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Sample records for bacterial drug resistance

  1. Drug resistance analysis of bacterial strains isolated from burn patients.

    PubMed

    Wang, L F; Li, J L; Ma, W H; Li, J Y

    2014-01-01

    This study aimed to analyze the spectrum and drug resistance of bacteria isolated from burn patients to provide a reference for rational clinical use of antibiotics. Up to 1914 bacterial strain specimens isolated from burn patients admitted to hospital between 2001 and 2010 were subjected to resistance monitoring by using the K-B paper disk method. Retrospective analysis was performed on drug resistance analysis of burn patients. The top eight bacterium strains according to detection rate. A total of 1355 strains of Gram-negative (G(-)) bacteria and 559 strains of Gram-positive (G(+)) bacteria were detected. The top eight bacterium strains, according to detection rate, were Acinetobacter baumannii, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus epidermidis, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Enterobacter cloacae, and Enterococcus. Drug resistance rates were higher than 90% in A. baumannii, P. aeruginosa, S. epidermidis, and S. aureus, which accounted for 52.2, 21.7, 27.8, and 33.3%, respectively, of the entire sample. Those with drug resistance rates lower than 30% accounted for 4.3, 30.4, 16.7, and 16.7%, respectively. Multidrug-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) and methicillin-resistant S. epidermidis (MRSE) accounted for 49.2 and 76.4% of the S. epidermis and S. aureus resistance, respectively. Antibacterial drugs that had drug resistance rates to MRSE and MRSA higher than 90% accounted for 38.9 and 72.2%, respectively, whereas those with lower than 30% drug resistance rates accounted for 11.1 and 16.7%, respectively. The burn patients enrolled in the study were mainly infected with G(-) bacteria. These results strongly suggest that clinicians should practice rational use of antibiotics based on drug susceptibility test results. PMID:24535909

  2. 75 FR 33317 - Antibacterial Resistance and Diagnostic Device and Drug Development Research for Bacterial...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-11

    ...Docket No. FDA-2010-N-0001] Antibacterial Resistance and Diagnostic Device and...scientific and potential research issues in antibacterial drug resistance, rapid diagnostic...development for bacterial diseases, and antibacterial drug development. The workshop...

  3. Whole-genome sequencing targets drug-resistant bacterial infections.

    PubMed

    Punina, N V; Makridakis, N M; Remnev, M A; Topunov, A F

    2015-01-01

    During the past two decades, the technological progress of whole-genome sequencing (WGS) had changed the fields of Environmental Microbiology and Biotechnology, and, currently, is changing the underlying principles, approaches, and fundamentals of Public Health, Epidemiology, Health Economics, and national productivity. Today's WGS technologies are able to compete with conventional techniques in cost, speed, accuracy, and resolution for day-to-day control of infectious diseases and outbreaks in clinical laboratories and in long-term epidemiological investigations. WGS gives rise to an exciting future direction for personalized Genomic Epidemiology. One of the most vital and growing public health problems is the emerging and re-emerging of multidrug-resistant (MDR) bacterial infections in the communities and healthcare settings, reinforced by a decline in antimicrobial drug discovery. In recent years, retrospective analysis provided by WGS has had a great impact on the identification and tracking of MDR microorganisms in hospitals and communities. The obtained genomic data are also important for developing novel easy-to-use diagnostic assays for clinics, as well as for antibiotic and therapeutic development at both the personal and population levels. At present, this technology has been successfully applied as an addendum to the real-time diagnostic methods currently used in clinical laboratories. However, the significance of WGS for public health may increase if: (a) unified and user-friendly bioinformatics toolsets for easy data interpretation and management are established, and (b) standards for data validation and verification are developed. Herein, we review the current and future impact of this technology on diagnosis, prevention, treatment, and control of MDR infectious bacteria in clinics and on the global scale. PMID:26243131

  4. Drug Resistance

    MedlinePLUS

    HIV Treatment Drug Resistance (Last updated 4/29/2015; last reviewed 4/29/2015) Key Points As HIV multiplies in the ... the risk of drug resistance. What is HIV drug resistance? Once a person becomes infected with HIV, ...

  5. Exposure to phages has little impact on the evolution of bacterial antibiotic resistance on drug concentration gradients

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Quan-Guo

    2014-01-01

    The use of phages for treating bacterial pathogens has recently been advocated as an alternative to antibiotic therapy. Here, we test a hypothesis that bacteria treated with phages may show more limited evolution of antibiotic resistance as the fitness costs of resistance to phages may add to those of antibiotic resistance, further reducing the growth performance of antibiotic-resistant bacteria. We did this by studying the evolution of phage-exposed and phage-free Pseudomonas fluorescens cultures on concentration gradients of single drugs, including cefotaxime, chloramphenicol, and kanamycin. During drug treatment, the level of bacterial antibiotic resistance increased through time and was not affected by the phage treatment. Exposure to phages did not cause slower growth in antibiotic-resistant bacteria, although it did so in antibiotic-susceptible bacteria. We observed significant reversion of antibiotic resistance after drug use being terminated, and the rate of reversion was not affected by the phage treatment. The results suggest that the fitness costs caused by resistance to phages are unlikely to be an important constraint on the evolution of bacterial antibiotic resistance in heterogeneous drug environments. Further studies are needed for the interaction of fitness costs of antibiotic resistance with other factors. PMID:24665341

  6. Inhibition of bacterial growth by iron oxide nanoparticles with and without attached drug: Have we conquered the antibiotic resistance problem?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Armijo, Leisha M.; Jain, Priyanka; Malagodi, Angelina; Fornelli, F. Zuly; Hayat, Allison; Rivera, Antonio C.; French, Michael; Smyth, Hugh D. C.; Osi?ski, Marek

    2015-03-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is among the top three leading causative opportunistic human pathogens, possessing one of the largest bacterial genomes and an exceptionally large proportion of regulatory genes therein. It has been known for more than a decade that the size and complexity of the P. aeruginosa genome is responsible for the adaptability and resilience of the bacteria to include its ability to resist many disinfectants and antibiotics. We have investigated the susceptibility of P. aeruginosa bacterial biofilms to iron oxide (magnetite) nanoparticles (NPs) with and without attached drug (tobramycin). We also characterized the susceptibility of zero-valent iron NPs, which are known to inactivate microbes. The particles, having an average diameter of 16 nm were capped with natural alginate, thus doubling the hydrodynamic size. Nanoparticle-drug conjugates were produced via cross-linking drug and alginate functional groups. Drug conjugates were investigated in the interest of determining dosage, during these dosage-curve experiments, NPs unbound to drug were tested in cultures as a negative control. Surprisingly, we found that the iron oxide NPs inhibited bacterial growth, and thus, biofilm formation without the addition of antibiotic drug. The inhibitory dosages of iron oxide NPs were investigated and the minimum inhibitory concentrations are presented. These findings suggest that NP-drug conjugates may overcome the antibiotic drug resistance common in P. aeruginosa infections.

  7. Bacterial quorum sensing inhibitors: attractive alternatives for control of infectious pathogens showing multiple drug resistance.

    PubMed

    Bhardwaj, Ashima K; Vinothkumar, Kittappa; Rajpara, Neha

    2013-04-01

    Quorum sensing (QS) is a bacterial communication process that depends on the bacterial population density. It involves small diffusible signaling molecules which activate the expression of myriad genes that control diverse array of functions like bioluminescence, virulence, biofilm formation, sporulation, to name a few. Since QS is responsible for virulence in the clinically relevant bacteria, inhibition of QS appears to be a promising strategy to control these pathogenic bacteria. With indiscriminate use of antibiotics, there has been an alarming increase in the number of antibiotic resistant pathogens. Antibiotics are no longer the magic bullets they were once thought to be and therefore there is a need for development of new antibiotics and/or other novel strategies to combat the infections caused by multidrug resistant organisms. Quorum sensing inhibition or quorum quenching has been pursued as one of such novel strategies. While antibiotics kill or slow down the growth of bacteria, quorum sensing inhibitors (QSIs) or quorum quenchers (QQs) attenuate bacterial virulence. A large body of work on QS has been carried out in deadly pathogens like Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Staphylococcus aureus, Vibrio fischeri, V. harveyi, Escherichia coli and V. cholerae etc to unravel the mechanisms of QS as well as identify and study QSIs. This review describes various aspects of QS, QSI, different model systems to study these phenomena and recent patents on various QSIs. It suggests QSIs as attractive alternatives for controlling human, animal and plant pathogens and their utility in agriculture and other industries. PMID:23394143

  8. Dendrimer-based multivalent vancomycin nanoplatform for targeting the drug-resistant bacterial surface.

    PubMed

    Choi, Seok Ki; Myc, Andrzej; Silpe, Justin Ezekiel; Sumit, Madhuresh; Wong, Pamela Tinmoi; McCarthy, Kelly; Desai, Ankur M; Thomas, Thommey P; Kotlyar, Alina; Holl, Mark M Banaszak; Orr, Bradford G; Baker, James R

    2013-01-22

    Vancomycin represents the preferred ligand for bacteria-targeting nanosystems. However, it is inefficient for emerging vancomycin-resistant species because of its poor affinity to the reprogrammed cell wall structure. This study demonstrates the use of a multivalent strategy as an effective way for overcoming such an affinity limitation in bacteria targeting. We designed a series of fifth generation (G5) poly(amidoamine) (PAMAM) dendrimers tethered with vancomycin at the C-terminus at different valencies. We performed surface plasmon resonance (SPR) studies to determine their binding avidity to two cell wall models, each made with either a vancomycin-susceptible (D)-Ala-(D)-Ala or vancomycin-resistant (D)-Ala-(D)-Lac cell wall precursor. These conjugates showed remarkable enhancement in avidity in the cell wall models tested, including the vancomycin-resistant model, which had an increase in avidity of four to five orders of magnitude greater than free vancomycin. The tight adsorption of the conjugate to the model surface corresponded with its ability to bind vancomycin-susceptible Staphylococcus aureus bacterial cells in vitro as imaged by confocal fluorescent microscopy. This vancomycin platform was then used to fabricate the surface of iron oxide nanoparticles by coating them with the dendrimer conjugates, and the resulting dendrimer-covered magnetic nanoparticles were demonstrated to rapidly sequester bacterial cells. In summary, this article investigates the biophysical basis of the tight, multivalent association of dendrimer-based vancomycin conjugates to the bacterial cell wall, and proposes a potential new use of this nanoplatform in targeting Gram-positive bacteria. PMID:23259666

  9. [Prevention of the formation of drug resistance in bacterial populations by using biologically active substances].

    PubMed

    Afinogenov, G E; Kopylova, T V; Vladimirov, N I; Briantseva, L N

    1984-06-01

    The patients with infected wounds of the extremities were treated with kanamycin electrophoresis in combination with chlorhexidine bigluconate, an antiseptic. As compared to the patients treated with kanamycin alone, the rate of the wound size decrease in such patients was 2 times higher. The levels of microbial contamination in these patients were much lower. The contamination level with the aerobic flora was 4.8 times lower, including staphylococci, the level of contamination with which was 5.9 times lower. The contamination level with the kanamycin-resistant bacteria was 22 times lower. The treatment with kanamycin alone resulted in a 2.6-fold increase in the number of the antibiotic-resistant variants in the microbial populations of the wounds. In 48.2 per cent of the patients, this was accompanied by development of resistance to kanamycin in the whole microbial population of the wound. The development of the kanamycin resistance in the staphylococcal populations of 18.1 per cent of the patients was associated with changed sensitivity of the initial strains and in 81.9 per cent of the patients, with superinfection by the resistant strains. No changes in the kanamycin sensitivity of the initial gram-negative organisms during the treatment were observed. The use of chlorhexidine bigluconate, as a biologically active substance in combination with kanamycin potentiated the action of the antibiotic, prevented development and accumulation of the antibiotic-resistant variants in the microbial populations of the wounds and development of the drug resistance in these populations. PMID:6476802

  10. 75 FR 33317 - Antibacterial Resistance and Diagnostic Device and Drug Development Research for Bacterial...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-11

    ... diagnosis and treatment of bacterial diseases. The input from this public workshop will help in developing... diagnostics in the diagnosis and management of bacterial infections, and (4) the science of antibacterial...

  11. Mechanisms of drug resistance: quinolone resistance.

    PubMed

    Hooper, David C; Jacoby, George A

    2015-09-01

    Quinolone antimicrobials are synthetic and widely used in clinical medicine. Resistance emerged with clinical use and became common in some bacterial pathogens. Mechanisms of resistance include two categories of mutation and acquisition of resistance-conferring genes. Resistance mutations in one or both of the two drug target enzymes, DNA gyrase and DNA topoisomerase IV, are commonly in a localized domain of the GyrA and ParE subunits of the respective enzymes and reduce drug binding to the enzyme-DNA complex. Other resistance mutations occur in regulatory genes that control the expression of native efflux pumps localized in the bacterial membrane(s). These pumps have broad substrate profiles that include quinolones as well as other antimicrobials, disinfectants, and dyes. Mutations of both types can accumulate with selection pressure and produce highly resistant strains. Resistance genes acquired on plasmids can confer low-level resistance that promotes the selection of mutational high-level resistance. Plasmid-encoded resistance is due to Qnr proteins that protect the target enzymes from quinolone action, one mutant aminoglycoside-modifying enzyme that also modifies certain quinolones, and mobile efflux pumps. Plasmids with these mechanisms often encode additional antimicrobial resistances and can transfer multidrug resistance that includes quinolones. Thus, the bacterial quinolone resistance armamentarium is large. PMID:26190223

  12. Evolution and Impact of Bacterial Drug Resistance in the Context of Cystic Fibrosis Disease and Nosocomial Settings

    PubMed Central

    Sriramulu, Dinesh

    2013-01-01

    The use of antibiotics is unavoidable in trying to treat acute infections and in the prevention and control of chronic infections. Over the years, an ever increasing number of infections has escalated the use of antibiotics, which has necessitated action against an emerging bacterial resistance. There seems to be a continuous acquisition of new resistance mechanisms among bacteria that switch niches between human, animals, and the environment. An antibiotic resistant strain emerges when it acquires the DNA that confers the added capacity needed to survive in an unusual niche. Once acquired, a new resistance mechanism evolves according to the dynamics of the microenvironment; there is then a high probability that it is transferred to other species or to an avirulent strain of the same species. A well understood model for studying emerging antibiotic resistance and its impact is Pseudomonas aeruginosa, an opportunistic pathogen which is able to cause acute and chronic infections in nosocomial settings. This bacterium has a huge genetic repertoire consisting of genes that encode both innate and acquired antibiotic resistance traits. Besides acute infections, chronic colonization of P. aeruginosa in the lungs of cystic fibrosis (CF) patients plays a significant role in morbidity and mortality. Antibiotics used in the treatment of such infections has increased the longevity of patients over the last several decades. However, emerging multidrug resistant strains and the eventual increase in the dosage of antibiotic(s) is of major concern. Though there are various infections that are treated by single/combined antibiotics, the particular case of P. aeruginosa infection in CF patients serves as a reference for understanding the impact of overuse of antibiotics and emerging antibiotic resistant strains. This mini review presents the need for judicious use of antibiotics to treat various types of infections, protecting patients and the environment, as well as achieving a better treatment outcome. PMID:24826072

  13. Transfer between an Algerian and a French hospital of four multi-drug resistant bacterial strains together via a single patient

    PubMed Central

    Moissenet, Didier; Richard, Patrick; Granados, Maria; Mérens, Audrey; Fournier, Damien; Fines-Guyon, Marguerite; Arlet, Guillaume; Vu-Thien, Hoang

    2015-01-01

    A 5 years-old girl, seriously burnt with fire, was first hospitalized during four days in an hospital at Alger, and then transferred to our hospital at Paris. Admitted in our intensive care burns unit, she was third degree burnt on 78% of total body surface area, already treated with imipenem and vancomycin at her arrival. Clinical aggravation was rapidly observed and death occurred within 24 hours. Cultures of blood and multiple wound swabs yielded 3 multi-drug resistant bacterial strains: Acinetobacter baumannii with carbapenemase OXA-23, Pseudomonas aeruginosa serotype O11 with metallo-ß-lactamase VIM-4 and Klebsiella pneumoniae with CTX-M-15 extended-spectrum ß-lactamase. Culture of a rectal swab showed colonization by Enterococcus faecium with vanA glycopeptides resistance. Patients colonized with one or two multi-drug-resistant strains were not rare in our burns unit, especially those transferred from Algeria, but this case of a single patient harboring four multi-drug-resistant strains is exceptional. PMID:26550534

  14. Isolation and characterization of multiple drug resistance bacterial pathogens from waste water in hospital and non-hospital environments, Northwest Ethiopia

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The importance of bacterial isolates from waste water environment as a reservoir of antibiotic resistance and a potential source of novel resistance genes to clinical pathogens is underestimated. This study is aimed at to isolate and characterize public health important bacteria from waste water in hospital and non- hospital environments and evaluate the distribution of multiple drug resistance bacteria in the study area. Methods A cross-sectional study was conducted at Gondar from January-June 2012. The hospital waste water was taken from different sections of the Gondar University Teaching Hospital. Non- hospital environment samples were taken at different sites of the university campuses, Gondar College of Teachers education, and soft drink factory in Gondar. Samples were aseptically collected, transported and processed with in two hours following standard procedure. Identified organisms were assessed for different antibiotics following Kirby-Bauer disk diffusion method. All data was registered and entered in to SPSS version 16 computer program. P-values less than 0.05 were taken as statistically significant. Result A total of 60 waste water samples were processed for the presence of drug resistance pathogens. Among the total samples 113 bacterial isolates were recovered and of these 65 (57.5%) were from hospital environment and 48 (42.5%) were from non-hospital environment. The most frequently identified bacterium was Klebsiella spp. 30 (26.6%) followed by Pseudomonas spp. 19(16.8%), E. coli (11.5%) and Citrobacter spp (11.5%), and Staphylococcus aureus (8.2%). The over all prevalence of multiple drug resistance (MDR) in this study was 79/113 (69.9%). MDR in hospital environment was found to be 53/68 (81.5%) while in non hospital environment was found to be 26/48 (54.2%). Conclusions Multiple drug resistance to the commonly used antibiotics is high in the study area. The contamination of waste water by antibiotics or other pollutants lead to the rise of resistance due to selection pressure. The presence of antibiotic resistance organisms in this waste water should not be overlooked. Since this organisms may be vital to the safety and well-being of patients who are hospitalized and individual susceptible to infection. Therefore, proper waste water treatment plant should be established and improved sanitary measure should be practice. PMID:24708553

  15. Bacterial cheating limits antibiotic resistance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao Chao, Hui; Yurtsev, Eugene; Datta, Manoshi; Artemova, Tanya; Gore, Jeff

    2012-02-01

    The widespread use of antibiotics has led to the evolution of resistance in bacteria. Bacteria can gain resistance to the antibiotic ampicillin by acquiring a plasmid carrying the gene beta-lactamase, which inactivates the antibiotic. This inactivation may represent a cooperative behavior, as the entire bacterial population benefits from removing the antibiotic. The cooperative nature of this growth suggests that a cheater strain---which does not contribute to breaking down the antibiotic---may be able to take advantage of cells cooperatively inactivating the antibiotic. Here we find experimentally that a ``sensitive'' bacterial strain lacking the plasmid conferring resistance can invade a population of resistant bacteria, even in antibiotic concentrations that should kill the sensitive strain. We observe stable coexistence between the two strains and find that a simple model successfully explains the behavior as a function of antibiotic concentration and cell density. We anticipate that our results will provide insight into the evolutionary origin of phenotypic diversity and cooperative behaviors.

  16. Influence of First-Line Antibiotics on the Antibacterial Activities of Acetone Stem Bark Extract of Acacia mearnsii De Wild. against Drug-Resistant Bacterial Isolates.

    PubMed

    Olajuyigbe, Olufunmiso O; Coopoosamy, Roger M

    2014-01-01

    Background. This study was aimed at evaluating the antibacterial activity of the acetone extract of A. mearnsii and its interactions with antibiotics against some resistant bacterial strains. Methods. The antibacterial susceptibility testing was determined by agar diffusion and macrobroth dilution methods while the checkerboard method was used for the determination of synergy between the antibiotics and the extract. Results. The results showed that the susceptibility of the different bacterial isolates was concentration dependent for the extract and the different antibiotics. With the exception of S. marcescens, the inhibition zones of the extract produced by 20?mg/mL ranged between 18 and 32?mm. While metronidazole did not inhibit any of the bacterial isolates, all the antibiotics and their combinations, except for ciprofloxacin and its combination, did not inhibit Enterococcus faecalis. The antibacterial combinations were more of being antagonistic than of being synergistic in the agar diffusion assay. From the macrobroth dilution, the extract and the antibiotics exerted a varied degree of inhibitory effect on the test organisms. The MIC values of the acetone extract which are in mg/mL are lower than those of the different antibiotics which are in ?g/mL. From the checkerboard assay, the antibacterial combinations showed varied degrees of interactions including synergism, additive, indifference, and antagonism interactions. While antagonistic and additive interactions were 14.44%, indifference interaction was 22.22% and synergistic interaction was 37.78% of the antibacterial combinations against the test isolates. While the additivity/indifference interactions indicated no interactions, the antagonistic interaction may be considered as a negative interaction that could result in toxicity and suboptimal bioactivity. Conclusion. The synergistic effects of the herbal-drug combinations may be harnessed for the discovery and development of more rational evidence-based drug combinations with optimized efficiency in the prevention of multidrug resistance and therapy of multifactorial diseases. PMID:25101132

  17. Drug resistance and Giardia.

    PubMed

    Upcroft, J A; Upcroft, P

    1993-05-01

    Giardiasis is a worldwide disease that can cause serious morbidity. Metronidozole is the current recommended drug for treatment, and is mostly still effective. However, Giardia duodenalis, the causative agent, is capable of developing resistance to high levels of metronidozole and other drugs, in vitro, via a number of mechanisms. Resistance, in vivo, has been reported and many cases of treatment failure have been variously attributed to a number of causes, including resistance. Here, Jacqueline and Peter Upcroft ask: is this the beginning of another chapter of drug resistance? or is the situation likely to remain as a 'few refractory cases'? Should we wait to find out or can we act positively to avert the possibility of yet another valuable drug in our limited pharmacopoeia becoming obsolete? PMID:15463750

  18. Antimicrobial (Drug) Resistance

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Resistance Microbes, collectively, include bacteria, viruses, fungi, and parasites. For the past 70 years, antimicrobial drugs, such ... Promise Against Common Healthcare-Associated Infections —June 19, 2015 Multiple NIAID Efforts Investigating Vaccines, New Treatments for ...

  19. Bacterial Enzymes and Antibiotic Resistance- Oral Presentation

    SciTech Connect

    Maltz, Lauren

    2015-08-25

    By using protein crystallography and X-ray diffraction, structures of bacterial enzymes were solved to gain a better understanding of how enzymatic modification acts as an antibacterial resistance mechanism. Aminoglycoside phosphotransferases (APHs) are one of three aminoglycoside modifying enzymes that confer resistance to the aminoglycoside antibiotics via enzymatic modification, rendering many drugs obsolete. Specifically, the APH(2”) family vary in their substrate specificities and also in their preference for the phosphate donor (ADP versus GDP). By solving the structures of members of the APH(2”) family of enzymes, we can see how domain movements are important to their substrate specificity. Our structure of the ternary complex of APH(2”)-IIIa with GDP and kanamycin, when compared to the known structures of APH(2”)-IVa, reveals that there are real physical differences between these two enzymes, a structural finding that explains why the two enzymes differ in their preferences for certain aminoglycosides. Another important group of bacterial resistance enzymes are the Class D ?-lactamases. Oxacillinase carbapenemases (OXAs) are part of this enzyme class and have begun to confer resistance to ‘last resort’ drugs, most notably carbapenems. Our structure of OXA-143 shows that the conformational flexibility of a conserved hydrophobic residue in the active site (Val130) serves to control the entry of a transient water molecule responsible for a key step in the enzyme’s mechanism. Our results provide insight into the structural mechanisms of these two different enzymes.

  20. Antibiotic drugs targeting bacterial RNAs

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Weiling; Zeng, Jie; Xie, Jianping

    2014-01-01

    RNAs have diverse structures that include bulges and internal loops able to form tertiary contacts or serve as ligand binding sites. The recent increase in structural and functional information related to RNAs has put them in the limelight as a drug target for small molecule therapy. In addition, the recognition of the marked difference between prokaryotic and eukaryotic rRNA has led to the development of antibiotics that specifically target bacterial rRNA, reduce protein translation and thereby inhibit bacterial growth. To facilitate the development of new antibiotics targeting RNA, we here review the literature concerning such antibiotics, mRNA, riboswitch and tRNA and the key methodologies used for their screening.

  1. PCR amplfication on a microarray of gel-immobilized oligonucleotides : detection of bacterial toxin- and drug-resistent genes and their mutations.

    SciTech Connect

    Strizhkov, B. N.; Drobyshev, A. L.; Mikhailovich, V. M.; Mirzabekov, A. D.; Biochip Technology Center; Engelhardt Inst. of Molecular Biology

    2000-10-01

    PCR amplification on a microarray of gel-immobilized primers (microchip) has been developed. One of a pair of PCR primers was immobilized inside a separate microchip polyacrylamide porous gel pad of 0.1 x 0.1 x 0.02 (or 0.04) micron in size and 0.2 (or 0.4) nL in volume. The amplification was carried out simultaneously both in solution covering the microchip array and inside gel pads. Each gel pad contained the immobilized forward primers, while the fluorescently labeled reverse primers, as well as all components of the amplification reaction, diffused into the gel pads from the solution. To increase the amplification efficiency, the forward primers were also added into the solution. The kinetics of amplification was measured in real time in parallel for all gel pads with a fluorescent microscope equipped with a charge-coupled device (CCD) camera. The accuracy of the amplification was assessed by using the melting curves obtained for the duplexes formed by the labeled amplification product and the gel-immobilized primers during the amplification process; alternatively, the duplexes were produced by hybridization of the extended immobilized primers with labeled oligonucleotide probes. The on-chip amplification was applied to detect the anthrax toxin genes and the plasmid-borne beta-lactamase gene responsible for bacterial ampicillin resistance. The allele-specific type of PCR amplification was used to identify the Shiga toxin gene and discriminate it from the Shiga-like one. The genomic mutations responsible for rifampicin resistance of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis strains were detected by the same type of PCR amplification of the rpoB gene fragment isolated from sputum of tuberculosis patients. The on-chip PCR amplification has been shown to be a rapid, inexpensive and powerful tool to test genes responsible for bacterial toxin production and drug resistance, as well as to reveal point nucleotide mutations.

  2. Clinical management of resistance evolution in a bacterial infection

    PubMed Central

    Woods, Robert J.; Read, Andrew F.

    2015-01-01

    We report the case of a patient with a chronic bacterial infection that could not be cured. Drug treatment became progressively less effective due to antibiotic resistance, and the patient died, in effect from overwhelming evolution. Even though the evolution of drug resistance was recognized as a major threat, and the fundamentals of drug resistance evolution are well understood, it was impossible to make evidence-based decisions about the evolutionary risks associated with the various treatment options. We present this case to illustrate the urgent need for translational research in the evolutionary medicine of antibiotic resistance. PMID:26454762

  3. The population genetics of drug resistance evolution in natural1 populations of viral, bacterial, and eukaryotic pathogens2

    E-print Network

    Petrov, Dmitri

    to the costs borne by human19 health, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention estimate the economic to jump from multiple host species to humans (e.g.15 SARS coronavirus or Ebola virus; Woolhouse et al 2005 to control epidemic pathogens, there22 is an urgent need to understand the evolution and spread of drug

  4. Antibiotics and Bacterial Resistance in the 21st Century

    PubMed Central

    Fair, Richard J; Tor, Yitzhak

    2014-01-01

    Dangerous, antibiotic resistant bacteria have been observed with increasing frequency over the past several decades. In this review the factors that have been linked to this phenomenon are addressed. Profiles of bacterial species that are deemed to be particularly concerning at the present time are illustrated. Factors including economic impact, intrinsic and acquired drug resistance, morbidity and mortality rates, and means of infection are taken into account. Synchronously with the waxing of bacterial resistance there has been waning antibiotic development. The approaches that scientists are employing in the pursuit of new antibacterial agents are briefly described. The standings of established antibiotic classes as well as potentially emerging classes are assessed with an emphasis on molecules that have been clinically approved or are in advanced stages of development. Historical perspectives, mechanisms of action and resistance, spectrum of activity, and preeminent members of each class are discussed. PMID:25232278

  5. Potential of Novel Antimicrobial Peptide P3 from Bovine Erythrocytes and Its Analogs To Disrupt Bacterial Membranes In Vitro and Display Activity against Drug-Resistant Bacteria in a Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Qinghua; Wang, Qing; Hang, Bolin; Sun, Yawei; Wei, Xiaoxiao

    2015-01-01

    With the emergence of many antibiotic-resistant strains worldwide, antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) are being evaluated as promising alternatives to conventional antibiotics. P3, a novel hemoglobin peptide derived from bovine erythrocytes, exhibited modest antimicrobial activity in vitro. We evaluated the antimicrobial activities of P3 and an analog, JH-3, both in vitro and in vivo. The MICs of P3 and JH-3 ranged from 3.125 ?g/ml to 50 ?g/ml when a wide spectrum of bacteria was tested, including multidrug-resistant strains. P3 killed bacteria within 30 min by disrupting the bacterial cytoplasmic membrane and disturbing the intracellular calcium balance. Circular dichroism (CD) spectrometry showed that P3 assumed an ?-helical conformation in bacterial lipid membranes, which was indispensable for antimicrobial activity. Importantly, the 50% lethal dose (LD50) of JH-3 was 180 mg/kg of mouse body weight after intraperitoneal (i.p.) injection, and no death was observed at any dose up to 240 mg/kg body weight following subcutaneous (s.c.) injection. Furthermore, JH-3 significantly decreased the bacterial count and rescued infected mice in a model of mouse bacteremia. In conclusion, P3 and an analog exhibited potent antimicrobial activities and relatively low toxicities in a mouse model, indicating that they may be useful for treating infections caused by drug-resistant bacteria. PMID:25753638

  6. Antimicrobial (Drug) Resistance

    MedlinePLUS

    ... studies on ClinicalTrials.gov . Related Links Antibacterial Resistance Leadership Group (ARLG) Microbiology and Infectious Diseases Resources for Researchers NIAID Antimicrobial Resistance Funding Information National Strategy for Combating Antibiotic-Resistant Bacteria (PDF) National Action ...

  7. Antimicrobial (Drug) Resistance Prevention

    MedlinePLUS

    ... studies on ClinicalTrials.gov . Related Links Antibacterial Resistance Leadership Group (ARLG) Microbiology and Infectious Diseases Resources for Researchers NIAID Antimicrobial Resistance Funding Information National Strategy for Combating Antibiotic-Resistant Bacteria (PDF) National Action ...

  8. Small-molecule inhibition of bacterial two-component systems to combat antibiotic resistance and virulence.

    PubMed

    Worthington, Roberta J; Blackledge, Meghan S; Melander, Christian

    2013-07-01

    Infections caused by multidrug-resistant bacteria are a considerable and increasing global problem. The development of new antibiotics is not keeping pace with the rapid evolution of resistance to almost all clinically available drugs, and novel strategies are required to fight bacterial infections. One such strategy is the control of pathogenic behaviors, as opposed to simply killing bacteria. Bacterial two-component system (TCS) signal transduction pathways control many pathogenic bacterial behaviors, such as virulence, biofilm formation and antibiotic resistance and are, therefore, an attractive target for the development of new drugs. This review presents an overview of TCS that are potential targets for such a strategy, describes small-molecules inhibitors of TCS identified to date and discusses assays for the identification of novel inhibitors. The future perspective for the identification and use of inhibitors of TCS to potentially provide new therapeutic options for the treatment of drug-resistant bacterial infections is discussed. PMID:23859207

  9. Antibiotic resistance in prevalent bacterial and protozoan sexually transmitted infections

    PubMed Central

    Krupp, Karl; Madhivanan, Purnima

    2015-01-01

    The emergence of multi-drug resistant sexually transmitted infections (STIs) is causing a treatment crisis across the globe. While cephalosporin-resistant gonorrhea is one of the most pressing issues, extensively antibiotic resistant Chlamydia trachomatis and Mycoplasma hominis are also becoming commonplace. Experts have suggested that the failure of current treatment regimens are “largely inevitable” and have called for entirely new classes of antimicrobial agents. With the exception of several new classes of drugs primarily targeting nosocomial infections, progress has been slow. While pharmaceutical companies continue to introduce new drugs, they are based on decade-old discoveries. While there is disagreement about what constitutes new classes of antibiotics, many experts suggest that the last truly new family of antimicrobials was discovered in 1987. This review summarizes the existing literature on antibiotic resistance in common bacterial and protozoal STIs. It also briefly discusses several of the most promising alternatives to current therapies, and further examines how advances in drug delivery, formulation, concentration, and timing are improving the efficacy of existing treatments. Finally, the paper discusses the current state of pharmaceutical development for multidrug-resistant STI. PMID:26392647

  10. Antibiotic resistance in prevalent bacterial and protozoan sexually transmitted infections.

    PubMed

    Krupp, Karl; Madhivanan, Purnima

    2015-01-01

    The emergence of multi-drug resistant sexually transmitted infections (STIs) is causing a treatment crisis across the globe. While cephalosporin-resistant gonorrhea is one of the most pressing issues, extensively antibiotic resistant Chlamydia trachomatis and Mycoplasma hominis are also becoming commonplace. Experts have suggested that the failure of current treatment regimens are "largely inevitable" and have called for entirely new classes of antimicrobial agents. With the exception of several new classes of drugs primarily targeting nosocomial infections, progress has been slow. While pharmaceutical companies continue to introduce new drugs, they are based on decade-old discoveries. While there is disagreement about what constitutes new classes of antibiotics, many experts suggest that the last truly new family of antimicrobials was discovered in 1987. This review summarizes the existing literature on antibiotic resistance in common bacterial and protozoal STIs. It also briefly discusses several of the most promising alternatives to current therapies, and further examines how advances in drug delivery, formulation, concentration, and timing are improving the efficacy of existing treatments. Finally, the paper discusses the current state of pharmaceutical development for multidrug-resistant STI. PMID:26392647

  11. Repurposing Salicylanilide Anthelmintic Drugs to Combat Drug Resistant Staphylococcus aureus

    PubMed Central

    Rajamuthiah, Rajmohan; Fuchs, Beth Burgwyn; Conery, Annie L.; Kim, Wooseong; Jayamani, Elamparithi; Kwon, Bumsup; Ausubel, Frederick M.; Mylonakis, Eleftherios

    2015-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a Gram-positive bacterium that has become the leading cause of hospital acquired infections in the US. Repurposing Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved drugs for antimicrobial therapy involves lower risks and costs compared to de novo development of novel antimicrobial agents. In this study, we examined the antimicrobial properties of two commercially available anthelmintic drugs. The FDA approved drug niclosamide and the veterinary drug oxyclozanide displayed strong in vivo and in vitro activity against methicillin resistant S. aureus (minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC): 0.125 and 0.5 ?g/ml respectively; minimum effective concentration: ? 0.78 ?g/ml for both drugs). The two drugs were also effective against another Gram-positive bacteria Enterococcus faecium (MIC 0.25 and 2 ?g/ml respectively), but not against the Gram-negative species Klebsiella pneumoniae, Acinetobacter baumannii, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Enterobacter aerogenes. The in vitro antimicrobial activity of niclosamide and oxyclozanide were determined against methicillin, vancomycin, linezolid or daptomycin resistant S. aureus clinical isolates, with MICs at 0.0625-0.5 and 0.125-2 ?g/ml for niclosamide and oxyclozanide respectively. A time-kill study demonstrated that niclosamide is bacteriostatic, whereas oxyclozanide is bactericidal. Interestingly, oxyclozanide permeabilized the bacterial membrane but neither of the anthelmintic drugs exhibited demonstrable toxicity to sheep erythrocytes. Oxyclozanide was non-toxic to HepG2 human liver carcinoma cells within the range of its in vitro MICs but niclosamide displayed toxicity even at low concentrations. These data show that the salicylanilide anthelmintic drugs niclosamide and oxyclozanide are suitable candidates for mechanism of action studies and further clinical evaluation for treatment of staphylococcal infections. PMID:25897961

  12. Repurposing salicylanilide anthelmintic drugs to combat drug resistant Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Rajamuthiah, Rajmohan; Fuchs, Beth Burgwyn; Conery, Annie L; Kim, Wooseong; Jayamani, Elamparithi; Kwon, Bumsup; Ausubel, Frederick M; Mylonakis, Eleftherios

    2015-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a Gram-positive bacterium that has become the leading cause of hospital acquired infections in the US. Repurposing Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved drugs for antimicrobial therapy involves lower risks and costs compared to de novo development of novel antimicrobial agents. In this study, we examined the antimicrobial properties of two commercially available anthelmintic drugs. The FDA approved drug niclosamide and the veterinary drug oxyclozanide displayed strong in vivo and in vitro activity against methicillin resistant S. aureus (minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC): 0.125 and 0.5 ?g/ml respectively; minimum effective concentration: ? 0.78 ?g/ml for both drugs). The two drugs were also effective against another Gram-positive bacteria Enterococcus faecium (MIC 0.25 and 2 ?g/ml respectively), but not against the Gram-negative species Klebsiella pneumoniae, Acinetobacter baumannii, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Enterobacter aerogenes. The in vitro antimicrobial activity of niclosamide and oxyclozanide were determined against methicillin, vancomycin, linezolid or daptomycin resistant S. aureus clinical isolates, with MICs at 0.0625-0.5 and 0.125-2 ?g/ml for niclosamide and oxyclozanide respectively. A time-kill study demonstrated that niclosamide is bacteriostatic, whereas oxyclozanide is bactericidal. Interestingly, oxyclozanide permeabilized the bacterial membrane but neither of the anthelmintic drugs exhibited demonstrable toxicity to sheep erythrocytes. Oxyclozanide was non-toxic to HepG2 human liver carcinoma cells within the range of its in vitro MICs but niclosamide displayed toxicity even at low concentrations. These data show that the salicylanilide anthelmintic drugs niclosamide and oxyclozanide are suitable candidates for mechanism of action studies and further clinical evaluation for treatment of staphylococcal infections. PMID:25897961

  13. Repurposing salicylanilide anthelmintic drugs to combat drug resistant Staphylococcus aureus.

    TOXLINE Toxicology Bibliographic Information

    Rajamuthiah R; Fuchs BB; Conery AL; Kim W; Jayamani E; Kwon B; Ausubel FM; Mylonakis E

    2015-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a Gram-positive bacterium that has become the leading cause of hospital acquired infections in the US. Repurposing Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved drugs for antimicrobial therapy involves lower risks and costs compared to de novo development of novel antimicrobial agents. In this study, we examined the antimicrobial properties of two commercially available anthelmintic drugs. The FDA approved drug niclosamide and the veterinary drug oxyclozanide displayed strong in vivo and in vitro activity against methicillin resistant S. aureus (minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC): 0.125 and 0.5 ?g/ml respectively; minimum effective concentration: ? 0.78 ?g/ml for both drugs). The two drugs were also effective against another Gram-positive bacteria Enterococcus faecium (MIC 0.25 and 2 ?g/ml respectively), but not against the Gram-negative species Klebsiella pneumoniae, Acinetobacter baumannii, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Enterobacter aerogenes. The in vitro antimicrobial activity of niclosamide and oxyclozanide were determined against methicillin, vancomycin, linezolid or daptomycin resistant S. aureus clinical isolates, with MICs at 0.0625-0.5 and 0.125-2 ?g/ml for niclosamide and oxyclozanide respectively. A time-kill study demonstrated that niclosamide is bacteriostatic, whereas oxyclozanide is bactericidal. Interestingly, oxyclozanide permeabilized the bacterial membrane but neither of the anthelmintic drugs exhibited demonstrable toxicity to sheep erythrocytes. Oxyclozanide was non-toxic to HepG2 human liver carcinoma cells within the range of its in vitro MICs but niclosamide displayed toxicity even at low concentrations. These data show that the salicylanilide anthelmintic drugs niclosamide and oxyclozanide are suitable candidates for mechanism of action studies and further clinical evaluation for treatment of staphylococcal infections.

  14. Antibacterial Mechanisms of Polymyxin and Bacterial Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Qin, Wangrong; Fang, Shisong; Qiu, Juanping

    2015-01-01

    Multidrug resistance in pathogens is an increasingly significant threat for human health. Indeed, some strains are resistant to almost all currently available antibiotics, leaving very limited choices for antimicrobial clinical therapy. In many such cases, polymyxins are the last option available, although their use increases the risk of developing resistant strains. This review mainly aims to discuss advances in unraveling the mechanisms of antibacterial activity of polymyxins and bacterial tolerance together with the description of polymyxin structure, synthesis, and structural modification. These are expected to help researchers not only develop a series of new polymyxin derivatives necessary for future medical care, but also optimize the clinical use of polymyxins with minimal resistance development. PMID:25664322

  15. Colourful parrot feathers resist bacterial degradation

    PubMed Central

    Burtt, Edward H.; Schroeder, Max R.; Smith, Lauren A.; Sroka, Jenna E.; McGraw, Kevin J.

    2011-01-01

    The brilliant red, orange and yellow colours of parrot feathers are the product of psittacofulvins, which are synthetic pigments known only from parrots. Recent evidence suggests that some pigments in bird feathers function not just as colour generators, but also preserve plumage integrity by increasing the resistance of feather keratin to bacterial degradation. We exposed a variety of colourful parrot feathers to feather-degrading Bacillus licheniformis and found that feathers with red psittacofulvins degraded at about the same rate as those with melanin and more slowly than white feathers, which lack pigments. Blue feathers, in which colour is based on the microstructural arrangement of keratin, air and melanin granules, and green feathers, which combine structural blue with yellow psittacofulvins, degraded at a rate similar to that of red and black feathers. These differences in resistance to bacterial degradation of differently coloured feathers suggest that colour patterns within the Psittaciformes may have evolved to resist bacterial degradation, in addition to their role in communication and camouflage. PMID:20926430

  16. Evaluation of antibacterial efficacy of phyto fabricated silver nanoparticles using Mukia scabrella (Musumusukkai) against drug resistance nosocomial gram negative bacterial pathogens.

    PubMed

    Prabakar, Kandasamy; Sivalingam, Periyasamy; Mohamed Rabeek, Siyed Ibrahim; Muthuselvam, Manickam; Devarajan, Naresh; Arjunan, Annavi; Karthick, Rajamanickam; Suresh, Micky Maray; Wembonyama, John Pote

    2013-04-01

    Given the fact in the limitation of the therapeutic options for emerging multidrug resistance gram-negative bacteria (MDR-GNB) of respiratory tract infections, the present study was focused on green synthesis of antimicrobial silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) using leaf extract of Mukia scabrella. An obvious color change to brown color and surface plasmon resonance by UV-visible spectroscopy (UV-vis) indicated a well observable peak at 440 nm confirming the synthesis of AgNPs. Fourier transform infra-red spectroscopy (FTIR) analysis indicates protein as possible capping agents. Energy dispersive X-ray (EDAX) spectroscopy results showed major signal for elemental silver. X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis indicates the formation of metallic silver nanomaterials. Transmission electron microscopic (TEM) study showed the nanoparticles in the size range of 18-21 nm with spherical shape. Zeta potential analysis showed -21.7 mV characteristic for stable AgNPs. The biosynthesized AgNPs exhibited significant antimicrobial activity against MDR-GNB nosocomial pathogens of Acinetobacter sp., Klebsiella pneumoniae and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Results from the current study suggested that M. scabrella material could be exploited for the fabrication of AgNPs with potential therapeutic applications in nanomedicine especially for nosocomial bacterial infections. PMID:23334182

  17. BACTERIAL EPIDEMIOLOGY AND ANTIMICROBIAL RESISTANCE RESEARCH UNIT PROJECTS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Knowledge about the prevalence and spread of antimicrobial resistant pathogens in animals is incomplete and techniques to study this problem are lacking. To address this, the Bacterial Epidemiology and Antimicrobial Resistance Research Unit (BEARRU) studies antimicrobial resistance in zoonotic food ...

  18. Determination of Bacterial Antibiotic Resistance Based on Osmotic Shock Response

    E-print Network

    Manalis, Scott

    Determination of Bacterial Antibiotic Resistance Based on Osmotic Shock Response Scott M. Knudsen. This behavior can be used to differentiate between an antibiotic-resistant and an antibiotic-susceptible strain- sion of the SMR for rapid detection of antibiotic resistance. The buoyant densities of bacterial cells

  19. Drug resistance in Giardia duodenalis.

    PubMed

    Ansell, Brendan R E; McConville, Malcolm J; Ma'ayeh, Showgy Y; Dagley, Michael J; Gasser, Robin B; Svärd, Staffan G; Jex, Aaron R

    2015-11-01

    Giardia duodenalis is a microaerophilic parasite of the human gastrointestinal tract and a major contributor to diarrheal and post-infectious chronic gastrointestinal disease world-wide. Treatment of G. duodenalis infection currently relies on a small number of drug classes. Nitroheterocyclics, in particular metronidazole, have represented the front line treatment for the last 40 years. Nitroheterocyclic-resistant G. duodenalis have been isolated from patients and created in vitro, prompting considerable research into the biomolecular mechanisms of resistance. These compounds are redox-active and are believed to damage proteins and DNA after being activated by oxidoreductase enzymes in metabolically active cells. In this review, we explore the molecular phenotypes of nitroheterocyclic-resistant G. duodenalis described to date in the context of the protist's unusual glycolytic and antioxidant systems. We propose that resistance mechanisms are likely to extend well beyond currently described resistance-associated enzymes (i.e., pyruvate ferredoxin oxidoreductases and nitroreductases), to include NAD(P)H- and flavin-generating pathways, and possibly redox-sensitive epigenetic regulation. Mechanisms that allow G. duodenalis to tolerate oxidative stress may lead to resistance against both oxygen and nitroheterocyclics, with implications for clinical control. The present review highlights the potential for systems biology tools and advanced bioinformatics to further investigate the multifaceted mechanisms of nitroheterocyclic resistance in this important pathogen. PMID:25922317

  20. Emerging Infections Program as Surveillance for Antimicrobial Drug Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Cleveland, Angela A.; See, Isaac; Lynfield, Ruth

    2015-01-01

    Across the United States, antimicrobial drug–resistant infections affect a diverse population, and effective interventions require concerted efforts across various public health and clinical programs. Since its onset in 1994, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Emerging Infections Program has provided robust and timely data on antimicrobial drug–resistant infections that have been used to inform public health action across a spectrum of partners with regard to many highly visible antimicrobial drug–resistance threats. These data span several activities within the Program, including respiratory bacterial infections, health care–associated infections, and some aspects of foodborne diseases. These data have contributed to estimates of national burden, identified populations at risk, and determined microbiological causes of infection and their outcomes, all of which have been used to inform national policy and guidelines to prevent antimicrobial drug–resistant infections. PMID:26291638

  1. Cancer Metabolism and Drug Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Rahman, Mahbuba; Hasan, Mohammad Rubayet

    2015-01-01

    Metabolic alterations, driven by genetic and epigenetic factors, have long been known to be associated with the etiology of cancer. Furthermore, accumulating evidence suggest that cancer metabolism is intimately linked to drug resistance, which is currently one of the most important challenges in cancer treatment. Altered metabolic pathways help cancer cells to proliferate at a rate higher than normal, adapt to nutrient limited conditions, and develop drug resistance phenotypes. Application of systems biology, boosted by recent advancement of novel high-throughput technologies to obtain cancer-associated, transcriptomic, proteomic and metabolomic data, is expected to make a significant contribution to our understanding of metabolic properties related to malignancy. Indeed, despite being at a very early stage, quantitative data obtained from the omics platforms and through applications of 13C metabolic flux analysis (MFA) in in vitro studies, researchers have already began to gain insight into the complex metabolic mechanisms of cancer, paving the way for selection of molecular targets for therapeutic interventions. In this review, we discuss some of the major findings associated with the metabolic pathways in cancer cells and also discuss new evidences and achievements on specific metabolic enzyme targets and target-directed small molecules that can potentially be used as anti-cancer drugs. PMID:26437434

  2. Bacterial and archaeal resistance to ionizing radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Confalonieri, F.; Sommer, S.

    2011-01-01

    Organisms living in extreme environments must cope with large fluctuations of temperature, high levels of radiation and/or desiccation, conditions that can induce DNA damage ranging from base modifications to DNA double-strand breaks. The bacterium Deinococcus radiodurans is known for its resistance to extremely high doses of ionizing radiation and for its ability to reconstruct a functional genome from hundreds of radiation-induced chromosomal fragments. Recently, extreme ionizing radiation resistance was also generated by directed evolution of an apparently radiation-sensitive bacterial species, Escherichia coli. Radioresistant organisms are not only found among the Eubacteria but also among the Archaea that represent the third kingdom of life. They present a set of particular features that differentiate them from the Eubacteria and eukaryotes. Moreover, Archaea are often isolated from extreme environments where they live under severe conditions of temperature, pressure, pH, salts or toxic compounds that are lethal for the large majority of living organisms. Thus, Archaea offer the opportunity to understand how cells are able to cope with such harsh conditions. Among them, the halophilic archaeon Halobacterium sp and several Pyrococcus or Thermococcus species, such as Thermococcus gammatolerans, were also shown to display high level of radiation resistance. The dispersion, in the phylogenetic tree, of radioresistant prokaryotes suggests that they have independently acquired radioresistance. Different strategies were selected during evolution including several mechanisms of radiation byproduct detoxification and subtle cellular metabolism modifications to help cells recover from radiation-induced injuries, protection of proteins against oxidation, an efficient DNA repair tool box, an original pathway of DNA double-strand break repair, a condensed nucleoid that may prevent the dispersion of the DNA fragments and specific radiation-induced proteins involved in radioresistance. Here, we compare mechanisms and discuss hypotheses suggested to contribute to radioresistance in several Archaea and Eubacteria.

  3. Leishmania donovani Develops Resistance to Drug Combinations

    PubMed Central

    García-Hernández, Raquel; Manzano, José Ignacio

    2012-01-01

    Drug combinations for the treatment of leishmaniasis represent a promising and challenging chemotherapeutic strategy that has recently been implemented in different endemic areas. However, the vast majority of studies undertaken to date have ignored the potential risk that Leishmania parasites could develop resistance to the different drugs used in such combinations. As a result, this study was designed to elucidate the ability of Leishmania donovani to develop experimental resistance to anti-leishmanial drug combinations. The induction of resistance to amphotericin B/miltefosine, amphotericin B/paromomycin, amphotericin B/SbIII, miltefosine/paromomycin, and SbIII/paromomycin was determined using a step-wise adaptation process to increasing drug concentrations. Intracellular amastigotes resistant to these drug combinations were obtained from resistant L. donovani promastigote forms, and the thiol and ATP levels and the mitochondrial membrane potential of the resistant lines were analysed. Resistance to drug combinations was obtained after 10 weeks and remained in the intracellular amastigotes. Additionally, this resistance proved to be unstable. More importantly, we observed that promastigotes/amastigotes resistant to one drug combination showed a marked cross-resistant profile to other anti-leishmanial drugs. Additionally, the thiol levels increased in resistant lines that remained protected against the drug-induced loss of ATP and mitochondrial membrane potential. We have therefore demonstrated that different resistance patterns can be obtained in L. donovani depending upon the drug combinations used. Resistance to the combinations miltefosine/paromomycin and SbIII/paromomycin is easily obtained experimentally. These results have been validated in intracellular amastigotes, and have important relevance for ensuring the long-term efficacy of drug combinations. PMID:23285310

  4. Introduction Treatment resistance in antidepressant drug therapy

    E-print Network

    Introduction Treatment resistance in antidepressant drug therapy Major depressive disorder (MDD of Pharmacogenetic Diagnostics in Antidepressant Drug Treatment of Major Depressive Disorders J. Kirchheiner1 L-system for bedside-genotyping. Key words Major depressive disorder ´ antidepressants ´ pharmacogenetics

  5. Pervasive Sign Epistasis between Conjugative Plasmids and Drug-Resistance Chromosomal Mutations

    E-print Network

    Gordo, Isabel

    Pervasive Sign Epistasis between Conjugative Plasmids and Drug-Resistance Chromosomal Mutations Rui, Lisboa, Portugal Abstract Multidrug-resistant bacteria arise mostly by the accumulation of plasmids and chromosomal mutations. Typically, these resistant determinants are costly to the bacterial cell. Yet, recently

  6. 77 FR 60126 - Guidance for Industry on Acute Bacterial Otitis Media: Developing Drugs for Treatment; Availability

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-02

    ...for Industry on Acute Bacterial Otitis Media: Developing Drugs for Treatment; Availability...industry entitled ``Acute Bacterial Otitis Media: Developing Drugs for Treatment...the treatment of acute bacterial otitis media (ABOM). This guidance finalizes...

  7. Preventing drug resistance in severe influenza

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dobrovolny, Hana; Deecke, Lucas

    2015-03-01

    Severe, long-lasting influenza infections are often caused by new strains of influenza. The long duration of these infections leads to an increased opportunity for the emergence of drug resistant mutants. This is particularly problematic for new strains of influenza since there is often no vaccine, so drug treatment is the first line of defense. One strategy for trying to minimize drug resistance is to apply periodic treatment. During treatment the wild-type virus decreases, but resistant virus might increase; when there is no treatment, wild-type virus will hopefully out-compete the resistant virus, driving down the number of resistant virus. We combine a mathematical model of severe influenza with a model of drug resistance to study emergence of drug resistance during a long-lasting infection. We apply periodic treatment with two types of antivirals: neuraminidase inhibitors, which block release of virions; and adamantanes, which block replication of virions. We compare the efficacy of the two drugs in reducing emergence of drug resistant mutants and examine the effect of treatment frequency on the emergence of drug resistant mutants.

  8. Architecture and Conservation of the Bacterial DNA Replication Machinery, an Underexploited Drug Target

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, Andrew; Causer, Rebecca J; Dixon, Nicholas E

    2012-01-01

    New antibiotics with novel modes of action are required to combat the growing threat posed by multi-drug resistant bacteria. Over the last decade, genome sequencing and other high-throughput techniques have provided tremendous insight into the molecular processes underlying cellular functions in a wide range of bacterial species. We can now use these data to assess the degree of conservation of certain aspects of bacterial physiology, to help choose the best cellular targets for development of new broad-spectrum antibacterials. DNA replication is a conserved and essential process, and the large number of proteins that interact to replicate DNA in bacteria are distinct from those in eukaryotes and archaea; yet none of the antibiotics in current clinical use acts directly on the replication machinery. Bacterial DNA synthesis thus appears to be an underexploited drug target. However, before this system can be targeted for drug design, it is important to understand which parts are conserved and which are not, as this will have implications for the spectrum of activity of any new inhibitors against bacterial species, as well as the potential for development of drug resistance. In this review we assess similarities and differences in replication components and mechanisms across the bacteria, highlight current progress towards the discovery of novel replication inhibitors, and suggest those aspects of the replication machinery that have the greatest potential as drug targets. PMID:22206257

  9. SCREENING OF TRANSGENIC ANTHURIUMS FOR BACTERIAL BLIGHT AND NEMATODE RESISTANCE

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Anthuriums exhibit limited resistance to bacterial blight caused by Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. dieffenbachiae and to the nematodes Radopholus simile and Meloidogyne javanica. Agrobacterium tumefaciens transformation of embryogenic calli with strains LBA4404, EHA105, and AGLO resulted in transgenic p...

  10. A model of antibiotic-resistant bacterial epidemics in hospitals

    E-print Network

    Ruan, Shigui

    A model of antibiotic-resistant bacterial epidemics in hospitals Glenn F. Webb , Erika M. C. D is an increasing threat to society, especially in hospital settings. Many antibiotics that were formerly effective in combating bacterial infections in hospital patients are no longer effective because of the evolution

  11. The Association between Mycobacterium Tuberculosis Genotype and Drug Resistance in Peru

    PubMed Central

    Grandjean, Louis; Iwamoto, Tomotada; Lithgow, Anna; Gilman, Robert H; Arikawa, Kentaro; Nakanishi, Noriko; Martin, Laura; Castillo, Edith; Alarcon, Valentina; Coronel, Jorge; Solano, Walter; Aminian, Minoo; Guezala, Claudia; Rastogi, Nalin; Couvin, David; Sheen, Patricia; Zimic, Mirko; Moore, David AJ

    2015-01-01

    Background The comparison of Mycobacterium tuberculosis bacterial genotypes with phenotypic, demographic, geospatial and clinical data improves our understanding of how strain lineage influences the development of drug-resistance and the spread of tuberculosis. Methods To investigate the association of Mycobacterium tuberculosis bacterial genotype with drug-resistance. Drug susceptibility testing together with genotyping using both 15-loci MIRU-typing and spoligotyping, was performed on 2,139 culture positive isolates, each from a different patient in Lima, Peru. Demographic, geospatial and socio-economic data were collected using questionnaires, global positioning equipment and the latest national census. Results The Latin American Mediterranean (LAM) clade (OR 2.4, p<0.001) was significantly associated with drug-resistance and alone accounted for more than half of all drug resistance in the region. Previously treated patients, prisoners and genetically clustered cases were also significantly associated with drug-resistance (OR's 2.5, 2.4 and 1.8, p<0.001, p<0.05, p<0.001 respectively). Conclusions Tuberculosis disease caused by the LAM clade was more likely to be drug resistant independent of important clinical, genetic and socio-economic confounding factors. Explanations for this include; the preferential co-evolution of LAM strains in a Latin American population, a LAM strain bacterial genetic background that favors drug-resistance or the "founder effect" from pre-existing LAM strains disproportionately exposed to drugs. PMID:25984723

  12. Acquisition of second-line drug resistance and extensive drug resistance during recent transmission of Mycobacterium tuberculosis in rural China.

    PubMed

    Hu, Y; Mathema, B; Zhao, Q; Chen, L; Lu, W; Wang, W; Kreiswirth, B; Xu, B

    2015-12-01

    Multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB) is prevalent in countries with a high TB burden, like China. As little is known about the emergence and spread of second-line drug (SLD) -resistant TB, we investigate the emergence and transmission of SLD-resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis in rural China. In a multi-centre population-based study, we described the bacterial population structure and the transmission characteristics of SLD-resistant TB using Spoligotyping in combination with genotyping based on 24-locus MIRU-VNTR (mycobacterial interspersed repetitive unit-variable-number tandem repeat) plus four highly variable loci for the Beijing family, in four rural Chinese regions with diverse geographic and socio-demographic characteristics. Transmission networks among genotypically clustered patients were constructed using social network analysis. Of 1332 M. tuberculosis patient isolates recovered, the Beijing family represented 74.8% of all isolates and an association with MDR and simultaneous resistance between first-line drugs and SLDs. The genotyping analysis revealed that 189 isolates shared MIRU-VNTR patterns in 78 clusters with clustering rate and recent transmission rate of 14.2% and 8.3%, respectively. Fifty-three SLD-resistant isolates were observed in 31 clusters, 30 of which contained the strains with different drug susceptibility profiles and genetic mutations. In conjunction with molecular data, socio-network analysis indicated a key role of Central Township in the transmission across a highly interconnected network where SLD resistance accumulation occurred during transmission. SLD-resistant M. tuberculosis has been spreading in rural China with Beijing family being the dominant strains. Primary transmission of SLD-resistant strains in the population highlights the importance of routine drug susceptibility testing and effective anti-tuberculosis regimens for drug-resistant TB. PMID:26348262

  13. Design of anti-bacterial drug and anti-mycobacterial drug for drug delivery system.

    PubMed

    Yanagihara, Katsunori

    2002-01-01

    Liposome-encapsulated drugs often exhibit reduced toxicity and have also been shown to enhance retention of drugs in the tissues. Thus, encapsulation of drugs in liposomes has often resulted in an improved overall therapeutic efficacy. The results of efficacy of liposome-encapsulated ciplofloxacin or azithromycin for therapy of intracellular M. avium infection show enhanced cellular delivery of liposome-encapsulated antibiotics and suggest that efficiency of intracellular targeting is sufficient to mediate enhanced antimycobacterial effects. The antitubercular drugs encapsulated in lung specific stealth liposomes have enhanced efficacies against tuberculosis infection in mice. These results from stealth liposome study indicate that antitubercular drugs encapsulated in liposome may provide therapeutic advantages over the existing chemotherapeutic regimen for tuberculosis. Liposomes with encapsulated amikacin are able to protect collagen almost completely from adherence of bacterial cells of all strains examined and prevent from invading of bacteria. PMID:12069384

  14. Drug repurposing as an alternative for the treatment of recalcitrant bacterial infections

    PubMed Central

    Rangel-Vega, Adrián; Bernstein, Lawrence R.; Mandujano-Tinoco, Edna Ayerim; García-Contreras, Silvia Julieta; García-Contreras, Rodolfo

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial infection remains one of the leading causes of death worldwide, and the options for treating such infections are decreasing, due the rise of antibiotic-resistant bacteria. The pharmaceutical industry has produced few new types of antibiotics in more than a decade. Researchers are taking several approaches toward developing new classes of antibiotics, including (1) focusing on new targets and processes, such as bacterial cell–cell communication that upregulates virulence; (2) designing inhibitors of bacterial resistance, such as blockers of multidrug e?ux pumps; and (3) using alternative antimicrobials such as bacteriophages. In addition, the strategy of finding new uses for existing drugs is beginning to produce results: antibacterial properties have been discovered for existing anticancer, antifungal, anthelmintic, and anti-inflammatory drugs. In this review, we discuss the antimicrobial properties of gallium compounds, 5-fluorouracil, ciclopirox, diflunisal, and some other FDA-approved drugs and argue that their repurposing for the treatment of bacterial infections, including those that are multidrug resistant, is a feasible strategy. PMID:25914685

  15. Drug repurposing as an alternative for the treatment of recalcitrant bacterial infections.

    PubMed

    Rangel-Vega, Adrián; Bernstein, Lawrence R; Mandujano-Tinoco, Edna Ayerim; García-Contreras, Silvia Julieta; García-Contreras, Rodolfo

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial infection remains one of the leading causes of death worldwide, and the options for treating such infections are decreasing, due the rise of antibiotic-resistant bacteria. The pharmaceutical industry has produced few new types of antibiotics in more than a decade. Researchers are taking several approaches toward developing new classes of antibiotics, including (1) focusing on new targets and processes, such as bacterial cell-cell communication that upregulates virulence; (2) designing inhibitors of bacterial resistance, such as blockers of multidrug e?ux pumps; and (3) using alternative antimicrobials such as bacteriophages. In addition, the strategy of finding new uses for existing drugs is beginning to produce results: antibacterial properties have been discovered for existing anticancer, antifungal, anthelmintic, and anti-inflammatory drugs. In this review, we discuss the antimicrobial properties of gallium compounds, 5-fluorouracil, ciclopirox, diflunisal, and some other FDA-approved drugs and argue that their repurposing for the treatment of bacterial infections, including those that are multidrug resistant, is a feasible strategy. PMID:25914685

  16. MULTIPLE DRUG RESISTANCE: TRENDS AND IMPLICATIONS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Antimicrobial resistance (AR) has emerged as a global problem. Although AR occurs shortly after the introduction and use of an antimicrobial, resistance levels vary over time. Historically, antimicrobials were regarded as wonder drugs and for years, when resistance to a single antimicrobial occurr...

  17. Recovery and identification of bacterial DNA from illicit drugs.

    PubMed

    Cho, Kaymann T; Richardson, Michelle M; Kirkbride, K Paul; McNevin, Dennis; Nelson, Michelle; Pianca, Dennis; Roffey, Paul; Gahan, Michelle E

    2014-02-01

    Bacterial infections, including Bacillus anthracis (anthrax), are a common risk associated with illicit drug use, particularly among injecting drug users. There is, therefore, an urgent need to survey illicit drugs used for injection for the presence of bacteria and provide valuable information to health and forensic authorities. The objectives of this study were to develop a method for the extraction of bacterial DNA from illicit drugs and conduct a metagenomic survey of heroin and methamphetamine seized in the Australian Capital Territory during 2002-2011 for the presence of pathogens. Trends or patterns in drug contamination and their health implications for injecting drug users were also investigated. Methods based on the ChargeSwitch(®)gDNA mini kit (Invitrogen), QIAamp DNA extraction mini kit (QIAGEN) with and without bead-beating, and an organic phenol/chloroform extraction with ethanol precipitation were assessed for the recovery efficiency of both free and cellular bacterial DNA. Bacteria were identified using polymerase chain reaction and electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry (PCR/ESI-MS). An isopropanol pre-wash to remove traces of the drug and diluents, followed by a modified ChargeSwitch(®) method, was found to efficiently lyse cells and extract free and cellular DNA from Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria in heroin and methamphetamine which could then be identified by PCR/ESI-MS. Analysis of 12 heroin samples revealed the presence of DNA from species of Comamonas, Weissella, Bacillus, Streptococcus and Arthrobacter. No organisms were detected in the nine methamphetamine samples analysed. This study develops a method to extract and identify Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria from illicit drugs and demonstrates the presence of a range of bacterial pathogens in seized drug samples. These results will prove valuable for future work investigating trends or patterns in drug contamination and their health implications for injecting drug users as well as enabling forensic links between seizures to be examined. PMID:24447454

  18. Drug resistant tuberculosis: a diagnostic challenge.

    PubMed

    Dash, M

    2013-01-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) is responsible for 1.4 million deaths annually. Wide-spread misuse of anti-tubercular drugs over three decades has resulted in emergence of drug resistant TB including multidrug-resistant TB and extensively drug-resistant TB globally. Accurate and rapid diagnosis of drug-resistant TB is one of the paramount importance for instituting appropriate clinical management and infection control measures. The present article provides an overview of the various diagnostic options available for drug resistant TB, by searching PubMed for recent articles. Rapid phenotypic tests still requires days to weeks to obtain final results, requiring biosafety and quality control measures. For newly developed molecular methods, infrastructure, training and quality assurance should be followed. Successful control of drug resistant TB globally will depend upon strengthening TB control programs, wider access to rapid diagnosis and provision of effective treatment. Therefore, political and fund provider commitment is essential to curb the spread of drug resistant TB. PMID:24029197

  19. Antibiotic Restriction Might Facilitate the Emergence of Multi-drug Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Obolski, Uri; Stein, Gideon Y.; Hadany, Lilach

    2015-01-01

    High antibiotic resistance frequencies have become a major public health issue. The decrease in new antibiotics' production, combined with increasing frequencies of multi-drug resistant (MDR) bacteria, cause substantial limitations in treatment options for some bacterial infections. To diminish overall resistance, and especially the occurrence of bacteria that are resistant to all antibiotics, certain drugs are deliberately scarcely used—mainly when other options are exhausted. We use a mathematical model to explore the efficiency of such antibiotic restrictions. We assume two commonly used drugs and one restricted drug. The model is examined for the mixing strategy of antibiotic prescription, in which one of the drugs is randomly assigned to each incoming patient. Data obtained from Rabin medical center, Israel, is used to estimate realistic single and double antibiotic resistance frequencies in incoming patients. We find that broad usage of the hitherto restricted drug can reduce the number of incorrectly treated patients, and reduce the spread of bacteria resistant to both common antibiotics. Such double resistant infections are often eventually treated with the restricted drug, and therefore are prone to become resistant to all three antibiotics. Thus, counterintuitively, a broader usage of a formerly restricted drug can sometimes lead to a decrease in the emergence of bacteria resistant to all drugs. We recommend re-examining restriction of specific drugs, when multiple resistance to the relevant alternative drugs already exists. PMID:26110266

  20. Bacterial Cheating Limits the Evolution of Antibiotic Resistance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yurtsev, Eugene; Xiao Chao, Hui; Datta, Manoshi; Artemova, Tatiana; Gore, Jeff

    2012-02-01

    The emergence of antibiotic resistance in bacteria is a significant health concern. Bacteria can gain resistance to the antibiotic ampicillin by acquiring a plasmid carrying the gene beta-lactamase, which inactivates the antibiotic. This inactivation may represent a cooperative behavior, as the entire bacterial population benefits from removal of the antibiotic. The presence of a cooperative mechanism of resistance suggests that a cheater strain - which does not contribute to breaking down the antibiotic - may be able to take advantage of resistant cells. We find experimentally that a ``sensitive'' bacterial strain lacking the plasmid conferring resistance can invade a population of resistant bacteria, even in antibiotic concentrations that should kill the sensitive strain. We use a simple model in conjunction with difference equations to explain the observed population dynamics as a function of cell density and antibiotic concentration. Our experimental difference equations resemble the logistic map, raising the possibility of oscillations or even chaotic dynamics.

  1. Giardiasis, drug resistance, and new target discovery.

    PubMed

    Tian, Hai-Feng; Chen, Bing; Wen, Jian-Fan

    2010-08-01

    Giardiasis is a worldwide parasitic disease caused by the protozoan Giardia lamblia in humans and other animals, especially live stocks. Here, we briefly review the current state of therapeutic availability for giardiasis, including chemical drugs and vaccines, and the dilemma in the prevention and treatment of this disease, including the emergence of drug resistance and the shortage of vaccine (especially for humans). Future efforts and progress in controlling giardiasis are expected in three aspects: clarification of the drug resistance mechanisms, development of efficient vaccines, and identification of more targets for new drugs and vaccines. PMID:20429862

  2. Emerging pathogens: Dynamics, mutation and drug resistance

    SciTech Connect

    Perelson, A.S.; Goldstein, B.; Korber, B.T.

    1997-10-01

    This is the final report of a one-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The objectives of this project were to develop models of the spread of pathogens, such as HIV-1 and influenza, in humans, and then to use the models to address the possibility of designing appropriate drug therapies that may limit the ability of the pathogen to escape treatment by mutating into a drug resistant form. We have developed a model of drug-resistance to amantidine and rimantadine, the two major antiviral drugs used to treat influenza, and have used the model to suggest treatment strategies during an epidemic.

  3. NOTE: Dielectrophoretic assay of bacterial resistance to antibiotics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johari, Juliana; Hübner, Yvonne; Hull, Judith C.; Dale, Jeremy W.; Hughes, Michael P.

    2003-07-01

    The dielectrophoretic collection spectra of antibiotic-sensitive and antibiotic-resistant strains of Staphylococcus epidermidis have been determined. These indicate that in the absence of antibiotic treatment there is a strong similarity between the dielectric properties of sensitive and resistant strains, and that there is a significant difference between the sensitive strains before and after treatment with the antibiotic streptomycin after 24 h exposure. This method offers possibilities for the assessment of bacterial resistance to antibiotics.

  4. Identifying representative drug resistant mutants of HIV

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Background Drug resistance is one of the most important causes for failure of anti-AIDS treatment. During therapy, multiple mutations accumulate in the HIV genome, eventually rendering the drugs ineffective in blocking replication of the mutant virus. The huge number of possible mutants precludes experimental analysis to explore the molecular mechanisms of resistance and develop improved antiviral drugs. Results In order to solve this problem, we have developed a new algorithm to reveal the most representative mutants from the whole drug resistant mutant database based on our newly proposed unified protein sequence and 3D structure encoding method. Mean shift clustering and multiple regression analysis were applied on genotype-resistance data for mutants of HIV protease and reverse transcriptase. This approach successfully chooses less than 100 mutants with the highest resistance to each drug out of about 10K in the whole database. When considering high level resistance to multiple drugs, the numbers reduce to one or two representative mutants. Conclusion This approach for predicting the most representative mutants for each drug has major importance for experimental verification since the results provide a small number of representative sequences, which will be amenable for in vitro testing and characterization of the expressed mutant proteins. PMID:26678327

  5. Antibiotic Adjuvants: Diverse Strategies for Controlling Drug-Resistant Pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Gill, Erin E; Franco, Octavio L; Hancock, Robert E W

    2015-01-01

    The growing number of bacterial pathogens that are resistant to numerous antibiotics is a cause for concern around the globe. There have been no new broad-spectrum antibiotics developed in the last 40 years, and the drugs we have currently are quickly becoming ineffective. In this article, we explore a range of therapeutic strategies that could be employed in conjunction with antibiotics and may help to prolong the life span of these life-saving drugs. Discussed topics include antiresistance drugs, which are administered to potentiate the effects of current antimicrobials in bacteria where they are no longer (or never were) effective; antivirulence drugs, which are directed against bacterial virulence factors; host-directed therapies, which modulate the host's immune system to facilitate infection clearance; and alternative treatments, which include such therapies as oral rehydration for diarrhea, phage therapy, and probiotics. All of these avenues show promise for the treatment of bacterial infections and should be further investigated to explore their full potential in the face of a postantibiotic era. PMID:25393203

  6. Extensively Drug-Resistant Tuberculosis (XDR TB)

    MedlinePLUS

    ... 1993-2011. Is it safe to travel to countries where cases of XDR TB have been reported? ... drug-resistant TB (XDR TB). Since then, more countries have improved their laboratory capacity to test for ...

  7. BACTERIAL RESISTANCE IMPROVEMENT IN DRY BEANS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Common bacterial blight (CBB) (Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. phaseoli) and halo blight (HB) (Pseudomonas savastanoi pv. phaseolicola) are serious seedborne diseases of dry beans. These diseases are widely distributed throughout the bean producing areas in South Africa and can cause severe yield and see...

  8. Expression of cytokeratin confers multiple drug resistance

    SciTech Connect

    Bauman, P.A.; Dalton, W.S.; Anderson, J.M.; Cress, A.E. )

    1994-06-07

    The cytokeratin network is an extensive filamentous structure in the cytoplasm whose biological function(s) is unknown. Based upon previous data showing the modification of cytokeratin by mitoxantrone, the authors investigated the ability of cytokeratin networks to influence the survival response of cells to chemotherapeutic agents. They have compared the survival of mouse L fibroblasts lacking cytokeratins with that of L cells transfected with cytokeratins 8 and 18 in the presence of chemotherapeutic drugs. The expression of cytokeratins 8 and 18 conferred a multiple drug resistance phenotype on cells exposed to mitoxantrone, doxorubicin, methotrexate, melphalan, Colcemid, and vincristine. The degree of drug resistance was 5-454 times that of parental cells, depending upon the agent used. Drug resistance could not be attributed to altered growth characteristics, altered drug accumulation, or an altered drug efflux in the transfected cells. Cytokeratin does not confer resistance to ionizing radiation, which damages DNA independently on intracellular transport mechanisms. These data suggest a role for cytokeratin networks in conferring a drug resistance phenotype.

  9. Sensitive, resistant and multi-drug resistant Acinetobacter baumanii at Saudi Arabia hospital eastern region.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Mughis Uddin; Farooq, Reshma; Al-Hawashim, Nadia; Ahmed, Motasim; Yiannakou, Nearchos; Sayeed, Fatima; Sayed, Ali Rifat; Lutfullah, Sualiha

    2015-05-01

    Since the Physicians start use of antibiotics long ago with un-notice drug resistance. However actual problem was recognized about 85 years ago. Antibiotic resistant and Multi-drug resistant bacterial strains are at rise throughout the world. It is physicians and researchers to take scientific research based appropriate action to overcome this ever-spreading problem. This study is designed to find out sensitive (S), resistant (R) and multi-drug resistant (MDR) Acinetobacter baumanii strain along with other isolates in the resident patients of Eastern Region of Saudi Arabia. Pseudomonas aeruginosa is excluded from other gram-negative organisms isolated from different sites as it will be dealt separately. This study is based in was retrospective observations designed to collect data of different stains of Acinetobacter baumanii with reference to their Sensitivity (S), Resistance (R), Multi-Drug Resistance (MDR) along with other Gram negative isolated from different sites (from 1st January 2004 to 31st December 2011) at King Abdulaziz Hospital located Eastern Region of Kingdom of Saudi Arabia (KSA). All necessary techniques were used to culture and perform sensitivity of these isolates. There were 4532 isolates out of which 3018 (67%) were from patients. Out of Acinetobacter baumanii infected were 906 (20%) while other 3626 (80%) isolates were miscellaneous. Numbers of patients or cases were 480 (53%) out of 906 isolates and numbers of patients or cases in other organisms were 2538 (70%) out of 3626 isolates. Acinetobacter baumanii infected patients 221 (46%) were male and 259 (54%) were female and the male and female ratio of 1:1.2. In other organisms this male female ratio was almost same. There was steady rise in number of patients and the hence the isolates from 2004 to 2011. Majority of the bacterial strains were isolated as single organism but some were isolated as double or triple or quadruple or more organisms from different sites. Sensitive, Resistant and Multi-Drug Resistant Acinetobacter baumanii have been isolated from different sites. The other Gram negative isolates included Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Proteus vulgaris, Klebsiella oxytoca, Serratia marcescens and Stenotrophomonas maltophilia. A significant rise in R and MDR but there is rise in R and MDR Acinetobacter baumanii Strains has been interceded other isolates. It is important to adopt proper and sustainable policies and guideline regarding antibiotics prescription and used. We should also check our infection control practices in our hospital or healthcare settings. We should start antibiotics stewardship in our hospital in order to reducing or overcoming antibiotics Resistant (R) and Multi-Drug Resistant (MDR) strains prevalence. PMID:26004714

  10. Alleviating Cancer Drug Toxicity by Inhibiting a Bacterial Enzyme

    SciTech Connect

    Wallace, Bret D.; Wang, Hongwei; Lane, Kimberly T.; Scott, John E.; Orans, Jillian; Koo, Ja Seol; Venkatesh, Madhukumar; Jobin, Christian; Yeh, Li-An; Mani, Sridhar; Redinbo, Matthew R.

    2011-08-12

    The dose-limiting side effect of the common colon cancer chemotherapeutic CPT-11 is severe diarrhea caused by symbiotic bacterial {beta}-glucuronidases that reactivate the drug in the gut. We sought to target these enzymes without killing the commensal bacteria essential for human health. Potent bacterial {beta}-glucuronidase inhibitors were identified by high-throughput screening and shown to have no effect on the orthologous mammalian enzyme. Crystal structures established that selectivity was based on a loop unique to bacterial {beta}-glucuronidases. Inhibitors were highly effective against the enzyme target in living aerobic and anaerobic bacteria, but did not kill the bacteria or harm mammalian cells. Finally, oral administration of an inhibitor protected mice from CPT-11-induced toxicity. Thus, drugs may be designed to inhibit undesirable enzyme activities in essential microbial symbiotes to enhance chemotherapeutic efficacy.

  11. Mechanisms of Drug-Resistance in Kinases

    PubMed Central

    Barouch-Bentov, Rina; Sauer, Karsten

    2010-01-01

    Introduction Because of their important roles in disease and excellent “druggability”, kinases have become the second-largest drug target family. The great success of the BCR-ABL inhibitor imatinib in treating CML illustrates the high potential of kinase inhibitor (KI) therapeutics, but also unveiled a major limitation: the development of drug-resistance. This is a significant concern as KIs reach large patient populations for an expanding array of indications. Areas covered We provide an up-to-date understanding of the mechanisms through which KIs function, and through which cells can become KI-resistant. We review current and future approaches to overcome KI-resistance, focussing on currently approved KIs and KIs in clinical trials. We then discuss approaches to improve KI efficacy and overcome drug-resistance and novel approaches to develop less drug-resistance prone KI-therapeutics. Expert opinion Although drug-resistance is a concern for current KI-therapeutics, recent progress in our understanding of the underlying mechanisms and promising technological advances may overcome this limitation and provide powerful new therapeutics. PMID:21235428

  12. Overcoming drug resistance for macro parasites.

    PubMed

    Srivastava, Mrigank; Misra-Bhattacharya, Shailja

    2015-11-01

    Helminth infections impose burden on human and livestock populations, and their control predominantly relies on periodic mass administration of anthelmintic drugs. However, recent emergence of drug resistance among parasites to currently available drugs raises serious problems for continuation of control strategies and achievement of elimination of parasitic diseases. This review discusses the problem of anthelmintic resistance in humans and livestock, and suggests steps that can be taken to overcome this problem. To achieve the goals of morbidity reduction or elimination of infection we need to develop novel tools, including more efficacious drugs, vaccines and/or antivectorial agents; new diagnostics for infection and assessment of drug efficacy; and markers for possible anthelmintic resistance. Harnessing the knowledge generated from sequencing of parasite genome sequences is the key to identify genes responsible for drug resistance, which can be used as a starting point for discovery of target-specific pharmacological or genetic modulation to test the functional importance of individual genes and pathways. Involvement of chemical genetic screens and Caenorhabditis elegans as a model system for drug discovery needs to be explored in greater detail. Collective effort from several quarters is needed to think of a world that is free of parasitic infections. PMID:26517758

  13. Drug-resistant tuberculosis: emerging treatment options

    PubMed Central

    Adhvaryu, Meghna; Vakharia, Bhasker

    2011-01-01

    Multidrug-resistant tuberculosis has emerged worldwide, with an increasing incidence due to failure of implementation of apparently effective first-line antituberculous therapy as well as primary infection with drug-resistant strains. Failure of current therapy is attributed to a long duration of treatment leading to nonadherence and irregular therapy, lack of patient education about the disease, poverty, irregular supply by care providers, drug–drug interactions in patients coinfected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), inadequate regulations causing market overlap and irresponsible drug usage in the private sector, and lack of research, with no addition of new drugs in the last four decades. Present standards of care for the treatment of drugsusceptible tuberculosis, multidrug-resistant tuberculosis, tuberculosis-HIV coinfection, and latent tuberculosis infection are all unsatisfactory. Since 2000, the World Health Organization (WHO) has focused on drug development for tuberculosis, as well as research in all relevant aspects to discover new regimens by 2015 and to eliminate tuberculosis as a public health concern by 2050. As a result, some 20 promising compounds from 14 groups of drugs have been discovered. Twelve candidates from eight classes are currently being evaluated in clinical trials. Ongoing research should prioritize identification of novel targets and newer application of existing drugs, discovery of multitargeted drugs from natural compounds, strengthening host factors by immunopotentiation with herbal immunomodulators, as well as protective vaccines before and after exposure, consideration of surgical measures when indicated, development of tools for rapid diagnosis, early identification of resistant strains, and markers for adequacy of treatment and an integrative approach to fulfill WHO goals. However, regulatory control over the drug market, as well as public-private partnership to use health program facilities to track patients and ensure completion of adequate therapy will be necessary to exploit fully the potential of the newer regimens to eliminate tuberculosis. PMID:22287857

  14. The Hippo pathway in chemotherapeutic drug resistance.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yulei; Yang, Xiaolong

    2015-12-15

    Chemotherapy is one of the major treatments for cancer patients. Although chemotherapeutic drugs can sometimes effectively suppress tumor growth in cancer patients, a significant proportion of patients are either intrinsically resistant or later develop resistance to primary chemotherapy, leading to disease relapse and patient mortality. The best way to conquer the resistance is the better understanding of the molecular network in cancer cells in response to drugs. Therefore, identification of signaling pathways and molecules involved in drug resistance is essential for successful treatment of cancers. The Hippo pathway is an emerging signaling pathway that plays important roles in tumorigenesis, stem cell self-renewal and differentiation, organ size control as well as many other biological processes. Therefore, exploring novel roles of the Hippo pathway in various biological functions has become one of the cutting-edge research areas in cancer and other biomedical research. Recently, we and others have provided new evidence that the Hippo pathway is involved in the resistance of different types of cancer cells to various chemotherapeutic drugs. In this review, we will discuss the specific roles of the Hippo pathway in chemotherapy, potential applications for studying this network in response to drugs as well as the future direction in identification of therapeutic targets. PMID:25348697

  15. Genetics and breeding of bacterial leaf spot resistance

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Bacterial leaf spot (BLS) caused by the pathogen Xanthomonas campestris pv. vitians (Xcv) is a globally important disease of whole head and baby leaf lettuce that reduces crop yield and quality. Host resistance is the most feasible method to reduce disease losses. Screening Lactuca accessions has id...

  16. Antimalarial drug resistance and combination chemotherapy.

    PubMed Central

    White, N

    1999-01-01

    Antimarial drug resistance develops when spontaneously occurring parasite mutants with reduced susceptibility are selected, and are then transmitted. Drugs for which a single point mutation confers a marked reduction in susceptibility are particularly vulnerable. Low clearance and a shallow concentration-effect relationship increase the chance of selection. Use of combinations of antimalarials that do not share the same resistance mechanisms will reduce the chance of selection because the chance of a resistant mutant surviving is the product of the per parasite mutation rates for the individual drugs, multiplied by the number of parasites in an infection that are exposed to the drugs. Artemisinin derivatives are particularly effective combination partners because (i) they are very active antimalarials, producing up to 10,000-fold reductions in parasite biomass per asexual cycle; (ii) they reduce malaria transmissibility; and (iii) no resistance to these drugs has been reported yet. There are good arguments for no longer using antimalarial drugs alone in treatment, and instead always using a combination with artemisinin or one of its derivatives. PMID:10365399

  17. The drinking water treatment process as a potential source of affecting the bacterial antibiotic resistance.

    PubMed

    Bai, Xiaohui; Ma, Xiaolin; Xu, Fengming; Li, Jing; Zhang, Hang; Xiao, Xiang

    2015-11-15

    Two waterworks, with source water derived from the Huangpu or Yangtze River in Shanghai, were investigated, and the effluents were plate-screened for antibiotic-resistant bacteria (ARB) using five antibiotics: ampicillin (AMP), kanamycin (KAN), rifampicin (RFP), chloramphenicol (CM) and streptomycin (STR). The influence of water treatment procedures on the bacterial antibiotic resistance rate and the changes that bacteria underwent when exposed to the five antibiotics at concentration levels ranging from 1 to 100 ?g/mL were studied. Multi-drug resistance was also analyzed using drug sensitivity tests. The results indicated that bacteria derived from water treatment plant effluent that used the Huangpu River rather than the Yangtze River as source water exhibited higher antibiotic resistance rates against AMP, STR, RFP and CM but lower antibiotic resistance rates against KAN. When the antibiotic concentration levels ranged from 1 to 10 ?g/mL, the antibiotic resistance rates of the bacteria in the water increased as water treatment progressed. Biological activated carbon (BAC) filtration played a key role in increasing the antibiotic resistance rate of bacteria. Chloramine disinfection can enhance antibiotic resistance. Among the isolated ARB, 75% were resistant to multiple antibiotics. Ozone oxidation, BAC filtration and chloramine disinfection can greatly affect the relative abundance of bacteria in the community. PMID:26150304

  18. Test for bacterial resistance build-up against plasma treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zimmermann, J. L.; Shimizu, T.; Schmidt, H.-U.; Li, Y.-F.; Morfill, G. E.; Isbary, G.

    2012-07-01

    It is well known that the evolution of resistance of microorganisms to a range of different antibiotics presents a major problem in the control of infectious diseases. Accordingly, new bactericidal ‘agents’ are in great demand. Using a cold atmospheric pressure (CAP) plasma dispenser operated with ambient air, a more than five orders of magnitude inactivation or reduction of Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA; resistant against a large number of the tested antibiotics) was obtained in less than 10 s. This makes CAP the most promising candidate for combating nosocomial (hospital-induced) infections. To test for the occurrence and development of bacterial resistance against such plasmas, experiments with Gram-negative bacteria (Escherichia coli) and Gram-positive bacteria (Enterococcus mundtii) were performed. The aim was to determine quantitative limits for primary (naturally) or secondary (acquired) resistance against the plasma treatment. Our results show that E. coli and E. mundtii possess no primary resistance against the plasma treatment. By generating four generations of bacteria for every strain, where the survivors of the plasma treatment were used for the production of the next generation, a lower limit to secondary resistance was obtained. Our results indicate that CAP technology could contribute to the control of infections in hospitals, in outpatient care and in disaster situations, providing a new, fast and efficient broad-band disinfection technology that is not constrained by bacterial resistance mechanisms.

  19. PARAMETERS OF TREATED STAINLESS STEEL SURFACES IMPORTANT FOR RESISTANCE TO BACTERIAL CONTAMINATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Use of materials that are resistant to bacterial contamination could enhance food safety during processing. Common finishing treatments of stainless steel surfaces used for components of poultry processing equipment were tested for resistance to bacterial attachment. Surface char...

  20. Drug targeting of leptin resistance.

    PubMed

    Santoro, Anna; Mattace Raso, Giuseppina; Meli, Rosaria

    2015-11-01

    Leptin regulates glucose, lipid and energy homeostasis as well as feeding behavior, serving as a bridge between peripheral metabolically active tissues and the central nervous system (CNS). Indeed, this adipocyte-derived hormone, whose circulating levels mirror fat mass, not only exerts its anti-obesity effects mainly modulating the activity of specific hypothalamic neurons expressing the long form of the leptin receptor (Ob-Rb), but it also shows pleiotropic functions due to the activation of Ob-Rb in peripheral tissues. Nevertheless, several mechanisms have been suggested to mediate leptin resistance, including obesity-associated hyperleptinemia, impairment of leptin access to CNS and the reduction in Ob-Rb signal transduction effectiveness, among others. During the onset and progression of obesity, the dampening of leptin sensitivity often occurs, preventing the efficacy of leptin replacement therapy from overcoming obesity and/or its comorbidities. This review focuses on obesity-associated leptin resistance and the mechanisms underpinning this condition, to highlight the relevance of leptin sensitivity restoration as a useful therapeutic strategy to treat common obesity and its complications. Interestingly, although promising strategies to counteract leptin resistance have been proposed, these pharmacological approaches have shown limited efficacy or even relevant adverse effects in preclinical and clinical studies. Therefore, the numerous findings from this review clearly indicate a lack of a single and efficacious treatment for leptin resistance, highlighting the necessity to find new therapeutic tools to improve leptin sensitivity, especially in patients with most severe disease profiles. PMID:26071010

  1. Repurposing Clinical Molecule Ebselen to Combat Drug Resistant Pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Thangamani, Shankar; Younis, Waleed; Seleem, Mohamed N.

    2015-01-01

    Without a doubt, our current antimicrobials are losing the battle in the fight against newly-emerged multidrug-resistant pathogens. There is a pressing, unmet need for novel antimicrobials and novel approaches to develop them; however, it is becoming increasingly difficult and costly to develop new antimicrobials. One strategy to reduce the time and cost associated with antimicrobial innovation is drug repurposing, which is to find new applications outside the scope of the original medical indication of the drug. Ebselen, an organoselenium clinical molecule, possesses potent antimicrobial activity against clinical multidrug-resistant Gram-positive pathogens, including Staphylococcus, Streptococcus, and Enterococcus, but not against Gram-negative pathogens. Moreover, the activity of ebselen against Gram-positive pathogens exceeded those activities determined for vancomycin and linezolid, drugs of choice for treatment of Enterococcus and Staphylococcus infections. The minimum inhibitory concentrations of ebselen at which 90% of clinical isolates of Enterococcus and Staphylococcus were inhibited (MIC90) were found to be 0.5 and 0.25 mg/L, respectively. Ebselen showed significant clearance of intracellular methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) in comparison to vancomycin and linezolid. We demonstrated that ebselen inhibits the bacterial translation process without affecting mitochondrial biogenesis. Additionally, ebselen was found to exhibit excellent activity in vivo in a Caenorhabditis elegans MRSA-infected whole animal model. Finally, ebselen showed synergistic activities with conventional antimicrobials against MRSA. Taken together, our results demonstrate that ebselen, with its potent antimicrobial activity and safety profiles, can be potentially used to treat multidrug resistant Gram-positive bacterial infections alone or in combination with other antibiotics and should be further clinically evaluated. PMID:26222252

  2. Cooperative Bacterial Growth Dynamics Predict the Evolution of Antibiotic Resistance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Artemova, Tatiana; Gerardin, Ylaine; Hsin-Jung Li, Sophia; Gore, Jeff

    2011-03-01

    Since the discovery of penicillin, antibiotics have been our primary weapon against bacterial infections. Unfortunately, bacteria can gain resistance to penicillin by acquiring the gene that encodes beta-lactamase, which inactivates the antibiotic. However, mutations in this gene are necessary to degrade the modern antibiotic cefotaxime. Understanding the conditions that favor the spread of these mutations is a challenge. Here we show that bacterial growth in beta-lactam antibiotics is cooperative and that the nature of this growth determines the conditions in which resistance evolves. Quantitative analysis of the growth dynamics predicts a peak in selection at very low antibiotic concentrations; competition between strains confirms this prediction. We also find significant selection at higher antibiotic concentrations, close to the minimum inhibitory concentrations of the strains. Our results argue that an understanding of the evolutionary forces that lead to antibiotic resistance requires a quantitative understanding of the evolution of cooperation in bacteria.

  3. Protein Oxidation: Key to Bacterial Desiccation Resistance?

    SciTech Connect

    Fredrickson, Jim K.; Li, Shu-Mei W.; Gaidamakova, E.; Matrosova, V.; Zhai, M.; Sulloway, Heather M.; Scholten, Johannes C.; Brown,, Mindy G.; Balkwill, David L.; Daly, Michael J.

    2008-04-01

    For extremely ionizing radiation resistant bacteria, survival has been attributed to protection of proteins from oxidative damage during irradiation, with the result that repair systems survive and function with far greater efficiency during recovery than in sensitive bacteria. Here we examined the relationship between survival of dry-climate soil bacteria and the level of cellular protein oxidation induced by desiccation. Bacteria were isolated from surface soils of the shrub-steppe of the U.S. Department of Energy’s Hanford Site in Washington state. A total of 63 isolates were used for phylogenetic analysis. The majority of isolates were closely related to members of the genus Deinococcus, with Chelatococcus, Methylobacterium and Bosea also among the genera identified. Desiccation-resistant isolates accumulated high intracellular manganese and low iron concentrations compared to sensitive bacteria. In vivo, proteins of desiccation-resistant bacteria were protected from oxidative modifications that introduce carbonyl groups in sensitive bacteria during drying. We present the case that survival of bacteria that inhabit dry-climate soils are highly dependent on mechanisms which limit protein oxidation during dehydration.

  4. Efflux-mediated antifungal drug resistance.

    PubMed

    Cannon, Richard D; Lamping, Erwin; Holmes, Ann R; Niimi, Kyoko; Baret, Philippe V; Keniya, Mikhail V; Tanabe, Koichi; Niimi, Masakazu; Goffeau, Andre; Monk, Brian C

    2009-04-01

    Fungi cause serious infections in the immunocompromised and debilitated, and the incidence of invasive mycoses has increased significantly over the last 3 decades. Slow diagnosis and the relatively few classes of antifungal drugs result in high attributable mortality for systemic fungal infections. Azole antifungals are commonly used for fungal infections, but azole resistance can be a problem for some patient groups. High-level, clinically significant azole resistance usually involves overexpression of plasma membrane efflux pumps belonging to the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) or the major facilitator superfamily class of transporters. The heterologous expression of efflux pumps in model systems, such Saccharomyces cerevisiae, has enabled the functional analysis of efflux pumps from a variety of fungi. Phylogenetic analysis of the ABC pleiotropic drug resistance family has provided a new view of the evolution of this important class of efflux pumps. There are several ways in which the clinical significance of efflux-mediated antifungal drug resistance can be mitigated. Alternative antifungal drugs, such as the echinocandins, that are not efflux pump substrates provide one option. Potential therapeutic approaches that could overcome azole resistance include targeting efflux pump transcriptional regulators and fungal stress response pathways, blockade of energy supply, and direct inhibition of efflux pumps. PMID:19366916

  5. Efflux-Mediated Antifungal Drug Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Cannon, Richard D.; Lamping, Erwin; Holmes, Ann R.; Niimi, Kyoko; Baret, Philippe V.; Keniya, Mikhail V.; Tanabe, Koichi; Niimi, Masakazu; Goffeau, Andre; Monk, Brian C.

    2009-01-01

    Summary: Fungi cause serious infections in the immunocompromised and debilitated, and the incidence of invasive mycoses has increased significantly over the last 3 decades. Slow diagnosis and the relatively few classes of antifungal drugs result in high attributable mortality for systemic fungal infections. Azole antifungals are commonly used for fungal infections, but azole resistance can be a problem for some patient groups. High-level, clinically significant azole resistance usually involves overexpression of plasma membrane efflux pumps belonging to the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) or the major facilitator superfamily class of transporters. The heterologous expression of efflux pumps in model systems, such Saccharomyces cerevisiae, has enabled the functional analysis of efflux pumps from a variety of fungi. Phylogenetic analysis of the ABC pleiotropic drug resistance family has provided a new view of the evolution of this important class of efflux pumps. There are several ways in which the clinical significance of efflux-mediated antifungal drug resistance can be mitigated. Alternative antifungal drugs, such as the echinocandins, that are not efflux pump substrates provide one option. Potential therapeutic approaches that could overcome azole resistance include targeting efflux pump transcriptional regulators and fungal stress response pathways, blockade of energy supply, and direct inhibition of efflux pumps. PMID:19366916

  6. Heavy metals in liquid pig manure in light of bacterial antimicrobial resistance

    SciTech Connect

    Hoelzel, Christina S.; Mueller, Christa; Harms, Katrin S.; Mikolajewski, Sabine; Schaefer, Stefanie; Schwaiger, Karin; Bauer, Johann

    2012-02-15

    Heavy metals are regularly found in liquid pig manure, and might interact with bacterial antimicrobial resistance. Concentrations of heavy metals were determined by atomic spectroscopic methods in 305 pig manure samples and were connected to the phenotypic resistance of Escherichia coli (n=613) against 29 antimicrobial drugs. Concentrations of heavy metals (/kg dry matter) were 0.08-5.30 mg cadmium, 1.1-32.0 mg chrome, 22.4-3387.6 mg copper, <2.0-26.7 mg lead, <0.01-0.11 mg mercury, 3.1-97.3 mg nickel and 93.0-8239.0 mg zinc. Associated with the detection of copper and zinc, resistance rates against {beta}-lactams were significantly elevated. By contrast, the presence of mercury was significantly associated with low antimicrobial resistance rates of Escherichia coli against {beta}-lactams, aminoglycosides and other antibiotics. Effects of subinhibitory concentrations of mercury on bacterial resistance against penicillins, cephalosporins, aminoglycosides and doxycycline were also demonstrated in a laboratory trial. Antimicrobial resistance in the porcine microflora might be increased by copper and zinc. By contrast, the occurrence of mercury in the environment might, due to co-toxicity, act counter-selective against antimicrobial resistant strains.

  7. Virologic Tools for HCV Drug Resistance Testing

    PubMed Central

    Fourati, Slim; Pawlotsky, Jean-Michel

    2015-01-01

    Recent advances in molecular biology have led to the development of new antiviral drugs that target specific steps of the Hepatitis C Virus (HCV) lifecycle. These drugs, collectively termed direct-acting antivirals (DAAs), include non-structural (NS) HCV protein inhibitors, NS3/4A protease inhibitors, NS5B RNA-dependent RNA polymerase inhibitors (nucleotide analogues and non-nucleoside inhibitors), and NS5A inhibitors. Due to the high genetic variability of HCV, the outcome of DAA-based therapies may be altered by the selection of amino-acid substitutions located within the targeted proteins, which affect viral susceptibility to the administered compounds. At the drug developmental stage, preclinical and clinical characterization of HCV resistance to new drugs in development is mandatory. In the clinical setting, accurate diagnostic tools have become available to monitor drug resistance in patients who receive treatment with DAAs. In this review, we describe tools available to investigate drug resistance in preclinical studies, clinical trials and clinical practice. PMID:26690198

  8. The Culturable Soil Antibiotic Resistome: A Community of Multi-Drug Resistant Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Walsh, Fiona; Duffy, Brion

    2013-01-01

    Understanding the soil bacterial resistome is essential to understanding the evolution and development of antibiotic resistance, and its spread between species and biomes. We have identified and characterized multi-drug resistance (MDR) mechanisms in the culturable soil antibiotic resistome and linked the resistance profiles to bacterial species. We isolated 412 antibiotic resistant bacteria from agricultural, urban and pristine soils. All isolates were multi-drug resistant, of which greater than 80% were resistant to 16–23 antibiotics, comprising almost all classes of antibiotic. The mobile resistance genes investigated, (ESBL, blaNDM-1, and plasmid mediated quinolone resistance (PMQR) resistance genes) were not responsible for the respective resistance phenotypes nor were they present in the extracted soil DNA. Efflux was demonstrated to play an important role in MDR and many resistance phenotypes. Clinically relevant Burkholderia species are intrinsically resistant to ciprofloxacin but the soil Burkholderia species were not intrinsically resistant to ciprofloxacin. Using a phenotypic enzyme assay we identified the antibiotic specific inactivation of trimethoprim in 21 bacteria from different soils. The results of this study identified the importance of the efflux mechanism in the soil resistome and variations between the intrinsic resistance profiles of clinical and soil bacteria of the same family. PMID:23776501

  9. The culturable soil antibiotic resistome: a community of multi-drug resistant bacteria.

    PubMed

    Walsh, Fiona; Duffy, Brion

    2013-01-01

    Understanding the soil bacterial resistome is essential to understanding the evolution and development of antibiotic resistance, and its spread between species and biomes. We have identified and characterized multi-drug resistance (MDR) mechanisms in the culturable soil antibiotic resistome and linked the resistance profiles to bacterial species. We isolated 412 antibiotic resistant bacteria from agricultural, urban and pristine soils. All isolates were multi-drug resistant, of which greater than 80% were resistant to 16-23 antibiotics, comprising almost all classes of antibiotic. The mobile resistance genes investigated, (ESBL, bla NDM-1, and plasmid mediated quinolone resistance (PMQR) resistance genes) were not responsible for the respective resistance phenotypes nor were they present in the extracted soil DNA. Efflux was demonstrated to play an important role in MDR and many resistance phenotypes. Clinically relevant Burkholderia species are intrinsically resistant to ciprofloxacin but the soil Burkholderia species were not intrinsically resistant to ciprofloxacin. Using a phenotypic enzyme assay we identified the antibiotic specific inactivation of trimethoprim in 21 bacteria from different soils. The results of this study identified the importance of the efflux mechanism in the soil resistome and variations between the intrinsic resistance profiles of clinical and soil bacteria of the same family. PMID:23776501

  10. Host-Directed Antimicrobial Drugs with Broad-Spectrum Efficacy against Intracellular Bacterial Pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Czy?, Daniel M.; Potluri, Lakshmi-Prasad; Jain-Gupta, Neeta; Riley, Sean P.; Martinez, Juan J.; Steck, Theodore L.; Crosson, Sean; Gabay, Joëlle E.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT We sought a new approach to treating infections by intracellular bacteria, namely, by altering host cell functions that support their growth. We screened a library of 640 Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved compounds for agents that render THP-1 cells resistant to infection by four intracellular pathogens. We identified numerous drugs that are not antibiotics but were highly effective in inhibiting intracellular bacterial growth with limited toxicity to host cells. These compounds are likely to target three kinds of host functions: (i) G protein-coupled receptors, (ii) intracellular calcium signals, and (iii) membrane cholesterol distribution. The compounds that targeted G protein receptor signaling and calcium fluxes broadly inhibited Coxiella burnetii, Legionella pneumophila, Brucella abortus, and Rickettsia conorii, while those directed against cholesterol traffic strongly attenuated the intracellular growth of C. burnetii and L. pneumophila. These pathways probably support intracellular pathogen growth so that drugs that perturb them may be therapeutic candidates. Combining host- and pathogen-directed treatments is a strategy to decrease the emergence of drug-resistant intracellular bacterial pathogens. PMID:25073644

  11. Essential Oils, A New Horizon in Combating Bacterial Antibiotic Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Yap, Polly Soo Xi; Yiap, Beow Chin; Ping, Hu Cai; Lim, Swee Hua Erin

    2014-01-01

    For many years, the battle between humans and the multitudes of infection and disease causing pathogens continues. Emerging at the battlefield as some of the most significant challenges to human health are bacterial resistance and its rapid rise. These have become a major concern in global public health invigorating the need for new antimicrobial compounds. A rational approach to deal with antibiotic resistance problems requires detailed knowledge of the different biological and non-biological factors that affect the rate and extent of resistance development. Combination therapy combining conventional antibiotics and essential oils is currently blooming and represents a potential area for future investigations. This new generation of phytopharmaceuticals may shed light on the development of new pharmacological regimes in combating antibiotic resistance. This review consolidated and described the observed synergistic outcome between essential oils and antibiotics, and highlighted the possibilities of essential oils as the potential resistance modifying agent. PMID:24627729

  12. Resistance proof, folding-inhibitor drugs

    E-print Network

    R. Broglia; G. Tiana; R. Berera

    2002-10-09

    Conventional drugs work, as a rule, by inhibiting the enzymatic activity of specific proteins, capping their active site. In this paper we present a model of non- conventional drug design based on the inhibiting effects small peptides obtained from segments of the protein itself have on the folding ability of the system. Such peptides attach to the newly expressed (unfolded) protein and inhibit its folding, inhibition which cannot be avoided but through mutations which in any case denaturate the enzyme. These peptides, or their mimetic molecules, can be used as effective alternative drugs to those already available, displaying the advantage of not suffering from the upraise of resistence.

  13. Bisphosphocins: novel antimicrobials for enhanced killing of drug-resistant and biofilm-forming bacteria.

    PubMed

    Wong, Jonathan P; DiTullio, Paul; Parkinson, Steve

    2015-11-01

    The global prevalence of antibiotic resistance and the threat posed by drug-resistant superbugs are a leading challenge confronting modern medicine in the 21st century. However, the progress on the development of novel antibiotics to combat this problem is severely lagging. A more concerted effort to develop novel therapeutic agents with robust activity and unique mechanisms of action will be needed to overcome the problem of drug resistance. Furthermore, biofilm forming bacteria are known to be increasingly resistant to the actions of antibiotics and are a leading cause of mortality or morbidity in nosocomial infections. Bisphosphocins (also scientifically known as nubiotics) are novel small protonated deoxynucleotide molecules, and exert their antibacterial activity by depolarization of the bacterial cell membrane, causing bacterial cell death. Bisphosphocins may represent an effective weapon against antibiotic-resistant and biofilm-forming pathogenic bacteria. Preclinical efficacy studies in animals have shown that the compounds are safe and, efficacious against various bacterial infections, including drug-resistant pathogens. In vitro biochemical analysis confirmed that the bactericidal activity of bisphosphocins is mediated by depolarization of the bacterial cell membrane, and these compounds are better able to penetrate through bacterial biofilm and kill the biofilm encased bacteria. This article will cover the structure, mode of action, safety, efficacy and the current state of development of bisphosphocins. Together, the information presented here will present a strong case for bisphosphocins to be considered for use as new weapons to complement the existing arsenal of antimicrobial drugs and as a first line defence against drug-resistant and biofilm-forming bacteria. PMID:26597426

  14. Evolutionary consequences of drug resistance: shared principles across diverse targets and organisms.

    PubMed

    Hughes, Diarmaid; Andersson, Dan I

    2015-08-01

    Drug therapy has a crucial role in the treatment of viral, bacterial, fungal and protozoan infections, as well as the control of human cancer. The success of therapy is being threatened by the increasing prevalence of resistance. We examine and compare mechanisms of drug resistance in these diverse biological systems (using HIV and Plasmodium falciparum as examples of viral and protozoan pathogens, respectively) and discuss how factors — such as mutation rates, fitness effects of resistance, epistasis and clonal interference — influence the evolutionary trajectories of drug-resistant clones. We describe commonalities and differences related to resistance development that could guide strategies to improve therapeutic effectiveness and the development of a new generation of drugs. PMID:26149714

  15. Metabolic Mechanisms of Drug Resistance in Leukemia.

    PubMed

    Knoechel, Birgit; Aster, Jon C

    2015-11-01

    Tumor cells frequently undergo metabolic reprogramming, but it is unknown how these metabolic changes relate to drug resistance. A recent article now demonstrates that PI3K/AKT signaling causes a metabolic switch from glutaminolysis to aerobic glycolysis in Notch-dependent T cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL). PMID:26536486

  16. Differential resistance of drinking water bacterial populations to monochloramine disinfection.

    PubMed

    Chiao, Tzu-Hsin; Clancy, Tara M; Pinto, Ameet; Xi, Chuanwu; Raskin, Lutgarde

    2014-04-01

    The impact of monochloramine disinfection on the complex bacterial community structure in drinking water systems was investigated using culture-dependent and culture-independent methods. Changes in viable bacterial diversity were monitored using culture-independent methods that distinguish between live and dead cells based on membrane integrity, providing a highly conservative measure of viability. Samples were collected from lab-scale and full-scale drinking water filters exposed to monochloramine for a range of contact times. Culture-independent detection of live cells was based on propidium monoazide (PMA) treatment to selectively remove DNA from membrane-compromised cells. Quantitative PCR (qPCR) and pyrosequencing of 16S rRNA genes was used to quantify the DNA of live bacteria and characterize the bacterial communities, respectively. The inactivation rate determined by the culture-independent PMA-qPCR method (1.5-log removal at 664 mg·min/L) was lower than the inactivation rate measured by the culture-based methods (4-log removal at 66 mg·min/L). Moreover, drastic changes in the live bacterial community structure were detected during monochloramine disinfection using PMA-pyrosequencing, while the community structure appeared to remain stable when pyrosequencing was performed on samples that were not subject to PMA treatment. Genera that increased in relative abundance during monochloramine treatment include Legionella, Escherichia, and Geobacter in the lab-scale system and Mycobacterium, Sphingomonas, and Coxiella in the full-scale system. These results demonstrate that bacterial populations in drinking water exhibit differential resistance to monochloramine, and that the disinfection process selects for resistant bacterial populations. PMID:24625288

  17. Marine bacterial communities are resistant to elevated carbon dioxide levels.

    PubMed

    Oliver, Anna E; Newbold, Lindsay K; Whiteley, Andrew S; van der Gast, Christopher J

    2014-12-01

    It is well established that the release of anthropogenic-derived CO2 into the atmosphere will be mainly absorbed by the oceans, with a concomitant drop in pH, a process termed ocean acidification. As such, there is considerable interest in how changes in increased CO2 and lower pH will affect marine biota, such as bacteria, which play central roles in oceanic biogeochemical processes. Set within an ecological framework, we investigated the direct effects of elevated CO2, contrasted with ambient conditions on the resistance and resilience of marine bacterial communities in a replicated temporal seawater mesocosm experiment. The results of the study strongly indicate that marine bacterial communities are highly resistant to the elevated CO2 and lower pH conditions imposed, as demonstrated from measures of turnover using taxa–time relationships and distance–decay relationships. In addition, no significant differences in community abundance, structure or composition were observed. Our results suggest that there are no direct effects on marine bacterial communities and that the bacterial fraction of microbial plankton holds enough flexibility and evolutionary capacity to withstand predicted future changes from elevated CO2 and subsequent ocean acidification. PMID:25756110

  18. Update on tamper-resistant drug formulations.

    PubMed

    Romach, M K; Schoedel, K A; Sellers, E M

    2013-06-01

    An expert panel convened in 2005 by the College on Problems of Drug Dependence (CPDD) to consider strategies to reduce the risk of prescription medication abuse concluded that drug formulation plays a significant role in determining risk of abuse. Efforts on the part of the pharmaceutical industry to develop drugs that deter abuse have focused primarily on opioid formulations resistant to common forms of tampering, most notably crushing or dissolving the tablet to accelerate release. Several opioid formulations developed to be tamper resistant have been approved, but the US Food and Drug Administration has not approved explicit label claims of abuse deterrence and has stated that any such claim will require substantial postmarketing data. Drug development efforts in this area raise questions about the relative impact of abuse-deterrent formulations, not only on individuals who might abuse a medication, but also on patients who are compliant with therapy. This review discusses progress since the 2005 CPDD meeting with an emphasis on opioids. Articles cited in the review were identified via a PubMed search covering the period between January 1, 2000, and October 5, 2011. Scientific work presented by the authors and their colleagues at meetings held through May 2012 also was included. Published literature suggests that development of abuse-deterrent products will require broad public health support and continued encouragement from regulatory authorities so that such products will become the expected standard of care for certain drug classes. PMID:23415386

  19. 78 FR 63220 - Guidance for Industry on Acute Bacterial Skin and Skin Structure Infections: Developing Drugs for...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-23

    ...Acute Bacterial Skin and Skin Structure Infections: Developing Drugs for Treatment; Availability...Acute Bacterial Skin and Skin Structure Infections: Developing Drugs for Treatment...acute bacterial skin and skin structure infections (ABSSSI). This guidance...

  20. Structural Studies of Bacterial Enzymes and their Relation to Antibiotic Resistance Mechanisms - Final Paper

    SciTech Connect

    Maltz, Lauren

    2015-08-27

    By using protein crystallography and X-ray diffraction, structures of bacterial enzymes were solved to gain a better understanding of how enzymatic modification acts as an antibacterial resistance mechanism. Aminoglycoside phosphotransferases (APHs) are one of three aminoglycoside modifying enzymes that confer resistance to the aminoglycoside antibiotics via enzymatic modification, rendering many drugs obsolete. Specifically, the APH(2”) family vary in their substrate specificities and also in their preference for the phosphate donor (ADP versus GDP). By solving the structures of members of the APH(2”) family of enzymes, we can see how domain movements are important to their substrate specificity. Our structure of the ternary complex of APH(2”)-IIIa with GDP and kanamycin, when compared to the known structures of APH(2”)-IVa, reveals that there are real physical differences between these two enzymes, a structural finding that explains why the two enzymes differ in their preferences for certain aminoglycosides. Another important group of bacterial resistance enzymes are the Class D ?- lactamases. Oxacillinase carbapenemases (OXAs) are part of this enzyme class and have begun to confer resistance to ‘last resort’ drugs, most notably carbapenems. Our structure of OXA-143 shows that the conformational flexibility of a conserved hydrophobic residue in the active site (Val130) serves to control the entry of a transient water molecule responsible for a key step in the enzyme’s mechanism. Our results provide insight into the structural mechanisms of these two different enzymes

  1. [Effects of long-term application of pig manure containing residual tetracycline on the formation of drug-resistant bacteria and resistance genes].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jun; Yang, Xiao-Hong; Ge, Feng; Wang, Na; Jiao, Shao-Jun; Jiao, Shao-Jun

    2014-06-01

    The effect of residual veterinary tetracycline on the formation of drug-resistant bacteria and corresponding resistance genes was investigated. During the research, the soil with long-term application of pig manure containing residual tetracycline was collected in autumn and summer respectively in the farmland around a certain pig farm in Shuyang City, Huang Huai area, north of Jiangsu province. At the same time, soils without application of pig manure in the farmland of this area were collected as the reference sample. Composition of drug-resistant bacteria in all soil samples was analyzed and three common tetracycline-resistance genes (tetA, tetC, tetE) were studied by PCR as well. During the research, 59 drug-resistant bacteria belonging to 13 bacterial genus respectively were separated from the soil sample collected in autumn while 35 drug- resistant bacteria belonging to 10 bacterial genus respectively were separated from the soil sample collected in summer and as for the reference sample, 3 drug-resistant bacteria belonging to 1 bacterial genus (Streptomyces) were separated with pathogenic bacteria up to 38.14% of total drug-resistant bacteria. PCR result showed that resistance genes were detected in all drug-resistant bacteria and tetC accounted for the most. At the same time, the residual tetracycline in the soil which was in a range of 41.1-61.9 microg x kg(-1) correlated with the amount of resistance genes (4.63 x 10(5)-37.42 x 10(5) copies x g(-1)). Besides, the climate was found accelerating the formation of drug-resistant bacteria and resistance genes. PMID:25158520

  2. Absence of bacterial resistance following repeat exposure to photodynamic therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pedigo, Lisa A.; Gibbs, Aaron J.; Scott, Robert J.; Street, Cale N.

    2009-06-01

    The prevalence of antibiotic resistant bacteria necessitates exploration of alternative approaches to treat hospital and community acquired infections. The aim of this study was to determine whether bacterial pathogens develop resistance to antimicrobial photodynamic therapy (aPDT) during repeated sub-lethal challenge. Antibiotic sensitive and resistant strains of S. aureus and antibiotic sensitive E. coli were subjected to repeat PDT treatments using a methylene blue photosensitizer formulation and 670 nm illumination from a non-thermal diode laser. Parameters were adjusted such that kills were <100% so that surviving colonies could be passaged for subsequent exposures. With each repeat, kills were compared to those using non-exposed cultures of the same strain. Oxacillin resistance was induced in S. aureus using a disc diffusion method. For each experiment, "virgin" and "repeat" cultures were exposed to methylene blue at 0.01% w/v and illuminated with an energy dose of 20.6 J/cm2. No significant difference in killing of E. coli (repeat vs. virgin culture) was observed through 11 repeat exposures. Similar results were seen using MSSA and MRSA, wherein kill rate did not significantly differ from control over 25 repeat exposures. In contrast, complete oxacillin resistance could be generated in S. aureus over a limited number of exposures. PDT is effective in the eradication of pathogens including antibiotic resistance strains. Furthermore, repeated sub-lethal exposure does not induce resistance to subsequent PDT treatments. The absence of resistance formation represents a significant advantage of PDT over traditional antibiotics.

  3. Drug resistance in castration resistant prostate cancer: resistance mechanisms and emerging treatment strategies

    PubMed Central

    Armstrong, Cameron M; Gao, Allen C

    2015-01-01

    Several mechanisms facilitate the progression of hormone-sensitive prostate cancer to castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC). At present, the approved chemotherapies for CRPC include systemic drugs (docetaxel and cabazitaxel) and agents that target androgen signaling, including enzalutamide and abiraterone. While up to 30% of patients have primary resistance to these treatments, each of these drugs confers a significant survival benefit for many. Over time, however, all patients inevitably develop resistance to treatment and their disease will continue to progress. Several key mechanisms have been identified that give rise to drug resistance. Expression of constitutively active variants of the androgen receptor, such as AR-V7, intracrine androgens and overexpression of androgen synthesis enzymes like AKR1C3, and increased drug efflux through ABCB1 are just some of the many discovered mechanisms of drug resistance. Treatment strategies are being developed to target these pathways and reintroduce drug sensitivity. Niclosamide has been discovered to reduce AR-V7 activity and synergized to enzalutamide. Indomethacin has been explored to inhibit AKR1C3 activity and showed to be able to reverse resistance to enzalutamide. ABCB1 transport activity can be mitigated by the phytochemical apigenin and by antiandrogens such as bicalutamide, with each improving cellular response to chemotherapeutics. By better understanding the mechanisms by which drug resistance develops improved treatment strategies will be made possible. Herein, we review the existing knowledge of CRPC therapies and resistance mechanisms as well as methods that have been identified which may improve drug sensitivity. PMID:26309896

  4. Challenges of drug-resistant malaria

    PubMed Central

    Sinha, Shweta; Medhi, Bikash; Sehgal, Rakesh

    2014-01-01

    Over the past six decades, the drug resistance of Plasmodium falciparum has become an issue of utmost concern. Despite the remarkable progress that has been made in recent years in reducing the mortality rate to about 30% with the scaling-up of vector control, introduction of artemisinin-based combination therapies and other malaria control strategies, the confirmation of artemisinin resistance on the Cambodia–Thailand border threatened all the previous success. This review addresses the global scenario of antimalarial resistance and factors associated with it, with the main emphasis on futuristic approaches like nanotechnology and stem cell therapy that may impede resistant malaria, along with novel medications which are preparing to enter the global antimalarial market. These novel studies are likely to escalate over the coming years and will hopefully help to reduce the burden of malaria. PMID:25402734

  5. Functional Gold Nanoparticles as Potent Antimicrobial Agents against Multi-Drug-Resistant Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    We present the use of functionalized gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) to combat multi-drug-resistant pathogenic bacteria. Tuning of the functional groups on the nanoparticle surface provided gold nanoparticles that were effective against both Gram-negative and Gram-positive uropathogens, including multi-drug-resistant pathogens. These AuNPs exhibited low toxicity to mammalian cells, and bacterial resistance was not observed after 20 generations. A strong structure–activity relationship was observed as a function of AuNP functionality, providing guidance to activity prediction and rational design of effective antimicrobial nanoparticles. PMID:25232643

  6. Swiss Report Highlights Danger of Drug-Resistant Tuberculosis

    MedlinePLUS

    ... html Swiss Report Highlights Danger of Drug-Resistant Tuberculosis Cases where the infection isn't thwarted by ... after catching a highly drug-resistant strain of tuberculosis illustrates exactly what public health officials around the ...

  7. Current Perspectives on HIV-1 Antiretroviral Drug Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Iyidogan, Pinar; Anderson, Karen S.

    2014-01-01

    Current advancements in antiretroviral therapy (ART) have turned HIV-1 infection into a chronic and manageable disease. However, treatment is only effective until HIV-1 develops resistance against the administered drugs. The most recent antiretroviral drugs have become superior at delaying the evolution of acquired drug resistance. In this review, the viral fitness and its correlation to HIV-1 mutation rates and drug resistance are discussed while emphasizing the concept of lethal mutagenesis as an alternative therapy. The development of resistance to the different classes of approved drugs and the importance of monitoring antiretroviral drug resistance are also summarized briefly. PMID:25341668

  8. Capsule Polysaccharide Mediates Bacterial Resistance to Antimicrobial Peptides

    PubMed Central

    Campos, Miguel A.; Vargas, Miguel A.; Regueiro, Verónica; Llompart, Catalina M.; Albertí, Sebastián; Bengoechea, José A.

    2004-01-01

    The innate immune system plays a critical role in the defense of areas exposed to microorganisms. There is an increasing body of evidence indicating that antimicrobial peptides and proteins (APs) are one of the most important weapons of this system and that they make up the protective front for the respiratory tract. On the other hand, it is known that pathogenic organisms have developed countermeasures to resist these agents such as reducing the net negative charge of the bacterial membranes. Here we report the characterization of a novel mechanism of resistance to APs that is dependent on the bacterial capsule polysaccharide (CPS). Klebsiella pneumoniae CPS mutant was more sensitive than the wild type to human neutrophil defensin 1, ?-defensin 1, lactoferrin, protamine sulfate, and polymyxin B. K. pneumoniae lipopolysaccharide O antigen did not play an important role in AP resistance, and CPS was the only factor conferring protection against polymyxin B in strains lacking O antigen. In addition, we found a significant correlation between the amount of CPS expressed by a given strain and the resistance to polymyxin B. We also showed that K. pneumoniae CPS mutant bound more polymyxin B than the wild-type strain with a concomitant increased in the self-promoted pathway. Taken together, our results suggest that CPS protects bacteria by limiting the interaction of APs with the surface. Finally, we report that K. pneumoniae increased the amount of CPS and upregulated cps transcription when grown in the presence of polymyxin B and lactoferrin. PMID:15557634

  9. Bacterial cheating limits the evolution of antibiotic resistance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chao, Hui Xiao; Datta, Manoshi; Yurtsev, Eugene; Gore, Jeff

    2011-03-01

    The widespread use of antibiotics has led to the evolution of resistance in bacteria. Bacteria can gain resistance to the antibiotic ampicillin by acquiring a plasmid carrying the gene beta-lactamase, which inactivates the antibiotic. This inactivation may represent a cooperative behavior, as the entire bacterial population benefits from removing the antibiotic. The cooperative nature of this growth suggests that a cheater strain--which does not contribute to breaking down the antibiotic--may be able to take advantage of cells cooperatively inactivating the antibiotic. Here we experimentally find that a ``sensitive'' bacterial strain lacking the plasmid conferring resistance can invade a population of resistant bacteria, even in antibiotic concentrations that should kill the sensitive strain. We observe stable coexistence between the two strains and find that a simple model successfully explains the behavior as a function of antibiotic concentration and cell density. We anticipate that our results will provide insight into the evolutionary origin of phenotypic diversity and cooperative behaviors found in nature.

  10. HMGB1 promotes drug resistance in osteosarcoma.

    PubMed

    Huang, Jun; Ni, Jiangdong; Liu, Ke; Yu, Yan; Xie, Min; Kang, Rui; Vernon, Philip; Cao, Lizhi; Tang, Daolin

    2012-01-01

    Osteosarcoma is the most commonly occurring bone cancer in children and adolescents. Unfortunately, treatment failures are common due to the development of chemoresistance, for which the underlying molecular mechanisms remain unclear. In this study, we implicate the DNA-binding protein HMGB1, which also exerts immunoregulatory effects in its secreted form, in the development of drug resistance in osteosarcoma. Anticancer agents including doxorubicin, cisplatin, and methotrexate each induced HMGB1 upregulation in human osteosarcoma cells, and RNA interference-mediated knockdown of HMGB1 restored the chemosensitivity of osteosarcoma cells in vivo and in vitro. Mechanistic investigation revealed that HMGB1 increased drug resistance by inducing autophagy, an intracellular self-defense mechanism known to confer drug resistance. We found that HMGB1 bound to the autophagy regulator Beclin1 and regulated the formation of the Beclin1-PI3KC3 [PI3KC3, phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase class 3] complex that facilitates autophagic progression. In addition, we found that interaction between HMGB1 and Beclin1 relied upon the autophagic complex ULK1-mAtg13-FIP200. Therefore, through its role as a regulator of autophagy, HMGB1 is a critical factor in the development of chemoresistance, and it offers a novel target for improving osteosarcoma therapy. PMID:22102692

  11. Biophysics of cell membrane lipids in cancer drug resistance: Implications for drug transport and drug delivery with nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Peetla, Chiranjeevi; Vijayaraghavalu, Sivakumar; Labhasetwar, Vinod

    2013-11-01

    In this review, we focus on the biophysics of cell membrane lipids, particularly when cancers develop acquired drug resistance, and how biophysical changes in resistant cell membrane influence drug transport and nanoparticle-mediated drug delivery. Recent advances in membrane lipid research show the varied roles of lipids in regulating membrane P-glycoprotein function, membrane trafficking, apoptotic pathways, drug transport, and endocytic functions, particularly endocytosis, the primary mechanism of cellular uptake of nanoparticle-based drug delivery systems. Since acquired drug resistance alters lipid biosynthesis, understanding the role of lipids in cell membrane biophysics and its effect on drug transport is critical for developing effective therapeutic and drug delivery approaches to overcome drug resistance. Here we discuss novel strategies for (a) modulating the biophysical properties of membrane lipids of resistant cells to facilitate drug transport and regain endocytic function and (b) developing effective nanoparticles based on their biophysical interactions with membrane lipids to enhance drug delivery and overcome drug resistance. PMID:24055719

  12. Biophysics of Cell Membrane Lipids in Cancer Drug Resistance: Implications for Drug Transport and Drug Delivery with Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Peetla, Chiranjeevi; Vijayaraghavalu, Sivakumar; Labhasetwar, Vinod

    2013-01-01

    In this review, we focus on the biophysics of cell membrane lipids, particularly when cancers develop acquired drug resistance, and how biophysical changes in resistant cell membrane influence drug transport and nanoparticle-mediated drug delivery. Recent advances in membrane lipid research show the varied roles of lipids in regulating membrane P-glycoprotein function, membrane trafficking, apoptotic pathways, drug transport, and endocytic functions, particularly endocytosis, the primary mechanism of cellular uptake of nanoparticle-based drug delivery systems. Since acquired drug resistance alters lipid biosynthesis, understanding the role of lipids in cell membrane biophysics and its effect on drug transport is critical for developing effective therapeutic and drug delivery approaches to overcoming drug resistance. Here we discuss novel strategies for (a) modulating the biophysical properties of membrane lipids of resistant cells to facilitate drug transport and regain endocytic function and (b) developing effective nanoparticles based on their biophysical interactions with membrane lipids to enhance drug delivery and overcome drug resistance. PMID:24055719

  13. Exploiting Nanotechnology to Overcome Tumor Drug Resistance: Challenges and Opportunities

    PubMed Central

    Kirtane, Ameya; Kalscheuer, Stephen; Panyam, Jayanth

    2013-01-01

    Tumor cells develop resistance to chemotherapeutic drugs through multiple mechanisms. Overexpression of efflux transporters is an important source of drug resistance. Efflux transporters such as P-glycoprotein reduce intracellular drug accumulation and compromise drug efficacy. Various nanoparticle-based approaches have been investigated to overcome efflux-mediated resistance. These include the use of formulation excipients that inhibit transporter activity and co-delivery of the anticancer drug with a specific inhibitor of transporter function or expression. However, the effectiveness of nanoparticles can be diminished by poor transport in the tumor tissue. Hence, adjunct therapies that improve the intratumoral distribution of nanoparticles may be vital to the successful application of nanotechnology to overcome tumor drug resistance. This review discusses the mechanisms of tumor drug resistance and highlights the opportunities and challenges in the use of nanoparticles to improve the efficacy of anticancer drugs against resistant tumors. PMID:24036273

  14. The evolution and spread of antibiotic resistance in bacterial pathogens is a grow-

    E-print Network

    Kishony, Roy

    The evolution and spread of antibiotic resistance in bacterial pathogens is a grow- ing threat to public health. The frequency of antibiotic resistance in many bacterial pathogens is increasing around rate of novel antibiotic dis- covery and by the likelihood that pathogens will evolve resistance

  15. Protoplast dehydration correlated with heat resistance of bacterial spores.

    PubMed Central

    Nakashio, S; Gerhardt, P

    1985-01-01

    Water content of the protoplast in situ within the fully hydrated dormant bacterial spore was quantified by use of a spore in which the complex of coat and outer (pericortex) membrane was genetically defective or chemically removed, as evidenced by susceptibility of the cortex to lysozyme and by permeability of the periprotoplast integument to glucose. Water content was determined by equilibrium permeability measurement with 3H-labeled water (confirmed by gravimetric measurement) for the entire spore, with 14C-labeled glucose for the integument outside the inner (pericytoplasm) membrane, and by the difference for the protoplast. The method was applied to lysozyme-sensitive spores of Bacillus stearothermophilus, B. subtilis, B. cereus, B. thuringiensis, and B. megaterium (four types). Comparable lysozyme-resistant spores, in which the outer membrane functioned as the primary permeability barrier to glucose, were employed as controls. Heat resistances were expressed as D100 values. Protoplast water content of the lysozyme-sensitive spore types correlated with heat resistance exponentially in two distinct clusters, with the four B. megaterium types in one alignment, and with the four other species types in another. Protoplast water contents of the B. megaterium spore types were sufficiently low (26 to 29%, based on wet protoplast weight) to account almost entirely for their lesser heat resistance. Corresponding values of the other species types were similar or higher (30 to 55%), indicating that these spores depended on factors additional to protoplast dehydration for their much greater heat resistance. PMID:3988704

  16. Re-sensitizing drug-resistant bacteria to antibiotics by designing Antisense Therapeutics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Courtney, Colleen; Chatterjee, Anushree

    2014-03-01

    ``Super-bugs'' or ``multi-drug resistant organisms'' are a serious international health problem, with devastating consequences to patient health care. The Center for Disease Control has identified antibiotic resistance as one of the world's most pressing public health problems as a significant fraction of bacterial infections contracted are drug resistant. Typically, antibiotic resistance is encoded by ``resistance-genes'' which express proteins that carryout the resistance causing functions inside the bacterium. We present a RNA based therapeutic strategy for designing antimicrobials capable of re-sensitizing resistant bacteria to antibiotics by targeting labile regions of messenger RNAs encoding for resistance-causing proteins. We perform in silico RNA secondary structure modeling to identify labile target regions in an mRNA of interest. A synthetic biology approach is then used to administer antisense nucleic acids to our model system of ampicillin resistant Escherichia coli. Our results show a prolonged lag phase and decrease in viability of drug-resistant E. colitreated with antisense molecules. The antisense strategy can be applied to alter expression of other genes in antibiotic resistance pathways or other pathways of interest.

  17. Adaptive and Mutational Resistance: Role of Porins and Efflux Pumps in Drug Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Fernández, Lucía

    2012-01-01

    Summary: The substantial use of antibiotics in the clinic, combined with a dearth of new antibiotic classes, has led to a gradual increase in the resistance of bacterial pathogens to these compounds. Among the various mechanisms by which bacteria endure the action of antibiotics, those affecting influx and efflux are of particular importance, as they limit the interaction of the drug with its intracellular targets and, consequently, its deleterious effects on the cell. This review evaluates the impact of porins and efflux pumps on two major types of resistance, namely, mutational and adaptive types of resistance, both of which are regarded as key phenomena in the global rise of antibiotic resistance among pathogenic microorganisms. In particular, we explain how adaptive and mutational events can dramatically influence the outcome of antibiotic therapy by altering the mechanisms of influx and efflux of antibiotics. The identification of porins and pumps as major resistance markers has opened new possibilities for the development of novel therapeutic strategies directed specifically against these mechanisms. PMID:23034325

  18. Sterilization Resistance of Bacterial Spores Explained with Water Chemistry.

    PubMed

    Friedline, Anthony W; Zachariah, Malcolm M; Middaugh, Amy N; Garimella, Ravindranath; Vaishampayan, Parag A; Rice, Charles V

    2015-11-01

    Bacterial spores can survive for long periods without nutrients and in harsh environmental conditions. This survival is influenced by the structure of the spore, the presence of protective compounds, and water retention. These compounds, and the physical state of water in particular, allow some species of bacterial spores to survive sterilization schemes with hydrogen peroxide and UV light. The chemical nature of the spore core and its water has been a subject of some contention and the chemical environment of the water impacts resistance paradigms. Either the spore has a glassy core, where water is immobilized along with other core components, or the core is gel-like with mobile water diffusion. These properties affect the movement of peroxide and radical species, and hence resistance. Deuterium solid-state NMR experiments are useful for examining the nature of the water inside the spore. Previous work in our lab with spores of Bacillus subtilis indicate that, for spores, the core water is in a more immobilized state than expected for the gel-like core theory, suggesting a glassy core environment. Here, we report deuterium solid-state NMR observations of the water within UV- and peroxide-resistant spores from Bacillus pumilus SAFR-032. Variable-temperature NMR experiments indicate no change in the line shape after heating to 50 °C, but an overall decrease in signal after heating to 100 °C. These results show glass-like core dynamics within B. pumilus SAFR-032 that may be the potential source of its known UV-resistance properties. The observed NMR traits can be attributed to the presence of an exosporium containing additional labile deuterons that can aid in the deactivation of sterilizing agents. PMID:26435315

  19. Antitubercular and antibacterial activity of quinonoid natural products against multi-drug resistant clinical isolates.

    PubMed

    Dey, Diganta; Ray, Ratnamala; Hazra, Banasri

    2014-07-01

    Multi-drug resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis and other bacterial pathogens represent a major threat to human health. In view of the critical need to augment the current drug regime, we have investigated therapeutic potential of five quinonoids, viz. emodin, diospyrin, plumbagin, menadione and thymoquinone, derived from natural products. The antimicrobial activity of quinonoids was evaluated against a broad panel of multi-drug and extensively drug-resistant tuberculosis (M/XDR-TB) strains, rapid growing mycobacteria and other bacterial isolates, some of which were producers of ?-lactamase, Extended-spectrum ?-lactamase (ESBL), AmpC ?-lactamase, metallo-beta-lactamase (MBL) enzymes, as well as their drug-sensitive ATCC counterparts. All the tested quinones exhibited antimycobacterial and broad spectrum antibacterial activity, particularly against M. tuberculosis (lowest MIC 0.25?µg/mL) and Gram-positive bacteria (lowest MIC <4?µg/mL) of clinical origin. The order of antitubercular activity of the tested quinonoids was plumbagin?>?emodin?~?menadione?~?thymoquinone?>?diospyrin, whereas their antibacterial efficacy was plumbagin?>?menadione?~?thymoquinone?>?diospyrin?>?emodin. Furthermore, this is the first evaluation performed on these quinonoids against a broad panel of drug-resistant and drug-sensitive clinical isolates, to the best of our knowledge. PMID:24318724

  20. Emerging Roles of SIRT1 in Cancer Drug Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhiqiang

    2013-01-01

    Innate resistance to various therapeutic interventions is a hallmark of cancer. In recent years, acquired resistance has emerged as a daunting challenge to targeted cancer therapy, which abolishes the efficacy of otherwise successful targeting drugs. Cancer cells gain the resistance property through a variety of mechanisms in primary and metastatic cancers, involving cellular intrinsic and extrinsic factors. Increasing evidence suggests that the mammalian stress response gene sirtuin 1 (SIRT1) plays a critical role in multiple aspects of cancer drug resistance. SIRT1 decreases drug penetration, confers proliferation and antiapoptotic survival advantages to cancer cells, facilitates acquired resistance through genetic mutations, promotes the survival of cancer stem cells, and changes the tumor microenvironment for resistance in cell-autonomous and -nonautonomous manners. This article provides an overview of research advances in the roles of SIRT1 in cancer drug resistance and highlights the prospect of targeting SIRT1 as a new strategy to overcome cancer drug resistance and improve therapeutic outcomes. PMID:24019998

  1. Emergence of antibiotic resistance from multinucleated bacterial filaments

    PubMed Central

    Bos, Julia; Zhang, Qiucen; Vyawahare, Saurabh; Rogers, Elizabeth; Rosenberg, Susan M.; Austin, Robert H.

    2015-01-01

    Bacteria can rapidly evolve resistance to antibiotics via the SOS response, a state of high-activity DNA repair and mutagenesis. We explore here the first steps of this evolution in the bacterium Escherichia coli. Induction of the SOS response by the genotoxic antibiotic ciprofloxacin changes the E. coli rod shape into multichromosome-containing filaments. We show that at subminimal inhibitory concentrations of ciprofloxacin the bacterial filament divides asymmetrically repeatedly at the tip. Chromosome-containing buds are made that, if resistant, propagate nonfilamenting progeny with enhanced resistance to ciprofloxacin as the parent filament dies. We propose that the multinucleated filament creates an environmental niche where evolution can proceed via generation of improved mutant chromosomes due to the mutagenic SOS response and possible recombination of the new alleles between chromosomes. Our data provide a better understanding of the processes underlying the origin of resistance at the single-cell level and suggest an analogous role to the eukaryotic aneuploidy condition in cancer. PMID:25492931

  2. Rural Adolescent Perceptions of Alcohol and Other Drug Resistance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jenkins, Jeanne E.

    2001-01-01

    Used questionnaires and focus groups to examine 361 rural high schoolers' perceptions of drug resistance difficulties when offered beer, marijuana, and hard drugs. Found that drug nonusers had the widest range of explanations for resistance difficulty. Peer pressure was cited most frequently by nonusers, and seldom by heavy users. Frequent users…

  3. Evaluation of Idaho's DARE "Drug Abuse Resistance Education" Projects.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Silva, Roberta K.

    The DARE (Drug Abuse Resistance Education) program teaches students decision-making skills, shows them how to resist peer pressure to experiment with drugs and alcohol, and provides positive alternatives to drug use. This report looks at one state's DARE programs. Included are an overview of the implementation process, a program appraisal with…

  4. Evaluation of Idaho's DARE "Drug Abuse Resistance Education Projects."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Silva, Roberta K.

    The goal of DARE (Drug Abuse Resistance Education) is not to completely eliminate the drug and alcohol problems of society. It is a proactive prevention program designed to equip youth (focusing on elementary school) with skills for resisting peer pressure to experiment with drugs, and to manage anger without resorting to violence or the use of…

  5. Structure and function of efflux pumps that confer resistance to drugs.

    PubMed Central

    Borges-Walmsley, M Ines; McKeegan, Kenneth S; Walmsley, Adrian R

    2003-01-01

    Resistance to therapeutic drugs encompasses a diverse range of biological systems, which all have a human impact. From the relative simplicity of bacterial cells, fungi and protozoa to the complexity of human cancer cells, resistance has become problematic. Stated in its simplest terms, drug resistance decreases the chance of providing successful treatment against a plethora of diseases. Worryingly, it is a problem that is increasing, and consequently there is a pressing need to develop new and effective classes of drugs. This has provided a powerful stimulus in promoting research on drug resistance and, ultimately, it is hoped that this research will provide novel approaches that will allow the deliberate circumvention of well understood resistance mechanisms. A major mechanism of resistance in both microbes and cancer cells is the membrane protein-catalysed extrusion of drugs from the cell. Resistant cells exploit proton-driven antiporters and/or ATP-driven ABC (ATP-binding cassette) transporters to extrude cytotoxic drugs that usually enter the cell by passive diffusion. Although some of these drug efflux pumps transport specific substrates, many are transporters of multiple substrates. These multidrug pumps can often transport a variety of structurally unrelated hydrophobic compounds, ranging from dyes to lipids. If we are to nullify the effects of efflux-mediated drug resistance, we must first of all understand how these efflux pumps can accommodate a diverse range of compounds and, secondly, how conformational changes in these proteins are coupled to substrate translocation. These are key questions that must be addressed. In this review we report on the advances that have been made in understanding the structure and function of drug efflux pumps. PMID:13678421

  6. Myeloma Propagating Cells, Drug Resistance and Relapse.

    PubMed

    Karadimitris, Anastasios; Chaidos, Aristeidis; Caputo, Valentina; Goudevenou, Katerina; Ponnusamy, Kanagaraju; Xiao, Xiaolin

    2015-11-01

    Multiple myeloma (MM) is an incurable tumor of the plasma cells, the terminally differentiated immunoglobulin secreting B lineage cells. The genetic make-up of MM has been extensively characterized but its impact on the biology of the disease is incomplete without more precise knowledge of the identity and functional role of cells with multiple myeloma propagating activity (MMPA). We review here recent data that link MMPA with myeloma clonotypic populations organized in a cellular hierarchy that mirrors normal B cell development and also with drug resistance and disease relapse. We further propose a conceptual framework which, with optimal use of recent technological advances in genomics and phenomics, could allow dissection of the cellular and molecular properties of cells with MMPA, drug resistance and in vivo relapse in an integrated and patient-specific manner. There is real hope that these approaches will significantly contribute to further improvements in disease control, overall survival, and possibly cure of patients with MM. Stem Cells 2015;33:3205-3211. PMID:26302895

  7. Advantage and limitations of nitrofurantoin in multi-drug resistant Indian scenario.

    PubMed

    Shakti, Laishram; Veeraraghavan, Balaji

    2015-01-01

    Infections caused by antibiotic resistant pathogens are of significant concern and are associated with higher mortality and morbidity. Nitrofurantoin is a broad-spectrum bactericidal antibiotic and is effectively used to treat urinary tract infections (UTIs) caused by E. coli, Klebsiella sp., Enterobacter sp., Enterococcus sp. and Staphylococcus aureus. It interfere with the synthesis of cell wall, bacterial proteins and DNA of both Gram positive and Gram negative pathogens. Nitrofurantoin has been used successfully for treatment and prophylaxis of acute lower urinary tract infections. With the emergence of antibiotic resistance, nitrofurantoin has become the choice of agent for treating UTIs caused by multi-drug resistant pathogens. PMID:26470951

  8. Transmitted drug resistance in French HIV-2-infected patients.

    PubMed

    Charpentier, Charlotte; Visseaux, Benoit; Bénard, Antoine; Peytavin, Gilles; Damond, Florence; Roy, Céline; Taieb, Audrey; Chêne, Geneviève; Matheron, Sophie; Brun-Vézinet, Françoise; Descamps, Diane

    2013-06-19

    We report the first transmitted drug resistance survey study in HIV-2-infected patients living in France. The prevalence of transmitted drug resistance was 5.0% (95% confidence interval, 0.1-9.9) with mutations detected only in protease, not in reverse transcriptase. In this series, 10% of patients displayed X4/dual-mixed viruses. These findings classified the rate of transmitted drug resistance in the HIV-2 French Cohort as low prevalence. PMID:23595155

  9. Bacteriocin from Bacillus subtilis as a novel drug against diabetic foot ulcer bacterial pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Joseph, Baby; Dhas, Berlina; Hena, Vimalin; Raj, Justin

    2013-01-01

    Objective To isolate and identify Bacillus subtilis (B. subtilis) from soil and to characterize and partially purify the bacteriocin. To evaluate the antimicrobial activity against four diabetic foot ulcer bacterial pathogens. Methods Genotypic identification was done based on Bergey's manual of systemic bacteriology. Antimicrobial susceptibility test was done by Kirby-Bauer disc diffusion method. Colonies were identified by colony morphology and biochemical characterization and also compared with MTCC 121 strain. Further identification was done by 16S rRNA sequencing. Inhibitory activities of partially purified bacteriocin on all the DFU isolates were done by agar well diffusion method. The strain was identified to produce bacteriocin by stab overlay assay. Bacteriocin was extracted by organic solvent extraction using chloroform, further purified by HPLC and physical, and chemical characterization was performed. Results The four isolates showed high level of resistance to amoxyclav and sensitivity to ciprofloxacin. HPLC purification revealed that the extracts are bacteriocin. The phylogenetic tree analysis results showed that the isolate was 99% related to B. subtilis BSF01. The results reveled activity to all the four isolates and high level of activity was seen in case of Klebsiella sp. Conclusions Partially purified bacteriocin was found to have antimicrobial activity against the four diabetic foot ulcer bacterial pathogens, which can thus be applied as a better drug molecule on further studies. The strain B. subtilis are found to be safe for use and these antimicrobial peptides can be used as an antimicrobial in humans to treat DFU bacterial pathogens. PMID:24093784

  10. Stop the Spread of Superbugs: Help Fight Drug Resistant Bacteria

    MedlinePLUS

    ... the Spread of Superbugs Help Fight Drug-Resistant Bacteria For nearly a century, bacteria-fighting drugs known as antibiotics have helped to control and destroy many of the harmful bacteria that can make us sick. But in recent ...

  11. Exploiting fitness trade-offs to prevent antifungal drug resistance

    E-print Network

    Vincent, Benjamin Matteson

    2015-01-01

    The evolution of drug resistance in pathogenic microorganisms is typically viewed as an inevitable consequence of the selective pressures imposed by antimicrobial agents. However, although certain drugs rapidly lose efficacy ...

  12. Harnessing the potential of bacterial ghost for the effective delivery of drugs and biotherapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Ganeshpurkar, Aditya; Ganeshpurkar, Ankit; Pandey, Vikas; Agnihotri, Abhishek; Bansal, Divya; Dubey, Nazneen

    2014-01-01

    It seems to be a necessary need to develop an effective drug carrier system for targeted delivery of pharmaceuticals. Bacterial ghosts are emerging drug delivery platform that are capable of delivery of proteins, antigens, nucleic acids, and pharmaceuticals. Bacterial ghosts are generally produced by lysis of gram-negative bacteria. Pharmaceutically, these ghosts could be utilized to deliver proteins peptides, vaccines, drugs effectively. However, this technology is at initial stage and systematic studies are required to implement such system over humans. PMID:24678455

  13. Asynchronous magnetic bead rotation (AMBR) micro-viscometer for rapid, sensitive and label-free studies of bacterial growth and drug sensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Sinn, Irene; Albertson, Theodore; Kinnunen, Paivo; Breslauer, David N.; McNaughton, Brandon H.; Burns, Mark A.; Kopelman, Raoul

    2012-01-01

    The long turnaround time in antimicrobial susceptibility testing (AST) endangers patients and encourages the administration of wide spectrum antibiotics, thus resulting in alarming increases of multi-drug resistant pathogens. A method for faster detection of bacterial proliferation presents one avenue towards addressing this global concern. We report on a label-free asynchronous magnetic bead rotation (AMBR) based viscometry method that rapidly detects bacterial growth and determines drug sensitivity by measuring changes in the suspension’s viscosity. With this platform, we observed the growth of a uropathogenic Escherichia coli isolate, with an initial concentration of 50 cells per drop, within 20 minutes; in addition, we determined the gentamicin minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of the E. coli isolate within 100 minutes. We thus demonstrated a label-free, micro-viscometer platform that can measure bacterial growth and drug susceptibility more rapidly, with lower initial bacterial counts than existing commercial systems, and potentially with any microbial strains. PMID:22507307

  14. GWAMAR: Genome-wide assessment of mutations associated with drug resistance in bacteria

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Development of drug resistance in bacteria causes antibiotic therapies to be less effective and more costly. Moreover, our understanding of the process remains incomplete. One promising approach to improve our understanding of how resistance is being acquired is to use whole-genome comparative approaches for detection of drug resistance-associated mutations. Results We present GWAMAR, a tool we have developed for detecting of drug resistance-associated mutations in bacteria through comparative analysis of whole-genome sequences. The pipeline of GWAMAR comprises several steps. First, for a set of closely related bacterial genomes, it employs eCAMBer to identify homologous gene families. Second, based on multiple alignments of the gene families, it identifies mutations among the strains of interest. Third, it calculates several statistics to identify which mutations are the most associated with drug resistance. Conclusions Based on our analysis of two large datasets retrieved from publicly available data for M. tuberculosis, we identified a set of novel putative drug resistance-associated mutations. As a part of this work, we present also an application of our tool to detect putative compensatory mutations. PMID:25559874

  15. 78 FR 63220 - Guidance for Industry on Acute Bacterial Skin and Skin Structure Infections: Developing Drugs for...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-23

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Guidance for Industry on Acute Bacterial Skin and Skin... guidance for industry entitled ``Acute Bacterial Skin and Skin Structure Infections: Developing Drugs for... drugs to treat acute bacterial skin and skin structure infections (ABSSSI). This guidance finalizes...

  16. Genetic Analysis of Drug Resistance in Neisseria gonorrhoeae: Identification and Linkage Relationships of Loci Controlling Drug Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Maier, Thomas W.; Zubrzycki, Leonard; Coyle, Marie B.

    1975-01-01

    The genetic basis of multiple drug resistance of Neisseria gonorrhoeae was investigated by the technique of transformation. Six different genetic loci were characterized by the type and amount of antibiotic resistance they controlled, and also by the degree of linkage to other resistance markers. A streptomycin resistance locus is linked to separate loci determining resistance to tetracycline, chloramphenicol, and erythromycin. A multiple resistance locus was identified. This genetic locus determines resistance to a variety of antibacterial agents. Lastly, a locus determining resistance to the penicillins was found which is unlinked to any other resistance locus. PMID:807159

  17. Rainbow Trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) resistance to columnaris disease is heritable and favorably correlated with bacterial cold water disease resistance

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Columnaris disease (CD) is an emerging disease affecting rainbow trout aquaculture. Objectives were to estimate heritability of CD resistance in a line (ARS-Fp-R) selected 4 generations for improved bacterial cold water disease (BCWD) resistance; estimate genetic correlations among CD resistance, BC...

  18. Inhibition of bacterial carbonic anhydrases and zinc proteases: from orphan targets to innovative new antibiotic drugs.

    PubMed

    Supuran, C T

    2012-01-01

    Zinc-containing enzymes, such as carbonic anhydrases (CAs) and metalloproteases (MPs) play critical functions in bacteria, being involved in various steps of their life cycle, which are important for survival, colonization, acquisition of nutrients for growth and proliferation, facilitation of dissemination, invasion and pathogenicity. The development of resistance to many classes of clinically used antibiotics emphasizes the need of new antibacterial drug targets to be explored. There is a wealth of data regarding bacterial CAs and zinc MPs present in many pathogenic species, such as Neisseria spp., Helycobacter pylori Escherichia coli, Mycobacterium tuberculosis, Brucella spp., Streptococcus pneumoniae, Salmonella enterica, Haemophilus influenzae, Listeria spp, Vibrio spp., Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Legionella pneumophila, Streptomyces spp., Clostridium spp., Enterococcus spp., etc. Some of these enzymes have been cloned, purified and characterized by crystallographic techniques. However, for the moment, few potent and specific inhibitors for bacterial MPs have been reported except for Clostridium histolyticum collagenase, botulinum and tetanus neurotoxin and anthrax lethal factor, which will be reviewed in this article. Bacteria encode ?-,?-, and/or ?-CA families, but up to now only the first two classes have been investigated in some detail in different species. The ?-CAs from Neisseria spp. and H. pylori as well as the ?-class enzymes from E. coli, H. pylori, M. tuberculosis, Brucella spp., S. pneumoniae, S. enterica and H. influenzae have been cloned and characterized. The catalytic/inhibition mechanisms of these CAs are well understood as X-ray crystal structures are available for some of them, but no adducts of these enzymes with inhibitors have been characterized so far. In vitro and in vivo studies with various classes of inhibitors, such as anions, sulfonamides and sulfamates have been reported. Only for Neisseria spp., H. pylori, B. suis and S. pneumoniae CAs it has been possible to evidence inhibition of bacterial growth in vivo. Thus, bacterial CAs and MPs represent at this moment very promising targets for obtaining antibacterials devoid of the resistance problems of the clinically used such agents but further studies are needed to validate these and other less investigated enzymes as novel drug targets. PMID:22214451

  19. Understanding bacterial resistance to antimicrobial peptides: From the surface to deep inside.

    PubMed

    Maria-Neto, Simone; de Almeida, Keyla Caroline; Macedo, Maria Ligia Rodrigues; Franco, Octávio Luiz

    2015-11-01

    Resistant bacterial infections are a major health problem in many parts of the world. The major commercial antibiotic classes often fail to combat common bacteria. Although antimicrobial peptides are able to control bacterial infections by interfering with microbial metabolism and physiological processes in several ways, a large number of cases of resistance to antibiotic peptide classes have also been reported. To gain a better understanding of the resistance process various technologies have been applied. Here we discuss multiple strategies by which bacteria could develop enhanced antimicrobial peptide resistance, focusing on sub-cellular regions from the surface to deep inside, evaluating bacterial membranes, cell walls and cytoplasmic metabolism. Moreover, some high-throughput methods for antimicrobial resistance detection and discrimination are also examined. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Bacterial Resistance to Antimicrobial Peptides. PMID:25724815

  20. Population genomics of drug resistance in Candida albicans

    E-print Network

    Kohn, Linda M.

    330 generations of evolution in the presence of the antifungal drug fluconazole. Genome expression were also identified in fluconazole-resistant clinical isolates, providing further evidence that these patterns represent common programs of adap- tation to fluconazole. The emergence of drug resistance

  1. Small Hospitals Seeing More Drug-Resistant E. Coli Infections

    MedlinePLUS

    ... 155153.html Small Hospitals Seeing More Drug-Resistant E. Coli Infections Study suggests these tougher germs aren't limited ... WEDNESDAY, Oct. 14, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Drug-resistant E. coli infections are on the increase in small community hospitals, ...

  2. Knowledge-based Avoidance of Drug-Resistant HIV Mutants

    E-print Network

    Pazzani, Michael J.

    Knowledge-based Avoidance of Drug-Resistant HIV Mutants Richard H. Lathrop, Nicholas R. Ste en AI system CTSHIV that connects the scienti c AIDS literature describing speci c HIV drug resistances directly to the Customized Treatment Strategy of a speci c HIV patient. Rules in the CTSHIV knowledge base

  3. Knowledgebased Avoidance of DrugResistant HIV Mutants

    E-print Network

    Pazzani, Michael J.

    Knowledge­based Avoidance of Drug­Resistant HIV Mutants Richard H. Lathrop, Nicholas R. Steffen (AI) system (CTSHIV) that connects the scientific AIDS literature describing specific HIV drug resistances directly to the Customized Treatment Strategy of a specific HIV patient. Rules in the CTSHIV

  4. On-Demand Isolation of Bacteriophages Against Drug-Resistant Bacteria for Personalized Phage Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Mattila, Sari; Ruotsalainen, Pilvi; Jalasvuori, Matti

    2015-01-01

    Bacteriophages are bacterial viruses, capable of killing even multi-drug resistant bacterial cells. For this reason, therapeutic use of phages is considered as a possible alternative to conventional antibiotics. However, phages are very host specific in comparison to wide-spectrum antibiotics and thus preparation of phage-cocktails beforehand against pathogens can be difficult. In this study, we evaluate whether it may be possible to isolate phages on-demand from environmental reservoir. We attempted to enrich infectious bacteriophages from sewage against nosocomial drug-resistant bacterial strains of different medically important species in order to evaluate the probability of discovering novel therapeutic phages. Stability and host-range were determined for the acquired phages. Our results suggest that on-demand isolation of phages is possible against Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Salmonella and extended spectrum beta-lactamase Escherichia coli and Klebsiella pneumoniae. The probability of finding suitable phages was less than 40% against vancomycin resistant Enterococcus and Acinetobacter baumannii strains. Furthermore, isolation of new phages against methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus strains was found to be very difficult. PMID:26617601

  5. Intercellular Transfer of Cancer Drug Resistance Traits by Extracellular Vesicles.

    PubMed

    Sousa, Diana; Lima, Raquel T; Vasconcelos, M Helena

    2015-10-01

    Extracellular vesicles (EVs) are nanosized particles (100-1000nm) enclosed by a phospholipid bilayer that have been described as important mediators of intercellular communication. The role of EVs in oncobiology has been extensively studied, including their contribution to the horizontal transfer of drug resistance from drug-resistant to drug-sensitive cancer cells. This review focuses on the EVs cargo responsible for this intercellular transfer of drug resistance; namely, drug-efflux pumps, miRNAs, long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs), and other mediators. Additionally, the known molecular mechanisms and features of this transfer are discussed. This is an emerging area of research and we highlight topics that need to be further studied to fully understand and counteract the intercellular transfer of drug resistance mediated by EVs. PMID:26432017

  6. Molecular structure and dynamics in bacterial mercury resistance

    SciTech Connect

    Johs, Alexander; Shi, Liang; Miller, Susan M; Summers, Anne O; Liang, Liyuan

    2008-01-01

    Bacteria participate significantly in mercury transformation in natural and industrial environments. Previous studies have shown that bacterial mercury resistance is mediated by the mer operon, typically located on transposons or plasmids. It encodes specific genes that facilitate uptake of mercury species, cleavage of organomercurials, and reduction of Hg(II) to Hg(0). Expression of mer operon genes is regulated by MerR, a metal-responsive regulator protein on the level of transcription. In vitro studies have shown that MerR forms a non-transcribing pre-initiation complex with RNA polymerase and the promoter DNA. Binding of Hg(II) induces conformational changes in MerR and other components of the complex resulting in the transcription of mer operon genes. As part of ongoing investigations on allosteric conformational changes induced by Hg(II) in dimeric MerR, and the implications on the binding of RNA polymerase to the promoter of the mer operon, we applied small angle scattering to study the regulatory mechanism of MerR in the presence and absence of Hg(II). Our results show that in the presence of Hg(II) the MerR dimer undergoes a significant reorientation from a compact state to a conformation revealing two distinct domains. Bacterial reduction of Hg(II) can also occur at concentrations too low to induce mer operon functions. Dissimilatory metal reducing bacteria, such as Shewanella and Geobacter are able to reduce Hg(II) in the presence of mineral oxides. This process has been linked to the activity of outer membrane multiheme cytochromes. We isolated and purified a decaheme outer membrane cytochrome OmcA from Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 and characterized its envelope shape in solution by small angle x-ray scattering. Structural features were identified and compared to homology models. These results show that OmcA is an elongated macromolecule consisting of separate modules, which may be connected by flexible linkers.

  7. Quantifying the Determinants of Evolutionary Dynamics Leading to Drug Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Chevereau, Guillaume; Dravecká, Marta; Batur, Tugce; Guvenek, Aysegul; Ayhan, Dilay Hazal; Toprak, Erdal; Bollenbach, Tobias

    2015-01-01

    The emergence of drug resistant pathogens is a serious public health problem. It is a long-standing goal to predict rates of resistance evolution and design optimal treatment strategies accordingly. To this end, it is crucial to reveal the underlying causes of drug-specific differences in the evolutionary dynamics leading to resistance. However, it remains largely unknown why the rates of resistance evolution via spontaneous mutations and the diversity of mutational paths vary substantially between drugs. Here we comprehensively quantify the distribution of fitness effects (DFE) of mutations, a key determinant of evolutionary dynamics, in the presence of eight antibiotics representing the main modes of action. Using precise high-throughput fitness measurements for genome-wide Escherichia coli gene deletion strains, we find that the width of the DFE varies dramatically between antibiotics and, contrary to conventional wisdom, for some drugs the DFE width is lower than in the absence of stress. We show that this previously underappreciated divergence in DFE width among antibiotics is largely caused by their distinct drug-specific dose-response characteristics. Unlike the DFE, the magnitude of the changes in tolerated drug concentration resulting from genome-wide mutations is similar for most drugs but exceptionally small for the antibiotic nitrofurantoin, i.e., mutations generally have considerably smaller resistance effects for nitrofurantoin than for other drugs. A population genetics model predicts that resistance evolution for drugs with this property is severely limited and confined to reproducible mutational paths. We tested this prediction in laboratory evolution experiments using the “morbidostat”, a device for evolving bacteria in well-controlled drug environments. Nitrofurantoin resistance indeed evolved extremely slowly via reproducible mutations—an almost paradoxical behavior since this drug causes DNA damage and increases the mutation rate. Overall, we identified novel quantitative characteristics of the evolutionary landscape that provide the conceptual foundation for predicting the dynamics of drug resistance evolution. PMID:26581035

  8. Efflux-Mediated Drug Resistance in Bacteria: an Update

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xian-Zhi; Nikaido, Hiroshi

    2010-01-01

    Drug efflux pumps play a key role in drug resistance and also serve other functions in bacteria. There has been a growing list of multidrug and drug-specific efflux pumps characterized from bacteria of human, animal, plant and environmental origins. These pumps are mostly encoded on the chromosome although they can also be plasmid-encoded. A previous article (Li X-Z and Nikaido H, Drugs, 2004; 64[2]: 159–204) had provided a comprehensive review regarding efflux-mediated drug resistance in bacteria. In the past five years, significant progress has been achieved in further understanding of drug resistance-related efflux transporters and this review focuses on the latest studies in this field since 2003. This has been demonstrated in multiple aspects that include but are not limited to: further molecular and biochemical characterization of the known drug efflux pumps and identification of novel drug efflux pumps; structural elucidation of the transport mechanisms of drug transporters; regulatory mechanisms of drug efflux pumps; determining the role of the drug efflux pumps in other functions such as stress responses, virulence and cell communication; and development of efflux pump inhibitors. Overall, the multifaceted implications of drug efflux transporters warrant novel strategies to combat multidrug resistance in bacteria. PMID:19678712

  9. Aggressive Chemotherapy and the Selection of Drug Resistant Pathogens

    E-print Network

    Read, Andrew

    Aggressive Chemotherapy and the Selection of Drug Resistant Pathogens Silvie Huijben1¤a *, Andrew S. Aggressive chemotherapy thus generates opposing evolutionary forces which together determine the rate of drug, Bell AS, Sim DG, Tomasello D, Mideo N, et al. (2013) Aggressive Chemotherapy and the Selection of Drug

  10. Overcome Cancer Cell Drug Resistance Using Natural Products

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Pu; Yang, Hua Li; Yang, Ying Juan; Wang, Lan; Lee, Shao Chin

    2015-01-01

    Chemotherapy is one of the major treatment methods for cancer. However, failure in chemotherapy is not uncommon, mainly due to dose-limiting toxicity associated with drug resistance. Management of drug resistance is important towards successful chemotherapy. There are many reports in the Chinese literature that natural products can overcome cancer cell drug resistance, which deserve sharing with scientific and industrial communities. We summarized the reports into four categories: (1) in vitro studies using cell line models; (2) serum pharmacology; (3) in vivo studies using animal models; and (4) clinical studies. Fourteen single compounds were reported to have antidrug resistance activity for the first time. In vitro, compounds were able to overcome drug resistance at nontoxic or subtoxic concentrations, in a dose-dependent manner, by inhibiting drug transporters, cell detoxification capacity, or cell apoptosis sensitivity. Studies in vivo showed that single compounds, herbal extract, and formulas had potent antidrug resistance activities. Importantly, many single compounds, herbal extracts, and formulas have been used clinically to treat various diseases including cancer. The review provides comprehensive data on use of natural compounds to overcome cancer cell drug resistance in China, which may facilitate the therapeutic development of natural products for clinical management of cancer drug resistance. PMID:26421052

  11. Combinatorial discovery of polymers resistant to bacterial attachment

    E-print Network

    Hook, Andrew L.

    Bacterial attachment and subsequent biofilm formation pose key challenges to the optimal performance of medical devices. In this study, we determined the attachment of selected bacterial species to hundreds of polymeric ...

  12. Mycobacterium tuberculosis resistance to antituberculosis drugs in Mozambique*, **

    PubMed Central

    Pires, Germano Manuel; Folgosa, Elena; Nquobile, Ndlovu; Gitta, Sheba; Cadir, Nureisha

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine the drug resistance profile of Mycobacterium tuberculosis in Mozambique. METHODS: We analyzed secondary data from the National Tuberculosis Referral Laboratory, in the city of Maputo, Mozambique, and from the Beira Regional Tuberculosis Referral Laboratory, in the city of Beira, Mozambique. The data were based on culture-positive samples submitted to first-line drug susceptibility testing (DST) between January and December of 2011. We attempted to determine whether the frequency of DST positivity was associated with patient type or provenance. RESULTS: During the study period, 641 strains were isolated in culture and submitted to DST. We found that 374 (58.3%) were resistant to at least one antituberculosis drug and 280 (43.7%) were resistant to multiple antituberculosis drugs. Of the 280 multidrug-resistant tuberculosis cases, 184 (65.7%) were in previously treated patients, most of whom were from southern Mozambique. Two (0.71%) of the cases of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis were confirmed to be cases of extensively drug-resistant tuberculosis. Multidrug-resistant tuberculosis was most common in males, particularly those in the 21-40 year age bracket. CONCLUSIONS: M. tuberculosis resistance to antituberculosis drugs is high in Mozambique, especially in previously treated patients. The frequency of M. tuberculosis strains that were resistant to isoniazid, rifampin, and streptomycin in combination was found to be high, particularly in samples from previously treated patients. PMID:24831398

  13. Rapid evolution of drug resistance of multiple myeloma in the microenvironment with drug gradients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Amy; Zhang, Qiucen; Lambert, Guillaume; Khin, Zayar; Silva, Ariosto; Gatenby, Robert; Kim, John; Pourmand, Nader; Austin, Robert; Sturm, James

    2013-03-01

    Drug resistance in cancer is usually caused by the spatial drug gradients in tumor environment. Here, we culture multiple myeloma in a gradient from 0 to 20 nM of doxorubicin (genotoxic drug) across 2 mm wide region for 12 days. The myeloma cells grew rapidly and formed 3D colonies in the regions with less drug concentration. However, we have seen emergent colonies forming in regions with drug concentration above the minimal inhibitory concentration in less than one week. Once the cells have occupied the regions with less drug concentration, they tend to migrate toward the regions with higher drug concentration in a collective behavior. To characterize their resistance, we collect them from this microfluidic system, for further analysis of the dose response. We find that the IC50 (drug concentration that inhibits 50% of controlled population) of the cells, undergone a drug gradient, increase 16-fold of the wildtype cells. We further discover that these resistant cells express more Multidrug Resistance (mdr) protein, which pumps out the drugs and causes drug resistance, than the wildtype. Our current works on RNA-sequencing analysis may discover other biomolecular mechanisms that may confer the drug resistance.

  14. Development of Extensively Drug-resistant Tuberculosis during Multidrug-resistant Tuberculosis Treatment

    E-print Network

    Cohen, Ted

    Development of Extensively Drug-resistant Tuberculosis during Multidrug-resistant Tuberculosis of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts; 6 Tomsk Oblast Tuberculosis Services, Tomsk, Russian Federation; 7 Siberia State Medical University, Tomsk, Russian Federation; 8 Tomsk Oblast Tuberculosis Hospital, Tomsk

  15. Electrospinning polyvinylidene fluoride fibrous membranes containing anti-bacterial drugs used as wound dressing.

    PubMed

    He, Ting; Wang, Jingnan; Huang, Peilin; Zeng, Baozhen; Li, Haihong; Cao, Qingyun; Zhang, Shiying; Luo, Zhuo; Deng, David Y B; Zhang, Hongwu; Zhou, Wuyi

    2015-06-01

    The aim of this study was to synthesis drug-loaded fibrous membrane scaffolds for potential applications as wound dressing. Polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) fibrous membranes were loaded with enrofloxacin (Enro) drugs by using an electrospinning process, and their mechanical strength, drug release profile and anti-bacterial properties were evaluated. Enro drug-loaded PVDF membranes exhibited good elasticity, flexibility and excellent mechanical strength. The electrospinning Enro/PVDF membranes showed a burst drug release in the initial 12h, followed by sustained release for the next 3 days, which was an essential property for antibiotic drugs applied for wound healing. The drug-loaded PVDF fibrous membranes displayed excellent anti-bacterial activity toward Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus. The results suggest that electrospinning PVDF membrane scaffolds loaded with drugs can be used as wound dressing. PMID:25936562

  16. Bacterial fitness shapes the population dynamics of antibiotic-resistant and -susceptible bacteria in a model of combined antibiotic and anti-virulence treatment

    PubMed Central

    Ternent, Lucy; Dyson, Rosemary J.; Krachler, Anne-Marie; Jabbari, Sara

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial resistance to antibiotic treatment is a huge concern: introduction of any new antibiotic is shortly followed by the emergence of resistant bacterial isolates in the clinic. This issue is compounded by a severe lack of new antibiotics reaching the market. The significant rise in clinical resistance to antibiotics is especially problematic in nosocomial infections, where already vulnerable patients may fail to respond to treatment, causing even greater health concern. A recent focus has been on the development of anti-virulence drugs as a second line of defence in the treatment of antibiotic-resistant infections. This treatment, which weakens bacteria by reducing their virulence rather than killing them, should allow infections to be cleared through the body?s natural defence mechanisms. In this way there should be little to no selective pressure exerted on the organism and, as such, a predominantly resistant population should be less likely to emerge. However, before the likelihood of resistance to these novel drugs emerging can be predicted, we must first establish whether such drugs can actually be effective. Many believe that anti-virulence drugs would not be powerful enough to clear existing infections, restricting their potential application to prophylaxis. We have developed a mathematical model that provides a theoretical framework to reveal the circumstances under which anti-virulence drugs may or may not be successful. We demonstrate that by harnessing and combining the advantages of antibiotics with those provided by anti-virulence drugs, given infection-specific parameters, it is possible to identify treatment strategies that would efficiently clear bacterial infections, while preventing the emergence of antibiotic-resistant subpopulations. Our findings strongly support the continuation of research into anti-virulence drugs and demonstrate that their applicability may reach beyond infection prevention. PMID:25701634

  17. Bacterial resistance to antibiotics continues to pose a serious threat to human and animal

    E-print Network

    Singer, Randall

    Bacterial resistance to antibiotics continues to pose a serious threat to human and animal health. The relationship between antibiotic use and the development of resistance has been studied extensively, with some of this research aimed at identifying antibiotic treatment strategies that minimize the maintenance of resistance

  18. 21 CFR 866.3950 - In vitro human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) drug resistance genotype assay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...In vitro human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) drug resistance genotype assay. 866...In vitro human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) drug resistance genotype assay. (a) Identification . The in vitro HIV drug resistance genotype assay...

  19. 21 CFR 866.3950 - In vitro human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) drug resistance genotype assay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...In vitro human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) drug resistance genotype assay. 866...In vitro human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) drug resistance genotype assay. (a) Identification . The in vitro HIV drug resistance genotype assay...

  20. 21 CFR 866.3950 - In vitro human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) drug resistance genotype assay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...In vitro human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) drug resistance genotype assay. 866...In vitro human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) drug resistance genotype assay. (a) Identification . The in vitro HIV drug resistance genotype assay...

  1. 21 CFR 866.3950 - In vitro human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) drug resistance genotype assay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...In vitro human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) drug resistance genotype assay. 866...In vitro human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) drug resistance genotype assay. (a) Identification. The in vitro HIV drug resistance genotype assay...

  2. 21 CFR 866.3950 - In vitro human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) drug resistance genotype assay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...In vitro human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) drug resistance genotype assay. 866...In vitro human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) drug resistance genotype assay. (a) Identification . The in vitro HIV drug resistance genotype assay...

  3. Monopoly pricing of an antibiotic subject to bacterial resistance.

    PubMed

    Herrmann, Markus

    2010-01-01

    We develop a dynamic bio-economic model of bacterial resistance and disease transmission in which we characterize the pricing policy of a monopolist who is protected by a patent. After expiration, the monopolist behaves competitively in a generic industry having open access to the common pool of antibiotic efficacy and infection. The monopolist manages endogenously the levels of antibiotic efficacy as well as the infected population, which represent quality and market size respectively and achieves, at least temporarily, higher such levels than a hypothetically myopic monopolist who does not take into account the dynamic externalities. The pricing policy and the biological system is characterized by the turnpike property. Before the patent vanishes, the monopolist behaves more and more myopically, leading to a continuous decrease in the price of the antibiotic. Once the generic industry takes over, a discontinuous fall in price occurs. Whether a prolongation of the patent is socially desirable depends on the relative levels of antibiotic efficacy and infection. PMID:20015559

  4. Genotypic Testing for Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Drug Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Shafer, Robert W.

    2002-01-01

    There are 16 approved human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) drugs belonging to three mechanistic classes: protease inhibitors, nucleoside and nucleotide reverse transcriptase (RT) inhibitors, and nonnucleoside RT inhibitors. HIV-1 resistance to these drugs is caused by mutations in the protease and RT enzymes, the molecular targets of these drugs. Drug resistance mutations arise most often in treated individuals, resulting from selective drug pressure in the presence of incompletely suppressed virus replication. HIV-1 isolates with drug resistance mutations, however, may also be transmitted to newly infected individuals. Three expert panels have recommended that HIV-1 protease and RT susceptibility testing should be used to help select HIV drug therapy. Although genotypic testing is more complex than typical antimicrobial susceptibility tests, there is a rich literature supporting the prognostic value of HIV-1 protease and RT mutations. This review describes the genetic mechanisms of HIV-1 drug resistance and summarizes published data linking individual RT and protease mutations to in vitro and in vivo resistance to the currently available HIV drugs. PMID:11932232

  5. Inhibitory effect of Allium sativum and Zingiber officinale extracts on clinically important drug resistant pathogenic bacteria

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Herbs and spices are very important and useful as therapeutic agent against many pathological infections. Increasing multidrug resistance of pathogens forces to find alternative compounds for treatment of infectious diseases. Methods In the present study the antimicrobial potency of garlic and ginger has been investigated against eight local clinical bacterial isolates. Three types of extracts of each garlic and ginger including aqueous extract, methanol extract and ethanol extract had been assayed separately against drug resistant Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Bacillus subtilis, Staphylococcus aureus, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Shigella sonnei, Staphylococcusepidermidis and Salmonella typhi. The antibacterial activity was determined by disc diffusion method. Results All tested bacterial strains were most susceptible to the garlic aqueous extract and showed poor susceptibility to the ginger aqueous extract. The (minimum inhibitory concentration) MIC of different bacterial species varied from 0.05?mg/ml to 1.0?mg/ml. Conclusion In the light of several socioeconomic factors of Pakistan mainly poverty and poor hygienic condition, present study encourages the use of spices as alternative or supplementary medicine to reduce the burden of high cost, side effects and progressively increasing drug resistance of pathogens. PMID:22540232

  6. EPISOME-MEDIATED TRANSFER OF DRUG RESISTANCE IN ENTEROBACTERIACEAE VIII.

    PubMed Central

    Watanabe, Tsutomu; Ogata, Chizuko; Sato, Sachiko

    1964-01-01

    Watanabe, Tsutomu (Keio University School of Medicine, Tokyo, Japan), Chizuko Ogata, and Sachiko Sato. Episome-mediated transfer of drug resistance in Enterobacteriaceae. VIII. Six-drug-resistance R factor. J. Bacteriol. 88:922–928. 1964.—The multiple-drug-resistant Escherichia coli strain isolated by Lebek in 1963 was found to transfer resistance to sulfonamide, streptomycin, chloramphenicol, tetracycline, kanamycin, and neomycin together by conjugation, as well as by transduction with phage P1kc, suggesting that these drug-resistance markers are carried by a single R factor (R6). The results of transductional and spontaneous segregations of the drug-resistance markers of R6 have shown that R6 has independent genetic determinants for sulfonamide, streptomycin, chloramphenicol, tetracycline, and kanamycin-neomycin resistance. Resistance to kanamycin and neomycin is probably controlled by a single gene, because no segregation was observed between these two. The resistance transfer factor of R6 was found to be of the fi+ type. PMID:14219055

  7. PfCRT and its role in antimalarial drug resistance

    PubMed Central

    Ecker, Andrea; Lehane, Adele M.; Clain, Jérôme; Fidock, David A.

    2012-01-01

    Plasmodium falciparum resistance to chloroquine, the former gold standard antimalarial drug, is mediated primarily by mutant forms of the ‘Chloroquine Resistance Transporter’ (PfCRT). These mutations impart upon PfCRT the ability to efflux chloroquine from the intracellular digestive vacuole, the site of drug action. Recent studies reveal that PfCRT variants can also affect parasite fitness, protect immature gametocytes against chloroquine action, and alter P. falciparum susceptibility to current first-line therapies. These results highlight the need to be vigilant in screening for the appearance of novel pfcrt alleles that could contribute to new multi-drug resistance phenotypes. PMID:23020971

  8. Prediction of Cancer Drug Resistance and Implications for Personalized Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Volm, Manfred; Efferth, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Drug resistance still impedes successful cancer chemotherapy. A major goal of early concepts in individualized therapy was to develop in vitro tests to predict tumors’ drug responsiveness. We have developed an in vitro short-term test based on nucleic acid precursor incorporation to determine clinical drug resistance. This test detects inherent and acquired resistance in vitro and transplantable syngeneic and xenografted tumors in vivo. In several clinical trials, clinical resistance was predictable with more than 90% accuracy, while drug sensitivity was detected with less accuracy (~60%). Remarkably, clinical cross-resistance to numerous drugs (multidrug resistance, broad spectrum resistance) was detectable by a single compound, doxorubicin, due to its multifactorial modes of action. The results of this predictive test were in good agreement with predictive assays of other authors. As no predictive test has been established as yet for clinical diagnostics, the identification of sensitive drugs may not reach sufficiently high reliability for clinical routine. A meta-analysis of the literature published during the past four decades considering test results of more than 15,000 tumor patients unambiguously demonstrated that, in the majority of studies, resistance was correctly predicted with an accuracy between 80 and 100%, while drug sensitivity could only be predicted with an accuracy of 50–80%. This synopsis of the published literature impressively illustrates that prediction of drug resistance could be validated. The determination of drug resistance was reliable independent of tumor type, test assay, and drug used in these in vitro tests. By contrast, chemosensitivity could not be predicted with high reliability. Therefore, we propose a rethinking of the “chemosensitivity” concept. Instead, predictive in vitro tests may reliably identify drug-resistant tumors. The clinical consequence imply to subject resistant tumors not to chemotherapy, but to other new treatment options, such as antibody therapy, adoptive immune therapy, hyperthermia, gene therapy, etc. The high accuracy to predict resistant tumors may be exploited to develop new strategies for individualized cancer therapy. This new concept bears the potential of a revival of predictive tests for personalized medicine.

  9. Diverse and abundant multi-drug resistant E. coli in Matang mangrove estuaries, Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Ghaderpour, Aziz; Ho, Wing Sze; Chew, Li-Lee; Bong, Chui Wei; Chong, Ving Ching; Thong, Kwai-Lin; Chai, Lay Ching

    2015-01-01

    E.coli, an important vector distributing antimicrobial resistance in the environment, was found to be multi-drug resistant, abundant, and genetically diverse in the Matang mangrove estuaries, Malaysia. One-third (34%) of the estuarine E. coli was multi-drug resistant. The highest antibiotic resistance prevalence was observed for aminoglycosides (83%) and beta-lactams (37%). Phylogenetic groups A and B1, being the most predominant E. coli, demonstrated the highest antibiotic resistant level and prevalence of integrons (integron I, 21%; integron II, 3%). Detection of phylogenetic group B23 downstream of fishing villages indicates human fecal contamination as a source of E. coli pollution. Enteroaggregative E. coli (1%) were also detected immediately downstream of the fishing village. The results indicated multi-drug resistance among E. coli circulating in Matang estuaries, which could be reflective of anthropogenic activities and aggravated by bacterial and antibiotic discharges from village lack of a sewerage system, aquaculture farms and upstream animal husbandry. PMID:26483759

  10. Diverse and abundant multi-drug resistant E. coli in Matang mangrove estuaries, Malaysia

    PubMed Central

    Ghaderpour, Aziz; Ho, Wing Sze; Chew, Li-Lee; Bong, Chui Wei; Chong, Ving Ching; Thong, Kwai-Lin; Chai, Lay Ching

    2015-01-01

    E.coli, an important vector distributing antimicrobial resistance in the environment, was found to be multi-drug resistant, abundant, and genetically diverse in the Matang mangrove estuaries, Malaysia. One-third (34%) of the estuarine E. coli was multi-drug resistant. The highest antibiotic resistance prevalence was observed for aminoglycosides (83%) and beta-lactams (37%). Phylogenetic groups A and B1, being the most predominant E. coli, demonstrated the highest antibiotic resistant level and prevalence of integrons (integron I, 21%; integron II, 3%). Detection of phylogenetic group B23 downstream of fishing villages indicates human fecal contamination as a source of E. coli pollution. Enteroaggregative E. coli (1%) were also detected immediately downstream of the fishing village. The results indicated multi-drug resistance among E. coli circulating in Matang estuaries, which could be reflective of anthropogenic activities and aggravated by bacterial and antibiotic discharges from village lack of a sewerage system, aquaculture farms and upstream animal husbandry. PMID:26483759

  11. Antimicrobial (Drug) Resistance: Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA)

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Marketing Share this: Main Content Area Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) During the past four decades, methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus , or MRSA, has evolved from a controllable ...

  12. Drug Resistance Updates 15 (2012) 9097 Contents lists available at SciVerse ScienceDirect

    E-print Network

    Levy, Doron

    2012-01-01

    Drug Resistance Updates 15 (2012) 90­97 Contents lists available at SciVerse ScienceDirect Drug Resistance Updates journal homepage: www.elsevier.com/locate/drup The dynamics of drug resistance Park, MD, USA a r t i c l e i n f o Keywords: Drug-dependent/independent resistance Drug scheduling

  13. TRANSFORMATION OF ANTHURIUM WITH TRANSGENES FOR BACTERIAL BLIGHT AND NEMATODE RESISTANCE

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Anthurium transformation was undertaken to engineer plants for resistance to bacterial blight caused by Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. dieffenbachiae and to the nematodes Radopholus simile and Meloidogyne javanica. Agrobacterium tumefaciens transformation of embryogenic calli of ‘Marian Seefurth’ was sh...

  14. Discovery of Novel Materials with Broad Resistance to Bacterial Attachment Using Combinatorial Polymer Microarrays

    E-print Network

    Hook, Andrew L.

    A new class of bacteria-attachment-resistant materials is discovered using a multi-generation polymer microarray methodology that reduces bacterial attachment by up to 99.3% compared with a leading commercially available ...

  15. CHARACTERIZATION OF ARSENIC RESISTANT BACTERIAL COMMUNITIES IN THE RHIZOSPHERE OF AN ARSENIC HYPERACCUMULATOR Pteris vittata L.

    E-print Network

    Ma, Lena

    CHARACTERIZATION OF ARSENIC RESISTANT BACTERIAL COMMUNITIES IN THE RHIZOSPHERE OF AN ARSENIC..................................................................................................................11 1.1 Environmental Sources of Arsenic..................................................................................11 1.1.1 Arsenic in the Environment

  16. An antibiotic protocol to minimize emergence of drug-resistant tuberculosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Espíndola, Aquino L.; Girardi, Daniel; Penna, T. J. P.; Bauch, Chris T.; Troca Cabella, Brenno C.; Martinez, Alexandre Souto

    2014-04-01

    A within-host model of the spread of tuberculosis is proposed here where the emergence of drug resistance and bacterial dormancy are simultaneously combined. We consider both sensitive and resistant strains of tuberculosis pathogens as well as a dormant state of these bacteria. The dynamics of the within-host system is modeled by a set of coupled differential equations which are numerically solved to find a relation between the within-host bacterial populations and the host health states. The values of the parameters were taken from the current literature when available; a sensitivity analysis was performed for the others. Antibiotic treatment for standard, intermittent and oscillating intermittent protocols is analyzed for different conditions. Our results suggest that the oscillating protocol is the most effective one, that would imply a lower treatment cost.

  17. Registration of Common Bacterial Blight Resistant White Kidney Bean Germplasm Line USWK-CBB-17

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    White kidney bean germplasm line USWK-CBB-17 was developed by USDA-ARS in cooperation with the Idaho Agricultural Experiment Station and released in 2006. This line was bred with a high level of resistance to common bacterial blight caused by Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. phaseoli (Xap). Common bacteri...

  18. Analysis and Simulation of a Meso-scale Model of Diffusive Resistance of Bacterial Biofilms to

    E-print Network

    Demaret, Laurent

    Analysis and Simulation of a Meso-scale Model of Diffusive Resistance of Bacterial Biofilms Most bacteria live in biofilm communities, which offer protection against harmful external impacts. This makes treatment of biofilm borne bacterial infections with antibiotics difficult. We discuss a dy- namic

  19. Dominant gene for common bean resistance to common bacterial blight caused by Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. phaseoli

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The common bacterial blight pathogen [Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. phaseoli (Xap)] is a limiting factor for common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) production worldwide and resistance to the pathogen in most commercial cultivars is inadequate. Variability in virulence of the bacterial pathogen has been ob...

  20. Origin of Robustness in Generating Drug-Resistant Malaria Parasites

    PubMed Central

    Kümpornsin, Krittikorn; Modchang, Charin; Heinberg, Adina; Ekland, Eric H.; Jirawatcharadech, Piyaporn; Chobson, Pornpimol; Suwanakitti, Nattida; Chaotheing, Sastra; Wilairat, Prapon; Deitsch, Kirk W.; Kamchonwongpaisan, Sumalee; Fidock, David A.; Kirkman, Laura A.; Yuthavong, Yongyuth; Chookajorn, Thanat

    2014-01-01

    Biological robustness allows mutations to accumulate while maintaining functional phenotypes. Despite its crucial role in evolutionary processes, the mechanistic details of how robustness originates remain elusive. Using an evolutionary trajectory analysis approach, we demonstrate how robustness evolved in malaria parasites under selective pressure from an antimalarial drug inhibiting the folate synthesis pathway. A series of four nonsynonymous amino acid substitutions at the targeted enzyme, dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR), render the parasites highly resistant to the antifolate drug pyrimethamine. Nevertheless, the stepwise gain of these four dhfr mutations results in tradeoffs between pyrimethamine resistance and parasite fitness. Here, we report the epistatic interaction between dhfr mutations and amplification of the gene encoding the first upstream enzyme in the folate pathway, GTP cyclohydrolase I (GCH1). gch1 amplification confers low level pyrimethamine resistance and would thus be selected for by pyrimethamine treatment. Interestingly, the gch1 amplification can then be co-opted by the parasites because it reduces the cost of acquiring drug-resistant dhfr mutations downstream in the same metabolic pathway. The compensation of compromised fitness by extra GCH1 is an example of how robustness can evolve in a system and thus expand the accessibility of evolutionary trajectories leading toward highly resistant alleles. The evolution of robustness during the gain of drug-resistant mutations has broad implications for both the development of new drugs and molecular surveillance for resistance to existing drugs. PMID:24739308

  1. Clusterin regulates drug-resistance in melanoma cells.

    PubMed

    Hoeller, Christoph; Pratscher, Barbara; Thallinger, Christiane; Winter, Dorian; Fink, Dieter; Kovacic, Boris; Sexl, Veronika; Wacheck, Volker; Gleave, Martin E; Pehamberger, Hubert; Jansen, Burkhard

    2005-06-01

    Clusterin has recently been shown to act as an antiapoptotic protein that confers drug-resistance in models of epithelial tumors. The aim of our work was to provide an insight into a possible role of clusterin in the regulation of drug-resistance in melanoma. In tissue samples, clusterin expression was low in nevi, but high in primary melanoma and melanoma metastases. Clusterin was also strongly expressed in melanoma cell lines, but was barely detectable in cultured melanocytes. To elucidate a possible role of clusterin in drug-resistance of melanoma, clusterin expression was regulated by either plasmid-driven overexpression or by antisense-mediated downregulation. Clusterin overexpression was associated with an increase in drug-resistance, i.e., with an increased survival of melanoma cells in the presence of cytotoxic drugs. In contrast, downregulation of clusterin by 2'-O-(2-methoxy)ethyl (2'MOE)-modified antisense oligonucleotides (AS-ODN) directed against clusterin mRNA significantly reduced drug-resistance, i.e., decreased survival of melanoma cells in the presence of cytotoxic drugs. To evaluate the effects of clusterin-antisense treatment in vivo, we applied an SCID-mouse/human-melanoma xenotransplantation model. Pre-treatment of mice with the 2'MOE-modified clusterin AS-ODN was associated with a significantly improved tumor response to dacarbazine as compared with animals pretreated with a scrambled control oligonucleotide. Taken together, we show that clusterin is strongly expressed in melanoma. Downregulation of clusterin reduces drug-resistance, i.e., reduces melanoma cell survival in response to cytotoxic drugs in vitro and in vivo. Thus, reducing clusterin expression may provide a novel tool to overcome drug-resistance in melanoma. PMID:15955107

  2. Antimicrobial resistance determinant microarray for analysis of multi-drug resistant isolates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taitt, Chris Rowe; Leski, Tomasz; Stenger, David; Vora, Gary J.; House, Brent; Nicklasson, Matilda; Pimentel, Guillermo; Zurawski, Daniel V.; Kirkup, Benjamin C.; Craft, David; Waterman, Paige E.; Lesho, Emil P.; Bangurae, Umaru; Ansumana, Rashid

    2012-06-01

    The prevalence of multidrug-resistant infections in personnel wounded in Iraq and Afghanistan has made it challenging for physicians to choose effective therapeutics in a timely fashion. To address the challenge of identifying the potential for drug resistance, we have developed the Antimicrobial Resistance Determinant Microarray (ARDM) to provide DNAbased analysis for over 250 resistance genes covering 12 classes of antibiotics. Over 70 drug-resistant bacteria from different geographic regions have been analyzed on ARDM, with significant differences in patterns of resistance identified: genes for resistance to sulfonamides, trimethoprim, chloramphenicol, rifampin, and macrolide-lincosamidesulfonamide drugs were more frequently identified in isolates from sources in Iraq/Afghanistan. Of particular concern was the presence of genes responsible for resistance to many of the last-resort antibiotics used to treat war traumaassociated infections.

  3. The culturable intestinal microbiota of triploid and diploid juvenile Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) - a comparison of composition and drug resistance

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background With the increased use of ploidy manipulation in aquaculture and fisheries management this investigation aimed to determine whether triploidy influences culturable intestinal microbiota composition and bacterial drug resistance in Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar). The results could provide answers to some of the physiological differences observed between triploid and diploid fish, especially in terms of fish health. Results No ploidy effect was observed in the bacterial species isolated, however, triploids were found to contain a significant increase in total gut microbiota levels, with increases in Pseudomonas spp., Pectobacterium carotovorum, Psychrobacter spp., Bacillus spp., and Vibrio spp., (12, 42, 9, 10, and 11% more bacteria in triploids than diploids, respectively), whereas a decrease in Carnobacterium spp., within triploids compared to diploids was close to significant (8% more bacteria in diploids). With the exception of gentamicin, where no bacterial resistance was observed, bacterial isolates originating from triploid hosts displayed increased resistance to antibacterials, three of which were significant (tetracycline, trimethoprim, and sulphonamide). Conclusion Results indicate that triploidy influences both the community and drug resistance of culturable intestinal microbiota in juvenile salmon. These results demonstrate differences that are likely to contribute to the health of triploid fish and have important ramifications on the use of antibacterial drugs within aquaculture. PMID:22094054

  4. The potential application of photodynamic therapy in drug-resistant tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Chang, Ji-Eun; Oak, Chul-Ho; Sung, Nackmoon; Jheon, Sanghoon

    2015-09-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) is an infectious bacterial disease that has historically created a high global health burden. Unfortunately, the emergence of drug-resistant TB (DR-TB), which includes multidrug-resistant TB (MDR-TB) and extensively drug-resistant TB (XDR-TB), has greatly affected the treatment of TB. Anti-TB chemotherapy drugs are classified into five groups to facilitate application of effective guidelines for the treatment regimen. However, chemotherapy has a limited ability to treat DR-TB, and therefore a novel alternative treatment for DR-TB is required. In this review, we focused on photodynamic therapy (PDT) as potential treatment for DR-TB. PDT is a widely used cancer treatment that combines photosensitizers and harmless laser light to produce reactive oxygen species that selectively damage the target cells. Initially, PDT was originally developed to target pathogenic microorganisms but fell into disuse because of adverse reactions. Recently, photodynamic antimicrobial chemotherapy is attracting attention again as an alternative treatment for bacterial infections. In our previous study, we suggested that PDT could be a novel option to treat MDR- and XDR-TB in vitro. Despite the limited previous studies regarding PDT in TB models, fast-developing bronchoscopic technologies and clinician experience will soon facilitate the clinical application of safe and minimally invasive PDT for TB. PMID:25907636

  5. A research-inspired laboratory sequence investigating acquired drug resistance

    E-print Network

    Taylor, Elizabeth Vogel

    Here, we present a six-session laboratory exercise designed to introduce students to standard biochemical techniques in the context of investigating a high impact research topic, acquired resistance to the cancer drug ...

  6. Drug resistance analysis by next generation sequencing in Leishmania

    PubMed Central

    Leprohon, Philippe; Fernandez-Prada, Christopher; Gazanion, Élodie; Monte-Neto, Rubens; Ouellette, Marc

    2014-01-01

    The use of next generation sequencing has the power to expedite the identification of drug resistance determinants and biomarkers and was applied successfully to drug resistance studies in Leishmania. This allowed the identification of modulation in gene expression, gene dosage alterations, changes in chromosome copy numbers and single nucleotide polymorphisms that correlated with resistance in Leishmania strains derived from the laboratory and from the field. An impressive heterogeneity at the population level was also observed, individual clones within populations often differing in both genotypes and phenotypes, hence complicating the elucidation of resistance mechanisms. This review summarizes the most recent highlights that whole genome sequencing brought to our understanding of Leishmania drug resistance and likely new directions. PMID:25941624

  7. Combined antiretroviral and anti-tuberculosis drug resistance following incarceration.

    PubMed

    Stott, K E; de Oliviera, T; Lessells, R J

    2013-09-01

    We describe a case of HIV/tuberculosis (TB) co-infection from KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa, characterised by drug resistance in both pathogens. The development of drug resistance was linked temporally to two periods of incarceration. This highlights the urgent need for improved integration of HIV/TB control strategies within prison health systems and within the broader public health framework. PMID:24273475

  8. Serotype Distribution and Drug Resistance in Streptococcus pneumoniae, Palestinian Territories

    PubMed Central

    Kattan, Randa; Abu Rayyan, Amal; Zheiman, Inas; Idkeidek, Suzan; Baraghithi, Sabri; Rishmawi, Nabeel; Turkuman, Sultan; Abu-Diab, Afaf; Ghneim, Riyad; Zoughbi, Madeleine; Dauodi, Rula; Ghneim, Raed; Issa, Abed-El-Razeq; Siryani, Issa; Al Qas, Randa; Liddawi, Rawan; Khamash, Hatem; Kanaan, Moein; Marzouqa, Hiyam

    2011-01-01

    To determine antimicrobial drug resistance of Streptococcus pneumoniae serotypes, we analyzed isolates from blood cultures of sick children residing in the West Bank before initiation of pneumococcal vaccination. Of 120 serotypes isolated, 50.8%, 73.3%, and 80.8% of the bacteremia cases could have been prevented by pneumococcal conjugate vaccines. Serotype 14 was the most drug-resistant serotype isolated. PMID:21192863

  9. Comprehensive screening of genes resistant to an anticancer drug in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Tsutsui, Mai; Kawakubo, Hirofumi; Hayashida, Testsu; Fukuda, Kazumasa; Nakamura, Rieko; Takahashi, Tsunehiro; Wada, Norihito; Saikawa, Yoshiro; Omori, Tai; Takeuchi, Hiroya; Kitagawa, Yuko

    2015-09-01

    Drug resistance to chemotherapy is a major issue in esophageal cancer management. Drug resistance may be mediated by genetic changes in the tumor; therefore, the identification of gene mutations may lead to better therapeutic outcomes. We used a novel method involving transposons to screen and identify drug-resistant genes. Transposons are DNA sequences that move from one location on the gene to another. A modified piggyBac transposon was designed as an insertion mutagen, and a cytomegalovirus (CMV) promoter sequence was added to induce strong transcription. When the transposon is inserted to the upstream of a certain gene, the gene will be overexpressed while when intserted down or intragenically, it will be downregulated. After establishing a transposon-tagged cell library, we treated cell lines derived from esophageal squamous cell carcinomas (ESCC) [Tohoku esophagus (TE)] with cisplatin (CDDP). We performed splinkerette PCR and TOPO cloning on the resistant colonies. Bacterial colonies were sequenced, and next-generation sequencing was used to identify the overexpressed/downregulated sequences as candidate genes for CDDP resistance. We established 4 cell lines of transposon-tagged cells, TE4, 5, 9 and 15. We treated the two relatively viable cell lines, TE4 and TE15, with CDDP. We identified 37 candidate genes from 8 resistant colonies. Eight genes were overexpressed whilst 29 were downregulated. Among these genes was Janus kinase 2 (JAK2) that is implicated in the progression of myeloproliferative neoplasms. We identified 37 candidate genes responsible for CDDP resistance in the two cell lines derived from ESCC cells. The method is inexpensive, relatively simple, and capable of introducing activating and de-activating mutations in the genome, allowing for drug-resistant genes to be identified. PMID:26202837

  10. Comprehensive screening of genes resistant to an anticancer drug in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    TSUTSUI, MAI; KAWAKUBO, HIROFUMI; HAYASHIDA, TESTSU; FUKUDA, KAZUMASA; NAKAMURA, RIEKO; TAKAHASHI, TSUNEHIRO; WADA, NORIHITO; SAIKAWA, YOSHIRO; OMORI, TAI; TAKEUCHI, HIROYA; KITAGAWA, YUKO

    2015-01-01

    Drug resistance to chemotherapy is a major issue in esophageal cancer management. Drug resistance may be mediated by genetic changes in the tumor; therefore, the identification of gene mutations may lead to better therapeutic outcomes. We used a novel method involving transposons to screen and identify drug-resistant genes. Transposons are DNA sequences that move from one location on the gene to another. A modified piggyBac transposon was designed as an insertion mutagen, and a cytomegalovirus (CMV) promoter sequence was added to induce strong transcription. When the transposon is inserted to the upstream of a certain gene, the gene will be overexpressed while when intserted down or intragenically, it will be downregulated. After establishing a transposon-tagged cell library, we treated cell lines derived from esophageal squamous cell carcinomas (ESCC) [Tohoku esophagus (TE)] with cisplatin (CDDP). We performed splinkerette PCR and TOPO cloning on the resistant colonies. Bacterial colonies were sequenced, and next-generation sequencing was used to identify the overexpressed/downregulated sequences as candidate genes for CDDP resistance. We established 4 cell lines of transposon-tagged cells, TE4, 5, 9 and 15. We treated the two relatively viable cell lines, TE4 and TE15, with CDDP. We identified 37 candidate genes from 8 resistant colonies. Eight genes were overexpressed whilst 29 were downregulated. Among these genes was Janus kinase 2 (JAK2) that is implicated in the progression of myeloproliferative neoplasms. We identified 37 candidate genes responsible for CDDP resistance in the two cell lines derived from ESCC cells. The method is inexpensive, relatively simple, and capable of introducing activating and de-activating mutations in the genome, allowing for drug-resistant genes to be identified. PMID:26202837

  11. Anti-mycobacterial activity of garlic (Allium sativum) against multi-drug resistant and non-multi-drug resistant mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Hannan, Abdul; Ikram Ullah, Muhammad; Usman, Muhammad; Hussain, Shahid; Absar, Muhammad; Javed, Khursheed

    2011-01-01

    Emergence of multi-drug resistant (MDR) and extensively drug resistant (XDR) TB throughout the developing world is very disturbing in the present scenario of TB management. There is a fundamental need to explore alternative anti-TB agents. Hence natural plants should be investigated to understand their antimicrobial properties and safety. Garlic (Allium sativum) is one of natural plant which possesses variety of biological properties like anti-tumor, anti-hyperlipedemic and anti-microbial etc. The present study was evaluated for anti-bacterial activity of garlic against non-MDR and MDR isolates of M. tuberculosis. A total of 20 clinical isolates of MTB including 15 MDR and 5 non-MDR were investigated. Ethanolic extract of garlic was prepared by maceration method. Minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) was performed by using 7H9 middle brook broth dilution technique. MIC of garlic extract was ranged from 1 to 3 mg/ml; showing inhibitory effects of garlic against both non-MDR and MDR M. tuberculosis isolates. Alternate medicine practices with plant extracts including garlic should be considered to decrease the burden of drug resistance and cost in the management of diseases. The use of garlic against MDR-TB may be of great importance regarding public health. PMID:21190924

  12. Phenotypic drug profiling in droplet microfluidics for better targeting of drug-resistant tumors

    PubMed Central

    Sarkar, S.; Cohen, N.; Sabhachandani, P.; Konry, T.

    2015-01-01

    Acquired drug resistance is a key factor in the failure of chemotherapy. Due to intratumoral heterogeneity, cancer cells depict variations in intracellular drug uptake and efflux at the single cell level, which may not be detectable in bulk assays. In this study we present a droplet microfluidics-based approach to assess the dynamics of drug uptake, efflux and cytotoxicity in drug-sensitive and drug-resistant breast cancer cells. An integrated droplet generation and docking microarray was utilized to encapsulate single cells as well as homotypic cell aggregates. Drug-sensitive cells showed greater death in the presence or absence of Doxorubicin (Dox) compared to the drug-resistant cells. We observed heterogeneous Dox uptake in individual drug-sensitive cells while the drug-resistant cells showed uniformly low uptake and retention. Dox-resistant cells were classified into distinct subsets based on their efflux properties. Cells that showed longer retention of extracellular reagents also demonstrated maximal death. We further observed homotypic fusion of both cell types in droplets, which resulted in increased cell survival in the presence of high doses of Dox. Our results establish the applicability of this microfluidic platform for quantitative drug screening in single cells and multicellular interactions. PMID:26456240

  13. The multiple facets of drug resistance: one history, different approaches

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Some cancers like melanoma and pancreatic and ovarian cancers, for example, commonly display resistance to chemotherapy, and this is the major obstacle to a better prognosis of patients. Frequently, literature presents studies in monolayer cell cultures, 3D cell cultures or in vivo studies, but rarely the same work compares results of drug resistance in different models. Several of these works are presented in this review and show that usually cells in 3D culture are more resistant to drugs than monolayer cultured cells due to different mechanisms. Searching for new strategies to sensitize different tumors to chemotherapy, many methods have been studied to understand the mechanisms whereby cancer cells acquire drug resistance. These methods have been strongly advanced along the years and therapies using different drugs have been increasingly proposed to induce cell death in resistant cells of different cancers. Recently, cancer stem cells (CSCs) have been extensively studied because they would be the only cells capable of sustaining tumorigenesis. It is believed that the resistance of CSCs to currently used chemotherapeutics is a major contributing factor in cancer recurrence and later metastasis development. This review aims to appraise the experimental progress in the study of acquired drug resistance of cancer cells in different models as well as to understand the role of CSCs as the major contributing factor in cancer recurrence and metastasis development, describing how CSCs can be identified and isolated. PMID:24775603

  14. Factors limiting the transmission of HIV mutations conferring drug resistance

    E-print Network

    Blower, Sally

    Factors limiting the transmission of HIV mutations conferring drug resistance: fitness costs, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, Georgia. Transmission of HIV strains with drug transmission event a genetic bottleneck occurs and most HIV infections are initiated by a single variant6

  15. Emergence of HIV-1 Drug Resistance During Antiretroviral Treatment

    E-print Network

    2007-04-20

    Mugavero and Hicks, 2004; St Clair et al., 1991). ...... where Cc(t) is the intracellular concentration of the drug used, IC50 is a phenotype marker ..... is the large diversity of HIV genotypes (Vergu et al., 2002), particularly all the drug- resistant ...

  16. A Research-Inspired Laboratory Sequence Investigating Acquired Drug Resistance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, Elizabeth Vogel; Fortune, Jennifer A.; Drennan, Catherine L.

    2010-01-01

    Here, we present a six-session laboratory exercise designed to introduce students to standard biochemical techniques in the context of investigating a high impact research topic, acquired resistance to the cancer drug Gleevec. Students express a Gleevec-resistant mutant of the Abelson tyrosine kinase domain, the active domain of an oncogenic…

  17. The interplay between drug resistance and fitness in malaria parasites

    PubMed Central

    Rosenthal, Philip J.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Controlling the spread of antimalarial drug resistance, especially resistance of Plasmodium falciparum to artemisinin-based combination therapies, is a high priority. Available data indicate that, as with other microorganisms, the spread of drug-resistant malaria parasites is limited by fitness costs that frequently accompany resistance. Resistance-mediating polymorphisms in malaria parasites have been identified in putative drug transporters and in target enzymes. The impacts of these polymorphisms on parasite fitness have been characterized in vitro and in animal models. Additional insights have come from analyses of samples from clinical studies, both evaluating parasites under different selective pressures and determining the clinical consequences of infection with different parasites. With some exceptions, resistance-mediating polymorphisms lead to malaria parasites that, compared to wild type, grow less well in culture and in animals, and are replaced by wild type when drug pressure diminishes in the clinical setting. In some cases, the fitness costs of resistance may be offset by compensatory mutations that increase virulence or changes that enhance malaria transmission. However, not enough is known about effects of resistance mediators on parasite fitness. A better appreciation of the costs of fitness-mediating mutations will facilitate the development of optimal guidelines for the treatment and prevention of malaria. PMID:23899091

  18. An efficient system for intracellular delivery of beta-lactam antibiotics to overcome bacterial resistance

    PubMed Central

    Abed, Nadia; Saïd-Hassane, Fatouma; Zouhiri, Fatima; Mougin, Julie; Nicolas, Valérie; Desmaële, Didier; Gref, Ruxandra; Couvreur, Patrick

    2015-01-01

    The “Golden era” of antibiotics is definitely an old story and this is especially true for intracellular bacterial infections. The poor intracellular bioavailability of antibiotics reduces the efficency of many treatments and thereby promotes resistances. Therefore, the development of nanodevices coupled with antibiotics that are capable of targeting and releasing the drug into the infected-cells appears to be a promising solution to circumvent these complications. Here, we took advantage of two natural terpenes (farnesyl and geranyl) to design nanodevices for an efficient intracellular delivery of penicillin G. The covalent linkage between the terpene moieties and the antibiotic leads to formation of prodrugs that self-assemble to form nanoparticles with a high drug payload between 55–63%. Futhermore, the addition of an environmentally-sensitive bond between the antibiotic and the terpene led to an efficient antibacterial activity against the intracellular pathogen Staphylococcus aureus with reduced intracellular replication of about 99.9% compared to untreated infected cells. Using HPLC analysis, we demonstrated and quantified the intracellular release of PenG when this sensitive-bond (SB) was present on the prodrug, showing the success of this technology to deliver antibiotics directly into cells. PMID:26311631

  19. A Reservoir of Drug-Resistant Pathogenic Bacteria in Asymptomatic Hosts

    PubMed Central

    Perron, Gabriel G.; Quessy, Sylvain; Bell, Graham

    2008-01-01

    The population genetics of pathogenic bacteria has been intensively studied in order to understand the spread of disease and the evolution of virulence and drug resistance. However, much less attention has been paid to bacterial carriage populations, which inhabit hosts without producing disease. Since new virulent strains that cause disease can be recruited from the carriage population of bacteria, our understanding of infectious disease is seriously incomplete without knowledge on the population structure of pathogenic bacteria living in an asymptomatic host. We report the first extensive survey of the abundance and diversity of a human pathogen in asymptomatic animal hosts. We have found that asymptomatic swine from livestock productions frequently carry populations of Salmonella enterica with a broad range of drug-resistant strains and genetic diversity greatly exceeding that previously described. This study shows how agricultural practice and human intervention may lead and influence the evolution of a hidden reservoir of pathogens, with important implications for human health. PMID:19015729

  20. Response to selection for bacterial cold water disease resistance in rainbow trout

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Previous studies indicate that resistance to experimental bacterial cold water disease (BCWD) challenge is heritable and thus may be improved through selective breeding. Our objective was to estimate response after one generation of genetic selection for resistance to BCWD in a pedigreed population ...

  1. Effect of Vibration on Bacterial Growth and Antibiotic Resistance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Juergensmeyer, Elizabeth A.; Juergensmeyer, Margaret A.

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this research grant was to provide a fundamental, systematic investigation of the effects of oscillatory acceleration on bacterial proliferation and their responses to antibiotics in a liquid medium.

  2. Indoleamides are active against drug-resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Lun, Shichun; Guo, Haidan; Onajole, Oluseye K.; Pieroni, Marco; Gunosewoyo, Hendra; Chen, Gang; Tipparaju, Suresh K.; Ammerman, Nicole C.; Kozikowski, Alan P.; Bishai, William R.

    2014-01-01

    Responsible for nearly two million deaths each year, the infectious disease tuberculosis remains a serious global health challenge. The emergence of multidrug- and extensively drug-resistant strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis confounds control efforts, and new drugs with novel molecular targets are desperately needed. Here we describe lead compounds, the indoleamides, with potent activity against both drug-susceptible and drug-resistant strains of M. tuberculosis by targeting the mycolic acid transporter MmpL3. We identify a single mutation in mmpL3 which confers high resistance to the indoleamide class while remaining susceptible to currently used first- and second-line tuberculosis drugs, indicating a lack of cross-resistance. Importantly, an indoleamide derivative exhibits dose-dependent anti-mycobacterial activity when orally administered to M. tuberculosis-infected mice. The bioavailability of the indoleamides, combined with their ability to kill tubercle bacilli, indicates great potential for translational developments of this structure class for the treatment of drug-resistant tuberculosis. PMID:24352433

  3. Learning the ABC of oral fungal drug resistance.

    PubMed

    Cannon, R D; Holmes, A R

    2015-12-01

    ATP-binding cassette (ABC) proteins are ubiquitous in prokaryotes and eukaryotes. They are involved in energy-dependent transport of molecules across membranes. ABC proteins are often promiscuous transporters that can translocate a variety of substrates. In oral fungi, especially in Candida species, they have been implicated as major contributors to the high-level azole resistance of clinical isolates from infections that do not respond to drug therapy. Although this is predominantly due to efflux of azoles from the cells, ABC proteins can contribute to fungal drug resistance in other ways as well. Cells in biofilms are notoriously resistant to antifungal agents. ABC proteins can contribute to this resistance through the efflux of drugs. Biofilms are complex communities of myriad microorganisms which, to survive in such a milieu, need to communicate with, and respond to, other microorganisms and their products. ABC proteins are involved in the secretion of fungal mating factors and quorum sensing molecules. These molecules affect biofilm structure and behavior that can result in increased drug resistance. Hence, ABC proteins make multiple contributions to oral fungal drug resistance through a variety of responses to environmental signals. PMID:26042641

  4. Defensive remodeling: How bacterial surface properties and biofilm formation promote resistance to antimicrobial peptides.

    PubMed

    Nuri, Reut; Shprung, Tal; Shai, Yechiel

    2015-11-01

    Multidrug resistance bacteria are a major concern worldwide. These pathogens cannot be treated with conventional antibiotics and thus alternative therapeutic agents are needed. Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) are considered to be good candidates for this purpose. Most AMPs are short and positively charged amphipathic peptides, which are found in all known forms of life. AMPs are known to kill bacteria by binding to the negatively charged bacterial surface, and in most cases cause membrane disruption. Resistance toward AMPs can be developed, by modification of bacterial surface molecules, secretion of protective material and up-regulation or elimination of specific proteins. Because of the general mechanisms of attachment and action of AMPs, bacterial resistance to AMPs often involves biophysical and biochemical changes such as surface rigidity, cell wall thickness, surface charge, as well as membrane and cell wall modification. Here we focus on the biophysical, surface and surrounding changes that bacteria undergo in acquiring resistance to AMPs. In addition we discuss the question of whether bacterial resistance to administered AMPs might compromise our innate immunity to endogenous AMPs. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Bacterial Resistance to Antimicrobial Peptides. PMID:26051126

  5. Surveillance for Antimicrobial Drug Resistance in Under-Resourced Countries

    PubMed Central

    Mary, Catherine; Altmann, Dany M.; Doumbo, Ogobara; Morpeth, Susan; Bhutta, Zulfiqar A.; Klugman, Keith P.

    2014-01-01

    Antimicrobial drug resistance is usually not monitored in under-resourced countries because they lack surveillance networks, laboratory capacity, and appropriate diagnostics. This accelerating problem accounts for substantial number of excess deaths, especially among infants. Infections particularly affected by antimicrobial drug resistance include tuberculosis, malaria, severe acute respiratory infections, and sepsis caused by gram-negative bacteria. Nonetheless, mapping antimicrobial drug resistance is feasible in under-resourced countries, and lessons can be learned from previous successful efforts. Specimen shipping conditions, data standardization, absence of contamination, and adequate diagnostics must be ensured. As a first step toward solving this problem, we propose that a road map be created at the international level to strengthen antimicrobial resistance surveillance in under-resourced countries. This effort should include a research agenda; a map of existing networks and recommendations to unite them; and a communication plan for national, regional, and international organizations and funding agencies. PMID:24564906

  6. Antifungal drug resistance evoked via RNAi-dependent epimutations.

    PubMed

    Calo, Silvia; Shertz-Wall, Cecelia; Lee, Soo Chan; Bastidas, Robert J; Nicolás, Francisco E; Granek, Joshua A; Mieczkowski, Piotr; Torres-Martínez, Santiago; Ruiz-Vázquez, Rosa M; Cardenas, Maria E; Heitman, Joseph

    2014-09-25

    Microorganisms evolve via a range of mechanisms that may include or involve sexual/parasexual reproduction, mutators, aneuploidy, Hsp90 and even prions. Mechanisms that may seem detrimental can be repurposed to generate diversity. Here we show that the human fungal pathogen Mucor circinelloides develops spontaneous resistance to the antifungal drug FK506 (tacrolimus) via two distinct mechanisms. One involves Mendelian mutations that confer stable drug resistance; the other occurs via an epigenetic RNA interference (RNAi)-mediated pathway resulting in unstable drug resistance. The peptidylprolyl isomerase FKBP12 interacts with FK506 forming a complex that inhibits the protein phosphatase calcineurin. Calcineurin inhibition by FK506 blocks M. circinelloides transition to hyphae and enforces yeast growth. Mutations in the fkbA gene encoding FKBP12 or the calcineurin cnbR or cnaA genes confer FK506 resistance and restore hyphal growth. In parallel, RNAi is spontaneously triggered to silence the fkbA gene, giving rise to drug-resistant epimutants. FK506-resistant epimutants readily reverted to the drug-sensitive wild-type phenotype when grown without exposure to the drug. The establishment of these epimutants is accompanied by generation of abundant fkbA small RNAs and requires the RNAi pathway as well as other factors that constrain or reverse the epimutant state. Silencing involves the generation of a double-stranded RNA trigger intermediate using the fkbA mature mRNA as a template to produce antisense fkbA RNA. This study uncovers a novel epigenetic RNAi-based epimutation mechanism controlling phenotypic plasticity, with possible implications for antimicrobial drug resistance and RNAi-regulatory mechanisms in fungi and other eukaryotes. PMID:25079329

  7. Cooperative Antibiotic Resistance in a Multi-Drug Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yurtsev, Eugene; Dai, Lei; Gore, Jeff

    2013-03-01

    The emergence of antibiotic resistance in bacteria is a significant health concern. A frequent mechanism of antibiotic resistance involves the production of an enzyme which inactivates the antibiotic. By inactivating the antibiotic, resistant cells can ``share'' their resistance with other cells in the bacterial population, suggesting that it may be possible to observe cooperation between strains that inactivate different antibiotics. Here, we experimentally track the population dynamics of two E. coli strains in the presence of two different antibiotics. We find that together the strains are able to grow in antibiotic concentrations that inhibit growth of either of the strains individually. We observe that even when there is stable coexistence between the two strains, the population size of each strain can undergo large oscillations. We expect that our results will provide insight into the evolution of antibiotic resistance and the evolutionary origin of phenotypic diversity and cooperative behaviors.

  8. C. elegans pgp-5 IS INVOLVED IN RESISTANCE TO BACTERIAL INFECTION AND HEAVY METAL AND ITS REGULATION

    E-print Network

    Baillie, David

    C. elegans pgp-5 IS INVOLVED IN RESISTANCE TO BACTERIAL INFECTION AND HEAVY METAL AND ITS contributes to resistance to bacterial infection and heavy metals. Using pgp-5 transcription as a read-out, we that not all the TIR-1 isoforms are necessary for nematode resistance to infection, suggesting a molecular

  9. ‘A‘ole Drugs! Cultural Practices and Drug Resistance of Rural Hawaiian Youth

    PubMed Central

    PO‘A-KEKUAWELA, KA‘OHINANI; OKAMOTO, SCOTT K.; NEBRE, LA RISA H.; HELM, SUSANA; CHIN, CORALEE I. H.

    2009-01-01

    This qualitative study examined how Native Hawaiian youth from rural communities utilized cultural practices to promote drug resistance and/or abstinence. Forty-seven students from 5 different middle schools participated in gender specific focus groups that focused on the cultural and environmental contexts of drug use for Native Hawaiian youth. The findings described culturally specific activities that participants used in drug related problem situations. The findings also suggested that those youth with higher levels of enculturation were able to resist drugs more effectively than those youth who were disconnected from their culture. The implications of these findings for social work practice are discussed. PMID:20352019

  10. Breeding Strains of Cotton Resistant to Bacterial Blight. 

    E-print Network

    Blank, Lester M. (Lester Marion); Bird, L. S. (Luther Smith)

    1951-01-01

    the resistance of Stoneville 20. Methods developed for artifically inoculating cotton plants with the blight causal organism have proved effective to the extent - that selections for resistance can be made with a high degree of certainty. Such methods...

  11. Evolution of resistance to a last-resort antibiotic in Staphyloccocus aureus via bacterial competition

    PubMed Central

    Koch, Gudrun; Yepes, Ana; Förstner, Konrad U.; Wermser, Charlotte; Stengel, Stephanie T.; Modamio, Jennifer; Ohlsen, Knut; Foster, Kevin R.; Lopez, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    Summary Antibiotic resistance is a key medical concern, with antibiotic use likely being an important cause. However, here we describe an alternative route to clinically-relevant antibiotic resistance that occurs solely due to competitive interactions between bacterial cells. We consistently observe that isolates of Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus diversify spontaneously into two distinct, sequentially arising strains. The first evolved strain outgrows the parent strain via secretion of surfactants and a toxic bacteriocin. The second is resistant to the bacteriocin. Importantly, this second strain is also resistant to intermediate levels of vancomycin. This so-called VISA (vancomycin-intermediate S. aureus) phenotype is seen in many hard-to-treat clinical isolates. This strain diversification also occurs during in vivo infection in a mouse model, consistent with the fact that both coevolved phenotypes resemble strains commonly found in clinic. Our study shows how competition between coevolving bacterial strains can generate antibiotic resistance and recapitulate key clinical phenotypes. PMID:25171407

  12. Resistance and cross-resistance studies with narasin, a new polyether antibiotic anticoccidial drug.

    PubMed

    Jeffers, T K

    1981-01-01

    The Wisconsin (Wis) strain and a field strain (FS-196) of Eimeria tenella were propagated in the presence of 80 ppm narasin in an attempt to select for narasin resistance. Comparisons of the narasin sensitivity of the selected strains (Wis-NR and FS-196-NR) and of the parent strains (Wis and FS-196) from which they were derived revealed no resistance development. These findings agree with the results of similar studies with the polyether antibiotic anticoccidial drugs monensin and lasalocid and support the conclusion that chicken coccidia do not readily develop resistance to this class of anticoccidial drugs. In a separate series of experiments, the efficacy of narasin was evaluated against five E. tenella field strains, one each resistant to amprolium, clopidol, decoquinate, nicarbazin, and robenidine. Narasin effectively controlled infections that were inadequately controlled by the anticoccidial drugs to which the strains were resistant. There was no evidence of cross-resistance to narasin. PMID:7259679

  13. Establishing Drug Resistance in Microorganisms by Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demirev, Plamen A.; Hagan, Nathan S.; Antoine, Miquel D.; Lin, Jeffrey S.; Feldman, Andrew B.

    2013-08-01

    A rapid method to determine drug resistance in bacteria based on mass spectrometry is presented. In it, a mass spectrum of an intact microorganism grown in drug-containing stable isotope-labeled media is compared with a mass spectrum of the intact microorganism grown in non-labeled media without the drug present. Drug resistance is determined by predicting characteristic mass shifts of one or more microorganism biomarkers using bioinformatics algorithms. Observing such characteristic mass shifts indicates that the microorganism is viable even in the presence of the drug, thus incorporating the isotopic label into characteristic biomarker molecules. The performance of the method is illustrated on the example of intact E. coli, grown in control (unlabeled) and 13C-labeled media, and analyzed by MALDI TOF MS. Algorithms for data analysis are presented as well.

  14. Induction of anti-actin drug resistance in Tetrahymena.

    PubMed

    Zackroff, Robert V; Hufnagel, Linda A

    2002-01-01

    Both cytochalasin D and latrunculin B reversibly inhibited Tetrahymena phagocytosis at concentrations similar to those effective in mammalian systems, even though ciliate actins are known to be highly divergent from mammalian actins. Overnight exposure to relatively low (0.25 microM) concentrations of latrunculin B induced resistance in Tetrahymena to the inhibitory effects of that drug, as well as cross-resistance to cytochalasin D. However, much higher (> 30 microM) concentrations of cytochalasin D were required for induction of cross-resistance to latrunculin B. Anti-actin drug resistance in Tetrahymena may involve a general multidrug resistance mechanism and/or specific feedback regulation of F-actin assembly and stability. PMID:12503683

  15. Efficacy of OH-CATH30 and its analogs against drug-resistant bacteria in vitro and in mouse models.

    PubMed

    Li, Sheng-An; Lee, Wen-Hui; Zhang, Yun

    2012-06-01

    Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) have been considered alternatives to conventional antibiotics for drug-resistant bacterial infections. However, their comparatively high toxicity toward eukaryotic cells and poor efficacy in vivo hamper their clinical application. OH-CATH30, a novel cathelicidin peptide deduced from the king cobra, possesses potent antibacterial activity in vitro. The objective of this study is to evaluate the efficacy of OH-CATH30 and its analog OH-CM6 against drug-resistant bacteria in vitro and in vivo. The MICs of OH-CATH30 and OH-CM6 ranged from 1.56 to 12.5 ?g/ml against drug-resistant clinical isolates of several pathogenic species, including Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus. The MICs of OH-CATH30 and OH-CM6 were slightly altered in the presence of 25% human serum. OH-CATH30 and OH-CM6 killed E. coli quickly (within 60 min) by disrupting the bacterial cytoplasmic membrane. Importantly, the 50% lethal doses (LD(50)) of OH-CATH30 and OH-CM6 in mice following intraperitoneal (i.p.) injection were 120 mg/kg of body weight and 100 mg/kg, respectively, and no death was observed at any dose up to 160 mg/kg following subcutaneous (s.c.) injection. Moreover, 10 mg/kg OH-CATH30 or OH-CM6 significantly decreased the bacterial counts as well as the inflammatory response in a mouse thigh infection model and rescued infected mice in a bacteremia model induced by drug-resistant E. coli. Taken together, our findings demonstrate that the natural cathelicidin peptide OH-CATH30 and its analogs exhibit relatively low toxicity and potent efficacy in mouse models, indicating that they may have therapeutic potential against the systemic infections caused by drug-resistant bacteria. PMID:22491685

  16. E?ux pump-mediated drug resistance in Burkholderia

    PubMed Central

    Podnecky, Nicole L.; Rhodes, Katherine A.; Schweizer, Herbert P.

    2015-01-01

    Several members of the genus Burkholderia are prominent pathogens. Infections caused by these bacteria are difficult to treat because of significant antibiotic resistance. Virtually all Burkholderia species are also resistant to polymyxin, prohibiting use of drugs like colistin that are available for treatment of infections caused by most other drug resistant Gram-negative bacteria. Despite clinical significance and antibiotic resistance of Burkholderia species, characterization of e?ux pumps lags behind other non-enteric Gram-negative pathogens such as Acinetobacter baumannii and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Although e?ux pumps have been described in several Burkholderia species, they have been best studied in Burkholderia cenocepacia and B. pseudomallei. As in other non-enteric Gram-negatives, e?ux pumps of the resistance nodulation cell division (RND) family are the clinically most significant e?ux systems in these two species. Several e?ux pumps were described in B. cenocepacia, which when expressed confer resistance to clinically significant antibiotics, including aminoglycosides, chloramphenicol, fluoroquinolones, and tetracyclines. Three RND pumps have been characterized in B. pseudomallei, two of which confer either intrinsic or acquired resistance to aminoglycosides, macrolides, chloramphenicol, fluoroquinolones, tetracyclines, trimethoprim, and in some instances trimethoprim+sulfamethoxazole. Several strains of the host-adapted B. mallei, a clone of B. pseudomallei, lack AmrAB-OprA, and are therefore aminoglycoside and macrolide susceptible. B. thailandensis is closely related to B. pseudomallei, but non-pathogenic to humans. Its pump repertoire and ensuing drug resistance profile parallels that of B. pseudomallei. An e?ux pump in B. vietnamiensis plays a significant role in acquired aminoglycoside resistance. Summarily, e?ux pumps are significant players in Burkholderia drug resistance. PMID:25926825

  17. Will drug resistance against dolutegravir in initial therapy ever occur?

    PubMed Central

    Wainberg, Mark A.; Han, Ying-Shan

    2015-01-01

    Dolutegravir (DTG) is a second-generation integrase strand transfer inhibitor (INSTI) and INSTIs are the latest class of potent anti-HIV drugs. Compared to the first generation INSTIs, raltegravir, and elvitegravir, DTG shows a limited cross-resistance profile. More interestingly, clinical resistance mutations to DTG in treatment-naive patents have not been observed to this date. This review summarizes recent studies on resistance mutations to DTG and on our understanding of the mechanisms of resistance to DTG as well as future directions for research. PMID:25972810

  18. Antibacterial effect of Allium sativum cloves and Zingiber officinale rhizomes against multiple-drug resistant clinical pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Karuppiah, Ponmurugan; Rajaram, Shyamkumar

    2012-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the antibacterial properties of Allium sativum (garlic) cloves and Zingiber officinale (ginger) rhizomes against multi-drug resistant clinical pathogens causing nosocomial infection. Methods The cloves of garlic and rhizomes of ginger were extracted with 95% (v/v) ethanol. The ethanolic extracts were subjected to antibacterial sensitivity test against clinical pathogens. Results Anti-bacterial potentials of the extracts of two crude garlic cloves and ginger rhizomes were tested against five gram negative and two gram positive multi-drug resistant bacteria isolates. All the bacterial isolates were susceptible to crude extracts of both plants extracts. Except Enterobacter sp. and Klebsiella sp., all other isolates were susceptible when subjected to ethanolic extracts of garlic and ginger. The highest inhibition zone was observed with garlic (19.45 mm) against Pseudomonas aeruginosa (P. aeruginosa). The minimal inhibitory concentration was as low as 67.00 µg/mL against P. aeruginosa. Conclusions Natural spices of garlic and ginger possess effective anti-bacterial activity against multi-drug clinical pathogens and can be used for prevention of drug resistant microbial diseases and further evaluation is necessary. PMID:23569978

  19. Combinatorial discovery of polymers resistant to bacterial attachment

    PubMed Central

    Luckett, Jeni; Cockayne, Alan; Atkinson, Steve; Mei, Ying; Bayston, Roger; Irvine, Derek J; Langer, Robert; Anderson, Daniel G; Williams, Paul; Davies, Martyn C; Alexander, Morgan R

    2013-01-01

    Bacterial attachment and subsequent biofilm formation pose key challenges to the optimal performance of medical devices. In this study, we determined the attachment of selected bacterial species to hundreds of polymeric materials in a high-throughput microarray format. Using this method, we identified a group of structurally related materials comprising ester and cyclic hydrocarbon moieties that substantially reduced the attachment of pathogenic bacteria (Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli). Coating silicone with these ‘hit’ materials achieved up to a 30-fold (96.7%) reduction in the surface area covered by bacteria compared with a commercial silver hydrogel coating in vitro, and the same material coatings were effective at reducing bacterial attachment in vivo in a mouse implant infection model. These polymers represent a class of materials that reduce the attachment of bacteria that could not have been predicted to have this property from the current understanding of bacteria-surface interactions. PMID:22885723

  20. Multidrug resistance-associated proteins and implications in drug development.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ya-He; Di, Yuan-Ming; Zhou, Zhi-Wei; Mo, Sui-Lin; Zhou, Shu-Feng

    2010-01-01

    1. The multidrug resistance-associated proteins (MRPs) belong to the ATP-binding cassette superfamily (ABCC family) of transporters that are expressed differentially in the liver, kidney, intestine and blood-brain barrier. There are nine human MRPs that transport a structurally diverse array of endo- and xenobiotics as well as their conjugates. 2. Multidrug resistance-associated protein 1 can be distinguished from MRP2 and MRP3 by its higher affinity for leukotriene C(4). Unlike MRP1, MRP2 functions in the extrusion of endogenous organic anions, such as bilirubin glucuronide and certain anticancer agents. In addition to the transport of glutathione and glucuronate conjugates, MRP3 has the additional capability of mediating the transport of monoanionic bile acids. 3. Both MRP4 and MRP5 are able to mediate the transport of cyclic nucleotides and confer resistance to certain antiviral and anticancer nucleotide analogues. Hereditary deficiency of MRP6 results in pseudoxanthoma elasticum. In the body, MRP6 is involved in the transport of glutathione conjugates and the cyclic pentapeptide BQ123. 4. Various MRPs show considerable differences in tissue distribution, substrate specificity and proposed physiological function. These proteins play a role in drug disposition and excretion and thus are implicated in drug toxicity and drug interactions. Increased efflux of natural product anticancer drugs and other anticancer agents mediated by MRPs from cancer cells is associated with tumour resistance. 5. A better understanding of the function and regulating mechanisms of MRPs could help minimize and avoid drug toxicity and unfavourable drug-drug interactions, as well as help overcome drug resistance. PMID:19566819

  1. Nanomechanics of Drug-target Interactions and Antibacterial Resistance Detection

    PubMed Central

    Ndieyira, Joseph W.; Watari, Moyu; McKendry, Rachel A.

    2013-01-01

    The cantilever sensor, which acts as a transducer of reactions between model bacterial cell wall matrix immobilized on its surface and antibiotic drugs in solution, has shown considerable potential in biochemical sensing applications with unprecedented sensitivity and specificity1-5. The drug-target interactions generate surface stress, causing the cantilever to bend, and the signal can be analyzed optically when it is illuminated by a laser. The change in surface stress measured with nano-scale precision allows disruptions of the biomechanics of model bacterial cell wall targets to be tracked in real time. Despite offering considerable advantages, multiple cantilever sensor arrays have never been applied in quantifying drug-target binding interactions. Here, we report on the use of silicon multiple cantilever arrays coated with alkanethiol self-assembled monolayers mimicking bacterial cell wall matrix to quantitatively study antibiotic binding interactions. To understand the impact of vancomycin on the mechanics of bacterial cell wall structures1,6,7. We developed a new model1 which proposes that cantilever bending can be described by two independent factors; i) namely a chemical factor, which is given by a classical Langmuir adsorption isotherm, from which we calculate the thermodynamic equilibrium dissociation constant (Kd) and ii) a geometrical factor, essentially a measure of how bacterial peptide receptors are distributed on the cantilever surface. The surface distribution of peptide receptors (p) is used to investigate the dependence of geometry and ligand loading. It is shown that a threshold value of p ~10% is critical to sensing applications. Below which there is no detectable bending signal while above this value, the bending signal increases almost linearly, revealing that stress is a product of a local chemical binding factor and a geometrical factor combined by the mechanical connectivity of reacted regions and provides a new paradigm for design of powerful agents to combat superbug infections. PMID:24192763

  2. Identification, Characterization and Antibiotic Resistance of Bacterial Isolates Obtained from Waterpipe Device Hoses

    PubMed Central

    Masadeh, Majed M.; Hussein, Emad I.; Alzoubi, Karem H.; Khabour, Omar; Shakhatreh, Muhamad Ali K.; Gharaibeh, Mahmoud

    2015-01-01

    The general lack of knowledge about the health effects of waterpipe smoking is among the reasons for its global spread. In this study, bacterial contamination of waterpipe hoses was investigated. Twenty hoses were collected from waterpipe cafés and screened for bacterial pathogens using standard culture and isolation techniques. Additionally, resistance of isolated bacteria to common antibiotics was determined by identifying the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of each isolate. Forty eight bacterial isolates were detected. Isolates included both Gram-positive and Gram-negative pathogens from species that included Micrococcus (12), Corynebacterium (13) and Bacillus (9). In addition, some of the detected pathogens were found to be resistant to aztreonam (79%), cefixime (79%), norfloxacin, amoxicillin (47%), clarithromycin (46%) and enrofloxacin (38%). In conclusion, the hose of the waterpipe device is a good environment for the growth of bacterial pathogens, which can then be transmitted to users. PMID:25985311

  3. A Treatment Plant Receiving Waste Water from Multiple Bulk Drug Manufacturers Is a Reservoir for Highly Multi-Drug Resistant Integron-Bearing Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Walujkar, Sandeep A.; Charan, Shakti Singh; Moore, Edward R. B.; Larsson, D. G. Joakim; Shouche, Yogesh S.

    2013-01-01

    The arenas and detailed mechanisms for transfer of antibiotic resistance genes between environmental bacteria and pathogens are largely unclear. Selection pressures from antibiotics in situations where environmental bacteria and human pathogens meet are expected to increase the risks for such gene transfer events. We hypothesize that waste-water treatment plants (WWTPs) serving antibiotic manufacturing industries may provide such spawning grounds, given the high bacterial densities present there together with exceptionally strong and persistent selection pressures from the antibiotic-contaminated waste. Previous analyses of effluent from an Indian industrial WWTP that processes waste from bulk drug production revealed the presence of a range of drugs, including broad spectrum antibiotics at extremely high concentrations (mg/L range). In this study, we have characterized the antibiotic resistance profiles of 93 bacterial strains sampled at different stages of the treatment process from the WWTP against 39 antibiotics belonging to 12 different classes. A large majority (86%) of the strains were resistant to 20 or more antibiotics. Although there were no classically-recognized human pathogens among the 93 isolated strains, opportunistic pathogens such as Ochrobactrum intermedium, Providencia rettgeri, vancomycin resistant Enterococci (VRE), Aerococcus sp. and Citrobacter freundii were found to be highly resistant. One of the O. intermedium strains (ER1) was resistant to 36 antibiotics, while P. rettgeri (OSR3) was resistant to 35 antibiotics. Class 1 and 2 integrons were detected in 74/93 (80%) strains each, and 88/93 (95%) strains harbored at least one type of integron. The qPCR analysis of community DNA also showed an unprecedented high prevalence of integrons, suggesting that the bacteria living under such high selective pressure have an appreciable potential for genetic exchange of resistance genes via mobile gene cassettes. The present study provides insight into the mechanisms behind and the extent of multi-drug resistance among bacteria living under an extreme antibiotic selection pressure. PMID:24204801

  4. Polyacrylic acid-coated iron oxide nanoparticles for targeting drug resistance in mycobacteria.

    PubMed

    Padwal, Priyanka; Bandyopadhyaya, Rajdip; Mehra, Sarika

    2014-12-23

    The emergence of drug resistance is a major problem faced in current tuberculosis (TB) therapy, representing a global health concern. Mycobacterium is naturally resistant to most drugs due to export of the latter outside bacterial cells by active efflux pumps, resulting in a low intracellular drug concentration. Thus, development of agents that can enhance the effectiveness of drugs used in TB treatment and bypass the efflux mechanism is crucial. In this study, we present a new nanoparticle-based strategy for enhancing the efficacy of existing drugs. To that end, we have developed poly(acrylic acid) (PAA)-coated iron oxide (magnetite) nanoparticles (PAA-MNPs) as efflux inhibitors and used it together with rifampicin (a first line anti-TB drug) on Mycobacterium smegmatis. PAA-MNPs of mean diameter 9 nm interact with bacterial cells via surface attachment and are then internalized by cells. Although PAA-MNP alone does not inhibit cell growth, treatment of cells with a combination of PAA-MNP and rifampicin exhibits a synergistic 4-fold-higher growth inhibition compared to rifampicin alone. This is because the combination of PAA-MNP and rifampicin results in up to a 3-fold-increased accumulation of rifampicin inside the cells. This enhanced intracellular drug concentration has been explained by real-time transport studies on a common efflux pump substrate, ethidium bromide (EtBr). It is seen that PAA-MNP increases the accumulation of EtBr significantly and also minimizes the EtBr efflux in direct proportion to the PAA-MNP concentration. Our results thus illustrate that the addition of PAA-MNP with rifampicin may bypass the innate drug resistance mechanism of M. smegmatis. This generic strategy is also found to be successful for other anti-TB drugs, such as isoniazid and fluoroquinolones (e.g., norfloxacin), only when stabilized, coated nanoparticles (such as PAA-MNP) are used, not PAA or MNP alone. We hence establish coated nanoparticles as a new class of efflux inhibitors for potential therapeutic use. PMID:25375643

  5. Bacterial Community Shift Drives Antibiotic Resistance Promotion during Drinking Water Chlorination.

    PubMed

    Jia, Shuyu; Shi, Peng; Hu, Qing; Li, Bing; Zhang, Tong; Zhang, Xu-Xiang

    2015-10-20

    For comprehensive insights into the effects of chlorination, a widely used disinfection technology, on bacterial community and antibiotic resistome in drinking water, this study applied high-throughput sequencing and metagenomic approaches to investigate the changing patterns of antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs) and bacterial community in a drinking water treatment and distribution system. At genus level, chlorination could effectively remove Methylophilus, Methylotenera, Limnobacter, and Polynucleobacter, while increase the relative abundance of Pseudomonas, Acidovorax, Sphingomonas, Pleomonas, and Undibacterium in the drinking water. A total of 151 ARGs within 15 types were detectable in the drinking water, and chlorination evidently increased their total relative abundance while reduced their diversity in the opportunistic bacteria (p < 0.05). Residual chlorine was identified as the key contributing factor driving the bacterial community shift and resistome alteration. As the dominant persistent ARGs in the treatment and distribution system, multidrug resistance genes (mainly encoding resistance-nodulation-cell division transportation system) and bacitracin resistance gene bacA were mainly carried by chlorine-resistant bacteria Pseudomonas and Acidovorax, which mainly contributed to the ARGs abundance increase. The strong correlation between bacterial community shift and antibiotic resistome alteration observed in this study may shed new light on the mechanism behind the chlorination effects on antibiotic resistance. PMID:26397118

  6. [Mechanisms of drug resistance and cancer stem cells].

    PubMed

    Hol?aková, J; Nekulová, M; Orzol, P; Vojt?šek, B

    2014-01-01

    Although the success of anticancer treatments has been increasing annually, drug resistance remains the dominant cause of death of cancer patients. Initial therapy often leaves residual dis-ease that leads to repeated tumor development or to loss of its sensitivity to available therapy. One reason of residual disease formation is the presence of cancer stem cells (CSCs). CSCs have been identified as a small population of cells that is capable of self? renewal and differentiation. It is supposed that these cells are responsible for cancer initiation, progression, metastasis, recurrence and drug resistance. Over the past years, much attention has been paid to development of CSCs related therapies and to identification of key molecules involved in controlling the specific properties of CSCs populations. This article reviews the basic mechanisms of drug resistance in relation to cancer stem cells. PMID:24945535

  7. Distribution and drug resistance profile of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus after orthopaedic surgery.

    PubMed

    Song, Wen Chao; Zhang, Si Sen; Gong, Yu Hong

    2015-05-01

    This paper is aimed to comprehend clinical distribution and drug-resistance situation of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus. This study applied automatic microbe instrument Microscan W/A 96 for strain identification and drug susceptibility screening on the isolated strains. It was found that 312 MRSA strains were isolated in three years, which account for 58.1% of Staphylococcus aureus. MRSA were mainly focused in wound secretion, purulent sputum and prostatic fluid and a few of them were isolated from blood specimens; Endemic area distribution was mainly located in intensive care unit, neurosurgery, respiratory department, dermatology, orthopaedic burns and orthopaedics. MRSA strains showed high drug resistance of 82.37%~100% to most of the antibiotics including vancomycin, cotrimoxazole and rifampicin. Strain was 100% resistance towards ampicillin, amoxicillin/acid, cefalotin, cefazolin, tienam, benzylpenicillin, penicillin and tetracycline and 90% strains resisted clindamycin, cefotaxime, clarithromycin and gentamicin. PMID:26051737

  8. Phages limit the evolution of bacterial antibiotic resistance in experimental microcosms

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Quan-Guo; Buckling, Angus

    2012-01-01

    The evolution of multi-antibiotic resistance in bacterial pathogens, often resulting from de novo mutations, is creating a public health crisis. Phages show promise for combating antibiotic-resistant bacteria, the efficacy of which, however, may also be limited by resistance evolution. Here, we suggest that phages may be used as supplements to antibiotics in treating initially sensitive bacteria to prevent resistance evolution, as phages are unaffected by most antibiotics and there should be little cross-resistance to antibiotics and phages. In vitro experiments using the bacterium Pseudomonas fluorescens, a lytic phage, and the antibiotic kanamycin supported this prediction: an antibiotic–phage combination dramatically decreased the chance of bacterial population survival that indicates resistance evolution, compared with antibiotic treatment alone, whereas the phage alone did not affect bacterial survival. This effect of the combined treatment in preventing resistance evolution was robust to immigration of bacteria from an untreated environment, but not to immigration from environment where the bacteria had coevolved with the phage. By contrast, an isogenic hypermutable strain constructed from the wild-type P. fluorescens evolved resistance to all treatments regardless of immigration, but typically suffered very large fitness costs. These results suggest that an antibiotic–phage combination may show promise as an antimicrobial strategy. PMID:23028398

  9. Bacterial panicle blight resistance QTL in rice (Oryza sativa L.) and their association with resistance to other diseases

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Bacterial panicle blight (BPB) of rice (Oryza sativa L.) occurs when the bacterium Burkholderia glumae infects and colonizes emerging and flowering panicles, causing kernels to abort. To identify quantitative trait loci (QTL) for BPB resistance, a population of 300 recombinant inbred lines (RILs) d...

  10. Emerging novel and antimicrobial-resistant respiratory tract infections: new drug development and therapeutic options.

    PubMed

    Zumla, Alimuddin; Memish, Ziad A; Maeurer, Markus; Bates, Matthew; Mwaba, Peter; Al-Tawfiq, Jaffar A; Denning, David W; Hayden, Frederick G; Hui, David S

    2014-11-01

    The emergence and spread of antimicrobial-resistant bacterial, viral, and fungal pathogens for which diminishing treatment options are available is of major global concern. New viral respiratory tract infections with epidemic potential, such as severe acute respiratory syndrome, swine-origin influenza A H1N1, and Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus infection, require development of new antiviral agents. The substantial rise in the global numbers of patients with respiratory tract infections caused by pan-antibiotic-resistant Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria, multidrug-resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis, and multiazole-resistant fungi has focused attention on investments into development of new drugs and treatment regimens. Successful treatment outcomes for patients with respiratory tract infections across all health-care settings will necessitate rapid, precise diagnosis and more effective and pathogen-specific therapies. This Series paper describes the development and use of new antimicrobial agents and immune-based and host-directed therapies for a range of conventional and emerging viral, bacterial, and fungal causes of respiratory tract infections. PMID:25189352

  11. Is selection relevant in the evolutionary emergence of drug resistance?

    PubMed Central

    Day, Troy; Huijben, Silvie; Read, Andrew F.

    2015-01-01

    The emergence of drug resistant pathogens is often considered a canonical case of evolution by ‘natural’ selection. Here we argue that the strength of selection can be a poor predictor of the rate of resistance emergence. It is possible for a resistant strain to be under negative selection and still emerge in an infection or spread in a population. Measuring the right parameters is a necessary first step towards the development of evidence-based resistance management strategies. We argue that it is the absolute fitness of the resistant strains that matters most, and that a primary determinant of the absolute fitness of a resistant strain when it arises is the ecological context in which it finds itself. PMID:25680587

  12. Effect of electron beam irradiation on bacterial cellulose membranes used as transdermal drug delivery systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoica-Guzun, Anicuta; Stroescu, Marta; Tache, Florin; Zaharescu, Traian; Grosu, Elena

    2007-12-01

    Ionizing radiation is an effective energetic source for polymer surfaces modification in order to obtain transdermal systems with different controlled release properties. In this work, gamma rays have been applied to induce changes in bacterial cellulose membranes. Permeation of drug (tetracycline) was theoretically and experimentally investigated starting from the effect of ?-irradiation on membranes permeability. Release and permeation of drug from irradiated and non-irradiated membranes have been performed using a diffusion cell.

  13. Sec and drugs and rock'n'roll: antibiotic targeting of bacterial protein translocation Anti-infectives

    E-print Network

    Economou, Tassos

    Economou Sec and drugs and rock'n'roll: antibiotic targeting of bacterial protein translocation Anti-infectives Sec, drugs and rock'n'roll: antibiotic targeting of bacterial protein translocation of these secretory and membrane polypeptides is mediated by the Sec pathway. Protein secretion requires the co

  14. The new concepts on overcoming drug resistance in lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Weisan; Lei, Ping; Dong, Xifeng; Xu, Cuiping

    2014-01-01

    Lung cancer is one of the most deadly diseases worldwide. The current first-line therapies include chemotherapy using epidermal growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitors and radiotherapies. With the current progress in identifying new molecular targets, acquired drug resistance stands as an obstacle for good prognosis. About half the patients receiving epidermal growth factor receptor-tyrosine kinase inhibitor treatments develop resistance. Although extensive studies have been applied to elucidate the underlying mechanisms, evidence is far from enough to establish a well-defined picture to correct resistance. In the review, we will discuss four different currently developed strategies that have the potential to overcome drug resistance in lung cancer therapies and facilitate prolonged anticancer effects of the first-line therapies. PMID:24944510

  15. How Fitness Reduced, Antimicrobial Resistant Bacteria Survive and Spread: A Multiple Pig - Multiple Bacterial Strain Model

    PubMed Central

    Græsbøll, Kaare; Nielsen, Søren Saxmose; Toft, Nils; Christiansen, Lasse Engbo

    2014-01-01

    More than 30% of E. coli strains sampled from pig farms in Denmark over the last five years were resistant to the commonly used antimicrobial tetracycline. This raises a number of questions: How is this high level sustained if resistant bacteria have reduced growth rates? Given that there are multiple susceptible and resistant bacterial strains in the pig intestines, how can we describe their coexistence? To what extent does the composition of these multiple strains in individual pigs influence the total bacterial population of the pig pen? What happens to a complex population when antimicrobials are used? To investigate these questions, we created a model where multiple strains of bacteria coexist in the intestines of pigs sharing a pen, and explored the parameter limits of a stable system; both with and without an antimicrobial treatment. The approach taken is a deterministic bacterial population model with stochastic elements of bacterial distributions and transmission. The rates that govern the model are process-oriented to represent growth, excretion, and uptake from environment, independent of herd and meta-population structures. Furthermore, an entry barrier and elimination process for the individual strains in each pig were implemented. We demonstrate how competitive growth between multiple bacterial strains in individual pigs, and the transmission between pigs in a pen allow for strains of antimicrobial resistant bacteria to persist in a pig population to different extents, and how quickly they can become dominant if antimicrobial treatment is initiated. The level of spread depends in a non-linear way of the parameters that govern excretion and uptake. Furthermore, the sampling of initial distributions of strains and stochastic transmission events give rise to large variation in how homogenous and how resistant the bacterial population becomes. Most important: resistant bacteria are demonstrated to survive with a disadvantage in growth rate of well over 10%. PMID:25006965

  16. Wear and corrosion resistance of anti-bacterial Ti-Cu-N coatings on titanium implants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Haibo; Zhang, Xiangyu; He, Xiaojing; Li, Meng; Huang, Xiaobo; Hang, Ruiqiang; Tang, Bin

    2014-10-01

    Anti-bacterial coatings with excellent wear and corrosion resistance play a vital role in ensuring the durability of implant materials in constant use. To this end, a novel anti-bacterial surface modification by combining magnetron sputtering with plasma nitriding was adopted in this paper to fabricate Cu-bearing Ti-based nitrides coatings (Ti-Cu-N) on titanium surface. The anti-bacterial properties of Ti-Cu-N coatings were evaluated. The microstructures and composition of the coatings were investigated by using FESEM, EDS, GDOES, XRD. The wear and corrosion resistance of the coatings were investigated. The results confirmed that an anti-bacterial Ti-Cu-N coating with a thickness of 6 ?m and good adhesive strength to substrate was successfully achieved on titanium surface. As implied by XRD, the coatings were consisted of TiN, Ti2N, TiN0.3 phases. The surface micro-hardness and wear resistance of Ti-Cu-N coatings were significantly enhanced after plasma nitriding treatment. The analysis of potentiodynamic polarization curves and Nyquist plots obtained in 0.9 wt.% NaCl solution suggested that the Ti-Cu-N coatings also exhibited an excellent corrosion resistance. As mentioned above, it can be concluded that the duplex-treatment reported here was a versatile approach to develop anti-bacterial Ti-Cu-N coatings with excellent comprehensive properties on titanium implants.

  17. Anticancer drug nanomicelles formed by self-assembling amphiphilic dendrimer to combat cancer drug resistance

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Tuo; Chen, Chao; Liu, Juan; Liu, Cheng; Posocco, Paola; Liu, Xiaoxuan; Cheng, Qiang; Huo, Shuaidong; Liang, Zicai; Fermeglia, Maurizio; Liang, Xing-Jie; Rocchi, Palma; Peng, Ling

    2015-01-01

    Drug resistance and toxicity constitute challenging hurdles for cancer therapy. The application of nanotechnology for anticancer drug delivery is expected to address these issues and bring new hope for cancer treatment. In this context, we established an original nanomicellar drug delivery system based on an amphiphilic dendrimer (AmDM), which could generate supramolecular micelles to effectively encapsulate the anticancer drug doxorubicin (DOX) with high drug-loading capacity (>40%), thanks to the unique dendritic structure creating large void space for drug accommodation. The resulting AmDM/DOX nanomicelles were able to enhance drug potency and combat doxorubicin resistance in breast cancer models by significantly enhancing cellular uptake while considerably decreasing efflux of the drug. In addition, the AmDM/DOX nanoparticles abolished significantly the toxicity related to the free drug. Collectively, our studies demonstrate that the drug delivery system based on nanomicelles formed with the self-assembling amphiphilic dendrimer constitutes a promising and effective drug carrier in cancer therapy. PMID:25713374

  18. Role of multidrug resistance associated proteins in drug development.

    PubMed

    Zhou, S F

    2008-12-01

    The multidrug resistance associated proteins (MRP1, MRP2, MRP3, MRP4, MRP5, MRP6, MRP7, MRP8 and MRP9) belongs to the ATP-binding cassette superfamily (ABCC family) of transporters expressed differentially in the liver, kidney, intestine and blood-brain barrier. MRPs transport a structurally diverse array of endo- and xenobiotics and their metabolites (in particular conjugates) and are subject to induction and inhibition by a variety of compounds. An increased efflux of natural product anticancer drugs and other anticancer agents by MRPs in cancer cells is associated with tumor resistance. These transporting proteins play a role in the absorption, distribution and elimination of various compounds in the body. There are increased reports on the clinical impact of genetic mutations of genes encoding MRP1-9. Therefore, MRPs have an important role in drug development, and a better understanding of their function and regulating mechanism can help minimize and avoid drug toxicity, unfavourable drug-drug interactions, and to overcome drug resistance. PMID:22504741

  19. 21 CFR 866.3950 - In vitro human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) drug resistance genotype assay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... resistance genotype assay. 866.3950 Section 866.3950 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT... Serological Reagents § 866.3950 In vitro human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) drug resistance genotype assay. (a) Identification. The in vitro HIV drug resistance genotype assay is a device that consists of nucleic acid...

  20. Antimicrobial Resistance and Virulence: a Successful or Deleterious Association in the Bacterial World?

    PubMed Central

    Beceiro, Alejandro; Tomás, María

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY Hosts and bacteria have coevolved over millions of years, during which pathogenic bacteria have modified their virulence mechanisms to adapt to host defense systems. Although the spread of pathogens has been hindered by the discovery and widespread use of antimicrobial agents, antimicrobial resistance has increased globally. The emergence of resistant bacteria has accelerated in recent years, mainly as a result of increased selective pressure. However, although antimicrobial resistance and bacterial virulence have developed on different timescales, they share some common characteristics. This review considers how bacterial virulence and fitness are affected by antibiotic resistance and also how the relationship between virulence and resistance is affected by different genetic mechanisms (e.g., coselection and compensatory mutations) and by the most prevalent global responses. The interplay between these factors and the associated biological costs depend on four main factors: the bacterial species involved, virulence and resistance mechanisms, the ecological niche, and the host. The development of new strategies involving new antimicrobials or nonantimicrobial compounds and of novel diagnostic methods that focus on high-risk clones and rapid tests to detect virulence markers may help to resolve the increasing problem of the association between virulence and resistance, which is becoming more beneficial for pathogenic bacteria. PMID:23554414

  1. Pyramiding B genes in cotton achieves broader but not always higher resistance to bacterial blight.

    PubMed

    Essenberg, Margaret; Bayles, Melanie B; Pierce, Margaret L; Verhalen, Laval M

    2014-10-01

    ABSTRACT Near-isogenic lines of upland cotton (Gossypium hirsutum) carrying single, race-specific genes B4, BIn, and b7 for resistance to bacterial blight were used to develop a pyramid of lines with all possible combinations of two and three genes to learn whether the pyramid could achieve broad and high resistance approaching that of L. A. Brinkerhoff's exceptional line Im216. Isogenic strains of Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. malvacearum carrying single avirulence (avr) genes were used to identify plants carrying specific resistance (B) genes. Under field conditions in north-central Oklahoma, pyramid lines exhibited broader resistance to individual races and, consequently, higher resistance to a race mixture. It was predicted that lines carrying two or three B genes would also exhibit higher resistance to race 1, which possesses many avr genes. Although some enhancements were observed, they did not approach the level of resistance of Im216. In a growth chamber, bacterial populations attained by race 1 in and on leaves of the pyramid lines decreased significantly with increasing number of B genes in only one of four experiments. The older lines, Im216 and AcHR, exhibited considerably lower bacterial populations than any of the one-, two-, or three-B-gene lines. A spreading collapse of spray-inoculated AcBIn and AcBInb7 leaves appears to be a defense response (conditioned by BIn) that is out of control. PMID:24655289

  2. Additional drug resistance of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis in patients in 9 countries.

    PubMed

    Kurbatova, Ekaterina V; Dalton, Tracy; Ershova, Julia; Tupasi, Thelma; Caoili, Janice Campos; Van Der Walt, Martie; Kvasnovsky, Charlotte; Yagui, Martin; Bayona, Jaime; Contreras, Carmen; Leimane, Vaira; Via, Laura E; Kim, HeeJin; Akksilp, Somsak; Kazennyy, Boris Y; Volchenkov, Grigory V; Jou, Ruwen; Kliiman, Kai; Demikhova, Olga V; Cegielski, J Peter

    2015-06-01

    Data from a large multicenter observational study of patients with multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR TB) were analyzed to simulate the possible use of 2 new approaches to treatment of MDR TB: a short (9-month) regimen and a bedaquiline-containing regimen. Of 1,254 patients, 952 (75.9%) had no resistance to fluoroquinolones and second-line injectable drugs and thus would qualify as candidates for the 9-month regimen; 302 (24.1%) patients with resistance to a fluoroquinolone or second-line injectable drug would qualify as candidates for a bedaquiline-containing regimen in accordance with published guidelines. Among candidates for the 9-month regimen, standardized drug-susceptibility tests demonstrated susceptibility to a median of 5 (interquartile range 5-6) drugs. Among candidates for bedaquiline, drug-susceptibility tests demonstrated susceptibility to a median of 3 (interquartile range 2-4) drugs; 26% retained susceptibility to <2 drugs. These data may assist national TB programs in planning to implement new drugs and drug regimens. PMID:25988299

  3. biotic resistance and virulence factors. The nding of a connection between bacterial conjugation and biolm formation suggests that

    E-print Network

    Hayward, Vincent

    Methods Bacterial strains and plasmids Bacterial strains are listed in Table 1 and were providedbiotic resistance and virulence factors. The ®nding of a connection between bacterial conjugation and biocides in clinical medicine and agriculture may have been the selection of plasmid-bearing strains

  4. Role of the Mmr efflux pump in drug resistance in Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, Liliana; Villellas, Cristina; Bailo, Rebeca; Viveiros, Miguel; Aínsa, José A

    2013-02-01

    Efflux pumps are membrane proteins capable of actively transporting a broad range of substrates from the cytoplasm to the exterior of the cell. Increased efflux activity in response to drug treatment may be the first step in the development of bacterial drug resistance. Previous studies showed that the efflux pump Mmr was significantly overexpressed in strains exposed to isoniazid. In the work to be described, we constructed mutants lacking or overexpressing Mmr in order to clarify the role of this efflux pump in the development of resistance to isoniazid and other drugs in M. tuberculosis. The mmr knockout mutant showed an increased susceptibility to ethidium bromide, tetraphenylphosphonium, and cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB). Overexpression of mmr caused a decreased susceptibility to ethidium bromide, acriflavine, and safranin O that was obliterated in the presence of the efflux inhibitors verapamil and carbonyl cyanide m-chlorophenylhydrazone. Isoniazid susceptibility was not affected by the absence or overexpression of mmr. The fluorometric method allowed the detection of a decreased efflux of ethidium bromide in the knockout mutant, whereas the overexpressed strain showed increased efflux of this dye. This increased efflux activity was inhibited in the presence of efflux inhibitors. Under our experimental conditions, we have found that efflux pump Mmr is mainly involved in the susceptibility to quaternary compounds such as ethidium bromide and disinfectants such as CTAB. The contribution of this efflux pump to isoniazid resistance in Mycobacterium tuberculosis still needs to be further elucidated. PMID:23165464

  5. Bacterial antibiotic resistance in soils irrigated with reclaimed municipal wastewater

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Wastewater reclamation for municipal irrigation and groundwater recharge is an increasingly attractive option for extending water supplies. However, public health concerns include the potential for development of antibiotic resistance (AR) in soil bacteria after exposure to residual chemicals in rec...

  6. Development of a protocol for predicting bacterial resistance to microbicides.

    PubMed

    Knapp, Laura; Amézquita, Alejandro; McClure, Peter; Stewart, Sara; Maillard, Jean-Yves

    2015-04-01

    Regulations dealing with microbicides in Europe and the United States are evolving and now require data on the risk of the development of resistance in organisms targeted by microbicidal products. There is no standard protocol to assess the risk of the development of resistance to microbicidal formulations. This study aimed to validate the use of changes in microbicide and antibiotic susceptibility as initial markers for predicting microbicide resistance and cross-resistance to antibiotics. Three industrial isolates (Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Burkholderia cepacia, and Klebsiella pneumoniae) and two Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium strains (SL1344 and 14028S) were exposed to a shampoo, a mouthwash, eye makeup remover, and the microbicides contained within these formulations (chlorhexidine digluconate [CHG] and benzalkonium chloride [BZC]) under realistic, in-use conditions. Baseline and postexposure data were compared. No significant increases in the MIC or the minimum bactericidal concentration (MBC) were observed for any strain after exposure to the three formulations. Increases as high as 100-fold in the MICs and MBCs of CHG and BZC for SL1344 and 14028S were observed but were unstable. Changes in antibiotic susceptibility were not clinically significant. The use of MICs and MBCs combined with antibiotic susceptibility profiling and stability testing generated reproducible data that allowed for an initial prediction of the development of resistance to microbicides. These approaches measure characteristics that are directly relevant to the concern over resistance and cross-resistance development following the use of microbicides. These are low-cost, high-throughput techniques, allowing manufacturers to provide to regulatory bodies, promptly and efficiently, data supporting an early assessment of the risk of resistance development. PMID:25636848

  7. Development of a Protocol for Predicting Bacterial Resistance to Microbicides

    PubMed Central

    Knapp, Laura; Amézquita, Alejandro; McClure, Peter; Stewart, Sara

    2015-01-01

    Regulations dealing with microbicides in Europe and the United States are evolving and now require data on the risk of the development of resistance in organisms targeted by microbicidal products. There is no standard protocol to assess the risk of the development of resistance to microbicidal formulations. This study aimed to validate the use of changes in microbicide and antibiotic susceptibility as initial markers for predicting microbicide resistance and cross-resistance to antibiotics. Three industrial isolates (Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Burkholderia cepacia, and Klebsiella pneumoniae) and two Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium strains (SL1344 and 14028S) were exposed to a shampoo, a mouthwash, eye makeup remover, and the microbicides contained within these formulations (chlorhexidine digluconate [CHG] and benzalkonium chloride [BZC]) under realistic, in-use conditions. Baseline and postexposure data were compared. No significant increases in the MIC or the minimum bactericidal concentration (MBC) were observed for any strain after exposure to the three formulations. Increases as high as 100-fold in the MICs and MBCs of CHG and BZC for SL1344 and 14028S were observed but were unstable. Changes in antibiotic susceptibility were not clinically significant. The use of MICs and MBCs combined with antibiotic susceptibility profiling and stability testing generated reproducible data that allowed for an initial prediction of the development of resistance to microbicides. These approaches measure characteristics that are directly relevant to the concern over resistance and cross-resistance development following the use of microbicides. These are low-cost, high-throughput techniques, allowing manufacturers to provide to regulatory bodies, promptly and efficiently, data supporting an early assessment of the risk of resistance development. PMID:25636848

  8. Drug Targets and Mechanisms of Resistance in the Anaerobic Protozoa

    PubMed Central

    Upcroft, Peter; Upcroft, Jacqueline A.

    2001-01-01

    The anaerobic protozoa Giardia duodenalis, Trichomonas vaginalis, and Entamoeba histolytica infect up to a billion people each year. G. duodenalis and E. histolytica are primarily pathogens of the intestinal tract, although E. histolytica can form abscesses and invade other organs, where it can be fatal if left untreated. T. vaginalis infection is a sexually transmitted infection causing vaginitis and acute inflammatory disease of the genital mucosa. T. vaginalis has also been reported in the urinary tract, fallopian tubes, and pelvis and can cause pneumonia, bronchitis, and oral lesions. Respiratory infections can be acquired perinatally. T. vaginalis infections have been associated with preterm delivery, low birth weight, and increased mortality as well as predisposing to human immunodeficiency virus infection, AIDS, and cervical cancer. All three organisms lack mitochondria and are susceptible to the nitroimidazole metronidazole because of similar low-redox-potential anaerobic metabolic pathways. Resistance to metronidazole and other drugs has been observed clinically and in the laboratory. Laboratory studies have identified the enzyme that activates metronidazole, pyruvate:ferredoxin oxidoreductase, to its nitroso form and distinct mechanisms of decreasing drug susceptibility that are induced in each organism. Although the nitroimidazoles have been the drug family of choice for treating the anaerobic protozoa, G. duodenalis is less susceptible to other antiparasitic drugs, such as furazolidone, albendazole, and quinacrine. Resistance has been demonstrated for each agent, and the mechanism of resistance has been investigated. Metronidazole resistance in T. vaginalis is well documented, and the principal mechanisms have been defined. Bypass metabolism, such as alternative oxidoreductases, have been discovered in both organisms. Aerobic versus anaerobic resistance in T. vaginalis is discussed. Mechanisms of metronidazole resistance in E. histolytica have recently been investigated using laboratory-induced resistant isolates. Instead of downregulation of the pyruvate:ferredoxin oxidoreductase and ferredoxin pathway as seen in G. duodenalis and T. vaginalis, E. histolytica induces oxidative stress mechanisms, including superoxide dismutase and peroxiredoxin. The review examines the value of investigating both clinical and laboratory-induced syngeneic drug-resistant isolates and dissection of the complementary data obtained. Comparison of resistance mechanisms in anaerobic bacteria and the parasitic protozoa is discussed as well as the value of studies of the epidemiology of resistance. PMID:11148007

  9. Drug targets and mechanisms of resistance in the anaerobic protozoa.

    PubMed

    Upcroft, P; Upcroft, J A

    2001-01-01

    The anaerobic protozoa Giardia duodenalis, Trichomonas vaginalis, and Entamoeba histolytica infect up to a billion people each year. G. duodenalis and E. histolytica are primarily pathogens of the intestinal tract, although E. histolytica can form abscesses and invade other organs, where it can be fatal if left untreated. T. vaginalis infection is a sexually transmitted infection causing vaginitis and acute inflammatory disease of the genital mucosa. T. vaginalis has also been reported in the urinary tract, fallopian tubes, and pelvis and can cause pneumonia, bronchitis, and oral lesions. Respiratory infections can be acquired perinatally. T. vaginalis infections have been associated with preterm delivery, low birth weight, and increased mortality as well as predisposing to human immunodeficiency virus infection, AIDS, and cervical cancer. All three organisms lack mitochondria and are susceptible to the nitroimidazole metronidazole because of similar low-redox-potential anaerobic metabolic pathways. Resistance to metronidazole and other drugs has been observed clinically and in the laboratory. Laboratory studies have identified the enzyme that activates metronidazole, pyruvate:ferredoxin oxidoreductase, to its nitroso form and distinct mechanisms of decreasing drug susceptibility that are induced in each organism. Although the nitroimidazoles have been the drug family of choice for treating the anaerobic protozoa, G. duodenalis is less susceptible to other antiparasitic drugs, such as furazolidone, albendazole, and quinacrine. Resistance has been demonstrated for each agent, and the mechanism of resistance has been investigated. Metronidazole resistance in T. vaginalis is well documented, and the principal mechanisms have been defined. Bypass metabolism, such as alternative oxidoreductases, have been discovered in both organisms. Aerobic versus anaerobic resistance in T. vaginalis is discussed. Mechanisms of metronidazole resistance in E. histolytica have recently been investigated using laboratory-induced resistant isolates. Instead of downregulation of the pyruvate:ferredoxin oxidoreductase and ferredoxin pathway as seen in G. duodenalis and T. vaginalis, E. histolytica induces oxidative stress mechanisms, including superoxide dismutase and peroxiredoxin. The review examines the value of investigating both clinical and laboratory-induced syngeneic drug-resistant isolates and dissection of the complementary data obtained. Comparison of resistance mechanisms in anaerobic bacteria and the parasitic protozoa is discussed as well as the value of studies of the epidemiology of resistance. PMID:11148007

  10. Interfamily transfer of a plant pattern-recognition receptor confers broad-spectrum bacterial resistance.

    PubMed

    Lacombe, Séverine; Rougon-Cardoso, Alejandra; Sherwood, Emma; Peeters, Nemo; Dahlbeck, Douglas; van Esse, H Peter; Smoker, Matthew; Rallapalli, Ghanasyam; Thomma, Bart P H J; Staskawicz, Brian; Jones, Jonathan D G; Zipfel, Cyril

    2010-04-01

    Plant diseases cause massive losses in agriculture. Increasing the natural defenses of plants may reduce the impact of phytopathogens on agricultural productivity. Pattern-recognition receptors (PRRs) detect microbes by recognizing conserved pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs). Although the overall importance of PAMP-triggered immunity for plant defense is established, it has not been used to confer disease resistance in crops. We report that activity of a PRR is retained after its transfer between two plant families. Expression of EFR (ref. 4), a PRR from the cruciferous plant Arabidopsis thaliana, confers responsiveness to bacterial elongation factor Tu in the solanaceous plants Nicotiana benthamiana and tomato (Solanum lycopersicum), making them more resistant to a range of phytopathogenic bacteria from different genera. Our results in controlled laboratory conditions suggest that heterologous expression of PAMP recognition systems could be used to engineer broad-spectrum disease resistance to important bacterial pathogens, potentially enabling more durable and sustainable resistance in the field. PMID:20231819

  11. 75 FR 52755 - Draft Guidance for Industry on Acute Bacterial Skin and Skin Structure Infections: Developing...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-27

    ...new drugs to treat drug-resistant bacterial pathogens implicated in ABSSSI, such as methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus. The definitions of ABSSSI and the designs of ABSSSI clinical trials were discussed at a meeting of the...

  12. Nanomechanical detection of antibiotic-mucopeptide binding in a model for superbug drug resistance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ndieyira, Joseph Wafula; Watari, Moyu; Barrera, Alejandra Donoso; Zhou, Dejian; Vögtli, Manuel; Batchelor, Matthew; Cooper, Matthew A.; Strunz, Torsten; Horton, Mike A.; Abell, Chris; Rayment, Trevor; Aeppli, Gabriel; McKendry, Rachel A.

    2008-11-01

    The alarming growth of the antibiotic-resistant superbugs methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus (VRE) is driving the development of new technologies to investigate antibiotics and their modes of action. We report the label-free detection of vancomycin binding to bacterial cell wall precursor analogues (mucopeptides) on cantilever arrays, with 10 nM sensitivity and at clinically relevant concentrations in blood serum. Differential measurements have quantified binding constants for vancomycin-sensitive and vancomycin-resistant mucopeptide analogues. Moreover, by systematically modifying the mucopeptide density we gain new insights into the origin of surface stress. We propose that stress is a product of a local chemical binding factor and a geometrical factor describing the mechanical connectivity of regions activated by local binding in terms of a percolation process. Our findings place BioMEMS devices in a new class of percolative systems. The percolation concept will underpin the design of devices and coatings to significantly lower the drug detection limit and may also have an impact on our understanding of antibiotic drug action in bacteria.

  13. "Applied" Aspects of the Drug Resistance Strategies Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hecht, Michael L.; Miller-Day, Michelle A.

    2010-01-01

    This paper discusses the applied aspects of our Drug Resistance Strategies Project. We argue that a new definitional distinction is needed to expand the notion of "applied" from the traditional notion of utilizing theory, which we call "applied.1," in order to consider theory-grounded, theory testing and theory developing applied research. We…

  14. Drug-resistantTB Nature-inspired Polymers

    E-print Network

    Drug-resistantTB Nature-inspired Polymers MRI for Everyone Mesoscale Maneuvers Los Alamos ScienceWorldWar II, all that the outside world knew of Los Alamos and its top-secret laboratory was the mailing the Mesoscale Gap Science to understand material properties Borrowing Nature's Blueprints Battlefield MRI

  15. PREVALENCE OF MULTI-DRUG RESISTANT SALMONELLA IN DAIRY CATTLE

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    To determine the prevalence of multi-drug resistant (MDR) Salmonella in dairy cattle and which groups of cattle may be more likely to harbor MDR Salmonella, we sampled animals on four commercial dairy farms that all utilized a central calf/heifer raising facility. Fecal samples were obtained from h...

  16. Alcohol and Other Drug Resistance Strategies Employed by Rural Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pettigrew, Jonathan; Miller-Day, Michelle; Krieger, Janice; Hecht, Michael L.

    2011-01-01

    This study seeks to identify how rural adolescents make health decisions and utilize communication strategies to resist influence attempts in offers of alcohol, tobacco, and other drugs (ATOD). Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 113 adolescents from rural school districts to solicit information on ATOD norms, past ATOD experiences, and…

  17. Rapid detection of bacterial resistance to antibiotics using AFM cantilevers as nanomechanical sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Longo, G.; Alonso-Sarduy, L.; Rio, L. Marques; Bizzini, A.; Trampuz, A.; Notz, J.; Dietler, G.; Kasas, S.

    2013-07-01

    The widespread misuse of drugs has increased the number of multiresistant bacteria, and this means that tools that can rapidly detect and characterize bacterial response to antibiotics are much needed in the management of infections. Various techniques, such as the resazurin-reduction assays, the mycobacterial growth indicator tube or polymerase chain reaction-based methods, have been used to investigate bacterial metabolism and its response to drugs. However, many are relatively expensive or unable to distinguish between living and dead bacteria. Here we show that the fluctuations of highly sensitive atomic force microscope cantilevers can be used to detect low concentrations of bacteria, characterize their metabolism and quantitatively screen (within minutes) their response to antibiotics. We applied this methodology to Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus, showing that live bacteria produced larger cantilever fluctuations than bacteria exposed to antibiotics. Our preliminary experiments suggest that the fluctuation is associated with bacterial metabolism.

  18. Modeling mass drug treatment and resistant filaria disease transmission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuady, A. M.; Nuraini, N.; Soewono, E.; Tasman, H.; Supriatna, A. K.

    2014-03-01

    It has been indicated that a long term application of combined mass drug treatment may contribute to the development of drug resistance in lymphatic filariasis. This phenomenon is not well understood due to the complexity of filaria life cycle. In this paper we formulate a mathematical model for the spread of mass drug resistant in a filaria endemic region. The model is represented in a 13-dimensional Host-Vector system. The basic reproductive ratio of the system which is obtained from the next generation matrix, and analysis of stability of both the disease free equilibrium and the coexistence equilibria are shown. Numerical simulation for long term dynamics for possible field conditions is also shown.

  19. Mechanisms of Drug Resistance in Relapse and Refractory Multiple Myeloma

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Wen-Chi; Lin, Sheng-Fung

    2015-01-01

    Multiple myeloma (MM) is a hematological malignancy that remains incurable because most patients eventually relapse or become refractory to current treatments. Although the treatments have improved, the major problem in MM is resistance to therapy. Clonal evolution of MM cells and bone marrow microenvironment changes contribute to drug resistance. Some mechanisms affect both MM cells and microenvironment, including the up- and downregulation of microRNAs and programmed death factor 1 (PD-1)/PD-L1 interaction. Here, we review the pathogenesis of MM cells and bone marrow microenvironment and highlight possible drug resistance mechanisms. We also review a potential molecular targeting treatment and immunotherapy for patients with refractory or relapse MM. PMID:26649299

  20. MRJP1-containing glycoproteins isolated from honey, a novel antibacterial drug candidate with broad spectrum activity against multi-drug resistant clinical isolates

    PubMed Central

    Brudzynski, Katrina; Sjaarda, Calvin; Lannigan, Robert

    2015-01-01

    The emergence of extended- spectrum ?-lactamase (ESBL) is the underlying cause of growing antibiotic resistance among Gram-negative bacteria to ?-lactam antibiotics. We recently reported the discovery of honey glycoproteins (glps) that exhibited a rapid, concentration-dependent antibacterial activity against both Gram-positive Bacillus subtilis and Gram-negative Escherichia coli that resembled action of cell wall-active ?-lactam drugs. Glps showed sequence identity with the Major Royal Jelly Protein 1 (MRJP1) precursor that harbors three antimicrobial peptides: Jelleins 1, 2, and 4. Here, we used semi-quantitative radial diffusion assay and broth microdilution assay to evaluate susceptibility of a number of multi-drug resistant (MDR) clinical isolates to the MRJP1-contaning honey glycoproteins. The MDR bacterial strains comprised three methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), four Pseudomonas aeruginosa, two Klebsiella pneumoniae, two vancomycin-resistant Enterococci (VRE), and five ESBL identified as one Proteus mirabilis, three E. coli, and one E. coli NDM. Their resistance to different classes of antibiotics was confirmed using automated system Vitek 2. MDR isolates differed in their susceptibility to glps with MIC90 values ranging from 4.8 ?g/ml against B. subtilis to 14.4 ?g/ml against ESBL K. pneumoniae, Klebsiella spp. ESBL and E. coli and up to 33 ?g/ml against highly resistant strains of P. aeruginosa. Glps isolated from different honeys showed a similar ability to overcome bacterial resistance to ?-lactams suggesting that (a) their mode of action is distinct from other classes of ?-lactams and that (b) the common glps structure was the lead structure responsible for the activity. The results of the current study together with our previous evidence of a rapid bactericidal activity of glps demonstrate that glps possess suitable characteristics to be considered a novel antibacterial drug candidate. PMID:26217333

  1. Insights into the amplification of bacterial resistance to erythromycin in activated sludge.

    PubMed

    Guo, Mei-Ting; Yuan, Qing-Bin; Yang, Jian

    2015-10-01

    Wastewater treatment plants are significant reservoirs for antimicrobial resistance. However, little is known about wastewater treatment effects on the variation of antibiotic resistance. The shifts of bacterial resistance to erythromycin, a macrolide widely used in human medicine, on a lab-scale activated sludge system fed with real wastewater was investigated from levels of bacteria, community and genes, in this study. The resistance variation of total heterotrophic bacteria was studied during the biological treatment process, based on culture dependent method. The alterations of bacterial community resistant to erythromycin and nine typical erythromycin resistance genes were explored with molecular approaches, including high-throughput sequencing and quantitative polymerase chain reaction. The results revealed that the total heterotrophs tolerance level to erythromycin concentrations (higher than 32 mg/L) was significantly amplified during the activated sludge treatment, with the prevalence increased from 9.6% to 21.8%. High-throughput sequencing results demonstrated an obvious increase of the total heterotrophic bacterial diversity resistant to erythromycin. Proteobacteria and Bacteroidetes were the two dominant phyla in the influent and effluent of the bioreactor. However, the prevalence of Proteobacteria decreased from 76% to 59% while the total phyla number increased greatly from 18 to 29 through activated sludge treatment. The gene proportions of erm(A), mef(E) and erm(D) were greatly amplified after biological treatment. It is proposed that the transfer of antibiotic resistance genes through the variable mixtures of bacteria in the activated sludge might be the reason for the antibiotic resistance amplification. The amplified risk of antibiotic resistance in wastewater treatment needs to be paid more attention. PMID:25957255

  2. Interferon in resistance to bacterial and protozoan infections

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sonnenfeld, Gerald; Gould, Cheryl L.; Kierszenbaum, Felipe; Degee, Antonie L. W.; Mansfield, John M.

    1986-01-01

    The effects of genetic differences in mouse strains on the modulation of protozoan infections by interferon (IFN) were investigated. In one set of experiments, three different strains of mice were injected with T. cruzi, and their sera were assayed at five time intervals for IFN titer. A greater quantity of IFN was produced by mouse strains that were susceptible to T. cruzi infection than by the more resistant strain. In another set of experiments, spleen cell cultures from inbred strains of mice were challenged with an antigen made from T.b. rhodesiense. The cells from mice resistant to infection, produced greater amounts of IFN-gamma than did cells from the susceptible mice. In a third set of experiments, it was found that mice injected with T.b. rhodesiense before being infected with a diabetogenic virus (EMC-D) were resistant to the effects of the virus and did not produce virus-specific antibody.

  3. Role of wild birds as carriers of multi-drug resistant Escherichia coli and Escherichia vulneris

    PubMed Central

    Shobrak, Mohammed Y.; Abo-Amer, Aly E.

    2014-01-01

    Emergence and distribution of multi-drug resistant (MDR) bacteria in environments pose a risk to human and animal health. A total of 82 isolates of Escherichia spp. were recovered from cloacal swabs of migrating and non-migrating wild birds. All bacterial isolates were identified and characterized morphologically and biochemically. 72% and 50% of isolates recovered from non-migrating and migrating birds, respectively, showed positive congo red dye binding (a virulence factor). Also, hemolysin production (a virulence factor) was showed in 8% of isolates recovered from non-migrating birds and 75% of isolates recovered from migrating birds. All isolates recovered from non-migrating birds were found resistant to Oxacillin while all isolates recovered from migrating birds demonstrated resistance to Oxacillin, Chloramphenicol, Oxytetracycline and Lincomycin. Some bacterial isolates recovered from non-migrating birds and migrating birds exhibited MDR phenotype. The MDR isolates were further characterized by API 20E and 16S rRNA as E. coli and E. vulneris. MDR Escherichia isolates contain ~1–5 plasmids of high-molecular weights. Accordingly, wild birds could create a potential threat to human and animal health by transmitting MDR bacteria to water streams and other environmental sources through their faecal residues, and to remote regions by migration. PMID:25763023

  4. Registration of Common Bacterial Blight Resistant Dark Red Kidney Bean Germplasm Line USDK-CBB-15

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Dark red kidney bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) germplasm line USDK-CBB-15 was developed by USDA-ARS in cooperation with the Idaho Agricultural Experiment Station and released in 2005. This line was bred specifically for a high level of resistance to common bacterial blight (Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. ...

  5. RELEASE OF COMMON BACTERIAL BLIGHT RESISTANT WHITE KIDNEY BEAN GERMPLASM LINE USWK-CBB-17

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Agricultural Research Service, U.S. Department of Agriculture, and the Idaho Agricultural Experiment Station announce the release of USWK-CBB-17 white kidney (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) germplasm line with a high level of resistance to common bacterial blight caused by Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. ph...

  6. Response to selection for bacterial cold water disease resistance in rainbow trout

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A family-based selection program was initiated at the National Center for Cool and Cold Water Aquaculture in 2005 to improve resistance to bacterial cold water disease (BCWD) in rainbow trout. The objective of this study was to estimate response to 2 generations of selection. A total of 14,841 juven...

  7. Antibiotic exposure can induce various bacterial virulence phenotypes in multidrug-resistant Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Salmonella is one of the most prevalent bacterial foodborne diseases in the United States and causes an estimated 1 million human cases every year. Multidrug-resistant (MDR) Salmonella has emerged as a public health issue as it has been associated with increased morbidity in humans and mortality in...

  8. Resistance to a Bacterial Toxin Is Mediated by Removal of a Conserved Glycosylation Pathway Required for

    E-print Network

    Aroian, Raffi V.

    Resistance to a Bacterial Toxin Is Mediated by Removal of a Conserved Glycosylation Pathway Required for Toxin-Host Interactions* Received for publication, July 25, 2003, and in revised form, August, California 92093 Crystal (Cry) proteins made by the bacterium Bacillus thuringiensis are pore-forming toxins

  9. Tetracycline Resistance Gene Maintenance under Varying Bacterial Growth Rate, Substrate and Oxygen Availability, and Tetracycline

    E-print Network

    Alvarez, Pedro J.

    Tetracycline Resistance Gene Maintenance under Varying Bacterial Growth Rate, Substrate and Oxygen Availability, and Tetracycline Concentration Michal Rysz, William R. Mansfield, John D. Fortner,§ and Pedro J on continuous culture and batch experiments to determine how tetracycline (TC), aerobic vs anaerobic conditions

  10. Clinically Relevant Transmitted Drug Resistance to First Line Antiretroviral Drugs and Implications for Recommendations

    PubMed Central

    Monge, Susana; Guillot, Vicente; Alvarez, Marta; Chueca, Natalia; Stella, Natalia; Peña, Alejandro; Delgado, Rafael; Córdoba, Juan; Aguilera, Antonio; Vidal, Carmen; García, Federico; CoRIS

    2014-01-01

    Background The aim was to analyse trends in clinically relevant resistance to first-line antiretroviral drugs in Spain, applying the Stanford algorithm, and to compare these results with reported Transmitted Drug Resistance (TDR) defined by the 2009 update of the WHO SDRM list. Methods We analysed 2781 sequences from ARV naive patients of the CoRIS cohort (Spain) between 2007–2011. Using the Stanford algorithm “Low-level resistance”, “Intermediate resistance” and “High-level resistance” categories were considered as “Resistant”. Results 70% of the TDR found using the WHO list were relevant for first-line treatment according to the Stanford algorithm. A total of 188 patients showed clinically relevant resistance to first-line ARVs [6.8% (95%Confidence Interval: 5.8–7.7)], and 221 harbored TDR using the WHO list [7.9% (6.9–9.0)]. Differences were due to a lower prevalence in clinically relevant resistance for NRTIs [2.3% (1.8–2.9) vs. 3.6% (2.9–4.3) by the WHO list] and PIs [0.8% (0.4–1.1) vs. 1.7% (1.2–2.2)], while it was higher for NNRTIs [4.6% (3.8–5.3) vs. 3.7% (3.0–4.7)]. While TDR remained stable throughout the study period, clinically relevant resistance to first line drugs showed a significant trend to a decline (p?=?0.02). Conclusions Prevalence of clinically relevant resistance to first line ARVs in Spain is decreasing, and lower than the one expected looking at TDR using the WHO list. Resistance to first-line PIs falls below 1%, so the recommendation of screening for TDR in the protease gene should be questioned in our setting. Cost-effectiveness studies need to be carried out to inform evidence-based recommendations. PMID:24637804

  11. Balancing drug resistance and growth rates via compensatory mutations in the Plasmodium falciparum chloroquine resistance transporter.

    PubMed

    Petersen, Ines; Gabryszewski, Stanislaw J; Johnston, Geoffrey L; Dhingra, Satish K; Ecker, Andrea; Lewis, Rebecca E; de Almeida, Mariana Justino; Straimer, Judith; Henrich, Philipp P; Palatulan, Eugene; Johnson, David J; Coburn-Flynn, Olivia; Sanchez, Cecilia; Lehane, Adele M; Lanzer, Michael; Fidock, David A

    2015-07-01

    The widespread use of chloroquine to treat Plasmodium falciparum infections has resulted in the selection and dissemination of variant haplotypes of the primary resistance determinant PfCRT. These haplotypes have encountered drug pressure and within-host competition with wild-type drug-sensitive parasites. To examine these selective forces in vitro, we genetically engineered P.?falciparum to express geographically diverse PfCRT haplotypes. Variant alleles from the Philippines (PH1 and PH2, which differ solely by the C72S mutation) both conferred a moderate gain of chloroquine resistance and a reduction in growth rates in vitro. Of the two, PH2 showed higher IC50 values, contrasting with reduced growth. Furthermore, a highly mutated pfcrt allele from Cambodia (Cam734) conferred moderate chloroquine resistance and enhanced growth rates, when tested against wild-type pfcrt in co-culture competition assays. These three alleles mediated cross-resistance to amodiaquine, an antimalarial drug widely used in Africa. Each allele, along with the globally prevalent Dd2 and 7G8 alleles, rendered parasites more susceptible to lumefantrine, the partner drug used in the leading first-line artemisinin-based combination therapy. These data reveal ongoing region-specific evolution of PfCRT that impacts drug susceptibility and relative fitness in settings of mixed infections, and raise important considerations about optimal agents to treat chloroquine-resistant malaria. PMID:25898991

  12. Balancing drug resistance and growth rates via compensatory mutations in the Plasmodium falciparum chloroquine resistance transporter

    PubMed Central

    Petersen, Ines; Gabryszewski, Stanislaw J.; Johnston, Geoffrey L.; Dhingra, Satish K.; Ecker, Andrea; Lewis, Rebecca E.; de Almeida, Mariana Justino; Straimer, Judith; Henrich, Philipp H.; Palatulan, Eugene; Johnson, David J.; Coburn-Flynn, Olivia; Sanchez, Cecilia; Lehane, Adele M.; Lanzer, Michael; Fidock, David A.

    2015-01-01

    Summary The widespread use of chloroquine to treat Plasmodium falciparum infections has resulted in the selection and dissemination of variant haplotypes of the primary resistance determinant PfCRT. These haplotypes have encountered drug pressure and within-host competition with wild-type drug-sensitive parasites. To examine these selective forces in vitro, we genetically engineered P. falciparum to express geographically diverse PfCRT haplotypes. Variant alleles from the Philippines (PH1 and PH2, which differ solely by the C72S mutation) both conferred a moderate gain of chloroquine resistance and a reduction in growth rates in vitro. Of the two, PH2 showed higher IC50 values, contrasting with reduced growth. Furthermore, a highly mutated pfcrt allele from Cambodia (Cam734) conferred moderate chloroquine resistance and enhanced growth rates, when tested against wild-type pfcrt in co-culture competition assays. These three alleles mediated cross-resistance to amodiaquine, an antimalarial drug widely used in Africa. Each allele, along with the globally prevalent Dd2 and 7G8 alleles, rendered parasites more susceptible to lumefantrine, the partner drug used in the leading first-line artemisinin-based combination therapy. These data reveal ongoing region-specific evolution of PfCRT that impacts drug susceptibility and relative fitness in settings of mixed infections, and raise important considerations about optimal agents to treat chloroquine-resistant malaria. PMID:25898991

  13. Drug resistance following irradiation of RIF-1 tumors: Influence of the interval between irradiation and drug treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Hopwood, L.E.; Davies, B.M.; Moulder, J.E. )

    1990-09-01

    RIF-1 tumors contain a small number of cells (1 to 100 per 10(6) cells) that are resistant to 5-fluorouracil, methotrexate, or adriamycin. The frequency of drug-resistant cells among individual untreated tumors is highly variable. Radiation, delivered in vivo at doses of 3 to 12 Gy, increases the frequency of methotrexate- and 5-fluorouracil-resistant cells, but not the frequency of adriamycin-resistant cells. The magnitude of induction of 5-fluorouracil and methotrexate resistance shows a complex dependence on the radiation dose and on the interval between irradiation and assessment of drug resistance. For a dose of 3 Gy, induced 5-fluorouracil and methotrexate resistance is seen only after an interval of 5 to 7 days, whereas for a dose of 12 Gy, high levels of induced resistance are observed 1 to 3 days after irradiation. The maximum absolute risk for induction of resistance is 4 per 10(4) cells per Gy for methotrexate, and 3 per 10(6) cells per Gy for 5-fluorouracil. These results indicate that tumor hypoxia may play a role in the increased levels of drug resistance seen after irradiation, and that both genetic and environmental factors may influence radiation-induction of drug resistance. These studies provide essential data for models of the development of tumor drug resistance, and imply that some of the drug resistance seen when chemotherapy follows radiotherapy may be caused by radiation-induced drug resistance.

  14. Bacterial Volatiles Induce Systemic Resistance in Arabidopsis1

    E-print Network

    Paré, Paul W.

    of bacteria VOCs as initiators of defense responses in plants. Plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR) are a wide range of root-colonizing bacteria with the capacity to enhance plant growth by increasing seed are stimulated and primed to resist infection by pathogens (Van Loon, 1997). Such plant microbe interactions lack

  15. Antibiotic resistant bacterial profiles of anaerobic swine lagoon effluent

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Although land application of swine manure lagoon effluent is a common and effective method of disposal, the presence of antibiotic-resistant bacteria, both pathogenic and commensal can complicate already understood issues associated with its safe disposal. To better understand this, more data is ne...

  16. The prevalence of multidrug-resistant bacterial strains has substantially

    E-print Network

    Nizet, Victor

    against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). S. aureus is the leading cause of many human infections, particularly those of the skin and soft tissues. Moreover, MRSA -- a variation of this bacterium MRSA. Such virulence-factor-based approaches offer a new direction for therapies targeting multidrug

  17. Smart doxorubicin nanoparticles with high drug payload for enhanced chemotherapy against drug resistance and cancer diagnosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Caitong; Zhou, Mengjiao; Zhang, Xiujuan; Wei, Weijia; Chen, Xianfeng; Zhang, Xiaohong

    2015-03-01

    Considering the obvious advantages in efficacy and price, doxorubicin (DOX) has been widely used for a range of cancers, which is usually encapsulated in various nanocarriers for drug delivery. Although effective, in most nanocarrier-based delivery systems, the drug loading capacity of DOX is rather low; this can lead to undesired systemic toxicity and excretion concern. Herein, we report for the first time the usage of pure doxorubicin nanoparticles (DOX NPs) without addition of any carriers for enhanced chemotherapy against drug-resistance. The drug payload reaches as high as 90.47%, which largely surpassed those in previous reports. These PEG stabilized DOX NPs exhibit good biocompatibility and stability, long blood circulation time, fast release in an acidic environment and high accumulation in tumors. Compared with free DOX, DOX NPs display a dramatically enhanced anticancer therapeutic efficacy in the inhibition of cell and tumor growth. Moreover, they can also be readily incorporated with other anticancer drugs for synergistic chemotherapy to overcome the drug resistance of cancers. The fluorescence properties of DOX also endow these NPs with imaging capabilities, thus making it a multifunctional system for diagnosis and treatment. This work demonstrates great potential of DOX NPs for cancer diagnosis, therapy and overcoming drug tolerance.Considering the obvious advantages in efficacy and price, doxorubicin (DOX) has been widely used for a range of cancers, which is usually encapsulated in various nanocarriers for drug delivery. Although effective, in most nanocarrier-based delivery systems, the drug loading capacity of DOX is rather low; this can lead to undesired systemic toxicity and excretion concern. Herein, we report for the first time the usage of pure doxorubicin nanoparticles (DOX NPs) without addition of any carriers for enhanced chemotherapy against drug-resistance. The drug payload reaches as high as 90.47%, which largely surpassed those in previous reports. These PEG stabilized DOX NPs exhibit good biocompatibility and stability, long blood circulation time, fast release in an acidic environment and high accumulation in tumors. Compared with free DOX, DOX NPs display a dramatically enhanced anticancer therapeutic efficacy in the inhibition of cell and tumor growth. Moreover, they can also be readily incorporated with other anticancer drugs for synergistic chemotherapy to overcome the drug resistance of cancers. The fluorescence properties of DOX also endow these NPs with imaging capabilities, thus making it a multifunctional system for diagnosis and treatment. This work demonstrates great potential of DOX NPs for cancer diagnosis, therapy and overcoming drug tolerance. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c5nr00290g

  18. Drug resistance profiles of Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolates to first line anti-tuberculous drugs: A five years study

    PubMed Central

    Menon, Sarala; Dharmshale, Sujata; Chande, Chhaya; Gohil, Aruna; Lilani, Sunil; Mohammad, Salim; Joshi, Ameeta; Chowdhary, Abhay; Bharadwaj, Renu

    2012-01-01

    Background: Drug resistance is a major problem in the treatment of tuberculosis (TB). An estimate of drug resistance is extremely important in the epidemiology and control of TB. However, an assessment of the magnitude of drug resistance in TB is not very well described globally and data remains scantier for India. In view of this, we reviewed our data over last five years. Materials and Methods: Six hundred and seventy-three Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolates were subjected to drug susceptibility against primary anti-tuberculosis drugs by economic variant proportion method. All isolates resistant to isoniazid and rifampicin were taken as multi-drug resistant (MDR). Results: Out of the 673 strains tested, 95 (14.11%) showed monoresistance, 365 (54.23%) strains were found to be resistant to more than one drug. A total of 118 (17.53%) strains were found to be resistant to all the four drugs tested. MDR was seen with 320 (47.54%) isolates. This study observed maximum resistance with rifampicin (74.4%) followed by streptomycin (70.0%), isoniazid (53.2%), and ethambutol (21.7%). Conclusion: While this information may not reflect true prevalence of drug resistance in the region, this may help in further planning long term surveillance studies to know the trend of drug resistance in this area. PMID:22919160

  19. Trends in drug resistance mutations in antiretroviral-naïve intravenous drug users of Rio de Janeiro.

    PubMed

    Maia Teixeira, Sylvia Lopes; Bastos, Francisco Inácio; Hacker, Mariana A; Guimarães, Monick Lindenmeyer; Morgado, Mariza Gonçalves

    2006-06-01

    DNA sequencing of a pol gene fragment from drug-naive injecting drug users samples obtained at two time points of the Brazilian AIDS epidemic (Pre-HAART era: 1994 to early 1997, n = 27; post-HAART era: 1999-2001, n = 38) was undertaken to assess HIV-1 antiretroviral drug resistance mutations and subtyping profiles. Genotypic analysis revealed the presence of PR primary L90M, D30N, M46I, and V82A mutations in 7.9% of the post-HAART group, and a high frequency of secondary mutations (84.2%). Nucleoside RT-associated mutations were observed in 13.2%. In the pre-HAART group, a higher frequency of RT mutations was observed (22.2%) and no PR primary mutations were found, in agreement with the introduction of protease inhibitors (PIs) in therapy during the same period. The identification of 7.9% of drug-naive injecting drug users already bearing RT/PR primary resistance mutations in the post-HAART era group constitutes a major concern in terms of dissemination of drug resistant viruses. The resistance mutations profile of the individuals may reflect the context of antiretroviral treatment in Brazil at the sample collection periods (1994-1997 and 1999-2001). In spite of the differences observed in the drug resistance profiles, similar frequencies of subtype B (63.0 vs. 73.7%), F (22.2 vs. 10.5%), and recombinant B/F (14.8 vs. 15.8%) viruses were found, respectively, in the pre- and post-HAART groups. PMID:16628575

  20. Survival of multi-drug resistant enteropathogenic Escherichia coli and Salmonella paratyphi in Vembanadu

    E-print Network

    Mazumder, Asit

    Survival of multi-drug resistant enteropathogenic Escherichia coli and Salmonella paratyphi the survival response of multi-drug resistant enteropathogenic Escherichia coli and Salmonella paratyphi- otypes of Escherichia coli, Salmonella enterica typhi and paratyphi are highly endemic to India

  1. Multi-resistant bacteria in spontaneous bacterial peritonitis: A new step in management?

    PubMed Central

    de Mattos, Angelo Alves; Costabeber, Ane Micheli; Lionço, Livia Caprara; Tovo, Cristiane Valle

    2014-01-01

    Spontaneous bacterial peritonitis (SBP) is the most typical infection observed in cirrhosis patients. SBP is responsible for an in-hospital mortality rate of approximately 32%. Recently, pattern changes in the bacterial flora of cirrhosis patients have been observed, and an increase in the prevalence of infections caused by multi-resistant bacteria has been noted. The wide-scale use of quinolones in the prophylaxis of SBP has promoted flora modifications and resulted in the development of bacterial resistance. The efficacy of traditionally recommended therapy has been low in nosocomial infections (up to 40%), and multi-resistance has been observed in up to 22% of isolated germs in nosocomial SBP. For this reason, the use of a broad empirical spectrum antibiotic has been suggested in these situations. The distinction between community-acquired infectious episodes, healthcare-associated infections, or nosocomial infections, and the identification of risk factors for multi-resistant germs can aid in the decision-making process regarding the empirical choice of antibiotic therapy. Broad-spectrum antimicrobial agents, such as carbapenems with or without glycopeptides or piperacillin-tazobactam, should be considered for the initial treatment not only of nosocomial infections but also of healthcare-associated infections when the risk factors or severity signs for multi-resistant bacteria are apparent. The use of cephalosporins should be restricted to community-acquired infections. PMID:25339797

  2. Resistance of Aerosolized Bacterial Viruses to Relative Humidity and Temperature.

    PubMed

    Verreault, Daniel; Marcoux-Voiselle, Mélissa; Turgeon, Nathalie; Moineau, Sylvain; Duchaine, Caroline

    2015-10-01

    The use of aerosolized bacteriophages as surrogates for hazardous viruses might simplify and accelerate the discovery of links between viral components and their persistence in the airborne state under diverse environmental conditions. In this study, four structurally distinct lytic phages, MS2 (single-stranded RNA [ssRNA]), ?6 (double-stranded RNA [dsRNA]), ?X174 (single-stranded DNA [ssDNA]), and PR772 (double-stranded DNA [dsDNA]), were nebulized into a rotating chamber and exposed to various levels of relative humidity (RH) and temperature as well as to germicidal UV radiation. The aerosolized viral particles were allowed to remain airborne for up to 14 h before being sampled for analysis by plaque assays and quantitative PCRs. Phages ?6 and MS2 were the most resistant at low levels of relative humidity, while ?X174 was more resistant at 80% RH. Phage ?6 lost its infectivity immediately after exposure to 30°C and 80% RH. The infectivity of all tested phages rapidly declined as a function of the exposure time to UVC radiation, phage MS2 being the most resistant. Taken altogether, our data indicate that these aerosolized phages behave differently under various environmental conditions and highlight the necessity of carefully selecting viral simulants in bioaerosol studies. PMID:26253683

  3. Diazenes as modificators of drug-resistance in tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Osmak, M; Bordukalo, T; Ristov, A A; Jernej, B; Kosmrlj, J; Polanc, S

    2000-01-01

    To overcome the drug resistance, which is the major obstacle in the successful treatment of cancer patients, various compounds have been tested. Glutathione is one of the most promising targets for modulation. In the present study, we examined the influence of five new synthesized compounds--diazenes on the reduction of the intracellular level of GSH. Further, we investigated their ability to increase the cytotoxicity of cisplatin, vincristine and doxorubicin. In experiments human parental cervical (HeLa) and laryngeal (HEp2) carcinoma cells and their drug-resistant cell sublines (HeLaCA and CK2, respectively) were used. Intracellular GSH content was examined spectrophotometrically by the procedure developed by Tietze. The cell sensitivity to drugs was determined using a modified colorimetric MTT assay. Results showed that the rate of reduction of GSH concentration was dependent on the cell type and the type of diazenes. We did not find a correlation between the reduction in GSH level and increased cytotoxicity to selected anticancer drugs. Nevertheless, we found that: a) diazenes LV-35 and VZ-19 increased the cytotoxicity of cisplatin in HEp2 cells, b) diazene MG-19 potentiated the cytotoxicity of vincristine in HEp2 cells, and c) diazene VZ-19 in HeLaCA cells. These data suggest that specific combination of diazene and anticancer drug may be useful in the treatment of certain tumor types. PMID:11263864

  4. Recognition of the Hyaloperonospora parasitica effector ATR13 triggers resistance against oomycete, bacterial, and viral pathogens.

    PubMed

    Rentel, Maike C; Leonelli, Lauriebeth; Dahlbeck, Douglas; Zhao, Bingyu; Staskawicz, Brian J

    2008-01-22

    Phytopathogenic oomycetes cause some of the most devastating diseases affecting agricultural crops. Hyaloperonospora parasitica is a native oomycete pathogen of Arabidopsis and is related to other oomycete phytopathogens that include several species of Phytophthora, including the causal agent of potato late blight. Recently, four oomycete effector genes have been isolated, and several oomycete genomes have been sequenced. We have developed an efficient and genetically amenable system to test putative effector genes using the bacterial pathogen Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato DC3000. The H. parasitica effector protein ATR13 was delivered via P. syringae by fusing the ATR13 gene with the avrRpm1 type three secretion signal peptide, a bacterial sequence that allows transfer of proteins into the host cell through the bacterial type III secretion system. We also inserted ATR13 into the genome of the turnip mosaic virus, a single-stranded RNA virus. Our results show that delivery of ATR13 via the bacterial or viral pathogen triggers defense responses in plants containing the cognate resistance protein RPP13(Nd), which restricts proliferation of both pathogens. Hence, recognition of ATR13 by RPP13 initiates defense responses that are effective against oomycete, bacterial and viral pathogens, pointing to a common defense mechanism. We have characterized regions of the RPP13(Nd) resistance protein that are essential for effector recognition and/or downstream signaling, using transient coexpression in Nicotiana benthamiana. PMID:18198274

  5. Cultivable Bacterial Microbiota of Northern Bobwhite (Colinus virginianus): A New Reservoir of Antimicrobial Resistance?

    PubMed Central

    Su, Hongwen; McKelvey, Jessica; Rollins, Dale; Zhang, Michael; Brightsmith, Donald J.; Derr, James; Zhang, Shuping

    2014-01-01

    The northern bobwhite (Colinus virginianus) is an ecologically and economically important avian species. At the present time, little is known about the microbial communities associated with these birds. As the first step to create a quail microbiology knowledge base, the current study conducted an inventory of cultivable quail tracheal, crop, cecal, and cloacal microbiota and associated antimicrobial resistance using a combined bacteriology and DNA sequencing approach. A total of 414 morphologically unique bacterial colonies were selected from nonselective aerobic and anaerobic cultures, as well as selective and enrichment cultures. Analysis of the first 500-bp 16S rRNA gene sequences in conjunction with biochemical identifications revealed 190 non-redundant species-level taxonomic units, representing 160 known bacterial species and 30 novel species. The bacterial species were classified into 4 phyla, 14 orders, 37 families, and 59 or more genera. Firmicutes was the most commonly encountered phylum (57%) followed by Actinobacteria (24%), Proteobacteria (17%) and Bacteroidetes (0.02%). Extensive diversity in the species composition of quail microbiota was observed among individual birds and anatomical locations. Quail microbiota harbored several opportunistic pathogens, such as E. coli and Ps. aeruginosa, as well as human commensal organisms, including Neisseria species. Phenotypic characterization of selected bacterial species demonstrated a high prevalence of resistance to the following classes of antimicrobials: phenicol, macrolide, lincosamide, quinolone, and sulphate. Data from the current investigation warrant further investigation on the source, transmission, pathology, and control of antimicrobial resistance in wild quail populations. PMID:24937705

  6. Steering Evolution with Sequential Therapy to Prevent the Emergence of Bacterial Antibiotic Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Nichol, Daniel; Jeavons, Peter; Fletcher, Alexander G.; Bonomo, Robert A.; Maini, Philip K.; Paul, Jerome L.; Gatenby, Robert A.; Anderson, Alexander R.A.; Scott, Jacob G.

    2015-01-01

    The increasing rate of antibiotic resistance and slowing discovery of novel antibiotic treatments presents a growing threat to public health. Here, we consider a simple model of evolution in asexually reproducing populations which considers adaptation as a biased random walk on a fitness landscape. This model associates the global properties of the fitness landscape with the algebraic properties of a Markov chain transition matrix and allows us to derive general results on the non-commutativity and irreversibility of natural selection as well as antibiotic cycling strategies. Using this formalism, we analyze 15 empirical fitness landscapes of E. coli under selection by different ?-lactam antibiotics and demonstrate that the emergence of resistance to a given antibiotic can be either hindered or promoted by different sequences of drug application. Specifically, we demonstrate that the majority, approximately 70%, of sequential drug treatments with 2–4 drugs promote resistance to the final antibiotic. Further, we derive optimal drug application sequences with which we can probabilistically ‘steer’ the population through genotype space to avoid the emergence of resistance. This suggests a new strategy in the war against antibiotic–resistant organisms: drug sequencing to shepherd evolution through genotype space to states from which resistance cannot emerge and by which to maximize the chance of successful therapy. PMID:26360300

  7. Steering Evolution with Sequential Therapy to Prevent the Emergence of Bacterial Antibiotic Resistance.

    PubMed

    Nichol, Daniel; Jeavons, Peter; Fletcher, Alexander G; Bonomo, Robert A; Maini, Philip K; Paul, Jerome L; Gatenby, Robert A; Anderson, Alexander R A; Scott, Jacob G

    2015-09-01

    The increasing rate of antibiotic resistance and slowing discovery of novel antibiotic treatments presents a growing threat to public health. Here, we consider a simple model of evolution in asexually reproducing populations which considers adaptation as a biased random walk on a fitness landscape. This model associates the global properties of the fitness landscape with the algebraic properties of a Markov chain transition matrix and allows us to derive general results on the non-commutativity and irreversibility of natural selection as well as antibiotic cycling strategies. Using this formalism, we analyze 15 empirical fitness landscapes of E. coli under selection by different ?-lactam antibiotics and demonstrate that the emergence of resistance to a given antibiotic can be either hindered or promoted by different sequences of drug application. Specifically, we demonstrate that the majority, approximately 70%, of sequential drug treatments with 2-4 drugs promote resistance to the final antibiotic. Further, we derive optimal drug application sequences with which we can probabilistically 'steer' the population through genotype space to avoid the emergence of resistance. This suggests a new strategy in the war against antibiotic-resistant organisms: drug sequencing to shepherd evolution through genotype space to states from which resistance cannot emerge and by which to maximize the chance of successful therapy. PMID:26360300

  8. Coherent feedforward transcriptional regulatory motifs enhance drug resistance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charlebois, Daniel A.; Balázsi, Gábor; Kærn, Mads

    2014-05-01

    Fluctuations in gene expression give identical cells access to a spectrum of phenotypes that can serve as a transient, nongenetic basis for natural selection by temporarily increasing drug resistance. In this study, we demonstrate using mathematical modeling and simulation that certain gene regulatory network motifs, specifically coherent feedforward loop motifs, can facilitate the development of nongenetic resistance by increasing cell-to-cell variability and the time scale at which beneficial phenotypic states can be maintained. Our results highlight how regulatory network motifs enabling transient, nongenetic inheritance play an important role in defining reproductive fitness in adverse environments and provide a selective advantage subject to evolutionary pressure.

  9. Giardiasis in the post genomic era: treatment, drug resistance and novel therapeutic perspectives.

    PubMed

    Lalle, Marco

    2010-08-01

    Giardia duodenalis (syn. G. lamblia, G. intestinalis) is a flagellated protozoan, member of the order Diplomonadidae, that parasitizes the upper part of the small intestine of mammals, including human, pets and livestock. G. duodenalis is the causative agent of giardiasis, the most common non-bacterial and non-viral diarrheal diseases affecting humans worldwide. Recently, giardiasis was included in the 'Neglected Disease Initiative', estimating that 280 million people are infected each year with G. duodenalis. Transmission occurs via the faecal-oral route by ingestion of cysts, the infective stage of the parasite, either by direct person-to-person transmission or indirectly through water and food. There are several effective drugs that have been approved for the treatment of giardiasis. The 5-nitroimidazole and benzimidazole derivatives, quinacrine, furazolidone, paromomycin, nitazoxanide are the most commonly used, however some of these compounds have sometimes relevant side effects. Single- and multi-drug resistance to some of these compounds, including metronidazole (MTZ), has been reported in human patients and can be induced in vitro. The aims of this review are (i) to provide a bird's eye view on the current knowledge of the mechanisms of action, including resistance mechanisms, of the most commonly used anti-giardial compounds, and (ii) to summarize recent findings on novel promising drugs targeting unique proteins and metabolic pathways of G. duodenalis. PMID:20429863

  10. EDITORIAL REVIEW The antiretroviral rollout and drug-resistant HIV in

    E-print Network

    Blower, Sally

    EDITORIAL REVIEW The antiretroviral rollout and drug-resistant HIV in Africa: insights from in Africa is likely to generate an epidemic of drug-resistant strains of HIV. We review what has occurred, and the emergence and transmission of drug-resistant HIV. We also review how mathematical models have been used

  11. Studies Show Microenvironment Plays Key Role in Anticancer Drug Resistance | Physical Sciences in Oncology

    Cancer.gov

    As mounting evidence continues to show that evolutionary selective pressure will ultimately drive cancer cells to develop resistance to drug therapies, cancer researchers are looking for new treatment paradigms that might avoid or surmount drug resistance. One promising approach aims to better understand how the microenvironment surrounding a tumor impacts drug resistance and use that knowledge to create novel strategies for attacking tumors.

  12. Multidrug and Extensively Drug-resistant Tuberculosis in Canada 1997–2008: Demographic and Disease Characteristics

    PubMed Central

    Minion, Jessica; Gallant, Victor; Wolfe, Joyce; Jamieson, Frances; Long, Richard

    2013-01-01

    Setting Nationwide Canadian public health surveillance. Objective Description of demographic features and disease characteristics of drug-resistant tuberculosis (TB) in Canada over a 12 year period. Design Continuous surveillance of all cases of culture-confirmed TB in Canada. Demographic and microbiologic features were analyzed and comparisons between drug-susceptible, multidrug-resistant (MDR), and drug-resistant not-MDR were made. Cases of extensively drug resistant TB are described. Results 15,993 cases of culture-confirmed TB were reported during the study period. There were 5 cases of XDR-TB, 177 cases of MDR-TB, and 1,234 cases of first-line drug resistance not-MDR. The majority of drug-resistant cases were reported in foreign-born individuals, with drug-resistant cases diagnosed earlier post-arrival in Canada compared to drug-susceptible cases. In MDR-TB isolates, there was a high rate of drug-resistance to other first- and second-line drugs, making reliable empiric therapeutic recommendations for MDR-TB difficult. There was a statistically significant association between both MDR and drug-resistance not-MDR, and the risk of a negative treatment outcome (defined as treatment failure, absconded, or treatment ongoing >3 yrs). Conclusion Drug-resistance complicates TB management even in developed nations with well-established TB control programs. The predominantly international origin of drug-resistant cases highlights the need for global strategies to combat TB. PMID:23326436

  13. Bottlenecks in the Transferability of Antibiotic Resistance from Natural Ecosystems to Human Bacterial Pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Martínez, José L.

    2011-01-01

    It is generally accepted that resistance genes acquired by human pathogens through horizontal gene transfer originated in environmental, non-pathogenic bacteria. As a consequence, there is increasing concern on the roles that natural, non-clinical ecosystems, may play in the evolution of resistance. Recent studies have shown that the variability of determinants that can provide antibiotic resistance on their expression in a heterologous host is much larger than what is actually found in human pathogens, which implies the existence of bottlenecks modulating the transfer, spread, and stability of antibiotic resistance genes. In this review, the role that different factors such as founder effects, ecological connectivity, fitness costs, or second-order selection may have on the establishment of a specific resistance determinant in a population of bacterial pathogens is analyzed. PMID:22319513

  14. Smart doxorubicin nanoparticles with high drug payload for enhanced chemotherapy against drug resistance and cancer diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Yu, Caitong; Zhou, Mengjiao; Zhang, Xiujuan; Wei, Weijia; Chen, Xianfeng; Zhang, Xiaohong

    2015-03-19

    Considering the obvious advantages in efficacy and price, doxorubicin (DOX) has been widely used for a range of cancers, which is usually encapsulated in various nanocarriers for drug delivery. Although effective, in most nanocarrier-based delivery systems, the drug loading capacity of DOX is rather low; this can lead to undesired systemic toxicity and excretion concern. Herein, we report for the first time the usage of pure doxorubicin nanoparticles (DOX NPs) without addition of any carriers for enhanced chemotherapy against drug-resistance. The drug payload reaches as high as 90.47%, which largely surpassed those in previous reports. These PEG stabilized DOX NPs exhibit good biocompatibility and stability, long blood circulation time, fast release in an acidic environment and high accumulation in tumors. Compared with free DOX, DOX NPs display a dramatically enhanced anticancer therapeutic efficacy in the inhibition of cell and tumor growth. Moreover, they can also be readily incorporated with other anticancer drugs for synergistic chemotherapy to overcome the drug resistance of cancers. The fluorescence properties of DOX also endow these NPs with imaging capabilities, thus making it a multifunctional system for diagnosis and treatment. This work demonstrates great potential of DOX NPs for cancer diagnosis, therapy and overcoming drug tolerance. PMID:25740312

  15. Emergence of Extensively Drug-Resistant Proteus mirabilis Harboring a Conjugative NDM-1 Plasmid and a Novel Salmonella Genomic Island 1 Variant, SGI1-Z.

    PubMed

    Qin, Shangshang; Qi, Hui; Zhang, Qijing; Zhao, Di; Liu, Zhen-Zhen; Tian, Hao; Xu, Lijuan; Xu, Hui; Zhou, Mengmeng; Feng, Xianju; Liu, Hong-Min

    2015-10-01

    Acquisition of blaNDM-1 in bacterial species, such as Proteus mirabilis that is intrinsically resistant to tetracycline, tigecycline and colistin, will make clinical treatment extremely difficult. Here, we characterized an NDM-1-producing clinical isolate of P. mirabilis (PM58) that displayed an extensively drug-resistant (XDR) phenotype, susceptible only to aztreonam. Molecular analysis revealed that PM58 harbored both a conjugative NDM-1 plasmid and a novel Salmonella genomic island 1 variant on chromosome. PMID:26195511

  16. Bacterial resistance after short-term exposure to antibiotics.

    PubMed Central

    Wood, Thomas O; Dickson, Harold; Nix, Vickie A; Hamilton, Danielle

    2002-01-01

    PURPOSE: To determine if there is a difference in antibiotic sensitivity to coagulase-negative Staphylococcus (CNS) cultured from the host versus the donor cornea at the time of corneal transplantation. Then to apply this knowledge to preoperative preparation of patients undergoing eye surgery. METHOD: A total of 923 donor corneas stored in Optisol and 895 host corneas with no preoperative antibiotic exposure were cultured. Forty-two CNS positive cultures grew from the donor corneas and 40 from the host corneas (P = .5). RESULTS: There was an increase in resistance in the bacteria cultured from the donor compared with the host. The most striking changes occurred in host versus donor to: ciprofloxacin 27.5% (P = .0033); gentamicin 27% (P = .0113); tobramycin 31.6% (P = .059). The combination of polymixin, bacitracin, and neomycin (P/B/N) was significantly better than ciprofloxacin, gentamicin, and tobramycin or the combination of ciprofloxacin, gentamicin, and tobramycin (C/G/T) (P = .0007). CONCLUSION: The combination of C/G/T exhibited the highest change to resistant bacteria. P/B/N was the most effective commercially available preparation. These results should be considered when making the decision about which preoperative antibiotic to use, if any. PMID:12545687

  17. Chemosensitisation of drug-resistant and drug-sensitive yeast cells to antifungals.

    PubMed

    Cernicka, Jana; Kozovska, Zuzana; Hnatova, Martina; Valachovic, Martin; Hapala, Ivan; Riedl, Zsuzsanna; Hajós, György; Subik, Julius

    2007-02-01

    Multidrug resistance in yeast results from overexpression of genes encoding drug efflux transporters owing to gain-of-function mutations in transcription factors regulating their expression. We have screened a library of synthetic compounds for modulators of drug resistance using the multidrug-resistant Saccharomyces cerevisiae pdr3-9 mutant strain. One of the compounds, 7-chlorotetrazolo[5,1-c]benzo[1,2,4]triazine (CTBT), displayed weak antifungal activity and strongly inhibited the growth of yeast cells in combination with subinhibitory concentrations of other antifungals with a different mode of action. Biological activity of CTBT was demonstrated in Saccharomyces, Kluyveromyces and Candida yeast species grown on solid and in liquid media. The chemosensitising effect of CTBT, manifested as increased antifungal activity of fluconazole, was demonstrated in yeast mutant strains with deleted genes encoding the major multidrug resistance transcription factors Yap1p, Pdr1p and Pdr3p as well as the drug efflux pumps Pdr5p and Snq2p in S. cerevisiae or their counterparts in Candida albicans and Candida glabrata, named Cdr1p and Mdr1p, respectively. Importantly, CTBT also increased the sensitivity to fluconazole in multidrug-resistant cells overexpressing the efflux pumps. Yeast cells grown in the presence of subinhibitory concentrations of CTBT exhibited an altered sterol composition and a slightly enhanced accumulation of Rhodamine 6G, which suggests that the plasma membrane plays a role in sensitisation. This novel chemosensitisation by CTBT that can overcome multidrug resistance in yeast may prove useful in combined treatment of infections caused by drug-resistant fungal pathogens. PMID:17204400

  18. Mathematical Modeling of Bacterial Kinetics to Predict the Impact of Antibiotic Colonic Exposure and Treatment Duration on the Amount of Resistant Enterobacteria Excreted

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Thu Thuy; Guedj, Jeremie; Chachaty, Elisabeth; de Gunzburg, Jean; Andremont, Antoine; Mentré, France

    2014-01-01

    Fecal excretion of antibiotics and resistant bacteria in the environment are major public health threats associated with extensive farming and modern medical care. Innovative strategies that can reduce the intestinal antibiotic concentrations during treatments are in development. However, the effect of lower exposure on the amount of resistant enterobacteria excreted has not been quantified, making it difficult to anticipate the impact of these strategies. Here, we introduce a bacterial kinetic model to capture the complex relationships between drug exposure, loss of susceptible enterobacteria and growth of resistant strains in the feces of piglets receiving placebo, 1.5 or 15 mg/kg/day ciprofloxacin, a fluoroquinolone, for 5 days. The model could well describe the kinetics of drug susceptible and resistant enterobacteria observed during treatment, and up to 22 days after treatment cessation. Next, the model was used to predict the expected amount of resistant enterobacteria excreted over an average piglet's lifetime (150 days) when varying drug exposure and treatment duration. For the clinically relevant dose of 15 mg/kg/day for 5 days, the total amount of resistant enterobacteria excreted was predicted to be reduced by 75% and 98% when reducing treatment duration to 3 and 1 day treatment, respectively. Alternatively, for a fixed 5-days treatment, the level of resistance excreted could be reduced by 18%, 33%, 57.5% and 97% if 3, 5, 10 and 30 times lower levels of colonic drug concentrations were achieved, respectively. This characterization on in vivo data of the dynamics of resistance to antibiotics in the colonic flora could provide new insights into the mechanism of dissemination of resistance and can be used to design strategies aiming to reduce it. PMID:25210849

  19. 21 CFR 866.3950 - In vitro human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) drug resistance genotype assay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false In vitro human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) drug... Serological Reagents § 866.3950 In vitro human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) drug resistance genotype assay. (a) Identification. The in vitro HIV drug resistance genotype assay is a device that consists of nucleic acid...

  20. 21 CFR 866.3950 - In vitro human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) drug resistance genotype assay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false In vitro human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) drug... Serological Reagents § 866.3950 In vitro human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) drug resistance genotype assay. (a) Identification. The in vitro HIV drug resistance genotype assay is a device that consists of nucleic acid...

  1. 21 CFR 866.3950 - In vitro human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) drug resistance genotype assay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false In vitro human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) drug... Serological Reagents § 866.3950 In vitro human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) drug resistance genotype assay. (a) Identification. The in vitro HIV drug resistance genotype assay is a device that consists of nucleic acid...

  2. 21 CFR 866.3950 - In vitro human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) drug resistance genotype assay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false In vitro human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) drug... Serological Reagents § 866.3950 In vitro human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) drug resistance genotype assay. (a) Identification. The in vitro HIV drug resistance genotype assay is a device that consists of nucleic acid...

  3. Assessing transmissibility of HIV-1 drug resistance mutations from treated and from drug-naive individuals

    PubMed Central

    Winand, Raf; Theys, Kristof; Eusébio, Mónica; Aerts, Jan; Camacho, Ricardo J.; Gomes, Perpetua; Suchard, Marc A.; Vandamme, Anne-Mieke; Abecasis, Ana B.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: Surveillance drug resistance mutations (SDRMs) in drug-naive patients are typically used to survey HIV-1-transmitted drug resistance (TDR). We test here how SDRMs in patients failing treatment, the original source of TDR, contribute to assessing TDR, transmissibility and transmission source of SDRMs. Design: This is a retrospective observational study analyzing a Portuguese cohort of HIV-1-infected patients. Methods: The prevalence of SDRMs to protease inhibitors, nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs) and nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTIs) in drug-naive and treatment-failing patients was measured for 3554 HIV-1 subtype B patients. Transmission ratio (prevalence in drug-naive/prevalence in treatment-failing patients), average viral load and robust linear regression with outlier detection (prevalence in drug-naive versus in treatment-failing patients) were analyzed and used to interpret transmissibility. Results: Prevalence of SDRMs in drug-naive and treatment-failing patients were linearly correlated, but some SDRMs were classified as outliers – above (PRO: D30N, N88D/S, L90?M, RT: G190A/S/E) or below (RT: M184I/V) expectations. The normalized regression slope was 0.073 for protease inhibitors, 0.084 for NRTIs and 0.116 for NNRTIs. Differences between SDRMs transmission ratios were not associated with differences in viral loads. Conclusion: The significant linear correlation between prevalence of SDRMs in drug-naive and in treatment-failing patients indicates that the prevalence in treatment-failing patients can be useful to predict levels of TDR. The slope is a cohort-dependent estimate of rate of TDR per drug class and outlier detection reveals comparative persistence of SDRMs. Outlier SDRMs with higher transmissibility are more persistent and more likely to have been acquired from drug-naive patients. Those with lower transmissibility have faster reversion dynamics after transmission and are associated with acquisition from treatment-failing patients. PMID:26355575

  4. Combating Drug-Resistant Bacteria: Small Molecule Mimics of Plasmid Incompatibility as Antiplasmid Compounds

    E-print Network

    Hergenrother, Paul J.

    Combating Drug-Resistant Bacteria: Small Molecule Mimics of Plasmid Incompatibility as Antiplasmid drug-resistant bacteria. Many bacteria become resistant to antibiotics through the uptake of a plasmid As a consequence, significant plasmid- encoded resistance is observed clinically for the major classes

  5. Overcoming Drug Resistance and Treating Advanced Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Semenas, Julius; Allegrucci, Cinzia; Boorjian, Stephen A; Mongan, Nigel P; Persson, Jenny Liao

    2012-01-01

    Most of the prostate cancers (PCa) in advanced stage will progress to castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC). Within CRPC group, 50-70% of the patients will develop bone metastasis in axial and other regions of the skeleton. Once PCa cells spread to the bone, currently, no treatment regimens are available to eradicate the metastasis, and cancer-related death becomes inevitable. In 2012, it is estimated that there will be 28,170 PCa deaths in the United States. Thus, PCa bone metastasis-associated clinical complications and treatment resistance pose major clinical challenges. In this review, we will present recent findings on the molecular and cellular pathways that are responsible for bone metastasis of PCa. We will address several novel mechanisms with a focus on the role of bone and bone marrow microenvironment in promoting PCa metastasis, and will further discuss why prostate cancer cells preferentially metastasize to the bone. Additionally, we will discuss novel roles of several key pathways, including angiogenesis and extracellular matrix remodeling in bone marrow and stem cell niches with their relationship to PCa bone metastasis and poor treatment response. We will evaluate how various chemotherapeutic drugs and radiation therapies may allow aggressive PCa cells to gain advantageous mutations leading to increased survival and rendering the cancer cells to become resistant to treatment. The novel concept relating several key survival and invasion signaling pathways to stem cell niches and treatment resistance will be reviewed. Lastly, we will provide an update of several recently developed novel drug candidates that target metastatic cancer microenvironments or niches, and discuss the advantages and significance provided by such therapeutic approaches in pursuit of overcoming drug resistance and treating advanced PCa. PMID:22746994

  6. Delamanid expanded access novel treatment of drug resistant tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Rustomjee, Roxana; Zumla, Alimuddin

    2015-01-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) remains a global emergency and is one of the most common infectious disease causes of death in developing countries. Current treatment regimens for multi-drug resistant TB are associated with low treatment success rates, are toxic, and require long duration of treatment. The need for shorter and more effective treatment regimens is urgent. Delamanid (Deltyba, or formerly known as OPC-67683) is a new dihydro-imidazooxazole anti-TB drug active against resistant forms of pulmonary TB. Delamanid kills Mycobacterium tuberculosis by inhibiting the synthesis of mycolic acids required for cell wall synthesis. Whilst delamanid has been included in the WHO Model List of Essential Medicine by the World Health Organization Expert Committee on Selection and Use of Essential Medicines and in international guidance for the treatment of multi-drug resistant TB since April 2014, its access in countries with the greatest need, has proven challenging. This review provides an update on currently available clinical safety and efficacy data on delamanid and offers a discussion on research priorities and recommendations for expedited, expanded access. PMID:26604805

  7. Stochastic model of an influenza epidemic with drug resistance.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yaji; Allen, Linda J S; Perelson, Alan S

    2007-09-01

    A continuous-time Markov chain (CTMC) model is formulated for an influenza epidemic with drug resistance. This stochastic model is based on an influenza epidemic model, expressed in terms of a system of ordinary differential equations (ODE), developed by Stilianakis, N.I., Perelson, A.S., Hayden, F.G., [1998. Emergence of drug resistance during an influenza epidemic: insights from a mathematical model. J. Inf. Dis. 177, 863-873]. Three different treatments-chemoprophylaxis, treatment after exposure but before symptoms, and treatment after symptoms appear, are considered. The basic reproduction number, R(0), is calculated for the deterministic-model under different treatment strategies. It is shown that chemoprophylaxis always reduces the basic reproduction number. In addition, numerical simulations illustrate that the basic reproduction number is generally reduced with realistic treatment rates. Comparisons are made among the different models and the different treatment strategies with respect to the number of infected individuals during an outbreak. The final size distribution is computed for the CTMC model and, in some cases, it is shown to have a bimodal distribution corresponding to two situations: when there is no outbreak and when an outbreak occurs. Given an outbreak occurs, the total number of cases for the CTMC model is in good agreement with the ODE model. The greatest number of drug resistant cases occurs if treatment is delayed or if only symptomatic individuals are treated. PMID:17582443

  8. [Drug resistance in nosocomial strains of staphylococci to methicillin].

    PubMed

    Sawicka-Grzelak, A; Rokosz, A; Meisel-Miko?ajczyk, F

    1998-01-01

    The aim of the present study was the analysis of drug susceptibility of MRSA and MRCNS strains isolated from patients hospitalized in 14 wards of the State Clinical Hospital No 1 in Warsaw. The strains were identified (ID 32 STAPH), and their susceptibility to antimicrobial agents (ATB STAPH) was determined in ATB system (bioMérieux, France). Four methods were applied to confirm the resistance to methicillin: ATB-plus system, disc-diffusion method (Oxa 1 microgram, Oxoid, U.K.), Crystal MRSA ID (Becton Dickinson-BBL, USA) and agar screen test in TSA medium (Difco, USA) with methicillin (25 mg/l, Sigma, USA). 108 Staphylococcus spp. strains were found in 300 clinical specimens. 56 strains were methicillin-resistant (52%). Among methicillin-resistant strains 13 MRSA, 28 MRSE and 15 of other species were found. All MRSA strains were susceptible to vancomycin, teicoplanin and fusidic acid. MRCNS were susceptible first of all to vancomycin (43/43), minocycline (42/43) and pristinamycin (42/43). On the basis of the obtained results it can be stated that methicillin-resistant staphylococci occur in hospital wards. The greatest number of methicillin-resistant strains was cultured from patients hospitalized in surgery wards (32), methicillin-resistant strains much more frequently occur among coagulase-negative staphylococci, especially in Staphylococcus epidermis. Glycopeptide antibiotics are most active against isolated MRSA strains. The most active therapeutic agent against MRCNS is vancomycin. PMID:9857608

  9. Exosomes in development, metastasis and drug resistance of breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Dan-dan; Wu, Ying; Shen, Hong-yu; Lv, Meng-meng; Chen, Wei-xian; Zhang, Xiao-hui; Zhong, Shan-liang; Tang, Jin-hai; Zhao, Jian-hua

    2015-01-01

    Transport through the cell membrane can be divided into active, passive and vesicular types (exosomes). Exosomes are nano-sized vesicles released by a variety of cells. Emerging evidence shows that exosomes play a critical role in cancers. Exosomes mediate communication between stroma and cancer cells through the transfer of nucleic acid and proteins. It is demonstrated that the contents and the quantity of exosomes will change after occurrence of cancers. Over the last decade, growing attention has been paid to the role of exosomes in the development of breast cancer, the most life-threatening cancer in women. Breast cancer could induce salivary glands to secret specific exosomes, which could be used as biomarkers in the diagnosis of early breast cancer. Exosome-delivered nucleic acid and proteins partly facilitate the tumorigenesis, metastasis and resistance of breast cancer. Exosomes could also transmit anti-cancer drugs outside breast cancer cells, therefore leading to drug resistance. However, exosomes are effective tools for transportation of anti-cancer drugs with lower immunogenicity and toxicity. This is a promising way to establish a drug delivery system. PMID:26052865

  10. Exosomes in development, metastasis and drug resistance of breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Yu, Dan-dan; Wu, Ying; Shen, Hong-yu; Lv, Meng-meng; Chen, Wei-xian; Zhang, Xiao-hui; Zhong, Shan-liang; Tang, Jin-hai; Zhao, Jian-hua

    2015-08-01

    Transport through the cell membrane can be divided into active, passive and vesicular types (exosomes). Exosomes are nano-sized vesicles released by a variety of cells. Emerging evidence shows that exosomes play a critical role in cancers. Exosomes mediate communication between stroma and cancer cells through the transfer of nucleic acid and proteins. It is demonstrated that the contents and the quantity of exosomes will change after occurrence of cancers. Over the last decade, growing attention has been paid to the role of exosomes in the development of breast cancer, the most life-threatening cancer in women. Breast cancer could induce salivary glands to secret specific exosomes, which could be used as biomarkers in the diagnosis of early breast cancer. Exosome-delivered nucleic acid and proteins partly facilitate the tumorigenesis, metastasis and resistance of breast cancer. Exosomes could also transmit anti-cancer drugs outside breast cancer cells, therefore leading to drug resistance. However, exosomes are effective tools for transportation of anti-cancer drugs with lower immunogenicity and toxicity. This is a promising way to establish a drug delivery system. PMID:26052865

  11. Catalysis and sulfa drug resistance in dihydropteroate synthase.

    PubMed

    Yun, Mi-Kyung; Wu, Yinan; Li, Zhenmei; Zhao, Ying; Waddell, M Brett; Ferreira, Antonio M; Lee, Richard E; Bashford, Donald; White, Stephen W

    2012-03-01

    The sulfonamide antibiotics inhibit dihydropteroate synthase (DHPS), a key enzyme in the folate pathway of bacteria and primitive eukaryotes. However, resistance mutations have severely compromised the usefulness of these drugs. We report structural, computational, and mutagenesis studies on the catalytic and resistance mechanisms of DHPS. By performing the enzyme-catalyzed reaction in crystalline DHPS, we have structurally characterized key intermediates along the reaction pathway. Results support an S(N)1 reaction mechanism via formation of a novel cationic pterin intermediate. We also show that two conserved loops generate a substructure during catalysis that creates a specific binding pocket for p-aminobenzoic acid, one of the two DHPS substrates. This substructure, together with the pterin-binding pocket, explains the roles of the conserved active-site residues and reveals how sulfonamide resistance arises. PMID:22383850

  12. Catalysis and Sulfa Drug Resistance in Dihydropteroate Synthase

    SciTech Connect

    Yun, Mi-Kyung; Wu, Yinan; Li, Zhenmei; Zhao, Ying; Waddell, M. Brett; Ferreira, Antonio M.; Lee, Richard E.; Bashford, Donald; White, Stephen W.

    2013-04-08

    The sulfonamide antibiotics inhibit dihydropteroate synthase (DHPS), a key enzyme in the folate pathway of bacteria and primitive eukaryotes. However, resistance mutations have severely compromised the usefulness of these drugs. We report structural, computational, and mutagenesis studies on the catalytic and resistance mechanisms of DHPS. By performing the enzyme-catalyzed reaction in crystalline DHPS, we have structurally characterized key intermediates along the reaction pathway. Results support an S{sub N}1 reaction mechanism via formation of a novel cationic pterin intermediate. We also show that two conserved loops generate a substructure during catalysis that creates a specific binding pocket for p-aminobenzoic acid, one of the two DHPS substrates. This substructure, together with the pterin-binding pocket, explains the roles of the conserved active-site residues and reveals how sulfonamide resistance arises.

  13. Genetics of drug resistance in malaria : identification of genes conferring chloroquine and artemisinin resistance in rodent malaria parasite Plasmodium chabaudi 

    E-print Network

    Modrzynska, Katarzyna Kinga

    2011-01-01

    Resistance to antimalarial drugs continues to be a major obstacle in controlling and eradicating malaria. The identification of genetic markers of resistance is vital for disease management but they can be difficult to ...

  14. Regulatory Circuitry Governing Fungal Development, Drug Resistance, and Disease

    PubMed Central

    Shapiro, Rebecca S.; Robbins, Nicole; Cowen, Leah E.

    2011-01-01

    Summary: Pathogenic fungi have become a leading cause of human mortality due to the increasing frequency of fungal infections in immunocompromised populations and the limited armamentarium of clinically useful antifungal drugs. Candida albicans, Cryptococcus neoformans, and Aspergillus fumigatus are the leading causes of opportunistic fungal infections. In these diverse pathogenic fungi, complex signal transduction cascades are critical for sensing environmental changes and mediating appropriate cellular responses. For C. albicans, several environmental cues regulate a morphogenetic switch from yeast to filamentous growth, a reversible transition important for virulence. Many of the signaling cascades regulating morphogenesis are also required for cells to adapt and survive the cellular stresses imposed by antifungal drugs. Many of these signaling networks are conserved in C. neoformans and A. fumigatus, which undergo distinct morphogenetic programs during specific phases of their life cycles. Furthermore, the key mechanisms of fungal drug resistance, including alterations of the drug target, overexpression of drug efflux transporters, and alteration of cellular stress responses, are conserved between these species. This review focuses on the circuitry regulating fungal morphogenesis and drug resistance and the impact of these pathways on virulence. Although the three human-pathogenic fungi highlighted in this review are those most frequently encountered in the clinic, they represent a minute fraction of fungal diversity. Exploration of the conservation and divergence of core signal transduction pathways across C. albicans, C. neoformans, and A. fumigatus provides a foundation for the study of a broader diversity of pathogenic fungi and a platform for the development of new therapeutic strategies for fungal disease. PMID:21646428

  15. A MAJOR QTL FOR COMMON BACTERIAL BLIGHT RESISTANCE DERIVES FROM THE COMMON BEAN GREAT NORTHERN LANDRACE CULTIVAR MONTANA NO. 5

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Knowledge of the evolutionary origin and sources of pest resistance genes will facilitate gene deployment and development of crop cultivars with durable resistance. Our objective was to determine the source of common bacterial blight (CBB) resistance in great northern dry bean cultivars. Several cul...

  16. Combinatorial Activity of Flavonoids with Antibiotics Against Drug-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Abreu, Ana Cristina; Serra, Sofia C; Borges, Anabela; Saavedra, Maria José; Mcbain, Andrew J; Salgado, António J; Simões, Manuel

    2015-12-01

    The use of resistance-modifying agents is a potential strategy that is used to prolong the effective life of antibiotics in the face of increasing antibiotic resistance. Since certain flavonoids are potent bacterial efflux pump inhibitors, we assessed morin, rutin, quercetin, hesperidin, and (+)-catechin for their combined activity with the antibiotics ciprofloxacin, tetracycline, erythromycin, oxacillin, and ampicillin against drug-resistant strains of Staphylococcus aureus, including methicillin-resistant S. aureus. Four established methods were used to determine the combined efficacy of each combination: microdilution checkerboard assays, time-kill determinations, the Etest, and dual disc-diffusion methods. The cytotoxicity of the flavonoids was additionally evaluated in a mouse fibroblast cell line. Quercetin and its isomer morin decreased by 3- to 16-fold the minimal inhibitory concentration of ciprofloxacin, tetracycline, and erythromycin against some S. aureus strains. Rutin, hesperidin, and (+)-catechin did not promote any potentiation of antibiotics. Despite the potential cytotoxicity of these phytochemicals at a high concentration (fibroblast IC50 of 41.8 and 67.5?mg/L, respectively), quercetin is commonly used as a supplement for several therapeutic purposes. All the methods, with exception of the time-kill assay, presented a high degree of congruence without any apparent strain specificity. PMID:25734256

  17. Infectious prosthetic hip joint loosening: bacterial species involved in its aetiology and their antibiotic resistance profiles against antibiotics recommended for the therapy of implant-associated infections.

    PubMed

    Bogut, Agnieszka; Nied?wiadek, Justyna; Strzelec-Nowak, Dagmara; Blacha, Jan; Mazurkiewicz, Tomasz; Marczy?ski, Wojciech; Kozio?-Montewka, Maria

    2014-04-01

    Reliable microbiological diagnosis along with surgery and prolonged antibiotic therapy are key elements in the management of prosthetic-joint infections (PJIs). The purpose of this study was to characterize antibiotic resistance profiles of bacteria involved in the aetiology of PJIs. A total of 33 bacterial isolates cultured from 31 patients undergoing exchange of total hip prostheses were analyzed. The diagnostic approach toward isolation of prosthesis- associated microorganisms included sonication of retrieved implants and conventional cultures of periprosthetic tissues and synovial fluid. The in vitro resistance profiles of bacterial isolates were determined in relation to antibiotics recommended for the therapy of PJIs using the disc diffusion method, E-tests(®) and broth microdilution system. Coagulase-negative staphylococci (CNS) were predominant microorganisms followed by Staphylococcus aureus, Enterobacter cloacae, Streptococcus mitis, and Propionibacterium acnes. Twenty out of 30 and 12 out of 30 staphylococcal isolates were methicillin- and multi-drug resistant, respectively. Only two isolates were rifampicinresistant. All staphylococci were susceptible to glycopeptides and linezolid. This paper stresses the pathogenic role of staphylococci in patients suffering from implant loosening and reports high methicillin- and multidrug-resistance rates in these bacteria. Hence, antimicrobial susceptibility tests of individual bacterial isolates must always be performed to guide selection of the optimal therapeutic option. PMID:24858648

  18. Steroidal regulation of uterine resistance to bacterial infection in livestock

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, Gregory S

    2003-01-01

    Postpartum uterine infections reduce reproductive efficiency and have significant animal welfare and economic consequences. Postpartum uterine infections are classified as nonspecific, but Arcanobacterium pyogenes and Escherichia coli are usually associated with them in cattle and sheep. Pyometra is the most common type of uterine infection in dairy cattle, and it is detected almost exclusively in cows with active corpora lutea. Luteal progesterone typically down-regulates uterine immune functions and prevents the uterus from resisting infections. Progesterone also can down-regulate uterine eicosanoid synthesis. This seems to be a critical event in the onset of uterine infections, because eicosanoids can up-regulate immune cell functions in vitro. In addition, exogenous prostaglandin F2 alpha stimulates uterine secretion of prostaglandin F2 alpha and enhances immune functions in vivo. Thus, one may hypothesize that eicosanoids can override the negative effects of progesterone and that the up-regulatory effects of exogenous prostaglandin F2 alpha allow the uterus to resolve an infection, regardless of progesterone concentrations. Based on the results of studies to test that hypothesis, cows, sheep, and pigs in various physiological statuses are resistant to intrauterine infusions of Arcanobacterium pyogenes and Escherichia coli, unless progesterone concentrations are increased. In sheep and pigs, exogenous prostaglandin F2 alpha stimulates uterine production of prostaglandin F2 alpha and allows the uterus to resolve Arcanobacterium pyogenes-Escherichia coli-induced infections, even when progesterone is maintained at luteal phase concentrations before and after treatment. Prostaglandin F2 alpha is a proinflammatory molecule that stimulates the production of various proinflammatory cytokines, and it may enhance uterine production of leukotriene B4. Proinflammatory cytokines and leukotriene B4 enhance phagocytosis and lymphocyte functions. Even though there are clear associations among prostaglandin F2 alpha, leukotriene B4, proinflammatory cytokines, phagocytosis, and lymphocyte functions, the mechanism of action of exogenous prostaglandin F2 alpha in overriding the down-regulatory effects of progesterone and resolving uterine infections has not been elucidated. Defining this mechanism should yield new prevention and treatment strategies for uterine infections that do not rely on antibiotic and antimicrobial compounds. PMID:14641941

  19. Possible Role of Curcumin as an Efflux Pump Inhibitor in Multi Drug Resistant Clinical Isolates of Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Prakash, Pradyot; Gupta, Mohan Lal; Mohapatra, Tribhuban Mohan

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Multidrug resistant non-fermenters are continuously increasing in hospital and ICU settings. One of the mechanisms of developing drug resistance is possession of efflux pump through which bacteria extrude antimicrobial agents and other toxic substances. If these efflux channels are blocked or inhibited, increased drug concentration can be achieved in a bacterial cell with optimal drug dose. Present study was aimed to investigate role of curcumin as efflux pump inhibitor (EPI) and to compare its activity with a known EPI like phe-arg-beta-naphthylamide (PA?N). Materials and Methods: A total of 170 clinical isolates of Pseudomonas aeruginosa were taken, antimicrobial susceptibility was performed by disc diffusion test and minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) against selected drugs before and after adding known synthetic EPI, PA?N (20mg/L). Out of these, 30 multidrug resistant strains were taken and MIC was performed with curcumin (50mg/L) with and without selected drugs. Results : Significant reduction in MIC was observed after adding curcumin (50mg/L) with selected antimicrobial agents in 9/30 (30%) of multi drug resistant (MDR) isolates of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, while no change in MIC was observed when curcumin (50mg/L) was used alone, indicating its efflux pump inhibitor activity. Conclusion: This study suggests role of efflux pump in development of drug resistance which can be overcome by use of an efflux pump inhibitor, with more emphasis on compound like curcumin which will have less or no adverse effects if used in vivo. PMID:25478340

  20. Resistance profile and risk factors of drug resistant tuberculosis in the Baltic countries.

    PubMed

    Ignatyeva, Olga; Balabanova, Yanina; Nikolayevskyy, Vladyslav; Koshkarova, Ekaterina; Radiulyte, Birute; Davidaviciene, Edita; Riekstina, Vija; Jaama, Kadri; Danilovits, Manfred; Popa, Cristina M; Drobniewski, Francis A

    2015-09-01

    The rates of multi- and extensively drug-resistant tuberculosis (X/MDRTB) in the Baltic countries are the highest within the European Union hampering recent achievements of national TB control programmes. We included all consecutive culture-confirmed X/MDRTB patients registered for treatment in 2009 in Latvia, Lithuania and Estonia into this multicenter case-control study. Cases were compared with randomly selected controls with non-MDRTB registered for treatment in the same year across these sites. Of 495 MDRTB patients, 243 (49.7%) showed resistance to at least one second-line drug, 206 (42.1%) had pre-XDRTB (i.e. MDRTB with additional resistance to a second-line injectable or fluoroquinolones) and 64 (13.1%) had XDRTB. Younger age, male gender and known contact with an MDRTB case were associated with increased risk of primary infection with X/MDRTB strains. Previous treatment and alcohol abuse were strong predictors for MDRTB acquisition; defaults and failures in the past triggered XDRTB development. All patients received appropriate therapy; less than half of the patients were fully adherent. An erroneous treatment strategy is unlikely to drive resistance development. Increasing patients' compliance, addressing issues of social support, rapid detection of drug resistance and improving infection control is crucial for prevention of further spread of X/MDRTB and achieving higher cure rates. PMID:26164355

  1. Quantification of antibiotic drug potency by a two-compartment radioassay of bacterial growth

    SciTech Connect

    Boonkitticharoen, V.; Ehrhardt, J.C.; Kirchner, P.T. )

    1990-06-01

    The two-compartment radioassay for microbial kinetics based on continuous measurement of the {sup 14}CO{sub 2} released by bacterial metabolism of 14C-labeled substrate offers a valuable approach to testing the potency of antimicrobial drugs. By using a previously validated radioassay with gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria, a group of protein synthesis inhibitors was evaluated for their effect on microbial growth kinetics. All tested drugs induced changes in both the slopes and intercepts of the growth curves. An exponential growth model was applied to quantify the drug effect on the processes of bacterial {sup 14}CO{sub 2} liberation and cell generation. The response was measured in terms of a generation rate constant. A linear dependence of the generation rate constant on the dose of spectinomycin was observed with Escherichia coli. Sigmoidal-shaped curves were found in the assays of chloramphenicol and tetracycline. The implications of dose-response curves are discussed on the basis of the receptor site concept for drug action. The assay sensitivities for chloramphenicol and tetracycline were similar to those obtained by the cell counting method, but the sensitivity of the radioassay was at least 10 times greater for spectinomycin.

  2. Polymeric micelles and nanoemulsions as drug carriers: Therapeutic efficacy, toxicity, and drug resistance.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Roohi; Shea, Jill; Scafe, Courtney; Shurlygina, Anna; Rapoport, Natalya

    2015-08-28

    The manuscript reports the side-by-side comparison of therapeutic properties of polymeric micelles and nanoemulsions generated from micelles. The effect of the structure of a hydrophobic block of block copolymer on the therapeutic efficacy, tumor recurrence, and development of drug resistance was studied in pancreatic tumor bearing mice. Mice were treated with paclitaxel (PTX) loaded poly(ethylene oxide)-co-polylactide micelles or corresponding perfluorocarbon nanoemulsions. Two structures of the polylactide block differing in a physical state of micelle cores or corresponding nanodroplet shells were compared. Poly(ethylene oxide)-co-poly(d,l-lactide) (PEG-PDLA) formed micelles with elastic amorphous cores while poly(ethylene oxide)-co-poly(l-lactide) (PEG-PLLA) formed micelles with solid crystalline cores. Micelles and nanoemulsions stabilized with PEG-PDLA copolymer manifested higher therapeutic efficacy than those formed with PEG-PLLA copolymer studied earlier. Better performance of PEG-PDLA micelles and nanodroplets was attributed to the elastic physical state of micelle cores (or droplet shells) allowing adequate rate of drug release via drug diffusion and/or copolymer biodegradation. The biodegradation of PEG-PDLA stabilized nanoemulsions was monitored by the ultrasonography of nanodroplets injected directly into the tumor; the PEG-PDLA stabilized nanodroplets disappeared from the injection site within 48h. In contrast, nanodroplets stabilized with PEG-PLLA copolymer were preserved at the injection site for weeks and months indicating extremely slow biodegradation of solid PLLA blocks. Multiple injections of PTX-loaded PEG-PDLA micelles or nanoemulsions to pancreatic tumor bearing mice resulted in complete tumor resolution. Two of ten tumors treated with either PEG-PDLA micellar or nanoemulsion formulation recurred after the completion of treatment but proved sensitive to the second treatment cycle indicating that drug resistance has not been developed. This is in contrast to the treatment with PEG-PLLA micelles or nanoemulsions where all resolved tumors quickly recurred after the completion of treatment and proved resistant to the repeated treatment. The prevention of drug resistance in tumors treated with PEG-PDLA stabilized formulations was attributed to the presence and preventive effect of copolymer unimers that were in equilibrium with PEG-PDLA micelles. PEG-PDLA stabilized nanoemulsions manifested lower hematological toxicity than corresponding micelles suggesting higher drug retention in circulation. Summarizing, micelles with elastic cores appear preferable to those with solid cores as drug carriers. Micelles with elastic cores and corresponding nanoemulsions both manifest high therapeutic efficacy, with nanoemulsions exerting lower systemic toxicity than micelles. The presence of a small fraction of micelles with elastic cores in nanoemulsion formulations is desirable for prevention of the development of drug resistance. PMID:26091919

  3. Structural insights into how irreversible inhibitors can overcome drug resistance in EGFR.

    PubMed

    Michalczyk, Anja; Klüter, Sabine; Rode, Haridas B; Simard, Jeffrey R; Grütter, Christian; Rabiller, Matthias; Rauh, Daniel

    2008-04-01

    Resistance to kinase-targeted cancer drugs has recently been linked to a single point mutation in the ATP binding site of the kinase. In EGFR, the crucial Thr790 gatekeeper residue is mutated to a Met and prevents reversible ATP competitive inhibitors from binding. Irreversible 4-(phenylamino)quinazolines have been shown to overcome this drug resistance and are currently in clinical trials. In order to obtain a detailed structural understanding of how irreversible inhibitors overcome drug resistance, we used Src kinase as a model system for drug resistant EGFR-T790M. We report the first crystal structure of a drug resistant kinase in complex with an irreversible inhibitor. This 4-(phenylamino)quinazoline inhibits wild type and drug resistant EGFR in vitro at low nM concentrations. The co-crystal structure of drug resistant cSrc-T338M kinase domain provides the structural basis of this activity. PMID:18316192

  4. Quick discrimination of heavy metal resistant bacterial populations using infrared spectroscopy coupled with chemometrics.

    PubMed

    Gurbanov, Rafig; Simsek Ozek, Nihal; Gozen, Ayse Gul; Severcan, Feride

    2015-10-01

    Lead and cadmium are frequently encountered heavy metals in industrially polluted areas. Many heavy metal resistant bacterial strains have a high biosorption capacity and thus are good candidates for the removal of toxic metals from the environment. However, as of yet there is no accurate method for discrimination of highly adaptive bacterial strains among the populations present in a given habitat. In this study, we aimed to find distinguishing molecular features of lead and cadmium resistant bacteria using Attenuated Total Reflectance-Fourier Transformed Infrared (ATR-FT-IR) spectroscopy and chemometric approaches. Our results demonstrated that both control and metal exposed E. coli and S. aureus strains could be successfully discriminated from each other using hierarchical cluster and principal component analysis methods. Moreover, we found that lead exposed bacterial strains could be successfully discriminated from cadmium exposed ones with a high heterogeneity value. These clear discriminations can be described by the ability of a bacterium to change its metabolism in terms of the content and structure of cellular macromolecules under heavy metal stress. In our case, cadmium and lead-induced genetic response systems in bacteria caused remarkable alterations in overall cellular metabolism. Bacteria deal with a heavy metal stress by altering nucleic acid methylations and lipid and protein synthesis. Heavy metal burden led to the development of relevant metabolic changes in proteins, lipids, and nucleic acids of the resistant bacteria described in this study. Our approach showed that infrared spectra obtained via ATR-FT-IR spectroscopy coupled with chemometric analysis can be utilized for rapid, low-cost, informative, reliable, and operator-independent discrimination of resistant bacterial populations. PMID:26366586

  5. Transmitted HIV Drug Resistance in Treatment-Naive Romanian Patients

    PubMed Central

    Temereanca, Aura; Ene, Luminita; Mehta, Sanjay; Manolescu, Loredana; Duiculescu, Dan; Ruta, Simona

    2014-01-01

    Transmitted HIV drug resistance (TDR) remains an important concern for individuals unexposed to antiretroviral treatment. Data on the prevalence of TDR, available mainly for HIV-1 subtype B, are now also emerging for other subtypes. In Romania, a steady predominance of subtype F was reported among both long-term survivor children and newly infected adults. The pol gene of 61 drug-naïve patients infected with HIV, diagnosed between 1997 and 2011 was sequenced in order to analyze the prevalence of primary resistance mutations and to correlate these with the infecting genotype. Only 5/61 specimens were classified as infected recently using the BED-Capture Enzyme Immunoassay. Subtype F1 was prevalent (80.3%), however, other HIV-1 clades are increasingly identified, especially in the group of subjects infected recently. An HIV transmission cluster, associated to injecting drug use was identified by phylogenetic analysis. The overall prevalence of TDR was 14.75%, mainly associated with NRTI resistance (13.11%), TAMs and M184V being the most common mutations. A declining trend of TDR was recorded from 26.08% in 1997–2004 to 7.89% in 2005–2011. No primary resistance was identified among recent seroconvertors. All HIV-1 strains had minor mutations in the protease and RT genes, often detected at polymorphic positions. The declining rates of TDR might be related to the high efficacy of HAART and to the increasing number of treated patients with virological success who have a low risk of transmission. The recent increase of HIV-1 infections which involve other subtypes impose a continuous surveillance of the genetic composition of the epidemic. PMID:23592112

  6. Restoration of paclitaxel resistance by CDK1 intervention in drug-resistant ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Bae, Taejeong; Weon, Kwon-Yeon; Lee, Jeong-Won; Eum, Ki-Hwan; Kim, Sungchul; Choi, Jin Woo

    2015-12-01

    Epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) commonly acquires resistance to chemotherapy, and this is the major obstacle to the better prognosis. Elucidating the molecular targets altered by chemotherapy is critically required to understand and overcome drug resistance. As a drug combination including paclitaxel is a prevalent prescription for treatment of EOC, to uncover gene expression altered in paclitaxel-resistant EOC, we analyzed multidirectional microarray profiles in both EOC cell lines and patients with paclitaxel resistance. Cyclin-dependent kinase 1 (CDK1) was found to be a potential target of transcription factors to regulate paclitaxel resistance. As a result of the subsequent pharmacogenomics analysis, CDK1 inhibitor alsterpaullone was also indicated as a promising chemical that may be used in combinatorial therapies to reverse paclitaxel-induced chemoresistance. Although a CDK1 inhibitor has the potential to kill cancer cells, short-term treatment over 2 weeks at sublethal doses effectively induced cell death only upon additional treatment with paclitaxel. A prominent reduction in the tumor growth rate was observed upon paclitaxel subsequent to alsterpaullone treatment in EOC xenograft model. Thus, we suggest that inhibition of CDK1 with alsterpaullone may be a novel therapeutic method to reverse paclitaxel-induced resistance in ovarian cancer cells. PMID:26442525

  7. Persistence of Multi-Drug Resistance Plasmids in Sterile Water under Very Low Concentrations of Tetracycline.

    PubMed

    Bien, Thi Lan Thanh; Sato-Takabe, Yuki; Ogo, Mitsuko; Usui, Masaru; Suzuki, Satoru

    2015-12-22

    The persistence of the multi-drug resistance plasmids pAQU1 and IncFIB was examined in bacterial populations under very low selective pressure. We herein demonstrated that these plasmids stably remained not only in the original host, but also in a transconjugant, even after being in a non-culturable state. In seawater microcosms containing Photobacterium damselae 04Ya311 possessing pAQU1, no significant loss of pAQU1 was observed during a 30-d starvation period. The copy numbers of pAQU1 and IncFIB in E. coli were constant. The results of the present study suggest that these plasmids have the ability to remain among various bacteria under oligotrophic conditions with low antibiotic selection pressure. PMID:26639579

  8. Persistence of Multi-Drug Resistance Plasmids in Sterile Water under Very Low Concentrations of Tetracycline

    PubMed Central

    Bien, Thi Lan Thanh; Sato-Takabe, Yuki; Ogo, Mitsuko; Usui, Masaru; Suzuki, Satoru

    2015-01-01

    The persistence of the multi-drug resistance plasmids pAQU1 and IncFIB was examined in bacterial populations under very low selective pressure. We herein demonstrated that these plasmids stably remained not only in the original host, but also in a transconjugant, even after being in a non-culturable state. In seawater microcosms containing Photobacterium damselae 04Ya311 possessing pAQU1, no significant loss of pAQU1 was observed during a 30-d starvation period. The copy numbers of pAQU1 and IncFIB in E. coli were constant. The results of the present study suggest that these plasmids have the ability to remain among various bacteria under oligotrophic conditions with low antibiotic selection pressure. PMID:26639579

  9. The Wag31 protein interacts with AccA3 and coordinates cell wall lipid permeability and lipophilic drug resistance in Mycobacterium smegmatis.

    PubMed

    Xu, Wen-xi; Zhang, Lu; Mai, Jun-tao; Peng, Ru-chao; Yang, En-zhuo; Peng, Chao; Wang, Hong-hai

    2014-06-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis, especially drug resistant tuberculosis, is a serious threat to global human health. Compared with other bacterial pathogens, M. tuberculosis gains stronger natural drug resistance from its unusually lipid-rich cell wall. As a DivIVA homolog, Wag31 has been demonstrated to be closely involved in peptidoglycan synthesis, cell growth and cell division. Previous research rarely investigated the role of Wag31 in drug resistance. In this study, we found Wag31 knock-down in Mycobacterium smegmatis resulted in a co-decrease of the resistance to four lipophilic drugs (rifampicin, novobiocin, erythromycin and clofazimine) and an increase in the cell permeability to lipophilic molecules. Six proteins (AccA3, AccD4 and AccD5, Fas, InhA and MmpL3) that are involved in fatty acid and mycolic acid synthesis were identified in the Wag31 interactome through Co-Immunoprecipitation. The Wag31-AccA3 interaction was confirmed by the pull-down assay. AccA3 overexpression resulted in a decrease in lipid permeability and an increase in the resistance of rifampicin and novobiocin. It confirmed the close relationship of lipophilic drug resistance, lipid permeability and the Wag31-AccA3 interaction. These results demonstrated that Wag31 maintained the resistance to lipophilic drugs and that Wag31 could play a role in controlling the lipid permeability of the cell wall through the Wag31-AccA3 interaction. PMID:24792177

  10. Ceramide glycosylation catalyzed by glucosylceramide synthase and cancer drug resistance.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yong-Yu; Hill, Ronald A; Li, Yu-Teh

    2013-01-01

    Glucosylceramide synthase (GCS), converting ceramide to glucosylceramide, catalyzes the first reaction of ceramide glycosylation in sphingolipid metabolism. This glycosylation by GCS is a critical step regulating the modulation of cellular activities by controlling ceramide and glycosphingolipids (GSLs). An increase of ceramide in response to stresses, such as chemotherapy, drives cells to proliferation arrest and apoptosis or autophagy; however, ceramide glycosylation promptly eliminates ceramide and consequently, these induced processes, thus protecting cancer cells. Further, persistently enhanced ceramide glycosylation can increase GSLs, participating in selecting cancer cells to drug resistance. GCS is overexpressed in diverse drug-resistant cancer cells and in tumors of breast, colon, and leukemia that display poor response to chemotherapy. As ceramide glycosylation by GCS is a rate-limiting step in GSL synthesis, inhibition of GCS sensitizes cancer cells to anticancer drugs and eradicates cancer stem cells. Mechanistic studies indicate that uncoupling ceramide glycosylation can modulate gene expression, decreasing MDR1 through the cSrc/?-catenin pathway and restoring p53 expression via RNA splicing. These studies not only expand our knowledge in understanding how ceramide glycosylation affects cancer cells but also provide novel therapeutic approaches for targeting refractory tumors. PMID:23290777

  11. Escape from stress granule sequestration: another way to drug resistance?

    PubMed

    Yagüe, Ernesto; Raguz, Selina

    2010-12-01

    Overexpression of P-glycoprotein, encoded by the MDR1 (multidrug resistance 1) gene, is often responsible for multidrug resistance and chemotherapy failure in cancer. We have demonstrated that, in leukaemic cells, P-glycoprotein expression is regulated at the translational level. More recently, we have shown that in cells overexpressing P-glycoprotein, MDR1 mRNA does not aggregate into translationally silent stress granules. Importantly, this is not unique for MDR1, since other transcripts encoding transmembrane proteins, and which are thus translated at the endoplasmic reticulum, follow the same pattern. By using a series of chimaeric transcripts, we have demonstrated that transcript localization at the endoplasmic reticulum bypasses the signals dictating stress granule sequestration. Polysome profile analyses and protein synthesis experiments indicate that, upon stress withdrawal, endoplasmic-reticulum-bound transcripts resume translation faster than those at the cytosol, which have been sequestered into stress granules. This may represent a novel mechanism by which drug-resistant cells respond quickly to stress, helping them to survive the cytotoxic effect of chemotherapeutic drugs. PMID:21118122

  12. Map the gap: missing children with drug-resistant tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Yuen, C. M.; Rodriguez, C. A.; Keshavjee, S.

    2015-01-01

    Background: The lack of published information about children with multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB) is an obstacle to efforts to advocate for better diagnostics and treatment. Objective: To describe the lack of recognition in the published literature of MDR-TB and extensively drug-resistant TB (XDR-TB) in children. Design: We conducted a systematic search of the literature published in countries that reported any MDR- or XDR-TB case by 2012 to identify MDR- or XDR-TB cases in adults and in children. Results: Of 184 countries and territories that reported any case of MDR-TB during 2005–2012, we identified adult MDR-TB cases in the published literature in 143 (78%) countries and pediatric MDR-TB cases in 78 (42%) countries. Of the 92 countries that reported any case of XDR-TB, we identified adult XDR-TB cases in the published literature in 55 (60%) countries and pediatric XDR-TB cases for 9 (10%) countries. Conclusion: The absence of publications documenting child MDR- and XDR-TB cases in settings where MDR- and XDR-TB in adults have been reported indicates both exclusion of childhood disease from the public discourse on drug-resistant TB and likely underdetection of sick children. Our results highlight a large-scale lack of awareness about children with MDR- and XDR-TB. PMID:26400601

  13. Radiation induction of drug resistance in RIF-1: Correlation of tumor and cell culture results

    SciTech Connect

    Moulder, J.E.; Hopwood, L.E.; Volk, D.M.; Davies, B.M. )

    1991-02-01

    The RIF-1 tumor line contains cells that are resistant to various anti-neoplastic drugs, including 5-fluorouracil (5FU), methotrexate (MTX), adriamycin (ADR), and etoposide (VP16). The frequency of these drug-resistant cells is increased after irradiation. The frequency of drug-resistant cells and the magnitude of radiation-induced drug resistance are different in cell culture than in tumors. The dose-response and expression time relationships for radiation induction of drug resistance observed in RIF-1 tumors are unusual.We hypothesize that at high radiation doses in vivo, we are selecting for cells that are both drug resistant and radiation resistant due to microenvironmental factors, whereas at low radiation doses in vivo and all radiation doses in vitro, we are observing true mutants. These studies indicate that there can be significant differences in drug-resistance frequencies between tumors and their cell lines of origin, and that radiation induction of drug resistance depends significantly on whether the induction is done in tumors or in cell culture. These results imply that theories about the induction of drug resistance that are based on cell culture studies may be inapplicable to the induction of drug resistance in tumors.

  14. An exhaustive yet simple virtual screening campaign against Sortase A from multiple drug resistant Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Uddin, Reaz; Saeed, Kiran

    2014-08-01

    Methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is one of the challenging bacterial pathogen due to its acquired resistance to the ? lactam antibiotics. The Sortase A is an enzyme of Gram-positive bacteria including S. aureus to anchor surface proteins to the cell wall. Sortase A is well studied enzyme and considered as the drug target against MRSA. Sortase A plays active role in anchoring the virulence proteins on the cell wall of the Gram-positive bacteria. The inhibition of Sortase A activity results in the separation of S. aureus from the host cells and ultimately alleviation of the infection. Here, we adapted a structure-based virtual screening protocol which helped in identification of novel potential inhibitors of Sortase A. The protocol involved the docking of a chemical library of druglike compounds with the Sortase A binding site represented by multiple crystal structures. The compounds were ranked by multiple scoring functions and shortlisted for future experimental screening. The method resulted in shortlisting of three compounds as potential novel inhibitors of Sortase A out of a large chemical library. The high rankings of shortlisted compounds estimated by multiple scoring functions showed their binding potential with Sortase A. The results are proved to be a simple yet efficient choice of structure-based virtual screening. The identified compounds are druglike and show high rankings among all set protocols of the virtual screening. We hope that the study would eventually help to expedite the discovery of novel drug candidates against MRSA. PMID:24797540

  15. Radiation induction of drug resistance in RIF-1 tumors and tumor cells

    SciTech Connect

    Hopwood, L.E.; Moulder, J.E. )

    1989-11-01

    The RIF-1 tumor cell line contains a small number of cells (1-20 per 10(6) cells) that are resistant to various single antineoplastic drugs, including 5-fluorouracil (5FU), methotrexate (MTX), and adriamycin (ADR). For 5FU the frequency of drug resistance is lower for tumor-derived cells than for cells from cell culture; for MTX the reverse is true, and for ADR there is no difference. In vitro irradiation at 5 Gy significantly increased the frequency of drug-resistant cells for 5FU, MTX, and ADR. In vivo irradiation at 3 Gy significantly increased the frequency of drug-resistant cells for 5FU and MTX, but not for ADR. The absolute risk for in vitro induction of MTX, 5FU, and ADR resistance, and for in vivo induction of 5FU resistance, was 1-3 per 10(6) cells per Gy; but the absolute risk for in vivo induction of MTX resistance was 54 per 10(6) cells per Gy. The frequency of drug-resistant cells among individual untreated tumors was highly variable; among individual irradiated tumors the frequency of drug-resistant cells was significantly less variable. These studies provide supporting data for models of the development of tumor drug resistance, and imply that some of the drug resistance seen when chemotherapy follows radiotherapy may be due to radiation-induced drug resistance.

  16. Life in cellulose houses: Symbiotic bacterial biosynthesis of ascidian drugs and drug leads

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, Eric W.; Donia, Mohamed S.

    2010-01-01

    Ascidians (tunicates; sea squirts) are sources of diverse, bioactive natural products, one of which is an approved drug and many of which are potent drug leads. It has been shown that symbiotic bacteria living with ascidians produce some of the bioactive compounds isolated from whole animals, and indirect evidence strongly implicates symbiotic bacteria in the synthesis of many others. However, for the majority the producing organism has not been identified. In cases where a symbiotic origin has been definitively assigned, the resulting data lead to improved paths to drug discovery and development from marine animals. This review traces evidence for symbiotic production where such evidence exists and describes the strengths and limitations of that evidence. PMID:21050742

  17. Directed transport of bacteria-based drug delivery vehicles: bacterial chemotaxis dominates particle shape.

    PubMed

    Sahari, Ali; Traore, Mahama A; Scharf, Birgit E; Behkam, Bahareh

    2014-10-01

    Several attenuated and non-pathogenic bacterial species have been demonstrated to actively target diseased sites and successfully deliver plasmid DNA, proteins and other therapeutic agents into mammalian cells. These disease-targeting bacteria can be employed for targeted delivery of therapeutic and imaging cargos in the form of a bio-hybrid system. The bio-hybrid drug delivery system constructed here is comprised of motile Escherichia coli MG1655 bacteria and elliptical disk-shaped polymeric microparticles. The transport direction for these vehicles can be controlled through biased random walk of the attached bacteria in presence of chemoattractant gradients in a process known as chemotaxis. In this work, we utilize a diffusion-based microfluidic platform to establish steady linear concentration gradients of a chemoattractant and investigate the roles of chemotaxis and geometry in transport of bio-hybrid drug delivery vehicles. Our experimental results demonstrate for the first time that bacterial chemotactic response dominates the effect of body shape in extravascular transport; thus, the non-spherical system could be more favorable for drug delivery applications owing to the known benefits of using non-spherical particles for vascular transport (e.g. relatively long circulation time). PMID:24907051

  18. Candida Efflux ATPases and Antiporters in Clinical Drug Resistance.

    PubMed

    Prasad, Rajendra; Rawal, Manpreet Kaur; Shah, Abdul Haseeb

    2016-01-01

    An enhanced expression of genes encoding ATP binding cassette (ABC) and major facilitator superfamily (MFS) transport proteins are known to contribute to the development of tolerance to antifungals in pathogenic yeasts. For example, the azole resistant (AR) clinical isolates of the opportunistic human fungal pathogen Candida albicans show an overexpression of CDR1 and/or CaMDR1 belonging to ABC and MFS, superfamilies, respectively. The reduced accumulation (due to rapid efflux) of drugs in AR isolates confirms the role of efflux pump proteins in the development of drug tolerance. Considering the importance of major multidrug transporters, the focus of recent research has been to understand the structure and function of these proteins which could help to design inhibitors/modulators of these pump proteins. This chapter focuses on some aspects of the structure and function of yeast transporter proteins particularly in relation to MDR in Candida. PMID:26721282

  19. Outwitting Evolution: Fighting Drug Resistance in the Treatment of TB, Malaria and HIV

    PubMed Central

    Goldberg, Daniel E.; Siliciano, Robert F.; Jacobs, William R.

    2012-01-01

    Although caused by vastly different pathogens, the world’s three most serious infectious diseases, tuberculosis, malaria and HIV-1 infection, share the common problem of drug resistance. The pace of drug development has been very slow for tuberculosis and malaria and rapid for HIV-1. But for each disease, resistance to most drugs has appeared quickly after the introduction of the drug. Learning how to manage and prevent resistance is a major medical challenge that requires an understanding of the evolutionary dynamics of each pathogen. This review summarized the similarities and differences in the evolution of drug resistance for these three pathogens. PMID:22424234

  20. Constitutive presence of antibiotic resistance genes within the bacterial community of a large subalpine lake.

    PubMed

    Di Cesare, Andrea; Eckert, Ester M; Teruggi, Alessia; Fontaneto, Diego; Bertoni, Roberto; Callieri, Cristiana; Corno, Gianluca

    2015-08-01

    The fate of antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs) in environmental microbial communities is of primary concern as prodromal of a potential transfer to pathogenic bacteria. Although of diverse origin, the persistence of ARGs in aquatic environments is highly influenced by anthropic activities, allowing potential control actions in well-studied environments. However, knowledge of abundance and space-time distribution of ARGs in ecosystems is still scarce. Using quantitative real-time PCR, we investigated the presence and the abundance of twelve ARGs (against tetracyclines, ?-lactams, aminoglycosides, quinolones and sulphonamides) at different sampling sites, depths and seasons, in Lake Maggiore, a large subalpine lake, and in the area of its watershed. We then evaluated the correlation between each ARG and a number of ecological parameters in the water column in the deepest part of the lake. Our results suggest the constitutive presence of at least four ARGs within the bacterial community with a high proportion of bacteria potentially resistant to tetracyclines and sulphonamides. The presence of these ARGs was independent of the total bacterial density and temperature. The dynamics of tet(A) and sulII genes were, however, positively correlated with dissolved oxygen and negatively to chlorophyll a, suggesting that the resistant microbes inhabit specific niches. These observations indicate that the lake is a reservoir of antibiotic resistances, highlighting the need of a deeper understanding of the sources of ARGs and the factors allowing their persistence in waters. PMID:26118321

  1. [Current strategies against multi-drug resistant organisms].

    PubMed

    Pletz, Mathias W; Eckmann, Christian; Hagel, Stefan; Heppner, Hans Jürgen; Huber, Kora; Kämmerer, Wolfgang; Schmitz, Franz-Josef; Wilke, Michael; Grabein, Béatrice

    2015-06-01

    The global spread of multi-drug resistant organisms (MDRO) is a major threat to public health. Fighting MDRO spread requires a multi-faceted approach as summarized in the German Antibiotic Resistance Strategy (DART). In the hospital, this includes antibiotic stewardship concepts and strict infection control measures. Treatment of MDRO is sophisticated. Within the last years, several antibiotics with activity against MRSA were launched and facilitate an individual therapy according to site of infection and co-morbidities. In contrast, novel antibiotics against carbapenemase producing Gram-negatives are still lacking. Current studies have shown, that a colistin-based combination treatment can improve the prognosis in these patients. The following article reviews MDRO definitions, burden of disease, treatment options and general strategies against MDRO. PMID:26115132

  2. Treatment Options for Carbapenem-Resistant and Extensively Drug-Resistant Acinetobacter baumannii Infections

    PubMed Central

    Viehman, J. Alexander; Nguyen, Minh-Hong; Doi, Yohei

    2014-01-01

    Acinetobacter baumannii is a leading cause of healthcare-associated infections worldwide. Due to various intrinsic and acquired mechanisms of resistance, most ?-lactam agents are not effective against many strains, and carbapenems have played an important role in therapy. Recent trends show many infections are caused by carbapenem-resistant, or even extensively drug-resistant (XDR) strains, for which effective therapy is not well established. Evidence to date suggests that colistin constitutes the backbone of therapy, but the unique pharmacokinetic properties of colistin have led many to suggest the use of combination antimicrobial therapy. However, the combination of agents and dosing regimens that delivers the best clinical efficacy while minimizing toxicity is yet to be defined. Carbapenems, sulbactam, rifampin and tigecycline have been the most studied in the context of combination therapy. Most data regarding therapy for invasive, resistant A. baumannii infections come from uncontrolled case series and retrospective analyses, though some clinical trials have been completed and others are underway. Early institution of appropriate antimicrobial therapy is shown to consistently improve survival of patients with carbapenem-resistant and XDR A. baumannii infection, but the choice of empiric therapy in these infections remains an open question. This review summarizes the most current knowledge regarding the epidemiology, mechanisms of resistance, and treatment considerations of carbapenem-resistant and XDR A. baumannii. PMID:25091170

  3. Drug resistance-conferring mutations in Mycobacterium tuberculosis from Madang, Papua New Guinea

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Monitoring drug resistance in Mycobacterium tuberculosis is essential to curb the spread of tuberculosis (TB). Unfortunately, drug susceptibility testing is currently not available in Papua New Guinea (PNG) and that impairs TB control in this country. We report for the first time M. tuberculosis mutations associated with resistance to first and second-line anti-TB drugs in Madang, PNG. A molecular cluster analysis was performed to identify M. tuberculosis transmission in that region. Results Phenotypic drug susceptibility tests showed 15.7% resistance to at least one drug and 5.2% multidrug resistant (MDR) TB. Rifampicin resistant strains had the rpoB mutations D516F, D516Y or S531L; Isoniazid resistant strains had the mutations katG S315T or inhA promoter C15T; Streptomycin resistant strains had the mutations rpsL K43R, K88Q, K88R), rrs A514C or gidB V77G. The molecular cluster analysis indicated evidence for transmission of resistant strain. Conclusions We observed a substantial rate of MDR-TB in the Madang area of PNG associated with mutations in specific genes. A close monitoring of drug resistance is therefore urgently required, particularly in the presence of drug-resistant M. tuberculosis transmission. In the absence of phenotypic drug susceptibility testing in PNG, molecular assays for drug resistance monitoring would be of advantage. PMID:22943573

  4. Exploring Culturally Specific Drug Resistance Strategies of Hawaiian Youth in Rural Communities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Okamoto, Scott K.; Po'a-Kekuawela, Ka'ohinani; Chin, Coralee I. H.; Nebre, La Risa H.; Helm, Susana

    2010-01-01

    This qualitative study examined the drug resistance strategies of Hawaiian youth residing in rural communities in Hawai'i. Forty seven youth participated in 14 focus groups which focused on the social and environmental context of drug use for these youth. The findings indicated that there were 47 references to resistance strategies used in drug

  5. Successful Treatment of a Child With Extensively Drug-Resistant Tuberculous Meningitis.

    PubMed

    Alsleben, Neele; Garcia-Prats, Anthony J; Hesseling, Anneke C; Willemse, Marianne; Donald, Peter R; Schaaf, H Simon

    2015-09-01

    Unlike in pulmonary multidrug-resistant (MDR) tuberculosis, the clinical outcome of MDR tuberculous meningitis (TBM) in children, including extensively drug-resistant tuberculosis, is poor and management is challenging. We report the successful treatment of a case of extensively drug-resistant TBM in a 4-year-old girl, and we discuss implications for tuberculosis diagnosis and chemotherapy. PMID:26407442

  6. [Infectious Disease Reports 2013; 5:s1e5] [page 21] HIV drug resistance: problems

    E-print Network

    Petrov, Dmitri

    - lion HIV-infected people were receiving ART in low-income and middle-income countries. ART generally in low-income countries, drug resistance is still a serious threat to their health. This essay having any resistance problems, while for oth- ers, drug resistance is a serious threat to their health

  7. Decision tools for bacterial blight resistance gene deployment in rice-based agricultural ecosystems

    PubMed Central

    Dossa, Gerbert S.; Sparks, Adam; Cruz, Casiana Vera; Oliva, Ricardo

    2015-01-01

    Attempting to achieve long-lasting and stable resistance using uniformly deployed rice varieties is not a sustainable approach. The real situation appears to be much more complex and dynamic, one in which pathogens quickly adapt to resistant varieties. To prevent disease epidemics, deployment should be customized and this decision will require interdisciplinary actions. This perspective article aims to highlight the current progress on disease resistance deployment to control bacterial blight in rice. Although the model system rice-Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae has distinctive features that underpin the need for a case-by-case analysis, strategies to integrate those elements into a unique decision tool could be easily extended to other crops. PMID:25999970

  8. Multi Drug and Other Forms of Drug Resistant Tuberculosis Are Uncommon among Treatment Naïve Tuberculosis Patients in Tanzania

    PubMed Central

    Nagu, Tumaini J.; Aboud, Said; Mwiru, Ramadhani; Matee, Mecky; Fawzi, Wafaie; Mugusi, Ferdinand

    2015-01-01

    Background Surveillance and effective management of drug resistance is important to sustaining tuberculosis (TB) control efforts. We aimed to determine resistance rates to first line anti tuberculosis drugs and to describe factors associated with the resistance to any of the first line anti tuberculosis drugs in Dar es Salaam Tanzania. Materials Newly diagnosed, TB patients with neither history of tuberculosis treatment nor isoniazid prophylaxis were included into the study. Sputum specimens were cultured on either mycobacteria growth indicator tube 960 (MGIT 960) or Lowenstein Jenstein (LJ) medium supplemented with either glycerol (GLJ) or pyruvate (PLJ). Drug susceptibility for isoniazid, rifampicin, streptomycin and ethambutol was determined by either Lowenstein–Jensen (LJ) medium or mycobacteria growth indicator tube 960 (MGIT 960). Results A total of 933 newly diagnosed TB patients, were included into the study. Multi drug resistance (MDR) tuberculosis was detected among 2 (0.2%) patients. Resistance to any of the four tested drugs was detected among 54 (5.8%) patients. Mono-resistance to isoniazid, rifampicin, streptomycin and ethambutol were 21(2.3%), 3 (0.3%), 13 (1.4%), 9 (1.0%) respectively. Conclusion Primary resistance to first line anti tuberculosis drugs is still low in this setting. Continued vigilance including periodic national surveillance of anti-tuberculosis resistance is recommended. PMID:25849784

  9. Overexpression of polyphenol oxidase in transgenic tomato plants results in enhanced bacterial disease resistance.

    PubMed

    Li, Li; Steffens, John C

    2002-06-01

    Polyphenol oxidases (PPOs; EC 1.10.3.2 or EC 1.14.18.1) catalyzing the oxygen-dependent oxidation of phenols to quinones are ubiquitous among angiosperms and assumed to be involved in plant defense against pests and pathogens. In order to investigate the role of PPO in plant disease resistance, we made transgenic tomato ( Lycopersicon esculentum Mill. cv. Money Maker) plants that overexpressed a potato ( Solanum tuberosum L.) PPO cDNA under control of the cauliflower mosaic virus 35S promoter. The transgenic plants expressed up to 30-fold increases in PPO transcripts and 5- to 10-fold increases in PPO activity and immunodetectable PPO. As expected, these PPO-overexpressing transgenic plants oxidized the endogenous phenolic substrate pool at a higher rate than control plants. Three independent transgenic lines were selected to assess their interaction with the bacterial pathogen Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato. The PPO-overexpressing tomato plants exhibited a great increase in resistance to P. syringae. Compared with control plants, these transgenic lines showed less severity of disease symptoms, with over 15-fold fewer lesions, and strong inhibition of bacterial growth, with over 100-fold reduction of bacterial population in the infected leaves. These results demonstrate the importance of PPO-mediated phenolic oxidation in restricting plant disease development. PMID:12029473

  10. Antimalarial drug resistance: a review of the biology and strategies to delay emergence and spread

    PubMed Central

    Klein, E.Y.

    2013-01-01

    The emergence of resistance to former first-line antimalarial drugs has been an unmitigated disaster. In recent years, artemisinin class drugs have become standard and they are considered an essential tool for helping to eradicate the disease. However, their ability to reduce morbidity and mortality and to slow transmission requires the maintenance of effectiveness. Recently, an artemisinin delayed-clearance phenotype was described. This is believed to be the precursor to resistance and threatens local elimination and global eradication plans. Understanding how resistance emerges and spreads is important for developing strategies to contain its spread. Resistance is the result of two processes: (i) drug selection of resistant parasites; and (ii) the spread of resistance. In this review, we examine the factors that lead to both drug selection and the spread of resistance. We then examine strategies for controlling the spread of resistance, pointing out the complexities and deficiencies in predicting how resistance will spread. PMID:23394809

  11. Comparison of two multimetal resistant bacterial strains: Enterobacter sp. YSU and Stenotrophomonas maltophilia ORO2.

    PubMed

    Holmes, Andrew; Vinayak, Anubhav; Benton, Cherise; Esbenshade, Aaron; Heinselman, Carlisle; Frankland, Daniel; Kulkarni, Samatha; Kurtanich, Adrienne; Caguiat, Jonathan

    2009-11-01

    The Y-12 plant in Oak Ridge, TN, which manufactured nuclear weapons during World War II and the Cold War, contaminated East Fork Poplar Creek with heavy metals. The multimetal resistant bacterial strain, Stenotrophomonas maltophilia Oak Ridge strain O2 (S. maltophilia O2), was isolated from East Fork Poplar Creek. Sequence analysis of 16s rDNA suggested that our working strain of S. maltophilia O2 was a strain of Enterobacter. Phylogenetic tree analysis and biochemical tests confirmed that it belonged to an Enterobacter species. This new strain was named Enterobacter sp. YSU. Using a modified R3A growth medium, R3A-Tris, the Hg(II), Cd(II), Zn(II), Cu(II), Au(III), Cr(VI), Ag(I), As(III), and Se(IV) MICs for a confirmed strain of S. maltophilia O2 were 0.24, 0.33, 5, 5, 0.25, 7, 0.03, 14, and 40 mM, respectively, compared to 0.07, 0.24, 0.8, 3, 0.05, 0.4, 0.08, 14, and 40 mM, respectively, for Enterobacter sp. YSU. Although S. maltophilia O2 was generally more metal resistant than Enterobacter sp. YSU, in comparison to Escherichia coli strain HB101, Enterobacter sp. YSU was resistant to Hg(II), Cd(II), Zn(II), Au(III), Ag(I), As(III), and Se(IV). By studying metal resistances in these two strains, it may be possible to understand what makes one microorganism more metal resistant than another microorganism. This work also provided benchmark MICs that can be used to evaluate the metal resistance properties of other bacterial isolates from East Fork Poplar Creek and other metal contaminated sites. PMID:19688378

  12. 77 FR 7588 - Antiparasitic Drug Use and Resistance in Ruminants and Equines; Public Meeting; Request for Comments

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-13

    ...Antiparasitic Drug Use and Resistance in Ruminants and Equines; Public Meeting; Request...Antiparasitic Drug Use and Resistance in Ruminants and Equines.'' The purpose of the...combinations of antiparasitic drugs in ruminants and equines. DATES: Date and...

  13. Could bacteriophages transfer antibiotic resistance genes from environmental bacteria to human-body associated bacterial populations?

    PubMed Central

    Muniesa, Maite; Colomer-Lluch, Marta; Jofre, Juan

    2013-01-01

    Environments without any contact with anthropogenic antibiotics show a great abundance of antibiotic resistance genes that use to be chromosomal and are part of the core genes of the species that harbor them. Some of these genes are shared with human pathogens where they appear in mobile genetic elements. Diversity of antibiotic resistance genes in non-contaminated environments is much greater than in human and animal pathogens, and in environments contaminated with antibiotic from anthropogenic activities. This suggests the existence of some bottleneck effect for the mobilization of antibiotic resistance genes among different biomes. Bacteriophages have characteristics that make them suitable vectors between different biomes, and as well for transferring genes from biome to biome. Recent metagenomic studies and detection of bacterial genes by genomic techniques in the bacteriophage fraction of different microbiota provide indirect evidences that the mobilization of genes mediated by phages, including antibiotic resistance genes, is far more relevant than previously thought. Our hypothesis is that bacteriophages might be of critical importance for evading one of the bottlenecks, the lack of ecological connectivity that modulates the pass of antibiotic resistance genes from natural environments such as waters and soils, to animal and human microbiomes. This commentary concentrates on the potential importance of bacteriophages in transferring resistance genes from the environment to human and animal body microbiomes, but there is no doubt that transduction occurs also in body microbiomes. PMID:24195016

  14. Hidden Selection of Bacterial Resistance to Fluoroquinolones In Vivo: The Case of Legionella pneumophila and Humans

    PubMed Central

    Shadoud, Lubana; Almahmoud, Iyad; Jarraud, Sophie; Etienne, Jérôme; Larrat, Sylvie; Schwebel, Carole; Timsit, Jean-François; Schneider, Dominique; Maurin, Max

    2015-01-01

    Background Infectious diseases are the leading cause of human morbidity and mortality worldwide. One dramatic issue is the emergence of microbial resistance to antibiotics which is a major public health concern. Surprisingly however, such in vivo adaptive ability has not been reported yet for many intracellular human bacterial pathogens such as Legionella pneumophila. Methods We examined 82 unrelated patients with Legionnaire's disease from which 139 respiratory specimens were sampled during hospitalization and antibiotic therapy. We both developed a real time PCR assay and used deep-sequencing approaches to detect antibiotic resistance mutations in L. pneumophila and follow their selection and fate in these samples. Findings We identified the in vivo selection of fluoroquinolone resistance mutations in L. pneumophila in two infected patients treated with these antibiotics. By investigating the mutational dynamics in patients, we showed that antibiotic resistance occurred during hospitalization most likely after fluoroquinolone treatment. Interpretation In vivo selection of antibiotic resistances in L. pneumophila may be associated with treatment failures and poor prognosis. This hidden resistance must be carefully considered in the therapeutic management of legionellosis patients and in the control of the gradual loss of effectiveness of antibiotics. PMID:26501115

  15. Practical survey on antibiotic-resistant bacterial communities in livestock manure and manure-amended soil.

    PubMed

    Yang, Qingxiang; Wang, Ruifei; Ren, Siwei; Szoboszlay, Marton; Moe, Luke A

    2016-01-01

    Through livestock manure fertilization, antibiotics, antibiotic-resistant bacteria and genes are transferred to agricultural soils, resulting in a high prevalence of antibiotic-resistant bacteria in the soil. It is not clear, however, whether a correlation exists between resistant bacterial populations in manure and manure-amended soil. In this work, we demonstrate that the prevalence of cephalexin-, amoxicillin-, kanamycin- and gentamicin-resistant bacteria as well as bacteria simultaneously resistant to all four antibiotics was much higher in manure-amended soils than in manure-free soil. 454-pyrosequencing indicated that the ARB and multiple antibiotic-resistant bacteria (MARB) in swine or chicken manure and manure-amended soil were mainly distributed among Sphingobacterium, Myroides, Enterococcus, Comamonas and unclassified Flavobacteriaceae. The genus Sphingobacterium was highly prevalent among ARB from swine manure and manure-amended soil, and was also the most dominant genus among MARB from chicken manure and manure-amended soil. Other dominant genera among ARB or MARB populations in manure samples, including Myroides, Enterococcus and Comamonas, could not be detected or were detected at very low relative abundance in manure-amended soil. The present study suggests the possibility of transfer of ARBs from livestock manures to soils and persistence of ARB in these environments. PMID:26513264

  16. Simple PCR Assays Improve the Sensitivity of HIV-1 Subtype B Drug Resistance Testing and Allow Linking of Resistance Mutations

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Jeffrey A.; Li, Jin-Fen; Wei, Xierong; Lipscomb, Jonathan; Bennett, Diane; Brant, Ashley; Cong, Mian-er; Spira, Thomas; Shafer, Robert W.; Heneine, Walid

    2007-01-01

    Background The success of antiretroviral therapy is known to be compromised by drug-resistant HIV-1 at frequencies detectable by conventional bulk sequencing. Currently, there is a need to assess the clinical consequences of low-frequency drug resistant variants occurring below the detection limit of conventional genotyping. Sensitive detection of drug-resistant subpopulations, however, requires simple and practical methods for routine testing. Methodology We developed highly-sensitive and simple real-time PCR assays for nine key drug resistance mutations and show that these tests overcome substantial sequence heterogeneity in HIV-1 clinical specimens. We specifically used early wildtype virus samples from the pre-antiretroviral drug era to measure background reactivity and were able to define highly-specific screening cut-offs that are up to 67-fold more sensitive than conventional genotyping. We also demonstrate that sequencing the mutation-specific PCR products provided a direct and novel strategy to further detect and link associated resistance mutations, allowing easy identification of multi-drug-resistant variants. Resistance mutation associations revealed in mutation-specific amplicon sequences were verified by clonal sequencing. Significance Combined, sensitive real-time PCR testing and mutation-specific amplicon sequencing provides a powerful and simple approach that allows for improved detection and evaluation of HIV-1 drug resistance mutations. PMID:17653265

  17. The intersection between viral oncolysis, drug resistance, and autophagy.

    PubMed

    Beljanski, Vladimir; Chiang, Cindy; Hiscott, John

    2015-12-01

    Resistance to both cytotoxic and targeted therapies is a major problem facing cancer treatment. The mechanisms of resistance to unrelated drugs share many common features, including up-regulation of detoxifying pathways, activation of pro-survival mechanisms, and ineffective induction of cell death. Oncolytic viruses (OVs) are promising biotherapeutics for cancer treatment that specifically replicate in and lyse cancer cells. In addition to direct viral lysis, the anti-tumor effects of OVs are mediated via innate and adaptive immune responses, and several adaptation mechanisms such as autophagy appear to contribute to their anti-tumor properties. Autophagy is a versatile pathway that plays a key role in cancer survival during stressful conditions such as starvation or cytotoxic drug challenges. Autophagy also plays a role in mediating innate and adaptive immune responses by contributing to antigen presentation and cytokine secretion. This role of autophagy in regulation of immune responses can be utilized to design therapeutic combinations using approaches that either stimulate or block autophagy to potentiate therapeutic efficacy of OVs. Additional studies are needed to determine optimal multimodal combination approaches that will facilitate future successful clinical implementation of OV-based therapies. PMID:26068902

  18. Emerging Technologies for Monitoring Drug-Resistant Tuberculosis at the Point-of-Care

    PubMed Central

    Mani, Vigneshwaran; Wang, ShuQi; Inci, Fatih; De Libero, Gennaro; Singhal, Amit; Demirci, Utkan

    2014-01-01

    Infectious diseases are the leading cause of death worldwide. Among them, tuberculosis (TB) remains a major threat to public health, exacerbated by the emergence of multiple drug-resistant (MDR) and extensively drug-resistant (XDR) Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb). MDR-Mtb strains are resistant to first-line anti-TB drugs such as isoniazid and rifampicin; whereas XDR-Mtb strains are resistant to additional drugs including at least to any fluoroquinolone and at least one of the second-line anti-TB injectable drugs such as kanamycin, capreomycin, or amikacin. Clinically, these strains have significantly impacted the management of TB in high-incidence developing countries, where systemic surveillance of TB drug resistance is lacking. For effective management of TB on-site, early detection of drug resistance is critical to initiate treatment, to reduce mortality, and to thwart drug-resistant TB transmission. In this review, we discuss the diagnostic challenges to detect drug-resistant TB at the point-of-care (POC). Moreover, we present the latest advances in nano/microscale technologies that can potentially detect TB drug resistance to improve on-site patient care. PMID:24882226

  19. Combination of amikacin and doxycycline against multidrug-resistant and extensively drug-resistant tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Gonzalo, Ximena; Casali, Nicola; Broda, Agnieszka; Pardieu, Claire; Drobniewski, Francis

    2015-04-01

    The objective of this study was to assess the activity of amikacin in combination with doxycycline against clinical strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis in the search for new strategies against multidrug-resistant (MDR) and extensively drug-resistant (XDR) tuberculosis. The study included 28 clinical M. tuberculosis strains, comprising 5 fully susceptible, 1 isoniazid-resistant, 17 MDR, 1 poly-resistant (streptomycin/isoniazid), 1 rifampicin-resistant and 3 XDR isolates, as well as the laboratory strain M. tuberculosis H37Rv. Minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) were determined using a modified chequerboard methodology in a BACTEC™ MGIT™ 960 System. Fractional inhibitory concentration indices (FICIs) were calculated, and synergy, indifference or antagonism was assessed. Whole-genome sequencing was performed to investigate the genetic basis of synergy, indifference or antagonism. The MIC50 and MIC90 values (MICs that inhibit 50% and 90% of the isolates, respectively) were, respectively, 0.5 mg/L and 1.0 mg/L for amikacin and 8 mg/L and 16 mg/L for doxycycline. The combination of amikacin and doxycycline showed a synergistic effect in 18 of the 29 strains tested and indifference in 11 strains. Antagonism was not observed. A streptomycin resistance mutation (K43R) was associated with indifference. In conclusion, the benefit of addition of doxycycline to an amikacin-containing regimen should be explored since in vitro results in this study indicate either synergy or indifference. Moreover, doxycycline also has immunomodulatory effects. PMID:25717028

  20. Comparative Resistance of AH26 and a New Sealer Prototype to a Bacterial Challenge.

    PubMed

    Duggan, Derek; Zhong, Sheng; Rivera, Eric; Arnold, Roland; Simmons, Eric

    2012-01-01

    Objective. This study compared the leakage resistance of a New Sealer Prototype (NSP) with a traditional sealer (AH 26) in Resilon-filled roots subjected to a bacterial challenge. Study Design. 41 roots were instrumented to ISO size 50 apically. Group 1 (n = 20) contained Resilon and AH 26 sealer and roots in group 2 (n = 21) contained Resilon and NSP. Roots were embedded in a dual-chamber model with the upper chamber containing Streptococcus mutans inoculum. Evidence of bacterial penetration was observed for 1 month. Fisher's Test was used to analyze the data. Results. 8 of 20 roots (40%) in the AH 26 group demonstrated leakage whereas 3 of 21 roots (14%) in the NSP group leaked. The difference in leakage rates was not statistically significant (P = 0.053). Conclusion. The traditional sealer (AH 26) demonstrated increased leakage rates compared to the New Sealer Prototype (NSP), but the difference did not reach statistical significance in this study. PMID:22505898

  1. Nucleoside anticancer drugs: the role of nucleoside transporters in resistance to cancer chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Damaraju, Vijaya L; Damaraju, Sambasivarao; Young, James D; Baldwin, Stephen A; Mackey, John; Sawyer, Michael B; Cass, Carol E

    2003-10-20

    The clinical efficacy of anticancer nucleoside drugs depends on a complex interplay of transporters mediating entry of nucleoside drugs into cells, efflux mechanisms that remove drugs from intracellular compartments and cellular metabolism to active metabolites. Nucleoside transporters (NTs) are important determinants for salvage of preformed nucleosides and mediated uptake of antimetabolite nucleoside drugs into target cells. The focus of this review is the two families of human nucleoside transporters (hENTs, hCNTs) and their role in transport of cytotoxic chemotherapeutic nucleoside drugs. Resistance to anticancer nucleoside drugs is a major clinical problem in which NTs have been implicated. Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in drug transporters may contribute to interindividual variation in response to nucleoside drugs. In this review, we give an overview of the functional and molecular characteristics of human NTs and their potential role in resistance to nucleoside drugs and discuss the potential use of genetic polymorphism analyses for NTs to address drug resistance. PMID:14576856

  2. Role of Breast Cancer Resistance Protein (BCRP/ABCG2) in Cancer Drug Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Natarajan, Karthika; Xie, Yi; Baer, Maria R.; Ross, Douglas D.

    2012-01-01

    Since cloning of the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) family member breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP/ABCG2) and its characterization as a multidrug resistance efflux transporter in 1998, BCRP has been the subject of more than two thousand scholarly articles. In normal tissues, BCRP functions as a defense mechanism against toxins and xenobiotics, with expression in the gut, bile canaliculi, placenta, blood-testis and blood-brain barriers facilitating excretion and limiting absorption of potentially toxic substrate molecules, including many cancer chemotherapeutic drugs. BCRP also plays a key role in heme and folate homeostasis, which may help normal cells survive under conditions of hypoxia. BCRP expression appears to be a characteristic of certain normal tissue stem cells termed “side population cells,” which are identified on flow cytometric analysis by their ability to exclude Hoechst 33342, a BCRP substrate fluorescent dye. Hence, BCRP expression may contribute to the natural resistance and longevity of these normal stem cells. Malignant tissues can exploit the properties of BCRP to survive hypoxia and to evade exposure to chemotherapeutic drugs. Evidence is mounting that many cancers display subpopulations of stem cells that are responsible for tumor self-renewal. Such stem cells frequently manifest the “side population” phenotype characterized by expression of BCRP and other ABC transporters. Along with other factors, these transporters may contribute to the inherent resistance of these neoplasms and their failure to be cured. PMID:22248732

  3. Perampanel: A Review in Drug-Resistant Epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Frampton, James E

    2015-09-01

    Perampanel (Fycompa®), an orally-active, selective, noncompetitive ?-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid (AMPA) receptor antagonist, is a first-in-class antiepileptic drug (AED) offering the convenience of once-daily administration. In the EU and US, perampanel is approved in patients with epilepsy aged ?12 years for the adjunctive treatment of primary generalized tonic-clonic seizures (GTCS) and partial-onset seizures (POS; with or without secondary generalization). In phase III trials of 17 or 19 weeks' duration, add-on perampanel ?12 mg/day significantly improved seizure control in patients aged ?12 years who were experiencing either primary GTCS or POS (with or without secondary generalization), despite ongoing treatment with stable dosages of one to three AEDs. Improvements in seizure control were maintained for up to 2 years in extensions of these core studies. Perampanel also provided sustained seizure control for up to ?4 years in an extension of two phase II studies in patients aged ?18 years with drug-resistant POS. Adjunctive perampanel therapy was generally well tolerated. Treatment-emergent adverse events were most commonly CNS-related (e.g. dizziness, somnolence, fatigue and irritability) and dose-related; however, most were of mild to moderate intensity. Clinical experience with perampanel is accumulating, although comparative studies and pharmacoeconomic data that could assist in positioning it relative to other AEDS that are approved and/or recommended as adjunctive therapy are lacking. Nonetheless, on the basis of its overall clinical profile and unique mechanism of action, perampanel is a useful additional adjunctive treatment option for patients with drug-resistant POS, with or without secondary generalization, and primary GTCS. PMID:26370209

  4. Asparaginases: biochemical pharmacology and modes of drug resistance.

    PubMed

    Avramis, Vassilios I

    2012-07-01

    This is an ambitious effort attempting to present as many aspects as possible in a review article on asparaginases (ASNase), and their use against acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) and T-cell lymphomas. In the process, the modes of drug resistance are described both of the host and in the leukemia cells themselves. These modes of drug resistance, developed by the ALL cells, are an attempt to overcome the toxic insult this class of anti-leukemic drugs causes to them. It is expected that by reading this article one would obtain a better understanding of the initial events in the leukemia development, its microenvironment, and the many issues that a leukemia specialist has to deal with, especially in the treatment of refractory and relapsed patient populations. The specific issues addressed in this review deal with the importance of nutrients in tumor growth and progression of malignancies; the cytogenetics of ALL, as well as its chemotherapy, are also briefly presented. The emphasis will turn to ASNase, their mechanisms of action, the immune responses they cause in a significant percentage of the ALL patients, the significance of the up-regulation of glutamine synthetase and asparagine synthetase and the complexity of the elucidation of the mechanisms of action of ASNase. Additional details on the ASNase epitope mapping of anti-ASNase antibodies, the degradation of the protein, and the unmet needs in producing an optimal ASNase protein, will be also presented. Finally, a brief description of the toxicity, as well as the correlative factor of ALL treatment with ASNase is given. PMID:22753699

  5. Evidence of major genes affecting bacterial cold water disease resistance in rainbow trout using Bayesian methods of complex segregation analysis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Bacterial cold water disease (BCWD) causes significant economic loss in salmonid aquaculture. We previously detected genetic variation for BCWD resistance in our rainbow trout population, and a family-based selection program to improve resistance was initiated at the NCCCWA in 2005. The main objec...

  6. Baby leaf lettuce germplasm enhancement: developing diverse populations with resistance to bacterial leaf spot caused by Xanthomonas campestris pv. vitians

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Baby leaf lettuce cultivars with resistance to bacterial leaf spot (BLS) caused by Xanthomonas campestris pv. vitians (Xcv) are needed to reduce crop losses. The objectives of this research were to assess the genetic diversity for BLS resistance in baby leaf lettuce cultivars and to select early gen...

  7. Parallel Loss-of-Function at the RPM1 Bacterial Resistance Locus in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Rose, Laura; Atwell, Susanna; Grant, Murray; Holub, Eric B.

    2012-01-01

    Dimorphism at the Resistance to Pseudomonas syringae pv. maculicola 1 (RPM1) locus is well documented in natural populations of Arabidopsis thaliana and has been portrayed as a long-term balanced polymorphism. The haplotype from resistant plants contains the RPM1 gene, which enables these plants to recognize at least two structurally unrelated bacterial effector proteins (AvrB and AvrRpm1) from bacterial crop pathogens. A complete deletion of the RPM1 coding sequence has been interpreted as a single event resulting in susceptibility in these individuals. Consequently, the ability to revert to resistance or for alternative R-gene specificities to evolve at this locus has also been lost in these individuals. Our survey of variation at the RPM1 locus in a large species-wide sample of A. thaliana has revealed four new loss-of-function alleles that contain most of the intervening sequence of the RPM1 open reading frame. Multiple loss-of-function alleles may have originated due to the reported intrinsic cost to plants expressing the RPM1 protein. The frequency and geographic distribution of rpm1 alleles observed in our survey indicate the parallel origin and maintenance of these loss-of-function mutations and reveal a more complex history of natural selection at this locus than previously thought. PMID:23272006

  8. Bacterial diversity and antibiotic resistance in water habitats: searching the links with the human microbiome.

    PubMed

    Vaz-Moreira, Ivone; Nunes, Olga C; Manaia, Célia M

    2014-07-01

    Water is one of the most important bacterial habitats on Earth. As such, water represents also a major way of dissemination of bacteria between different environmental compartments. Human activities led to the creation of the so-called urban water cycle, comprising different sectors (waste, surface, drinking water), among which bacteria can hypothetically be exchanged. Therefore, bacteria can be mobilized between unclean water habitats (e.g. wastewater) and clean or pristine water environments (e.g. disinfected and spring drinking water) and eventually reach humans. In addition, bacteria can also transfer mobile genetic elements between different water types, other environments (e.g. soil) and humans. These processes may involve antibiotic resistant bacteria and antibiotic resistance genes. In this review, the hypothesis that some bacteria may share different water compartments and be also hosted by humans is discussed based on the comparison of the bacterial diversity in different types of water and with the human-associated microbiome. The role of such bacteria as potential disseminators of antibiotic resistance and the inference that currently only a small fraction of the clinically relevant antibiotic resistome may be known is discussed. PMID:24484530

  9. PHACOS, a functionalized bacterial polyester with bactericidal activity against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus

    PubMed Central

    Dinjaski, Nina; Fernández-Gutiérrez, Mar; Selvam, Shivaram; Parra-Ruiz, Francisco J.; Lehman, Susan M.; Román, Julio San; García, Ernesto; García, José L.; García, Andrés J.; Prieto, María Auxiliadora

    2013-01-01

    Biomaterial-associated infections represent a significant clinical problem, and treatment of these microbial infections is becoming troublesome due to the increasing number of antibiotic-resistant strains. Here, we report a naturally functionalized bacterial polyhydroxyalkanoate (PHACOS) with antibacterial properties. We demonstrate that PHACOS selectively and efficiently inhibits the growth of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) both in vitro and in vivo. This ability has been ascribed to the functionalized side chains containing thioester groups. Significantly less (3.2-fold) biofilm formation of S. aureus was detected on PHACOS compared to biofilms formed on control poly(3-hydroxyoctanoate-co-hydroxyhexanoate) and poly(ethylene terephthalate), but no differences were observed in bacterial adhesion among these polymers. PHACOS elicited minimal cytotoxic and inflammatory effects on murine macrophages and supported normal fibroblast adhesion. In vivo fluorescence imaging demonstrated minimal inflammation and excellent antibacterial activity for PHACOS compared to controls in an in vivo model of implant-associated infection. Additionally, reductions in neutrophils and macrophages in the vicinity of sterile PHACOS compared to sterile PHO implant were observed by immunohistochemistry. Moreover, a similar percentage of inflammatory cells was found in the tissue surrounding sterile PHACOS and S. aureus pre-colonized PHACOS implants, and these levels were significantly lower than S. aureus pre-colonized control polymers. These findings support a contact active surface mode of antibacterial action for PHACOS and establish this functionalized polyhydroxyalkanoate as an infection-resistant biomaterial. PMID:24094939

  10. Triclosan Derivatives: Towards Potent Inhibitors of Drug-Sensitive and Drug-Resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    SciTech Connect

    Freundlich, Joel S.; Wang, Feng; Vilchèze, Catherine; Gulten, Gulcin; Langley, Robert; Schiehser, Guy A.; Jacobus, David P.; Jacobs, Jr., William R.; Sacchettini, James C.

    2009-06-30

    Isoniazid (INH) is a frontline antitubercular drug that inhibits the enoyl acyl carrier protein reductase InhA. Novel inhibitors of InhA that are not cross-resistant to INH represent a significant goal in antitubercular chemotherapy. The design, synthesis, and biological activity of a series of triclosan-based inhibitors is reported, including their promising efficacy against INH-resistant strains of M. tuberculosis. Triclosan has been previously shown to inhibit InhA, an essential enoyl acyl carrier protein reductase involved in mycolic acid biosynthesis, the inhibition of which leads to the lysis of Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Using a structure-based drug design approach, a series of 5-substituted triclosan derivatives was developed. Two groups of derivatives with alkyl and aryl substituents, respectively, were identified with dramatically enhanced potency against purified InhA. The most efficacious inhibitor displayed an IC{sub 50} value of 21 nM, which was 50-fold more potent than triclosan. X-ray crystal structures of InhA in complex with four triclosan derivatives revealed the structural basis for the inhibitory activity. Six selected triclosan derivatives were tested against isoniazid-sensitive and resistant strains of M. tuberculosis. Among those, the best inhibitor had an MIC value of 4.7 {mu}g mL{sup -1} (13 {mu}M), which represents a tenfold improvement over the bacteriocidal activity of triclosan. A subset of these triclosan analogues was more potent than isoniazid against two isoniazid-resistant M. tuberculosis strains, demonstrating the significant potential for structure-based design in the development of next generation antitubercular drugs.

  11. High-resolution genetic mapping of rice bacterial blight resistance gene Xa23.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chunlian; Fan, Yinglun; Zheng, Chongke; Qin, Tengfei; Zhang, Xiaoping; Zhao, Kaijun

    2014-10-01

    Bacterial blight (BB) caused by Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae (Xoo) is the most devastating bacterial disease of rice (Oryza sativa L.), a staple food crop that feeds half of the world's population. In management of this disease, the most economical and effective approach is cultivating resistant varieties. Due to rapid change of pathogenicity in the pathogen, it is necessary to identify and characterize more host resistance genes for breeding new resistant varieties. We have previously identified the BB resistance (R) gene Xa23 that confers the broadest resistance to Xoo strains isolated from different rice-growing regions and preliminarily mapped the gene within a 1.7 cm region on the long arm of rice chromosome 11. Here, we report fine genetic mapping and in silico analysis of putative candidate genes of Xa23. Based on F2 mapping populations derived from crosses between Xa23-containing rice line CBB23 and susceptible varieties JG30 or IR24, six new STS markers Lj36, Lj46, Lj138, Lj74, A83B4, and Lj13 were developed. Linkage analysis revealed that the new markers were co-segregated with or closely linked to the Xa23 locus. Consequently, the Xa23 gene was mapped within a 0.4 cm region between markers Lj138 and A83B4, in which the co-segregating marker Lj74 was identified. The corresponding physical distance between Lj138 and A83B4 on Nipponbare genome is 49.8 kb. Six Xa23 candidate genes have been annotated, including four candidate genes encoding hypothetical proteins and the other two encoding a putative ADP-ribosylation factor protein and a putative PPR protein. These results will facilitate marker-assisted selection of Xa23 in rice breeding and molecular cloning of this valuable R gene. PMID:24715026

  12. Experimental studies on the ecology and evolution of drug-resistant malaria parasites 

    E-print Network

    Huijben, Silvie

    2010-01-01

    Drug resistance is a serious problem in health care in general, and in malaria treatment in particular, rendering many of our previously considered ‘wonder drugs’ useless. Recently, large sums of money have been allocated ...

  13. Detecting and understanding combinatorial mutation patterns responsible for HIV drug resistance

    E-print Network

    Wang, Wei

    the usefulness of this sys- tematic procedure on three HIV drugs, (Indinavir, Zidovudine, and Nevirapine-transcriptase inhibitor (nevirapine). We have rediscovered the majority of known resistant mutations to the three drugs

  14. First-Line Treatment for Tuberculosis (TB), Drug Resistant TB -- A Visual Tour

    MedlinePLUS

    ... NIAID News & Events Volunteer NIAID > Health & Research Topics > Tuberculosis > Understanding TB > What is TB? > Drug-Resistant TB ... Line Treatment of TB for Drug-Sensitive TB Tuberculosis, which results from an infection with Mycobacterium tuberculosis , ...

  15. Drug-resistant tuberculosis in subjects included in the Second National Survey on Antituberculosis Drug Resistance in Porto Alegre, Brazil*, **

    PubMed Central

    Micheletti, Vania Celina Dezoti; Moreira, José da Silva; Ribeiro, Marta Osório; Kritski, Afranio Lineu; Braga, José Ueleres

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To describe the prevalence of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB) among tuberculosis patients in a major Brazilian city, evaluated via the Second National Survey on Antituberculosis Drug Resistance, as well as the social, demographic, and clinical characteristics of those patients. METHODS: Clinical samples were collected from tuberculosis patients seen between 2006 to 2007 at three hospitals and five primary health care clinics participating in the survey in the city of Porto Alegre, Brazil. The samples were subjected to drug susceptibility testing. The species of mycobacteria was confirmed using biochemical methods. RESULTS: Of the 299 patients included, 221 (73.9%) were men and 77 (27.3%) had a history of tuberculosis. The mean age was 36 years. Of the 252 patients who underwent HIV testing, 66 (26.2%) tested positive. The prevalence of MDR-TB in the sample as a whole was 4.7% (95% CI: 2.3-7.1), whereas it was 2.2% (95% CI: 0.3-4.2) among the new cases of tuberculosis and 12.0% (95% CI: 4.5-19.5) among the patients with a history of tuberculosis treatment. The multivariate analysis showed that a history of tuberculosis and a longer time to diagnosis were both associated with MDR-TB. CONCLUSIONS: If our results are corroborated by other studies conducted in Brazil, a history of tuberculosis treatment and a longer time to diagnosis could be used as predictors of MDR-TB. PMID:24831400

  16. Increasing chloramphenicol resistance in Streptococcus pneumoniae isolates from Papua New Guinean children with acute bacterial meningitis.

    PubMed

    Manning, Laurens; Laman, Moses; Greenhill, Andrew R; Michael, Audrey; Siba, Peter; Mueller, Ivo; Davis, Timothy M E

    2011-09-01

    In Papua New Guinean (PNG) children with acute bacterial meningitis (ABM), all Haemophilus influenzae isolates were resistant to chloramphenicol. Although Streptococcus pneumoniae isolates had a median chloramphenicol MIC of 3 ?g/ml, it was ?4 ?g/ml in 42.8%, and the likelihood of an area under the 24-hour concentration-time curve/MIC ratio of >100 h at a MIC of ?4 ?g/ml was approximately 50%. All isolates were ceftriaxone sensitive. These data support ceftriaxone rather than conventional chloramphenicol for all PNG children with suspected ABM. PMID:21709079

  17. Increasing antibiotic resistance in preservative-tolerant bacterial strains isolated from cosmetic products.

    PubMed

    Orús, Pilar; Gomez-Perez, Laura; Leranoz, Sonia; Berlanga, Mercedes

    2015-03-01

    To ensure the microbiological quality, consumer safety and organoleptic properties of cosmetic products, manufacturers need to comply with defined standards using several preservatives and disinfectants. A drawback regarding the use of these preservatives is the possibility of generating cross-insusceptibility to other disinfectants or preservatives, as well as cross resistance to antibiotics. Therefore, the objective of this study was to understand the adaptive mechanisms of Enterobacter gergoviae, Pseudomonas putida and Burkholderia cepacia that are involved in recurrent contamination in cosmetic products containing preservatives. Diminished susceptibility to formaldehyde-donors was detected in isolates but not to other preservatives commonly used in the cosmetics industry, although increasing resistance to different antibiotics (?-lactams, quinolones, rifampicin, and tetracycline) was demonstrated in these strains when compared with the wild-type strain. The outer membrane protein modifications and efflux mechanism activities responsible for the resistance trait were evaluated. The development of antibiotic-resistant microorganisms due to the selective pressure from preservatives included in cosmetic products could be a risk for the emergence and spread of bacterial resistance in the environment. Nevertheless, the large contribution of disinfection and preservation cannot be denied in cosmetic products. PMID:26415667

  18. Expression of the Bs2 pepper gene confers resistance to bacterial spot disease in tomato.

    PubMed

    Tai, T H; Dahlbeck, D; Clark, E T; Gajiwala, P; Pasion, R; Whalen, M C; Stall, R E; Staskawicz, B J

    1999-11-23

    The Bs2 resistance gene of pepper specifically recognizes and confers resistance to strains of Xanthomonas campestris pv. vesicatoria that contain the corresponding bacterial avirulence gene, avrBs2. The involvement of avrBs2 in pathogen fitness and its prevalence in many X. campestris pathovars suggests that the Bs2 gene may be durable in the field and provide resistance when introduced into other plant species. Employing a positional cloning strategy, the Bs2 locus was isolated and the gene was identified by coexpression with avrBs2 in an Agrobacterium-mediated transient assay. A single candidate gene, predicted to encode motifs characteristic of the nucleotide binding site-leucine-rich repeat class of resistance genes, was identified. This gene specifically controlled the hypersensitive response when transiently expressed in susceptible pepper and tomato lines and in a nonhost species, Nicotiana benthamiana, and was designated as Bs2. Functional expression of Bs2 in stable transgenic tomatoes supports its use as a source of resistance in other Solanaceous plant species. PMID:10570214

  19. Antimicrobial Resistance and Plasmid Profile of Bacterial Strains Isolated from the Urbanized Eltsovka-1 River (Russia).

    PubMed

    Lobova, Tatiana I; Yemelyanova, Elena; Andreeva, Irina S; Puchkova, Larisa I; Repin, Vladimir Ye

    2015-08-01

    Antimicrobial resistance and plasmid profile of Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacterial strains isolated from the urbanized Eltsovka-1 River (Russia) were investigated. Sequencing of the 16S rRNA of of G+ strains showed 99-100% identity to that of Bacillus aerophilus, Bacillus altitudinis, Bacillus amyloliquefaciens, Bacillus anthrancis, Bacillus barbaricus, Bacillus cereus, Bacillus flexus, Bacillus indriensis, Bacillus stratosphericus, Bacillus subtilis subsp. subtilis, Bacillus thuringiensis, Streptomyces albidoflavus, Streptomyces albus, Streptomyces exfoliatus, Streptomyces odorifer, and Streptomyces sampsonii. Sequencing of the 16S rRNA of G-strains was similar in 99-100% to that of Aeromonas bestiarum, Aeromonas encheleia, Aeromonas hydrophila, A. hydrophila subsp. anaerogenes, A. hydrophila subsp. dhakensis, Aeromonas media, Aeromonas molluscorum, Aeromonas popoffii, Aeromonas salmonicida subsp. masoucida, A. salmonicida subsp. pectinolytica, A. salmonicida subsp. salmonicida, Aeromonas punctata, Aeromonas sobria, and Shewanella putrefaciens. The highest percentage (88.4%) of strains was resistant to polymyxin B followed by 69% to lincomycin, 61.5% to benzilpenicillin, 57.7% to ampicillin, and 50% to carbenicillin. A low level of resistance (4%) was found to kanamycin (8%), to streptomycin (11.5%), to neomycin and tetracycline, and (15%) to erythromycin. No resistance was found to gentamycin, monomycin, and chloroamphenicol. The majority (80.7%) of strains was multidrug-resistant. Ninety-two percent of all strains carried plasmid DNA of various sizes. PMID:25803299

  20. Drug Resistance in Human Helminths: Current Situation and Lessons from Livestock

    PubMed Central

    Geerts, S.; Gryseels, B.

    2000-01-01

    In this review the available reports on drug resistance in human helminths, particularly hookworms and schistosomes, are critically analyzed. The experiences with helminths of livestock are then reviewed, in particular the factors contributing to the development of anthelmintic resistance, the mechanisms and genetics of resistance to various anthelmintic classes, and the methods available for detection. These experiences appear to be worryingly similar and relevant to the potential development of drug resistance in human helminths. Recommendations to reduce its risks are suggested. PMID:10755998

  1. An obligatory bacterial mutualism in a multi-drug environment exhibits strong oscillatory population dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conwill, Arolyn; Yurtsev, Eugene; Gore, Jeff

    2014-03-01

    A common mechanism of antibiotic resistance in bacteria involves the production of an enzyme that inactivates the antibiotic. By inactivating the antibiotic, resistant cells can protect other cells in the population that would otherwise be sensitive to the drug. In a multidrug environment, an obligatory mutualism arises because populations of different strains rely on each other to breakdown antibiotics in the environment. Here, we experimentally track the population dynamics of two E. coli strains in the presence of two different antibiotics: ampicillin and chloramphenicol. Together the strains are able to grow in antibiotic concentrations that inhibit growth of either one of the strains alone. Although mutualisms are often thought to stabilize population dynamics, we observe strong oscillatory dynamics even when there is long-term coexistence between the two strains. We expect that our results will provide insight into the evolution of antibiotic resistance and, more generally, the evolutionary origin of phenotypic diversity, cooperation, and ecological stability.

  2. Implementation of In Vitro Drug Resistance Assays: Maximizing the Potential for Uncovering Clinically Relevant Resistance Mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Korpal, Manav; Feala, Jacob; Puyang, Xiaoling; Zou, Jian; Ramos, Alex H; Wu, Jeremy; Baumeister, Timm; Yu, Lihua; Warmuth, Markus; Zhu, Ping

    2015-01-01

    Although targeted therapies are initially effective, resistance inevitably emerges. Several methods, such as genetic analysis of resistant clinical specimens, have been applied to uncover these resistance mechanisms to facilitate follow-up care. Although these approaches have led to clinically relevant discoveries, difficulties in attaining the relevant patient material or in deconvoluting the genomic data collected from these specimens have severely hampered the path towards a cure. To this end, we here describe a tool for expeditious discovery that may guide improvement in first-line therapies and alternative clinical management strategies. By coupling preclinical in vitro or in vivo drug selection with next-generation sequencing, it is possible to identify genomic structural variations and/or gene expression alterations that may serve as functional drivers of resistance. This approach facilitates the spontaneous emergence of alterations, enhancing the probability that these mechanisms may be observed in the patients. In this protocol we provide guidelines to maximize the potential for uncovering single nucleotide variants that drive resistance using adherent lines. PMID:26710000

  3. Implementation of In Vitro Drug Resistance Assays: Maximizing the Potential for Uncovering Clinically Relevant Resistance Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Korpal, Manav; Feala, Jacob; Puyang, Xiaoling; Zou, Jian; Ramos, Alex H.; Wu, Jeremy; Baumeister, Timm; Yu, Lihua; Warmuth, Markus; Zhu, Ping

    2015-01-01

    Although targeted therapies are initially effective, resistance inevitably emerges. Several methods, such as genetic analysis of resistant clinical specimens, have been applied to uncover these resistance mechanisms to facilitate follow-up care. Although these approaches have led to clinically relevant discoveries, difficulties in attaining the relevant patient material or in deconvoluting the genomic data collected from these specimens have severely hampered the path towards a cure. To this end, we here describe a tool for expeditious discovery that may guide improvement in first-line therapies and alternative clinical management strategies. By coupling preclinical in vitro or in vivo drug selection with next-generation sequencing, it is possible to identify genomic structural variations and/or gene expression alterations that may serve as functional drivers of resistance. This approach facilitates the spontaneous emergence of alterations, enhancing the probability that these mechanisms may be observed in the patients. In this protocol we provide guidelines to maximize the potential for uncovering single nucleotide variants that drive resistance using adherent lines. PMID:26710000

  4. Prevalence of antibacterial resistant bacterial contaminants from mobile phones of hospital inpatients

    PubMed Central

    Vinod Kumar, B.; Hobani, Yahya Hasan; Abdulhaq, Ahmed; Jerah, Ahmed Ali; Hakami, Othman M.; Eltigani, Magdeldin; Bidwai, Anil K.

    2014-01-01

    Mobile phones contaminated with bacteria may act as fomites. Antibiotic resistant bacterial contamination of mobile phones of inpatients was studied. One hundred and six samples were collected from mobile phones of patients admitted in various hospitals in Jazan province of Saudi Arabia. Eighty-nine (83.9%) out of 106 mobile phones were found to be contaminated with bacteria. Fifty-two (49.0%) coagulase-negative Staphylococcus, 12 (11.3%) Staphylococcus aureus, 7 (6.6%) Enterobacter cloacae, 3 (2.83%) Pseudomonas stutzeri, 3 (2.83%) Sphingomonas paucimobilis, 2 (1.8%) Enterococcus faecalis and 10 (9.4%) aerobic spore bearers were isolated. All the isolated bacteria were found to be resistant to various antibiotics. Hence, regular disinfection of mobile phones of hospital inpatients is advised. PMID:25292217

  5. Genotype and diet shape resistance and tolerance across distinct phases of bacterial infection

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Host defense against pathogenic infection is composed of resistance and tolerance. Resistance is the ability of the host to limit a pathogen burden, whereas tolerance is the ability to limit the deleterious effects of a given pathogen burden. This distinction recognizes that the fittest host does not necessarily have the most aggressive immune system, suggesting that host-pathogen co-evolution involves more than an escalating arms race between pathogen virulence factors and host antimicrobial activity. How a host balances resistance and tolerance and how this balance influences the evolution of host defense remains unanswered. In order to determine how genotype-by-diet interactions and evolutionary costs of each strategy may constrain the evolution of host defense, we measured survival, fecundity, and pathogen burden over five days in ten genotypes of Drosophila melanogaster reared on two diets and infected with the Gram-negative bacterial pathogen Providencia rettgeri. Results We demonstrated two distinct phases of infection: an acute phase that consists of high mortality, low fecundity, and high pathogen loads, and a chronic phase where there was a substantial but stable pathogen load and mortality and fecundity returned to uninfected levels. We demonstrated genetic variation for resistance in both phases of infection, but found genetic variation for tolerance only in the acute phase. We found genotype-by-diet interactions for tolerance, especially in the acute phase, but genotype-by-diet interaction did not significantly shape resistance. We found a diet-dependent positive relationship between resistance and tolerance and a weak evolutionary cost of resistance, but did not detect any costs of tolerance. Conclusions Existing models of tolerance and resistance are overly simplistic. Multi-phase infections such as that studied here are rarely considered, but we show important differences in determination and evolutionary constraints on tolerance and resistance over the two phases of infection. Our observation of genetic variation for tolerance is inconsistent with simple models that predict evolutionary fixation of tolerance alleles, and instead indicate that genetic variation for resistance and tolerance is likely to be maintained by non-independence between resistance and tolerance, condition-dependent evolutionary costs, and environmental heterogeneity. PMID:24655914

  6. Drug resistance in sea lice: a threat to salmonid aquaculture.

    PubMed

    Aaen, Stian Mørch; Helgesen, Kari Olli; Bakke, Marit Jørgensen; Kaur, Kiranpreet; Horsberg, Tor Einar

    2015-02-01

    Sea lice are copepod ectoparasites with vast reproductive potential and affect a wide variety of fish species. The number of parasites causing morbidity is proportional to fish size. Natural low host density restricts massive parasite dispersal. However, expanded salmon farming has shifted the conditions in favor of the parasite. Salmon farms are often situated near wild salmonid migrating routes, with smolts being particularly vulnerable to sea lice infestation. In order to protect both farmed and wild salmonids passing or residing in the proximity of the farms, several measures are taken. Medicinal treatment of farmed fish has been the most predictable and efficacious, leading to extensive use of the available compounds. This has resulted in drug-resistant parasites occurring on farmed and possibly wild salmonids. PMID:25639521

  7. Phenotypic and Genotypic Diversity in a Multinational Sample of Drug-resistant Mycobacterium Tuberculosis Isolates

    PubMed Central

    Garfein, Richard S.; Catanzaro, Donald G.; Rodwell, Timothy C.; Avelos, Elisea; Jackson, Lynn; Kaping, Janice; Evasco, Henry; Rodriques, Camilla; Crudu, Valeriu; Lin, Shou-Yean Grace; Grossel, Erik; Hillery, Naomi; Trollip, Andre; Ganiats, Theodore; Victor, Thomas C.; Eisenach, Kathleen; Valafar, Faramarz; Channick, Jessica; Qian, Lishi; Catanzaro, Antonino

    2015-01-01

    Background To develop and evaluate rapid, molecular-based drug susceptibility tests (DST) for extensively drug resistant tuberculosis (XDR-TB), we assembled a phenotypically and genotypically diverse collection of M. tuberculosis (Mtb) isolates from patients evaluated for drug resistance in four high-burden countries. Methods Mtb isolates from India (n=111), Moldova (n=90), the Philippines (n=96), and South Africa (n=103) were selected from existing regional and national repositories to maximize phenotypic diversity for resistance to isoniazid, rifampin, moxifloxacin, ofloxacin, amikacin, kanamycin and capreomycin. MGIT-960 was performed on viable isolates in one laboratory using standardized procedures and drug concentrations. Genetic diversity within drug-resistance phenotypes was assessed. Results Nineteen distinct phenotypes were observed among 400 isolates with complete DST results. Diversity was greatest in the Philippines (14 phenotypes) and least in South Africa (9 phenotypes). Nearly all phenotypes included multiple genotypes. All sites provided isolates resistant to injectable but susceptible to fluoroquinolone drugs. Many patients were taking antibiotics to which their current infection was resistant. Discussion Diverse phenotypes for XDR-TB-defining drugs, including resistance to fluoroquinolone and/or injectable drugs in rifampin-sensitive isolates indicate that rifampin-sensitivity does not ensure effectiveness of a standard four-drug regimen. Thus, rapid, low-cost DST assays for first- and second-line drugs are needed. PMID:25859997

  8. Arabidopsis dual resistance proteins, both RPS4 and RRS1, are required for resistance to bacterial wilt in transgenic Brassica crops

    PubMed Central

    Narusaka, Mari; Hatakeyama, Katsunori; Shirasu, Ken; Narusaka, Yoshihiro

    2014-01-01

    Bacterial wilt phytopathogen Ralstonia solanacearum is a serious soil-borne disease that attacks several economically important plants worldwide, including Brassicaceae. Previous studies indicate that recognition of avirulence (Avr)-effector PopP2 by resistance (R) protein, RRS1-R, and physical interaction between RRS1-R and PopP2 in the nucleus are required for resistance. Of late, we showed that a pair of Arabidopsis thaliana TIR-NLR proteins, RRS1 and RPS4, function together in disease resistance against multiple pathogen isolates. Here, we report that dual R proteins, RRS1 and RPS4, from A. thaliana ecotype Wassilewskija confer resistance to bacterial wilt in transgenic Brassica crops. For practical applications, this finding may provide a new strategy for developing disease resistant plants that express R genes from other plants. PMID:25763492

  9. Device-associated infection rates and bacterial resistance in six academic teaching hospitals of Iran: Findings from the International Nocosomial Infection Control Consortium (INICC).

    PubMed

    Jahani-Sherafat, Somayeh; Razaghi, Maryam; Rosenthal, Victor D; Tajeddin, Elahe; Seyedjavadi, Simasadat; Rashidan, Marjan; Alebouyeh, Masoud; Rostampour, Maryam; Haghi, Arezo; Sayarbayat, Masoumeh; Farazmandian, Somayeh; Yarmohammadi, Tahere; Arshadi, Fardokht K; Mansouri, Nahid; Sarbazi, Mohammad R; Vilar, Mariano; Zali, Mohammad R

    2015-01-01

    Device-associated health care-acquired infections (DA-HAIs) pose a threat to patient safety, particularly in the intensive care unit (ICU). However, few data regarding DA-HAI rates and their associated bacterial resistance in ICUs from Iran are available. A DA-HAI surveillance study was conducted in six adult and pediatric ICUs in academic teaching hospitals in Tehran using CDC/NHSN definitions. We collected prospective data regarding device use, DA-HAI rates, and lengths of stay from 2584 patients, 16,796 bed-days from one adult ICU, and bacterial profiles and bacterial resistance from six ICUs. Among the DA-HAIs, there were 5.84 central line-associated bloodstream infections (CLABs) per 1000 central line-days, 7.88 ventilator-associated pneumonias (VAPs) per 1000 mechanical ventilator-days and 8.99 catheter-associated urinary tract infections (CAUTIs) per 1000 urinary catheter-days. The device utilization ratios were 0.44 for central lines, 0.42 for mechanical ventilators and 1.0 for urinary catheters. The device utilization ratios of mechanical ventilators and urinary catheters were higher than those reported in the ICUs of the INICC and the CDC's NHSN reports, but central line use was lower. The DA-HAI rates in this study were higher than the CDC's NHSN report. However, compared with the INICC report, the VAP rate in our study was lower, while the CLAB rate was similar and the CAUTI rate was higher. Nearly 83% of the samples showed a mixed-type infection. The most frequent pathogens were Acinetobacter baumannii, Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa, followed by Klebsiella pneumoniae and Enterococcus spp. In the S. aureus isolates, 100% were resistant to oxacillin. Overall resistances of A. baumannii and K. pneumonia to imipenem were 70.5% and 76.7%, respectively. A multiple drug resistance phenotype was detected in 68.15% of the isolates. The DA-HAI rates in Iran were shown to be higher than the CDC-NHSN rates and similar to the INICC rates. Resistance to oxacillin and imipenem was higher as well. Comparing device use, DA-HAI rates, and bacterial resistance for the primary isolated bacteria indicated a direct association between urinary catheter use and the rates of CAUTI. PMID:26027477

  10. Prevalence of plasmid mediated pesticide resistant bacterial assemblages in crop fields.

    PubMed

    Umamaheswari, S; Murali, M

    2010-11-01

    Three crop fields namely paddy sugarcane and tomato exposed to bavistin [Methyl (1H-benzimidazol-2-yl) carbomate], monocrotophos[Dimethyl(E)-1-methyl-2-(methyl-carbamoyl) vinyl phosphate] and kinado plus [(EZ)-2-chloro-3-dimethoxyphosphinoyloxy-X1, X1-diethylbut-2-enamide], respectively were chosen for the present investigation to know the bacterial population and degradation of pesticides. The chemical nature of the soil and water samples from the pesticide contaminated fields was analysed along with counting of the total heterotrophic bacteria (THB), Staphylococci and Enterococcci population. Mean calcium, phosphate and biological oxygen demand were maximum in tomato field water Field water recorded maximum phophate and silicate content, whereas, sugarcane field water elicited maximum dissolved oxygen content. On the other hand, available phosphate and exchangeable potassium were maximum is sugarcane field soil. Significant variations in the bacterial population were evident between the treatments in sugarcane field soil and tomato field water exposed to monocrotophos and kinado plus, respectively In addition, significant variations between THB, Staphlyococci and Enterococci population were also evinced in both the sugarcane andtomato fields. The dominant pesticide resistant bacteria, Staphylococcus aureus, Enterococcus faecalis and Pseudomonas aeuroginosa harboured plasmids and the resistant trait observed were found to be plasmid borne. PMID:21506482

  11. Bacterial Spectrum and Antibiotic Resistance Patterns of Ocular Infection: Differences between External and Intraocular Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Nan; Yang, Qian; Tan, Yiwei; Lin, Liping; Huang, Qiang; Wu, Kaili

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to compare the differences of microbial spectrum and antibiotic resistance patterns between external and intraocular bacterial infections in an eye hospital in South China. A total of 737 bacteria isolates from suspected ocular infections were included in this retrospective study covering the period 2010–2013. The organisms cultured from the ocular surface (cornea, conjunctiva) accounted for the majority of the isolates (82.77%, n = 610), followed by the intraocular (aqueous humor, vitreous fluid), which accounted for 17.23% (n = 127). The top three species accounting for the external ocular infections were S. epidermidis (35.25%), P. aeruginosa (8.03%), and S. simulans (4.43%). The top three species for the intraocular infections were S. epidermidis (14.96%), S. hominis (8.66%), and B. subtilis (7.87%). The bacteria from the external ocular surface were more sensitive to neomycin, while those from the intraocular specimens were more sensitive to levofloxacin (P < 0.01). Multidrug resistance was found in 89 bacteria (12.08%), including isolates from both external (13.28%) and intraocular samples (6.30%). The results of this study indicate that the bacteria spectrum of external and intraocular infections is variable in the setting. A high percentage of bacterial organisms were found to be primarily susceptible to neomycin for external infection and levofloxacin for intraocular infection. PMID:26576294

  12. Statin-Conferred Enhanced Cellular Resistance against Bacterial Pore-Forming Toxins in Airway Epithelial Cells.

    PubMed

    Statt, Sarah; Ruan, Jhen-Wei; Hung, Li-Yin; Chang, Ching-Yun; Huang, Chih-Ting; Lim, Jae Hyang; Li, Jian-Dong; Wu, Reen; Kao, Cheng-Yuan

    2015-11-01

    Statins are widely used to prevent cardiovascular disease. In addition to their inhibitory effects on cholesterol synthesis, statins have beneficial effects in patients with sepsis and pneumonia, although molecular mechanisms have mostly remained unclear. Using human airway epithelial cells as a proper in vitro model, we show that prior exposure to physiological nanomolar serum concentrations of simvastatin (ranging from 10-1,000 nM) confers significant cellular resistance to the cytotoxicity of pneumolysin, a pore-forming toxin and the main virulence factor of Streptococcus pneumoniae. This protection could be demonstrated with a different statin, pravastatin, or on a different toxin, ?-hemolysin. Furthermore, through the use of gene silencing, pharmacological inhibitors, immunofluorescence microscopy, and biochemical and metabolic rescue approaches, we demonstrate that the mechanism of protection conferred by simvastatin at physiological nanomolar concentrations could be different from the canonical mevalonate pathways seen in most other mechanistic studies conducted with statins at micromolar levels. All of these data are integrated into a protein synthesis-dependent, calcium-dependent model showing the interconnected pathways used by statins in airway epithelial cells to elicit an increased resistance to pore-forming toxins. This research fills large gaps in our understanding of how statins may confer host cellular protection against bacterial infections in the context of airway epithelial cells without the confounding effect from the presence of immune cells. In addition, our discovery could be potentially developed into a host-centric strategy for the adjuvant treatment of pore-forming toxin associated bacterial infections. PMID:25874372

  13. Nanoparticle Approaches against Bacterial Infections

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Weiwei; Thamphiwatana, Soracha; Angsantikul, Pavimol; Zhang, Liangfang

    2014-01-01

    Despite the wide success of antibiotics, the treatment of bacterial infection still faces significant challenges, particularly the emergence of antibiotic resistance. As a result, nanoparticle drug delivery platforms including liposomes, polymeric nanoparticles, dendrimers, and various inorganic nanoparticles have been increasingly exploited to enhance the therapeutic effectiveness of existing antibiotics. This review focuses on areas where nanoparticle approaches hold significant potential to advance the treatment of bacterial infection. These areas include targeted antibiotic delivery, environmentally responsive antibiotic delivery, combinatorial antibiotic delivery, nanoparticle-enabled antibacterial vaccination, and nanoparticle-based bacterial detection. In each area we highlight the innovative antimicrobial nanoparticle platforms and review their progress made against bacterial infections. PMID:25044325

  14. A population model evaluating the consequences of the evolution of double-resistance and tradeoffs on the benefits of two-drug antibiotic treatments.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Ellsworth M; Chao, Lin

    2014-01-01

    The evolution of antibiotic resistance in microbes poses one of the greatest challenges to the management of human health. Because addressing the problem experimentally has been difficult, research on strategies to slow the evolution of resistance through the rational use of antibiotics has resorted to mathematical and computational models. However, despite many advances, several questions remain unsettled. Here we present a population model for rational antibiotic usage by adding three key features that have been overlooked: 1) the maximization of the frequency of uninfected patients in the human population rather than the minimization of antibiotic resistance in the bacterial population, 2) the use of cocktails containing antibiotic pairs, and 3) the imposition of tradeoff constraints on bacterial resistance to multiple drugs. Because of tradeoffs, bacterial resistance does not evolve directionally and the system reaches an equilibrium state. When considering the equilibrium frequency of uninfected patients, both cycling and mixing improve upon single-drug treatment strategies. Mixing outperforms optimal cycling regimens. Cocktails further improve upon aforementioned strategies. Moreover, conditions that increase the population frequency of uninfected patients also increase the recovery rate of infected individual patients. Thus, a rational strategy does not necessarily result in a tragedy of the commons because benefits to the individual patient and general public are not in conflict. Our identification of cocktails as the best strategy when tradeoffs between multiple-resistance are operating could also be extended to other host-pathogen systems. Cocktails or other multiple-drug treatments are additionally attractive because they allow re-using antibiotics whose utility has been negated by the evolution of single resistance. PMID:24498003

  15. Aurora Kinases as Targets in Drug-Resistant Neuroblastoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Rothweiler, Florian; Löschmann, Nadine; Nüsse, Benedikt; Dirks, Wilhelm G.; Zehner, Richard; Cinatl, Jindrich

    2014-01-01

    Aurora kinase inhibitors displayed activity in pre-clinical neuroblastoma models. Here, we studied the effects of the pan-aurora kinase inhibitor tozasertib (VX680, MK-0457) and the aurora kinase inhibitor alisertib (MLN8237) that shows some specificity for aurora kinase A over aurora kinase B in a panel of neuroblastoma cell lines with acquired drug resistance. Both compounds displayed anti-neuroblastoma activity in the nanomolar range. The anti-neuroblastoma mechanism included inhibition of aurora kinase signalling as indicated by decreased phosphorylation of the aurora kinase substrate histone H3, cell cycle inhibition in G2/M phase, and induction of apoptosis. The activity of alisertib but not of tozasertib was affected by ABCB1 expression. Aurora kinase inhibitors induced a p53 response and their activity was enhanced in combination with the MDM2 inhibitor and p53 activator nutlin-3 in p53 wild-type cells. In conclusion, aurora kinases are potential drug targets in therapy-refractory neuroblastoma, in particular for the vast majority of p53 wild-type cases. PMID:25268132

  16. Autophagy and Transporter-Based Multi-Drug Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Priyank; Zhang, Dong-Mei; Degenhardt, Kurt; Chen, Zhe-Sheng

    2012-01-01

    All the therapeutic strategies for treating cancers aim at killing the cancer cells via apoptosis (programmed cell death type I). Defective apoptosis endow tumor cells with survival. The cell can respond to such defects with autophagy. Autophagy is a cellular process by which cytoplasmic material is either degraded to maintain homeostasis or recycled for energy and nutrients in starvation. A plethora of evidence has shown that the role of autophagy in tumors is complex. A lot of effort is needed to underline the functional status of autophagy in tumor progression and treatment, and elucidate how to tweak autophagy to treat cancer. Furthermore, during the treatment of cancer, the limitation for the cure rate and survival is the phenomenon of multi drug resistance (MDR). The development of MDR is an intricate process that could be regulated by drug transporters, enzymes, anti-apoptotic genes or DNA repair mechanisms. Reports have shown that autophagy has a dual role in MDR. Furthermore, it has been reported that activation of a death pathway may overcome MDR, thus pointing the importance of other death pathways to regulate tumor cell progression and growth. Therefore, in this review we will discuss the role of autophagy in MDR tumors and a possible link amongst these phenomena. PMID:24710490

  17. Toward repurposing ciclopirox as an antibiotic against drug-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii, Escherichia coli, and Klebsiella pneumoniae.

    PubMed

    Carlson-Banning, Kimberly M; Chou, Andrew; Liu, Zhen; Hamill, Richard J; Song, Yongcheng; Zechiedrich, Lynn

    2013-01-01

    Antibiotic-resistant infections caused by gram-negative bacteria are a major healthcare concern. Repurposing drugs circumvents the time and money limitations associated with developing new antimicrobial agents needed to combat these antibiotic-resistant infections. Here we identified the off-patent antifungal agent, ciclopirox, as a candidate to repurpose for antibiotic use. To test the efficacy of ciclopirox against antibiotic-resistant pathogens, we used a curated collection of Acinetobacter baumannii, Escherichia coli, and Klebsiella pneumoniae clinical isolates that are representative of known antibiotic resistance phenotypes. We found that ciclopirox, at 5-15 µg/ml concentrations, inhibited bacterial growth regardless of the antibiotic resistance status. At these same concentrations, ciclopirox reduced growth of Pseudomonas aeruginosa clinical isolates, but some of these pathogens required higher ciclopirox concentrations to completely block growth. To determine how ciclopirox inhibits bacterial growth, we performed an overexpression screen in E. coli. This screen revealed that galE, which encodes UDP-glucose 4-epimerase, rescued bacterial growth at otherwise restrictive ciclopirox concentrations. We found that ciclopirox does not inhibit epimerization of UDP-galactose by purified E. coli GalE; however, ?galU, ?galE, ?rfaI, or ?rfaB mutant strains all have lower ciclopirox minimum inhibitory concentrations than the parent strain. The galU, galE, rfaI, and rfaB genes all encode enzymes that use UDP-galactose or UDP-glucose for galactose metabolism and lipopolysaccharide (LPS) biosynthesis. Indeed, we found that ciclopirox altered LPS composition of an E. coli clinical isolate. Taken together, our data demonstrate that ciclopirox affects galactose metabolism and LPS biosynthesis, two pathways important for bacterial growth and virulence. The lack of any reported fungal resistance to ciclopirox in over twenty years of use in the clinic, its excellent safety profiles, novel target(s), and efficacy, make ciclopirox a promising potential antimicrobial agent to use against multidrug-resistant problematic gram-negative pathogens. PMID:23936064

  18. Transgenic Resistance Confers Effective Field Level Control of Bacterial Spot Disease in Tomato

    PubMed Central

    Horvath, Diana M.; Stall, Robert E.; Jones, Jeffrey B.; Pauly, Michael H.; Vallad, Gary E.; Dahlbeck, Doug; Staskawicz, Brian J.; Scott, John W.

    2012-01-01

    We investigated whether lines of transgenic tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) expressing the Bs2 resistance gene from pepper, a close relative of tomato, demonstrate improved resistance to bacterial spot disease caused by Xanthomonas species in replicated multi-year field trials under commercial type growing conditions. We report that the presence of the Bs2 gene in the highly susceptible VF 36 background reduced disease to extremely low levels, and VF 36-Bs2 plants displayed the lowest disease severity amongst all tomato varieties tested, including commercial and breeding lines with host resistance. Yields of marketable fruit from transgenic lines were typically 2.5 times that of the non-transformed parent line, but varied between 1.5 and 11.5 fold depending on weather conditions and disease pressure. Trials were conducted without application of any copper-based bactericides, presently in wide use despite negative impacts on the environment. This is the first demonstration of effective field resistance in a transgenic genotype based on a plant R gene and provides an opportunity for control of a devastating pathogen while eliminating ineffective copper pesticides. PMID:22870280

  19. Epidemiology of Carbapenem Resistance among Multi-drug Resistant Enterobacteriaceae in Uganda

    PubMed Central

    Ampaire, Lucas M.; Katawera, Victoria; Nyehangane, Dan; Boum, Yap; Bazira, Joel

    2015-01-01

    Background Multi-drug resistant (MDR) Enterobacteriaceae are on the increase worldwide and their spread has become a global challenge. Escalating the challenge is the possibility that many of these are Carbapenemase-producing Enterobacteriaceae (CPE). This further complicates patient management. The magnitude of MDR-CPE in many developed settings has been reported, however, there is paucity of data from resource limited settings. We evaluated the epidemiology of MDR-CPE of clinical origin in South Western Uganda. Methods From September 2013 to June 2014, all Enterobacteriaceae isolated from diverse specimens obtained from patients attending Mbarara Regional Referral Hospital, South-western Uganda, were screened for MDR in a laboratory-based cross sectional study. Isolates found to be MDR were screened for carbapenem susceptibility/resistance phenotypically by Kirby Bauer disc diffusion method following CLSI guidelines and genetically using the multiplex real-time Polymerase Chain Reaction (RT-PCR). Results Of the 658 strains isolated, 183 (27.8%) were MDR and 68 (37.15%) of those MDR exhibited at least one form of carbapenem resistance with 23 (12.57%) and 56 (30.60%) isolates expressing phenotypic and genetic resistance, respectively. Eleven MDR-CPE (6.01%) isolates exhibited both phenotypic and genotypic resistance to carbapenems. Only blaVIM and blaOXA-48 genes were detected among the genetically resistant isolates. Conclusion The high prevalence of MDR-CPE calls for aggressive infection control and prevention strategies, including reinforcement of hand hygiene, using contact precautions and early detection of CPE through use of targeted surveillance and molecular techniques in resource limited settings.

  20. Prevalence of Transmitted Drug Resistance and Impact of Transmitted Resistance on Treatment Success in the German HIV-1 Seroconverter Cohort

    PubMed Central

    Houareau, Claudia; Werning, Johanna; Keeren, Kathrin; Somogyi, Sybille; Kollan, Christian; Jessen, Heiko; Dupke, Stephan; Hamouda, Osamah

    2010-01-01

    Background The aim of this study is to analyse the prevalence of transmitted drug resistance, TDR, and the impact of TDR on treatment success in the German HIV-1 Seroconverter Cohort. Methods Genotypic resistance analysis was performed in treatment-naïve study patients whose sample was available 1,312/1,564 (83.9% October 2008). A genotypic resistance result was obtained for 1,276/1,312 (97.3%). The resistance associated mutations were identified according to the surveillance drug resistance mutations list recommended for drug-naïve patients. Treatment success was determined as viral suppression below 500 copies/ml. Results Prevalence of TDR was stable at a high level between 1996 and 2007 in the German HIV-1 Seroconverter Cohort (N?=?158/1,276; 12.4%; CIwilson 10.7–14.3; p for trend?=?0.25). NRTI resistance was predominant (7.5%) but decreased significantly over time (CIWilson: 6.2–9.1, p for trend?=?0.02). NNRTI resistance tended to increase over time (NNRTI: 3.5%; CIWilson: 2.6–4.6; p for trend ?=?0.07), whereas PI resistance remained stable (PI: 3.0%; CIWilson: 2.1–4.0; p for trend ?=?0.24). Resistance to all drug classes was frequently caused by singleton resistance mutations (NRTI 55.6%, PI 68.4%, NNRTI 99.1%). The majority of NRTI-resistant strains (79.8%) carried resistance-associated mutations selected by the thymidine analogues zidovudine and stavudine. Preferably 2NRTI/1PIr combinations were prescribed as first line regimen in patients with resistant HIV as well as in patients with susceptible strains (susceptible 45.3%; 173/382 vs. resistant 65.5%; 40/61). The majority of patients in both groups were treated successfully within the first year after ART-initiation (susceptible: 89.9%; 62/69; resistant: 7/9; 77.8%). Conclusion Overall prevalence of TDR remained stable at a high level but trends of resistance against drug classes differed over time. The significant decrease of NRTI-resistance in patients newly infected with HIV might be related to the introduction of novel antiretroviral drugs and a wider use of genotypic resistance analysis prior to treatment initiation. PMID:20949104

  1. Violacein as a genetically-controlled, enzymatically amplified and photobleaching-resistant chromophore for optoacoustic bacterial imaging

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Yuanyuan; Sigmund, Felix; Reber, Josefine; Luís Deán-Ben, Xosé; Glasl, Sarah; Kneipp, Moritz; Estrada, Héctor; Razansky, Daniel; Ntziachristos, Vasilis; Westmeyer, Gil G.

    2015-01-01

    There is growing interest in genetically expressed reporters for in vivo studies of bacterial colonization in the context of infectious disease research, studies of the bacterial microbiome or cancer imaging and treatment. To empower non-invasive high-resolution bacterial tracking with deep tissue penetration, we herein use the genetically controlled biosynthesis of the deep-purple pigment Violacein as a photobleaching-resistant chromophore label for in vivo optoacoustic (photoacoustic) imaging in the near-infrared range. We demonstrate that Violacein-producing bacteria can be imaged with high contrast-to-noise in strongly vascularized xenografted murine tumors and further observe that Violacein shows anti-tumoral activity. Our experiments thus identify Violacein as a robust bacterial label for non-invasive optoacoustic imaging with high potential for basic research and future theranostic applications in bacterial tumor targeting. PMID:26091543

  2. Re-engineering nalidixic acid's chemical scaffold: A step towards the development of novel anti-tubercular and anti-bacterial leads for resistant pathogens.

    PubMed

    Peraman, Ramalingam; Varma, Raghu Veer; Reddy, Y Padmanabha

    2015-10-01

    Occurrence of antibacterial and antimycobacterial resistance stimulated a thrust to discover new drugs for infectious diseases. Herein we report the work on re-engineering nalidixic acid's chemical scaffold for newer leads. Stepwise clubbing of quinoxaline, 1,2,4-triazole/1,3,4-oxadiazole with nalidixic acid yielded better compounds. Compounds were screened against ciprofloxacin resistant bacteria and Mycobacterium tuberculosis H37Rv species. Results were obtained as minimum inhibitory concentration, it was evident that molecule with quinoxaline linked azide as side chain served as antitubercular lead (<6.25 ?g/ml) whilst molecule with oxadiazole or triazole linked quinoxaline side chain served as anti-bacterial lead. Few compounds were significantly active against Escherichia coli and Proteus vulgaris with MIC less than 0.06 ?g/ml and relatively potent than ciprofloxacin. No true compound was potentially active against Salmonella species as compared to amoxicillin. PMID:26277407

  3. Competitive release and facilitation of drug-resistant parasites after therapeutic chemotherapy in a

    E-print Network

    de Roode, Jaap

    Competitive release and facilitation of drug-resistant parasites after therapeutic chemotherapy densities are suppressed by the presence of coinfecting clones, removal of susceptible clones by drug treatment could allow resistant clones to expand into the newly vacated niche space within a host

  4. Evolution and recombination of genes encoding HIV-1 drug resistance and tropism during antiretroviral therapy

    E-print Network

    Suchard, Marc A.

    Evolution and recombination of genes encoding HIV-1 drug resistance and tropism during HIV-1 recombination HIV-1 tropism Characterization of residual plasma virus during antiretroviral the hypotheses that drug resistance in pol was unrelated to changes in coreceptor usage (tropism

  5. The evolution of drug resistance and the curious orthodoxy of aggressive chemotherapy

    E-print Network

    Day, Troy

    The evolution of drug resistance and the curious orthodoxy of aggressive chemotherapy Andrew F-course chemotherapy The evolution of drug-resistant pathogens significantly affects human well-being and health after they feel better (long-course chemotherapy). Our claim is that aggressive che- motherapy cannot

  6. An Invitation to Project DARE: Drug Abuse Resistance Education. Program Brief.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marx, Eva; DeJong, William

    Project DARE (Drug Abuse Resistance Education) is a substance use prevention education program designed to equip elementary school children with skills for resisting peer pressure to experiment with tobacco, drugs, and alcohol. This unique program, which was developed in 1983 as a cooperative effort by the Los Angeles Police Department and the Los…

  7. MICROARRAY ANALYSIS OF A LACTIC ACID STRESSED, MULTI-DRUG RESISTANT MUTANT OF SALMONELLA TYPHIMURIUM

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Salmonella Typhimurium is one of the most common Salmonella serovars associated with human foodborne infections and has been associated with multi-drug resistance properties. It is important to establish the ability of multi-drug resistant Salmonella to survive food processing interventions. Lactic ...

  8. Interactions among virulence, coinfection and drug resistance in a complex life-cycle parasite

    E-print Network

    Feng, Zhilan

    Interactions among virulence, coinfection and drug resistance in a complex life-cycle parasite January 2012 Accepted 29 March 2012 Available online 8 April 2012 Keywords: Schistosomiasis Parasite by multiple parasite strains on the evolution of parasites' drug resistance. Through the examination

  9. Chromosomal alterations cause the high rates and wide ranges of drug resistance in cancer cells

    E-print Network

    Duesberg, Peter

    by definition [24,33,34]? Second: How does the range of drug resistance of cancer cells far exceed a challengingChromosomal alterations cause the high rates and wide ranges of drug resistance in cancer cells Ruhong Lia , Ruediger Hehlmanb , Rainer Sachsc , Peter Duesberga, * a Department of Molecular and Cell

  10. Polymyxins for the treatment of extensively-drug-resistant Gram-negative bacteria: from pharmacokinetics to bedside.

    PubMed

    Zavascki, Alexandre P

    2014-05-01

    The initial use of polymyxins, polymyxin B and colistin (administered as a pro-drug colistin methanesulfonate sodium [CMS]), mostly relied on old pharmacokinetic (PK) studies that lacked appropriate methodology. In recent years, many PK studies in both animals and humans have provided more consistent evidence supporting better use of these invaluable antibiotics. However, translating preclinical data to clinical practice is not always an easy task and some may experience difficulties on how recent knowledge on polymyxins can be applied into the patients' care. Although many questions are still unresolved, there are consistent data able to improve clinical practice when prescribing initial and maintenance doses of both polymyxin B and CMS. Considering the importance of optimal use of polymyxins, this editorial discusses recent PK findings and how to take advantage of them at the bedside to improve the treatment of patient with extensively-drug-resistant Gram-negative bacterial infections. PMID:24666285

  11. Reducing the Risk of Drug Involvement among Early Adolescents: An Evaluation of Drug Abuse Resistance Education (DARE).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harmon, Michele Alicia

    1993-01-01

    DARE's effectiveness in Charleston County (South Carolina) was studied by comparing 341 DARE to 367 non-DARE fifth-grade students. DARE teaches students to recognize and resist social pressures to use drugs. DARE has positive impacts on anti-substance abuse attitudes, assertiveness, positive peer association, association with drug-using peers, and…

  12. [Leishmania: role of P glycoprotein in drug resistance and reversion strategies].

    PubMed

    Osorio, Edison J; Robledo, Sara M; Arango, Gabriel J; Muskus, Carlos E

    2005-06-01

    Protozoan parasites are important causative agents of morbidity and mortality throughout the world--a problem further complicated by the emergence of drug resistance in these parasites. Mechanisms of drug resistance include the following: decreased uptake of the drug into the cell, loss of drug activation, alterations in the drug target, and over-expression of a well-known multiple drug transporter proteins. In this review, two critical components of resistance are stressed: (1) the role of ATP binding cassette proteins, such as P-glycoproteins, in mediating drug resistance in Leishmania and other protozoans, followed by development of cross-resistance to many structurally and functionally unrelated drugs, and (2) some concepts concerning the reversal mechanism of multidrug resistance by drugs and natural products. Several modulators or chemosensitizers alter the capacity of P-glycoproteins to maintain subtoxic intracellular drug concentrations. Calcium channel blockers such as verapamil act in this mode; however, high concentrations are required for an efficient and effective inhibition and, in addition, produce undesirable side effects. The discovery of new, natural product modulators of P-glycoproteins is stressed. This category of modulators offer potentially improved efficacy and lowered toxicity for the mammalian host. PMID:16022379

  13. Antimalarial Drug Resistance: Literature Review and Activities and Findings of the ICEMR Network

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Liwang; Mharakurwa, Sungano; Ndiaye, Daouda; Rathod, Pradipsinh K.; Rosenthal, Philip J.

    2015-01-01

    Antimalarial drugs are key tools for the control and elimination of malaria. Recent decreases in the global malaria burden are likely due, in part, to the deployment of artemisinin-based combination therapies. Therefore, the emergence and potential spread of artemisinin-resistant parasites in southeast Asia and changes in sensitivities to artemisinin partner drugs have raised concerns. In recognition of this urgent threat, the International Centers of Excellence for Malaria Research (ICEMRs) are closely monitoring antimalarial drug efficacy and studying the mechanisms underlying drug resistance. At multiple sentinel sites of the global ICEMR network, research activities include clinical studies to track the efficacies of antimalarial drugs, ex vivo/in vitro assays to measure drug susceptibilities of parasite isolates, and characterization of resistance-mediating parasite polymorphisms. Taken together, these efforts offer an increasingly comprehensive assessment of the efficacies of antimalarial therapies, and enable us to predict the emergence of drug resistance and to guide local antimalarial drug policies. Here we briefly review worldwide antimalarial drug resistance concerns, summarize research activities of the ICEMRs related to drug resistance, and assess the global impacts of the ICEMR programs. PMID:26259943

  14. Mutations in the Bacterial Ribosomal Protein L3 and Their Association with Antibiotic Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Klitgaard, Rasmus N.; Ntokou, Eleni; Nørgaard, Katrine; Biltoft, Daniel; Hansen, Lykke H.; Trædholm, Nicolai M.; Kongsted, Jacob

    2015-01-01

    Different groups of antibiotics bind to the peptidyl transferase center (PTC) in the large subunit of the bacterial ribosome. Resistance to these groups of antibiotics has often been linked with mutations or methylations of the 23S rRNA. In recent years, there has been a rise in the number of studies where mutations have been found in the ribosomal protein L3 in bacterial strains resistant to PTC-targeting antibiotics but there is often no evidence that these mutations actually confer antibiotic resistance. In this study, a plasmid exchange system was used to replace plasmid-carried wild-type genes with mutated L3 genes in a chromosomal L3 deletion strain. In this way, the essential L3 gene is available for the bacteria while allowing replacement of the wild type with mutated L3 genes. This enables investigation of the effect of single mutations in Escherichia coli without a wild-type L3 background. Ten plasmid-carried mutated L3 genes were constructed, and their effect on growth and antibiotic susceptibility was investigated. Additionally, computational modeling of the impact of L3 mutations in E. coli was used to assess changes in 50S structure and antibiotic binding. All mutations are placed in the loops of L3 near the PTC. Growth data show that 9 of the 10 mutations were well accepted in E. coli, although some of them came with a fitness cost. Only one of the mutants exhibited reduced susceptibility to linezolid, while five exhibited reduced susceptibility to tiamulin. PMID:25845869

  15. In vivo dual-targeted chemotherapy of drug resistant cancer by rationally designed nanocarrier.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yang; Zhao, Ruibo; Wang, Shibing; Liu, Zhaoming; Tang, Ruikang

    2016-01-01

    Multidrug resistance is one of major obstacles to the effective cancer chemotherapy. To address this issue, we developed the effective circumvention of multidrug resistance in cancer cells by a yolk-shell Fe3O4@MgSiO3 nanoplatform with the polymerpoly(ethylene glycol) and folic acid modifications can achieve active targeted delivery of anti-cancer drug by using combined magnetic and ligand targeting. The direct intracellular drug delivery of doxorubicin by nanocarrier was much more effectively than free DOX for multidrug resistant Hep-G2/MDR cancer cells. Besides the excellent biocompatibility, high drug loading efficiency, dual-targeting delivery, and controlled releasing behavior, in vivo experiments demonstrate that this nanocarrier can specifically deliver and concentrate doxorubicin hydrochloride in tumor sites to overcome drug resistance. It follows an alternative strategy for effective chemotherapy against drug resistant cancers by using rationally designed nanomaterial. PMID:26491996

  16. Multi drug resistance in strong biofilm forming clinical isolates of Staphylococcus epidermidis

    PubMed Central

    Sahal, Gulcan; Bilkay, Isil Seyis

    2014-01-01

    Staphylococcus epidermidis which exists in healthy human skin as a commensal inhabitant is also an important pathogen forming biofilms on many surfaces and recently, increased resistance traits were suggested to be acquired in biofilm environments. In this study; clinical Prevalences, antibiotic resistances and biofilm formations of S. epidermidis strains were determined and comparison of all these findings with each other was carried out in order to take precautions against them and figure out if high biofilm forming S. epidermidis strains display multi drug resistance. According to our results; samples of wound and blood were the most S. epidermidis isolated clinical materials (40%; 35%) and cardiothoracic surgery was the most S. epidermidis observed service unit. All of these strains were sensitive to vancomycin, however 65% of them showed resistance to all ?-lactam antibiotics (Penicillin, Oxacillin, Amoxicilin/Clavulonic acid), used in this study and 60% of all S. epidermidis strains were found as multi drug resistant. When the results of strong biofilm forming S. epidermidis strains are examined; they were isolated from sample of blood and service unit of cardiovascular surgery in highest frequency and 80% of them were ?-lactam resistant whereas 100% of them were multi drug resistant. One of these multi drug resistant strains which was resistant to maximum amount of different antimicrobial classes, was also observed as maximum biofilm forming strain among all the other S. epidermidis isolates. Multi drug resistance in strong biofilm forming strains shows that; biofilms play a role in antimicrobial resistance traits of S. epidermidis. PMID:25242939

  17. Experimental Resistance to Drug Combinations in Leishmania donovani: Metabolic and Phenotypic Adaptations

    PubMed Central

    Berg, Maya; García-Hernández, Raquel; Cuypers, Bart; Vanaerschot, Manu; Manzano, José I.; Poveda, José A.; Ferragut, José A.; Castanys, Santiago

    2015-01-01

    Together with vector control, chemotherapy is an essential tool for the control of visceral leishmaniasis (VL), but its efficacy is jeopardized by growing resistance and treatment failure against first-line drugs. To delay the emergence of resistance, the use of drug combinations of existing antileishmanial agents has been tested systematically in clinical trials for the treatment of visceral leishmaniasis (VL). In vitro, Leishmania donovani promastigotes are able to develop experimental resistance to several combinations of different antileishmanial drugs after 10 weeks of drug pressure. Using an untargeted liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) metabolomics approach, we identified metabolic changes in lines that were experimentally resistant to drug combinations and their respective single-resistant lines. This highlighted both collective metabolic changes (found in all combination therapy-resistant [CTR] lines) and specific ones (found in certain CTR lines). We demonstrated that single-resistant and CTR parasite cell lines show distinct metabolic adaptations, which all converge on the same defensive mechanisms that were experimentally validated: protection against drug-induced and external oxidative stress and changes in membrane fluidity. The membrane fluidity changes were accompanied by changes in drug uptake only in the lines that were resistant against drug combinations with antimonials, and surprisingly, drug accumulation was higher in these lines. Together, these results highlight the importance and the central role of protection against oxidative stress in the different resistant lines. Ultimately, these phenotypic changes might interfere with the mode of action of all drugs that are currently used for the treatment of VL and should be taken into account in drug development. PMID:25645828

  18. Cationic amphipathic D-enantiomeric antimicrobial peptides with in vitro and ex vivo activity against drug-resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Lan, Yun; Lam, Jason T; Siu, Gilman K H; Yam, Wing Cheong; Mason, A James; Lam, Jenny K W

    2014-12-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) is the leading cause of bacterial death worldwide. Due to the emergence of multi-drug resistant TB (MDR-TB) and extensively drug-resistant TB (XDR-TB), and the persistence of latent infections, a safe and effective TB therapy is highly sought after. Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) have therapeutic potential against infectious diseases and have the ability to target microbial pathogens within eukaryotic cells. In the present study, we investigated the activity of a family of six AMPs containing all-D amino acids (D-LAK peptides) against MDR and XDR clinical strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) both in vitro and, using THP-1 cells as a macrophage model, cultured ex vivo. All the D-LAK peptides successfully inhibited the growth of Mtb in vitro and were similarly effective against MDR and XDR strains. D-LAK peptides effectively broke down the heavy clumping of mycobacteria in broth culture, consistent with a 'detergent-like effect' that could reduce the hydrophobic interactions between the highly lipidic cell walls of the mycobacteria, preventing bacteria cell aggregation. Furthermore, though not able to eradicate the intracellular mycobacteria, D-LAK peptides substantially inhibited the intracellular growth of drug-resistant Mtb clinical isolates at concentrations that were well tolerated by THP-1 cells. Finally, combining D-LAK peptide with isoniazid could enhance the anti-TB efficacy. D-LAK peptide, particularly D-LAK120-A, was effective as an adjunct agent at non-toxic concentration to potentiate the efficacy of isoniazid against drug-resistant Mtb in vitro, possibly by facilitating the access of isoniazid into the mycobacteria by increasing the surface permeability of the pathogen. PMID:25154927

  19. Drug resistance and molecular epidemiology of aerobic bacteria isolated from puerperal infections in Bangladesh.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Salma; Kawaguchiya, Mitsuyo; Ghosh, Souvik; Paul, Shyamal Kumar; Urushibara, Noriko; Mahmud, Chand; Nahar, Kamrun; Hossain, Mohammad Akram; Kobayashi, Nobumichi

    2015-06-01

    Puerperal infection is a common complication during postnatal period in developing countries. Bacterial species, drug resistance, and genetic characteristics were investigated for a total of 470 isolates from puerperal infections in Bangladesh for a 2-year period (2010-2012). The most common species was Escherichia coli (n=98), followed by Enterococcus faecalis (n=54), Staphylococcus haemolyticus (n=33), Proteus mirabilis (n=32), Staphylococcus aureus (n=27), Klebsiella pneumoniae (n=22), and Enterobacter cloacae (n=21). S. aureus and Acinetobacter baumannii were isolated at a higher frequency from wound infections after cesarean section, while E. coli, E. cloacae, and K. pneumoniae were isolated from community-acquired endometritis and urinary tract infections. Resistance to third-generation cephalosporins was frequent for Enterobacteriacae, and was mainly mediated by blaCTX-M-1 group beta-lactamases. The CTX-M gene in E. coli from the four phylogroups was identified as blaCTX-M-15, and phylogroup B2 isolates with blaCTX-M-15 were classified into ST131 with O25b allele, harboring aac(6')-Ib-cr and various virulence factors. Carbapenemase genes blaNDM-1 and blaNDM-7 were identified in one isolate each of phylogroup A E. coli. Methicillin-resistant S. aureus isolates had type IV or V SCCmec, including isolates of ST361 (CC672), which is related to an emerging ST672 clone in the Indian subcontinent. This study revealed the recent epidemiological status of aerobic bacteria causing puerperal infections in Bangladesh, providing useful information to improve clinical practice and infection control. PMID:25555043

  20. Analysis of antimicrobial resistance genes detected in multiple-drug-resistant Escherichia coli isolates from broiler chicken carcasses

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Multi-drug resistant (MDR) bacteria in food animals are a potential problem in both animal and human health. In this study, MDR commensal Escherichia coli isolates from poultry were examined. Thirty-two E. coli isolates from broiler carcass rinses were selected based on resistance to aminoglycosid...

  1. Does a multi-drug resistant Escherichia coli facilitate dissemination of resistance to Salmonella in dairy calves?

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Previous research conducted by our laboratory investigated the incidence of multi-drug resistant (MDR) Salmonella in dairy cattle and reported that individual cattle, and most often calves, can shed multiple Salmonella serotypes that vary in the degree of antibiotic resistance. More recently, we di...

  2. Evaluation of the potential antimicrobial resistance transfer from a multi-drug resistant Escherichia coli to Salmonella in dairy calves

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Previous research conducted by our laboratory investigated the incidence of multi-drug resistant (MDR) Salmonella in dairy cattle and reported that individual cattle, and most often calves, shed multiple Salmonella serotypes that vary in the degree of antibiotic resistance. More recently, we invest...

  3. Cancer 'Roadmap' Could Help Combat Resistance to Targeted Drug Therapies | Physical Sciences in Oncology

    Cancer.gov

    New drugs that specifically target the mutated genes responsible for cancer growth have shown great success in extending the lives of patients, with far fewer side effects than conventional anti-cancer therapies. Unfortunately, many patients become resistant to these drugs when secondary mutations arise. Now, a multidisciplinary team of researchers at UCLA has developed a "roadmap" of the complex signaling processes involved in cancer that could lead to new methods for diagnosing and overcoming clinical drug resistance.

  4. Small-plasmid-mediated antibiotic resistance is enhanced by increases in plasmid copy number and bacterial fitness.

    PubMed

    San Millan, Alvaro; Santos-Lopez, Alfonso; Ortega-Huedo, Rafael; Bernabe-Balas, Cristina; Kennedy, Sean P; Gonzalez-Zorn, Bruno

    2015-01-01

    Plasmids play a key role in the horizontal spread of antibiotic resistance determinants among bacterial pathogens. When an antibiotic resistance plasmid arrives in a new bacterial host, it produces a fitness cost, causing a competitive disadvantage for the plasmid-bearing bacterium in the absence of antibiotics. On the other hand, in the presence of antibiotics, the plasmid promotes the survival of the clone. The adaptations experienced by plasmid and bacterium in the presence of antibiotics during the first generations of coexistence will be crucial for the progress of the infection and the maintenance of plasmid-mediated resistance once the treatment is over. Here we developed a model system using the human pathogen Haemophilus influenzae carrying the small plasmid pB1000 conferring resistance to ?-lactam antibiotics to investigate host and plasmid adaptations in the course of a simulated ampicillin therapy. Our results proved that plasmid-bearing clones compensated for the fitness disadvantage during the first 100 generations of plasmid-host adaptation. In addition, ampicillin treatment was associated with an increase in pB1000 copy number. The augmentation in both bacterial fitness and plasmid copy number gave rise to H. influenzae populations with higher ampicillin resistance levels. In conclusion, we show here that the modulations in bacterial fitness and plasmid copy number help a plasmid-bearing bacterium to adapt during antibiotic therapy, promoting both the survival of the host and the spread of the plasmid. PMID:25824216

  5. Resistance to currently used drugs is a serious problem in most fields of antimicrobial chemotherapy. Crossresistance

    E-print Network

    Schnaufer, Achim

    Resistance to currently used drugs is a serious problem in most fields of antimicrobial chemotherapy. Crossresistance between two of the major classes of drug used in the treat- ment of African as a result of alterations in an unusual adenosine transporter involved in the uptake of these drugs. African

  6. Establishment and characterization of triple drug resistant head and neck squamous cell carcinoma cell lines.

    PubMed

    Govindan, Sindhu Valiyaveedan; Kulsum, Safeena; Pandian, Ramanan Somasundara; Das, Debashish; Seshadri, Mukund; Hicks, Wesley; Kuriakose, Moni Abraham; Suresh, Amritha

    2015-08-01

    Resistance to chemotherapy leading to poor outcome and survival remains a challenge for developing strategies for therapeutic interventions in all types of cancer, including head and neck cancer. In vitro chemoresistant cell line models are an indispensable resource towards delineating the mechanisms involved in drug resistance/response and for the development of novel drugs. Current treatment for head and neck cancer includes chemotherapy with cisplatin, docetaxel and 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) and the response rates to these drugs in patients is 60-80%. The present study aimed to generate head and neck cancer triple drug-resistant cell lines in an effort towards elucidating the mechanisms underlying chemoresistance and providing a resourceful tool for drug design. Using two head and neck squamous cell carcinoma cell lines, Hep-2 (larynx) and CAL-27 (oral cavity), the present study sequentially exposed these cells to increasing concentrations of the combination of docetaxel, cisplatin and 5-FU (TPF) to generate triple drug-resistant cells, termed Hep-2 TPF resistant (TPFR) and CAL-27 TPFR. The effect of the drug treatments on the cell viability, apoptosis, cell cycle and the expression of genes associated with multidrug resistance were analyzed in the parental cells and drug-resistant counterparts. PMID:25962396

  7. Imperfect drug penetration leads to spatial monotherapy and rapid evolution of multidrug resistance

    PubMed Central

    Moreno-Gamez, Stefany; Hill, Alison L.; Petrov, Dmitri A.; Nowak, Martin A.

    2015-01-01

    Infections with rapidly evolving pathogens are often treated using combinations of drugs with different mechanisms of action. One of the major goal of combination therapy is to reduce the risk of drug resistance emerging during a patient’s treatment. Although this strategy generally has significant benefits over monotherapy, it may also select for multidrug-resistant strains, particularly during long-term treatment for chronic infections. Infections with these strains present an important clinical and public health problem. Complicating this issue, for many antimicrobial treatment regimes, individual drugs have imperfect penetration throughout the body, so there may be regions where only one drug reaches an effective concentration. Here we propose that mismatched drug coverage can greatly speed up the evolution of multidrug resistance by allowing mutations to accumulate in a stepwise fashion. We develop a mathematical model of within-host pathogen evolution under spatially heterogeneous drug coverage and demonstrate that even very small single-drug compartments lead to dramatically higher resistance risk. We find that it is often better to use drug combinations with matched penetration profiles, although there may be a trade-off between preventing eventual treatment failure due to resistance in this way and temporarily reducing pathogen levels systemically. Our results show that drugs with the most extensive distribution are likely to be the most vulnerable to resistance. We conclude that optimal combination treatments should be designed to prevent this spatial effective monotherapy. These results are widely applicable to diverse microbial infections including viruses, bacteria, and parasites. PMID:26038564

  8. Trade-offs between drug toxicity and benefit in the multi-antibiotic resistance system underlie optimal growth of E. coli

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Efflux is a widespread mechanism of reversible drug resistance in bacteria that can be triggered by environmental stressors, including many classes of drugs. While such chemicals when used alone are typically toxic to the cell, they can also induce the efflux of a broad range of agents and may therefore prove beneficial to cells in the presence of multiple stressors. The cellular response to a combination of such chemical stressors may be governed by a trade-off between the fitness costs due to drug toxicity and benefits mediated by inducible systems. Unfortunately, disentangling the cost-benefit interplay using measurements of bacterial growth in response to the competing effects of the drugs is not possible without the support of a theoretical framework. Results Here, we use the well-studied multiple antibiotic resistance (MAR) system in E. coli to experimentally characterize the trade-off between drug toxicity (“cost”) and drug-induced resistance (“benefit”) mediated by efflux pumps. Specifically, we show that the combined effects of a MAR-inducing drug and an antibiotic are governed by a superposition of cost and benefit functions that govern these trade-offs. We find that this superposition holds for all drug concentrations, and it therefore allows us to describe the full dose–response diagram for a drug pair using simpler cost and benefit functions. Moreover, this framework predicts the existence of optimal growth at a non-trivial concentration of inducer. We demonstrate that optimal growth does not coincide with maximum induction of the mar promoter, but instead results from the interplay between drug toxicity and mar induction. Finally, we derived and experimentally validated a general phase diagram highlighting the role of these opposing effects in shaping the interaction between two drugs. Conclusions Our analysis provides a quantitative description of the MAR system and highlights the trade-off between inducible resistance and the toxicity of the inducing agent in a multi-component environment. The results provide a predictive framework for the combined effects of drug toxicity and induction of the MAR system that are usually masked by bulk measurements of bacterial growth. The framework may also be useful for identifying optimal growth conditions in more general systems where combinations of environmental cues contribute to both transient resistance and toxicity. PMID:22631053

  9. Development of a Graphene Oxide Nanocarrier for Dual-Drug Chemo-phototherapy to Overcome Drug Resistance in Cancer.

    PubMed

    Tran, Tuan Hiep; Nguyen, Hanh Thuy; Pham, Tung Thanh; Choi, Ju Yeon; Choi, Han-Gon; Yong, Chul Soon; Kim, Jong Oh

    2015-12-30

    Despite tremendous progress in chemotherapy, drug resistance remains a major challenge for anticancer treatment. The combinations of chemo-photothermal and chemo-chemo treatments have been reported to be potential solutions to overcome drug resistance. In this study, we developed a dual-in-dual synergistic therapy based on the use of dual anticancer drug-loaded graphene oxide (GO) stabilized with poloxamer 188 for generating heat and delivering drugs to kill cancer cells under near-infrared (NIR) laser irradiation. The nanocomparable system is stable and uniform in size, generating sufficient heat to induce cell death. Dual drugs (doxorubicin and irinotecan)-loaded GO (GO-DI) in combination with laser irradiation caused higher cytotoxicity than that caused by the administration of a free single drug as well as a combination of drugs and blank GO in various cancer cells, especially in MDA-MB-231 resistant breast cancer cells. Exposure to "hot" NIR and GO-DI activated the intrinsic apoptosis pathway, which was confirmed based on changes in the morphology of cell nuclei and overexpression of apoptosis-related proteins. On the basis of the results, the combined treatment showed a synergistic effect compared to the effect of chemotherapy or photothermal treatment alone, demonstrating higher therapeutic efficacy to overcome one of the most severe problem in anticancer therapy, that of intrinsic resistance to chemotherapeutics. PMID:26641922

  10. Evaluation of efflux pump gene expression among drug susceptible and drug resistant strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis from Iran.

    PubMed

    Kardan Yamchi, Jalil; Haeili, Mehri; Gizaw Feyisa, Seifu; Kazemian, Hossein; Hashemi Shahraki, Abdolrazagh; Zahednamazi, Fatemeh; Imani Fooladi, Abbas Ali; Feizabadi, Mohammad Mehdi

    2015-12-01

    Absence of mutations within the genes encoding drug targets in some phenotypically drug resistant strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis suggests possible involvement of alternative mechanisms such as over-expression of efflux pumps. We investigated the expression level of Rv1410c, Rv2459, Rv1218c and Rv1273c efflux pumps gene by real-time quantitative reverse transcription PCR (qRT-PCR) in 31 clinical isolates of M. tuberculosis. Susceptibility to first-line drugs was performed using the proportion method. Twenty one isolates were characterized with drug resistance (DR), and among them 12 showed a significantly elevated level of expression (>4 fold) for at least one of the studied genes encoding for efflux pumps. Point mutations in the katG (codons 315 or 335) and rpoB (codons 456 and 441) genes were found in 42.85% and 66.6% of drug resistant isolates, respectively. Only one isolate showed mutation at position -15 of the inhA promoter region. Among the 7 isolates (33.33%) which had no mutation in the studied regions of drug target genes, 5 isolates showed over-expression for efflux pumps. Our results demonstrated that over-expression of efflux pumps can contribute to drug resistance in M. tuberculosis. PMID:26325681

  11. A Differential Drug Screen for Compounds That Select Against Antibiotic Resistance

    E-print Network

    Kishony, Roy

    A Differential Drug Screen for Compounds That Select Against Antibiotic Resistance Remy Chait1, Massachusetts, United States of America Abstract Antibiotics increase the frequency of resistant bacteria of chemicals that counteracts antibiotic resistance. Finally, we show that our assay can more generally permit

  12. Money, Sex, and Drugs: A Case Study to Teach the Genetics of Antibiotic Resistance

    E-print Network

    Handelsman, Jo

    Article Money, Sex, and Drugs: A Case Study to Teach the Genetics of Antibiotic Resistance Karen A here was to help students expand their understanding of antibiotic resistance, the Central Dogma used the problem of antibiotic resistance in Neisseria gonorhoeae and the societal questions linked

  13. Chlorhexidine Gluconate Cleansing in Preventing Central Line Associated Bloodstream Infection and Acquisition of Multi-drug Resistant Organisms in Younger Patients With Cancer or Undergoing Donor Stem Cell Transplant | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    This randomized phase III trial studies chlorhexidine gluconate cleansing to see how well it works compared to control cleansing in preventing central line associated bloodstream infection and acquisition of multi-drug resistant organisms in younger patients with cancer or undergoing donor stem cell transplant. Chlorhexidine gluconate may help reduce bloodstream infections and bacterial infections associated with the central line.

  14. Composite films of poly(vinyl alcohol)-chitosan-bacterial cellulose for drug controlled release.

    PubMed

    Pavaloiu, Ramona-Daniela; Stoica-Guzun, Anicuta; Stroescu, Marta; Jinga, Sorin Ion; Dobre, Tanase

    2014-07-01

    Mono and multilayer composite films of poly(vinyl alcohol)-chitosan-bacterial cellulose (PVA/chitosan/BC) have been prepared to achieve controlled release of ibuprofen sodium salt (IbuNa) as model drug. The composite films have been characterized by Fourier transformed infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). Surface morphology was investigated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Equilibrium swelling was measured in water at two different pH values and in vitro release of IbuNa in pH 1.2 and pH 7.4 media was studied. The release experiments revealed that drug release is pH sensitive. The release kinetics of IbuNa could be described by the Fickian model of diffusion with a good agreement. The IbuNa release rate was decreasing for all the films as the BC concentration was increased in the films composition, the decrease being higher for the multilayer films. PMID:24769089

  15. Different Frequencies of Drug Resistance Mutations among HIV-1 Subtypes Circulating in China: A Comprehensive Study

    PubMed Central

    Sui, Hongshuai; Gui, Tao; Jia, Lei; Guo, Wei; Han, Jingwan; Liu, Yongjian; Bao, Zuoyi; Li, Hanping; Li, Jingyun; Li, Lin

    2014-01-01

    The rapid spreading of HIV drug resistance is threatening the overall success of free HAART in China. Much work has been done on drug-resistant mutations, however, most of which were based on subtype B. Due to different genetic background, subtypes difference would have an effect on the development of drug-resistant mutations, which has already been proved by more and more studies. In China, the main epidemic subtypes are CRF07_BC, CRF08_BC, Thai B and CRF01_AE. The depiction of drug resistance mutations in those subtypes will be helpful for the selection of regimens for Chinese. In this study, the distributions difference of amino acids at sites related to HIV drug resistance were compared among subtype B, CRF01_AE, CRF07_BC and CRF08_BC strains prevalent in China. The amino acid composition of sequences belonging to different subtypes, which were obtained from untreated and treated individuals separately, were also compared. The amino acids proportions of 19 sites in RT among subtype B, CRF01_AE and CRF08_BC have significant difference in drug resistance groups (chi-square test, p<0.05). Genetic barriers analysis revealed that sites 69, 138, 181, 215 and 238 were significantly different among subtypes (Kruskal Wallis test, p<0.05). All subtypes shared three highest prevalent drug resistance sites 103, 181 and 184 in common. Many drug resistant sites in protease show surprising high proportions in almost all subtypes in drug-naïve patients. This is the first comprehensive study in China on different development of drug resistance among different subtypes. The detailed data will lay a foundation for HIV treatment regimens design and improve HIV therapy in China. PMID:24663120

  16. Adaptation of the Cecal Bacterial Microbiome of Growing Pigs in Response to Resistant Starch Type 4.

    PubMed

    Metzler-Zebeli, Barbara U; Schmitz-Esser, Stephan; Mann, Evelyne; Grüll, Dietmar; Molnar, Timea; Zebeli, Qendrim

    2015-12-15

    Resistant starch (RS) exacerbates health benefits on the host via modulation of the gut bacterial community. By far, these effects have been less well explored for RS of type 4. This study aimed at gaining a community-wide insight into the impact of enzymatically modified starch (EMS) on the cecal microbiota and hindgut fermentation in growing pigs. Castrated male pigs (n = 12/diet; 29-kg body weight) were fed diets with either 70% EMS or control starch for 10 days. The bacterial profile of each cecal sample was determined by sequencing of the V345 region of the 16S rRNA gene using the Illumina MiSeq platform. EMS diet reduced short-chain fatty acid concentrations in cecum and proximal colon compared to the control diet. Linear discriminant analyses and K means clustering indicated diet-specific cecal community profiles, whereby diversity and species richness were not different among diets. Pigs showed host-specific variation in their most abundant phyla, Firmicutes (55%), Proteobacteria (35%), and Bacteroidetes (10%). The EMS diet decreased abundance of Ruminococcus, Parasutterella, Bilophila, Enterococcus, and Lactobacillus operational taxonomic units (OTU), whereas Meniscus and Actinobacillus OTU were increased compared to those with the control diet (P < 0.05). Quantitative PCR confirmed results for host effect on Enterobacteriaceae and diet effect on members of the Lactobacillus group. The presence of less cecal short-chain fatty acids and the imputed metabolic functions of the cecal microbiome suggested that EMS was less degradable for cecal bacteria than the control starch. The present EMS effects on the bacterial community profiles were different than the previously reported RS effects and can be linked to the chemical structure of EMS. PMID:26431973

  17. Please cite this article in press as: Duesberg, P. et al., Cancer drug resistance: The central role of the karyotype, Drug Resist. Updat. (2007), doi:10.1016/j.drup.2007.02.003

    E-print Network

    Duesberg, Peter

    2007-01-01

    evidence that resistance of chronic myeloid leukemia against the drug imatinib is chromosomal, although: Drug resistance; Cancer; Karyotype; Aneuploidy; Mutations; Imatinib 1. Introduction Cancer cellsPlease cite this article in press as: Duesberg, P. et al., Cancer drug resistance: The central role

  18. Molecular Approaches for Detection of the Multi-Drug Resistant Tuberculosis (MDR-TB) in Bangladesh

    PubMed Central

    Aurin, Tafsina Haque; Munshi, Saurab Kishore; Kamal, S. M. Mostofa; Rahman, Md. Mostafizur; Hossain, Md. Shamim; Marma, Thaythayhla; Rahman, Farjana; Noor, Rashed

    2014-01-01

    The principal obstacles in the treatment of tuberculosis (TB) are delayed and inaccurate diagnosis which often leads to the onset of the drug resistant TB cases. To avail the appropriate treatment of the patients and to hinder the transmission of drug-resistant TB, accurate and rapid detection of resistant isolates is critical. Present study was designed to demonstrate the efficacy of molecular techniques inclusive of line probe assay (LPA) and GeneXpert MTB/RIF methods for the detection of multi-drug resistant (MDR) TB. Sputum samples from 300 different categories of treated and new TB cases were tested for the detection of possible mutation in the resistance specific genes (rpoB, inhA and katG) through Genotype MTBDRplus assay or LPA and GeneXpert MTB/RIF tests. Culture based conventional drug susceptibility test (DST) was also carried out to measure the efficacy of the molecular methods employed. Among 300 samples, 191 (63.7%) and 193 (64.3%) cases were found to be resistant against rifampicin in LPA and GeneXpert methods, respectively; while 189 (63%) cases of rifampicin resistance were detected by conventional DST methods. On the other hand, 196 (65.3%) and 191 (63.7%) isolates showed isoniazid resistance as detected by LPA and conventional drug susceptibility test (DST), respectively. Among the drug resistant isolates (collectively 198 in LPA and 193 in conventional DST), 189 (95.6%) and 187 (96.9%) were considered to be MDR as examined by LPA and conventional DST, respectively. Category-II and -IV patients encountered higher frequency of drug resistance compared to those from category-I and new cases. Considering the higher sensitivity, specificity and accuracy along with the required time to results significantly shorter, our study supports the adoption of LPA and GeneXpert assay as efficient tools in detecting drug resistant TB in Bangladesh. PMID:24932706

  19. Effects of melatonin on oxidative stress, and resistance to bacterial, parasitic, and viral infections: a review.

    PubMed

    Vielma, José Ramón; Bonilla, Ernesto; Chacín-Bonilla, Leonor; Mora, Marylú; Medina-Leendertz, Shirley; Bravo, Yanauri

    2014-09-01

    Melatonin, a hormone secreted by the pineal gland, works directly and indirectly as a free radical scavenger. Its other physiological or pharmacological activities could be dependent or independent of receptors located in different cells, organs, and tissues. In addition to its role in promoting sleep and circadian rhythms regulation, it has important immunomodulatory, antioxidant, and neuroprotective effects suggesting that this indole must be considered as a therapeutic alternative against infections. The aim of this review is to describe the effects of melatonin on oxidative stress and the resistance to bacterial (Klebsiella pneumoniae, Helicobacter pylori, Mycobacterium tuberculosis, and Clostridium perfringens), viral (Venezuelan equine encephalomyelitis virus and respiratory syncytial virus), and parasitic (Plasmodium spp., Entamoeba histolytica, Trypanosoma cruzi, Toxoplasma gondii, and Opisthorchis viverrini) infections. PMID:24811367

  20. A CCL21 chemokine of tongue sole (Cynoglossus semilaevis) promotes host resistance against bacterial infection.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ming-Qing; Chi, Heng; Li, Mo-Fei

    2015-11-01

    Chemokines are a large family of chemotactic cytokines. Based on the arrangement of the first two cysteine residues, chemokines are divided into four groups, one of which is the CC chemokine group. In this study, we characterized a CC chemokine, CsCCL21, from half-smooth tongue sole (Cynoglossus semilaevis), and analyzed its activity. CsCCL21 contains two conserved N-terminal cysteine residues in a NCCL motif and is phylogenetically related to the CCL19/21/25 subgroup of CC chemokines. CsCCL21 was constitutively expressed in nine tissues and significantly upregulated by bacterial and viral infection. The recombinant CsCCL21 (rCsCCL21) induced migration of peripheral blood leukocytes. When the two conserved cysteine residues in the NCCL motif were mutated, the chemotactic activity of rCsCCL21 was abolished. rCsCCL21 enhanced the resistance of tongue sole against bacterial infection, but the mutant protein with NCCL mutation lacked this antibacterial effect. Taken together, these results suggest that CsCCL21 is a functional CC chemokine with the ability to recruit leukocytes and is involved in antibacterial immunity in a manner that requires the conserved NCCL motif. PMID:26416599

  1. The evolution of bacterial resistance against bacteriophages in the horse chestnut phyllosphere is general across both space and time.

    PubMed

    Koskella, Britt; Parr, Nicole

    2015-08-19

    Insight to the spatial and temporal scales of coevolution is key to predicting the outcome of host-parasite interactions and spread of disease. For bacteria infecting long-lived hosts, selection to overcome host defences is just one factor shaping the course of evolution; populations will also be competing with other microbial species and will themselves be facing infection by bacteriophage viruses. Here, we examine the temporal and spatial patterns of bacterial adaptation against natural phage populations from within leaves of horse chestnut trees. Using a time-shift experiment with both sympatric and allopatric phages from either contemporary or earlier points in the season, we demonstrate that bacterial resistance is higher against phages from the past, regardless of spatial sympatry or how much earlier in the season phages were collected. Similarly, we show that future bacterial hosts are more resistant to both sympatric and allopatric phages than contemporary bacterial hosts. Together, our results suggest the evolution of relatively general bacterial resistance against phages in nature and are contrasting to previously observed patterns of phage adaptation to bacteria from the same tree hosts over the same time frame, indicating a potential asymmetry in coevolutionary dynamics. PMID:26150663

  2. The evolution of bacterial resistance against bacteriophages in the horse chestnut phyllosphere is general across both space and time

    PubMed Central

    Koskella, Britt; Parr, Nicole

    2015-01-01

    Insight to the spatial and temporal scales of coevolution is key to predicting the outcome of host–parasite interactions and spread of disease. For bacteria infecting long-lived hosts, selection to overcome host defences is just one factor shaping the course of evolution; populations will also be competing with other microbial species and will themselves be facing infection by bacteriophage viruses. Here, we examine the temporal and spatial patterns of bacterial adaptation against natural phage populations from within leaves of horse chestnut trees. Using a time-shift experiment with both sympatric and allopatric phages from either contemporary or earlier points in the season, we demonstrate that bacterial resistance is higher against phages from the past, regardless of spatial sympatry or how much earlier in the season phages were collected. Similarly, we show that future bacterial hosts are more resistant to both sympatric and allopatric phages than contemporary bacterial hosts. Together, our results suggest the evolution of relatively general bacterial resistance against phages in nature and are contrasting to previously observed patterns of phage adaptation to bacteria from the same tree hosts over the same time frame, indicating a potential asymmetry in coevolutionary dynamics. PMID:26150663

  3. Bacterial profile and drug susceptibility pattern of urinary tract infection in pregnant women at University of Gondar Teaching Hospital, Northwest Ethiopia

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Urinary tract infection (UTI) is a common health problem among pregnant women. Proper investigation and prompt treatment are needed to prevent serious life threatening condition and morbidity due to urinary tract infection that can occur in pregnant women. Recent report in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia indicated the prevalence of UTI in pregnant women was 11.6?% and Gram negative bacteria was the predominant isolates and showed multi drug resistance. This study aimed to assess bacterial profile that causes urinary tract infection and their antimicrobial susceptibility pattern among pregnant women visiting antenatal clinic at University of Gondar Teaching Hospital, Northwest Ethiopia. Methods A cross-sectional study was conducted at University of Gondar Teaching Hospital from March 22 to April 30, 2011. Mid stream urine samples were collected and inoculated into Cystine Lactose Electrolyte Deficient medium (CLED). Colony counts yielding bacterial growth of 105/ml of urine or more of pure isolates were regarded as significant bacteriuria for infection. Colony from CLED was sub cultured onto MacConkey agar and blood agar plates. Identification was done using cultural characteristics and a series of biochemical tests. A standard method of agar disc diffusion susceptibility testing method was used to determine susceptibility patterns of the isolates. Results The overall prevalence of UTI in pregnant women was 10.4?%. The predominant bacterial pathogens were Escherichia coli 47.5?% followed by coagulase-negative staphylococci 22.5?%, Staphylococcus aureus 10?%, and Klebsiella pneumoniae 10?%. Gram negative isolates were resulted low susceptibility to co-trimoxazole (51.9?%) and tetracycline (40.7?%) whereas Gram positive showed susceptibility to ceftriaxon (84.6?%) and amoxicillin–clavulanic acid (92.3?%). Multiple drug resistance (resistance to two or more drugs) was observed in 95?% of the isolates. Conclusion Significant bacteriuria was observed in asymptomatic pregnant women. Periodic studies are recommended to check the outcome of asymptomatic bacteriuria and also monitor any changes in the susceptibility patterns of urinary tract pathogens in pregnant women. PMID:22534117

  4. Resistance of a novel root canal sealer to bacterial ingress in vitro.

    PubMed

    Padachey, N; Patel, V; Santerre, P; Cvitkovitch, D; Lawrence, H P; Friedman, S

    2000-11-01

    A dentin-bonding root canal sealer (ZUT) has been developed, consisting of an experimental glass ionomer cement (KT-308) and an antimicrobial silver-containing zeolite (0.2% by weight). This in vitro study evaluated the ability of ZUT used with or without gutta-percha, to resist bacterial ingress of Enterococcus faecalis over a period of 90 days. Canals of 80 single-rooted teeth were prepared with apical patency and filled as follows (n = 10): KT-308 alone; KT-308 with a single gutta-percha cone (SCGP); ZUT alone; ZUT with SCGP; AH26 alone; AH26 with SCGP; positive control-no root canal filling; and negative control-no root canal filling, with the apices of this group sealed with C&B Metabond cement. Teeth were coated with nail polish except for the apical 2 mm, and each tooth was sealed in a 4-ml glass vial, with an 18-gauge needle inserted through the vial cover and bonded into the pulp chamber with C&B Metabond cement. After sterilization with 2.5 Mrad gamma-radiation, Brain Heart Infusion broth with phenol red was injected into each vial. An inoculum of E. faecalis was pipetted through the needle into the pulp chamber every 5 days, and the broth was monitored daily for color change and turbidity. When change occurred, the broth was cultured for growth of E. faecalis. Kaplan-Meier survival analysis and the log-rank test revealed no significant differences among the three sealers used. The presence of gutta-percha, however, significantly improved resistance to bacterial ingress through obturated root canals (X, p < 0.05). Under the conditions of this study, the hypothesized advantage of ZUT (0.2% zeolite) was not demonstrated. PMID:11469295

  5. Characterization of rhizosphere fungi that mediate resistance in tomato against bacterial wilt disease.

    PubMed

    Jogaiah, Sudisha; Abdelrahman, Mostafa; Tran, Lam-Son Phan; Shin-ichi, Ito

    2013-09-01

    Plant immunization for resistance against a wide variety of phytopathogens is an effective strategy for plant disease management. Seventy-nine plant growth-promoting fungi (PGPFs) were isolated from rhizosphere soil of India. Among them, nine revealed saprophytic ability, root colonization, phosphate solubilization, IAA production, and plant growth promotion. Seed priming with four PGPFs exhibited early seedling emergence and enhanced vigour of a tomato cultivar susceptible to the bacterial wilt pathogen compared to untreated controls. Under greenhouse conditions, TriH_JSB27 and PenC_JSB41 treatments remarkably enhanced the vegetative and reproductive growth parameters. Maximum NPK uptake was noticed in TriH_JSB27-treated plants. A significant disease reduction of 57.3% against Ralstonia solanacearum was observed in tomato plants pretreated with TriH_JSB27. Furthermore, induction of defence-related enzymes and genes was observed in plants pretreated with PGPFs or inoculated with pathogen. The maximum phenylalanine ammonia lyase (PAL) activity (111U) was observed at 24h in seedlings treated with TriH_JSB27 and this activity was slightly reduced (99U) after pathogen inoculation. Activities of peroxidase (POX, 54U) and ?-1,3-glucanase (GLU, 15U) were significantly higher in control plants inoculated with pathogen after 24h and remained constant at all time points. A similar trend in gene induction for PAL was evident in PGPFs-treated tomato seedlings with or without pathogen inoculation, whereas POX and GLU were upregulated in control plus pathogen-inoculated tomato seedlings. These results determine that the susceptible tomato cultivar is triggered after perception of potent PGPFs to synthesize PAL, POX, and GLU, which activate defence resistance against bacterial wilt disease, thereby contributing to plant health improvement. PMID:23956415

  6. Bacteriophage therapy for membrane biofouling in membrane bioreactors and antibiotic-resistant bacterial biofilms.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharjee, Ananda Shankar; Choi, Jeongdong; Motlagh, Amir Mohaghegh; Mukherji, Sachiyo T; Goel, Ramesh

    2015-08-01

    To demonstrate elimination of bacterial biofilm on membranes to represent wastewater treatment as well as biofilm formed by antibiotic-resistant bacterial (ARB) to signify medical application, an antibiotic-resistant bacterium and its lytic bacteriophage were isolated from a full-scale wastewater treatment plant. Based on gram staining and complete 16?S rDNA sequencing, the isolated bacterium showed a more than 99% homology with Delftia tsuruhatensis, a gram-negative bacterium belonging to ?-proteobacteria. The Delftia lytic phage's draft genome revealed the phage to be an N4-like phage with 59.7% G?+?C content. No transfer RNAs were detected for the phage suggesting that the phage is highly adapted to its host Delftia tsuruhatensis ARB-1 with regard to codon usage, and does not require additional tRNAs of its own. The gene annotation of the Delftia lytic phage found three different components of RNA polymerase (RNAP) in the genome, which is a typical characteristic of N4-like phages. The lytic phage specific to D. tsuruhatensis ARB-1 could successfully remove the biofilm formed by it on a glass slide. The water flux through the membrane of a prototype lab-scale membrane bioreactor decreased from 47?L/h?m(2) to ?15?L/h?m(2) over 4 days due to a biofilm formed by D. tsuruhatensis ARB-1. However, the flux increased to 70% of the original after the lytic phage application. Overall, this research demonstrated phage therapy's great potential to solve the problem of membrane biofouling, as well as the problems posed by pathogenic biofilms in external wounds and on medical instruments. PMID:25728819

  7. Housefly Larva Vermicomposting Efficiently Attenuates Antibiotic Resistance Genes in Swine Manure, with Concomitant Bacterial Population Changes.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hang; Li, Hongyi; Gilbert, Jack A; Li, Haibo; Wu, Longhua; Liu, Meng; Wang, Liling; Zhou, Qiansheng; Yuan, Junxiang; Zhang, Zhijian

    2015-11-15

    Manure from swine treated with antimicrobials as feed additives is a major source for the expansion of the antibiotic resistance gene (ARG) reservoir in the environment. Vermicomposting via housefly larvae (Musca domestica) can be efficiently used to treat manure and regenerate biofertilizer, but few studies have investigated its effect on ARG attenuation. Here, we tracked the abundances of 9 ARGs and the composition and structure of the bacterial communities in manure samples across 6 days of full-scale manure vermicomposting. On day 6, the abundances of genes encoding tetracycline resistance [tet(M), tet(O), tet(Q), and tet(W)] were reduced (P < 0.05), while those of genes encoding sulfonamide resistance (sul1 and sul2) were increased (P < 0.05) when normalized to 16S rRNA. The abundances of tetracycline resistance genes were correlated (P < 0.05) with the changing concentrations of tetracyclines in the manure. The overall diversity and richness of the bacteria significantly decreased during vermicomposting, accompanied by a 100 times increase in the relative abundance of Flavobacteriaceae spp. Variations in the abundances of ARGs were correlated with the changing microbial community structure and the relative abundances of the family Ruminococcaceae, class Bacilli, or phylum Proteobacteria. Vermicomposting, as a waste management practice, can reduce the overall abundance of ARGs. More research is warranted to assess the use of this waste management practice as a measure to attenuate the dissemination of antimicrobial residues and ARGs from livestock production before vermicompost can be safely used as biofertilizer in agroecosystems. PMID:26296728

  8. HIV-1 protease and reverse transcriptase mutations for drug resistance surveillance

    PubMed Central

    Shafer, Robert W.; Rhee, Soo-Yon; Pillay, Deenan; Miller, Veronica; Sandstrom, Paul; Schapiro, Jonathan M.; Kuritzkes, Daniel R.; Bennett, Diane

    2008-01-01

    Objectives Monitoring regional levels of transmitted HIV-1 resistance informs treatment guidelines and provides feedback on the success of HIV-1 prevention efforts. Surveillance programs for estimating the frequency of transmitted resistance are being developed in both industrialized and resource-poor countries. However, such programs will not produce comparable estimates unless a standardized list of drug-resistance mutations is used to define transmitted resistance. Methods In this paper, we outline considerations for developing a list of drug-resistance mutations for epidemiologic estimates of transmitted resistance. First, the mutations should cause or contribute to drug resistance and should develop in persons receivingantiretroviraltherapy. Second,the mutationsshould not occuraspolymorphisms in the absence of therapy. Third, the mutation list should be applicable to all group M subtypes. Fourth, the mutation list should be simple, unambiguous, and parsimonious. Results Applying these considerations, we developed a list of 31 protease inhibitor-resistance mutations at 14 proteasepositions, 31 nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor-resistance mutations at 15 reverse transcriptase positions, and 18 non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor-resistance mutations at 10 reverse transcriptase positions. Conclusions This list, which should be updated regularly using the same or similar criteria, can be used for genotypic surveillance of transmitted HIV-1 drug resistance. PMID:17197813

  9. Priming cancer cells for drug resistance: role of the fibroblast niche

    PubMed Central

    FANG, Wei Bin; YAO, Min; CHENG, Nikki

    2014-01-01

    Conventional and targeted chemotherapies remain integral strategies to treat solid tumors. Despite the large number of anti-cancer drugs available, chemotherapy does not completely eradicate disease. Disease recurrence and the growth of drug resistant tumors remain significant problems in anti-cancer treatment. To develop more effective treatment strategies, it is important to understand the underlying cellular and molecular mechanisms of drug resistance. It is generally accepted that cancer cells do not function alone, but evolve through interactions with the surrounding tumor microenvironment. As key cellular components of the tumor microenvironment, fibroblasts regulate the growth and progression of many solid tumors. Emerging studies demonstrate that fibroblasts secrete a multitude of factors that enable cancer cells to become drug resistant. This review will explore how fibroblast secretion of soluble factors act on cancer cells to enhance cancer cell survival and cancer stem cell renewal, contributing to the development of drug resistant cancer. PMID:25045348

  10. Anti-Mycobacterial Activity of Tamoxifen Against Drug-Resistant and Intra-Macrophage Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Jang, Woong Sik; Kim, Sukyung; Podder, Biswajit; Jyoti, Md Anirban; Nam, Kung-Woo; Lee, Byung-Eui; Song, Ho-Yeon

    2015-06-01

    Recently, it has become a struggle to treat tuberculosis with the current commercial antituberculosis drugs because of the increasing emergence of multidrug-resistant (MDR) tuberculosis and extensively drug-resistant (XDR) tuberculosis. We evaluated here the antimycobacterial activity of tamoxifen, known as a synthetic anti-estrogen, against eight drug-sensitive or resistant strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (TB), and the active intracellular killing of tamoxifen on TB in macrophages. The results showed that tamoxifen had antituberculosis activity against drug-sensitive strains (MIC, 3.125-6.25 ?g/ml) as well as drug-resistant strains (MIC, 6.25 to 12.5 ?g/ml). In addition, tamoxifen profoundly decreased the number of intracellular TB in macrophages in a dose-dependent manner. PMID:25639719

  11. Targeting Notch signaling pathway to overcome drug-resistance for cancer therapy

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhiwei; Li, Yiwei; Ahmad, Aamir; Azmi, Asfar S; Banerjee, Sanjeev; Kong, Dejuan; Sarkar, Fazlul H

    2010-01-01

    Chemotherapy is an important therapeutic strategy for cancer treatment and remains the mainstay for the management of human malignancies; however, chemotherapy fails to eliminate all tumor cells because of intrinsic or acquired drug- resistance, which is the most common cause of tumor recurrence. Recently, emerging evidences suggest that Notch signaling pathway is one of the most important signaling pathways in drug-resistant tumor cells. Moreover, down-regulation of Notch pathway could induce drug sensitivity, leading to increased inhibition of cancer cell growth, invasion, and metastasis. This article will provide a brief overview of the published evidences in support of the roles of Notch in drug-resistance, and will further summarize how targeting Notch by “natural agents” could become a novel and safer approach for the improvement of tumor treatment by overcoming drug-resistance. PMID:20600632

  12. The emergence of drug resistant HIV variants and novel anti-retroviral therapy

    PubMed Central

    Paydary, Koosha; Khaghani, Parisa; Emamzadeh-Fard, Sahra; Alinaghi, Seyed Ahmad Seyed; Baesi, Kazem

    2013-01-01

    After its identification in 1980s, HIV has infected more than 30 million people worldwide. In the era of highly active anti-retroviral therapy, anti-retroviral drug resistance results from insufficient anti-retroviral pressure, which may lead to treatment failure. Preliminary studies support the idea that anti-retroviral drug resistance has evolved largely as a result of low-adherence of patients to therapy and extensive use of anti-retroviral drugs in the developed world; however, a highly heterogeneous horde of viral quasi-species are currently circulating in developing nations. Thus, the prioritizing of strategies adopted in such two worlds should be quite different considering the varying anti-retroviral drug resistance prevalence. In this article, we explore differences in anti-retroviral drug resistance patterns between developed and developing countries, as they represent two distinct ecological niches of HIV from an evolutionary standpoint. PMID:23835806

  13. Appraising Contemporary Strategies to Combat Multidrug Resistant Gram-Negative Bacterial Infections–Proceedings and Data From the Gram-Negative Resistance Summit

    PubMed Central

    Golan, Yoav; Micek, Scott T.; Shorr, Andrew F.; Restrepo, Marcos I.

    2011-01-01

    The emerging problem of antibiotic resistance, especially among Gram-negative bacteria (GNB), has become a serious threat to global public health. Very few new antibacterial classes with activity against antibiotic-resistant GNB have been brought to market. Renewed and growing attention to the development of novel compounds targeting antibiotic-resistant GNB, as well as a better understanding of strategies aimed at preventing the spread of resistant bacterial strains and preserving the efficacy of existing antibiotic agents, has occurred. The Gram-Negative Resistance Summit convened national opinion leaders for the purpose of analyzing current literature, epidemiologic trends, clinical trial data, therapeutic options, and treatment guidelines related to the management of antibiotic-resistant GNB infections. After an in-depth analysis, the Summit investigators were surveyed with regard to 4 clinical practice statements. The results then were compared with the same survey completed by 138 infectious disease and critical care physicians and are the basis of this article. PMID:21868447

  14. The Raf/MEK/ERK pathway can govern drug resistance, apoptosis and sensitivity to targeted therapy.

    PubMed

    Abrams, Stephen L; Steelman, Linda S; Shelton, John G; Wong, Ellis W T; Chappell, William H; Bäsecke, Jörg; Stivala, Franca; Donia, Marco; Nicoletti, Ferdinando; Libra, Massimo; Martelli, Alberto M; McCubrey, James A

    2010-05-01

    The effects of the Raf/MEK/ERK and PI3K/PTEN/Akt/mTOR signaling pathways on proliferation, drug resistance, prevention of apoptosis and sensitivity to signal transduction inhibitors were examined in FL/DeltaAkt-1:ER*(Myr(+)) + DeltaRaf-1:AR cells which are conditionally-transformed to grow in response to Raf and Akt activation. Drug resistant cells were isolated from FL/DeltaAkt-1:ER*(Myr(+)) + DeltaRaf-1:AR cells in the presence of doxorubicin. Activation of Raf-1, in the drug resistant FL/DeltaAkt-1:ER*(Myr(+)) + DeltaRaf-1:AR cells, increased the IC(50) for doxorubicin 80-fold, whereas activation of Akt-1, by itself, had no effect on the doxorubicin IC50. However, Akt-1 activation enhanced cell proliferation and clonogenicity in the presence of chemotherapeutic drugs. Thus the Raf/MEK/ERK pathway had profound effects on the sensitivity to chemotherapeutic drugs, and Akt-1 activation was required for the long term growth of these cells as well as resistance to chemotherapeutic drugs. The effects of doxorubicin on the induction of apoptosis in the drug resistant cells were enhanced by addition of either mTOR and MEK inhibitors. These results indicate that targeting the Raf/MEK/ERK and PI3K/Akt/mTOR pathways may be an effective approach for therapeutic intervention in drug resistant cancers that have mutations activating these cascades. PMID:20436278

  15. Immune responses and the emergence of drug-resistant virus strains in vivo.

    PubMed Central

    Wodarz, Dominik; Lloyd, Alun L.

    2004-01-01

    The treatment of viral infections using antiviral drugs has had a significant public health benefit in the setting of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection, and newly developed drugs offer potential benefits in the management of other viral infections, including acute self-limiting infections such as influenza and picornaviruses (including the rhinoviruses that are responsible for a large proportion of 'common colds'). A serious concern with such treatments is that they may lead to the selection of drug-resistant strains. This has been a significant problem in the case of HIV infection. Existing mathematical-modelling studies of drug resistance have focused on the interactions between virus, target cells and infected cells, ignoring the impact of immune responses. Here, we present a model that explores the role of immune responses in the rise of drug-resistant mutants in vivo. We find that drug resistance is unlikely to be a problem if immune responses are maintained above a threshold level during therapy. Alternatively, if immune responses decline at a fast rate and fall below a threshold level during treatment (indicating impaired immunity), the rise of drug-resistant mutants is more likely. This indicates an important difference between HIV, which impairs immunity and for which immune responses have been observed to vanish during treatment, and viral infections such as influenza and rhinoviruses, for which such immune impairment is not present. Drug resistance is much more likely to be a problem in HIV than in acute and self-limiting infections. PMID:15306358

  16. Yeast cell wall extract induces disease resistance against bacterial and fungal pathogens in Arabidopsis thaliana and Brassica crop.

    PubMed

    Narusaka, Mari; Minami, Taichi; Iwabuchi, Chikako; Hamasaki, Takashi; Takasaki, Satoko; Kawamura, Kimito; Narusaka, Yoshihiro

    2015-01-01

    Housaku Monogatari (HM) is a plant activator prepared from a yeast cell wall extract. We examined the efficacy of HM application and observed that HM treatment increased the resistance of Arabidopsis thaliana and Brassica rapa leaves to bacterial and fungal infections. HM reduced the severity of bacterial leaf spot and anthracnose on A. thaliana and Brassica crop leaves with protective effects. In addition, gene expression analysis of A. thaliana plants after treatment with HM indicated increased expression of several plant defense-related genes. HM treatment appears to induce early activation of jasmonate/ethylene and late activation of salicylic acid (SA) pathways. Analysis using signaling mutants revealed that HM required SA accumulation and SA signaling to facilitate resistance to the bacterial pathogen Pseudomonas syringae pv. maculicola and the fungal pathogen Colletotrichum higginsianum. In addition, HM-induced resistance conferred chitin-independent disease resistance to bacterial pathogens in A. thaliana. These results suggest that HM contains multiple microbe-associated molecular patterns that activate defense responses in plants. These findings suggest that the application of HM is a useful tool that may facilitate new disease control methods. PMID:25565273

  17. RELEASE OF COMMON BACTERIAL BLIGHT RESISTANT PINTO BEAN GERMPLASM LINES USPT-CBB-5 AND USPT-CBB-6

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Agricultural Research Service, U.S. Department of Agriculture, and the Idaho Agricultural Experiment Station announce the release of USPT-CBB-5 and USPT-CBB-6 pinto bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) germplasm lines with high levels of resistance to common bacterial blight caused by Xanthomonas axonop...

  18. Two independent QTL in dry bean conditioning resistance to common bacterial blight express recessive epistasis when combined

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Common bacterial blight (CBB) caused by (Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. phaseoli) is a major seed-borne disease limiting commercial yield and disease-free seed production of dry bean (Phaseolus vulgaris) worldwide. Genetic resistance is the most effective control method but is difficult to incorporate b...

  19. Development of practical diagnostic methods for monitoring rice bacterial panicle blight disease and evaluation of rice germplasm for resistance

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A study was initiated to understand Burkholderia glumae, the major causal agent for bacterial panicle blight disease of rice; to develop practical diagnostic methods for monitoring the disease; and to evaluate rice germplasm for resistance. Burkholderia glumae was frequently isolated from infected p...

  20. Development of practical diagnostic methods for monitoring rice bacterial panicle blight disease and evaluation of rice germplasm for resistance

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A study was initiated to understand Burkholderia glumae (major causal agent for bacterial panicle blight disease of rice) to develop practical diagnostic methods for monitoring the disease; and to evaluate rice germplasm for resistance. B. glumae was frequently isolated from symptomatic panicles on...

  1. Registration of Common Bacterial Blight, Rust and Bean Common Mosaic Resistant Great Northern Bean Germplasm Line ABC - Weihing

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Great northern common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) germplasm line ABC-Weihing was developed specifically for enhanced resistance to common bacterial blight (CBB), a major disease of common bean caused by the seedborne bacteria Xanthomonas campestris pv. phaseoli (Xcp) and the brown-pigmented variant...

  2. Genetic Diversity of Lettuce (Lactuca sativa) for Resistance to Bacterial Leaf Spot Caused by Xanthomonas campestris pv. vitians.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Lettuce plants were artificially inoculated with three isolates of Xanthomonas campestris pv. vitians in field and greenhouse evaluations for genetic variation in resistance to bacterial leaf spot. The cultivar Little Gem had the least amount of disease, whether evaluated for disease severity or dis...

  3. Genotypic diversity of multidrug-, quinolone- and extensively drug-resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolates in Thailand.

    PubMed

    Disratthakit, Areeya; Meada, Shinji; Prammananan, Therdsak; Thaipisuttikul, Iyarit; Doi, Norio; Chaiprasert, Angkana

    2015-06-01

    Drug-resistant tuberculosis (TB), which includes multidrug-resistant (MDR-TB), quinolone-resistant (QR-TB) and extensively drug-resistant tuberculosis (XDR-TB), is a serious threat to TB control. We aimed to characterize the genotypic diversity of drug-resistant TB clinical isolates collected in Thailand to establish whether the emergence of drug-resistant TB is attributable to transmitted resistance or acquired resistance. We constructed the first molecular phylogeny of MDR-TB (n=95), QR-TB (n=69) and XDR-TB (n=28) in Thailand based on spoligotyping and proposed 24-locus multilocus variable-number of tandem repeat analysis (MLVA). Clustering analysis was performed using the unweighted pair group method with arithmetic mean. Spoligotyping identified the Beijing strain (SIT1) as the most predominant genotype (n=139; 72.4%). The discriminatory power of 0.9235 Hunter-Gaston Discriminatory Index (HGDI) with the 15-locus variable-number tandem repeats of mycobacterial interspersed repetitive units typing was improved to a 0.9574 HGDI with proposed 24-locus MLVA, thereby resulting in the subdivision of a large cluster of Beijing strains (SIT1) into 17 subclusters. We identified the spread of drug-resistant TB clones caused by three different MLVA types in the Beijing strain (SIT1) and a specific clone of XDR-TB caused by a rare genotype, the Manu-ancestor strain (SIT523). Overall, 49.5% of all isolates were clustered. These findings suggest that a remarkable transmission of drug-resistant TB occurred in Thailand. The remaining 50% of drug-resistant TB isolates were unique genotypes, which may have arisen from the individual acquisition of drug resistance. Our results suggest that transmitted and acquired resistance have played an equal role in the emergence of drug-resistant TB. Further characterization of whole genome sequences of clonal strains could help to elucidate the mycobacterial genetic factors relevant for drug resistance, transmissibility and virulence. PMID:25847698

  4. Is Incident Drug-Resistance of Childhood-Onset Epilepsy Reversible? A Long-Term Follow-Up Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sillanpaa, Matti; Schmidt, Dieter

    2012-01-01

    Given the grave morbidity and mortality of drug-resistant epilepsy, it is of great clinical interest to determine how often prior proven drug-resistant epilepsy is reversible without surgery and whether remission can be predicted by clinical features in children with incident drug-resistant epilepsy. We determined the likelihood of 1-, 2- and…

  5. Gender Differences in Preferred Drug Resistance Strategies of Rural Native Hawaiian Youth

    PubMed Central

    Okamoto, Scott K.; Helm, Susana; McClain, Latoya L.; Pel, Suzanne; Hayashida, Janai K. P.; Hill, Amber P.

    2013-01-01

    This study examined the gender differences in preferred strategies used to resist drugs and alcohol for rural Native Hawaiian youth. Seventy-four youth (60% female) within eight different middle/intermediate or high schools participated in 15 different focus groups as part of a pilot/feasibility drug prevention study funded by the National Institute on Drug Abuse. Consistent with relational-cultural theory, qualitative findings indicated how female youth participants favored drug resistance strategies that maintained relational connectedness with the drug offerer, and how they considered the long-term relational consequences of different drug resistance strategies. Implications of these findings for indigenous- and gender-specific prevention are discussed. PMID:24511181

  6. Assessment of Relationship Between Bacterial Stripe Resistance And Leaf Protein Bands In Rice (Oryza sativa L.) Varieties.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Talei, D.; Fotokian, M. H.

    2008-01-01

    Bacterial stripe as a new rice disease in Iran is more frequent nowadays. The objective of this study was to assessment of resistance in rice varieties together with evaluating of zymogram bands resulted from SDS PAGE electrophoresis of leaf proteins. For this purpose, 30 lines were tested in a randomized complete block design with three replications. The analysis of variance showed that there was significant difference between genotypes for resistance. Mean compare based on field results revealed that Domsiyah had the lowest resistance while Nemat and 7162 demonstrated the highest resistance. Laboratory results showed that there were significant difference between protein bands resulted from sensitive and resistance verities. Twenty bands were observed through SDS PAGE electrophoresis of leaf proteins. The 9th and 12th bands were found in sensitive varieties while were not in resistance genotypes. According to the results of this study, 7162 variety can be considered as the sources of resistance in breeding programs. Meanwhile attending to existence of 9th and 12th bands in sensitive varieties, resistance against bacterial stripe of rice maybe influenced by absence of these proteins.

  7. 3-Halo Chloroquine Derivatives Overcome Plasmodium falciparum Chloroquine Resistance Transporter-Mediated Drug Resistance in P. falciparum.

    PubMed

    Edaye, Sonia; Tazoo, Dagobert; Bohle, D Scott; Georges, Elias

    2015-12-01

    Polymorphism in the Plasmodium falciparum chloroquine resistance transporter (PfCRT) was shown to cause chloroquine resistance. In this report, we examined the antimalarial potential of novel 3-halo chloroquine derivatives (3-chloro, 3-bromo, and 3-iodo) against chloroquine-susceptible and -resistant P. falciparum. All three derivatives inhibited the proliferation of P. falciparum; with 3-iodo chloroquine being most effective. Moreover, 3-iodo chloroquine was highly effective at potentiating and reversing chloroquine toxicity of drug-susceptible and -resistant P. falciparum. PMID:26438496

  8. Multi-drug resistance in a canine lymphoid cell line due to increased P-glycoprotein expression, a potential model for drug-resistant canine lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Zandvliet, M; Teske, E; Schrickx, J A

    2014-12-01

    Canine lymphoma is routinely treated with a doxorubicin-based multidrug chemotherapy protocol, and although treatment is initially successful, tumor recurrence is common and associated with therapy resistance. Active efflux of chemotherapeutic agents by transporter proteins of the ATP-Binding Cassette superfamily forms an effective cellular defense mechanism and a high expression of these transporters is frequently observed in chemotherapy-resistant tumors in both humans and dogs. In this study we describe the ABC-transporter expression in a canine lymphoid cell line and a sub-cell line with acquired drug resistance following prolonged exposure to doxorubicin. This sub-cell line was more resistant to doxorubicin and vincristine, but not to prednisolone, and had a highly increased P-glycoprotein (P-gp/abcb1) expression and transport capacity for the P-gp model-substrate rhodamine123. Both resistance to doxorubicin and vincristine, and rhodamine123 transport capacity were fully reversed by the P-gp inhibitor PSC833. No changes were observed in the expression and function of the ABC-transporters MRP-1 and BCRP. It is concluded that GL-40 cells represent a useful model for studying P-gp dependent drug resistance in canine lymphoid neoplasia, and that this model can be used for screening substances as potential P-gp substrates and their capacity to modulate P-gp mediated drug resistance. PMID:24975508

  9. Clinical implications of molecular drug resistance testing for Mycobacterium tuberculosis: a TBNET/RESIST-TB consensus statement.

    PubMed

    Domínguez, J; Boettger, E C; Cirillo, D; Cobelens, F; Eisenach, K D; Gagneux, S; Hillemann, D; Horsburgh, R; Molina-Moya, B; Niemann, S; Tortoli, E; Whitelaw, A; Lange, C

    2016-01-01

    The emergence of drug-resistant strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis is a challenge to global tuberculosis (TB) control. Although culture-based methods have been regarded as the gold standard for drug susceptibility testing (DST), molecular methods provide rapid information on mutations in the M. tuberculosis genome associated with resistance to anti-tuberculosis drugs. We ascertained consensus on the use of the results of molecular DST for clinical treatment decisions in TB patients. This document has been developed by TBNET and RESIST-TB groups to reach a consensus about reporting standards in the clinical use of molecular DST results. Review of the available literature and the search for evidence included hand-searching journals and searching electronic databases. The panel identified single nucleotide mutations in genomic regions of M. tuberculosis coding for katG, inhA, rpoB, embB, rrs, rpsL and gyrA that are likely related to drug resistance in vivo. Identification of any of these mutations in clinical isolates of M. tuberculosis has implications for the management of TB patients, pending the results of in vitro DST. However, false-positive and false-negative results in detecting resistance-associated mutations in drugs for which there is poor or unproven correlation between phenotypic and clinical drug resistance complicate the interpretation. Reports of molecular DST results should therefore include specific information on the mutations identified and provide guidance for clinicians on interpretation and on the choice of the appropriate initial drug regimen. PMID:26688526

  10. Sulfonamide and tetracycline resistance genes in total- and culturable-bacterial assemblages in South African aquatic environments

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Satoru; Ogo, Mitsuko; Koike, Tatsuya; Takada, Hideshige; Newman, Brent

    2015-01-01

    Antibiotic resistant bacteria are ubiquitous in the natural environment. The introduction of e?uent derived antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs) into aquatic environments is of concern in the spreading of genetic risk. This study showed the prevalence of sulfonamide and tetracycline resistance genes, sul1, sul2, sul3, and tet(M), in the total bacterial assemblage and colony forming bacterial assemblage in river and estuarine water and sewage treatment plants (STP) in South Africa. There was no correlation between antibiotic concentrations and ARGs, suggesting the targeted ARGs are spread in a wide area without connection to selection pressure. Among sul genes, sul1 and sul2 were major genes in the total (over 10-2 copies/16S) and colony forming bacteria assemblages (?10-1 copies/16S). In urban waters, the sul3 gene was mostly not detectable in total and culturable assemblages, suggesting sul3 is not abundant. tet(M) was found in natural assemblages with 10-3 copies/16S level in STP, but was not detected in colony forming bacteria, suggesting the non-culturable (yet-to-be cultured) bacterial community in urban surface waters and STP e?uent possess the tet(M) gene. Sulfamethoxazole (SMX) resistant (SMXr) and oxytetracycline (OTC) resistant (OTCr) bacterial communities in urban waters possessed not only sul1 and sul2 but also sul3 and tet(M) genes. These genes are widely distributed in SMXr and OTCr bacteria. In conclusion, urban river and estuarine water and STP e?uent in the Durban area were highly contaminated with ARGs, and the yet-to-be cultured bacterial community may act as a non-visible ARG reservoir in certain situations. PMID:26300864

  11. Bioremediation potential of a highly mercury resistant bacterial strain Sphingobium SA2 isolated from contaminated soil.

    PubMed

    Mahbub, Khandaker Rayhan; Krishnan, Kannan; Megharaj, Mallavarapu; Naidu, Ravi

    2016-02-01

    A mercury resistant bacterial strain, SA2, was isolated from soil contaminated with mercury. The 16S rRNA gene sequence of this isolate showed 99% sequence similarity to the genera Sphingobium and Sphingomonas of ?-proteobacteria group. However, the isolate formed a distinct phyletic line with the genus Sphingobium suggesting the strain belongs to Sphingobium sp. Toxicity studies indicated resistance to high levels of mercury with estimated EC50 values 4.5 mg L(-1) and 44.15 mg L(-1) and MIC values 5.1 mg L(-1) and 48.48 mg L(-1) in minimal and rich media, respectively. The strain SA2 was able to volatilize mercury by producing mercuric reductase enzyme which makes it potential candidate for remediating mercury. ICP-QQQ-MS analysis of Hg supplemented culture solutions confirmed that almost 79% mercury in the culture suspension was volatilized in 6 h. A very small amount of mercury was observed to accumulate in cell pellets which was also evident according to ESEM-EDX analysis. The mercuric reductase gene merA was amplified and sequenced. The deduced amino acid sequence demonstrated sequence homology with ?-proteobacteria and Ascomycota group. PMID:26378869

  12. Caenorhabditis elegans Bacterial Pathogen Resistant bus-4 Mutants Produce Altered Mucins

    PubMed Central

    Parsons, Lisa M.; Mizanur, Rahman M.; Jankowska, Ewa; Hodgkin, Jonathan; O?Rourke, Delia; Stroud, Dave; Ghosh, Salil; Cipollo, John F.

    2014-01-01

    Caenorabditis elegans bus-4 glycosyltransferase mutants are resistant to infection by Microbacterium nematophilum, Yersinia pestis and Yersinia pseudotuberculosis and have altered susceptibility to two Leucobacter species Verde1 and Verde2. Our objective in this study was to define the glycosylation changes leading to this phenotype to better understand how these changes lead to pathogen resistance. We performed MALDI-TOF MS, tandem MS and GC/MS experiments to reveal fine structural detail for the bus-4 N- and O-glycan pools. We observed dramatic changes in O-glycans and moderate ones in N-glycan pools compared to the parent strain. Ce core-I glycans, the nematode's mucin glycan equivalent, were doubled in abundance, halved in charge and bore shifts in terminal substitutions. The fucosyl O-glycans, Ce core-II and neutral fucosyl forms, were also increased in abundance as were fucosyl N-glycans. Quantitative expression analysis revealed that two mucins, let-653 and osm-8, were upregulated nearly 40 fold and also revealed was a dramatic increase in GDP-Man 4,6 dehydratease expression. We performed detailed lectin binding studies that showed changes in glycoconjugates in the surface coat, cuticle surface and intestine. The combined changes in cell surface glycoconjugate distribution, increased abundance and altered properties of mucin provide an environment where likely the above pathogens are not exposed to normal glycoconjugate dependent cues leading to barriers to these bacterial infections. PMID:25296196

  13. Resistance and resilience responses of a range of soil eukaryote and bacterial taxa to fungicide application

    PubMed Central

    Howell, Christopher C.; Hilton, Sally; Semple, Kirk T.; Bending, Gary D.

    2014-01-01

    The application of plant protection products has the potential to significantly affect soil microbial community structure and function. However, the extent to which soil microbial communities from different trophic levels exhibit resistance and resilience to such compounds remains poorly understood. The resistance and resilience responses of a range of microbial communities (bacteria, fungi, archaea, pseudomonads, and nematodes) to different concentrations of the strobilurin fungicide, azoxystrobin were studied. A significant concentration-dependent decrease, and subsequent recovery in soil dehydrogenase activity was recorded, but no significant impact on total microbial biomass was observed. Impacts on specific microbial communities were studied using small subunit (SSU) rRNA terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP) profiling using soil DNA and RNA. The application of azoxystrobin significantly affected fungal and nematode community structure and diversity but had no impact on other communities. Community impacts were more pronounced in the RNA-derived T-RFLP profiles than in the DNA-derived profiles. qPCR confirmed that azoxystrobin application significantly reduced fungal, but not bacterial, SSU rRNA gene copy number. Azoxystrobin application reduced the prevalence of ascomycete fungi, but increased the relative abundance of zygomycetes. Azoxystrobin amendment also reduced the relative abundance of nematodes in the order Enoplia, but stimulated a large increase in the relative abundance of nematodes from the order Araeolaimida. PMID:25048906

  14. EPISOME-MEDIATED TRANSFER OF DRUG RESISTANCE IN ENTEROBACTERIACEAE VII.

    PubMed Central

    Watanabe, Tsutomu; Nishida, Hiroshi; Ogata, Chizuko; Arai, Toshihiko; Sato, Sachiko

    1964-01-01

    Watanabe, Tsutomu (Keio University, Tokyo, Japan), Hiroshi Nishida, Chizuko Ogata, Toshihiko Arai, and Sachiko Sato. Episome-mediated transfer of drug resistance in Enterobacteriaceae. VII. Two types of naturally occurring R factors. J. Bacteriol. 88:716–726. 1964.—Naturally occurring R factors are classified into two types, fi+ and fi?, depending on their fi characters. The term fi is an abbreviation of fertility inhibition and fi? and fi? mean, respectively, the presence and absence of suppression of the functions of the sex factor F of Escherichia coli K-12. It was found that fi? R factors reduce the efficiency of plating of phages ? and T1 in K-12; fi+ R factors did not have this inhibitory action. One of the fi? R factors reduced the efficiency of plating of phage T7 as well. Phages ? and T1 underwent host-induced modifications in the host carrying some fi? R factors. At least two types of fi? R factors were recognized by the types of their restriction and host-induced modification of these phages. CaCl2 exhibited antagonistic actions against the restrictions of phages ? and T1 by fi? R factors. Transduction of the ability to ferment galactose with HFT lysates of ? was reduced by fi? R factors. Ultraviolet induction of ? was not affected by any R factors. Furthermore, adsorption of phages ? and T1 was not altered by the presence of any R factors. From these results, we concluded that the suppression of progeny formation of these phages by fi? R factors is due to some step(s) after adsorption of the phages to the bacteria. Superinfection immunity and mutual exclusion were found between two different fi+ R factors but not between fi+ and fi? R factors. The two different fi? R factors were frequently genetically recombined. but fi+ and fi? R factors were not genetically recombined, as indicated by findings of independent transfer of these R factors by conjugation and by transduction from the donors having these two R factors. It was assumed from these findings that fi+ and fi? R factors are considerably different episomes having different resistance-transfer factors. Images PMID:14208512

  15. The role of delamanid in the treatment of drug-resistant tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, Joseph M; Sloan, Derek J

    2015-01-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) remains a significant cause of death worldwide, and emergence of drug-resistant TB requires lengthy treatments with toxic drugs that are less effective than their first-line equivalents. New treatments are urgently needed. Delamanid, previously OPC-67863, is a novel drug of the dihydro-nitroimidazole class with potent anti-TB activity and great promise to be effective in the treatment of drug-resistant TB. This review examines the preclinical and clinical development of delamanid, reviews current guidance on its use and evaluates the opportunities and challenges for its future role in TB management. PMID:25999726

  16. Frequency of drug resistance in Plasmodium falciparum: a nonsynergistic combination of 5-fluoroorotate and atovaquone suppresses in vitro resistance.

    PubMed Central

    Gassis, S; Rathod, P K

    1996-01-01

    A combination of 5-fluoroorotate and atovaquone eliminated Plasmodium falciparum in long-term cultures more efficiently than either compound alone. The improved potency came not through synergistic activity but through decreased frequency of drug resistance. In support of this finding, it was shown that 5-fluoroorotate and atovaquone do not act in a synergistic fashion, that 5-fluoroorotate-resistant and atovaquone-resistant P. falciparum organisms generated in vitro do not show cross-resistance, and that the frequency of simultaneous resistance to the two compounds approached the product of their individual resistance frequencies. To demonstrate the last finding, and establish proof of principle, an in vitro method was developed for measuring the frequency of drug resistance in P. falciparum. By this method, it was shown that the frequency of resistance to 10(-7) M 5-fluoroorotate was about 10(-6) and the frequency of resistance to 10(-8) M atovaquone was about 10(-5); the frequency of simultaneous resistance to a combination of 10(-7) M 5-fluoroorotate and 10(-8) M atovaquone was less than 5 x 10(-10). On the basis of additional measurements, it was estimated that the frequency of simultaneous resistance to higher, pharmacologically more relevant, concentrations of 10(-6) M 5-fluoroorotate and 10(-7) M atovaquone would be less than 10(-17). Control experiments demonstrated that these drug combinations did not cause increased toxicity to mammalian cells in culture. On this basis, it is predicted that a combination of 5-fluoroorotate and atovaquone will successfully eliminate typical malarial infections in animals and in human patients at doses that are readily tolerated. PMID:8849251

  17. Drug-resistant tuberculosis can be predicted by Mycobacterial interspersed repetitive unit locus

    PubMed Central

    Yu-feng, Wen; Chao, Jiang; Xian-feng, Cheng

    2015-01-01

    It is unknown whether MIRU-VNTR (Mycobacterial Interspersed Repetitive Unit-Variable Number of Tandem Repeat) is associated with drug resistance of Mycobacterium tuberculosis. The purpose of this study was to explore the ability of 24 MIRU loci to predict the drug resistance of Isoniazid (INH), Rifampicin (RFP), Streptomycin (SM), Ethambutol (EMB) and Pyrazinamide (PZA). We collected the drug resistance and MIRU loci information of 109 strains of M. tuberculosis from an open database. The results of multivariate logistic regression showed that the VNTR polymorphism of MTUB04 was related to INH resistance [odds ratio (OR) = 2.82, P = 0.00], RFP resistance (OR = 1.91, P = 0.02), SM resistance (OR = 1.98, P = 0.01) and EMB resistance (OR = 1.95, P = 0.03). MIRU40 was associated with INH resistance (OR = 2.22, P = 0.00). MTUB21 was connected with INH resistance (OR = 1.63, P = 0.02) and SM resistance (OR = 1.69, P = 0.01). MIRU26 was correlated with SM resistance (OR = 1.52, P = 0.04). MIRU39 was associated with EMB resistance (OR = 4.07, P = 0.02). The prediction power of MIRU loci were 0.84, 0.70, 0.85, and 0.74 respectively for INH (predicted by MTUB04, MIRU20, and MTUB21), RFP (predicted by MTUB04), SM (predicted by MTUB21 and MIRU26) and EMB (MTUB04 and MIRU39) through ROC analysis. Our results showed that MIRU loci were related to anti-tuberculosis drug and could predict the drug resistance of tuberculosis. PMID:25759689

  18. Synergistic effect of Myrtus communis L. essential oils and conventional antibiotics against multi-drug resistant Acinetobacter baumannii wound isolates.

    PubMed

    Aleksic, Verica; Mimica-Dukic, Neda; Simin, Natasa; Nedeljkovic, Natasa Stankovic; Knezevic, Petar

    2014-10-15

    Acinetobacter baumannii is a rapidly emerging, highly resistant clinical pathogen with increasing prevalence. In recent years, the limited number of antimicrobial agents available for treatment of infections with multi-drug resistant (MDR) strains reinforced tendency for discovery of novel antimicrobial agents or treatment strategies. The aim of the study was to determine antimicrobial effectiveness of three Myrtus communis L. essential oils, both alone and in combination with conventional antibiotics, against MDR A. baumannii wound isolates. The results obtained highlighted the occurrence of good antibacterial effect of myrtle oils when administered alone. Using checkerboard method, the combinations of subinhibitory concentrations of myrtle essential oils and conventional antibiotics, i.e. polymixin B and ciprofloxacine were examined. The results proved synergism among M. communis L. essential oils and both antibiotics against MDR A. baumannii wound isolates, with a FIC index under or equal 0.50. Combination of subinhibitory concentrations of essential oils and ciprofloxacin most frequently reduced bacterial growth in synergistic manner. The similar has been shown for combination with polymyxin B; furthermore, the myrtle essential oil resulted in re-sensitization of the MDR wound isolates, i.e. MICs used in combination were below the cut off for the sensitivity to the antibiotic. Time-kill curve method confirmed efficacy of myrtle essential oil and polymyxin B combination, with complete reduction of bacterial count after 6h. The detected synergy offers an opportunity for future development of treatment strategies for potentially lethal wound infections caused by MDR A. baumannii. PMID:25442275

  19. Biased random walk model for the prioritization of drug resistance associated proteins

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Hao; Dong, Jiaqiang; Hu, Sijun; Cai, Xiqiang; Tang, Guangbo; Dou, Jianhua; Tian, Miaomiao; He, Fuchu; Nie, Yongzhan; Fan, Daiming

    2015-01-01

    Multi-drug resistance is the main cause of treatment failure in cancer patients. How to identify molecules underlying drug resistance from multi-omics data remains a great challenge. Here, we introduce a data biased strategy, ProteinRank, to prioritize drug-resistance associated proteins in cancer cells. First, we identified differentially expressed proteins in Adriamycin and Vincristine resistant gastric cancer cells compared to their parental cells using iTRAQ combined with LC-MS/MS experiments, and then mapped them to human protein-protein interaction network; second, we applied ProteinRank to analyze the whole network and rank proteins similar to known drug resistance related proteins. Cross validations demonstrated a better performance of ProteinRank compared to the method without usage of MS data. Further validations confirmed the altered expressions or activities of several top ranked proteins. Functional study showed PIM3 or CAV1 silencing was sufficient to reverse the drug resistance phenotype. These results indicated ProteinRank could prioritize key proteins related to drug resistance in gastric cancer and provided important clues for cancer research. PMID:26039373

  20. Insight into Pleiotropic Drug Resistance ATP-binding Cassette Pump Drug Transport through Mutagenesis of Cdr1p Transmembrane Domains*

    PubMed Central

    Rawal, Manpreet Kaur; Khan, Mohammad Firoz; Kapoor, Khyati; Goyal, Neha; Sen, Sobhan; Saxena, Ajay Kumar; Lynn, Andrew M.; Tyndall, Joel D. A.; Monk, Brian C.; Cannon, Richard D.; Komath, Sneha Sudha; Prasad, Rajendra

    2013-01-01

    The fungal ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter Cdr1 protein (Cdr1p), responsible for clinically significant drug resistance, is composed of two transmembrane domains (TMDs) and two nucleotide binding domains (NBDs). We have probed the nature of the drug binding pocket by performing systematic mutagenesis of the primary sequences of the 12 transmembrane segments (TMSs) found in the TMDs. All mutated proteins were expressed equally well and localized properly at the plasma membrane in the heterologous host Saccharomyces cerevisiae, but some variants differed significantly in efflux activity, substrate specificity, and coupled ATPase activity. Replacement of the majority of the amino acid residues with alanine or glycine yielded neutral mutations, but about 42% of the variants lost resistance to drug efflux substrates completely or selectively. A predicted three-dimensional homology model shows that all the TMSs, apart from TMS4 and TMS10, interact directly with the drug-binding cavity in both the open and closed Cdr1p conformations. However, TMS4 and TMS10 mutations can also induce total or selective drug susceptibility. Functional data and homology modeling assisted identification of critical amino acids within a drug-binding cavity that, upon mutation, abolished resistance to all drugs tested singly or in combinations. The open and closed Cdr1p models enabled the identification of amino acid residues that bordered a drug-binding cavity dominated by hydrophobic residues. The disposition of TMD residues with differential effects on drug binding and transport are consistent with a large polyspecific drug binding pocket in this yeast multidrug transporter. PMID:23824183

  1. Molecular targeting therapy of cancer: drug resistance, apoptosis and survival signal.

    PubMed

    Tsuruo, Takashi; Naito, Mikihiko; Tomida, Akihiro; Fujita, Naoya; Mashima, Tetsuo; Sakamoto, Hiroshi; Haga, Naomi

    2003-01-01

    Recent progress in the development of molecular cancer therapeutics has revealed new types of antitumor drugs, such as Herceptin, Gleevec, and Iressa, as potent therapeutics for specific tumors. Our work has focused on molecular cancer therapeutics, mainly in the areas of drug resistance, apoptosis and apoptosis resistance, and survival-signaling, which is related to drug resistance. In this review, we describe our research on molecular cancer therapeutics, including molecular mechanisms and therapeutic approaches. Resistance to chemotherapeutic drugs is a principal problem in the treatment of cancer. P-Glycoprotein (P-gp), encoded by the MDR1 gene, is a multidrug transporter and has a major role in multidrug resistance (MDR). Targeting of P-gp by small-molecular compounds and/or antibodies is an effective strategy to overcome MDR in cancer, especially hematologic malignancies. Several P-gp inhibitors have been developed and are currently under clinical phased studies. In addition to the multidrug transporter proteins, cancer cells have several drug resistance mechanisms. Solid tumors are often placed under stress conditions, such as glucose starvation and hypoxia. These conditions result in topo II poison resistance that is due to proteasome-mediated degradation of DNA topoisomerases. Proteasome inhibitors effectively prevent this stress-induced drug resistance. Glyoxalase I, which is often elevated in drug- and apoptosis-resistant cancers, offers another possibility for overcoming drug resistance. It plays a role in detoxification of methylglioxal, a side product of glycolysis, which is highly reactive with DNA and proteins. Inhibitors of glyoxalase I selectively kill drug-resistant tumors that express glyoxalase I. Finally, the susceptibility of tumor cells to apoptosis induced by antitumor drugs appears to depend on the balance between pro-apoptotic and survival (anti-apoptotic) signals. PI3K-Akt is an important survival signal pathway, that has been shown to be the target of various antitumor drugs, including UCN-01 and geldanamycin, new anticancer drugs under clinical evaluation. Our present studies provide novel targets for future effective molecular cancer therapeutics. PMID:12708468

  2. Longitudinal Detection and Persistence of Minority Drug-Resistant Populations and Their Effect on Salvage Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Nishizawa, Masako; Matsuda, Masakazu; Hattori, Junko; Shiino, Teiichiro; Matano, Tetsuro; Heneine, Walid; Johnson, Jeffrey A.; Sugiura, Wataru

    2015-01-01

    Background Drug-resistant HIV are more prevalent and persist longer than previously demonstrated by bulk sequencing due to the ability to detect low-frequency variants. To clarify a clinical benefit to monitoring minority-level drug resistance populations as a guide to select active drugs for salvage therapy, we retrospectively analyzed the dynamics of low-frequency drug-resistant population in antiretroviral (ARV)-exposed drug resistant individuals. Materials and Methods Six HIV-infected individuals treated with ARV for more than five years were analyzed. These individuals had difficulty in controlling viremia, and treatment regimens were switched multiple times guided by standard drug resistance testing using bulk sequencing. To detect minority variant populations with drug resistance, we used a highly sensitive allele-specific PCR (AS-PCR) with detection thresholds of 0.3–2%. According to ARV used in these individuals, we focused on the following seven reverse transcriptase inhibitor-resistant mutations: M41L, K65R, K70R, K103N, Y181C, M184V, and T215F/Y. Results of AS-PCR were compared with bulk sequencing data for concordance and presence of additional mutations. To clarify the genetic relationship between low-frequency and high-frequency populations, AS-PCR amplicon sequences were compared with bulk sequences in phylogenetic analysis. Results The use of AS-PCR enabled detection of the drug-resistant mutations, M41L, K103N, Y181C, M184V and T215Y, present as low-frequency populations in five of the six individuals. These drug resistant variants persisted for several years without ARV pressure. Phylogenetic analysis indicated that pre-existing K103N and T215I variants had close genetic relationships with high-frequency K103N and T215I observed during treatment. Discussion and Conclusion Our results demonstrate the long-term persistence of drug-resistant viruses in the absence of drug pressure. The rapid virologic failures with pre-existing mutant viruses detectable by AS-PCR highlight the clinical importance of low-frequency drug-resistant viruses. Thus, our results highlight the usefulness of AS-PCR and support its expanded evaluation in ART clinical management. PMID:26360259

  3. Atmospheric pressure resistive barrier air plasma jet induced bacterial inactivation in aqueous environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thiyagarajan, Magesh; Sarani, Abdollah; Gonzales, Xavier

    2013-03-01

    An atmospheric pressure resistive barrier air plasma jet is designed to inactivate bacteria in aqueous media in direct and indirect exposure modes of treatment. The resistive barrier plasma jet is designed to operate at both dc and standard 50-60 Hz low frequency ac power input and the ambient air at 50% humidity level was used as the operating gas. The voltage-current characteristics of the plasma jet were analyzed and the operating frequency of the discharge was measured to be 20 kHz and the plasma power was measured to be 26 W. The plasma jet rotational temperatures (Trot) are obtained from the optical emission spectra, from the N2C-B(2+) transitions by matching the experimental spectrum results with the Spectra Air (SPECAIR) simulation spectra. The reactive oxygen and nitrogen species were measured using optical emission spectroscopy and gas analyzers, for direct and indirect treatment modes. The nitric oxides (NO) were observed to be the predominant long lived reactive nitrogen species produced by the plasma. Three different bacteria including Staphylococcus aureus (Gram-positive), Escherichia coli (Gram-negative), and Neisseria meningitidis (Gram-negative) were suspended in an aqueous media and treated by the resistive barrier air plasma jet in direct and indirect exposure modes. The results show that a near complete bacterial inactivation was achieved within 120 s for both direct and indirect plasma treatment of S. aureus and E. coli bacteria. Conversely, a partial inactivation of N. meningitidis was observed by 120 s direct plasma exposure and insignificant inactivation was observed for the indirect plasma exposure treatment. Plasma induced shifts in N. meningitidis gene expression was analyzed using pilC gene expression as a representative gene and the results showed a reduction in the expression of the pilC gene compared to untreated samples suggesting that the observed protection against NO may be regulated by other genes.

  4. Evaluation of the resistance of a geopolymer-based drug delivery system to tampering.

    PubMed

    Cai, Bing; Engqvist, Håkan; Bredenberg, Susanne

    2014-04-25

    Tamper-resistance is an important property of controlled-release formulations of opioid drugs. Tamper-resistant formulations aim to increase the degree of effort required to override the controlled release of the drug molecules from extended-release formulations for the purpose of non-medical use. In this study, the resistance of a geopolymer-based formulation to tampering was evaluated by comparing it with a commercial controlled-release tablet using several methods commonly used by drug abusers. Because of its high compressive strength and resistance to heat, much more effort and time was required to extract the drug from the geopolymer-based formulation. Moreover, in the drug-release test, the geopolymer-based formulation maintained its controlled-release characteristics after milling, while the drug was released immediately from the milled commercial tablets, potentially resulting in dose dumping. Although the tampering methods used in this study does not cover all methods that abuser could access, the results obtained by the described methods showed that the geopolymer matrix increased the degree of effort required to override the controlled release of the drug, suggesting that the formulation has improved resistance to some common drug-abuse tampering methods. The geopolymer matrix has the potential to make the opioid product less accessible and attractive to non-medical users. PMID:24556174

  5. Optimization of the Bacterial Cytochrome P450 BM3 System for the Production of Human Drug Metabolites

    PubMed Central

    Di Nardo, Giovanna; Gilardi, Gianfranco

    2012-01-01

    Drug metabolism in human liver is a process involving many different enzymes. Among them, a number of cytochromes P450 isoforms catalyze the oxidation of most of the drugs commercially available. Each P450 isoform acts on more than one drug, and one drug may be oxidized by more than one enzyme. As a result, multiple products may be obtained from the same drug, and as the metabolites can be biologically active and may cause adverse drug reactions (ADRs), the metabolic profile of a new drug has to be known before this can be commercialized. Therefore, the metabolites of a certain drug must be identified, synthesized and tested for toxicity. Their synthesis must be in sufficient quantities to be used for metabolic tests. This review focuses on the progresses done in the field of the optimization of a bacterial self-sufficient and efficient cytochrome P450, P450 BM3 from Bacillus megaterium, used for the production of metabolites of human enzymes. The progress made in the improvement of its catalytic performance towards drugs, the substitution of the costly NADPH cofactor and its immobilization and scale-up of the process for industrial application are reported. PMID:23443101

  6. [Multi-drug resistant bacteria, a complex mechanism].

    PubMed

    Hilaire, Jean-Christophe

    2013-01-01

    Bacteria are said to be multidrug resistant when they are only sensitive to a small number of antibiotics used as treatments. This problem of resistance appeared in hospitals soon after antibiotics were first used. In the 1960s, strains of staphylococcus became resistant to penicillin. PMID:23865246

  7. The resistance of bacterial isolates from spacecraft assembly cleanrooms against physical and chemical treatments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rettberg, Petra; Kloss, Maria; Barczyk, Simon; Reitz, Guenther

    The COSPAR planetary protection guidelines define bioburden limits for spacecraft to protect solar system bodies from contamination by terrestrial life, and to protect Earth from possible life forms that may be returned from other solar system bodies. The cleaning and sterilisation methods to be selected for space hardware have to be as efficient as necessary to reach the maximal allowed bioburden limit. To be able to asses the suitability of different methods it is mandatory to investigate the physiological potential of the microbial isolates from cleanrooms. In the ESA project BioDiv the bioburden and biodiversity was determined in cleanrooms where the satellite Herschel was integrated and tested. From all bacterial isolates obtained in sev-eral measurement campaigns 30 strains were selected. Their resistance as vegetative cells was tested against different physical and chemical treatments: drying under ambient conditions, desiccation under defined relative humidity, vacuum exposure, UVC radiation exposure, freeze-thaw cycles under martian atmosphere and pressure, exposure to high and low pH values, and exposure to alcohols. The results of these tests can be summarised as follows: i) Most of the tested microorganisms from cleanrooms exhibit a certain resistance against one or more of the tested conditions. This is in contrast to strains which have already been cultured for long-periods in time under optimal laboratory conditions. They tend to loose their original resistance against different environmental parameters. ii) Different isolates from the same species can exhibit significantly different resistances. Therefore, the sole identification of microorgnisms by 16S rDNA sequencing does not give insights into their physiological potential. iii) The first hours of drying have a substantial inactiviation effect, longer periods of drying or even vacuum exposure reduce the surviving fraction only slightly more. iv) The sensitivity against UVC radiation varies between the different strains. However, those which exhibit a low resistance against other factors also tend to be quite radiation sensitive. v) The survivability of dried bacteria after exposure under martian atmsophere and pressure was comparable to the survival under ambient conditions. vi) 10 freeze-thaw cycles under martian atmosphere and pressure can be tolerated to a varying degree by all tested isolates. 6 of the isolates could not survive 100 cycles. Therefore terrestrial microorganisms unintentionally taken to the surface of Mars could survive there at least for a certain period of time. vii) Several of the isolates could tolerate exposure to pH 9 better than exposure to pH 2. viii) Dried bacteria were able to survive the exposure to alcohols (ethanol and isopropylalcohol) at least to a certain degree. The cleaning with these agents does not inactivate them sufficiently.

  8. HIV-1 drug resistance-associated mutations among HIV-1 infected drug-naïve antenatal clinic attendees in rural Kenya

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Access to antiretroviral therapy (ART) has increased dramatically in Sub-Saharan Africa. In Kenya, 560,000 people had access to ART by the end of 2011. This scaling up of ART has raised challenges to the Kenyan health system due to emergence of drug resistant viruses among those on treatment and possible onward transmission. To counter this, and come up with an effective treatment strategy, it has become vital to determine baseline mutations associated with drug resistance among the circulating strains of HIV-1in Kenya. Methods The prevalence of mutations associated with drug resistance in HIV-1 protease (PR) and reverse transcriptase (RT) regions from 188 HIV-1 infected treatment-naïve pregnant women was investigated in Kapsabet, Nandi Hills and Kitale district hospitals of Kenya. Blood samples were collected between April 2005 and June 2006. The HIV-1 pol gene was amplified using primers for HIV-1 PR and RT and sequenced using the BigDye chemistry. The mutations were analyzed based on the IAS algorithm as well as the Stanford University HIV Drug Resistance Database. Results Based on the PR and RT sequences, HIV-1 subtypes A1 (n=117, 62.2%), A2 (n=2, 1.1%), D (n=27, 14.4%), C (n=13, 6.9%), G (n=3, 1.6%), and possible recombinants (n=26, 13.8%) were detected. Mutations associated with nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTI) and non-nucleoside RTI (NNRTI)-resistance were detected in 1.6% (3 of 188) and 1.1% (2 of 188), respectively. Mutations associated with PI resistance were detected in 0.5% (1 of 188) of the study population. Conclusion The prevalence of drug resistance among drug-naïve pregnant women in rural North Rift, Kenya in 2006 was 3.2%. Major drug resistance mutations associated with PIs, NRTIs and NNRTIs do exist among treatment-naïve pregnant women in North Rift, Kenya. There is a need for consistent follow-up of drug-naïve individuals in this region to determine the impact of mutations on treatment outcomes. PMID:24180455

  9. Eimeria tenella: relative survival of drug-resistant and drug-sensitive populations in floor pen chickens.

    PubMed

    Long, P L; Johnson, J; Baxter, S

    1985-12-01

    The effect was studied of introducing about equal numbers of decoquinate-sensitive or decoquinate-resistant Eimeria tenella oocysts into a floor pen of susceptible unmedicated chickens. "Sentinel" birds introduced 2, 3, 4, 5, and 6 weeks later were used to recover populations of E. tenella oocysts. In drug sensitivity tests, populations of oocysts harvested at 4 weeks were partially resistant to decoquinate medication. Oocysts obtained after 5 and 6 weeks were highly sensitive to decoquinate medication. The results indicate that drug-sensitive E. tenella parasites are more likely to dominate in absence of medication. PMID:4095074

  10. Goniothalamus Species: A Source of Drugs for the Treatment of Cancers and Bacterial Infections?

    PubMed Central

    2007-01-01

    Irrespective of the presence of cytotoxic acetogenins and styryl-lactones in the genus Goniothalamus, only 22 species in the genus Goniothalamus, out of 160 species (13.7%) have so far been investigated. In an effort to promote further research on the genus Goniothalamus which could represent a source of drugs for the treatment of cancers and bacterial infections, this work offers a broad analysis of current knowledge on Goniothalamus species. Therefore, it includes (i) taxonomy (ii) botanical description (iii) traditional medicinal uses and (iv) phytochemical and pharmacological studies. We discuss the molecular mechanisms of actions of acetogenins and styryl-lactones, with some emphasis on the possible involvement of protein kinase, Bax and TRAIL receptors in the cytotoxic effects of styryl-lactones. We also report (v) the growth inhibition of several nosocomial bacteria by Goniothalamus. scortechinii. The crude methanol extract of G. scortechinii showed a good and broad spectrum of antibacterial activity against both Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria. PMID:17965760

  11. Goniothalamus species: a source of drugs for the treatment of cancers and bacterial infections?

    PubMed

    Wiart, Christophe

    2007-09-01

    Irrespective of the presence of cytotoxic acetogenins and styryl-lactones in the genus Goniothalamus, only 22 species in the genus Goniothalamus, out of 160 species (13.7%) have so far been investigated. In an effort to promote further research on the genus Goniothalamus which could represent a source of drugs for the treatment of cancers and bacterial infections, this work offers a broad analysis of current knowledge on Goniothalamus species. Therefore, it includes (i) taxonomy (ii) botanical description (iii) traditional medicinal uses and (iv) phytochemical and pharmacological studies. We discuss the molecular mechanisms of actions of acetogenins and styryl-lactones, with some emphasis on the possible involvement of protein kinase, Bax and TRAIL receptors in the cytotoxic effects of styryl-lactones. We also report (v) the growth inhibition of several nosocomial bacteria by Goniothalamus. scortechinii. The crude methanol extract of G. scortechinii showed a good and broad spectrum of antibacterial activity against both Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria. PMID:17965760

  12. In situ potentiometric method to evaluate bacterial outer membrane-permeabilizing ability of drugs: example using antiprotozoal diamidines.

    PubMed

    Ando, Makoto; Kamei, Rie; Komagoe, Keiko; Inoue, Tsuyoshi; Yamada, Keiichi; Katsu, Takashi

    2012-12-01

    We introduced a new assay system, combining tyrocidine A and a K(+)-selective electrode, to evaluate the bacterial outer membrane-permeabilizing ability of drugs. Tyrocidine A, in the presence of an outer membrane permeabilizer, increased the permeability to K(+) of the cytoplasmic membrane of Escherichia coli, because this antibiotic could markedly increase the permeability of phospholipid layers constituting the cytoplasmic membrane, while it acted weakly on the outer membrane. Hence, the novel function of agents increasing the permeability of the outer membrane could be examined directly by monitoring the tyrocidine A-induced leakage of K(+) from the bacterial cytoplasm using a K(+)-selective electrode. We found that antiprotozoal diamidines, such as diminazene, pentamidine, and 4',6-diamidino-2-phenylindole (DAPI), can increase the permeability of the bacterial outer membrane and appropriate lipophilicity is important for diamidines to permeabilize the outer membrane. PMID:23046554

  13. Specific Cell Targeting Therapy Bypasses Drug Resistance Mechanisms in African Trypanosomiasis

    PubMed Central

    Unciti-Broceta, Juan D.; Arias, José L.; Maceira, José; Soriano, Miguel; Ortiz-González, Matilde; Hernández-Quero, José; Muñóz-Torres, Manuel; de Koning, Harry P.; Magez, Stefan; Garcia-Salcedo, José A.

    2015-01-01

    African trypanosomiasis is a deadly neglected disease caused by the extracellular parasite Trypanosoma brucei. Current therapies are characterized by high drug toxicity and increasing drug resistance mainly associated with loss-of-function mutations in the transporters involved in drug import. The introduction of new antiparasitic drugs into therapeutic use is a slow and expensive process. In contrast, specific targeting of existing drugs could represent a more rapid and cost-effective approach for neglected disease treatment, impacting through reduced systemic toxicity and circumventing resistance acquired through impaired compound uptake. We have generated nanoparticles of chitosan loaded with the trypanocidal drug pentamidine and coated by a single domain nanobody that specifically targets the surface of African trypanosomes. Once loaded into this nanocarrier, pentamidine enters trypanosomes through endocytosis instead of via classical cell surface transporters. The curative dose of pentamidine-loaded nanobody-chitosan nanoparticles was 100-fold lower than pentamidine alone in a murine model of acute African trypanosomiasis. Crucially, this new formulation displayed undiminished in vitro and in vivo activity against a trypanosome cell line resistant to pentamidine as a result of mutations in the surface transporter aquaglyceroporin 2. We conclude that this new drug delivery system increases drug efficacy and has the ability to overcome resistance to some anti-protozoal drugs. PMID:26110623

  14. The new tuberculosis drug Perchlozone® shows cross-resistance with thiacetazone.

    PubMed

    Gopal, Pooja; Dick, Thomas

    2015-04-01

    Perchlozone(®) (PCZ), a new thiosemicarbazone developed by JSC Pharmasyntez (Moscow, Russia) for the treatment of tuberculosis (TB), was approved for use against multidrug-resistant disease in Russia in 2012. The mechanism of action of the drug is unknown. A well-studied thiosemicarbazone is the old TB drug thiacetazone (TAC). It has a narrow spectrum and inhibits the FASII dehydratase complex HadABC, which is involved in cell wall biosynthesis in Mycobacterium tuberculosis. TAC is a prodrug, requiring activation by the monooxygenase EthA. In this study, a comparative in vitro analysis of both drugs was performed. The two compounds had an identical spectrum of activity, spontaneous resistant mutants showed cross-resistance, and resistance was mapped to HadABC and EthA. These results suggest that PCZ, like TAC, is a prodrug and that both drugs share EthA as an activating enzyme and HadABC as their principal target. PMID:25704063

  15. The epidemiology of drug resistance of malaria parasites: Memorandum from a WHO Meeting*

    PubMed Central

    1987-01-01

    This Memorandum presents current knowledge concerning the epidemiology of drug resistance of malaria parasites and outlines 33 research proposals which could lead to a better understanding of that epidemiology and to a better management of the problem. PMID:3325184

  16. DRUG DISCOVERY AND RESISTANCE Antibacterial activities of dendritic amphiphiles against nontuberculous

    E-print Network

    Falkinham, Joseph

    DRUG DISCOVERY AND RESISTANCE Antibacterial activities of dendritic amphiphiles against November 2011 Accepted 4 December 2011 Keywords: Dendritic amphiphiles Nontuberculous mycobacteria Anti of nine series of dicarboxyl and tricarboxyl dendritic amphiphiles with one alkyl, two alkyl

  17. Non-Darwinian dynamics in therapy-induced cancer drug resistance

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Joseph; Moor, Andreas; Mojtahedi, Mitra; Jackson, Dean; Huang, Sui

    2015-01-01

    Development of drug resistance, the prime cause of failure in cancer therapy, is commonly explained by the selection of resistant mutant cancer cells. However, dynamic non-genetic heterogeneity of clonal cell populations continuously produces meta-stable phenotypic variants (persisters), some of which represent stem-like states that confer resistance. Even without genetic mutations, Darwinian selection can expand these resistant variants, which would explain the invariably rapid emergence of stem-like resistant cells. Here, using quantitative measurements and modeling we show that appearance of multi-drug resistance in HL60 leukemic cells following treatment with vincristine is not explained by Darwinian selection but by Lamarckian induction. Single-cell longitudinal monitoring confirms the induction of multi-drug resistance in individual cells. Associated transcriptome changes indicate a lasting stress-response consistent with a drug-induced switch between high-dimensional cancer attractors. Resistance-induction correlates with Wnt-pathway up-regulation and is suppressed by ?-catenin knock-down, revealing a new opportunity for early therapeutic intervention against resistance development. PMID:24045430

  18. Drug resistance strategies of rural Hawaiian youth as a function of drug offerers and substances: a community stakeholder analysis.

    PubMed

    Okamoto, Scott K; Helm, Susana; Kulis, Stephen; Delp, Justin A; Dinson, Ay-Laina

    2012-08-01

    This study examined the variations in drug resistance strategies endorsed by community members for rural Native Hawaiian youth in drug-related problem situations. Community stakeholders completed a Web-based survey focused on drug-related problem scenarios and their matched set of responses developed by middle/intermediate school youth in prior research. Mean differences were examined based on drug offerers described in the scenarios (i.e., peers/friends, cousins, and parents) and the substances offered in the scenarios (i.e., marijuana and alcohol). Compared with other strategies, Refuse had the highest mean scores within two offerer subgroups (peers/friends and cousins) and within both substances (alcohol and marijuana). Leave had the highest mean score within scenarios describing drug offers from parents. The endorsement of different resistance strategies varied based on drug offerers and substances offered in the selected scenarios. This study suggests that resistance skills in prevention should be tailored to youths' social context in rural Hawai'i. PMID:24212171

  19. Drug Resistance Strategies Rural Hawaiian Youth of as a Function of Drug Offerers and Substances: A Community Stakeholder Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Okamoto, Scott K.; Helm, Susana; Kulis, Stephen; Delp, Justin A.; Dinson, Ay-Laina

    2012-01-01

    This study examined the variations in drug resistance strategies endorsed by community members for rural Native Hawaiian youth in drug-related problem situations. Community stakeholders completed a Web-based survey focused on drug-related problem scenarios and their matched set of responses developed by middle/intermediate school youth in prior research. Mean differences were examined based on drug offerers described in the scenarios (i.e., peers/friends, cousins, and parents) and the substances offered in the scenarios (i.e., marijuana and alcohol). Compared with other strategies, Refuse had the highest mean scores within two offerer subgroups (peers/friends and cousins) and within both substances (alcohol and marijuana). Leave had the highest mean score within scenarios describing drug offers from parents. The endorsement of different resistance strategies varied based on drug offerers and substances offered in the selected scenarios. This study suggests that resistance skills in prevention should be tailored to youths’ social context in rural Hawai‘i. PMID:24212171

  20. Members of the Conserved DedA Family Are Likely Membrane Transporters and Are Required for Drug Resistance in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Sujeet

    2014-01-01

    Bacterial resistance to antibiotics and biocides is an increasing public health problem. Genes encoding integral membrane proteins belonging to the DedA family are present in most bacterial genomes, including Escherichia coli. An E. coli strain lacking partially redundant DedA family genes yqjA and yghB (strain BC202) displays temperature sensitivity and cell division defects. These phenotypes can be corrected by overexpression of mdfA, an Na+-K+/H+ antiporter of the major facilitator superfamily. We show that BC202 is hypersensitive to several biocides and cationic compounds that are known substrates of several multidrug resistance transporters, including MdfA, EmrE, and AcrB. The introduction of deletions of genes encoding these drug transporters into BC202 results in additional sensitivity. Expression of wild-type yghB or yqjA can restore drug resistance, but this is eliminated upon mutation of two membrane-embedded acidic amino acids (E39 or D51 in either protein). This dependence upon membrane-embedded acidic amino acids is a hallmark of proton-dependent antiporters. Overexpression of mdfA in BC202 or artificially restoring proton motive force (PMF) restores wild-type resistance to substrates of MdfA as well as other drug resistance transporters such as EmrE and AcrAB. These results suggest that YqjA and YghB may be membrane transporters required for PMF-dependent drug efflux in E. coli. PMID:24277026