Sample records for bacterial drug resistance

  1. Bacterial drug resistance in meat animals: a review.

    PubMed

    Okolo, M I

    1986-09-01

    Prolonged oral or parenteral administration of antibiotics has led to the development of resistant strains of microorganisms. Bacteria acquire drug resistance by mutation, conjugation and transduction. Oral antibiotics by a process of selection pressure facilitate the proliferation of resistant population of bacteria. Drug resistant bacteria are capable of transferring their resistance to drugs to other bacteria by the process of transferable drug resistance (TDR). This can lead to multiple resistance to a vast number of therapeutically useful antibiotics which will, therefore, become ineffective for treatment. TDR can occur between pathogenic organism, between organism of different species, such as E. coli, Salmonella and Shigella; and also between pathogenic and non-pathogenic organisms. Faecal contamination of meat during slaughter may result in the transfer of antibiotic resistant E. coli to the meat. In the human gut this E. coli could transfer resistance to other gut flora, namely E. coli or Salmonella. Antibiotic-resistant coliforms have been isolated from carcases, fresh and cooked meat, raw meat handlers and livestock handlers. Handling of raw market meat by buyers in Nigeria could also lead to contamination of meat with resistant microorganisms. Veterinary drugs are sold and used without much control in Nigeria. This practice may have created a population of resistant bacteria in the meat animals. The presence of antibiotic residues in meat, milk and their products pose potential health hazards for man. Allergic skin conditions, nausea, vomiting, anaphylactic shock and even death have resulted from the ingestion of residues. Cooking and freezing have minimal effect on residues. Resistance to antibiotics have been detected in food poisoning bacteria, namely Salmonella typhimurium, Staphylococcus aureus and Clostridium perfringens. Some epidemiological link has been established between S. typhimurium of calves and food poisoning in man. Judicious use of antibiotics, public education on the health risks of the promiscuous use of drugs in livestock production; and hygienic slaughter at the slaughter houses, will help to reduce bacterial drug resistance in man and animals. PMID:3549599

  2. Drug Resistance

    MedlinePLUS

    ... the risk of drug resistance. What is HIV drug resistance? Once a person becomes infected with HIV, ... does poor medication adherence increase the risk of drug resistance? Medication adherence means taking HIV medicines every ...

  3. Building a Morbidostat: An automated continuous-culture device for studying bacterial drug resistance under dynamically sustained drug inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Toprak, Erdal; Veres, Adrian; Yildiz, Sadik; Pedraza, Juan M.; Chait, Remy; Paulsson, Johan; Kishony, Roy

    2013-01-01

    We present a protocol for building and operating an automated fluidic system for continuous culture that we call the “morbidostat”. The morbidostat is used to follow evolution of microbial drug resistance in real time. Instead of exposing bacteria to predetermined drug environments, the morbidostat constantly measures the growth rates of evolving microbial populations and dynamically adjusts drug concentrations inside culture vials in order to maintain a constant drug induced inhibition. The growth rate measurements are done using an optical detection system that is based on measuring the intensity of back-scattered light from bacterial cells suspended in the liquid culture. The morbidostat can additionally be used as a chemostat or a turbidostat. The whole system can be built from readily available components within two to three weeks, by biologists with some electronics experience or engineers familiar with basic microbiology. PMID:23429717

  4. Mechanisms of action of systemic antibiotics used in periodontal treatment and mechanisms of bacterial resistance to these drugs

    PubMed Central

    SOARES, Geisla Mary Silva; FIGUEIREDO, Luciene Cristina; FAVERI, Marcelo; CORTELLI, Sheila Cavalca; DUARTE, Poliana Mendes; FERES, Magda

    2012-01-01

    Antibiotics are important adjuncts in the treatment of infectious diseases, including periodontitis. The most severe criticisms to the indiscriminate use of these drugs are their side effects and, especially, the development of bacterial resistance. The knowledge of the biological mechanisms involved with the antibiotic usage would help the medical and dental communities to overcome these two problems. Therefore, the aim of this manuscript was to review the mechanisms of action of the antibiotics most commonly used in the periodontal treatment (i.e. penicillin, tetracycline, macrolide and metronidazole) and the main mechanisms of bacterial resistance to these drugs. Antimicrobial resistance can be classified into three groups: intrinsic, mutational and acquired. Penicillin, tetracycline and erythromycin are broad-spectrum drugs, effective against gram-positive and gram-negative microorganisms. Bacterial resistance to penicillin may occur due to diminished permeability of the bacterial cell to the antibiotic; alteration of the penicillin-binding proteins, or production of ?-lactamases. However, a very small proportion of the subgingival microbiota is resistant to penicillins. Bacteria become resistant to tetracyclines or macrolides by limiting their access to the cell, by altering the ribosome in order to prevent effective binding of the drug, or by producing tetracycline/macrolide-inactivating enzymes. Periodontal pathogens may become resistant to these drugs. Finally, metronidazole can be considered a prodrug in the sense that it requires metabolic activation by strict anaerobe microorganisms. Acquired resistance to this drug has rarely been reported. Due to these low rates of resistance and to its high activity against the gram-negative anaerobic bacterial species, metronidazole is a promising drug for treating periodontal infections. PMID:22858695

  5. Exposure to phages has little impact on the evolution of bacterial antibiotic resistance on drug concentration gradients.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Quan-Guo

    2014-03-01

    The use of phages for treating bacterial pathogens has recently been advocated as an alternative to antibiotic therapy. Here, we test a hypothesis that bacteria treated with phages may show more limited evolution of antibiotic resistance as the fitness costs of resistance to phages may add to those of antibiotic resistance, further reducing the growth performance of antibiotic-resistant bacteria. We did this by studying the evolution of phage-exposed and phage-free Pseudomonas fluorescens cultures on concentration gradients of single drugs, including cefotaxime, chloramphenicol, and kanamycin. During drug treatment, the level of bacterial antibiotic resistance increased through time and was not affected by the phage treatment. Exposure to phages did not cause slower growth in antibiotic-resistant bacteria, although it did so in antibiotic-susceptible bacteria. We observed significant reversion of antibiotic resistance after drug use being terminated, and the rate of reversion was not affected by the phage treatment. The results suggest that the fitness costs caused by resistance to phages are unlikely to be an important constraint on the evolution of bacterial antibiotic resistance in heterogeneous drug environments. Further studies are needed for the interaction of fitness costs of antibiotic resistance with other factors. PMID:24665341

  6. Exposure to phages has little impact on the evolution of bacterial antibiotic resistance on drug concentration gradients

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Quan-Guo

    2014-01-01

    The use of phages for treating bacterial pathogens has recently been advocated as an alternative to antibiotic therapy. Here, we test a hypothesis that bacteria treated with phages may show more limited evolution of antibiotic resistance as the fitness costs of resistance to phages may add to those of antibiotic resistance, further reducing the growth performance of antibiotic-resistant bacteria. We did this by studying the evolution of phage-exposed and phage-free Pseudomonas fluorescens cultures on concentration gradients of single drugs, including cefotaxime, chloramphenicol, and kanamycin. During drug treatment, the level of bacterial antibiotic resistance increased through time and was not affected by the phage treatment. Exposure to phages did not cause slower growth in antibiotic-resistant bacteria, although it did so in antibiotic-susceptible bacteria. We observed significant reversion of antibiotic resistance after drug use being terminated, and the rate of reversion was not affected by the phage treatment. The results suggest that the fitness costs caused by resistance to phages are unlikely to be an important constraint on the evolution of bacterial antibiotic resistance in heterogeneous drug environments. Further studies are needed for the interaction of fitness costs of antibiotic resistance with other factors. PMID:24665341

  7. Inhibition of bacterial growth by iron oxide nanoparticles with and without attached drug: Have we conquered the antibiotic resistance problem?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Armijo, Leisha M.; Jain, Priyanka; Malagodi, Angelina; Fornelli, F. Zuly; Hayat, Allison; Rivera, Antonio C.; French, Michael; Smyth, Hugh D. C.; Osi?ski, Marek

    2015-03-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is among the top three leading causative opportunistic human pathogens, possessing one of the largest bacterial genomes and an exceptionally large proportion of regulatory genes therein. It has been known for more than a decade that the size and complexity of the P. aeruginosa genome is responsible for the adaptability and resilience of the bacteria to include its ability to resist many disinfectants and antibiotics. We have investigated the susceptibility of P. aeruginosa bacterial biofilms to iron oxide (magnetite) nanoparticles (NPs) with and without attached drug (tobramycin). We also characterized the susceptibility of zero-valent iron NPs, which are known to inactivate microbes. The particles, having an average diameter of 16 nm were capped with natural alginate, thus doubling the hydrodynamic size. Nanoparticle-drug conjugates were produced via cross-linking drug and alginate functional groups. Drug conjugates were investigated in the interest of determining dosage, during these dosage-curve experiments, NPs unbound to drug were tested in cultures as a negative control. Surprisingly, we found that the iron oxide NPs inhibited bacterial growth, and thus, biofilm formation without the addition of antibiotic drug. The inhibitory dosages of iron oxide NPs were investigated and the minimum inhibitory concentrations are presented. These findings suggest that NP-drug conjugates may overcome the antibiotic drug resistance common in P. aeruginosa infections.

  8. Drug resistance of bacterial dental biofilm and the potential use of natural compounds as alternative for prevention and treatment.

    PubMed

    Kouidhi, Bochra; Al Qurashi, Yasir Mohammed A; Chaieb, Kamel

    2015-03-01

    Oral diseases, such as dental caries and periodontal disease are directly linked with the ability of bacteria to form biofilm. The development of dental caries involves acidogenic and aciduric Gram-positive bacteria colonizing the supragingival biofilm (Streptococcus, Lactobacillus and Actinomycetes). Periodontal diseases have been linked to anaerobic Gram-negative bacteria forming a subgingival plaque (Porphyromonas gingivalis, Actinobacillus, Prevotella and Fusobacterium). Cells embedded in biofilm are up to 1000-fold more resistant to antibiotics compared to their planctonic ones. Several mechanisms have been proposed to explain biofilms drug resistance. Given the increased bacterial resistance to antibiotics currently used in dentistry, a great importance is given to natural compounds for the prevention of oral bacterial growth, adhesion and colonization. Over the past decade, interest in drugs derived from medicinal plants has markedly increased. It has been well documented that medicinal plants and natural compounds confer considerable antibacterial activity against various microorganisms including cariogenic and periodontal pathogens. This paper provides a review of the literature focusing on the studies on (i) biofilm in the oral cavity, (ii) drug resistance of bacterial biofilm and (iii) the potential use of plant extracts, essential oils and natural compounds as biofilm preventive agents in dentistry, involving their origin and their mechanism of biofilm inhibition. PMID:25708507

  9. Rationalization and prediction of drug resistant mutations in targets for clinical anti-tubercular drugs

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jyothi Padiadpu; Sumanta Mukherjee; Nagasuma Chandra

    2012-01-01

    Resistance to therapy limits the effectiveness of drug treatment in many diseases. Drug resistance can be considered as a successful outcome of the bacterial struggle to survive in the hostile environment of a drug-exposed cell. An important mechanism by which bacteria acquire drug resistance is through mutations in the drug target. Drug resistant strains (multi-drug resistant and extensively drug resistant)

  10. Bacterial Resistance in Acne

    Microsoft Academic Search

    E. A. Eady

    1998-01-01

    Antibiotics play a major role in acne therapy. Physicians base treatment choices on personal perceptions of efficacy, cost-effectiveness or risk-benefit ratios and rarely take bacterial resistance into account. It is well documented that resistant strains of coagulase-negative staphylococci within the resident skin flora increase in both prevalence and population density as duration of therapy increases. Acne patients represent a considerable

  11. 75 FR 33317 - Antibacterial Resistance and Diagnostic Device and Drug Development Research for Bacterial...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-11

    ...OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration [Docket...Diseases; Public Workshop AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS...SUMMARY: The Food and Drug Administration (FDA...by the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases...

  12. Isolation and characterization of multiple drug resistance bacterial pathogens from waste water in hospital and non-hospital environments, Northwest Ethiopia

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The importance of bacterial isolates from waste water environment as a reservoir of antibiotic resistance and a potential source of novel resistance genes to clinical pathogens is underestimated. This study is aimed at to isolate and characterize public health important bacteria from waste water in hospital and non- hospital environments and evaluate the distribution of multiple drug resistance bacteria in the study area. Methods A cross-sectional study was conducted at Gondar from January-June 2012. The hospital waste water was taken from different sections of the Gondar University Teaching Hospital. Non- hospital environment samples were taken at different sites of the university campuses, Gondar College of Teachers education, and soft drink factory in Gondar. Samples were aseptically collected, transported and processed with in two hours following standard procedure. Identified organisms were assessed for different antibiotics following Kirby-Bauer disk diffusion method. All data was registered and entered in to SPSS version 16 computer program. P-values less than 0.05 were taken as statistically significant. Result A total of 60 waste water samples were processed for the presence of drug resistance pathogens. Among the total samples 113 bacterial isolates were recovered and of these 65 (57.5%) were from hospital environment and 48 (42.5%) were from non-hospital environment. The most frequently identified bacterium was Klebsiella spp. 30 (26.6%) followed by Pseudomonas spp. 19(16.8%), E. coli (11.5%) and Citrobacter spp (11.5%), and Staphylococcus aureus (8.2%). The over all prevalence of multiple drug resistance (MDR) in this study was 79/113 (69.9%). MDR in hospital environment was found to be 53/68 (81.5%) while in non hospital environment was found to be 26/48 (54.2%). Conclusions Multiple drug resistance to the commonly used antibiotics is high in the study area. The contamination of waste water by antibiotics or other pollutants lead to the rise of resistance due to selection pressure. The presence of antibiotic resistance organisms in this waste water should not be overlooked. Since this organisms may be vital to the safety and well-being of patients who are hospitalized and individual susceptible to infection. Therefore, proper waste water treatment plant should be established and improved sanitary measure should be practice. PMID:24708553

  13. Influence of First-Line Antibiotics on the Antibacterial Activities of Acetone Stem Bark Extract of Acacia mearnsii De Wild. against Drug-Resistant Bacterial Isolates

    PubMed Central

    Olajuyigbe, Olufunmiso O.; Coopoosamy, Roger M.

    2014-01-01

    Background. This study was aimed at evaluating the antibacterial activity of the acetone extract of A. mearnsii and its interactions with antibiotics against some resistant bacterial strains. Methods. The antibacterial susceptibility testing was determined by agar diffusion and macrobroth dilution methods while the checkerboard method was used for the determination of synergy between the antibiotics and the extract. Results. The results showed that the susceptibility of the different bacterial isolates was concentration dependent for the extract and the different antibiotics. With the exception of S. marcescens, the inhibition zones of the extract produced by 20?mg/mL ranged between 18 and 32?mm. While metronidazole did not inhibit any of the bacterial isolates, all the antibiotics and their combinations, except for ciprofloxacin and its combination, did not inhibit Enterococcus faecalis. The antibacterial combinations were more of being antagonistic than of being synergistic in the agar diffusion assay. From the macrobroth dilution, the extract and the antibiotics exerted a varied degree of inhibitory effect on the test organisms. The MIC values of the acetone extract which are in mg/mL are lower than those of the different antibiotics which are in ?g/mL. From the checkerboard assay, the antibacterial combinations showed varied degrees of interactions including synergism, additive, indifference, and antagonism interactions. While antagonistic and additive interactions were 14.44%, indifference interaction was 22.22% and synergistic interaction was 37.78% of the antibacterial combinations against the test isolates. While the additivity/indifference interactions indicated no interactions, the antagonistic interaction may be considered as a negative interaction that could result in toxicity and suboptimal bioactivity. Conclusion. The synergistic effects of the herbal-drug combinations may be harnessed for the discovery and development of more rational evidence-based drug combinations with optimized efficiency in the prevention of multidrug resistance and therapy of multifactorial diseases. PMID:25101132

  14. Drug Abuse Resistance

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Mrs. Koyle

    2005-03-22

    STUDENTS NEED TO BE AWARE OF THE DANGERS OF DRUGS! The following includes helpful ways to learn about drug abuse resistance. Please finish the smoking quiz for class discussion on Friday! If parents would like a helpful resource on how to teach their children to say no to drugs and alcohol. See NIDA for Teens : The Science Behind Drug Abuse Click on the following link ...

  15. PCR amplfication on a microarray of gel-immobilized oligonucleotides : detection of bacterial toxin- and drug-resistent genes and their mutations.

    SciTech Connect

    Strizhkov, B. N.; Drobyshev, A. L.; Mikhailovich, V. M.; Mirzabekov, A. D.; Biochip Technology Center; Engelhardt Inst. of Molecular Biology

    2000-10-01

    PCR amplification on a microarray of gel-immobilized primers (microchip) has been developed. One of a pair of PCR primers was immobilized inside a separate microchip polyacrylamide porous gel pad of 0.1 x 0.1 x 0.02 (or 0.04) micron in size and 0.2 (or 0.4) nL in volume. The amplification was carried out simultaneously both in solution covering the microchip array and inside gel pads. Each gel pad contained the immobilized forward primers, while the fluorescently labeled reverse primers, as well as all components of the amplification reaction, diffused into the gel pads from the solution. To increase the amplification efficiency, the forward primers were also added into the solution. The kinetics of amplification was measured in real time in parallel for all gel pads with a fluorescent microscope equipped with a charge-coupled device (CCD) camera. The accuracy of the amplification was assessed by using the melting curves obtained for the duplexes formed by the labeled amplification product and the gel-immobilized primers during the amplification process; alternatively, the duplexes were produced by hybridization of the extended immobilized primers with labeled oligonucleotide probes. The on-chip amplification was applied to detect the anthrax toxin genes and the plasmid-borne beta-lactamase gene responsible for bacterial ampicillin resistance. The allele-specific type of PCR amplification was used to identify the Shiga toxin gene and discriminate it from the Shiga-like one. The genomic mutations responsible for rifampicin resistance of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis strains were detected by the same type of PCR amplification of the rpoB gene fragment isolated from sputum of tuberculosis patients. The on-chip PCR amplification has been shown to be a rapid, inexpensive and powerful tool to test genes responsible for bacterial toxin production and drug resistance, as well as to reveal point nucleotide mutations.

  16. Development of bacterial transglycosylase inhibitors as new antibiotics: moenomycin A treatment for drug-resistant Helicobacter pylori.

    PubMed

    Tseng, Yen-Yu; Liou, Jyh-Ming; Hsu, Tsui-Ling; Cheng, Wei-Chieh; Wu, Ming-Shiang; Wong, Chi-Huey

    2014-06-01

    The problem of multidrug-resistant Helicobacter pylori requires new antibiotics development. We have evaluated a potential antibiotics, moenomycin A, which is classified as a phosphoglycolipid antibiotics that targets transglycosylase and is previously thought to be limited in Gram-positive bacteria. Herein, we report the activity of moenomycin A against multidrug-resistant H. pylori and the isolates from patients with different gastrointestinal diseases. PMID:24775303

  17. Dramatic increase of third-generation cephalosporin-resistant E. coli in German intensive care units: secular trends in antibiotic drug use and bacterial resistance, 2001 to 2008

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Elisabeth Meyer; Frank Schwab; Barbara Schroeren-Boersch; Petra Gastmeier

    2010-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: The objective of the present study was to analyse secular trends in antibiotic consumption and resistance data from a network of 53 intensive care units (ICUs). METHODS: The study involved prospective unit and laboratory-based surveillance in 53 German ICUs from 2001 through 2008. Data were calculated on the basis of proportions of nonduplicate resistant isolates, resistance densities (that is,

  18. Dramatic increase of third-generation cephalosporin-resistant E. coli in German intensive care units: secular trends in antibiotic drug use and bacterial resistance, 2001 to 2008

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Introduction The objective of the present study was to analyse secular trends in antibiotic consumption and resistance data from a network of 53 intensive care units (ICUs). Methods The study involved prospective unit and laboratory-based surveillance in 53 German ICUs from 2001 through 2008. Data were calculated on the basis of proportions of nonduplicate resistant isolates, resistance densities (that is, the number of resistant isolates of a species per 1,000 patient-days) and an antimicrobial usage density (AD) expressed as daily defined doses (DDD) and normalised per 1,000 patient-days. Results Total mean antibiotic use remained stable over time and amounted to 1,172 DDD/1,000 patient-days (range 531 to 2,471). Carbapenem use almost doubled to an AD of 151 in 2008. Significant increases were also calculated for quinolone (AD of 163 in 2008) and third-generation and fourth-generation cephalosporin use (AD of 117 in 2008). Aminoglycoside consumption decreased substantially (AD of 86 in 2001 and 24 in 2008). Resistance proportions were as follows in 2001 and 2008, respectively: methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) 26% and 20% (P = 0.006; trend test showed a significant decrease), vancomycin-resistant enterococcus (VRE) faecium 2.3% and 8.2% (P = 0.008), third-generation cephalosporin (3GC)-resistant Escherichia. coli 1.2% and 19.7% (P < 0.001), 3GC-resistant Klebsiella pneumoniae 3.8% and 25.5% (P < 0.001), imipenem-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii 1.1% and 4.5% (P = 0.002), and imipenem-resistant K. pneumoniae 0.4% and 1.1%. The resistance densities did not change for MRSA but increased significantly for VRE faecium and 3GC-resistant E. coli and K. pneumoniae. In 2008, the resistance density for MRSA was 3.73, 0.48 for VRE, 1.39 for 3GC-resistant E. coli and 0.82 for K. pneumoniae. Conclusions Although total antibiotic use did not change over time in German ICUs, carbapenem use doubled. This is probably due to the rise in 3GC-resistant E. coli and K. pneumoniae. Increased carbapenem consumption was associated with carbapenem-resistant K. pneumoniae carbapenemase-producing bacteria and imipenem-resistant A. baumannii. PMID:20546564

  19. Modulation of Bacterial Multidrug Resistance Efflux Pumps of the Major Facilitator Superfamily

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Sanath; Mukherjee, Mun Mun; Varela, Manuel F.

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial infections pose a serious public health concern, especially when an infectious disease has a multidrug resistant causative agent. Such multidrug resistant bacteria can compromise the clinical utility of major chemotherapeutic antimicrobial agents. Drug and multidrug resistant bacteria harbor several distinct molecular mechanisms for resistance. Bacterial antimicrobial agent efflux pumps represent a major mechanism of clinical resistance. The major facilitator superfamily (MFS) is one of the largest groups of solute transporters to date and includes a significant number of bacterial drug and multidrug efflux pumps. We review recent work on the modulation of multidrug efflux pumps, paying special attention to those transporters belonging primarily to the MFS. PMID:25750934

  20. Tumor Physiology and Drug Resistance

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ian F. Tannock

    2001-01-01

    Clinical resistance is usually assumed to be due to the initial presence or selection of drug-resistant cells in tumors. While important, it is suggested in this review that genetically-determined causes of cellular resistance represent but one cause (and possibly not the major cause) of effective clinical resistance of solid tumors. Factors that depend on tumor physiology, and on the microenvironment

  1. Antibacterial Cleaning Products and Drug Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Marshall, Bonnie; Levy, Stuart B.; Della-Latta, Phyllis; Lin, Susan X.; Larson, Elaine

    2005-01-01

    We examined whether household use of antibacterial cleaning and hygiene products is an emerging risk factor for carriage of antimicrobial drug–resistant bacteria on hands of household members. Households (N = 224) were randomized to use of antibacterial or nonantibacterial cleaning and hygiene products for 1 year. Logistic regression was used to assess the influence of antibacterial product use in homes. Antibacterial product use did not lead to a significant increase in antimicrobial drug resistance after 1 year (odds ratio 1.33, 95% confidence interval 0.74–2.41), nor did it have an effect on bacterial susceptibility to triclosan. However, more extensive and longer term use of triclosan might provide a suitable environment for emergence of resistant species. Further research on this issue is needed. PMID:16318697

  2. Bacterial resistance: new threats, new challenges

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jean-Claude Pechčre

    1993-01-01

    Bacterial resistance remains a major concern. Recently, genetic transfers from saprophytic, non-pathogenic, species to pathogenic S. pneumoniae and N. meningitidis have introduced multiple changes in the penicillin target molecules, leading to rapidly growing penicillin resistance. In enterobacteriaceae, a succession of minute mutations has generated new ß-lactamases with increasingly expanded spectrum, now covering practically all available ß-lactam antibiotics. Resistance emerges in

  3. New drugs in resistant tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Rao, Nisar Ahmed

    2007-05-01

    The World Health Organization estimates that up to 50 million persons worldwide may be infected with drug resistant strains of TB. The fatality rate of MDR-TB is 20-80%. Drug resistant tuberculosis cases are on the rise in Pakistan. The reasons for this menace are multiple including improper prescription, compliance and over the counter sale of anti-TB drugs. The treatment cost of drug-resistant TB is high, both to the individual patient and society. This article is written to create awareness about the available second line drugs and those in the pipeline. Considering the fact that resistant tuberculosis is difficult to manage, it is suggested that these drugs should only be used after consultation with a physician experienced in the treatment of drug resistant TB. The most frequent mistake made by treating physicians is addition of one drug in the failing regimen. At present, 27 potential anti-TB drugs are at various stages of development. The aim is that by 2010 at least one of these molecules completes the journey and should come in the market. PMID:17571483

  4. Membrane active vancomycin analogues: a strategy to combat bacterial resistance.

    PubMed

    Yarlagadda, Venkateswarlu; Akkapeddi, Padma; Manjunath, Goutham B; Haldar, Jayanta

    2014-06-12

    The alarming growth of antibiotic resistant superbugs such as vancomycin-resistant Enterococci and Staphylococci has become a major global health hazard. To address this issue, we report the development of lipophilic cationic vancomycin analogues possessing excellent antibacterial activity against several drug-resistant strains. Compared to vancomycin, efficacy greater than 1000-fold was demonstrated against vancomycin-resistant Enterococci (VRE). Significantly, unlike vancomycin, these compounds were shown to be bactericidal at low concentrations and did not induce bacterial resistance. An optimized compound in the series, compared to vancomycin, showed higher activity in methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) infected mouse model and exhibited superior antibacterial activity in whole blood with no observed toxicity. The remarkable activity of these compounds is attributed to the incorporation of a new membrane disruption mechanism into vancomycin and opens up a great opportunity for the development of novel antibiotics. PMID:24846441

  5. Bacterial resistance to antibiotics: modified target sites.

    PubMed

    Lambert, Peter A

    2005-07-29

    Alteration in the target sites of antibiotics is a common mechanism of resistance. Examples of clinical strains showing resistance can be found for every class of antibiotic, regardless of the mechanism of action. Target site changes often result from spontaneous mutation of a bacterial gene on the chromosome and selection in the presence of the antibiotic. Examples include mutations in RNA polymerase and DNA gyrase, resulting in resistance to the rifamycins and quinolones, respectively. In other cases, acquisition of resistance may involve transfer of resistance genes from other organisms by some form of genetic exchange (conjugation, transduction, or transformation). Examples of these mechanisms include acquisition of the mecA genes encoding methicillin resistance in Staphylococcus aureus and the various van genes in enterococci encoding resistance to glycopeptides. PMID:15964098

  6. Resistance to Bacterial Pathogens in Plants

    E-print Network

    Innes, Roger

    Resistance to Bacterial Pathogens in Plants Jules Ade, Indiana University, Bloomington, Indiana, pathogens must overcome three layers of defense: (1) preformed physical barriers; (2) a cell-surface-based surveillance system that detects conserved pathogen molecules and (3) an intracellular surveillance system

  7. Antibiotic resistance in ocular bacterial pathogens.

    PubMed

    Sharma, S

    2011-01-01

    Bacterial infections of the eye are common and ophthalmologists are spoilt for choice with a variety of antibiotics available in the market. Antibiotics can be administered in the eye by a number of routes; topical, subconjunctival, subtenon and intraocular. Apart from a gamut of eye drops available, ophthalmologists also have the option of preparing fortified eye drops from parenteral formulations, thereby, achieving high concentrations; often much above the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC), of antibiotics in ocular tissues during therapy. Antibiotic resistance among ocular pathogens is increasing in parallel with the increase seen over the years in bacteria associated with systemic infections. Although it is believed that the rise in resistant ocular bacterial isolates is linked to the rise in resistant systemic pathogens, recent evidence has correlated the emergence of resistant bacteria in the eye to prior topical antibiotic therapy. One would like to believe that either of these contributes to the emergence of resistance to antibiotics among ocular pathogens. Until recently, ocular pathogens resistant to fluoroquinolones have been minimal but the pattern is currently alarming. The new 8-fluoroquinolone on the scene-besifloxacin, is developed exclusively for ophthalmic use and it is hoped that it will escape the selective pressure for resistance because of lack of systemic use. In addition to development of new antibacterial agents, the strategies to halt or control further development of resistant ocular pathogens should always include judicious use of antibiotics in the treatment of human, animal or plant diseases. PMID:21860100

  8. Microcin C: biosynthesis and mechanisms of bacterial resistance

    PubMed Central

    Severinov, Konstantin; Nair, Satish K

    2012-01-01

    Nonhydrolyzable aminoacyl-adenylates that inhibit protein synthesis provide a promising route towards the development of novel antibiotics whose mechanism of action limits the appearance of bacterial drug resistance. The ‘Trojan horse’ antibiotic microcin C (McC) consists of a nonhydrolyzable aspartyl–adenylate that is efficiently imported into bacterial cells owing to a covalently attached peptide carrier. Once inside the cell, the carrier is removed by proteolytic processing to release a potent aspartyl tRNA synthetase inhibitor. The focus of this article is on the mechanism of biosynthesis of McC. We also examine the strategies utilized by McC-producing strains to overcome toxicity due to unwanted, premature processing of the drug. This article will discuss how McC biosynthesis can be systematically manipulated for the development of derivatives that will target the entire battery of aminoacyl tRNA synthetases in various bacteria. PMID:22324995

  9. Antibacterial Mechanisms of Polymyxin and Bacterial Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Qin, Wangrong; Fang, Shisong; Qiu, Juanping

    2015-01-01

    Multidrug resistance in pathogens is an increasingly significant threat for human health. Indeed, some strains are resistant to almost all currently available antibiotics, leaving very limited choices for antimicrobial clinical therapy. In many such cases, polymyxins are the last option available, although their use increases the risk of developing resistant strains. This review mainly aims to discuss advances in unraveling the mechanisms of antibacterial activity of polymyxins and bacterial tolerance together with the description of polymyxin structure, synthesis, and structural modification. These are expected to help researchers not only develop a series of new polymyxin derivatives necessary for future medical care, but also optimize the clinical use of polymyxins with minimal resistance development. PMID:25664322

  10. Colourful parrot feathers resist bacterial degradation

    PubMed Central

    Burtt, Edward H.; Schroeder, Max R.; Smith, Lauren A.; Sroka, Jenna E.; McGraw, Kevin J.

    2011-01-01

    The brilliant red, orange and yellow colours of parrot feathers are the product of psittacofulvins, which are synthetic pigments known only from parrots. Recent evidence suggests that some pigments in bird feathers function not just as colour generators, but also preserve plumage integrity by increasing the resistance of feather keratin to bacterial degradation. We exposed a variety of colourful parrot feathers to feather-degrading Bacillus licheniformis and found that feathers with red psittacofulvins degraded at about the same rate as those with melanin and more slowly than white feathers, which lack pigments. Blue feathers, in which colour is based on the microstructural arrangement of keratin, air and melanin granules, and green feathers, which combine structural blue with yellow psittacofulvins, degraded at a rate similar to that of red and black feathers. These differences in resistance to bacterial degradation of differently coloured feathers suggest that colour patterns within the Psittaciformes may have evolved to resist bacterial degradation, in addition to their role in communication and camouflage. PMID:20926430

  11. Lipid and polymer nanoparticles for drug delivery to bacterial biofilms.

    PubMed

    Forier, Katrien; Raemdonck, Koen; De Smedt, Stefaan C; Demeester, Jo; Coenye, Tom; Braeckmans, Kevin

    2014-09-28

    Biofilms are matrix-enclosed communities of bacteria that show increased antibiotic resistance and the capability to evade the immune system. They can cause recalcitrant infections which cannot be cured with classical antibiotic therapy. Drug delivery by lipid or polymer nanoparticles is considered a promising strategy for overcoming biofilm resistance. These particles are able to improve the delivery of antibiotics to the bacterial cells, thereby increasing the efficacy of the treatment. In this review we give an overview of the types of polymer and lipid nanoparticles that have been developed for this purpose. The antimicrobial activity of nanoparticle encapsulated antibiotics compared to the activity of the free antibiotic is discussed in detail. In addition, targeting and triggered drug release strategies to further improve the antimicrobial activity are reviewed. Finally, ample attention is given to advanced microscopy methods that shed light on the behavior of nanoparticles inside biofilms, allowing further optimization of the nanoformulations. Lipid and polymer nanoparticles were found to increase the antimicrobial efficacy in many cases. Strategies such as the use of fusogenic liposomes, targeting of the nanoparticles and triggered release of the antimicrobial agent ensured the delivery of the antimicrobial agent in close proximity of the bacterial cells, maximizing the exposure of the biofilm to the antimicrobial agent. The majority of the discussed papers still present data on the in vitro anti-biofilm activity of nanoformulations, indicating that there is an urgent need for more in vivo studies in this field. PMID:24794896

  12. [A problem of the HIV drug resistance].

    PubMed

    Nosik, M N

    2014-01-01

    The wide use of the highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) of HIV infection leads to the HIV drug resistance. The simultaneous formation of the resistance to different groups of antiviral drugs compromises the efficacy of HAART. Thus, the problem of the drug resistance becomes of an enormous significance. In this review, a definition of the resistance is given; the problem of the drug-resistant strains transmission is discussed; the assays used for resistance testing are described; recommendations for the antiviral drug-resistance testing are given. PMID:25549461

  13. BACTERIAL EPIDEMIOLOGY AND ANTIMICROBIAL RESISTANCE RESEARCH UNIT PROJECTS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Knowledge about the prevalence and spread of antimicrobial resistant pathogens in animals is incomplete and techniques to study this problem are lacking. To address this, the Bacterial Epidemiology and Antimicrobial Resistance Research Unit (BEARRU) studies antimicrobial resistance in zoonotic food ...

  14. Genetic dissection of bacterial speck disease resistance in tomato

    Microsoft Academic Search

    John Salmeron; Caius Rommens; Susan Barker; Francine Carland; Giles Oldroyd; Anand Mehta; Douglas Dahlbeck; Brian Staskawicz

    1994-01-01

    The bacterial speck disease of tomato has been developed as a model system to elucidate the molecular basis of specificity in plant-bacterial interactions and to study signal transduction events involved in the expression of plant disease resistance. We have employed a mutagenic approach to define the steps involved in the expression of disease resistance to the bacterial pathogen, Pseudomonas syringae

  15. Fungal Biofilms and Drug Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Falkler, William A.; Meiller, Timothy F.

    2004-01-01

    Candida species, including the novel opportunistic pathogen Candida dubliniensis, are now emerging as major agents of nosocomial infections. Many such manifestations of infections associated with the formation of Candida biofilms include those occurring on devices such as indwelling intravascular catheters. Fungal biofilm-associated infections are frequently refractory to conventional therapy because of resistance to antimicrobial agents. This resistance could be in part due to the surface-induced upregulation of drug efflux pumps. Biofilm-associated Candida show uniform resistance to a wide spectrum of the currently available conventional antifungal agents, which implies that antimicrobial drugs that specifically target biofilm-associated infections are needed. The novel classes of antifungal agents, the lipid formulation of amphotericins, and the echinocandins have demonstrated unique antifungal activity against the resistant Candida biofilms, providing a breakthrough in the treatment of life-threatening invasive systemic mycoses. The use of drugs effective in combating biofilm-associated infections could lead to major developments in the treatment of fungal implant infections. PMID:15078591

  16. [Maternal and neonatal drug resistance].

    PubMed

    Bobkova, M R

    2011-01-01

    The debatable article gives new evidence for the possibility, conditions, and resistance rate of the resistance to nevirapine, which results from its single use during labor for the prevention of vertical HIV transmission. The author analyzes the results of the 2009-2010 studies dealing with the use of high-sensitive methods for mutation detection, the impact of minor mutations on therapeutic effectiveness, and the evaluation of the effect of therapeutic support. She expressed the idea that it is expedient to test HIV for nevirapine resistance mutations in different periods after single administration of the drug as a prophylactic agent, the possible effects and algorithm of treatment if the above mutations are detected. PMID:22171480

  17. The assembly motif of a bacterial small multidrug resistance protein.

    PubMed

    Poulsen, Bradley E; Rath, Arianna; Deber, Charles M

    2009-04-10

    Multidrug transporters such as the small multidrug resistance (SMR) family of bacterial integral membrane proteins are capable of conferring clinically significant resistance to a variety of common therapeutics. As antiporter proteins of approximately 100 amino acids, SMRs must self-assemble into homo-oligomeric structures for efflux of drug molecules. Oligomerization centered at transmembrane helix four (TM4) has been implicated in SMR assembly, but the full complement of residues required to mediate its self-interaction remains to be characterized. Here, we use Hsmr, the 110-residue SMR family member of the archaebacterium Halobacterium salinarum, to determine the TM4 residue motif required to mediate drug resistance and SMR self-association. Twelve single point mutants that scan the central portion of the TM4 helix (residues 85-104) were constructed and were tested for their ability to confer resistance to the cytotoxic compound ethidium bromide. Six residues were found to be individually essential for drug resistance activity (Gly(90), Leu(91), Leu(93), Ile(94), Gly(97), and Val(98)), defining a minimum activity motif of (90)GLXLIXXGV(98) within TM4. When the propensity of these mutants to dimerize on SDS-PAGE was examined, replacements of all but Ile resulted in approximately 2-fold reduction of dimerization versus the wild-type antiporter. Our work defines a minimum activity motif of (90)GLXLIXXGV(98) within TM4 and suggests that this sequence mediates TM4-based SMR dimerization along a single helix surface, stabilized by a small residue heptad repeat sequence. These TM4-TM4 interactions likely constitute the highest affinity locus for disruption of SMR function by directly targeting its self-assembly mechanism. PMID:19224913

  18. Persisters and beyond: mechanisms of phenotypic drug resistance and drug tolerance in bacteria.

    PubMed

    Kester, Jemila C; Fortune, Sarah M

    2014-01-01

    One of the challenges in clinical infectious diseases is the problem of chronic infections, which can require long durations of antibiotic treatment and often recur. An emerging explanation for the refractoriness of some infections to treatment is the existence of subpopulations of drug tolerant cells. While typically discussed as "persister" cells, it is becoming increasingly clear that there is significant heterogeneity in drug responses within a bacterial population and that multiple mechanisms underlie the emergence of drug tolerant and drug-resistant subpopulations. Many of these parallel mechanisms have been shown to affect drug susceptibility at the level of a whole population. Here we review mechanisms of phenotypic drug tolerance and resistance in bacteria with the goal of providing a framework for understanding the similarities and differences in these cells. PMID:24328927

  19. Bacterial resistance to disinfectants: present knowledge and future problems

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. D. Russell

    1999-01-01

    Bacterial resistance to antibiotics is a long-established, widely-studied problem. Increasingly, attention is being directed to the responses of various types of microbes to biocides (antiseptics, disinfectants and preservatives). Different groups of bacteria vary in their susceptibility to biocides, with bacterial spores being the most resistant, followed by mycobacteria, then Gramnegative organisms, with cocci generally being the most sensitive. There are

  20. Developing live bacterial vaccines by selecting resistance to antibacterials

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Four chemicals were used in this study to modify bacterial isolates through chemical-resistance strategy. All bacteria were able to develop high resistance to gossypol. However, none of the gossypol-resistant isolate was attenuated. Although majority of the proflavine hemisulfate-resistant isolates ...

  1. Surgery for drug-resistant focal epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Rao, Malla Bhaskara; Arivazhagan, Arimappamagan; Sinha, Sanjib; Bharath, Rose Dawn; Mahadevan, Anita; Bhat, Maya; Satishchandra, Parthasarthy

    2014-03-01

    During the colloquium on drug-resistant epilepsy (DRE) at National Institute of Mental Health and Neurosciences (NIMHANS), Bangalore on August 16-18, 2013, a number of presentations were made on the surgically remediable lesional epilepsy syndromes, presurgical evaluation, surgical techniques, neuropathology of drug resistance focal epilepsy and surgical outcome. This pictorial essay with the illustrative case examples provides an overview of the various surgical techniques for the management of drug-resistant focal epilepsy. PMID:24791080

  2. Surgery for drug-resistant focal epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Rao, Malla Bhaskara; Arivazhagan, Arimappamagan; Sinha, Sanjib; Bharath, Rose Dawn; Mahadevan, Anita; Bhat, Maya; Satishchandra, Parthasarthy

    2014-01-01

    During the colloquium on drug-resistant epilepsy (DRE) at National Institute of Mental Health and Neurosciences (NIMHANS), Bangalore on August 16-18, 2013, a number of presentations were made on the surgically remediable lesional epilepsy syndromes, presurgical evaluation, surgical techniques, neuropathology of drug resistance focal epilepsy and surgical outcome. This pictorial essay with the illustrative case examples provides an overview of the various surgical techniques for the management of drug-resistant focal epilepsy. PMID:24791080

  3. Architecture and Conservation of the Bacterial DNA Replication Machinery, an Underexploited Drug Target

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, Andrew; Causer, Rebecca J; Dixon, Nicholas E

    2012-01-01

    New antibiotics with novel modes of action are required to combat the growing threat posed by multi-drug resistant bacteria. Over the last decade, genome sequencing and other high-throughput techniques have provided tremendous insight into the molecular processes underlying cellular functions in a wide range of bacterial species. We can now use these data to assess the degree of conservation of certain aspects of bacterial physiology, to help choose the best cellular targets for development of new broad-spectrum antibacterials. DNA replication is a conserved and essential process, and the large number of proteins that interact to replicate DNA in bacteria are distinct from those in eukaryotes and archaea; yet none of the antibiotics in current clinical use acts directly on the replication machinery. Bacterial DNA synthesis thus appears to be an underexploited drug target. However, before this system can be targeted for drug design, it is important to understand which parts are conserved and which are not, as this will have implications for the spectrum of activity of any new inhibitors against bacterial species, as well as the potential for development of drug resistance. In this review we assess similarities and differences in replication components and mechanisms across the bacteria, highlight current progress towards the discovery of novel replication inhibitors, and suggest those aspects of the replication machinery that have the greatest potential as drug targets. PMID:22206257

  4. Architecture and conservation of the bacterial DNA replication machinery, an underexploited drug target.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Andrew; Causer, Rebecca J; Dixon, Nicholas E

    2012-03-01

    New antibiotics with novel modes of action are required to combat the growing threat posed by multi-drug resistant bacteria. Over the last decade, genome sequencing and other high-throughput techniques have provided tremendous insight into the molecular processes underlying cellular functions in a wide range of bacterial species. We can now use these data to assess the degree of conservation of certain aspects of bacterial physiology, to help choose the best cellular targets for development of new broad-spectrum antibacterials. DNA replication is a conserved and essential process, and the large number of proteins that interact to replicate DNA in bacteria are distinct from those in eukaryotes and archaea; yet none of the antibiotics in current clinical use acts directly on the replication machinery. Bacterial DNA synthesis thus appears to be an underexploited drug target. However, before this system can be targeted for drug design, it is important to understand which parts are conserved and which are not, as this will have implications for the spectrum of activity of any new inhibitors against bacterial species, as well as the potential for development of drug resistance. In this review we assess similarities and differences in replication components and mechanisms across the bacteria, highlight current progress towards the discovery of novel replication inhibitors, and suggest those aspects of the replication machinery that have the greatest potential as drug targets. PMID:22206257

  5. Bacterial and archaeal resistance to ionizing radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Confalonieri, F.; Sommer, S.

    2011-01-01

    Organisms living in extreme environments must cope with large fluctuations of temperature, high levels of radiation and/or desiccation, conditions that can induce DNA damage ranging from base modifications to DNA double-strand breaks. The bacterium Deinococcus radiodurans is known for its resistance to extremely high doses of ionizing radiation and for its ability to reconstruct a functional genome from hundreds of radiation-induced chromosomal fragments. Recently, extreme ionizing radiation resistance was also generated by directed evolution of an apparently radiation-sensitive bacterial species, Escherichia coli. Radioresistant organisms are not only found among the Eubacteria but also among the Archaea that represent the third kingdom of life. They present a set of particular features that differentiate them from the Eubacteria and eukaryotes. Moreover, Archaea are often isolated from extreme environments where they live under severe conditions of temperature, pressure, pH, salts or toxic compounds that are lethal for the large majority of living organisms. Thus, Archaea offer the opportunity to understand how cells are able to cope with such harsh conditions. Among them, the halophilic archaeon Halobacterium sp and several Pyrococcus or Thermococcus species, such as Thermococcus gammatolerans, were also shown to display high level of radiation resistance. The dispersion, in the phylogenetic tree, of radioresistant prokaryotes suggests that they have independently acquired radioresistance. Different strategies were selected during evolution including several mechanisms of radiation byproduct detoxification and subtle cellular metabolism modifications to help cells recover from radiation-induced injuries, protection of proteins against oxidation, an efficient DNA repair tool box, an original pathway of DNA double-strand break repair, a condensed nucleoid that may prevent the dispersion of the DNA fragments and specific radiation-induced proteins involved in radioresistance. Here, we compare mechanisms and discuss hypotheses suggested to contribute to radioresistance in several Archaea and Eubacteria.

  6. Medical Management of Drug-Resistant Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Drug-resistant tuberculosis (TB) is still a major threat worldwide. However, recent scientific advances in diagnostic and therapeutic tools have improved the management of drug-resistant TB. The development of rapid molecular testing methods allows for the early detection of drug resistance and prompt initiation of an appropriate treatment. In addition, there has been growing supportive evidence for shorter treatment regimens in multidrug-resistant TB; and for the first time in over 50 years, new anti-TB drugs have been developed. The World Health Organization has recently revised their guidelines, primarily based on evidence from a meta-analysis of individual patient data (n=9,153) derived from 32 observational studies, and outlined the recommended combination and correct use of available anti-TB drugs. This review summarizes the updated guidelines with a focus on the medical management of drug-resistant TB.

  7. Management of multidrug resistant bacterial endemic.

    PubMed

    Zahar, J-R; Lesprit, P

    2014-09-01

    The fight against multi-drug resistant Gram-negative bacilli (MDRGNB), especially extended-spectrum ?-lactamase producing Enterobacteriaceae, is about to be lost in our country. The emergence of new resistance mechanisms to carbapenems in these Enterobacteriaceae exposes patients to a risk of treatment failure without any other therapeutic options. This dramatic situation is paradoxical because we are well aware of the 2 major factors responsible for this situation: 1) MDRO cross-transmission, associated with a low compliance to standard precautions, especially hand hygiene, and 2) overexposure of patients to antibiotics. The implementation of a "search and isolate" policy, which was justified to control the spread of some MDRO that remained rare in the country, was not associated with a better adherence to standard precautions. The antibiotic policy and the measures implemented to control antibiotic consumptions have rarely been enforced and have shown inconsistent results. Notably, no significant decrease of antibiotic consumption has been observed. There is no excuse for these poor results, because some authors evaluating the effectiveness of programs for the control of MDRO have reported their positive effects on antimicrobial resistance without any detrimental effects. It is now urgent to deal with the 2 major factors by establishing an educational and persuasive program with quantified and opposable objectives. Firstly, we have to improve the observance of hand hygiene above 70%. Secondly, we have to define and reach a target for the reduction of antibiotic consumption both in community and in hospital settings. PMID:25169940

  8. Preventing drug resistance in severe influenza

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dobrovolny, Hana; Deecke, Lucas

    2015-03-01

    Severe, long-lasting influenza infections are often caused by new strains of influenza. The long duration of these infections leads to an increased opportunity for the emergence of drug resistant mutants. This is particularly problematic for new strains of influenza since there is often no vaccine, so drug treatment is the first line of defense. One strategy for trying to minimize drug resistance is to apply periodic treatment. During treatment the wild-type virus decreases, but resistant virus might increase; when there is no treatment, wild-type virus will hopefully out-compete the resistant virus, driving down the number of resistant virus. We combine a mathematical model of severe influenza with a model of drug resistance to study emergence of drug resistance during a long-lasting infection. We apply periodic treatment with two types of antivirals: neuraminidase inhibitors, which block release of virions; and adamantanes, which block replication of virions. We compare the efficacy of the two drugs in reducing emergence of drug resistant mutants and examine the effect of treatment frequency on the emergence of drug resistant mutants.

  9. The Association between Mycobacterium Tuberculosis Genotype and Drug Resistance in Peru

    PubMed Central

    Grandjean, Louis; Iwamoto, Tomotada; Lithgow, Anna; Gilman, Robert H; Arikawa, Kentaro; Nakanishi, Noriko; Martin, Laura; Castillo, Edith; Alarcon, Valentina; Coronel, Jorge; Solano, Walter; Aminian, Minoo; Guezala, Claudia; Rastogi, Nalin; Couvin, David; Sheen, Patricia; Zimic, Mirko; Moore, David AJ

    2015-01-01

    Background The comparison of Mycobacterium tuberculosis bacterial genotypes with phenotypic, demographic, geospatial and clinical data improves our understanding of how strain lineage influences the development of drug-resistance and the spread of tuberculosis. Methods To investigate the association of Mycobacterium tuberculosis bacterial genotype with drug-resistance. Drug susceptibility testing together with genotyping using both 15-loci MIRU-typing and spoligotyping, was performed on 2,139 culture positive isolates, each from a different patient in Lima, Peru. Demographic, geospatial and socio-economic data were collected using questionnaires, global positioning equipment and the latest national census. Results The Latin American Mediterranean (LAM) clade (OR 2.4, p<0.001) was significantly associated with drug-resistance and alone accounted for more than half of all drug resistance in the region. Previously treated patients, prisoners and genetically clustered cases were also significantly associated with drug-resistance (OR's 2.5, 2.4 and 1.8, p<0.001, p<0.05, p<0.001 respectively). Conclusions Tuberculosis disease caused by the LAM clade was more likely to be drug resistant independent of important clinical, genetic and socio-economic confounding factors. Explanations for this include; the preferential co-evolution of LAM strains in a Latin American population, a LAM strain bacterial genetic background that favors drug-resistance or the "founder effect" from pre-existing LAM strains disproportionately exposed to drugs. PMID:25984723

  10. Types and drug susceptibility patterns of bacterial isolates from eye discharge samples at Gondar University Hospital, Northwest Ethiopia

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The type and pattern of organisms that cause ocular infection changes over time. Moreover, the causative organisms have developed increased drug resistance. Therefore, the aim of this study was to determine the prevalent bacterial agents of eye discharge and their drug susceptibility patterns to commonly used antimicrobial agents. Methods A retrospective study was conducted at Gondar University Hospital, Northwest Ethiopia from September, 2009 to August, 2012. Culture and drug susceptibility test results of patients who had eye infections were taken for analysis. Eye discharge samples were cultured on MacConkey agar, blood agar and chocolate agar plates. A standard biochemical procedure was used for full identification of bacterial isolates. Antimicrobial susceptibility tests were done on Mueller-Hinton agar by using disk diffusion method. Data was entered and analyzed by using SPSS version 16 software. Result A total of 102 eye discharges were submitted for microbiological evaluation, of which (60.8%) had bacterial growth. The most frequently isolated bacterial isolates were gram-positive bacteria (74.2%). The predominant bacterial species isolated was Coagulase-negative staphylococci (27.4%) followed by S. aureus (21%). Within the age group of 1 day-2 years old, (66.1%) of bacteria were isolated. Most of the bacterial isolates were resistance to ampicilin (71%), amoxicilin (62.9%), erythromycin (43.5%), gentamicin (45.2%), penicillin (71%), trimethoprim-sulphamethoxazole (58.1%), and tetracycline (64.6%) while Ceftriaxon and Ciprofloxacin showed (75.8%) and (80%) susceptibility respectively. From the total bacterial isolates, (87.1%) were showed multi drug resistance (MDR) to two or more drugs. Conclusion The prevalence of bacterial isolates in eye discharge was high in the study area and majority of isolates were gram-positive bacteria. Most of the bacterial isolates were resistant to frequently used antimicrobials. Therefore, drug susceptibility test is necessary before prescribing any antimicrobials. PMID:24885599

  11. Drug repurposing as an alternative for the treatment of recalcitrant bacterial infections

    PubMed Central

    Rangel-Vega, Adrián; Bernstein, Lawrence R.; Mandujano-Tinoco, Edna Ayerim; García-Contreras, Silvia Julieta; García-Contreras, Rodolfo

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial infection remains one of the leading causes of death worldwide, and the options for treating such infections are decreasing, due the rise of antibiotic-resistant bacteria. The pharmaceutical industry has produced few new types of antibiotics in more than a decade. Researchers are taking several approaches toward developing new classes of antibiotics, including (1) focusing on new targets and processes, such as bacterial cell–cell communication that upregulates virulence; (2) designing inhibitors of bacterial resistance, such as blockers of multidrug e?ux pumps; and (3) using alternative antimicrobials such as bacteriophages. In addition, the strategy of finding new uses for existing drugs is beginning to produce results: antibacterial properties have been discovered for existing anticancer, antifungal, anthelmintic, and anti-inflammatory drugs. In this review, we discuss the antimicrobial properties of gallium compounds, 5-fluorouracil, ciclopirox, diflunisal, and some other FDA-approved drugs and argue that their repurposing for the treatment of bacterial infections, including those that are multidrug resistant, is a feasible strategy. PMID:25914685

  12. Population Mobility, Globalization, and Antimicrobial Drug Resistance

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Douglas W. MacPherson; Brian D. Gushulak; William B. Baine; Shukal Bala; Paul O. Gubbins; Paul Holtom; Marisel Segarra-Newnham

    2009-01-01

    Population mobility is a main factor in globalization of public health threats and risks, specifically distribution of antimicrobial drug-resistant organisms. Drug resistance is a major risk in healthcare settings and is emerging as a problem in community-acquired infections. Traditional health policy approaches have focused on diseases of global public health significance such as tuberculosis, yellow fever, and cholera; however, new

  13. Drug-resistant malaria - an insight

    PubMed Central

    Hyde, John E.

    2009-01-01

    Despite intensive research extending back to the 1930s, when the first synthetic antimalarial drugs made their appearance, the repertoire of clinically licensed formulations remains very limited. Moreover, widespread and increasing resistance to these drugs contributes enormously to the difficulties in controlling malaria, posing considerable intellectual, technical and humanitarian challenges. A detailed understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying resistance to these agents is emerging that should permit new drugs to be rationally developed and older ones to be engineered to regain their efficacy. This review summarizes recent progress in analysing the causes of resistance to the major antimalarial drugs and its spread. PMID:17824955

  14. Antimicrobial resistance in selected bacterial enteropathogens in north India

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Neelam Taneja; Balvinder Mohan; Sumeeta Khurana; Meera Sharma

    Background & objectives: The resistance of enteropathogenic bacteria to commonly prescribed antibiotics is increasing both in developing as well as in developed countries. Resistance has emerged even to newer, more potent antimicrobial agents. The present study was therefore undertaken to report the current antibiotic resistance in common bacterial enteropathogens isolated in a tertiary care hospital in north India. Methods: Faecal

  15. MRSA, Clostridium difficile and Other Drug Resistant Bacteria Information for Patients and Families What is Drug Resistant Bacteria?

    E-print Network

    Oliver, Douglas L.

    MRSA, Clostridium difficile and Other Drug Resistant Bacteria Information for Patients and Families What is Drug Resistant Bacteria? Drug Resistant Bacteria also referred to as Multi Drug Resistant Bacteria? Drug Resistant Bacteria are germs that can not be treated by some antibiotics often used to treat

  16. Molecular basis of bacterial resistance to chloramphenicol and florfenicol

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Stefan Schwarz; Corinna Kehrenberg; Axel Cloeckaert

    2004-01-01

    Chloramphenicol (Cm) and its fluorinated derivative florfenicol (Ff) represent highly potent inhibitors of bacterial protein biosynthesis. As a consequence of the use of Cm in human and veterinary medicine, bacterial pathogens of various species and genera have developed and\\/or acquired Cm resistance. Ff is solely used in veterinary medicine and has been introduced into clinical use in the mid-1990s. Of

  17. SCREENING OF TRANSGENIC ANTHURIUMS FOR BACTERIAL BLIGHT AND NEMATODE RESISTANCE

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Anthuriums exhibit limited resistance to bacterial blight caused by Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. dieffenbachiae and to the nematodes Radopholus simile and Meloidogyne javanica. Agrobacterium tumefaciens transformation of embryogenic calli with strains LBA4404, EHA105, and AGLO resulted in transgenic p...

  18. MULTIPLE DRUG RESISTANCE: TRENDS AND IMPLICATIONS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Antimicrobial resistance (AR) has emerged as a global problem. Although AR occurs shortly after the introduction and use of an antimicrobial, resistance levels vary over time. Historically, antimicrobials were regarded as wonder drugs and for years, when resistance to a single antimicrobial occurr...

  19. Antibiotic Restriction Might Facilitate the Emergence of Multi-drug Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Obolski, Uri; Stein, Gideon Y.; Hadany, Lilach

    2015-01-01

    High antibiotic resistance frequencies have become a major public health issue. The decrease in new antibiotics' production, combined with increasing frequencies of multi-drug resistant (MDR) bacteria, cause substantial limitations in treatment options for some bacterial infections. To diminish overall resistance, and especially the occurrence of bacteria that are resistant to all antibiotics, certain drugs are deliberately scarcely used—mainly when other options are exhausted. We use a mathematical model to explore the efficiency of such antibiotic restrictions. We assume two commonly used drugs and one restricted drug. The model is examined for the mixing strategy of antibiotic prescription, in which one of the drugs is randomly assigned to each incoming patient. Data obtained from Rabin medical center, Israel, is used to estimate realistic single and double antibiotic resistance frequencies in incoming patients. We find that broad usage of the hitherto restricted drug can reduce the number of incorrectly treated patients, and reduce the spread of bacteria resistant to both common antibiotics. Such double resistant infections are often eventually treated with the restricted drug, and therefore are prone to become resistant to all three antibiotics. Thus, counterintuitively, a broader usage of a formerly restricted drug can sometimes lead to a decrease in the emergence of bacteria resistant to all drugs. We recommend re-examining restriction of specific drugs, when multiple resistance to the relevant alternative drugs already exists. PMID:26110266

  20. Plasmids and evolutionary rescue by drug resistance.

    PubMed

    Tazzyman, Samuel J; Bonhoeffer, Sebastian

    2014-07-01

    Antibiotic resistance provides evolutionary rescue for bacterial populations under the threat of extinction through antibiotics. It can arise de novo through mutation in the population, or be obtained from other bacterial populations via the transfer of a resistance-conferring plasmid. We use stochastic modeling methods to establish whether the most likely source of rescue is via a plasmid or via the chromosome, and show that contrary to what is assumed plasmids are not necessarily beneficial locations for resistance genes. Competition at the plasmid level of selection is of great importance-the spread of a resistant plasmid in the population can be slowed or entirely stopped by a nonresistant version of the same plasmid. We suggest that future studies on antibiotic-resistant plasmids should explicitly consider competition at this level of selection. PMID:24749717

  1. HIV drug resistance analysis tool based on process algebra

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Luciano Vieira De Araújo; Ester C. Sabino; Joăo Eduardo Ferreira

    2008-01-01

    The increasing number of drugs used in HIV patient treatment and the mutations associated with drug resistance make the inference of drug resistance a complex task that demands computational systems. Furthermore, the software development\\/update can generate an extra level of complexity in the process drug resistance analysis. An alternative to handle the complexity of drug resistance and software development is

  2. Antibiotic adjuvants: diverse strategies for controlling drug-resistant pathogens.

    PubMed

    Gill, Erin E; Franco, Octavio L; Hancock, Robert E W

    2015-01-01

    The growing number of bacterial pathogens that are resistant to numerous antibiotics is a cause for concern around the globe. There have been no new broad-spectrum antibiotics developed in the last 40 years, and the drugs we have currently are quickly becoming ineffective. In this article, we explore a range of therapeutic strategies that could be employed in conjunction with antibiotics and may help to prolong the life span of these life-saving drugs. Discussed topics include antiresistance drugs, which are administered to potentiate the effects of current antimicrobials in bacteria where they are no longer (or never were) effective; antivirulence drugs, which are directed against bacterial virulence factors; host-directed therapies, which modulate the host's immune system to facilitate infection clearance; and alternative treatments, which include such therapies as oral rehydration for diarrhea, phage therapy, and probiotics. All of these avenues show promise for the treatment of bacterial infections and should be further investigated to explore their full potential in the face of a postantibiotic era. PMID:25393203

  3. Antibiotic Adjuvants: Diverse Strategies for Controlling Drug-Resistant Pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Gill, Erin E; Franco, Octavio L; Hancock, Robert E W

    2015-01-01

    The growing number of bacterial pathogens that are resistant to numerous antibiotics is a cause for concern around the globe. There have been no new broad-spectrum antibiotics developed in the last 40 years, and the drugs we have currently are quickly becoming ineffective. In this article, we explore a range of therapeutic strategies that could be employed in conjunction with antibiotics and may help to prolong the life span of these life-saving drugs. Discussed topics include antiresistance drugs, which are administered to potentiate the effects of current antimicrobials in bacteria where they are no longer (or never were) effective; antivirulence drugs, which are directed against bacterial virulence factors; host-directed therapies, which modulate the host's immune system to facilitate infection clearance; and alternative treatments, which include such therapies as oral rehydration for diarrhea, phage therapy, and probiotics. All of these avenues show promise for the treatment of bacterial infections and should be further investigated to explore their full potential in the face of a postantibiotic era. PMID:25393203

  4. Facing multi-drug resistant tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Sotgiu, Giovanni; Migliori, Giovanni Battista

    2015-06-01

    Multi-drug resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB) is caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis strains resistant to at least two of the most effective anti-tuberculosis drugs (i.e., isoniazid and rifampicin). Therapeutic regimens based on second- and third-line anti-tuberculosis medicines showed poor efficacy, safety, and tolerability profiles. It was estimated that in 2012 the multi-drug resistant tuberculosis incidence ranged from 300,000 to 600,000 cases, mainly diagnosed in the Eastern European and Central Asian countries. The highest proportion of cases is among individuals previously exposed to anti-tuberculosis drugs. Three main conditions can favour the emergence and spread of multi-drug resistant tuberculosis: the poor implementation of the DOTS strategy, the shortage or the poor quality of the anti-tuberculosis drugs, and the poor therapeutic adherence of the patients to the prescribed regimens. Consultation with tuberculosis experts (e.g., consilium) is crucial to tailor the best anti-tuberculosis therapy. New therapeutic options are necessary: bedaquiline and delamanid seem promising drugs; in particular, during the development phase they demonstrated a protective effect against the emergence of further resistances towards the backbone drugs. In the recent past, other antibiotics have been administered off-label: the most relevant efficacy, safety, and tolerability profile was proved in linezolid-, meropenem/clavulanate-, cotrimoxazole-containing regimens. New research and development activities are needed in the diagnostic, therapeutic, preventive fields. PMID:24792579

  5. Antimicrobial (Drug) Resistance: Vancomycin-Resistant Enterococci (VRE)

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Tools Print this page Get email updates Order publications Volunteer for Clinical Studies Help people who are suffering from chronic, serious, or life-threatening illnesses related to antimicrobial (drug) resistance by volunteering for NIAID ...

  6. Computational Analysis of HIV Drug Resistance Data

    E-print Network

    and the use of combination therapy, successful treatment of HIV-infections is hampered by the emergence of drug-resistant genetic variants in response to therapy. Finding a new potent drug combination af- ter database schema that serves as the logical and physical ba- sis for this task. We introduce a mixture model

  7. Sensitive, resistant and multi-drug resistant Acinetobacter baumanii at Saudi Arabia hospital eastern region.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Mughis Uddin; Farooq, Reshma; Al-Hawashim, Nadia; Ahmed, Motasim; Yiannakou, Nearchos; Sayeed, Fatima; Sayed, Ali Rifat; Lutfullah, Sualiha

    2015-05-01

    Since the Physicians start use of antibiotics long ago with un-notice drug resistance. However actual problem was recognized about 85 years ago. Antibiotic resistant and Multi-drug resistant bacterial strains are at rise throughout the world. It is physicians and researchers to take scientific research based appropriate action to overcome this ever-spreading problem. This study is designed to find out sensitive (S), resistant (R) and multi-drug resistant (MDR) Acinetobacter baumanii strain along with other isolates in the resident patients of Eastern Region of Saudi Arabia. Pseudomonas aeruginosa is excluded from other gram-negative organisms isolated from different sites as it will be dealt separately. This study is based in was retrospective observations designed to collect data of different stains of Acinetobacter baumanii with reference to their Sensitivity (S), Resistance (R), Multi-Drug Resistance (MDR) along with other Gram negative isolated from different sites (from 1st January 2004 to 31st December 2011) at King Abdulaziz Hospital located Eastern Region of Kingdom of Saudi Arabia (KSA). All necessary techniques were used to culture and perform sensitivity of these isolates. There were 4532 isolates out of which 3018 (67%) were from patients. Out of Acinetobacter baumanii infected were 906 (20%) while other 3626 (80%) isolates were miscellaneous. Numbers of patients or cases were 480 (53%) out of 906 isolates and numbers of patients or cases in other organisms were 2538 (70%) out of 3626 isolates. Acinetobacter baumanii infected patients 221 (46%) were male and 259 (54%) were female and the male and female ratio of 1:1.2. In other organisms this male female ratio was almost same. There was steady rise in number of patients and the hence the isolates from 2004 to 2011. Majority of the bacterial strains were isolated as single organism but some were isolated as double or triple or quadruple or more organisms from different sites. Sensitive, Resistant and Multi-Drug Resistant Acinetobacter baumanii have been isolated from different sites. The other Gram negative isolates included Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Proteus vulgaris, Klebsiella oxytoca, Serratia marcescens and Stenotrophomonas maltophilia. A significant rise in R and MDR but there is rise in R and MDR Acinetobacter baumanii Strains has been interceded other isolates. It is important to adopt proper and sustainable policies and guideline regarding antibiotics prescription and used. We should also check our infection control practices in our hospital or healthcare settings. We should start antibiotics stewardship in our hospital in order to reducing or overcoming antibiotics Resistant (R) and Multi-Drug Resistant (MDR) strains prevalence. PMID:26004714

  8. Characterisation of ceftiofur resistance in swine bacterial pathogens

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Yogesh Chander; Simone Oliveira; Sagar M. Goyal

    2011-01-01

    A PCR based method was developed for the identification of ceftiofur resistance genes (blaCMY-2, blaTEM-1, and ampC) in swine bacterial pathogens. Using this method, the ceftiofur resistant (n=76) and susceptible (n=45) strains of Bordetella bronchiseptica, Salmonella spp., Escherichia coli, and Pasteurella multocida were screened for the presence of these three genes. The resistant genes were detected in 70% (blaTEM-1), 68%

  9. Legal issues associated with antimicrobial drug resistance.

    PubMed Central

    Fidler, D. P.

    1998-01-01

    An effective public health strategy against the development of antimicrobial drug resistance needs to be informed by legal as well as scientific analysis. This article describes some legal issues arising from current efforts against antimicrobial resistance and underscores the interdependence between law and public health in these efforts. PMID:9621187

  10. Resistance to echinocandin-class antifungal drugs

    PubMed Central

    Perlin, David S.

    2009-01-01

    Invasive fungal infections cause morbidity and mortality in severely ill patients, and limited drug classes restrict treatment choices. The echinocandins drugs are the first new class of antifungal compounds that target the fungal cell wall by blocking ?-1,3-D-glucan synthase. Elevated MIC values with occasional treatment failure have been reported for strains of Candida. Yet, an uncertain correlation exists between clinical failure and elevated MIC values for the echinocandin drugs. Fungi display several adaptive physiological mechanisms that result in elevated MIC values. However, resistance to echinocandin drugs among clinical isolates is associated with amino acid substitutions in two “hot-spot” regions of Fks1, the major subunit of glucan synthase. The mutations, yielding highly elevated MIC values, are genetically dominant and confer cross-resistance to all echinocandin drugs. Prominent Fks1 mutations decrease the sensitivity of glucan synthase for drug by one thousand-fold or more, and strains harboring such mutations may require a concomitant increase in drug to reduce fungal organ burdens in animal infection models. The Fks1-mediated resistance mechanism is conserved in a wide variety of Candida spp. and can account for intrinsic reduced susceptibility of certain species. Fks1 mutations confer resistance in both yeasts and moulds suggesting that this mechanism is pervasive in the fungal kingdom. PMID:17569573

  11. Bacteriophage Host Range and Bacterial Resistance

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Paul Hyman; Stephen T. Abedon

    2010-01-01

    Host range describes the breadth of organisms a parasite is capable of infecting, with limits on host range stemming from parasite, host, or environmental characteristics. Parasites can adapt to overcome host or environmental limitations, while hosts can adapt to control the negative impact of parasites. We consider these adaptations as they occur among bacteriophages (phages) and their bacterial hosts, since

  12. Cancer drug resistance: The central role of the karyotype

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Peter Duesberg; Ruhong Li; Rainer Sachs; Alice Fabarius; Madhvi B. Upender; Ruediger Hehlmann

    2007-01-01

    Current genetic and epigenetic theories of cancer-specific drug resistance do not adequately explain: (i) the karyotypic changes that coincide with resistance, (ii) the high rates at which cancer cells acquire and enhance resistance compared to the rates of conventional mutation, (iii) the wide ranges of resistance such as multidrug resistance, (iv) the frequent occurrence of intrinsic drug resistance. We have

  13. Characterisation of ceftiofur resistance in swine bacterial pathogens.

    PubMed

    Chander, Yogesh; Oliveira, Simone; Goyal, Sagar M

    2011-01-01

    A PCR based method was developed for the identification of ceftiofur resistance genes (bla(CMY-2), bla(TEM-1), and ampC) in swine bacterial pathogens. Using this method, the ceftiofur resistant (n=76) and susceptible (n=45) strains of Bordetella bronchiseptica, Salmonella spp., Escherichia coli, and Pasteurella multocida were screened for the presence of these three genes. The resistant genes were detected in 70% (bla(TEM-1)), 68% (bla(CMY-2)) and 45% (ampC) of the resistant isolates and in 18% (bla(TEM-1)), 27% (bla(CMY-2)), and 36% (ampC) of the susceptible isolates. Results obtained in the present study showed widespread distribution of these three resistance genes in ceftiofur-resistant swine pathogens. It was also observed that more pathogens are acquiring these resistance genes. PMID:19914850

  14. Aedesin: Structure and Antimicrobial Activity against Multidrug Resistant Bacterial Strains

    PubMed Central

    Padilla, André; Hamel, Rodolphe; Luplertlop, Natthanej; Chauffour, Aurélie; Vittecoq, Marion; Hoh, François; Thomas, Frédéric; Sougakoff, Wladimir; Lionne, Corinne; Yssel, Hans; Missé, Dorothée

    2014-01-01

    Multidrug resistance, which is acquired by both Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria, causes infections that are associated with significant morbidity and mortality in many clinical settings around the world. Because of the rapidly increasing incidence of pathogens that have become resistant to all or nearly all available antibiotics, there is a need for a new generation of antimicrobials with a broad therapeutic range for specific applications against infections. Aedesin is a cecropin-like anti-microbial peptide that was recently isolated from dengue virus-infected salivary glands of the Aedes aegypti mosquito. In the present study, we have refined the analysis of its structural characteristics and have determined its antimicrobial effects against a large panel of multidrug resistant bacterial strains, directly isolated from infected patients. Based the results from nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy analysis, Aedesin has a helix-bend-helix structure typical for a member of the family of ?-helix anti-microbial peptides. Aedesin efficiently killed Gram-negative bacterial strains that display the most worrisome resistance mechanisms encountered in the clinic, including resistance to carbapenems, aminoglycosides, cephalosporins, 4th generation fluoroquinolones, folate inhibitors and monobactams. In contrast, Gram-positive strains were insensitive to the lytic effects of the peptide. The anti-bacterial activity of Aedesin was found to be salt-resistant, indicating that it is active under physiological conditions encountered in body fluids characterized by ionic salt concentrations. In conclusion, because of its strong lytic activity against multidrug resistant Gram-negative bacterial strains displaying all types of clinically relevant resistance mechanisms known today, Aedesin might be an interesting candidate for the development of alternative treatment for infections caused by these types of bacteria. PMID:25162372

  15. Drug-resistant Neisseria gonorrhoeae in Michigan

    PubMed Central

    Boehme, Martha S.; Rudrik, James T.; Ganoczy, Dara; Crandell-Alden, Erin; Schneider, William A.; Somsel, Patricia A.

    2005-01-01

    The increasing prevalence of quinolone-resistant Neisseria gonorrhoeae (QRNG) in the United States is a cause for concern. Detecting resistance is complicated by the widespread use of molecular tests that do not provide isolates for susceptibility testing. The Michigan Department of Community Health developed a sentinel surveillance program to detect antimicrobial drug resistance in N. gonorrhoeae. Sentinel surveillance from 11 laboratories submitted 1,122 isolates for antimicrobial drug susceptibility testing and detected 2 clusters of QRNG from January 2003 to September 2004. These clusters were epidemiologically distinct: one involved young, heterosexual youth, and the other involved older men who have sex with men. This finding led to changes in local treatment recommendations that limited spread of resistant strains. Development of the sentinel program, collection of data, and epidemiologic analysis of the clusters are discussed. PMID:16022773

  16. Drug-resistant Neisseria gonorrhoeae in Michigan.

    PubMed

    Macomber, Kathryn E; Boehme, Martha S; Rudrik, James T; Ganoczy, Dara; Crandell-Alden, Erin; Schneider, William A; Somsel, Patricia A

    2005-07-01

    The increasing prevalence of quinolone-resistant Neisseria gonorrhoeae (QRNG) in the United States is a cause for concern. Detecting resistance is complicated by the widespread use of molecular tests that do not provide isolates for susceptibility testing. The Michigan Department of Community Health developed a sentinel surveillance program to detect antimicrobial drug resistance in N. gonorrhoeae. Sentinel surveillance from 11 laboratories submitted 1,122 isolates for antimicrobial drug susceptibility testing and detected 2 clusters of QRNG from January 2003 to September 2004. These clusters were epidemiologically distinct: one involved young, heterosexual youth, and the other involved older men who have sex with men. This finding led to changes in local treatment recommendations that limited spread of resistant strains. Development of the sentinel program, collection of data, and epidemiologic analysis of the clusters are discussed. PMID:16022773

  17. Efflux-Mediated Antifungal Drug Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Cannon, Richard D.; Lamping, Erwin; Holmes, Ann R.; Niimi, Kyoko; Baret, Philippe V.; Keniya, Mikhail V.; Tanabe, Koichi; Niimi, Masakazu; Goffeau, Andre; Monk, Brian C.

    2009-01-01

    Summary: Fungi cause serious infections in the immunocompromised and debilitated, and the incidence of invasive mycoses has increased significantly over the last 3 decades. Slow diagnosis and the relatively few classes of antifungal drugs result in high attributable mortality for systemic fungal infections. Azole antifungals are commonly used for fungal infections, but azole resistance can be a problem for some patient groups. High-level, clinically significant azole resistance usually involves overexpression of plasma membrane efflux pumps belonging to the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) or the major facilitator superfamily class of transporters. The heterologous expression of efflux pumps in model systems, such Saccharomyces cerevisiae, has enabled the functional analysis of efflux pumps from a variety of fungi. Phylogenetic analysis of the ABC pleiotropic drug resistance family has provided a new view of the evolution of this important class of efflux pumps. There are several ways in which the clinical significance of efflux-mediated antifungal drug resistance can be mitigated. Alternative antifungal drugs, such as the echinocandins, that are not efflux pump substrates provide one option. Potential therapeutic approaches that could overcome azole resistance include targeting efflux pump transcriptional regulators and fungal stress response pathways, blockade of energy supply, and direct inhibition of efflux pumps. PMID:19366916

  18. Detection of bacterial blight resistance genes in basmati rice landraces.

    PubMed

    Ullah, I; Jamil, S; Iqbal, M Z; Shaheen, H L; Hasni, S M; Jabeen, S; Mehmood, A; Akhter, M

    2012-01-01

    Aromatic basmati rice is vulnerable to bacterial blight disease. Genes conferring resistance to bacterial blight have been identified in coarse rice; however, their incorporation into basmati varieties compromises the prized basmati aroma. We identified bacterial blight resistance genes Xa4, xa5, Xa7, and xa13 in 52 basmati landraces and five basmati cultivars using PCR markers. The Xa7 gene was found to be the most prevalent among the cultivars and landraces. The cultivars Basmati-385 and Basmati-2000 also contained the Xa4 gene; however, xa5 and xa13 were confined to landraces only. Ten landraces were found to have multiple resistance genes. Landraces Basmati-106, Basmati-189 and Basmati-208 contained Xa4 and Xa7 genes. Whereas, landraces Basmati-122, Basmati-427, Basmati-433 were observed to have xa5 and Xa7 genes. Landraces Basmati-48, Basmati-51A, Basmati-334, and Basmati-370A possessed Xa7 and xa13 genes. The use of landraces containing recessive genes xa5 and xa13 as donor parents in hybridization with cultivars Basmati-385 and Basmati-2000, which contain the genes Xa4 and Xa7, will expedite efforts to develop bacterial blight-resistant basmati rice cultivars through marker assisted selection, based on a pyramiding approach, without compromising aroma and grain quality. PMID:22869552

  19. PARAMETERS OF TREATED STAINLESS STEEL SURFACES IMPORTANT FOR RESISTANCE TO BACTERIAL CONTAMINATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Use of materials that are resistant to bacterial contamination could enhance food safety during processing. Common finishing treatments of stainless steel surfaces used for components of poultry processing equipment were tested for resistance to bacterial attachment. Surface char...

  20. Evolutionary consequences of drug resistance: shared principles across diverse targets and organisms.

    PubMed

    Hughes, Diarmaid; Andersson, Dan I

    2015-08-01

    Drug therapy has a crucial role in the treatment of viral, bacterial, fungal and protozoan infections, as well as the control of human cancer. The success of therapy is being threatened by the increasing prevalence of resistance. We examine and compare mechanisms of drug resistance in these diverse biological systems (using HIV and Plasmodium falciparum as examples of viral and protozoan pathogens, respectively) and discuss how factors - such as mutation rates, fitness effects of resistance, epistasis and clonal interference - influence the evolutionary trajectories of drug-resistant clones. We describe commonalities and differences related to resistance development that could guide strategies to improve therapeutic effectiveness and the development of a new generation of drugs. PMID:26149714

  1. Resistance of bacterial spores to ultraviolet light

    SciTech Connect

    Setlow, P.

    1988-01-01

    Dormant spores of gram-positive bacteria, such as the various Bacillus species, usually are more resistant to killing by ultraviolet light than are growing cells. During the first minutes of spore germination, the spore's UV resistance rises significantly before dropping to the decreased value of the vegetative cell. For all strains of all species that have been tested, the spores are considerably more UV-resistant than their corresponding growing cells. Since the killing of cells or spores by UV-radiation is due to the presence of UV-induced photoproducts in DNA, there are two major factors that might be expected to influence UV resistance. (1) the UV photochemistry of the DNA in vivo, i.e., the type of photoproducts formed in DNA by UV radiation, the quantum efficiency of their formation, and their lethality; and (2) the efficiency of the repair or removal of these photoproducts. The DNA in the dormant spores has a different UV photochemistry than does the DNA in the growing cell, while the young germinated spore's DNA may exhibit a third type of UV photochemistry. There is at least one repair system which is specific for UV photoproducts produced in the dormant spore, as well as repair systems that act on UV photoproducts formed in other stages of growth.

  2. Antimicrobial Drug Resistance in Pathogens Causing Nosocomial Infections at a University Hospital in Taiwan, 1981-1999

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Po-Ren Hsueh; Mei-Ling Chen; Chun-Chuan Sun; Wen-Hwei Chen; Hui-Ju Pan; Li-Seh Yang; Shan-Chwen Chang; Shen-Wu Ho; Chin-Yu Lee; Wei-Chuan Hsieh; Kwen-Tay Luh

    2002-01-01

    To determine the distribution and antimicrobial drug resistance in bacterial pathogens causing nosocomial infections, surveillance data on nosocomial infections documented from 1981 to 1999 at National Taiwan Uni- versity Hospital were analyzed. During this period, 35,580 bacterial pathogens causing nosocomial infections were identified. Candida species increased considerably, ranking first by 1999 in the incidence of pathogens causing all nosocomial infections,

  3. Resistance to antibiotics targeted to the bacterial cell wall

    PubMed Central

    Nikolaidis, I; Favini-Stabile, S; Dessen, A

    2014-01-01

    Peptidoglycan is the main component of the bacterial cell wall. It is a complex, three-dimensional mesh that surrounds the entire cell and is composed of strands of alternating glycan units crosslinked by short peptides. Its biosynthetic machinery has been, for the past five decades, a preferred target for the discovery of antibacterials. Synthesis of the peptidoglycan occurs sequentially within three cellular compartments (cytoplasm, membrane, and periplasm), and inhibitors of proteins that catalyze each stage have been identified, although not all are applicable for clinical use. A number of these antimicrobials, however, have been rendered inactive by resistance mechanisms. The employment of structural biology techniques has been instrumental in the understanding of such processes, as well as the development of strategies to overcome them. This review provides an overview of resistance mechanisms developed toward antibiotics that target bacterial cell wall precursors and its biosynthetic machinery. Strategies toward the development of novel inhibitors that could overcome resistance are also discussed. PMID:24375653

  4. Mechanisms of Candida biofilm drug resistance.

    PubMed

    Taff, Heather T; Mitchell, Kaitlin F; Edward, Jessica A; Andes, David R

    2013-10-01

    Candida commonly adheres to implanted medical devices, growing as a resilient biofilm capable of withstanding extraordinarily high antifungal concentrations. As currently available antifungals have minimal activity against biofilms, new drugs to treat these recalcitrant infections are urgently needed. Recent investigations have begun to shed light on the mechanisms behind the profound resistance associated with the biofilm mode of growth. This resistance appears to be multifactorial, involving both mechanisms similar to conventional, planktonic antifungal resistance, such as increased efflux pump activity, as well as mechanisms specific to the biofilm lifestyle. A unique biofilm property is the production of an extracellular matrix. Two components of this material, ?-glucan and extracellular DNA, promote biofilm resistance to multiple antifungals. Biofilm formation also engages several stress response pathways that impair the activity of azole drugs. Resistance within a biofilm is often heterogeneous, with the development of a subpopulation of resistant persister cells. In this article we review the molecular mechanisms underlying Candida biofilm antifungal resistance and their relative contributions during various growth phases. PMID:24059922

  5. Heavy metals in liquid pig manure in light of bacterial antimicrobial resistance.

    PubMed

    Hölzel, Christina S; Müller, Christa; Harms, Katrin S; Mikolajewski, Sabine; Schäfer, Stefanie; Schwaiger, Karin; Bauer, Johann

    2012-02-01

    Heavy metals are regularly found in liquid pig manure, and might interact with bacterial antimicrobial resistance. Concentrations of heavy metals were determined by atomic spectroscopic methods in 305 pig manure samples and were connected to the phenotypic resistance of Escherichia coli (n=613) against 29 antimicrobial drugs. Concentrations of heavy metals (/kg dry matter) were 0.08-5.30 mg cadmium, 1.1-32.0 mg chrome, 22.4-3387.6 mg copper, <2.0-26.7 mg lead, <0.01-0.11 mg mercury, 3.1-97.3 mg nickel and 93.0-8239.0 mg zinc. Associated with the detection of copper and zinc, resistance rates against ?-lactams were significantly elevated. By contrast, the presence of mercury was significantly associated with low antimicrobial resistance rates of Escherichia coli against ?-lactams, aminoglycosides and other antibiotics. Effects of subinhibitory concentrations of mercury on bacterial resistance against penicillins, cephalosporins, aminoglycosides and doxycycline were also demonstrated in a laboratory trial. Antimicrobial resistance in the porcine microflora might be increased by copper and zinc. By contrast, the occurrence of mercury in the environment might, due to co-toxicity, act counter-selective against antimicrobial resistant strains. PMID:22280821

  6. Heavy metals in liquid pig manure in light of bacterial antimicrobial resistance

    SciTech Connect

    Hoelzel, Christina S., E-mail: Christina.Hoelzel@wzw.tum.de [Chair of Animal Hygiene, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Weihenstephaner Berg 3, 85354 Freising (Germany); Mueller, Christa [Institute for Agroecology, Organic Farming and Soil Protection, Bavarian State Research Center for Agriculture (LfL), Lange Point 12, 85354 Freising (Germany)] [Institute for Agroecology, Organic Farming and Soil Protection, Bavarian State Research Center for Agriculture (LfL), Lange Point 12, 85354 Freising (Germany); Harms, Katrin S. [Chair of Animal Hygiene, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Weihenstephaner Berg 3, 85354 Freising (Germany)] [Chair of Animal Hygiene, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Weihenstephaner Berg 3, 85354 Freising (Germany); Mikolajewski, Sabine [Department for Quality Assurance and Analytics, Bavarian State Research Center for Agriculture (LfL), Lange Point 4, 85354 Freising (Germany)] [Department for Quality Assurance and Analytics, Bavarian State Research Center for Agriculture (LfL), Lange Point 4, 85354 Freising (Germany); Schaefer, Stefanie; Schwaiger, Karin; Bauer, Johann [Chair of Animal Hygiene, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Weihenstephaner Berg 3, 85354 Freising (Germany)] [Chair of Animal Hygiene, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Weihenstephaner Berg 3, 85354 Freising (Germany)

    2012-02-15

    Heavy metals are regularly found in liquid pig manure, and might interact with bacterial antimicrobial resistance. Concentrations of heavy metals were determined by atomic spectroscopic methods in 305 pig manure samples and were connected to the phenotypic resistance of Escherichia coli (n=613) against 29 antimicrobial drugs. Concentrations of heavy metals (/kg dry matter) were 0.08-5.30 mg cadmium, 1.1-32.0 mg chrome, 22.4-3387.6 mg copper, <2.0-26.7 mg lead, <0.01-0.11 mg mercury, 3.1-97.3 mg nickel and 93.0-8239.0 mg zinc. Associated with the detection of copper and zinc, resistance rates against {beta}-lactams were significantly elevated. By contrast, the presence of mercury was significantly associated with low antimicrobial resistance rates of Escherichia coli against {beta}-lactams, aminoglycosides and other antibiotics. Effects of subinhibitory concentrations of mercury on bacterial resistance against penicillins, cephalosporins, aminoglycosides and doxycycline were also demonstrated in a laboratory trial. Antimicrobial resistance in the porcine microflora might be increased by copper and zinc. By contrast, the occurrence of mercury in the environment might, due to co-toxicity, act counter-selective against antimicrobial resistant strains.

  7. Tumour stem cells and drug resistance

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Tito Fojo; Susan Bates; Michael Dean

    2005-01-01

    The contribution of tumorigenic stem cells to haematopoietic cancers has been established for some time, and cells possessing stem-cell properties have been described in several solid tumours. Although chemotherapy kills most cells in a tumour, it is believed to leave tumour stem cells behind, which might be an important mechanism of resistance. For example, the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) drug transporters

  8. Mechanisms of Drug Resistance in Cancer Chemotherapy

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Y. A. Luqmani

    2005-01-01

    The management of cancer involves procedures, which include surgery, radiotherapy and chemotherapy. Development of chemoresistance is a persistent problem during the treatment of local and disseminated disease. A plethora of cytotoxic drugs that selectively, but not exclusively, target actively proliferating cells include such diverse groups as DNA alkylating agents, antimetabolites, intercalating agents and mitotic inhibitors. Resistance constitutes a lack of

  9. Countering amyloid polymorphism and drug resistance with minimal drug cocktails.

    PubMed

    Duennwald, Martin L; Shorter, James

    2010-01-01

    Several fatal, progressive neurodegenerative diseases, including various prion and prion-like disorders, are connected with the misfolding of specific proteins. These proteins misfold into toxic oligomeric species and a spectrum of distinct self-templating amyloid structures, termed strains. Hence, small molecules that prevent or reverse these protein-misfolding events might have therapeutic utility. Yet it is unclear whether a single small molecule can antagonize the complete repertoire of misfolded forms encompassing diverse amyloid polymorphs and soluble oligomers. We have begun to investigate this issue using the yeast prion protein Sup35 as an experimental paradigm. We have discovered that a polyphenol, (-)epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG), effectively inhibited the formation of infectious amyloid forms (prions) of Sup35 and even remodeled preassembled prions. Surprisingly, EGCG selectively modulated specific prion strains and even selected for EGCG-resistant prion strains with novel structural and biological characteristics. Thus, treatment with a single small molecule antagonist of amyloidogenesis can select for novel, drug-resistant amyloid polymorphs. Importantly, combining EGCG with another small molecule, 4,5-bis-(4-methoxyanilino)phthalimide, synergistically antagonized and remodeled a wide array of Sup35 prion strains without producing any drug-resistant prions. We suggest that minimal drug cocktails, small collections of drugs that collectively antagonize all amyloid polymorphs, should be identified to besiege various neurodegenerative disorders. PMID:20935457

  10. Protein Oxidation: Key to Bacterial Desiccation Resistance?

    SciTech Connect

    Fredrickson, Jim K.; Li, Shu-Mei W.; Gaidamakova, E.; Matrosova, V.; Zhai, M.; Sulloway, Heather M.; Scholten, Johannes C.; Brown,, Mindy G.; Balkwill, David L.; Daly, Michael J.

    2008-04-01

    For extremely ionizing radiation resistant bacteria, survival has been attributed to protection of proteins from oxidative damage during irradiation, with the result that repair systems survive and function with far greater efficiency during recovery than in sensitive bacteria. Here we examined the relationship between survival of dry-climate soil bacteria and the level of cellular protein oxidation induced by desiccation. Bacteria were isolated from surface soils of the shrub-steppe of the U.S. Department of Energy’s Hanford Site in Washington state. A total of 63 isolates were used for phylogenetic analysis. The majority of isolates were closely related to members of the genus Deinococcus, with Chelatococcus, Methylobacterium and Bosea also among the genera identified. Desiccation-resistant isolates accumulated high intracellular manganese and low iron concentrations compared to sensitive bacteria. In vivo, proteins of desiccation-resistant bacteria were protected from oxidative modifications that introduce carbonyl groups in sensitive bacteria during drying. We present the case that survival of bacteria that inhabit dry-climate soils are highly dependent on mechanisms which limit protein oxidation during dehydration.

  11. Evaluation of polyamidoamine (PAMAM) dendrimers as drug carriers of anti-bacterial drugs using sulfamethoxazole (SMZ) as a model drug

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Minglu Ma; Yiyun Cheng; Zhenhua Xu; Peng Xu; Haiou Qu; Yujie Fang; Tongwen Xu; Longping Wen

    2007-01-01

    Sulfamethoxazole (SMZ), a sulfonamide with well-known anti-bacterial properties, is not freely soluble in water and causes problems in its clinical applications. In the present study we investigated the potential of ethylenediamine (EDA) core polyamidoamine (PAMAM) dendrimers as drug carriers of SMZ by aqueous solubility, in vitro release as well as anti-bacterial activity studies. Results showed that the aqueous solubility of

  12. Challenges of drug-resistant malaria

    PubMed Central

    Sinha, Shweta; Medhi, Bikash; Sehgal, Rakesh

    2014-01-01

    Over the past six decades, the drug resistance of Plasmodium falciparum has become an issue of utmost concern. Despite the remarkable progress that has been made in recent years in reducing the mortality rate to about 30% with the scaling-up of vector control, introduction of artemisinin-based combination therapies and other malaria control strategies, the confirmation of artemisinin resistance on the Cambodia–Thailand border threatened all the previous success. This review addresses the global scenario of antimalarial resistance and factors associated with it, with the main emphasis on futuristic approaches like nanotechnology and stem cell therapy that may impede resistant malaria, along with novel medications which are preparing to enter the global antimalarial market. These novel studies are likely to escalate over the coming years and will hopefully help to reduce the burden of malaria. PMID:25402734

  13. Insect peptides with improved protease-resistance protect mice against bacterial infection.

    PubMed Central

    Otvos, L.; Bokonyi, K.; Varga, I.; Otvos, B. I.; Hoffmann, R.; Ertl, H. C.; Wade, J. D.; McManus, A. M.; Craik, D. J.; Bulet, P.

    2000-01-01

    At a time of the emergence of drug-resistant bacterial strains, the development of antimicrobial compounds with novel mechanisms of action is of considerable interest. Perhaps the most promising among these is a family of antibacterial peptides originally isolated from insects. These were shown to act in a stereospecific manner on an as-yet unidentified target bacterial protein. One of these peptides, drosocin, is inactive in vivo due to the rapid decomposition in mammalian sera. However, another family member, pyrrhocoricin, is significantly more stable, has increased in vitro efficacy against gram-negative bacterial strains, and if administered alone, as we show here, is devoid of in vitro or in vivo toxicity. At low doses, pyrrhocoricin protected mice against Escherichia coli infection, but at a higher dose augmented the infection of compromised animals. Analogs of pyrrhocoricin were, therefore, synthesized to further improve protease resistance and reduce toxicity. A linear derivative containing unnatural amino acids at both termini showed high potency and lack of toxicity in vivo and an expanded cyclic analog displayed broad activity spectrum in vitro. The bioactive conformation of native pyrrhocoricin was determined by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, and similar to drosocin, reverse turns were identified as pharmacologically important elements at the termini, bridged by an extended peptide domain. Knowledge of the primary and secondary structural requirements for in vivo activity of these peptides allows the design of novel antibacterial drug leads. PMID:10794416

  14. Liposome-based approaches to overcome anticancer drug resistance

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Christoph Mamot; Daryl C. Drummond; Keelung Hong; Dmitri B. Kirpotin; John W. Park

    2003-01-01

    Drug resistance remains an important obstacle towards better outcomes in the treatment of cancer. One general approach to overcome this problem has been to inhibit specific resistance mechanisms, such as P-glycoprotein (PGP)-mediated drug efflux, using small molecule agents or other therapeutic strategies. Alternatively, drug delivery approaches using liposomes or other carriers can in principle target drugs to tumor tissue, tumor

  15. Flow cytometric monitoring of drug resistance in human tumor cells

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Awtar Krishan

    2002-01-01

    Recent studies have identified a family of glycoproteins which moulate cellular transport of antibiotics, alkaloids and drugs used in cancer chemotherapy. By facilitating efflux of drugs from the intracellular domain, these proteins reduce cytotoxicity and thus confer drug resistance. With the availability of antibodies raised against these phenotypic markers of drug resistance, immunohistochemistry and flow cytometry has been used to

  16. Nontoxic antimicrobials that evade drug resistance.

    PubMed

    Davis, Stephen A; Vincent, Benjamin M; Endo, Matthew M; Whitesell, Luke; Marchillo, Karen; Andes, David R; Lindquist, Susan; Burke, Martin D

    2015-07-01

    Drugs that act more promiscuously provide fewer routes for the emergence of resistant mutants. This benefit, however, often comes at the cost of serious off-target and dose-limiting toxicities. The classic example is the antifungal amphotericin B (AmB), which has evaded resistance for more than half a century. We report markedly less toxic amphotericins that nevertheless evade resistance. They are scalably accessed in just three steps from the natural product, and they bind their target (the fungal sterol ergosterol) with far greater selectivity than AmB. Hence, they are less toxic and far more effective in a mouse model of systemic candidiasis. To our surprise, exhaustive efforts to select for mutants resistant to these more selective compounds revealed that they are just as impervious to resistance as AmB. Thus, highly selective cytocidal action and the evasion of resistance are not mutually exclusive, suggesting practical routes to the discovery of less toxic, resistance-evasive therapies. PMID:26030729

  17. Drug resistance beyond extensively drug-resistant tuberculosis: individual patient data meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Migliori, Giovanni Battista; Sotgiu, Giovanni; Gandhi, Neel R; Falzon, Dennis; DeRiemer, Kathryn; Centis, Rosella; Hollm-Delgado, Maria-Graciela; Palmero, Domingo; Pérez-Guzmán, Carlos; Vargas, Mario H; D'Ambrosio, Lia; Spanevello, Antonio; Bauer, Melissa; Chan, Edward D; Schaaf, H Simon; Keshavjee, Salmaan; Holtz, Timothy H; Menzies, Dick

    2013-07-01

    The broadest pattern of tuberculosis (TB) drug resistance for which a consensus definition exists is extensively drug-resistant (XDR)-TB. It is not known if additional drug resistance portends worsened patient outcomes. This study compares treatment outcomes of XDR-TB patients with and without additional resistance in order to explore the need for a new definition. Individual patient data on XDR-TB outcomes were included in a meta-analysis comparing outcomes between XDR alone and three nonmutually exclusive XDR-TB patient groups: XDR plus resistance to all the second-line injectables (sli) and capreomycin and kanamycin/amikacin (XDR+2sli) XDR plus resistance to second-line injectables and to more than one group 4 drug, i.e. ethionamide/protionamide, cycloserine/terizidone or para-aminosalicylic acid (XDR+sliG4) and XDR+sliG4 plus resistance to ethambutol and/or pyrazinamide (XDR+sliG4EZ). Of 405 XDR-TB cases, 301 were XDR alone, 68 XDR+2sli, 48 XDR+sliG4 and 42 XDR+sliG4EZ. In multivariate analysis, the odds of cure were significantly lower in XDR+2sli (adjusted OR 0.4, 95% CI 0.2-0.8) compared to XDR alone, while odds of failure and death were higher in all XDR patients with additional resistance (adjusted OR 2.6-2.8). Patients with additional resistance beyond XDR-TB showed poorer outcomes. Limitations in availability, accuracy and reproducibility of current drug susceptibility testing methods preclude the adoption of a useful definition beyond the one currently used for XDR-TB. PMID:23060633

  18. Emerging issues in gram-negative bacterial resistance: an update for the practicing clinician.

    PubMed

    Vasoo, Shawn; Barreto, Jason N; Tosh, Pritish K

    2015-03-01

    The rapid and global spread of antimicrobial-resistant organisms in recent years has been unprecedented. Although resistant gram-positive infections have been concerning to clinicians, the increasing incidence of antibiotic-resistant gram-negative infections has become the most pressing issue in bacterial resistance. Indiscriminate antimicrobial use in humans and animals coupled with increased global connectivity facilitated the transmission of gram-negative infections harboring extended-spectrum ?-lactamases in the 1990s. Carbapenemase-producing Enterobacteriaceae, such as those containing Klebsiella pneumoniae carbapenemases and New Delhi metallo-?-lactamases, have been the latest scourge since the late 1990s to 2000s. Besides ?-lactam resistance, these gram-negative infections are often resistant to multiple drug classes, including fluoroquinolones, which are commonly used to treat community-onset infections. In certain geographic locales, these pathogens, which have been typically associated with health care-associated infections, are disseminating into the community, posing a significant dilemma for clinicians treating community-onset infections. In this Concise Review, we summarize emerging trends in antimicrobial resistance. We also review the current knowledge on the detection, treatment, and prevention of infection with these organisms, with a focus on the carbapenemase-producing gram-negative bacilli. Finally, we discuss emerging therapies and areas that need further research and effort to stem the spread of antimicrobial resistance. PMID:25744116

  19. Capsule Polysaccharide Mediates Bacterial Resistance to Antimicrobial Peptides

    PubMed Central

    Campos, Miguel A.; Vargas, Miguel A.; Regueiro, Verónica; Llompart, Catalina M.; Albertí, Sebastián; Bengoechea, José A.

    2004-01-01

    The innate immune system plays a critical role in the defense of areas exposed to microorganisms. There is an increasing body of evidence indicating that antimicrobial peptides and proteins (APs) are one of the most important weapons of this system and that they make up the protective front for the respiratory tract. On the other hand, it is known that pathogenic organisms have developed countermeasures to resist these agents such as reducing the net negative charge of the bacterial membranes. Here we report the characterization of a novel mechanism of resistance to APs that is dependent on the bacterial capsule polysaccharide (CPS). Klebsiella pneumoniae CPS mutant was more sensitive than the wild type to human neutrophil defensin 1, ?-defensin 1, lactoferrin, protamine sulfate, and polymyxin B. K. pneumoniae lipopolysaccharide O antigen did not play an important role in AP resistance, and CPS was the only factor conferring protection against polymyxin B in strains lacking O antigen. In addition, we found a significant correlation between the amount of CPS expressed by a given strain and the resistance to polymyxin B. We also showed that K. pneumoniae CPS mutant bound more polymyxin B than the wild-type strain with a concomitant increased in the self-promoted pathway. Taken together, our results suggest that CPS protects bacteria by limiting the interaction of APs with the surface. Finally, we report that K. pneumoniae increased the amount of CPS and upregulated cps transcription when grown in the presence of polymyxin B and lactoferrin. PMID:15557634

  20. A Locked Nucleic Acid (LNA)-Based Real-Time PCR Assay for the Rapid Detection of Multiple Bacterial Antibiotic Resistance Genes Directly from Positive Blood Culture

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Lingxiang; Shen, Dingxia; Zhou, Qiming; Li, Zexia; Fang, Xiangdong; Li, Quan-Zhen

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial strains resistant to various antibiotic drugs are frequently encountered in clinical infections, and the rapid identification of drug-resistant strains is highly essential for clinical treatment. We developed a locked nucleic acid (LNA)-based quantitative real-time PCR (LNA-qPCR) method for the rapid detection of 13 antibiotic resistance genes and successfully used it to distinguish drug-resistant bacterial strains from positive blood culture samples. A sequence-specific primer-probe set was designed, and the specificity of the assays was assessed using 27 ATCC bacterial strains and 77 negative blood culture samples. No cross-reaction was identified among bacterial strains and in negative samples, indicating 100% specificity. The sensitivity of the assays was determined by spiking each bacterial strain into negative blood samples, and the detection limit was 1–10 colony forming units (CFU) per reaction. The LNA-qPCR assays were first applied to 72 clinical bacterial isolates for the identification of known drug resistance genes, and the results were verified by the direct sequencing of PCR products. Finally, the LNA-qPCR assays were used for the detection in 47 positive blood culture samples, 19 of which (40.4%) were positive for antibiotic resistance genes, showing 91.5% consistency with phenotypic susceptibility results. In conclusion, LNA-qPCR is a reliable method for the rapid detection of bacterial antibiotic resistance genes and can be used as a supplement to phenotypic susceptibility testing for the early detection of antimicrobial resistance to allow the selection of appropriate antimicrobial treatment and to prevent the spread of resistant isolates. PMID:25775001

  1. Exploiting Nanotechnology to Overcome Tumor Drug Resistance: Challenges and Opportunities

    PubMed Central

    Kirtane, Ameya; Kalscheuer, Stephen; Panyam, Jayanth

    2013-01-01

    Tumor cells develop resistance to chemotherapeutic drugs through multiple mechanisms. Overexpression of efflux transporters is an important source of drug resistance. Efflux transporters such as P-glycoprotein reduce intracellular drug accumulation and compromise drug efficacy. Various nanoparticle-based approaches have been investigated to overcome efflux-mediated resistance. These include the use of formulation excipients that inhibit transporter activity and co-delivery of the anticancer drug with a specific inhibitor of transporter function or expression. However, the effectiveness of nanoparticles can be diminished by poor transport in the tumor tissue. Hence, adjunct therapies that improve the intratumoral distribution of nanoparticles may be vital to the successful application of nanotechnology to overcome tumor drug resistance. This review discusses the mechanisms of tumor drug resistance and highlights the opportunities and challenges in the use of nanoparticles to improve the efficacy of anticancer drugs against resistant tumors. PMID:24036273

  2. Targeted dual agent nanoparticles to overcome tumor drug resistance

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Yogesh B Patil

    2008-01-01

    Tumor drug resistance is a major challenge for the success of chemotherapy in cancer. Overexpression of ATP-binding cassette (ABC) drug transporters, such as P-glycoprotein (P-gp) confers resistance to a broad range of chemically diverse anticancer drugs. The objective of this research was to develop a delivery system that will overcome drug resistance in tumor cells. It was hypothesized that ligand-functionalized,

  3. Mycobacterium tuberculosis mutation rate estimates from different lineages predict substantial differences in the emergence of drug resistant tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Ford, Christopher B.; Shah, Rupal R.; Maeda, Midori Kato; Gagneux, Sebastien; Murray, Megan B.; Cohen, Ted; Johnston, James C.; Gardy, Jennifer; Lipsitch, Marc; Fortune, Sarah M.

    2013-01-01

    A critical question in tuberculosis control is why some strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis are preferentially associated with multiple drug resistances. We demonstrate that M. tuberculosis strains from Lineage 2 (East Asian lineage and Beijing sublineage) acquire drug resistances in vitro more rapidly than M. tuberculosis strains from Lineage 4 (Euro-American lineage) and that this higher rate can be attributed to a higher mutation rate. Moreover, the in vitro mutation rate correlates well with the bacterial mutation rate in humans as determined by whole genome sequencing of clinical isolates. Finally, using a stochastic mathematical model, we demonstrate that the observed differences in mutation rate predict a substantially higher probability that patients infected with a drug susceptible Lineage 2 strain will harbor multidrug resistant bacteria at the time of diagnosis. These data suggest that interventions to prevent the emergence of drug resistant tuberculosis should target bacterial as well as treatment-related risk factors. PMID:23749189

  4. Neurostimulation for Drug-Resistant Epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    DeGiorgio, Christopher M.; Krahl, Scott E.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose of Review: The purpose of this review is to provide an evidence-based update on the neurostimulation options available for patients with drug-resistant epilepsy in the United States and in European countries. Recent Findings: The field of neurostimulation for epilepsy has grown dramatically since 1997, when vagus nerve stimulation became the first device to be approved for epilepsy by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA). New data from recently completed randomized controlled trials are available for deep brain stimulation of the anterior thalamus, responsive neurostimulation, and trigeminal nerve stimulation. Although vagus nerve stimulation is the only device currently approved in the United States, deep brain stimulation and responsive neurostimulation devices are awaiting FDA approval. Deep brain stimulation, trigeminal nerve stimulation, and transcutaneous vagus nerve stimulation are now approved for epilepsy in the European Union. In this article, the mechanisms of action, safety, and efficacy of new neurostimulation devices are reviewed, and the key advantages and disadvantages of each are discussed. Summary: The exponential growth of the field of neuromodulation for epilepsy is an exciting development; these new devices provide physicians with new options for patients with drug-resistant epilepsy. PMID:23739108

  5. Bacterial isolates and drug susceptibility patterns of ear discharge from patients with ear infection at Gondar University Hospital, Northwest Ethiopia

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Ear infection is a common problem for both children and adults especially in developing countries. However in Ethiopia particularly in the study area, there is no recent data that shows the magnitude of the problem. The aim of this study was to determine the bacterial isolates and their drug susceptibility patterns from patients who had ear infection. Method A retrospective study was conducted from September, 2009 to August, 2012 at Gondar University Hospital, Northwest Ethiopia. Ear discharge samples were cultured on MacConkey agar, blood agar and chocolate agar plates. A standard biochemical procedure was used for full identification of bacterial isolates. Antimicrobial susceptibility tests were done on Mueller-Hinton agar by using disk diffusion method. Data were entered and analyzed by using SPSS version 20 software and P-value of?bacterial isolation and 204 (89.5%) cases were found to have bacterial isolates. From the total bacterial isolates, 115 (56.4%) were gram negative bacteria and the predominant isolate was proteus species (27.5%). Of individuals who had ear infection, 185 (90.7%) had single bacterial infection while 19 (9.3%) had mixed infections. Under five children were more affected by ear infection. The prevalence of ear infection was significantly high in males (63.7 vs 36.3%) (P?=?0.017). Of all bacterial isolates, 192 (94.1%) had multiple antibiotic resistant pattern. Non Lactose Fermenter Gram Negative Rods (46.0%), Klebsella species (47.7%) and Pseudomonas species (48.5%) were resistant against the commonly used antibiotics. Conclusion The prevalence of ear infection was very high in the study area. Majority of the bacterial isolates were resistant to multiple antibiotics. Hence antibiotics susceptibility test is mandatory before prescribing any antibiotics. PMID:23914777

  6. Adaptive and Mutational Resistance: Role of Porins and Efflux Pumps in Drug Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Fernández, Lucía

    2012-01-01

    Summary: The substantial use of antibiotics in the clinic, combined with a dearth of new antibiotic classes, has led to a gradual increase in the resistance of bacterial pathogens to these compounds. Among the various mechanisms by which bacteria endure the action of antibiotics, those affecting influx and efflux are of particular importance, as they limit the interaction of the drug with its intracellular targets and, consequently, its deleterious effects on the cell. This review evaluates the impact of porins and efflux pumps on two major types of resistance, namely, mutational and adaptive types of resistance, both of which are regarded as key phenomena in the global rise of antibiotic resistance among pathogenic microorganisms. In particular, we explain how adaptive and mutational events can dramatically influence the outcome of antibiotic therapy by altering the mechanisms of influx and efflux of antibiotics. The identification of porins and pumps as major resistance markers has opened new possibilities for the development of novel therapeutic strategies directed specifically against these mechanisms. PMID:23034325

  7. Young Women's Experiences of Resisting Invitations to Use Illicit Drugs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koehn, Corinne V.; O'Neill, Linda K.

    2011-01-01

    Ten young women were interviewed regarding their experiences of resisting invitations to use illicit drugs. Hermeneutic phenomenology was used to gather and analyze information. One key theme was the motivations that inspired women to refuse drug offers. Young women resisted drug invitations because of their desires to be authentic, protect their…

  8. Structure and function of efflux pumps that confer resistance to drugs.

    PubMed Central

    Borges-Walmsley, M Ines; McKeegan, Kenneth S; Walmsley, Adrian R

    2003-01-01

    Resistance to therapeutic drugs encompasses a diverse range of biological systems, which all have a human impact. From the relative simplicity of bacterial cells, fungi and protozoa to the complexity of human cancer cells, resistance has become problematic. Stated in its simplest terms, drug resistance decreases the chance of providing successful treatment against a plethora of diseases. Worryingly, it is a problem that is increasing, and consequently there is a pressing need to develop new and effective classes of drugs. This has provided a powerful stimulus in promoting research on drug resistance and, ultimately, it is hoped that this research will provide novel approaches that will allow the deliberate circumvention of well understood resistance mechanisms. A major mechanism of resistance in both microbes and cancer cells is the membrane protein-catalysed extrusion of drugs from the cell. Resistant cells exploit proton-driven antiporters and/or ATP-driven ABC (ATP-binding cassette) transporters to extrude cytotoxic drugs that usually enter the cell by passive diffusion. Although some of these drug efflux pumps transport specific substrates, many are transporters of multiple substrates. These multidrug pumps can often transport a variety of structurally unrelated hydrophobic compounds, ranging from dyes to lipids. If we are to nullify the effects of efflux-mediated drug resistance, we must first of all understand how these efflux pumps can accommodate a diverse range of compounds and, secondly, how conformational changes in these proteins are coupled to substrate translocation. These are key questions that must be addressed. In this review we report on the advances that have been made in understanding the structure and function of drug efflux pumps. PMID:13678421

  9. The evolution and spread of antibiotic resistance in bacterial pathogens is a grow-

    E-print Network

    Kishony, Roy

    The evolution and spread of antibiotic resistance in bacterial pathogens is a grow- ing threat to public health. The frequency of antibiotic resistance in many bacterial pathogens is increasing around rate of novel antibiotic dis- covery and by the likelihood that pathogens will evolve resistance

  10. Evaluation of Glyphosate-Resistant Soybean Cultivars for Resistance to Bacterial Pustule

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. glycines causes bacterial pustule of soybean, which is a common disease in many soybean-growing areas of the world and is controlled by a single recessive gene that was commonly found in many conventional glyphosate-sensitive soybean cultivars. Since glyphosate-resistant c...

  11. Drug and radiation resistance in spheroids: cell contact and kinetics

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Peggy L. Olive; Ralph E. Durand

    1994-01-01

    Cells from multicellular spheroids are often more resistant than monolayers to drugs and radiation. While explanations for resistance can be based on differences in cell cycle distribution, inability of the drug to penetrate the spheroid, or the presence of hypoxic cells, these mechanisms do not adequately explain resistance to all agents. Small spheroids (containing about 25–50 cells) exposed to ionizing

  12. Bacteriocin from Bacillus subtilis as a novel drug against diabetic foot ulcer bacterial pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Joseph, Baby; Dhas, Berlina; Hena, Vimalin; Raj, Justin

    2013-01-01

    Objective To isolate and identify Bacillus subtilis (B. subtilis) from soil and to characterize and partially purify the bacteriocin. To evaluate the antimicrobial activity against four diabetic foot ulcer bacterial pathogens. Methods Genotypic identification was done based on Bergey's manual of systemic bacteriology. Antimicrobial susceptibility test was done by Kirby-Bauer disc diffusion method. Colonies were identified by colony morphology and biochemical characterization and also compared with MTCC 121 strain. Further identification was done by 16S rRNA sequencing. Inhibitory activities of partially purified bacteriocin on all the DFU isolates were done by agar well diffusion method. The strain was identified to produce bacteriocin by stab overlay assay. Bacteriocin was extracted by organic solvent extraction using chloroform, further purified by HPLC and physical, and chemical characterization was performed. Results The four isolates showed high level of resistance to amoxyclav and sensitivity to ciprofloxacin. HPLC purification revealed that the extracts are bacteriocin. The phylogenetic tree analysis results showed that the isolate was 99% related to B. subtilis BSF01. The results reveled activity to all the four isolates and high level of activity was seen in case of Klebsiella sp. Conclusions Partially purified bacteriocin was found to have antimicrobial activity against the four diabetic foot ulcer bacterial pathogens, which can thus be applied as a better drug molecule on further studies. The strain B. subtilis are found to be safe for use and these antimicrobial peptides can be used as an antimicrobial in humans to treat DFU bacterial pathogens. PMID:24093784

  13. Harnessing the potential of bacterial ghost for the effective delivery of drugs and biotherapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Ganeshpurkar, Aditya; Ganeshpurkar, Ankit; Pandey, Vikas; Agnihotri, Abhishek; Bansal, Divya; Dubey, Nazneen

    2014-01-01

    It seems to be a necessary need to develop an effective drug carrier system for targeted delivery of pharmaceuticals. Bacterial ghosts are emerging drug delivery platform that are capable of delivery of proteins, antigens, nucleic acids, and pharmaceuticals. Bacterial ghosts are generally produced by lysis of gram-negative bacteria. Pharmaceutically, these ghosts could be utilized to deliver proteins peptides, vaccines, drugs effectively. However, this technology is at initial stage and systematic studies are required to implement such system over humans. PMID:24678455

  14. Bacterial drug tolerance under clinical conditions is governed by anaerobic adaptation but not anaerobic respiration.

    PubMed

    Hemsley, Claudia M; Luo, Jamie X; Andreae, Clio A; Butler, Clive S; Soyer, Orkun S; Titball, Richard W

    2014-10-01

    Noninherited antibiotic resistance is a phenomenon whereby a subpopulation of genetically identical bacteria displays phenotypic tolerance to antibiotics. We show here that compared to Escherichia coli, the clinically relevant genus Burkholderia displays much higher levels of cells that tolerate ceftazidime. By measuring the dynamics of the formation of drug-tolerant cells under conditions that mimic in vivo infections, we show that in Burkholderia bacteria, oxygen levels affect the formation of these cells. The drug-tolerant cells are characterized by an anaerobic metabolic signature and can be eliminated by oxygenating the system or adding nitrate. The transcriptome profile suggests that these cells are not dormant persister cells and are likely to be drug tolerant as a consequence of the upregulation of anaerobic nitrate respiration, efflux pumps, ?-lactamases, and stress response proteins. These findings have important implications for the treatment of chronic bacterial infections and the methodologies and conditions that are used to study drug-tolerant and persister cells in vitro. PMID:25049258

  15. Bacterial Drug Tolerance under Clinical Conditions Is Governed by Anaerobic Adaptation but not Anaerobic Respiration

    PubMed Central

    Hemsley, Claudia M.; Luo, Jamie X.; Andreae, Clio A.; Butler, Clive S.; Soyer, Orkun S.

    2014-01-01

    Noninherited antibiotic resistance is a phenomenon whereby a subpopulation of genetically identical bacteria displays phenotypic tolerance to antibiotics. We show here that compared to Escherichia coli, the clinically relevant genus Burkholderia displays much higher levels of cells that tolerate ceftazidime. By measuring the dynamics of the formation of drug-tolerant cells under conditions that mimic in vivo infections, we show that in Burkholderia bacteria, oxygen levels affect the formation of these cells. The drug-tolerant cells are characterized by an anaerobic metabolic signature and can be eliminated by oxygenating the system or adding nitrate. The transcriptome profile suggests that these cells are not dormant persister cells and are likely to be drug tolerant as a consequence of the upregulation of anaerobic nitrate respiration, efflux pumps, ?-lactamases, and stress response proteins. These findings have important implications for the treatment of chronic bacterial infections and the methodologies and conditions that are used to study drug-tolerant and persister cells in vitro. PMID:25049258

  16. Stop the Spread of Superbugs: Help Fight Drug Resistant Bacteria

    MedlinePLUS

    ... the Spread of Superbugs Help Fight Drug-Resistant Bacteria For nearly a century, bacteria-fighting drugs known as antibiotics have helped to control and destroy many of the harmful bacteria that can make us sick. But in recent ...

  17. Emergence of antibiotic resistance from multinucleated bacterial filaments

    PubMed Central

    Bos, Julia; Zhang, Qiucen; Vyawahare, Saurabh; Rogers, Elizabeth; Rosenberg, Susan M.; Austin, Robert H.

    2015-01-01

    Bacteria can rapidly evolve resistance to antibiotics via the SOS response, a state of high-activity DNA repair and mutagenesis. We explore here the first steps of this evolution in the bacterium Escherichia coli. Induction of the SOS response by the genotoxic antibiotic ciprofloxacin changes the E. coli rod shape into multichromosome-containing filaments. We show that at subminimal inhibitory concentrations of ciprofloxacin the bacterial filament divides asymmetrically repeatedly at the tip. Chromosome-containing buds are made that, if resistant, propagate nonfilamenting progeny with enhanced resistance to ciprofloxacin as the parent filament dies. We propose that the multinucleated filament creates an environmental niche where evolution can proceed via generation of improved mutant chromosomes due to the mutagenic SOS response and possible recombination of the new alleles between chromosomes. Our data provide a better understanding of the processes underlying the origin of resistance at the single-cell level and suggest an analogous role to the eukaryotic aneuploidy condition in cancer. PMID:25492931

  18. Impaired fitness of drug-resistant malaria parasites: evidence and implication on drug-deployment policies.

    PubMed

    Babiker, Hamza A; Hastings, Ian M; Swedberg, Göte

    2009-06-01

    Malaria, a leading parasitic disease, inflicts an enormous toll on human lives and is caused by protozoal parasites belonging to the genus Plasmodium. Antimalarial drugs targeting essential biochemical processes in the parasite are the primary resources for management and control. However, the parasite has established mutations, substantially reducing the efficacy of these drugs. First-line therapy is faced the with the consistent evolution of drug-resistant genotypes carrying these mutations. However, drug-resistant genotypes are likely to be less fit than the wild-type, suggesting that they might disappear by reducing the volume of drug pressure. A substantial body of epidemiological evidence confirmed that the frequency of resistant genotypes wanes when active drug selection declines. Drug selection on the parasite genome that removes genetic variation in the vicinity of drug-resistant genes (hitch-hiking) is common among resistant parasites in the field. This can further disadvantage drug-resistant strains and limit their variability in the face of a mounting immune response. Attempts to provide unequivocal evidence for the fitness cost of drug resistance have monitored the outcomes of laboratory competition experiments of deliberate mixtures of sensitive and resistant strains, in the absence of drug pressure, using isogenic clones produced either by drug selection or gene manipulation. Some of these experiments provided inconclusive results, but they all suggested reduced fitness of drug-resistant clones in the absence of drug pressure. In addition, biochemical analyses provided clearer information demonstrating that the mutation of some antimalarial-targeted enzymes lowers their activity compared with the wild-type enzyme. Here, we review current evidences for the disadvantage of drug-resistance mutations, and discuss some strategies of drug deployment to maximize the cost of resistance and limit its spread. PMID:19485798

  19. Mapping Factors that Drive Drug Resistance (with a Focus on Resource-Limited Settings): A First Step Towards Better Informed Policy

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Alexandra Beith

    Drug resistance is a global challenge, affecting multiple diseases and recognizing no borders. Resistance to the pharmacopeia available to treat AIDS, malaria, tuberculosis, and other bacterial infections is rising and threatens progress in global health. Up to 10% of treatment-naive HIV+ individuals in the industrialized world have been found to be infected by relatively fit strains of HIV with resistance

  20. Novel antimicrobial peptides that exhibit activity against select agents and other drug resistant bacteria.

    PubMed

    Venugopal, Divakaramenon; Klapper, David; Srouji, Antoine H; Bhonsle, Jayendra B; Borschel, Richard; Mueller, Allen; Russell, Amanda L; Williams, Brittany C; Hicks, Rickey P

    2010-07-15

    One of the greatest challenges facing modern medicine is the evolution of drug resistant strains of bacteria. In addition to traditional methods of exposure to traditional bacterial organisms there is a growing concerned of the use of bacteria as bio-terrorism agents. To counter the evolution of drug resistant and potential bio-terrorism bacterial agents new antibiotic drugs must be developed. One potential source of new therapeutic agents that act via a novel mechanism of action are natural and synthetic antimicrobial peptides (AMPs). In our laboratories we have developed a series of AMPs incorporating the un-natural amino acids Tic-Oic to impart organism selectivity and potency while increasing metabolic stability. Herein the in vitro activity of these peptides, including ten new compounds, against eight potential bio-terrorism bacterial agents and three other bacterial strains is presented and discussed. These peptides exhibit a wide range of organism potency and selectivity. Calcein fluorescence leakage and circular dichroism studies were conducted to confirm that these peptides interact with zwitterionic and anionic liposomes. PMID:20558071

  1. Targeted cancer therapy; nanotechnology approaches for overcoming drug resistance.

    PubMed

    Gao, Yan; Shen, Jacson K; Milane, Lara; Hornicek, Francis J; Amiji, Mansoor M; Duan, Zhenfeng

    2015-01-01

    Recent advances in cancer molecular biology have resulted in parallel and unprecedented progress in the development of targeted cancer therapy. Targeted therapy can provide higher efficacy and lower toxicity than conventional chemotherapy for cancer. However, like traditional chemotherapy, molecularly targeted cancer therapy also faces the challenge of drug resistance. Multiple mechanisms are responsible for chemotherapy resistance in tumors, including over-expression of efflux transporters, somatic alterations of drug targets, deregulation of apoptosis, and numerous pharmacokinetic issues. Nanotechnology based approaches are proving to be efficacious in overcoming drug resistance in cancer. Combination of targeted therapies with nanotechnology approaches is a promising strategy to overcome targeted therapy drug resistance in cancer treatment. This review discusses the mechanisms of targeted drug resistance in cancer and discusses nanotechnology approaches to circumvent this resistance. PMID:25666804

  2. Application of hordothionins and cecropin B for engineering bacterial disease resistance into plants

    Microsoft Academic Search

    D. Florack

    1994-01-01

    Bacterial diseases can cause a drastic decrease of yield in certain crops. Breeding for bacterial disease resistance therefore is of utmost necessity. Up to now, traditional plant breeding was the only method to reach this goal. Recent developments in genetic engineering technology however provide novel ways for the production of disease resistant plants. This thesis describes the results of two

  3. Recent highlights in antimalarial drug resistance and chemotherapy research

    E-print Network

    Symington, Lorraine S.

    Recent highlights in antimalarial drug resistance and chemotherapy research David A. Fidock1 investigations into anti- malarial drug resistance and chemotherapy, including reports of some of the many of antimalarial chemotherapy and priorities moving forward. The search for new antimalarials For decades, malaria

  4. Emergence of HIV-1 Drug Resistance During Antiretroviral Treatment

    E-print Network

    2007-04-20

    mune response in the emergence of drug resistance was investigated in (Shiri et al., ..... These coefficients measure the independent influence of each input pa- ..... exact same resources—uninfected target T cells, hence the resistant strain that becomes ...... the susceptibility of the virus to antiretroviral drugs in cell culture.

  5. Electrospinning polyvinylidene fluoride fibrous membranes containing anti-bacterial drugs used as wound dressing.

    PubMed

    He, Ting; Wang, Jingnan; Huang, Peilin; Zeng, Baozhen; Li, Haihong; Cao, Qingyun; Zhang, Shiying; Luo, Zhuo; Deng, David Y B; Zhang, Hongwu; Zhou, Wuyi

    2015-06-01

    The aim of this study was to synthesis drug-loaded fibrous membrane scaffolds for potential applications as wound dressing. Polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) fibrous membranes were loaded with enrofloxacin (Enro) drugs by using an electrospinning process, and their mechanical strength, drug release profile and anti-bacterial properties were evaluated. Enro drug-loaded PVDF membranes exhibited good elasticity, flexibility and excellent mechanical strength. The electrospinning Enro/PVDF membranes showed a burst drug release in the initial 12h, followed by sustained release for the next 3 days, which was an essential property for antibiotic drugs applied for wound healing. The drug-loaded PVDF fibrous membranes displayed excellent anti-bacterial activity toward Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus. The results suggest that electrospinning PVDF membrane scaffolds loaded with drugs can be used as wound dressing. PMID:25936562

  6. Dominant drug targets suppress the emergence of antiviral resistance

    PubMed Central

    Tanner, Elizabeth J; Liu, Hong-mei; Oberste, M Steven; Pallansch, Mark; Collett, Marc S; Kirkegaard, Karla

    2014-01-01

    The emergence of drug resistance can defeat the successful treatment of pathogens that display high mutation rates, as exemplified by RNA viruses. Here we detail a new paradigm in which a single compound directed against a ‘dominant drug target’ suppresses the emergence of naturally occurring drug-resistant variants in mice and cultured cells. All new drug-resistant viruses arise during intracellular replication and initially express their phenotypes in the presence of drug-susceptible genomes. For the targets of most anti-viral compounds, the presence of these drug-susceptible viral genomes does not prevent the selection of drug resistance. Here we show that, for an inhibitor of the function of oligomeric capsid proteins of poliovirus, the expression of drug-susceptible genomes causes chimeric oligomers to form, thus rendering the drug-susceptible genomes dominant. The use of dominant drug targets should suppress drug resistance whenever multiple genomes arise in the same cell and express products in a common milieu. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.03830.001 PMID:25365453

  7. 78 FR 63220 - Guidance for Industry on Acute Bacterial Skin and Skin Structure Infections: Developing Drugs for...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-23

    ...sponsors in the development of new antibacterial drugs to treat acute bacterial skin...sponsors in the development of new antibacterial drugs for the treatment of ABSSSI...of clinical trials with respect to antibacterial and antifungal drugs . . . .''...

  8. Acquired Drug Resistance in Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Poor Outcomes among Patients with Multidrug-Resistant Tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Kempker, Russell R; Kipiani, Maia; Mirtskhulava, Veriko; Tukvadze, Nestani; Magee, Matthew J; Blumberg, Henry M

    2015-06-01

    Rates and risk factors for acquired drug resistance and association with outcomes among patients with multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR TB) are not well defined. In an MDR TB cohort from the country of Georgia, drug susceptibility testing for second-line drugs (SLDs) was performed at baseline and every third month. Acquired resistance was defined as any SLD whose status changed from susceptible at baseline to resistant at follow-up. Among 141 patients, acquired resistance in Mycobacterium tuberculosis was observed in 19 (14%); prevalence was 9.1% for ofloxacin and 9.8% for capreomycin or kanamycin. Baseline cavitary disease and resistance to >6 drugs were associated with acquired resistance. Patients with M. tuberculosis that had acquired resistance were at significantly increased risk for poor treatment outcome compared with patients without these isolates (89% vs. 36%; p<0.01). Acquired resistance occurs commonly among patients with MDR TB and impedes successful treatment outcomes. PMID:25993036

  9. Acquired Drug Resistance in Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Poor Outcomes among Patients with Multidrug-Resistant Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Kipiani, Maia; Mirtskhulava, Veriko; Tukvadze, Nestani; Magee, Matthew J.; Blumberg, Henry M.

    2015-01-01

    Rates and risk factors for acquired drug resistance and association with outcomes among patients with multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR TB) are not well defined. In an MDR TB cohort from the country of Georgia, drug susceptibility testing for second-line drugs (SLDs) was performed at baseline and every third month. Acquired resistance was defined as any SLD whose status changed from susceptible at baseline to resistant at follow-up. Among 141 patients, acquired resistance in Mycobacterium tuberculosis was observed in 19 (14%); prevalence was 9.1% for ofloxacin and 9.8% for capreomycin or kanamycin. Baseline cavitary disease and resistance to >6 drugs were associated with acquired resistance. Patients with M. tuberculosis that had acquired resistance were at significantly increased risk for poor treatment outcome compared with patients without these isolates (89% vs. 36%; p<0.01). Acquired resistance occurs commonly among patients with MDR TB and impedes successful treatment outcomes. PMID:25993036

  10. Aggressive Chemotherapy and the Selection of Drug Resistant Pathogens

    E-print Network

    Day, Troy

    Aggressive Chemotherapy and the Selection of Drug Resistant Pathogens Silvie Huijben1¤a *, Andrew S. Aggressive chemotherapy thus generates opposing evolutionary forces which together determine the rate of drug, Bell AS, Sim DG, Tomasello D, Mideo N, et al. (2013) Aggressive Chemotherapy and the Selection of Drug

  11. Efflux-Mediated Drug Resistance in Bacteria: an Update

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xian-Zhi; Nikaido, Hiroshi

    2010-01-01

    Drug efflux pumps play a key role in drug resistance and also serve other functions in bacteria. There has been a growing list of multidrug and drug-specific efflux pumps characterized from bacteria of human, animal, plant and environmental origins. These pumps are mostly encoded on the chromosome although they can also be plasmid-encoded. A previous article (Li X-Z and Nikaido H, Drugs, 2004; 64[2]: 159–204) had provided a comprehensive review regarding efflux-mediated drug resistance in bacteria. In the past five years, significant progress has been achieved in further understanding of drug resistance-related efflux transporters and this review focuses on the latest studies in this field since 2003. This has been demonstrated in multiple aspects that include but are not limited to: further molecular and biochemical characterization of the known drug efflux pumps and identification of novel drug efflux pumps; structural elucidation of the transport mechanisms of drug transporters; regulatory mechanisms of drug efflux pumps; determining the role of the drug efflux pumps in other functions such as stress responses, virulence and cell communication; and development of efflux pump inhibitors. Overall, the multifaceted implications of drug efflux transporters warrant novel strategies to combat multidrug resistance in bacteria. PMID:19678712

  12. HIV Drug Resistance and the importance of adherence

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    2005-01-01

    This animation is comprised of five sections and outlines the specifics of drug resistant HIV, drugs that are available to stop HIV, and more information relating to HIV Medication. The animation goes to the level of cell biology and discusses multiple types of drugs used in fighting HIV.

  13. Cancer stem cells and drug resistance: the potential of nanomedicine

    PubMed Central

    Vinogradov, Serguei; Wei, Xin

    2012-01-01

    Properties of the small group of cancer cells called tumor-initiating or cancer stem cells (CSCs) involved in drug resistance, metastasis and relapse of cancers can significantly affect tumor therapy. Importantly, tumor drug resistance seems to be closely related to many intrinsic or acquired properties of CSCs, such as quiescence, specific morphology, DNA repair ability and overexpression of antiapoptotic proteins, drug efflux transporters and detoxifying enzymes. The specific microenvironment (niche) and hypoxic stability provide additional protection against anticancer therapy for CSCs. Thus, CSC-focused therapy is destined to form the core of any effective anticancer strategy. Nanomedicine has great potential in the development of CSC-targeting drugs, controlled drug delivery and release, and the design of novel gene-specific drugs and diagnostic modalities. This review is focused on tumor drug resistance-related properties of CSCs and describes current nanomedicine approaches, which could form the basis of novel combination therapies for eliminating metastatic and CSCs. PMID:22471722

  14. Relatively low primary drug resistant tuberculosis in southwestern Ethiopia

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The prevalence of drug resistant tuberculosis (TB) in Ethiopia in general, and Jimma area in particular, is not well documented. We conducted a study at Jimma University specialized hospital in southwest Ethiopia among new cases of smear positive TB patients to determine the pattern of resistance to first-line drugs. Methods A health institution based cross sectional study was conducted from November 2010 to September 2011. Any newly diagnosed smear positive TB patient 18?years and above was included in the study. Demographic and related data were collected by trained personnel using a pretested structured questionnaire. Mycobacterial drug susceptibility testing (DST) to the first line drugs isoniazid (INH), rifampicin (RIF), ethambutol (EMB) and streptomycin (STM) was performed on cultures using the indirect proportion method. M. tuberculosis complex (MTBC) was identified with the Capilia TB-Neo test. Results 136 patients were enrolled in the study. Resistance to at least one drug was identified in 18.4%. The highest prevalence of resistance to any drug was identified against INH (13.2%) followed by STM (8.1%). There was no statistically significant difference in the proportion of any resistance by sex, age, HIV status and history of being imprisoned. The highest mono resistance was observed against INH (7.4%). Mono resistance to streptomycin was associated with HIV infection (crude OR 15.63, 95%CI: 1.31, 187). Multidrug-resistance TB (MDR-TB) was observed in two patients (1.5%). Conclusion Resistance to at least one drug was 18.4% (INH-13.2% and STM-8.1%). STM resistance was associated with HIV positivity. There was relatively low prevalence of MDR-TB yet INH resistance was common around Jimma. The capacity of laboratories for TB culture and DST should be strengthened, in order to correctly manage TB patients and avoid amplification of drug resistance. PMID:22574696

  15. Biochemistry of Bacterial Multidrug Efflux Pumps

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Sanath; Varela, Manuel F.

    2012-01-01

    Bacterial pathogens that are multi-drug resistant compromise the effectiveness of treatment when they are the causative agents of infectious disease. These multi-drug resistance mechanisms allow bacteria to survive in the presence of clinically useful antimicrobial agents, thus reducing the efficacy of chemotherapy towards infectious disease. Importantly, active multi-drug efflux is a major mechanism for bacterial pathogen drug resistance. Therefore, because of their overwhelming presence in bacterial pathogens, these active multi-drug efflux mechanisms remain a major area of intense study, so that ultimately measures may be discovered to inhibit these active multi-drug efflux pumps. PMID:22605991

  16. Management of febrile neutropenia in the era of bacterial resistance

    PubMed Central

    Alp, Sehnaz

    2013-01-01

    Managing cancer patients with fever and neutropenia must be considered as a medical emergency since any delay in initiating appropriate empirical antibacterial therapy may result in high rates of mortality and morbidity. Emerging antibacterial resistance in bacterial pathogens infecting febrile neutropenic patients complicates management, and choosing the type of empirical antimicrobial therapy has become a challenge. To further complicate the decision process, not all neutropenic patients are in same category of susceptibility to develop severe infection. While low-risk patients may be treated with oral antibiotics in the outpatient setting, high-risk patients usually need to be admitted to hospital and receive parenteral broad-spectrum antibiotics until the neutrophil levels recover. These strategies have recently been addressed in two international guidelines from the Infectious Diseases Society of America (IDSA) and the European Conference on Infections in Leukaemia (ECIL). This review gives a brief overview of current antimicrobial resistance problems and their effects in febrile neutropenic cancer patients by summarizing the suggestions from the IDSA and ECIL guidelines. PMID:25165543

  17. Sec and drugs and rock'n'roll: antibiotic targeting of bacterial protein translocation Anti-infectives

    E-print Network

    Economou, Tassos

    Anti-infectives Sec, drugs and rock'n'roll: antibiotic targeting of bacterial protein translocationEconomou Sec and drugs and rock'n'roll: antibiotic targeting of bacterial protein translocation, University of Crete, PO Box 1527, GR-711 10 Iraklio, Crete, Greece A large number of bacterial proteins

  18. Development of new antituberculous drugs based on bacterial virulence factors interfering with host cytokine networks

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Haruaki TomiokaYutaka Tatano; Yutaka Tatano; Chiaki Sano; Toshiaki Shimizu

    2011-01-01

    The worldwide increase in the prevalence of tuberculosis (TB), especially multidrug-resistant TB and extensively drug-resistant\\u000a TB, is an important global health concern, and new effective drugs are urgently needed. Information on the genome of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) and various mycobacterial virulence genes is leading to the identification of genes that code for new drug targets.\\u000a Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) is resistant

  19. Drug Resistance among Pulmonary Tuberculosis Patients in Calabar, Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Otu, Akaninyene; Umoh, Victor; Habib, Abdulrazak; Ameh, Soter; Lawson, Lovett; Ansa, Victor

    2013-01-01

    Background. This study aimed to determine the pattern of drug susceptibility to first-line drugs among pulmonary TB patients in two hospitals in Calabar, Nigeria. Methods. This was a descriptive cross-sectional study carried out between February 2011 and April 2012. Sputum samples from consecutive TB patients in Calabar were subjected to culture on Lowenstein-Jensen (LJ) slopes followed by drug susceptibility testing (DST). The DST was performed on LJ medium by the proportion method. Results. Forty-two of the 100 Mycobacterium tuberculosis strains were found to be resistant to at least one drug. Resistance to only one drug (monoresistance) was found in 17 patients. No strains with monoresistance to rifampicin were found. Resistance to two drugs was found in 22 patients, while one patient was resistant to both three and four drugs. MDR TB was seen in 4% (4/100). The independent variables of HIV serology and sex were not significantly associated with resistance (P > 0.05). Conclusion. There was a high prevalence of anti-TB drug resistance in Calabar. PMID:24078872

  20. Drug Resistance among Pulmonary Tuberculosis Patients in Calabar, Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    Otu, Akaninyene; Umoh, Victor; Habib, Abdulrazak; Ameh, Soter; Lawson, Lovett

    2013-01-01

    Background. This study aimed to determine the pattern of drug susceptibility to first-line drugs among pulmonary TB patients in two hospitals in Calabar, Nigeria. Methods. This was a descriptive cross-sectional study carried out between February 2011 and April 2012. Sputum samples from consecutive TB patients in Calabar were subjected to culture on Lowenstein-Jensen (LJ) slopes followed by drug susceptibility testing (DST). The DST was performed on LJ medium by the proportion method. Results. Forty-two of the 100 Mycobacterium tuberculosis strains were found to be resistant to at least one drug. Resistance to only one drug (monoresistance) was found in 17 patients. No strains with monoresistance to rifampicin were found. Resistance to two drugs was found in 22 patients, while one patient was resistant to both three and four drugs. MDR TB was seen in 4% (4/100). The independent variables of HIV serology and sex were not significantly associated with resistance (P > 0.05). Conclusion. There was a high prevalence of anti-TB drug resistance in Calabar. PMID:24078872

  1. Structural pharmacogenomics, drug resistance and the design of anti-infective super-drugs

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Edward T. Maggio; Mark Shenderovich; Ron Kagan; Dean Goddette; Kal Ramnarayan

    2002-01-01

    Large-scale comparative analysis of drug-target polymorphism structures enables the rational design of next generation ‘super drugs’ – drugs that are less prone to development of drug resistance or that work for the largest possible fraction of the patient population. Furthermore, knowledge of the drug-target-shape repertoire that exists within the patient population enables predictions of likely clinical trial outcomes and response

  2. Understanding Drug Resistance in Breast Cancer with Mathematical Oncology

    PubMed Central

    Brocato, Terisse; Dogra, Prashant; Koay, Eugene J.; Day, Armin; Chuang, Yao-Li; Wang, Zhihui; Cristini, Vittorio

    2014-01-01

    Chemotherapy is mainstay of treatment for the majority of patients with breast cancer, but results in only 26% of patients with distant metastasis living 5 years past treatment in the United States, largely due to drug resistance. The complexity of drug resistance calls for an integrated approach of mathematical modeling and experimental investigation to develop quantitative tools that reveal insights into drug resistance mechanisms, predict chemotherapy efficacy, and identify novel treatment approaches. This paper reviews recent modeling work for understanding cancer drug resistance through the use of computer simulations of molecular signaling networks and cancerous tissues, with a particular focus on breast cancer. These mathematical models are developed by drawing on current advances in molecular biology, physical characterization of tumors, and emerging drug delivery methods (e.g., nanotherapeutics). We focus our discussion on representative modeling works that have provided quantitative insight into chemotherapy resistance in breast cancer and how drug resistance can be overcome or minimized to optimize chemotherapy treatment. We also discuss future directions of mathematical modeling in understanding drug resistance. PMID:24891927

  3. AcrB drug-binding pocket substitution confers clinically relevant resistance and altered substrate specificity.

    PubMed

    Blair, Jessica M A; Bavro, Vassiliy N; Ricci, Vito; Modi, Niraj; Cacciotto, Pierpaolo; Kleinekath?fer, Ulrich; Ruggerone, Paolo; Vargiu, Attilio V; Baylay, Alison J; Smith, Helen E; Brandon, Yvonne; Galloway, David; Piddock, Laura J V

    2015-03-17

    The incidence of multidrug-resistant bacterial infections is increasing globally and the need to understand the underlying mechanisms is paramount to discover new therapeutics. The efflux pumps of Gram-negative bacteria have a broad substrate range and transport antibiotics out of the bacterium, conferring intrinsic multidrug resistance (MDR). The genomes of pre- and posttherapy MDR clinical isolates of Salmonella Typhimurium from a patient that failed antibacterial therapy and died were sequenced. In the posttherapy isolate we identified a novel G288D substitution in AcrB, the resistance-nodulation division transporter in the AcrAB-TolC tripartite MDR efflux pump system. Computational structural analysis suggested that G288D in AcrB heavily affects the structure, dynamics, and hydration properties of the distal binding pocket altering specificity for antibacterial drugs. Consistent with this hypothesis, recreation of the mutation in standard Escherichia coli and Salmonella strains showed that G288D AcrB altered substrate specificity, conferring decreased susceptibility to the fluoroquinolone antibiotic ciprofloxacin by increased efflux. At the same time, the substitution increased susceptibility to other drugs by decreased efflux. Information about drug transport is vital for the discovery of new antibacterials; the finding that one amino acid change can cause resistance to some drugs, while conferring increased susceptibility to others, could provide a basis for new drug development and treatment strategies. PMID:25737552

  4. Genotypic Testing for Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Drug Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Shafer, Robert W.

    2002-01-01

    There are 16 approved human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) drugs belonging to three mechanistic classes: protease inhibitors, nucleoside and nucleotide reverse transcriptase (RT) inhibitors, and nonnucleoside RT inhibitors. HIV-1 resistance to these drugs is caused by mutations in the protease and RT enzymes, the molecular targets of these drugs. Drug resistance mutations arise most often in treated individuals, resulting from selective drug pressure in the presence of incompletely suppressed virus replication. HIV-1 isolates with drug resistance mutations, however, may also be transmitted to newly infected individuals. Three expert panels have recommended that HIV-1 protease and RT susceptibility testing should be used to help select HIV drug therapy. Although genotypic testing is more complex than typical antimicrobial susceptibility tests, there is a rich literature supporting the prognostic value of HIV-1 protease and RT mutations. This review describes the genetic mechanisms of HIV-1 drug resistance and summarizes published data linking individual RT and protease mutations to in vitro and in vivo resistance to the currently available HIV drugs. PMID:11932232

  5. Delamanid: A new armor in combating drug-resistant tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Xavier, Alphienes Stanley; Lakshmanan, Mageshwaran

    2014-07-01

    Intense search has been made in the discovery of newer anti-TB drugs to tackle the issues such as drug resistance, HIV co-infection and risk of drug-drug interactions in the management of TB. Delamanid, a newer mycobacterial cell wall synthesis inhibitor, received a conditional approval from European medicines agency (EMA) for the treatment of MDR-TB. Preclinical and clinical studies have shown that delamanid has high potency, least risk for drug-drug interactions and better tolerability. PMID:25210407

  6. Geographical variation in cloacal microflora and bacterial antibiotic resistance in a threatened avian scavenger in relation to diet and livestock farming practices.

    PubMed

    Blanco, Guillermo; Lemus, Jesús A; Grande, Javier; Gangoso, Laura; Grande, Juan M; Donázar, José A; Arroyo, Bernardo; Frías, Oscar; Hiraldo, Fernando

    2007-07-01

    The impact on wildlife health of the increase in the use of antimicrobial agents with the intensification of livestock production remains unknown. The composition, richness and prevalence of cloacal microflora as well as bacterial resistance to antibiotics in nestlings and full-grown Egyptian vultures Neophron percnopterus were assessed in four areas of Spain in which the degree of farming intensification differs. Differences in diet composition, especially the role of stabled livestock carrion, appear to govern the similarities of bacterial flora composition among continental populations, while the insular vulture population (Fuerteventura, Canary Islands) showed differences attributed to isolation. Evidence of a positive relationship between the consumption of stabled livestock carrion and bacterial resistance to multiple antibiotics was found. Bacterial resistance was high for semisynthetic penicillins and enrofloxacin, especially in the area with the most intensive stabled livestock production. The pattern of antibiotic resistance was similar for the different bacterial species within each area. Bacterial resistance to antibiotics may be determined by resistance of bacteria present in the livestock meat remains that constituted the food of this species, as indicated by the fact that resistance to each antibiotic was correlated in Escherichia coli isolated from swine carrion and Egyptian vulture nestlings. In addition, resistance in normal faecal bacteria (present in the microflora of both livestock and vultures) was higher than in Staphylococcus epidermidis, a species indicator of the transient flora acquired presumably through the consumption of wild rabbits. Potential negative effects of the use of antimicrobials in livestock farming included the direct ingestion of these drug residues and the effects of bacterial antibiotic resistance on the health of scavengers. PMID:17564607

  7. Combinatorial discovery of polymers resistant to bacterial attachment

    E-print Network

    Hook, Andrew L

    Bacterial attachment and subsequent biofilm formation pose key challenges to the optimal performance of medical devices. In this study, we determined the attachment of selected bacterial species to hundreds of polymeric ...

  8. Drug-resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae in community-acquired pneumonia

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Michael Henry; Howard L. Leaf

    2003-01-01

    The emergence of Streptococcus pneumoniae isolates resistant to not only penicillin, but to other antipneumococcal agents as well, has major public health implications.\\u000a Drug-resistant S. pneumoniae are distributed worldwide, and resistance has become increasingly prevalent in the United States within the past decade.\\u000a The relevance of resistance, particularly to the ?-lactams, to treatment outcome has been subject to debate. Pneumonia

  9. Drug-Resistant Candida glabrata Infection in Cancer Patients

    PubMed Central

    Farmakiotis, Dimitrios; Tarrand, Jeffrey J.

    2014-01-01

    Cancer patients are at risk for candidemia, and increasing Candida spp. resistance poses an emerging threat. We determined rates of antifungal drug resistance, identified factors associated with resistance, and investigated the correlation between resistance and all-cause mortality rates among cancer patients with ?1 C. glabrata–positive blood culture at MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas, USA, during March 2005–September 2013. Of 146 isolates, 30 (20.5%) were resistant to fluconazole, 15 (10.3%) to caspofungin, and 10 (6.8%) to multiple drugs (9 caspofungin-resistant isolates were also resistant to fluconazole, 1 to amphotericin B). Independently associated with fluconazole resistance were azole preexposure, hematologic malignancy, and mechanical ventilation. Independently associated with caspofungin resistance were echinocandin preexposure, monocytopenia, and total parenteral nutrition. Fluconazole resistance was highly associated with caspofungin resistance, independent of prior azole or echinocandin use. Caspofungin resistance was associated with increased 28-day all-cause mortality rates. These findings highlight the need for good stewardship of antifungal drugs. PMID:25340258

  10. Drug-resistant Candida glabrata infection in cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Farmakiotis, Dimitrios; Tarrand, Jeffrey J; Kontoyiannis, Dimitrios P

    2014-11-01

    Cancer patients are at risk for candidemia, and increasing Candida spp. resistance poses an emerging threat. We determined rates of antifungal drug resistance, identified factors associated with resistance, and investigated the correlation between resistance and all-cause mortality rates among cancer patients with ?1 C. glabrata-positive blood culture at MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas, USA, during March 2005-September 2013. Of 146 isolates, 30 (20.5%) were resistant to fluconazole, 15 (10.3%) to caspofungin, and 10 (6.8%) to multiple drugs (9 caspofungin-resistant isolates were also resistant to fluconazole, 1 to amphotericin B). Independently associated with fluconazole resistance were azole preexposure, hematologic malignancy, and mechanical ventilation. Independently associated with caspofungin resistance were echinocandin preexposure, monocytopenia, and total parenteral nutrition. Fluconazole resistance was highly associated with caspofungin resistance, independent of prior azole or echinocandin use. Caspofungin resistance was associated with increased 28-day all-cause mortality rates. These findings highlight the need for good stewardship of antifungal drugs. PMID:25340258

  11. Thermal resistance of naturally occurring airborne bacterial spores.

    PubMed Central

    Puleo, J R; Bergstrom, S L; Peeler, J T; Oxborrow, G S

    1978-01-01

    Simulation of a heat process used in the terminal dry-heat decontamination of the Viking spacecraft is reported. Naturally occurring airborne bacterial spores were collected on Teflon ribbons in selected spacecraft assembly areas and subsequently subjected to dry heat. Thermal inactivation experiments were conducted at 105, 111.7, 120, 125, 130, and 135 degrees C with a moisture level of 1.2 mg of water per liter. Heat survivors were recovered at temperatures of 135 degrees C when a 30-h heating cycle was employed. Survivors were recovered from all cycles studied and randomly selected for identification. The naturally occurring spore population was reduced an average of 2.2 to 4.4 log cycles from 105 to 135 degrees C. Heating cycles of 5 and 15 h at temperature were compared with the standard 30-h cycle at 111.7, 120, and 125 degrees C. No significant differences in inactivation (alpha = 0.05) were observed between 111.7 and 120 degrees C. The 30-h cycle differs from the 5-and 15-h cycles at 125 degrees C. Thus, the heating cycle can be reduced if a small fraction (about 10-3 to 10-4) of very resistant spores can be tolerated. PMID:727780

  12. Bacterial Magnetosome: A Novel Biogenetic Magnetic Targeted Drug Carrier with Potential Multifunctions

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Jianbo; Li, Ying; Liang, Xing-Jie; Wang, Paul C.

    2012-01-01

    Bacterial magnetosomes (BMs) synthesized by magnetotactic bacteria have recently drawn great interest due to their unique features. BMs are used experimentally as carriers for antibodies, enzymes, ligands, nucleic acids, and chemotherapeutic drugs. In addition to the common attractive properties of magnetic carriers, BMs also show superiority as targeting nanoscale drug carriers, which is hardly matched by artificial magnetic particles. We are presenting the potential applications of BMs as drug carriers by introducing the drug-loading methods and strategies and the recent research progress of BMs which has contributed to the application of BMs as drug carriers. PMID:22448162

  13. Extensively drug resistant tuberculosis (XDR-TB): A potential threat

    PubMed Central

    Marwar, Anaga; Shaker, Ivvala Anand; Palawan, Hemraz; Nanadal; Ranjith, M. S.; GokulShankar

    2010-01-01

    Emergence of extensively drug resistant tuberculosis (XDR-TB) has been reported by more than 55 countries. XDR-TB is considered as untreatable and highly fatal disease. In developing countries like India, number of cases of multi-drug resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB) and XDR-TB are increasing. Emergence of resistance to Isoniazid and Rifampicin, the two most effective and well tolerated agents, coupled with resistance to second line agents pose limited treatment options for XDR-TB. The present minireview provides information about the seriousness of XDR-TB and the drugs available for its treatment. Although considered a fatal disorder, judicious use of combination of drugs, retaining their antimycobacterial activity, can improve the clinical outcome of XDR-TB. Only such an approach can provide some hope for the patients of XDR-TB PMID:24825999

  14. Emergence of Drug-Resistant Influenza Virus: Population Dynamical Considerations

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Roland R. Regoes (Institute of Integrative Biology, ETH ZĂĽrich; )

    2006-04-21

    Access to the article is free, however registration and sign-in are required: Given the considerable challenges to the rapid development of an effective vaccine against influenza, antiviral agents will play an important role as a first-line defense if a new pandemic occurs. The large-scale use of drugs for chemoprophylaxis and treatment will impose strong selection for the evolution of drug-resistant strains. The ensuing transmission of those strains could substantially limit the effectiveness of the drugs as a first-line defense. Summarizing recent data on the rate at which the treatment of influenza infection generates resistance de novo and on the transmission fitness of resistant virus, we discuss possible implications for the epidemiological spread of drug resistance in the context of an established population dynamic model.

  15. Travelers Bringing Drug-Resistant Bacteria to United States

    MedlinePLUS

    ... 151813.html Travelers Bringing Drug-Resistant Bacteria to United States Strain of Shigella is easily transmitted and causes ... bacteria that causes diarrhea is spreading in the United States, federal health officials warned Thursday. Travelers are bringing ...

  16. Antimicrobial resistance determinant microarray for analysis of multi-drug resistant isolates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taitt, Chris Rowe; Leski, Tomasz; Stenger, David; Vora, Gary J.; House, Brent; Nicklasson, Matilda; Pimentel, Guillermo; Zurawski, Daniel V.; Kirkup, Benjamin C.; Craft, David; Waterman, Paige E.; Lesho, Emil P.; Bangurae, Umaru; Ansumana, Rashid

    2012-06-01

    The prevalence of multidrug-resistant infections in personnel wounded in Iraq and Afghanistan has made it challenging for physicians to choose effective therapeutics in a timely fashion. To address the challenge of identifying the potential for drug resistance, we have developed the Antimicrobial Resistance Determinant Microarray (ARDM) to provide DNAbased analysis for over 250 resistance genes covering 12 classes of antibiotics. Over 70 drug-resistant bacteria from different geographic regions have been analyzed on ARDM, with significant differences in patterns of resistance identified: genes for resistance to sulfonamides, trimethoprim, chloramphenicol, rifampin, and macrolide-lincosamidesulfonamide drugs were more frequently identified in isolates from sources in Iraq/Afghanistan. Of particular concern was the presence of genes responsible for resistance to many of the last-resort antibiotics used to treat war traumaassociated infections.

  17. Antimicrobial (Drug) Resistance: Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA)

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Marketing Share this: Main Content Area Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) During the past four decades, methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus , or MRSA, has evolved from a controllable ...

  18. Human Immunodeficiency Virus: Resistance to Antiretroviral Drugs in Developing Countries

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Rebecca F. Baggaley; Maya L. Petersen; Marcelo A. Soares; Marie-Claude Boily; Francisco I. Bastos

    \\u000a This chapter reviews issues central to understanding the emergence and transmission of drug-resistant human immunodeficiency\\u000a virus (HIV) and its impact on developing countries. We first give an overview of HIV, HIV treatment using antiretroviral drugs,\\u000a and access to treatment in developing countries. Then we review current understanding of the impact of adherence and treatment\\u000a interruption on the emergence of resistance

  19. Dynamical Basis for Drug Resistance of HIV-1 Protease

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Protease inhibitors designed to bind to protease have become major anti-AIDS drugs. Unfortunately, the emergence of viral mutations severely limits the long-term efficiency of the inhibitors. The resistance mechanism of these diversely located mutations remains unclear. Results Here I use an elastic network model to probe the connection between the global dynamics of HIV-1 protease and the structural distribution of drug-resistance mutations. The models for study are the crystal structures of unbounded and bound (with the substrate and nine FDA approved inhibitors) forms of HIV-1 protease. Coarse-grained modeling uncovers two groups that couple either with the active site or the flap. These two groups constitute a majority of the drug-resistance residues. In addition, the significance of residues is found to be correlated with their dynamical changes in binding and the results agree well with the complete mutagenesis experiment of HIV-1 protease. Conclusions The dynamic study of HIV-1 protease elucidates the functional importance of common drug-resistance mutations and suggests a unifying mechanism for drug-resistance residues based on their dynamical properties. The results support the robustness of the elastic network model as a potential predictive tool for drug resistance. PMID:21740562

  20. Sparse Representation for Prediction of HIV-1 Protease Drug Resistance.

    PubMed

    Yu, Xiaxia; Weber, Irene T; Harrison, Robert W

    2013-01-01

    HIV rapidly evolves drug resistance in response to antiviral drugs used in AIDS therapy. Estimating the specific resistance of a given strain of HIV to individual drugs from sequence data has important benefits for both the therapy of individual patients and the development of novel drugs. We have developed an accurate classification method based on the sparse representation theory, and demonstrate that this method is highly effective with HIV-1 protease. The protease structure is represented using our newly proposed encoding method based on Delaunay triangulation, and combined with the mutated amino acid sequences of known drug-resistant strains to train a machine-learning algorithm both for classification and regression of drug-resistant mutations. An overall cross-validated classification accuracy of 97% is obtained when trained on a publically available data base of approximately 1.5×10(4) known sequences (Stanford HIV database http://hivdb.stanford.edu/cgi-bin/GenoPhenoDS.cgi). Resistance to four FDA approved drugs is computed and comparisons with other algorithms demonstrate that our method shows significant improvements in classification accuracy. PMID:24910813

  1. Registration of Common Bacterial Blight Resistant White Kidney Bean Germplasm Line USWK-CBB-17

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    White kidney bean germplasm line USWK-CBB-17 was developed by USDA-ARS in cooperation with the Idaho Agricultural Experiment Station and released in 2006. This line was bred with a high level of resistance to common bacterial blight caused by Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. phaseoli (Xap). Common bacteri...

  2. Discovery of Novel Materials with Broad Resistance to Bacterial Attachment Using Combinatorial Polymer Microarrays

    E-print Network

    Hook, Andrew L.

    A new class of bacteria-attachment-resistant materials is discovered using a multi-generation polymer microarray methodology that reduces bacterial attachment by up to 99.3% compared with a leading commercially available ...

  3. CHARACTERIZATION OF ARSENIC RESISTANT BACTERIAL COMMUNITIES IN THE RHIZOSPHERE OF AN ARSENIC HYPERACCUMULATOR Pteris vittata L.

    E-print Network

    Ma, Lena

    CHARACTERIZATION OF ARSENIC RESISTANT BACTERIAL COMMUNITIES IN THE RHIZOSPHERE OF AN ARSENIC..................................................................................................................11 1.1 Environmental Sources of Arsenic..................................................................................11 1.1.1 Arsenic in the Environment

  4. The multiple facets of drug resistance: one history, different approaches

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Some cancers like melanoma and pancreatic and ovarian cancers, for example, commonly display resistance to chemotherapy, and this is the major obstacle to a better prognosis of patients. Frequently, literature presents studies in monolayer cell cultures, 3D cell cultures or in vivo studies, but rarely the same work compares results of drug resistance in different models. Several of these works are presented in this review and show that usually cells in 3D culture are more resistant to drugs than monolayer cultured cells due to different mechanisms. Searching for new strategies to sensitize different tumors to chemotherapy, many methods have been studied to understand the mechanisms whereby cancer cells acquire drug resistance. These methods have been strongly advanced along the years and therapies using different drugs have been increasingly proposed to induce cell death in resistant cells of different cancers. Recently, cancer stem cells (CSCs) have been extensively studied because they would be the only cells capable of sustaining tumorigenesis. It is believed that the resistance of CSCs to currently used chemotherapeutics is a major contributing factor in cancer recurrence and later metastasis development. This review aims to appraise the experimental progress in the study of acquired drug resistance of cancer cells in different models as well as to understand the role of CSCs as the major contributing factor in cancer recurrence and metastasis development, describing how CSCs can be identified and isolated. PMID:24775603

  5. African bovine trypanosomiasis: the problem of drug resistance

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Stanny Geerts; Peter H Holmes; Mark C Eisler; Oumar Diall

    2001-01-01

    The three trypanocides used to control tsetse-transmitted trypanosomiasis in domestic animals in Africa have been in use for over 40 years and, not surprisingly, resistance of trypanosomes to these drugs has emerged. Because of the relatively limited market in Africa and the high costs of developing and licensing new drugs, international pharmaceutical companies have shown little interest in the development

  6. Drug resistance in malignant rhabdoid tumor cell lines

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Gary B. Rosson; Timothy S. Vincent; Betty W. Oswald; Cynthia F. Wright

    2002-01-01

    Purpose: We evaluated the in vitro sensitivity of four malignant rhabdoid tumor (MRT) cell lines to six chemotherapeutic agents: 5-fluororuacil, vincristine, carboplatin, doxorubicin, etoposide, and paclitaxel. We also sought to determine whether a defect in the p53 signaling pathway may contribute to the pronounced drug resistance of MRT. Methods: MRT cells were treated with various concentrations of each drug and

  7. Reversal of Multidrug Resistance by Synthetic and Natural Compounds in Drug-Resistant MCF7 Cell Lines

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Meltem Demirel Kars; Ufuk Gunduz; Jozsef Molnar

    2008-01-01

    Background: Ineffectiveness of anticancer drugs is frequently observed in cancer chemotherapy. The resistance of tumor cells to various cytotoxic drugs is defined as multidrug resistance (MDR). The purpose of this study is to investigate the potential reversal effect of some synthetic and natural chemicals on drug-resistant MCF-7 cell lines. The effects of potential MDR modulators combined with some anticancer drugs

  8. MicroRNA-mediated drug resistance in breast cancer

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Kristy R. Kutanzi; Olga V. Yurchenko; Frederick A. Beland; Vasyl’ F. Checkhun; Igor P. Pogribny

    Chemoresistance is one of the major hurdles to overcome for the successful treatment of breast cancer. At present, there are\\u000a several mechanisms proposed to explain drug resistance to chemotherapeutic agents, including decreased intracellular drug\\u000a concentrations, mediated by drug transporters and metabolic enzymes; impaired cellular responses that affect cell cycle arrest,\\u000a apoptosis, and DNA repair; the induction of signaling pathways that

  9. Bacterial resistance surveillance in China: a report from Mohnarin 2004–2005

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Y. H. Xiao; J. Wang; Y. Li

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this study was to establish a nationwide antimicrobial resistant surveillance network and obtain information on\\u000a bacterial resistance in China. A total of 4075 clinical bacterial isolates were collected from 17 hospitals in 15 cities throughout\\u000a China. Antibacterial minimal inhibitory concentrations (MICs) were determined by the standard agar dilution method recommended\\u000a by Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute. The

  10. A Research-Inspired Laboratory Sequence Investigating Acquired Drug Resistance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, Elizabeth Vogel; Fortune, Jennifer A.; Drennan, Catherine L.

    2010-01-01

    Here, we present a six-session laboratory exercise designed to introduce students to standard biochemical techniques in the context of investigating a high impact research topic, acquired resistance to the cancer drug Gleevec. Students express a Gleevec-resistant mutant of the Abelson tyrosine kinase domain, the active domain of an oncogenic…

  11. Antimicrobial Action of Water-Soluble ?-Chitosan against Clinical Multi-Drug Resistant Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Park, Seong-Cheol; Nam, Joung-Pyo; Kim, Jun-Ho; Kim, Young-Min; Nah, Jae-Woon; Jang, Mi-Kyeong

    2015-01-01

    Recently, the number of patients infected by drug-resistant pathogenic microbes has increased remarkably worldwide, and a number of studies have reported new antibiotics from natural sources. Among them, chitosan, with a high molecular weight and ?-conformation, exhibits potent antimicrobial activity, but useful applications as an antibiotic are limited by its cytotoxicity and insolubility at physiological pH. In the present study, the antibacterial activity of low molecular weight water-soluble (LMWS) ?-chitosan (?1k, ?5k, and ?10k with molecular masses of 1, 5, and 10 kDa, respectively) and ?-chitosan (?1k, ?5k, and ?10k) was compared using a range of pathogenic bacteria containing drug-resistant bacteria isolated from patients at different pH. Interestingly, ?5k and ?10k exhibited potent antibacterial activity, even at pH 7.4, whereas only ?10k was effective at pH 7.4. The active target of ?-chitosan is the bacterial membrane, where the leakage of calcein is induced in artificial PE/PG vesicles, bacterial mimetic membrane. Moreover, scanning electron microscopy showed that they caused significant morphological changes on the bacterial surfaces. An in vivo study utilizing a bacteria-infected mouse model found that LMWS ?-chitosan could be used as a candidate in anti-infective or wound healing therapeutic applications. PMID:25867474

  12. Interactions among Strategies Associated with Bacterial Infection: Pathogenicity, Epidemicity, and Antibiotic Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Martínez, José L.; Baquero, Fernando

    2002-01-01

    Infections have been the major cause of disease throughout the history of human populations. With the introduction of antibiotics, it was thought that this problem should disappear. However, bacteria have been able to evolve to become antibiotic resistant. Nowadays, a proficient pathogen must be virulent, epidemic, and resistant to antibiotics. Analysis of the interplay among these features of bacterial populations is needed to predict the future of infectious diseases. In this regard, we have reviewed the genetic linkage of antibiotic resistance and bacterial virulence in the same genetic determinants as well as the cross talk between antibiotic resistance and virulence regulatory circuits with the aim of understanding the effect of acquisition of resistance on bacterial virulence. We also discuss the possibility that antibiotic resistance and bacterial virulence might prevail as linked phenotypes in the future. The novel situation brought about by the worldwide use of antibiotics is undoubtedly changing bacterial populations. These changes might alter the properties of not only bacterial pathogens, but also the normal host microbiota. The evolutionary consequences of the release of antibiotics into the environment are largely unknown, but most probably restoration of the microbiota from the preantibiotic era is beyond our current abilities. PMID:12364374

  13. Impact of Bacterial Genetics on the Transmission of Isoniazid-Resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Sebastien Gagneux; Marcos V. Burgos; Kathryn DeRiemer; Antonio Enciso; Samira Muńoz; Phillip C. Hopewell; Peter M. Small; Alexander S. Pym

    2006-01-01

    Understanding the ecology of drug-resistant pathogens is essential for devising rational programs to preserve the effective lifespan of antimicrobial agents and to abrogate epidemics of drug-resistant organisms. Mathematical models predict that strain fitness is an important determinant of multidrug-resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis transmission, but the effects of strain diversity have been largely overlooked. Here we compared the impact of resistance mutations

  14. Drug resistant breast cancer cells overexpress ETS1 gene

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Meltem Demirel Kars; Özlem Darcansoy I?eri; Ufuk Gündüz

    2010-01-01

    PurposeMultidrug resistance (MDR) is resistance to wide range of structurally unrelated anticancer agents. MDR is a serious limitation to the effective chemotherapy. Involvement of ETS1 overexpression in upregulation of MDR1 gene expression is implicated. In the present study the aim was to assess the involvement of ETS1 and the genes, which encode the proteins interacting with ETS1 in drug resistant

  15. C. elegans pgp-5 IS INVOLVED IN RESISTANCE TO BACTERIAL INFECTION AND HEAVY METAL AND ITS REGULATION

    E-print Network

    Baillie, David

    C. elegans pgp-5 IS INVOLVED IN RESISTANCE TO BACTERIAL INFECTION AND HEAVY METAL AND ITS of a C. elegans ABC transporter, pgp-5 is induced by both bacterial infection and heavy metal stress contributes to resistance to bacterial infection and heavy metals. Using pgp-5 transcription as a read-out, we

  16. In vitro antibiotic resistance in bacterial keratitis in London

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Stephen J Tuft; Melville Matheson

    2000-01-01

    AIMTo document changes in the profile of bacterial isolates from cases of keratitis and changes in their susceptibility to first line antibiotic therapies.METHODSA retrospective review was performed of all bacterial isolates from cases of keratitis seen between 1984 and 1999. In vitro laboratory susceptibilities to antibiotics were determined by the Kirby–Bauer disc diffusion method. The number of isolates, changes in

  17. Therapeutic Implications of Hepatitis C virus Resistance to Antiviral Drugs

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Treatment of chronic hepatitis C is currently based on a combination of pegylated interferon-o! and ribavirin. Neither drug exerts direct selective pressure on viral functions, meaning that interferon-a/ribavirin treatment failure is not due to selection of interferon-a- or ribavirin-resistant viral variants. Several novel antiviral approaches are currently in preclinical or clinical development, and most target viral enzymes and functions, such as hepatitis C virus protease and polymerase. These new drugs all potentially select resistant viral variants both in vitro and in vivo, and resistance is therefore likely to become an important issue in clinical practice. PMID:21180544

  18. Indoleamides are active against drug-resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Lun, Shichun; Guo, Haidan; Onajole, Oluseye K.; Pieroni, Marco; Gunosewoyo, Hendra; Chen, Gang; Tipparaju, Suresh K.; Ammerman, Nicole C.; Kozikowski, Alan P.; Bishai, William R.

    2014-01-01

    Responsible for nearly two million deaths each year, the infectious disease tuberculosis remains a serious global health challenge. The emergence of multidrug- and extensively drug-resistant strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis confounds control efforts, and new drugs with novel molecular targets are desperately needed. Here we describe lead compounds, the indoleamides, with potent activity against both drug-susceptible and drug-resistant strains of M. tuberculosis by targeting the mycolic acid transporter MmpL3. We identify a single mutation in mmpL3 which confers high resistance to the indoleamide class while remaining susceptible to currently used first- and second-line tuberculosis drugs, indicating a lack of cross-resistance. Importantly, an indoleamide derivative exhibits dose-dependent anti-mycobacterial activity when orally administered to M. tuberculosis-infected mice. The bioavailability of the indoleamides, combined with their ability to kill tubercle bacilli, indicates great potential for translational developments of this structure class for the treatment of drug-resistant tuberculosis. PMID:24352433

  19. Epistasis between antibiotic resistance mutations drives the evolution of extensively drug-resistant tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Borrell, Sňnia; Teo, Youjin; Giardina, Federica; Streicher, Elizabeth M.; Klopper, Marisa; Feldmann, Julia; Müller, Borna; Victor, Tommie C.; Gagneux, Sebastien

    2013-01-01

    Background and objectives: Multidrug resistant (MDR) bacteria are a growing threat to global health. Studies focusing on single antibiotics have shown that drug resistance is often associated with a fitness cost in the absence of drug. However, little is known about the fitness cost associated with resistance to multiple antibiotics. Methodology: We used Mycobacterium smegmatis as a model for human tuberculosis (TB) and an in vitro competitive fitness assay to explore the combined fitness effects and interaction between mutations conferring resistance to rifampicin (RIF) and ofloxacin (OFX); two of the most important first- and second-line anti-TB drugs, respectively. Results: We found that 4 out of 17 M. smegmatis mutants (24%) resistant to RIF and OFX showed a statistically significantly higher or lower competitive fitness than expected when assuming a multiplicative model of fitness effects of each individual mutation. Moreover, 6 out of the 17 double drug-resistant mutants (35%) had a significantly higher fitness than at least one of the corresponding single drug-resistant mutants. The particular combinations of resistance mutations associated with no fitness deficit in M. smegmatis were the most frequent among 151 clinical isolates of MDR and extensively drug-resistant (XDR) Mycobacterium tuberculosis from South Africa. Conclusions and implications: Our results suggest that epistasis between drug resistance mutations in mycobacteria can lead to MDR strains with no fitness deficit, and that these strains are positively selected in settings with a high burden of drug-resistant TB. Taken together, our findings support a role for epistasis in the evolution and epidemiology of MDR- and XDR-TB. PMID:24481187

  20. Surveillance for Antimicrobial Drug Resistance in Under-Resourced Countries

    PubMed Central

    Mary, Catherine; Altmann, Dany M.; Doumbo, Ogobara; Morpeth, Susan; Bhutta, Zulfiqar A.; Klugman, Keith P.

    2014-01-01

    Antimicrobial drug resistance is usually not monitored in under-resourced countries because they lack surveillance networks, laboratory capacity, and appropriate diagnostics. This accelerating problem accounts for substantial number of excess deaths, especially among infants. Infections particularly affected by antimicrobial drug resistance include tuberculosis, malaria, severe acute respiratory infections, and sepsis caused by gram-negative bacteria. Nonetheless, mapping antimicrobial drug resistance is feasible in under-resourced countries, and lessons can be learned from previous successful efforts. Specimen shipping conditions, data standardization, absence of contamination, and adequate diagnostics must be ensured. As a first step toward solving this problem, we propose that a road map be created at the international level to strengthen antimicrobial resistance surveillance in under-resourced countries. This effort should include a research agenda; a map of existing networks and recommendations to unite them; and a communication plan for national, regional, and international organizations and funding agencies. PMID:24564906

  1. HIV antiviral drug resistance: patient comprehension

    Microsoft Academic Search

    C. Sarai Racey; Wendy Zhang; Eirikka K. Brandson; Kimberly A. Fernandes; Despina Tzemis; P. Richard Harrigan; Julio S. G. Montaner; Rolando Barrios; Junine Toy; Robert S. Hogg

    2010-01-01

    A patient's understanding and use of healthcare information can affect their decisions regarding treatment. Better patient understanding about HIV resistance may improve adherence to therapy, decrease population viral load and extend the use of first-line HIV therapies. We examined knowledge of developing HIV resistance and explored treatment outcomes in a cohort of HIV+ persons on highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART).

  2. Multidrug-resistant bacterial infections after liver transplantation: An ever-growing challenge

    PubMed Central

    Santoro-Lopes, Guilherme; de Gouvęa, Erika Ferraz

    2014-01-01

    Bacterial infections are a leading cause of morbidity and mortality among solid organ transplant recipients. Over the last two decades, various multidrug-resistant (MDR) pathogens have emerged as relevant causes of infection in this population. Although this fact reflects the spread of MDR pathogens in health care facilities worldwide, several factors relating to the care of transplant donor candidates and recipients render these patients particularly prone to the acquisition of MDR bacteria and increase the likelihood of MDR infectious outbreaks in transplant units. The awareness of this high vulnerability of transplant recipients to infection leads to the more frequent use of broad-spectrum empiric antibiotic therapy, which further contributes to the selection of drug resistance. This vicious cycle is difficult to avoid and leads to a scenario of increased complexity and narrowed therapeutic options. Infection by MDR pathogens is more frequently associated with a failure to start appropriate empiric antimicrobial therapy. The lack of appropriate treatment may contribute to the high mortality occurring in transplant recipients with MDR infections. Furthermore, high therapeutic failure rates have been observed in patients infected with extensively-resistant pathogens, such as carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae, for which optimal treatment remains undefined. In such a context, the careful implementation of preventive strategies is of utmost importance to minimize the negative impact that MDR infections may have on the outcome of liver transplant recipients. This article reviews the current literature regarding the incidence and outcome of MDR infections in liver transplant recipients, and summarizes current preventive and therapeutic recommendations. PMID:24876740

  3. The communicative process of drug resistance among high school students.

    PubMed

    Alberts, J K; Hecht, M L; Miller-Rassulo, M; Krizek, R L

    1992-01-01

    This article reports the results of the second of two studies designed to examine social influences on adolescents' responses to drug offers. In the first study, a typology of both drug offers and drug resistance strategies was developed. The present study provides an analysis of the associations between offers and resistance and the differences between drug and alcohol offers. To accomplish this, sixty-nine narrative accounts of both successful and unsuccessful attempts to say no were collected from high school students. Analysis of the interviews indicated that peer pressure was applied in approximately 70% of the offers; however, much of that pressure was applied after the initial offer had been refused. It also was determined that simple offers were more likely with alcohol, while drug offers were more likely to be persuasive and involve pressure during the initial offer. PMID:1539497

  4. [Advances in molecular mechanisms of bacterial resistance caused by stress-induced transfer of resistance genes--a review].

    PubMed

    Sun, Dongchang; Wang, Bing; Zhu, Lihong

    2013-07-01

    The transfer of resistance gene is one of the most important causes of bacterial resistance. Recent studies reveal that stresses induce the transfer of antibiotic resistance gene through multiple mechanisms. DNA damage stresses trigger bacterial SOS response and induce the transfer of resistance gene mediated by conjugative DNA. Antibiotic stresses induce natural bacterial competence for transformation in some bacteria which lack the SOS system. In addition, our latest studies show that the general stress response regulator RpoS regulates a novel type of resistance gene transfer which is mediated by double-stranded plasmid DNA and occurs exclusively on the solid surface. In this review, we summarized recent advances in SOS dependent and independent stress-induced DNA transfer which is mediated by conjugation and transformation respectively, and the transfer of double-stranded plasmid DNA on the solid surface which is regulated by RpoS. We propose that future work should address how stresses activate the key regulators and how these regulators control the expression of gene transfer related genes. Answers to the above questions would pave the way for searching for candidate targets for controlling bacterial resistance resulted from the transfer of antibiotic genes. PMID:24195370

  5. [Study on the drug sensitivity of multiple drug-resistant Staphylococcus aureus].

    PubMed

    Deguchi, K; Fukayama, S; Nishimura, Y; Yokota, N; Tanaka, S; Oda, S; Matsumoto, Y; Ikegami, R; Satoh, K; Toyonaga, Y

    1985-08-01

    Of clinically isolated Staphylococcus aureus showing resistance to multiple drugs among penicillins (PCs), cephem antibiotics (CEPs), aminoglycosides (AGs), minocycline (MINO) and fosfomycin (FOM), 64 strains were selected for the determination of MIC. Twenty-one drugs were used for the determination of MIC, with ampicillin (ABPC), cloxacillin (MCIPC), cephalothin (CET), cefazolin (CEZ), cefotiam (CTM), cefuroxime (CXM), cefamandole (CMD), cefotaxime (CTX), ceftizoxime (CZX), cefmenoxime (CMX), cefmetazole (CMZ), cefoxitin (CFX), latamoxef (LMOX), cefotetan (CTT), cefoperazone (CPZ), gentamicin (GM), dibekacin (DKB), tobramycin (TOB), amikacin (AMK), MINO, and FOM. MIC80 of each drug at 10(6) CFU/ml were: ABPC, MCIPC, CEZ, CTM, CXM, CTX, CZX, CMX, CFX, LMOX, CTT, CPZ, GM, DKB and TOB greater than 100 micrograms/ml; CET 50 micrograms/ml; CMD and AMK 25 micrograms/ml; CMZ 12.5 micrograms/ml; FOM 6.25 micrograms/ml; and MINO 0.78 micrograms/ml. The ratio of highly resistant strains with MIC greater than 100 micrograms/ml at 10(6) CFU/ml varied according to drug, and a difference tended to be seen in the degree of influence by resistant factors reflected upon MIC, e.g. drugs for which a high resistance of more than 50% was confirmed were ABPC, CXM, CZX, LMOX and TOB, and 20 approximately 30% MCIPC, CTM, CTX, CMX and CFX. MIC on MCIPC which has a correlation of structural activity with methicillin correlated with cephems (CEPs) resistance to a high degree, but many of the so-called new CEPs showed resistance even to the strains with a low MIC on MCIPC. It was assumed that CEPs resistant strains have multiple drug resistant factors based on the fact that such strains showed multiple drug resistance.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:3852898

  6. Ecology and Evolution as Targets: the Need for Novel Eco-Evo Drugs and Strategies To Fight Antibiotic Resistance?†

    PubMed Central

    Baquero, Fernando; Coque, Teresa M.; de la Cruz, Fernando

    2011-01-01

    In recent years, the explosive spread of antibiotic resistance determinants among pathogenic, commensal, and environmental bacteria has reached a global dimension. Classical measures trying to contain or slow locally the progress of antibiotic resistance in patients on the basis of better antibiotic prescribing policies have clearly become insufficient at the global level. Urgent measures are needed to directly confront the processes influencing antibiotic resistance pollution in the microbiosphere. Recent interdisciplinary research indicates that new eco-evo drugs and strategies, which take ecology and evolution into account, have a promising role in resistance prevention, decontamination, and the eventual restoration of antibiotic susceptibility. This minireview summarizes what is known and what should be further investigated to find drugs and strategies aiming to counteract the “four P's,” penetration, promiscuity, plasticity, and persistence of rapidly spreading bacterial clones, mobile genetic elements, or resistance genes. The term “drug” is used in this eco-evo perspective as a tool to fight resistance that is able to prevent, cure, or decrease potential damage caused by antibiotic resistance, not necessarily only at the individual level (the patient) but also at the ecological and evolutionary levels. This view offers a wealth of research opportunities for science and technology and also represents a large adaptive challenge for regulatory agencies and public health officers. Eco-evo drugs and interventions constitute a new avenue for research that might influence not only antibiotic resistance but the maintenance of a healthy interaction between humans and microbial systems in a rapidly changing biosphere. PMID:21576439

  7. Response to selection for bacterial cold water disease resistance in rainbow trout

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Previous studies indicate that resistance to experimental bacterial cold water disease (BCWD) challenge is heritable and thus may be improved through selective breeding. Our objective was to estimate response after one generation of genetic selection for resistance to BCWD in a pedigreed population ...

  8. Antifungal drug resistance evokedvia RNAi-dependent epimutations

    PubMed Central

    Calo, Silvia; Shertz-Wall, Cecelia; Lee, Soo Chan; Bastidas, Robert J.; Nicolás, Francisco E.; Granek, Joshua A.; Mieczkowski, Piotr; Torres-Martinez, Santiago; Ruiz-Vazquez, Rosa M.; Cardenas, Maria E.; Heitman, Joseph

    2014-01-01

    Microorganisms evolve via mechanisms spanning sexual/parasexual reproduction, mutators, aneuploidy, Hsp90, and even prions. Mechanisms that may seem detrimental can be repurposed to generate diversity. Here we show the human fungal pathogen Mucor circinelloides develops spontaneous resistance to the antifungal drug FK506 (tacrolimus) via two distinct mechanisms. One involves Mendelian mutations that confer stable drug resistance; the other occurs via an epigenetic RNA interference (RNAi)-mediated pathway resulting in unstable drug resistance. The peptidyl-prolyl isomerase FKBP12 interacts with FK506 forming a complex that inhibits the protein phosphatase calcineurin1. Calcineurin inhibition by FK506 blocks M. circinelloides transition to hyphae and enforces yeast growth2. Mutations in the fkbA gene encoding FKBP12 or the calcineurin cnbR or cnaA genes confer FK506 resistance (FK506R) and restore hyphal growth. In parallel, RNAi is spontaneously triggered to silence the FKBP12 fkbA gene, giving rise to drug-resistant epimutants. FK506R epimutants readily reverted to the drug-sensitive wild-type (WT) phenotype when grown without drug. The establishment of these epimutants is accompanied by generation of abundant fkbA small RNA (sRNA) and requires the RNAi pathway as well as other factors that constrain or reverse the epimutant state. Silencing involves generation of a double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) trigger intermediate from the fkbA mature mRNA to produce antisense fkbA RNA. This study uncovers a novel epigenetic RNAi-based epimutation mechanism controlling phenotypic plasticity, with possible implications for antimicrobial drug resistance and RNAi-regulatory mechanisms in fungi and other eukaryotes. PMID:25079329

  9. Drug resistance to targeted therapies: déjŕ vu all over again.

    PubMed

    Groenendijk, Floris H; Bernards, René

    2014-09-12

    A major limitation of targeted anticancer therapies is intrinsic or acquired resistance. This review emphasizes similarities in the mechanisms of resistance to endocrine therapies in breast cancer and those seen with the new generation of targeted cancer therapeutics. Resistance to single-agent cancer therapeutics is frequently the result of reactivation of the signaling pathway, indicating that a major limitation of targeted agents lies in their inability to fully block the cancer-relevant signaling pathway. The development of mechanism-based combinations of targeted therapies together with non-invasive molecular disease monitoring is a logical way forward to delay and ultimately overcome drug resistance development. PMID:24910388

  10. A Treatment Plant Receiving Waste Water from Multiple Bulk Drug Manufacturers Is a Reservoir for Highly Multi-Drug Resistant Integron-Bearing Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Walujkar, Sandeep A.; Charan, Shakti Singh; Moore, Edward R. B.; Larsson, D. G. Joakim; Shouche, Yogesh S.

    2013-01-01

    The arenas and detailed mechanisms for transfer of antibiotic resistance genes between environmental bacteria and pathogens are largely unclear. Selection pressures from antibiotics in situations where environmental bacteria and human pathogens meet are expected to increase the risks for such gene transfer events. We hypothesize that waste-water treatment plants (WWTPs) serving antibiotic manufacturing industries may provide such spawning grounds, given the high bacterial densities present there together with exceptionally strong and persistent selection pressures from the antibiotic-contaminated waste. Previous analyses of effluent from an Indian industrial WWTP that processes waste from bulk drug production revealed the presence of a range of drugs, including broad spectrum antibiotics at extremely high concentrations (mg/L range). In this study, we have characterized the antibiotic resistance profiles of 93 bacterial strains sampled at different stages of the treatment process from the WWTP against 39 antibiotics belonging to 12 different classes. A large majority (86%) of the strains were resistant to 20 or more antibiotics. Although there were no classically-recognized human pathogens among the 93 isolated strains, opportunistic pathogens such as Ochrobactrum intermedium, Providencia rettgeri, vancomycin resistant Enterococci (VRE), Aerococcus sp. and Citrobacter freundii were found to be highly resistant. One of the O. intermedium strains (ER1) was resistant to 36 antibiotics, while P. rettgeri (OSR3) was resistant to 35 antibiotics. Class 1 and 2 integrons were detected in 74/93 (80%) strains each, and 88/93 (95%) strains harbored at least one type of integron. The qPCR analysis of community DNA also showed an unprecedented high prevalence of integrons, suggesting that the bacteria living under such high selective pressure have an appreciable potential for genetic exchange of resistance genes via mobile gene cassettes. The present study provides insight into the mechanisms behind and the extent of multi-drug resistance among bacteria living under an extreme antibiotic selection pressure. PMID:24204801

  11. Sonic Hedgehog promotes multiple drug resistance by regulation of drug transport

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J Sims-Mourtada; J G Izzo; J Ajani; K S C Chao; KSC Chao

    2007-01-01

    A major obstacle to successful chemotherapy is intrinsic or acquired multi-drug resistance (MDR). The most common cause of MDR involves increased drug efflux from cancer cells mediated by members of the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter family. The regulation of ABC transporters in the context of cancer is poorly understood, and clinical efforts to inhibit their function have not been fruitful.

  12. Evolution of resistance to a last-resort antibiotic in Staphyloccocus aureus via bacterial competition

    PubMed Central

    Koch, Gudrun; Yepes, Ana; Förstner, Konrad U.; Wermser, Charlotte; Stengel, Stephanie T.; Modamio, Jennifer; Ohlsen, Knut; Foster, Kevin R.; Lopez, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    Summary Antibiotic resistance is a key medical concern, with antibiotic use likely being an important cause. However, here we describe an alternative route to clinically-relevant antibiotic resistance that occurs solely due to competitive interactions between bacterial cells. We consistently observe that isolates of Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus diversify spontaneously into two distinct, sequentially arising strains. The first evolved strain outgrows the parent strain via secretion of surfactants and a toxic bacteriocin. The second is resistant to the bacteriocin. Importantly, this second strain is also resistant to intermediate levels of vancomycin. This so-called VISA (vancomycin-intermediate S. aureus) phenotype is seen in many hard-to-treat clinical isolates. This strain diversification also occurs during in vivo infection in a mouse model, consistent with the fact that both coevolved phenotypes resemble strains commonly found in clinic. Our study shows how competition between coevolving bacterial strains can generate antibiotic resistance and recapitulate key clinical phenotypes. PMID:25171407

  13. Antiviral Drug- and Multidrug Resistance in Cytomegalovirus Infected SCT Patients.

    PubMed

    Göhring, Katharina; Hamprecht, Klaus; Jahn, Gerhard

    2015-01-01

    In pediatric and adult patients after stem cell transplantation (SCT) disseminated infections caused by human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) can cause life threatening diseases. For treatment, the three antivirals ganciclovir (GCV), foscarnet (PFA) and cidofovir (CDV) are approved and most frequently used. Resistance to all of these antiviral drugs may induce a severe problem in this patient cohort. Responsible for resistance phenomena are mutations in the HCMV phosphotransferase-gene (UL97) and the polymerase-gene (UL54). Most frequently mutations in the UL97-gene are associated with resistance to GCV. Resistance against all three drugs is associated to mutations in the UL54-gene. Monitoring of drug resistance by genotyping is mostly done by PCR-based Sanger sequencing. For phenotyping with cell culture the isolation of HCMV is a prerequisite. The development of multidrug resistance with mutation in both genes is rare, but it is often associated with a fatal outcome. The manifestation of multidrug resistance is mostly associated with combined UL97/UL54-mutations. Normally, mutations in the UL97 gene occur initially followed by UL54 mutation after therapy switch. The appearance of UL54-mutation alone without any detection of UL97-mutation is rare. Interestingly, in a number of patients the UL97 mutation could be detected in specific compartments exclusively and not in blood. PMID:25750703

  14. Efficient overcoming of drug resistance to anticancer nucleoside analogs by nanodelivery of active phosphorylated drugs

    PubMed Central

    Galmarini, Carlos M.; Warren, Galya; Senanayake, Madapathage T.; Vinogradov, Serguei V.

    2010-01-01

    One of the major problems in cancer chemotherapy is the fast development of drug resistance to most anticancer therapeutics. Thus, an important cause of the eventual decline in clinical efficacy of cytotoxic nucleoside analogs was the selection of resistant cancer cells with deficiencies in the expression of nucleoside transporters or nucleoside-activating kinases. Here, we present an efficient strategy of overcoming this type of drug resistance by tumor-specific delivery of nanogel-encapsulated active triphosphates of nucleoside analogs (NATP). The small particles of biodegradable cationic nanogels loaded with anionic NATP efficiently interacted with cancer cells and released active drug compounds into the cytoplasm. The potential of novel drug formulations was evaluated in the nucleoside transport-deficient (CEM/araC/C8) or nucleoside activation-deficient (RL7/G) lymphogenic cancer cells. Compared to nucleoside analogs, NATP-loaded nanogels demonstrated increased cytotoxicity, reducing the drug resistance index 250 to 900-fold in CEM/araC/C8 cells and 70 to 100-fold in RL7/G cells. The strong cytotoxic effect of nanoformulations was accompanied by characteristic cell cycle perturbations, usually observed in drug-treated sensitive cells, and resulted in the induction of apoptosis in all studied drug-resistant cells. Efficient cellular accumulation of nanogels and the consequent increase in intracellular levels of NATP were found to be the major factors determining cytotoxic efficacy of nanoformulations. Decoration of nanogels with multiple molecules of tumor lymphatic-specific peptide (LyP1) enhanced the binding efficacy of nanocarriers with lymphogenic cancer cells. The targeted nanoformulation of activated gemcitabine (LyP1-NG-dFdCTP), when injected in subcutaneous RL7/G xenograft tumor model, demonstrated two-fold more efficient tumor growth inhibition than gemcitabine at a higher dose. Nanogel-drug formulations exhibited no systemic toxicity during the treatment, hence extending the versatility of nucleoside analogs in the treatment of drug-resistant lymphogenic tumors. PMID:20580798

  15. Treatment of drug-resistant Shigella infections.

    PubMed

    Klontz, Karl C; Singh, Nalini

    2015-01-01

    Since the introduction of sulfonamides in the late 1930s, selective pressure and the widespread dissemination of mobile genetic elements conferring antimicrobial resistance have forced clinicians to seek successive agents for the treatment of multidrug-resistant shigellosis. Over the decades, the principal antibiotics used to treat Shigella infections have included tetracycline, chloramphenicol, ampicillin, trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole, and nalidixic acid. Presently, ciprofloxacin, azithromycin, and ceftriaxone serve as the mainstays of treatment, although growing evidence has documented decreased susceptibility or full resistance to these agents in some regions. With diminishing pharmaceutical options available, there is an enhanced need for preventive measures in the form of improved sanitation and hygiene standards, strict use of currently effective agents, and a safe and effective licensed vaccine. PMID:25399653

  16. RESEARCH ARTICLE Open Access Antimicrobial resistance of bacterial

    E-print Network

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    strains presented a resistance to third generation cephalosporins due to the production of extended-spectrum beta-lactamases. The resistance of Campylobacter sp to ampicillin was the most prevalent, whereas less

  17. Expression of the Bs2 Pepper Gene Confers Resistance to Bacterial Spot Disease in Tomato

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Thomas H. Tai; Douglas Dahlbeck; Eszter T. Clark; Paresh Gajiwala; Romela Pasion; Maureen C. Whalen; Robert E. Stall; Brian J. Staskawicz

    1999-01-01

    The Bs2 resistance gene of pepper specifically recognizes and confers resistance to strains of Xanthomonas campestris pv. vesicatoria that contain the corresponding bacterial avirulence gene, avrBs2. The involvement of avrBs2 in pathogen fitness and its prevalence in many X. campestris pathovars suggests that the Bs2 gene may be durable in the field and provide resistance when introduced into other plant

  18. Emerging novel and antimicrobial-resistant respiratory tract infections: new drug development and therapeutic options.

    PubMed

    Zumla, Alimuddin; Memish, Ziad A; Maeurer, Markus; Bates, Matthew; Mwaba, Peter; Al-Tawfiq, Jaffar A; Denning, David W; Hayden, Frederick G; Hui, David S

    2014-11-01

    The emergence and spread of antimicrobial-resistant bacterial, viral, and fungal pathogens for which diminishing treatment options are available is of major global concern. New viral respiratory tract infections with epidemic potential, such as severe acute respiratory syndrome, swine-origin influenza A H1N1, and Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus infection, require development of new antiviral agents. The substantial rise in the global numbers of patients with respiratory tract infections caused by pan-antibiotic-resistant Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria, multidrug-resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis, and multiazole-resistant fungi has focused attention on investments into development of new drugs and treatment regimens. Successful treatment outcomes for patients with respiratory tract infections across all health-care settings will necessitate rapid, precise diagnosis and more effective and pathogen-specific therapies. This Series paper describes the development and use of new antimicrobial agents and immune-based and host-directed therapies for a range of conventional and emerging viral, bacterial, and fungal causes of respiratory tract infections. PMID:25189352

  19. Emergence of Drug-Resistant Influenza Virus: Population Dynamical Considerations

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Roland R. Regoes; Sebastian Bonhoeffer

    2006-01-01

    Given the considerable challenges to the rapid development of an effective vaccine against influenza, antiviral agents will play an important role as a first-line defense if a new pandemic occurs. The large-scale use of drugs for chemoprophylaxis and treatment will impose strong selection for the evolution of drug-resistant strains. The ensuing transmission of those strains could substantially limit the effectiveness

  20. Dynamic optical tweezers based assay for monitoring early drug resistance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Xiaojing; Zhang, Yuquan; Min, Changjun; Zhu, Siwei; Feng, Jie; Yuan, X.-C.

    2013-06-01

    In this letter, a dynamic optical tweezers based assay is proposed and investigated for monitoring early drug resistance with Pemetrexed-resistant non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cell lines. The validity and stability of the method are verified experimentally in terms of the physical parameters of the optical tweezers system. The results demonstrate that the proposed technique is more convenient and faster than traditional techniques when the capability of detecting small variations of the response of cells to a drug is maintained.

  1. Management of drug-resistant chronic hepatitis B.

    PubMed

    Fung, Scott K; Fontana, Robert J

    2006-05-01

    Lamivudine, adefovir, and entecavir are safe and effective orally administered inhibitors of hepatitis B virus (HBV) replication, but drug-resistant strains of HBV with point mutations in the HBV polymerase gene are being reported with prolonged treatment that can lead to viral rebound and serum alanine aminotransferase flares. Salvage treatment with antiviral agents including investigational nucleoside/nucleotide analogues is available but highlights the limitations and hazards of sequential antiviral monotherapy for chronic HBV. Studies of pegylated interferon combined with an antiviral agent or dual nucleoside/nucleotide combination therapy are awaited to minimize the incidence of drug-resistant HBV and improve long-term outcomes. PMID:16971262

  2. Is selection relevant in the evolutionary emergence of drug resistance?

    PubMed Central

    Day, Troy; Huijben, Silvie; Read, Andrew F.

    2015-01-01

    The emergence of drug resistant pathogens is often considered a canonical case of evolution by ‘natural’ selection. Here we argue that the strength of selection can be a poor predictor of the rate of resistance emergence. It is possible for a resistant strain to be under negative selection and still emerge in an infection or spread in a population. Measuring the right parameters is a necessary first step towards the development of evidence-based resistance management strategies. We argue that it is the absolute fitness of the resistant strains that matters most, and that a primary determinant of the absolute fitness of a resistant strain when it arises is the ecological context in which it finds itself. PMID:25680587

  3. Microbial persistence and the road to drug resistance

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Nadia R.; Lobritz, Michael A.; Collins, James J.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Microbial drug persistence is a widespread phenomenon in which a sub-population of microorganisms is able to survive antimicrobial treatment without acquiring resistance-conferring genetic changes. Microbial persisters can cause recurrent or intractable infections, and like resistant mutants, they carry an increasing clinical burden. In contrast to heritable drug resistance, however, the biology of persistence is only beginning to be unraveled. Persisters have traditionally been thought of as metabolically dormant, non-dividing cells. However, as discussed in this review, increasing evidence suggests that persistence is in fact an actively maintained state, triggered and enabled by a network of intracellular stress-responses that can accelerate processes of adaptive evolution. Beyond shedding light on the basis of persistence, these findings raise the possibility that persisters behave as an evolutionary reservoir from which resistant organisms can emerge. As persistence and its consequences come into clearer focus, clinically relevant eradication strategies are urgently needed. PMID:23768488

  4. Microbial persistence and the road to drug resistance.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Nadia R; Lobritz, Michael A; Collins, James J

    2013-06-12

    Microbial drug persistence is a widespread phenomenon in which a subpopulation of microorganisms is able to survive antimicrobial treatment without acquiring resistance-conferring genetic changes. Microbial persisters can cause recurrent or intractable infections, and, like resistant mutants, they carry an increasing clinical burden. In contrast to heritable drug resistance, however, the biology of persistence is only beginning to be unraveled. Persisters have traditionally been thought of as metabolically dormant, nondividing cells. As discussed in this review, increasing evidence suggests that persistence is in fact an actively maintained state, triggered and enabled by a network of intracellular stress responses that can accelerate processes of adaptive evolution. Beyond shedding light on the basis of persistence, these findings raise the possibility that persisters behave as an evolutionary reservoir from which resistant organisms can emerge. As persistence and its consequences come into clearer focus, so too does the need for clinically useful persister-eradication strategies. PMID:23768488

  5. Identification, Characterization and Antibiotic Resistance of Bacterial Isolates Obtained from Waterpipe Device Hoses

    PubMed Central

    Masadeh, Majed M.; Hussein, Emad I.; Alzoubi, Karem H.; Khabour, Omar; Shakhatreh, Muhamad Ali K.; Gharaibeh, Mahmoud

    2015-01-01

    The general lack of knowledge about the health effects of waterpipe smoking is among the reasons for its global spread. In this study, bacterial contamination of waterpipe hoses was investigated. Twenty hoses were collected from waterpipe cafés and screened for bacterial pathogens using standard culture and isolation techniques. Additionally, resistance of isolated bacteria to common antibiotics was determined by identifying the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of each isolate. Forty eight bacterial isolates were detected. Isolates included both Gram-positive and Gram-negative pathogens from species that included Micrococcus (12), Corynebacterium (13) and Bacillus (9). In addition, some of the detected pathogens were found to be resistant to aztreonam (79%), cefixime (79%), norfloxacin, amoxicillin (47%), clarithromycin (46%) and enrofloxacin (38%). In conclusion, the hose of the waterpipe device is a good environment for the growth of bacterial pathogens, which can then be transmitted to users. PMID:25985311

  6. Identification, characterization and antibiotic resistance of bacterial isolates obtained from waterpipe device hoses.

    PubMed

    Masadeh, Majed M; Hussein, Emad I; Alzoubi, Karem H; Khabour, Omar; Shakhatreh, Muhamad Ali K; Gharaibeh, Mahmoud

    2015-01-01

    The general lack of knowledge about the health effects of waterpipe smoking is among the reasons for its global spread. In this study, bacterial contamination of waterpipe hoses was investigated. Twenty hoses were collected from waterpipe cafés and screened for bacterial pathogens using standard culture and isolation techniques. Additionally, resistance of isolated bacteria to common antibiotics was determined by identifying the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of each isolate. Forty eight bacterial isolates were detected. Isolates included both Gram-positive and Gram-negative pathogens from species that included Micrococcus (12), Corynebacterium (13) and Bacillus (9). In addition, some of the detected pathogens were found to be resistant to aztreonam (79%), cefixime (79%), norfloxacin, amoxicillin (47%), clarithromycin (46%) and enrofloxacin (38%). In conclusion, the hose of the waterpipe device is a good environment for the growth of bacterial pathogens, which can then be transmitted to users. PMID:25985311

  7. Skin conditions: emerging drug-resistant skin infections and infestations.

    PubMed

    Zuniga, Ramiro; Nguyen, Tam

    2013-04-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) skin infections are increasingly common. Automated microbiology systems are now available to detect MRSA and to determine antibiotic resistance patterns. Abscesses should be drained and antibiotics administered, with systemic antibiotics used to manage more severe infections. Until sensitivities are known and depending on local resistance rates, clindamycin is an option for empiric management of stable patients without bacteremia. For patients who are more ill, linezolid and vancomycin are alternatives, the latter being first-line treatment for children hospitalized with MRSA skin infections. Drug resistance also occurs in head lice management. Although topical permethrin is still the first-line drug management, its effectiveness has decreased due to permethrin-resistant strains. Patients who do not benefit from 2 applications of permethrin can be treated with topical malathion or topical ivermectin. Though not approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for treating head lice, oral ivermectin is sometimes used for difficult-to-treat cases. Permethrin is also the first-line management for scabies, though there is a concern that permethrin-resistant scabies may soon occur. For patients with scabies who do not benefit from topical treatment, oral ivermectin is recommended by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, although it is not approved by the FDA for this purpose. PMID:23600335

  8. Dominant gene for common bean resistance to common bacterial blight caused by Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. phaseoli

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Mildred Zapata; James S. Beaver; Timothy G. Porch

    2011-01-01

    The common bacterial blight pathogen [Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. phaseoli (Xap)] is a limiting factor for common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) production worldwide and resistance to the pathogen in most commercial cultivars is inadequate. Variability in virulence\\u000a of the bacterial pathogen has been observed in strains isolated from Puerto Rico and Central America. A few common bean lines\\u000a show a differential

  9. Additional Drug Resistance of Multidrug-Resistant Tuberculosis in Patients in 9 Countries

    PubMed Central

    Dalton, Tracy; Ershova, Julia; Tupasi, Thelma; Caoili, Janice Campos; Van Der Walt, Martie; Kvasnovsky, Charlotte; Yagui, Martin; Bayona, Jaime; Contreras, Carmen; Leimane, Vaira; Via, Laura E.; Kim, HeeJin; Akksilp, Somsak; Kazennyy, Boris Y.; Volchenkov, Grigory V.; Jou, Ruwen; Kliiman, Kai; Demikhova, Olga V.; Cegielski, J. Peter

    2015-01-01

    Data from a large multicenter observational study of patients with multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR TB) were analyzed to simulate the possible use of 2 new approaches to treatment of MDR TB: a short (9-month) regimen and a bedaquiline-containing regimen. Of 1,254 patients, 952 (75.9%) had no resistance to fluoroquinolones and second-line injectable drugs and thus would qualify as candidates for the 9-month regimen; 302 (24.1%) patients with resistance to a fluoroquinolone or second-line injectable drug would qualify as candidates for a bedaquiline-containing regimen in accordance with published guidelines. Among candidates for the 9-month regimen, standardized drug-susceptibility tests demonstrated susceptibility to a median of 5 (interquartile range 5–6) drugs. Among candidates for bedaquiline, drug-susceptibility tests demonstrated susceptibility to a median of 3 (interquartile range 2–4) drugs; 26% retained susceptibility to <2 drugs. These data may assist national TB programs in planning to implement new drugs and drug regimens. PMID:25988299

  10. Epigenetic Modulation of the Biophysical Properties of Drug-Resistant Cell Lipids to Restore Drug Transport and Endocytic Functions

    PubMed Central

    Vijayaraghavalu, Sivakumar; Peetla, Chiranjeevi; Lu, Shan; Labhasetwar, Vinod

    2012-01-01

    In our recent studies exploring the biophysical characteristics of resistant cell lipids, and the role they play in drug transport, we demonstrated the difference of drug-resistant breast cancer cells from drug-sensitive cells in lipid composition and biophysical properties, suggesting that cancer cells acquire a drug-resistant phenotype through the alteration of lipid synthesis to inhibit intracellular drug transport to protect from cytotoxic effect. In cancer cells, epigenetic changes (e.g., DNA hypermethylation) are essential to maintain this drug-resistant phenotype. Thus, altered lipid synthesis may be linked to epigenetic mechanisms of drug resistance. We hypothesize that reversing DNA hypermethylation in resistant cells with an epigenetic drug could alter lipid synthesis, changing the cell membrane’s biophysical properties to facilitate drug delivery to overcome drug resistance. Herein we show that treating drug-resistant breast cancer cells (MCF-7/ADR) with the epigenetic drug, 5-aza-2?-deoxycytidine (decitabine), significantly alters cell lipid composition and biophysical properties, causing the resistant cells to acquire biophysical characteristics similar to those of sensitive cell (MCF-7) lipids. Following decitabine treatment, resistant cells demonstrated increased sphingomyelinase activity, resulting in a decreased sphingomyelin level that influenced lipid domain structures, increased membrane fluidity, and reduced P-glycoprotein expression. Changes in the biophysical characteristics of resistant cell lipids facilitated doxorubicin transport and restored endocytic function for drug delivery with a lipid-encapsulated form of doxorubicin, enhancing the drug efficacy. In conclusion, we have established a new mechanism for efficacy of an epigenetic drug, mediated through changes in lipid composition and biophysical properties, in reversing cancer drug resistance. PMID:22817326

  11. Overexpression of Multidrug Resistance-associated Protein (MRP) Increases Resistance to Natural Product Drugs I

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Caroline E. Grant; Gunnar Valdimarsson; David R. Hipfner; Kurt C. AImquist; Susan P. C. Cole; Roger G. Deeley

    1994-01-01

    Amplification of the gene encoding multidrug resistance-associated pro- tein (MRP) and overexpression of its cognate mRNA have been detected in multidrug-resistant cell lines derived from several different tumor types. To establish whether or not the increase in MRP is responsible for drug resistance in these cell lines, we have transfected HeLa cells with MRP expression vectors. The transfectants display an

  12. Bacterial panicle blight resistance QTL in rice (Oryza sativa L.) and their association with resistance to other diseases

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Bacterial panicle blight (BPB) of rice (Oryza sativa L.) occurs when the bacterium Burkholderia glumae infects and colonizes emerging and flowering panicles, causing kernels to abort. To identify quantitative trait loci (QTL) for BPB resistance, a population of 300 recombinant inbred lines (RILs) d...

  13. Using experimental evolution to explore natural patterns between bacterial motility and resistance to bacteriophages

    PubMed Central

    Koskella, Britt; Taylor, Tiffany B; Bates, Jennifer; Buckling, Angus

    2011-01-01

    Resistance of bacteria to phages may be gained by alteration of surface proteins to which phages bind, a mechanism that is likely to be costly as these molecules typically have critical functions such as movement or nutrient uptake. To address this potential trade-off, we combine a systematic study of natural bacteria and phage populations with an experimental evolution approach. We compare motility, growth rate and susceptibility to local phages for 80 bacteria isolated from horse chestnut leaves and, contrary to expectation, find no negative association between resistance to phages and bacterial motility or growth rate. However, because correlational patterns (and their absence) are open to numerous interpretations, we test for any causal association between resistance to phages and bacterial motility using experimental evolution of a subset of bacteria in both the presence and absence of naturally associated phages. Again, we find no clear link between the acquisition of resistance and bacterial motility, suggesting that for these natural bacterial populations, phage-mediated selection is unlikely to shape bacterial motility, a key fitness trait for many bacteria in the phyllosphere. The agreement between the observed natural pattern and the experimental evolution results presented here demonstrates the power of this combined approach for testing evolutionary trade-offs. PMID:21509046

  14. Wear and corrosion resistance of anti-bacterial Ti-Cu-N coatings on titanium implants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Haibo; Zhang, Xiangyu; He, Xiaojing; Li, Meng; Huang, Xiaobo; Hang, Ruiqiang; Tang, Bin

    2014-10-01

    Anti-bacterial coatings with excellent wear and corrosion resistance play a vital role in ensuring the durability of implant materials in constant use. To this end, a novel anti-bacterial surface modification by combining magnetron sputtering with plasma nitriding was adopted in this paper to fabricate Cu-bearing Ti-based nitrides coatings (Ti-Cu-N) on titanium surface. The anti-bacterial properties of Ti-Cu-N coatings were evaluated. The microstructures and composition of the coatings were investigated by using FESEM, EDS, GDOES, XRD. The wear and corrosion resistance of the coatings were investigated. The results confirmed that an anti-bacterial Ti-Cu-N coating with a thickness of 6 ?m and good adhesive strength to substrate was successfully achieved on titanium surface. As implied by XRD, the coatings were consisted of TiN, Ti2N, TiN0.3 phases. The surface micro-hardness and wear resistance of Ti-Cu-N coatings were significantly enhanced after plasma nitriding treatment. The analysis of potentiodynamic polarization curves and Nyquist plots obtained in 0.9 wt.% NaCl solution suggested that the Ti-Cu-N coatings also exhibited an excellent corrosion resistance. As mentioned above, it can be concluded that the duplex-treatment reported here was a versatile approach to develop anti-bacterial Ti-Cu-N coatings with excellent comprehensive properties on titanium implants.

  15. Nanomechanical detection of antibiotic-mucopeptide binding in a model for superbug drug resistance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ndieyira, Joseph Wafula; Watari, Moyu; Barrera, Alejandra Donoso; Zhou, Dejian; Vögtli, Manuel; Batchelor, Matthew; Cooper, Matthew A.; Strunz, Torsten; Horton, Mike A.; Abell, Chris; Rayment, Trevor; Aeppli, Gabriel; McKendry, Rachel A.

    2008-11-01

    The alarming growth of the antibiotic-resistant superbugs methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus (VRE) is driving the development of new technologies to investigate antibiotics and their modes of action. We report the label-free detection of vancomycin binding to bacterial cell wall precursor analogues (mucopeptides) on cantilever arrays, with 10 nM sensitivity and at clinically relevant concentrations in blood serum. Differential measurements have quantified binding constants for vancomycin-sensitive and vancomycin-resistant mucopeptide analogues. Moreover, by systematically modifying the mucopeptide density we gain new insights into the origin of surface stress. We propose that stress is a product of a local chemical binding factor and a geometrical factor describing the mechanical connectivity of regions activated by local binding in terms of a percolation process. Our findings place BioMEMS devices in a new class of percolative systems. The percolation concept will underpin the design of devices and coatings to significantly lower the drug detection limit and may also have an impact on our understanding of antibiotic drug action in bacteria.

  16. Nanomechanical detection of antibiotic-mucopeptide binding in a model for superbug drug resistance.

    PubMed

    Ndieyira, Joseph Wafula; Watari, Moyu; Barrera, Alejandra Donoso; Zhou, Dejian; Vögtli, Manuel; Batchelor, Matthew; Cooper, Matthew A; Strunz, Torsten; Horton, Mike A; Abell, Chris; Rayment, Trevor; Aeppli, Gabriel; McKendry, Rachel A

    2008-11-01

    The alarming growth of the antibiotic-resistant superbugs methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus (VRE) is driving the development of new technologies to investigate antibiotics and their modes of action. We report the label-free detection of vancomycin binding to bacterial cell wall precursor analogues (mucopeptides) on cantilever arrays, with 10 nM sensitivity and at clinically relevant concentrations in blood serum. Differential measurements have quantified binding constants for vancomycin-sensitive and vancomycin-resistant mucopeptide analogues. Moreover, by systematically modifying the mucopeptide density we gain new insights into the origin of surface stress. We propose that stress is a product of a local chemical binding factor and a geometrical factor describing the mechanical connectivity of regions activated by local binding in terms of a percolation process. Our findings place BioMEMS devices in a new class of percolative systems. The percolation concept will underpin the design of devices and coatings to significantly lower the drug detection limit and may also have an impact on our understanding of antibiotic drug action in bacteria. PMID:18989336

  17. Animal Health Advisory Multi-drug Resistant Salmonella in Horses

    E-print Network

    Keinan, Alon

    Animal Health Advisory Multi-drug Resistant Salmonella in Horses The NYS Veterinary Diagnostic Laboratory has isolated Salmonella Group C2 from cultures submitted from 4 different horse farms in either to most antibiotics. A Salmonella newport strain (Group C2) was recently associated with the closing

  18. JOURNAL OF HEMATOLOGY Induction of acquired drug resistance in

    E-print Network

    Boyer, Edmond

    JOURNAL OF HEMATOLOGY & ONCOLOGY Induction of acquired drug resistance in endothelial cells and its involvement in anticancer therapy Huang et al. Huang et al. Journal of Hematology & Oncology 2013, 6:49 http OF HEMATOLOGY & ONCOLOGY © 2013 Huang et al.; licensee BioMed Central Ltd. This is an Open Access article

  19. "Applied" Aspects of the Drug Resistance Strategies Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hecht, Michael L.; Miller-Day, Michelle A.

    2010-01-01

    This paper discusses the applied aspects of our Drug Resistance Strategies Project. We argue that a new definitional distinction is needed to expand the notion of "applied" from the traditional notion of utilizing theory, which we call "applied.1," in order to consider theory-grounded, theory testing and theory developing applied research. We…

  20. Alcohol and Other Drug Resistance Strategies Employed by Rural Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pettigrew, Jonathan; Miller-Day, Michelle; Krieger, Janice; Hecht, Michael L.

    2011-01-01

    This study seeks to identify how rural adolescents make health decisions and utilize communication strategies to resist influence attempts in offers of alcohol, tobacco, and other drugs (ATOD). Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 113 adolescents from rural school districts to solicit information on ATOD norms, past ATOD experiences, and…

  1. PREVALENCE OF MULTI-DRUG RESISTANT SALMONELLA IN DAIRY CATTLE

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    To determine the prevalence of multi-drug resistant (MDR) Salmonella in dairy cattle and which groups of cattle may be more likely to harbor MDR Salmonella, we sampled animals on four commercial dairy farms that all utilized a central calf/heifer raising facility. Fecal samples were obtained from h...

  2. METHOD FOR MEASURING BACTERIAL RESISTANCE TO METALS EMPLOYING EPIFLUORESCENT MICROSCOPY

    EPA Science Inventory

    A direct viable counting method has been developed which can be used to measure resistance of bacteria to metal (DVCMR bio-assay). Results obtained using DVCMR was compared with classical culture methods and proven superior. Evaluation of test strains resistant to arsenic or mang...

  3. Resistance to fluoroquinolones and second-line injectable drugs: impact on multidrug-resistant TB outcomes.

    PubMed

    Falzon, Dennis; Gandhi, Neel; Migliori, Giovanni B; Sotgiu, Giovanni; Cox, Helen S; Holtz, Timothy H; Hollm-Delgado, Maria-Graciela; Keshavjee, Salmaan; DeRiemer, Kathryn; Centis, Rosella; D'Ambrosio, Lia; Lange, Christoph G; Bauer, Melissa; Menzies, Dick

    2013-07-01

    A meta-analysis for response to treatment was undertaken using individual data of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB) (resistance to isoniazid and rifampicin) patients from 26 centres. The analysis assessed the impact of additional resistance to fluoroquinolones and/or second-line injectable drugs on treatment outcome. Compared with treatment failure, relapse and death, treatment success was higher in MDR-TB patients infected with strains without additional resistance (n=4763; 64%, 95% CI 57-72%) or with resistance to second-line injectable drugs only (n=1130; 56%, 95% CI 45-66%), than in those having resistance to fluoroquinolones alone (n=426; 48%, 95% CI 36-60%) or to fluoroquinolones plus second-line injectable drugs (extensively drug resistant (XDR)-TB) (n=405; 40%, 95% CI 27-53%). In XDR-TB patients, treatment success was highest if at least six drugs were used in the intensive phase (adjusted OR 4.9, 95% CI 1.4-16.6; reference fewer than three drugs) and four in the continuation phase (OR 6.1, 95% CI 1.4-26.3). The odds of success in XDR-TB patients was maximised when the intensive phase reached 6.6-9.0 months duration and the total duration of treatment 20.1-25.0 months. In XDR-TB patients, regimens containing more drugs than those recommended in MDR-TB but given for a similar duration were associated with the highest odds of success. All data were from observational studies and methodologies varied between centres, therefore, the bias may be substantial. Better quality evidence is needed to optimise regimens. PMID:23100499

  4. Pyramiding B genes in cotton achieves broader but not always higher resistance to bacterial blight.

    PubMed

    Essenberg, Margaret; Bayles, Melanie B; Pierce, Margaret L; Verhalen, Laval M

    2014-10-01

    ABSTRACT Near-isogenic lines of upland cotton (Gossypium hirsutum) carrying single, race-specific genes B4, BIn, and b7 for resistance to bacterial blight were used to develop a pyramid of lines with all possible combinations of two and three genes to learn whether the pyramid could achieve broad and high resistance approaching that of L. A. Brinkerhoff's exceptional line Im216. Isogenic strains of Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. malvacearum carrying single avirulence (avr) genes were used to identify plants carrying specific resistance (B) genes. Under field conditions in north-central Oklahoma, pyramid lines exhibited broader resistance to individual races and, consequently, higher resistance to a race mixture. It was predicted that lines carrying two or three B genes would also exhibit higher resistance to race 1, which possesses many avr genes. Although some enhancements were observed, they did not approach the level of resistance of Im216. In a growth chamber, bacterial populations attained by race 1 in and on leaves of the pyramid lines decreased significantly with increasing number of B genes in only one of four experiments. The older lines, Im216 and AcHR, exhibited considerably lower bacterial populations than any of the one-, two-, or three-B-gene lines. A spreading collapse of spray-inoculated AcBIn and AcBInb7 leaves appears to be a defense response (conditioned by BIn) that is out of control. PMID:24655289

  5. Antimicrobial Resistance and Virulence: a Successful or Deleterious Association in the Bacterial World?

    PubMed Central

    Beceiro, Alejandro; Tomás, María

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY Hosts and bacteria have coevolved over millions of years, during which pathogenic bacteria have modified their virulence mechanisms to adapt to host defense systems. Although the spread of pathogens has been hindered by the discovery and widespread use of antimicrobial agents, antimicrobial resistance has increased globally. The emergence of resistant bacteria has accelerated in recent years, mainly as a result of increased selective pressure. However, although antimicrobial resistance and bacterial virulence have developed on different timescales, they share some common characteristics. This review considers how bacterial virulence and fitness are affected by antibiotic resistance and also how the relationship between virulence and resistance is affected by different genetic mechanisms (e.g., coselection and compensatory mutations) and by the most prevalent global responses. The interplay between these factors and the associated biological costs depend on four main factors: the bacterial species involved, virulence and resistance mechanisms, the ecological niche, and the host. The development of new strategies involving new antimicrobials or nonantimicrobial compounds and of novel diagnostic methods that focus on high-risk clones and rapid tests to detect virulence markers may help to resolve the increasing problem of the association between virulence and resistance, which is becoming more beneficial for pathogenic bacteria. PMID:23554414

  6. Antibiotic-resistant gram-negative bacterial infections in patients with cancer.

    PubMed

    Perez, Federico; Adachi, Javier; Bonomo, Robert A

    2014-11-15

    Patients with cancer are at high risk for infections caused by antibiotic resistant gram-negative bacteria. In this review, we summarize trends among the major pathogens and clinical syndromes associated with antibiotic resistant gram-negative bacterial infection in patients with malignancy, with special attention to carbapenem and expanded-spectrum ?-lactam resistance in Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Acinetobacter baumannii, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Stenotrophomonas maltophilia--all major threats to our cancer patients. Optimal therapy for these antibiotic-resistant pathogens still remains to be determined. PMID:25352627

  7. Drug resistance following irradiation of RIF-1 tumors: Influence of the interval between irradiation and drug treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Hopwood, L.E.; Davies, B.M.; Moulder, J.E. (Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee (USA))

    1990-09-01

    RIF-1 tumors contain a small number of cells (1 to 100 per 10(6) cells) that are resistant to 5-fluorouracil, methotrexate, or adriamycin. The frequency of drug-resistant cells among individual untreated tumors is highly variable. Radiation, delivered in vivo at doses of 3 to 12 Gy, increases the frequency of methotrexate- and 5-fluorouracil-resistant cells, but not the frequency of adriamycin-resistant cells. The magnitude of induction of 5-fluorouracil and methotrexate resistance shows a complex dependence on the radiation dose and on the interval between irradiation and assessment of drug resistance. For a dose of 3 Gy, induced 5-fluorouracil and methotrexate resistance is seen only after an interval of 5 to 7 days, whereas for a dose of 12 Gy, high levels of induced resistance are observed 1 to 3 days after irradiation. The maximum absolute risk for induction of resistance is 4 per 10(4) cells per Gy for methotrexate, and 3 per 10(6) cells per Gy for 5-fluorouracil. These results indicate that tumor hypoxia may play a role in the increased levels of drug resistance seen after irradiation, and that both genetic and environmental factors may influence radiation-induction of drug resistance. These studies provide essential data for models of the development of tumor drug resistance, and imply that some of the drug resistance seen when chemotherapy follows radiotherapy may be caused by radiation-induced drug resistance.

  8. Bacterial resistance to tetracycline: mechanisms, transfer, and clinical significance.

    PubMed Central

    Speer, B S; Shoemaker, N B; Salyers, A A

    1992-01-01

    Tetracycline has been a widely used antibiotic because of its low toxicity and broad spectrum of activity. However, its clinical usefulness has been declining because of the appearance of an increasing number of tetracycline-resistant isolates of clinically important bacteria. Two types of resistance mechanisms predominate: tetracycline efflux and ribosomal protection. A third mechanism of resistance, tetracycline modification, has been identified, but its clinical relevance is still unclear. For some tetracycline resistance genes, expression is regulated. In efflux genes found in gram-negative enteric bacteria, regulation is via a repressor that interacts with tetracycline. Gram-positive efflux genes appear to be regulated by an attenuation mechanism. Recently it was reported that at least one of the ribosome protection genes is regulated by attenuation. Tetracycline resistance genes are often found on transmissible elements. Efflux resistance genes are generally found on plasmids, whereas genes involved in ribosome protection have been found on both plasmids and self-transmissible chromosomal elements (conjugative transposons). One class of conjugative transposon, originally found in streptococci, can transfer itself from streptococci to a variety of recipients, including other gram-positive bacteria, gram-negative bacteria, and mycoplasmas. Another class of conjugative transposons has been found in the Bacteroides group. An unusual feature of the Bacteroides elements is that their transfer is enhanced by preexposure to tetracycline. Thus, tetracycline has the double effect of selecting for recipients that acquire a resistance gene and stimulating transfer of the gene. PMID:1423217

  9. Global Phenotypic Characterization of Effects of Fluoroquinolone Resistance Selection on the Metabolic Activities and Drug Susceptibilities of Clostridium perfringens Strains

    PubMed Central

    Park, Miseon

    2014-01-01

    Fluoroquinolone resistance affects toxin production of Clostridium perfringens strains differently. To investigate the effect of fluoroquinolone resistance selection on global changes in metabolic activities and drug susceptibilities, four C. perfringens strains and their norfloxacin-, ciprofloxacin-, and gatifloxacin-resistant mutants were compared in nearly 2000 assays, using phenotype microarray plates. Variations among mutant strains resulting from resistance selection were observed in all aspects of metabolism. Carbon utilization, pH range, osmotic tolerance, and chemical sensitivity of resistant strains were affected differently in the resistant mutants depending on both the bacterial genotype and the fluoroquinolone to which the bacterium was resistant. The susceptibilities to gentamicin and erythromycin of all resistant mutants except one increased, but some resistant strains were less susceptible to amoxicillin, cefoxitin, ceftriaxone, chloramphenicol, and metronidazole than their wild types. Sensitivity to ethidium bromide decreased in some resistant mutants and increased in others. Microarray analysis of two gatifloxacin-resistant mutants showed changes in metabolic activities that were correlated with altered expression of various genes. Both the chemical structures of fluoroquinolones and the genomic makeup of the wild types influenced the changes found in resistant mutants, which may explain some inconsistent reports of the effects of therapeutic use of fluoroquinolones on clinical isolates of bacteria. PMID:25587280

  10. Bacterial disease resistance in Arabidopsis through flagellin perception

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Cyril Zipfel; Silke Robatzek; Lionel Navarro; Edward J. Oakeley; Jonathan D. G. Jones; Georg Felix; Thomas Boller

    2004-01-01

    Plants and animals recognize microbial invaders by detecting pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) such as flagellin. However, the importance of flagellin perception for disease resistance has, until now, not been demonstrated. Here we show that treatment of plants with flg22, a peptide representing the elicitor-active epitope of flagellin, induces the expression of numerous defence-related genes and triggers resistance to pathogenic bacteria

  11. Lipid A Acylation and Bacterial Resistance against Vertebrate Antimicrobial Peptides

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Lin Guo; Kheng B Lim; Cristina M Poduje; Morad Daniel; John S Gunn; Murray Hackett; Samuel I Miller

    1998-01-01

    The Salmonellae PhoP-PhoQ virulence regulators induce resistance to host cationic antimicrobial peptides (CAMP) after infection of vertebrate tissues, and Mg2+ or Ca2+ limitation. The PhoP-PhoQ activated gene, pagP, was identified as important to inducible CAMP resistance and increased acylation of lipid A, the major component of the outer leaflet of the outer membrane. pagP mutants demonstrated increased outer membrane permeability

  12. Breeding Strains of Cotton Resistant to Bacterial Blight. 

    E-print Network

    Blank, Lester M. (Lester Marion); Bird, L. S. (Luther Smith)

    1951-01-01

    to fully susceptible strains. Blank (3) found that the backcross method was suitable for transferring Stone- ville 20 resistance to susceptible commercial types used in his breeding program. MATERIALS AND METHODS X. malvacearum was isolated from... at College Station, plus appropriate checks. ?Strain designations: Blight-resistant types; Ston~ville- R-, M-. 76-, 7%. 131- and Tex. BR St. No. 1. Ern~ire- 212- and 226-. 1)eltanine- 342-. Fiber strength6 -- Susreptihle cherks; Stoneville...

  13. Development of a protocol for predicting bacterial resistance to microbicides.

    PubMed

    Knapp, Laura; Amézquita, Alejandro; McClure, Peter; Stewart, Sara; Maillard, Jean-Yves

    2015-04-01

    Regulations dealing with microbicides in Europe and the United States are evolving and now require data on the risk of the development of resistance in organisms targeted by microbicidal products. There is no standard protocol to assess the risk of the development of resistance to microbicidal formulations. This study aimed to validate the use of changes in microbicide and antibiotic susceptibility as initial markers for predicting microbicide resistance and cross-resistance to antibiotics. Three industrial isolates (Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Burkholderia cepacia, and Klebsiella pneumoniae) and two Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium strains (SL1344 and 14028S) were exposed to a shampoo, a mouthwash, eye makeup remover, and the microbicides contained within these formulations (chlorhexidine digluconate [CHG] and benzalkonium chloride [BZC]) under realistic, in-use conditions. Baseline and postexposure data were compared. No significant increases in the MIC or the minimum bactericidal concentration (MBC) were observed for any strain after exposure to the three formulations. Increases as high as 100-fold in the MICs and MBCs of CHG and BZC for SL1344 and 14028S were observed but were unstable. Changes in antibiotic susceptibility were not clinically significant. The use of MICs and MBCs combined with antibiotic susceptibility profiling and stability testing generated reproducible data that allowed for an initial prediction of the development of resistance to microbicides. These approaches measure characteristics that are directly relevant to the concern over resistance and cross-resistance development following the use of microbicides. These are low-cost, high-throughput techniques, allowing manufacturers to provide to regulatory bodies, promptly and efficiently, data supporting an early assessment of the risk of resistance development. PMID:25636848

  14. A Priori Descriptors in QSAR: a Case of Gram-Negative Bacterial Multidrug Resistance to b-Lactams

    E-print Network

    Ferreira, Márcia M. C.

    A Priori Descriptors in QSAR: a Case of Gram-Negative Bacterial Multidrug Resistance to b in terms of molecular descriptors. Keywords · gram-negative bacteria · multidrug resistance · b Inhibitory Con- centration (MIC) values18 for b-lactams that are extru- ded from Gram-negative bacterial

  15. A RAPD-derived STS marker is linked to a bacterial wilt ( Burkholderia caryophylli ) resistance gene in carnation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Takashi Onozaki; Natsu Tanikawa; Mitsuyasu Taneya; Kiyofumi Kudo; Takuya Funayama; Hiroshi Ikeda; Michio Shibata

    2004-01-01

    Bacterial wilt caused by Burkholderia caryophylli is one of the most important and damaging diseases of carnations (Dianthus caryophyllus) in Japan. We aimed to identify random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) markers associated with the genes controlling bacterial wilt resistance in a resistance-segregating population of 134 progeny plants derived from a cross between ‘Carnation Nou No. 1’ (a carnation breeding line

  16. Survival of multi-drug resistant enteropathogenic Escherichia coli and Salmonella paratyphi in Vembanadu

    E-print Network

    Mazumder, Asit

    Survival of multi-drug resistant enteropathogenic Escherichia coli and Salmonella paratyphi the survival response of multi-drug resistant enteropathogenic Escherichia coli and Salmonella paratyphi- otypes of Escherichia coli, Salmonella enterica typhi and paratyphi are highly endemic to India

  17. 21 CFR 866.3950 - In vitro human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) drug resistance genotype assay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...genotype assay. (a) Identification . The in vitro HIV drug resistance genotype assay is a device that consists of nucleic acid reagent primers and probes together with software for predicting drug resistance/susceptibility based on...

  18. 21 CFR 866.3950 - In vitro human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) drug resistance genotype assay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...genotype assay. (a) Identification . The in vitro HIV drug resistance genotype assay is a device that consists of nucleic acid reagent primers and probes together with software for predicting drug resistance/susceptibility based on...

  19. 21 CFR 866.3950 - In vitro human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) drug resistance genotype assay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...genotype assay. (a) Identification . The in vitro HIV drug resistance genotype assay is a device that consists of nucleic acid reagent primers and probes together with software for predicting drug resistance/susceptibility based on...

  20. Application of Metabolomics in Drug Resistant Breast Cancer Research

    PubMed Central

    Shajahan-Haq, Ayesha N.; Cheema, Mehar S.; Clarke, Robert

    2015-01-01

    The metabolic profiles of breast cancer cells are different from normal mammary epithelial cells. Breast cancer cells that gain resistance to therapeutic interventions can reprogram their endogenous metabolism in order to adapt and proliferate despite high oxidative stress and hypoxic conditions. Drug resistance in breast cancer, regardless of subgroups, is a major clinical setback. Although recent advances in genomics and proteomics research has given us a glimpse into the heterogeneity that exists even within subgroups, the ability to precisely predict a tumor’s response to therapy remains elusive. Metabolomics as a quantitative, high through put technology offers promise towards devising new strategies to establish predictive, diagnostic and prognostic markers of breast cancer. Along with other “omics” technologies that include genomics, transcriptomics, and proteomics, metabolomics fits into the puzzle of a comprehensive systems biology approach to understand drug resistance in breast cancer. In this review, we highlight the challenges facing successful therapeutic treatment of breast cancer and the innovative approaches that metabolomics offers to better understand drug resistance in cancer. PMID:25693144

  1. Convergent Evolutionary Analysis Identifies Significant Mutations in Drug Resistance Targets of Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Manzour Hernando Hazbon; Alifiya S. Motiwala; Magali Cavatore; Michael Brimacombe; Thomas S. Whittam; David Alland

    2008-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis adapts to the environment by selecting for advantageous single-nucleotide poly- morphisms (SNPs). We studied whether advantageous SNPs could be distinguished from neutral mutations within genes associated with drug resistance. A total of 1,003 clinical isolates of M. tuberculosis were related phylogenetically and tested for the distribution of SNPs in putative drug resistance genes. Drug resistance- associated versus non-drug-resistance-associated

  2. Antifungal drug resistance among Candida species: mechanisms and clinical impact.

    PubMed

    Sanguinetti, Maurizio; Posteraro, Brunella; Lass-Flörl, Cornelia

    2015-06-01

    The epidemiology of Candida infections has changed in recent years. Although Candida albicans is still the main cause of invasive candidiasis in most clinical settings, a substantial proportion of patients is now infected with non-albicans Candida species. The various Candida species vary in their susceptibility to the most commonly used antifungal agents, and the intrinsic resistance to antifungal therapy seen in some species, along with the development of acquired resistance during treatment in others, is becoming a major problem in the management of Candida infection. A better understanding of the mechanisms and clinical impact of antifungal drug resistance is essential for the efficient treatment of patients with Candida infection and for improving treatment outcomes. Herein, we report resistance to the azoles and echinocandins among Candida species. PMID:26033251

  3. Insights into the amplification of bacterial resistance to erythromycin in activated sludge.

    PubMed

    Guo, Mei-Ting; Yuan, Qing-Bin; Yang, Jian

    2015-10-01

    Wastewater treatment plants are significant reservoirs for antimicrobial resistance. However, little is known about wastewater treatment effects on the variation of antibiotic resistance. The shifts of bacterial resistance to erythromycin, a macrolide widely used in human medicine, on a lab-scale activated sludge system fed with real wastewater was investigated from levels of bacteria, community and genes, in this study. The resistance variation of total heterotrophic bacteria was studied during the biological treatment process, based on culture dependent method. The alterations of bacterial community resistant to erythromycin and nine typical erythromycin resistance genes were explored with molecular approaches, including high-throughput sequencing and quantitative polymerase chain reaction. The results revealed that the total heterotrophs tolerance level to erythromycin concentrations (higher than 32mg/L) was significantly amplified during the activated sludge treatment, with the prevalence increased from 9.6% to 21.8%. High-throughput sequencing results demonstrated an obvious increase of the total heterotrophic bacterial diversity resistant to erythromycin. Proteobacteria and Bacteroidetes were the two dominant phyla in the influent and effluent of the bioreactor. However, the prevalence of Proteobacteria decreased from 76% to 59% while the total phyla number increased greatly from 18 to 29 through activated sludge treatment. The gene proportions of erm(A), mef(E) and erm(D) were greatly amplified after biological treatment. It is proposed that the transfer of antibiotic resistance genes through the variable mixtures of bacteria in the activated sludge might be the reason for the antibiotic resistance amplification. The amplified risk of antibiotic resistance in wastewater treatment needs to be paid more attention. PMID:25957255

  4. THEORETICAL STUDY ON SOME -LACTAMS AS SUBSTRATES OF THE BACTERIAL MULTIDRUG RESISTANCE ACRB PUMP

    E-print Network

    Ferreira, Márcia M. C.

    THEORETICAL STUDY ON SOME -LACTAMS AS SUBSTRATES OF THE BACTERIAL MULTIDRUG RESISTANCE ACRB PUMPB pump is a part of the most important multidrug efflux system of gram-negative bacteria, which excretes recognition site (PRS) of the AcrB pump was also performed. Parsimonius PLS models were obtained (Q2 > 0.67, R

  5. Selection for resistance to the rhizoctonia-bacterial root rot complex in sugar beet

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Rhizoctonia-bacterial root rot complex continues to be a concerning problem in sugar beet production areas. To investigate resistance to this complex in 26 commercial sugar beet cultivars, field studies and greenhouse studies with mature roots from the field were conducted with Rhizoctonia solan...

  6. Enhanced tomato resistance to bacterial canker by application of turtle oil

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ömür Baysal; Y. Ziya Gürsoy; Hakan Örnek; Ahmet Duru

    2005-01-01

    Pretreatment with oil of sea turtle Caretta caretta protected tomato plants against bacterial canker caused by Clavibacter michiganensis subsp. michiganensis (Cmm). The turtle oil was ineffective in inhibiting Cmm in an agar diffusion test, suggesting a mechanism of induced resistance. Under controlled conditions in the greenhouse, turtle oil lowered the disease index and had reduced the growth of bacteria up

  7. Antibiotic Resistant Bacteria in Mud of Shrimp Farming Ponds and Bacterial Degradation of Antibiotic

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jatindra Nath Bhakta; Yukihiro Munekage

    An investigation was conducted to determine the occurrence, resistant efficiency of bacteria collected from four shrimp farming zones, Vunh Tau (VT), Nha Trang (NT), Da Nang (DN) and Hue (HU) of Viet Nam against five commonly applied antibiotics (sulphamethoxazole (SMX), trimethoprim (TMP), norfloxacin (NFC), amoxillin (AXC) and streptomycin (SMC)) and bacterial degradation of antibiotic. Mud samples were employed to examine

  8. Development of candidate gene markers associated to common bacterial blight resistance in common bean

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Common bacterial blight (CBB), caused by Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. phaseoli (Xap), is a major yield-limiting factor of common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) production around the world. Two major CBB-resistant quantitative trait loci (QTL), linked to the sequence characterized amplified region marker...

  9. Nanocrystallization of Ag-incorporated stainless steel surface for enhanced resistance to corrosion and bacterial colonization

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Bin Yu; Elisabeth M. Davis; Adam E. Lesiuk; Randall T. Irvin; D. Y. Li

    2011-01-01

    Incorporating silver as an antimicrobial compound into the surface of medical implants may directly attack bacteria, thus preventing bacteria-induced infections. However, it was demonstrated that stainless steel (frequently used as an implant material) incorporated with Ag, though exhibiting enhanced anti-bacterial capability, showed a decreased resistance to corrosion in the physiological environment. In this study, we demonstrate a promising approach for

  10. Registration of Common Bacterial Blight Resistant Dark Red Kidney Bean Germplasm Line USDK-CBB-15

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Dark red kidney bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) germplasm line USDK-CBB-15 was developed by USDA-ARS in cooperation with the Idaho Agricultural Experiment Station and released in 2005. This line was bred specifically for a high level of resistance to common bacterial blight (Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. ...

  11. Interferon in resistance to bacterial and protozoan infections

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sonnenfeld, Gerald; Gould, Cheryl L.; Kierszenbaum, Felipe; Degee, Antonie L. W.; Mansfield, John M.

    1986-01-01

    The effects of genetic differences in mouse strains on the modulation of protozoan infections by interferon (IFN) were investigated. In one set of experiments, three different strains of mice were injected with T. cruzi, and their sera were assayed at five time intervals for IFN titer. A greater quantity of IFN was produced by mouse strains that were susceptible to T. cruzi infection than by the more resistant strain. In another set of experiments, spleen cell cultures from inbred strains of mice were challenged with an antigen made from T.b. rhodesiense. The cells from mice resistant to infection, produced greater amounts of IFN-gamma than did cells from the susceptible mice. In a third set of experiments, it was found that mice injected with T.b. rhodesiense before being infected with a diabetogenic virus (EMC-D) were resistant to the effects of the virus and did not produce virus-specific antibody.

  12. Smart doxorubicin nanoparticles with high drug payload for enhanced chemotherapy against drug resistance and cancer diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Yu, Caitong; Zhou, Mengjiao; Zhang, Xiujuan; Wei, Weijia; Chen, Xianfeng; Zhang, Xiaohong

    2015-03-19

    Considering the obvious advantages in efficacy and price, doxorubicin (DOX) has been widely used for a range of cancers, which is usually encapsulated in various nanocarriers for drug delivery. Although effective, in most nanocarrier-based delivery systems, the drug loading capacity of DOX is rather low; this can lead to undesired systemic toxicity and excretion concern. Herein, we report for the first time the usage of pure doxorubicin nanoparticles (DOX NPs) without addition of any carriers for enhanced chemotherapy against drug-resistance. The drug payload reaches as high as 90.47%, which largely surpassed those in previous reports. These PEG stabilized DOX NPs exhibit good biocompatibility and stability, long blood circulation time, fast release in an acidic environment and high accumulation in tumors. Compared with free DOX, DOX NPs display a dramatically enhanced anticancer therapeutic efficacy in the inhibition of cell and tumor growth. Moreover, they can also be readily incorporated with other anticancer drugs for synergistic chemotherapy to overcome the drug resistance of cancers. The fluorescence properties of DOX also endow these NPs with imaging capabilities, thus making it a multifunctional system for diagnosis and treatment. This work demonstrates great potential of DOX NPs for cancer diagnosis, therapy and overcoming drug tolerance. PMID:25740312

  13. Enteric dysbiosis promotes antibiotic-resistant bacterial infection: systemic dissemination of resistant and commensal bacteria through epithelial transcytosis.

    PubMed

    Yu, Linda Chia-Hui; Shih, Yi-An; Wu, Li-Ling; Lin, Yang-Ding; Kuo, Wei-Ting; Peng, Wei-Hao; Lu, Kuo-Shyan; Wei, Shu-Chen; Turner, Jerrold R; Ni, Yen-Hsuan

    2014-10-15

    Antibiotic usage promotes intestinal colonization of antibiotic-resistant bacteria. However, whether resistant bacteria gain dominance in enteric microflora or disseminate to extraintestinal viscera remains unclear. Our aim was to investigate temporal diversity changes in microbiota and transepithelial routes of bacterial translocation after antibiotic-resistant enterobacterial colonization. Mice drinking water with or without antibiotics were intragastrically gavaged with ampicillin-resistant (Amp-r) nonpathogenic Escherichia coli (E. coli) and given normal water afterward. The composition and spatial distribution of intestinal bacteria were evaluated using 16S rDNA sequencing and fluorescence in situ hybridization. Bacterial endocytosis in epithelial cells was examined using gentamicin resistance assay and transmission electromicroscopy. Paracellular permeability was assessed by tight junctional immunostaining and measured by tissue conductance and luminal-to-serosal dextran fluxes. Our results showed that antibiotic treatment enabled intestinal colonization and transient dominance of orally acquired Amp-r E. coli in mice. The colonized Amp-r E. coli peaked on day 3 postinoculation and was competed out after 1 wk, as evidenced by the recovery of commensals, such as Escherichia, Bacteroides, Lachnospiraceae, Clostridium, and Lactobacillus. Mucosal penetration and extraintestinal dissemination of exogenous and endogenous enterobacteria were correlated with abnormal epithelial transcytosis but uncoupled with paracellular tight junctional damage. In conclusion, antibiotic-induced enteric dysbiosis predisposes to exogenous infection and causes systemic dissemination of both antibiotic-resistant and commensal enterobacteria through transcytotic routes across epithelial layers. These results may help explain the susceptibility to sepsis in antibiotic-resistant enteric bacterial infection. PMID:25059827

  14. Evolution of Drug-resistant Viral Populations during Interruption of Antiretroviral Therapy

    E-print Network

    Ahlers, Guenter

    therapy (ART), some HIV-2 infected patients still fail treatment due to drug resistance, poor adherence1 Evolution of Drug-resistant Viral Populations during Interruption of Antiretroviral Therapy antiretroviral treatment (ART) interruption allows determination of the evolution of3 drug-resistant viruses

  15. First-Line Treatment for Tuberculosis (TB), Drug Resistant TB -- A Visual Tour

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Content Area First-Line Treatment of TB for Drug-Sensitive TB Tuberculosis, which results from an infection ... Click here to see how these drugs work . Drug-Resistant TB—A Visual Tour First-Line Treatment ...

  16. 21 CFR 866.3950 - In vitro human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) drug resistance genotype assay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false In vitro human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) drug...Serological Reagents § 866.3950 In vitro human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) drug...assay. (a) Identification . The in vitro HIV drug resistance genotype...

  17. Coherent feedforward transcriptional regulatory motifs enhance drug resistance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charlebois, Daniel A.; Balázsi, Gábor; Kćrn, Mads

    2014-05-01

    Fluctuations in gene expression give identical cells access to a spectrum of phenotypes that can serve as a transient, nongenetic basis for natural selection by temporarily increasing drug resistance. In this study, we demonstrate using mathematical modeling and simulation that certain gene regulatory network motifs, specifically coherent feedforward loop motifs, can facilitate the development of nongenetic resistance by increasing cell-to-cell variability and the time scale at which beneficial phenotypic states can be maintained. Our results highlight how regulatory network motifs enabling transient, nongenetic inheritance play an important role in defining reproductive fitness in adverse environments and provide a selective advantage subject to evolutionary pressure.

  18. The prevalence of multidrug-resistant bacterial strains has substantially

    E-print Network

    Nizet, Victor

    against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). S. aureus is the leading cause of many human infections, particularly those of the skin and soft tissues. Moreover, MRSA -- a variation of this bacterium MRSA. Such virulence-factor-based approaches offer a new direction for therapies targeting multidrug

  19. Antibiotic Resistant Bacterial Profiles of Anaerobic Swine Lagoon Effluent

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Although land application of swine manure lagoon effluent is a common and effective method of disposal, the presence of antibiotic-resistant bacteria, both pathogenic and commensal can complicate already understood issues associated with its safe disposal. The aim of this study was to assess antibi...

  20. Towards an understanding of the genetics of bacterial metal resistance.

    PubMed

    Mergeay, M

    1991-01-01

    Many bacteria show great promise for use in metal recovery. However, the genetics of metal-leaching, accumulation-resistance, and oxidation/reduction mechanisms of these bacteria is still an area of research in its infancy. The introduction of such genes into bacteria of economic importance would have application in biomining and environmental bioremediation. PMID:1366923

  1. Quantification of antibiotic drug potency by a two-compartment radioassay of bacterial growth

    SciTech Connect

    Boonkitticharoen, V.; Ehrhardt, J.C.; Kirchner, P.T. (Univ. of Iowa, Iowa City (USA))

    1990-06-01

    The two-compartment radioassay for microbial kinetics based on continuous measurement of the {sup 14}CO{sub 2} released by bacterial metabolism of 14C-labeled substrate offers a valuable approach to testing the potency of antimicrobial drugs. By using a previously validated radioassay with gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria, a group of protein synthesis inhibitors was evaluated for their effect on microbial growth kinetics. All tested drugs induced changes in both the slopes and intercepts of the growth curves. An exponential growth model was applied to quantify the drug effect on the processes of bacterial {sup 14}CO{sub 2} liberation and cell generation. The response was measured in terms of a generation rate constant. A linear dependence of the generation rate constant on the dose of spectinomycin was observed with Escherichia coli. Sigmoidal-shaped curves were found in the assays of chloramphenicol and tetracycline. The implications of dose-response curves are discussed on the basis of the receptor site concept for drug action. The assay sensitivities for chloramphenicol and tetracycline were similar to those obtained by the cell counting method, but the sensitivity of the radioassay was at least 10 times greater for spectinomycin.

  2. Clock and ATF4 transcription system regulates drug resistance in human cancer cell lines

    Microsoft Academic Search

    T Igarashi; H Izumi; T Uchiumi; K Nishio; T Arao; M Tanabe; H Uramoto; K Sugio; K Yasumoto; Y Sasaguri; K Y Wang; Y Otsuji; K Kohno

    2007-01-01

    The mechanisms underlying cellular drug resistance have been extensively studied, but little is known about its regulation. We have previously reported that activating transcription factor 4 (ATF4) is upregulated in cisplatin-resistant cells and plays a role in cisplatin resistance. Here, we find out a novel relationship between the circadian transcription factor Clock and drug resistance. Clock drives the periodical expression

  3. Overcoming Drug Resistance and Treating Advanced Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Semenas, Julius; Allegrucci, Cinzia; Boorjian, Stephen A; Mongan, Nigel P; Persson, Jenny Liao

    2012-01-01

    Most of the prostate cancers (PCa) in advanced stage will progress to castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC). Within CRPC group, 50-70% of the patients will develop bone metastasis in axial and other regions of the skeleton. Once PCa cells spread to the bone, currently, no treatment regimens are available to eradicate the metastasis, and cancer-related death becomes inevitable. In 2012, it is estimated that there will be 28,170 PCa deaths in the United States. Thus, PCa bone metastasis-associated clinical complications and treatment resistance pose major clinical challenges. In this review, we will present recent findings on the molecular and cellular pathways that are responsible for bone metastasis of PCa. We will address several novel mechanisms with a focus on the role of bone and bone marrow microenvironment in promoting PCa metastasis, and will further discuss why prostate cancer cells preferentially metastasize to the bone. Additionally, we will discuss novel roles of several key pathways, including angiogenesis and extracellular matrix remodeling in bone marrow and stem cell niches with their relationship to PCa bone metastasis and poor treatment response. We will evaluate how various chemotherapeutic drugs and radiation therapies may allow aggressive PCa cells to gain advantageous mutations leading to increased survival and rendering the cancer cells to become resistant to treatment. The novel concept relating several key survival and invasion signaling pathways to stem cell niches and treatment resistance will be reviewed. Lastly, we will provide an update of several recently developed novel drug candidates that target metastatic cancer microenvironments or niches, and discuss the advantages and significance provided by such therapeutic approaches in pursuit of overcoming drug resistance and treating advanced PCa. PMID:22746994

  4. Antibiotic resistance differentiates Echinacea purpurea endophytic bacterial communities with respect to plant organs.

    PubMed

    Mengoni, Alessio; Maida, Isabel; Chiellini, Carolina; Emiliani, Giovanni; Mocali, Stefano; Fabiani, Arturo; Fondi, Marco; Firenzuoli, Fabio; Fani, Renato

    2014-10-01

    Recent findings have shown that antibiotic resistance is widespread in multiple environments and multicellular organisms, as plants, harboring rich and complex bacterial communities, could be hot spot for emergence of antibiotic resistances as a response to bioactive molecules production by members of the same community. Here, we investigated a panel of 137 bacterial isolates present in different organs of the medicinal plant Echinacea purpurea, aiming to evaluate if different plant organs harbor strains with different antibiotic resistance profiles, implying then the presence of different biological interactions in the communities inhabiting different plant organs. Data obtained showed a large antibiotic resistance variability among strains, which was strongly related to the different plant organs (26% of total variance, P < 0.0001). Interestingly this uneven antibiotic resistance pattern was present also when a single genus (Pseudomonas), ubiquitous in all organs, was analyzed and no correlation of antibiotic resistance pattern with genomic relatedness among strains was found. In conclusion, we speculate that antibiotic resistance patterns are tightly linked to the type of plant organ under investigation, suggesting the presence of differential forms of biological interaction in stem/leaves, roots and rhizosphere. PMID:25283726

  5. Antibiotic resistance among cultured bacterial isolates from bioethanol fermentation facilities across the United States.

    PubMed

    Murphree, Colin A; Heist, E Patrick; Moe, Luke A

    2014-09-01

    Bacterial contamination of fuel ethanol fermentations by lactic acid bacteria (LAB) can have crippling effects on bioethanol production. Producers have had success controlling bacterial growth through prophylactic addition of antibiotics to fermentors, yet concerns have arisen about antibiotic resistance among the LAB. Here, we report on mechanisms used by 32 LAB isolates from eight different US bioethanol facilities to persist under conditions of antibiotic stress. Minimum inhibitory concentration assays with penicillin, erythromycin, and virginiamycin revealed broad resistance to each of the antibiotics as well as high levels of resistance to individual antibiotics. Phenotypic assays revealed that antibiotic inactivation mechanisms contributed to the high levels of individual resistances among the isolates, especially to erythromycin and virginiamycin, yet none of the isolates appeared to use a ?-lactamase. Biofilm formation was noted among the majority of the isolates and may contribute to persistence under low levels of antibiotics. Nearly all of the isolates carried at least one canonical antibiotic resistance gene and many carried more than one. The erythromycin ribosomal methyltransferase (erm) gene class was found in 19 of 32 isolates, yet a number of these isolates exhibit little to no resistance to erythromycin. The erm genes were present in 15 isolates that encoded more than one antibiotic resistance mechanism, suggestive of potential genetic linkages. PMID:24748439

  6. Possible Role of Curcumin as an Efflux Pump Inhibitor in Multi Drug Resistant Clinical Isolates of Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Prakash, Pradyot; Gupta, Mohan Lal; Mohapatra, Tribhuban Mohan

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Multidrug resistant non-fermenters are continuously increasing in hospital and ICU settings. One of the mechanisms of developing drug resistance is possession of efflux pump through which bacteria extrude antimicrobial agents and other toxic substances. If these efflux channels are blocked or inhibited, increased drug concentration can be achieved in a bacterial cell with optimal drug dose. Present study was aimed to investigate role of curcumin as efflux pump inhibitor (EPI) and to compare its activity with a known EPI like phe-arg-beta-naphthylamide (PA?N). Materials and Methods: A total of 170 clinical isolates of Pseudomonas aeruginosa were taken, antimicrobial susceptibility was performed by disc diffusion test and minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) against selected drugs before and after adding known synthetic EPI, PA?N (20mg/L). Out of these, 30 multidrug resistant strains were taken and MIC was performed with curcumin (50mg/L) with and without selected drugs. Results : Significant reduction in MIC was observed after adding curcumin (50mg/L) with selected antimicrobial agents in 9/30 (30%) of multi drug resistant (MDR) isolates of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, while no change in MIC was observed when curcumin (50mg/L) was used alone, indicating its efflux pump inhibitor activity. Conclusion: This study suggests role of efflux pump in development of drug resistance which can be overcome by use of an efflux pump inhibitor, with more emphasis on compound like curcumin which will have less or no adverse effects if used in vivo. PMID:25478340

  7. Regulatory Circuitry Governing Fungal Development, Drug Resistance, and Disease

    PubMed Central

    Shapiro, Rebecca S.; Robbins, Nicole; Cowen, Leah E.

    2011-01-01

    Summary: Pathogenic fungi have become a leading cause of human mortality due to the increasing frequency of fungal infections in immunocompromised populations and the limited armamentarium of clinically useful antifungal drugs. Candida albicans, Cryptococcus neoformans, and Aspergillus fumigatus are the leading causes of opportunistic fungal infections. In these diverse pathogenic fungi, complex signal transduction cascades are critical for sensing environmental changes and mediating appropriate cellular responses. For C. albicans, several environmental cues regulate a morphogenetic switch from yeast to filamentous growth, a reversible transition important for virulence. Many of the signaling cascades regulating morphogenesis are also required for cells to adapt and survive the cellular stresses imposed by antifungal drugs. Many of these signaling networks are conserved in C. neoformans and A. fumigatus, which undergo distinct morphogenetic programs during specific phases of their life cycles. Furthermore, the key mechanisms of fungal drug resistance, including alterations of the drug target, overexpression of drug efflux transporters, and alteration of cellular stress responses, are conserved between these species. This review focuses on the circuitry regulating fungal morphogenesis and drug resistance and the impact of these pathways on virulence. Although the three human-pathogenic fungi highlighted in this review are those most frequently encountered in the clinic, they represent a minute fraction of fungal diversity. Exploration of the conservation and divergence of core signal transduction pathways across C. albicans, C. neoformans, and A. fumigatus provides a foundation for the study of a broader diversity of pathogenic fungi and a platform for the development of new therapeutic strategies for fungal disease. PMID:21646428

  8. Cultivable bacterial microbiota of northern bobwhite (Colinus virginianus): a new reservoir of antimicrobial resistance?

    PubMed

    Su, Hongwen; McKelvey, Jessica; Rollins, Dale; Zhang, Michael; Brightsmith, Donald J; Derr, James; Zhang, Shuping

    2014-01-01

    The northern bobwhite (Colinus virginianus) is an ecologically and economically important avian species. At the present time, little is known about the microbial communities associated with these birds. As the first step to create a quail microbiology knowledge base, the current study conducted an inventory of cultivable quail tracheal, crop, cecal, and cloacal microbiota and associated antimicrobial resistance using a combined bacteriology and DNA sequencing approach. A total of 414 morphologically unique bacterial colonies were selected from nonselective aerobic and anaerobic cultures, as well as selective and enrichment cultures. Analysis of the first 500-bp 16S rRNA gene sequences in conjunction with biochemical identifications revealed 190 non-redundant species-level taxonomic units, representing 160 known bacterial species and 30 novel species. The bacterial species were classified into 4 phyla, 14 orders, 37 families, and 59 or more genera. Firmicutes was the most commonly encountered phylum (57%) followed by Actinobacteria (24%), Proteobacteria (17%) and Bacteroidetes (0.02%). Extensive diversity in the species composition of quail microbiota was observed among individual birds and anatomical locations. Quail microbiota harbored several opportunistic pathogens, such as E. coli and Ps. aeruginosa, as well as human commensal organisms, including Neisseria species. Phenotypic characterization of selected bacterial species demonstrated a high prevalence of resistance to the following classes of antimicrobials: phenicol, macrolide, lincosamide, quinolone, and sulphate. Data from the current investigation warrant further investigation on the source, transmission, pathology, and control of antimicrobial resistance in wild quail populations. PMID:24937705

  9. Cultivable Bacterial Microbiota of Northern Bobwhite (Colinus virginianus): A New Reservoir of Antimicrobial Resistance?

    PubMed Central

    Su, Hongwen; McKelvey, Jessica; Rollins, Dale; Zhang, Michael; Brightsmith, Donald J.; Derr, James; Zhang, Shuping

    2014-01-01

    The northern bobwhite (Colinus virginianus) is an ecologically and economically important avian species. At the present time, little is known about the microbial communities associated with these birds. As the first step to create a quail microbiology knowledge base, the current study conducted an inventory of cultivable quail tracheal, crop, cecal, and cloacal microbiota and associated antimicrobial resistance using a combined bacteriology and DNA sequencing approach. A total of 414 morphologically unique bacterial colonies were selected from nonselective aerobic and anaerobic cultures, as well as selective and enrichment cultures. Analysis of the first 500-bp 16S rRNA gene sequences in conjunction with biochemical identifications revealed 190 non-redundant species-level taxonomic units, representing 160 known bacterial species and 30 novel species. The bacterial species were classified into 4 phyla, 14 orders, 37 families, and 59 or more genera. Firmicutes was the most commonly encountered phylum (57%) followed by Actinobacteria (24%), Proteobacteria (17%) and Bacteroidetes (0.02%). Extensive diversity in the species composition of quail microbiota was observed among individual birds and anatomical locations. Quail microbiota harbored several opportunistic pathogens, such as E. coli and Ps. aeruginosa, as well as human commensal organisms, including Neisseria species. Phenotypic characterization of selected bacterial species demonstrated a high prevalence of resistance to the following classes of antimicrobials: phenicol, macrolide, lincosamide, quinolone, and sulphate. Data from the current investigation warrant further investigation on the source, transmission, pathology, and control of antimicrobial resistance in wild quail populations. PMID:24937705

  10. Primary trastuzumab resistance: new tricks for an old drug

    PubMed Central

    Wilken, Jason A.; Maihle, Nita J.

    2011-01-01

    Trastuzumab (Herceptin®) is the first FDA-approved therapeutic targeting a HER-family receptor tyrosine kinase (HER2/ErbB2/neu). Although trastuzumab is effective in the treatment of HER2-positive breast cancer, a substantial proportion of patients will not respond to trastuzumab-based regimens (primary resistance), and those who do respond will often lose clinical benefit (i.e., secondary resistance). While multiple mechanisms underlying the development of secondary trastuzumab resistance have been identified, few studies have specifically examined the basis of primary trastuzumab resistance. Here, we review these studies, which, together, demonstrate that trastuzumab induces phenotypic changes in tumor cells, even when they are not growth inhibited by trastuzumab, including changes in gene expression. These changes have important clinical implications, including sensitization of malignant cells to other therapeutic drugs. In light of these observations, we propose that the conventional definition of “resistance” as it pertains to trastuzumab and, perhaps, to other targeted therapeutics, may require revision. The results of these studies will be useful in informing the direction of future basic and clinical research focused on overcoming primary trastuzumab resistance. PMID:20973799

  11. Conjugation to polymeric chains of influenza drugs targeting M2 ion channels partially restores inhibition of drug-resistant mutants

    PubMed Central

    Larson, Alyssa M.; Chen, Jianzhu; Klibanov, Alexander M.

    2013-01-01

    By attaching multiple copies of the influenza M2 ion channel inhibitors amantadine (1) and rimantadine (2) to polymeric chains we endeavored to recover their potency in inhibiting drug-resistant influenza viruses. Depending on loading densities, as well as the nature of the drug, the polymer, and the spacer arm, polymer-conjugated drugs were up to 30-fold more potent inhibitors of drug-resistant strains than their monomeric parents. In particular, a 20% loading density and a short linker group on the negatively charged poly-L-glutamate resulted in some of the most potent inhibitors for 2?s conjugates against drug-resistant influenza strains. Although full recovery of the inhibitory action against drug-resistant strains was not achieved, this study may be a step toward salvaging anti-influenza drugs that are no longer effective. PMID:23832466

  12. Catalysis and Sulfa Drug Resistance in Dihydropteroate Synthase

    SciTech Connect

    Yun, Mi-Kyung; Wu, Yinan; Li, Zhenmei; Zhao, Ying; Waddell, M. Brett; Ferreira, Antonio M.; Lee, Richard E.; Bashford, Donald; White, Stephen W. (SJCH)

    2013-04-08

    The sulfonamide antibiotics inhibit dihydropteroate synthase (DHPS), a key enzyme in the folate pathway of bacteria and primitive eukaryotes. However, resistance mutations have severely compromised the usefulness of these drugs. We report structural, computational, and mutagenesis studies on the catalytic and resistance mechanisms of DHPS. By performing the enzyme-catalyzed reaction in crystalline DHPS, we have structurally characterized key intermediates along the reaction pathway. Results support an S{sub N}1 reaction mechanism via formation of a novel cationic pterin intermediate. We also show that two conserved loops generate a substructure during catalysis that creates a specific binding pocket for p-aminobenzoic acid, one of the two DHPS substrates. This substructure, together with the pterin-binding pocket, explains the roles of the conserved active-site residues and reveals how sulfonamide resistance arises.

  13. Understanding drug resistance for monotherapy treatment of HIV infection.

    PubMed

    Kirschner, D E; Webb, G F

    1997-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate strategies in the monotherapy treatment of HIV infection in the presence of drug-resistant (mutant) strains. A mathematical system is developed to model resistance in HIV chemotherapy. It includes the key players in the immune response to HIV infection: virus and both uninfected CD4+ and infected CD4+ T-cell populations. We model the latent and progressive stages of the disease, and then introduce monotherapy treatment. The model is a system of differential equations describing the interaction of two distinct classes of HIV--drug-sensitive (wild type) and drug-resistant (mutant)--with lymphocytes in the peripheral blood. We then introduce chemotherapy effects. In the absence of treatment, the model produces the three types of qualitative clinical behavior--an uninfected steady state, an infected steady state (latency), and progression to AIDS. Simulation of treatment is provided for monotherapy, during the progression to AIDS state, in the consideration of resistance effects. Treatment benefit is based on an increase or retention in CD4+ T-cell counts together with a low viral titer. We explore the following treatment approaches: an antiviral drug which reduces viral infectivity that is administered early--when the CD4+ T-cell count is > or = 300/mm3, and the late--when the CD4+ T-cell count is less than 300/mm3. We compare all results with data. When treatment is initiated during the progression to AIDS state, treatment prevents T-cell collapse, but gradually loses effectiveness due to drug resistance. We hypothesize that it is the careful balance of mutant and wild-type HIV strains which provides the greatest prolonged benefit from treatment. This is best achieved when treatment is initiated when the CD4+ T-cell counts are greater than 250/mm3, but less than 400/mm3 in this model (i.e. not too early, not too late). These results are supported by clinical data. The work is novel in that it is the first model to accurately simulate data before, during and after monotherapy treatment. Our model also provides insight into recent clinical results, as well as suggests plausible guidelines for clinical testing in the monotherapy of HIV infection. PMID:9214852

  14. Risk Factors for Acquisition of Drug Resistance during Multidrug-Resistant Tuberculosis Treatment, Arkhangelsk Oblast, Russia, 2005–2010

    PubMed Central

    Ershova, Julia; Vlasova, Natalia; Nikishova, Elena; Tarasova, Irina; Eliseev, Platon; Maryandyshev, Andrey O.; Shemyakin, Igor G.; Kurbatova, Ekaterina; Cegielski, J. Peter

    2015-01-01

    Acquired resistance to antituberculosis drugs decreases effective treatment options and the likelihood of treatment success. We identified risk factors for acquisition of drug resistance during treatment for multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR TB) and evaluated the effect on treatment outcomes. Data were collected prospectively from adults from Arkhangelsk Oblast, Russia, who had pulmonary MDR TB during 2005–2008. Acquisition of resistance to capreomycin and of extensively drug-resistant TB were more likely among patients who received <3 effective drugs than among patients who received >3 effective drugs (9.4% vs. 0% and 8.6% vs. 0.8%, respectively). Poor outcomes were more likely among patients with acquired capreomycin resistance (100% vs. 25.9%), acquired ofloxacin resistance (83.6% vs. 22.7%), or acquired extensive drug resistance (100% vs. 24.4%). To prevent acquired drug resistance and poor outcomes, baseline susceptibility to first- and second-line drugs should be determined quickly, and treatment should be adjusted to contain >3 effective drugs. PMID:25988954

  15. Genetics of drug resistance in malaria : identification of genes conferring chloroquine and artemisinin resistance in rodent malaria parasite Plasmodium chabaudi 

    E-print Network

    Modrzynska, Katarzyna Kinga

    2011-01-01

    Resistance to antimalarial drugs continues to be a major obstacle in controlling and eradicating malaria. The identification of genetic markers of resistance is vital for disease management but they can be difficult to ...

  16. Bottlenecks in the Transferability of Antibiotic Resistance from Natural Ecosystems to Human Bacterial Pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Martínez, José L.

    2011-01-01

    It is generally accepted that resistance genes acquired by human pathogens through horizontal gene transfer originated in environmental, non-pathogenic bacteria. As a consequence, there is increasing concern on the roles that natural, non-clinical ecosystems, may play in the evolution of resistance. Recent studies have shown that the variability of determinants that can provide antibiotic resistance on their expression in a heterologous host is much larger than what is actually found in human pathogens, which implies the existence of bottlenecks modulating the transfer, spread, and stability of antibiotic resistance genes. In this review, the role that different factors such as founder effects, ecological connectivity, fitness costs, or second-order selection may have on the establishment of a specific resistance determinant in a population of bacterial pathogens is analyzed. PMID:22319513

  17. Drug resistance to Mycobacterium tuberculosis: From the traditional Chinese view to modern systems biology.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yuhui; Zhang, Zongde; Sun, Zhaogang

    2015-08-01

    The pathogen, Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M. tuberculosis) is a well-evolved, organized pathogen that has developed drug resistance, specifically multidrug resistance (MDR) and extensive drug resistance (XDR). This review primarily summarizes the mechanisms of drug resistance by M. tuberculosis according to the traditional Chinese view. The traditional Chinese view of drug resistance includes: the physical barrier of the cell wall; mutations relating to current anti-TB agents; drug efflux pumps; and drug stress, including the SOS response systems, the mismatch repair systems and the toxin-antitoxin systems. In addition, this review addresses the integrated systems biology of genomics, transcriptomics, proteomics, metabolomics and interactomics. Development of the various levels of systems biology has enabled determination of the anatomy of bacteria. Finally, the current review proposes that further investigation regarding the population of individuals with a high drug metabolic speed is vital to further understand drug resistance in M. tuberculosis. PMID:24433008

  18. Life in cellulose houses: Symbiotic bacterial biosynthesis of ascidian drugs and drug leads

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, Eric W.; Donia, Mohamed S.

    2010-01-01

    Ascidians (tunicates; sea squirts) are sources of diverse, bioactive natural products, one of which is an approved drug and many of which are potent drug leads. It has been shown that symbiotic bacteria living with ascidians produce some of the bioactive compounds isolated from whole animals, and indirect evidence strongly implicates symbiotic bacteria in the synthesis of many others. However, for the majority the producing organism has not been identified. In cases where a symbiotic origin has been definitively assigned, the resulting data lead to improved paths to drug discovery and development from marine animals. This review traces evidence for symbiotic production where such evidence exists and describes the strengths and limitations of that evidence. PMID:21050742

  19. A hybrid platinum drug dichloroacetate-platinum(II) overcomes cisplatin drug resistance through dual organelle targeting.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yu; Guo, Guannan; Ma, Ben; Du, Rong; Xiao, Haihua; Yang, Xiaoguang; Li, Wenliang; Gao, Ying; Li, Yuxin; Jing, Xiabin

    2015-08-01

    A hybrid drug dichloroacetate-platinum(II) [DCA-Pt(II)] was found to overcome cisplatin drug resistance of ovarian cancer through a dual targeting mode, which is different from the mode of action of the present platinum (Pt) drugs used in clinics. DCA-Pt(II) exhibited remarkable cytotoxicity against both cisplatin-sensitive (A2780) and cisplatin-resistant (A2780DDP) ovarian cancer cells. The Pt and Pt-DNA adduct content test showed that there was less Pt cellular uptake and fewer Pt-DNA adducts were present after DCA-Pt(II) treatment compared with treatment with cisplatin, carboplatin, and some other drugs. In the study, the effects of DCA-Pt(II) on the cell cycle and apoptosis were also investigated, which showed that DCA-Pt(II) induced G2/M phase arrest and mitochondria-mediated apoptosis in both sensitive and resistant cells lines. Interestingly, DCA-Pt(II) had much greater effects on mitochondria in A2780DDP cell lines than in A2780 cell lines. PMID:25811961

  20. Overcoming platinum drug resistance with copper-lowering agents.

    PubMed

    Chen, Helen H W; Kuo, Macus Tien

    2013-10-01

    Platinum (Pt)-based antitumor agents have been the mainstay of cancer chemotherapy for the last three decades. While multiple mechanisms are responsible for treatment failure, deficiency in drug transport is an important contributor. The human high-affinity copper (Cu) transporter-1 (hCtr1) can also transport Pt-based drugs including cisplatin (cDDP) and carboplatin. Reduced hCtr1 expression frequently occurs in cDDP-resistant cell lines and in cancer in patients who failed chemotherapy with these drugs. We previously demonstrated that Cu chelation induces the expression of transcription factor Sp1 which binds the promoters of Sp1 and hCtr1, thereby, up-regulating their expression, whereas Cu overload shuts down hCtr1 and Sp1 expression by dissociating Sp1 from their promoter promoters. Thus, mammalian Cu homeostasis is transcriptionally regulated within a loop consisting of Sp1, hCtr1, and Cu in a three-way mutually regulated manner. These findings suggest that it is feasible to module cDDP transport capacity through intervention of mammalian Cu homeostasis. Indeed, we found that cDDP resistance can be overcome by Cu-lowering agents through enhanced hCtr1 expression by up-regulation of Sp1 in cultured cells. This discovery provided a mechanistic basis for the ongoing clinical study using Cu chelator to overcome cDDP resistance in ovarian cancer chemotherapy. Preliminary study using copper chelator (trientine) for enhancing the treatment efficacy of carboplatin in 5 ovarian cancer patients showed encouraging results. This short review describes the perspectives of using Cu-lowering agents in overcoming Pt resistance in cancer chemotherapy. PMID:24122978

  1. Overcoming Platinum Drug Resistance with Copper-lowering Agents

    PubMed Central

    CHEN, HELEN H.W.; KUO, MACUS TIEN

    2014-01-01

    Platinum (Pt)-based antitumor agents have been the mainstay of cancer chemotherapy for the last three decades. While multiple mechanisms are responsible for treatment failure, deficiency in drug transport is an important contributor. The human high-affinity copper (Cu) transporter-1 (hCtr1) can also transport Pt-based drugs including cisplatin (cDDP) and carboplatin. Reduced hCtr1 expression frequently occurs in cDDP-resistant cell lines and in cancer in patients who failed chemotherapy with these drugs. We previously demonstrated that Cu chelation induces the expression of transcription factor Sp1 which binds the promoters of Sp1 and hCtr1, thereby, up-regulating their expression, whereas Cu overload shuts down hCtr1 and Sp1 expression by dissociating Sp1 from their promoter promoters. Thus, mammalian Cu homeostasis is transcriptionally regulated within a loop consisting of Sp1, hCtr1, and Cu in a three-way mutually regulated manner. These findings suggest that it is feasible to module cDDP transport capacity through intervention of mammalian Cu homeostasis. Indeed, we found that cDDP resistance can be overcome by Cu-lowering agents through enhanced hCtr1 expression by up-regulation of Sp1 in cultured cells. This discovery provided a mechanistic basis for the ongoing clinical study using Cu chelator to overcome cDDP resistance in ovarian cancer chemotherapy. Preliminary study using copper chelator (trientine) for enhancing the treatment efficacy of carboplatin in 5 ovarian cancer patients showed encouraging results. This short review describes the perspectives of using Cu-lowering agents in overcoming Pt resistance in cancer chemotherapy. PMID:24122978

  2. Antibiotics, Antibiotic Resistance Genes, and Bacterial Community Composition in Fresh Water Aquaculture Environment in China.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Wenguang; Sun, Yongxue; Zhang, Tong; Ding, Xueyao; Li, Yafei; Wang, Mianzhi; Zeng, Zhenling

    2015-08-01

    Environmental antibiotic resistance has drawn increasing attention due to its great threat to human health. In this study, we investigated concentrations of antibiotics (tetracyclines, sulfonamides and (fluoro)quinolones) and abundances of antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs), including tetracycline resistance genes, sulfonamide resistance genes, and plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance genes, and analyzed bacterial community composition in aquaculture environment in Guangdong, China. The concentrations of sulfametoxydiazine, sulfamethazine, sulfamethoxazole, oxytetracycline, chlorotetracycline, doxycycline, ciprofloxacin, norfloxacin, and enrofloxacin were as high as 446 ?g kg(-1) and 98.6 ng L(-1) in sediment and water samples, respectively. The relative abundances (ARG copies/16S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) gene copies) of ARGs (sul1, sul2, sul3, tetM, tetO, tetW, tetS, tetQ, tetX, tetB/P, qepA, oqxA, oqxB, aac(6')-Ib, and qnrS) were as high as 2.8?×?10(-2). The dominant phyla were Proteobacteria, Bacteroidetes, and Firmicutes in sediment samples and Proteobacteria, Actinobacteria and Bacteroidetes in water samples. The genera associated with pathogens were also observed, such as Acinetobacter, Arcobacter, and Clostridium. This study comprehensively investigated antibiotics, ARGs, and bacterial community composition in aquaculture environment in China. The results indicated that fish ponds are reservoirs of ARGs and the presence of potential resistant and pathogen-associated taxonomic groups in fish ponds might imply the potential risk to human health. PMID:25753824

  3. Directed transport of bacteria-based drug delivery vehicles: bacterial chemotaxis dominates particle shape.

    PubMed

    Sahari, Ali; Traore, Mahama A; Scharf, Birgit E; Behkam, Bahareh

    2014-10-01

    Several attenuated and non-pathogenic bacterial species have been demonstrated to actively target diseased sites and successfully deliver plasmid DNA, proteins and other therapeutic agents into mammalian cells. These disease-targeting bacteria can be employed for targeted delivery of therapeutic and imaging cargos in the form of a bio-hybrid system. The bio-hybrid drug delivery system constructed here is comprised of motile Escherichia coli MG1655 bacteria and elliptical disk-shaped polymeric microparticles. The transport direction for these vehicles can be controlled through biased random walk of the attached bacteria in presence of chemoattractant gradients in a process known as chemotaxis. In this work, we utilize a diffusion-based microfluidic platform to establish steady linear concentration gradients of a chemoattractant and investigate the roles of chemotaxis and geometry in transport of bio-hybrid drug delivery vehicles. Our experimental results demonstrate for the first time that bacterial chemotactic response dominates the effect of body shape in extravascular transport; thus, the non-spherical system could be more favorable for drug delivery applications owing to the known benefits of using non-spherical particles for vascular transport (e.g. relatively long circulation time). PMID:24907051

  4. Evaluation of radiation resistance of the bacterial contaminants from femoral heads processed for allogeneic transplantation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Rita; Singh, Durgeshwer

    2009-09-01

    Femoral heads excised during surgery were obtained from patients who had a fractured neck of the femur and were processed as bone allograft. The bacterial contaminants were isolated from femoral heads at different stages of processing and identified based on morphological characteristics and biochemical tests. Bacterial contaminants on bone were mainly Gram-positive bacilli and cocci (58.3%). Twenty-four isolates from bone samples were screened for resistance to radiation. The D10 values for Gram-negative bacteria isolated from femoral heads ranged from 0.17 to 0.65 kGy. Higher D10 values 0.56-1.04 kGy were observed for Gram-positive bacterial isolates.

  5. Radiation induction of drug resistance in RIF-1: Correlation of tumor and cell culture results

    SciTech Connect

    Moulder, J.E.; Hopwood, L.E.; Volk, D.M.; Davies, B.M. (Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee (USA))

    1991-02-01

    The RIF-1 tumor line contains cells that are resistant to various anti-neoplastic drugs, including 5-fluorouracil (5FU), methotrexate (MTX), adriamycin (ADR), and etoposide (VP16). The frequency of these drug-resistant cells is increased after irradiation. The frequency of drug-resistant cells and the magnitude of radiation-induced drug resistance are different in cell culture than in tumors. The dose-response and expression time relationships for radiation induction of drug resistance observed in RIF-1 tumors are unusual.We hypothesize that at high radiation doses in vivo, we are selecting for cells that are both drug resistant and radiation resistant due to microenvironmental factors, whereas at low radiation doses in vivo and all radiation doses in vitro, we are observing true mutants. These studies indicate that there can be significant differences in drug-resistance frequencies between tumors and their cell lines of origin, and that radiation induction of drug resistance depends significantly on whether the induction is done in tumors or in cell culture. These results imply that theories about the induction of drug resistance that are based on cell culture studies may be inapplicable to the induction of drug resistance in tumors.

  6. Ceramide Glycosylation Catalyzed by Glucosylceramide Synthase and Cancer Drug Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yong-Yu; Li, Yu-Teh

    2014-01-01

    Glucosylceramide synthase (GCS), converting ceramide to glucosylceramide, catalyzes the first reaction of ceramide glycosylation in sphingolipid metabolism. This glycosylation by GCS is a critical step regulating the modulation of cellular activities by controlling ceramide and glycosphingolipids (GSLs). An increase of ceramide in response to stresses, such as chemotherapy, drives cells to proliferation arrest and apoptosis or autophagy; however, ceramide glycosylation promptly eliminates ceramide and consequently, these induced processes, thus protecting cancer cells. Furthermore, persistently enhanced ceramide glycosylation can increase GSLs, participating in selecting cancer cells to drug resistance. GCS is overexpressed in diverse drug-resistant cancer cells and in tumors of breast, colon, and leukemia that display poor response to chemotherapy. As ceramide glycosylation by GCS is a rate-limiting step in GSL synthesis, inhibition of GCS sensitizes cancer cells to anticancer drugs and eradicates cancer stem cells. Mechanistic studies indicate that uncoupling ceramide glycosylation can modulate gene expression, decreasing MDR1 through the cSrc/?-catenin pathway and restoring p53 expression via RNA splicing. These studies not only expand our knowledge in understanding how ceramide glycosylation affects cancer cells, but also provide novel therapeutic approaches for targeting refractory tumors. PMID:23290777

  7. Radiation induction of drug resistance in RIF-1 tumors and tumor cells

    SciTech Connect

    Hopwood, L.E.; Moulder, J.E. (Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee (USA))

    1989-11-01

    The RIF-1 tumor cell line contains a small number of cells (1-20 per 10(6) cells) that are resistant to various single antineoplastic drugs, including 5-fluorouracil (5FU), methotrexate (MTX), and adriamycin (ADR). For 5FU the frequency of drug resistance is lower for tumor-derived cells than for cells from cell culture; for MTX the reverse is true, and for ADR there is no difference. In vitro irradiation at 5 Gy significantly increased the frequency of drug-resistant cells for 5FU, MTX, and ADR. In vivo irradiation at 3 Gy significantly increased the frequency of drug-resistant cells for 5FU and MTX, but not for ADR. The absolute risk for in vitro induction of MTX, 5FU, and ADR resistance, and for in vivo induction of 5FU resistance, was 1-3 per 10(6) cells per Gy; but the absolute risk for in vivo induction of MTX resistance was 54 per 10(6) cells per Gy. The frequency of drug-resistant cells among individual untreated tumors was highly variable; among individual irradiated tumors the frequency of drug-resistant cells was significantly less variable. These studies provide supporting data for models of the development of tumor drug resistance, and imply that some of the drug resistance seen when chemotherapy follows radiotherapy may be due to radiation-induced drug resistance.

  8. Self-assembled polymer/inorganic hybrid nanovesicles for multiple drug delivery to overcome drug resistance in cancer chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Gong, Meng-Qing; Wu, Jin-Long; Chen, Bin; Zhuo, Ren-Xi; Cheng, Si-Xue

    2015-05-12

    With the aim to develop a facile strategy to prepare functional drug carriers to overcome multidrug resistance (MDR), we prepared heparin/protamine/calcium carbonate (HP/PS/CaCO3) hybrid nanovesicles with enhanced cell internalization, good serum stability, and pH sensitivity for drug delivery. All the functional components including protamine to improve the cell uptake, heparin to enhance the stability, and CaCO3 to improve drug loading and endow the system with pH sensitivity were introduced to the nanovesicles by self-assembly in an aqueous medium. An antitumor drug (doxorubicin, DOX) and a drug resistance inhibitor (tariquidar, TQR) were coloaded in the nanovesicles during self-assembly preparation of the nanovesicles. The drug loaded nanovesicles, which had a mean size less than 200 nm, exhibited a pH-sensitive drug release behavior. In vitro study was carried out in both nonresistant cells (HeLa and MCF-7) and drug-resistant cancer cells (MCF-7/ADR). Because of the enhanced intracellular and nuclear drug accumulation through effective inhibition of the P-gp efflux transporter, DOX/TQR coloaded nanovesicles showed significantly improved tumor cell inhibitory efficiency, especially for drug-resistant cells. These results suggest the self-assembled nanovesicles have promising applications in multidrug delivery to overcome drug resistance in tumor treatments. PMID:25927163

  9. MULTI-FUNCTIONAL NANOCARRIERS TO OVERCOME TUMOR DRUG RESISTANCE

    PubMed Central

    Jabr-Milane, Lara S.; van Vlerken, Lilian E.; Yadav, Sunita; Amiji, Mansoor M.

    2008-01-01

    The development of resistance to variety of chemotherapeutic agents is one of the major challenges in effective cancer treatment. Tumor cells are able to generate a multi-drug resistance (MDR) phenotype due to microenvironmental selection pressures. This review addresses the use of nanotechnology-based delivery systems to overcome MDR in solid tumors. Our own work along with evidence from the literature illustrates the development of various types of engineered nanocarriers specifically designed to enhance tumor-targeted delivery through passive and active targeting strategies. Additionally, multi-functional nanocarriers are developed to enhance drug delivery and overcome MDR by either simultaneous or sequential delivery of resistance modulators (e.g., with P-glycoprotein substrates), agents that regulate intracellular pH, agents that lower the apoptotic threshold (e.g., with ceramide), or in combination with energy delivery (e.g., sound, heat, and light) to enhance the effectiveness of anticancer agents in refractory tumors. In preclinical studies, the use of multi-functional nanocarriers has shown significant promise in enhancing cancer therapy, especially against MDR tumors. PMID:18538481

  10. The Role of Antimicrobial Peptides in Preventing Multidrug-Resistant Bacterial Infections and Biofilm Formation

    PubMed Central

    Park, Seong-Cheol; Park, Yoonkyung; Hahm, Kyung-Soo

    2011-01-01

    Over the last decade, decreasing effectiveness of conventional antimicrobial-drugs has caused serious problems due to the rapid emergence of multidrug-resistant pathogens. Furthermore, biofilms, which are microbial communities that cause serious chronic infections and dental plaque, form environments that enhance antimicrobial resistance. As a result, there is a continuous search to overcome or control such problems, which has resulted in antimicrobial peptides being considered as an alternative to conventional drugs. Antimicrobial peptides are ancient host defense effector molecules in living organisms. These peptides have been identified in diverse organisms and synthetically developed by using peptidomimic techniques. This review was conducted to demonstrate the mode of action by which antimicrobial peptides combat multidrug-resistant bacteria and prevent biofilm formation and to introduce clinical uses of these compounds for chronic disease, medical devices, and oral health. In addition, combinations of antimicrobial peptides and conventional drugs were considered due to their synergetic effects and low cost for therapeutic treatment. PMID:22016639

  11. Bacterial mechanisms for Cr(VI) resistance and reduction: an overview and recent advances.

    PubMed

    Ahemad, Munees

    2014-07-01

    Chromium pollution is increasing incessantly due to continuing industrialization. Of various oxidation states, Cr(6+) is very toxic due to its carcinogenic and mutagenic nature. It also has deleterious effects on different microorganisms as well as on plants. Many species of bacteria thriving in the Cr(6+)-contaminated environments have evolved novel strategies to cope with Cr(6+) toxicity. Generally, decreased uptake or exclusion of Cr(6+) compounds through the membranes, biosorption, and the upregulation of genes associated with oxidative stress response are some of the resistance mechanisms in bacterial cells to overcome the Cr(6+) stress. In addition, bacterial Cr(6+) reduction into Cr(3+) is also a mechanism of specific significance as it transforms toxic and mobile chromium derivatives into reduced species which are innocuous and immobile. Ecologically, the bacterial trait of reductive immobilization of Cr(6+) derivatives is of great advantage in bioremediation. The present review is an effort to underline the bacterial resistance and reducing mechanisms to Cr(6+) compounds with recent development in order to garner a broad perspective. PMID:24470188

  12. Resistance to bacterial infectious diseases in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss).

    PubMed

    Kilpi, Maaria; Nikoskelainen, Sami; Grannas, Sanna; Nuutila, Jari; Järvisalo, Otso; Kause, Antti; Lilius, Esa-Matti

    2013-06-15

    Individually tagged rainbow trout representing 15 full-sibling families were sequentially challenged twice with Aeromonas salmonicida causing furunculosis: first as cohabitation and then as injected intraperitoneally. The bleeding procedure prior to challenges caused the outbreak of cold water disease by Flavobacterium psychrophilum. Before and after the outbreak and challenges, 11 immunological parameters were measured from blood samples. The immunological responses predicted the fate of the fish since nearly all the initial responses were lower in individuals which later died from cold water disease than in survivors. Fish died from furunculosis had impaired respiratory burst (RB) response to A. salmonicida. Fish that had initially the highest responses survived in the outbreak and challenges. The outbreak and challenges resulted in these individuals higher and faster responses compared with initial values. Unlike in mammals, the number of monocytes, but not that of granulocytes, in rainbow trout blood correlated well with the whole blood RB activity. The fish families differed markedly from each other in capacity to resist the induced diseases. PMID:23582478

  13. Outwitting Evolution: Fighting Drug Resistance in the Treatment of TB, Malaria and HIV

    PubMed Central

    Goldberg, Daniel E.; Siliciano, Robert F.; Jacobs, William R.

    2012-01-01

    Although caused by vastly different pathogens, the world’s three most serious infectious diseases, tuberculosis, malaria and HIV-1 infection, share the common problem of drug resistance. The pace of drug development has been very slow for tuberculosis and malaria and rapid for HIV-1. But for each disease, resistance to most drugs has appeared quickly after the introduction of the drug. Learning how to manage and prevent resistance is a major medical challenge that requires an understanding of the evolutionary dynamics of each pathogen. This review summarized the similarities and differences in the evolution of drug resistance for these three pathogens. PMID:22424234

  14. IL1 receptor regulates S100A8\\/A9-dependent keratinocyte resistance to bacterial invasion

    Microsoft Academic Search

    B S Sorenson; A Khammanivong; B D Guenther; K F Ross; M C Herzberg

    2012-01-01

    Previously, we reported that epithelial cells respond to exogenous interleukin (IL)-1? by increasing expression of several genes involved in the host response to microbes, including the antimicrobial protein complex calprotectin (S100A8\\/A9). Given that S100A8\\/A9 protects epithelial cells against invading bacteria, we studied whether IL-1? augments S100A8\\/A9-dependent resistance to bacterial invasion of oral keratinocytes. When inoculated with Listeria monocytogenes, human buccal

  15. Structural model of ATP-binding proteing associated with cystic fibrosis, multidrug resistance and bacterial transport

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Stephen C. Hyde; Paul Emsley; Michael J. Hartshorn; Michael M. Mimmack; Uzi Gileadi; Stephen R. Pearce; Maurice P. Gallagher; Deborah R. Gill; Roderick E. Hubbard; Christopher F. Higgins

    1990-01-01

    THE ATP-binding cassette (ABC) superfamily of transport systems now includes over thirty proteins that share extensive sequence similarity and domain organization (reviewed in refs 1-3). This superfamily includes the well characterized periplasmic binding protein-dependent uptake systems of prokaryotes, bacterial exporters, and eukaryotic proteins including the P-glycoprotein associated with multidrug resistance in tumours (MDR), the STE6 gene product that mediates export

  16. Chromium-Resistant Bacterial Populations from a Site Heavily Contaminated with Hexavalent Chromium

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. L. Bader; G. Gonzalez; P. C. Goodell; S. D. Pillai; A. S. Ali

    1999-01-01

    Chromium-containing industrial effluents are primarily responsible for environmental contamination by toxic and highly mobile, hexavalent chromium. The dilution plate-count method, using media amended with Cr(VI) at concentrations ranging from 0 to 1000 mg L-1, was used to compare the sizes of Cr(VI)-resistant bacterial populations from a soil contaminated with 25 100 mg kg-1 total Cr [12 400 mg kg-1 Cr(VI)

  17. Phenotypic and molecular characterization of conjugative antibiotic resistance plasmids isolated from bacterial communities of activated sludge

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. Dröge; A. Pühler; W. Selbitschka

    2000-01-01

    In order to isolate antibiotic resistance plasmids from bacterial communities found in activated sludge, derivatives of the\\u000a 3-chlorobenzoate-degrading strain Pseudomonas sp. B13, tagged with the green fluorescent protein as an identification marker, were used as recipients in filter crosses.\\u000a Transconjugants were selected on agar plates containing 3-chlorobenzoate as the sole carbon source and the antibiotic tetracycline,\\u000a streptomycin or spectinomycin, and

  18. Role of integrated cancer nanomedicine in overcoming drug resistance.

    PubMed

    Iyer, Arun K; Singh, Amit; Ganta, Srinivas; Amiji, Mansoor M

    2013-11-01

    Cancer remains a major killer of mankind. Failure of conventional chemotherapy has resulted in recurrence and development of virulent multi drug resistant (MDR) phenotypes adding to the complexity and diversity of this deadly disease. Apart from displaying classical physiological abnormalities and aberrant blood flow behavior, MDR cancers exhibit several distinctive features such as higher apoptotic threshold, aerobic glycolysis, regions of hypoxia, and elevated activity of drug-efflux transporters. MDR transporters play a pivotal role in protecting the cancer stem cells (CSCs) from chemotherapy. It is speculated that CSCs are instrumental in reviving tumors after the chemo and radiotherapy. In this regard, multifunctional nanoparticles that can integrate various key components such as drugs, genes, imaging agents and targeting ligands using unique delivery platforms would be more efficient in treating MDR cancers. This review presents some of the important principles involved in development of MDR and novel methods of treating cancers using multifunctional-targeted nanoparticles. Illustrative examples of nanoparticles engineered for drug/gene combination delivery and stimuli responsive nanoparticle systems for cancer therapy are also discussed. PMID:23880506

  19. Transcriptional Responses of Resistant and Susceptible Fish Clones to the Bacterial Pathogen Flavobacterium psychrophilum

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Samuel A. M.; Jouneau, Luc; Bernardet, Jean-Francois; Houel, Armel; Lunazzi, Aurélie; Duchaud, Eric; Michel, Christian; Quillet, Edwige; Boudinot, Pierre

    2012-01-01

    Flavobacterium psychrophilum is a bacterial species that represents one of the most important pathogens for aquaculture worldwide, especially for salmonids. To gain insights into the genetic basis of the natural resistance to F. psychrophilum, we selected homozygous clones of rainbow trout with contrasted susceptibility to the infection. We compared the transcriptional response to the bacteria in the pronephros of a susceptible and a resistant line by micro-array analysis five days after infection. While the basal transcriptome of healthy fish was significantly different in the resistant and susceptible lines, the transcriptome modifications induced by the bacteria involved essentially the same genes and pathways. The response to F. psychrophilum involved antimicrobial peptides, complement, and a number of enzymes and chemokines. The matrix metalloproteases mmp9 and mmp13 were among the most highly induced genes in both genetic backgrounds. Key genes of both pro- and anti-inflammatory response such as IL1 and IL10, were up-regulated with a greater magnitude in susceptible animals where the bacterial load was also much higher. While higher resistance to F. psychrophilum does not seem to be based on extensive differences in the orientation of the immune response, several genes including complement C3 showed stronger induction in the resistant fish. They may be important for the variation of susceptibility to the infection. PMID:22720048

  20. Transcriptional responses of resistant and susceptible fish clones to the bacterial pathogen Flavobacterium psychrophilum.

    PubMed

    Langevin, Christelle; Blanco, Mar; Martin, Samuel A M; Jouneau, Luc; Bernardet, Jean-Francois; Houel, Armel; Lunazzi, Aurélie; Duchaud, Eric; Michel, Christian; Quillet, Edwige; Boudinot, Pierre

    2012-01-01

    Flavobacterium psychrophilum is a bacterial species that represents one of the most important pathogens for aquaculture worldwide, especially for salmonids. To gain insights into the genetic basis of the natural resistance to F. psychrophilum, we selected homozygous clones of rainbow trout with contrasted susceptibility to the infection. We compared the transcriptional response to the bacteria in the pronephros of a susceptible and a resistant line by micro-array analysis five days after infection. While the basal transcriptome of healthy fish was significantly different in the resistant and susceptible lines, the transcriptome modifications induced by the bacteria involved essentially the same genes and pathways. The response to F. psychrophilum involved antimicrobial peptides, complement, and a number of enzymes and chemokines. The matrix metalloproteases mmp9 and mmp13 were among the most highly induced genes in both genetic backgrounds. Key genes of both pro- and anti-inflammatory response such as IL1 and IL10, were up-regulated with a greater magnitude in susceptible animals where the bacterial load was also much higher. While higher resistance to F. psychrophilum does not seem to be based on extensive differences in the orientation of the immune response, several genes including complement C3 showed stronger induction in the resistant fish. They may be important for the variation of susceptibility to the infection. PMID:22720048

  1. Drug resistant tuberculosis in Shanghai, China, 2000–2006: Prevalence, trends, and risk factors

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Xin; DeRiemer, Kathryn; Yuan, Zheng’an; Shen, Mei; Xia, Zhen; Gui, Xiaohong; Wang, Lili; Gao, Qian; Mei, Jian

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY SETTING During 2000–2006, a regional anti-tuberculosis drug resistance surveillance study was conducted in Shanghai, China. OBJECTIVE To determine the prevalence, trends and risk factors for drug resistant tuberculosis (TB) in Shanghai, China. DESIGN A retrospective study of all pulmonary TB patients reported in Shanghai during 2000–2006 was performed. RESULTS Of 8419 pulmonary TB patients, 16.6% had resistance to any first-line anti-tuberculosis drug and 4.0% had multi-drug resistance (MDR). The percentage of TB patients with resistance to any first-line anti-tuberculosis drug and MDR significantly increased during 2000–2003 (P = 0.01 and P<0.01, respectively). After improvements in the TB control programme in 2004, the increasing trend in drug resistance was contained. Age 30–59 years old, being an urban migrant and residence in an urban area of Shanghai were independently associated with resistance to any first-line drug and MDR in new cases, while age 30–59 years and being an urban migrant were independently associated with resistance to any first-line drug and MDR in previously treated cases. CONCLUSIONS Drug-resistant TB and MDR-TB pose a challenge for TB control in Shanghai. Improved case management, including DOTS and appropriate treatment regimens, should be sustained to prevent further transmission and development of drug-resistant TB in this setting. PMID:19146756

  2. Concerning antisense inhibition of the multiple drug resistance gene.

    PubMed

    Jaroszewski, J W; Kaplan, O; Syi, J L; Sehested, M; Faustino, P J; Cohen, J S

    1990-01-01

    Recently, Vasanthakumar and Ahmed reported (Vasanthakumar, G.; Ahmed, N.K., Cancer Communications 1:225-232; 1989) a complete inhibition of the multiple drug resistance gene (MDR1) in the K562/III erythroleukemia cells, using a 15 bases-long methylphosphonate oligodeoxynucleotide analog. The sequence used, however, contained three mismatches relative to the corresponding fragment of the human MDR1 gene and, hence, the results reported cannot at present be regarded as a classical antisense effect. We have made attempts to inhibit the expression of the MDR1 gene in MCF-7 human breast cancer cells selected for resistance to Adriamycin using phosphorothioate analogs of oligodeoxynucleotides. Studies with model 35S-labeled-phosphorothioates indicated poor uptake of the compounds into the cells; the radioactivity was located mainly in the soluble fraction (cytoplasm), but membranes and the nuclear fraction were also labeled. Unmodified oligodeoxynucleotides were toxic to the cells, whereas the phosphorothioates were not. The MDR1 inhibition with phosphorothioates was studied by measuring their effects on adriamycin toxicity and by immunocytochemical titration of P170. Elevation of adriamycin cytotoxicity consistent with a decreased drug resistance was observed with one antisense sequence, but the immunocytochemical assay indicated only slight inhibition of the synthesis of P170. In the wild type (drug sensitive) MCF-7 cells phosphorothioates decreased adriamycin toxicity in a sequence-independent manner. The results indicate that the effects of antisense oligodeoxynucleotides on cells are complex. Computer simulation of the secondary structure of MDR1 mRNA indicated not only extensive folding but, also, the presence of many regions not involved in intramolecular hybridization, which are of potential interest as targets for antisense oligodeoxynucleotides. PMID:2202383

  3. Inhibition of drug-resistant mutants of ABL, KIT, and EGF receptor kinases

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Todd A. Carter; Lisa M. Wodicka; Neil P. Shah; Anne Marie Velasco; Miles A. Fabian; Daniel K. Treiber; Zdravko V. Milanov; Corey E. Atteridge; William H. Biggs; Philip T. Edeen; Mark Floyd; Julia M. Ford; Robert M. Grotzfeld; Sanna Herrgard; Darren E. Insko; Shamal A. Mehta; Hitesh K. Patel; William Pao; Charles L. Sawyers; Harold Varmus; Patrick P. Zarrinkar; David J. Lockhart

    2005-01-01

    To realize the full potential of targeted protein kinase inhibitors for the treatment of cancer, it is important to address the emergence of drug resistance in treated patients. Mutant forms of BCR-ABL, KIT, and the EGF receptor (EGFR) have been found that confer resistance to the drugs imatinib, gefitinib, and erlotinib. The mutations weaken or prevent drug binding, and interestingly,

  4. Exploring Culturally Specific Drug Resistance Strategies of Hawaiian Youth in Rural Communities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Okamoto, Scott K.; Po'a-Kekuawela, Ka'ohinani; Chin, Coralee I. H.; Nebre, La Risa H.; Helm, Susana

    2010-01-01

    This qualitative study examined the drug resistance strategies of Hawaiian youth residing in rural communities in Hawai'i. Forty seven youth participated in 14 focus groups which focused on the social and environmental context of drug use for these youth. The findings indicated that there were 47 references to resistance strategies used in drug

  5. Bioengineered bacterial outer membrane vesicles as cell-specific drug-delivery vehicles for cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Gujrati, Vipul; Kim, Sunghyun; Kim, Sang-Hyun; Min, Jung Joon; Choy, Hyon E; Kim, Sun Chang; Jon, Sangyong

    2014-02-25

    Advances in genetic engineering tools have contributed to the development of strategies for utilizing biologically derived vesicles as nanomedicines for achieving cell-specific drug delivery. Here, we describe bioengineered bacterial outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) with low immunogenicity that can target and kill cancer cells in a cell-specific manner by delivering small interfering RNA (siRNA) targeting kinesin spindle protein (KSP). A mutant Escherichia coli strain that exhibits reduced endotoxicity toward human cells was engineered to generate OMVs displaying a human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2)-specific affibody in the membrane as a targeting ligand. Systemic injection of siRNA-packaged OMVs caused targeted gene silencing and induced highly significant tumor growth regression in an animal model. Importantly, the modified OMVs were well tolerated and showed no evidence of nonspecific side effects. We propose that bioengineered OMVs have great potential as cell-specific drug-delivery vehicles for treating various cancers. PMID:24410085

  6. A bacterial protein enhances the release and efficacy of liposomal cancer drugs.

    PubMed

    Cheong, Ian; Huang, Xin; Bettegowda, Chetan; Diaz, Luis A; Kinzler, Kenneth W; Zhou, Shibin; Vogelstein, Bert

    2006-11-24

    Clostridium novyi-NT is an anaerobic bacterium that can infect hypoxic regions within experimental tumors. Because C. novyi-NT lyses red blood cells, we hypothesized that its membrane-disrupting properties could be exploited to enhance the release of liposome-encapsulated drugs within tumors. Here, we show that treatment of mice bearing large, established tumors with C. novyi-NT plus a single dose of liposomal doxorubicin often led to eradication of the tumors. The bacterial factor responsible for the enhanced drug release was identified as a previously unrecognized protein termed liposomase. This protein could potentially be incorporated into diverse experimental approaches for the specific delivery of chemotherapeutic agents to tumors. PMID:17124324

  7. Plasmonic Nanobubbles Rapidly Detect and Destroy Drug-Resistant Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Lukianova-Hleb, Ekaterina Y.; Ren, Xiaoyang; Townley, Debra; Wu, Xiangwei; Kupferman, Michael E.; Lapotko, Dmitri O.

    2012-01-01

    The resistance of residual cancer cells after oncological resection to adjuvant chemoradiotherapies results in both high recurrence rates and high non-specific tissue toxicity, thus preventing the successful treatment of such cancers as head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC). The patients' survival rate and quality of life therefore depend upon the efficacy, selectivity and low non-specific toxicity of the adjuvant treatment. We report a novel, theranostic in vivo technology that unites both the acoustic diagnostics and guided intracellular delivery of anti-tumor drug (liposome-encapsulated doxorubicin, Doxil) in one rapid process, namely a pulsed laser-activated plasmonic nanobubble (PNB). HNSCC-bearing mice were treated with gold nanoparticle conjugates, Doxil, and single near-infrared laser pulses of low energy. Tumor-specific clusters of gold nanoparticles (solid gold spheres) converted the optical pulses into localized PNBs. The acoustic signals of the PNB detected the tumor with high specificity and sensitivity. The mechanical impact of the PNB, co-localized with Doxil liposomes, selectively ejected the drug into the cytoplasm of cancer cells. Cancer cell-specific generation of PNBs and their intracellular co-localization with Doxil improved the in vivo therapeutic efficacy from 5-7% for administration of only Doxil or PNBs alone to 90% thus demonstrating the synergistic therapeutic effect of the PNB-based intracellular drug release. This mechanism also reduced the non-specific toxicity of Doxil below a detectable level and the treatment time to less than one minute. Thus PNBs combine highly sensitive diagnosis, overcome drug resistance and minimize non-specific toxicity in a single rapid theranostic procedure for intra-operative treatment. PMID:23139725

  8. [Current strategies against multi-drug resistant organisms].

    PubMed

    Pletz, Mathias W; Eckmann, Christian; Hagel, Stefan; Heppner, Hans Jürgen; Huber, Kora; Kämmerer, Wolfgang; Schmitz, Franz-Josef; Wilke, Michael; Grabein, Béatrice

    2015-06-01

    The global spread of multi-drug resistant organisms (MDRO) is a major threat to public health. Fighting MDRO spread requires a multi-faceted approach as summarized in the German Antibiotic Resistance Strategy (DART). In the hospital, this includes antibiotic stewardship concepts and strict infection control measures. Treatment of MDRO is sophisticated. Within the last years, several antibiotics with activity against MRSA were launched and facilitate an individual therapy according to site of infection and co-morbidities. In contrast, novel antibiotics against carbapenemase producing Gram-negatives are still lacking. Current studies have shown, that a colistin-based combination treatment can improve the prognosis in these patients. The following article reviews MDRO definitions, burden of disease, treatment options and general strategies against MDRO. PMID:26115132

  9. Chrysin and its emerging role in cancer drug resistance.

    PubMed

    Kasala, Eshvendar Reddy; Bodduluru, Lakshmi Narendra; Barua, Chandana C; Gogoi, Ranadeep

    2015-07-01

    This letter illustrates the significant chemosensitizing effects of chrysin to resistance cancer cells and refers to the article on "Combination of chrysin and cisplatin promotes the apoptosis of Hep G2 cells by up-regulating p53" by Li et al., published in your journal recently. Recent studies have demonstrated that chrysin is able to sensitize or kill cancer cells which are resistant to chemotherapeutic drugs such as cisplatin, doxorubicin and adriamycin. Owing to its potential anti-cancer effects and devoid of toxicity to non-transformed cells, further research is required to completely explore its chemosensitizing effects in other cancers and also assess and evaluate its safety, before going for possible human application. PMID:25912556

  10. Reduction of rainbow trout spleen size by splenectomy does not alter resistance against bacterial cold water disease

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In lower vertebrates, the contribution of the spleen to anti-bacterial immunity is poorly understood. Researchers have previously reported a phenotypic and genetic correlation between resistance to Flavobacterium psychrophilum, the causative agent of bacterial cold water disease (BCWD) and spleen so...

  11. Epidemiological impact of prolonged systematic use of topical SDD on bacterial colonization of the tracheobronchial tree and antibiotic resistance

    Microsoft Academic Search

    G. Nardi; U. Valentinis; A. Proietti; A. De Monte; A. Di Silvestre; R. Muzzi; R. Peressutti; M. G. Troncon; F. Giordano

    1993-01-01

    Objective: to evaluate the effect of the pro- longed systematic use of topical SDD (tobramycin 80 rag, polymyxin E 100 mg, amphotericin B 500 rag) on ICU ecology as expressed by changes in tracheal colonization and bacterial resistances. Design: Prospective microbiological survey. Setting: Polyvalent ICU of a 2000 beds general hospital. Patients: Data concerning bacterial strains isolated from the tracheo-bronchial

  12. BMP7 Expression Correlates with Secondary Drug Resistance in Mantle Cell Lymphoma

    E-print Network

    Boyer, Edmond

    BMP7 Expression Correlates with Secondary Drug Resistance in Mantle Cell Lymphoma Valérie Camara to identify genes involved in secondary drug resistance in mantle cell lymphomas (MCL). Experimental Design in secondary resistance in mantle cell lymphoma. Citation: Camara-Clayette V, Koscielny S, Roux S, Lamy T, Bosq

  13. Midkine Mediates Intercellular Crosstalk between Drug-Resistant and Drug-Sensitive Neuroblastoma Cells In Vitro and In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Naiditch, Jessica A.; Clark, Sandra; Qiu, Yi-Yong; Zheng, Xin; Lautz, Timothy B.; Holub, Janette L.; Chou, Pauline M.; Czurylo, Michael; Madonna, Mary Beth

    2013-01-01

    Resistance to cytotoxic agents has long been known to be a major limitation in the treatment of human cancers. Although many mechanisms of drug resistance have been identified, chemotherapies targeting known mechanisms have failed to lead to effective reversal of drug resistance, suggesting that alternative mechanisms remain undiscovered. Previous work identified midkine (MK) as a novel putative survival molecule responsible for cytoprotective signaling between drug-resistant and drug-sensitive neuroblastoma, osteosarcoma and breast carcinoma cells in vitro. In the present study, we provide further in vitro and in vivo studies supporting the role of MK in neuroblastoma cytoprotection. MK overexpressing wild type neuroblastoma cells exhibit a cytoprotective effect on wild type cells when grown in a co-culture system, similar to that seen with doxorubicin resistant cells. siRNA knockdown of MK expression in doxorubicin resistant neuroblastoma and osteosarcoma cells ameliorates this protective effect. Overexpression of MK in wild type neuroblastoma cells leads to acquired drug resistance to doxorubicin and to the related drug etoposide. Mouse studies injecting various ratios of doxorubicin resistant or MK transfected cells with GFP transfected wild type cells confirm this cytoprotective effect in vivo. These findings provide additional evidence for the existence of intercellular cytoprotective signals mediated by MK which contribute to chemotherapy resistance in neuroblastoma. PMID:24083030

  14. Multi-drug-resistant Staphylococcus aureus and future chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Hiramatsu, K; Katayama, Y; Matsuo, M; Sasaki, T; Morimoto, Y; Sekiguchi, A; Baba, T

    2014-10-01

    Staphylococcus (S.) aureus silently stays as our natural flora, and yet sometimes threatens our life as a tenacious pathogen. In addition to its ability to outwit our immune system, its multi-drug resistance phenotype makes it one of the most intractable pathogenic bacteria in the history of antibiotic chemotherapy. It conquered practically all the antibiotics that have been developed since 1940s. In 1961, the first MRSA was found among S. aureus clinical isolates. Then MRSA prevailed throughout the world as a multi-resistant hospital pathogen. In 1997, MRSA strain Mu50 with reduced susceptibility to vancomycin was isolated. Vancomycin-intermediate S. aureus (VISA), so named according to the CLSI criteria, was the product of adaptive mutation of S. aureus against vancomycin that had long been the last resort to MRSA infection. Here, we describe the genetic basis for the remarkable ability of S. aureus to acquire multi-antibiotic resistance, and propose a novel paradigm for future chemotherapy against the multi-resistant pathogens. PMID:25172776

  15. 77 FR 7588 - Antiparasitic Drug Use and Resistance in Ruminants and Equines; Public Meeting; Request for Comments

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-13

    ...Antiparasitic Drug Use and Resistance in Ruminants and Equines; Public Meeting; Request...Antiparasitic Drug Use and Resistance in Ruminants and Equines.'' The purpose of the...combinations of antiparasitic drugs in ruminants and equines. DATES: Date and...

  16. Multidrug-resistant and extensively drug-resistant tuberculosis: a review of current concepts and future challenges.

    PubMed

    Günther, Gunar

    2014-06-01

    Multidrug-resistant and extensively drug-resistant tuberculosis are recent global health issues, which makes tuberculosis - after the success of short course treatment during the second half of the last century - a major health challenge. Globalisation, health inequalities, competing economic interests and political instability contribute substantially to the spread of drug-resistant strains, which are associated with high rates of morbidity and mortality. Issues such as increasing transmission of drug-resistant strains, poor diagnostic coverage and a lengthy, toxic treatment need to be overcome by innovative approaches to tuberculosis control, prevention, diagnostics and treatment. This review addresses recent developments and future concepts. PMID:24889573

  17. Enhancement of neutrophil autophagy by an IVIG preparation against multidrug-resistant bacteria as well as drug-sensitive strains.

    PubMed

    Itoh, Hiroshi; Matsuo, Hidemasa; Kitamura, Naoko; Yamamoto, Sho; Higuchi, Takeshi; Takematsu, Hiromu; Kamikubo, Yasuhiko; Kondo, Tadakazu; Yamashita, Kouhei; Sasada, Masataka; Takaori-Kondo, Akifumi; Adachi, Souichi

    2015-07-01

    Autophagy occurs in human neutrophils after the phagocytosis of multidrug-resistant bacteria and drug-sensitive strains, including Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The present study detected autophagy by immunoblot analysis of LC3B conversion, by confocal scanning microscopic examination of LC3B aggregate formation and by transmission electron microscopic examination of bacteria-containing autophagosomes. Patients with severe bacterial infections are often treated with IVIG alongside antimicrobial agents. Here, we showed that IVIG induced neutrophil-mediated phagocytosis of multidrug-resistant strains. Compared with untreated neutrophils, neutrophils exposed to IVIG showed increased levels of bacterial cell killing, phagocytosis, O2 (-) release, MPO release, and NET formation. IVIG also increased autophagy in these cells. Inhibiting the late phase of autophagy (fusion of lysosomes with autophagosomes) with bafilomycin A1-reduced, neutrophil-mediated bactericidal activity. These findings indicate that autophagy plays a critical role in the bactericidal activity mediated by human neutrophils. Furthermore, the autophagosomes within the neutrophils contained bacteria only and their organelles only, or both bacteria and their organelles, a previously undocumented observation. Taken together, these results suggest that the contents of neutrophil autophagosomes may be derived from specific autophagic systems, which provide the neutrophil with an advantage. Thus, IVIG promotes the neutrophil-mediated killing of multidrug-resistant bacteria as well as drug-sensitive strains. PMID:25908735

  18. Enhancement of neutrophil autophagy by an IVIG preparation against multidrug-resistant bacteria as well as drug-sensitive strains

    PubMed Central

    Itoh, Hiroshi; Matsuo, Hidemasa; Kitamura, Naoko; Yamamoto, Sho; Higuchi, Takeshi; Takematsu, Hiromu; Kamikubo, Yasuhiko; Kondo, Tadakazu; Yamashita, Kouhei; Sasada, Masataka; Takaori-Kondo, Akifumi; Adachi, Souichi

    2015-01-01

    Autophagy occurs in human neutrophils after the phagocytosis of multidrug-resistant bacteria and drug-sensitive strains, including Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The present study detected autophagy by immunoblot analysis of LC3B conversion, by confocal scanning microscopic examination of LC3B aggregate formation and by transmission electron microscopic examination of bacteria-containing autophagosomes. Patients with severe bacterial infections are often treated with IVIG alongside antimicrobial agents. Here, we showed that IVIG induced neutrophil-mediated phagocytosis of multidrug-resistant strains. Compared with untreated neutrophils, neutrophils exposed to IVIG showed increased levels of bacterial cell killing, phagocytosis, O2? release, MPO release, and NET formation. IVIG also increased autophagy in these cells. Inhibiting the late phase of autophagy (fusion of lysosomes with autophagosomes) with bafilomycin A1-reduced, neutrophil-mediated bactericidal activity. These findings indicate that autophagy plays a critical role in the bactericidal activity mediated by human neutrophils. Furthermore, the autophagosomes within the neutrophils contained bacteria only and their organelles only, or both bacteria and their organelles, a previously undocumented observation. Taken together, these results suggest that the contents of neutrophil autophagosomes may be derived from specific autophagic systems, which provide the neutrophil with an advantage. Thus, IVIG promotes the neutrophil-mediated killing of multidrug-resistant bacteria as well as drug-sensitive strains. PMID:25908735

  19. Gene expression analysis of two extensively drug-resistant tuberculosis isolates show that two-component response systems enhance drug resistance.

    PubMed

    Yu, Guohua; Cui, Zhenling; Sun, Xian; Peng, Jinfu; Jiang, Jun; Wu, Wei; Huang, Wenhua; Chu, Kaili; Zhang, Lu; Ge, Baoxue; Li, Yao

    2015-05-01

    Global analysis of expression profiles using DNA microarrays was performed between a reference strain H37Rv and two clinical extensively drug-resistant isolates in response to three anti-tuberculosis drug exposures (isoniazid, capreomycin, and rifampicin). A deep analysis was then conducted using a combination of genome sequences of the resistant isolates, resistance information, and related public microarray data. Certain known resistance-associated gene sets were significantly overrepresented in upregulated genes in the resistant isolates relative to that observed in H37Rv, which suggested a link between resistance and expression levels of particular genes. In addition, isoniazid and capreomycin response genes, but not rifampicin, either obtained from published works or our data, were highly consistent with the differentially expressed genes of resistant isolates compared to those of H37Rv, indicating a strong association between drug resistance of the isolates and genes differentially regulated by isoniazid and capreomycin exposures. Based on these results, 92 genes of the studied isolates were identified as candidate resistance genes, 10 of which are known resistance-related genes. Regulatory network analysis of candidate resistance genes using published networks and literature mining showed that three two-component regulatory systems and regulator CRP play significant roles in the resistance of the isolates by mediating the production of essential envelope components. Finally, drug sensitivity testing indicated strong correlations between expression levels of these regulatory genes and sensitivity to multiple anti-tuberculosis drugs in Mycobacterium tuberculosis. These findings may provide novel insights into the mechanism underlying the emergence and development of drug resistance in resistant tuberculosis isolates and useful clues for further studies on this issue. PMID:25869645

  20. Design of a large-scale femtoliter droplet array for single-cell analysis of drug-tolerant and drug-resistant bacteria.

    PubMed

    Iino, Ryota; Matsumoto, Yoshimi; Nishino, Kunihiko; Yamaguchi, Akihito; Noji, Hiroyuki

    2013-01-01

    Single-cell analysis is a powerful method to assess the heterogeneity among individual cells, enabling the identification of very rare cells with properties that differ from those of the majority. In this Methods Article, we describe the use of a large-scale femtoliter droplet array to enclose, isolate, and analyze individual bacterial cells. As a first example, we describe the single-cell detection of drug-tolerant persisters of Pseudomonas aeruginosa treated with the antibiotic carbenicillin. As a second example, this method was applied to the single-cell evaluation of drug efflux activity, which causes acquired antibiotic resistance of bacteria. The activity of the MexAB-OprM multidrug efflux pump system from Pseudomonas aeruginosa was expressed in Escherichia coli and the effect of an inhibitor D13-9001 were assessed at the single cell level. PMID:24109478

  1. Nanodelivery systems for nucleic acid therapeutics in drug resistant tumors.

    PubMed

    Iyer, Arun K; Duan, Zhenfeng; Amiji, Mansoor M

    2014-08-01

    Development of intrinsic and acquired drug resistance in cancer is a significant clinical challenge for effective therapeutic outcomes. Multidrug resistance (MDR) in solid tumors is especially difficult to overcome due to the many different factors that influence clinically manifested refractory disease. Genetic profiling of MDR tumors can provide for more specific control through RNA interference (RNAi) therapy. However, there are multiple barriers to effective in vivo delivery of functional nucleic acid constructs, such as small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) and micro RNAs (miRNAs or miRs). In this review, we have briefly described the principles and mechanisms based on the RNA interference phenomenon and the barriers to its successful clinical translation. The principles of active and passive tumor targeting using nanoparticles systems are also discussed. Furthermore, illustrative examples of miRNA, siRNA, and gene-drug combination delivery using nanoparticle systems that have shown promising potentials for the treatment of diseases such as MDR cancers are covered. PMID:24661041

  2. Constitutive presence of antibiotic resistance genes within the bacterial community of a large subalpine lake.

    PubMed

    Di Cesare, Andrea; Eckert, Ester M; Teruggi, Alessia; Fontaneto, Diego; Bertoni, Roberto; Callieri, Cristiana; Corno, Gianluca

    2015-08-01

    The fate of antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs) in environmental microbial communities is of primary concern as prodromal of a potential transfer to pathogenic bacteria. Although of diverse origin, the persistence of ARGs in aquatic environments is highly influenced by anthropic activities, allowing potential control actions in well-studied environments. However, knowledge of abundance and space-time distribution of ARGs in ecosystems is still scarce. Using quantitative real-time PCR, we investigated the presence and the abundance of twelve ARGs (against tetracyclines, ?-lactams, aminoglycosides, quinolones and sulphonamides) at different sampling sites, depths and seasons, in Lake Maggiore, a large subalpine lake, and in the area of its watershed. We then evaluated the correlation between each ARG and a number of ecological parameters in the water column in the deepest part of the lake. Our results suggest the constitutive presence of at least four ARGs within the bacterial community with a high proportion of bacteria potentially resistant to tetracyclines and sulphonamides. The presence of these ARGs was independent of the total bacterial density and temperature. The dynamics of tet(A) and sulII genes were, however, positively correlated with dissolved oxygen and negatively to chlorophyll a, suggesting that the resistant microbes inhabit specific niches. These observations indicate that the lake is a reservoir of antibiotic resistances, highlighting the need of a deeper understanding of the sources of ARGs and the factors allowing their persistence in waters. PMID:26118321

  3. Testing for bacterial resistance to arsenic in monitoring well water by the direct viable counting method

    SciTech Connect

    Zelibor, J.L. Jr.; Doughten, M.W.; Grimes, D.J.; Colwell, R.R.

    1987-12-01

    Direct viable counting of metal-resistant bacteria (DVCMR) has been found to be useful in both enumerating and differentiating metal-resistant and metal-sensitive strains of bacteria. The DVCMR bioassay was used to detect effects of low and high concentrations of arsenic and arsenicals on bacterial populations in ground water. The level of resistance of the bacterial populations to arsenate was determined by the DVCMR bioassay, and the results showed a linear correlation with the total arsenic concentrations in the monitoring well water samples; no correlation was observed by culture methods with the methods employed. Bacteria resistant to 2000 ..mu..g of arsenate per ml were isolated from all monitoring well water samples studied. Strains showed similar antibiotic and heavy-metal profiles, suggesting that the arsenic was not a highly selective pressure for arsenic alone. The monitoring well water samples were amended with arsenate and nutrients to determine the biotransformation mechanisms involved. Preliminary results suggest that bacteria indigenous to the monitoring well water samples did not directly transform, i.e., precipitate or volatilize, dissolved arsenic. It was concluded that arsenic contamination of the ground water can be monitored by the DVCMR bioassay.

  4. 21 CFR 866.3950 - In vitro human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) drug resistance genotype assay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents § 866.3950 In vitro human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) drug resistance genotype...

  5. High prevalence of multidrug resistance in bacterial uropathogens from Kathmandu, Nepal

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Urinary Tract Infection (UTI) is one of the most common infectious diseases and people of all age-groups and geographical locations are affected. The impact of disease is even worst in low-resource developing countries due to unaware of the UTIs caused by multidrug-resistant (MDR) pathogens and the possibility of transfer of MDR traits between them. The present study aimed to determine the prevalence of MDR bacterial isolates from UTI patients, the antibiotic resistance pattern and the conjugational transfer of multidrug resistance phenotypes in Escherichia coli (E. coli). Results Two hundred and nineteen bacterial isolates were recovered from 710 urine samples at Kathmandu Model hospital during the study period. All samples and isolates were investigated by standard laboratory procedures. Among the significant bacterial growth (30.8%, 219 isolates), 41.1% isolates were MDR. The most prevailing organism, E. coli (81.3%, 178 isolates) was 38.2% MDR, whereas second most common organism, Citrobacter spp. (5%, 11 isolates) was found 72.7% MDR. Extended-spectrum ?-lactamase (ESBL) production was detected in 55.2% of a subset of MDR E. coli isolates. Among the 29 MDR E. coli isolates, plasmids of size ranging 2-51 kb were obtained with different 15 profiles. The most common plasmid of size 32 kb was detected in all of the plasmid-harbored E. coli strains. The majority of E. coli isolates investigated for the multidrug resistance transfer were able to transfer plasmid-mediated MDR phenotypes along with ESBL pattern with a frequency ranging from 0.3 × 10-7 to 1.5 × 10-7 to an E. coli HB101 recipient strain by conjugation. Most of the donor and recipient strain showed high levels of minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) values for commonly-used antibiotics. Conclusions The high prevalence of multidrug resistance in bacterial uropathogens was observed. Particularly, resistance patterns were alarmingly higher for amoxycillin, co-trimoxazole, flouroquinolones and third-generation cephalosporins, which necessitate the re-evaluation of first and second line therapies for UTI. In addition, conjugational co-transfer of MDR phenotypes with ESBL-positive phenotypes was observed in MDR E. coli. PMID:22260454

  6. Analysis of Antimicrobial Resistance Genes in Multiple Drug Resistant (MDR) Salmonella enterica Isolated from Animals and Humans

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Background: Multiple Drug Resistant (MDR) foodborne bacteria are a concern in animal and human health. Identification of resistance genes in foodborne pathogens is necessary to determine similarities of resistance mechanisms in animal, food and human clinical isolates. This information will help us ...

  7. Drivers and Trajectories of Resistance to New First-Line Drug Regimens for Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Shrestha, Sourya; Knight, Gwenan M.; Fofana, Mariam; Cohen, Ted; White, Richard G.; Cobelens, Frank; Dowdy, David W.

    2014-01-01

    Background ?New first-line drug regimens for treatment of tuberculosis (TB) are in clinical trials: emergence of resistance is a key concern. Because population-level data on resistance cannot be collected in advance, epidemiological models are important tools for understanding the drivers and dynamics of resistance before novel drug regimens are launched. Methods ?We developed a transmission model of TB after launch of a new drug regimen, defining drug-resistant TB (DR-TB) as resistance to the new regimen. The model is characterized by (1) the probability of acquiring resistance during treatment, (2) the transmission fitness of DR-TB relative to drug-susceptible TB (DS-TB), and (3) the probability of treatment success for DR-TB versus DS-TB. We evaluate the effect of each factor on future DR-TB prevalence, defined as the proportion of incident TB that is drug-resistant. Results ?Probability of acquired resistance was the strongest predictor of the DR-TB proportion in the first 5 years after the launch of a new drug regimen. Over a longer term, however, the DR-TB proportion was driven by the resistant population's transmission fitness and treatment success rates. Regardless of uncertainty in acquisition probability and transmission fitness, high levels (>10%) of drug resistance were unlikely to emerge within 50 years if, among all cases of TB that were detected, 85% of those with DR-TB could be appropriately diagnosed as such and then successfully treated. Conclusions ?Short-term surveillance cannot predict long-term drug resistance trends after launch of novel first-line TB regimens. Ensuring high treatment success of drug-resistant TB through early diagnosis and appropriate second-line therapy can mitigate many epidemiological uncertainties and may substantially slow the emergence of drug-resistant TB. PMID:25734143

  8. Bacterial gene loss as a mechanism for gain of antimicrobial resistance

    PubMed Central

    Török, ME; Chantratita, N; Peacock, SJ

    2012-01-01

    Acquisition of exogenous DNA by pathogenic bacteria represents the basis for much of the acquired antimicrobial resistance in pathogenic bacteria. A more extreme mechanism to avoid the effect of an antibiotic is to delete the drug target, although this would be predicted to be rare since drug targets are often essential genes. Here, we review and discuss the description of a novel mechanism of resistance to the cephalosporin drug ceftazidime caused by loss of a penicillin-binding protein (PBP) in a Gram-negative bacillus (Burkholderia pseudomallei). This organism causes melioidosis across south-east Asia and northern Australia, and is usually treated with two or more weeks of ceftazidime followed by oral antibiotics for three to six months. Comparison of clinical isolates from six patients with melioidosis found initial ceftazidime-susceptible isolates and subsequent ceftazidime-resistant variants. The latter failed to grow on commonly used culture media, rendering these isolates difficult to detect in the diagnostic laboratory. Genomic analysis using pulsed-field gel electrophoresis and array based genomic hybridisation revealed a large-scale genomic deletion comprising 49 genes in the ceftazidime-resistant strains. Mutational analysis of wild-type B. pseudomallei demonstrated that ceftazidime resistance was due to deletion of a gene encoding a PBP 3 present within the region of genomic loss. This provides one explanation for ceftazidime treatment failure, and may be a frequent but undetected event in patients with melioidosis. PMID:23022568

  9. The diversity of membrane transporters encoded in bacterial arsenic-resistance operons

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Shiyang; Lilley, Ross McCausland; Zhang, Ren

    2015-01-01

    Transporter-facilitated arsenite extrusion is the major pathway of arsenic resistance within bacteria. So far only two types of membrane-bound transporter proteins, ArsB and ArsY (ACR3), have been well studied, although the arsenic transporters in bacteria display considerable diversity. Utilizing accumulated genome sequence data, we searched arsenic resistance (ars) operons in about 2,500 bacterial strains and located over 700 membrane-bound transporters which are encoded in these operons. Sequence analysis revealed at least five distinct transporter families, with ArsY being the most dominant, followed by ArsB, ArsP (a recently reported permease family), Major Facilitator protein Superfamily (MFS) and Major Intrinsic Protein (MIP). In addition, other types of transporters encoded in the ars operons were found, but in much lower frequencies. The diversity and evolutionary relationships of these transporters with regard to arsenic resistance will be discussed. PMID:26020003

  10. Decision tools for bacterial blight resistance gene deployment in rice-based agricultural ecosystems.

    PubMed

    Dossa, Gerbert S; Sparks, Adam; Cruz, Casiana Vera; Oliva, Ricardo

    2015-01-01

    Attempting to achieve long-lasting and stable resistance using uniformly deployed rice varieties is not a sustainable approach. The real situation appears to be much more complex and dynamic, one in which pathogens quickly adapt to resistant varieties. To prevent disease epidemics, deployment should be customized and this decision will require interdisciplinary actions. This perspective article aims to highlight the current progress on disease resistance deployment to control bacterial blight in rice. Although the model system rice-Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae has distinctive features that underpin the need for a case-by-case analysis, strategies to integrate those elements into a unique decision tool could be easily extended to other crops. PMID:25999970

  11. Decision tools for bacterial blight resistance gene deployment in rice-based agricultural ecosystems

    PubMed Central

    Dossa, Gerbert S.; Sparks, Adam; Cruz, Casiana Vera; Oliva, Ricardo

    2015-01-01

    Attempting to achieve long-lasting and stable resistance using uniformly deployed rice varieties is not a sustainable approach. The real situation appears to be much more complex and dynamic, one in which pathogens quickly adapt to resistant varieties. To prevent disease epidemics, deployment should be customized and this decision will require interdisciplinary actions. This perspective article aims to highlight the current progress on disease resistance deployment to control bacterial blight in rice. Although the model system rice-Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae has distinctive features that underpin the need for a case-by-case analysis, strategies to integrate those elements into a unique decision tool could be easily extended to other crops. PMID:25999970

  12. Combination of amikacin and doxycycline against multidrug-resistant and extensively drug-resistant tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Gonzalo, Ximena; Casali, Nicola; Broda, Agnieszka; Pardieu, Claire; Drobniewski, Francis

    2015-04-01

    The objective of this study was to assess the activity of amikacin in combination with doxycycline against clinical strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis in the search for new strategies against multidrug-resistant (MDR) and extensively drug-resistant (XDR) tuberculosis. The study included 28 clinical M. tuberculosis strains, comprising 5 fully susceptible, 1 isoniazid-resistant, 17 MDR, 1 poly-resistant (streptomycin/isoniazid), 1 rifampicin-resistant and 3 XDR isolates, as well as the laboratory strain M. tuberculosis H37Rv. Minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) were determined using a modified chequerboard methodology in a BACTEC™ MGIT™ 960 System. Fractional inhibitory concentration indices (FICIs) were calculated, and synergy, indifference or antagonism was assessed. Whole-genome sequencing was performed to investigate the genetic basis of synergy, indifference or antagonism. The MIC50 and MIC90 values (MICs that inhibit 50% and 90% of the isolates, respectively) were, respectively, 0.5 mg/L and 1.0 mg/L for amikacin and 8 mg/L and 16 mg/L for doxycycline. The combination of amikacin and doxycycline showed a synergistic effect in 18 of the 29 strains tested and indifference in 11 strains. Antagonism was not observed. A streptomycin resistance mutation (K43R) was associated with indifference. In conclusion, the benefit of addition of doxycycline to an amikacin-containing regimen should be explored since in vitro results in this study indicate either synergy or indifference. Moreover, doxycycline also has immunomodulatory effects. PMID:25717028

  13. Role of Breast Cancer Resistance Protein (BCRP/ABCG2) in Cancer Drug Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Natarajan, Karthika; Xie, Yi; Baer, Maria R.; Ross, Douglas D.

    2012-01-01

    Since cloning of the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) family member breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP/ABCG2) and its characterization as a multidrug resistance efflux transporter in 1998, BCRP has been the subject of more than two thousand scholarly articles. In normal tissues, BCRP functions as a defense mechanism against toxins and xenobiotics, with expression in the gut, bile canaliculi, placenta, blood-testis and blood-brain barriers facilitating excretion and limiting absorption of potentially toxic substrate molecules, including many cancer chemotherapeutic drugs. BCRP also plays a key role in heme and folate homeostasis, which may help normal cells survive under conditions of hypoxia. BCRP expression appears to be a characteristic of certain normal tissue stem cells termed “side population cells,” which are identified on flow cytometric analysis by their ability to exclude Hoechst 33342, a BCRP substrate fluorescent dye. Hence, BCRP expression may contribute to the natural resistance and longevity of these normal stem cells. Malignant tissues can exploit the properties of BCRP to survive hypoxia and to evade exposure to chemotherapeutic drugs. Evidence is mounting that many cancers display subpopulations of stem cells that are responsible for tumor self-renewal. Such stem cells frequently manifest the “side population” phenotype characterized by expression of BCRP and other ABC transporters. Along with other factors, these transporters may contribute to the inherent resistance of these neoplasms and their failure to be cured. PMID:22248732

  14. Pipecolic acid enhances resistance to bacterial infection and primes salicylic acid and nicotine accumulation in tobacco

    PubMed Central

    Vogel-Adghough, Drissia; Stahl, Elia; Návarová, Hana; Zeier, Jürgen

    2013-01-01

    Distinct amino acid metabolic pathways constitute integral parts of the plant immune system. We have recently identified pipecolic acid (Pip), a lysine-derived non-protein amino acid, as a critical regulator of systemic acquired resistance (SAR) and basal immunity to bacterial infection in Arabidopsis thaliana. In Arabidopsis, Pip acts as an endogenous mediator of defense amplification and priming. For instance, Pip conditions plants for effective biosynthesis of the phenolic defense signal salicylic acid (SA), accumulation of the phytoalexin camalexin, and expression of defense-related genes. Here, we show that tobacco plants respond to leaf infection by the compatible bacterial pathogen Pseudomonas syringae pv tabaci (Pstb) with a significant accumulation of several amino acids, including Lys, branched-chain, aromatic, and amide group amino acids. Moreover, Pstb strongly triggers, alongside the biosynthesis of SA and increases in the defensive alkaloid nicotine, the production of the Lys catabolites Pip and ?-aminoadipic acid. Exogenous application of Pip to tobacco plants provides significant protection to infection by adapted Pstb or by non-adapted, hypersensitive cell death-inducing P. syringae pv maculicola. Pip thereby primes tobacco for rapid and strong accumulation of SA and nicotine following bacterial infection. Thus, our study indicates that the role of Pip as an amplifier of immune responses is conserved between members of the rosid and asterid groups of eudicot plants and suggests a broad practical applicability for Pip as a natural enhancer of plant disease resistance. PMID:24025239

  15. An obligatory bacterial mutualism in a multi-drug environment exhibits strong oscillatory population dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conwill, Arolyn; Yurtsev, Eugene; Gore, Jeff

    2014-03-01

    A common mechanism of antibiotic resistance in bacteria involves the production of an enzyme that inactivates the antibiotic. By inactivating the antibiotic, resistant cells can protect other cells in the population that would otherwise be sensitive to the drug. In a multidrug environment, an obligatory mutualism arises because populations of different strains rely on each other to breakdown antibiotics in the environment. Here, we experimentally track the population dynamics of two E. coli strains in the presence of two different antibiotics: ampicillin and chloramphenicol. Together the strains are able to grow in antibiotic concentrations that inhibit growth of either one of the strains alone. Although mutualisms are often thought to stabilize population dynamics, we observe strong oscillatory dynamics even when there is long-term coexistence between the two strains. We expect that our results will provide insight into the evolution of antibiotic resistance and, more generally, the evolutionary origin of phenotypic diversity, cooperation, and ecological stability.

  16. Synthesis and evaluation of hetero- and homo-dimers of ribosome-targeting antibiotics: Antimicrobial activity, in vitro inhibition of translation, and drug resistance

    PubMed Central

    Berkov-Zrihen, Yifat; Green, Keith D.; Labby, Kristin J.; Feldman, Mark; Garneau-Tsodikova, Sylvie; Fridman, Micha

    2013-01-01

    In this study, we describe the synthesis of a full set of homo- and hetero-dimers of three intact structures of different ribosome-targeting antibiotics: tobramycin, clindamycin, and chloramphenicol. Several aspects of the biological activity of the dimeric structures were evaluated including antimicrobial activity, inhibition of in vitro bacterial protein translation, and the effect of dimerization on the action of several bacterial resistance mechanisms that deactivate tobramycin and chloramphenicol. This study demonstrates that covalently linking two identical or different ribosome-targeting antibiotics may lead to (i) a broader spectrum of antimicrobial activity, (ii) improved inhibition of bacterial translation properties compared to that of the parent antibiotics, and (iii) reduction in the efficacy of some drug-modifying enzymes that confer high levels of resistance to the parent antibiotics from which the dimers were derived. PMID:23786357

  17. Pervasive Sign Epistasis between Conjugative Plasmids and Drug-Resistance Chromosomal Mutations

    PubMed Central

    Carvalho, Luís M.; Reis, Ana M.; Gordo, Isabel; Trindade, Sandra; Dionisio, Francisco

    2011-01-01

    Multidrug-resistant bacteria arise mostly by the accumulation of plasmids and chromosomal mutations. Typically, these resistant determinants are costly to the bacterial cell. Yet, recently, it has been found that, in Escherichia coli bacterial cells, a mutation conferring resistance to an antibiotic can be advantageous to the bacterial cell if another antibiotic-resistance mutation is already present, a phenomenon called sign epistasis. Here we study the interaction between antibiotic-resistance chromosomal mutations and conjugative (i.e., self-transmissible) plasmids and find many cases of sign epistasis (40%)—including one of reciprocal sign epistasis where the strain carrying both resistance determinants is fitter than the two strains carrying only one of the determinants. This implies that the acquisition of an additional resistance plasmid or of a resistance mutation often increases the fitness of a bacterial strain already resistant to antibiotics. We further show that there is an overall antagonistic interaction between mutations and plasmids (52%). These results further complicate expectations of resistance reversal by interdiction of antibiotic use. PMID:21829372

  18. The bacterial leaf spot disease of castorbeans. I.A study of the inheritance of resistance. II. Some elemental components associated with physiological resistance. III. A histological evaluation of resistance 

    E-print Network

    Poole, D. Donald

    1957-01-01

    THE BACTERIAL LEAF SPOT DISEASE OF CASTORBEANS. I. A STUDY OF THE INHERITANCE OF RESISTANCE. II. SOME ELEMENTAL COMPONENTS ASSOCIATED WITH PHYSIOLOGICAL RESISTANCE. III. A HISTOLOGICAL EVALUATION OF RESISTANCE. By D. DONALD POOLE ?* i A.... A STUDY OF THE INHERITANCE OF RESISTANCE. II. SOME ELEMENTAL COMPONENTS ASSOCIATED WITH PHYSIOLOGICAL RESISTANCE. III. A HISTOLOGICAL EVALUATION OF RESISTANCE. A Dissertation By D. DONALD POOLE Approved as to style and content by...

  19. Could bacteriophages transfer antibiotic resistance genes from environmental bacteria to human-body associated bacterial populations?

    PubMed Central

    Muniesa, Maite; Colomer-Lluch, Marta; Jofre, Juan

    2013-01-01

    Environments without any contact with anthropogenic antibiotics show a great abundance of antibiotic resistance genes that use to be chromosomal and are part of the core genes of the species that harbor them. Some of these genes are shared with human pathogens where they appear in mobile genetic elements. Diversity of antibiotic resistance genes in non-contaminated environments is much greater than in human and animal pathogens, and in environments contaminated with antibiotic from anthropogenic activities. This suggests the existence of some bottleneck effect for the mobilization of antibiotic resistance genes among different biomes. Bacteriophages have characteristics that make them suitable vectors between different biomes, and as well for transferring genes from biome to biome. Recent metagenomic studies and detection of bacterial genes by genomic techniques in the bacteriophage fraction of different microbiota provide indirect evidences that the mobilization of genes mediated by phages, including antibiotic resistance genes, is far more relevant than previously thought. Our hypothesis is that bacteriophages might be of critical importance for evading one of the bottlenecks, the lack of ecological connectivity that modulates the pass of antibiotic resistance genes from natural environments such as waters and soils, to animal and human microbiomes. This commentary concentrates on the potential importance of bacteriophages in transferring resistance genes from the environment to human and animal body microbiomes, but there is no doubt that transduction occurs also in body microbiomes. PMID:24195016

  20. THE USE OF NANOPARTICLE-MEDIATED TARGETED GENE SILENCING AND DRUG DELIVERY TO OVERCOME TUMOR DRUG RESISTANCE

    PubMed Central

    Patil, Yogesh; Swaminathan, Suresh; Sadhukha, Tanmoy; Ma, Linan; Panyam, Jayanth

    2009-01-01

    Overexpression of drug efflux transporters such as P-glycoprotein (P-gp) enables cancer cells to develop resistance to multiple anticancer drugs. Functional inhibitors of P-gp have shown promising efficacy in early clinical trials, but their long-term safety is yet to be established. A novel approach to overcome drug resistance is to use siRNA-mediated RNA interference to silence the expression of the efflux transporter. Because P-gp plays an important role in the physiological regulation of endogenous and xenobiotic compounds in the body, it is important to deliver P-gp targeted siRNA and anticancer drug specifically to tumor cells. Further, for optimal synergy, both the drug and siRNA may need to be temporally colocalized in the tumor cells. In the current study, we investigated the effectiveness of simultaneous and targeted delivery of anticancer drug, paclitaxel, along with P-gp targeted siRNA, using poly(D,L-lactide-co-glycolide) nanoparticles to overcome tumor drug resistance. Nanoparticles were surface functionalized with biotin for active tumor targeting. Dual agent nanoparticles encapsulating the combination of paclitaxel and P-gp targeted siRNA showed significantly higher cytotoxicity in vitro than nanoparticles loaded with paclitaxel alone. Enhanced therapeutic efficacy of dual agent nanoparticles could be correlated with effective silencing of the MDR1 gene that encodes for P-gp and with increased accumulation of paclitaxel in drug-resistant tumor cells. In vivo studies in a mouse model of drug-resistant tumor demonstrated significantly greater inhibition of tumor growth following treatment with biotin-functionalized nanoparticles encapsulating both paclitaxel and P-gp targeted siRNA at a paclitaxel dose that was ineffective in the absence of gene silencing. These results suggest that that the combination of P-gp gene silencing and cytotoxic drug delivery using targeted nanoparticles can overcome tumor drug resistance. PMID:19800114

  1. Genetic and Genomic Architecture of the Evolution of Resistance to Antifungal Drug Combinations

    PubMed Central

    Hill, Jessica A.; Ammar, Ron; Torti, Dax; Nislow, Corey; Cowen, Leah E.

    2013-01-01

    The evolution of drug resistance in fungal pathogens compromises the efficacy of the limited number of antifungal drugs. Drug combinations have emerged as a powerful strategy to enhance antifungal efficacy and abrogate drug resistance, but the impact on the evolution of drug resistance remains largely unexplored. Targeting the molecular chaperone Hsp90 or its downstream effector, the protein phosphatase calcineurin, abrogates resistance to the most widely deployed antifungals, the azoles, which inhibit ergosterol biosynthesis. Here, we evolved experimental populations of the model yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae and the leading human fungal pathogen Candida albicans with azole and an inhibitor of Hsp90, geldanamycin, or calcineurin, FK506. To recapitulate a clinical context where Hsp90 or calcineurin inhibitors could be utilized in combination with azoles to render resistant pathogens responsive to treatment, the evolution experiment was initiated with strains that are resistant to azoles in a manner that depends on Hsp90 and calcineurin. Of the 290 lineages initiated, most went extinct, yet 14 evolved resistance to the drug combination. Drug target mutations that conferred resistance to geldanamycin or FK506 were identified and validated in five evolved lineages. Whole-genome sequencing identified mutations in a gene encoding a transcriptional activator of drug efflux pumps, PDR1, and a gene encoding a transcriptional repressor of ergosterol biosynthesis genes, MOT3, that transformed azole resistance of two lineages from dependent on calcineurin to independent of this regulator. Resistance also arose by mutation that truncated the catalytic subunit of calcineurin, and by mutation in LCB1, encoding a sphingolipid biosynthetic enzyme. Genome analysis revealed extensive aneuploidy in four of the C. albicans lineages. Thus, we identify molecular determinants of the transition of azole resistance from calcineurin dependence to independence and establish multiple mechanisms by which resistance to drug combinations evolves, providing a foundation for predicting and preventing the evolution of drug resistance. PMID:23593013

  2. Comparative Resistance of AH26 and a New Sealer Prototype to a Bacterial Challenge.

    PubMed

    Duggan, Derek; Zhong, Sheng; Rivera, Eric; Arnold, Roland; Simmons, Eric

    2012-01-01

    Objective. This study compared the leakage resistance of a New Sealer Prototype (NSP) with a traditional sealer (AH 26) in Resilon-filled roots subjected to a bacterial challenge. Study Design. 41 roots were instrumented to ISO size 50 apically. Group 1 (n = 20) contained Resilon and AH 26 sealer and roots in group 2 (n = 21) contained Resilon and NSP. Roots were embedded in a dual-chamber model with the upper chamber containing Streptococcus mutans inoculum. Evidence of bacterial penetration was observed for 1 month. Fisher's Test was used to analyze the data. Results. 8 of 20 roots (40%) in the AH 26 group demonstrated leakage whereas 3 of 21 roots (14%) in the NSP group leaked. The difference in leakage rates was not statistically significant (P = 0.053). Conclusion. The traditional sealer (AH 26) demonstrated increased leakage rates compared to the New Sealer Prototype (NSP), but the difference did not reach statistical significance in this study. PMID:22505898

  3. Baby leaf lettuce germplasm enhancement: developing diverse populations with resistance to bacterial leaf spot caused by Xanthomonas campestris pv. vitians

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Baby leaf lettuce cultivars with resistance to bacterial leaf spot (BLS) caused by Xanthomonas campestris pv. vitians (Xcv) are needed to reduce crop losses. The objectives of this research were to assess the genetic diversity for BLS resistance in baby leaf lettuce cultivars and to select early gen...

  4. Transfer of bacterial blight and blast resistance from the tetraploid wild rice Oryza minuta to cultivated rice, Oryza sativa

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. Amante-Bordeos; L. A. Sitch; R. Nelson; R. D. Dalmacio; N. P. Oliva; H. Aswidinnoor; H. Leung

    1992-01-01

    Oryza minuta J. S. Presl ex C. B. Presl is a tetraploid wild rice with resistance to several insects and diseases, including blast (caused by Pyricularia grisea) and bacterial blight (caused by Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae). To transfer resistance from the wild species into the genome of cultivated rice (Oryza sativa L.), backcross progeny (BC1, BC2, and BC3) were produced

  5. Genetic mapping reveals a single major QTL for bacterial wilt resistance in Italian ryegrass ( Lolium multiflorum Lam.)

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Bruno Studer; Beat Boller; Doris Herrmann; Eva Bauer; Ulrich K. Posselt; Franco Widmer; Roland Kölliker

    2006-01-01

    Bacterial wilt caused by Xanthomonas translucens pv. graminis (Xtg) is a major disease of economically important forage crops such as ryegrasses and fescues. Targeted breeding based on seedling inoculation has resulted in cultivars with considerable levels of resistance. However, the mechanisms of inheritance of resistance are poorly understood and further breeding progress is difficult to obtain. This study aimed to

  6. Evidence of major genes affecting resistance to bacterial cold water disease in rainbow trout using Bayesian methods of segregation analysis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Bacterial cold water disease (BCWD) causes significant economic loss in salmonid aquaculture. We previously detected genetic variation for BCWD resistance in our rainbow trout population, and a family-based selection program to improve resistance was initiated at the National Center for Cool and Col...

  7. Evidence of major genes affecting bacterial cold water disease resistance in rainbow trout using Bayesian methods of complex segregation analysis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Bacterial cold water disease (BCWD) causes significant economic loss in salmonid aquaculture. We previously detected genetic variation for BCWD resistance in our rainbow trout population, and a family-based selection program to improve resistance was initiated at the NCCCWA in 2005. The main objec...

  8. Parallel Loss-of-Function at the RPM1 Bacterial Resistance Locus in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Rose, Laura; Atwell, Susanna; Grant, Murray; Holub, Eric B.

    2012-01-01

    Dimorphism at the Resistance to Pseudomonas syringae pv. maculicola 1 (RPM1) locus is well documented in natural populations of Arabidopsis thaliana and has been portrayed as a long-term balanced polymorphism. The haplotype from resistant plants contains the RPM1 gene, which enables these plants to recognize at least two structurally unrelated bacterial effector proteins (AvrB and AvrRpm1) from bacterial crop pathogens. A complete deletion of the RPM1 coding sequence has been interpreted as a single event resulting in susceptibility in these individuals. Consequently, the ability to revert to resistance or for alternative R-gene specificities to evolve at this locus has also been lost in these individuals. Our survey of variation at the RPM1 locus in a large species-wide sample of A. thaliana has revealed four new loss-of-function alleles that contain most of the intervening sequence of the RPM1 open reading frame. Multiple loss-of-function alleles may have originated due to the reported intrinsic cost to plants expressing the RPM1 protein. The frequency and geographic distribution of rpm1 alleles observed in our survey indicate the parallel origin and maintenance of these loss-of-function mutations and reveal a more complex history of natural selection at this locus than previously thought. PMID:23272006

  9. Novel integron gene cassette arrays identified in a global collection of multi-drug resistant non-typhoidal Salmonella enterica.

    PubMed

    Krauland, Mary; Harrison, Lee; Paterson, David; Marsh, Jane

    2010-03-01

    Investigation of integron carriage in a global collection of multi-drug resistant Salmonella enterica identified 3 unique class 1 integron gene cassette arrays not previously reported in this species. The present study used PCR and DNA sequence analysis to characterize the structure of these gene cassette arrays. A approximately 4.0 kb integron containing the gene cassette array arr2/cmlA5/bla (OXA10) /aadA1 was found in isolates belonging to serovars Isangi and Typhimurium from South Africa. A approximately 6.0 kb integron containing the gene cassettes aac(6')IIc/ereA2/IS1247/aac/arr/ereA2 was found in isolates belonging to serovar Heidelberg from the Philippines. In this gene cassette array, the insertion sequence, IS1247, and two putative resistance genes, disrupt the erythromycin resistance gene cassette. Finally, a approximately 6.0 kb integron containing the gene cassette qacH/dfrA32/ereA1/aadA2/cmlA/aadA1 was found in serovar Stanley isolates from Taiwan. This integron, which has not been previously reported in any bacterial species, contains a new dihydrofolate reductase gene cassette sequence designated dfrA32, with only 90% sequence similarity to previously reported dfrA cassettes. The S. enterica integrons described in the present study represent novel collections of resistance genes which confer multi-drug resistance and have the potential to be widely disseminated among S. enterica as well as other bacterial species. PMID:19921331

  10. Novel Integron Gene Cassette Arrays Identified in a Global Collection of Multi-Drug Resistant Non-Typhoidal Salmonella enterica

    PubMed Central

    Krauland, Mary; Harrison, Lee; Paterson, David

    2009-01-01

    Investigation of integron carriage in a global collection of multi-drug resistant Salmonella enterica identified 3 unique class 1 integron gene cassette arrays not previously reported in this species. The present study used PCR and DNA sequence analysis to characterize the structure of these gene cassette arrays. A ~4.0 kb integron containing the gene cassette array arr2/cmlA5/blaOXA10/ aadA1 was found in isolates belonging to serovars Isangi and Typhimurium from South Africa. A ~6.0 kb integron containing the gene cassettes aac(6?)IIc/ereA2/IS1247/aac/ arr/ereA2 was found in isolates belonging to serovar Heidelberg from the Philippines. In this gene cassette array, the insertion sequence, IS1247, and two putative resistance genes, disrupt the erythromycin resistance gene cassette. Finally, a ~6.0 kb integron containing the gene cassette qacH/dfrA32/ereA1/aadA2/cmlA/aadA1 was found in serovar Stanley isolates from Taiwan. This integron, which has not been previously reported in any bacterial species, contains a new dihydrofolate reductase gene cassette sequence designated dfrA32, with only 90% sequence similarity to previously reported dfrA cassettes. The S. enterica integrons described in the present study represent novel collections of resistance genes which confer multi-drug resistance and have the potential to be widely disseminated among S. enterica as well as other bacterial species. PMID:19921331

  11. Structural basis and dynamics of multidrug recognition in a minimal bacterial multidrug resistance system

    PubMed Central

    Habazettl, Judith; Allan, Martin; Jensen, Pernille Rose; Sass, Hans-Jürgen; Thompson, Charles J.; Grzesiek, Stephan

    2014-01-01

    TipA is a transcriptional regulator found in diverse bacteria. It constitutes a minimal autoregulated multidrug resistance system against numerous thiopeptide antibiotics. Here we report the structures of its drug-binding domain TipAS in complexes with promothiocin A and nosiheptide, and a model of the thiostrepton complex. Drug binding induces a large transition from a partially unfolded to a globin-like structure. The structures rationalize the mechanism of promiscuous, yet specific, drug recognition: (i) a four-ring motif present in all known TipA-inducing antibiotics is recognized specifically by conserved TipAS amino acids; and (ii) the variable part of the antibiotic is accommodated within a flexible cleft that rigidifies upon drug binding. Remarkably, the identified four-ring motif is also the major interacting part of the antibiotic with the ribosome. Hence the TipA multidrug resistance mechanism is directed against the same chemical motif that inhibits protein synthesis. The observed identity of chemical motifs responsible for antibiotic function and resistance may be a general principle and could help to better define new leads for antibiotics. PMID:25489067

  12. Phenotypic and Genotypic Diversity in a Multinational Sample of Drug-resistant Mycobacterium Tuberculosis Isolates

    PubMed Central

    Garfein, Richard S.; Catanzaro, Donald G.; Rodwell, Timothy C.; Avelos, Elisea; Jackson, Lynn; Kaping, Janice; Evasco, Henry; Rodriques, Camilla; Crudu, Valeriu; Lin, Shou-Yean Grace; Grossel, Erik; Hillery, Naomi; Trollip, Andre; Ganiats, Theodore; Victor, Thomas C.; Eisenach, Kathleen; Valafar, Faramarz; Channick, Jessica; Qian, Lishi; Catanzaro, Antonino

    2015-01-01

    Background To develop and evaluate rapid, molecular-based drug susceptibility tests (DST) for extensively drug resistant tuberculosis (XDR-TB), we assembled a phenotypically and genotypically diverse collection of M. tuberculosis (Mtb) isolates from patients evaluated for drug resistance in four high-burden countries. Methods Mtb isolates from India (n=111), Moldova (n=90), the Philippines (n=96), and South Africa (n=103) were selected from existing regional and national repositories to maximize phenotypic diversity for resistance to isoniazid, rifampin, moxifloxacin, ofloxacin, amikacin, kanamycin and capreomycin. MGIT-960 was performed on viable isolates in one laboratory using standardized procedures and drug concentrations. Genetic diversity within drug-resistance phenotypes was assessed. Results Nineteen distinct phenotypes were observed among 400 isolates with complete DST results. Diversity was greatest in the Philippines (14 phenotypes) and least in South Africa (9 phenotypes). Nearly all phenotypes included multiple genotypes. All sites provided isolates resistant to injectable but susceptible to fluoroquinolone drugs. Many patients were taking antibiotics to which their current infection was resistant. Discussion Diverse phenotypes for XDR-TB-defining drugs, including resistance to fluoroquinolone and/or injectable drugs in rifampin-sensitive isolates indicate that rifampin-sensitivity does not ensure effectiveness of a standard four-drug regimen. Thus, rapid, low-cost DST assays for first- and second-line drugs are needed. PMID:25859997

  13. Active and Passive Immunization Protects against Lethal, Extreme Drug Resistant-Acinetobacter baumannii Infection

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Guanpingshen; Lin, Lin; Ibrahim, Ashraf S.; Baquir, Beverlie; Pantapalangkoor, Paul; Bonomo, Robert A.; Doi, Yohei; Adams, Mark D.; Russo, Thomas A.; Spellberg, Brad

    2012-01-01

    Extreme-drug-resistant (XDR) Acinetobacter baumannii is a rapidly emerging pathogen causing infections with unacceptably high mortality rates due to inadequate available treatment. New methods to prevent and treat such infections are a critical unmet medical need. To conduct a rational vaccine discovery program, OmpA was identified as the primary target of humoral immune response after intravenous infection by A. baumannii in mice. OmpA was >99% conserved at the amino acid level across clinical isolates harvested between 1951 and 2009 from cerebrospinal fluid, blood, lung, and wound infections, including carbapenem-resistant isolates, and was ?89% conserved among other sequenced strains, but had minimal homology to the human proteome. Vaccination of diabetic mice with recombinant OmpA (rOmpA) with aluminum hydroxide adjuvant markedly improved survival and reduced tissue bacterial burden in mice infected intravenously. Vaccination induced high titers of anti-OmpA antibodies, the levels of which correlated with survival in mice. Passive transfer with immune sera recapitulated protection. Immune sera did not enhance complement-mediated killing but did enhance opsonophagocytic killing of A. baumannii. These results define active and passive immunization strategies to prevent and treat highly lethal, XDR A. baumannii infections. PMID:22253723

  14. Bayesian analysis of complex interacting mutations in HIV drug resistance and cross-resistance.

    PubMed

    Kozyryev, Ivan; Zhang, Jing

    2015-01-01

    A successful treatment of AIDS world-wide is severely hindered by the HIV virus' drug resistance capability resulting from complicated mutation patterns of viral proteins. Such a system of mutations enables the virus to survive and reproduce despite the presence of various antiretroviral drugs by disrupting their binding capability. Although these interacting mutation patterns are extremely difficult to efficiently uncover and interpret, they contribute valuable information to personalized therapeutic regimen design. The use of Bayesian statistical modeling provides an unprecedented opportunity in the field of anti-HIV therapy to understand detailed interaction structures of drug resistant mutations. Multiple Bayesian models equipped with Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) methods have been recently proposed in this field (Zhang et al. in PNAS 107:1321, 2010 [1]; Zhang et al. in J Proteome Sci Comput Biol 1:2, 2012 [2]; Svicher et al. in Antiviral Res 93(1):86-93, 2012 [3]; Svicher et al. in Antiviral Therapy 16(7):1035-1045, 2011 [4]; Svicher et al. in Antiviral Ther 16(4):A14-A14, 2011 [5]; Svicher et al. in Antiviral Ther 16(4):A85-A85, 2011 [6]; Alteri et al. in Signature mutations in V3 and bridging sheet domain of HIV-1 gp120 HIV-1 are specifically associated with dual tropism and modulate the interaction with CCR5 N-Terminus, 2011 [7]). Probabilistically modeling mutations in the HIV-1 protease or reverse transcriptase (RT) isolated from drug-treated patients provides a powerful statistical procedure that first detects mutation combinations associated with single or multiple-drug resistance, and then infers detailed dependence structures among the interacting mutations in viral proteins (Zhang et al. in PNAS 107:1321, 2010 [1]; Zhang et al. in J Proteome Sci Comput Biol 1:2, 2012 [2]). Combined with molecular dynamics simulations and free energy calculations, Bayesian analysis predictions help to uncover genetic and structural mechanisms in the HIV treatment resistance. Results obtained with such stochastic methods pave the way not only for optimization of the use for existing HIV drugs, but also for the development of the new more efficient antiretroviral medicines. In this chapter we survey current challenges in the bioinformatics of anti-HIV therapy, and outline how recently emerged Bayesian methods can help with the clinical management of HIV-1 infection. We will provide a rigorous review of the Bayesian variable partition model and the recursive model selection procedure based on probability theory and mathematical data analysis techniques while highlighting real applications in HIV and HBV studies including HIV drug resistance (Zhang et al. in PNAS 107:1321, 2010 [1]), cross-resistance (Zhang et al. in J Proteome Sci Comput Biol 1:2, 2012 [2]), HIV coreceptor usage (Svicher et al. in Antiviral Therapy 16(7):1035-1045, 2011 [4]; Svicher et al. in Antiviral Ther 16(4):A14-A14, 2011 [5]; Alteri et al. in Signature mutations in V3 and bridging sheet domain of HIV-1 gp120 HIV-1 are specifically associated with dual tropism and modulate the interaction with CCR5 N-Terminus, 2011 [7]), and occult HBV infection (Svicher et al. in Antiviral Res 93(1):86-93, 2012 [3]; Svicher et al. in Antiviral Ther 16(4):A85-A85, 2011 [6]). PMID:25387976

  15. Nanoparticle-mediated simultaneous and targeted delivery of paclitaxel and tariquidar overcomes tumor drug resistance.

    PubMed

    Patil, Yogesh; Sadhukha, Tanmoy; Ma, Linan; Panyam, Jayanth

    2009-05-21

    Drug resistance is a major obstacle to the success of cancer chemotherapy. Overexpression of the drug-efflux transporter P-glycoprotein (P-gp) is a key factor contributing to tumor drug resistance. Third generation P-gp inhibitors like tariquidar have shown promising efficacy in early clinical trials. However, for maximum efficacy, it is important to limit the exposure of normal cells and tissues to the efflux inhibitor and the anticancer drug, and temporally colocalize the drug-inhibitor combination in the tumor cells. In this study, we investigated simultaneous and targeted delivery of anticancer drug, paclitaxel, with P-gp modulator, tariquidar, using poly(d,l-lactide-co-glycolide) nanoparticles to overcome tumor drug resistance. Nanoparticles were surface functionalized with biotin for active tumor targeting. Dual agent nanoparticles encapsulating the combination of paclitaxel and tariquidar showed significantly higher cytotoxicity in vitro than nanoparticles loaded with paclitaxel alone. Enhanced therapeutic efficacy of dual agent nanoparticles could be correlated with increased accumulation of paclitaxel in drug-resistant tumor cells. In vivo studies in a mouse model of drug-resistant tumor demonstrated significantly greater inhibition of tumor growth following treatment with biotin-functionalized nanoparticles encapsulating both paclitaxel and tariquidar at a paclitaxel dose that was ineffective in the absence of tariquidar. Taken together, these results suggest that the use of targeted, dual agent nanoparticles delivering a combination of P-gp modulator and anticancer drug is a very promising approach to overcome tumor drug resistance. PMID:19331851

  16. Drug resistance in sea lice: a threat to salmonid aquaculture.

    PubMed

    Aaen, Stian Mřrch; Helgesen, Kari Olli; Bakke, Marit Jřrgensen; Kaur, Kiranpreet; Horsberg, Tor Einar

    2015-02-01

    Sea lice are copepod ectoparasites with vast reproductive potential and affect a wide variety of fish species. The number of parasites causing morbidity is proportional to fish size. Natural low host density restricts massive parasite dispersal. However, expanded salmon farming has shifted the conditions in favor of the parasite. Salmon farms are often situated near wild salmonid migrating routes, with smolts being particularly vulnerable to sea lice infestation. In order to protect both farmed and wild salmonids passing or residing in the proximity of the farms, several measures are taken. Medicinal treatment of farmed fish has been the most predictable and efficacious, leading to extensive use of the available compounds. This has resulted in drug-resistant parasites occurring on farmed and possibly wild salmonids. PMID:25639521

  17. Standing genetic variation and the evolution of drug resistance in HIV.

    PubMed

    Pennings, Pleuni Simone

    2012-01-01

    Drug resistance remains a major problem for the treatment of HIV. Resistance can occur due to mutations that were present before treatment starts or due to mutations that occur during treatment. The relative importance of these two sources is unknown. Resistance can also be transmitted between patients, but this process is not considered in the current study. We study three different situations in which HIV drug resistance may evolve: starting triple-drug therapy, treatment with a single dose of nevirapine and interruption of treatment. For each of these three cases good data are available from literature, which allows us to estimate the probability that resistance evolves from standing genetic variation. Depending on the treatment we find probabilities of the evolution of drug resistance due to standing genetic variation between 0 and 39%. For patients who start triple-drug combination therapy, we find that drug resistance evolves from standing genetic variation in approximately 6% of the patients. We use a population-dynamic and population-genetic model to understand the observations and to estimate important evolutionary parameters under the assumption that treatment failure is caused by the fixation of a single drug resistance mutation. We find that both the effective population size of the virus before treatment, and the fitness of the resistant mutant during treatment, are key-arameters which determine the probability that resistance evolves from standing genetic variation. Importantly, clinical data indicate that both of these parameters can be manipulated by the kind of treatment that is used. PMID:22685388

  18. Structure-Based Drug Design and Optimization of Mannoside Bacterial FimH Antagonists

    PubMed Central

    Han, Zhenfu; Pinkner, Jerome S.; Ford, Bradley; Obermann, Robert; Nolan, William; Wildman, Scott A.; Hobbs, Doug; Ellenberger, Tom; Cusumano, Corinne K.; Hultgren, Scott J.; Janetka, James W.

    2010-01-01

    FimH-mediated cellular adhesion to mannosylated proteins is critical in the ability of uropathogenic E. coli (UPEC) to colonize and invade the bladder epithelium during urinary tract infection. We describe the discovery and optimization of potent small-molecule FimH bacterial adhesion antagonists based on ?-D-mannose 1-position anomeric glycosides using X-ray structure-guided drug design. Optimized biaryl mannosides display low nanomolar binding affinity for FimH in a fluorescence polarization assay and sub micromolar cellular activity in a hemagglutination (HA) functional cell assay of bacterial adhesion. X-ray crystallography demonstrates that the biphenyl moiety makes several key interactions with the outer surface of FimH including ?-? interactions with Tyr-48 and an H-bonding electrostatic interaction with the Arg-98/Glu-50 salt-bridge. Dimeric analogs linked through the biaryl ring show an impressive 8-fold increase in potency relative to monomeric matched pairs and represent the most potent FimH antagonists identified to date. The FimH antagonists described herein hold great potential for development as novel therapeutics for the effective treatment of urinary tract infections. PMID:20507142

  19. Aurora Kinases as Targets in Drug-Resistant Neuroblastoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Rothweiler, Florian; Löschmann, Nadine; Nüsse, Benedikt; Dirks, Wilhelm G.; Zehner, Richard; Cinatl, Jindrich

    2014-01-01

    Aurora kinase inhibitors displayed activity in pre-clinical neuroblastoma models. Here, we studied the effects of the pan-aurora kinase inhibitor tozasertib (VX680, MK-0457) and the aurora kinase inhibitor alisertib (MLN8237) that shows some specificity for aurora kinase A over aurora kinase B in a panel of neuroblastoma cell lines with acquired drug resistance. Both compounds displayed anti-neuroblastoma activity in the nanomolar range. The anti-neuroblastoma mechanism included inhibition of aurora kinase signalling as indicated by decreased phosphorylation of the aurora kinase substrate histone H3, cell cycle inhibition in G2/M phase, and induction of apoptosis. The activity of alisertib but not of tozasertib was affected by ABCB1 expression. Aurora kinase inhibitors induced a p53 response and their activity was enhanced in combination with the MDM2 inhibitor and p53 activator nutlin-3 in p53 wild-type cells. In conclusion, aurora kinases are potential drug targets in therapy-refractory neuroblastoma, in particular for the vast majority of p53 wild-type cases. PMID:25268132

  20. Averting epidemics of extensively drug-resistant tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Basu, Sanjay; Friedland, Gerald H.; Medlock, Jan; Andrews, Jason R.; Shah, N. Sarita; Gandhi, Neel R.; Moll, Anthony; Moodley, Prashini; Sturm, A. Willem; Galvani, Alison P.

    2009-01-01

    Extensively drug-resistant tuberculosis (XDR TB) has been detected in most provinces of South Africa, particularly in the KwaZulu-Natal province where several hundred cases have been reported since 2004. We analyzed the transmission dynamics of XDR TB in the region using mathematical models, and observed that nosocomial transmission clusters of XDR TB may emerge into community-based epidemics under the public health conditions of many South African communities. The effective reproductive number of XDR TB in KwaZulu-Natal may be around 2. Intensified community-based case finding and therapy appears critical to curtailing transmission. In the setting of delayed disease presentation and high system demand, improved diagnostic approaches may need to be employed in community-based programs rather than exclusively at tertiary hospitals. Using branching process mathematics, we observed that early, community-based drug-susceptibility testing and effective XDR therapy could help curtail ongoing transmission and reduce the probability of XDR TB epidemics in neighboring territories. PMID:19365076

  1. Autophagy and Transporter-Based Multi-Drug Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Priyank; Zhang, Dong-Mei; Degenhardt, Kurt; Chen, Zhe-Sheng

    2012-01-01

    All the therapeutic strategies for treating cancers aim at killing the cancer cells via apoptosis (programmed cell death type I). Defective apoptosis endow tumor cells with survival. The cell can respond to such defects with autophagy. Autophagy is a cellular process by which cytoplasmic material is either degraded to maintain homeostasis or recycled for energy and nutrients in starvation. A plethora of evidence has shown that the role of autophagy in tumors is complex. A lot of effort is needed to underline the functional status of autophagy in tumor progression and treatment, and elucidate how to tweak autophagy to treat cancer. Furthermore, during the treatment of cancer, the limitation for the cure rate and survival is the phenomenon of multi drug resistance (MDR). The development of MDR is an intricate process that could be regulated by drug transporters, enzymes, anti-apoptotic genes or DNA repair mechanisms. Reports have shown that autophagy has a dual role in MDR. Furthermore, it has been reported that activation of a death pathway may overcome MDR, thus pointing the importance of other death pathways to regulate tumor cell progression and growth. Therefore, in this review we will discuss the role of autophagy in MDR tumors and a possible link amongst these phenomena. PMID:24710490

  2. Toward Repurposing Ciclopirox as an Antibiotic against Drug-Resistant Acinetobacter baumannii, Escherichia coli, and Klebsiella pneumoniae

    PubMed Central

    Carlson-Banning, Kimberly M.; Chou, Andrew; Liu, Zhen; Hamill, Richard J.; Song, Yongcheng; Zechiedrich, Lynn

    2013-01-01

    Antibiotic-resistant infections caused by gram-negative bacteria are a major healthcare concern. Repurposing drugs circumvents the time and money limitations associated with developing new antimicrobial agents needed to combat these antibiotic-resistant infections. Here we identified the off-patent antifungal agent, ciclopirox, as a candidate to repurpose for antibiotic use. To test the efficacy of ciclopirox against antibiotic-resistant pathogens, we used a curated collection of Acinetobacter baumannii, Escherichia coli, and Klebsiella pneumoniae clinical isolates that are representative of known antibiotic resistance phenotypes. We found that ciclopirox, at 5–15 µg/ml concentrations, inhibited bacterial growth regardless of the antibiotic resistance status. At these same concentrations, ciclopirox reduced growth of Pseudomonas aeruginosa clinical isolates, but some of these pathogens required higher ciclopirox concentrations to completely block growth. To determine how ciclopirox inhibits bacterial growth, we performed an overexpression screen in E. coli. This screen revealed that galE, which encodes UDP-glucose 4-epimerase, rescued bacterial growth at otherwise restrictive ciclopirox concentrations. We found that ciclopirox does not inhibit epimerization of UDP-galactose by purified E. coli GalE; however, ?galU, ?galE, ?rfaI, or ?rfaB mutant strains all have lower ciclopirox minimum inhibitory concentrations than the parent strain. The galU, galE, rfaI, and rfaB genes all encode enzymes that use UDP-galactose or UDP-glucose for galactose metabolism and lipopolysaccharide (LPS) biosynthesis. Indeed, we found that ciclopirox altered LPS composition of an E. coli clinical isolate. Taken together, our data demonstrate that ciclopirox affects galactose metabolism and LPS biosynthesis, two pathways important for bacterial growth and virulence. The lack of any reported fungal resistance to ciclopirox in over twenty years of use in the clinic, its excellent safety profiles, novel target(s), and efficacy, make ciclopirox a promising potential antimicrobial agent to use against multidrug-resistant problematic gram-negative pathogens. PMID:23936064

  3. Toward repurposing ciclopirox as an antibiotic against drug-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii, Escherichia coli, and Klebsiella pneumoniae.

    PubMed

    Carlson-Banning, Kimberly M; Chou, Andrew; Liu, Zhen; Hamill, Richard J; Song, Yongcheng; Zechiedrich, Lynn

    2013-01-01

    Antibiotic-resistant infections caused by gram-negative bacteria are a major healthcare concern. Repurposing drugs circumvents the time and money limitations associated with developing new antimicrobial agents needed to combat these antibiotic-resistant infections. Here we identified the off-patent antifungal agent, ciclopirox, as a candidate to repurpose for antibiotic use. To test the efficacy of ciclopirox against antibiotic-resistant pathogens, we used a curated collection of Acinetobacter baumannii, Escherichia coli, and Klebsiella pneumoniae clinical isolates that are representative of known antibiotic resistance phenotypes. We found that ciclopirox, at 5-15 µg/ml concentrations, inhibited bacterial growth regardless of the antibiotic resistance status. At these same concentrations, ciclopirox reduced growth of Pseudomonas aeruginosa clinical isolates, but some of these pathogens required higher ciclopirox concentrations to completely block growth. To determine how ciclopirox inhibits bacterial growth, we performed an overexpression screen in E. coli. This screen revealed that galE, which encodes UDP-glucose 4-epimerase, rescued bacterial growth at otherwise restrictive ciclopirox concentrations. We found that ciclopirox does not inhibit epimerization of UDP-galactose by purified E. coli GalE; however, ?galU, ?galE, ?rfaI, or ?rfaB mutant strains all have lower ciclopirox minimum inhibitory concentrations than the parent strain. The galU, galE, rfaI, and rfaB genes all encode enzymes that use UDP-galactose or UDP-glucose for galactose metabolism and lipopolysaccharide (LPS) biosynthesis. Indeed, we found that ciclopirox altered LPS composition of an E. coli clinical isolate. Taken together, our data demonstrate that ciclopirox affects galactose metabolism and LPS biosynthesis, two pathways important for bacterial growth and virulence. The lack of any reported fungal resistance to ciclopirox in over twenty years of use in the clinic, its excellent safety profiles, novel target(s), and efficacy, make ciclopirox a promising potential antimicrobial agent to use against multidrug-resistant problematic gram-negative pathogens. PMID:23936064

  4. Antibiotic resistance in bacterial pathogens from retail raw meats and food-producing animals in Japan.

    PubMed

    Hiroi, Midori; Kawamori, Fumihiko; Harada, Tetsuya; Sano, Yono; Miwa, Norinaga; Sugiyama, Kanji; Hara-Kudo, Yukiko; Masuda, Takashi

    2012-10-01

    To determine the prevalence and antimicrobial susceptibility profiles of Campylobacter, Salmonella, Staphylococcus aureus, methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA), and vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VRE) in food-producing animals and retail raw meats in Japan, raw meat samples as well as food-producing animal feces, cutaneous swabs, and nasal swabs collected from 2004 to 2006 were analyzed. Isolation rates of Campylobacter jejuni and Campylobacter coli, Salmonella, and S. aureus were 34.6% (363 of 1,050), 2.7% (28 of 1,050), and 32.8% (238 of 725), respectively. MRSA was isolated from 3% (9 of 300) of meat samples. No VRE were isolated in this study. Antibiotic resistance in C. coli was higher than that in C. jejuni. Three C. jejuni isolates from a patient with diarrhea in a hospital of Shizuoka Prefecture and two chicken samples that exhibited resistance to ciprofloxacin had identical pulsed-field gel electrophoresis patterns, suggesting that ciprofloxacin-resistant C. jejuni could have been distributed in meat. S. aureus isolates showed the highest level of resistance to ampicillin and tetracycline. Resistance to tetracycline in S. aureus isolates from beef was lower than that seen in isolates from chicken and pork (P < 0.01). This study revealed that the prevalence of MRSA and VRE were low in food-producing animals and retail domestic meats in Japan, although Campylobacter isolates resistant to fluoroquinolone and erythromycin were detected. The occurrence of antimicrobial-resistant pathogens should be monitored continuously to improve the management of the risks associated with antimicrobial drug resistance transferred from food-producing animals to humans. PMID:23043825

  5. Secrets of drug resistance in NSCLC exposed by new molecular definition of EMT.

    PubMed

    Neel, Dana S; Bivona, Trever G

    2013-01-01

    Non-small cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC) metastasis and drug resistance has been associated with epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT). This study reports the development of a robust gene expression signature of EMT in NSCLC and reveals new insights into the key molecular events that underlie EMT and drug resistance in NSCLC. PMID:23172883

  6. Antiviral resistance during pandemic influenza: implications for stockpiling and drug use

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Julien Arino; Christopher S Bowman; Seyed M Moghadas

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The anticipated extent of antiviral use during an influenza pandemic can have adverse consequences for the development of drug resistance and rationing of limited stockpiles. The strategic use of drugs is therefore a major public health concern in planning for effective pandemic responses. METHODS: We employed a mathematical model that includes both sensitive and resistant strains of a virus

  7. Structural insights into how irreversible inhibitors can overcome drug resistance in EGFR

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Anja Michalczyk; Sabine Klüter; Haridas B. Rode; Jeffrey R. Simard; Christian Grütter; Matthias Rabiller; Daniel Rauh

    2008-01-01

    Resistance to kinase- targeted cancer drugs has recently been linked to a single point mutation in the ATP binding site of the kinase. In EGFR, the crucial Thr790 gatekeeper residue is mutated to a Met and prevents reversible ATP competitive inhibitors from binding. Irreversible 4-(phenylamino)quinazolines have been shown to overcome this drug resistance and are currently in clinical trials. In

  8. Direct susceptibility testing for multi drug resistant tuberculosis: A meta-analysis

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Freddie Bwanga; Sven Hoffner; Melles Haile; Moses L Joloba

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: One of the challenges facing the tuberculosis (TB) control programmes in resource-limited settings is lack of rapid techniques for detection of drug resistant TB, particularly multi drug resistant tuberculosis (MDR TB). Results obtained with the conventional indirect susceptibility testing methods come too late to influence a timely decision on patient management. More rapid tests directly applied on sputum samples

  9. Antiangiogenic Scheduling of Chemotherapy Improves Efficacy against Experimental Drug-resistant Cancer

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Timothy Browder; Catherine E. Butterfield; Birgit M. Kra ling; Bin Shi; Blair Marshall; Michael S. O'Reilly; Judah Folkman

    ABSTRACT To reveal the antiangiogenic capability of cancer chemotherapy, we developed an alternative antiangiogenic schedule for administration of cyclophosphamide. We show here that this antiangiogenic schedule avoided drug resistance and eradicated Lewis lung carcinoma and L1210 leukemia, an outcome not possible with the conventional schedule. When Lewis lung carcinoma and EMT-6 breast cancer were made drug resistant before therapy, the

  10. Old drug new use - Amoxapine and its metabolites as potent bacterial ?-glucuronidase inhibitors for alleviating cancer drug toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Kong, Ren; Liu, Timothy; Zhu, Xiaoping; Ahmad, Syed; Williams, Alfred L.; Phan, Alexandria T; Zhao, Hong; Scott, John E.; Yeh, Li-An; Wong, Stephen TC

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Irinotecan (CPT-11) induced diarrhea occurs frequently in cancer patients and limits its usage. Bacteria ?-glucuronidase (GUS) enzymes in intestines convert the non-toxic metabolite of CPT-11, SN-38G, to toxic SN-38, and finally lead to damage of intestinal epithelial cells and diarrhea. We previously reported amoxapine as potent GUS inhibitor in vitro. To further understand the molecular mechanism of amoxapine and its potential for treatment of CPT-11 induced diarrhea, we studied the binding modes of amoxapine and its metabolites by docking and molecular dynamics simulation, and tested the in vivo efficacy on mice in combination with CPT-11. Experimental Design The binding of amoxapine, its metabolites, 7-hydroxyamoxapine and 8-hydroxyamoxapine, and a control drug loxapine with GUS was explored by computational protocols. The in vitro potencies of metabolites were measured by E. Coli GUS enzyme and cell-based assay. Low dosage daily oral administration was designed to use along with CPT-11 to treat tumor-bearing mice. Results Computational modeling results indicated that amoxapine and its metabolites bound in the active site of GUS and satisfied critical pharmacophore features: aromatic features near bacterial loop residue F365’ and hydrogen bond toward E413. Amoxapine and its metabolites were demonstrated as potent in vitro. Administration of low dosages of amoxapine with CPT-11 in mice achieved significant suppression of diarrhea and reduced tumor growth. Conclusions Amoxapine has great clinical potential to be rapidly translated to human subjects for irinotecan induced diarrhea. PMID:24780296

  11. Two-component system YvqEC-dependent bacterial resistance against vancomycin in Bacillus thuringiensis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shumeng; Hu, Yimin; Fan, Qingyun; Wang, Xun; He, Jin

    2015-08-01

    YvqEC is one of the two-component signal transduction systems that may respond to cell envelope stress and enable cells to adjust multiple cellular functions. It consists of a histidine kinase YvqE and a response regulator YvqC. In this study, we separately constructed a single gene mutant ?yvqE and a double gene mutant ?yvqEC in Bacillus thuringiensis BMB171 through a homing endonucleases I-SceI mediated markerless gene deletion method. We found that the deletion of either yvqE or yvqEC weakened the resistance of B. thuringiensis against vancomycin. We also identified nine operons that may be involved in the cellular metabolism regulated by YvqC. This study not only enriches our understanding of bacterial resistance mechanisms against vancomycin, but also helps investigate the functions of YvqEC. PMID:26025304

  12. How could preventive therapy affect the prevalence of drug resistance? Causes and consequences

    PubMed Central

    Kunkel, Amber; Colijn, Caroline; Lipsitch, Marc; Cohen, Ted

    2015-01-01

    Various forms of preventive and prophylactic antimicrobial therapies have been proposed to combat HIV (e.g. pre-exposure prophylaxis), tuberculosis (e.g. isoniazid preventive therapy) and malaria (e.g. intermittent preventive treatment). However, the potential population-level effects of preventative therapy (PT) on the prevalence of drug resistance are not well understood. PT can directly affect the rate at which resistance is acquired among those receiving PT. It can also indirectly affect resistance by altering the rate at which resistance is acquired through treatment for active disease and by modifying the level of competition between transmission of drug-resistant and drug-sensitive pathogens. We propose a general mathematical model to explore the ways in which PT can affect the long-term prevalence of drug resistance. Depending on the relative contributions of these three mechanisms, we find that increasing the level of coverage of PT may result in increases, decreases or non-monotonic changes in the overall prevalence of drug resistance. These results demonstrate the complexity of the relationship between PT and drug resistance in the population. Care should be taken when predicting population-level changes in drug resistance from small pilot studies of PT or estimates based solely on its direct effects. PMID:25918446

  13. Comparison of spontaneous, UV-induced, and nitrosoguanidine-induced mutability to drug resistance in myxobacteria.

    PubMed Central

    Grimm, K

    1978-01-01

    The UV survival curves of different strains of myxobacteria exhibited shoulders; in the case of Polyangium luteum, an unusual double shoulder appeared. Repair inhibitors like acriflavine, caffeine, and coumarin reduced the survival of UV-irradiated cells if the drugs were incorporated in the post-irradiation plating medium. The shoulders were reduced, but the final inactivation slopes were not affected by the repair inhibitors. Those strains that were resistant to UV were also more resistant to being killed by nitrosoguanidine. A variety of drug-resistant mutants occurred. The spontaneous mutation frequencies to drug resistance varied with the drug and the strain used. Drug-resistant mutants were inducible by UV irradiation and nitrosoguanidine. The UV mutability of Myxococcus xanthus was high compared to Cystobacter sp. However, the nitrosoguanidine mutability of M. xanthus was low compared to the other strains. PMID:99434

  14. Fatty acid synthase causes drug resistance by inhibiting TNF-? and ceramide production[S

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Hailan; Wu, Xi; Dong, Zizheng; Luo, Zhiyong; Zhao, Zhenwen; Xu, Yan; Zhang, Jian-Ting

    2013-01-01

    Fatty acid synthase (FASN) is a key enzyme in the synthesis of palmitate, the precursor of major nutritional, energetic, and signaling lipids. FASN expression is upregulated in many human cancers and appears to be important for cancer cell survival. Overexpression of FASN has also been found to associate with poor prognosis and higher risk of recurrence of human cancers. Indeed, elevated FASN expression has been shown to contribute to drug resistance. However, the mechanism of FASN-mediated drug resistance is currently unknown. In this study, we show that FASN overexpression causes resistance to multiple anticancer drugs via inhibiting drug-induced ceramide production, caspase 8 activation, and apoptosis. We also show that FASN overexpression suppresses tumor necrosis factor-? production and nuclear factor-?B activation as well as drug-induced activation of neutral sphingomyelinase. Thus, TNF-? may play an important role in mediating FASN function in drug resistance. PMID:23319743

  15. Survival of Civilian and Prisoner DrugSensitive, Multi and Extensive Drug Resistant Tuberculosis Cohorts Prospectively Followed in Russia

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Yanina Balabanova; Vladyslav Nikolayevskyy; Olga Ignatyeva; Irina Kontsevaya; Clare M. Rutterford; Anastasiya Shakhmistova; Nadezhda Malomanova; Yulia Chinkova; Svetlana Mironova; Ivan Fedorin; Francis A. Drobniewski

    2011-01-01

    Objective and MethodsA long-term observational study was conducted in Samara, Russia to assess the survival and risk factors for death of a cohort of non-multidrug resistant tuberculosis (non-MDRTB) and multidrug resistant tuberculosis (MDRTB) civilian and prison patients and a civilian extensive drug-resistant tuberculosis (XDRTB) cohort.ResultsMDRTB and XDRTB rates of 54.8% and 11.1% were identified in the region. Half (50%) of

  16. Experimental resistance to drug combinations in Leishmania donovani: metabolic and phenotypic adaptations.

    PubMed

    Berg, Maya; García-Hernández, Raquel; Cuypers, Bart; Vanaerschot, Manu; Manzano, José I; Poveda, José A; Ferragut, José A; Castanys, Santiago; Dujardin, Jean-Claude; Gamarro, Francisco

    2015-04-01

    Together with vector control, chemotherapy is an essential tool for the control of visceral leishmaniasis (VL), but its efficacy is jeopardized by growing resistance and treatment failure against first-line drugs. To delay the emergence of resistance, the use of drug combinations of existing antileishmanial agents has been tested systematically in clinical trials for the treatment of visceral leishmaniasis (VL). In vitro, Leishmania donovani promastigotes are able to develop experimental resistance to several combinations of different antileishmanial drugs after 10 weeks of drug pressure. Using an untargeted liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) metabolomics approach, we identified metabolic changes in lines that were experimentally resistant to drug combinations and their respective single-resistant lines. This highlighted both collective metabolic changes (found in all combination therapy-resistant [CTR] lines) and specific ones (found in certain CTR lines). We demonstrated that single-resistant and CTR parasite cell lines show distinct metabolic adaptations, which all converge on the same defensive mechanisms that were experimentally validated: protection against drug-induced and external oxidative stress and changes in membrane fluidity. The membrane fluidity changes were accompanied by changes in drug uptake only in the lines that were resistant against drug combinations with antimonials, and surprisingly, drug accumulation was higher in these lines. Together, these results highlight the importance and the central role of protection against oxidative stress in the different resistant lines. Ultimately, these phenotypic changes might interfere with the mode of action of all drugs that are currently used for the treatment of VL and should be taken into account in drug development. PMID:25645828

  17. Arabidopsis dual resistance proteins, both RPS4 and RRS1, are required for resistance to bacterial wilt in transgenic Brassica crops.

    PubMed

    Narusaka, Mari; Hatakeyama, Katsunori; Shirasu, Ken; Narusaka, Yoshihiro

    2014-05-15

    Bacterial wilt phytopathogen Ralstonia solanacearum is a serious soil-borne disease that attacks several economically important plants worldwide, including Brassicaceae. Previous studies indicate that recognition of avirulence (Avr)-effector PopP2 by resistance (R) protein, RRS1-R, and physical interaction between RRS1-R and PopP2 in the nucleus are required for resistance. Of late, we showed that a pair of Arabidopsis thaliana TIR-NLR proteins, RRS1 and RPS4, function together in disease resistance against multiple pathogen isolates. Here, we report that dual R proteins, RRS1 and RPS4, from A. thaliana ecotype Wassilewskija confer resistance to bacterial wilt in transgenic Brassica crops. For practical applications, this finding may provide a new strategy for developing disease resistant plants that express R genes from other plants. PMID:24832367

  18. Tuberculosis drug resistance testing by molecular methods: Opportunities and challenges in resource limited settings

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Gemeda Abebe; Fabienne Paasch; Ludwig Apers; Leen Rigouts; Robert Colebunders

    2011-01-01

    One of the greatest threats to global tuberculosis (TB) control is the growing prevalence of drug-resistant bacilli. Correctly diagnosing drug-resistant TB patients is more problematic in resource-limited settings as there is no or limited infrastructure for drug susceptibility testing (DST) of TB bacilli. The conventional phenotypic DST method for TB takes weeks before declaring the results and initiating proper anti-TB

  19. Prior antimicrobial drug exposure: a risk factor for trimethoprim- sulfamethoxazole-resistant urinary tract infections

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Joshua P. Metlay; Brian L. Strom; David A. Asch

    Objectives: Antimicrobial drug use is believed to be an important risk factor for the emerging problem of antimicrobial drug resistance, yet strong evidence for the causal relationship in com- munity settings has been limited. Detailed analysis of this risk factor at the level of the individual patient has been hampered by limited availability of drug exposure data among patients with

  20. proteinsSTRUCTURE O FUNCTION O BIOINFORMATICS Predicting drug resistance of the HIV-1

    E-print Network

    Wang, Wei

    Genotypic and phenotypic re- sistance testing has become an important step in drug develop- ment- pared with amprenavir, our analysis suggested that darunavir might be more potent to combat drug resistproteinsSTRUCTURE O FUNCTION O BIOINFORMATICS Predicting drug resistance of the HIV-1 protease

  1. Resistance to currently used drugs is a serious problem in most fields of antimicrobial chemotherapy. Crossresistance

    E-print Network

    Schnaufer, Achim

    Resistance to currently used drugs is a serious problem in most fields of antimicrobial chemotherapy. Crossresistance between two of the major classes of drug used in the treat- ment of African as a result of alterations in an unusual adenosine transporter involved in the uptake of these drugs. African

  2. Extracellular Bacterial Pathogen Induces Host Cell Surface Reorganization to Resist Shear Stress

    PubMed Central

    Mikaty, Guillain; Soyer, Magali; Mairey, Emilie; Henry, Nelly; Dyer, Dave; Forest, Katrina T.; Morand, Philippe; Guadagnini, Stéphanie; Prévost, Marie Christine; Nassif, Xavier; Duménil, Guillaume

    2009-01-01

    Bacterial infections targeting the bloodstream lead to a wide array of devastating diseases such as septic shock and meningitis. To study this crucial type of infection, its specific environment needs to be taken into account, in particular the mechanical forces generated by the blood flow. In a previous study using Neisseria meningitidis as a model, we observed that bacterial microcolonies forming on the endothelial cell surface in the vessel lumen are remarkably resistant to mechanical stress. The present study aims to identify the molecular basis of this resistance. N. meningitidis forms aggregates independently of host cells, yet we demonstrate here that cohesive forces involved in these bacterial aggregates are not sufficient to explain the stability of colonies on cell surfaces. Results imply that host cell attributes enhance microcolony cohesion. Microcolonies on the cell surface induce a cellular response consisting of numerous cellular protrusions similar to filopodia that come in close contact with all the bacteria in the microcolony. Consistent with a role of this cellular response, host cell lipid microdomain disruption simultaneously inhibited this response and rendered microcolonies sensitive to blood flow–generated drag forces. We then identified, by a genetic approach, the type IV pili component PilV as a triggering factor of plasma membrane reorganization, and consistently found that microcolonies formed by a pilV mutant are highly sensitive to shear stress. Our study shows that bacteria manipulate host cell functions to reorganize the host cell surface to form filopodia-like structures that enhance the cohesion of the microcolonies and therefore blood vessel colonization under the harsh conditions of the bloodstream. PMID:19247442

  3. In Vitro Activities of a Novel Nanoemulsion against Burkholderia and Other Multidrug-Resistant Cystic Fibrosis-Associated Bacterial Species

    Microsoft Academic Search

    John J. LiPuma; Sivaprakash Rathinavelu; Bridget K. Foster; Jordan C. Keoleian; Paul E. Makidon; Linda M. Kalikin; James R. Baker

    2009-01-01

    Respiratory tract infection, most often involving opportunistic bacterial species with broad-spectrum anti- biotic resistance, is the primary cause of death in persons with cystic fibrosis (CF). Species within the Burkholderia cepacia complex are especially problematic in this patient population. We investigated a novel surfactant-stabilized oil-in-water nanoemulsion (NB-401) for activity against 150 bacterial isolates recovered primarily from CF respiratory tract specimens.

  4. Multi drug resistance in strong biofilm forming clinical isolates of Staphylococcus epidermidis

    PubMed Central

    Sahal, Gulcan; Bilkay, Isil Seyis

    2014-01-01

    Staphylococcus epidermidis which exists in healthy human skin as a commensal inhabitant is also an important pathogen forming biofilms on many surfaces and recently, increased resistance traits were suggested to be acquired in biofilm environments. In this study; clinical Prevalences, antibiotic resistances and biofilm formations of S. epidermidis strains were determined and comparison of all these findings with each other was carried out in order to take precautions against them and figure out if high biofilm forming S. epidermidis strains display multi drug resistance. According to our results; samples of wound and blood were the most S. epidermidis isolated clinical materials (40%; 35%) and cardiothoracic surgery was the most S. epidermidis observed service unit. All of these strains were sensitive to vancomycin, however 65% of them showed resistance to all ?-lactam antibiotics (Penicillin, Oxacillin, Amoxicilin/Clavulonic acid), used in this study and 60% of all S. epidermidis strains were found as multi drug resistant. When the results of strong biofilm forming S. epidermidis strains are examined; they were isolated from sample of blood and service unit of cardiovascular surgery in highest frequency and 80% of them were ?-lactam resistant whereas 100% of them were multi drug resistant. One of these multi drug resistant strains which was resistant to maximum amount of different antimicrobial classes, was also observed as maximum biofilm forming strain among all the other S. epidermidis isolates. Multi drug resistance in strong biofilm forming strains shows that; biofilms play a role in antimicrobial resistance traits of S. epidermidis. PMID:25242939

  5. Violacein as a genetically-controlled, enzymatically amplified and photobleaching-resistant chromophore for optoacoustic bacterial imaging.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Yuanyuan; Sigmund, Felix; Reber, Josefine; Luís Deán-Ben, Xosé; Glasl, Sarah; Kneipp, Moritz; Estrada, Héctor; Razansky, Daniel; Ntziachristos, Vasilis; Westmeyer, Gil G

    2015-01-01

    There is growing interest in genetically expressed reporters for in vivo studies of bacterial colonization in the context of infectious disease research, studies of the bacterial microbiome or cancer imaging and treatment. To empower non-invasive high-resolution bacterial tracking with deep tissue penetration, we herein use the genetically controlled biosynthesis of the deep-purple pigment Violacein as a photobleaching-resistant chromophore label for in vivo optoacoustic (photoacoustic) imaging in the near-infrared range. We demonstrate that Violacein-producing bacteria can be imaged with high contrast-to-noise in strongly vascularized xenografted murine tumors and further observe that Violacein shows anti-tumoral activity. Our experiments thus identify Violacein as a robust bacterial label for non-invasive optoacoustic imaging with high potential for basic research and future theranostic applications in bacterial tumor targeting. PMID:26091543

  6. Violacein as a genetically-controlled, enzymatically amplified and photobleaching-resistant chromophore for optoacoustic bacterial imaging

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Yuanyuan; Sigmund, Felix; Reber, Josefine; Luís Deán-Ben, Xosé; Glasl, Sarah; Kneipp, Moritz; Estrada, Héctor; Razansky, Daniel; Ntziachristos, Vasilis; Westmeyer, Gil G.

    2015-01-01

    There is growing interest in genetically expressed reporters for in vivo studies of bacterial colonization in the context of infectious disease research, studies of the bacterial microbiome or cancer imaging and treatment. To empower non-invasive high-resolution bacterial tracking with deep tissue penetration, we herein use the genetically controlled biosynthesis of the deep-purple pigment Violacein as a photobleaching-resistant chromophore label for in vivo optoacoustic (photoacoustic) imaging in the near-infrared range. We demonstrate that Violacein-producing bacteria can be imaged with high contrast-to-noise in strongly vascularized xenografted murine tumors and further observe that Violacein shows anti-tumoral activity. Our experiments thus identify Violacein as a robust bacterial label for non-invasive optoacoustic imaging with high potential for basic research and future theranostic applications in bacterial tumor targeting. PMID:26091543

  7. Chlorhexidine Gluconate Cleansing in Preventing Central Line Associated Bloodstream Infection and Acquisition of Multi-drug Resistant Organisms in Younger Patients With Cancer or Undergoing Donor Stem Cell Transplant | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    This randomized phase III trial studies chlorhexidine gluconate cleansing to see how well it works compared to control cleansing in preventing central line associated bloodstream infection and acquisition of multi-drug resistant organisms in younger patients with cancer or undergoing donor stem cell transplant. Chlorhexidine gluconate may help reduce bloodstream infections and bacterial infections associated with the central line.

  8. Increased mdr Gene Expression and Decreased Drug Accumulation in Multidrug-resistant Human Melanoma Cells1

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jeffrey F. Lemontt; Marie Azzaria; Philippe Gros

    Multidrug-resistant clones of a drug-sensitive human malignant mel anoma cell line were isolated by single-step selection in culture medium containing either vincristine (4.5 ng\\/ml or 7.5 ng\\/ml), vinblastine (3 ng\\/ ml), or colchicine (8 ng\\/ml). This protocol yielded primary colonies showing relatively low (4- to 24-fold) levels of drug resistance. These clones exhibit the classical multidrug resistance (MDR) phenotype, being

  9. Drug resistance and molecular epidemiology of aerobic bacteria isolated from puerperal infections in bangladesh.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Salma; Kawaguchiya, Mitsuyo; Ghosh, Souvik; Paul, Shyamal Kumar; Urushibara, Noriko; Mahmud, Chand; Nahar, Kamrun; Hossain, Mohammad Akram; Kobayashi, Nobumichi

    2015-06-01

    Puerperal infection is a common complication during postnatal period in developing countries. Bacterial species, drug resistance, and genetic characteristics were investigated for a total of 470 isolates from puerperal infections in Bangladesh for a 2-year period (2010-2012). The most common species was Escherichia coli (n=98), followed by Enterococcus faecalis (n=54), Staphylococcus haemolyticus (n=33), Proteus mirabilis (n=32), Staphylococcus aureus (n=27), Klebsiella pneumoniae (n=22), and Enterobacter cloacae (n=21). S. aureus and Acinetobacter baumannii were isolated at a higher frequency from wound infections after cesarean section, while E. coli, E. cloacae, and K. pneumoniae were isolated from community-acquired endometritis and urinary tract infections. Resistance to third-generation cephalosporins was frequent for Enterobacteriacae, and was mainly mediated by blaCTX-M-1 group beta-lactamases. The CTX-M gene in E. coli from the four phylogroups was identified as blaCTX-M-15, and phylogroup B2 isolates with blaCTX-M-15 were classified into ST131 with O25b allele, harboring aac(6')-Ib-cr and various virulence factors. Carbapenemase genes blaNDM-1 and blaNDM-7 were identified in one isolate each of phylogroup A E. coli. Methicillin-resistant S. aureus isolates had type IV or V SCCmec, including isolates of ST361 (CC672), which is related to an emerging ST672 clone in the Indian subcontinent. This study revealed the recent epidemiological status of aerobic bacteria causing puerperal infections in Bangladesh, providing useful information to improve clinical practice and infection control. PMID:25555043

  10. Drug-resistant variants of Escherichia coli thymidylate synthase: effects of substitutions at Pro-254.

    PubMed

    Fantz, C; Shaw, D; Jennings, W; Forsthoefel, A; Kitchens, M; Phan, J; Minor, W; Lebioda, L; Berger, F G; Spencer, H T

    2000-02-01

    Drug-resistant variants of thymidylate synthase (TS) can potentially be used in gene therapy applications to decrease the myelosuppressive side effects of TS-directed anticancer agents or to select genetically modified cells in vivo. Mutations of proline 303 of human TS confer resistance to TS-directed fluoropyrimidines and antifolates (). We generated the corresponding variants in Escherichia coli TS (ecTS), position 254, to better understand the mechanism by which mutations at this residue confer resistance. In addition, because ecTS is intrinsically resistant to several antifolates when compared with human TS, we suspected that greater resistance could be achieved with the bacterial enzyme. The P254L enzyme conferred >100-fold resistance to both raltitrexed and 5-fluoro-2'-deoxyuridine (FdUrd) compared with wild-type ecTS. Four additional mutants (P254F, P254S, P254G, and P254D), each of which complemented growth of a TS-deficient cell line, were generated, isolated, and characterized. Steady-state values of K(m) for dUMP and k(cat) were not substantially different among the variants and were comparable with the wild-type values, but K(m) for methylenetetrahydrofolate (CH(2)H(4)PteGlu) was >10-fold higher for P254D. Values of k(on) and k(off) for nucleotide binding, which were obtained by stopped-flow spectroscopy, were virtually unchanged among the mutants. Drastic differences were observed for CH(2)H(4)PteGlu binding, with K(d) values >15-fold higher than observed with the wild-type enzyme; surprisingly, the proposed isomerization reaction that is very evident for the wild-type enzyme is not observed with P254S. The decrease in affinity for CH(2)H(4)PteGlu correlates well with K(i) values obtained for three TS-directed inhibitors. These results show that mutations at Pro-254 specifically affect the initial binding interactions between enzyme and cofactor and also alter the ability of the mutant enzymes to undergo conformational changes that occur on ternary complex formation. The crystal structure of P254S was determined at 1.5 A resolution and is the most precise structure of TS available. When compared with wild-type TS, the structure shows local conformational changes affecting mostly Asp-253; its carbonyl is rotated approximately 40 degrees, and the side chain forms an ion pair with Arg-225. PMID:10648646

  11. Imperfect drug penetration leads to spatial monotherapy and rapid evolution of multidrug resistance

    PubMed Central

    Moreno-Gamez, Stefany; Hill, Alison L.; Petrov, Dmitri A.; Nowak, Martin A.

    2015-01-01

    Infections with rapidly evolving pathogens are often treated using combinations of drugs with different mechanisms of action. One of the major goal of combination therapy is to reduce the risk of drug resistance emerging during a patient’s treatment. Although this strategy generally has significant benefits over monotherapy, it may also select for multidrug-resistant strains, particularly during long-term treatment for chronic infections. Infections with these strains present an important clinical and public health problem. Complicating this issue, for many antimicrobial treatment regimes, individual drugs have imperfect penetration throughout the body, so there may be regions where only one drug reaches an effective concentration. Here we propose that mismatched drug coverage can greatly speed up the evolution of multidrug resistance by allowing mutations to accumulate in a stepwise fashion. We develop a mathematical model of within-host pathogen evolution under spatially heterogeneous drug coverage and demonstrate that even very small single-drug compartments lead to dramatically higher resistance risk. We find that it is often better to use drug combinations with matched penetration profiles, although there may be a trade-off between preventing eventual treatment failure due to resistance in this way and temporarily reducing pathogen levels systemically. Our results show that drugs with the most extensive distribution are likely to be the most vulnerable to resistance. We conclude that optimal combination treatments should be designed to prevent this spatial effective monotherapy. These results are widely applicable to diverse microbial infections including viruses, bacteria, and parasites. PMID:26038564

  12. Imperfect drug penetration leads to spatial monotherapy and rapid evolution of multidrug resistance.

    PubMed

    Moreno-Gamez, Stefany; Hill, Alison L; Rosenbloom, Daniel I S; Petrov, Dmitri A; Nowak, Martin A; Pennings, Pleuni S

    2015-06-01

    Infections with rapidly evolving pathogens are often treated using combinations of drugs with different mechanisms of action. One of the major goal of combination therapy is to reduce the risk of drug resistance emerging during a patient's treatment. Although this strategy generally has significant benefits over monotherapy, it may also select for multidrug-resistant strains, particularly during long-term treatment for chronic infections. Infections with these strains present an important clinical and public health problem. Complicating this issue, for many antimicrobial treatment regimes, individual drugs have imperfect penetration throughout the body, so there may be regions where only one drug reaches an effective concentration. Here we propose that mismatched drug coverage can greatly speed up the evolution of multidrug resistance by allowing mutations to accumulate in a stepwise fashion. We develop a mathematical model of within-host pathogen evolution under spatially heterogeneous drug coverage and demonstrate that even very small single-drug compartments lead to dramatically higher resistance risk. We find that it is often better to use drug combinations with matched penetration profiles, although there may be a trade-off between preventing eventual treatment failure due to resistance in this way and temporarily reducing pathogen levels systemically. Our results show that drugs with the most extensive distribution are likely to be the most vulnerable to resistance. We conclude that optimal combination treatments should be designed to prevent this spatial effective monotherapy. These results are widely applicable to diverse microbial infections including viruses, bacteria, and parasites. PMID:26038564

  13. Drug transporters play a key role in the complex process of Imatinib resistance in vitro.

    PubMed

    Alves, Raquel; Fonseca, Ana Raquel; Gonçalves, Ana C; Ferreira-Teixeira, Margarida; Lima, Joana; Abrantes, Ana M; Alves, Vera; Rodrigues-Santos, Paulo; Jorge, Lénia; Matoso, Eunice; Carreira, Isabel M; Botelho, Maria Filomena; Sarmento-Ribeiro, Ana B

    2015-03-01

    Imatinib resistance has been associated with BCR-ABL alterations, but other mechanisms might be involved, like drug transporters. Additionally, the impact of poor adherence in resistance has been little explored. Using sensitive and resistance CML cell lines, we investigated the expression of influx/efflux transporters, like P-gP and OCT1. In the therapeutic interruption model, we observed decrease of influx and increase in efflux transporters combined with BCR-ABL over-expression. Comparatively, resistant cells obtained by continuous TKI exposure only demonstrated alterations in drug's transporters. By exploring P-gP expression of resistant cells, we observed the potential of P-gP inhibitor in circumventing Imatinib resistance. Our results revealed the importance of treatment interruptions for expected response levels and show the complexity of Imatinib resistant process. Efflux transports appear as not only relevant for acquisition of resistant phenotype, but also as valid therapeutic tool for managing resistance. PMID:25575688

  14. Analysis of antimicrobial resistance genes detected in multiple-drug-resistant Escherichia coli isolates from broiler chicken carcasses

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Multi-drug resistant (MDR) bacteria in food animals are a potential problem in both animal and human health. In this study, MDR commensal Escherichia coli isolates from poultry were examined. Thirty-two E. coli isolates from broiler carcass rinses were selected based on resistance to aminoglycosid...

  15. Does a multi-drug resistant Escherichia coli facilitate dissemination of resistance to Salmonella in dairy calves?

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Previous research conducted by our laboratory investigated the incidence of multi-drug resistant (MDR) Salmonella in dairy cattle and reported that individual cattle, and most often calves, can shed multiple Salmonella serotypes that vary in the degree of antibiotic resistance. More recently, we di...

  16. Evaluation of the potential antimicrobial resistance transfer from a multi-drug resistant Escherichia coli to Salmonella in dairy calves

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Previous research conducted by our laboratory investigated the incidence of multi-drug resistant (MDR) Salmonella in dairy cattle and reported that individual cattle, and most often calves, shed multiple Salmonella serotypes that vary in the degree of antibiotic resistance. More recently, we invest...

  17. Label-Free Recognition of Drug Resistance via Impedimetric Screening of Breast Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Bertsch, Arnaud; Mehta, Kapil; Renaud, Philippe

    2013-01-01

    We present a novel study on label-free recognition and distinction of drug resistant breast cancer cells (MCF-7 DOX) from their parental cells (MCF-7 WT) via impedimetric measurements. Drug resistant cells exhibited significant differences in their dielectric properties compared to wild-type cells, exerting much higher extracellular resistance (Rextra). Immunostaining revealed that MCF-7 DOX cells gained a much denser F-actin network upon acquiring drug resistance indicating that remodeling of actin cytoskeleton is probably the reason behind higher Rextra, providing stronger cell architecture. Moreover, having exposed both cell types to doxorubicin, we were able to distinguish these two phenotypes based on their substantially different drug response. Interestingly, impedimetric measurements identified a concentration-dependent and reversible increase in cell stiffness in the presence of low non-lethal drug doses. Combined with a profound frequency analysis, these findings enabled distinguishing distinct cellular responses during drug exposure within four concentration ranges without using any labeling. Overall, this study highlights the possibility to differentiate drug resistant phenotypes from their parental cells and to assess their drug response by using microelectrodes, offering direct, real-time and noninvasive measurements of cell dependent parameters under drug exposure, hence providing a promising step for personalized medicine applications such as evaluation of the disease progress and optimization of the drug treatment of a patient during chemotherapy. PMID:23483910

  18. Molecular Approaches for Detection of the Multi-Drug Resistant Tuberculosis (MDR-TB) in Bangladesh

    PubMed Central

    Aurin, Tafsina Haque; Munshi, Saurab Kishore; Kamal, S. M. Mostofa; Rahman, Md. Mostafizur; Hossain, Md. Shamim; Marma, Thaythayhla; Rahman, Farjana; Noor, Rashed

    2014-01-01

    The principal obstacles in the treatment of tuberculosis (TB) are delayed and inaccurate diagnosis which often leads to the onset of the drug resistant TB cases. To avail the appropriate treatment of the patients and to hinder the transmission of drug-resistant TB, accurate and rapid detection of resistant isolates is critical. Present study was designed to demonstrate the efficacy of molecular techniques inclusive of line probe assay (LPA) and GeneXpert MTB/RIF methods for the detection of multi-drug resistant (MDR) TB. Sputum samples from 300 different categories of treated and new TB cases were tested for the detection of possible mutation in the resistance specific genes (rpoB, inhA and katG) through Genotype MTBDRplus assay or LPA and GeneXpert MTB/RIF tests. Culture based conventional drug susceptibility test (DST) was also carried out to measure the efficacy of the molecular methods employed. Among 300 samples, 191 (63.7%) and 193 (64.3%) cases were found to be resistant against rifampicin in LPA and GeneXpert methods, respectively; while 189 (63%) cases of rifampicin resistance were detected by conventional DST methods. On the other hand, 196 (65.3%) and 191 (63.7%) isolates showed isoniazid resistance as detected by LPA and conventional drug susceptibility test (DST), respectively. Among the drug resistant isolates (collectively 198 in LPA and 193 in conventional DST), 189 (95.6%) and 187 (96.9%) were considered to be MDR as examined by LPA and conventional DST, respectively. Category-II and -IV patients encountered higher frequency of drug resistance compared to those from category-I and new cases. Considering the higher sensitivity, specificity and accuracy along with the required time to results significantly shorter, our study supports the adoption of LPA and GeneXpert assay as efficient tools in detecting drug resistant TB in Bangladesh. PMID:24932706

  19. CYP3A-dependent drug metabolism is reduced in bacterial inflammation in mice

    PubMed Central

    Gandhi, AS; Guo, T; Shah, P; Moorthy, B; Chow, DS-L; Hu, M; Ghose, R

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE Gene expression of Cyp3a11 is reduced by activation of Toll-like receptors (TLRs) by Gram-negative or Gram-positive bacterial components, LPS or lipoteichoic acid (LTA) respectively. The primary adaptor protein in the TLR signalling pathway, TIRAP, plays differential roles in LPS- and LTA-mediated down-regulations of Cyp3a11 mRNA. Here, we have determined the functional relevance of these findings by pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic (PK/PD) analysis of the Cyp3a substrate midazolam in mice. Midazolam is also metabolized by Cyp2c in mice. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH Adult male C57BL/6, TIRAP+/+ and TIRAP?/? mice were pretreated with saline, LPS (2 mg·kg?1) or LTA (6 mg·kg?1). Cyp3a11 protein expression, activity and PK/PD studies using midazolam were performed. KEY RESULTS Cyp3a11 protein expression in LPS- or LTA-treated mice was reduced by 95% and 60% compared with saline-treated mice. Cyp3a11 activity was reduced by 70% in LPS- or LTA-treated mice. Plasma AUC of midazolam was increased two- to threefold in LPS- and LTA-treated mice. Plasma levels of 1?-OHMDZ decreased significantly only in LTA-treated mice. Both LPS and LTA decreased AUC of 1?-OHMDZ-glucuronide. In the PD study, sleep time was increased by ?2-fold in LPS- and LTA-treated mice. LTA-mediated decrease in Cyp3a11 protein expression and activity was dependent on TIRAP. In PK/PD correlation, AUC of midazolam was increased only in LPS-treated mice compared with saline-treated mice. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS LPS or LTA altered PK/PD of midazolam. This is the first study to demonstrate mechanistic differences in regulation of metabolite formation of a clinically relevant drug by Gram-negative or Gram-positive bacterial endotoxins. PMID:22394353

  20. Screening foods for processing-resistant bacterial spores and characterization of a pressure- and heat-resistant Bacillus licheniformis isolate.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Juhee; Balasubramaniam, V M

    2014-06-01

    This study was carried out to isolate pressure- and heat-resistant indicator spores from selected food matrices (black pepper, red pepper, garlic, and potato peel). Food samples were processed under various thermal (90 to 105°C) and pressure (700 MPa) combination conditions, and surviving microorganisms were isolated. An isolate from red pepper powder, Bacillus licheniformis, was highly resistant to pressure-thermal treatments. Spores of the isolate in deionized water were subjected to the combination treatments of pressure (0.1 to 700 MPa) and heat (90 to 121°C). Compared with the thermal treatment, the combined pressure-thermal treatments considerably reduced the numbers of B. licheniformis spores to less than 1.0 log CFU/g at 700 MPa plus 105°C and at 300 to 700 MPa plus 121°C. The inactivation kinetic parameters of the isolated B. licheniformis spores were estimated using linear and nonlinear models. Within the range of the experimental conditions tested, the pressure sensitivity (zP) of the spores decreased with increasing temperature (up to 121°C), and the temperature sensitivity (zT) was maximum at atmospheric pressure (0.1 MPa). These results will be useful for developing a combined pressure-thermal inactivation kinetics database for various bacterial spores. PMID:24853517

  1. Priming cancer cells for drug resistance: role of the fibroblast niche

    PubMed Central

    FANG, Wei Bin; YAO, Min; CHENG, Nikki

    2014-01-01

    Conventional and targeted chemotherapies remain integral strategies to treat solid tumors. Despite the large number of anti-cancer drugs available, chemotherapy does not completely eradicate disease. Disease recurrence and the growth of drug resistant tumors remain significant problems in anti-cancer treatment. To develop more effective treatment strategies, it is important to understand the underlying cellular and molecular mechanisms of drug resistance. It is generally accepted that cancer cells do not function alone, but evolve through interactions with the surrounding tumor microenvironment. As key cellular components of the tumor microenvironment, fibroblasts regulate the growth and progression of many solid tumors. Emerging studies demonstrate that fibroblasts secrete a multitude of factors that enable cancer cells to become drug resistant. This review will explore how fibroblast secretion of soluble factors act on cancer cells to enhance cancer cell survival and cancer stem cell renewal, contributing to the development of drug resistant cancer. PMID:25045348

  2. Emergence and Spread of Extensively and Totally Drug-Resistant Tuberculosis, South Africa

    PubMed Central

    Klopper, Marisa; Hayes, Cindy; Gey van Pittius, Nicolaas Claudius; Streicher, Elizabeth Maria; Müller, Borna; Sirgel, Frederick Adriaan; Chabula-Nxiweni, Mamisa; Hoosain, Ebrahim; Coetzee, Gerrit; David van Helden, Paul; Victor, Thomas Calldo; Trollip, André Phillip

    2013-01-01

    Factors driving the increase in drug-resistant tuberculosis (TB) in the Eastern Cape Province, South Africa, are not understood. A convenience sample of 309 drug-susceptible and 342 multidrug-resistant (MDR) TB isolates, collected July 2008–July 2009, were characterized by spoligotyping, DNA fingerprinting, insertion site mapping, and targeted DNA sequencing. Analysis of molecular-based data showed diverse genetic backgrounds among drug-sensitive and MDR TB sensu stricto isolates in contrast to restricted genetic backgrounds among pre–extensively drug-resistant (pre-XDR) TB and XDR TB isolates. Second-line drug resistance was significantly associated with the atypical Beijing genotype. DNA fingerprinting and sequencing demonstrated that the pre-XDR and XDR atypical Beijing isolates evolved from a common progenitor; 85% and 92%, respectively, were clustered, indicating transmission. Ninety-three percent of atypical XDR Beijing isolates had mutations that confer resistance to 10 anti-TB drugs, and some isolates also were resistant to para-aminosalicylic acid. These findings suggest the emergence of totally drug-resistant TB. PMID:23622714

  3. An investigation of total bacterial communities, culturable antibiotic-resistant bacterial communities and integrons in the river water environments of Taipei city.

    PubMed

    Yang, Chu-Wen; Chang, Yi-Tang; Chao, Wei-Liang; Shiung, Iau-Iun; Lin, Han-Sheng; Chen, Hsuan; Ho, Szu-Han; Lu, Min-Jheng; Lee, Pin-Hsuan; Fan, Shao-Ning

    2014-07-30

    The intensive use of antibiotics may accelerate the development of antibiotic-resistant bacteria (ARB). The global geographical distribution of environmental ARB has been indicated by many studies. However, the ARB in the water environments of Taiwan has not been extensively investigated. The objective of this study was to investigate the communities of ARB in Huanghsi Stream, which presents a natural acidic (pH 4) water environment. Waishuanghsi Stream provides a neutral (pH 7) water environment and was thus also monitored to allow comparison. The plate counts of culturable bacteria in eight antibiotics indicate that the numbers of culturable carbenicillin- and vancomycin-resistant bacteria in both Huanghsi and Waishuanghsi Streams are greater than the numbers of culturable bacteria resistant to the other antibiotics tested. Using a 16S rDNA sequencing approach, both the antibiotic-resistant bacterial communities (culture-based) and the total bacterial communities (metagenome-based) in Waishuanghsi Stream exhibit a higher diversity than those in Huanghsi Stream were observed. Of the three classes of integron, only class I integrons were identified in Waishuanghsi Stream. Our results suggest that an acidic (pH 4) water environment may not only affect the community composition of antibiotic-resistant bacteria but also the horizontal gene transfer mediated by integrons. PMID:24411460

  4. Is Incident Drug-Resistance of Childhood-Onset Epilepsy Reversible? A Long-Term Follow-Up Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sillanpaa, Matti; Schmidt, Dieter

    2012-01-01

    Given the grave morbidity and mortality of drug-resistant epilepsy, it is of great clinical interest to determine how often prior proven drug-resistant epilepsy is reversible without surgery and whether remission can be predicted by clinical features in children with incident drug-resistant epilepsy. We determined the likelihood of 1-, 2- and…

  5. Computational Coevolution of Antiviral Drug Resistance Christopher D. Rosin 1;2 , Richard K. Belew 2 , Garrett M. Morris 1 ,

    E-print Network

    Belew, Richard K.

    Computational Coevolution of Antiviral Drug Resistance Christopher D. Rosin 1;2 , Richard K. Belew resistance is important in the design of effective drugs. Compre­ hensive features of the interaction between drug designs and resistance mutations are difficult to study experimentally, because of the very large

  6. Tetracycline Antibiotics: Mode of Action, Applications, Molecular Biology, and Epidemiology of Bacterial Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Chopra, Ian; Roberts, Marilyn

    2001-01-01

    Tetracyclines were discovered in the 1940s and exhibited activity against a wide range of microorganisms including gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria, chlamydiae, mycoplasmas, rickettsiae, and protozoan parasites. They are inexpensive antibiotics, which have been used extensively in the prophlylaxis and therapy of human and animal infections and also at subtherapeutic levels in animal feed as growth promoters. The first tetracycline-resistant bacterium, Shigella dysenteriae, was isolated in 1953. Tetracycline resistance now occurs in an increasing number of pathogenic, opportunistic, and commensal bacteria. The presence of tetracycline-resistant pathogens limits the use of these agents in treatment of disease. Tetracycline resistance is often due to the acquisition of new genes, which code for energy-dependent efflux of tetracyclines or for a protein that protects bacterial ribosomes from the action of tetracyclines. Many of these genes are associated with mobile plasmids or transposons and can be distinguished from each other using molecular methods including DNA-DNA hybridization with oligonucleotide probes and DNA sequencing. A limited number of bacteria acquire resistance by mutations, which alter the permeability of the outer membrane porins and/or lipopolysaccharides in the outer membrane, change the regulation of innate efflux systems, or alter the 16S rRNA. New tetracycline derivatives are being examined, although their role in treatment is not clear. Changing the use of tetracyclines in human and animal health as well as in food production is needed if we are to continue to use this class of broad-spectrum antimicrobials through the present century. PMID:11381101

  7. A system for the continuous directed evolution of proteases rapidly reveals drug-resistance mutations

    PubMed Central

    Dickinson, Bryan C.; Packer, Michael S.; Badran, Ahmed H.; Liu, David R.

    2014-01-01

    The laboratory evolution of protease enzymes has the potential to generate proteases with therapeutically relevant specificities, and to assess the vulnerability of protease inhibitor drug candidates to the evolution of drug resistance. Here we describe a system for the continuous directed evolution of proteases using phage-assisted continuous evolution (PACE) that links the proteolysis of a target peptide to phage propagation through a protease-activated RNA polymerase (PA-RNAP). We use protease PACE in the presence of danoprevir or asunaprevir, two hepatitis C virus (HCV) protease inhibitor drug candidates in clinical trials, to continuously evolve HCV protease variants that exhibit up to 30-fold drug resistance in only 1 to 3 days of PACE. The predominant mutations evolved during PACE are mutations observed to arise in human patients treated with danoprevir or asunaprevir, demonstrating that protease PACE can rapidly identify the vulnerabilities of drug candidates to the evolution of clinically relevant drug resistance. PMID:25355134

  8. Overcoming drug efflux-based multidrug resistance in cancer with nanotechnology

    PubMed Central

    Xue, Xue; Liang, Xing-Jie

    2012-01-01

    Multidrug resistance (MDR), which significantly decreases the efficacy of anticancer drugs and causes tumor recurrence, has been a major challenge in clinical cancer treatment with chemotherapeutic drugs for decades. Several mechanisms of overcoming drug resistance have been postulated. Well known P-glycoprotein (P-gp) and other drug efflux transporters are considered to be critical in pumping anticancer drugs out of cells and causing chemotherapy failure. Innovative theranostic (therapeutic and diagnostic) strategies with nanoparticles are rapidly evolving and are anticipated to offer opportunities to overcome these limits. In this review, we discuss the mechanisms of drug efflux-mediated resistance and the application of multiple nanoparticle-based platforms to overcome chemoresistance and improve therapeutic outcome. PMID:22237039

  9. Optimization of the Bacterial Cytochrome P450 BM3 System for the Production of Human Drug Metabolites

    PubMed Central

    Di Nardo, Giovanna; Gilardi, Gianfranco

    2012-01-01

    Drug metabolism in human liver is a process involving many different enzymes. Among them, a number of cytochromes P450 isoforms catalyze the oxidation of most of the drugs commercially available. Each P450 isoform acts on more than one drug, and one drug may be oxidized by more than one enzyme. As a result, multiple products may be obtained from the same drug, and as the metabolites can be biologically active and may cause adverse drug reactions (ADRs), the metabolic profile of a new drug has to be known before this can be commercialized. Therefore, the metabolites of a certain drug must be identified, synthesized and tested for toxicity. Their synthesis must be in sufficient quantities to be used for metabolic tests. This review focuses on the progresses done in the field of the optimization of a bacterial self-sufficient and efficient cytochrome P450, P450 BM3 from Bacillus megaterium, used for the production of metabolites of human enzymes. The progress made in the improvement of its catalytic performance towards drugs, the substitution of the costly NADPH cofactor and its immobilization and scale-up of the process for industrial application are reported. PMID:23443101

  10. Genomic analysis identifies targets of convergent positive selection in drug-resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Farhat, Maha R; Shapiro, B Jesse; Kieser, Karen J; Sultana, Razvan; Jacobson, Karen R; Victor, Thomas C; Warren, Robin M; Streicher, Elizabeth M; Calver, Alistair; Sloutsky, Alex; Kaur, Devinder; Posey, Jamie E; Plikaytis, Bonnie; Oggioni, Marco R; Gardy, Jennifer L; Johnston, James C; Rodrigues, Mabel; Tang, Patrick K C; Kato-Maeda, Midori; Borowsky, Mark L; Muddukrishna, Bhavana; Kreiswirth, Barry N; Kurepina, Natalia; Galagan, James; Gagneux, Sebastien; Birren, Bruce; Rubin, Eric J; Lander, Eric S; Sabeti, Pardis C; Murray, Megan

    2013-10-01

    M. tuberculosis is evolving antibiotic resistance, threatening attempts at tuberculosis epidemic control. Mechanisms of resistance, including genetic changes favored by selection in resistant isolates, are incompletely understood. Using 116 newly sequenced and 7 previously sequenced M. tuberculosis whole genomes, we identified genome-wide signatures of positive selection specific to the 47 drug-resistant strains. By searching for convergent evolution--the independent fixation of mutations in the same nucleotide position or gene--we recovered 100% of a set of known resistance markers. We also found evidence of positive selection in an additional 39 genomic regions in resistant isolates. These regions encode components in cell wall biosynthesis, transcriptional regulation and DNA repair pathways. Mutations in these regions could directly confer resistance or compensate for fitness costs associated with resistance. Functional genetic analysis of mutations in one gene, ponA1, demonstrated an in vitro growth advantage in the presence of the drug rifampicin. PMID:23995135

  11. Alteration of gene expression and DNA methylation in drug-resistant gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Maeda, Osamu; Ando, Takafumi; Ohmiya, Naoki; Ishiguro, Kazuhiro; Watanabe, Osamu; Miyahara, Ryoji; Hibi, Yoko; Nagai, Taku; Yamada, Kiyofumi; Goto, Hidemi

    2014-04-01

    The mechanisms of drug resistance in cancer are not fully elucidated. To study the drug resistance of gastric cancer, we analyzed gene expression and DNA methylation profiles of 5-fluorouracil (5-FU)- and cisplatin (CDDP)-resistant gastric cancer cells and biopsy specimens. Drug-resistant gastric cancer cells were established with culture for >10 months in a medium containing 5-FU or CDDP. Endoscopic biopsy specimens were obtained from gastric cancer patients who underwent chemotherapy with oral fluoropyrimidine S-1 and CDDP. Gene expression and DNA methylation analyses were performed using microarray, and validated using real-time PCR and pyrosequencing, respectively. Out of 17,933 genes, 541 genes commonly increased and 569 genes decreased in both 5-FU- and CDDP-resistant AGS cells. Genes with expression changed by drugs were related to GO term 'extracellular region' and 'p53 signaling pathway' in both 5-FU- and CDDP-treated cells. Expression of 15 genes including KLK13 increased and 12 genes including ETV7 decreased, in both drug-resistant cells and biopsy specimens of two patients after chemotherapy. Out of 10,365 genes evaluated with both expression microarray and methylation microarray, 74 genes were hypermethylated and downregulated, or hypomethylated and upregulated in either 5-FU-resistant or CDDP-resistant cells. Of these genes, expression of 21 genes including FSCN1, CPT1C and NOTCH3, increased from treatment with a demethylating agent. There are alterations of gene expression and DNA methylation in drug-resistant gastric cancer; they may be related to mechanisms of drug resistance and may be useful as biomarkers of gastric cancer drug sensitivity. PMID:24504010

  12. Isolation and partial characterization of drug-resistant Aedes albopictus cells

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Steven J. Mento; Victor Stollar

    1978-01-01

    We report here the first isolation and characterization of drug-resistant cell lines from cultured mosquito cells. A BrdU-resistant cell line was isolated from mutagen-treatedAedes albopictus cells, and then used as the parent cell from which sublines resistant to ouabain or a-amanitin were derived. The BrdU-resistant cell line and all sublines derived from it were shown to be deficient in thymidine

  13. Insight into Pleiotropic Drug Resistance ATP-binding Cassette Pump Drug Transport through Mutagenesis of Cdr1p Transmembrane Domains*

    PubMed Central

    Rawal, Manpreet Kaur; Khan, Mohammad Firoz; Kapoor, Khyati; Goyal, Neha; Sen, Sobhan; Saxena, Ajay Kumar; Lynn, Andrew M.; Tyndall, Joel D. A.; Monk, Brian C.; Cannon, Richard D.; Komath, Sneha Sudha; Prasad, Rajendra

    2013-01-01

    The fungal ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter Cdr1 protein (Cdr1p), responsible for clinically significant drug resistance, is composed of two transmembrane domains (TMDs) and two nucleotide binding domains (NBDs). We have probed the nature of the drug binding pocket by performing systematic mutagenesis of the primary sequences of the 12 transmembrane segments (TMSs) found in the TMDs. All mutated proteins were expressed equally well and localized properly at the plasma membrane in the heterologous host Saccharomyces cerevisiae, but some variants differed significantly in efflux activity, substrate specificity, and coupled ATPase activity. Replacement of the majority of the amino acid residues with alanine or glycine yielded neutral mutations, but about 42% of the variants lost resistance to drug efflux substrates completely or selectively. A predicted three-dimensional homology model shows that all the TMSs, apart from TMS4 and TMS10, interact directly with the drug-binding cavity in both the open and closed Cdr1p conformations. However, TMS4 and TMS10 mutations can also induce total or selective drug susceptibility. Functional data and homology modeling assisted identification of critical amino acids within a drug-binding cavity that, upon mutation, abolished resistance to all drugs tested singly or in combinations. The open and closed Cdr1p models enabled the identification of amino acid residues that bordered a drug-binding cavity dominated by hydrophobic residues. The disposition of TMD residues with differential effects on drug binding and transport are consistent with a large polyspecific drug binding pocket in this yeast multidrug transporter. PMID:23824183

  14. Shifts in Mycobacterial Populations and Emerging Drug-Resistance in West and Central Africa

    PubMed Central

    Fissette, Kristina; de Rijk, Pim; Uwizeye, Cécile; Nduwamahoro, Elie; Goovaerts, Odin; Affolabi, Dissou; Gninafon, Martin; Lingoupou, Fanny M.; Barry, Mamadou Dian; Sow, Oumou; Merle, Corinne; Olliaro, Piero; Ba, Fatoumata; Sarr, Marie; Piubello, Alberto; Noeske, Juergen; Antonio, Martin; Rigouts, Leen; de Jong, Bouke C

    2014-01-01

    In this study, we retrospectively analysed a total of 605 clinical isolates from six West or Central African countries (Benin, Cameroon, Central African Republic, Guinea-Conakry, Niger and Senegal). Besides spoligotyping to assign isolates to ancient and modern mycobacterial lineages, we conducted phenotypic drug-susceptibility-testing for each isolate for the four first-line drugs. We showed that phylogenetically modern Mycobacterium tuberculosis strains are more likely associated with drug resistance than ancient strains and predict that the currently ongoing replacement of the endemic ancient by a modern mycobacterial population in West/Central Africa might result in increased drug resistance in the sub-region. PMID:25493429

  15. Shifts in Mycobacterial Populations and Emerging Drug-Resistance in West and Central Africa.

    PubMed

    Gehre, Florian; Ejo, Mebrat; Fissette, Kristina; de Rijk, Pim; Uwizeye, Cécile; Nduwamahoro, Elie; Goovaerts, Odin; Affolabi, Dissou; Gninafon, Martin; Lingoupou, Fanny M; Barry, Mamadou Dian; Sow, Oumou; Merle, Corinne; Olliaro, Piero; Ba, Fatoumata; Sarr, Marie; Piubello, Alberto; Noeske, Juergen; Antonio, Martin; Rigouts, Leen; de Jong, Bouke C

    2014-01-01

    In this study, we retrospectively analysed a total of 605 clinical isolates from six West or Central African countries (Benin, Cameroon, Central African Republic, Guinea-Conakry, Niger and Senegal). Besides spoligotyping to assign isolates to ancient and modern mycobacterial lineages, we conducted phenotypic drug-susceptibility-testing for each isolate for the four first-line drugs. We showed that phylogenetically modern Mycobacterium tuberculosis strains are more likely associated with drug resistance than ancient strains and predict that the currently ongoing replacement of the endemic ancient by a modern mycobacterial population in West/Central Africa might result in increased drug resistance in the sub-region. PMID:25493429

  16. The role of delamanid in the treatment of drug-resistant tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, Joseph M; Sloan, Derek J

    2015-01-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) remains a significant cause of death worldwide, and emergence of drug-resistant TB requires lengthy treatments with toxic drugs that are less effective than their first-line equivalents. New treatments are urgently needed. Delamanid, previously OPC-67863, is a novel drug of the dihydro-nitroimidazole class with potent anti-TB activity and great promise to be effective in the treatment of drug-resistant TB. This review examines the preclinical and clinical development of delamanid, reviews current guidance on its use and evaluates the opportunities and challenges for its future role in TB management. PMID:25999726

  17. The evolution of bacterial resistance against bacteriophages in the horse chestnut phyllosphere is general across both space and time.

    PubMed

    Koskella, Britt; Parr, Nicole

    2015-08-19

    Insight to the spatial and temporal scales of coevolution is key to predicting the outcome of host-parasite interactions and spread of disease. For bacteria infecting long-lived hosts, selection to overcome host defences is just one factor shaping the course of evolution; populations will also be competing with other microbial species and will themselves be facing infection by bacteriophage viruses. Here, we examine the temporal and spatial patterns of bacterial adaptation against natural phage populations from within leaves of horse chestnut trees. Using a time-shift experiment with both sympatric and allopatric phages from either contemporary or earlier points in the season, we demonstrate that bacterial resistance is higher against phages from the past, regardless of spatial sympatry or how much earlier in the season phages were collected. Similarly, we show that future bacterial hosts are more resistant to both sympatric and allopatric phages than contemporary bacterial hosts. Together, our results suggest the evolution of relatively general bacterial resistance against phages in nature and are contrasting to previously observed patterns of phage adaptation to bacteria from the same tree hosts over the same time frame, indicating a potential asymmetry in coevolutionary dynamics. PMID:26150663

  18. Goniothalamus Species: A Source of Drugs for the Treatment of Cancers and Bacterial Infections?

    PubMed Central

    2007-01-01

    Irrespective of the presence of cytotoxic acetogenins and styryl-lactones in the genus Goniothalamus, only 22 species in the genus Goniothalamus, out of 160 species (13.7%) have so far been investigated. In an effort to promote further research on the genus Goniothalamus which could represent a source of drugs for the treatment of cancers and bacterial infections, this work offers a broad analysis of current knowledge on Goniothalamus species. Therefore, it includes (i) taxonomy (ii) botanical description (iii) traditional medicinal uses and (iv) phytochemical and pharmacological studies. We discuss the molecular mechanisms of actions of acetogenins and styryl-lactones, with some emphasis on the possible involvement of protein kinase, Bax and TRAIL receptors in the cytotoxic effects of styryl-lactones. We also report (v) the growth inhibition of several nosocomial bacteria by Goniothalamus. scortechinii. The crude methanol extract of G. scortechinii showed a good and broad spectrum of antibacterial activity against both Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria. PMID:17965760

  19. Goniothalamus species: a source of drugs for the treatment of cancers and bacterial infections?

    PubMed

    Wiart, Christophe

    2007-09-01

    Irrespective of the presence of cytotoxic acetogenins and styryl-lactones in the genus Goniothalamus, only 22 species in the genus Goniothalamus, out of 160 species (13.7%) have so far been investigated. In an effort to promote further research on the genus Goniothalamus which could represent a source of drugs for the treatment of cancers and bacterial infections, this work offers a broad analysis of current knowledge on Goniothalamus species. Therefore, it includes (i) taxonomy (ii) botanical description (iii) traditional medicinal uses and (iv) phytochemical and pharmacological studies. We discuss the molecular mechanisms of actions of acetogenins and styryl-lactones, with some emphasis on the possible involvement of protein kinase, Bax and TRAIL receptors in the cytotoxic effects of styryl-lactones. We also report (v) the growth inhibition of several nosocomial bacteria by Goniothalamus. scortechinii. The crude methanol extract of G. scortechinii showed a good and broad spectrum of antibacterial activity against both Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria. PMID:17965760

  20. Lysosomal drug sequestration as a mechanism of drug resistance in vascular sarcoma cells marked by high CSF-1R expression

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Human angiosarcoma and canine hemangiosarcoma are thought to arise from vascular tissue or vascular forming cells based upon their histological appearance. However, recent evidence indicates a hematopoietic or angioblastic cell of origin for these tumors. In support of this idea, we previously identified an endothelial-myeloid progenitor cell population with high expression of endothelial cell markers and the myeloid cell marker, colony stimulating factor 1 receptor (CSF-1R). Here, we further characterized these cells to better understand how their cellular characteristics may impact current therapeutic applications. Methods We performed cell enrichment studies from canine hemangiosarcoma and human angiosarcoma cell lines to generate cell populations with high or low CSF-1R expression. We then utilized flow cytometry, side population and cell viability assays, and fluorescence based approaches to elucidate drug resistance mechanisms and to determine the expression of hematopoietic and endothelial progenitor cell markers. Results We demonstrated that cells with high CSF-1R expression enriched from hemangiosarcoma and angiosarcoma cell lines are more drug resistant than cells with little or no CSF-1R expression. We determined that the increased drug resistance may be due to increased ABC transporter expression in hemangiosarcoma and increased drug sequestration within cellular lysosomes in both hemangiosarcoma and angiosarcoma. Conclusions We identified drug sequestration within cellular lysosomes as a shared drug resistance mechanism in human and canine vascular sarcomas marked by high CSF-1R expression. Taken together, our results demonstrate that studies in highly prevalent canine hemangiosarcoma may be especially relevant to understanding and addressing drug resistance mechanisms in both the canine and human forms of this disease. PMID:25295160

  1. Bacteriophage therapy for membrane biofouling in membrane bioreactors and antibiotic-resistant bacterial biofilms.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharjee, Ananda Shankar; Choi, Jeongdong; Motlagh, Amir Mohaghegh; Mukherji, Sachiyo T; Goel, Ramesh

    2015-08-01

    To demonstrate elimination of bacterial biofilm on membranes to represent wastewater treatment as well as biofilm formed by antibiotic-resistant bacterial (ARB) to signify medical application, an antibiotic-resistant bacterium and its lytic bacteriophage were isolated from a full-scale wastewater treatment plant. Based on gram staining and complete 16?S rDNA sequencing, the isolated bacterium showed a more than 99% homology with Delftia tsuruhatensis, a gram-negative bacterium belonging to ?-proteobacteria. The Delftia lytic phage's draft genome revealed the phage to be an N4-like phage with 59.7% G?+?C content. No transfer RNAs were detected for the phage suggesting that the phage is highly adapted to its host Delftia tsuruhatensis ARB-1 with regard to codon usage, and does not require additional tRNAs of its own. The gene annotation of the Delftia lytic phage found three different components of RNA polymerase (RNAP) in the genome, which is a typical characteristic of N4-like phages. The lytic phage specific to D. tsuruhatensis ARB-1 could successfully remove the biofilm formed by it on a glass slide. The water flux through the membrane of a prototype lab-scale membrane bioreactor decreased from 47?L/h?m(2) to ?15?L/h?m(2) over 4 days due to a biofilm formed by D. tsuruhatensis ARB-1. However, the flux increased to 70% of the original after the lytic phage application. Overall, this research demonstrated phage therapy's great potential to solve the problem of membrane biofouling, as well as the problems posed by pathogenic biofilms in external wounds and on medical instruments. Biotechnol. Bioeng. 2015;112: 1644-1654. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:25728819

  2. Molecular Pathways: GLI1-Induced Drug Glucuronidation in Resistant Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Zahreddine, Hiba Ahmad; Borden, Katherine L B

    2015-05-15

    Drug resistance remains a major impediment in the development of durable cancer therapies. Studies in acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) patients revealed a new form of multidrug resistance. Here, increased glioma-associated protein GLI1 leads to elevation of the UDP-glucuronosyl transferase (UGT) enzymes. UGTs add glucuronic acid to xenobiotics and metabolites. Traditionally, the loss of these enzymes is thought to contribute to cancer as a result of impaired clearance of environmental carcinogens. However, we demonstrate that overexpression of UGTs can contribute to oncogenesis by promoting drug resistance. Indeed, UGT levels in AML patients treated with ribavirin and/or cytarabine were elevated at relapse relative to diagnosis. This was reversed by GLI1 inhibition, suggesting a clinically relevant strategy to overcome drug resistance. Further, overexpression of UGTs can also lead to drug resistance in other cancers, such as certain Hsp90 inhibitors and vorinostat in colorectal and chronic lymphoblastic leukemia, respectively. Not all drugs are targets of glucuronidation, suggesting that UGT status could be relevant to treatment choice. Here, we describe several facets of UGT biology and how these could be exploited clinically. These studies demonstrate how drugs in cancer cells can be metabolized differentially than their normal counterparts. In summary, we describe a new form of drug resistance relevant to a variety of cancer contexts. Clin Cancer Res; 21(10); 2207-10. ©2015 AACR. PMID:25810373

  3. Update on HIV-1 acquired and transmitted drug resistance in Africa.

    PubMed

    Ssemwanga, Deogratius; Lihana, Raphael W; Ugoji, Chinenye; Abimiku, Alash'le; Nkengasong, John; Dakum, Patrick; Ndembi, Nicaise

    2015-01-01

    The last ten years have witnessed a significant scale-up and access to antiretroviral therapy in Africa, which has improved patient quality of life and survival. One major challenge associated with increased access to antiretroviral therapy is the development of antiretroviral resistance due to inconsistent drug supply and/or poor patient adherence. We review the current state of both acquired and transmitted drug resistance in Africa over the past ten years (2001-2011) to identify drug resistance associated with the different drug regimens used on the continent and to help guide affordable strategies for drug resistance surveillance. A total of 161 references (153 articles, six reports and two conference abstracts) were reviewed. Antiretroviral resistance data was available for 40 of 53 African countries. A total of 5,541 adult patients from 99 studies in Africa were included in this analysis. The pooled prevalence of drug resistance mutations in Africa was 10.6%, and Central Africa had the highest prevalence of 54.9%. The highest prevalence of nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor mutations was in the west (55.3%) and central (54.8%) areas; nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor mutations were highest in East Africa (57.0%) and protease inhibitors mutations highest in Southern Africa (16.3%). The major nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor mutation in all four African regions was M184V. Major nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor as well as protease inhibitor mutations varied by region. The prevalence of drug resistance has remained low in several African countries although the emergence of drug resistance mutations varied across countries. Continued surveillance of antiretroviral therapy resistance remains crucial in gauging the effectiveness of country antiretroviral therapy programs and strategizing on effective and affordable strategies for successful treatment. PMID:25427100

  4. Establishment and characterization of triple drug resistant head and neck squamous cell carcinoma cell lines.

    PubMed

    Govindan, Sindhu Valiyaveedan; Kulsum, Safeena; Pandian, Ramanan Somasundara; Das, Debashish; Seshadri, Mukund; Hicks, Wesley; Kuriakose, Moni Abraham; Suresh, Amritha

    2015-08-01

    Resistance to chemotherapy leading to poor outcome and survival remains a challenge for developing strategies for therapeutic interventions in all types of cancer, including head and neck cancer. In vitro chemoresistant cell line models are an indispensable resource towards delineating the mechanisms involved in drug resistance/response and for the development of novel drugs. Current treatment for head and neck cancer includes chemotherapy with cisplatin, docetaxel and 5?fluorouracil (5?FU) and the response rates to these drugs in patients is 60?80%. The present study aimed to generate head and neck cancer triple drug?resistant cell lines in an effort towards elucidating the mechanisms underlying chemoresistance and providing a resourceful tool for drug design. Using two head and neck squamous cell carcinoma cell lines, Hep?2 (larynx) and CAL?27 (oral cavity), the present study sequentially exposed these cells to increasing concentrations of the combination of docetaxel, cisplatin and 5?FU (TPF) to generate triple drug?resistant cells, termed Hep?2 TPF resistant (TPFR) and CAL?27 TPFR. The effect of the drug treatments on the cell viability, apoptosis, cell cycle and the expression of genes associated with multidrug resistance were analyzed in the parental cells and drug?resistant counterparts. The Hep?2 TPFR and CAL?27 TPFR cells exhibited a higher resistance index (RI?2) compared with that of the parental cells. Cell cycle analysis revealed a decreased number of TPFR cells in G0/G1 phase (P<0.05) and a corresponding accumulation of cells in G2/M phase. A reduced degree of apoptosis in these cells (Hep?2, 33 vs 20%, P=0.003; and CAL?27, 18 vs 9.7%) was complemented by an increased expression of genes involved in drug resistance, including MDR1, MRP2, ERCC1, CTR, survivin and thymidylate synthase. The present study, therefore, established two multi drug?resistant head and neck squamous cell carcinoma cell lines and characterized these cells on a cellular and molecular level. Development of these tools accentuates their requirement in the field of drug discovery and in mechanistic studies elucidating the underlying mechanisms of drug resistance. PMID:25962396

  5. Antitubercular activity of disulfiram, an antialcoholism drug, against multidrug- and extensively drug-resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolates.

    PubMed

    Horita, Yasuhiro; Takii, Takemasa; Yagi, Tetsuya; Ogawa, Kenji; Fujiwara, Nagatoshi; Inagaki, Emi; Kremer, Laurent; Sato, Yasuo; Kuroishi, Ryuji; Lee, Yoosa; Makino, Toshiaki; Mizukami, Hajime; Hasegawa, Tomohiro; Yamamoto, Ryuji; Onozaki, Kikuo

    2012-08-01

    The antimycobacterial activities of disulfiram (DSF) and diethyldithiocarbamate (DDC) against multidrug- and extensively drug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR/XDR-TB) clinical isolates were evaluated in vitro. Both DSF and DDC exhibited potent antitubercular activities against 42 clinical isolates of M. tuberculosis, including MDR/XDR-TB strains. Moreover, DSF showed remarkable bactericidal activity ex vivo and in vivo. Therefore, DSF might be a drug repurposed for the treatment of MDR/XDR-TB. PMID:22615274

  6. HIV Drug Resistance Mutations in Proviral DNA from a Community Treatment Program

    PubMed Central

    Derache, Anne; Shin, Hyoung-Shik; Balamane, Maya; White, Elizabeth; Israelski, Dennis; Klausner, Jeffrey D.; Freeman, Alexandra H.; Katzenstein, David

    2015-01-01

    Background Drug resistance mutations archived in resting memory CD4+ cells may persist despite suppression of HIV RNA to <50 copies/ml. We sequenced pol gene from proviral DNA among viremic and suppressed patients to identify drug resistance mutations. Methods The Peninsula AIDS Research Cohort study enrolled and followed over 2 years 120 HIV infected patients from San Mateo and San Francisco Counties. HIV-1 pol genotyping by bulk sequencing was performed on 38 DNA and RNA from viremic patients and DNA only among 82 suppressed patients at baseline. Antiretroviral susceptibility was predicted by HIVDB.stanford.edu. Results Among 120 subjects, 81% were on antiretroviral therapy and had been treated for a median time of 7 years. Thirty-two viremic patients showed concordant RNA and DNA genotypes (84%); the discordant profiles were mainly observed in patients with low-level viremia. Among suppressed patients, 21 had drug resistance mutations in proviral DNA (26%) with potential resistance to one, two or three ARV classes in 16, 4 and 1 samples respectively. Conclusions The high level of genotype concordance between DNA and RNA in viremic patients suggested that DNA genotyping might be used to assess drug resistance in resource-limited settings, and further investigation of extracted DNA from dried blood spots is needed. Drug resistance mutations in proviral DNA in 26% of subjects with less than 50 copies/ml pose a risk for the transmission of drug resistant virus with virologic failure, treatment interruption or decreased adherence. PMID:25635815

  7. Biased random walk model for the prioritization of drug resistance associated proteins

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Hao; Dong, Jiaqiang; Hu, Sijun; Cai, Xiqiang; Tang, Guangbo; Dou, Jianhua; Tian, Miaomiao; He, Fuchu; Nie, Yongzhan; Fan, Daiming

    2015-01-01

    Multi-drug resistance is the main cause of treatment failure in cancer patients. How to identify molecules underlying drug resistance from multi-omics data remains a great challenge. Here, we introduce a data biased strategy, ProteinRank, to prioritize drug-resistance associated proteins in cancer cells. First, we identified differentially expressed proteins in Adriamycin and Vincristine resistant gastric cancer cells compared to their parental cells using iTRAQ combined with LC-MS/MS experiments, and then mapped them to human protein-protein interaction network; second, we applied ProteinRank to analyze the whole network and rank proteins similar to known drug resistance related proteins. Cross validations demonstrated a better performance of ProteinRank compared to the method without usage of MS data. Further validations confirmed the altered expressions or activities of several top ranked proteins. Functional study showed PIM3 or CAV1 silencing was sufficient to reverse the drug resistance phenotype. These results indicated ProteinRank could prioritize key proteins related to drug resistance in gastric cancer and provided important clues for cancer research. PMID:26039373

  8. Biased random walk model for the prioritization of drug resistance associated proteins.

    PubMed

    Guo, Hao; Dong, Jiaqiang; Hu, Sijun; Cai, Xiqiang; Tang, Guangbo; Dou, Jianhua; Tian, Miaomiao; He, Fuchu; Nie, Yongzhan; Fan, Daiming

    2015-01-01

    Multi-drug resistance is the main cause of treatment failure in cancer patients. How to identify molecules underlying drug resistance from multi-omics data remains a great challenge. Here, we introduce a data biased strategy, ProteinRank, to prioritize drug-resistance associated proteins in cancer cells. First, we identified differentially expressed proteins in Adriamycin and Vincristine resistant gastric cancer cells compared to their parental cells using iTRAQ combined with LC-MS/MS experiments, and then mapped them to human protein-protein interaction network; second, we applied ProteinRank to analyze the whole network and rank proteins similar to known drug resistance related proteins. Cross validations demonstrated a better performance of ProteinRank compared to the method without usage of MS data. Further validations confirmed the altered expressions or activities of several top ranked proteins. Functional study showed PIM3 or CAV1 silencing was sufficient to reverse the drug resistance phenotype. These results indicated ProteinRank could prioritize key proteins related to drug resistance in gastric cancer and provided important clues for cancer research. PMID:26039373

  9. Metal nanobullets for multidrug resistant bacteria and biofilms.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ching-Wen; Hsu, Chia-Yen; Lai, Syu-Ming; Syu, Wei-Jhe; Wang, Ting-Yi; Lai, Ping-Shan

    2014-11-30

    Infectious diseases were one of the major causes of mortality until now because drug-resistant bacteria have arisen under broad use and abuse of antibacterial drugs. These multidrug-resistant bacteria pose a major challenge to the effective control of bacterial infections and this threat has prompted the development of alternative strategies to treat bacterial diseases. Recently, use of metallic nanoparticles (NPs) as antibacterial agents is one of the promising strategies against bacterial drug resistance. This review first describes mechanisms of bacterial drug resistance and then focuses on the properties and applications of metallic NPs as antibiotic agents to deal with antibiotic-sensitive and -resistant bacteria. We also provide an overview of metallic NPs as bactericidal agents combating antibiotic-resistant bacteria and their potential in vivo toxicology for further drug development. PMID:25138828

  10. Synergistic effect of Myrtus communis L. essential oils and conventional antibiotics against multi-drug resistant Acinetobacter baumannii wound isolates.

    PubMed

    Aleksic, Verica; Mimica-Dukic, Neda; Simin, Natasa; Nedeljkovic, Natasa Stankovic; Knezevic, Petar

    2014-10-15

    Acinetobacter baumannii is a rapidly emerging, highly resistant clinical pathogen with increasing prevalence. In recent years, the limited number of antimicrobial agents available for treatment of infections with multi-drug resistant (MDR) strains reinforced tendency for discovery of novel antimicrobial agents or treatment strategies. The aim of the study was to determine antimicrobial effectiveness of three Myrtus communis L. essential oils, both alone and in combination with conventional antibiotics, against MDR A. baumannii wound isolates. The results obtained highlighted the occurrence of good antibacterial effect of myrtle oils when administered alone. Using checkerboard method, the combinations of subinhibitory concentrations of myrtle essential oils and conventional antibiotics, i.e. polymixin B and ciprofloxacine were examined. The results proved synergism among M. communis L. essential oils and both antibiotics against MDR A. baumannii wound isolates, with a FIC index under or equal 0.50. Combination of subinhibitory concentrations of essential oils and ciprofloxacin most frequently reduced bacterial growth in synergistic manner. The similar has been shown for combination with polymyxin B; furthermore, the myrtle essential oil resulted in re-sensitization of the MDR wound isolates, i.e. MICs used in combination were below the cut off for the sensitivity to the antibiotic. Time-kill curve method confirmed efficacy of myrtle essential oil and polymyxin B combination, with complete reduction of bacterial count after 6h. The detected synergy offers an opportunity for future development of treatment strategies for potentially lethal wound infections caused by MDR A. baumannii. PMID:25442275

  11. Drug-resistant tuberculosis can be predicted by Mycobacterial interspersed repetitive unit locus

    PubMed Central

    Yu-feng, Wen; Chao, Jiang; Xian-feng, Cheng

    2015-01-01

    It is unknown whether MIRU-VNTR (Mycobacterial Interspersed Repetitive Unit-Variable Number of Tandem Repeat) is associated with drug resistance of Mycobacterium tuberculosis. The purpose of this study was to explore the ability of 24 MIRU loci to predict the drug resistance of Isoniazid (INH), Rifampicin (RFP), Streptomycin (SM), Ethambutol (EMB) and Pyrazinamide (PZA). We collected the drug resistance and MIRU loci information of 109 strains of M. tuberculosis from an open database. The results of multivariate logistic regression showed that the VNTR polymorphism of MTUB04 was related to INH resistance [odds ratio (OR) = 2.82, P = 0.00], RFP resistance (OR = 1.91, P = 0.02), SM resistance (OR = 1.98, P = 0.01) and EMB resistance (OR = 1.95, P = 0.03). MIRU40 was associated with INH resistance (OR = 2.22, P = 0.00). MTUB21 was connected with INH resistance (OR = 1.63, P = 0.02) and SM resistance (OR = 1.69, P = 0.01). MIRU26 was correlated with SM resistance (OR = 1.52, P = 0.04). MIRU39 was associated with EMB resistance (OR = 4.07, P = 0.02). The prediction power of MIRU loci were 0.84, 0.70, 0.85, and 0.74 respectively for INH (predicted by MTUB04, MIRU20, and MTUB21), RFP (predicted by MTUB04), SM (predicted by MTUB21 and MIRU26) and EMB (MTUB04 and MIRU39) through ROC analysis. Our results showed that MIRU loci were related to anti-tuberculosis drug and could predict the drug resistance of tuberculosis. PMID:25759689

  12. Association mapping of quantitative trait loci responsible for resistance to Bacterial Leaf Streak and Spot Blotch in spring wheat landraces

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Bacterial leaf streak (BLS), caused by Xanthomonas translucens pv. undulosa, and spot blotch (SB), caused by Cochliobolus sativus are two major diseases of wheat (Triticum aestivum L.). Planting resistant cultivars is the best approach to manage these diseases and identifying new sources of resistan...

  13. Registration of Common Bacterial Blight, Rust and Bean Common Mosaic Resistant Great Northern Bean Germplasm Line ABC - Weihing

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Great northern common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) germplasm line ABC-Weihing was developed specifically for enhanced resistance to common bacterial blight (CBB), a major disease of common bean caused by the seedborne bacteria Xanthomonas campestris pv. phaseoli (Xcp) and the brown-pigmented variant...

  14. The inheritance of resistance to bacterial leaf spot of lettuce caused by Xanthomonas campestris pv. vitians in three lettuce cultivars

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Lettuce yields can be reduced by the disease bacterial leaf spot (BLS) caused by the pathogen Xanthomonas campestris pv. vitians (Xcv) and host resistance is the most feasible method to reduce disease losses. The cultivars La Brillante, Pavane, and Little Gem express an incompatible host-pathogen in...

  15. Two independent QTL in dry bean conditioning resistance to common bacterial blight express recessive epistasis when combined

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Common bacterial blight (CBB) caused by (Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. phaseoli) is a major seed-borne disease limiting commercial yield and disease-free seed production of dry bean (Phaseolus vulgaris) worldwide. Genetic resistance is the most effective control method but is difficult to incorporate b...

  16. RELEASE OF COMMON BACTERIAL BLIGHT RESISTANT PINTO BEAN GERMPLASM LINES USPT-CBB-5 AND USPT-CBB-6

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Agricultural Research Service, U.S. Department of Agriculture, and the Idaho Agricultural Experiment Station announce the release of USPT-CBB-5 and USPT-CBB-6 pinto bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) germplasm lines with high levels of resistance to common bacterial blight caused by Xanthomonas axonop...

  17. Gravitational and Space Biology 19(2) August 2006 31 INCREASED BACTERIAL RESISTANCE AND VIRULENCE IN SIMULATED MICROGRAVITY

    E-print Network

    Matin, A.C.

    can potentially pose in space. INTRODUCTION Space travel, although tantalizing, is fraught. Bone decalcification and loss are well documented in astronauts during space travel and residenceGravitational and Space Biology 19(2) August 2006 31 INCREASED BACTERIAL RESISTANCE AND VIRULENCE

  18. Validation of linked QTL for bacterial cold water disease resistance and spleen size on rainbow trout chromosome Omy19

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Bacterial cold water disease (BCWD) is caused by infection with Flavobacterium psychrophilum, and results in significant economic losses in salmonid aquaculture. Previously, we identified a major QTL for BCWD resistance and a QTL for spleen size (SPLW = spleen weight and SPLI = spleen index) in naď...

  19. Serious Bacterial Infections in Febrile Infants Younger Than 90 Days of Age: The Importance of Ampicillin-Resistant Pathogens

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Carrie L. Byington; Kristine K. Rittichier; Kathlene E. Bassett; Heidi Castillo; Tiffany S. Glasgow; Judy Daly; Andrew T. Pavia

    2010-01-01

    Background. Intrapartum antibiotic pro- phylaxis against group B Streptococcus (GBS) has re- duced the occurrence of serious bacterial infections (SBI) in young infants caused by GBS. Recommendations for initial antibiotic therapy for the febrile infant 1 to 90 days old were developed when infections with GBS were common and antibiotic resistance was rare. Objective. To document the pathogens responsible for

  20. Gamma-Glutamyl Transpeptidase: Redox Regulation and Drug Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Hanigan, Marie H.

    2015-01-01

    Expression of gamma-glutamyl transpeptidase (GGT) is essential to maintaining cysteine levels in the body. GGT is a cell surface enzyme that hydrolyzes the gamma-glutamyl bond of extracellular reduced and oxidized glutathione, initiating their cleavage into glutamate, cysteine (cystine) and glycine. GGT is normally expressed on the apical surface of ducts and glands, salvaging the amino acids from glutathione in the ductal fluids. GGT in tumors is expressed over the entire cell membrane and provides tumors with access to additional cysteine and cystine from reduced and oxidized glutathione in the blood and interstitial fluid. Cysteine is rate-limiting for glutathione synthesis in cells under oxidative stress. Induction of GGT is observed in tumors with elevated levels of intracellular glutathione. Studies in models of hepatocarcinogenesis show that GGT expression in foci of preneoplastic hepatocytes provides a selective advantage to the cells during tumor promotion with agents that deplete intracellular glutathione. Similarly, expression of GGT in tumors enables cells to maintain elevated levels of intracellular glutathione and to rapidly replenish glutathione during treatment with pro-oxidant anti-cancer therapy. In the clinic, expression of GGT in tumors is correlated with drug resistance. Inhibitors of GGT block GGT-positive tumors from accessing the cysteine in extracellular glutathione. They also inhibit GGT activity in the kidney, which results in excretion of GSH in the urine, and a rapid decrease in blood cysteine levels, leading to depletion of intracellular GSH in both GGT-positive and GGT-negative tumors. GGT inhibitors are being developed for clinical use to sensitize tumors to chemotherapy. PMID:24974180

  1. Specific Cell Targeting Therapy Bypasses Drug Resistance Mechanisms in African Trypanosomiasis.

    PubMed

    Unciti-Broceta, Juan D; Arias, José L; Maceira, José; Soriano, Miguel; Ortiz-González, Matilde; Hernández-Quero, José; Muńóz-Torres, Manuel; de Koning, Harry P; Magez, Stefan; Garcia-Salcedo, José A

    2015-06-01

    African trypanosomiasis is a deadly neglected disease caused by the extracellular parasite Trypanosoma brucei. Current therapies are characterized by high drug toxicity and increasing drug resistance mainly associated with loss-of-function mutations in the transporters involved in drug import. The introduction of new antiparasitic drugs into therapeutic use is a slow and expensive process. In contrast, specific targeting of existing drugs could represent a more rapid and cost-effective approach for neglected disease treatment, impacting through reduced systemic toxicity and circumventing resistance acquired through impaired compound uptake. We have generated nanoparticles of chitosan loaded with the trypanocidal drug pentamidine and coated by a single domain nanobody that specifically targets the surface of African trypanosomes. Once loaded into this nanocarrier, pentamidine enters trypanosomes through endocytosis instead of via classical cell surface transporters. The curative dose of pentamidine-loaded nanobody-chitosan nanoparticles was 100-fold lower than pentamidine alone in a murine model of acute African trypanosomiasis. Crucially, this new formulation displayed undiminished in vitro and in vivo activity against a trypanosome cell line resistant to pentamidine as a result of mutations in the surface transporter aquaglyceroporin 2. We conclude that this new drug delivery system increases drug efficacy and has the ability to overcome resistance to some anti-protozoal drugs. PMID:26110623

  2. Assessing resistance costs of antiretroviral therapies via measures of future drug options.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Hongyu; Deeks, Steven G; Kuritzkes, Daniel R; Lallemant, Marc; Katzenstein, David; Albrecht, Mary; DeGruttola, Victor

    2003-10-01

    The emergence of drug-resistant human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) type 1 in the setting of antiretroviral therapy failure limits the number of drugs available for use in subsequent therapy regimens. To quantify the relative HIV-1-resistance costs associated with various antiretroviral therapy strategies, we developed 2 related measures of future drug options (FDOs) by use of rule-based genotype-interpretation systems. The FDO1 metric assesses the number of drug classes that remain useful; the FDO2 metric assesses the number of drug classes that remain useful and the number of active drugs within each class. Application of these methods is illustrated with data from a randomized study of 3 therapy regimens in nucleoside analog-experienced patients. Each therapy regimen resulted in a unique pattern of drug-resistance (and cross-resistance) mutations. The regimen with the highest virologic failure rate preserved greater future drug options. Quantification of future drug options as an outcome of antiretroviral therapy trials may complement traditional clinical, virologic, and immunologic end points, thereby providing novel insights. PMID:14513420

  3. Specific Cell Targeting Therapy Bypasses Drug Resistance Mechanisms in African Trypanosomiasis

    PubMed Central

    Unciti-Broceta, Juan D.; Arias, José L.; Maceira, José; Soriano, Miguel; Ortiz-González, Matilde; Hernández-Quero, José; Muńóz-Torres, Manuel; de Koning, Harry P.; Magez, Stefan; Garcia-Salcedo, José A.

    2015-01-01

    African trypanosomiasis is a deadly neglected disease caused by the extracellular parasite Trypanosoma brucei. Current therapies are characterized by high drug toxicity and increasing drug resistance mainly associated with loss-of-function mutations in the transporters involved in drug import. The introduction of new antiparasitic drugs into therapeutic use is a slow and expensive process. In contrast, specific targeting of existing drugs could represent a more rapid and cost-effective approach for neglected disease treatment, impacting through reduced systemic toxicity and circumventing resistance acquired through impaired compound uptake. We have generated nanoparticles of chitosan loaded with the trypanocidal drug pentamidine and coated by a single domain nanobody that specifically targets the surface of African trypanosomes. Once loaded into this nanocarrier, pentamidine enters trypanosomes through endocytosis instead of via classical cell surface transporters. The curative dose of pentamidine-loaded nanobody-chitosan nanoparticles was 100-fold lower than pentamidine alone in a murine model of acute African trypanosomiasis. Crucially, this new formulation displayed undiminished in vitro and in vivo activity against a trypanosome cell line resistant to pentamidine as a result of mutations in the surface transporter aquaglyceroporin 2. We conclude that this new drug delivery system increases drug efficacy and has the ability to overcome resistance to some anti-protozoal drugs. PMID:26110623

  4. Appraising Contemporary Strategies to Combat Multidrug Resistant Gram-Negative Bacterial Infections–Proceedings and Data From the Gram-Negative Resistance Summit

    PubMed Central

    Golan, Yoav; Micek, Scott T.; Shorr, Andrew F.; Restrepo, Marcos I.

    2011-01-01

    The emerging problem of antibiotic resistance, especially among Gram-negative bacteria (GNB), has become a serious threat to global public health. Very few new antibacterial classes with activity against antibiotic-resistant GNB have been brought to market. Renewed and growing attention to the development of novel compounds targeting antibiotic-resistant GNB, as well as a better understanding of strategies aimed at preventing the spread of resistant bacterial strains and preserving the efficacy of existing antibiotic agents, has occurred. The Gram-Negative Resistance Summit convened national opinion leaders for the purpose of analyzing current literature, epidemiologic trends, clinical trial data, therapeutic options, and treatment guidelines related to the management of antibiotic-resistant GNB infections. After an in-depth analysis, the Summit investigators were surveyed with regard to 4 clinical practice statements. The results then were compared with the same survey completed by 138 infectious disease and critical care physicians and are the basis of this article. PMID:21868447

  5. Time trends in primary resistance to HIV drugs in the United Kingdom: multicentre observational study

    PubMed Central

    2005-01-01

    Objective To examine whether the level of primary resistance to HIV drugs is increasing in the United Kingdom. Design Multicentre observational study. Setting All virology laboratories in the United Kingdom carrying out tests for HIV resistance as part of routine clinical care. Participants 2357 people infected with HIV who were tested for resistance before receiving antiretroviral therapy. Main outcome measure Prevalence of drug resistance on basis of the Stanford genotypic interpretation system. Results Over the study period (February 1996 to May 2003), 335 (14.2%, 95% confidence interval 12.8% to 15.7%) samples had mutations that conferred resistance to one or more antiretroviral drugs (9.3% high level resistance, 5.9% medium level resistance). The prevalence of primary resistance has increased markedly over time, although patterns are specific to drug class; the largest increase was for non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors. In 2002-3, the prevalence of resistance to any antiretroviral drug to nucleoside or nucleotide reverse transcriptase inhibitors, to non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors, or to protease inhibitors was 19.2% (15.7% to 23.2%), 12.4% (9.5% to 15.9%), 8.1% (5.8% to 11.1%), and 6.6% (4.4% to 9.3%), respectively. The risk of primary resistance was only weakly related to most demographic and clinical factors, including ethnicity and viral subtype. Conclusions The United Kingdom has one of the highest reported rates of primary resistance to HIV drugs worldwide. Prevalence seems still to be increasing and is high in all demographic subgroups. PMID:16299012

  6. U.S. Health Officials Search for Those Exposed to Drug-Resistant TB

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Search Search MedlinePlus GO GO About MedlinePlus Site Map FAQs Contact Us Health Topics Drugs & Supplements Videos & ... resistant form of tuberculosis. The woman flew from India to Chicago in April. She then traveled to ...

  7. DRUG DISCOVERY AND RESISTANCE Antibacterial activities of dendritic amphiphiles against nontuberculous

    E-print Network

    Falkinham, Joseph

    DRUG DISCOVERY AND RESISTANCE Antibacterial activities of dendritic amphiphiles against November 2011 Accepted 4 December 2011 Keywords: Dendritic amphiphiles Nontuberculous mycobacteria Anti of nine series of dicarboxyl and tricarboxyl dendritic amphiphiles with one alkyl, two alkyl

  8. Harnessing gene expression to identify the genetic basis of drug resistance Supplementary Information

    E-print Network

    Pe'er, Dana

    . There are two parts, development and testing of the predictive model and post-linkage analysis. The predictive1 Harnessing gene expression to identify the genetic basis of drug resistance Supplementary .......................................................................................................................... 2 Triangle test

  9. Members of the conserved DedA family are likely membrane transporters and are required for drug resistance in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Sujeet; Doerrler, William T

    2014-01-01

    Bacterial resistance to antibiotics and biocides is an increasing public health problem. Genes encoding integral membrane proteins belonging to the DedA family are present in most bacterial genomes, including Escherichia coli. An E. coli strain lacking partially redundant DedA family genes yqjA and yghB (strain BC202) displays temperature sensitivity and cell division defects. These phenotypes can be corrected by overexpression of mdfA, an Na(+)-K(+)/H(+) antiporter of the major facilitator superfamily. We show that BC202 is hypersensitive to several biocides and cationic compounds that are known substrates of several multidrug resistance transporters, including MdfA, EmrE, and AcrB. The introduction of deletions of genes encoding these drug transporters into BC202 results in additional sensitivity. Expression of wild-type yghB or yqjA can restore drug resistance, but this is eliminated upon mutation of two membrane-embedded acidic amino acids (E39 or D51 in either protein). This dependence upon membrane-embedded acidic amino acids is a hallmark of proton-dependent antiporters. Overexpression of mdfA in BC202 or artificially restoring proton motive force (PMF) restores wild-type resistance to substrates of MdfA as well as other drug resistance transporters such as EmrE and AcrAB. These results suggest that YqjA and YghB may be membrane transporters required for PMF-dependent drug efflux in E. coli. PMID:24277026

  10. Assessment of Relationship Between Bacterial Stripe Resistance And Leaf Protein Bands In Rice (Oryza sativa L.) Varieties.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Talei, D.; Fotokian, M. H.

    2008-01-01

    Bacterial stripe as a new rice disease in Iran is more frequent nowadays. The objective of this study was to assessment of resistance in rice varieties together with evaluating of zymogram bands resulted from SDS PAGE electrophoresis of leaf proteins. For this purpose, 30 lines were tested in a randomized complete block design with three replications. The analysis of variance showed that there was significant difference between genotypes for resistance. Mean compare based on field results revealed that Domsiyah had the lowest resistance while Nemat and 7162 demonstrated the highest resistance. Laboratory results showed that there were significant difference between protein bands resulted from sensitive and resistance verities. Twenty bands were observed through SDS PAGE electrophoresis of leaf proteins. The 9th and 12th bands were found in sensitive varieties while were not in resistance genotypes. According to the results of this study, 7162 variety can be considered as the sources of resistance in breeding programs. Meanwhile attending to existence of 9th and 12th bands in sensitive varieties, resistance against bacterial stripe of rice maybe influenced by absence of these proteins.

  11. Yakult: a role in combating multi-drug resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa?

    PubMed

    Thomson, C H; Hassan, I; Dunn, K

    2012-11-01

    Presence of extremely drug resistant metallo-beta-lactamase (MBL VIM) Pseudomonas aeruginosa in a patient presenting with 54% deep-dermal and full-thickness flame burns to her neck, chest, upper abdomen and upper limbs, appeared to coincide with wound breakdown and non-healing. This organism was also seen to colonise the patient's gastrointestinal tract, which was thought to act as a reservoir for re-infection of her wounds. Oral treatment with a probiotic drink (Yakult yoghurt) was commenced in order to alter gut flora. Two weeks after this regimen began, P. aeruginosa grown from wound swabs was seen to change from multi-drug resistant to multi-drug sensitive strains. This change persisted through to patient discharge home from hospital. The temporal relationship seen between commencement of once-daily probiotic and change of the organism from multi-drug resistant to multi-drug sensitive suggests that this may have been an effective intervention. PMID:23413495

  12. Antimicrobial susceptibility and multi-drug resistance of Salmonella enterica subspecies enterica serovars in Sudan.

    PubMed

    Elmadiena, Mayha Mohammed Ali Nor; El Hussein, Adil Ali; Muckle, Catherine Anne; Cole, Linda; Wilkie, Elizabeth; Mistry, Ketna; Perets, Ann

    2013-06-01

    This study was undertaken to determine the antimicrobial resistance patterns of Salmonella enterica subspecies enterica recovered from human, food, water, and animal samples collected in Khartoum State, Sudan. A total of 64 Salmonella isolates belonging to 28 different serovars were tested for their susceptibility to 13 antimicrobial agents. The majority of isolates (98.4 %) were resistant to at least one antimicrobial agent. Isolates were frequently resistant to ampicillin (90.6 %), cephalexin (50.0 %), nalidixic acid (25.0 %), streptomycin (21.9 %), kanamycin (18.8 %), gentamicin (17.2 %), and co-trimoxazole and trimethoprim (12.5 %). The most common pattern of multiple drug resistance included resistance to ampicillin and cephalexin. Most isolates were sensitive to chloramphenicol (98.4 %), ciprofloxacin (93.8 %), and norfloxacin (90.6 %). Two chicken- and the two human-origin S. Kentucky isolates were resistant to both ciprofloxacin and norfloxacin. All S. Kentucky isolates and the one S. Rissen isolate demonstrated multi-drug resistance. The results indicate the significance of multi-drug-resistant Salmonella serovars isolated from chickens and other animals and foods as sources for multi-drug-resistant Salmonella in humans in Sudan. PMID:23271416

  13. NEK2 induces drug resistance mainly through activation of efflux drug pumps and is associated with poor prognosis in myeloma and other cancers.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Wen; Yang, Ye; Xia, Jiliang; Wang, He; Salama, Mohamed E; Xiong, Wei; Xu, Hongwei; Shetty, Shashirekha; Chen, Tiehua; Zeng, Zhaoyang; Shi, Lei; Zangari, Maurizio; Miles, Rodney; Bearss, David; Tricot, Guido; Zhan, Fenghuang

    2013-01-14

    Using sequential gene expression profiling (GEP) samples, we defined a major functional group related to drug resistance that contains chromosomal instability (CIN) genes. One CIN gene in particular, NEK2, was highly correlated with drug resistance, rapid relapse, and poor outcome in multiple cancers. Overexpressing NEK2 in cancer cells resulted in enhanced CIN, cell proliferation and drug resistance, while targeting NEK2 by NEK2 shRNA overcame cancer cell drug resistance and induced apoptosis in vitro and in a xenograft myeloma mouse model. High expression of NEK2 induced drug resistance mainly through activation of the efflux pumps. Thus, NEK2 represents a strong predictor for drug resistance and poor prognosis in cancer and could be an important target for cancer therapy. PMID:23328480

  14. NEK2 Induces Drug-resistance Mainly through Activation of Efflux Drug Pumps and Is Associated with Poor Prognosis in Myeloma and Other Cancers

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Wen; Yang, Ye; Xia, Jiliang; Wang, He; Salama, Mohamed E; Xiong, Wei; Xu, Hongwei; Shetty, Shashirekha; Chen, Tiehua; Zeng, Zhaoyang; Shi, Lei; Zangari, Maurizio; Miles, Rodney; Bearss, David; Tricot, Guido; Zhan, Fenghuang

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Using sequential gene expression profiling (GEP) samples, we defined a major functional group related to drug resistance that contains chromosomal instability (CIN) genes. One CIN gene in particular, NEK2, was highly correlated with drug resistance, rapid relapse, and poor outcome in multiple cancers. Over-expressing NEK2 in cancer cells resulted in enhanced CIN, cell proliferation and drug resistance, while targeting NEK2 by NEK2 shRNA overcame cancer cell drug resistance and induced apoptosis in vitro and in a xenograft myeloma mouse model. High expression of NEK2 induced drug resistance mainly through activation of the efflux pumps. Thus, NEK2 represents a strong predictor for drug resistance and poor prognosis in cancer and could be an important target for cancer therapy. PMID:23328480

  15. Genetic Diversity and Drug Resistance of Helicobacter pylori Strains

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Reza Khashei; Hasan Shojaei; Peyman Adibi; Ahmad Shavakhi; Mohammad Mehdi Aslani; Abass Daei Naser

    Objective(s) Resistance to antimicrobial agents, particularly metronidazole and clarithromycin, is frequently observed in Helicobacter pylori and may be associated with treatment failure. This resistance rate varies according to the population studied. The aim of this study was to assess the pattern of antimicrobial resistance of H. pylori isolates from dyspeptic patients in Isfahan. Materials and Methods Antral gastric biopsies from

  16. Prevalence and molecular characteristics of drug-resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis in Hunan, China.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Li-li; Chen, Yan; Chen, Zhong-nan; Liu, Hai-can; Hu, Pei-lei; Sun, Qing; Zhao, Xiu-qin; Jiang, Yi; Li, Gui-lian; Tan, Yun-hong; Wan, Kang-lin

    2014-06-01

    To determine the prevalence and molecular characteristics of drug-resistant tuberculosis in Hunan province, drug susceptibility testing and spoligotyping methods were performed among 171 M. tuberculosis isolates. In addition, the mutated characteristics of 12 loci, including katG, inhA, rpoB, rpsL, nucleotides 388 to 1084 of the rrs gene [rrs(388-1084)], embB, pncA, tlyA, eis, nucleotides 1158 to 1674 of the rrs gene [rrs(1158-1674)], gyrA, and gyrB, among drug-resistant isolates were also analyzed by DNA sequencing. Our results indicated that the prevalences of isoniazid (INH), rifampin (RIF), streptomycin (SM), ethambutol (EMB), pyrazinamide (PZA), capreomycin (CAP), kanamycin (KAN), amikacin (AKM), and ofloxacin (OFX) resistance in Hunan province were 35.7%, 26.9%, 20.5%, 9.9% 15.2%, 2.3%, 1.8%, 1.2%, and 10.5%, respectively. The previously treated patients presented significantly increased risks for developing drug resistance. The majority of M. tuberculosis isolates belonged to the Beijing family. Almost all the drug resistance results demonstrated no association with genotype. The most frequent mutations of drug-resistant isolates were katG codon 315 (katG315), inhA15, rpoB531, rpoB526, rpoB516, rpsL43, rrs514, embB306, pncA96, rrs1401, gyrA94, and gyrA90. These results contribute to the knowledge of the prevalence of drug resistance in Hunan province and also expand the molecular characteristics of drug resistance in China. PMID:24733464

  17. Drug Resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis of the Beijing Genotype Does Not Spread in Sweden

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Solomon Ghebremichael; Ramona Groenheit; Alexandra Pennhag; Tuija Koivula; Emmi Andersson; Judith Bruchfeld; Sven Hoffner; Victoria Romanus; Gunilla Källenius; Niyaz Ahmed

    2010-01-01

    BackgroundDrug resistant (DR) and multi-drug resistant (MDR) tuberculosis (TB) is increasing worldwide. In some parts of the world 10% or more of new TB cases are MDR. The Beijing genotype is a distinct genetic lineage of Mycobacterium tuberculosis, which is distributed worldwide, and has caused large outbreaks of MDR-TB. It has been proposed that certain lineages of M. tuberculosis, such

  18. Circulating microRNAs are promising novel biomarkers for drug-resistant epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jun; Tan, Lan; Tan, Lin; Tian, Yan; Ma, Jing; Tan, Chen-Chen; Wang, Hui-Fu; Liu, Ying; Tan, Meng-Shan; Jiang, Teng; Yu, Jin-Tai

    2015-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) open up a new field for molecular diagnosis for cancer and other diseases based on their stability in serum. However, the role of circulating miRNAs in plasma/serum in epilepsy diagnosis is still unclear. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether miRNAs can be used as biomarkers for drug-resistant epilepsy. We measured the differences in serum miRNA levels between 30 drug-resistant patients and 30 drug-responsive epilepsy patients in discovery and training phases using Illumina HiSeq2000 sequencing followed by quantitative reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) assays. The selected miRNAs were then validated in 77 drug-resistant epilepsy patients, 81 drug-responsive epilepsy patients and 85 healthy controls by qRT-PCR. We found that circulating miRNAs are differentially expressed between drug-resistant group and drug-responsive group. MiR-194-5p, -301a-3p, -30b-5p, -342-5p and -4446-3p were significantly deregulated in drug-resistant group compared to drug-responsive group and control group. Among these 5 miRNAs, miR-301a-3p had the best diagnostic value for drug-resistant epilepsy with 80.5% sensitivity and 81.2% specificity, and was negatively associated with seizure severity. These provide the rationale for further confirmation studies in larger prospective cohorts and in other ethnics. PMID:25984652

  19. Whole Animal Automated Platform for Drug Discovery against Multi-Drug Resistant Staphylococcus aureus

    PubMed Central

    Rajamuthiah, Rajmohan; Fuchs, Beth Burgwyn; Jayamani, Elamparithi; Kim, Younghoon; Larkins-Ford, Jonah; Conery, Annie; Ausubel, Frederick M.; Mylonakis, Eleftherios

    2014-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus, the leading cause of hospital-acquired infections in the United States, is also pathogenic to the model nematode Caenorhabditis elegans. The C. elegans-S. aureus infection model was previously carried out on solid agar plates where the bacteriovorous C. elegans feeds on a lawn of S. aureus. However, agar-based assays are not amenable to large scale screens for antibacterial compounds. We have developed a high throughput liquid screening assay that uses robotic instrumentation to dispense a precise amount of methicillin resistant S. aureus (MRSA) and worms in 384-well assay plates, followed by automated microscopy and image analysis. In validation of the liquid assay, an MRSA cell wall defective mutant, MW2?tarO, which is attenuated for killing in the agar-based assay, was found to be less virulent in the liquid assay. This robust assay with a Z’-factor consistently greater than 0.5 was utilized to screen the Biomol 4 compound library consisting of 640 small molecules with well characterized bioactivities. As proof of principle, 27 of the 30 clinically used antibiotics present in the library conferred increased C. elegans survival and were identified as hits in the screen. Surprisingly, the antihelminthic drug closantel was also identified as a hit in the screen. In further studies, we confirmed the anti-staphylococcal activity of closantel against vancomycin-resistant S. aureus isolates and other Gram-positive bacteria. The liquid C. elegans – S. aureus assay described here allows screening for anti-staphylococcal compounds that are not toxic to the host. PMID:24586584

  20. IL-1 Receptor Regulates S100A8/A9-Dependent Keratinocyte Resistance to Bacterial Invasion

    PubMed Central

    Sorenson, BS; Khammanivong, A; Guenther, BD; Ross, KF; Herzberg, MC

    2012-01-01

    Previously we reported that epithelial cells respond to exogenous IL-1? by increasing expression of several genes involved in the host response to microbes, including the antimicrobial protein complex calprotectin (S100A8/A9). Given that S100A8/A9 protects epithelial cells against invading bacteria, we studied whether IL-1? augments S100A8/A9-dependent resistance to bacterial invasion of oral keratinocytes. When inoculated with Listeria monocytogenes, human buccal epithelial (TR146) cells expressed and released IL-1?. Subsequently, IL-1?-containing media from Listeria-infected cells increased S100A8/A9 gene expression in naďve TR146 cells an IL-1 receptor (IL-1R)-dependent manner. Incubation with exogenous IL-1? decreased Listeria invasion into TR146 cells, whereas invasion increased with IL-1R antagonist. Conversely, when S100A8/A9 genes were knocked down using shRNA, TR146 cells responded to exogenous IL-1? with increased intracellular bacteria. These data strongly suggest that infected epithelial cells release IL-1? to signal neighboring keratinocytes in a paracrine manner, promoting S100A8/A9-dependent resistance to invasive L. monocytogenes. PMID:22031183

  1. Nucleotide Diversity Analysis of Three Major Bacterial Blight Resistance Genes in Rice

    PubMed Central

    Bimolata, Waikhom; Kumar, Anirudh; M, Sai Kiran Reddy; Sundaram, Raman Meenakshi; Laha, Gouri Sankar; Qureshi, Insaf Ahmed; Ghazi, Irfan Ahmad

    2015-01-01

    Nucleotide sequence polymorphisms among R gene alleles influence the process of co-evolutionary interaction between host and pathogen by shaping the response of host plants towards invading pathogens. Here, we present the DNA sequence polymorphisms and diversities present among natural alleles of three rice bacterial blight resistance genes, Xa21, Xa26 and xa5. The diversity was examined across different wild relatives and cultivars of Oryza species. Functional significance of selected alleles was evaluated through semi-quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction and real time PCR. The greatest nucleotide diversity and singleton variable sites (SVS) were present in Xa26 (? = 0.01958; SVS = 182) followed by xa5 and Xa21 alleles. The highest frequency of single nucleotide polymorphisms were observed in Xa21 alleles and least in xa5. Transition bias was observed in all the genes and ‘G’ to ‘A’ transitions were more favored than other form of transitions. Neutrality tests failed to show the presence of selection at these loci, though negative Tajima’s D values indicate the presence of a rare form of polymorphisms. At the interspecies level, O. nivara exhibited more diversity than O. sativa. We have also identified two nearly identical resistant alleles of xa5 and two sequentially identical alleles of Xa21. The alleles of xa5 showed basal levels of expression while Xa21 alleles were functionally not expressed. PMID:25807168

  2. Caenorhabditis elegans Bacterial Pathogen Resistant bus-4 Mutants Produce Altered Mucins

    PubMed Central

    Parsons, Lisa M.; Mizanur, Rahman M.; Jankowska, Ewa; Hodgkin, Jonathan; O?Rourke, Delia; Stroud, Dave; Ghosh, Salil; Cipollo, John F.

    2014-01-01

    Caenorabditis elegans bus-4 glycosyltransferase mutants are resistant to infection by Microbacterium nematophilum, Yersinia pestis and Yersinia pseudotuberculosis and have altered susceptibility to two Leucobacter species Verde1 and Verde2. Our objective in this study was to define the glycosylation changes leading to this phenotype to better understand how these changes lead to pathogen resistance. We performed MALDI-TOF MS, tandem MS and GC/MS experiments to reveal fine structural detail for the bus-4 N- and O-glycan pools. We observed dramatic changes in O-glycans and moderate ones in N-glycan pools compared to the parent strain. Ce core-I glycans, the nematode's mucin glycan equivalent, were doubled in abundance, halved in charge and bore shifts in terminal substitutions. The fucosyl O-glycans, Ce core-II and neutral fucosyl forms, were also increased in abundance as were fucosyl N-glycans. Quantitative expression analysis revealed that two mucins, let-653 and osm-8, were upregulated nearly 40 fold and also revealed was a dramatic increase in GDP-Man 4,6 dehydratease expression. We performed detailed lectin binding studies that showed changes in glycoconjugates in the surface coat, cuticle surface and intestine. The combined changes in cell surface glycoconjugate distribution, increased abundance and altered properties of mucin provide an environment where likely the above pathogens are not exposed to normal glycoconjugate dependent cues leading to barriers to these bacterial infections. PMID:25296196

  3. Resistance and resilience responses of a range of soil eukaryote and bacterial taxa to fungicide application

    PubMed Central

    Howell, Christopher C.; Hilton, Sally; Semple, Kirk T.; Bending, Gary D.

    2014-01-01

    The application of plant protection products has the potential to significantly affect soil microbial community structure and function. However, the extent to which soil microbial communities from different trophic levels exhibit resistance and resilience to such compounds remains poorly understood. The resistance and resilience responses of a range of microbial communities (bacteria, fungi, archaea, pseudomonads, and nematodes) to different concentrations of the strobilurin fungicide, azoxystrobin were studied. A significant concentration-dependent decrease, and subsequent recovery in soil dehydrogenase activity was recorded, but no significant impact on total microbial biomass was observed. Impacts on specific microbial communities were studied using small subunit (SSU) rRNA terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP) profiling using soil DNA and RNA. The application of azoxystrobin significantly affected fungal and nematode community structure and diversity but had no impact on other communities. Community impacts were more pronounced in the RNA-derived T-RFLP profiles than in the DNA-derived profiles. qPCR confirmed that azoxystrobin application significantly reduced fungal, but not bacterial, SSU rRNA gene copy number. Azoxystrobin application reduced the prevalence of ascomycete fungi, but increased the relative abundance of zygomycetes. Azoxystrobin amendment also reduced the relative abundance of nematodes in the order Enoplia, but stimulated a large increase in the relative abundance of nematodes from the order Araeolaimida. PMID:25048906

  4. Clinical and epidemiological profiles of individuals with drug-resistant tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Pedro, Heloisa da Silveira Paro; Nardi, Susilene Maria Tonelli; Pereira, Maria Izabel Ferreira; Oliveira, Rosângela Siqueira; Suffys, Philip Noel; Gomes, Harrison Magdinier; Finardi, Amanda Juliane; de Moraes, Eloise Brasil; Baptista, Ida Maria Foschiani Dias; Machado, Ricardo Luiz Dantas; Castiglioni, Lilian

    2015-01-01

    Drug-resistant tuberculosis (TB) is a growing global threat. Approximately 450,000 people developed multidrug-resistant TB worldwide in 2012 and an estimated 170,000 people died from the disease. This paper describes the sociodemographic, clinical-epidemiological and bacteriological aspects of TB and correlates these features with the distribution of anti-TB drug resistance. Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MT) cultures and drug susceptibility testing were performed according to the BACTEC MGIT 960 method. The results demonstrated that MT strains from individuals who received treatment for TB and people who were infected with human immunodeficiency virus were more resistant to TB drugs compared to other individuals (p < 0.05). Approximately half of the individuals received supervised treatment, but most drug-resistant cases were positive for pulmonary TB and exhibited positive acid-fast bacilli smears, which are complicating factors for TB control programs. Primary healthcare is the ideal level for early disease detection, but tertiary healthcare is the most common entry point for patients into the system. These factors require special attention from healthcare managers and professionals to effectively control and monitor the spread of TB drug-resistant cases. PMID:25946248

  5. Genome Analysis of the First Extensively Drug-Resistant (XDR) Mycobacterium tuberculosis in Malaysia Provides Insights into the Genetic Basis of Its Biology and Drug Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Kuan, Chee Sian; Chan, Chai Ling; Yew, Su Mei; Toh, Yue Fen; Khoo, Jia-Shiun; Chong, Jennifer; Lee, Kok Wei; Tan, Yung-Chie; Yee, Wai-Yan; Ngeow, Yun Fong; Ng, Kee Peng

    2015-01-01

    The outbreak of extensively drug-resistant tuberculosis (XDR-TB) has become an increasing problem in many TB-burdened countries. The underlying drug resistance mechanisms, including the genetic variation favored by selective pressure in the resistant population, are partially understood. Recently, the first case of XDR-TB was reported in Malaysia. However, the detailed genotype family and mechanisms of the formation of multiple drugs resistance are unknown. We sequenced the whole genome of the UM 1072388579 strain with a 2-kb insert-size library and combined with that from previously sequenced 500-bp-insert paired-end reads to produce an improved sequence with maximal sequencing coverage across the genome. In silico spoligotyping and phylogenetic analyses demonstrated that UM 1072388579 strain belongs to an ancestral-like, non-Beijing clade of East Asia lineage. This is supported by the presence of a number of lineage-specific markers, including fadD28, embA, nuoD and pks7. Polymorphism analysis showed that the drug-susceptibility profile is correlated with the pattern of resistance mutations. Mutations in drug-efflux pumps and the cell wall biogenesis pathway such as mmpL, pks and fadD genes may play an important role in survival and adaptation of this strain to its surrounding environment. In this work, fifty-seven putative promoter SNPs were identified. Among them, we identified a novel SNP located at -4 T allele of TetR/acrR promoter as an informative marker to recognize strains of East Asian lineage. Our work indicates that the UM 1072388579 harbors both classical and uncommon SNPs that allow it to escape from inhibition by many antibiotics. This study provides a strong foundation to dissect the biology and underlying resistance mechanisms of the first reported XDR M. tuberculosis in Malaysia. PMID:26110649

  6. Drug resistance of Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolates from tuberculosis lymphadenitis patients in Ethiopia

    PubMed Central

    Biadglegne, Fantahun; Tessema, Belay; Sack, Ulrich; Rodloff, Arne C.

    2014-01-01

    Background & objectives: The emergence of drug resistance tuberculosis (TB) is a significant challenge for TB control and prevention programmes, and the major problem is multidrug resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB). The present study was carried out to determine the frequency of drug resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolates among newly and retreated TB lymphadenitis patients and risk factors for acquiring this infection. Methods: Two hundred twenty five M. tuberculosis isolates from TB lymphadenitis patients who were diagnosed as new and retreated tuberculosis cases between April 2012 and May 2012 were included in this study. Isolates were tested for susceptibility to isoniazed (INH), rifampicin (RMP), streptomycin (SM), ethambutol (EMB) and pyrazinamide (PZA) using the BacT/AlerT 3D system protocol. Results: Among 225 isolates, 15 (6.7%) were resistant to at least one first line anti-TB drug. Three (1.3%) were MDR-TB. Resistance to INH, RMP, SM, and EMB was found in 8 (3.6%), 4 (1.8%), 10 (4.4%), and 4 (1.8%) isolates, respectively. Of the 212 new TB lymphadenitis cases three (1.4%) were MDR-TB. A rifampicin resistant M. tuberculosis isolate was diagnosed from smear and culture negative newly treated cases. All isolates were susceptible to PZA. Matted cervical lymph nodes were the prominent sites involved. Newly treated TB lymphadenitis patients had a greater risk for presenting resistance to anti-TB drugs (P=0.046). Interpretation & conclusions: Our study showed that TB lymphadenitis patients harboured drug resistant TB and MDR-TB, although at a low rate. Resistance was not associated with age, sex, patients’ education and contact history. Further research is required to determine transmission dynamics of drug resistant strains. PMID:25222786

  7. Antibiotic resistance genes in bacterial and bacteriophage fractions of Tunisian and Spanish wastewaters as markers to compare the antibiotic resistance patterns in each population.

    PubMed

    Colomer-Lluch, Marta; Calero-Cáceres, William; Jebri, Sihem; Hmaied, Fatma; Muniesa, Maite; Jofre, Juan

    2014-12-01

    The emergence and increased prevalence of antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs) in the environment may pose a serious global health concern. This study evaluates the abundance of several ARGs in bacterial and bacteriophage DNA via real-time qPCR in samples from five different sampling points in Tunisia; three wastewater treatment plants (WWTP 1, 2 and 3) and wastewater from two abattoirs slaughtering different animals. Results are compared with those obtained in the Barcelona area, in northeast Spain. Eight ARGs were quantified by qPCR from total and phage DNA fraction from the samples. Three ?-lactamases (bla(TEM), bla(CTX-M) cluster 1 and bla(CTX-M) cluster 9), two quinolone resistance genes (qnrA and qnrS), the mecA gene that confers resistance to methicillin in Staphylococcus aureus, the emerging armA gene, conferring resistance to aminoglycosides and sul1, the most extended gene conferring resistance to sulfonamides, were evaluated. Sul1 and bla(TEM) were the most prevalent ARGs detected at all five Tunisian sampling points, similarly with the observations in Barcelona. bla(CTX-M-9) was more prevalent than bla(CTX-M-1) both in bacterial and DNA within phage particles in all samples analysed. mecA and armA were almost absent in Tunisian waters from human or animal origin in contrast with Barcelona that showed a medium prevalence. qnrA was more prevalent than qnrS in bacterial and phage DNA from all sampling points. In conclusion, our study shows that ARGs are found in the bacterial and is reflected in the phage DNA fraction of human and animal wastewaters. The densities of each ARGs vary depending on the ARGs shed by each population and is determined by the characteristics of each area. Thus, the evaluation of ARGs in wastewaters seems to be suitable as marker reflecting the antibiotic resistance patterns of a population. PMID:25127043

  8. Drugs and immunity: cannabinoids and their role in decreased resistance to infectious disease

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Guy A. Cabral; Denise A. Dove Pettit

    1998-01-01

    Marijuana, Cannabis sativa, elicits a variety of effects in experimental animals and humans. Delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) is the major psychoactive component in marijuana. This substance has been shown, also, to be immunosuppressive and to decrease host resistance to bacterial, protozoan, and viral infections. Macrophages, T lymphocytes, and natural killer cells appear to be major targets of the immunosuppressive effects of THC.

  9. Low MITF/AXL ratio predicts early resistance to multiple targeted drugs in melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Müller, Judith; Krijgsman, Oscar; Tsoi, Jennifer; Robert, Lidia; Hugo, Willy; Song, Chunying; Kong, Xiangju; Possik, Patricia A.; Cornelissen-Steijger, Paulien D.M.; Foppen, Marnix H. Geukes; Kemper, Kristel; Goding, Colin R.; McDermott, Ultan; Blank, Christian; Haanen, John; Graeber, Thomas G.; Ribas, Antoni; Lo, Roger S.; Peeper, Daniel S.

    2015-01-01

    Increased expression of the Microphthalmia-associated transcription factor (MITF) contributes to melanoma progression and resistance to BRAF pathway inhibition. Here we show that the lack of MITF is associated with more severe resistance to a range of inhibitors, while its presence is required for robust drug responses. Both in primary and acquired resistance, MITF levels inversely correlate with the expression of several activated receptor tyrosine kinases, most frequently AXL. The MITF-low/AXL-high/drug-resistance phenotype is common among mutant BRAF and NRAS melanoma cell lines. The dichotomous behaviour of MITF in drug response is corroborated in vemurafenib-resistant biopsies, including MITF-high and -low clones in a relapsed patient. Furthermore, drug cocktails containing AXL inhibitor enhance melanoma cell elimination by BRAF or ERK inhibition. Our results demonstrate that a low MITF/AXL ratio predicts early resistance to multiple targeted drugs, and warrant clinical validation of AXL inhibitors to combat resistance of BRAF and NRAS mutant MITF-low melanomas. PMID:25502142

  10. Drug-resistant tuberculosis in the WHO European Region: an analysis of surveillance data.

    PubMed

    Zignol, Matteo; Dara, Masoud; Dean, Anna S; Falzon, Dennis; Dadu, Andrei; Kremer, Kristin; Hoffmann, Harald; Hoffner, Sven; Floyd, Katherine

    2013-12-01

    To review the latest information about levels of anti-tuberculosis (TB) drug resistance in the European Region of the World Health Organization (WHO) and time-trends in multidrug-resistant TB (resistance to isoniazid and rifampicin; MDR-TB) over the past fifteen years. We analysed data on drug resistance among new and previously treated TB cases reported from 1997 to 2012. Data are collected in surveys of representative samples of TB patients or from surveillance systems based on diagnostic drug susceptibility testing. A total of 15.7% (95% confidence limits (CI): 9.5-21.9) of new and 45.3% (95%CI: 39.2-51.5) of previously treated TB cases are estimated to have MDR-TB in the Region. Extensively drug-resistant TB (MDR-TB and resistance to fluoroquinolones and second-line injectables; XDR-TB) had been reported by 38 of the 53 countries of the region (72%). The proportion of MDR-TB cases with XDR-TB is 11.4% (95%CI: 8.6-14.2). Between 1997 and 2012, population rates of MDR-TB declined in Estonia, Latvia and Germany and increased in the United Kingdom, Sweden and Tomsk Oblasts of the Russian Federation. Surveillance of drug resistance has been strengthened in the WHO European Region, which has the highest proportions of MDR-TB and XDR-TB ever reported globally. More complete data are needed particularly from the Russian Federation. PMID:24631052

  11. Blood Brain Barrier group Multi drug resistance and P-glycoprotein efflux transporter: physiological roles and

    E-print Network

    Applebaum, David

    1 Blood Brain Barrier group Multi drug resistance and P-glycoprotein efflux transporter-binding cassette) transporter family expressed in many tissue barriers (e.g. gut, lung, blood-brain barrier of many drugs to the brain and has been the subject of intensive research in the last 10 years

  12. Control of parasitic disease using vaccines: an answer to drug resistance?

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. Vercruysse; T. P. M. Schetters; D. P. Knox; P. Willadsen; E. Claerebout

    2007-01-01

    Summary Antiparasitic drugs have been used successfully to control parasitic diseases in animals for many years, as they are safe, cheap and effective against a broad spectrum of parasites. One drawback of this success appears to be the emergence of drug resistance in many target parasites. Moreover, issues of residues in the food chain and environment have arisen, which threaten

  13. The Generality of Drug Resistance Self-Efficacy across Social Situations and Solitary Contexts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jenkins, Jeanne E.; Nolan, Heather; Rieder, Christie

    According to a recent national survey, 9 out of 10 high school students in the United States reported that they had tried alcohol at least once. Previous research has identified drug resistance self-efficacy (DRSE) as an important construct in adolescent drug use, which is the focus of this research study. A total of 361 students in grades 9-12…

  14. A Typology and Analysis of Drug Resistance Strategies of Rural Native Hawaiian Youth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Okamoto, Scott K.; Helm, Susana; Giroux, Danielle; Kaliades, Alexis; Kawano, Kaycee Nahe; Kulis, Stephen

    2010-01-01

    This study examines the drug resistance strategies described by Native Hawaiian youth residing in rural communities. Sixty-four youth from 7 middle and intermediate schools on the Island of Hawai'i participated in a series of gender-specific focus groups. Youth responded to 15 drug-related problem situations developed and validated from prior…

  15. Molecular Genetic Analysis of Multi-drug Resistance in Indian Isolates of Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Noman Siddiqi; NK Jain; Ashok Rattan; Amol Amin; VM Katoch; SK Sharma; Seyed E Hasnain

    1998-01-01

    A total of 116 isolates from patients attending the out-patient department at the All India Institute of Medical Sciences, New Delhi and the New Delhi Tuberculosis Centre, New Delhi, India were collected. They were analyzed for resistance to drugs prescribed in the treatment for tuberculosis. The drug resis- tance was initially determined by microbiological techniques. The Bactec 460TB system was

  16. Transcranial direct current stimulation in severe, drug-resistant major depression

    Microsoft Academic Search

    R. Ferrucci; M. Bortolomasi; M. Vergari; L. Tadini; B. Salvoro; M. Giacopuzzi; S. Barbieri; A. Priori

    2009-01-01

    BackgroundThough antidepressant drugs are the treatment of choice for severe major depression, a number of patients do not improve with pharmacologic treatment. This study aimed to assess the effects of transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) in patients with severe, drug-resistant depression.

  17. Tipping the balance both ways: drug resistance and virulence in Candida glabrata.

    PubMed

    Vale-Silva, Luis A; Sanglard, Dominique

    2015-06-01

    Among existing fungal pathogens, Candida glabrata is outstanding in its capacity to rapidly develop resistance to currently used antifungal agents. Resistance to the class of azoles, which are still widely used agents, varies in proportion (from 5 to 20%) depending on geographical area. Moreover, resistance to the class of echinocandins, which was introduced in the late 1990s, is rising in several institutions. The recent emergence of isolates with acquired resistance to both classes of agents is a major concern since alternative therapeutic options are scarce. Although considered less pathogenic than C. albicans, C. glabrata has still evolved specific virulence traits enabling its survival and propagation in colonized and infected hosts. Development of drug resistance is usually associated with fitness costs, and this notion is documented across several microbial species. Interestingly, azole resistance in C. glabrata has revealed the opposite. Experimental models of infection showed enhanced virulence of azole-resistant isolates. Moreover, azole resistance could be associated with specific changes in adherence properties to epithelial cells or innate immunity cells (macrophages), both of which contribute to virulence changes. Here we will summarize the current knowledge on C. glabrata drug resistance and also discuss the consequences of drug resistance acquisition on the balance between C. glabrata and its hosts. PMID:25979690

  18. The resistance of bacterial isolates from spacecraft assembly cleanrooms against physical and chemical treatments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rettberg, Petra; Kloss, Maria; Barczyk, Simon; Reitz, Guenther

    The COSPAR planetary protection guidelines define bioburden limits for spacecraft to protect solar system bodies from contamination by terrestrial life, and to protect Earth from possible life forms that may be returned from other solar system bodies. The cleaning and sterilisation methods to be selected for space hardware have to be as efficient as necessary to reach the maximal allowed bioburden limit. To be able to asses the suitability of different methods it is mandatory to investigate the physiological potential of the microbial isolates from cleanrooms. In the ESA project BioDiv the bioburden and biodiversity was determined in cleanrooms where the satellite Herschel was integrated and tested. From all bacterial isolates obtained in sev-eral measurement campaigns 30 strains were selected. Their resistance as vegetative cells was tested against different physical and chemical treatments: drying under ambient conditions, desiccation under defined relative humidity, vacuum exposure, UVC radiation exposure, freeze-thaw cycles under martian atmosphere and pressure, exposure to high and low pH values, and exposure to alcohols. The results of these tests can be summarised as follows: i) Most of the tested microorganisms from cleanrooms exhibit a certain resistance against one or more of the tested conditions. This is in contrast to strains which have already been cultured for long-periods in time under optimal laboratory conditions. They tend to loose their original resistance against different environmental parameters. ii) Different isolates from the same species can exhibit significantly different resistances. Therefore, the sole identification of microorgnisms by 16S rDNA sequencing does not give insights into their physiological potential. iii) The first hours of drying have a substantial inactiviation effect, longer periods of drying or even vacuum exposure reduce the surviving fraction only slightly more. iv) The sensitivity against UVC radiation varies between the different strains. However, those which exhibit a low resistance against other factors also tend to be quite radiation sensitive. v) The survivability of dried bacteria after exposure under martian atmsophere and pressure was comparable to the survival under ambient conditions. vi) 10 freeze-thaw cycles under martian atmosphere and pressure can be tolerated to a varying degree by all tested isolates. 6 of the isolates could not survive 100 cycles. Therefore terrestrial microorganisms unintentionally taken to the surface of Mars could survive there at least for a certain period of time. vii) Several of the isolates could tolerate exposure to pH 9 better than exposure to pH 2. viii) Dried bacteria were able to survive the exposure to alcohols (ethanol and isopropylalcohol) at least to a certain degree. The cleaning with these agents does not inactivate them sufficiently.

  19. Stimuli-responsive bacterial cellulose-g-poly(acrylic acid-co-acrylamide) hydrogels for oral controlled release drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Mohd Amin, Mohd Cairul Iqbal; Ahmad, Naveed; Pandey, Manisha; Jue Xin, Chong

    2014-10-01

    This study evaluated the potential of stimuli-responsive bacterial cellulose-g-poly(acrylic acid-co-acrylamide) hydrogels as oral controlled-release drug delivery carriers. Hydrogels were synthesized by graft copolymerization of the monomers onto bacterial cellulose (BC) fibers by using a microwave irradiation technique. The hydrogels were characterized by Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction (XRD), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). FT-IR spectroscopy confirmed the grafting. XRD showed that the crystallinity of BC was reduced by grafting, whereas an increase in the thermal stability profile was observed in TGA. SEM showed that the hydrogels exhibited a highly porous morphology, which is suitable for drug loading. The hydrogels demonstrated a pH-responsive swelling behavior, with decreased swelling in acidic media, which increased with increase in pH of the media, reaching maximum swelling at pH 7. The release profile of the hydrogels was investigated in simulated gastric fluid (SGF) and simulated intestinal fluid (SIF). The hydrogels showed lesser release in SGF than in SIF, suggesting that hydrogels may be suitable drug carriers for oral controlled release of drug delivery in the lower gastrointestinal tract. PMID:23875787

  20. Genomic insights into intrinsic and acquired drug resistance mechanisms in Achromobacter xylosoxidans.

    PubMed

    Hu, Yongfei; Zhu, Yuying; Ma, Yanan; Liu, Fei; Lu, Na; Yang, Xi; Luan, Chunguang; Yi, Yong; Zhu, Baoli

    2015-02-01

    Achromobacter xylosoxidans is an opportunistic pathogen known to be resistant to a wide range of antibiotics; however, the knowledge about the drug resistance mechanisms is limited. We used a high-throughput sequencing approach to sequence the genomes of the A. xylosoxidans type strain ATCC 27061 and a clinical isolate, A. xylosoxidans X02736, and then we used different bioinformatics tools to analyze the drug resistance genes in these bacteria. We obtained the complete genome sequence for A. xylosoxidans ATCC 27061 and the draft sequence for X02736. We predicted a total of 50 drug resistance-associated genes in the type strain, including 5 genes for ?-lactamases and 17 genes for efflux pump systems; these genes are also conserved among other A. xylosoxidans genomes. In the clinical isolate, except for the conserved resistance genes, we also identified several acquired resistance genes carried by a new transposon embedded in a novel integrative and conjugative element. Our study provides new insights into the intrinsic and acquired drug resistance mechanisms in A. xylosoxidans, which will be helpful for better understanding the physiology of A. xylosoxidans and the evolution of antibiotic resistance in this bacterium. PMID:25487802

  1. Multi-Drug Resistance among Salmonella spp. Isolated from Food Animals

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Introduction: Since the early 1990’s there has been increasing awareness and concern regarding the development of antimicrobial resistance among bacteria of public health significance. Of particular concern starting in 2000, was the emergence of multiple drug resistant (MDR) Salmonella Newport. How...

  2. Antimicrobial drug resistance in Salmonella: problems and perspectives in food- and water-borne infections

    Microsoft Academic Search

    E. John Threlfall

    2002-01-01

    Strains of Salmonella spp. with resistance to antimicrobial drugs are now widespread in both developed and developing countries. In developed countries it is now increasingly accepted that for the most part such strains are zoonotic in origin and acquire their resistance in the food-animal host before onward transmission to humans through the food chain. Of particular importance since the early

  3. Liver Int . Author manuscript Hepatitis B virus resistance to antiviral drugs: where are we going?

    E-print Network

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Liver Int . Author manuscript Page /1 7 Hepatitis B virus resistance to antiviral drugs: where hepatitis B has been made during the last decade with the development of antivirals that inhibit viral-term therapy for chronic hepatitis B. The development of resistance to nucleoside analogues has been associated

  4. Increase of Virulence and Its Phenotypic Traits in Drug-Resistant Strains of Candida albicans?

    PubMed Central

    Angiolella, Letizia; Stringaro, Anna Rita; De Bernardis, Flavia; Posteraro, Brunella; Bonito, Mariantonietta; Toccacieli, Laura; Torosantucci, Antonella; Colone, Marisa; Sanguinetti, Maurizio; Cassone, Antonio; Palamara, Anna Teresa

    2008-01-01

    There is concern about the rise of antifungal drug resistance, but little is known about comparative biological properties and pathogenicity of drug-resistant strains. We generated fluconazole (FLC; CO23RFLC)- or micafungin (FK; CO23RFK)-resistant strains of Candida albicans by treating a FLC- and FK-susceptible strain of this fungus (CO23S) with stepwise-increasing concentrations of either drug. Molecular analyses showed that CO23RFLC had acquired markedly increased expression of the drug-resistance efflux pump encoded by the MDR1 gene, whereas CO23RFK had a homozygous mutation in the FSK1 gene. These genetic modifications did not alter to any extent the growth capacity of the drug-resistant strains in vitro, either at 28°C or at 37°C, but markedly increased their experimental pathogenicity in a systemic mouse infection model, as assessed by the overall mortality and target organ invasion. Interestingly, no apparent increase in the vaginopathic potential of the strains was observed with an estrogen-dependent rat vaginal infection. The increased pathogenicity of drug-resistant strains for systemic infection was associated with a number of biochemical and physiological changes, including (i) marked cellular alterations associated with a different expression and content of major cell wall polysaccharides, (ii) more rapid and extensive hypha formation in both liquid and solid media, and (iii) increased adherence to plastic and a propensity for biofilm formation. Overall, our data demonstrate that experimentally induced resistance to antifungal drugs, irrespective of drug family, can substantially divert C. albicans biology, affecting in particular biological properties of potential relevance for deep-seated candidiasis. PMID:18180350

  5. Drug Intervention Response Predictions with PARADIGM (DIRPP) identifies drug resistant cancer cell lines and pathway mechanisms of resistance.

    PubMed

    Brubaker, Douglas; Difeo, Analisa; Chen, Yanwen; Pearl, Taylor; Zhai, Kaide; Bebek, Gurkan; Chance, Mark; Barnholtz-Sloan, Jill

    2014-01-01

    The revolution in sequencing techniques in the past decade has provided an extensive picture of the molecular mechanisms behind complex diseases such as cancer. The Cancer Cell Line Encyclopedia (CCLE) and The Cancer Genome Project (CGP) have provided an unprecedented opportunity to examine copy number, gene expression, and mutational information for over 1000 cell lines of multiple tumor types alongside IC50 values for over 150 different drugs and drug related compounds. We present a novel pipeline called DIRPP, Drug Intervention Response Predictions with PARADIGM7, which predicts a cell line's response to a drug intervention from molecular data. PARADIGM (Pathway Recognition Algorithm using Data Integration on Genomic Models) is a probabilistic graphical model used to infer patient specific genetic activity by integrating copy number and gene expression data into a factor graph model of a cellular network. We evaluated the performance of DIRPP on endometrial, ovarian, and breast cancer related cell lines from the CCLE and CGP for nine drugs. The pipeline is sensitive enough to predict the response of a cell line with accuracy and precision across datasets as high as 80 and 88% respectively. We then classify drugs by the specific pathway mechanisms governing drug response. This classification allows us to compare drugs by cellular response mechanisms rather than simply by their specific gene targets. This pipeline represents a novel approach for predicting clinical drug response and generating novel candidates for drug repurposing and repositioning. PMID:24297540

  6. Detecting virulence and drug-resistance mycobacterial phenotypes in vivo.

    PubMed

    Timmins, Graham S

    2015-06-01

    Bacterial phenotypes are predominantly studied in culture because detection of their specific metabolic pathways in the host is challenging. Development of stable-isotope breath tests, allowing in situ phenotype analyses, may endow diagnostics with new modalities based upon direct monitoring of in vivo microbial metabolism and host-pathogen phenotypic interactions. PMID:25800730

  7. In vitro Development of Chemotherapy and Targeted Therapy Drug-Resistant Cancer Cell Lines: A Practical Guide with Case Studies

    PubMed Central

    McDermott, Martina; Eustace, Alex J.; Busschots, Steven; Breen, Laura; Crown, John; Clynes, Martin; O’Donovan, Norma; Stordal, Britta

    2014-01-01

    The development of a drug-resistant cell line can take from 3 to 18?months. However, little is published on the methodology of this development process. This article will discuss key decisions to be made prior to starting resistant cell line development; the choice of parent cell line, dose of selecting agent, treatment interval, and optimizing the dose of drug for the parent cell line. Clinically relevant drug-resistant cell lines are developed by mimicking the conditions cancer patients experience during chemotherapy and cell lines display between two- and eight-fold resistance compared to their parental cell line. Doses of drug administered are low, and a pulsed treatment strategy is often used where the cells recover in drug-free media. High-level laboratory models are developed with the aim of understanding potential mechanisms of resistance to chemotherapy agents. Doses of drug are higher and escalated over time. It is common to have difficulty developing stable clinically relevant drug-resistant cell lines. A comparative selection strategy of multiple cell lines or multiple chemotherapeutic agents mitigates this risk and gives insight into which agents or type of cell line develops resistance easily. Successful selection strategies from our research are presented. Pulsed-selection produced platinum or taxane-resistant large cell lung cancer (H1299 and H460) and temozolomide-resistant melanoma (Malme-3M and HT144) cell lines. Continuous selection produced a lapatinib-resistant breast cancer cell line (HCC1954). Techniques for maintaining drug-resistant cell lines are outlined including; maintaining cells with chemotherapy, pulse treating with chemotherapy, or returning to master drug-resistant stocks. The heterogeneity of drug-resistant models produced from the same parent cell line with the same chemotherapy agent is explored with reference to P-glycoprotein. Heterogeneity in drug-resistant cell lines reflects the heterogeneity that can occur in clinical drug resistance. PMID:24639951

  8. Antiretroviral drug resistance in HIV-1 therapy-naive patients in Cuba.

    PubMed

    Pérez, Lissette; Kourí, Vivian; Alemán, Yoan; Abrahantes, Yeisel; Correa, Consuelo; Aragonés, Carlos; Martínez, Orlando; Pérez, Jorge; Fonseca, Carlos; Campos, Jorge; Álvarez, Delmis; Schrooten, Yoeri; Dekeersmaeker, Nathalie; Imbrechts, Stijn; Beheydt, Gertjan; Vinken, Lore; Soto, Yudira; Álvarez, Alina; Vandamme, Anne-Mieke; Van Laethem, Kristel

    2013-06-01

    In Cuba, antiretroviral therapy rollout started in 2001 and antiretroviral therapy coverage has reached almost 40% since then. The objectives of this study were therefore to analyze subtype distribution, and level and patterns of drug resistance in therapy-naive HIV-1 patients. Four hundred and one plasma samples were collected from HIV-1 therapy-naive patients in 2003 and in 2007-2011. HIV-1 drug resistance genotyping was performed in the pol gene and drug resistance was interpreted according to the WHO surveillance drug-resistance mutations list, version 2009. Potential impact on first-line therapy response was estimated using genotypic drug resistance interpretation systems HIVdb version 6.2.0 and Rega version 8.0.2. Phylogenetic analysis was performed using Neighbor-Joining. The majority of patients were male (84.5%), men who have sex with men (78.1%) and from Havana City (73.6%). Subtype B was the most prevalent subtype (39.3%), followed by CRF20-23-24_BG (19.5%), CRF19_cpx (18.0%) and CRF18_cpx (10.3%). Overall, 29 patients (7.2%) had evidence of drug resistance, with 4.0% (CI 1.6%-4.8%) in 2003 versus 12.5% (CI 7.2%-14.5%) in 2007-2011. A significant increase in drug resistance was observed in recently HIV-1 diagnosed patients, i.e. 14.8% (CI 8.0%-17.0%) in 2007-2011 versus 3.8% (CI 0.9%-4.7%) in 2003 (OR 3.9, CI 1.5-17.0, p=0.02). The majority of drug resistance was restricted to a single drug class (75.8%), with 55.2% patients displaying nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NRTI), 10.3% non-NRTI (NNRTI) and 10.3% protease inhibitor (PI) resistance mutations. Respectively, 20.7% and 3.4% patients carried viruses containing drug resistance mutations against NRTI+NNRTI and NRTI+NNRTI+PI. The first cases of resistance towards other drug classes than NRTI were only detected from 2008 onwards. The most frequent resistance mutations were T215Y/rev (44.8%), M41L (31.0%), M184V (17.2%) and K103N (13.8%). The median genotypic susceptibility score for the commonly prescribed first-line therapies was 2.5. This analysis emphasizes the need to perform additional surveillance studies to accurately assess the level of transmitted drug resistance in Cuba, as the extent of drug resistance might jeopardize effectiveness of first-line regimens prescribed in Cuba and might necessitate the implementation of baseline drug resistance testing. PMID:23416260

  9. Imaging the Urokinase Plasminongen Activator Receptor in Preclinical Breast Cancer Models of Acquired Drug Resistance

    PubMed Central

    LeBeau, Aaron M.; Sevillano, Natalia; King, Mandy L.; Duriseti, Sai; Murphy, Stephanie T.; Craik, Charles S.; Murphy, Laura L.; VanBrocklin, Henry F.

    2014-01-01

    Subtype-targeted therapies can have a dramatic impact on improving the quality and quantity of life for women suffering from breast cancer. Despite an initial therapeutic response, cancer recurrence and acquired drug-resistance are commonplace. Non-invasive imaging probes that identify drug-resistant lesions are urgently needed to aid in the development of novel drugs and the effective utilization of established therapies for breast cancer. The protease receptor urokinase plasminogen activator receptor (uPAR) is a target that can be exploited for non-invasive imaging. The expression of uPAR has been associated with phenotypically aggressive breast cancer and acquired drug-resistance. Acquired drug-resistance was modeled in cell lines from two different breast cancer subtypes, the uPAR negative luminal A subtype and the uPAR positive triple negative subtype cell line MDA-MB-231. MCF-7 cells, cultured to be resistant to tamoxifen (MCF-7 TamR), were found to significantly over-express uPAR compared to the parental cell line. uPAR expression was maintained when resistance was modeled in triple-negative breast cancer by generating doxorubicin and paclitaxel resistant MDA-MB-231 cells (MDA-MB-231 DoxR and MDA-MB-231 TaxR). Using the antagonistic uPAR antibody 2G10, uPAR was imaged in vivo by near-infrared (NIR) optical imaging and 111In-single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT). Tumor uptake of the 111In-SPECT probe was high in the three drug-resistant xenografts (> 46 %ID/g) and minimal in uPAR negative xenografts at 72 hours post-injection. This preclinical study demonstrates that uPAR can be targeted for imaging breast cancer models of acquired resistance leading to potential clinical applications. PMID:24505235

  10. Tuberculosis drug resistance testing by molecular methods: opportunities and challenges in resource limited settings.

    PubMed

    Abebe, Gemeda; Paasch, Fabienne; Apers, Ludwig; Rigouts, Leen; Colebunders, Robert

    2011-02-01

    One of the greatest threats to global tuberculosis (TB) control is the growing prevalence of drug-resistant bacilli. Correctly diagnosing drug-resistant TB patients is more problematic in resource-limited settings as there is no or limited infrastructure for drug susceptibility testing (DST) of TB bacilli. The conventional phenotypic DST method for TB takes weeks before declaring the results and initiating proper anti-TB treatment. Molecular DST offers advantages over the phenotypic methods mainly because of the short turnaround time. This review summarizes the different molecular DST methods for TB and discusses challenges and opportunities in implementing them in resource-limited settings. PMID:21129417

  11. Programmatically Selected Multidrug-Resistant Strains Drive the Emergence of Extensively Drug-Resistant Tuberculosis in South Africa

    PubMed Central

    Pillay, Manormoney; Klopper, Marisa; Streicher, Elizabeth M.; Coetzee, Gerrit; Trollip, Andre; Hayes, Cindy; Bosman, Marlein E.; Gey van Pittius, Nicolaas C.; Victor, Thomas C.; Gagneux, Sebastien; van Helden, Paul D.; Warren, Robin M.

    2013-01-01

    Background South Africa shows one of the highest global burdens of multidrug-resistant (MDR) and extensively drug-resistant (XDR) tuberculosis (TB). Since 2002, MDR-TB in South Africa has been treated by a standardized combination therapy, which until 2010 included ofloxacin, kanamycin, ethionamide, ethambutol and pyrazinamide. Since 2010, ethambutol has been replaced by cycloserine or terizidone. The effect of standardized treatment on the acquisition of XDR-TB is not currently known. Methods We genetically characterized a random sample of 4,667 patient isolates of drug-sensitive, MDR and XDR-TB cases collected from three South African provinces, namely, the Western Cape, Eastern Cape and KwaZulu-Natal. Drug resistance patterns of a subset of isolates were analyzed for the presence of commonly observed resistance mutations. Results Our analyses revealed a strong association between distinct strain genotypes and the emergence of XDR-TB in three neighbouring provinces of South Africa. Strains predominant in XDR-TB increased in proportion by more than 20-fold from drug-sensitive to XDR-TB and accounted for up to 95% of the XDR-TB cases. A high degree of clustering for drug resistance mutation patterns was detected. For example, the largest cluster of XDR-TB associated strains in the Eastern Cape, affecting more than 40% of all MDR patients in this province, harboured identical mutations concurrently conferring resistance to isoniazid, rifampicin, pyrazinamide, ethambutol, streptomycin, ethionamide, kanamycin, amikacin and capreomycin. Conclusions XDR-TB associated genotypes in South Africa probably were programmatically selected as a result of the standard treatment regimen being ineffective in preventing their transmission. Our findings call for an immediate adaptation of standard treatment regimens for M/XDR-TB in South Africa. PMID:24058399

  12. Targeting Mitochondrial Cell Death Pathway to Overcome Drug Resistance with a Newly Developed Iron Chelate

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Avishek Ganguly; Soumya Basu; Paramita Chakraborty; Shilpak Chatterjee; Avijit Sarkar; Mitali Chatterjee; Soumitra Kumar Choudhuri; Maxim Antopolsky

    2010-01-01

    BackgroundMulti drug resistance (MDR) or cross-resistance to multiple classes of chemotherapeutic agents is a major obstacle to successful application of chemotherapy and a basic problem in cancer biology. The multidrug resistance gene, MDR1, and its gene product P-glycoprotein (P-gp) are an important determinant of MDR. Therefore, there is an urgent need for development of novel compounds that are not substrates

  13. Antimicrobial and Herbal Drug Resistance in Enteric Bacteria Isolated from Faecal Droppings of Common House Lizard/Gecko (Hemidactylus frenatus)

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Bhoj R.; Singh, Vidya; Ebibeni, N.; Singh, Raj K.

    2013-01-01

    From 194 faecal dropping samples of common house geckos collected from offices (60), houses (88), integrated farm units (IFS,18) and hostels, guest houses, and dining rooms of different canteen/mess (HGM, 28), 326 bacterial isolates of enteric bacteria belonging to 17 genera and 34 species were detected. Escherichia coli were the most frequently (39) isolated followed by Citrobacter freundii (33), Klebsiella pneumonia (27), Salmonella indica (12), Enterobacter gergoviae (12), and Ent. agglomerans (11). Other important bacteria isolated from gecko droppings were Listonella damsela (2), Raoultella terrigena (3), S. salamae (2), S. houtenae (3), Edwardsiella tarda (4), Edwardsiella hoshinae (1), and Klebsiella oxytoca (2). Of the 223 isolates tested for antimicrobial drug sensitivity, 27 (12.1%) had multiple drug resistance (MDR). None of the salmonellae or edwardsiellae had MDR however, MDR strains were significantly more common among Escherichia spp. (P = 1.9 × 10?5) and isolates from IFS units (P = 3.58 × 10?23). The most effective herbal drug, Ageratum conyzoides extract, inhibited growth of only 27.8% of strains tested followed by ethanolic extract of Zanthoxylum rhetsa (13.9%), eucalyptus oil (5.4%), patchouli oil (5.4%), lemongrass oil (3.6%), and sandalwood oil (3.1%), and Artemisia vulgaris essential oil (3.1%). PMID:24223595

  14. Perinatal acquisition of drug-resistant HIV-1 infection: mechanisms and long-term outcome

    PubMed Central

    Delaugerre, Constance; Chaix, Marie-Laure; Blanche, Stephane; Warszawski, Josiane; Cornet, Dorine; Dollfus, Catherine; Schneider, Veronique; Burgard, Marianne; Faye, Albert; Mandelbrot, Laurent; Tubiana, Roland; Rouzioux, Christine

    2009-01-01

    Background Primary-HIV-1-infection in newborns that occurs under antiretroviral prophylaxis that is a high risk of drug-resistance acquisition. We examine the frequency and the mechanisms of resistance acquisition at the time of infection in newborns. Patients and Methods We studied HIV-1-infected infants born between 01 January 1997 and 31 December 2004 and enrolled in the ANRS-EPF cohort. HIV-1-RNA and HIV-1-DNA samples obtained perinatally from the newborn and mother were subjected to population-based and clonal analyses of drug resistance. If positive, serial samples were obtained from the child for resistance testing. Results Ninety-two HIV-1-infected infants were born during the study period. Samples were obtained from 32 mother-child pairs and from another 28 newborns. Drug resistance was detected in 12 newborns (20%): drug resistance to nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors was seen in 10 cases, non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors in two cases, and protease inhibitors in one case. For 9 children, the detection of the same resistance mutations in mothers' samples (6 among 10 available) and in newborn lymphocytes (6/8) suggests that the newborn was initially infected by a drug-resistant strain. Resistance variants were either transmitted from mother-to-child or selected during subsequent temporal exposure under suboptimal perinatal prophylaxis. Follow-up studies of the infants showed that the resistance pattern remained stable over time, regardless of antiretroviral therapy, suggesting the early cellular archiving of resistant viruses. The absence of resistance in the mother of the other three children (3/10) and neonatal lymphocytes (2/8) suggests that the newborns were infected by a wild-type strain without long-term persistence of resistance when suboptimal prophylaxis was stopped. Conclusion This study confirms the importance of early resistance genotyping of HIV-1-infected newborns. In most cases (75%), drug resistance was archived in the cellular reservoir and persisted during infancy, with or without antiretroviral treatment. This finding stresses the need for effective antiretroviral treatment of pregnant women. PMID:19765313

  15. Expression of the PXR gene in various types of cancer and drug resistance

    PubMed Central

    QIAO, ENQI; JI, MINGHUA; WU, JIANZHONG; MA, RONG; ZHANG, XIAOHUA; HE, YUEJUN; ZHA, QUANBIN; SONG, XUE; ZHU, LI-WEI; TANG, JINHAI

    2013-01-01

    Pregnane X receptor (PXR) is a member of the nuclear receptor superfamily of ligand-regulated transcription factors. PXR is a key xenobiotic receptor that regulates the expression of genes implicated in drug metabolism, detoxification and clearance, including drug metabolizing enzymes and transporters, suggesting that it is significant in the drug resistance of cancer cells. PXR is expressed in a wide range of tissues in the human body. Studies have demonstrated that PXR is expressed in a variety of tumor types, correlating not only with drug resistance but also with the cell proliferation, apoptosis and prognosis of cancer. The purpose of the present review is to provide a comprehensive review of PXR and its potential roles in multidrug resistance and the biological characteristics of PXR-positive tumors. PMID:23599746

  16. Fluorometric assay for phenotypic differentiation of drug-resistant HIV mutants

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Qinchang; Yu, Zhiqiang; Kabashima, Tsutomu; Yin, Sheng; Dragusha, Shpend; El-Mahdy, Ahmed F. M.; Ejupi, Valon; Shibata, Takayuki; Kai, Masaaki

    2015-01-01

    Convenient drug-resistance testing of viral mutants is indispensable to effective treatment of viral infection. We developed a novel fluorometric assay for phenotypic differentiation of drug-resistant mutants of human immunodeficiency virus-I protease (HIV-PR) which uses enzymatic and peptide-specific fluorescence (FL) reactions and high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) of three HIV-PR substrates. This assay protocol enables use of non-purified enzyme sources and multiple substrates for the enzymatic reaction. In this study, susceptibility of HIV mutations to drugs was evaluated by selective formation of three FL products after the enzymatic HIV-PR reaction. This proof-of-concept study indicates that the present HPLC-FL method could be an alternative to current phenotypic assays for the evaluation of HIV drug resistance. PMID:25988960

  17. Consensus Statement on Research Definitions for Drug-Resistant Tuberculosis in Children

    PubMed Central

    Seddon, James A.; Perez-Velez, Carlos M.; Schaaf, H. Simon; Furin, Jennifer J.; Marais, Ben J.; Tebruegge, Marc; Detjen, Anne; Hesseling, Anneke C.; Shah, Sarita; Adams, Lisa V.; Starke, Jeffrey R.; Swaminathan, Soumya; Becerra, Mercedes C.

    2013-01-01

    Few children with drug-resistant (DR) tuberculosis (TB) are identified, diagnosed, and given an appropriate treatment. The few studies that have described this vulnerable population have used inconsistent definitions. The World Health Organization (WHO) definitions used for adults with DR-TB and for children with drug-susceptible TB are not always appropriate for children with DR-TB. The Sentinel Project on Pediatric Drug-Resistant Tuberculosis was formed in 2011 as a network of experts and stakeholders in childhood DR-TB. An early priority was to establish standardized definitions for key parameters in order to facilitate study comparisons and the development of an evidence base to guide future clinical management. This consensus statement proposes standardized definitions to be used in research. In particular, it suggests consistent terminology, as well as definitions for measures of exposure, drug resistance testing, previous episodes and treatment, certainty of diagnosis, site and severity of disease, adverse events, and treatment outcome. PMID:23717785

  18. Primary Drug-Resistant Tuberculosis in Hanoi, Viet Nam: Present Status and Risk Factors

    PubMed Central

    Hang, Nguyen Thi Le; Maeda, Shinji; Lien, Luu Thi; Thuong, Pham Huu; Hung, Nguyen Van; Thuy, Tran Bich; Nanri, Akiko; Mizoue, Tetsuya; Hoang, Nguyen Phuong; Cuong, Vu Cao; Ngoc, Khieu Thi Thuy; Sakurada, Shinsaku; Endo, Hiroyoshi; Keicho, Naoto

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Resistance of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) to anti-tuberculosis (TB) drugs presents a serious challenge to TB control worldwide. We investigated the status of drug resistance, including multidrug-resistant (MDR) TB, and possible risk factors among newly diagnosed TB patients in Hanoi, the capital of Viet Nam. Methods Clinical and epidemiological information was collected from 506 newly diagnosed patients with sputum smear- and culture-positive TB, and 489 (96.6%) MTB isolates were subjected to conventional drug susceptibility testing, spoligotyping, and 15-locus variable numbers of tandem repeats typing. Adjusted odds ratios (aORs) were calculated to analyze the risk factors for primary drug resistance. Results Of 489 isolates, 298 (60.9%) were sensitive to all drugs tested. Resistance to isoniazid, rifampicin, streptomycin, ethambutol, and MDR accounted for 28.2%, 4.9%, 28.2%, 2.9%, and 4.5%, respectively. Of 24 isolates with rifampicin resistance, 22 (91.7%) were MDR and also resistant to streptomycin, except one case. Factors associated with isoniazid resistance included living in old urban areas, presence of the Beijing genotype, and clustered strains [aOR = 2.23, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.15–4.35; 1.91, 1.18–3.10; and 1.69, 1.06–2.69, respectively). The Beijing genotype was also associated with streptomycin resistance (aOR = 2.10, 95% CI 1.29–3.40). Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) coinfection was associated with rifampicin resistance and MDR (aOR = 5.42, 95% CI 2.07–14.14; 6.23, 2.34–16.58, respectively). Conclusion Isoniazid and streptomycin resistance was observed in more than a quarter of TB patients without treatment history in Hanoi. Transmission of isoniazid-resistant TB among younger people should be carefully monitored in urban areas, where Beijing strains and HIV coinfection are prevalent. Choosing an optimal treatment regimen on the basis of the results of drug susceptibility tests and monitoring of treatment adherence would minimize further development of drug resistance strains. PMID:23967255

  19. Induction of multiple drug resistance in HMEC-1 endothelial cells after long-term exposure to sunitinib

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Limin; Hu, Chaoquan; Di Benedetto, Mélanie; Varin, Rémi; Liu, Jielin; Wang, Li; Vannier, Jean-Pierre; Jin, Jian; Janin, Anne; Lu, He; Li, Hong

    2014-01-01

    Multiple drug resistance is still an unsolved problem in cancer therapy. Our previous study demonstrated that the chemotherapeutic drug doxorubicin (Dox) induced upregulation of P-glycoprotein (P-gp) in endothelial cells, resulting in a 20-fold increase in drug resistance and reduced efficiency of Dox treatment in a mice tumor model. In this study, we exposed human microvascular endothelial cells (HMEC-1) to sunitinib, a tyrosine kinase receptor inhibitor, to induce drug resistance. The results show that sunitinib treatment induced multiple drug resistance in these cells. They became resistant not only to sunitinib but also to Dox, paclitaxel, and vinblastine. Significant increases in P-gp (9.3-fold), ABCG2 (breast cancer resistance protein, 1.9-fold), and multidrug resistance-associated protein 1 (2.7-fold) gene transcription were found by quantitative polymerase chain reaction quantification, and their protein expression was confirmed by Western blot. These increases gave rise to an approximately five-fold increase in half maximal inhibitory concentration in these cells in response to sunitinib treatment in vitro. The inhibitors of adenosine triphosphate-binding cassette transporters did not reverse the drug resistance in sunitinib-resistant HMEC-1 cells, assumedly because of a blockage of the pump function caused by sunitinib. Our study indicates that the antiangiogenic drug sunitinib induces multiple drug resistance in endothelial cells. The induction of adenosine triphosphate-binding cassette transporters seems not to be responsible for observed multiple drug resistance, and the underlying mechanisms remain unknown. PMID:25587220

  20. Enteric Bacterial Pathogens in Children with Diarrhea in Niger: Diversity and Antimicrobial Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Moumouni, Aissatou; Gouali, Malika; Mamaty, Abdoul-Aziz; Grais, Rebecca F.

    2015-01-01

    Background Although rotavirus is the leading cause of severe diarrhea among children in sub-Saharan Africa, better knowledge of circulating enteric pathogenic bacteria and their antimicrobial resistance is crucial for prevention and treatment strategies. Methodology/Principal Findings As a part of rotavirus gastroenteritis surveillance in Maradi, Niger, we performed stool culture on a sub-population of children under 5 with moderate-to-severe diarrhea between April 2010 and March 2012. Campylobacter, Shigella and Salmonella were sought with conventional culture and biochemical methods. Shigella and Salmonella were serotyped by slide agglutination. Enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (EPEC) were screened by slide agglutination with EPEC O-typing antisera and confirmed by detection of virulence genes. Antimicrobial susceptibility was determined by disk diffusion. We enrolled 4020 children, including 230 with bloody diarrhea. At least one pathogenic bacterium was found in 28.0% of children with watery diarrhea and 42.2% with bloody diarrhea. Mixed infections were found in 10.3% of children. EPEC, Salmonella and Campylobacter spp. were similarly frequent in children with watery diarrhea (11.1%, 9.2% and 11.4% respectively) and Shigella spp. were the most frequent among children with bloody diarrhea (22.1%). The most frequent Shigella serogroup was S. flexneri (69/122, 56.5%). The most frequent Salmonella serotypes were Typhimurimum (71/355, 20.0%), Enteritidis (56/355, 15.8%) and Corvallis (46/355, 13.0%). The majority of putative EPEC isolates was confirmed to be EPEC (90/111, 81.1%). More than half of all Enterobacteriaceae were resistant to amoxicillin and co-trimoxazole. Around 13% (46/360) Salmonella exhibited an extended-spectrum beta-lactamase phenotype. Conclusions This study provides updated information on enteric bacteria diversity and antibiotic resistance in the Sahel region, where such data are scarce. Whether they are or not the causative agent of diarrhea, bacterial infections and their antibiotic resistance profiles should be closely monitored in countries like Niger where childhood malnutrition pre-disposes to severe and invasive infections. PMID:25799400