Sample records for bacterial growth curve

  1. Growth of curved and helical bacterial cells

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Hongyuan

    2013-01-01

    A combination of cell wall growth and cytoskeletal protein action gives rise to the observed bacterial cell shape. Aside from the common rod-like and spherical shapes, bacterial cells can also adopt curved or helical geometries. To understand how curvature in bacteria is developed or maintained, we examine how Caulobacter crescentus obtains its crescent-like shape. Caulobacter cells with or without the cytoskeletal bundle crescentin, an intermediate filament-like protein, exhibit two distinct growth modes, curvature maintenance that preserves the radius of curvature and curvature relaxation that straightens the cell (Fig. 1). Using a proposed mechanochemical model, we show that bending and twisting of the crescentin bundle can influence the stress distribution in the cell wall, and lead to the growth of curved cells. In contrast, after crescentin bundle is disrupted, originally curved cells will slowly relax towards a straight rod over time. The model is able to quantitatively capture experimentally observed curvature dynamics. Furthermore, we show that the shape anisotropy of the cross-section of a curved cell is never greater than 4%, even in the presence of crescentin.

  2. Analyzing population growth curves

    Microsoft Academic Search

    L. L. Eberhardt; J. M. Breiwick; D. P. Demaster

    2008-01-01

    Assessing animal population growth curves is an essential feature of field studies in ecology and wildlife management. We used five models to assess population growth rates with a number of sets of population growth rate data. A 'generalized' logistic curve provides a better model than do four other popular models. Use of difference equations for fitting was checked by a

  3. Growth of Bacterial Colonies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warren, Mya; Hwa, Terence

    2013-03-01

    On hard agar gel, there is insufficient surface hydration for bacteria to swim or swarm. Instead, growth occurs in colonies of close-packed cells, which expand purely due to repulsive interactions: individual bacteria push each other out of the way through the force of their growth. In this way, bacterial colonies represent a new type of ``active'' granular matter. In this study, we investigate the physical, biochemical, and genetic elements that determine the static and dynamic aspects of this mode of bacterial growth for E. coli. We characterize the process of colony expansion empirically, and use discrete and continuum models to examine the extent to which our observations can be explained by the growth characteristics of non-communicating cells, coupled together by physical forces, nutrients, and waste products. Our results challenge the commonly accepted modes of bacterial colony growth and provide insight into sources of growth limitation in crowded bacterial communities.

  4. Curved microchannels and bacterial streamers

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Roberto Rusconi; Sigolene Lecuyer; Laura Guglielmini; Howard Stone

    2010-01-01

    Bacterial biofilms are commonly identified as microbial communities attached to a surface and encased in a self-secreted extracellular matrix. Due to their increased resistance to antimicrobial agents, biofilms have an enormous impact on health and medicine (e.g., wound healing, implant-associated infections, disease transmission). On the other hand, they constitute a major component of the stream ecosystem by increasing transport of

  5. Electromagnetism of Bacterial Growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ainiwaer, Ailiyasi

    2011-10-01

    There has been increasing concern from the public about personal health due to the significant rise in the daily use of electrical devices such as cell phones, radios, computers, GPS, video games and television. All of these devices create electromagnetic (EM) fields, which are simply magnetic and electric fields surrounding the appliances that simultaneously affect the human bio-system. Although these can affect the human system, obstacles can easily shield or weaken the electrical fields; however, magnetic fields cannot be weakened and can pass through walls, human bodies and most other objects. The present study was conducted to examine the possible effects of bacteria when exposed to magnetic fields. The results indicate that a strong causal relationship is not clear, since different magnetic fields affect the bacteria differently, with some causing an increase in bacterial cells, and others causing a decrease in the same cells. This phenomenon has yet to be explained, but the current study attempts to offer a mathematical explanation for this occurrence. The researchers added cultures to the magnetic fields to examine any effects to ion transportation. Researchers discovered ions such as potassium and sodium are affected by the magnetic field. A formula is presented in the analysis section to explain this effect.

  6. Population Growth Curves

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    2014-09-18

    Using Avida-ED freeware, students control a few factors in an environment populated with digital organisms, and then compare how changing these factors affects population growth. They experiment by altering the environment size (similar to what is called carrying capacity, the maximum population size that an environment can normally sustain), the initial organism gestation rate, and the availability of resources. How systems function often depends on many different factors. By altering these factors one at a time, and observing the results, students are able to clearly see the effect of each one.

  7. Metabolic AssessmentQC Preprocessing Growth curves from PM undergo filtering to

    E-print Network

    on the logistic model: Figure 2. Phenotype distribution of 72 unique carbon growth conditions across 81 E. coli data from analysis pipeline: Logistic Model Growth curves fitted by a logistic model: Measuring Growth pipeline to accurately qualify growth of bacterial cells using PM measurements. Using logistic growth curve

  8. Stochasticity in Colonial Growth Dynamics of Individual Bacterial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Lianou, Alexandra

    2013-01-01

    Conventional bacterial growth studies rely on large bacterial populations without considering the individual cells. Individual cells, however, can exhibit marked behavioral heterogeneity. Here, we present experimental observations on the colonial growth of 220 individual cells of Salmonella enterica serotype Typhimurium using time-lapse microscopy videos. We found a highly heterogeneous behavior. Some cells did not grow, showing filamentation or lysis before division. Cells that were able to grow and form microcolonies showed highly diverse growth dynamics. The quality of the videos allowed for counting the cells over time and estimating the kinetic parameters lag time (?) and maximum specific growth rate (?max) for each microcolony originating from a single cell. To interpret the observations, the variability of the kinetic parameters was characterized using appropriate probability distributions and introduced to a stochastic model that allows for taking into account heterogeneity using Monte Carlo simulation. The model provides stochastic growth curves demonstrating that growth of single cells or small microbial populations is a pool of events each one of which has its own probability to occur. Simulations of the model illustrated how the apparent variability in population growth gradually decreases with increasing initial population size (N0). For bacterial populations with N0 of >100 cells, the variability is almost eliminated and the system seems to behave deterministically, even though the underlying law is stochastic. We also used the model to demonstrate the effect of the presence and extent of a nongrowing population fraction on the stochastic growth of bacterial populations. PMID:23354712

  9. Detection of outliers in growth curve models

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Madhusudan Bhandary

    1995-01-01

    The growth curve model introduced by Potthoff and Roy (1964) is a general statistical model which includes as special cases regression models and both univariate and multivariate analysis of variance models. In this paper, we discuss procedures for detection of outliers in growth curve models for mean-slippage and dispersion-slippage outlier model. The distributions of the test statistics are discussed and

  10. Nonlinear Growth Curves in Developmental Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grimm, Kevin J.; Ram, Nilam; Hamagami, Fumiaki

    2011-01-01

    Developmentalists are often interested in understanding change processes, and growth models are the most common analytic tool for examining such processes. Nonlinear growth curves are especially valuable to developmentalists because the defining characteristics of the growth process such as initial levels, rates of change during growth spurts, and…

  11. Model for the Growth of Bacterial Genomes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsieh, L. C.; Lee, H. C.

    Analysis of the frequency of occurrence of short oligonucleotides in typical bacterial genomes reveals that they exhibit the statistical characteristics of a DNA sequence of a much shorter length. This peculiar property suggests a model for genome growth in which a genome evolves by random mutation but primarily grows by random segmental self-copying. Computer-generated genome sequence based on this model indeed has statistical properties similar to those of bacterial genomes.

  12. Model for the Growth of Bacterial Genomes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsieh, L. C.; Lee, H. C.

    2003-04-01

    Analysis of frequency of occurrence of short oligonucleotides in typical bacterial genomes reveals that they exhibit the statistical characteristics of a DNA sequence of a much shorter length. This peculiar property suggests a model for genome growth in which a genome evolves by random mutation but primarily grows by random segmental selfcopying. Computer generated genome sequence based on the model indeed have statistical properties similar to those of bacterial genomes.

  13. SMOOTHING SPLINE GROWTH CURVES WITH COVARIATES

    E-print Network

    ; 2 is replaced by its unbiased esti- mate. #3; Permanent address: College of Staten Island, C.U.N.Y., Staten Island 1 #12; I. INTRODUCTION Growth curve analysis is used to parameterize a family of temporal

  14. Growth-dependent bacterial susceptibility to ribosome-targeting antibiotics.

    PubMed

    Greulich, Philip; Scott, Matthew; Evans, Martin R; Allen, Rosalind J

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial growth environment strongly influences the efficacy of antibiotic treatment, with slow growth often being associated with decreased susceptibility. Yet in many cases, the connection between antibiotic susceptibility and pathogen physiology remains unclear. We show that for ribosome-targeting antibiotics acting on Escherichia coli, a complex interplay exists between physiology and antibiotic action; for some antibiotics within this class, faster growth indeed increases susceptibility, but for other antibiotics, the opposite is true. Remarkably, these observations can be explained by a simple mathematical model that combines drug transport and binding with physiological constraints. Our model reveals that growth-dependent susceptibility is controlled by a single parameter characterizing the 'reversibility' of ribosome-targeting antibiotic transport and binding. This parameter provides a spectrum classification of antibiotic growth-dependent efficacy that appears to correspond at its extremes to existing binary classification schemes. In these limits, the model predicts universal, parameter-free limiting forms for growth inhibition curves. The model also leads to non-trivial predictions for the drug susceptibility of a translation mutant strain of E. coli, which we verify experimentally. Drug action and bacterial metabolism are mechanistically complex; nevertheless, this study illustrates how coarse-grained models can be used to integrate pathogen physiology into drug design and treatment strategies. PMID:25790818

  15. Bacterial growth on dissolved organic carbon from a blackwater river

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Judy L. Meyer; Richard T. Edwards; Rebecca Risley

    1987-01-01

    Different nominal molecular weight (nMW) fractions of DOC from a southeastern blackwater river were concentrated by ultrafiltration and added to sieved river water to assess each fraction's ability to stimulate bacterial growth. Bacterial growth was measured using change in bacterial biomass from direct counts and using3H-thymidine incorporated into DNA. Bacterial growth and amount of DOC used was greatest in the

  16. Curved tails in polymerization-based bacterial motility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rutenberg, Andrew D.; Grant, Martin

    2001-08-01

    The curved actin ``comet-tail'' of the bacterium Listeria monocytogenes is a visually striking signature of actin polymerization-based motility. Similar actin tails are associated with Shigella flexneri, spotted-fever Rickettsiae, the Vaccinia virus, and vesicles and microspheres in related in vitro systems. We show that the torque required to produce the curvature in the tail can arise from randomly placed actin filaments pushing the bacterium or particle. We find that the curvature magnitude determines the number of actively pushing filaments, independent of viscosity and of the molecular details of force generation. The variation of the curvature with time can be used to infer the dynamics of actin filaments at the bacterial surface.

  17. Bacterial growth and form under mechanical compression

    PubMed Central

    Si, Fangwei; Li, Bo; Margolin, William; Sun, Sean X.

    2015-01-01

    A combination of physical and chemical processes is involved in determining the bacterial cell shape. In standard medium, Escherichia coli cells are rod-shaped, and maintain a constant diameter during exponential growth. Here, we demonstrate that by applying compressive forces to growing E. coli, cells no longer retain their rod-like shapes but grow and divide with a flat pancake-like geometry. The deformation is reversible: deformed cells can recover back to rod-like shapes in several generations after compressive forces are removed. During compression, the cell elongation rate, proliferation rate, DNA replication rate, and protein synthesis are not significantly altered from those of the normal rod-shaped cells. Quantifying the rate of cell wall growth under compression reveals that the cell wall growth rate depends on the local cell curvature. MreB not only influences the rate of cell wall growth, but also influences how the growth rate scales with cell geometry. The result is consistent with predictions of a mechanochemical model, and suggests an active mechanical role for MreB during cell wall growth. The developed compressive device is also useful for studying a variety of cells in unique geometries. PMID:26086542

  18. Coulter counter determination of bacterial growth and cellular size change following ??Co gamma irradiation 

    E-print Network

    Gaston, Gary W

    1976-01-01

    of Department Member mber December 1976 ABSTRACT Coulter Counter Determination of Bacterial Growth and Cellular Size Change Following Co Gamma 60 Irradiation (December 1976) Gary W. Gaston, B. S. , University of Southern Mississippi Directed by: Dr. R... II. Generation times of shaking cultures 12 LIST OF FIGURES Page Figure 1. Set-up for bacterial irradiation using a Figure 2. Figure 3. 16, 000 Ci Co gamma source at a 548 R/min. 60 exposure rate Growth curve of Serratia marcescens 933 Growth...

  19. Menaquinone Analogs Inhibit Growth of Bacterial Pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Merriman, Joseph A.; Salgado-Pabón, Wilmara; Mueller, Elizabeth A.; Spaulding, Adam R.; Vu, Bao G.; Chuang-Smith, Olivia N.; Kohler, Petra L.; Kirby, John R.

    2013-01-01

    Gram-positive bacteria cause serious human illnesses through combinations of cell surface and secreted virulence factors. We initiated studies with four of these organisms to develop novel topical antibacterial agents that interfere with growth and exotoxin production, focusing on menaquinone analogs. Menadione, 1,4-naphthoquinone, and coenzymes Q1 to Q3 but not menaquinone, phylloquinone, or coenzyme Q10 inhibited the growth and to a greater extent exotoxin production of Staphylococcus aureus, Bacillus anthracis, Streptococcus pyogenes, and Streptococcus agalactiae at concentrations of 10 to 200 ?g/ml. Coenzyme Q1 reduced the ability of S. aureus to cause toxic shock syndrome in a rabbit model, inhibited the growth of four Gram-negative bacteria, and synergized with another antimicrobial agent, glycerol monolaurate, to inhibit S. aureus growth. The staphylococcal two-component system SrrA/B was shown to be an antibacterial target of coenzyme Q1. We hypothesize that menaquinone analogs both induce toxic reactive oxygen species and affect bacterial plasma membranes and biosynthetic machinery to interfere with two-component systems, respiration, and macromolecular synthesis. These compounds represent a novel class of potential topical therapeutic agents. PMID:23959313

  20. Menaquinone analogs inhibit growth of bacterial pathogens.

    PubMed

    Schlievert, Patrick M; Merriman, Joseph A; Salgado-Pabón, Wilmara; Mueller, Elizabeth A; Spaulding, Adam R; Vu, Bao G; Chuang-Smith, Olivia N; Kohler, Petra L; Kirby, John R

    2013-11-01

    Gram-positive bacteria cause serious human illnesses through combinations of cell surface and secreted virulence factors. We initiated studies with four of these organisms to develop novel topical antibacterial agents that interfere with growth and exotoxin production, focusing on menaquinone analogs. Menadione, 1,4-naphthoquinone, and coenzymes Q1 to Q3 but not menaquinone, phylloquinone, or coenzyme Q10 inhibited the growth and to a greater extent exotoxin production of Staphylococcus aureus, Bacillus anthracis, Streptococcus pyogenes, and Streptococcus agalactiae at concentrations of 10 to 200 ?g/ml. Coenzyme Q1 reduced the ability of S. aureus to cause toxic shock syndrome in a rabbit model, inhibited the growth of four Gram-negative bacteria, and synergized with another antimicrobial agent, glycerol monolaurate, to inhibit S. aureus growth. The staphylococcal two-component system SrrA/B was shown to be an antibacterial target of coenzyme Q1. We hypothesize that menaquinone analogs both induce toxic reactive oxygen species and affect bacterial plasma membranes and biosynthetic machinery to interfere with two-component systems, respiration, and macromolecular synthesis. These compounds represent a novel class of potential topical therapeutic agents. PMID:23959313

  1. Growth factor parametrization in curved space

    SciTech Connect

    Gong Yungui; Ishak, Mustapha; Wang Anzhong [College of Mathematics and Physics, Chongqing University of Posts and Telecommunications, Chongqing 400065 (China) and Kavli Institute for Theoretical Physics China, CAS, Beijing 100190 (China); Department of Physics, University of Texas at Dallas, Richardson, Texas 75083 (United States); CASPER, Physics Department, Baylor University, Waco, Texas 76798 (United States)

    2009-07-15

    The growth rate of matter perturbation and the expansion rate of the Universe can be used to distinguish modified gravity and dark energy models in explaining cosmic acceleration. We explore here the inclusion of spatial curvature into the growth factor. We expand previous results using the approximation {omega}{sub m}{sup {gamma}} and then suggest a new form, f{sub a}={omega}{sub m}{sup {gamma}}+({gamma}-4/7){omega}{sub k}, as an approximation for the growth factor when the curvature {omega}{sub k} is not negligible, and where the growth index {gamma} is usually model dependent. The expression recovers the standard results for the curved and flat {lambda}CDM and Dvali-Gabadadze-Porrati models. Using the best fit values of {omega}{sub m0} and {omega}{sub k0} to the expansion/distance measurements from Type Ia SNe, baryon acoustic oscillation, WMAP5, and H(z) data, we fit the growth index parameter to current growth factor data and obtain {gamma}{sub {lambda}}({omega}{sub k}{ne}0)=0.65{sub -0.15}{sup +0.17} and {gamma}{sub DGP}({omega}{sub k}{ne}0)=0.53{sub -0.12}{sup +0.14}. For the {lambda}CDM model, the 1-{sigma} observational bounds are found consistent with theoretical value, unlike the case for the Dvali-Gabadadze-Porrati model. We also find that the current data we used is not enough to put significant constraints when the 3 parameters in f{sub a} are fit simultaneously. Importantly, we find that, in the presence of curvature, the analytical expression proposed for f{sub a} provides a better fit to the growth factor than other forms and should be useful for future high precision missions and studies.

  2. Bacterial adhesion and growth on a polymer brush-coating

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. Reza Nejadnik; Henny C. van der Mei; Willem Norde; Henk J. Busscher

    2008-01-01

    Biomaterials-related infections pose serious problems in implant surgery, despite the development of non-adhesive coatings. Non-adhesive coatings, like polymer brush-coatings, have so far only been investigated with respect to preventing initial bacterial adhesion, but never with respect to effects on kinetics of bacterial growth. Here, we compare adhesion and 20h growth of three bacterial strains (Staphylococcus aureus, Staphylococcus epidermidis and Pseudomonas

  3. Theory of hydrokinetic clearance of bacteria from the urinary bladder. I. Effect of variations in bacterial growth rate.

    PubMed

    Mackintosh, I P; Hammond, B J; Watson, B W; O'Grady, F

    1975-05-01

    If the bladder is regularly emptied in appropriate circumstances the concentration of bacteria in successively voided samples progressively falls. By making a number of assumptions about conditions of bacterial growth in the bladder the way in which this washout of bacteria will occur can be predicted. Such predictions give a form of washout curve which differs significantly from that commonly encountered in patients. The shape of the predicted washout curve is affected by the form of the bacterial growth curve but this influence is not sufficient to account for the observed difference between patients and predictions. PMID:1120639

  4. A brief history of bacterial growth physiology

    PubMed Central

    Schaechter, Moselio

    2015-01-01

    Arguably, microbial physiology started when Leeuwenhoek became fascinated by observing a Vorticella beating its cilia, my point being that almost any observation of microbes has a physiological component. With the advent of modern microbiology in the mid-19th century, the field became recognizably distinctive with such discoveries as anaerobiosis, fermentation as a biological phenomenon, and the nutritional requirements of microbes. Soon came the discoveries of Winogradsky and his followers of the chemical changes in the environment that result from microbial activities. Later, during the first half of the 20th century, microbial physiology became the basis for much of the elucidation of central metabolism. Bacterial physiology then became a handmaiden of molecular biology and was greatly influenced by the discovery of cellular regulatory mechanisms. Microbial growth, which had come of age with the early work of Hershey, Monod, and others, was later pursued by studies on a whole cell level by what became known as the “Copenhagen School.” During this time, the exploration of physiological activities became coupled to modern inquiries into the structure of the bacterial cell. Recent years have seen the development of a further phase in microbial physiology, one seeking a deeper quantitative understanding of phenomena on a whole cell level. This pursuit is exemplified by the emergence of systems biology, which is made possible by the development of technologies that permit the gathering of information in huge amounts. As has been true through history, the research into microbial physiology continues to be guided by the development of new methods of analysis. Some of these developments may well afford the possibility of making stunning breakthroughs. PMID:25954250

  5. Descriptive and Predictive Growth Curves in Energy System Analysis

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Mikael Höök; Junchen Li; Noriaki Oba; Simon Snowden

    2011-01-01

    This study reviews a variety of growth curve models and the theoretical frameworks that lay behind them. In many systems,\\u000a growth patterns are, or must, ultimately be subjected to some form of limitation. A number of curve models have been developed\\u000a to describe and predict such behaviours. Symmetric growth curves have frequently been used for forecasting fossil fuel production,\\u000a but

  6. Effect of bacterial satellites on Chlamydomonas reinhardtii growth in an algo-bacterial community

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Yu. A. Nikolaev; V. K. Plakunov; N. A. Voronina; N. V. Nemtseva; A. O. Plotnikov; O. A. Gogoleva; M. E. Murav’eva; G. V. Ovechkina

    2008-01-01

    The growth characteristics of an algo-bacterial community (Chlamydomonas reinhardtii and bacterial satellites) were studied, as well as the mechanism and patterns of bacterial effect on algae. Four strains\\u000a of predominant bacteria were isolated and partially characterized. They were assigned to the following taxa: Rhodococcus terrea, Micrococcus roseus, and Bacillus spp. A pure culture of the alga under study was obtained

  7. Regime Switching in the Latent Growth Curve Mixture Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dolan, Conor V.; Schmittmann, Verena D.; Lubke, Gitta H.; Neale, Michael C.

    2005-01-01

    A linear latent growth curve mixture model is presented which includes switching between growth curves. Switching is accommodated by means of a Markov transition model. The model is formulated with switching as a highly constrained multivariate mixture model and is fitted using the freely available Mx program. The model is illustrated by analyzing…

  8. Hypothesis Generation in Latent Growth Curve Modeling Using Principal Components

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davison, Mark L.

    2008-01-01

    While confirmatory latent growth curve analyses provide procedures for testing hypotheses about latent growth curves underlying data, one must first derive hypotheses to be tested. It is argued that such hypotheses should be generated from a combination of theory and exploratory data analyses. An exploratory components analysis is described and…

  9. Catecholamines and in vitro growth of pathogenic bacteria: enhancement of growth varies greatly among bacterial species

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Belay, Tesfaye; Aviles, Hernan; Vance, Monique; Fountain, Kimberly; Sonnenfeld, Gerald

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of catecholamines on in vitro growth of a range of bacterial species, including anaerobes. Bacteria tested included: Porphyromonas gingivalis, Bacteriodes fragilis, Shigella boydii, Shigella sonnie, Enterobacter Sp, and Salmonella choleraesuis. The results of the current study indicated that supplementation of bacterial cultures in minimal medium with norepinephrine or epinephrine did not result in increased growth of bacteria. Positive controls involving treatment of Escherichia coli with catecholamines did result in increased growth of that bacterial species. The results of the present study extend previous observations that showed differential capability of catecholamines to enhance bacterial growth in vitro.

  10. [Effect of bacterial satellites on Chlamydomonas reinhardtii growth in an algo-bacterial community].

    PubMed

    Nikolaev, Iu A; Plakunov, V K; Voronina, N A; Nemtseva, N V; Plotnikov, A O; Gogoleva, O A; Murav'eva, M E; Ovechkina, G V

    2008-01-01

    The growth characteristics of an algo-bacterial community (Chlamydomonas reinhardtii and bacterial satellites) were studied, as well as the mechanism and patterns of bacterial effect on algae. Four strains of predominant bacteria were isolated and partially characterized. They were assigned to the following taxa: Rhodococcus terrea, Micrococcus roseus, and Bacillus spp. A pure culture of the alga under study was obtained by plating serial dilutions on agarized media with ampicillin. Within the algo-bacterial association, the alga had a higher growth rate (0.76 day(-1)) and yield (60 microg chlorophyll/ml culture) than in pure cultures (0.4 day(-1) and 10 microg chlorophyll/ml culture, respectively). The viability of the algal cells within the association was retained longer than in pure culture. Among the isolated bacterial satellites, strains B1 and Y1, assigned to the species Rhodococcus terrae, had the highest stimulatory effect on algal growth. The culture liquid of bacteria incubated under the conditions not permitting growth stimulated algal growth; the culture liquid of actively growing bacteria had an opposite effect. PMID:18365726

  11. BGFit: management and automated fitting of biological growth curves

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Existing tools to model cell growth curves do not offer a flexible integrative approach to manage large datasets and automatically estimate parameters. Due to the increase of experimental time-series from microbiology and oncology, the need for a software that allows researchers to easily organize experimental data and simultaneously extract relevant parameters in an efficient way is crucial. Results BGFit provides a web-based unified platform, where a rich set of dynamic models can be fitted to experimental time-series data, further allowing to efficiently manage the results in a structured and hierarchical way. The data managing system allows to organize projects, experiments and measurements data and also to define teams with different editing and viewing permission. Several dynamic and algebraic models are already implemented, such as polynomial regression, Gompertz, Baranyi, Logistic and Live Cell Fraction models and the user can add easily new models thus expanding current ones. Conclusions BGFit allows users to easily manage their data and models in an integrated way, even if they are not familiar with databases or existing computational tools for parameter estimation. BGFit is designed with a flexible architecture that focus on extensibility and leverages free software with existing tools and methods, allowing to compare and evaluate different data modeling techniques. The application is described in the context of bacterial and tumor cells growth data fitting, but it is also applicable to any type of two-dimensional data, e.g. physical chemistry and macroeconomic time series, being fully scalable to high number of projects, data and model complexity. PMID:24067087

  12. Surface Growth of a Motile Bacterial Population Resembles Growth in a Chemostat

    E-print Network

    Surface Growth of a Motile Bacterial Population Resembles Growth in a Chemostat Daniel A. Koster.alon@weizmann.ac.il http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jmb.2012.09.005 Edited by I. B. Holland Abstract The growth behavior conditions on surfaces where their growth is dependent on spatial position, especially in the case of motile

  13. Quantification of antibiotic drug potency by a two-compartment radioassay of bacterial growth

    SciTech Connect

    Boonkitticharoen, V.; Ehrhardt, J.C.; Kirchner, P.T. (Univ. of Iowa, Iowa City (USA))

    1990-06-01

    The two-compartment radioassay for microbial kinetics based on continuous measurement of the {sup 14}CO{sub 2} released by bacterial metabolism of 14C-labeled substrate offers a valuable approach to testing the potency of antimicrobial drugs. By using a previously validated radioassay with gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria, a group of protein synthesis inhibitors was evaluated for their effect on microbial growth kinetics. All tested drugs induced changes in both the slopes and intercepts of the growth curves. An exponential growth model was applied to quantify the drug effect on the processes of bacterial {sup 14}CO{sub 2} liberation and cell generation. The response was measured in terms of a generation rate constant. A linear dependence of the generation rate constant on the dose of spectinomycin was observed with Escherichia coli. Sigmoidal-shaped curves were found in the assays of chloramphenicol and tetracycline. The implications of dose-response curves are discussed on the basis of the receptor site concept for drug action. The assay sensitivities for chloramphenicol and tetracycline were similar to those obtained by the cell counting method, but the sensitivity of the radioassay was at least 10 times greater for spectinomycin.

  14. Determination of Compounds Inhibiting Bacterial Growth in Sterilized Medical Devices

    Microsoft Academic Search

    H. Shintani; E. Suzuki; M. Sakurai

    2003-01-01

    Summary Medical devices must be sterilized before shipping. During sterilization the quality of the medical device must be maintained. Polysulfone (PS) and polycarbonate (PC) are often used as materials for medical devices. It has been observed that compounds inhibiting bacterial growth are produced when PS or PC are sterilized by autoclaving or by use of ozone gas, especially when ozone

  15. Adaptive identification and control algorithms for nonlinear bacterial growth systems

    Microsoft Academic Search

    D. DOCHAINt; G. BASTIN

    1984-01-01

    This paper suggests how nonlinear adaptive control of nonlinear bacterial growth systems could be performed. The process is described by a time-varying nonlinear model obtained from material balance equations. Two different control problems are considered: substrate concentration control and production rate control. For each of these cases, an adaptive minimum variance control algorithm is proposed and its effectiveness is shown

  16. Kinetics of bacterial growth on chlorinated aliphatic compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Wijngaard, A.J. van den; Wind, R.E.; Janssen, D.B. (Univ. of Groningen (Netherlands))

    1993-07-01

    Halogenated aliphatic compounds are frequent constituents of industrial waste gases. Because of the environmental and biological toxic effects of these compounds, there is a growing interest in technologies for their removal. Biological waste gas purification is an option if specialized bacterial strains that use halogenated aliphatics as sole carbon and energy sources can be used. Elimination efficiency of the compounds depends not only on the process technology but on the degradation properties of the bacterial strains. Important aspects of bacterial growth are the Monod half-saturation constant and the maximum growth rate. In this study the kinetic properties of the organisms (Ancylobacter aquaticus AD20 and AD25, Xanthobacter autotrophicus GJ10, Pseudomonas sp. strain AD1) weree measured during growth in continuous cultures and wer compared with the kinetic properties of the first catabolic enzyme involved in the degradation of the growth substrate. The results indicate that the growth of the strains examined followed Monod kinetics. Stains AD20 and GJ10 showed growth rates on DCE somewhat higher than predicted from the amount of haloalkane dehalogenase present in the cells, while strain AD25 was much lower. 33 refs., 3 figs., 4 tabs.

  17. Growth curve for girls with Turner syndrome

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A J Lyon; M A Preece; D B Grant

    1985-01-01

    A growth chart for girls with Turner syndrome has been prepared using data from four published series of European patients, and evaluated using retrospective data on the heights of girls with Turner syndrome seen at this hospital. The results indicate that calculation of height standard deviation score from this chart allows a reasonable prediction of adult stature in any patient

  18. Modeling growth curves to track growing obesity

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Our purpose was to examine the relationship between total physical activity (PA) and PA at various intensity levels with insulin resistance at increasing waist circumference and skinfold thickness levels. Being able to describe growth appropriately and succinctly is important in many nutrition and p...

  19. Interactions of cosmic rays in the atmosphere: growth curves revisited

    SciTech Connect

    Obermeier, A.; Boyle, P.; Müller, D. [Enrico Fermi Institute, University of Chicago, Chicago, IL 60637 (United States); Hörandel, J., E-mail: a.obermeier@astro.ru.nl [Radboud Universiteit Nijmegen, 6525-HP Nijmegen (Netherlands)

    2013-12-01

    Measurements of cosmic-ray abundances on balloons are affected by interactions in the residual atmosphere above the balloon. Corrections for such interactions are particularly important for observations of rare secondary particles such as boron, antiprotons, and positrons. These corrections either can be calculated if the relevant cross sections in the atmosphere are known or may be empirically determined by extrapolation of the 'growth curves', i.e., the individual particle intensities as functions of atmospheric depth. The growth-curve technique is particularly attractive for long-duration balloon flights where the periodic daily altitude variations permit rather precise determinations of the corresponding particle intensity variations. We determine growth curves for nuclei from boron (Z = 5) to iron (Z = 26) using data from the 2006 Arctic balloon flight of the TRACER detector for cosmic-ray nuclei, and we compare the growth curves with predictions from published cross section values. In general, good agreement is observed. We then study the boron/carbon abundance ratio and derive a simple and energy-independent correction term for this ratio. We emphasize that the growth-curve technique can be developed further to provide highly accurate tests of published interaction cross section values.

  20. Bayesian Inference and Application of Robust Growth Curve Models Using Student's "t" Distribution

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhang, Zhiyong; Lai, Keke; Lu, Zhenqiu; Tong, Xin

    2013-01-01

    Despite the widespread popularity of growth curve analysis, few studies have investigated robust growth curve models. In this article, the "t" distribution is applied to model heavy-tailed data and contaminated normal data with outliers for growth curve analysis. The derived robust growth curve models are estimated through Bayesian…

  1. Growth curve analysis of Rambouillet ewes

    E-print Network

    Mathenge, James Mwai

    1981-01-01

    for this study. However, most of the results were reported for 152 observations; a subset of the 283 records that contained the smst complete set of weighted' Type of birth and rearing was the single most significant source of variation for preweaning body... weights and growth rates. Estimation of mature weight obtained for 184 records was 59. 6 + . 77 kilograms. Based upon analysis of yearly weights, ewes had reached maturity by 42 months of age. Birth and 120-day weight were lower than those reported...

  2. Evolution of bacterial and fungal growth media

    PubMed Central

    Basu, Srijoni; Bose, Chandra; Ojha, Nupur; Das, Nabajit; Das, Jagaree; Pal, Mrinmoy; Khurana, Sukant

    2015-01-01

    Microbial media has undergone several changes since its inception but some key challenges remain. In recent years, there has been exploration of several alternative nutrient sources, both to cater to the specificity in requirement of growth of “fussy microorganisms” and also to reduce costs for large-scale fermentation that is required for biotechnology. Our mini-review explores these developments and also points at lacunas in the present areas of exploration, such as a lack of concerted effort in pH and osmolarity regulation. We hope that our commentary provides direction for future research in microbial media.

  3. R-Curve Instability Calculations Of Crack Growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Orange, Thomas W.

    1989-01-01

    Report discusses use of instability method of calculation and R-curve mathematical models to analyze growth of cracks in fracture-mechanics specimens. In case of single material and structure, such analysis sometimes simple enough to be done on pocket calculator. Where microcomputer or larger computer available, comprehensive program includes libraries of driving-force equations for various configurations and R-curve mathematical models for different materials. Author concludes instability method simple and effective and model equations studied all viable in sense at lease one of them should fit almost any applicable set of crack-growth data. Method and models constitute powerful mathematical tools for analysis of fractures.

  4. Reducing atelectasis attenuates bacterial growth and translocation in experimental pneumonia

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Kaam van A. H. L. C; Robert A. Lachmann; Egbert Herting; Anne De Jaegere; F. Iwaarden; L. Arnold Noorduyn; Joke H. Kok; Jack J. Haitsma; Burkhard Lachmann

    2004-01-01

    Abstract Besides being one of the mechanisms responsible for ventilator-induced lung injury, atelectasis also seems to aggravate the course of experimental pneumonia. In this study, we examined,the effect of reducing the degree of atelectasis by natural modified surfactant and\\/or open lung ventilation, on bacterial growth and translocation in a piglet model of group B streptococcal pneumonia. After creating surfactant-deficiency by

  5. Microcoupon Assay Of Adhesion And Growth Of Bacterial Films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pierson, Duane L.; Koenig, David W.

    1994-01-01

    Microbiological assay technique facilitates determination of some characteristics of sessile bacteria like those that attach to and coat interior walls of water-purification systems. Biofilms cause sickness and interfere with purification process. Technique enables direct measurement of rate of attachment of bacterial cells, their metabolism, and effects of chemicals on them. Used to quantify effects of both bactericides and growth-stimulating agents and in place of older standard plate-count and tube-dilution techniques.

  6. Diagnostics of Robust Growth Curve Modeling Using Student's "t" Distribution

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tong, Xin; Zhang, Zhiyong

    2012-01-01

    Growth curve models with different types of distributions of random effects and of intraindividual measurement errors for robust analysis are compared. After demonstrating the influence of distribution specification on parameter estimation, 3 methods for diagnosing the distributions for both random effects and intraindividual measurement errors…

  7. The Multigroup Multilevel Categorical Latent Growth Curve Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hung, Lai-Fa

    2010-01-01

    Longitudinal data describe developmental patterns and enable predictions of individual changes beyond sampled time points. Major methodological issues in longitudinal data include modeling random effects, subject effects, growth curve parameters, and autoregressive residuals. This study embedded the longitudinal model within a multigroup…

  8. Twelve Frequently Asked Questions about Growth Curve Modeling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Curran, Patrick J.; Obeidat, Khawla; Losardo, Diane

    2010-01-01

    Longitudinal data analysis has long played a significant role in empirical research within the developmental sciences. The past decade has given rise to a host of new and exciting analytic methods for studying between-person differences in within-person change. These methods are broadly organized under the term "growth curve models." The…

  9. Market Bid Functions For Treasury Securities As Logistic Growth Curves

    E-print Network

    Tsirelson, Boris

    Market Bid Functions For Treasury Securities As Logistic Growth Curves Benzion Boukai Department that in spite of large uctuations across auctions, it is pos- sible to identify an intertemporally stable market logistic structure that is intertemporally stable. Secondary market yields are shown to be pivotal

  10. A SAS Macro for Estimating and Visualizing Individual Growth Curves

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carrig, Madeline M.; Wirth, R. J.; Curran, Patrick J.

    2004-01-01

    Longitudinal data analyses can be usefully supplemented by the plotting of individual growth curves. Unfortunately, such graphics can be challenging and tedious to produce. This article presents and demonstrates a SAS macro designed to automate this task. The OLStraj macro graphically depicts ordinary least squares (OLS)-estimated individual…

  11. Bayesian Analysis of Longitudinal Data Using Growth Curve Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhang, Zhiyong; Hamagami, Fumiaki; Wang, Lijuan Lijuan; Nesselroade, John R.; Grimm, Kevin J.

    2007-01-01

    Bayesian methods for analyzing longitudinal data in social and behavioral research are recommended for their ability to incorporate prior information in estimating simple and complex models. We first summarize the basics of Bayesian methods before presenting an empirical example in which we fit a latent basis growth curve model to achievement data…

  12. Growth Interactions during Bacterial Colonization of Seedling Rootlets

    PubMed Central

    De Bellis, P.; Ercolani, G. L.

    2001-01-01

    Rootlet elongation and bacterial growth on rootlets were determined after inoculation of cucumber and spinach seedlings with Pseudomonas strains differing in production of siderophores and HCN. Siderophore producers grew more profusely than nonproducers on both species and promoted rootlet elongation on cucumber. Coinoculation of siderophore producers and nonproducers resulted in restricted growth of the latter. The total populations of nonproducers of HCN in the presence of HCN producers were not decreased, but the tenacity of their association with the rootlet surface was altered. PMID:11282653

  13. Effect of glycerol monolaurate on bacterial growth and toxin production.

    PubMed

    Schlievert, P M; Deringer, J R; Kim, M H; Projan, S J; Novick, R P

    1992-03-01

    Glycerol monolaurate (GML) is a naturally occurring surfactant that has potential use as an additive to tampons and wound dressings to reduce the incidence of certain bacterial toxin-mediated illnesses. In vitro studies were undertaken to evaluate the effect of GML on the growth of and toxin production by potentially pathogenic bacteria. GML inhibited the growth of clinical isolates of group A, B, F, and G streptococci at concentrations of 10 to 20 micrograms/ml. Exotoxin production, including that of pyrogenic exotoxins and hemolysins, was reduced by concentrations of GML that were below those inhibitory for growth as well as growth inhibitory. The growth of Staphylococcus aureus strains from patients with toxic shock syndrome and scalded skin syndrome was inhibited or delayed in the presence of 100 to 300 micrograms of GML per ml. Growth inhibition by GML could be overcome by the production of lipase. S. aureus elaboration of hemolysin, toxic shock syndrome toxin 1, and exfoliative toxin A was inhibited at GML concentrations below those necessary to inhibit growth. Results similar to those for S. aureus were obtained in tests of S. hominis. Escherichia coli growth and Salmonella minnesota growth were unaffected by GML, but an S. minnesota Re mutant was susceptible to growth-inhibitory activity. Endotoxin release into the medium from E. coli cells was also unaffected by GML, but the release or activity of E. coli hemolysin was increased by GML. Streptococcal pyrogenic endotoxin A production by an E. coli clone was not affectd by GML. These studies indicate that GML is effective in blocking or delaying the production of exotoxins by pathogenic gram-positive bacteria. PMID:1622174

  14. Effect of glycerol monolaurate on bacterial growth and toxin production.

    PubMed Central

    Schlievert, P M; Deringer, J R; Kim, M H; Projan, S J; Novick, R P

    1992-01-01

    Glycerol monolaurate (GML) is a naturally occurring surfactant that has potential use as an additive to tampons and wound dressings to reduce the incidence of certain bacterial toxin-mediated illnesses. In vitro studies were undertaken to evaluate the effect of GML on the growth of and toxin production by potentially pathogenic bacteria. GML inhibited the growth of clinical isolates of group A, B, F, and G streptococci at concentrations of 10 to 20 micrograms/ml. Exotoxin production, including that of pyrogenic exotoxins and hemolysins, was reduced by concentrations of GML that were below those inhibitory for growth as well as growth inhibitory. The growth of Staphylococcus aureus strains from patients with toxic shock syndrome and scalded skin syndrome was inhibited or delayed in the presence of 100 to 300 micrograms of GML per ml. Growth inhibition by GML could be overcome by the production of lipase. S. aureus elaboration of hemolysin, toxic shock syndrome toxin 1, and exfoliative toxin A was inhibited at GML concentrations below those necessary to inhibit growth. Results similar to those for S. aureus were obtained in tests of S. hominis. Escherichia coli growth and Salmonella minnesota growth were unaffected by GML, but an S. minnesota Re mutant was susceptible to growth-inhibitory activity. Endotoxin release into the medium from E. coli cells was also unaffected by GML, but the release or activity of E. coli hemolysin was increased by GML. Streptococcal pyrogenic endotoxin A production by an E. coli clone was not affectd by GML. These studies indicate that GML is effective in blocking or delaying the production of exotoxins by pathogenic gram-positive bacteria. PMID:1622174

  15. In vitro effects on bacterial growth of phenoloxidase reaction products.

    PubMed

    Cerenius, Lage; Babu, Ramesh; Söderhäll, Kenneth; Jiravanichpaisal, Pikul

    2010-01-01

    An active phenoloxidase preparation from the freshwater crayfish Pacifastacus leniusculus exhibited a strong antibacterial effect in vitro on the bacteria Aeromonas hydrophila, Escherichia coli, Streptococcus pneumoniae whereas a weaker but still significant effect against Bacillus cereus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus aureus. In most cases reduction of bacterial growth was stronger when dopamine was used as substrate as compared to L-dopa. The effect on bacteria was abolished if no substrate was available for the phenoloxidase or in the presence of the phenoloxidase inhibitor phenylthiourea. PMID:19808037

  16. Modeling Bacterial Population Growth from Stochastic Single-Cell Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Molina, Ignacio; Theodoropoulos, Constantinos

    2014-01-01

    A few bacterial cells may be sufficient to produce a food-borne illness outbreak, provided that they are capable of adapting and proliferating on a food matrix. This is why any quantitative health risk assessment policy must incorporate methods to accurately predict the growth of bacterial populations from a small number of pathogens. In this aim, mathematical models have become a powerful tool. Unfortunately, at low cell concentrations, standard deterministic models fail to predict the fate of the population, essentially because the heterogeneity between individuals becomes relevant. In this work, a stochastic differential equation (SDE) model is proposed to describe variability within single-cell growth and division and to simulate population growth from a given initial number of individuals. We provide evidence of the model ability to explain the observed distributions of times to division, including the lag time produced by the adaptation to the environment, by comparing model predictions with experiments from the literature for Escherichia coli, Listeria innocua, and Salmonella enterica. The model is shown to accurately predict experimental growth population dynamics for both small and large microbial populations. The use of stochastic models for the estimation of parameters to successfully fit experimental data is a particularly challenging problem. For instance, if Monte Carlo methods are employed to model the required distributions of times to division, the parameter estimation problem can become numerically intractable. We overcame this limitation by converting the stochastic description to a partial differential equation (backward Kolmogorov) instead, which relates to the distribution of division times. Contrary to previous stochastic formulations based on random parameters, the present model is capable of explaining the variability observed in populations that result from the growth of a small number of initial cells as well as the lack of it compared to populations initiated by a larger number of individuals, where the random effects become negligible. PMID:24928885

  17. Modeling bacterial population growth from stochastic single-cell dynamics.

    PubMed

    Alonso, Antonio A; Molina, Ignacio; Theodoropoulos, Constantinos

    2014-09-01

    A few bacterial cells may be sufficient to produce a food-borne illness outbreak, provided that they are capable of adapting and proliferating on a food matrix. This is why any quantitative health risk assessment policy must incorporate methods to accurately predict the growth of bacterial populations from a small number of pathogens. In this aim, mathematical models have become a powerful tool. Unfortunately, at low cell concentrations, standard deterministic models fail to predict the fate of the population, essentially because the heterogeneity between individuals becomes relevant. In this work, a stochastic differential equation (SDE) model is proposed to describe variability within single-cell growth and division and to simulate population growth from a given initial number of individuals. We provide evidence of the model ability to explain the observed distributions of times to division, including the lag time produced by the adaptation to the environment, by comparing model predictions with experiments from the literature for Escherichia coli, Listeria innocua, and Salmonella enterica. The model is shown to accurately predict experimental growth population dynamics for both small and large microbial populations. The use of stochastic models for the estimation of parameters to successfully fit experimental data is a particularly challenging problem. For instance, if Monte Carlo methods are employed to model the required distributions of times to division, the parameter estimation problem can become numerically intractable. We overcame this limitation by converting the stochastic description to a partial differential equation (backward Kolmogorov) instead, which relates to the distribution of division times. Contrary to previous stochastic formulations based on random parameters, the present model is capable of explaining the variability observed in populations that result from the growth of a small number of initial cells as well as the lack of it compared to populations initiated by a larger number of individuals, where the random effects become negligible. PMID:24928885

  18. A Bayesian analysis of the effect of selection for growth rate on growth curves in rabbits

    PubMed Central

    Blasco, Agustín; Piles, Miriam; Varona, Luis

    2003-01-01

    Gompertz growth curves were fitted to the data of 137 rabbits from control (C) and selected (S) lines. The animals came from a synthetic rabbit line selected for an increased growth rate. The embryos from generations 3 and 4 were frozen and thawed to be contemporary of rabbits born in generation 10. Group C was the offspring of generations 3 and 4, and group S was the contemporary offspring of generation 10. The animals were weighed individually twice a week during the first four weeks of life, and once a week thereafter, until 20 weeks of age. Subsequently, the males were weighed weekly until 40 weeks of age. The random samples of the posterior distributions of the growth curve parameters were drawn by using Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) methods. As a consequence of selection, the selected animals were heavier than the C animals throughout the entire growth curve. Adult body weight, estimated as a parameter of the Gompertz curve, was 7% higher in the selected line. The other parameters of the Gompertz curve were scarcely affected by selection. When selected and control growth curves are represented in a metabolic scale, all differences disappear. PMID:12605849

  19. Divergent selection for shape of growth curve in Japanese quail. 2. Embryonic development and growth

    Microsoft Academic Search

    L. Hyánková; B. Novotná; H. Knížetová; Š Horá?ková

    2004-01-01

    1. Embryonic growth and development were analysed using meat type lines of Japanese quail, HG and LG, divergently selected for shape of the growth curve. A total of 1020 embryos of generations 9, 10 or 13 were used for analysis.2. Considerable inter-line differences were observed in the rate of embryonic development. When compared to HG, LG embryos appeared to be

  20. Dislocation-mediated growth of bacterial cell walls

    E-print Network

    Ariel Amir; David R. Nelson

    2012-05-07

    Recent experiments have illuminated a remarkable growth mechanism of rod-shaped bacteria: proteins associated with cell wall extension move at constant velocity in circles oriented approximately along the cell circumference (Garner et al., Science (2011), Dominguez-Escobar et al. Science (2011), van Teeffelen et al. PNAS (2011). We view these as dislocations in the partially ordered peptidoglycan structure, activated by glycan strand extension machinery, and study theoretically the dynamics of these interacting defects on the surface of a cylinder. Generation and motion of these interacting defects lead to surprising effects arising from the cylindrical geometry, with important implications for growth. We also discuss how long range elastic interactions and turgor pressure affect the dynamics of the fraction of actively moving dislocations in the bacterial cell wall.

  1. Dislocation-mediated growth of bacterial cell walls

    PubMed Central

    Amir, Ariel; Nelson, David R.

    2012-01-01

    Recent experiments have illuminated a remarkable growth mechanism of rod-shaped bacteria: proteins associated with cell wall extension move at constant velocity in circles oriented approximately along the cell circumference [Garner EC, et al., (2011) Science 333:222–225], [Domínguez-Escobar J, et al. (2011) Science 333:225–228], [van Teeffelen S, et al. (2011) PNAS 108:15822–15827]. We view these as dislocations in the partially ordered peptidoglycan structure, activated by glycan strand extension machinery, and study theoretically the dynamics of these interacting defects on the surface of a cylinder. Generation and motion of these interacting defects lead to surprising effects arising from the cylindrical geometry, with important implications for growth. We also discuss how long range elastic interactions and turgor pressure affect the dynamics of the fraction of actively moving dislocations in the bacterial cell wall. PMID:22660931

  2. Bacterial growth and motility in sub-micron constrictions

    PubMed Central

    Männik, Jaan; Driessen, Rosalie; Galajda, Peter; Keymer, Juan E.; Dekker, Cees

    2009-01-01

    In many naturally occurring habitats, bacteria live in micrometer-size confined spaces. Although bacterial growth and motility in such constrictions is of great interest to fields as varied as soil microbiology, water purification, and biomedical research, quantitative studies of the effects of confinement on bacteria have been limited. Here, we establish how Gram-negative Escherichia coli and Gram-positive Bacillus subtilis bacteria can grow, move, and penetrate very narrow constrictions with a size comparable to or even smaller than their diameter. We show that peritrichously flagellated E. coli and B. subtilis are still motile in microfabricated channels where the width of the channel exceeds their diameters only marginally (?30%). For smaller widths, the motility vanishes but bacteria can still pass through these channels by growth and division. We observe E. coli, but not B. subtilis, to penetrate channels with a width that is smaller than their diameter by a factor of approximately 2. Within these channels, bacteria are considerably squeezed but they still grow and divide. After exiting the channels, E. coli bacteria obtain a variety of anomalous cell shapes. Our results reveal that sub-micron size pores and cavities are unexpectedly prolific bacterial habitats where bacteria exhibit morphological adaptations. PMID:19706420

  3. Volatiles of bacterial antagonists inhibit mycelial growth of the plant pathogen Rhizoctonia solani

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Marco Kai; Uta Effmert; Gabriele Berg; Birgit Piechulla

    2007-01-01

    Bacterial antagonists are bacteria that negatively affect the growth of other organisms. Many antagonists inhibit the growth\\u000a of fungi by various mechanisms, e.g., secretion of lytic enzymes, siderophores and antibiotics. Such inhibition of fungal\\u000a growth may indirectly support plant growth. Here, we demonstrate that small organic volatile compounds (VOCs) emitted from\\u000a bacterial antagonists negatively influence the mycelial growth of the

  4. Engineered cerium oxide nanoparticles: Effects on bacterial growth and viability

    SciTech Connect

    Pelletier, Dale A [ORNL; Suresh, Anil K [ORNL; Holton, Gregory A [ORNL; McKeown, Catherine K [ORNL; Wang, Wei [ORNL; Gu, Baohua [ORNL; Mortensen, Ninell P [ORNL; Allison, David P [ORNL; Joy, David Charles [ORNL; Allison, Martin R [ORNL; Brown, Steven D [ORNL; Phelps, Tommy Joe [ORNL; Doktycz, Mitchel John [ORNL

    2010-01-01

    Interest in engineered nanostructures has risen in recent years due to their use in energy conservation strategies and biomedicine. To ensure prudent development and use of nanomaterials, the fate and effects of such engineered structures on the environment should be understood. Interactions of nanomaterials with environmental microorganisms are inevitable, but the general consequences of such interactions remain unclear. Further, standardized methods for assessing such interactions are lacking. Therefore, we have initiated a multianalytical approach to understand the interactions of synthesized nanoparticles with bacterial systems. These efforts are focused initially on cerium oxide nanoparticles and model bacteria in order to evaluate characterization procedures and the possible fate of such materials in the environment. In this study the effects of cerium oxide nanoparticles on the growth and viability of Gram-negative Escherichia coli and Shewanella oneidensis, a metal-reducing bacteria, and Gram-positive Bacillus subtilis were examined relative to particle size, growth media, pH, and dosage. A hydrothermal based synthesis procedure was used to prepare cerium oxide nanoparticles of defined sizes in order to eliminate complications originating from the use of organic solvents and surfactants. Bactericidal effects were determined by minimum inhibitory concentration, colony forming units, disc diffusion tests and Live/Dead assays. In growth inhibition experiments involving E. coli and B. subtilis, a clear strain and size-dependent inhibition was observed. S. oneidensis appeared to be unaffected by the cerium oxide nanoparticles. Transmission electron microscopy along with microarray-based transcriptional profiling have been used to understand the response mechanism of the bacteria. The use of multiple analytical approaches adds confidence to toxicity assessments while the use of different bacterial systems highlights the potential wide-ranging effects of nanomaterial interactions in the environment.

  5. Effects of Low-Level Deuterium Enrichment on Bacterial Growth

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Xueshu; Zubarev, Roman A.

    2014-01-01

    Using very precise (±0.05%) measurements of the growth parameters for bacteria E. coli grown on minimal media, we aimed to determine the lowest deuterium concentration at which the adverse effects that are prominent at higher enrichments start to become noticeable. Such a threshold was found at 0.5% D, a surprisingly high value, while the ultralow deuterium concentrations (?0.25% D) showed signs of the opposite trend. Bacterial adaptation for 400 generations in isotopically different environment confirmed preference for ultralow (?0.25% D) enrichment. This effect appears to be similar to those described in sporadic but multiple earlier reports. Possible explanations include hormesis and isotopic resonance phenomena, with the latter explanation being favored. PMID:25033078

  6. Silver Nanoparticles Part 2: BDo Silver Nanoparticles Inhibit Bacterial Growth?

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    The NACK Center is an organization committed to supporting two â??year degree programs in micro and nanotechnology. The center offers online educational material for curriculum enhancement in this subject field. One of these resources is a lab documentation focusing on the topic of silver nanoparticles. The lab "may be used with a middle school through high school biology class.â? The lesson includes objectives, sample solution preparations, and sample data and calculations. Overall, the objectives of this lesson are to practice aseptic techniques to inoculate/grow bacteria and describe the impact of silver nanoparticles on bacterial growth. The site requires a free log-in for access to the material.

  7. Bacterial growth phase influences methylmercury production by the sulfate-reducing bacterium Desulfovibrio desulfuricans ND132.

    PubMed

    Biswas, Abir; Brooks, Scott C; Miller, Carrie L; Mosher, Jennifer J; Yin, Xiangping L; Drake, Meghan M

    2011-09-01

    The effect of bacterial growth phase is an aspect of mercury (Hg) methylation that previous studies have not investigated in detail. Here we consider the effect of growth phase (mid-log, late-log and late stationary phase) on Hg methylation by the known methylator Desulfovibrio desulfuricans ND132. We tested the addition of Hg alone (chloride-complex), Hg with Suwannee River natural organic matter (SRNOM) (unequilibrated), and Hg equilibrated with SRNOM on monomethylmercury (MMHg) production by ND132 over a growth curve in pyruvate-fumarate media. This NOM did not affect MMHg production even under very low Hg:SRNOM ratios, where Hg binding is predicted to be dominated by high energy sites. Adding Hg or Hg-NOM to growing cultures 24 h before sampling (late addition) resulted in ~2× greater net fraction of Hg methylated than for comparably aged cultures exposed to Hg from the initial culture inoculation (early addition). Mid- and late-log phase cultures produced similar amounts of MMHg, but late stationary phase cultures (both under early and late Hg addition conditions) produced up to ~3× more MMHg, indicating the potential importance of growth phase in studies of MMHg production. PMID:21762955

  8. Bacterial locomotion, adsorption and growth over chemically patterned surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jalali, Maryam; Molaei, Mehdi; Sheng, Jian

    2013-11-01

    Complex dynamic interactions between bacteria and chemically patched interface that mimics the heterogeneous energy landscape of a real-life interfacial environment are studied in the paper. We explore effects of these spatially varying chemical patches on bacterial locomotion, adsorption, biofilm formation and the film growth rate. Using micro-fabrication and soft-lithography, we have fabricated PDMS microfluidic channels with a solid substrate covered by micro-scale chemical patches. Arrays of 2D geometries of characteristic scales varying from 10 to 50 ?m are transferred onto a glass substrate by soft-lithography. The substrate is functionalized to generate alternating hydrophobic and hydrophilic regions and bonded with the channel. The 3D swimming characteristics near these surfaces, such as swimming velocity, linear and angular dispersions, are measured in-situ using 3D digital holographic microscopy. The observations are used to examine the mechanisms involved in adsorption and desorption of swimming bacteria onto the substrate. Long-term experiments are conducted to quantify the growth rate and structures of colony. A correlation between various length scales of the substrate and bacteria motility are observed.

  9. Kinetics of Bacterial Growth on Chlorinated Aliphatic Compounds

    PubMed Central

    van den Wijngaard, Arjan J.; Wind, Richèle D.; Janssen, Dick B.

    1993-01-01

    With the pure bacterial cultures Ancylobacter aquaticus AD20 and AD25, Xanthobacter autotrophicus GJ10, and Pseudomonas sp. strain AD1, Monod kinetics was observed during growth in chemostat cultures on 1,2-dichloroethane (AD20, AD25, and GJ10), 2-chloroethanol (AD20 and GJ10), and 1,3-dichloro-2-propanol (AD1). Both the Michaelis-Menten constants (Km) of the first catabolic (dehalogenating) enzyme and the Monod half-saturation constants (Ks) followed the order 2-chloroethanol, 1,3-dichloro-2-propanol, epichlorohydrin, and 1,2-dichloroethane. The Ks values of strains GJ10, AD20, and AD25 for 1,2-dichloroethane were 260, 222, and 24 ?M, respectively. The low Ks value of strain AD25 was correlated with a higher haloalkane dehalogenase content of this bacterium. The growth rates of strains AD20 and GJ10 in continuous cultures on 1,2-dichloroethane were higher than the rates predicted from the kinetics of the haloalkane dehalogenase and the concentration of the enzyme in the cells. The results indicate that the efficiency of chlorinated compound removal is indeed influenced by the kinetic properties and cellular content of the first catabolic enzyme. The cell envelope did not seem to act as a barrier for permeation of 1,2-dichloroethane. PMID:16348981

  10. Analysis of cholera epidemics with bacterial growth and spatial movement.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xueying; Wang, Jin

    2015-07-01

    In this work, we propose novel epidemic models (named, susceptible-infected-recovered-susceptible-bacteria) for cholera dynamics by incorporating a general formulation of bacteria growth and spatial variation. In the first part, a generalized ordinary differential equation (ODE) model is presented and it is found that bacterial growth contributes to the increase in the basic reproduction number, [Formula: see text]. With the derived basic reproduction number, we analyse the local and global dynamics of the model. Particularly, we give a rigorous proof on the endemic global stability by employing the geometric approach. In the second part, we extend the ODE model to a partial differential equation (PDE) model with the inclusion of diffusion to capture the movement of human hosts and bacteria in a heterogeneous environment. The disease threshold of this PDE model is studied again by using the basic reproduction number. The results on the threshold dynamics of the ODE and PDE models are compared, and verified through numerical simulation. Additionally, our analysis shows that incorporating diffusive spatial spread does not produce a Turing instability when [Formula: see text] associated with the ODE model is less than the unity. PMID:25363286

  11. Fungal and bacterial growth in soil with plant materials of different C/N ratios.

    PubMed

    Rousk, Johannes; Bååth, Erland

    2007-12-01

    Fungal (acetate-in-ergosterol incorporation) and bacterial (leucine/thymidine incorporation) growth resulting from alfalfa (C/N=15) and barley straw (C/N=75) addition was studied in soil microcosms for 64 days. Nitrogen amendments were used to compensate for the C/N difference between the substrates. Fungal growth increased to a maximum after 3-7 days, at five to eight times the controls, following the addition of straw, and three to four times the controls following the addition of alfalfa. After 20-30 days, the fungal growth rate converged with the controls, resulting in a cumulative fungal growth two to three times the controls following straw addition and about 20% higher than the controls following alfalfa addition. The bacterial growth rate reached rates five times the controls following alfalfa addition and twice that of the controls following straw addition after 3-7 days. It remained elevated after 64 days. The cumulative bacterial growth was two and four times the controls following straw and alfalfa addition, respectively. A negative correlation was found between N addition and bacterial growth, while N stimulated fungal growth. Thus, the C/N ratio of the additions (substrate and extra N) could not entirely explain the different results regarding fungal and bacterial growths. Respiration was not always related to the combined growth of the microorganisms, emphasizing the requirement for a better understanding of growth efficiencies of fungi and bacteria. PMID:17991019

  12. Bacterial Growth on Chitosan-Coated Polypropylene Textile

    PubMed Central

    Erben, D.; Hola, V.; Jaros, J.; Rahel, J.

    2012-01-01

    Biofouling is a problem common in all systems where microorganisms and aqueous environment meet. Prevention of biofouling is therefore important in many industrial processes. The aim of this study was to develop a method to evaluate the ability of material coating to inhibit biofilm formation. Chitosan-coated polypropylene nonwoven textile was prepared using dielectric barrier discharge plasma activation. Resistance of the textile to biofouling was then tested. First, the textile was submerged into a growth medium inoculated with green fluorescein protein labelled Pseudomonas aeruginosa. After overnight incubation at 33°C, the textile was observed using confocal laser scanning microscopy for bacterial enumeration and biofilm structure characterisation. In the second stage, the textile was used as a filter medium for prefiltered river water, and the pressure development on the in-flow side was measured to quantify the overall level of biofouling. In both cases, nontreated textile samples were used as a control. The results indicate that the chitosan coating exhibits antibacterial properties. The developed method is applicable for the evaluation of the ability to inhibit biofilm formation. PMID:23724330

  13. Bacterial growth on chitosan-coated polypropylene textile.

    PubMed

    Erben, D; Hola, V; Jaros, J; Rahel, J

    2012-01-01

    Biofouling is a problem common in all systems where microorganisms and aqueous environment meet. Prevention of biofouling is therefore important in many industrial processes. The aim of this study was to develop a method to evaluate the ability of material coating to inhibit biofilm formation. Chitosan-coated polypropylene nonwoven textile was prepared using dielectric barrier discharge plasma activation. Resistance of the textile to biofouling was then tested. First, the textile was submerged into a growth medium inoculated with green fluorescein protein labelled Pseudomonas aeruginosa. After overnight incubation at 33°C, the textile was observed using confocal laser scanning microscopy for bacterial enumeration and biofilm structure characterisation. In the second stage, the textile was used as a filter medium for prefiltered river water, and the pressure development on the in-flow side was measured to quantify the overall level of biofouling. In both cases, nontreated textile samples were used as a control. The results indicate that the chitosan coating exhibits antibacterial properties. The developed method is applicable for the evaluation of the ability to inhibit biofilm formation. PMID:23724330

  14. Scaling laws governing stochastic growth and division of single bacterial cells

    E-print Network

    Scherer, Norbert F.

    conditions. single-cell dynamics | cell-to-cell variability | exponential growth | Hinshelwood cycle (1). Thus, observation of the population is insufficient to reveal the functional form of the growthScaling laws governing stochastic growth and division of single bacterial cells Srividya Iyer

  15. Modeling Pacing Behavior and Test Speededness Using Latent Growth Curve Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kahraman, Nilufer; Cuddy, Monica M.; Clauser, Brian E.

    2013-01-01

    This research explores the usefulness of latent growth curve modeling in the study of pacing behavior and test speededness. Examinee response times from a high-stakes, computerized examination, collected before and after the examination was subjected to a timing change, were analyzed using a series of latent growth curve models to detect…

  16. The Effects of Autocorrelation on the Curve-of-Factors Growth Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murphy, Daniel L.; Beretvas, S. Natasha; Pituch, Keenan A.

    2011-01-01

    This simulation study examined the performance of the curve-of-factors model (COFM) when autocorrelation and growth processes were present in the first-level factor structure. In addition to the standard curve-of factors growth model, 2 new models were examined: one COFM that included a first-order autoregressive autocorrelation parameter, and a…

  17. Using Design-Based Latent Growth Curve Modeling with Cluster-Level Predictor to Address Dependency

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wu, Jiun-Yu; Kwok, Oi-Man; Willson, Victor L.

    2014-01-01

    The authors compared the effects of using the true Multilevel Latent Growth Curve Model (MLGCM) with single-level regular and design-based Latent Growth Curve Models (LGCM) with or without the higher-level predictor on various criterion variables for multilevel longitudinal data. They found that random effect estimates were biased when the…

  18. Changes in the bacterial community of soybean rhizospheres during growth in the field.

    PubMed

    Sugiyama, Akifumi; Ueda, Yoshikatsu; Zushi, Takahiro; Takase, Hisabumi; Yazaki, Kazufumi

    2014-01-01

    Highly diverse communities of bacteria inhabiting soybean rhizospheres play pivotal roles in plant growth and crop production; however, little is known about the changes that occur in these communities during growth. We used both culture-dependent physiological profiling and culture independent DNA-based approaches to characterize the bacterial communities of the soybean rhizosphere during growth in the field. The physiological properties of the bacterial communities were analyzed by a community-level substrate utilization assay with BioLog Eco plates, and the composition of the communities was assessed by gene pyrosequencing. Higher metabolic capabilities were found in rhizosphere soil than in bulk soil during all stages of the BioLog assay. Pyrosequencing analysis revealed that differences between the bacterial communities of rhizosphere and bulk soils at the phylum level; i.e., Proteobacteria were increased, while Acidobacteria and Firmicutes were decreased in rhizosphere soil during growth. Analysis of operational taxonomic units showed that the bacterial communities of the rhizosphere changed significantly during growth, with a higher abundance of potential plant growth promoting rhizobacteria, including Bacillus, Bradyrhizobium, and Rhizobium, in a stage-specific manner. These findings demonstrated that rhizosphere bacterial communities were changed during soybean growth in the field. PMID:24955843

  19. Development of normalized curves for the international growth reference: historical and technical considerations?3

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Michael J Dibley; James B Goldsby; Norman W Staehling; Frederick L Trowbridge

    ABSTRACF The World Health Organization recommended in 1978 that the National Center for Health Statistics\\/Centers for Disease Control growth reference curves be used as an inter- national growth reference. To permit the expression ofgrowth in terms of standard deviations, CDC developed growth curves from the observed data that approximate normal distributions. Because of significant skewness, standard deviations for weight-for-age and

  20. Effects of Environmental Measures on Intelligence in Young Children: Growth Curve Modeling of Longitudinal Data.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Espy, Kimberly Andrews; Molfese, Victoria J.; DiLalla, Lisabeth F.

    2001-01-01

    Examined effects of different environmental measures on individual intellectual growth patterns. Growth curve analyses revealed that HOME scores exerted a constant influence on the expected composite, verbal, and nonverbal intellectual skills at each age. Only SES influenced the rate of growth, specifically nonverbal intellectual skills. (Author)

  1. A unique crack growth rate curve method for fatigue life prediction of steel structures

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Xiaoping Huang; Torgeir Moan; Weicheng Cui

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, a unique crack growth rate curve method, which is based on the equivalent stress intensity factor range (ESIFR) as the driving force, has been proposed and examined with crack growth rate data of base metals and as welded joints of some structural steels under constant amplitude external loading. By expressing the crack growth rate data with ESIFR

  2. Squeezing Interval Change From Ordinal Panel Data: Latent Growth Curves With Ordinal Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mehta, Paras D.; Neale, Michael C.; Flay, Brian R.

    2004-01-01

    A didactic on latent growth curve modeling for ordinal outcomes is presented. The conceptual aspects of modeling growth with ordinal variables and the notion of threshold invariance are illustrated graphically using a hypothetical example. The ordinal growth model is described in terms of 3 nested models: (a) multivariate normality of the…

  3. Elliptic curves with p-Selmer growth for all p

    E-print Network

    Bartel, Alex

    2012-01-01

    It is known, that for every elliptic curve over Q there exists a quadratic extension in which the rank does not go up. For a large class of elliptic curves, the same is known with the rank replaced by the 2-Selmer group. We show, however, that there exists a large supply of semistable elliptic curves E/Q whose 2-Selmer group goes up in every bi-quadratic extension and for any odd prime p, the p-Selmer group goes up in every D_{2p}-extension and every elementary abelian p-extension of rank at least 2. We provide a simple criterion for an elliptic curve over an arbitrary number field to exhibit this behaviour. We also discuss generalisations to other Galois groups.

  4. Monensin inhibits growth of bacterial contaminants from fuel ethanol plants

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Contamination of commercial fermentation cultures by lactic acid bacteria (LAB) is a common and costly problem to the fuel ethanol industry. Virginiamycin (VIR) and penicillin (PEN) are frequently used to control bacterial contamination but extensive use of antibiotics may select for strains with d...

  5. Blue light (470 nm) effectively inhibits bacterial and fungal growth

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The activity of blue light (470nm) alone on (1) bacterial viability, and (2) with a food grade photosensitizer on filamentous fungal viability, was studied. Suspensions of the bacteria Leuconostoc mesenteroides (LM), Bacillus atrophaeus (BA), and Pseudomonas aeruginosa (PA) were prepared and aliquo...

  6. Demonstration and partial characterization of a bacterial growth enhancer in sera.

    PubMed

    Okayama, Kanna; Honda, Takeshi; Matsuda, Shigeaki; Saito, Tadashi; Kawase, Masaya

    2011-01-01

    During our research into the pathogenesis of Vibrio parahaemolyticus, we noticed that the concentration of serum added to the tissue culture medium (Dulbecco's modified Eagle's medium: DMEM) greatly affected its growth. Using gel filtration column chromatography, we clearly demonstrated that serum contains not only a bacterial growth inhibitor (BGI) but also a bacterial growth enhancer (BGE) for Vibrio parahaemolyticus. Our data indicate that the BGI is transferrin, whereas the BGE seems to be an undescribed small molecule (molecular weight of 1,000-3,000 Da) and is associated with magnesium and molybdenum ions. BGE activity was not decreased by heat treatment (at 60 or 100°C for 30 min) and affected the growth rate of a wide range of Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria. The addition of EDTA into DMEM lowered the growth rate, whereas the addition of BGE restored the growth activity. This study suggests that sera contain a previously undescribed small BGE molecule. PMID:20514485

  7. A Multilevel Latent Growth Curve Approach to Predicting Student Proficiency

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Choi, Kilchan; Goldschmidt, Pete

    2012-01-01

    Value-added models and growth-based accountability aim to evaluate school's performance based on student growth in learning. The current focus is on linking the results from value-added models to the ones from growth-based accountability systems including Adequate Yearly Progress decisions mandated by No Child Left Behind. We present a new…

  8. A Rhizocarpon geographicum growth curve for the Cascade Range of Washington and northern Oregon, usa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Neal, Michael A.; Schoenenberger, Katherine R.

    2003-09-01

    Lichen thallus measurements from 22 surfaces of known age on Mount Baker, Mount Hood, and Mount Rainier are used to construct a regional Rhizocarpon geographicum growth curve for the Cascade Range of Washington and northern Oregon. Growth rates determined by measuring the largest thallus diameters on the same surfaces at Mount Rainier in 1976 and 2002 are used for comparison with lichenometric data from Mount Baker and Mount Hood. Similar lichen thallus diameter vs age relationships identified in the data from the three mountains suggest the presence of uniform growth rates over the 400-km range. A regional growth curve developed during our study shows three growth phases of successively slower growth: a rapid phase from 8 to 20 yr, a linear phase from 20 to 145 yr, and a slow phase of unknown duration beyond ca. 145 yr. Uncertainty in lichen growth rates beyond 145 yr limits projection of the curve beyond that age; however, the age range of the constrained growth curve covers an important period of recent climate variability. When applied in appropriate settings, our growth curve can be used to determine numeric ages to ±10 yr for surfaces between 20 and 145 years old in areas where other techniques are not applicable or do not provide unique or well-constrained ages.

  9. Tidally Induced Changes in Bacterial Growth and Viability in the Macrotidal Han River Estuary, Yellow Sea

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J.-H. Hyun; J. K. Choi; K. H. Chung; E.-J. Yang; M.-K. Kim

    1999-01-01

    The Han River estuary in the Yellow Sea is a macrotidal (tidal range of 3·5m at neap tide and 8·0m at spring tide) eutrophic environment. Changes in bacterial growth and viability at different NaCl concentrations as well as other physico-chemical environmental parameters were investigated at different tidal levels in order to elucidate the major environmental factors controlling the bacterial community.

  10. Promotion of Plant Growth by Bacterial ACC Deaminase

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Bernard R. Glick; Biljana Todorovic; Jennifer Czarny; Zhenyu Cheng; Jin Duan; Brendan McConkey

    2007-01-01

    To date, there has been only limited commercial use of plant growth-promoting bacteria in agriculture, horticulture, and silviculture. However, with recent progress toward understanding the mechanisms that these organisms utilize to facilitate plant growth, the use of plant growth-promoting bacteria is expected to continue to increase worldwide. One of the key mechanisms employed by plant growth-promoting bacteria to facilitate plant

  11. Bacterial Growth Rate and Host Factors as Determinants of Intracellular Bacterial Distributions in Systemic Salmonella enterica Infections?

    PubMed Central

    Grant, Andrew J.; Foster, Gemma L.; McKinley, Trevelyan J.; Brown, Sam P.; Clare, Simon; Maskell, Duncan J.; Mastroeni, Pietro

    2009-01-01

    Bacteria of the species Salmonella enterica cause a range of life-threatening diseases in humans and animals worldwide. The within-host quantitative, spatial, and temporal dynamics of S. enterica interactions are key to understanding how immunity acts on these infections and how bacteria evade immune surveillance. In this study, we test hypotheses generated from mathematical models of in vivo dynamics of Salmonella infections with experimental observation of bacteria at the single-cell level in infected mouse organs to improve our understanding of the dynamic interactions between host and bacterial mechanisms that determine net growth rates of S. enterica within the host. We show that both bacterial and host factors determine the numerical distributions of bacteria within host cells and thus the level of dispersiveness of the infection. PMID:19797065

  12. Inhibition of bacterial growth by iron oxide nanoparticles with and without attached drug: Have we conquered the antibiotic resistance problem?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Armijo, Leisha M.; Jain, Priyanka; Malagodi, Angelina; Fornelli, F. Zuly; Hayat, Allison; Rivera, Antonio C.; French, Michael; Smyth, Hugh D. C.; Osi?ski, Marek

    2015-03-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is among the top three leading causative opportunistic human pathogens, possessing one of the largest bacterial genomes and an exceptionally large proportion of regulatory genes therein. It has been known for more than a decade that the size and complexity of the P. aeruginosa genome is responsible for the adaptability and resilience of the bacteria to include its ability to resist many disinfectants and antibiotics. We have investigated the susceptibility of P. aeruginosa bacterial biofilms to iron oxide (magnetite) nanoparticles (NPs) with and without attached drug (tobramycin). We also characterized the susceptibility of zero-valent iron NPs, which are known to inactivate microbes. The particles, having an average diameter of 16 nm were capped with natural alginate, thus doubling the hydrodynamic size. Nanoparticle-drug conjugates were produced via cross-linking drug and alginate functional groups. Drug conjugates were investigated in the interest of determining dosage, during these dosage-curve experiments, NPs unbound to drug were tested in cultures as a negative control. Surprisingly, we found that the iron oxide NPs inhibited bacterial growth, and thus, biofilm formation without the addition of antibiotic drug. The inhibitory dosages of iron oxide NPs were investigated and the minimum inhibitory concentrations are presented. These findings suggest that NP-drug conjugates may overcome the antibiotic drug resistance common in P. aeruginosa infections.

  13. Shaping the Growth Behaviour of Bacterial Aggregates in Biofilms

    E-print Network

    Melaugh, Gavin; Kragh, Kasper Nørskov; Irie, Yasuhiko; Roberts, Aled; Bjarnsholt, Thomas; Diggle, Steve P; Gordon, Vernita; Allen, Rosalind J

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial biofilms are usually assumed to originate from individual cells deposited on a surface. However, many biofilm-forming bacteria tend to aggregate in the planktonic phase meaning it is possible that many natural and infectious biofilms originate wholly or partially from pre-formed cell aggregates. Here, we use agent-based computer simulations to investigate the role of pre-formed aggregates in biofilm development. Focusing on the role of aggregate shape, we find that the degree of spreading of an aggregate on a surface can play a key role in determining its eventual fate during biofilm development. Specifically, initially spread aggregates perform better when competition with surrounding bacterial cells is low, while initially rounded aggregates perform better when competition is high. These contrasting outcomes are governed by a trade-off between aggregate surface area and height. Our results provide new insight into biofilm formation and development, and reveal new factors that may be at play in the...

  14. Geometry dependence of crack growth resistance curves in thin sheet aluminum alloys 

    E-print Network

    Stricklin, Lance Lee

    1988-01-01

    GEOMETRY DEPENDENCE OF CRACK GROWTH RESISTANCE CURVES IN THIN SHEET ALUMINUM ALLOYS A Thesis by LANCE LEE STRICKLIN Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas ASM University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree... of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1988 Major Subject: Mechanical Engineering GEOMETRY DEPENDENCE OF CRACK GROWTH RESISTANCE CURVES IN THIN SHEET ALUMINUM ALLOYS A Thesis by LANCE LEE STRICKLIN Approved as to style and content by: Ted L. Anderson...

  15. Effects of grain growth on the interstellar polarization curve

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voshchinnikov, Nikolai V.; Hirashita, Hiroyuki

    2014-11-01

    We apply the time evolution of grain size distributions through accretion and coagulation found in our previous work to the modelling of the wavelength dependence of interstellar linear polarization. We focus in particular on the parameters of the Serkowski curve K and ?max , characterizing the width and maximum wavelength of this curve, respectively. We use aligned silicate and non-aligned carbonaceous spheroidal particles with different aspect ratios a/b. The imperfect alignment of grains with sizes larger than a cut-off size rV, cut is considered. We find that the evolutionary effects on the polarization curve are negligible in the original model with commonly used material parameters (hydrogen number density nH = 103 cm-3, gas temperature Tgas = 10 K and sticking probability for accretion Sacc = 0.3). Therefore, we apply the tuned model, where the coagulation threshold of silicate is removed. In this model, ?max displaces to longer wavelengths and the polarization curve becomes wider (K reduces) on time-scales ˜(30-50)(nH/103cm-3)-1 Myr. The tuned models at T ? 30 (n_H/10^3 cm^{-3})^{-1} Myr and different values of the parameters rV, cut can also explain the observed trend between K and ?max . It is significant that the evolutionary effect appears in the perpendicular direction to the effect of rV, cut on the K - ?max diagram. Very narrow polarization curves can be reproduced if we change the type of particles (prolate/oblate) and/or vary a/b.

  16. Growing Growth curves using PROC MIXED and PROC NLMIXED

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Being able to describe growth appropriately and succinctly is important in many contexts, including biology, epidemiology, and statistics. Various approaches are used varying from differential equations, deterministic modeling, and statistical approaches like regression. Often, with epidemiologic da...

  17. Parent Involvement and Science Achievement: A Cross-Classified Multilevel Latent Growth Curve Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Ursula Y.; Hull, Darrell M.

    2014-01-01

    The authors examined science achievement growth at Grades 3, 5, and 8 and parent school involvement at the same time points using the Early Childhood Longitudinal Study-Kindergarten Class of 1998-1999. Data were analyzed using cross-classified multilevel latent growth curve modeling with time invariant and varying covariates. School-based…

  18. A Rhizocarpon geographicum growth curve for the Cascade Range of Washington and northern Oregon, usa

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Michael A O'Neal; Katherine R Schoenenberger

    2003-01-01

    Lichen thallus measurements from 22 surfaces of known age on Mount Baker, Mount Hood, and Mount Rainier are used to construct a regional Rhizocarpon geographicum growth curve for the Cascade Range of Washington and northern Oregon. Growth rates determined by measuring the largest thallus diameters on the same surfaces at Mount Rainier in 1976 and 2002 are used for comparison

  19. Development of Oral Reading Fluency in Children with Speech or Language Impairments: A Growth Curve Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Puranik, Cynthia S.; Petscher, Yaacov; Al Otaiba, Stephanie; Catts, Hugh W.; Lonigan, Christopher J.

    2008-01-01

    This longitudinal study used piece-wise growth curve analyses to examine growth patterns in oral reading fluency for 1,991 students with speech impairments (SI) or language impairments (LI) from first through third grade. The main finding of this study was that a diagnosis of SI or LI can have a detrimental and persistent effect on early reading…

  20. Teaching the Microbial Growth Curve Concept Using Microalgal Cultures and Flow Cytometry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Forget, Nathalie; Belzile, Claude; Rioux, Pierre; Nozais, Christian

    2010-01-01

    The microbial growth curve is widely studied within microbiology classes and bacteria are usually the microbial model used. Here, we describe a novel laboratory protocol involving flow cytometry to assess the growth dynamics of the unicellular microalgae "Isochrysis galbana." The algal model represents an appropriate alternative to bacteria…

  1. Bacterial growth on articulating spacers: an in vitro study.

    PubMed

    Chambers, Bryan; Fankhauser, Richard A; Howard, Michael

    2008-03-01

    We fashioned cement disk-shaped spacer models using antibiotic-loaded Palacos and embedded polyethylene and titanium into the surface of half of the models and inoculated the models with methicillin-sensitive Staphylococcus aureus (MSSA), methicillin-resistant S aureus (MRSA), or Staphylococcus epidermidis, and placed them in nutrient broth. Vancomycin was loaded into the cement of the MRSA spacer models and tobramycin into the MSSA and Staphylococcus epidermidis models. In the MSSA and MRSA models, no organisms survived beyond 48 hours in the antibiotic bath regardless of the presence of additional materials. At 96 hours, 86.6% of models with only antibiotic cement had viable Staphylococcus epidermidis, while 80% of models with antibiotic cement, polyethylene, and titanium had viable Staphylococcus epidermidis. Adding polyethylene and titanium to antibiotic-loaded cement does not promote bacterial survival. PMID:19292253

  2. Estimates of bacterial growth from changes in uptake rates and biomass.

    PubMed Central

    Kirchman, D; Ducklow, H; Mitchell, R

    1982-01-01

    Rates of nucleic acid synthesis have been used to examine microbiol growth in natural waters. These rates are calculated from the incorporation of [3H]adenine and [3H]thymidine for RNA and DNA syntheses, respectively. Several additional biochemical parameters must be measured or taken from the literature to estimate growth rates from the incorporation of the tritiated compounds. We propose a simple method of estimating a conversion factor which obviates measuring these biochemical parameters. The change in bacterial abundance and incorporation rates of [3H]thymidine was measured in samples from three environments. The incorporation of exogenous [3H]thymidine was closely coupled with growth and cell division as estimated from the increase in bacterial biomass. Analysis of the changes in incorporation rates and initial bacterial abundance yielded a conversion factor for calculating bacterial production rates from incorporation rates. Furthermore, the growth rate of only those bacteria incorporating the compound can be estimated. The data analysis and experimental design can be used to estimate the proportion of nondividing cells and to examine changes in cell volumes. PMID:6760812

  3. Conformity of bacterial growth in sputum and contamination free endobronchial samples in patients with cystic fibrosis

    Microsoft Academic Search

    H Gilljam; A S Malmborg; B Strandvik

    1986-01-01

    The use of sputum cultures to guide the antimicrobial treatment of patients with cystic fibrosis has been questioned. Bacterial growth and antibiotic susceptibility patterns of 33 culture pairs from sputum and contamination free endobronchial swabs from 14 patients with cystic fibrosis were compared. As expected, Pseudomonas aeruginosa of the mucoid and non-mucoid type, Staphylococcus aureus, and Haemophilus influenzae were the

  4. Semielectronic turbidimeter for automated monitoring of bacterial growth in test tubes.

    PubMed Central

    Marcelis, J H; Versteeg, H; Beck, H J; Vinke, D

    1980-01-01

    An automated turbidimeter for measuring bacterial growth in ordinary test tubes is described. The device records and prints adsorbance, expressed as Klett units, of 60 cultures every 15 min. Provision is made for either aerobic or anaerobic incubation. The device is adaptable to modification, depending upon local requirements and availability of computation facilities. Images PMID:6990863

  5. Materials and Methods Bacterial and eukaryotic cell growth conditions. Listeria monocytogenes strains were

    E-print Network

    Perrimon, Norbert

    1 Materials and Methods Bacterial and eukaryotic cell growth conditions. Listeria monocytogenes cell cultures were maintained in a humidified chamber at 25°C to 29°C. L. monocytogenes infection of SL cultures were subsequently incubated at 27°C for 15-18 hrs. The following day, cultures of L. monocytogenes

  6. Curved tails in polymerization-based bacterial motility Andrew D. Rutenberg*

    E-print Network

    Grant, Martin

    ; published 19 July 2001 The curved actin ``comet-tail'' of the bacterium Listeria monocytogenes is a visually.40. a INTRODUCTION The bacteria L. monocytogenes, S. flexneri, the spotted fever group of Rickettsiae experiments in L. monocytogenes 24 and quali- tative observation of S. flexneri 15 and of spotted

  7. Non-Homothetic Growth Models for the Environmental Kuznets Curve

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Katsuyuki Shibayama; Iain Fraser

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, we study the impact of the economic growth on the environment. First, we show that, at each income level, eta determines the direction of environmental degradation, where eta is the elasticity of substitution between consumption and the environment. That is, for eta large enough, as income increases people accept environmental degradation by enjoying more consumption as compensation,

  8. Parent Involvement and Science Achievement: A Latent Growth Curve Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Ursula Yvette

    2011-01-01

    This study examined science achievement growth across elementary and middle school and parent school involvement using the Early Childhood Longitudinal Study-Kindergarten Class of 1998-1999 (ECLS-K). The ECLS-K is a nationally representative kindergarten cohort of students from public and private schools who attended full-day or half-day…

  9. BIOASSAY PROCEDURES FOR PREDICTING COLIFORM BACTERIAL GROWTH IN DRINKING WATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    Water quality degradation due to the growth of microorganisms is an area of concern for many water utilities. o date, the procedures developed or determining the amount of biodegradable material present in potable water have utilized heterotrophic non-coliform bacteria as bioassa...

  10. EFFECT OF THE GROWTH REGULATOR PACLOBUTRAZOL ON GROWTH OF THE BACTERIAL PATHOGEN XYLELLA FASTIDIOSA

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Xyella fastidiosa is a fastidious, xylem-limited, insect transmitted, bacterial plant pathogen that has a wide host range and causes bacterial leaf scorch (BLS) in shade trees. BLS is a chronic disorder characterized by late season leaf scorch and dieback and is common in urban and suburban areas o...

  11. Effects of nitric oxide and nitrogen dioxide on bacterial growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mancinelli, R. L.; Mckay, C. P.

    1983-01-01

    While it is generally thought that the bactericidal effects of NO and NO2 derive from their reaction with water to form nitrous and nitric acids (Shank et al., 1962), this appears to be true only at high concentrations. The data presented here suggest that at low NO and NO2 concentrations, acids are not present in high enough concentrations to act as toxic agents. Reference is made to a study by Grant et al. (1979), which found that exposing acid forest soil to 1 ppm of NO2 did not cause the soil pH to drop. The results presented here show that at low concentrations of NO and NO2, the NO is bacteriostatic for some organisms and not for others, whereas NO2 may protect some bacteria from the inhibitory effects of NO. Since it has been shown that bacteria can divide while airborne (Dimmick et al., 1979), the present results suggest that NO at the low concentrations found in the atmosphere can select for resistant bacteria in the air and affect the viable airborne bacterial population.

  12. Effects of Surface Area and Flow Rate on Marine Bacterial Growth in Activated Carbon Columns

    PubMed Central

    Shimp, Robert J.; Pfaender, Frederic K.

    1982-01-01

    The colonization of granular activated carbon columns by bacteria can have both beneficial and potentially detrimental consequences. Bacterial growth on the carbon surface can remove adsorbed organics and thus partially regenerate the carbon bed. However, growth can also increase the levels of bacteria in the column effluents, which can adversely affect downstream uses of the treated water. This study of a sand column and several activated carbon columns demonstrated that considerable marine bacterial growth occurred in both sand and carbon columns and that this growth increased the number of bacteria in column effluents. Activated carbon supported approximately 50% more bacteria than did sand. Bacterial growth on activated carbon was reduced by increasing the flow rate through a carbon column and increasing the carbon particle size. Scanning electron micrographs showed that bacteria preferred to attach in the protected crevices on both the sand and carbon surface. The results of this study indicated that the colonization of activated carbon by marine bacteria was enhanced because of carbon's high surface area, its rough surface texture, and its ability to absorb organic materials. Images PMID:16346080

  13. Bacterial exopolysaccharide and biofilm formation stimulate chickpea growth and soil aggregation under salt stress

    PubMed Central

    Qurashi, Aisha Waheed; Sabri, Anjum Nasim

    2012-01-01

    To compensate for stress imposed by salinity, biofilm formation and exopolysaccharide production are significant strategies of salt tolerant bacteria to assist metabolism. We hypothesized that two previously isolated salt-tolerant strains Halomonas variabilis (HT1) and Planococcus rifietoensis (RT4) have an ability to improve plant growth, These strains can form biofilm and accumulate exopolysacharides at increasing salt stress. These results showed that bacteria might be involved in developing microbial communities under salt stress and helpful in colonizing of bacterial strains to plant roots and soil particles. Eventually, it can add to the plant growth and soil structure. We investigated the comparative effect of exopolysacharide and biofilm formation in two bacterial strains Halomonas variabilis (HT1) and Planococcus rifietoensis (RT4) in response to varying salt stress. We found that biofilm formation and exopolysaccharide accumulation increased at higher salinity. To check the effect of bacterial inoculation on the plant (Cicer arietinum Var. CM-98) growth and soil aggregation, pot experiment was conducted by growing seedlings under salt stress. Inoculation of both strains increased plant growth at elevated salt stress. Weight of soil aggregates attached with roots and present in soil were added at higher salt concentrations compared to untreated controls. Soil aggregation was higher at plant roots under salinity. These results suggest the feasibility of using above strains in improving plant growth and soil fertility under salinity. PMID:24031943

  14. Bacterial exopolysaccharide and biofilm formation stimulate chickpea growth and soil aggregation under salt stress.

    PubMed

    Qurashi, Aisha Waheed; Sabri, Anjum Nasim

    2012-07-01

    To compensate for stress imposed by salinity, biofilm formation and exopolysaccharide production are significant strategies of salt tolerant bacteria to assist metabolism. We hypothesized that two previously isolated salt-tolerant strains Halomonas variabilis (HT1) and Planococcus rifietoensis (RT4) have an ability to improve plant growth, These strains can form biofilm and accumulate exopolysacharides at increasing salt stress. These results showed that bacteria might be involved in developing microbial communities under salt stress and helpful in colonizing of bacterial strains to plant roots and soil particles. Eventually, it can add to the plant growth and soil structure. We investigated the comparative effect of exopolysacharide and biofilm formation in two bacterial strains Halomonas variabilis (HT1) and Planococcus rifietoensis (RT4) in response to varying salt stress. We found that biofilm formation and exopolysaccharide accumulation increased at higher salinity. To check the effect of bacterial inoculation on the plant (Cicer arietinum Var. CM-98) growth and soil aggregation, pot experiment was conducted by growing seedlings under salt stress. Inoculation of both strains increased plant growth at elevated salt stress. Weight of soil aggregates attached with roots and present in soil were added at higher salt concentrations compared to untreated controls. Soil aggregation was higher at plant roots under salinity. These results suggest the feasibility of using above strains in improving plant growth and soil fertility under salinity. PMID:24031943

  15. Statistical power of latent growth curve models to detect quadratic growth.

    PubMed

    Diallo, Thierno M O; Morin, Alexandre J S; Parker, Philip D

    2014-06-01

    Latent curve models (LCMs) have been used extensively to analyze longitudinal data. However, little is known about the power of LCMs to detect nonlinear trends when they are present in the data. For this study, we utilized simulated data to investigate the power of LCMs to detect the mean of the quadratic slope, Type I error rates, and rates of nonconvergence during the estimation of quadratic LCMs. Five factors were examined: the number of time points, growth magnitude, interindividual variability, sample size, and the R (2)s of the measured variables. The results showed that the empirical Type I error rates were close to the nominal value of 5 %. The empirical power to detect the mean of the quadratic slope was affected by the simulation factors. Finally, a substantial proportion of samples failed to converge under conditions of no to small variation in the quadratic factor, small sample sizes, and small R (2) of the repeated measures. In general, we recommended that quadratic LCMs be based on samples of (a) at least 250 but ideally 400, when four measurement points are available; (b) at least 100 but ideally 150, when six measurement points are available; (c) at least 50 but ideally 100, when ten measurement points are available. PMID:24234337

  16. Mixed models defined by stochastic differential equations 1 Bayesian analysis of growth curves using mixed models defined by stochastic

    E-print Network

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Mixed models defined by stochastic differential equations 1 Bayesian analysis of growth curves a parametric growth function, such as the Gompertz, logistic, Richards or Weibull functions (Zimmerman and N. In animal genetics, a wrong modeling of these curves could affect the genetic analysis. In fetal growth

  17. Culturable bacterial endophytes isolated from Mangrove tree (Rhizophora apiculata Blume) enhance seedling growth in Rice

    PubMed Central

    Deivanai, Subramanian; Bindusara, Amitraghata Santhanam; Prabhakaran, Guruswamy; Bhore, Subhash Janardhan

    2014-01-01

    Background: Endophytic bacteria do have several potential applications in medicine and in other various sectors of biotechnology including agriculture. Bacterial endophytes need to be explored for their potential applications in agricultural biotechnology. One of the potential applications of bacterial endophytes in agricultural is to enhance the growth of the agricultural crops. Hence, this study was undertaken to explore the plant growth promoting potential application of bacterial endophytes. Objective: The objective of this study was to examine the effect of endophytic bacteria from mangrove tree (Rhizophora apiculata Blume) for their efficacy in promoting seedling growth in rice. Materials and Methods: Eight endophytic bacterial isolates (EBIs) isolated from twig and petiole tissues of the mangrove were identified based on their 16S ribosomal ribonucleic acid (rRNA) gene sequence homology. Separately, surface sterilized paddy seeds were treated with cell-free broth and cell suspension of the EBIs. Rice seedlings were analyzed by various bioassays and data was recorded. Results: The gene sequences of the isolates were closely related to two genera namely, Bacillus and Pantoea. Inoculation of EBIs from R. apiculata with rice seeds resulted in accelerated root and shoot growth with significant increase in chlorophyll content. Among the isolates, Pantoea ananatis (1MSE1) and Bacillus amyloliquefaciens (3MPE1) had shown predominance of activity. Endophytic invasion was recognized by the non-host by rapid accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and was counteracted by the production of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and lipid peroxide. The results demonstrated that EBIs from mangrove tree can increase the fitness of the rice seedlings under controlled conditions. Conclusion: These research findings could be useful to enhance the seedling growth and could serve as foundation in further research on enhancing the growth of the rice crop using endophytic bacteria. PMID:25097431

  18. Can we derive a continental growth curve from global S seismic tomography?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poupinet, G.; Shapiro, N.

    2007-05-01

    The origin of continents is a standard question in geology; the worldwide application of geochronology lead to propose several models for the rate of formation of continental surfaces: see Hurley and Rand (1969), Amstrong (1981), Allègre (1982), McLennan and Taylor (1982), McCulloch and Bennett(1994), Condie (1998) ... In a diagram plotting the percentage of continental surface as a function of surface rock age, each model is characterized by a different curve - see Rino et al (2004) for example. In seismology, the structure of the continental lithosphere has been mapped in detail on all continents during the last 20 years. Large scale studies suggest a close relationship between the average P and S vertical travel times across the lithosphere inside continents and the age of surface rocks. The vertical travel time is directly related to the velocity and to the thickness of the lithosphere. It is correlated to the geotherm which is also known to be nearly dependent on the age of the continents. Using such a vertical traveltime - age relationship, it is straightforward to build a seismological curve which would be the seismic equivalent of the crustal growth curve familiar to geochronologists. This curve relates the percentage of continental surface to the average S vertical travel time and indirectly to age. We present various attempts to build such a curve. Our basic input is the S-tomography model obtained from global surface wave measurements by Shapiro and Ritzwoller (2002). P-delays derived from ISC residuals could in principle be used but they are a local measurement. S-tomography models have the advantage that they are surface measurements. We finally compare our growth curve with standard crustal growth curves and find that it is an "intermediate" curve. The S-tomography derived growth curve does not exhibit fast growth episodes as in McCulloch and Bennett (1994) and Condie (1998). A regular rate of formation of continents seems the most probable hypothesis at a worldwide scale from the S-tomography data set. This may reflect the smoothing inherent in computing S-models. On the contrary, P-station delay histograms are compatible with a few faster growth episodes but unfortunately, their spatial coverage is not good enough to conclude if fast growth episodes have been the rule or not.

  19. Growth curve analysis for plasma profiles using smoothing splines

    SciTech Connect

    Imre, K.

    1993-05-01

    We are developing a profile analysis code for the statistical estimation of the parametric dependencies of the temperature and density profiles in tokamaks. Our code uses advanced statistical techniques to determine the optimal fit, i.e. the fit which minimized the predictive error. For a forty TFTR Ohmic profile dataset, our preliminary results indicate that the profile shape depends almost exclusively on q[sub a][prime] but that the shape dependencies are not Gaussian. We are now comparing various shape models on the TFTR data. In the first six months, we have completed the core modules of the code, including a B-spline package for variable knot locations, a data-based method to determine the optimal smoothing parameters, self-consistent estimation of the bias errors, and adaptive fitting near the plasma edge. Visualization graphics already include three dimensional surface plots, and discharge by discharge plots of the predicted curves with error bars together with the actual measurements values, and plots of the basis functions with errors.

  20. Growth curve analysis of placental and fetal growth influenced by adjacent fetal sex status under crowded uterine conditions in pigs

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Intrauterine position and sex of adjacent fetuses in litter bearing species have been implicated in physiological and behavioral differences in males and females. Our objective was to establish growth curves for fetal and placental weight gain as influenced by sex status of flanking fetuses under cr...

  1. Infant Gaze Following and Pointing Predict Accelerated Vocabulary Growth through Two Years of Age: A Longitudinal, Growth Curve Modeling Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brooks, Rechele; Meltzoff, Andrew N.

    2008-01-01

    We found that infant gaze following and pointing predicts subsequent language development. At ages 0 ; 10 or 0 ; 11, infants saw an adult turn to look at an object in an experimental setting. Productive vocabulary was assessed longitudinally through two years of age. Growth curve modeling showed that infants who gaze followed and looked longer at…

  2. Identifying Longitudinal Growth Trajectories of Learning Domains in Problem-Based Learning: A Latent Growth Curve Modeling Approach Using SEM

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wimmers, Paul F.; Lee, Ming

    2015-01-01

    To determine the direction and extent to which medical student scores (as observed by small-group tutors) on four problem-based-learning-related domains change over nine consecutive blocks during a two-year period (Domains: Problem Solving/Use of Information/Group Process/Professionalism). Latent growth curve modeling is used to analyze…

  3. Body Temperatures in Dinosaurs: What Can Growth Curves Tell Us?

    PubMed Central

    Griebeler, Eva Maria

    2013-01-01

    To estimate the body temperature (BT) of seven dinosaurs Gillooly, Alleen, and Charnov (2006) used an equation that predicts BT from the body mass and maximum growth rate (MGR) with the latter preserved in ontogenetic growth trajectories (BT-equation). The results of these authors evidence inertial homeothermy in Dinosauria and suggest that, due to overheating, the maximum body size in Dinosauria was ultimately limited by BT. In this paper, I revisit this hypothesis of Gillooly, Alleen, and Charnov (2006). I first studied whether BTs derived from the BT-equation of today’s crocodiles, birds and mammals are consistent with core temperatures of animals. Second, I applied the BT-equation to a larger number of dinosaurs than Gillooly, Alleen, and Charnov (2006) did. In particular, I estimated BT of Archaeopteryx (from two MGRs), ornithischians (two), theropods (three), prosauropods (three), and sauropods (nine). For extant species, the BT value estimated from the BT-equation was a poor estimate of an animal’s core temperature. For birds, BT was always strongly overestimated and for crocodiles underestimated; for mammals the accuracy of BT was moderate. I argue that taxon-specific differences in the scaling of MGR (intercept and exponent of the regression line, log-log-transformed) and in the parameterization of the Arrhenius model both used in the BT-equation as well as ecological and evolutionary adaptations of species cause these inaccuracies. Irrespective of the found inaccuracy of BTs estimated from the BT-equation and contrary to the results of Gillooly, Alleen, and Charnov (2006) I found no increase in BT with increasing body mass across all dinosaurs (Sauropodomorpha, Sauropoda) studied. This observation questions that, due to overheating, the maximum size in Dinosauria was ultimately limited by BT. However, the general high inaccuracy of dinosaurian BTs derived from the BT-equation makes a reliable test of whether body size in dinosaurs was ultimately limited by overheating impossible. PMID:24204568

  4. Coal Fly Ash Impairs Airway Antimicrobial Peptides and Increases Bacterial Growth

    PubMed Central

    Borcherding, Jennifer A.; Chen, Haihan; Caraballo, Juan C.; Baltrusaitis, Jonas; Pezzulo, Alejandro A.; Zabner, Joseph; Grassian, Vicki H.; Comellas, Alejandro P.

    2013-01-01

    Air pollution is a risk factor for respiratory infections, and one of its main components is particulate matter (PM), which is comprised of a number of particles that contain iron, such as coal fly ash (CFA). Since free iron concentrations are extremely low in airway surface liquid (ASL), we hypothesize that CFA impairs antimicrobial peptides (AMP) function and can be a source of iron to bacteria. We tested this hypothesis in vivo by instilling mice with Pseudomonas aeruginosa (PA01) and CFA and determine the percentage of bacterial clearance. In addition, we tested bacterial clearance in cell culture by exposing primary human airway epithelial cells to PA01 and CFA and determining the AMP activity and bacterial growth in vitro. We report that CFA is a bioavailable source of iron for bacteria. We show that CFA interferes with bacterial clearance in vivo and in primary human airway epithelial cultures. Also, we demonstrate that CFA inhibits AMP activity in vitro, which we propose as a mechanism of our cell culture and in vivo results. Furthermore, PA01 uses CFA as an iron source with a direct correlation between CFA iron dissolution and bacterial growth. CFA concentrations used are very relevant to human daily exposures, thus posing a potential public health risk for susceptible subjects. Although CFA provides a source of bioavailable iron for bacteria, not all CFA particles have the same biological effects, and their propensity for iron dissolution is an important factor. CFA impairs lung innate immune mechanisms of bacterial clearance, specifically AMP activity. We expect that identifying the PM mechanisms of respiratory infections will translate into public health policies aimed at controlling, not only concentration of PM exposure, but physicochemical characteristics that will potentially cause respiratory infections in susceptible individuals and populations. PMID:23469047

  5. Chlorhexidine Digluconate Effects on Planktonic Growth and Biofilm Formation in Some Field Isolates of Animal Bacterial Pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Ebrahimi, Azizollah; Hemati, Majid; Habibian Dehkordi, Saeed; Bahadoran, Shahab; Khoshnood, Sheida; Khubani, Shahin; Dokht Faraj, Mahdi; Hakimi Alni, Reza

    2014-01-01

    Background: To study chlorhexidine digluconate disinfectant effects on planktonic growth and biofilm formation in some bacterial field isolates from animals. Objectives: The current study investigated chlorhexidine digluconate effects on planktonic growth and biofilm formation in some field isolates of veterinary bacterial pathogens. Materials and Methods: Forty clinical isolates of Escherichia coli, Salmonella serotypes, Staphylococcus. aureus and Streptococcus agalactiae (10 isolates for each) were examined for chlorhexidine digluconate effects on biofilm formation and planktonic growth using microtiter plates. In all of the examined strains in the presence of chlorhexidine digluconate, biofilm development and planktonic growth were affected at the same concentrations of the disinfectant. Results: Chlorhexidine digluconate inhibited the planktonic growth of different bacterial species at sub-MICs. But they were able to induce biofilm development of the E. coli, Salmonella spp., S. aureus and Str. agalactiae strains. Conclusions: Bacterial resistance against chlorhexidine is increasing. Sub-MIC doses of chlorhexidine digluconate can stimulate the formation of biofilm strains. PMID:24872940

  6. Spatial and Temporal Features of the Growth of a Bacterial Species Colonizing the Zebrafish Gut

    PubMed Central

    Jemielita, Matthew; Taormina, Michael J.; Burns, Adam R.; Hampton, Jennifer S.; Rolig, Annah S.; Guillemin, Karen

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT The vertebrate intestine is home to microbial ecosystems that play key roles in host development and health. Little is known about the spatial and temporal dynamics of these microbial communities, limiting our understanding of fundamental properties, such as their mechanisms of growth, propagation, and persistence. To address this, we inoculated initially germ-free zebrafish larvae with fluorescently labeled strains of an Aeromonas species, representing an abundant genus in the zebrafish gut. Using light sheet fluorescence microscopy to obtain three-dimensional images spanning the gut, we quantified the entire bacterial load, as founding populations grew from tens to tens of thousands of cells over several hours. The data yield the first ever measurements of the growth kinetics of a microbial species inside a live vertebrate intestine and show dynamics that robustly fit a logistic growth model. Intriguingly, bacteria were nonuniformly distributed throughout the gut, and bacterial aggregates showed considerably higher growth rates than did discrete individuals. The form of aggregate growth indicates intrinsically higher division rates for clustered bacteria, rather than surface-mediated agglomeration onto clusters. Thus, the spatial organization of gut bacteria both relative to the host and to each other impacts overall growth kinetics, suggesting that spatial characterizations will be an important input to predictive models of host-associated microbial community assembly. PMID:25516613

  7. Biofilm growth alters regulation of conjugation by a bacterial pheromone

    PubMed Central

    Cook, Laura; Barnes, Aaron; Dunny, Gary; Chatterjee, Anushree; Hu, Wei-Shou; Yarwood, Jeremy

    2011-01-01

    Conjugation is an important mode of horizontal gene transfer in bacteria, enhancing the spread of antibiotic resistance. In clinical settings, biofilms are likely locations for antibiotic resistance transfer events involving nosocomial pathogens such as Enterococcus faecalis. Here we demonstrate that growth in biofilms alters the induction of conjugation by a sex pheromone in E. faecalis. Mathematical modeling suggested that a higher plasmid copy number in biofilm cells would enhance a switch-like behavior in the pheromone response of donor cells with a delayed, but increased response to the mating signal. Alterations in plasmid copy number, and a bimodal response to induction of conjugation in populations of plasmid-containing donor cells were both observed in biofilms, consistent with the predictions of the model. The pheromone system may have evolved such that donor cells in biofilms are only induced to transfer when they are in extremely close proximity to potential recipients in the biofilm community. These results may have important implications for development of chemotherapeutic agents to block resistance transfer and treat biofilm-related clinical infections. PMID:21843206

  8. Social complementation and growth advantages promote socially defective bacterial isolates

    PubMed Central

    Kraemer, Susanne A.; Velicer, Gregory J.

    2014-01-01

    Social interactions among diverse individuals that encounter one another in nature have often been studied among animals but rarely among microbes. For example, the evolutionary forces that determine natural frequencies of bacteria that express cooperative behaviours at low levels remain poorly understood. Natural isolates of the soil bacterium Myxococcus xanthus sampled from the same fruiting body often vary in social phenotypes, such as group swarming and multicellular development. Here, we tested whether genotypes highly proficient at swarming or development might promote the persistence of less socially proficient genotypes from the same fruiting body. Fast-swarming strains complemented slower isolates, allowing the latter to keep pace with faster strains in mixed groups. During development, one low-sporulating strain was antagonized by high sporulators, whereas others with severe developmental defects had those defects partially complemented by high-sporulating strains. Despite declining in frequency overall during competition experiments spanning multiple cycles of development, developmentally defective strains exhibited advantages during the growth phases of competitions. These results suggest that microbes with low-sociality phenotypes often benefit from interacting with more socially proficient strains. Such complementation may combine with advantages at other traits to increase equilibrium frequencies of low-sociality genotypes in natural populations. PMID:24573856

  9. Bacterial growth inhibition produced by root canal sealer cements with a calcium hydroxide base.

    PubMed

    Canalda, C; Pumarola, J

    1989-07-01

    Inhibition of growth of six bacterial strains produced by two root canal sealers with a calcium hydroxide base, CRCS and Sealapex sealers, is studied. The results are compared with those obtained with two zinc oxide eugenol sealers and one epoxy resin. The inhibition produced with the calcium hydroxide sealers is similar to that obtained with the other sealers. The component of paraformaldehyde in a sealer increases the inhibition significantly. PMID:2755695

  10. Growth promoting effects of corn ( Zea mays) bacterial isolates under greenhouse and field conditions

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Samina Mehnaz; Tom Kowalik; Bruce Reynolds; George Lazarovits

    2010-01-01

    Fertilizer costs are a major component of corn production. The use of biofertilizers may be one way of reducing production costs. In this study we present isolation and identification of three plant growth promoting bacteria that were identified as Enterobacter cloacae (CR1), Pseudomonas putida (CR7) and Stenotrophomonas maltophilia (CR3). All bacterial strains produced IAA in the presence of 100mgl?1 of

  11. Calibrated Rhizocarpon spp. Growth Curve for the Mount Waddington Area, British Columbia Coast Mountains, Canada

    Microsoft Academic Search

    S. J. Larocque; D. J. Smith

    2004-01-01

    A calibrated Rhizocarpon spp. lichen growth curve spanning the last 680 yr was developed for the Bella Coola and Mount Waddington areas, southern Coast Mountains of British Columbia (Canada). It is based on 18 control surfaces whose ages were determined using radiocarbon dates, tree-ring dated moraines, and ice front positions derived from historical air photographs. Population distribution statistics were used

  12. Career Maturity Growth Curve and Sex-Role Stereotypes of Korean Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yon, Kyu Jin; Choi, Wonseok; Goh, Michael

    2013-01-01

    This longitudinal study investigated the career maturity growth curve of Korean Adolescents from 4th grade to 12th grade. The participants consisted of 3,241 male and 3,029 female students from the Korea Youth Panel Survey, a nationwide longitudinal study of South Korean adolescents. The present study explored the shape of the career maturity…

  13. Sample Sizes for Two-Group Second-Order Latent Growth Curve Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wanstrom, Linda

    2009-01-01

    Second-order latent growth curve models (S. C. Duncan & Duncan, 1996; McArdle, 1988) can be used to study group differences in change in latent constructs. We give exact formulas for the covariance matrix of the parameter estimates and an algebraic expression for the estimation of slope differences. Formulas for calculations of the required sample…

  14. The Dynamics of Self-Esteem: A Growth-Curve Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baldwin, Scott A.; Hoffmann, John P.

    2002-01-01

    Using 7 years of sequential data from the Family Health Study for 762 subjects aged 11 to 16 years in year 1, estimated a hierarchical growth curve model that emphasized the effects of age, life events, gender, and family cohesion on self-esteem. Results show a curvilinear relationship between age and self-esteem, suggesting that self-esteem is a…

  15. Aptitude-Treatment Interaction Effects on Explicit Rule Learning: A Latent Growth Curve Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hwu, Fenfang; Pan, Wei; Sun, Shuyan

    2014-01-01

    Finding the match between individuals and educational treatments is the aim of both educators and the aptitude-treatment interaction research paradigm. Using the latent growth curve analysis, the present study investigates the interaction between the type of explicit instructional approaches (deductive vs. explicit-inductive) and the level of…

  16. 1. INTRODUCTION Current design methods focus on crack growth curves which are material properties for given

    E-print Network

    Hively, Lee M.

    1. INTRODUCTION Current design methods focus on crack growth curves which are material properties aluminum, and construction steel under pristine and corroded conditions, and for Mode I and Mode III fatigue, as well as Mode I low-temperature creep and stress corrosion. During the 1930s, A. A. Griffith

  17. Longitudinal Changes in Physical Fitness Performance in Youth: A Multilevel Latent Growth Curve Modeling Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, Chee Keng John; Pyun, Do Young; Liu, Woon Chia; Lim, Boon San Coral; Li, Fuzhong

    2013-01-01

    Using a multilevel latent growth curve modeling (LGCM) approach, this study examined longitudinal change in levels of physical fitness performance over time (i.e. four years) in young adolescents aged from 12-13 years. The sample consisted of 6622 students from 138 secondary schools in Singapore. Initial analyses found between-school variation on…

  18. Investigation of Mediational Processes Using Parallel Process Latent Growth Curve Modeling.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cheong, JeeWon; MacKinnon, David P.; Khoo, Siek Toon

    2003-01-01

    Investigated a method to evaluate mediational processes using latent growth curve modeling and tested it with empirical data from a longitudinal steroid use prevention program focusing on 1,506 high school football players over 4 years. Findings suggest the usefulness of the approach. (SLD)

  19. From the regulation of peptidoglycan synthesis to bacterial growth and morphology.

    PubMed

    Typas, Athanasios; Banzhaf, Manuel; Gross, Carol A; Vollmer, Waldemar

    2012-02-01

    How bacteria grow and divide while retaining a defined shape is a fundamental question in microbiology, but technological advances are now driving a new understanding of how the shape-maintaining bacterial peptidoglycan sacculus grows. In this Review, we highlight the relationship between peptidoglycan synthesis complexes and cytoskeletal elements, as well as recent evidence that peptidoglycan growth is regulated from outside the sacculus in Gram-negative bacteria. We also discuss how growth of the sacculus is sensitive to mechanical force and nutritional status, and describe the roles of peptidoglycan hydrolases in generating cell shape and of D-amino acids in sacculus remodelling. PMID:22203377

  20. Evaluation of toxic effects of several carboxylic acids on bacterial growth by toxicodynamic modelling

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Effects of organic acids on microbial fermentation are commonly tested in investigations about metabolic behaviour of bacteria. However, they typically provide only descriptive information without modelling the influence of acid concentrations on bacterial kinetics. Results We developed and applied a mathematical model (secondary model) to capture the toxicological effects of those chemicals on kinetic parameters that define the growth of bacteria in batch cultures. Thus, dose-response kinetics were performed with different bacteria (Leuconostoc mesenteroides, Carnobacterium pisicola, Escherichia coli, Bacillus subtilis and Listonella anguillarum) exposed at increasing concentrations of individual carboxylic acids (formic, acetic, propionic, butyric and lactic). In all bioassays the acids affected the maximum bacterial load (Xm) and the maximum growth rate (vm) but only in specific cases the lag phase (?) was modified. Significance of the parameters was always high and in all fermentations the toxicodynamic equation was statistically consistent and had good predictability. The differences between D and L-lactic acid effects were significant for the growth of E. coli, L. mesenteroides and C. piscicola. In addition, a global parameter (EC50,?) was used to compare toxic effects and provided a realistic characterization of antimicrobial agents using a single value. Conclusions The effect of several organic acids on the growth of different bacteria was accurately studied and perfectly characterized by a bivariate equation which combines the basis of dose-response theory with microbial growth kinetics (secondary model). The toxicity of carboxylic acids was lower with the increase of the molecular weight of these chemicals. PMID:22118421

  1. Tropical freshwater ecosystems have lower bacterial growth efficiency than temperate ones

    PubMed Central

    Amado, André M.; Meirelles-Pereira, Frederico; Vidal, Luciana O.; Sarmento, Hugo; Suhett, Albert L.; Farjalla, Vinicius F.; Cotner, James B.; Roland, Fabio

    2013-01-01

    Current models and observations indicate that bacterial respiration should increase and growth efficiency (BGE) should decrease with increasing temperatures. However, these models and observations are mostly derived from data collected in temperate regions, and the tropics are under-represented. The aim of this work was to compare bacterial metabolism, namely bacterial production (BP) and respiration (BR), bacterial growth efficiency (BGE) and bacterial carbon demand (BCD) between tropical and temperate ecosystems via a literature review and using unpublished data. We hypothesized that (1) tropical ecosystems have higher metabolism than temperate ones and, (2) that BGE is lower in tropical relative to temperate ecosystems. We collected a total of 498 coupled BP and BR observations (Ntotal = 498; Ntemperate = 301; Ntropical = 197), calculated BGE (BP/(BP+BR)) and BCD (BP+BR) for each case and examined patterns using a model II regression analysis and compared each parameter between the two regions using non-parametric Mann–Whitney U test. We observed a significant positive linear regression between BR and BP for the whole dataset, and also for tropical and temperate data separately. We found that BP, BR and BCD were higher in the tropics, but BGE was lower compared to temperate regions. Also, BR rates per BP unit were at least two fold higher in the tropics than in temperate ecosystems. We argue that higher temperature, nutrient limitation, and light exposure all contribute to lower BGE in the tropics, mediated through effects on thermodynamics, substrate stoichiometry, nutrient availability and interactions with photochemically produced compounds. More efforts are needed in this study area in the tropics, but our work indicates that bottom-up (nutrient availability and resource stoichiometry) and top-down (grazer pressure) processes, coupled with thermodynamic constraints, might contribute to the lower BGE in the tropics relative to temperate regions. PMID:23801986

  2. Growth Curve Models for the Analysis of Phenotype Arrays for a Systems Biology Overview of Yersinia pestis

    SciTech Connect

    Fodor, I K; Holtz-Morris, A E; McCutchen-Maloney, S L

    2005-09-08

    The Phenotype MicroArray technology of Biolog, Inc. (Hayward, CA) measures the respiration of cells as a function of time in thousands of microwells simultaneously, and thus provides a high-throughput means of studying cellular phenotypes. The microwells contain compounds involved in a number of biochemical pathways, as well as chemicals that test the sensitivity of cells against antibiotics and stress. While the PM experimental workflow is completely automated, statistical methods to analyze and interpret the data are lagging behind. To take full advantage of the technology, it is essential to develop efficient analytical methods to quantify the information in the complex datasets resulting from PM experiments. We propose the use of statistical growth-curve models to rigorously quantify observed differences in PM experiments, in the context of the growth and metabolism of Yersinia pestis cells grown under different physiological conditions. The information from PM experiments complement genomic and proteomic results and can be used to identify gene function and in drug development. Successful coupling of phenomics results with genomics and proteomics will lead to an unprecedented ability to characterize bacterial function at a systems biology level.

  3. Characterization of commercial and biological growth curves in the Segureña sheep breed.

    PubMed

    Lupi, T M; Nogales, S; León, J M; Barba, C; Delgado, J V

    2015-08-01

    Non-linear models were analysed to describe both the biological and commercial growth curves of the Segureña sheep, one of the most important Spanish breeds. We evaluated Brody, von Bertalanffy, Verhulst, logistic and Gompertz models, using historical data from the National Association of Segureña Sheep Breeders (ANCOS). These records were collected between 2000 and 2013, from a total of 129 610 weight observations ranging from birth to adulthood. The aim of this research was to establish the mathematical behaviour of body development throughout this breed's commercial life (birth to slaughter) and biological life (birth to adulthood); comparison between both slopes gives important information regarding the best time for slaughter, informs dietary advice according to animals' needs, permits economical predictions of productions and, by using the curve parameters as selection criteria, enables improvements in growth characteristics of the breed. Models were fitted according to the non-linear regression procedure of statistical package SPSS version19. Model parameters were estimated using the Levenberg-Marquardt algorithm. Candidate models were compared using the determinative coefficient, mean square error, number of iterations, Akaike information coefficient and biological coherence of the estimated parameters. The von Bertalanffy and logistic models were found to be best suited to the biological and commercial growth curves, respectively, for both sexes. The Brody equation was found to be unsuitable for studying the commercial growth curve. Differences between the parameters in both sexes indicate a strong impact of sexual dimorphism on growth. This can emphasize the value of the highest growth rate for females, indicating that they reach maturity earlier. PMID:25903216

  4. Parameters of bacterial killing and regrowth kinetics and antimicrobial effect examined in terms of area under the concentration-time curve relationships: action of ciprofloxacin against Escherichia coli in an in vitro dynamic model.

    PubMed Central

    Firsov, A A; Vostrov, S N; Shevchenko, A A; Cornaglia, G

    1997-01-01

    Although many parameters have been described to quantitate the killing and regrowth of bacteria, substantial shortcomings are inherent in most of them, such as low sensitivity to pharmacokinetic determinants of the antimicrobial effect, an inability to predict a total effect, insufficient robustness, and uncertain interrelations between the parameters that prevent an ultimate determination of the effect. To examine different parameters, the kinetics of killing and regrowth of Escherichia coli (MIC, 0.013 microg/ml) were studied in vitro by simulating a series of ciprofloxacin monoexponential pharmacokinetic profiles. Initial ciprofloxacin concentrations varied from 0.02 to 19.2 microg/ml, whereas the half-life of 4 h was the same in all experiments. The following parameters were calculated and estimated: the time to reduce the initial inoculum (N0) 10-, 100-, and 1,000-fold (T90%, T99%, and T99.9%, respectively), the rate constant of bacterial elimination (k(elb)), the nadir level (Nmin) in the viable count (N)-versus-time (t) curve, the time to reach Nmin (t(min)), the numbers of bacteria that survived (Ntau) by the end of the observation period (tau), the area under the bacterial killing and regrowth curve (log N(A)-t curve) from the zero point (time zero) to tau (AUBC), the area above this curve (AAC), the area between the control growth curve (log N(C)-t curve) and the bacterial killing and regrowth curve (log N(A)-t curve) from the zero point to tau (ABBC) or to the time point when log N(A) reaches the maximal values observed in the log N(C)-t curve (I(E); intensity of the effect), and the time shift between the control growth and regrowth curves (T(E); duration of the effect). Being highly sensitive to the AUC, I(E), and T(E) showed the most regular AUC relationships: the effect expressed by I(E) or T(E) increased systematically when the AUC or initial concentration of ciprofloxacin rose. Other parameters, especially T90%, T99%, T99.9%, t(min), and log N0 - log Nmin = delta log Nmin, related to the AUC less regularly and were poorly sensitive to the AUC. T(E) proved to be the best predictor and t(min) proved to be the worst predictor of the total antimicrobial effect reflected by I(E). Distinct feedback relationships between the effect determination and the experimental design were demonstrated. It was shown that unjustified shortening of the observation period, i.e., cutting off the log N(A)-t curves, may lead to the degeneration of the AUC-response relationships, as expressed by log N0 - log Ntau = delta log Ntau, AUBC, AAC, or ABBC, to a point where it gives rise to the false idea of an AUC- or concentration-independent effect. Thus, use of I(E) and T(E) provides the most unbiased, robust, and comprehensive means of determining the antimicrobial effect. PMID:9174184

  5. Intestinal bacterial community and growth performance of chickens fed diets containing antibiotics.

    PubMed

    Pedroso, A A; Menten, J F M; Lambais, M R; Racanicci, A M C; Longo, F A; Sorbara, J O B

    2006-04-01

    This study was conducted to relate the performance of broiler chickens fed diets containing growth-promoting antibiotics to changes in the intestinal microbiota. The technique of denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) of amplicons of the region V3 of 16S rDNA was used to characterize the microbiota. Two experiments were conducted, one with broilers raised in battery cages and the other with broilers raised in floor pens. Antibiotics improved the performance of the chickens raised in floor pens only. Avilamycin, bacitracin methylene disalicylate, and enramycin induced changes in the composition of the intestinal bacterial community of the birds in both experiments. The number of bacterial genotypes found in the intestinal tract of chickens was not reduced by the antibiotics supplemented in either environment. However, the changes in the composition of the intestinal bacterial community induced by antibiotics may be related to improvement in growth performance. This was indicated by the suppression of 6 amplicons and the presence of 4 amplicons exclusive to the treatment that had the best performance in the floor pen experiment. PMID:16615359

  6. Effects of Eyjafjallajökull Volcanic Ash on Innate Immune System Responses and Bacterial Growth in Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Baltrusaitis, Jonas; Powers, Linda S.; Borcherding, Jennifer A.; Caraballo, Juan C.; Mudunkotuwa, Imali; Peate, David W.; Walters, Katherine; Thompson, Jay M.; Grassian, Vicki H.; Gudmundsson, Gunnar; Comellas, Alejandro P.

    2013-01-01

    Background: On 20 March 2010, the Icelandic volcano Eyjafjallajökull erupted for the first time in 190 years. Despite many epidemiological reports showing effects of volcanic ash on the respiratory system, there are limited data evaluating cellular mechanisms involved in the response to ash. Epidemiological studies have observed an increase in respiratory infections in subjects and populations exposed to volcanic eruptions. Methods: We physicochemically characterized volcanic ash, finding various sizes of particles, as well as the presence of several transition metals, including iron. We examined the effect of Eyjafjallajökull ash on primary rat alveolar epithelial cells and human airway epithelial cells (20–100 µg/cm2), primary rat and human alveolar macrophages (5–20 µg/cm2), and Pseudomonas aeruginosa (PAO1) growth (3 µg/104 bacteria). Results: Volcanic ash had minimal effect on alveolar and airway epithelial cell integrity. In alveolar macrophages, volcanic ash disrupted pathogen-killing and inflammatory responses. In in vitro bacterial growth models, volcanic ash increased bacterial replication and decreased bacterial killing by antimicrobial peptides. Conclusions: These results provide potential biological plausibility for epidemiological data that show an association between air pollution exposure and the development of respiratory infections. These data suggest that volcanic ash exposure, while not seriously compromising lung cell function, may be able to impair innate immunity responses in exposed individuals. PMID:23478268

  7. Empirical Growth Curve Estimation Using Sigmoid Sub-functions that Adjust Seasonal Compensatory Growth for Male Body Weight of Thoroughbred Horses

    PubMed Central

    ONODA, Tomoaki; YAMAMOTO, Ryuta; SAWAMURA, Kyohei; INOUE, Yoshinobu; MATSUI, Akira; MIYAKE, Takeshi; HIRAI, Nobuhiro

    2011-01-01

    Thoroughbred horses are seasonal mating animals, raised in northern regions or countries. Foals born yearly in spring generally show a typical seasonal compensatory growth pattern, in which their growth rate declines in the first winter and increases in the next spring. In this study, a new empirical adjustment approach is proposed to adjust for this compensatory growth when growth curve equations are estimated, by using 1,633 male body weights of Thoroughbreds as an illustrating example. Based on general Richards growth curve equation, a new growth curve equation was developed and fit to the weight-age data. The new growth curve equation had a sigmoid sub-function that can adjust the compensatory growth, combined with the Richards biological parameter responsible for the maturity of animals. The unknown parameters included in the equations were estimated by SAS NLMIXED procedure. The goodness of fit was examined by using Akaike’s Information Criterion (AIC). The AIC values decreased from 13,053 (general Richards equation) to 12,794 (the newly developed equation), indicating the better fit of the new equation to the weight-age data. The shape of the growth curve was improved during the period of compensatory growth. The proposed method is one of the useful approaches for adjusting seasonal compensatory growth in growth curve estimations for Thoroughbreds, and for their management during the compensatory period. Based on this approach, the optimal growth curve equations can be estimated also for female body weight of Thoroughbreds or other growth traits affected by seasonal compensatory growth. PMID:24833986

  8. Scaling laws governing stochastic growth and division of single bacterial cells

    E-print Network

    Iyer-Biswas, Srividya; Henry, Jonathan T; Lo, Klevin; Burov, Stanislav; Lin, Yihan; Crooks, Gavin E; Crosson, Sean; Dinner, Aaron R; Scherer, Norbert F

    2014-01-01

    Uncovering the quantitative laws that govern the growth and division of single cells remains a major challenge. Using a unique combination of technologies that yields unprecedented statistical precision, we find that the sizes of individual Caulobacter crescentus cells increase exponentially in time. We also establish that they divide upon reaching a critical multiple ($\\approx$1.8) of their initial sizes, rather than an absolute size. We show that when the temperature is varied, the growth and division timescales scale proportionally with each other over the physiological temperature range. Strikingly, the cell-size and division-time distributions can both be rescaled by their mean values such that the condition-specific distributions collapse to universal curves. We account for these observations with a minimal stochastic model that is based on an autocatalytic cycle. It predicts the scalings, as well as specific functional forms for the universal curves. Our experimental and theoretical analysis reveals a ...

  9. Individual Growth Curves of Frequency of Sexual Intercourse Among Urban, Adolescent, African American Youth

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Christian Delucia; Roberta L. Paikoff; Grayson N. Holmbeck

    2007-01-01

    In the current study we examined individual growth curves of frequency of sexual intercourse among a sample of urban, low-income, African American youth at increased risk for subsequent HIV\\/AIDS exposure. Three waves of longitudinal data from the Collaborative HIV-Prevention AdolescentMental Health (CHAMP) project were utilized. Participant ages ranged from 9 to 12 years (M = 11 years) at the first

  10. Fundal height growth curve patterns of pregnant women with term low birth weight infants

    PubMed Central

    Deeluea, Jirawan; Sirichotiyakul, Supatra; Weerakiet, Sawaek; Khunpradit, Suthit; Patumanond, Jayanton

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To investigate the patterns of fundal height (FH) growth curve in pregnant women with term low birth weight (LBW) infants compared with the standard FH growth curve for Thai women. Subjects and methods A retrospective study was conducted at the four governmental general hospitals in the northern part of Thailand between 2009 and 2011. All data were obtained from antenatal records and labor registry. Serial FH measurements in centimeters of 75 pregnant women with term LBW infants were plotted against the standard FH growth curve for Thai women throughout pregnancy. Results Six patterns of the FH growth curve were summarized: pattern I: FH below or around the tenth percentile throughout pregnancy (n=17, 22.7%); pattern II: FH below normal in early pregnancy, caught up with normal, then decelerated or stagnant (n=19, 25.3%); pattern III: FH normal in early pregnancy, then decelerated or stagnant (n=17, 22.7%); pattern IV: FH normal in early pregnancy, decelerated or stagnant, then caught up to normal (n=6, 8.0%); pattern V: FH normal throughout pregnancy except for the last visit (n=6, 8.0%); and pattern VI: FH normal throughout pregnancy (n=10, 13.3%). Conclusion Patterns I–V may be used to recognize women who are likely to deliver term LBW infants from early pregnancy, during pregnancy, and on the day of admission for labor. Ultrasound evaluation is still recommended in cases with known risk factors that might be undetectable by FH, or in cases where FH measurement may be inaccurate. PMID:25053895

  11. NK cells activated in vivo by bacterial DNA control the intracellular growth of Francisella tularensis LVS.

    PubMed

    Elkins, Karen L; Colombini, Susan M; Krieg, Arthur M; De Pascalis, Roberto

    2009-01-01

    We demonstrated previously that mice treated with bacterial or oligonucleotide DNA containing unmethylated CpG motifs are transiently protected against lethal parenteral challenge with the intracellular bacterium Francisella tularensis Live Vaccine Strain (LVS). Here we explore the cellular basis of this protection. Wild-type mice that were treated with CpG oligonucleotide DNA and challenged with a lethal dose of LVS survived, while mice lacking TLR9 did not. In vitro, treatment of LVS-infected macrophages and/or naive splenocytes with oligo DNA had no impact on intracellular bacterial replication. In contrast, in vitro co-culture of LVS-infected macrophages with splenocytes obtained from mice treated with oligo DNA in vivo resulted in control of intracellular LVS growth. Control was reversed by antibodies to interferon-gamma or to tumor necrosis factor-alpha and by inhibition of nitric oxide, and to a lesser degree by antibodies to Interleukin-12. Further, splenocytes from DNA-primed normal, T cell KO, B cell KO, lymphocyte-deficient scid, or perforin KO mice all controlled intra-macrophage LVS growth. Enriched DNA-primed natural killer cells, but not B cells, clearly controlled intracellular LVS growth. Thus, NK cells contribute to DNA-mediated protection by production of cytokines including IFN-gamma and TNF-alpha, resulting in nitric oxide production and control of intracellular Francisella replication. PMID:18992838

  12. Bacterial Standing Stock, Activity, and Carbon Production during Formation and Growth of Sea Ice in the Weddell Sea, Antarctica †

    PubMed Central

    Grossmann, Sönnke; Dieckmann, Gerhard S.

    1994-01-01

    Bacterial response to formation and growth of sea ice was investigated during autumn in the northeastern Weddell Sea. Changes in standing stock, activity, and carbon production of bacteria were determined in successive stages of ice development. During initial ice formation, concentrations of bacterial cells, in the order of 1 × 108 to 3 × 108 liter-1, were not enhanced within the ice matrix. This suggests that physical enrichment of bacteria by ice crystals is not effective. Due to low concentrations of phytoplankton in the water column during freezing, incorporation of bacteria into newly formed ice via attachment to algal cells or aggregates was not recorded in this study. As soon as the ice had formed, the general metabolic activity of bacterial populations was strongly suppressed. Furthermore, the ratio of [3H]leucine incorporation into proteins to [3H]thymidine incorporation into DNA changed during ice growth. In thick pack ice, bacterial activity recovered and growth rates up to 0.6 day-1 indicated actively dividing populations. However, biomass-specific utilization of organic compounds remained lower than in open water. Bacterial concentrations of up to 2.8 × 109 cells liter-1 along with considerably enlarged cell volumes accumulated within thick pack ice, suggesting reduced mortality rates of bacteria within the small brine pores. In the course of ice development, bacterial carbon production increased from about 0.01 to 0.4 ?g of C liter-1 h-1. In thick ice, bacterial secondary production exceeded primary production of microalgae. PMID:16349347

  13. Growth and location of bacterial colonies within dairy foods using microscopy techniques: a review

    PubMed Central

    Hickey, Cian D.; Sheehan, Jeremiah J.; Wilkinson, Martin G.; Auty, Mark A. E.

    2015-01-01

    The growth, location, and distribution of bacterial colonies in dairy products are important factors for the ripening and flavor development of cheeses, yogurts, and soured creams. Starter, non-starter, spoilage, and pathogenic bacteria all become entrapped in the developing casein matrix of dairy foods. In order to visualize these bacterial colonies and the environments surrounding them, microscopy techniques are used. The use of various microscopy methods allow for the rapid detection, enumeration, and distribution of starter, non-starter and pathogenic bacteria in dairy foods. Confocal laser scanning microscopy is extensively utilized to identify bacteria location via the use of fluorescent dyes. Further study is needed in relation to the development of micro- gradients and localized ripening parameters in dairy products due to the location of bacteria at the protein–fat interface. Development in the area of bacterial discrimination using microscopy techniques and fluorescent dyes/tags is needed as the benefits of rapidly identifying spoilage/pathogenic bacteria early in product manufacture would be of huge benefit in relation to both safety and financial concerns. PMID:25741328

  14. Mixed models defined by stochastic differential equations 1 Bayesian analysis of growth curves using mixed models defined by stochastic

    E-print Network

    Samson, Adeline

    of repeated measurements of a continuous growth process over time in a population of individuals. These data curve data consist of repeated measurements of a growth process over time among a population are classically analyzed by nonlinear mixed models. However, the standard growth functions used in this context

  15. Functional properties of peanut fractions on the growth of probiotics and foodborne bacterial pathogens.

    PubMed

    Peng, Mengfei; Bitsko, Elizabeth; Biswas, Debabrata

    2015-03-01

    Various compounds found in peanut (Arachis hypogaea) have been shown to provide multiple benefits to human health and may influence the growth of a broad range of gut bacteria. In this study, we investigated the effects of peanut white kernel and peanut skin on 3 strains of Lactobacillus and 3 major foodborne enteric bacterial pathogens. Significant (P < 0.05) growth stimulation of Lactobacillus casei and Lactobacillus rhamnosus was observed in the presence of 0.5% peanut flour (PF) made from peanut white kernel, whereas 0.5% peanut skin extract (PSE) exerted the inhibitory effect on the growth of these beneficial microbes. We also found that within 72 h, PF inhibited growth of enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli O157:H7 (EHEC), while PSE significantly (P < 0.05) inhibited Listeria monocytogenes but promoted the growth of both EHEC and Salmonella Typhimurium. The cell adhesion and invasion abilities of 3 pathogens to the host cells were also significantly (P < 0.05) reduced by 0.5% PF and 0.5% PSE. These results suggest that peanut white kernel might assist in improving human gut flora as well as reducing EHEC, whereas the beneficial effects of peanut skins require further research and investigation. PMID:25627431

  16. Pump-free gradient-based micro-device enables quantitative and high-throughput bacterial growth inhibition analysis.

    PubMed

    Ran, Min; Wang, Ying; Wang, Sida; Luo, Chunxiong

    2015-08-01

    Antibiotic susceptibility testing is very important in antibiotic therapy. Traditional methods to determine antibiotic susceptibility include disk diffusion and broth dilution. However, these tests are always labor intensive, time-consuming, and need large amounts of reagents. In this paper, we demonstrated a novel pump-free micro-device that enables quantitative and high-throughput bacterial growth inhibition analysis. This device consists of a series of wells and diffusion-based antibiotic gradient channels. The wells serve as antibiotic sources and buffer sinks, and we could easily observe the bacterial growth in the gradient channels .The design of the multi-wells is adapted to the commercialized multi-channel pipette, which makes it very convenient for loading reagents into the wells. For each assay, only about 20 ?L antibiotic solution is needed. As a demonstration, we used both fluorescence images and dark-field images to quantify the bacterial growth inhibition effect under different antibiotics. The quantitative data of bacterial growth inhibition under different antibiotics can be obtained within 3 to 4 h. Considering the simple operation process and the high-throughput and quantitative result this device can offer, it has great potential to be widely used in clinics and may be useful for the study of the kinetics of bacterial growth. PMID:26044203

  17. Application of a microcomputer-based system to control and monitor bacterial growth.

    PubMed

    Titus, J A; Luli, G W; Dekleva, M L; Strohl, W R

    1984-02-01

    A modular microcomputer-based system was developed to control and monitor various modes of bacterial growth. The control system was composed of an Apple II Plus microcomputer with 64-kilobyte random-access memory; a Cyborg ISAAC model 91A multichannel analog-to-digital and digital-to-analog converter; paired MRR-1 pH, pO(2), and foam control units; and in-house-designed relay, servo control, and turbidimetry systems. To demonstrate the flexibility of the system, we grew bacteria under various computer-controlled and monitored modes of growth, including batch, turbidostat, and chemostat systems. The Apple-ISAAC system was programmed in Labsoft BASIC (extended Applesoft) with an average control program using ca. 6 to 8 kilobytes of memory and up to 30 kilobytes for datum arrays. This modular microcomputer-based control system was easily coupled to laboratory scale fermentors for a variety of fermentations. PMID:16346462

  18. Asynchrony in the growth and motility responses to environmental changes by individual bacterial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Umehara, Senkei [Department of Life Sciences, Graduate School of Arts and Sciences, The University of Tokyo (Japan); Hattori, Akihiro [Department of Biomedical Information, Division of Biosystems, Institute of Biomaterials and Bioengineering, Tokyo Medical and Dental University (Japan); Inoue, Ippei [Department of Life Sciences, Graduate School of Arts and Sciences, The University of Tokyo (Japan); Yasuda, Kenji [Department of Biomedical Information, Division of Biosystems, Institute of Biomaterials and Bioengineering, Tokyo Medical and Dental University (Japan)]. E-mail: yasuda.bmi@tmd.ac.jp

    2007-05-04

    Knowing how individual cells respond to environmental changes helps one understand phenotypic diversity in a bacterial cell population, so we simultaneously monitored the growth and motility of isolated motile Escherichia coli cells over several generations by using a method called on-chip single-cell cultivation. Starved cells quickly stopped growing but remained motile for several hours before gradually becoming immotile. When nutrients were restored the cells soon resumed their growth and proliferation but remained immotile for up to six generations. A flagella visualization assay suggested that deflagellation underlies the observed loss of motility. This set of results demonstrates that single-cell transgenerational study under well-characterized environmental conditions can provide information that will help us understand distinct functions within individual cells.

  19. Cloning of human epidermal growth factor as a bacterial secretory protein, its properties and mutagenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Engler, D.A.; Matsunami, R.K.; Campion, S.R.; Foote, R.S.; Mural, R.J.; Larimer, F.W.; Stevens, A.; Niyogi, S.K.

    1987-05-01

    A chimeric gene, containing the DNA coding for the human epidermal growth factor (EGF) and that for the signal peptide of E. coli alkaline phosphatase, was constructed by the annealing and subsequent ligation of appropriate DNA oligonucleotides synthesized in an automated DNA synthesizer. The gene was then cloned into a bacterial plasmid under the transcriptional control of the E. coli trp-lac (tac) promoter, and then transformed into E. coli. Following induction with isopropylthiogalactoside, the secretion of EGF into the E. coli periplasmic space and some into the growth medium was confirmed by its specific binding to the EGF receptor and stimulation of the EGF receptor tyrosine kinase activity. The size and physicochemical properties of the purified protein mimicked those of authentic human EGF. Studies of structure/function relationships by specific alterations of targeted amino acid residues in the EGF molecule have been initiated by utilizing site-directed mutagenesis.

  20. Inhibition of Pseudogymnoascus destructans growth from conidia and mycelial extension by bacterially produced volatile organic compounds.

    PubMed

    Cornelison, Christopher T; Gabriel, Kyle T; Barlament, Courtney; Crow, Sidney A

    2014-02-01

    The recently identified causative agent of white-nose syndrome (WNS), Pseudogymnoascus destructans, has been implicated in the mortality of an estimated 5.5 million North American bats since its initial documentation in 2006 (Frick et al. in Science 329:679-682, 2010). In an effort to identify potential biological and chemical control options for WNS, 6 previously described bacterially produced volatile organic compounds (VOCs) were screened for anti-P. destructans activity. The compounds include decanal; 2-ethyl-1-hexanol; nonanal; benzothiazole; benzaldehyde; andN,N-dimethyloctylamine. P. destructans conidia and mycelial plugs were exposed to the VOCs in a closed air space at 15 and 4 °C and then evaluated for growth inhibition. All VOCs inhibited growth from conidia as well as inhibiting radial mycelial extension, with the greatest effect at 4 °C. Studies of the ecology of fungistatic soils and the natural abundance of the fungistatic VOCs present in these environments suggest a synergistic activity of select VOCs may occur. The evaluation of formulations of two or three VOCs at equivalent concentrations was supportive of synergistic activity in several cases. The identification of bacterially produced VOCs with anti-P. destructans activity indicates disease-suppressive and fungistatic soils as a potentially significant reservoir of biological and chemical control options for WNS and provides wildlife management personnel with tools to combat this devastating disease. PMID:24190516

  1. Factors affecting sperm motility. VI. Sperm viability under the influence of bacterial growth in human ejaculates.

    PubMed

    Makler, A; Urbach, Y; Lefler, E; Merzbach, D

    1981-06-01

    The influence of bacterial growth on human sperm motility and viability was evaluated objectively with the multiple-exposure photography method. Experimental semen specimens, obtained from normal donors bh nonaseptic means of masturbation, were incubated with antibiotics at room temperature or body temperature for 24 hours. Although bacteria, grew in control specimens, were totally eradicated in all antibiotic-treated specimens, no significant difference was found between these groups with regard to sperm motility throughout the time of incubation. Sperm survival was not inhibited, nor was it extended as a result of suppression of bacterial growth. In both groups, survival time was much shorter in specimens incubated at body temperature than in those kept at room temperature. Sperm motility was not affected after 2 hours of incubation of fresh specimens with concentrations of various pathogenic bacteria similar to those found in severe prostatitis. The question of whether the use of antibiotics in the treatment of asthenospermia per se has a prognostic value is discussed. PMID:6788609

  2. Longitudinal Growth Curves of Brain Function Underlying Inhibitory Control through Adolescence

    PubMed Central

    Foran, William; Velanova, Katerina; Luna, Beatriz

    2013-01-01

    Neuroimaging studies suggest that developmental improvements in inhibitory control are primarily supported by changes in prefrontal executive function. However, studies are contradictory with respect to how activation in prefrontal regions changes with age, and they have yet to analyze longitudinal data using growth curve modeling, which allows characterization of dynamic processes of developmental change, individual differences in growth trajectories, and variables that predict any interindividual variability in trajectories. In this study, we present growth curves modeled from longitudinal fMRI data collected over 302 visits (across ages 9 to 26 years) from 123 human participants. Brain regions within circuits known to support motor response control, executive control, and error processing (i.e., aspects of inhibitory control) were investigated. Findings revealed distinct developmental trajectories for regions within each circuit and indicated that a hierarchical pattern of maturation of brain activation supports the gradual emergence of adult-like inhibitory control. Mean growth curves of activation in motor response control regions revealed no changes with age, although interindividual variability decreased with development, indicating equifinality with maturity. Activation in certain executive control regions decreased with age until adolescence, and variability was stable across development. Error-processing activation in the dorsal anterior cingulate cortex showed continued increases into adulthood and no significant interindividual variability across development, and was uniquely associated with task performance. These findings provide evidence that continued maturation of error-processing abilities supports the protracted development of inhibitory control over adolescence, while motor response control regions provide early-maturing foundational capacities and suggest that some executive control regions may buttress immature networks as error processing continues to mature. PMID:24227721

  3. The effect of different growth regimes on the endophytic bacterial communities of the fern, Dicksonia sellowiana hook (Dicksoniaceae)

    PubMed Central

    de Araújo Barros, Irene; Luiz Araújo, Welington; Lúcio Azevedo, João

    2010-01-01

    Endophytic bacteria associated with the fern Dicksonia sellowiana were investigated. The bacterial communities from the surface-sterilized pinnae and rachis segments of the plants from the Brazilian Atlantic Rainforest that grew in native field conditions were compared with the bacterial communities from plants grown in greenhouses and plants that were initially grown in greenhouses and then transferred to the forest. From 540 pinnae and 540 rachis segments, 163 (30.2%) and 346 (64.2%) were colonized by bacteria, respectively. The main bacterial genera and species that were isolated included Bacillus spp. ( B. cereus, B. megaterium, B. pumilus and B. subtilis ) , Paenibacillus sp. , Amphibacillus sp. , Gracilibacillus sp. , Micrococcus sp. and Stenotrophomonas spp. ( S. maltophilia and S. nitroreducens ). B. pumilus was the most frequently isolated bacterial species . Amphibacillus and Gracilibacillus were reported as endophytes for the first time. Other commonly found bacterial genera were not observed in D. sellowiana , which may reflect preferences of specific bacterial communities inside this fern or detection limitations due to the isolation procedures. Plants that were grown in greenhouses and plants that were reintroduced into the forest displayed more bacterial genera and species diversity than native field plants, suggesting that reintroduction shifts the bacterial diversity. Endophytic bacteria that displayed antagonistic properties against different microorganisms were detected, but no obvious correlation was found between their frequencies with plant tissues or with plants from different growth regimes. This paper reports the first isolation of endophytic bacteria from a fern. PMID:24031575

  4. The effect of different growth regimes on the endophytic bacterial communities of the fern, Dicksonia sellowiana hook (Dicksoniaceae).

    PubMed

    de Araújo Barros, Irene; Luiz Araújo, Welington; Lúcio Azevedo, João

    2010-10-01

    Endophytic bacteria associated with the fern Dicksonia sellowiana were investigated. The bacterial communities from the surface-sterilized pinnae and rachis segments of the plants from the Brazilian Atlantic Rainforest that grew in native field conditions were compared with the bacterial communities from plants grown in greenhouses and plants that were initially grown in greenhouses and then transferred to the forest. From 540 pinnae and 540 rachis segments, 163 (30.2%) and 346 (64.2%) were colonized by bacteria, respectively. The main bacterial genera and species that were isolated included Bacillus spp. ( B. cereus, B. megaterium, B. pumilus and B. subtilis ) , Paenibacillus sp. , Amphibacillus sp. , Gracilibacillus sp. , Micrococcus sp. and Stenotrophomonas spp. ( S. maltophilia and S. nitroreducens ). B. pumilus was the most frequently isolated bacterial species . Amphibacillus and Gracilibacillus were reported as endophytes for the first time. Other commonly found bacterial genera were not observed in D. sellowiana , which may reflect preferences of specific bacterial communities inside this fern or detection limitations due to the isolation procedures. Plants that were grown in greenhouses and plants that were reintroduced into the forest displayed more bacterial genera and species diversity than native field plants, suggesting that reintroduction shifts the bacterial diversity. Endophytic bacteria that displayed antagonistic properties against different microorganisms were detected, but no obvious correlation was found between their frequencies with plant tissues or with plants from different growth regimes. This paper reports the first isolation of endophytic bacteria from a fern. PMID:24031575

  5. Silver-decorated orthorhombic nanotubes of lithium vanadium oxide: an impeder of bacterial growth and biofilm.

    PubMed

    Diggikar, Rahul S; Patil, Rajendra H; Kale, Sheetal B; Thombre, Dipalee K; Gade, Wasudeo N; Kulkarni, Milind V; Kale, Bharat B

    2013-09-01

    Reoccurrence of infectious diseases and ability of pathogens to resist antibacterial action has raised enormous challenges which may possibly be confronted by nanotechnology routes. In the present study, uniformly embedded silver nanoparticles in orthorhombic nanotubes of lithium vanadium oxide (LiV2O5/Ag) were explored as an impeder of bacterial growth and biofilm. The LiV2O5/Ag nanocomposites have impeded growth of Gram-positive Bacillus subtilis NCIM 2063 and Gram-negative Escherichia coli NCIM 2931 at 60 to 120 ?g/mL. It also impeded the biofilm in Pseudomonas aeruginosa NCIM 2948 at 12.5 to 25 ?g/mL. Impedance in the growth and biofilm occurs primarily by direct action of the nanocomposites on the cell surfaces of test organisms as revealed by surface perturbation in scanning electron microscopy. As the metabolic growth and biofilm formation phenomena of pathogens play a central role in progression of pathogenesis, LiV2O5/Ag nanocomposite-based approach is likely to curb the menace of reoccurrence of infectious diseases. Thus, LiV2O5/Ag nanocomposites can be viewed as a promising candidate in biofabrication of biomedical materials. PMID:23880876

  6. Bacterial growth in the cold: Evidence for an enhanced substrate requirement

    SciTech Connect

    Wiebe, W.J.; Sheldon, W.M. Jr.; Pomeroy, L.R. (Univ. of Georgia, Athens (United States))

    1992-01-01

    Growth responses and biovolume changes for four facultatively psychrophilic bacterial isolates from Conception Bay, Newfoundland, and the Arctic Ocean were examined at temperatures from {minus}1.5 to 35C, with substrate concentrations of 0.15, 1.5, and 1,500 mg of proteose peptone-yeast extract per liter. For two cultures, growth in 0.1, 1.0, and 1,000 mg of proline per liter was also examined. At 10 to 15C and above, growth rates showed no marked effect of substrate concentration, while at {minus}1.5 and 0C, there was an increasing requirement for organic nutrients, with generation times in low-nutrient media that were two to three times longer than in high-nutrient media. Biovolume showed a clear dependence on substrate concentration and quality; the largest cells were in the highest-nutrient media. Biovolume was also affected by temperature; the largest cells were found at the lowest temperatures. These data have implications for both food web structure and carbon flow in cold waters and for the effects of global climate change, since the change in growth rate is most dramatic at the lowest temperatures.

  7. Causal factors and consequences of parent involvement growth: the second-order latent growth curve model

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Varaporn Yamtim

    The purposes of this research were to 1) assess the training needs of teachers and parents in parent involvement and 3M principle roles (M1: moral supporter, M2: monitor, and M3: mentor), 2) investigate the results of the school-based training on the teachers' skills, and 3) examine the effects of causal factors and the consequences of the parent involvement growth on

  8. Determination of In Situ Bacterial Growth Rates in Aquifers and Aquifer Sediments

    PubMed Central

    Mailloux, Brian J.; Fuller, Mark E.

    2003-01-01

    Laboratory and field-scale studies with stained cells were performed to monitor cell growth in groundwater systems. During cell division, the fluorescence intensity of the protein stain 5-(and 6-)-carboxyfluorescein diacetate succinimidyl ester (CFDA/SE) for each cell is halved, and the intensity can be tracked with a flow cytometer. Two strains of bacteria, Comamonas sp. strain DA001 and Acidovorax sp. strain OY-107, both isolated from a shallow aquifer, were utilized in this study. The change in the average generation or the average fluorescence intensity of the CFDA/SE-stained cells could be used to obtain estimates of doubling times. In microcosm experiments, the CFDA/SE-based doubling times were similar to the values calculated by total cell counting and were independent of cell concentration. Intact and repacked sediment core experiments with the same bacteria indicated that changes in groundwater chemistry were just as important as growth rates in determining planktonic cell concentrations. The growth rates within the sediment cores were similar to those calculated in microcosm experiments, and preferential transport of the daughter cells was not observed. The experiments indicated that the growth rates could be determined in systems with cell losses due to other phenomena, such as attachment to sediment or predation. Application of this growth rate estimation method to data from a field-scale bacterial transport experiment indicated that the doubling time was approximately 15 days, which is the first known direct determination of an in situ growth rate for bacteria in an aquifer. PMID:12839747

  9. Effects of Assimilable Organic Carbon and Free Chlorine on Bacterial Growth in Drinking Water

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Tingting; Kong, Weiwen; He, Xiaoqing; Jin, Yi; Zhang, Bolin

    2015-01-01

    Assimilable organic carbon (AOC) is one of the most important factors affecting the re-growth of microorganisms in drinking water. High AOC concentrations result in biological instability, but disinfection kills microbes to ensure the safety of drinking water. Free chlorine is an important oxidizing agent used during the disinfection process. Therefore, we explored the combined effects of AOC and free chlorine on bacterial growth in drinking water using flow cytometry (FCM). The initial AOC concentration was 168 ?g.L-1 in all water samples. Without free chlorine, the concentrations of intact bacteria increased but the level of AOC decreased. The addition of sodium hypochlorite caused an increase and fluctuation in AOC due to the oxidation of organic carbon. The concentrations of intact bacteria decreased from 1.1×105 cells.mL-1 to 2.6×104 cells.mL-1 at an initial free chlorine dose of 0.6 mg.L-1 to 4.8×104 cells.mL-1 at an initial free chlorine dose of 0.3 mg.L-1 due to free chlorine originating from sodium hypochlorite. Additionally, free chlorine might be more obviously affected AOC concentrations than microbial growth did. These results suggested that AOC and free chlorine might have combined effects on microbial growth. In this study, our results showed concentrations determined by FCM were higher than those by HPC, which indicated that some E. coli detected by FCM might not be detected using HPC in drinking water. The level of free chlorine might restrain the consumption of AOC by inhibiting the growth of E. coli; on the other hand, chlorination might increase the level of AOC, thereby increase the potential for microbial growth in the drinking water network. PMID:26034988

  10. Agarose particle-templated porous bacterial cellulose and its application in cartilage growth in vitro.

    PubMed

    Yin, Na; Stilwell, Matthew D; Santos, Thiago M A; Wang, Huaping; Weibel, Douglas B

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial cellulose (BC) is a biocompatible hydrogel with a three-dimensional (3-D) structure formed by a dense network of cellulose nanofibers. A limitation of using BC for applications in tissue engineering is that the pore size of the material (?0.02-10?m) is smaller than the dimensions of mammalian cells and prevents cells from penetrating into the material and growing into 3-D structures that mimic tissues. This paper describes a new route to porous bacterial cellulose (pBC) scaffolds by cultivating Acetobacter xylinum in the presence of agarose microparticles deposited on the surface of a growing BC pellicle. Monodisperse agarose microparticles with a diameter of 300-500?m were created using a microfluidic technique, layered on growing BC pellicles and incorporated into the polymer as A. xylinum cells moved upward through the growing pellicle. Removing the agarose microparticles by autoclaving produced BC gels containing a continuous, interconnected network of pores with diameters ranging from 300 to 500?m. Human P1 chondrocytes seeded on the scaffolds, replicated, invaded the 3-D porous network and distributed evenly throughout the substrate. Chondrocytes grown on pBC substrates displayed a higher viability compared to growth on the surface of unmodified BC substrates. The approach described in this paper introduces a new method for creating pBC substrates with user-defined control over the physical dimensions of the pore network, and demonstrates the application of these materials for tissue engineering. PMID:25449918

  11. Changes in bacterial flora of Japanese cabbage during growth and potential source of flora.

    PubMed

    Izumi, Hidemi; Sera, Kaori

    2011-04-01

    Bacterial flora of cabbage were identified and enumerated during various stages of growth, and the potential sources of contamination in the field were determined. Bacterial counts increased from below the level of detection (2.4 log CFU/g) on seeds to 2.5 to 5.7 log CFU/g on seedlings. After transplanting, the counts of mesophilic aerobic bacteria on leaves decreased and then increased to 5.7 log CFU/g on outer leaves, 5.0 log CFU/g on middle leaves, and 3.0 log CFU/g on inner leaves at the harvesting stage. Counts of coliforms were below the level of detection during the growing period of the leaves. Bacteria isolated from cabbage seeds, seedlings, and leaves were soilborne organisms such as Bacillus, Curtobacterium, and Delftia and phytopathogenic organisms such as Pseudomonas, Pantoea, and Stenotrophomonas. These bacteria were found frequently in seeding machines, potting soil mix, soil, agricultural water, pesticide solutions mixed with the agricultural water, liquid fertilizers, and chemical fertilizers. Contamination from these environmental sites occurred throughout the cabbage growing period rather than only at the harvesting stage. These results indicate that use of clean water for irrigation and for mixing with pesticides and amendments from seeding to the harvesting stage is an important part of a good agricultural practices program for cabbage in Japan. PMID:21477482

  12. Effects of Gypsophila saponins on bacterial growth kinetics and on selection of subterranean clover rhizosphere bacteria.

    PubMed

    Fons, F; Amellal, N; Leyval, C; Saint-Martin, N; Henry, M

    2003-06-01

    Plant secondary metabolites, such as saponins, have a considerable impact in agriculture because of their allelopathic effects. They also affect the growth of soil microorganisms, especially fungi. We investigated the influence of saponins on rhizosphere bacteria in vitro and in soil conditions. The effects of gypsophila saponins on the growth kinetics of rhizosphere bacteria were studied by monitoring the absorbance of the cultures in microtiter plates. Gypsophila saponins (1%) increased the lag phase of bacterial growth. The impact of gypsophila saponins on subterranean clover rhizosphere was also investigated in a pot experiment. The addition of gypsophila saponins did not modify clover biomass but significantly increased (twofold with 1% saponins) the weight of adhering soil. The number of culturable heterotrophic bacteria of the clover rhizosphere was not affected by the addition of gypsophila saponins. Nevertheless, the phenotypical characterization of the dominant Gram-negative strains of the clover rhizosphere, using the Biolog system, showed qualitative and quantitative differences induced by 1% saponins. With the addition of saponins, the populations of Chryseomonas spp. and Acinetobacter spp., the two dominant culturable genera of control clover, were no longer detectable or were significantly decreased, while that of Aquaspirillum dispar increased and Aquaspirillum spp. became the major genus. Aquaspirillum dispar and Aquaspirillum spp. were also the dominant rhizosphere bacteria of Gypsophila paniculata, which greatly accumulates these saponins in its roots. These results suggest that saponins may control rhizosphere bacteria in soil through rhizodeposition mechanisms. PMID:14569290

  13. Response of the bacterial symbiont Holospora caryophila to different growth conditions of its host.

    PubMed

    Castelli, Michele; Lanzoni, Olivia; Fokin, Sergei I; Schrallhammer, Martina; Petroni, Giulio

    2015-02-01

    Previous studies on bacterial symbionts of ciliates have shown that some symbionts can be maintained relatively well under standard laboratory conditions whereas others are frequently lost, especially when the host is cultivated at a high division rate. In this study, the variation in infection level by the endosymbiont Holospora caryophila within its host population Paramecium octaurelia was investigated in response to three alimentary treatments and a subsequent starvation phase. The response of the ciliates was determined as a nearly exponential growth rate with different slopes in each treatment, proportional to the amount of food received. The initial infection level was higher than 90%. After 24 days of exponential host's growth, the prevalence remained stable at approximately 90% in all treatments, even after a subsequent starvation phase of 20 days. However, at intermediate time-points in both the feeding and the starvation phase, fluctuations in the presence of the intracellular bacteria were observed. These results show that H. caryophila is able to maintain its infection under the tested range of host growth conditions, also due to the possibility of an effective re-infection in case of partial loss. PMID:25635695

  14. Molecular mechanisms for the evolution of bacterial morphologies and growth modes

    PubMed Central

    Randich, Amelia M.; Brun, Yves V.

    2015-01-01

    Bacteria exhibit a rich diversity of morphologies. Within this diversity, there is a uniformity of shape for each species that is replicated faithfully each generation, suggesting that bacterial shape is as selectable as any other biochemical adaptation. We describe the spatiotemporal mechanisms that target peptidoglycan synthesis to different subcellular zones to generate the rod-shape of model organisms Escherichia coli and Bacillus subtilis. We then demonstrate, using the related genera Caulobacter and Asticcacaulis as examples, how the modularity of the core components of the peptidoglycan synthesis machinery permits repositioning of the machinery to achieve different growth modes and morphologies. Finally, we highlight cases in which the mechanisms that underlie morphological evolution are beginning to be understood, and how they depend upon the expansion and diversification of the core components of the peptidoglycan synthesis machinery.

  15. Determining Cloud Parameters with the Curve-Of-Growth: Application Eta Car

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vieira, G. L.; Gull, T. R.; Bruhweiler, F.; Nielsen, K. E.; Verner, E. M.

    2004-01-01

    We have investigated the NUV part of the Eta Car spectrum, using data with high spatial and high spectral resolving power obtained with the HST/STIS under the Treasury Program. The NUV spectrum of Eta Car Shows a great contribution of absorption features from neutral and singly ionized elements along the line-of-sight. A large number of velocity systems have been observed. The two most prominent, with Doppler shifts corresponding to -146 and -513 km/s respectively, are shown to be useful for investigations of the gaseous environments responsible for the absorption. The -146 and the -513 km/s velocity systems display different characteristics regarding the ionization state and spectral line width, which suggest that they originate at different distances from the central object. We have investigated the absorption structures before the spectroscopic minimum, occurring during the summer of 2003, with a standard curve-of-growth. We have independently derived the column density and the b-value for the Fe II (-146 km/s) and Ti II (-513 km/s) velocity systems. The excitation temperature has been determined for the -146 km/s velocity system using the photo-ionization code \\textsc(cloudy). The -146 km/s velocity structure shows noticeable variation over the spectroscopic minimum. The sudden appearance and disappearance of Ti II and V II are astonishing. We have made an attempt to analyze these variations with the curve-of-growth method and will present preliminary results.

  16. Effects of Engineered Cerium Oxide Nanoparticles on Bacterial Growth and Viability?†

    PubMed Central

    Pelletier, Dale A.; Suresh, Anil K.; Holton, Gregory A.; McKeown, Catherine K.; Wang, Wei; Gu, Baohua; Mortensen, Ninell P.; Allison, David P.; Joy, David C.; Allison, Martin R.; Brown, Steven D.; Phelps, Tommy J.; Doktycz, Mitchel J.

    2010-01-01

    Interest in engineered nanostructures has risen in recent years due to their use in energy conservation strategies and biomedicine. To ensure prudent development and use of nanomaterials, the fate and effects of such engineered structures on the environment should be understood. Interactions of nanomaterials with environmental microorganisms are inevitable, but the general consequences of such interactions remain unclear, due to a lack of standard methods for assessing such interactions. Therefore, we have initiated a multianalytical approach to understand the interactions of synthesized nanoparticles with bacterial systems. These efforts are focused initially on cerium oxide nanoparticles and model bacteria in order to evaluate characterization procedures and the possible fate of such materials in the environment. The growth and viability of the Gram-negative species Escherichia coli and Shewanella oneidensis, a metal-reducing bacterium, and the Gram-positive species Bacillus subtilis were examined relative to cerium oxide particle size, growth media, pH, and dosage. A hydrothermal synthesis approach was used to prepare cerium oxide nanoparticles of defined sizes in order to eliminate complications originating from the use of organic solvents and surfactants. Bactericidal effects were determined from MIC and CFU measurements, disk diffusion tests, and live/dead assays. For E. coli and B. subtilis, clear strain- and size-dependent inhibition was observed, whereas S. oneidensis appeared to be unaffected by the particles. Transmission electron microscopy along with microarray-based transcriptional profiling was used to understand the response mechanism of the bacteria. Use of multiple analytical approaches adds confidence to toxicity assessments, while the use of different bacterial systems highlights the potential wide-ranging effects of nanomaterial interactions in the environment. PMID:20952651

  17. Nanoscale imaging of the growth and division of bacterial cells on planar substrates with the atomic force microscope.

    PubMed

    Van Der Hofstadt, M; Hüttener, M; Juárez, A; Gomila, G

    2015-07-01

    With the use of the atomic force microscope (AFM), the Nanomicrobiology field has advanced drastically. Due to the complexity of imaging living bacterial processes in their natural growing environments, improvements have come to a standstill. Here we show the in situ nanoscale imaging of the growth and division of single bacterial cells on planar substrates with the atomic force microscope. To achieve this, we minimized the lateral shear forces responsible for the detachment of weakly adsorbed bacteria on planar substrates with the use of the so called dynamic jumping mode with very soft cantilever probes. With this approach, gentle imaging conditions can be maintained for long periods of time, enabling the continuous imaging of the bacterial cell growth and division, even on planar substrates. Present results offer the possibility to observe living processes of untrapped bacteria weakly attached to planar substrates. PMID:25791909

  18. Effects of inoculation with PGPR Bacillus and Pisolithus tinctorius on Pinus pinea L. growth, bacterial rhizosphere colonization, and mycorrhizal infection

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. Probanza; J. L. Mateos; J. A. Lucas Garcia; B. Ramos; M. R. de Felipe; F. J. Gutierrez Manero

    2001-01-01

    The effect of co-inoculation with Pisolithus tinctorius and a PGPR belonging to the genus Bacillus (Bacillus licheniformis CECT 5106 and Bacillus pumilus CECT 5105) in enhancing growth of Pinus pinea plants and the changes that occurred in rhizosphere microbial communities and the degree of mycorrhization were evaluated.\\u000a Both bacterial strains of Bacillus promote the growth of Pinus pinea seedlings, but

  19. Effects of pH, Nitrite, and Ascorbic Acid on Nonenzymatic Nitric Oxide Generation and Bacterial Growth in Urine

    Microsoft Academic Search

    S. Carlsson; N. P. Wiklund; L. Engstrand; E. Weitzberg; J. O. N. Lundberg

    2001-01-01

    Nitrite may be generated by bacteria in urine during urinary tract infections. Acidification of nitrite results in the formation of nitric oxide (NO) and other reactive nitrogen oxides, which are toxic to a variety of microorganisms. We have studied NO formation and bacterial growth in mildly acidified human urine containing nitrite and the reducing agent vitamin C. Urine collected from

  20. Development and validation of a liquid chromatography - mass spectrometry assay for polymyxin B in bacterial growth media

    PubMed Central

    Cheah, Soon-Ee; Bulitta, Jurgen B.; Li, Jian; Nation, Roger L.

    2014-01-01

    There is increasing interest in the optimization of polymyxin B dosing regimens to treat infections caused by multidrug-resistant Gram-negative bacteria. We aimed to develop and validate a liquid chromatography - single quadrupole mass spectrometry (LC-MS) method to quantify polymyxin B in two growth media commonly used in in vitro pharmacodynamic studies, cation-adjusted Mueller-Hinton and tryptone soya broth. Samples were pre-treated with sodium hydroxide (1.0 M) and formic acid in acetonitrile (1:100, v/v) before analysis. The summed peak areas of polymyxin B1 and B2 relative to the summed peak areas of colistin A and B (internal standard) were used to quantify polymyxin B. Quality control samples were prepared and analyzed to assess the intra- and inter-day accuracy and precision. The robustness of the assay in the presence of bacteria and commonly co-administered antibiotics (rifampicin, doripenem, imipenem, cefepime and tigecycline) was also examined. Chromatographic separation was achieved with retention times of approximately 9.7 min for polymyxin B2 and 10.4 min for polymyxin B1. Calibration curves were linear between 0.103 and 6.60 mg/L. Accuracy (% relative error) and precision (% coefficient of variation), pooled for all assay days and matrices (n=84), were ?6.85% (8.17%) at 0.248 mg/L, 1.73% (6.15%) at 2.48 mg/L and 1.54% (5.49%) at 4.95 mg/L, and within acceptable ranges at all concentrations examined. Further, the presence of high bacterial concentrations or of commonly co-administered antibiotics in the samples did not affect the assay. The accuracy, precision and cost-efficiency of the assay make it ideally suited to quantifying polymyxin B in samples from in vitro pharmacodynamic models. PMID:24530981

  1. Bacterial and fungal growth for monitoring the impact of wildfire combined or not with different soil stabilization treatments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barreiro, Ana; Baath, Erland; Díaz-Raviña, Montserrat

    2015-04-01

    Soil stabilization techniques are rapidly gaining acceptance as efficient tool for reducing post-fire erosion. However, despite its interest, information concerning their impact on soil biota is scarce. We examined, under field conditions, the bacterial and fungal medium-term responses in a hillslope area located in Laza (NW Spain) affected by a high severity wildfire with the following treatments established by triplicate (4 x 20 m plots): unburnt control soil, burnt control soil, burnt soil with rye seeding and burnt soil with straw mulch. The bacterial and fungal growth, as well as respiration, were measured 4 years after fire and application of treatments using leucine incorporation for bacterial growth and acetate-in-ergosterol incorporation for fungal growth. The results showed that soil respiration and fungal biomass were negatively affected by fire, in the top layer (0-5 cm), while bacterial and fungal growth was stimulated. These microbial changes induced by fire were associated with modifications in organic matter (50% reduction in C content) and soil pH (increase of 0.5-0.9 units). Thus, the results suggested that under acid environment (pH in water 3.5) post-fire conditions might have favoured both microbial groups, which is supported by the fact that estimated bacterial and fungal growth were positive and significant correlated with soil pH (range of 3.5-4.5). This contrast with the well-known reported investigations showing that bacteria rather than fungi proliferation occurred after prescribed fire or wildfire; it should be noticed, however, that soils with a higher pH than that in the present study were used. Our data also indicated that bacterial and fungal communities were not significantly affected by seeding and mulching treatments. The results highlighted the importance of pre-fire soil pH as key factor in determining the microbial response after fire. Acknowledgements. A. Barreiro is recipient of FPU grant from Spanish Ministry of Education. Keywords: wildfire, seeding, mulching, bacterial growth, fungal growth

  2. Secreted Pyomelanin of Legionella pneumophila Promotes Bacterial Iron Uptake and Growth under Iron-Limiting Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Huaixin; Chatfield, Christa H.; Liles, Mark R.

    2013-01-01

    Iron acquisition is critical to the growth and virulence of Legionella pneumophila. Previously, we found that L. pneumophila uses both a ferrisiderophore pathway and ferrous iron transport to obtain iron. We now report that two molecules secreted by L. pneumophila, homogentisic acid (HGA) and its polymerized variant (HGA-melanin, a pyomelanin), are able to directly mediate the reduction of various ferric iron salts. Furthermore, HGA, synthetic HGA-melanin, and HGA-melanin derived from bacterial supernatants enhanced the ability of L. pneumophila and other species of Legionella to take up radiolabeled iron. Enhanced iron uptake was not observed with a ferrous iron transport mutant. Thus, HGA and HGA-melanin mediate ferric iron reduction, with the resulting ferrous iron being available to the bacterium for uptake. Upon further testing of L. pneumophila culture supernatants, we found that significant amounts of ferric and ferrous iron were associated with secreted HGA-melanin. Importantly, a pyomelanin-containing fraction obtained from a wild-type culture supernatant was able to stimulate the growth of iron-starved legionellae. That the corresponding supernatant fraction obtained from a nonpigmented mutant culture did not stimulate growth demonstrated that HGA-melanin is able to both promote iron uptake and enhance growth under iron-limiting conditions. Indicative of a complementary role in iron acquisition, HGA-melanin levels were inversely related to the levels of siderophore activity. Compatible with a role in the ecology and pathogenesis of L. pneumophila, HGA and HGA-melanin were effective at reducing and releasing iron from both insoluble ferric hydroxide and the mammalian iron chelates ferritin and transferrin. PMID:23980114

  3. Production of fungal and bacterial growth modulating secondary metabolites is widespread among mycorrhiza-associated streptomycetes

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Studies on mycorrhiza associated bacteria suggest that bacterial-fungal interactions play important roles during mycorrhiza formation and affect plant health. We surveyed Streptomyces Actinobacteria, known as antibiotic producers and antagonists of fungi, from Norway spruce mycorrhizas with predominantly Piloderma species as the fungal partner. Results Fifteen Streptomyces isolates exhibited substantial variation in inhibition of tested mycorrhizal and plant pathogenic fungi (Amanita muscaria, Fusarium oxysporum, Hebeloma cylindrosporum, Heterobasidion abietinum, Heterobasidion annosum, Laccaria bicolor, Piloderma croceum). The growth of the mycorrhiza-forming fungus Laccaria bicolor was stimulated by some of the streptomycetes, and Piloderma croceum was only moderately affected. Bacteria responded to the streptomycetes differently than the fungi. For instance the strain Streptomyces sp. AcM11, which inhibited most tested fungi, was less inhibitory to bacteria than other tested streptomycetes. The determined patterns of Streptomyces-microbe interactions were associated with distinct patterns of secondary metabolite production. Notably, potentially novel metabolites were produced by strains that were less antagonistic to fungi. Most of the identified metabolites were antibiotics (e.g. cycloheximide, actiphenol) and siderophores (e.g. ferulic acid, desferroxiamines). Plant disease resistance was activated by a single streptomycete strain only. Conclusions Mycorrhiza associated streptomycetes appear to have an important role in inhibiting the growth of fungi and bacteria. Additionally, our study indicates that the Streptomyces strains, which are not general antagonists of fungi, may produce still un-described metabolites. PMID:22852578

  4. A new model for the spectral induced polarization signature of bacterial growth in porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Revil, A.; Atekwana, E.; Zhang, C.; Jardani, A.; Smith, S.

    2012-09-01

    The complex conductivity of porous materials and colloidal suspensions comprises two components: an in-phase conductivity associated with electromigration of the charge carriers and a quadrature conductivity associated with the reversible storage of the charges at some polarization length scales. We developed a quantitative model to investigate the frequency domain induced polarization response of suspensions of bacteria and bacteria growth in porous media. Induced polarization of bacteria (? polarization) is related to the properties of the electrical double layer of the bacteria. Surface conductivity and ? polarization are due to the Stern layer of counterions occurring in a brush of polymers coating the surface of the bacteria. These phenomena can be related to their cation exchange capacity. The mobility of the counterions in this Stern layer is found to be very small (4.7 × 10-10 m2 s-1 V-1 at 25°C). This implies a very low relaxation frequency for the ?polarization of the bacteria cells (typically around 0.1-5 Hz), in agreement with experimental observations. This new model can be coupled to reactive transport modeling codes in which the evolution of bacterial populations are usually described by Monod kinetics. We show that the growth rate and endogenous decay coefficients of bacteria in a porous sand can be inferred nonintrusively from time-lapse frequency domain induced polarization data.

  5. Btcd, a mouse protein that binds to curved DNA, can substitute in Escherichia coli for H-NS, a bacterial nucleoid protein.

    PubMed Central

    Timchenko, T; Bailone, A; Devoret, R

    1996-01-01

    In an Escherichia coli mutant devoid of H-NS, a bacterial nucleoid protein, mouse protein Btcd was able to substitute for H-NS in two tested functions. It restored cell motility and repression of the expression of the bgl operon. Btcd1, a mutant Btcd protein deleted of its zinc finger and thus having reduced DNA binding, failed to substitute for H-NS. Mouse protein Btcd was shown to repress the bgl operon at the level of transcription initiation and to bind preferentially to a curved DNA fragment encompassing the bgl promoter. These effects of Btcd on bacterial gene transcription can be accounted for by the binding of Btcd or H-NS to a curved DNA sequence near a promoter. A few mammalian proteins have been shown to substitute for their Escherichia prototypes involved in DNA and RNA transactions. The efficiency of Btcd protein in substituting for H-NS in Escherichia suggests its possible involvement in regulating gene expression in mouse cells. Images PMID:8670903

  6. Ice formation and growth shape bacterial community structure in Baltic Sea drift ice.

    PubMed

    Eronen-Rasimus, Eeva; Lyra, Christina; Rintala, Janne-Markus; Jürgens, Klaus; Ikonen, Vilma; Kaartokallio, Hermanni

    2015-02-01

    Drift ice, open water and under-ice water bacterial communities covering several developmental stages from open water to thick ice were studied in the northern Baltic Sea. The bacterial communities were assessed with 16S rRNA gene terminal-restriction fragment length polymorphism and cloning, together with bacterial abundance and production measurements. In the early stages, open water and pancake ice were dominated by Alphaproteobacteria and Actinobacteria, which are common bacterial groups in Baltic Sea wintertime surface waters. The pancake ice bacterial communities were similar to the open-water communities, suggesting that the parent water determines the sea-ice bacterial community in the early stages of sea-ice formation. In consolidated young and thick ice, the bacterial communities were significantly different from water bacterial communities as well as from each other, indicating community development in Baltic Sea drift ice along with ice-type changes. The thick ice was dominated by typical sea-ice genera from classes Flavobacteria and Gammaproteobacteria, similar to those in polar sea-ice bacterial communities. Since the thick ice bacterial community was remarkably different from that of the parent seawater, results indicate that thick ice bacterial communities were recruited from the rarer members of the seawater bacterial community. PMID:25764550

  7. Hormone-Dependent Bacterial Growth, Persistence and Biofilm Formation – A Pilot Study Investigating Human Follicular Fluid Collected during IVF Cycles

    PubMed Central

    Pelzer, Elise S.; Allan, John A.; Theodoropoulos, Christina; Ross, Tara; Beagley, Kenneth W.; Knox, Christine L.

    2012-01-01

    Human follicular fluid, considered sterile, is aspirated as part of an in vitro fertilization (IVF) cycle. However, it is easily contaminated by the trans-vaginal collection route and little information exists in its potential to support the growth of microorganisms. The objectives of this study were to determine whether human follicular fluid can support bacterial growth over time, whether the steroid hormones estradiol and progesterone (present at high levels within follicular fluid) contribute to the in vitro growth of bacterial species, and whether species isolated from follicular fluid form biofilms. We found that bacteria in follicular fluid could persist for at least 28 weeks in vitro and that the steroid hormones stimulated the growth of some bacterial species, specifically Lactobacillus spp., Bifidobacterium spp. Streptococcus spp. and E. coli. Several species, Lactobacillus spp., Propionibacterium spp., and Streptococcus spp., formed biofilms when incubated in native follicular fluids in vitro (18/24, 75%). We conclude that bacteria aspirated along with follicular fluid during IVF cycles demonstrate a persistent pattern of growth. This discovery is important since it can offer a new avenue for investigation in infertile couples. PMID:23226503

  8. Acetate Availability and Utilization Supports the Growth of Mutant Sub-Populations on Aging Bacterial Colonies

    PubMed Central

    Bergman, Jessica M.; Wrande, Marie; Hughes, Diarmaid

    2014-01-01

    When bacterial colonies age most cells enter a stationary phase, but sub-populations of mutant bacteria can continue to grow and accumulate. These sub-populations include bacteria with mutations in rpoB (RNA polymerase ?-subunit) or rpoS (RNA polymerase stress-response sigma factor). Here we have identified acetate as a nutrient present in the aging colonies that is utilized by these mutant subpopulations to support their continued growth. Proteome analysis of aging colonies showed that several proteins involved in acetate conversion and utilization were upregulated during aging. Acetate is known to be excreted during the exponential growth phase but can be imported later during the transition to stationary phase and converted to acetyl-CoA. Acetyl-CoA is used in multiple processes, including feeding into the TCA cycle, generating ATP via the glyoxylate shunt, as a source of acetyl groups for protein modification, and to support fatty acid biosynthesis. We showed that deletion of acs (encodes acetyl-CoA synthetase; converts acetate into acetyl-CoA) significantly reduced the accumulation of rpoB and rpoS mutant subpopulations on aging colonies. Measurement of radioactive acetate uptake showed that the rate of conversion decreased in aging wild-type colonies, was maintained at a constant level in the rpoB mutant, and significantly increased in the aging rpoS mutant. Finally, we showed that the growth of subpopulations on aging colonies was greatly enhanced if the aging colony itself was unable to utilize acetate, leaving more acetate available for mutant subpopulations to use. Accordingly, the data show that the accumulation of subpopulations of rpoB and rpoS mutants on aging colonies is supported by the availability in the aging colony of acetate, and by the ability of the subpopulation cells to convert the acetate to acetyl-CoA. PMID:25275605

  9. Latent growth curve analyses of peer and parent influences on smoking progression among early adolescents.

    PubMed

    Simons-Morton, Bruce; Chen, Rusan; Abroms, Lorien; Haynie, Denise L

    2004-11-01

    Social influences on smoking uptake were examined in latent growth curve analyses of data from 1,320 youths assessed 5 times during 6th to 9th grade. Initial smoking stage predicted increases in number of friends who smoked, indicating selection; however, initial number of friends who smoked did not predict smoking stage progression, indicating no significant effect of socialization. Associations over time among smoking stage progression, affiliation with friends who smoke, and parenting behaviors were significant, suggesting dynamic, reciprocal relationships. Parental involvement, monitoring, and expectations provided direct protective effects against smoking progression as well as indirect effects, by limiting increases in number of friends who smoke. These results are consistent with the peer selection hypothesis, confirm the powerful association over time of social influences with smoking, and provide the first evidence that parenting behavior may protect against smoking progression by limiting increases in number of friends who smoke. PMID:15546229

  10. Ex Vivo - Growth Response of Porcine Small Intestinal Bacterial Communities to Pharmacological Doses of Dietary Zinc Oxide

    PubMed Central

    Starke, Ingo C.; Zentek, Jürgen; Vahjen, Wilfried

    2013-01-01

    Piglets were fed diets containing 57 (low) or 2425 (high) mg zinc from analytical grade zinc oxide (ZnO) ·kg?1 feed. Digesta samples from the stomach and jejuna of 32, 39, 46 and 53 d old animals (n ?=?6 per group) were incubated in media containing 80, 40, 20 and 0 µg·mL?1 soluble zinc from ZnO. Turbidity was recorded for 16 h and growth parameters were calculated. Additionally, DNA extracts of selected samples were analyzed via qPCR for different bacterial groups. Samples from animals fed the low dietary zinc concentration always showed highest rate of growth and lowest lag times in media without added zinc. However, media supplemented with zinc displayed highest growth rates and lowest lag time in the high dietary zinc group. Specific growth rates and lag time showed significant differences on day 32 and 39 of age, but rarely on days 46 and 53 of age. Bacterial growth in digesta samples from the high dietary zinc group was less influenced by zinc and recovered growth more rapidly than in the low dietary zinc group. Specific growth rates and bacterial cell numbers from qPCR results showed that lactobacilli were most susceptible to zinc, while bifidobacteria, enterobacteria and enterococci exhibited increased growth rates in samples of animals from the high dietary zinc treatment. No treatment related differences were observed for clostridial cluster IV and the Bacteroides-Prevotella-Porphyromonas cluster. The diversity of enterobacteria after incubation was always higher in the high dietary zinc treatment or in medium supplemented with 80 µg·mL?1 soluble ZnO. This study has shown that a pharmacological dosage of ZnO leads to a reduced ex vivo- bacterial growth rate of bacteria from the stomach and jejunum of weaned piglets. In view of the rapid bacterial adaptation to dietary zinc, the administration of ZnO in feeds for weaned piglets might only be beneficial in a short period after weaning. PMID:23441186

  11. The effect of pH on the inhibition of bacterial growth by physiological concentrations of butyric acid: Implications for neonates fed on suckled milk

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Cynthia Q Sun; Charmian J O'Connor; Susan J Turner; Gillian D Lewis; Roger A Stanley; Anthony M Roberton

    1998-01-01

    Butyric acid is released from milk by pre-intestinal lipases during suckling. It is also known to inhibit bacterial growth. To investigate whether butyric acid may be a significant factor in controlling bacterial growth in the stomach of pre-weaned animals, the ability of butyric acid to inhibit growth of selected bacteria was tested over physiological ranges of pH and butyric acid

  12. Bacterial growth and biofilm formation in household-stored groundwater collected from public wells.

    PubMed

    Burkowska-But, Aleksandra; Kalwasi?ska, Agnieszka; Swiontek Brzezinska, Maria

    2015-06-01

    The research was aimed at assessing changes in the number of bacteria and evaluating biofilm formation in groundwater collected from public wells, both aspects directly related to the methods of household storage. In the research, water collected from Cretaceous aquifer wells in Toru? (Poland) was stored in a refrigerator and at room temperature. Microbiological parameters of the water were measured immediately after the water collection, and then after 3 and 7 days of storage under specified conditions. The microbiological examination involved determining the number of heterotrophic bacteria capable of growth at 22 and 37 °C, the number of spore-forming bacteria, and the total number of bacteria on membrane filters. The storage may affect water quality to such an extent that the water, which initially met the microbiological criteria for water intended for human consumption, may pose a health risk. The repeated use of the same containers for water storage results in biofilm formation containing live and metabolically active bacterial cells. PMID:26042968

  13. Developmental changes in group climate in two types of group therapy for binge-eating disorder: A growth curve analysis

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Giorgio A. Tasca; Louise Balfour; Kerri Ritchie; Hany Bissada

    2006-01-01

    The development of group climate across 16 sessions of group psychodynamic–interpersonal psychotherapy (GPIP) and group cognitive–behavioral therapy (GCBT) for 65 female treatment completers with binge-eating disorder (BED) was assessed. Engaged scale growth for GPIP patients varied across sessions and was best represented by a cubic growth curve. This suggested that GPIP progressed in definable phases that reflected a rupture and

  14. Soil bacterial diversity responses to root colonization by an ectomycorrhizal fungus are not root-growth-dependent.

    PubMed

    Assigbetse, Komi; Gueye, Mariama; Thioulouse, Jean; Duponnois, Robin

    2005-10-01

    The hypothesis tested in this present study was that the ectomycorrhizosphere effect on the bacterial community was not root-growth-dependent. The impacts of ectomycorrhizal infection (Pisolithus albus COI007) and a chemical fertilization to reproduce the fungal effect on root growth were examined on (1) the structure of bacterial community and (2) fluorescent pseudomonad and actinomycete populations in the mycorrhizosphere of Acacia auriculiformis using both culture-independent and culture-dependent methods. A. auriculiformis plants were grown in disinfested soil in pots with or without addition of the ectomycorrhizal fungus or N/P/K fertilization (to reproduce the fungal effect on root growth) for 4 months and then transferred to 20-L pots filled with nondisinfested sandy soil. The fungal and fertilizer applications significantly improved the plant growth after 4-month culture in the disinfested soil. In the nondisinfested cultural substrate, these positive effects on plant growth were maintained. The total soil microbiota was significantly different within the treatments as revealed from DNA analysis [denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE)]. The structure of fluorescent pseudomonad populations was also affected by fungal and fertilizer applications. In contrast, no qualitative effect was observed for the actinomycete communities within each treatment, but fungal inoculation significantly decreased the number of actinomycetes compared to the fertilizer application treatment. These results show that the mycorrhizosphere effect is not root-growth-dependent but is mainly due to the presence of the ectomycorrhizal fungus and more particularly to the extramatrical mycelium. PMID:16254760

  15. Discrete cyclic di-GMP-dependent control of bacterial predation versus axenic growth in Bdellovibrio bacteriovorus.

    PubMed

    Hobley, Laura; Fung, Rowena K Y; Lambert, Carey; Harris, Maximilian A T S; Dabhi, Jayesh M; King, Simon S; Basford, Sarah M; Uchida, Kaoru; Till, Robert; Ahmad, Rashidah; Aizawa, Shin-Ichi; Gomelsky, Mark; Sockett, R Elizabeth

    2012-02-01

    Bdellovibrio bacteriovorus is a Delta-proteobacterium that oscillates between free-living growth and predation on Gram-negative bacteria including important pathogens of man, animals and plants. After entering the prey periplasm, killing the prey and replicating inside the prey bdelloplast, several motile B. bacteriovorus progeny cells emerge. The B. bacteriovorus HD100 genome encodes numerous proteins predicted to be involved in signalling via the secondary messenger cyclic di-GMP (c-di-GMP), which is known to affect bacterial lifestyle choices. We investigated the role of c-di-GMP signalling in B. bacteriovorus, focussing on the five GGDEF domain proteins that are predicted to function as diguanylyl cyclases initiating c-di-GMP signalling cascades. Inactivation of individual GGDEF domain genes resulted in remarkably distinct phenotypes. Deletion of dgcB (Bd0742) resulted in a predation impaired, obligately axenic mutant, while deletion of dgcC (Bd1434) resulted in the opposite, obligately predatory mutant. Deletion of dgcA (Bd0367) abolished gliding motility, producing bacteria capable of predatory invasion but unable to leave the exhausted prey. Complementation was achieved with wild type dgc genes, but not with GGAAF versions. Deletion of cdgA (Bd3125) substantially slowed predation; this was restored by wild type complementation. Deletion of dgcD (Bd3766) had no observable phenotype. In vitro assays showed that DgcA, DgcB, and DgcC were diguanylyl cyclases. CdgA lacks enzymatic activity but functions as a c-di-GMP receptor apparently in the DgcB pathway. Activity of DgcD was not detected. Deletion of DgcA strongly decreased the extractable c-di-GMP content of axenic Bdellovibrio cells. We show that c-di-GMP signalling pathways are essential for both the free-living and predatory lifestyles of B. bacteriovorus and that obligately predatory dgcC- can be made lacking a propensity to survive without predation of bacterial pathogens and thus possibly useful in anti-pathogen applications. In contrast to many studies in other bacteria, Bdellovibrio shows specificity and lack of overlap in c-di-GMP signalling pathways. PMID:22319440

  16. APPLICATION OF ULTRA-VIOLET RADIATION TO CONTROL BACTERIAL GROWTH IN THE RO FEED WATER FROM NANOFILTRATION MEMBRANES1

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Hassan A. Munshi; Mohamed O. Saeed; Troy N. Green; Ali A. Al-Hamza; Mohammad Farooque; Rahim A. Ismail

    2001-01-01

    SUMMARY The study was carried out to evaluate the effectiveness of UV treatment on bacterial growth in a NF-SWRO Pilot Plant at Al-Jubail. The study was divided into five phases: (i) regular operation stage (without UV), (ii) operation under UV-radiation at raw seawater (RSW) inlet, (iii) plant operation under UV- radiation at RSW inlet and up-stream of NF membrane, at

  17. Application of an extended Kalman filter in a feedback control of a generalized nonlinear bacterial growth system

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Chun-Yao Lien; Tse-Wei Wang

    1988-01-01

    In previous work by T.W. Wang et al. (1987) the robust multivariable linear quadratic Gaussian\\/loop transfer recovery (LQG\\/LTR) control design methodology was used in designing for the control of the linearized version of a generalized nonlinear bacterial growth system. Here, the effect of applying an extended Kalman filter (EKF) in conjunction with the same linear feedback regulator in the control

  18. Enhancing the Psychological Well-Being of Elderly Individuals through Tai Chi Exercise: A Latent Growth Curve Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Li, Fuzhong; Duncan, Terry E.; Duncan, Susan C.; McAuley, Edward; Chaumeton, Nigel R.; Harmer, Peter

    2001-01-01

    Examined whether a Tai Chi exercise program enhanced the psychological well-being of 98 elderly individuals. Analyzed repeated measures data about participants using latent growth curve analysis. Results indicate the beneficial effects of participation in the Tai Chi program. Discusses implications related to the exercise-psychological health…

  19. Modeling Latent Growth Curves With Incomplete Data Using Different Types of Structural Equation Modeling and Multilevel Software

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ferrer, Emilio; Hamagami, Fumiaki; McArdle, John J.

    2004-01-01

    This article offers different examples of how to fit latent growth curve (LGC) models to longitudinal data using a variety of different software programs (i.e., LISREL, Mx, Mplus, AMOS, SAS). The article shows how the same model can be fitted using both structural equation modeling and multilevel software, with nearly identical results, even in…

  20. Soil data and the shape of the lichen growth-rate curve for the Mt Cook area (Note)

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Peter W. Birkeland

    1981-01-01

    The Rhizocarpon geographicum growth-rate curve for the Mt Cook area, South Island, New Zealand, has been depicted as being linear with time. However, soil data from the 1890 and 1850 moraines suggest that more than 40 years is required to explain the marked difference between the 2 soils. Hence, it is suggested that the “1850” moraine may be older than

  1. Examining the Earnings Trajectories of Community College Students Using a Piecewise Growth Curve Modeling Approach. A CAPSEE Working Paper

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jaggars, Shanna Smith; Xu, Di

    2015-01-01

    Policymakers have become increasingly concerned with measuring--and holding colleges accountable for--students' labor market outcomes. In this paper we introduce a piecewise growth curve approach to analyzing community college students' labor market outcomes, and we discuss how this approach differs from Mincerian and fixed-effects approaches. Our…

  2. A Model to Explain Plant Growth Promotion Traits: A Multivariate Analysis of 2,211 Bacterial Isolates

    PubMed Central

    da Costa, Pedro Beschoren; Granada, Camille E.; Ambrosini, Adriana; Moreira, Fernanda; de Souza, Rocheli; dos Passos, João Frederico M.; Arruda, Letícia; Passaglia, Luciane M. P.

    2014-01-01

    Plant growth-promoting bacteria can greatly assist sustainable farming by improving plant health and biomass while reducing fertilizer use. The plant-microorganism-environment interaction is an open and complex system, and despite the active research in the area, patterns in root ecology are elusive. Here, we simultaneously analyzed the plant growth-promoting bacteria datasets from seven independent studies that shared a methodology for bioprospection and phenotype screening. The soil richness of the isolate's origin was classified by a Principal Component Analysis. A Categorical Principal Component Analysis was used to classify the soil richness according to isolate's indolic compound production, siderophores production and phosphate solubilization abilities, and bacterial genera composition. Multiple patterns and relationships were found and verified with nonparametric hypothesis testing. Including niche colonization in the analysis, we proposed a model to explain the expression of bacterial plant growth-promoting traits according to the soil nutritional status. Our model shows that plants favor interaction with growth hormone producers under rich nutrient conditions but favor nutrient solubilizers under poor conditions. We also performed several comparisons among the different genera, highlighting interesting ecological interactions and limitations. Our model could be used to direct plant growth-promoting bacteria bioprospection and metagenomic sampling. PMID:25542031

  3. Analysis of growth curve parameters of Gobra zebu females in Senegal.

    PubMed

    Abassa, K P

    1987-11-01

    Analysis of growth curve parameters was performed using body weight data collected from 1968 through 1980 at Dahra Research Station, Senegal. Month of birth had little or no effect on mature size and maturing rate. Females born from mid-wet through mid-dry seasons were likely to reach lighter mature weights than those born from mid-dry through mid-wet seasons. Year of birth affected both mature weight and maturing rate (P less than 0.01 and P less than 0.001 respectively). Sire had effects (P less than 0.05) on maturing rate and no effect on mature size. Genetic correlations between maturing rate and body weights at birth, weaning, 12 and 18 months were 0.45 +/- 0.51, -0.21 +/- 0.52, -0.61 +/- 0.57 and -0.76 +/- 0.51 respectively. Selection for maturing rate in Gobra females would be expected to decrease weaning and post-weaning weights. The least squares means of mature size and maturing rate were 398.83 +/- 45.81 kg and 0.187% per day respectively. Gobra zebu females were about 50 and 99% mature at about 12 and 87.6 months respectively. PMID:3424450

  4. Self-Regulation and Recall: Growth Curve Modeling of Intervention Outcomes for Older Adults

    PubMed Central

    West, Robin L.; Hastings, Erin C.

    2013-01-01

    Memory training has often been supported as a potential means to improve performance for older adults. Less often studied are the characteristics of trainees that benefit most from training. Using a self-regulatory perspective, the current project examined a latent growth curve model to predict training-related gains for middle-aged and older adult trainees from individual differences (e.g., education), information processing skills (strategy use) and self-regulatory factors such as self-efficacy, control, and active engagement in training. For name recall, a model including strategy usage and strategy change as predictors of memory gain, along with self-efficacy and self-efficacy change, showed comparable fit to a more parsimonious model including only self-efficacy variables as predictors. The best fit to the text recall data was a model focusing on self-efficacy change as the main predictor of memory change, and that model showed significantly better fit than a model also including strategy usage variables as predictors. In these models, overall performance was significantly predicted by age and memory self-efficacy, and subsequent training-related gains in performance were best predicted directly by change in self-efficacy (text recall), or indirectly through the impact of active engagement and self-efficacy on gains (name recall). These results underscore the benefits of targeting self-regulatory factors in intervention programs designed to improve memory skills. PMID:21604891

  5. Perceived social support and academic achievement: cross-lagged panel and bivariate growth curve analyses.

    PubMed

    Mackinnon, Sean P

    2012-04-01

    As students transition to post-secondary education, they experience considerable stress and declines in academic performance. Perceived social support is thought to improve academic achievement by reducing stress. Longitudinal designs with three or more waves are needed in this area because they permit stronger causal inferences and help disentangle the direction of relationships. This study uses a cross-lagged panel and a bivariate growth curve analysis with a three-wave longitudinal design. Participants include 10,445 students (56% female; 12.6% born outside of Canada) transitioning to post-secondary education from ages 15-19. Self-report measures of academic achievement and a generalized measure of perceived social support were used. An increase in average relative standing in academic achievement predicted an increase in average relative standing on perceived social support 2 years later, but the reverse was not true. High levels of perceived social support at age 15 did not protect against declines in academic achievement over time. In sum, perceived social support appears to have no bearing on adolescents' future academic performance, despite commonly held assumptions of its importance. PMID:21720859

  6. Bayesian analysis for nonlinear regression model under skewed errors, with application in growth curves.

    PubMed

    De la Cruz, Rolando; Branco, Márcia D

    2009-08-01

    We have considered a Bayesian approach for the nonlinear regression model by replacing the normal distribution on the error term by some skewed distributions, which account for both skewness and heavy tails or skewness alone. The type of data considered in this paper concerns repeated measurements taken in time on a set of individuals. Such multiple observations on the same individual generally produce serially correlated outcomes. Thus, additionally, our model does allow for a correlation between observations made from the same individual. We have illustrated the procedure using a data set to study the growth curves of a clinic measurement of a group of pregnant women from an obstetrics clinic in Santiago, Chile. Parameter estimation and prediction were carried out using appropriate posterior simulation schemes based in Markov Chain Monte Carlo methods. Besides the deviance information criterion (DIC) and the conditional predictive ordinate (CPO), we suggest the use of proper scoring rules based on the posterior predictive distribution for comparing models. For our data set, all these criteria chose the skew-t model as the best model for the errors. These DIC and CPO criteria are also validated, for the model proposed here, through a simulation study. As a conclusion of this study, the DIC criterion is not trustful for this kind of complex model. PMID:19629998

  7. Diversity matters: dynamic simulation of distributed bacterial states in suspended growth biological wastewater treatment systems.

    PubMed

    Schuler, Andrew J

    2005-07-01

    A MATLAB-based program was developed to simulate the distributions of states and behaviors of microbial storage product-accumulating bacteria in suspended growth systems. Currently available computer simulators of these systems predict dynamic behaviors by numerically solving differential biokinetic equations using average, or "lumped" system states (e.g., average microbial storage products concentrations). However, individual bacterial states are expected to diverge from average values, in part because individuals can have different hydrodynamic histories in terms of their residence times in upstream completely mixed flow reactors. The distributed state simulation program presented in this paper (DisSimulator 1.0) tracks individual bacteria as they move through a completely mixed reactor system. The program was evaluated for competition between polyphosphate-accumulating organisms (PAOs) and non-polyphosphate-accumulating heterotrophs in an enhanced biological phosphorus removal (EBPR) system for treatment of domestic wastewater. For identical systems and process conditions, simulations accounting for distributed states predicted larger anaerobic and aerobic solids residence time requirements for successful EBPR than did simulations using the lumped approach. One reason for this was that distributed simulations predicted large numbers of the PAOs were essentially inactive due to depleted or maximized storage product contents, while the lumped simulations predicted homogenous, 100% active PAO populations. Characteristic state profile shapes developed rapidly and were stable as total population numbers changed. Lumped state assumptions were demonstrated to produce large errors in predictions of EBPR system performance, and so consideration of distributed states may improve the accuracy of microbial storage products-based process simulations in systems with completely mixed hydrodynamics. PMID:15880520

  8. Bacterial Growth at the High Concentrations of Magnesium Sulfate Found in Martian Soils

    PubMed Central

    Crisler, J.D.; Newville, T.M.; Chen, F.; Clark, B.C.

    2012-01-01

    Abstract The martian surface environment exhibits extremes of salinity, temperature, desiccation, and radiation that would make it difficult for terrestrial microbes to survive. Recent evidence suggests that martian soils contain high concentrations of MgSO4 minerals. Through warming of the soils, meltwater derived from subterranean ice-rich regolith may exist for an extended period of time and thus allow the propagation of terrestrial microbes and create significant bioburden at the near surface of Mars. The current report demonstrates that halotolerant bacteria from the Great Salt Plains (GSP) of Oklahoma are capable of growing at high concentrations of MgSO4 in the form of 2 M solutions of epsomite. The epsotolerance of isolates in the GSP bacterial collection was determined, with 35% growing at 2 M MgSO4. There was a complex physiological response to mixtures of MgSO4 and NaCl coupled with other environmental stressors. Growth also was measured at 1 M concentrations of other magnesium and sulfate salts. The complex responses may be partially explained by the pattern of chaotropicity observed for high-salt solutions as measured by agar gelation temperature. Select isolates could grow at the high salt concentrations and low temperatures found on Mars. Survival during repetitive freeze-thaw or drying-rewetting cycles was used as other measures of potential success on the martian surface. Our results indicate that terrestrial microbes might survive under the high-salt, low-temperature, anaerobic conditions on Mars and present significant potential for forward contamination. Stringent planetary protection requirements are needed for future life-detection missions to Mars. Key Words: Analogue—Mars—Planetary protection—Salts—Life in extreme environments. Astrobiology 12, 98–106. PMID:22248384

  9. Common Components of Industrial Metal-Working Fluids as Sources of Carbon for Bacterial Growth

    PubMed Central

    Foxall-VanAken, S.; Brown, J. A.; Young, W.; Salmeen, I.; McClure, T.; Napier, S.; Olsen, R. H.

    1986-01-01

    Water-based metal-working fluids used in large-scale industrial operations consist of many components, but in the most commonly used formulations only three classes of components are present in high enough concentrations that they could, in principle, provide enough carbon to support the high bacterial densities (109 CFU/ml) often observed in contaminated factory fluids. These components are petroleum oil (1 to 5%), petroleum sulfonates (0.1 to 0.5%), and fatty acids (less than 0.1%, mainly linoleic and oleic acids supplied as tall oils). We isolated pure strains of predominating bacteria from contaminated reservoirs of two metal-working systems and randomly selected 12 strains which we tested in liquid culture for growth with each of the metal-working fluid components as the sole source of carbon. Of the 12 strains, 7 reached high density (109 CFU/ml from an initial inoculum of less than 2 × 103) in 24 h, and 1 strain did the same in 48 h with 0.05% oleic or linoleic acid as the carbon source. These same strains also grew on 1% naphthenic petroleum oil but required up to 72 h to reach densities near 108 CFU/ml. One strain grew slightly and the others not at all on the petroleum sulfonates. The four remaining strains did not grow on any of the components, even though they were among the predominating bacteria in the contaminated system. Of the seven strains that grew best on the fatty acids and on the naphthenic petroleum oil, five were tentatively identified as Acinetobacter species and two were identified as Pseudomonas species. Four of the bacteria that did not grow were tentatively identified as species of Pseudomonas, and one could not be identified. PMID:16347072

  10. Effects of High Hydrostatic Pressure on Bacterial Growth on Human Ossicles Explanted from Cholesteatoma Patients

    PubMed Central

    Ostwald, Jürgen; Lindner, Tobias; Zautner, Andreas Erich; Arndt, Kathleen; Pau, Hans Wilhelm; Podbielski, Andreas

    2012-01-01

    Background High hydrostatic pressure (HHP) treatment can eliminate cholesteatoma cells from explanted human ossicles prior to re-insertion. We analyzed the effects of HHP treatment on the microbial flora on ossicles and on the planktonic and biofilm states of selected isolates. Methodology Twenty-six ossicles were explanted from cholesteatoma patients. Five ossicles were directly analyzed for microbial growth without further treatment. Fifteen ossicles were cut into two pieces. One piece was exposed to HHP of 350 MPa for 10 minutes. Both the treated and untreated (control) pieces were then assessed semi-quantitatively. Three ossicles were cut into two pieces and exposed to identical pressure conditions with or without the addition of one of two different combinations of antibiotics to the medium. Differential effects of 10-minute in vitro exposure of planktonic and biofilm bacteria to pressures of 100 MPa, 250 MPa, 400 MPa and 540 MPa in isotonic and hypotonic media were analyzed using two patient isolates of Staphylococcus epidermidis and Neisseria subflava. Bacterial cell inactivation and biofilm destruction were assessed by colony counting and electron microscopy. Principal Findings A variety of microorganisms were isolated from the ossicles. Irrespective of the medium, HHP treatment at 350 MPa for 10 minutes led to satisfying but incomplete inactivation especially of Gram-negative bacteria. The addition of antibiotics increased the efficacy of elimination. A comparison of HHP treatment of planktonic and biofilm cells showed that the effects of HPP were reduced by about one decadic logarithmic unit when HPP was applied to biofilms. High hydrostatic pressure conditions that are suitable to inactivate cholesteatoma cells fail to completely sterilize ossicles even if antibiotics are added. As a result of the reduced microbial load and the viability loss of surviving bacteria, however, there is a lower risk of re-infection after re-insertion. PMID:22291908

  11. Structure of a Bacterial Dynamin-like Protein Lipid Tube Provides a Mechanism For Assembly and Membrane Curving

    PubMed Central

    Low, Harry H.; Sachse, Carsten; Amos, Linda A.; Löwe, Jan

    2009-01-01

    Summary Proteins of the dynamin superfamily mediate membrane fission, fusion, and restructuring events by polymerizing upon lipid bilayers and forcing regions of high curvature. In this work, we show the electron cryomicroscopy reconstruction of a bacterial dynamin-like protein (BDLP) helical filament decorating a lipid tube at ?11 Å resolution. We fitted the BDLP crystal structure and produced a molecular model for the entire filament. The BDLP GTPase domain dimerizes and forms the tube surface, the GTPase effector domain (GED) mediates self-assembly, and the paddle region contacts the lipids and promotes curvature. Association of BDLP with GMPPNP and lipid induces radical, large-scale conformational changes affecting polymerization. Nucleotide hydrolysis seems therefore to be coupled to polymer disassembly and dissociation from lipid, rather than membrane restructuring. Observed structural similarities with rat dynamin 1 suggest that our results have broad implication for other dynamin family members. PMID:20064379

  12. Structure of a bacterial dynamin-like protein lipid tube provides a mechanism for assembly and membrane curving.

    PubMed

    Low, Harry H; Sachse, Carsten; Amos, Linda A; Löwe, Jan

    2009-12-24

    Proteins of the dynamin superfamily mediate membrane fission, fusion, and restructuring events by polymerizing upon lipid bilayers and forcing regions of high curvature. In this work, we show the electron cryomicroscopy reconstruction of a bacterial dynamin-like protein (BDLP) helical filament decorating a lipid tube at approximately 11 A resolution. We fitted the BDLP crystal structure and produced a molecular model for the entire filament. The BDLP GTPase domain dimerizes and forms the tube surface, the GTPase effector domain (GED) mediates self-assembly, and the paddle region contacts the lipids and promotes curvature. Association of BDLP with GMPPNP and lipid induces radical, large-scale conformational changes affecting polymerization. Nucleotide hydrolysis seems therefore to be coupled to polymer disassembly and dissociation from lipid, rather than membrane restructuring. Observed structural similarities with rat dynamin 1 suggest that our results have broad implication for other dynamin family members. PMID:20064379

  13. Root ethylene signalling is involved in Miscanthus sinensis growth promotion by the bacterial endophyte Herbaspirillum frisingense GSF30T

    PubMed Central

    Ludewig, Uwe

    2013-01-01

    The bacterial endophyte Herbaspirillum frisingense GSF30T is a colonizer of several grasses grown in temperate climates, including the highly nitrogen-efficient perennial energy grass Miscanthus. Inoculation of Miscanthus sinensis seedlings with H. frisingense promoted root and shoot growth but had only a minor impact on nutrient concentrations. The bacterium affected the root architecture and increased fine-root structures. Although H. frisingense has the genetic requirements to fix nitrogen, only minor changes in nitrogen concentrations were observed. Herbaspirillum agglomerates were identified primarily in the root apoplast but also in the shoots. The short-term (3h) and long-term (3 weeks) transcriptomic responses of the plant to bacterial inoculation revealed that H. frisingense induced rapid changes in plant hormone signalling, most prominent in jasmonate signalling. Ethylene signalling pathways were also affected and persisted after 3 weeks in the root. Growth stimulation of the root by the ethylene precursor 1-aminocyclopropane 1-carboxylic acid was dose dependent and was affected by H. frisingense inoculation. Minor changes in the proteome were identified after 3 weeks. This study suggests that H. frisingense improves plant growth by modulating plant hormone signalling pathways and provides a framework to understand the beneficial effects of diazotrophic plant-growth-promoting bacteria, such as H. frisingense, on the biomass grass Miscanthus. PMID:24043849

  14. Root ethylene signalling is involved in Miscanthus sinensis growth promotion by the bacterial endophyte Herbaspirillum frisingense GSF30(T).

    PubMed

    Straub, Daniel; Yang, Huaiyu; Liu, Yan; Tsap, Tatsiana; Ludewig, Uwe

    2013-11-01

    The bacterial endophyte Herbaspirillum frisingense GSF30(T) is a colonizer of several grasses grown in temperate climates, including the highly nitrogen-efficient perennial energy grass Miscanthus. Inoculation of Miscanthus sinensis seedlings with H. frisingense promoted root and shoot growth but had only a minor impact on nutrient concentrations. The bacterium affected the root architecture and increased fine-root structures. Although H. frisingense has the genetic requirements to fix nitrogen, only minor changes in nitrogen concentrations were observed. Herbaspirillum agglomerates were identified primarily in the root apoplast but also in the shoots. The short-term (3h) and long-term (3 weeks) transcriptomic responses of the plant to bacterial inoculation revealed that H. frisingense induced rapid changes in plant hormone signalling, most prominent in jasmonate signalling. Ethylene signalling pathways were also affected and persisted after 3 weeks in the root. Growth stimulation of the root by the ethylene precursor 1-aminocyclopropane 1-carboxylic acid was dose dependent and was affected by H. frisingense inoculation. Minor changes in the proteome were identified after 3 weeks. This study suggests that H. frisingense improves plant growth by modulating plant hormone signalling pathways and provides a framework to understand the beneficial effects of diazotrophic plant-growth-promoting bacteria, such as H. frisingense, on the biomass grass Miscanthus. PMID:24043849

  15. Population Dynamics of a Salmonella Lytic Phage and Its Host: Implications of the Host Bacterial Growth Rate in Modelling

    PubMed Central

    Santos, Sílvio B.; Carvalho, Carla; Azeredo, Joana; Ferreira, Eugénio C.

    2014-01-01

    The prevalence and impact of bacteriophages in the ecology of bacterial communities coupled with their ability to control pathogens turn essential to understand and predict the dynamics between phage and bacteria populations. To achieve this knowledge it is essential to develop mathematical models able to explain and simulate the population dynamics of phage and bacteria. We have developed an unstructured mathematical model using delay-differential equations to predict the interactions between a broad-host-range Salmonella phage and its pathogenic host. The model takes into consideration the main biological parameters that rule phage-bacteria interactions likewise the adsorption rate, latent period, burst size, bacterial growth rate, and substrate uptake rate, among others. The experimental validation of the model was performed with data from phage-interaction studies in a 5 L bioreactor. The key and innovative aspect of the model was the introduction of variations in the latent period and adsorption rate values that are considered as constants in previous developed models. By modelling the latent period as a normal distribution of values and the adsorption rate as a function of the bacterial growth rate it was possible to accurately predict the behaviour of the phage-bacteria population. The model was shown to predict simulated data with a good agreement with the experimental observations and explains how a lytic phage and its host bacteria are able to coexist. PMID:25051248

  16. An impedimetric biosensor for real-time monitoring of bacterial growth in a microbial fermentor

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Young-Hun Kim; Jae-Sung Park; Hyo-Il Jung

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, we describe an in situ sensor for estimating bacterial concentration in a lab-scale fermentor using impedance spectroscopy. We constructed the impedimetric biosensor using a gold-coated silicon wafer, PDMS polymer, and a borosilicate glass tube. An advantage of using these materials was that we could make a plug-type, disposable electrode. We compared the impedimetric differences between bacterial cells,

  17. Endophytic bacterial communities of field-grown potato plants and their plant-growth-promoting and antagonistic abilities.

    PubMed

    Sessitsch, Angela; Reiter, Birgit; Berg, Gabriele

    2004-04-01

    To study the effect of plant growth on potato-associated bacteria, the composition and properties of bacteria colonizing the endosphere of field-grown potato were analyzed by a multiphasic approach. The occurrence and diversity of potato-associated bacteria were monitored by a cultivation-independent approach, using terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis of 16S rDNA. The patterns obtained revealed a high heterogeneity of community composition and suggested the existence of plant-specific communities. However, endophytic populations correlated to a certain extent with plant growth performance. Endophytes were also isolated from plants that grew well or grew poorly and were identified by partial sequencing of the 16S rRNA genes. A broad phylogenetic spectrum was found among isolates and differently growing plants hosted different bacterial populations. In an approach to investigate the plant-growth-promoting potential of potato-associated bacteria, a total of 35 bacteria were screened by dual testing for in vitro antagonism towards (i) the fungal pathogens Verticillium dahliae, Rhizoctonia solani, Sclerotinia sclerotiorum, and Phytophthora cactorum and (ii) the bacterial pathogens Erwinia carotovora, Streptomyces scabies, and Xanthomonas campestris. The proportion of isolates with antagonistic activity was highest against Streptomyces sp. (43%) followed by those against Xanthomonas sp. (29%). As all plants showed more or less severe disease symptoms of scab disease caused by Streptomyces scabies, we assume that the presence of the pathogen induced the colonization of antagonists. The antifungal activity of the isolates was generally low. The biotechnological potential of endophytic isolates assessed by their antagonistic activity and by in vitro production of enzymes, antibiotics, siderophores, and the plant growth hormone indole-1,3-acetic acid was generally high. Overall, seven endophytes were found to antagonize fungal as well as bacterial pathogens and showed a high production of active compounds and were therefore considered promising biological control agents. PMID:15213748

  18. Bacterial Growth Kinetics under a Novel Flexible Methacrylate Dressing Serving as a Drug Delivery Vehicle for Antiseptics

    PubMed Central

    Forstner, Christina; Leitgeb, Johannes; Schuster, Rupert; Dosch, Verena; Kramer, Axel; Cutting, Keith F.; Leaper, David J.; Assadian, Ojan

    2013-01-01

    A flexible methacrylate powder dressing (Altrazeal®) transforms into a wound contour conforming matrix once in contact with wound exudate. We hypothesised that it may also serve as a drug delivery vehicle for antiseptics. The antimicrobial efficacy and influence on bacterial growth kinetics in combination with three antiseptics was investigated in an in vitro porcine wound model. Standardized in vitro wounds were contaminated with Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA; ATCC 33591) and divided into six groups: no dressing (negative control), methacrylate dressing alone, and combinations with application of 0.02% Polyhexamethylene Biguanide (PHMB), 0.4% PHMB, 0.1% PHMB + 0.1% betaine, 7.7 mg/mL Povidone-iodine (PVP-iodine), and 0.1% Octenidine-dihydrochloride (OCT) + 2% phenoxyethanol. Bacterial load per gram tissue was measured over five days. The highest reduction was observed with PVP-iodine at 24 h to log10 1.43 cfu/g, followed by OCT at 48 h to log10 2.41 cfu/g. Whilst 0.02% PHMB resulted in a stable bacterial load over 120 h to log10 4.00 cfu/g over 120 h, 0.1% PHMB + 0.1% betaine inhibited growth during the first 48 h, with slightly increasing bacterial numbers up to log10 5.38 cfu/g at 120 h. These results indicate that this flexible methacrylate dressing can be loaded with various antiseptics serving as drug delivery system. Depending on the selected combination, an individually shaped and controlled antibacterial effect may be achieved using the same type of wound dressing. PMID:23698780

  19. Bacterial Growth Kinetics under a Novel Flexible Methacrylate Dressing Serving as a Drug Delivery Vehicle for Antiseptics.

    PubMed

    Forstner, Christina; Leitgeb, Johannes; Schuster, Rupert; Dosch, Verena; Kramer, Axel; Cutting, Keith F; Leaper, David J; Assadian, Ojan

    2013-01-01

    A flexible methacrylate powder dressing (Altrazeal®) transforms into a wound contour conforming matrix once in contact with wound exudate. We hypothesised that it may also serve as a drug delivery vehicle for antiseptics. The antimicrobial efficacy and influence on bacterial growth kinetics in combination with three antiseptics was investigated in an in vitro porcine wound model. Standardized in vitro wounds were contaminated with Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA; ATCC 33591) and divided into six groups: no dressing (negative control), methacrylate dressing alone, and combinations with application of 0.02% Polyhexamethylene Biguanide (PHMB), 0.4% PHMB, 0.1% PHMB + 0.1% betaine, 7.7 mg/mL Povidone-iodine (PVP-iodine), and 0.1% Octenidine-dihydrochloride (OCT) + 2% phenoxyethanol. Bacterial load per gram tissue was measured over five days. The highest reduction was observed with PVP-iodine at 24 h to log10 1.43 cfu/g, followed by OCT at 48 h to log10 2.41 cfu/g. Whilst 0.02% PHMB resulted in a stable bacterial load over 120 h to log10 4.00 cfu/g over 120 h, 0.1% PHMB + 0.1% betaine inhibited growth during the first 48 h, with slightly increasing bacterial numbers up to log10 5.38 cfu/g at 120 h. These results indicate that this flexible methacrylate dressing can be loaded with various antiseptics serving as drug delivery system. Depending on the selected combination, an individually shaped and controlled antibacterial effect may be achieved using the same type of wound dressing. PMID:23698780

  20. Predicting Individual Bacterium Cell Growth Behavior from Population Information We explore the kinetics of bacterial cells to predict the dependency of growth and division rates on cell length and

    E-print Network

    Watkins, Joseph C.

    ) - the steady-state length density function. - and a number k, the instantaneous growth rate of the populationPredicting Individual Bacterium Cell Growth Behavior from Population Information Abstract We explore the kinetics of bacterial cells to predict the dependency of growth and division rates on cell

  1. Television Viewing and Adolescents’ Judgment of Sexual Request Scripts: A Latent Growth Curve Analysis in Early and Middle Adolescence

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Steven Eggermont

    2006-01-01

    A longitudinal study was conducted to explore the relationship between television viewing and beliefs about expressing sexual\\u000a desire in dating situations. In three consecutive years, a panel of early adolescents (N?=?883) and a panel of middle adolescents (N?=?651) rated the effectiveness of a sexual approach and a romantic approach. Latent growth curve analyses indicate that between\\u000a the ages of 12

  2. Bacterial Growth State Distinguished by Single-Cell Protein Profiling: Does Chlorination Kill Coliforms in Municipal Effluent?

    PubMed Central

    Rockabrand, David; Austin, Teresa; Kaiser, Robyn; Blum, Paul

    1999-01-01

    Municipal effluent is the largest reservoir of human enteric bacteria. Its public health significance, however, depends upon the physiological status of the wastewater bacterial community. A novel immunofluorescence assay was developed and used to examine the bacterial growth state during wastewater disinfection. Quantitative levels of three highly conserved cytosolic proteins (DnaK, Dps, and Fis) were determined by using enterobacterium-specific antibody fluorochrome-coupled probes. Enterobacterial Fis homologs were abundant in growing cells and nearly undetectable in stationary-phase cells. In contrast, enterobacterial Dps homologs were abundant in stationary-phase cells but virtually undetectable in growing cells. The range of variation in the abundance of both proteins was at least 100-fold as determined by Western blotting and immunofluorescence analysis. Enterobacterial DnaK homologs were nearly invariant with growth state, enabling their use as permeabilization controls. The cellular growth states of individual enterobacteria in wastewater samples were determined by measurement of Fis, Dps, and DnaK abundance (protein profiling). Intermediate levels of Fis and Dps were evident and occurred in response to physiological transitions. The results indicate that chlorination failed to kill coliforms but rather elicited nutrient starvation and a reversible nonculturable state. These studies suggest that the current standard procedures for wastewater analysis which rely on detection of culturable cells likely underestimate fecal coliform content. PMID:10473432

  3. Bacterial growth state distinguished by single-cell protein profiling: Does chlorination kill coliforms in municipal effluent?

    SciTech Connect

    Rockabrand, D.; Austin, T.; Kaiser, R.; Blum, P.

    1999-09-01

    Municipal effluent is the largest reservoir of human enteric bacteria. Its public health significance, however, depends upon the physiological status of the wastewater bacterial community. A novel immunofluorescence assay was developed and used to examine the bacterial growth state during wastewater disinfection. Quantitative levels of three highly conserved cytosolic proteins (DnaK, Dps, and Fis) were determined by using enterobacterium-specific antibody fluorochrome-coupled probes. Enterobacterial Fis homologs were abundant in growing cells and nearly undetectable in stationary-phase cells. In contrast, enterobacterial Dps homologs were abundant in stationary-phase cells but virtually undetectable in growing cells. The range of variation in the abundance of both proteins was at least 100-fold as determined by Western blotting and immunofluorescence analysis. Enterobacterial DnaK homologs were nearly invariant with growth state, enabling their use as permeabilization controls. The cellular growth states of individual enterobacteria in wastewater samples were determined by measurement of Fis, Dps, and DnaK abundance (protein profiling). Intermediate levels of Fis and Dps were evident and occurred in response to physiological transitions. The results indicate that chlorination failed to kill coliforms but rather elicited nutrient starvation and a reversible nonculturable state. These studies suggest that the current standard procedures for wastewater analysis which rely on detection of culturable cells likely underestimate fecal coliform content.

  4. Appropriate Fe (II) addition significantly enhances anaerobic ammonium oxidation (Anammox) activity through improving the bacterial growth rate.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yiwen; Ni, Bing-Jie

    2015-01-01

    The application of anaerobic ammonium oxidation (Anammox) process is often limited by the slow growth rate of Anammox bacteria. As the essential substrate element that required for culturing Anammox sludge, Fe (II) is expected to affect Anammox bacterial growth. This work systematically studied the effects of Fe (II) addition on Anammox activity based on the kinetic analysis of specific growth rate using data from batch tests with an enriched Anammox sludge at different dosing levels. Results clearly demonstrated that appropriate Fe (II) dosing (i.e., 0.09?mM) significantly enhanced the specific Anammox growth rate up to 0.172?d(-1) compared to 0.118?d(-1) at regular Fe (II) level (0.03?mM). The relationship between Fe (II) concentration and specific Anammox growth rate was found to be well described by typical substrate inhibition kinetics, which was integrated into currently well-established Anammox model to describe the enhanced Anammox growth with Fe (II) addition. The validity of the integrated Anammox model was verified using long-term experimental data from three independent Anammox reactors with different Fe (II) dosing levels. This Fe (II)-based approach could be potentially implemented to enhance the process rate for possible mainstream application of Anammox technology, in order for an energy autarchic wastewater treatment. PMID:25644239

  5. Effects of Interactions of Auxin-Producing Bacteria and Bacterial-Feeding Nematodes on Regulation of Peanut Growths

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Li; Xu, Wensi; Jiang, Ying; Hu, Feng; Li, Huixin

    2015-01-01

    The influences of an IAA (indole-3-acetic acid)-producing bacterium (Bacillus megaterium) and two bacterial-feeding nematodes (Cephalobus sp. or Mesorhabditis sp.) on the growth of peanut (Arachis hypogaea L. cv. Haihua 1) after various durations of time were investigated in natural soils. The addition of bacteria and nematodes and incubation time all significantly affected plant growth, plant root growth, plant nutrient concentrations, soil nutrient concentrations, soil microorganisms and soil auxin concentration. The addition of nematodes caused greater increases in these indices than those of bacteria, while the addition of the combination of bacteria and nematodes caused further increases. After 42-day growth, the increases in soil respiration differed between the additions of two kinds of nematodes because of differences in their life strategies. The effects of the bacteria and nematodes on the nutrient and hormone concentrations were responsible for the increases in plant growth. These results indicate the potential for promoting plant growth via the addition of nematodes and bacteria to soil. PMID:25867954

  6. Effects of interactions of auxin-producing bacteria and bacterial-feeding nematodes on regulation of peanut growths.

    PubMed

    Xu, Li; Xu, Wensi; Jiang, Ying; Hu, Feng; Li, Huixin

    2015-01-01

    The influences of an IAA (indole-3-acetic acid)-producing bacterium (Bacillus megaterium) and two bacterial-feeding nematodes (Cephalobus sp. or Mesorhabditis sp.) on the growth of peanut (Arachis hypogaea L. cv. Haihua 1) after various durations of time were investigated in natural soils. The addition of bacteria and nematodes and incubation time all significantly affected plant growth, plant root growth, plant nutrient concentrations, soil nutrient concentrations, soil microorganisms and soil auxin concentration. The addition of nematodes caused greater increases in these indices than those of bacteria, while the addition of the combination of bacteria and nematodes caused further increases. After 42-day growth, the increases in soil respiration differed between the additions of two kinds of nematodes because of differences in their life strategies. The effects of the bacteria and nematodes on the nutrient and hormone concentrations were responsible for the increases in plant growth. These results indicate the potential for promoting plant growth via the addition of nematodes and bacteria to soil. PMID:25867954

  7. The Ability of Salmonella to Enter Mammalian Cells is Affected by Bacterial Growth State

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Catherine A. Lee; Stanley Falkow

    1990-01-01

    We have examined the effect of different growth conditions on the ability of Salmonella to interact with Madin-Darby canine kidney cells. Two growth conditions that affect the expression of Salmonella adherence and invasiveness have been identified. First, bacteria lose their invasiveness in the stationary phase of growth. Second, bacteria growing in oxygen-limited growth conditions are induced for adherence and invasiveness,

  8. Plant Growth Promotion Potential Is Equally Represented in Diverse Grapevine Root-Associated Bacterial Communities from Different Biopedoclimatic Environments

    PubMed Central

    Fusi, Marco; Cherif, Ameur; Abou-Hadid, Ayman; El-Bahairy, Usama; Sorlini, Claudia; Daffonchio, Daniele

    2013-01-01

    Plant-associated bacteria provide important services to host plants. Environmental factors such as cultivar type and pedoclimatic conditions contribute to shape their diversity. However, whether these environmental factors may influence the plant growth promoting (PGP) potential of the root-associated bacteria is not widely understood. To address this issue, the diversity and PGP potential of the bacterial assemblage associated with the grapevine root system of different cultivars in three Mediterranean environments along a macrotransect identifying an aridity gradient were assessed by culture-dependent and independent approaches. According to 16S rRNA gene PCR-DGGE, the structure of endosphere and rhizosphere bacterial communities was highly diverse (P = 0.03) and was associated with a cultivar/latitudinal/climatic effect. Despite being diverse, the bacterial communities associated with Egyptian grapevines shared a higher similarity with the Tunisian grapevines than those cultivated in North Italy. A similar distribution, according to the cultivar/latitude/aridity gradients, was observed for the cultivable bacteria. Many isolates (23%) presented in vitro multiple stress resistance capabilities and PGP activities, the most frequent being auxin synthesis (82%), insoluble phosphate solubilisation (61%), and ammonia production (70%). The comparable numbers and types of potential PGP traits among the three different environmental settings indicate a strong functional homeostasis of beneficial bacteria associated with grape root. PMID:23878810

  9. Synthesis of fluorescent D-amino acids and their use for probing peptidoglycan synthesis and bacterial growth in situ.

    PubMed

    Kuru, Erkin; Tekkam, Srinivas; Hall, Edward; Brun, Yves V; Van Nieuwenhze, Michael S

    2015-01-01

    Fluorescent D-amino acids (FDAAs) are efficiently incorporated into the peptidoglycans (PGs) of diverse bacterial species at the sites of PG biosynthesis, allowing specific and covalent probing of bacterial growth with minimal perturbation. Here we provide a protocol for the synthesis of four FDAAs emitting light in blue (HCC-amino-D-alanine, HADA), green (NBD-amino-D-alanine, NADA, and fluorescein-D-lysine, FDL) or red (TAMRA-D-lysine, TDL) and for their use in PG labeling of live bacteria. Our modular synthesis protocol gives easy access to a library of different FDAAs made with commercially available fluorophores and diamino acid starting materials. Molecules can be synthesized in a typical chemistry laboratory in 2-3 d using standard chemical transformations. The simple labeling procedure involves the addition of the FDAAs to a bacterial sample for the desired labeling duration and stopping further label incorporation by fixing the cells with cold 70% (vol/vol) ethanol or by washing away excess dye. We discuss several scenarios for the use of these labels in fluorescence microscopy applications, including short or long labeling durations, and the combination of different labels in pure culture (e.g., for 'virtual time-lapse' microscopy) or in situ labeling of complex environmental samples. Depending on the experiment, FDAA labeling can take as little as 30 s for a rapidly growing species such as Escherichia coli. PMID:25474031

  10. Effects of chemical and biological pesticides on plant growth parameters and rhizospheric bacterial community structure in Vigna radiata.

    PubMed

    Singh, Sunil; Gupta, Rashi; Sharma, Shilpi

    2015-06-30

    With increasing application of pesticides in agriculture, their non-target effects on soil microbial communities are critical to soil health maintenance. The present study aimed to evaluate the effects of chemical pesticides (chlorpyrifos and cypermethrin) and a biological pesticide (azadirachtin) on growth parameters and the rhizospheric bacterial community of Vigna radiata. Qualitative and quantitative analysis by PCR-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) and q-PCR, respectively, of the 16S rRNA gene and transcript were performed to study the impact of these pesticides on the resident and active rhizospheric bacterial community. While plant parameters were not affected significantly by the pesticides, a shift in the bacterial community structure was observed with an adverse effect on the abundance of 16S rRNA gene and transcripts. Chlorpyrifos showed almost complete degradation toward the end of the experiment. These non-target impacts on soil ecosystems and the fact that the effects of the biopesticide mimic those of chemical pesticides raise serious concerns regarding their application in agriculture. PMID:25791643

  11. Body mass index trajectories and predictors among 3rd to 12th graders using growth curve mixture modeling the Child and Adolescent Trial for Cardiovascular Health (CATCH) study

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Hao T Duong

    2009-01-01

    This dissertation examined body mass index (BMI) growth trajectories and the effects of gender, ethnicity, dietary intake, and physical activity (PA) on BMI growth trajectories among 3rd to 12th graders (9-18 years of age). Growth curve model analysis was performed using data from The Child and Adolescent Trial for Cardiovascular Health (CATCH) study. The study population included 2909 students who

  12. 40 CFR 798.5500 - Differential growth inhibition of repair proficient and repair deficient bacteria: “Bacterial DNA...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...and repair deficient bacteria: âBacterial DNA damage or repair tests.â 798.5500 ...and repair deficient bacteria: “Bacterial DNA damage or repair tests.” (a) Purpose. Bacterial DNA damage or repair tests measure DNA...

  13. 40 CFR 798.5500 - Differential growth inhibition of repair proficient and repair deficient bacteria: “Bacterial DNA...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...and repair deficient bacteria: âBacterial DNA damage or repair tests.â 798.5500 ...and repair deficient bacteria: “Bacterial DNA damage or repair tests.” (a) Purpose. Bacterial DNA damage or repair tests measure DNA...

  14. 40 CFR 798.5500 - Differential growth inhibition of repair proficient and repair deficient bacteria: “Bacterial DNA...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...and repair deficient bacteria: âBacterial DNA damage or repair tests.â 798.5500 ...and repair deficient bacteria: “Bacterial DNA damage or repair tests.” (a) Purpose. Bacterial DNA damage or repair tests measure DNA...

  15. Growth inhibition of bacterial fish pathogens and quorum-sensing blocking by bacteria recovered from chilean salmonid farms.

    PubMed

    Fuente, Mery de la; Miranda, Claudio D; Jopia, Paz; González-Rocha, Gerardo; Guiliani, Nicolás; Sossa, Katherine; Urrutia, Homero

    2015-06-01

    The main goal of this study was to find bacterial isolates with the ability to inhibit the growth of the fish pathogens Aeromonas hydrophila, Vibrio anguillarum, and Flavobacterium psychrophilum and to inhibit the blockage of the quorum-sensing (QS) system. A total of 80 gram-negative strains isolated from various freshwater Chilean salmonid farms were studied. We determined that 10 strains belonging to the genus Pseudomonas inhibited at least one of the assayed fish pathogens. Of these, nine strains were able to produce siderophores and two strains were able to inhibit the growth of all assayed pathogenic species. When the 80 strains were examined for QS-blocking activity, only the strains Pseudomonas sp. FF16 and Raoultella planticola R5B1 were identified as QS blockers. When the QS-blocker strains were analyzed for their ability to produce homoserine lactone (HSL) molecules, thin-layer chromatography analysis showed that both strains were able to produce C6-HSL- and C8-HSL-type molecules. Strain R5B1 did not show growth inhibition properties, but strain FF16 also led to inhibition of growth in A. hydrophila and F. psychrophilum as well as to siderophore production. Pseudomonas sp. FF16 exhibited potentially useful antagonistic properties and could be a probiotic candidate for the salmon farming industry. Received July 31, 2014; accepted December 17, 2014. PMID:26000731

  16. A multiphasic approach for the identification of endophytic bacterial in strawberry fruit and their potential for plant growth promotion.

    PubMed

    de Melo Pereira, Gilberto Vinícius; Magalhães, Karina Teixeira; Lorenzetii, Emi Rainildes; Souza, Thiago Pereira; Schwan, Rosane Freitas

    2012-02-01

    This study used a multiphasic approach, characterized by the simultaneous use of culture-dependent and culture-independent methods, to investigate endophytic bacterial communities in strawberry (Fragaria ananassa) fruit. A total of 92 bacterial endophytes were isolated and initially grouped by their repetitive extragenic palindromic (rep)-PCR banding pattern and biochemical features. Phylogenetic analysis of the 16S rRNA gene sequences of 45 representatives showed that the isolates belonged to the species Bacillus subtilis (eight isolates), Bacillus sp. (seven isolates), Enterobacter sp. (seven isolates), Enterobacter ludwigii (six isolates), Lactobacillus plantarum (six isolates), Pseudomonas sp. (five isolates), Pantoea punctata (three isolates), and Curtobacterium citreum (three isolates). Nucleic acids were extracted from the strawberry fruit and subjected to 16S rRNA gene directed polymerase chain reaction denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (16S rRNA PCR-DGGE). The species B. subtilis, Enterobacter sp., and Pseudomonas sp. were detected both by isolation and DGGE. The DGGE fingerprints of total bacterial DNA did not exhibit bands corresponding to several of the representative species isolated in the extinction dilution (L. plantarum, C. citreum, and P. punctata). In contrast, bands in the DGGE profile that were identified as relatives of Arthrobacter sp. and one uncultivable Erythrobacter sp. were not recovered by cultivation techniques. After isolation, the nitrogen fixation ability and the in vitro production of indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) equivalents and siderophores were evaluated. A high percentage of isolates were found to possess the ability to produce siderophores and IAA equivalents; however, only a few isolates belonging to the genera Pseudomonas and Enterobacter showed the ability to fix nitrogen. Plant growth promotion was evaluated under greenhouse conditions and revealed the ability of the Bacillus strains to enhance the number of leaves, shoot length, root dry weight, and shoot dry weight. The activity of the bacterial isolate identified as B. subtilis NA-108 exerted the greatest influence on strawberry growth and showed a 42.8% increase in number of leaves, 15.26% for high shoot, 43.5% increase in root dry weight, and a 77% increase in shoot dry weight when compared with untreated controls. PMID:21837472

  17. Tentative Growth Curve for Rhizocarpon geographicum s. I. in Stroud Basin, Wind River Range, Western Wyoming

    Microsoft Academic Search

    William C. Mahaney

    A tentative fime{ize curre for Rhizocarpon geographicun s. l. hasheen dereloped for dating Neoelacial deposits in the Vind River Range, Wyoming. Nunerous differences in fie Inaxinum diamerers of R. geogrdphicun s.l. on Neoglacial subshares have proved useful as relarive age indicarors in severai Wind River cirques; however, consrruction ofa erowth curve {as hampered by a lack of deposirs dared by

  18. Effects of gypsophila saponins on bacterial growth kinetics and on selection of subterranean clover rhizosphere bacteria

    Microsoft Academic Search

    F. Fons; N. Amellal; C. Leyval; N. Saint-Martin; M. Henry

    2003-01-01

    Plant secondary metabolites, such as saponins, have a considerable impact in agriculture because of their allelopathic effects. They also affect the growth of soil microorganisms, especially fungi. We investigated the influence of saponins on rhizosphere bacteria in vitro and in soil conditions. The effects of gypsophila saponins on the growth kinetics of rhizosphere bacteria were studied by monitoring the absorbance

  19. Joint effects of heavy metal binary mixtures on seed germination, root and shoot growth, bacterial bioluminescence, and gene mutation.

    PubMed

    Kong, In Chul

    2013-05-01

    This investigation was to assess the joint effects of metal binary mixtures on seed germination, root and shoot growth, bacterial bioluminescence, and gene mutation based on the one toxic unit (1 TU) approach. Different sensitivities and orders of toxicity of metal mixtures were observed among the bioassays. In general, mostly additive or antagonistic effects were observed, while almost no synergistic effects by the binary metal mixtures in all bioassays. Therefore, the combined effects of heavy metals in the different bioassays were difficult to generalize since they were dependent on both chemical type and the organism used in each bioassay. However, these results indicate that a battery of bioassays with mixture chemicals as opposed to just a single assay with single metal is a better strategy for the bioassessment of environmental pollutants. PMID:24218818

  20. Consideration of probability of bacterial growth for Jovian planets and their satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, D. M.; Berkman, R. M.; Divine, N.

    1974-01-01

    Environmental parameters affecting growth of bacteria are compared with current atmospheric models for Jupiter and Saturn, and with the available physical data for their satellites. Different zones of relative probability of growth are identified for Jupiter and Saturn. Of the more than two dozen satellites, only the largest (Io, Europa, Ganymede, Callisto, and Titan) are found to be interesting biologically. Titan's atmosphere may produce a substantial greenhouse effect providing increased surface temperatures. Models predicting a dense atmosphere are compatible with microbial growth for a range of pressures at Titan's surface. For Titan's surface the probability of growth would be enhanced if: (1) the surface is entirely or partially liquid; (2) volcanism is present; or (3) access to internal heat sources is significant.

  1. Self-Esteem and Delinquency Revisited (Again): A Test of Kaplan's Self-Derogation Theory of Delinquency Using Latent Growth Curve Modeling.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mason, W. Alex

    2001-01-01

    Studied the relationship between self-esteem and delinquency using latent growth curve modeling. Analyses of panel data for 2,213 adolescent boys from the Youth in Transition Study supported Kaplan's self-derogation theory of delinquency (H. Kaplan, 1978) by showing that delinquency was positively associated with growth in self-esteem among…

  2. Selenium hyperaccumulators harbor a diverse endophytic bacterial community characterized by high selenium resistance and plant growth promoting properties.

    PubMed

    Sura-de Jong, Martina; Reynolds, Ray J B; Richterova, Klara; Musilova, Lucie; Staicu, Lucian C; Chocholata, Iva; Cappa, Jennifer J; Taghavi, Safiyh; van der Lelie, Daniel; Frantik, Tomas; Dolinova, Iva; Strejcek, Michal; Cochran, Alyssa T; Lovecka, Petra; Pilon-Smits, Elizabeth A H

    2015-01-01

    Selenium (Se)-rich plants may be used to provide dietary Se to humans and livestock, and also to clean up Se-polluted soils or waters. This study focused on endophytic bacteria of plants that hyperaccumulate selenium (Se) to 0.5-1% of dry weight. Terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP) analysis was used to compare the diversity of endophytic bacteria of hyperaccumulators Stanleya pinnata (Brassicaceae) and Astragalus bisulcatus (Fabaceae) with those from related non-accumulators Physaria bellii (Brassicaceae) and Medicago sativa (Fabaceae) collected on the same, seleniferous site. Hyperaccumulators and non-accumulators showed equal T-RF diversity. Parsimony analysis showed that T-RFs from individuals of the same species were more similar to each other than to those from other species, regardless of plant Se content or spatial proximity. Cultivable endophytes from hyperaccumulators S. pinnata and A. bisulcatus were further identified and characterized. The 66 bacterial morphotypes were shown by MS MALDI-TOF Biotyper analysis and 16S rRNA gene sequencing to include strains of Bacillus, Pseudomonas, Pantoea, Staphylococcus, Paenibacillus, Advenella, Arthrobacter, and Variovorax. Most isolates were highly resistant to selenate and selenite (up to 200 mM) and all could reduce selenite to red elemental Se, reduce nitrite and produce siderophores. Seven isolates were selected for plant inoculation and found to have plant growth promoting properties, both in pure culture and when co-cultivated with crop species Brassica juncea (Brassicaceae) or M. sativa. There were no effects on plant Se accumulation. We conclude that Se hyperaccumulators harbor an endophytic bacterial community in their natural seleniferous habitat that is equally diverse to that of comparable non-accumulators. The hyperaccumulator endophytes are characterized by high Se resistance, capacity to produce elemental Se and plant growth promoting properties. PMID:25784919

  3. Selenium hyperaccumulators harbor a diverse endophytic bacterial community characterized by high selenium resistance and plant growth promoting properties

    PubMed Central

    Sura-de Jong, Martina; Reynolds, Ray J. B.; Richterova, Klara; Musilova, Lucie; Staicu, Lucian C.; Chocholata, Iva; Cappa, Jennifer J.; Taghavi, Safiyh; van der Lelie, Daniel; Frantik, Tomas; Dolinova, Iva; Strejcek, Michal; Cochran, Alyssa T.; Lovecka, Petra; Pilon-Smits, Elizabeth A. H.

    2015-01-01

    Selenium (Se)-rich plants may be used to provide dietary Se to humans and livestock, and also to clean up Se-polluted soils or waters. This study focused on endophytic bacteria of plants that hyperaccumulate selenium (Se) to 0.5–1% of dry weight. Terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP) analysis was used to compare the diversity of endophytic bacteria of hyperaccumulators Stanleya pinnata (Brassicaceae) and Astragalus bisulcatus (Fabaceae) with those from related non-accumulators Physaria bellii (Brassicaceae) and Medicago sativa (Fabaceae) collected on the same, seleniferous site. Hyperaccumulators and non-accumulators showed equal T-RF diversity. Parsimony analysis showed that T-RFs from individuals of the same species were more similar to each other than to those from other species, regardless of plant Se content or spatial proximity. Cultivable endophytes from hyperaccumulators S. pinnata and A. bisulcatus were further identified and characterized. The 66 bacterial morphotypes were shown by MS MALDI-TOF Biotyper analysis and 16S rRNA gene sequencing to include strains of Bacillus, Pseudomonas, Pantoea, Staphylococcus, Paenibacillus, Advenella, Arthrobacter, and Variovorax. Most isolates were highly resistant to selenate and selenite (up to 200 mM) and all could reduce selenite to red elemental Se, reduce nitrite and produce siderophores. Seven isolates were selected for plant inoculation and found to have plant growth promoting properties, both in pure culture and when co-cultivated with crop species Brassica juncea (Brassicaceae) or M. sativa. There were no effects on plant Se accumulation. We conclude that Se hyperaccumulators harbor an endophytic bacterial community in their natural seleniferous habitat that is equally diverse to that of comparable non-accumulators. The hyperaccumulator endophytes are characterized by high Se resistance, capacity to produce elemental Se and plant growth promoting properties. PMID:25784919

  4. Growth inhibition of bacterial isolates recovered from two types of Portuguese dry smoked sausages ( chouriço)

    Microsoft Academic Search

    T. J. S. Matos; A. Bruno-Soares; B. B. Jensen; A. S. Barreto; O. Hojberg

    2008-01-01

    Potassium sorbate (PS), sodium benzoate (SB) and methyl p-hydroxybenzoate (MHB) were investigated as surface treatments for their ability to inhibit the growth of 18 isolates of spoilage and pathogenic bacteria from two types of Portuguese dry smoked sausages (Chouriço). MHB significantly inhibited the growth rate of 12 of the isolates (p<0.05) whereas no effect was observed for four isolates of

  5. Growth kinetics of a diesel-degrading bacterial strain from petroleum-contaminated soil.

    PubMed

    Dahalan, S F A; Yunus, I; Johari, W L W; Shukor, M Y; Halmi, M I E; Shamaan, N A; Syed, M A

    2014-03-01

    A diesel-degrading bacterium was isolated from a diesel-contaminated site in Selangor, Malaysia. The isolate was tentatively identified as Acinetobacter sp. strain DRY12 based on partial 16S rDNA molecular phylogeny and Biolog GN microplate panels and Microlog database. Optimum growth occurred from 3 to 5% diesel and the strain was able to tolerate as high as 8% diesel. The optimal pH that supported growth of the bacterium was between pH 7.5 to 8.0. The isolate exhibited optimal growth in between 30 and 35 degrees C. The best nitrogen source was potassium nitrate (between 0.6 and 0.9% (w/v)) followed by ammonium chloride, sodium nitrite and ammonium sulphate in descending order. An almost complete removal of diesel components was seen from the reduction in hydrocarbon peaks observed using Solid Phase Microextraction Gas Chromatography analysis after 10 days of incubation. The best growth kinetic model to fit experimental data was the Haldane model of substrate inhibiting growth with a correlation coefficient value of 0.97. The maximum growth rate- micromax was 0.039 hr(-1) while the saturation constant or half velocity constant Ks and inhibition constant Ki, were 0.387% and 4.46%, respectively. MATH assays showed that 75% of the bacterium was found in the hexadecane phase indicating that the bacterium was hydrophobic. The characteristics of this bacterium make it useful for bioremediation works in the Tropics. PMID:24665769

  6. Effect of 2-alkynoic acids on in vitro growth of bacterial and mammalian cells.

    PubMed Central

    Konthikamee, W; Gilbertson, J R; Langkamp, H; Gershon, H

    1982-01-01

    3-Decynoyl-N-acetylcystamine is known to inhibit the in vitro growth of Escherichia coli but not of yeasts or mammalian cells. Neither the free acid nor the 2 positional isomer is active (L. R. Kass, J. Biol. Chem. 243:3223-3228, 1968). Other studies have shown that 2-hexadecynoic acid is fungitoxic whereas most of the shorter chain isomers are inactive (H. Gershon and L. Shanks, Can J. Microbiol. 24:591-597, 1978). Since these studies suggested that positional or chain length isomers of the acetylenic acids may selectively inhibit the growth of microorganisms, the effect of the alkynoic acids on the in vitro growth of gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria was evaluated. 2-Hexadecynoic acid was found to be the most active species. This acid was bacteriostatic for all gram-positive bacteria tested. The acid was readily taken up by the treated cells and incorporated into the phospholipid fraction. When added to the culture medium, 2-hexadecynoic acid inhibited the growth of HeLa cells, but when mixed with an equivalent amount of palmitic acid, growth inhibition was not observed. PMID:7181490

  7. Geometry dependence of crack growth resistance curves in thin sheet aluminum alloys

    E-print Network

    Stricklin, Lance Lee

    1988-01-01

    resistance curves [32]. Full scale ASTM standard E 813-87 compact tension specimens. s. ) ~z T, b) 1 T, c) 2 T Test stand layout shoving MTS, HP9816 computer and data aquisition system used to run the tests. Representative load versus load... the load line displacement. The LVDT had a half inch 18 Fig. 4. Full scale ASTM standard E 813-87 compact tension specimens. a) 2 T, b)1T, c)2T 19 range for zero to ten volts output. Figure 8 shows schematically how the LVDT was attached...

  8. Marine microbial ecology in the sub-Antarctic Zone: Rates of bacterial and phytoplankton growth and grazing by heterotrophic protists

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pearce, Imojen; Davidson, Andrew T.; Thomson, Paul G.; Wright, Simon; van den Enden, Rick

    2011-11-01

    The sub-Antarctic zone (SAZ) of the Southern Ocean is considered one of the largest sinks for atmospheric CO 2 and as such is an important region for climate change research. To determine the importance of micro- and nano-heterotrophs in controlling microbial abundance within this region, we determined microbial standing stocks and rates of herbivory and bacterivory in relation to changes in the water masses south of Tasmania. The SAZ-Sense ('Sensitivity of the sub-Antarctic zone to environmental change') cruise traversed the SAZ during mid-late austral summer and focussed on process stations to the southeast (45°S, 153°E) and southwest (46°S, 140°E) of Tasmania and at the Polar Front (54°S, 147°E). Growth and grazing mortality of phytoplankton and bacteria were estimated by the grazing dilution technique using seawater from 10 m depth at 15 sites along the survey, along with concentrations of heterotrophic nanoflagellates (HNF), microzooplankton, bacteria, cyanobacteria and size fractionated (pico-, nano- and micro-sized) chlorophyll a (Chl a). Rates of herbivory ranged from 0.12 to 1.39 d -1 and were highest in the north-eastern SAZ (NE-SAZ) where concentrations of prey (as indicated by Chl a) and microzooplankton were also highest. Rates of herbivory were correlated with total rates of phytoplankton growth, bacterial growth and concentrations of microzooplankton. On average 82%, 67% and 42% primary production d -1 was consumed by microzooplankton and HNF at process stations in the north-western SAZ (NW-SAZ), NE-SAZ and polar frontal zone (PFZ), respectively. In the NW-SAZ, grazing pressure was highest on the pico-sized Chl a fraction, whereas in the NE-SAZ, grazing pressure was more evenly distributed across all three size fractions of Chl a. Bacterivory removed 77%, 93% and 39% of bacterial production d -1 in the NW-SAZ, NE-SAZ and PFZ, respectively, and rates of bacterivory ranged from 0.12 to 1.03 d -1. Rates of bacterivory were highest in the NE-SAZ where concentrations of bacteria were significantly higher than elsewhere in the region and bacterivory was correlated with bacterial growth rates and rates of cyanobacterivory. Cluster analysis of the concentrations of marine microbes and their rates of growth and grazing mortality identified 5 groups of sampling sites that differed in community structure. Analysis distinguished between high nutrient, low Chl a (HNLC) communities in the NW-SAZ that were iron-limited; iron-limited low Chl a PFZ communities; and iron-replete NE-SAZ communities where high rates of remineralisation correlated with higher concentrations of Chl a. Our findings show that much of the carbon sequestered by photosynthesis in the SAZ during summer is reprocessed via the microbial loop rather than contributing to vertical flux, particularly to the southeast of Tasmania. This suggests strong seasonality in carbon export in the region and that future climate-driven changes in oceanography may reduce carbon export from the region in summer.

  9. Growth curve analyses of the relationship between early maternal age and children's mathematics and reading performance.

    PubMed

    Torres, D Diego

    2015-03-01

    Regarding the methods used to examine the early maternal age-child academic outcomes relationship, the extant literature has tended to examine change using statistical analyses that fail to appreciate that individuals vary in their rates of growth. Of the one study I have been able to find that employs a true growth model to estimate this relationship, the authors only controlled for characteristics of the maternal household after family formation; confounding background factors of mothers that might select them into early childbearing, a possible source of bias, were ignored. The authors' findings nonetheless suggested an inverse relationship between early maternal age, i.e., a first birth between the ages of 13 and 17, and Canadian adolescents' mean math performance at age 10. Early maternal age was not related to the linear slope of age. To elucidate whether the early maternal age-child academic outcomes association, treated in a growth context, is consistent with this finding, the present study built on it using US data and explored children's mathematics and reading trajectories from age 5 on. Its unique contribution is that it further explicitly controlled for maternal background factors and employed a three-level growth model with repeated measures of children nested within their mothers. Though the strength of the relationship varied between mean initial academic performance and mean academic growth, results confirmed that early maternal age was negatively related to children's mathematics and reading achievement, net of post-teen first birth child-specific and maternal household factors. Once maternal background factors were included, there was no statistically significant relationship between early maternal age and either children's mean initial mathematics and reading scores or their mean mathematics and reading growth. PMID:25592941

  10. Individual Differences in the Onset of Tense Marking: A Growth-Curve Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hadley, Pamela A.; Holt, Janet K.

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore individual differences in children's tense onset growth trajectories and to determine whether any within- or between-child predictors could account for these differences. Twenty-two children with expressive vocabulary abilities in the low-average to below-average range participated. Sixteen children were at…

  11. Level and Change of Bullying Behavior during High School: A Multilevel Growth Curve Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nocentini, Annalaura; Menesini, Ersilia; Salmivalli, Christina

    2013-01-01

    The development of bullying behavior was examined across three years in a sample of 515 adolescents (46% females) from 41 classrooms. At time 1, the students were in grades 9 and 10 (mean age = 14.5 years; SD = 0.54). Results of a multilevel growth model showed that both baseline level and change of bullying varied significantly across individuals…

  12. CURVED WALLS: GRAIN GROWTH, SETTLING, AND COMPOSITION PATTERNS IN T TAURI DISK DUST SUBLIMATION FRONTS

    SciTech Connect

    McClure, M. K.; Calvet, N.; Hartmann, L.; Ingleby, L. [Department of Astronomy, The University of Michigan, 500 Church Street, 830 Dennison Building., Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); D'Alessio, P. [Centro de Radioastronomía y Astrofísica, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, 58089 Morelia, Michoacán (Mexico); Espaillat, C. [Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Sargent, B. [Center for Imaging Science and Laboratory for Multiwavelength Astrophysics, Rochester Institute of Technology, 54 Lomb Memorial Drive, Rochester, NY 14623 (United States); Watson, D. M. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Rochester, Rochester, NY 14627 (United States); Hernández, J., E-mail: melisma@umich.edu, E-mail: ncalvet@umich.edu, E-mail: lhartm@umich.edu, E-mail: lingleby@umich.edu, E-mail: p.dalessio@astrosmo.unam.mx, E-mail: cespaillat@cfa.harvard.edu, E-mail: baspci@rit.edu, E-mail: dmw@pas.rochester.edu, E-mail: hernandj@cida.ve [Centro de Investigaciones de Astronomía (CIDA), Mérida 5101-A (Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of)

    2013-10-01

    The dust sublimation walls of disks around T Tauri stars represent a directly observable cross-section through the disk atmosphere and midplane. Their emission properties can probe the grain size distribution and composition of the innermost regions of the disk, where terrestrial planets form. Here we calculate the inner dust sublimation wall properties for four classical T Tauri stars with a narrow range of spectral types and inclination angles and a wide range of mass accretion rates to determine the extent to which the walls are radially curved. Best fits to the near- and mid-IR excesses are found for curved, two-layer walls in which the lower layer contains larger, hotter, amorphous pyroxene grains with Mg/(Mg+Fe) = 0.6 and the upper layer contains submicron, cooler, mixed amorphous olivine and forsterite grains. As the mass accretion rates decrease from 10{sup –8} to 10{sup –10} M{sub ?} yr{sup –1}, the maximum grain size in the lower layer decreases from ?3 to 0.5 ?m. We attribute this to a decrease in fragmentation and turbulent support for micron-sized grains with decreasing viscous heating. The atmosphere of these disks is depleted of dust with dust-gas mass ratios 1 × 10{sup –4} of the interstellar medium (ISM) value, while the midplane is enhanced to eight times the ISM value. For all accretion rates, the wall contributes at least half of the flux in the optically thin 10 ?m silicate feature. Finally, we find evidence for an iron gradient in the disk, suggestive of that found in our solar system.

  13. Curved Walls: Grain Growth, Settling, and Composition Patterns in T Tauri Disk Dust Sublimation Fronts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McClure, M. K.; D'Alessio, P.; Calvet, N.; Espaillat, C.; Hartmann, L.; Sargent, B.; Watson, D. M.; Ingleby, L.; Hernández, J.

    2013-10-01

    The dust sublimation walls of disks around T Tauri stars represent a directly observable cross-section through the disk atmosphere and midplane. Their emission properties can probe the grain size distribution and composition of the innermost regions of the disk, where terrestrial planets form. Here we calculate the inner dust sublimation wall properties for four classical T Tauri stars with a narrow range of spectral types and inclination angles and a wide range of mass accretion rates to determine the extent to which the walls are radially curved. Best fits to the near- and mid-IR excesses are found for curved, two-layer walls in which the lower layer contains larger, hotter, amorphous pyroxene grains with Mg/(Mg+Fe) = 0.6 and the upper layer contains submicron, cooler, mixed amorphous olivine and forsterite grains. As the mass accretion rates decrease from 10-8 to 10-10 M ? yr-1, the maximum grain size in the lower layer decreases from ~3 to 0.5 ?m. We attribute this to a decrease in fragmentation and turbulent support for micron-sized grains with decreasing viscous heating. The atmosphere of these disks is depleted of dust with dust-gas mass ratios 1 × 10-4 of the interstellar medium (ISM) value, while the midplane is enhanced to eight times the ISM value. For all accretion rates, the wall contributes at least half of the flux in the optically thin 10 ?m silicate feature. Finally, we find evidence for an iron gradient in the disk, suggestive of that found in our solar system.

  14. Bacterial adhesion and growth reduction by novel rubber-derived oligomers.

    PubMed

    Badawy, Hope T; Pasetto, Pamela; Mouget, Jean-Luc; Pilard, Jean-François; Cutright, Teresa J; Milsted, Amy

    2013-09-01

    In the medical field, attached bacteria can cause infections associated with catheters, incisions, burns, and medical implants especially in immunocompromised patients. The problem is exacerbated by the fact that attached bacteria are ?1000 times more resistant to antibiotics than planktonic cells. The rapid spread of antibiotic resistance in these and other organisms has led to a significant need to find new methods for preventing bacterial attachment. The goal of this research was to evaluate the effectiveness of novel polymer coatings to prevent the attachment of three medically relevant bacteria. Tests were conducted with Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Staphylococcus epidermidis, and Staphylococcus aureus for oligomers derived from modifications of natural rubber (cis 1,4-polyisoprene). The different oligomers were: PP04, with no quaternary ammonium (QA); MV067, one QA; PP06, three QA groups. In almost all experiments, cell attachment was inhibited to various extents as long as the oligomers were used. PP06 was the most effective as it decreased the planktonic cell numbers by at least 50% for all bacteria. Differences between species sensitivity were also observed. P. aeruginosa was the most resistant bacteria tested, S. aureus, the most sensitive. Further experiments are required to understand the full extent and mode of the antimicrobial properties of these surfaces. PMID:23921230

  15. Bacterial cellulose as a support for the growth of retinal pigment epithelium.

    PubMed

    Gonçalves, Sara; Padrão, Jorge; Rodrigues, Inês Patrício; Silva, João Pedro; Sencadas, Vítor; Lanceros-Mendez, Senentxu; Girão, Henrique; Dourado, Fernando; Rodrigues, Lígia R

    2015-04-13

    The feasibility of bacterial cellulose (BC) as a novel substrate for retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) culture was evaluated. Thin (41.6 ± 2.2 ?m of average thickness) and heat-dried BC substrates were surface-modified via acetylation and polysaccharide adsorption, using chitosan and carboxymethyl cellulose. All substrates were characterized according to their surface chemistry, wettability, energy, topography, and also regarding their permeability, dimensional stability, mechanical properties, and endotoxin content. Then, their ability to promote RPE cell adhesion and proliferation in vitro was assessed. All surface-modified BC substrates presented similar permeation coefficients with solutes of up to 300 kDa. Acetylation of BC decreased it's swelling and the amount of endotoxins. Surface modification of BC greatly enhanced the adhesion and proliferation of RPE cells. All samples showed similar stress-strain behavior; BC and acetylated BC showed the highest elastic modulus, but the latter exhibited a slightly smaller tensile strength and elongation at break as compared to pristine BC. Although similar proliferation rates were observed among the modified substrates, the acetylated ones showed higher initial cell adhesion. This difference may be mainly due to the moderately hydrophilic surface obtained after acetylation. PMID:25748276

  16. Family Structure and Problem Behavior of Adolescents and Young Adults: A Growth-Curve Study

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Inge VanderValk; Ed Spruijt; Martijn de Goede; Cora Maas; Wim Meeus

    2005-01-01

    In the present longitudinal 3-wave study of 1274 adolescents and young adults, aged 12–24 at the 1st wave, it is examined\\u000a whether youngsters from intact versus postdivorce families show long-term differences in internalizing and externalizing problems.\\u000a Furthermore, possible differences in the development of this problem behavior between offspring from intact and postdivorce\\u000a families are examined, i.e., possible differences in growth

  17. Spectrum–effect relationships between ultra performance liquid chromatography fingerprints and anti-bacterial activities of Rhizoma coptidis

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Wei-Jun Kong; Yan-Ling Zhao; Xiao-He Xiao; Jia-Bo Wang; Han-Bing Li; Zu-Lun Li; Cheng Jin; Yi Liu

    2009-01-01

    The fingerprints of Rhizoma coptidis from various sources were established by ultra performance liquid chromatography (UPLC) and the anti-bacterial activities of R. coptidis on Escherichia coli (E. coli) growth was studied by microcalarimetry. The UPLC fingerprints were evaluated using similarity analysis (SA) and hierarchical clustering analysis (HCA). Some quantitative parameters obtained from the thermo-genic curves of E. coli growth affected

  18. Do Trajectories of At-Home Dementia Caregiving Account for Burden After Nursing Home Placement? A Growth Curve Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Newcomer, Robert; Gaugler, Joseph E.

    2010-01-01

    Transitioning to the nursing home setting is a complex process for family caregivers of older adults with dementia. While nursing home placement (NHP) can alleviate certain caregiving responsibilities, new stressors can also emerge. In the present study, the researchers examined how care-related factors can change leading up to NHP and how these factors influence caregiver outcomes following NHP. A sample of 634 family dementia caregivers (N = 634) were surveyed at three six-month intervals prior to NHP and once during the 12 month period following institutionalization. Growth curve modeling revealed dynamic changes in certain factors leading up to NHP (e.g., caregivers’ perceived health), while other factors remained stable (e.g., caregiver burden). Several factors emerged as significant predictors of caregiver burden following NHP, including pre-placement burden and adult day service utilization. For geriatric social workers, these findings may be useful in assessing family caregivers, and in the development and utilization of appropriate interventions. PMID:20853212

  19. A Latent Growth Curve Analysis of Early and Increasing Peer Victimization as Predictors of Mental Health Across Elementary School

    PubMed Central

    Rudolph, Karen D.; Troop-Gordon, Wendy; Hessel, Elenda T.; Schmidt, Jennifer D.

    2011-01-01

    Peer victimization has been implicated as a traumatic stressor that compromises children’s long-term mental health, yet a dearth of prospective research specifically demonstrates lasting effects of early victimization. This research examined whether early (2nd grade) victimization and increasing (2nd – 5th grade) victimization independently predicted depressive symptoms and aggressive behavior (overt and relational) in 5th grade. Participants included 433 children (238 girls, 195 boys). Children reported on peer victimization and depressive symptoms; teachers reported on peer victimization and aggressive behavior. Latent growth curve analysis revealed that both early and increasing victimization made unique contributions to subsequent depressive symptoms and aggressive behavior. Relational aggression was particularly likely to follow victimization in girls. PMID:21229448

  20. A latent growth curve analysis of early and increasing peer victimization as predictors of mental health across elementary school.

    PubMed

    Rudolph, Karen D; Troop-Gordon, Wendy; Hessel, Elenda T; Schmidt, Jennifer D

    2011-01-01

    Peer victimization has been implicated as a traumatic stressor that compromises children's long-term mental health, yet a dearth of prospective research documents lasting effects of early victimization. This study examined whether early (2nd grade) and increasing (2nd-5th grade) victimization predicted 5th grade depressive symptoms and aggressive behavior. Children (238 girls, 195 boys) reported on victimization and depressive symptoms; teachers reported on victimization and aggressive behavior. Latent growth curve analysis revealed that early and increasing victimization made unique contributions to depressive symptoms and aggressive behavior. Relational aggression was particularly likely to follow victimization in girls. This study reveals that victimization contributes to mental health over an extended period and elucidates the role of early versus increasing victimization, supporting the need for programs to prevent the pernicious mental health consequences of victimization. PMID:21229448

  1. Growth curve analysis for plasma profiles using smoothing splines. Annual progress report, June 1992--June 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Imre, K.

    1993-05-01

    We are developing a profile analysis code for the statistical estimation of the parametric dependencies of the temperature and density profiles in tokamaks. Our code uses advanced statistical techniques to determine the optimal fit, i.e. the fit which minimized the predictive error. For a forty TFTR Ohmic profile dataset, our preliminary results indicate that the profile shape depends almost exclusively on q{sub a}{prime} but that the shape dependencies are not Gaussian. We are now comparing various shape models on the TFTR data. In the first six months, we have completed the core modules of the code, including a B-spline package for variable knot locations, a data-based method to determine the optimal smoothing parameters, self-consistent estimation of the bias errors, and adaptive fitting near the plasma edge. Visualization graphics already include three dimensional surface plots, and discharge by discharge plots of the predicted curves with error bars together with the actual measurements values, and plots of the basis functions with errors.

  2. Growth curves for school children from Kuching, Sarawak: a methodological development.

    PubMed

    Bong, Yii Bonn; Shariff, Asma Ahmad; Mohamed, Abdul Majid; Merican, Amir Feisal

    2015-03-01

    In this article, the authors propose reference curves for height and weight for school children in the Kuching area, Sarawak. The school children were from primary to secondary schools (aged 6.5 to 17 years old) and comprised both genders. Anthropometric measurements and demographic information for 3081 school-aged children were collected (1440 boys and 1641 girls). Fitted line plots and percentiles for height and weight (3rd, 10th, 25th, 50th, 75th, 90th, and 97th percentiles) were obtained. The height of school boys and school girls were almost similar at the start of their school-going age. For school girls, height and weight values stabilized when they reached 16 or 17 years old but kept increasing for school boys. School boys were taller than school girls as they entered adolescence. Height differences between school boys and school girls became significantly wider as they grew older. Chinese school children were taller and heavier than those of other ethnic groups. PMID:22652249

  3. Improved detection of bacterial growth in continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis effluent by use of BacT/Alert FAN bottles.

    PubMed Central

    Alfa, M J; Degagne, P; Olson, N; Harding, G K

    1997-01-01

    Culture-negative peritonitis is a major complication for patients on continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis (CAPD) and precludes organism-specific therapy. The aim of the present study was to compare inoculation of 10 ml of CAPD effluent into BacT/Alert blood culture bottles (FAN [fastidious antimicrobic neutralizing], BacTAlert aerobic [BTA], and BacT/Alert anaerobic [BTAn] bottles) to our conventional method of using 50 ml of concentrated CAPD effluent to inoculate peptone broth bottles (BD bottles) and MacConkey agar and blood agar medium (BA-MAC). The FAN, BTA, and BTAn bottles were monitored automatically in the BacT/Alert blood culture instrument. A total of 207 CAPD effluents were studied, and in 97 bacteria were detected by at least one method. Compared to BTA bottles (79 of 97; 81.4%), BTAn bottles (78 of 97; 80.4%), and BD bottles (88 of 97; 90.7%), the single best broth medium for detecting bacterial growth in CAPD effluents was the FAN bottle (90 of 97 effluents; 92.8%). A total of 125 bacterial species were detected by any method, and the majority (91.8%) of CAPD effluents were infected with a single species. A combination of FAN and BTAn bottles detected 111 of 125 (88.8%) of all organisms, whereas a combination of BD bottles and BA-MAC detected 107 of 125 (85.6%) of all organisms. One or more organisms that would have been completely missed by the conventional method with BD bottles and BA-MAC were detected in 18 CAPD effluents. Of these 18 CAPD effluents, 6 showed no growth by the conventional method with BD bottles and BA-MAC. On the basis of our data, the most sensitive and least labor intensive method was direct inoculation of 10 ml of CAPD effluent into a FAN bottle and a BTAn bottle, which could be automatically monitored by the BacT/Alert blood culture instrument. On the basis of case definitions for peritonitis, the sensitivities and specificities of the methods with FAN and BTAn bottles and with BD bottles and BA-MAC were 81.1 and 98.8% and 74.5 and 96.5%, respectively. PMID:9157143

  4. Illustration of year-to-year variation in wheat spectral profile crop growth curves. [Kansas, Oklahoma, North Dakota and South Dakota

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gonzalez, P.; Jones, C. (principal investigators)

    1980-01-01

    Data previously compiled on the year to year variability of spectral profile crop growth parameters for spring and winter wheat in Kansas, Oklahoma, and the Dakotas were used with a profile model to develop graphs illustrating spectral profile crop growth curves for a number of years and a number of spring and winter wheat segments. These curves show the apparent variability in spectral profiles for wheat from one year to another within the same segment and from one segment to another within the same year.

  5. Autoinducer 2: A concentration-dependent signal for mutualistic bacterial biofilm growth

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rickard, A.H.; Palmer, R.J., Jr.; Blehert, D.S.; Campagna, S.R.; Semmelhack, M.F.; Egland, P.G.; Bassler, B.L.; Kolenbrander, P.E.

    2006-01-01

    4,5-dihydroxy-2,3-pentanedione (DPD), a product of the LuxS enzyme in the catabolism of S-ribosylhomocysteine, spontaneously cyclizes to form autoinducer 2 (AI-2). AI-2 is proposed to be a universal signal molecule mediating interspecies communication among bacteria. We show that mutualistic and abundant biofilm growth in flowing saliva of two human oral commensal bacteria, Actinomyces naeslundii T14V and Streptococcus oralis 34, is dependent upon production of AI-2 by S. oralis 34. A luxS mutant of S. oralis 34 was constructed which did not produce AI-2. Unlike wild-type dual-species biofilms, A. naeslundii T14V and an S. oralis 34 luxS mutant did not exhibit mutualism and generated only sparse biofilms which contained a 10-fold lower biomass of each species. Restoration of AI-2 levels by genetic or chemical (synthetic AI-2 in the form of DPD) complementation re-established the mutualistic growth and high biomass characteristic for the wild-type dual-species biofilm. Furthermore, an optimal concentration of DPD was determined, above and below which biofilm formation was suppressed. The optimal concentration was 100-fold lower than the detection limit of the currently accepted AI-2 assay. Thus, AI-2 acts as an interspecies signal and its concentration is critical for mutualism between two species of oral bacteria grown under conditions that are representative of the human oral cavity. ?? 2006 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  6. Predicting Response to Intensive Multimodal Inpatient Treatment: A Comparison of Single and Multiple Class Latent Growth Curve Modeling Approaches

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Justin D.; Van Ryzin, Mark J.; Fowler, J. Christopher; Handler, Leonard

    2013-01-01

    In a modest body of research, personality functioning assessed via performance-based instruments has been found to validly predict treatment outcome and, to some extent, differential response to treatment. However, state-of-the-science longitudinal and mixture modeling techniques, which are common in many areas of clinical psychology, have rarely been used. In this article, we compare multilevel growth curve modeling (MLM) and latent class growth modeling (LCGM) approaches with the same dataset to illustrate the different research questions that can be addressed by each method. Global Assessment of Functioning (GAF) scores collected at six points during the course of a long-term multimodal inpatient treatment of 58 severely and persistently mentally ill adults were used to model the trajectory of treatment outcome. Pretreatment personality functioning and other markers of psychiatric severity were examined as covariates in each modeling approach. The results of both modeling approaches generally indicated that more psychologically impaired clients responded less favorably to treatment. The LCGM approach revealed two unique trajectories of improvement (a persistently low group and a higher starting, improving group). Personality functioning and baseline psychiatric variables significantly predicted group membership and the rate of change within the groups. A side-by-side examination of these two methods was found to be useful in predicting differential treatment response with personality functioning variables. PMID:24066712

  7. Bacterial Methanogenesis and Growth from CO2 with Elemental Iron as the Sole Source of Electrons.

    PubMed

    Daniels, L; Belay, N; Rajagopal, B S; Weimer, P J

    1987-07-31

    Previous studies of anaerobic biocorrosion have suggested that microbial sulfur and phosphorus products as well as cathodic hydrogen consumption may accelerate anaerobic metal oxidation. Methanogenic bacteria, which normally use molecular hydrogen (H(2)) and carbon dioxide (CO(2)) to produce methane (CH(4)) and which are major inhabitants of most anaerobic ecosystems, use either pure elemental iron (Fe(0)) or iron in mild steel as a source of electrons in the reduction of CO(2) to CH(4). These bacteria use Fe(0) oxidation for energy generation and growth. The mechanism of Fe(0) oxidation is cathodic depolarization, in which electrons from Fe(0) and H(+) from water produce H(2), which is then released for use by the methanogens; thermodynamic calculations show that significant Fe(0) oxidation will not occur in the absence of H(2) consumption by the methanogens. The data suggest that methanogens can be significant contributors to the corrosion of iron-containing materials in anaerobic environments. PMID:17730323

  8. New protein hydrolysates from collagen wastes used as peptone for bacterial growth.

    PubMed

    Vasileva-Tonkova, E; Nustorova, M; Gushterova, A

    2007-01-01

    A simple and low-cost procedure was developed for the effective processing of native calf skin and blood wastes to produce protein hydrolysates. The method includes extraction of high-molecular-weight protein from the raw material, followed by enzymatic hydrolysis of the extracted residue. The enzymatic hydrolysis was performed by inexpensive commercial subtilisin DY, produced by Bacillus subtilis strain DY possessing high specific activity. The contents of protein, nitrogen, ash, and amino acids of the obtained hydrolysates were determined and compared with those of the commonly used commercial casein hydrolysate (Fluka Biochemica, Switzerland). The newly obtained calf skin hydrolysate, called Eladin, was found to be suitable as a low-cost alternative peptone in growth media of different microorganisms, such as Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Salmonella dublin, and Staphylococcus aureus. The method allows utilization of waste materials by converting them into valuable protein products that could find widespread application in microbiologic practice. PMID:17171464

  9. Effects of Bacillus amyloliquefaciens FZB42 on Lettuce Growth and Health under Pathogen Pressure and Its Impact on the Rhizosphere Bacterial Community

    PubMed Central

    Rändler, Manuela; Schmid, Michael; Junge, Helmut; Borriss, Rainer; Hartmann, Anton; Grosch, Rita

    2013-01-01

    The soil-borne pathogen Rhizoctonia solani is responsible for crop losses on a wide range of important crops worldwide. The lack of effective control strategies and the increasing demand for organically grown food has stimulated research on biological control. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the rhizosphere competence of the commercially available inoculant Bacillus amyloliquefaciens FZB42 on lettuce growth and health together with its impact on the indigenous rhizosphere bacterial community in field and pot experiments. Results of both experiments demonstrated that FZB42 is able to effectively colonize the rhizosphere (7.45 to 6.61 Log 10 CFU g?1 root dry mass) within the growth period of lettuce in the field. The disease severity (DS) of bottom rot on lettuce was significantly reduced from severe symptoms with DS category 5 to slight symptom expression with DS category 3 on average through treatment of young plants with FZB42 before and after planting. The 16S rRNA gene based fingerprinting method terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP) showed that the treatment with FZB42 did not have a major impact on the indigenous rhizosphere bacterial community. However, the bacterial community showed a clear temporal shift. The results also indicated that the pathogen R. solani AG1-IB affects the rhizosphere microbial community after inoculation. Thus, we revealed that the inoculant FZB42 could establish itself successfully in the rhizosphere without showing any durable effect on the rhizosphere bacterial community. PMID:23935892

  10. CdTe-TiO2 nanocomposite: an impeder of bacterial growth and biofilm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gholap, Haribhau; Patil, Rajendra; Yadav, Prasad; Banpurkar, Arun; Ogale, Satishchandra; Gade, Wasudeo

    2013-05-01

    The resurgence of infectious diseases and associated issues related to antibiotic resistance has raised enormous challenges which may possibly be confronted primarily by nanotechnology routes. One key need of critical significance in this context is the development of an agent capable of inhibiting quorum sensing mediated biofilm formation in pathogenic organisms. In this work we examine the possible use of a nanocomposite, CdTe-TiO2, as an impeder of growth and biofilm. In the presence of CdTe-TiO2, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) analysis shows exposed cells without the surrounding matrix. Confocal laser scanning microscopy shows spatially distributed fluorescence, a typical indication of an impeded biofilm, as opposed to the control which shows matrix-covered cells and continuous fluorescence, typical of biofilm formation. Quantitatively, the inhibition of biofilm was ˜57%. CdTe-TiO2 also exhibits good antibacterial properties against Gram positive and Gram negative organisms by virtue of the generation of reactive oxygen species inside the cells, reflected by a ruptured appearance in the SEM analysis.

  11. Effects of vitamin A on growth, serum anti-bacterial activity and transaminase activities in the juvenile Japanese flounder, Paralichthys olivaceus

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Luis Hector Hernandez Hernandez; Shin-ichi Teshima; Shunsuke Koshio; Manabu Ishikawa; Yoshito Tanaka

    2007-01-01

    The present study examined the effects of dietary vitamin A (vitA) deficiency and excess on growth, serum anti-bacterial activity and serum enzyme activities of juvenile Japanese flounder, Paralichthys olivaceus. Three semi-purified diets containing 0, 10,000 and 25,000 International Units of vitA per kg of diet (IU vitA\\/kg) were fed to juvenile Japanese flounder (initial weight 1.59 g) for 120 days. At the

  12. The effects on N 2 fixation (C 2 H 2 reduction), bacterial population and rice plant growth of two modes of straw application to a wetland rice field

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. K. Ladha; A. Tirol-Padre; M. L. G. Daroy; G. Punzalan; I. Watanabe

    1987-01-01

    The effects of incorporation and surface application of straw to a wetland rice field on nitrogen fixation (C2H2 reduction), bacterial population and rice plant growth were studied. Rice straw (5 t ha-1) was chopped (10- to 15-cm pieces) and applied to the field 2 weeks before transplanting IR42, a long-duration variety, and IR50, a short-duration variety. The acetylene-reducing activity (ARA)

  13. Growth of Bacterial Biofilms on Tenckhoff Catheter Discs in vitro after Simulated Touch Contamination of the Y-Connecting Set in Continuous Ambulatory Peritoneal Dialysis

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Mrinal K. Dasgupta; Marlene Larabie; Kan Lam; K. B. Bettcher; David L. Tyrrell; William Costerton

    1990-01-01

    We simulated touch contamination of peritoneal dialysis fluids perfused through an in vitro system with a modified Robbins’ device (MRD) and Y-connecting tubings, to study the pathogenesis of bacterial biofilm (BB) growth on Tenckhoff catheter (TC) discs. The spike ends of Y-connecting sets were dipped in a suspension of freshly cultured cells of Staphylococcus epidermidis (3X108 cfu\\/ml), and connected to

  14. Paclobutrazol and plant-growth promoting bacterial endophyte Pantoea sp. enhance copper tolerance of guinea grass ( Panicum maximum ) in hydroponic culture

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Wei HuoChun-hua; Chun-hua Zhuang; Ya Cao; Meng Pu; Hui Yao; Lai-qing Lou; Qing-sheng Cai

    As most gramineous plants, guinea grass (Panicum maximum) comprise cellulosic biomass, which may be used as a feedstock for bioenergy. In order to develop such potential energy plants\\u000a on copper-polluted lands, the hydroponic experiments with Cu, Paclobutrazol (PP333, a kind of antigibberellin) and plant growth-promoting\\u000a bacterial endophyte (PGPB) treatments were carried out in a greenhouse. The seedlings of two cultivars

  15. The Role of Peer Contacts in the Relationship between Parental Knowledge and Adolescents' Externalizing Behaviors: A Latent Growth Curve Modeling Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reitz, Ellen; Prinzie, Peter; Dekovic, Maja; Buist, Kirsten L.

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to examine the direct and indirect effects (through peer contacts) of parental knowledge on adolescents' delinquent and aggressive problem behavior, using latent growth curve modeling. A sample of 457 13- to 14-year old adolescents at first measurement wave (M = 13.27; SD = 0.45 years) filled out questionnaires…

  16. The heat-shock-regulated grpE gene of Escherichia coli is required for bacterial growth at all temperatures but is dispensable in certain mutant backgrounds.

    PubMed Central

    Ang, D; Georgopoulos, C

    1989-01-01

    Previous work has established that the grpE+ gene product is a heat shock protein that is essential for bacteriophage lambda growth at all temperatures and for Escherichia coli growth at temperatures above 43 degrees C. Here it is shown that the grpE+ gene product is essential for bacterial viability at all temperatures. The strategy required constructing a grpE deletion derivative carrying a selectable chloramphenicol drug resistance marker provided by an omega insertion and showing that this deletion construct can be crossed into the bacterial chromosome if and only if a functional grpE+ gene is present elsewhere in the same cell. As a control, the same omega insertion could be placed immediately downstream of the grpE+ coding sequence without any observable effects on host growth. This result demonstrates that the inability to construct a grpE-deleted E. coli strain is not simply due to a lethal polar effect on neighboring gene expression. Unexpectedly, it was found that the grpE deletion derivative could be crossed into the bacterial chromosome in a strain that was defective in DnaK function. Further analysis showed that it was not the lack of DnaK function per se that allowed E. coli to tolerate a deletion in the grpE+ gene. Rather, it was the presence of unknown extragenic suppressors of a dnaK mutation that somehow compensated for the deficiency in both DnaK and GrpE function. Images PMID:2651417

  17. RELATIONS BETWEEN BACTERIAL NITROGEN METABOLISM AND GROWTH EFFICIENCY IN AN ESTUARINE AND AN OPEN-WATER ECOSYSTEM

    EPA Science Inventory

    Bacterial uptake or release of dissolved nitrogen compounds (amino nitrogen, urea, ammonium and nitrate) were examined in 0.8 |m filtered water from an estuary (Santa Rosa Sound [SRS], northwestern Florida) and an open-water location in the Gulf of Mexico [GM]. The bacterial nutr...

  18. 12-step affiliation and attendance following treatment for comorbid substance dependence and depression: a latent growth curve mediation model.

    PubMed

    Worley, Matthew J; Tate, Susan R; McQuaid, John R; Granholm, Eric L; Brown, Sandra A

    2013-01-01

    Among substance-dependent individuals, comorbid major depressive disorder (MDD) is associated with greater severity and poorer treatment outcomes, but little research has examined mediators of posttreatment substance use outcomes within this population. Using latent growth curve models, the authors tested relationships between individual rates of change in 12-step involvement and substance use, utilizing posttreatment follow-up data from a trial of group Twelve-Step Facilitation (TSF) and integrated cognitive-behavioral therapy (ICBT) for veterans with substance dependence and MDD. Although TSF patients were higher on 12-step affiliation and meeting attendance at end-of-treatment as compared with ICBT, they also experienced significantly greater reductions in these variables during the year following treatment, ending at similar levels as ICBT. Veterans in TSF also had significantly greater increases in drinking frequency during follow-up, and this group difference was mediated by their greater reductions in 12-step affiliation and meeting attendance. Patients with comorbid depression appear to have difficulty sustaining high levels of 12-step involvement after the conclusion of formal 12-step interventions, which predicts poorer drinking outcomes over time. Modifications to TSF and other formal 12-step protocols or continued therapeutic contact may be necessary to sustain 12-step involvement and reduced drinking for patients with substance dependence and MDD. PMID:23327503

  19. 12-step Affiliation and Attendance following Treatment for Comorbid Substance Dependence and Depression: A Latent Growth Curve Mediation Model

    PubMed Central

    Worley, Matthew J.; Tate, Susan R.; McQuaid, John R.; Granholm, Eric L.; Brown, Sandra A.

    2012-01-01

    Among substance-dependent individuals comorbid major depressive disorder (MDD) is associated with greater severity and poorer treatment outcomes, but little research has examined mediators of post-treatment substance use outcomes within this population. Using latent growth curve models we tested relationships between individual rates of change in 12-step involvement and substance use, utilizing post-treatment follow-up data from a trial of group Twelve-Step Facilitation (TSF) and Integrated Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy (ICBT) for veterans with substance dependence and MDD. While TSF patients were higher on 12-step affiliation and meeting attendance at end-of-treatment as compared to ICBT, they also experienced significantly greater reductions in these variables during the year following treatment, ending at similar levels as ICBT. Veterans in TSF also had significantly greater increases in drinking frequency during follow-up, and this group difference was mediated by their greater reductions in 12-step affiliation and meeting attendance. Patients with comorbid depression appear to have difficulty sustaining high levels of 12-step involvement after the conclusion of formal 12-step interventions, which predicts poorer drinking outcomes over time. Modifications to TSF and other formal 12-step protocols or continued therapeutic contact may be necessary to sustain 12-step involvement and reduced drinking for patients with substance dependence and MDD. PMID:23327503

  20. Influence of Asthma on the Longitudinal Trajectories of Cigarette Use Behaviors From Adolescence to Adulthood Using Latent Growth Curve Models

    PubMed Central

    Bae, Jisuk

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: While epidemiologic research indicates that the prevalence of risk-taking behaviors including cigarette smoking among young people with asthma is substantial, the longitudinal patterns of cigarette smoking in this vulnerable population have received little attention. The aim of this study was to evaluate differences in the longitudinal trajectories of cigarette use behaviors from adolescence to adulthood between young people with and without asthma. Methods: Data from the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent to Adult Health (Add Health) during the years 1994 to 1995 (Wave I, adolescence), 2001 to 2002 (Wave III, young adulthood), and 2007 to 2008 (Wave IV, adulthood) were analyzed (n=12 244). Latent growth curve models were used to examine the longitudinal trajectories of cigarette use behaviors during the transition to adulthood according to asthma status. Results: Regardless of asthma status, the trajectory means of cigarette use behaviors were found to increase, and then slightly decrease from adolescence to adulthood. In total participants, there were no statistically significant differences in initial levels and changes in cigarette use behaviors according to asthma status. However, in select sex and race subgroups (i.e., females and non-whites), former asthmatics showed greater escalation in cigarette use behaviors than did non-asthmatics or current asthmatics. Conclusions: This study indicated that the changing patterns of cigarette use behaviors during the transition to adulthood among young people with asthma are comparable to or even more drastic than those among young people without asthma. PMID:25857649

  1. Common components of industrial metal-working fluids as sources of carbon for bacterial growth. [Acinetobacter; Pseudomonas

    SciTech Connect

    Foxall-vanAken, S.; Brown, J.A. Jr.; Young, W.; Salmeen, I.; McClure, T.; Napier, S. Jr.; Olsen, R.H.

    1986-06-01

    Water-based metal-working fluids in large-scale industrial operations consist of many components, but in the most commonly used formulations only three classes of components are present in high enough concentrations that they could, in principle, provide enough carbon to support the high bacterial densities (10/sup 9/ CFU/ml) often observed in contaminated factory fluids. These components are petroleum oil (1 to 5%), petroleum sulfonates (0.1 to 0.5%), and fatty acids (less than 0.1%, mainly linoleic and oleic acids supplied as tall oils). Pure strains of predominating bacteria were isolated from contaminated reservoirs of two metal-working systems and randomly selected 12 strains which were tested in liquid culture for growth with each of the metal-working fluid components as the sole source of carbon. Of the 12 strains, 7 reached high density (10/sup 9/ CFU/ml from an initial inoculum of less than 2 x 10/sup 3/) in 24 h, and 1 strain did the same in 48 h with 0.05% oleic or linoleic acid as the carbon source. These same strains also grew on 1% naphthenic petroleum oil but required up to 72 h to reach densities near 10/sup 8/ CFU/ml. One strain grew slightly and the others not at all on the petroleum sulfonates. The four remaining strains did not grow on any of the components, even though they were among the predominating bacteria in the contaminated system. Of the seven strains that grew best on the fatty acids and on the naphthenic petroleum oil, five were tentatively identified as Acinetobacter species and two were identified as Pseudomonas species. Four of the bacteria that did not grow were tentatively identified as species of Pseudomonas, and one could not be identified.

  2. Optimized polymeric film-based nitric oxide delivery inhibits bacterial growth in a mouse burn wound model.

    PubMed

    Brisbois, Elizabeth J; Bayliss, Jill; Wu, Jianfeng; Major, Terry C; Xi, Chuanwu; Wang, Stewart C; Bartlett, Robert H; Handa, Hitesh; Meyerhoff, Mark E

    2014-10-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) has many biological roles (e.g. antimicrobial agent, promoter of angiogenesis, prevention of platelet activation) that make NO releasing materials desirable for a variety of biomedical applications. Localized NO release can be achieved from biomedical grade polymers doped with diazeniumdiolated dibutylhexanediamine (DBHD/N2O2) and poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA). In this study, the optimization of this chemistry to create film/patches that can be used to decrease microbial infection at wound sites is examined. Two polyurethanes with different water uptakes (Tecoflex SG-80A (6.2±0.7wt.%) and Tecophilic SP-60D-20 (22.5±1.1wt.%)) were doped with 25wt.% DBHD/N2O2 and 10wt.% of PLGA with various hydrolysis rates. Films prepared with the polymer that has the higher water uptake (SP-60D-20) were found to have higher NO release and for a longer duration than the polyurethane with the lower water uptake (SG-80A). The more hydrophilic polymer enhances the hydrolysis rate of the PLGA additive, thereby providing a more acidic environment that increases the rate of NO release from the NO donor. The optimal NO releasing and control SG-80A patches were then applied to scald burn wounds that were infected with Acinetobacter baumannii. The NO released from these patches applied to the wounds is shown to significantly reduce the A. baumannii infection after 24h (?4 log reduction). The NO release patches are also able to reduce the level of transforming growth factor-? in comparison to controls, which can enhance re-epithelialization, decrease scarring and reduce migration of bacteria. The combined DBHD/N2O2 and PLGA-doped polymer patches, which could be replaced periodically throughout the wound healing process, demonstrate the potential to reduce risk of bacterial infection and promote the overall wound healing process. PMID:24980058

  3. Immune response and inhibition of bacterial growth by electrotransfer of plasmid DNA containing the antimicrobial peptide, epinecidin-1, into zebrafish muscle.

    PubMed

    Lin, Shih-Bin; Fan, Tzu-Wen; Wu, Jen-Leih; Hui, Cho-Fat; Chen, Jyh-Yih

    2009-03-01

    Bacterial infections represent serious diseases in aquaculture, rapidly leading to fish death by septicemia. We investigated whether the electrotransfer of green fluorescent protein gene fusion epinecidin-1 (CMV-gfp-epi) DNA into zebrafish muscle could regulate the fish immune response and inhibit bacterial growth. Electroporation parameters such as the number of pulses, voltage, and amount of plasmid DNA were analyzed, and results demonstrated the greatest mRNA expression level of gfp-epi relative to beta-actin was obtained with a pulse number of 4, a voltage strength of 100 V/cm, a concentration of DNA of 90 microg/fish, and electroporation for 96 h. In addition, the cytomegalovirus (CMV) promoter exhibited higher activity compared to the mylz promoter in muscle for electrotransfer in zebrafish. GFP fluorescence and gfp-epi mRNA expression in tissues after electroporation were also studied by a polymerase chain reaction, immunohistochemistry, and fluorescence microscopy. gfp-epi expression was significantly correlated with decreased bacterial numbers and immune-related gene expression. These data demonstrate that electroporation of epinecidin-1 might have provoked an inflammatory response that accounts for the improvement in bacterial clearance. PMID:19340938

  4. Comparison of the bacterial community and characterization of plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria from different genotypes of Chrysopogon zizanioides (L.) Roberty (vetiver) rhizospheres.

    PubMed

    Monteiro, Juliana Mendes; Vollú, Renata Estebanez; Coelho, Marcia Reed Rodrigues; Alviano, Celuta Sales; Blank, Arie Fitzgerald; Seldin, Lucy

    2009-08-01

    Molecular approaches [PCR-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE)] were used to determine whether three different vetiver (Chrysopogon zizanioides) genotypes, commercially used in Brazil and considered economically important over the world, select specific bacterial populations to coexist in their rhizospheres. DGGE profiles revealed that the predominant rhizospheric bacterial community hardly varies regarding the vetiver genotype. Moreover, using traditional cultivation methods, bacterial strains were isolated from the different rhizospheres. Colonies presenting different morphologies (83) were selected for determining their potential for plant growth promotion. More than half of the strains tested (57.8%) were amplified by PCR using nifH-based primers, specific for the enzyme nitrogenase reductase. The production of siderophores was observed in 88% of the strains, while the production of antimicrobial substances was detected in only 14.5% of the isolates when Micrococcus sp. was used as the indicator strain. Production of indole-3-acetic acid and the solubilization of phosphate were observed in 55.4% and 59% of the isolates, respectively. In total, 44 strains (53%) presented at least three characteristics of plant growth promotion and were submitted to amplified ribosomal DNA restriction analysis. Twenty-four genetic groups were formed at 100% similarity and one representative of each group was selected for their identification by partial 16S rRNA gene sequencing. They were affiliated with the genera Acinetobacter, Comamonas, Chryseobacterium, Klebsiella, Enterobacter, Pantoea, Dyella, Burkholderia, or Pseudomonas. These strains can be considered of great importance as possible biofertilizers in vetiver. PMID:19763409

  5. Bacterial growth rates, production and estimates of detrital carbon utilization in deep-sea sediments of the Solomon and Coral Seas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alongi, Daniel M.

    1990-05-01

    Surface (0-5 mm) sediments at 10 bathyal and abyssal (695-4350 m) stations were sampled to determine variations in bacterial densities, productivity (tritiated thymidine incorporation at simulated in situ conditions) and specific growth rates (?) in relation to environmental conditions and phytodetritus in the Solomon and Coral Seas. bacterial direct counts ranged from 2.5 to 60.6 × 10 8 cells g -1 sediment dry wt, but did not decline significantly with ocean depth or correlate with any other variables measured. Bacterial productivity was generally low, ranging from 34 to 7010 ?g C m -2 d -1, but specific growth rates varied widely, ranging from 0.001 to 0.12 d -1. Incubation of samples at in situ temperature and atmospheric pressure at two stations resulted in either no detectable growth or significantly decreased thymidine incorporation, indicating a barophilic response. Quantities of macroalgal detritus were found at stations closest to reefs, whereas vascular plant and wood debris were found at most of the other stations, indicating that some detrital material transported from adjacent reefs and by massive riverine export from Papua New Guinea reaches the deep-sea floor in both seas. Significant quantities of sedimentary chlorophyll ? and phaeo-pigments also were detected, indicating some deposition of phytoplankton-derived detritus. The fluxes of phytoplankton-derived, detrital carbon to the benthos were estimated (using available plankton data and the flux equation of Suess) as on the order of 2-23 mg C m -2 d -1. Assuming a median carbon assimilation efficiency of 50%, utilization of this material by sedimentary bacteria was estimated to vary widely (2-97%), averaging 40% oof total detrital carbon flux. Rates of bacterial productivity declined significantly with water depth and correlated with no other factors, but specific growth rates correlated positively with the standing amounts of macroalgal debris and were comparatively rapid (= turnover times of 6-63 days) only at the sites where this detritus was found. These results suggest that factors traditionally invoked as regulating bacterial activity in the deep sea may not always be applicable, particularly for habitats receiving significant quantities of fresh algal detritus.

  6. High-throughput analysis of growth differences among phage strains Paul E. Turner , Jeremy A. Draghi 1

    E-print Network

    Turner, Paul

    estimated by scattering of light at a wavelength of 600 nm. Phage particles are too smallHigh-throughput analysis of growth differences among phage strains Paul E. Turner , Jeremy A of a mathematical model for phage growth to predict which fea- tures of bacterial growth curves were best associated

  7. A Multiphasic Approach for the Identification of Endophytic Bacterial in Strawberry Fruit and their Potential for Plant Growth Promotion

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Gilberto Vinícius de Melo Pereira; Karina Teixeira Magalhães; Emi Rainildes Lorenzetii; Thiago Pereira Souza; Rosane Freitas Schwan

    This study used a multiphasic approach, characterized by the simultaneous use of culture-dependent and culture-independent\\u000a methods, to investigate endophytic bacterial communities in strawberry (Fragaria ananassa) fruit. A total of 92 bacterial endophytes were isolated and initially grouped by their repetitive extragenic palindromic\\u000a (rep)-PCR banding pattern and biochemical features. Phylogenetic analysis of the 16S rRNA gene sequences of 45 representatives\\u000a showed

  8. Fabrication of a platform to isolate the influences of surface nanotopography from chemistry on bacterial attachment and growth.

    PubMed

    Pegalajar-Jurado, Adoracion; Easton, Christopher D; Crawford, Russell J; McArthur, Sally L

    2015-03-01

    Billions of dollars are spent annually worldwide to combat the adverse effects of bacterial attachment and biofilm formation in industries as varied as maritime, food, and health. While advances in the fabrication of antifouling surfaces have been reported recently, a number of the essential aspects responsible for the formation of biofilms remain unresolved, including the important initial stages of bacterial attachment to a substrate surface. The reduction of bacterial attachment to surfaces is a key concept in the prevention or minimization of biofilm formation. The chemical and physical characteristics of both the substrate and bacteria are important in understanding the attachment process, but substrate modification is likely the most practical route to enable the extent of bacterial attachment taking place to be effectively controlled. The microtopography and chemistry of the surface are known to influence bacterial attachment. The role of surface chemistry versus nanotopography and their interplay, however, remain unclear. Most methods used for imparting nanotopographical patterns onto a surface also induce changes in the surface chemistry and vice versa. In this study, the authors combine colloidal lithography and plasma polymerization to fabricate homogeneous, reproducible, and periodic nanotopographies with a controllable surface chemistry. The attachment of Escherichia coli bacteria onto carboxyl (plasma polymerized acrylic acid, ppAAc) and hydrocarbon (plasma polymerized octadiene, ppOct) rich plasma polymer films on either flat or colloidal array surfaces revealed that the surface chemistry plays a critical role in bacterial attachment, whereas the effect of surface nanotopography on the bacterial attachment appears to be more difficult to define. This platform represents a promising approach to allow a greater understanding of the role that surface chemistry and nanotopography play on bacterial attachment and the subsequent biofouling of the surface. PMID:25720764

  9. The effect of micro-architectural structure of cabbage substratum and or background bacterial flora on the growth of Listeria monocytogenes.

    PubMed

    Ongeng, Duncan; Ryckeboer, Jaak; Vermeulen, An; Devlieghere, Frank

    2007-11-01

    The effect of micro-architectural structure of cabbage (Brassica oleracea var. capitata L.) substratum and or background bacterial flora on the growth of Listeria monocytogenes as a function of incubation temperature was investigated. A cocktail mixture of Pseudomonas fluorescens, Pantoea agglomerans and Lactobacillus plantarum was constituted to a population density of approximately 5 log CFU/ml in order to pseudo-simulate background bacterial flora of fresh-cut cabbage. This mixture was co-inoculated with L. monocytogenes (approximately 3 log CFU/ml) on fresh-cut cabbage or in autoclaved cabbage juice followed by incubation at different temperatures (4-30 degrees C). Data on growth of L. monocytogenes were fitted to the primary growth model of Baranyi in order to generate the growth kinetic parameters of the pathogen. During storage, microbial ecology was dominated by P. fluorescens and L. plantarum at refrigeration and abuse temperature, respectively. At all temperatures investigated, lag duration (lambda, h), maximum specific growth rate (micro(max), h(-1)) and maximum population density (MPD, log CFU/ml) of L. monocytogenes were only affected by medium micro-architectural structure, except at 4 degrees C where it had no effect on the micro(max) of the pathogen. Comparison of observed values of micro(max) with those obtained from the Pathogen Modelling Program (PMP), showed that PMP overestimated the growth rate of L. monocytogenes on fresh-cut cabbage and in cabbage juice, respectively. Temperature dependency of micro(max) of L. monocytogenes, according to the models of Ratkowsky and Arrhenius, showed linearity for temperature range of 4-15 degrees C, discontinuities and linearity again for temperature range of 20-30 degrees C. The results of this experiment have shown that the constituted background bacterial flora had no effect on the growth of L. monocytogenes and that micro-architectural structure of the vegetable was the primary factor that limited the applicability of PMP model for predicting the growth of L. monocytogenes on fresh-cut cabbage. A major limitation of this study however is that nutrient profile of the autoclaved cabbage juice may be different from that of the raw juice thus compromising realistic comparison of the behaviour of L. monocytogenes as affected by micro-architectural structure. PMID:17910986

  10. A curve of growth determination of the f-values for the fourth positive system of CO and the Lyman-Birge-Hopfield system of N2.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pilling, M. J.; Bass, A. M.; Braun, W.

    1971-01-01

    The curve of growth method has been employed to determine f-values for the fourth positive system of CO and the magnetic dipole and electric quadrupole components of the Lyman-Birge-Hopfield system of N2. No significant dependence on r-centroid was found. The mean value of the ratio of the electric quadrupole to magnetic dipole f-values was 0.076.

  11. Molecular characterization of RNA and protein synthesis during a one-step growth curve of bovine viral diarrhoea virus in ovine (SFT-R) cells

    Microsoft Academic Search

    N. Mishra; B. S. Mathapati; K. Rajukumar; R. K. Nema; S. P. Behera; S. C. Dubey

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the kinetics of noncytopathic bovine viral diarrhoea virus (BVDV) multiplication and synthesis of BVDV specific RNA and proteins in ovine cells (SFT-R) during a one-step growth curve. The virus titre and RNA level were determined by focus-forming assay and real time RT-PCR. The RNA synthesis was detected by Northern blot while synthesis

  12. Development of a real-time system of monitoring bacterial colony growth and registering the forward-scattering pattern

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, Nan; Bae, Euiwon; Aroonnual, Amornrat; Bhunia, Arun K.; Robinson, J. Paul; Hirleman, E. Daniel

    2009-05-01

    Early detection and classification of pathogenic bacteria species is crucial to food safety. The previous BARDOT (BActeria Rapid Detection by using Optical light scattering Technology) system is capable of classifying the bacterial colonies of around 1~1.5mm diameter within 24~36 hours of incubation. However, in order to further reduce the detection time and synchronize the detection operation with the bacterial cultivation, a micro-incubator is developed that not only grows bacteria at 37°C but also enables forward scatterometry. This new design feature enables us to continuously characterize the light scattering patterns of the bacterial colonies throughout their growing stages. Some experimental results from this new system are demonstrated and compared with the images obtained from phase contrast microscopy and a confocal displacement meter to show the possibility of earlier identification of bacteria species. Moreover, this paper also explains the updated optical and mechanical modules for the beam waist control to accommodate the smaller bacteria colony detection.

  13. EVALUATION OF ULTRA-VIOLET RADIATION DISINFECTION ON THE BACTERIAL GROWTH IN THE SWRO PILOT PLANT, AL-JUBAIL1

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Hassan A. Munshi; N. Sasikumar; A. T. Jamaluddin; Kither Mohammed

    SUMMARY The present study summarizes findings of experiment on the evaluation of UV- treatment for bacterial disinfection at SWRO pilot plant at Al-Jubail. Two UV- generation units were installed along the pretreatment line. One before the dual media filter and the second before the micron cartridge filter. The study was carried out at three seawater flow rates: the regular flow

  14. Chemistry of fly ash and cyclone ash leachate from waste materials and effects of ash leachates on bacterial growth, nitrogen-transformation activity, and metal accumulation.

    PubMed

    Takeuchi, Mio; Kawahata, Hodaka; Gupta, Lallan P; Itouga, Misao; Sakakibara, Hitoshi; Ohta, Hidekazu; Komai, Takeshi; Ono, Yoshiro

    2009-06-15

    The effects of waste ash leachates on soil microorganism were evaluated along with a chemical characterization of ash leachates. Thirty fly ash samples and cyclone ash samples obtained from the incineration of municipal solid waste, plastic waste, and construction waste were used. Twenty-one and 22 samples inhibited N transformation activity of soil microorganism and growth of Bacillus subtilis, respectively. On the other hand, 11 and 18 samples stimulated bacterial activity and growth, respectively, at low concentrations. Generally, cyclone ash contained a smaller amount of toxic metals than fly ash. Our results suggest that cyclone ash can be further studied for reuse, perhaps as a soil amendment. Pb was found to be highly accumulated in B. subtilis cells, and should be carefully monitored when waste ash is reused in the environment. PMID:19084330

  15. Bdellovibrio and like organisms enhanced growth and survival of Penaeus monodon and altered bacterial community structures in its rearing water.

    PubMed

    Li, Huanhuan; Chen, Cheng; Sun, Qiuping; Liu, Renliang; Cai, Junpeng

    2014-10-01

    In this study, a 96-h laboratory reduction test was conducted with strain BDHSH06 (GenBank accession no. EF011103) as the test strain for Bdellovibrio and like organisms (BALOs) and 20 susceptible marine bacterial strains forming microcosms as the targets. The results showed that BDHSH06 reduced the levels of approximately 50% of prey bacterial strains within 96 h in the seawater microcosms. An 85-day black tiger shrimp (Penaeus monodon) rearing experiment was performed. The shrimp survival rate, body length, and weight in the test tanks were 48.1% ± 1.2%, 99.8 ± 10.0 mm, and 6.36 ± 1.50 g, respectively, which were values significantly (P < 0.05) higher than those for the control, viz., 31.0% ± 2.1%, 86.0 ± 11.1 mm, and 4.21 ± 1.56 g, respectively. With the addition of BDHSH06, total bacterial and Vibrio numbers were significantly reduced (P < 0.05) by 1.3 to 4.5 log CFU · ml(-1) and CFU · g(-1) in both water and shrimp intestines, respectively, compared to those in the control. The effect of BDHSH06 on bacterial community structures in the rearing water was also examined using PCR amplification of the 16S rRNA gene and denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE). The DGGE profiles of rearing water samples from the control and test tanks revealed that the amounts of 44% of the bacterial species were reduced when BDHSH06 was added to the rearing water over the 85-day rearing period, and among these, approximately 57.1% were nonculturable. The results of this study demonstrated that BDHSH06 can be used as a biocontrol/probiotic agent in P. monodon culture. PMID:25107962

  16. Bdellovibrio and Like Organisms Enhanced Growth and Survival of Penaeus monodon and Altered Bacterial Community Structures in Its Rearing Water

    PubMed Central

    Li, Huanhuan; Chen, Cheng; Sun, Qiuping; Liu, Renliang

    2014-01-01

    In this study, a 96-h laboratory reduction test was conducted with strain BDHSH06 (GenBank accession no. EF011103) as the test strain for Bdellovibrio and like organisms (BALOs) and 20 susceptible marine bacterial strains forming microcosms as the targets. The results showed that BDHSH06 reduced the levels of approximately 50% of prey bacterial strains within 96 h in the seawater microcosms. An 85-day black tiger shrimp (Penaeus monodon) rearing experiment was performed. The shrimp survival rate, body length, and weight in the test tanks were 48.1% ± 1.2%, 99.8 ± 10.0 mm, and 6.36 ± 1.50 g, respectively, which were values significantly (P < 0.05) higher than those for the control, viz., 31.0% ± 2.1%, 86.0 ± 11.1 mm, and 4.21 ± 1.56 g, respectively. With the addition of BDHSH06, total bacterial and Vibrio numbers were significantly reduced (P < 0.05) by 1.3 to 4.5 log CFU · ml?1 and CFU · g?1 in both water and shrimp intestines, respectively, compared to those in the control. The effect of BDHSH06 on bacterial community structures in the rearing water was also examined using PCR amplification of the 16S rRNA gene and denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE). The DGGE profiles of rearing water samples from the control and test tanks revealed that the amounts of 44% of the bacterial species were reduced when BDHSH06 was added to the rearing water over the 85-day rearing period, and among these, approximately 57.1% were nonculturable. The results of this study demonstrated that BDHSH06 can be used as a biocontrol/probiotic agent in P. monodon culture. PMID:25107962

  17. Molecular analysis of bacterial microbiota associated with oysters (Crassostrea gigas and Crassostrea corteziensis) in different growth phases at two cultivation sites.

    PubMed

    Trabal, Natalia; Mazón-Suástegui, José M; Vázquez-Juárez, Ricardo; Asencio-Valle, Felipe; Morales-Bojórquez, Enrique; Romero, Jaime

    2012-08-01

    Microbiota presumably plays an essential role in inhibiting pathogen colonization and in the maintenance of health in oysters, but limited data exist concerning their different growth phases and conditions. We analyzed the bacterial microbiota composition of two commercial oysters: Crassostrea gigas and Crassostrea corteziensis. Differences in microbiota were assayed in three growth phases: post-larvae at the hatchery, juvenile, and adult at two grow-out cultivation sites. Variations in the microbiota were assessed by PCR analysis of the 16S rRNA gene in DNA extracted from depurated oysters. Restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) profiles were studied using Dice's similarity coefficient (Cs) and statistical principal component analysis (PCA). The microbiota composition was determined by sequencing temperature gradient gel electrophoresis (TGGE) bands. The RFLP analysis of post-larvae revealed homology in the microbiota of both oyster species (Cs > 88 %). Dice and PCA analyses of C. corteziensis but not C. gigas showed differences in the microbiota according to the cultivation sites. The sequencing analysis revealed low bacterial diversity (primarily ?-Proteobacteria, Firmicutes, and Spirochaetes), with Burkholderia cepacia being the most abundant bacteria in both oyster species. This study provides the first description of the microbiota in C. corteziensis, which was shown to be influenced by cultivation site conditions. During early growth, we observed that B. cepacia colonized and remained strongly associated with the two oysters, probably in a symbiotic host-bacteria relationship. This association was maintained in the three growth phases and was not altered by environmental conditions or the management of the oysters at the grow-out site. PMID:22450510

  18. Correlation of Increased Metabolic Activity, Resistance to Infection, Enhanced Phagocytosis, and Inhibition of Bacterial Growth by Macrophages from Listeria- and BCG-Infected Mice

    PubMed Central

    Ratzan, Kenneth R.; Musher, Daniel M.; Keusch, Gerald T.; Weinstein, Louis

    1972-01-01

    Macrophages from mice infected with facultative intracellular organisms such as Listeria monocytogenes and BCG have been shown to resist infection by antigenically unrelated intracellular bacterial parasites. This study compares phagocytosis, bacterial growth inhibition, and oxidation of glucose by macrophages from normal mice, mice infected with listeria or BCG, or mice immunized with killed listeria in incomplete Freund's adjuvant. Macrophages from listeria- and BCG-infected mice ingested more listeria; 67 and 57%, respectively, had three or more cell-associated bacteria versus 22% of controls (P < 0.001). Peritoneal macrophages from listeria- and BCG-infected animals significantly (P < 0.001 covariance analysis) inhibited growth of listeria in suspension, whereas control macrophages had no such inhibitory effect. The rate of oxidation of glucose-1-14C was higher in macrophages from listeria- and BCG-infected mice than from either uninfected animals or those immunized with killed listeria. During phagocytosis of killed or live bacteria, or latex particles, the rate of glucose oxidation was increased (P < 0.01). These data suggest that the cellular immunity after infection by an intracellular organism is associated with an increase in metabolic activity of macrophages, namely, an increase in the rate of glucose oxidation resulting in enhancement of phagocytosis and killing. PMID:4629124

  19. Genetic variances, heritabilities and maternal effects on body weight, breast meat yield, meat quality traits and the shape of the growth curve in turkey birds

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Turkey is an important agricultural species and is largely used as a meat bird. In 2004, turkey represented 6.5% of the world poultry meat production. The world-wide turkey population has rapidly grown due to increased commercial farming. Due to the high demand for turkey meat from both consumers and industry global turkey stocks increased from 100 million in 1970 to over 276 million in 2004. This rapidly increasing importance of turkeys was a reason to design this study for the estimation of genetic parameters that control body weight, body composition, meat quality traits and parameters that shape the growth curve in turkey birds. Results The average heritability estimate for body weight traits was 0.38, except for early weights that were strongly affected by maternal effects. This study showed that body weight traits, upper asymptote (a growth curve trait), percent breast meat and redness of meat had high heritability whereas heritabilities of breast length, breast width, percent drip loss, ultimate pH, lightness and yellowness of meat were medium to low. We found high positive genetic and phenotypic correlations between body weight, upper asymptote, most breast meat yield traits and percent drip loss but percent drip loss was found strongly negatively correlated with ultimate pH. Percent breast meat, however, showed genetic correlations close to zero with body weight traits and upper asymptote. Conclusion The results of this analysis and the growth curve from the studied population of turkey birds suggest that the turkey birds could be selected for breeding between 60 and 80 days of age in order to improve overall production and the production of desirable cuts of meat. The continuous selection of birds within this age range could promote high growth rates but specific attention to meat quality would be needed to avoid a negative impact on the quality of meat. PMID:21266032

  20. Rapid evaporative ionization mass spectrometry imaging platform for direct mapping from bulk tissue and bacterial growth media.

    PubMed

    Golf, Ottmar; Strittmatter, Nicole; Karancsi, Tamas; Pringle, Steven D; Speller, Abigail V M; Mroz, Anna; Kinross, James M; Abbassi-Ghadi, Nima; Jones, Emrys A; Takats, Zoltan

    2015-03-01

    Rapid evaporative ionization mass spectrometry (REIMS) technology allows real time intraoperative tissue classification and the characterization and identification of microorganisms. In order to create spectral libraries for training the classification models, reference data need to be acquired in large quantities as classification accuracy generally improves as a function of number of training samples. In this study, we present an automated high-throughput method for collecting REIMS data from heterogeneous organic tissue. The underlying instrumentation consists of a 2D stage with an additional high-precision z-axis actuator that is equipped with an electrosurgical diathermy-based sampling probe. The approach was validated using samples of human liver with metastases and bacterial strains, cultured on solid medium, belonging to the species P. aeruginosa, B. subtilis, and S. aureus. For both sample types, spatially resolved spectral information was obtained that resulted in clearly distinguishable multivariate clustering between the healthy/cancerous liver tissues and between the bacterial species. PMID:25671656

  1. Indoor-biofilter growth and exposure to airborne chemicals drive similar changes in plant root bacterial communities.

    PubMed

    Russell, Jacob A; Hu, Yi; Chau, Linh; Pauliushchyk, Margarita; Anastopoulos, Ioannis; Anandan, Shivanthi; Waring, Michael S

    2014-08-01

    Due to the long durations spent inside by many humans, indoor air quality has become a growing concern. Biofiltration has emerged as a potential mechanism to clean indoor air of harmful volatile organic compounds (VOCs), which are typically found at concentrations higher indoors than outdoors. Root-associated microbes are thought to drive the functioning of plant-based biofilters, or biowalls, converting VOCs into biomass, energy, and carbon dioxide, but little is known about the root microbial communities of such artificially grown plants, how or whether they differ from those of plants grown in soil, and whether any changes in composition are driven by VOCs. In this study, we investigated how bacterial communities on biofilter plant roots change over time and in response to VOC exposure. Through 16S rRNA amplicon sequencing, we compared root bacterial communities from soil-grown plants with those from two biowalls, while also comparing communities from roots exposed to clean versus VOC-laden air in a laboratory biofiltration system. The results showed differences in bacterial communities between soil-grown and biowall-grown plants and between bacterial communities from plant roots exposed to clean air and those from VOC-exposed plant roots. Both biowall-grown and VOC-exposed roots harbored enriched levels of bacteria from the genus Hyphomicrobium. Given their known capacities to break down aromatic and halogenated compounds, we hypothesize that these bacteria are important VOC degraders. While different strains of Hyphomicrobium proliferated in the two studied biowalls and our lab experiment, strains were shared across plant species, suggesting that a wide range of ornamental houseplants harbor similar microbes of potential use in living biofilters. PMID:24878602

  2. Correlation between PLD repair capacity and the survival curve of human fibroblasts in exponential growth phase: analysis in terms of several parameters

    SciTech Connect

    Fertil, B.; Deschavanne, P.J.; Debieu, D.; Malaise, E.P.

    1988-10-01

    Published data on the in vitro radiosensitivity of 46 nontransformed fibroblasts of different genetic origins studied in plateau phase with immediate or delayed plating were used to investigate to what extent potentially lethal damage repair capacity is related to intrinsic radiosensitivity (i.e., irradiated in exponential growth phase). While most of the survival curve analysis is conducted in terms of D0, Dq, and the mean inactivation dose D, some of the data are also discussed in terms of the linear-quadratic model parameter alpha. Using D it is shown that: (i) the radiosensitivity of human fibroblasts in exponential growth phase does not significantly differ from that of plateau-phase fibroblasts with immediate plating; (ii) the radiosensitivity of plateau-phase cells with delayed plating is correlated to the radiosensitivity of cells with immediate plating: the more radioresistant the cell strain in exponential growth phase, the higher its repair capacity; (iii) the repair capacity of the cell strains is related to their genetic origin. In conclusion, we suggest that the survival curve of growing cells depends on the repair capacity of the cells.

  3. Growth of bacterial biofilms on Tenckhoff catheter discs in vitro after simulated touch contamination of the Y-connecting set in continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis.

    PubMed

    Dasgupta, M K; Larabie, M; Lam, K; Bettcher, K B; Tyrrell, D L; Costerton, J W

    1990-01-01

    We simulated touch contamination of peritoneal dialysis fluids perfused through an in vitro system with a modified Robbins' device (MRD) and Y-connecting tubings, to study the pathogenesis of bacterial biofilm (BB) growth on Tenckhoff catheter (TC) discs. The spike ends of Y-connecting sets were dipped in a suspension of freshly cultured cells of Staphylococcus epidermidis (3 X 10(8) cfu/ml), and connected to 2 litres of 0.5% dianeal solution which was perfused through the MRD with plugs containing TC discs. Four simulated clinical exchanges were performed with or without prior flushing and/or bleach treatment of the Y sets. Control experiments were done with fresh Dianeal solution with no contamination, flushing, or bleach treatment. BB growth on the TC discs was examined by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy and quantitated by routine culture of scrapings from the discs. We noted that touch contamination of dialysis fluids via the spike ends of the connecting sets can generate dense BB growth on TC discs in this experimental system (62 +/- 8% by SEM and 10.2 +/- 8.3 X 10(3) cfu/ml by culture). This growth of BB was significantly reduced by flushing the Y set with sterile Dianeal solution (24.3 +/- 3% by SEM and 5.7 +/- 3.5 X 10(1) cfu/ml by culture) and was absent by bleach treatment. We conclude that although bleach treatment of Y sets can prevent BB growth, the 'flushing' procedure alone can significantly reduce BB growth on TC from touch contamination of dialysate fluid. PMID:2080785

  4. Convexity of the Photosynthetic Light-Response Curve in Relation to lntensity and Direction of Light during Growth

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Erling Ogren

    1993-01-01

    Photosynthesis in the intermediate light range is most efficient when the convexity of the photosynthetic light-response curve is high. Factors determining the convexity were examined for intact leaves using Salix sp. and for a plant cell culture using the green microalga Coccomyra sp. It was found that the leaf had lower convexity than diluted plant cells because the light gradient

  5. Hierarchical Bayesian analysis to incorporate age uncertainty in growth curve analysis and estimates of age from length: Florida manatee (Trichechus manatus) carcasses

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schwarz, L.K.; Runge, M.C.

    2009-01-01

    Age estimation of individuals is often an integral part of species management research, and a number of ageestimation techniques are commonly employed. Often, the error in these techniques is not quantified or accounted for in other analyses, particularly in growth curve models used to describe physiological responses to environment and human impacts. Also, noninvasive, quick, and inexpensive methods to estimate age are needed. This research aims to provide two Bayesian methods to (i) incorporate age uncertainty into an age-length Schnute growth model and (ii) produce a method from the growth model to estimate age from length. The methods are then employed for Florida manatee (Trichechus manatus) carcasses. After quantifying the uncertainty in the aging technique (counts of ear bone growth layers), we fit age-length data to the Schnute growth model separately by sex and season. Independent prior information about population age structure and the results of the Schnute model are then combined to estimate age from length. Results describing the age-length relationship agree with our understanding of manatee biology. The new methods allow us to estimate age, with quantified uncertainty, for 98% of collected carcasses: 36% from ear bones, 62% from length.

  6. Soil Bacterial Diversity Responses to Root Colonization by an Ectomycorrhizal Fungus are not Root-Growth-Dependent

    E-print Network

    Thioulouse, Jean

    . In the nondisinfested cultural substrate, these positive effects on plant growth were maintained. The total soil and fertilizer applications significantly improved the plant growth after 4-month culture in the disinfested soil-independent and culture-dependent methods. A. auriculiformis plants were grown in disinfested soil in pots with or without

  7. Effects of a biocontrol bacterium on growth and defence of transgenic rice plants expressing a bacterial type-III effector

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Haiying Ren; Tao Song; TingQuan Wu; Lijun Sun; YuXing Liu; Feifei Yang; ZhiYi Chen; Hansong Dong

    2006-01-01

    Expression of HpaGxoo, a bacterial type-III effector protein, in transgenic plants induces disease resistance. Resistance also can be elicited\\u000a by biocontrol bacteria. We studied effects of the biocontrolBacillus subtilis strain B-916 on the rice variety R109 and the thehpaG\\u000a \\u000a xoo\\u000a -expressing rice line HER1. Colonisation of roots by B-916 caused 12.5±1.3% and 0.5±0.05% increases, in contrast to controls,\\u000a in root

  8. Sources and composition of organic matter for bacterial growth in a large European river floodplain system (Danube, Austria)

    PubMed Central

    Besemer, Katharina; Luef, Birgit; Preiner, Stefan; Eichberger, Birgit; Agis, Martin; Peduzzi, Peter

    2010-01-01

    Dissolved and particulate organic matter (DOM and POM) distribution, lignin phenol signatures, bulk elemental compositions, fluorescence indices and microbial plankton (algae, bacteria, viruses) in a temperate river floodplain system were monitored from January to November 2003. We aimed to elucidate the sources and compositions of allochthonous and autochthonous organic matter (OM) in the main channel and a representative backwater in relation to the hydrological regime. Additionally, bacterial secondary production was measured to evaluate the impact of organic carbon source on heterotrophic prokaryotic productivity. OM properties in the backwater tended to diverge from those in the main channel during phases without surface water connectivity; this was likely enhanced due to the exceptionally low river discharge in 2003. The terrestrial OM in this river floodplain system was largely derived from angiosperm leaves and grasses, as indicated by the lignin phenol composition. The lignin signatures exhibited significant seasonal changes, comparable to the seasonality of plankton-derived material. Microbially-derived material contributed significantly to POM and DOM, especially during periods of low discharge. High rates of bacterial secondary production (up to 135 ?g C L?1 d?1) followed algal blooms and suggested that autochthonous OM significantly supported heterotrophic microbial productivity. PMID:21151814

  9. Food abundance and fish density alters habitat selection, growth, and habitat suitability curves for juvenile coho salmon ( Oncorhynchus kisutch )

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jordan S. Rosenfeld; Thomas Leiter; Gerhard Lindner; Lorne Rothman

    2005-01-01

    To understand how fish density and food availability affect habitat selection and growth of juvenile coho salmon (Oncorhynchus kisutch), we manipulated fish density (2-12 fish·m-2) and natural invertebrate drift (0.047- 0.99 mg·m-3) in 12 experimental stream channels constructed in a side-channel of Chapman Creek, British Columbia. Increased food resulted in increased growth of both dominant and subdominant fish and a

  10. The metabolism of neonicotinoid insecticide thiamethoxam by soil enrichment cultures, and the bacterial diversity and plant growth-promoting properties of the cultured isolates.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Guang-Can; Wang, Ying; Ma, Yuan; Zhai, Shan; Zhou, Ling-Yan; Dai, Yi-Jun; Yuan, Sheng

    2014-06-01

    A soil enrichment culture (SEC) rapidly degraded 96% of 200 mg L(-1) neonicotinoid insecticide thiamethoxam (TMX) in MSM broth within 30 d; therefore, its metabolic pathway of TMX, bacterial diversity and plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR) activities of the cultured isolates were studied. The SEC transformed TMX via the nitro reduction pathway to form nitrso, urea metabolites and via cleavage of the oxadiazine cycle to form a new metabolite, hydroxyl CLO-tri. In addition, 16S rRNA gene-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis analysis revealed that uncultured rhizobacteria are predominant in the SEC broth and that 77.8% of the identified bacteria belonged to uncultured bacteria. A total of 31 cultured bacterial strains including six genera (Achromobacter, Agromyces, Ensifer, Mesorhizobium, Microbacterium and Pseudoxanthomonas) were isolated from the SEC broth. The 12 strains of Ensifer adhaerens have the ability to degrade TMX. All six selected bacteria showed PGPR activities. E. adhaerens TMX-23 and Agromyces mediolanus TMX-25 produced indole-3-acetic acid, whereas E. adhaerens TMX-23 and Mesorhizobium alhagi TMX-36 are N2-fixing bacteria. The six-isolated microbes were tolerant to 200 mg L(-1) TMX, and the growth of E. adhaerens was significantly enhanced by TMX, whereas that of Achromobacter sp. TMX-5 and Microbacterium sp.TMX-6 were enhanced slightly. The present study will help to explain the fate of TMX in the environment and its microbial degradation mechanism, as well as to facilitate future investigations of the mechanism through which TMX enhances plant vigor. PMID:24762175

  11. Ogive Curves

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    2008-01-01

    This page contains a discussion of ogive curves, logistic regression curves, and architecture. Nice photographs of architectural applications are included. The classic Birthday Problems is included as an example of an ogive curve.

  12. Stimulated Bacterial Growth under Elevated pCO2: Results from an Off-Shore Mesocosm Study

    PubMed Central

    Endres, Sonja; Galgani, Luisa; Riebesell, Ulf; Schulz, Kai-Georg; Engel, Anja

    2014-01-01

    Marine bacteria are the main consumers of freshly produced organic matter. Many enzymatic processes involved in the bacterial digestion of organic compounds were shown to be pH sensitive in previous studies. Due to the continuous rise in atmospheric CO2 concentration, seawater pH is presently decreasing at a rate unprecedented during the last 300 million years but the consequences for microbial physiology, organic matter cycling and marine biogeochemistry are still unresolved. We studied the effects of elevated seawater pCO2 on a natural plankton community during a large-scale mesocosm study in a Norwegian fjord. Nine Kiel Off-Shore Mesocosms for Future Ocean Simulations (KOSMOS) were adjusted to different pCO2 levels ranging initially from ca. 280 to 3000 µatm and sampled every second day for 34 days. The first phytoplankton bloom developed around day 5. On day 14, inorganic nutrients were added to the enclosed, nutrient-poor waters to stimulate a second phytoplankton bloom, which occurred around day 20. Our results indicate that marine bacteria benefit directly and indirectly from decreasing seawater pH. During the first phytoplankton bloom, 5–10% more transparent exopolymer particles were formed in the high pCO2 mesocosms. Simultaneously, the efficiency of the protein-degrading enzyme leucine aminopeptidase increased with decreasing pH resulting in up to three times higher values in the highest pCO2/lowest pH mesocosm compared to the controls. In general, total and cell-specific aminopeptidase activities were elevated under low pH conditions. The combination of enhanced enzymatic hydrolysis of organic matter and increased availability of gel particles as substrate supported up to 28% higher bacterial abundance in the high pCO2 treatments. We conclude that ocean acidification has the potential to stimulate the bacterial community and facilitate the microbial recycling of freshly produced organic matter, thus strengthening the role of the microbial loop in the surface ocean. PMID:24941307

  13. Aging, Maturation and Growth of Sauropodomorph Dinosaurs as Deduced from Growth Curves Using Long Bone Histological Data: An Assessment of Methodological Constraints and Solutions

    PubMed Central

    Griebeler, Eva Maria; Klein, Nicole; Sander, P. Martin

    2013-01-01

    Information on aging, maturation, and growth is important for understanding life histories of organisms. In extinct dinosaurs, such information can be derived from the histological growth record preserved in the mid-shaft cortex of long bones. Here, we construct growth models to estimate ages at death, ages at sexual maturity, ages at which individuals were fully-grown, and maximum growth rates from the growth record preserved in long bones of six sauropod dinosaur individuals (one indeterminate mamenchisaurid, two Apatosaurus sp., two indeterminate diplodocids, and one Camarasaurus sp.) and one basal sauropodomorph dinosaur individual (Plateosaurus engelhardti). Using these estimates, we establish allometries between body mass and each of these traits and compare these to extant taxa. Growth models considered for each dinosaur individual were the von Bertalanffy model, the Gompertz model, and the logistic model (LGM), all of which have inherently fixed inflection points, and the Chapman-Richards model in which the point is not fixed. We use the arithmetic mean of the age at the inflection point and of the age at which 90% of asymptotic mass is reached to assess respectively the age at sexual maturity or the age at onset of reproduction, because unambiguous indicators of maturity in Sauropodomorpha are lacking. According to an AIC-based model selection process, the LGM was the best model for our sauropodomorph sample. Allometries established are consistent with literature data on other Sauropodomorpha. All Sauropodomorpha reached full size within a time span similar to scaled-up modern mammalian megaherbivores and had similar maximum growth rates to scaled-up modern megaherbivores and ratites, but growth rates of Sauropodomorpha were lower than of an average mammal. Sauropodomorph ages at death probably were lower than that of average scaled-up ratites and megaherbivores. Sauropodomorpha were older at maturation than scaled-up ratites and average mammals, but younger than scaled-up megaherbivores. PMID:23840575

  14. Bacterial Inhibition by Electrical Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Asadi, Mohammad Reza; Torkaman, Giti

    2014-01-01

    Significance: Much evidence shows that electrical stimulation (ES) promotes the wound healing process. The inhibitory effect of ES on bacterial growth has been proposed as a mechanism to explain the useful effects of ES on wound healing. Bacterial burden has been associated with chronic wounds. The extensive use of antibiotics can lead to the spread of multiple drug resistant bacteria. Whether biophysical energies, such as ES, can be used as a treatment modality against pathogenic microorganisms remains an open question. Recent Advances: The research literature provides evidence for useful effects of ES in terms of inhibition of bacterial growth. The type of ES, its polarity, and the intensity of the current play a major role in establishment of antibacterial effects. Both direct current (DC) and high voltage pulse current are more effective at inhibiting bacterial growth than are other types of ES. The exact mechanism underlying the antibacterial effects of ES is not clear. Critical Issues: Available evidence indicates that microampere DC (?ADC) is better than other ES types for inhibition of bacterial growth. The results of most studies also support the application of cathodal current for bacterial growth inhibition. The current intensity of ES would appear to be tolerable by humans if used clinically for treatment of infected wounds. Future Directions: The cathodal ?ADC appears to be more effective for inhibition of microorganism growth. Further research, especially in vivo, is necessary to clarify the inhibitory effects of ES on wound bacterial infections. PMID:24761349

  15. Bacterial Sialidase

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    Data shows that elevated sialidase in bacterial vaginosis patients correlates to premature births in women. Bacterial sialidase also plays a significant role in the unusual colonization of Pseudomonas aeruginosa in cystic fibrosis patients. Crystals of Salmonella sialidase have been reproduced and are used for studying the inhibitor-enzyme complexes. These inhibitors may also be used to inhibit a trans-sialidase of Trypanosome cruzi, a very similar enzyme to bacterial sialidase, therefore preventing T. cruzi infection, the causitive agent of Chagas' disease. The Center for Macromolecular Crystallography suggests that inhibitors of bacterial sialidases can be used as prophylactic drugs to prevent bacterial infections in these critical cases.

  16. A Growth Curve Analysis of Literacy Performance among Second-Grade, Spanish-Speaking, English-Language Learners

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gutiierrez, Gabriel; Vanderwood, Mike L.

    2013-01-01

    The literacy growth of 260 second-grade English learners (ELs) with varying degrees of English language proficiency (e.g., Beginning, Early Intermediate, Intermediate, Early Advanced and Advanced English language proficiency) was assessed with English literacy skill assessments. Dynamic Indicators of Basic Early Literacy Skills measures were…

  17. Fungal biodegradation of dibutyl phthalate and toxicity of its breakdown products on the basis of fungal and bacterial growth.

    PubMed

    Ahuactzin-Pérez, M; Torres, J L; Rodríguez-Pastrana, B R; Soriano-Santos, J; Díaz-Godínez, G; Díaz, R; Tlecuitl-Beristain, S; Sánchez, C

    2014-11-01

    Phthalates are esters of phthalic acid that give flexibility to polyvinyl chloride. Diverse studies have reported that these compounds might be carcinogenic, mutagenic and/or teratogenic. Radial growth rate, biomass, hyphal thickness of Neurospora sitophyla, Trichoderma harzianum and Aspergillus niger, grown in two different concentrations of dibutyl phthalate (DBP) (500 and 1,000 mg/l) in agar and in submerged fermentation were studied. The inhibitory concentration (IC50) and the constant of biodegradation of dibutyl phthalate in Escherichia coli cultures were used to evaluate toxicity. The radial growth rate and thickness of the hypha were positively correlated with the concentration of phthalate. The pH of the cultures decreased as the fermentation proceeded. It is shown that these fungi are able to degrade DBP to non-toxic compounds and that these can be used as sole carbon and energy sources by this bacterium. It is demonstrated that the biodegradation of the DBP is directly correlated with the IC50. This is the first study that reports a method to determine the biodegradation of DBP on the basis of the IC50 and fungal growth, and the effect of this phthalate on the growth and thickness of hyphae of filamentous fungi in agar and in submerged fermentation. PMID:25063688

  18. Multiresolution curves

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Adam Finkelstein; David H. Salesin

    1994-01-01

    We describe a multiresolution curve representation, based on wavelets, that conveniently supports a variety of operations: smoothing a curve; editing the overall form of a curve while preserving its details; and approximating a curve within any given error tolerance for scan conversion. We present methods to support continuous levels of smoothing as well as direct manipulation of an arbitrary portion

  19. Frequency curves

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Riggs, H.C.

    1968-01-01

    This manual describes graphical and mathematical procedures for preparing frequency curves from samples of hydrologic data. It also discusses the theory of frequency curves, compares advantages of graphical and mathematical fitting, suggests methods of describing graphically defined frequency curves analytically, and emphasizes the correct interpretations of a frequency curve.

  20. Overcoming the anaerobic hurdle in phenotypic microarrays: Generation and visualization of growth curve data for Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Sharon Borglin; Dominique Joyner; Janet Jacobsen; Aindrila Mukhopadhyay; Terry C. Hazen

    2009-01-01

    Growing anaerobic microorganisms in phenotypic microarrays (PM) and 96-well microtiter plates is an emerging technology that allows high throughput survey of the growth and physiology and\\/or phenotype of cultivable microorganisms. For non-model bacteria, a method for phenotypic analysis is invaluable, not only to serve as a starting point for further evaluation, but also to provide a broad understanding of the

  1. Transformation zone shape, size, and crack-growth-resistance (R-curve) behavior of ceria-partially-stabilized zirconia polycrystals

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Cheng-Sheng Yu; Dinesh K. Shetty

    1989-01-01

    This paper reports on transformation zone shape, size, and crack-growth-resistance behavior studied in precracked and annealed single-edge notch bend specimens of commercial-grade ceria-partially-stabilized zirconia polycrystals as a function of applied load. Well-defined transformation zones with a characteristic elongated shape in the plane of the crack were observed. It is shown that the observed zone shape is significantly different from the

  2. Diversity and characterization of culturable bacterial endophytes from Zea mays and their potential as plant growth-promoting agents in metal-degraded soils.

    PubMed

    Pereira, S I A; Castro, P M L

    2014-12-01

    In this study, we evaluated the phylogenetic diversity of culturable bacterial endophytes of Zea mays plants growing in an agricultural soil contaminated with Zn and Cd. Endophytic bacterial counts were determined in roots and shoots, and isolates were grouped by random amplified polymorphic DNA and identified by 16S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) gene sequencing. Endophytes were further characterized for the production of plant growth-promoting (PGP) substances, such as NH3, siderophores, indol-3-acetic acid (IAA), hydrogen cyanide and extracellular enzymes, and for the capacity to solubilize phosphate. The endophytes producing higher amounts of IAA were screened for their tolerance to Zn and Cd and used as bioinoculants for maize seedlings grown in the Zn/Cd-contaminated soil. The counts of endophytes varied between plant tissues, being higher in roots (6.48 log10 g(-1) fresh weight) when compared to shoots (5.77 log10 g(-1) fresh weight). Phylogenetic analysis showed that endophytes belong to three major groups: ?-Proteobacteria (31 %), ?-Proteobacteria (26 %) and Actinobacteria (26 %). Pseudomonas, Agrobacterium, Variovorax and Curtobacterium were among the most represented genera. Endophytes were well-adapted to high Zn/Cd concentrations (up to 300 mg Cd l(-1) and 1,000 mg Zn l(-1)) and showed ability to produce several PGP traits. Strains Ochrobactrum haematophilum ZR 3-5, Acidovorax oryzae ZS 1-7, Frigoribacterium faeni ZS 3-5 and Pantoea allii ZS 3-6 increased root elongation and biomass of maize seedlings grown in soil contaminated with Cd and Zn. The endophytes isolated in this study have potential to be used in bioremediation/phytoremediation strategies. PMID:25053283

  3. A Novel Mouse Model of Soft-Tissue Infection Using Bioluminescence Imaging Allows Noninvasive, Real-Time Monitoring of Bacterial Growth

    PubMed Central

    Yoshioka, Kenji; Ishii, Ken; Kuramoto, Tetsuya; Nagai, Shigenori; Funao, Haruki; Ishihama, Hiroko; Shiono, Yuta; Sasaki, Aya; Aizawa, Mamoru; Okada, Yasunori; Koyasu, Shigeo; Toyama, Yoshiaki; Matsumoto, Morio

    2014-01-01

    Musculoskeletal infections, including surgical-site and implant-associated infections, often cause progressive inflammation and destroy areas of the soft tissue. Treating infections, especially those caused by multi-antibiotic resistant bacteria such as methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) remains a challenge. Although there are a few animal models that enable the quantitative evaluation of infection in soft tissues, these models are not always reproducible or sustainable. Here, we successfully established a real-time, in vivo, quantitative mouse model of soft-tissue infection in the superficial gluteus muscle (SGM) using bioluminescence imaging. A bioluminescent strain of MRSA was inoculated into the SGM of BALB/c adult male mice, followed by sequential measurement of bacterial photon intensity and serological and histological analyses of the mice. The mean photon intensity in the mice peaked immediately after inoculation and remained stable until day 28. The serum levels of interleukin-6, interleukin-1 and C-reactive protein at 12 hours after inoculation were significantly higher than those prior to inoculation, and the C-reactive protein remained significantly elevated until day 21. Histological analyses showed marked neutrophil infiltration and abscesses containing necrotic and fibrous tissues in the SGM. With this SGM mouse model, we successfully visualized and quantified stable bacterial growth over an extended period of time with bioluminescence imaging, which allowed us to monitor the process of infection without euthanizing the experimental animals. This model is applicable to in vivo evaluations of the long-term efficacy of novel antibiotics or antibacterial implants. PMID:25184249

  4. Initiation and growth of multiple-site damage in the riveted lap joint of a curved stiffened fuselage panel: An experimental and analytical study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmed, Abubaker Ali

    As part of the structural integrity research of the National Aging Aircraft Research Program, a comprehensive study on multiple-site damage (MSD) initiation and growth in a pristine lap-joint fuselage panel has been conducted. The curved stiffened fuselage panel was tested at the Full-Scale Aircraft Structural Test Evaluation and Research (FASTER) facility located at the Federal Aviation Administration William J. Hughes Technical Center. A strain survey test was conducted to verify proper load application. The panel was then subjected to a fatigue test with constant-amplitude cyclic loading. The applied loading spectrum included underload marker cycles so that crack growth history could be reconstructed from post-test fractographic examinations. Crack formation and growth were monitored via nondestructive and high-magnification visual inspections. Strain gage measurements recorded during the strain survey tests indicated that the inner surface of the skin along the upper rivet row of the lap joint experienced high tensile stresses due to local bending. During the fatigue loading, cracks were detected by eddy-current inspections at multiple rivet holes along the upper rivet row. Through-thickness cracks were detected visually after about 80% of the fatigue life. Once MSD cracks from two adjacent rivet holes linked up, there was a quick deterioration in the structural integrity of the lap joint. The linkup resulted in a 2.87" (72.9-mm) lead fatigue crack that rapidly propagated across 12 rivet holes and crossed over into the next skin bay, at which stage the fatigue test was terminated. A post-fatigue residual strength test was then conducted by loading the panel quasi-statically up to final failure. The panel failed catastrophically when the crack extended instantaneously across three additional bays. Post-test fractographic examinations of the fracture surfaces in the lap joint of the fuselage panel were conducted to characterize subsurface crack initiation and growth. Results showed evidence of fretting damage and crack initiation at multiple locations near the rivet holes along the faying surface of the skin. The subsurface cracks grew significantly along the faying surface before reaching the outer surface of the skin, forming elliptical crack fronts. A finite element model (FE) of the panel was constructed and geometrically-nonlinear analyses conducted to determine strain distribution under the applied loads. The FE model was validated by comparing the analysis results with the strain gage measurements recorded during the strain survey test. The validated FE model was then used to determine stress-intensity factors at the crack tips. Stress-intensity factor results indicated that crack growth in the lap joint was under mixed-mode; however, the opening-mode stress intensity factor was dominant. The stress-intensity factors computed from the FE analysis were used to conduct cycle-by-cycle integration of fatigue crack growth. In the cycle-by-cycle integration, the NASGRO crack growth model was used with its parameters selected to account for the effects of plasticity-induced crack closure and the test environment on crack growth rate. Fatigue crack growth predictions from cycle-by-cycle computation were in good agreement with the experimental measured crack growth data. The results of the study provide key insights into the natural development and growth of MSD cracks in the pristine lap joint. The data provided by the study represent a valuable source for the evaluation and validation of analytical methodologies used for predicting MSD crack initiation and growth.

  5. Chemical Modification of Reactive Multilayered Films Fabricated from Poly(2-Alkenyl Azlactone)s: Design of Surfaces that Prevent or Promote Mammalian Cell Adhesion and Bacterial Biofilm Growth

    PubMed Central

    Buck, Maren E.; Breitbach, Anthony S.; Belgrade, Sonja K.; Blackwell, Helen E.; Lynn, David M.

    2009-01-01

    We report an approach to the design of reactive polymer films that can be functionalized post-fabrication to either prevent or promote the attachment and growth of cells. Our approach is based on the reactive layer-by-layer assembly of covalently crosslinked thin films using a synthetic polyamine and a polymer containing reactive azlactone functionality. Our results demonstrate (i) that the residual azlactone functionality in these films can be exploited to immobilize amine-functionalized chemical motifs similar to those that promote or prevent cell and protein adhesion when assembled as self-assembled monolayers on gold-coated surfaces, and (ii) that the immobilization of these motifs changes significantly the behaviors and interactions of cells with the surfaces of these polymer films. We demonstrate that films treated with the hydrophobic molecule decylamine support the attachment and growth of mammalian cells in vitro. In contrast, films treated with the hydrophilic carbohydrate D-glucamine prevent cell adhesion and growth almost completely. The results of additional experiments suggest that these large differences in cell behavior can be understood, at least in part, in terms of differences in the abilities of these two different chemical motifs to promote or prevent the adsorption of protein onto film coated surfaces. We demonstrate further that this approach can be used to pattern regions of these reactive films that resist the initial attachment and subsequent invasion of mammalian cells for periods of at least one month in the presence of serum-containing cell culture media. Finally, we report that films that prevent the adhesion and growth of mammalian cells also prevent the initial formation of bacterial biofilms when incubated in the presence of the clinically relevant pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The results of these studies, collectively, suggest the basis of general approaches to the fabrication and functionalization of thin films that prevent, promote, or pattern cell growth or the formation of biofilms on surfaces of interest in the contexts of both fundamental biological studies and a broad range of other practical applications. PMID:19438231

  6. Bacterial Vaginosis

    MedlinePLUS

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  7. Adaptive acid tolerance response of Vibrio parahaemolyticus as affected by acid adaptation conditions, growth phase, and bacterial strains.

    PubMed

    Chiang, Ming-Lun; Chou, Cheng-Chun; Chen, Hsi-Chia; Tseng, Yu-Ting; Chen, Ming-Ju

    2012-08-01

    Vibrio parahaemolyticus strain 690 was isolated from gastroenteritis patients. Its thermal and ethanol stress responses have been reported in our previous studies. In this study, we further investigated the effects of various acid adaptation conditions including pH (5.0-6.0) and time (30-90?min) on the acid tolerance in different growth phases of V. parahaemolyticus 690. Additionally, the adaptive acid tolerance among different V. parahaemolyticus strains was compared. Results indicated that the acid tolerance of V. parahaemolyticus 690 was significantly increased after acid adaptation at pH 5.5 and 6.0 for 30-90?min. Among the various acid adaptation conditions examined, V. parahaemolyticus 690 acid-adapted at pH 5.5 for 90?min exhibited the highest acid tolerance. The acid adaptation also influenced the acid tolerance of V. parahaemolyticus 690 in different growth phases with late-exponential phase demonstrating the greatest acid tolerance response (ATR) than other phases. Additionally, the results also showed that the induction of adaptive ATR varied with different strains of V. parahaemolyticus. An increase in acid tolerance of V. parahaemolyticus was observed after prior acid adaptation in five strains (556, 690, BCRC 13023, BCRC 13025, and BCRC 12864), but not in strains 405 and BCRC 12863. PMID:22827515

  8. Spectrophotometric Analysis of Bacterial Contamination in Water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spence, Sarah

    2010-10-01

    Bacterial contamination in water is a hazard everywhere from wells in third world countries to reclaimed water on the International Space Station. Traditional lab techniques detect bacteria in approximately 48 hours, while optical techniques can detect bacteria in as little as six hours. The Beer-Lambert Law states that absorption of light is directly correlated to the concentration of a solute in a solution. By passing light through a sample of contaminated broth, the transmittance and in turn the absorption of the solution can be observed. The transmittance data alone follows the inverse of the bacterial growth curve. A sharp drop in transmittance represents the exponential growth phase of bacteria. This drop is observed between six and eight hours following the inoculation of the laboratory samples with Escherichia coli, using both a standard lab monochrometer as well as a device designed for this study. The Optical Bacteria Detection (OBD) was designed to be effective and inexpensive, with a limited use of consumables and minimum waste generation. The OBD device uses a phototransistor as a sensor and an LED with wavelength of approximately 500 nm. Data from the monochrometer shows the sudden decrease in transmittance is most pronounced at this wavelength. The OBD can be tuned to test for other bacteria, such as Salmonella and Vibrio fisheri by changing the wavelength of the LED light source.

  9. Physics of Bacterial Morphogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Sean X.; Jiang, Hongyuan

    2011-01-01

    Summary: Bacterial cells utilize three-dimensional (3D) protein assemblies to perform important cellular functions such as growth, division, chemoreception, and motility. These assemblies are composed of mechanoproteins that can mechanically deform and exert force. Sometimes, small-nucleotide hydrolysis is coupled to mechanical deformations. In this review, we describe the general principle for an understanding of the coupling of mechanics with chemistry in mechanochemical systems. We apply this principle to understand bacterial cell shape and morphogenesis and how mechanical forces can influence peptidoglycan cell wall growth. We review a model that can potentially reconcile the growth dynamics of the cell wall with the role of cytoskeletal proteins such as MreB and crescentin. We also review the application of mechanochemical principles to understand the assembly and constriction of the FtsZ ring. A number of potential mechanisms are proposed, and important questions are discussed. PMID:22126993

  10. Quantum curves

    E-print Network

    Albert Schwarz

    2014-08-16

    One says that a pair (P,Q) of ordinary differential operators specify a quantum curve if [P,Q]=const. If a pair of difference operators (K,L) obey the relation KL=const LK we say that they specify a discrete quantum curve. This terminology is prompted by well known results about commuting differential and difference operators, relating pairs of such operators with pairs of meromorphic functions on algebraic curves obeying some conditions. The goal of this paper is to study the moduli spaces of quantum curves. We will show how to quantize a pair of commuting differential or difference operators (i.e. to construct the corresponding quantum curve or discrete quantum curve). The KP-hierarchy acts on the moduli space of quantum curves; we prove that similarly the discrete KP-hierarchy acts on the moduli space of discrete quantum curves.

  11. Propionibacterium acidipropionici CRL1198 influences the production of acids and the growth of bacterial genera stimulated by inulin in a murine model of cecal slurries.

    PubMed

    Lorenzo-Pisarello, M J; Gultemirian, M L; Nieto-Peñalver, C; Perez Chaia, A

    2010-08-01

    Different attempts have been made to improve the health status of humans and animals by increasing the intestinal production of short-chain fatty acids (SCFA) derived from non-digestible carbohydrates fermentation. In this paper we investigate the in vitro production of short-chain fatty acids (SCFA) after addition of inulin, propionibacteria or a combination of both in an experimental model of mice cecal slurries. The development of bacterial genera which are usually stimulated by inulin addition was also investigated. According to our experimental data, acetic acid and butyric acids concentrations increased after incubation in slurries that had no supplements. By contrast, butyric acid concentrations remained in the basal value when supplements were used. Fermentation of only inulin did not increase the concentration of total SCFA. Propionibacterium acidipropionici CRL1198 improved the production of propionic acid in cecal slurries when it was added alone, but the effect was more noticeable in the combination with inulin. A modulation of the global fermentative activity of the cecal microbiota was evidenced by the increase on the ratio propionic acid/SCFA in supplementations with propionibacteria. Statistical analysis of data demonstrated that samples from homogenates with propionibacteria alone or combined with inulin belong to the same cluster. The presence of propionibacteria limited the growth of Bacteroides fragilis and Clostridium hystoliticum groups in slurries with and without inulin. The growth of Bifidobacterium was not modified and the stimulating effect of inulin on lactobacilli disappeared in the presence of propionibacteria. In conclusion, dairy propionibacteria are potential candidates to develop new functional foods helpful to ensure the intestinal production of SCFA during inulin supplementation and to control the overgrowth of bacteria belonging to Bacteroides and Clostridium genera. PMID:20451635

  12. Differential expression of fibronectin, tenascin-C and NCAMs in cultured hippocampal astrocytes activated by kainate, bacterial lipopolysaccharide or basic fibroblast growth factor.

    PubMed

    Mahler, M; Ben-Ari, Y; Represa, A

    1997-11-14

    Different reports demonstrated that reactive glial cells express increased amounts of adhesion and matrix molecules. Despite a wealth of information on the expression of these molecules during development and after lesion, very little is known of how this expression is regulated. In the present report we used Western blots and immunocytochemistry to investigate the expression of neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM), fibronectin and tenascin-C in cultured astrocytes from rat hippocampus. The effects of three different extracellular signals were analyzed: the glutamatergic receptor agonist kainic acid, the basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) and the bacterial lipopolysaccharide. Each treatment had a specific pattern of glial activation and differentially modified the expression of these proteins. Treatment of astrocytes with kainic acid resulted in an increase of tenascin-C, a decrease of fibronectin and a shift of NCAMs isoforms: NCAM 140 and PSA-NCAM (polysialic acid-rich NCAMs) were increased while NCAM 120 was decreased, bFGF increased fibronectin, tenascin-C and NCAM 120, while decreasing PSA-NCAM. Finally, the treatment of astrocytes with lipopolysaccharide induced a significant increase of fibronectin, tenascin-C and NCAM 120 but did not modify the expression of NCAM 140 and PSA-NCAM. These data suggest different mechanisms for modulation of cell surface interactions. They suggest that glial activation by bFGF and lipopolysaccharide are associated with an increase of the adhesive properties, while kainate action is rather associated with a decrease of the adhesiveness of astrocytes. PMID:9439829

  13. Biochemical Studies of Bacterial Sporulation and Germination XV. Fatty Acids in Growth, Sporulation, and Germination of Bacillus megaterium

    PubMed Central

    Scandella, Carl J.; Kornberg, Arthur

    1969-01-01

    The levels of fatty acids and their distribution were determined in cultures of Bacillus megaterium during growth, sporulation, and germination. Branched-chain pentadecanoates (br-C15) were the principal fatty acids of log-phase cells. Synthesis of branched-chain tetradecanoates (br-C14) during sporulation increased the relative proportion of these branched fatty acids in sporulating cells and in mature spores. The log-phase distribution was reestablished during outgrowth of the spore. The ratio of br-C15 to br-C14 could be radically altered by addition of their respective amino acid precursors, isoleucine and valine, without seriously affecting the sporulation process. The fatty acid composition of each of the purified phospholipids from log-phase cells was the same, indicating that each phospholipid receives a portion of the fatty acid pool present in the cell at the time of its synthesis. Similarly, the fatty acids of each of the spore phospholipids resembled those of the spore extract. Phospholipids accounted for two-thirds of the fatty acids of the log-phase but only one-third of those of the spore. PMID:4976472

  14. Symbiotic in vitro seed propagation of Dendrobium: fungal and bacterial partners and their influence on plant growth and development.

    PubMed

    Teixeira da Silva, Jaime A; Tsavkelova, Elena A; Zeng, Songjun; Ng, Tzi Bun; Parthibhan, S; Dobránszki, Judit; Cardoso, Jean Carlos; Rao, M V

    2015-07-01

    The genus Dendrobium is one of the largest genera of the Orchidaceae Juss. family, although some of its members are the most threatened today. The reason why many species face a vulnerable or endangered status is primarily because of anthropogenic interference in natural habitats and commercial overexploitation. The development and application of modern techniques and strategies directed towards in vitro propagation of orchids not only increases their number but also provides a viable means to conserve plants in an artificial environment, both in vitro and ex vitro, thus providing material for reintroduction. Dendrobium seed germination and propagation are challenging processes in vivo and in vitro, especially when the extreme specialization of these plants is considered: (1) their biotic relationships with pollinators and mycorrhizae; (2) adaptation to epiphytic or lithophytic life-styles; (3) fine-scale requirements for an optimal combination of nutrients, light, temperature, and pH. This review also aims to summarize the available data on symbiotic in vitro Dendrobium seed germination. The influence of abiotic factors as well as composition and amounts of different exogenous nutrient substances is examined. With a view to better understanding how to optimize and control in vitro symbiotic associations, a part of the review describes the strong biotic relations of Dendrobium with different associative microorganisms that form microbial communities with adult plants, and also influence symbiotic seed germination. The beneficial role of plant growth-promoting bacteria is also discussed. PMID:25940846

  15. Photosynthesis and Growth of Tobacco with a Substituted Bacterial Rubisco Mirror the Properties of the Introduced Enzyme

    PubMed Central

    Whitney, Spencer M.; Andrews, T. John

    2003-01-01

    Complete replacement, by biolistic plastid transformation, of the hexadecameric ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (Rubisco) of tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) with the dimeric version from the bacterium, Rhodospirillum rubrum, resulted in fully autotrophic and reproductive tobacco plants that required high CO2 concentrations to grow (Whitney SM, Andrews TJ [2001] Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 98: 14738-14743). Growth and photosynthesis of these plants was compared with that of nontransformed tobacco and other controls where the rbcL gene for the large subunit of tobacco Rubisco was linked to the aadA selectable-marker gene, simulating the gene arrangement of the transformants with R. rubrum Rubisco. An arrangement of the rbcL and aadA genes that gave rise to an abundant monocistronic rbcL transcript and a one-fifth as abundant bicistronic rbcL-aadA transcript had Rubisco levels and photosynthetic properties similar to those of nontransformed tobacco. Direct linkage of the rbcL and aadA genes, resulting in exclusive production of a bicistronic mRNA transcript analogous to that of the transformants with R. rubrum Rubisco, reduced transcript abundance and tobacco Rubisco content. The analogous transcript with the R. rubrum rbcM gene substituted for rbcL was not only reduced in abundance, but was also translated less efficiently. The photosynthetic rates of the transformants and controls were measured at high CO2 concentrations, using a mass spectrometric method. The rates and their responses to atmospheric CO2 concentration mirrored the amounts and the kinetic properties of the Rubiscos present. The contents of total nitrogen, carbohydrates, and photosynthetic metabolites of the leaves were also consistent with the content and type of Rubisco. PMID:12970494

  16. Protective effect of Growth Hormone-Releasing Hormone agonist in bacterial toxin-induced pulmonary barrier dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Czikora, Istvan; Sridhar, Supriya; Gorshkov, Boris; Alieva, Irina B.; Kasa, Anita; Gonzales, Joyce; Potapenko, Olena; Umapathy, Nagavedi S.; Pillich, Helena; Rick, Ferenc G.; Block, Norman L.; Verin, Alexander D.; Chakraborty, Trinad; Matthay, Michael A.; Schally, Andrew V.; Lucas, Rudolf

    2014-01-01

    Rationale: Antibiotic treatment of patients infected with G? or G+ bacteria promotes release of the toxins lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and pneumolysin (PLY) in their lungs. Growth Hormone-releasing Hormone (GHRH) agonist JI-34 protects human lung microvascular endothelial cells (HL-MVEC), expressing splice variant 1 (SV-1) of the receptor, from PLY-induced barrier dysfunction. We investigated whether JI-34 also blunts LPS-induced hyperpermeability. Since GHRH receptor (GHRH-R) signaling can potentially stimulate both cAMP-dependent barrier-protective pathways as well as barrier-disruptive protein kinase C pathways, we studied their interaction in GHRH agonist-treated HL-MVEC, in the presence of PLY, by means of siRNA-mediated protein kinase A (PKA) depletion. Methods: Barrier function measurements were done in HL-MVEC monolayers using Electrical Cell substrate Impedance Sensing (ECIS) and VE-cadherin expression by Western blotting. Capillary leak was assessed by Evans Blue dye (EBD) incorporation. Cytokine generation in broncho-alveolar lavage fluid (BALF) was measured by multiplex analysis. PKA and PKC-? activity were assessed by Western blotting. Results: GHRH agonist JI-34 significantly blunts LPS-induced barrier dysfunction, at least in part by preserving VE-cadherin expression, while not affecting inflammation. In addition to activating PKA, GHRH agonist also increases PKC-? activity in PLY-treated HL-MVEC. Treatment with PLY significantly decreases resistance in control siRNA-treated HL-MVEC, but does so even more in PKA-depleted monolayers. Pretreatment with GHRH agonist blunts PLY-induced permeability in control siRNA-treated HL-MVEC, but fails to improve barrier function in PKA-depleted PLY-treated monolayers. Conclusions: GHRH signaling in HL-MVEC protects from both LPS and PLY-mediated endothelial barrier dysfunction and concurrently induces a barrier-protective PKA-mediated and a barrier-disruptive PKC-?-induced pathway in the presence of PLY, the former of which dominates the latter. PMID:25076911

  17. Bacterial numbers and growth in surficial deep-sea sediments and phytodetritus in the NE Atlantic: Relationships with particulate organic carbon and total nitrogen

    Microsoft Academic Search

    C. M. Turley; J. L. Dixon

    2002-01-01

    Bacteria in deep-sea sediments constitute the largest global fraction of total benthic bacteria, and play a major role in most biogeochemical cycles. However, as yet the relationship between bacterial production and substrate availability (particulate organic carbon and nitrogen) in deep-sea sediments is not well understood. Therefore the aim of this study was to explore the relationships between bacterial numbers and

  18. Bacterial Vaginosis

    MedlinePLUS

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  19. Sensitivity of the curve-to-growth technique utilized in rocket experiments to determine the line shape of solar He I resonance lines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, C. Y. R.; Ogawa, H. S.

    1986-01-01

    The sensitivity of the curve-of-growth (COG) technique utilized in rocket measurements to determine the line profiles of the solar He I resonance emissions is theoretically examined with attention to the possibility of determining the line core shape using this technique. The line at 584.334 A is chosen as an illustration. Various possible source functions of the solar line have been assumed in the computation of the integrated transmitted intensity. A recent observational data set obtained by the present researchers is used as the constraint of the computation. It is confirmed that the COG technique can indeed provide a good measurement of the solar line width. However, to obtain detailed knowledge of the solar profile at line center and in the core region, (1) it is necessary to be able to carry out relative solar flux measurements with a 1-percent or better precision, and (2) it must be possible to measure the He gas pressure in the absorption cell to lower than 0.1 mtorr. While these numbers apply specifically to the present geometry, the results are readily scaled to other COG measurements using other experimental parameters.

  20. Antibacterial compounds of Canadian honeys target bacterial cell wall inducing phenotype changes, growth inhibition and cell lysis that resemble action of ?-lactam antibiotics.

    PubMed

    Brudzynski, Katrina; Sjaarda, Calvin

    2014-01-01

    Honeys show a desirable broad spectrum activity against Gram-positive and negative bacteria making antibacterial activity an intrinsic property of honey and a desirable source for new drug development. The cellular targets and underlying mechanism of action of honey antibacterial compounds remain largely unknown. To facilitate the target discovery, we employed a method of phenotypic profiling by directly comparing morphological changes in Escherichia coli induced by honeys to that of ampicillin, the cell wall-active ?-lactam of known mechanism of action. Firstly, we demonstrated the purity of tested honeys from potential ?-lactam contaminations using quantitative LC-ESI-MS. Exposure of log-phase E. coli to honey or ampicillin resulted in time- and concentration-dependent changes in bacterial cell shape with the appearance of filamentous phenotypes at sub-inhibitory concentrations and spheroplasts at the MBC. Cell wall destruction by both agents, clearly visible on microscopic micrographs, was accompanied by increased permeability of the lipopolysaccharide outer membrane as indicated by fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS). More than 90% E. coli exposed to honey or ampicillin became permeable to propidium iodide. Consistently with the FACS results, both honey-treated and ampicillin-treated E. coli cells released lipopolysaccharide endotoxins at comparable levels, which were significantly higher than controls (p<0.0001). E. coli cells transformed with the ampicillin-resistance gene (?-lactamase) remained sensitive to honey, displayed the same level of cytotoxicity, cell shape changes and endotoxin release as ampicillin-sensitive cells. As expected, ?-lactamase protected the host cell from antibacterial action of ampicillin. Thus, both honey and ampicillin induced similar structural changes to the cell wall and LPS and that this ability underlies antibacterial activities of both agents. Since the cell wall is critical for cell growth and survival, honey active compounds would be highly applicable for therapeutic purposes while differences in the mode of action between honey and ampicillin may provide clinical advantage in eradicating ?-lactam-resistant pathogens. PMID:25191847

  1. Modeling Microbial Growth

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Ethel D. Stanley (Beloit College; Biology)

    2006-05-20

    Is bacterial growth always exponential? Do bacteria with the fastest rate of growth always have the largest populations? Biota models offer extended opportunities to observe population growth over time. What are the factors that affect growth? Explore continuous, chaotic, and cyclic growth models. * examine the dynamics of growth for populations of virtual bacteria with differing growth rates and carrying capacities

  2. Features of membrane receptors in bacterial multiplication process and necessary conditions for phage infection of bacteria.

    PubMed

    Mdzinarashvili, Tamaz; Papukashvili, Irina; Shengelia, Nino; Khvedelidze, Mariam

    2014-12-01

    According to the obtained experimental results, the thermal shock (from 37 to 53 °C) not only stops the multiplication process of Escherichia coli bacteria, but also causes bacterial titer to decrease gradually. After this period lasting up to 1 hour, the bacterial cells continue to grow. A similar type of response was observed when bacteria were subjected to acid shock. Increasing acidity of media leads to decrease of bacterial growth process, and finally, their titer curve sharply falls over time. Also, interesting results were obtained about necessary conditions for infecting the bacteria by phages. Particularly, DNA injection from phages into bacterial cells requires most of corresponding bacterial membrane receptors to be occupied by phages. We suppose that this occurs due to autocrine phenomenon when the signaling molecules block the DNA ejection from phage particles. This effect lasts until a certain number of phage particles are attached to the membrane. After that, DNA injection from phage head into the cytoplasm takes place and the process of bacterial infection begins. The real number of phages in a stock is by several orders higher than the number of plaque-forming units in a given stock, which is determined by a classical double-layer agar method. PMID:25096899

  3. 4-(3-Chloro-5-(trifluoromethyl)pyridin-2-yl)-N-(4-methoxypyridin-2-yl)piperazine-1-carbothioamide (ML267), a Potent Inhibitor of Bacterial Phosphopantetheinyl Transferase That Attenuates Secondary Metabolism and Thwarts Bacterial Growth

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    4?-Phosphopantetheinyl transferases (PPTases) catalyze a post-translational modification essential to bacterial cell viability and virulence. We present the discovery and medicinal chemistry optimization of 2-pyridinyl-N-(4-aryl)piperazine-1-carbothioamides, which exhibit submicromolar inhibition of bacterial Sfp-PPTase with no activity toward the human orthologue. Moreover, compounds within this class possess antibacterial activity in the absence of a rapid cytotoxic response in human cells. An advanced analogue of this series, ML267 (55), was found to attenuate production of an Sfp-PPTase-dependent metabolite when applied to Bacillus subtilis at sublethal doses. Additional testing revealed antibacterial activity against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, and chemical genetic studies implicated efflux as a mechanism for resistance in Escherichia coli. Additionally, we highlight the in vitro absorption, distribution, metabolism, and excretion and in vivo pharmacokinetic profiles of compound 55 to further demonstrate the potential utility of this small-molecule inhibitor. PMID:24450337

  4. Light Curves

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    2013-02-12

    This is a game about light curves that will test your ability to figure out things about an asteroid from just a graph of its brightness. Astronomers use telescopes to collect light curves - measurements of the brightness of distant asteroids over time. It is part of the Killer Asteroids Web Site. The site also features a background overview of the differences between asteroids and comets, information on different types of asteroids (rubble piles vs monoliths), a discussion of how at risk Earth really is to an asteroid or comet impact, and background information on light curves.

  5. Growth curves of crossbred cows sired by Hereford, Angus, Belgian Blue, Brahman, Boran, and Tuli bulls, and the fraction of mature body weight and height at puberty.

    PubMed

    Freetly, H C; Kuehn, L A; Cundiff, L V

    2011-08-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the growth curves of females to determine if mature size and relative rates of maturation among breeds differed. Body weight and hip height data were fitted to the nonlinear function BW = f(age) = A - Be(k×age), where A is an estimate of mature BW and k determines the rate that BW or height moves from B to A. Cows represented progeny from 28 Hereford, 38 Angus, 25 Belgian Blue, 34 Brahman, 8 Boran, and 9 Tuli sires. Bulls from these breeds were mated by AI to Angus, Hereford, and MARC III composite (1/4 Angus, 1/4 Hereford, 1/4 Red Poll, and 1/4 Pinzgauer) cows to produce calves in 1992, 1993, and 1994. These matings resulted in 516 mature cows whose growth curves were subsequently evaluated. Hereford-sired cows tended to have heavier mature BW, as estimated by parameter A, than Angus- (P=0.09) and Brahman-sired cows (P=0.06), and were heavier than the other breeds (P < 0.001). Angus-sired cows were heavier than Boran- (P < 0.001) and Tuli-sired cows (P < 0.001), and tended to be heavier than Belgian Blue-sired cows (P=0.097). Angus-sired cows did not differ from Brahman-sired cows (P=0.94). Brahman-sired cows had a heavier mature BW than Boran- (P < 0.001), Tuli- (P < 0.001), and Belgian Blue-sired cows (P < 0.04). Angus-sired cows matured faster (k) than cows sired by Hereford (P=0.03), Brahman (P < 0.001), Boran (P=0.03), and Tuli (P < 0.001) sires, but did not differ from Belgian Blue-sired (P=0.13) cows. Brahman-sired cows took longer to mature than Boran- (P=0.03) or Belgian Blue-sired cows (P=0.003). Belgian Blue-sired cows were faster maturing than Tuli-sired cows (P=0.02). Brahman-sired cows had reached a greater proportion of their mature BW at puberty than had Hereford- (P < 0.001), Tuli- (P=0.003), and Belgian Blue-sired cows (P=0.001). Boran-sired cows tended to have reached a greater proportion of their mature BW at puberty than had Angus-sired cows (P=0.09), and had reached a greater proportion of their mature BW at puberty than had Hereford- (P < 0.001), Tuli- (P < 0.001), and Belgian Blue-sired cows (P < 0.001). Within species of cattle, the relative range in proportion of mature BW at puberty (Bos taurus 0.56 through 0.58, and Bos indicus 0.60) was highly conserved, suggesting that proportion of mature BW is a more robust predictor of age at puberty across breeds than is absolute weight or age. PMID:21531851

  6. Bacterial lipases

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Onno Misset; Margreet van Heuvel; Charles Colson; Bauke W. Dijkstra; Stéphane Ransac; Karl-Erich Jaeger

    1994-01-01

    Many different bacterial species produce lipases which hydrolyze esters of glycerol with preferably long-chain fatty acids. They act at the interface generated by a hydrophobic lipid substrate in a hydrophilic aqueous medium. A characteristic property of lipases is called interfacial activation, meaning a sharp increase in lipase activity observed when the substrate starts to form an emulsion, thereby presenting to

  7. [Bacterial Keratitis].

    PubMed

    Rachwalik, D; Pleyer, U

    2015-06-01

    Worldwide inflammatory corneal diseases are considered to be one of the leading causes of monocular blindness. Bacterial infectious are still predominant and are found in 80?% of patients with ulcerative keratitis. In recent years, both changes in risk conditions and changes in the bacterial spectrum can be observed. Contact lenses and refractive surgery are factors that have increased in importance according to some studies. Microorganisms especially Pseudomonas spp. and atypical mycobacteria are detectable in these patients. In contrast, the bacterial keratitis is observed less frequently after trauma. The broad, often unsighted use of highly effective antimicrobial agents, especially of fluoroquinolones is assumed to be a factor in the transformation of the microbial spectrum. Due to the frequent course of keratitis and a targeted, effective therapy to initiate a pathogen is desirable. The possibilities of diagnostics have been expanded in recent years by molecular biological techniques, but cannot replace established methods. The aim of this paper is to provide a positioning on current aspects of bacterial keratitis. PMID:26084962

  8. Phase nucleation in curved space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gómez, Leopoldo R.; García, Nicolás A.; Vitelli, Vincenzo; Lorenzana, José; Vega, Daniel A.

    2015-04-01

    Nucleation and growth is the dominant relaxation mechanism driving first-order phase transitions. In two-dimensional flat systems, nucleation has been applied to a wide range of problems in physics, chemistry and biology. Here we study nucleation and growth of two-dimensional phases lying on curved surfaces and show that curvature modifies both critical sizes of nuclei and paths towards the equilibrium phase. In curved space, nucleation and growth becomes inherently inhomogeneous and critical nuclei form faster on regions of positive Gaussian curvature. Substrates of varying shape display complex energy landscapes with several geometry-induced local minima, where initially propagating nuclei become stabilized and trapped by the underlying curvature.

  9. Growth performance, nitrogen balance and urinary purine derivatives in growing-furring mink (Mustela vison) fed bacterial protein produced from natural gas

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ø. Ahlstrøm; A.-H. Tauson; A. L. Frydendahl Hellwing; L. T. Mydland; A. Skrede

    A bacterial protein meal (BPM), containing 70% crude protein and produced on natural gas, was evaluated versus fish meal as protein source for mink in the growing-furring period (June 29 - November 26). BPM, rich in nucleic acids, accounted for 0 (control), 20 and 40% of dietary crude protein corresponding to 0, 4 and 8% of the wet diets, respectively.

  10. Bacterial endophytes in processing carrots ( Daucus carota L. var. sativus): their localization, population density, biodiversity and their effects on plant growth

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Monique A. Surette; Antony V. Sturz; Rajasekaran R. Lada; Jerzy Nowak

    2003-01-01

    A survey of endophytic bacteria colonizing roots of processing carrots (Daucus carota) was performed with two high-yielding cultivars (Carochoice, Red Core Chantenay) grown at two locations (Canning, Great Village) in Nova Scotia. Most bacterial endophyte colony-forming units (CFU) were recovered from the carrot crown tissues (96%) compared to the periderm and metaxylem tissues of carrot storage tissues irrespective of the

  11. BACTERIAL INDICATORS OF RECREATIONAL WATER QUALITY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The selection of bacterial indicators of recreational water quality are considered with respect to suggested ideal characteristics, such as association with pathogens, growth in aquatic environments, resistance to disinfection and ease of enumeration, and through the use of epide...

  12. Anti-bacterial activity of Achatina CRP and its mechanism of action.

    PubMed

    Mukherjee, Sandip; Barman, Soma; Mandal, Narayan Chandra; Bhattacharya, Shelley

    2014-07-01

    The physiological role of C-reactive protein (CRP), the classical acute-phase protein, is not well documented, despite many reports on biological effects of CRP in vitro and in model systems in vivo. It has been suggested that CRP protects mice against lethal toxicity of bacterial infections by implementing immunological responses. In Achatina fulica CRP is a constitutive multifunctional protein in haemolymph and considered responsible for their survival in the environment for millions of years. The efficacy of Achatina CRP (ACRP) was tested against both Salmonella typhimurium and Bacillus subtilis infections in mice where endogenous CRP level is negligible even after inflammatory stimulus. Further, growth curves of the bacteria revealed that ACRP (50 microg/mL) is bacteriostatic against gram negative salmonellae and bactericidal against gram positive bacilli. ACRP induced energy crises in bacterial cells, inhibited key carbohydrate metabolic enzymes such as phosphofructokinase in glycolysis, isocitrate dehydrogenase in TCA cycle, isocitrate lyase in glyoxylate cycle and fructose-1,6-bisphosphatase in gluconeogenesis. ACRP disturbed the homeostasis of cellular redox potential as well as reduced glutathione status, which is accompanied by an enhanced rate of lipid peroxidation. Annexin V-Cy3/CFDA dual staining clearly showed ACRP induced apoptosis-like death in bacterial cell population. Moreover, immunoblot analyses also indicated apoptosis-like death in ACRP treated bacterial cells, where activation of poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 (PARP) and caspase-3 was noteworthy. It is concluded that metabolic impairment by ACRP in bacterial cells is primarily due to generation of reactive oxygen species and ACRP induced anti-bacterial effect is mediated by metabolic impairment leading to apoptosis-like death in bacterial cells. PMID:25059037

  13. Synthetic furanones inhibit quorum-sensing and enhance bacterial clearance in Pseudomonas aeruginosa lung infection in mice

    Microsoft Academic Search

    H. Wu; Z. Song; M. Hentzer; J. B. Andersen; S. Molin; M. Givskov; N. Høiby

    2004-01-01

    Introduction: Antibiotics are used to treat bacterial infections by killing the bacteria or inhibiting their growth, but resistance to antibiotics can develop readily. The discovery that bacterial quorum-sensing regu- lates bacterial virulence as well as the formation of biofilms opens up new ways to control certain bacterial infections. Furanone compounds capable of inhibiting bacterial quorum-sensing systems have been isolated from

  14. Introduction Elliptic curves

    E-print Network

    Kwak, Do Young

    Introduction Elliptic curves Modular curves Elliptic curves and modular forms Application to number theory y-coordinates of elliptic curves Dong Hwa Shin Department of Mathematical Sciences KAIST January 11, 2010 #12;Introduction Elliptic curves Modular curves Elliptic curves and modular forms

  15. Inhibitory effects on bacterial growth and beta-ketoacyl-ACP reductase by different species of maple leaf extracts and tannic acid.

    PubMed

    Wu, Dan; Wu, Xiao-Dong; You, Xue-Fu; Ma, Xiao-Feng; Tian, Wei-Xi

    2010-01-01

    It is important to develop new antibiotics aimed at novel targets. The investigation found that the leaf extracts from five maples (Acer platanoides, Acer campestre, Acer rubrum, Acer saccharum and Acer truncatum Bunge collected in Denmark, Canada and China) and their component tannic acid displayed antibacterial ability against 24 standard bacteria strains with the minimum inhibitory concentration of 0.3-8.0 mg/mL. Unlike the standard antibiotic levofloxacin (LFX), these samples inhibited Gram-positive bacteria more effectively than they inhibited Gram-negative bacteria. These samples effectively inhibited two antidrug bacterial strains. The results show that these samples inhibit bacteria by a different mechanism from LFX. These samples potently inhibited b-ketoacyl-ACP reductase (FabG), which is an important enzyme in bacterial fatty acid synthesis. Tannic acid showed the strongest inhibition on FabG with a half inhibition concentration of 0.78 microM (0.81 microg/mL). Furthermore, tannic acid and two maple leaf extracts showed time-dependent irreversible inhibition of FabG. These three samples also exhibited better inhibition on bacteria. It is suggested that FabG is the antibacteria target of maple leaf extracts and tannic acid, and both reversible and irreversible inhibitions of FabG are important for the antibacterial effect. PMID:19444866

  16. Bacterial vaginosis.

    PubMed Central

    Spiegel, C A

    1991-01-01

    Bacterial vaginosis (BV) is the most common of the vaginitides affecting women of reproductive age. It appears to be due to an alteration in the vaginal ecology by which Lactobacillus spp., the predominant organisms in the healthy vagina, are replaced by a mixed flora including Prevotella bivia, Prevotella disiens, Porphyromonas spp., Mobiluncus spp., and Peptostreptococcus spp. All of these organisms except Mobiluncus spp. are also members of the endogenous vaginal flora. While evidence from treatment trials does not support the notion that BV is sexually transmitted, recent studies have shown an increased risk associated with multiple sexual partners. It has also been suggested that the pathogenesis of BV may be similar to that of urinary tract infections, with the rectum serving as a reservoir for some BV-associated flora. The organisms associated with BV have also been recognized as agents of female upper genital tract infection, including pelvic inflammatory disease, and the syndrome BV has been associated with adverse outcome of pregnancy, including premature rupture of membranes, chorioamnionitis, and fetal loss; postpartum endometritis; cuff cellulitis; and urinary tract infections. The mechanisms by which the BV-associated flora causes the signs of BV are not well understood, but a role for H2O2-producing Lactobacillus spp. in protecting against colonization by catalase-negative anaerobic bacteria has been recognized. These and other aspects of BV are reviewed. PMID:1747864

  17. Phenotypic and genetic relationships between growth and feed intake curves and feed efficiency and amino acid requirements in the growing pig.

    PubMed

    Saintilan, R; Brossard, L; Vautier, B; Sellier, P; Bidanel, J; van Milgen, J; Gilbert, H

    2015-01-01

    Improvement of feed efficiency in pigs has been achieved essentially by increasing lean growth rate, which resulted in lower feed intake (FI). The objective was to evaluate the impact of strategies for improving feed efficiency on the dynamics of FI and growth in growing pigs to revisit nutrient recommendations and strategies for feed efficiency improvement. In 2010, three BWs, at 35±2, 63±9 and 107±7 kg, and daily FI during this period were recorded in three French test stations on 379 Large White and 327 French Landrace from maternal pig populations and 215 Large White from a sire population. Individual growth and FI model parameters were obtained with the InraPorc® software and individual nutrient requirements were computed. The model parameters were explored according to feed efficiency as measured by residual feed intake (RFI) or feed conversion ratio (FCR). Animals were separated in groups of better feed efficiency (RFI- or FCR-), medium feed efficiency and poor feed efficiency. Second, genetic relationships between feed efficiency and model parameters were estimated. Despite similar average daily gains (ADG) during the test for all RFI groups, RFI- pigs had a lower initial growth rate and a higher final growth rate compared with other pigs. The same initial growth rate was found for all FCR groups, but FCR- pigs had significantly higher final growth rates than other pigs, resulting in significantly different ADG. Dynamic of FI also differed between RFI or FCR groups. The calculated digestible lysine requirements, expressed in g/MJ net energy (NE), showed the same trends for RFI or FCR groups: the average requirements for the 25% most efficient animals were 13% higher than that of the 25% least efficient animals during the whole test, reaching 0.90 to 0.95 g/MJ NE at the beginning of the test, which is slightly greater than usual feed recommendations for growing pigs. Model parameters were moderately heritable (0.30±0.13 to 0.56±0.13), except for the precocity of growth (0.06±0.08). The parameter representing the quantity of feed at 50 kg BW showed a relatively high genetic correlation with RFI (0.49±0.14), and average protein deposition between 35 and 110 kg had the highest correlation with FCR (-0.76±0.08). Thus, growth and FI dynamics may be envisaged as breeding tools to improve feed efficiency. Furthermore, improvement of feed efficiency should be envisaged jointly with new feeding strategies. PMID:25192352

  18. Low-intensity electromagnetic irradiation of 70.6 and 73 GHz frequencies enhances the effects of disulfide bonds reducer on Escherichia coli growth and affects the bacterial surface oxidation-reduction state

    SciTech Connect

    Torgomyan, Heghine [Department of Biophysics of Biology Faculty, Yerevan State University, Yerevan 0025 (Armenia)] [Department of Biophysics of Biology Faculty, Yerevan State University, Yerevan 0025 (Armenia); Trchounian, Armen, E-mail: Trchounian@ysu.am [Department of Biophysics of Biology Faculty, Yerevan State University, Yerevan 0025 (Armenia)] [Department of Biophysics of Biology Faculty, Yerevan State University, Yerevan 0025 (Armenia)

    2011-10-14

    Highlights: {yields} Low intensity 70.6 and 73 GHz electromagnetic irradiation (EMI) strongly suppressed Escherichia coli growth at 73 GHz and pH 7.3. {yields} Reducer DL-dithiothreitol had bactericidal effect and disturbed the SH-groups number. {yields} EMI enhanced E. coli sensitivity toward dithiothreitol. {yields} EMI decreased the SH-groups number of membrane disturbed by ATP and N,N'-dicyclohexycarbodiimide. {yields} The changed membrane oxidation-reduction state could be the primary mechanisms in EMI effects. -- Abstract: Low-intensity electromagnetic irradiation (EMI) of 70.6 and 73 GHz frequencies (flux capacity - 0.06 mW cm{sup -2}) had bactericidal effects on Escherichia coli. This EMI (1 h) exposure suppressed the growth of E. coli K-12({lambda}). The pH value (6.0-8.0) did not significantly affect the growth. The lag-phase duration was prolonged, and the growth specific rate was inhibited, and these effects were more noticeable after 73 GHz irradiation. These effects were enhanced by the addition of DL-dithiothreitol (DTT), a strong reducer of disulfide bonds in surface membrane proteins, which in its turn also has bactericidal effect. Further, the number of accessible SH-groups in membrane vesicles was markedly decreased by EMI that was augmented by N,N'-dicyclohexycarbodiimide and DTT. These results indicate a change in the oxidation-reduction state of bacterial cell membrane proteins that could be the primary membranous mechanism in the bactericidal effects of low-intensity EMI of the 70.6 and 73 GHz frequencies.

  19. Testing the Importance of Individual Growth Curves in Predicting Performance on a High-Stakes Reading Comprehension Test in Florida. Summary. REL 2014-006

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Petscher, Yaacov; Kershaw, Sarah; Koon, Sharon; Foorman, Barbara R.

    2014-01-01

    Districts and schools use progress monitoring to assess student progress, to identify students who fail to respond to intervention, and to further adapt instruction to student needs. Researchers and practitioners often use progress monitoring data to estimate student achievement growth (slope) and evaluate changes in performance over time for…

  20. A Cohort-Sequential Multivariate Latent Growth Curve Analysis of Normative CBCL Aggressive and Delinquent Problem Behavior: Associations with Harsh Discipline and Gender

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prinzie, P.; Onghena, P.; Hellinckx, W.

    2006-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the normative developmental trajectories of aggressive and delinquent behavior in young children. Cohort-sequential univariate latent growth modeling (LGM) analyses were employed to conceptualize and analyze intraindividual changes in children's aggressive and delinquent behavior and interindividual differences…

  1. Testing the Importance of Individual Growth Curves in Predicting Performance on a High-Stakes Reading Comprehension Test in Florida. REL 2014-006

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Petscher, Yaacov; Kershaw, Sarah; Koon, Sharon; Foorman, Barbara R.

    2014-01-01

    Districts and schools use progress monitoring to assess student progress, to identify students who fail to respond to intervention, and to further adapt instruction to student needs. Researchers and practitioners often use progress monitoring data to estimate student achievement growth (slope) and evaluate changes in performance over time for…

  2. Methane oxidation activity and bacterial community composition in a simulated landfill cover soil is influenced by the growth of Chenopodium album L

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Yunlong Wang; Weixiang Wu; Ying Ding; Wei Liu; Anton Perera; Yingxu Chen; Medha Devare

    2008-01-01

    Oxygen availability in landfill cover soil is a major limitation to the growth and activity of methanotrophs as methane oxidation is an aerobic microbial process. Plants tolerant to high concentrations of landfill gas (LFG) may play an important role in improving methane oxidation within landfill cover soil and reducing emission of methane, a greenhouse gas, from it. In this study,

  3. Proteins as potential bacterial growth inhibitors in foods: Suppression of the activity of water by proteins as determined by NMR relaxation methods

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Thomas F. Kumosinski; Helmut Pessen; Harold M. Farrell

    1988-01-01

    Summary Food microbiologists have long known that suppression of the activity of water,aw, can retard microbial growth in food systems. Traditionally,aw, suppression has been achieved by addition of salts or humectants to foods. To limit the amount of preservatives added to food products, studies were initiated to assess the feasibility of using proteins to suppressaw to a practical value for

  4. R-curve behavior and stable crack growth at elevated temperature (1,500--1,650 C) in a Si[sub 3]N[sub 4]/SiC nanocomposite

    SciTech Connect

    Rouxel, T. (Ecole Nationale Superieure de Ceramique Industrielle, Limoges (France). Lab. de Materiaux Ceramiques et Traitements de Surface); Wakai, Fumihiro; Sakaguchi, Shuji (Government Industrial Research Inst. of Nagoya (Japan). Ceramic Science Dept.)

    1994-12-01

    The crack growth resistance behavior and the stable crack growth regime of a Si[sub 3]N[sub 4]/SiC composite have been examined at high temperature (1,500-1,650 C). Single edged notched beam specimens were used and the load/unloading technique, with high deflection rates to ensure an elastic behavior, has been employed to estimate the crack lengths. Rising R-curves have bee obtained with a maximum crack growth resistance almost twice as high as the initial value. Above the T[sub g] of the intergranular glassy phase, the behavior changes from brittle to visco-plastic and, consequently, the fracture characteristics become strongly rate dependent. It is observed experimentally that in the enhanced ductile region the crack extension velocity during the stable crack propagation from a preexisting flaw decreases rapidly with time. This phenomenon has been tentatively attributed to dynamic crack-tip stress relaxation resulting from the rapid flow of the glassy intergranular phase in the process zone. Thus, the rheological properties of the composite appear to be of major importance to gain insight into the mechanical behavior at such elevated temperatures.

  5. Phase nucleation in curved space.

    PubMed

    Gómez, Leopoldo R; García, Nicolás A; Vitelli, Vincenzo; Lorenzana, José; Vega, Daniel A

    2015-01-01

    Nucleation and growth is the dominant relaxation mechanism driving first-order phase transitions. In two-dimensional flat systems, nucleation has been applied to a wide range of problems in physics, chemistry and biology. Here we study nucleation and growth of two-dimensional phases lying on curved surfaces and show that curvature modifies both critical sizes of nuclei and paths towards the equilibrium phase. In curved space, nucleation and growth becomes inherently inhomogeneous and critical nuclei form faster on regions of positive Gaussian curvature. Substrates of varying shape display complex energy landscapes with several geometry-induced local minima, where initially propagating nuclei become stabilized and trapped by the underlying curvature. PMID:25896725

  6. Regulation of Cell Growth during Serum Starvation and Bacterial Survival in Macrophages by the Bifunctional Enzyme SpoT in Helicobacter pylori

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Yan Ning Zhou; William G. Coleman; Z. Yang; Y. Yang; N. Hodgson; F. Chen; D. J. Jin

    2008-01-01

    In Helicobacter pylori the stringent response is mediated solely by spoT. The spoT gene is known to encode (p)ppGpp synthetase activity and is required for H. pylori survival in the stationary phase. However, neither the hydrolase activity of the H. pylori SpoT protein nor the role of SpoT in the regulation of growth during serum starvation and intracellular survival of

  7. Macroscopic Streamer Growths in Acidic, Metal-Rich Mine Waters in North Wales Consist of Novel and Remarkably Simple Bacterial Communities

    PubMed Central

    Hallberg, Kevin B.; Coupland, Kris; Kimura, Sakurako; Johnson, D. Barrie

    2006-01-01

    The microbial composition of acid streamers (macroscopic biofilms) in acidic, metal-rich waters in two locations (an abandoned copper mine and a chalybeate spa) in north Wales was studied using cultivation-based and biomolecular techniques. Known chemolithotrophic and heterotrophic acidophiles were readily isolated from disrupted streamers, but they accounted for only <1 to 7% of the total microorganisms present. Fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) revealed that 80 to 90% of the microbes in both types of streamers were ?-Proteobacteria. Terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis of the streamers suggested that a single bacterial species was dominant in the copper mine streamers, while two distinct bacteria (one of which was identical to the bacterium found in the copper mine streamers) accounted for about 90% of the streamers in the spa water. 16S rRNA gene clone libraries showed that the ?-proteobacterium found in both locations was closely related to a clone detected previously in acid mine drainage in California and that its closest characterized relatives were neutrophilic ammonium oxidizers. Using a modified isolation technique, this bacterium was isolated from the copper mine streamers and shown to be a novel acidophilic autotrophic iron oxidizer. The ?-proteobacterium found only in the spa streamers was closely related to the neutrophilic iron oxidizer Gallionella ferruginea. FISH analysis using oligonucleotide probes that targeted the two ?-proteobacteria confirmed that the biodiversity of the streamers in both locations was very limited. The microbial compositions of the acid streamers found at the two north Wales sites are very different from the microbial compositions of the previously described acid streamers found at Iron Mountain, California, and the Rio Tinto, Spain. PMID:16517651

  8. Macrophages inhibit human osteosarcoma cell growth after activation with the bacterial cell wall derivative liposomal muramyl tripeptide in combination with interferon-?

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background In osteosarcoma, the presence of tumor-infiltrating macrophages positively correlates with patient survival in contrast to the negative effect of tumor-associated macrophages in patients with other tumors. Liposome-encapsulated muramyl tripeptide (L-MTP-PE) has been introduced in the treatment of osteosarcoma patients, which may enhance the potential anti-tumor activity of macrophages. Direct anti-tumor activity of human macrophages against human osteosarcoma cells has not been described so far. Hence, we assessed osteosarcoma cell growth after co-culture with human macrophages. Methods Monocyte-derived M1-like and M2-like macrophages were polarized with LPS?+?IFN-?, L-MTP-PE +/? IFN-? or IL-10 and incubated with osteosarcoma cells. Two days later, viable tumor cell numbers were analyzed. Antibody-dependent effects were investigated using the therapeutic anti-EGFR antibody cetuximab. Results M1-like macrophages inhibited osteosarcoma cell growth when activated with LPS?+?IFN-?. Likewise, stimulation of M1-like macrophages with liposomal muramyl tripeptide (L-MTP-PE) inhibited tumor growth, but only when combined with IFN-?. Addition of the tumor-reactive anti-EGFR antibody cetuximab did not further improve the anti-tumor activity of activated M1-like macrophages. The inhibition was mediated by supernatants of activated M1-like macrophages, containing TNF-? and IL-1?. However, specific blockage of these cytokines, nitric oxide or reactive oxygen species did not inhibit the anti-tumor effect, suggesting the involvement of other soluble factors released upon macrophage activation. While LPS?+?IFN-?–activated M2-like macrophages had low anti-tumor activity, IL-10–polarized M2-like macrophages were able to reduce osteosarcoma cell growth in the presence of the anti-EGFR cetuximab involving antibody-dependent tumor cell phagocytosis. Conclusion This study demonstrates that human macrophages can be induced to exert direct anti-tumor activity against osteosarcoma cells. Our observation that the induction of macrophage anti-tumor activity by L-MTP-PE required IFN-? may be of relevance for the optimization of L-MTP-PE therapy in osteosarcoma patients. PMID:24612598

  9. Coarse-grained simulations of bacterial cell wall growth reveal that local coordination alone can be sufficient to maintain rod shape.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Lam T; Gumbart, James C; Beeby, Morgan; Jensen, Grant J

    2015-07-14

    Bacteria are surrounded by a peptidoglycan (PG) cell wall that must be remodeled to allow cell growth. While many structural details and properties of PG and the individual enzymes involved are known, how the process is coordinated to maintain cell integrity and rod shape is not understood. We have developed a coarse-grained method to simulate how individual transglycosylases, transpeptidases, and endopeptidases could introduce new material into an existing unilayer PG network. We find that a simple model with no enzyme coordination fails to maintain cell wall integrity and rod shape. We then iteratively analyze failure modes and explore different mechanistic hypotheses about how each problem might be overcome by the macromolecules involved. In contrast to a current theory, which posits that long MreB filaments are needed to coordinate PG insertion sites, we find that local coordination of enzyme activities in individual complexes can be sufficient to maintain cell integrity and rod shape. We also present possible molecular explanations for the existence of monofunctional transpeptidases and glycosidases (glycoside hydrolases), trimeric peptide crosslinks, cell twisting during growth, and synthesis of new strands in pairs. PMID:26130803

  10. Fitting Richards' curve to data of diverse origins

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Johnson, D.H.; Sargeant, A.B.; Allen, S.H.

    1975-01-01

    Published techniques for fitting data to nonlinear growth curves are briefly reviewed, most techniques require knowledge of the shape of the curve. A flexible growth curve developed by Richards (1959) is discussed as an alternative when the shape is unknown. The shape of this curve is governed by a specific parameter which can be estimated from the data. We describe in detail the fitting of a diverse set of longitudinal and cross-sectional data to Richards' growth curve for the purpose of determining the age of red fox (Vulpes vulpes) pups on the basis of right hind foot length. The fitted curve is found suitable for pups less than approximately 80 days old. The curve is extrapolated to pre-natal growth and shown to be appropriate only for about 10 days prior to birth.

  11. Bacterial adherence to bioinert and bioactive materials studied in vitro.

    PubMed

    Oga, M; Arizono, T; Sugioka, Y

    1993-06-01

    In vitro, bioinert stainless steel and titanium alloy, and bioactive sintered hydroxyapatite and hydroxyapatite-coated titanium materials were exposed to Staphylococcus epidermidis to study bacterial adhesion. Scanning electron microscopy showed that fibrous strands interconnected the adherent bacteria, and that background matrix enclosed bacterial colonies. This adherent mode of growth may reduce the susceptibility of the bacteria to host clearance mechanisms and antibiotic therapy. Adherence assays revealed that bacterial adherence to sintered hydroxyapatite was higher than to the other 3 materials. PMID:8391746

  12. Proteome analysis of Arabidopsis seedlings exposed to bacterial volatiles

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Young Sang Kwon; Choong-Min Ryu; Soohyun Lee; Hyo Bee Park; Ki Soo Han; Jung Han Lee; Kyunghee Lee; Woo Sik Chung; Mi-Jeong Jeong; Hee Kyu Kim; Dong-Won Bae

    2010-01-01

    Plant root-associated bacteria (rhizobacteria) elicit plant basal immunity referred to as induced systemic resistance (ISR)\\u000a against multiple pathogens. Among multi-bacterial determinants involving such ISR, the induction of ISR and promotion of growth\\u000a by bacterial volatile compounds was previously reported. To exploit global de novo expression of plant proteins by bacterial\\u000a volatiles, proteomic analysis was performed after exposure of Arabidopsis plants

  13. Isolated Curves for Hyperelliptic Curve Cryptography

    E-print Network

    Wang, Wenhan

    2012-01-01

    We introduce the notion of isolated genus two curves. As there is no known efficient algorithm to explicitly construct isogenies between two genus two curves with large conductor gap, the discrete log problem (DLP) cannot be efficiently carried over from an isolated curve to a large set of isogenous curves. Thus isolated genus two curves might be more secure for DLP based hyperelliptic curve cryptography. We establish results on explicit expressions for the index of an endomorphism ring in the maximal CM order, and give conditions under which the index is a prime number or an almost prime number for three different categories of quartic CM fields. We also derived heuristic asymptotic results on the densities and distributions of isolated genus two curves with CM by any fixed quartic CM field. Computational results, which are also shown for three explicit examples, agree with heuristic prediction with errors within a tolerable range.

  14. Identification of mVOCs from Andean rhizobacteria and field evaluation of bacterial and mycorrhizal inoculants on growth of potato in its center of origin.

    PubMed

    Velivelli, Siva L S; Kromann, Peter; Lojan, Paul; Rojas, Mercy; Franco, Javier; Suarez, Juan Pablo; Prestwich, Barbara Doyle

    2015-04-01

    Food security (a pressing issue for all nations) faces a threat due to population growth, land availability for growing crops, a changing climate (leading to increases in both abiotic and biotic stresses), heightened consumer awareness of the risks related to the use of agrichemicals, and also the reliance on depleting fossil fuel reserves for their production. Legislative changes in Europe mean that fewer agrichemicals will be available in the future for the control of crop pests and pathogens. The need for the implementation of a more sustainable agricultural system globally, incorporating an integrated approach to disease management, has never been more urgent. To that end, the Valorizing Andean Microbial Diversity (VALORAM) project (http://valoram.ucc.ie), funded under FP7, examined the role of microbial communities in crop production and protection to improve the sustainability, food security, environmental protection, and productivity for rural Andean farmers. During this work, microbial volatile organic compounds (mVOCs) of 27 rhizobacterial isolates were identified using gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS), and their antifungal activity against Rhizoctonia solani was determined in vitro and compared to the activity of a selection of pure volatile compounds. Five of these isolates, Pseudomonas palleroniana R43631, Bacillus sp. R47065, R47131, Paenibacillus sp. B3a R49541, and Bacillus simplex M3-4 R49538 trialled in the field in their respective countries of origin, i.e., Bolivia, Peru, and Ecuador, showed significant increase in the yield of potato. The strategy followed in the VALORAM project may offer a template for the future isolation and determination of putative biocontrol and plant growth-promoting agents, useful as part of a low-input integrated pest management system. PMID:25339308

  15. Screening of an E. coli O157:H7 Bacterial Artificial Chromosome Library by Comparative Genomic Hybridization to Identify Genomic Regions Contributing to Growth in Bovine Gastrointestinal Mucus and Epithelial Cell Colonization

    PubMed Central

    Bai, Jianing; McAteer, Sean P.; Paxton, Edith; Mahajan, Arvind; Gally, David L.; Tree, Jai J.

    2011-01-01

    Enterohemorrhagic E. coli (EHEC) O157:H7 can cause serious gastrointestinal and systemic disease in humans following direct or indirect exposure to ruminant feces containing the bacterium. The main colonization site of EHEC O157:H7 in cattle is the terminal rectum where the bacteria intimately attach to the epithelium and multiply in the intestinal mucus. This study aimed to identify genomic regions of EHEC O157:H7 that contribute to colonization and multiplication at this site. A bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) library was generated from a derivative of the sequenced E. coli O157:H7 Sakai strain. The library contains 1152 clones averaging 150?kbp. To verify the library, clones containing a complete locus of enterocyte effacement (LEE) were identified by DNA hybridization. In line with a previous report, these did not confer a type III secretion (T3S) capacity to the K-12 host strain. However, conjugation of one of the BAC clones into a strain containing a partial LEE deletion restored T3S. Three hundred eighty-four clones from the library were subjected to two different selective screens; one involved three rounds of adherence assays to bovine primary rectal epithelial cells while the other competed the clones over three rounds of growth in bovine rectal mucus. The input strain DNA was then compared with the selected strains using comparative genomic hybridization (CGH) on an E. coli microarray. The adherence assay enriched for pO157 DNA indicating the importance of this plasmid for colonization of rectal epithelial cells. The mucus assay enriched for multiple regions involved in carbohydrate utilization, including hexuronate uptake, indicating that these regions provide a competitive growth advantage in bovine mucus. This BAC-CGH approach provides a positive selection screen that complements negative selection transposon-based screens. As demonstrated, this may be of particular use for identifying genes with redundant functions such as adhesion and carbon metabolism. PMID:21887152

  16. Influence of bacterial N-acyl-homoserine lactones on growth parameters, pigments, antioxidative capacities and the xenobiotic phase II detoxification enzymes in barley and yam bean

    PubMed Central

    Götz-Rösch, Christine; Sieper, Tina; Fekete, Agnes; Schmitt-Kopplin, Philippe; Hartmann, Anton; Schröder, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Bacteria are able to communicate with each other and sense their environment in a population density dependent mechanism known as quorum sensing (QS). N-acyl-homoserine lactones (AHLs) are the QS signaling compounds of Gram-negative bacteria which are frequent colonizers of rhizospheres. While cross-kingdom signaling and AHL-dependent gene expression in plants has been confirmed, the responses of enzyme activities in the eukaryotic host upon AHLs are unknown. Since AHL are thought to be used as so-called plant boosters or strengthening agents, which might change their resistance toward radiation and/or xenobiotic stress, we have examined the plants’ pigment status and their antioxidative and detoxifying capacities upon AHL treatment. Because the yield of a crop plant should not be negatively influenced, we have also checked for growth and root parameters. We investigated the influence of three different AHLs, namely N-hexanoyl- (C6-HSL), N-octanoyl- (C8-HSL), and N-decanoyl- homoserine lactone (C10-HSL) on two agricultural crop plants. The AHL-effects on Hordeum vulgare (L.) as an example of a monocotyledonous crop and on the tropical leguminous crop plant Pachyrhizus erosus (L.) were compared. While plant growth and pigment contents in both plants showed only small responses to the applied AHLs, AHL treatment triggered tissue- and compound-specific changes in the activity of important detoxification enzymes. The activity of dehydroascorbate reductase in barley shoots after C10-HSL treatment for instance increased up to 384% of control plant levels, whereas superoxide dismutase activity in barley roots was decreased down to 23% of control levels upon C6-HSL treatment. Other detoxification enzymes reacted similarly within this range, with interesting clusters of positive or negative answers toward AHL treatment. In general the changes on the enzyme level were more severe in barley than in yam bean which might be due to the different abilities of the plants to degrade AHLs to metabolites such as the hydroxy- or keto-form of the original compound. PMID:25914699

  17. Supplementary Information Growth Characterisation

    E-print Network

    Burke, Ian

    DNA was extracted from the bacterial community growing in the alkaline Fe(III) media containing yeast of the iron reducing culture can be modelled using a logistic sigmoidal growth function (8); { [ ( ) ]} (1

  18. The resemblance of clinical attributes between mastitic cows with no growth on bacterial milk cultures and those with gram-positive bacteria cultured.

    PubMed Central

    White, M E; Montgomery, M E

    1987-01-01

    The clinical attributes of 40 dairy cows which had mastitis but no growth of bacteria from the milk were analyzed and compared to the attributes in 102 cows with only gram-positive and 61 cows with only gram-negative bacteria cultured from the milk. Cows with no bacteria cultured from the milk did not differ significantly from cows with gram-positive bacteria cultured, but 9 of 12 attributes were significantly different between cows with no bacteria cultured and cows with gram-negative bacteria cultured. Discriminant analysis was used to classify cows as members of the gram-positive or gram-negative culture groups. The discriminant equation was then applied to the cows with no bacteria cultured, and 78% of cows with no bacteria cultured were classified as members of the gram-positive group. Most mastitis in cows with no bacteria grown from the milk was probably due to gram-positive bacteria. If antibiotic therapy is used in cows with persistent mastitis and a negative culture in the belief that the culture is a false negative, treatment with antibiotics effective only against gram-negative organisms would not be appropriate. PMID:3300920

  19. Pre-Exposure of Mycobacterium tuberculosis-Infected Macrophages to Crystalline Silica Impairs Control of Bacterial Growth by Deregulating the Balance between Apoptosis and Necrosis

    PubMed Central

    Chávez-Galán, Leslie; Ramon-Luing, Lucero A.; Torre-Bouscoulet, Luis; Pérez-Padilla, Rogelio; Sada-Ovalle, Isabel

    2013-01-01

    Inhalation of crystalline silica (CS) particles increases the risk of pulmonary tuberculosis; however, the precise mechanism through which CS exposure facilitates Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) infection is unclear. We speculate that macrophage exposure to CS deregulates the cell death pathways that could explain, at least in part, the association observed between exposure to CS and pulmonary tuberculosis. We therefore established an in vitro model in which macrophages were exposed to CS and then infected with Mtb. Expression of surface markers was analyzed by flow cytometry, JNK1/2, ASK1, caspase 9, P-p38, Bcl-2 and Mcl-1 were analyzed by Western blot, and cytokines by ELISA. Our results show that exposure to CS limits macrophage ability to control Mtb growth. Moreover, this exposure reduced the expression of TLR2, Bcl-2 and Mcl-1, but increased that of JNK1 and ASK1 molecules in the macrophages. Finally, when the pre-exposed macrophages were infected with Mtb, the concentrations of TNF?, IL-1? and caspase-9 expression increased. This pro-inflammatory profile of the macrophage unbalanced the apoptosis/necrosis pathway. Taken together, these data suggest that macrophages exposed to CS are sensitized to cell death by MAPK kinase-dependent signaling pathway. Secretion of TNF-? and IL-1? by Mtb-infected macrophages promotes necrosis, and this deregulation of cell death pathways may favor the release of viable bacilli, thus leading to the progression of tuberculosis. PMID:24278357

  20. Effects of pH, potassium, magnesium, and bacterial growth phase on lysozyme inhibition of glucose fermentation by Streptococcus mutans 10449.

    PubMed

    Wang, Y B; Germaine, G R

    1993-05-01

    The effects of physiological (saliva and plaque fluid) concentrations of potassium and magnesium and growth phase on lysozyme inhibition of glucose fermentation by S. mutans 10449 were investigated. Glucose fermentations were carried out in a pH-stat at pH 7.0 or 5.5. Cells were at least two times more sensitive to lysozyme in the early-to-middle exponential phase compared with the stationary phase. S. sobrinus 6715 exhibited three-fold greater lysozyme resistance than S. rattus BHT or S. mutans 10449. The concentration of potassium which reduced lysozyme inhibition of S. mutans 10449 fermentation by 50% was 0.2 and 10 mmol/L for stationary and exponential phase cells, respectively. Corresponding values for magnesium were < or = 0.01 and 0.50 mmol/L. Potassium and magnesium exhibited little pH dependence in their reduction of lysozyme inhibition of fermentation by exponential- or stationary-phase S. mutans 10449. The results suggest that: (i) lysozyme interaction with stationary-phase cells involves more non-inhibitory modes than with exponential-phase cells, and (ii) lysozyme may be more effective as an antibacterial agent in saliva than in plaque fluid. PMID:8501288

  1. Oxygen-Controlled Bacterial Growth in the Sponge Suberites domuncula: toward a Molecular Understanding of the Symbiotic Relationships between Sponge and Bacteria†

    PubMed Central

    Müller, Werner E. G.; Grebenjuk, Vladislav A.; Thakur, Narsinh L.; Thakur, Archana N.; Batel, Renato; Krasko, Anatoli; Müller, Isabel M.; Breter, Hans J.

    2004-01-01

    Sponges (phylum Porifera), known to be the richest producers among the metazoans of bioactive secondary metabolites, are assumed to live in a symbiotic relationship with microorganisms, especially bacteria. Until now, the molecular basis of the mutual symbiosis, the exchange of metabolites for the benefit of the other partner, has not been understood. We show with the demosponge Suberites domuncula as a model that the sponge expresses under optimal aeration conditions the enzyme tyrosinase, which synthesizes diphenols from monophenolic compounds. The cDNA isolated was used as a probe to determine the steady-state level of gene expression. The gene expression level parallels the level of specific activity in sponge tissue, indicating that without aeration the tyrosinase level drops drastically; this effect is reversible. The SB2 bacterium isolated from the sponge surface grew well in M9 minimal salt medium supplemented with the dihydroxylated aromatic compound protocatechuate; this carbon source supported growth more than did glucose. From the SB2 bacterium the protocatechuate gene cluster was cloned and sequenced. This cluster comprises all genes coding for enzymes involved in the conversion of protocatechuate to acetyl coenzyme A. Expression is strongly induced if the bacteria are cultivated on M9-protocatechuate medium; the genes pcaQ (encoding the putative transcriptional activator of the pca operon) and pcaDC were used for quantitative PCR analyses. We conclude that metabolites, in this case diphenols, which might be produced by the sponge S. domuncula are utilized by the sponge surface-associated bacterium for energy generation. This rationale will help to further uncover the symbiotic pathways between sponges and their associated “nonculturable” microorganisms; our approach is flanked by the establishment of an EST (expressed sequence tags) database in our laboratory. PMID:15066829

  2. Upregulation of Androgen-Responsive Genes and Transforming Growth Factor-?1 Cascade Genes in a Rat Model of Non-bacterial Prostatic Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Funahashi, Yasuhito; O’Malley, Katherine J.; Kawamorita, Naoki; Tyagi, Pradeep; DeFranco, Donald B.; Takahashi, Ryosuke; Gotoh, Momokazu; Wang, Zhou; Yoshimura, Naoki

    2013-01-01

    Background Prostatic inflammation is associated with the development of prostatic hyperplasia. We investigated the effects of prostatic inflammation on expression levels of androgen-responsive genes and growth factors in the prostate. Methods Prostatic inflammation was induced by formalin injection into bilateral ventral lobes of the prostate of male SD rats. After 28 days, the prostate was harvested for analyses of proinflammatory cytokines, androgen-responsive genes in the epithelium and TGF-?1 cascade genes in the stroma. Some rats were given a COX-2 inhibitor (celecoxib; 10 mg/kg/day) by oral gavage for 28 days. Results The formalin-injected prostate exhibited widespread low-grade inflammation (< 50 leukocytes/10,000 ?m2) along with focal high-grade inflammation (> 100 leukocytes/10,000 ?m2) in limited areas. Compared to control, formalin-injected prostate exhibited a 2.5–6 fold increased protein expression of IL-1?, IL-1?, and IL-6. In the low-grade inflammatory regions, 3–9 fold and 2–3 fold upregulations of mRNA levels of androgen receptors/androgen-responsive genes and TGF-?1 cascade genes were respectively observed in the epithelium and stroma obtained by laser-capture microdissection. Positive staining for androgen receptors in the epithelial nuclei, and TGF-?1, IL-6 and COX-2 in the stroma was increased in the low-grade inflammation area. COX-2 inhibitor treatment suppressed these upregulations of cytokines, androgen-responsive and TGF-?1 cascade genes. Conclusions Prostatic inflammation induced increased expression of androgen-responsive genes in the epithelium and TGF-?1 cascade genes in the stroma, which were suppressed by COX-2 inhibitors, suggesting that activation of these genes in the low-grade inflammatory region might be involved in the development of symptomatic BPH. PMID:24446128

  3. ORIGINAL ARTICLE Colorimetric / fluorescent bacterial sensing by agarose-

    E-print Network

    Jelinek, Raz

    interest owing to the recurring incidents of bacterial con- taminations in foods and water, the anthrax that diffuse through the agarose. The agarose matrix coating the sensor film further contains growth nutrients

  4. ORIGINAL ARTICLE Colorimetric / fluorescent bacterial sensing by agarose-

    E-print Network

    Jelinek, Raz

    interest owing to the recurring incidents of bacterial con- taminations in foods and water, the anthrax the agarose. The agarose matrix coating the sensor film further contains growth nutrients, facilitating signal

  5. Understanding curved detonation waves

    SciTech Connect

    Bukiet, B.G. (New Jersey Inst. of Tech., Newark, NJ (United States). Dept. of Mathematics); Menikoff, R. (Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States))

    1992-01-01

    A wave curve is the set of final states to which an initial state may be connected by a traveling wave. In gas dynamics, for example, the wave curve consists of the shock Hugoniot curve for compressive waves and the rarefaction curve for expansive waves. In this paper, we discuss the wave curve for an undriven planar detonation and for general planar detonations. We then extend the wave curve concept to detonations in converging and diverging geometry. We also discuss the application of these wave curves to the numerical computation of detonation problems.

  6. Understanding curved detonation waves

    SciTech Connect

    Bukiet, B.G. [New Jersey Inst. of Tech., Newark, NJ (United States). Dept. of Mathematics; Menikoff, R. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)

    1992-10-01

    A wave curve is the set of final states to which an initial state may be connected by a traveling wave. In gas dynamics, for example, the wave curve consists of the shock Hugoniot curve for compressive waves and the rarefaction curve for expansive waves. In this paper, we discuss the wave curve for an undriven planar detonation and for general planar detonations. We then extend the wave curve concept to detonations in converging and diverging geometry. We also discuss the application of these wave curves to the numerical computation of detonation problems.

  7. Measurement of Behavioral Evolution in Bacterial Populations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Austin, Robert

    2013-03-01

    A curious aspect of bacterial behavior under stress is the induction of filamentation: the anomalous growth of certain bacteria in which cells continue to elongate but do not divide into progeny. We show that E.coli under the influence of the genotoxic antibiotic ciprofloxacin have robust filamentous growth, which provides individual bacteria a mesoscopic niche for evolution until resistant progeny can bud off and propagate. Hence, filamentation is a form of genomic amplification where even a single, isolated bacteria can have access to multiple genomes. We propose a model that predicts that the first arrival time of the normal sized progeny should follow a Gompertz distribution with the mean first arrival time proportional to the elongation rate of filament. These predictions agree with our experimental measurements. Finally, we suggest bacterial filament growth and budding has many similarities to tumor growth and metastasis and can serve as a simpler model to study those complicated processes. A curious aspect of bacterial behavior under stress is the induction of filamentation: the anomalous growth of certain bacteria in which cells continue to elongate but do not divide into progeny. We show that E.coli under the influence of the genotoxic antibiotic ciprofloxacin have robust filamentous growth, which provides individual bacteria a mesoscopic niche for evolution until resistant progeny can bud off and propagate. Hence, filamentation is a form of genomic amplification where even a single, isolated bacteria can have access to multiple genomes. We propose a model that predicts that the first arrival time of the normal sized progeny should follow a Gompertz distribution with the mean first arrival time proportional to the elongation rate of filament. These predictions agree with our experimental measurements. Finally, we suggest bacterial filament growth and budding has many similarities to tumor growth and metastasis and can serve as a simpler model to study those complicated processes. Sponsored by the NCI/NIH Physical Sciences Oncology Centers

  8. Influence of topology on bacterial social interaction

    E-print Network

    Yuzbashyan, Emil

    medium behaves as a Brownian particle. A wild-type bacterium E. coli executing a random walk. #12;Is many Diffusion. J ­ current of bacteria, ­ bacterial density, c ­ attractant concentration, a ­ growth rate, Db secreted by other bacteria. Need another equation for the attractant concentration c. += cD t c c 2

  9. Study of bacterial motility using optical tweezers

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Suddhashil Chattopadhyay

    2008-01-01

    Bacteria are arguably the simplest of known microorganisms, forming a fundamental part of the world we live in. Many functions they perform are found in scaled-up versions in higher organisms. Among many advanced functions, bacteria possess the ability to move in search for nutrients and favorable growth conditions. Measurement of the dynamical variables associated with bacterial swimming has proven to

  10. Bacterial plant oncogenes: The rol genes' saga

    Microsoft Academic Search

    P. Costantino; I. Capone; M. Cardarelli; A. De Paolis; M. L. Mauro; M. Trovato

    1994-01-01

    Therol genes are part of the T-DNA which is transferred byAgrobacterium rhizogenes in plant cells, causing neoplastic growth and differentiation. Each of these bacterial oncogenes deeply influences plant development and is finely regulated once transferred into the plant host. Both from the study of the effects and biochemical function of therol genes and from the analysis of their regulation, important

  11. curves reconstructed for dinosaurs are realistic, because other types of curve might fit better, and few data at their

    E-print Network

    Wenseleers, Tom

    curves reconstructed for dinosaurs are realistic, because other types of curve might fit better in dinosaurs showed that adult size and absolute growth rate are usually correlated [12]. As bird ancestors of this article. References 1 Erickson, G.M. (2005) Assessing dinosaur growth patterns: a microscopic revolution

  12. PERMEABILITY OF BACTERIAL SPORES II.

    PubMed Central

    Gerhardt, Philipp; Black, S. H.

    1961-01-01

    Gerhardt, Philipp (University of Michigan, Ann Arbor) and S. H. Black. Permeability of bacterial spores. II. Molecular variables affecting solute permeation. J. Bacteriol. 82:750–760. 1961.—More than 100 compounds were tested for their uptake by dormant spores of a bacillus. The extent of penetration was found to be dependent on at least three molecular properties: (i) The dissociation of electrolytes usually resulted in high or low uptake predictable from their charge. (ii) Lipid insolubility restricted permeation of small molecules. (iii) The molecular weight of unsubstituted glycol and sugar polymers exponentially limited penetration to eventual exclusion at mol wt above 160,000. The results were plotted as a generalized curve, calculations from which permitted an interpretation that the effective spore surface contains pores varying in diameter from 10 to 200 A. PMID:13897940

  13. N=1 Curve

    E-print Network

    Dan Xie

    2014-09-29

    N=1 curve is defined for four dimensional class S theory using Cayley-Hamilton theorem for two commuting matrices. The curve consists of three ingredients: 1: A set of N+1 degree N equations defining a curve; 2: a set of constraints relating the coefficients in the curve; 3: a canonically defined differential. We then extract from spectral curve various physical information such as the space of moduli fields, chiral ring relations, full moduli space, etc. Many examples are discussed, and the curve recovers the intricate vacua structure which often involves highly non-trivial field theory dynamics such as monopole condensation, dynamical generated superpotential, Seiberg duality, etc.

  14. Jellyfish modulate bacterial dynamic and community structure.

    PubMed

    Tinta, Tinkara; Kogovšek, Tjaša; Malej, Alenka; Turk, Valentina

    2012-01-01

    Jellyfish blooms have increased in coastal areas around the world and the outbreaks have become longer and more frequent over the past few decades. The Mediterranean Sea is among the heavily affected regions and the common bloom-forming taxa are scyphozoans Aurelia aurita s.l., Pelagia noctiluca, and Rhizostoma pulmo. Jellyfish have few natural predators, therefore their carcasses at the termination of a bloom represent an organic-rich substrate that supports rapid bacterial growth, and may have a large impact on the surrounding environment. The focus of this study was to explore whether jellyfish substrate have an impact on bacterial community phylotype selection. We conducted in situ jellyfish-enrichment experiment with three different jellyfish species. Bacterial dynamic together with nutrients were monitored to assess decaying jellyfish-bacteria dynamics. Our results show that jellyfish biomass is characterized by protein rich organic matter, which is highly bioavailable to 'jellyfish-associated' and 'free-living' bacteria, and triggers rapid shifts in bacterial population dynamics and composition. Based on 16S rRNA clone libraries and denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) analysis, we observed a rapid shift in community composition from unculturable Alphaproteobacteria to culturable species of Gammaproteobacteria and Flavobacteria. The results of sequence analyses of bacterial isolates and of total bacterial community determined by culture independent genetic analysis showed the dominance of the Pseudoalteromonadaceae and the Vibrionaceae families. Elevated levels of dissolved proteins, dissolved organic and inorganic nutrient release, bacterial abundance and carbon production as well as ammonium concentrations characterized the degradation process. The biochemical composition of jellyfish species may influence changes in the amount of accumulated dissolved organic and inorganic nutrients. Our results can contribute insights into possible changes in bacterial population dynamics and nutrient pathways following jellyfish blooms which have important implications for ecology of coastal waters. PMID:22745726

  15. Jellyfish Modulate Bacterial Dynamic and Community Structure

    PubMed Central

    Tinta, Tinkara; Kogovšek, Tjaša; Malej, Alenka; Turk, Valentina

    2012-01-01

    Jellyfish blooms have increased in coastal areas around the world and the outbreaks have become longer and more frequent over the past few decades. The Mediterranean Sea is among the heavily affected regions and the common bloom - forming taxa are scyphozoans Aurelia aurita s.l., Pelagia noctiluca, and Rhizostoma pulmo. Jellyfish have few natural predators, therefore their carcasses at the termination of a bloom represent an organic-rich substrate that supports rapid bacterial growth, and may have a large impact on the surrounding environment. The focus of this study was to explore whether jellyfish substrate have an impact on bacterial community phylotype selection. We conducted in situ jellyfish - enrichment experiment with three different jellyfish species. Bacterial dynamic together with nutrients were monitored to assess decaying jellyfish-bacteria dynamics. Our results show that jellyfish biomass is characterized by protein rich organic matter, which is highly bioavailable to ‘jellyfish - associated’ and ‘free - living’ bacteria, and triggers rapid shifts in bacterial population dynamics and composition. Based on 16S rRNA clone libraries and denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) analysis, we observed a rapid shift in community composition from unculturable Alphaproteobacteria to culturable species of Gammaproteobacteria and Flavobacteria. The results of sequence analyses of bacterial isolates and of total bacterial community determined by culture independent genetic analysis showed the dominance of the Pseudoalteromonadaceae and the Vibrionaceae families. Elevated levels of dissolved proteins, dissolved organic and inorganic nutrient release, bacterial abundance and carbon production as well as ammonium concentrations characterized the degradation process. The biochemical composition of jellyfish species may influence changes in the amount of accumulated dissolved organic and inorganic nutrients. Our results can contribute insights into possible changes in bacterial population dynamics and nutrient pathways following jellyfish blooms which have important implications for ecology of coastal waters. PMID:22745726

  16. A study on the ability of quaternary ammonium groups attached to a polyurethane foam wound dressing to inhibit bacterial attachment and biofilm formation.

    PubMed

    Tran, Phat L; Hamood, Abdul N; de Souza, Anselm; Schultz, Gregory; Liesenfeld, Bernd; Mehta, Dilip; Reid, Ted W

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial infection of acute and chronic wounds impedes wound healing significantly. Part of this impediment is the ability of bacterial pathogens to grow in wound dressings. In this study, we examined the effectiveness of a polyurethane (PU) foam wound dressings coated with poly diallyl-dimethylammonium chloride (pDADMAC-PU) to inhibit the growth and biofilm development by three main wound pathogens, Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Acinetobacter baumannii, within the wound dressing. pDADMAC-PU inhibited the growth of all three pathogens. Time-kill curves were conducted both with and without serum to determine the killing kinetic of pDADMAC-PU. pDADMAC-PU killed S.?aureus, A.?baumannii, and P.?aeruginosa. The effect of pDADMAC-PU on biofilm development was analyzed quantitatively and qualitatively. Quantitative analysis, colony-forming unit assay, revealed that pDADMAC-PU dressing produced more than eight log reduction in biofilm formation by each pathogen. Visualization of the biofilms by either confocal laser scanning microscopy or scanning electron microscopy confirmed these findings. In addition, it was found that the pDADMAC-PU-treated foam totally inhibited migration of bacteria through the foam for all three bacterial strains. These results suggest that pDADMAC-PU is an effective wound dressing that inhibits the growth of wound pathogens both within the wound and in the wound dressing. PMID:25469865

  17. An extraordinary origami curve

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Frank Herrlich; Gabriela Schmithusen

    2008-01-01

    We study a special Teichmueller curve in the moduli space of curves of genus\\u000a3 that is intersected by infinitely many other Teichmueller curves. The Veech\\u000agroup of the underlying translation surface is SL_2(Z). All occurring\\u000aTeichmueller curves are induced by origamis, i.e. unramified coverings of the\\u000aonce punctured torus.

  18. Root numbers of curves

    Microsoft Academic Search

    MARIA SABITOVA

    2004-01-01

    We generalize a theorem of D. Rohrlich concerning root numbers of elliptic curves over the field of rational numbers. Our result applies to curves of all higher genera over number fields. Namely, under certain conditions which naturally extend the conditions used by D. Rohrlich, we show that the root number associated to a smooth projective curve over a number field

  19. Growth curve analysis of Rambouillet ewes 

    E-print Network

    Mathenge, James Mwai

    1981-01-01

    51 53 VITA 59 LIST OF TABLES TABLE PAGE NUMBER OF EWES BY YEARS, AGE OF DAM AND TYPE OF BIRTH/REARING SUBCLASSES LEAST-SQUARES MEANS FOR BREEDING WEIGHTS 3, 4 AND 5 BY YEAR OF BIRTH. . . . . . . . . ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ 18 LEAST-SQUARES MEANS FOR AGE... and Whiteman (1975) reported single-reared lambs were heavier at birth (4. 2 vs. 3. 7 kg), gained faster to weaning (. 34 vs. . 25 kg/day) and were heavier at 70 days (25. 9 vs. 21. 4 kg) than the twin-reared lambs. Holtman and Bernard (1969) reported lambs...

  20. From principal curves to granular principal curves.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hongyun; Pedrycz, Witold; Miao, Duoqian; Wei, Zhihua

    2014-06-01

    Principal curves arising as an essential construct in dimensionality reduction and data analysis have recently attracted much attention from theoretical as well as practical perspective. In many real-world situations, however, the efficiency of existing principal curves algorithms is often arguable, in particular when dealing with massive data owing to the associated high computational complexity. A certain drawback of these constructs stems from the fact that in several applications principal curves cannot fully capture some essential problem-oriented facets of the data dealing with width, aspect ratio, width change, etc. Information granulation is a powerful tool supporting processing and interpreting massive data. In this paper, invoking the underlying ideas of information granulation, we propose a granular principal curves approach, regarded as an extension of principal curves algorithms, to improve efficiency and achieve a sound accuracy-efficiency tradeoff. First, large amounts of numerical data are granulated into C intervals-information granules developed with the use of fuzzy C-means clustering and the two criteria of information granulation, which significantly reduce the amount of data to be processed at the later phase of the overall design. Granular principal curves are then constructed by determining the upper and the lower bounds of the interval data. Finally, we develop an objective function using the criteria of information confidence and specificity to evaluate the granular output formed by the principal curves. We also optimize the granular principal curves by adjusting the level of information granularity (the number of clusters), which is realized with the aid of the particle swarm optimization. A number of numeric studies completed for synthetic and real-world datasets provide a useful quantifiable insight into the effectiveness of the proposed algorithm. PMID:23996588

  1. Quantification, distribution, and possible source of bacterial biofilm in mouse automated watering systems.

    PubMed

    Meier, Thomas R; Maute, Carrie J; Cadillac, Joan M; Lee, Ji Young; Righter, Daniel J; Hugunin, Kelly M S; Deininger, Rolf A; Dysko, Robert C

    2008-03-01

    The use of automated watering systems for providing drinking water to rodents has become commonplace in the research setting. Little is known regarding bacterial biofilm growth within the water piping attached to the racks (manifolds). The purposes of this project were to determine whether the mouse oral flora contributed to the aerobic bacterial component of the rack biofilm, quantify bacterial growth in rack manifolds over 6 mo, assess our rack sanitation practices, and quantify bacterial biofilm development within sections of the manifold. By using standard methods of bacterial identification, the aerobic oral flora of 8 strains and stocks of mice were determined on their arrival at our animal facility. Ten rack manifolds were sampled before, during, and after sanitation and monthly for 6 mo. Manifolds were evaluated for aerobic bacterial growth by culture on R2A and trypticase soy agar, in addition to bacterial ATP quantification by bioluminescence. In addition, 6 racks were sampled at 32 accessible sites for evaluation of biofilm distribution within the watering manifold. The identified aerobic bacteria in the oral flora were inconsistent with the bacteria from the manifold, suggesting that the mice do not contribute to the biofilm bacteria. Bacterial growth in manifolds increased while they were in service, with exponential growth of the biofilm from months 3 to 6 and a significant decrease after sanitization. Bacterial biofilm distribution was not significantly different across location quartiles of the rack manifold, but bacterial levels differed between the shelf pipe and connecting elbow pipes. PMID:18351724

  2. Rate of bacterial mortality in aquatic environments

    SciTech Connect

    Servais, P.; Billen, G.; Rego, J.V.

    1985-06-01

    A method is proposed which provides a minimum estimate of the rate of bacterial mortality in growing natural populations of planktonic bacteria. This estimate is given by the rate of decrease of radioactivity from the DNA of a (/sup 3/H)thymidine-labeled natural assemblage of bacteria after all added thymidine has been exhausted from the medium. Results obtained from river water, estuarine water, and seawater show overall bacterial mortality rates in the range 0.010 to 0.030 h/sup -1/, in good agreement with the range of growth rates measured in the same environments. Use of selective filtration through Nuclepore filters (pore size, 2 ..mu..m) allowed us to determine the contribution of microzooplankton grazing to overall bacterial mortality. Grazing rates estimated by this method ranged from 0 to 0.02 h/sup -1/.

  3. Scanning electron microscopy studies of bacterial cultures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swinger, Tracy; Blust, Brittni; Calabrese, Joseph; Tzolov, Marian

    2012-02-01

    Scanning electron microscopy is a powerful tool to study the morphology of bacteria. We have used conventional scanning electron microscope to follow the modification of the bacterial morphology over the course of the bacterial growth cycle. The bacteria were fixed in vapors of Glutaraldehyde and ruthenium oxide applied in sequence. A gold film of about 5 nm was deposited on top of the samples to avoid charging and to enhance the contrast. We have selected two types of bacteria Alcaligenes faecalis and Kocuria rhizophila. Their development was carefully monitored and samples were taken for imaging in equal time intervals during their cultivation. These studies are supporting our efforts to develop an optical method for identification of the Gram-type of bacterial cultures.

  4. Sensitivity of selected bacterial species to UV radiation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jordi Gascón; Anna Oubifia; Ana Pérez-Lezaun; Jordi Urmeneta

    1995-01-01

    The effect of exposure of bacterial suspensions to UV radiation by means of the dose-response curves was assessed. The D37 and D10 values were used for subsequent statistical analysis of the results. The aim of this article is to evaluate the sensitivity to UV radiation of several microorganisms of different habitats (Rhizobium meliloti, Rhodobacter sphaeroides, Escherichia coli, and Deinococcus radiodurans),

  5. Mechanisms of bacterial pathogenicity

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, J; Schurr, M; LeBlanc, C; Ramamurthy, R; Buchanan, K; Nickerson, C

    2002-01-01

    Pathogenic bacteria utilise a number of mechanisms to cause disease in human hosts. Bacterial pathogens express a wide range of molecules that bind host cell targets to facilitate a variety of different host responses. The molecular strategies used by bacteria to interact with the host can be unique to specific pathogens or conserved across several different species. A key to fighting bacterial disease is the identification and characterisation of all these different strategies. The availability of complete genome sequences for several bacterial pathogens coupled with bioinformatics will lead to significant advances toward this goal. PMID:11930024

  6. Bacterial challenges in food

    PubMed Central

    Collee, J. G.

    1974-01-01

    Qualitative and quantitative aspects of bacterial challenges that might be encountered in food are discussed with reference to recognized and relatively unrecognized hazards. Mechanisms of pathogenicity are reviewed and the populations at risk are noted. The bacterial content of food as it is served at table merits more study. The challenge of prevention by education is discussed. Indirect bacterial challenges in our food are considered. The real challenge of diagnosis depends upon an awareness of a complex range of conditions; the importance of effective communication with efficient laboratory and epidemiological services is stressed. There is an increasing need for care in the preparation and distribution of food. PMID:4467860

  7. Microfluidics for bacterial chemotaxis

    E-print Network

    Ahmed, Tanvir, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2011-01-01

    Bacterial chemotaxis, a remarkable behavioral trait which allows bacteria to sense and respond to chemical gradients in the environment, has implications in a broad range of fields including but not limited to disease ...

  8. Asphalt Showing Bacterial Degeneration 

    E-print Network

    Unknown

    2011-08-17

    Widely considered in the medical field as the last of the golden anti-microbial drugs, fluorinated quinolones provide a "last defense" for the attack on bacterial infections. The drugs are useful for treating gram negative and some gram positive...

  9. Bacterial Nasal Infections

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Version Ear, Nose, and Throat Disorders Nose and Sinus Disorders Bacterial Nasal Infections Nasal vestibulitis Nasal furuncles ... Version DOCTORS: Go to Professional Version Nose and Sinus Disorders Introduction to Nose and Sinus Disorders Deviated ...

  10. Continuous monitoring of bacterial attachment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koeing, D. W.; Mishra, S. K.; Pierson, D. L.

    1994-01-01

    A major concern with the Space Station Freedom (SSF) water supply system is the control of longterm microbial contamination and biofilm development in the water storage and distribution systems. These biofilms have the potential for harboring pathogens as well as microbial strains containing resistance factors that could negatively influence crew health. The proposed means for disinfecting the water system on SSF (iodine) may encourage the selection of resistant strains. In fact, biofilm bacteria were observed in water lines from the Space Shuttle Columbia (OV-102); therefore, an alternative remediation method is required to disinfect spacecraft water lines. A thorough understanding of colonization events and the physiological parameters that will influence bacteria adhesion is required. The limiting factor for development of this technology is the ability to continuously monitor adhesion events and the effects of biocides on sessile bacteria. Methods were developed to allow bacterial adhesion and subsequent biocidal treatment to be monitored continuously. This technique couples automated image analysis with a continuous flow of a bacterial suspension through an optical flow cell. A strain of Pseudomonas cepacia isolated from the water supply of the Space Shuttle Discovery (OV-103) during STS-39 was grown in a nitrogen-limited continuous culture. This culture was challenged continuously with iodine during growth, and the adhesion characteristics of this strain was measure with regard to flow rate. Various biocides (ozone, hypochlorite, and iodine) were added to the flow stream to evaluate how well each chemical removed the bacteria. After biocide treatment, a fresh bacterial suspension was introduced into the flow cell, and the attachment rate was evaluated on the previously treated surface. This secondary fouling was again treated with biocide to determine the efficacy of multiple batch chemical treatments in removing biofilm.

  11. Resistance curve behavior of polycrystalline niobium failing via cleavage

    Microsoft Academic Search

    D Padhi; J. J Lewandowski

    2004-01-01

    The present work illustrates the crack growth resistance behavior of polycrystalline niobium failing via transgranular cleavage fracture. Bend tests were conducted on fatigue-precracked Charpy specimens at ?125 and ?75°C under different loading rates. Crack growth was monitored in situ during the tests in order to compute the fracture initiation toughness and develop crack growth resistance curves. The cleavage fracture initiation

  12. Bacterial Ice Crystal Controlling Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Lorv, Janet S. H.; Rose, David R.; Glick, Bernard R.

    2014-01-01

    Across the world, many ice active bacteria utilize ice crystal controlling proteins for aid in freezing tolerance at subzero temperatures. Ice crystal controlling proteins include both antifreeze and ice nucleation proteins. Antifreeze proteins minimize freezing damage by inhibiting growth of large ice crystals, while ice nucleation proteins induce formation of embryonic ice crystals. Although both protein classes have differing functions, these proteins use the same ice binding mechanisms. Rather than direct binding, it is probable that these protein classes create an ice surface prior to ice crystal surface adsorption. Function is differentiated by molecular size of the protein. This paper reviews the similar and different aspects of bacterial antifreeze and ice nucleation proteins, the role of these proteins in freezing tolerance, prevalence of these proteins in psychrophiles, and current mechanisms of protein-ice interactions. PMID:24579057

  13. Teaching Microbial Growth by Simulation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ruiz, A. Fernandez; And Others

    1989-01-01

    Presented is a simulation program for Apple II computer which assays the effects of a series of variables on bacterial growth and interactions between microbial populations. Results of evaluation of the program with students are summarized. (CW)

  14. [Specific gravity of the dried biomass of pure bacterial cultures].

    PubMed

    Romanenko, V I; Dobrynin, E G

    1978-01-01

    The weight of wet and dry biomass taken from colonies after growth on MPA was determined in pure bacterial cultures of Pseudomonas denitrificans and Brevibacterium imperiale, and the number and dimensions of bacterial cells in dry preparations of the same colonies were measured by means of membrane filters. The average specific weight of dry biomass was found to be 1.68 and 1.62. In calculating the weight of bacterial biomass in pure cultures and natural cenoses, its volume should be assayed taking into account the number and dimensions of the cells in dry preparations on membrane filters and multiplying by a coefficient 1.6. PMID:661634

  15. CPR: curved planar reformation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Armin Kanitsar; Dominik Fleischmann; Rainer Wegenkittl; Petr Felkel; Meister Eduard Gröller

    2002-01-01

    Visualization of tubular structures such as blood vessels is an important topic in medical imaging. One way to display tubular structures for diagnostic purposes is to generate longitudinal cross-sections in order to show their lumen, wall, and surrounding tissue in a curved plane. This process is called Curved Planar Reformation (CPR). We present three different methods to generate CPR images.

  16. The Skipping Rope Curve

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nordmark, Arne; Essen, Hanno

    2007-01-01

    The equilibrium of a flexible inextensible string, or chain, in the centrifugal force field of a rotating reference frame is investigated. It is assumed that the end points are fixed on the rotation axis. The shape of the curve, the skipping rope curve or "troposkien", is given by the Jacobi elliptic function sn. (Contains 3 figures.)

  17. ?-function for analytic curves

    Microsoft Academic Search

    I. K. Kostov; I. Krichever; M. Mineev-Weinstein; P. B. Wiegmann; A. Zabrodin

    We review the concept of ?-function for simple analytic curves. The ?-function gives a formal solution to the 2D inverse potential problem and appears as the ?-function of the integrable hierarchy which describes conformal maps of simply- connected domains bounded by analytic curves to the unit disk. The ?-function also emerges in the context of topological gravity and enjoys an

  18. Flow-duration curves

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Searcy, James Kincheon

    1959-01-01

    The flow-duration curve is a cumulative frequency curve that shows the percent of time specified discharges were equaled or exceeded during a given period. It combines in one curve the flow characteristics of a stream throughout the range of discharge, without regard to the sequence of occurrence. If the period upon which the curve is based represents the long-term flow of a stream, the curve may be used to predict the distribution of future flows for water- power, water-supply, and pollution studies. This report shows that differences in geology affect the low-flow ends of flow-duration curves of streams in adjacent basins. Thus, duration curves are useful in appraising the geologic characteristics of drainage basins. A method for adjusting flow-duration curves of short periods to represent long-term conditions is presented. The adjustment is made by correlating the records of a short-term station with those of a long-term station.

  19. The Curved Cube

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Hill, David R.

    2003-02-24

    Take a solid cube with rods attached at diagonally opposite vertices. Hold the rods horizontally and rapidly spin the cube. (See Figure 1.) You should see a curved outline formed by the spinning cube. The objective of this demos is to discover how the straight edges of the cube become curved. The demo is physically based, but can be simulated within various software packages.

  20. Anodic Polarization Curves Revisited

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liu, Yue; Drew, Michael G. B.; Liu, Ying; Liu, Lin

    2013-01-01

    An experiment published in this "Journal" has been revisited and it is found that the curve pattern of the anodic polarization curve for iron repeats itself successively when the potential scan is repeated. It is surprising that this observation has not been reported previously in the literature because it immediately brings into…

  1. Famous Curves Index

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Throughout history, there have been many famous curves. In this case, the famous curves profiled here have names such as rhodonea, right strophoid, and the Kampyle of Eudoxus. These curves belong to the world of the mathematical sciences, and they are offered up for teachers and the generally curious by the staff at the School of Mathematics and Statistics at the University of St. Andrews. Visitors can scroll through the complete list of curves (there are over eighty here), and click on each one for an illustration and a listing of the equation that would create such a curve. The site is rounded out by an interactive map that lets users learn about the birthplaces of famous mathematicians from Leibniz to Babbage.

  2. Tripod configurations of curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Eric; Lourie, Nick

    2015-03-01

    Tripod configurations of plane curves, formed by certain triples of normal lines coinciding at a point, were introduced by Tabachnikov, who showed that C2 closed convex curves possess at least two tripod configurations. Later, Kao and Wang established the existence of tripod configurations for C2 closed locally convex curves. In this paper we generalize these results, answering a conjecture of Tabachnikov on the existence of tripod configurations for all closed plane curves by proving existence for a generalized notion of tripod configuration. We then demonstrate the existence of the natural extensions of these tripod configurations to the spherical and hyperbolic geometries for a certain class of convex curves, and discuss an analogue of the problem for regular plane polygons.

  3. Structural correlations in bacterial metabolic networks

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Evolution of metabolism occurs through the acquisition and loss of genes whose products acts as enzymes in metabolic reactions, and from a presumably simple primordial metabolism the organisms living today have evolved complex and highly variable metabolisms. We have studied this phenomenon by comparing the metabolic networks of 134 bacterial species with known phylogenetic relationships, and by studying a neutral model of metabolic network evolution. Results We consider the 'union-network' of 134 bacterial metabolisms, and also the union of two smaller subsets of closely related species. Each reaction-node is tagged with the number of organisms it belongs to, which we denote organism degree (OD), a key concept in our study. Network analysis shows that common reactions are found at the centre of the network and that the average OD decreases as we move to the periphery. Nodes of the same OD are also more likely to be connected to each other compared to a random OD relabelling based on their occurrence in the real data. This trend persists up to a distance of around five reactions. A simple growth model of metabolic networks is used to investigate the biochemical constraints put on metabolic-network evolution. Despite this seemingly drastic simplification, a 'union-network' of a collection of unrelated model networks, free of any selective pressure, still exhibit similar structural features as their bacterial counterpart. Conclusions The OD distribution quantifies topological properties of the evolutionary history of bacterial metabolic networks, and lends additional support to the importance of horizontal gene transfer during bacterial metabolic evolution where new reactions are attached at the periphery of the network. The neutral model of metabolic network growth can reproduce the main features of real networks, but we observe that the real networks contain a smaller common core, while they are more similar at the periphery of the network. This suggests that natural selection and biochemical correlations can act both to diversify and to narrow down metabolic evolution. PMID:21251250

  4. Powerful bacterial killing by buckwheat honeys is concentration-dependent, involves complete DNA degradation and requires hydrogen peroxide

    PubMed Central

    Brudzynski, Katrina; Abubaker, Kamal; Wang, Tony

    2012-01-01

    Exposure of bacterial cells to honey inhibits their growth and may cause cell death. Our previous studies showed a cause-effect relationship between hydroxyl radical generated from honey hydrogen peroxide and growth arrest. Here we explored the role of hydroxyl radicals as inducers of bacterial cells death. The bactericidal effect of ·OH on antibiotic-resistant clinical isolates of MRSA and VRE and standard bacterial strains of E. coli and B. subtiles was examined using a broth microdilution assay supplemented with 3?-(p-aminophenyl) fluorescein (APF) as the ·OH trap, followed by colony enumeration. Bactericidal activities of eight honeys (six varieties of buckwheat, blueberry and manuka honeys) were analyzed. The MBC/MIC ratio ?4 and the killing curves indicated that honeys exhibited powerful, concentration-dependent bactericidal effect. The extent of killing depended on the ratio of honey concentration to bacterial load, indicating that honey dose was critical for its bactericidal efficacy. The killing rate and potency varied between honeys and ranged from over a 6-log10 to 4-log10 CFU/ml reduction of viable cells, equivalent to complete bacterial eradication. The maximal killing was associated with the extensive degradation of bacterial DNA. Honey concentration at which DNA degradation occurred correlated with cell death observed in the concentration-dependent cell-kill on agar plates. There was no quantitative relationship between the ·OH generation by honey and bactericidal effect. At the MBC, where there was no surviving cells and no DNA was visible on agarose gels, the ·OH levels were on average 2–3x lower than at Minimum Inhibitory Concentration (MICs) (p < 0.0001). Pre-treatment of honey with catalase, abolished the bactericidal effect. This raised possibilities that either the abrupt killing prevented accumulation of ·OH (dead cells did not generate ·OH) or that DNA degradation and killing is the actual footprint of ·OH action. In conclusion, honeys of buckwheat origin exhibited powerful, concentration-dependent bactericidal effect. The killing and DNA degradation showed a cause-effect relationship. Hydrogen peroxide was an active part of honey killing mechanism. PMID:22783246

  5. Spiral crystal growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smereka, Peter

    2000-04-01

    We numerically study the spiral mode of crystal growth using a theory developed by Burton, Cabrera and Frank using a level set method. This method is novel in that it can handle not only closed curves but open curves as well. We use our method to compute interacting spirals and make estimates of growth rates. We also propose a possible coarsening mechanism for a large number of interacting spirals.

  6. Bacterial avirulence genes.

    PubMed

    Leach, J E; White, F F

    1996-01-01

    Although more than 30 bacterial avirulence genes have been cloned and characterized, the function of the gene products in the elictitation of resistance is unknown in all cases but one. The product of avrD from Pseudomonas syringae pv. glycinea likely functions indirectly to elicit resistance in soybean, that is, evidence suggests the gene product is an enzyme involved in elicitor production. In most if not all cases, bacterial avirulence gene function is dependent on interactions with the hypersensitive response and pathogenicity (hrp) genes. Many hrp genes are similar to genes involved in delivery of pathogenicity factors in mammalian bacterial pathogens. Thus, analogies between mammalian and plant pathogens may provide needed clues to elucidate how virulence gene products control induction of resistance. PMID:15012539

  7. [Bacterial overgrowth syndrome].

    PubMed

    Stein, J M; Schneider, A R

    2007-07-01

    Small bowel bacterial overgrowth is a syndrome caused by an abnormal number of bacteria in the upper part of the small bowel and associated with a complex array of clinical symptoms, i. e., chronic diarrhoea, steatorrhoea, macrocytic anaemia, weight loss, and less commonly, protein-losing enteropathy. The most common underlying factors are small intestinal stagnation or dysmotility, intestinal obstruction, blind or afferent loops, and decreased gastric secretion. The treatment usually consists in the eradication of bacterial overgrowth with repeated courses of antimicrobials, correction of associated nutritional deficiencies and, when possible, correction of the underlying predisposing conditions. PMID:17620228

  8. [Bacterial vaginosis and pregnancy].

    PubMed

    Canova, I; Caputo, S; Ciardo, A; Stragapede, B

    2002-01-01

    Premature rupture of membranes (PROM) occurs in approximately 5-10% of all pregnancies and is implicated in approximately one third of preterm births. PROM is associated with increased risks of perinatal as well as maternal morbidity and mortality at every gestational age. Much information suggest that the presence of bacterial vaginosis may be implicated in the occurrence of PROM and subsequent preterm delivery in significant numbers of pregnant women. We will briefly review clinical and pathophysiologic information linking bacterial vaginosis and PROM. PMID:12510420

  9. Frequency of Dividing Cells as an Estimator of Bacterial Productivity †

    PubMed Central

    Newell, Steven Y.; Christian, Robert R.

    1981-01-01

    It has recently been proposed that the frequency of dividing bacterial cells (FDC) can be used to predict growth rates of natural aquatic bacterial assemblages. We have examined the relationship between FDC and growth rate in bacteria from southern-temperate, coastal marine waters by using incubation under conditions of manipulated nutrient availability and exclusion of bacterivores. The regression of the natural logarithm of bacterial instantaneous growth rate (?) on FDC resulted in a better fit than regression of untransformed ? on FDC. The regression equation was ln ? = 0.299FDC ? 4.961. The coefficient of variation for predicted ln ? at mean FDC was 7%. The range of FDC-estimated bacterial instantaneous generation times for coastal Georgia waters was 12 to 68 h, and range of calculated bacterial production rates was 0.6 to 17.6 mg of C·m?3· h?1. Unresolved problems of and suggested improvements on the FDC method of predicting growth rate are discussed. PMID:16345812

  10. Change of Collision Efficiency with Distance in Bacterial Transport Experiements

    SciTech Connect

    Dong, Hailiang; Scheibe, Timothy D.; Johnson, William P.; Monkman, Crystal; Fuller, Mark E.

    2006-05-01

    Previous bacterial transport studies have shown decreased bacterial adhesion with transport distance, largely based on laboratory core experiments. An inferred effect of microbial population variability is invoked to interpret experimental data, but there lacks direct measurement at field-scale, especially in correlation of transport distance with change of bacterial surface properties. This study was undertaken to determine change of collision efficiency with transport distance, taking advantage of the bacterial transport experiment in Oyster, VA in the summer of 2001. Upon injection of an adhesion deficient strain, Comamonas sp. DA001 into a up-gradient well, bacterial samples were taken from multi-level samplers along the flow path, and were injected into cores of 40 cm in length and 7.5 cm in diameter packed with homogenized sediment from the same site, South Oyster focus area (SOFA). Bacterial suspension samples were also measured for bacterial electrophoretic mobility distribution. Using filtration theory, collision efficiency, the probability of bacterial attachment to the grain surfaces upon collision and a quantitative measure of bacterial adhesion, was determined using CXTFIT model fitted attachment rate, measured grain size (10th percentile), porosity, flow velocity, and collector efficiency. Collision efficiency was also determined based on the fraction of retention in the cores. Contrary to previous results and interpretation of field-scale breakthrough curves, our experimentally determined collision efficiency increases with transport distance in the core experiments, which correlates with increasingly negative surface charge of the injected bacteria. Therefore we conclude that the apparent decrease in adhesion with transport distance in the field is strongly controlled by field-scale heterogeneity in physical and chemical aquifer properties and not by microbial population heterogeneity.

  11. Elliptic Curves Kenneth A. Ribet

    E-print Network

    Ribet, Kenneth A.

    Elliptic Curves Kenneth A. Ribet UC Berkeley PARC Forum October 17, 2008 Kenneth A. Ribet Elliptic Curves #12;In talking about elliptic curves, one can do no better than to quote the Yale mathematician endlessly on elliptic curves. (This is not a threat.) Kenneth A. Ribet Elliptic Curves #12;Although I have

  12. Bacterial Acclimation Inside an Aqueous Battery

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Dexian; Chen, Baoling; Chen, P.

    2015-01-01

    Specific environmental stresses may lead to induced genomic instability in bacteria, generating beneficial mutants and potentially accelerating the breeding of industrial microorganisms. The environmental stresses inside the aqueous battery may be derived from such conditions as ion shuttle, pH gradient, free radical reaction and electric field. In most industrial and medical applications, electric fields and direct currents are used to kill bacteria and yeast. However, the present study focused on increasing bacterial survival inside an operating battery. Using a bacterial acclimation strategy, both Escherichia coli and Bacillus subtilis were acclimated for 10 battery operation cycles and survived in the battery for over 3 days. The acclimated bacteria changed in cell shape, growth rate and colony color. Further analysis indicated that electrolyte concentration could be one of the major factors determining bacterial survival inside an aqueous battery. The acclimation process significantly improved the viability of both bacteria E. coli and B. subtilis. The viability of acclimated strains was not affected under battery cycle conditions of 0.18-0.80 mA cm-2 and 1.4-2.1 V. Bacterial addition within 1.0×1010 cells mL-1 did not significantly affect battery performance. Because the environmental stress inside the aqueous battery is specific, the use of this battery acclimation strategy may be of great potential for the breeding of industrial microorganisms. PMID:26070088

  13. Logistic Curve Demo

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Roberts, Lila F.

    2002-02-03

    This interactive demo illustrates the generation of a logistic curve. This demo is appropriate for a pre-calculus course, but is quite effective in a calculus class immediately after a discussion of inflection points.

  14. Terrestrial Exoplanet Light Curves

    E-print Network

    Eric Gaidos; Nicholas Moskovitz; Darren M. Williams

    2005-11-23

    The phase or orbital light curves of extrasolar terrestrial planets in reflected or emitted light will contain information about their atmospheres and surfaces complementary to data obtained by other techniques such as spectrosopy. We show calculated light curves at optical and thermal infrared wavelengths for a variety of Earth-like and Earth-unlike planets. We also show that large satellites of Earth-sized planets are detectable, but may cause aliasing effects if the lightcurve is insufficiently sampled.

  15. Immunopotentiation for bacterial biodefense.

    PubMed

    Skyberg, Jerod A

    2014-01-01

    Activation of the innate immune system can enhance resistance to a variety of bacterial and viral infections. In situations where the etiological agent of disease is unknown, such as a bioterror attack, stimulation of innate immunity may be particularly useful as induced immune responses are often capable of providing protection against a broad range of pathogens. In particular, the threat of an intentional release of a highly virulent bacterial pathogen that is either intrinsically resistant to antibiotics, or has been weaponized via the introduction of antibiotic resistance, makes immunopotentiation an attractive complementary or alternative strategy to enhance resistance to bacterial biothreat agents. Francisella tularensis, Yersinia pestis, Bacillus anthracis, and Burkholderia mallei or pseudomallei can all be easily disseminated via the respiratory route and infections can result in high mortality rates. Therefore, there has been a marked increase in research on immunotherapeutics against these Tier 1 select agents over the last 10 years that will be covered in this review. In addition, immunopotentiation against non-Tier 1 select agents such as Brucella spp., and Coxiella burnetii has also been studied and will be reviewed here. In particular, we will focus on cellular targets, such as toll-like receptors (TLRs), carbohydrate receptors and cytokine receptors, which have been exploited by immunomodulatory regimens that confer broad-spectrum protection against virulent bacterial pathogens. PMID:25373479

  16. Bacterial leaf spot

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Bacterial leaf spot has been reported in Australia (Queensland), Egypt, El Salvador, India, Japan, Nicaragua, Sudan, and the United States (Florida, Iowa, Kansas, Maryland, and Wisconsin). It occasionally causes locally severe defoliation and post-emergence damping-off and stunting. The disease is...

  17. Bacterial social engagements

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jennifer M. Henke; Bonnie L. Bassler

    2004-01-01

    Quorum sensing is a process that enables bacteria to communicate using secreted signaling molecules called autoinducers. This process enables a population of bac- teria to regulate gene expression collectively and, there- fore, control behavior on a community-wide scale. Quorum sensing is widespread in the bacterial world and, generally, processes controlled by quorum sensing are unproductive when undertaken by an individual

  18. Bacterial microflora of nectarines

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Microflora of fruit surfaces has been the best source of antagonists against fungi causing postharvest decays of fruit. However, there is little information on microflora colonizing surfaces of fruits other than grapes, apples, and citrus fruit. We characterized bacterial microflora on nectarine f...

  19. Change in Size of Chromatium minus Cells in Relation to Growth Rate, Sulfur Content, and Photosynthetic Activity: A Comparison of Pure Cultures and Field Populations

    PubMed Central

    Montesinos, Emilio

    1987-01-01

    The size frequency distribution of planktonic cells of purple sulfur phototrophic bacteria was measured at several depths in a bacterial layer of Lake Cisó (Spain). The bacterioplankton was dominated by Chromatium minus (87 to 94% of the total biomass). The largest cells of C. minus were found in the top part of the bacterial layer. In addition, the in situ and potential specific photosynthetic activity (CO2 fixation and acetate uptake) and specific pigment content were measured in relation to several key environmental parameters that determine the activity of cells. Potential growth rates were estimated from production rates and biomass. A maximal specific growth rate of 0.074 h?1 was found for the top part of the bacterial layer. Photosynthesis versus light and versus sulfide curves among field samples indicated that light was the main limiting factor controlling the activity of C. minus in Lake Cisó. The specific bacteriochlorophyll a content was very high in all samples (0.27 to 0.36 ?g ?g of C?1). Results of laboratory experiments performed with pure cultures indicated that the average cell volume changes from 5.9 to 20.0 ?m3 and that differences in growth rate, breakdown, or synthesis of sulfur and glycogen and degradation of the photosynthetic apparatus are the main factors accounting for the observed changes in cell volume across the bacterial layer. Images PMID:16347330

  20. Corticosteroids for Bacterial Keratitis

    PubMed Central

    Srinivasan, Muthiah; Mascarenhas, Jeena; Rajaraman, Revathi; Ravindran, Meenakshi; Lalitha, Prajna; Glidden, David V.; Ray, Kathryn J.; Hong, Kevin C.; Oldenburg, Catherine E.; Lee, Salena M.; Zegans, Michael E.; McLeod, Stephen D.; Lietman, Thomas M.; Acharya, Nisha R.

    2013-01-01

    Objective To determine whether there is a benefit in clinical outcomes with the use of topical corticosteroids as adjunctive therapy in the treatment of bacterial corneal ulcers. Methods Randomized, placebo-controlled, double-masked, multicenter clinical trial comparing prednisolone sodium phosphate, 1.0%, to placebo as adjunctive therapy for the treatment of bacterial corneal ulcers. Eligible patients had a culture-positive bacterial corneal ulcer and received topical moxifloxacin for at least 48 hours before randomization. Main Outcome Measures The primary outcome was best spectacle-corrected visual acuity (BSCVA) at 3 months from enrollment. Secondary outcomes included infiltrate/scar size, reepithelialization, and corneal perforation. Results Between September 1, 2006, and February 22, 2010, 1769 patients were screened for the trial and 500 patients were enrolled. No significant difference was observed in the 3-month BSCVA (?0.009 logarithm of the minimum angle of resolution [logMAR]; 95% CI, ?0.085 to 0.068; P = .82), infiltrate/scar size (P = .40), time to reepithelialization (P = .44), or corneal perforation (P > .99). A significant effect of corticosteroids was observed in subgroups of baseline BSCVA (P = .03) and ulcer location (P = .04). At 3 months, patients with vision of counting fingers or worse at baseline had 0.17 logMAR better visual acuity with corticosteroids (95% CI, ?0.31 to ?0.02; P = .03) compared with placebo, and patients with ulcers that were completely central at baseline had 0.20 logMAR better visual acuity with corticosteroids (?0.37 to ?0.04; P = .02). Conclusions We found no overall difference in 3-month BSCVA and no safety concerns with adjunctive corticosteroid therapy for bacterial corneal ulcers. Application to Clinical Practice Adjunctive topical corticosteroid use does not improve 3-month vision in patients with bacterial corneal ulcers. PMID:21987582

  1. Bacterial tactic responses.

    PubMed

    Armitage, J P

    1999-01-01

    Many, if not most, bacterial species swim. The synthesis and operation of the flagellum, the most complex organelle of a bacterium, takes a significant percentage of cellular energy, particularly in the nutrient limited environments in which many motile species are found. It is obvious that motility accords cells a survival advantage over non-motile mutants under normal, poorly mixed conditions and is an important determinant in the development of many associations between bacteria and other organisms, whether as pathogens or symbionts and in colonization of niches and the development of biofilms. This survival advantage is the result of sensory control of swimming behaviour. Although too small to sense a gradient along the length of the cell, and unable to swim great distances because of buffetting by Brownian motion and the curvature resulting from a rotating flagellum, bacteria can bias their random swimming direction towards a more favourable environment. The favourable environment will vary from species to species and there is now evidence that in many species this can change depending on the current physiological growth state of the cell. In general, bacteria sense changes in a range of nutrients and toxins, compounds altering electron transport, acceptors or donors into the electron transport chain, pH, temperature and even the magnetic field of the Earth. The sensory signals are balanced, and may be balanced with other sensory pathways such as quorum sensing, to identify the optimum current environment. The central sensory pathway in this process is common to most bacteria and most effectors. The environmental change is sensed by a sensory protein. In most species examined this is a transmembrane protein, sensing the external environment, but there is increasing evidence for additional cytoplasmic receptors in many species. All receptors, whether sensing sugars, amino acids or oxygen, share a cytoplasmic signalling domain that controls the activity of a histidine protein kinase, CheA, via a linker protein, CheW. A reduction in an attractant generally leads to the increased autophosphorylation of CheA. CheA passes its phosphate to a small, single domain response regulator, CheY. CheY-P can interact with the flagellar motor to cause it to change rotational direction or stop. Signal termination either via a protein, CheZ, which increases the dephosphorylation rate of CheY-P or via a second CheY which acts as a phosphate sink, allows the cell to swim off again, usually in a new direction. In addition to signal termination the receptor must be reset, and this occurs via methylation of the receptor to return it to a non-signalling conformation. The way in which bacteria use these systems to move to optimum environments and the interaction of the different sensory pathways to produce species-specific behavioural response will be the subject of this review. PMID:10500847

  2. The Inhibiting Effect of Aqueous Azadirachta indica (Neem) Extract Upon Bacterial Properties Influencing in vitro Plaque Formation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    L. E. Wolinsky; S. Mania; S. Nachnani; S. Ling

    1996-01-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to examine the inhibitory effects of aqueous extracts derived from the bark-containing sticks (Neem stick) of Azadirachta indica upon bacterial aggregation, growth, adhesion to hydroxyapatite, and production of insoluble glucan, which may affect in vitro plaque formation. Neem stick extracts were screened for minimal bacterial growth inhibition (MIC) against a panel of streptococci by

  3. Colorimetric \\/ fluorescent bacterial sensing by agarose-embedded lipid \\/ polydiacetylene films

    Microsoft Academic Search

    D. Meir; L. Silbert; R. Volinsky; S. Kolusheva; I. Weiser; R. Jelinek

    2008-01-01

    Aim: Development of a new chromatic (colorimetric ?fluorescence) bacterial sensor, for rapid, sensitive and versatile detection of bacterial proliferation. Methods and Results: We constructed agarose-embedded chromatic films which produce dramatic colour changes and fluorescence transformations in response to bacterial growth. The sensing constructs comprise glass-supported Langmuir-Schaeffer phospholipid ?polydiacetylene films that undergo both blue-red transformations and induction of intense fluorescence following

  4. Metabolism links bacterial biofilms and colon carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Caroline H; Dejea, Christine M; Edler, David; Hoang, Linh T; Santidrian, Antonio F; Felding, Brunhilde H; Ivanisevic, Julijana; Cho, Kevin; Wick, Elizabeth C; Hechenbleikner, Elizabeth M; Uritboonthai, Winnie; Goetz, Laura; Casero, Robert A; Pardoll, Drew M; White, James R; Patti, Gary J; Sears, Cynthia L; Siuzdak, Gary

    2015-06-01

    Bacterial biofilms in the colon alter the host tissue microenvironment. A role for biofilms in colon cancer metabolism has been suggested but to date has not been evaluated. Using metabolomics, we investigated the metabolic influence that microbial biofilms have on colon tissues and the related occurrence of cancer. Patient-matched colon cancers and histologically normal tissues, with or without biofilms, were examined. We show the upregulation of polyamine metabolites in tissues from cancer hosts with significant enhancement of N(1), N(12)-diacetylspermine in both biofilm-positive cancer and normal tissues. Antibiotic treatment, which cleared biofilms, decreased N(1), N(12)-diacetylspermine levels to those seen in biofilm-negative tissues, indicating that host cancer and bacterial biofilm structures contribute to the polyamine metabolite pool. These results show that colonic mucosal biofilms alter the cancer metabolome to produce a regulator of cellular proliferation and colon cancer growth potentially affecting cancer development and progression. PMID:25959674

  5. Different bacterial strategies to degrade taurocholate.

    PubMed

    Rösch, Verena; Denger, Karin; Schleheck, David; Smits, Theo H M; Cook, Alasdair M

    2008-07-01

    Aerobic enrichment cultures with taurocholate or alkanesulfonates as sole sources of carbon and energy for growth were successful and yielded nine bacterial isolates, all of which utilized taurocholate. Growth was complex and involved not only many, usually transient, excretion products but also sorption of taurocholate and cholate to cells. Three metabolic strategies to dissimilate taurocholate were elucidated, all of which involved bile salt hydrolase cleaving taurocholate to cholate and taurine. Comamonas testosteroni KF-1 utilized both the taurine and the cholate moieties for growth. Pseudomonas spp., e.g. strain TAC-K3 and Rhodococcus equi TAC-A1 grew with the cholate moiety and released taurine quantitatively. Delftia acidovorans SPH-1 utilized the taurine moiety and released cholate. PMID:18320171

  6. Analysis of bacterial function by multi-colour fluorescence flow cytometry and single cell sorting

    Microsoft Academic Search

    G Nebe-von-Caron; P. J Stephens; C. J Hewitt; J. R Powell; R. A Badley

    2000-01-01

    With the increased awareness of the problems associated with the growth dependent analysis of bacterial populations, direct optical detection methods such as flow cytometry have enjoyed increased popularity over the last few years. Among the analyses discussed here are: (1) Bacterial discrimination from other particles on the basis of nucleic acid staining, using sample disaggregation to provide fast reliable enumeration

  7. Nature and Role of Bacterial Contaminants in Mass Cultures of Thermophilic Chlorella pyrenoidosa

    PubMed Central

    Blasco, Richard J.

    1965-01-01

    A study was made of bacterial contaminants isolated from an algal mass-culture unit. The study was performed specifically to determine the dependence of the size of bacterial population on algal density and the nature of any association of the contaminants with the algal cell. Growth of the bacterial contaminants on standard medium was also investigated. An estimate was made of the O2 uptake of the bacterial population under normal operating conditions of the algal massculture system. Viable numbers of bacteria tended to increase with increased algal density. Bacteria were found imbedded in the surface of algal cells when the cultures of algae were characterized by subnormal rates of growth and photosynthetic gas exchange. Bacterial isolates failed to grow in standard medium alone, thus implying a dependency of bacterial growth on material(s) produced by the algae. A slight inhibitory effect on algal growth was noted in the case of two of three of the bacterial isolates. Manometric studies demonstrated that the bacterial population normally found in the algal cultures did not appreciably effect total gas exchange. PMID:14325291

  8. Bacterial Genome Instability

    PubMed Central

    Darmon, Elise

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Bacterial genomes are remarkably stable from one generation to the next but are plastic on an evolutionary time scale, substantially shaped by horizontal gene transfer, genome rearrangement, and the activities of mobile DNA elements. This implies the existence of a delicate balance between the maintenance of genome stability and the tolerance of genome instability. In this review, we describe the specialized genetic elements and the endogenous processes that contribute to genome instability. We then discuss the consequences of genome instability at the physiological level, where cells have harnessed instability to mediate phase and antigenic variation, and at the evolutionary level, where horizontal gene transfer has played an important role. Indeed, this ability to share DNA sequences has played a major part in the evolution of life on Earth. The evolutionary plasticity of bacterial genomes, coupled with the vast numbers of bacteria on the planet, substantially limits our ability to control disease. PMID:24600039

  9. Bacterial ratchet motors

    PubMed Central

    Di Leonardo, R.; Angelani, L.; Dell’Arciprete, D.; Ruocco, G.; Iebba, V.; Schippa, S.; Conte, M. P.; Mecarini, F.; De Angelis, F.; Di Fabrizio, E.

    2010-01-01

    Self-propelling bacteria are a nanotechnology dream. These unicellular organisms are not just capable of living and reproducing, but they can swim very efficiently, sense the environment, and look for food, all packaged in a body measuring a few microns. Before such perfect machines can be artificially assembled, researchers are beginning to explore new ways to harness bacteria as propelling units for microdevices. Proposed strategies require the careful task of aligning and binding bacterial cells on synthetic surfaces in order to have them work cooperatively. Here we show that asymmetric environments can produce a spontaneous and unidirectional rotation of nanofabricated objects immersed in an active bacterial bath. The propulsion mechanism is provided by the self-assembly of motile Escherichia coli cells along the rotor boundaries. Our results highlight the technological implications of active matter’s ability to overcome the restrictions imposed by the second law of thermodynamics on equilibrium passive fluids. PMID:20457936

  10. Bacterial Resistance in Acne

    Microsoft Academic Search

    E. A. Eady

    1998-01-01

    Antibiotics play a major role in acne therapy. Physicians base treatment choices on personal perceptions of efficacy, cost-effectiveness or risk-benefit ratios and rarely take bacterial resistance into account. It is well documented that resistant strains of coagulase-negative staphylococci within the resident skin flora increase in both prevalence and population density as duration of therapy increases. Acne patients represent a considerable

  11. Floppy Curves with Applications to Real Algebraic Curves

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Patrick M. Gilmer

    1996-01-01

    We show how one may sometimes perform singular ambient surgery on the complex\\u000alocus of a real algebraic curve and obtain what we call a floppy curve. A\\u000afloppy curve is a certain kind of singular surface in CP(2), more general than\\u000athe complex locus of a real nodal curve. We derive analogs for floppy curves of\\u000aknown restrictions on

  12. IGMtransmission: Transmission curve computation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harrison, Christopher M.; Meiksin, Avery; Stock, David

    2015-04-01

    IGMtransmission is a Java graphical user interface that implements Monte Carlo simulations to compute the corrections to colors of high-redshift galaxies due to intergalactic attenuation based on current models of the Intergalactic Medium. The effects of absorption due to neutral hydrogen are considered, with particular attention to the stochastic effects of Lyman Limit Systems. Attenuation curves are produced, as well as colors for a wide range of filter responses and model galaxy spectra. Photometric filters are included for the Hubble Space Telescope, the Keck telescope, the Mt. Palomar 200-inch, the SUBARU telescope and UKIRT; alternative filter response curves and spectra may be readily uploaded.

  13. The ?-proteobacteria: the Darwin finches of the bacterial world

    PubMed Central

    Ettema, Thijs J.G.; Andersson, Siv G.E.

    2009-01-01

    The ?-proteobacteria represent one of the most diverse bacterial subdivisions, displaying extreme variations in lifestyle, geographical distribution and genome size. Species for which genome data are available have been classified into a species tree based on a conserved set of vertically inherited core genes. By mapping the variation in gene content onto the species tree, genomic changes can be associated with adaptations to specific growth niches. Genes for adaptive traits are mostly located in ‘plasticity zones’ in the bacterial genome, which also contain mobile elements and are highly variable across strains. By physically separating genes for information processing from genes involved in interactions with the surrounding environment, the rate of evolutionary change can be substantially enhanced for genes underlying adaptation to new growth habitats, possibly explaining the ecological success of the ?-proteo-bacterial subdivision. PMID:19324639

  14. Polymer Crystallization at Curved Liquid-Liquid Interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Christopher; Wang, Wenda; Qi, Hao; Huang, Ziyin

    2013-03-01

    Curved space is incommensurate with typical ordered structures with three-dimensional (3D) translational symmetry. However, upon assembly, soft matter, including colloids, amphiphiles, and block copolymers (BCPs), often forms structures depicting curved surface/interface. Examples include liposomes, colloidosomes, spherical micelles, worm-like micelles, and vesicles (also known as polymersomes). For crystalline BCPs, crystallization oftentimes overwrites curved geometries since the latter is incommensurate with crystalline order. On the other hand, twisted and curved crystals are often observed in crystalline polymers. Various mechanisms have been proposed for these non-flat crystalline morphologies. In this presentation, we will demonstrate that curved liquid/liquid (L/L) interface can guide polymer single crystal growth. The crystal morphology is strongly dependent on the nucleation mechanism. A myriad of controlled curved single crystals can be readily obtained.

  15. Clostridium difficile Is an Autotrophic Bacterial Pathogen

    PubMed Central

    Köpke, Michael; Straub, Melanie; Dürre, Peter

    2013-01-01

    During the last decade, Clostridium difficile infection showed a dramatic increase in incidence and virulence in the Northern hemisphere. This incessantly challenging disease is the leading cause of antibiotic-associated and nosocomial infectious diarrhea and became life-threatening especially among elderly people. It is generally assumed that all human bacterial pathogens are heterotrophic organisms, being either saccharolytic or proteolytic. So far, this has not been questioned as colonization of the human gut gives access to an environment, rich in organic nutrients. Here, we present data that C. difficile (both clinical and rumen isolates) is also able to grow on CO2+H2 as sole carbon and energy source, thus representing the first identified autotrophic bacterial pathogen. Comparison of several different strains revealed high conservation of genes for autotrophic growth and showed that the ability to use gas mixtures for growth decreases or is lost upon prolonged culturing under heterotrophic conditions. The metabolic flexibility of C. difficile (heterotrophic growth on various substrates as well as autotrophy) could allow the organism in the gut to avoid competition by niche differentiation and contribute to its survival when stressed or in unfavorable conditions that cause death to other bacteria. This may be an important trait for the pathogenicity of C. difficile. PMID:23626782

  16. Enhancing microalgal biomass productivity by engineering a microalgal-bacterial community.

    PubMed

    Cho, Dae-Hyun; Ramanan, Rishiram; Heo, Jina; Lee, Jimin; Kim, Byung-Hyuk; Oh, Hee-Mock; Kim, Hee-Sik

    2014-11-01

    This study demonstrates that ecologically engineered bacterial consortium could enhance microalgal biomass and lipid productivities through carbon exchange. Phycosphere bacterial diversity analysis in xenic Chlorella vulgaris (XCV) confirmed the presence of growth enhancing and inhibiting microorganisms. Co-cultivation of axenic C. vulgaris (ACV) with four different growth enhancing bacteria revealed a symbiotic relationship with each bacterium. An artificial microalgal-bacterial consortium (AMBC) constituting these four bacteria and ACV showed that the bacterial consortium exerted a statistically significant (P<0.05) growth enhancement on ACV. Moreover, AMBC had superior flocculation efficiency, lipid content and quality. Studies on carbon exchange revealed that bacteria in AMBC might utilize fixed organic carbon released by microalgae, and in return, supply inorganic and low molecular weight (LMW) organic carbon influencing algal growth and metabolism. Such exchanges, although species specific, have enormous significance in carbon cycle and can be exploitated by microalgal biotechnology industry. PMID:25459870

  17. Bacterial and phytoplankton dynamics in a sub-tropical estuary

    Microsoft Academic Search

    José Juan Barrera-Alba; Sônia Maria Flores Gianesella; Gleyci Aparecida Oliveira Moser; Flávia Marisa Prado Saldanha-Corrêa

    2008-01-01

    Heterotrophic bacterial and phytoplankton biomass, production, specific growth rates and growth efficiencies were studied\\u000a in July 2001 and January 2002 during both spring and neap tides, along a tidal cycle, at three sites in a subtropical estuary.\\u000a Major freshwater inputs located in the Northern region led to differences in both phytoplankton and bacterioplankton biomass\\u000a and activity along the estuary. While

  18. The biology behind lichenometric dating curves.

    PubMed

    Loso, Michael G; Doak, Daniel F

    2006-03-01

    Lichenometry is used to date late-Holocene terminal moraines that record glacier fluctuations. Traditionally, it relies upon dating curves that relate diameters of the largest lichens in a population to surface ages. Although widely used, the technique remains controversial, in part because lichen biology is poorly understood. We use size-frequency distributions of lichens growing on well-dated surfaces to fit demographic models for Rhizocarpon geographicum and Pseudophebe pubescens, two species commonly used for lichenometry. We show that both species suffer from substantial mortality of 2-3% per year, and grow slowest when young-trends that explain a long-standing contradiction between the literatures of lichenometry and lichen biology. Lichenometrists interpret the shape of typical dating curves to indicate a period of rapid juvenile "great growth," contrary to the growth patterns expected by biologists. With a simulation, we show how the "great growth" pattern can be explained by mortality alone, which ensures that early colonists are rarely found on the oldest surfaces. The consistency of our model predictions with biological theory and observations, and with dozens of lichenometric calibration curves from around the world, suggests opportunities to assess quantitatively the accuracy and utility of this common dating technique. PMID:16237538

  19. Bacterial iron biomineralisation in nature Kurt O. Konhauser *

    E-print Network

    Konhauser, Kurt

    Bacterial iron biomineralisation in nature Kurt O. Konhauser * Department of Earth Sciences a variety of iron minerals. The development of these authigenic mineral phases may be either `biologically as nucleation sites for crystal growth. Because of its relatively high activity in aqueous solutions, iron

  20. Bacterial alkaline proteases: molecular approaches and industrial applications

    Microsoft Academic Search

    R. Gupta; Q. Beg; P. Lorenz

    2002-01-01

    Proteolytic enzymes are ubiquitous in occurrence, being found in all living organisms, and are essential for cell growth and differentiation. The extracellular proteases are of commercial value and find multiple applications in various industrial sectors. Although there are many microbial sources available for producing proteases, only a few are recognized as commercial producers. A good number of bacterial alkaline proteases

  1. Electrostatic curved electrode actuators

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Rob Legtenberg; John Gilbert; Stephen D. Senturia; Miko Elwenspoek

    1997-01-01

    This paper presents the design and performance of an electrostatic actuator consisting of a laterally compliant cantilever beam and a fixed curved electrode, both suspended above a ground plane. A theoretical description of the static behavior of the cantilever as it is pulled into contact with the rigid fixed-electrode structure is given. Two models are presented: a simplified semi-analytical model

  2. Throwing a Curve

    E-print Network

    Wedge, Philip

    2000-09-01

    134 Aethlon XVIII: 1 / Fall 2000 Throwing A Curve Coming home from Roy's team picture, we stop to show off the brand-new uniform - Blue Jays stenciled on the front, stockings, the works. Out of mischief or shyness hes at the edge of the room...

  3. Uncertainty propagation: Curve fitting

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    2013-06-21

    Students will learn a sample-variance curve fitting method that can be used to determine whether a set of experimental data appears to have been generated by a model. This method is based on minimizing the reduced chi-squared value. This video includes a reminder to inspect normalized residuals before reporting fitted parameters.

  4. Parametric Curves Introduction

    E-print Network

    Vickers, James

    in three dimensional space. 9 8 6 7 Prerequisites Before starting this Section you should.3: Parametric Curves 2 #12;i.e. x2 4 + y2 9 = 1 which we easily recognise as an ellipse whose major = 3 sin t together with the parametric range 0 t /2 describe that part of the ellipse x2 4 + y2 9

  5. Straightening Out Learning Curves

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Corlett, E. N.; Morecombe, V. J.

    1970-01-01

    The basic mathematical theory behind learning curves is explained, together with implications for clerical and industrial training, evaluation of skill development, and prediction of future performance. Brief studies of textile worker and typist training are presented to illustrate such concepts as the reduction fraction (a consistent decrease in…

  6. Characteristic Curves of PEMFC

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This in-class exercise will allow students hands-on experience working with a proton exchange membrane fuel cell, or PEMFC. The class will examine the characteristic curve of one of these fuel cells and measure the voltage and current output of the cell. Step by step instructions are provided for the experiment. This document may be downloaded in PDF file format.

  7. Curve Fit Challenge

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harper, Suzanne R.; Driskell, Shannon

    2005-01-01

    Graphic tips for using the Geometer's Sketchpad (GSP) are described. The methods to import an image into GSP, define a coordinate system, plot points and curve fit the function using a graphical calculator are demonstrated where the graphic features of GSP allow teachers to expand the use of the technology application beyond the classroom.

  8. Symbolic Parametrization of Curves

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. Rafael Sendra; Franz Winkler

    1991-01-01

    If algebraic varieties like curves or surfaces are to be manipulated by computers, it is essential to be able to represent these geometric objects in an appropriate way. For some applications an implicit representation by algebraic equations is desirable, whereas for others an explicit or parametric representation is more suitable. Therefore, transformation algorithms from one representation to the other are

  9. The role of metabolism in bacterial persistence

    PubMed Central

    Amato, Stephanie M.; Fazen, Christopher H.; Henry, Theresa C.; Mok, Wendy W. K.; Orman, Mehmet A.; Sandvik, Elizabeth L.; Volzing, Katherine G.; Brynildsen, Mark P.

    2013-01-01

    Bacterial persisters are phenotypic variants with extraordinary tolerances toward antibiotics. Persister survival has been attributed to inhibition of essential cell functions during antibiotic stress, followed by reversal of the process and resumption of growth upon removal of the antibiotic. Metabolism plays a critical role in this process, since it participates in the entry, maintenance, and exit from the persister phenotype. Here, we review the experimental evidence that demonstrates the importance of metabolism to persistence, highlight the successes and potential of targeting metabolism in the search for anti-persister therapies, and discuss the current methods and challenges to understand persister physiology. PMID:24624123

  10. Bacterial plant oncogenes: the rol genes' saga.

    PubMed

    Costantino, P; Capone, I; Cardarelli, M; De Paolis, A; Mauro, M L; Trovato, M

    1994-01-01

    The rol genes are part of the T-DNA which is transferred by Agrobacterium rhizogenes in plant cells, causing neoplastic growth and differentiation. Each of these bacterial oncogenes deeply influences plant development and is finely regulated once transferred into the plant host. Both from the study of the effects and biochemical function of the rol genes and from the analysis of their regulation, important insight in plant development can be derived. Some of the most intriguing aspects of past, current and future research on this gene system are highlighted and discussed. PMID:7896140

  11. Planktonic community structure determines the fate of bacterial production in a temperate lake

    Microsoft Academic Search

    MICHAEL L. PACE; GEORGE B. MCMANUS; STUART E. G. FINDLAY

    1990-01-01

    We examined the fate of planktonic bacterial production and the balance between bacterial growth and grazing mortality in the surface waters of Upton Lake, New York. Growth rates were measured by the incorporation of t3H)thymidine into DNA. Grazing rates on bacteria were de- termined with small cells produced by a mutant strain ofEscherichia coli and made either fluorescent or radioactive

  12. Molecular biology of bacterial bioluminescence.

    PubMed Central

    Meighen, E A

    1991-01-01

    The cloning and expression of the lux genes from different luminescent bacteria including marine and terrestrial species have led to significant advances in our knowledge of the molecular biology of bacterial bioluminescence. All lux operons have a common gene organization of luxCDAB(F)E, with luxAB coding for luciferase and luxCDE coding for the fatty acid reductase complex responsible for synthesizing fatty aldehydes for the luminescence reaction, whereas significant differences exist in their sequences and properties as well as in the presence of other lux genes (I, R, F, G, and H). Recognition of the regulatory genes as well as diffusible metabolites that control the growth-dependent induction of luminescence (autoinducers) in some species has advanced our understanding of this unique regulatory mechanism in which the autoinducers appear to serve as sensors of the chemical or nutritional environment. The lux genes have now been transferred into a variety of different organisms to generate new luminescent species. Naturally dark bacteria containing the luxCDABE and luxAB genes, respectively, are luminescent or emit light on addition of aldehyde. Fusion of the luxAB genes has also allowed the expression of luciferase under a single promoter in eukaryotic systems. The ability to express the lux genes in a variety of prokaryotic and eukaryotic organisms and the ease and sensitivity of the luminescence assay demonstrate the considerable potential of the widespread application of the lux genes as reporters of gene expression and metabolic function. Images PMID:2030669

  13. Bacterial processes in the intermediate and deep layers of the Ionian Sea in winter 1999: Vertical profiles and their relationship to the different water masses

    Microsoft Academic Search

    R. Zaccone; L. S. Monticelli; A. Seritti; C. Santinelli; M. Azzaro; A. Boldrin; R. La Ferla; M. Ribera d'Alcalà

    2003-01-01

    Dissolved and particulate organic carbon, bacterial biomass, microbial enzymatic activities (EEA: leucine aminopeptidase, beta-glucosidase, and alkaline phosphatase), bacterial production, respiration rates, and bacterial growth efficiency were determined in 10 stations of the Ionian Sea (winter 1998-1999) with the aim of characterizing the recycling of biogenic carbon and phosphorus in the different water masses, previously identified on the basis of their

  14. Bacterial processes in the intermediate and deep layers of the Ionian Sea in winter 1999: Vertical profiles and their relationship to the different water masses

    Microsoft Academic Search

    R. Zaccone; L. S. Monticelli; A. Seritti; C. Santinelli; M. Azzaro; A. Boldrin; R. La Ferla; M. Ribera d'Alcalà

    2003-01-01

    Dissolved and particulate organic carbon, bacterial biomass, microbial enzymatic activities (EEA: leucine aminopeptidase, ?-glucosidase, and alkaline phosphatase), bacterial production, respiration rates, and bacterial growth efficiency were determined in 10 stations of the Ionian Sea (winter 1998–1999) with the aim of characterizing the recycling of biogenic carbon and phosphorus in the different water masses, previously identified on the basis of their

  15. 3D printing of microscopic bacterial communities.

    PubMed

    Connell, Jodi L; Ritschdorff, Eric T; Whiteley, Marvin; Shear, Jason B

    2013-11-12

    Bacteria communicate via short-range physical and chemical signals, interactions known to mediate quorum sensing, sporulation, and other adaptive phenotypes. Although most in vitro studies examine bacterial properties averaged over large populations, the levels of key molecular determinants of bacterial fitness and pathogenicity (e.g., oxygen, quorum-sensing signals) may vary over micrometer scales within small, dense cellular aggregates believed to play key roles in disease transmission. A detailed understanding of how cell-cell interactions contribute to pathogenicity in natural, complex environments will require a new level of control in constructing more relevant cellular models for assessing bacterial phenotypes. Here, we describe a microscopic three-dimensional (3D) printing strategy that enables multiple populations of bacteria to be organized within essentially any 3D geometry, including adjacent, nested, and free-floating colonies. In this laser-based lithographic technique, microscopic containers are formed around selected bacteria suspended in gelatin via focal cross-linking of polypeptide molecules. After excess reagent is removed, trapped bacteria are localized within sealed cavities formed by the cross-linked gelatin, a highly porous material that supports rapid growth of fully enclosed cellular populations and readily transmits numerous biologically active species, including polypeptides, antibiotics, and quorum-sensing signals. Using this approach, we show that a picoliter-volume aggregate of Staphylococcus aureus can display substantial resistance to ?-lactam antibiotics by enclosure within a shell composed of Pseudomonas aeruginosa. PMID:24101503

  16. Bacterial Fruit Blotch of Watermelon 

    E-print Network

    Isakeit, Thomas

    1999-06-28

    Bacterial fruit blotch is a disease occurring sporadically in almost all areas of Texas where watermelons are grown. This publication discusses symptoms, diagnosis and disease development and management....

  17. Ellipsometric Measurement of Bacterial Films at Metal-Electrolyte Interfaces

    PubMed Central

    Busalmen, J. P.; de Sánchez, S. R.; Schiffrin, D. J.

    1998-01-01

    Ellipsometric measurements were used to monitor the formation of a bacterial cell film on polarized metal surfaces (Al-brass and Ti). Under cathodic polarization bacterial attachment was measured from changes in the ellipsometric angles. These were fitted to an effective medium model for a nonabsorbing bacterial film with an effective refractive index (nf) of 1.38 and a thickness (df) of 160 ± 10 nm. From the optical measurements a surface coverage of 17% was estimated, in agreement with direct microscopic observations. The influence of bacteria on the formation of oxide films was monitored by ellipsometry following the film growth in situ. A strong inhibition of metal oxide film formation was observed, which was assigned to the decrease in oxygen concentration due to the presence of bacteria. It is shown that the irreversible adhesion of bacteria to the surface can be monitored ellipsometrically. Electrophoretic mobility is proposed as one of the factors determining bacterial attachment. The high sensitivity of ellipsometry and its usefulness for the determination of growth of interfacial bacterial films is demonstrated. PMID:9758786

  18. Hydration dynamics promote bacterial coexistence on rough surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Gang; Or, Dani

    2013-01-01

    Identification of mechanisms that promote and maintain the immense microbial diversity found in soil is a central challenge for contemporary microbial ecology. Quantitative tools for systematic integration of complex biophysical and trophic processes at spatial scales, relevant for individual cell interactions, are essential for making progress. We report a modeling study of competing bacterial populations cohabiting soil surfaces subjected to highly dynamic hydration conditions. The model explicitly tracks growth, motion and life histories of individual bacterial cells on surfaces spanning dynamic aqueous networks that shape heterogeneous nutrient fields. The range of hydration conditions that confer physical advantages for rapidly growing species and support competitive exclusion is surprisingly narrow. The rapid fragmentation of soil aqueous phase under most natural conditions suppresses bacterial growth and cell dispersion, thereby balancing conditions experienced by competing populations with diverse physiological traits. In addition, hydration fluctuations intensify localized interactions that promote coexistence through disproportional effects within densely populated regions during dry periods. Consequently, bacterial population dynamics is affected well beyond responses predicted from equivalent and uniform hydration conditions. New insights on hydration dynamics could be considered in future designs of soil bioremediation activities, affect longevity of dry food products, and advance basic understanding of bacterial diversity dynamics and its role in global biogeochemical cycles. PMID:23051694

  19. Inhibition of bacterial degradation of EtG by collection as dried urine spots (DUS).

    PubMed

    Redondo, Ana Hernández; Körber, Christiane; König, Stefan; Längin, Andreas; Al-Ahmad, Ali; Weinmann, Wolfgang

    2012-03-01

    Ethyl glucuronide (EtG) and ethyl sulfate (EtS) are direct alcohol consumption markers widely used nowadays for clinical and forensic applications. They are detectable in blood and urine even after consumption of trace amounts of ethanol and for a longer time frame, being detectable even when no more ethanol is present. The instability of EtG against bacterial degradation in contaminated urine samples and/or the possible postcollection synthesis of this metabolite in samples containing, e.g., Escherichia coli and ethanol, may cause false identification of alcohol uptake. Therefore, it is of paramount importance to constrict these error sources by inhibition of any bacterial growth causing hydrolization or synthesis of EtG. This study evaluates a new method of collecting urine samples on filter paper, dried urine spots (DUS), for simultaneous detection of EtG, EtS and creatinine, having the great advantage of inhibiting bacterial activity. In addition, a method validation for the determination of EtG and EtS in DUS was performed according to the FDA guidelines. Sterile-filtered urine was spiked with EtG and EtS, inoculated with E. coli and incubated. Liquid and dried urine samples were collected after various time intervals up to 96 h. Liquid samples were frozen immediately after collection, whereas aliquots for DUS were pipetted onto filter paper, allowed to dry and stored at RT until analysis 1 week after. The specimens were analyzed by LC-ESI-MS/MS. As expected, degradation of EtG, but not of EtS, was observed in contaminated liquid urine samples. However, the specimens collected on filter paper and stored at RT showed no degradation during storage. Therefore, collecting urine samples on filter paper for EtG and EtS analysis turns out to be a reliable method to avoid bacterial degradation of EtG and EtS, and consequently, stabilization of these ethanol metabolites is achieved. In addition, simultaneous measurement of creatinine content as an indicator of urine dilution helps to interpret the results. Method validation for EtG and EtS in DUS was satisfactory, showing the linearity of the calibration curves in the studied concentration range, good precision, accuracy and selectivity. PMID:22249418

  20. Effects of sample preparation on bacterial colonization of polymers

    PubMed Central

    Zeiger, Diana N.; Stafford, Christopher M.; Cheng, Yajun; Leigh, Stefan D.; Lin-Gibson, Sheng; Lin, Nancy J.

    2010-01-01

    Characterization of materials developed for medical usage frequently includes studies in which the materials are inoculated with bacteria in order to assess bacterial colonization and biofilm formation. Observed differences in bacterial growth are typically considered to be due to the material or the incubation conditions. To our knowledge, the method used to prepare the materials has generally not been considered with regard to its influence on bacterial colonization. The objective of this study was to determine the effects that various preparation methods exert on bacterial colonization of polymer disks. Polymer disks of the same dimethacrylate composition were photopolymerized: (1) between untreated glass slides, (2) between polyester release film, (3) between glass slides treated with an alkyl silane, (4) between glass slides treated with a perfluorinated silane, or (5) with one free surface in an argon-purged chamber. Surface chemistry was quantified using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, hydrophobicity was assessed by water contact angle, and topography was characterized using atomic force microscopy. The disks were inoculated with Streptococcus mutans for 4 h, fixed, and visualized using confocal laser scanning microscopy. Differences among all groups were found with regard to surface chemistry, hydrophobicity, topography, and bacteria morphology, density, and coverage, indicating that the method of sample preparation strongly affects both the surface properties and the initial bacterial colonization. Polymerization on untreated slides was selected as the preferred method of preparation due to minimal material transfer to the polymer and consistent, reproducible bacterial colonization. PMID:19839634

  1. An iteration method for directly determining J-Resistance curves of nuclear structural steels

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Thak-Sang Byun; Bong-Sang Lee; Ji-Hyun Yoon; Jun-Hwa Hong

    1999-01-01

    An iteration method has been developed for determining crack growth and fracture resistance curves (J-R curves) of nuclear structural steels from the load versus load-line displacement record only. In this method, the hardening curve, the load versus displacement curve at a given crack length, is assumed to be a power-law function, where the exponent varies with the crack length. The

  2. Trishear for curved faults

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brandenburg, J. P.

    2013-08-01

    Fault-propagation folds form an important trapping element in both onshore and offshore fold-thrust belts, and as such benefit from reliable interpretation. Building an accurate geologic interpretation of such structures requires palinspastic restorations, which are made more challenging by the interplay between folding and faulting. Trishear (Erslev, 1991; Allmendinger, 1998) is a useful tool to unravel this relationship kinematically, but is limited by a restriction to planar fault geometries, or at least planar fault segments. Here, new methods are presented for trishear along continuously curved reverse faults defining a flat-ramp transition. In these methods, rotation of the hanging wall above a curved fault is coupled to translation along a horizontal detachment. Including hanging wall rotation allows for investigation of structures with progressive backlimb rotation. Application of the new algorithms are shown for two fault-propagation fold structures: the Turner Valley Anticline in Southwestern Alberta, and the Alpha Structure in the Niger Delta.

  3. Connecting curves for dynamical systems

    E-print Network

    R. Gilmore; Jean-Marc Ginoux; Timothy Jones; C. Letellier; U. S. Freitas

    2010-03-08

    We introduce one dimensional sets to help describe and constrain the integral curves of an $n$ dimensional dynamical system. These curves provide more information about the system than the zero-dimensional sets (fixed points) do. In fact, these curves pass through the fixed points. Connecting curves are introduced using two different but equivalent definitions, one from dynamical systems theory, the other from differential geometry. We describe how to compute these curves and illustrate their properties by showing the connecting curves for a number of dynamical systems.

  4. Anatomical curve identification

    PubMed Central

    Bowman, Adrian W.; Katina, Stanislav; Smith, Joanna; Brown, Denise

    2015-01-01

    Methods for capturing images in three dimensions are now widely available, with stereo-photogrammetry and laser scanning being two common approaches. In anatomical studies, a number of landmarks are usually identified manually from each of these images and these form the basis of subsequent statistical analysis. However, landmarks express only a very small proportion of the information available from the images. Anatomically defined curves have the advantage of providing a much richer expression of shape. This is explored in the context of identifying the boundary of breasts from an image of the female torso and the boundary of the lips from a facial image. The curves of interest are characterised by ridges or valleys. Key issues in estimation are the ability to navigate across the anatomical surface in three-dimensions, the ability to recognise the relevant boundary and the need to assess the evidence for the presence of the surface feature of interest. The first issue is addressed by the use of principal curves, as an extension of principal components, the second by suitable assessment of curvature and the third by change-point detection. P-spline smoothing is used as an integral part of the methods but adaptations are made to the specific anatomical features of interest. After estimation of the boundary curves, the intermediate surfaces of the anatomical feature of interest can be characterised by surface interpolation. This allows shape variation to be explored using standard methods such as principal components. These tools are applied to a collection of images of women where one breast has been reconstructed after mastectomy and where interest lies in shape differences between the reconstructed and unreconstructed breasts. They are also applied to a collection of lip images where possible differences in shape between males and females are of interest. PMID:26041943

  5. Curved PN triangles

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Alex Vlachos; Jörg Peters; Chas Boyd; Jason L. Mitchell

    2001-01-01

    To improve the visual quality of existing triangle-based art in real- time entertainment, such as computer games, we propose replacing flat triangles with curved patches and higher-order normal variation. At the hardware level, based only on the three vertices and three vertex normals of a given flat triangle, we substitute the geometry of a three-sided cubic Bezier patch for the

  6. Diffusion in Curved Spacetimes

    E-print Network

    Matteo Smerlak

    2011-11-18

    Using simple kinematical arguments, we derive the Fokker-Planck equation for diffusion processes in curved spacetimes. In the case of Brownian motion, it coincides with Eckart's relativistic heat equation (albeit in a simpler form), and therefore provides a microscopic justification for his phenomenological heat-flux ansatz. Furthermore, we obtain the small-time asymptotic expansion of the mean square displacement of Brownian motion in static spacetimes. Beyond general relativity itself, this result has potential applications in analogue gravitational systems.

  7. Brody curves omitting hyperplanes

    E-print Network

    For the recent work on Brody curves we refer to [3, 10, 11, 12, 13]. A. general reference .... We are going to prove first that. u0(z) ? u?(z) + 4(n + 1)|z| sup. C. f . (5). 4 ... On the other hand, |f0(z1)| = |fk(z1)|?|fj(z1)| for all j ? {1,...,n}, so. f (z1) ?

  8. Bacterial chemoreceptors and chemoeffectors.

    PubMed

    Bi, Shuangyu; Lai, Luhua

    2015-02-01

    Bacteria use chemotaxis signaling pathways to sense environmental changes. Escherichia coli chemotaxis system represents an ideal model that illustrates fundamental principles of biological signaling processes. Chemoreceptors are crucial signaling proteins that mediate taxis toward a wide range of chemoeffectors. Recently, in deep study of the biochemical and structural features of chemoreceptors, the organization of higher-order clusters in native cells, and the signal transduction mechanisms related to the on-off signal output provides us with general insights to understand how chemotaxis performs high sensitivity, precise adaptation, signal amplification, and wide dynamic range. Along with the increasing knowledge, bacterial chemoreceptors can be engineered to sense novel chemoeffectors, which has extensive applications in therapeutics and industry. Here we mainly review recent advances in the E. coli chemotaxis system involving structure and organization of chemoreceptors, discovery, design, and characterization of chemoeffectors, and signal recognition and transduction mechanisms. Possible strategies for changing the specificity of bacterial chemoreceptors to sense novel chemoeffectors are also discussed. PMID:25374297

  9. Quantization on Curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frønsdal, Christian; Kontsevich, Maxim

    2007-02-01

    Deformation quantization on varieties with singularities offers perspectives that are not found on manifolds. The Harrison component of Hochschild cohomology, vanishing on smooth manifolds, reflects information about singularities. The Harrison 2-cochains are symmetric and are interpreted in terms of abelian *-products. This paper begins a study of abelian quantization on plane curves over mathbb{C}, being algebraic varieties of the form {mathbb{C}}^2/R, where R is a polynomial in two variables; that is, abelian deformations of the coordinate algebra mathbb{C}[x,y]/(R). To understand the connection between the singularities of a variety and cohomology we determine the algebraic Hochschild (co)homology and its Barr Gerstenhaber Schack decomposition. Homology is the same for all plane curves mathbb{C}[x,y]/R, but the cohomology depends on the local algebra of the singularity of R at the origin. The Appendix, by Maxim Kontsevich, explains in modern mathematical language a way to calculate Hochschild and Harrison cohomology groups for algebras of functions on singular planar curves etc. based on Koszul resolutions.

  10. Role of bacterial volatile compounds in bacterial biology.

    PubMed

    Audrain, Bianca; Farag, Mohamed A; Ryu, Choong-Min; Ghigo, Jean-Marc

    2015-03-01

    Bacterial interactions with neighboring microorganisms via production of small metabolites enable bacteria to respond and adapt to environmental changes. The study of intercellular interactions primarily focused on soluble metabolites, but bacteria also produce and release into their headspace a wide variety of volatile secondary metabolites, the ecological roles of which have generally been overlooked. However, bacterial volatile compounds are known to contribute to interkingdom interactions (plant, fungi and nematodes), and recent studies also identified their at-a-distance influence on bacterial behavior. The present review describes the biological roles of bacterial volatile compounds in inter- and intraspecies bacterial interactions, a new and yet unexplored research area, with potential clinical and industrial applications. PMID:25725014

  11. Transforming Curves into Curves with the Same Shape.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levine, Michael V.

    Curves are considered to have the same shape when they are related by a similarity transformation of a certain kind. This paper extends earlier work on parallel curves to curves with the same shape. Some examples are given more or less explicitly. A generalization is used to show that the theory is ordinal and to show how the theory may be applied…

  12. space curves and surfaces 1 Plotting Space Curves

    E-print Network

    Verschelde, Jan

    the twisted cubic give the azimuth : -30 give the elevation : 10 Scientific Software (MCS 507 L-16) space=30, elev=30) plt.show() Scientific Software (MCS 507 L-16) space curves and surfaces 2 October 2013space curves and surfaces 1 Plotting Space Curves the twisted cubic with matplotlib four subplots

  13. Impairment of the Bacterial Biofilm Stability by Triclosan

    PubMed Central

    Hubas, Cédric; Behrens, Sebastian; Ricciardi, Francesco; Paterson, David M.

    2012-01-01

    The accumulation of the widely-used antibacterial and antifungal compound triclosan (TCS) in freshwaters raises concerns about the impact of this harmful chemical on the biofilms that are the dominant life style of microorganisms in aquatic systems. However, investigations to-date rarely go beyond effects at the cellular, physiological or morphological level. The present paper focuses on bacterial biofilms addressing the possible chemical impairment of their functionality, while also examining their substratum stabilization potential as one example of an important ecosystem service. The development of a bacterial assemblage of natural composition – isolated from sediments of the Eden Estuary (Scotland, UK) – on non-cohesive glass beads (<63 µm) and exposed to a range of triclosan concentrations (control, 2 – 100 µg L?1) was monitored over time by Magnetic Particle Induction (MagPI). In parallel, bacterial cell numbers, division rate, community composition (DGGE) and EPS (extracellular polymeric substances: carbohydrates and proteins) secretion were determined. While the triclosan exposure did not prevent bacterial settlement, biofilm development was increasingly inhibited by increasing TCS levels. The surface binding capacity (MagPI) of the assemblages was positively correlated to the microbial secreted EPS matrix. The EPS concentrations and composition (quantity and quality) were closely linked to bacterial growth, which was affected by enhanced TCS exposure. Furthermore, TCS induced significant changes in bacterial community composition as well as a significant decrease in bacterial diversity. The impairment of the stabilization potential of bacterial biofilm under even low, environmentally relevant TCS levels is of concern since the resistance of sediments to erosive forces has large implications for the dynamics of sediments and associated pollutant dispersal. In addition, the surface adhesive capacity of the biofilm acts as a sensitive measure of ecosystem effects. PMID:22523534

  14. Bacterial nitrate assimilation: gene distribution and regulation.

    PubMed

    Luque-Almagro, Víctor M; Gates, Andrew J; Moreno-Vivián, Conrado; Ferguson, Stuart J; Richardson, David J; Roldán, M Dolores

    2011-12-01

    In the context of the global nitrogen cycle, the importance of inorganic nitrate for the nutrition and growth of marine and freshwater autotrophic phytoplankton has long been recognized. In contrast, the utilization of nitrate by heterotrophic bacteria has historically received less attention because the primary role of these organisms has classically been considered to be the decomposition and mineralization of dissolved and particulate organic nitrogen. In the pre-genome sequence era, it was known that some, but not all, heterotrophic bacteria were capable of growth on nitrate as a sole nitrogen source. However, examination of currently available prokaryotic genome sequences suggests that assimilatory nitrate reductase (Nas) systems are widespread phylogenetically in bacterial and archaeal heterotrophs. Until now, regulation of nitrate assimilation has been mainly studied in cyanobacteria. In contrast, in heterotrophic bacterial strains, the study of nitrate assimilation regulation has been limited to Rhodobacter capsulatus, Klebsiella oxytoca, Azotobacter vinelandii and Bacillus subtilis. In Gram-negative bacteria, the nas genes are subjected to dual control: ammonia repression by the general nitrogen regulatory (Ntr) system and specific nitrate or nitrite induction. The Ntr system is widely distributed in bacteria, whereas the nitrate/nitrite-specific control is variable depending on the organism. PMID:22103536

  15. On planar rational cuspidal curves

    E-print Network

    Liu, Tiankai

    2014-01-01

    This thesis studies rational curves in the complex projective plane that are homeomorphic to their normalizations. We derive some combinatorial constraints on such curves from a result of Borodzik-Livingston in Heegaard-Floer ...

  16. Bacterial lipopolysaccharides and innate immunity

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Christian Alexander; E. T. Rietschel

    2001-01-01

    Bacterial lipopolysaccharides (LPS) are the major outer surface membrane components present in almost all Gram-negative bacteria and act as extremely strong stimulators of innate or natural immunity in diverse eukaryotic species ranging from insects to humans. LPS consist of a poly- or oligosaccharide region that is anchored in the outer bacterial membrane by a specific carbohydrate lipid moiety termed lipid

  17. 7 CFR 58.135 - Bacterial estimate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ...with respect to bacterial estimates: (1) Whenever the bacterial estimate indicates the presence of more than 500,000 bacteria per ml., the producer shall be notified with a warning of the excessive bacterial estimate. (2) Whenever two...

  18. Surface nanocrystallization for bacterial control.

    PubMed

    Yu, Bin; Lesiuk, Adam; Davis, Elisabeth; Irvin, Randall T; Li, D Y

    2010-07-01

    Stainless steel is commonly used in indwelling medical devices, food preparation, and heavy industry. Bacteria display reduced adherence to nanocrystallized stainless steel. In this article, we present quantitative information on the surface adhesive force, surface electron work function, and bacterial adherence to surfaces of nanocrystallized stainless steel with differing grain sizes. Surface nanocrystallization was achieved by sandblasting followed by recovery treatment. The adhesive force of bacterial binding to nanocrystallized surfaces was measured using an atomic force microscope with a synthetic-peptide-coated AFM tip designed to mimic the bacterial binding site of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, a common pathogen known to form biofilms. The electron work function of the steel surfaces was measured, and bacterial binding assays were performed using subinoculated P. aeruginosa cultures. It was demonstrated that for nanograined steel surfaces, the adhesive force, peptide adherence, surface electron activity, and bacterial binding all decreased with decreasing grain size. PMID:20433185

  19. Equine cortical bone exhibits rising R-curve fracture mechanics.

    PubMed

    Malik, C L; Stover, S M; Martin, R B; Gibeling, J C

    2003-02-01

    Previous studies of the fracture properties of cortical bone have suggested that the fracture toughness increases with crack length, which is indicative of rising R-curve behavior. Based on this indirect evidence and the similarity of bone to ceramic matrix composites, we hypothesized that bone would exhibit rising R-curve behavior in the transverse orientation and that the characteristics of the R-curves would be regionally dependent within the cortex due to variations in bone microstructure and toughening mechanisms. To test these hypotheses, we conducted R-curve experiments on specimens from equine third metacarpal bones using standard fracture mechanics testing methods. Compact type specimens from the dorsal and lateral regions in the middle of the diaphysis were oriented for crack propagation transverse to the longitudinal axis of the bone. The test results demonstrate that equine cortical bone exhibits rising R-curve behavior during transverse crack propagation as hypothesized. Statistical analyses of the crack growth initiation toughness, K0, the peak toughness, Kpeak, and the crack extension at peak toughness, deltaa, revealed significant regional differences in these characteristics. Specifically, the lateral cortex displayed higher crack growth initiation and peak toughnesses. The dorsal cortex exhibited greater crack extension at the peak of crack growth resistance. Scanning electron microscopy revealed osteon pullout on fracture surfaces from the dorsal cortex and but not in the lateral cortex. Taken together, the significant differences in R-curves and the SEM fractography indicate that the fracture mechanisms acting in equine cortical bone are regionally dependent. PMID:12547356

  20. Titration Curves: Fact and Fiction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chamberlain, John

    1997-01-01

    Discusses ways in which datalogging equipment can enable titration curves to be measured accurately and how computing power can be used to predict the shape of curves. Highlights include sources of error, use of spreadsheets to generate titration curves, titration of a weak acid with a strong alkali, dibasic acids, weak acid and weak base, and…