Robert M.

    1970-01-01

    Five gram-negative bacteria, two gram-positive bacteria, and one yeast were isolated from acid streamers taken from acid mine water. One gram-positive rod which has been tentatively identified as a Bacillus species appeared to be the predominant organism in the streamers. This isolate produced copious amounts of extracellular polymer at 10 C in the laboratory and was considered to be the primary source of polymer in the acid streamer slime matrix. The organism grew slowly at pH 2.8 in mine water media, but the optimal pH was approximately 7.0. Images PMID:4908791

  2. The fecal bacteria

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sadowsky, Michael J., (Edited By); Whitman, Richard L.

    2011-01-01

    The Fecal Bacteria offers a balanced, integrated discussion of fecal bacteria and their presence and ecology in the intestinal tract of mammals, in the environment, and in the food supply. This volume covers their use in examining and assessing water quality in order to offer protection from illnesses related to swimming in or ingesting contaminated water, in addition to discussing their use in engineering considerations of water quality, modeling, monitoring, and regulations. Fecal bacteria are additionally used as indicators of contamination of ready-to-eat foods and fresh produce. The intestinal environment, the microbial community structure of the gut microbiota, and the physiology and genomics of this broad group of microorganisms are explored in the book. With contributions from an internationally recognized group of experts, the book integrates medicine, public health, environmental, and microbiological topics in order to provide a unique, holistic understanding of fecal bacteria. Moreover, it shows how the latest basic science and applied research findings are helping to solve problems and develop effective management strategies. For example, readers will discover how the latest tools and molecular approaches have led to our current understanding of fecal bacteria and enabled us to improve human health and water quality. The Fecal Bacteria is recommended for microbiologists, clinicians, animal scientists, engineers, environmental scientists, food safety experts, water quality managers, and students. It will help them better understand fecal bacteria and use their knowledge to protect human and environmental health. They can also apply many of the techniques and molecular tools discussed in this book to the study of a broad range of microorganisms in a variety of habitats.

  3. PVC biodeterioration and DEHP leaching by DEHP-degrading bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Latorre, Isomar; Hwang, Sangchul; Sevillano, Maria; Montalvo-Rodriguez, Rafael

    2012-01-01

    Newly isolated, not previously reported, di-(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (DEHP)-degraders were augmented to assess their role in polyvinyl chloride (PVC) shower curtain deterioration and DEHP leaching. The biofilms that developed on the surfaces of the bioaugmented shower curtains with Gram-positive strains LHM1 and LHM2 were thicker than those of the biostimulated and Gram-negative strain LHM3-augmented shower curtains. The first derivative thermogravimetric (DTG) peaks of the bioaugmented shower curtains with the Gram-positive bacteria were observed at ~287C, whereas the control and Gram-negative strain LHM3-augmented shower curtains were detected at ~283C. This slight delay in the first DTG peak temperature is indicative of lower plasticizer concentrations in the shower curtains that were bioaugmented with Gram positive bacteria. Despite bioaugmentation with DEHP-degraders, aqueous solutions of the bioaugmentation reactors were not DEHP-free due probably to the presence of co-solutes that must have supported microbial growth. Generally, the bioaugmented reactors with the Gram-positive strains LHM1 and LHM2 had greater aqueous DEHP concentrations in the first-half (<3 wk) of the biodeterioration experiment than the biostimulated and strain LHM3-augmented reactors. Therefore, strains LHM1 and LHM2 may play an important role in DEHP leaching to the environment and PVC biodeterioration. PMID:22736894

  4. ?Hall Chip for Sensitive Detection of Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Issadore, David; Chung, Hyun Jung; Chung, Jaehoon; Budin, Ghyslain; Weissleder, Ralph; Lee, Hakho

    2015-01-01

    Sensitive, rapid and phenotype-specific enumeration of pathogens is essential for the diagnosis of infectious disease, monitoring of food chains, and for defense against bioterrorism. Microbiological culture and genotyping, techniques that sensitively and selectively detect bacteria in laboratory settings, have limited application in clinical environments due to high cost, slow response times, and the need for specially trained staff and laboratory infrastructure. To address these challenges, we developed a microfluidic chip-based micro-Hall (?Hall) platform capable of measuring single, magnetically tagged bacteria directly in clinical specimens with minimal sample processing. We demonstrated the clinical utility of the ?Hall chip by enumerating Gram-positive bacteria using a two-step bioorthogonal labeling procedure. The overall detection limit of the system was similar to that of culture tests (~10 bacteria), but the assay time was 50-times faster. This low-cost, single-cell analytical technique is especially well-suited to diagnose infectious diseases in resource-limited clinical settings. PMID:23495188

  5. Metabolic engineering of bacteria for ethanol production

    SciTech Connect

    Ingram, L.O.; Gomez, P.F.; Lai, X.; Moniruzzaman, M.; Wood, B.E.; Yomano, L.P.; York, S.W.

    1998-04-20

    Technologies are available which will allow the conversion of lignocellulose into fuel ethanol using genetically engineered bacteria. Assembling these into a cost-effective process remains a challenge. The authors` work has focused primarily on the genetic engineering of enteric bacteria using a portable ethanol production pathway. Genes encoding Zymomonas mobilis pyruvate decarboxylase and alcohol dehydrogenase have been integrated into the chromosome of Escherichia coli B to produce strain KO11 for the fermentation of hemicellulose-derived syrups. This organism can efficiently ferment all hexose and pentose sugars present in the polymers of hemicellulose. Klebsiella oxytoca M5A1 has been genetically engineered in a similar manner to produce strain P2 for ethanol production from cellulose. This organism has the native ability to ferment cellobiose and cellotriose, eliminating the need for one class of cellulase enzymes. The optimal pH for cellulose fermentation with this organism is near that of fungal cellulases. The general approach for the genetic engineering of new biocatalysts has been most successful with enteric bacteria thus far. However, this approach may also prove useful with gram-positive bacteria which have other important traits for lignocellulose conversion. Many opportunities remain for further improvements in the biomass to ethanol processes.

  6. Endocarditis Due to Rare and Fastidious Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Brouqui, P.; Raoult, D.

    2001-01-01

    The etiologic diagnosis of infective endocarditis is easily made in the presence of continuous bacteremia with gram-positive cocci. However, the blood culture may contain a bacterium rarely associated with endocarditis, such as Lactobacillus spp., Klebsiella spp., or nontoxigenic Corynebacterium, Salmonella, Gemella, Campylobacter, Aeromonas, Yersinia, Nocardia, Pasteurella, Listeria, or Erysipelothrix spp., that requires further investigation to establish the relationship with endocarditis, or the blood culture may be uninformative despite a supportive clinical evaluation. In the latter case, the etiologic agents are either fastidious extracellular or intracellular bacteria. Fastidious extracellular bacteria such as Abiotrophia, HACEK group bacteria, Clostridium, Brucella, Legionella, Mycobacterium, and Bartonella spp. need supplemented media, prolonged incubation time, and special culture conditions. Intracellular bacteria such as Coxiella burnetii cannot be isolated routinely. The two most prevalent etiologic agents of culture-negative endocarditis are C. burnetti and Bartonella spp. Their diagnosis is usually carried out serologically. A systemic pathologic examination of excised heart valves including periodic acid-Schiff (PAS) staining and molecular methods has allowed the identification of Whipple's bacillus endocarditis. Pathologic examination of the valve using special staining, such as Warthin-Starry, Gimenez, and PAS, and broad-spectrum PCR should be performed systematically when no etiologic diagnosis is evident through routine laboratory evaluation. PMID:11148009

  7. The CodY pleiotropic repressor controls virulence in gram-positive pathogens.

    PubMed

    Stenz, Ludwig; Francois, Patrice; Whiteson, Katrine; Wolz, Christiane; Linder, Patrick; Schrenzel, Jacques

    2011-07-01

    CodY is involved in the adaptive response to starvation in at least 30 different low G+C gram-positive bacteria. After dimerization and activation by cofactor binding, CodY binds to a consensus palindromic DNA sequence, leading to the repression of approximately 5% of the genome. CodY represses the transcription of target genes when bound to DNA by competition with the RNA polymerase for promoter binding, or by interference with transcriptional elongation as a roadblock. CodY displays enhanced affinity for its DNA target when bound to GTP and/or branched chain amino acids (BCAA). When nutrients become limiting in the postexponential growth phase, a decrease of intracellular levels of GTP and BCAA causes a deactivation of CodY and decreases its affinity for DNA, leading to the induction of its regulon. CodY-regulated genes trigger adaptation of the bacteria to starvation by highly diverse mechanisms, such as secretion of proteases coupled to expression of amino acid transporters, and promotion of survival strategies like sporulation or biofilm formation. Additionally, in pathogenic bacteria, several virulence factors are regulated by CodY. As a function of their access to nutrients, pathogenic gram-positive bacteria express virulence factors in a codY-dependant manner. This is true for the anthrax toxins of Bacillus anthracis and the haemolysins of Staphylococcus aureus. The purpose of this review is to illustrate CodY-regulated mechanisms on virulence in major gram-positive pathogens. PMID:21539625

  8. A Flow-Cytometric Gram-Staining Technique for Milk-Associated Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Holm, Claus; Jespersen, Lene

    2003-01-01

    A Gram-staining technique combining staining with two fluorescent stains, Oregon Green-conjugated wheat germ agglutinin (WGA) and hexidium iodide (HI) followed by flow-cytometric detection is described. WGA stains gram-positive bacteria while HI binds to the DNA of all bacteria after permeabilization by EDTA and incubation at 50C for 15 min. For WGA to bind to gram-positive bacteria, a 3 M potassium chloride solution was found to give the highest fluorescence intensity. A total of 12 strains representing some of the predominant bacterial species in bulk tank milk and mixtures of these were stained and analyzed by flow cytometry. Overall, the staining method showed a clear differentiation between gram-positive and gram-negative bacterial populations. For stationary-stage cultures of seven gram-positive bacteria and five gram-negative bacteria, an average of 99% of the cells were correctly interpreted. The method was only slightly influenced by the growth phase of the bacteria or conditions such as freezing at ?18C for 24 h. For any of these conditions, an average of at least 95% of the cells were correctly interpreted. When stationary-stage cultures were stored at 5C for 14 days, an average of 86% of the cells were correctly interpreted. The Gram-staining technique was applied to the flow cytometry analysis of bulk tank milk inoculated with Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli. These results demonstrate that the technique is suitable for analyzing milk samples without precultivation. PMID:12732558

  9. Characterization of Bacteria from a Swine Manure Digester †

    PubMed Central

    Iannotti, E. L.; Fischer, J. R.; Sievers, D. M.

    1982-01-01

    One-hundred thirty bacteria isolated from a swine manure digester were predominately gram-positive anaerobes which were tentatively classified into the following genera: Peptostreptococcus, Eubacterium, Bacteroides, Lactobacillus, Peptococcus, Clostridium, and Streptococcus plus two unidentified groups. The major fermentation products formed by these organisms included acetate, propionate, succinate, lactate, and ethanol, singly or in various combinations. Acetate was the sole end product of several groups. Few of the isolates (14%) reduced the pH below 6.0. The predominate bacteria appear to differ from the predominate organisms isolated from other anaerobic ecosystems. PMID:16345916

  10. PATHOGENICITY OF BIOFILM BACTERIA

    EPA Science Inventory

    There is a paucity of information concerning any link between the microorganisms commonly found in biofilms of drinking water systems and their impacts on human health. For bacteria, culture-based techniques detect only a limited number of the total microorganisms associated wit...

  11. Aquatic Bacteria Samples

    USGS Multimedia Gallery

    On April 20, 2010, the BP Deepwater Horizon drilling platform collapsed and sank in the Gulf of Mexico, causing one of the largest oil spills in history. One of the big dilemmas in responding to the oil spil is how to clean up the oil itself. One way currently under research is to use bacteria that ...

  12. Antibiotic-Resistant Bacteria.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Longenecker, Nevin E.; Oppenheimer, Dan

    1982-01-01

    A study conducted by high school advanced bacteriology students appears to confirm the hypothesis that the incremental administration of antibiotics on several species of bacteria (Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus epidermis, Bacillus sublitus, Bacillus megaterium) will allow for the development of antibiotic-resistant strains. (PEB)

  13. Communication among Oral Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Kolenbrander, Paul E.; Andersen, Roxanna N.; Blehert, David S.; Egland, Paul G.; Foster, Jamie S.; Palmer, Robert J.

    2002-01-01

    Human oral bacteria interact with their environment by attaching to surfaces and establishing mixed-species communities. As each bacterial cell attaches, it forms a new surface to which other cells can adhere. Adherence and community development are spatiotemporal; such order requires communication. The discovery of soluble signals, such as autoinducer-2, that may be exchanged within multispecies communities to convey information between organisms has emerged as a new research direction. Direct-contact signals, such as adhesins and receptors, that elicit changes in gene expression after cell-cell contact and biofilm growth are also an active research area. Considering that the majority of oral bacteria are organized in dense three-dimensional biofilms on teeth, confocal microscopy and fluorescently labeled probes provide valuable approaches for investigating the architecture of these organized communities in situ. Oral biofilms are readily accessible to microbiologists and are excellent model systems for studies of microbial communication. One attractive model system is a saliva-coated flowcell with oral bacterial biofilms growing on saliva as the sole nutrient source; an intergeneric mutualism is discussed. Several oral bacterial species are amenable to genetic manipulation for molecular characterization of communication both among bacteria and between bacteria and the host. A successful search for genes critical for mixed-species community organization will be accomplished only when it is conducted with mixed-species communities. PMID:12209001

  14. Bacteria-surface interactions

    PubMed Central

    Tuson, Hannah H.; Weibel, Douglas B.

    2013-01-01

    The interaction of bacteria with surfaces has important implications in a range of areas, including bioenergy, biofouling, biofilm formation, and the infection of plants and animals. Many of the interactions of bacteria with surfaces produce changes in the expression of genes that influence cell morphology and behavior, including genes essential for motility and surface attachment. Despite the attention that these phenotypes have garnered, the bacterial systems used for sensing and responding to surfaces are still not well understood. An understanding of these mechanisms will guide the development of new classes of materials that inhibit and promote cell growth, and complement studies of the physiology of bacteria in contact with surfaces. Recent studies from a range of fields in science and engineering are poised to guide future investigations in this area. This review summarizes recent studies on bacteria-surface interactions, discusses mechanisms of surface sensing and consequences of cell attachment, provides an overview of surfaces that have been used in bacterial studies, and highlights unanswered questions in this field. PMID:23930134

  15. Non-thermal plasma mills bacteria: Scanning electron microscopy observations

    SciTech Connect

    Lunov, O. Churpita, O.; Zablotskii, V.; Jäger, A.; Dejneka, A.; Deyneka, I. G.; Meshkovskii, I. K.; Syková, E.; Kubinová, Š.

    2015-02-02

    Non-thermal plasmas hold great promise for a variety of biomedical applications. To ensure safe clinical application of plasma, a rigorous analysis of plasma-induced effects on cell functions is required. Yet mechanisms of bacteria deactivation by non-thermal plasma remain largely unknown. We therefore analyzed the influence of low-temperature atmospheric plasma on Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. Using scanning electron microscopy, we demonstrate that both Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria strains in a minute were completely destroyed by helium plasma. In contrast, mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) were not affected by the same treatment. Furthermore, histopathological analysis of hematoxylin and eosin–stained rat skin sections from plasma–treated animals did not reveal any abnormalities in comparison to control ones. We discuss possible physical mechanisms leading to the shred of bacteria under non-thermal plasma irradiation. Our findings disclose how helium plasma destroys bacteria and demonstrates the safe use of plasma treatment for MSCs and skin cells, highlighting the favorability of plasma applications for chronic wound therapy.

  16. Non-thermal plasma mills bacteria: Scanning electron microscopy observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lunov, O.; Churpita, O.; Zablotskii, V.; Deyneka, I. G.; Meshkovskii, I. K.; Jäger, A.; Syková, E.; Kubinová, Š.; Dejneka, A.

    2015-02-01

    Non-thermal plasmas hold great promise for a variety of biomedical applications. To ensure safe clinical application of plasma, a rigorous analysis of plasma-induced effects on cell functions is required. Yet mechanisms of bacteria deactivation by non-thermal plasma remain largely unknown. We therefore analyzed the influence of low-temperature atmospheric plasma on Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. Using scanning electron microscopy, we demonstrate that both Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria strains in a minute were completely destroyed by helium plasma. In contrast, mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) were not affected by the same treatment. Furthermore, histopathological analysis of hematoxylin and eosin-stained rat skin sections from plasma-treated animals did not reveal any abnormalities in comparison to control ones. We discuss possible physical mechanisms leading to the shred of bacteria under non-thermal plasma irradiation. Our findings disclose how helium plasma destroys bacteria and demonstrates the safe use of plasma treatment for MSCs and skin cells, highlighting the favorability of plasma applications for chronic wound therapy.

  17. Heterologous expression and purification of a multiheme cytochrome from a Gram-positive bacterium capable of performing extracellular respiration.

    PubMed

    Costa, N L; Carlson, H K; Coates, J D; Louro, R O; Paquete, C M

    2015-07-01

    Microbial electrochemical technologies are emerging as environmentally friendly biotechnological processes. Recently, a thermophilic Gram-positive bacterium capable of electricity production in a microbial fuel cell was isolated. Thermincola potens JR contains several multiheme c-type cytochromes that were implicated in the process of electricity production. In order to understand the molecular basis by which Gram-positive bacteria perform extracellular electron transfer, the relevant proteins need to be characterized in detail. Towards this end, a chimeric gene containing the signal peptide from Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 small tetraheme cytochrome c (STC) and the gene sequence of the target protein TherJR_0333 was constructed. This manuscript reports the successful expression of this chimeric gene in the Gram-negative bacterium Escherichia coli and its subsequent purification and characterization. This methodology opens the possibility to study other multiheme cytochromes from Gram-positive bacteria, allowing the extracellular electron transfer mechanisms of this class of organisms to be unraveled. PMID:25797208

  18. Susceptibility and resistance of ruminal bacteria to antimicrobial feed additives.

    PubMed Central

    Nagaraja, T G; Taylor, M B

    1987-01-01

    Susceptibility and resistance of ruminal bacterial species to avoparcin, narasin, salinomycin, thiopeptin, tylosin, virginiamycin, and two new ionophore antibiotics, RO22-6924/004 and RO21-6447/009, were determined. Generally, antimicrobial compounds were inhibitory to gram-positive bacteria and those bacteria that have gram-positive-like cell wall structure. MICs ranged from 0.09 to 24.0 micrograms/ml. Gram-negative bacteria were resistant at the highest concentration tested (48.0 micrograms/ml). On the basis of their fermentation products, ruminal bacteria that produce lactic acid, butyric acid, formic acid, or hydrogen were susceptible and bacteria that produce succinic acid or ferment lactic acid were resistant to the antimicrobial compounds. Selenomonas ruminantium was the only major lactic acid-producing bacteria resistant to all the antimicrobial compounds tested. Avoparcin and tylosin appeared to be less inhibitory (MIC greater than 6.0 micrograms/ml) than the other compounds to the two major lactic acid-producing bacteria, Streptococcus bovis and Lactobacillus sp. Ionophore compounds seemed to be more inhibitory (MIC, 0.09 to 1.50 micrograms/ml) than nonionophore compounds (MIC, 0.75 to 12.0 micrograms/ml) to the major butyric acid-producing bacteria. Treponema bryantii, an anaerobic rumen spirochete, was less sensitive to virginiamycin than to the other antimicrobial compounds. Ionophore compounds were generally bacteriostatic, and nonionophore compounds were bactericidal. The specific growth rate of Bacteroides ruminicola was reduced by all the antimicrobial compounds except avoparcin. The antibacterial spectra of the feed additives were remarkably similar, and it appears that MICs may not be good indicators of the potency of the compounds in altering ruminal fermentation characteristics. PMID:3116929

  19. Multitasking SecB chaperones in bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Sala, Ambre; Bordes, Patricia; Genevaux, Pierre

    2014-01-01

    Protein export in bacteria is facilitated by the canonical SecB chaperone, which binds to unfolded precursor proteins, maintains them in a translocation competent state and specifically cooperates with the translocase motor SecA to ensure their proper targeting to the Sec translocon at the cytoplasmic membrane. Besides its key contribution to the Sec pathway, SecB chaperone tasking is critical for the secretion of the Sec-independent heme-binding protein HasA and actively contributes to the cellular network of chaperones that control general proteostasis in Escherichia coli, as judged by the significant interplay found between SecB and the trigger factor, DnaK and GroEL chaperones. Although SecB is mainly a proteobacterial chaperone associated with the presence of an outer membrane and outer membrane proteins, secB-like genes are also found in Gram-positive bacteria as well as in certain phages and plasmids, thus suggesting alternative functions. In addition, a SecB-like protein is also present in the major human pathogen Mycobacterium tuberculosis where it specifically controls a stress-responsive toxinantitoxin system. This review focuses on such very diverse chaperone functions of SecB, both in E. coli and in other unrelated bacteria. PMID:25538690

  20. Influence of Sodium Hexametaphosphate on Selected Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Post, F. J.; Krishnamurty, G. B.; Flanagan, M. D.

    1963-01-01

    Sodium hexametaphosphate (HEX), the solvent of calcium alginate wool used in swabbing inanimate surfaces was studied relative to its effect on various bacterial populations, both pure cultures and wild. It was found that bacteria in wild populations were greatly inhibited, and that a percentage reduction of count was directly related to concentration of HEX. Most gram-positive bacteria were prevented from growing on a medium containing 0.1% HEX. This, or a higher concentration, occurred in the final medium when the method recommended in Standard Methods for the Examination of Dairy Products was followed. Growth of Sarcina lutea occurred on media with higher concentrations than that of inhibition (0.05%), if MgSO47H2O was incorporated in the medium. Gram-negative bacteria were capable of growing in higher concentrations, even up to 10% HEX. A large percentage of the cells of some strains (represented by Pseudomonas fluorescens) were lysed on contact with HEX. Lysis could be prevented by the addition of NaCl or MgSO47H2O. The evidence presented suggests that HEX, a phosphate-glass water-softening sequestrant, interferes with divalent cation metabolism, notably magnesium ion, and possibly others, producing cell division inhibition and loss of cell-wall integrity. The mechanism of action was not elucidated. PMID:14063787

  1. Peritonitis due to uncommon gram-positive pathogens in children undergoing peritoneal dialysis

    PubMed Central

    Dotis, J; Printza, N; Papachristou, F

    2012-01-01

    Peritonitis is still the main complication of peritoneal dialysis (PD) in children. Staphylococcus, especially Staphylococcus epidermidis and Staphylococcus aureus, are the predominant species isolated, followed by Streptococcus spp. and by far by gram-negative bacteria and fungi. We describe three cases of PD-related peritonitis in pediatric patients due to uncommon gram-positive pathogens, which were treated with intraperitoneal antibiotic agents. PMID:23935296

  2. Cell wall structure and function in lactic acid bacteria

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The cell wall of Gram-positive bacteria is a complex assemblage of glycopolymers and proteins. It consists of a thick peptidoglycan sacculus that surrounds the cytoplasmic membrane and that is decorated with teichoic acids, polysaccharides, and proteins. It plays a major role in bacterial physiology since it maintains cell shape and integrity during growth and division; in addition, it acts as the interface between the bacterium and its environment. Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) are traditionally and widely used to ferment food, and they are also the subject of more and more research because of their potential health-related benefits. It is now recognized that understanding the composition, structure, and properties of LAB cell walls is a crucial part of developing technological and health applications using these bacteria. In this review, we examine the different components of the Gram-positive cell wall: peptidoglycan, teichoic acids, polysaccharides, and proteins. We present recent findings regarding the structure and function of these complex compounds, results that have emerged thanks to the tandem development of structural analysis and whole genome sequencing. Although general structures and biosynthesis pathways are conserved among Gram-positive bacteria, studies have revealed that LAB cell walls demonstrate unique properties; these studies have yielded some notable, fundamental, and novel findings. Given the potential of this research to contribute to future applied strategies, in our discussion of the role played by cell wall components in LAB physiology, we pay special attention to the mechanisms controlling bacterial autolysis, bacterial sensitivity to bacteriophages and the mechanisms underlying interactions between probiotic bacteria and their hosts. PMID:25186919

  3. Characterization of viable bacteria from Siberian permafrost by 16S rDNA sequencing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shi, T.; Reeves, R. H.; Gilichinsky, D. A.; Friedmann, E. I.

    1997-01-01

    Viable bacteria were found in permafrost core samples from the Kolyma-Indigirka lowland of northeast Siberia. The samples were obtained at different depths; the deepest was about 3 million years old. The average temperature of the permafrost is -10 degrees C. Twenty-nine bacterial isolates were characterized by 16S rDNA sequencing and phylogenetic analysis, cell morphology, Gram staining, endospore formation, and growth at 30 degrees C. The majority of the bacterial isolates were rod shaped and grew well at 30 degrees C; but two of them did not grow at or above 28 degrees C, and had optimum growth temperatures around 20 degrees C. Thirty percent of the isolates could form endospores. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that the isolates fell into four categories: high-GC Gram-positive bacteria, beta-proteobacteria, gamma-proteobacteria, and low-GC Gram-positive bacteria. Most high-GC Gram-positive bacteria and beta-proteobacteria, and all gamma-proteobacteria, came from samples with an estimated age of 1.8-3.0 million years (Olyor suite). Most low-GC Gram-positive bacteria came from samples with an estimated age of 5,000-8,000 years (Alas suite).

  4. Characterization of viable bacteria from Siberian permafrost by 16S rDNA sequencing.

    PubMed

    Shi, T; Reeves, R H; Gilichinsky, D A; Friedmann, E I

    1997-01-01

    Viable bacteria were found in permafrost core samples from the Kolyma-Indigirka lowland of northeast Siberia. The samples were obtained at different depths; the deepest was about 3 million years old. The average temperature of the permafrost is -10 degrees C. Twenty-nine bacterial isolates were characterized by 16S rDNA sequencing and phylogenetic analysis, cell morphology, Gram staining, endospore formation, and growth at 30 degrees C. The majority of the bacterial isolates were rod shaped and grew well at 30 degrees C; but two of them did not grow at or above 28 degrees C, and had optimum growth temperatures around 20 degrees C. Thirty percent of the isolates could form endospores. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that the isolates fell into four categories: high-GC Gram-positive bacteria, beta-proteobacteria, gamma-proteobacteria, and low-GC Gram-positive bacteria. Most high-GC Gram-positive bacteria and beta-proteobacteria, and all gamma-proteobacteria, came from samples with an estimated age of 1.8-3.0 million years (Olyor suite). Most low-GC Gram-positive bacteria came from samples with an estimated age of 5,000-8,000 years (Alas suite). PMID:9115180

  5. Lipoprotein sorting in bacteria.

    PubMed

    Okuda, Suguru; Tokuda, Hajime

    2011-01-01

    Bacterial lipoproteins are synthesized as precursors in the cytoplasm and processed into mature forms on the cytoplasmic membrane. A lipid moiety attached to the N terminus anchors these proteins to the membrane surface. Many bacteria are predicted to express more than 100 lipoproteins, which play diverse functions on the cell surface. The Lol system, composed of five proteins, catalyzes the localization of Escherichia coli lipoproteins to the outer membrane. Some lipoproteins play vital roles in the sorting of other lipoproteins, lipopolysaccharides, and β-barrel proteins to the outer membrane. On the basis of results from biochemical, genetic, and structural studies, we discuss the biogenesis of lipoproteins in bacteria, their importance in cellular functions, and the molecular mechanisms underlying efficient sorting of hydrophobic lipoproteins to the outer membrane through the hydrophilic periplasm. PMID:21663440

  6. Reanimation of Ancient Bacteria

    SciTech Connect

    Vreeland, Russell H.

    2009-01-09

    Recent highly publicized experiments conducted on salt crystals taken from the Permian Salado Formation in Southeastern New Mexico have shown that some ancient crystals contain viable microorganisms trapped within fluid inclusions. Stringent geological and microbiological selection criteria were used to select crystals and conduct all sampling. This talk will focus on how each of these lines of data support the conclusion that such isolated bacteria are as old as the rock in which they are trapped. In this case, the isolated microbes are salt tolerant bacilli that grow best in media containing 8% NaCl, and respond to concentrated brines by forming spores. One of the organisms is phylogenetically related to several bacilli, but does have several unique characteristics. This talk will trace the interdisciplinary data and procedures supporting these discoveries, and describe the various isolated bacteria.

  7. Exopolysaccharides from marine bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chi, Zhenming; Fang, Yan

    2005-01-01

    Microbial polysaccharides represent a class of important products of growing interest for many sectors of industry. In recent years, there has been a growing interest in isolating new exopolysaccharides (EPSs)-producing bacteria from marine environments, particularly from various extreme marine environments. Many new marine microbial EPSs with novel chemical compositions, properties and structures have been found to have potential applications in fields such as adhesives, textiles, Pharmaceuticals and medicine for anti-cancer, food additives, oil recovery and metal removal in mining and industrial waste treatments, etc This paper gives a brief summary of the information about the EPSs produced by marine bacteria, including their chemical compositions, properties and structures, together with their potential applications in industry.

  8. Reanimation of Ancient Bacteria

    SciTech Connect

    Vreeland, Russell H.

    2002-01-09

    Recent highly publicized experiments conducted on salt crystals taken from the Permian Salado Formation in Southeastern New Mexico have shown that some ancient crystals contain viable microorganisms trapped within fluid inclusions. Stringent geological and microbiological selection criteria were used to select crystals and conduct all sampling. This talk will focus on how each of these lines of data support the conclusion that such isolated bacteria are as old as the rock in which they are trapped. In this case, the isolated microbes are salt tolerant bacilli that grow best in media containing 8% NaCl, and respond to concentrated brines by forming spores. One of the organisms is phylogenetically related to several bacilli, but does have several unique characteristics. This talk will trace the interdisciplinary data and procedures supporting these discoveries, and describe the various isolated bacteria.

  9. Manufacture of Probiotic Bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muller, J. A.; Ross, R. P.; Fitzgerald, G. F.; Stanton, C.

    Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) have been used for many years as natural biopreservatives in fermented foods. A small group of LAB are also believed to have beneficial health effects on the host, so called probiotic bacteria. Probiotics have emerged from the niche industry from Asia into European and American markets. Functional foods are one of the fastest growing markets today, with estimated growth to 20 billion dollars worldwide by 2010 (GIA, 2008). The increasing demand for probiotics and the new food markets where probiotics are introduced, challenges the industry to produce high quantities of probiotic cultures in a viable and stable form. Dried concentrated probiotic cultures are the most convenient form for incorporation into functional foods, given the ease of storage, handling and transport, especially for shelf-stable functional products. This chapter will discuss various aspects of the challenges associated with the manufacturing of probiotic cultures.

  10. Denitrification by extremely halophilic bacteria

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hochstein, L. I.; Tomlinson, G. A.

    1985-01-01

    Extremely halophilic bacteria were isolated from widely separated sites by anaerobic enrichment in the presence of nitrate. The anaerobic growth of several of these isolates was accompanied by the production of nitrite, nitrous oxide, and dinitrogen. These results are a direct confirmation of the existence of extremely halophilic denitrifying bacteria, and suggest that such bacteria may be common inhabitants of hypersaline environments.

  11. Growing Unculturable Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    The bacteria that can be grown in the laboratory are only a small fraction of the total diversity that exists in nature. At all levels of bacterial phylogeny, uncultured clades that do not grow on standard media are playing critical roles in cycling carbon, nitrogen, and other elements, synthesizing novel natural products, and impacting the surrounding organisms and environment. While molecular techniques, such as metagenomic sequencing, can provide some information independent of our ability to culture these organisms, it is essentially impossible to learn new gene and pathway functions from pure sequence data. A true understanding of the physiology of these bacteria and their roles in ecology, host health, and natural product production requires their cultivation in the laboratory. Recent advances in growing these species include coculture with other bacteria, recreating the environment in the laboratory, and combining these approaches with microcultivation technology to increase throughput and access rare species. These studies are unraveling the molecular mechanisms of unculturability and are identifying growth factors that promote the growth of previously unculturable organisms. This minireview summarizes the recent discoveries in this area and discusses the potential future of the field. PMID:22661685

  12. Siboglinid-bacteria endosymbiosis

    PubMed Central

    Fielman, Kevin T; Santos, Scott R; Halanych, Kenneth M

    2008-01-01

    Siboglinid worms are a group of gutless marine annelids which are nutritionally dependent upon endosymbiotic bacteria.1,2 Four major groups of siboglinids are known including vestimentiferans, Osedax spp., frenulates and moniliferans.35 Very little is known about the diversity of bacterial endosymbionts associated with frenulate or monoliferan siboglinids. This lack of knowledge is surprising considering the global distribution of siboglinids; this system is likely among the most common symbioses in the deep sea. At least three distinct clades of endosymbiotic ?-proteobacteria associate with siboglinid annelids.6 Frenulates harbor a clade of ?-proteobacteria that are divergent from both the thiotrophic bacteria of vestimentiferans and monoliferans as well as the heterotrophic bacteria of Osedax spp.6,7 We also discuss priorities for future siboglinid research and the need to move beyond descriptive studies. A promising new method, laser-capture microdissection (LCM), allows for the precise excision of tissue regions of interest.8 This method, when used in concert with molecular and genomic techniques, such as Expressed Sequence Tag (EST) surveys using pyrosequencing technology, will likely enable investigations into physiological processes and mechanisms in these symbioses. Furthermore, adopting a comparative approach using different siboglinid groups, such as worms harboring thiotrophic versus methanotrophic endosymbionts, may yield considerable insight into the ecology and evolution of the Siboglinidae. PMID:19704881

  13. Biocide tolerance in bacteria.

    PubMed

    Ortega Morente, Elena; Fernández-Fuentes, Miguel Angel; Grande Burgos, Maria José; Abriouel, Hikmate; Pérez Pulido, Rubén; Gálvez, Antonio

    2013-03-01

    Biocides have been employed for centuries, so today a wide range of compounds showing different levels of antimicrobial activity have become available. At the present time, understanding the mechanisms of action of biocides has also become an important issue with the emergence of bacterial tolerance to biocides and the suggestion that biocide and antibiotic resistance in bacteria might be linked. While most of the mechanisms providing antibiotic resistance are agent specific, providing resistance to a single antimicrobial or class of antimicrobial, there are currently numerous examples of efflux systems that accommodate and, thus, provide tolerance to a broad range of structurally unrelated antimicrobials, both antibiotics and biocides. If biocide tolerance becomes increasingly common and it is linked to antibiotic resistance, not only resistant (even multi-resistant) bacteria could be passed along the food chain, but also there are resistance determinants that can spread and lead to the emergence of new resistant microorganisms, which can only be detected and monitored when the building blocks of resistance traits are understood on the molecular level. This review summarizes the main advances reached in understanding the mechanism of action of biocides, the mechanisms of bacterial resistance to both biocides and antibiotics, and the incidence of biocide tolerance in bacteria of concern to human health and the food industry. PMID:23340387

  14. Pepsin homologues in bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Rawlings, Neil D; Bateman, Alex

    2009-01-01

    Background Peptidase family A1, to which pepsin belongs, had been assumed to be restricted to eukaryotes. The tertiary structure of pepsin shows two lobes with similar folds and it has been suggested that the gene has arisen from an ancient duplication and fusion event. The only sequence similarity between the lobes is restricted to the motif around the active site aspartate and a hydrophobic-hydrophobic-Gly motif. Together, these contribute to an essential structural feature known as a psi-loop. There is one such psi-loop in each lobe, and so each lobe presents an active Asp. The human immunodeficiency virus peptidase, retropepsin, from peptidase family A2 also has a similar fold but consists of one lobe only and has to dimerize to be active. All known members of family A1 show the bilobed structure, but it is unclear if the ancestor of family A1 was similar to an A2 peptidase, or if the ancestral retropepsin was derived from a half-pepsin gene. The presence of a pepsin homologue in a prokaryote might give insights into the evolution of the pepsin family. Results Homologues of the aspartic peptidase pepsin have been found in the completed genomic sequences from seven species of bacteria. The bacterial homologues, unlike those from eukaryotes, do not possess signal peptides, and would therefore be intracellular acting at neutral pH. The bacterial homologues have Thr218 replaced by Asp, a change which in renin has been shown to confer activity at neutral pH. No pepsin homologues could be detected in any archaean genome. Conclusion The peptidase family A1 is found in some species of bacteria as well as eukaryotes. The bacterial homologues fall into two groups, one from oceanic bacteria and one from plant symbionts. The bacterial homologues are all predicted to be intracellular proteins, unlike the eukaryotic enzymes. The bacterial homologues are bilobed like pepsin, implying that if no horizontal gene transfer has occurred the duplication and fusion event might be very ancient indeed, preceding the divergence of bacteria and eukaryotes. It is unclear whether all the bacterial homologues are derived from horizontal gene transfer, but those from the plant symbionts probably are. The homologues from oceanic bacteria are most closely related to memapsins (or BACE-1 and BACE-2), but are so divergent that they are close to the root of the phylogenetic tree and to the division of the A1 family into two subfamilies. PMID:19758436

  15. Design and synthesis of novel antimicrobials with activity against Gram-positive bacteria and mycobacterial species, including M. tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Tiruveedhula, V.V.N. Phani Babu; Witzigmann, Christopher M.; Verma, Ranjit; Kabir, M. Shahjahan; Rott, Marc; Schwan, William R.; Medina-Bielski, Sara; Lane, Michelle; Close, William; Polanowski, Rebecca L.; Sherman, David; Monte, Aaron; Deschamps, Jeffrey R.; Cook, James M.

    2013-01-01

    The alarming increase in bacterial resistance over the last decade along with a dramatic decrease in new treatments for infections has led to problems in the healthcare industry. Tuberculosis (TB) is caused mainly by Mycobacterium tuberculosis which is responsible for 1.4 million deaths per year. A world-wide threat with HIV co-infected with multi and extensively drug-resistant strains of TB has emerged. In this regard, herein, novel acrylic acid ethyl ester derivatives were synthesized in simple, efficient routes and evaluated as potential agents against several Mycobacterium species. These were synthesized via a stereospecific process for structure activity relationship (SAR) studies. Minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) assays indicated that esters 12, 13, and 20 exhibited greater in vitro activity against Mycobacterium smegmatis than rifampin, one of the current, first-line anti-mycobacterial chemotherapeutic agents. Based on these studies the acrylic ester 20 has been developed as a potential lead compound which was found to have an MIC value of 0.4 ?g/mL against Mycobacterium tuberculosis. The SAR and biological activity of this series is presented; a Michael acceptor mechanism appears to be important for potent activity of this series of analogs. PMID:24200931

  16. Antibacterial activity of silver-doped hydroxyapatite nanoparticles against gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Ag-doped nanocrystalline hydroxyapatite nanoparticles (Ag:HAp-NPs) (Ca10-xAgx(PO4)6(OH)2, xAg = 0.05, 0.2, and 0.3) with antibacterial properties are of great interest in the development of new products. Coprecipitation method is a promising route for obtaining nanocrystalline Ag:HAp with antibacterial properties. X-ray diffraction identified HAp as an unique crystalline phase in each sample. The calculated lattice constants of a = b = 9.435 Å, c = 6.876 Å for xAg = 0.05, a = b = 9.443 Å, c = 6.875 Å for xAg = 0.2, and a = b = 9.445 Å, c = 6.877 Å for xAg = 0.3 are in good agreement with the standard of a = b = 9.418 Å, c = 6.884 Å (space group P63/m). The Fourier transform infrared and Raman spectra of the sintered HAp show the absorption bands characteristic to hydroxyapatite. The Ag:HAp nanoparticles are evaluated for their antibacterial activity against Staphylococcus aureus, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Providencia stuartii, Citrobacter freundii and Serratia marcescens. The results showed that the antibacterial activity of these materials, regardless of the sample types, was greatest against S. aureus, K. pneumoniae, P. stuartii, and C. freundii. The results of qualitative antibacterial tests revealed that the tested Ag:HAp-NPs had an important inhibitory activity on P. stuartii and C. freundii. The absorbance values measured at 490 nm of the P. stuartii and C. freundii in the presence of Ag:HAp-NPs decreased compared with those of organic solvent used (DMSO) for all the samples (xAg = 0.05, 0.2, and 0.3). Antibacterial activity increased with the increase of xAg in the samples. The Ag:HAp-NP concentration had little influence on the bacterial growth (P. stuartii). PMID:22721352

  17. Staphylococcin 1580 is identical to the lantibiotic epidermin: implications for the nature of bacteriocins from gram-positive bacteria.

    PubMed Central

    Sahl, H G

    1994-01-01

    Staphylococcin 1580 was purified to homogeneity from culture supernatants of Staphylococcus epidermidis 1580 by means of adsorption to XAD 2, cation exchange chromatography, and high-performance liquid chromatography on reversed-phase C18. The purified active substance migrated in sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis with an apparent M(r) of approximately 2,000. Amino acid analysis, mass determination (2,165 Da) and N-terminal sequencing (Ile-Ala-Xaa-Lys-Phe-Ile-Xaa-Xaa-Pro-Gly-Xaa-Ala-Lys-block) demonstrated that staphylococcin 1580 is identical to epidermin, a lanthionine-containing antibiotic peptide (lantibiotic). Images PMID:8135526

  18. Antibacterial effect (in vitro) of Moringa oleifera and Annona muricata against Gram positive and Gram negative bacteria.

    PubMed

    Viera, Gustavo Hitzschky Fernandes; Mourão, Jozeanne Alves; Angelo, Angela Maria; Costa, Renata Albuquerque; Vieira, Regine Helena Silva dos Fernandes

    2010-01-01

    Antibacterial effects of aqueous and ethanolic extracts of seeds of moringa (Moringa oleifera) and pods of soursop (Annona muricata) in the concentration of 1:5 and 1:10 in volumes 50, 100, 150 and 200 microL were examined against Staphylococcus aureus, Vibrio cholerae, Escherichia coli (isolated from the organism and the aquatic environment) and Salmonella Enteritidis. Antibacterial activity (inhibition halo > 13 mm) against S. aureus, V. cholerae and E. coli isolated from the whiteleg shrimp, Litopenaeus vannmaei, was detected in aqueous and ethanolic extracts of moringa. E. coli isolated from tilapiafish, Oreochromis niloticus, was sensitive to the ethanolic extract of moringa. The aqueous extracts of soursop showed an antibacterial effect against S. aureus and V. cholerae, but the antibacterial activity by the ethanol extracts of this plant was not demonstrated. PMID:20602021

  19. Response of antimicrobial peptides from porcine neutrophils to pentoxifylline and antigens from Gram negative and Gram positive bacteria.

    PubMed

    Wessely-Szponder, Joanna; Smolira, Anna

    2016-02-01

    Neutrophils, the main component of the defense against invading organisms have also been implicated in tissue damage in numerous inflammatory conditions. Neutrophil products can degrade the extracellular matrix and when excessively released are thought to cause some disorders. As it is known, pentoxifylline (PTX) can suppress a range of neutrophil responses. Cathelicidins are components of the early host defenses against infection, however, in most cases cleavage with elastase is necessary to obtain active forms. Thus, the aim of our study was to assess the usage of PTX as a factor which could inhibit some neutrophil functions, and to assess if PTX can lead to the impairment of the release from these cells active cathelicidins. For these purposes we determined neutrophil activity as well as expression of cathelicidins from porcine neutrophils in cultures under the influence of PTX. PTX exerted an inhibitory effect on elastase and MPO release from neutrophils. At lower concentrations of PTX, ALP release was inhibited both in cultures stimulated with PTX+fMLP and with PTX+LPS. Inhibition of superoxide generation was insignificant, whereas a decrease of NO production was noted. The MALDI TOF analysis revealed that in all cultures stimulated with PTX+fLMP and PTX+LPS there was no inhibition of the release of cathelicidins in comparison with cultures stimulated only with fMLP and only with LPS. Our study proved that although PTX in porcine neutrophils is able to suppress many neutrophil functions, the expression of cathelicidins is maintained. PMID:26850555

  20. Homologous metalloregulatory proteins from both gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria control transcription of mercury resistance operons.

    PubMed Central

    Helmann, J D; Wang, Y; Mahler, I; Walsh, C T

    1989-01-01

    We report the overexpression, purification, and properties of the regulatory protein, MerR, for a chromosomally encoded mercury resistance determinant from Bacillus strain RC607. This protein is similar in sequence to the metalloregulatory proteins encoded by gram-negative resistance determinants found on transposons Tn21 and Tn501 and to a predicted gene product of a Staphylococcus aureus resistance determinant. In vitro DNA-binding and transcription experiments were used to demonstrate those purified Bacillus MerR protein controls transcription from a promoter-operator site similar in sequence to that found in the transposon resistance determinants. The Bacillus MerR protein bound in vitro to its promoter-operator region in both the presence and absence of mercuric ion and functioned as a negative and positive regulator of transcription. The MerR protein bound less tightly to its operator region (ca. 50- to 100-fold) in the presence of mercuric ion; this reduced affinity was largely accounted for by an increased rate of dissociation of the MerR protein from the DNA. Despite this reduced DNA-binding affinity, genetic and biochemical evidence support a model in which the MerR protein-mercuric ion complex is a positive regulator of operon transcription. Although the Bacillus MerR protein bound only weakly to the heterologous Tn501 operator region, the Tn501 and Tn21 MerR proteins bound with high affinity to the Bacillus promoter-operator region and exhibited negative, but not positive, transcriptional control. Images PMID:2492496

  1. Antibacterial activity of silver-doped hydroxyapatite nanoparticles against gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciobanu, Carmen Steluta; Iconaru, Simona Liliana; Le Coustumer, Phillippe; Constantin, Liliana Violeta; Predoi, Daniela

    2012-06-01

    Ag-doped nanocrystalline hydroxyapatite nanoparticles (Ag:HAp-NPs) (Ca10- x Ag x (PO4)6(OH)2, x Ag = 0.05, 0.2, and 0.3) with antibacterial properties are of great interest in the development of new products. Coprecipitation method is a promising route for obtaining nanocrystalline Ag:HAp with antibacterial properties. X-ray diffraction identified HAp as an unique crystalline phase in each sample. The calculated lattice constants of a = b = 9.435 Å, c = 6.876 Å for x Ag = 0.05, a = b = 9.443 Å, c = 6.875 Å for x Ag = 0.2, and a = b = 9.445 Å, c = 6.877 Å for x Ag = 0.3 are in good agreement with the standard of a = b = 9.418 Å, c = 6.884 Å (space group P63/m). The Fourier transform infrared and Raman spectra of the sintered HAp show the absorption bands characteristic to hydroxyapatite. The Ag:HAp nanoparticles are evaluated for their antibacterial activity against Staphylococcus aureus, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Providencia stuartii, Citrobacter freundii and Serratia marcescens. The results showed that the antibacterial activity of these materials, regardless of the sample types, was greatest against S. aureus, K. pneumoniae, P. stuartii, and C. freundii. The results of qualitative antibacterial tests revealed that the tested Ag:HAp-NPs had an important inhibitory activity on P. stuartii and C. freundii. The absorbance values measured at 490 nm of the P. stuartii and C. freundii in the presence of Ag:HAp-NPs decreased compared with those of organic solvent used (DMSO) for all the samples ( x Ag = 0.05, 0.2, and 0.3). Antibacterial activity increased with the increase of x Ag in the samples. The Ag:HAp-NP concentration had little influence on the bacterial growth ( P. stuartii).

  2. Mechanism of action of recombinant Acc-royalisin from royal jelly of Chinese honeybee against gram-positive bacteria

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The antibacterial activity of royalisin, an antimicrobial peptide from the royal jelly produced by honeybees has been addressed extensively. However, its mechanism of action remains unclear. In this study, a recombinant royalisin, RAcc-royalisin from the royal jelly of Chinese honeybee Apis cerana...

  3. Comparison of the Potency of the Lipid II Targeting Antimicrobials Nisin, Lacticin 3147 and Vancomycin Against Gram-Positive Bacteria.

    PubMed

    Iancu, Catalin; Grainger, Aoife; Field, Des; Cotter, Paul D; Hill, Colin; Ross, R Paul

    2012-06-01

    While nisin (lantibiotic), lacticin 3147 (lantibiotic) and vancomycin (glycopeptides) are among the best studied lipid II-binding antimicrobials, their relative activities have never been compared. Nisin and lacticin 3147 have been employed/investigated primarily as food preservatives, although they do have potential in terms of veterinary and clinical applications. Vancomycin is used exclusively in clinical therapy. We reveal a higher potency for lacticin 3147 (MIC 0.95-3.8?g/ml) and vancomycin (MIC 0.78-1.56?g/ml) relative to that of nisin (MIC 6.28-25.14?g/ml) against the food-borne pathogen Listeria monocytogenes. A comparison of the activity of the three antimicrobials against nisin resistance mutants of L. monocytogenes also reveals that their susceptibility to vancomycin and lacticin 3147 changed only slightly or not at all. A further assessment of relative activity against a selection of Bacillus cereus, Enterococcus and Staphylococcus aureus targets revealed that vancomycin MICs consistently ranged between 0.78 and 1.56?g/ml against all but one strain. Lacticin 3147 was found to be more effective than nisin against B. cereus (lacticin 3147 MIC 1.9-3.8?g/ml; nisin MIC 4.1-16.7?g/ml) and E. faecium and E. faecalis targets (lacticin 3147 MIC from 1.9 to 3.8?g/ml; nisin MIC ?8.3?g/ml). The greater effectiveness of lacticin 3147 is even more impressive when expressed as molar values. However, in agreement with the previous reports, nisin was the more effective of the two lantibiotics against S. aureus strains. This study highlights that in many instances the antimicrobial activity of these leading lantibiotics are comparable with that of vancomycin and emphasizes their particular value with respect to use in situations including foods and veterinary medicine, where the use of vancomycin is not permitted. PMID:26781852

  4. Phenotypic and Phylogenetic Characterization of Ruminal Tannin-Tolerant Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, Karen E.; Thonney, Michael L.; Woolston, Tina K.; Zinder, Stephen H.; Pell, Alice N.

    1998-01-01

    The 16S rRNA sequences and selected phenotypic characteristics were determined for six recently isolated bacteria that can tolerate high levels of hydrolyzable and condensed tannins. Bacteria were isolated from the ruminal contents of animals in different geographic locations, including Sardinian sheep (Ovis aries), Honduran and Colombian goats (Capra hircus), white-tail deer (Odocoileus virginianus) from upstate New York, and Rocky Mountain elk (Cervus elaphus nelsoni) from Oregon. Nearly complete sequences of the small-subunit rRNA genes, which were obtained by PCR amplification, cloning, and sequencing, were used for phylogenetic characterization. Comparisons of the 16S rRNA of the six isolates showed that four of the isolates were members of the genus Streptococcus and were most closely related to ruminal strains of Streptococcus bovis and the recently described organism Streptococcus gallolyticus. One of the other isolates, a gram-positive rod, clustered with the clostridia in the low-G+C-content group of gram-positive bacteria. The sixth isolate, a gram-negative rod, was a member of the family Enterobacteriaceae in the gamma subdivision of the class Proteobacteria. None of the 16S rRNA sequences of the tannin-tolerant bacteria examined was identical to the sequence of any previously described microorganism or to the sequence of any of the other organisms examined in this study. Three phylogenetically distinct groups of ruminal bacteria were isolated from four species of ruminants in Europe, North America, and South America. The presence of tannin-tolerant bacteria is not restricted by climate, geography, or host animal, although attempts to isolate tannin-tolerant bacteria from cows on low-tannin diets failed. PMID:9758806

  5. Living bacteria in silica gels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nassif, Nadine; Bouvet, Odile; Noelle Rager, Marie; Roux, Ccile; Coradin, Thibaud; Livage, Jacques

    2002-09-01

    The encapsulation of enzymes within silica gels has been extensively studied during the past decade for the design of biosensors and bioreactors. Yeast spores and bacteria have also been recently immobilized within silica gels where they retain their enzymatic activity, but the problem of the long-term viability of whole cells in an inorganic matrix has never been fully addressed. It is a real challenge for the development of sol-gel processes. Generic tests have been performed to check the viability of Escherichia coli bacteria in silica gels. Surprisingly, more bacteria remain culturable in the gel than in an aqueous suspension. The metabolic activity of the bacteria towards glycolysis decreases slowly, but half of the bacteria are still viable after one month. When confined within a mineral environment, bacteria do not form colonies. The exchange of chemical signals between isolated bacteria rather than aggregates can then be studied, a point that could be very important for 'quorum sensing'.

  6. Antibacterial Activity of Some Lactic Acid Bacteria Isolated from an Algerian Dairy Product

    PubMed Central

    Mezaini, Abdelkader; Chihib, Nour-Eddine; Dilmi Bouras, Abdelkader; Nedjar-Arroume, Naima; Hornez, Jean Pierre

    2009-01-01

    In the present study, the antibacterial effect of 20 lactic acid bacteria isolates from a traditional cheese was investigated. 6 isolates showed antibacterial effect against Gram positive bacteria. Streptococcus thermophilus T2 strain showed the wide inhibitory spectrum against the Gram positive bacteria. Growth and bacteriocin production profiles showed that the maximal bacteriocin production, by S. thermophilus T2 cells, was measured by the end of the late-log phase (90 AU ml?1) with a bacteriocine production rate of 9.3 (AU ml?1) h?1. In addition, our findings showed that the bacteriocin, produced by S. thermophilus T2, was stable over a wide pH range (48); this indicates that such bacteriocin may be useful in acidic as well as nonacidic food. This preliminarily work shows the potential application of autochthonous lactic acid bacteria to improve safety of traditional fermented food. PMID:20041021

  7. Gram-Positive Anaerobic Cocci

    PubMed Central

    Murdoch, D. A.

    1998-01-01

    Gram-positive anaerobic cocci (GPAC) are a heterogeneous group of organisms defined by their morphological appearance and their inability to grow in the presence of oxygen; most clinical isolates are identified to species in the genus Peptostreptococcus. GPAC are part of the normal flora of all mucocutaneous surfaces and are often isolated from infections such as deep organ abscesses, obstetric and gynecological sepsis, and intraoral infections. They have been little studied for several reasons, which include an inadequate classification, difficulties with laboratory identification, and the mixed nature of the infections from which they are usually isolated. Nucleic acid studies indicate that the classification is in need of radical revision at the genus level. Several species of Peptostreptococcus have recently been described, but others still await formal recognition. Identification has been based on carbohydrate fermentation tests, but most GPAC are asaccharolytic and use the products of protein degradation for their metabolism; the introduction of commercially available preformed enzyme kits affords a physiologically more appropriate method of identification, which is simple and relatively rapid and can be used in routine diagnostic laboratories. Recent reports have documented the isolation in pure culture of several species, notably Peptostreptococcus magnus, from serious infections. Studies of P. magnus have elucidated several virulence factors which correlate with the site of infection, and reveal some similarities to Staphylococcus aureus. P. micros is a strongly proteolytic species; it is increasingly recognized as an important pathogen in intraoral infections, particularly periodontitis, and mixed anaerobic deep-organ abscesses. Comparison of antibiotic susceptibility patterns reveals major differences between species. Penicillins are the antibiotics of choice, although some strains of P. anaerobius show broad-spectrum β-lactam resistance. PMID:9457430

  8. Microcins from Enterobacteria: On the Edge Between Gram-Positive Bacteriocins and Colicins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rebuffat, Sylvie

    Most bacteria and archaea produce gene-encoded antimicrobial peptides/proteins called bacteriocins, which are secreted by the producing bacteria to compete against other microorganisms in a given niche. They are considered important mediators of intra- and interspecies interactions and therefore a factor in ­maintaining the microbial diversity and stability. They are ribosomally synthesized, and most of them are produced as inactive precursor proteins, which in some cases are further enzymatically modified. Bacteriocins generally exert potent antibacterial activities directed against bacterial species closely related to the producing bacteria. Bacteriocins are abundant and diverse in Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria. This chapter focuses on colicins and microcins from enterobacteria (mainly Escherichia coli) and on bacteriocins from lactic acid bacteria (LAB). Microcins are the lower-molecular-mass bacteriocins produced by Gram-negative bacteria with a repertoire of only 14 representatives. They form a very restricted family of bacteriocins, compared to the huge family of LAB bacteriocins that is constituted of several hundreds of peptides, with which microcins share common characteristics. Nevertheless, microcins also show similarities, particularly in their uptake mechanisms, with the higher-molecular-mass colicins, also produced by E. coli strains. On the edge between LAB bacteriocins and colicins, microcins appear to combine highly efficient strategies developed by both Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria at different levels, including uptake, translocation, killing of target cells, and immunity of the producing bacteria, making them important actors of bacterial competitions and fascinating models for novel concepts toward antimicrobial strategies and against resistance mechanisms.

  9. Bacteria in Solitary Confinement

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Even in clonal bacterial cultures, individual bacteria can show substantial stochastic variation, leading to pitfalls in the interpretation of data derived from millions of cells in a culture. In this issue of the Journal of Bacteriology, as part of their study on osmoadaptation in a cyanobacterium, Nanatani et al. describe employing an ingenious microfluidic device that gently cages individual cells (J Bacteriol 197:676687, 2015, http://dx.doi.org/10.1128/JB.02276-14). The device is a welcome addition to the toolkit available to probe the responses of individual cells to environmental cues. PMID:25488297

  10. Surface layers of bacteria.

    PubMed Central

    Beveridge, T J; Graham, L L

    1991-01-01

    Since bacteria are so small, microscopy has traditionally been used to study them as individual cells. To this end, electron microscopy has been a most powerful tool for studying bacterial surfaces; the viewing of macromolecular arrangements of some surfaces is now possible. This review compares older conventional electron-microscopic methods with new cryotechniques currently available and the results each has produced. Emphasis is not placed on the methodology but, rather, on the importance of the results in terms of our perception of the makeup and function of bacterial surfaces and their interaction with the surrounding environment. Images PMID:1723487

  11. Surface layers of bacteria.

    PubMed

    Beveridge, T J; Graham, L L

    1991-12-01

    Since bacteria are so small, microscopy has traditionally been used to study them as individual cells. To this end, electron microscopy has been a most powerful tool for studying bacterial surfaces; the viewing of macromolecular arrangements of some surfaces is now possible. This review compares older conventional electron-microscopic methods with new cryotechniques currently available and the results each has produced. Emphasis is not placed on the methodology but, rather, on the importance of the results in terms of our perception of the makeup and function of bacterial surfaces and their interaction with the surrounding environment. PMID:1723487

  12. Effects of oral commensal and pathogenic bacteria on human dendritic cells

    PubMed Central

    Chino, T.; Santer, D. M.; Giordano, D.; Chen, C.; Li, C.; Chen, C.-H.; Darveau, R. P.; Clark, E. A.

    2009-01-01

    Background/aims The oral cavity harbors a diverse and complex microbial community. Bacteria accumulate on both the hard and soft oral tissues in sessile biofilms and engage the host in an intricate cellular dialog, which normally constrains the bacteria to a state of commensal harmony. Dendritic cells (DCs) are likely to balance tolerance and active immunity to commensal microorganisms as part of chronic inflammatory responses. While the role played by DCs in maintaining intestinal homeostasis has been investigated extensively, relatively little is known about DC responses to oral bacteria. Methods In this study, we pulsed human monocyte-derived immature DCs (iDCs) with cell wall extracts from pathogenic and commensal gram-positive or gram-negative oral bacteria. Results Although all bacterial extracts tested induced iDCs to mature and produce cytokines/chemokines including interleukin-12p40, tumor necrosis factor-?, and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1), the most important factor for programming DCs by oral bacteria was whether they were gram-positive or gram-negative, not whether they were commensal or pathogenic. In general, gram-negative oral bacteria, except for periodontopathic Porphyromonas gingivalis, stimulated DC maturation and cytokine production at lower concentrations than gram-positive oral bacteria. The threshold of bacteria needed to stimulate chemokine production was 100-fold to 1000-fold lower than that needed to induce cytokines. In addition, very low doses of oral commensal bacteria triggered monocytes to migrate toward DC-derived MCP-1. Conclusion Oral commensal and pathogenic bacteria do not differ qualitatively in how they program DCs. DC-derived MCP-1 induced in response to oral commensal bacteria may play a role, at least in part, in the maintenance of oral tissue integrity by attracting monocytes. PMID:19239635

  13. Resistance of rumen bacteria murein to bovine gastric lysozyme

    PubMed Central

    Domnguez-Bello, Mara G; Pacheco, M Andrena; Ruiz, Marie C; Michelangeli, Fabin; Leippe, Matthias; de Pedro, Miguel A

    2004-01-01

    Background Lysozymes, enzymes mostly associated with defence against bacterial infections, are mureinolytic. Ruminants have evolved a gastric c type lysozyme as a digestive enzyme, and profit from digestion of foregut bacteria, after most dietary components, including protein, have been fermented in the rumen. In this work we characterized the biological activities of bovine gastric secretions against membranes, purified murein and bacteria. Results Bovine gastric extract (BGE) was active against both G+ and G- bacteria, but the effect against Gram- bacteria was not due to the lysozyme, since purified BGL had only activity against Gram+ bacteria. We were unable to find small pore forming peptides in the BGE, and found that the inhibition of Gram negative bacteria by BGE was due to an artefact caused by acetate. We report for first time the activity of bovine gastric lysozyme (BG lysozyme) against pure bacterial cultures, and the specific resistance of some rumen Gram positive strains to BGL. Conclusions Some Gram+ rumen bacteria showed resistance to abomasum lysozyme. We discuss the implications of this finding in the light of possible practical applications of such a stable antimicrobial peptide. PMID:15137912

  14. Methanobactin: a copper binding compound having antibiotic and antioxidant activity isolated from methanotrophic bacteria

    DOEpatents

    DiSpirito, Alan A. (Ames, IA); Zahn, James A. (Harbor Beach, MI); Graham, David W. (Lawrence, KS); Kim, Hyung J. (St. Paul, MN); Alterman, Michail (Lawrence, KS); Larive, Cynthia (Lawrence, KS)

    2007-04-03

    A means and method for treating bacterial infection, providing antioxidant activity, and chelating copper using a copper binding compound produced by methanotrophic bacteria is described. The compound, known as methanobactin, is the first of a new class of antibiotics having gram-positive activity. Methanobactin has been sequenced, and its structural formula determined.

  15. Photocatalytic disinfection of spoilage bacteria Pseudomonas fluorescens and Macrococcus caseolyticus by nano-TiO2

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Photocatalytic disinfection of spoilage bacteria gram-negative (G-) P. fluorescens and gram-positive (G+) M. caseolyticus by nano-TiO2 under different experimental conditions and the disinfection mechanism were investigated. The experimental conditions included the initial bacterial populations, nan...

  16. Nitrogen control in bacteria.

    PubMed Central

    Merrick, M J; Edwards, R A

    1995-01-01

    Nitrogen metabolism in prokaryotes involves the coordinated expression of a large number of enzymes concerned with both utilization of extracellular nitrogen sources and intracellular biosynthesis of nitrogen-containing compounds. The control of this expression is determined by the availability of fixed nitrogen to the cell and is effected by complex regulatory networks involving regulation at both the transcriptional and posttranslational levels. While the most detailed studies to date have been carried out with enteric bacteria, there is a considerable body of evidence to show that the nitrogen regulation (ntr) systems described in the enterics extend to many other genera. Furthermore, as the range of bacteria in which the phenomenon of nitrogen control is examined is being extended, new regulatory mechanisms are also being discovered. In this review, we have attempted to summarize recent research in prokaryotic nitrogen control; to show the ubiquity of the ntr system, at least in gram-negative organisms; and to identify those areas and groups of organisms about which there is much still to learn. PMID:8531888

  17. Designing surfaces that kill bacteria on contact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tiller, Joerg C.; Liao, Chun-Jen; Lewis, Kim; Klibanov, Alexander M.

    2001-05-01

    Poly(4-vinyl-N-alkylpyridinium bromide) was covalently attached to glass slides to create a surface that kills airborne bacteria on contact. The antibacterial properties were assessed by spraying aqueous suspensions of bacterial cells on the surface, followed by air drying and counting the number of cells remaining viable (i.e., capable of growing colonies). Amino glass slides were acylated with acryloyl chloride, copolymerized with 4-vinylpyridine, and N-alkylated with different alkyl bromides (from propyl to hexadecyl). The resultant surfaces, depending on the alkyl group, were able to kill up to 94 4% of Staphylococcus aureus cells sprayed on them. A surface alternatively created by attaching poly(4-vinylpyridine) to a glass slide and alkylating it with hexyl bromide killed 94 3% of the deposited S. aureus cells. On surfaces modified with N-hexylated poly(4-vinylpyridine), the numbers of viable cells of another Gram-positive bacterium, Staphylococcus epidermidis, as well as of the Gram-negative bacteria Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Escherichia coli, dropped more than 100-fold compared with the original amino glass. In contrast, the number of viable bacterial cells did not decline significantly after spraying on such common materials as ceramics, plastics, metals, and wood.

  18. Isolation and Characterization of Bacteria from Ancient Siberian Permafrost Sediment

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, De-Chao; Brouchkov, Anatoli; Griva, Gennady; Schinner, Franz; Margesin, Rosa

    2013-01-01

    In this study, we isolated and characterized bacterial strains from ancient (Neogene) permafrost sediment that was permanently frozen for 3.5 million years. The sampling site was located at Mammoth Mountain in the Aldan river valley in Central Yakutia in Eastern Siberia. Analysis of phospolipid fatty acids (PLFA) demonstrated the dominance of bacteria over fungi; the analysis of fatty acids specific for Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria revealed an approximately twofold higher amount of Gram-negative bacteria compared to Gram-positive bacteria. Direct microbial counts after natural permafrost enrichment showed the presence of (4.7 1.5) 108 cells g?1 sediment dry mass. Viable heterotrophic bacteria were found at 0 C, 10 C and 25 C, but not at 37 C. Spore-forming bacteria were not detected. Numbers of viable fungi were low and were only detected at 0 C and 10 C. Selected culturable bacterial isolates were identified as representatives of Arthrobacter phenanthrenivorans, Subtercola frigoramans and Glaciimonas immobilis. Representatives of each of these species were characterized with regard to their growth temperature range, their ability to grow on different media, to produce enzymes, to grow in the presence of NaCl, antibiotics, and heavy metals, and to degrade hydrocarbons. All strains could grow at ?5 C; the upper temperature limit for growth in liquid culture was 25 C or 30 C. Sensitivity to rich media, antibiotics, heavy metals, and salt increased when temperature decreased (20 C > 10 C > 1 C). In spite of the ligninolytic activity of some strains, no biodegradation activity was detected. PMID:24832653

  19. Aerobic salivary bacteria in wild and captive Komodo dragons.

    PubMed

    Montgomery, Joel M; Gillespie, Don; Sastrawan, Putra; Fredeking, Terry M; Stewart, George L

    2002-07-01

    During the months of November 1996, August 1997, and March 1998, saliva and plasma samples were collected for isolation of aerobic bacteria from 26 wild and 13 captive Komodo dragons (Varanus komodoensis). Twenty-eight Gram-negative and 29 Gram-positive species of bacteria were isolated from the saliva of the 39 Komodo dragons. A greater number of wild than captive dragons were positive for both Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria. The average number of bacterial species within the saliva of wild dragons was 46% greater than for captive dragons. While Escherichia coli was the most common bacterium isolated from the saliva of wild dragons, this species was not present in captive dragons. The most common bacteria isolated from the saliva of captive dragons were Staphylococcus capitis and Staphylococcus capitis and Staphylococcus caseolyticus, neither of which were found in wild dragons. High mortality was seen among mice injected with saliva from wild dragons and the only bacterium isolated from the blood of dying mice was Pasteurella multocida. A competitive inhibition enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay revealed the presence of anti-Pasteurella antibody in the plasma of Komodo dragons. Four species of bacteria isolated from dragon saliva showed resistance to one or more of 16 antimicrobics tested. The wide variety of bacteria demonstrated in the saliva of the Komodo dragon in this study, at least one species of which was highly lethal in mice and 54 species of which are known pathogens, support the observation that wounds inflicted by this animal are often associated with sepsis and subsequent bacteremia in prey animals. PMID:12238371

  20. Isolation and characterization of bacteria from ancient siberian permafrost sediment.

    PubMed

    Zhang, De-Chao; Brouchkov, Anatoli; Griva, Gennady; Schinner, Franz; Margesin, Rosa

    2013-01-01

    In this study, we isolated and characterized bacterial strains from ancient (Neogene) permafrost sediment that was permanently frozen for 3.5 million years. The sampling site was located at Mammoth Mountain in the Aldan river valley in Central Yakutia in Eastern Siberia. Analysis of phospolipid fatty acids (PLFA) demonstrated the dominance of bacteria over fungi; the analysis of fatty acids specific for Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria revealed an approximately twofold higher amount of Gram-negative bacteria compared to Gram-positive bacteria. Direct microbial counts after natural permafrost enrichment showed the presence of (4.7 1.5) 108 cells g-1 sediment dry mass. Viable heterotrophic bacteria were found at 0 C, 10 C and 25 C, but not at 37 C. Spore-forming bacteria were not detected. Numbers of viable fungi were low and were only detected at 0 C and 10 C. Selected culturable bacterial isolates were identified as representatives of Arthrobacter phenanthrenivorans, Subtercola frigoramans and Glaciimonas immobilis. Representatives of each of these species were characterized with regard to their growth temperature range, their ability to grow on different media, to produce enzymes, to grow in the presence of NaCl, antibiotics, and heavy metals, and to degrade hydrocarbons. All strains could grow at -5 C; the upper temperature limit for growth in liquid culture was 25 C or 30 C. Sensitivity to rich media, antibiotics, heavy metals, and salt increased when temperature decreased (20 C > 10 C > 1 C). In spite of the ligninolytic activity of some strains, no biodegradation activity was detected. PMID:24832653

  1. Programmed Death in Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, Kim

    2000-01-01

    Programmed cell death (PCD) in bacteria plays an important role in developmental processes, such as lysis of the mother cell during sporulation of Bacillus subtilis and lysis of vegetative cells in fruiting body formation of Myxococcus xanthus. The signal transduction pathway leading to autolysis of the mother cell includes the terminal sporulation sigma factor EςK, which induces the synthesis of autolysins CwlC and CwlH. An activator of autolysin in this and other PCD processes is yet to be identified. Autolysis plays a role in genetic exchange in Streptococcus pneumoniae, and the gene for the major autolysin, lytA, is located in the same operon with recA. DNA from lysed cells is picked up by their neighbors and recombined into the chromosome by RecA. LytA requires an unknown activator controlled by a sensory kinase, VncS. Deletion of vncS inhibits autolysis and also decreases killing by unrelated antibiotics. This observation suggests that PCD in bacteria serves to eliminate damaged cells, similar to apoptosis of defective cells in metazoa. The presence of genes affecting survival without changing growth sensitivity to antibiotics (vncS, lytA, hipAB, sulA, and mar) indicates that bacteria are able to control their fate. Elimination of defective cells could limit the spread of a viral infection and donate nutrients to healthy kin cells. An altruistic suicide would be challenged by the appearance of asocial mutants without PCD and by the possibility of maladaptive total suicide in response to a uniformly present lethal factor or nutrient depletion. It is proposed that a low rate of mutation serves to decrease the probability that asocial mutants without PCD will take over the population. It is suggested that PCD is disabled in persistors, rare cells that are resistant to killing, to ensure population survival. It is suggested that lack of nutrients leads to the stringent response that suppresses PCD, producing a state of tolerance to antibiotics, allowing cells to discriminate between nutrient deprivation and unrepairable damage. High levels of persistors are apparently responsible for the extraordinary survival properties of bacterial biofilms, and genes affecting persistence appear to be promising targets for development of drugs aimed at eradicating recalcitrant infections. PCD in unicellular eukaryotes is also considered, including aging in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Apoptosis-like elimination of defective cells in S. cerevisiae and protozoa suggests that all unicellular life forms evolved altruistic programmed death that serves a variety of useful functions. PMID:10974124

  2. Phenotypic switching in bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merrin, Jack

    Living matter is a non-equilibrium system in which many components work in parallel to perpetuate themselves through a fluctuating environment. Physiological states or functionalities revealed by a particular environment are called phenotypes. Transitions between phenotypes may occur either spontaneously or via interaction with the environment. Even in the same environment, genetically identical bacteria can exhibit different phenotypes of a continuous or discrete nature. In this thesis, we pursued three lines of investigation into discrete phenotypic heterogeneity in bacterial populations: the quantitative characterization of the so-called bacterial persistence, a theoretical model of phenotypic switching based on those measurements, and the design of artificial genetic networks which implement this model. Persistence is the phenotype of a subpopulation of bacteria with a reduced sensitivity to antibiotics. We developed a microfluidic apparatus, which allowed us to monitor the growth rates of individual cells while applying repeated cycles of antibiotic treatments. We were able to identify distinct phenotypes (normal and persistent) and characterize the stochastic transitions between them. We also found that phenotypic heterogeneity was present prior to any environmental cue such as antibiotic exposure. Motivated by the experiments with persisters, we formulated a theoretical model describing the dynamic behavior of several discrete phenotypes in a periodically varying environment. This theoretical framework allowed us to quantitatively predict the fitness of dynamic populations and to compare survival strategies according to environmental time-symmetries. These calculations suggested that persistence is a strategy used by bacterial populations to adapt to fluctuating environments. Knowledge of the phenotypic transition rates for persistence may provide statistical information about the typical environments of bacteria. We also describe a design of artificial genetic networks that would implement a more general theoretical model of phenotypic switching. We will use a new cloning strategy in order to systematically assemble a large number of genetic features, such as site-specific recombination components from the R64 plasmid, which invert several coexisting DNA segments. The inversion of these segments would lead to discrete phenotypic transitions inside a living cell. These artificial phenotypic switches can be controlled precisely in experiments and may serve as a benchmark for their natural counterparts.

  3. The Mechanisms of Virulence Regulation by Small Noncoding RNAs in Low GC Gram-Positive Pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Pitman, Stephanie; Cho, Kyu Hong

    2015-01-01

    The discovery of small noncoding regulatory RNAs (sRNAs) in bacteria has grown tremendously recently, giving new insights into gene regulation. The implementation of computational analysis and RNA sequencing has provided new tools to discover and analyze potential sRNAs. Small regulatory RNAs that act by base-pairing to target mRNAs have been found to be ubiquitous and are the most abundant class of post-transcriptional regulators in bacteria. The majority of sRNA studies has been limited to E. coli and other gram-negative bacteria. However, examples of sRNAs in gram-positive bacteria are still plentiful although the detailed gene regulation mechanisms behind them are not as well understood. Strict virulence control is critical for a pathogen’s survival and many sRNAs have been found to be involved in that process. This review outlines the targets and currently known mechanisms of trans-acting sRNAs involved in virulence regulation in various gram-positive pathogens. In addition, their shared characteristics such as CU interaction motifs, the role of Hfq, and involvement in two-component regulators, riboswitches, quorum sensing, or toxin/antitoxin systems are described. PMID:26694351

  4. The Mechanisms of Virulence Regulation by Small Noncoding RNAs in Low GC Gram-Positive Pathogens.

    PubMed

    Pitman, Stephanie; Cho, Kyu Hong

    2015-01-01

    The discovery of small noncoding regulatory RNAs (sRNAs) in bacteria has grown tremendously recently, giving new insights into gene regulation. The implementation of computational analysis and RNA sequencing has provided new tools to discover and analyze potential sRNAs. Small regulatory RNAs that act by base-pairing to target mRNAs have been found to be ubiquitous and are the most abundant class of post-transcriptional regulators in bacteria. The majority of sRNA studies has been limited to E. coli and other gram-negative bacteria. However, examples of sRNAs in gram-positive bacteria are still plentiful although the detailed gene regulation mechanisms behind them are not as well understood. Strict virulence control is critical for a pathogen's survival and many sRNAs have been found to be involved in that process. This review outlines the targets and currently known mechanisms of trans-acting sRNAs involved in virulence regulation in various gram-positive pathogens. In addition, their shared characteristics such as CU interaction motifs, the role of Hfq, and involvement in two-component regulators, riboswitches, quorum sensing, or toxin/antitoxin systems are described. PMID:26694351

  5. Bacteriophages of methanotrophic bacteria

    SciTech Connect

    Tyutikow, F.M.; Bespalova, I.A.; Rebentish, B.A.; Aleksandrushkina, N.N.; Krivisky, A.S.

    1980-10-01

    Bacteriophages of methanotrophic bacteria have been found in 16 out of 88 studied samples (underground waters, pond water, soil, gas and oil installation waters, fermentor cultural fluids, bacterial paste, and rumen of cattle) taken in different geographic zones of the Soviet Union. Altogether, 23 phage strains were isolated. By fine structure, the phages were divided into two types (with very short or long noncontractile tails); by host range and serological properties, they fell into three types. All phages had guanine- and cytosine-rich double-stranded deoxyribonucleic acid consisting of common nitrogen bases. By all of the above-mentioned properties, all phages within each of the groups were completely identical to one another, but differed from phages of other groups.

  6. Immunology Taught by Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Introduction It has been proposed that the innate immune system might discriminate living and virulent pathogens from dead or harmless microbes, but the molecular mechanisms by which this discrimination could occur remain unclear. Although studies of model antigens and adjuvants have illuminated important principles underlying immune responses, the specific immune responses made to living, virulent pathogens can only be discovered by studies of the living, virulent pathogens themselves. Methods and Findings Here, I review what one particular bacterium, Legionella pneumophila, has taught us about the innate immune response. Pathogens differ greatly in the mechanisms they use to invade, replicate within, and transmit among their hosts. However, a theme that emerges is that the pathogenic activities sensed by host cells are conserved among multiple pathogenic bacteria. Conclusion Thus, immunology taught by L. pneumophila may lead to a more general understanding of the host response to infection. PMID:20373001

  7. Drug resistant bacteria in non carbonated mineral waters.

    PubMed

    Massa, S; Petruccioli, M; Fanelli, M; Gori, L

    1995-11-01

    The presence of antibiotic resistant bacteria was revealed among bacteria isolated from non carbonated mineral waters bottled in plastic (PVC) and in glass containers. Heterotrophic plate count values ranged between < 10 and 4.3 x 10(3) and between < 10 and 1.2 x 10(4) colony forming units/ml for the waters bottled in PVC and glass, respectively. The greatest resistance to a single antibiotic, 39.1% of 320 isolates from mineral waters, was found for nalidixic acid. Resistance to the other antibiotics was as follows: ampicillin (26.2%), bacitracin (19.7%), cotrimoxazole (18.7%), streptomycin (15.0%), tetracycline (14.4%), gentamycin (11.6%), chloramphenicol and rifampin (9.7%). The strains resistant to two or more antibiotics (multiple antibiotic resistant, MAR) provided 51% of the total isolates. Identification of 127 MAR strains showed that in the mineral waters gram-positive cocci dominated. The second, third and fourth group of identified MAR phenotypes were, in order to importance, gram-negative non-fermentative rods, gram-positive rods and gram-negative fermentative rods. The importance of the antibiotic resistant bacteria in mineral water is discussed. PMID:8564367

  8. Clay-Bacteria Systems and Biofilm Production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steiner, J.; Alimova, A.; Katz, A.; Steiner, N.; Rudolph, E.; Gottlieb, P.

    2007-12-01

    Soil clots and the aerosol transport of bacteria and spores are promoted by the formation of biofilms (bacteria cells in an extracellular polymeric matrix). Biofilms protect microorganisms by promoting adhesion to both organic and inorganic surfaces. Time series experiments on bacteria-clay suspensions demonstrate that biofilm growth is catalyzed by the presence of hectorite in minimal growth media for the studied species: Gram negatives (Pseudomonas syringae and Escherichia coli,) and Gram positives (Staphylococcus aureus and Bacillus subtilis). Soil organisms (P. syringae, B. subtilis) and organisms found in the human population (E. coli, S. aureus) are both used to demonstrate the general applicability of clay involvement. Fluorescent images of the biofilms are acquired by staining with propidium iodide, a component of the BacLightTM Live/Dead bacterial viability staining kit (Molecular Probes, Eugene, OR). The evolving polysaccharide-rich biofilm reacts with the clay interlayer site causing a complex substitution of the two-water hectorite interlayer with polysaccharide. The result is often a three-peak composite of the (001) x-ray diffraction maxima resulting from polysaccharide-expanded clays and an organic-driven contraction of a subset of the clays in the reaction medium. X-ray diffractograms reveal that the expanded set creates a broad maximum with clay subsets at 1.84 nm and 1.41 nm interlayer spacings as approximated by a least squares double Lorentzian fit, and a smaller shoulder at larger 2q, deriving from a contraction of the interlayer spacing. Washing with chlorox removes organic material from the contracted clay and creates a 1-water hectorite single peak in place of the double peak. The clay response can be used as an indirect indicator of biofilm in an environmental system.

  9. Blue green alga mediated synthesis of gold nanoparticles and its antibacterial efficacy against Gram positive organisms.

    PubMed

    Suganya, K S Uma; Govindaraju, K; Kumar, V Ganesh; Dhas, T Stalin; Karthick, V; Singaravelu, G; Elanchezhiyan, M

    2015-02-01

    Biofunctionalized gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) play an important role in design and development of nanomedicine. Synthesis of AuNPs from biogenic materials is environmentally benign and possesses high bacterial inhibition and bactericidal properties. In the present study, blue green alga Spirulina platensis protein mediated synthesis of AuNPs and its antibacterial activity against Gram positive bacteria is discussed. AuNPs were characterized using Ultraviolet-visible (UV-vis) spectroscopy, Fluorescence spectroscopy, Fourier Transform-Infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy, High Resolution-Transmission Electron Microscopy (HR-TEM) and Energy Dispersive X-ray analysis (EDAX). Stable, well defined AuNPs of smaller and uniform shape with an average size of ~ 5 nm were obtained. The antibacterial efficacy of protein functionalized AuNPs were tested against Gram positive organisms Bacillus subtilis and Staphylococcus aureus. PMID:25492207

  10. Swimming bacteria in liquid crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sokolov, Andrey; Zhou, Shuang; Aranson, Igor; Lavrentovich, Oleg

    2014-03-01

    Dynamics of swimming bacteria can be very complex due to the interaction between the bacteria and the fluid, especially when the suspending fluid is non-Newtonian. Placement of swimming bacteria in lyotropic liquid crystal produces a new class of active materials by combining features of two seemingly incompatible constituents: self-propelled live bacteria and ordered liquid crystals. Here we present fundamentally new phenomena caused by the coupling between direction of bacterial swimming, bacteria-triggered flows and director orientations. Locomotion of bacteria may locally reduce the degree of order in liquid crystal or even trigger nematic-isotropic phase transition. Microscopic flows generated by bacterial flagella disturb director orientation. Emerged birefringence patterns allow direct optical observation and quantitative characterization of flagella dynamics. At high concentration of bacteria we observed the emergence of self-organized periodic texture caused by bacteria swimming. Our work sheds new light on self-organization in hybrid bio-mechanical systems and can lead to valuable biomedical applications. Was supported by the US DOE, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Division of Materials Science and Engineering, under the Contract No. DE AC02-06CH11357.

  11. Determination of the gram-positive bacterial content of soils and sediments by analysis of teichoic acid components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gehron, M. J.; Davis, J. D.; Smith, G. A.; White, D. C.

    1984-01-01

    Many gram-positive bacteria form substituted polymers of glycerol and ribitol phosphate esters known as teichoic acids. Utilizing the relative specificity of cold concentrated hydrofluoric acid in the hydrolysis of polyphosphate esters it proved possible to quantitatively assay the teichoic acid-derived glycerol and ribitol from gram-positive bacteria added to various soils and sediments. The lipids are first removed from the soils or sediments with a one phase chloroform-methanol extraction and the lipid extracted residue is hydrolyzed with cold concentrated hydrofluoric acid. To achieve maximum recovery of the teichoic acid ribitol, a second acid hydrolysis of the aqueous extract is required. The glycerol and ribitol are then acetylated after neutralization and analyzed by capillary gas-liquid chromatography. This technique together with measures of the total phospholipid, the phospholipid fatty acid, the muramic acid and the hydroxy fatty acids of the lipopolysaccharide lipid A of the gram-negative bacteria makes it possible to describe the community structure environmental samples. The proportion of gram-positive bacteria measured as the teichoic acid glycerol and ribitol is higher in soils than in sediments and increases with depth in both.

  12. A novel indicator plant to test the hypersensitivity of phytopathogenic bacteria.

    PubMed

    Umesha, S; Richardson, P A; Kong, P; Hong, C X

    2008-01-01

    Hypersensitive response is an important, definitive test to separate plant pathogenic bacteria from saprophytes. The current standard protocol uses tobacco and four o'clock plants as indicators for Gram negative and Gram positive phytopathogenic bacteria, respectively, and inoculation is accomplished by infiltrating bacterial suspensions into intact leaves. Both plants, especially the four o'clock, have thin leaves which make inoculation difficult, sometimes leading to inaccurate tests. Here we propose the use of Sedum hybridum as an alternative indicator plant. Sedum plants are readily available, easy to propagate and fast growing. Their leaves are much thicker, thus infiltration of a bacterial suspension is easier compared to tobacco and four o'clock. Additionally, sedum plants can be used universally to test both Gram negative and Gram positive phytopathogenic bacteria. PMID:18068247

  13. Grapefruit juice and its furocoumarins inhibits autoinducer signaling and biofilm formation in bacteria.

    PubMed

    Girennavar, Basavaraj; Cepeda, Martha L; Soni, Kamlesh A; Vikram, Amit; Jesudhasan, Palmy; Jayaprakasha, G K; Pillai, Suresh D; Patil, Bhimanagouda S

    2008-07-15

    Cell-to-cell communications in bacteria mediated by small diffusible molecules termed as autoinducers (AI) are known to influence gene expression and pathogenicity. Oligopeptides and N-acylhomoserine lactones (AHL) are major AI molecules involved in intra-specific communication in gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria respectively, whereas boronated-diester molecules (AI-2) are involved in inter-specific communication among both gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria. Naturally occurring furocoumarins from grapefruit showed >95% inhibition of AI-1 and AI-2 activities based on the Vibrio harveyi based autoinducer bioassay. Grapefruit juice and furocoumarins also inhibited biofilm formation by Escherichia coli O157:H7, Salmonella typhimurium and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. These results suggest that grape fruit juice and furocoumarins could serve as a source to develop bacterial intervention strategies targeting microbial cell signaling processes. PMID:18504060

  14. Bacteria tracking by in vivo magnetic resonance imaging

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Different non-invasive real-time imaging techniques have been developed over the last decades to study bacterial pathogenic mechanisms in mouse models by following infections over a time course. In vivo investigations of bacterial infections previously relied mostly on bioluminescence imaging (BLI), which is able to localize metabolically active bacteria, but provides no data on the status of the involved organs in the infected host organism. In this study we established an in vivo imaging platform by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for tracking bacteria in mouse models of infection to study infection biology of clinically relevant bacteria. Results We have developed a method to label Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria with iron oxide nano particles and detected and pursued these with MRI. The key step for successful labeling was to manipulate the bacterial surface charge by producing electro-competent cells enabling charge interactions between the iron particles and the cell wall. Different particle sizes and coatings were tested for their ability to attach to the cell wall and possible labeling mechanisms were elaborated by comparing Gram-positive and -negative bacterial characteristics. With 5-nm citrate-coated particles an iron load of 0.015 0.002 pg Fe/bacterial cell was achieved for Staphylococcus aureus. In both a subcutaneous and a systemic infection model induced by iron-labeled S. aureus bacteria, high resolution MR images allowed for bacterial tracking and provided information on the morphology of organs and the inflammatory response. Conclusion Labeled with iron oxide particles, in vivo detection of small S. aureus colonies in infection models is feasible by MRI and provides a versatile tool to follow bacterial infections in vivo. The established cell labeling strategy can easily be transferred to other bacterial species and thus provides a conceptual advance in the field of molecular MRI. PMID:23714179

  15. Identity and Behavior of Xylem-Residing Bacteria in Rough Lemon Roots of Florida Citrus Trees

    PubMed Central

    Gardner, John M.; Feldman, Albert W.; Zablotowicz, Robert M.

    1982-01-01

    An aseptic vacuum extraction technique was used to obtain xylem fluid from the roots of rough lemon (Citrus jambhiri Lush.) rootstock of Florida citrus trees. Bacteria were consistently isolated from vascular fluid of both healthy and young tree decline-affected trees. Thirteen genera of bacteria were found, the most frequently occurring genera being Pseudomonas (40%), Enterobacter (18%), Bacillus, Corynebacterium, and other gram-positive bacteria (16%), and Serratia (6%). Xylem bacterial counts fluctuated seasonally. Bacterial populations ranged from 0.1 to 22 per mm3 of root tissue (about 102 to 2 104 bacteria per g of xylem) when bacterial counts were made on vascular fluid, but these numbers were 10- to 1,000-fold greater when aseptically homogenized xylem tissue was examined similarly. Some of the resident bacteria (4%) are potentially phytopathogenic. It is proposed that xylem bacteria have an important role in the physiology of citrus. PMID:16346030

  16. The Genus Corynebacterium and Other Medically Relevant Coryneform-Like Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Catalase-positive Gram-positive bacilli, commonly called diphtheroids or coryneform bacteria were historically nearly always dismissed as contaminants when recovered from patients, but increasingly have been implicated as the cause of significant infections. These taxa have been underreported, and the taxa were taxonomically confusing. The mechanisms of pathogenesis, especially for newly described taxa, were rarely studied. Antibiotic susceptibility data were relatively scant. In this minireview, clinical relevance, phenotypic and genetic identification methods, matrix-assisted laser desorption ionizationtime of flight (MALDI-TOF) evaluations, and antimicrobial susceptibility testing involving species in the genus Corynebacterium and other medically relevant Gram-positive rods, collectively called coryneforms, are described. PMID:22837327

  17. Tetrachloroethene-dehalogenating bacteria.

    PubMed

    Damborsk, J

    1999-01-01

    Tetrachloroethene is a frequent groundwater contaminant often persisting in the subsurface environments. It is recalcitrant under aerobic conditions because it is in a highly oxidized state and is not readily susceptible to oxidation. Nevertheless, at least 15 organisms from different metabolic groups, viz. halorespirators (9), acetogens (2), methanogens (3) and facultative anaerobes (2), that are able to metabolize tetrachloroethene have been isolated as axenic cultures to-date. Some of these organisms couple dehalo-genation to energy conservation and utilize tetrachloroethene as the only source of energy while others dehalogenate tetrachloroethene fortuitously. Halorespiring organisms (halorespirators) utilize halogenated organic compounds as electron acceptors in an anaerobic respiratory process. Different organisms exhibit differences in the final products of tetrachloroethene dehalogenation, some strains convert tetrachloroethene to trichloroethene only, while others also carry out consecutive dehalogenation to dichloroethenes and vinyl chloride. Thus far, only a single organism, 'Dehalococcoides ethenogenes' strain 195, has been isolated which dechlorinates tetrachloroethene all the way down to ethylene. The majority of tetrachloroethene-dehalogenating organisms have been isolated only in the past few years and several of them, i.e., Dehalobacter restrictus, Desulfitobacterium dehalogenans, 'Dehalococcoides ethenogenes', 'Dehalospirillum multivorans', Desulfuromonas chloroethenica, and Desulfomonile tiedjei, are representatives of new taxonomic groups. This contribution summarizes the available information regarding the axenic cultures of the tetrachloroethene-dehalogenating bacteria. The present knowledge about the isolation of these organisms, their physiological characteristics, morphology, taxonomy and their ability to dechlorinate tetrachloroethene is presented to facilitate a comprehensive comparison. PMID:10664879

  18. Antimicrobial activity of the carnivorous plant Dionaea muscipula against food-related pathogenic and putrefactive bacteria.

    PubMed

    Ogihara, Hirokazu; Endou, Fumiko; Furukawa, Soichi; Matsufuji, Hiroshi; Suzuki, Kouichi; Anzai, Hiroshi

    2013-01-01

    Solvent extracts from the carnivorous plant Dionaea muscipula (Venus flytrap) were prepared using eight different organic solvents, and examined for antibacterial activity against food-related pathogenic and putrefactive bacteria. All solvent extracts showed higher antibacterial activity against gram positive bacteria than against gram negative bacteria. The TLC-bioautography analysis of the extracts revealed that a yellow spot was detected at Rf value of 0.85, which showed strong antibacterial activity. The UV, MS, and NMR analyses revealed that the antibacterial compound was plumbagin. PMID:24077538

  19. Selective detection of bacteria in urine with a long-range surface plasmon waveguide biosensor.

    PubMed

    Bland, Paul; Krupin, Oleksiy; Berini, Pierre

    2015-08-01

    Experimentation demonstrates long-range surface plasmon polariton waveguides as a useful biosensor to selectively detect gram negative or gram positive bacteria in human urine having a low concentration of constituents. The biosensor can detect bacteria at concentrations of 10(5) CFU/ml, the internationally recommended threshold for diagnostic of urinary tract infection. Using a negative control urine solution of bacterial concentration 1000? higher than the targeted bacteria, we obtain a ratio of 5.4 for the positive to negative signals. PMID:26309755

  20. Selective detection of bacteria in urine with a long-range surface plasmon waveguide biosensor

    PubMed Central

    Bland, Paul; Krupin, Oleksiy; Berini, Pierre

    2015-01-01

    Experimentation demonstrates long-range surface plasmon polariton waveguides as a useful biosensor to selectively detect gram negative or gram positive bacteria in human urine having a low concentration of constituents. The biosensor can detect bacteria at concentrations of 105 CFU/ml, the internationally recommended threshold for diagnostic of urinary tract infection. Using a negative control urine solution of bacterial concentration 1000? higher than the targeted bacteria, we obtain a ratio of 5.4 for the positive to negative signals. PMID:26309755

  1. Phosphoenolpyruvate:carbohydrate phosphotransferase systems of bacteria.

    PubMed Central

    Postma, P W; Lengeler, J W; Jacobson, G R

    1993-01-01

    Numerous gram-negative and gram-positive bacteria take up carbohydrates through the phosphoenolpyruvate (PEP):carbohydrate phosphotransferase system (PTS). This system transports and phosphorylates carbohydrates at the expense of PEP and is the subject of this review. The PTS consists of two general proteins, enzyme I and HPr, and a number of carbohydrate-specific enzymes, the enzymes II. PTS proteins are phosphoproteins in which the phospho group is attached to either a histidine residue or, in a number of cases, a cysteine residue. After phosphorylation of enzyme I by PEP, the phospho group is transferred to HPr. The enzymes II are required for the transport of the carbohydrates across the membrane and the transfer of the phospho group from phospho-HPr to the carbohydrates. Biochemical, structural, and molecular genetic studies have shown that the various enzymes II have the same basic structure. Each enzyme II consists of domains for specific functions, e.g., binding of the carbohydrate or phosphorylation. Each enzyme II complex can consist of one to four different polypeptides. The enzymes II can be placed into at least four classes on the basis of sequence similarity. The genetics of the PTS is complex, and the expression of PTS proteins is intricately regulated because of the central roles of these proteins in nutrient acquisition. In addition to classical induction-repression mechanisms involving repressor and activator proteins, other types of regulation, such as antitermination, have been observed in some PTSs. Apart from their role in carbohydrate transport, PTS proteins are involved in chemotaxis toward PTS carbohydrates. Furthermore, the IIAGlc protein, part of the glucose-specific PTS, is a central regulatory protein which in its nonphosphorylated form can bind to and inhibit several non-PTS uptake systems and thus prevent entry of inducers. In its phosphorylated form, P-IIAGlc is involved in the activation of adenylate cyclase and thus in the regulation of gene expression. By sensing the presence of PTS carbohydrates in the medium and adjusting the phosphorylation state of IIAGlc, cells can adapt quickly to changing conditions in the environment. In gram-positive bacteria, it has been demonstrated that HPr can be phosphorylated by ATP on a serine residue and this modification may perform a regulatory function. PMID:8246840

  2. Opioid Exacerbation of Gram-positive sepsis, induced by Gut Microbial Modulation, is Rescued by IL-17A Neutralization

    PubMed Central

    Meng, Jingjing; Banerjee, Santanu; Li, Dan; Sindberg, Gregory M.; Wang, Fuyuan; Ma, Jing; Roy, Sabita

    2015-01-01

    Sepsis is the predominant cause of mortality in ICUs, and opioids are the preferred analgesic in this setting. However, the role of opioids in sepsis progression has not been well characterized. The present study demonstrated that morphine alone altered the gut microbiome and selectively induced the translocation of Gram-positive gut bacteria in mice. Using a murine model of poly-microbial sepsis, we further demonstrated that morphine treatment led to predominantly Gram-positive bacterial dissemination. Activation of TLR2 by disseminated Gram-positive bacteria induced sustained up-regulation of IL-17A and IL-6. We subsequently showed that overexpression of IL-17A compromised intestinal epithelial barrier function, sustained bacterial dissemination and elevated systemic inflammation. IL-17A neutralization protected barrier integrity and improved survival in morphine-treated animals. We further demonstrated that TLR2 expressed on both dendritic cells and T cells play essential roles in IL-17A production. Additionally, intestinal sections from sepsis patients on opioids exhibit similar disruption in gut epithelial integrity, thus establishing the clinical relevance of this study. This is the first study to provide a mechanistic insight into the opioid exacerbation of sepsis and show that neutralization of IL-17A might be an effective therapeutic strategy to manage Gram-positive sepsis in patients on an opioid regimen. PMID:26039416

  3. Interactions between diatoms and bacteria.

    PubMed

    Amin, Shady A; Parker, Micaela S; Armbrust, E Virginia

    2012-09-01

    Diatoms and bacteria have cooccurred in common habitats for hundreds of millions of years, thus fostering specific associations and interactions with global biogeochemical consequences. Diatoms are responsible for one-fifth of the photosynthesis on Earth, while bacteria remineralize a large portion of this fixed carbon in the oceans. Through their coexistence, diatoms and bacteria cycle nutrients between oxidized and reduced states, impacting bioavailability and ultimately feeding higher trophic levels. Here we present an overview of how diatoms and bacteria interact and the implications of these interactions. We emphasize that heterotrophic bacteria in the oceans that are consistently associated with diatoms are confined to two phyla. These consistent bacterial associations result from encounter mechanisms that occur within a microscale environment surrounding a diatom cell. We review signaling mechanisms that occur in this microenvironment to pave the way for specific interactions. Finally, we discuss known interactions between diatoms and bacteria and exciting new directions and research opportunities in this field. Throughout the review, we emphasize new technological advances that will help in the discovery of new interactions. Deciphering the languages of diatoms and bacteria and how they interact will inform our understanding of the role these organisms have in shaping the ocean and how these interactions may change in future oceans. PMID:22933565

  4. Interactions between Diatoms and Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Amin, Shady A.; Parker, Micaela S.

    2012-01-01

    Summary: Diatoms and bacteria have cooccurred in common habitats for hundreds of millions of years, thus fostering specific associations and interactions with global biogeochemical consequences. Diatoms are responsible for one-fifth of the photosynthesis on Earth, while bacteria remineralize a large portion of this fixed carbon in the oceans. Through their coexistence, diatoms and bacteria cycle nutrients between oxidized and reduced states, impacting bioavailability and ultimately feeding higher trophic levels. Here we present an overview of how diatoms and bacteria interact and the implications of these interactions. We emphasize that heterotrophic bacteria in the oceans that are consistently associated with diatoms are confined to two phyla. These consistent bacterial associations result from encounter mechanisms that occur within a microscale environment surrounding a diatom cell. We review signaling mechanisms that occur in this microenvironment to pave the way for specific interactions. Finally, we discuss known interactions between diatoms and bacteria and exciting new directions and research opportunities in this field. Throughout the review, we emphasize new technological advances that will help in the discovery of new interactions. Deciphering the languages of diatoms and bacteria and how they interact will inform our understanding of the role these organisms have in shaping the ocean and how these interactions may change in future oceans. PMID:22933565

  5. Genetically modified bacteria in agriculture.

    PubMed

    Amarger, N

    2002-11-01

    Certain bacteria isolated from soils possess properties that allow them to exert beneficial effects on plants either by enhancing crop nutrition or by reducing damages caused by pathogens or pests. Some of them, such as rhizobia, azospirilla, and agrobacteria, have been traditionally released in fields as seed inoculants and they often lead to increases in the yield of different crops while the application of others, such as pseudomonads, often fails to give the expected results. Bacteria genetically modified to be easily traceable and/or to be improved in their expression of beneficial traits have been constructed and released with plants in a number of experimental field plots. With these releases, it has been possible to monitor the modified inoculant bacteria after their introduction in field ecosystems and to assess their impact on the resident microflora. Local environmental factors appeared as playing a crucial role in the survival and persistence of bacteria once released in fields and in the expression of the beneficial traits whether improved or not. The spread of inoculant bacteria from their point of dissemination was limited. Transient shifts in favour of the released bacteria and in disfavour of some members of the bacterial and fungal populations present in the plant rhizosphere might occur with certain released bacteria. The changes observed were, however, less important than those observed under usual agricultural practices. Gene transfer from resident population to introduced bacteria was detected in one case. The transconjugants were found only transiently in the phytosphere of plants but not in soils. No differences between the survival, spread, persistence in field and ecological impacts of genetically modified bacteria and of the corresponding unmodified parent strain could be detected. PMID:12595134

  6. A CYTOCHEMICAL LOCALIZATION OF REDUCTIVE SITES IN A GRAM-POSITIVE BACTERIUM

    PubMed Central

    van Iterson, Woutera; Leene, W.

    1964-01-01

    In bacteria the exact location of a respiratory enzyme system comparable to that of the mitochondria of other cells has remained uncertain. On the one hand, the existence of particulate "bacterial mitochondria" has been advocated (Mudd); on the other hand, important enzymes of the respiratory chain were recovered in the cytoplasmic membranes associated with some granular material (Weibull). In order to gain insight into this question, sites of reducing activity were localized in thin sections of bacteria using the reduction of potassium tellurite as an indicator. When this salt was added to the culture medium of Bacillus subtilis, it turned out that in this Gram-positive organism the reduced product is strictly bound at two sites, and that the plasma membrane does not materially gain in electron opacity through deposition of the reduced product. The reduction product is found on or in the membranes of particular organelles, which may possibly be regarded as the mitochondrial equivalents in Gram-positive bacteria, and which are sometimes seen connected to the plasma membrane. The second location is in thin rod-like elements at the cell periphery, possibly the sites from which the flagella emerge. PMID:14128042

  7. Sampling bacteria with a laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwarzwälder, Kordula; Rutschmann, Peter

    2014-05-01

    Water quality is a topic of high interest and it's getting more and more important due to climate change and the implementation of European Water Framework Directive (WFD). One point of interest here is the inflow of bacteria into a river caused by combined sewer overflows which lead untreated wastewater including bacteria directly into a river. These bacteria remain in the river for a certain time, they settle down and can be remobilised again. In our study we want to investigate these processes of sedimentation and resuspension and use the results for the development of a software module coupled with the software Flow3D. Thereby we should be able to simulate and therefore predict the water quality influenced by combined sewer overflows. Hence we need to get information about the bacteria transport and fate. We need to know about the size of the bacteria or of the bacteria clumps and the size of the particles the bacteria are attached to. The agglomerates lead to different characteristics and velocities of settlement. The timespan during this bacteria can be detected in the bulk phase depends on many factors like the intensity of UV light, turbidity of the water, the temperature of the water, if there are grazers and a lot more. The size, density and composition of the agglomerates is just a part of all these influencing factors, but it is extremely difficult to differ between the other effects if we have no information about the simple sedimentation in default of these basic information. However we have a big problem getting the data. The chaining between bacteria or bacteria and particles is not too strong, so filtering the water to get a sieving curve may destroy these connections. We did some experiments similar to PIV (particle image velocimetry) measurements and evaluated the pictures with a macro written for the software ImageJ. Doing so we were able to get the concentration of bacteria in the water and collect information about the size of the bacteria. We also compared these data to samples of usual collection and filtering. The results of these laser measurements are very promising.

  8. Potent Antibacterial Nanoparticles against Biofilm and Intracellular Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Mu, Haibo; Tang, Jiangjiang; Liu, Qianjin; Sun, Chunli; Wang, Tingting; Duan, Jinyou

    2016-01-01

    The chronic infections related to biofilm and intracellular bacteria are always hard to be cured because of their inherent resistance to both antimicrobial agents and host defenses. Herein we develop a facile approach to overcome the above conundrum through phosphatidylcholine-decorated Au nanoparticles loaded with gentamicin (GPA NPs). The nanoparticles were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), dynamic light scattering (DLS) and ultraviolet−visible (UV−vis) absorption spectra which demonstrated that GPA NPs with a diameter of approximately 180 nm were uniform. The loading manner and release behaviors were also investigated. The generated GPA NPs maintained their antibiotic activities against planktonic bacteria, but more effective to damage established biofilms and inhibited biofilm formation of pathogens including Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. In addition, GPA NPs were observed to be nontoxic to RAW 264.7 cells and readily engulfed by the macrophages, which facilitated the killing of intracellular bacteria in infected macrophages. These results suggested GPA NPs might be a promising antibacterial agent for effective treatment of chronic infections due to microbial biofilm and intracellular bacteria. PMID:26728712

  9. Lactulose, lactic acid bacteria, intestinal microecology and mucosal protection.

    PubMed

    Salminen, S; Salminen, E

    1997-01-01

    During the fermentation of lactulose, short-chain fatty acids are formed with consequent lowering of the colon pH and modification of the microflora. Lactulose promotes the growth of lactic acid bacteria and bifidobacteria and, more specifically, Lactobacillus acidophilus in the colon. Lactulose and lactulose-containing products fermented with lactic acid bacteria lower colonic pH balancing intestinal microecology and normalizing intestinal transit. In animal studies, lactulose promotes a mainly Gram-positive faecal microflora, but large doses of lactulose may be associated with transient diarrhoea. Our studies indicate that lactulose with lactic acid bacteria effectively relieves constipation in human volunteers. Lactulose with lactic acid bacteria in a fermented diary product can balance and prevent radiotherapy-associated diarrhoea and intestinal side effects. Normalizing the intestinal flora and stabilizing mucosal integrity with lactulose has beneficial effects in intestinal disorders. Lactulose and lactic acid bacteria offer a promising ingredient combination for future functional and special dietary foods in treating intestinal disturbances. PMID:9145446

  10. Potent Antibacterial Nanoparticles against Biofilm and Intracellular Bacteria.

    PubMed

    Mu, Haibo; Tang, Jiangjiang; Liu, Qianjin; Sun, Chunli; Wang, Tingting; Duan, Jinyou

    2016-01-01

    The chronic infections related to biofilm and intracellular bacteria are always hard to be cured because of their inherent resistance to both antimicrobial agents and host defenses. Herein we develop a facile approach to overcome the above conundrum through phosphatidylcholine-decorated Au nanoparticles loaded with gentamicin (GPA NPs). The nanoparticles were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), dynamic light scattering (DLS) and ultraviolet-visible (UV-vis) absorption spectra which demonstrated that GPA NPs with a diameter of approximately 180 nm were uniform. The loading manner and release behaviors were also investigated. The generated GPA NPs maintained their antibiotic activities against planktonic bacteria, but more effective to damage established biofilms and inhibited biofilm formation of pathogens including Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. In addition, GPA NPs were observed to be nontoxic to RAW 264.7 cells and readily engulfed by the macrophages, which facilitated the killing of intracellular bacteria in infected macrophages. These results suggested GPA NPs might be a promising antibacterial agent for effective treatment of chronic infections due to microbial biofilm and intracellular bacteria. PMID:26728712

  11. A Green Nonsulfur Bacterium, Dehalococcoides ethenogenes, with the LexA Binding Sequence Found in Gram-Positive Organisms

    PubMed Central

    Fernndez de Henestrosa, Antonio R.; Cu, Jordi; Erill, Ivan; Magnuson, Jon K.; Barb, Jordi

    2002-01-01

    Dehalococcoides ethenogenes is a member of the physiologically diverse division of green nonsulfur bacteria. Using a TBLASTN search, the D. ethenogenes lexA gene has been identified, cloned, and expressed and its protein has been purified. Mobility shift assays revealed that the D. ethenogenes LexA protein specifically binds to both its own promoter and that of the uvrA gene, but not to the recA promoter. Our results demonstrate that the D. ethenogenes LexA binding site is GAACN4GTTC, which is identical to that found in gram-positive bacteria. In agreement with this fact, the Bacillus subtilis DinR protein binds specifically to the D. ethenogenes LexA operator. This constitutes the first non-gram-positive bacterium exhibiting a LexA binding site identical to that of B. subtilis. PMID:12374844

  12. A Green Nonsulfur Bacterium, Dehalococcoides ethenogenes, with the LexA-binding sequence found in Gram-positive organisms

    SciTech Connect

    de Henestrosa, Antonio R.; Cune, Jordi; Erill, Ivan; Magnuson, Jon K. ); Barbe, Jordi

    2002-12-01

    Dehalococcoides ethenogenes is a member of the physiologically diverse division of green nonsulfur bacteria. Using a TBLASTN search, the D. ethenogenes lexA gene has been identified, cloned, and expressed and its protein has been purified. Mobility shift assays revealed that the D. ethenogenes LexA protein specifically binds to both its own promoter and that of the uvrA gene, but not to the recA promoter. Our results demonstrate that the D. ethenogenes LexA binding site is GAACNNNNGTTC, which is identical to that found in gram-positive bacteria. In agreement with this fact, the Bacillus subtilis DinR protein binds specifically to the D. ethenogenes LexA operator. This constitutes the first non-gram-positive bacterium exhibiting a LexA binding site identical to that of B. subtilis.

  13. Chlorine resistance patterns of bacteria from two drinking water distribution systems.

    PubMed Central

    Ridgway, H F; Olson, B H

    1982-01-01

    The relative chlorine sensitivities of bacteria isolated from chlorinated and unchlorinated drinking water distribution systems were compared by two independent methods. One method measured the toxic effect of free chlorine on bacteria, whereas the other measured the effect of combined chlorine. Bacteria from the chlorinated system were more resistant to both the combined and free forms of chlorine than those from the unchlorinated system, suggesting that there may be selection for more chlorine-tolerant microorganisms in chlorinated waters. Bacteria retained on the surfaces of 2.0-microns Nuclepore membrane filters were significantly more resistant to free chlorine compared to the total microbial population recovered on 0.2-micron membrane filters, presumably because aggregated cells or bacteria attached to suspended particulate matter exhibit more resistance than unassociated microorganisms. In accordance with this hypothesis, scanning electron microscopy of suspended particulate matter from the water samples revealed the presence of attached bacteria. The most resistant microorganisms were able to survive a 2-min exposure to 10 mg of free chlorine per liter. These included gram-positive spore-forming bacilli, actinomycetes, and some micrococci. The most sensitive bacteria were readily killed by chlorine concentrations of 1.0 mg liter-1 or less, and included most gram-positive micrococci, Corynebacterium/Arthrobacter, Klebsiella, Pseudomonas/Alcaligenes, Flavobacterium/Moraxella, and Acinetobacter. Images PMID:7149722

  14. In vitro antibacterial activities and mechanism of sugar fatty acid esters against five food-related bacteria.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Lei; Zhang, Heyan; Hao, Tianyang; Li, Siran

    2015-11-15

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the antibacterial activities of sugar fatty acid esters, with different fatty acid and saccharide moieties, against five food-related bacteria including Bacillus cereus, Bacillus subtilis, Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli and Salmonella typhimurium. Sucrose monocaprate showed the strongest antibacterial activity against all tested bacteria, especially Gram-positive bacteria. The minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) for Gram-positive bacteria and Gram-negative bacteria were 2.5 and 10 mM, respectively. The minimum bactericidal concentrations (MBCs) for Gram-positive bacteria were 10 mM. Time-kill assay also showed that sucrose monocaprate significantly inhibit the growth of tested bacteria. The permeability of the cell membrane and intracellular proteins were both changed by sucrose monocaprate according to cell constituents' leakage, SDS-PAGE and scanning electron microscope assays. It is suggested that sucrose monocaprate, with both emulsifying and antibacterial activities, have a potential to serve as a safe multifunctional food additive in food industries. PMID:25977039

  15. Development of Mucosal Vaccines Based on Lactic Acid Bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bermdez-Humarn, Luis G.; Innocentin, Silvia; Lefvre, Francois; Chatel, Jean-Marc; Langella, Philippe

    Today, sufficient data are available to support the use of lactic acid bacteria (LAB), notably lactococci and lactobacilli, as delivery vehicles for the development of new mucosal vaccines. These non-pathogenic Gram-positive bacteria have been safely consumed by humans for centuries in fermented foods. They thus constitute an attractive alternative to the attenuated pathogens (most popular live vectors actually studied) which could recover their pathogenic potential and are thus not totally safe for use in humans. This chapter reviews the current research and advances in the use of LAB as live delivery vectors of proteins of interest for the development of new safe mucosal vaccines. The use of LAB as DNA vaccine vehicles to deliver DNA directly to antigen-presenting cells of the immune system is also discussed.

  16. Targeting bacteria via iminoboronate chemistry of amine-presenting lipids.

    PubMed

    Bandyopadhyay, Anupam; McCarthy, Kelly A; Kelly, Michael A; Gao, Jianmin

    2015-01-01

    Synthetic molecules that target specific lipids serve as powerful tools for understanding membrane biology and may also enable new applications in biotechnology and medicine. For example, selective recognition of bacterial lipids may give rise to novel antibiotics, as well as diagnostic methods for bacterial infection. Currently known lipid-binding molecules primarily rely on noncovalent interactions to achieve lipid selectivity. Here we show that targeted recognition of lipids can be realized by selectively modifying the lipid of interest via covalent bond formation. Specifically, we report an unnatural amino acid that preferentially labels amine-presenting lipids via iminoboronate formation under physiological conditions. By targeting phosphatidylethanolamine and lysylphosphatidylglycerol, the two lipids enriched on bacterial cell surfaces, the iminoboronate chemistry allows potent labelling of Gram-positive bacteria even in the presence of 10% serum, while bypassing mammalian cells and Gram-negative bacteria. The covalent strategy for lipid recognition should be extendable to other important membrane lipids. PMID:25761996

  17. Targeting Bacteria via Iminoboronate Chemistry of Amine-Presenting Lipids

    PubMed Central

    Bandyopadhyay, Anupam; McCarthy, Kelly A.; Kelly, Michael A.; Gao, Jianmin

    2015-01-01

    Synthetic molecules that target specific lipids serve as powerful tools for understanding membrane biology and may also enable new applications in biotechnology and medicine. For example, selective recognition of bacterial lipids may give rise to novel antibiotics, as well as diagnostic methods for bacterial infection. Currently known lipid-binding molecules primarily rely on noncovalent interactions to achieve lipid selectivity. Here we show that targeted recognition of lipids can be realized by selectively modifying the lipid of interest via covalent bond formation. Specifically, we report an unnatural amino acid that preferentially labels amine-presenting lipids via iminoboronate formation under physiological conditions. By targeting phosphatidylethanolamine and lysylphosphatidylglycerol, the two lipids enriched on bacterial cell surfaces, the iminoboronate chemistry allows potent labeling of Gram-positive bacteria even in presence of 10% serum, while bypassing mammalian cells and Gram-negative bacteria. The covalent strategy for lipid recognition should be extendable to other important membrane lipids. PMID:25761996

  18. Bacteriocins of lactic acid bacteria: extending the family.

    PubMed

    Alvarez-Sieiro, Patricia; Montalbán-López, Manuel; Mu, Dongdong; Kuipers, Oscar P

    2016-04-01

    Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) constitute a heterogeneous group of microorganisms that produce lactic acid as the major product during the fermentation process. LAB are Gram-positive bacteria with great biotechnological potential in the food industry. They can produce bacteriocins, which are proteinaceous antimicrobial molecules with a diverse genetic origin, posttranslationally modified or not, that can help the producer organism to outcompete other bacterial species. In this review, we focus on the various types of bacteriocins that can be found in LAB and the organization and regulation of the gene clusters responsible for their production and biosynthesis, and consider the food applications of the prototype bacteriocins from LAB. Furthermore, we propose a revised classification of bacteriocins that can accommodate the increasing number of classes reported over the last years. PMID:26860942

  19. Genomic organization of lactic acid bacteria.

    PubMed

    Davidson, B E; Kordias, N; Dobos, M; Hillier, A J

    1996-10-01

    Current knowledge of the genomes of the lactic acid bacteria, Lactococcus lactis and Streptococcus thermophilus, and members of the genera Lactobacillus, Leuconostoc, Pediococcus and Carnobacterium, is reviewed. The genomes contain a chromosome within the size range of 1.8 to 3.4 Mbp. Plasmids are common in Lactococcus lactis (most strains carry 4-7 different plasmids), some of the lactobacilli and pediococci, but they are not frequently present in S. thermophilus, Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus or the intestinal lactobacilli. Five IS elements have been found in L. lactis and most strains carry multiple copies of at least two of them; some strains also carry a 68-kbp conjugative transposon. IS elements have been found in the genera Lactobacillus and Leuconostoc, but not in S. thermophilus. Prophages are also a normal component of the L. lactis genome and lysogeny is common in the lactobacilli, however it appears to be rare in S. thermophilus. Physical and genetic maps for two L. lactis subsp. lactis strains, two L. lactis subsp. cremoris strains and S. thermophilus A054 have been constructed and each reveals the presence of six rrn operons clustered in less than 40% of the chromosome. The L. lactis subsp. cremoris MG1363 map contains 115 genetic loci and the S. thermophilus map has 35. The maps indicate significant plasticity in the L. lactis subsp. cremoris chromosome in the form of a number of inversions and translocations. The cause(s) of these rearrangements is (are) not known. A number of potentially powerful genetic tools designed to analyse the L. lactis genome have been constructed in recent years. These tools enable gene inactivation, gene replacement and gene recovery experiments to be readily carried out with this organism, and potentially with other lactic acid bacteria and Gram-positive bacteria. Integration vectors based on temperate phage attB sites and the random insertion of IS elements have also been developed for L. lactis and the intestinal lactobacilli. In addition, a L. lactis sex factor that mobilizes the chromosome in a manner reminiscent to that seen with Escherichia coli Hfr strains has been discovered and characterized. With the availability of this new technology, research into the genome of the lactic acid bacteria is poised to undertake a period of extremely rapid information accrual. PMID:8879406

  20. Environmental sources of fecal bacteria

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Byappanahalli, Muruleedhara N.; Ishii, Satoshi

    2011-01-01

    This chapter provides a review of the research on environmental occurrences of faecal indicator bacteria in a variety of terrestrial and aquatic habitats under different geographic and climatic conditions, and discusses how these external sources may affect surface water quality.

  1. Collective Motion of Magnetotactic Bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barkley, Solomon; Fradin, Cecile; Dalnoki-Veress, Kari

    2014-03-01

    Magnetotactic bacteria produce magnetic crystals that align the cells with an external magnetic field. Due to the field these bacteria preferentially swim along magnetic field lines in a behaviour known as magnetotaxis. Previous work has focused on bacteria in isolation, with investigations into the degree of orientation with the magnetic field as well as the response to magnetic field reversal. However, the motion of a cell in isolation cannot be extended to a cell with many neighbours, where collisions and collective effects cannot be ignored. The increased interaction between magnetotactic bacteria at very high concentrations alters the ability of any individual cell to align with an applied magnetic field. We will present experiments on the interplay between magnetotaxis and collectivity and the effects on the spatial and temporal organization of cells.

  2. A poultry-intestinal isolate of Campylobacter jejuni produces a bacteriocin (CUV-3) active against a range of Gram positive bacterial pathogens including Clostridium perfringens

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A newly isolated bacteriocin, CUV-3, produced by a poultry cecal isolate of Campylobacter jejuni strain CUV-3 had inhibitory activity against several Gram positive bacteria including Clostridium perfringens (38 strains), Staphylococcus aureus, Staph.epidermidis and Listeria monocytogenes. The pept...

  3. Streptococcus mutans: a new Gram-positive paradigm?

    PubMed

    Lemos, Jos A; Quivey, Robert G; Koo, Hyun; Abranches, Jacqueline

    2013-03-01

    Despite the enormous contributions of the bacterial paradigms Escherichia coli and Bacillus subtilis to basic and applied research, it is well known that no single organism can be a perfect representative of all other species. However, given that some bacteria are difficult, or virtually impossible, to cultivate in the laboratory, that some are recalcitrant to genetic and molecular manipulation, and that others can be extremely dangerous to manipulate, the use of model organisms will continue to play an important role in the development of basic research. In particular, model organisms are very useful for providing a better understanding of the biology of closely related species. Here, we discuss how the lifestyle, the availability of suitable in vitro and in vivo systems, and a thorough understanding of the genetics, biochemistry and physiology of the dental pathogen Streptococcus mutans have greatly advanced our understanding of important areas in the field of bacteriology such as interspecies biofilms, competence development and stress responses. In this article, we provide an argument that places S. mutans, an organism that evolved in close association with the human host, as a novel Gram-positive model organism. PMID:23393147

  4. [Nosocomial bacteria: profiles of resistance].

    PubMed

    Sow, A I

    2005-01-01

    Nosocomial infections may be parasitic, mycosal or viral, but bacterial infections are more frequent. They are transmitted by hands or by oral route. This paper describes the main bacteria responsive of nosocomial infections, dominated by Staphylococcus, enterobacteria and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The author relates natural and savage profiles of these bacterias, characterized by multiresistance due to large use of antibiotics. Knowledge of natural resistance and verification of aquired resistance permit to well lead probabilist antibiotherapy. PMID:16190117

  5. The mechanical world of bacteria.

    PubMed

    Persat, Alexandre; Nadell, Carey D; Kim, Minyoung Kevin; Ingremeau, Francois; Siryaporn, Albert; Drescher, Knut; Wingreen, Ned S; Bassler, Bonnie L; Gitai, Zemer; Stone, Howard A

    2015-05-21

    In the wild, bacteria are predominantly associated with surfaces as opposed to existing as free-swimming, isolated organisms. They are thus subject to surface-specific mechanics, including hydrodynamic forces, adhesive forces, the rheology of their surroundings, and transport rules that define their encounters with nutrients and signaling molecules. Here, we highlight the effects of mechanics on bacterial behaviors on surfaces at multiple length scales, from single bacteria to the development of multicellular bacterial communities such as biofilms. PMID:26000479

  6. Fewer Bacteria Adhere to Softer Hydrogels.

    PubMed

    Kolewe, Kristopher W; Peyton, Shelly R; Schiffman, Jessica D

    2015-09-01

    Clinically, biofilm-associated infections commonly form on intravascular catheters and other hydrogel surfaces. The overuse of antibiotics to treat these infections has led to the spread of antibiotic resistance and underscores the importance of developing alternative strategies that delay the onset of biofilm formation. Previously, it has been reported that during surface contact, bacteria can detect surfaces through subtle changes in the function of their motors. However, how the stiffness of a polymer hydrogel influences the initial attachment of bacteria is unknown. Systematically, we investigated poly(ethylene glycol) dimethacrylate (PEGDMA) and agar hydrogels that were 20 times thicker than the cumulative size of bacterial cell appendages, as a function of Young's moduli. Soft (44.05-308.5 kPa), intermediate (1495-2877 kPa), and stiff (5152-6489 kPa) hydrogels were synthesized. Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus attachment onto the hydrogels was analyzed using confocal microscopy after 2 and 24 h incubation periods. Independent of hydrogel chemistry and incubation time, E. coli and S. aureus attachment correlated positively to increasing hydrogel stiffness. For example, after a 24 h incubation period, there were 52 and 82% fewer E. coli adhered to soft PEGDMA hydrogels than to the intermediate and stiff PEGDMA hydrogels, respectively. A 62 and 79% reduction in the area coverage by the Gram-positive microbe S. aureus occurred after 24 h incubation on the soft versus intermediate and stiff PEGDMA hydrogels. We suggest that hydrogel stiffness is an easily tunable variable that could potentially be used synergistically with traditional antimicrobial strategies to reduce early bacterial adhesion and therefore the occurrence of biofilm-associated infections. PMID:26291308

  7. Fewer Bacteria Adhere to Softer Hydrogels

    PubMed Central

    Kolewe, Kristopher W.; Peyton, Shelly R.; Schiffman, Jessica D.

    2015-01-01

    Clinically, biofilm-associated infections commonly form on intravascular catheters and other hydrogel surfaces. The overuse of antibiotics to treat these infections has led to the spread of antibiotic resistance and underscores the importance of developing alternative strategies that delay the onset of biofilm formation. Previously, it has been reported that during surface contact, bacteria can detect surfaces through subtle changes in the function of their motors. However, how the stiffness of a polymer hydrogel influences the initial attachment of bacteria is unknown. Systematically, we investigated poly(ethylene glycol) dimethacrylate (PEGDMA) and agar hydrogels that were twenty times thicker than the cumulative size of bacterial cell appendages, as a function of Youngs moduli. Soft (44.05 308.5 kPa), intermediate (1495 2877 kPa), and stiff (5152 6489 kPa) hydrogels were synthesized. Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus attachment onto the hydrogels was analyzed using confocal microscopy after 2 and 24 hr incubation periods. Independent of hydrogel chemistry and incubation time, E. coli and S. aureus attachment correlated positively to increasing hydrogel stiffness. For example, after a 24 hr incubation period, there were 52% and 82% less E. coli adhered to soft PEGDMA hydrogels, than to the intermediate and stiff PEGDMA hydrogels, respectively. A 62% and 79% reduction in the area coverage by the Gram-positive microbe S. aureus occurred after 24 hr incubation on the soft versus intermediate and stiff PEGDMA hydrogels. We suggest that hydrogel stiffness is an easily tunable variable that, potentially, could be used synergistically with traditional antimicrobial strategies to reduce early bacterial adhesion, and therefore the occurrence of biofilm-associated infections. PMID:26291308

  8. Cable Bacteria in Freshwater Sediments.

    PubMed

    Risgaard-Petersen, Nils; Kristiansen, Michael; Frederiksen, Rasmus B; Dittmer, Anders Lindequist; Bjerg, Jesper Tataru; Trojan, Daniela; Schreiber, Lars; Damgaard, Lars Riis; Schramm, Andreas; Nielsen, Lars Peter

    2015-09-01

    In marine sediments cathodic oxygen reduction at the sediment surface can be coupled to anodic sulfide oxidation in deeper anoxic layers through electrical currents mediated by filamentous, multicellular bacteria of the Desulfobulbaceae family, the so-called cable bacteria. Until now, cable bacteria have only been reported from marine environments. In this study, we demonstrate that cable bacteria also occur in freshwater sediments. In a first step, homogenized sediment collected from the freshwater stream Giber Å, Denmark, was incubated in the laboratory. After 2 weeks, pH signatures and electric fields indicated electron transfer between vertically separated anodic and cathodic half-reactions. Fluorescence in situ hybridization revealed the presence of Desulfobulbaceae filaments. In addition, in situ measurements of oxygen, pH, and electric potential distributions in the waterlogged banks of Giber Å demonstrated the presence of distant electric redox coupling in naturally occurring freshwater sediment. At the same site, filamentous Desulfobulbaceae with cable bacterium morphology were found to be present. Their 16S rRNA gene sequence placed them as a distinct sister group to the known marine cable bacteria, with the genus Desulfobulbus as the closest cultured lineage. The results of the present study indicate that electric currents mediated by cable bacteria could be important for the biogeochemistry in many more environments than anticipated thus far and suggest a common evolutionary origin of the cable phenotype within Desulfobulbaceae with subsequent diversification into a freshwater and a marine lineage. PMID:26116678

  9. Cable Bacteria in Freshwater Sediments

    PubMed Central

    Kristiansen, Michael; Frederiksen, Rasmus B.; Dittmer, Anders Lindequist; Bjerg, Jesper Tataru; Trojan, Daniela; Schreiber, Lars; Damgaard, Lars Riis; Schramm, Andreas; Nielsen, Lars Peter

    2015-01-01

    In marine sediments cathodic oxygen reduction at the sediment surface can be coupled to anodic sulfide oxidation in deeper anoxic layers through electrical currents mediated by filamentous, multicellular bacteria of the Desulfobulbaceae family, the so-called cable bacteria. Until now, cable bacteria have only been reported from marine environments. In this study, we demonstrate that cable bacteria also occur in freshwater sediments. In a first step, homogenized sediment collected from the freshwater stream Giber , Denmark, was incubated in the laboratory. After 2 weeks, pH signatures and electric fields indicated electron transfer between vertically separated anodic and cathodic half-reactions. Fluorescence in situ hybridization revealed the presence of Desulfobulbaceae filaments. In addition, in situ measurements of oxygen, pH, and electric potential distributions in the waterlogged banks of Giber demonstrated the presence of distant electric redox coupling in naturally occurring freshwater sediment. At the same site, filamentous Desulfobulbaceae with cable bacterium morphology were found to be present. Their 16S rRNA gene sequence placed them as a distinct sister group to the known marine cable bacteria, with the genus Desulfobulbus as the closest cultured lineage. The results of the present study indicate that electric currents mediated by cable bacteria could be important for the biogeochemistry in many more environments than anticipated thus far and suggest a common evolutionary origin of the cable phenotype within Desulfobulbaceae with subsequent diversification into a freshwater and a marine lineage. PMID:26116678

  10. Bioreporter bacteria for landmine detection

    SciTech Connect

    Burlage, R.S.; Youngblood, T.; Lamothe, D.

    1998-04-01

    Landmines (and other UXO) gradually leak explosive chemicals into the soil at significant concentrations. Bacteria, which have adapted to scavenge low concentrations of nutrients, can detect these explosive chemicals. Uptake of these chemicals results in the triggering of specific bacterial genes. The authors have created genetically recombinant bioreporter bacteria that detect small concentrations of energetic chemicals. These bacteria are genetically engineered to produce a bioluminescent signal when they contact specific explosives. A gene for a brightly fluorescent compound can be substituted for increased sensitivity. By finding the fluorescent bacteria, you find the landmine. Detection might be accomplished using stand-off illumination of the minefield and GPS technology, which would result in greatly reduced risk to the deminers. Bioreporter technology has been proven at the laboratory scale, and will be tested under field conditions in the near future. They have created a bacterial strain that detects sub-micromolar concentrations of o- and p-nitrotoluene. Related bacterial strains were produced using standard laboratory protocols, and bioreporters of dinitrotoluene and trinitrotoluene were produced, screening for activity with the explosive compounds. Response time is dependent on the growth rate of the bacteria. Although frill signal production may require several hours, the bacteria can be applied over vast areas and scanned quickly, producing an equivalent detection speed that is very fast. This technology may be applicable to other needs, such as locating buried explosives at military and ordnance/explosive manufacturing facilities.

  11. Filtrating forms of soil bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van'kova, A. A.; Ivanov, P. I.; Emtsev, V. T.

    2013-03-01

    Filtrating (ultramicroscopic) forms (FF) of bacteria were studied in a soddy-podzolic soil and the root zone of alfalfa plants as part of populations of the most widespread physiological groups of soil bacteria. FF were obtained by filtering soil solutions through membrane filters with a pore diameter of 0.22 ?m. It was established that the greater part of the bacteria in the soil and in the root zone of the plants has an ultramicroscopic size: the average diameter of the cells is 0.3 ?m, and their length is 0.6 ?m, which is significantly less than the cell size of banal bacteria. The number of FF varies within a wide range depending on the physicochemical conditions of the habitat. The FF number's dynamics in the soil is of a seasonal nature; i.e., the number of bacteria found increases in the summer and fall and decreases in the winter-spring period. In the rhizosphere of the alfalfa, over the vegetation period, the number of FF and their fraction in the total mass of the bacteria increase. A reverse tendency is observed in the rhizoplane. The morphological particularities (identified by an electron microscopy) and the nature of the FF indicate their physiological activity.

  12. Gram-typing of mastitis bacteria in milk samples using flow cytometry.

    PubMed

    Langerhuus, S N; Ingvartsen, K L; Bennedsgaard, T W; Røntved, C M

    2013-01-01

    Fast identification of pathogenic bacteria in milk samples from cows with clinical mastitis is central to proper treatment. In Denmark, time to bacterial diagnosis is typically 24 to 48 h when using traditional culturing methods. The PCR technique provides a faster and highly sensitive identification of bacterial pathogens, although shipment of samples to diagnostic laboratories delays treatment decisions. Due to the lack of fast on-site tests that can identify the causative pathogens, antibiotic treatments are often initiated before bacterial identification. The present study describes a flow cytometry-based method, which can detect and distinguish gram-negative and gram-positive bacteria in mastitis milk samples. The differentiation was based on bacterial fluorescence intensities upon labeling with biotin-conjugated wheat germ agglutinin and acridine orange. Initially 19 in-house bacterial cultures (4 gram-negative and 15 gram-positive strains) were analyzed, and biotin-conjugated wheat germ agglutinin and acridine orange florescence intensities were determined for gram-negative and gram-positive bacteria, respectively. Fluorescence cut-off values were established based on receiver operating characteristic curves for the 19 bacterial cultures. The method was then tested on 53 selected mastitis cases obtained from the department biobank (milk samples from 6 gram-negative and 47 gram-positive mastitis cases). Gram-negative bacteria in milk samples were detected with a sensitivity of 1 and a specificity of 0.74, when classification was based on the previously established cut-off values. However, when receiver operating characteristic curves were constructed for the 53 mastitis cases, results indicate that a sensitivity and specificity of 1 could be reached if cut-off values were reduced. This flow cytometry-based technique could potentially provide dairy farmers and attending veterinarians with on-site information on bacterial gram-type and prevent ineffective antimicrobial treatment in mastitis cases caused by gram-negative bacteria. PMID:23141826

  13. Platelet Activation by Streptococcus pyogenes Leads to Entrapment in Platelet Aggregates, from Which Bacteria Subsequently Escape

    PubMed Central

    Svensson, Lisbeth; Baumgarten, Maria; Mrgelin, Matthias

    2014-01-01

    Platelet activation and aggregation have been reported to occur in response to a number of Gram-positive pathogens. Here, we show that platelet aggregates induced by Streptococcus pyogenes were unstable and that viable bacteria escaped from the aggregates over time. This was not due to differential activation in response to the bacteria compared with physiological activators. All the bacterial isolates induced significant platelet activation, including integrin activation and alpha and dense-granule release, at levels equivalent to those induced by potent physiological platelet activators that induced stable aggregates. The ability to escape the aggregates and to resist the antibacterial effects of platelets was dependent on active protein synthesis by the bacteria within the aggregate. We conclude that S. pyogenes bacteria can temporarily cover themselves with activated platelets, and we propose that this may facilitate survival of the bacteria in the presence of platelets. PMID:25069984

  14. [Isolation and characterization of two marine algicidal bacteria against the Phaeocystis globosa].

    PubMed

    Yan, Rong-Jun; Yin, Ping-He; Qiu, Jun-Hong

    2011-01-01

    The algae-lysis bacteria Y01 and Y04 were isolated from seawater, during a red tide survey of the Zhuhai Estuary in southern China. The algae-lysis bacteria Y01 and Y04 were Gram-positive bacteria which can remove P. globosa in 6 days. The lysing process was observed by microscope and SEM, both of them could directly lyse P. globosa. The strains were identified by the sequence analysis of 16S rDNA. The length of the two bacteria's sequences were 1 468 bp and 1 548 bp (strain Y01: DQ531607; strain Y04: DQ531608). The DNA sequence similarity searches showed that share more than 99.7% sequence homology with some strain of Bacillus. The algae-lysing bacteria would provide a possibility to control P. globosa red-tide by microbial agents. PMID:21404691

  15. Occurrence and ultrastructural characterization of bacteria in association with and isolated from Azolla caroliniana.

    PubMed Central

    Nierzwicki-Bauer, S A; Aulfinger, H

    1991-01-01

    The occurrence and ultrastructure of bacteria in leaf cavities of symbiotic Azolla caroliniana were examined by transmission electron microscopy. Bacteria were observed in all leaf cavities of Azolla cultures. Five ultrastructurally distinct types of bacteria were observed in each individual leaf cavity. Features used to characterize the bacteria included morphology, cell wall structure, and cytoplasmic organization. At least one gram-positive and as many as four gram-negative types of bacteria reside in leaf cavities of A. caroliniana. The morphological and ultrastructural characteristics of the gram-positive bacterium suggest that it is an Arthrobacter sp. The gram-negative bacteria could not be cultured; therefore, they have not been classified further. Bacterial cell shape and cell wall structure were similar in leaf cavities of different ages, but cell size and cytoplasmic composition varied. The relative contributions of each bacterial type to the total community within individual leaves was determined. Ultrastructural characteristics of bacterial isolates cultured from A. caroliniana in a free-living state were also examined. Images PMID:1785935

  16. Isolation, characterization and phylogeny of sponge-associated bacteria with antimicrobial activities from Brazil.

    PubMed

    Santos, Olinda C S; Pontes, Paula V M L; Santos, Juliana F M; Muricy, Guilherme; Giambiagi-deMarval, Marcia; Laport, Marinella S

    2010-09-01

    Bacteria associated with marine sponges represent a rich source of bioactive metabolites. The aim of this study was to isolate and characterize bacteria with antimicrobial activities from Brazilian sponges. A total of 158 colony-forming units were isolated from nine sponge species. Among these, 12 isolates presented antimicrobial activities against pathogenic bacteria. Based on comparative sequence analysis of their 16S rRNA genes, the sponge-associated bacterial strains could be subdivided into three phylogenetically different clusters. Five strains were affiliated with Firmicutes (genera Bacillus and Virgibacillus), three with alpha-Proteobacteria (Pseudovibrio sp.) and four with gamma-Proteobacteria (genera Pseudomonas and Stenotrophomonas). The sponge-associated bacterial strains Pseudomonas fluorescens H40 and H41 and Pseudomonas aeruginosa H51 exhibited antimicrobial activity against both Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria, including strains such as vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus faecium and multiresistant Klebsiella pneumoniae. Bacillus pumilus Pc31 and Pc32, Pseudovibrio ascidiaceicola Pm31 and Ca31 and Pseudovibrio denitrificans Mm37 strains were more effective against Gram-positive bacteria. These findings suggest that the identified strains may contribute to the search for new sources of antimicrobial substances, an important strategy for developing alternative therapies to treat infections caused by multidrug-resistant bacteria. PMID:20600863

  17. Characterization of predominant bacteria isolates from clean rooms in a pharmaceutical production unit*

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Gen-fu; Liu, Xiao-hua

    2007-01-01

    Aims: To screen for the predominant bacteria strains distributed in clean rooms and to analyze their phylogenetic relationships. Methods and Results: The bacteria distributed in air, surfaces and personnel in clean rooms were routinely monitored using agar plates. Five isolates frequently isolated from the clean rooms of an aseptic pharmaceutical production workshop were selected based on their colony and cell morphology characteristics. Their physiological and biochemical properties, as well as partial 16S rDNA sequences, were analyzed. Results showed that all the five isolates belong to Gram positive bacteria, of which three were Staphylococcus, one Microbacterium and one Bacillus species. Sensitivity tests for these bacteria isolates to 3 disinfectants showed that isolate F03 was obtuse, and had low susceptivity to UV irradiation, while isolates F02, F01 and F04 were not sensitive to phenol treatment. Isolates F04, F01 and F05 were resistant to chlorhexidine gluconate. Conclusion: Bacteria widely distributed in clean rooms are mainly a group of Gram positive strains, showing high resistance to selected disinfectants. Significance and impact of the study: Clean rooms are essential in aseptic pharmaceutical and food production. Screening bacteria isolates and identifying them is part of good manufacturing practices, and will aid in finding a more effective disinfection method. PMID:17726748

  18. Microgravity effects on magnetotactic bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urban, James E.

    1998-01-01

    An unusual group of iron bacteria has recently been discovered which form inclusion bodies containing a form of iron oxide known as magnetite (ferrosoferric oxide, Fe3O4.) The inclusions are of a nano-particle size, are encased within a protein envelope, and are called magnetosomes. Magnetosomes are arranged adjacent to one another and parallel to the long axis of the cell such that cells appear to contain an electron-dense string of beads. The bacteria containing magnetosomes exhibit metal reductase activity, an activity critical to element recycling in nature, and the inclusions are a means for the organism to sequester reduced iron atoms and thereby keep iron reduction stoichiometry favorable. The magnetosomes also allow the bacteria to display magnetotaxis, which is movement in response to a magnetic field, such as the north or south magnetic poles. It is presumed that the bacteria use the alignment to the earth's magnetic field to orient themselves downward towards sediments where the habitat is favorable to their growth and metabolism. The comparatively few species of these bacteria isolated in the northern and southern hemispheres respond to magnetic north and south respectively, or alternatively respond only to the magnetic pole of the hemisphere from which they were isolated. This apparent dichotomy in response to magnetism could mean that the organisms are not responding to magnetism, per se, but instead are using the magnetosomes to respond to gravity. To resolve if magnetosomes respond to gravity in addition to magnetism we have used Magnetospirillum magnetotacticum, a well-studied magnetotactic bacterium isolated in the northern hemisphere, to examine magnetotactic behavior in the absence of gravity. Experiments to compare the orientation of Magnetospirillum magnetotacticum to north- or south-pole magnets were conducted in normal gravity and in the microgravity environments aboard the Space Shuttle and Space Station MIR. In each of the microgravity situations studied, bacteria were impaired in their ability to orient to magnets, suggesting that on earth the bacteria use magnetosomes to respond to gravity. These experiments could have significant commercial utility and could lead to the use of magnetosomes to direct biodegrading bacteria to contaminated aquifers or soils and likewise could be used to direct and localize bacteria used in element leaching and microbial mining.

  19. Procalcitonin Levels in Gram-Positive, Gram-Negative, and Fungal Bloodstream Infections

    PubMed Central

    Ferranti, Marta; Moretti, Amedeo; Al Dhahab, Zainab Salim; Cenci, Elio; Mencacci, Antonella

    2015-01-01

    Procalcitonin (PCT) can discriminate bacterial from viral systemic infections and true bacteremia from contaminated blood cultures. The aim of this study was to evaluate PCT diagnostic accuracy in discriminating Gram-positive, Gram-negative, and fungal bloodstream infections. A total of 1,949 samples from patients with suspected bloodstream infections were included in the study. Median PCT value in Gram-negative (13.8?ng/mL, interquartile range (IQR) 3.444.1) bacteremias was significantly higher than in Gram-positive (2.1?ng/mL, IQR 0.67.6) or fungal (0.5?ng/mL, IQR 0.41) infections (P < 0.0001). Receiver operating characteristic analysis showed an area under the curve (AUC) for PCT of 0.765 (95% CI 0.7250.805, P < 0.0001) in discriminating Gram-negatives from Gram-positives at the best cut-off value of 10.8?ng/mL and an AUC of 0.944 (95% CI 0.9190.969, P < 0.0001) in discriminating Gram-negatives from fungi at the best cut-off of 1.6?ng/mL. Additional results showed a significant difference in median PCT values between Enterobacteriaceae and nonfermentative Gram-negative bacteria (17.1?ng/mL, IQR 5.948.5 versus 3.5?ng/mL, IQR 0.821.5; P < 0.0001). This study suggests that PCT may be of value to distinguish Gram-negative from Gram-positive and fungal bloodstream infections. Nevertheless, its utility to predict different microorganisms needs to be assessed in further studies. PMID:25852221

  20. Bacteriophage endolysins: a novel anti-infective to control Gram-positive pathogens.

    PubMed

    Fischetti, Vincent A

    2010-08-01

    Endolysins (or lysins) are highly evolved enzymes produced by bacteriophage (phage for short) to digest the bacterial cell wall for phage progeny release. In Gram-positive bacteria, small quantities of purified recombinant lysin added externally results in immediate lysis causing log-fold death of the target bacterium. Lysins have been used successfully in a variety of animal models to control pathogenic antibiotic-resistant bacteria found on mucosal surfaces and infected tissues. Their specificity for the pathogen without disturbing the normal flora, the low chance of bacterial resistance, and their ability to kill colonizing pathogens on mucosal surfaces, a capacity previously unavailable, make them ideal anti-infectives in an age of mounting resistance. Here we review the current literature showing the effectiveness of these enzymes in controlling a variety of infections. PMID:20452280

  1. Bacteriophage endolysins: A novel anti-infective to control Gram-positive pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Fischetti, Vincent A.

    2010-01-01

    Endolysins (or lysins) are highly evolved enzymes produced by bacteriophage (phage for short) to digest the bacterial cell wall for phage progeny release. In Gram-positive bacteria, small quantities of purified recombinant lysin added externally results in immediate lysis causing log-fold death of the target bacterium. Lysins have been used successfully in a variety of animal models to control pathogenic antibiotic-resistant bacteria found on mucosal surfaces and infected tissues. Their specificity for the pathogen without disturbing the normal flora, the low chance of bacterial resistance, and their ability to kill colonizing pathogens on mucosal surfaces, a capacity previously unavailable, make them ideal anti-infectives in an age of mounting resistance. Here we review the current literature showing the effectiveness of these enzymes in controlling a variety of infections. PMID:20452280

  2. Structure, Function, and Assembly of Adhesive Organelles by Uropathogenic Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Chahales, Peter; Thanassi, David G.

    2015-01-01

    Bacteria assemble a wide range of adhesive proteins, termed adhesins, to mediate binding to receptors and colonization of surfaces. For pathogenic bacteria, adhesins are critical for early stages of infection, allowing the bacteria to initiate contact with host cells, colonize different tissues, and establish a foothold within the host. The adhesins expressed by a pathogen are also critical for bacterial-bacterial interactions and the formation of bacterial communities such as biofilms. The ability to adhere to host tissues is particularly important for bacteria that colonize sites such as the urinary tract, where the flow of urine functions to maintain sterility by washing away non-adherent pathogens. Adhesins vary from monomeric proteins that are directly anchored to the bacterial surface to polymeric, hairlike fibers that extend out from the cell surface. These latter fibers are termed pili or fimbriae, and were among the first identified virulence factors of uropathogenic Escherichia coli. Studies since then have identified a range of both pilus and non-pilus adhesins that contribute to bacterial colonization of the urinary tract, and have revealed molecular details of the structures, assembly pathways, and functions of these adhesive organelles. In this review, we describe the different types of adhesins expressed by both Gram-negative and Gram-positive uropathogens, what is known about their structures, how they are assembled on the bacterial surface, and the functions of specific adhesins in the pathogenesis of urinary tract infections. PMID:26542038

  3. Selective antimicrobial activity of maggots against pathogenic bacteria.

    PubMed

    Jaklic, Domen; Lapanje, Ales; Zupancic, Klemen; Smrke, Dragica; Gunde-Cimerman, Nina

    2008-05-01

    Maggot therapy, also known as biosurgery, is an ancient method for the healing of chronic infected wounds. Although clinicians have reported on the beneficial activities of the Lucilia sericata larvae that have been used for healing chronic wounds, the selectivity of this therapy against the different pathogenic micro-organisms that are found in chronic wounds has never been analysed. In the present study, we have investigated the in vitro activities of larval excreta/secreta both against selected bacterial strains that frequently occur in chronically infected wounds, and against bacteria isolated directly from the larvae and their excreta/secreta. Additionally, the antibacterial activities were investigated in in vivo studies, by comparing bacterial diversity in wounds before and after the application of L. sericata larvae. In conclusion, larval therapy is highly recommended, particularly for the treatment of wounds infected with Gram-positive bacteria, like Staphylococcus aureus, but less so for wounds infected with Gram-negative bacteria, especially Proteus spp. and Pseudomonas spp. strains. Bacteria from the genus Vagococcus were resistant to the maggot excreta/secreta. PMID:18436596

  4. Pathways for degradation of lignin in bacteria and fungi.

    PubMed

    Bugg, Timothy D H; Ahmad, Mark; Hardiman, Elizabeth M; Rahmanpour, Rahman

    2011-11-01

    Lignin is a heterogeneous aromatic polymer found as 10-35% of lignocellulose, found in plant cell walls. The bio-conversion of plant lignocellulose to glucose is an important part of second generation biofuel production, but the resistance of lignin to breakdown is a major obstacle in this process, hence there is considerable interest in the microbial breakdown of lignin. White-rot fungi are known to break down lignin with the aid of extracellular peroxidase and laccase enzymes. There are also reports of bacteria that can degrade lignin, and recent work indicates that bacterial lignin breakdown may be more significant than previously thought. The review will discuss the enzymes for lignin breakdown in fungi and bacteria, and the catabolic pathways for breakdown of the ?-aryl ether, biphenyl and other components of lignin in bacteria and fungi. The review will also discuss small molecule phenolic breakdown products from lignin that have been identified from lignin-degrading microbes, and includes a bioinformatic analysis of the occurrence of known lignin-degradation pathways in Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. PMID:21918777

  5. Structure, Function, and Assembly of Adhesive Organelles by Uropathogenic Bacteria.

    PubMed

    Chahales, Peter; Thanassi, David G

    2015-10-01

    Bacteria assemble a wide range of adhesive proteins, termed adhesins, to mediate binding to receptors and colonization of surfaces. For pathogenic bacteria, adhesins are critical for early stages of infection, allowing the bacteria to initiate contact with host cells, colonize different tissues, and establish a foothold within the host. The adhesins expressed by a pathogen are also critical for bacterial-bacterial interactions and the formation of bacterial communities, including biofilms. The ability to adhere to host tissues is particularly important for bacteria that colonize sites such as the urinary tract, where the flow of urine functions to maintain sterility by washing away non-adherent pathogens. Adhesins vary from monomeric proteins that are directly anchored to the bacterial surface to polymeric, hair-like fibers that extend out from the cell surface. These latter fibers are termed pili or fimbriae, and were among the first identified virulence factors of uropathogenic Escherichia coli. Studies since then have identified a range of both pilus and non-pilus adhesins that contribute to bacterial colonization of the urinary tract, and have revealed molecular details of the structures, assembly pathways, and functions of these adhesive organelles. In this review, we describe the different types of adhesins expressed by both Gram-negative and Gram-positive uropathogens, what is known about their structures, how they are assembled on the bacterial surface, and the functions of specific adhesins in the pathogenesis of urinary tract infections. PMID:26542038

  6. Silver Enhances Antibiotic Activity Against Gram-negative Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Spina, Catherine S.; Collins, James J.

    2013-01-01

    A declining pipeline of clinically useful antibiotics has made it imperative to develop more effective antimicrobial therapies, particularly against difficult-to-treat Gram-negative pathogens. Silver has been used as an antimicrobial since antiquity, yet its mechanism of action remains unclear. Here, we show that silver disrupts multiple bacterial cellular processes, including disulfide bond formation, metabolism and iron homeostasis. These changes lead to increased production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and increased membrane permeability of Gram-negative bacteria, that can potentiate the activity of a broad range of antibiotics against Gram-negative bacteria in different metabolic states, as well as restore antibiotic susceptibility to a resistant bacterial strain. We show both in vitro and in a mouse model of urinary tract infection that the ability of silver to induce oxidative stress can be harnessed to potentiate antibiotic activity. Additionally, we demonstrate in vitro and in two different mouse models of peritonitis that silver sensitizes Gram-negative bacteria to the Gram-positive specific antibiotic, vancomycin, thereby expanding the antibacterial spectrum of this drug. Finally, we used silver and antibiotic combinations in vitro to eradicate bacterial persister cells, and show both in vitro and in a mouse biofilm infection model, that silver can enhance antibacterial action against biofilms. This work shows that silver can be used to enhance the action of existing antibiotics against Gram-negative bacteria thus strengthening the antibiotic arsenal for fighting bacterial infections. PMID:23785037

  7. Host-Bacteria Crosstalk at the Dentogingival Junction

    PubMed Central

    Pöllänen, M. T.; Laine, M. A.; Ihalin, R.; Uitto, V.-J.

    2012-01-01

    The dentogingival junction is of crucial importance in periodontal host defense both structurally and functionally. Oral bacteria exert a constant challenge to the host cells and tissues at the dentogingival junction. The host response is set up to eliminate the pathogens by the innate and adaptive defense mechanisms. In health, the commensal bacteria and the host defense mechanisms are in a dynamic steady state. During periodontal disease progression, the dental bacterial plaque, junctional epithelium (JE), inflammatory cells, connective tissue, and bone all go through a series of changes. The tissue homeostasis is turned into tissue destruction and progression of periodontitis. The classical study of Slots showed that in the bacterial plaque, the most remarkable change is the shift from gram-positive aerobic and facultatively anaerobic flora to a predominantly gram-negative and anaerobic flora. This has been later confirmed by several other studies. Furthermore, not only the shift of the bacterial flora to a more pathogenic one, but also bacterial growth as a biofilm on the tooth surface, allows the bacteria to communicate with each other and exert their virulence aimed at favoring their growth. This paper focuses on host-bacteria crosstalk at the dentogingival junction and the models studying it in vitro. PMID:22899931

  8. Antibiotic-producing bacteria from stag beetle mycangia.

    PubMed

    Miyashita, Atsushi; Hirai, Yuuki; Sekimizu, Kazuhisa; Kaito, Chikara

    2015-02-01

    The search for new antibiotics or antifungal agents is crucial for the chemotherapies of infectious diseases. The limited resource of soil bacteria makes it difficult to discover such new drug candidate. We, therefore, focused on another bacterial resource than soil bacteria, the microbial flora of insect species. In the present study, we isolated 40 strains of bacteria and fungi from the mycangia of three species of stag beetle, Dorcus hopei binodulosus, Dorcus rectus, and Dorcus titanus pilifer. We identified those species with their ribosomal DNA sequences, and revealed that Klebsiella spp. are the most frequent symbiont in the stag beetle mycangia. We examined whether these microorganisms produce antibiotics against a Gram-negative bacterium, Escherichia coli, a Gram-positive bacterium, Staphylococcus aureus, or a fungus, Cryptococcus neoformans. Culture supernatants from 33, 29, or 18 strains showed antimicrobial activity against E. coli, S. aureus, or C. neoformans, respectively. These findings suggest that bacteria present in the mycangia of stag beetles are useful resources for screening novel antibiotics. PMID:25639488

  9. Commensal bacteria and cutaneous immunity.

    PubMed

    Nakamizo, Satoshi; Egawa, Gyohei; Honda, Tetsuya; Nakajima, Saeko; Belkaid, Yasmine; Kabashima, Kenji

    2015-01-01

    The skin is the human body's largest organ and is home to a diverse and complex variety of innate and adaptive immune functions that protect against pathogenic invasion. Recent studies have demonstrated that cutaneous commensal bacteria modulated the host immune system. For example, Staphylococcus epidermidis, a skin commensal bacterium, has been demonstrated to induce cutaneous interferon (IFN)-?- and interleukin (IL)-17A-producing T cells. In addition, cutaneous microbiota changes occur in the chronic inflammatory skin disorders, such as atopic dermatitis, and may influence the activity of skin diseases. In this article, we will review the recent findings related to the interactions of the commensal bacteria with skin homeostasis and discuss the role of the dysbiosis of these bacteria in the pathogenesis of skin diseases. PMID:25326105

  10. Enteropathogenic bacteria in frozen chicken.

    PubMed Central

    Norberg, P

    1981-01-01

    Eighty-two samples of frozen chicken from retail stores were examined for the presence of Campylobacter, Yersinia enterocolitica, and salmonellae. Aerobic plate counts and numbers of coliform bacteria at 37 degrees C were determined. Campylobacter fetus subsp. jejuni was found in 22% of the samples, Y. enterocolitica was found in 24.5% and Salmonella typhimurium was found in one sample (1.2%). The isolated strains of Y. enterocolitica belonged to serotypes 4, 5b, 6, and 8. Aerobic plate counts and numbers of coliform bacteria at 37 degrees C were not found to be noticeably higher in samples containing pathogens than in pathogen-free samples. This investigation showed that chicken does contain other pathogenic bacteria than salmonellae. Campylobacter and Y. enterocolitica were isolated in much higher frequencies than Salmonella. PMID:7020597

  11. Genetic transfer in acidophilic bacteria

    SciTech Connect

    Roberto, F.F.; Glenn, A.W.; Bulmer, D.; Ward, T.E.

    1990-01-01

    There is increasing interest in the use of microorganisms to recover metals from ores, as well as to remove sulfur from coal. These so-called bioleaching processes are mediated by a number of bacteria. The best-studied of these organisms are acidophiles including Thiobacillus and Acidiphilium species. Our laboratory has focused on developing genetic strategies to allow the manipulation of acidophilic bacteria to improve and augment their utility in large scale operations. We have recently been successful in employing conjugation for interbacterial transfer of genetic information, as well as in directly transforming Acidiphilium by use of electroporation. We are now testing the properties of IncPl, IncW and IncQ plasmid vectors in Acidiphilium to determine their relative usefulness in routine manipulation of acidophiles and transfer between organisms. This study also allows us to determine the natural ability of these bacteria to transfer genetic material amongst themselves in their particular environment. 21 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  12. Radioresistant Bacteria Came From Mars?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavlov, A.; Kalinin, V.; Konstantinov, A.; Shelegedin, V.

    We propose that the radioresistant bacteria (i.e. Deinococcus radiodurans) has been originated on Mars. This bacteria possesses an ability which should have been ab- solutely "unnecessary" in the Earth environment. It can survive very high doses of the ionizing radiation. Our experiments demonstrate that different kinds of non- radioresistant bacteria are able to develop very high radioresistance ability also. To develop radioresistance we exposed different bacterial cultures to several dozens of cycles of high irradiation. Therefore, radioresistance is not a result of some early spontaneous bacterial mutation but rather a consequence of the very specific plane- tary environment. Polar regions of Mars are the most probable (if not the only) place in the Solar System for such a periodical high-dosage irradiation process. We pro- pose a plausible scenario of where and when such an adaptation process could have taken place and also discuss indirect arguments of the Martian origin of Deinococcus Radiodurans based on their specific genetic structure.

  13. Envisaging bacteria as phage targets

    PubMed Central

    Abedon, Stephen T.

    2011-01-01

    It can be difficult to appreciate just how small bacteria and phages are or how large, in comparison, the volumes that they occupy. A single milliliter, for example, can represent to a phage what would be, with proper scaling, an ocean to you and me. Here I illustrate, using more easily visualized macroscopic examples, the difficulties that a phage, as a randomly diffusing particle, can have in locating bacteria to infect. I conclude by restating the truism that the rate of phage adsorption to a given target bacterium is a function of phage density, that is, titer, in combination with the degree of bacterial susceptibility to adsorption by an encountering phage. PMID:23616932

  14. Enteric Bacteria Isolated from Diarrheal Patients in Korea in 2014

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Nan-Ok; Jung, Su-Mi; Na, Hae-Young; Chung, Gyung Tae; Yoo, Cheon-Kwon; Seong, Won Keun; Hong, Sahyun

    2015-01-01

    Objectives The aim of this study was to characterize the pathogens responsible for causing diarrhea according to season, region of isolation, patient age, and sex as well as to provide useful data for the prevention of diarrheal disease. Methods Stool specimens from 14,886 patients with diarrhea were collected to identify pathogenic bacteria from January 2014 to December 2014 in Korea. A total of 3,526 pathogenic bacteria were isolated and analyzed according to season, region of isolation, and the age and sex of the patient. Results The breakdown of the isolated pathogenic bacteria were as follows: Salmonella spp. 476 (13.5%), pathogenic Escherichia coli 777 (22.0%), Vibrio parahaemolyticus 26 (0.74%), Shigella spp. 13 (0.37%), Campylobacter spp. 215 (6.10%), Clostridium perfringens 508 (14.4%), Staphylococcus aureus 1,144 (32.4%), Bacillus cereus 356 (10.1%), Listeria monocytogenes 1 (0.03%), and Yersinia enterocolitica 10 (0.3%). The isolation rate trend showed the highest ratio in the summer season from June to September for most of the pathogenic bacteria except the Gram-positive bacteria. The isolation rate of most of the pathogenic bacteria by patient age showed highest ratio in the 0–19 year age range. For isolation rate by region, 56.2% were isolated from cities and 43.8% were isolated from provinces. Conclusion Hygiene education should be addressed for diarrheal disease-susceptible groups, such as those younger than 10 years, aged 10–19 years, and older than 70 years, and monitoring for the pathogens is still required. In addition, an efficient laboratory surveillance system for infection control should be continued. PMID:26473090

  15. Poles apart: biodiversity and biogeography of sea ice bacteria.

    PubMed

    Staley, J T; Gosink, J J

    1999-01-01

    This review introduces the subjects of bacterial biodiversity and biogeography. Studies of biogeography are important for understanding biodiversity, the occurrence of threatened species, and the ecological role of free-living and symbiotic prokaryotes. A set of postulates is proposed for biogeography as a guide to determining whether prokaryotes are "cosmopolitan" (found in more than one geographic location on Earth) or candidate endemic species. The term "geovar" is coined to define a geographical variety of prokaryote that is restricted to one area on Earth or one host species. This review discusses sea ice bacteriology as a test case for examining bacterial diversity and biogeography. Approximately 7% of Earth's surface is covered by sea ice, which is colonized principally by psychrophilic microorganisms. This extensive community of microorganisms, referred to as the sea ice microbial community (SIMCO), contains algae (mostly diatoms), protozoa, and bacteria. Recent investigations indicate that the sea ice bacteria fall into four major phylogenetic groups: the proteobacteria, the Cytophaga-Flavobacterium-Bacteroides (CFB) group, and the high and low mol percent gram-positive bacteria. Archaea associated with sea ice communities have also been reported. Several novel bacterial genera and species have been discovered, including Polaromonas, Polaribacter, Psychroflexus, Gelidibacter, and Octadecabacter; many others await study. Some of the gram-negative sea ice bacteria have among the lowest maximum temperatures for growth known, < 10 degrees C for some strains. The polar sea ice environment is an ideal habitat for studying microbial biogeography because of the dispersal issues involved. Dispersal between poles is problematic because of the long distances and the difficulty of transporting psychrophilic bacteria across the equator. Studies to date indicate that members of some genera occur at both poles; however, cosmopolitan species have not yet been discovered. Additional research on polar sea ice bacteria is needed to resolve this issue and extend our understanding of its microbial diversity. PMID:10547690

  16. Antimicrobial Photodynamic Therapy to Kill Gram-negative Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Sperandio, Felipe F; Huang, Ying-Ying; Hamblin, Michael R

    2013-01-01

    Antimicrobial photodynamic therapy (PDT) or photodynamic inactivation (PDI) is a new promising strategy to eradicate pathogenic microorganisms such as Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria, yeasts and fungi. The search for new approaches that can kill bacteria but do not induce the appearance of undesired drug-resistant strains suggests that PDT may have advantages over traditional antibiotic therapy. PDT is a non-thermal photochemical reaction that involves the simultaneous presence of visible light, oxygen and a dye or photosensitizer (PS). Several PS have been studied for their ability to bind to bacteria and efficiently generate reactive oxygen species (ROS) upon photostimulation. ROS are formed through type I or II mechanisms and may inactivate several classes of microbial cells including Gram-negative bacteria such as Pseudomonas aeruginosa, which are typically characterized by an impermeable outer cell membrane that contains endotoxins and blocks antibiotics, dyes, and detergents, protecting the sensitive inner membrane and cell wall. This review covers significant peer-reviewed articles together with US and World patents that were filed within the past few years and that relate to the eradication of Gram-negative bacteria via PDI or PDT. It is organized mainly according to the nature of the PS involved and includes natural or synthetic food dyes; cationic dyes such as methylene blue and toluidine blue; tetrapyrrole derivatives such as phthalocyanines, chlorins, porphyrins, chlorophyll and bacteriochlorophyll derivatives; functionalized fullerenes; nanoparticles combined with different PS; other formulations designed to target PS to bacteria; photoactive materials and surfaces; conjugates between PS and polycationic polymers or antibodies; and permeabilizing agents such as EDTA, PMNP and CaCl2. The present review also covers the different laboratory animal models normally used to treat Gram-negative bacterial infections with antimicrobial PDT. PMID:23550545

  17. Antibacterial peptide nisin: a potential role in the inhibition of oral pathogenic bacteria.

    PubMed

    Tong, Zhongchun; Ni, Longxing; Ling, Junqi

    2014-10-01

    Although the antimicrobial peptide nisin has been extensively studied in the food industry for decades, its application in the oral cavity remains to develop and evaluate its feasibility in treating oral common diseases. Nisin is an odorless, colorless, tasteless substance with low toxicity and with antibacterial activities against Gram-positive bacteria. These biologic properties may establish its use in promising products for oral diseases. This article summarizes the antibacterial efficiency of nisin against pathogenic bacteria related to dental caries and root canal infection and discusses the combination of nisin and common oral drugs. PMID:25088158

  18. Hydrocarbon degradation by antarctic bacteria

    SciTech Connect

    Cavanagh, J.A.E.; Nichols, P.D.; McMeekin, T.A.; Franzmann, P.D.

    1996-12-31

    Bacterial cultures obtained from sediment samples collected during a trial oil spill experiment conducted at Airport beach, Eastern Antarctica were selectively enriched for n-alkane-degrading and phenanthrenedegrading bacteria. Samples were collected from a control site and sites treated with different hydrocarbon mixtures - Special Antarctic blend (SAB), BP-Visco and orange roughy oils. One set of replicate sites was also treated with water from Organic Lake which had previously been shown to contain hydrocarbon-degrading bacteria. No viable bacteria were obtained from samples collected from sites treated with orange roughy oil. Extensive degradation of n-alkanes by enrichment cultures obtained from sites treated with SAB and BP-Visco occurred at both 25{degrees}C and 10{degrees}C. Extensive degradation of phenanthrene also occurred in enrichment cultures from these sites grown at 25{degrees}C. Concurrent increases of polar lipid in these cultures were also observed. The presence of 1,4-naphthaquinone and 1-naphthol during the growth of the cultures on phenanthrene is unusual and warrants further investigation of the mechanism of phenanthrene-degradation by these Antarctic bacteria.

  19. Manipulating Genetic Material in Bacteria

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    Lisa Crawford, a graduate research assistant from the University of Toledo, works with Laurel Karr of Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) in the molecular biology laboratory. They are donducting genetic manipulation of bacteria and yeast for the production of large amount of desired protein. Photo credit: NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC)

  20. Role of Bacteria in Oncogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Alicia H.; Parsonnet, Julie

    2010-01-01

    Summary: Although scientific knowledge in viral oncology has exploded in the 20th century, the role of bacteria as mediators of oncogenesis has been less well elucidated. Understanding bacterial carcinogenesis has become increasingly important as a possible means of cancer prevention. This review summarizes clinical, epidemiological, and experimental evidence as well as possible mechanisms of bacterial induction of or protection from malignancy. PMID:20930075

  1. Antibacterial susceptibility of plaque bacteria.

    PubMed

    Newman, M G; Hulem, C; Colgate, J; Anselmo, C

    1979-07-01

    Selected anaerobic, capnophilic and facultative bacteria isolated from patients with various forms of periodontal health and disease were tested for their susceptibility to antibiotics and antimicrobial agents. Specific bactericidal and minimum inhibitory concentrations were compared to disc zone diameters, thereby generating new standards for the potential selection of antimicrobial agents. PMID:286720

  2. Novel antimicrobial peptides that inhibit gram positive bacterial exotoxin synthesis.

    PubMed

    Merriman, Joseph A; Nemeth, Kimberly A; Schlievert, Patrick M

    2014-01-01

    Gram-positive bacteria, such as Staphylococcus aureus, cause serious human illnesses through combinations of surface virulence factors and secretion of exotoxins. Our prior studies using the protein synthesis inhibitor clindamycin and signal transduction inhibitors glycerol monolaurate and ?-globin and ?-globin chains of hemoglobin indicate that their abilities to inhibit exotoxin production by S. aureus are separable from abilities to inhibit growth of the organism. Additionally, our previous studies suggest that inhibition of exotoxin production, in absence of ability to kill S. aureus and normal flora lactobacilli, will prevent colonization by pathogenic S. aureus, while not interfering with lactobacilli colonization. These disparate activities may be important in development of novel anti-infective agents that do not alter normal flora. We initiated studies to explore the exotoxin-synthesis-inhibition activity of hemoglobin peptides further to develop potential agents to prevent S. aureus infections. We tested synthesized ?-globin chain peptides, synthetic variants of ?-globin chain peptides, and two human defensins for ability to inhibit exotoxin production without significantly inhibiting S. aureus growth. All of these peptides were weakly or not inhibitory to bacterial growth. However, the peptides were inhibitory to exotoxin production with increasing activity dependent on increasing numbers of positively-charged amino acids. Additionally, the peptides could be immobilized on agarose beads or have amino acid sequences scrambled and still retain exotoxin-synthesis-inhibition. The peptides are not toxic to human vaginal epithelial cells and do not inhibit growth of normal flora L. crispatus. These peptides may interfere with plasma membrane signal transduction in S. aureus due to their positive charges. PMID:24748386

  3. Novel Antimicrobial Peptides That Inhibit Gram Positive Bacterial Exotoxin Synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Merriman, Joseph A.; Nemeth, Kimberly A.; Schlievert, Patrick M.

    2014-01-01

    Gram-positive bacteria, such as Staphylococcus aureus, cause serious human illnesses through combinations of surface virulence factors and secretion of exotoxins. Our prior studies using the protein synthesis inhibitor clindamycin and signal transduction inhibitors glycerol monolaurate and ?-globin and ?-globin chains of hemoglobin indicate that their abilities to inhibit exotoxin production by S. aureus are separable from abilities to inhibit growth of the organism. Additionally, our previous studies suggest that inhibition of exotoxin production, in absence of ability to kill S. aureus and normal flora lactobacilli, will prevent colonization by pathogenic S. aureus, while not interfering with lactobacilli colonization. These disparate activities may be important in development of novel anti-infective agents that do not alter normal flora. We initiated studies to explore the exotoxin-synthesis-inhibition activity of hemoglobin peptides further to develop potential agents to prevent S. aureus infections. We tested synthesized ?-globin chain peptides, synthetic variants of ?-globin chain peptides, and two human defensins for ability to inhibit exotoxin production without significantly inhibiting S. aureus growth. All of these peptides were weakly or not inhibitory to bacterial growth. However, the peptides were inhibitory to exotoxin production with increasing activity dependent on increasing numbers of positively-charged amino acids. Additionally, the peptides could be immobilized on agarose beads or have amino acid sequences scrambled and still retain exotoxin-synthesis-inhibition. The peptides are not toxic to human vaginal epithelial cells and do not inhibit growth of normal flora L. crispatus. These peptides may interfere with plasma membrane signal transduction in S. aureus due to their positive charges. PMID:24748386

  4. Chip-based in situ hybridization for identification of bacteria from the human microbiome.

    SciTech Connect

    Light, Yooli Kim; Meagher, Robert J.; Singh, Anup K.; Liu, Peng

    2010-11-01

    The emerging field of metagenomics seeks to assess the genetic diversity of complex mixed populations of bacteria, such as those found at different sites within the human body. A single person's mouth typically harbors up to 100 bacterial species, while surveys of many people have found more than 700 different species, of which {approx}50% have never been cultivated. In typical metagenomics studies, the cells themselves are destroyed in the process of gathering sequence information, and thus the connection between genotype and phenotype is lost. A great deal of sequence information may be generated, but it is impossible to assign any given sequence to a specific cell. We seek non-destructive, culture-independent means of gathering sequence information from selected individual cells from mixed populations. As a first step, we have developed a microfluidic device for concentrating and specifically labeling bacteria from a mixed population. Bacteria are electrophoretically concentrated against a photopolymerized membrane element, and then incubated with a specific fluorescent label, which can include antibodies as well as specific or non-specific nucleic acid stains. Unbound stain is washed away, and the labeled bacteria are released from the membrane. The stained cells can then be observed via epifluorescence microscopy, or counted via flow cytometry. We have tested our device with three representative bacteria from the human microbiome: E. coli (gut, Gram-negative), Lactobacillus acidophilus (mouth, Gram-positive), and Streptococcus mutans (mouth, Gram-positive), with results comparable to off-chip labeling techniques.

  5. In vitro growth inhibition of mastitis causing bacteria by phenolics and metal chelators

    SciTech Connect

    Chew, B.P.; Tjoelker, L.W.; Tanaka, T.S.

    1985-11-01

    Antimicrobial activities of three phenolic compounds and four metal chelators were tested at 0, 250, 500, and 1000 ppm in vitro against four major mastitis-causing bacteria, Streptococcus agalactiae, Staphylococcus aureus, Klebsiella pnuemoniae, and Escherichia coli. Overall, butylated hydroxyanisole and tert-butylhydroquinone showed the greatest antimicrobial activity. These phenolics were bactericidal at 250 to 500 ppm against all four bacteria tested. The butylated hydroxytoluene was bactericidal against the gram-positive bacteria but was ineffective against the coliforms. At 250 ppm, disodium ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid was bactericidal against the gram-positive bacteria but much less effective against the gram-negatives. However, diethylene-triaminepentaacetic acid was more growth inhibitory than ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid against the gram-negative bacteria and especially against Escherichia coli. All other compounds were generally much less effective or ineffective against all four microorganisms. Therefore, butylated hydroxyanisole, butylated hydroxytoluene, tert-butylhydroquinone, ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid, and diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid may have practical implications in the prevention or treatment of bovine mastitis.

  6. Photodynamic inactivation of antibiotic-resistant bacteria and biofilms by hematoporphyrin monomethyl ether.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chengcheng; Hu, Min; Ma, Dandan; Lei, Jin'e; Xu, Jiru

    2016-02-01

    The worldwide increase in bacterial antibiotic resistance has led to a search for alternative antibacterial therapies. A promising approach to killing antibiotic-resistant bacteria is photodynamic antimicrobial chemotherapy, which uses light in combination with a photosensitizer to induce a phototoxic reaction. We evaluated the photodynamic inactivation (PDI) efficiency of hematoporphyrin monomethyl ether (HMME) on antibiotic-resistant bacteria and biofilms. HMME exhibited no significant dark toxicity and provided dose-dependent inactivation of antibiotic-resistant bacteria and biofilms. After incubation with 100-μM HMME and irradiation with 72-J cm(-2) white light, 4.19-7.59 log10 reductions in survival were achieved in planktonic suspension. Antibiotic-resistant strains were as susceptible to PDI in biofilms as in planktonic suspensions, but the inactivation of bacterial cells in biofilms was attenuated. In addition, gram-positive bacterial strains and biofilms were more susceptible than gram-negative strains and biofilms to the PDI effect of HMME. Thus, HMME is a promising photosensitizer for the treatment of infectious diseases caused by antibiotic-resistant bacteria, especially gram-positive bacteria. PMID:26719055

  7. A novel, nested, multiplex, real-time PCR for detection of bacteria and fungi in blood

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The study describes the application of the PCR method for the simultaneous detection of DNA of Gram-negative bacteria, Gram-positive bacteria, yeast fungi and filamentous fungi in blood and, thus, a whole range of microbial etiological agents that may cause sepsis. Material for the study was sterile blood inoculated with four species of microorganisms (Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus, Candida albicans and Aspergillus fumigatus) and blood collected from patients with clinical symptoms of sepsis. The developed method is based on nested-multiplex real-time PCR . Results Analysis of the obtained data shows that sensitivity of nested-multiplex real-time PCR remained at the level of 101 CFU/ml for each of the four studied species of microorganisms and the percentage of positive results of the examined blood samples from the patients was 70% and 19% for the microbiological culture method. The designed primers correctly typed the studied species as belonging to the groups of Gram-positive bacteria, Gram-negative bacteria, yeast fungi, or filamentous fungi. Conclusions Results obtained by us indicated that the designed PCR methods: (1) allow to detect bacteria in whole blood samples, (2) are much more sensitive than culture method, (3) allow differentiation of the main groups of microorganisms within a few hours. PMID:24893651

  8. Larvicidal toxins from Bacillus thuringiensis subspp. kurstaki, morrisoni (strain tenebrionis), and israelensis have no microbicidal or microbiostatic activity against selected bacteria, fungi, and algae in vitro.

    PubMed

    Koskella, J; Stotzky, G

    2002-03-01

    The insecticidal toxins from Bacillus thuringiensis subspp. kurstaki (antilepidopteran), morrisoni strain tenebrionis (anticoleopteran), and israelensis (antidipteran) did not affect the growth of a variety of bacteria (8 gram-negative, 5 gram-positive, and a cyanobacterium), fungi (2 Zygomycetes, 1 Ascomycete, 2 Deuteromycetes, and 2 yeasts), and algae (primarily green and diatoms) in pure and mixed culture, as determined by dilution, disk-diffusion, and sporulation assays with purified free and clay-bound toxins. The insecticidal crystal proteins from B. thuringiensis subspp. kurstaki and israelensis had no antibiotic effect on various gram-positive bacteria. PMID:11989771

  9. Probing the relationship between Gram-negative and Gram-positive S1 proteins by sequence analysis

    PubMed Central

    Salah, Philippe; Bisaglia, Marco; Aliprandi, Pascale; Uzan, Marc; Sizun, Christina; Bontems, Franois

    2009-01-01

    Escherichia coli ribosomal protein S1 is required for the translation initiation of messenger RNAs, in particular when their ShineDalgarno sequence is degenerated. Closely related forms of the protein, composed of the same number of domains (six), are found in all Gram-negative bacteria. More distant proteins, generally formed of fewer domains, have been identified, by sequence similarities, in Gram-positive bacteria and are also termed S1 proteins. However in the absence of functional information, it is generally difficult to ascertain their relationship with Gram-negative S1. In this article, we report the solution structure of the fourth and sixth domains of the E. coli protein S1 and show that it is possible to characterize their ?-barrel by a consensus sequence that allows a precise identification of all domains in Gram-negative and Gram-positive S1 proteins. In addition, we show that it is possible to discriminate between five domain types corresponding to the domains 1, 2, 3, 45 and 6 of E. coli S1 on the basis of their sequence. This enabled us to identify the nature of the domains present in Gram-positive proteins and, subsequently, to probe the filiations between all forms of S1. PMID:19605565

  10. RNA-mediated regulation in Gram-positive pathogens: an overview punctuated with examples from the group A Streptococcus

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Eric W.; Cao, Tram N.; Pflughoeft, Kathryn J.; Sumby, Paul

    2014-01-01

    RNA-based mechanisms of regulation represent a ubiquitous class of regulators that are associated with diverse processes including nutrient sensing, stress response, modulation of horizontal gene transfer, and virulence factor expression. While better studied in Gram-negative bacteria, the literature is replete with examples of the importance of RNA-mediated regulatory mechanisms to the virulence and fitness of Gram-positives. Regulatory RNAs are classified as cis-acting, e.g. riboswitches, which modulate the transcription, translation, or stability of co-transcribed RNA, or trans-acting, e.g. small regulatory RNAs, which target separate mRNAs or proteins. The group A Streptococcus (GAS, Streptococcus pyogenes) is a Gram-positive bacterial pathogen from which several regulatory RNA mechanisms have been characterized. The study of RNA-mediated regulation in GAS has uncovered novel concepts with respect to how small regulatory RNAs may positively regulate target mRNA stability, and to how CRISPR RNAs are processed from longer precursors. This review provides an overview of RNA-mediated regulation in Gram-positive bacteria, and is highlighted with specific examples from GAS research. The key roles that these systems play in regulating bacterial virulence are discussed and future perspectives outlined. PMID:25091277

  11. RNA-mediated regulation in Gram-positive pathogens: an overview punctuated with examples from the group A Streptococcus.

    PubMed

    Miller, Eric W; Cao, Tram N; Pflughoeft, Kathryn J; Sumby, Paul

    2014-10-01

    RNA-based mechanisms of regulation represent a ubiquitous class of regulators that are associated with diverse processes including nutrient sensing, stress response, modulation of horizontal gene transfer, and virulence factor expression. While better studied in Gram-negative bacteria, the literature is replete with examples of the importance of RNA-mediated regulatory mechanisms to the virulence and fitness of Gram-positives. Regulatory RNAs are classified as cis-acting, e.g. riboswitches, which modulate the transcription, translation, or stability of co-transcribed RNA, or trans-acting, e.g. small regulatory RNAs, which target separate mRNAs or proteins. The group A Streptococcus (GAS, Streptococcus pyogenes) is a Gram-positive bacterial pathogen from which several regulatory RNA mechanisms have been characterized. The study of RNA-mediated regulation in GAS has uncovered novel concepts with respect to how small regulatory RNAs may positively regulate target mRNA stability, and to how CRISPR RNAs are processed from longer precursors. This review provides an overview of RNA-mediated regulation in Gram-positive bacteria, and is highlighted with specific examples from GAS research. The key roles that these systems play in regulating bacterial virulence are discussed and future perspectives outlined. PMID:25091277

  12. Evolving resistance among Gram-positive pathogens.

    PubMed

    Munita, Jose M; Bayer, Arnold S; Arias, Cesar A

    2015-09-15

    Antimicrobial therapy is a key component of modern medical practice and a cornerstone for the development of complex clinical interventions in critically ill patients. Unfortunately, the increasing problem of antimicrobial resistance is now recognized as a major public health threat jeopardizing the care of thousands of patients worldwide. Gram-positive pathogens exhibit an immense genetic repertoire to adapt and develop resistance to virtually all antimicrobials clinically available. As more molecules become available to treat resistant gram-positive infections, resistance emerges as an evolutionary response. Thus, antimicrobial resistance has to be envisaged as an evolving phenomenon that demands constant surveillance and continuous efforts to identify emerging mechanisms of resistance to optimize the use of antibiotics and create strategies to circumvent this problem. Here, we will provide a broad perspective on the clinical aspects of antibiotic resistance in relevant gram-positive pathogens with emphasis on the mechanistic strategies used by these organisms to avoid being killed by commonly used antimicrobial agents. PMID:26316558

  13. Non-classical protein secretion in bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Bendtsen, Jannick D; Kiemer, Lars; Fausbøll, Anders; Brunak, Søren

    2005-01-01

    Background We present an overview of bacterial non-classical secretion and a prediction method for identification of proteins following signal peptide independent secretion pathways. We have compiled a list of proteins found extracellularly despite the absence of a signal peptide. Some of these proteins also have known roles in the cytoplasm, which means they could be so-called "moon-lightning" proteins having more than one function. Results A thorough literature search was conducted to compile a list of currently known bacterial non-classically secreted proteins. Pattern finding methods were applied to the sequences in order to identify putative signal sequences or motifs responsible for their secretion. We have found no signal or motif characteristic to any majority of the proteins in the compiled list of non-classically secreted proteins, and conclude that these proteins, indeed, seem to be secreted in a novel fashion. However, we also show that the apparently non-classically secreted proteins are still distinguished from cellular proteins by properties such as amino acid composition, secondary structure and disordered regions. Specifically, prediction of disorder reveals that bacterial secretory proteins are more structurally disordered than their cytoplasmic counterparts. Finally, artificial neural networks were used to construct protein feature based methods for identification of non-classically secreted proteins in both Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. Conclusion We present a publicly available prediction method capable of discriminating between this group of proteins and other proteins, thus allowing for the identification of novel non-classically secreted proteins. We suggest candidates for non-classically secreted proteins in Escherichia coli and Bacillus subtilis. The prediction method is available online. PMID:16212653

  14. Emerging issues in antimicrobial resistance of bacteria from food-producing animals.

    PubMed

    Michael, Geovana Brenner; Freitag, Christin; Wendlandt, Sarah; Eidam, Christopher; Feßler, Andrea T; Lopes, Graciela Volz; Kadlec, Kristina; Schwarz, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    During the last decade, antimicrobial resistance in bacteria from food-producing animals has become a major research topic. In this review, different emerging resistance properties related to bacteria of food-producing animals are highlighted. These include: extended-spectrum β-lactamase-producing Enterobacteriaceae; carbapenemase-producing bacteria; bovine respiratory tract pathogens, such as Pasteurella multocida and Mannheimia haemolytica, which harbor the multiresistance mediating integrative and conjugative element ICEPmu1; Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria that carry the multiresistance gene cfr; and the occurrence of numerous novel antimicrobial resistance genes in livestock-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus. The emergence of the aforementioned resistance properties is mainly based on the exchange of mobile genetic elements that carry the respective resistance genes. PMID:25812464

  15. Classification and distribution of large intestinal bacteria in nonhibernating and hibernating leopard frogs (Rana pipiens).

    PubMed Central

    Banas, J A; Loesche, W J; Nace, G W

    1988-01-01

    The large intestinal flora of the leopard frog, Rana pipiens, was examined to determine whether differences existed between the nonhibernating and hibernating states of the animal and to determine the relative concentrations and proportions of potential frog pathogens. Hibernators had a logarithmic decrease of bacteria per milligram of intestine averaging one, and significantly greater proportions of facultative bacteria and psychrophiles relative to nonhibernators. The predominant anaerobic bacteria were gram-positive Clostridium species and gram-negative Bacteroides and Fusobacterium species. The predominant facultative bacteria were enterobacteria in nonhibernators but Pseudomonas species in hibernators. Many species of Pseudomonas are pathogenic for frogs, and thus the intestinal flora in hibernators may be a potential source of infectious disease. PMID:3263838

  16. Inactivation of Gram-positive biofilms by low-temperature plasma jet at atmospheric pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marchal, F.; Robert, H.; Merbahi, N.; Fontagn-Faucher, C.; Yousfi, M.; Romain, C. E.; Eichwald, O.; Rondel, C.; Gabriel, B.

    2012-08-01

    This work is devoted to the evaluation of the efficiency of a new low-temperature plasma jet driven in ambient air by a dc-corona discharge to inactivate adherent cells and biofilms of Gram-positive bacteria. The selected microorganisms were lactic acid bacteria, a Weissella confusa strain which has the particularity to excrete a polysaccharide polymer (dextran) when sucrose is present. Both adherent cells and biofilms were treated with the low-temperature plasma jet for different exposure times. The antimicrobial efficiency of the plasma was tested against adherent cells and 48 h-old biofilms grown with or without sucrose. Bacterial survival was estimated using both colony-forming unit counts and fluorescence-based assays for bacterial cell viability. The experiments show the ability of the low-temperature plasma jet at atmospheric pressure to inactivate the bacteria. An increased resistance of bacteria embedded within biofilms is clearly observed. The resistance is also significantly higher with biofilm in the presence of sucrose, which indicates that dextran could play a protective role.

  17. Monensin-based medium for determination of total gram-negative bacteria and Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Petzel, J P; Hartman, P A

    1985-01-01

    Plate count-monensin-KCl (PMK) agar, for enumeration of both gram-negative bacteria and Escherichia coli, is composed of (per liter) 23.5 g of plate count agar, 35 mg of monensin, 7.5 g of KCl, and 75 mg of 4-methylumbelliferyl-beta-D-glucuronide (MUG). Monensin was added after the medium was sterilized. The diluent of choice for use with PMK agar was 0.1% peptone (pH 6.8); other diluents were unsatisfactory. Gram-negative bacteria (selected for by the ionophore monensin) can be used to judge the general quality or sanitary history of a commodity. E. coli (differentiated by its ability to hydrolyze the fluorogenic compound MUG) can be used to assess the safety of a commodity in regard to the possible presence of enteric pathogens. Pure-culture studies demonstrated that monensin completely inhibited gram-positive bacteria and had little or no effect on gram-negative bacteria. When gram-negative bacteria were injured by one of several methods, a few species (including E. coli) became sensitive to monensin; this sensitivity was completely reversed in most instances by the inclusion of KCl in the medium. When PMK agar was tested with food and environmental samples, 96% of 535 isolates were gram negative; approximately 68% of colonies from nonselective medium were gram negative. PMK agar was more selective than two other media against gram-positive bacteria and was less inhibitory for gram-negative bacteria. However, with water samples, KCl had an inhibitory effect on gram-negative bacteria, and it should therefore be deleted from monensin-containing medium for water analysis.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:3890742

  18. How bacteria maintain location and number of flagella?

    PubMed

    Schuhmacher, Jan S; Thormann, Kai M; Bange, Gert

    2015-11-01

    Bacteria differ in number and location of their flagella that appear in regular patterns at the cell surface (flagellation pattern). Despite the plethora of bacterial species, only a handful of these patterns exist. The correct flagellation pattern is a prerequisite for motility, but also relates to biofilm formation and the pathogenicity of disease-causing flagellated bacteria. However, the mechanisms that maintain location and number of flagella are far from being understood. Here, we review our knowledge on mechanisms that enable bacteria to maintain their appropriate flagellation pattern. While some peritrichous flagellation patterns might occur by rather simple stochastic processes, other bacterial species appear to rely on landmark systems to define the designated flagellar position. Such landmarks are the Tip system of Caulobacter crescentus or the signal recognition particle (SRP)-GTPase FlhF and the MinD/ParA-type ATPase FlhG (synonyms: FleN, YlxH and MinD2). The latter two proteins constitute a regulatory circuit essential for diverse flagellation patterns in many Gram-positive and negative species. The interactome of FlhF/G (e.g. C-ring proteins FliM, FliN, FliY or the transcriptional regulator FleQ/FlrA) seems evolutionary adapted to meet the specific needs for a respective pattern. This variability highlights the importance of the correct flagellation pattern for motile species. PMID:26195616

  19. Rhs proteins from diverse bacteria mediate intercellular competition.

    PubMed

    Koskiniemi, Sanna; Lamoureux, James G; Nikolakakis, Kiel C; t'Kint de Roodenbeke, Claire; Kaplan, Michael D; Low, David A; Hayes, Christopher S

    2013-04-23

    Rearrangement hotspot (Rhs) and related YD-peptide repeat proteins are widely distributed in bacteria and eukaryotes, but their functions are poorly understood. Here, we show that Gram-negative Rhs proteins and the distantly related wall-associated protein A (WapA) from Gram-positive bacteria mediate intercellular competition. Rhs and WapA carry polymorphic C-terminal toxin domains (Rhs-CT/WapA-CT), which are deployed to inhibit the growth of neighboring cells. These systems also encode sequence-diverse immunity proteins (RhsI/WapI) that specifically neutralize cognate toxins to protect rhs(+)/wapA(+) cells from autoinhibition. RhsA and RhsB from Dickeya dadantii 3937 carry nuclease domains that degrade target cell DNA. D. dadantii 3937 rhs genes do not encode secretion signal sequences but are linked to hemolysin-coregulated protein and valine-glycine repeat protein G genes from type VI secretion systems. Valine-glycine repeat protein G is required for inhibitor cell function, suggesting that Rhs may be exported from D. dadantii 3937 through a type VI secretion mechanism. In contrast, WapA proteins from Bacillus subtilis strains appear to be exported through the general secretory pathway and deliver a variety of tRNase toxins into neighboring target cells. These findings demonstrate that YD-repeat proteins from phylogenetically diverse bacteria share a common function in contact-dependent growth inhibition. PMID:23572593

  20. The Sweet Tooth of Bacteria: Common Themes in Bacterial Glycoconjugates

    PubMed Central

    Tytgat, Hanne L. P.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Humans have been increasingly recognized as being superorganisms, living in close contact with a microbiota on all their mucosal surfaces. However, most studies on the human microbiota have focused on gaining comprehensive insights into the composition of the microbiota under different health conditions (e.g., enterotypes), while there is also a need for detailed knowledge of the different molecules that mediate interactions with the host. Glycoconjugates are an interesting class of molecules for detailed studies, as they form a strain-specific barcode on the surface of bacteria, mediating specific interactions with the host. Strikingly, most glycoconjugates are synthesized by similar biosynthesis mechanisms. Bacteria can produce their major glycoconjugates by using a sequential or an en bloc mechanism, with both mechanistic options coexisting in many species for different macromolecules. In this review, these common themes are conceptualized and illustrated for all major classes of known bacterial glycoconjugates, with a special focus on the rather recently emergent field of glycosylated proteins. We describe the biosynthesis and importance of glycoconjugates in both pathogenic and beneficial bacteria and in both Gram-positive and -negative organisms. The focus lies on microorganisms important for human physiology. In addition, the potential for a better knowledge of bacterial glycoconjugates in the emerging field of glycoengineering and other perspectives is discussed. PMID:25184559

  1. Pectin-fermenting Bacteria Isolated from the Bovine Rumen1

    PubMed Central

    Dehority, B. A.

    1969-01-01

    Thirty-two strains of pectin-fermenting rumen bacteria were isolated from bovine rumen contents in a rumen fluid medium which contained pectin as the only added energy source. Based on differences in morphology and the Gram stain, 10 of these strains were selected for characterization. Two strains were identified as Lachnospira multiparus, four strains were identified as Butyrivbrio fibrisolvens, and three strains were identified as Bacteroides ruminicola. Characteristics of the remaining strain did not correspond with any previously described species. It was a gram-positive anaerobic coccus, 1.0 to 1.2 μm in diameter, and occurred primarily as single cells or diplococci. The strain fermented pectin rapidly but showed little or no growth on any other energy sources tested. The only detectable end products were acetic acid and gas, a portion of which was identified as hydrogen. Although the physiological characteristics of this organism differ markedly from other described species, it has been placed in the genus Peptostreptococcus on the basis of morphology, Gram stain, relations to oxygen, and the occurrence of cell division in only one plane. End products of fermentation are somewhat similar to those of the cellulolytic ruminococci. Eight previously characterized strains of cellulolytic bacteria isolated in nonselective media were unable to ferment pectin, whereas ten strains of hemicellulolytic rumen bacteria, eight of which were isolated with a xylan medium, showed considerable variation in this characteristic. Images PMID:5802604

  2. Diabetes Drug Improves Gut Bacteria, Study Finds

    MedlinePLUS

    ... to trigger favorable changes in intestinal bacteria, a new study finds. Researchers analyzed the intestinal bacteria populations in 784 people with and without type 2 diabetes who lived in China, Denmark and Sweden. The results showed that taking ...

  3. Kitchen Utensils Can Spread Bacteria, Study Finds

    MedlinePLUS

    ... news/fullstory_155690.html Kitchen Utensils Can Spread Bacteria, Study Finds Expert advises washing knives, peelers between ... utensils such as knives and graters can spread bacteria between different types of produce, a new study ...

  4. Killer Pigments in Bacteria: An Ecological Nightmare.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Benathen, Isaiah A.; Saccardi, Marion

    2000-01-01

    Describes an alternative to teaching ecology by using bacteria to test competitor survival. Students observe a time-dependent selective killing of other unrelated bacteria by Pseudomonas aeruginosa. (SAH)

  5. Differential effects of gram-positive and gram-negative bacterial products on morphine induced inhibition of phagocytosis

    PubMed Central

    Jana, Ninkovic; Vidhu, Anand; Raini, Dutta; Zhang, Li; Saluja, Anuj; Meng, Jingjing; Lisa, Koodie; Santanu, Banerjee; Sabita, Roy

    2016-01-01

    Opioid drug abusers have a greater susceptibility to gram positive (Gram (+)) bacterial infections. However, the mechanism underlying opioid modulation of Gram (+) versus Gram (−) bacterial clearance has not been investigated. In this study, we show that opioid treatment resulted in reduced phagocytosis of Gram (+), when compared to Gram (−) bacteria. We further established that LPS priming of chronic morphine treated macrophages leads to potentiated phagocytosis and killing of both Gram (+) and Gram (−) bacteria in a P-38 MAP kinase dependent signaling pathway. In contrast, LTA priming lead to inhibition of both phagocytosis and bacterial killing. This study demonstrates for the first time the differential effects of TLR4 and TLR2 agonists on morphine induced inhibition of phagocytosis. Our results suggest that the incidence and severity of secondary infections with Gram (+) bacteria would be higher in opioid abusers. PMID:26891899

  6. Differential effects of gram-positive and gram-negative bacterial products on morphine induced inhibition of phagocytosis.

    PubMed

    Jana, Ninkovic; Vidhu, Anand; Raini, Dutta; Zhang, Li; Saluja, Anuj; Meng, Jingjing; Lisa, Koodie; Santanu, Banerjee; Sabita, Roy

    2016-01-01

    Opioid drug abusers have a greater susceptibility to gram positive (Gram (+)) bacterial infections. However, the mechanism underlying opioid modulation of Gram (+) versus Gram (-) bacterial clearance has not been investigated. In this study, we show that opioid treatment resulted in reduced phagocytosis of Gram (+), when compared to Gram (-) bacteria. We further established that LPS priming of chronic morphine treated macrophages leads to potentiated phagocytosis and killing of both Gram (+) and Gram (-) bacteria in a P-38 MAP kinase dependent signaling pathway. In contrast, LTA priming lead to inhibition of both phagocytosis and bacterial killing. This study demonstrates for the first time the differential effects of TLR4 and TLR2 agonists on morphine induced inhibition of phagocytosis. Our results suggest that the incidence and severity of secondary infections with Gram (+) bacteria would be higher in opioid abusers. PMID:26891899

  7. Re-engineering bacteria for ethanol production

    DOEpatents

    Yomano, Lorraine P; York, Sean W; Zhou, Shengde; Shanmugam, Keelnatham; Ingram, Lonnie O

    2014-05-06

    The invention provides recombinant bacteria, which comprise a full complement of heterologous ethanol production genes. Expression of the full complement of heterologous ethanol production genes causes the recombinant bacteria to produce ethanol as the primary fermentation product when grown in mineral salts medium, without the addition of complex nutrients. Methods for producing the recombinant bacteria and methods for producing ethanol using the recombinant bacteria are also disclosed.

  8. Sand Beach Bacteria: Enumeration and Characterization

    PubMed Central

    Khiyama, H. M.; Makemson, J. C.

    1973-01-01

    Bacteria in the water-saturated sand of a relatively unpolluted sand beach were enumerated by direct microscope and viable counting. The number of interstitial bacteria was estimated to be a significant fraction of the total number of bacteria present. Three hundred sixty-two strains were isolated and submitted to cultural and biochemical tests. Fermentational abilities and the production of indole suggested that a significant number of these bacteria were symbiotically associated with resident metazoans. PMID:4356458

  9. Genetics of Lactic Acid Bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zagorec, Monique; Anba-Mondoloni, Jamila; Coq, Anne-Marie Crutz-Le; Champomier-Vergs, Marie-Christine

    Many meat (or fish) products, obtained by the fermentation of meat originating from various animals by the flora that naturally contaminates it, are part of the human diet since millenaries. Historically, the use of bacteria as starters for the fermentation of meat, to produce dry sausages, was thus performed empirically through the endogenous micro-biota, then, by a volunteer addition of starters, often performed by back-slopping, without knowing precisely the microbial species involved. It is only since about 50 years that well defined bacterial cultures have been used as starters for the fermentation of dry sausages. Nowadays, the indigenous micro-biota of fermented meat products is well identified, and the literature is rich of reports on the identification of lactic acid bacteria (LAB) present in many traditional fermented products from various geographical origin, obtained without the addition of commercial starters (See Talon, Leroy, & Lebert, 2007, and references therein).

  10. Viability of bacteria in peatlands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bogdanova, O. Yu.; Golovchenko, A. V.; Lysak, L. V.; Glukhova, T. V.; Zvyagintsev, D. G.

    2014-04-01

    The viability of bacteria in oligotrofic bogs and fens was determined by the luminescent microscopy method with the help of a two-component fluorescent dye (L7012 LIVE/DEAD). Living bacterial cells were found in the entire peat profiles. Their portion was maximal (up to 60%) in the upper layers and did not exceed 25% in the lower layers. The portion of dead bacterial cells varied from 3 to 19%, and dormant cells constituted 25 to 95% of the total number of bacterial cells. The numbers of dormant cells increased down the profiles irrespectively of the peat type. The portion of nanoforms did not exceed 5% of the total. The cells of the nanoforms, unlike the bacteria of typical sizes, were characterized by their high viability (93-98%).

  11. Swimming bacteria power microscopic gears

    PubMed Central

    Sokolov, Andrey; Apodaca, Mario M.; Grzybowski, Bartosz A.; Aranson, Igor S.

    2010-01-01

    Whereas the laws of thermodynamics prohibit extraction of useful work from the Brownian motion of particles in equilibrium, these motions can be rectified under nonequilibrium conditions, for example, in the presence of asymmetric geometrical obstacles. Here, we describe a class of systems in which aerobic bacteria Bacillus subtilis moving randomly in a fluid film power submillimeter gears and primitive systems of gears decorated with asymmetric teeth. The directional rotation is observed only in the regime of collective bacterial swimming and the gears angular velocities depend on and can be controlled by the amount of oxygen available to the bacteria. The ability to harness and control the power of collective motions appears an important requirement for further development of mechanical systems driven by microorganisms. PMID:20080560

  12. Swimming bacteria power microscopic gears.

    SciTech Connect

    Sokolov, A.; Apodaca, M. M.; Grzybowski, B. A.; Aranson, I. S.; Materials Science Division; Princeton Univ.; Northwestern Univ.

    2010-01-19

    Whereas the laws of thermodynamics prohibit extraction of useful work from the Brownian motion of particles in equilibrium, these motions can be 'rectified' under nonequilibrium conditions, for example, in the presence of asymmetric geometrical obstacles. Here, we describe a class of systems in which aerobic bacteria Bacillus subtilis moving randomly in a fluid film power submillimeter gears and primitive systems of gears decorated with asymmetric teeth. The directional rotation is observed only in the regime of collective bacterial swimming and the gears angular velocities depend on and can be controlled by the amount of oxygen available to the bacteria. The ability to harness and control the power of collective motions appears an important requirement for further development of mechanical systems driven by microorganisms.

  13. Swimming bacteria power microscopic gears

    SciTech Connect

    Sokolov, Andrey; Apodaca, Mario M.; Grzybowski, Bartosz A.; Aranson, Igor S.

    2010-01-19

    Whereas the laws of thermodynamics prohibit extraction of useful work from the Brownian motion of particles in equilibrium, these motions can be rectified under nonequilibrium conditions, for example, in the presence of asymmetric geometrical obstacles. Here, we describe a class of systems in which aerobic bacteria Bacillus subtilis moving randomly in a fluid film power submillimeter gears and primitive systems of gears decorated with asymmetric teeth. The directional rotation is observed only in the regime of collective bacterial swimming and the gears angular velocities depend on and can be controlled by the amount of oxygen available to the bacteria. The ability to harness and control the power of collective motions appears an important requirement for further development of mechanical systems driven by microorganisms.

  14. Volatilization of Mercury By Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Magos, L.; Tuffery, A. A.; Clarkson, T. W.

    1964-01-01

    Volatilization of mercury has been observed from various biological media (tissue homogenates, infusion broth, plasma, urine) containing mercuric chloride. That micro-organisms were responsible was indicated by the finding that the rates of volatilization were highly variable, that a latent period often preceded volatilization, that toluene inhibited the process, and that the capacity to volatilize mercury could be transferred from one biological medium to another. Two species of bacteria when isolated and cultured from these homogenates were able to volatilize mercury. Two other bacteria, one of which was isolated from the local water supply, were also highly active. The volatile mercury was identified as mercury vapour. The importance of these findings in relation to the storage of urine samples prior to mercury analysis is discussed. PMID:14249899

  15. Swimming bacteria at complex interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopez, Diego; Lauga, Eric

    2013-11-01

    Swimming microorganisms such as bacteria often move in confined geometries. Such confinement can be caused by the presence of solid boundaries, free surfaces, or liquid interfaces. It is well established that confinement affects significantly locomotion, generating additional forces and torques on the bacteria. In the presence of a solid boundary (imposing a no-slip condition), microorganisms using helical propulsion undergo circular motion (clockwise in the case of E. coli). Conversely, close to a free (no-shear) surface the circular motion is reversed. However, realistic interfaces are complex, and experimental results do not always agree with theoretical predictions. In this work, we show, using analytical modeling, how different complex interfaces affect a nearby bacterium and modify its swimming kinematics. IUSTI UMR 7343, Polytech Marseille, France.

  16. Bacteria turn a tiny gear

    SciTech Connect

    2009-01-01

    Thousands of tiny Bacillus subtillis bacteria turn a single gear, just 380 microns across. (A human hair is about 100 microns across.) The method could be used to create micro-machines. Argonne National Laboratory scientist Igor Aronson pioneered this technique. Read more at the New York Times: http://ow.ly/ODfI or at Argonne: http://ow.ly/ODfa Video courtesy Igor Aronson.

  17. Compartmentalization of bacteria in microcapsules.

    PubMed

    van Wijk, Judith; Heunis, Tiaan; Harmzen, Elrika; Dicks, Leon M T; Meuldijk, Jan; Klumperman, Bert

    2014-12-18

    Lactobacillus plantarum strain 423 was encapsulated in hollow poly(organosiloxane) microcapsules by templating water-in-oil Pickering emulsion droplets via the interfacial reaction of alkylchlorosilanes. The bacteria were suspended in growth medium or buffer to protect the cells against pH changes during the interfacial reactions with alkylchlorosilanes. The results of this work open up novel avenues for the encapsulation of microbial cells. PMID:25351443

  18. Laser-Based Identification of Pathogenic Bacteria

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rehse, Steven J.

    2009-01-01

    Bacteria are ubiquitous in our world. From our homes, to our work environment, to our own bodies, bacteria are the omnipresent although often unobserved companions to human life. Physicists are typically untroubled professionally by the presence of these bacteria, as their study usually falls safely outside the realm of our typical domain. In the

  19. Simple chamber facilitates chemiluminescent detection of bacteria

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marts, E. C.; Wilkins, J. R.

    1970-01-01

    Test chamber enables rapid estimation of bacteria in a test sample through the reaction of luminol and an oxidant with the cytochrome C portion of certain species of bacteria. Intensity of the light emitted in the reaction is a function of the specific bacteria in the test sample.

  20. Laser-Based Identification of Pathogenic Bacteria

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rehse, Steven J.

    2009-01-01

    Bacteria are ubiquitous in our world. From our homes, to our work environment, to our own bodies, bacteria are the omnipresent although often unobserved companions to human life. Physicists are typically untroubled professionally by the presence of these bacteria, as their study usually falls safely outside the realm of our typical domain. In the…

  1. Chemical signature of magnetotactic bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Amor, Matthieu; Busigny, Vincent; Durand-Dubief, Mickaël; Tharaud, Mickaël; Ona-Nguema, Georges; Gélabert, Alexandre; Alphandéry, Edouard; Menguy, Nicolas; Benedetti, Marc F.; Chebbi, Imène; Guyot, François

    2015-01-01

    There are longstanding and ongoing controversies about the abiotic or biological origin of nanocrystals of magnetite. On Earth, magnetotactic bacteria perform biomineralization of intracellular magnetite nanoparticles under a controlled pathway. These bacteria are ubiquitous in modern natural environments. However, their identification in ancient geological material remains challenging. Together with physical and mineralogical properties, the chemical composition of magnetite was proposed as a promising tracer for bacterial magnetofossil identification, but this had never been explored quantitatively and systematically for many trace elements. Here, we determine the incorporation of 34 trace elements in magnetite in both cases of abiotic aqueous precipitation and of production by the magnetotactic bacterium Magnetospirillum magneticum strain AMB-1. We show that, in biomagnetite, most elements are at least 100 times less concentrated than in abiotic magnetite and we provide a quantitative pattern of this depletion. Furthermore, we propose a previously unidentified method based on strontium and calcium incorporation to identify magnetite produced by magnetotactic bacteria in the geological record. PMID:25624469

  2. Influence of formulation on photoinactivation of bacteria by lumichrome.

    PubMed

    Bergh, V J Valerón; Bruzell, E; Hegge, A B; Tønnesen, H H

    2015-09-01

    Lumichrome, a photodegradation product of riboflavin, is an endogenous compound in humans. The compound is more photostable and a more efficient photogenerator of singlet oxygen than riboflavin. It absorbs radiation in the UVA and blue-light region, which can be an advantage in antibacterial photodynamic therapy (aPDT) of superficial infections. The aim of this study was to investigate the in vitro aPDT effect of various lumichrome pharmaceutical formulations. Solutions of lumichrome (10(-5) - 10(-3)M) were prepared in plain phosphate buffered saline (PBS) or in PBS solutions containing cyclodextrins, DMSO, PEG 400 or polyoxamers (Pluronic). Supersaturated solutions of lumichrome in PBS were prepared via the cosolvent and solvent evaporation method. Phototoxic effects of selected lumichrome preparations were studied in planktonic Gram-positive (E. faecalis) and Gram-negative (E. coli) bacteria models. The UVA/blue light source emitted mainly in the range 340-440 nm. Lumichrome was up to tenfold more phototoxic against Gram-positive than to Gram-negative bacteria. Bacterial eradication was induced after exposure of lumichrome formulations (PBS, PEG 400 and HPγCD) combined with 24J/cm2 UVA/blue light. Increasing the concentration of lumichrome did not enhance the phototoxic effect, probably due to radiation attenuation in the highly absorbing solution (inner filter effect). Cyclodextrins were efficient enhancers of the lumichrome solubility in aqueous solutions, but inhibited the phototoxic effect. The study demonstrates that assuming the use of an optimized formulation, lumichrome has potential as a UVA/blue light photosensitizer in aPDT. PMID:26492641

  3. Distribution and Characterization of Kepone-Resistant Bacteria in the Aquatic Environment

    PubMed Central

    Orndorff, S. A.; Colwell, R. R.

    1980-01-01

    Effects of the chlorinated insecticide Kepone on the ecology of Chesapeake Bay and James River bacteria were studied. Kepone-resistant bacteria present in a given environment were found to reflect the degree of fecal and/or high organic pollution of the sampling sites, based on total numbers and generic composition of the populations of Kepone-resistant bacteria. The presence of Kepone-resistant bacteria was found to be correlated (? = 0.01) with total coliforms, fecal coliforms, and total aerobic viable heterotrophic bacteria, but not with Kepone concentration, since Kepone-resistant bacteria were present in locations where Kepone could not be detected by the analytical methods used in this study. Only gram-negative bacteria, predominantly Pseudomonas, Vibrio, and Aeromonas spp., were found to be resistant to ?10 ?g of Kepone per ml. Gram-positive bacteria, i.e., Bacillus and Corynebacterium spp., were generally sensitive to ?0.1 ?g of Kepone per ml. From results of cluster analysis of taxonomic data, we determined that characteristics of Kepone-resistant bacteria included: resistance to pesticides and heavy metals; degradation of oil; positive oxidase and catalase reactions; and nitrate reduction. From results of the ecological and taxonomic analyses, we conclude that Kepone resistance in estuarine bacteria is due to the physicochemical composition of the gram-negative cell wall and not prior exposure to Kepone. Therefore, the presence of Kepone-resistant bacteria cannot serve as an indicator of Kepone contamination in the aquatic environment where gram-negative bacteria are predominant. PMID:6155825

  4. In vitro activity of XF-73, a novel antibacterial agent, against antibiotic-sensitive and -resistant Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacterial species.

    PubMed

    Farrell, David J; Robbins, Marion; Rhys-Williams, William; Love, William G

    2010-06-01

    The antibacterial activity of XF-73, a dicationic porphyrin drug, was investigated against a range of Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria with known antibiotic resistance profiles, including resistance to cell wall synthesis, protein synthesis, and DNA and RNA synthesis inhibitors as well as cell membrane-active antibiotics. Antibiotic-sensitive strains for each of the bacterial species tested were also included for comparison purposes. XF-73 was active [minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) 0.25-4 mg/L] against all of the Gram-positive bacteria tested, irrespective of the antibiotic resistance profile of the isolates, suggesting that the mechanism of action of XF-73 is unique compared with the major antibiotic classes. Gram-negative activity was lower (MIC 1 mg/L to > 64 mg/L). Minimum bactericidal concentration data confirmed that the activity of XF-73 was bactericidal. Time-kill kinetics against healthcare-associated and community-associated meticillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus isolates demonstrated that XF-73 was rapidly bactericidal, with > 5 log(10) kill obtained after 15 min at 2 x MIC, the earliest time point sampled. The post-antibiotic effect (PAE) for XF-73 under conditions where the PAE for vancomycin was < 0.4h was found to be > 5.4 h. XF-73 represents a novel broad-spectrum Gram-positive antibacterial drug with potentially beneficial characteristics for the treatment and prevention of Gram-positive bacterial infections. PMID:20346634

  5. Enantioselective analysis of ofloxacin enantiomers by partial-filling capillary electrophoresis with bacteria as chiral selectors.

    PubMed

    Li, Lixian; Xia, Zhining; Yang, Fengqing; Chen, Hua; Zhang, Yonglan

    2012-08-01

    The enantiomeric separation of ofloxacin enantiomers (OFLX) was achieved by using capillary electrophoresis partial-filled with Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa (Gram-negative), and Staphylococcus aureus (Gram-positive) as chiral selectors. Experimental parameters, including the concentration of background electrolyte, applied voltage, length of the filled bacteria plug, and pH of the buffer, were intensively investigated. Baseline separation of OFLX could be achieved within 7 min by using E. coli and P. aeruginosa as chiral selectors under the following conditions: electrophoretic buffer composed of 10 mM phosphate buffer at pH 7.4, applied voltage at 15 kV, and the bacteria (6.0 10(8) cells/mL) were injected into the capillary by gravity with injection height of 17.5 cm for 180 s (E. coli), 300 s (P. aeruginosa), and 300 s (S. aureus), respectively. E. coli and P. aeruginosa had better chiral selectivity for OFLX than S. aureus, which was in good agreement with OFLX having better antimicrobial activity on Gram-negative rather than Gram-positive bacteria. A novel method was developed for the enantioselective separation of enantiomers using bacteria as chiral selectors, which provides a new approach for antimicrobials enantioselective analysis, chiral pharmacodynamics, and chiral pharmacokinetics studies. PMID:22674848

  6. Current status and emerging role of glutathione in food grade lactic acid bacteria

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) have taken centre stage in perspectives of modern fermented food industry and probiotic based therapeutics. These bacteria encounter various stress conditions during industrial processing or in the gastrointestinal environment. Such conditions are overcome by complex molecular assemblies capable of synthesizing and/or metabolizing molecules that play a specific role in stress adaptation. Thiols are important class of molecules which contribute towards stress management in cell. Glutathione, a low molecular weight thiol antioxidant distributed widely in eukaryotes and Gram negative organisms, is present sporadically in Gram positive bacteria. However, new insights on its occurrence and role in the latter group are coming to light. Some LAB and closely related Gram positive organisms are proposed to possess glutathione synthesis and/or utilization machinery. Also, supplementation of glutathione in food grade LAB is gaining attention for its role in stress protection and as a nutrient and sulfur source. Owing to the immense benefits of glutathione, its release by probiotic bacteria could also find important applications in health improvement. This review presents our current understanding about the status of glutathione and its role as an exogenously added molecule in food grade LAB and closely related organisms. PMID:22920585

  7. Activation of Type III Interferon Genes by Pathogenic Bacteria in Infected Epithelial Cells and Mouse Placenta

    PubMed Central

    Bierne, Hélène; Tailleux, Ludovic; Subtil, Agathe; Lebreton, Alice; Paliwal, Anupam; Gicquel, Brigitte; Staeheli, Peter; Lecuit, Marc; Cossart, Pascale

    2012-01-01

    Bacterial infections trigger the expression of type I and II interferon genes but little is known about their effect on type III interferon (IFN-λ) genes, whose products play important roles in epithelial innate immunity against viruses. Here, we studied the expression of IFN-λ genes in cultured human epithelial cells infected with different pathogenic bacteria and in the mouse placenta infected with Listeria monocytogenes. We first showed that in intestinal LoVo cells, induction of IFN-λ genes by L. monocytogenes required bacterial entry and increased further during the bacterial intracellular phase of infection. Other Gram-positive bacteria, Staphylococcus aureus, Staphylococcus epidermidis and Enterococcus faecalis, also induced IFN-λ genes when internalized by LoVo cells. In contrast, Gram-negative bacteria Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium, Shigella flexneri and Chlamydia trachomatis did not substantially induce IFN-λ. We also found that IFN-λ genes were up-regulated in A549 lung epithelial cells infected with Mycobacterium tuberculosis and in HepG2 hepatocytes and BeWo trophoblastic cells infected with L. monocytogenes. In a humanized mouse line permissive to fetoplacental listeriosis, IFN-λ2/λ3 mRNA levels were enhanced in placentas infected with L. monocytogenes. In addition, the feto-placental tissue was responsive to IFN-λ2. Together, these results suggest that IFN-λ may be an important modulator of the immune response to Gram-positive intracellular bacteria in epithelial tissues. PMID:22720036

  8. Influence of Bentonite Particles on the Transport and Deposition Behavior of Bacteria in Porous Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Haiyan; Tong, Meiping; Kim, Hyunjung

    2013-04-01

    The influence of clay particles on the transport and deposition behavior of bacteria in irregular quartz sand was examined by direct comparison of both breakthrough curves and retained profiles with clay particles in bacteria suspension versus those without clay particles. Two representative cell types, Gram-negative strain E.coli DH5? and Gram-positive strain Bacillus subtilis were utilized to systematically determine the influence of clay particles (bentonite) on cell transport behavior. Packed column experiments for both cell types were conducted in both NaCl (5 and 25 mM ionic strengths) and CaCl2 (5 mM ionic strength) solutions at pH 6.0. The breakthrough plateaus with bentonite in solutions (30 mg L-1 and 50 mg L-1) were lower than those without bentonite for both cell types under all examined conditions, indicating that bentonite in solutions decreased cell transport in porous media regardless of cell types (Gram-negative or Gram-positive) and solution chemistry (ionic strength and ion valence). The enhanced cell deposition with bentonite particles was mainly observed at segments near to column inlet, retained profiles for both cell types with bentonite particles therefore were steeper relative to those without bentonite. The increased cell deposition with bentonite observed in NaCl solutions was mainly attributed to the co-deposition of bacteria with bentonite particles whereas, in addition to co-deposition of bacteria with bentonite, the bacteria-bentonite-bacteria cluster formed in suspensions also contributed to the increased deposition of bacteria with bentonite in CaCl2 solution.

  9. Recognition of U-rich RNA by Hfq from the Gram-positive pathogen Listeria monocytogenes

    PubMed Central

    Kovach, Alexander R.; Hoff, Kirsten E.; Canty, John T.; Orans, Jillian

    2014-01-01

    Hfq is a post-transcriptional regulator that binds U- and A-rich regions of sRNAs and their target mRNAs to stimulate their annealing in order to effect translation regulation and, often, to alter their stability. The functional importance of Hfq and its RNA-binding properties are relatively well understood in Gram-negative bacteria, whereas less is known about the RNA-binding properties of this riboregulator in Gram-positive species. Here, we describe the structure of Hfq from the Gram-positive pathogen Listeria monocytogenes in its RNA-free form and in complex with a U6 oligoribonucleotide. As expected, the protein takes the canonical hexameric toroidal shape of all other known Hfq structures. The U6 RNA binds on the “proximal face” in a pocket formed by conserved residues Q9, N42, F43, and K58. Additionally residues G5 and Q6 are involved in protein-nucleic and inter-subunit contacts that promote uracil specificity. Unlike Staphylococcus aureus (Sa) Hfq, Lm Hfq requires magnesium to bind U6 with high affinity. In contrast, the longer oligo-uridine, U16, binds Lm Hfq tightly in the presence or absence of magnesium, thereby suggesting the importance of additional residues on the proximal face and possibly the lateral rim in RNA interaction. Intrinsic tryptophan fluorescence quenching (TFQ) studies reveal, surprisingly, that Lm Hfq can bind (GU)3G and U6 on its proximal and distal faces, indicating a less stringent adenine-nucleotide specificity site on the distal face as compared to the Gram-positive Hfq proteins from Sa and Bacillus subtilis and suggesting as yet uncharacterized RNA-binding modes on both faces. PMID:25150227

  10. Glycerol Monolaurate Inhibits the Effects of Gram Positive Select Agents on Eukaryotic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Peterson, Marnie L.; Schlievert, Patrick M.

    2008-01-01

    Many exotoxins of gram positive bacteria, such as superantigens (staphylococcal enterotoxins, toxic shock syndrome toxin-1 [TSST-1], and streptococcal pyrogenic exotoxins) and anthrax toxin are bioterrorism agents that cause diseases by immunostimulation or cytotoxicity. Glycerol monolaurate (GML), a fatty acid monoester found naturally in humans, has been reported to prevent synthesis of gram positive bacterial exotoxins. This study explored the ability of GML to inhibit the effects of exotoxins on mammalian cells and prevent rabbit lethality from TSS. GML (?10 ug/ml) inhibited superantigen (5 ug/ml) immunoproliferation, as determined by inhibition of 3H-thymidine incorporation into DNA of human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (1 106 cells/ml) as well as phospholipase C?1, suggesting inhibition of signal transduction. The compound (20 ug/ml) prevented superantigen (100 ug/ml) induced cytokine secretion by human vaginal epithelial cells (HVECs) as measured by ELISA. GML (250 ug) inhibited rabbit lethality due to TSST-1 administered vaginally. GML (10 ug/ml) inhibited HVEC and macrophage cytotoxicity by anthrax toxin, prevented erythrocyte lysis by purified hemolysins (staphylococcal ? and ?) and culture fluids containing streptococcal and Bacillus anthracis hemolysins, and was non-toxic to mammalian cells (up to 100 ug/ml) and rabbits (250 ug). GML stabilized mammalian cell membranes, as erythrocyte lysis was reduced in the presence of hypotonic aqueous solutions (0 to 0.05 M saline) or staphylococcal ? and ?-hemolysins when erythrocytes were pretreated with GML. GML may be useful in management of gram positive exotoxin illnesses; its action appears to be membrane stabilization with inhibition of signal transduction. PMID:16475828

  11. Teicoplanin or vancomycin in the treatment of gram-positive infections?

    PubMed

    Murphy, S; Pinney, R J

    1995-02-01

    The glycopeptide antibiotics vancomycin and teicoplanin have similar mechanisms of action on bacterial cell wall synthesis. Their spectra of activity are limited to Gram-positive bacteria, with the degree of bactericidal activity depending on the species of micro-organism. Staphylococcus aureus, Staphylococcus epidermis, enterococci and Clostridium difficile are generally sensitive, including methicillin-resistant strains of S. aureus and S. epidermidis. Glycopeptide resistance has recently emerged in staphylococci and enterococci. Vancomycin has a shorter half-life than teicoplanin and requires multiple dosing to maintain adequate serum levels. It can only be given by prolonged intravenous infusion over 1 h. In contrast, the pharmacokinetics of teicoplanin allow for once-daily dosing, either by rapid intravenous infusion or by the intramuscular route. The latter offers reliable absorption for patients with limited venous access and is also of benefit for out-patient therapy. Teicoplanin is a safer drug than vancomycin. It is associated with a lower incidence of nephrotoxicity or ototoxicity. Compared to vancomycin, the availability of the intramuscular route and the absence of a requirement for routine serum monitoring, together with the reduced need to treat drug-related side-effects make teicoplanin more cost-effective. It is as effective as vancomycin for most indications, is safe, easy to administer and an important agent for treating Gram-positive infections. Its role in hospitals is likely to increase if the price of drug acquisition is kept low. PMID:7775615

  12. Bioengineered Nisin A Derivatives with Enhanced Activity against Both Gram Positive and Gram Negative Pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Field, Des; Begley, Maire; OConnor, Paula M.; Daly, Karen M.; Hugenholtz, Floor; Cotter, Paul D.; Hill, Colin; Ross, R. Paul

    2012-01-01

    Nisin is a bacteriocin widely utilized in more than 50 countries as a safe and natural antibacterial food preservative. It is the most extensively studied bacteriocin, having undergone decades of bioengineering with a view to improving function and physicochemical properties. The discovery of novel nisin variants with enhanced activity against clinical and foodborne pathogens has recently been described. We screened a randomized bank of nisin A producers and identified a variant with a serine to glycine change at position 29 (S29G), with enhanced efficacy against S. aureus SA113. Using a site-saturation mutagenesis approach we generated three more derivatives (S29A, S29D and S29E) with enhanced activity against a range of Gram positive drug resistant clinical, veterinary and food pathogens. In addition, a number of the nisin S29 derivatives displayed superior antimicrobial activity to nisin A when assessed against a range of Gram negative food-associated pathogens, including E. coli, Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium and Cronobacter sakazakii. This is the first report of derivatives of nisin, or indeed any lantibiotic, with enhanced antimicrobial activity against both Gram positive and Gram negative bacteria. PMID:23056510

  13. NClassG+: A classifier for non-classically secreted Gram-positive bacterial proteins

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Most predictive methods currently available for the identification of protein secretion mechanisms have focused on classically secreted proteins. In fact, only two methods have been reported for predicting non-classically secreted proteins of Gram-positive bacteria. This study describes the implementation of a sequence-based classifier, denoted as NClassG+, for identifying non-classically secreted Gram-positive bacterial proteins. Results Several feature-based classifiers were trained using different sequence transformation vectors (frequencies, dipeptides, physicochemical factors and PSSM) and Support Vector Machines (SVMs) with Linear, Polynomial and Gaussian kernel functions. Nested k-fold cross-validation (CV) was applied to select the best models, using the inner CV loop to tune the model parameters and the outer CV group to compute the error. The parameters and Kernel functions and the combinations between all possible feature vectors were optimized using grid search. Conclusions The final model was tested against an independent set not previously seen by the model, obtaining better predictive performance compared to SecretomeP V2.0 and SecretPV2.0 for the identification of non-classically secreted proteins. NClassG+ is freely available on the web at http://www.biolisi.unal.edu.co/web-servers/nclassgpositive/ PMID:21235786

  14. Bacteria detection instrument and method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Renner, W.; Fealey, R. D. (inventors)

    1972-01-01

    A method and apparatus for screening a sample fluid for bacterial presence are disclosed wherein the fluid sample is mixed with culture media of sufficient quantity to permit bacterial growth in order to obtain a test solution. The concentration of oxygen dissolved in the test solution is then monitored using the potential difference between a reference electrode and a noble metal electrode which are in contact with the test solution. The change in oxygen concentration which occurs during a period of time as indicated by the electrode potential difference is compared with a detection criterion which exceeds the change which would occur absent bacteria.

  15. Turning Bacteria Suspensions into Superfluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lpez, Hctor Matas; Gachelin, Jrmie; Douarche, Carine; Auradou, Harold; Clment, Eric

    2015-07-01

    The rheological response under simple shear of an active suspension of Escherichia coli is determined in a large range of shear rates and concentrations. The effective viscosity and the time scales characterizing the bacterial organization under shear are obtained. In the dilute regime, we bring evidence for a low-shear Newtonian plateau characterized by a shear viscosity decreasing with concentration. In the semidilute regime, for particularly active bacteria, the suspension displays a "superfluidlike" transition where the viscous resistance to shear vanishes, thus showing that, macroscopically, the activity of pusher swimmers organized by shear is able to fully overcome the dissipative effects due to viscous loss.

  16. Phage-bacteria infection networks.

    PubMed

    Weitz, Joshua S; Poisot, Timothée; Meyer, Justin R; Flores, Cesar O; Valverde, Sergi; Sullivan, Matthew B; Hochberg, Michael E

    2013-02-01

    Phage and their bacterial hosts are the most abundant and genetically diverse group of organisms on the planet. Given their dominance, it is no wonder that many recent studies have found that phage-bacteria interactions strongly influence global biogeochemical cycles, incidence of human diseases, productivity of industrial microbial commodities, and patterns of microbial genome diversity. Unfortunately, given the extreme diversity and complexity of microbial communities, traditional analyses fail to characterize interaction patterns and underlying processes. Here, we review emerging systems approaches that combine empirical data with rigorous theoretical analysis to study phage-bacterial interactions as networks rather than as coupled interactions in isolation. PMID:23245704

  17. Bacteria and vampirism in cinema.

    PubMed

    Castel, O; Bourry, A; Thévenot, S; Burucoa, C

    2013-09-01

    A vampire is a non-dead and non-alive chimerical creature, which, according to various folklores and popular superstitions, feeds on blood of the living to draw vital force. Vampires do not reproduce by copulation, but by bite. Vampirism is thus similar to a contagious disease contracted by intravascular inoculation with a suspected microbial origin. In several vampire films, two real bacteria were staged, better integrated than others in popular imagination: Yersinia pestis and Treponema pallidum. Bacillus vampiris was created for science-fiction. These films are attempts to better define humans through one of their greatest fears: infectious disease. PMID:23916557

  18. Genetics of acidophilic, heterotrophic bacteria

    SciTech Connect

    Ward, T.E.; Bruhn, D.F.; Watkins, C.S.; Rowland, M.L.; Bulmer, D.K.; Winston, V.

    1988-01-01

    The genetic characteristics of members of the genus Acidiphilium are poorly understood. As part of our study of the genetics of these bacteria, a search was made for an inducible, lysogenic bacteriophage. Such a bacteriophage has been discovered. Several properties of the phage have been investigated. The phage has a lambdoid morphology and is somewhat larger than lambda. A variety of factors which affect phage stability have been investigated. The bacteriophage infects several of the strains that have been tested. Study of this bacteriophage should greatly increase our understanding of genetic mechanisms in Acidiphilium. 23 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  19. Exploiting what phage have evolved to control gram-positive pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Fischetti, Vincent A.

    2011-01-01

    In the billion years that bacteriophage (or phage) have existed together with bacteria the phage have evolved systems that may be exploited for our benefit. One of these is the lytic system used by the phage to release their progeny from an infected bacterium. Endolysins (or lysins) are highly evolved enzymes in the lytic system produced to cleave essential bonds in the bacterial cell wall peptidoglycan for progeny release. Small quantities of purified recombinant lysin added externally to gram-positive bacteria results in immediate lysis causing log-fold death of the target bacterium. Lysins have now been used successfully in a variety of animal models to control pathogenic antibiotic resistant bacteria found on mucosal surfaces and in infected tissues. The advantages over antibiotics are their specificity for the pathogen without disturbing the normal flora, the low chance of bacterial resistance, and their ability to kill colonizing pathogens on mucosal surfaces, a capacity previously unavailable. Lysins therefore, may be a much-needed anti-infective (or enzybiotic) in an age of mounting antibiotic resistance. PMID:23050211

  20. FURTHER OBSERVATIONS ON THE GROWTH OF BACTERIA ON MEDIA CONTAINING VARIOUS ANILIN DYES, WITH SPECIAL REFERENCE TO AN ENRICHMENT METHOD FOR TYPHOID AND PARATYPHOID BACILLI.

    PubMed

    Krumwiede, C; Pratt, J S

    1914-05-01

    Several green dyes show a marked selective action for members of the typhoid-paratyphoid-colon group. This can be used for the enrichment of typhoid and paratyphoid bacilli present in feces. Forty dyes were tested with thirty strains covering all types of pathogenic bacteria. In general the dyes restrained the growth of the Gram-positive bacteria but had no effect on the growth of the Gram-negative group. PMID:19867788

  1. The Effect of Bacteriophage Preparations on Intracellular Killing of Bacteria by Phagocytes

    PubMed Central

    Jończyk-Matysiak, Ewa; Łusiak-Szelachowska, Marzanna; Kłak, Marlena; Bubak, Barbara; Międzybrodzki, Ryszard; Weber-Dąbrowska, Beata; Żaczek, Maciej; Fortuna, Wojciech; Rogóż, Paweł; Letkiewicz, Sławomir; Szufnarowski, Krzysztof; Górski, Andrzej

    2015-01-01

    Intracellular killing of bacteria is one of the fundamental mechanisms against invading pathogens. Impaired intracellular killing of bacteria by phagocytes may be the reason of chronic infections and may be caused by antibiotics or substances that can be produced by some bacteria. Therefore, it was of great practical importance to examine whether phage preparations may influence the process of phagocyte intracellular killing of bacteria. It may be important especially in the case of patients qualified for experimental phage therapy (approximately half of the patients with chronic bacterial infections have their immunity impaired). Our analysis included 51 patients with chronic Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacterial infections treated with phage preparations at the Phage Therapy Unit in Wroclaw. The aim of the study was to investigate the effect of experimental phage therapy on intracellular killing of bacteria by patients' peripheral blood monocytes and polymorphonuclear neutrophils. We observed that phage therapy does not reduce patients' phagocytes' ability to kill bacteria, and it does not affect the activity of phagocytes in patients with initially reduced ability to kill bacteria intracellularly. Our results suggest that experimental phage therapy has no significant adverse effects on the bactericidal properties of phagocytes, which confirms the safety of the therapy. PMID:26783541

  2. Phylogenetic Diversity of Bacteria Associated with the Marine Sponge Rhopaloeides odorabile

    PubMed Central

    Webster, Nicole S.; Wilson, Kate J.; Blackall, Linda L.; Hill, Russell T.

    2001-01-01

    Molecular techniques were employed to document the microbial diversity associated with the marine sponge Rhopaloeides odorabile. The phylogenetic affiliation of sponge-associated bacteria was assessed by 16S rRNA sequencing of cloned DNA fragments. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) was used to confirm the presence of the predominant groups indicated by 16S rDNA analysis. The community structure was extremely diverse with representatives of the Actinobacteria, low-G+C gram-positive bacteria, the ?- and ?-subdivisions of the Proteobacteria, Cytophaga/Flavobacterium, green sulfur bacteria, green nonsulfur bacteria, planctomycetes, and other sequence types with no known close relatives. FISH probes revealed the spatial location of these bacteria within the sponge tissue, in some cases suggesting possible symbiotic functions. The high proportion of 16S rRNA sequences derived from novel actinomycetes is good evidence for the presence of an indigenous marine actinomycete assemblage in R. odorabile. High microbial diversity was inferred from low duplication of clones in a library with 70 representatives. Determining the phylogenetic affiliation of sponge-associated microorganisms by 16S rRNA analysis facilitated the rational selection of culture media and isolation conditions to target specific groups of well-represented bacteria for laboratory culture. Novel media incorporating sponge extracts were used to isolate bacteria not previously recovered from this sponge. PMID:11133476

  3. Differential elimination of enteric bacteria by protists in a freshwater system.

    PubMed

    Iriberri, J; Azúa, I; Labirua-Iturburu, A; Artolozaga, I; Barcina, I

    1994-11-01

    The short-term (1 h) and long-term (3 d) elimination of low and high densities of five enteric bacteria, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Aeromonas hydrophila, Escherichia coli, Enterococcus faecalis and Staphylococcus epidermidis, by flagellate and ciliate protists were measured in a freshwater system. In addition, the two processes, ingestion and digestion, which cause the disappearance of those enteric bacteria as time passes, were quantified. The results showed that the elimination of these enteric bacteria by protists depends on their initial density, which confirms that the lower the bacterial density the more difficult is their elimination. On the other hand, the short-term and long-term elimination rates of each enteric bacteria were different, and moreover, the order of priority for elimination in the two cases was not the same. Escherichia coli showed the highest elimination rate in short-term experiments, while Aer. hydrophila disappeared at highest rates in long-term experiments. This different order of priority in the elimination rates and the different digestion rates on the five enteric bacteria by phagotrophic protists indicated that the elimination in time is very much influenced by the digestive capacity on each enteric bacteria of those protists. Thus, the low digestion rates of Ent. faecalis and Staph. epidermidis by flagellates and ciliates as well as their low disappearance percentages in the long-term experiments confirm that enteric Gram-positive bacteria are eliminated from the aquatic systems at lower rates, because their digestion is difficult. PMID:8002473

  4. The ESAT-6/WXG100 superfamily -- and a new Gram-positive secretion system?

    PubMed

    Pallen, Mark J

    2002-05-01

    ESAT-6 is a small secreted protein of unknown function from Mycobacterium tuberculosis that is of fundamental importance in virulence and protective immunity. A PSI-BLAST search has identified distant homologues of ESAT-6 in more tractable bacteria, including Bacillus subtilis, Bacillus anthracis, Staphylococcus aureus and Clostridium acetobutylicum. The genes for ESAT-6-like proteins often cluster with genes encoding homologues of B. subtilis YukA. I speculate that the ESAT-6-like and YukA-like proteins form a novel Gram-positive secretion system potentially driven by the FtsK/SpoIIIE ATPase domains in the YukA-like proteins. The way is now open to investigate this hypothesis in organisms that are easier to manipulate than pathogenic mycobacteria. PMID:11973144

  5. Bromate Reduction by Denitrifying Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Hijnen, W.; Voogt, R.; Veenendaal, H. R.; van der Jagt, H.; van der Kooij, D.

    1995-01-01

    In the presence of bromide, ozonation as applied in water treatment results in the formation of bromate, an ion with carcinogenic properties. The reduction of bromate by mixed bacterial populations as well as pure cultures was studied under laboratory conditions. Bromate was reduced to bromide by a mixed bacterial population with and without a preceding nitrate reduction step in an anaerobically incubated medium with ethanol as the energy and carbon source at 20 and 25 deg C. The predominating bacteria isolated from the batches showing bromate reduction were identified as Pseudomonas spp. Strains of Pseudomonas fluorescens reduced BrO(inf3)(sup-) to Br(sup-) but at a much lower rate than the mixed bacterial population did. Nitrate is a preferred electron acceptor for the bromate-reducing bacteria. Bromate reduction did not occur in the presence of NO(inf3)(sup-), and the rate of bromate reduction was at least 100 times lower than the rate of nitrate reduction. Bromate was completely converted to Br(sup-), indicating that intermediates, e.g., BrO(inf2)(sup-), did not accumulate during bromate reduction. PMID:16534907

  6. Methanotrophic Bacteria: Use in Bioremediation

    SciTech Connect

    Brigmon, R.L.

    2001-02-15

    The methanotrophs are aerobic bacteria that oxidize methane as an energy source and carbon source through the enzyme methane monooxygenase (MMO). This MMO can cometabolize or transform nongrowth substrates by either growing or resting cells. Cometabolism is a result of nonspecific MMO activity towards organic compounds that do not serve as carbon or energy sources. While many cometabolizing bacterial species have been identified, the best studied are the methanotrophs. The reason for this is that methanotrophs are ubiquitous and can cometabolize many aliphatic compounds, alkanes, and aromatic compounds. Methanotrophs have been intensely studied for use in degrading chlorinated solvents, most notably trichloroethylene, to environmentally acceptable concentrations in soils, sediment, and groundwater. Stimulation of methanotrophic bacteria is accomplished through the addition of methane and other gaseous nutrients resulting in an increase in contaminant biodegradation and biotransformation. The composition of gaseous nutrients used with methane is dependent on the characteristics of the site geochemistry and microbiology. This biostimulation may be applied in situ within the contaminated aquifer or soil. If necessary, the contaminated soil or groundwater can be moved and treated ex situ based on the site-specific needs.

  7. Genetic manipulation of acidophilic bacteria

    SciTech Connect

    Ward, T.E.; Rowland, M.L.; Glenn, A.W.; Watkins, C.S.; Bruhn, D.F.; Bulmer, D.; Roberto, F.F.

    1989-01-01

    Thiobacillus ferrooxidans is important in leaching of metals from mineral ores and in the removal of pyritic sulfur from coal. It is also intimately involved in production of acid mine drainage. Other acidophilic bacteria, including members of the genus Acidiphilium, are usually present in the same environments as T. ferrooxidans, and there is evidence to suggest that these acidophilic heterotrophs may increase the rate of T. ferrooxidans' attack on inorganic sulfides. Our laboratory is studying the genetic characteristics of these acidophilic bacteria and developing techniques for introducing desirable genes into them. Several endogenous plasmids from Acidiphilium strains have been cloned into E. coli vectors. Some of the resulting plasmids are able to confer antibiotic resistance to Acidiphilium after transformation by electroporation. In addition, a broad-host range plasmid conferring resistance to tetracycline has been introduced into Acidiphilium strains by electroporation. This same plasmid, has also been transferred to Acidiphilium from E. coli directly by conjugation. A temperate bacteriophage which infects a number of Acidiphilium isolates has been discovered and partially characterized. It has a lambdoid morphology and a genome of approximately 97 kb, comprised of double-stranded DNA which is probably modified. 16 refs., 2 figs., 4 tabs.

  8. Multiwavelength Resonance Raman Characterization of the Effect of Growth Phase and Culture Medium on Bacteria.

    PubMed

    Kunapareddy, Nagapratima; Grun, Jacob; Lunsford, Robert; Nikitin, Sergei; Wang, Zheng; Gillis, David

    2015-08-01

    We examine the use of multiwavelength ultraviolet (UV) resonance-Raman signatures to identify the effects of growth phase and growth medium on gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria. Escherichia coli (E. coli), Citrobacter koseri (C. koseri), Citrobacter braakii (C. braakii), and Bacillus cereus (B. cereus) were grown to logarithmic and stationary phases in nutrient broth and brain heart infusion broth. Resonance Raman spectra of bacteria were obtained at multiple wavelengths between 220 and 260 nm; a range that encompasses the resonance frequencies of cellular constituents. We find that spectra of the same bacterial species exhibit differences due to both growth condition and growth phase, but the larger differences reflect changes due to growth phase. The differences in the Raman spectra correlate with genetic differences among the species. Using a Pearson correlation based algorithm, we achieve successful identification of these bacteria in 83% of the cases. PMID:26163518

  9. Distribution and Diversity of Symbiotic Thermophiles, Symbiobacterium thermophilum and Related Bacteria, in Natural Environments

    PubMed Central

    Ueda, Kenji; Ohno, Michiyo; Yamamoto, Kaori; Nara, Hanae; Mori, Yujiro; Shimada, Masafumi; Hayashi, Masahiko; Oida, Hanako; Terashima, Yuko; Nagata, Mitsuyo; Beppu, Teruhiko

    2001-01-01

    Symbiobacterium thermophilum is a tryptophanase-positive thermophile which shows normal growth only in coculture with its supporting bacteria. Analysis of the 16S rRNA gene (rDNA) indicated that the bacterium belongs to a novel phylogenetic branch at the outermost position of the gram-positive bacterial group without clustering to any other known genus. Here we describe the distribution and diversity of S. thermophilum and related bacteria in the environment. Thermostable tryptophanase activity and amplification of the specific 16S rDNA fragment were effectively employed to detect the presence of Symbiobacterium. Enrichment with kanamycin raised detection sensitivity. Mixed cultures of thermophiles containing Symbiobacterium species were frequently obtained from compost, soil, animal feces, and contents in the intestinal tracts, as well as feeds. Phylogenetic analysis and denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis of the specific 16S rDNA amplicons revealed a diversity of this group of bacteria in the environment. PMID:11525967

  10. Application of air ions for bacterial de-colonization in air filters contaminated by aerosolized bacteria.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yang Seon; Yoon, Ki Young; Park, Jae Hong; Hwang, Jungho

    2011-01-15

    We aerosolized the Escherichia coli (E. coli) and Staphylococcus epidermidis (S. epidermidis) bacteria and collected them on membrane filters. Then we generated air ions by applying a high voltage to a carbon fiber tip and applied them to the contaminated filters. The antibacterial efficiency was not significantly affected by the bacteria being Gram-positive or Gram-negative, however, negative ions showed a lower antibacterial efficiency than positive ions to both E. coli and S. epidermidis, even though the concentration of negative air ions was much higher than that of positive air ions. With a field emission scanning electron microscope (FE-SEM) images and fluorescence microscopy images using a LIVE/DEAD BacLight Bacterial Viability Kit, electrostatic disruption of the bacteria was found to be the dominant antibacterial effect. PMID:21146197

  11. The unique regulation of iron-sulfur cluster biogenesis in a Gram-positive bacterium

    PubMed Central

    Santos, Joana A.; Alonso-Garca, Noelia; Macedo-Ribeiro, Sandra; Pereira, Pedro Jos Barbosa

    2014-01-01

    Iron-sulfur clusters function as cofactors of a wide range of proteins, with diverse molecular roles in both prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells. Dedicated machineries assemble the clusters and deliver them to the final acceptor molecules in a tightly regulated process. In the prototypical Gram-negative bacterium Escherichia coli, the two existing iron-sulfur cluster assembly systems, iron-sulfur cluster (ISC) and sulfur assimilation (SUF) pathways, are closely interconnected. The ISC pathway regulator, IscR, is a transcription factor of the helix-turn-helix type that can coordinate a [2Fe-2S] cluster. Redox conditions and iron or sulfur availability modulate the ligation status of the labile IscR cluster, which in turn determines a switch in DNA sequence specificity of the regulator: cluster-containing IscR can bind to a family of gene promoters (type-1) whereas the clusterless form recognizes only a second group of sequences (type-2). However, iron-sulfur cluster biogenesis in Gram-positive bacteria is not so well characterized, and most organisms of this group display only one of the iron-sulfur cluster assembly systems. A notable exception is the unique Gram-positive dissimilatory metal reducing bacterium Thermincola potens, where genes from both systems could be identified, albeit with a diverging organization from that of Gram-negative bacteria. We demonstrated that one of these genes encodes a functional IscR homolog and is likely involved in the regulation of iron-sulfur cluster biogenesis in T. potens. Structural and biochemical characterization of T. potens and E. coli IscR revealed a strikingly similar architecture and unveiled an unforeseen conservation of the unique mechanism of sequence discrimination characteristic of this distinctive group of transcription regulators. PMID:24847070

  12. Antibacterial activity of licochalcone A against spore-forming bacteria.

    PubMed

    Tsukiyama, Ryo-Ichi; Katsura, Harumi; Tokuriki, Nozomu; Kobayashi, Makio

    2002-05-01

    Licochalcone A was isolated from the roots of licorice, Glycyrrhiza inflata, which has various uses in the food and pharmaceutical industries; isolation was followed by extraction with ethanol and column chromatography with silica gel. In this study, the activities of licochalcone A against some food contaminant microorganisms were evaluated in vitro. The vegetative cell growth of Bacillus subtilis was inhibited in a licochalcone A concentration-dependent manner and was completely prevented by 3 micrograms of licochalcone A/ml. Licochalcone A showed a high level of resistance to heating at 80 to 121 degrees C for 15 min. Licochalcone A did not inhibit the germination of heat-treated spores of B. subtilis induced by L-alanine. Licochalcone A showed effects against all gram-positive bacteria tested and especially was effective against all Bacillus spp. tested, with MICs of 2 to 3 micrograms/ml, but was not effective against gram-negative bacteria or eukaryotes at 50 micrograms/ml. Although the cationic antimicrobial peptides protamine and epsilon-poly-L-lysine resulted in the loss of antimicrobial activity in the presence of either 3% (wt/vol) NaCl or protease at 20 micrograms/ml, the antibacterial activity of licochalcone A was resistant to these conditions. Thus, licochalcone A could be a useful compound for the development of antibacterial agents for the preservation of foods containing high concentrations of salts and proteases, in which cationic peptides might be less effective. PMID:11959549

  13. Bacteria beneath composite restorations--a culturing and histobacteriological study.

    PubMed

    Mejre, B; Mejre, I; Edwardsson, S

    1979-01-01

    The occurrence, viability and identification of the microbial flora under composite fillings using an anaerobic technique were studied. Class V cavities were prepared on clinically healthy buccal surfaces of 7 contralateral pairs of premolars in children 11--15 years of age. After preparation, rubber dam was applied and one cavity in each pair of teeth was washed with water blasted dry with air and filled with Adaptic. The other cavity was washed with a cavity cleaner (Tubulicid) and a cavity liner (Tubulitec) was applicated prior to filling with Adaptic. The teeth were extracted after 4--6 weeks. Under anerobic conditions the tooth crown was split. From one half samples were taken from the pulpal wall under the filling and cultured on blood agar and in broth medium. The other half was examined with histobacteriological technique. No growth occurred in cultures from lined cavities but in 6 of the 7 unlined cavities. Full agreement was observed between the findings from the culturing and histobacteriological examinations concerning presence or absence of microorganisms at the pulpal wall in all 14 teeth. The flora was mixed. Gram-positive bacteria, mainly Streptococcus and Actinomyces, dominated over gram-negative bacteria including Veillonella, Fusobacterium, Campylobacter and Selenomonas. The composition of the flora was more similar to that observed in dental plaque than that found in carious dentin or in saliva in other studies. PMID:393051

  14. Novel co-enrichment method for isolation of magnetotactic bacteria.

    PubMed

    Sorty, Ajay M; Shaikh, Nasir R

    2015-04-01

    A novel co-enrichment technique was designed for enrichment of magnetotactic bacteria from soil, water, and sediments. Delayed addition of iron uptake inducer and the iron source proved amenable to induce magnetosome synthesis by MTB followed by their separation from consortium using magnetic flux. We successfully enriched and isolated both North seeking as well as South seeking magnetotactic bacteria from Lonar Lake (Buldhana), Moti Lake (Jalna), Ghanewadi Lake (Jalna), Ganesh Lake (Miraj), Rankala Lake (Kolhapur), and industrial metal-contaminated glaying soils (Jalna) and a soil (Karad), (MS, India) exposed to high-voltage electric current. The hanging drop preparations and growth under magnetic stress on low-agar media allowed conformation of magnetotactic behavior of the isolates. Both Gram positive and Gram negative MTB were isolated with diverse morphologies. South seeking population was more predominant. The soil inhabitants showed little dwelling property which was more prominent in case of aquatic inhabitants. The use of in situ pH and salt concentrations during enrichment and isolation found suited. The simultaneous growth of whole consortium in the system ensured the in situ simulation of microenvironment needful for proper growth of fastidious MTB. PMID:25546328

  15. Superoxide dismutase in anaerobic bacteria of clinical significance.

    PubMed

    Tally, F P; Goldin, B R; Jacobus, N V; Gorbach, S L

    1977-04-01

    Twenty-two anaerobic bacteria isolated from infected sites and normal fecal flora were assayed for superoxide dismutase (SOD). The organisms were also classified according to their oxygen tolerance into aerotolerant, intermediate, and extremely oxygen-sensitive groups. There was a correlation between the enzyme level and the oxygen tolerance, in that the aerotolerant and intermediate organisms had SOD, whereas the extremely oxygen-sensitive isolates had low or undetectable enzyme. Among the oxygen-tolerant organisms, gram-negative bacteria had higher levels of SOD than gram-positive organisms. Oxygen was shown to induce SOD production in a strain of Bacteriodes fragilis grown in minimal medium under continuous-culture conditions. Enzyme levels in this isolate grown under static conditions were lower in minimal medium than in complex medium, indicating that other components in the complex medium were stimulating the production of SOD. Our data suggest that the variation in oxygen tolerance of anaerobes is usually related to their level of SOD. It is postulated that SOD may be a virulence factor that allows pathogenic anaerobes to survive in oxygenated tissues until the proper reduced conditions are established for their growth. PMID:326669

  16. Dancing to Another Tune—Adhesive Moonlighting Proteins in Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Kainulainen, Veera; Korhonen, Timo K.

    2014-01-01

    Biological moonlighting refers to proteins which express more than one function. Moonlighting proteins occur in pathogenic and commensal as well as in Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. The canonical functions of moonlighting proteins are in essential cellular processes, i.e., glycolysis, protein synthesis, chaperone activity, and nucleic acid stability, and their moonlighting functions include binding to host epithelial and phagocytic cells, subepithelia, cytoskeleton as well as to mucins and circulating proteins of the immune and hemostatic systems. Sequences of the moonlighting proteins do not contain known motifs for surface export or anchoring, and it has remained open whether bacterial moonlighting proteins are actively secreted to the cell wall or whether they are released from traumatized cells and then rebind onto the bacteria. In lactobacilli, ionic interactions with lipoteichoic acids and with cell division sites are important for surface localization of the proteins. Moonlighting proteins represent an abundant class of bacterial adhesins that are part of bacterial interactions with the environment and in responses to environmental changes. Multifunctionality in bacterial surface proteins appears common: the canonical adhesion proteins fimbriae express also nonadhesive functions, whereas the mobility organelles flagella as well as surface proteases express adhesive functions. PMID:24833341

  17. [Surface proteins of bacteria of the genus Bifidobacterium].

    PubMed

    Dylus, Ewa; Buda, Barbara; Górska-Frączek, Sabina; Brzozowska, Ewa; Gamian, Andrzej

    2013-01-01

    Beneficial effects due to the presence of probiotic bacteria of the genus Bifidobacterium in the human intestinal tract are still an interesting object of study. So far activities have been confirmed of bifidobacteria in stimulation of the host immune system, stimulation of tumor cell apoptosis, improvement of bowel motility, alleviation of symptoms of lactose intolerance, cholesterol lowering capacity, prevention and treatment of diarrhea and irritable bowel syndrome, alleviation of allergy or atopic dermatitis, maintenance of homeostasis of the intestine, and stimulation of the development of normal intestinal microflora in infants. A multitude of therapeutic properties encourages researchers to investigate the possibility of using the potential of Bifidobacterium in the prevention and treatment of other conditions such as rheumatoid arthritis and depression. Although it is known that the beneficial effects are due to intestinal mucosal colonization by these bacteria, the cell components responsible for the colonization are still not determined. In addition to the beneficial effects of probiotic administration, there were also negative effects including sepsis. Therefore research has been directed to identify specific components of Bifidobacterium responsible for probiotic effects. Currently researchers are focused on identifying, isolating and evaluating the properties of surface proteins that are probably involved in the adhesion of bacterial cells to the intestinal epithelium, improving colonization. This paper is an overview of current knowledge on Bifidobacterium surface proteins. The ways of transport and anchoring proteins in Gram-positive bacterial cells, the assembly of cell wall, and a description of the genus Bifidobacterium are presented. PMID:23756375

  18. Isolation and Characterization of Bacteria Resistant to Metallic Copper Surfaces?

    PubMed Central

    Esprito Santo, Christophe; Morais, Paula Vasconcelos; Grass, Gregor

    2010-01-01

    Metallic copper alloys have recently attracted attention as a new antimicrobial weapon for areas where surface hygiene is paramount. Currently it is not understood on a molecular level how metallic copper kills microbes, but previous studies have demonstrated that a wide variety of bacteria, including Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus, and Clostridium difficile, are inactivated within minutes or a few hours of exposure. In this study, we show that bacteria isolated from copper alloy coins comprise strains that are especially resistant against the toxic properties exerted by dry metallic copper surfaces. The most resistant of 294 isolates were Gram-positive staphylococci and micrococci, Kocuria palustris, and Brachybacterium conglomeratum but also included the proteobacterial species Sphingomonas panni and Pseudomonas oleovorans. Cells of some of these bacterial strains survived on copper surfaces for 48 h or more. Remarkably, when these dry-surface-resistant strains were exposed to moist copper surfaces, resistance levels were close to those of control strains and MICs for copper ions were at or below control strain levels. This suggests that mechanisms conferring resistance against dry metallic copper surfaces in these newly isolated bacterial strains are different from well-characterized copper ion detoxification systems. Furthermore, staphylococci on coins did not exhibit increased levels of resistance to antibiotics, arguing against coselection with copper surface resistance traits. PMID:20048058

  19. Digestion of Herring by Indigenous Bacteria in the Minke Whale Forestomach

    PubMed Central

    Olsen, Monica A.; Aagnes, Tove H.; Mathiesen, Svein D.

    1994-01-01

    Northeastern Atlantic minke whales (Balaenoptera acutorostrata) have a multichambered stomach system which includes a nonglandular forestomach resembling that of ruminants. Bacteria from the forestomachs of herring-eating whales were enumerated and isolated in an anaerobic rumen-like culture medium (M8W medium). The total viable population of anaerobic bacteria ranged from 73 107 to 145 108/ml of forestomach fluid (n = 4). Lactobacillus spp. (19.7%), Streptococcus spp. (35.9%), and Ruminococcus spp. (12.8%) were the most common of the bacterial strains (n = 117) isolated by use of M8W medium from the forestomach fluid population of two minke whales. Most of the isolates stained gram positive (93.2%), 62.4% were cocci, and all strains were strictly anaerobic. The population of lipolytic bacteria in one animal, enumerated by use of a selective lipid medium, constituted 89.7% of the viable population. The total viable population of anaerobic bacteria in freshly caught and homogenized herring (Clupea harengus) ranged from 56.7 to 95.0 cells per gram of homogenized prey (n = 3) when M8W medium was used. Pediococcus spp. (30.6%) and Aerococcus spp. (25.0%) were most common of the bacterial strains (n = 72) isolated from the homogenized herring. Most of the bacterial strains were gram positive (80.6%), and 70.8% were cocci. Unlike the forestomach bacterial population, as many as 61.1% of the strains from the herring were facultatively anaerobic. All bacterial strains isolated from the prey had phenotypic patterns different from those of strains isolated from the dominant bacterial population in the forestomach, indicating that the forestomach microbiota is indigenous. Scanning electron microscopic examinations revealed large numbers of bacteria, surrounded by a glycocalyx, attached to partly digested food particles in the forestomach. These data support the hypothesis that symbiotic microbial digestion occurs in the forestomach and that the bacteria are indigenous to minke whales. Images PMID:16349460

  20. Discrimination of selected species of pathogenic bacteria using near-infrared Raman spectroscopy and principal components analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Siqueira e Oliveira, Fernanda S.; Giana, Hector E.; Silveira, Landulfo, Jr.

    2012-03-01

    It has been proposed a method based on Raman spectroscopy for identification of different microorganisms involved in bacterial urinary tract infections. Spectra were collected from different bacterial colonies (Gram negative: E. coli, K. pneumoniae, P. mirabilis, P. aeruginosa, E. cloacae and Gram positive: S. aureus and Enterococcus sp.), grown in culture medium (Agar), using a Raman spectrometer with a fiber Raman probe (830 nm). Colonies were scraped from Agar surface placed in an aluminum foil for Raman measurements. After pre-processing, spectra were submitted to a Principal Component Analysis and Mahalanobis distance (PCA/MD) discrimination algorithm. It has been found that the mean Raman spectra of different bacterial species show similar bands, being the S. aureus well characterized by strong bands related to carotenoids. PCA/MD could discriminate Gram positive bacteria with sensitivity and specificity of 100% and Gram negative bacteria with good sensitivity and high specificity.

  1. Characterizing the Catalytic Potential of Deinococcus, Arthrobacter and other Robust Bacteria in Contaminated Subsurface Environments of the Hanford Site

    SciTech Connect

    Daly, Michael J.

    2006-05-01

    Ionizing Radiation (IR) Resistance in Bacteria. Until recently, there have been no clear physiologic predictors of a cell's ability to recover from ionizing radiation (IR) and other DOE-relevant oxidative stress conditions. In general, the most resistant bacteria have been Gram-positive (e.g., Deinococcus, Arthrobacter, Lactobacillus & Enterococcus spp.) and the most sensitive have been Gram-negative (e.g., Pseudomonas, Shewanella & Neisseria spp.). However, there are several reported exceptions to this paradigm, the Gram-negative cyanobacterium Chroococcidiopsis is extremely resistant to IR, whereas the Gram-positive Micrococcus luteus is sensitive. We have identified biomolecular signatures for radiation sensitivity and resistance which are independent of phylogeny, where very high and very low intracellular Mn/Fe concentration ratios correlated with very high and very low resistances, respectively; and restricting Mn(II) in the famously resistant Deinococcus radiodurans sensitized this eubacterium to IR.

  2. Discrimination of selected species of pathogenic bacteria using near-infrared Raman spectroscopy and principal components analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Siqueira e Oliveira, Fernanda SantAna; Giana, Hector Enrique; Silveira, Landulfo

    2012-10-01

    A method, based on Raman spectroscopy, for identification of different microorganisms involved in bacterial urinary tract infections has been proposed. Spectra were collected from different bacterial colonies (Gram-negative: Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Proteus mirabilis, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Enterobacter cloacae, and Gram-positive: Staphylococcus aureus and Enterococcus spp.), grown on culture medium (agar), using a Raman spectrometer with a fiber Raman probe (830 nm). Colonies were scraped from the agar surface and placed on an aluminum foil for Raman measurements. After preprocessing, spectra were submitted to a principal component analysis and Mahalanobis distance (PCA/MD) discrimination algorithm. We found that the mean Raman spectra of different bacterial species show similar bands, and S. aureus was well characterized by strong bands related to carotenoids. PCA/MD could discriminate Gram-positive bacteria with sensitivity and specificity of 100% and Gram-negative bacteria with sensitivity ranging from 58 to 88% and specificity ranging from 87% to 99%.

  3. Commensal bacteria mediated defenses against pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Abt, Michael C.; Pamer, Eric G.

    2014-01-01

    Commensal bacterial communities residing within the intestinal lumen of mammals have evolved to flourish in this microenvironment. To preserve this niche, commensal bacteria act with the host to prevent colonization by invasive pathogens that induce inflammation and disrupt the intestinal niche commensal bacteria rely upon. Thus, it is mutually beneficial to the host and commensal bacteria to inhibit a pathogen's ability to establish an infection. Commensal bacteria express factors that support colonization, maximize nutrient uptake, and produce metabolites that confer a survival advantage over pathogens. Further, commensal bacteria stimulate the host's immune defenses and drive tonic expression of anti-microbial factors. In combination, these mechanisms preserve the niche for commensal bacteria and assist the host in preventing infection. PMID:24727150

  4. Evidence for Direct Electron Transfer by a Gram-Positive Bacterium Isolated from a Microbial Fuel Cell?

    PubMed Central

    Wrighton, K. C.; Thrash, J. C.; Melnyk, R. A.; Bigi, J. P.; Byrne-Bailey, K. G.; Remis, J. P.; Schichnes, D.; Auer, M.; Chang, C. J.; Coates, J. D.

    2011-01-01

    Despite their importance in iron redox cycles and bioenergy production, the underlying physiological, genetic, and biochemical mechanisms of extracellular electron transfer by Gram-positive bacteria remain insufficiently understood. In this work, we investigated respiration by Thermincola potens strain JR, a Gram-positive isolate obtained from the anode surface of a microbial fuel cell, using insoluble electron acceptors. We found no evidence that soluble redox-active components were secreted into the surrounding medium on the basis of physiological experiments and cyclic voltammetry measurements. Confocal microscopy revealed highly stratified biofilms in which cells contacting the electrode surface were disproportionately viable relative to the rest of the biofilm. Furthermore, there was no correlation between biofilm thickness and power production, suggesting that cells in contact with the electrode were primarily responsible for current generation. These data, along with cryo-electron microscopy experiments, support contact-dependent electron transfer by T. potens strain JR from the cell membrane across the 37-nm cell envelope to the cell surface. Furthermore, we present physiological and genomic evidence that c-type cytochromes play a role in charge transfer across the Gram-positive bacterial cell envelope during metal reduction. PMID:21908627

  5. Exploring the potential environmental functions of viable but non-culturable bacteria.

    PubMed

    Su, Xiaomei; Chen, Xi; Hu, Jinxing; Shen, Chaofeng; Ding, Linxian

    2013-12-01

    A conventional plate count is the most commonly employed method to estimate the number of living bacteria in environmental samples. In fact, judging the level of viable culture by plate count is limited, because it is often several orders of magnitude less than the number of living bacteria actually present. Most of the bacteria are in "viable but non-culturable" (VBNC) state, whose cells are intact and alive and can resuscitate when surrounding conditions are more favorable. The most exciting recent development in resuscitating VBNC bacteria is a bacterial cytokine, namely, the resuscitation-promoting factor (Rpf), secreted by Micrococcus luteus, which promotes the resuscitation and growth of high G+C Gram-positive organisms, including some species of the genus Mycobacterium. However, most of studies deal with VBNC bacteria only from the point of view of medicine and epidemiology. It is therefore of great significance to research whether these VBNC state bacteria also possess some useful environmental capabilities, such as degradation, flocculation, etc. Further studies are needed to elucidate the possible environmental role of the VBNC bacteria, rather than only considering their role as potential pathogens from the point view of epidemiology and public health. We have studied the resuscitation of these VBNC bacteria in polluted environments by adding culture supernatant containing Rpf from M. luteus, and it was found that, as a huge microbial resource, VBNC bacteria could provide important answers to dealing with existing problems of environmental pollution. This mini-review will provide new insight for considering the potentially environmental functions of VBNC bacteria. PMID:23733177

  6. Mobile DNA in obligate intracellular bacteria.

    PubMed

    Bordenstein, Seth R; Reznikoff, William S

    2005-09-01

    The small genomes of obligate intracellular bacteria are often presumed to be impervious to mobile DNA and the fluid genetic processes that drive diversification in free-living bacteria. Categorized by reductive evolution and streamlining, the genomes of some obligate intracellular bacteria manifest striking degrees of stability and gene synteny. However, recent findings from complete genome sequences of obligate intracellular species and their mobile genetic associates favour the abandonment of these wholesale terms for a more complex and tantalizing picture. PMID:16138097

  7. Lactic acid bacteria as probiotics.

    PubMed

    Ljungh, Asa; Wadstrm, Torkel

    2006-09-01

    A number of Lactobacillus species, Bifidobacterium sp, Saccharomyces boulardii, and some other microbes have been proposed as and are used as probiotic strains, i.e. live microorganisms as food supplement in order to benefit health. The health claims range from rather vague as regulation of bowel activity and increasing of well-being to more specific, such as exerting antagonistic effect on the gastroenteric pathogens Clostridium difficile, Campylobacter jejuni, Helicobacter pylori and rotavirus, neutralising food mutagens produced in colon, shifting the immune response towards a Th2 response, and thereby alleviating allergic reactions, and lowering serum cholesterol (Tannock, 2002). Unfortunately, most publications are case reports, uncontrolled studies in humans, or reports of animal or in vitro studies. Whether or not the probiotic strains employed shall be of human origin is a matter of debate but this is not a matter of concern, as long as the strains can be shown to survive the transport in the human gastrointestinal (GI) tract and to colonise the human large intestine. This includes survival in the stressful environment of the stomach - acidic pH and bile - with induction of new genes encoding a number of stress proteins. Since the availability of antioxidants decreases rostrally in the GI tract production of antioxidants by colonic bacteria provides a beneficial effect in scavenging free radicals. LAB strains commonly produce antimicrobial substance(s) with activity against the homologous strain, but LAB strains also often produce microbicidal substances with effect against gastric and intestinal pathogens and other microbes, or compete for cell surface and mucin binding sites. This could be the mechanism behind reports that some probiotic strains inhibit or decrease translocation of bacteria from the gut to the liver. A protective effect against cancer development can be ascribed to binding of mutagens by intestinal bacteria, reduction of the enzymes beta-glucuronidase and beta-glucosidase, and deconjugation of bile acids, or merely by enhancing the immune system of the host. The latter has attracted considerable interest, and LAB have been tested in several clinical trials in allergic diseases. Characteristics ascribed to a probiotic strain are in general strain specific, and individual strains have to be tested for each property. Survival of strains during production, packing and storage of a viable cell mass has to be tested and declared. PMID:16875422

  8. Bacteria cell properties and grain size impact on bacteria transport and deposition in porous media.

    PubMed

    Bai, Hongjuan; Cochet, Nelly; Pauss, Andr; Lamy, Edvina

    2016-03-01

    The simultaneous role of bacteria cell properties and porous media grain size on bacteria transport and deposition behavior was investigated in this study. Transport column experiments and numerical HYDRUS-1D simulations of three bacteria with different cell properties (Escherichia coli, Klebsiella oxytoca, and Rhodococcus rhodochrous) were carried out on two sandy media with different grain sizes, under saturated steady state flow conditions. Each bacterium was characterized by cell size and shape, cell motility, electrophoretic mobility, zeta potential, hydrophobicity and potential of interaction with the sand surface. Cell characteristics affected bacteria transport behavior in the fine sand, but similar bacteria breakthroughs and retardation factors observed in the coarse sand, indicated that bacteria transport was more depended on grain size than on bacteria cell properties. Retention decreased with increasing hydrophobicity and increased with increasing electrophoretic mobility of bacteria for both sand. The increasing sand grain size resulted in a decrease of bacteria retention, except for the motile E. coli, indicating that retention of this strain was more dependent on cell motility than on the sand grain size. Bacteria deposition coefficients obtained from numerical simulations of the retention profiles indicated that straining was an important mechanism affecting bacteria deposition of E. coli and Klebsiella sp., in the fine sand, but the attachment had the same importance as straining for R. rhodochrous. The results obtained in the coarse sand did not permit to discriminate the predominant mechanism of bacteria deposition and the relative implication of bacteria cell properties of this process. PMID:26705829

  9. Viscosity of suspension of swimming bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aranson, Igor; Sokolov, Andrey

    2010-03-01

    Measurements of the shear viscosity in suspensions of swimming Bacillus subtilis in free standing liquid films have revealed that the viscosity can decrease by up to a factor of seven compared to the viscosity of the same liquid without bacteria or with non-motile bacteria. The reduction in viscosity is observed in two complimentary experiments: one studying the decay of a large vortex induced by a moving probe and another measuring the viscous torque on a rotating magnetic particle immersed in the film. The viscosity depends on the concentration and swimming speed of the bacteria. The viscosity reduction is attributed to the effect of self- propulsion of swimming bacteria.

  10. Survival of soil bacteria during prolonged desiccation.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, M.; Alexander, M.

    1973-01-01

    A determination was made of the kinds and numbers of bacteria surviving when two soils were maintained in the laboratory under dry conditions for more than half a year. Certain non-spore-forming bacteria were found to survive in the dry condition for long periods. A higher percentage of drought-tolerant than drought-sensitive bacteria was able to grow at low water activities. When they were grown in media with high salt concentrations, bacteria generally became more tolerant of prolonged drought and they persisted longer. The percent of cells in a bacterial population that remained viable when exposed to drought stress varied with the stage of growth.

  11. Spectroscopic diagnostics for bacteria in biologic sample

    SciTech Connect

    El-Sayed, Mostafa A.; El-Sayed, Ivan H.

    2002-01-01

    A method to analyze and diagnose specific bacteria in a biologic sample using spectroscopy is disclosed. The method includes obtaining the spectra of a biologic sample of a non-infected patient for use as a reference, subtracting the reference from the spectra of an infected sample, and comparing the fingerprint regions of the resulting differential spectrum with reference spectra of bacteria in saline. Using this diagnostic technique, specific bacteria can be identified sooner and without culturing, bacteria-specific antibiotics can be prescribed sooner, resulting in decreased likelihood of antibiotic resistance and an overall reduction of medical costs.

  12. Bacteria, inflammation, and colon cancer

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Liying; Pei, Zhiheng

    2006-01-01

    Our relationship with the colonic bacterial flora has long been viewed as benign, but recent studies suggest that this symbiosis has risks as well as benefits. This relationship requires that the host not only provide a supportive environment for the symbiotic bacteria, but also actively maintain intact mechanisms for properly managing the physiologic stresses that are closely associated with the symbiont’s essential survival functions. Failure to do so breaches the host-symbiont contract, and can result in serious effects on the health of the host. Recent investigations that employ several knockout mouse models reveal the consequences of genetic deficiency in the host regarding these mechanisms, and the latent, pro-inflammatory, tumorigenic nature of normal bacterial flora. Further study of the interactions between normal bacterial flora and hosts could shed light on the etiologies and pathogenesis of inflammatory diseases and related cancers, with implications for human health. PMID:17106919

  13. Oxygen sensitivity of methanogenic bacteria.

    PubMed

    Kiener, A; Leisinger, T

    1983-01-01

    Exponentially growing cells of five methanogenic bacteria were plated on solid media with efficiencies greater than 80%. This permitted the determination of the oxygen sensitivity of these strains under standardized conditions involving the exposure of suspensions of starved cells in non-reduced buffer to air. The death curves of Methanobacterium thermoautotrophicum, Methanobrevibacter arboriphilus and Methanosarcina barkeri were biphasic. Exposures to air for up to 30 h were without effect on the number of colony forming units whereas longer periods of contact with oxygen led to a rapid decrease in viability. In Methanococcus voltae and Methanococcus vannielii the number of surviving cells upon exposure to air dropped exponentially without lag leading to 99% kill within 10 h. PMID:23194731

  14. Bacteria in chronic maxillary sinusitis.

    PubMed

    Karma, P; Jokipii, L; Sipilä, P; Luotonen, J; Jokipii, A M

    1979-07-01

    Sixty-one chronically inflamed maxillary sinuses produced 131 bacterial strains from mucosal pieces that were taken during a Caldwell-Luc operation and cultured aerobically and anaerobically. Sinus secretions showed only 62 and nasal secretions 106 bacterial strains. Fourteen mucosal strains, including 11 Haemophilus influenzae, grew heavily. None of 24 mucosal anaerobes showed heavy growth. Of 52 antral mucosae with culturable bacteria, 37 disclosed mixed and 15 pure growth. The bacteriological characteristics of the diseased sinus and the nose did not correlate. The duration or extent of the disease, the macroscopic appearance of the diseased sinus, or the presence or absence of allergy were unrelated to bacteriological findings, except that H influenzae was concentrated in purulent sinuses. Intraoperative culture of antral mucosa seems to give the most reliable picture of the bacteriological condition in chronic maxillary sinusitis. PMID:313206

  15. Single Bacteria as Turing Machines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bos, Julia; Zang, Qiucen; Vyawahare, Saurabh; Austin, Robert

    2014-03-01

    In Allan Turing's famous 1950 paper on Computing Machinery and Intelligence, he started with the provocative statement: ``I propose to consider the question, `Can machines think?' This should begin with definitions of the meaning of the terms `machine' and `think'.'' In our own work on exploring the way that organisms respond to stress and evolve, it seems at times as if they come to remarkably fast solutions to problems, indicating some sort of very clever computational machinery. I'll discuss how it would appear that bacteria can indeed create a form of a Turing Machine, the first example of a computer, and how they might use this algorithm to do rapid evolution to solve a genomics problem.

  16. Flow cytometric viability assessment and transmission electron microscopic morphological study of bacteria in glycerol.

    PubMed

    Saegeman, Veroniek S M; De Vos, Rita; Tebaldi, Nilvanira D; van der Wolf, Jan M; Bergervoet, Jan H W; Verhaegen, Jan; Lismont, Daniel; Verduyckt, Bert; Ectors, Nadine L

    2007-02-01

    Human cadaveric skin allografts are used in the treatment of burns and can be preserved in glycerol at high concentrations. Previously, glycerol has been attributed some antimicrobial effect. In an experimental set-up, we aimed at investigating this effect of prolonged incubation of bacteria in 85% glycerol. Staphylococcus epidermidis, Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Bacillus subtilis were incubated in 85% glycerol. The influence of duration of incubation and temperature on ultrastructure and viability were investigated. Unstressed cultures served as controls. Survival was studied after 24-36 h and 10 days incubation in 85% glycerol at 4 degrees C and 36 degrees C with transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and flow cytometry using viability stains indicating membrane damage (SYTO9, propidium iodide) or esterase activity (carboxyfluorescein diacetate). TEM clearly demonstrated variability in morphological changes of bacteria suggesting different mechanisms of damage. Viability stains supported these findings with faster declining viable cell populations in 85% glycerol at 36 degrees C compared with 4 degrees C. Both methods demonstrated that Gram-negative species were more susceptible than Gram-positive species. In conclusion, 85% glycerol may have some additional antimicrobial effect. Temperature is an important factor herein and Gram-negatives are most susceptible. The latter finding probably reflects the difference in cell wall composition between Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. PMID:17234033

  17. Synergistic Antimicrobial Activity of Camellia sinensis and Juglans regia against Multidrug-Resistant Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Farooqui, Amber; Khan, Adnan; Borghetto, Ilaria; Kazmi, Shahana U.; Rubino, Salvatore; Paglietti, Bianca

    2015-01-01

    Synergistic combinations of antimicrobial agents with different mechanisms of action have been introduced as more successful strategies to combat infections involving multidrug resistant (MDR) bacteria. In this study, we investigated synergistic antimicrobial activity of Camellia sinensis and Juglans regia which are commonly used plants with different antimicrobial agents. Antimicrobial susceptibility of 350 Gram-positive and Gram-negative strains belonging to 10 different bacterial species, was tested against Camellia sinensis and Juglans regia extracts. Minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) were determined by agar dilution and microbroth dilution assays. Plant extracts were tested for synergistic antimicrobial activity with different antimicrobial agents by checkerboard titration, Etest/agar incorporation assays, and time kill kinetics. Extract treated and untreated bacteria were subjected to transmission electron microscopy to see the effect on bacterial cell morphology. Camellia sinensis extract showed higher antibacterial activity against MDR S. Typhi, alone and in combination with nalidixic acid, than to susceptible isolates.” We further explore anti-staphylococcal activity of Juglans regia that lead to the changes in bacterial cell morphology indicating the cell wall of Gram-positive bacteria as possible target of action. The synergistic combination of Juglans regia and oxacillin reverted oxacillin resistance of methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) strains in vitro. This study provides novel information about antimicrobial and synergistic activity of Camellia sinensis and Juglans regia against MDR pathogens PMID:25719410

  18. Synergistic antimicrobial activity of Camellia sinensis and Juglans regia against multidrug-resistant bacteria.

    PubMed

    Farooqui, Amber; Khan, Adnan; Borghetto, Ilaria; Kazmi, Shahana U; Rubino, Salvatore; Paglietti, Bianca

    2015-01-01

    Synergistic combinations of antimicrobial agents with different mechanisms of action have been introduced as more successful strategies to combat infections involving multidrug resistant (MDR) bacteria. In this study, we investigated synergistic antimicrobial activity of Camellia sinensis and Juglans regia which are commonly used plants with different antimicrobial agents. Antimicrobial susceptibility of 350 Gram-positive and Gram-negative strains belonging to 10 different bacterial species, was tested against Camellia sinensis and Juglans regia extracts. Minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) were determined by agar dilution and microbroth dilution assays. Plant extracts were tested for synergistic antimicrobial activity with different antimicrobial agents by checkerboard titration, Etest/agar incorporation assays, and time kill kinetics. Extract treated and untreated bacteria were subjected to transmission electron microscopy to see the effect on bacterial cell morphology. Camellia sinensis extract showed higher antibacterial activity against MDR S. Typhi, alone and in combination with nalidixic acid, than to susceptible isolates." We further explore anti-staphylococcal activity of Juglans regia that lead to the changes in bacterial cell morphology indicating the cell wall of Gram-positive bacteria as possible target of action. The synergistic combination of Juglans regia and oxacillin reverted oxacillin resistance of methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) strains in vitro. This study provides novel information about antimicrobial and synergistic activity of Camellia sinensis and Juglans regia against MDR pathogens. PMID:25719410

  19. Antimicrobial activities of novel cultivable bacteria isolated from marine sponge Tedania anhelans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Zhen; Zhao, Jing; Ke, Caihuan; Wang, Dexiang

    2013-05-01

    Marine sponge Tedania anhelans distributes throughout the intertidal zone of Fujian, southeastern China, and is a potential source of natural bioactive products. The sponge harbors a large number of bacterial groups that have been identified using various techniques, including fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH). Fractionation of dissociated sponge allowed isolation of 25 bacterial species. Based on 16S rRNA gene sequencing, phylogenetic analysis attributed most of these eubacteria to α- Proteobacteria, γ- Proteobacteria, Cytophaga / Flavobacterium / Bacteroidetes (CFB group), and the family Bacillaceae of Gram-positive bacteria. In sequence similarity, five putatively novel species were identified with less than 98% similarity to other strains in the NCBI database. Tests for antimicrobial activities were performed against Gram-positive bacteria, Gram-negative bacteria, fungi, antitumor indicators Escherichia coli 343/591 (with DNA repair deficiency), regular E. coli 343/636 (with different DNA repair capacity), and 10 bacterial isolates exhibited inhibitory bioactivities. Among these strains, three isolates were detected involving function gene NRPS-A domains, which were most closely related to the amino acid sequences of linear gramicidin synthetase and pyoverdine synthetase. These results contribute to our knowledge of the microbes associated with marine sponges and further reveal novel bacterial resources for the screening of bioactive marine natural products.

  20. [Utility of MALDI-TOF MS for the identification of anaerobic bacteria].

    PubMed

    Zrate, Mariela S; Romano, Vanesa; Nievas, Jimena; Smayevsky, Jorgelina

    2014-01-01

    The analysis by MALDI-TOF MS (Matrix-assited laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry) has become a reference method for the identification of microorganisms in Clinical Microbiology. However, data on some groups of microorganisms are still controversial. The aim of this study is to determine the utility of MALDI-TOF MS for the identification of clinical isolates of anaerobic bacteria. One-hundred and six anaerobic bacteria isolates were analyzed by MALDI-TOF MS and by conventional biochemical tests. In those cases where identification by conventional methodology was not applicable or in the face of discordance between sequencing methodologies, 16 S rRNA gene sequence analysis was performed. The conventional method and MALDI-TOF MS agreed at genus and species level by 95.3 %. Concordance in gram-negative bacilli was 91.4% and 100% among gram-positive bacilli; there was also concordance both in the 8 isolates studied in gram-positive cocci and in the single gram-negative cocci included. The data obtained in this study demonstrate that MALDI-TOF MS offers the possibility of adequate identification of anaerobic bacteria. PMID:25011591