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Sample records for bacterial antigen detection

  1. Bacterial antigen detection in body fluids: methods for rapid antigen concentration and reduction of nonspecific reactions.

    PubMed Central

    Doskeland, S O; Berdal, B P

    1980-01-01

    We sought procedures which would allow a rapid concentration in high yield of bacterial antigens from tissue fluids of patients and which could be applied also to protein-rich fluids like serum. Ethanol precipitation at a subzero temperature with albumin added as an antigen coprecipitant made it possible to achieve a more than 20-fold concentration of antigen in 15 min and a 200-fold concentration in 45 min. Heat-stable antigens could be concentrated from protein-rich fluids (like serum) after the sample had been deproteinized by boiling. Such heating (100 degrees C, 3 min) also liberated bacterial polysaccharides from antibody complexes and elminated the nonspecific interference of serum in enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. PMID:7372801

  2. Comparison of staphylococcal coagglutination, latex agglutination, and counterimmunoelectrophoresis for bacterial antigen detection.

    PubMed Central

    Thirumoorthi, M C; Dajani, A S

    1979-01-01

    Soluble antigens of Haemophilus influenzae type b, Streptococcus pneumoniae, Neisseria meningitidis, and group B streptococcus were looked for in cerebrospinal fluid, serum, and urine by using the staphylococcal coagglutination test, latex agglutination test, and counterimmunoelectrophoresis. The staphylococcal coaggultination and latex agglutination tests were more sensitive than counterimmunoelectrophoresis in identifying antigens of H. influenzae type b, S. pneumoniae, and N. meningitidis. None of the three tests successfully detected group B streptococcal antigens in body fluids. Nonspecific reactions noted with the staphylococcal coagglutination test could be usually eliminated after premixing test specimens with soluble protein A. PMID:34622

  3. Value of bacterial antigen detection in the diagnostic yield of transthoracic needle aspiration in severe community acquired pneumonia.

    PubMed Central

    Bella, F.; Tort, J.; Morera, M. A.; Espaulella, J.; Armengol, J.

    1993-01-01

    BACKGROUND--Transthoracic needle aspiration (TNA) with an ultrathin needle is a safe and highly specific procedure for obtaining a diagnosis in bacterial pneumonias, but its sensitivity is at best 70%. A study was performed to assess whether Streptococcus pneumoniae and Haemophilus influenzae type b antigen detection by latex agglutination from the TNA sample enhanced the diagnostic yield. METHODS--Blood cultures, TNA with an ultrathin needle (culture, Gram stain, and latex agglutination), serological tests, and pneumococcal antigen detection in the urine by counterimmunoelectrophoresis were performed in samples from 18 of 23 consecutive patients with severe community acquired pneumonia. RESULTS--The causative organism was identified in 16 cases (88%): S pneumoniae (10 cases), S pneumoniae plus H influenzae (two cases), Legionella pneumophila (three cases), and Mycoplasma pneumoniae (one case). The investigation of antigens by latex agglutination in the pulmonary aspirate increased the diagnostic yield of TNA from 50% to 78% and provided a rapid diagnosis (in less than two hours) with therapeutic implications in seven cases. Its effectiveness was not modified by prior antibiotic therapy. CONCLUSIONS--A latex agglutination test on the pulmonary aspirate enhances the diagnostic yield of TNA in severe community acquired pneumonia. PMID:8303628

  4. Antigen detection systems

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Infectious agents or their constituent parts (antigens or nucleic acids) can be detected in fresh, frozen, or fixed tissue using a variety of direct or indirect assays. The assays can be modified to yield the greatest sensitivity and specificity but in most cases a particular methodology is chosen ...

  5. Antigen detection systems

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Infectious agents or their constituent parts (antigens or nucleic acids) can be detected in fresh, frozen, or fixed tissues or other specimens, using a variety of direct or indirect assays. The assays can be modified to yield the greatest sensitivity and specificity but in most cases a particular m...

  6. Relationship between antigen concentration and bacterial load in Pacific salmon with bacterial kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Hamel, Owen S; Anderson, James J

    2002-08-29

    Using data collected to test spawning female Pacific salmon (Oncorhynchus kisutch and O. tshawytscha for the presence and severity of bacterial kidney disease (BKD), a mathematical model of the relationship between bacterial load and antigen concentration in tissues and ovarian fluid is developed. Renibacterium salmoninarum, the causative agent of BKD, secretes large amounts of a 57 kDa protein ('p57'), its major soluble antigen, which eventually breaks down or is otherwise removed from free circulation. Bacterial load and soluble antigen concentration in tissues are strong indicators of fish health, while in ovarian fluid they are predictors of the success of offspring. Model results indicate either an exponentially increasing antigen removal rate or an exponentially decreasing per-bacterium antigen secretion rate with increasing antigen concentration. Possible mechanisms underlying the observed relationship include a nonlinear increasing autolytic rate of the 'p57' antigen and a bacterium-antigen interaction threshold which prevents bacterial antigen secretion. PMID:12363089

  7. Optoacoustic sensing of ocular bacterial antigen using targeted gold nanorods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maswadi, Saher; Page, Leland; Woodward, Lee; Glickman, Randolph D.; Barsalou, Norman

    2008-02-01

    Bacterial contamination can be detected using a minimally invasive optical method, based on laser-induced optoacoustic spectroscopy, to probe for specific antigens associated with a specific infectious agent. As a model system, we have used a surface antigen (Ag), isolated from Chlamydia trachomatis, and a complementary antibody (Ab). A preparation of 0.2 mg/ml of monoclonal Ab specific to the C. trachomatis surface Ag was conjugated to gold nanorods using standard commercial reagents, in order to produce a targeted contrast agent with a strong optoacoustic signal. The C. trachomatis Ag was absorbed in standard plastic microwells, and the binding of the complementary Ab-nanorod conjugate was tested in an immunoaffinity assay. Optoacoustic signals were elicited from the bound nanorods, using an optical parametric oscillator (OPO) laser system as the optical pump. The wavelength tuneability of the OPO optimized the spectroscopic measurement by exciting the nanorods at their optical absorption maxima. Optoacoustic responses were measured in the microwells using a probe beam deflection technique. Immunoaffinity assays were performed on several dilutions of purified C. trachomatis antigen ranging from 50 μg/ml to 1 pg/ml, in order to determine the detection limit for the optoacoustic-based assay. Only when the antigen was present, and the complementary Ab-NR reagent was introduced into the microwell, was an enhanced optoacoustic signal obtained, which indicated specific binding of the Ab-NR complex. The limit of detection with the current system design is between 1 and 5 pg/ml of bacterial Ag.

  8. Bacterial vectors for the delivery of tumor antigens.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yan; Toussaint, Bertrand; Le Gouëllec, Audrey

    2014-01-01

    The use of bacterial vectors, which offer ease of production and efficiency, has become an important mechanism for the delivery of protein antigens to antigen-presenting cells (APCs) in vivo. Proof of concept studies has been carried out utilizing different bacteria in various cancer models with some in clinical trials. Here we described the way to prepare Pseudomonas aeruginosa (P. aeruginosa) vaccines based on a virulence-attenuated strain to test the efficacy of different fragments of a well-known tumor antigen. This protocol could be applied to efficacy studies in murine models of human cancers. PMID:24619697

  9. Immunoproteomics: The Key to Discovery of New Vaccine Antigens Against Bacterial Respiratory Infections

    PubMed Central

    Dennehy, Ruth; McClean, Siobhán

    2012-01-01

    The increase in antibiotic resistance and the shortage of new antimicrobials to prevent difficult bacterial infections underlines the importance of prophylactic therapies to prevent infection by bacterial pathogens. Vaccination has reduced the incidence of many serious diseases, including respiratory bacterial infections. However, there are many pathogens for which no vaccine is available and some vaccines are not effective among all age groups or among immunocompromised individuals. Immunoproteomics is a powerful technique which has been used to identify potential vaccine candidates to protect against pathogenic bacteria. The combination of proteomics with the detection of immunoreactive antigens using serum highlights immunogenic proteins that are expressed during infection. This is particularly useful when patient serum is used as the antigens that promote a humoral response during human infection are identified. This review outlines examples of vaccine candidates that have been identified using immunoproteomics and have successfully protected animals against challenge when tested in immunisation studies. Many immunoreactive proteins are common to several unrelated pathogens, however some of these are not always protective in animal immunisation and challenge studies. Furthermore, examples of well-established immunogens, including Bordetella pertussis antigen FHA were not detected in immunoproteomics studies, indicating that this technology may underrepresent the immunoreactive proteins in a pathogen. Although only one step in the pathway towards an efficacious approved vaccine, immunoproteomics is an important technology in the identification of novel vaccine antigens. PMID:23305366

  10. Detection of Renibacterium salmoninarum antigen in migrating adult chum salmon (Oncorhynchus keta) in Japan.

    PubMed

    Sakai, M; Atsuta, S; Kobayashi, M

    1992-01-01

    Renibacterium salmoninarum antigen was detected in the kidney of migrating chum salmon (Oncorhynchus keta) using the indirect dot blot assay and indirect fluorescent antibody test. The adult chum salmon had migrated into a bay in which cultured coho salmon infected with R. salmoninarum were present. Antigen was detected in 5% of the chum salmon although they did not have clinical signs of bacterial kidney disease (BKD). This report describes the first case of R. salmoninarum antigen detection among wild chum salmon populations in eastern Asia. PMID:1548789

  11. Bacterial detection: from microscope to smartphone.

    PubMed

    Gopinath, Subash C B; Tang, Thean-Hock; Chen, Yeng; Citartan, Marimuthu; Lakshmipriya, Thangavel

    2014-10-15

    The ubiquitous nature of bacteria enables them to survive in a wide variety of environments. Hence, the rise of various pathogenic species that are harmful to human health raises the need for the development of accurate sensing systems. Sensing systems are necessary for diagnosis and epidemiological control of pathogenic organism, especially in the food-borne pathogen and sanitary water treatment facility' bacterial populations. Bacterial sensing for the purpose of diagnosis can function in three ways: bacterial morphological visualization, specific detection of bacterial component and whole cell detection. This paper provides an overview of the currently available bacterial detection systems that ranges from microscopic observation to state-of-the-art smartphone-based detection. PMID:24836016

  12. A Bacterial Glycoengineered Antigen for Improved Serodiagnosis of Porcine Brucellosis.

    PubMed

    Cortina, María E; Balzano, Rodrigo E; Rey Serantes, Diego A; Caillava, Ana J; Elena, Sebastián; Ferreira, A C; Nicola, Ana M; Ugalde, Juan E; Comerci, Diego J; Ciocchini, Andrés E

    2016-06-01

    Brucellosis is a highly zoonotic disease that affects animals and human beings. Brucella suis is the etiological agent of porcine brucellosis and one of the major human brucellosis pathogens. Laboratory diagnosis of porcine brucellosis mainly relies on serological tests, and it has been widely demonstrated that serological assays based on the detection of anti O-polysaccharide antibodies are the most sensitive tests. Here, we validate a recombinant glycoprotein antigen, an N-formylperosamine O-polysaccharide-protein conjugate (OAg-AcrA), for diagnosis of porcine brucellosis. An indirect immunoassay based on the detection of anti-O-polysaccharide IgG antibodies was developed coupling OAg-AcrA to enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay plates (glyco-iELISA). To validate the assay, 563 serum samples obtained from experimentally infected and immunized pigs, as well as animals naturally infected with B. suis biovar 1 or 2, were tested. A receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis was performed, and based on this analysis, the optimum cutoff value was 0.56 (relative reactivity), which resulted in a diagnostic sensitivity and specificity of 100% and 99.7%, respectively. A cutoff value of 0.78 resulted in a test sensitivity of 98.4% and a test specificity of 100%. Overall, our results demonstrate that the glyco-iELISA is highly accurate for diagnosis of porcine brucellosis, improving the diagnostic performance of current serological tests. The recombinant glycoprotein OAg-AcrA can be produced in large homogeneous batches in a standardized way, making it an ideal candidate for further validation as a universal antigen for diagnosis of "smooth" brucellosis in animals and humans. PMID:26984975

  13. An O Antigen Capsule Modulates Bacterial Pathogenesis in Shigella sonnei

    PubMed Central

    Caboni, Mariaelena; Pédron, Thierry; Rossi, Omar; Goulding, David; Pickard, Derek; Citiulo, Francesco; MacLennan, Calman A.; Dougan, Gordon; Thomson, Nicholas R.; Saul, Allan; Sansonetti, Philippe J.; Gerke, Christiane

    2015-01-01

    Shigella is the leading cause for dysentery worldwide. Together with several virulence factors employed for invasion, the presence and length of the O antigen (OAg) of the lipopolysaccharide (LPS) plays a key role in pathogenesis. S. flexneri 2a has a bimodal OAg chain length distribution regulated in a growth-dependent manner, whereas S. sonnei LPS comprises a monomodal OAg. Here we reveal that S. sonnei, but not S. flexneri 2a, possesses a high molecular weight, immunogenic group 4 capsule, characterized by structural similarity to LPS OAg. We found that a galU mutant of S. sonnei, that is unable to produce a complete LPS with OAg attached, can still assemble OAg material on the cell surface, but a galU mutant of S. flexneri 2a cannot. High molecular weight material not linked to the LPS was purified from S. sonnei and confirmed by NMR to contain the specific sugars of the S. sonnei OAg. Deletion of genes homologous to the group 4 capsule synthesis cluster, previously described in Escherichia coli, abolished the generation of the high molecular weight OAg material. This OAg capsule strongly affects the virulence of S. sonnei. Uncapsulated knockout bacteria were highly invasive in vitro and strongly inflammatory in the rabbit intestine. But, the lack of capsule reduced the ability of S. sonnei to resist complement-mediated killing and to spread from the gut to peripheral organs. In contrast, overexpression of the capsule decreased invasiveness in vitro and inflammation in vivo compared to the wild type. In conclusion, the data indicate that in S. sonnei expression of the capsule modulates bacterial pathogenesis resulting in balanced capabilities to invade and persist in the host environment. PMID:25794007

  14. Detection of O antigens in Escherichia coli

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Lipopolysaccharide on the surface of Escherichia coli constitute the O antigens, which are important virulence factors that are targets of both the innate and adaptive immune system and play a major role in host-pathogen interactions. O antigens that are responsible for antigenic specificity of the ...

  15. [Towards bacterial detection in labile blood products].

    PubMed

    Morel, P

    2005-06-01

    Bacterial contamination of blood components represents today the highest infectious risk in blood transfusion, the risk is particularly high when it affects platelet concentrates. The prevention methods developed over the past ten years (donor selection, phlebotomy site preparation, first 30 ml diversion, systematic leuko-reduction...) which aimed at limiting the introduction of bacteria in donations and bacterial proliferation, has reduced the risk of transfusion reaction due to the bacterial contamination. Improving strategies for reducing the risks of bacterial contamination is one of the priorities of the French National Blood Transfusion Service (l'Etablissement français du sang - EFS). It is essential to improve existent prevention methods and develop the implication of all the actors (from donation to transfusion) involved in the prevention of this risk. Bacterial detection or pathogens inactivation are now available and are able to reduce (for detection) or prevent (for inactivation) the occurrence of reaction due to bacterial contamination of PC. Up to now, the choice is in favour of bacterial detection. Three methods (BacT/Alert, BioMerieux; eBDS, Pall; ScanSystem, Hemosystem) of detection of bacterial contamination in PC can be generalised now. Adaptations, need for their implementation are acceptable, especially concerning PC availability. PMID:15894499

  16. Biosensors for Whole-Cell Bacterial Detection

    PubMed Central

    Rushworth, Jo V.; Hirst, Natalie A.; Millner, Paul A.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Bacterial pathogens are important targets for detection and identification in medicine, food safety, public health, and security. Bacterial infection is a common cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. In spite of the availability of antibiotics, these infections are often misdiagnosed or there is an unacceptable delay in diagnosis. Current methods of bacterial detection rely upon laboratory-based techniques such as cell culture, microscopic analysis, and biochemical assays. These procedures are time-consuming and costly and require specialist equipment and trained users. Portable stand-alone biosensors can facilitate rapid detection and diagnosis at the point of care. Biosensors will be particularly useful where a clear diagnosis informs treatment, in critical illness (e.g., meningitis) or to prevent further disease spread (e.g., in case of food-borne pathogens or sexually transmitted diseases). Detection of bacteria is also becoming increasingly important in antibioterrorism measures (e.g., anthrax detection). In this review, we discuss recent progress in the use of biosensors for the detection of whole bacterial cells for sensitive and earlier identification of bacteria without the need for sample processing. There is a particular focus on electrochemical biosensors, especially impedance-based systems, as these present key advantages in terms of ease of miniaturization, lack of reagents, sensitivity, and low cost. PMID:24982325

  17. Effect of Lewis blood group antigen expression on bacterial adherence to COS-1 cells.

    PubMed Central

    Gaffney, R A; Schaeffer, A J; Anderson, B E; Duncan, J L

    1994-01-01

    Epithelial cells from secretor individuals demonstrate decreased bacterial adherence compared with cells from nonsecretors. Lewis blood group antigen expression is one component of the secretor/nonsecretor phenotype and several epidemiologic studies have suggested a link between Lewis blood group antigen phenotype and susceptibility to urinary tract infections. In this study, we examined the possibility that the expression of the difucosylated Lewis blood group determinants, Leb and Ley (associated with the secretor phenotype), made cells less susceptible to Escherichia coli adherence by masking receptors for pili. COS-1 cells, which do not produce Lewis (Lea, Leb, Le(x), and Ley) blood group antigens, were used as target cells for bacterial adherence. The surface blood group antigen expression pattern of the cells was then modified by cotransfection with plasmids containing DNA inserts encoding alpha (1,2)-fucosyltransferase and alpha (1,3)- and alpha (1,4)-fucosyltransferases, resulting in the expression of Leb and Ley. E. coli HB101 expressing various adhesins (type 1, PapJ96, PapIA2, PapAD110, Prs, and S) from recombinant plasmids bound equally well to untransfected cells and transfected cells expressing Lea and Le(x) (nonsecretor phenotype) and Leb and Ley (secretor phenotype) antigens. We conclude that the presence of Leb and Ley antigens on cells from secretors does not alone mask receptors for E. coli pili or hinder bacterial adherence. PMID:8005692

  18. Point detection of bacterial and viral pathogens using oral samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malamud, Daniel

    2008-04-01

    Oral samples, including saliva, offer an attractive alternative to serum or urine for diagnostic testing. This is particularly true for point-of-use detection systems. The various types of oral samples that have been reported in the literature are presented here along with the wide variety of analytes that have been measured in saliva and other oral samples. The paper focuses on utilizing point-detection of infectious disease agents, and presents work from our group on a rapid test for multiple bacterial and viral pathogens by monitoring a series of targets. It is thus possible in a single oral sample to identify multiple pathogens based on specific antigens, nucleic acids, and host antibodies to those pathogens. The value of such a technology for detecting agents of bioterrorism at remote sites is discussed.

  19. Analysis of protective antigen peptide binding motifs using bacterial display technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarkes, Deborah A.; Dorsey, Brandi L.; Stratis-Cullum, Dimitra N.

    2015-05-01

    In today's fast-paced world, a new biological threat could emerge at any time, necessitating a prompt, reliable, inexpensive detection reagent in each case. Combined with magnetic-activated cell sorting (MACS), bacterial display technology makes it possible to isolate selective, high affinity peptide reagents in days to weeks. Utilizing the eCPX display scaffold is also a rapid way to screen potential peptide reagents. Peptide affinity reagents for protective antigen (PA) of the biothreat Bacillus anthracis were previously discovered using bacterial display. Bioinformatics analysis resulted in the consensus sequence WXCFTC. Additionally, we have discovered PA binding peptides with a WW motif, one of which, YGLHPWWKNAPIGQR, can pull down PA from 1% human serum. The strength of these two motifs combined, to obtain a WWCFTC consensus, is assessed here using Fluorescence Activated Cell Sorting (FACS). While monitoring binding to PA, overall expression of the display scaffold was assessed using the YPet Mona expression control tag (YPet), and specificity was assessed by binding to Streptavidin R-Phycoerythrin (SAPE). The importance of high YPet binding is highlighted as many of the peptides in one of the three replicate experiments fell below our 80% binding threshold. We demonstrate that it is preferable to discard this experiment, due to questionable expression of the peptide itself, than to try to normalize for relative expression. The peptides containing the WWCFTC consensus were of higher affinity and greater specificity than the peptides containing the WW consensus alone, validating further investigation to optimize known PA binders.

  20. Quantum dot based fluorometric detection of cancer TF-antigen.

    PubMed

    Li, Nan; Chow, Ari M; Ganesh, Hashwin V S; Brown, Ian R; Kerman, Kagan

    2013-10-15

    Cancer is a major global health challenge that would benefit from advances in screening methods for early detection that are rapid and low cost. TF-antigen is a tumor-associated antigen displayed on cell surface proteins of a high percentage of human carcinomas. Here we present a fluorometric bioassay for TF-antigen (galactose-β-(1→3)-N-acetyl-d-galactosamine) that utilizes quantum dot (QD) technology coupled with magnetic beads for rapid detection of TF-antigen at high sensitivity (10(-7) M range). In the competitive bioassay, 4-aminophenyl β-d-galactopyranoside (4-APG) conjugated to QDs competes with TF-antigen for binding sites on peanut agglutinin (PNA) that is immobilized on magnetic beads. The bioassay is specific and ultrasensitive in the environment of complex protein mixtures, demonstrating its potential applicability for the screening of clinical samples. PMID:23980999

  1. Mini-review: Strategies for Variation and Evolution of Bacterial Antigens

    PubMed Central

    Foley, Janet

    2015-01-01

    Across the eubacteria, antigenic variation has emerged as a strategy to evade host immunity. However, phenotypic variation in some of these antigens also allows the bacteria to exploit variable host niches as well. The specific mechanisms are not shared-derived characters although there is considerable convergent evolution and numerous commonalities reflecting considerations of natural selection and biochemical restraints. Unlike in viruses, mechanisms of antigenic variation in most bacteria involve larger DNA movement such as gene conversion or DNA rearrangement, although some antigens vary due to point mutations or modified transcriptional regulation. The convergent evolution that promotes antigenic variation integrates various evolutionary forces: these include mutations underlying variant production; drift which could remove alleles especially early in infection or during life history phases in arthropod vectors (when the bacterial population size goes through a bottleneck); selection not only for any particular variant but also for the mechanism for the production of variants (i.e., selection for mutability); and overcoming negative selection against variant production. This review highlights the complexities of drivers of antigenic variation, in particular extending evaluation beyond the commonly cited theory of immune evasion. A deeper understanding of the diversity of purpose and mechanisms of antigenic variation in bacteria will contribute to greater insight into bacterial pathogenesis, ecology and coevolution with hosts. PMID:26288700

  2. CD1c tetramers detect ex vivo T cell responses to processed phosphomycoketide antigens

    PubMed Central

    Ly, Dalam; Kasmar, Anne G.; Cheng, Tan-Yun; de Jong, Annemieke; Huang, Shouxiong; Roy, Sobhan; Bhatt, Apoorva; van Summeren, Ruben P.; Altman, John D.; Jacobs, William R.; Adams, Erin J.; Minnaard, Adriaan J.; Porcelli, Steven A.

    2013-01-01

    CD1c is expressed with high density on human dendritic cells (DCs) and B cells, yet its antigen presentation functions are the least well understood among CD1 family members. Using a CD1c-reactive T cell line (DN6) to complete an organism-wide survey of M. tuberculosis lipids, we identified C32 phosphomycoketide (PM) as a previously unknown molecule and a CD1c-presented antigen. CD1c binding and presentation of mycoketide antigens absolutely required the unusual, mycobacteria-specific lipid branching patterns introduced by polyketide synthase 12 (pks12). Unexpectedly, one TCR responded to diversely glycosylated and unglycosylated forms of mycoketide when presented by DCs and B cells. Yet cell-free systems showed that recognition was mediated only by the deglycosylated phosphoantigen. These studies identify antigen processing of a natural bacterial antigen in the human CD1c system, indicating that cells act on glycolipids to generate a highly simplified neoepitope composed of a sugar-free phosphate anion. Using knowledge of this processed antigen, we generated human CD1c tetramers, and demonstrate that CD1c–PM complexes stain T cell receptors (TCRs), providing direct evidence for a ternary interaction among CD1c-lipid-TCR. Furthermore, PM-loaded CD1c tetramers detect fresh human T cells from peripheral blood, demonstrating a polyclonal response to PM antigens in humans ex vivo. PMID:23530121

  3. Real time viability detection of bacterial spores

    DOEpatents

    Vanderberg, Laura A.; Herdendorf, Timothy J.; Obiso, Richard J.

    2003-07-29

    This invention relates to a process for detecting the presence of viable bacterial spores in a sample and to a spore detection system, the process including placing a sample in a germination medium for a period of time sufficient for commitment of any present viable bacterial spores to occur, mixing the sample with a solution of a lanthanide capable of forming a fluorescent complex with dipicolinic acid, and, measuring the sample for the presence of dipicolinic acid, and the system including a germination chamber having inlets from a sample chamber, a germinant chamber and a bleach chamber, the germination chamber further including an outlet through a filtering means, the outlet connected to a detection chamber, the detection chamber having an inlet from a fluorescence promoting metal chamber and the detection chamber including a spectral excitation source and a means of measuring emission spectra from a sample, the detection chamber further connected to a waste chamber. A germination reaction mixture useful for promoting commitment of any viable bacterial spores in a sample including a combination of L-alanine, L-asparagine and D-glucose is also described.

  4. Detection of group B streptococcal antigens in amniotic fluid of rhesus monkeys.

    PubMed Central

    Hemming, V G; London, W T; Smith, L P; Curfman, B L; Fischer, G W; Sever, J L

    1983-01-01

    To simulate group B streptococci (GBS) amniotic fluid infections common in humans and to examine bacterial growth and the appearance of GBS antigens in vivo, GBS were injected into the amniotic cavity of 19 near-term rhesus monkeys. Transabdominal aspirates of amniotic fluid were obtained before bacterial challenge, after 2 and 6 h, and during cesarean section delivery (24 h). Each fluid was quantitatively cultured for GBS. Specimens of amniotic fluid and gastric aspirate from each infant were tested for the presence of GBS antigens with a commercial latex particle agglutination test (Wellcogen Strep B; Wellcome Diagnostics, Dartford, England). To eliminate nonspecific latex particle agglutination reactivity, presumably caused by proteins, a processing procedure was required. Despite active proliferation of bacteria, only 12% of the 2-h amniotic specimens were latex particle agglutination positive. In contrast, 94% of th3 6-h and 100% of the 24-h specimens had detectable antigens, as did 89% of the gastric fluid specimens aspirated from the 19 newborns. Latex particle agglutination tests, after proper processing, will readily detect GBS antigens in amniotic or gastric aspirate fluid from experimentally infected rhesus monkeys. PMID:6348078

  5. Bacterial surface antigens defined by monoclonal antibodies: the methanogens

    SciTech Connect

    Conway de Macario, E.; Macario, A.J.L.; Magarinos, M.C.; Jovell, R.J.; Kandler, O.

    1982-01-01

    The methanogens (MB) are unique microbes of great evolutionary interest with applications in biotechnology-bioengineerings and are important in digestive processes. Their cell-wall composition is distinctively different from that of Eubacteria, e.g. the Methanobacteriaceae possess the peptidoglycan pseudomurein rather than murein. The range of cell-wall compositions among MB and their evolutionary and functional significance is not well known. The authors undertook a systematic study of the MB's surface structure using monoclonal antibodies through the following steps: (1) generation of hybridomas that produce antibody to several MB from 3 of their 4 families; (2) development of immunoenzymatic assays for MB's antigens and antibodies; (3) determination of the fine specificity of monoclonal antibodies by inhibition-blocking tests using cell-wall extracts and compounds of known structure; thus a set of monoclonal probes of predetermined specificity was assembled; and (4) resolution of surface determinants of MB representative of the Methanobacteriaceae using the monoclonal probes. Specific markers of MB strains were characterized. Two epitopes were identified within the pseudomurein molecule.

  6. Synthetic peptides with antigenic specificity for bacterial toxins.

    PubMed

    Sela, M; Arnon, R; Jacob, C O

    1986-01-01

    The attachment of a diphtheria toxin-specific synthetic antigenic determinant and a synthetic adjuvant to a synthetic polymeric carrier led to production of a totally synthetic macromolecule which provoked protective antibodies against diphtheria when administered in aqueous solution. When peptides related to the B subunit of cholera toxin were synthesized and attached to tetanus toxoid, antibodies produced against the conjugate reacted in some but not all cases with intact cholera toxin and (especially with peptide CTP 3, residues 50-64) neutralized toxin reactivity, as tested by permeability in rabbit skin, fluid accumulation in ligated small intestinal loops and adenylate cyclase activation. Polymerization of the peptide without any external carrier, or conjugation with the dipalmityl lysine group, had as good an effect in enhancing the immune response as its attachment to tetanus toxoid. Prior exposure to the carrier suppressed the immune response to the epitope attached to it, whereas prior exposure to the synthetic peptide had a good priming effect when the intact toxin was given; when two different peptides were attached to the same carrier, both were expressed. Antisera against peptide CTP 3 were highly cross-reactive with the heat-labile toxin of Escherichia coli and neutralized it to the same extent as cholera toxin, which is not surprising in view of the great homology between the two proteins. A synthetic oligonucleotide coding for CTP 3 has been used to express the peptide in a form suitable for immunization. It led to a priming effect against the intact cholera toxin. PMID:2426052

  7. [Detection and typing for swine leukocyte antigen].

    PubMed

    Li, Hua; Luo, Huai-Rong; Zhang, Ya-Ping; Qiu, Xiang-Pin; Ye, Chun

    2004-03-01

    Traditionally the cluster of swine leukocyte antigen (SLA) was typed by serological, cytological and biochemical methods. Many special molecular typing methods have been developed with the progress of molecular biological technology, such as PCR-RFLP, PCR-SSCP , MS and DNA sequencing. Here we discussed the advantages and disadvantages of each method based on the polymorphic and conservative (from the functional aspect, such as supertype and supermotif) characteristics of SLA, and illustrated the development of typing for SLA in the future. In addition, we pointed out the editorial mistakes about the serological haplotype of SLA in reference book and emphasized that the accurate polymorphism of SLA-DQB gene must be based on the cloning sequencing. PMID:15639990

  8. Common antigens prediction in bacterial bioweapons: a perspective for vaccine design.

    PubMed

    Jaiswal, Varun; Chauhan, Rajinder S; Rout, Chittaranjan

    2014-01-01

    Bioweapons (BWs) are a serious threat to mankind and the lack of efficient vaccines against bacterial bioweapons (BBWs) further worsens the situation in face of BW attack. Experts believe that difficulties in detection and ease in dissemination of deadly pathogens make BW a better option for attack compared to nuclear weapons. Molecular biology techniques facilitate the use of genetically modified BBWs thus creating uncertainty on which bacteria will be used for BW attack. In the present work, available resources such as proteomic sequences of BBWs, protective antigenic proteins (PAPs) reported in Protegen database and VaxiJen dataset, and immunogenic epitopes in immune epitope database (IEDB) were used to predict potential broad-specific vaccine candidates against BBWs. Comparison of proteomes sequences of BBWs and their analyses using in-house PERL scripts identified 44 conserved proteins and many of them were known to be immunogenic. Comparison of conserved proteins against PAPs identified six either as PAPs or their homologues with a potential of providing protection against multiple pathogens. Similarly, mapping of conserved proteins against experimentally known IEDB epitopes identified six epitopes which had exact epitope match in four proteins including three from earlier predicted six PAPs. These epitopes were also reported to provide protection against several pathogens. In the backdrop of conserved heat shock GroEL protein from Salmonella enterica providing protection against five diverse bacterial pathogens involved in different diseases, and synthetic proteins produced by combination of epitopes from Mycobacterium tuberculosis and 4 viruses providing protection against both bacterium and viruses, the identified putative immunogenic conserved proteins and immune-protective epitopes can further be explored for their potential as broad-specific vaccine candidates against BBWs. PMID:24300889

  9. Sensitive, Rapid Detection of Bacterial Spores

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kern, Roger G.; Venkateswaran, Kasthuri; Chen, Fei; Pickett, Molly; Matsuyama, Asahi

    2009-01-01

    A method of sensitive detection of bacterial spores within delays of no more than a few hours has been developed to provide an alternative to a prior three-day NASA standard culture-based assay. A capability for relatively rapid detection of bacterial spores would be beneficial for many endeavors, a few examples being agriculture, medicine, public health, defense against biowarfare, water supply, sanitation, hygiene, and the food-packaging and medical-equipment industries. The method involves the use of a commercial rapid microbial detection system (RMDS) that utilizes a combination of membrane filtration, adenosine triphosphate (ATP) bioluminescence chemistry, and analysis of luminescence images detected by a charge-coupled-device camera. This RMDS has been demonstrated to be highly sensitive in enumerating microbes (it can detect as little as one colony-forming unit per sample) and has been found to yield data in excellent correlation with those of culture-based methods. What makes the present method necessary is that the specific RMDS and the original protocols for its use are not designed for discriminating between bacterial spores and other microbes. In this method, a heat-shock procedure is added prior to an incubation procedure that is specified in the original RMDS protocols. In this heat-shock procedure (which was also described in a prior NASA Tech Briefs article on enumerating sporeforming bacteria), a sample is exposed to a temperature of 80 C for 15 minutes. Spores can survive the heat shock, but nonspore- forming bacteria and spore-forming bacteria that are not in spore form cannot survive. Therefore, any colonies that grow during incubation after the heat shock are deemed to have originated as spores.

  10. Immune response profile elicited by the model antigen ovalbumin expressed in fusion with the bacterial OprI lipoprotein.

    PubMed

    Basto, Afonso P; Badenes, Marina; Almeida, Sílvia C P; Martins, Carlos; Duarte, António; Santos, Dulce M; Leitão, Alexandre

    2015-03-01

    The use of immunogenic formulations targeting pattern recognition receptors towards modulation of immune responses is a promising strategy to develop better vaccines against infectious and malignant diseases. Molecules targeting TLR2 offer interesting properties that are relevant for vaccine development, including the possibility to covalently attach the lipidic ligands to the antigens. However, the type of immune response elicited by these formulations is still controversial. In this work, we used the model antigen ovalbumin (OVA) expressed in fusion with the bacterial lipoprotein OprI in order to characterize the immunomodulatory properties of this TLR ligand. Murine bone marrow-derived dendritic cells stimulated with OprI-OVA fusion lipoprotein produced high levels of the pro-inflammatory cytokines TNF-α and IL-6 and also IL-10, IL-12(p70) and IL-27, while TGF-β and IL-23 were not detected. Using OT-II and OT-I mice, an enhancement of MHC class II and class I antigen presentation was observed for the OVA antigen in fusion with OprI. Mice immunized by intraperitoneal route with this fusion lipoprotein in prime-boost protocols developed strong specific antibody responses including IgG1, IgG2c, IgG2b, IgG3 and IgE. These results, together with data obtained by restimulation of splenocytes from the immunized mice, point to an immune response profile that does not correspond to a strict Th1 or Th2 polarization. Finally, in a challenge experiment using a melanoma syngeneic mouse model (B16-OVA), prophylactic inoculation with OprI fused with the unrelated antigen eGFP increased the tumor growth, while the fusion with the tumor-associated antigen OVA delayed the tumor growth and increased mice survival. PMID:25467796

  11. Recombinant CHIK virus E1 coat protein of 11 KDa with antigenic domains for the detection of Chikungunya.

    PubMed

    Yathi, Krishna Kammara; Joseph, Julia Mary; Bhasker, Salini; Kumar, Ramesh; Chinnamma, Mohankumar

    2011-09-30

    Chikungunya is an acute febrile illness caused by an alpha virus technically called as CHIK virus. A smaller size of CHIK virus E1 coat protein -11 kDa was expressed in prokaryotic expression system. The recombinant protein was purified and confirmed by western blot analysis. The positions of the antigenic domain in the protein were identified and the immunoreactivity of recombinant protein with anti-CHIK IgM antibodies was ascertained. The antigen showed an 88% sensitivity and 100% specificity by Indirect ELISA. No cross reactivity of the antigen was observed with anti-Dengue virus serum samples. The results strongly support that the recombinant CHIK coat protein could be used as a diagnostic antigen for the detection of Chikungunya by Indirect ELISA. The relevance of a smaller size recombinant antigen highlights its large scale application in serodiagnosis of CHIK virus since bacterial expression is more simple and cost effective than eukaryotic system. PMID:21798263

  12. Human schistosomiasis: Schistosoma mansoni antigen detection in renal glomeruli.

    PubMed

    Hoshino-Shimizu, S; De Brito, T; Kanamura, H Y; Canto, A L; Silva, A O; Campos, A R; Penna, D O; Da Silva, L C

    1976-01-01

    Twelve kidney, five biopsy and seven necropsy specimens, all from schistosomiasis mansoni patients were studied by light and immunoflurescent microscopy in an attempt to detect antigen in the glomerular walls. Deposits of IgM, IgG,I gA, IgE, complement C3 and fibrinogen were observered in most cases. Antigen was successfully detected in two cases(one biopsy and one necropsy specimen), both exhibiting proliferative glomerulonephritis. The only clinical manifestation was a slight proteinuria. IgG antibodies eluted from the sutopsy kidney homogenates showed specific binding mostly to Schistosoma mansoni gut, thus spggesting that the fixed antibodies (eluates) are, at least partially, consituted by antibodies similar to the anti-circulating antigen. These data reinfroce the hypothesis that renal injury in schistosomiasis is mediated through an immune complex disease. PMID:65811

  13. Shared themes of antigenic variation and virulence in bacterial, protozoal, and fungal infections.

    PubMed Central

    Deitsch, K W; Moxon, E R; Wellems, T E

    1997-01-01

    Pathogenic microbes have evolved highly sophisticated mechanisms for colonizing host tissues and evading or deflecting assault by the immune response. The ability of these microbes to avoid clearance prolongs infection, thereby promoting their long-term survival within individual hosts and, through transmission, between hosts. Many pathogens are capable of extensive antigenic changes in the face of the multiple constitutive and dynamic components of host immune defenses. As a result, highly diverse populations that have widely different virulence properties can arise from a single infecting organism (clone). In this review, we consider the molecular and genetic features of antigenic variation and corresponding host-parasite interactions of different pathogenic bacterial, fungal, and protozoan microorganisms. The host and microbial molecules involved in these interactions often determine the adhesive, invasive, and antigenic properties of the infecting organisms and can dramatically affect the virulence and pathobiology of individual infections. Pathogens capable of such antigenic variation exhibit mechanisms of rapid mutability in confined chromosomal regions containing specialized genes designated contingency genes. The mechanisms of hypermutability of contingency genes are common to a variety of bacterial and eukaryotic pathogens and include promoter alterations, reading-frame shifts, gene conversion events, genomic rearrangements, and point mutations. PMID:9293182

  14. 'Nothing is permanent but change'- antigenic variation in persistent bacterial pathogens.

    PubMed

    Palmer, Guy H; Bankhead, Troy; Lukehart, Sheila A

    2009-12-01

    Pathogens persist in immunocompetent mammalian hosts using various strategies, including evasion of immune effectors by antigenic variation. Among highly antigenically variant bacteria, gene conversion is used to generate novel expressed variants from otherwise silent donor sequences. Recombination using oligonucleotide segments from multiple donors is a combinatorial mechanism that tremendously expands the variant repertoire, allowing thousands of variants to be generated from a relatively small donor pool. Three bacterial pathogens, each encoded by a small genome (< 1.2 Mb), illustrate this variant generating capacity and its role in persistent infection. Borrelia burgdorferi VlsE diversity is encoded and expressed on a linear plasmid required for persistence and recent experiments have demonstrated that VlsE recombination is necessary for persistence in the immunocompetent host. In contrast, both Treponema pallidum TprK and Anaplasma marginale Msp2 expression sites and donors are chromosomally encoded. Both T. pallidum and A. marginale generate antigenic variants in vivo in individual hosts and studies at the population level reveal marked strain diversity in the variant repertoire that may underlie pathogen strain structure and the capacity for re-infection and heterologous strain superinfection. Here, we review gene conversion in bacterial antigenic variation and discuss the short- and long-term selective pressures that shape the variant repertoire. PMID:19709057

  15. O antigen modulates insect vector acquisition of the bacterial plant pathogen Xylella fastidiosa.

    PubMed

    Rapicavoli, Jeannette N; Kinsinger, Nichola; Perring, Thomas M; Backus, Elaine A; Shugart, Holly J; Walker, Sharon; Roper, M Caroline

    2015-12-01

    Hemipteran insect vectors transmit the majority of plant pathogens. Acquisition of pathogenic bacteria by these piercing/sucking insects requires intimate associations between the bacterial cells and insect surfaces. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) is the predominant macromolecule displayed on the cell surface of Gram-negative bacteria and thus mediates bacterial interactions with the environment and potential hosts. We hypothesized that bacterial cell surface properties mediated by LPS would be important in modulating vector-pathogen interactions required for acquisition of the bacterial plant pathogen Xylella fastidiosa, the causative agent of Pierce's disease of grapevines. Utilizing a mutant that produces truncated O antigen (the terminal portion of the LPS molecule), we present results that link this LPS structural alteration to a significant decrease in the attachment of X. fastidiosa to blue-green sharpshooter foreguts. Scanning electron microscopy confirmed that this defect in initial attachment compromised subsequent biofilm formation within vector foreguts, thus impairing pathogen acquisition. We also establish a relationship between O antigen truncation and significant changes in the physiochemical properties of the cell, which in turn affect the dynamics of X. fastidiosa adhesion to the vector foregut. Lastly, we couple measurements of the physiochemical properties of the cell with hydrodynamic fluid shear rates to produce a Comsol model that predicts primary areas of bacterial colonization within blue-green sharpshooter foreguts, and we present experimental data that support the model. These results demonstrate that, in addition to reported protein adhesin-ligand interactions, O antigen is crucial for vector-pathogen interactions, specifically in the acquisition of this destructive agricultural pathogen. PMID:26386068

  16. O Antigen Modulates Insect Vector Acquisition of the Bacterial Plant Pathogen Xylella fastidiosa

    PubMed Central

    Rapicavoli, Jeannette N.; Kinsinger, Nichola; Perring, Thomas M.; Backus, Elaine A.; Shugart, Holly J.; Walker, Sharon

    2015-01-01

    Hemipteran insect vectors transmit the majority of plant pathogens. Acquisition of pathogenic bacteria by these piercing/sucking insects requires intimate associations between the bacterial cells and insect surfaces. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) is the predominant macromolecule displayed on the cell surface of Gram-negative bacteria and thus mediates bacterial interactions with the environment and potential hosts. We hypothesized that bacterial cell surface properties mediated by LPS would be important in modulating vector-pathogen interactions required for acquisition of the bacterial plant pathogen Xylella fastidiosa, the causative agent of Pierce's disease of grapevines. Utilizing a mutant that produces truncated O antigen (the terminal portion of the LPS molecule), we present results that link this LPS structural alteration to a significant decrease in the attachment of X. fastidiosa to blue-green sharpshooter foreguts. Scanning electron microscopy confirmed that this defect in initial attachment compromised subsequent biofilm formation within vector foreguts, thus impairing pathogen acquisition. We also establish a relationship between O antigen truncation and significant changes in the physiochemical properties of the cell, which in turn affect the dynamics of X. fastidiosa adhesion to the vector foregut. Lastly, we couple measurements of the physiochemical properties of the cell with hydrodynamic fluid shear rates to produce a Comsol model that predicts primary areas of bacterial colonization within blue-green sharpshooter foreguts, and we present experimental data that support the model. These results demonstrate that, in addition to reported protein adhesin-ligand interactions, O antigen is crucial for vector-pathogen interactions, specifically in the acquisition of this destructive agricultural pathogen. PMID:26386068

  17. 21 CFR 866.3402 - Plasmodium species antigen detection assays.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Plasmodium species antigen detection assays. 866.3402 Section 866.3402 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents §...

  18. 21 CFR 866.3402 - Plasmodium species antigen detection assays.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Plasmodium species antigen detection assays. 866.3402 Section 866.3402 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents §...

  19. 21 CFR 866.3402 - Plasmodium species antigen detection assays.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Plasmodium species antigen detection assays. 866.3402 Section 866.3402 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents §...

  20. 21 CFR 866.3402 - Plasmodium species antigen detection assays.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Plasmodium species antigen detection assays. 866.3402 Section 866.3402 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents §...

  1. 21 CFR 866.3402 - Plasmodium species antigen detection assays.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Plasmodium species antigen detection assays. 866.3402 Section 866.3402 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents §...

  2. Protein Stains to Detect Antigen on Membranes.

    PubMed

    Dsouza, Anil; Scofield, R Hal

    2015-01-01

    Western blotting (protein blotting/electroblotting) is the gold standard in the analysis of complex protein mixtures. Electroblotting drives protein molecules from a polyacrylamide (or less commonly, of an agarose) gel to the surface of a binding membrane, thereby facilitating an increased availability of the sites with affinity for both general and specific protein reagents. The analysis of these complex protein mixtures is achieved by the detection of specific protein bands on a membrane, which in turn is made possible by the visualization of protein bands either by chemical staining or by reaction with an antibody of a conjugated ligand. Chemical methods employ staining with organic dyes, metal chelates, autoradiography, fluorescent dyes, complexing with silver, or prelabeling with fluorophores. All of these methods have differing sensitivities and quantitative determinations vary significantly. This review will describe the various protein staining methods applied to membranes after western blotting. "Detection" precedes and is a prerequisite to obtaining qualitative and quantitative data on the proteins in a sample, as much as to comparing the protein composition of different samples. "Detection" is often synonymous to staining, i.e., the reversible or irreversible binding by the proteins of a colored organic or inorganic chemical. PMID:26139252

  3. The detection of two antigenic groups among Renibacterium salmoninarum isolates.

    PubMed

    Bandín, I; Santos, Y; Magariños, B; Barja, J L; Toranzo, A E

    1992-07-01

    The analysis of the membrane proteins and their antigenic properties in a group of 14 geographically diverse strains of Renibacterium salmoninarum revealed the existence of antigenic diversity within this species. Eleven isolates, including the type strain ATCC 33209, shared a similar protein profile with a major component of 57 kDa whereas three strains showed a common pattern with a major protein of 30 kDa. The quantitative agglutination tests and Western blotting assays seem to indicate the existence of serological heterogeneity, with two distinct groups being detected. PMID:1521757

  4. Directed antigen delivery as a vaccine strategy for an intracellular bacterial pathogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouwer, H. G. Archie; Alberti-Segui, Christine; Montfort, Megan J.; Berkowitz, Nathan D.; Higgins, Darren E.

    2006-03-01

    We have developed a vaccine strategy for generating an attenuated strain of an intracellular bacterial pathogen that, after uptake by professional antigen-presenting cells, does not replicate intracellularly and is readily killed. However, after degradation of the vaccine strain within the phagolysosome, target antigens are released into the cytosol for endogenous processing and presentation for stimulation of CD8+ effector T cells. Applying this strategy to the model intracellular pathogen Listeria monocytogenes, we show that an intracellular replication-deficient vaccine strain is cleared rapidly in normal and immunocompromised animals, yet antigen-specific CD8+ effector T cells are stimulated after immunization. Furthermore, animals immunized with the intracellular replication-deficient vaccine strain are resistant to lethal challenge with a virulent WT strain of L. monocytogenes. These studies suggest a general strategy for developing safe and effective, attenuated intracellular replication-deficient vaccine strains for stimulation of protective immune responses against intracellular bacterial pathogens. CD8+ T cell | replication-deficient | Listeria monocytogenes

  5. Detection of peste des petits ruminants virus antigen using immunofiltration and antigen-competition ELISA methods.

    PubMed

    Raj, G Dhinakar; Rajanathan, T M C; Kumar, C Senthil; Ramathilagam, G; Hiremath, Geetha; Shaila, M S

    2008-06-22

    Peste des petits ruminants (PPR) is one of the most economically important diseases affecting sheep and goats in India. An immunofiltration-based test has been developed using either mono-specific serum/monoclonal antibodies (mAb) prepared against a recombinant truncated nucleocapsid protein of rinderpest virus (RPV) cross-reactive with PPR virus. This method consists of coating ocular swab eluate from suspected animals onto a nitrocellulose membrane housed in a plastic module, which is allowed to react with suitable dilutions of a mAb or a mono-specific polyclonal antibody. The antigen-antibody complex formed on the membrane is then detected by protein A-colloidal gold conjugate, which forms a pink colour. In the immunofiltration test, concordant results were obtained using either PPRV mAb or mono-specific serum. Another test, an antigen-competition ELISA which relies on the competition between plate-coated recombinant truncated 'N' protein of RPV and the PPRV 'N' protein present in ocular swab eluates (sample) for binding to the mono-specific antibody against N protein of RPV (in liquid phase) was developed. The cut-off value for this test was established using reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) positive and negative oculo-nasal swab samples. Linear correlation between percent inhibition (PI) values in antigen-competition ELISA and virus infectivity titres was 0.992. Comparison of the immunofiltration test with the antigen-competition ELISA yielded a sensitivity of 80% and specificity of 100%. These two tests can serve as a screening (immunofiltration) and confirmatory (antigen-competition ELISA) test, respectively, in the diagnosis of PPR in sheep or goats. PMID:18182256

  6. Microbiology: Detection of Bacterial Pathogens and Their Occurrence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reasoner, Donald J.

    1978-01-01

    Presents a literature review of bacterial pathogens that are related to water pollution, covering publications from 1976-77. This review includes: (1) bacterial pathogens in animals; and (2) detection and identification of waterborne bacterial pathogens. A list of 129 references is also presented. (HM)

  7. Benchtop Antigen Detection Technique using Nanofiltration and Fluorescent Dyes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scardelletti, Maximilian C.; Varaljay, Vanessa

    2009-01-01

    The designed benchtop technique is primed to detect bacteria and viruses from antigenic surface marker proteins in solutions, initially water. This inclusive bio-immunoassay uniquely combines nanofiltration and near infrared (NIR) dyes conjugated to antibodies to isolate and distinguish microbial antigens, using laser excitation and spectrometric analysis. The project goals include detecting microorganisms aboard the International Space Station, space shuttle, Crew Exploration Vehicle (CEV), and human habitats on future Moon and Mars missions, ensuring astronaut safety. The technique is intended to improve and advance water contamination testing both commercially and environmentally as well. Lastly, this streamlined technique poses to greatly simplify and expedite testing of pathogens in complex matrices, such as blood, in hospital and laboratory clinics.

  8. Immunoglobulin (Ig) D in Labeo rohita is widely expressed and differentially modulated in viral, bacterial and parasitic antigenic challenges.

    PubMed

    Basu, Madhubanti; Lenka, Saswati S; Paichha, Mahismita; Swain, Banikalyan; Patel, Bhakti; Banerjee, Rajanya; Jayasankar, Pallipuram; Das, Surajit; Samanta, Mrinal

    2016-10-15

    Immunoglobulins (Igs) play critical roles in protecting host against diverse pathogenic invasion and diseases. Among all Ig isotypes, IgD is the most recently-evolved and enigmatic molecule detected in all vertebrates species except birds. In South-East Asia, Labeo rohita (rohu) is the leading candidate fish species for freshwater aquaculture, and this article describes about IgD gene expression in rohu following viral, bacterial and parasitic antigenic challenges. The partial cDNA (761bp) of Labeo rohita-IgD (LrIgD) was cloned and submitted in the GenBank with the accession no KT883581. Phylogenetically, LrIgD was closely related to grass carp IgD. Analysis of LrIgD gene expression in juveniles by quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR) assay revealed gradual increase in IgD expression with the advancement of time. In the healthy rohu fingerlings, LrIgD expression occurred predominantly in kidney followed by liver and spleen. In response to rhabdoviral antigenic stimulation, LrIgD expression was significantly enhanced in all tested tissues. In bacterial (Aeromonas hydrophila) infection, transcripts of LrIgD increased more dramatically in liver followed by kidney and gill. In parasitic (Argulus) infection, most significant expression of IgD was noted in the skin, followed by kidney, liver, spleen and gill. These results collectively suggest the key role of IgD in the immune response of rohu during viral, bacterial and parasitic infections. PMID:27590429

  9. Detecting polysaccharide antigen of Neisseria meningitidis group C in cerebrospinal fluid by dot-ELISA assay.

    PubMed

    Correia Barbosa, S F; Alkmin, M G; Landgraf, I M

    2000-06-01

    Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) samples from 210 patients (200 with clinical evidence of bacterial meningitis, 10 with other clinical neurologic disease) were tested by a Dot-ELISA assay for detection of polysaccharide antigen of N. meningitidis group C. CSF samples were treated with EDTA 0.1 M, at pH 7.5 and heated to 90>C for 10 min. Polyclonal antiserum was purified by use of ethanol fractionation. The results were compared to those using bacterial culture (BC), latex agglutination (LA), counterimmunoelectrophoresis (CIE), and direct microscopy (DM) methods. Test results showed a correlation of 93.3%, 94.3%, 91.0% and 69.5% respectively, and sensitivity of 0.947 and specificity of 0.930. This study suggests that the dot-ELISA assay of CSF is a useful alternative technique for the diagnosis of group C meningitis. PMID:10934498

  10. Serological versus antigen detection methods for Giardia duodenalis diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Bashir, M; Farid, A; Rabia, I; Mostafa, B; El Amir, A

    2014-12-01

    Giardiasis constitutes an important public health problem in the world. Contamination of the water with fecal materials including viruses and pathogenic protozoa still represents an environmental health hazard, especially in rural areas. The survey study evaluated the relation between seropositivity and some risk factors. Moreover, the study compared between the serological IgG and IgM level and antigen detection methods for the diagnosis of giardiasis. The results indicate that sex distribution and age were the mean risk factors for seroprevelence. In this study, sera samples were employed in sandwich ELISA assay, to detect circulating Giardia antigens. None of the negative control serum samples gave a positive reaction, but cross reaction was encountered with 3 case of Cryptosporidium. The specificity of the assay was 94.830/a. On the other hand, the sensitivity of the Giardia patient's sera was 94.12% which was higher than that of IgG (86.25%) and IgM (87.50%) secretion measurements. In conclusion, antigen detection methods give better and earlier diagnosis for giardiasis can be performed quickly and do not require an experienced and skilled morphologist. PMID:25643512

  11. Rapid detection of Yersinia pestis recombinant fraction 1 capsular antigen.

    PubMed

    Tsui, Pei-Yi; Tsai, Hui-Ping; Chiao, Der-Jiang; Liu, Cheng-Che; Shyu, Rong-Hwa

    2015-09-01

    Yersinia pestis, an infectious bacterium that is a causative agent of plague, a disease which has been shown to be one of the most feared in history and which has caused millions of deaths. The capsule-like fraction 1 (F1) antigen expressed by Y. pestis is a known specific marker for the identification of the bacteria; therefore, the detection of F1 is important for Y. pestis recognition. In this study, a rapid, sensitive, and specific technique, the lateral flow assay (LFA), was successfully developed to detect Y. pestis by the recombinant F1 antigen. The assay that utilized an anti-F1 polyclonal antibody (Pab) to identify the bacteria was based on a double-antibody sandwich format on a nitrocellulose membrane. With the LFA method, 50 ng/ml of recombinant F1 protein and 10(5) CFU/mL of Y. pestis could be detected in less than 10 min. This assay also showed no cross-reaction with other Yersinia spp. or with some selected capsule-producing Enterobacteriaceae strains. Furthermore, detection of Y. pestis in simulated samples has been evaluated. The detection sensitivity of Y. pestis in various matrices was 10(5) CFU/mL, which was identical to that in PBS buffer. The results obtained suggest that LFA is an excellent tool for detection of Y. pestis contamination in an environment and hence can be used to monitor plague diseases when they emerge. PMID:25994256

  12. Antigen

    MedlinePlus

    An antigen is any substance that causes your immune system to produce antibodies against it. This means your immune ... and is trying to fight it off. An antigen may be a substance from the environment, such ...

  13. Transplant immuno-diagnostics: crossmatch and antigen detection.

    PubMed

    South, Andrew M; Grimm, Paul C

    2016-06-01

    Identifying and monitoring donor-directed anti-human leukocyte antigen antibodies are a rapidly evolving area of solid organ transplantation. Donor-specific antibodies dictate pre-transplant donor choice and donor-recipient matching and underlie much acute and chronic allograft rejection and loss. The evolution of available technology has driven this progress. Early, labor-intensive, whole-cell assays based on complement-dependent cytotoxicity suffered from poor sensitivity and specificity, technical challenges and lack of precision. Sequential improvement in assay performance included anti-human immunoglobulin-enhanced, complement-dependent cytotoxicity techniques followed by cell-based flow cytometry. However, variable specificity and sensitivity inherent in cell-based testing continued to limit flow cytometry. The introduction of solid-phase assays led to a second revolution in histocompatibility testing with the use of purified antigens bound to artificial surfaces rather than whole cells. These techniques augmented sensitivity and specificity to detect even low-titer antibodies to previously undetected antigens. Identification of complement-activating antibodies is being introduced, but current technology is in the developmental stage. While the detection of alloantibodies has improved dramatically, our comprehension of their importance remains imperfect. Variability in methodology and a lack of standardization limits the clinical application of these tests. In spite of the hurdles that remain, antibody-mediated rejection has become a key target to improve graft survival. PMID:26139577

  14. Exploiting bacterial glycosylation machineries for the synthesis of a Lewis antigen-containing glycoprotein.

    PubMed

    Hug, Isabelle; Zheng, Blake; Reiz, Bela; Whittal, Randy M; Fentabil, Messele A; Klassen, John S; Feldman, Mario F

    2011-10-28

    Glycoproteins constitute a class of compounds of increasing importance for pharmaceutical applications. The manipulation of bacterial protein glycosylation systems from Gram-negative bacteria for the synthesis of recombinant glycoproteins is a promising alternative to the current production methods. Proteins carrying Lewis antigens have been shown to have potential applications for the treatment of diverse autoimmune diseases. In this work, we developed a mixed approach consisting of in vivo and in vitro steps for the synthesis of glycoproteins containing the Lewis x antigen. Using glycosyltransferases from Haemophilus influenzae, we engineered Escherichia coli to assemble a tetrasaccharide on the lipid carrier undecaprenylphosphate. This glycan was transferred in vivo from the lipid to a carrier protein by the Campylobacter jejuni oligosaccharyltransferase PglB. The glycoprotein was then fucosylated in vitro by a truncated fucosyltransferase from Helicobacter pylori. Diverse mass spectrometry techniques were used to confirm the structure of the glycan. The strategy presented here could be adapted in the future for the synthesis of diverse glycoproteins. Our experiments demonstrate that bacterial enzymes can be exploited for the production of glycoproteins carrying glycans present in human cells for potential therapeutic applications. PMID:21878645

  15. Staphylococcal Enterotoxin B Primes Cytokine Secretion and Lytic Activity in Response to Native Bacterial Antigens

    PubMed Central

    Mason, Kevin M.; Dryden, Tricia D.; Bigley, Nancy J.; Fink, Pamela S.

    1998-01-01

    Superantigens stimulate T-lymphocyte proliferation and cytokine production, but the effects of superantigen exposure on cell function within a complex, highly regulated immune response remain to be determined. In this study, we demonstrate that superantigen exposure significantly alters the murine host response to bacterial antigens in an in vitro coculture system. Two days after exposure to the superantigen staphylococcal enterotoxin B, splenocytes cultured with Streptococcus mutans produced significantly greater amounts of gamma interferon (IFN-γ) and interleukin-12 than did sham-injected controls. The majority of IFN-γ production appeared to be CD8+ T-cell derived since depletion of this cell type dramatically reduced the levels of IFN-γ. To study host cell damage that may occur following superantigen exposure, we analyzed cytotoxicity to “bystander” fibroblast cells cultured with splenocytes in the presence of bacterial antigens. Prior host exposure to staphylococcal enterotoxin B significantly enhanced fibroblast cytotoxicity in the presence of bacteria. Neutralization of IFN-γ decreased the amount of cytotoxicity observed. However, a greater reduction was evident when splenocyte-bacterium cocultures were separated from the bystander cell monolayer via a permeable membrane support. Increased cytotoxicity appears to be primarily dependent upon cell-cell contact. Collectively, these data indicate that overproduction of inflammatory cytokines may alter the activity of cytotoxic immune cells. Superantigen exposure exacerbates cytokine production and lytic cell activity when immune cells encounter bacteria in vitro and comparable activities could possibly occur in vivo. PMID:9784507

  16. Detection of bacterial concentration variations based on dielectric magnetic flux.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jingyao; Cai, Jie; Huang, Xingjian; Yi, Tian; Wang, Kexing; Pan, Siyi

    2016-02-01

    This study is based on the development of bacterial count quantification generated by medium dielectric variations and consequent polarization material release. The proposed approach is an action method for the fast detection of bacterial concentration in orange juice. The sensing method relies on bacterial attachment up to biofilm formation. Furthermore, different media provide more oxygen group content to enhance capacitance and self-discharge. The test took only 30 min and it provided the means for rapid bacterial detection in the juice industry. PMID:26304394

  17. Demonstration of cross-reactivity between bacterial antigens and class I human leukocyte antigens by using monoclonal antibodies to Shigella flexneri.

    PubMed Central

    Williams, K M; Raybourne, R B

    1990-01-01

    Bacterial envelope proteins which share immunodeterminants with the human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class I histocompatibility antigen HLA-B27 may invoke spondyloarthritic disease through the process of molecular mimicry in patients expressing this phenotype. Monoclonal antibodies generated by the immunization of BALB/c mice with envelope proteins of Shigella flexneri type 2a were tested for reactivity against cultured lymphoblastoid cell lines of defined HLA phenotype. As measured by flow microfluorometry, four immunoglobulin M monoclonal antibodies reacted preferentially with HLA-B27-positive lymphocytes (HOM-2, MM) as compared with a B27-loss mutant line (1065) or cells lacking major histocompatibility complex class I antigen (Daudi, K562). Monoclonal antibodies also reacted with mouse EL-4 cells transfected with and expressing the HLA-B7 gene. Western immunoblot analysis of isolated enterobacterial envelopes demonstrated that the reactive epitope was present on bacterial proteins with an apparent relative molecular mass of 36 and 19 kilodaltons. The structural basis for the cross-reactivity of bacterial antigen and HLA-B27 appeared to reside in the portion of the HLA molecule that is responsible for allotypic specificity (amino acids 63 through 83), since monoclonal antibodies were positive by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay with synthetic polypeptides corresponding to this segment. Images PMID:2187807

  18. Immunoliposome-PCR: a generic ultrasensitive quantitative antigen detection system

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The accurate quantification of antigens at low concentrations over a wide dynamic range is needed for identifying biomarkers associated with disease and detecting protein interactions in high-throughput microarrays used in proteomics. Here we report the development of an ultrasensitive quantitative assay format called immunoliposome polymerase chain reaction (ILPCR) that fulfills these requirements. This method uses a liposome, with reporter DNA encapsulated inside and biotin-labeled polyethylene glycol (PEG) phospholipid conjugates incorporated into the outer surface of the liposome, as a detection reagent. The antigenic target is immobilized in the well of a microplate by a capture antibody and the liposome detection reagent is then coupled to a biotin-labeled second antibody through a NeutrAvidin bridge. The liposome is ruptured to release the reporter DNA, which serves as a surrogate to quantify the protein target using real-time PCR. Results A liposome detection reagent was prepared, which consisted of a population of liposomes ~120 nm in diameter with each liposome possessing ~800 accessible biotin receptors and ~220 encapsulated reporters. This liposome detection reagent was used in an assay to quantify the concentration of carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) in human serum. This ILPCR assay exhibited a linear dose–response curve from 10-10 M to 10-16 M CEA. Within this range the assay coefficient of variance was <6 % for repeatability and <2 % for reproducibility. The assay detection limit was 13 fg/mL, which is 1,500-times more sensitive than current clinical assays for CEA. An ILPCR assay to quantify HIV-1 p24 core protein in buffer was also developed. Conclusions The ILPCR assay has several advantages over other immuno-PCR methods. The reporter DNA and biotin-labeled PEG phospholipids spontaneously incorporate into the liposomes as they form, simplifying preparation of the detection reagent. Encapsulation of the reporter inside the

  19. Optoacoustic detection of viral antigens using targeted gold nanorods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maswadi, Saher; Woodward, Lee; Glickman, Randolph D.; Barsalou, Norman

    2009-02-01

    We are detecting antigens (Ag), isolated from infectious organisms, utilizing laser optoacoustic spectroscopy and antibody-coupled gold nanorod (NR) contrast agents specifically targeted to the antigen of interest. We have detected, in clinical ocular samples, both Herpes Simplex Virus Type 1 and 2 (HSV-1 and HSV-2) . A monoclonal antibody (Ab) specific to both HSV-1 and HSV-2 was conjugated to gold nanorods to produce a targeted contrast agent with a strong optoacoustic signal. Elutions obtained from patient corneal swabs were adsorbed in standard plastic micro-wells. An immunoaffinity reaction was then performed with the functionalized gold nanorods, and the results were probed with an OPO laser, emitting wavelengths at the peak absorptions of the nanorods. Positive optoacoustic responses were obtained from samples containing authentic (microbiologically confirmed) HSV-1 and HSV-2. To obtain an estimate of the sensitivity of the technique, serial dilutions from 1 mg/ml to 1 pg/ml of a C. trachomatis surface Ag were prepared, and were probed with a monoclonal Ab, specific to the C. trachomatis surface Ag, conjugated to gold nanorods. An optoacoustic response was obtained, proportional to the concentration of antigen, and with a limit of detection of about 5 pg/ml. The optoacoustic signals generated from micro-wells containing albumin or saline were similar to those from blank wells. The potential benefit of this method is identify viral agents more rapidly than with existing techniques. In addition, the sensitivity of the assay is comparable or superior to existing colorimetric- or fluorometric-linked immunoaffinity assays.

  20. Automated Image Analysis for Determination of Antibody Titers Against Occupational Bacterial Antigens Using Indirect Immunofluorescence.

    PubMed

    Brauner, Paul; Jäckel, Udo

    2016-06-01

    Employees who are exposed to high concentrations of microorganisms in bioaerosols frequently suffer from respiratory disorders. However, etiology and in particular potential roles of microorganisms in pathogenesis still need to be elucidated. Thus, determination of employees' antibody titers against specific occupational microbial antigens may lead to identification of potentially harmful species. Since indirect immunofluorescence (IIF) is easy to implement, we used this technique to analyze immunoreactions in human sera. In order to address disadvantageous inter-observer variations as well as the absence of quantifiable fluorescence data in conventional titer determination by eye, we specifically developed a software tool for automated image analysis. The 'Fluorolyzer' software is able to reliably quantify fluorescence intensities of antibody-bound bacterial cells on digital images. Subsequently, fluorescence values of single cells have been used to calculate non-discrete IgG titers. We tested this approach on multiple bacterial workplace isolates and determined titers in sera from 20 volunteers. Furthermore, we compared image-based results with the conventional manual readout and found significant correlation as well as statistically confirmed reproducibility. In conclusion, we successfully employed 'Fluorolyzer' for determination of titers against various bacterial species and demonstrated its applicability as a useful tool for reliable and efficient analysis of immune response toward occupational exposure to bioaerosols. PMID:27026659

  1. Expression patterns of the T antigen and the cryptic T antigen in rat fetuses: detection with the lectin amaranthin.

    PubMed

    Sata, T; Zuber, C; Rinderle, S J; Goldstein, I J; Roth, J

    1990-06-01

    The lectin amaranthin, purified from the seeds of Amaranthus caudatus, has been shown to react specifically with the Gal beta 1,3GalNAc-alpha and the NeuAc alpha 2,3Gal beta 1,3GalNAc-alpha sequence which represent the T antigen and the cryptic T antigen, respectively. We report here the development of labeling techniques that apply amaranthin to stain paraffin sections from rat fetuses. Amaranthin staining was inhibited by pre-incubation of lectin-gold complexes with 10 mM Gal beta 1,3GalNAc-alpha-O-benzyl (synthetic T antigen) or 10 mM Gal beta 1,3GalNAc-alpha-O-aminophenylethyl-human serum albumin (T antigen neoglycoprotein), asialoglycophorin, asialofetuin, and asialomucin. The beta-elimination reaction also abolished the lectin staining demonstrating specificity for O-glycosidically linked structures. A comparison with monoclonal anti-T antigen antibody immunostaining demonstrated that amaranthin detects the T antigen and its cryptic form in tissue sections. Application of the galactose oxidase-Schiff sequence abolished amaranthin (and anti-T antibody) binding to the T antigen but not to its cryptic form, and therefore permitted their differentiation in tissue sections. Histochemical evidence was obtained indicating that amaranthin is a more specific anti-T reagent than peanut lectin. Data are presented that show the differential expression of the T antigen and the cryptic T antigen in organs and cells of rat fetuses late in gestation. Therefore, amaranthin can be used for histochemical detection of the T antigen and the cryptic T antigen, and facilitates discrimination between them. PMID:2335739

  2. Comparison of commercial kits for detection of cryptococcal antigen.

    PubMed Central

    Tanner, D C; Weinstein, M P; Fedorciw, B; Joho, K L; Thorpe, J J; Reller, L

    1994-01-01

    Although kits to detect cryptococcal antigen are used widely to diagnose cryptococcal infection, the comparative performance of commercially available assays has not been evaluated in the past decade. Therefore, we compared the sensitives and specificities of five commercially available kits for detecting cryptococcal antigen (four latex agglutination test kits--Calas [Meridian Diagnostics])--Crypto-LA [International Biological Labs], Myco-Immune [MicroScan], and Immy [Immunomycologics]--and an enzyme immunoassay kit, Premier [Meridian Diagnostics]) with culture for the diagnosis of cryptococcal meningitis and fungemia. Of 182 cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and 90 serum samples submitted for cryptococcal antigen and fungal culture, 49 (19 and 30 samples, respectively) from 20 patients had a culture positive for Cryptococcus neoformans. For CSF specimens, the sensitivities and specificities of all kits were comparable (sensitivity, 93 to 100%; specificity, 93 to 98%). There was a significant difference in sensitivities of the kits when serum samples were tested with the International Biological Labs and MicroScan kits, which do not pretreat serum with pronase. These kits were less sensitive (sensitivity, 83%) than the Immy and Meridian latex kits (sensitivity, 97%), which do pretreat with pronase. The sensitivity of the Meridian enzyme immunoassay kit was comparable to that of the pronase-containing latex kits. These kits were of equivalent specificities (93 to 100%) when testing serum. Some of the currently available kits have limitations that need to be recognized for proper interpretation of results. Specifically, the use of pronase on serum samples reduces the number of false-positive results, and a titer of < or = 1:4 can be a false-positive result when CSF samples are being tested. PMID:7929757

  3. Optimisation of immuno-gold nanoparticle complexes for antigen detection.

    PubMed

    van der Heide, Susan; Russell, David A

    2016-06-01

    The aim of this investigation was to define the optimum method of binding antibodies to the surface of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) and then to apply the optimised antibody-functionalised AuNPs for the detection of a target antigen. A detailed investigation of three different techniques for the functionalisation of AuNPs with anti-cocaine antibody and methods for the subsequent characterisation of the antibody-functionalised AuNP are reported. The addition of anti-cocaine antibody onto the AuNP surface was facilitated by either: a polyethylene glycol (PEG) linker with a COOH terminal functional group; an aminated PEG ligand; or an N-succinimidyl 3-(2-pyridyldithio)-propionate (SPDP)-Protein A/G intermediate. Characterisation of the functionalised particles was performed using transmission electron microscopy, UV-Visible spectrophotometry and by agarose gel electrophoresis. In addition, the cocaine binding efficacy of the resultant AuNPs and their cocaine-binding capacity was determined using a cocaine-horseradish peroxidase conjugate, and by the application of a microtiter plate-based immunoassay. The results showed that the number of antibody per particle was the highest when the AuNP were functionalised with the Protein A/G intermediate. As compared to free antibody, the cocaine binding efficacy was significantly enhanced using the AuNP-Protein A/G-antibody complex. This optimal antibody-antigen binding efficacy is thought to be the result of the large number of antibody per particle and the oriented binding of the antibody to the Protein A/G on the AuNP surface. These results highlight the ideal immuno-gold nanoparticle characteristics for the detection of target antigens such as cocaine. PMID:26994353

  4. A bacterial engineered glycoprotein as a novel antigen for diagnosis of bovine brucellosis.

    PubMed

    Ciocchini, Andrés E; Serantes, Diego A Rey; Melli, Luciano J; Guidolin, Leticia S; Iwashkiw, Jeremy A; Elena, Sebastián; Franco, Cristina; Nicola, Ana M; Feldman, Mario F; Comerci, Diego J; Ugalde, Juan E

    2014-08-27

    Brucellosis is a highly contagious zoonosis that affects livestock and human beings. Laboratory diagnosis of bovine brucellosis mainly relies on serological diagnosis using serum and/or milk samples. Although there are several serological tests with different diagnostic performance and capacity to differentiate vaccinated from infected animals, there is still no standardized reference antigen for the disease. Here we validate the first recombinant glycoprotein antigen, an N-formylperosamine O-polysaccharide-protein conjugate (OAg-AcrA), for diagnosis of bovine brucellosis. This antigen can be produced in homogeneous batches without the need of culturing pathogenic brucellae; all characteristics that make it appropriate for standardization. An indirect immunoassay based on the detection of anti O-polysaccharide IgG antibodies in bovine samples was developed coupling OAg-AcrA to magnetic beads or ELISA plates. As a proof of concept and to validate the antigen, we analyzed serum, whole blood and milk samples obtained from non-infected, experimentally infected and vaccinated animals included in a vaccination/infection trial performed in our laboratory as well as more than 1000 serum and milk samples obtained from naturally infected and S19-vaccinated animals from Argentina. Our results demonstrate that OAg-AcrA-based assays are highly accurate for diagnosis of bovine brucellosis, even in vaccinated herds, using different types of samples and in different platforms. We propose this novel recombinant glycoprotein as an antigen suitable for the development of new standard immunological tests for screening and confirmatory diagnosis of bovine brucellosis in regions or countries with brucellosis-control programs. PMID:24984948

  5. Leaky RAG Deficiency in Adult Patients with Impaired Antibody Production against Bacterial Polysaccharide Antigens

    PubMed Central

    Geier, Christoph B.; Piller, Alexander; Linder, Angela; Sauerwein, Kai M. T.; Eibl, Martha M.; Wolf, Hermann M.

    2015-01-01

    Loss of function mutations in the recombination activating genes RAG1 and RAG2 have been reported to cause a T-B-NK+ type of severe combined immunodeficiency. In addition identification of hypomorphic mutations in RAG1 and RAG2 has led to an expansion of the spectrum of disease to include Omenn syndrome, early onset autoimmunity, granuloma, chronic cytomegalovirus- or EBV-infection with expansion of gamma/delta T-cells, idiophatic CD4 lymphopenia and a phenotype resembling common variable immunodeficiency. Herein we describe a novel presentation of leaky RAG1 and RAG2 deficiency in two unrelated adult patients with impaired antibody production against bacterial polysaccharide antigens. Clinical manifestation included recurrent pneumonia, sinusitis, otitis media and in one patient recurrent cutaneous vasculitis. Both patients harbored a combination of a null mutation on one allele with a novel hypomorphic RAG1/2 mutation on the other allele. One of these novel mutations affected the start codon of RAG1 and resulted in an aberrant gene and protein expression. The second novel RAG2 mutation leads to a truncated RAG2 protein, lacking the C-terminus with intact core RAG2 and reduced VDJ recombination capacity as previously described in a mouse model. Both patients presented with severely decreased numbers of naïve CD4+ T cells and defective T independent IgG responses to bacterial polysaccharide antigens, while T cell-dependent IgG antibody formation e.g. after tetanus or TBEV vaccination was intact. In conclusion, hypomorphic mutations in genes responsible for SCID should be considered in adults with predominantly antibody deficiency. PMID:26186701

  6. An antigen-specific, four-color, B-cell FluoroSpot assay utilizing tagged antigens for detection.

    PubMed

    Jahnmatz, Peter; Bengtsson, Theresa; Zuber, Bartek; Färnert, Anna; Ahlborg, Niklas

    2016-06-01

    The FluoroSpot assay, a variant of ELISpot utilizing fluorescent detection, has so far been used primarily for assessment of T cells, where simultaneous detection of several cytokines has allowed a more qualitative analysis of functionally distinct T cells. The potential to measure multiple analytes also presents several advantages when analyzing B cells. Our aim was to develop a B-cell FluoroSpot assay adaptable to studies of a variety of antigens. The assay utilizes anti-IgG antibodies immobilized in 96-well filter membrane plates. During cell culture, IgG antibodies secreted by antibody-secreting cells (ASCs) are captured in the vicinity of each of these cells and the specificity of single ASCs is defined using antigens for detection. The antigens were labeled with biotin or peptide tags enabling secondary detection with fluorophore-conjugated streptavidin or tag-specific antibodies. The assay, utilizing up to four different tag systems and fluorophores simultaneously, was evaluated using hybridomas and immunized splenocytes as ASCs. Assay variants were developed that could: i) identify multiple ASCs with different antigen specificities; ii) detect ASCs showing cross-reactivity with different but related antigens; and iii) define the antigen-specificity and, by including anti-IgG subclass detection reagents, simultaneously determine the IgG subclass of antibodies secreted by ASCs. As demonstrated here, the B-cell FluoroSpot assay using tag-based detection systems provides a versatile and powerful tool to investigate antibody responses by individual cells that can be readily adapted to studies of a variety of antigen-specific ASCs. PMID:26930550

  7. Th2 Allergic Immune Response to Inhaled Fungal Antigens is Modulated By TLR-4-Independent Bacterial Products

    PubMed Central

    Allard, Jenna B.; Rinaldi, Lisa; Wargo, Matt; Allen, Gilman; Akira, Shizuo; Uematsu, Satoshi; Poynter, Matthew E.; Hogan, Deborah A.; Rincon, Mercedes; Whittaker, Laurie A.

    2009-01-01

    SUMMARY Allergic airway disease is characterized by eosinophilic inflammation, mucus hypersecretion and increased airway resistance. Fungal antigens are ubiquitous within the environment and are well know triggers of allergic disease. Bacterial products are also frequently encountered within the environment and may alter the immune response to certain antigens. The consequence of simultaneous exposure to bacterial and fungal products on the lung adaptive immune response has not been explored. Here we show that oropharyngeal aspiration of fungal lysates (Candida albicans, Aspergillus fumigatus) promotes airway eosinophilia, secretion of Th2 cytokines and mucus cell metaplasia. In contrast, oropharyngeal exposure to bacterial lysates (Pseudomonas aeruginosa) promotes airway inflammation characterized by neutrophils, Th1 cytokine secretion and no mucus production. More importantly, administration of bacterial lysates together with fungal lysates deviates the adaptive immune response to a Th1 type associated with neutrophilia and diminished mucus production. The immunomodulatory effect that bacterial lysates have on the response to fungi is TLR4-independent but MyD88 dependent. Thus, different types of microbial products within the airway can alter the host's adaptive immune response, and potentially impact the development of allergic airway disease to environmental fungal antigens. PMID:19224641

  8. Multiplexed BioCD for prostate specific antigen detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xuefeng; Zhao, Ming; Nolte, David D.

    2008-02-01

    Specific protein concentrations in human body fluid can serve as diagnostic markers for some diseases, and a quantitative and high-throughput technique for multiplexed protein detection would speed up diagnosis and facilitate medical research. For this purpose, our group developed the BioCD, a spinning-disc interferometric biosensor on which antibody is immobilized. The detection system adopts a common-path scheme making it ultra stable. The scaling mass sensitivity is below 10 pg/mm for protein surface density. A 25000-spot antibody BioCD was fabricated to measure the concentration of prostate specific antigen (PSA), a protein indicating prostate cancer if its level is high. Statistical analysis of our immunoassay results projects that the detection limit of PSA would reach 20 pg/ml in a 2 mg/ml background solution. For future prospects, a multiplexed BioCD can be produced for simultaneous diagnosis of diverse diseases. For instance, 100 markers above 200 pg/ml could be measured on a single disc given that the detection limit is inversely proportional to square root of the number of spots.

  9. Cryptococcus neoformans meningitis with negative cryptococcal antigen: Evaluation of a new immunochromatographic detection assay

    PubMed Central

    Opota, O.; Desgraz, B.; Kenfak, A.; Jaton, K.; Cavassini, M.; Greub, G.; Prod'hom, G.; Giulieri, S.

    2014-01-01

    Detection of cryptococcal antigen in serum or cerebrospinal fluid allows cryptococcal meningitis diagnosis within few hours with >90% sensitivity. In an HIV-positive patient with Cryptococcus neoformans meningitis, initial antigen detection by immunoagglutination was negative. We thus evaluated a new immunochromatographic detection assay that exhibited a higher sensitivity. PMID:25755893

  10. [Detection of T-antigen in colorectal adenocarcinoma and polyps].

    PubMed

    Xu, S; Lu, Y; Wang, Q

    1995-10-01

    Galactose oxidase method was employed to detect the beta-D-Gal (1-->3) -D-Gal NAc residue of T-antigen present in the large intestinal mucus of 156 subjects. The positive rates of the test were 84.4%, 29.1%, and 7.2% in the mucus samples obtained from 32 patients with colorectal adenocarcinomas, 55 with polyps and 69 controls respectively. Chi-square test demonstrated that there were significant differences between the group of carcinoma and control (P < 0.001) as well as between also polyp and control (P < 0.01). The test had a high sensitivity (84.4%) and specificity (92.8%) in the diagnosis of colorectal cancer and may be used as a practical mass screening test for colorectal neoplasms. PMID:8731834

  11. Bacteriophage Amplification-Coupled Detection and Identification of Bacterial Pathogens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cox, Christopher R.; Voorhees, Kent J.

    Current methods of species-specific bacterial detection and identification are complex, time-consuming, and often require expensive specialized equipment and highly trained personnel. Numerous biochemical and genotypic identification methods have been applied to bacterial characterization, but all rely on tedious microbiological culturing practices and/or costly sequencing protocols which render them impractical for deployment as rapid, cost-effective point-of-care or field detection and identification methods. With a view towards addressing these shortcomings, we have exploited the evolutionarily conserved interactions between a bacteriophage (phage) and its bacterial host to develop species-specific detection methods. Phage amplification-coupled matrix assisted laser desorption time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF-MS) was utilized to rapidly detect phage propagation resulting from species-specific in vitro bacterial infection. This novel signal amplification method allowed for bacterial detection and identification in as little as 2 h, and when combined with disulfide bond reduction methods developed in our laboratory to enhance MALDI-TOF-MS resolution, was observed to lower the limit of detection by several orders of magnitude over conventional spectroscopy and phage typing methods. Phage amplification has been combined with lateral flow immunochromatography (LFI) to develop rapid, easy-to-operate, portable, species-specific point-of-care (POC) detection devices. Prototype LFI detectors have been developed and characterized for Yersinia pestis and Bacillus anthracis, the etiologic agents of plague and anthrax, respectively. Comparable sensitivity and rapidity was observed when phage amplification was adapted to a species-specific handheld LFI detector, thus allowing for rapid, simple, POC bacterial detection and identification while eliminating the need for bacterial culturing or DNA isolation and amplification techniques.

  12. [Partially automated antigen determination and antibody detection with microtiter plates].

    PubMed

    Rapp, C; Weisshaar, C

    1993-01-01

    In addition to several conventional methods for the detection of red cell antigens, the use of microplates has various advantages either as a solid-phase assay (enzyme immunoassay) or as native microplate. Microplates may also be used for the detection of red cell antibodies in 'pooled-cell solid-phase assays' of the second generation and for antibody screening. Blood donors and patients are the two main fields which are to be examined in immunohematology. There are various advantages in using the microplate in blood group serology: (i) if there is hardware already available, like sample processors and microplate readers, the use of microplates in blood group serology reduces the costs even if the equipment has to be purchased for this purpose only; (ii) low quantities of reagents are used in microplate assays; (iii) the application of bar codes on tubes and microplates guarantees the most security in sample identification; (iv) it is possible to investigate blood samples selectively depending on the available software if antibody detection is done as the sixth test beside anti-HIV, anti-HCV, HBsAG, lues antibodies and ALT, and (v) recording of data will be easy if electronic data processing is used. PMID:7693246

  13. Investigation of contactless detection using a giant magnetoresistance sensor for detecting prostate specific antigen.

    PubMed

    Sun, Xuecheng; Zhi, Shaotao; Lei, Chong; Zhou, Yong

    2016-08-01

    This paper presents a contactless detection method for detecting prostate specific antigen with a giant magnetoresistance sensor. In contactless detection case, the prostate specific antigen sample preparation was separated from the sensor that prevented the sensor from being immersed in chemical solvents, and made the sensor implementing in immediately reuse without wash. Experimental results showed that applied an external magnetic field in a range of 50 Oe to 90 Oe, Dynabeads with a concentration as low as 0.1 μg/mL can be detected by this system and could give an approximate quantitation to the logarithmic of Dynabeads concentration. Sandwich immunoassay was employed for preparing PSA samples. The PSA capture was implemented on a gold film modified with a self-assembled monolayer and using biotinylated secondary antibody against PSA and streptavidinylated Dynabeads. With DC magnetic field in the range of 50 to 90 Oe, PSA can be detected with a detection limit as low as 0.1 ng/mL. Samples spiked with different concentrations of PSA can be distinguished clearly. Due to the contactless detection method, the detection system exhibited advantages such as convenient manipulation, reusable, inexpensive, small weight. So, this detection method was a promising candidate in biomarker detection, especially in point of care detection. PMID:27379844

  14. Detecting Bacterial Vaginosis Using Machine Learning

    PubMed Central

    Baker, Yolanda S.; Agrawal, Rajeev; Foster, James A.; Beck, Daniel; Dozier, Gerry

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial Vaginosis (BV) is the most common of vaginal infections diagnosed among women during the years where they can bear children. Yet, there is very little insight as to how it occurs. There are a vast number of criteria that can be taken into consideration to determine the presence of BV. The purpose of this paper is two-fold; first to discover the most significant features necessary to diagnose the infection, second is to apply various classification algorithms on the selected features. It is observed that certain feature selection algorithms provide only a few features; however, the classification results are as good as using a large number of features. PMID:26753179

  15. Protective efficacy of bacterial membranes containing surface-exposed BM95 antigenic peptides for the control of cattle tick infestations.

    PubMed

    Canales, Mario; Labruna, Marcelo B; Soares, João F; Prudencio, Carlos R; de la Fuente, José

    2009-12-01

    The Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus BM86 and BM95 glycoproteins are homologous proteins that protect cattle against tick infestations. In this study, we demonstrated that the recombinant chimeric protein comprising tick BM95 immunogenic peptides fused to the A. marginale MSP1a N-terminal region for presentation on the Escherichia coli membrane was protective against R. microplus infestations in rabbits. This system provides a novel and simple approach for the production of tick protective antigens by surface display of antigenic protein chimera on live E. coli and suggests the possibility of using recombinant bacterial membrane fractions for vaccination against cattle tick infestations. PMID:19835826

  16. Detection of Bacterial Spores with Lanthanide-Macrocycle Binary Complexes

    PubMed Central

    Cable, Morgan L.; Kirby, James P.; Levine, Dana J.; Manary, Micah J.; Gray, Harry B.; Ponce, Adrian

    2009-01-01

    The detection of bacterial spores via dipicolinate-triggered lanthanide luminescence has been improved in terms of detection limit, stability, and susceptibility to interferents by use of lanthanide-macrocycle binary complexes. Specifically, we compared the effectiveness of Sm, Eu, Tb and Dy complexes with the macrocycle 1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-1,7-diacetate (DO2A) to the corresponding lanthanide aquo ions. The Ln(DO2A)+ binary complexes bind dipicolinic acid (DPA), a major constituent of bacterial spores, with greater affinity and demonstrate significant improvement in bacterial spore detection. Of the four luminescent lanthanides studied, the terbium complex exhibits the greatest dipicolinate binding affinity (100-fold greater than Tb3+ alone, and 10-fold greater than other Ln(DO2A)+ complexes) and highest quantum yield. Moreover, the inclusion of DO2A extends the pH range over which Tb-DPA coordination is stable, reduces the interference of calcium ions nearly 5-fold, and mitigates phosphate interference 1000-fold compared to free terbium alone. In addition, detection of Bacillus atrophaeus bacterial spores was improved by the use of Tb(DO2A)+, yielding a 3-fold increase in the signal-to-noise ratio over Tb3+. Out of the eight cases investigated, the Tb(DO2A)+ binary complex is best for the detection of bacterial spores. PMID:19537757

  17. Label-free detection of antigens using implantable SERS nanosensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Honggang; Baum, Caitlin E.; Cullum, Brian M.

    2005-11-01

    Monitoring the presence, production and transport of proteins inside individual living cells can provide vital information about cellular signaling pathways and the overall biological response of an organism. For example, cellular response to external stimuli, such as biological warfare (BW) agents, can be monitored by measuring interleukin-II (IL-2) expression inside T-cells as well as other chemical species associated with T-cell activation. By monitoring such species, pre-symptomatic detection of exposure to BW agents can be achieved, leading to significantly increased post-exposure survival rates. To accomplish such monitoring, we have developed and optimized implantable nanosphere-based nanosensors for the intracellular analysis of specific proteins in a label-free fashion. These sensors consist of 300-520 nm diameter silica spheres that have been coated with silver and antibodies to allow for trace protein detection via surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS). They have been optimized for SERS response by evaluating the size of the nanospheres best suited to 632.8 nm laser excitation, as well as the various nanosensor fabrication steps (i.e., silver deposition process, antibody binding, etc.). During usage, the presence of the specific protein of interest is monitored by either directly measuring SERS signals associated with the protein and/or changes in the SERS spectrum of the antibodies resulting from conformational changes after antigen binding. In this work, human insulin was used as a model compound for initial studies into the sensitivity of these optimized nanosensors.

  18. Non-labeled QCM Biosensor for Bacterial Detection using Carbohydrate and Lectin Recognitions

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Zhihong; Huang, Mingchuan; Xiao, Caide; Zhang, Yun; Zeng, Xiangqun; Wang, Peng G.

    2008-01-01

    High percentages of harmful microbes or their secreting toxins bind to specific carbohydrate sequences on human cells at the recognition and attachment sites. A number of studies also show that lectins react with specific structures of bacteria and fungi. In this report, we take advantage of the fact that a high percentage of microorganisms have both carbohydrate and lectin binding pockets at their surface. We demonstrate here for the first time that a carbohydrate non-labeled mass sensor in combination with lectin-bacterial O-antigen recognition can be used for detection of high molecular weight bacterial targets with remarkably high sensitivity and specificity. A functional mannose self-assembled monolayer (SAM) in combination with lectin Con A was used as molecular recognition elements for the detection of E. coli W1485 using Quartz Crytsal Microbalance (QCM) as a transducer. The multivalent binding of Concanavalin A (Con A) to the Escherichia coli (E. coli) surface O-antigen favors the strong adhesion of E. coli to mannose modified QCM surface by forming bridges between these two. As a result, the contact area between cell and QCM surface increases that leads to rigid and strong attachment. Therefore it enhances the binding between E. coli and the mannose. Our results show a significant improvement of the sensitivity and specificity of carbohydrate QCM biosensor with a experimental detection limit of a few hundred bacterial cells. The linear range is from 7.5 × 102 to 7.5 × 107 cells/mL that is four decade wider than the mannose alone QCM sensor. The change of damping resistances for E. coli adhesion experiments was no more than 1.4% suggesting that the bacterial attachment was rigid, rather than a viscoelastic behavior. Little non-specific binding was observed for Staphylococcus aureus and other proteins (Fetal Bovine serum, Erythrina cristagalli lectin). Our approach not only overcomes the challenges of applying QCM technology for bacterial detection but

  19. Sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for detection of excretory secretory antigens in humans with fascioliasis.

    PubMed Central

    Espino, A M; Finlay, C M

    1994-01-01

    A sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay has been developed for the detection of Fasciola hepatica excretory secretory (ES) antigens in stool specimens of infected humans. The assay uses antibodies against F. hepatica ES antigens. A monoclonal antibody (ES78, mouse immunoglobulin G2a) was used to capture ES antigens, and a rabbit polyclonal antibody, peroxidase conjugate, was used to identify ES antigens. Thirteen of 14 patients with parasitological evidence of fascioliasis had a detectable concentration of ES antigens (more than 15 ng/ml). None of the stool specimens from controls and from patients with parasites other than F. hepatica showed a positive reaction, suggesting the absence of cross-reactions in this assay. When the 14 patients were retested 2 months after treatment, all of the specimens from the 11 parasitologically cured patients were negative by the antigen detection assay while the specimens from the 3 patients with persisting F. hepatica eggs in their stools remained positive. PMID:8126178

  20. [Prevention of bacterial risk: pathogen inactivation/detection of bacteria].

    PubMed

    Morel, P; Naegelen, C; Deschaseaux, M; Bardiaux, L

    2013-05-01

    Bacterial contamination of blood products remains the most important infectious risk of blood transfusion in 2013. Platelet concentrates (PC) are in cause in the majority of the transfusion reaction due to bacterial contaminations. A lot of prevention methods have been developed over the last 10 years (pre-donation interview, skin decontamination, diversion of the first 30 mL of the donation, leuko-reduction...), they have focused on limiting the contamination of the donations and prevent the bacterial growth in donations and/or in the blood products. These measures were effective and led to significantly reducing the risk of adverse effects associated with bacterial growth. However, every year there are about six accidents (with a high level of imputability) and one death. The reduction of the bacterial risk remains a priority for the French Blood Establishment (EFS). The procedure for skin disinfection is going to be improved in order to further strengthen this crucial step to avoid the contamination of donation. Methods of pathogen inactivation applied to plasma and PC are available in France and their effectiveness is demonstrated on the bacterial risk. Methods for bacterial detection of PC are used in many countries now. Automated culture is the most common. Alternatives are now available in the form of rapid tests able to analyze the PC just before the delivery and avoid false negatives observed with automated culture. Assessments are under way to confirm these benefits in 2013. PMID:23622837

  1. Aromatic-dependent salmonella as anti-bacterial vaccines and as presenters of heterologous antigens or of DNA encoding them.

    PubMed

    Stocker, B A

    2000-09-29

    The development of live bacterial vaccines is reviewed, in particular aromatic-dependent Salmonella, either for protection against the corresponding infections (including typhoid fever) or as carrier-presenter of antigens of unrelated pathogens or of DNA specifying them. Aromatic-dependent Salmonella live vaccines are also compared with BCG and Ty21a and the recent records of exceptional situations are discussed in which aroA (deletion) strains of Salmonella typhimurium cause progressive disease in mice. PMID:11000459

  2. Electrochemical immunosensor based on hyperbranched structure for carcinoembryonic antigen detection.

    PubMed

    Miao, Jingjing; Wang, Xiaobo; Lu, Liandi; Zhu, Peiyuan; Mao, Chun; Zhao, Haolin; Song, Youchao; Shen, Jian

    2014-08-15

    Sensitive determination of carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) is very important in clinical research and diagnosis. Herein we report the design and synthesis of a new kind of immunosensor based on the benefits of hyperbranched structure. The hyperbranched polyester was grafted to the surface of indium tin oxides glass (ITO) electrode, and the grafting processes were characterized by attentuated total reflectance Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (ATR-FTIR), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). After CEA and horse radish peroxidase (HRP)-labeled antibody-conjugated AuNPs (HRP-Ab2-AuNPs) bioconjugates were immobilized on the surface of the hyperbranched structure-modified electrode, the optimized conditions of the above electrode were investigated. Moreover, the analytical performance of the proposed immunosensor showed a high sensitivity, a linear range from 0.01 to 80ng/mL with a low detection limit of 2.36pg/mL, and good selectivity for CEA. The designed immunoassay system holds great potential for ultrasensitive electrochemical biosensing of other analytes. PMID:24607616

  3. [Detection of dengue virus antigen in post-mortem tissues].

    PubMed

    Rivera, Jorge; Neira, Marcela; Parra, Edgar; Méndez, Jairo; Sarmiento, Ladys; Caldas, María Leonor

    2014-01-01

    The epidemiological situation of dengue has worsened over the last decade. The difficulties in preventing its transmission and the absence of a vaccine or specific treatment have made dengue a serious risk to public health, health centers and research systems at different levels. Currently, most studies on the pathogenesis of dengue infection focus on the T-cell immune response almost exclusively in secondary infections and are aimed at identifying the mechanisms involved in the development of vascular permeability and bleeding events that accompany the infection. This report describes the case of a baby girl less than 45 days of age with clinical signs of severe dengue, whose diagnosis was confirmed by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction in post-mortem tissue samples and by the ancillary diagnostic use of immunohistochemistry, which detected viral antigens in all organs obtained at autopsy. This case highlights the importance of studying primary infections associated with severe dengue, particularly in children, who are more likely to develop the severe form of the disease without previous infection, and it further stresses the importance of a diagnosis that should not be based solely on the examination of liver tissue samples when studying the pathogenesis of the viral infection. PMID:25504239

  4. Bioluminescent enzyme immunoassay for the detection of norovirus capsid antigen.

    PubMed

    Sakamaki, Nozomi; Ohiro, Yoshiyuki; Ito, Mitsuki; Makinodan, Mitsuru; Ohta, Tsubasa; Suzuki, Wataru; Takayasu, Susumu; Tsuge, Harufumi

    2012-12-01

    An ultrasensitive and fully automated bioluminescent enzyme immunoassay (BLEIA) was developed for the detection of norovirus (NV) capsid antigen. In the evaluation tests with recombinant virus-like particles, the BLEIA demonstrated broad reactivity against several NV genotypes (genotypes 1, 3, 4, 7, 8, and 12 in genogroup I [GI] and genotypes 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 12, and 13 in GII), a wide dose-response range from 0.25 pg/ml to 10,000 pg/ml, and good reproducibility with low coefficients of variation (CVs) (within-run CVs of <2.8%, between-day CVs of <3.7%). In the evaluation tests with NV-positive fecal samples, a good correlation (y = 0.66x - 3.21, r = 0.84) between the BLEIA and real-time quantitative reverse transcription-PCR was obtained. Furthermore, in the dilution test with NV specimens, the analytical sensitivity of NV was estimated to be 10(5) to 10(6) copies/g of fecal sample, indicating that the analytical sensitivity of the BLEIA is comparable to that of commercially available molecular methods. All assay steps are fully automated, the turnaround time is 46 min, and the throughput of the assay is 120 tests/h. These results indicate that the BLEIA is potentially useful for the rapid diagnosis of NV in epidemic and sporadic gastroenteritis. PMID:23081816

  5. Control of tick infestations in cattle vaccinated with bacterial membranes containing surface-exposed tick protective antigens.

    PubMed

    Almazán, Consuelo; Moreno-Cantú, Orlando; Moreno-Cid, Juan A; Galindo, Ruth C; Canales, Mario; Villar, Margarita; de la Fuente, José

    2012-01-01

    Vaccines containing the Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus BM86 and BM95 antigens protect cattle against tick infestations. Tick subolesin (SUB), elongation factor 1a (EF1a) and ubiquitin (UBQ) are new candidate protective antigens for the control of cattle tick infestations. Previous studies showed that R. microplus BM95 immunogenic peptides fused to the Anaplasma marginale major surface protein (MSP) 1a N-terminal region (BM95-MSP1a) for presentation on the Escherichia coli membrane were protective against R. microplus infestations in rabbits. In this study, we extended these results by expressing SUB-MSP1a, EF1a-MSP1a and UBQ-MSP1a fusion proteins on the E. coli membrane using this system and demonstrating that bacterial membranes containing the chimeric proteins BM95-MSP1a and SUB-MSP1a were protective (>60% vaccine efficacy) against experimental R. microplus and Rhipicephalus annulatus infestations in cattle. This system provides a novel, simple and cost-effective approach for the production of tick protective antigens by surface display of antigenic protein chimera on the E. coli membrane and demonstrates the possibility of using recombinant bacterial membrane fractions in vaccine preparations to protect cattle against tick infestations. PMID:22085549

  6. Fluorescence immunoassay for detecting periodontal bacterial pathogens in plaque.

    PubMed Central

    Wolff, L F; Anderson, L; Sandberg, G P; Aeppli, D M; Shelburne, C E

    1991-01-01

    A particle concentration fluorescence immunoassay has been modified into a bacterial concentration fluorescence immunoassay (BCFIA) to rapidly detect periodontopathic bacteria in human plaque samples. The BCFIA utilizes fluorescently tagged monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) directed against the lipopolysaccharide of selected gram-negative plaque bacteria. Microorganisms closely associated with periodontal disease that can be identified in plaque with the BCFIA include Porphyromonas gingivalis, Bacteroides intermedius, Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans, Fusobacterium nucleatum, and Eikenella corrodens. Briefly, the procedure involved mixing a patient's plaque sample or other bacterial preparation with a species-specific fluorescein isothiocyanate-labeled MAb in a specialized microtiter plate. This mixture was incubated to allow binding of the MAb to its homologous bacteria. The bound and unbound fluorescent tagged MAbs were separated by filtration in the modified microtiter plate, and the total bacterial bound fluorescence was determined with a fluorimeter. The number of a specific bacterial species in a given plaque sample or other bacterial suspension was estimated by reference to a primary standard carried through the BCFIA. The lower detection limit of the BCFIA was 10(3) to 10(4) bacterial cells from single cultures of bacteria or 10(4) bacterial cells in mixed cultures. The coefficient of variation within and between plates for each of the five bacterium-specific MAbs in screening plaque for the periodontal pathogens was less than 10%. These results demonstrate that microbes in plaque can be used as the solid phase in the BCFIA to detect and quantitate MAbs associated with specific bacteria quickly and reliably. PMID:1761686

  7. Detection Of Bacterial Endosymbionts In Clinical Acanthamoeba Isolates

    PubMed Central

    Iovieno, Alfonso; Ledee, Dolena R.; Miller, Darlene; Alfonso, Eduardo C.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose To determine the presence of four clinically relevant bacterial endosymbionts in Acanthamoeba isolates obtained from patients with Acanthamoeba keratitis (AK) and the possible contribution of endosymbionts to the pathogenesis of AK. Design Experimental study Participants Acanthamoeba isolates (N=37) recovered from cornea and contact lens paraphernalia of 23 patients with culture proven AK and 1 environmental isolate. Methods Acanthamoeba isolates were evaluated for the presence of microbial endosymbionts belonging to the bacterial genera Legionella, Pseudomonas, Mycobacteria and Chlamydia using molecular techniques (Polymerase chain reaction and sequence analysis, fluorescent in situ hybridization) and transmission electron microscopy. Corneal toxicity and virulence of Acanthamoeba isolates with and without endosymbionts were compared using a cytopathic effect (CPE) assay of human corneal epithelial cells in vitro. Initial visual acuity (VA), location and characteristics of the infiltrate, time to detection of the infection and symptoms duration at presentation were evaluated in all patients. Main Outcome Measures Prevalence and potential pathobiology of bacterial endosymbionts detected in Acanthamoeba isolates recovered from AK. Results Twenty-two of the 38 (59.4%) cultures examined contained at least one bacterial endosymbiont. One isolate contained two endosymbionts, Legionella and Chlamydia, confirmed by fluorescence in situ hybridization. Corneal toxicity (CPE) was significantly higher for Acanthamoebae hosting endosymbionts compared to isolates without endosymbionts (p<0.05). Corneal pathogenic endosymbionts such as Pseudomonas and Mycobacterium enhanced Acanthamoeba CPE significantly more than Legionella (p<0.05). In the presence of bacterial endosymbionts, there was a trend toward worse initial VA (p>0.05), central location (p<0.05), absence of radial perineuritis (p<0.05), delayed time to detection (p>0.05) and longer symptoms duration at

  8. Cross-Reactivity of the PLATELIA CANDIDA Antigen Detection Enzyme Immunoassay with Fungal Antigen Extracts

    PubMed Central

    Rimek, Dagmar; Singh, Jagpal; Kappe, Reinhard

    2003-01-01

    We studied the specificity of the PLATELIA CANDIDA Ag enzyme immunoassay by using 130 isolates of 63 clinically relevant fungal species. Antigen extracts of seven Candida spp. (Candida albicans, C. dubliniensis, C. famata, C. glabrata, C. guilliermondii, C. lusitaniae, and C. tropicalis) repeatedly yielded positive reactions (>0.5 ng/ml). Geotrichum candidum and Fusarium verticillioides were found to yield borderline-positive reactions (0.25 to 0.50 ng/ml). Antigen preparations from the other 54 fungal species, including yeasts, molds, dermatophytes, and dimorphic fungi, did not cross-react in the assay. PMID:12843102

  9. Rapid diagnosis of typhoid fever by antigen detection.

    PubMed

    Sivadasan, K; Kurien, B; John, T J

    1984-01-21

    Salmonella typhi antigen was demonstrated in the blood of patients with typhoid fever by a passive staphylococcal agglutination test. This test was positive in 10 culture-proven typhoid patients and negative in 10 febrile patients without typhoid. PMID:6140444

  10. Detection of sugarcane yellow leaf virus by direct antigen coated enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The L9 (34) orthogonal diagram was applied to optimize detection conditions of direct antigen coated enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (DAC-ELISA) for Sugarcane yellow leaf virus (SCYLV) in sugarcane. Statistic analyses indicated that 150 µL of SCYLV in juice and leaf crude extract antigens was the ...

  11. Development of Recombinant Antigen Array for Simultaneous Detection of Viral Antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yi; Yu, Fengling; Huang, Haiyan; Han, Jinxiang

    2013-01-01

    Protein microarrays have been developed to study antibody reactivity against a large number of antigens, demonstrating extensive perspective for clinical application. We developed a viral antigen array by spotting four recombinant antigens and synthetic peptide, including glycoprotein G of herpes simplex virus (HSV) type 1 and 2, phosphoprotein 150 of cytomegalovirus (CMV), Rubella virus (RV) core plus glycoprotein E1 and E2 as well as a E1 peptide with the optimal concentrations on activated glass slides to simultaneously detect IgG and IgM against HSV1, HSV2, CMV and RV in clinical specimens of sera and cerebrospinal fluids (CSFs). The positive reference sera were initially used to measure the sensitivity and specificity of the array with the optimal conditions. Then clinical specimens of 144 sera and 93 CSFs were tested for IgG and IgM antibodies directed against HSV1, HSV2, CMV and RV by the antigen array. Specificity of the antigen array for viral antibodies detection was satisfying compared to commercial ELISA kits but sensitivity of the array varied relying on quality and antigenic epitopes of the spotting antigens. In short, the recombinant antigen array has potential to simultaneous detect multiple viral antibodies using minute amount (3 µl) of samples, which holds the particularly advantage to detect viral antibodies in clinical CSFs being suspicious of neonatal meningitis and encephalitis. PMID:24058498

  12. Detection of Bacterial Endospores in Soil by Terbium Fluorescence

    PubMed Central

    Brandes Ammann, Andrea; Kölle, Linda; Brandl, Helmut

    2011-01-01

    Spore formation is a survival mechanism of microorganisms when facing unfavorable environmental conditions resulting in “dormant” states. We investigated the occurrence of bacterial endospores in soils from various locations including grasslands (pasture, meadow), allotment gardens, and forests, as well as fluvial sediments. Bacterial spores are characterized by their high content of dipicolinic acid (DPA). In the presence of terbium, DPA forms a complex showing a distinctive photoluminescence spectrum. DPA was released from soil by microwaving or autoclaving. The addition of aluminium chloride reduced signal quenching by interfering compounds such as phosphate. The highest spore content (up to 109 spores per gram of dry soil) was found in grassland soils. Spore content is related to soil type, to soil depth, and to soil carbon-to-nitrogen ratio. Our study might provide a basis for the detection of “hot spots” of bacterial spores in soil. PMID:21754939

  13. Serogroup-Specific Bacterial Engineered Glycoproteins as Novel Antigenic Targets for Diagnosis of Shiga Toxin-Producing-Escherichia coli-Associated Hemolytic-Uremic Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Melli, Luciano J.; Ciocchini, Andrés E.; Caillava, Ana J.; Vozza, Nicolás; Chinen, Isabel; Rivas, Marta; Feldman, Mario F.

    2014-01-01

    Human infection with Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) is a major cause of postdiarrheal hemolytic-uremic syndrome (HUS), a life-threatening condition characterized by hemolytic anemia, thrombocytopenia, and acute renal failure. E. coli O157:H7 is the dominant STEC serotype associated with HUS worldwide, although non-O157 STEC serogroups can cause a similar disease. The detection of anti-O157 E. coli lipopolysaccharide (LPS) antibodies in combination with stool culture and detection of free fecal Shiga toxin considerably improves the diagnosis of STEC infections. In the present study, we exploited a bacterial glycoengineering technology to develop recombinant glycoproteins consisting of the O157, O145, or O121 polysaccharide attached to a carrier protein as serogroup-specific antigens for the serological diagnosis of STEC-associated HUS. Our results demonstrate that using these antigens in indirect ELISAs (glyco-iELISAs), it is possible to clearly discriminate between STEC O157-, O145-, and O121-infected patients and healthy children, as well as to confirm the diagnosis in HUS patients for whom the classical diagnostic procedures failed. Interestingly, a specific IgM response was detected in almost all the analyzed samples, indicating that it is possible to detect the infection in the early stages of the disease. Additionally, in all the culture-positive HUS patients, the serotype identified by glyco-iELISAs was in accordance with the serotype of the isolated strain, indicating that these antigens are valuable not only for diagnosing HUS caused by the O157, O145, and O121 serogroups but also for serotyping and guiding the subsequent steps to confirm diagnosis. PMID:25472487

  14. Detection of Burkholderia pseudomallei O-antigen serotypes in near-neighbor species

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Burkholderia pseudomallei is the etiological agent of melioidosis and a CDC category B select agent with no available effective vaccine. Previous immunizations in mice have utilized the lipopolysaccharide (LPS) as a potential vaccine target because it is known as one of the most important antigenic epitopes in B. pseudomallei. Complicating this strategy are the four different B. pseudomallei LPS O-antigen types: A, B, B2, and rough. Sero-crossreactivity is common among O-antigens of Burkholderia species. Here, we identified the presence of multiple B. pseudomallei O-antigen types and sero-crossreactivity in its near-neighbor species. Results PCR screening of O-antigen biosynthesis genes, phenotypic characterization using SDS-PAGE, and immunoblot analysis showed that majority of B. mallei and B. thailandensis strains contained the typical O-antigen type A. In contrast, most of B. ubonensis and B. thailandensis-like strains expressed the atypical O-antigen types B and B2, respectively. Most B. oklahomensis strains expressed a distinct and non-seroreactive O-antigen type, except strain E0147 which expressed O-antigen type A. O-antigen type B2 was also detected in B. thailandensis 82172, B. ubonensis MSMB108, and Burkholderia sp. MSMB175. Interestingly, B. thailandensis-like MSMB43 contained a novel serotype B positive O-antigen. Conclusions This study expands the number of species which express B. pseudomallei O-antigen types. Further work is required to elucidate the full structures and how closely these are to the B. pseudomallei O-antigens, which will ultimately determine the efficacy of the near-neighbor B serotypes for vaccine development. PMID:23126230

  15. Genetic Diversity of O-Antigens in Hafnia alvei and the Development of a Suspension Array for Serotype Detection

    PubMed Central

    Duan, Zhifeng; Niedziela, Tomasz; Lugowski, Czeslaw; Cao, Boyang; Wang, Tianwei; Xu, Lingling; Yang, Baopeng; Liu, Bin; Wang, Lei

    2016-01-01

    Hafnia alvei is a facultative and rod-shaped gram-negative bacterium that belongs to the Enterobacteriaceae family. Although it has been more than 50 years since the genus was identified, very little is known about variations among Hafnia species. Diversity in O-antigens (O-polysaccharide, OPS) is thought to be a major factor in bacterial adaptation to different hosts and situations and variability in the environment. Antigenic variation is also an important factor in pathogenicity that has been used to define clones within a number of species. The genes that are required to synthesize OPS are always clustered within the bacterial chromosome. A serotyping scheme including 39 O-serotypes has been proposed for H. alvei, but it has not been correlated with known OPS structures, and no previous report has described the genetic features of OPS. In this study, we obtained the genome sequences of 21 H. alvei strains (as defined by previous immunochemical studies) with different lipopolysaccharides. This is the first study to show that the O-antigen gene cluster in H. alvei is located between mpo and gnd in the chromosome. All 21 of the OPS gene clusters contain both the wzx gene and the wzy gene and display a large number of polymorphisms. We developed an O serotype-specific wzy-based suspension array to detect all 21 of the distinct OPS forms we identified in H. alvei. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report to identify the genetic features of H. alvei antigenic variation and to develop a molecular technique to identify and classify different serotypes. PMID:27171009

  16. Genetic Diversity of O-Antigens in Hafnia alvei and the Development of a Suspension Array for Serotype Detection.

    PubMed

    Duan, Zhifeng; Niedziela, Tomasz; Lugowski, Czeslaw; Cao, Boyang; Wang, Tianwei; Xu, Lingling; Yang, Baopeng; Liu, Bin; Wang, Lei

    2016-01-01

    Hafnia alvei is a facultative and rod-shaped gram-negative bacterium that belongs to the Enterobacteriaceae family. Although it has been more than 50 years since the genus was identified, very little is known about variations among Hafnia species. Diversity in O-antigens (O-polysaccharide, OPS) is thought to be a major factor in bacterial adaptation to different hosts and situations and variability in the environment. Antigenic variation is also an important factor in pathogenicity that has been used to define clones within a number of species. The genes that are required to synthesize OPS are always clustered within the bacterial chromosome. A serotyping scheme including 39 O-serotypes has been proposed for H. alvei, but it has not been correlated with known OPS structures, and no previous report has described the genetic features of OPS. In this study, we obtained the genome sequences of 21 H. alvei strains (as defined by previous immunochemical studies) with different lipopolysaccharides. This is the first study to show that the O-antigen gene cluster in H. alvei is located between mpo and gnd in the chromosome. All 21 of the OPS gene clusters contain both the wzx gene and the wzy gene and display a large number of polymorphisms. We developed an O serotype-specific wzy-based suspension array to detect all 21 of the distinct OPS forms we identified in H. alvei. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report to identify the genetic features of H. alvei antigenic variation and to develop a molecular technique to identify and classify different serotypes. PMID:27171009

  17. Reaction of goat's milk with stained antigens in the detection of brucellosis

    PubMed Central

    Alivisatos, G. P.; Edipides, T.

    1953-01-01

    Testing for brucellosis in goats by the reaction of milk with stained antigens was carried out on 206 milk-samples and the results compared with those of sero-agglutination tests on the same animals. The authors find that in most cases the milk reactions correspond to the sero-agglutination results, and that it is the agglutination of the stained antigen which is the principal sign of a positive reaction rather than ring formation, which is very irregular. Haematoxylin antigen is generally more reliable than Bendtsen antigen, but, with either, the results should be read after 1-2 hours' incubation at 37°C. The authors conclude that the stained antigen test can be used for the detection of infection in herds of goats, but that it is not yet possible to say whether it is also valuable for detecting individual infection. PMID:13141139

  18. Detection of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli colonization factor antigen I in stool specimens by an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay.

    PubMed Central

    Evans, D G; Evans, D J; Clegg, S

    1980-01-01

    An enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) was employed to detect and quantitate the fimbrial colonization factor antigen (CFA/I) of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli in stool specimens obtained from adult cases of diarrhea in which CFA/I-positive E. coli was the known causative agent. The inhibition method, or blocking technique, was used. In this method, a standardized dilution of human anti-CFA/I serum was preincubated with dilutions of stool extract before transfer to CFA/I-coated microtiter plate wells, and then ELISA was performed with alkaline phosphatase-conjugated anti-human immunoglobulin. CFA/I purified from E. coli strain H-10407 (O78:H11) was used. Acute-phase diarrheal stool specimens were found to contain approximately 3.0 mg of antigen (mean value) per g stool, whereas control (CFA/I-negative) specimens contained insignificant amounts (less than 0.03 mg/g) of antigen. Also, CFA/I was detected in culture fluids of CFA/I positive enterotoxigenic E. coli belonging to a variety of serotypes and was undetectable in similar preparations from P-strains (spontaneous CFA/I-negative derivatives) of the same test cultures. Equivalent results were obtained in ELISA tests by using bacterial cells taken from isolated colonies grown on CFA agar. These results indicate that the ELISA technique will be useful for the diagnosis of diarrhea caused by CFA/I-positive enterotoxigenic E. coli. PMID:7031075

  19. Liquid crystals as optical amplifiers for bacterial detection.

    PubMed

    Zafiu, C; Hussain, Z; Küpcü, S; Masutani, A; Kilickiran, P; Sinner, E-K

    2016-06-15

    Interactions of bacteria with target molecules (e.g. antibiotics) or other microorganisms are of growing interest. The first barrier for targeting gram-negative bacteria is layer of a Lipopolysaccharides (LPS). Liquid crystal (LC) based sensors covered with LPS monolayers, as presented in this study, offer a simple model to study and make use of this type of interface for detection and screening. This work describes in detail the production and application of such sensors based on three different LPS that have been investigated regarding their potential to serve as sensing layer to detect bacteria. The LPS O127:B8 in combination with a LC based sensor was identified to be most useful as biomimetic sensing surface. This LPS/LC combination interacts with three different bacteria species, one gram-positive and two gram-negative species, allowing the detection of bacterial presence regardless from their viability. It could be shown that even very low bacterial cell numbers (minimum 500 cell ml(-1)) could be detected within minutes (maximum 15 min). The readout mechanism is the adsorption of bacterial entities on surface bond LPS molecules with the LC serving as an optical amplifier. PMID:26827146

  20. Post immunization Hib antigen detection in the CSF of a patient with meningococcal meningitis.

    PubMed

    Samaha, A N; Araj, G F; Mroueh, S M

    1997-01-01

    We report a case of meningococcal meningitis where the cerebrospinal fluid was negative for Neisseria meningitidis but positive for Haemophilus influenzae type b by rapid antigen detection test. We believe that this was due to prior immunization with Haemophilus influenzae type b vaccine. We recommend caution in interpretation of the rapid antigen detection tests especially in patients who had been vaccinated against organisms screened by these tests. PMID:9421943

  1. A Cronobacter turicensis O1 Antigen-Specific Monoclonal Antibody Inhibits Bacterial Motility and Entry into Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Lehner, Angelika; Dietrich, Richard; Kleinsteuber, Ina; Canals, Rocío; Zurfluh, Katrin; Weiner, Kerstin; Märtlbauer, Erwin

    2014-01-01

    Cronobacter turicensis is an opportunistic foodborne pathogen that can cause a rare but sometimes lethal infection in neonates. Little is known about the virulence mechanisms and intracellular lifestyle of this pathogen. In this study, we developed an IgG monoclonal antibody (MAb; MAb 2G4) that specifically recognizes the O1 antigen of C. turicensis cells. The antilipopolysaccharide antibody bound predominantly monovalently to the O antigen and reduced bacterial growth without causing cell agglutination. Furthermore, binding of the antibody to the O1 antigen of C. turicensis cells caused a significant reduction of the membrane potential which is required to energize flagellar rotation, accompanied by a decreased flagellum-based motility. These results indicate that binding of IgG to the O antigen of C. turicensis causes a direct antimicrobial effect. In addition, this feature of the antibody enabled new insight into the pathogenicity of C. turicensis. In a tissue culture infection model, pretreatment of C. turicensis with MAb 2G4 showed no difference in adhesion to human epithelial cells, whereas invasion of bacteria into Caco-2 cells was significantly inhibited. PMID:25534937

  2. Sensitive immunoradiometric assay for the detection of Paracoccidioides brasiliensis antigens in human sera.

    PubMed Central

    Ferreira-da-Cruz, M F; Galvão-Castro, B; Daniel-Ribeiro, C T

    1991-01-01

    In the present study we report the standardization of an immunoradiometric assay (IRMA) for detection of Paracoccidioides brasiliensis circulating antigens that could be useful in the diagnosis and prognosis of paracoccidioidomycosis. For this purpose we studied the reactivities of P. brasiliensis and other mycotic antigens with rabbit polyclonal anti-P. brasiliensis antibodies (immunoglobulin G) in order to evaluate the sensitivity and specificity of an IRMA for detecting P. brasiliensis antigens. The results were compared with those obtained by the double immunodiffusion test, the standard technique for the serodiagnosis of paracoccidioidomycosis. By using the immunoglobulin G fraction of rabbit antisera (900 ng per well), it was possible to detect up to 3.6 ng (0.12 micrograms/ml) of cellular antigen and 360 ng (12 micrograms/ml) of metabolic antigen in contrast to the double immunodiffusion test that could detect only 12 micrograms (1.2 mg/ml) of both antigens. IRMA was shown to be feasible and very sensitive and may therefore help, together with clinical data, in establishing early diagnosis and assessing disease activity. It could also allow the study of relationships between P. brasiliensis circulating antigens and host defense mechanisms during the disease. PMID:1907608

  3. CD4+ T Cells and Toll-Like Receptors Recognize Salmonella Antigens Expressed in Bacterial Surface Organelles

    PubMed Central

    Bergman, Molly A.; Cummings, Lisa A.; Barrett, Sara L. Rassoulian; Smith, Kelly D.; Lara, J. Cano; Aderem, Alan; Cookson, Brad T.

    2005-01-01

    A better understanding of immunity to infection is revealed from the characteristics of microbial ligands recognized by host immune responses. Murine infection with the intracellular bacterium Salmonella generates CD4+ T cells that specifically recognize Salmonella proteins expressed in bacterial surface organelles such as flagella and membrane vesicles. These natural Salmonella antigens are also ligands for Toll-like receptors (TLRs) or avidly associated with TLR ligands such as lipopolysaccharide (LPS). PhoP/PhoQ, a regulon controlling Salmonella virulence and remodeling of LPS to resist innate immunity, coordinately represses production of surface-exposed antigens recognized by CD4+ T cells and TLRs. These data suggest that genetically coordinated surface modifications may provide a growth advantage for Salmonella in host tissues by limiting both innate and adaptive immune recognition. PMID:15731032

  4. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for a soluble antigen of Renibacterium salmoninarum, the causative agent for salmonid bacterial kidney disease

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pascho, R.J.; Mulcahy, D.

    1987-01-01

    A double-antibody enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) for detection of a soluble fraction of Renibacterium salmoninarum was developed from components extracted from the supernatant of an R. salmoninarum broth culture. The Costar® Serocluster™ EIA microplate gave the highest absorbance and signal-to-noise ratios among seven types tested. Including Tween 80 in the wash buffer resulted in higher absorbances than Tween 20 when antigen was present. Background absorbance did not increase when Tween 80 was added to the wash buffer, but did when Tween 80 replaced Tween 20 in antigen and conjugate diluents. Adsorption of coating antibody peaked within 4 h at 37 °C and 16 h at 4 °C. Antigen attachment to antibody-coated microplate wells depended more on incubation temperature than duration; we adopted a 3-h incubation at 25 °C. Conjugate incubation for longer than 1 h at 37 °C or 3 h at 25 °C resulted in unacceptable background levels. No cross-reactions resulted from heat-extracted antigens of 10 other species of bacteria. The optimized ELISA is a 6-h test that enables detection of levels of soluble antigen as low as 2–20 ng.

  5. Evaluation of Diagnos Malaria Stix test (antigen detection assay) for diagnosis of malaria.

    PubMed

    Khan, Haris M; Shujatullah, Fatima; Shahid, M; Raza, Adil; Malik, Ritu

    2010-06-01

    Malaria is one of the most common parasitic infection in India. The diagnosis largely depends on peripheral blood smear examination. Newer diagnostic methods like various antigen detection assays are now in use for prompt diagnosis and treatment. This study was done to determine the effectiveness of Diagnos Malaria Stix (antigen detection) assay in diagnosis of malaria. This involves detection of PfHRP-2 antigen and P.V. specific pLDH antigen. 162 patients with signs and symptoms of malaria included in the study. Leishman stained blood smear examination was done for all patients. Commercially available Diagnos Malaria Stix assay was used. Diagnos Malaria Stix showed sensitivity, specificity positive and negative predictive values of 100% each while Sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive values of Leishman stained blood smear examination were 45.45%, 100%, 100% and 92% respectively. PMID:22471175

  6. Method to conjugate polysaccharide antigens to surfaces for the detection of antibodies.

    PubMed

    Boas, Ulrik; Lind, Peter; Riber, Ulla

    2014-11-15

    A new generic method for the conjugation of lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-derived polysaccharide antigens from gram-negative bacteria has been developed using Salmonella as a model. After removal of lipid A from the LPS by mild acidolysis, the polysaccharide antigen was conjugated to polystyrene microbeads modified with N-alkyl hydroxylamine and N-alkyl-O-methyl hydroxylamine surface groups by incubation of antigen and beads for 16 h at 40 °C without the need for coupling agents. The efficiency of the new method was evaluated by flow cytometry in model samples and serum samples containing antibodies against Salmonella typhimurium and Salmonella dublin. The presented method was compared with a similar method for conjugation of Salmonella polysaccharide antigens to surfaces. Here, the new method showed higher antigen coupling efficiency by detecting low concentrations of antibodies. Furthermore, the polysaccharide-conjugated beads showed preserved bioactivity after 1 year of use. PMID:25076184

  7. Performance Assessment of Four Chimeric Trypanosoma cruzi Antigens Based on Antigen-Antibody Detection for Diagnosis of Chronic Chagas Disease.

    PubMed

    Santos, Fred Luciano Neves; Celedon, Paola Alejandra Fiorani; Zanchin, Nilson Ivo Tonin; Brasil, Tatiana de Arruda Campos; Foti, Leonardo; Souza, Wayner Vieira de; Silva, Edmilson Domingos; Gomes, Yara de Miranda; Krieger, Marco Aurélio

    2016-01-01

    The performance of serologic tests in chronic Chagas disease diagnosis largely depends on the type and quality of the antigen preparations that are used for detection of anti-Trypanosoma cruzi antibodies. Whole-cell T. cruzi extracts or recombinant proteins have shown variation in the performance and cross-reactivity. Synthetic chimeric proteins comprising fragments of repetitive amino acids of several different proteins have been shown to improve assay performances to detect Chagasic infections. Here, we describe the production of four chimeric T. cruzi proteins and the assessment of their performance for diagnostic purposes. Circular Dichroism spectra indicated the absence of well-defined secondary structures, while polydispersity evaluated by Dynamic Light Scattering revealed only minor aggregates in 50 mM carbonate-bicarbonate (pH 9.6), demonstrating that it is an appropriate buffering system for sensitizing microplates. Serum samples from T. cruzi-infected and non-infected individuals were used to assess the performance of these antigens for detecting antibodies against T. cruzi, using both enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and a liquid bead array platform. Performance parameters (AUC, sensitivity, specificity, accuracy and J index) showed high diagnostic accuracy for all chimeric proteins for detection of specific anti-T. cruzi antibodies and differentiated seropositive individuals from those who were seronegative. Our data suggest that these four chimeric proteins are eligible for phase II studies. PMID:27517281

  8. Performance Assessment of Four Chimeric Trypanosoma cruzi Antigens Based on Antigen-Antibody Detection for Diagnosis of Chronic Chagas Disease

    PubMed Central

    Zanchin, Nilson Ivo Tonin; Brasil, Tatiana de Arruda Campos; Foti, Leonardo; de Souza, Wayner Vieira; Silva, Edmilson Domingos; Gomes, Yara de Miranda; Krieger, Marco Aurélio

    2016-01-01

    The performance of serologic tests in chronic Chagas disease diagnosis largely depends on the type and quality of the antigen preparations that are used for detection of anti-Trypanosoma cruzi antibodies. Whole-cell T. cruzi extracts or recombinant proteins have shown variation in the performance and cross-reactivity. Synthetic chimeric proteins comprising fragments of repetitive amino acids of several different proteins have been shown to improve assay performances to detect Chagasic infections. Here, we describe the production of four chimeric T. cruzi proteins and the assessment of their performance for diagnostic purposes. Circular Dichroism spectra indicated the absence of well-defined secondary structures, while polydispersity evaluated by Dynamic Light Scattering revealed only minor aggregates in 50 mM carbonate-bicarbonate (pH 9.6), demonstrating that it is an appropriate buffering system for sensitizing microplates. Serum samples from T. cruzi-infected and non-infected individuals were used to assess the performance of these antigens for detecting antibodies against T. cruzi, using both enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and a liquid bead array platform. Performance parameters (AUC, sensitivity, specificity, accuracy and J index) showed high diagnostic accuracy for all chimeric proteins for detection of specific anti-T. cruzi antibodies and differentiated seropositive individuals from those who were seronegative. Our data suggest that these four chimeric proteins are eligible for phase II studies. PMID:27517281

  9. Antigenic Crossreactivity between Bacterial and Plant Cytochrome P-450 Monoxygenases 1

    PubMed Central

    Stewart, Cassie B.; Schuler, Mary A.

    1989-01-01

    Although cytochrome P-450 monoxygenases mediate critical reactions in plant microsomes, characterization of their activities has been difficult due to their inherent instability and the lack of a crossreacting P-450 antibody. We have surveyed the effects of protein stabilizing agents on t-cinnamic acid hydroxylase (t-CAH), a prominent microsomal P-450, and on total P-450 monoxygenase content. Trans-cinnamic acid is the most effective protecting agent for t-CAH activity. Leupeptin, a broad spectrum protease inhibitor, stabilizes t-CAH activity and increases the apparent P-450 content more than serine protease inhibitors such as phenylmethylsulfonyl fluoride. The combination of t-cinnamic acid and protease inhibitors increase the level of detectable t-CAH activity 4- to 14-fold over the levels detected by previously published procedures. In order to estimate the molecular weights and diversity of the plant P-450 monoxygenases in wounded pea epicotyls, we have prepared two polyclonal antibodies against the Pseudomonas putida camphor hydroxylase (P-450cam). One of the heterologous antibodies cross-reacts with constitutive microsomal polypeptides between 52 and 54 kilodaltons and several pea (Pisum sativum L.) mitochondrial proteins between 47 and 48 kilodaltons. The other polyclonal antibody cross-reacts strongly with two wound-induced polypeptides (65 and 47 kilodaltons) and weakly with one constitutive polypeptide (58 kilodaltons). We conclude that at least two subclasses of plant P-450 monoxygenases share common epitopes with the bacterial P-450 enzyme. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 PMID:16666804

  10. Bovine viral diarrhea virus antigen detection across whole cattle hides using two antigen-capture enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays.

    PubMed

    Vander Ley, Brian L; Ridpath, Julia F; Sweiger, Shaun H

    2012-05-01

    Bovine viral diarrhea virus is a costly disease of cattle that can be controlled by vaccination, biosecurity, and removal of persistently infected cattle. Development and proficiency testing of assays to identify persistently infected cattle requires substantial quantities of known positive- and negative-sample material. The objective of this study was to determine what sections of bovine skin contained Bovine viral diarrhea virus antigen. Two commercially available antigen-capture enzyme-linked immunoassays were used to test subsamples representing the entire skin of 3 persistently infected calves. Both assays detected Bovine viral diarrhea virus antigen in the samples indicated for use by assay protocol. However, one assay identified all subsamples as positive, while the second assay identified 64.4% of subsamples as positive. These results show that use of samples other than those specified by the assay protocol must be validated for each individual assay. In this study, alternative sample sites and use of the entire hide for proficiency testing would be acceptable for only one of the assays tested. PMID:22529122

  11. Rapid Bacterial Detection via an All-Electronic CMOS Biosensor.

    PubMed

    Nikkhoo, Nasim; Cumby, Nichole; Gulak, P Glenn; Maxwell, Karen L

    2016-01-01

    The timely and accurate diagnosis of infectious diseases is one of the greatest challenges currently facing modern medicine. The development of innovative techniques for the rapid and accurate identification of bacterial pathogens in point-of-care facilities using low-cost, portable instruments is essential. We have developed a novel all-electronic biosensor that is able to identify bacteria in less than ten minutes. This technology exploits bacteriocins, protein toxins naturally produced by bacteria, as the selective biological detection element. The bacteriocins are integrated with an array of potassium-selective sensors in Complementary Metal Oxide Semiconductor technology to provide an inexpensive bacterial biosensor. An electronic platform connects the CMOS sensor to a computer for processing and real-time visualization. We have used this technology to successfully identify both Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria commonly found in human infections. PMID:27618185

  12. Sandwich-ELISA detection of venom antigens in envenoming by Phoneutria nigriventer spider.

    PubMed

    Chávez-Olórtegui, C; Bohórquez, K; Alvarenga, L M; Kalapothakis, E; Campolina, D; Maria, W S; Diniz, C R

    2001-06-01

    Enzyme linked immunosorbent assays (ELISA) were developed to detect antigens from Phoneutria nigriventer spider venom. Horse anti-P. nigriventer immunoglobulins were prepared by immunoaffinity chromatography and used to set up a sandwich-type ELISA. The specificity of the assay was demonstrated by its capacity to correctly discriminate between the circulating antigens in mice that were experimentally inoculated with P. nigriventer venom from those in mice inoculated with Lycosa sp. and Loxosceles intermedia spider venoms, Tityus serrulatus scorpion venom and Apis mellifera bee venom. Measurable absorbance signals were obtained with 0.8ng of venom per assay. The ELISA was used to follow the kinetic distribution of antigens in experimentally envenomed mice and to detect antigens in the sera of patients envenomed by P. nigriventer. PMID:11137553

  13. Development and Evaluation of a Rapid Antigen Detection and Serotyping Lateral Flow Antigen Detection System for Foot-and-Mouth Disease Virus.

    PubMed

    Morioka, Kazuki; Fukai, Katsuhiko; Yoshida, Kazuo; Kitano, Rie; Yamazoe, Reiko; Yamada, Manabu; Nishi, Tatsuya; Kanno, Toru

    2015-01-01

    We developed a lateral flow strip using monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) which allows for rapid antigen detection and serotyping of foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV). This FMDV serotyping strip was able to detect all 7 serotypes and distinguish serotypes O, A, C and Asia1. Its sensitivities ranged from 10(3) to 10(4) of a 50% tissue culture infectious dose of each FMDV stain; this is equal to those of the commercial product Svanodip (Boehringer Ingelheim Svanova, Uppsala, Sweden), which can detect all seven serotypes of FMDV, but does not distinguish them. Our evaluation of the FMDV serotyping strip using a total of 118 clinical samples (vesicular fluids, vesicular epithelial emulsions and oral and/or nasal swabs) showed highly sensitive antigen detection and accuracy in serotyping in accordance with ELISA or RT-PCR. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report on any FMDV serotyping strip that provides both rapid antigen detection and serotyping of FMDV at the same time on one strip without extra devices. This method will be useful in both FMD-free countries and FMD-infected countries, especially where laboratory diagnosis cannot be carried out. PMID:26270053

  14. A novel inhibition ELISA for the detection and monitoring of Penicillium marneffei antigen in human serum.

    PubMed

    Prakit, K; Nosanchuk, J D; Pruksaphon, K; Vanittanakom, N; Youngchim, S

    2016-04-01

    The thermally dimorphic fungus Penicillium marneffei is a causative agent of penicilliosis marneffei, a disease considered to be an acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS)-defining illness in Southeast Asia and southern China. We have developed an inhibition enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (inh-ELISA) incorporating the yeast phase specific mannoprotein-binding monoclonal antibody 4D1 for the detection of P. marneffei infection. In our sample set, the test detected antigenemia in all 45 (100 %) patients with P. marneffei, with a mean antigen concentration of 4.32 μg/ml. No cross-reactivity in this assay was found using serum from 44 additional patients with other fungal infections, such as Aspergillus fumigatus, Cryptococcus neoformans, and Candida albicans, as well as 44 patients with bacterial infections, such as Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Streptococcus suis. Additionally, no reactivity occurred using serum from 31 human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected patients without a history of fungal infections and 113 healthy controls residing in endemic areas. To investigate the potential of the inh-ELISA for disease monitoring, we followed the reduction in antigenemia in six patients who clinically responded to itraconazole and P. marneffei was no longer isolated from their blood or tissues. In contrast, we correlated increased concentrations of antigenemia in patients with relapsed P. marneffei infection with the progression of their clinical symptoms and the isolation of P. marneffei from their clinical specimens. In summary, the P. marneffei inh-ELISA is a promising new assay for the rapid diagnosis of P. marneffei, as well as a tool for evaluating clinical response and clearance of the fungus during treatment. PMID:26838686

  15. Detection of Aspergillus antigens associated with invasive infection.

    PubMed Central

    Haynes, K A; Latge, J P; Rogers, T R

    1990-01-01

    Serial urine samples were collected from 33 neutropenic patients, 10 of whom developed invasive aspergillosis (IA) while undergoing bone marrow transplantation or remission induction therapy for leukemia. Concentrated urine samples from the infected patients were subjected to polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, blotted, and then incubated with antiserum raised to a cell wall extract of Aspergillus fumigatus (anti-CW) or an immunoglobulin G monoclonal antibody to A. fumigatus galactomannan (EBA1). When IA patient urine blots were probed with anti-CW, major bands at 11 and 18 kilodaltons (kDa); intermediate bands at 13, 14, and 29 kDa; and minor bands at 38 and 44 kDa were seen. In contrast, EBA1 showed diffuse staining at molecular masses larger than 45 kDa and a single weak band at 21 kDa. Urine samples from the 23 patients with no evidence of IA were unreactive with both anti-CW and EBA1. These antigen bands are likely to represent immunodominant antigens which are excreted during IA and should play a valuable role in the development of rapid diagnostic tests for aspergillosis. Images PMID:2229387

  16. Selective detection of bacterial layers with terahertz plasmonic antennas.

    PubMed

    Berrier, Audrey; Schaafsma, Martijn C; Nonglaton, Guillaume; Bergquist, Jonas; Rivas, Jaime Gómez

    2012-11-01

    Current detection and identification of micro-organisms is based on either rather unspecific rapid microscopy or on more accurate but complex and time-consuming procedures. In a medical context, the determination of the bacteria Gram type is of significant interest. The diagnostic of microbial infection often requires the identification of the microbiological agent responsible for the infection, or at least the identification of its family (Gram type), in a matter of minutes. In this work, we propose to use terahertz frequency range antennas for the enhanced selective detection of bacteria types. Several microorganisms are investigated by terahertz time-domain spectroscopy: a fast, contactless and damage-free investigation method to gain information on the presence and the nature of the microorganisms. We demonstrate that plasmonic antennas enhance the detection sensitivity for bacterial layers and allow the selective recognition of the Gram type of the bacteria. PMID:23162730

  17. Immuno-PCR: Very sensitive antigen detection by means of specific antibody-DNA conjugates

    SciTech Connect

    Sano, T.; Smith, C.L.; Cantor, C.R. )

    1992-10-02

    An antigen detection system, termed immuno-polymerase chain reaction (immuno-PCR), was developed in which a specific DNA molecule is used as the marker. A streptavidin-protein A chimera that possesses tight and specific binding affinity both for biotin and immunoglobulin G was used to attach a biotinylated DNA specifically to antigen-monoclonal antibody complexes that had been immobilized on microtiter plate wells. Then, a segment of the attached DNA was amplified by PCR. Analysis of the PCR products by agarose gel electrophoresis after staining with ethidium bromide allowed as few as 580 antigen molecules to be readily and reproducibly detected. Direct comparison with enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay with the use of a chimera-alkaline phosphatase conjugate demonstrates that enhancement in detection sensitivity was obtained with the use of immuno-PCR. Given the enormous amplification capability and specificity of PCR, this immuno-PCR technology has a sensitivity greater than any existing antigen detection system and, in principle, could be applied to the detection of single antigen molecules.

  18. Bacterial histo-blood group antigens contributing to genotype-dependent removal of human noroviruses with a microfiltration membrane.

    PubMed

    Amarasiri, Mohan; Hashiba, Satoshi; Miura, Takayuki; Nakagomi, Toyoko; Nakagomi, Osamu; Ishii, Satoshi; Okabe, Satoshi; Sano, Daisuke

    2016-05-15

    We demonstrated the genotype-dependent removal of human norovirus particles with a microfiltration (MF) membrane in the presence of bacteria bearing histo-blood group antigens (HBGAs). Three genotypes (GII.3, GII.4, and GII.6) of norovirus-like particles (NoVLPs) were mixed with three bacterial strains (Enterobacter sp. SENG-6, Escherichia coli O86:K61:B7, and Staphylococcus epidermidis), respectively, and the mixture was filtered with an MF membrane having a nominal pore size of 0.45 μm. All NoVLP genotypes were rejected by the MF membrane in the presence of Enterobacter sp. SENG-6, which excreted HBGAs as extracellular polymeric substances (EPS). This MF membrane removal of NoVLPs was not significant when EPS was removed from cells of Enterobacter sp. SENG-6. GII.6 NoVLP was not rejected with the MF membrane in the presence of E. coli O86:K61:B7, but the removal of EPS of E. coli O86:K61:B7 increased the removal efficiency due to the interaction of NoVLPs with the exposed B-antigen in lipopolysaccharide (LPS) of E. coli O86:K61:B7. No MF membrane removal of all three genotypes was observed when S. epidermidis, an HBGA-negative strain, was mixed with NoVLPs. These results demonstrate that the location of HBGAs on bacterial cells is an important factor in determining the genotype-dependent removal efficiency of norovirus particles with the MF membrane. The presence of HBGAs in mixed liquor suspended solids from a membrane bioreactor (MBR) pilot plant was confirmed by immune-transmission electron microscopy, which implies that bacterial HBGAs can contribute to the genotype-dependent removal of human noroviruses with MBR using MF membrane. PMID:27095709

  19. IRAK-4 and MyD88 deficiencies impair IgM responses against T-independent bacterial antigens.

    PubMed

    Maglione, Paul J; Simchoni, Noa; Black, Samuel; Radigan, Lin; Overbey, Jessica R; Bagiella, Emilia; Bussel, James B; Bossuyt, Xavier; Casanova, Jean-Laurent; Meyts, Isabelle; Cerutti, Andrea; Picard, Capucine; Cunningham-Rundles, Charlotte

    2014-12-01

    IRAK-4 and MyD88 deficiencies impair interleukin 1 receptor and Toll-like receptor (TLR) signaling and lead to heightened susceptibility to invasive bacterial infections. Individuals with these primary immunodeficiencies have fewer immunoglobulin M (IgM)(+)IgD(+)CD27(+) B cells, a population that resembles murine splenic marginal zone B cells that mount T-independent antibody responses against bacterial antigens. However, the significance of this B-cell subset in humans is poorly understood. Using both a 610 carbohydrate array and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, we found that patients with IRAK-4 and MyD88 deficiencies have reduced serum IgM, but not IgG antibody, recognizing T-independent bacterial antigens. Moreover, the quantity of specific IgM correlated with IgM(+)IgD(+)CD27(+) B-cell frequencies. As with mouse marginal zone B cells, human IgM(+)CD27(+) B cells activated by TLR7 or TLR9 agonists produced phosphorylcholine-specific IgM. Further linking splenic IgM(+)IgD(+)CD27(+) B cells with production of T-independent IgM, serum from splenectomized subjects, who also have few IgM(+)IgD(+)CD27(+) B cells, had reduced antibacterial IgM. IRAK-4 and MyD88 deficiencies impaired TLR-induced proliferation of this B-cell subset, suggesting a means by which loss of this activation pathway leads to reduced cell numbers. Thus, by bolstering the IgM(+)IgD(+)CD27(+) B-cell subset, IRAK-4 and MyD88 promote optimal T-independent IgM antibody responses against bacteria in humans. PMID:25320238

  20. Gibbs motif sampling: detection of bacterial outer membrane protein repeats.

    PubMed Central

    Neuwald, A. F.; Liu, J. S.; Lawrence, C. E.

    1995-01-01

    The detection and alignment of locally conserved regions (motifs) in multiple sequences can provide insight into protein structure, function, and evolution. A new Gibbs sampling algorithm is described that detects motif-encoding regions in sequences and optimally partitions them into distinct motif models; this is illustrated using a set of immunoglobulin fold proteins. When applied to sequences sharing a single motif, the sampler can be used to classify motif regions into related submodels, as is illustrated using helix-turn-helix DNA-binding proteins. Other statistically based procedures are described for searching a database for sequences matching motifs found by the sampler. When applied to a set of 32 very distantly related bacterial integral outer membrane proteins, the sampler revealed that they share a subtle, repetitive motif. Although BLAST (Altschul SF et al., 1990, J Mol Biol 215:403-410) fails to detect significant pairwise similarity between any of the sequences, the repeats present in these outer membrane proteins, taken as a whole, are highly significant (based on a generally applicable statistical test for motifs described here). Analysis of bacterial porins with known trimeric beta-barrel structure and related proteins reveals a similar repetitive motif corresponding to alternating membrane-spanning beta-strands. These beta-strands occur on the membrane interface (as opposed to the trimeric interface) of the beta-barrel. The broad conservation and structural location of these repeats suggests that they play important functional roles. PMID:8520488

  1. Diagnostic markers of ovarian cancer by high-throughput antigen cloning and detection on arrays.

    PubMed

    Chatterjee, Madhumita; Mohapatra, Saroj; Ionan, Alexei; Bawa, Gagandeep; Ali-Fehmi, Rouba; Wang, Xiaoju; Nowak, James; Ye, Bin; Nahhas, Fatimah A; Lu, Karen; Witkin, Steven S; Fishman, David; Munkarah, Adnan; Morris, Robert; Levin, Nancy K; Shirley, Natalie N; Tromp, Gerard; Abrams, Judith; Draghici, Sorin; Tainsky, Michael A

    2006-01-15

    A noninvasive screening test would significantly facilitate early detection of epithelial ovarian cancer. This study used a combination of high-throughput selection and array-based serologic detection of many antigens indicative of the presence of cancer, thereby using the immune system as a biosensor. This high-throughput selection involved biopanning of an ovarian cancer phage display library using serum immunoglobulins from an ovarian cancer patient as bait. Protein macroarrays containing 480 of these selected antigen clones revealed 65 clones that interacted with immunoglobulins in sera from 32 ovarian cancer patients but not with sera from 25 healthy women or 14 patients having other benign or malignant gynecologic diseases. Sequence analysis data of these 65 clones revealed 62 different antigens. Among the markers, we identified some known antigens, including RCAS1, signal recognition protein-19, AHNAK-related sequence, nuclear autoantogenic sperm protein, Nijmegen breakage syndrome 1 (Nibrin), ribosomal protein L4, Homo sapiens KIAA0419 gene product, eukaryotic initiation factor 5A, and casein kinase II, as well as many previously uncharacterized antigenic gene products. Using these 65 antigens on protein microarrays, we trained neural networks on two-color fluorescent detection of serum IgG binding and found an average sensitivity and specificity of 55% and 98%, respectively. In addition, the top 6 of the most specific clones resulted in an average sensitivity and specificity of 32% and 94%, respectively. This global approach to antigenic profiling, epitomics, has applications to cancer and autoimmune diseases for diagnostic and therapeutic studies. Further work with larger panels of antigens should provide a comprehensive set of markers with sufficient sensitivity and specificity suitable for clinical testing in high-risk populations. PMID:16424057

  2. Detection of major diarrheagenic bacterial pathogens by multiplex PCR panels.

    PubMed

    Sjöling, Åsa; Sadeghipoorjahromi, Leila; Novak, Daniel; Tobias, Joshua

    2015-03-01

    Diarrheal diseases remain a major threat to the youngest population in low- and middle-income countries. The main bacterial pathogens causing diarrhea are diarrheagenic Escherichia coli (DEC) that consists of enteroaggregative (EAEC), enteropathogenic (EPEC), enterotoxigenic (ETEC), enterohemorrhagic EHEC and enteroinvasive E. coli (EIEC), Salmonella, Shigella spp. (S. dysenteria, S. sonnei, S. flexneri) Campylobacter (C. coli, C. jejuni), Vibrio (V. vulnificus, V. parahaemolyticusm, V. cholerae), Yersinia enterocolitica and Aeromonas hydrophila. The aim of this study was to set up rapid multiplex PCR (mPCR) panels to identify these diarrheagenic pathogens based on their specific virulence genes. Primers against specific target genes were combined into three mPCR panels: one for diarrheal E. coli, one for pathogens causing mainly bloody diarrhea, and the third for the remaining pathogens. The panels were tested against a set of stool samples from Swedish children with diarrhea and controls and the analysis identified bacterial pathogens in 14/54 (26%) of the samples. These results show that our three developed mPCR panels can detect main bacterial diarrheagenic pathogens in clinical samples. PMID:25542594

  3. Simultaneous multicolor detection system of the single-molecular microbial antigen by total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy with fluorescent nanocrystal quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoshino, Akiyoshi; Fujioka, Kouki; Yamamoto, Mayu; Manabe, Noriyoshi; Yasuhara, Masato; Suzuki, Kazuo; Yamamoto, Kenji

    2005-11-01

    Immunological diagnostic methods have been widely performed and showed high performance in molecular and cellular biology, molecular imaging, and medical diagnostics. We have developed novel methods for the fluorescent labeling of several antibodies coupled with fluorescent nanocrystals QDs. In this study we demonstrated that two bacterial toxins, diphtheria toxin and tetanus toxin, were detected simultaneously in the same view field of a cover slip by using directly QD-conjugated antibodies. We have succeeded in detecting bacterial toxins by counting luminescent spots on the evanescent field with using primary antibody conjugated to QDs. In addition, each bacterial toxin in the mixture can be separately detected by single excitation laser with emission band pass filters, and simultaneously in situ pathogen quantification was performed by calculating the luminescent density on the surface of the cover slip. Our results demonstrate that total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy (TIRFM) enables us to distinguish each antigen from mixed samples and can simultaneously quantitate multiple antigens by QD-conjugated antibodies. Bioconjugated QDs could have great potentialities for in practical biomedical applications to develop various high-sensitivity detection systems.

  4. Immunofluorescence versus ELISA for the detection of antinuclear antigens.

    PubMed

    Rondeel, Jan M M

    2002-05-01

    Determining the presence and specificity of antinuclear antigens (ANA) is a challenge to a laboratory involved in the diagnosis of connective tissue disease (CTD). The immunofluorescent technique (IF), once considered the gold standard, is more and more displaced by ELISA. ELISA can be fully automated and the interpretation does not require the extensive experience needed in IF. However, literature in which both techniques are compared does not give unequivocal conclusions that ELISA indeed performs better. The clue as to which technique is best in the cascade testing of ANA, is given by its clinical value, not only by its technical and logistic performance. Selective test ordering is strongly recommended to increase the predictive value of these tests. The pros and cons of both techniques are discussed. PMID:12050861

  5. Radioimmunoassay for detecting antibodies against murine malarial parasite antigens: monoclonal antibodies recognizing Plasmodium yoelii antigens

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, K.J.; Taylor, D.W.; Evans, C.B.; Asofsky, R.

    1980-12-01

    A solid-phase radioimmunoassay (SPRIA) in microtiter wells was established for detecting antibodies against Plasmodium yoelii Ag. The SPRIA was found (1) to require as little as 5 ..mu..g of crude parasite Ag per well, (2) to be able to detect 0.5 ng of monoclonal Ab, and (3) to be 10/sup 4/ times more sensitive than the indirect fluorescent Ab staining technique. In a modification of the above assay using intact RBC as an Ag, hyperimmune serum showed significant binding to the surface of erythrocytes of mice infected with P. yoelii parasites but not to RBC of normal mice. Hybridomas were prepared by fusing infected mouse spleen cells with myeloma cells. Using the SPRIA, hybrids secreting Ab against P. yoelii 17XL Ag were detected.

  6. Development of an antigen-capture ELISA for the detection of avian leukosis virus p27 antigen.

    PubMed

    Yun, Bingling; Li, Delong; Zhu, Haibo; Liu, Wen; Qin, Liting; Liu, Zaisi; Wu, Guan; Wang, Yongqiang; Qi, Xiaole; Gao, Honglei; Wang, Xiaomei; Gao, Yulong

    2013-02-01

    An antigen-capture enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (AC-ELISA) employing monoclonal and polyclonal antibodies against p27 was developed for the detection of the avian leukosis virus (ALV). The specificity of the optimized AC-ELISA was evaluated using avian leukosis virus subgroup J (ALV-J), avian leukosis virus subgroup A (ALV-A), avian leukosis virus subgroup B (ALV-B), avian infectious bronchitis virus (IBV), Marek's disease virus (MDV), avian infectious laryngotracheitis virus (ILTV), Fowlpox virus (FPV), infectious bursal disease virus (IBDV), Newcastle disease virus (NDV), avian reovirus (ARV), reticuloendotheliosis virus (REV), avian influenza virus (AIV) and Escherichia coli. The only specimens that yielded a strong signal were ALV-J, ALV-A and ALV-B, indicating that this assay is suitable for the detection of ALV. The limit of detection of this assay was 1.25 ng/ml of rp27 protein and 10(1.79)TCID(50) units of HLJ09MDJ-1 (ALV-J). Moreover, this AC-ELISA can detect ALV in cloacal swabs of chickens experimentally infected as early as 12 days post-infection. The AC-ELISA detected the virus in the albumin and cloacal swabs of naturally infected chickens, and the results were confirmed by PCR, indicating that the AC-ELISA was a suitable method for the detection of ALV. This test is rapid and sensitive and could be convenient for epidemiological studies and eradication programs. PMID:23201286

  7. Double-antigen sandwich ELISA for the detection of anti-hepatitis C virus antibodies.

    PubMed

    He, Jing; Xiu, Bingshui; Wang, Guohua; Chen, Kun; Feng, Xiaoyan; Song, Xiaoguo; Zhu, Cuixia; Ling, Shigan; Zhang, Heqiu

    2011-01-01

    A double-antigen sandwich ELISA was developed a detection of HCV antibodies by a recombinant multi-epitope HCV antigen and a biotin-streptavidin amplification system. Three plasma specimens from 1708 individuals who were suspected previously to be HCV-positive using an HCV antibody diagnostic kit (Chuangxin, Xiamen, China) displayed negative results when using the ELISA. These results were validated by a recombinant immunoblotting assay (two were negative, and one was indeterminate). Among 889 blood specimens donated for clinical evaluation, 246 were positive and 630 were negative using the ELISA. The sensitivity and specificity of the ELISA were 98.7% and 100%, respectively. In 43 donors and 14 patients with chronic hepatitis C, the detectable rates for HCV IgM by both ELISA and the HCV anti-IgM detection reagents (Huimin, Shenyang, China) were 100%, and the detectable rate for HCV IgG using an indirect HCV-antibody detection kit (GWK, Beijing, China) was 98.3%. Thus, the double-antigen sandwich ELISA exhibits strong specificity and sensitivity and has been approved by the China State Food and Drug Administration (SFDA). The performance of the double-antigen sandwich ELISA was similar to the Ortho ELISA 3.0. It did not give false-negative results otherwise IgM was undetectable using an indirect HCV-antibody detection kit. This ELISA provides another method for the detection of HCV antibodies. PMID:21029749

  8. Clinical comparison of two assays for rapid detection of cytomegalovirus early nuclear antigen.

    PubMed

    Woods, G L; Johnson, A M; Thiele, G M

    1990-03-01

    Three methods for detection of cytomegalovirus (CMV) in 218 clinical specimens were compared: (1) shell vial assay to detect the early nuclear antigen after incubation for 16 hours and 40 hours (Syva Company); (2) 24-well plate assay to detect the early nuclear antigen after incubation for 16 hours (DuPont); and (3) convention tissue cell culture. CMV was detected in 26 specimens (12%) by one or more of these methods. With the shell vial assay, 12 (46%) and 15 (58%) specimens were positive after incubation for 16 hours and 40 hours, respectively. CMV was detected in 17 specimens (65%) by the 24-well plate assay. There was no significant difference in the detection of CMV between these assays. CMV was identified by conventional tissue culture in 15 of 22 (68%) evaluable cultures after an average of 14.2 days. More specimens were positive by conventional culture than by the 16-hour shell vial assay (P = 0.035). For optimal detection of CMV in clinical specimens, both conventional tissue cell culture and an early antigen assay should be performed. The two early antigen assays evaluated in this study yielded comparable results. However, the 24-well plates are more easily manipulated, and the 24-well plate assay, as performed, was easier to interpret and more cost efficient. PMID:2155527

  9. Detection with monoclonal antibody of Salmonella typhi antigen 9 in specimens from patients.

    PubMed Central

    Chaicumpa, W; Thin-Inta, W; Khusmith, S; Tapchaisri, P; Echeverria, P; Kalambaheti, T; Chongsa-Nguan, M

    1988-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies were raised against Barber antigen (Ba) of Salmonella typhi 0901. Antibodies produced to antigen 9 of group D salmonellae were used in double- and triple-sandwich antibody enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs) for detecting antigen 9 in urine and plasma specimens from three groups of patients and 49 controls. The triple-antibody ELISA detected the antigen in urine samples from 11 of 18 (65%) patients with hemoculture-proven typhoid (group 1) and 12 of 39 (31%) patients with clinical features compatible with typhoid but whose hemocultures were negative (group 2). This ELISA was negative in three patients from whom Salmonella paratyphi A, Escherichia coli, and Klebsiella pneumoniae (group 3) were isolated by hemoculture and in all healthy controls. The double-antibody sandwich ELISA was positive in 41 and 15% of urine samples from patients in groups 1 and 2, respectively, and was negative with samples from two patients from group 3 and all controls. The sensitivity and specificity compared with those for healthy controls were 65 and 100%, respectively, for the triple-antibody ELISA. Although as little as 7.8 ng of homologous lipopolysaccharide could be detected, background in clinical specimens prevented accurate interpretation of the detection of this antigen in serum. Results were best with urine specimens. Images PMID:3183027

  10. Functionalized nanowire-based antigen detection using frequency-based signals.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Thanh Cong; Qiu, Wanzhi Z; Skafidas, Efstratios

    2012-01-01

    As part of clinical diagnosis, a clinician is required to detect disease causing antigens, bacteria, or viruses in serum, saliva, or other biological samples. Usually, this requires the sample to be sent to a pathology laboratory for analysis. Silicon nanowires can be made into sensitive molecular sensors. When being functionalized with antibodies, they are capable of detecting femto molar concentrations of antigens in real time. Biological molecules at a pH different from their isoelectric point exhibit a net charge. When an antigen attaches to the antibody on the nanowire, the net charged on the antigen displaces free carriers in the nanowire changing its conductance. To date, detection methods have been based upon directly measuring the change in dc conductance. This is difficult and requires sensitive low-noise amplifiers and high-resolution analog-to-digital converters. This is not ideal for low-cost and highly integrated systems. In this paper, it is demonstrated that nanowires exhibit an ac-transfer function that resembles that of a high-pass filter. To the authors' knowledge, this is the first time this effect has been reported. Furthermore, it is illustrated that as molecules with a higher net charge attach to the nanowire and displace more charge carriers within the nanowire channel, the filter's corner frequency decreases. This property of silicon nanowires is exploited to build a low-cost real-time antigen detection system. PMID:21968710

  11. Novel use of a radiolabelled antibody against stage specific embryonic antigen for the detection of occult abscesses in mammals

    DOEpatents

    Thakur, Madhukar L.

    1990-01-01

    The invention discloses improved reagents containing antibodies against stage specific embryonic antigen-1 antibodies and improved methods for detection of occult abscess and inflammation using the improved reagents.

  12. Investigation of magnetic microdiscs for bacterial pathogen detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castillo-Torres, Keisha Y.; Garraud, Nicolas; Arnold, David P.; McLamore, Eric S.

    2016-05-01

    Despite strict regulations to control the presence of human pathogens in our food supply, recent foodborne outbreaks have heightened public concern about food safety and created urgency to improve methods for pathogen detection. Herein we explore a potentially portable, low-cost system that uses magnetic microdiscs for the detection of bacterial pathogens in liquid samples. The system operates by optically measuring the rotational dynamics of suspended magnetic microdiscs functionalized with pathogen-binding aptamers. The soft ferromagnetic (Ni80Fe20) microdiscs exhibit a closed magnetic spin arrangement (i.e. spin vortex) with zero magnetic stray field, leading to no disc agglomeration when in free suspension. With very high surface area for functionalization and volumes 10,000x larger than commonly used superparamagnetic nanoparticles, these 1.5-μm-diameter microdiscs are well suited for tagging, trapping, actuating, or interrogating bacterial targets. This work reports a wafer-level microfabrication process for fabrication of 600 million magnetic microdiscs per substrate and measurement of their rotational dynamics response. Additionally, the biofunctionalization of the microdiscs with DNA aptamers, subsequent binding to E. coli bacteria, and their magnetic manipulation is reported.

  13. Ultrasensitive immunoassay for prostate specific antigen using scanning tunneling microscopy-based electrical detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Jeong-Woo; Oh, Byung-Keun; Jang, Yong-Hark; Kang, Da-Yeon

    2008-07-01

    We characterized a vertically configured electrical detection system that used scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) to detect antigen-antibody binding. This technique could be used to easily construct a multiple measurement system in a protein chip. We utilized immunocomplexes comprised of our model protein, prostate specific antigen (PSA), corresponding antibody fragments, and gold nanoparticle-antibody conjugates. The electrical tunneling current between the STM tip and these complexes exhibited a peaklike pulse, the frequency of which depended on the surface density of the bound complexes. We could therefore quantitatively measure PSA concentrations as low as 10fg/mL using periodogram analysis of this peak frequency.

  14. Detection Of Viral And Bacterial Pathogens In Acute Respiratory Infections

    PubMed Central

    Obasi, Chidi N.; Barrett, Bruce; Brown, Roger; Vrtis, Rose; Barlow, Shari; Muller, Daniel; Gern, James

    2013-01-01

    Objectives The role of bacteria in acute respiratory illnesses (ARI) of adults and interactions with viral infections is incompletely understood. This study tested the hypothesis that bacterial co-infection during ARI adds to airway inflammation and illness severity. Methods Two groups of 97 specimens each were randomly selected from multiplex-PCR identified virus-positive and virus-negative nasal specimens obtained from adults with new onset ARI, and 40 control specimens were collected from healthy adults. All specimens were analyzed for Haemophilus influenza(HI), Moraxella catarrhalis(MC) and Streptococcus pneumonia(SP) by quantitative-PCR. General linear models tested for relationships between respiratory pathogens, biomarkers (nasal wash neutrophils and CXCL8), and ARI-severity. Results Nasal specimens from adults with ARIs were more likely to contain bacteria (37% overall; HI=28%, MC=14%, SP=7%) compared to specimens from healthy adults (5% overall; HI=0%, MC=2.5%, SP=2.5%;p<0.001). Among ARI specimens, bacteria were more likely to be detected among virus-negative specimens compared to virus-positive specimens (46% vs. 27%;p=0.0046). The presence of bacteria was significantly associated with increased CXCL8 and neutrophils, but not increased symptoms. Conclusion Pathogenic bacteria were more often detected in virus-negative ARI, and also associated with increased inflammatory biomarkers. These findings suggest the possibility that bacteria may augment virus-induced ARI and contribute to airway inflammation. Summary We tested whether bacterial pathogens were associated with ARI illness and inflammation. Bacteria were detected more often in nasal secretions during ARI, especially in samples without detectable viruses, and were associated with increased airway inflammation, but not increased symptoms. PMID:24211414

  15. Detection of bacterial pathogens in environmental samples using DNA microarrays.

    PubMed

    Call, Douglas R; Borucki, Monica K; Loge, Frank J

    2003-05-01

    Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) is an important tool for pathogen detection, but historically, it has not been possible to accurately identify PCR products without sequencing, Southern blots, or dot-blots. Microarrays can be coupled with PCR where they serve as a set of parallel dot-blots to enhance product detection and identification. Microarrays are composed of many discretely located probes on a solid substrate such as glass. Each probe is composed of a sequence that is complimentary to a pathogen-specific gene sequence. PCR is used to amplify one or more genes and the products are then hybridized to the array to identify species-specific polymorphism within one or more genes. We illustrate this type of array using 16S rDNA probes suitable for distinguishing between several salmonid pathogens. We also describe the use of microarrays for direct detection of either RNA or DNA without the aid of PCR, although the sensitivity of these systems currently limits their application for pathogen detection. Finally, microarrays can also be used to "fingerprint" bacterial isolates and they can be used to identify diagnostic markers suitable for developing new PCR-based detection assays. We illustrate this type of array for subtyping an important food-borne pathogen, Listeria monocytogenes. PMID:12654494

  16. Capsular polysaccharide antigens for detection of serotype-specific antibodies to Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae.

    PubMed Central

    Bossé, J T; Johnson, R P; Rosendal, S

    1990-01-01

    Capsular polysaccharides (CPS) of serotypes 1, 2, 5 and 7 of Actinobacillus (Haemophilus) pleuropneumoniae were obtained from 18 h culture supernatants by precipitation with hexadecyltrimethyl-ammonium bromide (Cetavlon) followed by extraction with sodium chloride and reprecipitation in ethanol. These crude extracts, and portions purified further by phenol extraction to remove contaminating proteins, were evaluated as antigens for the detection of serotype-specific antibodies to A. pleuropneumoniae in sera from immunized rabbits and swine by an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The crude extracts reacted strongly with homologous antisera, but except for serotype 1 showed considerable cross-reactivity with antisera to other serotypes. Phenol extraction greatly improved the serospecificity of the antigens from serotypes 1, 7 and, to a lesser extent, 5. The serotype 2 CPS antigen showed poor reactivity following phenol extraction, and did not appear as useful for detection of serotype-specific antibodies. PMID:2379111

  17. Trichinella spiralis: monoclonal antibody against the muscular larvae for the detection of circulating and fecal antigens in experimentally infected rats.

    PubMed

    Zumaquero-Ríos, José-Lino; García-Juarez, Jazmín; de-la-Rosa-Arana, Jorge-Luis; Marcet, Ricardo; Sarracent-Pérez, Jorge

    2012-12-01

    In this work we search for antigens of Trichinella spiralis in sera and stool of rats experimentally infected. The kinetic of antibodies to excretory and secretory (ES) antigens of muscle larvae (ML) was also determined. Wistar rats were infected with 15 ML per gram of body weight and blood samples were collected weekly for 10 weeks. Antibodies were studied using an indirect ELISA. For detection of circulating antigens and coproantigens, a sandwich ELISA was developed with the use of polyclonal rabbit antibodies obtained against the total extract of ML and an IgM monoclonal antibody (Mab) against ES antigens of ML. No reactivity was observed between Mab and the total worm antigens of Angiostrongylus cantonensis, Ascaris suum, Echinococcus granulosus, Fasciola hepatica, Strongyloides stercoralis, Taenia solium, Toxocara canis and Trichuris trichiura. The IgM Mab recognized antigens of 45, 49, and 55 kDa in ES antigens and was unable to bind ES antigens deglycosylated with trifluoromethanesulphonic acid (TFMS) indicating that a glycan structure is present in the epitope recognized by this Mab. The sensitivity of sandwich ELISA was 1 ng/mL. Circulating antigens were detected in all infected rats between 3 and 8 weeks post infection and coproantigens were found during the first two days post infection. Antibodies were detected since the third week post infection through the end of experiment. These results suggested that antigen detection by our sandwich ELISA could be a useful complementary laboratory test for antibody detection. PMID:23026455

  18. Subdominant antigens in bacterial vaccines: Am779 is subdominant in the anaplasma marginale outer membrane vaccine but does not associate with protective immunity

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Identification of specific antigens responsible for the ability of complex immunogens to induce protection is a major goal in development of bacterial vaccines. Much of the investigation has focused on highly abundant and highly immunodominant outer membrane proteins. Recently however, genomic and p...

  19. Biochemical principle of Limulus test for detecting bacterial endotoxins

    PubMed Central

    Iwanaga, Sadaaki

    2007-01-01

    A hemocyte lysate from horseshoe crab (Limulus) produced a gel, when exposed to Gram-negative bacterial endotoxins, lipopolysaccharides (LPS). This gelation reaction of the lysate, so-called Limulus test, has been widely employed as a simple and very sensitive assay method for endotoxins. Recent biochemical studies on the principle of Limulus test indicate that the hemocytes contain several serine protease zymogens, which constitute a coagulation cascade triggered by endotoxins, and that there is a (1,3)-β-D-glucan-mediated coagulation pathway which also results in the formation of gel. Up to now, six protein components, designated coagulogen, proclotting enzyme, factor B, factor C, and factor G, all of which are closely associated with the endotoxin-mediated coagulation pathway, have been purified and biochemically characterized. The molecular structures of these proteins have also been elucidated. Moreover, the reconstitution experiments using the isolated clotting factors, factor C, factor B, proclotting enzyme and coagulogen in the presence of endotoxin, leads to the formation of coagulin gel. Here, I will focus on the biochemical principle of Limulus test for detecting bacterial endotoxins, and its activation and regulation mechanism on the LPS-mediated coagulation cascade. PMID:24019589

  20. Detecting Bacterial Surface Organelles on Single Cells Using Optical Tweezers.

    PubMed

    Zakrisson, Johan; Singh, Bhupender; Svenmarker, Pontus; Wiklund, Krister; Zhang, Hanqing; Hakobyan, Shoghik; Ramstedt, Madeleine; Andersson, Magnus

    2016-05-10

    Bacterial cells display a diverse array of surface organelles that are important for a range of processes such as intercellular communication, motility and adhesion leading to biofilm formation, infections, and bacterial spread. More specifically, attachment to host cells by Gram-negative bacteria are mediated by adhesion pili, which are nanometers wide and micrometers long fibrous organelles. Since these pili are significantly thinner than the wavelength of visible light, they cannot be detected using standard light microscopy techniques. At present, there is no fast and simple method available to investigate if a single cell expresses pili while keeping the cell alive for further studies. In this study, we present a method to determine the presence of pili on a single bacterium. The protocol involves imaging the bacterium to measure its size, followed by predicting the fluid drag based on its size using an analytical model, and thereafter oscillating the sample while a single bacterium is trapped by an optical tweezer to measure its effective fluid drag. Comparison between the predicted and the measured fluid drag thereby indicate the presence of pili. Herein, we verify the method using polymer coated silica microspheres and Escherichia coli bacteria expressing adhesion pili. Our protocol can in real time and within seconds assist single cell studies by distinguishing between piliated and nonpiliated bacteria. PMID:27088225

  1. Detection of influenza antigenic variants directly from clinical samples using polyclonal antibody based proximity ligation assays

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Brigitte E.; Jia, Kun; Sun, Hailiang; Ye, Jianqiang; Hall, Crystal; Ware, Daphne; Wan, Xiu-Feng

    2016-01-01

    Identification of antigenic variants is the key to a successful influenza vaccination program. The empirical serological methods to determine influenza antigenic properties require viral propagation. Here a novel quantitative PCR-based antigenic characterization method using polyclonal antibody and proximity ligation assays, or so-called polyPLA, was developed and validated. This method can detect a viral titer that is less than 1000 TCID50/mL. Not only can this method differentiate between different HA subtypes of influenza viruses but also effectively identify antigenic drift events within the same HA subtype of influenza viruses. Applications in H3N2 seasonal influenza data showed that the results from this novel method are consistent with those from the conventional serological assays. This method is not limited to the detection of antigenic variants in influenza but also other pathogens. It has the potential to be applied through a large-scale platform in disease surveillance requiring minimal biosafety and directly using clinical samples. PMID:25546251

  2. Biomarker Detection Using NAPPA Tumor Antigen Arrays — EDRN Public Portal

    Cancer.gov

    Cancer patients spontaneously generate autoantibodies (AAb) to tumor-derived proteins. To detect AAb, we have probed novel high-density custom protein microarrays (NAPPA) expressing 4988 candidate tumor antigens with sera from patients with early stage breast cancer (IBC), and bound IgG was measured. We used a three-phase serial screening approach. First, a prescreen was performed to eliminate uninformative antigens. Sera from stage I-III IBC (n = 53) and healthy women (n = 53) were screened for AAb to all 4988 protein antigens. Antigens were selected if the 95th percentile of signal of cases and controls were significantly different (p 91% specificity. Twenty-eight of these antigens were confirmed using an independent serum cohort (n = 51 cases/38 controls, p < 0.05). Using all 28 AAb, a classifier was identified with a sensitivity of 80.8% and a specificity of 61.6% (AUC = 0.756). These are potential biomarkers for the early detection of breast cancer.

  3. Detection of Schistosoma mansoni circulating cathodic antigen for evaluation of resistance induced by irradiated cercariae.

    PubMed

    Barsoum, I S; Bogitsh, B J; Colley, D G

    1992-08-01

    The appearance of serum levels of circulating cathodic antigen (CCA) detectable by a monoclonal antibody (mAb) (5H11) antigen-capture sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) system was evaluated during acute Schistosoma mansoni infections in female CF1 mice exposed to either 100 or 25 cercariae. Measurable CCA levels occurred in these groups at 5 and 7 wk after infection, respectively. The kinetics of appearance of CCA were thus related to the intensity of infection. The level of resistance developed by female C57BL/6 mice upon immunization with irradiated cercariae, as expressed by both worm burden and CCA levels after cercarial challenge was evaluated. Immunization conferred 44% protection against the challenge infection, and the level of CCA detected in the sera of the control group was significantly (P less than 0.02) higher than that found in the sera of the immunized group, 6 wk after challenge. These results demonstrate that CCA detection by the 5H11 mAb antigen-capture sandwich ELISA can reflect vaccine-induced resistance against S. mansoni. Localization studies showed that 5H11 reacts with a CCA epitope in the adult worm gut and to a lesser extent with the male tegument. Adaptations of this and other antigen detection systems may prove useful in monitoring the efficacy of developmental vaccines, an ability that may be essential for the extension of such studies to humans. PMID:1635027

  4. Production of a novel monoclonal antibody, JT-95, which can detect antigen of thyroid carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Takeyama, H; Hosoya, T; Sakurai, K; Mori, Y; Watanabe, M; Kisaki, H; Ohno, T

    1996-04-15

    Monoclonal antibody (MAb) JT-95 was produced by immunization of mice with membrane fractions of a human thyroid carcinoma. Immuno-histochemical staining has demonstrated that the antigen recognized by JT-95 is strongly expressed in 95 (95%) of 100 cases of papillary carcinomas and in 3 (75%) of 4 cases of follicular carcinomas. In benign diseases of the thyroid gland, MAb JT-95 reacted with 0 (0%) of 39 adenomas, 1 (4%) of 21 adenomatous goiters, 0 (0%) of 8 hyperthyroidism specimens, and 3 (38%) of 8 chronic thyroiditis specimens. The antigen detected by MAb JT-95 has an apparent Mr 250,000 in thyroid carcinomas. Moreover, circulating antigen in thyroid carcinoma patients was detected by MAb JT-95 in an ELISA and in Western blotting. The circulating antigen has a Mr 105,000. MAb JT-95 conjugated with (131) I was administrated to nude mice bearing a human thyroid carcinoma. JT-95 131I accumulation at the transplanted tumor was visualized by autoradiography with 2.68-14.75-fold higher levels detected at the xenograft compared to that for normal organs. Based on these data, MAb JT-95 may be useful in the diagnosis detection and therapy of thyroid carcinoma. PMID:8620498

  5. Salmonella typhimurium-induced M1 macrophage polarization is dependent on the bacterial O antigen.

    PubMed

    Luo, Fengling; Sun, Xiaoming; Qu, Zhen; Zhang, Xiaolian

    2016-02-01

    Recently, macrophages were shown to be capable of differentiating toward two phenotypes after antigen stimulation: a classically activated (M1) or an alternatively activated phenotype (M2). To investigate the effect of Salmonella enteric serovar typhimurium (S. typhimurium) on macrophage differentiation, we compared macrophage phenotypes after infection of murine bone marrow-derived macrophages with wild-type S. typhimurium and its isogenic rfc mutant. S. typhimurium C5 induced M1 macrophage polarization and enhanced inducible nitric oxide synthase expression by macrophages; this induction was dependent on Toll-like receptor 4. In contrast, the Δrfc mutant (S. typhimurium C5 rfc::Km(r)) lost this function and induced an M2 response in the macrophages. Here, we propose that S. typhimurium C5 is capable of polarizing macrophages towards the M1 phenotype and that this polarization is dependent on the O antigen encoded by rfc. Our finding indicates that M1 macrophage polarization induced by S. typhimurium may be related to the ability of this intracellular bacterium to survive and replicate within macrophages, which is essential for systemic disease. PMID:26745982

  6. Adenosine Monophosphate-Based Detection of Bacterial Spores

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kern, Roger G.; Chen, Fei; Venkateswaran, Kasthuri; Hattori, Nori; Suzuki, Shigeya

    2009-01-01

    A method of rapid detection of bacterial spores is based on the discovery that a heat shock consisting of exposure to a temperature of 100 C for 10 minutes causes the complete release of adenosine monophosphate (AMP) from the spores. This method could be an alternative to the method described in the immediately preceding article. Unlike that method and related prior methods, the present method does not involve germination and cultivation; this feature is an important advantage because in cases in which the spores are those of pathogens, delays involved in germination and cultivation could increase risks of infection. Also, in comparison with other prior methods that do not involve germination, the present method affords greater sensitivity. At present, the method is embodied in a laboratory procedure, though it would be desirable to implement the method by means of a miniaturized apparatus in order to make it convenient and economical enough to encourage widespread use.

  7. Detecting rare gene transfer events in bacterial populations.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, Kaare M; Bøhn, Thomas; Townsend, Jeffrey P

    2014-01-01

    Horizontal gene transfer (HGT) enables bacteria to access, share, and recombine genetic variation, resulting in genetic diversity that cannot be obtained through mutational processes alone. In most cases, the observation of evolutionary successful HGT events relies on the outcome of initially rare events that lead to novel functions in the new host, and that exhibit a positive effect on host fitness. Conversely, the large majority of HGT events occurring in bacterial populations will go undetected due to lack of replication success of transformants. Moreover, other HGT events that would be highly beneficial to new hosts can fail to ensue due to lack of physical proximity to the donor organism, lack of a suitable gene transfer mechanism, genetic compatibility, and stochasticity in tempo-spatial occurrence. Experimental attempts to detect HGT events in bacterial populations have typically focused on the transformed cells or their immediate offspring. However, rare HGT events occurring in large and structured populations are unlikely to reach relative population sizes that will allow their immediate identification; the exception being the unusually strong positive selection conferred by antibiotics. Most HGT events are not expected to alter the likelihood of host survival to such an extreme extent, and will confer only minor changes in host fitness. Due to the large population sizes of bacteria and the time scales involved, the process and outcome of HGT are often not amenable to experimental investigation. Population genetic modeling of the growth dynamics of bacteria with differing HGT rates and resulting fitness changes is therefore necessary to guide sampling design and predict realistic time frames for detection of HGT, as it occurs in laboratory or natural settings. Here we review the key population genetic parameters, consider their complexity and highlight knowledge gaps for further research. PMID:24432015

  8. Detecting rare gene transfer events in bacterial populations

    PubMed Central

    Nielsen, Kaare M.; Bøhn, Thomas; Townsend, Jeffrey P.

    2014-01-01

    Horizontal gene transfer (HGT) enables bacteria to access, share, and recombine genetic variation, resulting in genetic diversity that cannot be obtained through mutational processes alone. In most cases, the observation of evolutionary successful HGT events relies on the outcome of initially rare events that lead to novel functions in the new host, and that exhibit a positive effect on host fitness. Conversely, the large majority of HGT events occurring in bacterial populations will go undetected due to lack of replication success of transformants. Moreover, other HGT events that would be highly beneficial to new hosts can fail to ensue due to lack of physical proximity to the donor organism, lack of a suitable gene transfer mechanism, genetic compatibility, and stochasticity in tempo-spatial occurrence. Experimental attempts to detect HGT events in bacterial populations have typically focused on the transformed cells or their immediate offspring. However, rare HGT events occurring in large and structured populations are unlikely to reach relative population sizes that will allow their immediate identification; the exception being the unusually strong positive selection conferred by antibiotics. Most HGT events are not expected to alter the likelihood of host survival to such an extreme extent, and will confer only minor changes in host fitness. Due to the large population sizes of bacteria and the time scales involved, the process and outcome of HGT are often not amenable to experimental investigation. Population genetic modeling of the growth dynamics of bacteria with differing HGT rates and resulting fitness changes is therefore necessary to guide sampling design and predict realistic time frames for detection of HGT, as it occurs in laboratory or natural settings. Here we review the key population genetic parameters, consider their complexity and highlight knowledge gaps for further research. PMID:24432015

  9. Identification and Analysis of Immunodominant Antigens for ELISA-Based Detection of Theileria annulata

    PubMed Central

    Bakırcı, Serkan; Tait, Andrew; Kinnaird, Jane; Eren, Hasan

    2016-01-01

    Tropical or Mediterranean theileriosis, caused by the protozoan parasite Theileria annulata, remains an economically important bovine disease in North Africa, Southern Europe, India, the Middle East and Asia. The disease affects mainly exotic cattle and imposes serious constraints upon livestock production and breed improvement programmes. While microscopic and molecular methods exist which are capable of detecting T. annulata during acute infection, the identification of animals in the carrier state is more challenging. Serological tests, which detect antibodies that react against parasite-encoded antigens, should ideally have the potential to identify carrier animals with very high levels of sensitivity and specificity. However, assays developed to date have suffered from a lack of sensitivity and/or specificity and it is, therefore, necessary to identify novel parasite antigens, which can be developed for this purpose. In the present study, genes encoding predicted antigens were bioinformatically identified in the T. annulata genome. These proteins, together with a panel of previously described antigens, were assessed by western blot analysis for immunoreactivity, and this revealed that four novel candidates and five previously described antigens were recognised by immune bovine serum. Using a combination of immunoprecipitation and mass spectrophotometric analysis, an immunodominant protein (encoded by TA15705) was identified as Ta9, a previously defined T cell antigen. Western blotting revealed another of the five proteins in the Ta9 family, TA15710, also to be an immunodominant protein. However, validation by Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay indicated that due to either allelic polymorphism or differential immune responses of individual hosts, none of the novel candidates can be considered ideal for routine detection of T. annulata-infected/carrier animals. PMID:27270235

  10. Identification and Analysis of Immunodominant Antigens for ELISA-Based Detection of Theileria annulata.

    PubMed

    Bilgic, Huseyin Bilgin; Karagenc, Tulin; Bakırcı, Serkan; Shiels, Brian; Tait, Andrew; Kinnaird, Jane; Eren, Hasan; Weir, William

    2016-01-01

    Tropical or Mediterranean theileriosis, caused by the protozoan parasite Theileria annulata, remains an economically important bovine disease in North Africa, Southern Europe, India, the Middle East and Asia. The disease affects mainly exotic cattle and imposes serious constraints upon livestock production and breed improvement programmes. While microscopic and molecular methods exist which are capable of detecting T. annulata during acute infection, the identification of animals in the carrier state is more challenging. Serological tests, which detect antibodies that react against parasite-encoded antigens, should ideally have the potential to identify carrier animals with very high levels of sensitivity and specificity. However, assays developed to date have suffered from a lack of sensitivity and/or specificity and it is, therefore, necessary to identify novel parasite antigens, which can be developed for this purpose. In the present study, genes encoding predicted antigens were bioinformatically identified in the T. annulata genome. These proteins, together with a panel of previously described antigens, were assessed by western blot analysis for immunoreactivity, and this revealed that four novel candidates and five previously described antigens were recognised by immune bovine serum. Using a combination of immunoprecipitation and mass spectrophotometric analysis, an immunodominant protein (encoded by TA15705) was identified as Ta9, a previously defined T cell antigen. Western blotting revealed another of the five proteins in the Ta9 family, TA15710, also to be an immunodominant protein. However, validation by Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay indicated that due to either allelic polymorphism or differential immune responses of individual hosts, none of the novel candidates can be considered ideal for routine detection of T. annulata-infected/carrier animals. PMID:27270235

  11. A valuable antigen detection method for diagnosis of acute hepatitis E.

    PubMed

    Wen, Gui-Ping; Tang, Zi-Min; Yang, Fan; Zhang, Ke; Ji, Wen-Fang; Cai, Wei; Huang, Shou-Jie; Wu, Ting; Zhang, Jun; Zheng, Zi-Zheng; Xia, Ning-Shao

    2015-03-01

    Hepatitis E virus (HEV) is a serious public health problem. The commonly used tests that are specific for current HEV infection diagnosis include the detection of anti-HEV IgM and HEV RNA. Here, we report an improved enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) method for HEV antigen detection with a linear range equivalent to 6.3 × 10(3) to 9.2 × 10(5) RNA copies per ml. The monoclonal antibody (MAb) 12F12, a high-ability MAb that binds HEV virus, was selected as the capture antibody from a panel of 95 MAbs. The positive period of HEV antigenemia in infected monkeys using this test was, on average, 3 weeks longer than previously reported and covered the majority of the acute phase. The positive detection rates of IgM, RNA, and new antigen from the first serum samples collected from 16 confirmed acute hepatitis E patients were 81% (13/16), 81% (13/16), and 100% (16/16), respectively. In three patients, the initial serum specimens that tested negative for IgM, despite the presence of symptoms of acute hepatitis and elevated alanine aminotransferase (ALT) levels, were positive for HEV antigen and HEV RNA. In contrast, the serum samples of the three RNA-negative patients were antigen positive (and IgM positive), possibly due to the degradation of HEV nucleic acids. Our results suggest that this new antigen detection method has acceptable concordance with RNA detection and could serve as an important tool for diagnosing acute hepatitis E. PMID:25540394

  12. Detection of Salivary IgA Antibodies Against the HlyE Antigen as a Diagnosis of Typhoid Fever

    PubMed Central

    Chin, Kai Ling; Redhuan, Nur Eliyana Mohd; Balaram, Prabha; Phua, Kia Kien

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The Salmonella typhi (S. typhi) haemolysin E protein (HlyE) has been shown to be a sensitive and specific antigen for the detection of typhoid fever through the detection of anti-HlyE antibodies in sera. Saliva can also be a useful diagnostic fluid as it also contains antibodies against bacterial pathogens. Aim This study aims to evaluate the potential detection of salivary anti-HlyE antibodies as a diagnosis of typhoid fever. Materials and Methods Saliva was collected from acute typhoid patients (n=16) who presented at Hospital Universiti Sains Malaysia with prolonged fever of more than five days and were positive for S. Typhi blood culture. Saliva was also collected from convalescent typhoid patients (n=11), patients with other febrile fevers (n=15), and from healthy individuals (n=25). An ELISA was developed to detect the presence of IgA antibodies against HlyE in the saliva of typhoid patients. Results The acute typhoid group had a higher mean absorbance value of 1.496 compared to the convalescent typhoid (0.538), other febrile fevers (0.678), and healthy individuals (0.457) group. Conclusion This study demonstrated the utility of salivary anti-HlyE IgA antibody as a biomarker for the diagnosis of typhoid fever. Follow-up studies with a larger sample size will allow the optimization of the sensitivity and specificity of the assay. This non-invasive method can be useful for mass screening programs. PMID:27504289

  13. Detection of an Antigenic Group 2 Coronavirus in an Adult Alpaca with Enteritis▿

    PubMed Central

    Genova, Suzanne G.; Streeter, Robert N.; Simpson, Katharine M.; Kapil, Sanjay

    2008-01-01

    Antigenic group 2 coronavirus was detected in a fecal sample of an adult alpaca by reverse transcription-PCR. The presence of alpaca coronavirus (ApCoV) in the small intestine was demonstrated by immune histochemistry with an antinucleocapsid monoclonal antibody that reacts with group 2 coronaviruses. Other common causes of diarrhea in adult camelids were not detected. We conclude that nutritional stress may have predisposed the alpaca to severe ApCoV infection. PMID:18716008

  14. A novel agglutination test for antigen-specific detection of platelet antibodies.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Oliver; Agaylan, Ashraf; Borchert, Hans-Hubert; Aslan, Tunay; Bombard, Stéphane; Kiesewetter, Holger; Salama, Abdulgabar

    2006-10-15

    A simple and rapid antigen-specific assay for the identification antibodies to platelets is lacking, yet. Red-dyed polystyrene microbeads were coated with monoclonal antibodies to various platelet glycoprotein complexes, and used for the detection of platelet autoantibodies and alloantibodies. The results were largely identical with those obtained by monoclonal antibody-specific immobilization of platelet antigen assay (MAIPA). The new test is reliable yet less complex and time-consuming than the currently available assays, and it can be implemented in any routine laboratory. PMID:16933262

  15. Procedures for Sxs antigen detection by antibody-mediated cytotoxicity tests. A comparative analysis.

    PubMed

    Sánchez, A; Jiménez, R; Burgos, M; Díaz de la Guardia, R

    1994-11-01

    Biological reagents used in the serological detection of Sxs antigen by antibody-mediated cytotoxicity tests were compared in order to optimize the method. Our analyses showed that: (a) red cell-free spleen cells are the best target cells, (b) rabbit serum used as the complement source should be obtained from females, and absorbed with female spleen cells before use, (c) antiserum obtained by immunizing females with repeated injections of syngenic male spleen cells provides the highest anti-Sxs antibody titer, and (d) of the different biological fluids investigated, testis supernatant has highest concentration of Sxs antigen. PMID:7836542

  16. Modulation of cytokine release from colonic explants by bacterial antigens in inflammatory bowel disease.

    PubMed

    Dionne, S; Laberge, S; Deslandres, C; Seidman, E G

    2003-07-01

    The intestinal flora play an important role in experimental colitis and inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Using colonic explant cultures from 132 IBD and control subjects, we examined tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha), interleukin (IL)-1 and interleukin-1 receptor antagonist (IL-1RA) production in vitro in response to bacterial activators. Unstimulated TNF-alpha release was increased significantly in rectal biopsies from involved IBD tissue, correlating with inflammation severity. Whereas lipopolysaccharide (LPS) only moderately stimulated TNF-alpha production from inflamed tissue, pokeweed mitogen (PWM) induced its release in all groups, with a stronger response in involved IBD tissue. Superantigen staphylococcal enterotoxin A (SEA) had a similar, but weaker effect. SEB was observed to be the strongest inducer of TNF-alpha for all groups, again with a more marked response in inflamed tissue. Stimulated release of IL-1 was considerably less than for TNF-alpha. The superantigens' superior potency over LPS was not as marked for IL-1 as it was for TNF-alpha. In addition to IL-1, IL-1RA release was also triggered by the bacterial products. The net effect of activation on the IL-1RA/IL-1 ratio was relatively modest. Release of the proinflammatory cytokines TNF-alpha and IL-1, as well as that of the anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-1RA was increased by incubation of colonic tissue with bacterial factors. TNF-alpha production and release was increased significantly in involved colonic explants from IBD. SEB was even capable of inducing TNF-alpha release from uninvolved colonic tissue. PMID:12823284

  17. Evaluation by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) of Renibacterium salmoninarum bacterins affected by persistence of bacterial antigens

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pascho, R.J.; Goodrich, T.D.; McKibben, C.L.

    1997-01-01

    Rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss were injected intraperitoneally with a bacterin containing killed Renibacterium salmoninarum cells delivered alone or in an oil-based adjuvant. We evaluated the relative abilities of the batterins to prevent the initiation or progression of infection in fish challenged by waterborne exposure to R. salmoninarum. Sixty-one days after vaccination, fish were held for 24 h in water containing either no bacteria or approximately 1.7 x 103, 1.7 x 105, or 5.3 x 106 live R. salmoninarum cells/mL. An enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) was used to monitor changes in the levels of R. salmoninarum antigen in live fish before and after the immersion challenges. High levels of R. salmoninarum antigens were detected by ELISA in kidney-spleen tissue homogenates from vaccinated fish immediately before the challenges. Levels of those antigens remained high in the tissues of unchallenged fish throughout the study. We found that the ELISA used in this study may be unsuitable for evaluating the efficacy of batterins because it did not distinguish antigens produced by the challenge bacteria during an infection from those of the bacterins. Groups of control and vaccinated fish also were injected with either 1.7 x 104 or 1.7 x 106 R. salmoninarum cells and served as R. salmoninarum virulence controls. Relative survival among the various subgroups in the injection challenge suggests that adverse effects might have been associated with the adjuvant used in this study. The lowest survival at both injection challenge levels was among fish vaccinated with bacteria in adjuvant.

  18. Detection of antibodies and antigens of human parvovirus B19 by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay.

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, L J; Tsou, C; Parker, R A; Chorba, T L; Wulff, H; Tattersall, P; Mortimer, P P

    1986-01-01

    Acute-phase serum from a patient with aplastic crisis provided sufficient human parvovirus B19 to make a monoclonal antibody against B19 and to develop antigen and immunoglobulin M (IgM) and IgG antibody detection enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs). The indirect capture antibody method was used for all three assays. Antigen was detected in 8 of 29 sera drawn within 2 days of onset of illness from patients with aplastic crisis. These sera had high titers of virus by electron microscopy and DNA hybridization and had no detectable B19 antibody. Antigen was not detected in serum specimens that had low titers of B19 DNA and had B19 antibody. With the IgM ELISA, we detected B19 IgM in over 85% of clinical cases of aplastic crisis and fifth disease and less than 2% of controls. The prevalence of B19 IgG antibodies increased with age. Approximately 2% of children less than 5 years of age and 49% of adults greater than 20 years of age had B19 IgG antibodies. The B19 antibody ELISAs are sensitive and specific tests to detect B19 infections. PMID:3021807

  19. Infection with Bartonella weissii and Detection of Nanobacterium Antigens in a North Carolina Beef Herd

    PubMed Central

    Breitschwerdt, Edward B.; Sontakke, Sushama; Cannedy, Allen; Hancock, Susan I.; Bradley, Julie M.

    2001-01-01

    Very recently, Bartonella organisms have been isolated from large ruminants (deer, elk, and dairy and beef cattle) located in the United States and in France. In this study, we report the serologic, microbiologic, and molecular findings related to the isolation of a Bartonella species in North Carolina beef cattle and the detection of nanobacterial antigen using a commercially available enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Between August 1998 and September 1999, blood was collected from 38 cattle ranging in age from 1 month to 6.5 years. After a 1-month incubation period, a Bartonella sp. was isolated on a 5% rabbit blood agar plate from three of six EDTA blood samples. PCR amplification of the 16S rRNA gene from all three isolates resulted in a DNA sequence that was 100% identical to that of B. weissii 16S rRNA (GenBank no. AF199502). By IFA testing, 36 of 38 cattle had antibodies (≥1:64) to Bartonella weissii (bovine origin) antigens. Nanobacterial antigen was detected in 22 of 22 serum samples. We conclude that infection with an organism similar or closely related to B. weissii can occur in North Carolina cattle and that although their actual existence is still controversial Nanobacterium antigens were detected with a commercially available test kit. The epidemiology, vector biology, and potential pathogenicity of these organisms in cattle deserve future consideration. PMID:11230398

  20. Antigens of Trypanosoma cruzi detected by different classes and subclasses of antibodies.

    PubMed

    Araujo, F G; Heilman, B; Tighe, L

    1984-01-01

    The kinetics of the appearance of specific IgM and of subclasses of IgG antibodies following infection of mice with Trypanosoma cruzi and the antigens of amastigotes and epimastigotes recognized by these antibodies were investigated by using the indirect immunofluorescent antibody test and the protein transfer technique. IgM and IgG2 antibodies were detected almost at the same time and peaked on day 30 and 40 of infection respectively. On day 150 of infection IgM antibodies were barely detectable whereas IgG2 antibodies were still at a high titre. IgG3 and IgG1 antibodies were first detected on days 20 and 30, peaked on days 30 and 50 respectively, and were still detected at low titres on day 150 of infection. The immunofluorescent test with each antibody revealed differences in the patterns of the fluorescent staining of the organisms, particularly with amastigotes. These differences were most striking with IgG3 antibodies. Fluorescent staining with IgM or IgG1 was localized mostly on one or two poles of the amastigotes; with IgG2 it was over the entire body of either amastigotes or epimastigotes; and with IgG3 it was in the form of very small spots over the entire body of organisms of both stages. The Western blots revealed that each antibody apparently recognized the same antigens in both the epimastigote and amastigote antigen preparations. The 90 Kd MW antigen of epimastigotes as well as two antigens of MW 92 Kd and 90 Kd of amastigotes were recognized by each of the antibodies examined. PMID:6438837

  1. Performance evaluation of four rapid antigen tests for the detection of Respiratory syncytial virus.

    PubMed

    Jung, Bo Kyeung; Choi, Sung Hyuk; Lee, Jong Han; Lee, JungHwa; Lim, Chae Seung

    2016-10-01

    Rapid identification of Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is important in the management of infected patients. Rapid diagnostic tests (RDT) are widely used for this purpose. This study aimed to evaluate the clinical performance of four RSV antigen tests including the BinaxNow RSV Card test, SD Bioline RSV test, BD Veritor RSV test, and Humasis RSV antigen test in comparison with real-time RT-PCR as the reference method. Nasopharyngeal swabs were collected from 280 patients with symptoms of lower respiratory tract infection and stored at -80°C. All swabs were tested for RSV using four rapid antigen tests and real time RT-PCR. The sensitivity of the BinaxNow RSV Card test, SD Bioline RSV test, BD Veritor RSV test, and Humasis RSV Antigen tests were 62.5%, 61.3%, 65.0%, and 67.5% for RSV A, and 61.3%, 65.0%, 61.3%, and 67.5% for RSV B compared to real time RT-PCR, respectively. The specificity of BD Veritor RSV test was 95.8% and those of the other three RDTs was 100%. Commercial RSV antigen detection assays are useful tools for the rapid diagnosis of RSV infection. However, confirmatory testing is always recommended. J. Med. Virol. 88:1720-1724, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26990654

  2. Detection of targeted carcinoembryonic antigens using a micro-fluxgate-based biosensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lei, Jian; Lei, Chong; Wang, Tao; Yang, Zhen; Zhou, Yong

    2013-11-01

    In this work, a micro-fluxgate-based biosensor was designed for the detection of carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) labeled by Dynabeads. The sensor with Fe-based amorphous core and three dimension solenoid coils was fabricated by Micro Electro-Mechanical system technology. Sandwich assays are performed using antibody-antigen pair combination of biotin-streptavidin assay on a separated Au film substrate surface with a self-assembled layer. With dc magnetic fields in the range of 560 μT to 875 μT, detection of CEAs with different concentrations was performed and a minimum detectable concentration of 1 pg/ml was achieved. Furthermore, CEA samples with different concentrations can be distinguished.

  3. Evaluation of enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for detection of Salmonella typhi antigen and antibodies.

    PubMed

    el Fattah, M M; Hassan, E M; Shaheen, H; Awad, R A; Girgis, N

    1991-01-01

    Enteric fever is considered a major health problem in developing countries. The need for a rapid, accurate and conclusive method for diagnosis is important for adequate and proper treatment. The usefulness and reliability of the ELISA test in detection of S. typhi O antigen and specific IgG and IgM antibodies were assessed using sera obtained from 63 subjects clinically suspected to have enteric fever, 22 febrilenon-enteric subjects and 20 normal subjects. ELISA detection of S. typhi somatic antigen was positive in 75% of subjects with positive clot cultures. IgG and IgM antibodies to S. typhi lipopolysaccharide (LPS) were detected in sera from 83% and 88% of enteric fever subjects, respectively. While anti-LPS IgM was negative in all sera from febrile non-enteric subjects, 9% were positive for anti-LPS-IgG. The use of an ELISA for detection of anti-S. typhi LPS antibody in combination with the Widal test and/or the O antigen detection ELISA would provide a useful (95.8% sensitivity) adjunct to standard culture methods and allow for an earlier and more rapid diagnosis of enteric fever. PMID:1724780

  4. Detection of avian influenza antigens in proximity fiber, droplet, and optical waveguide microfluidics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoon, Jeong-Yeol; Heinze, Brian C.; Gamboa, Jessica; You, David J.

    2009-05-01

    Virus antigens of avian influenza subtype H3N2 were detected on two different microfluidic platforms: microchannel and droplet. Latex immunoagglutination assays were performed using 920-nm highly carboxylated polystyrene beads that are conjugated with antibody to avian influenza virus. The bead suspension was merged with the solutions of avian influenza virus antigens in a Y-junction of a microchannel made by polydimethylsiloxane soft lithography. The resulting latex immunoagglutinations were measured with two optical fibers in proximity setup to detect 45° forward light scattering. Alternatively, 10 μL droplets of a bead suspension and an antigen solution were merged on a superhydrophobic surface (water contact angle = 155°), whose movement was guided by a metal wire, and 180° back light scattering is measured with a backscattering optical probe. Detection limits were 0.1 pg mL-1 for both microchannel with proximity fibers and droplet microfluidics, thanks to the use of micro-positioning stages to help generate reproducible optical signals. Additionally, optical waveguide was tested by constructing optical waveguide channels (filled with mineral oil) within a microfluidic device to detect the same light scattering. Detection limit was 0.1 ng mL-1 for an optical waveguide device, with a strong potential of improvement in the near future. The use of optical waveguide enabled smaller device setup, easier operation, smaller standard deviations and broader linear range of assay than proximity fiber microchannel and droplet microfluidics. Total assay time was less than 10 min.

  5. Bacteriophage Tailspikes and Bacterial O-Antigens as a Model System to Study Weak-Affinity Protein-Polysaccharide Interactions.

    PubMed

    Kang, Yu; Gohlke, Ulrich; Engström, Olof; Hamark, Christoffer; Scheidt, Tom; Kunstmann, Sonja; Heinemann, Udo; Widmalm, Göran; Santer, Mark; Barbirz, Stefanie

    2016-07-27

    Understanding interactions of bacterial surface polysaccharides with receptor protein scaffolds is important for the development of antibiotic therapies. The corresponding protein recognition domains frequently form low-affinity complexes with polysaccharides that are difficult to address with experimental techniques due to the conformational flexibility of the polysaccharide. In this work, we studied the tailspike protein (TSP) of the bacteriophage Sf6. Sf6TSP binds and hydrolyzes the high-rhamnose, serotype Y O-antigen polysaccharide of the Gram-negative bacterium Shigella flexneri (S. flexneri) as a first step of bacteriophage infection. Spectroscopic analyses and enzymatic cleavage assays confirmed that Sf6TSP binds long stretches of this polysaccharide. Crystal structure analysis and saturation transfer difference (STD) NMR spectroscopy using an enhanced method to interpret the data permitted the detailed description of affinity contributions and flexibility in an Sf6TSP-octasaccharide complex. Dodecasaccharide fragments corresponding to three repeating units of the O-antigen in complex with Sf6TSP were studied computationally by molecular dynamics simulations. They showed that distortion away from the low-energy solution conformation found in the octasaccharide complex is necessary for ligand binding. This is in agreement with a weak-affinity functional polysaccharide-protein contact that facilitates correct placement and thus hydrolysis of the polysaccharide close to the catalytic residues. Our simulations stress that the flexibility of glycan epitopes together with a small number of specific protein contacts provide the driving force for Sf6TSP-polysaccharide complex formation in an overall weak-affinity interaction system. PMID:27045683

  6. Natural Killer Cells and Helicobacter pylori Infection: Bacterial Antigens and Interleukin-12 Act Synergistically To Induce Gamma Interferon Production

    PubMed Central

    Yun, Cheol H.; Lundgren, Anna; Azem, Josef; Sjöling, Åsa; Holmgren, Jan; Svennerholm, Ann-Mari; Lundin, B. Samuel

    2005-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori is known to induce a local immune response, which is characterized by activation of lymphocytes and the production of IFN-γ in the stomach mucosa. Since not only T cells, but also natural killer (NK) cells, are potent producers of gamma interferon (IFN-γ), we investigated whether NK cells play a role in the immune response to H. pylori infection. Our results showed that NK cells were present in both the gastric and duodenal mucosae but that H. pylori infection did not affect the infiltration of NK cells into the gastrointestinal area. Furthermore, we could show that NK cells could be activated directly by H. pylori antigens, as H. pylori bacteria, as well as lysate from H. pylori, induced the secretion of IFN-γ by NK cells. NK cells were also activated without direct contact when separated from the bacteria by an epithelial cell layer, indicating that the activation of NK cells by H. pylori can also occur in vivo, in the infected stomach mucosa. Moreover, the production of IFN-γ by NK cells was greatly enhanced when a small amount of interleukin-12 (IL-12) was added, and this synergistic effect was associated with increased expression of the IL-12 receptor β2. It was further evident that bacterial lysate alone was sufficient to induce the activation of cytotoxicity-related molecules. In conclusion, we demonstrated that NK cells are present in the gastroduodenal mucosa of humans and that NK cells produce high levels of IFN-γ when stimulated with a combination of H. pylori antigen and IL-12. We propose that NK cells play an active role in the local immune response to H. pylori infection. PMID:15731046

  7. Detection of Antibodies to Pasteurella multocida by capture enzyme immunoassay using a monoclonal antibody against P37 antigen.

    PubMed Central

    Peterson, R R; Deeb, B J; DiGiacomo, R F

    1997-01-01

    As infection with Pasteurella multocida is common in rabbits, an enzyme immunoassay (EIA) was developed for its detection. A murine immunoglobulin G monoclonal antibody was used to capture a 37-kDa polypeptide of P. multocida serotype A:12 in an EIA to detect antibodies to P. multocida. The 37-kDa antigen was selected since it was previously shown to be a major immunogen during P. multocida infection in rabbits. The sensitivity of the P37 EIA, determined with sera from 56 rabbits infected with P. multocida, was 98%. Specificity, evaluated with sera from 62 rabbits from colonies free of P. multocida, was 92%. Titration curves of sera from rabbits immunized with P. multocida serotype A:3 or A:12 coincided, indicating that the P37 EIA was equally efficient in detecting antibodies to the two major serotypes of the organism. Comparison of the P37 EIA with the current serodiagnostic test, a bacterial lysate EIA, revealed relatively good correlation (r = 0.68). However, specificity was greatly improved, as 34% of uninfected rabbits were falsely positive by the lysate EIA whereas only 3% of uninfected rabbits were falsely positive by the P37 EIA. The coefficient of variation for same-day tests was 10%, and that for interday tests was 15%, indicating good reproducibility. The greater sensitivity and specificity of the P37 EIA should significantly enhance diagnostic capability to identify rabbits infected with P. multocida. PMID:8968909

  8. An antibody profile of systemic lupus erythematosus detected by antigen microarray

    PubMed Central

    Fattal, Ittai; Shental, Noam; Mevorach, Dror; Anaya, Juan-Manuel; Livneh, Avi; Langevitz, Pnina; Zandman-Goddard, Gisele; Pauzner, Rachel; Lerner, Miriam; Blank, Miri; Hincapie, Maria-Eugenia; Gafter, Uzi; Naparstek, Yaakov; Shoenfeld, Yehuda; Domany, Eytan; Cohen, Irun R

    2010-01-01

    Patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) produce antibodies to many different self-antigens. Here, we investigated antibodies in SLE sera using an antigen microarray containing many hundreds of antigens, mostly self-antigens. The aim was to detect sets of antibody reactivities characteristic of SLE patients in each of various clinical states – SLE patients with acute lupus nephritis, SLE patients in renal remission, and SLE patients who had never had renal involvement. The analysis produced two novel findings: (i) an SLE antibody profile persists independently of disease activity and despite long-term clinical remission, and (ii) this SLE antibody profile includes increases in four specific immunoglobulin G (IgG) reactivities to double-stranded DNA (dsDNA), single-stranded DNA (ssDNA), Epstein–Barr virus (EBV) and hyaluronic acid; the profile also includes decreases in specific IgM reactivities to myeloperoxidase (MPO), CD99, collagen III, insulin-like growth factor binding protein 1 (IGFBP1) and cardiolipin. The reactivities together showed high sensitivity (> 93%) and high specificity for SLE (> 88%). A healthy control subject who had the SLE antibody profile was later found to develop clinical SLE. The present study did not detect antibody reactivities that differentiated among the various subgroups of SLE subjects with statistical significance. Thus, SLE is characterized by an enduring antibody profile irrespective of clinical state. The association of SLE with decreased IgM natural autoantibodies suggests that these autoantibodies might enhance resistance to SLE. PMID:20201986

  9. Haloarchaeal gas vesicle nanoparticles displaying Salmonella SopB antigen reduce bacterial burden when administered with live attenuated bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Karan, Ram; Barnes, Susan; Ekulona, Folasade; Chakravortty, Dipshikha; DasSarma, Shiladitya

    2014-01-01

    Innovative vaccines against typhoid and other Salmonella diseases that are safe, effective, and inexpensive are urgently needed. In order to address this need, buoyant, self-adjuvating gas vesicle nanoparticles (GVNPs) from the halophilic archaeon Halobacterium sp. NRC-1 were bioengineered to display the highly conserved Salmonella enterica antigen SopB, a secreted inosine phosphate effector protein injected by pathogenic bacteria during infection into the host cell. Two highly conserved sopB gene segments near the 3’-coding region, named sopB4 and B5, were each fused to the C-terminal coding region of the gvpC gene, and resulting GVNPs were purified by centrifugally accelerated flotation. Display of SopB4 and B5 antigenic epitopes on GVNPs was established by Western blotting analysis using antisera raised against short synthetic peptides of SopB. Immunostimulatory activities of the SopB4 and B5 nanoparticles were tested by intraperitoneal administration of recombinant GVNPs to BALB/c mice which had been immunized with S. enterica serovar Typhimurium 14028 ΔpmrG-HM-D (DV-STM-07), a live attenuated vaccine strain. Proinflammatory cytokines IFN-γ, IL-2, and IL-9 were significantly induced in mice boosted with SopB5-GVNPs, consistent with a robust Th1 response. After challenge with virulent S. enterica serovar Typhimurium 14028, bacterial burden was found to be diminished in spleen of mice boosted with SopB4-GVNPs and absent or significantly diminished in liver, mesenteric lymph node, and spleen of mice boosted with SopB5-GVNPs, indicating that the C-terminal portions of SopB displayed on GVNPs elicit a protective response to Salmonella infection in mice. SopB antigen-GVNPs were found to be stable at elevated temperatures for extended periods without refrigeration in Halobacterium cells. The results all together show that bioengineered GVNPs are likely to represent a valuable platform for the development of improved vaccines against Salmonella diseases. PMID

  10. Comparative efficacy of antigen and antibody detection tests for human trichinellosis

    SciTech Connect

    Ivanoska, D.; Cuperlovic, K.; Gamble, H.R.; Murrell, K.D.

    1989-02-01

    Sera collected from patients with suspected or confirmed exposure to Trichinella spiralis were tested for circulating parasite antigens and antiparasite antibodies. Using an immunoradiometric assay, excretory--secretory antigens from muscle-stage larvae of T. spiralis were detected in the sera of 47% of 62 patients with clinical trichinellosis and 13% of 39 patients without clinical signs but suspected of exposure to infected meat. In comparison, antibodies were detected using an indirect immunofluorescent test in the circulation of 100% of the 62 patients with clinical trichinellosis and 46% of the 39 patients with suspected exposure. The presence of antibodies specific to excretory-secretory products of T. spiralis muscle larvae was confirmed in the majority of the samples tested by a monoclonal antibody-based competitive inhibition assay. These results indicate that antibody detection is a more sensitive diagnostic method for human trichinellosis, but that antigen detection might be a useful confirmatory test because it is a direct demonstration of parasite products in the circulation.

  11. Detection and Characterization of Autoantibodies to Neuronal Cell-Surface Antigens in the Central Nervous System.

    PubMed

    van Coevorden-Hameete, Marleen H; Titulaer, Maarten J; Schreurs, Marco W J; de Graaff, Esther; Sillevis Smitt, Peter A E; Hoogenraad, Casper C

    2016-01-01

    Autoimmune encephalitis (AIE) is a group of disorders in which autoantibodies directed at antigens located on the plasma membrane of neurons induce severe neurological symptoms. In contrast to classical paraneoplastic disorders, AIE patients respond well to immunotherapy. The detection of neuronal surface autoantibodies in patients' serum or CSF therefore has serious consequences for the patients' treatment and follow-up and requires the availability of sensitive and specific diagnostic tests. This mini-review provides a guideline for both diagnostic and research laboratories that work on the detection of known surface autoantibodies and/or the identification of novel surface antigens. We discuss the strengths and pitfalls of different techniques for anti-neuronal antibody detection: (1) Immunohistochemistry (IHC) and immunofluorescence on rat/primate brain sections; (2) Immunocytochemistry (ICC) of living cultured hippocampal neurons; and (3) Cell Based Assay (CBA). In addition, we discuss the use of immunoprecipitation and mass spectrometry analysis for the detection of novel neuronal surface antigens, which is a crucial step in further disease classification and the development of novel CBAs. PMID:27303263

  12. Detection and Characterization of Autoantibodies to Neuronal Cell-Surface Antigens in the Central Nervous System

    PubMed Central

    van Coevorden-Hameete, Marleen H.; Titulaer, Maarten J.; Schreurs, Marco W. J.; de Graaff, Esther; Sillevis Smitt, Peter A. E.; Hoogenraad, Casper C.

    2016-01-01

    Autoimmune encephalitis (AIE) is a group of disorders in which autoantibodies directed at antigens located on the plasma membrane of neurons induce severe neurological symptoms. In contrast to classical paraneoplastic disorders, AIE patients respond well to immunotherapy. The detection of neuronal surface autoantibodies in patients’ serum or CSF therefore has serious consequences for the patients’ treatment and follow-up and requires the availability of sensitive and specific diagnostic tests. This mini-review provides a guideline for both diagnostic and research laboratories that work on the detection of known surface autoantibodies and/or the identification of novel surface antigens. We discuss the strengths and pitfalls of different techniques for anti-neuronal antibody detection: (1) Immunohistochemistry (IHC) and immunofluorescence on rat/primate brain sections; (2) Immunocytochemistry (ICC) of living cultured hippocampal neurons; and (3) Cell Based Assay (CBA). In addition, we discuss the use of immunoprecipitation and mass spectrometry analysis for the detection of novel neuronal surface antigens, which is a crucial step in further disease classification and the development of novel CBAs. PMID:27303263

  13. Nanostructured materials detect epidermal growth factor receptor, neuron specific enolase and carcinoembryonic antigen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stefan-van Staden, Raluca-Ioana; Comnea-Stancu, Ionela Raluca; Surdu-Bob, Carmen Cristina; Badulescu, Marius

    2015-09-01

    New nanostructured materials based on thin films of Cu and Ni deposited on textile material (veil), as well as gold nanostructured microspheres were used for the design of new stochastic sensors. The stochastic sensors were able to detect simultaneously a panel of biomarkers comprising epidermal growth factor receptor, neuron specific enolase, and carcinoembryonic antigen from whole blood samples with high reliabilities - recovery tests higher than 97.00%, with a RSD (%) lower than 0.1%. The stochastic sensors had shown high sensitivities and low determination levels for the detection of the proposed panel of biomarkers making early detection of lung cancer possible by fast screening of whole blood.

  14. Novel fusion antigen displayed-bacterial ghosts vaccine candidate against infection of Escherichia coli O157:H7.

    PubMed

    Cai, Kun; Tu, Wei; Liu, Yuenan; Li, Tao; Wang, Hui

    2015-01-01

    Infection with Escherichia coli O157:H7 may develop into hemorrhagic colitis, or hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS), which usually causes kidney failure or even death. The adhesion and toxins are the important virulent factors. In this study, a novel vaccine candidate rSOBGs was constructed based on the bacterial ghost (BG). rSOBGs maintained the integrity of cellular morphology and displayed the linear Stx2Am-Stx1B antigen on the surface of outer membrane. rSOBGs induced Stxs-specific IgA/IgG antibodies and stronger intimin-specific IgA/IgG antibodies effectively in sera in this study. In vivo, the rSOBGs provided the higher protection rate (52%) than native bacterial ghost-OBGs (12%) when challenged intragastricly with high dose (500 LD50) viable E. coli O157:H7. Meanwhile, the rSOBGs provided higher protection rate (73.33%) than OBGs when challenged with 2 LD50 even to 5 LD50 lysed E. coli O157:H7. In vitro, the rSOBGs-immunized sera possessed neutralizing activity to lysed pathogenic bacteria. Furthermore, the results of histopathology also displayed that the administration of rSOBGs have the ability to reduce or inhibit the adhesion lesions and toxins damages of organs. The novel vaccine candidate rSOBGs induced both anti-toxin and anti-adhesion immune protection, suggesting the possibility to prevent the infectious diseases caused by Escherichia coli O157:H7. PMID:26626573

  15. Novel fusion antigen displayed-bacterial ghosts vaccine candidate against infection of Escherichia coli O157:H7

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Kun; Tu, Wei; Liu, Yuenan; Li, Tao; Wang, Hui

    2015-01-01

    Infection with Escherichia coli O157:H7 may develop into hemorrhagic colitis, or hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS), which usually causes kidney failure or even death. The adhesion and toxins are the important virulent factors. In this study, a novel vaccine candidate rSOBGs was constructed based on the bacterial ghost (BG). rSOBGs maintained the integrity of cellular morphology and displayed the linear Stx2Am-Stx1B antigen on the surface of outer membrane. rSOBGs induced Stxs-specific IgA/IgG antibodies and stronger intimin-specific IgA/IgG antibodies effectively in sera in this study. In vivo, the rSOBGs provided the higher protection rate (52%) than native bacterial ghost-OBGs (12%) when challenged intragastricly with high dose (500 LD50) viable E. coli O157:H7. Meanwhile, the rSOBGs provided higher protection rate (73.33%) than OBGs when challenged with 2 LD50 even to 5 LD50 lysed E. coli O157:H7. In vitro, the rSOBGs-immunized sera possessed neutralizing activity to lysed pathogenic bacteria. Furthermore, the results of histopathology also displayed that the administration of rSOBGs have the ability to reduce or inhibit the adhesion lesions and toxins damages of organs. The novel vaccine candidate rSOBGs induced both anti-toxin and anti-adhesion immune protection, suggesting the possibility to prevent the infectious diseases caused by Escherichia coli O157:H7. PMID:26626573

  16. Osteosarcoma Microenvironment: Whole-Slide Imaging and Optimized Antigen Detection Overcome Major Limitations in Immunohistochemical Quantification

    PubMed Central

    Kunz, Pierre; Fellenberg, Jörg; Moskovszky, Linda; Sápi, Zoltan; Krenacs, Tibor; Poeschl, Johannes; Lehner, Burkhard; Szendrõi, Miklos; Ewerbeck, Volker; Kinscherf, Ralf; Fritzsching, Benedikt

    2014-01-01

    Background In osteosarcoma survival rates could not be improved over the last 30 years. Novel biomarkers are warranted to allow risk stratification of patients for more individual treatment following initial diagnosis. Although previous studies of the tumor microenvironment have identified promising candidates, novel biomarkers have not been translated into routine histopathology. Substantial difficulties regarding immunohistochemical detection and quantification of antigens in decalcified and heterogeneous osteosarcoma might largely explain this translational short-coming. Furthermore, we hypothesized that conventional hot spot analysis is often not representative for the whole section when applied to heterogeneous tissues like osteosarcoma. We aimed to overcome these difficulties for major biomarkers of the immunovascular microenvironment. Methods Immunohistochemistry was systematically optimized for cell surface (CD31, CD8) and intracellular antigens (FOXP3) including evaluation of 200 different antigen retrieval conditions. Distribution patterns of these antigens were analyzed in formalin-fixed and paraffin-embedded samples from 120 high-grade central osteosarcoma biopsies and computer-assisted whole-slide analysis was compared with conventional quantification methods including hot spot analysis. Results More than 96% of osteosarcoma samples were positive for all antigens after optimization of immunohistochemistry. In contrast, standard immunohistochemistry retrieved false negative results in 35–65% of decalcified osteosarcoma specimens. Standard hot spot analysis was applicable for homogeneous distributed FOXP3+ and CD8+ cells. However, heterogeneous distribution of vascular CD31 did not allow reliable quantification with hot spot analysis in 85% of all samples. Computer-assisted whole-slide analysis of total CD31- immunoreactive area proved as the most appropriate quantification method. Conclusion Standard staining and quantification procedures are not

  17. Biotin avidin amplified magnetic immunoassay for hepatitis B surface antigen detection using GoldMag nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, An; Geng, Tingting; Fu, Qiang; Chen, Chao; Cui, Yali

    2007-04-01

    Using GoldMag (Fe3O4/Au) nanoparticles as a carrier, a biotin-avidin amplified ELISA was developed to detect hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg). A specific antibody was labeled with biotin and then used to detect the antigen with an antibody coated on GoldMag nanoparticles by a sandwich ELISA assay. The results showed that 5 mol of biotin were surface bound per mole of antibody. The biotin-avidin amplified ELISA assay has a higher sensitivity than that of the direct ELISA assay. There is 5-fold difference between HBsAg positive and negative serum even at dilution of 1:10000, and the relative standard deviation of the parallel positive serum at dilution of 1:4000 is 5.98% (n=11).

  18. Biomimetic/Optical Sensors for Detecting Bacterial Species

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Homer, Margie; Ksendzov, Alexander; Yen, Shiao-Pin; Ryan, Margaret; Lazazzera, Beth

    2006-01-01

    Biomimetic/optical sensors have been proposed as means of real-time detection of bacteria in liquid samples through real-time detection of compounds secreted by the bacteria. Bacterial species of interest would be identified through detection of signaling compounds unique to those species. The best-characterized examples of quorum-signaling compounds are acyl-homoserine lactones and peptides. Each compound, secreted by each bacterium of an affected species, serves as a signal to other bacteria of the same species to engage in a collective behavior when the population density of that species reaches a threshold level analogous to a quorum. A sensor according to the proposal would include a specially formulated biomimetic film, made of a molecularly imprinted polymer (MIP), that would respond optically to the signaling compound of interest. The MIP film would be integrated directly onto an opticalwaveguide- based ring resonator for optical readout. Optically, the sensor would resemble the one described in Chemical Sensors Based on Optical Ring Resonators (NPO-40601), NASA Tech Briefs, Vol. 29, No. 10 (October 2005), page 32. MIPs have been used before as molecular- recognition compounds, though not in the manner of the present proposal. Molecular imprinting is an approach to making molecularly selective cavities in a polymer matrix. These cavities function much as enzyme receptor sites: the chemical functionality and shape of a cavity in the polymer matrix cause the cavity to bind to specific molecules. An MIP matrix is made by polymerizing monomers in the presence of the compound of interest (template molecule). The polymer forms around the template. After the polymer solidifies, the template molecules are removed from the polymer matrix by decomplexing them from their binding sites and then dissolving them, leaving cavities that are matched to the template molecules in size, shape, and chemical functionality. The cavities thus become molecular-recognition sites

  19. Antigen Detection in the Diagnosis of Histoplasmosis: A Meta-analysis of Diagnostic Performance.

    PubMed

    Fandiño-Devia, Estefanía; Rodríguez-Echeverri, Carolina; Cardona-Arias, Jaiberth; Gonzalez, Angel

    2016-04-01

    We performed a meta-analysis of diagnostic data to evaluate the performance of Histoplasma antigen detection tests for diagnosing histoplasmosis. We included all studies involving human subjects that assessed the performance of any antigen detection test for histoplasmosis in urine or serum by carrying out an exhaustive and reproducible search of the literature between 1980 and 2014 from four databases. Quality of the articles was assessed, and meta-analysis was performed under the random effects model, calculating sensitivity, specificity, likelihood and odds ratios, and ROC curve using Meta-DiSc(es). Nine out of a total of 23 studies met strict quality criteria and were therefore included. The overall sensitivity for antigen detection in serum and urine was 81% (95% CI 78-83%), while specificity was 99% (95% CI 98-99%). Sensitivity for antigenuria and antigenemia was 79% (95% CI 76-82%) and 82% (95% CI 79-85%), respectively; specificity values were 99% (95% CI 98-100%) in urine and 97% (95% CI 96-98%) in serum. The positive and negative likelihood ratios were 49.5 (95% CI 20.7-118.7) and 0.19 (95% CI 0.14-0.26), respectively, while the diagnostic OR was 362 (95% CI 121.2-1080.3) and area under the curve was 0.99. In conclusion, the performance of Histoplasma antigen detection assay of urine was not significantly different from that of blood, indicating that antigenuria and antigenemia have equal diagnostic value in histoplasmosis. PMID:26559429

  20. Detecting West Nile Virus in Owls and Raptors by an Antigen-capture Assay

    PubMed Central

    Campbell, Douglas G.; Barker, Ian K.; Lindsay, Robbin; Hunter, Bruce

    2004-01-01

    We evaluated a rapid antigen-capture assay (VecTest) for detection of West Nile virus in oropharyngeal and cloacal swabs, collected at necropsy from owls (N = 93) and raptors (N = 27). Sensitivity was 93.5%–95.2% for northern owl species but <42.9% for all other species. Specificity was 100% for owls and 85.7% for raptors. PMID:15663862

  1. An enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for the detection of Entamoeba histolytica antigens in faecal material.

    PubMed

    Grundy, M S; Voller, A; Warhurst, D

    1987-01-01

    This paper describes a method for the detection of Entamoeba histolytica antigens in stool samples using a multi-layer ELISA. The method is sensitive and specific, showing no interference with other intestinal parasites, e.g. E. coli, E. hartmanni, Endolimax nana, Iodamoeba buetschlii, Hymenolepis nana, Giardia lamblia, Trichomonas and Ascaris. The method provides a rapid and simple screening assay for E. histolytica infections and should assist in diagnosis and epidemiological studies of the disease. PMID:2895514

  2. Evaluation of a Combination Rapid Immunoassay for Detection of Giardia and Cryptosporidium Antigens

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Raymond; Chen, Jing; York, Mary K.; Setijono, Norman; Kaplan, Raymond L.; Graham, Fitzroy; Tanowitz, Herbert B.

    2000-01-01

    A combination cassette format nonenzymatic rapid immunoassay for detection of Giardia and Cryptosporidium antigens was evaluated by using 556 patient stool specimens from three clinical laboratories. This assay (Genzyme Diagnostics Contrast Giardia/Cryptosporidium), which can be used with fresh or formalin-fixed specimens, had unadjusted sensitivities and specificities of 96.1 and 98.5% for Giardia and 100 and 98.7% for Cryptosporidium, respectively, in this study. PMID:10618122

  3. Application of Protein Microarrays for Multiplexed Detection of Antibodies to Tumor Antigens in Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Karen S.; Ramachandran, Niroshan; Wong, Jessica; Raphael, Jacob V.; Hainsworth, Eugenie; Demirkan, Gokhan; Cramer, Daniel; Aronzon, Diana; Hodi, F. Stephen; Harris, Lyndsay; Logvinenko, Tanya; LaBaer, Joshua

    2012-01-01

    There is strong preclinical evidence that cancer, including breast cancer, undergoes immune surveillance. This continual monitoring, by both the innate and the adaptive immune systems, recognizes changes in protein expression, mutation, folding, glycosylation, and degradation. Local immune responses to tumor antigens are amplified in draining lymph nodes, and then enter the systemic circulation. The antibody response to tumor antigens, such as p53 protein, are robust, stable, and easily detected in serum, may exist in greater concentrations than their cognate antigens, and are potential highly specific biomarkers for cancer. However, antibodies have limited sensitivities as single analytes, and differences in protein purification and assay characteristics have limited their clinical application. For example, p53 autoantibodies in the sera are highly specific for cancer patients, but are only detected in the sera of 10-20% of patients with breast cancer. Detection of p53 autoantibodies is dependent on tumor burden, p53 mutation, rapidly decreases with effective therapy, but is relatively independent of breast cancer subtype. Although antibodies to hundreds of other tumor antigens have been identified in the sera of breast cancer patients, very little is known about the specificity and clinical impact of the antibody immune repertoire to breast cancer. Recent advances in proteomic technologies have the potential for rapid identification of immune response signatures for breast cancer diagnosis and monitoring. We have adapted programmable protein microarrays for the specific detection of autoantibodies in breast cancer. Here, we present the first demonstration of the application of programmable protein microarray ELISAs for the rapid identification of breast cancer autoantibodies. PMID:18311903

  4. Method and apparatus for detecting and quantifying bacterial spores on a surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ponce, Adrian (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    A method and an apparatus for detecting and quantifying bacterial spores on a surface. In accordance with the method: a matrix including lanthanide ions is provided on the surface containing the bacterial spores; functionalized aromatic molecules are released from the bacterial spores on the surface; a complex of the lanthanide ion and the aromatic molecule is formed on the surface; the complex of the lanthanide ion and the aromatic molecule is excited to generate a characteristic luminescence of the complex on the surface; and the bacterial spores exhibiting the luminescence of the complex on the surface are detected and quantified.

  5. Rapid detection of Mannheimia haemolytica in lung tissues of sheep and from bacterial culture

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Jyoti; Dixit, Shivendra Kumar; Kumar, Rajiv

    2015-01-01

    Aim: This study was aimed to detect Mannheimia haemolytica in lung tissues of sheep and from a bacterial culture. Introduction: M. haemolytica is one of the most important and well-established etiological agents of pneumonia in sheep and other ruminants throughout the world. Accurate diagnosis of M. haemolytica primarily relies on bacteriological examination, biochemical characteristics and, biotyping and serotyping of the isolates. In an effort to facilitate rapid M. haemolytica detection, polymerase chain reaction assay targeting Pasteurella haemolytica serotype-1 specific antigens (PHSSA), Rpt2 and 12S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) genes were used to detect M. haemolytica directly from lung tissues and from bacterial culture. Materials and Methods: A total of 12 archived lung tissues from sheep that died of pneumonia on an organized farm were used. A multiplex polymerase chain reaction (mPCR) based on two-amplicons targeted PHSSA and Rpt2 genes of M. haemolytica were used for identification of M. haemolytica isolates in culture from the lung samples. All the 12 lung tissue samples were tested for the presence M. haemolytica by PHSSA and Rpt2 genes based PCR and its confirmation by sequencing of the amplicons. Results: All the 12 lung tissue samples tested for the presence of PHSSA and Rpt2 genes of M. haemolytica by mPCR were found to be positive. Amplification of 12S rRNA gene fragment as internal amplification control was obtained with each mPCR reaction performed from DNA extracted directly from lung tissue samples. All the M. haemolytica were also positive for mPCR. No amplified DNA bands were observed for negative control reactions. All the three nucleotide sequences were deposited in NCBI GenBank (Accession No. KJ534629, KJ534630 and KJ534631). Sequencing of the amplified products revealed the identity of 99-100%, with published sequence of PHSSA and Rpt2 genes of M. haemolytica available in the NCBI database. Sheep specific mitochondrial 12S rRNA gene sequence

  6. Use of monoclonal antibodies in diagnosis of paracoccidioidomycosis: new strategies for detection of circulating antigens.

    PubMed Central

    Gómez, B L; Figueroa, J I; Hamilton, A J; Ortiz, B; Robledo, M A; Hay, R J; Restrepo, A

    1997-01-01

    The precise diagnosis of paracoccidioidomycosis, in most cases, is established by direct methods and indirect immunological tests. The latter method is reliant on the identification of the host's humoral responses, which are usually impaired or absent in patients with severe juvenile forms of the disease and in immunocompromised patients. Determining disease activity or assessing treatment responses by measuring antibody levels is difficult, since antibody titer may remain elevated or persist at stationary levels, even in the presence of clinical improvement. Consequently, there is a need for alternative tests aimed at the identification of circulating antigens. A modification of the standard hybridoma production method was used to raise a panel of murine monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) against the yeast form of Paracoccidioides brasiliensis. Of these, MAb PIB, directed against an 87-kDa determinant, was used to develop an inhibition ELISA (inh-ELISA) capable of detecting as little as 5.8 ng of circulating antigen per ml of serum. Sera from 46 patients with paracoccidioidomycosis or other mycoses and sera from healthy individuals were evaluated by the inh-ELISA; overall sensitivity was 80.4% (37 of 46 paracoccidioidomycosis patients tested positive), and specificity compared with that of normal controls from areas of endemicity was 81.4%. The inh-ELISA detected circulating antigen in 100% of patients with the acute form of paracoccidioidomycosis and in 83.3 and 60% of patients with the chronic multifocal and unifocal forms of paracoccidioidomycosis according to the patients' clinical presentation. These results indicate that the inh-ELISA with MAb PIB is effective in the detection of circulating antigen and that this test may be useful for monitoring responses to treatment and establishing disease prognoses. PMID:9399534

  7. Use of monoclonal antibodies in diagnosis of paracoccidioidomycosis: new strategies for detection of circulating antigens.

    PubMed

    Gómez, B L; Figueroa, J I; Hamilton, A J; Ortiz, B; Robledo, M A; Hay, R J; Restrepo, A

    1997-12-01

    The precise diagnosis of paracoccidioidomycosis, in most cases, is established by direct methods and indirect immunological tests. The latter method is reliant on the identification of the host's humoral responses, which are usually impaired or absent in patients with severe juvenile forms of the disease and in immunocompromised patients. Determining disease activity or assessing treatment responses by measuring antibody levels is difficult, since antibody titer may remain elevated or persist at stationary levels, even in the presence of clinical improvement. Consequently, there is a need for alternative tests aimed at the identification of circulating antigens. A modification of the standard hybridoma production method was used to raise a panel of murine monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) against the yeast form of Paracoccidioides brasiliensis. Of these, MAb PIB, directed against an 87-kDa determinant, was used to develop an inhibition ELISA (inh-ELISA) capable of detecting as little as 5.8 ng of circulating antigen per ml of serum. Sera from 46 patients with paracoccidioidomycosis or other mycoses and sera from healthy individuals were evaluated by the inh-ELISA; overall sensitivity was 80.4% (37 of 46 paracoccidioidomycosis patients tested positive), and specificity compared with that of normal controls from areas of endemicity was 81.4%. The inh-ELISA detected circulating antigen in 100% of patients with the acute form of paracoccidioidomycosis and in 83.3 and 60% of patients with the chronic multifocal and unifocal forms of paracoccidioidomycosis according to the patients' clinical presentation. These results indicate that the inh-ELISA with MAb PIB is effective in the detection of circulating antigen and that this test may be useful for monitoring responses to treatment and establishing disease prognoses. PMID:9399534

  8. Detection of cell and tissue surface antigens using up-converting phosphors: a new reporter technology.

    PubMed

    Zijlmans, H J; Bonnet, J; Burton, J; Kardos, K; Vail, T; Niedbala, R S; Tanke, H J

    1999-02-01

    A novel luminescent reporter for the sensitive detection of antigens in tissue sections or on cell membranes is described. It consists of submicron-size phosphor crystals (0.2-0.4 microm), which are surface labeled with avidin or antibodies and capable of binding specifically to antigens on intact cells or in tissue sections. These phosphor reporters exhibit two-photon, anti-Stokes luminescence by up-converting infrared to visible light and are named Up-converting Phosphor Technology (UPT). They typically consist of yttriumoxysulfides doped with two different lanthanides exhibiting photostable, strong emission in the visible (blue, green, and red) upon excitation in the infrared. This report describes the conjugation of phosphor particles to NeutrAvidin with the subsequent use of this conjugate in a model system consisting of prostate-specific antigen in tissue sections and the CD4 membrane antigen on human lymphocytes. An epi-illumination fluorescence microscope was adapted to provide near-IR excitation using a xenon lamp for visualization of the visible emission. Advantages of UPT are (i) permanent, strong, anti-Stokes emission of discrete wavelengths; (ii) unmatched contrast in biological specimens due to the absence of autofluorescence upon excitation with IR light; (iii) simultaneous detection of multiple target analytes; and (iv) low-cost microscope modifications. The new methodology has not only high potential value in diagnostic pathology as described here, but may offer advantages for the detection of proteins or nucleic acids when applied to molecular biology, genomic research, virology, and microbiology. PMID:9918652

  9. Development of a DNA Microarray Method for Detection and Identification of All 15 Distinct O-Antigen Forms of Legionella pneumophila

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Boyang; Yao, Fangfang; Liu, Xiangqian; Feng, Lu

    2013-01-01

    Legionella is ubiquitous in many environments. At least 50 species and 70 serogroups of the Gram-negative bacterium have been identified. Of the 50 species, 20 are pathogenic, and Legionella pneumophila is responsible for the great majority (approximately 90%) of the Legionnaires' disease cases that occur. Furthermore, of the 15 L. pneumophila serogroups identified, O1 alone causes more than 84% of the Legionnaires' disease cases that occur worldwide. Rapid and reliable assays for the detection and identification of L. pneumophila in water, environmental, and clinical samples are in great demand. L. pneumophila bacteria are traditionally identified by their O antigens by immunological methods. We have recently developed an O serogroup-specific DNA microarray for the detection of all 15 distinct O-antigen forms of L. pneumophila, including serogroups O1 to O15. A total of 35 strains were used to verify the specificity of the microarray, including 15 L. pneumophila O-antigen standard reference strains and seven L. pneumophila clinical isolates as target strains, seven reference strains of other non-pneumophila Legionella species as closely related strains, and six non-Legionella bacterial species as nonrelated strains. The detection sensitivity was 1 ng of genomic DNA or 0.4 CFU/ml in water samples with filter enrichment and plate culturing. This study demonstrated that the microarray allows specific, sensitive, and reproducible detection of L. pneumophila serogroups. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of a microarray serotyping method for all 15 distinct O-antigen forms of L. pneumophila. PMID:23974134

  10. Detection and monitoring of human bocavirus 1 infection by a new rapid antigen test

    PubMed Central

    Bruning, A.H.L.; Susi, P.; Toivola, H.; Christensen, A.; Söderlund-Venermo, M.; Hedman, K.; Aatola, H.; Zvirbliene, A.; Koskinen, J.O.

    2016-01-01

    Clinically relevant diagnosis of human bocavirus 1 (HBoV1) is challenging, as the virus is frequently detected in asymptomatic patients, and cofindings with other respiratory viruses are common. The clinical value of current diagnostic methods, such as PCR, is therefore low, and alternative diagnostic strategies are needed. We describe for the first time the use of an antigen detection assay for the rapid identification of HBoV1 in a paediatric patient with respiratory tract infection symptoms. We estimate the duration of active HBoV1 infection to be 6 days. PMID:27014463

  11. Detection of West Nile virus antigen in mosquitoes and avian tissues by a monoclonal antibody-based capture enzyme immunoassay.

    PubMed

    Hunt, Ann R; Hall, Roy A; Kerst, Amy J; Nasci, Roger S; Savage, Harry M; Panella, Nicholas A; Gottfried, Kristy L; Burkhalter, Kristen L; Roehrig, John T

    2002-06-01

    An antigen capture immunoassay to detect West Nile (WN) virus antigen in infected mosquitoes and avian tissues has been developed. With this assay purified WN virus was detected at a concentration of 32 pg/0.1 ml, and antigen in infected suckling mouse brain and laboratory-infected mosquito pools could be detected when the WN virus titer was 10(2.1) to 10(3.7) PFU/0.1 ml. In a blindly coded set of field-collected mosquito pools (n = 100), this assay detected WN virus antigen in 12 of 18 (66.7%) TaqMan-positive pools, whereas traditional reverse transcriptase PCR detected 10 of 18 (55.5%) positive pools. A sample set of 73 organ homogenates from naturally infected American crows was also examined by WN virus antigen capture immunoassay and TaqMan for the presence of WN virus. The antigen capture assay detected antigen in 30 of 34 (88.2%) TaqMan-positive tissues. Based upon a TaqMan-generated standard curve of infectious WN virus, the limit of detection in the antigen capture assay for avian tissue homogenates was approximately 10(3) PFU/0.1 ml. The recommended WN virus antigen capture protocol, which includes a capture assay followed by a confirmatory inhibition assay used to retest presumptive positive samples, could distinguish between the closely related WN and St. Louis encephalitis viruses in virus-infected mosquito pools and avian tissues. Therefore, this immunoassay demonstrates adequate sensitivity and specificity for surveillance of WN virus activity in mosquito vectors and avian hosts, and, in addition, it is easy to perform and relatively inexpensive compared with the TaqMan assay. PMID:12037058

  12. Bacterial membranes enhance the immunogenicity and protective capacity of the surface exposed tick Subolesin-Anaplasma marginale MSP1a chimeric antigen.

    PubMed

    Contreras, Marinela; Moreno-Cid, Juan A; Domingos, Ana; Canales, Mario; Díez-Delgado, Iratxe; Pérez de la Lastra, José M; Sánchez, Emilio; Merino, Octávio; Zavala, Rigoberto López; Ayllón, Nieves; Boadella, Mariana; Villar, Margarita; Gortázar, Christian; de la Fuente, José

    2015-09-01

    Ticks are vectors of diseases that affect humans and animals worldwide. Tick vaccines have been proposed as a cost-effective and environmentally sound alternative for tick control. Recently, the Rhipicephalus microplus Subolesin (SUB)-Anaplasma marginale MSP1a chimeric antigen was produced in Escherichia coli as membrane-bound and exposed protein and used to protect vaccinated cattle against tick infestations. In this research, lipidomics and proteomics characterization of the E. coli membrane-bound SUB-MSP1a antigen showed the presence of components with potential adjuvant effect. Furthermore, vaccination with membrane-free SUB-MSP1a and bacterial membranes containing SUB-MSP1a showed that bacterial membranes enhance the immunogenicity of the SUB-MSP1a antigen in animal models. R. microplus female ticks were capillary-fed with sera from pigs orally immunized with membrane-free SUB, membrane bound SUB-MSP1a and saline control. Ticks ingested antibodies added to the blood meal and the effect of these antibodies on reduction of tick weight was shown for membrane bound SUB-MSP1a but not SUB when compared to control. Using the simple and cost-effective process developed for the purification of membrane-bound SUB-MSP1a, endotoxin levels were within limits accepted for recombinant vaccines. These results provide further support for the development of tick vaccines using E. coli membranes exposing chimeric antigens such as SUB-MSP1a. PMID:26219233

  13. Enzyme immunoassay for detection of Giardia lamblia cyst antigens in formalin-fixed and unfixed human stool.

    PubMed Central

    Stibbs, H H; Samadpour, M; Manning, J F

    1988-01-01

    An antigen-capture enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay employing rabbit and mouse antisera to Giardia lamblia cyst antigens was developed for the diagnosis of Giardia infection through detection of G. lamblia-specific stool antigens in cell-free aqueous eluates of human stool. This is the first report of the use of anti-cyst antibodies in an enzyme immunoassay for G. lamblia. The assay gave a positive result with 54 of 59 stools from patients with symptomatic, clinically diagnosed giardiasis, giving the test a sensitivity of 91.5%. A negative reading was obtained with all of 25 stools from G. lamblia-negative control patients. The assay could detect as few as 20 sonicated cysts added to control stool eluate. The assay was more sensitive to cyst-derived antigens than to trophozoite-derived antigens. With two exceptions, the assay gave a negative result with stools from patients infected with Entamoeba histolytica (seven), Cryptosporidium sp. (four), or Blastocystis hominis (seven) and thus appears to be specific for G. lamblia antigens. Storage of stool eluates for more than 6 months at 4 degrees C as unpreserved aqueous eluates or as formalinized eluates did not affect the ability of the assay to detect the giardial antigens. The enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay proved useful for monitoring the levels of G. lamblia-specific stool antigens in the stool of patients undergoing antigiardial chemotherapy. PMID:3183015

  14. [Detections of hepatitis C virus RNA and NS3 antigen and their relation to liver histopathology].

    PubMed

    Wang, F; Wang, S; Jin, L

    1995-11-01

    To detect the distribution of hepatitis C virus and investigate the pathogenesis mechanisms of the viral infection in the liver tissues of the patients with acute or chronic hepatitis C, we examined HCV antigen expression by using the murine monoclonal antibody against HCV C33c peptide in the paraffin-embedded liver tissues from 28 patients with acute or chronic hepatitis C. The NS3 antigen was detected in 85.7% (24/28) of all the biopsy specimens. The distribution and staining density of the antigen immunoreactive signal varied according to different types of patients and the regions in the liver sections, but they obviously had a topographical relationship with the inflammatory-necrosis areas such as fatty and ballooning degeneration and focal necrosis in the liver tissues of nearly all the patients. In addition, the localization of HCV RNA investigated by in situ hybridization assay in 20 liver tissues the above 28 biopsy HD in the Chinese. They also provide valuable data for HD molecular diagnosis, genetic counselling and genetic health. PMID:8697087

  15. Detection and manipulation of live antigen-expressing cells using conditionally stable nanobodies

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Jonathan CY; Drokhlyansky, Eugene; Etemad, Behzad; Rudolph, Stephanie; Guo, Binggege; Wang, Sui; Ellis, Emily G; Li, Jonathan Z; Cepko, Constance L

    2016-01-01

    The ability to detect and/or manipulate specific cell populations based upon the presence of intracellular protein epitopes would enable many types of studies and applications. Protein binders such as nanobodies (Nbs) can target untagged proteins (antigens) in the intracellular environment. However, genetically expressed protein binders are stable regardless of antigen expression, complicating their use for applications that require cell-specificity. Here, we created a conditional system in which the stability of an Nb depends upon an antigen of interest. We identified Nb framework mutations that can be used to rapidly create destabilized Nbs. Fusion of destabilized Nbs to various proteins enabled applications in living cells, such as optogenetic control of neural activity in specific cell types in the mouse brain, and detection of HIV-infected human cells by flow cytometry. These approaches are generalizable to other protein binders, and enable the rapid generation of single-polypeptide sensors and effectors active in cells expressing specific intracellular epitopes. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.15312.001 PMID:27205882

  16. Novel surface antigen based impedimetric immunosensor for detection of Salmonella typhimurium in water and juice samples.

    PubMed

    Mutreja, Ruchi; Jariyal, Monu; Pathania, Preeti; Sharma, Arunima; Sahoo, D K; Suri, C Raman

    2016-11-15

    A specific surface antigen, OmpD has been reported first time as a surface biomarker in the development of selective and sensitive immunosensor for detecting Salmonella typhimurium species. The OmpD surface antigen extraction was done from Salmonella typhimurium serovars, under the optimized growth conditions for its expression. Anti-OmpD antibodies were generated and used as detector probe in immunoassay format on graphene-graphene oxide (G-GO) modified screen printed carbon electrodes. The water samples were spiked with standard Salmonella typhimurium cells, and detection was done by measuring the change in impedimetric response of developed immunosensor to know the concentration of serovar Salmonella typhimurium. The developed immunosensor was able to specifically detect S. typhimurium in spiked water and juice samples with a sensitivity upto 10(1)CFUmL(-1), with high selectivity and very low cross-reactivity with other strains. This is the first report on the detection of Salmonella typhimurum species using a specific biomarker, OmpD. The developed technique could be very useful for the detection of nontyphoidal Salmonellosis and is also important from an epidemiological point of view. PMID:27261886

  17. Improved Detection of Hepatitis B Virus Surface Antigen by a New Rapid Automated Assay

    PubMed Central

    Weber, Bernard; Bayer, Anja; Kirch, Peter; Schlüter, Volker; Schlieper, Dietmar; Melchior, Walter

    1999-01-01

    The performance of hepatitis B virus (HBV) surface antigen (HBsAg) screening assays is continuously improved in order to reduce the residual risk of transfusion-associated hepatitis B. In a multicenter study, a new automated rapid screening assay, Elecsys HBsAg (Roche Diagnostics), was compared to well-established tests (Auszyme Monoclonal [overnight incubation] version B and IMx HBsAg [Abbott]). Included in the evaluation were 23 seroconversion panels; sera from the acute and chronic phases of infection; dilution series of various HBsAg standards, HBV subtypes, and S gene mutants; and isolated anti-HBV core antigen-positive samples. To challenge the specificity of the new assay, sera from HBsAg-negative blood donors, pregnant women, and dialysis and hospitalized patients and potentially cross-reactive samples were investigated. Elecsys HBsAg showed a higher sensitivity for HBsAg subtypes ad, ay, adw2, adw4, ayw1, ayw2, ayw4, and adr detection in dilution series of different standards or sera than Auszyme Monoclonal version B and/or IMx HBsAg. Acute hepatitis B was detected in 11 to 16 of 23 seroconversion panels between 2 and 16 days earlier with Elecsys HBsAg than with the alternative assays. Elecsys HBsAg and Auszyme Monoclonal version B detected HBsAg surface mutants with equal sensitivity. The sensitivity and specificity of Elecsys HBsAg were 100%. Auszyme Monoclonal version B had a 99.9% specificity, and its sensitivity was 96.6%. IMx HBsAg showed a poorer sensitivity and specificity than the other assays. In conclusion, Elecsys HBsAg permits earlier detection of acute hepatitis B and different HBV subtypes than the alternative assays. By using highly sensitive HBsAg screening assays, low-level HBsAg carriers among isolated anti-HBV core antigen-positive individuals can be detected. PMID:10405414

  18. Reverse phase passive haemagglutination and single radial immunodiffusion to detect epsilon antigen of Clostridium perfringens type D.

    PubMed

    Beh, K J; Buttery, S H

    1978-11-01

    Two in vitro immunological assays were developed for detection of the epsilon (epsilon) antigen of Cl. perfringens type D. It was found that the reverse phase passive haemagglutination assay (RPHA) was able to detect concentrations of epsilon-antigen as low as 6 x 10-7 mg/ml whereas the single radial immunodiffusion techniques (SRID) was capable of detecting concentrations of epsilon-antigen above 0.01 mg/ml. When applied to gut contents from freshly dead infected sheep the RPHA test was found to be more sensitive than mouse toxicity assay in detecting the presence of epsilon-antigen. However, very low titres were detected in gut contents from normal sheep which meant that in a diagnostic situation interpretation of RPHA titres would be difficult. No epsilon-antigen was detected by SRID in gut contents from normal sheep or in gut contents from freshly dead infected sheep. The SRID assay could detect epsilon-antigen in gut contents from infected sheep allowed to decompose for 20 h post-mortem. PMID:223537

  19. Novel use of a radiolabelled antibody against stage specific embryonic antigen for the detection of occult abscesses in mammals

    DOEpatents

    Thakur, M.L.

    1990-04-17

    The invention discloses improved reagents containing antibodies against stage specific embryonic antigen-1 antibodies and improved methods for detection of occult abscess and inflammation using the improved reagents. No Drawings

  20. Production of monoclonal antibodies to hepatitis B surface and core antigens, and use in the detection of viral antigens in liver biopsies.

    PubMed Central

    Tedder, R. S.; Guarascio, P.; Yao, J. L.; Lord, R. B.; Eddleston, A. L.

    1983-01-01

    Hybridomas secreting monoclonal antibodies to HBsAg and HBcAg were prepared from immunized mice. An antibody capture radioimmunoassay was used to detect and select appropriate hybrids for propagation and cloning. The advantages of this assay were discussed. The resulting monoclonal antibodies were compared with conventional polyclonal antisera for the detection of virus antigens in liver tissue and found to give excellent results. Images Plate 2 Plate 1 PMID:6337208

  1. Development of Lateral Flow Immunoassay for Antigen Detection in Human Angiostrongylus cantonensis Infection

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Mu-Xin; Chen, Jia-Xu; Chen, Shao-Hong; Huang, Da-Na; Ai, Lin; Zhang, Ren-Li

    2016-01-01

    Angiostrongyliasis is difficult to be diagnosed for the reason that no ideal method can be used. Serologic tests require specific equipment and are not always available in poverty-stricken zone and are time-consuming. A lateral flow immunoassay (LFIA) may be useful for angiostrongyliasis control. We established a LFIA for the diagnosis of angiostrongyliasis based on 2 monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) against antigens of Angiostrongylus cantonensis adults. The sensitivity and specificity were 91.1% and 100% in LFIA, while those of commercial ELISA kit was 97.8% and 86.3%, respectively. Youden index was 0.91 in LFIA and 0.84 in commercial ELISA kit. LFIA showed detection limit of 1 ng/ml of A. cantonensis ES antigens. This LFIA was simple, rapid, highly sensitive and specific, which opened an alternative approach for the diagnosis of human angiostrongyliasis. PMID:27417097

  2. Detection of antibodies to Salmonella "O" antigens in typhoid fever by counterimmunoelectrophoresis. I. Description of technique.

    PubMed

    Hernández-Velarde, R; Muñoz, O; Garduño-Rodríguez, G; Gonzáles-Arroyo, S; Gutiérrez, G

    1979-01-01

    In the serum of patients with typhoid fever counterimmunoelectrophoretic techniques were used for the detection of antibodies to Salmonella "O" antigen. Lipopolysacharides (LPS) obtained with phenol and water from Salmonella typhi (antigens 0, 9 and 12) were used. Positive results were obtained in those patients with typhoid fever (20). The lower and higher titration levels were 1:8 and 1:32 respectively; the geometric mean was 1:16. The variation coefficient during the intra assay tests was 0.19, and remained stable throughout the inter-assay tests. Reproducibility, as well as a rapid technique, make this test a valuable tool for the serologic diagnosis of typhoid fever. PMID:420534

  3. Development of Lateral Flow Immunoassay for Antigen Detection in Human Angiostrongylus cantonensis Infection.

    PubMed

    Chen, Mu-Xin; Chen, Jia-Xu; Chen, Shao-Hong; Huang, Da-Na; Ai, Lin; Zhang, Ren-Li

    2016-06-01

    Angiostrongyliasis is difficult to be diagnosed for the reason that no ideal method can be used. Serologic tests require specific equipment and are not always available in poverty-stricken zone and are time-consuming. A lateral flow immunoassay (LFIA) may be useful for angiostrongyliasis control. We established a LFIA for the diagnosis of angiostrongyliasis based on 2 monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) against antigens of Angiostrongylus cantonensis adults. The sensitivity and specificity were 91.1% and 100% in LFIA, while those of commercial ELISA kit was 97.8% and 86.3%, respectively. Youden index was 0.91 in LFIA and 0.84 in commercial ELISA kit. LFIA showed detection limit of 1 ng/ml of A. cantonensis ES antigens. This LFIA was simple, rapid, highly sensitive and specific, which opened an alternative approach for the diagnosis of human angiostrongyliasis. PMID:27417097

  4. Procedures involving lipid media for detection of bacterial contamination in breweries.

    PubMed Central

    Van Vuuren, H J; Louw, H A; Loos, M A; Meisel, R

    1977-01-01

    The liquid equivalent of universal beer agar, designated universal beer liquid medium, and its beer-free equivalent, universal liquid medium (UL), were equally effective in demonstrating bacterial contamination in 120 of 200 samples from different stages of commercial brewing process. Growth of the contaminants after 3 days was consistently more luxuriant in the UL medium. A yeast-water substrate medium failed to reveal many contaminants detected with UL in 392 samples from three breweries and revealed only a few not detected with UL. The use of UL and a lactose-peptone medium, with microscope examination of the media for bacterial growth, permitted detection of 93% of the known contaminants compared to 87%, detected with UL alone; this combination or universal beer liquid medium plus lactose-peptone medium can therefore be recommended for the detection of bacterial contaminants in brewery samples. Bacterial contamination of pitching yeasts appeared to be a particular problem in the breweries investigated. PMID:848948

  5. Prostate specific antigen detection using AlGaN /GaN high electron mobility transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, B. S.; Wang, H. T.; Lele, T. P.; Tseng, Y.; Ren, F.; Pearton, S. J.; Johnson, J. W.; Rajagopal, P.; Roberts, J. C.; Piner, E. L.; Linthicum, K. J.

    2007-09-01

    Antibody-functionalized Au-gated AlGaN /GaN high electron mobility transistors (HEMTs) were used to detect prostate specific antigen (PSA). The PSA antibody was anchored to the gate area through the formation of carboxylate succinimdyl ester bonds with immobilized thioglycolic acid. The AlGaN /GaN HEMT drain-source current showed a rapid response of less than 5s when target PSA in a buffer at clinical concentrations was added to the antibody-immobilized surface. The authors could detect a wide range of concentrations from 10pg/mlto1μg/ml. The lowest detectable concentration was two orders of magnitude lower than the cutoff value of PSA measurements for clinical detection of prostate cancer. These results clearly demonstrate the promise of portable electronic biological sensors based on AlGaN /GaN HEMTs for PSA screening.

  6. Detection of a Pancreatic Cancer-Associated Antigen (DU-PAN-2 Antigen) in Serum and Ascites of Patients with Adenocarcinoma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Metzgar, Richard S.; Rodriguez, Ned; Finn, Olivera J.; Lan, Michael S.; Daasch, Vicki N.; Fernsten, Philip D.; Meyers, William C.; Sindelar, William F.; Sandler, Robert S.; Seigler, H. F.

    1984-08-01

    A competition radioimmunoassay was developed, utilizing a murine monoclonal antibody to human pancreatic adenocarcinoma cells. Immunoblotting of a standard antigen preparation from either serum or ascites fluid after electrophoresis in 1% agarose showed that the specific DUPAN-2 activity resided in two major high molecular weight bands. DU-PAN-2 antigen levels were expressed as arbitrary units based on a standard partially purified antigen preparation. The inhibition curve with standard antigen was reproducible (SD < 10%) and essentially linear from 25 to 200 units/ml. The mean DU-PAN-2 antigen concentration for the sera from 126 normal individuals was 81 units/ml. Sera from pediatric patients with malignancy had a mean of 127 units/ml, while nasopharyngeal, stage III melanoma, and ovarian carcinoma patients had means of 89, 92, and 119 units/ml, respectively. All values in normal subjects as well as the melanoma, nasopharyngeal, ovarian, and pediatric cancer patients were less than 400 units/ml. Intermediate antigen levels were detected in patients with alimentary tract malignancies. Eight of 20 gastric cancer and 8 of 76 colorectal carcinoma patients and 3 patients with benign or nonmalig nant gastrointestinal tract disease had DU-PAN-2 values exceeding 400 units/ml. Ascites fluids from 6/6 and pancreatic juice from 2/2 pancreatic cancer patients had values greater than 750 units/ml. Serum from 68% of the 89 pancreatic cancer patients tested had DU-PAN-2 antigen levels greater than 400 units/ml. The mean serum value in this patient population was 4888 units/ml.

  7. A novel nanostructured biosensor for the detection of the dust mite antigen Der p2

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Jaw-Ji; Bau, I-Jiuan; Chen, He-Tsing; Lin, Yu-Ta; Wang, Gou-Jen

    2011-01-01

    The group 2 allergen, Der p2, has been reported to activate innate toll-like receptors (TLRs) on respiratory epithelial cells and thus aggravate respiratory diseases. In this study, a highly sensitive nanostructured biosensor based on a 3D sensing element with uniformly deposited gold nanoparticles is proposed for the detection of the dust mite antigen Der p2. The barrier layer comprises an anodic aluminum oxide (AAO) film which is used as the template in this highly sensitive nanostructured biosensor. Simple electrochemical deposition without reducing agent and stabilizer was enough to uniformly synthesize gold nanoparticles on the surface of the barrier layer. The size and the distribution density of the nanoparticles can be well controlled by the applied potential during electrochemical deposition. Following this procedure, the dust mite monoclonal antibodies (IgG) were then immobilized through the 11-MUA (11-mercaptoundecanoic acid), (1-ethyl-3-(3-dimethyl-aminopropyl)-carbodiimide)/(N-hydroxysuccinimide) self-assembled monolayer approach for the dust mite antigen Der p2 detection. The detection limit of the proposed 3D gold nanoparticle-based nanostructured biosensor was examined using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy analysis and found to be 1 pg/mL. The dynamic range was found to be 5 μg/mL. The proposed nanostructured biosensor would be useful for fast detection of rare molecules in a solution. PMID:21822382

  8. Anisakis antigens detected in fish muscle infested with Anisakis simplex L3.

    PubMed

    Solas, M Teresa; García, Maria Luisa; Rodriguez-Mahillo, Ana I; Gonzalez-Munoz, Miguel; de las Heras, Cristina; Tejada, Margarita

    2008-06-01

    Anisakis simplex is a fish parasite that is a public health risk to those consuming raw or poorly cooked marine fish and cephalopods because of the possibility of becoming infested with live larvae. In humans, penetration of the larvae into the gastrointestinal track can cause acute and chronic symptoms and allergic anisakiasis. Excretion and secretion products released by the larvae are thought to play a role in migration through the tissues and induce an immunoglobulin E-mediated immune response. The aim of this preliminary study was to detect parasite antigens and allergens in fish tissues surrounding the migrating larvae. Hake and anchovy fillets were artificially parasitized with Anisakis larvae and stored in chilled conditions for 5 days. Larvae were evaluated for fluorescence, fish muscle tissue was examined with transmission electron microscopy, and immunohistochemical reactions of two rabbit polyclonal antisera against a parasite crude extract and the allergen Ani s 4 were recorded. Larvae immediately migrated into the fish muscle, and no emission of bluish fluorescence was observed. Fish muscle areas in contact with the parasite showed disruptions in the structure and inclusion of granules within sarcomeres. Both parasite antigens and the Ani s 4 allergen were located in areas close to the larvae and where sarcomere structure was preserved. These findings indicate that parasite antigens and allergens are dispersed into the muscle and might cause allergic symptoms such as dyspnea, vomiting, diarrhea, urticaria, angioedema, or anaphylaxis in some individuals sensitive to A. simplex. PMID:18592760

  9. Rapid diagnosis of typhoid fever by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay detection of Salmonella serotype typhi antigens in urine.

    PubMed

    Fadeel, Moustafa Abdel; Crump, John A; Mahoney, Frank J; Nakhla, Isabelle A; Mansour, Adel M; Reyad, Baheia; El Melegi, Dawlat; Sultan, Yehia; Mintz, Eric D; Bibb, William F

    2004-03-01

    We developed and evaluated an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) using monoclonal antibodies to capture somatic antigen 9 (O9), flagellar antigen d (Hd), and the Vi capsular polysaccharide antigen (Vi) from the urine of persons with and without typhoid fever. Sequential urine samples were collected from 44 patients with blood culture-confirmed typhoid fever and from two control groups. The first control group included patients with brucellosis (n = 12) and those with clinically diagnosed, non-typhoid, acute, febrile illness (n = 27). The second control group was a sample of healthy volunteer laboratory workers (n = 11). When assessed relative to date of fever onset, sensitivity was highest during the first week for all three antigens: Vi was detected in the urine of nine (100%) patients, O9 in 4 (44%) patients, and Hd in 4 (44%) patients. Sequential testing of two urine samples from the same patient improved test sensitivity. Combined testing for Vi with O9 and Hd produced a trend towards increased sensitivity without compromising specificity. The specificity for Vi exceeded 90% when assessed among both febrile and healthy control subjects, but was only 25% when assessed among patients with brucellosis. Detection of urinary Vi antigen with this ELISA shows promise for the diagnosis of typhoid fever, particularly when used within the first week after fever onset. However, positive reactions for Vi antigen in patients with brucellosis must be understood before urinary Vi antigen detection can be developed further as a useful rapid diagnostic test. PMID:15031525

  10. Universal primer PCR with DGGE for rapid detection of bacterial pathogens.

    PubMed

    Ji, Niannian; Peng, Bo; Wang, Guizhong; Wang, Sanying; Peng, Xuanxian

    2004-06-01

    A universal primer PCR (UPPCR) combined with denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) was evaluated as a method permitting the rapid detection of pathogens. The results show that this method is efficient at amplifying the conserved regions of bacterial 16S rRNA genes with universal primers and can detect causative bacterial pathogens rapidly. Six species of bacteria from fisheries (Pseudomonas fluorescens, Vibrio anguillarum, Aeromonas hydrophila, Vibrio fluvialis, Providencia rettgeri and Aeromonas sobria) were examined. Our results indicate that the approach we undertook can be adopted not only for axenic bacterial populations but also for mixed communities as well. Furthermore, we were able to achieve the rapid detection of multiple bacteria a single in sample. In addition, UPPCR-DGGE was shown to be better than previously reported UPPCR-single-stranded conformation polymorphism (SSCP)-based methods for the rapid detection of bacterial pathogens. PMID:15134888

  11. Detection of Giardia duodenalis antigen in coprolites using a commercially available enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay.

    PubMed

    Gonçalves, Marcelo Luiz Carvalho; Araújo, Adauto; Duarte, Rosemere; da Silva, Joaquim Pereira; Reinhard, Karl; Bouchet, Françoise; Ferreira, Luiz Fernando

    2002-01-01

    The objective of this experiment was to assess the utility of a commercially available enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) kit for diagnosis of giardiasis in archaeological human remains. The kit, a monoclonal antibody assay, is used to detect the presence of Giardia-specific antigen 65 (GSA65) in human faeces. We utilized the assay in ancient faecal material. The material included desiccated faeces found in mummies or in archaeological sites, and sediments from latrines. A total of 83 specimens, previously examined microscopically for parasites, were examined. The ELISA detected 3 positive samples, dated to about 1200 AD, 1600 AD and 1700 AD. The ELISA was superior to direct observation. It was possible to identify G. duodenalis cysts by direct microscopy in only one of these samples. The results did not show cross-reactivity between this protozoan and helminths. The use of ELISA to detect G. duodenalis coproantigen could help the diagnosis of giardiasis in ancient human remains. PMID:12625140

  12. Development of a PMMA Electrochemical Microfluidic Device for Carcinoembryonic Antigen Detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Anh, Nguyen; Van Trung, Hoang; Tien, Bui Quang; Binh, Nguyen Hai; Ha, Cao Hong; Le Huy, Nguyen; Loc, Nguyen Thai; Thu, Vu Thi; Lam, Tran Dai

    2016-05-01

    In this study, a poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) microfluidic device fabricated by an inexpensive CO2 laser etching system was developed for detection of carcino-embryonic antigens (CEA). The device was capable of working in continuous mode and was designed with the aid of numerical simulation. The detection of target CEA was based on immuno-assay via magnetic particles and electrochemical sensing. The as-prepared microfluidic can be used to detect CEA at the relatively low concentration of 150 pg mL-1. The device could be reused many times, since the capture and removal of magnetic particles in the assay could be manipulated by an external magnetic field. The proposed approach appears to be suitable for high-throughput and automated analysis of large biomolecules such as tumor markers and pathogens.

  13. Enhanced detection of bladder cancer using the epithelial surface marker epithelial membrane antigen: a preliminary report.

    PubMed

    Ring, K S; Karp, F; Benson, M C

    1990-09-01

    The flow cytometry (FCM) technique allows for the rapid quantitative analysis of the DNA content of individual cells. In a variety of genitourinary tumors, DNA ploidy has a significant impact upon prognosis and ultimate patient survival. In patients having transitional cell cancer (TCC) of the bladder, FCM of voided urine and bladder barbotage specimens is highly correlated with cytologic analysis in the detection of malignant cells. One problem with this technique has been decreased sensitivity in samples containing large numbers of inflammatory cells. To improve FCM detection of TCC in bladder wash specimens, we developed a technique using a monoclonal antibody (Mab) specific to human, epithelial membrane antigen (EMA). The EMA cell-surface marker enabled us to differentiate bladder epithelial cells from lymphocytes and cellular debris. In combination with DNA analysis using propidium iodide, the EMA Mab increased the sensitivity and specificity of FCM compared to conventional analysis using propidium iodide alone. We conclude that epithelial cell-surface antigen staining using both EMA Mab and DNA staining can increase the FCM detection of TCC in bladder wash specimens. PMID:2074517

  14. Multiplexed immunoassay for the rapid detection of anti-tumor-associated antigens antibodies.

    PubMed

    Desmet, C; Le Goff, G C; Brès, J-C; Rigal, D; Blum, L J; Marquette, C A

    2011-07-21

    TAAs (tumor-associated antigens) microarrays were designed to detect auto-antibodies directly in patient sera. Twelve different probes were chosen according to their described occurrence in cancer pathologies (Cyclin B1, Cyclin D1, Complement factor H, c-myc, IMP1, p53, p62, survivin, Her2/neu, Koc, NY-ESO-1 and PSA). Microarrays of these 12 proteins were immobilized within the nitrocellulose/cellulose acetate membrane of a 96-well filtering microtiter plate bottom. The captured auto-antibodies were detected using a staining approach based on alkaline phosphatase labeling. Thus, the presence of specific auto-antibodies in samples was visualized through the positive staining of the corresponding TAA spots. The TAA HiFi microarrays were shown to be able to capture specific purified anti-TAA antibodies. In real samples, 9 proteins from the 12 TAAs panel were shown to generate specific signal and 5 antigens (p53, NY-ESO-1, IMP1, cyclin B1 and c-myc) were shown to have interaction with more than 10% of the positive sera from cancer patients. This protein subpanel was proven to be able to detect 72.2% of the cancer patients tested (within a 34 panel of 18 patients and 16 healthy donors). PMID:21666912

  15. Detection of a human intracisternal A-type retroviral particle antigenically related to HIV

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garry, R. F.; Fermin, C. D.; Hart, D. J.; Alexander, S. S.; Donehower, L. A.; Luo-Zhang, H.

    1990-01-01

    Sjogren's syndrome is an autoimmune disease that is characterized by dryness of the mouth and eyes. The loss of salivary and lacrimal gland function is accompanied by lymphocytic infiltration. Because similar symptoms and glandular pathology are observed in certain persons infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), a search was initiated for a possible retroviral etiology in this syndrome. A human intracisternal A-type retroviral particle that is antigenically related to HIV was detected in lymphoblastoid cells exposed to homogenates of salivary tissue from patients with Sjogren's syndrome. Comparison of this retroviral particle to HIV indicates that they are distinguishable by several ultrastructural, physical, and enzymatic criteria.

  16. Comparison of techniques for detecting antigens of Giardia lamblia and Cryptosporidium parvum in faeces.

    PubMed Central

    Tee, G H; Moody, A H; Cooke, A H; Chiodini, P L

    1993-01-01

    AIM--To compare the use of commercial monoclonal antibody test systems--the Giardia CEL IF test and the Crypto CEL IF test--for the detection of Giardia lamblia and Cryptosporidium parvum antigens in faeces with conventional techniques. METHODS--Sensitivity and specificity were evaluated using preparations of cysts of G lamblia and purified oocysts of C parvum. Evaluation of 59 random faecal samples passing through the Department of Clinical Parasitology, Hospital for Tropical Diseases, London, was carried out for both organisms. RESULTS--The fluorescence staining techniques proved more sensitive than other tests routinely used for diagnosis. PMID:8331181

  17. Method and apparatus for detecting and quantifying bacterial spores on a surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ponce, Adrian (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    A method and an apparatus for detecting and quantifying bacterial spores on a surface. In accordance with the method: bacterial spores are transferred from a place of origin to a test surface, the test surface comprises lanthanide ions. Aromatic molecules are released from the bacterial spores; a complex of the lanthanide ions and aromatic molecules is formed on the test surface, the complex is excited to generate a characteristic luminescence on the test surface; the luminescence on the test surface is detected and quantified.

  18. Suitability of Optical, Physical and Chemical Measurements for Detection of Changes in Bacterial Drinking Water Quality

    PubMed Central

    Ikonen, Jenni; Pitkänen, Tarja; Miettinen, Ilkka T.

    2013-01-01

    In this study, different optical, physical and chemical measurements were tested for their capacity to detect changes in water quality. The tests included UV-absorbance at 254 nm, absorbance at 420 nm, turbidity, particle counting, temperature, pH, electric conductivity (EC), free chlorine concentration and ATP concentration measurements. Special emphasis was given to investigating the potential for measurement tools to detect changes in bacterial concentrations in drinking water. Bacterial colony counts (CFU) and total bacterial cell counts (TBC) were used as reference methods for assessing the bacterial water quality. The study consists of a series of laboratory scale experiments: monitoring of regrowth of Pseudomonas fluorescens, estimation of the detection limits for optical measurements using Escherichia coli dilutions, verification of the relationships by analysing grab water samples from various distribution systems and utilisation of the measurements in the case of an accidentally contaminated distribution network. We found significant correlations between the tested measurements and the bacterial water quality. As the bacterial contamination of water often co-occurs with the intrusion of matrixes containing mainly non-bacterial components, the tested measurement tools can be considered to have the potential to rapidly detect any major changes in drinking water quality. PMID:24284353

  19. Surface plasmon resonance biosensor detects the downstream events of active PKCbeta in antigen-stimulated mast cells.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Maiko; Hiragun, Takaaki; Tsutsui, Tomoko; Yanase, Yuhki; Suzuki, Hidenori; Hide, Michihiro

    2008-06-15

    Surface plasmon resonance (SPR) biosensors detect large changes of angle of resonance (AR) when RBL-2H3 mast cells are cultured on a sensor chip and stimulated with antigen. However, the detail of molecular events that are responsible for such large changes of AR remained unknown. In this study, we investigated the relationship between intracellular signaling events induced by antigen and the change of AR, by genetic manipulation of intracellular signaling molecules; spleen tyrosine kinase (Syk), src-like adaptor protein (SLAP), linker for activation of T cells (LAT), growth-factor-receptor-bound protein 2 (Grb2), Grb2-related adaptor protein (Gads), and isotypes of protein kinase C (PKC). RBL-2H3 mast cells overexpressing dominant-negative Syk or SLAP, which both interfere with active Syk, exhibited only minimal increase of AR in response to antigen stimulation. Likewise, the interference of the activation of LAT and Gads, by expressing dominant-negative LAT and Gads, respectively, resulted in nearly complete suppression of the antigen-induced increase of AR. The cells overexpressing PKCs, apart from PKCbeta, showed a reduced extent of increase of AR in response to antigen stimulation. Moreover, the introduction of the small interfering RNA targeted against PKCbeta suppressed the antigen-induced increase of AR. These results indicate that the activation of Syk, LAT, Gads, and subsequent PKCbeta is indispensable for the antigen-induced increase of AR of mast cells detected by SPR biosensors. PMID:18339533

  20. Use of peroxidase-labelled antigen for the detection of antibodies to Borrelia burgdorferi in human and animal sera.

    PubMed

    Eiffert, H; Lotter, H; Thomssen, R

    1991-01-01

    We have developed a modified ELISA for the detection of anti-Borrelia burgdorferi (Bb) antibodies based on a peroxidase enzyme labelled antigen (ELAT). Microtiter plates were coated with antigen of Bb. The immunoglobulins of the serum samples were bound to the antigen and specific antibodies were detected by an enzyme labelled antigen. The test principle facilitates the recognition of specific antibodies in different collectives of human and animal sera. We performed epidemiological studies with the ELAT on 231 sera from mothers in maternity wards (9.5% positive), 219 patient sera sent to the Bb routine diagnostics (15% positive) and 230 sera from forestry workers (21.3% positive). We further investigated sera from red deer from South Lower Saxony which remained 55% Bb-antibody positive; deer were 37% and fallow deer were 29% positive. PMID:2028231

  1. Effective detection of toxigenic Clostridium difficile by a two-step algorithm including tests for antigen and cytotoxin.

    PubMed

    Ticehurst, John R; Aird, Deborah Z; Dam, Lisa M; Borek, Anita P; Hargrove, John T; Carroll, Karen C

    2006-03-01

    We evaluated a two-step algorithm for detecting toxigenic Clostridium difficile: an enzyme immunoassay for glutamate dehydrogenase antigen (Ag-EIA) and then, for antigen-positive specimens, a concurrent cell culture cytotoxicity neutralization assay (CCNA). Antigen-negative results were > or = 99% predictive of CCNA negativity. Because the Ag-EIA reduced cell culture workload by approximately 75 to 80% and two-step testing was complete in < or = 3 days, we decided that this algorithm would be effective. Over 6 months, our laboratories' expenses were US dollar 143,000 less than if CCNA alone had been performed on all 5,887 specimens. PMID:16517916

  2. Detection of Q Fever Specific Antibodies Using Recombinant Antigen in ELISA with Peroxidase Based Signal Amplification

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Hua-Wei; Zhang, Zhiwen; Glennon, Erin; Ching, Wei-Mei

    2014-01-01

    Currently, the accepted method for Q fever serodiagnosis is indirect immunofluorescent antibody assay (IFA) using the whole cell antigen. In this study, we prepared the recombinant antigen of the 27-kDa outer membrane protein (Com1) which has been shown to be recognized by Q fever patient sera. The performance of recombinant Com1 was evaluated in ELISA by IFA confirmed serum samples. Due to the low titers of IgG and IgM in Q fever patients, the standard ELISA signals were further amplified by using biotinylated anti-human IgG or IgM plus streptavidin-HRP polymer. The modified ELISA can detect 88% (29 out of 33) of Q fever patient sera collected from Marines deployed to Iraq. Less than 5% (5 out of 156) of the sera from patients with other febrile diseases reacted with the Com1. These results suggest that the modified ELISA using Com1 may have the potential to improve the detection of Q fever specific antibodies. PMID:26904739

  3. Citrinin detection using phage-displayed anti-idiotypic single-domain antibody for antigen mimicry.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yang; Xiong, Liang; Li, Yanping; Xiong, Yonghua; Tu, Zhui; Fu, Jinheng; Tang, Xiao

    2015-06-15

    Anti-idiotypic antibodies (AIds) can mimic antigen molecules and can thus offer an alternative to conventional antigens in immunoassays. In this study, citrinin (CIT) was chosen as a target analyte, and an anti-idiotypic single-domain antibody (VHH) was selected from a naïve alpaca VHHs library to serve as a surrogate for CIT hapten. The phage-displayed VHH was used as a signal-amplification carrier to develop an indirect competitive phage enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (P-ELISA) for the sensitive detection of CIT. The half-inhibition concentration (IC50) of P-ELISA was 10.9 μg/kg, which was 9-fold better than that of conventional ELISA (IC50=102.1 μg/kg). Results on P-ELISA analysis of naturally contaminated samples were also consistent with those obtained by conventional ELISA. In conclusion, the proposed P-ELISA demonstrates the potential use of phage-displayed anti-idiotypic VHH as surrogate for small molecules and signal-amplification carrier to improve assay performance for more sensitive analyte detection in food safety monitoring. PMID:25660863

  4. Inexpensive Designer Antigen for Anti-HIV Antibody Detection with High Sensitivity and Specificity ▿

    PubMed Central

    Talha, Sheikh M.; Salminen, Teppo; Chugh, Deepti A.; Swaminathan, Sathyamangalam; Soukka, Tero; Pettersson, Kim; Khanna, Navin

    2010-01-01

    A novel recombinant multiepitope protein (MEP) has been designed that consists of four linear, immunodominant, and phylogenetically conserved epitopes, taken from human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-encoded antigens that are used in many third-generation immunoassay kits. This HIV-MEP has been evaluated for its diagnostic potential in the detection of anti-HIV antibodies in human sera. A synthetic MEP gene encoding these epitopes, joined by flexible peptide linkers in a single open reading frame, was designed and overexpressed in Escherichia coli. The recombinant HIV-MEP was purified using a single affinity step, yielding >20 mg pure protein/liter culture, and used as the coating antigen in an in-house immunoassay. Bound anti-HIV antibodies were detected by highly sensitive time-resolved fluorometry, using europium(III) chelate-labeled anti-human antibody. The sensitivity and specificity of the HIV-MEP were evaluated using Boston Biomedica worldwide HIV performance, HIV seroconversion, and viral coinfection panels and were found to be comparable with those of commercially available anti-HIV enzyme immunoassay (EIA) kits. The careful choice of epitopes, high epitope density, and an E. coli-based expression system, coupled with a simple purification protocol and the use of europium(III) chelate-labeled tracer, provide the capability for the development of an inexpensive diagnostic test with high degrees of sensitivity and specificity. PMID:20089793

  5. Evaluation of Culture, Antigen Detection and Polymerase Chain Reaction for Detection of Vaginal Colonization of Group B Streptococcus (GBS) in Pregnant Women

    PubMed Central

    Konikkara, Kavitha Paul; Baliga, Shrikala; Shenoy, Suchithra; Bharati, B.

    2014-01-01

    Background and Objective: Group B Streptococcal infection is an important cause of neonatal morbidity and mortality. Early detection of perinatal vagino-rectal (VR) carriage of Group B Streptococcus (GBS) is important in the management of newborn infections. The objective of the study was to evaluate Culture, antigen detection and Polymerase chain reaction for detection of GBS in Pregnant women. Settings and Design: Observational descriptive study was done in a tertiary care hospital in Southern India. Materials and Methods: VR swabs were collected from 50 women at 35 to 37 weeks of gestation. Culture in a selective Lim enrichment broth with subsequent culture on 5% sheep blood agar, Conventional PCR assay and antigen detection method were performed. The performance of antigen detection and PCR methods were compared with culture. Statistical analysis: Statistical analysis was performed by Chi-Square test. Results: GBS cultures were positive for 16% of the specimen (8 out of 50). Considering culture as a gold standard, Sensitivity, Specificity, Positive predictive value and Negative predictive value of antigen detection was 100%, 92.86%, 72.73%, 100% and similarly for that of PCR was 100%, 45.23%, 25.80%, 100%, respectively. Conclusion: Antigen detection method was the rapid, sensitive and specific test for the detection of GBS colonizers during pregnancy. PMID:24701479

  6. Highly sensitive nanoparticle-based immunoassays with elemental detection: Application to Prostate-Specific Antigen quantification.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Cortes, Marta; Encinar, Jorge Ruiz; Costa-Fernandez, Jose M; Sanz-Medel, Alfredo

    2016-11-15

    One of the major challenges in developing novel assay methods for the detection of biomolecules is achieving high sensitivity, because of the ultralow concentrations typically in clinical samples. Here, a Mn-doped ZnS quantum dots-based immunoassay platform is presented for highly sensitive detection of cancer biomarkers. Ultrahigh sensitivity is achieved through gold deposition on the surface of the nanoparticle tags acting as catalytic seeds, thus effectively amplifying the size of the metallic nanoparticles after the immunoassay and before the tag detection. Elemental mass spectrometry measurement of the gold content allowed detection of Prostate-Specific Antigen (PSA) at the low attog mL(-1) level. Moreover, the developed method showed not only an extremely high sensitivity for PSA detection but also a broad dynamic range, higher than 8 orders of magnitude, particularly useful for clinical studies involving quantitative detection of diverse biomarkers at their very different relevant concentration levels. Its applicability to discriminate small differences in PSA concentrations at low levels (few pgmL(-1)) in real serum samples was successfully evaluated. PMID:27162143

  7. Detection of dengue NS1 antigen using long-range surface plasmon waveguides.

    PubMed

    Wong, Wei Ru; Sekaran, Shamala Devi; Adikan, Faisal Rafiq Mahamd; Berini, Pierre

    2016-04-15

    The non-structural 1 (NS1) protein of the dengue virus circulates in infected patients' blood samples and can be used for early diagnosis of dengue infection. In this paper, we present the detection of naturally-occurring dengue NS1 antigen in infected patient blood plasma using straight long-range surface plasmon waveguides. Three commercially-available anti-NS1 monoclonal antibodies were used for recognition and their performance was compared and discussed. A similar figure of merit to the one used in conventional dengue NS1 capture using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) was applied to our results. In general, the positive patient samples can be clearly differentiated from the negative ones and the results agree with those obtained using ELISA. The largest signal-to-noise ratio observed during the experiments was 356 and the best detection limit observed is estimated as 5.73 pg/mm(2). PMID:26599483

  8. Magnetic nanoparticle-based immunosensor for electrochemical detection of hepatitis B surface antigen.

    PubMed

    Nourani, Sara; Ghourchian, Hedayatollah; Boutorabi, Seyed Mehdi

    2013-10-01

    An electrochemical immunosensor was developed for the detection of hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg). The biotinylated hepatitis B surface antibody was immobilized on streptavidin magnetic nanoparticles and used for targeting the HBsAg. By the addition of horseradish peroxidase conjugated with secondary antibody (HRP-HBsAb), a sandwich-type immunoassay format was formed. Aminophenol as substrate for conjugated HRP was enzymatically changed into 3-aminophenoxazone (3-APZ). This electroactive enzymatic production (3-APZ) was transferred into an electrochemical cell and monitored by cyclic voltammetry. Under optimal conditions, the cathodic current response of 3-APZ, which was proportional to the HBsAg concentration, was measured by a glassy carbon electrode. The immunosensor response was linear toward HBsAg in the concentration range from 0.001 to 0.015 ng/ml with a detection limit of 0.9 pg/ml at a signal/noise ratio of 3. PMID:23831477

  9. Graphene oxide supported rhombic dodecahedral Cu2O nanocrystals for the detection of carcinoembryonic antigen.

    PubMed

    Feng, Taotao; Chen, Xiaoyu; Qiao, Xiuwen; Sun, Zhao; Wang, Haining; Qi, Yu; Hong, Chenglin

    2016-02-01

    In this work, a simple electrochemical immunosensor was developed for the detection of carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) based on rhombic dodecahedral Cu2O nanocrystals-graphene oxide-gold nanoparticles (rCu2O-GO-AuNPs). GO as the template and surfactant resulting in rCu2O exhibit improved rhombic dodecahedral structure uniformity and excellent electrochemical performance. Moreover, GO was found to be able to effectively improve the long stability of rCu2O on the electrode response. Under optimal conditions, the immunosensor showed a low limit of detection (0.004 ng ml(-1)) and a large linear range (0.01-120 ng ml(-1)). This work presents a potential alternative for the diagnostic applications of GO-supported special morphology materials in biomedicine and biosensors. PMID:26596552

  10. Detection of bovine group a rotavirus using rapid antigen detection kits, rt-PCR and next-generation DNA sequencing.

    PubMed

    Minami-Fukuda, Fujiko; Nagai, Makoto; Takai, Hikaru; Murakami, Toshiaki; Ozawa, Tadashi; Tsuchiaka, Shinobu; Okazaki, Sachiko; Katayama, Yukie; Oba, Mami; Nishiura, Naomi; Sassa, Yukiko; Omatsu, Tsutomu; Furuya, Tetsuya; Koyama, Satoshi; Shirai, Junsuke; Tsunemitsu, Hiroshi; Fujii, Yoshiki; Katayama, Kazuhiko; Mizutani, Tetsuya

    2013-12-30

    We investigated the sensitivity of human rotavirus rapid antigen detection (RAD) kits, RT-PCR and next-generation DNA sequencing (NGS) for detection of bovine group A rotavirus (RVA). The Dipstick 'Eiken' Rota (Dipstick) showed the highest sensitivity out of the seven RAD kits against all selected strains in limited dilution analyses, which was consistent with the results for equine rotavirus previously reported. RT-PCR had 10⁰-10³-fold higher sensitivity than the Dipstick. NGS using thirteen RT-PCR-negative fecal samples revealed that all samples yielded RVA reads and especially that two of them covered all 11 genome segments. Moreover, mapping reads to reference sequences allowed genotyping. The NGS would be sensitive and useful for analysis of less dependent on specific primers and screening of genotypes. PMID:23912876

  11. Vaccination with Brucella abortus recombinant in vivo-induced antigens reduces bacterial load and promotes clearance in a mouse model for infection.

    PubMed

    Lowry, Jake E; Isaak, Dale D; Leonhardt, Jack A; Vernati, Giulia; Pate, Jessie C; Andrews, Gerard P

    2011-01-01

    Current vaccines used for the prevention of brucellosis are ineffective in inducing protective immunity in animals that are chronically infected with Brucella abortus, such as elk. Using a gene discovery approach, in vivo-induced antigen technology (IVIAT) on B. abortus, we previously identified ten loci that encode products up-regulated during infection in elk and consequently may play a role in virulence. In our present study, five of the loci (D15, 0187, VirJ, Mdh, AfuA) were selected for further characterization and compared with three additional antigens with virulence potential (Hia, PrpA, MltA). All eight genes were PCR-amplified from B. abortus and cloned into E. coli. The recombinant products were then expressed, purified, adjuvanted, and delivered subcutaneously to BALB/c mice. After primary immunization and two boosts, mice were challenged i.p. with 5 x 10⁴ CFU of B. abortus strain 19. Spleens from challenged animals were harvested and bacterial loads determined by colony count at various time points. While vaccination with four of the eight individual proteins appeared to have some effect on clearance kinetics, mice vaccinated with recombinant Mdh displayed the most significant reduction in bacterial colonization. Furthermore, mice immunized with Mdh maintained higher levels of IFN-γ in spleens compared to other treatment groups. Collectively, our in vivo data gathered from the S19 murine colonization model suggest that vaccination with at least three of the IVIAT antigens conferred an enhanced ability of the host to respond to infection, reinforcing the utility of this methodology for the identification of potential vaccine candidates against brucellosis. Mechanisms for immunity to one protein, Mdh, require further in vitro exploration and evaluation against wild-type B. abortus challenge in mice, as well as other hosts. Additional studies are being undertaken to clarify the role of Mdh and other IVI antigens in B. abortus virulence and induction of

  12. Construction and bacterial expression of a recombinant single-chain antibody fragment against Wuchereria bancrofti SXP-1 antigen for the diagnosis of lymphatic filariasis.

    PubMed

    Kamatchi, R; Charumathi, J; Ravishankaran, R; Kaliraj, P; Meenakshisundaram, S

    2016-01-01

    Global programmes to eliminate lymphatic filariasis (GPELF) require mapping, monitoring and evaluation using filarial antigen diagnostic kits. To meet this objective, a functional single-chain fragment variable (ScFv) specific for filarial Wuchereria bancrofti SXP-1 (Wb-SXP-1) antigen was constructed for the diagnosis of active filarial infection, an alternative to the production of complete antibodies using hybridomas. The variable heavy chain (VH) and the variable light chain (kappa) (Vκ) genes were amplified from the mouse hybridoma cell line and were linked together with a flexible linker by overlap extension polymerase chain reaction (PCR). The ScFv construct (Vκ-Linker-VH) was expressed as a fusion protein with N-terminal His tag in Escherichia coli and purified using immobilized metal affinity chromatography (IMAC) without the addition of reducing agents. Immunoblotting and sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) were used to analyse the antigen binding affinity of purified ScFv. The purified ScFv was found to recognize recombinant and native Wb-SXP-1 antigen in microfilariae (Mf)-positive patient sera. The affinity of ScFv was comparable with that of the monoclonal antibody. The development of recombinant ScFv to replace monoclonal antibody for detection of filarial antigen was achieved. The recombinant ScFv was purified, on-column refolded and its detection ability validated using field samples. PMID:26693887

  13. Comparison of Stool Antigen Detection Kits to PCR for Diagnosis of Amebiasis ▿

    PubMed Central

    Stark, D.; van Hal, S.; Fotedar, R.; Butcher, A.; Marriott, D.; Ellis, J.; Harkness, J.

    2008-01-01

    The present study was conducted to compare two stool antigen detection kits with PCR for the diagnosis of Entamoeba histolytica infections by using fecal specimens submitted to the Department of Microbiology at St. Vincent's Hospital, Sydney, and the Institute of Medical and Veterinary Science, Adelaide, Australia. A total of 279 stool samples containing the E complex (E. histolytica, Entamoeba dispar, and Entamoeba moshkovskii) were included in this study. The stool specimens were tested by using two commercially produced enzyme immunoassays (the Entamoeba CELISA PATH and TechLab E. histolytica II kits) to detect antigens of E. histolytica. DNA was extracted from all of the samples with a Qiagen DNA stool mini kit (Qiagen, Hilden, Germany), and a PCR targeting the small-subunit ribosomal DNA was performed on all of the samples. When PCR was used as a reference standard, the CELISA PATH kit showed 28% sensitivity and 100% specificity. The TechLab ELISA (enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay) kit did not prove to be useful in detecting E. histolytica, as it failed to identify any of the E. histolytica samples which were positive by PCR. With the TechLab kit, cross-reactivity was observed for three specimens, one of which was positive for both E. dispar and E. moshkovskii while the other two samples contained E. moshkovskii. Quantitative assessment of the PCR and ELISA results obtained showed that the ELISA kits were 1,000 to 10,000 times less sensitive, and our results show that the CELISA PATH kit and the TechLab ELISA are not useful for the detection of E. histolytica in stool samples from patients in geographical regions where this parasite is not endemic. PMID:18367563

  14. Rapid detection of bacterial growth in blood samples by a continuous-monitoring electrical impedance apparatus.

    PubMed Central

    Specter, S; Throm, R; Strauss, R; Friedman, H

    1977-01-01

    A growth detection method utilizing an automated apparatus capable of rapidly detecting bacterial growth by measuring changes of electrical impedance in bacteriological medium was utilized with "mock" blood cultures containing various gram-negative and gram-positive bacteria. Measurement of changes of electrical impedance was found to ba as accurate and comparable for time of growth detection as the radiometric method for detection of the same bacteria using mock blood cultures. In a limited clinical trial the use of the electrical impedance apparatus detected in 1 positive specimen from 40 clinical blood specimens as rapidly as by radiometric measurement. Both methods were considerably faster for detecting bacterial growth as compared with conventional culture methods. The selected species of gram-positive and -negative organisms tested were all detected by the electrical impedance method, including aerobes and anerobes. However, addition of 5% CO2 to the incubation atmosphere enhanced detection of gram-positive organisms. PMID:336642

  15. Surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) detection of multiple viral antigens using magnetic capture of SERS-active nanoparticles

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A highly sensitive immunoassay based on surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) spectroscopy has been developed for multiplex detection of surface envelope and capsid antigens of the viral zoonotic pathogens West Nile virus (WNV) and Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV). Detection was mediated by antibo...

  16. NAIP proteins are required for cytosolic detection of specific bacterial ligands in vivo.

    PubMed

    Rauch, Isabella; Tenthorey, Jeannette L; Nichols, Randilea D; Al Moussawi, Khatoun; Kang, James J; Kang, Chulho; Kazmierczak, Barbara I; Vance, Russell E

    2016-05-01

    NLRs (nucleotide-binding domain [NBD] leucine-rich repeat [LRR]-containing proteins) exhibit diverse functions in innate and adaptive immunity. NAIPs (NLR family, apoptosis inhibitory proteins) are NLRs that appear to function as cytosolic immunoreceptors for specific bacterial proteins, including flagellin and the inner rod and needle proteins of bacterial type III secretion systems (T3SSs). Despite strong biochemical evidence implicating NAIPs in specific detection of bacterial ligands, genetic evidence has been lacking. Here we report the use of CRISPR/Cas9 to generate Naip1(-/-) and Naip2(-/-) mice, as well as Naip1-6(Δ/Δ) mice lacking all functional Naip genes. By challenging Naip1(-/-) or Naip2(-/-) mice with specific bacterial ligands in vivo, we demonstrate that Naip1 is uniquely required to detect T3SS needle protein and Naip2 is uniquely required to detect T3SS inner rod protein, but neither Naip1 nor Naip2 is required for detection of flagellin. Previously generated Naip5(-/-) mice retain some residual responsiveness to flagellin in vivo, whereas Naip1-6(Δ/Δ) mice fail to respond to cytosolic flagellin, consistent with previous biochemical data implicating NAIP6 in flagellin detection. Our results provide genetic evidence that specific NAIP proteins function to detect specific bacterial proteins in vivo. PMID:27045008

  17. A novel approach for reliable detection of cathepsin S activities in mouse antigen presenting cells.

    PubMed

    Steimle, Alex; Kalbacher, Hubert; Maurer, Andreas; Beifuss, Brigitte; Bender, Annika; Schäfer, Andrea; Müller, Ricarda; Autenrieth, Ingo B; Frick, Julia-Stefanie

    2016-05-01

    Cathepsin S (CTSS) is a eukaryotic protease mostly expressed in professional antigen presenting cells (APCs). Since CTSS activity regulation plays a role in the pathogenesis of various autoimmune diseases like multiple sclerosis, atherosclerosis, Sjögren's syndrome and psoriasis as well as in cancer progression, there is an ongoing interest in the reliable detection of cathepsin S activity. Various applications have been invented for specific detection of this enzyme. However, most of them have only been shown to be suitable for human samples, do not deliver quantitative results or the experimental procedure requires technical equipment that is not commonly available in a standard laboratory. We have tested a fluorogen substrate, Mca-GRWPPMGLPWE-Lys(Dnp)-DArg-NH2, that has been described to specifically detect CTSS activities in human APCs for its potential use for mouse samples. We have modified the protocol and thereby offer a cheap, easy, reproducible and quick activity assay to detect CTSS activities in mouse APCs. Since most of basic research on CTSS is performed in mice, this method closes a gap and offers a possibility for reliable and quantitative CTSS activity detection that can be performed in almost every laboratory. PMID:26899824

  18. Development of dual-function ELISA for effective antigen and antibody detection against H7 avian influenza virus

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Outbreaks in poultry involving influenza virus from H7 subtype have resulted in human infections, thus causing a major concern for public health, as well as for the poultry industry. Currently, no efficient rapid test is available for large-scale detection of either antigen or antibody of H7 avian influenza viruses. Results In the present study, a dual function ELISA was developed for the effective detection of antigen and antibody against H7 AIVs. The test was established based on antigen-capture-ELISA and epitope blocking ELISA. The two Mabs 62 and 98 which were exploited in the assay were identified to recognize two conformational neutralizing epitopes on H7 HA1. Both of the epitopes exist in all of the human H7 strains, including the recent H7N9 strain from China and > 96.6% of avian H7 strains. The dual ELISA was able to detect all of the five H7 antigens tested without any cross reaction to other influenza subtypes. The antigen detection limit was less than 1 HA unit of H7. For antibody detection, the sensitivity and specificity of the dual ELISA was evaluated and compared to HI and microneutralization using immunized animal sera to different H7 strains and different subtypes of AIVs. Results indicated that antibodies to H7 were readily detected in immunized animal sera by the dual ELISA whereas specimens with antibodies to other AIVs yielded negative results. Conclusions This is the first dual-function ELISA reported for either antigen or antibody detection against H7 AIVs. The assay was highly sensitive and 100% specific in both functions rendering it effective for H7 diagnosis. PMID:24083616

  19. The TUBEX test detects not only typhoid-specific antibodies but also soluble antigens and whole bacteria.

    PubMed

    Tam, Frankie C H; Ling, Thomas K W; Wong, Kam Tak; Leung, Danny T M; Chan, Raphael C Y; Lim, Pak Leong

    2008-03-01

    TUBEX (IDL Biotech) is a 5 min semiquantitative colorimetric test for typhoid fever, a widely endemic disease. TUBEX detects anti-Salmonella O9 antibodies from a patient's serum by the ability of these antibodies to inhibit the binding between an indicator antibody-bound particle and a magnetic antigen-bound particle. Herein, we report that TUBEX could also be used to specifically detect soluble O9 lipopolysaccharide in antigen-spiked buffer by the ability of the antigen to inhibit the same binding between the particles. Sensitivity of antigen detection was improved (8-31 mug ml(-1)) by using a modified protocol in which the test sample was mixed with the indicator particles first, rather than with the magnetic particles as for antibody detection. The antigen was also detectable in spiked serum and urine samples, albeit less well (2-4-fold) than in buffer generally. However, no antigen was detected from six typhoid sera examined, all of which had anti-O9 antibodies. In addition, whole organisms of Salmonella Typhi (15 strains) and Salmonella Enteritidis (6 strains) (both O9(+) Salmonella), grown in simulated blood broths or on MacConkey agar, were also detectable by TUBEX when suspended at >9 x 10(8) organisms ml(-1). Expectedly, Salmonella Paratyphi A (7 strains), Salmonella Typhimurium (1 strain) and Escherichia coli (2 strains) were negative in the test. Thus, the same TUBEX kit may be used in several ways both serologically and microbiologically for the rapid diagnosis of typhoid fever. However, validation of the newer applications will require the systematic examination of real patient and laboratory materials. PMID:18287294

  20. Simplified Protocol for Carba NP Test for Enhanced Detection of Carbapenemase Producers Directly from Bacterial Cultures

    PubMed Central

    Pasteran, Fernando; Tijet, Nathalie; Melano, Roberto G.

    2015-01-01

    We compared carbapenemase detection among 266 Gram-negative bacilli (161 carbapenemase producers) using the Carba NP tests issued by the CLSI (CNPt-CLSI) and a novel protocol (CNPt-direct) designed for carbapenemase detection direct from bacterial cultures (instead of bacterial extracts required by the CLSI tests). The specificities were comparable (100%), but the CNPt-direct was more sensitive (98% versus 84%). The CNPt-direct was easier to perform due to the direct use of colonies and offered a more robust detection of carbapenemase producers. PMID:26424841

  1. Escherichia coli Nissle 1917 bacterial ghosts retain crucial surface properties and express chlamydial antigen: an imaging study of a delivery system for the ocular surface.

    PubMed

    Montanaro, Jacqueline; Inic-Kanada, Aleksandra; Ladurner, Angela; Stein, Elisabeth; Belij, Sandra; Bintner, Nora; Schlacher, Simone; Schuerer, Nadine; Mayr, Ulrike Beate; Lubitz, Werner; Leisch, Nikolaus; Barisani-Asenbauer, Talin

    2015-01-01

    To target chronic inflammatory ocular surface diseases, a drug delivery platform is needed that is safe, possesses immunomodulatory properties, and can be used either for drug delivery, or as a foreign antigen carrier. A new therapeutic approach that we have previously proposed uses nonliving bacterial ghosts (BGs) as a carrier-delivery system which can be engineered to carry foreign antigens and/or be loaded with therapeutic drugs. The parent strain chosen for development of our BG delivery system is the probiotic Escherichia coli strain Nissle 1917 (EcN), whose intrinsic properties trigger the innate immune system with the flagella and fimbriae used to attach and stimulate epithelial cells. In previous studies, we have shown that EcN BGs are safe for the ocular surface route, but evidence that EcN BGs retain flagella and fimbriae after transformation, has never been visually confirmed. In this study, we used different visualization techniques to determine whether flagella and fimbriae are retained on EcN BGs engineered either for drug delivery or as a foreign antigen carrier. We have also shown by immunoelectron microscopy that EcN retains two foreign antigens after processing to become EcN BGs. Furthermore, we demonstrated that BGs derived from EcN and expressing a foreign antigen attachment to conjunctival epithelial cells in vitro without causing reduced cell viability. These results are an important step in constructing a delivery system based on a nonliving probiotic that is suitable for use in ocular surface diseases pairing immunomodulation and targeted delivery. PMID:26229437

  2. Escherichia coli Nissle 1917 bacterial ghosts retain crucial surface properties and express chlamydial antigen: an imaging study of a delivery system for the ocular surface

    PubMed Central

    Montanaro, Jacqueline; Inic-Kanada, Aleksandra; Ladurner, Angela; Stein, Elisabeth; Belij, Sandra; Bintner, Nora; Schlacher, Simone; Schuerer, Nadine; Mayr, Ulrike Beate; Lubitz, Werner; Leisch, Nikolaus; Barisani-Asenbauer, Talin

    2015-01-01

    To target chronic inflammatory ocular surface diseases, a drug delivery platform is needed that is safe, possesses immunomodulatory properties, and can be used either for drug delivery, or as a foreign antigen carrier. A new therapeutic approach that we have previously proposed uses nonliving bacterial ghosts (BGs) as a carrier-delivery system which can be engineered to carry foreign antigens and/or be loaded with therapeutic drugs. The parent strain chosen for development of our BG delivery system is the probiotic Escherichia coli strain Nissle 1917 (EcN), whose intrinsic properties trigger the innate immune system with the flagella and fimbriae used to attach and stimulate epithelial cells. In previous studies, we have shown that EcN BGs are safe for the ocular surface route, but evidence that EcN BGs retain flagella and fimbriae after transformation, has never been visually confirmed. In this study, we used different visualization techniques to determine whether flagella and fimbriae are retained on EcN BGs engineered either for drug delivery or as a foreign antigen carrier. We have also shown by immunoelectron microscopy that EcN retains two foreign antigens after processing to become EcN BGs. Furthermore, we demonstrated that BGs derived from EcN and expressing a foreign antigen attachment to conjunctival epithelial cells in vitro without causing reduced cell viability. These results are an important step in constructing a delivery system based on a nonliving probiotic that is suitable for use in ocular surface diseases pairing immunomodulation and targeted delivery. PMID:26229437

  3. Enhanced Sensitivity for Detection of HIV-1 p24 Antigen by a Novel Nuclease-Linked Fluorescence Oligonucleotide Assay

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Peihu; Li, Xiaojun; Su, Weiheng; Kong, Wei; Kong, Xianggui; Wang, Zhenxin; Wang, Youchun; Jiang, Chunlai; Gao, Feng

    2015-01-01

    The relatively high detection limit of the Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) prevents its application for detection of low concentrations of antigens. To increase the sensitivity for detection of HIV-1 p24 antigen, we developed a highly sensitive nuclease-linked fluorescence oligonucleotide assay (NLFOA). Two major improvements were incorporated in NLFOA to amplify antibody-antigen interaction signals and reduce the signal/noise ratio; a large number of nuclease molecules coupled to the gold nanoparticle/streptavidin complex and fluorescent signals generated from fluorescent-labeled oligonucleotides by the nuclease. The detection limit of p24 by NLFOA was 1 pg/mL, which was 10-fold more sensitive than the conventional ELISA (10 pg/mL). The specificity was 100% and the coefficient of variation (CV) was 7.8% at low p24 concentration (1.5 pg/mL) with various concentrations of spiked p24 in HIV-1 negative sera. Thus, NLFOA is highly sensitive, specific, reproducible and user-friendly. The more sensitive detection of low p24 concentrations in HIV-1-infected individuals by NLFOA could allow detection of HIV-1 infections that are missed by the conventional ELISA at the window period during acute infection to further reduce the risk for HIV-1 infection due to the undetected HIV-1 in the blood products. Moreover, NLFOA can be easily applied to more sensitive detection of other antigens. PMID:25915630

  4. Enhanced Sensitivity for Detection of HIV-1 p24 Antigen by a Novel Nuclease-Linked Fluorescence Oligonucleotide Assay.

    PubMed

    Fan, Peihu; Li, Xiaojun; Su, Weiheng; Kong, Wei; Kong, Xianggui; Wang, Zhenxin; Wang, Youchun; Jiang, Chunlai; Gao, Feng

    2015-01-01

    The relatively high detection limit of the Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) prevents its application for detection of low concentrations of antigens. To increase the sensitivity for detection of HIV-1 p24 antigen, we developed a highly sensitive nuclease-linked fluorescence oligonucleotide assay (NLFOA). Two major improvements were incorporated in NLFOA to amplify antibody-antigen interaction signals and reduce the signal/noise ratio; a large number of nuclease molecules coupled to the gold nanoparticle/streptavidin complex and fluorescent signals generated from fluorescent-labeled oligonucleotides by the nuclease. The detection limit of p24 by NLFOA was 1 pg/mL, which was 10-fold more sensitive than the conventional ELISA (10 pg/mL). The specificity was 100% and the coefficient of variation (CV) was 7.8% at low p24 concentration (1.5 pg/mL) with various concentrations of spiked p24 in HIV-1 negative sera. Thus, NLFOA is highly sensitive, specific, reproducible and user-friendly. The more sensitive detection of low p24 concentrations in HIV-1-infected individuals by NLFOA could allow detection of HIV-1 infections that are missed by the conventional ELISA at the window period during acute infection to further reduce the risk for HIV-1 infection due to the undetected HIV-1 in the blood products. Moreover, NLFOA can be easily applied to more sensitive detection of other antigens. PMID:25915630

  5. Direct fluorescent antibody technique for the detection of bacterial kidney disease in paraffin-embedded tissues

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ochiai, T.; Yasutake, W.T.; Gould, R.W.

    1985-01-01

    The direct fluorescent antibody technique (FAT) was successfully used to detect the causative agent of bacterial kidney disease (BKD), Renibacterium salmoninarum, in Bouin's solution flexed and paraffinembedded egg and tissue sections. This method is superior to gram stain and may be particularly useful in detecting the BKD organism in fish with low-grade infection.

  6. Fluorescence-based endoscopic imaging of Thomsen-Friedenreich antigen to improve early detection of colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Sakuma, Shinji; Yu, James Y H; Quang, Timothy; Hiwatari, Ken-Ichiro; Kumagai, Hironori; Kao, Stephanie; Holt, Alex; Erskind, Jalysa; McClure, Richard; Siuta, Michael; Kitamura, Tokio; Tobita, Etsuo; Koike, Seiji; Wilson, Kevin; Richards-Kortum, Rebecca; Liu, Eric; Washington, Kay; Omary, Reed; Gore, John C; Pham, Wellington

    2015-03-01

    Thomsen-Friedenreich (TF) antigen belongs to the mucin-type tumor-associated carbohydrate antigen. Notably, TF antigen is overexpressed in colorectal cancer (CRC) but is rarely expressed in normal colonic tissue. Increased TF antigen expression is associated with tumor invasion and metastasis. In this study, we sought to validate a novel nanobeacon for imaging TF-associated CRC in a preclinical animal model. We developed and characterized the nanobeacon for use with fluorescence colonoscopy. In vivo imaging was performed on an orthotopic rat model of CRC. Both white light and fluorescence colonoscopy methods were utilized to establish the ratio-imaging index for the probe. The nanobeacon exhibited specificity for TF-associated cancer. Fluorescence colonoscopy using the probe can detect lesions at the stage which is not readily confirmed by conventional visualization methods. Further, the probe can report the dynamic change of TF expression as tumor regresses during chemotherapy. Data from this study suggests that fluorescence colonoscopy can improve early CRC detection. Supplemented by the established ratio-imaging index, the probe can be used not only for early detection, but also for reporting tumor response during chemotherapy. Furthermore, since the data obtained through in vivo imaging confirmed that the probe was not absorbed by the colonic mucosa, no registered toxicity is associated with this nanobeacon. Taken together, these data demonstrate the potential of this novel probe for imaging TF antigen as a biomarker for the early detection and prediction of the progression of CRC at the molecular level. PMID:25052906

  7. Detecting Antigen-Specific T Cell Responses: From Bulk Populations to Single Cells

    PubMed Central

    Phetsouphanh, Chansavath; Zaunders, John James; Kelleher, Anthony Dominic

    2015-01-01

    A new generation of sensitive T cell-based assays facilitates the direct quantitation and characterization of antigen-specific T cell responses. Single-cell analyses have focused on measuring the quality and breadth of a response. Accumulating data from these studies demonstrate that there is considerable, previously-unrecognized, heterogeneity. Standard assays, such as the ICS, are often insufficient for characterization of rare subsets of cells. Enhanced flow cytometry with imaging capabilities enables the determination of cell morphology, as well as the spatial localization of the protein molecules within a single cell. Advances in both microfluidics and digital PCR have improved the efficiency of single-cell sorting and allowed multiplexed gene detection at the single-cell level. Delving further into the transcriptome of single-cells using RNA-seq is likely to reveal the fine-specificity of cellular events such as alternative splicing (i.e., splice variants) and allele-specific expression, and will also define the roles of new genes. Finally, detailed analysis of clonally related antigen-specific T cells using single-cell TCR RNA-seq will provide information on pathways of differentiation of memory T cells. With these state of the art technologies the transcriptomics and genomics of Ag-specific T cells can be more definitively elucidated. PMID:26274954

  8. Asymptomatic females: detection of antibody activity to gonococcal pili antigen by radioimmunoassay.

    PubMed Central

    Oates, S A; Falkler, W A; Joseph, J M; Warfel, L E

    1977-01-01

    A gonococcal pili antigen preparation was used to detect antibody activity sera obtained from 322 culture-positive asymptomatic females and 150 negative controls. Pili were obtained from a culture of type 2 Neisseria gonorrhoeae (strain 2686) and labeled with 125I for use in a double-antibody radioimmunoassay test system. Of the 322 sera obtained from culture-positive, asymptomatic females, 276 (85.7%) showed antibody activity greater than or equal to 1.8 mug/ml. Negative controls were obtained from three different groups of individuals, and 130 (86.7%) had undetectable antibody activity. Sera from asymptomatic, culture-positive females were absorbed with three different strains of N. gonorrhoeae, one of these strains being the organism used for pili antigen preparations. The absorbed sera were tested for antibody activity, and in each case the activity in the absorbed sera dropped to an undetectable level. When the same sera were absorbed with N. meningitidis, N. catarrhalis, N. perflava, Escherichia coli, Herellea vaginicola, Mima polymorpha, Staphylococcus aureus, and Candida albicans, little, if any, decline in the level of anti-pili antibody activity was observed. PMID:401829

  9. Detection of antibody-antigen reaction by silicon nitride slot-ring biosensors using protein G

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taniguchi, Tomoya; Hirowatari, Anna; Ikeda, Takeshi; Fukuyama, Masataka; Amemiya, Yoshiteru; Kuroda, Akio; Yokoyama, Shin

    2016-04-01

    Biosensors using ring resonators with silicon nitride (SiN) slot waveguides have been fabricated. The temperature coefficient of the resonance wavelength of the SiN resonator is 0.006 nm/°C, which is one order of magnitude smaller than that of Si. The sensitivity of the biosensor has been improved by using slot waveguide together with Si-binding protein (designated as Si-tag), which bonds to SiN or SiO2 surface, as an anchoring molecule to immobilize bioreceptors on the SiN rings in an oriented manner. Furthermore, the protein G, which strongly bonds to many kinds of mammalian antibodies only by mixing the antibody solution, is used to efficiently immobilize the antigen on the sensor surface. By means of these devises the sensitivity of the biosensor has been improved by factor of 10-100 compared with that of normal Si ring resonator sensors without slot. Then the detection of prostate specific antigen (PSA) with the sensitivity of ~1×10-8 g/ml, which is the concentration of strongly suspicious for the prostate cancer, has been achieved.

  10. Diagnosis of Giardia lamblia infections by detection of parasite-specific antigens.

    PubMed Central

    Janoff, E N; Craft, J C; Pickering, L K; Novotny, T; Blaser, M J; Knisley, C V; Reller, L B

    1989-01-01

    Antigen detection methods may facilitate diagnosis of Giardia lamblia in stool specimens. As determined by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis analysis and immunoblotting, G. lamblia cysts and trophozoites share several antigens, especially in the 65-kilodalton and 30- to 34-kilodalton regions. By using blind methods, we compared results obtained by counterimmunoelectrophoresis using cyst-immune rabbit serum and by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) using trophozoite-immune rabbit serum with results obtained by microscopic examination of a preserved, concentrated, and permanently stained stool specimen. Results were similar when these three methods were used to examine 118 stool specimens from clinical microbiology laboratories (53 specimens with G. lamblia) and specimens from 239 day-care-center toddlers (39 specimens with G. lamblia). Compared with microscopy, we found, for counterimmunoelectrophoresis and ELISA, respectively: sensitivity, 88 versus 94%; specificity, 97 versus 95%; positive predictive value, 86 versus 76%; negative predictive value, 98 versus 97%; and concordance, 89%. The false-positive rate by ELISA was 24% (10 of 42) in day-care-center toddlers but only 3% (1 of 32) in healthy adults (P less than 0.04) as corroborated by microscopy. This discrepancy suggests that the ELISA may be more sensitive than microscopy, which is considered the reference standard, and that results may be dependent, in part, on the epidemiology of the infection in the study subjects. Images PMID:2715318

  11. Bacterial regrowth in water reclamation and distribution systems revealed by viable bacterial detection assays.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yi-wen; Li, Dan; Gu, April Z; Zeng, Si-yu; He, Miao

    2016-02-01

    Microbial regrowth needs to be managed during water reclamation and distribution. The aim of present study was to investigate the removal and regrowth of Escherichia coli (E. coli) and Salmonella in water reclamation and distribution system by using membrane integrity assay (PMA-qPCR), reverse transcriptional activity assay (Q-RT-PCR) and culture-based assay, and also to evaluate the relationships among bacterial regrowth, and environmental factors in the distribution system. The results showed that most of the water reclamation processes potentially induced bacteria into VBNC state. The culturable E. coli and Salmonella regrew 1.8 and 0.7 log10 in distribution system, which included reactivation of bacteria in the viable but non-culturable (VBNC) state and reproduction of culturable bacteria. The regrowth of culturable E. coli and Salmonella in the distribution system mainly depended on the residual chlorine levels, with correlations (R(2)) of -0.598 and -0.660. The abundances of membrane integrity and reverse transcriptional activity bacteria in reclamation effluents had significant correlations with the culturable bacteria at the end point of the distribution system, demonstrating that PMA-qPCR and Q-RT-PCR are sensitive and accurate tools to determine and predict bacterial regrowth in water distribution systems. This study has improved our understanding of microbial removal and regrowth in reclaimed water treatment and distribution systems. And the results also recommended that more processes should be equipped to remove viable bacteria in water reclamation plants for the sake of inhibition microbial regrowth during water distribution and usages. PMID:26595310

  12. Immunodiagnosis of fascioliasis using sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for detection of Fasciola gigantica paramyosin antigen

    PubMed Central

    Abou-Elhakam, Hany Mohamed Adel; Bauomy, Ibraheem Rabia; El Deeb, Somaya Osman; El Amir, Azza Mohamed

    2013-01-01

    Background: Many immunological techniques have been developed over years using the different Fasciola antigens for diagnosis of parasitic infection and to replace the parasitological techniques, which are time consuming and usually lack sensitivity and reproducibility. Materials and Methods: In this study, Fasciola gigantica paramyosin (Pmy) antigen was early detected in cattle sera using sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), to evaluate the Pmy antigen performance in diagnosis. This work was conducted on 135 cattle blood samples, which were classified according to parasitological investigation into, healthy control (30), fascioliasis (75), and other parasites (30) groups. Results: The sensitivity of Sandwich ELISA was 97.33%, and the specificity was 95%, in comparison with parasitological examination, which recorded 66.66% sensitivity and 100% specificity, respectively. Conclusions: It was clear that the native F. gigantica Pmy is considered as a powerful antigen in early immunodiagnosis of fascioliasis, using a highly sensitive and specific sandwich ELISA technique. PMID:23961441

  13. Wicking assay for the rapid detection of Rift Valley fever viral antigens in mosquitoes (Diptera: Culicidae).

    PubMed

    Turell, M; Davé, K; Mayda, M; Parker, Z; Coleman, R; Davé, S; Strickman, D

    2011-05-01

    Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV) causes outbreaks of severe disease in domestic ungulates as well as humans in Africa. There is a logical concern that RVFV could be introduced into the Americas and cause significant health and economic damage based on the precedent of the introduction and spread of West Nile virus (WNV). Unfortunately, there are currently no licensed diagnostic assays available for RVFV in the Americas. In this work, we report on the ability of a novel dipstick assay, VectorTest RVFV antigen assay, modeled on the VecTest assay for WNV, to detect a RVFV-infected female within a pool of mosquitoes. The dipsticks provided results in <20 min, were easy to use, and did not require a laboratory with containment facilities. Although readily able to detect a mosquito with a disseminated RVFV infection, it only occasionally detected RVFV in a mosquito with a nondisseminated infection, and therefore may fail to detect some pools that actually contain one or more positive mosquitoes. The RVFV dipstick assay was highly specific and did not react with samples to which had been added yellow fever, West Nile, Venezuelan equine encephalitis, sandfly fever Naples, sandfly fever Sicilian, or sandfly fever Toscana viruses. The RVFV assay can provide a rapid, safe, easy-to-use assay to alert public health personnel to the presence of RVFV in mosquitoes. Results from this assay will allow a rapid threat assessment and the focusing of vector control measures in high-risk areas. PMID:21661324

  14. [THE APPLICATION OF DOT-TECHNIQUE FOR DETECTING ANTIGENS OF ADENOVIRUS IN CLINICAL SAMPLES].

    PubMed

    Ivanova, I A; Pisareva, M M; Leontieva, G F; Smirnova, T D; Sorokin, E V; Amosova, I V; Petrova, E R; Shaldjian, A A; Sirosh, A A; Maiorova, V G

    2016-02-01

    The article substantiates possibility of application of point enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (dot-technique) for detecting viral antigens in samples from patients. To diagnose adenovirus infection conjugate of virus-specific monoclonal antibodies and peroxidase of horse-radish were used The chromatographic rectification of conjugate from free peroxidase permits diminishing background coloring of nitrocellulose membrane and therefore to increase sensitivity. The application of direct conjugates on the basis of virus-specific monoclonal antibodies increases specifcity of dot-technique and significantly shortens time period of analysis. As in case of application of direct conjugates on the basis of polyclonal serum, samples from patients require preliminary processing with detergent for preventing non-specific reactions. The dot-technique demonstrates good coincidence with data of polymerase chain reaction and after clinical trials it can be used in diagnostic of human viral infections. PMID:27455569

  15. Field evaluation of latex agglutination test for detecting urinary antigens in visceral leishmaniasis in Sudan.

    PubMed

    El-Safi, S H; Abdel-Haleem, A; Hammad, A; El-Basha, I; Omer, A; Kareem, H G; Boelaert, M; Chance, M; Hommel, M

    2003-07-01

    A latex agglutination test to detect urinary antigens for visceral leishmaniasis (VL) was studied. In 204 patients with suspected VL, KAtex had a sensitivity of 95.2% with good agreement with microscopy smears but poor agreement with 4 different serology tests. It was also positive in 2 confirmed VL cases co-infected with HIV. In all K4tex-positive confirmed cases actively followed up after treatment, the test became negative 1 month after completion of treatment. While IC4tex had a specificity of 100% in healthy endemic and non-endemic controls, the direct agglutination test (DAT) was positive in 14% of the KAtex-negative healthy endemic controls. KAtex is a simple addition to the diagnostics of VL particularly at field level and as a complementary test for the diagnosis of VL in smear-negative cases with positive DAT results. PMID:15748081

  16. Comparison of LightCycler PCR, rapid antigen immunoassay, and culture for detection of group A streptococci from throat swabs.

    PubMed

    Uhl, J R; Adamson, S C; Vetter, E A; Schleck, C D; Harmsen, W S; Iverson, L K; Santrach, P J; Henry, N K; Cockerill, F R

    2003-01-01

    We compared the performance characteristics of a real-time PCR method, the LightCycler Strep-A assay (Roche Applied Science, Indianapolis, Ind.), to those of a rapid antigen immunoassay, the Directigen 1-2-3 Group A Strep Test kit (BD Diagnostic Systems, Sparks, Md.), and a standard culture method for detection of group A streptococci (GAS) from 384 throat swabs. The LightCycler PCR produced more positive results (n = 58) than either culture (n = 55) or the Directigen immunoassay (n = 31). The results of the LightCycler PCR and the Directigen method were independently compared to the results of the accepted "gold standard," bacterial culture. The sensitivities, specificities, and positive and negative predictive values for this comparison were as follows: for the Directigen method, 55, 99, 97, and 93%, respectively; for the LightCycler PCR, 93, 98, 88, and 99%, respectively. In no case was a throat swab positive by both the LightCycler PCR and the Directigen method but negative by culture. The medical histories of patients whose throat swabs were negative by culture but positive by either the LightCycler PCR (n = 7) or the Directigen method (n = 1) were reviewed. All of these patients had signs or symptoms compatible with GAS disease, and therefore, all of these discordant positive results (along with positive results by either the Directigen method or the LightCycler PCR that agreed with the culture results) were counted as true positives for statistical analysis. For this analysis, the LightCycler PCR detected more true-positive results than the culture method (58 versus 55 swabs); however, this difference was not statistically significant (P = 0.5465). In contrast, statistically significantly more true-positive results occurred by culture than by the Directigen method (55 versus 31 swabs; P < 0.0001) and by the LightCycler PCR than by the Directigen method (58 versus 31 swabs; P < 0.0001). The LightCycler PCR is a suitable stand-alone method for the detection of

  17. Comparison of LightCycler PCR, Rapid Antigen Immunoassay, and Culture for Detection of Group A Streptococci from Throat Swabs

    PubMed Central

    Uhl, J. R.; Adamson, S. C.; Vetter, E. A.; Schleck, C. D.; Harmsen, W. S.; Iverson, L. K.; Santrach, P. J.; Henry, N. K.; Cockerill, F. R.

    2003-01-01

    We compared the performance characteristics of a real-time PCR method, the LightCycler Strep-A assay (Roche Applied Science, Indianapolis, Ind.), to those of a rapid antigen immunoassay, the Directigen 1-2-3 Group A Strep Test kit (BD Diagnostic Systems, Sparks, Md.), and a standard culture method for detection of group A streptococci (GAS) from 384 throat swabs. The LightCycler PCR produced more positive results (n = 58) than either culture (n = 55) or the Directigen immunoassay (n = 31). The results of the LightCycler PCR and the Directigen method were independently compared to the results of the accepted “gold standard,” bacterial culture. The sensitivities, specificities, and positive and negative predictive values for this comparison were as follows: for the Directigen method, 55, 99, 97, and 93%, respectively; for the LightCycler PCR, 93, 98, 88, and 99%, respectively. In no case was a throat swab positive by both the LightCycler PCR and the Directigen method but negative by culture. The medical histories of patients whose throat swabs were negative by culture but positive by either the LightCycler PCR (n = 7) or the Directigen method (n = 1) were reviewed. All of these patients had signs or symptoms compatible with GAS disease, and therefore, all of these discordant positive results (along with positive results by either the Directigen method or the LightCycler PCR that agreed with the culture results) were counted as true positives for statistical analysis. For this analysis, the LightCycler PCR detected more true-positive results than the culture method (58 versus 55 swabs); however, this difference was not statistically significant (P = 0.5465). In contrast, statistically significantly more true-positive results occurred by culture than by the Directigen method (55 versus 31 swabs; P < 0.0001) and by the LightCycler PCR than by the Directigen method (58 versus 31 swabs; P < 0.0001). The LightCycler PCR is a suitable stand-alone method for the

  18. Spectrum and Inoculum Size Effect of a Rapid Antigen Detection Test for Group A Streptococcus in Children with Pharyngitis

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Jérémie F.; Chalumeau, Martin; Levy, Corinne; Bidet, Philippe; Thollot, Franck; Wollner, Alain; Bingen, Edouard; Cohen, Robert

    2012-01-01

    Background The stability of the accuracy of a diagnostic test is critical to whether clinicians can rely on its result. We aimed to assess whether the performance of a rapid antigen detection test (RADT) for group A streptococcus (GAS) is affected by the clinical spectrum and/or bacterial inoculum size. Methods Throat swabs were collected from 785 children with pharyngitis in an office-based, prospective, multicenter study (2009–2010). We analysed the effect of clinical spectrum (i.e., the McIsaac score and its components) and inoculum size (light or heavy GAS growth) on the accuracy (sensitivity, specificity, likelihood ratios and predictive values) of a RADT, with laboratory throat culture as the reference test. We also evaluated the accuracy of a McIsaac-score–based decision rule. Results GAS prevalence was 36% (95CI: 33%–40%). The inoculum was heavy for 85% of cases (81%–89%). We found a significant spectrum effect on sensitivity, specificity, likelihood ratios and positive predictive value (p<0.05) but not negative predictive value, which was stable at about 92%. RADT sensitivity was greater for children with heavy than light inoculum (95% vs. 40%, p<0.001). After stratification by inoculum size, the spectrum effect on RADT sensitivity was significant only in patients with light inoculum, on univariate and multivariate analysis. The McIsaac-score–based decision rule had 99% (97%–100%) sensitivity and 52% (48%–57%) specificity. Conclusions Variations in RADT sensitivity only occur in patients with light inocula. Because the spectrum effect does not affect the negative predictive value of the test, clinicians who want to rule out GAS can rely on negative RADT results regardless of clinical features if they accept that about 10% of children with negative RADT results will have a positive throat culture. However, such a policy is more acceptable in populations with very low incidence of complications of GAS infection. PMID:22768060

  19. Use of replication restricted recombinant vesicular stomatitis virus vectors for detection of antigen-specific T cells.

    PubMed

    Moseley, Nelson B; Laur, Oskar; Ibegbu, Chris C; Loria, Gilbert D; Ikwuenzunma, Gini; Jayakar, Himangi R; Whitt, Michael A; Altman, John D

    2012-01-31

    Detection of antigen-specific T cells at the single-cell level by ELISpot or flow cytometry techniques employing intracellular cytokine staining (ICS) is now an indispensable tool in many areas of immunology. When precisely mapped, optimal MHC-binding peptide epitopes are unknown, these assays use antigen in a variety of forms, including recombinant proteins, overlapping peptide sets representing one or more target protein sequences, microbial lysates, lysates of microbially-infected cells, or gene delivery vectors such as DNA expression plasmids or recombinant vaccinia or adenoviruses expressing a target protein of interest. Here we introduce replication-restricted, recombinant vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) vectors as a safe, easy to produce, simple to use, and highly effective vector for genetic antigen delivery for the detection of human antigen-specific helper and cytotoxic T cells. To demonstrate the broad applicability of this approach, we have used these vectors to detect human T cell responses to the immunodominant pp65 antigen of human cytomegalovirus, individual segments of the yellow fever virus polyprotein, and to various influenza proteins. PMID:22004852

  20. Improved performance and quantitative detection of copro-antigens by a monoclonal antibody based ELISA to diagnose human opisthorchiasis.

    PubMed

    Watwiengkam, Nattaya; Sithithaworn, Jiraporn; Duenngai, Kunyarat; Sripa, Banchob; Laha, Thewarach; Johansen, Maria Vang; Sithithaworn, Paiboon

    2013-12-01

    Copro-antigen detection has been advocated as a promising method for diagnosis of opisthorchiasis, particularly in people that harbored light infection or have had recent drug treatment. This study aimed to improve performance of a monoclonal antibody-based enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (Mab-ELISA) for detection of Opisthorchis viverrini copro-antigen and assess the correlation between copro-antigen and intensity of infection. Four different treatment methods of 71 samples from the Lawa endemic area, Khon Kaen province were assessed for copro-antigen detection, namely (1) phosphate buffer saline (PBS), (2) heating (70°C 30min), (3) alkaline (pH 9.6 in carbonate buffer), and (4) trichloroacetic acid (TCA) treatment. Comparison of these protocols showed that the TCA method gave the best performance in discriminating O. viverrini positive and negative samples with high sensitivity (97.9%) and moderate specificity (54.2%) compared with other methods. Application of TCA-based Mab-ELISA method for antigen detection in fecal samples obtained from an endemic area of opisthorchiasis revealed that 86 of 141 samples (61.0%) were positive compared with 68 (48.2%) by PBS-based protocol, while the formalin ethyl-acetate concentration technique (FECT) yielded a positive proportion of 71.6%. Among 40 egg-negative samples confirmed by a gold standard parasitological method (FECT) from the same endemic area, 19 (47.5%) were positive by the TCA-based while only 6 (15%) were positive by PBS-based Mab-ELISA protocol. In addition, levels of antigen detection significantly correlated with intensity of infection (egg per gram feces). The results show that the improved Mab-ELISA method has high sensitivity and also quantifiable diagnosis of opisthorchiasis. PMID:24055716

  1. A handheld magnetic sensing platform for antigen and nucleic acid detection.

    PubMed

    Pai, Alex; Khachaturian, Aroutin; Chapman, Stephen; Hu, Alexander; Wang, Hua; Hajimiri, Ali

    2014-03-21

    The core requirements for point-of-care (POC) diagnostics necessitate low-cost, portability, easily integrated sample preparation, and quick measurement time. Frequency-shift based magnetic sensing is a measurement technique utilizing a complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) integrated-circuit (IC) chip for magnetic label detection. The sensing scheme leverages the low-cost manufacturing of IC chips while demonstrating the potential for multiplexing capabilities. In this article, we present modifications to this scheme for POC viability. We introduce a handheld reusable reader and a disposable open-well cartridge for the detection of nucleic acids and antigens. The diagnostic system utilizes a novel "magnetic freezing" technique to reduce measurement time, obviates baseline measurement before or during biological assay, and reduces sensor noise. We utilize these enhancements for the room temperature, amplification-free detection of a 31 base-pair DNA oligomer and the interferon-γ (IFN-γ) protein. We have demonstrated reliable measurements down to 100 pM for the DNA assay and 1 pM for the protein. PMID:24471157

  2. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for detection of Salmonella typhi Vi antigen in urine from typhoid patients.

    PubMed

    Barrett, T J; Snyder, J D; Blake, P A; Feeley, J C

    1982-02-01

    Because typhoid fever continues to be a major cause of illness in many developing countries, there is a clear need for a sensitive and specific test that will permit rapid laboratory diagnosis of the disease. An enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) has recently been developed and tested, both in the laboratory and in a clinical situation, for its ability to detect Vi antigen in urine. The ELISA was capable of detecting as little as 1 ng of purified Vi antigen per ml in urine, compared with 100 ng/ml detectable by a previously tested coagglutination method. It could also detect antigen in urine diluted as much as 1:1,024 in normal urine. In tests of urine specimens from six stool culture-positive persons in a small typhoid outbreak in the United States, the ELISA detected antigen in specimens from four of the six patients. The ELISA also proved to be specific, giving no false-positive results for specimens from 50 persons who did not have typhoid fever. The apparent high sensitivity and specificity of this ELISA make it a promising test for rapid diagnosis of typhoid fever. PMID:7040446

  3. APPLYING MACHINE LEARNING TECHNIQUES IN DETECTING BACTERIAL VAGINOSIS

    PubMed Central

    Baker, Yolanda S.; Agrawal, Rajeev; Foster, James A.; Beck, Daniel; Dozier, Gerry

    2014-01-01

    There are several diseases which arise because of changes in the microbial communities in the body. Scientists continue to conduct research in a quest to find the catalysts that provoke these changes in the naturally occurring microbiota. Bacterial Vaginosis (BV) is a disease that fits the above criteria. BV afflicts approximately 29% of women in child bearing age. Unfortunately, its causes are unknown. This paper seeks to uncover the most important features for diagnosis and in turn employ classification algorithms on those features. In order to fulfill our purpose, we conducted two experiments on the data. We isolated the clinical and medical features from the full set of raw data, we compared the accuracy, precision, recall and F-measure and time elapsed for each feature selection and classification grouping. We noticed that classification results were as good or better after performing feature selection although there was a wide range in the number of features produced from the feature selection process. After comparing the experiments, the algorithms performed best on the medical dataset. PMID:25914861

  4. Detection of Only Viable Bacterial Spores Using a Live/Dead Indicator in Mixed Populations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Behar, Alberto E.; Stam, Christina N.; Smiley, Ronald

    2013-01-01

    This method uses a photoaffinity label that recognizes DNA and can be used to distinguish populations of bacterial cells from bacterial spores without the use of heat shocking during conventional culture, and live from dead bacterial spores using molecular-based methods. Biological validation of commercial sterility using traditional and alternative technologies remains challenging. Recovery of viable spores is cumbersome, as the process requires substantial incubation time, and the extended time to results limits the ability to quickly evaluate the efficacy of existing technologies. Nucleic acid amplification approaches such as PCR (polymerase chain reaction) have shown promise for improving time to detection for a wide range of applications. Recent real-time PCR methods are particularly promising, as these methods can be made at least semi-quantitative by correspondence to a standard curve. Nonetheless, PCR-based methods are rarely used for process validation, largely because the DNA from dead bacterial cells is highly stable and hence, DNA-based amplification methods fail to discriminate between live and inactivated microorganisms. Currently, no published method has been shown to effectively distinguish between live and dead bacterial spores. This technology uses a DNA binding photoaffinity label that can be used to distinguish between live and dead bacterial spores with detection limits ranging from 109 to 102 spores/mL. An environmental sample suspected of containing a mixture of live and dead vegetative cells and bacterial endospores is treated with a photoaffinity label. This step will eliminate any vegetative cells (live or dead) and dead endospores present in the sample. To further determine the bacterial spore viability, DNA is extracted from the spores and total population is quantified by real-time PCR. The current NASA standard assay takes 72 hours for results. Part of this procedure requires a heat shock step at 80 degC for 15 minutes before the

  5. Evaluation of a novel chemiluminescent microplate enzyme immunoassay for hepatitis B surface antigen detection.

    PubMed

    Yang, Lin; Song, Liu-Wei; Fang, Lin-Lin; Wu, Yong; Ge, Sheng-Xiang; Li, Hui; Yuan, Quan; Zhang, Jun; Xia, Ning-Shao

    2016-02-01

    Hepatitis B virus surface antigen (HBsAg) is an important biomarker used in the diagnosis of hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection, but false-negative results are still reported in the detection of HBsAg using commercial assays. In this study, we evaluated the qualitative properties of a novel HBsAg chemiluminescence enzyme immunoassay (CLEIA) assay--WTultra. WHO standard sample dilution series and samples from low-level HBsAg carriers (<1 ng/mL) were used to evaluate the sensitivity of the WTultra assay. Boston Biomedica, Inc. (BBI) hepatitis B seroconversion panels were used to assess the ability of the WTultra assay to detect the window period. In addition, dilution series of 22 serum samples with different genotypes, serotypes and HBsAg mutations were used to assess the WTultra assay, and these were compared with other commercial assays. The lower detection limit of the WTultra assay was 0.012 IU/mL, and it showed a high sensitivity (97.52%, 95% CI, 94.95-99.00) in the detection of 282 low-level HBsAg carriers (<1 ng/mL). In samples with various HBV genotypes, serotypes and HBsAg mutations, the WTultra assay yielded 117 positive results in 132 samples, which was significantly higher than the results with the other four commercial assays (89, 83, 65 and 45, respectively, p<0.01). In the assays of mutant strains, the WTultra assay detected 82 positive results in 90 samples, which was significantly better than the results for the Hepanostika HBsAg Ultra (58 positive) and Architect (55 positive) (p<0.01) assays, which in turn were significantly better than the Murex V.3 (41 positive, p=0.026) and AxSYM V2 (29 positive, p<0.01) assays. However, in the detection of 42 samples of wild-type strains with various genotypes and serotypes, no significant differences were observed among the WTultra (35 positive), Architect (28 positive) and Hepanostika HBsAg Ultra (31 positive) assays. However, the WTultra assay detected significantly more samples than the Murex V.3 (24

  6. Short bacterial DNA fragments: detection in dialysate and induction of cytokines.

    PubMed

    Schindler, Ralf; Beck, Werner; Deppisch, Reinhold; Aussieker, Mario; Wilde, Adelheid; Göhl, Hermann; Frei, Ulrich

    2004-12-01

    A number of bacterial cytokine-inducing substances (CIS) such as lipopolysaccharides (LPS) and exotoxins have been detected in dialysate and may contribute to inflammation in hemodialysis patients. Short DNA fragments, oligodeoxynucleotides (ODN) of 6 to 20 nucleotides, are able to bind to Toll-like receptors and are stimulatory on immune cells. ODN induce natural killer cell activity and induce IFN-gamma, TNF-alpha, and IL-6 from mononuclear cells. The presence of ODN in dialysate samples and bacterial cultures was investigated. ODN were extracted from fluids by adsorption to reverse-phase columns. ODN were detected in 18 of 20 investigated dialysate samples, in eight of 10 reverse-osmosis water samples, and in all cultures from various bacterial strains. The presence of bacterial DNA in dialysate was confirmed by PCR specific for bacterial tRNA gene sequences. Saline for intravenous use contained 0.02 +/- 0.01 microg/ml DNA, dialysate samples contained 0.28 +/- 0.02 microg/ml, and Pseudomonas cultures contained 1.0 +/- 0.03 microg/ml DNA. ODN from bacterial cultures were only partially removed by ultrafiltration and were able to diffuse through regular high-flux dialyzer membranes. Synthetic cytosine-guanosine dinucleotide-containing ODN were able to induce IL-6 in human mononuclear cells. It is concluded that short bacterial-derived DNA fragments are present in clinically used fluids, e.g., dialysate. These fragments are of sufficient small size to pass through dialyzer membranes. Bacterial DNA fragments may be an overlooked factor contributing to inflammation in hemodialysis patients. PMID:15579524

  7. [Elaboration of new adjuvant lipid-saponin complex and its use at experimental immunization by bacterial antigen].

    PubMed

    Tsybul'skiĭ, A V; Sanina, N M; Li, I A; Popov, A M; Kostetskiĭ, E Ia; Portniagina, O Iu; Shnyrov, V L

    2007-01-01

    Results of experiments on modification of immunostimulating complexes (ISCOM's) matrix by the replacement of the phospholipid for the glycolipid (monogalactosyldiacylglycerol) from sea macrophytes, and saponin QuillA to triterpene glycoside of cucumarioside A2-2 from Cucumaria japonica are shown. The resultant complexes include the morphological structures of two types: ISCOM-like structures with the characteristic morphology and sizes and also the tubular structures with diameter of approximately 40 nm and length of 150-400 nm. We have named these structures as TI-complexes. These TI-complexes exhibit considerably lower toxicity than ISCOM. They may include an amphiphilic protein antigen and provide immunoadjuvant effect during experimental vaccination. Under conditions of experimental immunization of mice by a weak immunogen--(subunit membrane pore protein from Y. pseudotuberculosis), TI-complexes with antigen provided stronger humoral immune response to antigen than the complexes of porin with classical ISCOM, liposomes and Freund's adjuvant. Thus, it's shown the prospect of the use of TI-complexes as a new type of adjuvant carriers for antigens. PMID:17722580

  8. Detection of a unique antigen on radiation leukemia virus-induced leukemia B6RV2

    SciTech Connect

    Nakayama, E.; Uenaka, A.; Stockert, E.; Obata, Y.

    1984-11-01

    Radiation leukemia virus-induced leukemia of a male C57BL/6 mouse, B6RV2, is immunogenic to female BALB/c X C57BL/6 F1 mice. In these mice, B6RV2 tumors regressed after initial growth, and after tumor regression the mice were resistant to repeated inocula of up to 10(8) B6RV2 cells. Serum from these mice reacted with B6RV2 in mixed hemadsorption or protein A assays, and absorption analysis indicated that the antigen was restricted to B6RV2; it could not be detected in normal thymocytes or spleen concanavalin A blasts from different inbred strains, nor in 16 C57BL/6 or BALB/c leukemias. Spleen cells from mice in which the tumor had regressed were cytotoxic to B6RV2 after in vitro stimulation with B6RV2, as shown by /sup 51/chromium release assay. This cytotoxicity was eliminated by pretreatment of the cells with anti-Thy-1.2, anti-Lyt-2.2, anti-Lyt-3.2, and complement, indicating that the effector cells were T-cells. The specificity of T-cell killing of B6RV2 was examined by competitive inhibition assays with unlabeled cells; only B6RV2 inhibited killing, while eight other C57BL/6 leukemias did not inhibit. Thus, the antigen on B6RV2 defined serologically and by cytotoxic T-cells is a unique antigen. However, it was not revealed by antibody-blocking test whether the unique determinant defined serologically was related to that recognized by T-cells; B6RV2 antiserum did not block lytic activity in the absence of added complement, irrespective of whether the target cells were untreated or anti-H-2b-treated B6RV2. H-2Kb antisera, but not H-2Db antisera, blocked lysis. This indicated that the H-2Kb molecule was exclusively involved in recognition of B6RV2 by cytotoxic T-cell.

  9. Development of an Immunochromatographic Test for Diagnosis of Visceral Leishmaniasis Based on Detection of a Circulating Antigen

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Chun-hua; Yang, Yue-tao; Shi, Feng; Wang, Jun-yun; Steverding, Dietmar; Wang, Xia

    2015-01-01

    Background Visceral leishmaniasis (VL) is a life-threatening disease caused by protozoan parasites of the Leishmania donovani complex. Early case detection followed by adequate treatment is essential to the control of VL. However, the available diagnostic tests are either invasive and require considerable expertise (parasitological demonstration of the parasite in tissue smears) or unable to distinguish between past and active infection (serological methods). Therefore, we aimed to develop a lateral flow assay in the form of an immunochromatographic test (ICT) device based on the detection of a circulating Leishmania antigen using monoclonal antibodies (mAbs). Methodology/Principal Findings mAbs were produced by fusion of murine myeloma cells with splenocytes isolated from a mouse immunized with L. donovani soluble crude antigen. Out of 12 cloned hybridoma cell lines, two secreted mAbs recognizing the same leishmanial protein. These mAbs were used to produce an ICT as a sandwich assay for the detection of circulating antigen in serum and blood samples. The ICT was evaluated with 213 serum samples from VL patients living in VL endemic areas in China, and with 156 serum samples from patients with other diseases as well as 78 serum samples from healthy donors. Sensitivity, specificity and diagnostic efficiency of the new ICT was 95.8%, 98.7% and 97.3%, respectively. Compared with a commercially available antibody detecting ICT, our antigen-based ICT performed slightly better. Conclusion/Significance The newly developed ICT is an easy to use and more accurate diagnostic tool which fulfils the performance and operational characteristics required for VL case detection under field and laboratory conditions. As our ICT detects a circulating antigen, it will also be useful in monitoring treatment success and diagnosing VL in immunocompromised patients. PMID:26125560

  10. Elevated IgG levels against specific bacterial antigens in obese patients with diabetes and in mice with diet-induced obesity and glucose intolerance.

    PubMed

    Mohammed, Nadeem; Tang, Lihua; Jahangiri, Anisa; de Villiers, Willem; Eckhardt, Erik

    2012-09-01

    High fat diets increase the risk for insulin resistance by promoting inflammation. The cause of inflammation is unclear, but germfree mouse studies have implicated commensal gut bacteria. We tested whether diet-induced obesity, diabetes, and inflammation are associated with anti-bacterial IgG. Blood from lean and obese healthy volunteers or obese patients with diabetes were analyzed by ELISA for IgG against extracts of potentially pathogenic and pro-biotic strains of Escherichia coli (LF-82 and Nissle), Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron, and Lactobacillus acidophilus, and for circulating tumor necrosis factor α (TNFα). C57Bl/6 mice were fed low- or high-fat diets (10% or 60% kcal from fat) for 10 weeks and tested for anti-bacterial IgG, bodyweight, fasting glucose, and inflammation. Obese diabetic patients had significantly more IgG against extracts of E. coli LF-82 compared with lean controls, whereas IgG against extracts of the other bacteria was unchanged. Circulating TNFα was elevated and correlated with IgG against the LF-82 extract. Mice fed high-fat diets had increased fasting glucose levels, elevated TNFα and neutrophils, and significantly more IgG against the LF-82 extracts. Diabetes in obesity is characterized by increased IgG against specific bacterial antigens. Specific commensal bacteria may mediate inflammatory effects of high-fat diets. PMID:22424821

  11. Advances in the Diagnosis of Human Opisthorchiasis: Development of Opisthorchis viverrini Antigen Detection in Urine

    PubMed Central

    Duenngai, Kunyarat; Wangboon, Chompunoot; Sithithaworn, Jiraporn; Watwiengkam, Nattaya; Namwat, Nisana; Techasen, Anchalee; Loilome, Watcharin; Yongvanit, Puangrat; Loukas, Alex; Sithithaworn, Paiboon; Bethony, Jeffrey M.

    2015-01-01

    Background Many strategies to control opisthorchiasis have been employed in Thailand, but not in the other neighbouring countries. Specific control methods include mass drug administration (MDA) and health education to reduce raw fish consumption. These control efforts have greatly shifted the epidemiology of Opisthorchis viverrini (OV) infection over the last decade from presenting as densely concentrated "heavy" infections in single villages to widespread "light" OV infections distributed over wide geographical areas. Currently, the "gold standard" detection method for OV infection is formalin ethyl-acetate concentration technique (FECT), which has limited diagnostic sensitivity and diagnostic specificity for light OV infections, with OV eggs often confused with eggs of minute intestinal flukes (MIFs) in feces. In this study, we developed and evaluated the diagnostic performance of a monoclonal antibody-based enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for the measurement of OV excretory-secretory (ES) antigens in urine (urine OV-ES assay) for the diagnosis of opisthorchiasis compared to the gold standard detection FECT method. Methodology We tested several methods for pre-treating urine samples prior to testing the diagnostic performance of the urine OV-ES assay. Using trichloroacetic acid (TCA) pre-treated urine, we compared detection and quantification of OV infection using the urine OV-ES assay versus FECT in OV-endemic areas in Northeastern Thailand. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves were used to determine the diagnostic sensitivity and specificity of the urine OV-ES assay using TCA pre-treated urine, and to establish diagnostic positivity thresholds. The Positive Predictive Value as well as the likelihood of obtaining a positive test result (LR+) or a negative test result (LR-) were calculated for the established diagnostic positivity threshold. Diagnostic risks (Odds Ratios) were estimated using logistic regression. Results When urine samples were pre

  12. Detection of dichloromethane with a bioluminescent (lux) bacterial bioreporter.

    PubMed

    Lopes, Nicholas; Hawkins, Shawn A; Jegier, Patricia; Menn, Fu-Min; Sayler, Gary S; Ripp, Steven

    2012-01-01

    The focus of this research effort was to develop an autonomous, inducible, lux-based bioluminescent bioreporter for the real-time detection of dichloromethane. Dichloromethane (DCM), also known as methylene chloride, is a volatile organic compound and one of the most commonly used halogenated solvents in the U.S., with applications ranging from grease and paint stripping to aerosol propellants and pharmaceutical tablet coatings. Predictably, it is released into the environment where it contaminates air and water resources. Due to its classification as a probable human carcinogen, hepatic toxin, and central nervous system effector, DCM must be carefully monitored and controlled. Methods for DCM detection usually rely on analytical techniques such as solid-phase microextraction (SPME) and capillary gas chromatography or photoacoustic environmental monitors, all of which require trained personnel and/or expensive equipment. To complement conventional monitoring practices, we have created a bioreporter for the self-directed detection of DCM by taking advantage of the evolutionary adaptation of bacteria to recognize and metabolize chemical agents. This bioreporter, Methylobacterium extorquens DCM( lux ), was engineered to contain a bioluminescent luxCDABE gene cassette derived from Photorhabdus luminescens fused downstream to the dcm dehalogenase operon, which causes the organism to generate visible light when exposed to DCM. We have demonstrated detection limits down to 1.0 ppm under vapor phase exposures and 0.1 ppm under liquid phase exposures with response times of 2.3 and 1.3 h, respectively, and with specificity towards DCM under relevant industrial environmental monitoring conditions. PMID:21688172

  13. A functional gene array for detection of bacterial virulence elements

    SciTech Connect

    Jaing, C

    2007-11-01

    We report our development of the first of a series of microarrays designed to detect pathogens with known mechanisms of virulence and antibiotic resistance. By targeting virulence gene families as well as genes unique to specific biothreat agents, these arrays will provide important data about the pathogenic potential and drug resistance profiles of unknown organisms in environmental samples. To validate our approach, we developed a first generation array targeting genes from Escherichia coli strains K12 and CFT073, Enterococcus faecalis and Staphylococcus aureus. We determined optimal probe design parameters for microorganism detection and discrimination, measured the required target concentration, and assessed tolerance for mismatches between probe and target sequences. Mismatch tolerance is a priority for this application, due to DNA sequence variability among members of gene families. Arrays were created using the NimbleGen Maskless Array Synthesizer at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. Purified genomic DNA from combinations of one or more of the four target organisms, pure cultures of four related organisms, and environmental aerosol samples with spiked-in genomic DNA were hybridized to the arrays. Based on the success of this prototype, we plan to design further arrays in this series, with the goal of detecting all known virulence and antibiotic resistance gene families in a greatly expanded set of organisms.

  14. Multi-scale silica structures for improved HIV-1 Capsid (p24) antigen detection.

    PubMed

    Lin, Sophia; Hedde, Per Niklas; Venugopalan, Vasan; Gratton, Enrico; Khine, Michelle

    2016-06-20

    Silica (SiO2) micro- and nanostructures fabricated with pre-stressed thermoplastic shrink wrap film have been shown to yield far-field fluorescence signal enhancements over their planar or wrinkled counterparts. The SiO2 structures have previously been used for improved detection of fluorescently labelled proteins and DNA. In this work, we probe the mechanism responsible for the dramatic increases in fluorescence signal intensity. Optical characterization studies attribute the fluorescence signal enhancements to increased surface density and light scattering from the rough SiO2 structures. Using this information, we come up with a theoretical approximation for the enhancement factor based off the scattering effects alone. We show that increased deposition thickness of SiO2 yields improved fluorescence signal enhancements, with an optimal SiO2 thin layer achieved at 20 nm. Finally, we show that the SiO2 substrates serve as a suitable platform for disease diagnostics, and show improved limits of detection (LOD) for the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) p24 antigen. PMID:27163263

  15. Evaluation of Leishmania (Leishmania) infantum excreted-secreted antigens for detection of canine leishmaniasis.

    PubMed

    Pinedo-Cancino, Viviana; Laurenti, Márcia Dalastra; Kesper, Norival; Umezawa, Eufrosina Setsu

    2016-09-01

    The efficacy of tests with L. (L.) infantum excreted-secreted antigens (ESA) to detect canine leishmaniasis (CanL) was evaluated using immunoblotting (ESA-blot), ELISA (ESA-ELISA) and ELISA with alkaline extract from promastigotes (PAE). Of one hundred fifty-five domestic dogs tested, 100 were suspected of CanL, 23 had other diseases and 32 were healthy. Sera from the dogs suspected of CanL were tested by immunohistochemistry (IHC), and 54% were confirmed to be infected by L. (L.) infantum (38 symptomatic and 16 asymptomatic). Of these, 100% were positive by ESA-blot, ESA-ELISA and PAE-ELISA. In the ESA-blot their sera recognized polypeptides in the 26.5-31.5kDa region. Of the 46% of dogs with negative IHC, 44-53% tested positive in all three tests irrespective of clinical status. The twenty-three dogs with other diseases were negative by ESA-blot, but sera from 9% and 26% of them reacted with ESA-ELISA and PAE-ELISA, respectively. The 32 healthy dogs were negative in all the tests. ESA-blot showed good correlation with IHC in the detection of CanL and a high specificity index. PMID:27212707

  16. Development of monoclonal antibodies suitable for rabies virus antibody and antigen detection.

    PubMed

    Chander, Vishal; Singh, R P; Verma, P C

    2012-12-01

    The control of an infectious viral disease as rabies is made easier by rapid and accurate diagnosis. Successful rabies prophylaxis is dependent upon the active immunization with vaccine along with passive administration of rabies virus neutralizing antibodies which together clear the virus before widespread infection of central nervous system occurs. The present study aimed at the development of monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) suitable for rabies virus antibody and antigen detection. For the production of rabies specific MAbs, immunization of Swiss albino mice with a commercially available vaccine was done and Polyethylene glycol mediated fusion of spleenocytes with myeloma cells was performed. The positive clones were selected on the basis of distinct reactivity by cell Enzyme linked immunosorbent assay and fluorescence in Indirect Fluorescent antibody test. The positive clones obtained were subjected to single cell cloning by limiting dilution method. The reactive clones were further titrated and employed for virus titration and virus neutralization. The neutralizing activity was evaluated using Fluorescence Activated Cell Sorter technique. Three MAb clones showed a distinct percent inhibition in the presence of positive serum. One of the MAb clone No. 5C3 was relatively more specific in detecting rabies antibodies and also found suitable for competitive ELISA to assess the antibody level in vaccinated subjects. PMID:24293819

  17. Development of glycan specific lectin based immunoassay for detection of prostate specific antigen.

    PubMed

    Bhanushali, Paresh B; Badgujar, Shamkant B; Tripathi, Mukesh M; Gupta, Sanjeev; Murthy, Vedang; Krishnasastry, Musti V; Puri, Chander P

    2016-05-01

    We describe an analytical approach for the detection and verification of glycosylation patterns of prostate specific antigen (PSA), a key biomarker currently used for understanding the onset and prognosis of prostate cancer. PSA has been purified from the human seminal plasma and total PSA from prostate cancer sera. PSA is a monomeric glycoprotein with an apparent molecular mass 28040.467Da, which exhibits a characteristic protease activity against casein and gelatin. Its optimal protease activity is centered on neutral pH. Peptide mass fingerprint analysis of the purified PSA has yielded peptides that partially match with known database sequences (Uniprot ID P07288). Tryptic digestion profile of isolated PSA, infer the exclusive nature of PSA and may be additive molecule in the dictionary of seminal proteins. Surface plasmon resonance and lectin immunoassay revealed direct interaction between a newly developed anti-PSA monoclonal antibody (C4E6) and PSA. A lectin based immunoassay is reported here which was achieved with the C4E6 anti-PSA antibody and biotinylated plant lectins. This investigation provides an alternative method to isolate and quantify PSA with altered glycosylation which might be seen in the prostate cancer and developing a lectin based immunoassay to detect PSA in serum of prostate cancer patients. PMID:26840176

  18. Detection of specific antibodies to an antigenic mannoprotein for diagnosis of Penicillium marneffei penicilliosis.

    PubMed

    Cao, L; Chen, D L; Lee, C; Chan, C M; Chan, K M; Vanittanakom, N; Tsang, D N; Yuen, K Y

    1998-10-01

    The disseminated and progressive fungal disease Penicillium marneffei penicilliosis is one of the most common infectious diseases in AIDS patients in Southeast Asia. To diagnose systemic penicilliosis, we developed an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA)-based antibody test with Mp1p, a purified recombinant antigenic mannoprotein of P. marneffei. Evaluation of the test with guinea pig sera against P. marneffei and other pathogenic fungi indicated that this assay was specific for P. marneffei. Clinical evaluation revealed that high levels of specific antibody were detected in two immunocompetent penicilliosis patients. Furthermore, approximately 80% (14 of 17) of the documented penicilliosis patients with human immunodeficiency virus tested positive for the specific antibody. No false-positive results were found for serum samples from 90 healthy blood donors, 20 patients with typhoid fever, and 55 patients with tuberculosis, indicating a high specificity of the test. Thus, this ELISA-based test for the detection of anti-Mp1p antibody can be of significant value as a diagnostic for penicilliosis. PMID:9738061

  19. Aptasensor based on tripetalous cadmium sulfide-graphene electrochemiluminescence for the detection of carcinoembryonic antigen.

    PubMed

    Shi, Gui-Fang; Cao, Jun-Tao; Zhang, Jing-Jing; Huang, Ke-Jing; Liu, Yan-Ming; Chen, Yong-Hong; Ren, Shu-Wei

    2014-11-21

    A facile label-free electrochemiluminescence (ECL) aptasensor, based on the ECL of cadmium sulfide-graphene (CdS-GR) nanocomposites with peroxydisulfate as the coreactant, was designed for the detection of carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA). Tripetalous CdS-GR nanocomposites were synthesized through a simple onepot solvothermal method and immobilized on the glassy carbon electrode surface. L-Cystine (L-cys) could largely promote the electron transfer and enhance the ECL intensity. Gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) were assembled onto the L-cys film modified electrode for aptamer immobilization and ECL signal amplification. The aptamer modified with thiol was adsorbed onto the surface of the AuNPs through a Au-S bond. Upon hybridization of the aptamer with the target protein, the sequence could conjugate CEA to form a Y architecture. With CEA as a model analyte, the decreased ECL intensity is proportional to the CEA concentration in the range of 0.01-10.0 ng mL(-1) with a detection limit of 3.8 pg mL(-1) (S/N = 3). The prepared aptasensor was applied to the determination of CEA in human serum samples. The recoveries of CEA in the human serum samples were between 85.0% and 109.5%, and the RSD values were no more than 3.4%. PMID:25209409

  20. Avian host range of Chlamydophila spp. based on isolation, antigen detection and serology.

    PubMed

    Kaleta, E F; Taday, Eva M A

    2003-10-01

    Published reports and our own diagnostic data on the avian host range of avian Chlamydophila spp. are presented in an attempt to provide evidence for the large number of bird species that have been naturally infected with chlamydia. The term 'chlamydia-positive' is based on either isolation of the organism and antigen detection or on serological detection of circulating antibodies. The list of chlamydia-positive birds contains the six major domestic species (chicken, turkey, Pekin duck, Muscovy duck, goose, and pigeon), the three minor domestic species (Japanese quail, bobwhite quail, and peafowl) and a total of 460 free-living or pet bird species in 30 orders. The order Psittaciformes contains by far the most (153 of 342; 45%) chlamydia-positive bird species. More than 20% of all species per order are positive for chlamydia in the orders Lariformes (gulls, 26 of 92 species; 28%), Alciformes (alks, six of 23 species; 26%), Sphenisciformes (penguins, four of 16 species; 25%), and Anseriformes (ducks and geese, 33 of 157 species; 21%). Only 5% of all bird species (14 of 259 species) in the order Phasianiformes (gallinaceus birds) are chlamydia-positive. The different percentages of chlamydia-positive bird species reflect: (i) a high rate of investigations (e.g. of domestic birds) compared with infrequent testing (e.g. of Charadriiformes or Cuculiformes), (ii) frequent zoonotic implications (e.g. psittacine and columbiform birds), and (iii) an assumed high susceptibility to infection and subsequent seroconversion (e.g. waterfowl). PMID:14522700

  1. Bacteriophages for detection and control of bacterial pathogens in food and food-processing environment.

    PubMed

    Brovko, Lubov Y; Anany, Hany; Griffiths, Mansel W

    2012-01-01

    This chapter presents recent advances in bacteriophage research and their application in the area of food safety. Section 1 describes general facts on phage biology that are relevant to their application for control and detection of bacterial pathogens in food and environmental samples. Section 2 summarizes the recently acquired data on application of bacteriophages to control growth of bacterial pathogens and spoilage organisms in food and food-processing environment. Section 3 deals with application of bacteriophages for detection and identification of bacterial pathogens. Advantages of bacteriophage-based methods are presented and their shortcomings are discussed. The chapter is intended for food scientist and food product developers, and people in food inspection and health agencies with the ultimate goal to attract their attention to the new developing technology that has a tremendous potential in providing means for producing wholesome and safe food. PMID:23034118

  2. Rapid detection of bacterial resistance to antibiotics using AFM cantilevers as nanomechanical sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Longo, G.; Alonso-Sarduy, L.; Rio, L. Marques; Bizzini, A.; Trampuz, A.; Notz, J.; Dietler, G.; Kasas, S.

    2013-07-01

    The widespread misuse of drugs has increased the number of multiresistant bacteria, and this means that tools that can rapidly detect and characterize bacterial response to antibiotics are much needed in the management of infections. Various techniques, such as the resazurin-reduction assays, the mycobacterial growth indicator tube or polymerase chain reaction-based methods, have been used to investigate bacterial metabolism and its response to drugs. However, many are relatively expensive or unable to distinguish between living and dead bacteria. Here we show that the fluctuations of highly sensitive atomic force microscope cantilevers can be used to detect low concentrations of bacteria, characterize their metabolism and quantitatively screen (within minutes) their response to antibiotics. We applied this methodology to Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus, showing that live bacteria produced larger cantilever fluctuations than bacteria exposed to antibiotics. Our preliminary experiments suggest that the fluctuation is associated with bacterial metabolism.

  3. Phage-protease-peptide: a novel trifecta enabling multiplex detection of viable bacterial pathogens.

    PubMed

    Alcaine, S D; Tilton, L; Serrano, M A C; Wang, M; Vachet, R W; Nugen, S R

    2015-10-01

    Bacteriophages represent rapid, readily targeted, and easily produced molecular probes for the detection of bacterial pathogens. Molecular biology techniques have allowed researchers to make significant advances in the bioengineering of bacteriophage to further improve speed and sensitivity of detection. Despite their host specificity, bacteriophages have not been meaningfully leveraged in multiplex detection of bacterial pathogens. We propose a proof-of-principal phage-based scheme to enable multiplex detection. Our scheme involves bioengineering bacteriophage to carry a gene for a specific protease, which is expressed during infection of the target cell. Upon lysis, the protease is released to cleave a reporter peptide, and the signal detected. Here we demonstrate the successful (i) modification of T7 bacteriophage to carry tobacco etch virus (TEV) protease; (ii) expression of TEV protease by Escherichia coli following infection by our modified T7, an average of 2000 units of protease per phage are produced during infection; and (iii) proof-of-principle detection of E. coli in 3 h after a primary enrichment via TEV protease activity using a fluorescent peptide and using a designed target peptide for matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry analysis (MALDI-TOF MS) analysis. This proof-of-principle can be translated to other phage-protease-peptide combinations to enable multiplex bacterial detection and readily adopted on multiple platforms, like MALDI-TOF MS or fluorescent readers, commonly found in labs. PMID:26245682

  4. A handheld real time thermal cycler for bacterial pathogen detection.

    PubMed

    Higgins, James A; Nasarabadi, Shanavaz; Karns, Jeffrey S; Shelton, Daniel R; Cooper, Mary; Gbakima, Aiah; Koopman, Ronald P

    2003-08-15

    The handheld advanced nucleic acid analyzer (HANAA) is a portable real time thermal cycler unit that weighs under 1 kg and uses silicon and platinum-based thermalcycler units to conduct rapid heating and cooling of plastic reaction tubes. Two light emitting diodes (LED) provide greater than 1 mW of electrical power at wavelengths of 490 nm (blue) and 525 nm (green), allowing detection of the dyes FAM and JOE/TAMRA. Results are displayed in real time as bar graphs, and up to three, 4-sample assays can be run on the charge of the 12 V portable battery pack. The HANAA was evaluated for detection of defined Escherichia coli strains, and wild-type colonies isolated from stream water, using PCR for the lac Z and Tir genes. PCR reactions using SYBR Green dye allowed detection of E. coli ATCC 11775 and E. coli O157:H7 cells in under 30 min of assay time; however, background fluorescence associated with dye binding to nonspecific PCR products was present. DNA extracted from three isolates of Bacillus anthracis Ames, linked to a bioterrorism incident in Washington DC in October 2001, were also successfully tested on the HANAA using primers for the vrrA and capA genes. Positive results were observed at 32 and 22 min of assay time, respectively. A TaqMan probe specific to the aroQ gene of Erwinia herbicola was tested on the HANAA and when 500 cells were used as template, positive results were observed after only 7 min of assay time. Background fluorescence associated with the use of the probe was negligible. The HANAA is unique in offering real time PCR in a handheld format suitable for field use; a commercial version of the instrument, offering six reaction chambers, is available as of Fall 2002. PMID:12788554

  5. Targeted PCR for Detection of Vaginal Bacteria Associated with Bacterial Vaginosis▿

    PubMed Central

    Fredricks, David N.; Fiedler, Tina L.; Thomas, Katherine K.; Oakley, Brian B.; Marrazzo, Jeanne M.

    2007-01-01

    Several novel bacterial species have been detected in subjects with bacterial vaginosis (BV) by using broad-range PCR assays, but this approach is insensitive for detecting minority species. We developed a series of taxon-directed 16S rRNA gene PCR assays for more sensitive detection of key vaginal bacteria. We sought to determine the prevalence of each species in the vagina, its association with BV, and the utility of PCR for the microbiological diagnosis of BV. Targeted PCR assays were developed for 17 vaginal bacterial species and applied to 264 vaginal-fluid samples from 81 subjects with and 183 subjects without BV. The results were compared to those of two widely accepted methods for diagnosing BV, the use of clinical findings (Amsel criteria) and the interpretation of vaginal-fluid Gram stains (Nugent criteria). Leptotrichia/Sneathia, Atopobium vaginae, an Eggerthella-like bacterium, Megasphaera species, and three novel bacteria in the order Clostridiales are among the bacterial species significantly associated with BV. PCR detection of either a Megasphaera species or one of the Clostridiales bacteria yielded a sensitivity of 99% and a specificity of 89% for diagnosis of BV compared to the Amsel clinical criteria and a sensitivity of 95.9% and a specificity of 93.7% compared to the Nugent criteria (Gram stain). PCR detection of one or more fastidious bacterial species is a more reliable indicator of BV than detection of bacteria, such as Gardnerella vaginalis, previously linked to BV, highlighting the potential of PCR for the diagnosis of BV. PMID:17687006

  6. Development of an engineered bioluminescent reporter phage for detection of bacterial blight of crucifers.

    PubMed

    Schofield, David A; Bull, Carolee T; Rubio, Isael; Wechter, W Patrick; Westwater, Caroline; Molineux, Ian J

    2012-05-01

    Bacterial blight, caused by the phytopathogen Pseudomonas cannabina pv. alisalensis, is an emerging disease afflicting important members of the Brassicaceae family. The disease is often misdiagnosed as pepper spot, a much less severe disease caused by the related pathogen Pseudomonas syringae pv. maculicola. We have developed a phage-based diagnostic that can both identify and detect the causative agent of bacterial blight and differentiate the two pathogens. A recombinant "light"-tagged reporter phage was generated by integrating bacterial luxAB genes encoding luciferase into the genome of P. cannabina pv. alisalensis phage PBSPCA1. The PBSPCA1::luxAB reporter phage is viable and stable and retains properties similar to those of the wild-type phage. PBSPCA1::luxAB rapidly and sensitively detects P. cannabina pv. alisalensis by conferring a bioluminescent signal response to cultured cells. Detection is dependent on cell viability. Other bacterial pathogens of Brassica species such as P. syringae pv. maculicola, Pseudomonas marginalis, Pectobacterium carotovorum, Xanthomonas campestris pv. campestris, and X. campestris pv. raphani either do not produce a response or produce significantly attenuated signals with the reporter phage. Importantly, the reporter phage detects P. cannabina pv. alisalensis on diseased plant specimens, indicating its potential for disease diagnosis. PMID:22427491

  7. Development of an Engineered Bioluminescent Reporter Phage for Detection of Bacterial Blight of Crucifers

    PubMed Central

    Bull, Carolee T.; Rubio, Isael; Wechter, W. Patrick; Westwater, Caroline; Molineux, Ian J.

    2012-01-01

    Bacterial blight, caused by the phytopathogen Pseudomonas cannabina pv. alisalensis, is an emerging disease afflicting important members of the Brassicaceae family. The disease is often misdiagnosed as pepper spot, a much less severe disease caused by the related pathogen Pseudomonas syringae pv. maculicola. We have developed a phage-based diagnostic that can both identify and detect the causative agent of bacterial blight and differentiate the two pathogens. A recombinant “light”-tagged reporter phage was generated by integrating bacterial luxAB genes encoding luciferase into the genome of P. cannabina pv. alisalensis phage PBSPCA1. The PBSPCA1::luxAB reporter phage is viable and stable and retains properties similar to those of the wild-type phage. PBSPCA1::luxAB rapidly and sensitively detects P. cannabina pv. alisalensis by conferring a bioluminescent signal response to cultured cells. Detection is dependent on cell viability. Other bacterial pathogens of Brassica species such as P. syringae pv. maculicola, Pseudomonas marginalis, Pectobacterium carotovorum, Xanthomonas campestris pv. campestris, and X. campestris pv. raphani either do not produce a response or produce significantly attenuated signals with the reporter phage. Importantly, the reporter phage detects P. cannabina pv. alisalensis on diseased plant specimens, indicating its potential for disease diagnosis. PMID:22427491

  8. [Detection of cell death markers as a tool for bacterial antimicrobial susceptibility testing].

    PubMed

    Mlynárčik, P; Kolář, M

    2016-01-01

    Antimicrobial resistance among nosocomial pathogens has emerged as one of the most important health care problems in the new millennium. In this review, we present new methods for bacterial antimicrobial susceptibility testing, based on the detection of antibiotic-mediated cell death markers that could provide valuable alternatives to existing phenotypic approaches in the very near future. PMID:27467325

  9. Development of a mixed antigen agar gel enzyme assay (AGEA) for the detection of antibodies to poxvirus in chicken and turkey sera.

    PubMed

    Tadese, Theodros; Potter, E A; Reed, W M

    2003-02-01

    A mixed-antigen agar gel enzyme assay (AGEA) was developed to detect antibodies to poxviruses in chicken and turkey sera. The assay combines the principles of immunodiffusion and enzyme assay. For the detection of antibodies to fowl poxvirus (FP), pigeon poxvirus (PP) and turkey poxvirus (TP) in turkey serum samples, the three antigens were combined to form a mixed-antigen assay. To screen for antibodies to FP and PP in chicken serum samples, the two antigens were combined. When FP and PP viruses were combined as antigens, the sensitivity for chicken sera was 64% but the sensitivity of the agar gel precipitation test (AGPT) was 34% (P<0.001). When antibodies were detected in turkey sera using the mixed antigens, the AGEA had a sensitivity of 66.4% while that of AGPT was 25% (P<0.001). PMID:12655123

  10. Detection of IgG antibody against Crimean-Congo haemorrhagic fever virus using ELISA with recombinant nucleoprotein antigens from genetically diverse strains.

    PubMed

    Rangunwala, A; Samudzi, R R; Burt, F J

    2014-10-01

    Crimean-Congo haemorrhagic fever virus (CCHFV) has the propensity to cause nosocomial infections with a high fatality rate. Handling the virus requires biosafety level-4 facilities, limiting accessibility for many laboratories. Advances in molecular techniques have allowed preparation of safe recombinant antigens that have application in diagnosis and serosurveillance of CCHFV. The aim of this study was to determine genetic diversity in CCHFV based on all available complete sequence data for the S gene encoding CCHFV nucleoprotein (NP) and antibody cross-reactivity between the NP of a South African isolate and the NP of a Greek isolate (AP92), the most genetically diverse CCHFV strain. The nucleotide sequence diversity and amino-acid diversity between genotypes, within genotypes and the pairwise distances were calculated for a dataset of 45 CCHFV isolates retrieved from GenBank. The most diverse virus, AP92, isolated from a tick in Greece, displayed the highest amino-acid difference (8·7%) with SPU415/85, isolated from a human infection in South Africa. Recombinant NP encoded for by codon-optimized S genes of SPU415/85 and AP92 were expressed in a bacterial host system and used to develop an in-house ELISA to detect IgG antibody against CCHFV in South African patients who survived infection. A total of 14/14 sera reacted with the South African recombinant NP and 13/14 reacted with the Greek recombinant NP. The serological cross-reactivity of the two NP antigens suggests that recombinant antigens prepared from geographically distinct CCHFV will have diagnostic and epidemiological applications worldwide. PMID:24330947

  11. Accelerator mass spectrometry detection of beryllium ions in the antigen processing and presentation pathway.

    PubMed

    Tooker, Brian C; Brindley, Stephen M; Chiarappa-Zucca, Marina L; Turteltaub, Kenneth W; Newman, Lee S

    2015-01-01

    Exposure to small amounts of beryllium (Be) can result in beryllium sensitization and progression to Chronic Beryllium Disease (CBD). In CBD, beryllium is presented to Be-responsive T-cells by professional antigen-presenting cells (APC). This presentation drives T-cell proliferation and pro-inflammatory cytokine (IL-2, TNFα, and IFNγ) production and leads to granuloma formation. The mechanism by which beryllium enters an APC and is processed to become part of the beryllium antigen complex has not yet been elucidated. Developing techniques for beryllium detection with enough sensitivity has presented a barrier to further investigation. The objective of this study was to demonstrate that Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS) is sensitive enough to quantify the amount of beryllium presented by APC to stimulate Be-responsive T-cells. To achieve this goal, APC - which may or may not stimulate Be-responsive T-cells - were cultured with Be-ferritin. Then, by utilizing AMS, the amount of beryllium processed for presentation was determined. Further, IFNγ intracellular cytokine assays were performed to demonstrate that Be-ferritin (at levels used in the experiments) could stimulate Be-responsive T-cells when presented by an APC of the correct HLA type (HLA-DP0201). The results indicated that Be-responsive T-cells expressed IFNγ only when APC with the correct HLA type were able to process Be for presentation. Utilizing AMS, it was determined that APC with HLA-DP0201 had membrane fractions containing 0.17-0.59 ng Be and APC with HLA-DP0401 had membrane fractions bearing 0.40-0.45 ng Be. However, HLA-DP0401 APC had 20-times more Be associated with the whole cells (57.68-61.12 ng) than HLA-DP0201 APC (0.90-3.49 ng). As these findings demonstrate, AMS detection of picogram levels of Be processed by APC is possible. Further, regardless of form, Be requires processing by APC to successfully stimulate Be-responsive T-cells to generate IFNγ. PMID:24932923

  12. Accelerator mass spectrometry detection of beryllium ions in the antigen processing and presentation pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Tooker, Brian C.; Brindley, Stephen M.; Chiarappa-Zucca, Marina L.; Turteltaub, Kenneth W.; Newman, Lee S.

    2014-06-16

    We report that exposure to small amounts of beryllium (Be) can result in beryllium sensitization and progression to Chronic Beryllium Disease (CBD). In CBD, beryllium is presented to Be-responsive T-cells by professional antigen-presenting cells (APC). This presentation drives T-cell proliferation and pro-inflammatory cytokine (IL-2, TNFα, and IFNγ) production and leads to granuloma formation. The mechanism by which beryllium enters an APC and is processed to become part of the beryllium antigen complex has not yet been elucidated. Developing techniques for beryllium detection with enough sensitivity has presented a barrier to further investigation. The objective of this study was to demonstrate that Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS) is sensitive enough to quantify the amount of beryllium presented by APC to stimulate Be-responsive T-cells. To achieve this goal, APC - which may or may not stimulate Be-responsive T-cells - were cultured with Be-ferritin. Then, by utilizing AMS, the amount of beryllium processed for presentation was determined. Further, IFNγ intracellular cytokine assays were performed to demonstrate that Be-ferritin (at levels used in the experiments) could stimulate Be-responsive T-cells when presented by an APC of the correct HLA type (HLA-DP0201). The results indicated that Be-responsive T-cells expressed IFNγ only when APC with the correct HLA type were able to process Be for presentation. Utilizing AMS, we determined that APC with HLA-DP0201 had membrane fractions containing 0.17-0.59 ng Be and APC with HLA-DP0401 had membrane fractions bearing 0.40-0.45 ng Be. However, HLA-DP0401 APC had 20-times more Be associated with the whole cells (57.68-61.12 ng) then HLA-DP0201 APC (0.90-3.49 ng). As these findings demonstrate, AMS detection of picogram levels of Be processed by APC is possible. Further, regardless of form, Be requires processing by APC to successfully stimulate Be-responsive T-cells to generate IFNγ.

  13. Accelerator Mass Spectrometry Detection of Beryllium Ions in the Antigen Processing and Presentation Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Tooker, Brian C.; Brindley, Stephen M.; Chiarappa-Zucca, Marina L.; Turteltaub, Kenneth W.; Newman, Lee S.

    2015-01-01

    Exposure to small amounts of beryllium (Be) can result in beryllium sensitization and progression to Chronic Beryllium Disease (CBD). In CBD, beryllium is presented to Be-responsive T-cells by professional antigen-presenting cells (APC). This presentation drives T-cell proliferation and pro-inflammatory cytokine (IL-2, TNFα, and IFNγ) production and leads to granuloma formation. The mechanism by which beryllium enters an APC and is processed to become part of the beryllium antigen complex has not yet been elucidated. Developing techniques for beryllium detection with enough sensitivity has presented a barrier to further investigation. The objective of this study was to demonstrate that Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS) is sensitive enough to quantify the amount of beryllium presented by APC to stimulate Be-responsive T-cells. To achieve this goal, APC - which may or may not stimulate Be-responsive T-cells - were cultured with Be-ferritin. Then, by utilizing AMS, the amount of beryllium processed for presentation was determined. Further, IFNγ intracellular cytokine assays were performed to demonstrate that Be-ferritin (at levels used in the experiments) could stimulate Be-responsive T-cells when presented by an APC of the correct HLA type (HLA-DP0201). The results indicated that Be-responsive T-cells expressed IFNγ only when APC with the correct HLA type were able to process Be for presentation. Utilizing AMS, it was determined that APC with HLA-DP0201 had membrane fractions containing 0.17-0.59 ng Be and APC with HLA-DP0401 had membrane fractions bearing 0.40-0.45 ng Be. However, HLA-DP0401 APC had 20-times more Be associated with the whole cells (57.68-61.12 ng) then HLA-DP0201 APC (0.90-3.49 ng). As these findings demonstrate, AMS detection of picogram levels of Be processed by APC is possible. Further, regardless of form, Be requires processing by APC to successfully stimulate Be-responsive T-cells to generate IFNγ. PMID:24932923

  14. Accelerator mass spectrometry detection of beryllium ions in the antigen processing and presentation pathway

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Tooker, Brian C.; Brindley, Stephen M.; Chiarappa-Zucca, Marina L.; Turteltaub, Kenneth W.; Newman, Lee S.

    2014-06-16

    We report that exposure to small amounts of beryllium (Be) can result in beryllium sensitization and progression to Chronic Beryllium Disease (CBD). In CBD, beryllium is presented to Be-responsive T-cells by professional antigen-presenting cells (APC). This presentation drives T-cell proliferation and pro-inflammatory cytokine (IL-2, TNFα, and IFNγ) production and leads to granuloma formation. The mechanism by which beryllium enters an APC and is processed to become part of the beryllium antigen complex has not yet been elucidated. Developing techniques for beryllium detection with enough sensitivity has presented a barrier to further investigation. The objective of this study was to demonstratemore » that Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS) is sensitive enough to quantify the amount of beryllium presented by APC to stimulate Be-responsive T-cells. To achieve this goal, APC - which may or may not stimulate Be-responsive T-cells - were cultured with Be-ferritin. Then, by utilizing AMS, the amount of beryllium processed for presentation was determined. Further, IFNγ intracellular cytokine assays were performed to demonstrate that Be-ferritin (at levels used in the experiments) could stimulate Be-responsive T-cells when presented by an APC of the correct HLA type (HLA-DP0201). The results indicated that Be-responsive T-cells expressed IFNγ only when APC with the correct HLA type were able to process Be for presentation. Utilizing AMS, we determined that APC with HLA-DP0201 had membrane fractions containing 0.17-0.59 ng Be and APC with HLA-DP0401 had membrane fractions bearing 0.40-0.45 ng Be. However, HLA-DP0401 APC had 20-times more Be associated with the whole cells (57.68-61.12 ng) then HLA-DP0201 APC (0.90-3.49 ng). As these findings demonstrate, AMS detection of picogram levels of Be processed by APC is possible. Further, regardless of form, Be requires processing by APC to successfully stimulate Be-responsive T-cells to generate IFNγ.« less

  15. Detection of bacterial contamination in platelet concentrates using flow cytometry and real-time PCR methods.

    PubMed

    Vollmer, Tanja; Kleesiek, Knut; Dreier, Jens

    2013-01-01

    Despite considerable advances in the safety of blood components based on the application of highly sensitive and specific screening methods to minimize the viral infection risk, the prevention of transfusion-associated bacterial infection remains a major challenge in transfusion medicine. In particular, platelet concentrates represent the greatest infectious risk of transfusion-transmitted bacterial sepsis. The detection of bacterial contamination in platelet concentrates has been implemented in several blood services as a routine quality control testing. Although culture is likely to remain the gold standard method of detecting bacterial contamination, the use of rapid methods is likely to increase and play an important role in transfusion medicine in the future. In particular, flow cytometric methods and nucleic acid amplification techniques are powerful tools in bacterial screening assays. Compared to culture-based methods, the combination of high sensitivity and specificity, low contamination risk, ease of performance, and speed has made those technologies appealing alternatives to conventional culture-based testing methods. PMID:23104283

  16. Quantitative detection of the tumor-associated antigen large external antigen in colorectal cancer tissues and cells using quantum dot probe.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shuo; Li, Wanming; Yuan, Dezheng; Song, Jindan; Fang, Jin

    2016-01-01

    The large external antigen (LEA) is a cell surface glycoprotein that has been proven to be highly expressed in colorectal cancer (CRC) as a tumor-associated antigen. To evaluate and validate the relationship between LEA expression and clinical characteristics of CRC with high efficiency, LEA expression levels were detected in 85 tissue blocks from CRC patients by quantum dot-based immunohistochemistry (QD-IHC) combined with imaging quantitative analysis using quantum dots with a 605 nm emission wavelength (QD605) conjugated to an ND-1 monoclonal antibody against LEA as a probe. Conventional IHC was performed in parallel for comparison. Both QD-IHC and conventional IHC showed that LEA was specifically expressed in CRC, but not in non-CRC tissues, and high LEA expression was significantly associated with a more advanced T-stage (P<0.05), indicating that LEA is likely to serve as a CRC prognostic marker. Compared with conventional IHC, receiver operating characteristic analysis revealed that QD-IHC possessed higher sensitivity, resulting in an increased positive detection rate of CRC, from 70.1% to 89.6%. In addition, a simpler operation, objective analysis of results, and excellent repeatability make QD-IHC an attractive alternative to conventional IHC in clinical practice. Furthermore, to explore whether the QD probes can be utilized to quantitatively detect living cells or single cells, quantum dot-based immunocytochemistry (QD-ICC) combined with imaging quantitative analysis was developed to evaluate LEA expression in several CRC cell lines. It was demonstrated that QD-ICC could also predict the correlation between LEA expression and the T-stage characteristics of the cell lines, which was confirmed by flow cytometry. The results of this study indicate that QD-ICC has the potential to noninvasively detect rare circulating tumor cells in clinical samples in real clinical applications. PMID:26834472

  17. Quantitative detection of the tumor-associated antigen large external antigen in colorectal cancer tissues and cells using quantum dot probe

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shuo; Li, Wanming; Yuan, Dezheng; Song, Jindan; Fang, Jin

    2016-01-01

    The large external antigen (LEA) is a cell surface glycoprotein that has been proven to be highly expressed in colorectal cancer (CRC) as a tumor-associated antigen. To evaluate and validate the relationship between LEA expression and clinical characteristics of CRC with high efficiency, LEA expression levels were detected in 85 tissue blocks from CRC patients by quantum dot-based immunohistochemistry (QD-IHC) combined with imaging quantitative analysis using quantum dots with a 605 nm emission wavelength (QD605) conjugated to an ND-1 monoclonal antibody against LEA as a probe. Conventional IHC was performed in parallel for comparison. Both QD-IHC and conventional IHC showed that LEA was specifically expressed in CRC, but not in non-CRC tissues, and high LEA expression was significantly associated with a more advanced T-stage (P<0.05), indicating that LEA is likely to serve as a CRC prognostic marker. Compared with conventional IHC, receiver operating characteristic analysis revealed that QD-IHC possessed higher sensitivity, resulting in an increased positive detection rate of CRC, from 70.1% to 89.6%. In addition, a simpler operation, objective analysis of results, and excellent repeatability make QD-IHC an attractive alternative to conventional IHC in clinical practice. Furthermore, to explore whether the QD probes can be utilized to quantitatively detect living cells or single cells, quantum dot-based immunocytochemistry (QD-ICC) combined with imaging quantitative analysis was developed to evaluate LEA expression in several CRC cell lines. It was demonstrated that QD-ICC could also predict the correlation between LEA expression and the T-stage characteristics of the cell lines, which was confirmed by flow cytometry. The results of this study indicate that QD-ICC has the potential to noninvasively detect rare circulating tumor cells in clinical samples in real clinical applications. PMID:26834472

  18. Detection of Peroxynitrite in Plants Exposed to Bacterial Infection.

    PubMed

    Bellin, Diana; Delledonne, Massimo; Vandelle, Elodie

    2016-01-01

    Peroxynitrite is a highly reactive derivative of nitric oxide (NO) which is gaining attention in the plant biology community because it may play a role in NO signaling during biotic stress. Peroxynitrite can react with many different biomolecules, but its ability to nitrate the tyrosine residues of proteins is particularly important because this may regulate defense signaling in response to pathogens. The analysis of peroxynitrite levels in the context of its proposed defense role requires an accurate and specific detection method. Here, we describe a photometric assay using the fluorescent dye Hong Kong Green 2 as a specific and quantitative probe for peroxynitrite in Arabidopsis thaliana plants challenged with an avirulent strain of Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato. This protocol includes the preparation of plant samples, the assay procedure, the measurement of peroxynitrite-specific fluorescence, and data presentation. PMID:27094421

  19. Nucleic Acid-based Detection of Bacterial Pathogens Using Integrated Microfluidic Platform Systems

    PubMed Central

    Lui, Clarissa; Cady, Nathaniel C.; Batt, Carl A.

    2009-01-01

    The advent of nucleic acid-based pathogen detection methods offers increased sensitivity and specificity over traditional microbiological techniques, driving the development of portable, integrated biosensors. The miniaturization and automation of integrated detection systems presents a significant advantage for rapid, portable field-based testing. In this review, we highlight current developments and directions in nucleic acid-based micro total analysis systems for the detection of bacterial pathogens. Recent progress in the miniaturization of microfluidic processing steps for cell capture, DNA extraction and purification, polymerase chain reaction, and product detection are detailed. Discussions include strategies and challenges for implementation of an integrated portable platform. PMID:22412335

  20. Severe Fever with Thrombocytopenia Syndrome Virus Antigen Detection Using Monoclonal Antibodies to the Nucleocapsid Protein

    PubMed Central

    Fukuma, Aiko; Fukushi, Shuetsu; Yoshikawa, Tomoki; Tani, Hideki; Taniguchi, Satoshi; Kurosu, Takeshi; Egawa, Kazutaka; Suda, Yuto; Singh, Harpal; Nomachi, Taro; Gokuden, Mutsuyo; Ando, Katsuyuki; Kida, Kouji; Kan, Miki; Kato, Nobuyuki; Yoshikawa, Akira; Kitamoto, Hiroaki; Sato, Yuko; Suzuki, Tadaki; Hasegawa, Hideki; Morikawa, Shigeru; Shimojima, Masayuki; Saijo, Masayuki

    2016-01-01

    Background Severe fever with thrombocytopenia syndrome (SFTS) is a tick-borne infectious disease with a high case fatality rate, and is caused by the SFTS virus (SFTSV). SFTS is endemic to China, South Korea, and Japan. The viral RNA level in sera of patients with SFTS is known to be strongly associated with outcomes. Virological SFTS diagnosis with high sensitivity and specificity are required in disease endemic areas. Methodology/Principal Findings We generated novel monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) against the SFTSV nucleocapsid (N) protein and developed a sandwich antigen (Ag)-capture enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) for the detection of N protein of SFTSV using MAb and polyclonal antibody as capture and detection antibodies, respectively. The Ag-capture system was capable of detecting at least 350–1220 TCID50/100 μl/well from the culture supernatants of various SFTSV strains. The efficacy of the Ag-capture ELISA in SFTS diagnosis was evaluated using serum samples collected from patients suspected of having SFTS in Japan. All 24 serum samples (100%) containing high copy numbers of viral RNA (>105 copies/ml) showed a positive reaction in the Ag-capture ELISA, whereas 12 out of 15 serum samples (80%) containing low copy numbers of viral RNA (<105 copies/ml) showed a negative reaction in the Ag-capture ELISA. Among these Ag-capture ELISA-negative 12 samples, 9 (75%) were positive for IgG antibodies against SFTSV. Conclusions The newly developed Ag-capture ELISA is useful for SFTS diagnosis in acute phase patients with high levels of viremia. PMID:27045364

  1. Advances in alloimmune thrombocytopenia: perspectives on current concepts of human platelet antigens, antibody detection strategies, and genotyping

    PubMed Central

    Hayashi, Tomoya; Hirayama, Fumiya

    2015-01-01

    Alloimmunisation to platelets leads to the production of antibodies against platelet antigens and consequently to thrombocytopenia. Numerous molecules located on the platelet surface are antigenic and induce immune-mediated platelet destruction with symptoms that can be serious. Human platelet antigens (HPA) cause thrombocytopenias, such as neonatal alloimmune thrombocytopenia, post-transfusion purpura, and platelet transfusion refractoriness. Thirty-four HPA are classified into 28 systems. Assays to identify HPA and anti-HPA antibodies are critically important for preventing and treating thrombocytopenia caused by anti-HPA antibodies. Significant progress in furthering our understanding of HPA has been made in the last decade: new HPA have been discovered, antibody-detection methods have improved, and new genotyping methods have been developed. We review these advances and discuss issues that remain to be resolved as well as future prospects for preventing and treating immune thrombocytopenia. PMID:26057488

  2. Anti-Taenia solium monoclonal antibodies for the detection of parasite antigens in body fluids from patients with neurocysticercosis.

    PubMed

    Paredes, Adriana; Sáenz, Patricia; Marzal, Miguel W; Orrego, Miguel A; Castillo, Yesenia; Rivera, Andrea; Mahanty, Siddhartha; Guerra-Giraldez, Cristina; García, Hector H; Nash, Theodore E

    2016-07-01

    Neurocysticercosis (NCC), an infection of the brain by Taenia solium (Ts) cysts, is the most common cause of adult-onset epilepsy in developing countries. Serological testing consists primarily of varying methods to detect antibodies in body fluids and more recently antigen (Ag) detection assays to identify individuals or animals with viable parasites. Antigen assays currently in use employ monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) raised against T. saginata, which have known cross reactivity to animal cestodes but are highly specific in human samples. We produced, characterized and tested 21 mAbs raised against T. solium whole cyst antigens, vesicular fluid or excretory secretory products. Reactivity of the TsmAbs against specific cyst structures was determined using immunofluorescence and immunohistochemistry on histological sections of Ts muscle cysts. Four TsmAbs reacted to vesicular space alone, 9 to the neck and cyst wall, one to the neck and vesicular space and 7 to the neck, cyst wall and vesicular space. An in-house ELISA assay to detect circulating Ts antigen, using the TsmAbs as capture antibodies and a rabbit polyclonal anti-Ts whole cyst antibody as a detector antibody demonstrated that eight of the 21 TsmAbs detected antigens in known NCC-positive human sera and three of these also in urine samples. Reactivity was expressed as normalized ratios of optical densities (OD positive control/OD negative control). Three TsmAbs had ratios >10 and five between 2 and 10. The TsmAbs have potential utility for the diagnosis and post-treatment monitoring of patients with viable NCC infections. PMID:27018063

  3. Detection of T- and B-cell Target Antigens of Fowlpox Virus Isolated from Backyard Chickens in India.

    PubMed

    Roy, Bithi; Joardar, Siddhartha N; Samanta, Indranil; Das, Pradip K; Alam, Sk Sahanawaz; Nandi, Sudip

    2015-06-01

    With the aim of assessing the antigenic characteristics of a circulating pool of fowlpox virus (FPV) that exists in the backyard poultry system in India, one of the field isolates generated was characterized by in vitro immunologic techniques. FPV was isolated from clinically positive fowlpox cases (n  =  10) from the Jhargram (West Midnapur district) and Kakdwip (South 24 Pargana district) areas of West Bengal State, India. Initially, FPV-specific PCR was performed for confirmation of the samples. Isolation of FPV was done using embryonated chicken eggs and the choreoallantoic membrane route. Subsequently, FPV antigen was prepared from chicken embryo fibroblast cell culture-adapted field isolate. Biologic transmission of FPV was performed in Rhode Island red chickens experimentally to assess humoral and cell-mediated immune (CMI) responses. High level of anti-FPV antibodies were observed in test birds as assessed by indirect ELISA. Seroreactive polypeptides (B-cell antigens) of FPV antigen with molecular weights of 44.5, 66.5, 75, 90.5, and 99 kDa were detected by western blot analysis. Significant increases in CMI responses were observed in inoculated chickens as assessed by lymphocyte proliferation assay, cytotoxicity assay, and T-cell immunoblotting. The predominant T-cell antigen of FPV detected had a molecular weight of 66.5 kDa. The present study revealed the antigenic characteristics of FPV that exists in backyard poultry system in West Bengal for the first time, thus exploring the rationality of designing future T- and B-cell vaccines against fowlpox. PMID:26473675

  4. Detection of Group A Streptococcus from Pharyngeal Swab Samples by Bacterial Culture Is Challenged by a Novel mariPOC Point-of-Care Test

    PubMed Central

    Koskinen, Janne O.; Brandt, Annika; Muotiala, Anna; Liukko, Viivi; Soittu, Sari; Meriluoto, Siiri; Vesalainen, Marika; Huovinen, Pentti; Irjala, Kerttu

    2015-01-01

    mariPOC is a novel point-of-care test system for rapid detection of respiratory tract infections. We compared the performance of the mariPOC test to that of bacterial culture for detecting group A streptococcus (GAS) in 219 pharyngitis patients (ages 1–64 years) and 109 healthy asymptomatic controls (ages 19–69 years). In addition, 42 patient samples were analyzed by quantitative PCR (qPCR). Of the 219 pharyngeal patient samples, 32 were positive in a GAS bacterial culture (prevalence 15%) and 65 (30%) in the mariPOC test. The amount of GAS in samples reported positive by the mariPOC test and negative by culture was, on average, 10-fold less than that of those positive in both methods. This indicated that the negative results in bacterial cultures were due to lower sensitivity. The qPCR results were positive and in line with the mariPOC results in 43% of the discordant samples studied. Two GAS culture-positive samples were negative by the mariPOC test. The prevalences of GAS in the control subjects were 2% and 6% by culture and mariPOC results, respectively. We conclude that the mariPOC antigen detection test is more sensitive than the conventional bacterial culture for the detection of GAS among symptomatic pharyngitis patients. The higher prevalence of GAS by the mariPOC test among symptomatic patients was probably not due to carriership, since among the control patients, the difference in the prevalence of GAS by the mariPOC test and culture was not nearly as high, 15% versus 4%, respectively. Clinical trials are needed to show the clinical importance of our findings. PMID:25903570

  5. A novel label-free microfluidic paper-based immunosensor for highly sensitive electrochemical detection of carcinoembryonic antigen.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yang; Xu, Huiren; Luo, Jinping; Liu, Juntao; Wang, Li; Fan, Yan; Yan, Shi; Yang, Yue; Cai, Xinxia

    2016-09-15

    In this work, a highly sensitive label-free paper-based electrochemical immunosensor employing screen-printed working electrode (SPWE) for detection of carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) was fabricated. In order to raise the detection sensitivity and immobilize anti-CEA, amino functional graphene (NH2-G)/thionine (Thi)/gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) nanocomposites were synthesized and coated on SPWE. The principle of the immunosensor determination was based on the fact that the decreased response currents of Thi were proportional to the concentrations of corresponding antigens due to the formation of antibody-antigen immunocomplex. Experimental results revealed that the immunoassay enabled the determination of standard CEA solutions with linear working ranges of 50pgmL(-1) to 500ngmL(-1), the limit of detections for CEA is 10pgmL(-1) (S/N=3) and its corresponding correlation coefficients were 0.996. Furthermore, the proposed immunosensor could be used for the determination of clinical serum samples. A large number of clinical serum samples were detected and the relative errors between measured values and reference concentrations were calculated. Results showed that this novel paper-based electrochemical immunosensor could provide a new platform for low cost, sensitive, specific, and point-of-care diagnosis in cancer detection. PMID:27132007

  6. Serological detection of circulating Angiostrongylus vasorum antigen and specific antibodies in dogs from central and northern Italy.

    PubMed

    Guardone, L; Schnyder, M; Macchioni, F; Deplazes, P; Magi, M

    2013-02-18

    The most frequently employed method for the diagnosis of Angiostrongylus vasorum in dogs is the detection of first stage larvae (L1) in faeces. The sensitivity of coproscopy, however, is limited in case of low parasite load, intermittent larval excretion, and during pre-patency. An epidemiological survey on dogs was conducted applying serological methods in two Italian regions where angiostrongylosis is endemic in foxes. 265 dog serum samples from Tuscany (central Italy - site A) and 447 from Liguria (north-western Italy - site B) were tested with a sandwich-ELISA for detection of circulating antigen, and with an ELISA using A. vasorum adult somatic antigen purified by monoclonal antibodies for specific antibody detection. During previous examinations dogs naturally infected with Leishmania infantum (n=149), Dirofilaria immitis (n=40), Dirofilaria repens (n=30), Acanthocheilonema reconditum (n=27), Crenosoma vulpis (n=1), A. vasorum (n=2), Capillaria aerophila (n=35), Capillaria boehmi (n=3), Toxocara canis (n=68), Toxascaris leonina (n=5), hookworms (n=37) and Trichuris vulpis (n=39) were detected. Sera of these dogs were used to evaluate cross reactions. In site A, 2 dogs (0.8%) were seropositive for antibody and antigen detection and 4 (1.5%) for antibody detection only. From site B, 4 dogs (0.9%) were seropositive for both tests, while other 4 dogs (0.9%) for antigen detection only and 9 dogs (2%) for antibody detection only. Considering a subgroup of 347 dogs from site B which had also been tested with the Baermann technique, 2 (0.6%) were positive for both tests, 4 (1.2%) for antigen detection only and 9 (2.6%) for antibody detection only. The two dogs which were positive for both serological tests were also positive for A. vasorum L1 in the faeces. No significant difference in seropositivities was observed in the group of dogs with other proven parasitic infections. A. vasorum serology presents significant advantages (diagnosis before patency, single serum

  7. Recurrent acute hemolytic transfusion reactions by antibodies against Doa antigens, not detected by cross-matching.

    PubMed

    Baumgarten, Ruben; van Gelder, Warry; van Wintershoven, Joyce; Maaskant-Van Wijk, Petra A; Beckers, Erik A M

    2006-02-01

    An 81-year-old male patient suffered from recurrent acute hemolytic transfusion reactions after transfusion with phenotyped cross-match-negative red blood cells (RBCs). Extensive posttransfusion workup eventually revealed Dombrock (a) (Do(a)) antibodies. Because commercially available cell panels do not allow for identification of anti-Do(a) and owing to the lack of Do(a) typing serum samples, selection of matched units of RBCs is dependent on negative cross-match results. In this case, selection of Do(a-) units by cross-matching failed, indicating that serologic methods were not reliable. A polymerase chain reaction with sequence-specific priming assay was used to detect DOA and DOB alleles, which encode Do(a) and Do(b) antigens, respectively. The patient was confirmed to be DOB/DOB by DNA sequencing. Furthermore, the involved mismatched units in each of the three hemolytic episodes were shown to be Do(a+). In the presenting case, DNA typing appeared to be superior to serologic methods in selecting matched RBC units in the presence of anti-Do(a). PMID:16441602

  8. Immunoblot assays using recombinant antigens for the detection of Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae antibodies.

    PubMed

    Subramaniam, S; Frey, J; Huang, B; Djordjevic, S; Kwang, J

    2000-07-01

    The 36kDa L-lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) and a 29kDa partial fragment of an ABC transporter ATP-binding protein analogue/multidrug resistance protein homologue (PR2) of Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae were tested for their potential as diagnostic antigens. Recombinant LDH was genetically engineered to contain six histidine residues at its C-terminal end, expressed in Escherichia coli and purified to a high degree using Ni(2+)-chelate affinity chromatography. A partial 262 amino acid segment representing the C-terminal end of the PR2 protein was cloned as a glutathione S-transferase (GST) fusion protein, expressed in E. coli and purified by urea extraction. Purified recombinant LDH-6xHis and PR2-GST were then reacted with pig sera in immunoblot assays. Our immunoblots showed that both proteins detected anti-M. hyopneumoniae antibodies in field and experimentally infected pig sera but not in any of the SPF control sera. The two proteins were specific for M. hyopneumoniae as they did not react with sera of pigs infected with the closely related Mycoplasma flocculare and Mycoplasma hyorhinis which are frequently isolated in pigs but are not of particular concern. PMID:10865156

  9. Transient Elastography with Serum Hepatitis B Surface Antigen Enhances Liver Fibrosis Detection

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Tianyi; Si, Jia; Hao, Meina; Li, Cheng; Liu, Xia; Li, Jie; Ma, Anlin

    2016-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to explore transient elastography (TE) with quantitative hepatitis B surface antigen (qHBsAg) for detecting advanced hepatic fibrosis. Material/Methods This was a single-center prospective real-life analysis of 111 treatment-naïve chronic hepatitis B (CHB) patients enrolled into the Establishment of Non-invasive Diagnosis Criteria and Model of Hepatitis B Virus-related Cirrhosis Study. Results There were significant correlations between TE, qHBsAg, and fibrosis. Both qHBsAg and TE were identified as independent predictors for advanced fibrosis. In receiver operating characteristic curve (ROC) analysis, TEqHBsAg (combination of TE and qHBsAg) resulted in the highest area under the receiver-operator curve (AUC) (0.912), mainly due to increased specificity. Using the optimal cut-off, TEqHBsAg provided a sensitivity of 86.7%, and increased specificity from 78.7% to 85.1%. Conclusions Combining TE with qHBsAg enhances specificity in identifying advanced fibrosis in treatment-naïve CHB patients. PMID:27526179

  10. Detection of immunoglobulins M and G using culture filtrate antigen of Burkholderia pseudomallei.

    PubMed

    Chenthamarakshan, V; Vadivelu, J; Puthucheary, S D

    2001-01-01

    IgM and IgG based ELISA systems were developed using the culture filtrate antigen (CFA) of Burkholderia pseudomallei. The assays were evaluated using 95 sera from 66 septicemic cases and 47 sera from 20 cases with localized melioidosis. In addition 65 sera from culture negative cases that were also serologically negative for other endemic infections clinically suspected of melioidosis were included. These were compared with sera from 260 non-melioidosis cases, 169 sera from individuals with high risk of acquiring the infection and 48 sera from healthy controls. The IgG-ELISA was 96% sensitive and 94% specific. All sera from cases with septicemic and localized infections and 61 of 63 sera from clinically suspected melioidosis cases were positive for IgG antibody. The geometric mean titre index (GMTI) values of IgG antibody in melioidosis cases were significantly higher (p < 0.0005) compared to that of healthy subjects, high risk group and subjects with non-melioidosis infections. The sensitivity and specificity of IgM ELISA was 74 and 99% respectively. The GMTI value of IgM antibody in the sera of melioidosis cases was significantly higher as compared to that of non-melioidosis disease controls (p < or = 0.001). These results demonstrate that the detection of IgG is a better indicator of the disease in the diagnosis of melioidosis. PMID:11173184

  11. Mass spectrometric detection of the amino acid sequence polymorphism of the hepatitis C virus antigen.

    PubMed

    Kaysheva, A L; Ivanov, Yu D; Frantsuzov, P A; Krohin, N V; Pavlova, T I; Uchaikin, V F; Konev, V А; Kovalev, O B; Ziborov, V S; Archakov, A I

    2016-03-01

    A method for detection and identification of the hepatitis C virus antigen (HCVcoreAg) in human serum with consideration for possible amino acid substitutions is proposed. The method is based on a combination of biospecific capturing and concentrating of the target protein on the surface of the chip for atomic force microscope (AFM chip) with subsequent protein identification by tandem mass spectrometric (MS/MS) analysis. Biospecific AFM-capturing of viral particles containing HCVcoreAg from serum samples was performed by use of AFM chips with monoclonal antibodies (anti-HCVcore) covalently immobilized on the surface. Biospecific complexes were registered and counted by AFM. Further MS/MS analysis allowed to reliably identify the HCVcoreAg in the complexes formed on the AFM chip surface. Analysis of MS/MS spectra, with the account taken of the possible polymorphisms in the amino acid sequence of the HCVcoreAg, enabled us to increase the number of identified peptides. PMID:26773170

  12. Detecting antibody-antigen reaction using nano ripple gold LSPR based biosensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saleem, Iram; Wijesundera, Dharshana; Tilakaratne, Buddhi; Widger, William; Chu, Wei-Kan

    We introduce a simple and cost-effective scheme for bio-sensing using nano-ripple structures. One-dimension metallic nano-ripple structures formed by gas cluster ion beam irradiation have shown polarization of light as well as the localized surface plasmon resonance. These localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) based bio sensors not only are capable of label free real time analytical detection but also show high sensitivity. The nano surface morphology determines the changes in the plasmonic properties of nanostructures hence the plasmonic response is tunable. By immobilizing a stable and sterically accessible monolayer of antibody on the surface of these substrates and loading different concentrations of the specific antigen we identified the shift in the LSPR peaks triggered by the change of dielectric function in the neighborhood of the structures. These plasmonic nano-metallic structures can be utilized to observe the shift in the LSPR resonance frequency due to the cycle of adsorption, re-adsorption and reactions taking place on the surface that can potentially be mapped in to reaction mechanics. The bio-sensor has monolayer molecule-coating sensitivity and specific selectivity.

  13. Aptamer-MIP hybrid receptor for highly sensitive electrochemical detection of prostate specific antigen.

    PubMed

    Jolly, Pawan; Tamboli, Vibha; Harniman, Robert L; Estrela, Pedro; Allender, Chris J; Bowen, Jenna L

    2016-01-15

    This study reports the design and evaluation of a new synthetic receptor sensor based on the amalgamation of biomolecular recognition elements and molecular imprinting to overcome some of the challenges faced by conventional protein imprinting. A thiolated DNA aptamer with established affinity for prostate specific antigen (PSA) was complexed with PSA prior to being immobilised on the surface of a gold electrode. Controlled electropolymerisation of dopamine around the complex served to both entrap the complex, holding the aptamer in, or near to, it's binding conformation, and to localise the PSA binding sites at the sensor surface. Following removal of PSA, it was proposed that the molecularly imprinted polymer (MIP) cavity would act synergistically with the embedded aptamer to form a hybrid receptor (apta-MIP), displaying recognition properties superior to that of aptamer alone. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) was used to evaluate subsequent rebinding of PSA to the apta-MIP surface. The apta-MIP sensor showed high sensitivity with a linear response from 100pg/ml to 100ng/ml of PSA and a limit of detection of 1pg/ml, which was three-fold higher than aptamer alone sensor for PSA. Furthermore, the sensor demonstrated low cross-reactivity with a homologous protein (human Kallikrein 2) and low response to human serum albumin (HSA), suggesting possible resilience to the non-specific binding of serum proteins. PMID:26318788

  14. Standoff detection of explosives and buried landmines using fluorescent bacterial sensor cells.

    PubMed

    Kabessa, Yossef; Eyal, Ori; Bar-On, Ofer; Korouma, Victor; Yagur-Kroll, Sharon; Belkin, Shimshon; Agranat, Aharon J

    2016-05-15

    A standoff detection scheme for buried landmines and concealed explosive charges is presented. The detection procedure consists of the following: Live bacterial sensor strains, genetically engineered to produce a dose-dependent amount of green fluorescent protein (GFP) in the presence of explosives' vapors, are encapsulated and spread on the suspected area. The fluorescence produced by the bacteria in response to traces of the explosive material in their microenvironment is remotely detected by a phase-locked optoelectronic sampling system. This scheme enables fast direct access to a large minefield area, while obviating the need to endanger personnel and equipment. Moreover, the employment of phase locking detection efficiently isolates the bacterial sensors' fluorescent output from the background optical signals. This facilitates the application of bacterial sensors in an outdoor environment, where control of background illumination is not possible. Using this system, we demonstrate standoff detection of 2,4-DNT both in aqueous solution and when buried in soil, by sensor bacteria either in liquid culture or agar-immobilized, respectively, at a distance of 50 m in a realistic optically noisy environment. PMID:26774094

  15. Evaluation of NS1 Antigen Detection for Early Diagnosis of Dengue in a Tertiary Hospital in Southern India

    PubMed Central

    Anand, Ashwini Manoor; Dhodapkar, Rahul; Hamide, Abdoul; Biswal, Niranjan; Srinivasan, Badrinath

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Dengue is a mosquito-borne disease affecting mainly tropical and subtropical regions of the world. The early diagnosis of dengue is required for identifying an epidemic and also for implementing effective vector control measures. Aim To evaluate NS1 antigen assay as an alternative to RT-PCR for the early diagnosis of Dengue. Materials and Methods A comparative study was conducted to evaluate NS1 antigen assay in clinically suspected dengue cases admitted to JIPMER hospital from January to November 2011. Serum samples were tested for NS1 antigen, IgM and IgG antibodies by ELISA and RT-PCR. Results Out of total 112 clinically suspected dengue, 94 were laboratory-confirmed dengue cases (positive by one or more of the following tests - IgM ELISA, NS1 antigen ELISA and RT-PCR). NS1 was detectable from day 1 to day 12 of fever. The positive detection rate of NS1 antigen ELISA, RT-PCR and IgM ELISA were 80.9%, 68.1% and 47.9% respectively. NS1 antigen ELISA was evaluated using RT-PCR as the reference standard and showed a sensitivity of 96.8%, specificity of 53.3%, positive predictive value of 81.6% and negative predictive value of 88.9% with a likelihood ratio of 2.1 by Fisher’s-exact test. The combination of NS1 and IgM had the highest sensitivity of 97.8%. DEN-3 was the serotype identified by RT-PCR for 24 randomly selected samples. NS1 antigen detection had the highest sensitivity in the early stages while IgM detection was more sensitive in the later half of the illness. Conclusion Both NS1 and RT-PCR are useful for early dengue diagnosis, although in terms of cost, ease of performance and rapidity, NS1 is superior to RT-PCR. NS1 in combination with IgM assay offers the most sensitive and cost-effective diagnostic modality for dengue. PMID:27190798

  16. Antigen detection and apoptosis in Mongolian gerbil's kidney experimentally intraperitoneally infected by swine hepatitis E virus.

    PubMed

    Soomro, Majid Hussain; Shi, Ruihan; She, Ruiping; Yang, Yifei; Hu, Fengjiao; Li, Heng

    2016-02-01

    We examined the effect of hepatitis E virus (HEV) on the renal tissue pathogenesis, morphological damages and related molecular mechanisms following swine HEV suspension intraperitoneally inoculation in Mongolian gerbils. The microscopic and ultramicroscopic analyses of kidney tissue structure were carried out at different points after inoculation of HEV. The immunohistochemistry, real-time PCR and Western blot were performed to explore the molecular mechanisms associated with HEV presence in the renal tissues. Real-time PCR revealed that the copies of HEV RNA in the kidney were detected at 7 dpi, and peaked at 14 dpi at a concentration was 7.18 logs g(-1), with detection of HEV ORF2 antigen by immunohistochemistry. Hematoxylin and eosin (HE) staining showed pathological lesions including glomerular atrophy, degeneration, edema and necrosis of renal tubular epithelial cells and Mallory and Sirius red staining indicated the presence of collagen fibers and fibrosis in kidney tissues of inoculated gerbils. Ultrastructural studies of basal membrane of renal tubules demonstrated the rough and uneven with mitochondria swelling and vacuolation in the tissues of HEV inoculated animals. Similarly, significantly higher number of (TUNEL)-positive cells were seen in renal tubule tissues compared to control group. Moreover, immuno histochemical results indicated that significant increase expression of the B-cell lymphoma 2 (Bcl-2), Bcl-2 associated X protein (Bax), FAS and Caspase-3 in HEV inoculated Mongolian gerbils at each time points. Relative mRNA expression by real-time PCR revealed a significantly higher (P<0.05) mRNA level of BAX, Bcl-2 and caspase-3 transcription in HEV inoculated Mongolian gerbils. Our results demonstrates that activation of mitochondria and Caspase-3 protease might be induced the apoptosis which subsequently cause the necrosis and cell death of renal epithelial cells during acute phase of HEV infection in HEV inoculated Mongolian gerbils. PMID

  17. Accuracy of faecal occult blood test and Helicobacter pylori stool antigen test for detection of upper gastrointestinal lesions

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Yi-Chia; Chiu, Han-Mo; Chiang, Tsung-Hsien; Yen, Amy Ming-Fang; Chiu, Sherry Yueh-Hsia; Chen, Sam Li-Sheng; Fann, Jean Ching-Yuan; Yeh, Yen-Po; Liao, Chao-Sheng; Hu, Tsung-Hui; Tu, Chia-Hung; Tseng, Ping-Huei; Chen, Chien-Chuan; Chen, Mei-Jyh; Liou, Jyh-Ming; Liao, Wei-Chih; Lai, Yo-Ping; Wang, Chen-Ping; Ko, Jenq-Yuh; Wang, Hsiu-Po; Chiang, Hung; Lin, Jaw-Town; Chen, Hsiu-Hsi; Wu, Ming-Shiang

    2013-01-01

    Objective Highly sensitive guaiac-based faecal occult blood (Hemoccult SENSA) and Helicobacter pylori stool antigen testing might help detect upper gastrointestinal lesions when appended to a colorectal cancer screening programme with faecal immunochemical testing. We evaluated the diagnostic accuracies of two stool tests in detecting upper gastrointestinal lesions. Design Cross-sectional design. Setting Hospital-based and community-based screening settings. Participants A hospital-based deviation cohort of 3172 participants to evaluate test performance and a community-based validation cohort of 3621 to verify the findings. Interventions Three types of stool tests with bidirectional endoscopy as the reference standard. Outcomes Sensitivity, specificity and positive and negative likelihood ratios. Results For detecting upper gastrointestinal lesions in cases with negative immunochemical tests, the sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative likelihood ratios of the guaiac-based and H pylori antigen tests were 16.3% (95% CI 13.3% to 19.8%), 90.1% (88.9% to 91.2%), 1.64 (1.31 to 2.07), and 0.93 (0.89 to 0.97), respectively, and 52.5% (48.1% to 56.9%), 80.6% (79.0% to 82.1%), 2.71 (2.41 to 3.04) and 0.59 (0.54 to 0.65), respectively. For detecting upper gastrointestinal lesions in cases with normal colonoscopy, the results of the guaiac-based and H pylori antigen tests were 17.9% (14.8% to 21.5%), 90.1% (88.9% to 91.2%), 1.81 (1.45 to 2.26) and 0.91 (0.87 to 0.95), respectively, and 53.1% (48.6% to 57.4%), 80.7% (79.1% to 82.2%), 2.75 (2.45 to 3.08) and 0.58 (0.53 to 0.64), respectively. Within the community, positive predictive values of the immunochemical and H pylori antigen tests were 36.0% (26.0% to 46.0%) and 31.9% (28.3% to 35.5%), respectively, for detecting lower and upper gastrointestinal lesions, which were similar to expected values. Conclusions The H pylori stool antigen test is more accurate than the guaiac-based test in the screening of upper

  18. Two types of nanoparticle-based bio-barcode amplification assays to detect HIV-1 p24 antigen

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background HIV-1 p24 antigen is a major viral component of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) which can be used to identify persons in the early stage of infection and transmission of HIV-1 from infected mothers to infants. The detection of p24 is usually accomplished by using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) with low detection sensitivity. Here we report the use of two bio-barcode amplification (BCA) assays combined with polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and gel electrophoresis to quantify HIV-1 p24 antigen. Method A pair of anti-p24 monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) were used in BCA assays to capture HIV-1 p24 antigen in a sandwich format and allowed for the quantitative measurement of captured p24 using PCR and gel electrophoresis. The first 1 G12 mAb was coated on microplate wells or magnetic microparticles (MMPs) to capture free p24 antigens. Captured p24 in turn captured 1D4 mAb coated gold nanoparticle probes (GNPs) containing double-stranded DNA oligonucleotides. One strand of the oligonucleotides was covalently immobilized whereas the unbound complimentary bio-barcode DNA strand could be released upon heating. The released bio-barcode DNA was amplified by PCR, electrophoresed in agarose gel and quantified. Results The in-house ELISA assay was found to quantify p24 antigen with a limit of detection (LOD) of 1,000 pg/ml and a linear range between 3,000 and 100,000 pg/ml. In contrast, the BCA-based microplate method yielded an LOD of 1 pg/ml and a linear detection range from 1 to 10,000 pg/ml. The BCA-based MMP method yielded an LOD of 0.1 pg/ml and a linear detection range from 0.1 to 1,000 pg/ml. Conclusions When combined with PCR and simple gel electrophoresis, BCA-based microplate and MMPs assays can be used to quantify HIV-1 p24 antigen. These methods are 3–4 orders of magnitude more sensitive than our in-house ELISA-based assay and may provide a useful approach to detect p24 in patients newly infected with HIV. PMID

  19. Immunoenzymatic detection of three kinds of 43,000-molecular-weight antigens by monoclonal antibodies in the insoluble fraction of Toxoplasma gondii.

    PubMed Central

    Ogata, K; Kasahara, T; Shioiri-Nakano, K; Igarashi, I; Suzuki, M

    1984-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies (TpM 3, TpM 6, and TpM 19) against Toxoplasma gondii insoluble antigens were produced by the hybridization of NS-1, a mouse myeloma cell line, with spleen cells from mice immunized with T. gondii insoluble antigens. TpM 3, TpM 6, and TpM 19 were characterized by the dye test, the latex agglutination test, two types of enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays, using either T. gondii supernatant antigens or T. gondii insoluble antigens, and immunoperoxidase staining. TpM 3, TpM 6, and TpM 19 antigens were analyzed by the immunoblotting method, using sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and electrophoretic transfer of the antigens to nitrocellulose sheets. TpM 3, TpM 6, and TpM 19 were all negative by the dye test, the latex agglutination test, and the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, using T. gondii supernatant antigens but positive by the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, using T. gondii insoluble antigens. Each antibody gave unique spot patterns in the cytoplasm of tachyzoites, and each detected antigens of ca. 43,000 molecular weight with different electrophoretic patterns. Purified TpM 3 antigen bound only to TpM 3 but not to TpM 6 or TpM 19. Comparable results were obtained with TpM 6 and TpM 19 antigens. Rabbit anti-T. gondii sera reacted with both TpM 3 and TpM 19 antigens. However, human anti-T. gondii sera reacted only with TpM 3 antigen. These results indicate that T. gondii insoluble antigens contained at least three types of 43,000-molecular-weight antigens that have been revealed for the first time in this paper. Images PMID:6698600

  20. Detection of infectious bursal disease virus isolates with unknown antigenic properties by reverse genetics.

    PubMed

    Icard, Alan H; Sellers, Holly S; Mundt, Egbert

    2008-12-01

    Infectious bursal disease virus (IBDV) serotype 1 is the causative agent of a highly contagious immunosuppressive disease of young chickens. In the past, a number of antigenic, as well as pathogenic, subtypes have been described. The determination of the antigenic makeup of circulating strains is of vital interest to the poultry industry because changes in the antigenicity of circulating field strains have an impact on the use of vaccines. To obtain a more comprehensive overview of the relationship between the nucleotide and amino acid sequence and the antigenic makeup of field isolates, a system based on reverse genetics of IBDV was established. Using this approach, a database for field isolates from three different states in the United States (Georgia, Alabama, and Louisiana), consisting of nucleotide sequence, amino acid sequence, and a reaction pattern based on a panel of monoclonal antibodies, was established. The obtained results showed that phylogenic analysis, which is based on the similarity of sequences, would lead to false conclusions regarding a possible antigenic makeup of the particular isolate. Sequences of field samples were divided into three groups: 1) those that grouped with variant strain E/Del sequences but were antigenically different, 2) those that did not group with sequences of E/Del but were similar in their antigenic makeup, and 3) those that did not group with E/Del sequences and were antigenically different. In addition, using the reverse-genetics approach, a number of field isolates showed no reactivity with any of the used monoclonal antibodies, indicating that an unknown, antigenic subtype of IBDV serotype 1 is circulating in the field. PMID:19166049

  1. Noninvasive forward-scattering system for rapid detection, characterization, and identification of bacterial colonies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajwa, Bartek; Bayraktar, Bulent; Banada, Padmapriya P.; Huff, Karleigh; Bae, Euiwon; Hirleman, E. Daniel; Bhunia, Arun K.; Robinson, J. Paul

    2007-04-01

    Bacterial contamination of food products puts the public at risk and also generates a substantial cost for the food-processing industry. One of the greatest challenges in the response to these incidents is rapid recognition of the bacterial agents involved. Only a few currently available technologies allow testing to be performed outside of specialized microbiological laboratories. Most current systems are based on the use of expensive PCR or antibody-based techniques, and require complicated sample preparation for reliable results. Herein, we report our efforts to develop a noninvasive optical forward-scattering system for rapid, automated identification of bacterial colonies grown on solid surfaces. The presented system employs computer-vision and pattern-recognition techniques to classify scatter patterns produced by bacterial colonies irradiated with laser light. Application of Zernike and Chebyshev moments, as well as Haralick texture descriptors for image feature extraction, allows for a very high recognition rate. An SVM algorithm was used for classification of patterns. Low error rates determined by cross-validation, reproducibility of the measurements, and robustness of the system prove that the proposed technology can be implemented in automated devices for bacterial detection.

  2. Engulfment of Neisseria gonorrhoeae: revealing distinct processes of bacterial entry by individual carcinoembryonic antigen-related cellular adhesion molecule family receptors.

    PubMed

    McCaw, Shannon E; Liao, Edward H; Gray-Owen, Scott D

    2004-05-01

    Individual Neisseria gonorrhoeae colony opacity-associated (Opa) protein variants can bind up to four different carcinoembryonic antigen-related cellular adhesion molecule (CEACAM) receptors. Most human cells encountered by gonococci express a combination of CEACAM receptors, thereby complicating the elucidation of intracellular signaling pathways triggered by individual receptors. Here, we compare the process of bacterial engulfment by a panel of stably transfected HeLa epithelial cell lines expressing each CEACAM receptor in isolation. CEACAM1 and CEACAM3 each contain proteinaceous transmembrane and cytoplasmic domains; however, the processes of neisserial uptake mediated by these receptors differ with respect to their susceptibilities to both tyrosine kinase inhibitors and the actin microfilament-disrupting agent cytochalasin D. Neisserial uptake mediated by glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchored CEACAM5 and CEACAM6 was not significantly affected by any of a broad spectrum of inhibitors tested. However, cleavage of the GPI anchor by phosphatidylinositol-specific phospholipase C reduced bacterial uptake by HeLa cells expressing CEACAM5, consistent with a single zipper-like mechanism of uptake mediated by this receptor. Regardless of the CEACAM receptor expressed, internalized gonococci were effectively killed by a microtubule-dependent process that required acidification of the bacterium-containing phagosome. Given the phase-variable nature of neisserial Opa proteins, these results indicate that the mechanism of bacterial engulfment and the cellular response to gonococcal infection depend on both the receptor specificities of the neisserial Opa protein variants expressed and the spectrum of CEACAM receptors present on target cells, each of which determines the combination of receptors ultimately engaged. PMID:15102784

  3. Generation of novel bacterial regulatory proteins that detect priority pollutant phenols

    SciTech Connect

    Wise, A.A.; Kuske, C.R.

    2000-01-01

    The genetic systems of bacteria that have the ability to use organic pollutants as carbon and energy sources can be adapted to create bacterial biosensors for the detection of industrial pollution. The creation of bacterial biosensors is hampered by a lack of information about the genetic systems that control production of bacterial enzymes that metabolize pollutants. The authors have attempted to overcome this problem through modification of DmpR, a regulatory protein for the phenol degradation pathway of Pseudomonas sp. strain CF600. The phenol detection capacity of DmpR was altered by using mutagenic PCR targeted to the DmpR sensor domain. DmpR mutants were identified that both increased sensitivity to the phenolic effectors of wild-type DmpR and increased the range of molecules detected. The phenol detection characteristics of seven DmpR mutants were demonstrated through their ability to activate transcription of a lacZ reporter gene. Effectors of the DmpR derivatives included phenol, 2-chlorophenol, 2,4-dichlorophenol, 4-chloro-3-methylphenol, 2,4-dimethylphenol, 2-nitrophenol, and 4-nitrophenol.

  4. Electrochemical Biosensor for Rapid and Sensitive Detection of Magnetically Extracted Bacterial Pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Setterington, Emma B.; Alocilja, Evangelyn C.

    2012-01-01

    Biological defense and security applications demand rapid, sensitive detection of bacterial pathogens. This work presents a novel qualitative electrochemical detection technique which is applied to two representative bacterial pathogens, Bacillus cereus (as a surrogate for B. anthracis) and Escherichia coli O157:H7, resulting in detection limits of 40 CFU/mL and 6 CFU/mL, respectively, from pure culture. Cyclic voltammetry is combined with immunomagnetic separation in a rapid method requiring approximately 1 h for presumptive positive/negative results. An immunofunctionalized magnetic/polyaniline core/shell nano-particle (c/sNP) is employed to extract target cells from the sample solution and magnetically position them on a screen-printed carbon electrode (SPCE) sensor. The presence of target cells significantly inhibits current flow between the electrically active c/sNPs and SPCE. This method has the potential to be adapted for a wide variety of target organisms and sample matrices, and to become a fully portable system for routine monitoring or emergency detection of bacterial pathogens. PMID:25585629

  5. Measurement of serum carcinoembryonic antigen, carbohydrate antigen 19-9, cytokeratin-19 fragment and matrix metalloproteinase-7 for detecting cholangiocarcinoma: a preliminary case-control study.

    PubMed

    Lumachi, Franco; Lo Re, Giovanni; Tozzoli, Renato; D'Aurizio, Federica; Facomer, Flavio; Chiara, Giordano B; Basso, Stefano M M

    2014-11-01

    Cholangiocarcinoma is a malignant tumor of the liver arising from the bile duct epithelium, accounting for 10-25% of all primary hepatic cancers. The clinical presentation of this tumor is not specific and the diagnosis of early cholangiocarcinoma is difficult, especially in patients with other biliary diseases. Measurement of serum carbohydrate antigen (CA) 19-9 and carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) are commonly used to monitor response to therapy, but are also useful for confirming the presence of a cholangiocarcinoma. In this setting, other biomarkers have been previously tested, including cytokeratin-19 fragment (CYFRA 21-1) and the matrix metalloproteinase-7 (MMP7). The purpose of this retrospective study was to determine the clinical usefulness of the assay of serum CEA, CA 19-9, CYFRA 21-1 and MMP7, individually and together, as tumor markers for the diagnosis of cholangiocarcinoma. Twenty-four patients (14 men, 10 women, 62.6±8.2 years of age) with histologically-confirmed cholangiocarcinoma (cases) and 25 age- and sex-matched patients with benign liver disease (controls) underwent measurement of these biomarkers. The mean values of all serum markers of patients with cholangiocarcinoma were significantly higher (p<0.01) than that of the controls. No correlation was found between serum tumor markers and total bilirubin, aspartate aminotransferase (AST) and alkaline phosphatase (ALP). The sensitivity, specificity and accuracy were: CEA: 52%, 55%, and 58%; CA 19-9: 74%, 82% and 78%; CYFRA 21-1: 76%, 79% and 78%; MMP7: 78%, 77% and 80%, respectively. The combination of all serum markers afforded 92.0% sensitivity and 96% specificity in detecting cholangiocarcinoma, showing the highest diagnostic accuracy (94%). In conclusion, our preliminary results suggest that the measurement of all four biomarkers together can help in the early detection of cholangiocarcinoma. PMID:25368272

  6. Comparison of clinical performance of antigen based-enzyme immunoassay (EIA) and major outer membrane protein (MOMP)-PCR for detection of genital Chlamydia trachomatis infection

    PubMed Central

    Nateghi Rostami, Mahmoud; Hossein Rashidi, Batool; Aghsaghloo, Fatemeh; Nazari, Razieh

    2016-01-01

    Background: Chlamydia trachomatis is the most common sexually transmitted bacterial pathogen worldwide. Early detection and treatment of C.trachomatis genital infection prevent serious reproductive complications. Objective: Performances of enzyme immunoassay (EIA) and major outer membrane protein (MOMP)-polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for diagnosis of genital C.trachomatis infection in women were compared. Materials and Methods: In this cross sectional study a total of 518 women volunteers were included (33.67±8.3 yrs) who had been referred to Gynecology clinics of Qom province, Iran, were included. Endocervical swab specimens were collected to detect lipopolysaccharide (LPS) antigen in EIA and to amplify MOMP gene of C.trachomatis in PCR. Results were confirmed using ompI nested-PCR. Sensitivity, specificity, positive (PPV) and negative predictive values (NPV) were calculated for performance of the tests. Odds ratios were determined using binary logistic regression analysis. Results: In total, 37 (7.14%) cases were positive by EIA and/or MOMP-PCR. All discrepant results were confirmed by nested-PCR. Sensitivity, specificity, PPV and NPV values of EIA were 59.46%, 100%, 100% and 96.98%, and those of MOMP-PCR were 97.30%, 100%, 100%, 99.79%, respectively. Reproductive complications including 2.7% ectopic pregnancy, 5.4% stillbirth, 5.4% infertility, and 10.8% PROM were recorded. The risk of developing chlamydiosis was increased 4.8-fold in volunteers with cervicitis (p<0.05; OR 4.80; 95% CI 1.25-18.48). Conclusion: C.trachomatis infection should be regarded in women of reproductive ages especially those with cervicitis. Primary screening of women by using the low cost antigen-EIA is recommended; however, due to the low sensitivity of Ag-EIA, verification of the negative results by a DNA amplification method is needed. PMID:27525325

  7. Detection of Salmonella typhi D, Vi, and d antigens, by slide coagglutination, in urine from patients with typhoid fever.

    PubMed Central

    Rockhill, R C; Rumans, L W; Lesmana, M; Dennis, D T

    1980-01-01

    Salmonella typhi antigens D, Vi, and d were detected in the urine of 59 out of 61 (97%) bacteriologically confirmed typhoid fever patients by slide coagglutination with monovalent antisera coupled to protein A-rich staphylococci. These antigens were also detected in the urine of an additional 22 patients, 16 of whom subsequently demonstrated seroconversion by S. typhi O antibody agglutination, but from whom the bacterium was not isolated. The remaining 13 patients had negative urine coagglutination results, no isolation of S. typhi from blood or stool specimens, and no demonstration of seroconversion. These results suggest that the method of slide coagglutination of urine can be used to screen patients with suspected typhoid fever with a high degree of reliability. The method may also have potential importance in the diagnosis of typhoid when the bacterium is not isolated. PMID:7380998

  8. Spherical Body Protein 4 Is a New Serological Antigen for Global Detection of Babesia bovis Infection in Cattle ▿

    PubMed Central

    Terkawi, Mohamad Alaa; Huyen, Nguyen Xuan; Wibowo, Putut Eko; Seuseu, Faasoa Junior; Aboulaila, Mahmoud; Ueno, Akio; Goo, Youn-Kyoung; Yokoyama, Naoaki; Xuan, Xuenan; Igarashi, Ikuo

    2011-01-01

    Five Babesia bovis recombinant proteins, including merozoite surface antigen 2c (BbMSA-2c), C-terminal rhoptry-associated protein 1 (BbRAP-1/CT), truncated thrombospondin-related anonymous protein (BbTRAP-T), spherical body protein 1 (BbSBP-1), and spherical body protein 4 (BbSBP-4), were evaluated as diagnostic antigens to detect the infection in cattle. The recombinant proteins were highly antigenic when tested with experimentally B. bovis-infected bovine serum in Western blot analysis. Furthermore, five antisera that had been raised against each of the recombinant proteins reacted specifically with the corresponding authentic protein, as determined in Western blot analysis. Next, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs) using these recombinant proteins were evaluated for diagnostic use, and the sensitivity and specificity of each protein were demonstrated with a series of serum samples from experimentally B. bovis-infected cattle. Furthermore, a total of 669 field serum samples collected from cattle in regions of B. bovis endemicity in seven countries were tested with the ELISAs, and the results were compared to those of an indirect fluorescent antibody test (IFAT), as a reference. Among five recombinant antigens, recombinant BbSBP-4 (rBbSBP-4) had the highest concordance rate (85.3%) and kappa value (0.705), indicating its reliability in the detection of specific antibodies to B. bovis in cattle, even in different geographical regions. Overall, we have successfully developed an ELISA based on rBbSBP-4 as a new serological antigen for a practical and sensitive test which will be applicable for epidemiologic survey and control programs in the future. PMID:21123520

  9. Nile Red Detection of Bacterial Hydrocarbons and Ketones in a High-Throughput Format

    SciTech Connect

    Pinzon, NM; Aukema, KG; Gralnick, JA; Wackett, LP

    2011-06-28

    A method for use in high-throughput screening of bacteria for the production of long-chain hydrocarbons and ketones by monitoring fluorescent light emission in the presence of Nile red is described. Nile red has previously been used to screen for polyhydroxybutyrate (PHB) and fatty acid esters, but this is the first report of screening for recombinant bacteria making hydrocarbons or ketones. The microtiter plate assay was evaluated using wild-type and recombinant strains of Shewanella oneidensis and Escherichia coli expressing the enzyme OleA, previously shown to initiate hydrocarbon biosynthesis. The strains expressing exogenous Stenotrophomonas maltophilia oleA, with increased levels of ketone production as determined by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry, were distinguished with Nile red fluorescence. Confocal microscopy images of S. oneidensis oleA-expressing strains stained with Nile red were consistent with a membrane localization of the ketones. This differed from Nile red staining of bacterial PHB or algal lipid droplets that showed intracellular inclusion bodies. These results demonstrated the applicability of Nile red in a high-throughput technique for the detection of bacterial hydrocarbons and ketones. IMPORTANCE In recent years, there has been renewed interest in advanced biofuel sources such as bacterial hydrocarbon production. Previous studies used solvent extraction of bacterial cultures followed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) to detect and quantify ketones and hydrocarbons (Beller HR, Goh EB, Keasling JD, Appl. Environ. Microbiol. 76: 1212-1223, 2010; Sukovich DJ, Seffernick JL, Richman JE, Gralnick JA, Wackett LP, Appl. Environ. Microbiol. 76: 3850-3862, 2010). While these analyses are powerful and accurate, their labor-intensive nature makes them intractable to high-throughput screening; therefore, methods for rapid identification of bacterial strains that are overproducing hydrocarbons are needed. The use of high

  10. PCR detection of bacterial genes provides evidence of death by drowning.

    PubMed

    Suto, Miwako; Kato, Naho; Abe, Sumiko; Nakamura, Masahide; Tsuchiya, Reo; Hiraiwa, Kouichi

    2009-04-01

    We have developed a sensitive and specific PCR method for detecting plankton DNA in cases of death by drowning. However, this PCR method could not be used for cases of drowning in water containing no plankton. Bacteria species are normally localized in the throat and trachea and they may invade into blood through the respiratory tract in people who have drowned as well as species localized in water. The aim of this study was to establish a novel and expedient PCR method for detecting bacterial genes in samples from drowning cases. We designed primer pairs for Streptococcus salivarius (SL1) and Streptococcus sanguinis (SN1), which are common species in the throat, and for Aeromonas hydrophila (AH1), which has been found in various water samples. With SL1, SN1, and AH1, we detected 10, 0.1, and 1 pg of target DNA, respectively. Among 19 drowned cases within 3 days postmortem, SL-DNA was detected in all of the blood samples from hearts with SL1 and AH-DNA was detected in several samples with AH1. In a case of drowning in a bathtub, use of the conventional acid digestion method for diatom analyses and the PCR method for identifying plankton DNA revealed no plankton, but our PCR method for detecting bacterial DNA showed a positive result for SL-DNA in a blood sample from the heart. In conclusion, our novel PCR method is highly specific and sensitive for detecting bacterial DNA and is useful for cases of death by drowning in water containing no plankton. PMID:19264526

  11. Cryopreservation of MHC Multimers: Recommendations for Quality Assurance in Detection of Antigen Specific T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Hadrup, Sine Reker; Maurer, Dominik; Laske, Karoline; Frøsig, Thomas Mørch; Andersen, Sofie Ramskov; Britten, Cedrik M; van der Burg, Sjoerd H; Walter, Steffen; Gouttefangeas, Cécile

    2015-01-01

    Fluorescence-labeled peptide-MHC class I multimers serve as ideal tools for the detection of antigen-specific T cells by flow cytometry, enabling functional and phenotypical characterization of specific T cells at the single cell level. While this technique offers a number of unique advantages, MHC multimer reagents can be difficult to handle in terms of stability and quality assurance. The stability of a given fluorescence-labeled MHC multimer complex depends on both the stability of the peptide-MHC complex itself and the stability of the fluorochrome. Consequently, stability is difficult to predict and long-term storage is generally not recommended. We investigated here the possibility of cryopreserving MHC multimers, both in-house produced and commercially available, using a wide range of peptide-MHC class I multimers comprising virus and cancer-associated epitopes of different affinities presented by various HLA-class I molecules. Cryopreservation of MHC multimers was feasible for at least 6 months, when they were dissolved in buffer containing 5–16% glycerol (v/v) and 0.5% serum albumin (w/v). The addition of cryoprotectants was tolerated across three different T-cell staining protocols for all fluorescence labels tested (PE, APC, PE-Cy7 and Quantum dots). We propose cryopreservation as an easily implementable method for stable storage of MHC multimers and recommend the use of cryopreservation in long-term immunomonitoring projects, thereby eliminating the variability introduced by different batches and inconsistent stability. © 2014 International Society for Advancement of Cytometry PMID:25297339

  12. Detection of Cytotoxic T-Lymphocyte Associated Antigen-4 Gene Polymorphism in Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus.

    PubMed

    Arafa, Roshdan M; Desouky, Somaya M; Emam, Sherin M; Abed, Neveen Tawfik; Mohamed, Sahar Y

    2015-01-01

    Type 1 diabetes is one of the most common chronic childhood illnesses. Interplay between genetic susceptibility and environmental factors is thought to provide the fundamental element for the disease. It has been shown that more than 40 genetic loci are associated with T1DM. Important one among these is the CTLA-4. This work aimed to detect Cytotoxic T Lymphocyte-associated antigen 4 (CTLA-4) gene polymorphism in patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus T1DM using polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) to clarify its role in the susceptibility to T1DM. The study was carried out on forty unrelated Egyptian children with TIDM. Twenty unrelated healthy children were enrolled as a control group. Blood samples were collected from patients and control groups and subjected to CTLA-4 gene polymorphism analysis using polymerase chain reaction followed by restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP). CTLA-4 G allele and GG homozygous genotype were significantly increased in T1DM patients than in control group (P < 0.001, P = 0.002 respectively). There was significant association between the three CTLA-4 genotypes (AA, AG, GG) and diabetic complications (p = 0.002), AG and GG polymorphisms were associated with complications of diabetes with ratio 84.6% and 100% respectively. While no association was found with sex, weight, height, risk factors of diabetes or insulin treatment. It was concluded that there is a strong association between AG polymorphism and T1DM (P = 0.002). PMID:26415372

  13. Association between use of rapid antigen detection tests and adherence to antibiotics in suspected streptococcal pharyngitis

    PubMed Central

    Llor, Carl; Hernández, Silvia; Sierra, Nuria; Moragas, Ana; Hernández, Marta; Bayona, Carolina

    2010-01-01

    Objective Few studies have analysed adherence to antibiotic treatment in pharyngitis. The aim of this study was to evaluate the association of rapid antigen detection tests (RADT) and treatment adherence among patients 18 years of age or over with pharyngitis treated with different antibiotic regimens. Design Prospective study from 2003 to 2008. Setting Office-based physician practices. Intervention The adherence of patients prior to the use of RADTs – no test was available until mid-2006 – was compared with the adherence associated with the use of RADTs. Subjects Patients with suspected streptococcal pharyngitis. Main outcome measures Patient adherence was assessed by electronic monitoring. The adherence outcomes considered were antibiotic-taking adherence, correct dosing, and good timing adherence during at least 80% of the antibiotic course. Results A total of 196 patients were recruited. The percentage of container openings was 77.9%±17.7%, being significantly higher for patients in whom the RADTs were performed compared with those in whom this test was not undertaken (80.1% vs. 70.8% for thrice-daily antibiotic regimens and 88.1% vs. 76.5% for twice-daily regimens; p < 0.01). The other variables of adherence were also better among patients undergoing RADT in both those who took at least 80% of the pills (71.3% vs. 42.2%; p < 0.001) as well as those with good timing adherence (52.5% vs. 32.8%; p < 0.01). Furthermore, correct dosing was always greater when the patient had undergone an RADT. Conclusion Adherence to antibiotic treatment is higher when an RADT is carried out at the consultation prior to administration of antibiotic treatment. PMID:20201628

  14. Construction of cell surface-engineered yeasts displaying antigen to detect antibodies by immunofluorescence and yeast-ELISA.

    PubMed

    Tang, Yu Qian; Han, Shuang Yan; Zheng, Hong; Wu, Lin; Ueda, Mitsuyoshi; Wang, Xiao Ning; Lin, Ying

    2008-07-01

    In order to detect monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) from insufficient and unavailable human proteins, yeast cells were engineered to display human antigens on their surface and consequently endowed with the ability to specifically bind antibodies. Thus, a fusion gene for the expression of the human proteasome subunit alpha 6 (hPSA6) and human profilin I (hProI) were assembled, respectively, with a His.tag marker at the C-terminal and displayed on yeast surface. With anti-His.tag MAb as the primary antibody and the fluorescein isothiocyanate-conjugated goat anti-mouse Immunoglobulin G as the second antibody, the surface display of hPSA6 and hProI were verified by immunofluorescence labeling. The antigen-displayed yeast particles were used for MAbs detection from ascites through both immunofluorescence and yeast-enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) methods. The results were verified by Western blotting and indirect ELISA. By improving the sensitivity, the novel MAbs detection can be applied in the generation and screening of positive hybridoma. It is suggested that by combining the DNA immunization, the present study can evolve into a quick and protein-free way of MAbs production for insufficient and unavailable antigen. PMID:18542951

  15. High detection rates of cryptococcal antigen in pulmonary cryptococcosis by Eiken latex agglutination test with pronase pretreatment.

    PubMed

    Kohno, S; Yasuoka, A; Koga, H; Kaku, M; Maesaki, S; Tanaka, K; Mitsutake, K; Matsuda, H; Hara, K

    1993-08-01

    Two different kits for the detection of serum cryptococcal antigen in patients with pulmonary cryptococcosis were evaluated. The Eiken test (the Eiken Co., Tokyo), which uses pronase for pretreatment of serum, was compared with the Crypto-LA test (International Biological Laboratories, Cranbury, NJ), which did not use pronase prior to testing. Cryptococcal antigen was detected in 21 of 23 patients (91%) with the Eiken test and in only 10 of 23 patients (43%) with the Crypto-LA test (p < 0.01 by McNemar test). However, the sensitivity of two tests was identical without use of pronase, as both tests could detect as little as 10(4) cells/ml of Cryptococcus neoformans and 10 ng/ml of capsular polysaccharide of C. neoformans. In those serum specimens for which both tests were positive, titers were much higher for the Eiken test, but there was a statistically significant correlation between the two tests (coefficient correlation 0.79, p < 0.01). Cryptococcal antigen titer levels measured by the Eiken test correlated well with clinical courses. There was one false-positive reaction among 82 sera of non-cryptococcal patients. Pronase enhanced the sensitivity of the Eiken test, which appeared to be useful in patients with pulmonary cryptococcal disease, and its use may prevent unneeded lung biopsies. PMID:8264770

  16. Rotavirus antigen test

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003349.htm Rotavirus antigen test To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. The rotavirus antigen test detects rotavirus in the feces. This ...

  17. Flow cytometric analysis to detect pathogens in bacterial cell mixtures using semiconductor quantum dots.

    PubMed

    Hahn, Megan A; Keng, Peter C; Krauss, Todd D

    2008-02-01

    Compared to a common green organic dye, semiconductor quantum dots (QDs) composed of CdSe/ZnS core/shell bioconjugates display brighter fluorescence intensities, lower detection thresholds, and better accuracy in analyzing bacterial cell mixtures composed of pathogenic E. coli O157:H7 and harmless E. coli DH5alpha using flow cytometry. For the same given bacterial mixture, QDs display fluorescence intensity levels that are approximately 1 order of magnitude brighter compared to the analogous experiments that utilize the standard dye fluorescein isothiocyanate. Detection limits are lowest when QDs are used as the fluorophore label for the pathogenic E. coli O157:H7 serotype: limits of 1% O157:H7 in 99% DH5alpha result, corresponding to 106 cells/mL, which is comparable to other developing fluorescence-based techniques for pathogen detection. Finally, utilizing QDs to label E. coli O157:H7 in cell mixtures results in greater accuracy and more closely approaches the ideal fluorophore for pathogen detection using flow cytometry. With their broader absorption spectra and narrower emission spectra than organic dyes, QDs can make vast improvements in the field of flow cytometry, where single-source excitation and simultaneous detection of multicolor species without complicating experimental setups or data analysis is quite advantageous for analyzing heterogeneous cell mixtures, both for prokaryotic pathogen detection and for studies on eukaryotic cell characteristics. PMID:18186615

  18. Voltammetric detection and profiling of isoprenoid quinones hydrophobically transferred from bacterial cells.

    PubMed

    Le, Dung Quynh; Morishita, Aya; Tokonami, Shiho; Nishino, Tomoaki; Shiigi, Hiroshi; Miyake, Masami; Nagaoka, Tsutomu

    2015-08-18

    We have developed a novel bacterial detection technique by desiccating a bacterial suspension deposited on an electrode. It was also found that the use of an indium-tin-oxide (ITO) electrode dramatically improved the resolution of the voltammogram, allowing us to observe two pairs of redox peaks, each assigned to the adsorption of isoprenoid ubiquinone (UQn) and menaquinone (MKn), which were present in the bacterial cell envelopes, giving midpeak potentials of -0.015 and -0.25 V versus Ag|AgCl|saturated KCl| at pH 7.0, respectively. Most of the microorganisms classified in both the Gram-negative and -positive bacteria gave well-defined redox peaks, demonstrating that this procedure made the detection of the quinones possible without solvent extraction. It has been demonstrated that the present technique can be used not only for the detection of bacteria, but also for profiling of the isoprenoid quinones, which play important roles in electron and proton transfer in microorganisms. In this respect, the present technique provides a much more straightforward way than the solvent extraction in that one sample can be prepared in 1 min by heat evaporation of a suspension containing the targeted bacteria, which has been applied on the ITO electrode. PMID:26218886

  19. Electrochemical detection of the binding of Bacillus anthracis protective antigen (PA) to the membrane receptor on macrophages through release of nitric oxide.

    PubMed

    Trouillon, Raphaël; Williamson, E Diane; Saint, Richard J; O'Hare, Danny

    2012-01-01

    Anthrax is a serious bacterial disease of man and animals whose pathogenesis involves the secretion of lethal toxins in the host. The intracellular delivery of toxic complexes involves a complex structural rearrangement of sub-domains of the exotoxin protective antigen (PA). We have used a biocompatible microelectrode array, coated with J774 mouse macrophages, to detect PA binding and intracellular signaling resulting in nitric oxide (NO) release. We have found that exposure of macrophages to PA in vitro activates the inducible isoform of NO synthase (iNOS), thus increasing the extracellular concentration of NO and nitrite, in a dose- and time-dependent manner. However, the cell-binding domain 4 of PA (PA4) could substitute for full-length PA to achieve equivalent NO release, suggesting that the heptamerisation of PA, ultimately required to deliver toxic complexes into the cell, is not a requirement for the activation of an intracellular cascade through the ERK 1/2 and the PI-3K/ Akt kinase pathways and that these events could be triggered by the binding of PA4 alone to its cell membrane receptor. Further, we have found that pre-incubation of the cells with azidothymidine, a pro-oxidant drug, significantly improves the limit of detection of rPA-induced NO release thus offering a sensitive tool for the analysis of the kinetics of anthrax intoxication and ultimately drug discovery. PMID:22672762

  20. Impact of rapid antigen detection testing on antibiotic prescription in acute pharyngitis in adults. FARINGOCAT STUDY: a multicentric randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Acute pharyngitis is one of the most frequent consultations to the general practitioner and in most of the cases an antibiotic is prescribed in primary care in Spain. Bacterial etiology, mainly by group A beta-hemolytic streptococcus (GABHS), accounts for 10-20% of all these infections in adults. The purpose of this study is to assess the impact of rapid antigen detection testing (RADT) to identify GABHS in acute pharyngitis on the utilization of antibiotics in primary care. Methods/design Multicentric randomized controlled trial in which antibiotic prescription between two groups of patients with acute pharyngitis will be compared. The trial will include two arms, a control and an intervention group in which RADT will be performed. The primary outcome measure will be the proportion of inappropriate antibiotic prescription in each group. Two hundred seventy-six patients are required to detect a reduction in antibiotic prescription from 85% in the control group to 75% in the intervention group with a power of 90% and a level of significance of 5%. Secondary outcome measures will be specific antibiotic treatment, antibiotic resistance rates, secondary effects, days without working, medical visits during the first month and patient satisfaction. Discussion The implementation of RADT would allow a more rational use of antibiotics and would prevent adverse effects of antibiotics, emergence of antibiotic resistance and the growth of inefficient health expenses. Trial registration ISRCTN23587778 PMID:20331895

  1. Detection of Renibacterium salmoninarum, the Causative Agent of Bacterial Kidney Disease in Salmonid Fish, from Pen-Cultured Coho Salmon.

    PubMed

    Sakai, M; Kobayashi, M

    1992-03-01

    The detection of Renibacterium salmoninarum antigen from pen-cultured coho salmon was attempted. Flounder (Limanda herzensteini) (n = 24), greenling (Hexagrammos otakii) (n = 5), Japanese sculpin (Cottus japonicus) (n = 1), and flathead (Platycephalus indicus) (n = 22) captured by fishing around coho salmon net pens were examined for the presence of R. salmoninarum antigen by an indirect dot blot assay and by an indirect fluorescent-antibody technique using polyclonal and monoclonal antibodies. R. salmoninarum antigen was detected from kidney samples of one greenling and six flathead. Moreover, 86 scallops (Patinopecten yessoensis) were hung from the edge of the net pen for 50 days, and R. salmoninarum antigen was demonstrated in 31 samples by the indirect dot blot assay and the indirect fluorescent-antibody technique. PMID:16348666

  2. Detection of Renibacterium salmoninarum, the Causative Agent of Bacterial Kidney Disease in Salmonid Fish, from Pen-Cultured Coho Salmon

    PubMed Central

    Sakai, Masahiro; Kobayashi, Masanori

    1992-01-01

    The detection of Renibacterium salmoninarum antigen from pen-cultured coho salmon was attempted. Flounder (Limanda herzensteini) (n = 24), greenling (Hexagrammos otakii) (n = 5), Japanese sculpin (Cottus japonicus) (n = 1), and flathead (Platycephalus indicus) (n = 22) captured by fishing around coho salmon net pens were examined for the presence of R. salmoninarum antigen by an indirect dot blot assay and by an indirect fluorescent-antibody technique using polyclonal and monoclonal antibodies. R. salmoninarum antigen was detected from kidney samples of one greenling and six flathead. Moreover, 86 scallops (Patinopecten yessoensis) were hung from the edge of the net pen for 50 days, and R. salmoninarum antigen was demonstrated in 31 samples by the indirect dot blot assay and the indirect fluorescent-antibody technique. PMID:16348666

  3. Application of photostable quantum dots for indirect immunofluorescent detection of specific bacterial serotypes on small marine animals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Decho, Alan W.; Beckman, Erin M.; Chandler, G. Thomas; Kawaguchi, Tomohiro

    2008-06-01

    An indirect immunofluorescence approach was developed using semiconductor quantum dot nanocrystals to label and detect a specific bacterial serotype of the bacterial human pathogen Vibrio parahaemolyticus, attached to small marine animals (i.e. benthic harpacticoid copepods), which are suspected pathogen carriers. This photostable labeling method using nanotechnology will potentially allow specific serotypes of other bacterial pathogens to be detected with high sensitivity in a range of systems, and can be easily applied for sensitive detection to other Vibrio species such as Vibrio cholerae.

  4. Dynamic laser speckle to detect motile bacterial response of Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sendra, H.; Murialdo, S.; Passoni, L.

    2007-11-01

    This proposal deals with the technique for detection of motile response of Pseudomonas aeruginosa using dynamic laser speckle or biospeckle as an alternative method. The study of bacterial displacement plays an essential role in biocatalysts processes and biodegradation. Hence, some biodegrading enzymes are benign catalytic that could be used for the production of industrially useful compounds as well as in wastewater treatments. This work presents an experimental set up and a computational process using frame sequences of dynamic laser speckle as a novel application. The objective was the detection of different levels of motility in bacteria. The encouraging results were achieved through a direct and non invasive observation method of the phenomenon.

  5. Colorimetric detection of Shewanella oneidensis based on immunomagnetic capture and bacterial intrinsic peroxidase activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wen, Junlin; Zhou, Shungui; Chen, Junhua

    2014-06-01

    Rapid detection and enumeration of target microorganisms is considered as a powerful tool for monitoring bioremediation process that typically involves cleaning up polluted environments with functional microbes. A novel colorimetric assay is presented based on immunomagnetic capture and bacterial intrinsic peroxidase activity for rapidly detecting Shewanella oneidensis, an important model organism for environmental bioremediation because of its remarkably diverse respiratory abilities. Analyte bacteria captured on the immunomagnetic beads provided a bacterial out-membrane peroxidase-amplified colorimetric readout of the immunorecognition event by oxidizing 3, 3', 5, 5'-tetramethylbenzidine (TMB) in the present of hydrogen peroxide. The high-efficiency of immunomagnetic capture and signal amplification of peroxidase activity offers an excellent detection performance with a wide dynamic range between 5.0 × 103 and 5.0 × 106 CFU/mL toward target cells. Furthermore, this method was demonstrated to be feasible in detecting S. oneidensis cells spiked in environmental samples. The proposed colorimetric assay shows promising environmental applications for rapid detection of target microorganisms.

  6. Colorimetric detection of Shewanella oneidensis based on immunomagnetic capture and bacterial intrinsic peroxidase activity

    PubMed Central

    Wen, Junlin; Zhou, Shungui; Chen, Junhua

    2014-01-01

    Rapid detection and enumeration of target microorganisms is considered as a powerful tool for monitoring bioremediation process that typically involves cleaning up polluted environments with functional microbes. A novel colorimetric assay is presented based on immunomagnetic capture and bacterial intrinsic peroxidase activity for rapidly detecting Shewanella oneidensis, an important model organism for environmental bioremediation because of its remarkably diverse respiratory abilities. Analyte bacteria captured on the immunomagnetic beads provided a bacterial out-membrane peroxidase-amplified colorimetric readout of the immunorecognition event by oxidizing 3, 3′, 5, 5′-tetramethylbenzidine (TMB) in the present of hydrogen peroxide. The high-efficiency of immunomagnetic capture and signal amplification of peroxidase activity offers an excellent detection performance with a wide dynamic range between 5.0 × 103 and 5.0 × 106 CFU/mL toward target cells. Furthermore, this method was demonstrated to be feasible in detecting S. oneidensis cells spiked in environmental samples. The proposed colorimetric assay shows promising environmental applications for rapid detection of target microorganisms. PMID:24898751

  7. Mucosal immunisation with novel Streptococcus pneumoniae protein antigens enhances bacterial clearance in an acute mouse lung infection model.

    PubMed

    Jomaa, Maha; Kyd, Jennelle M; Cripps, Allan W

    2005-04-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae contains many proteins that have not been evaluated as potential protective vaccine antigens. In this study we isolated proteins from a serotype 3 strain of S. pneumoniae for use in mouse immunisation studies. Separation of the protein mix was achieved by SDS-PAGE electrophoresis followed by electro-elution to isolate individual proteins. This procedure successfully separated 21 fractions from which six proteins were selected based on purity and quantity and were initially denoted by their molecular masses: 14-, 34-, 38-, 48-, 57- and 75-kDa. The immunogenicity of these proteins was investigated in a mucosal immunisation model in mice involving a primary inoculation to the intestinal Peyer's patches followed by an intra-tracheal boost two weeks later. The immune response was assessed by enhancement of pulmonary clearance of infection, recruitment of phagocytes to the lungs and induction of an antibody response. Two of the proteins, the 14-kDa identified as a L7/L12 ribosomal protein, and the 34-kDa identified as glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase resulted in up to 99% and 94%, respectively, enhanced clearance of infection within 5 h following pulmonary challenge with S. pneumoniae. This study has shown that novel pneumococcal proteins have the potential to be vaccine candidates to enhance clearance of an acute mucosal S. pneumoniae infection. PMID:15780579

  8. A Comparison between Transcriptome Sequencing and 16S Metagenomics for Detection of Bacterial Pathogens in Wildlife

    PubMed Central

    Razzauti, Maria; Galan, Maxime; Bernard, Maria; Maman, Sarah; Klopp, Christophe; Charbonnel, Nathalie; Vayssier-Taussat, Muriel; Eloit, Marc; Cosson, Jean-François

    2015-01-01

    Background Rodents are major reservoirs of pathogens responsible for numerous zoonotic diseases in humans and livestock. Assessing their microbial diversity at both the individual and population level is crucial for monitoring endemic infections and revealing microbial association patterns within reservoirs. Recently, NGS approaches have been employed to characterize microbial communities of different ecosystems. Yet, their relative efficacy has not been assessed. Here, we compared two NGS approaches, RNA-Sequencing (RNA-Seq) and 16S-metagenomics, assessing their ability to survey neglected zoonotic bacteria in rodent populations. Methodology/Principal Findings We first extracted nucleic acids from the spleens of 190 voles collected in France. RNA extracts were pooled, randomly retro-transcribed, then RNA-Seq was performed using HiSeq. Assembled bacterial sequences were assigned to the closest taxon registered in GenBank. DNA extracts were analyzed via a 16S-metagenomics approach using two sequencers: the 454 GS-FLX and the MiSeq. The V4 region of the gene coding for 16S rRNA was amplified for each sample using barcoded universal primers. Amplicons were multiplexed and processed on the distinct sequencers. The resulting datasets were de-multiplexed, and each read was processed through a pipeline to be taxonomically classified using the Ribosomal Database Project. Altogether, 45 pathogenic bacterial genera were detected. The bacteria identified by RNA-Seq were comparable to those detected by 16S-metagenomics approach processed with MiSeq (16S-MiSeq). In contrast, 21 of these pathogens went unnoticed when the 16S-metagenomics approach was processed via 454-pyrosequencing (16S-454). In addition, the 16S-metagenomics approaches revealed a high level of coinfection in bank voles. Conclusions/Significance We concluded that RNA-Seq and 16S-MiSeq are equally sensitive in detecting bacteria. Although only the 16S-MiSeq method enabled identification of bacteria in each

  9. New Skin Test for Detection of Bovine Tuberculosis on the Basis of Antigen-Displaying Polyester Inclusions Produced by Recombinant Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Shuxiong; Parlane, Natalie A.; Lee, Jason; Wedlock, D. Neil; Buddle, Bryce M.

    2014-01-01

    The tuberculin skin test for diagnosing tuberculosis (TB) in cattle lacks specificity if animals are sensitized to environmental mycobacteria, as some antigens in purified protein derivative (PPD) prepared from Mycobacterium bovis are present in nonpathogenic mycobacteria. Three immunodominant TB antigens, ESAT6, CFP10, and Rv3615c, are present in members of the pathogenic Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex but absent from the majority of environmental mycobacteria. These TB antigens have the potential to enhance skin test specificity. To increase their immunogenicity, these antigens were displayed on polyester beads by translationally fusing them to a polyhydroxyalkanoate (PHA) synthase which mediated formation of antigen-displaying inclusions in recombinant Escherichia coli. The most common form of these inclusions is poly(3-hydroxybutyric acid) (PHB). The respective fusion proteins displayed on these PHB inclusions (beads) were identified using tryptic peptide fingerprinting analysis in combination with matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization–time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS). The surface exposure and accessibility of antigens were assessed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Polyester beads displaying all three TB antigens showed greater reactivity with TB antigen-specific antibody than did beads displaying only one TB antigen. This was neither due to cross-reactivity of antibodies with the other two antigens nor due to differences in protein expression levels between beads displaying single or three TB antigens. The triple-antigen-displaying polyester beads were used for skin testing of cattle and detected all cattle experimentally infected with M. bovis with no false-positive reactions observed in those sensitized to environmental mycobacteria. The results suggested applicability of TB antigen-displaying polyester inclusions as diagnostic reagents for distinguishing TB-infected from noninfected animals. PMID:24532066

  10. Comparison of an enzyme immunoassay for the detection of Helicobacter pylori antigens in the faeces with the urea breath test

    PubMed Central

    Shepherd, A.; Williams, C.; Doherty, C.; Hossack, M.; Preston, T.; McColl, K.; Weaver, L.

    2000-01-01

    BACKGROUND—Current diagnostic tests for Helicobacter pylori are invasive (endoscopy) or indirect (urea breath test, serology).
AIMS—To evaluate a new enzyme immunoassay (EIA) which detects H pylori antigens in faeces, by comparing its sensitivity and specificity in children with the 13C urea breath test (UBT).
METHODS—A total of 119 children underwent a UBT and provided a faecal sample for antigen testing within seven days. After an overnight fast each child provided a pretest breath sample, and samples at 30 and 40 minutes after ingestion of 100 mg 13C labelled urea. 13C enrichment of breath was measured by isotope ratio mass spectrometry. Faeces were stored at −70°C until antigen testing, using the EIA. Samples were read spectrophotometrically at 450 nm and results were interpreted using recommended cut offs of optical density <0.14 as negative, ⩾0.16 as positive, with ⩾0.14 and <0.16 representing equivocal results. Sensitivity and specificity were calculated using the manufacturer's cut off compared with UBT.
RESULTS—Sensitivity and specificity were 88% and 82%, respectively. Negative and positive predictive values were 97% and 58%.
CONCLUSIONS—The EIA is an alternative, non-invasive, and easy to use method for the detection of H pylori in children. Its high negative predictive value suggests a role in screening out uninfected children.

 PMID:10952653

  11. Detection and quantification of circulating antigen in schistosomiasis by a monoclonal antibody. I. Specificity analysis of a monoclonal antibody with immunodiagnostic capacity.

    PubMed Central

    Nogueira-Queiroz, J A; Lutsch, C; Capron, M; Dessaint, J P; Capron, A

    1986-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies were obtained after immunization of mice with Schistosoma mansoni excretory/secretory antigen, previously shown to contain the circulating cathodic (M) antigen. Among these, the 40:B1 monoclonal antibody proved to be specific for the schistosome genus and to detect only adult worm-derived antigens as shown both by immunoprecipitation and with a two-site immunoradiometric assay using the monoclonal as both the solid-phase and the labelled antibody. The two-site immunoradiometric assay allows a sensitive measurement (detection limit: 5 ng) of circulating schistosome antigen in blood and in urine from patients with schistosomiasis. The amount of circulating schistosome M antigen is correlated with schistosome egg excretion in stool. Images Fig. 2 PMID:3098474

  12. Species Specific Bacterial Spore Detection Using Lateral-Flow Immunoassay with DPA-Triggered Tb Luminescence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ponce, Adrian

    2003-01-01

    A method of detecting bacterial spores incorporates (1) A method of lateral-flow immunoassay in combination with (2) A method based on the luminescence of Tb3+ ions to which molecules of dipicolinic acid (DPA) released from the spores have become bound. The present combination of lateral-flow immunoassay and DPA-triggered Tb luminescence was developed as a superior alternative to a prior lateral-flow immunoassay method in which detection involves the visual observation and/or measurement of red light scattered from colloidal gold nanoparticles. The advantage of the present combination method is that it affords both (1) High selectivity for spores of the species of bacteria that one seeks to detect (a characteristic of lateral-flow immunoassay in general) and (2) Detection sensitivity much greater (by virtue of the use of DPA-triggered Tb luminescence instead of gold nanoparticles) than that of the prior lateral-flow immunoassay method

  13. ELISA for the detection of toxic antigens in experimental and clinical envenoming by Tityus serrulatus scorpion venom.

    PubMed

    Chávez-Olórtegui, C; Fonseca, S C; Campolina, D; Amaral, C F; Diniz, C R

    1994-12-01

    An ELISA was developed for identification of circulating toxic antigens from Tityus serrulatus scorpion venom. The toxic fraction from the scorpion venom was purified by Sephadex G-50 chromatography and immunoaffinity techniques were used for identifying antibodies that reacted with this fraction. These antibodies were used to develop a sandwich-type ELISA. The specificity of the assay was demonstrated by its capacity for identifying mice that were experimentally inoculated with T. serrulatus venom from those inoculated with Phoneutria nigriventer spider venom, Apis mellifera bee venom and Bothrops atrox, Crotalus durissus terrificus, Lachesis muta muta and Micrurus frontalis snake venoms. Measurable absorbance signals were obtained with 0.1 ng of venom per assay. The ELISA also detected antigens in the sera of patients systemically envenomed by T. serrulatus. Therefore, this ELISA could be a valuable tool for clinicians and epidemiologists, owing to its sensitivity and specificity. PMID:7725332

  14. Standardization of natural mycolic acid antigen composition and production for use in biomarker antibody detection to diagnose active tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Ndlandla, F L; Ejoh, V; Stoltz, A C; Naicker, B; Cromarty, A D; van Wyngaardt, S; Khati, M; Rotherham, L S; Lemmer, Y; Niebuhr, J; Baumeister, C R; Al Dulayymi, J R; Swai, H; Baird, M S; Verschoor, J A

    2016-08-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the causative agent of tuberculosis, is characterized by the abundance of species specific, antigenic cell wall lipids called mycolic acids. These wax-like molecules all share an identical, amphiphilic mycolic motif, but have different functional groups in a long hydrophobic hydrocarbon mero-chain that divide them into three main classes: alpha-, keto- and methoxy-mycolic acids. Whereas alpha-mycolic acids constitutively maintain an abundance of around 50%, the ratio of methoxy- to keto-mycolic acid types may vary depending on, among other things, the growth stage of M. tuberculosis. In human patients, antibodies to mycolic acids have shown potential as diagnostic serum biomarkers for active TB. Variations in mycolic acid composition affect the antigenic properties and can potentially compromise the precision of detection of anti-mycolic acids antibodies in patient sera to natural mixtures. We demonstrate this here with combinations of synthetic mycolic acid antigens, tested against TB patient and control sera. Combinations of methoxy- and α-mycolic acids are more antigenic than combinations of keto- and α-mycolic acids, showing the former to give a more sensitive test for TB biomarker antibodies. Natural mixtures of mycolic acids isolated from mature cultures of M. tuberculosis H37Rv give the same sensitivity as that with synthetic methoxy- and α-mycolic acids in combination, in a surface plasmon resonance inhibition biosensor test. To ensure that the antigenic activity of isolates of natural mycolic acids is reproducible, we cultured M. tuberculosis H37Rv on Middlebrook 7H10 solid agar plates to stationary growth phase in a standardized, optimal way. The proportions of mycolic acid classes in various batches of the isolates prepared from these cultures were compared to a commercially available natural mycolic acid isolate. LC-MS/MS and NMR data for quantitation of mycolic acids class compositions show that the variation in batches

  15. Classifying patients for breast cancer by detection of autoantibodies against a panel of conformation-carrying antigens.

    PubMed

    Evans, Rick L; Pottala, James V; Egland, Kristi A

    2014-05-01

    Patients with breast cancer elicit an autoantibody response against cancer proteins, which reflects and amplifies the cellular changes associated with tumorigenesis. Detection of autoantibodies in plasma may provide a minimally invasive mechanism for early detection of breast cancer. To identify cancer proteins that elicit a humoral response, we generated a cDNA library enriched for breast cancer genes that encode membrane and secreted proteins, which are more likely to induce an antibody response compared with intracellular proteins. To generate conformation-carrying antigens that are efficiently recognized by patients' antibodies, a eukaryotic expression strategy was established. Plasma from 200 patients with breast cancer and 200 age-matched healthy controls were measured for autoantibody activity against 20 different antigens designed to have conformational epitopes using ELISA. A conditional logistic regression model was used to select a combination of autoantibody responses against the 20 different antigens to classify patients with breast cancer from healthy controls. The best combination included ANGPTL4, DKK1, GAL1, MUC1, GFRA1, GRN, and LRRC15; however, autoantibody responses against GFRA1, GRN, and LRRC15 were inversely correlated with breast cancer. When the autoantibody responses against the 7 antigens were added to the base model, including age, BMI, race and current smoking status, the assay had the following diagnostic capabilities: c-stat (95% CI), 0.82 (0.78-0.86); sensitivity, 73%; specificity, 76%; and positive likelihood ratio (95% CI), 3.04 (2.34-3.94). The model was calibrated across risk deciles (Hosmer-Lemeshow, P = 0.13) and performed well in specific subtypes of breast cancer including estrogen receptor positive, HER-2 positive, invasive, in situ and tumor sizes >1 cm. PMID:24641868

  16. Classifying Patients for Breast Cancer by Detection of Autoantibodies against a Panel of Conformation-Carrying Antigens

    PubMed Central

    Evans, Rick L.; Pottala, James V.; Egland, Kristi A.

    2015-01-01

    Breast cancer (BCa) patients elicit an autoantibody response against cancer proteins, which reflects and amplifies the cellular changes associated with tumorigenesis. Detection of autoantibodies in plasma may provide a minimally invasive mechanism for early detection of BCa. To identify cancer proteins that elicit a humoral response, we generated a cDNA library enriched for BCa genes that encode membrane and secreted proteins, which are more likely to induce an antibody response compared to intracellular proteins. To generate conformation-carrying antigens that are efficiently recognized by patients’ antibodies, a eukaryotic expression strategy was established. Plasma from 200 BCa patients and 200 age-matched healthy controls were measured for autoantibody activity against 20 different antigens designed to have conformational epitopes using ELISA. A conditional logistic regression model was used to select a combination of autoantibody responses against the 20 different antigens to classify BCa patients from healthy controls. The best combination included ANGPTL4, DKK1, GAL1, MUC1, GFRA1, GRN and LRRC15; however, autoantibody responses against GFRA1, GRN and LRRC15 were inversely correlated with BCa. When the autoantibody responses against the 7 antigens were added to the base model, including age, BMI, race and current smoking status, the assay had the following diagnostic capabilities: c-stat (95% CI), 0.82 (0.78 to 0.86); sensitivity, 73%; specificity, 76%; and PLR (95% CI), 3.04 (2.34 to 3.94). The model was calibrated across risk deciles (Hosmer-Lemeshow, p = 0.13) and performed well in specific subtypes of BCa including estrogen receptor positive, HER-2 positive, invasive, in situ and tumor sizes >1 cm. PMID:24641868

  17. Comparison of a Stool Antigen Detection Kit and PCR for Diagnosis of Entamoeba histolytica and Entamoeba dispar Infections in Asymptomatic Cyst Passers in Iran

    PubMed Central

    Solaymani-Mohammadi, Shahram; Rezaian, Mostafa; Babaei, Zahra; Rajabpour, Azam; Meamar, Ahmad R.; Pourbabai, Ahmad A.; Petri, William A.

    2006-01-01

    The present study was conducted to compare stool antigen detection with PCR for the diagnosis of Entamoeba sp. infection in asymptomatic cyst passers from Iran. Entamoeba dispar and, in one case, E. moshkovskii were the Entamoeba spp. found in the amebic cyst passers. There was a 100% correlation between the results from the TechLab E. histolytica II stool antigen kit and those from nested PCR. We concluded that E. dispar is much more common in asymptomatic cyst passers in Iran and that antigen detection and PCR are comparable diagnostic modalities. PMID:16757634

  18. Elaboration of optical immunosensors based on the surface plasmon resonance for detecting specific antibodies and antigens of Epstein-Barr virus and human adenovirus.

    PubMed

    Nesterova, N V; Nosach, L M; Zagorodnya, S D; Povnitsa, O Y; Boltovets, P M; Baranova, G V; Golovan, A V

    2008-01-01

    The study of antigen-antibody interaction on the model of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) and second type adenovirus (Ad2) based on the surface plasmon resonance (SPR) was carried out. Kinetic and concentration dependences between virus antigens and specific antisera to them at different pH were determined. Experimental samples of biosensors for the detection by SPR method of virus (EBV and Ad2) antigens using monospecific antibodies, immobilized on the surface of gold, and also for detection of specific antibodies in the blood sera of patients with EBV or adenovirus infection were elaborated PMID:19351051

  19. A prospective field evaluation of an enzyme immunoassay: Detection of eastern equine encephalomyelitis virus antigen in pools of Culiseta melanura

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Scott, T.W.; Olson, J.G.; Lewis, T.E.; Carpenter, J.W.; Lorenz, L.H.; Lembeck, L.A.; Joseph, S.R.; Pagac, B.B.

    1987-01-01

    A prospective field study was conducted to determine the sensitivity and specificity of an enzyme immunoassay (EIA) compared to virus isolation in cell culture for the detection of eastern equine encephalomyelitis (EEE) virus in naturally infected mosquitoes. A total of 10,811 adult female Culiseta melanura were collected in light traps during 1985 from four locations in Maryland. Eastern equine encephalomyelitis virus was isolated from 5 of 495 mosquito pools in African green monkey kidney and baby hamster kidney cell cultures. All five virus-infected pools were detected by the EIA, and all 490 uninfected pools were correctly scored as not containing virus. The EIA did not produce false positive or false negative results. Results support the assertion of previous researchers that the antigen detection EIA is a rapid, sensitive, specific, and simple alternative to traditional bioassays for the detection of EEE virus in mosquitoes.

  20. Single-molecule detection of proteins with antigen-antibody interaction using resistive-pulse sensing of submicron latex particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takakura, T.; Yanagi, I.; Goto, Y.; Ishige, Y.; Kohara, Y.

    2016-03-01

    We developed a resistive-pulse sensor with a solid-state pore and measured the latex agglutination of submicron particles induced by antigen-antibody interaction for single-molecule detection of proteins. We fabricated the pore based on numerical simulation to clearly distinguish between monomer and dimer latex particles. By measuring single dimers agglutinated in the single-molecule regime, we detected single human alpha-fetoprotein molecules. Adjusting the initial particle concentration improves the limit of detection (LOD) to 95 fmol/l. We established a theoretical model of the LOD by combining the reaction kinetics and the counting statistics to explain the effect of initial particle concentration on the LOD. The theoretical model shows how to improve the LOD quantitatively. The single-molecule detection studied here indicates the feasibility of implementing a highly sensitive immunoassay by a simple measurement method using resistive-pulse sensing.

  1. Nasal chemosensory cells use bitter taste signaling to detect irritants and bacterial signals

    PubMed Central

    Tizzano, Marco; Gulbransen, Brian D.; Vandenbeuch, Aurelie; Clapp, Tod R.; Herman, Jake P.; Sibhatu, Hiruy M.; Churchill, Mair E. A.; Silver, Wayne L.; Kinnamon, Sue C.; Finger, Thomas E.

    2010-01-01

    The upper respiratory tract is continually assaulted with harmful dusts and xenobiotics carried on the incoming airstream. Detection of such irritants by the trigeminal nerve evokes protective reflexes, including sneezing, apnea, and local neurogenic inflammation of the mucosa. Although free intra-epithelial nerve endings can detect certain lipophilic irritants (e.g., mints, ammonia), the epithelium also houses a population of trigeminally innervated solitary chemosensory cells (SCCs) that express T2R bitter taste receptors along with their downstream signaling components. These SCCs have been postulated to enhance the chemoresponsive capabilities of the trigeminal irritant-detection system. Here we show that transduction by the intranasal solitary chemosensory cells is necessary to evoke trigeminally mediated reflex reactions to some irritants including acyl–homoserine lactone bacterial quorum-sensing molecules, which activate the downstream signaling effectors associated with bitter taste transduction. Isolated nasal chemosensory cells respond to the classic bitter ligand denatonium as well as to the bacterial signals by increasing intracellular Ca2+. Furthermore, these same substances evoke changes in respiration indicative of trigeminal activation. Genetic ablation of either Gα-gustducin or TrpM5, essential elements of the T2R transduction cascade, eliminates the trigeminal response. Because acyl–homoserine lactones serve as quorum-sensing molecules for Gram-negative pathogenic bacteria, detection of these substances by airway chemoreceptors offers a means by which the airway epithelium may trigger an epithelial inflammatory response before the bacteria reach population densities capable of forming destructive biofilms. PMID:20133764

  2. Molecular versus conventional culture for detection of respiratory bacterial pathogens in poultry.

    PubMed

    Ammar, A M; Abd El-Aziz, N K; Abd El Wanis, S; Bakry, N R

    2016-01-01

    Acute respiratory tract infections are leading causes of morbidity in poultry farms allover the world. Six pathogens; Escherichia coli, Mycoplasma gallisepticum, Staphylococcus aureus, Pasteurella multocida, Mannheimia haemolytica and Pseudomonas aeruginosa were involved in respiratory infections in poultry. Herein, conventional identification procedures and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) were applied for detection of the most common respiratory bacterial pathogens in clinical specimens of poultry obtained from 53 Egyptian farms with various respiratory problems and the results were compared statistically. The analyzed data demonstrated a significantly higher rate of detection of the most recovered microorganisms (P<0.05) by PCR comparing to classical culture procedures. Further, multiplex PCR could detect E. coli, M. gallisepticum, S. aureus and Ps. aeruginosa in a single reaction, however, M. haemolytica was reported in a uinplex system. According to PCR results, the most commonly recorded bacterial pathogens in examined poultry farms were E. coli and Ps. aeruginosa (54.71% each), followed by M. haemolylica (35.85%) and M. gallisepticum (20.75%). In conclusion, PCR assay offered an effective alternative to traditional typing methods for the identification and simultaneous detection of the most clinically relevant respiratory pathogens in poultry. PMID:26950451

  3. Near-infrared spectroscopy for the detection and quantification of bacterial contaminations in pharmaceutical products.

    PubMed

    Quintelas, Cristina; Mesquita, Daniela P; Lopes, João A; Ferreira, Eugénio C; Sousa, Clara

    2015-08-15

    Accurate detection and quantification of microbiological contaminations remains an issue mainly due the lack of rapid and precise analytical techniques. Standard methods are expensive and time-consuming being associated to high economic losses and public health threats. In the context of pharmaceutical industry, the development of fast analytical techniques able to overcome these limitations is crucial and spectroscopic techniques might constitute a reliable alternative. In this work we proved the ability of Fourier transform near infrared spectroscopy (FT-NIRS) to detect and quantify bacteria (Bacillus subtilis, Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas fluorescens, Salmonella enterica, Staphylococcus epidermidis) from 10 to 10(8) CFUs/mL in sterile saline solutions (NaCl 0.9%). Partial least squares discriminant analysis (PLSDA) models showed that FT-NIRS was able to discriminate between sterile and contaminated solutions for all bacteria as well as to identify the contaminant bacteria. Partial least squares (PLS) models allowed bacterial quantification with limits of detection ranging from 5.1 to 9 CFU/mL for E. coli and B. subtilis, respectively. This methodology was successfully validated in three pharmaceutical preparations (contact lens solution, cough syrup and topic anti-inflammatory solution) proving that this technique possess a high potential to be routinely used for the detection and quantification of bacterial contaminations. PMID:26151105

  4. Peroxide test strips detect added hydrogen peroxide in raw milk at levels affecting bacterial load.

    PubMed

    Martin, Nicole H; Friedlander, Adam; Mok, Allen; Kent, David; Wiedmann, Martin; Boor, Kathryn J

    2014-10-01

    Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) has a long-established history of use as a preservative in milk worldwide. The use of H2O2 to activate the inherent lactoperoxidase enzyme system has dramatically improved the quality of raw dairy products in areas in which cooling is not widely available. In the United States, however, where refrigeration is widely available, the addition of H2O2 to milk is not permitted, with the exception of certain applications prior to cheesemaking and during the preparation of modified whey. Due to the relatively quick deterioration of H2O2 in fluid milk, the detection of raw milk adulterated with the compound can be challenging. In this study we evaluated (i) total aerobic bacterial counts and (ii) ability of peroxide test strips to detect H2O2 in raw milk with various concentrations (0, 100, 300, 500, 700, and 900 ppm) of added H2O2, incubated at both 6 and 21°C for 0, 24, and 48 h. Results showed that at both 6 and 21°C the H2O2 concentration and time had a significant effect on bacterial loads in raw milk. Additionally, commercially available test strips were able to detect H2O2 in raw milk, with predicted probability of >90%, immediately after addition and after 24 and 48 h for the higher concentrations used, offering a viable method for detecting raw milk adulteration with H2O2. PMID:25285503

  5. Entamoeba histolytica antigenic protein detected in pus aspirates from patients with amoebic liver abscess.

    PubMed

    Othman, Nurulhasanah; Mohamed, Zeehaida; Yahya, Maya Mazuwin; Leow, Voon Meng; Lim, Boon Huat; Noordin, Rahmah

    2013-08-01

    Entamoeba histolytica is a causative agent of amoebic liver abscess (ALA) and is endemic in many underdeveloped countries. We investigated antigenic E. histolytica proteins in liver abscess aspirates using proteomics approach. Pus samples were first tested by real-time PCR to confirm the presence of E. histolytica DNA and the corresponding serum samples tested for E. histolytica-specific IgG by a commercial ELISA. Proteins were extracted from three and one pool(s) of pus samples from ALA and PLA (pyogenic liver abscess) patients respectively, followed by analysis using isoelectric focussing, SDS-PAGE and Western blot. Unpurified pooled serum samples from infected hamsters and pooled human amoebic-specific IgG were used as primary antibodies. The antigenic protein band was excised from the gel, digested and analysed by MALDI-TOF/TOF and LC-MS/MS. The results using both primary antibodies showed an antigenic protein band of ∼14kDa. Based on the mass spectrum analysis, putative tyrosine kinase is the most probable identification of the antigenic band. PMID:23680184

  6. Direct detection of influenza virus antigen in nasopharyngeal specimens by direct enzyme immunoassay in comparison with quantitating virus shedding.

    PubMed Central

    Döller, G; Schuy, W; Tjhen, K Y; Stekeler, B; Gerth, H J

    1992-01-01

    We developed a direct enzyme immunoassay [EIA; Enzygnost Influenza A(Ag) and Enzygnost Influenza B(Ag)] for the direct detection of influenza A and B virus antigens in nasopharyngeal secretion specimens (NPS). The test is performed without sonification of specimens, and results are obtained within 4 h. A direct comparison between direct EIA and quantitation of virus shedding for influenza A and B virus antigen detection was carried out. A total of 210 NPS and 98 nasopharyngeal wash specimens (NPW) were investigated. We isolated influenza A viruses from 79 (37.6%) of 210 NPS; of these 79 cell-culture-positive NPS, 70 (88.6%) were also positive by direct EIA. Of 29 (13.8%) NPS from which influenza B virus was isolated, 24 (82.8%) NPS were positive by direct EIA. Virus shedding was determined quantitatively in 48 NPS from patients with influenza A and in 24 NPS from patients with influenza B. Only a crude correlation between optical density values and virus concentrations was observed. Detection of influenza virus antigens in NPS by direct EIA showed sensitivities of 89.7% for influenza A virus and 87.9% for influenza B virus and specificities of 99.3% for influenza A virus and 100% for influenza B virus. With direct EIA, all NPW were negative for influenza A virus, although virus was isolated from 21 (21.4%) NPW. Of 15 NPW from which influenza B virus was isolated, 7 showed positive results in direct EIA. In addition, direct EIA is suitable for detecting influenza A and B viruses in cell cultures before the appearance of any cytopathic effects and can be used as a cell culture confirmation test. PMID:1572972

  7. Detection of group C rotavirus antigens and antibodies in animals and humans by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays.

    PubMed Central

    Tsunemitsu, H; Jiang, B; Saif, L J

    1992-01-01

    Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs) were developed to detect group (gp) C rotavirus antigens and antibodies. Both assays were confirmed to be specific for gp C rotavirus by using serogroup A, B, and C rotaviruses; hyperimmune antisera to these serogroups of rotaviruses; and paired serum specimens from animals infected with gp C rotaviruses. The ELISA for antigen detection reacted not only with porcine gp C rotaviruses but also with human and bovine gp C rotaviruses. Following experimental challenge of gnotobiotic pigs with porcine gp C rotavirus, the virus was found by ELISA in all diarrheic feces. A high prevalence of antibodies to gp C rotaviruses was detected in sera from adult pigs (93 to 97%) and cattle (47 to 56%) in the United States and Japan. However, no antibody to gp C rotavirus was detected in the sera (n = 20) of adult horses in the United States. In human sera from Hokkaido, Japan, 3% of children and 13% of adults possessed antibody to gp C rotaviruses. These results suggest that the ELISA that we developed may be useful for surveying gp C rotavirus infections in animals and humans. On the basis of serology, gp C rotavirus infections are common in pigs and cattle in the United States and Japan, but they occur at lower levels in humans from the Hokkaido area of Japan. PMID:1323577

  8. A double-antibody sandwich ELISA for the detection of Entamoeba histolytica antigen in stool samples of humans.

    PubMed

    Baumann, D; Gottstein, B

    1987-06-01

    A double-antibody sandwich ELISA was developed to detect detergent-solubilized antigens of Entamoeba histolytica in stool samples of humans. The test system was evaluated for its methodical and diagnostic sensitivity and specificity. In recovery experiments the lower limit of detection was 400 ng E. histolytica (HK9) protein/ml stool, corresponding to approximately 2000 amoebic trophozoites/ml stool. Samples of 97 patients with suspected intestinal amoebiasis were examined. Specific antigens were detected by ELISA (= positive reaction) in 14 (93%) out of 15 stool samples containing trophozoites of E. histolytica. In contrast, 68 (93%) of 73 samples with other protozoa, including Entamoeba coli, E. hartmanni, Endolimax nana, Iodamoeba buetschlii and Giardia lamblia, did not react in the test system (= negative reaction). The test was shown to detect only trophozoites of E. histolytica and not the cyst stage. This fact could facilitate the differentiation between cyst carriers and persons excreting trophozoites. The results of this preliminary study justify a further large scale evaluation of the test system. PMID:2888183

  9. The routine use of prostate-specific antigen for early detection of cancer prostate in India: Is it justified?

    PubMed Central

    Dubey, Deepak

    2009-01-01

    Background: The use of prostate-specific antigen (PSA) for early detection of prostate cancer is a widely debated issue. The average Indian urologist is faced with the dilemma of whether PSA testing should be routinely offered to men over 50 years of age. The Urological Society of India is yet to issue any guidelines on PSA testing. This article attempts to explore scientific evidence dealing with this controversial subject. Materials and Methods: A MEDLINE search was performed using the words ‘PSA screening’, ‘prostate cancer statistics’, and ‘PSA screening guidelines’. The relevant articles were then analysed for evidence regarding the utility of PSA screening. Results: Prostate cancer does not qualify to be categorized as a major health problem in India. The natural history of screen-detected cancer is not known. Prostate-specific antigen testing for early detection of prostate cancer has questionable benefits and has a potential to cause harm to asymptomatic individuals. There is no consensus amongst learned medical societies as to what should be the best approach for PSA testing. Most organizations caution against widespread PSA screening and emphasize on informed consent and patient counseling with regard to PSA testing. Randomized prospective trials are ongoing to assess to the true impact of screening on prostate cancer mortality. Conclusions: There is no scientific rationale to advocate routine use of PSA for early detection of prostate cancer in Indian males. Results of randomized screening trials are awaited to clarify on this issue. PMID:19672341

  10. Rapid methods for the detection of foodborne bacterial pathogens: principles, applications, advantages and limitations

    PubMed Central

    Law, Jodi Woan-Fei; Ab Mutalib, Nurul-Syakima; Chan, Kok-Gan; Lee, Learn-Han

    2015-01-01

    The incidence of foodborne diseases has increased over the years and resulted in major public health problem globally. Foodborne pathogens can be found in various foods and it is important to detect foodborne pathogens to provide safe food supply and to prevent foodborne diseases. The conventional methods used to detect foodborne pathogen are time consuming and laborious. Hence, a variety of methods have been developed for rapid detection of foodborne pathogens as it is required in many food analyses. Rapid detection methods can be categorized into nucleic acid-based, biosensor-based and immunological-based methods. This review emphasizes on the principles and application of recent rapid methods for the detection of foodborne bacterial pathogens. Detection methods included are simple polymerase chain reaction (PCR), multiplex PCR, real-time PCR, nucleic acid sequence-based amplification (NASBA), loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) and oligonucleotide DNA microarray which classified as nucleic acid-based methods; optical, electrochemical and mass-based biosensors which classified as biosensor-based methods; enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and lateral flow immunoassay which classified as immunological-based methods. In general, rapid detection methods are generally time-efficient, sensitive, specific and labor-saving. The developments of rapid detection methods are vital in prevention and treatment of foodborne diseases. PMID:25628612

  11. Rapid methods for the detection of foodborne bacterial pathogens: principles, applications, advantages and limitations.

    PubMed

    Law, Jodi Woan-Fei; Ab Mutalib, Nurul-Syakima; Chan, Kok-Gan; Lee, Learn-Han

    2014-01-01

    The incidence of foodborne diseases has increased over the years and resulted in major public health problem globally. Foodborne pathogens can be found in various foods and it is important to detect foodborne pathogens to provide safe food supply and to prevent foodborne diseases. The conventional methods used to detect foodborne pathogen are time consuming and laborious. Hence, a variety of methods have been developed for rapid detection of foodborne pathogens as it is required in many food analyses. Rapid detection methods can be categorized into nucleic acid-based, biosensor-based and immunological-based methods. This review emphasizes on the principles and application of recent rapid methods for the detection of foodborne bacterial pathogens. Detection methods included are simple polymerase chain reaction (PCR), multiplex PCR, real-time PCR, nucleic acid sequence-based amplification (NASBA), loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) and oligonucleotide DNA microarray which classified as nucleic acid-based methods; optical, electrochemical and mass-based biosensors which classified as biosensor-based methods; enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and lateral flow immunoassay which classified as immunological-based methods. In general, rapid detection methods are generally time-efficient, sensitive, specific and labor-saving. The developments of rapid detection methods are vital in prevention and treatment of foodborne diseases. PMID:25628612

  12. Effect of bacterial antigen lysate on IgG and IgA levels in children with recurrent infections and hypogammaglobulinemia.

    PubMed

    Quezada, A; Maggi, L; Pérez, M A; Rodríguez, J

    1999-01-01

    To evaluate the effect of bacterial antigen lysate on serum immunoglobulin (Ig) levels, we studied 14 children with recurrent infections and hypogammaglobulinemia (IgG and IgA levels below 2 standard deviations for age). Patients were treated for a 60-90 day period with OM-85 BV and reevaluated both clinically and by measuring serum Ig levels at the end of follow-up. The control group consisted of 10 children with recurrent infections who received a placebo. Serum Ig levels were also compared with the reference values for age. The Wilcoxon and Mann-Whitney tests were used for statistical analysis. In the study group, IgG (pretreatment: 707 mg/dl; post-treatment: 1,022 mg/dl; p < 0.004) and IgA levels (pretreatment: 41 mg/dl; post-treatment: 83 mg/dl; p < 0.018) increased significantly. Furthermore, 13/14 children reached normal IgG levels, and 12/14 children reached normal age levels for serum IgA. Similarly, when comparing the pre- and post-treatment levels in the study group with the levels in the control group, they were significant for IgG (p < 0.002) as well as IgA levels (p < 0.04). The overall clinical response was favorable in all patients in the treated group. These results suggest an immunostimulant effect of OM-85 BV, both improving Ig levels and reducing recurrent infections. PMID:10412680

  13. [Comparative research into sensitivity and specificity of immune-enzyme analysis with chemiluminescence and colorimetric detection for detecting antigens and antibodies to avian influenza viruses and newcastle disease].

    PubMed

    Vitkova, O N; Kapustina, T P; Mikhailova, V V; Safonov, G A; Vlasova, N N; Belousova, R V

    2015-01-01

    The goal of this work was to demonstrate the results of the development of the enzyme-linked immunosorbent tests with chemiluminescence detection and colorimetric detection of specific viral antigens and antibodies for identifying the avian influenza and the Newcastle disease viruses: high sensitivity and specificity of the immuno- chemiluminescence assay, which are 10-50 times higher than those of the ELISA colorimetric method. The high effectiveness of the results and the automation of the process of laboratory testing (using a luminometer) allow these methods to be recommended for including in primary screening tests for these infectious diseases. PMID:27024917

  14. Diagnostic performances of antigen detection compared to conventional and nucleic acid detection of Entamoeba histolytica in a non-endemic setting.

    PubMed

    Calderaro, Adriana; Piergianni, Maddalena; Piccolo, Giovanna; Rossi, Sabina; Montecchini, Sara; Buttrini, Mirko; Arcangeletti, Maria Cristina; Medici, Maria Cristina; Chezzi, Carlo; De Conto, Flora

    2016-04-01

    This study evaluated the immunochromatographic (IC) assay "TECHLAB(®) E. HISTOLYTICA QUIK CHEK™" analysing 36 faecal samples and 7 cultured strains. This assay was compared to the methods performed in our laboratory for the diagnosis of amoebiasis. The IC assay revealed a detection limit of 103 trophozoites/g faeces and no cross-reactivity with other parasites and failed to detect E. histolytica antigen in frozen faeces. In our laboratory located in a non-endemic setting this assay could not replace the methods currently used for the diagnosis of amoebiasis. PMID:27196557

  15. Diagnosis of tuberculosis based on the detection of a cocktail of mycobacterial antigen 85B, ESAT-6 and cord factor by immuno-PCR.

    PubMed

    Mehta, Promod K; Singh, Netrapal; Dharra, Renu; Dahiya, Bhawna; Sharma, Suman; Sheoran, Abhishek; Gupta, Krishna B; Chaudhary, Dhruva; Mehta, Neeru; Varma-Basil, Mandira

    2016-08-01

    Attempts were made to enhance the sensitivity of immuno-PCR assay based on the detection of cocktail of mycobacterial antigen 85B (Rv1886c), ESAT-6 (Rv3875) and cord factor (trehalose 6,6'-dimycolate) in pulmonary and extrapulmonary TB patients. Detection of Ag85B was found to be superior to the detection of cocktail in TB patients. PMID:27164021

  16. Utilization of monoclonal antibodies for detection of Plasmodium falciparum antigen in cerebrospinal fluid of cerebral malaria patients.

    PubMed

    Khushiramani, Rekha; Shrivastava, Sandeep; Varma, Subhash; Batra, Harsh Vardhan; Dubey, Mohan Lal

    2008-08-01

    A uniform protein profile of bands at 34, 43, and 52 kDa was obtained with all the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) samples of malaria (10 in number) and non-malaria patients (31 in number) by sodium dodecyl sulphate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE). An immunoreactive band was observed at 43 kDa in CSF samples of cerebral malaria patients but not in non-malaria cases when tested with rabbit anti-Plasmodium falciparum antibodies by Western blot analysis. Eleven reactive monoclonal antibodies against P. falciparum were stabilized and expanded. Nine monoclonal antibodies were reactive to CSF samples of cerebral malaria and non-malaria and P. falciparum antigen by dot-ELISA and a common immunoreactive band at 43 kDa by Western blot. One clone Cl-2 was reactive at 43 kDa with CSF of the cerebral malaria patients and also in P. falciparum antigen but at 66 kDa with non-malarial CSF samples in Western blot. The other two clones (Cl-6 and 14) reacted with 3/31 (90% specific) and 8/31 (74%) CSF samples of non-malaria patients, respectively. The monoclonal antibody based ELISA reported in the present study using clone-6 can therefore offer another possibility for developing rapid, easy-to-perform, low-cost tests for diagnosis of cerebral malaria in CSF samples. Western blot using clone-2 might be useful for the detection of cerebral malaria antigen in CSF. PMID:18707548

  17. Comparison between a soluble antigen-based ELISA and IFAT in detecting antibodies against Babesia canis in dogs.

    PubMed

    Furuta, Patrícia Iriê; Oliveira, Tricia Maria Ferreira de Sousa; Theixeira, Márcia Cristina Alves; Rocha, Artur Gouveia; Machado, Rosangela Zacarias; Tinucci-Costa, Mirela Gouveia

    2009-01-01

    An available enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) was studied for the detection of anti-B. canis antibodies in the sera of dogs using, indirect fluorescent antibody test (IFAT) as a reference test. ELISA uses a soluble antigenic preparation of B. canis and the optimal dilutions of the antigen, serum and conjugate were determined by check board titration, using positive and negative reference serum. The soluble antigen preparation of B. canis merozoites was 10 microg x mL(-1), with reference sera from positive and negative in a single dilution of 1:100, and conjugated to 1:4.000. A total of 246 serum samples were collected from dogs during the rabies vaccination campaign in Jaboticabal, São Paulo, Brazil and examined for the presence of antibodies against B. canis by ELISA and IFAT. Under these conditions, the average absorbance of negative serum was 0.129 + or - 0.025, resulting in a cut-of value of 0.323 (ELISA level 3) and the average absorbance of positive reference serum was 2.156 + or - 1.187. The serological positive samples tested for B. canis by ELISA and IFAT were 67.89% (n = 167) and 59.35% (n = 146), respectively. These results suggest that ELISA described may prove to be an effective serological test to diagnose canine babesiosis. PMID:19772774

  18. Pretreatment of serum samples to reduce interference of colostrum-derived specific antibodies with detection of Bovine viral diarrhea virus antigen by ELISA in young calves.

    PubMed

    Lanyon, Sasha R; Reichel, Michael P

    2016-05-01

    Antigen enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) is used for the detection of Bovine viral diarrhea virus persistently infected (BVDV PI) cattle; however, colostrum-derived antibodies may interfere with antigen detection in serum from young PI calves. Our study aimed to assess serum pretreatment methods for reducing such interference. Dilution of PI serum with serum containing specific antibody showed that antibody levels equivalent to those observed in colostrum-fed calves were able to eliminate all antigen signals in a serum sample. Serum was treated with ethylenediamine tetra-acetic acid at pH 4.5, 5.5, 6.5, and 7.5, then boiled, centrifuged, and the supernatant-recovered. BVDV antibody was undetectable by ELISA in supernatants from treated samples, and the antigen ELISA signal was improved. Maximum antigen signal recovery of >90% was achieved at pH 5 ± 0.5. When this optimal treatment method was applied to field samples from 3 PI calves (which were negative in the antigen-capture ELISA without treatment), the antigen signal improved and gave a positive result in each case. Pretreatment may provide an improvement in the detection of young PI calves. PMID:27016723

  19. Nanostructured sensor based on carbon nanotubes and clavanin A for bacterial detection.

    PubMed

    Andrade, César A S; Nascimento, Jéssica M; Oliveira, Idjane S; de Oliveira, Carlos V J; de Melo, Celso P; Franco, Octávio L; Oliveira, Maria D L

    2015-11-01

    Unusual methods for specific detection of pathogenic bacteria are becoming key points for control and identification of problems related to health and (bio)safety. In this context, this work aims to propose a new approach for the development of nanostructured biosensors based on carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and antimicrobial peptides for bacterial detection. Firstly, the antimicrobial peptide clavanin A (ClavA) was chemically immobilized on CNTs and surface-immobilized ClavA was used to detect Klebsiella pneumoniae, Enterococcus faecalis, Escherichia coli and Bacillus subtilis in a direct assay format. We used electrochemical impedance spectroscopy technique to evaluate the effectiveness and sensitivity of the ClavA-based biosensors by measuring the modifications in their electrochemical responses before and after incubation in presence of different bacteria concentrations. The biosensor was able to discriminate between bacteria concentrations in the 10(2)-10(6)CFU mL(-1) range. Atomic force microscopy analysis confirmed the biosensor functionality for bacterial recognition. This new sensor system was capable of differentiating between Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria, since ClavA showed different affinities toward the pathogenic bacteria species. PMID:25847459

  20. Hybrid Bacterial Foraging and Particle Swarm Optimization for detecting Bundle Branch Block.

    PubMed

    Kora, Padmavathi; Kalva, Sri Ramakrishna

    2015-01-01

    Abnormal cardiac beat identification is a key process in the detection of heart diseases. Our present study describes a procedure for the detection of left and right bundle branch block (LBBB and RBBB) Electrocardiogram (ECG) patterns. The electrical impulses that control the cardiac beat face difficulty in moving inside the heart. This problem is termed as bundle branch block (BBB). BBB makes it harder for the heart to pump blood effectively through the heart circulatory system. ECG feature extraction is a key process in detecting heart ailments. Our present study comes up with a hybrid method combining two heuristic optimization methods: Bacterial Forging Optimization (BFO) and Particle Swarm Optimization (PSO) for the feature selection of ECG signals. One of the major controlling forces of BFO algorithm is the chemotactic movement of a bacterium that models a test solution. The chemotaxis process of the BFO depends on random search directions which may lead to a delay in achieving the global optimum solution. The hybrid technique: Bacterial Forging-Particle Swarm Optimization (BFPSO) incorporates the concepts from BFO and PSO and it creates individuals in a new generation. This BFPSO method performs local search through the chemotactic movement of BFO and the global search over the entire search domain is accomplished by a PSO operator. The BFPSO feature values are given as the input for the Levenberg-Marquardt Neural Network classifier. PMID:26361582

  1. Identification of Bacterial DNA Markers for the Detection of Human Fecal Pollution in Water▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Shanks, Orin C.; Domingo, Jorge W. Santo; Lu, Jingrang; Kelty, Catherine A.; Graham, James E.

    2007-01-01

    We used genome fragment enrichment and bioinformatics to identify several microbial DNA sequences with high potential for use as markers in PCR assays for detection of human fecal contamination in water. Following competitive solution-phase hybridization of total DNA from human and pig fecal samples, 351 plasmid clones were sequenced and were determined to define 289 different genomic DNA regions. These putative human-specific fecal bacterial DNA sequences were then analyzed by dot blot hybridization, which confirmed that 98% were present in the source human fecal microbial community and absent from the original pig fecal DNA extract. Comparative sequence analyses of these sequences suggested that a large number (43.5%) were predicted to encode bacterial secreted or surface-associated proteins. Deoxyoligonucleotide primers capable of annealing to a subset of 26 of the candidate sequences predicted to encode factors involved in interactions with host cells were then used in the PCR and did not amplify markers in DNA from any additional pig fecal specimens. These 26 PCR assays exhibited a range of specificity in tests with 11 other animal sources, with more than half amplifying markers only in specimens from dogs or cats. Four assays were more specific, detecting markers only in specimens from humans, including those from 18 different human populations examined. We then demonstrated the potential utility of these assays by using them to detect human fecal contamination in several impacted watersheds. PMID:17209067

  2. Label-Free Detection and Discrimination of Bacterial Pathogens Based on Hemin Recognition.

    PubMed

    Maltais, Thora R; Adak, Avijit K; Younis, Waleed; Seleem, Mohamed N; Wei, Alexander

    2016-07-20

    Hemin linked to hexa(ethylene glycol)bishydrazide was patterned by inkjet printing into periodic microarrays, and evaluated for their ability to capture bacterial pathogens expressing various hemin receptors. Bacterial adhesion was imaged under darkfield conditions with Fourier analysis, supporting a label-free method of pathogen detection. Hemin microarrays were screened against a panel of 16 bacteria and found capable of capturing multiple species, some with limits of detection as low as 10(3) cfu/mL. Several Gram-positive strains including Staphylococcus aureus and Bacillus anthracis also exhibited rapid adhesion, enabling pattern recognition within minutes of exposure. This can be attributed to differences in hemin acquisition systems: aggressively adherent bacteria express cell-surface hemin receptors (CSHRs) that enable direct hemin binding and uptake, whereas other types of bacteria including most Gram-negative strains rely on the secretion and recapture of soluble proteins (hemophores) for hemin acquisition, with consequently longer times for ligand binding and detection. PMID:27337653

  3. Identification of bacterial DNA markers for the detection of human fecal pollution in water.

    PubMed

    Shanks, Orin C; Domingo, Jorge W Santo; Lu, Jingrang; Kelty, Catherine A; Graham, James E

    2007-04-01

    We used genome fragment enrichment and bioinformatics to identify several microbial DNA sequences with high potential for use as markers in PCR assays for detection of human fecal contamination in water. Following competitive solution-phase hybridization of total DNA from human and pig fecal samples, 351 plasmid clones were sequenced and were determined to define 289 different genomic DNA regions. These putative human-specific fecal bacterial DNA sequences were then analyzed by dot blot hybridization, which confirmed that 98% were present in the source human fecal microbial community and absent from the original pig fecal DNA extract. Comparative sequence analyses of these sequences suggested that a large number (43.5%) were predicted to encode bacterial secreted or surface-associated proteins. Deoxyoligonucleotide primers capable of annealing to a subset of 26 of the candidate sequences predicted to encode factors involved in interactions with host cells were then used in the PCR and did not amplify markers in DNA from any additional pig fecal specimens. These 26 PCR assays exhibited a range of specificity in tests with 11 other animal sources, with more than half amplifying markers only in specimens from dogs or cats. Four assays were more specific, detecting markers only in specimens from humans, including those from 18 different human populations examined. We then demonstrated the potential utility of these assays by using them to detect human fecal contamination in several impacted watersheds. PMID:17209067

  4. Novel high-throughput detection method to assess bacterial surfactant production.

    PubMed

    Burch, Adrien Y; Shimada, Briana K; Browne, Patrick J; Lindow, Steven E

    2010-08-01

    A novel biosurfactant detection assay was developed for the observation of surfactants on agar plates. By using an airbrush to apply a fine mist of oil droplets, surfactants can be observed instantaneously as halos around biosurfactant-producing colonies. This atomized oil assay can detect a wide range of different synthetic and bacterially produced surfactants. This method could detect much lower concentrations of many surfactants than a commonly used water drop collapse method. It is semiquantitative and therefore has broad applicability for uses such as high-throughput mutagenesis screens of biosurfactant-producing bacterial strains. The atomized oil assay was used to screen for mutants of the plant pathogen Pseudomonas syringae pv. syringae B728a that were altered in the production of biosurfactants. Transposon mutants displaying significantly altered surfactant halos were identified and further analyzed. All mutants identified displayed altered swarming motility, as would be expected of surfactant mutants. Additionally, measurements of the transcription of the syringafactin biosynthetic cluster in the mutants, the principal biosurfactant known to be produced by B728a, revealed novel regulators of this pathway. PMID:20562275

  5. Combined Serological Detection of Circulating Angiostrongylus vasorum Antigen and Parasite-specific Antibodies in Dogs from Hungary.

    PubMed

    Schnyder, Manuela; Schaper, Roland; Lukács, Zoltán; Hornok, Sándor; Farkas, Róbert

    2015-08-01

    The occurrence of the nematode Angiostrongylus vasorum, also known as the French heartworm, is increasingly being reported from various European countries. The adults of this parasite species live in the pulmonary arteries and right cardiac ventricle of wild canids and domestic dogs. Larval stages and eggs in the lungs induce inflammatory verminous pneumonia, causing severe respiratory disease in dogs. Furthermore, haematological and neurological signs and even death may occur. In Hungary, A. vasorum has been identified in red foxes, golden jackals and in two dogs and some slugs. In this first large-scale survey, 1247 sera from pet dogs were collected and tested by an ELISA for the detection of circulating antigen of A. vasorum and by a separate ELISA to detect specific antibodies against the parasite. A total of 1.36% (n = 17, 95 % confidence intervals, CI: 0.80 - 2.17 %) of the animals were positive in both ELISAs, while 1.76 % (n = 22, CI: 1.11 - 2.66 %) of the tested dogs were antigen-positive only and 2.73 % (n = 34, CI: 1.90 - 3.79 %) were positive for specific antibodies only. Regions with antigen- and antibody-positive animals overlapped and were distributed over nearly the whole sampled areas of the country. A considerable number of cases was observed in Budapest and also in the southern part of the country bordering Croatia, while in the most eastern part bordering Ukraine no positive samples were detected. These results confirm the endemic occurrence of A. vasorum in dogs originating from different parts of Hungary and the significant advantages of A. vasorum serology in epidemiological studies. PMID:26152415

  6. Disposable bioluminescence-based biosensor for detection of bacterial count in food.

    PubMed

    Luo, Jinping; Liu, Xiaohong; Tian, Qing; Yue, Weiwei; Zeng, Jing; Chen, Guangquan; Cai, Xinxia

    2009-11-01

    A biosensor for rapid detection of bacterial count based on adenosine 5'-triphosphate (ATP) bioluminescence has been developed. The biosensor is composed of a key sensitive element and a photomultiplier tube used as a detector element. The disposable sensitive element consists of a sampler, a cartridge where intracellular ATP is chemically extracted from bacteria, and a microtube where the extracted ATP reacts with the luciferin-luciferase reagent to produce bioluminescence. The bioluminescence signal is transformed into relevant electrical signal by the detector and further measured with a homemade luminometer. Parameters affecting the amount of the extracted ATP, including the types of ATP extractants, the concentrations of ATP extractant, and the relevant neutralizing reagent, were optimized. Under the optimal experimental conditions, the biosensor showed a linear response to standard bacteria in a concentration range from 10(3) to 10(8) colony-forming units (CFU) per milliliter with a correlation coefficient of 0.925 (n=22) within 5min. Moreover, the bacterial count of real food samples obtained by the biosensor correlated well with those by the conventional plate count method. The proposed biosensor, with characteristics of low cost, easy operation, and fast response, provides potential application to rapid evaluation of bacterial contamination in the food industry, environment monitoring, and other fields. PMID:19464252

  7. Sublingual therapeutic immunization with a polyvalent bacterial preparation in patients with recurrent respiratory infections: immunomodulatory effect on antigen-specific memory CD4+ T cells and impact on clinical outcome

    PubMed Central

    Alecsandru, D; Valor, L; Sánchez-Ramón, S; Gil, J; Carbone, J; Navarro, J; Rodríguez, J J; Rodríguez-Sainz, C; Fernández-Cruz, E

    2011-01-01

    Recurrent respiratory tract infections (RRTIs) are common clinical conditions in individuals with alterations of the immune function. A prospective open pilot study in a cohort of patients with RRTIs has been performed to assess whether sublingual immunization with a polyvalent bacterial vaccine could exert an immunomodulatory effect on the antigen-specific immunological responses and have an impact on the clinical outcome. Seventeen patients with RRTIs were recruited. An oral polyvalent bacterial preparation (Bactek®) was administered to all patients daily for 6 months. Immunological assessment was performed at baseline and at the end of immunization. Immunological measurements included: T cell-specific proliferations of CD3+CD4+ and CD3+CD8+ to Bactek® antigens, total immunoglobulin levels, antibodies to pneumococcal polysaccharide and tetanus toxoid and B, T and natural killer (NK) cell subsets. There was a significant increase in the proliferative capacity of CD3+CD4+ T cells specific to Bactek® antigens at month 6 in comparison to baseline (P < 0·0001). A significant increase in total CD3+ T cells was also observed (P < 0·05). No significant differences were observed between baseline and month 6 in levels of total immunoglobulins, specific antibodies and B, T or NK cell subsets. A significant reduction in the patient's rate of RRTIs was observed compared with 1 year prior to initiation of therapy (P < 0·0001). The results demonstrate that long-term administration of a sublingual polyvalent bacterial preparation in patients with RRTIs exerts an immune stimulating effect on CD4+ T helper cell responses to bacterial antigens which could be associated with clinical benefit. PMID:21391984

  8. A multiple antigen ELISA to detect Neospora-specific antibodies in bovine sera, bovine foetal fluids, ovine and caprine sera.

    PubMed

    Osawa, T; Wastling, J; Maley, S; Buxton, D; Innes, E A

    1998-09-01

    Neospora caninum is a cyst-forming coccidian parasite recently identified as a cause of abortion in cattle. The epidemiology of neosporosis is poorly understood, partly because accurate diagnosis of infection is difficult. In this paper we describe the development of a multiple antigen-based enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) to detect antibodies to N. caninum in sera from cattle, sheep and goats as well as from bovine foetal fluids. A water-soluble fraction (wsf) of sonicated NC-1 strain tachyzoites was used as the antigen in the ELISA. Minimum optical density (OD) values that were considered to be Neospora antibody-positive, that is, the cut-off OD values were determined separately for bovine maternal sera, bovine foetal fluids, ovine sera and caprine sera; they were 0.40, 0.17, 0.23 and 0.41 OD, respectively. The ELISA gave a high signal/noise ratio, giving good sensitivity and specificity, correlating well with the indirect fluorescent antibody test (IFAT) currently used to diagnose Neospora infection in cattle, sheep and goats. In both the ELISA and immunoblot analysis using the same antigen, there was no significant cross-reactivity with sera from cattle, sheep or goats that had been infected with Toxoplasma gondii. The ELISA also showed no cross-reactivity in sera from cattle infected with Sarcocystis cruzi, Babesia divergens, B. bovis and B. bigemina. The wsf fraction of sonicated N. caninum tachyzoites used in this ELISA can be easily prepared and may be more sensitive than a single antigen ELISA, whilst still retaining good specificity. PMID:9777723

  9. FRET detection of lymphocyte function–associated antigen-1 conformational extension

    PubMed Central

    Chigaev, Alexandre; Smagley, Yelena; Haynes, Mark K.; Ursu, Oleg; Bologa, Cristian G.; Halip, Liliana; Oprea, Tudor; Waller, Anna; Carter, Mark B.; Zhang, Yinan; Wang, Wei; Buranda, Tione; Sklar, Larry A.

    2015-01-01

    Lymphocyte function–associated antigen 1 (LFA-1, CD11a/CD18, αLβ2-integrin) and its ligands are essential for adhesion between T-cells and antigen-presenting cells, formation of the immunological synapse, and other immune cell interactions. LFA-1 function is regulated through conformational changes that include the modulation of ligand binding affinity and molecular extension. However, the relationship between molecular conformation and function is unclear. Here fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) with new LFA-1–specific fluorescent probes showed that triggering of the pathway used for T-cell activation induced rapid unquenching of the FRET signal consistent with extension of the molecule. Analysis of the FRET quenching at rest revealed an unexpected result that can be interpreted as a previously unknown LFA-1 conformation. PMID:25378583

  10. Antigen Export Reduces Antigen Presentation and Limits T Cell Control of M. tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Srivastava, Smita; Grace, Patricia S; Ernst, Joel D

    2016-01-13

    Persistence of Mycobacterium tuberculosis results from bacterial strategies that manipulate host adaptive immune responses. Infected dendritic cells (DCs) transport M. tuberculosis to local lymph nodes but activate CD4 T cells poorly, suggesting bacterial manipulation of antigen presentation. However, M. tuberculosis antigens are also exported from infected DCs and taken up and presented by uninfected DCs, possibly overcoming this blockade of antigen presentation by infected cells. Here we show that the first stage of this antigen transfer, antigen export, benefits M. tuberculosis by diverting bacterial proteins from the antigen presentation pathway. Kinesin-2 is required for antigen export and depletion of this microtubule-based motor increases activation of antigen-specific CD4 T cells by infected cells and improves control of intracellular infection. Thus, although antigen transfer enables presentation by bystander cells, it does not compensate for reduced antigen presentation by infected cells and represents a bacterial strategy for CD4 T cell evasion. PMID:26764596

  11. Establishment of a cell line panel for the detection of antibodies against human platelet antigen 4b.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Tomoya; Amakishi, Etsuko; Inoue, Masayasu; Hirayama, Fumiya

    2011-02-01

    Antibodies against human platelet antigens (HPAs) play important roles in thrombocytopenia. In Japan, HPA-4b antibody is frequently responsible for HPA-related neonatal alloimmune thrombocytopenia. A highly sensitive assay using platelets has been developed for the detection of antibodies against HPAs. However, it is difficult to obtain the platelets expressing specific HPAs required for the assay. Therefore, an alternative method not requiring platelets would be helpful to detect antibodies against HPAs. Glycoprotein IIIa (GPIIIa) cDNA encoding HPA-4b was individually co-transduced with that of wild-type GPIIb in K562 cells, which is a non-adherent cell line, using a retroviral vector. The expression of transgene products in cultured cells were observed for over 6 months. Next, to evaluating the sensitivity and specificity of this cell line panel, we performed monoclonal antibody-specific immobilization of platelet antigens (MAIPA) assay with a serum previously identified by another method. All HPA-4b antibodies in serum samples were positive, and all serum samples, including normal serum and serum containing HLA antibodies were negative. No difference was observed in the specificity and sensitivity between our method and conventional MAIPA using platelets. The present results indicate that this established cell line panel permits highly sensitive detection of specific antibodies against HPA-4b. PMID:21286877

  12. Importance of competitive binding in the detection of antigen specific bovine isotypes and subisotypes by the micro ELISA.

    PubMed

    Townsend, J; Duffus, W P; Lammas, D A

    1982-11-01

    An enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay was developed to detect and quantify the specific bovine immunoglobulin class response to Trypanosoma theileri, Dictyocaulus viviparus and infectious bovine rhinotracheitis virus. Comparative measurement of the specific immunoglobulin classes in whole serum was achieved using monospecific rabbit antibovine IgG1, IgG2 and IgM, followed by a goat anti-rabbit Ig-enzyme conjugate (antiglobulin ELISA). The results obtained in the antiglobulin ELISA compared favourably with the standard (or indirect) ELISA using the purified immunoglobulins. Competitive inhibition between specific immunoglobulins of different isotypes and subisotypes was the major disadvantage of the antiglobulin ELISA. This latter assay failed to detect specific IgG2 against T theileri antigen in both calf and adult whole serum. The inability to detect the specific IgG2 was a result of competitive inhibition by specific IgG1. However, competitive inhibition between specific immunoglobulins was not observed in either of the other test systems using D viviparus and infectious bovine rhinotracheitis virus antigens. PMID:6296953

  13. Development and evaluation of an immunochromatographic strip for rapid detection of capsid protein antigen p27 of avian leukosis virus.

    PubMed

    Qian, Kun; Liang, You-zhi; Yin, Li-ping; Shao, Hong-xia; Ye, Jian-qiang; Qin, Ai-jian

    2015-09-01

    A rapid immunochromatographic strip for detecting capsid protein antigen p27 of avian leukosis virus was successfully developed based on two high-affinity monoclonal antibodies. The test strip could detect not only 600pg purified recombinant p27 protein but also quantified avian leukosis virus as low as 70 TCID50, which has comparative sensitivity to the commercial enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) kit. For the evaluation of this test strip, 1100 samples consisting of cloacal swabs, meconium collected from the earliest stool of one day old chicken and virus isolates were assessed both by the strip and by the commercial ELISA kit. The agreement between these two tests was 93.91%, 93.42% and 100%, respectively. The sensitivity and specificity of the strip were also calculated by using the ELISA kit as the standard. This immunochromatographic strip provides advantages of rapid and simple detection of capsid protein antigen p27 of avian leukosis virus, which could be applied as an on-site testing assay and used for control and eradication programs of avian leukosis disease. PMID:25977186

  14. SDS-PAGE/immunoblot detection of Abeta multimers in human cortical tissue homogenates using antigen-epitope retrieval.

    PubMed

    Rosen, Rebecca F; Tomidokoro, Yasushi; Ghiso, Jorge A; Walker, Lary C

    2010-01-01

    The anomalous folding and polymerization of the beta-amyloid (Abeta) peptide is thought to initiate the neurodegenerative cascade in Alzheimer's disease pathogenesis(1). Abeta is predominantly a 40- or 42-amino acid peptide that is prone to self-aggregation into beta-sheet-rich amyloid fibrils that are found in the cores of cerebral senile plaques in Alzheimer's disease. Increasing evidence suggests that low molecular weight, soluble Abeta multimers are more toxic than fibrillar Abeta amyloid(2). The identification and quantification of low- and high-molecular weight multimeric Abeta species in brain tissue is an essential objective in Alzheimer's disease research, and the methods employed also can be applied to the identification and characterization of toxic multimers in other proteopathies(3). Naturally occurring Abeta multimers can be detected by SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis followed by immunoblotting with Abeta-specific antibodies. However, the separation and detection of multimeric Abeta requires the use of highly concentrated cortical homogenates and antigen retrieval in small pore-size nitrocellulose membranes. Here we describe a technique for the preparation of clarified human cortical homogenates, separation of proteins by SDS-PAGE, and antigen-epitope retrieval/Western blotting with antibody 6E10 to the N-terminal region of the Abeta peptide. Using this protocol, we consistently detect Abeta monomers, dimers, trimers, tetramers, and higher molecular weight multimers in cortical tissue from humans with Alzheimer's pathology. PMID:20418805

  15. Immunofluorescent Detection of Herpesvirus Antigens in Exfoliated Cells from Human Cervical Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Royston, Ivor; Aurelian, Laure

    1970-01-01

    Exfoliated cells from patients with squamous carcinoma of the cervix contain antigens related to herpesvirus subtype 2, as revealed by direct or indirect immunofluorescent techniques. Normal squamous cells from the same subjects and from controls without the disease, and cells from a small number of tumors at sites other than the cervix, did not react with anti-herpesvirus subtype 2 serum. Antisera to adenovirus 18 or mycoplasma orale did not react with the exfoliated cells. Images PMID:4318779

  16. Detection of Human Herpesvirus-6 Variants in Pediatric Brain Tumors: Association of Viral Antigen in Low Grade Gliomas

    PubMed Central

    Crawford, John R.; Santi, Maria R.; Thorarinsdottir, Halldora K.; Cornelison, Robert; Rushing, Elisabeth J.; Zhang, Huizhen; Yao, Karen; Jacobson, Steven; MacDonald, Tobey J.

    2009-01-01

    Background Human Herpesvirus-6 (HHV-6) has been associated with a diverse spectrum of central nervous system (CNS) diseases and reported glial tropism. Objective To determine if HHV-6 is present in a series of pediatric brain tumors. Study Design Pediatric gliomas from 88 untreated patients represented in a tissue microarray (TMA) were screened for HHV-6 by nested polymerase chain reaction (PCR), in situ hybridization (ISH), and immunohistochemistry (IHC) and compared to non glial tumors (N=22) and control brain (N=32). Results were correlated with tumor grade and overall survival. Results HHV-6 U57 was detected by nested PCR in 68/120 (57%) tumors and 7/32 (22%) age-matched non-tumor brain (P=0.001). HHV-6 U31 was positive in 73/120 (61%) tumors and 11/32 (34%) controls (P=0.019). Seventy-two percent (43/60) of tumors were HHV-6 Variant A. HHV-6 U57 was confirmed by ISH in 83/150 (54%) tumors and 10/32 (31%) controls (P=0.021), revealing a non-lymphocytic origin of HHV-6. HHV-6A/B gp116/64/54 late antigen was detected by IHC in 50/124 (40%) tumors and 6/32 (18%) controls (P=0.013). Interestingly, 58% of low grade gliomas (N=67) were IHC positive compared to 19% of high grade gliomas (N=21, P=0.002) and 25% of non gliomas (N=36; P=0.001). HHV-6A/B gp116/64/54 antigen co-localized with glial fibrillary acidic protein, confirming the astrocytic origin of antigen. Overall, there was no primary association between HHV-6A/B gp116/64/54 antigen detection and survival (P=0.861). Conclusions We provide the first reported series of HHV-6 detection in pediatric brain tumors. The predominance of HHV-6 in glial tumors warrants further investigation into potential neurooncologic disease mechanisms. PMID:19505845

  17. Rapid and sensitive detection of HIV-1 p24 antigen by immunomagnetic separation coupled with catalytic fluorescent immunoassay.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yun; Yang, Hang; Yu, Junping; Wei, Hongping

    2016-09-01

    In this study, a system of magnetic beads (MBs) coupled with catalytic fluorescent immunoassay for rapid and sensitive determination of HIV-1 capsid antigen p24 was developed. p24 was captured by antibody immobilized MBs, and the detection antibody was linked to horseradish peroxidase (HRP) through biotin-streptavidin recognition, catalyzing the oxidation of o-phenylenediamine (OPD) and hydrogen peroxide to produce a fluorescent product. This is the first reported utilization of the fluorescence of OPD oxidation product catalyzed by HRP for immunoassay. Optimization of conditions afforded a low detection limit of 0.5 pg/mL (3σ) for p24 with a linear range of 1.4-90.0 pg/mL. The assay exhibited good reproducibility with a relative standard deviation (RSD) of 4.4 %, 4.7 %, and 5.0 % for detecting 1.4 pg/mL, 22.5 pg/mL, and 45.0 pg/mL p24, respectively. The assay can be completed in less than 90 min. Moreover, the proposed method was successfully applied to detect p24 in spiked serum. This method overcomes the interference of MBs to the fluorescence signal and demonstrated higher sensitivity for detection of p24 than conventional ELISA kits. The system could be applied for detecting other antigens with high sensitivity, rapidity, specificity, and simple operation. Graphical Abstract A rapid and sensitive biosensing method coupling immunomagnetic separation and catalytic fluorescence for determination of HIV-1 p24 has been developed. PMID:27351993

  18. Accuracy of universal polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for detection of bacterial meningitis among suspected patients

    PubMed Central

    Moayedi, Ali Reza; Nejatizadeh, Abdolazim; Mohammadian, Maryam; Rahmati, Mohammad Bagher; Namardizadeh, Vahideh

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Central nervous system (CNS) infections are life-threatening diseases caused by viral, bacterial, parasitic and fungal microorganisms. The aim of this study was to determine the accuracy of universal polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for the detection of bacterial meningitis among patients who were referred to Koodakan Hospital in Bandar Abbas because they were suspected of having the disease. Methods This study was conducted in 2013 on the patients who were admitted to Bandar Abbas’ Koodakan Hospital because they were suspected of having meningitis. A questionnaire, including demographic data, was completed for each patient. Universal PCR, Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) analysis, and gram staining and cultures were done for all the patients. The data were analyzed using SPSS software. Results Among the 100 patients studied 59 (59%) were male and 41 (41%) were female. No patient in our study had a positive smear and culture for meningitis. Among the patients with negative smears and cultures six (6%) had positive universal PCR, and 94 (94%) had negative universal PCR. Based on these results, PCR had 95% specificity and 100% negative predictive value for the prediction of meningitis. In 30 patients (30%), the biochemical analysis of CSF were in favor of meningitis. Among the 30 patients, six patients (20%) had positive universal PCR and 24 patients (80%) had negative universal PCR. Conclusion Based on our results, the universal PCR test is useful in the diagnosis of bacterial meningitis in children. We recommend using it in combination with other tests, such as CSF analysis, for diagnosis of bacterial meningitis. PMID:26816587

  19. Development of a bacterial bioassay for atrazine and cyanuric acid detection

    PubMed Central

    Hua, Anna; Gueuné, Hervé; Cregut, Mickaël; Thouand, Gérald; Durand, Marie-José

    2015-01-01

    The s-triazine herbicides are compounds which can disseminate into soils and water. Due to their toxic effects on living organisms, their concentrations in drinking water are legislated by WHO recommendations. Here we have developed for the first time, to the best of our knowledge, an alternative method for physicochemical quantification using two bioluminescent bacterial biosensors: E. coli SM003 for cyanuric acid detection and E. coli SM004 for both atrazine and cyanuric acid detection. The concentration of cyanuric acid detection for E. coli SM003 ranges from 7.83 μM to 2.89 mM, and for E. coli SM004 ranges from 0.22 to 15 μM. Moreover, atrazine detection by E. coli SM004 ranges from 1.08 to 15 μM. According to WHO recommendations, the cyanuric acid detection range is sensitive enough to discriminate between polluted and drinking water. Nevertheless, the detection of atrazine by E. coli SM004 is only applicable for high concentrations of contaminants. PMID:25852669

  20. Shear horizontal surface acoustic wave microsensor for Class A viral and bacterial detection.

    SciTech Connect

    Branch, Darren W.; Huber, Dale L.; Brozik, Susan Marie; Edwards, Thayne L.

    2008-10-01

    The rapid autonomous detection of pathogenic microorganisms and bioagents by field deployable platforms is critical to human health and safety. To achieve a high level of sensitivity for fluidic detection applications, we have developed a 330 MHz Love wave acoustic biosensor on 36{sup o} YX Lithium Tantalate (LTO). Each die has four delay-line detection channels, permitting simultaneous measurement of multiple analytes or for parallel detection of single analyte containing samples. Crucial to our biosensor was the development of a transducer that excites the shear horizontal (SH) mode, through optimization of the transducer, minimizing propagation losses and reducing undesirable modes. Detection was achieved by comparing the reference phase of an input signal to the phase shift from the biosensor using an integrated electronic multi-readout system connected to a laptop computer or PDA. The Love wave acoustic arrays were centered at 330 MHz, shifting to 325-328 MHz after application of the silicon dioxide waveguides. The insertion loss was -6 dB with an out-of-band rejection of 35 dB. The amplitude and phase ripple were 2.5 dB p-p and 2-3{sup o} p-p, respectively. Time-domain gating confirmed propagation of the SH mode while showing suppression of the triple transit. Antigen capture and mass detection experiments demonstrate a sensitivity of 7.19 {+-} 0.74{sup o} mm{sup 2}/ng with a detection limit of 6.7 {+-} 0.40 pg/mm{sup 2} for each channel.

  1. Comparison of individual and pooled sampling methods for detecting bacterial pathogens of fish

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mumford, Sonia; Patterson, Chris; Evered, J.; Brunson, Ray; Levine, J.; Winton, J.

    2005-01-01

    Examination of finfish populations for viral and bacterial pathogens is an important component of fish disease control programs worldwide. Two methods are commonly used for collecting tissue samples for bacteriological culture, the currently accepted standards for detection of bacterial fish pathogens. The method specified in the Office International des Epizooties Manual of Diagnostic Tests for Aquatic Animals permits combining renal and splenic tissues from as many as 5 fish into pooled samples. The American Fisheries Society (AFS) Blue Book/US Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) Inspection Manual specifies the use of a bacteriological loop for collecting samples from the kidney of individual fish. An alternative would be to more fully utilize the pooled samples taken for virology. If implemented, this approach would provide substantial savings in labor and materials. To compare the relative performance of the AFS/USFWS method and this alternative approach, cultures of Yersinia ruckeri were used to establish low-level infections in groups of rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) that were sampled by both methods. Yersinia ruckeri was cultured from 22 of 37 groups by at least 1 method. The loop method yielded 18 positive groups, with 1 group positive in the loop samples but negative in the pooled samples. The pooled samples produced 21 positive groups, with 4 groups positive in the pooled samples but negative in the loop samples. There was statistically significant agreement (Spearman coefficient 0.80, P < 0.001) in the relative ability of the 2 sampling methods to permit detection of low-level bacterial infections of rainbow trout.

  2. Comparison of individual and pooled sampling methods for detecting bacterial pathogens of fish.

    PubMed

    Mumford, Sonia; Patterson, Chris; Evered, Joy; Brunson, Ray; Levine, Jay; Winton, Jim

    2005-07-01

    Examination of finfish populations for viral and bacterial pathogens is an important component of fish disease control programs worldwide. Two methods are commonly used for collecting tissue samples for bacteriological culture, the currently accepted standards for detection of bacterial fish pathogens. The method specified in the Office International des Epizooties Manual of Diagnostic Tests for Aquatic Animals permits combining renal and splenic tissues from as many as 5 fish into pooled samples. The American Fisheries Society (AFS) Blue Book/US Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) Inspection Manual specifies the use of a bacteriological loop for collecting samples from the kidney of individual fish. An alternative would be to more fully utilize the pooled samples taken for virology. If implemented, this approach would provide substantial savings in labor and materials. To compare the relative performance of the AFS/USFWS method and this alternative approach, cultures of Yersinia ruckeri were used to establish low-level infections in groups of rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) that were sampled by both methods. Yersinia ruckeri was cultured from 22 of 37 groups by at least 1 method. The loop method yielded 18 positive groups, with 1 group positive in the loop samples but negative in the pooled samples. The pooled samples produced 21 positive groups, with 4 groups positive in the pooled samples but negative in the loop samples. There was statistically significant agreement (Spearman coefficient 0.80, P < 0.001) in the relative ability of the 2 sampling methods to permit detection of low-level bacterial infections of rainbow trout. PMID:16130986

  3. Flow cytometry-based methods for assessing soluble scFv activities and detecting pathogen antigens in solution

    SciTech Connect

    Gray, Sean; Weigel, Kris M.; Miller, Keith D.; Ndung'u, Joseph; Buscher, Philippe; Tran, Thao N.; Baird, Cheryl L.; Cangelosi, Gerard A.

    2010-04-01

    Novel methods are reported for evaluating and utilizing single chain fragment variable (scFv) antibodies derived from yeast-display libraries. Yeast-display was used to select scFv specific to invariant surface glycoproteins (ISG) of Trypanosoma brucei. A limiting step in the isolation of scFv from nonimmune libraries is the conversion of highly active yeast-displayed scFv into soluble antibodies that can be used in standard immunoassays. Challenges include limited solubility or activity following secretion and purification of scFv. For this reason, few scFv derived from yeast-display platforms have moved into development and implementation as diagnostic reagents. To address this problem, assays were developed that employ both yeastdisplayed and secreted scFv as analytical reagents. The first is a competitive inhibition flow cytometry (CIFC) assay that detects secreted scFv by virtue of its ability to competitively inhibit the binding of biotinylated antigen to yeast-displayed scFv. The second is an epitope binning assay that uses secreted scFv toidentify additional yeast-displayed scFv that bind nonoverlapping or noncompeting epitopes on an antigen. The epitope binning assay was used not only to identify sandwich assay pairs with yeast-displayed scFv, but also to identify active soluble scFv present in low concentration in a crude expression extract. Finally, a CIFC assay was developed that bypasses entirely the need for soluble scFv expression, by using yeast displayed scFv to detect unlabeled antigen in samples. These methods will facilitate the continued development and practical implementation of scFv derived from yeast-display libraries.

  4. A broadband capacitive sensing method for label-free bacterial LPS detection.

    PubMed

    Rydosz, Artur; Brzozowska, Ewa; Górska, Sabina; Wincza, Krzysztof; Gamian, Andrzej; Gruszczynski, Slawomir

    2016-01-15

    In this paper, the authors present a new type of highly sensitive label-free microwave sensor in a form of interdigital capacitor coated with T4 bacteriophage gp37 adhesin. The adhesin binds Escherichia coli B (E. coli B) by precise recognizing its bacterial host lipopolysaccharide (LPS). The C-terminal part of the adhesin consists of the receptor-binding amino acid residues which are involved in a specific interaction with two terminal glucose residues of the bacterial LPS. The change of the sensors' capacitance and conductance as a subject to LPS presence is an indicator of the detection. The measurements in the frequency range of 0-3GHz utilizing vector network analyzer have been carried out at different concentrations to verify experimentally the proposed method. The measured capacitance change between the reference and the biofunctionalized sensor equals 15% in the entire frequency range and the measured conductance change exceeds 19%. The changes of both parameters can be used as good indicators of the LPS detection. The selectivity has been confirmed by the ELISA experiments and tested by sensor measurements with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) from E. coli B, E. coli 056, E. coli 0111, Pseudomonas aeruginosa NBRC 13743 and Hafnia alvei 1185. PMID:26339930

  5. Fluorescence-Based Bacterial Bioreporter for Specific Detection of Methyl Halide Emissions in the Environment

    PubMed Central

    Farhan Ul Haque, Muhammad; Nadalig, Thierry; Bringel, Françoise; Schaller, Hubert

    2013-01-01

    Methyl halides are volatile one-carbon compounds responsible for substantial depletion of stratospheric ozone. Among them, chloromethane (CH3Cl) is the most abundant halogenated hydrocarbon in the atmosphere. Global budgets of methyl halides in the environment are still poorly understood due to uncertainties in their natural sources, mainly from vegetation, and their sinks, which include chloromethane-degrading bacteria. A bacterial bioreporter for the detection of methyl halides was developed on the basis of detailed knowledge of the physiology and genetics of Methylobacterium extorquens CM4, an aerobic alphaproteobacterium which utilizes chloromethane as the sole source of carbon and energy. A plasmid construct with the promoter region of the chloromethane dehalogenase gene cmuA fused to a promotorless yellow fluorescent protein gene cassette resulted in specific methyl halide-dependent fluorescence when introduced into M. extorquens CM4. The bacterial whole-cell bioreporter allowed detection of methyl halides at femtomolar levels and quantification at concentrations above 10 pM (approximately 240 ppt). As shown for the model chloromethane-producing plant Arabidopsis thaliana in particular, the bioreporter may provide an attractive alternative to analytical chemical methods to screen for natural sources of methyl halide emissions. PMID:23956392

  6. Fluorescence-based bacterial bioreporter for specific detection of methyl halide emissions in the environment.

    PubMed

    Farhan Ul Haque, Muhammad; Nadalig, Thierry; Bringel, Françoise; Schaller, Hubert; Vuilleumier, Stéphane

    2013-11-01

    Methyl halides are volatile one-carbon compounds responsible for substantial depletion of stratospheric ozone. Among them, chloromethane (CH3Cl) is the most abundant halogenated hydrocarbon in the atmosphere. Global budgets of methyl halides in the environment are still poorly understood due to uncertainties in their natural sources, mainly from vegetation, and their sinks, which include chloromethane-degrading bacteria. A bacterial bioreporter for the detection of methyl halides was developed on the basis of detailed knowledge of the physiology and genetics of Methylobacterium extorquens CM4, an aerobic alphaproteobacterium which utilizes chloromethane as the sole source of carbon and energy. A plasmid construct with the promoter region of the chloromethane dehalogenase gene cmuA fused to a promotorless yellow fluorescent protein gene cassette resulted in specific methyl halide-dependent fluorescence when introduced into M. extorquens CM4. The bacterial whole-cell bioreporter allowed detection of methyl halides at femtomolar levels and quantification at concentrations above 10 pM (approximately 240 ppt). As shown for the model chloromethane-producing plant Arabidopsis thaliana in particular, the bioreporter may provide an attractive alternative to analytical chemical methods to screen for natural sources of methyl halide emissions. PMID:23956392

  7. Sensitive Detection of Thirteen Bacterial Vaginosis-Associated Agents Using Multiplex Polymerase Chain Reaction

    PubMed Central

    Malaguti, Natália; Bahls, Larissa Danielle; Uchimura, Nelson Shozo; Gimenes, Fabrícia; Consolaro, Marcia Edilaine Lopes

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial vaginosis (BV) is characterized by a polymicrobial proliferation of anaerobic bacteria and depletion of lactobacilli, which are components of natural vaginal microbiota. Currently, there are limited conventional methods for BV diagnosis, and these methods are time-consuming, expensive, and rarely allow for the detection of more than one agent simultaneously. Therefore, we conceived and validated a multiplex polymerase chain reaction (M-PCR) assay for the simultaneous screening of thirteen bacterial vaginosis-associated agents (BV-AAs) related to symptomatic BV: Gardnerella vaginalis, Mobiluncus curtisii, Mobiluncus mulieris, Bacteroides fragilis, Mycoplasma hominis, Atopobium vaginae, Ureaplasma urealyticum, Megasphaera type I, Clostridia-like bacteria vaginosis-associated bacteria (BVABs) 1, 2, and 3, Sneathia sanguinegens, and Mycoplasma genitalium. The overall validation parameters of M-PCR compared to single PCR (sPCR) were extremely high, including agreement of 99.1% and sensitivity, specificity, and positive predictive values of 100.0%, negative predictive value of 97.0%, accuracy of 99.3%, and agreement with Nugent results of 100.0%. The prevalence of BV-AAs was very high (72.6%), and simultaneous agents were detected in 53.0%, which demonstrates the effectiveness of the M-PCR assay. Therefore, the M-PCR assay has great potential to impact BV diagnostic methods in vaginal samples and diminish associated complications in the near future. PMID:26078959

  8. Single-shot detection of bacterial endospores via coherent Raman spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Pestov, Dmitry; Wang, Xi; Ariunbold, Gombojav O.; Murawski, Robert K.; Sautenkov, Vladimir A.; Dogariu, Arthur; Sokolov, Alexei V.; Scully, Marlan O.

    2008-01-01

    Recent advances in coherent Raman spectroscopy hold exciting promise for many potential applications. For example, a technique, mitigating the nonresonant four-wave-mixing noise while maximizing the Raman-resonant signal, has been developed and applied to the problem of real-time detection of bacterial endospores. After a brief review of the technique essentials, we show how extensions of our earlier experimental work [Pestov D, et al. (2007) Science 316:265–268] yield single-shot identification of a small sample of Bacillus subtilis endospores (≈104 spores). The results convey the utility of the technique and its potential for “on-the-fly” detection of biohazards, such as Bacillus anthracis. The application of optimized coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering scheme to problems requiring chemical specificity and short signal acquisition times is demonstrated. PMID:18184801

  9. Rapid oligonucleotide suspension array-based multiplex detection of bacterial pathogens.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jinyin; Kang, Lin; Hu, Rui; Gao, Shan; Xin, Wenwen; Chen, Weijun; Wang, Jinglin

    2013-10-01

    A gene-specific microsphere suspension array coupled with 15-plex polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was developed to screen bacterial samples rapidly for 10 strains of bacteria: Shigella spp. (S. flexneri, S. dysenteriae, and S. sonnei), Staphylococcus aureus, Vibrio cholerae (serology O1 and O139), Legionella pneumophila, and Clostridium botulinum (types A, B, and E). Fifteen sets of highly validated primers were chosen to amplify target genes simultaneously. Corresponding oligonucleotide probes directly conjugated with microsphere sets were used to specifically identify PCR amplicons. Sensitivity tests revealed that the array coupled with single PCR was able to detect purified genomic DNA at concentrations as low as 10 copies/μL, while the multiplex detection limit was 10-10⁴ copies/μL. The assay was validated using water samples artificially spiked with S. aureus and S. dysenteriae, as well as water specimens from swimming pools previously identified to contain S. aureus. PMID:23947819

  10. Phage-based platforms for the clinical detection of human bacterial pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Schofield, David A.; Sharp, Natasha J.; Westwater, Caroline

    2012-01-01

    Bacteriophages (phages) have been utilized for decades as a means for uniquely identifying their target bacteria. Due to their inherent natural specificity, ease of use, and straightforward production, phage possess a number of desirable attributes which makes them particularly suited as bacterial detectors. As a result, extensive research has been conducted into the development of phage, or phage-derived products to expedite the detection of human pathogens. However, very few phage-based diagnostics have transitioned from the research lab into a clinical diagnostic tool. Herein we review the phage-based platforms that are currently used for the detection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis, Yersinia pestis, Bacillus anthracis and Staphylococcus aureus in the clinical field. We briefly describe the disease, the current diagnostic options, and the role phage diagnostics play in identifying the cause of infection, and determining antibiotic susceptibility. PMID:23050221

  11. Bacterial and viral pathogens detected in sea turtles stranded along the coast of Tuscany, Italy.

    PubMed

    Fichi, G; Cardeti, G; Cersini, A; Mancusi, C; Guarducci, M; Di Guardo, G; Terracciano, G

    2016-03-15

    During 2014, six loggerhead turtles, Caretta caretta and one green turtle, Chelonia mydas, found stranded on the Tuscany coast of Italy, were examined for the presence of specific bacterial and viral agents, along with their role as carriers of fish and human pathogens. Thirteen different species of bacteria, 10 Gram negative and 3 Gram positive, were identified. Among them, two strains of Vibrio parahaemolyticus and one strain of Lactococcus garviae were recovered and confirmed by specific PCR protocols. No trh and tdh genes were detected in V. parahaemolyticus. The first isolation of L. garviae and the first detection of Betanodavirus in sea turtles indicate the possibility for sea turtles to act as carriers of fish pathogens. Furthermore, the isolation of two strains of V. parahaemolyticus highlights the possible role of these animals in human pathogens' diffusion. PMID:26931392

  12. Direct Detection and Quantification of Bacterial Genes Associated with Inflammation in DNA Isolated from Stool

    PubMed Central

    Gómez-Moreno, Ramón; Robledo, Iraida E.; Baerga-Ortiz, Abel

    2014-01-01

    Although predominantly associated with health benefits, the gut microbiota has also been shown to harbor genes that promote inflammation. In this work, we report a method for the direct detection and quantification of these pro-inflammatory bacterial genes by PCR and qPCR in DNA extracted from human stool samples. PCR reactions were performed to detect (i) the pks island genes, (ii) tcpC, which is present in some strains of Escherichia coli and (iii) gelE presented in some strains of Enterococcus faecalis. Additionally, we screened for the presence of the following genes encoding cyclomodulins that disrupted mammalian cell division: (iv) cdt (which encodes the cytolethal distending toxin) and (v) cnf-1 (which encodes the cytotoxic necrotizing factor-1). Our results show that 20% of the samples (N = 41) tested positive for detectable amounts of pks island genes, whereas 10% of individuals were positive for tcpC or gelE and only one individual was found to harbor the cnf-1 gene. Of the 13 individuals that were positive for at least one of the pro-inflammatory genes, 5 were found to harbor more than one. A quantitative version of the assay, which used real-time PCR, revealed the pro-inflammatory genes to be in high copy numbers: up to 1.3 million copies per mg of feces for the pks island genes. Direct detection of specific genes in stool could prove useful toward screening for the presence of pro-inflammatory bacterial genes in individuals with inflammatory bowel diseases or colorectal cancer. PMID:25635239

  13. Real-time Bacterial Detection by Single Cell Based Sensors UsingSynchrotron FTIR Spectromicroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Veiseh, Mandana; Veiseh, Omid; Martin, Michael C.; Bertozzi,Carolyn; Zhang, Miqin

    2005-08-10

    Microarrays of single macrophage cell based sensors weredeveloped and demonstrated for real time bacterium detection bysynchrotron FTIR microscopy. The cells were patterned on gold-SiO2substrates via a surface engineering technique by which the goldelectrodes were immobilized with fibronectin to mediate cell adhesion andthe silicon oxide background were passivated with PEG to resist proteinadsorption and cell adhesion. Cellular morphology and IR spectra ofsingle, double, and triple cells on gold electrodes exposed tolipopolysaccharide (LPS) of different concentrations were compared toreveal the detection capabilities of these biosensors. The single-cellbased sensors were found to generate the most significant IR wave numbervariation and thus provide the highest detection sensitivity. Changes inmorphology and IR spectrum for single cells exposed to LPS were found tobe time- and concentration-dependent and correlated with each other verywell. FTIR spectra from single cell arrays of gold electrodes withsurface area of 25 mu-m2, 100 mu-m2, and 400 mu-m2 were acquired usingboth synchrotron and conventional FTIR spectromicroscopes to study thesensitivity of detection. The results indicated that the developedsingle-cell platform can be used with conventional FTIRspectromicroscopy. This technique provides real-time, label-free, andrapid bacterial detection, and may allow for statistic and highthroughput analyses, and portability.

  14. Detection of antigens specific for B-lymphoid cultured cell lines with human alloantisera.

    PubMed

    Mann, D L; Abelson, L; Harris, S; Amos, D B

    1975-07-01

    Human sera were tested for cytotoxicity to pairs of long-term tissue-cultured cell lines. Each pair had been derived from the same individual and one of the pairs possessed the characteristics of either "T" or "B" cells. The alloantisera used were HL-A-typing reagents or sera obtained from Amish multiparas. Selected cytotoxicity was found against the B-cell lines by direct testing. Cytotoxicity was abolished by absorption with B-cell line but not by absorption with the T-cell lines. The results suggest that a group of allotypic antigens may be expressed exculsively on human B cells. PMID:1080182

  15. Bacterial community composition of chronic periodontitis and novel oral sampling sites for detecting disease indicators

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Periodontitis is an infectious and inflammatory disease of polymicrobial etiology that can lead to the destruction of bones and tissues that support the teeth. The management of chronic periodontitis (CP) relies heavily on elimination or at least control of known pathogenic consortia associated with the disease. Until now, microbial plaque obtained from the subgingival (SubG) sites has been the primary focus for bacterial community analysis using deep sequencing. In addition to the use of SubG plaque, here, we investigated whether plaque obtained from supragingival (SupG) and tongue dorsum sites can serve as alternatives for monitoring CP-associated bacterial biomarkers. Results Using SubG, SupG, and tongue plaque DNA from 11 healthy and 13 diseased subjects, we sequenced V3 regions (approximately 200 bases) of the 16S rRNA gene using Illumina sequencing. After quality filtering, approximately 4.1 million sequences were collapsed into operational taxonomic units (OTUs; sequence identity cutoff of >97%) that were classified to a total of 19 phyla spanning 114 genera. Bacterial community diversity and overall composition was not affected by health or disease, and multiresponse permutation procedure (MRPP) on Bray-Curtis distance measures only supported weakly distinct bacterial communities in SubG and tongue plaque depending on health or disease status (P < 0.05). Nonetheless, in SubG and tongue sites, the relative abundance of Firmicutes was increased significantly from health to disease and members of Synergistetes were found in higher abundance across all sites in disease. Taxa indicative of CP were identified in all three locations (for example, Treponema denticola, Porphyromonas gingivalis, Synergistes oral taxa 362 and 363). Conclusions For the first time, this study demonstrates that SupG and tongue dorsum plaque can serve as alternative sources for detecting and enumerating known and novel bacterial biomarkers of CP. This finding is clinically

  16. Synthesis of a peptide-universal nucleotide antigen: towards next-generation antibodies to detect topoisomerase I-DNA covalent complexes.

    PubMed

    Perkins, Angela L; Peterson, Kevin L; Beito, Thomas G; Flatten, Karen S; Kaufmann, Scott H; Harki, Daniel A

    2016-04-26

    The topoisomerase (topo) I-DNA covalent complex represents an attractive target for developing diagnostic antibodies to measure responsiveness to drugs. We report a new antigen, peptide , and four murine monoclonal antibodies raised against that exhibit excellent specificity for recognition of in comparison to structurally similar peptides by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays. Although topo I-DNA complex detection was not achieved in cellular samples by these new antibodies, a new strategy for antigen design is reported. PMID:27113574

  17. Combination of culture, antigen and toxin detection, and cytotoxin neutralization assay for optimal Clostridium difficile diagnostic testing

    PubMed Central

    Alfa, Michelle J; Sepehri, Shadi

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: There has been a growing interest in developing an appropriate laboratory diagnostic algorithm for Clostridium difficile, mainly as a result of increases in both the number and severity of cases of C difficile infection in the past decade. A C difficile diagnostic algorithm is necessary because diagnostic kits, mostly for the detection of toxins A and B or glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) antigen, are not sufficient as stand-alone assays for optimal diagnosis of C difficile infection. In addition, conventional reference methods for C difficile detection (eg, toxigenic culture and cytotoxin neutralization [CTN] assays) are not routinely practiced in diagnostic laboratory settings. OBJECTIVE: To review the four-step algorithm used at Diagnostic Services of Manitoba sites for the laboratory diagnosis of toxigenic C difficile. RESULT: One year of retrospective C difficile data using the proposed algorithm was reported. Of 5695 stool samples tested, 9.1% (n=517) had toxigenic C difficile. Sixty per cent (310 of 517) of toxigenic C difficile stools were detected following the first two steps of the algorithm. CTN confirmation of GDH-positive, toxin A- and B-negative assays resulted in detection of an additional 37.7% (198 of 517) of toxigenic C difficile. Culture of the third specimen, from patients who had two previous negative specimens, detected an additional 2.32% (12 of 517) of toxigenic C difficile samples. DISCUSSION: Using GDH antigen as the screening and toxin A and B as confirmatory test for C difficile, 85% of specimens were reported negative or positive within 4 h. Without CTN confirmation for GDH antigen and toxin A and B discordant results, 37% (195 of 517) of toxigenic C difficile stools would have been missed. Following the algorithm, culture was needed for only 2.72% of all specimens submitted for C difficile testing. CONCLUSION: The overview of the data illustrated the significance of each stage of this four-step C difficile algorithm and

  18. Antigen-capture enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays for detection of different H5 avian Influenza A virus.

    PubMed

    Chiu, Yi-Chung; Chu, Wen-Yu; Tsao, Zak; Wang, Ching-Ho

    2012-07-01

    Avian Influenza A virus (AIV) subtype H5 is divided into American and Eurasian lineages, according to hemagglutinin gene sequences. Although methods for detecting H5 AIVs have been described, no H5 strain-specific detection method has been reported. The purpose of the present study was to develop an antigen-capture enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ACE) to detect and differentiate between the American and the Eurasian H5 AIVs. Monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) against the HA fragment of a Eurasian H5N2 AIV were used as the capture antibodies as well as the detector antibodies after labeling with horseradish peroxidase to develop an ACE. One mAb was selected for detecting the American as well as the Eurasian H5 AIVs. The other mAb was used for detecting only the Eurasian H5N2 but not the American H5N2 AIVs, H6N1 AIVs, or Newcastle disease virus. The ACEs developed would be useful for detection and differentiation of H5 AIVs from the Eurasian and the American H5 AIVs. PMID:22621946

  19. Bacterial ClpB heat-shock protein, an antigen-mimetic of the anorexigenic peptide α-MSH, at the origin of eating disorders.

    PubMed

    Tennoune, N; Chan, P; Breton, J; Legrand, R; Chabane, Y N; Akkermann, K; Järv, A; Ouelaa, W; Takagi, K; Ghouzali, I; Francois, M; Lucas, N; Bole-Feysot, C; Pestel-Caron, M; do Rego, J-C; Vaudry, D; Harro, J; Dé, E; Déchelotte, P; Fetissov, S O

    2014-01-01

    The molecular mechanisms at the origin of eating disorders (EDs), including anorexia nervosa (AN), bulimia and binge-eating disorder (BED), are currently unknown. Previous data indicated that immunoglobulins (Igs) or autoantibodies (auto-Abs) reactive with α-melanocyte-stimulating hormone (α-MSH) are involved in regulation of feeding and emotion; however, the origin of such auto-Abs is unknown. Here, using proteomics, we identified ClpB heat-shock disaggregation chaperone protein of commensal gut bacteria Escherichia coli as a conformational antigen mimetic of α-MSH. We show that ClpB-immunized mice produce anti-ClpB IgG crossreactive with α-MSH, influencing food intake, body weight, anxiety and melanocortin receptor 4 signaling. Furthermore, chronic intragastric delivery of E. coli in mice decreased food intake and stimulated formation of ClpB- and α-MSH-reactive antibodies, while ClpB-deficient E. coli did not affect food intake or antibody levels. Finally, we show that plasma levels of anti-ClpB IgG crossreactive with α-MSH are increased in patients with AN, bulimia and BED, and that the ED Inventory-2 scores in ED patients correlate with anti-ClpB IgG and IgM, which is similar to our previous findings for α-MSH auto-Abs. In conclusion, this work shows that the bacterial ClpB protein, which is present in several commensal and pathogenic microorganisms, can be responsible for the production of auto-Abs crossreactive with α-MSH, associated with altered feeding and emotion in humans with ED. Our data suggest that ClpB-expressing gut microorganisms might be involved in the etiology of EDs. PMID:25290265

  20. Bacterial ClpB heat-shock protein, an antigen-mimetic of the anorexigenic peptide α-MSH, at the origin of eating disorders

    PubMed Central

    Tennoune, N; Chan, P; Breton, J; Legrand, R; Chabane, Y N; Akkermann, K; Järv, A; Ouelaa, W; Takagi, K; Ghouzali, I; Francois, M; Lucas, N; Bole-Feysot, C; Pestel-Caron, M; do Rego, J-C; Vaudry, D; Harro, J; Dé, E; Déchelotte, P; Fetissov, S O

    2014-01-01

    The molecular mechanisms at the origin of eating disorders (EDs), including anorexia nervosa (AN), bulimia and binge-eating disorder (BED), are currently unknown. Previous data indicated that immunoglobulins (Igs) or autoantibodies (auto-Abs) reactive with α-melanocyte-stimulating hormone (α-MSH) are involved in regulation of feeding and emotion; however, the origin of such auto-Abs is unknown. Here, using proteomics, we identified ClpB heat-shock disaggregation chaperone protein of commensal gut bacteria Escherichia coli as a conformational antigen mimetic of α-MSH. We show that ClpB-immunized mice produce anti-ClpB IgG crossreactive with α-MSH, influencing food intake, body weight, anxiety and melanocortin receptor 4 signaling. Furthermore, chronic intragastric delivery of E. coli in mice decreased food intake and stimulated formation of ClpB- and α-MSH-reactive antibodies, while ClpB-deficient E. coli did not affect food intake or antibody levels. Finally, we show that plasma levels of anti-ClpB IgG crossreactive with α-MSH are increased in patients with AN, bulimia and BED, and that the ED Inventory-2 scores in ED patients correlate with anti-ClpB IgG and IgM, which is similar to our previous findings for α-MSH auto-Abs. In conclusion, this work shows that the bacterial ClpB protein, which is present in several commensal and pathogenic microorganisms, can be responsible for the production of auto-Abs crossreactive with α-MSH, associated with altered feeding and emotion in humans with ED. Our data suggest that ClpB-expressing gut microorganisms might be involved in the etiology of EDs. PMID:25290265

  1. Antigen 43/Fcε3 chimeric protein expressed by a novel bacterial surface expression system as an effective asthma vaccine

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Feng-Ying; Wang, Cai-Chun; Huang, Yong-Hao; Zhao, Huan-Ge; Guo, Jun-Li; Zhou, Song-Lin; Wang, Hua; Lin, Ying-Ying; Tan, Guang-Hong

    2014-01-01

    The IgE Fcε3 domain is an active immunotherapeutic target for asthma and other allergic diseases. However, previous methods for preparing IgE fusion protein vaccines are complex. Antigen 43 (Ag43) is a surface protein found in Escherichia coli that contains α and β subunits (the α subunit contains multiple T epitopes). Here we constructed a novel Ag43 surface display system (Ag43 system) to express Ag43 chimeric proteins to disrupt immune tolerance against IgE. The Ag43 system was constructed from the E. coli strain Tan109, in which the Ag43 gene was deleted and a recombinant plasmid (pETAg43) expressing a partial Ag43 gene was introduced. The Fcε3 domain of the IgE gene was then subcloned into plasmid pETAg43, resulting in a recombinant plasmid pETAg43/Fcε3, which was used to transform Tan109 for Ag43/Fcε3 surface expression. Thereafter, Ag43/Fcε3 was investigated as an asthma vaccine in a mouse model. Ag43/Fcε3 was expressed on and could be separated from the bacterial surface by heating to 60° while retaining activity. Ag43/Fcε3, as a protein vaccine, produced neutralizing autoantibodies to murine IgE, induced significant anti-asthma effects, and regulated IgE and T helper cytokines in a murine asthma model. Data show that Ag43/Fcε3 chimeric protein is a potential model vaccine for asthma treatment, and that the Ag43 system may be an effective tool for novel vaccine preparation to break immune tolerance to other self-molecules. PMID:24750112

  2. T cell-dependent IgM memory B cells generated during bacterial infection are required for IgG responses to antigen challenge.

    PubMed

    Yates, Jennifer L; Racine, Rachael; McBride, Kevin M; Winslow, Gary M

    2013-08-01

    Immunological memory has long considered to be harbored in B cells that express high-affinity class-switched IgG. IgM-positive memory B cells can also be generated following immunization, although their physiological role has been unclear. In this study, we show that bacterial infection elicited a relatively large population of IgM memory B cells that were uniquely identified by their surface expression of CD11c, CD73, and programmed death-ligand 2. The cells lacked expression of cell surface markers typically expressed by germinal center B cells, were CD138 negative, and did not secrete Ab ex vivo. The population was also largely quiescent and accumulated somatic mutations. The IgM memory B cells were located in the region of the splenic marginal zone and were not detected in blood or other secondary lymphoid organs. Generation of the memory cells was CD4 T cell dependent and required IL-21R signaling. In vivo depletion of the IgM memory B cells abrogated the IgG recall responses to specific Ag challenge, demonstrating that the cell population was required for humoral memory, and underwent class-switch recombination following Ag encounter. Our findings demonstrate that T cell-dependent IgM memory B cells can be elicited at high frequency and can play an important role in maintaining long-term immunity during bacterial infection. PMID:23804710

  3. Single molecule-level detection and long read-based phasing of epigenetic variations in bacterial methylomes

    PubMed Central

    Beaulaurier, John; Zhang, Xue-Song; Zhu, Shijia; Sebra, Robert; Rosenbluh, Chaggai; Deikus, Gintaras; Shen, Nan; Munera, Diana; Waldor, Matthew K.; Chess, Andrew; Blaser, Martin J.; Schadt, Eric E.; Fang, Gang

    2015-01-01

    Beyond its role in host defense, bacterial DNA methylation also plays important roles in the regulation of gene expression, virulence and antibiotic resistance. Bacterial cells in a clonal population can generate epigenetic heterogeneity to increase population-level phenotypic plasticity. Single molecule, real-time (SMRT) sequencing enables the detection of N6-methyladenine and N4-methylcytosine, two major types of DNA modifications comprising the bacterial methylome. However, existing SMRT sequencing-based methods for studying bacterial methylomes rely on a population-level consensus that lacks the single-cell resolution required to observe epigenetic heterogeneity. Here, we present SMALR (single-molecule modification analysis of long reads), a novel framework for single molecule-level detection and phasing of DNA methylation. Using seven bacterial strains, we show that SMALR yields significantly improved resolution and reveals distinct types of epigenetic heterogeneity. SMALR is a powerful new tool that enables de novo detection of epigenetic heterogeneity and empowers investigation of its functions in bacterial populations. PMID:26074426

  4. Label- and amplification-free electrochemical detection of bacterial ribosomal RNA.

    PubMed

    Henihan, Grace; Schulze, Holger; Corrigan, Damion K; Giraud, Gerard; Terry, Jonathan G; Hardie, Alison; Campbell, Colin J; Walton, Anthony J; Crain, Jason; Pethig, Ronald; Templeton, Kate E; Mount, Andrew R; Bachmann, Till T

    2016-07-15

    Current approaches to molecular diagnostics rely heavily on PCR amplification and optical detection methods which have restrictions when applied to point of care (POC) applications. Herein we describe the development of a label-free and amplification-free method of pathogen detection applied to Escherichia coli which overcomes the bottleneck of complex sample preparation and has the potential to be implemented as a rapid, cost effective test suitable for point of care use. Ribosomal RNA is naturally amplified in bacterial cells, which makes it a promising target for sensitive detection without the necessity for prior in vitro amplification. Using fluorescent microarray methods with rRNA targets from a range of pathogens, an optimal probe was selected from a pool of probe candidates identified in silico. The specificity of probes was investigated on DNA microarray using fluorescently labeled 16S rRNA target. The probe yielding highest specificity performance was evaluated in terms of sensitivity and a LOD of 20 pM was achieved on fluorescent glass microarray. This probe was transferred to an EIS end point format and specificity which correlated to microarray data was demonstrated. Excellent sensitivity was facilitated by the use of uncharged PNA probes and large 16S rRNA target and investigations resulted in an LOD of 50 pM. An alternative kinetic EIS assay format was demonstrated with which rRNA could be detected in a species specific manner within 10-40min at room temperature without wash steps. PMID:27016627

  5. Diagnosis of bacterial kidney disease by detection of Renibacterium salmoninarum by real-time PCR.

    PubMed

    Jansson, E; Lindberg, L; Säker, E; Aspán, A

    2008-10-01

    Bacterial kidney disease (BKD), caused by Renibacterium salmoninarum (Rs), is a serious threat to salmon in aquaculture as well as to wild populations. We have developed a real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for detection of Rs in kidney samples. The PCR is based on detection of unique parts of the 16S rRNA gene of Rs and DNA equivalent to 1-10 Rs genomes was detected per reaction. No cross-reactivity with other fish pathogenic or related bacteria could be demonstrated. Analysis of individual kidney samples collected from BKD classified populations identified 39.9% of the fish as positive by real-time PCR compared with 28.0% by polyclonal enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). The real-time PCR assay was found to be well suited for complementary use with ELISA for diagnosis of BKD, with the ability to detect clinical as well as covert Rs infections. The infection level determined by the polyclonal ELISA and by real-time PCR was significantly correlated. PMID:18681904

  6. Single-cell-based sensors and synchrotron FTIR spectroscopy: a hybrid system towards bacterial detection.

    PubMed

    Veiseh, Mandana; Veiseh, Omid; Martin, Michael C; Bertozzi, Carolyn; Zhang, Miqin

    2007-09-30

    Microarrays of single macrophage cell-based sensors were developed and demonstrated for potential real-time bacterium detection by synchrotron FTIR microscopy. The cells were patterned on gold electrodes of silicon oxide substrates by a surface engineering technique, in which the gold electrodes were immobilized with fibronectin to mediate cell adhesion and the silicon oxide background was passivated with polyethylene glycol (PEG) to resist protein adsorption and cell adhesion. Cell morphology and IR spectra of single, double, and triple cells on gold electrodes exposed to lipopolysaccharide (LPS) of different concentrations were compared to reveal the detection capability of this cell-based sensing platform. The single-cell-based system was found to generate the most significant and consistent IR spectrum shifts upon exposure to LPS, thus providing the highest detection sensitivity. Changes in cell morphology and IR shifts upon cell exposure to LPS were found to be dependent on the LPS concentration and exposure time, which established a method for the identification of LPS concentration and infected cell population. Possibility of using this single-cell system with conventional IR spectroscopy as well as its limitation was investigated by comparing IR spectra of single-cell arrays with gold electrode surface areas of 25, 100, and 400 microm2 using both synchrotron and conventional FTIR spectromicroscopes. This cell-based platform may potentially provide real-time, label-free, and rapid bacterial detection, and allow for high-throughput statistical analyses, and portability. PMID:17560777

  7. A nanoparticle label/immunochromatographic electrochemical biosensor for rapid and sensitive detection of prostate-specific antigen

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Ying-Ying; Wang, Jun; Liu, Guodong; Wu, Hong; Wai, Chien M.; Lin, Yuehe

    2008-06-15

    We present a nanoparticle (NP) label/immunochromatographic electrochemical biosensor (IEB) for rapid and sensitive detection of prostate-specific antigen (PSA) in human serum. This IEB integrates the immunochromatographic strip with the electrochemical detector for transducing quantitative signals. The NP label, made of CdSe@ZnS, serves as a signal-amplifier vehicle. A sandwich immunoreaction was performed on the immunochromatographic strip. The captured NP labels in the test zone were determined by highly sensitive stripping voltammetric measurement of the dissolved metallic component (cadmium) with a disposable-screen-printed electrode, which is embedded underneath the membrane of the test zone. Experimental parameters (e.g., immunoreaction time, the amount of anti-PSA-NP conjugations applied) and electrochemical detection conditions (e.g., preconcentration potential and time) were optimized using this biosensor for PSA detection. The analytical performance of this biosensor was evaluated with serum PSA samples according to the “figure-of-merits” (e.g., dynamic range, reproducibility, and detection limit). The results were validated with enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and show high consistency. It is found that this biosensor is very sensitive with the detection limit of 0.02 ng/mL PSA and is quite reproducible. This method is rapid, clinically accurate, and less expensive than other diagnosis tools for PSA; therefore, this IEB coupled with a portable electrochemical analyzer shows great promise for simple, sensitive, quantitative point-of-care testing of disease-related protein biomarkers.

  8. Quantitative real-time detection of carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) from pancreatic cyst fluid using 3-D surface molecular imprinting.

    PubMed

    Yu, Yingjie; Zhang, Qi; Buscaglia, Jonathan; Chang, Chung-Chueh; Liu, Ying; Yang, Zhenhua; Guo, Yichen; Wang, Yantian; Levon, Kalle; Rafailovich, Miriam

    2016-07-21

    In this study, a sensitive, yet robust, biosensing system with real-time electrochemical readout was developed. The biosensor system was applied to the detection of carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA), which is a common marker for many cancers such as pancreatic, breast, and colon cancer. Real time detection of CEA during a medical procedure can be used to make critical decisions regarding further surgical intervention. CEA was templated on gold surface (RMS roughness ∼3-4 nm) coated with a hydrophilic self-assembled monolayer (SAM) on the working electrode of an open circuit potentiometric network. The subsequent removal of template CEA makes the biosensor capable of CEA detection based on its specific structure and conformation. The molecular imprinting (MI) biosensor was further calibrated using the potentiometric responses in solutions with known CEA concentrations and a detection limit of 0.5 ng ml(-1) was achieved. Potentiometric sensing was then applied to pancreatic cyst fluid samples obtained from 18 patients when the cyst fluid was also evaluated using ELISA in a certified pathology laboratory. Excellent agreement was obtained between the quantitation of CEA obtained by both the ELISA and MI biosensor detection for CEA. A 3-D MI model, using the natural rms roughness of PVD gold layers, is presented to explain the high degree of sensitivity and linearity observed in those experiments. PMID:27193921

  9. A prospective microbiologic surveillance program to detect and prevent the transfusion of bacterially contaminated platelets.

    PubMed

    Yomtovian, R; Lazarus, H M; Goodnough, L T; Hirschler, N V; Morrissey, A M; Jacobs, M R

    1993-01-01

    After two patients received bacterially contaminated platelet transfusions, a prospective surveillance program was instituted to perform Gram staining and microbiologic culturing of platelets at the time of transfusion. In 12 months, 3141 random-donor platelet pools (prepared from 14,481 units) and 2476 single-donor apheresis units were cultured. All single-donor apheresis units were sterile, but 6 (0.19%) of the random-donor pools were found to be bacterially contaminated, with 1 unit of 5 in the pool being the source in each case. Contaminants were Staphylococcus epidermidis (4 cases), Bacillus cereus (1), and Staphylococcus aureus (1) at counts of 0.5 x 10(2) to 10(11) colony-forming units per mL in platelet pools and 10(3) to 10(13) colony-forming units per mL in source units. The contamination rate for units transfused at < or = 4 days (1.8/10,000) was significantly lower than that at 5 days (11.9/10,000; p < 0.05), as was the magnitude of contamination (p < 0.05). Use of the pretransfusion Gram stain on 4- and 5-day-old platelet pools was 100 percent sensitive (4/4 true positives) and 99.93 percent specific (1 false positive) in detecting contaminated pools. These data define the extent and magnitude of platelet bacterial contamination and demonstrate the efficacy of the pretransfusion Gram stain on platelet units stored for 4 and 5 days in preventing the transfusion of heavily contaminated units. It is concluded that the risk of platelet contamination is related to the duration of component storage.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8259595

  10. Modular microfluidic system fabricated in thermoplastics for the strain-specific detection of bacterial pathogens†

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yi-Wen; Wang, Hong; Hupert, Mateusz; Witek, Makgorzata; Dharmasiri, Udara; Pingle, Maneesh R.; Barany, Francis

    2015-01-01

    The recent outbreaks of a lethal E. coli strain in Germany have aroused renewed interest in developing rapid, specific and accurate systems for detecting and characterizing bacterial pathogens in suspected contaminated food and/or water supplies. To address this need, we have designed, fabricated and tested an integrated modular-based microfluidic system and the accompanying assay for the strain-specific identification of bacterial pathogens. The system can carry out the entire molecular processing pipeline in a single disposable fluidic cartridge and detect single nucleotide variations in selected genes to allow for the identification of the bacterial species, even its strain with high specificity. The unique aspect of this fluidic cartridge is its modular format with task-specific modules interconnected to a fluidic motherboard to permit the selection of the target material. In addition, to minimize the amount of finishing steps for assembling the fluidic cartridge, many of the functional components were produced during the polymer molding step used to create the fluidic network. The operation of the cartridge was provided by electronic, mechanical, optical and hydraulic controls located off-chip and packaged into a small footprint instrument (1 ft3). The fluidic cartridge was capable of performing cell enrichment, cell lysis, solid-phase extraction (SPE) of genomic DNA, continuous flow (CF) PCR, CF ligase detection reaction (LDR) and universal DNA array readout. The cartridge was comprised of modules situated on a fluidic motherboard; the motherboard was made from polycarbonate, PC, and used for cell lysis, SPE, CF PCR and CF LDR. The modules were task-specific units and performed universal zip-code array readout or affinity enrichment of the target cells with both made from poly(methylmethacrylate), PMMA. Two genes, uidA and sipB/C, were used to discriminate between E. coli and Salmonella, and evaluated as a model system. Results showed that the fluidic system

  11. Modular microfluidic system fabricated in thermoplastics for the strain-specific detection of bacterial pathogens.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yi-Wen; Wang, Hong; Hupert, Mateusz; Witek, Makgorzata; Dharmasiri, Udara; Pingle, Maneesh R; Barany, Francis; Soper, Steven A

    2012-09-21

    The recent outbreaks of a lethal E. coli strain in Germany have aroused renewed interest in developing rapid, specific and accurate systems for detecting and characterizing bacterial pathogens in suspected contaminated food and/or water supplies. To address this need, we have designed, fabricated and tested an integrated modular-based microfluidic system and the accompanying assay for the strain-specific identification of bacterial pathogens. The system can carry out the entire molecular processing pipeline in a single disposable fluidic cartridge and detect single nucleotide variations in selected genes to allow for the identification of the bacterial species, even its strain with high specificity. The unique aspect of this fluidic cartridge is its modular format with task-specific modules interconnected to a fluidic motherboard to permit the selection of the target material. In addition, to minimize the amount of finishing steps for assembling the fluidic cartridge, many of the functional components were produced during the polymer molding step used to create the fluidic network. The operation of the cartridge was provided by electronic, mechanical, optical and hydraulic controls located off-chip and packaged into a small footprint instrument (1 ft(3)). The fluidic cartridge was capable of performing cell enrichment, cell lysis, solid-phase extraction (SPE) of genomic DNA, continuous flow (CF) PCR, CF ligase detection reaction (LDR) and universal DNA array readout. The cartridge was comprised of modules situated on a fluidic motherboard; the motherboard was made from polycarbonate, PC, and used for cell lysis, SPE, CF PCR and CF LDR. The modules were task-specific units and performed universal zip-code array readout or affinity enrichment of the target cells with both made from poly(methylmethacrylate), PMMA. Two genes, uidA and sipB/C, were used to discriminate between E. coli and Salmonella, and evaluated as a model system. Results showed that the fluidic

  12. A self-amplified transistor immunosensor under dual gate operation: highly sensitive detection of hepatitis B surface antigen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, I.-K.; Jeun, M.; Jang, H.-J.; Cho, W.-J.; Lee, K. H.

    2015-10-01

    Ion-sensitive field-effect transistors (ISFETs), although they have attracted considerable attention as effective immunosensors, have still not been adopted for practical applications owing to several problems: (1) the poor sensitivity caused by the short Debye screening length in media with high ion concentration, (2) time-consuming preconditioning processes for achieving the highly-diluted media, and (3) the low durability caused by undesirable ions such as sodium chloride in the media. Here, we propose a highly sensitive immunosensor based on a self-amplified transistor under dual gate operation (immuno-DG ISFET) for the detection of hepatitis B surface antigen. To address the challenges in current ISFET-based immunosensors, we have enhanced the sensitivity of an immunosensor by precisely tailoring the nanostructure of the transistor. In the pH sensing test, the immuno-DG ISFET showed superior sensitivity (2085.53 mV per pH) to both standard ISFET under single gate operation (58.88 mV per pH) and DG ISFET with a non-tailored transistor (381.14 mV per pH). Moreover, concerning the detection of hepatitis B surface antigens (HBsAg) using the immuno-DG ISFET, we have successfully detected trace amounts of HBsAg (22.5 fg mL-1) in a non-diluted 1× PBS medium with a high sensitivity of 690 mV. Our results demonstrate that the proposed immuno-DG ISFET can be a biosensor platform for practical use in the diagnosis of various diseases.Ion-sensitive field-effect transistors (ISFETs), although they have attracted considerable attention as effective immunosensors, have still not been adopted for practical applications owing to several problems: (1) the poor sensitivity caused by the short Debye screening length in media with high ion concentration, (2) time-consuming preconditioning processes for achieving the highly-diluted media, and (3) the low durability caused by undesirable ions such as sodium chloride in the media. Here, we propose a highly sensitive immunosensor

  13. In vitro selection of RNA-cleaving DNAzymes for bacterial detection.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wenqing; Feng, Qian; Chang, Dingran; Tram, Kha; Li, Yingfu

    2016-08-15

    DNAzymes refer to single-stranded DNA molecules with catalytic activity and can be isolated from synthetic random-sequence DNA pools using the technique of in vitro selection. DNAzymes that cleave RNA, known as "RNA-cleaving DNAzymes", represent one of the best-studied classes of DNAzymes and have been widely used for the development of biosensors and bioassays for various analytes. We have been interested in developing RNA-cleaving DNAzymes as bacterial sensors and these DNAzymes are engineered to perform three linked functions: recognition of a bacterial biomarker, RNA cleavage, and fluorescence generation. These fluorogenic DNAzymes emit fluorescence automatically in the presence of a bacterium of interest and can be used to set up a simple "mix-and-read" assay to detect this bacterium. In this article, we will discuss this DNAzyme system and present a proven strategy for isolating highly specific bacteria-responding DNAzyme probes from random-sequence DNA pools. We will also provide an in vitro selection protocol successfully used to derive RNA-cleaving fluorogenic DNAzyme probes that are capable of recognizing a targeted strain of Clostridium difficile. PMID:27017912

  14. Beetroot-pigment-derived colorimetric sensor for detection of calcium dipicolinate in bacterial spores.

    PubMed

    Gonçalves, Letícia Christina Pires; Da Silva, Sandra Maria; DeRose, Paul C; Ando, Rômulo Augusto; Bastos, Erick Leite

    2013-01-01

    In this proof-of-concept study, we describe the use of the main red beet pigment betanin for the quantification of calcium dipicolinate in bacterial spores, including Bacillus anthracis. In the presence of europium(III) ions, betanin is converted to a water-soluble, non-luminescent orange 1∶1 complex with a stability constant of 1.4 × 10(5) L mol(-1). The addition of calcium dipicolinate, largely found in bacterial spores, changes the color of the aqueous solution of [Eu(Bn)(+)] from orange to magenta. The limit of detection (LOD) of calcium dipicolinate is around 2.0 × 10(-6) mol L(-1) and the LOD determined for both spores, B. cereus and B. anthracis, is (1.1 ± 0.3)× 10(6) spores mL(-1). This simple, green, fast and low cost colorimetric assay was selective for calcium dipicolinate when compared to several analogous compounds. The importance of this work relies on the potential use of betalains, raw natural pigments, as colorimetric sensors for biological applications. PMID:24019934

  15. Recent Developments in Antibody-Based Assays for the Detection of Bacterial Toxins

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Kui; Dietrich, Richard; Didier, Andrea; Doyscher, Dominik; Märtlbauer, Erwin

    2014-01-01

    Considering the urgent demand for rapid and accurate determination of bacterial toxins and the recent promising developments in nanotechnology and microfluidics, this review summarizes new achievements of the past five years. Firstly, bacterial toxins will be categorized according to their antibody binding properties into low and high molecular weight compounds. Secondly, the types of antibodies and new techniques for producing antibodies are discussed, including poly- and mono-clonal antibodies, single-chain variable fragments (scFv), as well as heavy-chain and recombinant antibodies. Thirdly, the use of different nanomaterials, such as gold nanoparticles (AuNPs), magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs), quantum dots (QDs) and carbon nanomaterials (graphene and carbon nanotube), for labeling antibodies and toxins or for readout techniques will be summarized. Fourthly, microscale analysis or minimized devices, for example microfluidics or lab-on-a-chip (LOC), which have attracted increasing attention in combination with immunoassays for the robust detection or point-of-care testing (POCT), will be reviewed. Finally, some new materials and analytical strategies, which might be promising for analyzing toxins in the near future, will be shortly introduced. PMID:24732203

  16. Immunonucleochemistry: a new method for in situ detection of antigens in the nucleus of cells in culture

    PubMed Central

    Lee, HyunSook; Park, Sung Dong; Seog, Dae-Hyun

    2010-01-01

    The advancement of immunocytochemistry (ICC) allows one to observe detailed spatial distribution of cellular antigens, but, with some limitations. Using conventional ICC, it is difficult to distinguish the nuclear localization from cytoplasm, as two large subcellular compartments overlap on the z-axis. In this study, we have investigated whether in situ immunostaining of ‘naked’ nuclei could provide an unambiguous method for detection of nuclear antigens. We have designed a protocol that efficiently lyses plasmalemma, while keeping the nuclear envelope intact. The optimal condition for lysing the plasmalemma was 0.5% Nonidet P-40 for 5 min in both neuronal and non-neuronal cultured cells. Using this protocol, we could unambiguously isolate nuclear from cytoplasmic ICC signals. Since the present protocol has been designed for immunostaining of ‘naked’ nuclei from cultured or isolated cells, we have coined a new term to refer to this procedure as ‘immunonucleochemistry’ (‘INC’ for abbreviation). PMID:20383580

  17. Detection of prostate-specific antigen with biomolecule-gated AlGaN/GaN high electron mobility transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jia-dong; Cheng, Jun-jie; Miao, Bin; Wei, Xiao-wei; Xie, Jie; Zhang, Jin-cheng; Zhang, Zhi-qiang; Wu, Dong-min

    2014-07-01

    In order to improve the sensitivity of AlGaN/GaN high electron mobility transistor (HEMT) biosensors, a simple biomolecule-gated AlGaN/GaN HEMT structure was designed and successfully fabricated for prostate specific antigen (PSA) detection. UV/ozone was used to oxidize the GaN surface and then a 3-aminopropyl trimethoxysilane (APTES) self-assembled monolayer was bound to the sensing region. This monolayer serves as a binding layer for attachment of the prostate specific antibody (anti-PSA). The biomolecule-gated AlGaN/GaN HEMT sensor shows a rapid and sensitive response when the target prostate-specific antigen in buffer solution was added to the antibody-immobilized sensing area. The current change showed a logarithm relationship against the PSA concentration from 0.1 pg/ml to 0.993 ng/ml. The sensitivity of 0.215% is determined for 0.1 pg/ml PSA solution. The above experimental result of the biomolecule-gated AlGaN/GaN HEMT biosensor suggested that this biosensor might be a useful tool for prostate cancer screening.

  18. Detection of IgG Anti-Leishmania Antigen by Flow Cytometry as a Diagnostic Test for Cutaneous Leishmaniasis.

    PubMed

    Pedral-Sampaio, Geraldo; Alves, Jessé S; Schriefer, Albert; Magalhães, Andréa; Meyer, Roberto; Glesby, Marshall J; Carvalho, Edgar M; Carvalho, Lucas P

    2016-01-01

    Diagnosis of cutaneous leishmaniasis (CL) relies on clinical presentation, parasite isolation, histopathologic evaluation and positive Montenegro skin test. However, the low amounts of parasites in the lesion of these individuals make parasite isolation and histopatologic diagnosis unreliable, often leading to false-negative results. Also, 15% of people living in endemic areas have sub-clinical infection characterized by positive Montenegro skin test, which may contribute to misdiagnosis. Although the main Leishmania killing mechanism is through cell-mediated immune response, antibodies against Leishmania antigens are found in infected individuals. Here our goal was to develop a new serological technique using polystyrene microspheres sensitized with soluble Leishmania antigens as a tool for the detection of IgG in serum from CL patients by flow cytometry. To validate the assay we carried out a comparative test (ELISA) commonly used as a diagnostic test for parasitic diseases. To determine cross-reactivity we used serum from patients with Chagas disease, caused by a trypanosome that has several proteins with high homology to those of the Leishmania genus. We observed that the flow cytometry technique was more sensitive than the ELISA, but, less specific. Our results show that the flow cytometry serologic test can be used to confirm CL cases in L. braziliensis transmission areas, however, presence of Chagas disease has to be ruled out in these individuals. PMID:27622535

  19. Bacterial sensors based on biosilica immobilization for label-free OWLS detection.

    PubMed

    Adányi, Nóra; Bori, Zsuzsanna; Szendrő, István; Erdélyi, Katalin; Wang, Xiaohong; Schröder, Heinz C; Müller, Werner E G

    2013-06-25

    In the last years, a new group of enzymes, the so-called silicateins, have been identified and characterized, which form the axial filaments of the spicules of the siliceous sponges, consisting of not only amorphous silica among others. These enzymes are able to catalyze the polycondensation and deposition of silica at mild conditions. Silicateins can be expressed in Escherichia coli. The recombinant proteins are expressed on the surface of the cell wall and are able to catalyze the formation of a polysilicate net around the bacterial cells providing the possibility for further attachment to the surface of SiO2 containing sensor chips. With this mild immobilization process it is now possible to prepare novel microbial sensors based on Optical Waveguide Lightmode Spectroscopy. In the present study, the immobilization of silicatein modified E. coli BL21AI cells onto the SiO2-type chips was optimized (buffer concentration, pH, temperature, reaction time, and so on) and then the biological properties, in particular the inhibitory effect of stressors/environmental pollutants on the novel bacterial sensor were studied in real time. The effect of oxidative stress was investigated by exposing the sensors containing biosilica-immobilized E. coli BL21AI cells to various concentrations of hydrogen peroxide. The effect of antibiotics was tested using chloramphenicol (CAP) which is effective against a variety of Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria and penicillin G which destroys the bacterial cell wall. In addition, the inhibition by carbofuran (CF) pesticide was also tested. CF is a highly toxic compound which inhibits cholinesterase activity. According our results we can conclude that the novel bacterial sensor consisting of the silicatein modified E. coli BL21AI cells immobilized on OWLS sensor surface could be an effective tool to detect the presence of different type of pollutants in real time measurement. However penicillin G and CF are not specifically inhibitors of

  20. Development of monoclonal antibody-based galactomannoprotein antigen-capture ELISAs to detect Aspergillus fumigatus infection in the invasive aspergillosis rabbit models.

    PubMed

    Wang, Z-Y; Cai, J-P; Qiu, L-W; Hao, W; Pan, Y-X; Tung, E T K; Lau, C C Y; Woo, P C Y; Lau, S K P; Yuen, K-Y; Che, X-Y

    2012-11-01

    Aspergillus fumigatus is one of the most prominent opportunistic fungal pathogens in immunocompromised hosts. Early recognition of this infection along with prompt antifungal therapy may increase the survival rate. We expressed two potential bio-markers of A. fumigatus infection-galactomannoprotein Afmp1p and Afmp4p in Pichia pastoris. We generated 33 monoclonal antibodies (MAbs), 20 against recombinant Afmp1p (rAfmp1p) and the other 13 against recombinant Afmp4p (rAfmp4p). Subsequently, we developed two antigen-capture enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs) which employed MAbs as both the capture and the detection antibodies for rAfmp1p and rAfmp4p. The two antigen-capture ELISAs specifically detected Afmp1p/Afmp4p in cultures of A. fumigatus and had no cross-reaction with other tested pathogenic fungi, including Penicillium marneffei and other pathogenic Aspergillus species. The Afmp1p-captured ELISA would be positive even when the culture supernatant of A. fumigatus had been diluted to 128-fold of its original concentration. The two antigen ELISAs could capture circulating or excreted antigens during the acute phase of invasive aspergillosis (IA) in the animal model, and had no cross-reactivity to other Aspergillus-challenged animal models. We developed two antigen-capture ELISAs for the laboratory diagnosis of A. fumigatus infection. These two antigen-capture ELISAs may be useful in the clinical diagnosis of aspergillosis. PMID:22669560

  1. Detection of bacterial endospores by means of ultrafast coherent Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pestov, Dmitry Sergeyevich

    This work is devoted to formulation and development of a laser spectroscopic technique for rapid detection of biohazards, such as Bacillus anthracis spores. Coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) is used as an underlying process for active retrieval of species-specific characteristics of an analyte. Vibrational modes of constituent molecules are Raman-excited by a pair of ultrashort, femtosecond laser pulses, and then probed through inelastic scattering of a third, time-delayed laser field. We first employ the already known time-resolved CARS technique. We apply it to the spectroscopy of easy-to-handle methanol-water mixtures, and then continue building our expertise on solutions of dipicolinic acid (DPA) and its salts, which happen to be marker molecules for bacterial spores. Various acquisition schemes are evaluated, and the preference is given to multi-channel frequency-resolved detection, when the whole CARS spectrum is recorded as a function of the probe pulse delay. We demonstrate a simple detection algorithm that manages to differentiate DPA solution from common interferents. We investigate experimentally the advantages and disadvantages of near-resonant probing of the excited molecular coherence, and finally observe the indicative backscattered CARS signal from DPA and NaDPA powders. The possibility of selective Raman excitation via pulse shaping of the preparation pulses is also demonstrated. The analysis of time-resolved CARS experiments on powders and B. subtilis spores, a harmless surrogate for B. anthracis, facilitates the formulation of a new approach, where we take full advantage of the multi-channel frequency-resolved acquisition and spectrally discriminate the Raman-resonant CARS signal from the background due to other instantaneous four-wave mixing (FWM) processes. Using narrowband probing, we decrease the magnitude of the nonresonant FWM, which is further suppressed by the timing of the laser pulses. The devised technique, referred to as

  2. Profiling and Quantitation of Bacterial Carotenoids by Liquid Chromatography and Photodiode Array Detection

    PubMed Central

    Nelis, H. J.; De Leenheer, A. P.

    1989-01-01

    An analytical method for the profiling and quantitative determination of carotenoids in bacteria is described. Exhaustive extraction of the pigments from four selected bacterial strains required treatment of the cells with potassium hydroxide or liquefied phenol or both before the addition of the extracting solvent (methanol or diethyl ether). The carotenoids in the extracts were separated by nonaqueous reversed-phase liquid chromatography in conjunction with photodiode array absorption detection. The identity of a peak was considered definitive only when both its retention time and absorption spectrum, before and after chemical reactions, matched those of a reference component. In the absence of the latter, most peaks could be tentatively identified. Two examples illustrate how in the analysis of pigmented bacteria errors may result from using nonchromatographic procedures or liquid chromatographic methods lacking sufficient criteria for peak identification. Carotenoids of interest were determined quantitatively when the authentic reference substance was available or, alternatively, were determined semiquantitatively. PMID:16348068

  3. Detection of hepatitis B virus core antigen by phage display mediated TaqMan real-time immuno-PCR.

    PubMed

    Monjezi, Razieh; Tan, Sheau Wei; Tey, Beng Ti; Sieo, Chin Chin; Tan, Wen Siang

    2013-01-01

    The core antigen (HBcAg) of hepatitis B virus (HBV) is one of the markers for the identification of the viral infection. The main purpose of this study was to develop a TaqMan real-time detection assay based on the concept of phage display mediated immuno-PCR (PD-IPCR) for the detection of HBcAg. PD-IPCR combines the advantages of immuno-PCR (IPCR) and phage display technology. IPCR integrates the versatility of enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) with the sensitivity and signal generation power of PCR. Whereas, phage display technology exploits the physical association between the displayed peptide and the encoding DNA within the same phage particle. In this study, a constrained peptide displayed on the surface of an M13 recombinant bacteriophage that interacts tightly with HBcAg was applied as a diagnostic reagent in IPCR. The phage displayed peptide and its encoding DNA can be used to replace monoclonal antibody (mAb) and chemically bound DNA, respectively. This method is able to detect as low as 10ng of HBcAg with 10(8)pfu/ml of the recombinant phage which is about 10,000 times more sensitive than the phage-ELISA. The PD-IPCR provides an alternative means for the detection of HBcAg in human serum samples. PMID:23022731

  4. Europium nanoparticle-based simple to perform dry-reagent immunoassay for the detection of hepatitis B surface antigen.

    PubMed

    Talha, Sheikh M; Salminen, Teppo; Juntunen, Etvi; Spangar, Anni; Gurramkonda, Chandrasekhar; Vuorinen, Tytti; Khanna, Navin; Pettersson, Kim

    2016-03-01

    Hepatitis B infection, caused by hepatitis B virus (HBV), presents a huge global health burden. Serological diagnosis of HBV mainly relies on the detection of hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg). Although there are high sensitivity commercial HBsAg enzyme immunoassays (EIAs) available, many low-resource laboratories lacking trained technicians continue to use rapid point-of-care assays with low sensitivities for HBsAg detection, due to their simplicity to operate. We developed a time-resolved fluorometric dry-reagent HBsAg immunoassay which meets the detection limit of high sensitivity EIAs but is simple to operate. To develop the assay, anti-HBsAg monoclonal antibody coated on europium nanoparticles was dried atop of biotinylated anti-HBsAg polyclonal antibody immobilized on streptavidin-coated microtiter wells. To test a sample in dry-reagent assay, serum sample and assay buffer were added to the wells, incubated, washed and europium signals were measured. The assay showed a detection limit of 0.25 ng/ml using HBsAg spiked in serum sample. When evaluated with 24 HBV positive and 37 negative serum samples, assay showed 100% sensitivity and specificity. Assay wells are stable for at least 26 weeks when stored at 4°C, and can tolerate elevated temperatures of up to 35°C for two weeks. The developed assay has high potential to be used in low-resource laboratories. PMID:26762619

  5. Simultaneous Detection of α-Fetoprotein and Carcinoembryonic Antigen Based on Si Nanowire Field-Effect Transistors

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Kuiyu; Zhang, Ye; Li, Zengyao; Zhou, Fan; Feng, Kang; Dou, Huiqiang; Wang, Tong

    2015-01-01

    Primary hepatic carcinoma (PHC) is one of the most common malignancies worldwide, resulting in death within six to 20 months. The survival rate can be improved by effective treatments when diagnosed at an early stage. The α-fetoprotein (AFP) and carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) have been identified as markers that are expressed at higher levels in PHC patients. In this study, we employed silicon nanowire field-effect transistors (SiNW-FETs) with polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) microfluidic channels to simultaneously detect AFP and CEA in desalted human serum. Dual-channel PDMS was first utilized for the selective modification of AFP and CEA antibodies on SiNWs, while single-channel PDMS offers faster and more sensitive detection of AFP and CEA in serum. During the SiNW modification process, 0.1% BSA was utilized to minimize nonspecific protein binding from serum. The linear dynamic ranges for the AFP and CEA detection were measured to be 500 fg/mL to 50 ng/mL and 50 fg/mL to 10 ng/mL, respectively. Our work demonstrates the promising potential of fabricated SiNW-FETs as a direct detection kit for multiple tumor markers in serum; therefore, it provides a chance for early stage diagnose and, hence, more effective treatments for PHC patients. PMID:26251912

  6. A chitosan-Au-hyperbranched polyester nanoparticles-based antifouling immunosensor for sensitive detection of carcinoembryonic antigen.

    PubMed

    Sun, Chong; Ma, Lie; Qian, Qiuhui; Parmar, Soniya; Zhao, Wenbo; Zhao, Bo; Shen, Jian

    2014-09-01

    Analysts are always interested in finding new functional nanomaterials and devices with good properties for electrochemical sensor applications. In this paper, hyperbranched polyester nanoparticles with carboxylic acid functional groups (HBPE-CA NPs) were synthesized and combined with chitosan wrapped around Au nanoparticles (CS-Au NPs) to prepare a novel and sensitive electrochemical immunosensor by adsorption of carcinoembryonic antibody (anti-CEA) on the (HBPE-CA)/CS-Au NPs modified glass carbon electrode (GCE). Under the optimized conditions, the proposed immunosensor displayed a good amperometric response to carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA). Moreover, based on the antibiofouling properties, the immunosensor could be used for the direct detection of CEA in whole blood, and exhibited a wide detection range (1-10(7) fg mL(-1)), and a low detection limit of 0.251 fg mL(-1) (signal/noise = 3). Control experiments were also carried out by using ascorbic acid (AA), uric acid (UA), human immunoglobulin G (IgG), BSA and glucose in the absence of CEA. The good stability and repeatability of this immunosensor were also proven. Importantly, the results of the detection of clinical whole blood specimens with the proposed immunosensor showed good consistency with the data determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) in serum samples. Furthermore, the developed immunosensor could provide a promising immunoassay strategy for clinical applications, since the values we measured in whole blood directly are likely closer to the real values. PMID:24957417

  7. A sensitive enhanced chemiluminescent-ELISA for the detection of Plasmodium falciparum circumsporozoite antigen in midguts of Anopheles stephensi mosquitoes.

    PubMed

    Grabias, Bryan; Zheng, Hong; Mlambo, Godfree; Tripathi, Abhai K; Kumar, Sanjai

    2015-01-01

    Efforts to develop a successful malaria vaccine are hampered due to lack of assays that are predictive of protective immunity without conducting large clinical studies. The effect of experimental vaccines and drugs on malaria transmission is yet more difficult to measure. Knowledge on the Plasmodium infection rate in mosquito populations will aid the measurement of effects from intervention measures for malaria control. Here, we report the development of a chemiluminescent sandwich ELISA (ECL-ELISA) that can detect Plasmodium falciparum circumsporozoite protein (Pf CSP) produced in recombinant form at concentrations of 4.4pg and in P. falciparum sporozoites (Pf SPZ) derived from mosquito salivary glands at levels corresponding to 5 Pf SPZ. Most importantly, we demonstrate reliable Pf CSP-based detection of 0.056day 8 P. falciparum oocysts developing inside mosquito midguts in whole mosquito lysates. Cumulatively, the ECL-ELISA is 47× more sensitive for the detection of Pf CSP than a colorimetric ELISA while greatly simplifying sample preparation, obviating the need for cumbersome midgut dissections and allowing high throughput screening of Plasmodium infection in mosquito populations. The ECL-ELISA may also have broader application in diagnosis of infectious diseases and the prognostic value in cancer and other diseases such as auto-immunity and genetic disorders based on antigen detection, or quality validation of biological vaccine components. PMID:25455023

  8. Many young men with prostate-specific antigen (PSA) screen-detected prostate cancers may be candidates for active surveillance

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jeri; Ebertowski, James; Janiga, Matthew; Arzola, Jorge; Gillespie, Gayle; Fountain, Michael; Soderdahl, Douglas; Canby-Hagino, Edith; Elsamanoudi, Sally; Gurski, Jennifer; Davis, John W.; Parker, Patricia A.; Boyd, Douglas D.

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY Objective To identify a population of young men (aged < 55 years at diagnosis) with very-low-risk prostate cancer (stage cT1c, with prostate-specific antigen [PSA] density of < 0.15 ng/mL/g, Gleason score ≤ 6, and ≤ 2 positive biopsy cores with < 50% tumour involvement) that may be candidates for active surveillance (AS). Patients and methods We queried a Department of Defense tumor registry and hard-copy records for servicemen diagnosed with prostate cancer from 1987 to 2010. Statistical analyses were undertaken using Fisher's exact and chi-square testing. Results From 1987–1991 and 2007–2010, PSA screen-detected tumours diagnosed in men aged ≤ 55 years > 30-fold. Data for a subset of men (174) with PSA screen-detected cancer were evaluable for disease risk assessment. Of the 174 men with screen-detected disease, 81 (47%) had very-low-risk disease. Of that group, 96% (78/81) selected treatment and, of 57 men undergoing radical prostatectomy (RP), the tumours of 49 (86%) carried favourable pathology (organ confined, < 10% gland involvement, Gleason ≤ 6). Conclusions Nearly half of young men with PSA screen-detected prostate cancer are AS candidates but the overwhelming majority seek treatment. Considering that many tumours show favourable pathology at RP, there is a possibility that these patients may benefit from AS management. PMID:23350937

  9. Simultaneous Detection of α-Fetoprotein and Carcinoembryonic Antigen Based on Si Nanowire Field-Effect Transistors.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Kuiyu; Zhang, Ye; Li, Zengyao; Zhou, Fan; Feng, Kang; Dou, Huiqiang; Wang, Tong

    2015-01-01

    Primary hepatic carcinoma (PHC) is one of the most common malignancies worldwide, resulting in death within six to 20 months. The survival rate can be improved by effective treatments when diagnosed at an early stage. The α-fetoprotein (AFP) and carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) have been identified as markers that are expressed at higher levels in PHC patients. In this study, we employed silicon nanowire field-effect transistors (SiNW-FETs) with polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) microfluidic channels to simultaneously detect AFP and CEA in desalted human serum. Dual-channel PDMS was first utilized for the selective modification of AFP and CEA antibodies on SiNWs, while single-channel PDMS offers faster and more sensitive detection of AFP and CEA in serum. During the SiNW modification process, 0.1% BSA was utilized to minimize nonspecific protein binding from serum. The linear dynamic ranges for the AFP and CEA detection were measured to be 500 fg/mL to 50 ng/mL and 50 fg/mL to 10 ng/mL, respectively. Our work demonstrates the promising potential of fabricated SiNW-FETs as a direct detection kit for multiple tumor markers in serum; therefore, it provides a chance for early stage diagnose and, hence, more effective treatments for PHC patients. PMID:26251912

  10. Three-dimensional electrochemical immunosensor for sensitive detection of carcinoembryonic antigen based on monolithic and macroporous graphene foam.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jiyang; Wang, Jiao; Wang, Tianshu; Li, Dan; Xi, Fengna; Wang, Jin; Wang, Erkang

    2015-03-15

    A high performance three-dimensional (3D) electrochemical immunosensor was developed for sensitive detection of the tumor biomarker, carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA). Monolithic and macroporous graphene foam grown by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) served as the scaffold of the free-standing 3D electrode. Immuno-recognition interface was fabricated via simple and non-covalent immobilization of antibody using lectin-mediated strategy. Briefly, the well-known lectin macromolecule (concanavalin A, Con A) monolayer was functionalized on 3D graphene (3D-G) using in-situ polymerized polydopamine as the linker. Then the widely used horseradish peroxidase (HRP)-labeled antibody (anti-CEA) in immunoassays was efficiently immobilized to demonstrate the recognition interface via the biospecific affinity of lectin with sugarprotein. The 3D immunosensor is able to detect CEA with a wide linear range (0.1-750.0ngml(-1)), low detection limit (~90pgml(-1) at a signal-to-noise ratio of 3), and short incubation time (30min). Furthermore, this biosensor was used for the detection of the CEA level in real serum samples. PMID:25461170

  11. Broad spectrum detection and "barcoding" of water pollutants by a genome-wide bacterial sensor array.

    PubMed

    Elad, Tal; Belkin, Shimshon

    2013-07-01

    An approach for the rapid detection and classification of a broad spectrum of water pollutants, based on a genome-wide reporter bacterial live cell array, is proposed and demonstrated. An array of ca. 2000 Escherichia coli fluorescent transcriptional reporters was exposed to 25 toxic compounds as well as to unpolluted water, and its responses were recorded after 3 h. The 25 toxic compounds represented 5 pollutant classes: genotoxicants, metals, detergents, alcohols, and monoaromatic hydrocarbons. Identifying unique gene expression patterns, a nearest neighbour-based model detected pollutant presence and predicted class attribution with an estimated accuracy of 87%. Sensitivity and positive predictive values varied among classes, being higher for pollutant classes that were defined by mode of action than for those defined by structure only. Sensitivity for unpolluted water was 0.90 and the positive predictive value was 0.79. All pollutant classes induced the transcription of a statistically significant proportion of membrane associated genes; in addition, the sets of genes responsive to genotoxicants, detergents and alcohols were enriched with genes involved in DNA repair, iron utilization and the translation machinery, respectively. Following further development, a methodology of the type described herein may be suitable for integration in water monitoring schemes in conjunction with existing analytical and biological detection techniques. PMID:23726715

  12. Fish chromatophores as cytosensors in a microscale device: detection of environmental toxins and bacterial pathogens.

    PubMed

    Chaplen, Frank W R; Upson, Rosalyn H; Mcfadden, Philip N; Kolodziej, Wojtek

    2002-02-01

    Fish chromatophores from Betta splendens are used as the cytosensor element in the development of a portable microscale device capable of detecting certain environmental toxins and bacterial pathogens by monitoring changes in pigment granule distribution. The adaptation of chromatophores to a microscale environment has required the development of enabling technologies to produce miniaturized culture chambers, to integrate microfluidics for sample delivery, to miniaturize image capture, and to design new statistical methods for image analyses. Betta splendens chromatophores were selected as the cytosensor element because of their moderate size, their toleration of close contact, and most importantly, for their responses to a broad range of chemicals and pathogenic bacteria. A miniaturized culture chamber has been designed that supports chromatophore viability for as long as 3 months, and that can be easily transported without damage to the cells. New statistical methods for image analyses have been developed that increase sensitivity and also decrease the time required for detection of significant changes in pigment granule distribution. Betta chromatophores have been tested for their responses to selected pathogenic bacteria and chemical agents. We discuss in detail the aggregation of pigment granules seen when chromatophores are incubated with Bacillus cereus, a common cause of food poisoning. Also described are the more subtle responses of chromatophores to a class of environmental chemical toxins, polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons. We show that the chromatophores are able to detect the presence of certain polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons at concentrations lower than the Environment Protection Agency (EPA) 550.1 standards. PMID:11841070

  13. Miniaturized bacterial biosensor system for arsenic detection holds great promise for making integrated measurement device.

    PubMed

    Buffi, Nina; Merulla, Davide; Beutier, Julien; Barbaud, Fanny; Beggah, Siham; van Lintel, Harald; Renaud, Philippe; van der Meer, Jan Roelof

    2011-01-01

    Combining bacterial bioreporters with microfluidics systems holds great promise for in-field detection of chemical or toxicity targets. Recently we showed how Escherichia coli cells engineered to produce a variant of green fluorescent protein after contact to arsenite and arsenate can be encapsulated in agarose beads and incorporated into a microfluidic chip to create a device for in-field detection of arsenic, a contaminant of well known toxicity and carcinogenicity in potable water both in industrialized and developing countries. Cell-beads stored in the microfluidics chip at -20°C retained inducibility up to one month and we were able to reproducibly discriminate concentrations of 10 and 50 μg arsenite per L (the drinking water standards for European countries and the United States, and for the developing countries, respectively) from the blank in less than 200 minutes. We discuss here the reasons for decreasing bioreporter signal development upon increased storage of cell beads but also show how this decrease can be reduced, leading to a faster detection and a longer lifetime of the device. PMID:22008638

  14. Comparison of Two Suspension Arrays for Simultaneous Detection of Five Biothreat Bacterial in Powder Samples

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yu; Wang, Jing; Wen, Haiyan; Liu, Hengchuan

    2012-01-01

    We have developed novel Bio-Plex assays for simultaneous detection of Bacillus anthracis, Yersinia pestis, Brucella spp., Francisella tularensis, and Burkholderia pseudomallei. Universal primers were used to amplify highly conserved region located within the 16S rRNA amplicon, followed by hybridized to pathogen-specific probes for identification of these five organisms. The other assay is based on multiplex PCR to simultaneously amplify five species-specific pathogen identification-targeted regions unique to individual pathogen. Both of the two arrays are validated to be flexible and sensitive for simultaneous detection of bioterrorism bacteria. However, universal primer PCR-based array could not identify Bacillus anthracis, Yersinia pestis, and Brucella spp. at the species level because of the high conservation of 16S rDNA of the same genus. The two suspension arrays can be utilized to detect Bacillus anthracis sterne spore and Yersinia pestis EV76 from mimic “write powder” samples, they also proved that the suspension array system will be valuable tools for diagnosis of bacterial biothreat agents in environmental samples. PMID:22690123

  15. Comparison of two suspension arrays for simultaneous detection of five biothreat bacterial in powder samples.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yu; Wang, Jing; Wen, Haiyan; Liu, Hengchuan

    2012-01-01

    We have developed novel Bio-Plex assays for simultaneous detection of Bacillus anthracis, Yersinia pestis, Brucella spp., Francisella tularensis, and Burkholderia pseudomallei. Universal primers were used to amplify highly conserved region located within the 16S rRNA amplicon, followed by hybridized to pathogen-specific probes for identification of these five organisms. The other assay is based on multiplex PCR to simultaneously amplify five species-specific pathogen identification-targeted regions unique to individual pathogen. Both of the two arrays are validated to be flexible and sensitive for simultaneous detection of bioterrorism bacteria. However, universal primer PCR-based array could not identify Bacillus anthracis, Yersinia pestis, and Brucella spp. at the species level because of the high conservation of 16S rDNA of the same genus. The two suspension arrays can be utilized to detect Bacillus anthracis sterne spore and Yersinia pestis EV76 from mimic "write powder" samples, they also proved that the suspension array system will be valuable tools for diagnosis of bacterial biothreat agents in environmental samples. PMID:22690123

  16. New detection targets for amyloid-reactive probes: spectroscopic recognition of bacterial spores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Guilford, II; Landsman, Pavel

    2005-05-01

    We report characteristic changes in fluorescence of amyloid-binding dyes Thioflavin T (TfT), pinacyanol (PIN) and related dyes, caused by their interaction with suspended Bacillus spore cultures (B. subtilis, B thuringiensis). The gain in TfT emission in the presence of spores allowed their immediate detection in aqueous suspensions, with a sensitivity limit of < 105 spores per ml. The spectroscopic signatures are consistent with a large number of binding sites for the two dyes on spore coats. The possible structural relationship of these dye binding loci with characteristic motifs (β-stacks) of amyloid deposits and other misfolded protein formations suggests new designs for probing biocontamination and also for clinical studies of non-microbial human pathogens (e.g., amyloid-related protein aggregates in prion-related transmissible encephalopathies or in Alzheimer's disease). Also reported is a special screening technique that was designed and used herein for calibration of new detection probes and assays for spore detection. It employed spectroscopic interactions between the candidate amyloid stains and poly(vinylpyrrolidone)-coated colloid silica (Percoll) nanoparticles that also display remarkable parallelism with the corresponding dye-amyloid and dye-spore reactivities. Percoll may thus find new applications as a convenient non-biological structural model mimicking the putative probe-targeted motifs in both classes of bioanalytes. These findings are important in the design of new probes and assays for important human pathogens (i.e. bacterial spores and amyloidogenic protein aggregates).

  17. Preparation of Pd/Bacterial Cellulose Hybrid Nanofibers for Dopamine Detection.

    PubMed

    Li, Dawei; Ao, Kelong; Wang, Qingqing; Lv, Pengfei; Wei, Qufu

    2016-01-01

    Palladium nanoparticle-bacterial cellulose (PdBC) hybrid nanofibers were synthesized by in-situ chemical reduction method. The obtained PdBC nanofibers were characterized by a series of analytical techniques. The results revealed that Pd nanoparticles were evenly dispersed on the surfaces of BC nanofibers. Then, the as-prepared PdBC nanofibers were mixed with laccase (Lac) and Nafion to obtain mixture suspension, which was further modified on electrode surface to construct novel biosensing platform. Finally, the prepared electrochemical biosensor was employed to detect dopamine. The analysis result was satisfactory, the sensor showed excellent electrocatalysis towards dopamine with high sensitivity (38.4 µA·mM(-1)), low detection limit (1.26 µM), and wide linear range (5-167 µM). Moreover, the biosensor also showed good repeatability, reproducibility, selectivity and stability and was successfully used in the detection of dopamine in human urine, thus providing a promising method for dopamine analysis in clinical application. PMID:27187327

  18. A 16 × 16 CMOS Capacitive Biosensor Array Towards Detection of Single Bacterial Cell.

    PubMed

    Couniot, Numa; Francis, Laurent A; Flandre, Denis

    2016-04-01

    We present a 16 × 16 CMOS biosensor array aiming at impedance detection of whole-cell bacteria. Each 14 μm × 16 μm pixel comprises high-sensitive passivated microelectrodes connected to an innovative readout interface based on charge sharing principle for capacitance-to-voltage conversion and subthreshold gain stage to boost the sensitivity. Fabricated in a 0.25 μm CMOS process, the capacitive array was experimentally shown to perform accurate dielectric measurements of the electrolyte up to electrical conductivities of 0.05 S/m, with maximal sensitivity of 55 mV/fF and signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of 37 dB. As biosensing proof of concept, real-time detection of Staphylococcus epidermidis binding events was experimentally demonstrated and provides detection limit of ca. 7 bacteria per pixel and sensitivity of 2.18 mV per bacterial cell. Models and simulations show good matching with experimental results and provide a comprehensive analysis of the sensor and circuit system. Advantages, challenges and limits of the proposed capacitive biosensor array are finally described with regards to literature. With its small area and low power consumption, the present capacitive array is particularly suitable for portable point-of-care (PoC) diagnosis tools and lab-on-chip (LoC) systems. PMID:25974947

  19. Evaluation of Rapid Blood Sample Collection in the Detection of Circulating Filarial Antigens for Epidemiological Survey by rWbSXP-1 Capture Assay

    PubMed Central

    Ansel Vishal, Lawrence; Nazeer, Y.; Ravishankaran, Rajendran; Mahalakshmi, Natarajan; Kaliraj, Perumal

    2014-01-01

    Background Lymphatic filariasis is a neglected tropical disease leading to profound disfiguring causing socio economic burden in the tropics. Current diagnosis strategies available during field surveys and epidemics are based on traditional microscopic detections and a few antigen/antibody assays. We have compared different sampling methodologies and standardized the highly sensitive and reliable rWbSXP-1 antigen detection assay to our new sampling methodology. Methodology Samples collected as serum, whole blood, whole blood on filter paper and whole blood on microscopic slides from patients belonging to various clinical groups of filariasis [endemic normal(EN), chronic pathology(CP), microfilaraemic(MF) and non-endemic normal(NEN)] were collected and standardized the rWbSXP-1 antigen detection assay using monoclonal antibody raised against rWbSXP-1 protein. The whole blood collected on microscopic slide based sampling method was employed in the field and the presence of circulating filarial antigen (CFA) was assessed using the rWbSXP-1 assay. Principal Findings The sampling methods were compared and no significant difference was observed for the detection of CFA (MF, P = 0.304, EN, P = 0.675, CP, P = 0.5698, NEN, P = 0.4494). Further the optimized sampling method was utilized to collect the 1106 samples from Polur, Tiruvannamalai. The rWbSXP-1 assay gave 98 antigen positive results whereas the microscopic method gave only 17. Conclusions Four sampling methodologies were analyzed and the new sampling methodology of whole blood collected on microscopic slide was found to be convenient for the detection of CFA using rWbSXP-1 antigen detection assay. The 1106 samples from Polur were collected using the new method. The rWbSXP-1 antigen assay perceived a 7.32% increased result which was read as false negatives on the conventional microscopic staining method. This new sampling methodology coupled with the rWbSXP-1 antigen assay can be used in

  20. Site-selective in situ growth of fluorescent polymer-antibody conjugates with enhanced antigen detection by signal amplification.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Libin; Zhao, Wenguo; Liu, Xinyu; Wang, Guilin; Wang, Yang; Li, Dong; Xie, Liangzhi; Gao, Yan; Deng, Haiteng; Gao, Weiping

    2015-09-01

    This paper reports a new and general in situ methodology to grow fluorescent polymer conjugates from the interchain disulfide bridging sites of a monoclonal antibody. Atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP) initiators were attached to a monoclonal antibody at its interchain disulfide bridging sites by disulfide re-bridging to yield a macroinitiator. Subsequent in situ ATRP of PEG-like monomers with dye-functionalized monomers from the macroinitiator formed antibody-polymer-dye conjugates with site-selectivity and tunable dye-to-antibody ratios. Notably, these conjugates can amplify antigen detection signal by reducing label-density dependent fluorescence quenching and by increasing dye-to-antibody ratios. The method developed may be applicable to a variety of antibodies, dyes and drugs to create a number of antibody-polymer-dye/drug conjugates for advanced diagnosis and therapy of diseases. PMID:26102329

  1. Bench Test for the Detection of Bacterial Contamination in Platelet Concentrates Using Rapid and Cultural Detection Methods with a Standardized Proficiency Panel

    PubMed Central

    Vollmer, Tanja; Knabbe, Cornelius; Geilenkeuser, Wolf-Jochen; Schmidt, Michael; Dreier, Jens

    2015-01-01

    Summary Background The most frequent infectious complication in transfusion therapy in developed countries is related to the bacterial contamination of platelet concentrates (PCs). Rapid and cultural screening methods for bacterial detection in platelets are available, but external performance evaluation, especially of rapid methods, has been difficult to realize so far. Here we summarize the results of three individual collaborative trials using an external quality assessment program (EQAP) for the application of current rapid and cultural screening methods. Methods Three different modules were available for the detection of bacterial contamination: module 1: rapid methods, module 2: culture methods, module 3: bacterial identification methods. The sample set-up included up to six different bacterial strains, 1-2 negative samples and 4-6 positive samples with stabilized bacterial cell counts (approximately 103/104/105 CFU/ml). Time schedule for testing was limited (module 1: 6 h, module 2 and 3: 7 days). Results Samples of module 1 were analyzed with two different rapid methods (BactiFlow, NAT). The results of the three individual collaborative trials showed that all participants detected the negative samples with both assays correctly. Samples spiked with 104 to 105 CFU/ml of bacteria obtained positive results with both rapid screening methods, whereas samples spiked with only 103 CFU/ml disclosed a lower number of correctly identified positive results by NAT (86.6-93.8% sensitivity) compared to BactiFlow (100% sensitivity). The results for modules 2 and 3 revealed a 100% diagnostic sensitivity and specificity in all three collaborative trials. Conclusion This proficiency panel facilitates the verification of the analytical sensitivity of rapid and cultural bacterial detection systems under controlled routine conditions. The concept of samples provided in this EQAP has three main advantages: i) samples can be examined by both rapid and culture methods, ii) the

  2. Development of Antigen Detection Assay for Diagnosis of Tuberculosis Using Sputum Samples

    PubMed Central

    Pereira Arias-Bouda, Lenka M.; Nguyen, Lan N.; Ho, Ly M.; Kuijper, Sjoukje; Jansen, Henk M.; Kolk, Arend H. J.

    2000-01-01

    The rising incidence of tuberculosis worldwide means an increasing burden on diagnostic facilities, so tests simpler than Ziehl-Neelsen staining are needed. Such tests should be objective, reproducible, and have at least as good a detection limit as 104 bacteria/ml. A capture enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) was developed for detection of lipoarabinomannan (LAM) in human sputum samples. As a capture antibody, we used a murine monoclonal antibody against LAM, with rabbit antiserum against Mycobacterium tuberculosis as a source of detector antibodies. The sensitivity of the capture ELISA was evaluated by using purified LAM and M. tuberculosis whole cells. We were able to detect 1 ng of purified LAM/ml and 104 M. tuberculosis whole cells/ml. LAM could also be detected in culture filtrate of a 3-week-old culture of M. tuberculosis. The culture filtrate contained approximately 100 μg of LAM/ml. The detection limit in sputum pretreated with N-acetyl-l-cysteine and proteinase K was 104 M. tuberculosis whole cells per ml. Thirty-one (91%) of 34 sputum samples from 18 Vietnamese patients with tuberculosis (32 smear positive and 2 smear negative) were positive in the LAM detection assay. In contrast, none of the 25 sputum samples from 21 nontuberculous patients was positive. This specific and sensitive assay for the detection of LAM in sputum is potentially useful for the diagnosis of tuberculosis. PMID:10834989

  3. Utility of PCR, Culture, and Antigen Detection Methods for Diagnosis of Legionellosis

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Derrick J.; Procop, Gary W.; Vogel, Sherilynn; Yen-Lieberman, Belinda

    2015-01-01

    The goal of this retrospective study was to evaluate the performance of different diagnostic tests for Legionnaires' disease in a clinical setting where Legionella pneumophila PCR had been introduced. Electronic medical records at the Cleveland Clinic were searched for Legionella urinary antigen (UAG), culture, and PCR tests ordered from March 2010 through December 2013. For cases where two or more test methods were performed and at least one was positive, the medical record was reviewed for relevant clinical and epidemiologic factors. Excluding repeat testing on a given patient, 19,912 tests were ordered (12,569 UAG, 3,747 cultures, and 3,596 PCR) with 378 positive results. The positivity rate for each method was 0.4% for culture, 0.8% for PCR, and 2.7% for UAG. For 37 patients, at least two test methods were performed with at least one positive result: 10 (27%) cases were positive by all three methods, 16 (43%) were positive by two methods, and 11 (30%) were positive by one method only. For the 32 patients with medical records available, clinical presentation was consistent with proven or probable Legionella infection in 84% of the cases. For those cases, the sensitivities of culture, PCR, and UAG were 50%, 92%, and 96%, respectively. The specificities were 100% for culture and 99.9% for PCR and UAG. PMID:26292304

  4. Use of a new hypersensitive assay for the detection of prostate specific antigen in prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Arai, Y; Onishi, H; Oishi, K; Takeuchi, H; Yoshida, O

    1993-04-01

    We have developed a new hypersensitive enzyme immunoassay for prostate specific antigen (PSA) based on the (MARKIT-M PA) assay but employing a two-hour incubation of the primary monoclonal antibody. The analytical sensitivity has been determined at 0.2 ng/ml, calculated as the mean+three standard deviations of the zero calibrator. Serum PSA was measured at least one month after radical prostatectomy (nine patients) or cystoprostatectomy (six patients). Based on the PSA levels of these patients, the recommended PSA cut-off level indicative of residual disease after radical prostatectomy was 0.4 ng/ml. Increasing (> 0.4 ng/ml) PSA levels preceded recurrence by eight months in a patient who developed bone metastasis after radical prostatectomy. In two patients treated with endocrine therapy, increasing PSA levels also preceded clinical evidence of progression by between eight and nine months. The study suggests that the newly developed sensitive PSA assay allows for the identification of patients with disease progression and the early commencement of adjuvant treatment. PMID:7685834

  5. Immunological detection of chemotherapeutic success in bovine fasciolosis using the specific antigen f2.

    PubMed

    Levieux, D; Levieux, A; Mage, C; Garel, J P

    1992-12-01

    An improved hemagglutination (HA) test using the purified specific f2 antigen of Fasciola hepatica has been evaluated with regard to its potential use for the prediction of chemotherapeutic success in natural bovine infections with F. hepatica. Lactating cows (n = 16) from a herd naturally infected with F. hepatica were successively treated with nitroxynil (Dovenix, Specia) and with oxyclozanide (Zanil, ICI) 1 month later. Their f2-specific antibodies were significantly lower than those of a non-treated control group (n = 15) from the second month after the first treatment, and continued to decline thereafter to negative values 5-6 months post-treatment. In a second experiment, culled and fattened cows (n = 32) of unknown fasciolosis history were treated with closantel (Janssen Pharmaceutica). Three months after treatment, f2-specific antibodies of the serologically positive animals (n = 24) were reduced nine-fold. In contrast, in the control group (n = 28), the titers of f2-specific antibodies of the serologically positive animals (n = 21) were not modified significantly. The results show that the f2-HA test is useful for the prediction of chemotherapeutic success in bovine fascioliasis. PMID:1485423

  6. Detection of anthrax protective antigen (PA) using europium labeled anti-PA monoclonal antibody and time-resolved fluorescence.

    PubMed

    Stoddard, Robyn A; Quinn, Conrad P; Schiffer, Jarad M; Boyer, Anne E; Goldstein, Jason; Bagarozzi, Dennis A; Soroka, Stephen D; Dauphin, Leslie A; Hoffmaster, Alex R

    2014-06-01

    Inhalation anthrax is a rare but acute infectious disease following adsorption of Bacillus anthracis spores through the lungs. The disease has a high fatality rate if untreated, but early and correct diagnosis has a significant impact on case patient recovery. The early symptoms of inhalation anthrax are, however, non-specific and current anthrax diagnostics are primarily dependent upon culture and confirmatory real-time PCR. Consequently, there may be a significant delay in diagnosis and targeted treatment. Rapid, culture-independent diagnostic tests are therefore needed, particularly in the context of a large scale emergency response. The aim of this study was to evaluate the ability of monoclonal antibodies to detect anthrax toxin proteins that are secreted early in the course of B. anthracis infection using a time-resolved fluorescence (TRF) immunoassay. We selected monoclonal antibodies that could detect protective antigen (PA), as PA83 and also PA63 and LF in the lethal toxin complex. The assay reliable detection limit (RDL) was 6.63×10(-6)μM (0.551ng/ml) for PA83 and 2.51×10(-5)μM (1.58ng/ml) for PA63. Despite variable precision and accuracy of the assay, PA was detected in 9 out of 10 sera samples from anthrax confirmed case patients with cutaneous (n=7), inhalation (n=2), and gastrointestinal (n=1) disease. Anthrax Immune Globulin (AIG), which has been used in treatment of clinical anthrax, interfered with detection of PA. This study demonstrates a culture-independent method of diagnosing anthrax through the use of monoclonal antibodies to detect PA and LF in the lethal toxin complex. PMID:24857756

  7. Prostate-specific Antigen Density Variation Rate as a Potential Guideline Parameter for Second Prostate Cancer Detection Biopsy

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Gan-Sheng; Lyv, Jin-Xing; Li, Gang; Yan, Chun-Yin; Hou, Jian-Quan; Pu, Jin-Xian; Ding, Xiang; Huang, Yu-Hua

    2016-01-01

    Background: The diagnostic value of current prostate-specific antigen (PSA) tests is challenged by the poor detection rate of prostate cancer (PCa) in repeat prostate biopsy. In this study, we proposed a novel PSA-related parameter named PSA density variation rate (PSADVR) and designed a clinical trial to evaluate its potential diagnostic value for detecting PCa on a second prostate biopsy. Methods: Data from 184 males who underwent second ultrasound-guided prostate biopsy 6 months after the first biopsy were included in the study. The subjects were divided into PCa and non-PCa groups according to the second biopsy pathological results. Prostate volume, PSA density (PSAD), free-total PSA ratio, and PSADVR were calculated according to corresponding formulas at the second biopsy. These parameters were compared using t-test or Mann-Whitney U-test between PCa and non-PCa groups, and receiver operating characteristic analysis were used to evaluate their predictability on PCa detection. Results: PCa was detected in 24 patients on the second biopsy. Mean values of PSA, PSAD, and PSADVR were greater in the PCa group than in the non-PCa group (8.39 μg/L vs. 7.16 μg/L, 0.20 vs. 0.16, 14.15% vs. −1.36%, respectively). PSADVR had the largest area under the curve, with 0.667 sensitivity and 0.824 specificity when the cutoff was 10%. The PCa detection rate was significantly greater in subjects with PSADVR >10% than PSADVR ≤10% (28.6% vs. 6.5%, P < 0.001). In addition, PSADVR was the only parameter in this study that showed a significant correlation with mid-to-high-risk PCa (r = 0.63, P = 0.03). Conclusions: Our results demonstrated that PSADVR improved the PCa detection rate on second biopsies, especially for mid-to-high-risk cancers requiring prompt treatment. PMID:27453228

  8. A protein-conjugate approach to develop a monoclonal antibody-based antigen detection test for the diagnosis of human brucellosis.

    PubMed

    Patra, Kailash P; Saito, Mayuko; Atluri, Vidya L; Rolán, Hortensia G; Young, Briana; Kerrinnes, Tobias; Smits, Henk; Ricaldi, Jessica N; Gotuzzo, Eduardo; Gilman, Robert H; Tsolis, Renee M; Vinetz, Joseph M

    2014-06-01

    Human brucellosis is most commonly diagnosed by serology based on agglutination of fixed Brucella abortus as antigen. Nucleic acid amplification techniques have not proven capable of reproducibly and sensitively demonstrating the presence of Brucella DNA in clinical specimens. We sought to optimize a monoclonal antibody-based assay to detect Brucella melitensis lipopolysaccharide in blood by conjugating B. melitensis LPS to keyhole limpet hemocyanin, an immunogenic protein carrier to maximize IgG affinity of monoclonal antibodies. A panel of specific of monoclonal antibodies was obtained that recognized both B. melitensis and B. abortus lipopolysaccharide epitopes. An antigen capture assay was developed that detected B. melitensis in the blood of experimentally infected mice and, in a pilot study, in naturally infected Peruvian subjects. As a proof of principle, a majority (7/10) of the patients with positive blood cultures had B. melitensis lipopolysaccharide detected in the initial blood specimen obtained. One of 10 patients with relapsed brucellosis and negative blood culture had a positive serum antigen test. No seronegative/blood culture negative patients had a positive serum antigen test. Analysis of the pair of monoclonal antibodies (2D1, 2E8) used in the capture ELISA for potential cross-reactivity in the detection of lipopolysaccharides of E. coli O157:H7 and Yersinia enterocolitica O9 showed specificity for Brucella lipopolysaccharide. This new approach to develop antigen-detection monoclonal antibodies against a T cell-independent polysaccharide antigen based on immunogenic protein conjugation may lead to the production of improved rapid point-of-care-deployable assays for the diagnosis of brucellosis and other infectious diseases. PMID:24901521

  9. DETECTION OF HELICOBACTER ANTIGEN IN STOOL SAMPLES AND ITS RELATION TO H. PYLORI POSITIVE CHOLECYSTITIS IN EGYPTIAN PATIENTS WITH CHRONIC CALCULAR CHOLECYSTITIS.

    PubMed

    Hassan, Ehsan H; Gerges, Shawkat S; Ahmed, Rehab; Mostafa, Zeinab M; Al-Hamid, Hager Abd; Abd El-Galil, Heba; Thabet, Suzan

    2015-12-01

    Evidences supporting the association between H. pylori infection and chronic cholecystitis could be found by using direct culture or staining of H. pylori in gallbladder tissues as well as indirect techniques. Stool antigen test has been widely used due to its noninvasive nature. Various stool antigen tests were developed to detect H. pylori using an enzyme immunoassay (EIA) based on monoclonal or polyclonal antibodies This study evaluated the frequency of H. pylori antigen in stool samples of patients with chronic calcular cholecystitis as regard gall bladder histopathological changes. Fifty patients were included presented with symptomatic qholecystolithiasis recruited from the outpatient clinic of National Hepatology and Tropical Medicine Research Institute during 2014-2015. Full history and clinical examination and abdominal ultrasonography were performed. Stool samples were collected, prepared and examined for detection of H. pylori antigen. Cholecystectomy was done for all patients; 45 patients (90%) by laparoscopic Cholecystectomy and 5 patients (10%) by open surgery and removed gallbladders were submitted to pathology department for detection of H. pylori in tissue under microscope using Giemsa stain. The results showed that (82%) were females with mean age (42.6 +/- 1 years). The mean BMI was (29 + 7.2) H. pylori-specific antigen in stool samples was detected in 40% of patients and 38% were detected in patients; tissue, with significant correlation between H. pylori-specific antigen in stool and in tissue. Histopathological pictures infection in tissue were 68.4% mucosal erosions, 63.2% mucosal atrophy, 57.9% mucosal hyperplasia, 26.3% metaplasia, 42.1% musculosa hypertrophy, 26.3% fibrosis, but lymphoid aggregates were in 42.1% of cases. PMID:26939235

  10. Detection of circulating tumor cells using GeneScan analysis for antigen receptor gene rearrangements in canine lymphoma patients

    PubMed Central

    HIYOSHI-KANEMOTO, Saaya; GOTO-KOSHINO, Yuko; FUKUSHIMA, Kenjiro; TAKAHASHI, Masashi; KANEMOTO, Hideyuki; UCHIDA, Kazuyuki; FUJINO, Yasuhito; OHNO, Koichi; TSUJIMOTO, Hajime

    2016-01-01

    The presence of circulating tumor cells (CTCs) serves as a prognostic marker and indicator of disease relapse, as well as a means of evaluating treatment efficacy in human and canine lymphoma patients. As an extension of our previous study for the construction of clinically useful GeneScan system, we utilized the GeneScan system for detecting CTCs in canine lymphoma patients. Samples from the primary lesion and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) were obtained from 32 dogs with lymphoma at initial diagnosis. All samples were subjected to polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for antigen receptor gene rearrangements (PARR) followed by GeneScan analysis. Common clonal rearrangements with identical amplified fragments were detected in both the primary lesion and PBMCs in 19 of the 32 dogs (59.4%). However, the detection rate of CTCs varied among the anatomical classification of lymphoma studied. GeneScan analysis following PARR would facilitate studies on determining the clinical significance of CTCs in canine lymphoma patients. PMID:26888583

  11. Polyhydroquinone-graphene composite as new redox species for sensitive electrochemical detection of cytokeratins antigen 21-1

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Huiqiang; Rong, Qinfeng; Ma, Zhanfang

    2016-01-01

    Polyhydroquinone-graphene composite as a new redox species was synthesized simply by a microwave-assisted one-pot method through oxidative polymerization of hydroquinone by graphene oxide, which exhibited excellent electrochemical redox activity at 0.124 V and can remarkably promote electron transfer. The as-prepared composite was used as immunosensing substrate in a label-free electrochemical immunosensor for the detection of cytokeratins antigen 21-1, a kind of biomarker of lung cancer. The proposed immunosensor showed wide liner range from 10 pg mL−1 to 200 ng mL−1 with a detection limit 2.3 pg mL−1, and displayed a good stability and selectivity. In addition, this method has been used for the analysis of human serum sample, and the detection results showed good consistence with those of ELISA. The present substrate can be easily extended to other polymer-based nanocomposites. PMID:27464571

  12. Polyhydroquinone-graphene composite as new redox species for sensitive electrochemical detection of cytokeratins antigen 21-1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Huiqiang; Rong, Qinfeng; Ma, Zhanfang

    2016-07-01

    Polyhydroquinone-graphene composite as a new redox species was synthesized simply by a microwave-assisted one-pot method through oxidative polymerization of hydroquinone by graphene oxide, which exhibited excellent electrochemical redox activity at 0.124 V and can remarkably promote electron transfer. The as-prepared composite was used as immunosensing substrate in a label-free electrochemical immunosensor for the detection of cytokeratins antigen 21-1, a kind of biomarker of lung cancer. The proposed immunosensor showed wide liner range from 10 pg mL‑1 to 200 ng mL‑1 with a detection limit 2.3 pg mL‑1, and displayed a good stability and selectivity. In addition, this method has been used for the analysis of human serum sample, and the detection results showed good consistence with those of ELISA. The present substrate can be easily extended to other polymer-based nanocomposites.

  13. Polyhydroquinone-graphene composite as new redox species for sensitive electrochemical detection of cytokeratins antigen 21-1.

    PubMed

    Wang, Huiqiang; Rong, Qinfeng; Ma, Zhanfang

    2016-01-01

    Polyhydroquinone-graphene composite as a new redox species was synthesized simply by a microwave-assisted one-pot method through oxidative polymerization of hydroquinone by graphene oxide, which exhibited excellent electrochemical redox activity at 0.124 V and can remarkably promote electron transfer. The as-prepared composite was used as immunosensing substrate in a label-free electrochemical immunosensor for the detection of cytokeratins antigen 21-1, a kind of biomarker of lung cancer. The proposed immunosensor showed wide liner range from 10 pg mL(-1) to 200 ng mL(-1) with a detection limit 2.3 pg mL(-1), and displayed a good stability and selectivity. In addition, this method has been used for the analysis of human serum sample, and the detection results showed good consistence with those of ELISA. The present substrate can be easily extended to other polymer-based nanocomposites. PMID:27464571

  14. The TcTASV proteins are novel promising antigens to detect active Trypanosoma cruzi infection in dogs.

    PubMed

    Floridia-Yapur, N; Monje Rumi, M; Ragone, P; Lauthier, J J; Tomasini, N; Alberti D'Amato, A; Diosque, P; Cimino, R; Marco, J D; Barroso, P; Sanchez, D O; Nasser, J R; Tekiel, V

    2016-09-01

    In regions where Chagas disease is endemic, canine Trypanosoma cruzi infection is highly correlated with the risk of transmission of the parasite to humans. Herein we evaluated the novel TcTASV protein family (subfamilies A, B, C), differentially expressed in bloodstream trypomastigotes, for the detection of naturally infected dogs. A gene of each TcTASV subfamily was cloned and expressed. Indirect enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISA) were developed using recombinant antigens individually or mixed together. Our results showed that dogs with active T. cruzi infection differentially reacted against the TcTASV-C subfamily. The use of both TcTASV-C plus TcTASV-A proteins (Mix A+C-ELISA) enhanced the reactivity of sera from dogs with active infection, detecting 94% of the evaluated samples. These findings agree with our previous observations, where the infected animals exhibited a quick anti-TcTASV-C antibody response, coincident with the beginning of parasitaemia, in a murine model of the disease. Results obtained in the present work prove that the Mix A+C-ELISA is a specific, simple and cheap technique to be applied in endemic areas in screening studies. The Mix A+C-ELISA could help to differentially detect canine hosts with active infection and therefore with high impact in the risk of transmission to humans. PMID:27173912

  15. Bench-Top Antigen Detection Technique that Utilizes Nanofiltration and Fluorescent Dyes which Emit and Absorb Light in the Near Infrared

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Varaljay-Spence, Vanessa A.; Scardelletti, Maximilian C.

    2007-01-01

    This article discusses the development of a bench-top technique to detect antigens in fluids. The technique involves the use of near infrared NIR fluorescent dyes conjugated to antibodies, centrifugation, nanofilters, and spectrometry. The system used to detect the antigens utilizes a spectrometer, fiber optic cables, NIR laser, and laptop computer thus making it portable and ideally suited for desk top analysis. Using IgM as an antigen and the secondary antibody, anti-IgM conjugated to the near infrared dye, IRDye (trademark) 800, for detection, we show that nanofiltration can efficiently and specifically separate antibody-antigen complexes in solution and that the complexes can be detected by a spectrometer and software using NIR laser excitation at 778 nm and NIR dye offset emission at 804 nm. The peak power detected at 778 nm for the excitation emission and at 804 nm for the offset emission is 879 pW (-60.06 dBm) and 35.7 pW (-74.5 dBm), respectively.