Science.gov

Sample records for bacterial endocarditis sbe

  1. Aerococcus christensenii native aortic valve subacute bacterial endocarditis (SBE) presenting as culture negative endocarditis (CNE) mimicking marantic endocarditis.

    PubMed

    Jose, Anita; Cunha, Burke A; Klein, Natalie C; Schoch, Paul E

    2014-01-01

    This is a case report of an adult who presented with apparent culture negative endocarditis (CNE) thought to be marantic endocarditis due to a B-cell lymphoproliferative disorder. This was a most perplexing case and was eventually diagnosed as subacute bacterial endocarditis (SBE) due to a rare slow growing organism. Against the diagnosis of SBE was the lack of fever, hepatomegaly, peripheral manifestations and microscopic hematuria. Also, against a diagnosis of SBE was another explanation for the patient's abnormal findings, e.g., elevated ferritin levels, elevated α1/α2 globulins on SPEP, an elevated alkaline phosphatase, flow cytometry showing B-lymphocytes expressing CD5, and a bone lesion in the right iliac. Findings compatible with both SBE and marantic endocarditis due to a B-cell lymphoproliferative disorder included an elevated ESR, and splenomegaly. Blood cultures eventually became positive during hospitalization. We report a case of native aortic valve (AV) subacute bacterial endocarditis (SBE) due to Aerococcus christensenii mimicking marantic endocarditis due to a B-cell lymphoproliferative disorder. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first reported case of native AV SBE due to A. christensenii presenting as marantic endocarditis. PMID:24341951

  2. Extracardiac manifestations of bacterial endocarditis.

    PubMed

    Heffner, J E

    1979-08-01

    Bacterial endocarditis is an elusive disease that challenges clinicians' diagnostic capabilities. Because it can present with various combinations of extravalvular signs and symptoms, the underlying primary disease can go unnoticed.A review of the various extracardiac manifestations of bacterial endocarditis suggests three main patterns by which the valvular infection can be obscured. (1) A major clinical event may be so dramatic that subtle evidence of endocarditis is overlooked. The rupture of a mycotic aneurysm may simulate a subarachnoid hemorrhage from a congenital aneurysm. (2) The symptoms of bacterial endocarditis may be constitutional complaints easily attributable to a routine, trivial illness. Symptoms of low-grade fever, myalgias, back pain and anorexia may mimic a viral syndrome. (3) Endocarditis poses a difficult diagnostic dilemma when it generates constellations of findings that are classic for other disorders. Complaints of arthritis and arthralgias accompanied by hematuria and antinuclear antibody may suggest systemic lupus erythematosus; a renal biopsy study showing diffuse proliferative glomerulonephritis may support this diagnosis. The combination of fever, petechiae, altered mental status, thrombocytopenia, azotemia and anemia may promote the diagnosis of thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura. When the protean guises of bacterial endocarditis create these clinical difficulties, errors in diagnosis occur and appropriate therapy is delayed. Keen awareness of the varied disease presentations will improve success in managing endocarditis by fostering rapid diagnosis and prompt therapy. PMID:516715

  3. [Bacterial endocarditis in Morocco].

    PubMed

    Bennis, A; Zahraoui, M; Azzouzi, L; Soulami, S; Mehadji, B A; Tahiri, A; Chraibi, N

    1995-09-01

    This retrospective study was based on 157 cases of infectious endocarditis observed in the Cardiology department of Ibn Rochd Hospital in Casablanca between January 1983 and December 1994. The mean age of the patients was 27.5 years (11 to 65 years) with a male predominance (62.8%). Infectious endocarditis was secondary to rheumatic valvular heart disease in 63.% of patients and was primary in 29.9% of cases. Mitral or mitro-aortic valve involvement was clearly predominant. A portal of entry of the infection was identified in 63% of patients. It was dental in 64% of cases. Blood cultures were positive in 42% of cases with a predominance of unclassifiable Streptococci (37.8%) and coagulase-negative Staphylococci (25.7% of cases). Echocardiography was very useful, particularly in the presence of negative blood cultures. It demonstrated specific lesions of infectious endocarditis in 73.2% of cases and revealed very large, mobile vegetations in every case complicated by systemic embolism. The clinical course was complicated by heart failure (47.8%), renal failure (14.6%) or neurological lesions (11.5%). The global mortality was 28.7%, related to refractory heart failure in most cases. PMID:8561437

  4. ECHOCARDIOGRAPHIC FINDINGS IN BACTERIAL ENDOCARDITIS

    PubMed Central

    Ibrahim, M. Mohsen; El-Said, Galal M.

    1978-01-01

    Fifteen echocardiographic recordings in nine patients with bacterial endocarditis revealed vegetations in six cases. The vegetations appeared as uneven, irregular thickening of a valve, a mass of shaggy, dense echoes attached to a leaflet or cusp, or a mass of irregular dense echoes in the cavity or outflow tract of the left ventricle. Such findings were seen only on the echocardiograms of very sick patients with severe valvular lesions. Three patients had flail mitral valves. Echocardiography was not helpful in differentiating between active and healed lesions. Problems in the identification and differential diagnosis of vegetations shown on echocardiograms are discussed. Images PMID:15216037

  5. Saccular aneurysm caused by bacterial endocarditis in a syphilitic aorta

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, W. M.; McMillan, I. K. R.; Johnson, A. M.

    1973-01-01

    Robinson, W.M., McMillan, I.K.R., and Johnson, A. M. (1973). Thorax, 529-532. Saccular aneurysm caused by bacterial endocarditis in a syphilitic aorta. The rapid development of a saccular aneurysm during successfully treated bacterial endocarditis, in an ascending aorta previously affected by syphilis which had been treated with adequate chemotherapy 15 years previously, is described. Although bacterial endocarditis does occasionally complicate syphilitic aortic valve disease, the literature does not contain any report of resulting aneurysm development. The investigation and successful surgical treatment of the case are described. Images PMID:4741460

  6. Endocarditis

    MedlinePlus

    ... page from the NHLBI on Twitter. What Is Endocarditis? Endocarditis (EN-do-kar-DI-tis) is an infection ... de-um). The condition also is called infective endocarditis (IE). The term "endocarditis" also is used to ...

  7. Endocarditis

    MedlinePlus

    ... 2015:chap 64. Fowler VG Jr, Scheld WM, Bayer AS. Endocarditis and Intravascular Infections. In: Mandell GL, ... about A.D.A.M.'s editorial policy , editorial process and privacy policy . A.D.A.M. is ...

  8. Protease production by Streptococcus sanguis associated with subacute bacterial endocarditis.

    PubMed Central

    Straus, D C

    1982-01-01

    A viridans streptococcus (Streptococcus sanguis biotype II) isolated from the blood of a patient with subacute bacterial endocarditis was examined for protease production. In broth culture, extracellular proteolytic enzymes were not produced by this organism until after the early exponential phase of growth, with maximal protease production occurring during the stationary phase. Four distinct proteases were isolated and purified from the supernatant fluids of stationary-phase cultures, employing a combination of ion-exchange column chromatography, gel filtration column chromatography, and polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. All four proteases could be eluted from a diethylaminoethyl cellulose column at a sodium chloride gradient concentration of 0.25 M but were separable by gel filtration chromatography on a Sephadex G-100 column. They varied in molecular weights as determined by gel filtration and sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis from approximately 13,000 to 230,000. All four proteases had pH optima of between 8.0 and 9.0, and two of the proteases were active against casein, human serum albumin, and gelatin but were not active against elastin and collagen. The remaining two proteases were able to degrade only casein and gelatin. These results show that S. sanguis is able to excrete maximal levels of potentially destructive enzymes when the organisms are not actively multiplying. This finding may explain some of the damage caused in heart tissue by these organisms during subacute bacterial endocarditis. Images PMID:6759404

  9. Cervical Epidural Abscess: Rare Complication of Bacterial Endocarditis with Streptococcus Viridans: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Jae-Sang; Shim, Jai-Joon; Lee, Kyeong-Seok

    2015-01-01

    Although many patients with infective endocarditis (IE) complain of joint, muscle, and back pain, infections at these sights are rare. The incidence of spinal abscess in cervical spine complicating endocarditis is very rare. Although the surgical management is the mainstay of treatment, conservative treatment can get success in selected patients. We report a patient with cervical epidural abscess due to Streptococcus viridans endocarditis. Both epidural abscess and IE were managed conservatively with intravenous antibiotics for 8 weeks, with recovery. It is important to remind spinal epidural abscess can occur in those patients with bacterial endocarditis. PMID:25883665

  10. Cervical epidural abscess: rare complication of bacterial endocarditis with streptococcus viridans: a case report.

    PubMed

    Oh, Jae-Sang; Shim, Jai-Joon; Lee, Kyeong-Seok; Doh, Jae-Won

    2015-03-01

    Although many patients with infective endocarditis (IE) complain of joint, muscle, and back pain, infections at these sights are rare. The incidence of spinal abscess in cervical spine complicating endocarditis is very rare. Although the surgical management is the mainstay of treatment, conservative treatment can get success in selected patients. We report a patient with cervical epidural abscess due to Streptococcus viridans endocarditis. Both epidural abscess and IE were managed conservatively with intravenous antibiotics for 8 weeks, with recovery. It is important to remind spinal epidural abscess can occur in those patients with bacterial endocarditis. PMID:25883665

  11. Bacterial Endocarditis Caused by Lactobacillus acidophilus Leading to Rupture of Sinus of Valsalva Aneurysm

    PubMed Central

    Loranger, Austin Mitchell; Bharatkumar, A.G.; Almassi, G. Hossein

    2016-01-01

    Lactobacillus acidophilus rarely causes bacterial endocarditis, because it usually resides in the mucosa of the vagina, gastrointestinal tract, and oropharynx. Moreover, sinus of Valsalva aneurysms are rare cardiac anomalies, either acquired or congenital. We present the case of a middle-aged man whose bacterial endocarditis, caused by Lactobacillus acidophilus, led to an aneurysmal rupture of the sinus of Valsalva into the right ventricular outflow tract. The patient underwent successful surgical repair, despite numerous complications and sequelae. PMID:27127435

  12. Is there a need for bacterial endocarditis prophylaxis in patients undergoing gastrointestinal endoscopy?

    PubMed

    Patanè, Salvatore

    2014-04-01

    Heart valve repair or replacement is a serious problem. Patients can benefit from an open dialogue between both cardiologists and gastroenterologists for the optimal effective patients care. The focused update on infective endocarditis of the American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association 2008 (ACC/AHA guidelines) and guidelines on the prevention, diagnosis, and treatment of infective endocarditis (new version 2009) of the European Society of Cardiology (ESC guidelines) describe prophylaxis against infective endocarditis (IE) as not recommended for gastroscopy and colonoscopy in the absence of active infection but increasing evidence suggests that the role of IE antibiotic prophylaxis remains a dark side of the cardio-oncology prevention. New evidences concerning infective endocarditis due to Streptococcus bovis, Streptococcus agalactiae, Enterococcus faecalis, Enterococcus faecium, Enterococcus durans, and new findings indicate that there is a need for bacterial endocarditis prophylaxis in patients undergoing gastrointestinal endoscopy especially in elderly patients and in cancer and immunocompromised patients, to avoid serious consequences. PMID:24566725

  13. Bacterial endocarditis presenting as acute vertebral osteomyelitis: 14 cases.

    PubMed

    Ninet, J; Gayet, J L; Etienne, J; Bonvoisin, B; Vignon, E; Berthou, J D; Delahaye, J P; Pasquier, J; Delaye, J; Normand, J

    1984-10-01

    Association between bacterial endocarditis (BE) and vertebral osteomyelitis (VO) has infrequently been noted. In a retrospective analysis of BE (280 cases) and VO (150 cases) 14 cases were found to have this association. There were 12 males and 2 females, ages ranging from 39 to 72 years, mean age 56.6. Blood cultures were positive for Streptococcus viridans (6 cases). Str. faecalis (4 cases), staphylococcus (2 cases), Gram negative bacteria (1 case). Organism was not isolated in one case. Fever and severe back pain antedate the diagnosis of VO 3.5 and 2.5 months. X rays films of the spine and bone scans (4 cases) revealed lumbar (6 cases) or cervical (4 cases), or dorsal (3 cases) or combined cervical and dorsal (1 case) locations. History of murmur (4 cases) and development of mitral (8 cases) or aortic (4 cases) or combined mitral and aortic (2 cases) insufficiencies were consistent with concomitant BE. Echocardiogram revealed vegetations in 6 out of 9 cases. Patients received antibiotic therapy for 3.5 months. Ten patients were cured with antibiotics only, 4 required valve replacement. One died. Thus age, sex, history of heart disease, valvular involvement, duration of symptoms prior to admission and bacteriological pictures are the same in BE with VO as in BE without VO. Survival rates are also the same if early recognition of BE and VO with prompt and prolonged antibiotic therapy may prevent severe haemodynamic or vertebral problems. PMID:6519073

  14. A controlled evaluation of the risk of bacterial endocarditis in persons with mitral-valve prolapse.

    PubMed

    Clemens, J D; Horwitz, R I; Jaffe, C C; Feinstein, A R; Stanton, B F

    1982-09-23

    The absence of controlled evidence and the high prevalence of mitral-valve prolapse have created substantial uncertainty about whether this condition is an important risk factor for bacterial endocarditis. We evaluated this risk in a case-control study of hospital inpatients who had undergone echocardiography and who lacked any known cardiovascular risk factors for endocarditis, apart from mitral-valve prolapse and isolated mitral-regurgitant murmurs. Thirteen (25 per cent) of 51 patients with endocarditis had mitral-valve prolapse, as compared with 10 (seven per cent) of the 153 matched controls without endocarditis. For the 51 matched case-control sets, the odds ratio (8.2; 95 per cent confidence interval, 2.4 to 28.4) indicated a substantially higher risk of endocarditis for people with mitral-valve prolapse than for those without it. This association remained statistically significant when parenteral drug abuse and routine antibiotic prophylaxis preceding dental work and other forms of instrumentation were taken into account. Furthermore, the risk may be higher than is indicated by this study, since 46 per cent of the controls underwent echocardiography for clinically suspected mitral-valve prolapse, suggesting an overrepresentation of mitral prolapse in the control group. The results support the contention that mitral-valve prolapse is a significant risk factor for bacterial endocarditis. PMID:7110242

  15. Native-valve bacterial endocarditis caused by Lactococcus garvieae.

    PubMed

    Vinh, Donald C; Nichol, Kimberly A; Rand, Fern; Embil, John M

    2006-09-01

    We report a case of definite Lactococcus garvieae native-valve endocarditis. The diagnosis was suspected in a patient presenting with congestive heart failure and found to have Enterococcus hirae bacteremia, with a history of L. garvieae bacteremia 1 month prior. Diagnosis was confirmed by 16S rRNA gene sequencing of the 2 isolates and the demonstration of aortic valve vegetations. PMID:16650958

  16. Incomplete endothelialisation of an Amplatzer Septal Occluder device followed by meningitis and late acute bacterial endocarditis.

    PubMed

    Białkowski, Jacek; Pawlak, Szymon; Banaszak, Paweł

    2016-04-01

    A 19-year-old woman with atrial septal defect treated percutaneously with an Amplatzer Septal Occluder 24 months earlier, who presented with a history of bacterial meningitis, was admitted with a diagnosis of endocarditis. After 6 weeks of treatment with antibiotics, the incompletely endothelialised occluder was surgically removed. The present report illustrates the need for long-term follow-up of patients who have received nitinol wire mesh occluders. PMID:26707128

  17. Left ventricular outflow tract-right atrial communication (Gerbode type defect) associated with bacterial endocarditis in a dog.

    PubMed

    Ramírez, G A; Espinosa de los Monteros, A; Rodríguez, F; Weisbrode, S E; Jaber, J R; Herráez, P

    2003-09-01

    Left ventricular (LV) outflow tract-right atrial (RA) communication associated with bacterial endocarditis is described in a 6-year-old intact male Great Pyrenees dog with a 4- to 5-day history of fever, lethargy, weight loss, severe regenerative anemia, and asplenia. Typical vegetative mural endocardial lesions were observed grossly. Histologic evaluation revealed small gram-negative coccobacilli that were consistent with Bordetella avium-like organisms. These bacteria were associated with severe endocardial inflammation characterized by neutrophilic infiltration, extensive necrosis of endocardium, and fibrin deposition. LV-RA shunt (Gerbode defect) is a rare cardiac defect in humans that can be either congenital or, more rarely, secondary to septic endocarditis, valve replacement procedures, or thoracic trauma. B. avium-like organisms causing septicemia and endocarditis in immunocompromised and asplenic human patients have been described. To our knowledge, no previous descriptions of Gerbode defect associated with bacterial endocarditis in domestic animals have been reported in veterinary literature. PMID:12949418

  18. Community-acquired multidrug-resistant Gram-negative bacterial infective endocarditis

    PubMed Central

    Naha, Sowjanya; Naha, Kushal; Acharya, Vasudev; Hande, H Manjunath; Vivek, G

    2014-01-01

    We describe two cases of bacterial endocarditis secondary to multidrug-resistant Gram-negative organisms. In both cases, the diagnosis was made in accordance with the modified Duke's criteria and confirmed by histopathological analysis. Furthermore, in both instances there were no identifiable sources of bacteraemia and no history of contact with hospital or other medical services prior to the onset of symptoms. The patients were managed in similar fashion with prolonged broad-spectrum antibiotic therapy and surgical intervention and made complete recoveries. These cases highlight Gram-negative organisms as potential agents for endocarditis, as well as expose the dissemination of such multidrug-resistant bacteria into the community. The application of an integrated medical and surgical approach and therapeutic dilemmas encountered in managing these cases are described. PMID:25096655

  19. Antibiotic-impregnated heart valve sewing rings for treatment and prophylaxis of bacterial endocarditis.

    PubMed Central

    Cimbollek, M; Nies, B; Wenz, R; Kreuter, J

    1996-01-01

    Prosthetic heart valve sewing rings were impregnated with gentamicin crobefat (EMD 46217), a poorly soluble gentamicin salt, gentamicin sulfate, and clindamycin palmitate to prevent early prosthetic endocarditis. MICs and MBCs of gentamicin and/or clindamycin were tested against several pathogens of early prosthetic endocarditis. The combination of gentamicin and clindamycin was found to be effective against most relevant bacterial pathogens. With an in vitro pharmacokinetic model, the antibacterial activity of gentamicin and clindamycin was tested against Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli. High gentamicin levels over the first 24 h were required for a strong reduction of bacterial counts of both strains. Equal amounts of gentamicin and clindamycin sustained the antibacterial effect and prevented regrowth. The most effective release curves of gentamicin and clindamycin found with an in vitro model were used for monitoring release profiles of these antibiotics from impregnated sewing rings by investigating combinations of gentamicin sulfate, gentamicin crobefat, and clindamycin palmitate. Sewing rings impregnated with 4 mg of gentamicin sulfate, 14 mg of gentamicin crobefat, and 20 mg of clindamycin palmitate gave an initial gentamicin burst and afterwards yielded a lower sustained release of gentamicin and clindamycin palmitate. These in vitro release kinetics were confirmed in vivo by pharmacokinetic analysis after intramuscular implantation of impregnated sewing ring segments. Gentamicin and active clindamycin palmitate metabolites were obtained at the implantation site for at least 2 weeks in concentrations of 3 and 5 micrograms per g of muscle, respectively. The investigated method of impregnation holds promise for revision implants after prosthetic valve endocarditis. It may also serve as a prophylactic tool for routine use against this disease. PMID:8726015

  20. Right-sided non-bacterial thrombotic endocarditis in a chronic hemodialysis patient with Muir-Torre syndrome.

    PubMed

    Singhal, S; Harty, J; Lal, S; Reeve, R S; Al Baaj, F; Kalra, P

    2001-04-01

    Endocarditis is a recognised complication ofhemodialysis. This is generally only thought of in terms of infective vegetations. We present a case of right-sided NBTE in a patient with an indwelling venous catheter who also had advanced pelvic malignancy. The unusual side of this patient's endocarditic lesions implicates a role for the venous catheter in determining the site of non-bacterial thrombus formation. It is also a reminder that endocarditis is always a risk when using central venous catheters, even after appropriate sterile precautions have been taken. PMID:11334322

  1. Klebsiella oxytoca Endocarditis With Complete Heart Block

    PubMed Central

    Ullah, Saad; Elbita, Omar; Abdelghany, Mahmoud; Tahir, Hassan; Tuli, Puneet; Alkilani, Waseem Zaid; Suri, Joshan

    2016-01-01

    Gram-negative bacterial endocarditis causes 5% of all bacterial endocarditis. Among gram-negative bacteria, Klebsiella species are rare causes of native valve endocarditis. Klebsiella oxytoca is an extremely rare subspecies that can infrequently cause endocarditis and is associated with poor outcome. We report a case of Klebsiella oxytoca endocarditis in an elderly man who initially presented with stroke but later developed sepsis and heart block secondary to endocarditis.

  2. Bacterial Endocarditis

    MedlinePlus

    ... cysoscopy and sigmoidoscopy) can increase the risk of bacteria entering the bloodstream. ... may suspect you have BE if he or she hears abnormal heart sounds with a stethoscope. Your doctor will then need ...

  3. Multiple cerebral artery occlusion due to non-bacterial thrombotic endocarditis: an autopsy case report.

    PubMed

    Nagakane, Yoshinari; Takezawa, Hidesato; Katsura, Kanade; Yamamoto, Yasumasa

    2016-03-30

    A 60-year-old man was admitted to our hospital because of vertigo and repeated vomiting, which suddenly occurred 25 hours before admission. Neurologic examination revealed Wallenberg syndrome on the left side, and brain MRI showed acute infarcts in the left lateral medulla as well as in the left internal carotid artery (ICA) territory. MR angiography did not depict the left vertebral artery (VA) and the left ICA. Despite antithrombotic treatment, he developed bulbar palsy, and then, brain herniation due to infarct growth in the left middle cerebral artery territory. He died on day 9. Histopathlogical examination found verruca involving the mitral leaflet, which was consistent with non-bacterial thrombotic endocarditis (NBTE). Atherosclerosis was also found in the systemic arteries, and there was sclerotic stenosis with calcification at the portion of piercing dulla matter in the left VA and at the cavernous segment of the left ICA. Because the cerebral emboli in the narrowed lumen presented a histologic appearance similar to that of the verruca, the diagnosis of brain embolism due to NBTE was confirmed. PMID:26960272

  4. Endocarditis and Stroke

    PubMed Central

    GRECU, Nicolae; TIU, Cristina; TERECOASA, Elena; BAJENARU, Ovidiu

    2014-01-01

    Endocarditis is an important, although less common, cause of cerebral embolism. All forms of endocarditis share an initial common pathophysiologic pathway, best illustrated by the non-bacterial thrombotic form, but also a final potential for embolization. Stroke associated with endocarditis has signifficant mortality and morbidity rates, especially due to the frequent concomitant multiple sites of brain embolization. In this article we aim to briefly review endocarditis with a focus on stroke as a complication, while also presenting case correlates from our department. PMID:25705308

  5. Daptomycin Concentrations in Valve Tissue and Vegetation in Patients with Bacterial Endocarditis

    PubMed Central

    Di Paolo, Antonello; Poletti, Roberta; Flammini, Sarah; Emdin, Michele; Ciullo, Ilaria; Tagliaferri, Enrico; Moter, Annette; Menichetti, Francesco

    2013-01-01

    In a patient with mitral-aortic native-valve Streptococcus oralis endocarditis, daptomycin concentrations in aortic and mitral valves were 8.6 and 30.8 μg/g, respectively, and 26 μg/g in the mitral vegetation. In the case of porcine-aortic-valve Staphylococcus epidermidis endocarditis, the daptomycin concentrations were 53.1 μg/g in the valve and 18.1 μg/g in perivalvular tissues. Daptomycin achieved apparently adequate tissue concentrations. S. epidermidis was eradicated, whereas Streptococcus oralis persisted, and its daptomycin MIC displayed a 4-fold increase. PMID:23089753

  6. Daptomycin concentrations in valve tissue and vegetation in patients with bacterial endocarditis.

    PubMed

    Tascini, Carlo; Di Paolo, Antonello; Poletti, Roberta; Flammini, Sarah; Emdin, Michele; Ciullo, Ilaria; Tagliaferri, Enrico; Moter, Annette; Menichetti, Francesco

    2013-01-01

    In a patient with mitral-aortic native-valve Streptococcus oralis endocarditis, daptomycin concentrations in aortic and mitral valves were 8.6 and 30.8 μg/g, respectively, and 26 μg/g in the mitral vegetation. In the case of porcine-aortic-valve Staphylococcus epidermidis endocarditis, the daptomycin concentrations were 53.1 μg/g in the valve and 18.1 μg/g in perivalvular tissues. Daptomycin achieved apparently adequate tissue concentrations. S. epidermidis was eradicated, whereas Streptococcus oralis persisted, and its daptomycin MIC displayed a 4-fold increase. PMID:23089753

  7. Correction of coagulopathy associated with non-bacterial thrombotic endocarditis (NBTE) by surgical debulking in a case of ovarian clear cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Albright, Benjamin B; Black, Jonathan D; Vilardo, Nicole; Schwartz, Peter E

    2016-08-01

    •Ovarian cancer, particularly clear cell carcinoma, creates a hypercoagulable state.•This state can predispose to non-bacterial thrombotic endocarditis (NBTE).•NBTE can embolize and cause widespread arterial infarction.•NBTE is sometimes associated with a treatment refractory disseminated coagulopathy.•Surgical removal of the primary mass can sometimes reverse the coagulopathy. PMID:27354993

  8. Prophylaxis for infective endocarditis.

    PubMed

    Gray, J D

    1987-04-01

    Although antibiotic prophylaxis for patients at risk for bacterial endocarditis has never been scientifcally tested, it is now an accepted practice in medicine. Patients at risk include all individuals with prosthetic valves, congenital or rheumatic heart disease, previous endocarditis, idiopathic hypertrophic subaortic stenosis (IHSS), and mitral valve prolapse with a holosytolic murmur. Dental, upper respiratory tract, genitourinary and gastrointestinal procedures associated with bacteremia are reviewed. New antibiotic regimens utilizing oral agents for shorter periods have recently been published and are outlined here. Patients at high risk of endocarditis (especially those with prosthetic valves) should continue to receive prophylactic antibiotics by the parenteral route. PMID:21263914

  9. Prophylaxis for Infective Endocarditis

    PubMed Central

    Gray, Jean D.

    1987-01-01

    Although antibiotic prophylaxis for patients at risk for bacterial endocarditis has never been scientifcally tested, it is now an accepted practice in medicine. Patients at risk include all individuals with prosthetic valves, congenital or rheumatic heart disease, previous endocarditis, idiopathic hypertrophic subaortic stenosis (IHSS), and mitral valve prolapse with a holosytolic murmur. Dental, upper respiratory tract, genitourinary and gastrointestinal procedures associated with bacteremia are reviewed. New antibiotic regimens utilizing oral agents for shorter periods have recently been published and are outlined here. Patients at high risk of endocarditis (especially those with prosthetic valves) should continue to receive prophylactic antibiotics by the parenteral route. PMID:21263914

  10. Obturator internus pyomyositis manifested as sciatica in a patient with subacute bacterial endocarditis: A rare case report.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Wei-Ching; Hsu, Jin-Yi; Chen, Michael Yu-Chih; Liang, Chung-Chao

    2016-07-01

    Pyomyositis is a pyogenic infection of the skeletal muscles causing myalgia and fever in patients. Hematogenous seeding engendered by persistent bacteremia and septic embolism is usually the underlying cause of the disease. Trauma, intravenous drug use, and immunodeficiency are the main predisposing factors.Obturator internus pyomyositis with sciatica has not previously been reported. We report a rare case of a patient with subacute bacterial endocarditis presenting with left buttock pain and sciatica.Computed tomography confirmed the diagnosis of obturator internus pyomyositis. The patient was discharged uneventfully after successful antibiotic treatment.The mortality rate of patients who have pyomyositis comorbid with another condition or disease is extremely high. Early diagnosis and aggressive management are imperative. PMID:27472717

  11. Non-Bacterial Thrombotic Endocarditis in a Patient with Rheumatoid Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Jung-Hye; Park, Jeong-Eun; Kim, Jang-Young

    2016-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is frequently associated with various extra-joint complications. Although rare, thromboembolic complications are associated with high morbidity and mortality. We experienced a very rare case of nonbacterial thrombotic endocarditis (NBTE) and subsequent embolic stroke in a patient with RA. A 72-year-old male with a 15-year history of RA suddenly developed neurologic symptoms of vomiting and dizziness. Brain magnetic resonance imaging revealed recently developed multiple cerebellar and cerebral lacunar infarctions. Echocardiography showed a pulsating mitral valve vegetation involving the posterior cusp of the mitral valve leaflet, which was confirmed as NBTE. Immediate anti-coagulation therapy was started. The NBTE lesion disappeared in follow-up echocardiography after 4 weeks of anti-coagulation treatment. PMID:27275182

  12. Sbe2p and Sbe22p, Two Homologous Golgi Proteins Involved in Yeast Cell Wall Formation

    PubMed Central

    Santos, Beatriz; Snyder, Michael

    2000-01-01

    The cell wall of fungal cells is important for cell integrity and cell morphogenesis and protects against harmful environmental conditions. The yeast cell wall is a complex structure consisting mainly of mannoproteins, glucan, and chitin. The molecular mechanisms by which the cell wall components are synthesized and transported to the cell surface are poorly understood. We have identified and characterized two homologous yeast proteins, Sbe2p and Sbe22p, through their suppression of a chs5 spa2 mutant strain defective in chitin synthesis and cell morphogenesis. Although sbe2 and sbe22 null mutants are viable, sbe2 sbe22 cells display several phenotypes indicative of defects in cell integrity and cell wall structure. First, sbe2 sbe22 cells display a sorbitol-remediable lysis defect at 37°C and are hypersensitive to SDS and calcofluor. Second, electron microscopic analysis reveals that sbe2 sbe22 cells have an aberrant cell wall structure with a reduced mannoprotein layer. Finally, immunofluorescence experiments reveal that in small-budded cells, sbe2 sbe22 mutants mislocalize Chs3p, a protein involved in chitin synthesis. In addition, sbe2 sbe22 diploids have a bud-site selection defect, displaying a random budding pattern. A Sbe2p–GFP fusion protein localizes to cytoplasmic patches, and Sbe2p cofractionates with Golgi proteins. Deletion of CHS5, which encodes a Golgi protein involved in the transport of Chs3p to the cell periphery, is lethal in combination with disruption of SBE2 and SBE22. Thus, we suggest a model in which Sbe2p and Sbe22p are involved in the transport of cell wall components from the Golgi apparatus to the cell surface periphery in a pathway independent of Chs5p. PMID:10679005

  13. Infective endocarditis.

    PubMed

    Holland, Thomas L; Baddour, Larry M; Bayer, Arnold S; Hoen, Bruno; Miro, Jose M; Fowler, Vance G

    2016-01-01

    Infective endocarditis (IE) is a rare, life-threatening disease that has long-lasting effects even among patients who survive and are cured. IE disproportionately affects those with underlying structural heart disease and is increasingly associated with health care contact, particularly in patients who have intravascular prosthetic material. In the setting of bacteraemia with a pathogenic organism, an infected vegetation may form as the end result of complex interactions between invading microorganisms and the host immune system. Once established, IE can involve almost any organ system in the body. The diagnosis of IE may be difficult to establish and a strategy that combines clinical, microbiological and echocardiography results has been codified in the modified Duke criteria. In cases of blood culture-negative IE, the diagnosis may be especially challenging, and novel microbiological and imaging techniques have been developed to establish its presence. Once diagnosed, IE is best managed by a multidisciplinary team with expertise in infectious diseases, cardiology and cardiac surgery. Antibiotic prophylaxis for the prevention of IE remains controversial. Efforts to develop a vaccine that targets common bacterial causes of IE are ongoing, but have not yet yielded a commercially available product. PMID:27582414

  14. Infective Endocarditis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Endocarditis? | Spanish Order a package of ID cards Web Booklets on Congenital Heart Defects These online publications ... to you or your child’s defect and concerns. Web Booklet: Adults With Congenital Heart Defects Web Booklet: ...

  15. Citrobacter freundii induced endocarditis in a yearling colt.

    PubMed

    Guidi, Eleonora E A; Thomas, Aurélie; Cadoré, Jean-Luc; Smith, Agnès Benamou

    2016-07-01

    Endocarditis is a rare pathology in horses and the clinical signs can be misleading. We describe the clinical, echocardiographic, and pathological features of Citrobacter freundii induced bacterial endocarditis in a horse. This bacterium has never been reported before as an agent of vegetative endocarditis in the horse. PMID:27429467

  16. Infective endocarditis.

    PubMed

    Ferro, José M; Fonseca, Ana Catarina

    2014-01-01

    Infective endocarditis is a serious disease of the endocardium of the heart and cardiac valves, caused by a variety of infectious agents, ranging from streptococci to rickettsia. The proportion of cases associated with rheumatic valvulopathy and dental surgery has decreased in recent years, while endocarditis associated with intravenous drug abuse, prosthetic valves, degenerative valve disease, implanted cardiac devices, and iatrogenic or nosocomial infections has emerged. Endocarditis causes constitutional, cardiac and multiorgan symptoms and signs. The central nervous system can be affected in the form of meningitis, cerebritis, encephalopathy, seizures, brain abscess, ischemic embolic stroke, mycotic aneurysm, and subarachnoid or intracerebral hemorrhage. Stroke in endocarditis is an ominous prognostic sign. Treatment of endocarditis includes prolonged appropriate antimicrobial therapy and in selected cases, cardiac surgery. In ischemic stroke associated with infective endocarditis there is no indication to start antithrombotic drugs. In previously anticoagulated patients with an ischemic stroke, oral anticoagulants should be replaced by unfractionated heparin, while in intracranial hemorrhage, all anticoagulation should be interrupted. The majority of unruptured mycotic aneurysms can be treated by antibiotics, but for ruptured aneurysms, endovascular or neurosurgical therapy is indicated. PMID:24365290

  17. Lyme endocarditis.

    PubMed

    Hidri, N; Barraud, O; de Martino, S; Garnier, F; Paraf, F; Martin, C; Sekkal, S; Laskar, M; Jaulhac, B; Ploy, M-C

    2012-12-01

    Lyme borreliosis is a common tick-borne disease with a wide variety of clinical manifestations. Cardiac involvement has been reported during both the acute phase (atrioventricular block, pericarditis) and the chronic stage (dilated cardiomyopathy), but is rare (<5%). Here we describe the first case of Borrelia afzelii Lyme endocarditis, in a 61-year-old man living in an endemic area of France. The diagnosis was confirmed by detection of B. afzelii DNA in the mitral valve by specific real-time PCR. He was treated empirically with amoxicillin for 6 weeks and remains well 12 months later. PMID:23043635

  18. Infective endocarditis.

    PubMed

    Cahill, Thomas J; Prendergast, Bernard D

    2016-02-27

    Infective endocarditis occurs worldwide, and is defined by infection of a native or prosthetic heart valve, the endocardial surface, or an indwelling cardiac device. The causes and epidemiology of the disease have evolved in recent decades with a doubling of the average patient age and an increased prevalence in patients with indwelling cardiac devices. The microbiology of the disease has also changed, and staphylococci, most often associated with health-care contact and invasive procedures, have overtaken streptococci as the most common cause of the disease. Although novel diagnostic and therapeutic strategies have emerged, 1 year mortality has not improved and remains at 30%, which is worse than for many cancers. Logistical barriers and an absence of randomised trials hinder clinical management, and longstanding controversies such as use of antibiotic prophylaxis remain unresolved. In this Seminar, we discuss clinical practice, controversies, and strategies needed to target this potentially devastating disease. PMID:26341945

  19. Tricuspid valve endocarditis during the second trimester of pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Quiñones, Joanne N; Campbell, Faunda; Coassolo, Kara M; Pytlewski, Gerald; Maran, Patricia

    2010-01-01

    Bacterial endocarditis in pregnancy is rare, usually resulting from preexisting cardiac lesions or intravenous drug use. We present an interesting case of tricuspid valve endocarditis in a pregnant woman and raise important points in the management of this condition during pregnancy.

  20. Acoustic field distribution of sawtooth wave with nonlinear SBE model

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Xiaozhou Zhang, Lue; Wang, Xiangda; Gong, Xiufen

    2015-10-28

    For precise prediction of the acoustic field distribution of extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy with an ellipsoid transducer, the nonlinear spheroidal beam equations (SBE) are employed to model acoustic wave propagation in medium. To solve the SBE model with frequency domain algorithm, boundary conditions are obtained for monochromatic and sawtooth waves based on the phase compensation. In numerical analysis, the influence of sinusoidal wave and sawtooth wave on axial pressure distributions are investigated.

  1. Platelet depletion and severity of streptococcal endocarditis

    PubMed Central

    Dall, Lawrence; Miller, Todd; Herndon, Betty; Diez, Ireneo; Dew, Michelle

    1998-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the importance of thrombocytopenia in streptococcal endocarditis using an animal model. DESIGN: A model of human septic endocarditis was established in rats (polyethylene catheters across the aortic valve and administration of Streptococcus sanguis, 5×107 colony forming units [cfu] intravenous). Thrombocytopenia at four levels was produced by antiplatelet serum. Secondary methods of producing thrombocytopenia were also evaluated. At sacrifice (96 h after platelet depletion and 72 h after infection), vegetations were removed, weighed, diluted, plated and counted. Potential mechanisms of the dose-response relationship between vegetation density and platelet count were evaluated. SETTING: Controlled research laboratory experiments. POPULATION STUDIED: Animal models of streptococcal endocarditis. MAIN RESULTS: The bacterial density of the aortic valve vegetations significantly increased as the platelet count decreased (P=0.0007). In severely thrombocytopenic animals (two-dose antiplatelet serum), data suggest increased vegetation embolism. Platelet depletion, which was minimal with chemical methods, was produced most effectively by antithrombocyte serum. Platelet surfaces in endocarditis were found to express elevated CD62p proteins (72.7% endocarditis, 34.7% control). Platelet protein fractions were evaluated in vitro by both streptocidal (P=0.19) and phagocytosis-stimulating assays. Platelet presence in mature aortic valve vegetations averaged only about 2%. CONCLUSIONS: In platelet depletion experiments using a rat model, a dose-response relationship of peripheral circulating platelet depletion to aortic valve vegetation density was found. The mechanism relating thrombocytopenia to endocarditis severity remains unresolved. PMID:22346555

  2. Infective endocarditis-experience in Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Falase, A O; Jaiyesimi, F; Iyun, A O; Attah, E B

    1976-03-01

    Ninety cases of infective endocarditis seen over a 10-year-period at University College Hospital, Ibadan, are reviewed. The peak incidence was in the third decade and rheumatic heart disease was the commonest pre-existing lesion in 59 cases with subacute endocarditis. In most cases the source of infection was not known. In 41 of the 90 cases (44%) the diagnosis was made only at autopsy. The bacterial isolation rate was low, the commonest organisms being staphylococci, streptococci, micrococci and gramnegative bacilli. The overall mortality was 70%. A plea is made for increasing awareness of the disease and prompt institution of effective treatment. PMID:941246

  3. Nosocomial valve endocarditis due to corynebacterium striatum: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Marull, Jorge; Casares, Pablo A

    2008-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus, Coagulase-negative staphylococci, and Enterococci sp. are the usual pathogens involved in nosocomial bacterial endocarditis. Corynebacterium species isolation in blood specimens is usually considered to be a contaminant. We present an interesting case of native mitral valve endocarditis in a 73 year old African American female that was diagnosed days after she was discharged from our institution. The infection was cleared with medical therapy alone. PMID:19077258

  4. Bronchogenic Carcinoma, Leukemoid Reaction, Marantic Endocarditis, and Consumptive Thrombocytopathy

    PubMed Central

    Chisholm, Joseph C.; Ireland, Charles S.; Scott, Richard N.

    1982-01-01

    This paper details the simultaneous occurrence of a severe leukemoid reaction, non-bacterial thrombotic endocarditis (NBTE) (marantic endocarditis), and a consumptive thrombocytopathy without signs of micro-angiopathic hemolysis on peripheral blood smear in a patient with terminal metastatic, undifferentiated, large cell bronchogenic carcinoma. The case is presented and the condition is discussed in detail. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2Figure 3Figure 4Figure 5 PMID:6889655

  5. Diurnal oscillation of SBE expression in sorghum endosperm

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Chuanxin; Mutisya, J.; Rosenquist, S.; Baguma, Y.; Jansson, C.

    2009-01-15

    Spatial and temporal expression patterns of the sorghum SBEI, SBEIIA and SBEIIB genes, encoding, respectively, starch branching enzyme (SBE) I, IIA and IIB, in the developing endosperm of sorghum (Sorghum bicolor) were studied. Full-length genomic and cDNA clones for sorghum was cloned and the SBEIIA cDNA was used together with gene-specific probes for sorghum SBEIIB and SBEI. In contrast to sorghum SBEIIB, which was expressed primarily in endosperm and embryo, SBEIIA was expressed also in vegetative tissues. All three genes shared a similar temporal expression profile during endosperm development, with a maximum activity at 15-24 days after pollination. This is different from barley and maize where SBEI gene activity showed a significantly later onset compared to that of SBEIIA and SBEIIB. Expression of the three SBE genes in the sorghum endosperm exhibited a diurnal rhythm during a 24-h cycle.

  6. A putative gene sbe3-rs for resistant starch mutated from SBE3 for starch branching enzyme in rice (Oryza sativa L.).

    PubMed

    Yang, Ruifang; Sun, Chunlong; Bai, Jianjiang; Luo, Zhixiang; Shi, Biao; Zhang, Jianming; Yan, Wengui; Piao, Zhongze

    2012-01-01

    Foods high in resistant starch (RS) are beneficial to prevent various diseases including diabetes, colon cancers, diarrhea and chronic renal or hepatic diseases. Elevated RS in rice is important for public health since rice is a staple food for half of the world population. A japonica mutant 'Jiangtangdao 1' (RS = 11.67%) was crossed with an indica cultivar 'Miyang 23' (RS = 0.41%). The mutant sbe3-rs that explained 60.4% of RS variation was mapped between RM6611 and RM13366 on chromosome 2 (LOD = 36) using 178 F(2) plants genotyped with 106 genome-wide polymorphic SSR markers. Using 656 plants from four F(3:4) families, sbe3-rs was fine mapped to a 573.3 Kb region between InDel 2 and InDel 6 using one STS, five SSRs and seven InDel markers. SBE3 which codes for starch branching enzyme was identified as a candidate gene within the putative region. Nine pairs of primers covering 22 exons were designed to sequence genomic DNA of the wild type for SBE3 and the mutant for sbe3-rs comparatively. Sequence analysis identified a missense mutation site where Leu-599 of the wild was changed to Pro-599 of the mutant in the SBE3 coding region. Because the point mutation resulted in the loss of a restriction enzyme site, sbe3-rs was not digested by a CAPS marker for SpeI site while SBE3 was. Co-segregation of the digestion pattern with RS content among 178 F(2) plants further supported sbe3-rs responsible for RS in rice. As a result, the CAPS marker could be used in marker-assisted breeding to develop rice cultivars with elevated RS which is otherwise difficult to accurately assess in crops. Transgenic technology should be employed for a definitive conclusion of the sbe3-rs. PMID:22937009

  7. Bartonella henselae Endocarditis in Laos – ‘The Unsought Will Go Undetected’

    PubMed Central

    Rattanavong, Sayaphet; Fournier, Pierre-Edouard; Chu, Vang; Frichitthavong, Khamthavy; Kesone, Pany; Mayxay, Mayfong; Mirabel, Mariana; Newton, Paul N.

    2014-01-01

    Background Both endocarditis and Bartonella infections are neglected public health problems, especially in rural Asia. Bartonella endocarditis has been described from wealthier countries in Asia, Japan, Korea, Thailand and India but there are no reports from poorer countries, such as the Lao PDR (Laos), probably because people have neglected to look. Methodology/Principal Findings We conducted a retrospective (2006–2012), and subsequent prospective study (2012–2013), at Mahosot Hospital, Vientiane, Laos, through liaison between the microbiology laboratory and the wards. Patients aged >1 year admitted with definite or possible endocarditis according to modified Duke criteria were included. In view of the strong suspicion of infective endocarditis, acute and convalescent sera from 30 patients with culture negative endocarditis were tested for antibodies to Brucella melitensis, Mycoplasma pneumoniae, Bartonella quintana, B. henselae, Coxiella burnetii and Legionella pneumophila. Western blot analysis using Bartonella species antigens enabled us to describe the first two Lao patients with known Bartonella henselae endocarditis. Conclusions/Significance We argue that it is likely that Bartonella endocarditis is neglected and more widespread than appreciated, as there are few laboratories in Asia able to make the diagnosis. Considering the high prevalence of rheumatic heart disease in Asia, there is remarkably little evidence on the bacterial etiology of endocarditis. Most evidence is derived from wealthy countries and investigation of the aetiology and optimal management of endocarditis in low income countries has been neglected. Interest in Bartonella as neglected pathogens is emerging, and improved methods for the rapid diagnosis of Bartonella endocarditis are needed, as it is likely that proven Bartonella endocarditis can be treated with simpler and less expensive regimens than “conventional” endocarditis and multicenter trials to optimize treatment are

  8. Gemella morbillorum Endocarditis.

    PubMed

    Ural, Serap; Gul Yurtsever, Sureyya; Ormen, Bahar; Turker, Nesrin; Kaptan, Figen; El, Sibel; Akyildiz, Zehra Ilke; Coskun, Nejat Ali

    2014-01-01

    Infective endocarditis caused by Gemella morbillorum is a rare disease. In this report 67-year-old male patient with G. morbillorum endocarditis was presented. The patient was hospitalized as he had a fever of unknown origin and in the two of the three sets of blood cultures taken at the first day of hospitalization G. morbillorum was identified. The transthoracic echogram revealed 14 × 10 mm vegetation on the aortic noncoronary cuspis. After 4 weeks of antibiotic therapy, the case was referred to the clinic of cardiovascular surgery for valve surgery. PMID:25544914

  9. Valvular Cytomegalovirus Endocarditis.

    PubMed

    Stear, Timothy J; Shersher, David; Kim, George J; Smego, Douglas R

    2016-08-01

    Endocarditis is a rare presentation for cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection. We present the case of a 49-year-old man who underwent mitral and tricuspid valve replacement for valvular CMV endocarditis. The patient's past medical history was significant for human immunodeficiency virus, intravenous drug abuse, and chronic hepatitis B. During his clinical course, he was found to have tricuspid and mitral valve vegetations. After progressive valvular destruction despite antibiotic therapy, he underwent successful mitral and tricuspid valve replacement. Pathologic analysis of the culture-negative valve specimens were found to contain inclusion bodies consistent with CMV, and quantitative serum polymerase chain reaction returned a highly elevated CMV DNA count. PMID:27449440

  10. Infective Endocarditis and Cancer Risk

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Li-Min; Wu, Jung-Nan; Lin, Cheng-Li; Day, Jen-Der; Liang, Ji-An; Liou, Li-Ren; Kao, Chia-Hung

    2016-01-01

    Abstract This study investigated the possible relationship between endocarditis and overall and individual cancer risk among study participants in Taiwan. We used data from the National Health Insurance program of Taiwan to conduct a population-based, observational, and retrospective cohort study. The case group consisted of 14,534 patients who were diagnosed with endocarditis between January 1, 2000 and December 31, 2010. For the control group, 4 patients without endocarditis were frequency matched to each endocarditis patient according to age, sex, and index year. Competing risks regression analysis was conducted to determine the effect of endocarditis on cancer risk. A large difference was noted in Charlson comorbidity index between endocarditis and nonendocarditis patients. In patients with endocarditis, the risk for developing overall cancer was significant and 119% higher than in patients without endocarditis (adjusted subhazard ratio = 2.19, 95% confidence interval = 1.98–2.42). Regarding individual cancers, in addition to head and neck, uterus, female breast and hematological malignancies, the risks of developing colorectal cancer, and some digestive tract cancers were significantly higher. Additional analyses determined that the association of cancer with endocarditis is stronger within the 1st 5 years after endocarditis diagnosis. This population-based cohort study found that patients with endocarditis are at a higher risk for colorectal cancer and other cancers in Taiwan. The risk was even higher within the 1st 5 years after endocarditis diagnosis. It suggested that endocarditis is an early marker of colorectal cancer and other cancers. The underlying mechanisms must still be explored and may account for a shared risk factor of infection in both endocarditis and malignancy. PMID:27015220

  11. Non-traumatic subdural hematoma secondary to septic brain embolism: A rare cause of unexpected death in a drug addict suffering from undiagnosed bacterial endocarditis.

    PubMed

    Geisenberger, D; Huppertz, L M; Büchsel, M; Kramer, L; Pollak, S; Grosse Perdekamp, M

    2015-12-01

    Acute subdural hematomas are mostly due to blunt traumatization of the head. In rare instances, subdural bleeding occurs without evidence of a previous trauma following spontaneous hemorrhage, e.g. from a ruptured aneurysm or an intracerebral hematoma perforating the brain surface and the arachnoid. The paper presents the morphological, microbiological and toxicological findings in a 38-year-old drug addict who was found by his partner in a dazed state. When brought to a hospital, he underwent trepanation to empty a right-sided subdural hematoma, but he died already 4h after admission. Autopsy revealed previously undiagnosed infective endocarditis of the aortic valve as well as multiple infarctions of brain, spleen and kidneys obviously caused by septic emboli. The subdural hematoma originated from a subcortical brain hemorrhage which had perforated into the subdural space. Microbiological investigation of the polypous vegetations adhering to the aortic valve revealed colonization by Streptococcus mitis and Klebsiella oxytoca. According to the toxicological analysis, no psychotropic substances had contributed to the lethal outcome. The case reported underlines that all deaths of drug addicts should be subjected to complete forensic autopsy, as apart from intoxications also natural and traumatic causes of death have to be taken into consideration. PMID:26296471

  12. [Dentistry oral hygiene and endocarditis. Pathophysiology and prophylactic therapy].

    PubMed

    Santacroce, Luigi; Cagiano, Raffaele; Carlaio, Roberto G; Del Prete, Raffaele; Bottalico, Lucrezia

    2008-10-01

    Infectious endocarditis is a cardiac pathology of bacterial, viral or more rarely mycotic origin developing on the surfaces of the endocardium or heart valves. Predisposing conditions are congenital malformations of the heart or valvular acquired alterations, as well as the presence of a valvular prosthesis. The microorganisms involved in the etiology and pathogenesis of the damage of such infection (bacterias, viruses or yeasts) determine the formation of the endocardic vegetations typical of this condition. Such lesions can be located on the valvular or the parietal endocardium and sometimes on the endothelium of a great artery. In despite of the elevated standards of instrumental investigations and therapeutic protocols, the bacterial endocarditis represents a pathology of wide interest, scientific and social, due to its high rate of incidence, morbility and mortality. Still now infectious endocarditis causes death in 20-30% of the patients. Although the significant progress on prevention of the infectious diseases and of the cross infections in dentistry practice, from the tartar ablation up to the oncologic oral surgery, still now the skills of oral hygiene and dentistry represent a potential threat for the development of an infectious endocarditis in predisposed patients. The authors, on the base of the revision of the literature and of their own clinical experience, show the etiology, pathophysiology and the clinical pictures related to such complex disease. PMID:19040131

  13. Candida parapsilosis prosthetic valve endocarditis

    PubMed Central

    Silva-Pinto, André; Ferraz, Rita; Casanova, Jorge; Sarmento, António; Santos, Lurdes

    2015-01-01

    Candida endocarditis is a rare infection associated with high mortality and morbidity. There are still some controversies about Candida endocarditis treatment, especially about the treatment duration. We report a case of a Candida parapsilosis endocarditis that presented as a lower limb ischemia. The patient was surgically treated with a cryopreserved homograft aortic replacement. We used intravenous fluconazole 800 mg as initial treatment, followed with 12 months of 400 mg fluconazole per os. The patient outcome was good. PMID:26288749

  14. Atypical presentation of infective endocarditis.

    PubMed

    Arunachalam, Karuppiah

    2016-01-01

    The HACEK group of organisms are one of the infrequent causes of infective endocarditis. Infective endocarditis should be recognized and treated promptly to prevent excessive morbidity and mortality associated with the disease. Sometimes the diagnosis is delayed due to vague and subtle presentation. Through this case report, risk factors of Cardiobacterium hominis endocarditis and its atypical presentation is illustrated to increase the recognition of infective endocarditis as one of the differential diagnosis. [Full article available at http://rimed.org/rimedicaljournal-2016-07.asp, free with no login]. PMID:27379355

  15. Embolic retinopathy due to Corynebacterium minutissimum endocarditis.

    PubMed

    Herschorn, B J; Brucker, A J

    1985-01-01

    Infective embolic retinopathy as a sequela of bacterial endocarditis is described in a 31-year-old woman with mitral valve prolapse. The infective organism, Corynebacterium minutissimum, has not been previously found to cause ocular or multisystem diseases. It is a common mucocutaneous inhabitant which causes erythrasma. In our case report both ocular involvement and septicaemia were present. The infection was confirmed by positive serial blood cultures. Mitral valve prolapse was confirmed by echocardiography. On clinical examination the retinopathy consisted of white intraretinal lesions which resolved with antibiotic therapy. By fluorescein angiography focal areas of hypofluorescence corresponding to the white fundus lesions were present. Optic disc oedema was also seen. PMID:3965026

  16. Endocarditis and biofilm-associated pili of Enterococcus faecalis

    PubMed Central

    Nallapareddy, Sreedhar R.; Singh, Kavindra V.; Sillanpää, Jouko; Garsin, Danielle A.; Höök, Magnus; Erlandsen, Stanley L.; Murray, Barbara E.

    2006-01-01

    Increasing multidrug resistance in Enterococcus faecalis, a nosocomial opportunist and common cause of bacterial endocarditis, emphasizes the need for alternative therapeutic approaches such as immunotherapy or immunoprophylaxis. In an earlier study, we demonstrated the presence of antibodies in E. faecalis endocarditis patient sera to recombinant forms of 9 E. faecalis cell wall–anchored proteins; of these, we have now characterized an in vivo–expressed locus of 3 genes and an associated sortase gene (encoding sortase C; SrtC). Here, using mutation analyses and complementation, we demonstrated that both the ebp (encoding endocarditis and biofilm-associated pili) operon and srtC are important for biofilm production of E. faecalis strain OG1RF. In addition, immunogold electron microscopy using antisera against EbpA–EbpC proteins as well as patient serum demonstrated that E. faecalis produces pleomorphic surface pili. Assembly of pili and their cell wall attachment appeared to occur via a mechanism of cross-linking of the Ebp proteins by the designated SrtC. Importantly, a nonpiliated, allelic replacement mutant was significantly attenuated in an endocarditis model. These biologically important surface pili, which are antigenic in humans during endocarditis and encoded by a ubiquitous E. faecalis operon, may be a useful immunotarget for studies aimed at prevention and/or treatment of this pathogen. PMID:17016560

  17. Endocarditis Caused by Rhodotorula Infection

    PubMed Central

    Simon, Matthew S.; Somersan, Selin; Singh, Harjot K.; Hartman, Barry; Wickes, Brian L.; Jenkins, Stephen G.; Walsh, Thomas J.

    2014-01-01

    Rhodotorula is an emerging opportunistic fungal pathogen that is rarely reported to cause endocarditis. We describe a case involving a patient who developed endocarditis due to Rhodotorula mucilaginosa and Staphylococcus epidermidis, proven by culture and histopathology. The case illustrates the unique diagnostic and therapeutic challenges relevant to Rhodotorula spp. PMID:24197888

  18. Candida endocarditis with mycotic pulmonary emboli following re-do Rastelli operation

    PubMed Central

    Wijesekera, N T; Sheppard, M N; Mullen, M J

    2004-01-01

    A case of a 19 year old patient with Candida endocarditis complicated by pulmonary infarction and pulmonary mycotic abscesses following replacement of a right ventricle to pulmonary artery homograft conduit is presented. Despite preceding hospital admissions with probable septic pulmonary emboli, diagnosis was made only after massive pulmonary haemorrhage that ultimately proved fatal. This case highlights that Candida endocarditis should be considered in patients with symptoms and signs compatible with bacterial endocarditis when blood cultures are negative, especially in the setting of congenital cardiac malformations, and illustrates the high mortality associated with delayed diagnosis. PMID:15145898

  19. Indium-111 leukocyte scintigraphic detection of myocardial abscess formation in patients with endocarditis

    SciTech Connect

    Cerqueira, M.D.; Jacobson, A.F.

    1989-05-01

    Myocardial abscess formation in patients with bacterial endocarditis in most clinical settings, especially in patients with prosthetic valves, is a primary indicator for surgical valve replacement. We report the detection of myocardial abscesses using /sup 111/In leukocyte scintigraphy in three patients with prosthetic or native valve endocarditis and nondiagnostic echocardiograms. Leukocyte scintigraphy may allow identification of myocardial abscess formation earlier than other imaging modalities.

  20. Emerging Issues in Infective Endocarditis

    PubMed Central

    Millar, Beverley C.

    2004-01-01

    Infective endocarditis, a serious infection of the endocardium of the heart, particularly the heart valves, is associated with a high degree of illness and death. It generally occurs in patients with altered and abnormal heart architecture, in combination with exposure to bacteria through trauma and other potentially high-risk activities involving transient bacteremia. Knowledge about the origins of endocarditis stems from the work of Fernel in the early 1500s, and yet this infection still presents physicians with major diagnostic and management dilemmas. Endocarditis is caused by a variety of bacteria and fungi, as well as emerging infectious agents, including Tropheryma whiplei, Bartonella spp., and Rickettsia spp. We review the evolution of endocarditis and compare its progression with discoveries in microbiology, science, and medicine. PMID:15207065

  1. Enterococcal endocarditis revisited.

    PubMed

    Pericás, J M; Zboromyrska, Y; Cervera, C; Castañeda, X; Almela, M; Garcia-de-la-Maria, C; Mestres, C; Falces, C; Quintana, E; Ninot, S; Llopis, J; Marco, F; Moreno, A; Miró, J M

    2015-01-01

    The Enterococcus species is the third main cause of infective endocarditis (IE) worldwide, and it is gaining relevance, especially among healthcare-associated cases. Patients with enterococcal IE are older and have more comorbidities than other types of IE. Classical treatment options are limited due to the emergence of high-level aminoglycosides resistance (HLAR), vancomycin resistance and multidrug resistance in some cases. Besides, few new antimicrobial alternatives have shown real efficacy, despite some of them being recommended by major guidelines (including linezolid and daptomycin). Ampicillin plus ceftriaxone 2 g iv./12 h is a good option for Enterococcus faecalis IE caused by HLAR strains, but randomized clinical trials are essential to demonstrate its efficacy for non-HLAR EFIE and to compare it with ampicillin plus short-course gentamicin. The main mechanisms of resistance and treatment options are also reviewed for other enterococcal species. PMID:26118390

  2. Candida Infective Endocarditis

    PubMed Central

    Baddley, John W.; Benjamin, Daniel K.; Patel, Mukesh; Miró, José; Athan, Eugene; Barsic, Bruno; Bouza, Emilio; Clara, Liliana; Elliott, Tom; Kanafani, Zeina; Klein, John; Lerakis, Stamatios; Levine, Donald; Spelman, Denis; Rubinstein, Ethan; Tornos, Pilar; Morris, Arthur J.; Pappas, Paul; Fowler, Vance G.; Chu, Vivian H.; Cabell, Christopher

    2009-01-01

    Purpose Candida infective endocarditis (IE) is uncommon but often fatal. Most epidemiologic data are derived from small case series or case reports. This study was conducted to explore epidemiology, treatment patterns, and outcomes of patients with Candida IE. Methods We compared 33 Candida IE cases to 2716 patients with non-fungal IE in the International Collaboration on Endocarditis - Prospective Cohort Study. Patients were enrolled and data collected from June 2000 until August 2005. Results Patients with Candida IE were more likely to have prosthetic valves (p<0.001), short term indwelling catheters (p<0.0001), and have healthcare-associated infection (p<0.001). Reasons for surgery differed between the two groups: myocardial abscess (46.7% vs. 22.2% p=0.026) and persistent positive blood cultures (33.3% vs. 9.9%, p=0.003) were more common among those with Candida IE. Mortality at discharge was higher in patients with Candida IE (30.3%) when compared to non-fungal cases (17%, p=0.046). Among Candida patients, mortality was similar in patients who received combination surgical and antifungal therapy versus antifungal therapy alone (33.3% vs. 27.8%, p=0.26). New antifungal drugs, particularly echinocandins, were used frequently. Conclusions These multi-center data suggest distinct epidemiologic features of Candida IE when compared to non-fungal cases. Indications for surgical intervention are different and mortality is increased. Newer antifungal treatment options are increasingly used. Large, multi-center studies are needed to help better define Candida IE. PMID:18283504

  3. Mitral Valve Perforation in Libman-Sacks Endocarditis: A Heart-Wrenching Case of Lupus.

    PubMed

    Aby, Elizabeth S; Rosol, Zachary; Simegn, Mengistu A

    2016-08-01

    Libman-Sacks (LS) endocarditis is one of the most common cardiac manifestations of systemic lupus erythematosus. Rarely, however, it can lead to serious complications, including severe valvular regurgitation or superimposed bacterial endocarditis. We describe the initial diagnostic challenges, clinical course, imaging studies and histopathological findings of a patient who presented with life-threatening lupus complicated by hemoptysis and respiratory failure secondary to a rare complication of LS endocarditis, acute mitral valve perforation. We review the current literature on valve perforation in the setting of LS endocarditis. In conclusion, although the disease is often asymptomatic and hemodynamically insignificant, it can result in serious and potentially fatal complications secondary to valve perforation, which may demand emergency surgical management. PMID:26976291

  4. Removal of 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium cations with bacterial biosorbents from aqueous media.

    PubMed

    Won, Sung Wook; Choi, Sun Beom; Mao, Juan; Yun, Yeoung-Sang

    2013-01-15

    This study aims to determine whether biosorption can be used for the removal of ionic liquids (ILs), especially their cationic parts, from aqueous media. As a model IL, 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium acetate ([EMIM]OAc) was used. Five types of bacterial biosorbents were prepared from fermentation wastes through chemical modification of the bacterial surface. Screening study was performed to compare the cationic [EMIM] biosorption capacity among the bacterial biosorbents, indicating that the succinated Escherichia coli biomass (SB-E) was the best biosorbent for removing [EMIM] cations. The [EMIM] biosorption performance of SB-E was evaluated in detail through various experiments. The optimal pH range for [EMIM] biosorption was from 7 to 10, and biosorption equilibrium was reached within 10 min. The maximum uptake of SB-E was also estimated to be 72.6 mg/g. Moreover, [EMIM] cations were easily desorbed from [EMIM]-sorbed SB-E by adding acetic acid. PMID:23246948

  5. Prosthetic Valve Endocarditis Caused by Bartonella quintana

    PubMed Central

    Klein, John L.; Nair, Sukumaran K.; Harrison, Tim G.; Hunt, Ian; Fry, Norman K.

    2002-01-01

    We describe the first case of Bartonella quintana endocarditis affecting a prosthetic valve in a person with no known risk factors for this infection. Bartonella should be considered as a cause of endocarditis in any clinical setting. PMID:11897074

  6. Surgical progress: surgical management of infective endocarditis.

    PubMed Central

    Mills, S A

    1982-01-01

    Infective endocarditis of bacterial or fungal origin may arise in either the left or the right heart and can involve both natural and prosthetic valves. The diagnosis is based primarily upon clinical criteria and positive blood cultures, but serial electrocardiograms, fluoroscopy, and two-dimensional echocardiograms may also be helpful. The initial treatment should consist of antibiotic therapy and is itself often adequate in effecting cure. However, careful observation during antibiotic treatment is mandatory, since the development of congestive heart failure due to valvular obstruction or destruction can be an indication for surgical intervention. Other surgical indications include a failure to respond to antibiotic therapy, pulmonary or systemic emboli, evidence of abscess involving the valvular ring (particularly prevalent with prosthetic valve endocarditis), Brucella infection, and the onset of conduction disturbances. The goals of surgical treatment are removal of infective tissue, restoration of valve function, and correction of associated mechanical disorders. The results are surprisingly good, especially for a condition of this severity. Images Fig. 2. Fig. 3. Fig. 4. Fig. 5. Fig. 6. PMID:7065743

  7. High Frequency of Tropheryma whipplei in Culture-Negative Endocarditis

    PubMed Central

    Geißdörfer, Walter; Moter, Annette; Loddenkemper, Christoph; Jansen, Andreas; Tandler, René; Morguet, Andreas J.; Fenollar, Florence; Raoult, Didier; Bogdan, Christian

    2012-01-01

    “Classical” Whipple's disease (cWD) is caused by Tropheryma whipplei and is characterized by arthropathy, weight loss, and diarrhea. T. whipplei infectious endocarditis (TWIE) is rarely reported, either in the context of cWD or as isolated TWIE without signs of systemic infection. The frequency of TWIE is unknown, and systematic studies are lacking. Here, we performed an observational cohort study on the incidence of T. whipplei infection in explanted heart valves in two German university centers. Cardiac valves from 1,135 patients were analyzed for bacterial infection using conventional culture techniques, PCR amplification of the bacterial 16S rRNA gene, and subsequent sequencing. T. whipplei-positive heart valves were confirmed by specific PCR, fluorescence in situ hybridization, immunohistochemistry, histological examination, and culture for T. whipplei. Bacterial endocarditis was diagnosed in 255 patients, with streptococci, staphylococci, and enterococci being the main pathogens. T. whipplei was the fourth most frequent pathogen, found in 16 (6.3%) cases, and clearly outnumbered Bartonella quintana, Coxiella burnetii, and members of the HACEK group (Haemophilus species, Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans, Cardiobacterium hominis, Eikenella corrodens, and Kingella kingae). In this cohort, T. whipplei was the most commonly found pathogen associated with culture-negative infective endocarditis. PMID:22135251

  8. Actinomyces naeslundii: An Uncommon Cause of Endocarditis

    PubMed Central

    Cortes, Christopher D.; Urban, Carl; Turett, Glenn

    2015-01-01

    Actinomyces rarely causes endocarditis with 25 well-described cases reported in the literature in the past 75 years. We present a case of prosthetic valve endocarditis (PVE) caused by Actinomyces naeslundii. To our knowledge, this is the first report in the literature of endocarditis due to this organism and the second report of PVE caused by Actinomyces. PMID:26697243

  9. Actinomyces naeslundii: An Uncommon Cause of Endocarditis.

    PubMed

    Cortes, Christopher D; Urban, Carl; Turett, Glenn

    2015-01-01

    Actinomyces rarely causes endocarditis with 25 well-described cases reported in the literature in the past 75 years. We present a case of prosthetic valve endocarditis (PVE) caused by Actinomyces naeslundii. To our knowledge, this is the first report in the literature of endocarditis due to this organism and the second report of PVE caused by Actinomyces. PMID:26697243

  10. Rothia dentocariosa Endocarditis: An Especially Rare Case in a Previously Healthy Man.

    PubMed

    Fridman, David; Chaudhry, Ali; Makaryus, John; Black, Karen; Makaryus, Amgad N

    2016-06-01

    Rothia dentocariosa is a rare gram-positive bacterial organism, one of the group of microbes that normally resides in the mouth and respiratory tract. R. dentocariosa rarely causes disease. Documented cases occur chiefly in patients with valvular or dental disease, or both. We report the case of a previously healthy 58-year-old man who presented with evidence of bacterial endocarditis caused by this organism-which originated from an elusive source. His endocarditis was successfully treated with mitral valve replacement and the administration of antibiotic agents. PMID:27303245

  11. Rothia dentocariosa Endocarditis: An Especially Rare Case in a Previously Healthy Man

    PubMed Central

    Chaudhry, Ali; Makaryus, John; Black, Karen; Makaryus, Amgad N.

    2016-01-01

    Rothia dentocariosa is a rare gram-positive bacterial organism, one of the group of microbes that normally resides in the mouth and respiratory tract. R. dentocariosa rarely causes disease. Documented cases occur chiefly in patients with valvular or dental disease, or both. We report the case of a previously healthy 58-year-old man who presented with evidence of bacterial endocarditis caused by this organism—which originated from an elusive source. His endocarditis was successfully treated with mitral valve replacement and the administration of antibiotic agents. PMID:27303245

  12. Bacterial endocarditis caused by Oerskovia turbata.

    PubMed

    Reller, L B; Maddoux, G L; Eckman, M R; Pappas, G

    1975-11-01

    Oerskovia turbata is a yellow, motile actinomycete, which before now has only been found in soil and has not been known to cause disease in man or animals. It was isolated from 29 cultures of blood taken during 6 months from an urban pensioner after homograft replacement of his aortic valve. The combination of ampicillin, sulfamethoxazole, and trimethoprim was lethal for O. turbata in vitro; however, antimicrobial therapy alone failed to eradicate the patient's infection. Cure was achieved after the infected homograft was replaced with a prosthetic aortic valve. Although the source of O. turbata in this patient is unknown, sterilization of homograft valves with antimicrobial solutions is difficult. Moreover, environmental contamination during cardiopulmonary bypass is common. Oerskovia turbata is another opportunistic pathogen of man. PMID:1200499

  13. Prevention of Infective (Bacterial) Endocarditis: Wallet Card

    MedlinePlus

    ... IV Cephalexin**† 2g 50 mg/kg Allergic to penicillins or ampicillin — Oral regimen OR Clindamycin OR Azithromycin ... 20 mg/kg 15 mg/kg Allergic to penicillins or ampicillin and unable to take oral medication ...

  14. Analysis of adherence of Streptococcus defectivus and endocarditis-associated streptococci to extracellular matrix.

    PubMed Central

    Tart, R C; van de Rijn, I

    1991-01-01

    Pathogenesis of nutritionally variant streptococcal (NVS) endocarditis initiates with bacterial attachment to and colonization of the damaged heart valve surface. Underlying extracellular matrix (ECM) exposed to the environment during damage to cardiac endothelium provides additional receptors that could be involved in bacterial adherence. The ability of NVS and endocarditis-associated streptococci to bind ECM was investigated by using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay system that incorporated ECM secreted by baby hamster kidney and human umbilical vein endothelial cells in culture. Streptococcus defectivus, the major species isolated from NVS endocarditis cases, bound ECM of fibroblasts and endothelial cells, indicating that the ECM molecule involved in the binding was a common constituent of diverse matrices. The specific binding of S. defectivus to ECM was demonstrated by saturation binding and specific antibody inhibition studies. Of the 15 S. defectivus strains analyzed, 13 bound ECM, whereas Streptococcus adjacens and NVS serotype III strains were unable to bind the matrix. This selective binding suggested that S. defectivus binds to heart valves through a mechanism different from those of other NVS in subacute bacterial endocarditis. A survey of non-NVS streptococcal endocarditis isolates demonstrated that S. mutans, S. mitis, S. sanguis, and S. faecalis also bound ECM, whereas other viridans species were unable to bind the matrix. Images PMID:1997435

  15. Infective endocarditis in patients with hepatic diseases.

    PubMed

    Seminari, E; De Silvestri, A; Ravasio, V; Ludovisi, S; Utili, R; Petrosillo, N; Castelli, F; Bassetti, M; Barbaro, F; Grossi, P; Barzaghi, N; Rizzi, M; Minoli, L

    2016-02-01

    Few data have been published regarding the epidemiology and outcome of infective endocarditis (IE) in patients with chronic hepatic disease (CHD). A retrospective analysis of the Studio Endocarditi Italiano (SEI) database was performed to evaluate the epidemiology and outcome of CHD+ patients compared with CHD- patients. The diagnosis of IE was defined in accordance with the modified Duke criteria. Echocardiography, diagnosis, and treatment procedures were in accordance with current clinical practice. Among the 1722 observed episodes of IE, 300 (17.4 %) occurred in CHD+ patients. The cause of CHD mainly consisted of chronic viral infection. Staphylococcus aureus was the most common bacterial species in CHD+ patients; the frequency of other bacterial species (S. epidermidis, streptococci, and enterococci) were comparable among the two groups. The percentage of patients undergoing surgery for IE was 38.9 in CHD+ patients versus 43.7 in CHD- patients (p = 0.06). Complications were more common among CHD+ patients (77 % versus 65.3 %, p < 0.001); embolization (43.3 % versus 26.1 %, p < 0.001) and congestive heart failure (42 % versus 34.1 %, p = 0.01) were more frequent among CHD+ patients. Mortality was comparable (12.5 % in CHD- and 15 % in CHD+ patients). At multivariable analysis, factors associated with hospital-associated mortality were having an infection sustained by S. aureus, a prosthetic valve, diabetes and a neoplasia, and CHD. Being an intravenous drug user (IVDU) was a protective factor and was associated with a reduced death risk. CHD is a factor worsening the prognosis in patients with IE, in particular in patients for whom cardiac surgery was required. PMID:26690071

  16. Tropheryma whipplei endocarditis in Spain

    PubMed Central

    García-Álvarez, Lara; Sanz, María Mercedes; Marín, Mercedes; Fariñas, MªCarmen; Montejo, Miguel; Goikoetxea, Josune; Rodríguez García, Raquel; de Alarcón, Arístides; Almela, Manuel; Fernández-Hidalgo, Núria; Alonso Socas, María del Mar; Goenaga, Miguel Ángel; Navas, Enrique; Vicioso, Luis; Oteo, José Antonio

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Tropheryma whipplei endocarditis is an uncommon condition with very few series and <90 cases reported in the literature. The aim of the study was to analyze the epidemiological, clinical, and outcome characteristics of 17 cases of T. whipplei endocarditis recruited in our country from a multicentric cohort from 25 Spanish hospitals from the Spanish Collaboration on Endocarditis—Grupo de Apoyo al Manejo de la Endocarditis infecciosa en España. From a total of 3165 cases included in the cohort, 14.2% were diagnosed of blood culture negative endocarditis (BCNE) and 3.5% of these had T. whipplei endocarditis. This condition was more frequent in men. The average age was 60.3 years. Previous cardiac condition was present in 35.3% of the cases. The main clinical manifestation was cardiac failure (76.5%) while fever was only present in the 35.3%. Ecocardiography showed vegetations in 64.7% of patients. Surgery was performed in all but 1 cases and it allowed the diagnosis when molecular assays were performed. A broad range rRNA 16S polymerase chain reaction was used for first instance in all laboratories and different specific targets for T. whipplei were employed for confirmation. A concomitant Whipple disease was diagnosed in 11.9% of patients. All patients received specific antimicrobial treatment for at least 1 year, with no relapse and complete recovery. T. whipplei endocarditis is an uncommon condition with an atypical presentation that must be considered in the diagnosis of BCNE. The prognosis is very good when an appropriate surgical management and antimicrobial-specific treatment is given. PMID:27368042

  17. Brucella Endocarditis in Prosthetic Valves

    PubMed Central

    Mehanic, Snjezana; Mulabdic, Velida; Baljic, Rusmir; Hadzovic-Cengic, Meliha; Pinjo, Fikret; Hadziosmanovic, Vesna; Topalovic, Jasna

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY CONFLICT OF INTEREST: none declared. Introduction Brucella endocarditis (BE) is a rare but severe and potentially lethal manifestation of brucellosis. Pre-existing valves lesions and prosthetic valves (PV) are favorable for BE. Case report We represent the case of a 46-year-old man who was treated at the Clinic for Infectious Diseases, Clinical Center of Sarajevo University, as blood culture positive (Brucella melitensis) mitral and aortic PV endocarditis. He was treated with combined anti-brucella and cardiac therapy. Surgical intervention was postponed due to cardiac instability. Four months later he passed away. Surgery was not performed. PMID:24493988

  18. Current controversies in infective endocarditis

    PubMed Central

    Cahill, Thomas J.; Prendergast, Bernard D.

    2015-01-01

    Infective endocarditis is a life-threatening disease caused by a focus of infection within the heart. For clinicians and scientists, it has been a moving target that has an evolving microbiology and a changing patient demographic. In the absence of an extensive evidence base to guide clinical practice, controversies abound. Here, we review three main areas of uncertainty: first, in prevention of infective endocarditis, including the role of antibiotic prophylaxis and strategies to reduce health care-associated bacteraemia; second, in diagnosis, specifically the use of multimodality imaging; third, we discuss the optimal timing of surgical intervention and the challenges posed by increasing rates of cardiac device infection. PMID:26918142

  19. Septicemia and Aortic Valve Endocarditis due to Erysipelothrix rhusiopathiae in a Homeless Man

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    We report a case of bacterial endocarditis due to Erysipelothrix rhusiopathiae in a homeless man with no animal exposure. His course was complicated by an allergic reaction to ampicillin, urinary bladder infection, respiratory failure, and acute kidney injury. He recovered completely after aortic valve replacement and a 6-week course of intravenous ceftriaxone. PMID:23662222

  20. Prosthetic valve endocarditis. Experience with porcine bioprostheses.

    PubMed

    Sett, S S; Hudon, M P; Jamieson, W R; Chow, A W

    1993-03-01

    Prosthetic valve endocarditis remains an infrequent but serious complication of cardiac valvular replacement. Prosthetic valve endocarditis was diagnosed in 56 (1.8%) of 3200 patients in whom one or more porcine bioprostheses were implanted between 1975 and 1988. Of the 56 patients with prosthetic valve endocarditis, there were 40 men and 16 women, with a mean age at initial implantation of 57 years (27 to 81 years). Of the 56 patients, 6 were initially treated for native valve endocarditis. There were 8 cases of early prosthetic valve endocarditis (defined as occurring less than 60 days after initial surgical intervention) and 48 cases of late prosthetic valve endocarditis (occurring after 60 days). The overall mortality rate of the 56 patients was 32% (18 patients). Of the 8 patients with early prosthetic valve endocarditis, 6 (75%) died. Of the 48 patients with late prosthetic valve endocarditis, 12 (25%) died. The predominant organisms were Staphylococcus epidermidis (12 cases), Streptococcus viridans (8 cases) and Staphylococcus aureus (7 cases). The presence of hemodynamic compromise, including congestive heart failure, septic embolism, persistent sepsis, and echocardiographic evidence of vegetations, dictated the mode and timing of the addition of surgical intervention to medical therapy. The survival rate for medically and surgically treated patients with late prosthetic valve endocarditis was 91% (20 patients); none of the patients with early prosthetic valve endocarditis survived (all had severe hemodynamic compromise). We analyzed 18 factors for the prediction of early and late death. The predictors of death by univariate analysis for both early and late prosthetic valve endocarditis were age, diagnosis time, renal status, sepsis, management mode, fever, dental procedures, and dental prophylaxis. The predictors by multivariate analysis were age, diagnosis time, renal status, and management mode for early prosthetic valve endocarditis, and only diagnosis

  1. Antineutrophil Cytoplasmic Antibody Induction due to Infection: A Patient with Infective Endocarditis and Chronic Hepatitis C

    PubMed Central

    Kamar, Fareed B.; Hawkins, T. Lee-Ann

    2016-01-01

    While antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (ANCA) is often used as a diagnostic marker for certain vasculitides, ANCA induction in the setting of infection is much less common. In the case of infective endocarditis, patients may present with multisystem disturbances resembling an autoimmune process, cases that may be rendered even trickier to diagnose in the face of a positive ANCA. Though not always straightforward, distinguishing an infective from an inflammatory process is pivotal in order to guide appropriate therapy. We describe an encounter with a 43-year-old male with chronically untreated hepatitis C virus infection who featured ANCA positivity while hospitalized with acute bacterial endocarditis. His case serves as a reminder of two of the few infections known to uncommonly generate ANCA positivity. We also summarize previously reported cases of ANCA positivity in the context of endocarditis and hepatitis C infections. PMID:27366166

  2. Antineutrophil Cytoplasmic Antibody Induction due to Infection: A Patient with Infective Endocarditis and Chronic Hepatitis C.

    PubMed

    Kamar, Fareed B; Hawkins, T Lee-Ann

    2016-01-01

    While antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (ANCA) is often used as a diagnostic marker for certain vasculitides, ANCA induction in the setting of infection is much less common. In the case of infective endocarditis, patients may present with multisystem disturbances resembling an autoimmune process, cases that may be rendered even trickier to diagnose in the face of a positive ANCA. Though not always straightforward, distinguishing an infective from an inflammatory process is pivotal in order to guide appropriate therapy. We describe an encounter with a 43-year-old male with chronically untreated hepatitis C virus infection who featured ANCA positivity while hospitalized with acute bacterial endocarditis. His case serves as a reminder of two of the few infections known to uncommonly generate ANCA positivity. We also summarize previously reported cases of ANCA positivity in the context of endocarditis and hepatitis C infections. PMID:27366166

  3. Neurologic complications of infective endocarditis.

    PubMed

    Lerner, P I

    1985-03-01

    Neurologic complications continue to occur in approximately 30 per cent of all patients with infective endocarditis and represent a major factor associated with an increased mortality rate in that disease. Of these complications, cerebral embolism is the most common and the most important, occurring in as many as 30 per cent of all patients, most of whom ultimately die. Emboli that are infected also account for all the other complications (mycotic aneurysm, meningitis or meningoencephalitis, brain abscess) that may develop. Emboli are more common in patients with mitral valve infection and in those infected with more virulent organisms. Mycotic aneurysms (often preceded by an embolic event) occur more frequently and earlier in the course of acute endocarditis, rather than later, which is more common in the course of subacute disease. The management of a cerebral mycotic aneurysm depends on the presence or absence of hemorrhage, its anatomic location and the clinical course. Healing can occur during the course of effective antimicrobial therapy and thus will preclude the need for automatic surgery in all angiographically demonstrated aneurysms. The indication for surgical intervention must be evaluated on an individual basis. Meningitis is usually purulent when associated with virulent organisms, but the CSF may present an aseptic formula when associated with subarachnoid hemorrhage or multiple microscopic embolic lesions, infected or otherwise. Macroscopic brain abscesses are rare, but multiple microscopic abscesses are not uncommon in patients with acute endocarditis due to virulent organisms. Seizures are not uncommon in patients with infective endocarditis. Focal seizures are more commonly associated with acute emboli, whereas generalized seizures are more commonly associated with systemic metabolic factors. Penicillin neurotoxicity should be considered in seizure patients with compromised renal function who are receiving high doses of penicillin. The CSF tends

  4. Imaging endocarditis with Tc-99m-labeled antibody--an experimental study: concise communication

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, D.W.; Dhawan, V.K.; Tanaka, T.; Mishkin, F.S.; Reese, I.C.; Thadepalli, H.

    1982-03-01

    The sensitivity and specificity of Tc-99m-labeled antibacterial antibody (Tc-99m Ab) for detecting bacterial endocarditis were evaluated in an experimental model. Rabbit-produced antistaphylococcal antibody was extracted using Rivanol and chemically labeled with Tc-99m. This Tc-99m Ab was injected intravenously in New Zealand rabbits 24 hr after producing Staphylococcus aureus endocarditis of the aortic valve. Imaging and tissue analyses were performed on the following day. All 11 animals developed S. aureus aortic-valve vegetations and showed increased uptake of Tc-99m Ab at the aortic valve, 118 times higher than at the uninfected tricuspid valve. Although high hepatic radioactivity and anatomic uncertainties interfered with in vivo delineation of these lesions, images of the excised hearts showed all affected valves. Two rabbits inoculated with Escherichia coli did not develop endocarditis and had little uptake of Tc-99m Ab, while six rabbits with enterococcal endocarditis had no uptake of the Tc-99m Ab in their vegetations. The findings suggest potential value of Tc-99m Ab on the rapid diagnosis of endocarditis.

  5. Vertebral osteomyelitis combined streptococcal viridans endocarditis.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kuo-Chen; Tsai, Yi-Ting; Lin, Chih-Yuan; Tsai, Chien-Sung

    2003-01-01

    Endocarditis may be difficult to diagnose in patients with osteomyelitis in an early stage because they usually are treated for fever, bone pain and stiffness in the outpatient department. Herein we report an uncommon patient who developed severe lower back pain sustained for 2 months, and streptococcal viridans infected vertebral osteomyelitis combined endocarditis were diagnosed and cured. PMID:12493523

  6. Incidence and Outcome of Documented Fungal Endocarditis

    PubMed Central

    Badiee, Parisa; Amirghofran, Ahmad Ali; Ghazi Nour, Mohammad; Shafa, Masih; Nemati, Mohammad Hassan

    2014-01-01

    Background: Fungal endocarditis, the most severe form of infective endocarditis, is characterized by excessive mortality and morbidity. Objectives: The present study aimed to analyze the characteristics of fungal endocarditis to improve the management of these patients. Materials and Methods: In this cross-sectional study, vegetations on the mitral or tricuspid valves and embolic material surgically removed from the patients with suspected infective endocarditis between December 2009 and November 2011 were examined for fungal infection by direct smear and culture, and the susceptibility patterns of the isolated species were determined. Then, blood samples were cultured on BACTEC media and real-time PCR was done with blood and tissue samples. Results: Of the 31 patients with suspected infective endocarditis who did not respond to antibacterial therapy, 11 had confirmed fungal endocarditis. The most frequent predisposing risk factors were previous surgery and drug abuse. The organisms isolated were Aspergillus spp. and Candida albicans. Resistance to amphotericin B and itraconazole was observed in Aspergillus species, and to fluconazole in Candida albicans. Positive PCR results were obtained in blood and tissue samples. Conclusions: Fungal endocarditis should be considered in the patients not responsive to antimicrobials. Moreover, management of these patients can be improved with molecular diagnostic methods and by determining the susceptibility patterns of the etiologic agents. PMID:25614858

  7. Mutation of the maize sbe1a and ae genes alters morphology and physical behavior of wx-type endosperm starch granules.

    PubMed

    Li, Ji-Hong; Guiltinan, Mark J; Thompson, Donald B

    2007-12-10

    In maize, three isoforms of starch-branching enzyme, SBEI, SBEIIa, and SBEIIb, are encoded by the Sbe1a, Sbe2a, and Amylose extender (Ae) genes, respectively. The objective of this research was to explore the effects of null mutations in the Sbe1a and Ae genes alone and in combination in wx background on kernel characteristics and on the morphology and physical behavior of endosperm starch granules. Differences in kernel morphology and weight, starch accumulation, starch granule size and size distribution, starch microstructure, and thermal properties were observed between the ae wx and sbe1a ae wx plants but not between the sbe1a wx mutants when compared to wx. Starch from sbe1a ae wx plants exhibited a larger granule size with a wider gelatinization temperature range and a lower endotherm enthalpy than ae wx. Microscopy shows weaker iodine staining in sbe1a ae wx starch granules. X-ray diffraction revealed A-type crystallinity in wx and sbe1a wx starches and B-type in sbe1a ae wx and ae wx. This study suggests that, while the SBEIIb isoform plays a dominant role in maize endosperm starch synthesis, SBEI also plays a role, which is only observable in the presence of the ae mutation. PMID:17765880

  8. Nonbacterial Thrombotic Endocarditis: Pathogenesis, Diagnosis, and Management.

    PubMed

    Liu, Joshua; Frishman, William H

    2016-01-01

    Nonbacterial thrombotic endocarditis (NBTE), formerly known as marantic endocarditis, is a potentially overlooked condition that involves the formation of sterile, fibrin vegetations on heart valve leaflets. Often confused with classic infective endocarditis during its early stages, NBTE can lead to valvular dysfunction, heart failure, and systemic embolization when unchecked. The pathogenesis is not entirely clear but involves a preexisting hypercoagulable state. Diagnosis requires ruling out infection and establishing the presence of valvular vegetations using echocardiography. Therapy for NBTE includes treating the underlying disease, systemic anticoagulation and surgical intervention. PMID:27501336

  9. [Abiotrophia defectiva: an unusual cause of endocarditis].

    PubMed

    Baroz, Frédéric; Clément, Priscile; Levy, Monica; Duplain, Hervé

    2016-06-22

    This article reports one of the rare cases of Abiotrophia defectiva endocarditis with no underlying valvular condition. A sixty-three years old man was hospitalized because of complicated respiratory sepsis with acute heart failure. Hemocultures and echocardiogram enabled the diagnosis of A. defectiva endocarditis. The clinical course was favorable under combined aminoglycoside and cephalosporin. The patient ultimately required valvular replacement. A. defectiva is a micro-organism part of the Nutritionnaly Variant Streptococci (NVS) associated with a high mortality rate and often resistant to antibiotics. Although A. defectiva is a rare cause of endocarditis, prompt recognition and appropriate antibiotic treatment are essential to clinical course. PMID:27506070

  10. Enterococcus gallinarum endocarditis in a diabetic patient.

    PubMed

    Ortu, Massimiliano; Gabrielli, Eugenia; Caramma, Ilaria; Rossotti, Roberto; Gambirasio, Maria; Gervasoni, Cristina

    2008-07-01

    Recent studies pointed out the increasing rate of infective endocarditis (IE) in diabetic patients. As diabetes mellitus (DM) prevalence is expected to increase in the coming years, infective endocarditis could be more frequently reported in these patients. We here describe a rare case of Enterococcus gallinarum endocarditis developing on normal native heart valve in an elderly diabetic woman. Therapeutic options were restricted due to resistance factors of the microorganism, limited guidance in the medical literature, and the patient's history and underlying condition. Despite these challenges, adequate antibiotic therapy led to the patient's recovery. PMID:18457897

  11. Erysipelothrix rhusiopathiae endocarditis and presumed osteomyelitis.

    PubMed

    Romney, M; Cheung, S; Montessori, V

    2001-07-01

    Erysipelothrix rhusiopathiae is known to cause infections in humans following exposure to decaying organic matter or animals colonized with the organism, such as swine and fish. Invasive infections with this organism are unusual and are manifested primarily as infective endocarditis. The present report is believed to be the first to report a case of E rhusiopathiae endocarditis and presumptive osteomyelitis. E rhusiopathiae appears to have intrinsic resistance to vancomycin. Because vancomycin is often used empirically for the treatment of endocarditis, rapid differentiation of E rhusiopathiae from other Gram-positive organisms is critical. In patients with endocarditis caused by a Gram-positive bacillus and epidemiological risk factors for E rhusiopathiae exposure, empirical treatment with vancomycin should be reconsidered. PMID:18159347

  12. [Infective endocarditis : New ESC guidelines 2015].

    PubMed

    Plicht, B; Lind, A; Erbel, R

    2016-07-01

    Infective endocarditis is an endovascular infection usually caused by bacteria. Mortality rate is still approximately 20 %. To improve patients' prognosis by implementation of current diagnostic and therapeutic evidence, the European Society of Cardiology published an updated version of the guidelines for management of infective endocarditis in 2015. It strengthens the role of imaging modalities like PET/CT for detection of infectious foci when echocardiography remains negative and highlights the use of modern tests for identification of possible pathogens. New diagnostic criteria were introduced to integrate these methods for improved diagnostic sensitivity. Complicated cases should be treated in reference centers with on-site cardiac surgery. The antibiotic and early surgical management should be discussed in a multidisciplinary endocarditis team. A few years ago, the indication for endocarditis prophylaxis was limited to high-risk patients. These recommendations were confirmed in current guidelines. PMID:27307162

  13. Valvular endocarditis and septic thrombosis associated with a radial fracture in a red-tailed hawk (Buteo jamaicensis).

    PubMed

    Lemon, Matthew J; Pack, LeeAnn; Forzán, María J

    2012-01-01

    A free-ranging adult female red-tailed hawk died suddenly after 3 weeks in rehabilitation for a radial fracture. Cause of death was septic thrombosis from a chronic bacterial valvular endocarditis, probably associated with injury at the fracture site. The challenge of clinical diagnosis of sepsis in wild birds is emphasized. PMID:22753969

  14. Valvular endocarditis and septic thrombosis associated with a radial fracture in a red-tailed hawk (Buteo jamaicensis)

    PubMed Central

    Lemon, Matthew J.; Pack, LeeAnn; Forzán, María J.

    2012-01-01

    A free-ranging adult female red-tailed hawk died suddenly after 3 weeks in rehabilitation for a radial fracture. Cause of death was septic thrombosis from a chronic bacterial valvular endocarditis, probably associated with injury at the fracture site. The challenge of clinical diagnosis of sepsis in wild birds is emphasized. PMID:22753969

  15. Unusual septoplasty complication: Streptococcus viridans endocarditis.

    PubMed

    Leonard, D W; Thompson, D H

    1998-10-01

    Infection is an infrequently reported complication following septoplasty and septorhinoplasty. Among the recognized but rare infections are toxic shock syndrome, spinal osteomyelitis, meningitis, septic cavernous sinus thrombosis and endocarditis. A high index of suspicion is required to diagnose these infections early and thereby minimize morbidity and mortality. We present a case of endocarditis following septoplasty in a patient who had no identifiable preoperative risk factors but who experienced recurrent fever and chills postoperatively. PMID:9818534

  16. Clinical, virological, and pathological findings in a fatal case of Q fever endocarditis

    PubMed Central

    Ferguson, I. C.; Craik, J. E.; Grist, N. R.

    1962-01-01

    A case resembling subacute bacterial endocarditis in which blood cultures were repeatedly negative is described. The patient had had an influenza-like illness nine months before admission to hospital followed by intervening vague illness and loss of weight. Serological tests revealed a high titre of complement-fixing antibodies to phase 1 and phase 2 antigens of Rickettsia burneti. After death R. burneti was isolated from the diseased aortic valve, liver, and kidneys. Bodies morphologically resembling rickettsiae were seen in the aortic valve and in a very few renal tubule cells. No specific pathological lesions were found but there was a widespread stimulation of reticulo-endothelial cells particularly in the aortic valve cusps, spleen, lymph nodes, and renal glomeruli. It is suggested that tests for Q fever should be carried out in suspected cases of subacute bacterial endocarditis when blood culture is negative. Images PMID:13892334

  17. Septicemia, endocarditis, and cerebral infarction due to Staphylococcus aureus in a harp seal (Phoca groenlandica).

    PubMed

    Chinnadurai, Sathya K; Troan, Brigid V; Wolf, Karen N; DeVoe, Ryan S; Huijsmans, C J J; Hermans, Mirjam H A; Wever, Peter C

    2009-06-01

    An adult, wild-collected, male harp seal (Phoca groenlandica) was transferred from a rehabilitation center to a display facility because of unilateral phthisis bulbi and decreased use of the right forelimb, which precluded its release. In quarantine, the animal demonstrated limited use of the right forelimb, which acutely progressed to complete disuse of the limb accompanied by intermittent lethargy. One month after transfer, the animal was found dead on exhibit. Necropsy showed septic arthritis of the right scapulohumeral joint, valvular endocarditis with systemic bacterial thromboembolism, and infarction of the cerebrum and myocardium. Culture of the blood and affected joint space revealed Staphylococcus aureus. Bacterial polymerase chain reaction of formalin-fixed tissues from the heart and brain were also positive for S. aureus. Staphylococcus aureus infection should be considered as an additional cause of endocarditis and embolic encephalitis in seals. PMID:19569495

  18. Neurologic Complications in Infective Endocarditis

    PubMed Central

    Morris, Nicholas A.; Matiello, Marcelo; Samuels, Martin A.

    2014-01-01

    Neurologic complications of infective endocarditis (IE) are common and frequently life threatening. Neurologic events are not always obvious. The prediction and management of neurologic complications of IE are not easily approached algorithmically, and the impact they have on timing and ability to surgically repair or replace the affected valve often requires a painstaking evaluation and joint effort across multiple medical disciplines in order to achieve the best possible outcome. Although specific recommendations are always tailored to the individual patient, there are some guiding principles that can be used to help direct the decision-making process. Herein, we review the pathophysiology, epidemiology, manifestations, and diagnosis of neurological complications of IE and further consider the impact they have on clinical decision making. PMID:25360207

  19. Acquired Gerbode defect following endocarditis of the tricuspid valve: a case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Prifti, Edvin; Ademaj, Fadil; Baboci, Arben; Demiraj, Aurel

    2015-01-01

    The Gerbode's defect is a communication between the left ventricle and right atrium. It is usually congenital, but rarely is acquired, as a complication of endocarditis, myocardial infarction, trauma, or after previous cardiac surgery. The acquired Gerbode defect with involvement of the tricuspid valve acquired after bacterial endocarditis can be challenging to repair. We present a rare case of young woman, with endocarditis of the tricuspid valve and acquired Gerbode defect without previous cardiac surgery. She underwent successful surgical closure of the Gerbode defect and reconstruction of the septal leaflet of the tricuspid valve using a an autologous pericardial patch. A total of 20 other cases were reported with acquired Gerbode defect due to endocarditis in patients without previous cardiac surgery. Three other cases presented acquired Gerbode defect due to myocardial infarction and two due to chest trauma. Another series of 62 patients presented acquired Gerbode defect after previous cardiac surgery. Surgical treatment is always feasible with excellent outcome. However the percutanous transcatheter closure remains an excellent option especially in high risk patients. PMID:26353810

  20. Presence of gas in left ventricle due to infective endocarditis.

    PubMed

    Laiq, Zenab; Yarmohammadi, Hirad; Nabeel, Yassar; Adatya, Sirtaz

    2016-01-01

    Gas in myocardium is a rare manifestation of infective endocarditis caused by gas producing bacteria. We present a case of infective endocarditis caused by Citrobacter Koseri initially diagnosed by computed tomography and confirmed with transesophageal echocardiogram. PMID:27318588

  1. Endocarditis

    MedlinePlus

    ... causing the infection Complete blood count (CBC), C-reactive protein (CRP), or erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) A routine echocardiogram or a transesophageal echocardiogram to look at the heart valves

  2. Nosocomial Endocarditis Caused by Corynebacterium amycolatum and Other Nondiphtheriae Corynebacteria

    PubMed Central

    Holmes, Alison H.

    2002-01-01

    The nondiphtheriae corynebacteria are uncommon but increasingly recognized as important agents of community-acquired endocarditis in patients with underlying structural heart disease, as well as of prosthetic-valve endocarditis. We describe three cases of nondiphtheriae corynebacterial endocarditis, including the first reported case of endocarditis caused by Corynebacterium amycolatum, occurring over an 18-month period, all in association with indwelling intravascular devices. PMID:11749760

  3. Preterm Caesarean Delivery in a Parturient with Candida parapsilosis Endocarditis

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Jason; Retherford, Lance M.; Flynn, Brigid

    2015-01-01

    We present the first documented case of Candida parapsilosis infective endocarditis in a pregnant patient. While the incidence of infective endocarditis during pregnancy is rare, the incidence of C. parapsilosis endocarditis is even rarer. The numerous specific risks and decision making processes regarding this case are presented. PMID:26246916

  4. Surgical treatment of infective endocarditis with special reference to prosthetic valve endocarditis.

    PubMed Central

    Westaby, S; Oakley, C; Sapsford, R N; Bentall, H H

    1983-01-01

    Patients with native valve endocarditis treated surgically between 1968 and 1978 (n = 15) and all patients presenting with prosthetic valve endocarditis during this period (n = 21) were followed up for at least four years. Five of the patients with native valve endocarditis required urgent early surgical intervention, of whom two died. The remaining 10 underwent valve replacement after a course of antibiotic treatment: all survived, though one required further valve replacement. The 21 patients with prosthetic valve endocarditis suffered 25 attacks. Nine were cured by medical treatment alone; two died before surgical intervention was possible; 11 required valve replacement, of whom three died; and two required valve replacement after a course of antibiotic treatment. The incidence of early prosthetic valve endocarditis--that occurring within two months of operation--was 0.67%, but that of late prosthetic valve endocarditis could not be determined. Medical treatment when started early should cure endocarditis in most patients, but vigilance should be maintained for the appearance of indications for surgery. When such indications exist surgery should not be delayed. PMID:6409290

  5. Endocarditis Due to Rare and Fastidious Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Brouqui, P.; Raoult, D.

    2001-01-01

    The etiologic diagnosis of infective endocarditis is easily made in the presence of continuous bacteremia with gram-positive cocci. However, the blood culture may contain a bacterium rarely associated with endocarditis, such as Lactobacillus spp., Klebsiella spp., or nontoxigenic Corynebacterium, Salmonella, Gemella, Campylobacter, Aeromonas, Yersinia, Nocardia, Pasteurella, Listeria, or Erysipelothrix spp., that requires further investigation to establish the relationship with endocarditis, or the blood culture may be uninformative despite a supportive clinical evaluation. In the latter case, the etiologic agents are either fastidious extracellular or intracellular bacteria. Fastidious extracellular bacteria such as Abiotrophia, HACEK group bacteria, Clostridium, Brucella, Legionella, Mycobacterium, and Bartonella spp. need supplemented media, prolonged incubation time, and special culture conditions. Intracellular bacteria such as Coxiella burnetii cannot be isolated routinely. The two most prevalent etiologic agents of culture-negative endocarditis are C. burnetti and Bartonella spp. Their diagnosis is usually carried out serologically. A systemic pathologic examination of excised heart valves including periodic acid-Schiff (PAS) staining and molecular methods has allowed the identification of Whipple's bacillus endocarditis. Pathologic examination of the valve using special staining, such as Warthin-Starry, Gimenez, and PAS, and broad-spectrum PCR should be performed systematically when no etiologic diagnosis is evident through routine laboratory evaluation. PMID:11148009

  6. Granulicatella elegans endocarditis: a diagnostic and therapeutic challenge.

    PubMed

    Patri, Sandeep; Agrawal, Yashwant

    2016-01-01

    A 63-year-old man with a history of non-ischaemic cardiomyopathy presented with acute worsening of heart failure and septic shock. Echocardiogram revealed a large aortic valve vegetation with new onset severe aortic incompetence. Blood cultures grew Granulicatella elegans, for which antimicrobial sensitivities could not be carried out in our lab. Despite antibiotic therapy and aggressive care, the patient's clinical condition worsened and he died. G. elegans, previously grouped under nutrient variant streptococci (NVS), is an extremely rare cause for bacterial infective endocarditis (IE). Unlike with the Viridans group, IE caused by NVS has a very poor outcome and higher mortality rate. The difficulty in isolation of the bacteria in culture, inability to reliably measure antibiotic susceptibility in vitro, frequent treatment failure and complications such as multivalvular involvement, make this an extremely challenging infection to treat. Early detection of the organism, appropriate antibiotics and early surgical management when indicated, are key to management. PMID:26921367

  7. Utility of transesophageal echocardiography in infective endocarditis. A review.

    PubMed Central

    Jessurun, C; Mesa, A; Wilansky, S

    1996-01-01

    Despite recent diagnostic and therapeutic advances, infective endocarditis continues to be a very serious illness, with high patient morbidity and mortality rates. The diagnosis of infective endocarditis has been based primarily on clinical signs and positive blood cultures. Echocardiography is currently recognized as the technique of choice for the detection of valvular vegetations, which are the hallmark of endocarditis. We briefly review the use of echocardiography in the diagnosis of suspected infective endocarditis, with emphasis on transesophageal echocardiography. High-resolution imaging of the cardiac valves with transesophageal echocardiography has proved to be invaluable in the management of infective endocarditis. Images PMID:8792540

  8. Molecular and pathological insights into Chlamydia pecorum-associated sporadic bovine encephalomyelitis (SBE) in Western Australia

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Despite its global recognition as a ruminant pathogen, cases of Chlamydia pecorum infection in Australian livestock are poorly documented. In this report, a C. pecorum specific Multi Locus Sequence Analysis scheme was used to characterise the C. pecorum strains implicated in two cases of sporadic bovine encephalomyelitis confirmed by necropsy, histopathology and immunohistochemistry. This report provides the first molecular evidence for the presence of mixed infections of C. pecorum strains in Australian cattle. Case presentation Affected animals were two markedly depressed, dehydrated and blind calves, 12 and 16 weeks old. The calves were euthanized and necropsied. In one calf, a severe fibrinous polyserositis was noted with excess joint fluid in all joints whereas in the other, no significant lesions were seen. No gross abnormalities were noted in the brain of either calf. Histopathological lesions seen in both calves included: multifocal, severe, subacute meningoencephalitis with vasculitis, fibrinocellular thrombosis and malacia; diffuse, mild, acute interstitial pneumonia; and diffuse, subacute epicarditis, severe in the calf with gross serositis. Immunohistochemical labelling of chlamydial antigen in brain, spleen and lung from the two affected calves and brain from two archived cases, localised the antigen to the cytoplasm of endothelium, mesothelium and macrophages. C. pecorum specific qPCR, showed dissemination of the pathogen to multiple organs. Phylogenetic comparisons with other C. pecorum bovine strains from Australia, Europe and the USA revealed the presence of two genetically distinct sequence types (ST). The predominant ST detected in the brain, heart, lung and liver of both calves was identical to the C. pecorum ST previously described in cases of SBE. A second ST detected in an ileal tissue sample from one of the calves, clustered with previously typed faecal bovine isolates. Conclusion This report provides the first data to suggest

  9. HACEK endocarditis: state-of-the-art.

    PubMed

    Revest, Matthieu; Egmann, Gérald; Cattoir, Vincent; Tattevin, Pierre

    2016-01-01

    The HACEK group of bacteria - Haemophilus parainfluenzae, Aggregatibacter spp. (A. actinomycetemcomitans, A. aphrophilus, A. paraphrophilus, and A. segnis), Cardiobacterium spp. (C. hominis, C. valvarum), Eikenella corrodens, and Kingella spp. (K. kingae, K. denitrificans) - are fastidious gram-negative bacteria, part of the normal microbiota of oral and upper respiratory tract in humans. Although their pathogenicity is limited, they are responsible for 1-3% of all infective endocarditis. HACEK endocarditis mostly affect patients with underlying heart disease or prosthetic valves, and are characterized by an insidious course, with a mean diagnosis delay of 1 month (Haemophilus spp.) to 3 months (Aggregatibacter and Cardiobacterium spp.). The advent of continuously monitored blood culture systems with enriched media has erased the need for extended incubation for the diagnosis of HACEK endocarditis. Medical treatment relies on third-generation cephalosporin, with a favorable outcome in 80-90% of cases, with or without cardiac surgery. PMID:26953488

  10. Polymicrobial Infective Endocarditis: Clinical Features and Prognosis.

    PubMed

    García-Granja, Pablo Elpidio; López, Javier; Vilacosta, Isidre; Ortiz-Bautista, Carlos; Sevilla, Teresa; Olmos, Carmen; Sarriá, Cristina; Ferrera, Carlos; Gómez, Itziar; Román, José Alberto San

    2015-12-01

    To describe the profile of left-sided polymicrobial endocarditis (PE) and to compare it with monomicrobial endocarditis (ME).Among 1011 episodes of left-sided endocarditis consecutively diagnosed in 3 tertiary centers, between January 1, 1996 and December 31, 2014, 60 were polymicrobial (5.9%), 821 monomicrobial (81.7%), and in 123 no microorganism was detected (12.2%). Seven patients (0.7%) were excluded from the analysis because contamination of biologic tissue could not be discarded. The authors described the clinical, microbiologic, echocardiographic, and outcome of patients with PE and compared it with ME.Mean age was 64 years SD 16 years, 67% were men and 30% nosocomial. Diabetes mellitus (35%) were the most frequent comorbidities, fever (67%) and heart failure (43%) the most common symptoms at admission. Prosthetic valves (50%) were the most frequent infection location and coagulase-negative Staphylococci (48%) and enterococci (37%) the leading etiologies. The most repeated combination was coagulase-negative Staphylococci with enterococci (n = 9). Polymicrobial endocarditis appeared more frequently in patients with underlying disease (70% versus 56%, P = 0.036), mostly diabetics (35% versus 24%, P = 0.044) with previous cardiac surgery (15% versus 8% P = 0.049) and prosthetic valves (50% versus 37%, P = 0.038). Coagulase-negative Staphylococci, enterococci, Gram-negative bacilli, anaerobes, and fungi were more frequent in PE. No differences on age, sex, symptoms, need of surgery, and in-hospital mortality were detected.Polymicrobial endocarditis represents 5.9% of episodes of left-sided endocarditis in our series. Despite relevant demographic and microbiologic differences between PE and ME, short-term outcome is similar. PMID:26656328

  11. Valvulopathy consistent with endocarditis in an Argentine boa (Boa constrictor occidentalis).

    PubMed

    Wernick, Morena B; Novo-Matos, José; Ebling, Alessia; Kühn, Karolin; Ruetten, Maja; Hilbe, Monika; Howard, Judith; Chang, Rita; Prohaska, Sarah; Hatt, Jean-Michel

    2015-03-01

    An Argentine boa (Boa constrictor occidentalis) of 5 yr 7 mo of age was presented for respiratory problems and regurgitation. Radiographs revealed evidence of cardiomegaly and pneumonia. Blood smear examination revealed the presence of intracytoplasmic inclusion bodies in peripheral lymphocytes, consistent with inclusion body disease. Cultures of a tracheal wash sample resulted in growth of Ochrobactrum intermedium and Pseudomonas putida. Echocardiographic examination revealed a large vegetative lesion on the right atrioventricular valve with valvular insufficiency, a mildly dilated right atrium, and pulmonary hypertension. Postmortem examination confirmed the presence of pneumonia and bacterial endocarditis with dystrophic mineralization of the right atrioventricular valve, associated with different bacteria than those cultured from the tracheal wash. The present case is the first report of endocarditis in a boa constrictor and contributes to the rare reports of cardiac disease in snakes. PMID:25831585

  12. Infective endocarditis related to a coronary artery fistula with an unusual localization and ectatic coronary arteries.

    PubMed

    Gerede, Demet Menekse; Acibuca, Aynur; Uzun, Caglar; Goksuluk, Huseyin; Ongun, Aydan; Kilickap, Mustafa; Erol, Cetin

    2015-04-01

    Coronary artery fistulas (CAF) are a rare cardiac anomaly that can be either congenital or acquired. CAFs have clinical significance because of complications such as dyspnea on exertion, congestive heart failure, and cardiac tamponade. The literature also contains case reports of CAF presenting as bacterial endocarditis. We describe a 31-year-old man who presented with native valve infective endocarditis related to an unusual form of a CAF between the circumflex coronary artery and left ventricle. He also had giant coronary arteries, which were imaged with computed tomography angiography and transesophageal echocardiography. The diameter of the circumflex coronary artery and left main coronary artery was measured as 19 mm. Surgical intervention for heart valves was performed because of vegetations resistant to continued antibiotic treatment. At the same time, the CAF was treated with surgery. PMID:25362867

  13. Cytokine Signature in Infective Endocarditis

    PubMed Central

    Araújo, Izabella Rodrigues; Ferrari, Teresa Cristina Abreu; Teixeira-Carvalho, Andréa; Campi-Azevedo, Ana Carolina; Rodrigues, Luan Vieira; Guimarães Júnior, Milton Henriques; Barros, Thais Lins Souza; Gelape, Cláudio Léo; Sousa, Giovane Rodrigo; Nunes, Maria Carmo Pereira

    2015-01-01

    Infective endocarditis (IE) is a severe disease with high mortality rate. Cytokines participate in its pathogenesis and may contribute to early diagnosis improving the outcome. This study aimed to evaluate the cytokine profile in IE. Serum concentrations of interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6, IL-8, IL-10, IL-12 and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α were measured by cytometric bead array (CBA) at diagnosis in 81 IE patients, and compared with 34 healthy subjects and 30 patients with non-IE infections, matched to the IE patients by age and gender. Mean age of the IE patients was 47±17 years (range, 15–80 years), and 40 (50%) were male. The IE patients had significantly higher serum concentrations of IL-1β, IL-6, IL-8, IL-10 and TNF-α as compared to the healthy individuals. The median levels of IL-1β, TNF-α and IL-12 were higher in the IE than in the non-IE infections group. TNF-α and IL-12 levels were higher in staphylococcal IE than in the non-staphylococcal IE subgroup. There was a higher proportion of both low IL-10 producers and high producers of IL-1β, TNF-α and IL-12 in the staphylococcal IE than in the non-staphylococcal IE subgroup. This study reinforces a relationship between the expression of proinflammatory cytokines, especially IL-1β, IL-12 and TNF-α, and the pathogenesis of IE. A lower production of IL-10 and impairment in cytokine network may reflect the severity of IE and may be useful for risk stratification. PMID:26225421

  14. Cytokine Signature in Infective Endocarditis.

    PubMed

    Araújo, Izabella Rodrigues; Ferrari, Teresa Cristina Abreu; Teixeira-Carvalho, Andréa; Campi-Azevedo, Ana Carolina; Rodrigues, Luan Vieira; Guimarães Júnior, Milton Henriques; Barros, Thais Lins Souza; Gelape, Cláudio Léo; Sousa, Giovane Rodrigo; Nunes, Maria Carmo Pereira

    2015-01-01

    Infective endocarditis (IE) is a severe disease with high mortality rate. Cytokines participate in its pathogenesis and may contribute to early diagnosis improving the outcome. This study aimed to evaluate the cytokine profile in IE. Serum concentrations of interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6, IL-8, IL-10, IL-12 and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α were measured by cytometric bead array (CBA) at diagnosis in 81 IE patients, and compared with 34 healthy subjects and 30 patients with non-IE infections, matched to the IE patients by age and gender. Mean age of the IE patients was 47±17 years (range, 15-80 years), and 40 (50%) were male. The IE patients had significantly higher serum concentrations of IL-1β, IL-6, IL-8, IL-10 and TNF-α as compared to the healthy individuals. The median levels of IL-1β, TNF-α and IL-12 were higher in the IE than in the non-IE infections group. TNF-α and IL-12 levels were higher in staphylococcal IE than in the non-staphylococcal IE subgroup. There was a higher proportion of both low IL-10 producers and high producers of IL-1β, TNF-α and IL-12 in the staphylococcal IE than in the non-staphylococcal IE subgroup. This study reinforces a relationship between the expression of proinflammatory cytokines, especially IL-1β, IL-12 and TNF-α, and the pathogenesis of IE. A lower production of IL-10 and impairment in cytokine network may reflect the severity of IE and may be useful for risk stratification. PMID:26225421

  15. Association of Bartonella spp bacteremia with Chagas cardiomyopathy, endocarditis and arrhythmias in patients from South America.

    PubMed

    Corrêa, F G; Pontes, C L S; Verzola, R M M; Mateos, J C P; Velho, P E N F; Schijman, A G; Selistre-de-Araujo, H S

    2012-07-01

    Infection with Bartonella spp may cause cardiac arrhythmias, myocarditis and endocarditis in humans. The aim of the present study was to evaluate a possible association between Bartonella spp bacteremia and endocarditis, arrhythmia and Chagas cardiomyopathy in patients from Brazil and Argentina. We screened for the presence of bacterial 16S rRNA in human blood by PCR using oligonucleotides to amplify a 185-bp bacterial DNA fragment. Blood samples were taken from four groups of subjects in Brazil and Argentina: i) control patients without clinical disease, ii) patients with negative blood-culture endocarditis, iii) patients with arrhythmias, and iv) patients with chronic Chagas cardiomyopathy. PCR products were analyzed on 1.5% agarose gel to visualize the 185-bp fragment and then sequenced to confirm the identity of DNA. Sixty of 148 patients (40.5%) with cardiac disease and 1 of 56 subjects (1.8%) from the control group presented positive PCR amplification for Bartonella spp, suggesting a positive association of the bacteria with these diseases. Separate analysis of the four groups showed that the risk of a Brazilian patient with endocarditis being infected with Bartonella was 22 times higher than in the controls. In arrhythmic patients, the prevalence of infection was 45 times higher when compared to the same controls and 40 times higher for patients with Chagas cardiomyopathy. To the best of our knowledge this is the first report of the association between Bartonella spp bacteremia and Chagas disease. The present data may be useful for epidemiological and prevention studies in Brazil and Argentina. PMID:22584639

  16. Association of Bartonella spp bacteremia with Chagas cardiomyopathy, endocarditis and arrythmias in patients from South America

    PubMed Central

    Corrêa, F.G.; Pontes, C.L.S.; Verzola, R.M.M.; Mateos, J.C.P.; Velho, P.E.N.F.; Schijman, A.G.; Selistre-de-Araujo, H.S.

    2012-01-01

    Infection with Bartonella spp may cause cardiac arrhythmias, myocarditis and endocarditis in humans. The aim of the present study was to evaluate a possible association between Bartonella spp bacteremia and endocarditis, arrhythmia and Chagas cardiomyopathy in patients from Brazil and Argentina. We screened for the presence of bacterial 16S rRNA in human blood by PCR using oligonucleotides to amplify a 185-bp bacterial DNA fragment. Blood samples were taken from four groups of subjects in Brazil and Argentina: i) control patients without clinical disease, ii) patients with negative blood-culture endocarditis, iii) patients with arrhythmias, and iv) patients with chronic Chagas cardiomyopathy. PCR products were analyzed on 1.5% agarose gel to visualize the 185-bp fragment and then sequenced to confirm the identity of DNA. Sixty of 148 patients (40.5%) with cardiac disease and 1 of 56 subjects (1.8%) from the control group presented positive PCR amplification for Bartonella spp, suggesting a positive association of the bacteria with these diseases. Separate analysis of the four groups showed that the risk of a Brazilian patient with endocarditis being infected with Bartonella was 22 times higher than in the controls. In arrhythmic patients, the prevalence of infection was 45 times higher when compared to the same controls and 40 times higher for patients with Chagas cardiomyopathy. To the best of our knowledge this is the first report of the association between Bartonella spp bacteremia and Chagas disease. The present data may be useful for epidemiological and prevention studies in Brazil and Argentina. PMID:22584639

  17. Comparison of antimicrobial agents as therapy for experimental endocarditis: caused by methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Sacar, Mustafa; Sacar, Suzan; Cevahir, Nural; Onem, Gokhan; Teke, Zafer; Asan, Ali; Turgut, Huseyin; Adali, Fahri; Kaleli, Ilknur; Susam, Ibrahim; Yaylali, Yalin Tolga; Baltalarli, Ahmet

    2010-01-01

    We used an experimental rat model to compare the therapeutic efficacy of teicoplanin, linezolid, and quinupristin/dalfopristin with that of vancomycin as standard therapy for infective endocarditis.Aortic endocarditis was induced in rats by insertion of a polyethylene catheter into the left ventricle, followed by intravenous inoculation of 106 colony-forming units of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus 24 hours later. Forty-eight hours after bacterial challenge, intravenous antibiotic therapies were initiated. There were 6 groups of 8 rats each: uninfected control; infected, untreated control; vancomycin-treated (40 mg/kg twice daily); teicoplanin-treated (20 mg/kg twice daily after a loading dose of 40 mg/kg); linezolid-treated (75 mg/kg 3 times daily for 1 day, then 75 mg/kg twice daily); and quinupristin/dalfopristin-treated (30 mg/kg twice daily and an additional 10 mg/kg dalfopristin infusion over 6 to 12 hr daily). At the end of therapy, the aortic valve vegetations in the drug-treated rats were evaluated microbiologically.Compared with the infected, untreated group, all drug-treated groups had significantly reduced bacterial titers in the vegetations. Vancomycin, teicoplanin, and quinupristin/dalfopristin all effectively reduced the quantitative bacterial cultures of aortic valve vegetations. In addition, there was no significant difference in the comparative efficacy of teicoplanin, linezolid, and quinupristin/dalfopristin. Vancomycin significantly reduced bacterial counts in comparison with linezolid, which was nonetheless also effective.Our experimental model showed that each of the investigated antimicrobial agents was effective in the treatment of infective endocarditis. PMID:20844611

  18. Infective endocarditis in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Dominguez, Fernando; Ramos, Antonio; Bouza, Emilio; Muñoz, Patricia; Valerio, Maricela C.; Fariñas, M. Carmen; de Berrazueta, José Ramón; Zarauza, Jesús; Pericás Pulido, Juan Manuel; Paré, Juan Carlos; de Alarcón, Arístides; Sousa, Dolores; Rodriguez Bailón, Isabel; Montejo-Baranda, Miguel; Noureddine, Mariam; García Vázquez, Elisa; Garcia-Pavia, Pablo

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Infective endocarditis (IE) complicating hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is a poorly known entity. Although current guidelines do not recommend IE antibiotic prophylaxis (IEAP) in HCM, controversy remains. This study sought to describe the clinical course of a large series of IE HCM and to compare IE in HCM patients with IE patients with and without an indication for IEAP. Data from the GAMES IE registry involving 27 Spanish hospitals were analyzed. From January 2008 to December 2013, 2000 consecutive IE patients were prospectively included in the registry. Eleven IE HCM additional cases from before 2008 were also studied. Clinical, microbiological, and echocardiographic characteristics were analyzed in IE HCM patients (n = 34) and in IE HCM reported in literature (n = 84). Patients with nondevice IE (n = 1807) were classified into 3 groups: group 1, HCM with native-valve IE (n = 26); group 2, patients with IEAP indication (n = 696); group 3, patients with no IEAP indication (n = 1085). IE episode and 1-year follow-up data were gathered. One-year mortality in IE HCM was 42% in our study and 22% in the literature. IE was more frequent, although not exclusive, in obstructive HCM (59% and 74%, respectively). Group 1 exhibited more IE predisposing factors than groups 2 and 3 (62% vs 40% vs 50%, P < 0.01), and more previous dental procedures (23% vs 6% vs 8%, P < 0.01). Furthermore, Group 1 experienced a higher incidence of Streptococcus infections than Group 2 (39% vs 22%, P < 0.01) and similar to Group 3 (39% vs 30%, P = 0.34). Overall mortality was similar among groups (42% vs 36% vs 35%, P = 0.64). IE occurs in HCM patients with and without obstruction. Mortality of IE HCM is high but similar to patients with and without IEAP indication. Predisposing factors, previous dental procedures, and streptococcal infection are higher in IE HCM, suggesting that HCM patients could benefit from IEAP. PMID:27368014

  19. Aortic root abscess resulting from endocarditis: spectrum of angiographic findings

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, S.W.; Dinsmore, R.E.

    1984-11-01

    Abscesses in the aortic root are a serious complication of infective endocarditis and require accurate diagnosis for antibiotic and surgical management. Nineteen cases of endocarditis of a native valve or prosthetic valve and adjacent abscess cavities were identified with angiography. Of 6 patients with endocarditis of a native valve, 5 had bicuspid aortic valves and all had severe aortic regurgitation. Of 13 patients with endocarditis of a prosthetic aortic valve, all had paravalvular regurgitation. Fistulas were detected into the mitral anulus in 8 patients, and into the right ventricle in 3 patients. No complications from the catheterization were recorded during the 48-hour follow-up.

  20. Aortic valve endocarditis due to abiotrophia defectiva: a rare etiology.

    PubMed

    Yerebakan, Can; Westphal, Bernd; Skrabal, Christian; Kaminski, Alexander; Ugurlucan, Murat; Bomke, Anne-Kathrin; Liebold, Andreas; Steinhoff, Gustav

    2008-01-01

    Abiotrophia defectiva is a rare cause of infective endocarditis. Besides an association with often negative blood cultures and difficult treatment, high rates of relapse and higher mortality than endocarditis caused by other viridans streptococci are known features of this entity. We report on the surgical and medical management of the aortic valve endocarditis caused by Abiotrophia defectiva in a 19-year-old patient. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first case of a patient to have Down syndrome and Abiotrophia defectiva endocarditis requiring aortic valve replacement. PMID:18421556

  1. Libman-Sacks Endocarditis in a Patient With Antiphospholipid Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Kotkar, Kunal D; Said, Sameh M

    2016-07-01

    Antiphospholipid syndrome is a systemic autoimmune syndrome with cardiac manifestations such as nonbacterial thrombotic endocarditis, also known as Libman-Sacks endocarditis. A 61-year-old female with history of antiphospholipid syndrome presented in acute pulmonary edema. Echocardiography demonstrated mobile vegetations on the free margins of both the anterior and the posterior mitral valve leaflets. Blood cultures and fungal serologies were negative. During mitral valve replacement both the anterior and posterior mitral leaflets were covered with multiple small vegetations with features of nonbacterial thrombotic endocarditis. Though mostly asymptomatic, Libman-Sacks endocarditis may be an indication for valve replacement. PMID:27343524

  2. Polymicrobial infective endocarditis caused by Neisseria sicca and Haemophilus parainfluenzae.

    PubMed

    Koshkelashvili, Nikoloz; Shah, Mahek; Codolosa, J Nicolas; Climaco, Antonette

    2016-01-01

    Infective endocarditis is a common clinical problem in industrialized countries. Risk factors include abnormal cardiac valves, a history of endocarditis, intracardiac devices, prosthetic valves and intravenous drug use. We report a case of polymicrobial infective endocarditis in a 33 year-old female with a history chronic heroin use caused by Neisseria sicca and Haemophilus parainfluenzae. We believe the patient was exposed to these microbes by cleansing her skin with saliva prior to injection. Pairing a detailed history with the consideration of atypical agents is crucial in the proper diagnosis and management of endocarditis in patients with high-risk injection behaviors. PMID:27051571

  3. Man's best friend? Infective endocarditis due to Capnocytophaga canimorsus.

    PubMed

    Hayani, Omar; Higginson, Lyall A J; Toye, Baldwin; Burwash, Ian G

    2009-04-01

    Infective endocarditis caused by zoonotic microorganisms is an uncommon clinical entity. A 55-year-old man was diagnosed with endocarditis due to Capnocytophaga canimorsus, a commensal bacterium contained in the saliva of dogs, that involved the aortic and tricuspid valves and was complicated by a para-aortic valve abscess and aorta-to-right atrial fistula. The patient was successfully treated with antibiotic therapy and surgical intervention. C canimorsus endocarditis should be considered in patients with culture-negative endocarditis, particularly in immunosuppressed, asplenic or alcoholic individuals who have recently suffered a dog bite or have had close contact with dogs. PMID:19340358

  4. Prolonged Use of Oritavancin for Vancomycin-Resistant Enterococcus faecium Prosthetic Valve Endocarditis

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Jennifer A.; Feeney, Eoin R.; Kubiak, David W.; Corey, G. Ralph

    2015-01-01

    Oritavancin is a novel lipoglycopeptide with activity against Gram-positive organisms including streptococci, methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, vancomycin-resistant S aureus (VRSA), and vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VRE) [1–3]. The US Food and Drug Administration approved oritavancin as a single intravenous dose of 1200 mg for the treatment of acute bacterial skin and skin structure infections on the basis of 2 clinical trials demonstrating noninferiority compared with vancomycin [4, 5]. There are limited options for treatment of serious VRE infections. Monotherapy with daptomycin or tigecycline or linezolid may be sufficient in some cases, but combination therapy is often indicated for severe or complicated infections such as endocarditis. Several antibiotic combinations have been used in isolated case reports with some efficacy, including the following: high-dose ampicillin with an aminoglycoside [6], ampicillin with ceftriaxone or imipenem [7, 8], high-dose daptomycin with ampicillin and gentamicin [9] or with gentamicin and rifampin [10], daptomycin with tigecycline [11, 12], quinupristin-dalfopristin with high-dose ampicillin [13] or doxycycline and rifampin [14], and linezolid with tigecycline [15]. The limited efficacy, limited susceptibility, and extensive toxicities with many of these agents and combinations present barriers to effective treatment. Additional treatment options for VRE endocarditis would be valuable. Although oritavancin has been shown to have in vitro activity against some isolates of VRE, clinical data are lacking. We describe the first use of a prolonged course of oritavancin in the treatment of a serious VRE infection, prosthetic valve endocarditis. PMID:26677455

  5. Prolonged Use of Oritavancin for Vancomycin-Resistant Enterococcus faecium Prosthetic Valve Endocarditis.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Jennifer A; Feeney, Eoin R; Kubiak, David W; Corey, G Ralph

    2015-12-01

    Oritavancin is a novel lipoglycopeptide with activity against Gram-positive organisms including streptococci, methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, vancomycin-resistant S aureus (VRSA), and vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VRE) [1-3]. The US Food and Drug Administration approved oritavancin as a single intravenous dose of 1200 mg for the treatment of acute bacterial skin and skin structure infections on the basis of 2 clinical trials demonstrating noninferiority compared with vancomycin [4, 5]. There are limited options for treatment of serious VRE infections. Monotherapy with daptomycin or tigecycline or linezolid may be sufficient in some cases, but combination therapy is often indicated for severe or complicated infections such as endocarditis. Several antibiotic combinations have been used in isolated case reports with some efficacy, including the following: high-dose ampicillin with an aminoglycoside [6], ampicillin with ceftriaxone or imipenem [7, 8], high-dose daptomycin with ampicillin and gentamicin [9] or with gentamicin and rifampin [10], daptomycin with tigecycline [11, 12], quinupristin-dalfopristin with high-dose ampicillin [13] or doxycycline and rifampin [14], and linezolid with tigecycline [15]. The limited efficacy, limited susceptibility, and extensive toxicities with many of these agents and combinations present barriers to effective treatment. Additional treatment options for VRE endocarditis would be valuable. Although oritavancin has been shown to have in vitro activity against some isolates of VRE, clinical data are lacking. We describe the first use of a prolonged course of oritavancin in the treatment of a serious VRE infection, prosthetic valve endocarditis. PMID:26677455

  6. Native valve right sided infective endocarditis.

    PubMed

    Akinosoglou, Karolina; Apostolakis, Efstratios; Marangos, Markos; Pasvol, Geoffrey

    2013-09-01

    Right-sided infective endocarditis (RSIE) accounts for 5-10% of all cases of infective endocarditis (IE), and is predominantly encountered in the injecting drug user (IDU) population, where HIV and HCV coinfections often coexist. Staphylococcus aureus is the most common pathogen. The pathogenesis of RSIE is still not well understood. RSIE usually presents as a persistent fever with respiratory symptoms whilst signs of systemic embolisation as seen in left-sided IE are notably absent. The prompt diagnosis of RSIE thus requires a high index of suspicion. Transthoracic echocardiography (TTE) can detect the majority of RSIE, whilst transoesophageal echocardiography (TOE) can increase sensitivity. Virulence of the causative organism and vegetation size are the major determinants of prognosis. Most cases of RSIE resolve with appropriate antibiotic administration. PMID:23369408

  7. Bartonella endocarditis mimicking adult Still's disease.

    PubMed

    De Clerck, K F; Van Offel, J F; Vlieghe, E; Van Marck, E; Stevens, W J

    2008-01-01

    We describe the case of a 39-year-old Caucasian woman who was admitted to the University Hospital of Antwerp with a clinical picture suggestive of adult Still's disease. Even though a transoesophageal echocardiography showed endocarditis of the aortic valve, blood cultures remained negative. Additional serological testing revealed a positive result for Bartonella henselae. Histology of the supraclavicular lymph node showed a reactive lymph node with a positive polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for Bartonella henselae. Prednisolone treatment was started in a dosage of 10 mg per day and rifampicin 600 mg/d in combination with doxycyclin 200 mg/d was given for 6 months. During therapy the patient gradually improved and signs of endocarditis disappeared on echocardiography. PMID:18714850

  8. Intracranial fungal aneurysm caused by Candida endocarditis.

    PubMed

    Takeda, S; Wakabayashi, K; Yamazaki, K; Miyakawa, T; Arai, H

    1998-01-01

    We describe a 67-year-old man who died 4 days after suffering a subarachnoid hemorrhage. Autopsy revealed a fresh subarachnoid hemorrhage and a ruptured fungal aneurysm near the trifurcation of the right middle cerebral artery. In comparison with 21 previously reported cases in which the fungal aneurysms were proved to be intracranial, the present case had several characteristic features: the causative fungus of the aneurysm was Candida (only one such case has been reported previously). The aneurysm was caused by direct Candida invasion of the arterial wall from the Candida embolus (previously reported aneurysms have been caused by direct invasion of the arterial wall during fungal meningitis). The source of the Candida was endocarditis (the main sources of fungus in previously reported cases have been sinusitis, dental extraction wounds, and some forms of surgery). We describe the features of this rare autopsy case of a ruptured fungal aneurysm caused by Candida originating from endocarditis and review the literature. PMID:9707334

  9. [Erysipelothrix rhusiopathiae infections. General review of 31 cases of septicemia with endocarditis reported in the literature (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Freland, C

    1977-05-01

    Erysipelothrix rhusiopathiae is widely distributed in nature (animal, soil). It is commonly known as the causative agent of cutaneous lesions called "erysipeloid of Rosenbach". Only 31 cases of bacterial endocarditis have been reported in the literature. The etiologic diagnosis of Esysipelothrix infection was established by the presence of bacteria in blood cultures or heart-valve cultures. Immunological study is unusual owing to the rapid course of the infection. The histologic observation of heart lesions corroborates the diagnosis. The patient's receptivity depends on his occupation, general health (importance of rheumatic heart disease), sex (male), age (from 40 to 60 years old), but also on the season (from July to October) and climate (temperate). With the exception of the few cases where it is possible to recognize a portal of entry of infection or the appearance of typical cutaneous manifestations, bacterial endocarditis due to Erysipelothrix presents a clinical picture similar to that of most other bacterial endocarditis. The antibiotic treatment is an association of penicillin-streptomycin, administered in large doses over a period of at least four weeks. In spite of intensive therapy, many patients died. PMID:327415

  10. Bartonella henselae endocarditis in an immunocompetent adult.

    PubMed

    Holmes, A H; Greenough, T C; Balady, G J; Regnery, R L; Anderson, B E; O'Keane, J C; Fonger, J D; McCrone, E L

    1995-10-01

    We describe a case of aggressive Bartonella henselae endocarditis in an immunocompetent man who owned a cat. Aortic valve replacement was required, and his infection was diagnosed by histology, serology, and polymerase chain reaction analysis. The manifestations of his disease included mediastinal lymphadenopathy, glomerulonephritis, myocarditis, and a petechial rash; the unusual finding of a positive titer of c-antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies was noted. Serological titers were markedly elevated for > 1 year despite clinical improvement. PMID:8645787

  11. Purulent Pericarditis with Quadruple Valve Endocarditis

    PubMed Central

    Setty Natrajsetty, Huliyurdurga S.; Vijayalakshmi, Ishwarappa B.; Narasimhan, Chitra; Manjunath, Cholenahalli N.

    2015-01-01

    Patient: Male, 7 Final Diagnosis: Purulent pericarditis with quadruple valve endocarditis Symptoms: — Medication: (4S,4aS,5aR,12aS)-9-[2-(tert-butylamino)acetamido]-4,7 bis(dimethylamino)-1,4,4a,5,5a,6,11,12aoctahydro-3,10,12,12a-tetrahydroxy-1,11-dioxo-2 naphthacenecarboxamide Clinical Procedure: Pericardiocentisis Specialty: Cardiology Objective: Rare disease Background: Infective endocarditis (IE) is a disease with a highly varied clinical picture. Spread of the infection to the pericardium from the infective endocardium is uncommon and IE involving all 4 cardiac valves is also a very rare occurrence, being more common in intravenous drug users (IVDU). Case Report: A 7-year-old boy had purulent pericarditis with infective endocarditis (IE) on all 4 cardiac valves and vegetation in the left ventricular and right atrial cavity. Culture of the pericardial fluid grew methicillin-resistant staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) sensitive to tigecycline. The child made a dramatic improvement with tigecycline treatment. Conclusions: Aggressive management with pericardiocentesis and appropriate antibiotics can show remarkable clinical improvement. Tigecycline can be used safely and effectively as a life-saving drug in children. PMID:25904083

  12. Guidelines on prophylaxis to prevent infective endocarditis.

    PubMed

    Thornhill, M H; Dayer, M; Lockhart, P B; McGurk, M; Shanson, D; Prendergast, B; Chambers, J B

    2016-01-22

    Infective endocarditis is a devastating disease with high morbidity and mortality. The link to oral bacteria has been known for many decades and has caused ongoing concern for dentists, patients and cardiologists. Since 2008, the UK has been out of step with the rest of the world where antibiotic prophylaxis is recommended for high-risk patients undergoing invasive dental procedures. Recent evidence that identified an increase in endocarditis incidence prompted a guideline review by NICE and the European Society for Cardiology--which produces guidance for the whole of Europe. Despite reviewing the same evidence they reached completely opposing conclusions. The resulting conflict of opinions and guidance is confusing and poses difficulties for dentists, cardiologists and their patients. Recent changes in the law on consent, however, may provide a patient-centred and pragmatic solution to these problems. This Opinion piece examines the evidence and opposing guidance on antibiotic prophylaxis in the context of the recent changes in the law on consent and provides a framework for how patients at risk of endocarditis might be managed in practice. PMID:26794105

  13. Native Pulmonic Valve Endocarditis due to Mycobacterium fortuitum: A Case Report and Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Mulhall, Aaron M.; Hebbeler-Clark, Renee S.

    2015-01-01

    Endocarditis secondary to Mycobacterium fortuitum is a rare entity often involving prosthetic valves and rarely native valves. Pulmonic valve endocarditis secondary to any organism is rare. We report the first case of native pulmonic valve endocarditis secondary to M. fortuitum and a literature review of native valve M. fortuitum endocarditis. PMID:26167313

  14. Endocarditis due to Coccidioides spp: The Seventh Case.

    PubMed

    Horng, Lily M; Yaghoubian, Shadi; Ram, Arleen; Johnson, Royce; Castro, Luis; Kuo, Jenny; Deresinski, Stan

    2015-09-01

    Coccidioides, a dimorphic fungus endemic within the Americas, primarily causes pulmonary disease but may disseminate. We describe a case of confirmed Coccidioides endocarditis, the seventh reported in literature. Coccidioides endocarditis often requires tissue diagnosis and combined surgical and medical treatment. PMID:26180835

  15. [Nocardia endocarditis in aortic and tricuspid native valves].

    PubMed

    Chain, Sergio; Luciardi, Hector; Feldman, Gabriela; Berman, Sofia; Estrella, Cristina

    2007-01-01

    Nocardia endocarditis in native valve is an uncommon infection that usually arises in immunodepressed patients. We report a 51-year-old man diagnosed as having Nocardia endocarditis in aortic and tricuspid native valves, which received antimicrobial therapy and required aortic valve replacement. In 6 month follow up the patient remained asymptomatic with good clinical evolution. PMID:17628917

  16. Acute endocarditis of a percutaneously placed pulmonary valve

    PubMed Central

    Ramakrishnan, Karthik V; Olivieri, Laura; Jonas, Richard A

    2015-01-01

    Endocarditis of percutaneously placed pulmonary valve is increasingly being recognized and reported as a potentially life-threatening complication. In this report, we discuss a 17-year-old male who presented with septic shock secondary to staphylococcal endocarditis of a percutaneously placed pulmonary valve. PMID:26556969

  17. Mycoplasma hominis, a Rare but True Cause of Infective Endocarditis

    PubMed Central

    Grattard, Florence; Morel, Jerome; Suy, Florence; Fuzellier, Jean-François; Verhoeven, Paul; Cazorla, Celine; Guglielminotti, Claire; Fresard, Anne; Lucht, Frederic; Botelho-Nevers, Elisabeth

    2015-01-01

    Mycoplasma spp. are rarely recognized agents of infective endocarditis. We report a case of Mycoplasma hominis prosthetic valve endocarditis diagnosed by 16S ribosomal DNA (rDNA) PCR and culture of valves in a 74-year-old man. We reviewed the literature and found only 8 other cases reported. PMID:26135868

  18. Infective endocarditis caused by Streptococcus tigurinus-like organisms.

    PubMed

    Peuchant, O; Wirth, G; Tixier, R; Dijos, M; Camou, F; Greib, C; Mégraud, F; Ménard, A

    2016-09-01

    Streptococcus species are important causes of infective endocarditis but species identification remains challenging. We report two cases of infective endocarditis due to Streptococcus tigurinus-like organisms, which were first identified by 16S ribosomal RNA gene sequence analysis and subsequently confirmed using phylogeny based on the analysis of the shetA gene encoding exfoliative toxin. PMID:27408744

  19. Vegetative endocarditis in a scimitar-horned oryx (Oryx dammah).

    PubMed

    Chai, N

    1999-12-01

    Streptococcus uberis was cultured from vegetative endocarditis lesions in a scimitar-horned oryx (Oryx dammah) from the Parc de la Haute Touche, France. This is the first reported single isolation of S. uberis from an oryx with vegetative endocarditis leading to fatal congestive heart failure. PMID:10749451

  20. Embolic stroke complicating Staphylococcus aureus endocarditis circumstantially linked to rectal trauma from foreign body: a first case report

    PubMed Central

    Pandey, Braj B; Dang, Tuan C; Healy, John F

    2005-01-01

    Background Diagnostic and therapeutic instrumentation of the lower gastrointestinal tract has been reported to result in bacteremia and endocarditis. No such case has been reported in persons with a history of rectal foreign body insertion despite its potential for greater trauma. Case presentation A 58-year-old male was admitted with confusion and inability to speak. His past history was notable for hospitalization to extract a retained plastic soda bottle from the rectosigmoid two years prior. On examination, he was febrile, tachycardic and hypotensive. There was an apical pansystolic murmur on cardiac examination. He had a mixed receptive and expressive aphasia, and a right hemiparesis. On rectal examination he had perianal erythema and diminished sphincter tone. Magnetic resonance imaging of the brain showed infarction of the occipital and frontal lobes. Transesophageal Echocardiography of the heart revealed vegetations on the mitral valve. All of his blood culture bottles grew methicillin sensitive Staphylococcus aureus. He was successfully treated for bacterial endocarditis with intravenous nafcillin and gentamicin. The rectum is frequently colonized by Staphylococcus aureus and trauma to its mucosa can lead to bacteremia and endocarditis with this organism. In the absence of corroborative evidence such as presented here, it is difficult to make a correlation between staphylococcal endocarditis and anorectal foreign body insertion due to patients being less than forthcoming Conclusion There is a potential risk of staphylococcal bacteremia and endocarditis with rectal foreign body insertion. Further studies are needed to explore this finding. Detailed sexual history and patient counseling should be made a part of routine primary care. PMID:15921523

  1. MOLECULAR CHARACTERIZATION OF STAPHYLOCOCCUS AUREUS STRAINS ISOLATED FROM INFECTIVE ENDOCARDITIS.

    PubMed

    Oprea, Mihaela; Patriche, David Sebastian; Străuţ, Monica; Antohe, Felicia

    2014-01-01

    Infective endocarditis (IE) is an infection of the heart endothelium and valves and is frequently a consequence of a sanguine flow turbulence and injury of endocardium. Recent studies revealed an increase of Staphylococcus aureus strains involved in IE, but no evident correlations between the genetic background of this bacterium and IE involvement of certain strains have been found yet. In this study we analyzed the virulence profile, including adhesins, exotoxins, superantigens and biofilm determinants, along with agr type detection, for S. aureus strains isolated from IE, versus non-IE originating strains. We performed also bacterial typing (SCCmec typing, spa-typing and MLST typing), in order to compare our strains with international databases repositories. Although the study was carried out on a reduced number of isolates, our observations confirm the previous works, showing that no major differences were observed between the genetic backgrounds of the two groups of strains analyzed. Notably, the added value of this study was optimization of two new multiplex PCR protocols, and the enrichment of international databases with three new spa-types, three new MLST alleles and four new MLST sequence types. PMID:26201122

  2. Infective endocarditis in children in the Guinea savannah of Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Ifere, O A; Masokano, K A

    1991-01-01

    Thirty-two children with 33 episodes of infective endocarditis were admitted into the paediatric unit of Ahmadu Bello University Teaching Hospital, Zaria during an 8-year period (January 1982-December 1989). Thirty (94%) had underlying heart disease. Rheumatic heart disease was the pre-existing anomaly in 21 (66%) while congenital cardiac anomalies were detected in nine (28%). Cardiac failure, changing murmur or persisting fever drew attention to the disease. Bacterial isolation was achieved in 19 patients (58%), staphylococci in 11, and salmonella was found in three children. Others included Acinetobacter spp. in two patients, one of whom had a mixed infection involving alpha haemolytic streptococcus whereas three children had Klebsiella, pseudomonas or alpha haemolytic Streptococcus, respectively. Only six patients (18%) recovered. Abscondment rates were high (28%) and overall hospital mortality was 47%. Intractable cardiac failure and neurological complications were the most important events heralding death. There is a need for increased awareness and improved facilities for prompt and effective treatment. PMID:1719922

  3. Brucellosis complicated by aortic valve endocarditis.

    PubMed

    Skillington, P D; McGiffin, D C; Kemp, R; Bett, J H; Holt, G; Forgan-Smith, R

    1988-12-01

    A 30 year old veterinary surgeon developed a febrile illness with serological evidence of Brucellosis. He was known to have aortic valve disease and during the course of the illness, the clinical features of endocarditis became evident, with a vegetation visible echocardiographically on the aortic valve. Because of persisting fever despite appropriate antibiotic therapy, aortic valve replacement with a viable cryopreserved allograft aortic valve was undertaken. Organisms consistent with Brucella species were demonstrated in the excised vegetation. The patient received a six week course of antibiotics and his post-operative course was uneventful. PMID:3250411

  4. The Changing Epidemiology of Pediatric Endocarditis.

    PubMed

    Elder, Robert W; Baltimore, Robert S

    2015-09-01

    The epidemiology of infective endocarditis (IE) appears to be related to changes in the management of children with congenital heart disease (CHD) and the virtual disappearance of rheumatic heart disease. To better understand these changes, we divide the history into: I. The pre-surgical era, II. The early years of CHD surgical intervention, correlated with introduction of antibiotics, III. The modern era of cardiac interventions. Microbiologic changes include an early predominance of viridans streptococci and an overtaking by staphylococci. Additionally, there have been advances in imaging that allow earlier detection of IE and a reduction in IE-related mortality. PMID:26311357

  5. Loeffler endocarditis: silent right ventricular myocardium!

    PubMed

    Çetin, Süha; Heper, Gülümser; Gökhan Vural, Mustafa; Hazirolan, Tuncay

    2016-07-01

    We present the case of a 54-year-old male patient with Loeffler endocarditis. It is a rare disorder characterized by fibrous thickening of the endocardium leading to apical obliteration and restrictive cardiomyopathy resulting in heart failure, thromboembolic events or atrial fibrillation. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first case reporting the electrical silence of the right ventricular (RV) apex caused by fibrothrombotic thickening of this area. Under these circumstances RV apical implantation of an implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) or pacemaker electrode may lead to unsuccessful stimulation of these devices. PMID:26980214

  6. Mitral annuloplasty with biodegradable ring for infective endocarditis: a new tool for the surgeon for valve repair in childhood.

    PubMed

    Kazaz, Hakki; Celkan, Mehmet Adnan; Ustunsoy, Hasim; Baspinar, Osman

    2005-08-01

    The incidence of bacterial endocarditis and valvular involvement is rare in the childhood period. If the patient is unresponsive to medical treatment and some complications occur, early surgical treatment is indicated. Debridement of vegetation combined with valve repair techniques sparing the native valve is the ideal surgical procedure instead of replacement, especially for children. Annuloplasty is the key step during valve repair procedures. On the other hand, absence of appropriate sized annuloplasty rings on the market for this group of patients is the main problem. Nondegradable annuloplasty rings might lead to stenosis as the child grows. Thus, biodegradable tissue engineered materials are new solutions for such patients since the fibrous tissue induced by implanted ring grows with time. We describe a pediatric patient with Brucella endocarditis at the mitral position who was treated successfully with valve repair using a biodegradable annuloplasty ring (Kalangos Biodegradable Ring). PMID:17670435

  7. Pathogenesis of Streptococcus infantarius subspecies coli Isolated from Sea Otters with Infective Endocarditis.

    PubMed

    Counihan, Katrina L; Gill, Verena A; Miller, Melissa A; Burek-Huntington, Kathleen A; LeFebvre, Rance B; Byrne, Barbara A

    2015-06-01

    The Gram positive bacterial coccus Streptococcus infantarius subspecies coli is increasingly linked with development of fatal vegetative infective endocarditis and septicemia in humans, sea otters (Enhydra lutris) and other animals. However, the pathogenesis of these infections is poorly understood. Using S. infantarius subsp. coli strains isolated from sea otters with infective endocarditis, this study evaluated adherence and invasion of epithelial and endothelial cells, adherence to extracellular matrix components, and macrophage survival. Significant adherence to endothelial-derived cells was observed for 62% of isolates, 24% adhered to epithelial cell lines, and 95% invaded one or both cell types in vitro. The importance of the hyaluronic acid capsule in host cell adherence and invasion was also evaluated. Capsule removal significantly reduced epithelial adherence and invasion for most S. infantarius subsp. coli isolates, suggesting that the capsule facilitates attachment to and invasion of epithelium. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay testing revealed that all isolates adhered significantly to the extracellular matrix components collagen IV, fibronectin, laminin and hyaluronic acid. Finally, significant bacterial survival following phagocytosis by macrophages was apparent for 81% of isolates at one or more time points. Taken collectively these findings indicate that S. infantarius subsp. coli has multiple pathogenic properties that may be important to host colonization, invasion and disease. PMID:25838157

  8. The uptake of apoptotic cells drives Coxiella burnetii replication and macrophage polarization: a model for Q fever endocarditis.

    PubMed

    Benoit, Marie; Ghigo, Eric; Capo, Christian; Raoult, Didier; Mege, Jean-Louis

    2008-05-01

    Patients with valvulopathy have the highest risk to develop infective endocarditis (IE), although the relationship between valvulopathy and IE is not clearly understood. Q fever endocarditis, an IE due to Coxiella burnetii, is accompanied by immune impairment. Patients with valvulopathy exhibited increased levels of circulating apoptotic leukocytes, as determined by the measurement of active caspases and nucleosome determination. The binding of apoptotic cells to monocytes and macrophages, the hosts of C. burnetii, may be responsible for the immune impairment observed in Q fever endocarditis. Apoptotic lymphocytes (AL) increased C. burnetii replication in monocytes and monocyte-derived macrophages in a cell-contact dependent manner, as determined by quantitative PCR and immunofluorescence. AL binding induced a M2 program in monocytes and macrophages stimulated with C. burnetii as determined by a cDNA chip containing 440 arrayed sequences and functional tests, but this program was in part different in monocytes and macrophages. While monocytes that had bound AL released high levels of IL-10 and IL-6, low levels of TNF and increased CD14 expression, macrophages that had bound AL released high levels of TGF-beta1 and expressed mannose receptor. The neutralization of IL-10 and TGF-beta1 prevented the replication of C. burnetii due to the binding of AL, suggesting that they were critically involved in bacterial replication. In contrast, the binding of necrotic cells to monocytes and macrophages led to C. burnetii killing and typical M1 polarization. Finally, interferon-gamma corrected the immune deactivation induced by apoptotic cells: it prevented the replication of C. burnetii and re-directed monocytes and macrophages toward a M1 program, which was deleterious for C. burnetii. We suggest that leukocyte apoptosis associated with valvulopathy may be critical for the pathogenesis of Q fever endocarditis by deactivating immune cells and creating a favorable environment

  9. SPOUTED BED ELECTRODES (SBE) FOR DIRECT UTILIZATION OF CARBON IN FUEL CELLS

    SciTech Connect

    J.M. Calo

    2004-12-01

    controlled completely via pressure balance. Experimental investigations in a rectangular spouted vessel hydrodynamics apparatus (SVHA) showed that hydrodynamics can be used to control the circulation, residence time, and distribution of carbon within the spouted bed, as well as provide good particle contact with anode surfaces. This was shown to be a function of viscosity, carbon loading, and particle size, as well as relative densities. Higher viscosities and smaller particle sizes favor more efficient particle entrainment in the draft duct, and particle recirculation. Both the computational and experimental results are consistent with each another and exhibit the same general qualitative behavior. Based upon this work, a design of a prototype SBE/DCFC cell was developed and is presented.

  10. Unreported neurological complications of Gemella bergeriae infective endocarditis

    PubMed Central

    Hussain, Kosar; Abubaker, Jawed; Omar Al Deesi, Zulfa; Ahmed, Raees

    2014-01-01

    We report the first case of native aortic and mitral valve endocarditis due to Gemella bergeriae from the Middle East in a young patient with rheumatic heart disease. Our case illustrates a fulminant course of infection with G. bergeriae endocarditis that was complicated by embolic stroke, as well as intracerebral and subarachnoid haemorrhage secondary to rupture of a mycotic aneurysm in the right middle cerebral artery. This case highlights the dire, unreported neurological complications of infective endocarditis due to a rare causative organism—G. bergeriae. PMID:24899013

  11. Gonococcal endocarditis: an ever-present threat

    PubMed Central

    Kawabata, Vitor Sérgio; Bittencourt, Márcio Sommer; Lovisolo, Silvana Maria; Felipe-Silva, Aloísio; de Lemos, Ana Paula Silva

    2016-01-01

    The incidence of severe complications of the Neisseria gonorrhoeae infection has presented variations over recent decades since the advent of penicillin. Gonococcal endocarditis (GE) still remains an ever-present threat afflicting the society’s poor and sexually active young population. This entity frequently requires surgical intervention and usually exhibits a poor outcome. The interval between the onset of symptoms and the diagnosis does not usually exceed 4 weeks. One of the characteristics of GE is a proclivity for aortic valve involvement with large vegetation and valve ring abscess formation. The authors report the case of a young man with a 2-week history of fever, malaise, weakness, and progressive heart failure symptoms, who had no previous history of genital complaints or cardiopathy. The physical examination was consistent with acute aortic insufficiency, which was most probably of an infectious origin. The echocardiogram showed thickened aortic cusps and valve insufficiency. After hospital admission, the patient’s clinical status worsened rapidly and he died on the second day. The autopsy findings disclosed aortic valve destruction with vegetation and a ring abscess besides signs of septic shock, such as diffuse alveolar damage, acute tubular necrosis, and zone 3 hepatocellular necrosis. The blood culture isolated N. gonorrhoeae resistant to penicillin and ciprofloxacin. The authors call attention to the pathogen of this particular infectious endocarditis, and the need for early diagnosis and evaluation by a cardiac surgery team. PMID:27547739

  12. Gonococcal endocarditis: an ever-present threat.

    PubMed

    de Campos, Fernando Peixoto Ferraz; Kawabata, Vitor Sérgio; Bittencourt, Márcio Sommer; Lovisolo, Silvana Maria; Felipe-Silva, Aloísio; de Lemos, Ana Paula Silva

    2016-01-01

    The incidence of severe complications of the Neisseria gonorrhoeae infection has presented variations over recent decades since the advent of penicillin. Gonococcal endocarditis (GE) still remains an ever-present threat afflicting the society's poor and sexually active young population. This entity frequently requires surgical intervention and usually exhibits a poor outcome. The interval between the onset of symptoms and the diagnosis does not usually exceed 4 weeks. One of the characteristics of GE is a proclivity for aortic valve involvement with large vegetation and valve ring abscess formation. The authors report the case of a young man with a 2-week history of fever, malaise, weakness, and progressive heart failure symptoms, who had no previous history of genital complaints or cardiopathy. The physical examination was consistent with acute aortic insufficiency, which was most probably of an infectious origin. The echocardiogram showed thickened aortic cusps and valve insufficiency. After hospital admission, the patient's clinical status worsened rapidly and he died on the second day. The autopsy findings disclosed aortic valve destruction with vegetation and a ring abscess besides signs of septic shock, such as diffuse alveolar damage, acute tubular necrosis, and zone 3 hepatocellular necrosis. The blood culture isolated N. gonorrhoeae resistant to penicillin and ciprofloxacin. The authors call attention to the pathogen of this particular infectious endocarditis, and the need for early diagnosis and evaluation by a cardiac surgery team. PMID:27547739

  13. Management of infective endocarditis: seventeen years' experience.

    PubMed

    Arbulu, A; Asfaw, I

    1987-02-01

    Infective endocarditis remains a serious illness with a high mortality. In more than 75% of 417 patients, the infection was due to gram-positive microorganisms. The non-drug-addicted patients (33%) were elderly and debilitated with advanced illness that preceded the endocarditis. The drug-addicted patients (67%) were young and were infected with multiple kinds of microorganisms. The blood cultures grew strains of Staphylococcus aureus resistant to methicillin sodium and nafcillin sodium in a majority of patients. Gram-negative microorganisms and fungi were cultured almost exclusively from samples from the drug-addicted patients. The high mortality among the non-drug-addicted patients (28%) was related to their advanced age and debilitating illness. The high mortality among the drug-addicted patients (21%) was related to the complex bacteriology of their infections and the severe anatomical disruption of the valvular complexes of the heart. When cured of their disease after treatment with intravenously administered antibiotics or a valve procedure or both, their long-term survival was related to whether or not they abstained from their habit. If the patient abstained from the use of drugs, the chances of survival were good; if not, death invariably ensued. This experience strongly supports our contention that if a patient returns to the use of drugs and reinfects the valve after initial cure, a second valve operation is contraindicated. PMID:3813702

  14. [Candida albicans endocarditis after pulmonary artery banding].

    PubMed

    Talvard, M; Paranon, S; Dulac, Y; Mansir, T; Kreitmann, B; Acar, P

    2009-08-01

    Endocarditis is uncommon in infants and is exceptionally related to Candida albicans on pulmonary banding. We report on a case in a 7-month-old infant who had pulmonary artery banding for a ventricular septal defect and who presented with candidal endocarditis. Banding was chosen because of the patient's poor trophic and unstable status, which could be risky for surgery involving extracorporeal circulation. A few weeks after the banding, the patient developed systemic Candida infection, which was treated successfully. At 7 months, cardiac failure appeared without fever or inflammatory signs. Cardiac echography showed that the banding was not protective as well as a hyperechogenic image on the pulmonary bifurcation. The angioscan showed a hypodense thrombus. Emergency surgery was performed consisting of pulmonary artery exploration, thrombectomy, and ventricular septal defect closure. The exploration showed a pulmonary artery perforation caused by the infected pseudoaneurysm and the migration of the banding into the pulmonary artery. The anatomopathologic analysis of the vegetation identified multisensitive Candida albicans. After surgery and prolonged antifungal treatment, progression was satisfactory. PMID:19525096

  15. Splenic rupture as a presenting feature of endocarditis.

    PubMed

    Winearls, James Roger; McGloughlin, Steven; Fraser, John F

    2009-04-01

    We describe the first case of infective endocarditis presenting with spontaneous splenic rupture. Our patient, a known intravenous drug user presented with hypovolaemic shock secondary to splenic rupture. The patient was resuscitated and underwent an emergency splenectomy. Subsequent clinical examination revealed a systolic murmur and a diagnosis of mitral valve infective endocarditis was made after echocardiography. Splenic tissue, blood cultures and mitral valve tissue all cultured Enterococcus faecalis. The patient had a successful mitral valve replacement and was discharged home after 44 days. To our knowledge this is the first reported case of enterococcal endocarditis presenting with splenic rupture. This case highlights the need to consider endocarditis in spontaneous splenic rupture particularly in those patients in a high risk group, such as IV drug users, especially if they lack a clear history of trauma. PMID:19217796

  16. MRSA endocarditis of bovine Contegra valved conduit: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Different techniques are used for the right ventricular outflow tract reconstruction, including homo- or porcine xenografts, which have several limitations. Contegra, a bovine jugular vein graft, is an interesting alternative to overcome these limitations. It consists of a bovine jugular vein with a naturally integrated valve in it. Isolated pulmonary valve endocarditis is extremely rare. Case presentation We report the case of a 20 years old male patient with acute endocarditis of bovine Contegra valved conduit, four years after right ventricular outflow tract reconstruction and atrial septal defect correction, associated with acute glomerulonephritis, renal failure and severe anemia, secondary to methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus infection (MRSA). Conclusion We present a complex patient with acute endocarditis of bovine Contegra valved conduit. We believe that the presentation of this case should encourage the researchers for the discussing of the implantation of this conduit and the prevention of endocarditis in these patients. PMID:19146664

  17. Corynebacterium minutissimum endocarditis: a case report and review.

    PubMed

    Aperis, George; Moyssakis, Ioannis

    2007-02-01

    We present a rare case of infectious endocarditis in a 40-year old male with native valve, caused by Corynebacterium minutissimum. The diagnosis was established with transesophageal echocardiogram. The patient was managed successfully with antibiotic therapy. PMID:16757031

  18. Infective endocarditis due to Leptotrichia buccalis: a case report.

    PubMed Central

    Duperval, R.; Béland, S.; Marcoux, J. A.

    1984-01-01

    A patient with Down's syndrome presented with infective endocarditis due to Leptotrichia buccalis. The source of the infection was not detected, but the predisposing factor was a complex cardiac malformation. The disease followed a subacute course, had a number of immunologic manifestations and was successfully treated with a 28-day course of penicillin G, given intravenously. L. buccalis has never been reported before as a cause of endocarditis. PMID:6692239

  19. Lactococcus garvieae Endocarditis on a Prosthetic Biological Aortic Valve.

    PubMed

    Tsur, A; Slutzki, T; Flusser, D

    2015-09-01

    Lactococcus garvieae (LG) endocarditis is a rare disease in humans. There are only about 16 reported cases in the world. We report a 76-year-old male patient with LG endocarditis. In depth interview with the patient revealed that 2 weeks prior to admission, he had eaten sushi containing raw fish. Unlike many of the other infections reported, which were on a native mitral valve, our patient's vegetation was on a prosthetic aortic valve. PMID:25295408

  20. Endocarditis caused by Stenotrophomonas maltophilia: case report and review.

    PubMed

    Gutiérrez Rodero, F; Masiá, M M; Cortés, J; Ortiz de la Tabla, V; Mainar, V; Vilar, A

    1996-12-01

    Stenotrophomonas (Xanthomonas) maltophilia is a rare cause of endocarditis. The extensive resistance of this organism to several antibiotics leaves few options for antimicrobial therapy. In vitro synergism of the combination of trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole (TMP-SMZ) and ticarcillin/clavulanic acid (TIC/CA) has been demonstrated. To our knowledge, we report the first case of ventriculoatrial cerebrospinal fluid shunt-associated endocarditis due to S. maltophilia. The patient was cured with combination therapy with TMP-SMZ and TIC/CA along with catheter removal. This is also the first report of S. maltophilia endocarditis successfully treated with this antibiotic combination. In a review of the medical literature, only 16 cases of S. maltophilia endocarditis were found. Most patients were intravenous drug users (43.8%) or had either prosthetic heart valves (50%) or an indwelling vascular catheter (18.8%). Although S. maltophilia is usually considered a nosocomial pathogen, about one-half of the cases were community-acquired. Twelve of sixteen patients had left-sided endocarditis. Therapy with a combination of two or more antibiotics was employed in most cases. Seven patients had been given TMP-SMZ therapy, but none had been treated with TIC/CA before. One-half of the patients required cardiac surgery. The overall mortality rate was 33%. Although the optimal antibiotic treatment for S. maltophilia endocarditis remains unknown, the case reported herein reinforces in vitro findings that the combination of TMP-SMZ and TIC/CA may be effective therapy. PMID:8953069

  1. The challenge of staphylococcal pacemaker endocarditis in a patient with transposition of the great arteries endocarditis in congenital heart disease

    SciTech Connect

    Ch'ng, Julie; Chan, William; Lee, Paul; Joshi, Subodh; Grigg, Leanne E.; Ajani, Andrew E

    2003-06-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a leading cause of septicaemia and infective endocarditis. The overall incidence of staphylococcal bacteraemia is increasing, contributing to 16% of all hospital-acquired bacteraemias. The use of cardiac pacemakers has revolutionized the management of rhythm disturbances, yet this has also resulted in a group of patients at risk of pacemaker lead endocarditis and seeding in the range of 1% to 7%. We describe a 26-year-old man with transposition of the great arteries who had a pacemaker implanted and presented with S. aureus septicaemia 2 years postpacemaker implantation and went on to develop pacemaker lead endocarditis. This report illustrates the risk of endocarditis in the population with congenital heart disease and an intracardiac device.

  2. Septic sacroiliitis revealing an infectious endocarditis

    PubMed Central

    Mahfoudhi, Madiha; Hariz, Anis; Turki, Sami; Kheder, Adel

    2014-01-01

    We report the case of a 43-year-old man admitted for right hip ache and fever. Physical examination revealed a fever, an ache at the manipulation of the sacroiliac joint and a limitation of abduction and external rotation of the right hip. There was no murmur in cardiac auscultation. No anomaly was found at the conventional radiographs of the sacroiliac joint, while the pelvic MRI confirmed a right sacroiliitis. A sacroiliac puncture with a study of synovial fluid demonstrated the presence of Streptococcus viridans. The blood culture revealed the same germ. Transthoracic and transoesophageal echocardiography confirmed infectious endocarditis with vegetation in the mitral valve. He received penicillin G and gentamicin relayed by pristinamycin because of an allergy to penicillin G with a total duration of treatment of 40 days. His symptoms and the laboratory and radiological tests abnormalities resolved totally with no recurrence. PMID:25123569

  3. The Fibronectin-Binding Protein EfbA Contributes to Pathogenesis and Protects against Infective Endocarditis Caused by Enterococcus faecalis

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Kavindra V.; La Rosa, Sabina Leanti; Somarajan, Sudha R.; Roh, Jung Hyeob

    2015-01-01

    EfbA is a PavA-like fibronectin adhesin of Enterococcus faecalis previously shown to be important in experimental urinary tract infection. Here, we expressed and purified the E. faecalis OG1RF EfbA and confirmed that this protein binds with high affinity to immobilized fibronectin, collagen I, and collagen V. We constructed an efbA deletion mutant and demonstrated that its virulence was significantly attenuated (P < 0.0006) versus the wild type in a mixed inoculum rat endocarditis model. Furthermore, efbA deletion resulted in diminished ability to bind fibronectin (P < 0.0001) and reduced biofilm (P < 0.001). Reintroduction of efbA into the original chromosomal location restored virulence, adherence to fibronectin, and biofilm formation to wild-type levels. Finally, vaccination of rats with purified recombinant EfbA protein protected against OG1RF endocarditis (P = 0.008 versus control). Taken together, our results demonstrate that EfbA is an important factor involved in E. faecalis endocarditis and that rEfbA immunization is effective in preventing such infection, likely by interfering with bacterial adherence. PMID:26351286

  4. Long-term performance of Aanderaa optodes and sea-bird SBE-43 dissolved-oxygen sensors bottom mounted at 32 m in Massachusetts Bay

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Martini, Marinna; Butman, Bradford; Mickelson, Michael J.

    2007-01-01

    A field evaluation of two new dissolved-oxygen sensing technologies, the Aanderaa Instruments AS optode model 3830 and the Sea-Bird Electronics, Inc., model SBE43, was carried out at about 32-m water depth in western Massachusetts Bay. The optode is an optical sensor that measures fluorescence quenching by oxygen molecules, while the SBE43 is a Clark polarographic membrane sensor. Optodes were continuously deployed on bottom tripod frames by exchanging sensors every 4 months over a 19-month period. A Sea-Bird SBE43 was added during one 4-month deployment. These moored observations compared well with oxygen measurements from profiles collected during monthly shipboard surveys conducted by the Massachusetts Water Resources Authority. The mean correlation coefficient between the moored measurements and shipboard survey data was >0.9, the mean difference was 0.06 mL L−1, and the standard deviation of the difference was 0.15 mL L−1. The correlation coefficient between the optode and the SBE43 was >0.9 and the mean difference was 0.07 mL L−1. Optode measurements degraded when fouling was severe enough to block oxygen molecules from entering the sensing foil over a significant portion of the sensing window. Drift observed in two optodes beginning at about 225 and 390 days of deployment is attributed to degradation of the sensing foil. Flushing is necessary to equilibrate the Sea-Bird sensor. Power consumption by the SBE43 and required pump was 19.2 mWh per sample, and the optode consumed 0.9 mWh per sample, both within expected values based on manufacturers’ specifications.

  5. Effects of the Preparation Method on the Formation of True Nimodipine SBE-β-CD/HP-β-CD Inclusion Complexes and Their Dissolution Rates Enhancement.

    PubMed

    Semcheddine, Farouk; Guissi, Nida El Islem; Liu, XueYin; Wu, ZuoMin; Wang, Bo

    2015-06-01

    The aims of this study were to enhance the solubility and dissolution rate of nimodipine (ND) by preparing the inclusion complexes of ND with sulfobutylether-b-cyclodextrin (SBE-β-CD) and 2-hydroxypropyl-b-cyclodextrin (HP-β-CD) and to study the effect of the preparation method on the in vitro dissolution profile in different media (0.1 N HCl pH 1.2, phosphate buffer pH 7.4, and distilled water). Thus, the inclusion complexes were prepared by kneading, coprecipitation, and freeze-drying methods. Phase solubility studies were conducted to characterize the complexes in the liquid state. The inclusion complexes in the solid state were investigated with differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), X-ray diffractometry (X-RD), and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR). Stable complexes of ND/SBE-β-CD and ND/HP-β-CD were formed in distilled water in a 1:1 stoichiometric inclusion complex as indicated by an AL-type diagram. The apparent stability constants (Ks) were 1334.4 and 464.1 M(-1) for ND/SBE-β-CD and ND/HP-β-CD, respectively. The water-solubility of ND was significantly increased in an average of 22- and 8-fold for SBE-β-CD and HP-β-CD, respectively. DSC results showed the formation of true inclusion complexes between the drug and both SBE-β-CD and HP-β-CD prepared by the kneading method. In contrast, crystalline drug was detectable in all other products. The dissolution studies showed that all the products exhibited higher dissolution rate than those of the physical mixtures and ND alone, in all mediums. However, the kneading complexes displayed the maximum dissolution rate in comparison with drug and other complexes, confirming the influence of the preparation method on the physicochemical properties of the products. PMID:25511809

  6. Genome Sequence of Streptococcus gallolyticus: Insights into Its Adaptation to the Bovine Rumen and Its Ability To Cause Endocarditis ▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Rusniok, Christophe; Couvé, Elisabeth; Da Cunha, Violette; El Gana, Rachida; Zidane, Nora; Bouchier, Christiane; Poyart, Claire; Leclercq, Roland; Trieu-Cuot, Patrick; Glaser, Philippe

    2010-01-01

    Streptococcus gallolyticus (formerly known as Streptococcus bovis biotype I) is an increasing cause of endocarditis among streptococci and frequently associated with colon cancer. S. gallolyticus is part of the rumen flora but also a cause of disease in ruminants as well as in birds. Here we report the complete nucleotide sequence of strain UCN34, responsible for endocarditis in a patient also suffering from colon cancer. Analysis of the 2,239 proteins encoded by its 2,350-kb-long genome revealed unique features among streptococci, probably related to its adaptation to the rumen environment and its capacity to cause endocarditis. S. gallolyticus has the capacity to use a broad range of carbohydrates of plant origin, in particular to degrade polysaccharides derived from the plant cell wall. Its genome encodes a large repertoire of transporters and catalytic activities, like tannase, phenolic compounds decarboxylase, and bile salt hydrolase, that should contribute to the detoxification of the gut environment. Furthermore, S. gallolyticus synthesizes all 20 amino acids and more vitamins than any other sequenced Streptococcus species. Many of the genes encoding these specific functions were likely acquired by lateral gene transfer from other bacterial species present in the rumen. The surface properties of strain UCN34 may also contribute to its virulence. A polysaccharide capsule might be implicated in resistance to innate immunity defenses, and glucan mucopolysaccharides, three types of pili, and collagen binding proteins may play a role in adhesion to tissues in the course of endocarditis. PMID:20139183

  7. Prosthetic valve endocarditis due to Candida tropicalis complicated by multiple pseudoaneurysms.

    PubMed

    Zedtwitz-Liebenstein, K; Gabriel, H; Willinger, B; Ehringer, H; Polterauer, P; Graninger, W

    2001-01-01

    Candida endocarditis is an unusual but severe complication caused by Candida albicans or other fungal species. We describe a case of prosthetic valve endocarditis due to Candida tropicalis, complicated by multiple pseudoaneurysms. PMID:11440392

  8. Rupture of a pulmonary artery mycotic aneurysm associated with candidal endocarditis.

    PubMed

    Roush, K; Scala-Barnett, D M; Donabedian, H; Freimer, E H

    1988-01-01

    Candidal endocarditis can develop if candidemia occurs during Swan-Ganz catheterization. Candida endocarditis may persist for many months and is fatal unless the infected valve is resected. Herein is reported the first case of rupture of a mycotic pulmonary artery aneurysm caused by chronic candidal endocarditis. The endocarditis followed Swan-Ganz catheterization and aneurysm progressed despite appropriate medical and surgical therapy. PMID:3337118

  9. Chronic endocarditis due to Legionella anisa: a first case difficult to diagnose

    PubMed Central

    Compain, F.; Bruneval, P.; Jarraud, S.; Perrot, S.; Aubert, S.; Napoly, V.; Ramahefasolo, A.; Mainardi, J.-L.; Podglajen, I.

    2015-01-01

    Endocarditis due to Legionella spp. is uncommon but presumably underestimated given the prevalence of Legionellae in the environment. We report a first and unusual case of chronic native valve endocarditis due to L. anisa and advocate that the diagnosis of endocarditis be made collaboratively between the cardiologist, surgeon, microbiologist and pathologist. PMID:26693025

  10. Coxiella burnetii Endocarditis in a Child Caused by a New Genotype.

    PubMed

    Briggs, Benjamin J; Raoult, Didier; Hijazi, Ziyad M; Edouard, Sophie; Angelakis, Emmanouil; Logan, Latania K

    2016-02-01

    Coxiella burnetii endocarditis is a rare diagnosis in children. We present a case of Q fever endocarditis due to a new genotype, MST 54, and review recent literature on Q fever infections in children. Practitioners should consider Q fever in culture-negative endocarditis, particularly in children with congenital heart disease and history of travel or residence in endemic regions. PMID:26535879

  11. Brown-Pigmented Mycobacterium mageritense as a Cause of Prosthetic Valve Endocarditis and Bloodstream Infection

    PubMed Central

    McMullen, Allison R.; Mattar, Caline; Kirmani, Nigar

    2015-01-01

    Mycobacterium spp. are a rare cause of endocarditis. Herein, we describe a case of Mycobacterium mageritense prosthetic valve endocarditis. This organism produced an unusual brown pigment on solid media. Cultures of valve tissue for acid-fast bacilli might be considered in some cases of apparently culture-negative prosthetic valve endocarditis. PMID:26063854

  12. Mitral endocarditis due to Rothia aeria with cerebral haemorrhage and femoral mycotic aneurysms, first French description.

    PubMed

    Collarino, R; Vergeylen, U; Emeraud, C; Latournèrie, G; Grall, N; Mammeri, H; Messika-Zeitoun, D; Vallois, D; Yazdanpanah, Y; Lescure, F-X; Bleibtreu, A

    2016-09-01

    Rothia aeria is a Rothia species from the Micrococcaceae family. We report here the first French R. aeria endocarditis complicated by brain haemorrhage and femoral mycotic aneurysms. Altogether, severity and antimicrobial susceptibility should make us consider the management of R. aeria endocarditis as Staphylococcus aureus methicillin-susceptible endocarditis. PMID:27408740

  13. Chronic endocarditis due to Legionella anisa: a first case difficult to diagnose.

    PubMed

    Compain, F; Bruneval, P; Jarraud, S; Perrot, S; Aubert, S; Napoly, V; Ramahefasolo, A; Mainardi, J-L; Podglajen, I

    2015-11-01

    Endocarditis due to Legionella spp. is uncommon but presumably underestimated given the prevalence of Legionellae in the environment. We report a first and unusual case of chronic native valve endocarditis due to L. anisa and advocate that the diagnosis of endocarditis be made collaboratively between the cardiologist, surgeon, microbiologist and pathologist. PMID:26693025

  14. Fungal prosthetic valve endocarditis with mycotic aneurysm: Case report.

    PubMed

    Brandão, Mariana; Almeida, Jorge; Ferraz, Rita; Santos, Lurdes; Pinho, Paulo; Casanova, Jorge

    2016-09-01

    Fungal prosthetic valve endocarditis is an extremely severe form of infective endocarditis, with poor prognosis and high mortality despite treatment. Candida albicans is the most common etiological agent for this rare but increasingly frequent condition. We present a case of fungal prosthetic valve endocarditis due to C. albicans following aortic and pulmonary valve replacement in a 38-year-old woman with a history of surgically corrected tetralogy of Fallot, prior infective endocarditis and acute renal failure with need for catheter-based hemodialysis. Antifungal therapy with liposomal amphotericin B was initiated prior to cardiac surgery, in which the bioprostheses were replaced by homografts, providing greater resistance to recurrent infection. During hospitalization, a mycotic aneurysm was diagnosed following an episode of acute arterial ischemia, requiring two vascular surgical interventions. Despite the complications, the patient's outcome was good and she was discharged on suppressive antifungal therapy with oral fluconazole for at least a year. The reported case illustrates multiple risk factors for fungal endocarditis, as well as complications and predictors of poor prognosis, demonstrating its complexity. PMID:27493128

  15. Endocarditis caused by unusual Streptococcus species (Streptococcus pluranimalium)

    PubMed Central

    Fotoglidis, A; Pagourelias, E; Kyriakou, P; Vassilikos, V

    2015-01-01

    Background Infective endocarditis in intravenous drug abusers is caused mainly by Staphylococcus species and usually affects the right heart valves. Case Description We report the case of a 37-years-old intravenous drug abuser, who was diagnosed with infective endocarditis of the mitral and aortic valve. An unusual Streptococcus species (Streptococcus pluranimalium) was isolated from surgical specimens (peripheral arterial emboli, valves’ vegetations) which, according to the literature, is related to animals’ diseases such as infective endocarditis in adult broiler parents, with no references existing regarding causing such disease in humans. This unusual coccus infection caused specific clinical features (sizable vegetation on mitral valve >2cm, smaller vegetations on aortic valve, systemic emboli), resistance to antimicrobial therapy, rapid progression of the disease (despite of medical therapy and surgical replacement of both valves), and finally the death of the patient two months after the initial presentation of infective endocarditis. Conclusion Unusual cases of infective endocarditis in intravenous drug abusers are emerging and are characterized by changing microbiological profile and varying clinical characteristics. Clinical doctors must be aware of these cases, especially when their patients present an atypical clinical course, and reappraise their medical management. Hippokratia 2015; 19 (2):182-185. PMID:27418771

  16. [Therapy and prevention of infectious endocarditis].

    PubMed

    Horstkotte, D; Rosin, H

    1984-11-10

    Only 40 years ago infectious endocarditis (IE) was lethal in most cases. Due to the development of numerous antibiotics and continuous improvements in heart valve surgery, a wide range of possibilities for therapy and prophylaxis of IE are available. The prognosis depends essentially on rapid and relevant diagnosis, which should be followed by immediate and adequate therapy consisting of general measures for treatment of septicaemic disease and specific antibiotic therapy. As multiple complications may develop during IE, careful follow-up by clinical, laboratory and mechanical examinations is necessary to decide whether surgical intervention is urgently indicated or not. In case of complications such as myocardial failure, septicaemic embolism or acute renal failure, as well as septicaemia persisting for more than 72 hours in spite of antibiotic treatment, immediate valve replacement is usually indispensable. Furthermore, large vegetations found by echocardiography, or infections caused by staphylococci, gramnegative bacteria or fungi are arguments for early surgery. For most of the IE pathogens the antibiotic treatment concept is nowadays widely acknowledged. Penicillin-sensitive streptococci are treated with a combination of penicillin S and an amino-glycoside (streptomycin). If the penicillin-MBK is very low, combined treatment can usually be abandoned. In patients allergic to penicillin, treatment with lincomycin has advantages over vancomycin or cephalosporins. In enterococcal IE, ampicillin plus aminoglycoside is the combination of choice. Streptomycin has preference over gentamicin here only if the enterococci are not streptomycin-resistant. If penicillin allergy is evident, the new beta-lactam antibiotic imipenem offers a way out of the present therapy dilemma. For penicillin-sensitive staphylococci a combination of penicillin-G with gentamicin given over 6 weeks is recommended. In case of penicillin allergy, cefazolin or vancomycin may provide a substitute

  17. Comparative Genome Analyses of Streptococcus suis Isolates from Endocarditis Demonstrate Persistence of Dual Phenotypic Clones

    PubMed Central

    Tohya, Mari; Watanabe, Takayasu; Maruyama, Fumito; Arai, Sakura; Ota, Atsushi; Athey, Taryn B. T.; Fittipaldi, Nahuel; Nakagawa, Ichiro; Sekizaki, Tsutomu

    2016-01-01

    Many bacterial species coexist in the same niche as heterogeneous clones with different phenotypes; however, understanding of infectious diseases by polyphenotypic bacteria is still limited. In the present study, encapsulation in isolates of the porcine pathogen Streptococcus suis from persistent endocarditis lesions was examined. Coexistence of both encapsulated and unencapsulated S. suis isolates was found in 26 out of 59 endocarditis samples. The isolates were serotype 2, and belonged to two different sequence types (STs), ST1 and ST28. The genomes of each of the 26 pairs of encapsulated and unencapsulated isolates from the 26 samples were sequenced. The data showed that each pair of isolates had one or more unique nonsynonymous mutations in the cps gene, and the encapsulated and unencapsulated isolates from the same samples were closest to each other. Pairwise comparisons of the sequences of cps genes in 7 pairs of encapsulated and unencapsulated isolates identified insertion/deletions (indels) ranging from one to 104 bp in different cps genes of unencapsulated isolates. Capsule expression was restored in a subset of unencapsulated isolates by complementation in trans with cps expression vectors. Examination of gene content common to isolates indicated that mutation frequency was higher in ST28 pairs than in ST1 pairs. Genes within mobile genetic elements were mutation hot spots among ST28 isolates. Taken all together, our results demonstrate the coexistence of dual phenotype (encapsulated and unencapsulated) bacterial clones and suggest that the dual phenotypes arose independently in each farm by means of spontaneous mutations in cps genes. PMID:27433935

  18. [Surgical Treatment of Prosthetic Valve Endocarditis].

    PubMed

    Kaminishi, Yuichiro; Akutsu, Hirohiko; Sugaya, Akira; Kurumisawa, Soki; Takazawa, Ippei; Sato, Hirotaka; Muraoka, Arata; Aizawa, Kei; Ohki, Shinichi; Saito, Tsutomu; Kawahito, Koji; Misawa, Yoshio

    2015-11-01

    Between 2003 and 2014, at Jichi Medical University Hospital, 11 patients with prosthetic valve endocarditis (PVE) underwent re-operation. There was 1 in-hospital death and 2 late deaths. The cause of death was cirrhosis, heart failure and sepsis, respectively. Emergency surgery, previous double valve replacement (DVR) and Staphylococcus infection were common risk factors for all 3 cases. Two cases of patients that survived who underwent mitral valve replacement (MVR) and DVR for PVE after DVR were treated with multiple antibiotic courses for bacteremia associated with hemodialysis and colon cancer. One patient who underwent DVR after mitral valve plasty which was complicated with cerebral hemorrhage, had survived and was discharged. Of the aortic PVE patients, 2 cases of aortic valve replacement (AVR) using a mechanical valve, 1 case of aortic root replacement (ARR) using a mechanical valve, and 1 ARR using the homograft, were considered cured and never relapsed. A patient with aortic PVE, who underwent AVR after cesarean section for heart failure in birth period, has received ARR twice with the mechanical valve for recurrent pseudo-aneurysm of the left ventricular outflow tract. Since hemodialysis and colon cancer is a risk factor for recurrent PVE, it is necessary to consider the long-term administration of antibiotics after surgery. PMID:26469256

  19. Update on endocarditis-associated glomerulonephritis.

    PubMed

    Boils, Christie L; Nasr, Samih H; Walker, Patrick D; Couser, William G; Larsen, Christopher P

    2015-06-01

    Glomerulonephritis (GN) due to infective endocarditis (IE) is well documented, but most available data are based on old autopsy series. To update information, we now present the largest biopsy-based clinicopathologic series on IE-associated GN. The study group included 49 patients (male-to-female ratio of 3.5:1) with a mean age of 48 years. The most common presenting feature was acute kidney injury. Over half of the patients had no known prior cardiac abnormality. However, the most common comorbidities were cardiac valve disease (30%), intravenous drug use (29%), hepatitis C (20%), and diabetes (18%). The cardiac valve infected was tricuspid in 43%, mitral in 33%, and aortic in 29% of patients. The two most common infective bacteria were Staphylococcus (53%) and Streptococcus (23%). Hypocomplementemia was found in 56% of patients tested and ANCA antibody in 28%. The most common biopsy finding was necrotizing and crescentic GN (53%), followed by endocapillary proliferative GN (37%). C3 deposition was prominent in all cases, whereas IgG deposition was seen in <30% of cases. Most patients had immune deposits detectable by electron microscopy. Thus, IE-associated GN most commonly presents with AKI and complicates staphylococcal tricuspid valve infection. Contrary to infection-associated glomerulonephritis in general, the most common pattern of glomerular injury in IE-associated glomerulonephritis was necrotizing and crescentic glomerulonephritis. PMID:25607109

  20. [Infective endocarditis associated with vertebral osteomyelitis: report of two cases].

    PubMed

    Ogata, Y; Yabe, T; Matsumura, Y; Takata, J; Chikamori, T; Doi, Y

    1996-01-01

    A 42-year-old man and a 65-year-old woman with infective endocarditis suffered onset of severe back pain. Magnetic resonance imaging and technetium-99 m bone scanning demonstrated osteomyelitis in the lumbar spine which is an unusual complication of infective endocarditis. The man was treated by antibiotics and finally aortic valve replacement and laminectomy with bone grafting. The woman had small patent ductus arteriosus and developed aortic regurgitation, but was treated by antibiotics and corset application with good result. The possibility of osteomyelitis in the lumbar spine should be considered in a patient with endocarditis complaining of severe back pain. The appropriate antibiotic therapy over a prolonged period is recommended. PMID:9067825

  1. Contemporary management of prosthetic valve endocarditis: principals and future outlook.

    PubMed

    O'Connor, Cormac T; Kiernan, Thomas J

    2015-05-01

    Infective endocarditis involving prosthetic valves accounts for 20% of all endocarditis cases. Rising in prevalence due to increasing placement of valvular prostheses, prosthetic valve endocarditis (PVE) is more difficult to diagnose by conventional methods, associated with more invasive infection and increased mortality. This report explores the existing literature in identifying a direct approach to the management of PVE; such as adjuncts to establishing a diagnosis (for instance positron emission tomography/computed tomography and radiolabeled leukocyte scintigraphy), the trends in specific pathogens associated with PVE and the recommended antimicrobials for each. The patterns of disease requiring surgical intervention are also highlighted and explored. In addition, a 5-year outlook offers consolidated knowledge on epidemiological trends of both culprit organisms and population subgroups suffering (and projected to suffer) from PVE. PMID:25865118

  2. Adult patent Ductus Arteriosus complicated by endocarditis and hemolytic anemia

    PubMed Central

    Sabzi, Feridoun

    2015-01-01

    An adult with a large patent ductus arteriosus may present with fatigue, dyspnea or palpitations or in rare presentation with endocarditis. The case illustrated unique role of vegetation of endocarditis in hemolytic anemia in adult with patent ductus arteriosus (PDA). Despite treatment of endocarditis with complete course of appropriate antibiotic therapy and normality of C- reactive protein, erythrocyte sedimentation rate and leukocytosis and wellness of general condition, transthoracic echocardiography revealed large vegetation in PDA lumen, surgical closure of PDA completely relieved hemolysis, and fragmented red cell disappeared from peripheral blood smear. The 3-month follow-up revealed complete occlusion of PDA and abolishment of hemolytic anemia confirmed by clinical and laboratory examination. PMID:26309344

  3. A case of Salmonella typhi endocarditis in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Ozer, Orhan; Cebesoy, Fatma Bahar; Sari, Ibrahim; Davutoglu, Vedat

    2009-03-01

    Infective endocarditis (IE) is an uncommon but life-threatening infection during pregnancy. Although there have been several reports of endocarditis caused by Salmonella typhi, to our knowledge it has not been reported as a cause of endocarditis during pregnancy. We report a case of 27-year-old pregnant woman with aortic valve IE caused by S. typhi, who had moderate mitral stenosis and aortic regurgitation. During pregnancy, fever, increase in sedimentation should always alert the physician about the possibility of IE, especially in the presence of predisposing clinical conditions. Whenever possible, transesophageal echocardiographic evaluation should be performed because transthoracic echocardiography might not always demonstrate vegetation as in the present case. PMID:19174690

  4. Infective endocarditis in intravenous drug abusers: an update.

    PubMed

    Sousa, C; Botelho, C; Rodrigues, D; Azeredo, J; Oliveira, R

    2012-11-01

    Infective endocarditis despite advances in diagnosis remains a common cause of hospitalization, with high morbidity and mortality rates. Through literature review it is possible to conclude that polymicrobial endocarditis occurs mainly in intravenous drug abusers with predominance in the right side of the heart, often with tricuspid valve involvement. This fact can be associated with the type of drug used by the patients; therefore, knowledge of the patient's history is critical for adjustment of the therapy. It is also important to emphasize that the most common combinations of organisms in polymicrobial infective endocarditis are: Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus pneumonia and Pseudomonas aeruginosa, as well as mixed cultures of Candida spp. and bacteria. A better understanding of the epidemiology and associated risk factors are required in order to develop an efficient therapy, although PE studies are difficult to perform due to the rarity of cases and lack of prospective cohorts. PMID:22714640

  5. Adult patent ductus arteriosus complicated by endocarditis and hemolytic anemia.

    PubMed

    Sabzi, Feridoun; Faraji, Reza

    2015-01-01

    An adult with a large patent ductus arteriosus may present with fatigue, dyspnea or palpitations or in rare presentation with endocarditis. The case illustrated unique role of vegetation of endocarditis in hemolytic anemia in adult with patent ductus arteriosus (PDA). Despite treatment of endocarditis with complete course of appropriate antibiotic therapy and normality of C- reactive protein, erythrocyte sedimentation rate and leukocytosis and wellness of general condition, transthoracic echocardiography revealed large vegetation in PDA lumen, surgical closure of PDA completely relieved hemolysis, and fragmented red cell disappeared from peripheral blood smear. The 3-month follow-up revealed complete occlusion of PDA and abolishment of hemolytic anemia confirmed by clinical and laboratory examination. PMID:26309344

  6. Bacterial infections complicating tongue piercing

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Catherine HY; Minnema, Brian J; Gold, Wayne L

    2010-01-01

    Tongue piercing has become an increasingly popular form of body art. However, this procedure can occasionally be complicated by serious bacterial infections. The present article reports a case of prosthetic valve endocarditis caused by a Gemella species in a patient with a pierced tongue, and reviews 18 additional cases of local and systemic bacterial infections associated with tongue piercing. Infections localized to the oral cavity and head and neck region included molar abscess, glossal abscess, glossitis, submandibular lymphadenitis, submandibular sialadenitis, Ludwig’s angina and cephalic tetanus. Infections distal to the piercing site included eight cases of infective endocarditis, one case of chorioamnionitis and one case of cerebellar abscess. Oropharyngeal flora were isolated from all cases. While bacterial infections following tongue piercing are rare, there are reports of potentially life-threatening infections associated with the procedure. Both piercers and their clients should be aware of these potential complications, and standardized infection prevention and control practices should be adopted by piercers to reduce the risk. PMID:21358880

  7. Bioprosthetic Aortic Valve Endocarditis in Association with Enterococcus durans

    PubMed Central

    Di Gioacchino, Lorena; Balestrini, Fabrizio

    2016-01-01

    Enterococci are common organisms associated with endocarditis, but infection by Enterococcus durans is very rare. To our knowledge, only 3 cases have been reported in the medical literature, and all 3 have involved native valves. Here we publish the first reported case (to our knowledge) of E. durans endocarditis in association with a bioprosthetic aortic valve. After the organism and its antibiotic susceptibility were identified, the 74-year-old male patient was treated successfully with teicoplanin and gentamicin, over a course of 6 weeks. PMID:27127436

  8. Corynebacterium endocarditis species-specific risk factors and outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Belmares, Jaime; Detterline, Stephanie; Pak, Janet B; Parada, Jorge P

    2007-01-01

    Background Corynebacterium species are recognized as uncommon agents of endocarditis, but little is known regarding species-specific risk factors and outcomes in Corynebacterium endocarditis. Methods Case report and Medline search of English language journals for cases of Corynebacterium endocarditis. Inclusion criteria required that cases be identified as endocarditis, having persistent Corynebacterium bacteremia, murmurs described by the authors as identifying the affected valve, or vegetations found by echocardiography or in surgical or autopsy specimens. Cases also required patient-specific information on risk factors and outcomes (age, gender, prior prosthetic valve, other prior nosocomial risk factors (infected valve, involvement of native versus prosthetic valve, need for valve replacement, and death) to be included in the analysis. Publications of Corynebacterium endocarditis which reported aggregate data were excluded. Univariate analysis was conducted with chi-square and t-tests, as appropriate, with p = 0.05 considered significant. Results 129 cases of Corynebacterium endocarditis involving nine species met inclusion criteria. Corynebacterium endocarditis typically infects the left heart of adult males and nearly one third of patients have underlying valvular disease. One quarter of patients required valve replacement and one half of patients died. Toxigenic C. diphtheriae is associated with pediatric infections (p < 0.001). Only C. amycolatum has a predilection for women (p = 0.024), while C. pseudodiphtheriticum infections are most frequent in men (p = 0.023). C. striatum, C. jeikeium and C. hemolyticum are associated with nosocomial risk factors (p < 0.001, 0.028, and 0.024, respectively). No species was found to have a predilection for any particular heart valve. C. pseudodiphtheriticum is associated with a previous prosthetic valve replacement (p = 0.004). C. jeikeium infections are more likely to require valve replacement (p = 0.026). Infections

  9. Current Epidemiology and Outcome of Infective Endocarditis

    PubMed Central

    Muñoz, Patricia; Kestler, Martha; De Alarcon, Arístides; Miro, José María; Bermejo, Javier; Rodríguez-Abella, Hugo; Fariñas, Maria Carmen; Cobo Belaustegui, Manuel; Mestres, Carlos; Llinares, Pedro; Goenaga, Miguel; Navas, Enrique; Oteo, José Antonio; Tarabini, Paola; Bouza, Emilio

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The aim of the study was to describe the epidemiologic and clinical characteristics and identify the risk factors of short-term and 1-year mortality in a recent cohort of patients with infective endocarditis (IE). From January 2008, multidisciplinary teams have prospectively collected all consecutive cases of IE, diagnosed according to the Duke criteria, in 25 Spanish hospitals. Overall, 1804 patients were diagnosed. The median age was 69 years (interquartile range, 55–77), 68.0% were men, and 37.1% of the cases were nosocomial or health care-related IE. Gram-positive microorganisms accounted for 79.3% of the episodes, followed by Gram-negative (5.2%), fungi (2.4%), anaerobes (0.9%), polymicrobial infections (1.9%), and unknown etiology (9.1%). Heart surgery was performed in 44.2%, and in-hospital mortality was 28.8%. Risk factors for in-hospital mortality were age, previous heart surgery, cerebrovascular disease, atrial fibrillation, Staphylococcus or Candida etiology, intracardiac complications, heart failure, and septic shock. The 1-year independent risk factors for mortality were age (odds ratio [OR], 1.02), neoplasia (OR, 2.46), renal insufficiency (OR, 1.59), and heart failure (OR, 4.42). Surgery was an independent protective factor for 1-year mortality (OR, 0.44). IE remains a severe disease with a high rate of in-hospital (28.9%) and 1-year mortality (11.2%). Surgery was the only intervention that significantly reduced 1-year mortality. PMID:26512582

  10. Antineutrophil Cytoplasmic Antibodies Associated With Infective Endocarditis

    PubMed Central

    Langlois, Vincent; Lesourd, Anais; Girszyn, Nicolas; Ménard, Jean-Francois; Levesque, Hervé; Caron, Francois; Marie, Isabelle

    2016-01-01

    Abstract To determine the prevalence of antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies (ANCA) in patients with infective endocarditis (IE) in internal medicine; and to compare clinical and biochemical features and outcome between patients exhibiting IE with and without ANCA. Fifty consecutive patients with IE underwent ANCA testing. The medical records of these patients were reviewed. Of the 50 patients with IE, 12 exhibited ANCA (24%). ANCA-positive patients with IE exhibited: longer duration between the onset of first symptoms and IE diagnosis (P = 0.02); and more frequently: weight loss (P = 0.017) and renal impairment (P = 0.08), lower levels of C-reactive protein (P = 0.0009) and serum albumin (P = 0.0032), involvement of both aortic and mitral valves (P = 0.009), and longer hospital stay (P = 0.016). Under multivariate analysis, significant factors for ANCA-associated IE were: longer hospital stay (P = 0.004), lower level of serum albumin (P = 0.02), and multiple valve involvement (P = 0.04). Mortality rate was 25% in ANCA patients; death was because of IE complications in all these patients. Our study identifies a high prevalence of ANCA in unselected patients with IE in internal medicine (24%). Our findings further underscore that ANCA may be associated with a subacute form of IE leading to multiple valve involvement and more frequent renal impairment. Because death was due to IE complications in all patients, our data suggest that aggressive therapy may be required to improve such patients’ outcome. PMID:26817911

  11. Successful treatment by doxycycline of endocarditis caused by ornithosis.

    PubMed Central

    Walker, L J; Adgey, A A

    1987-01-01

    The case of a 59 year old man with ornithosis endocarditis and a history of contact with pheasants is reported. Treatment with oxytetracycline was not tolerated and so doxycycline was substituted. Over the two year follow up the patient's clinical condition and serial echocardiographic appearances improved and Chlamydia psittaci complement fixation titres returned to normal. Valve replacement was not required. Images Figure PMID:3801260

  12. Post-infectious glomerulonephritis following infective endocarditis: Amenable to immunosuppression

    PubMed Central

    Mantan, M.; Sethi, G. R.; Batra, V. V.

    2013-01-01

    Glomerulonephritis develops in about 20% patients with infective endocarditis (IE), but is mostly asymptomatic. Heavy proteinuria or derangement of kidney functions is uncommon. We report here a child with IE and proliferative glomerulonephritis who manifested as significant proteinuria that recovered on treatment with immunosupressants. PMID:24049276

  13. Case report of Streptomyces endocarditis of a prosthetic aortic valve.

    PubMed Central

    Mossad, S B; Tomford, J W; Stewart, R; Ratliff, N B; Hall, G S

    1995-01-01

    We describe the first case of prosthetic valve endocarditis due to a Streptomyces sp. The patient presented with fever, cutaneous embolic lesions, and bacteremia 3 months after aortic valve replacement. Treatment required valve replacement and a long course of parenteral imipenem. PMID:8586732

  14. Enterococcal Infective Endocarditis following Periodontal Disease in Dogs

    PubMed Central

    Semedo-Lemsaddek, Teresa; Tavares, Marta; São Braz, Berta; Tavares, Luís; Oliveira, Manuela

    2016-01-01

    In humans, one of the major factors associated with infective endocarditis (IE) is the concurrent presence of periodontal disease (PD). However, in veterinary medicine, the relevance of PD in the evolution of dogs’ endocarditis remains poorly understood. In order to try to establish a correlation between mouth-associated Enterococcus spp. and infective endocarditis in dogs, the present study evaluated the presence and diversity of enterococci in the gum and heart of dogs with PD. Samples were collected during necropsy of 32 dogs with PD and visually diagnosed with IE, which died of natural causes or euthanasia. Enterococci were isolated, identified and further characterized by Pulsed-Field Gel Electrophoresis (PFGE); susceptibility to antimicrobial agents and pathogenicity potential was also evaluated. In seven sampled animals, PFGE-patterns, resistance and virulence profiles were found to be identical between mouth and heart enterococci obtained from the same dog, allowing the establishment of an association between enterococcal periodontal disease and endocarditis in dogs. These findings represent a crucial step towards understanding the pathogenesis of PD-driven IE, and constitute a major progress in veterinary medicine. PMID:26752198

  15. Endocarditis of bovine jugular vein conduit due to Q fever.

    PubMed

    Stefanidis, Constantin; Benahmed-Mostafa, Aziz; Sanoussi, Ahmed; Quiriny, Marie; Demanet, Hélène; Theunissen, Caroline; Wauthy, Pierre

    2011-06-01

    Contegra (Medtronic, Minneapolis, MN) conduits are routinely used in cases of right ventricular outflow tract reconstruction during congenital heart surgery. We report two cases of Q fever endocarditis involving Contegra conduits. Surgical treatment and distinct aspects of both unusual cases are described. PMID:21620004

  16. Endocarditis caused by Streptococcus canis: an emerging zoonosis?

    PubMed

    Lacave, Guillaume; Coutard, Aymeric; Troché, Gilles; Augusto, Sandrine; Pons, Stéphanie; Zuber, Benjamin; Laurent, Virginie; Amara, Marlène; Couzon, Brigitte; Bédos, Jean-Pierre; Pangon, Béatrice; Grimaldi, David

    2016-02-01

    We report a human case of infective endocarditis caused by Streptococcus canis. Identification was carried out from positive blood culture using mass spectrometry and SodA gene sequencing. S. canis related zoonotic invasive infections may have been previously underdiagnosed due to inadequate identification of group G Streptococcus species. PMID:26104727

  17. Corynebacterium CDC Group G Native and Prosthetic Valve Endocarditis

    PubMed Central

    Sattar, Adil; Yu, Siegfried; Koirala, Janak

    2015-01-01

    We report the first case of native and recurrent prosthetic valve endocarditis with Corynebacterium CDC group G, a rarely reported cause of infective endocarditis (IE). Previously, there have been only two cases reported for prosthetic valve IE caused by these organisms. A 69-year-old female with a known history of mitral valve regurgitation presented with a 3-day history of high-grade fever, pleuritic chest pain and cough. Echocardiography confirmed findings of mitral valve thickening consistent with endocarditis, which subsequently progressed to become large and mobile vegetations. Both sets of blood cultures taken on admission were positive for Corynebacterium CDC group G. Despite removal of a long-term venous access port, the patient’s presumed source of line associated bacteremia, mitral valve replacement, and aggressive antibiotic therapy, the patient had recurrence of vegetations on the prosthetic valve. She underwent replacement of her prosthetic mitral valve in the subsequent 2 weeks, before she progressed to disseminated intravascular coagulation and expired. Although they are typically considered contaminants, corynebacteria, in the appropriate clinical setting, should be recognized, identified, and treated as potentially life-threatening infections, particularly in the case of line-associated bacteremias, and native and prosthetic valve endocarditis. PMID:26500737

  18. Left ventricular post-infraction pseudoaneurysm mimicking mitral valve endocarditis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    In this report we present a patient who was initially diagnosed as suffering from mitral valve endocarditis. The proper use of diagnostic modalities revealed a pseudo aneurysm of the left ventricle which was mimicking mitral valve vegetations. This allowed better planning of the subsequent operation. The optimal preoperative diagnostic studies are discussed along with the proper surgical treatment. PMID:24228621

  19. Left ventricular post-infraction pseudoaneurysm mimicking mitral valve endocarditis.

    PubMed

    Dedeilias, Panagiotis; Koukis, Ioannis; Roussakis, Antonios; Tsipas, Pantelis; Rouska, Effie

    2013-01-01

    In this report we present a patient who was initially diagnosed as suffering from mitral valve endocarditis. The proper use of diagnostic modalities revealed a pseudo aneurysm of the left ventricle which was mimicking mitral valve vegetations. This allowed better planning of the subsequent operation. The optimal preoperative diagnostic studies are discussed along with the proper surgical treatment. PMID:24228621

  20. Enterococcal Infective Endocarditis following Periodontal Disease in Dogs.

    PubMed

    Semedo-Lemsaddek, Teresa; Tavares, Marta; São Braz, Berta; Tavares, Luís; Oliveira, Manuela

    2016-01-01

    In humans, one of the major factors associated with infective endocarditis (IE) is the concurrent presence of periodontal disease (PD). However, in veterinary medicine, the relevance of PD in the evolution of dogs' endocarditis remains poorly understood. In order to try to establish a correlation between mouth-associated Enterococcus spp. and infective endocarditis in dogs, the present study evaluated the presence and diversity of enterococci in the gum and heart of dogs with PD. Samples were collected during necropsy of 32 dogs with PD and visually diagnosed with IE, which died of natural causes or euthanasia. Enterococci were isolated, identified and further characterized by Pulsed-Field Gel Electrophoresis (PFGE); susceptibility to antimicrobial agents and pathogenicity potential was also evaluated. In seven sampled animals, PFGE-patterns, resistance and virulence profiles were found to be identical between mouth and heart enterococci obtained from the same dog, allowing the establishment of an association between enterococcal periodontal disease and endocarditis in dogs. These findings represent a crucial step towards understanding the pathogenesis of PD-driven IE, and constitute a major progress in veterinary medicine. PMID:26752198

  1. Nonbacterial thrombotic endocarditis: A rare manifestation of gynecologic cancer.

    PubMed

    Orfanelli, Theofano; Sultanik, Elliot; Shell, Roger; Gibbon, Darlene

    2016-08-01

    •Nonbacterial thrombotic endocarditis (NBTE) is a rare complication of cancer.•NBTE may precede the diagnosis of an occult gynecologic malignancy.•Malignancy-induced NBTE must be considered in patients with unprovoked venous thromboembolism.•The most effective treatment is anticoagulation and treatment of the underlying cancer. PMID:27453927

  2. Staphylococcus aureus Endocarditis with Multivalvular Involvement Secondary to an Atrial Septal Defect

    PubMed Central

    Daruwalla, Vistasp Jimmy; Sagi, Jahnavi; Tahir, Hassan; Penumetsa, Srikanth

    2016-01-01

    Infective endocarditis is usually diagnosed using modified Duke's criteria. Our patient had a subacute presentation and a low suspicion for endocarditis during admission, unfortunately leading to her death. Despite advances in diagnostic and therapeutic measures including antibiotic therapy and surgical techniques, morbidity and mortality with staphylococcal infective endocarditis remain high. Hence, we stress the significance of having a low threshold for TEE in patients with multisystem involvement due to Staphylococcus aureus that have evidence of persistent infection despite antibiotic treatment, even if the suspicion for endocarditis is low based on Duke's criteria. TEE substantially improves the sensitivity of diagnosis but may not be readily available in many medical centers. Presence of an ASD has been noted to have increased the risk of left sided endocarditis even with conditions that predispose to right sided endocarditis, particularly in patients with hemodialysis and diabetes as morbid risk factors. PMID:26989519

  3. MRI Visualization of Staphyloccocus aureus-Induced Infective Endocarditis in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Ring, Janine; Hoerr, Verena; Tuchscherr, Lorena; Kuhlmann, Michael T.; Löffler, Bettina; Faber, Cornelius

    2014-01-01

    Infective endocarditis (IE) is a severe and often fatal disease, lacking a fast and reliable diagnostic procedure. The purpose of this study was to establish a mouse model of Staphylococcus aureus-induced IE and to develop a MRI technology to characterize and diagnose IE. To establish the mouse model of hematogenous IE, aortic valve damage was induced by placing a permanent catheter into right carotid artery. 24 h after surgery, mice were injected intravenously with either iron particle-labeled or unlabeled S. aureus (strain 6850). To distinguish the effect of IE from mere tissue injury or recruited macrophages, subgroups of mice received sham surgery prior to infection (n = 17), received surgery without infection (n = 8), or obtained additionally injection of free iron particles to label macrophages (n = 17). Cardiac MRI was performed 48 h after surgery using a self-gated ultra-short echo time (UTE) sequence (TR/TE, 5/0.31 ms; in-plane/slice, 0.125/1 mm; duration, 12∶08 min) to obtain high-resolution, artifact-free cinematographic images of the valves. After MRI, valves were either homogenized and plated on blood agar plates for determination of bacterial titers, or sectioned and stained for histology. In the animal model, both severity of the disease and mortality increased with bacterial numbers. Infection with 105 S. aureus bacteria reliably caused endocarditis with vegetations on the valves. Cinematographic UTE MRI visualised the aortic valve over the cardiac cycle and allowed for detection of bacterial vegetations, while mere tissue trauma or labeled macrophages were not detected. Iron labeling of S. aureus was not required for detection. MRI results were consistent with histology and microbial assessment. These data showed that S. aureus-induced IE in mice can be detected by MRI. The established mouse model allows for investigation of the pathophysiology of IE, testing of novel drugs and may serve for the development of a clinical diagnostic

  4. Native Triple Valve Endocarditis as Complication of Post-Abortal Sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Maturu, Mohan Venkata Sumedha; Devasia, Tom; Kareem, Hashir

    2016-01-01

    Infective endocarditis (IE) is a highly morbid condition in pregnancy which poses both maternal and fetal risk. In majority of cases, endocarditis occurs only on single valve and usually occurs on valve with structural disease or prosthetic valve. Multi-valvular involvement is not common and so we report a case of native triple valve endocarditis as a complication of post abortal sepsis which was successfully treated medically.

  5. Gemella Endocarditis Presenting as an ST-Segment-Elevation Myocardial Infarction

    PubMed Central

    Chaudhry, Sunit-Preet; Stockwell, Philip H.

    2016-01-01

    Acute myocardial infarction from septic embolization is a rare initial presentation of endocarditis. We report the case of a 67-year-old man who presented with acute chest pain, in whom emergency cardiac catheterization revealed findings that suggested coronary embolism. The patient was found to have Gemella endocarditis, with its initial presentation an embolic acute ST-segment-elevation myocardial infarction. We suggest that endocarditis be considered among the potential causes of acute myocardial infarction. PMID:27303246

  6. Endocarditis associated with Erysipelothrix rhusiopathiae in a fat-tailed ram

    PubMed Central

    Aslani, M. R; Ebrahimi Kahrisangi, A; Baghban, F; Kazemi, A; Heidari, M; Salehi, N

    2015-01-01

    Endocarditis is rarely reported in sheep and information presented for ovine endocarditis is based mostly on comparative findings in the cattle. Infective vegetative endocarditis of the right heart was diagnosed in a 3-year-old fat-tailed ram. Clinical findings included tachycardia, marked brisket edema, jugular veins distention and pulsation and pale mucous membranes. Hematologic abnormality included neutrophilic leukocytosis. Necropsy confirmed severe right atrioventricular and pulmonary valves vegetative endocarditis with evidence of right heart failure. Erysipelothrix rhusiopathiae was isolated from those vegetative lisions. PMID:27175196

  7. Sweet’s syndrome in a patient with infective endocarditis: a rare clinical entity

    PubMed Central

    Nayak, Hemanta K; Vangipuram, Deepak Rajkumar; Kumar, Suresh; Kar, Premashish; Gupta, Ankit; Kapoor, Neha; Sonika, Ujjwal

    2012-01-01

    Sweet’s syndrome, also known as acute febrile neutrophilic dermatosis, has been associated with malignancy, autoimmune disease and collagen vascular disease. The association of infective endocarditis and Sweet’s syndrome is rare. The authors report a case of Sweet’s syndrome in a patient with infective endocarditis. Infective endocarditis should be excluded in patients of rheumatic heart disease presenting with Sweet’s syndrome. Alternatively, Sweet’s syndrome should be considered as a differential diagnosis when a patient with infective endocarditis develops skin lesions. PMID:22605716

  8. Successful treatment of Candida parapsilosis mural endocarditis with combined caspofungin and voriconazole

    PubMed Central

    López-Ciudad, Víctor; Castro-Orjales, María J; León, Cristóbal; Sanz-Rodríguez, César; de la Torre-Fernández, María J; de Juan-Romero, Miguel A Pérez; Collell-Llach, María D; Díaz-López, María D

    2006-01-01

    Background Fungal mural endocarditis is a rare entity in which the antemortem diagnosis is seldom made. Seven cases of mural endocarditis caused by Candida spp. have been collected from literature and six of these patients died after treatment with amphotericin B. Case presentation We report a case of mural endocarditis diagnosed by transesophageal echocardiogram and positive blood cultures to Candida parapsilosis. Because blood cultures continued to yield C. parapsilosis despite caspofungin monotherapy, treatment with voriconazole was added. Conclusion This is the first description of successful treatment of C. parapsilosis mural endocarditis with caspofungin and voriconazole. PMID:16608509

  9. Diminished virulence of a sar-/agr- mutant of Staphylococcus aureus in the rabbit model of endocarditis.

    PubMed Central

    Cheung, A L; Eberhardt, K J; Chung, E; Yeaman, M R; Sullam, P M; Ramos, M; Bayer, A S

    1994-01-01

    Microbial pathogenicity in Staphylococcus aureus is a complex process involving a number of virulence genes that are regulated by global regulatory systems including sar and agr. To evaluate the roles of these two loci in virulence, we constructed sar-/agr- mutants of strains RN6390 and RN450 and compared their phenotypic profiles to the corresponding single sar- and agr- mutants and parents. The secretion of all hemolysins was absent in the sar-/agr- mutants while residual beta-hemolysin activity remained in single agr- mutants. The fibronectin binding capacity was significantly diminished in both single sar- mutants and double mutants when compared with parents while the reduction in fibrinogen binding capacity in the double mutants was modest. In the rabbit endocarditis model, there was a significant decrease in both infectivity rates and intravegetation bacterial densities with the double mutant as compared to the parent (RN6390) at 10(3)-10(6) CFU inocula despite comparable levels of early bacteremia among various challenge groups. Notably, fewer bacteria in the double mutant group adhered to valvular vegetations at 30 min after challenge (10(6) CFU) than the parent group. These studies suggest that both the sar and agr loci are involved in initial valvular adherence, intravegetation persistence and multiplication of S. aureus in endocarditis. Images PMID:7962526

  10. Synergistic Activity of Ceftobiprole and Vancomycin in a Rat Model of Infective Endocarditis Caused by Methicillin-Resistant and Glycopeptide-Intermediate Staphylococcus aureus

    PubMed Central

    Abbanat, Darren; Shang, Wenchi; He, Wenping; Amsler, Karen; Hastings, James; Queenan, Anne Marie; Melton, John L.; Barron, Alfred M.; Flamm, Robert K.; Lynch, A. Simon

    2012-01-01

    The therapeutic activity of ceftobiprole medocaril, the prodrug of ceftobiprole, was compared to that of vancomycin, daptomycin, and the combination of a subtherapeutic dose of ceftobiprole and vancomycin in a rat model of infective endocarditis due to methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) (ATCC 43300) or glycopeptide-intermediate Staphylococcus aureus (GISA) (NRS4 and HIP 5836) strains. The minimum bactericidal concentrations of ceftobiprole, vancomycin, and daptomycin at bacterial cell densities similar to those encountered in the cardiac vegetation in the rat endocarditis model were 2, >64, and 8 μg/ml, respectively, for MRSA ATCC 43300 and 4, >64, and 8 μg/ml, respectively, for the GISA strain. Ceftobiprole medocaril administered in doses of 100 mg/kg of body weight given intravenously (i.v.) twice a day (BID) every 8 h (q8h) (equivalent to a human therapeutic dose of ceftobiprole [500 mg given three times a day [TID]) was the most effective monotherapy, eradicating nearly 5 log10 CFU/g MRSA or 6 log10 CFU/g GISA organisms from the cardiac vegetation and had the highest incidence of sterile vegetation compared to the other monotherapies in the endocarditis model. In in vitro time-kill studies, synergistic effects were observed with ceftobiprole and vancomycin on MRSA and GISA strains, and in vivo synergy was noted with combinations of subtherapeutic doses of these agents for the same strains. Additionally, sterile vegetations were achieved in 33 and 60%, respectively, of the animals infected with MRSA ATCC 43300 or GISA NRS4 receiving ceftobiprole-vancomycin combination therapy. In summary, ceftobiprole was efficacious both as monotherapy and in combination with vancomycin in treating MRSA and GISA infections in a rat infective endocarditis model and warrants further evaluation. PMID:22232278

  11. Infective endocarditis caused by Listeria monocytogenes forming a pseudotumor.

    PubMed

    Uehara Yonekawa, Akiko; Iwasaka, Sho; Nakamura, Hisataka; Fukata, Mitsuhiro; Kadowaki, Masako; Uchida, Yujiro; Odashiro, Keita; Shimoda, Shinji; Shimono, Nobuyuki; Akashi, Koichi

    2014-01-01

    A 73-year-old woman with breast cancer and metastasis under chemotherapy suffered from fever, pleural effusion and pericardial effusion. Despite the administration of treatment with cefozopran and prednisolone, the patient's fever relapsed. An electrocardiogram identified a new complete atrioventricular block and an echocardiogram revealed vegetation with an unusual pseudotumoral mass in the right atrium. Blood cultures grew Listeria monocytogenes. The patient was eventually diagnosed with right-sided infective endocarditis, which improved following the six-week administration of ampicillin and gentamicin. Homemade yoghurt was suspected to be the cause of infection in this case. Listeria endocarditis is rare; however, physicians should pay more attention to preventing this fatal disease in immunocompromised patients. PMID:24785898

  12. Critical Questions About Left-Sided Infective Endocarditis.

    PubMed

    San Román, J Alberto; Vilacosta, Isidre; López, Javier; Sarriá, Cristina

    2015-09-01

    Research in different topics in cardiovascular medicine is evolving rapidly. However, this is not the case for endocarditis, despite its being the cardiovascular disease with the highest mortality and, at the same time, the entity with relatively less scientific evidence supporting its treatment. Many problems are delaying research: it is an uncommon disease, few multicenter registries are ongoing, financing for research in this topic is lacking, randomization is costly, difficult, and considered unethical by some, and conclusions coming from propensity score analysis are taken as if they came from randomized trials. In this review, we put forward the main issues in need of evidence and propose a different approach to advance the understanding of left-sided infective endocarditis. We summarize the limited evidence available, the questions that are pending, and how we should proceed to answer them. PMID:26314535

  13. Fungal Prosthetic Valve Endocarditis by Candida parapsilosis: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Shokohi, Tahereh; Nouraei, Seyed Mahmood; Afsarian, Mohammad Hosein; Najafi, Narges; Mehdipour, Shirin

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Fungal prosthetic valve endocarditis (PVE) is rare but serious complication of valve replacement surgery. Candida species, particularly Candida albicans is the most common isolated pathogen in fungal PVE (1–6%of cases). Case Presentation: We describe a 35-year-old woman who underwent mechanical mitral valve replacement about 3 years ago. She was admitted with neurological symptoms and later with dyspnea and hypotension. Transesophageal echocardiography showed large and mobile prosthetic valve vegetation. She underwent mitral valve surgery. The explanted valve and vegetation revealed lots of budding yeasts and the isolated yeast was identified as C. parapsilosis. Amphotericin B and broad spectrum antibiotic were started immediately. Unfortunately, the patient died two days after surgery, due to sepsis probably related to the candidemia. Conclusions: Fungal endocarditis is uncommon infection, but it is a serious problem in patients with prosthetic valve. Fungal PVE can occur years after the surgery, thus long-term follow-up is essential. PMID:25147692

  14. Selection of dental procedures for antibiotic prophylaxis against infective endocarditis.

    PubMed

    Tan, S Y; Gill, G

    1992-12-01

    A dental source of infection remains the most common identifiable risk factor in infective endocarditis and this may be particularly important in patients at 'high risk'. We therefore performed a questionnaire survey of dental practitioners to assess acceptance of The British Society of Antimicrobial Chemotherapy (BSAC) recommendations, especially with regards to selection of dental procedures for antibiotic prophylaxis. The results showed that the dental practitioners surveyed treated the 'high risk' patient group differently by extending the range of dental procedures covered by antibiotics but the BSAC only recommend that they be treated differently by hospital treatment and/or parenteral antibiotics. This must be an area of concern and deserves further attention, especially with regards to the need for wider publicity and the range of dental procedures that should be covered in the 'high risk' group where morbidity and mortality from infective endocarditis are higher. PMID:1452880

  15. What's New in the Treatment of Enterococcal Endocarditis?

    PubMed Central

    Nigo, Masayuki; Munita, Jose M.; Arias, Cesar A.

    2015-01-01

    Enterococcus spp. are among the common pathogens causing infective endocarditis (IE). Despite major medical advances and new potent antimicrobial agents, the mortality has not significantly improved for several decades. The usual lack of bactericidal activity of penicillin or ampicillin, the toxicity from the combination of penicillin plus aminoglycosides, and the increased reports of high-level resistance to aminoglycosides have led to the exploration of other regimens for treatment of Enterococcus faecalis IE. As an example, ampicillin plus ceftriaxone is now a well-recognized regimen for this organism. However, the emerging of new drug resistances in Enterococcus faecium dramatically reduces the therapeutic alternatives for this organism in IE which continues to be an immense challenge for clinicians even with the availability of newer antimicrobial agents. This article summarizes the current treatment options for enterococcal endocarditis and reviews of recent publications on the topic. PMID:25165018

  16. Uncommon acquired Gerbode defect following extensive bicuspid aortic valve endocarditis

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Gerbode defect is a rare type of left ventricle to right atrium shunt. It is usually congenital in origin, but acquired cases are also described, mainly following infective endocarditis, valve replacement, trauma or acute myocardial infarction. We report a case of a 50-year-old man who suffered an extensive and complex infective endocarditis involving a bicuspid aortic valve, the mitral-aortic intervalvular fibrosa and the anterior leaflet of the mitral valve. After dual valve replacement and annular reconstruction, a shunt between the left ventricle and the right atrium - Gerbode defect, and a severe leak of the mitral prosthesis were detected. Reintervention was performed with successful shunt closure with an autologous pericardial patch and paravalvular leak correction. No major complications occurred denying the immediate post-surgery period and the follow-up at the first year was uneventful. PMID:22360824

  17. Mycobacterium abscessus: Causing fatal endocarditis after cardiac catheterization

    PubMed Central

    Mahajan, S; Mishra, V; Sorabjee, J

    2015-01-01

    Mycobacterium abscessus is an unusual cause of infection in immunocompetent patients. The intrinsic and acquired resistance of this organism to multiple antibiotics is a major issue in planning treatment regimens. We report a case of M. abscessus endocarditis of the native aortic valve in an immunocompetent patient following coronary angiography with a fatal outcome. The case highlights an unfortunate intervention – related nosocomial infection and the difficulties in chemotherapeutic options for this organism, particularly in the presence of renal failure. PMID:25766351

  18. Prosthetic Valve Endocarditis and Bloodstream Infection Due to Mycobacterium chimaera

    PubMed Central

    Achermann, Yvonne; Rössle, Matthias; Hoffmann, Matthias; Deggim, Vanessa; Kuster, Stefan; Zimmermann, Dieter R.; Hombach, Michael; Hasse, Barbara

    2013-01-01

    Prosthetic valve endocarditis (PVE) due to fast-growing nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) has been reported anecdotally. Reports of PVE with slowly growing NTM, however, are lacking. We present here one case of PVE and one case of bloodstream infection caused by Mycobacterium chimaera. Randomly amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD)-PCR indicated a relatedness of the two M. chimaera strains. Both patients had heart surgery 2 years apart from each other. A nosocomial link was not detected. PMID:23536407

  19. Mycobacterium abscessus: causing fatal endocarditis after cardiac catheterization.

    PubMed

    Mahajan, S; Mishra, V; Sorabjee, J

    2015-01-01

    Mycobacterium abscessus is an unusual cause of infection in immunocompetent patients. The intrinsic and acquired resistance of this organism to multiple antibiotics is a major issue in planning treatment regimens. We report a case of M. abscessus endocarditis of the native aortic valve in an immunocompetent patient following coronary angiography with a fatal outcome. The case highlights an unfortunate intervention-related nosocomial infection and the difficulties in chemotherapeutic options for this organism, particularly in the presence of renal failure. PMID:25766351

  20. Streptobacillus moniliformis endocarditis: Case report and review of literature

    PubMed Central

    Madhubashini, M.; George, Susan; Chandrasekaran, Sujatha

    2013-01-01

    Rat bite fever is a rare infection and sometimes results in complications. This case report describes native mitral valve endocarditis in a 44-year-old male patient caused by Streptobacillus moniliformis. The diagnosis was confirmed by transesophageal echocardiography and blood cultures (BACTEC). The patient was treated with IV crystalline penicillin (6 weeks) and gentamicin (2 weeks). The fundamental importance of a high index of suspicion, interpreting investigations and appropriateness of therapy are highlighted. PMID:23993005

  1. Streptobacillus moniliformis endocarditis: case report and review of literature.

    PubMed

    Madhubashini, M; George, Susan; Chandrasekaran, Sujatha

    2013-01-01

    Rat bite fever is a rare infection and sometimes results in complications. This case report describes native mitral valve endocarditis in a 44-year-old male patient caused by Streptobacillus moniliformis. The diagnosis was confirmed by transesophageal echocardiography and blood cultures (BACTEC). The patient was treated with IV crystalline penicillin (6 weeks) and gentamicin (2 weeks). The fundamental importance of a high index of suspicion, interpreting investigations and appropriateness of therapy are highlighted. PMID:23993005

  2. Graft-related endocarditis caused by Neosartorya fischeri var. spinosa.

    PubMed Central

    Summerbell, R C; de Repentigny, L; Chartrand, C; St Germain, G

    1992-01-01

    The first case of endocarditis caused by Neosartorya fischeri var. spinosa is reported. The patient was a child who received a calf pericardium graft after removal of a previously inserted Dacron graft associated with deterioration of adjacent tissue. Copious vegetations removed from the heart were found to be composed of septate hyaline fungal filaments. The fungus was recognized in culture by its bivalved, winged, spiny ascospores, its Aspergillus fischerianus anamorph, and its thermotolerance. Images PMID:1624579

  3. Enterococcus faecium small colony variant endocarditis in an immunocompetent patient.

    PubMed

    Egido, S Hernández; Ruiz, M Siller; Inés Revuelta, S; García, I García; Bellido, J L Muñoz

    2016-01-01

    Small colony variants (SCV) are slow-growing subpopulations of bacteria usually associated with auxotrophism, causing persistent or recurrent infections. Enterococcus faecalis SCV have been seldom described, and only one case of Enterococcus faecium SCV has been reported, associated with sepsis in a leukaemia patient. Here we report the first case described of bacteraemia and endocarditis by SCV E. faecium in an immunocompetent patient. PMID:26862434

  4. Infective endocarditis in an HIV-infected intravenous drug user.

    PubMed

    Mėlinytė, Karolina; Savickaitė, Jurgita; Rekienė, Daiva Emilija; Naudžiūnas, Albinas; Burkauskienė, Aušra; Jankauskienė, Laima

    2015-10-01

    Infective endocarditis is a common complication among injecting drug users. Disease risk among these patients is increased by the spread of HIV infection. In the following article, we discuss the exceptional clinical presentation of a 28-year-old patient who used intravenous drugs (heroin) for 10 years, had been infected with HIV for seven years and as a complication had developed Staphylococcus aureus infective endocarditis. The patient came to the hospital in serious condition, complaining of bodily pain, swelling of the legs and general weakness. During hospitalization, besides infective endocarditis, she was also diagnosed with anemia, toxic hepatitis, renal failure, ascites, sepsis, and pneumonia. A completely disrupted tricuspid valve, damaged aortic valve, and fibrosis of the mitral valve were detected. Echocardiographic and radiologic data showed that the patient's condition continued to deteriorate day by day, with significant progression of heart failure, ejection fraction decreasing from 45% to 10%, and development of myocarditis, hydrothorax and pericarditis. However, this progressive worsening of the patient's condition ceased when vancomycin was administered. To the authors' knowledge, this is the first such case described in the literature in which significant improvement was observed despite the patient's complex condition with associated complications. PMID:26417654

  5. Sortase A promotes virulence in experimental Staphylococcus lugdunensis endocarditis.

    PubMed

    Heilbronner, Simon; Hanses, Frank; Monk, Ian R; Speziale, Pietro; Foster, Timothy J

    2013-10-01

    Staphylococcus lugdunensis is a commensal of humans and an opportunistic pathogen. It can cause an aggressive form of infective endocarditis in healthy humans akin to Staphylococcus aureus. Here we compared the virulence of the genome-sequenced S. lugdunensis strain N920143 to S. aureus in an experimental rat endocarditis model. N920143 caused a milder course of disease with lower levels of bacteraemia and smaller endocardial vegetations than S. aureus strain Newman. However, vegetations were comparable to those produced by S. aureus MRSA strain COL. Little is known about virulence factors of S. lugdunensis as systems to manipulate the bacterium genetically are currently limited. Here, we report a method for electroporation of S. lugdunensis with plasmid DNA and demonstrate that the low efficiency of transformation is due to the activity of a conserved type I restriction-modification system. To streamline the transformation process, we constructed SL01B, an E. coli strain expressing the hsdM/hsdS genes of N920143. Modified plasmid DNA isolated from SL01B transformed S. lugdunensis strains from clonal complexes 1 and 2 efficiently. A deletion mutant of N920143 lacking sortase A was significantly less virulent than the wild-type in the endocarditis model. Mutants defective in single surface proteins Fbl or vWbl were not significantly different from the wild-type but showed trends towards reduced virulence. PMID:23943787

  6. Complications of Candidemia in ICU Patients: Endophthalmitis, Osteomyelitis, Endocarditis.

    PubMed

    Kauffman, Carol A

    2015-10-01

    Bloodstream infection with Candida species is not uncommon in the intensive care unit setting and has the potential to distribute organisms to many different organ systems causing secondary infections, such as endophthalmitis, osteomyelitis, and endocarditis. In some patients, these types of infections become manifested shortly after the episode of candidemia. In others, especially vertebral osteomyelitis, weeks pass before the diagnosis is entertained. Endophthalmitis should be sought by a retinal examination in all patients early after an episode of candidemia. Both osteomyelitis and endocarditis are less common complications of candidemia than endophthalmitis. In patients who manifest symptoms or signs suggesting these infections, magnetic resonance imaging and transesophageal echocardiography, respectively, are extremely helpful diagnostic tests. Newer approaches to the treatment of these infections allow the use of better tolerated, safer antifungal agents. Endophthalmitis is often treated with fluconazole or voriconazole, and the echinocandins are increasingly used, instead of amphotericin B, as initial therapy for osteomyelitis and endocarditis before step-down therapy to oral azole agents. PMID:26398531

  7. Superantigen profiling of Staphylococcus aureus infective endocarditis isolates.

    PubMed

    Chung, Jin-Won; Karau, Melissa J; Greenwood-Quaintance, Kerryl E; Ballard, Alessandro D; Tilahun, Ashenafi; Khaleghi, Shahryar Rostamkolaei; David, Chella S; Patel, Robin; Rajagopalan, Govindarajan

    2014-06-01

    The frequency of superantigen production among Staphylococcus aureus isolates associated with endocarditis is not well defined. We tested 154 S. aureus isolates from definite infective endocarditis cases for the presence of staphylococcal enterotoxins A-E, H, and TSST-1 by PCR, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, and using an HLA-DR3 transgenic mouse splenocyte proliferation assay. Sixty-three isolates (50.8%) tested positive for at least 1 superantigen gene, with 21 (16.9%) testing positive for more than 2. tst (28.6%) was most common, followed by seb (27%), sea (22.2%), sed (20.6%), see (17.5%), and sec (11.1%). Of 41 methicillin-resistant S. aureus, 21 had superantigen genes, with sed being more frequently detected in this group compared to methicillin-susceptible S. aureus (P < 0.05). Superantigen genes were not associated with mortality (P = 0.81). 75% of PCR-positive isolates induced robust splenocyte proliferation. Overall, more than half of S. aureus isolates causing endocarditis carry superantigen genes, of which most are functional. PMID:24745820

  8. Infective endocarditis caused by Klebsiella oxytoca in an intravenous drug user with cancer

    PubMed Central

    Hall, Connor; Hatch, Michael; Ayan, Mohamed; Winn, Richard

    2016-01-01

    Infective endocarditis caused by Klebsiella species is rare, with most isolates being K. pneumoniae. We report the case of a 24-year-old intravenous drug user with newly diagnosed seminoma who developed K. oxytoca endocarditis. In addition to having K. oxytoca isolated from blood culture, cultures of that species were obtained from a retroperitoneal metastasis found on original presentation. PMID:27034562

  9. Unusual location of the Libman-Sacks endocarditis in a teenager: a case report.

    PubMed

    Wałdoch, Anna; Kwiatkowska, Joanna; Dorniak, Karolina

    2016-02-01

    Libman-Sacks endocarditis may be the first manifestation of systemic lupus erythematosus. The risk of its occurrence increases with the co-existence of the anti-phospholipid syndrome. Changes usually involve the mitral valve and the aortic valve. In this report, we present a case of Libman-Sacks endocarditis of the tricuspid valve in a teenage girl. PMID:25972079

  10. Daptomycin (LY146032) for prevention and treatment of experimental aortic valve endocarditis in rabbits.

    PubMed Central

    Kennedy, S; Chambers, H F

    1989-01-01

    The efficacy of daptomycin (LY146032), a vancomycinlike lipopeptide antibiotic, was compared with that of antibiotics commonly in use for prevention and treatment of experimental aortic valve endocarditis in rabbits. Strains of Staphylococcus aureus. S. epidermidis, Streptococcus sanguis, and Enterococcus faecalis were used to establish endocarditis. A single 10-mg/kg dose of daptomycin and a single 25-mg/kg dose of vancomycin were both effective in prevention of endocarditis produced by strains of S. aureus and S. sanguis. Daptomycin was more effective than vancomycin for prevention of endocarditis caused by the strain of S. epidermidis. A single dose of daptomycin also was more effective in prevention of staphylococcal and enterococcal endocarditis than were single-dose regimens of cefazolin (100 mg/kg) and the combination of ampicillin (30 mg/kg) plus gentamicin (3 mg/kg), respectively. For treatment of endocarditis, daptomycin (10 mg/kg) as a single daily dose was as effective as regimens of either vancomycin or beta-lactam antibiotics for staphylococcal and enterococcal endocarditis. Daptomycin, however, was not as effective as a single daily dose of 600,000 U of procaine penicillin for endocarditis caused by the strain of S. sanguis. PMID:2554799

  11. Effect of immunization on susceptibility to experimental Streptococcus mutans and Streptococcus sanguis endocarditis.

    PubMed Central

    Durack, D T; Gilliland, B C; Petersdorf, R G

    1978-01-01

    It has been asserted that humoral immunity is an important potentiating factor in pathogenesis of infective endocarditis, in that prior immunization to certain bacteria may predispose the host to endocarditis caused by those organisms. If so, possible future vaccination of humans with streptococcal antigens for the prevention of dental caries might increase the susceptibility of the population to streptococcal endocarditis. To examine this hypothesis further, we immunized rabbits with killed Streptococcus sanguis or Streptococcus mutans. After complement-fixing antibody had developed, the rabbits were tested for susceptibility to experimental infective endocarditis. Rabbits with high titers of complement-fixing antibody to the infecting organism developed streptococcal endocarditis less often (13%) than animals with lower titers (69%; P less than 0.0002). These findings do not support the hypothesis that pre-immunization predisposes to infective endocarditis and lend no credence to the concept that vaccination of human subjects against dental caries might increase their susceptibility to streptococcal endocarditis. On the contrary, the results of these experiments indicate that specific antibody can confer relative immunity to infective endocarditis. PMID:730349

  12. Streptococcus viridans osteomyelitis and endocarditis following dental treatment: a case report.

    PubMed

    Choudhury, Maitrayee; Patel, Brijesh R; Patel, Minal; Bashir, Tariq

    2009-01-01

    Vertebral osteomyelitis is an uncommon complication of infective endocarditis with the organism Streptococcus viridans being a rare cause of the condition. This case highlights an unusual presentation of Streptococcus viridans associated with infective endocarditis and pyogenic osteomyelitis in a patient following a dental procedure. PMID:19918551

  13. Recurrent prosthetic valve endocarditis caused by Aspergillus delacroxii (formerly Aspergillus nidulans var. echinulatus)

    PubMed Central

    Uhrin, Gábor Balázs; Jensen, Rasmus Hare; Korup, Eva; Grønlund, Jens; Hjort, Ulla; Moser, Claus; Arendrup, Maiken Cavling; Schønheyder, Henrik Carl

    2015-01-01

    We report Aspergillus delacroxii (formerly Aspergillus nidulans var. echinulatus) causing recurrent prosthetic valve endocarditis. The fungus was the sole agent detected during replacement of a mechanical aortic valve conduit due to abscess formation. Despite extensive surgery and anti-fungal treatment, the patient had a cerebral hemorrhage 4 months post-surgery prompting a diagnosis of recurrent prosthetic valve endocarditis and fungemia. PMID:26909244

  14. Rothia mucilaginosa Prosthetic Device Infections: a Case of Prosthetic Valve Endocarditis

    PubMed Central

    Tokarczyk, Mindy J.; Jungkind, Donald; DeSimone, Joseph A.

    2013-01-01

    Rothia mucilaginosa is increasingly recognized as an emerging opportunistic pathogen associated with prosthetic device infections. Infective endocarditis is one of the most common clinical presentations. We report a case of R. mucilaginosa prosthetic valve endocarditis and review the literature of prosthetic device infections caused by this organism. PMID:23467598

  15. [Endocarditis, meningitis, pneumopathy and pneumococcal cerebral abscess in an alcoholic smoker].

    PubMed

    Vandenbos, F; Roth, S; Montagne, N

    2001-10-01

    We report a case of mitral endocarditis caused by Streptococcus pneumoniae in a 43 year old man with history of alcohol abuse and cigarette smoking. The pneumococcal endocarditis was associated with pneumonia, meningitis and brain abscess. Only transesophageal echocardiography could confirm the presence of vegetation. The patient was treated medically with good results. PMID:11887774

  16. Successful treatment of mitral valve endocarditis in a dog associated with 'Actinomyces canis-like' infection.

    PubMed

    Balakrishnan, N; Alexander, K; Keene, B; Kolluru, S; Fauls, M L; Rawdon, I; Breitschwerdt, E B

    2016-09-01

    Infective endocarditis, an inflammation of the endocardial surface due to invasion by an infectious agent, is more common in middle sized to large breed dogs. We herein report a case of mitral valve endocarditis in a 9-year-old male-castrated Weimaraner caused by an Actinomyces canis-like bacterium, not previously reported in association with infection in dogs. PMID:27364088

  17. Daptomycin compared with teicoplanin and vancomycin for therapy of experimental Staphylococcus aureus endocarditis.

    PubMed Central

    Kaatz, G W; Seo, S M; Reddy, V N; Bailey, E M; Rybak, M J

    1990-01-01

    The efficacies of daptomycin, teicoplanin, and vancomycin were compared in the therapy of experimental Staphylococcus aureus endocarditis. Rabbits infected with either of two methicillin-susceptible strains (SA-12871 or its moderately teicoplanin-resistant derivative SA-12873) or a methicillin-resistant S. aureus strain (MRSA-494) were treated with daptomycin, 8 mg/kg of body weight, every 8 h; teicoplanin, 12.5 mg/kg (low-dose teicoplanin [teicoplanin-LD], excluding MRSA-494) or 40 mg/kg (high-dose teicoplanin [teicoplanin-HD]) every 12 h; or vancomycin, 17.5 mg/kg every 6 h, for 4 days. Compared with no treatment daptomycin, teicoplamin-HD, and vancomycin significantly reduced bacterial counts of all test strains in vegetations and renal and splenic tissues (P less than 0.001). Teicoplanin-LD was equally effective against SA-12871 but failed against SA-12873, with three of six animals still being bacteremic at the end of therapy. For SA-12871, daptomycin was as effective as teicoplanin-HD and was superior to teicoplanin-LD and vancomycin (P = 0.02) in lowering vegetation bacterial counts. There were no differences between daptomycin, teicoplanin-HD, or vancomycin in the reduction of bacterial counts in tissues for any of the test strains. In rabbits infected with SA-12871, vegetations from 33% of teicoplanin-LD-treated, 6% of teicoplanin-HD-treated, and 13% of daptomycin-treated animals yielded organisms for which there were up to eightfold increases in the MICs. Resistance may have contributed to early death in one daptomycin-treated animal. No increases in the MICs for the test strain were detected in animals infected with SA-12873 or MRSA-494. We conclude that in this model and against these strains of S. aureus, daptomycin and teicoplanin-HD are as efficacious as vancomycin, but diminished susceptibility to both can develop during therapy. PMID:1963526

  18. Brevundimonas vancanneytii sp. nov., isolated from blood of a patient with endocarditis.

    PubMed

    Estrela, Andréia B; Abraham, Wolf-Rainer

    2010-09-01

    A Gram-negative, rod-shaped, non-spore-forming bacterial strain, designated LMG 2337(T), was isolated from the blood of a patient with endocarditis and characterized. The strain was affiliated with the alphaproteobacterial genus Brevundimonas, with Brevundimonas diminuta LMG 2089(T) (98.3 % 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity) and Brevundimonas terrae KSL-145(T) (97.5 %) as its closest relatives. This affiliation was supported by chemotaxonomic data: the G+C content was 66.3 mol %, the major polar lipids were phosphatidyl diacylglycerol, sulfoquinovosyl diacylglycerol and phosphatidyl glucopyranosyl diacylglycerol and the major fatty acids were summed feature 7 (one or more of C(18 : 1)ω 7c, C(18 : 1)ω 9t and C(18 : 1)ω 12t) and C(16 : 0). Strain LMG 2337(T) displayed an unusually broad substrate spectrum. The results from DNA-DNA hybridization and physiological and biochemical tests allowed the genotypic and phenotypic differentiation of strain LMG 2337(T) from all of the type strains of hitherto-described Brevundimonas species. The strain therefore represents a novel species, for which the name Brevundimonas vancanneytii sp. nov. is proposed, with type strain LMG 2337(T) (=CCUG 1797(T) =ATCC 14736(T)). PMID:19880635

  19. [Endocarditis due to meticillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus originating from pigs].

    PubMed

    Ekkelenkamp, M B; Sekkat, M; Carpaij, N; Troelstra, A; Bonten, M J M

    2006-11-01

    A 63-year-old woman with a kidney transplant was admitted with endocarditis caused by meticillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). Once her antibiotic therapy had been adjusted to the sensitivity-pattern of the bacterial strain she recovered, without the need for surgical intervention. The isolated S. aureus was typed by multi-locus sequence typing as sequence type 398, a MRSA-strain that has recently been isolated from a high percentage of Dutch pigs. This is the first report of a life-threatening infection with this pig MRSA. This strain is genetically different from the globally dispersed nosocomial MRSA-strains, and also from the strains that have been epidemic for several years in the USA as the causative agent ofcommunity-acquired skin infections. The Dutch Working Group on Infection Prevention (WIP) has recently adjusted its guidelines to halt further spread of this strain, and advises that the population at risk (pig breeders, slaughterhouse personnel and veterinarians) be held in isolation when hospitalised until MRSA colonisation has been excluded. The patient described here, however, did not belong to this population at risk. PMID:17131705

  20. Endocarditis-associated brain lesions in slaughter pigs.

    PubMed

    Karstrup, C C; Jensen, H E; Aalbæk, B; Leifsson, P S; Boye, M; Agerholm, J S

    2011-05-01

    Left-sided valvular endocarditis (LSVE) is a common finding in slaughter pigs. The lesion is often associated with renal thromboembolism, but information on embolization to other organs is sparse. This study focuses on the presence and type of endocarditis-associated brain lesions (EABLs). The brains of 20 slaughter pigs with spontaneously arising LSVE and 11 controls were examined by sectioning half of a formalin-fixed brain into 4mm slices for histological examination. The aetiology of the endocarditis was determined by bacteriological and, in some cases, by fluorescence in-situ hybridization examinations. These examinations identified 11 cases of Streptococcus suis, six cases of Erysipelothrix rhusiopathiae, one Streptococcus spp. and two cases that remained aetiologically undetermined. One of the S. suis cases had a dual infection with S. suis in the aortic valve lesions and Streptococcus dysgalactiae subsp. equisimilis in the atrioventricular valve lesions. Renal infarcts were present in eight cases. Focal encephalitis was found in 12 cases, with the number of lesions ranging from one to 11. Most pigs had less than four microscopical lesions. Acute lesions were characterized by focal microabscesses without observable bacteria. Chronic lesions were characterized by astrocytosis and focal accumulation of mononuclear leucocytes. An infarct was observed in one animal. Perivascular inflammation was seen in 14 cases, mostly as two or three lesions, while focal leptomeningitis was found in eight cases. EABLs are therefore common in slaughter pigs with LSVE. The number of lesions per animal is small, which may explain the limited attention paid to this sequela of LSVE. EABLs have rarely been reported in domestic animals and mostly in patients with neurological signs. The frequent occurrence of EABLs in slaughter pigs suggests that this pathology should be investigated in other animal species with LSVE. PMID:21168147

  1. Infective endocarditis in chronic hemodialysis patients: experience from Morocco.

    PubMed

    Montasser, Dina; Bahadi, Abdelali; Zajjari, Yassir; Asserraji, Mohamed; Alayoude, Ahmed; Moujoud, Omar; Aattif, Toufik; Kadiri, Moncef; Zemraoui, Nadir; El Kabbaj, Driss; Hassani, Mohamed; Benyahia, Mohamed; El Allam, Mustapha; Oualim, Zouhir; Akhmouch, Ismail

    2011-01-01

    Since the 1960s, regular hemodialysis (HD) was recognized as a risk factor for the development of infective endocarditis (IE), particularly at vascular access sites. The present report describes our experience at the Etat Major General Agadir, Morocco, of taking care of IE in patients on regular dialysis. A retrospective analysis was made of five cases of IE in patients receiving regular HD having arteriovenous fistula as vascular access. They were sent from four private centers and admitted in our formation between January 2004 and March 2009. Infective endocarditis was detected after 34.5 months following initiation of dialysis. The causative organisms included Staphylococcus and Enterococcus in two cases each and negative blood culture in one case. A recent history of infection (<3 months) of the vascular access was found in three cases. Peripheric embolic phenomena were noted in two cases. A pre-existing heart disease was common and contributed to heart failure. Mortality was frequent due to valvular perforations and congestive heart failure, making the medical treatment alone unsatisfactory. Two patients survived and three of our patients received a prosthetic valve replacement, with a median survival after surgery of 10.3 months/person. The clinical diagnosis of infective endocarditis in regularly dialyzed patients remains difficult, with the presence of vascular calcification as a common risk factor. The vascular catheter infections are the cardinal gateway of pathogenic organisms, which are mainly Staphylococcus. The prognosis is bad and the mortality is significant, whereas medical and surgical treatments are often established in these patients who have many factors of comorbidity. PMID:21196639

  2. Kocuria kristinae endocarditis related to diabetic foot infection.

    PubMed

    Citro, Rodolfo; Prota, Costantina; Greco, Luigi; Mirra, Marco; Masullo, Alfonso; Silverio, Angelo; Bossone, Eduardo; Piscione, Federico

    2013-06-01

    We report an unusual case of endocarditis occurring in a 74-year-old man with a history of systemic hypertension, diabetes mellitus and minor amputation for left forefoot ulcer. The patient was hospitalized for vacuum-assisted closure therapy to aid in wound healing. After the first treatment session, the patient reported abdominal pain with haematemesis and fever (40 °C). Owing to persistent fever, three blood cultures were performed, all positive for Kocuria kristinae. The identification was based on biochemical tests and automated systems. The speciation of the micro-organism was achieved with MALDI-TOF and then confirmed by 16S rRNA gene sequencing. Transthoracic echocardiographic examination showed the presence of a large vegetation (38×20 mm) on the posterior mitral leaflet and moderate mitral regurgitation. Since there are no current guidelines for the treatment of K. kristinae endocarditis, empiric antibiotic therapy with intravenous sulbactam/ampicillin (1.5 g twice daily) and gentamicin (6 mg kg(-1) per day) was started. After 7 days of hospitalization, the patient's condition suddenly worsened because of the occurrence of haemorrhagic stroke. Despite inotropic support and rifampicin infusion, the haemodynamic status progressively deteriorated. After an initial improvement, he worsened again, becoming stuporous, hypotensive and dyspnoeic. In the following days, the patient developed compartment syndrome resulting in right foot ischaemia. Unfortunately, 25 days after hospitalization, the patient died of multiple organ failure from overwhelming sepsis. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first case of K. kristinae endocarditis on a native valve that is not related to a central venous catheter but associated with diabetic foot infection. PMID:23518651

  3. Surgical Treatment of Isolated Right-Sided Infective Endocarditis

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Sheng-li; Li, Bo-jun; Zhang, Tao; Ren, Chong-lei; Wang, Yao; Chen, Ting-ting; Gao, Chang-qing

    2011-01-01

    We reviewed our department's experience with the perioperative features and surgical treatment of isolated right-sided infective endocarditis. From January 2000 through July 2010, 35 patients underwent surgery for isolated right-sided infective endocarditis in our department. The mean pathologic course was 3.6 months. Preoperative transthoracic echocardiography had revealed intracardiac vegetations in all 35 patients: the tricuspid valve was involved in 28, and preoperative cultures were positive in 31. The median follow-up time was 5.8 years, and the follow-up rate was 85.3%. All the operations were performed with the patients on cardiopulmonary bypass, with or without cardiac arrest. All concomitant congenital heart defects were repaired, and vegetations and foreign materials were removed as part of intensive débridement of the infected area. After vegetation removal, 4 tricuspid valve replacements with tissue valves and 24 tricuspid valve reconstructions were performed. One patient who underwent tricuspid valve replacement died of uncontrollable infection and multiple-organ failure. Two patients required mechanical ventilation for more than 1 week, and 3 needed dialysis for acute renal failure. Of the excised vegetations, 31.4% were positive for microorganisms. Of the patients who underwent tricuspid valvuloplasty, 23 had no valvular incompetence and 11 had mild or moderate regurgitation before discharge from the hospital. During follow-up, no patient needed reoperation because of reinfection, and 1 underwent reoperation for severe tricuspid regurgitation. We conclude that surgery can yield satisfactory immediate and midterm results in the treatment of isolated right-sided infective endocarditis. PMID:22199423

  4. Unusual extracardiac manifestations of isolated native tricuspid valve endocarditis.

    PubMed

    Wilczynska, M; Khoo, J P; McCann, G P

    2010-01-01

    Isolated native tricuspid valve endocarditis (TVE) in non-intravenous drug users is a very rare condition. We describe an unusual presentation of Enterococcus faecalis TVE associated with spondylodiscitis, positive cytoplasmic antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies and antiproteinase-3 antibodies vasculitic rash in an otherwise healthy patient with no history of intravenous drug use or underlying cardiac abnormalities. A high index of clinical suspicion is required in patients presenting with unusual features and pyrexia of unknown origin. Simple tests including serial blood cultures and echocardiography may help to establish the correct diagnosis and commence appropriate treatment. PMID:22798103

  5. Mitral and Aortic Valvulitis in Primary Chronic Septic Endocarditis.

    PubMed

    Bushmanova, G M; Zorina, I G; Nikityuk, D B; Nepomnyashchikh, R D; Lapii, G A; Postnikova, O A; Semenov, D E

    2015-05-01

    Results of long-term prospective follow-up of patients with early stages of mitral and aortic valvulitis and primary chronic septic endocarditic are presented. Clinical diagnostics of the diseases is described and the key role is assigned to pathognomic (absolute) clinical symptoms. The tendency to progressive fibrosis of endocardial structures with subsequent gradual development of valve dysfunction and stenosis (especially for the mitral valve) is revealed. It is shown that early treatment increases the effective valve area and promotes reversion of mitral stenosis. The possibility of early diagnostics of primary chronic septic endocarditis in combination with adequate etiopathogenetic therapy provide the basis for prevention of acquired valvular disease. PMID:26033580

  6. Current Hypotheses in Cardiac Surgery: Biofilm in Infective Endocarditis.

    PubMed

    Elgharably, Haytham; Hussain, Syed T; Shrestha, Nabin K; Blackstone, Eugene H; Pettersson, Gösta B

    2016-01-01

    Despite recent advances in diagnostics and treatments, infective endocarditis is still associated with substantial morbidity and mortality. Even prolonged courses of broad-spectrum antimicrobials often fail to eradicate the infection, making surgical intervention necessary in many cases. In this review, we present recent advances in molecular microbiology techniques that have uncovered a plausible explanation for this resistance to treatment: the recently discovered social behavior of some microbes, in which colonies form a nearly impenetrable barrier around themselves called a biofilm. These biofilm structures isolate the colony from the body׳s immune response and antimicrobial drugs. We also present current thinking about possible ways biofilms can be destroyed. PMID:27568136

  7. Characteristics and prognosis of pneumococcal endocarditis: a case-control study.

    PubMed

    Daudin, M; Tattevin, P; Lelong, B; Flecher, E; Lavoué, S; Piau, C; Ingels, A; Chapron, A; Daubert, J-C; Revest, M

    2016-06-01

    Case series have suggested that pneumococcal endocarditis is a rare disease, mostly reported in patients with co-morbidities but no underlying valve disease, with a rapid progression to heart failure, and high mortality. We performed a case-control study of 28 patients with pneumococcal endocarditis (cases), and 56 patients with non-pneumococcal endocarditis (controls), not matched for sex and age, during the years 1991-2013, in one referral centre. Alcoholism (39.3% versus 10.7%; p <0.01), smoking (60.7% versus 21.4%; p <0.01), the absence of previously known valve disease (82.1% versus 60.7%; p 0.047), heart failure (64.3% versus 23.2%; p <0.01) and shock (53.6% versus 23.2%; p <0.01) were more common in pneumococcal than in non-pneumococcal endocarditis. Cardiac surgery was required in 64.3% of patients with pneumococcal endocarditis, much earlier than in patients with non-pneumococcal endocarditis (mean time from symptom onset, 14.1 ± 18.2 versus 69.0 ± 61.1 days). In-hospital mortality rates were similar (7.1% versus 12.5%). Streptococcus pneumoniae causes rapidly progressive endocarditis requiring life-saving early cardiac surgery in most cases. PMID:27021424

  8. Novel Tissue Level Effects of the Staphylococcus aureus Enterotoxin Gene Cluster Are Essential for Infective Endocarditis

    PubMed Central

    Stach, Christopher S.; Vu, Bao G.; Merriman, Joseph A.; Herrera, Alfa; Cahill, Michael P.; Schlievert, Patrick M.; Salgado-Pabón, Wilmara

    2016-01-01

    Background Superantigens are indispensable virulence factors for Staphylococcus aureus in disease causation. Superantigens stimulate massive immune cell activation, leading to toxic shock syndrome (TSS) and contributing to other illnesses. However, superantigens differ in their capacities to induce body-wide effects. For many, their production, at least as tested in vitro, is not high enough to reach the circulation, or the proteins are not efficient in crossing epithelial and endothelial barriers, thus remaining within tissues or localized on mucosal surfaces where they exert only local effects. In this study, we address the role of TSS toxin-1 (TSST-1) and most importantly the enterotoxin gene cluster (egc) in infective endocarditis and sepsis, gaining insights into the body-wide versus local effects of superantigens. Methods We examined S. aureus TSST-1 gene (tstH) and egc deletion strains in the rabbit model of infective endocarditis and sepsis. Importantly, we also assessed the ability of commercial human intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) plus vancomycin to alter the course of infective endocarditis and sepsis. Results TSST-1 contributed to infective endocarditis vegetations and lethal sepsis, while superantigens of the egc, a cluster with uncharacterized functions in S. aureus infections, promoted vegetation formation in infective endocarditis. IVIG plus vancomycin prevented lethality and stroke development in infective endocarditis and sepsis. Conclusions Our studies support the local tissue effects of egc superantigens for establishment and progression of infective endocarditis providing evidence for their role in life-threatening illnesses. In contrast, TSST-1 contributes to both infective endocarditis and lethal sepsis. IVIG may be a useful adjunct therapy for infective endocarditis and sepsis. PMID:27124393

  9. Embolic Stroke Caused by Staphylococcus lugdunensis Endocarditis Complicating Vasectomy in a 36-Year-Old Man

    PubMed Central

    Loftsgaarden, Megan; Chukwudelunzu, Felix

    2015-01-01

    Staphylococcus lugdunensis is part of the native flora in the inguinal region of the body. Inguinal surgeries, such as vasectomy, place carriers of this aggressive pathogen at risk for contamination. Native-valve endocarditis caused by coagulase-negative S. lugdunensis has a rapid and complicated clinical course. The pathogenicity of this organism is not limited to cardiac valvular destruction. We report the case of a 36-year-old man who presented with S. lugdunensis endocarditis, dysarthria, and hemiparesis 5 weeks after a vasectomy. To our knowledge, this is the first report of embolic stroke caused by S. lugdunensis endocarditis. In addition, we discuss the relevant medical literature. PMID:26664319

  10. A case of Ochrobactrum anthropi-induced septic shock and infective endocarditis.

    PubMed

    Ashraf, Farhan

    2016-01-01

    Ochrobactrum anthropi is a gram-negative rod of low virulence. Infections due to this organism are uncommon; however in immunocompromised hosts it can cause severe infections. Among the many infections it can cause, infective endocarditis is very rare. Even rarer is infective endocarditis of the native valves, as Ochrobactrum antropi affects damaged or prosthetic valves almost exclusively. This case describes native valve endocarditis due to Ochrobactrum anthropi. [Full article available at http://rimed.org/rimedicaljournal-2016-07.asp, free with no login]. PMID:27379356