Sample records for bacterial growth curve

  1. The Bacterial Growth Curve.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Paulton, Richard J. L.

    1991-01-01

    A procedure that allows students to view an entire bacterial growth curve during a two- to three-hour student laboratory period is described. Observations of the lag phase, logarithmic phase, maximum stationary phase, and phase of decline are possible. A nonpathogenic, marine bacterium is used in the investigation. (KR)

  2. Bacterial growth in space flight: logistic growth curve parameters for Escherichia coli and Bacillus subtilis

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. A. Kacena; G. A. Merrell; B. Manfredi; E. E. Smith; D. M. Klaus; P. Todd

    1999-01-01

    Previous investigations have reported that bacterial suspension cultures grow to higher stationary concentrations in space\\u000a flight than on Earth; however, none of these investigations included extensive ground controls under varied inertial conditions.\\u000a This study includes extensive controls and cell-growth data taken at several times during lag phase, log phase, and stationary\\u000a phase of Escherichia coli and Bacillus subtilis. The Marquardt-Levenberg,

  3. When is simple good enough: a comparison of the Gompertz, Baranyi, and three-phase linear models for fitting bacterial growth curves

    Microsoft Academic Search

    R. L Buchanan; R. C Whiting; W. C Damert

    1997-01-01

    The use of primary mathematical models with curve fitting software is dramatically changing quantitative food microbiology. The two most widely used primary growth models are the Baranyi and Gompertz models. A three-phase linear model was developed to determine how well growth curves could be described using a simpler model. The model divides bacterial growth curves into three phases: the lag

  4. Curved microchannels and bacterial streamers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rusconi, Roberto; Lecuyer, Sigolene; Guglielmini, Laura; Stone, Howard

    2010-03-01

    Bacterial biofilms are commonly identified as microbial communities attached to a surface and encased in a self-secreted extracellular matrix. Due to their increased resistance to antimicrobial agents, biofilms have an enormous impact on health and medicine (e.g., wound healing, implant-associated infections, disease transmission). On the other hand, they constitute a major component of the stream ecosystem by increasing transport of nutrients and retention of suspended particles. In this talk, we present an experimental study of bacterial biofilm development in a microfluidic device. In particular, we show the formation of filamentous structures, or streamers, in curved channels and how these suspended biofilms are linked to the underlying hydrodynamics.

  5. Phenotypic Signatures Arising from Unbalanced Bacterial Growth

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Cheemeng; Smith, Robert Phillip; Tsai, Ming-Chi; Schwartz, Russell; You, Lingchong

    2014-01-01

    Fluctuations in the growth rate of a bacterial culture during unbalanced growth are generally considered undesirable in quantitative studies of bacterial physiology. Under well-controlled experimental conditions, however, these fluctuations are not random but instead reflect the interplay between intra-cellular networks underlying bacterial growth and the growth environment. Therefore, these fluctuations could be considered quantitative phenotypes of the bacteria under a specific growth condition. Here, we present a method to identify “phenotypic signatures” by time-frequency analysis of unbalanced growth curves measured with high temporal resolution. The signatures are then applied to differentiate amongst different bacterial strains or the same strain under different growth conditions, and to identify the essential architecture of the gene network underlying the observed growth dynamics. Our method has implications for both basic understanding of bacterial physiology and for the classification of bacterial strains. PMID:25101949

  6. Modelling bacterial flagellar growth

    E-print Network

    Schmitt, Maximilian; 10.1209/0295-5075/96/28001

    2012-01-01

    The growth of bacterial flagellar filaments is a self-assembly process where flagellin molecules are transported through the narrow core of the flagellum and are added at the distal end. To model this situation, we generalize a growth process based on the TASEP model by allowing particles to move both forward and backward on the lattice. The bias in the forward and backward jump rates determines the lattice tip speed, which we analyze and also compare to simulations. For positive bias, the system is in a non-equilibrium steady state and exhibits boundary-induced phase transitions. The tip speed is constant. In the no-bias case we find that the length of the lattice grows as $N(t)\\propto\\sqrt{t}$, whereas for negative drift $N(t)\\propto\\ln{t}$. The latter result agrees with experimental data of bacterial flagellar growth.

  7. Solubilization and Bio-conjugation of Quantum Dots and Bacterial Toxicity Assays by Growth Curve and Plate Count

    PubMed Central

    Park, Soonhyang; Chibli, Hicham; Nadeau, Jay

    2012-01-01

    Quantum dots (QDs) are fluorescent semiconductor nanoparticles with size-dependent emission spectra that can be excited by a broad choice of wavelengths. QDs have attracted a lot of interest for imaging, diagnostics, and therapy due to their bright, stable fluorescence1,2 3,4,5. QDs can be conjugated to a variety of bio-active molecules for binding to bacteria and mammalian cells6. QDs are also being widely investigated as cytotoxic agents for targeted killing of bacteria. The emergence of multiply-resistant bacterial strains is rapidly becoming a public health crisis, particularly in the case of Gram negative pathogens 7. Because of the well-known antimicrobial effect of certain nanomaterials, especially Ag, there are hundreds of studies examining the toxicity of nanoparticles to bacteria 8. Bacterial studies have been performed with other types of semiconductor nanoparticles as well, especially TiO29,10-11, but also ZnO12 and others including CuO 13. Some comparisons of bacterial strains have been performed in these studies, usually comparing a Gram negative strain with a Gram positive. With all of these particles, mechanisms of toxicity are attributed to oxidation: either the photogeneration of reactive oxygen species (ROS) by the particles or the direct release of metal ions that can cause oxidative toxicity. Even with these materials, results of different studies vary greatly. In some studies the Gram positive test strain is reportedly more sensitive than the Gram negative 10; in others it is the opposite 14. These studies have been well reviewed 15. In all nanoparticle studies, particle composition, size, surface chemistry, sample aging/breakdown, and wavelength, power, and duration of light exposure can all dramatically affect the results. In addition, synthesis byproducts and solvents must be considered16 17. High-throughput screening techniques are needed to be able to develop effective new nanomedicine agents. CdTe QDs have anti-microbial effects alone18 or in combination with antibiotics. In a previous study, we showed that coupling of antibiotics to CdTe can increase toxicity to bacteria but decrease toxicity to mammalian cells, due to decreased production of reactive oxygen species from the conjugates19. Although it is unlikely that cadmium-containing compounds will be approved for use in humans, such preparations could be used for disinfection of surfaces or sterilization of water. In this protocol, we give a straightforward approach to solubilizing CdTe QDs with mercaptopropionic acid (MPA). The QDs are ready to use within an hour. We then demonstrate coupling to an antimicrobial agent. The second part of the protocol demonstrates a 96-well bacterial inhibition assay using the conjugated and unconjugated QDs. The optical density is read over many hours, permitting the effects of QD addition and light exposure to be evaluated immediately as well as after a recovery period. We also illustrate a colony count for quantifying bacterial survival. PMID:22824953

  8. Solubilization and bio-conjugation of quantum dots and bacterial toxicity assays by growth curve and plate count.

    PubMed

    Park, Soonhyang; Chibli, Hicham; Nadeau, Jay

    2012-01-01

    Quantum dots (QDs) are fluorescent semiconductor nanoparticles with size-dependent emission spectra that can be excited by a broad choice of wavelengths. QDs have attracted a lot of interest for imaging, diagnostics, and therapy due to their bright, stable fluorescence. QDs can be conjugated to a variety of bio-active molecules for binding to bacteria and mammalian cells. QDs are also being widely investigated as cytotoxic agents for targeted killing of bacteria. The emergence of multiply-resistant bacterial strains is rapidly becoming a public health crisis, particularly in the case of Gram negative pathogens. Because of the well-known antimicrobial effect of certain nanomaterials, especially Ag, there are hundreds of studies examining the toxicity of nanoparticles to bacteria. Bacterial studies have been performed with other types of semiconductor nanoparticles as well, especially TiO(2), but also ZnO and others including CuO. Some comparisons of bacterial strains have been performed in these studies, usually comparing a Gram negative strain with a Gram positive. With all of these particles, mechanisms of toxicity are attributed to oxidation: either the photogeneration of reactive oxygen species (ROS) by the particles or the direct release of metal ions that can cause oxidative toxicity. Even with these materials, results of different studies vary greatly. In some studies the Gram positive test strain is reportedly more sensitive than the Gram negative; in others it is the opposite. These studies have been well reviewed. In all nanoparticle studies, particle composition, size, surface chemistry, sample aging/breakdown, and wavelength, power, and duration of light exposure can all dramatically affect the results. In addition, synthesis byproducts and solvents must be considered. High-throughput screening techniques are needed to be able to develop effective new nanomedicine agents. CdTe QDs have anti-microbial effects alone or in combination with antibiotics. In a previous study, we showed that coupling of antibiotics to CdTe can increase toxicity to bacteria but decrease toxicity to mammalian cells, due to decreased production of reactive oxygen species from the conjugates. Although it is unlikely that cadmium-containing compounds will be approved for use in humans, such preparations could be used for disinfection of surfaces or sterilization of water. In this protocol, we give a straightforward approach to solubilizing CdTe QDs with mercaptopropionic acid (MPA). The QDs are ready to use within an hour. We then demonstrate coupling to an antimicrobial agent. The second part of the protocol demonstrates a 96-well bacterial inhibition assay using the conjugated and unconjugated QDs. The optical density is read over many hours, permitting the effects of QD addition and light exposure to be evaluated immediately as well as after a recovery period. We also illustrate a colony count for quantifying bacterial survival. PMID:22824953

  9. Population Growth Curves

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Bio-Inspired Technology and Systems (BITS) RET,

    Using Avida-ED freeware, students control a few factors in an environment populated with digital organisms, and then compare how changing these factors affects population growth. They experiment by altering the environment size (similar to what is called carrying capacity, the maximum population size that an environment can normally sustain), the initial organism gestation rate, and the availability of resources. How systems function often depends on many different factors. By altering these factors one at a time, and observing the results, students are able to clearly see the effect of each one.

  10. Bacterial Growth H. L. Smith

    E-print Network

    Smith, Hal

    . Exercise 1 The gut bacteria E. coli can divide every thirty minutes when nutrients are abundantBacterial Growth H. L. Smith 1 Simple Models Bacteria are the dominant form of life on the planet but a source of sustenance for bacteria. Humans have learned to harness bacteria and other microbes to produce

  11. Electromagnetism of Bacterial Growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ainiwaer, Ailiyasi

    2011-10-01

    There has been increasing concern from the public about personal health due to the significant rise in the daily use of electrical devices such as cell phones, radios, computers, GPS, video games and television. All of these devices create electromagnetic (EM) fields, which are simply magnetic and electric fields surrounding the appliances that simultaneously affect the human bio-system. Although these can affect the human system, obstacles can easily shield or weaken the electrical fields; however, magnetic fields cannot be weakened and can pass through walls, human bodies and most other objects. The present study was conducted to examine the possible effects of bacteria when exposed to magnetic fields. The results indicate that a strong causal relationship is not clear, since different magnetic fields affect the bacteria differently, with some causing an increase in bacterial cells, and others causing a decrease in the same cells. This phenomenon has yet to be explained, but the current study attempts to offer a mathematical explanation for this occurrence. The researchers added cultures to the magnetic fields to examine any effects to ion transportation. Researchers discovered ions such as potassium and sodium are affected by the magnetic field. A formula is presented in the analysis section to explain this effect.

  12. SMOOTHING SPLINE GROWTH CURVES WITH COVARIATES

    E-print Network

    SMOOTHING SPLINE GROWTH CURVES WITH COVARIATES Kurt S. Riedel and Kaya Imre Courant Institute splines, Multivariate analysis, Generalized crossvalidation, Adaptive splines, Fusion physics. ABSTRACT We adapt the interactive spline model of Wahba to growth curves with covariates. The smoothing spline

  13. Bacterial Growth on Allochthonous Carbon in Humic

    E-print Network

    Pace, Michael L.

    Bacterial Growth on Allochthonous Carbon in Humic and Nutrient-enriched Lakes: Results from Whole biomass con- sisted of 43­46% allochthonous C. In Tuesday Lake more than 75% of bacterial growth the relative importance of autochtho- nous and allochthonous C in supporting bacterial production. For 35 days

  14. Bacterial volatiles promote growth in Arabidopsis

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Choong-Min Ryu; Mohamed A. Farag; Chia-Hui Hu; Munagala S. Reddy; Han-Xun Wei; Paul W. Paré; Joseph W. Kloepper

    2003-01-01

    Several chemical changes in soil are associated with plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR). Some bacterial strains directly regulate plant physiology by mimicking synthesis of plant hormones, whereas others increase mineral and nitrogen availability in the soil as a way to augment growth. Identification of bacterial chemical messengers that trigger growth promotion has been limited in part by the understanding of how

  15. Bacterial growth with chlorinated methanes.

    PubMed Central

    Leisinger, T; Braus-Stromeyer, S A

    1995-01-01

    Chlorinated methanes are important industrial chemicals and significant environmental pollutants. While the highly chlorinated methanes, trichloromethane and tetrachloromethane, are not productively metabolized by bacteria, chloromethane and dichloromethane are used by both aerobic and anaerobic methylotrophic bacteria as carbon and energy sources. Some of the dehalogenation reactions involved in the utilization of the latter two compounds have been elucidated. In a strictly anaerobic acetogenic bacterium growing with chloromethane, an inducible enzyme forming methyltetrahydrofolate and chloride from chloromethane and tetrahydrofolate catalyzes dehalogenation of the growth substrate. A different mechanism for the nucleophilic displacement of chloride is observed in aerobic methylotrophic bacteria utilizing dichloromethane as the sole carbon and energy source. These organisms possess the enzyme dichloromethane dehalogenase which, in a glutathione-dependent reaction, converts dichloromethane to inorganic chloride and formaldehyde, a central metabolite of methylotrophic growth. Sequence comparisons have shown that bacterial dichloromethane dehalogenases belong to the glutathione S-transferase enzyme family, and within this family to class Theta. The dehalogenation reactions underlying aerobic utilization of chloromethane by a pure culture and anaerobic growth with dichloromethane by an acetogenic mixed culture are not known. It appears that they are based on mechanisms other than nucleophilic attack by tetrahydrofolate or glutathione. PMID:8565906

  16. SMOOTHING SPLINE GROWTH CURVES WITH COVARIATES

    E-print Network

    SMOOTHING SPLINE GROWTH CURVES WITH COVARIATES Kurt S. Riedel and Kaya Imre #3; Courant Institute splines, Multivariate analysis, Generalized crossvalidation, Adaptive splines, Fusion physics. ABSTRACT We adapt the interactive spline model of Wahba to growth curves with covariates. The smoothing spline

  17. Bacterial Colonization of Particles: Growth and Interactions

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Hans-Peter Grossart; T. Kiorboe; Kam Tang; Helle Ploug

    2003-01-01

    Marine particles in the ocean are exposed to diverse bacterial communities, and colonization and growth of attached bacteria are important processes in the degradation and transformation of the particles. In an earlier study, we showed that the initial colonization of model particles by individual bacterial strains isolated from marine aggregates was a function of attachment and detachment. In the present

  18. Bacterial Colonization of Particles: Growth and Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Grossart, Hans-Peter; Kiørboe, Thomas; Tang, Kam; Ploug, Helle

    2003-01-01

    Marine particles in the ocean are exposed to diverse bacterial communities, and colonization and growth of attached bacteria are important processes in the degradation and transformation of the particles. In an earlier study, we showed that the initial colonization of model particles by individual bacterial strains isolated from marine aggregates was a function of attachment and detachment. In the present study, we have investigated how this colonization process was further affected by growth and interspecific interactions among the bacteria. Long-term incubation experiments showed that growth dominated over attachment and detachment after a few hours in controlling the bacterial population density on agar particles. In the absence of grazing mortality, this growth led to an equilibrium population density consistent with the theoretical limit due to oxygen diffusion. Interspecific interaction experiments showed that the presence of some bacterial strains (“residents”) on the agar particles either increased or decreased the colonization rate of other strains (“newcomers”). Comparison between an antibiotic-producing strain and its antibiotic-free mutant showed no inhibitory effect on the newcomers due to antibiotic production. On the contrary, hydrolytic activity of the antibiotic-producing strain appeared to benefit the newcomers and enhance their colonization rate. These results show that growth- and species-specific interactions have to be taken into account to adequately describe bacterial colonization of marine particles. Changes in colonization pattern due to such small-scale processes may have profound effects on the transformation and fluxes of particulate matter in the ocean. PMID:12788756

  19. Nonlinear Growth Curves in Developmental Research

    PubMed Central

    Grimm, Kevin J.; Ram, Nilam; Hamagami, Fumiaki

    2011-01-01

    Developmentalists are often interested in understanding change processes and growth models are the most common analytic tool for examining such processes. Nonlinear growth curves are especially valuable to developmentalists because the defining characteristics of the growth process such as initial levels, rates of change during growth spurts, and asymptotic levels can be estimated. A variety of growth models are described beginning with the linear growth model and moving to nonlinear models of varying complexity. A detailed discussion of nonlinear models is provided, highlighting the added insights into complex developmental processes associated with their use. A collection of growth models are fit to repeated measures of height from participants of the Berkeley Growth and Guidance Studies from early childhood through adulthood. PMID:21824131

  20. Growth Curves for Girls with Turner Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Bertapelli, Fabio; Barros-Filho, Antonio de Azevedo; Antonio, Maria Ângela Reis de Góes Monteiro; Barbeta, Camila Justino de Oliveira; de Lemos-Marini, Sofia Helena Valente

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this study was to review the growth curves for Turner syndrome, evaluate the methodological and statistical quality, and suggest potential growth curves for clinical practice guidelines. The search was carried out in the databases Medline and Embase. Of 1006 references identified, 15 were included. Studies constructed curves for weight, height, weight/height, body mass index, head circumference, height velocity, leg length, and sitting height. The sample ranged between 47 and 1,565 (total?=?6,273) girls aged 0 to 24?y, born between 1950 and 2006. The number of measures ranged from 580 to 9,011 (total?=?28,915). Most studies showed strengths such as sample size, exclusion of the use of growth hormone and androgen, and analysis of confounding variables. However, the growth curves were restricted to height, lack of information about selection bias, limited distributional properties, and smoothing aspects. In conclusion, we observe the need to construct an international growth reference for girls with Turner syndrome, in order to provide support for clinical practice guidelines. PMID:24949463

  1. Phospholipid metabolism during bacterial growth

    Microsoft Academic Search

    DAVID C. WHITE; ANNE N. TUCKER

    Haemophiius parainjuenzae incorporates glycerol and phosphate into the membrane phospholipids without lag during logarithmic growth. In phosphatidyl glycerol (PG), the phosphate and unacylatcd glycerol moieties turn over and incorporate radioactivity much more rapidly than does the diacylated glycerol. At least half the radioactivity is lost from the phosphate and unacylated glycerol in about 1 doubling. The total fatty acids turn

  2. Growth-dependent bacterial susceptibility to ribosome-targeting antibiotics.

    PubMed

    Greulich, Philip; Scott, Matthew; Evans, Martin R; Allen, Rosalind J

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial growth environment strongly influences the efficacy of antibiotic treatment, with slow growth often being associated with decreased susceptibility. Yet in many cases, the connection between antibiotic susceptibility and pathogen physiology remains unclear. We show that for ribosome-targeting antibiotics acting on Escherichia coli, a complex interplay exists between physiology and antibiotic action; for some antibiotics within this class, faster growth indeed increases susceptibility, but for other antibiotics, the opposite is true. Remarkably, these observations can be explained by a simple mathematical model that combines drug transport and binding with physiological constraints. Our model reveals that growth-dependent susceptibility is controlled by a single parameter characterizing the 'reversibility' of ribosome-targeting antibiotic transport and binding. This parameter provides a spectrum classification of antibiotic growth-dependent efficacy that appears to correspond at its extremes to existing binary classification schemes. In these limits, the model predicts universal, parameter-free limiting forms for growth inhibition curves. The model also leads to non-trivial predictions for the drug susceptibility of a translation mutant strain of E. coli, which we verify experimentally. Drug action and bacterial metabolism are mechanistically complex; nevertheless, this study illustrates how coarse-grained models can be used to integrate pathogen physiology into drug design and treatment strategies. PMID:25790818

  3. Growth-dependent bacterial susceptibility to ribosome-targeting antibiotics

    PubMed Central

    Greulich, Philip; Scott, Matthew; Evans, Martin R; Allen, Rosalind J

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial growth environment strongly influences the efficacy of antibiotic treatment, with slow growth often being associated with decreased susceptibility. Yet in many cases, the connection between antibiotic susceptibility and pathogen physiology remains unclear. We show that for ribosome-targeting antibiotics acting on Escherichia coli, a complex interplay exists between physiology and antibiotic action; for some antibiotics within this class, faster growth indeed increases susceptibility, but for other antibiotics, the opposite is true. Remarkably, these observations can be explained by a simple mathematical model that combines drug transport and binding with physiological constraints. Our model reveals that growth-dependent susceptibility is controlled by a single parameter characterizing the ‘reversibility’ of ribosome-targeting antibiotic transport and binding. This parameter provides a spectrum classification of antibiotic growth-dependent efficacy that appears to correspond at its extremes to existing binary classification schemes. In these limits, the model predicts universal, parameter-free limiting forms for growth inhibition curves. The model also leads to non-trivial predictions for the drug susceptibility of a translation mutant strain of E. coli, which we verify experimentally. Drug action and bacterial metabolism are mechanistically complex; nevertheless, this study illustrates how coarse-grained models can be used to integrate pathogen physiology into drug design and treatment strategies. PMID:25790818

  4. Modelling and Analysis of Phase Variation in Bacterial Colony Growth

    E-print Network

    Gilbert, David

    Modelling and Analysis of Phase Variation in Bacterial Colony Growth Ovidiu P^arvu1 , David Gilbert case study, namely phase variation patterning in bacterial colony growth, forming circular colonies phase variation patterning in bacterial colony growth, forming circular colonies on a flat medium

  5. Bacterial Growth in Mixed Cultures on Dissolved Organic Carbon from Humic and Clear Waters

    PubMed Central

    Tranvik, Lars J.; Höfle, Manfred G.

    1987-01-01

    Interactions between bacterial assemblages and dissolved organic carbon (DOC) from different sources were investigated. Mixed batch cultures were set up with water from a humic and a clear-water lake by a 1:20 dilution of the bacterial assemblage (1.0 ?m of prefiltered lake water) with natural medium (sterile filtered lake water) in all four possible combinations of the two waters and their bacterial assemblages. Bacterial numbers and biomass, DOC, thymidine incorporation, ATP, and uptake of glucose and phenol were followed in these cultures. Growth curves and exponential growth rates were similar in all cultures, regardless of inoculum or medium. However, bacterial biomass produced was double in cultures based on water from the humic lake. The fraction of DOC consumed by heterotrophic bacteria during growth was in the same range, 15 to 22% of the total DOC pool, in all cultures. Bacterial growth efficiency, calculated from bacterial biomass produced and DOC consumed, was in the order of 20%. Glucose uptake reached a peak during exponential growth in all cultures. Phenol uptake was insignificant in the cultures based on the clear-water medium, but occurred in humic medium cultures after exponential growth. The similarity in the carbon budgets of all cultures indicated that the source of the bacterial assemblage did not have a significant effect on the overall carbon flux. However, fluxes of specific organic compounds differed, as reflected by glucose and phenol uptake, depending on the nature of the DOC and the bacterial assemblage. PMID:16347296

  6. Bacterial growth on dissolved organic carbon from a blackwater river

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Judy L. Meyer; Richard T. Edwards; Rebecca Risley

    1987-01-01

    Different nominal molecular weight (nMW) fractions of DOC from a southeastern blackwater river were concentrated by ultrafiltration and added to sieved river water to assess each fraction's ability to stimulate bacterial growth. Bacterial growth was measured using change in bacterial biomass from direct counts and using3H-thymidine incorporated into DNA. Bacterial growth and amount of DOC used was greatest in the

  7. Bacterial growth laws and their applications

    PubMed Central

    SCOTT, Matthew; HWA, Terence

    2011-01-01

    Quantitative empirical relationships between cell composition and growth rate played an important role in the early days of microbiology. Gradually, the focus of the field began to shift from growth physiology to the ever more elaborate molecular mechanisms of regulation employed by the organisms. Advances in systems biology and biotechnology have renewed interest in the physiology of the cell as a whole. Furthermore, gene expression is known to be intimately coupled to the growth state of the cell. Here, we review recent efforts in characterizing such couplings, particularly the quantitative phenomenological approaches exploiting bacterial `growth laws.' These approaches point toward underlying design principles that can guide the predictive manipulation of cell behavior in the absence of molecular details. PMID:21592775

  8. Surface Growth of a Motile Bacterial Population Resembles Growth in a Chemostat

    E-print Network

    Surface Growth of a Motile Bacterial Population Resembles Growth in a Chemostat Daniel A. Koster, that is similar to bacterial growth in a chemostat predicts that the fraction of the population lagging behind in space in terms of their gene expression and growth.5,7,8 Bacterial colonies on hard surfaces typically

  9. Bounds on bacterial cell growth rates

    E-print Network

    Landy, Jonathan

    2013-01-01

    Recent experiments have shown that rod-like bacteria in nutrient-rich media grow in length at an exponential rate. Here, I point out that it is the elongated shape of these bacteria that allows for this behavior. Further, I show that when a bacterium's growth is limited by some nutrient -- taken in by the cell through a diffusion-to-capture process -- its growth is suppressed: In three-dimensional geometries, the length $L$ is bounded by $\\log L \\lesssim t^{1/2}$, while in two dimensions the length is bounded by a power-law form. Fits of experimental growth curves to these predicted, sub-exponential forms could allow for direct measures of quantities relating to cellular metabolic rates.

  10. Coupled effects of chemotaxis and growth on traveling bacterial waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Zhifeng; Bouwer, Edward J.; Hilpert, Markus

    2014-08-01

    Traveling bacterial waves are capable of improving contaminant remediation in the subsurface. It is fairly well understood how bacterial chemotaxis and growth separately affect the formation and propagation of such waves. However, their interaction is not well understood. We therefore perform a modeling study to investigate the coupled effects of chemotaxis and growth on bacterial migration, and examine their effects on contaminant remediation. We study the waves by using different initial electron acceptor concentrations for different bacteria and substrate systems. Three types of traveling waves can occur: a chemotactic wave due to the biased movement of chemotactic bacteria resulting from metabolism-generated substrate concentration gradients; a growth/decay/motility wave due to a dynamic equilibrium between bacterial growth, decay and random motility; and an integrated wave due to the interaction between bacterial chemotaxis and growth. Chemotaxis hardly enhances the bacterial propagation if it is too weak to form a chemotactic wave or its wave speed is less than half of the growth/decay/motility wave speed. However, chemotaxis significantly accelerates bacterial propagation once its wave speed exceeds the growth/decay/motility wave speed. When convection occurs, it speeds up the growth/decay/motility wave but slows down or even eliminates the chemotactic wave due to the dispersion. Bacterial survival proves particularly important for bacterial propagation. Therefore we develop a conceptual model to estimate the speed of growth/decay/motility waves.

  11. Descriptive and Predictive Growth Curves in Energy System Analysis

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Mikael Höök; Junchen Li; Noriaki Oba; Simon Snowden

    2011-01-01

    This study reviews a variety of growth curve models and the theoretical frameworks that lay behind them. In many systems,\\u000a growth patterns are, or must, ultimately be subjected to some form of limitation. A number of curve models have been developed\\u000a to describe and predict such behaviours. Symmetric growth curves have frequently been used for forecasting fossil fuel production,\\u000a but

  12. BACTERIAL GROWTH EFFICIENCY ON NATURAL DISSOLVED ORGANIC MATTER

    EPA Science Inventory

    Bacterial growth efficiency was examined in batch cultures and continuous flow cultures. atural assemblages of pelagic bacteria were inoculated into particle free water and growth efficiencies determined from measurements of produced particulate organic carbon (POC) and utilized ...

  13. Elastic Deformations During Bacterial Cell Growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, K. C.

    2010-03-01

    The wide variety of shapes and sizes found in bacterial species is almost universally defined by the cell wall, which is a cross-linked network of the material peptidoglycan. In recent years, cell shape has been shown to play a critical role in regulating many important biological functions including attachment, dispersal, motility, polar differentiation, predation, and cellular differentiation. In previous work, we have shown that the spatial organization of the peptidoglycan network can change the mechanical equilibrium of the cell wall and result in changes in cell shape. However, experimental data on the mechanical properties of peptidoglycan is currently limited. Here, we describe a straightforward, inexpensive approach for extracting the mechanical properties of bacterial cells in gels of user-defined stiffness, using only optical microscopy to match growth kinetics to the predictions of a continuum model of cell growth. Using this simple yet general methodology, we have measured the Young's modulus for bacteria ranging across a wide variety of shapes, sizes, and cell wall thicknesses, and our method can easily be extended to other commonly studied bacteria. This method makes it possible to rapidly determine how changes in genotype and biochemistry affect the mechanical properties of the cell wall, and may be particularly relevant for studying the relationship between cell shape and structure, the genetic and molecular control of the mechanical properties of the cell wall, and the identification of antibiotics and other small molecules that affect and specifically modify the mechanical properties of the cell wall. Our work also suggests that bacteria may utilize peptidoglycan synthesis to transduce mechanosensory signals from local environment.

  14. ORIGINAL PAPER Bacterial growth properties at low optical densities

    E-print Network

    Bonhoeffer, Sebastian

    numbers of cultures of Escherichia coli. E. coli B lines were serially propagated at low glucoseORIGINAL PAPER Bacterial growth properties at low optical densities Maja Novak Ã? Thomas Pfeiffer Ã? quantification of growth rate and yield of bacterial populations at low densities was developed with a modified

  15. `Growth of bacterial cultures' 50 years on: towards an uncertainty principle instead of constants in bacterial growth kinetics

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Thomas Ferenci

    1999-01-01

    Ever since Monod's efforts to study bacterial cultures in quantitative terms, the growth of Escherichia coli on sugars like glucose has appeared an attractive subject for the mathematical description of nutrient conversion into biomass. But instead of simplicity, it is becoming evident that bacterial adaptations affect `constants' such as Ks (growth affinity constant) and are, in turn, a complex function

  16. BACTERIAL GROWTH EFFICIENCY IN NATURAL AQUATIC SYSTEMS

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Paul A. del Giorgio; Jonathan J. Cole

    1998-01-01

    Heterotrophic bacteria perform two major functions in the transformation of or- ganic matter: They produce new bacterial biomass (bacterial secondary produc- tion (BP)), and they respire organic C to inorganic C (bacterial respiration (BR)). For planktonic bacteria, a great deal has been learned about BP and its regulation during the past several decades but far less has been learned about

  17. Applications of Individual Growth Curve Modeling for Pediatric Psychology Research

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Christian DeLucia; Steven C. Pitts

    2006-01-01

    Objective To provide a brief, nontechnical introduction to individual growth curve modeling for the analysis of longitudinal data. Several applications of individual growth curve modeling for pediatric psychology research are discussed. Methods To illustrate these applications, we analyze data from an ongoing pediatric psychology study of the possible impact of spina bifida on child and family development (N = 135).

  18. Evaluating Latent Growth Curve Models Using Individual Fit Statistics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coffman, Donna L.; Millsap, Roger E.

    2006-01-01

    The usefulness of assessing individual fit in latent growth curve models was examined. The study used simulated data based on an unconditional and a conditional latent growth curve model with a linear component and a small quadratic component and a linear model was fit to the data. Then the overall fit of linear and quadratic models to these data…

  19. Bounded Population Growth: A Curve Fitting Lesson.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mathews, John H.

    1992-01-01

    Presents two mathematical methods for fitting the logistic curve to population data supplied by the U.S. Census Bureau utilizing computer algebra software to carry out the computations and plot graphs. (JKK)

  20. Bacterial cell curvature through mechanical control of cell growth

    E-print Network

    Weibel, Douglas B.

    Bacterial cell curvature through mechanical control of cell growth Matthew T Cabeen1 , Godefroid and Borisy, 2003), and the other is by affecting cell growth (Smith and Oppenheimer, 2005; Cabeen and Jacobs-Wagner, 2007; Fischer et al, 2008). In bacteria, as in plants and fungi, cell growth depends on cell wall

  1. Interactions of Cosmic Rays in the Atmosphere: Growth Curves Revisited

    E-print Network

    Obermeier, A; Hörandel, J; Müller, D

    2013-01-01

    Measurements of cosmic-ray abundances on balloons are affected by interactions in the residual atmosphere above the balloon. Corrections for such interactions are particularly important for observations of rare secondary particles such as boron, antiprotons and positrons. These corrections can either be calculated if the relevant cross sections in the atmosphere are known, or may be empirically determined by extrapolation of the "growth curves", i. e. the individual particle intensities as functions of atmospheric depth. The growth-curve technique is particularly attractive for long-duration balloon flights where the periodic daily altitude variations permit rather precise determinations of the corresponding particle intensity variations. We determine growth curves for nuclei from boron (Z=5) to iron (Z=26), using data from the 2006 Arctic balloon flight of the TRACER detector for cosmic-ray nuclei, and we compare the growth curves with predictions from published cross section values. In general, good agreeme...

  2. Catecholamines and in vitro growth of pathogenic bacteria: enhancement of growth varies greatly among bacterial species

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Belay, Tesfaye; Aviles, Hernan; Vance, Monique; Fountain, Kimberly; Sonnenfeld, Gerald

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of catecholamines on in vitro growth of a range of bacterial species, including anaerobes. Bacteria tested included: Porphyromonas gingivalis, Bacteriodes fragilis, Shigella boydii, Shigella sonnie, Enterobacter Sp, and Salmonella choleraesuis. The results of the current study indicated that supplementation of bacterial cultures in minimal medium with norepinephrine or epinephrine did not result in increased growth of bacteria. Positive controls involving treatment of Escherichia coli with catecholamines did result in increased growth of that bacterial species. The results of the present study extend previous observations that showed differential capability of catecholamines to enhance bacterial growth in vitro.

  3. Estimating Bacterial Growth Parameters by Means of Detection Times

    Microsoft Academic Search

    JOZSEF BARANYI; CARMEN PIN

    1999-01-01

    We developed a new numerical method to estimate bacterial growth parameters by means of detection times generated by different initial counts. The observed detection times are subjected to a transformation involving the (unknown) maximum specific growth rate and the (known) ratios between the different inoculum sizes and the constant detectable level of counts. We present an analysis of variance (ANOVA)

  4. Physiological Curve of Response to Plant Growth Hormones

    Microsoft Academic Search

    N. H. Grace

    1938-01-01

    THE addition of growth hormones to a variety of plant materials results in marked responses over appropriate concentration ranges. The behaviour varies with the particular hormone used, the method of application and the developmental stage of the plant. With graded concentrations of growth hormone the response assumes the form of a physiological curve.

  5. Growth curve for girls with Turner syndrome

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A J Lyon; M A Preece; D B Grant

    1985-01-01

    A growth chart for girls with Turner syndrome has been prepared using data from four published series of European patients, and evaluated using retrospective data on the heights of girls with Turner syndrome seen at this hospital. The results indicate that calculation of height standard deviation score from this chart allows a reasonable prediction of adult stature in any patient

  6. Can we estimate bacterial growth rates from ribosomal RNA content?

    SciTech Connect

    Kemp, P.F.

    1995-12-31

    Several studies have demonstrated a strong relationship between the quantity of RNA in bacterial cells and their growth rate under laboratory conditions. It may be possible to use this relationship to provide information on the activity of natural bacterial communities, and in particular on growth rate. However, if this approach is to provide reliably interpretable information, the relationship between RNA content and growth rate must be well-understood. In particular, a requisite of such applications is that the relationship must be universal among bacteria, or alternately that the relationship can be determined and measured for specific bacterial taxa. The RNA-growth rate relationship has not been used to evaluate bacterial growth in field studies, although RNA content has been measured in single cells and in bulk extracts of field samples taken from coastal environments. These measurements have been treated as probable indicators of bacterial activity, but have not yet been interpreted as estimators of growth rate. The primary obstacle to such interpretations is a lack of information on biological and environmental factors that affect the RNA-growth rate relationship. In this paper, the available data on the RNA-growth rate relationship in bacteria will be reviewed, including hypotheses regarding the regulation of RNA synthesis and degradation as a function of growth rate and environmental factors; i.e. the basic mechanisms for maintaining RNA content in proportion to growth rate. An assessment of the published laboratory and field data, the current status of this research area, and some of the remaining questions will be presented.

  7. Biological Consequences and Advantages of Asymmetric Bacterial Growth

    PubMed Central

    Kysela, David T.; Brown, Pamela J.B.; Huang, Kerwyn Casey; Brun, Yves V.

    2014-01-01

    Asymmetries in cell growth and division occur in eukaryotes and prokaryotes alike. Even seemingly simple and morphologically symmetric cell division processes belie inherent underlying asymmetries in the composition of the resulting daughter cells. We consider the types of asymmetry that arise in various bacterial cell growth and division processes, which include both conditionally activated mechanisms and constitutive, hardwired aspects of bacterial life histories. Although asymmetry disposes some cells to the deleterious effects of aging, it may also benefit populations by efficiently purging accumulated damage and rejuvenating newborn cells. Asymmetries may also generate phenotypic variation required for successful exploitation of variable environments, even when extrinsic changes outpace the capacity of cells to sense and respond to challenges. We propose specific experimental approaches to further develop our understanding of the prevalence and the ultimate importance of asymmetric bacterial growth. PMID:23808335

  8. Bayesian Inference and Application of Robust Growth Curve Models Using Student's "t" Distribution

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhang, Zhiyong; Lai, Keke; Lu, Zhenqiu; Tong, Xin

    2013-01-01

    Despite the widespread popularity of growth curve analysis, few studies have investigated robust growth curve models. In this article, the "t" distribution is applied to model heavy-tailed data and contaminated normal data with outliers for growth curve analysis. The derived robust growth curve models are estimated through Bayesian…

  9. Enteric Bacterial Growth Rates in River Water

    PubMed Central

    Hendricks, Charles W.

    1972-01-01

    Enteric bacteria, including stocked strains of pathogenic species and organisms naturally present in the stream, were capable of growth in a chemostat with autoclaved river water taken 750 m below a sewage outfall. Maximal specific growth rates for all organisms occurred at 30 C, whereas culture generation times ranged between 33.3 and 116 hr. Of the six laboratory strains of enteric species used, Escherichia coli and Enterobacter aerogenes grew at generation times of 34.5 and 33.3 hr, respectively, while the remaining Proteus, Arizona, Salmonella, and Shigella spp. reproduced at a rate two to three times slower than the coliforms. Little or no growth occurred in the water at incubation temperatures of 20 and 5 C, and death was observed for Salmonella senftenberg at 20 and 5 C and for E. aerogenes and Proteus rettgeri at 5 C. When enteric bacteria naturally present in the river water were employed in similar experiments, coliform bacteria demonstrated a generation time of approximately 116 hr, whereas fecal coliforms failed to grow. Growth of the bacteria from the river demonstrated a periodicity of approximately 100 hr, which suggests that much of the growth of these organisms in the chemostat may be on the glass surfaces. This phenomenon, however, was not observed with any of the stocked enteric species. Neither the stock cultures nor the aquatic strains were capable of growth in autoclaved river water taken above the sewage outfall at the three temperatures tested. PMID:4561100

  10. Theoretical Population Biology 69 (2006) 181191 The ideal free distribution and bacterial growth on two substrates

    E-print Network

    Krivan, Vlastimil

    Theoretical Population Biology 69 (2006) 181­191 The ideal free distribution and bacterial growth population growth rate. For batch bacterial growth, the model predicts that as the concentration is good. For bacterial growth in the chemostat, the model predicts that at low dilution rates bacteria

  11. Tracking bacterial growth in liquid media and a new bacterial life model

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Shi Liu

    1999-01-01

    By increasing viscosity of liquid media above 8.4 centipoise (cp) i.e. 0.084 g· cm-1 · s-1, individual growth and family formation ofEscherichia coli was continuously observed in real-time for up to 6 h. The observations showed primarily unidirectional growth and reproduction\\u000a ofE. coli and suggested more than one reproduction in the observed portion ofE. coli life span. A new bacterial

  12. Adaptive identification and control algorithms for nonlinear bacterial growth systems

    Microsoft Academic Search

    D. DOCHAINt; G. BASTIN

    1984-01-01

    This paper suggests how nonlinear adaptive control of nonlinear bacterial growth systems could be performed. The process is described by a time-varying nonlinear model obtained from material balance equations. Two different control problems are considered: substrate concentration control and production rate control. For each of these cases, an adaptive minimum variance control algorithm is proposed and its effectiveness is shown

  13. Sensitivity of Fit Indices to Misspecification in Growth Curve Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wu, Wei; West, Stephen G.

    2010-01-01

    This study investigated the sensitivity of fit indices to model misspecification in within-individual covariance structure, between-individual covariance structure, and marginal mean structure in growth curve models. Five commonly used fit indices were examined, including the likelihood ratio test statistic, root mean square error of…

  14. Optimal resource allocation explains growth curve diversity in zebra mussels

    E-print Network

    Kramarz, Paulina

    Optimal resource allocation explains growth curve diversity in zebra mussels Marcin Czarnoleski, 1 of Podlasie, Prusa 12, 08-110 Siedlce, Poland ABSTRACT We analysed data on zebra mussels (Dreissena polymorpha of mortality to the production rate index in the empirical data. The results indicate that zebra mussels

  15. Testing variance components in balanced linear growth curve models

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Reza Drikvandi; Ahmad Khodadadi; Geert Verbeke

    2011-01-01

    It is well known that the testing of zero variance components is a non-standard problem since the null hypothesis is on the boundary of the parameter space. The usual asymptotic chi-square distribution of the likelihood ratio and score statistics under the null does not necessarily hold because of this null hypothesis. To circumvent this difficulty in balanced linear growth curve

  16. Testing variance components in balanced linear growth curve models

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Reza Drikvandi; Ahmad Khodadadi; Geert Verbeke

    2012-01-01

    It is well known that the testing of zero variance components is a non-standard problem since the null hypothesis is on the boundary of the parameter space. The usual asymptotic chi-square distribution of the likelihood ratio and score statistics under the null does not necessarily hold because of this null hypothesis. To circumvent this difficulty in balanced linear growth curve

  17. Twelve Frequently Asked Questions about Growth Curve Modeling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Curran, Patrick J.; Obeidat, Khawla; Losardo, Diane

    2010-01-01

    Longitudinal data analysis has long played a significant role in empirical research within the developmental sciences. The past decade has given rise to a host of new and exciting analytic methods for studying between-person differences in within-person change. These methods are broadly organized under the term "growth curve models." The…

  18. Diagnostics of Robust Growth Curve Modeling Using Student's "t" Distribution

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tong, Xin; Zhang, Zhiyong

    2012-01-01

    Growth curve models with different types of distributions of random effects and of intraindividual measurement errors for robust analysis are compared. After demonstrating the influence of distribution specification on parameter estimation, 3 methods for diagnosing the distributions for both random effects and intraindividual measurement errors…

  19. Predicting Change in Postpartum Depression: An Individual Growth Curve Approach.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buchanan, Trey

    Recently, methodologists interested in examining problems associated with measuring change have suggested that developmental researchers should focus upon assessing change at both intra-individual and inter-individual levels. This study used an application of individual growth curve analysis to the problem of maternal postpartum depression.…

  20. Bacterial growth on 1,2-dichloroethane

    Microsoft Academic Search

    G. Stucki; U. Krebser; T. Leisinger

    1983-01-01

    Summary 1,2-Dichloroethane (5 mM) served as the only carbon and energy source for bacterium DE2, a gramnegative, oxidase-positive, motile rod. The specific growth rate ? of strain DE2 on 1,2-dichloroethane was 0.08 h?1. A NAD-dependent 2-chloroacetaldehyde dehydrogenase activity and a 2-chloroacetate halidohydrolase activity were detected in extracts of cells grown on 1,2-dichloroethane.

  1. Cooperative Bacterial Growth Dynamics Predict the Evolution of Antibiotic Resistance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Artemova, Tatiana; Gerardin, Ylaine; Hsin-Jung Li, Sophia; Gore, Jeff

    2011-03-01

    Since the discovery of penicillin, antibiotics have been our primary weapon against bacterial infections. Unfortunately, bacteria can gain resistance to penicillin by acquiring the gene that encodes beta-lactamase, which inactivates the antibiotic. However, mutations in this gene are necessary to degrade the modern antibiotic cefotaxime. Understanding the conditions that favor the spread of these mutations is a challenge. Here we show that bacterial growth in beta-lactam antibiotics is cooperative and that the nature of this growth determines the conditions in which resistance evolves. Quantitative analysis of the growth dynamics predicts a peak in selection at very low antibiotic concentrations; competition between strains confirms this prediction. We also find significant selection at higher antibiotic concentrations, close to the minimum inhibitory concentrations of the strains. Our results argue that an understanding of the evolutionary forces that lead to antibiotic resistance requires a quantitative understanding of the evolution of cooperation in bacteria.

  2. Morphology, Growth, and Size Limit of Bacterial Cells Hongyuan Jiang1

    E-print Network

    Sun, Sean

    Morphology, Growth, and Size Limit of Bacterial Cells Hongyuan Jiang1 and Sean X. Sun1,2 1 a general mechanochemical model of the growing bacterial cell wall, which shows explicitly how growth and shape are coupled together to determine the growth velocity and the bacteria size. The bacterial cell

  3. Stimulation of Alexandrium fundyense growth by bacterial assemblages from the Bay of Fundy

    E-print Network

    Rooney-Varga, Juliette N.

    Stimulation of Alexandrium fundyense growth by bacterial assemblages from the Bay of Fundy M on Alexandrium fundyense str. CB301 growth. Methods and Results: Bacterial assemblages were collected from into axenic CB301 cultures. Bacterial assemblages dramatically enhanced CB301 growth. Retrieval and analysis

  4. Both rate and extent of bacterial growth from 8h onwards ranked

    E-print Network

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Both rate and extent of bacterial growth from 8h onwards ranked S>P>M>CW (P growth. Addition of starch promoted a higher bacterial growth than pectin, but the latter enhanced- duced specific fibrolytic enzymatic activ- ity, but total activity was increased by a higher bacterial

  5. Bacterial Growth Classification with Support Vector Machines: A Comparative Emad A. El-Sebakhy

    E-print Network

    Faisal, Kanaan Abed

    Bacterial Growth Classification with Support Vector Machines: A Comparative Study Emad A. El@ccse.kfupm.edu.sa Abstract In this paper, we propose to use support vector machines for classification of bacterial growth. Keywords: Bacterial growth; Logistic regression; Support Vector Machines; K-nearest neighbors

  6. ULTRASOUND INCREASES THE RATE OF BACTERIAL CELL GROWTH

    PubMed Central

    Pitt, William G.; Ross, S. Aaron

    2006-01-01

    Ultrasound was employed to increase the growth rate of bacterial cells attached to surfaces. Staphylococcus epidermidis, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Escherichia coli cells adhered to and grew on a polyethylene surface in the presence of ultrasound. It was found that low frequency ultrasound (70 kHz) of low acoustic intensity (<2 W/cm2) increased the growth rate of the cells compared to growth without ultrasound. However, at high intensity levels, cells were partially removed from the surface. Ultrasound also enhanced planktonic growth of S. epidermidis and other planktonic bacteria. It is hypothesized that ultrasound increases the rate of transport of oxygen and nutrients to the cells and increases the rate of transport of waste products away from the cells, thus enhancing their growth. PMID:12790676

  7. The modulating effect of bacterial volatiles on plant growth

    PubMed Central

    Bailly, Aurélien; Weisskopf, Laure

    2012-01-01

    Bacteria interact with plants in many different ways. In recent years, bacterial production of volatiles has emerged as a novel process by which bacteria modulate plant growth. Exposure to the volatiles produced by certain bacterial strains has been shown to lead to up to 5-fold increased plant biomass or to plant death. Despite these drastic growth alterations, the elucidation of the molecules responsible, of the mechanisms of perception by the plant and of the specific metabolic changes induced in planta is still in its infancy. This review summarizes the current knowledge and highlights future lines of research that should increase our knowledge of the volatile-mediated dialog between bacteria and plants. PMID:22301973

  8. Microcoupon Assay Of Adhesion And Growth Of Bacterial Films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pierson, Duane L.; Koenig, David W.

    1994-01-01

    Microbiological assay technique facilitates determination of some characteristics of sessile bacteria like those that attach to and coat interior walls of water-purification systems. Biofilms cause sickness and interfere with purification process. Technique enables direct measurement of rate of attachment of bacterial cells, their metabolism, and effects of chemicals on them. Used to quantify effects of both bactericides and growth-stimulating agents and in place of older standard plate-count and tube-dilution techniques.

  9. Beyond growth: novel functions for bacterial cell wall hydrolases

    PubMed Central

    Wyckoff, Timna J.; Taylor, Jennifer A.; Salama, Nina R.

    2012-01-01

    The peptidoglycan cell wall maintains turgor pressure and cell shape of most bacteria. Cell wall hydrolases are essential, along with synthases, for growth and daughter cell separation. Recent work in diverse organisms has uncovered new cell wall hydrolases that act autonomously or on neighboring cells to modulate invasion of prey cells, cell shape, innate immune detection, intercellular communication, and competitor lysis. The hydrolases involved in these processes catalyze the cleavage of bonds throughout the sugar and peptide moities of peptidoglycan. Phenotypes associated with these diverse hydrolases reveal new functions of the bacterial cell wall beyond growth and division. PMID:22944244

  10. Limitation of Bacterial Growth by Dissolved Organic Matter and Iron in the Southern Ocean

    Microsoft Academic Search

    MATTHEW J. CHURCH; DAVID A. HUTCHINS; HUGH W. DUCKLOW

    2000-01-01

    Bacterial abundance, mean cell volume, and (3H)thymidine and (3H)leucine incorporation were measured during 4- to 5-day incubations. Bacterial biomass, production, and rates of growth all responded to organic enrichments in three of the four experiments. These results indicate that bacterial growth was constrained primarily by the availability of dissolved organic matter. Bacterial growth in the subtropical front, subantarctic zone, and

  11. Morphological instability and dynamics of fronts in bacterial growth models with nonlinear diffusion

    E-print Network

    van Saarloos, Wim

    Morphological instability and dynamics of fronts in bacterial growth models with nonlinear the growth of bacterial colonies under different growth conditions has been the focus of attention of several Leiden, The Netherlands Received 26 November 2001; published 28 June 2002 Depending on the growth

  12. VIRULENCE OF BRUCELLA : BACTERIAL GROWTH AND DECLINE IN MICE M PLOMMET AM PLOMMET

    E-print Network

    Boyer, Edmond

    Short note VIRULENCE OF BRUCELLA : BACTERIAL GROWTH AND DECLINE IN MICE M PLOMMET AM PLOMMET organs, liver, spleen, lungs and lymph nodes occurs followed by bacterial growth or decay. Growth may go evolving in three pha- ses, growth, decrease and plateau, whereas vacci- nal strain 19 differed in three

  13. Bacterial growth laws reflect the evolutionary importance of energy efficiency

    PubMed Central

    Maitra, Arijit; Dill, Ken A.

    2015-01-01

    We are interested in the balance of energy and protein synthesis in bacterial growth. How has evolution optimized this balance? We describe an analytical model that leverages extensive literature data on growth laws to infer the underlying fitness landscape and to draw inferences about what evolution has optimized in Escherichia coli. Is E. coli optimized for growth speed, energy efficiency, or some other property? Experimental data show that at its replication speed limit, E. coli produces about four mass equivalents of nonribosomal proteins for every mass equivalent of ribosomes. This ratio can be explained if the cell’s fitness function is the the energy efficiency of cells under fast growth conditions, indicating a tradeoff between the high energy costs of ribosomes under fast growth and the high energy costs of turning over nonribosomal proteins under slow growth. This model gives insight into some of the complex nonlinear relationships between energy utilization and ribosomal and nonribosomal production as a function of cell growth conditions. PMID:25548180

  14. Slow protein fluctuations explain the emergence of growth phenotypes and persistence in clonal bacterial populations

    E-print Network

    Andrea Rocco; Andrzej M. Kierzek; Johnjoe McFadden

    2013-10-31

    One of the most challenging problems in microbiology is to understand how a small fraction of microbes that resists killing by antibiotics can emerge in a population of genetically identical cells, the phenomenon known as persistence or drug tolerance. Its characteristic signature is the biphasic kill curve, whereby microbes exposed to a bactericidal agent are initially killed very rapidly but then much more slowly. Here we relate this problem to the more general problem of understanding the emergence of distinct growth phenotypes in clonal populations. We address the problem mathematically by adopting the framework of the phenomenon of so-called weak ergodicity breaking, well known in dynamical physical systems, which we extend to the biological context. We show analytically and by direct stochastic simulations that distinct growth phenotypes can emerge as a consequence of slow-down of stochastic fluctuations in the expression of a gene controlling growth rate. In the regime of fast gene transcription, the system is ergodic, the growth rate distribution is unimodal, and accounts for one phenotype only. In contrast, at slow transcription and fast translation, weakly non-ergodic components emerge, the population distribution of growth rates becomes bimodal, and two distinct growth phenotypes are identified. When coupled to the well-established growth rate dependence of antibiotic killing, this model describes the observed fast and slow killing phases, and reproduces much of the phenomenology of bacterial persistence. The model has major implications for efforts to develop control strategies for persistent infections.

  15. Limitation of Bacterial Growth by Dissolved Organic Matter and Iron in the Southern Ocean†

    PubMed Central

    Church, Matthew J.; Hutchins, David A.; Ducklow, Hugh W.

    2000-01-01

    The importance of resource limitation in controlling bacterial growth in the high-nutrient, low-chlorophyll (HNLC) region of the Southern Ocean was experimentally determined during February and March 1998. Organic- and inorganic-nutrient enrichment experiments were performed between 42°S and 55°S along 141°E. Bacterial abundance, mean cell volume, and [3H]thymidine and [3H]leucine incorporation were measured during 4- to 5-day incubations. Bacterial biomass, production, and rates of growth all responded to organic enrichments in three of the four experiments. These results indicate that bacterial growth was constrained primarily by the availability of dissolved organic matter. Bacterial growth in the subtropical front, subantarctic zone, and subantarctic front responded most favorably to additions of dissolved free amino acids or glucose plus ammonium. Bacterial growth in these regions may be limited by input of both organic matter and reduced nitrogen. Unlike similar experimental results in other HNLC regions (subarctic and equatorial Pacific), growth stimulation of bacteria in the Southern Ocean resulted in significant biomass accumulation, apparently by stimulating bacterial growth in excess of removal processes. Bacterial growth was relatively unchanged by additions of iron alone; however, additions of glucose plus iron resulted in substantial increases in rates of bacterial growth and biomass accumulation. These results imply that bacterial growth efficiency and nitrogen utilization may be partly constrained by iron availability in the HNLC Southern Ocean. PMID:10653704

  16. Regulation of Bacterial Growth Rates by Dissolved Organic Carbon and Temperature in the Equatorial Pacific Ocean

    Microsoft Academic Search

    D. L. Kirchman; J. H. Rich

    1997-01-01

    The effect of dissolved organic matter (DOM) and temperature on bacterial production was examined in the equatorial Pacific\\u000a Ocean. Addition of glucose, glucose plus ammonium, or free amino acids stimulated bacterial production ([3H]thymidine incorporation), whereas changes in bacterial abundance were either negligible or much less than changes in bacterial\\u000a production. The average bacterial growth rate also greatly increased following DOM

  17. In vitro effects on bacterial growth of phenoloxidase reaction products.

    PubMed

    Cerenius, Lage; Babu, Ramesh; Söderhäll, Kenneth; Jiravanichpaisal, Pikul

    2010-01-01

    An active phenoloxidase preparation from the freshwater crayfish Pacifastacus leniusculus exhibited a strong antibacterial effect in vitro on the bacteria Aeromonas hydrophila, Escherichia coli, Streptococcus pneumoniae whereas a weaker but still significant effect against Bacillus cereus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus aureus. In most cases reduction of bacterial growth was stronger when dopamine was used as substrate as compared to L-dopa. The effect on bacteria was abolished if no substrate was available for the phenoloxidase or in the presence of the phenoloxidase inhibitor phenylthiourea. PMID:19808037

  18. Modeling Bacterial Population Growth from Stochastic Single-Cell Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Molina, Ignacio; Theodoropoulos, Constantinos

    2014-01-01

    A few bacterial cells may be sufficient to produce a food-borne illness outbreak, provided that they are capable of adapting and proliferating on a food matrix. This is why any quantitative health risk assessment policy must incorporate methods to accurately predict the growth of bacterial populations from a small number of pathogens. In this aim, mathematical models have become a powerful tool. Unfortunately, at low cell concentrations, standard deterministic models fail to predict the fate of the population, essentially because the heterogeneity between individuals becomes relevant. In this work, a stochastic differential equation (SDE) model is proposed to describe variability within single-cell growth and division and to simulate population growth from a given initial number of individuals. We provide evidence of the model ability to explain the observed distributions of times to division, including the lag time produced by the adaptation to the environment, by comparing model predictions with experiments from the literature for Escherichia coli, Listeria innocua, and Salmonella enterica. The model is shown to accurately predict experimental growth population dynamics for both small and large microbial populations. The use of stochastic models for the estimation of parameters to successfully fit experimental data is a particularly challenging problem. For instance, if Monte Carlo methods are employed to model the required distributions of times to division, the parameter estimation problem can become numerically intractable. We overcame this limitation by converting the stochastic description to a partial differential equation (backward Kolmogorov) instead, which relates to the distribution of division times. Contrary to previous stochastic formulations based on random parameters, the present model is capable of explaining the variability observed in populations that result from the growth of a small number of initial cells as well as the lack of it compared to populations initiated by a larger number of individuals, where the random effects become negligible. PMID:24928885

  19. Inhibition of bacterial growth under composite restorations following GLUMA pretreatment.

    PubMed

    Felton, D; Bergenholtz, G; Cox, C F

    1989-03-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to test in five adult monkeys the effects of a glutaraldehyde-containing dentin bonding agent, GLUMA, on bacterial colonization in Class V cavities restored with composite resin. Experimental groups consisted of immediate placement of GLUMA and composite resin as well as placement of GLUMA or Scotchbond (control) in acid-etched cavities that had been left open to the oral environment for 48 hours. Various procedures for pretreatment of the cavities were included. Tissue specimens were prepared for light microscopy for observation of bacterial presence and pulp tissue reactions after eight days and 90 days. Bacteria were not detected in any of the 54 cavities treated with GLUMA regardless of observation period or use of enamel-etching procedure prior to placement of composite resin. When cavities were restored with composite resin without prior GLUMA pretreatment or with Scotchbond, bacteria were present under the majority of restorations at both time intervals. Pulpal inflammation of varying extent and character was seen after eight days in teeth that had been previously infected. At 90 days, pulps showed repair and healing regardless of treatment protocol. Data indicate that GLUMA has a distinct in vivo antibacterial effect that seems to prevent bacterial growth in tooth/restoration interfaces. PMID:2493491

  20. Experimental investigation on the role of bacterial growth and bacterial transport in MEOR processes

    SciTech Connect

    Jang, L.K.; Yen, T.F.

    1983-03-01

    In order to define the dynamics of Microbial Enhanced Oil Recovery (MEOR) process bench-scale MEOR using Bacillus subtilis was undertaken. The relationship between bacterial transport in the oil containing porous media, growth rate and the efficiency of oil recovery was investigated. Work using Pseudomonas fluorescens and clostridium acetobutylicum is in progress (no data). Heavy crude (API gravity 17/sup 0/) was used in these studies in which Continuous Flooding Process and the combination Huff-and-Puff and Nutrient Flooding Processes were compared. B. subtilis provided greater than 40% oil recovery after secondary flooding. Growth is satisfactory provided adequate nutrient and oxygen supply. Liquid phase metabolites (polysaccharides, lipids) and gaseous phase metabolites (CO/sub 2/, etc.) improve recovery. The Huff-and-Puff, etc. combination process is the most efficient based on nutrient consumption.

  1. Growth strategy of heterotrophic bacterial population along successional sequence on spoil of brown coal colliery substrate.

    PubMed

    Krist?fek, V; Elhottová, D; Chronáková, A; Dostálková, I; Picek, T; Kalcík, J

    2005-01-01

    The bacterial population of brown coal colliery spoil (Sokolov coal mining district, Czechia) was characterized by measuring viable bacterial biomass, the culturable to total cell ratio (C : T), colony-forming curve (CFC) analysis and species and/or biotype diversity. Bacterial representatives that differed in colony-forming growth (fast and/or slow growers) were used for growth-strategy investigation of heterotrophic bacteria. Spoil substrates from the surface (0-50 mm) and the mineral (100-150 mm) layers were sampled on 4 sites undergoing spontaneous succession corresponding to 1, 11, 21 and 43 years after deposition (initial, early, mid and late stages). The bacterial biomass of the surface layer increased during the initial and early stages with a maximum at mid stage and stabilized in the late stage while mineral layer biomass increased throughout the succession. The maxima of C : T ratios were at the early stage, minima at the late stage. Depending on the succession stage the C : T ratio was 1.5-2 times higher in the mineral than the surface layer of soil. An increase in the fraction of nonculturable bacteria was associated with the late succession stage. CFC analysis of the surface layer during a 3-d incubation revealed that the early-succession substrate contained more (75%) rapidly colonizing bacteria (opportunists, r-strategists) than successively older substrates. The culturable bacterial community of the mineral layer maintained a high genera and species richness of fast growers along the succession line in contrast to the surface layer community, where there was a maximum in the abundance of fast growers in the early stage. There was a balanced distribution of Gram-positive and Gram-negative representatives of fast growers in both layers. A markedly lower abundance of slow growers was observed in the mineral in contrast to the surface layer. Gram-positive species dominated the slow growers at the surface as well as in the mineral layers. The growth strategy of the heterotrophic bacterial population along four successional stages on spoil of brown coal colliery substrate in the surface layer displayed a trend indicative of a r-K continuum in contrast to the mineral layer, where an r-strategy persisted. PMID:16475503

  2. Dislocation-mediated growth of bacterial cell walls

    E-print Network

    Ariel Amir; David R. Nelson

    2012-05-07

    Recent experiments have illuminated a remarkable growth mechanism of rod-shaped bacteria: proteins associated with cell wall extension move at constant velocity in circles oriented approximately along the cell circumference (Garner et al., Science (2011), Dominguez-Escobar et al. Science (2011), van Teeffelen et al. PNAS (2011). We view these as dislocations in the partially ordered peptidoglycan structure, activated by glycan strand extension machinery, and study theoretically the dynamics of these interacting defects on the surface of a cylinder. Generation and motion of these interacting defects lead to surprising effects arising from the cylindrical geometry, with important implications for growth. We also discuss how long range elastic interactions and turgor pressure affect the dynamics of the fraction of actively moving dislocations in the bacterial cell wall.

  3. Dislocation-mediated growth of bacterial cell walls

    E-print Network

    Amir, Ariel

    2012-01-01

    Recent experiments have illuminated a remarkable growth mechanism of rod-shaped bacteria: proteins associated with cell wall extension move at constant velocity in circles oriented approximately along the cell circumference (Garner et al., Science (2011), Dominguez-Escobar et al. Science (2011), van Teeffelen et al. PNAS (2011). We view these as dislocations in the partially ordered peptidoglycan structure, activated by glycan strand extension machinery, and study theoretically the dynamics of these interacting defects on the surface of a cylinder. Generation and motion of these interacting defects lead to surprising effects arising from the cylindrical geometry, with important implications for growth. We also discuss how long range elastic interactions and turgor pressure affect the dynamics of the fraction of actively moving dislocations in the bacterial cell wall.

  4. Bacterial Growth on Surfaces: Automated Image Analysis for Quantification of Growth Rate-Related Parameters

    Microsoft Academic Search

    SØREN MØLLER; CLAUS S. KRISTENSEN; LARS K. POULSEN; JENS M. CARSTENSEN; ANDSØREN MOLIN

    1995-01-01

    A fast routine method for estimating bacterial cell growth rates by using the metachromatic dye acridine orange is described. The method allows simultaneous estimates of cellular RNA and DNA contents of single cells. Acridine orange staining can be used as a nonspecific supplement to quantitative species-specific hybridizationswithfluorescence-labelledribosomalprobestoestimatethesingle-cellconcentrationofRNA.By automated analysis of digitized images of stained cells, we determined four independent growth

  5. Gradient Microfluidics Enables Rapid Bacterial Growth Inhibition Testing

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Bacterial growth inhibition tests have become a standard measure of the adverse effects of inhibitors for a wide range of applications, such as toxicity testing in the medical and environmental sciences. However, conventional well-plate formats for these tests are laborious and provide limited information (often being restricted to an end-point assay). In this study, we have developed a microfluidic system that enables fast quantification of the effect of an inhibitor on bacteria growth and survival, within a single experiment. This format offers a unique combination of advantages, including long-term continuous flow culture, generation of concentration gradients, and single cell morphology tracking. Using Escherichia coli and the inhibitor amoxicillin as one model system, we show excellent agreement between an on-chip single cell-based assay and conventional methods to obtain quantitative measures of antibiotic inhibition (for example, minimum inhibition concentration). Furthermore, we show that our methods can provide additional information, over and above that of the standard well-plate assay, including kinetic information on growth inhibition and measurements of bacterial morphological dynamics over a wide range of inhibitor concentrations. Finally, using a second model system, we show that this chip-based systems does not require the bacteria to be labeled and is well suited for the study of naturally occurring species. We illustrate this using Nitrosomonas europaea, an environmentally important bacteria, and show that the chip system can lead to a significant reduction in the period required for growth and inhibition measurements (<4 days, compared to weeks in a culture flask). PMID:24548044

  6. Lactic acid bacterial extract as a biogenic mineral growth modifier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borah, Ballav M.; Singh, Atul K.; Ramesh, Aiyagari; Das, Gopal

    2009-04-01

    The formation of minerals and mechanisms by which bacteria could control their formation in natural habitats is now of current interest for material scientists to have an insight of the mechanism of in vivo mineralization, as well as to seek industrial and technological applications. Crystalline uniform structures of calcium and barium minerals formed micron-sized building blocks when synthesized in the presence of an organic matrix consisting of secreted protein extracts from three different lactic acid bacteria (LAB) viz.: Lactobacillus plantarum MTCC 1325, Lactobacillus acidophilus NRRL B4495 and Pediococcus acidilactici CFR K7. LABs are not known to form organic matrix in biological materialization processes. The influence of these bacterial extracts on the crystallization behavior was investigated in details to test the basic coordination behavior of the acidic protein. In this report, varied architecture of the mineral crystals obtained in presence of high molecular weight protein extracts of three different LAB strains has been discussed. The role of native form of high molecular weight bacterial protein extracts in the generation of nucleation centers for crystal growth was clearly established. A model for the formation of organic matrix-cation complex and the subsequent events leading to crystal growth is proposed.

  7. Medium-dependent control of the bacterial growth rate.

    PubMed

    Ehrenberg, Måns; Bremer, Hans; Dennis, Patrick P

    2013-04-01

    By combining results from previous studies of nutritional up-shifts we here re-investigate how bacteria adapt to different nutritional environments by adjusting their macromolecular composition for optimal growth. We demonstrate that, in contrast to a commonly held view the macromolecular composition of bacteria does not depend on the growth rate as an independent variable, but on three factors: (i) the genetic background (i.e. the strain used), (ii) the physiological history of the bacteria used for inoculation of a given growth medium, and (iii) the kind of nutrients in the growth medium. These factors determine the ribosome concentration and the average rate of protein synthesis per ribosome, and thus the growth rate. Immediately after a nutritional up-shift, the average number of ribosomes in the bacterial population increases exponentially with time at a rate which eventually is attained as the final post-shift growth rate of all cell components. After a nutritional up-shift from one minimal medium to another minimal medium of higher nutritional quality, ribosome and RNA polymerase syntheses are co-regulated and immediately increase by the same factor equal to the increase in the final growth rate. However, after an up-shift from a minimal medium to a medium containing all 20 amino acids, RNA polymerase and ribosome syntheses are no longer coregulated; a smaller rate of synthesis of RNA polymerase is compensated by a gradual increase in the fraction of free RNA polymerase, possibly due to a gradual saturation of mRNA promoters. We have also analyzed data from a recent publication, in which it was concluded that the macromolecular composition in terms of RNA/protein and RNA/DNA ratios is solely determined by the effector molecule ppGpp. Our analysis indicates that this is true only in special cases and that, in general, medium adaptation also depends on factors other than ppGpp. PMID:23228516

  8. Incorporating Student Mobility in Achievement Growth Modeling: A Cross-Classified Multiple Membership Growth Curve Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grady, Matthew W.; Beretvas, S. Natasha

    2010-01-01

    Multiple membership random effects models (MMREMs) have been developed for use in situations where individuals are members of multiple higher level organizational units. Despite their availability and the frequency with which multiple membership structures are encountered, no studies have extended the MMREM approach to hierarchical growth curve…

  9. Parent involvement and science achievement: A latent growth curve analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Ursula Yvette

    This study examined science achievement growth across elementary and middle school and parent school involvement using the Early Childhood Longitudinal Study - Kindergarten Class of 1998--1999 (ECLS-K). The ECLS-K is a nationally representative kindergarten cohort of students from public and private schools who attended full-day or half-day kindergarten class in 1998--1999. The present study's sample (N = 8,070) was based on students that had a sampling weight available from the public-use data file. Students were assessed in science achievement at third, fifth, and eighth grades and parents of the students were surveyed at the same time points. Analyses using latent growth curve modeling with time invariant and varying covariates in an SEM framework revealed a positive relationship between science achievement and parent involvement at eighth grade. Furthermore, there were gender and racial/ethnic differences in parents' school involvement as a predictor of science achievement. Findings indicated that students with lower initial science achievement scores had a faster rate of growth across time. The achievement gap between low and high achievers in earth, space and life sciences lessened from elementary to middle school. Parents' involvement with school usually tapers off after elementary school, but due to parent school involvement being a significant predictor of eighth grade science achievement, later school involvement may need to be supported and better implemented in secondary schooling.

  10. Volatiles of bacterial antagonists inhibit mycelial growth of the plant pathogen Rhizoctonia solani

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Marco Kai; Uta Effmert; Gabriele Berg; Birgit Piechulla

    2007-01-01

    Bacterial antagonists are bacteria that negatively affect the growth of other organisms. Many antagonists inhibit the growth\\u000a of fungi by various mechanisms, e.g., secretion of lytic enzymes, siderophores and antibiotics. Such inhibition of fungal\\u000a growth may indirectly support plant growth. Here, we demonstrate that small organic volatile compounds (VOCs) emitted from\\u000a bacterial antagonists negatively influence the mycelial growth of the

  11. Engineered cerium oxide nanoparticles: Effects on bacterial growth and viability

    SciTech Connect

    Pelletier, Dale A [ORNL; Suresh, Anil K [ORNL; Holton, Gregory A [ORNL; McKeown, Catherine K [ORNL; Wang, Wei [ORNL; Gu, Baohua [ORNL; Mortensen, Ninell P [ORNL; Allison, David P [ORNL; Joy, David Charles [ORNL; Allison, Martin R [ORNL; Brown, Steven D [ORNL; Phelps, Tommy Joe [ORNL; Doktycz, Mitchel John [ORNL

    2010-01-01

    Interest in engineered nanostructures has risen in recent years due to their use in energy conservation strategies and biomedicine. To ensure prudent development and use of nanomaterials, the fate and effects of such engineered structures on the environment should be understood. Interactions of nanomaterials with environmental microorganisms are inevitable, but the general consequences of such interactions remain unclear. Further, standardized methods for assessing such interactions are lacking. Therefore, we have initiated a multianalytical approach to understand the interactions of synthesized nanoparticles with bacterial systems. These efforts are focused initially on cerium oxide nanoparticles and model bacteria in order to evaluate characterization procedures and the possible fate of such materials in the environment. In this study the effects of cerium oxide nanoparticles on the growth and viability of Gram-negative Escherichia coli and Shewanella oneidensis, a metal-reducing bacteria, and Gram-positive Bacillus subtilis were examined relative to particle size, growth media, pH, and dosage. A hydrothermal based synthesis procedure was used to prepare cerium oxide nanoparticles of defined sizes in order to eliminate complications originating from the use of organic solvents and surfactants. Bactericidal effects were determined by minimum inhibitory concentration, colony forming units, disc diffusion tests and Live/Dead assays. In growth inhibition experiments involving E. coli and B. subtilis, a clear strain and size-dependent inhibition was observed. S. oneidensis appeared to be unaffected by the cerium oxide nanoparticles. Transmission electron microscopy along with microarray-based transcriptional profiling have been used to understand the response mechanism of the bacteria. The use of multiple analytical approaches adds confidence to toxicity assessments while the use of different bacterial systems highlights the potential wide-ranging effects of nanomaterial interactions in the environment.

  12. Comparative study of the growth curves of B. Subtilis, K. Pneumoniae, C. Xerosis, and E. Coli bacteria using nanometric silicon particles as a bacteriological sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perez, Lilyanna; Flores, Marjorie; Avalos, Javier; San Miguel, L.; Resto, O.; Fonseca, L. F.

    2003-04-01

    In this research nanometric particles from luminescent porous silicon film were synthesized. This particles were later inoculated in bacterial strains of B. subtilis (BSi) and K. pneumoniae (KSi). A comparison of the behavior of their growth curve and the ones reported for C. xerosis (XSi) and E. coli (ESi) in presence of silicon nanoparticles is presented. The growth curve of BSi, as well as the KSi, present changes compared to their standard curves. The BSi growth curve grows below the standard curve after teh fifth hor, while in the KSi this happens after the eighth hour. Based on our preliminary findings we can sepculate that at this point in time a critical population is present, and this may give rise to the possible incorporation of the silicon particles by the bacteria, or a possible pleomorphism inhibits reproduction. The stationary region, in both case, takes place sooner than in the standard curve. No significant oscillations are observed in any case, which differs from the XSi curve, were oscillations of intervals of almost 1 hour were reported. In addition, these curves have a different behavior when compared to the ESi growth curve, in which no significant differences between the standard and teh particle containing sample were reported.

  13. [Bacterial growth in breast milk under various storage conditions].

    PubMed

    Knoop, U; Schütt-Gerowitt, H; Matheis, G

    1985-07-01

    To find the best temperature for storing human breast milk in the first test series, bacterial growth was determined and recorded at refrigerator temperatures of 8 to 10 degrees C and at 4 degrees C respectively. During a 3-day observation period, there was a slight decrease in bacterial count (b.c.) at higher temperature whereas the b.c. decrease at the lower temperature was more significant. In another test 72 samples of milk were kept for one month at a temperature of -20 degrees C; the b.c. observed after thawing was substantially smaller than that recorded before freezing. Pasteurized milk samples were found sterile with the method we used (in 0.1 ml). In a third test a measured quantity of specific bacteria was added to the milk samples which were first deep-frozen, thereafter pasteurized and finally stored in a refrigerator for 3 days at 4 degrees C. During this process, a decrease was observed in all the bacteria involved. In our opinion, breast milk is best stored at a constant temperature of 4 degrees C. Pasteurization and freezing are also recommended from a bacteriological point of view. PMID:3900702

  14. Silver Nanoparticles Part 2: BDo Silver Nanoparticles Inhibit Bacterial Growth?

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    The NACK Center is an organization committed to supporting two â??year degree programs in micro and nanotechnology. The center offers online educational material for curriculum enhancement in this subject field. One of these resources is a lab documentation focusing on the topic of silver nanoparticles. The lab "may be used with a middle school through high school biology class.â? The lesson includes objectives, sample solution preparations, and sample data and calculations. Overall, the objectives of this lesson are to practice aseptic techniques to inoculate/grow bacteria and describe the impact of silver nanoparticles on bacterial growth. The site requires a free log-in for access to the material.

  15. Accumulation of mutants in ``aging'' bacterial colonies is due to growth under selection,

    E-print Network

    California at Davis, University of

    Accumulation of mutants in ``aging'' bacterial colonies is due to growth under selection (sent for review April 25, 2008) Several bacterial systems show behavior interpreted as evidence in cell populations that ``age'' on solid medium with little net growth. Mutant accumulation was initially

  16. Bacterial Growth Phase Influences Methylmercury Production by the Sulfate-Reducing Bacterium Desulfovibrio desulfuricans ND132

    SciTech Connect

    Biswas, Abir [ORNL; Brooks, Scott C [ORNL; Miller, Carrie L [ORNL; Mosher, Jennifer J [ORNL; Yin, Xiangping Lisa [ORNL; Drake, Meghan M [ORNL

    2011-01-01

    The effect of bacterial growth phase is an aspect of mercury (Hg) methylation that previous studies have not investigated in detail. Here we consider the effect of growth phase (mid-log, late-log and late stationary phase) on Hg methylation by the known methylator Desulfovibrio desulfuricans ND132. We tested the addition of Hg alone (chloride-complex), Hg with Suwannee River natural organic matter (SRNOM) (unequilibrated), and Hg equilibrated with SRNOM on monomethylmercury (MMHg) production by ND132 over a growth curve in pyruvate fumarate media. This NOM did not affect MMHg production even under very low Hg: SRNOM ratios, where Hg binding is predicted to be dominated by high energy sites. Adding Hg or Hg NOM to growing cultures 24 h before sampling (late addition) resulted in ~2 greater net fraction of Hg methylated than for comparably aged cultures exposed to Hg from the initial culture inoculation (early addition). Mid-and late-log phase cultures produced similar amounts of MMHg, but late stationary phase cultures (both under early and late Hg addition conditions) produced up to ~3 more MMHg, indicating the potential importance of growth phase in studies of MMHg production.

  17. Bacterial Growth Phase Influences Methylmercury Production by the Sulfate-Reducing Bacterium Desulfovibrio desulfuricans ND132

    SciTech Connect

    Biswas, Abir [ORNL; Brooks, Scott C [ORNL; Miller, Carrie L [ORNL; Mosher, Jennifer J [ORNL; Yin, Xiangping Lisa [ORNL; Drake, Meghan M [ORNL

    2011-01-01

    The effect of bacterial growth phase is an aspect of mercury (Hg) methylation that previous studies have not investigated in detail. Here we consider the effect of growth phase (mid-log, late-log and late stationary phase) on Hg methylation by the known methylator Desulfovibrio desulfuricans ND132. We tested the addition of Hg alone (chloride-complex), Hg with Suwannee River natural organic matter (SRNOM) (unequilibrated), and Hg equilibrated with SRNOM on monomethylmercury (MMHg) production by ND132 over a growth curve in pyruvate-fumarate media. This NOM did not affect MMHg production even under very low Hg:SRNOM ratios, where Hg binding is predicted to be dominated by high energy sites. Adding Hg or Hg-NOM to growing cultures 24h before sampling (late addition) resulted in {approx}2x greater net fraction of Hg methylated than for comparably aged cultures exposed to Hg from the initial culture inoculation (early addition). Mid- and late-log phase cultures produced similar amounts of MMHg, but late stationary phase cultures (both under early and late Hg addition conditions) produced up to {approx}3x more MMHg, indicating the potential importance of growth phase in studies of MMHg production.

  18. Energetics of bacterial growth: balance of anabolic and catabolic reactions.

    PubMed Central

    Russell, J B; Cook, G M

    1995-01-01

    Biomass formation represents one of the most basic aspects of bacterial metabolism. While there is an abundance of information concerning individual reactions that result in cell duplication, there has been surprisingly little information on the bioenergetics of growth. For many years, it was assumed that biomass production (anabolism) was proportional to the amount of ATP which could be derived from energy-yielding pathways (catabolism), but later work showed that the ATP yield (YATP) was not necessarily a constant. Continuous-culture experiments indicated that bacteria utilized ATP for metabolic reactions that were not directly related to growth (maintenance functions). Mathematical derivations showed that maintenance energy appeared to be a growth rate-independent function of the cell mass and time. Later work, however, showed that maintenance energy alone could not account for all the variations in yield. Because only some of the discrepancy could be explained by the secretion of metabolites (overflow metabolism) or the diversion of catabolism to metabolic pathways which produced less ATP, it appeared that energy-excess cultures had mechanisms of spilling energy. Bacteria have the potential to spill excess ATP in futile enzyme cycles, but there has been little proof that such cycles are significant. Recent work indicated that bacteria can also use futile cycles of potassium, ammonia, and protons through the cell membrane to dissipate ATP either directly or indirectly. The utility of energy spilling in bacteria has been a curiosity. The deprivation of energy from potential competitors is at best a teleological explanation that cannot be easily supported by standard theories of natural selection. The priming of intracellular intermediates for future growth or protection of cells from potentially toxic end products (e.g., methylglyoxal) seems a more plausible explanation. PMID:7708012

  19. Using Design-Based Latent Growth Curve Modeling with Cluster-Level Predictor to Address Dependency

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wu, Jiun-Yu; Kwok, Oi-Man; Willson, Victor L.

    2014-01-01

    The authors compared the effects of using the true Multilevel Latent Growth Curve Model (MLGCM) with single-level regular and design-based Latent Growth Curve Models (LGCM) with or without the higher-level predictor on various criterion variables for multilevel longitudinal data. They found that random effect estimates were biased when the…

  20. A Multivariate Reduced-Rank Growth Curve Model with Unbalanced Data

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hwang, Heungsun; Takane, Yoshio

    2004-01-01

    A multivariate reduced-rank growth curve model is proposed that extends the univariate reduced rank growth curve model to the multivariate case, in which several response variables are measured over multiple time points. The proposed model allows us to investigate the relationships among a number of response variables in a more parsimonious way…

  1. Growth Curve Models for Zero-Inflated Count Data: An Application to Smoking Behavior

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liu, Hui; Powers, Daniel A.

    2007-01-01

    This article applies growth curve models to longitudinal count data characterized by an excess of zero counts. We discuss a zero-inflated Poisson regression model for longitudinal data in which the impact of covariates on the initial counts and the rate of change in counts over time is the focus of inference. Basic growth curve models using a…

  2. The Role of Coding Time in Estimating and Interpreting Growth Curve Models.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Biesanz, Jeremy C.; Deeb-Sossa, Natalia; Papadakis, Alison A.; Bollen, Kenneth A.; Curran, Patrick J.

    2004-01-01

    The coding of time in growth curve models has important implications for the interpretation of the resulting model that are sometimes not transparent. The authors develop a general framework that includes predictors of growth curve components to illustrate how parameter estimates and their standard errors are exactly determined as a function of…

  3. The Effects of Autocorrelation on the Curve-of-Factors Growth Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murphy, Daniel L.; Beretvas, S. Natasha; Pituch, Keenan A.

    2011-01-01

    This simulation study examined the performance of the curve-of-factors model (COFM) when autocorrelation and growth processes were present in the first-level factor structure. In addition to the standard curve-of factors growth model, 2 new models were examined: one COFM that included a first-order autoregressive autocorrelation parameter, and a…

  4. Bacterial Growth on Chitosan-Coated Polypropylene Textile

    PubMed Central

    Erben, D.; Hola, V.; Jaros, J.; Rahel, J.

    2012-01-01

    Biofouling is a problem common in all systems where microorganisms and aqueous environment meet. Prevention of biofouling is therefore important in many industrial processes. The aim of this study was to develop a method to evaluate the ability of material coating to inhibit biofilm formation. Chitosan-coated polypropylene nonwoven textile was prepared using dielectric barrier discharge plasma activation. Resistance of the textile to biofouling was then tested. First, the textile was submerged into a growth medium inoculated with green fluorescein protein labelled Pseudomonas aeruginosa. After overnight incubation at 33°C, the textile was observed using confocal laser scanning microscopy for bacterial enumeration and biofilm structure characterisation. In the second stage, the textile was used as a filter medium for prefiltered river water, and the pressure development on the in-flow side was measured to quantify the overall level of biofouling. In both cases, nontreated textile samples were used as a control. The results indicate that the chitosan coating exhibits antibacterial properties. The developed method is applicable for the evaluation of the ability to inhibit biofilm formation. PMID:23724330

  5. Fructose-enhanced reduction of bacterial growth on nanorough surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Durmus, Naside Gozde; Taylor, Erik N; Inci, Fatih; Kummer, Kim M; Tarquinio, Keiko M; Webster, Thomas J

    2012-01-01

    Patients on mechanical ventilators for extended periods of time often face the risk of developing ventilator-associated pneumonia. During the ventilation process, patients incapable of breathing are intubated with polyvinyl chloride (PVC) endotracheal tubes (ETTs). PVC ETTs provide surfaces where bacteria can attach and proliferate from the contaminated oropharyngeal space to the sterile bronchoalveolar area. To overcome this problem, ETTs can be coated with antimicrobial agents. However, such coatings may easily delaminate during use. Recently, it has been shown that changes in material topography at the nanometer level can provide antibacterial properties. In addition, some metabolites, such as fructose, have been found to increase the efficiency of antibiotics used to treat Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) infections. In this study, we combined the antibacterial effect of nanorough ETT topographies with sugar metabolites to decrease bacterial growth and biofilm formation on ETTs. We present for the first time that the presence of fructose on the nanorough surfaces decreases the number of planktonic S. aureus bacteria in the solution and biofilm formation on the surface after 24 hours. We thus envision that this method has the potential to impact the future of surface engineering of biomaterials leading to more successful clinical outcomes in terms of longer ETT lifetimes, minimized infections, and decreased antibiotic usage; all of which can decrease the presence of antibiotic resistant bacteria in the clinical setting. PMID:22334783

  6. Heterotrophic Bacterial Growth Efficiency and Community Structure at Different Natural Organic Carbon Concentrations

    PubMed Central

    Eiler, Alexander; Langenheder, Silke; Bertilsson, Stefan; Tranvik, Lars J.

    2003-01-01

    Batch cultures of aquatic bacteria and dissolved organic matter were used to examine the impact of carbon source concentration on bacterial growth, biomass, growth efficiency, and community composition. An aged concentrate of dissolved organic matter from a humic lake was diluted with organic compound-free artificial lake water to obtain concentrations of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) ranging from 0.04 to 2.53 mM. The bacterial biomass produced in the cultures increased linearly with the DOC concentration, indicating that bacterial biomass production was limited by the supply of carbon. The bacterial growth rate in the exponential growth phase exhibited a hyperbolic response to the DOC concentration, suggesting that the maximum growth rate was constrained by the substrate concentration at low DOC concentrations. Likewise, the bacterial growth efficiency calculated from the production of biomass and CO2 increased asymptotically from 0.4 to 10.4% with increasing DOC concentration. The compositions of the microbial communities that emerged in the cultures were assessed by separation of PCR-amplified 16S rRNA fragments by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis. Nonmetric multidimensional scaling of the gel profiles showed that there was a gradual change in the community composition along the DOC gradient; members of the ? subclass of the class Proteobacteria and members of the Cytophaga-Flavobacterium group were well represented at all concentrations, whereas members of the ? subclass of the Proteobacteria were found exclusively at the lowest carbon concentration. The shift in community composition along the DOC gradient was similar to the patterns of growth efficiency and growth rate. The results suggest that the bacterial growth efficiencies, the rates of bacterial growth, and the compositions of bacterial communities are not constrained by substrate concentrations in most natural waters, with the possible exception of the most oligotrophic environments. PMID:12839735

  7. Ecological inference on bacterial succession using curve-based community fingerprint data analysis, demonstrated with rhizoremediation experiment.

    PubMed

    Mikkonen, Anu; Lappi, Kaisa; Wallenius, Kaisa; Lindström, Kristina; Suominen, Leena

    2011-12-01

    Nucleic acid-based community fingerprinting methods are valuable tools in microbial ecology, as they offer rapid and robust means to compare large series of replicates and references. To avoid the time-consuming and potentially subjective procedures of peak-based examination, we assessed the possibility to apply direct curve-based data analysis on community fingerprints produced with bacterial length heterogeneity PCR (LH-PCR). The dataset comprised 180 profiles from a 21-week rhizoremediation greenhouse experiment with three treatments and 10 sampling times. Curve-based analysis quantified the progressive effect of the plant (Galega orientalis) and the reversible effect of the contaminant (fuel oil) on bacterial succession. The major observed community shifts were assigned to changes in plant biomass and contamination level by canonical correlation analysis. A novel method to extract relative abundance data from the fingerprint curves for Shannon diversity index revealed contamination to reversibly decrease community complexity. By cloning and sequencing the fragment lengths, recognized to change in time in the averaged LH-PCR profiles, we identified Aquabacterium (Betaproteobacteria) as the putative r-strategic fuel oil degrader, and K-strategic Alphaproteobacteria growing in abundance later in succession. Curve-based community fingerprint analysis can be used for rapid data prescreening or as a robust alternative for the more heavily parameterized peak-based analysis. PMID:22066474

  8. Intestinal alkaline phosphatase promotes gut bacterial growth by reducing the concentration of luminal nucleotide triphosphates.

    PubMed

    Malo, Madhu S; Moaven, Omeed; Muhammad, Nur; Biswas, Brishti; Alam, Sayeda N; Economopoulos, Konstantinos P; Gul, Sarah Shireen; Hamarneh, Sulaiman R; Malo, Nondita S; Teshager, Abeba; Mohamed, Mussa M Rafat; Tao, Qingsong; Narisawa, Sonoko; Millán, José Luis; Hohmann, Elizabeth L; Warren, H Shaw; Robson, Simon C; Hodin, Richard A

    2014-05-15

    The intestinal microbiota plays a pivotal role in maintaining human health and well-being. Previously, we have shown that mice deficient in the brush-border enzyme intestinal alkaline phosphatase (IAP) suffer from dysbiosis and that oral IAP supplementation normalizes the gut flora. Here we aimed to decipher the molecular mechanism by which IAP promotes bacterial growth. We used an isolated mouse intestinal loop model to directly examine the effect of exogenous IAP on the growth of specific intestinal bacterial species. We studied the effects of various IAP targets on the growth of stool aerobic and anaerobic bacteria as well as on a few specific gut organisms. We determined the effects of ATP and other nucleotides on bacterial growth. Furthermore, we examined the effects of IAP on reversing the inhibitory effects of nucleotides on bacterial growth. We have confirmed that local IAP bioactivity creates a luminal environment that promotes the growth of a wide range of commensal organisms. IAP promotes the growth of stool aerobic and anaerobic bacteria and appears to exert its growth promoting effects by inactivating (dephosphorylating) luminal ATP and other luminal nucleotide triphosphates. We observed that compared with wild-type mice, IAP-knockout mice have more ATP in their luminal contents, and exogenous IAP can reverse the ATP-mediated inhibition of bacterial growth in the isolated intestinal loop. In conclusion, IAP appears to promote the growth of intestinal commensal bacteria by inhibiting the concentration of luminal nucleotide triphosphates. PMID:24722905

  9. Avian Incubation Inhibits Growth and Diversification of Bacterial Assemblages on Eggs

    E-print Network

    Beissinger, Steven R.

    Avian Incubation Inhibits Growth and Diversification of Bacterial Assemblages on Eggs Matthew D well known. Avian incubation has been hypothesized to reduce the risk of trans-shell infection bacterial assemblages on naturally incubated and experimentally unincubated eggs at laying and late

  10. Temporal Variation of Bacterial Respiration and Growth Efficiency in Tropical Coastal Waters ?

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Choon Weng; Bong, Chui Wei; Hii, Yii Siang

    2009-01-01

    We investigated the temporal variation of bacterial production, respiration, and growth efficiency in the tropical coastal waters of Peninsular Malaysia. We selected five stations including two estuaries and three coastal water stations. The temperature was relatively stable (averaging around 29.5°C), whereas salinity was more variable in the estuaries. We also measured dissolved organic carbon and nitrogen (DOC and DON, respectively) concentrations. DOC generally ranged from 100 to 900 ?M, whereas DON ranged from 0 to 32 ?M. Bacterial respiration ranged from 0.5 to 3.2 ?M O2 h?1, whereas bacterial production ranged from 0.05 to 0.51 ?M C h?1. Bacterial growth efficiency was calculated as bacterial production/(bacterial production + respiration), and ranged from 0.02 to 0.40. Multiple correlation analyses revealed that bacterial production was dependent upon primary production (r2 = 0.169, df = 31, and P < 0.02) whereas bacterial respiration was dependent upon both substrate quality (i.e., DOC/DON ratio) (r2 = 0.137, df = 32, and P = 0.03) and temperature (r2 = 0.113, df = 36, and P = 0.04). Substrate quality was the most important factor (r2 = 0.119, df = 33, and P = 0.04) for the regulation of bacterial growth efficiency. Using bacterial growth efficiency values, the average bacterial carbon demand calculated was from 5.30 to 11.28 ?M C h?1. When the bacterial carbon demand was compared with primary productivity, we found that net heterotrophy was established at only two stations. The ratio of bacterial carbon demand to net primary production correlated significantly with bacterial growth efficiency (r2 = 0.341, df = 35, and P < 0.001). From nonlinear regression analysis, we found that net heterotrophy was established when bacterial growth efficiency was <0.08. Our study showed the extent of net heterotrophy in these waters and illustrated the importance of heterotrophic microbial processes in coastal aquatic food webs. PMID:19820145

  11. Bacterial volatiles promote growth in Arabidopsis Choong-Min Ryu*, Mohamed A. Farag

    E-print Network

    Paré, Paul W.

    for review October 7, 2002) Several chemical changes in soil are associated with plant growth hormones, whereas others increase mineral and nitrogen availability in the soil as a way to augment growth- nents in plant­bacterial systems now can follow. Here, we present chemical and plant-growth data showing

  12. A new growth curve model for biological growth: some inferential studies on the growth of Cirrhinus mrigala.

    PubMed

    Bhowmick, Amiya Ranjan; Bhattacharya, Sabyasachi

    2014-08-01

    Growth of living organisms is a fundamental biological process. It depicts the physiological development of the species related to the environment. Mathematical development of growth curve models has a long history since its birth. We propose a mathematical model to describe the evolution of relative growth rate as a function of time based on a real life experiment on a major Indian Carp Cirrhinus mrigala. We establish that the proposed model is able to describe the fish growth dynamics more accurately for our experimental data than some existing models e.g. logistic, Gompertz, exponential. Approximate expressions of the points of inflection and the time of achieving the maximum relative growth rate are derived. We study, in detail, the existence of a nonlinear least squares estimator of the model parameters and their consistency properties. Test-statistics is developed to study the equality of points of inflection and equality of the amount of time necessary to achieve the maximum relative growth rate for a species at two different locations. Using the theory of variance stabilizing transformations, we propose a new test statistic to test the effect of the decay parameter for the proposed growth law. The testing procedure is found to be more sensitive in comparison with the test based on nonlinear least squares estimates. Our proposed model provides a general framework to model growth in other disciplines as well. PMID:24933474

  13. Regulation of planktonic bacterial growth rates: The effects of temperature and resources

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. Felip; M. L. Pace; J. J. Cole

    1996-01-01

    We examined the potential limitation of bacterial growth by temperature and nutrients in a eutrophic lake. Dilution cultures from winter and summer were incubated at both high (>20°C) and low (4°C) temperatures and enriched with various combinations of organic carbon (C), inorganic nitrogen (N), and inorganic phosphorus (P). Bacterial abundance, 3H-thymidine incorporation, and 3H-leucine incorporation were measured over the growth

  14. Coulter counter determination of bacterial growth and cellular size change following ??Co gamma irradiation

    E-print Network

    Gaston, Gary W

    1976-01-01

    COULTER COUNTER DETERMINATION OF BACTERIAL GROWTH AND CELLULAR SIZE CHANGE FOLLOWING Co GAMMA IRRADIATION A Thesis by GARY W. GASTON Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirement... for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1976 Ma)or Subject: Biophysics COULTER COUNTER DETERMINATION OF BACTERIAL GROWTH AND CELLULAR SIZE CHANGE FOLLOWING Co GAMMA IRRADIATION A Thesis by GARY W. GASTON APPROVED as to style and content by: ead...

  15. Bacterial synthesized cellulose nanofibers; Effects of growth times and culture mediums on the structural characteristics

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Somayeh Sheykhnazari; Taghi Tabarsa; Alireza Ashori; Alireza Shakeri; Masood Golalipour

    2011-01-01

    In this study the effects of growth times and culture mediums on the structural characteristics of bacterial cellulose have been investigated. Bacterial cellulose (BC) nanofibers were synthesized by Gluconacetobacter xylinus. BC pellicles were compared using SEM, FT-IR and X-ray diffraction techniques. The crystallinity index (CrI) and crystallite size (CrS) were calculated based on X-ray measurements. Three growth times (7, 14

  16. Metabolic AssessmentQC Preprocessing Growth curves from PM undergo filtering to

    E-print Network

    on the logistic model: Figure 2. Phenotype distribution of 72 unique carbon growth conditions across 81 E. coli). Computational Methods Figure 3. Qualitative growth level evaluation across a mix of 96 carbon- and nitrogenMetabolic AssessmentQC Preprocessing Growth curves from PM undergo filtering to remove troublesome

  17. PEROXOTITANATE- AND MONOSODIUM METAL-TITANATE COMPOUNDS AS INHIBITORS OF BACTERIAL GROWTH

    SciTech Connect

    Hobbs, D.

    2011-01-19

    Sodium titanates are ion-exchange materials that effectively bind a variety of metal ions over a wide pH range. Sodium titanates alone have no known adverse biological effects but metal-exchanged titanates (or metal titanates) can deliver metal ions to mammalian cells to alter cell processes in vitro. In this work, we test a hypothesis that metal-titanate compounds inhibit bacterial growth; demonstration of this principle is one prerequisite to developing metal-based, titanate-delivered antibacterial agents. Focusing initially on oral diseases, we exposed five species of oral bacteria to titanates for 24 h, with or without loading of Au(III), Pd(II), Pt(II), and Pt(IV), and measuring bacterial growth in planktonic assays through increases in optical density. In each experiment, bacterial growth was compared with control cultures of titanates or bacteria alone. We observed no suppression of bacterial growth by the sodium titanates alone, but significant (p < 0.05, two-sided t-tests) suppression was observed with metal-titanate compounds, particularly Au(III)-titanates, but with other metal titanates as well. Growth inhibition ranged from 15 to 100% depending on the metal ion and bacterial species involved. Furthermore, in specific cases, the titanates inhibited bacterial growth 5- to 375-fold versus metal ions alone, suggesting that titanates enhanced metal-bacteria interactions. This work supports further development of metal titanates as a novel class of antibacterials.

  18. Effect of Vibration on Bacterial Growth and Antibiotic Resistance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Juergensmeyer, Elizabeth A.; Juergensmeyer, Margaret A.

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this research grant was to provide a fundamental, systematic investigation of the effects of oscillatory acceleration on bacterial proliferation and their responses to antibiotics in a liquid medium.

  19. A Rhizocarpon geographicum growth curve for the Cascade Range of Washington and northern Oregon, usa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Neal, Michael A.; Schoenenberger, Katherine R.

    2003-09-01

    Lichen thallus measurements from 22 surfaces of known age on Mount Baker, Mount Hood, and Mount Rainier are used to construct a regional Rhizocarpon geographicum growth curve for the Cascade Range of Washington and northern Oregon. Growth rates determined by measuring the largest thallus diameters on the same surfaces at Mount Rainier in 1976 and 2002 are used for comparison with lichenometric data from Mount Baker and Mount Hood. Similar lichen thallus diameter vs age relationships identified in the data from the three mountains suggest the presence of uniform growth rates over the 400-km range. A regional growth curve developed during our study shows three growth phases of successively slower growth: a rapid phase from 8 to 20 yr, a linear phase from 20 to 145 yr, and a slow phase of unknown duration beyond ca. 145 yr. Uncertainty in lichen growth rates beyond 145 yr limits projection of the curve beyond that age; however, the age range of the constrained growth curve covers an important period of recent climate variability. When applied in appropriate settings, our growth curve can be used to determine numeric ages to ±10 yr for surfaces between 20 and 145 years old in areas where other techniques are not applicable or do not provide unique or well-constrained ages.

  20. Changes in the Bacterial Community of Soybean Rhizospheres during Growth in the Field

    PubMed Central

    Sugiyama, Akifumi; Ueda, Yoshikatsu; Zushi, Takahiro; Takase, Hisabumi; Yazaki, Kazufumi

    2014-01-01

    Highly diverse communities of bacteria inhabiting soybean rhizospheres play pivotal roles in plant growth and crop production; however, little is known about the changes that occur in these communities during growth. We used both culture-dependent physiological profiling and culture independent DNA-based approaches to characterize the bacterial communities of the soybean rhizosphere during growth in the field. The physiological properties of the bacterial communities were analyzed by a community-level substrate utilization assay with BioLog Eco plates, and the composition of the communities was assessed by gene pyrosequencing. Higher metabolic capabilities were found in rhizosphere soil than in bulk soil during all stages of the BioLog assay. Pyrosequencing analysis revealed that differences between the bacterial communities of rhizosphere and bulk soils at the phylum level; i.e., Proteobacteria were increased, while Acidobacteria and Firmicutes were decreased in rhizosphere soil during growth. Analysis of operational taxonomic units showed that the bacterial communities of the rhizosphere changed significantly during growth, with a higher abundance of potential plant growth promoting rhizobacteria, including Bacillus, Bradyrhizobium, and Rhizobium, in a stage-specific manner. These findings demonstrated that rhizosphere bacterial communities were changed during soybean growth in the field. PMID:24955843

  1. Understanding the Scalability of Bayesian Network Inference Using Clique Tree Growth Curves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mengshoel, Ole J.

    2010-01-01

    One of the main approaches to performing computation in Bayesian networks (BNs) is clique tree clustering and propagation. The clique tree approach consists of propagation in a clique tree compiled from a Bayesian network, and while it was introduced in the 1980s, there is still a lack of understanding of how clique tree computation time depends on variations in BN size and structure. In this article, we improve this understanding by developing an approach to characterizing clique tree growth as a function of parameters that can be computed in polynomial time from BNs, specifically: (i) the ratio of the number of a BN s non-root nodes to the number of root nodes, and (ii) the expected number of moral edges in their moral graphs. Analytically, we partition the set of cliques in a clique tree into different sets, and introduce a growth curve for the total size of each set. For the special case of bipartite BNs, there are two sets and two growth curves, a mixed clique growth curve and a root clique growth curve. In experiments, where random bipartite BNs generated using the BPART algorithm are studied, we systematically increase the out-degree of the root nodes in bipartite Bayesian networks, by increasing the number of leaf nodes. Surprisingly, root clique growth is well-approximated by Gompertz growth curves, an S-shaped family of curves that has previously been used to describe growth processes in biology, medicine, and neuroscience. We believe that this research improves the understanding of the scaling behavior of clique tree clustering for a certain class of Bayesian networks; presents an aid for trade-off studies of clique tree clustering using growth curves; and ultimately provides a foundation for benchmarking and developing improved BN inference and machine learning algorithms.

  2. Growing Growth curves using PROC MIXED and PROC NLMIXED

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Being able to describe growth appropriately and succinctly is important in many contexts, including biology, epidemiology, and statistics. Various approaches are used varying from differential equations, deterministic modeling, and statistical approaches like regression. Often, with epidemiologic da...

  3. Microbial degradation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons: effect of substrate availability on bacterial growth kinetics

    Microsoft Academic Search

    F. Volkering; A. M. Breure; A. Sterkenburg; J. G. van Andel

    1992-01-01

    It is demonstrated that bacterial growth on crystalline or adsorbed polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons can result in a linear increase in biomass concentration. A simple mathematical approach is presented, showing that under these circumstances mass transfer from the solid phase to the liquid phase is rate-limiting for growth.

  4. RESEARCH ARTICLE Open Access The last generation of bacterial growth in limiting

    E-print Network

    culture. As a model system, we study E. coli growing under nitrogen or carbon limitation, and explore that growth stops abruptly under limiting nitrogen or carbon, but slows gradually when nutrientsRESEARCH ARTICLE Open Access The last generation of bacterial growth in limiting nutrient Anat Bren

  5. Development of luminescent pH sensor films for monitoring bacterial growth through tissue

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Fenglin; Raval, Yash; Chen, Hongyu; Tzeng, Tzuen-Rong J.; DesJardins, John D.

    2014-01-01

    Although implanted medical devices (IMDs) offer many benefits, they are susceptible to bacterial colonization and infections. Such infections are difficult to treat because bacteria could form biofilms on the implant surface, which reduce antibiotics penetration and generate local dormant regions with low pH and low oxygen. In addition, these infections are hard to detect early because biofilms are often localized on the surface. Herein, an optical sensor film is developed to detect local acidosis on an implanted surface. The film contains both upconverting particles (UCPs) that serve as a light source and a pH indicator that alters the luminescence spectrum. When irradiated with 980 nm light, the UCPs produce deeply penetrating red light emission, while generating negligible autofluorescence in the tissue. The basic form of the pH indicator absorbs more of upconversion luminescence at 661 nm than at 671 nm and consequently the spectral ratio indicates pH. Implanting this pH sensor film beneath 6-7 mm of porcine tissue does not substantially affect the calibration curve because the peaks are closely spaced. Furthermore, growth of Staphylococcus epidermidis on the sensor surface causes a local pH decrease that can be detected non-invasively through the tissue. PMID:23832869

  6. Growth of Thiobacillus ferrooxidans: a Novel Experimental Design for Batch Growth and Bacterial Leaching Studies

    PubMed Central

    Harvey, P. I.; Crundwell, F. K.

    1997-01-01

    The concentrations of ferrous and ferric ions change dramatically during the course of the batch experiments usually performed to study the kinetics of the bacterial oxidation of ferrous ions and sulfide minerals. This change in concentration of the iron species during the course of the experiment often makes it difficult to interpret the results of these experiments, as is evidenced by the lack of consensus concerning the mechanism of bacterial leaching. If the concentrations of ferrous and ferric ions were constant throughout the course of the batch experiment, then the role of the bacteria could be easily established, because the rate of the chemical leaching should be the same at a given redox potential in the presence and in the absence of bacteria. In this paper we report an experiment designed to obtain kinetic data under these conditions. The redox potential is used as a measure of the concentrations of ferrous and ferric ions, and the redox potential of the leaching solution is controlled throughout the experiment by electrolysis. The effects of ferrous, ferric, and arsenite ions on the rate of growth of Thiobacillus ferrooxidans on ferrous ions in this redox-controlled reactor are presented. In addition, the growth of this bacterium on ferrous ions in batch culture was also determined, and it is shown that the parameters obtained from the batch culture and the redox-controlled batch culture are the same. An analysis of the results from the batch culture indicates that the initial number of bacteria that are adapted to the solution depends on the concentrations of ferrous and arsenite ions. PMID:16535639

  7. Blue light (470 nm) effectively inhibits bacterial and fungal growth

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The activity of blue light (470nm) alone on (1) bacterial viability, and (2) with a food grade photosensitizer on filamentous fungal viability, was studied. Suspensions of the bacteria Leuconostoc mesenteroides (LM), Bacillus atrophaeus (BA), and Pseudomonas aeruginosa (PA) were prepared and aliquo...

  8. Monensin inhibits growth of bacterial contaminants from fuel ethanol plants

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Contamination of commercial fermentation cultures by lactic acid bacteria (LAB) is a common and costly problem to the fuel ethanol industry. Virginiamycin (VIR) and penicillin (PEN) are frequently used to control bacterial contamination but extensive use of antibiotics may select for strains with d...

  9. Electrospun polystyrene fiber diameter influencing bacterial attachment, proliferation, and growth.

    PubMed

    Abrigo, Martina; Kingshott, Peter; McArthur, Sally L

    2015-04-15

    Electrospun materials have been widely investigated in the past few decades as candidates for tissue engineering applications. However, there is little available data on the mechanisms of interaction of bacteria with electrospun wound dressings of different morphology and surface chemistry. This knowledge could allow the development of effective devices against bacterial infections in chronic wounds. In this paper, the interactions of three bacterial species (Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Staphylococcus aureus) with electrospun polystyrene meshes were investigated. Bacterial response to meshes with different fiber diameters was assessed through a combination of scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and confocal microscopy. Experiments included attachment studies in liquid medium but also directly onto agar plates; the latter was aimed at mimicking a chronic wound environment. Fiber diameter was shown to affect the ability of bacteria to proliferate within the fibrous networks, depending on cell size and shape. The highest proliferation rates occurred when fiber diameter was close to the bacterial size. Nanofibers were found to induce conformational changes of rod shaped bacteria, limiting the colonization process and inducing cell death. The data suggest that simply tuning the morphological properties of electrospun fibers may be one strategy used to control biofilm formation within wound dressings. PMID:25798788

  10. Localization and Extinction of Bacterial Populations under Inhomogeneous Growth Conditions

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Anna L. Lin; Bernward A. Mann; Gelsy Torres-Oviedo; Bryan Lincoln; Josef Käs; Harry L. Swinney

    2004-01-01

    The transition from localized to systemic spreading of bacteria, viruses, and other agents is a fundamental problem that spans medicine, ecology, biology, and agriculture science. We have conducted experiments and simulations in a simple one-dimensional system to determine the spreading of bacterial populations that occurs for an inhomogeneous environment under the influence of external convection. Our system consists of a

  11. Differentiation of bacterial colonies and temporal growth patterns using hyperspectral imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehrübeoglu, Mehrube; Buck, Gregory W.; Livingston, Daniel W.

    2014-09-01

    Detection and identification of bacteria are important for health and safety. Hyperspectral imaging offers the potential to capture unique spectral patterns and spatial information from bacteria which can then be used to detect and differentiate bacterial species. Here, hyperspectral imaging has been used to characterize different bacterial colonies and investigate their growth over time. Six bacterial species (Pseudomonas fluorescens, Escherichia coli, Serratia marcescens, Salmonella enterica, Staphylococcus aureus, Enterobacter aerogenes) were grown on tryptic soy agar plates. Hyperspectral data were acquired immediately after, 24 hours after, and 96 hours after incubation. Spectral signatures from bacterial colonies demonstrated repeatable measurements for five out of six species. Spatial variations as well as changes in spectral signatures were observed across temporal measurements within and among species at multiple wavelengths due to strengthening or weakening reflectance signals from growing bacterial colonies based on their pigmentation. Between-class differences and within-class similarities were the most prominent in hyperspectral data collected 96 hours after incubation.

  12. Including Time-Invariant Covariates in the Latent Growth Curve Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stoel, Reinoud D.; van den Wittenboer, Godfried; Hox, Joop

    2004-01-01

    Within the latent growth curve model, time-invariant covariates are generally modeled on the subject level, thereby estimating the effect of the covariate on the latent growth parameters. Incorporating the time-invariant covariate in this manner may have some advantages regarding the interpretation of the effect but may also be incorrect in…

  13. Development of Oral Reading Fluency in Children with Speech or Language Impairments: A Growth Curve Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Puranik, Cynthia S.; Petscher, Yaacov; Al Otaiba, Stephanie; Catts, Hugh W.; Lonigan, Christopher J.

    2008-01-01

    This longitudinal study used piece-wise growth curve analyses to examine growth patterns in oral reading fluency for 1,991 students with speech impairments (SI) or language impairments (LI) from first through third grade. The main finding of this study was that a diagnosis of SI or LI can have a detrimental and persistent effect on early reading…

  14. Parent Involvement and Science Achievement: A Cross-Classified Multilevel Latent Growth Curve Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Ursula Y.; Hull, Darrell M.

    2014-01-01

    The authors examined science achievement growth at Grades 3, 5, and 8 and parent school involvement at the same time points using the Early Childhood Longitudinal Study-Kindergarten Class of 1998-1999. Data were analyzed using cross-classified multilevel latent growth curve modeling with time invariant and varying covariates. School-based…

  15. Growth curves of deviant behavior in early adolescence: A multilevel analysis

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Robert A. Johnson; John P. Hoffmann; S. Susan Su; Dean R. Gerstein

    1997-01-01

    Multilevel growth curve models provide a means of analyzing individual differences in the growth of deviance, allow a number of theories to be integrated in a single model, and can help to unify research on deviant\\/delinquent\\/criminal careers at different stages of the life cycle. Building on the distinction between “population heterogeneity” and “state dependence” as alternative explanations of persistent individual

  16. Teaching the Microbial Growth Curve Concept Using Microalgal Cultures and Flow Cytometry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Forget, Nathalie; Belzile, Claude; Rioux, Pierre; Nozais, Christian

    2010-01-01

    The microbial growth curve is widely studied within microbiology classes and bacteria are usually the microbial model used. Here, we describe a novel laboratory protocol involving flow cytometry to assess the growth dynamics of the unicellular microalgae "Isochrysis galbana." The algal model represents an appropriate alternative to bacteria…

  17. Exploring Gains in Reading and Mathematics Achievement among Regular and Exceptional Students Using Growth Curve Modeling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shin, Tacksoo; Davison, Mark L.; Long, Jeffrey D.; Chan, Chi-Keung; Heistad, David

    2013-01-01

    Using four-wave longitudinal reading and mathematics data (4th to 7th grades) from a large urban school district, growth curve modeling was used as a tool for examining three research questions: Are achievement gaps closing in reading and mathematics? What are the associations between prior-achievement and growth across the reading and mathematics…

  18. Changes in Nutrient and Carbon Availability and Temperature as Factors Controlling Bacterial Growth in the Northern Baltic Sea

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Laura Hoikkala; Hanna Aarnos; Risto Lignell

    2009-01-01

    The effects of inorganic nutrient (N and P) and glucose C treatments on bacterial growth were followed for 3 days in natural\\u000a surface and deep water bacterial samples during the main post-spring bloom stages of phytoplankton growth in the northern\\u000a Baltic Sea. In addition, the importance of photochemical degradation of dissolved organic matter on bacterial growth was investigated\\u000a vertically (0.1–2.0 m) and

  19. Parent Involvement and Science Achievement: A Latent Growth Curve Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Ursula Yvette

    2011-01-01

    This study examined science achievement growth across elementary and middle school and parent school involvement using the Early Childhood Longitudinal Study-Kindergarten Class of 1998-1999 (ECLS-K). The ECLS-K is a nationally representative kindergarten cohort of students from public and private schools who attended full-day or half-day…

  20. Avian Incubation Inhibits Growth and Diversification of Bacterial Assemblages on Eggs

    PubMed Central

    Shawkey, Matthew D.; Firestone, Mary K.; Brodie, Eoin L.; Beissinger, Steven R.

    2009-01-01

    Microbial infection is a critical source of mortality for early life stages of oviparous vertebrates, but parental defenses against infection are less well known. Avian incubation has been hypothesized to reduce the risk of trans-shell infection by limiting microbial growth of pathogenic bacteria on eggshells, while enhancing growth of commensal or beneficial bacteria that inhibit or competitively exclude pathogens. We tested this hypothesis by comparing bacterial assemblages on naturally incubated and experimentally unincubated eggs at laying and late incubation using a universal 16S rRNA microarray containing probes for over 8000 bacterial taxa. Before treatment, bacterial assemblages on individual eggs from both treatment groups were dissimilar to one another, as measured by clustering in non-metric dimensional scaling (NMDS) ordination space. After treatment, assemblages of unincubated eggs were similar to one another, but those of incubated eggs were not. Furthermore, assemblages of unincubated eggs were characterized by high abundance of six indicator species while incubated eggs had no indicator species. Bacterial taxon richness remained static on incubated eggs, but increased significantly on unincubated eggs, especially in several families of Gram-negative bacteria. The relative abundance of individual bacterial taxa did not change on incubated eggs, but that of 82 bacterial taxa, including some known to infect the interior of eggs, increased on unincubated eggs. Thus, incubation inhibits all of the relatively few bacteria that grow on eggshells, and does not appear to promote growth of any bacteria. PMID:19225566

  1. Dark Matter Redistribution Explains Galaxy Growth and Rotation Curve Development

    E-print Network

    Daniel E. Friedmann

    2011-05-08

    There are significant discrepancies between observational evidence and the hierarchical galaxy formation theory with respect to the shape of dark matter halos, the correlation between galaxy characteristics, and galaxy evolutionary history. This paper introduces a modification to the hierarchical galaxy formation theory that hypothesizes that dark matter enters into highly elliptical orbits, and is therefore, effectively redistributed during the period of galactic nuclei activity. Adding this modification, the theory more accurately predicts the observed development history of galaxies and their resulting mature state. In particular, this modification predicts that galaxies grow in size, but not in mass, at an early time (~7 to 10 billion years ago), and develop their characteristic rotation curves which, at large radius, exhibit a relatively flat shape versus the expected Keplerian decline.

  2. Distribution of Bacterial Growth Activity in Flow-Chamber Biofilms

    Microsoft Academic Search

    CLAUS STERNBERG; BJARKE B. CHRISTENSEN; TOVE JOHANSEN; ALEX TOFTGAARD NIELSEN; JENS BO ANDERSEN; MICHAEL GIVSKOV; SØREN MOLIN

    1999-01-01

    In microbial communities such as those found in biofilms, individual organisms most often display heter- ogeneous behavior with respect to their metabolic activity, growth status, gene expression pattern, etc. In that context, a novel reporter system for monitoring of cellular growth activity has been designed. It comprises a transposon cassette carrying fusions between the growth rate-regulated Escherichia coli rrnBP1 promoter

  3. Growth-rate dependence of a bacterial genetic oscillator dynamics

    E-print Network

    Osella, Matteo

    2012-01-01

    Gene networks exhibiting oscillatory dynamics are widespread in biology. The minimal regulatory designs giving rise to oscillations have been implemented synthetically and studied by mathematical modeling. However, most of the available analyses generally neglect the coupling of regulatory circuits with the cellular "chassis" in which the circuits are embedded. For example, the cell macromolecular composition of fast-growing bacteria changes with growth rate. As a consequence, important parameters of gene expression, such as ribosome concentration or cell volume, are growth-rate dependent, ultimately coupling the dynamics of genetic circuits with cell physiology. This work addresses the effects of growth rate on the dynamics of a paradigmatic example of genetic oscillator, the repressilator. Making use of empirical growth-rate dependences of parameters in bacteria, we show that the repressilator dynamics can switch between oscillations and convergence to a fixed point depending on the cellular state of growth...

  4. Temperature effects on recovery time of bacterial growth after rewetting dry soil.

    PubMed

    Maienza, Anita; Bååth, Erland

    2014-11-01

    The effect of temperature on the recovery of bacterial growth after rewetting dry soil was measured in a soil that responded with bacterial growth increasing immediately upon rewetting in a linear fashion (type (i) response sensu Meisner et al. (Soil Biol Biochem 66: 188-192, 2013)). The soil was air-dried for 4 days and then rewetted at different temperatures. Bacterial growth over time was then estimated using the leucine incorporation method. At 25 °C, the recovery of bacterial growth to levels of a wet control soil was rapid, within 6 h, while at 15 °C, recovery time increased to around 60 h, becoming more than a week at 5 °C. The temperature dependency of the recovery time was well modeled by a square root function. Thus, temperature will not only directly affect growth rates but also affect length of transition periods, like resuscitation after a drying event. The temperature during the rewetting event thus has to be taken into consideration when analyzing the microbial response dynamics. PMID:24952818

  5. Bacterial growth on a superhydrophobic surface containing silver nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heinonen, S.; Nikkanen, J.-P.; Laakso, J.; Raulio, M.; Priha, O.; Levänen, E.

    2013-12-01

    The antibacterial effect of silver can be exploited in the food and beverage industry and medicinal applications to reduce biofouling of surfaces. Very small amount of silver ions are enough to destructively affect the metabolism of bacteria. Moreover, superhydrophobic properties could reduce bacterial adhesion to the surface. In this study we fabricated superhydrophobic surfaces that contained nanosized silver particles. The superhydrophobic surfaces were manufactured onto stainless steel as combination of ceramic nanotopography and hydrophobication by fluorosilane. Silver nanoparticles were precipitated onto the surface by a chemical method. The dissolution of silver from the surface was tested in an aqueous environment under pH values of 1, 3, 5, 7, 9, 11 and 13. The pH value was adjusted with nitric acid and ammonia. It was found that dissolution rate of silver increased as the pH of the solution altered from the pH of de-ionized water to lower and higher pH values but dissolution occurred also in de-ionized water. The antimicrobial potential of this coating was investigated using bacterial strains isolated from the brewery equipment surfaces. The results showed that the number of bacteria adhering onto steel surface was significantly reduced (88%) on the superhydrophobic silver containing coating.

  6. Volatile Emissions from Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis Mirror Bacterial Growth and Enable Distinction of Different Strains

    PubMed Central

    Trefz, Phillip; Koehler, Heike; Klepik, Klaus; Moebius, Petra; Reinhold, Petra; Schubert, Jochen K.; Miekisch, Wolfram

    2013-01-01

    Control of paratuberculosis in livestock is hampered by the low sensitivity of established direct and indirect diagnostic methods. Like other bacteria, Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP) emits volatile organic compounds (VOCs). Differences of VOC patterns in breath and feces of infected and not infected animals were described in first pilot experiments but detailed information on potential marker substances is missing. This study was intended to look for characteristic volatile substances in the headspace of cultures of different MAP strains and to find out how the emission of VOCs was affected by density of bacterial growth. One laboratory adapted and four field strains, three of MAP C-type and one MAP S-type were cultivated on Herrold’s egg yolk medium in dilutions of 10-0, 10-2, 10-4 and 10-6. Volatile substances were pre-concentrated from the headspace over the MAP cultures by means of Solid Phase Micro Extraction (SPME), thermally desorbed from the SPME fibers and separated and identified by means of GC-MS. Out of the large number of compounds found in the headspace over MAP cultures, 34 volatile marker substances could be identified as potential biomarkers for growth and metabolic activity. All five MAP strains could clearly be distinguished from blank culture media by means of emission patterns based on these 34 substances. In addition, patterns of volatiles emitted by the reference strain were significantly different from the field strains. Headspace concentrations of 2-ethylfuran, 2-methylfuran, 3-methylfuran, 2-pentylfuran, ethyl acetate, 1-methyl-1-H-pyrrole and dimethyldisulfide varied with density of bacterial growth. Analysis of VOCs emitted from mycobacterial cultures can be used to identify bacterial growth and, in addition, to differentiate between different bacterial strains. VOC emission patterns may be used to approximate bacterial growth density. In a perspective volatile marker substances could be used to diagnose MAP infections in animals and to identify different bacterial strains and origins. PMID:24116177

  7. Supplemental oxygen attenuates the increase in wound bacterial growth during simulated aeromedical evacuation in goats

    PubMed Central

    Earnest, Ryan E.; Sonnier, Dennis I.; Makley, Amy T.; Campion, Eric M.; Wenke, Joseph C.; Bailey, Stephanie R.; Dorlac, Warren C.; Lentsch, Alex B.; Pritts, Timothy A.

    2012-01-01

    Background Bacterial growth in soft tissue and open fractures is a known risk factor for tissue loss and complications in contaminated musculoskeletal wounds. Current care for battlefield casualties with soft tissue and musculoskeletal wounds includes tactical and strategic aeromedical evacuation (AE). This exposes patients to a hypobaric, hypoxic environment. In the present study, we sought to determine whether exposure to AE alters bacterial growth in contaminated complex musculoskeletal wounds and whether supplemental oxygen had any effect on wound infections during simulated AE. Methods A caprine model of a contaminated complex musculoskeletal wound was employed. Complex musculoskeletal wounds were created and inoculated with bioluminescent Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Goats were divided into three experimental groups: ground control, simulated aeromedical evacuation (AE), and simulated AE with supplemental oxygen (AE+O2). Simulated AE was induced in a hypobaric chamber pressurized to 8800 feet for 7 hours. Bacterial luminescence was measured using a photon counting camera at three timepoints: preflight (20 hours post surgery), postflight (7 hours from preflight and 27 hours post-surgery), and necropsy (24 hours from preflight and 44 hours post surgery). Results There was a significant increase in bacterial growth in the AE group compared to the ground control group measured postflight and at necropsy. Simulated AE induced hypoxia with oxygen saturation less than 93%. Supplemental oxygen corrected the hypoxia and significantly reduced bacterial growth in wounds at necropsy. Conclusions Hypoxia induced during simulated AE enhances bacterial growth in complex musculoskeletal wounds which can be prevented with the application of supplemental oxygen to the host. PMID:22743376

  8. Body Temperatures in Dinosaurs: What Can Growth Curves Tell Us?

    PubMed Central

    Griebeler, Eva Maria

    2013-01-01

    To estimate the body temperature (BT) of seven dinosaurs Gillooly, Alleen, and Charnov (2006) used an equation that predicts BT from the body mass and maximum growth rate (MGR) with the latter preserved in ontogenetic growth trajectories (BT-equation). The results of these authors evidence inertial homeothermy in Dinosauria and suggest that, due to overheating, the maximum body size in Dinosauria was ultimately limited by BT. In this paper, I revisit this hypothesis of Gillooly, Alleen, and Charnov (2006). I first studied whether BTs derived from the BT-equation of today’s crocodiles, birds and mammals are consistent with core temperatures of animals. Second, I applied the BT-equation to a larger number of dinosaurs than Gillooly, Alleen, and Charnov (2006) did. In particular, I estimated BT of Archaeopteryx (from two MGRs), ornithischians (two), theropods (three), prosauropods (three), and sauropods (nine). For extant species, the BT value estimated from the BT-equation was a poor estimate of an animal’s core temperature. For birds, BT was always strongly overestimated and for crocodiles underestimated; for mammals the accuracy of BT was moderate. I argue that taxon-specific differences in the scaling of MGR (intercept and exponent of the regression line, log-log-transformed) and in the parameterization of the Arrhenius model both used in the BT-equation as well as ecological and evolutionary adaptations of species cause these inaccuracies. Irrespective of the found inaccuracy of BTs estimated from the BT-equation and contrary to the results of Gillooly, Alleen, and Charnov (2006) I found no increase in BT with increasing body mass across all dinosaurs (Sauropodomorpha, Sauropoda) studied. This observation questions that, due to overheating, the maximum size in Dinosauria was ultimately limited by BT. However, the general high inaccuracy of dinosaurian BTs derived from the BT-equation makes a reliable test of whether body size in dinosaurs was ultimately limited by overheating impossible. PMID:24204568

  9. Growth-rate-dependent dynamics of a bacterial genetic oscillator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osella, Matteo; Lagomarsino, Marco Cosentino

    2013-01-01

    Gene networks exhibiting oscillatory dynamics are widespread in biology. The minimal regulatory designs giving rise to oscillations have been implemented synthetically and studied by mathematical modeling. However, most of the available analyses generally neglect the coupling of regulatory circuits with the cellular “chassis” in which the circuits are embedded. For example, the intracellular macromolecular composition of fast-growing bacteria changes with growth rate. As a consequence, important parameters of gene expression, such as ribosome concentration or cell volume, are growth-rate dependent, ultimately coupling the dynamics of genetic circuits with cell physiology. This work addresses the effects of growth rate on the dynamics of a paradigmatic example of genetic oscillator, the repressilator. Making use of empirical growth-rate dependencies of parameters in bacteria, we show that the repressilator dynamics can switch between oscillations and convergence to a fixed point depending on the cellular state of growth, and thus on the nutrients it is fed. The physical support of the circuit (type of plasmid or gene positions on the chromosome) also plays an important role in determining the oscillation stability and the growth-rate dependence of period and amplitude. This analysis has potential application in the field of synthetic biology, and suggests that the coupling between endogenous genetic oscillators and cell physiology can have substantial consequences for their functionality.

  10. Choice of Bacterial Growth Medium Alters the Transcriptome and Phenotype of Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium

    PubMed Central

    Blair, Jessica M. A.; Richmond, Grace E.; Bailey, Andrew M.; Ivens, Al; Piddock, Laura J. V.

    2013-01-01

    The type of bacterial culture medium is an important consideration during design of any experimental protocol. The aim of this study was to understand the impact of medium choice on bacterial gene expression and physiology by comparing the transcriptome of Salmonella enterica SL1344 after growth in the widely used LB broth or the rationally designed MOPS minimal medium. Transcriptomics showed that after growth in MOPS minimal media, compared to LB, there was increased expression of 42 genes involved in amino acid synthesis and 23 genes coding for ABC transporters. Seven flagellar genes had decreased expression after growth in MOPS minimal medium and this correlated with a decreased motility. In both MOPS minimal medium and MEM expression of genes from SPI-2 was increased and the adhesion of S. Typhimurium to intestinal epithelial cells was higher compared to the levels after growth in LB. However, SL1344 invasion was not significantly altered by growth in either MOPs minimal media or MEM. Expression of SPI-2 was also measured using chromosomal GFP reporter fusions followed by flow cytometry which showed, for the first time, that the reduction in SPI-2 transcript after growth in different media related to a reduction in the proportion of the bacterial population expressing SPI-2. These data highlight the profound differences in the global transcriptome after in vitro growth in different media and show that choice of medium should be considered carefully during experimental design, particularly when virulence related phenotypes are being measured. PMID:23704954

  11. Differential Growth Responses of Soil Bacterial Taxa to Carbon Substrates of Varying Chemical Recalcitrance

    PubMed Central

    Goldfarb, Katherine C.; Karaoz, Ulas; Hanson, China A.; Santee, Clark A.; Bradford, Mark A.; Treseder, Kathleen K.; Wallenstein, Matthew D.; Brodie, Eoin L.

    2011-01-01

    Soils are immensely diverse microbial habitats with thousands of co-existing bacterial, archaeal, and fungal species. Across broad spatial scales, factors such as pH and soil moisture appear to determine the diversity and structure of soil bacterial communities. Within any one site however, bacterial taxon diversity is high and factors maintaining this diversity are poorly resolved. Candidate factors include organic substrate availability and chemical recalcitrance, and given that they appear to structure bacterial communities at the phylum level, we examine whether these factors might structure bacterial communities at finer levels of taxonomic resolution. Analyzing 16S rRNA gene composition of nucleotide analog-labeled DNA by PhyloChip microarrays, we compare relative growth rates on organic substrates of increasing chemical recalcitrance of >2,200 bacterial taxa across 43 divisions/phyla. Taxa that increase in relative abundance with labile organic substrates (i.e., glycine, sucrose) are numerous (>500), phylogenetically clustered, and occur predominantly in two phyla (Proteobacteria and Actinobacteria) including orders Actinomycetales, Enterobacteriales, Burkholderiales, Rhodocyclales, Alteromonadales, and Pseudomonadales. Taxa increasing in relative abundance with more chemically recalcitrant substrates (i.e., cellulose, lignin, or tannin–protein) are fewer (168) but more phylogenetically dispersed, occurring across eight phyla and including Clostridiales, Sphingomonadalaes, Desulfovibrionales. Just over 6% of detected taxa, including many Burkholderiales increase in relative abundance with both labile and chemically recalcitrant substrates. Estimates of median rRNA copy number per genome of responding taxa demonstrate that these patterns are broadly consistent with bacterial growth strategies. Taken together, these data suggest that changes in availability of intrinsically labile substrates may result in predictable shifts in soil bacterial composition. PMID:21833332

  12. Differential growth responses of soil bacterial taxa to carbon substrates of varying chemical recalcitrance

    SciTech Connect

    Goldfarb, K.C.; Karaoz, U.; Hanson, C.A.; Santee, C.A.; Bradford, M.A.; Treseder, K.K.; Wallenstein, M.D.; Brodie, E.L.

    2011-04-18

    Soils are immensely diverse microbial habitats with thousands of co-existing bacterial, archaeal, and fungal species. Across broad spatial scales, factors such as pH and soil moisture appear to determine the diversity and structure of soil bacterial communities. Within any one site however, bacterial taxon diversity is high and factors maintaining this diversity are poorly resolved. Candidate factors include organic substrate availability and chemical recalcitrance, and given that they appear to structure bacterial communities at the phylum level, we examine whether these factors might structure bacterial communities at finer levels of taxonomic resolution. Analyzing 16S rRNA gene composition of nucleotide analog-labeled DNA by PhyloChip microarrays, we compare relative growth rates on organic substrates of increasing chemical recalcitrance of >2,200 bacterial taxa across 43 divisions/phyla. Taxa that increase in relative abundance with labile organic substrates (i.e., glycine, sucrose) are numerous (>500), phylogenetically clustered, and occur predominantly in two phyla (Proteobacteria and Actinobacteria) including orders Actinomycetales, Enterobacteriales, Burkholderiales, Rhodocyclales, Alteromonadales, and Pseudomonadales. Taxa increasing in relative abundance with more chemically recalcitrant substrates (i.e., cellulose, lignin, or tannin-protein) are fewer (168) but more phylogenetically dispersed, occurring across eight phyla and including Clostridiales, Sphingomonadalaes, Desulfovibrionales. Just over 6% of detected taxa, including many Burkholderiales increase in relative abundance with both labile and chemically recalcitrant substrates. Estimates of median rRNA copy number per genome of responding taxa demonstrate that these patterns are broadly consistent with bacterial growth strategies. Taken together, these data suggest that changes in availability of intrinsically labile substrates may result in predictable shifts in soil bacterial composition.

  13. Plant growth promotion by a hexavalent chromium reducing bacterial strain, Cellulosimicrobium cellulans KUCr3

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Swagata Chatterjee; Gopi Ballav Sau; Samir Kumar Mukherjee

    2009-01-01

    This article reports on the isolation and characterization of a Cr(VI) resistant bacterial strain, having plant growth promoting\\u000a properties to improve general growth of plant in chromium-contaminated soil through rhizosphere colonization. The strain was\\u000a isolated from the sludge of waste canal carrying industrial effluents. The minimum inhibitory concentration of chromium to\\u000a this strain was found to be 450 and 400 mM

  14. Heterotrophic Bacterial Growth Efficiency and Community Structure at Different Natural Organic Carbon Concentrations

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Alexander Eiler; Silke Langenheder; Stefan Bertilsson; Lars J. Tranvik

    2003-01-01

    Batch cultures of aquatic bacteria and dissolved organic matter were used to examine the impact of carbon source concentration on bacterial growth, biomass, growth efficiency, and community composition. An aged concentrate of dissolved organic matter from a humic lake was diluted with organic compound-free artificial lake water to obtain concentrations of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) ranging from 0.04 to 2.53

  15. Modelling bacterial growth in quantitative microbiological risk assessment: is it possible?

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Maarten J. Nauta

    2002-01-01

    Quantitative microbiological risk assessment (QMRA), predictive modelling and HACCP may be used as tools to increase food safety and can be integrated fruitfully for many purposes. However, when QMRA is applied for public health issues like the evaluation of the status of public health, existing predictive models may not be suited to model bacterial growth. In this context, precise quantification

  16. Bacterial Growth Rate in Iced Fresh or Frozen-Thawed Atlantic Cod, Gadus morhua

    E-print Network

    . The initial count in thawed sam ples was reduced with increasing length of time held frozen. Bacteria10' ..... Id z ::> o u w ~ --'Q. Bacterial Growth Rate in Iced Fresh or Frozen-Thawed Atlantic Cod, Gadus morhua J. J. L1CCIARDELLO and D. L. D'ENTREMONT Introduction During times or seasons of fish har

  17. Improved bacterial growth test for rapid water toxicity screening

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. L. Slabbert

    1986-01-01

    Bacteria have several attributes which make them attractive as test organisms for the rapid screening of chemical pollution in natural waters. They have relatively short life cycles and, therefore, respond rapidly to environmental change. The degree of toxicity of chemicals to bacteria is normally established by measuring viability or growth. A very sensitive test has been described measuring cell multiplication

  18. BIOASSAY PROCEDURE FOR PREDICTING COLIFORM BACTERIAL GROWTH IN DRINKING WATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    Water quality degradation due to the growth of microorganisms Is an area of concern for many water utilities. urrently the nutrient status of drinking water is difficult to measure and can only be defined in relative terms. o date, the procedures developed for determining the amo...

  19. BIOASSAY PROCEDURES FOR PREDICTING COLIFORM BACTERIAL GROWTH IN DRINKING WATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    Water quality degradation due to the growth of microorganisms is an area of concern for many water utilities. o date, the procedures developed or determining the amount of biodegradable material present in potable water have utilized heterotrophic non-coliform bacteria as bioassa...

  20. EFFECT OF THE GROWTH REGULATOR PACLOBUTRAZOL ON GROWTH OF THE BACTERIAL PATHOGEN XYLELLA FASTIDIOSA

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Xyella fastidiosa is a fastidious, xylem-limited, insect transmitted, bacterial plant pathogen that has a wide host range and causes bacterial leaf scorch (BLS) in shade trees. BLS is a chronic disorder characterized by late season leaf scorch and dieback and is common in urban and suburban areas o...

  1. On the Power of Multivariate Latent Growth Curve Models to Detect Correlated Change

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hertzog, Christopher; Lindenberger, Ulman; Ghisletta, Paolo; Oertzen, Timo von

    2006-01-01

    We evaluated the statistical power of single-indicator latent growth curve models (LGCMs) to detect correlated change between two variables (covariance of slopes) as a function of sample size, number of longitudinal measurement occasions, and reliability (measurement error variance). Power approximations following the method of Satorra and Saris…

  2. A Latent Growth Curve Analysis of Reading Achievement for an At-Risk Population

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beecher, Constance C.

    2011-01-01

    The development of reading skills from age seven until age 19 was investigated for children who were referred for special education preschool intervention using latent growth curve analysis (n=206). Approximately one-third of the study sample did not require special education services after preschool, providing a natural comparison group. Reading…

  3. Sample Sizes for Two-Group Second-Order Latent Growth Curve Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wanstrom, Linda

    2009-01-01

    Second-order latent growth curve models (S. C. Duncan & Duncan, 1996; McArdle, 1988) can be used to study group differences in change in latent constructs. We give exact formulas for the covariance matrix of the parameter estimates and an algebraic expression for the estimation of slope differences. Formulas for calculations of the required sample…

  4. Economic growth and environmental degradation: The environmental Kuznets curve and sustainable development

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Edward B. Barbier; Michael S. Common

    1996-01-01

    In this paper we critically examine the concept of the environmental Kuznets curve (EKC). It proposes that there is an inverted U-shape relation between environmental degradation and income per capita, so that, eventually, growth reduces the environmental impact of economic activity. The concept is dependent on a model of the economy in which there is no feedback from the quality

  5. Effects of nitric oxide and nitrogen dioxide on bacterial growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mancinelli, R. L.; Mckay, C. P.

    1983-01-01

    While it is generally thought that the bactericidal effects of NO and NO2 derive from their reaction with water to form nitrous and nitric acids (Shank et al., 1962), this appears to be true only at high concentrations. The data presented here suggest that at low NO and NO2 concentrations, acids are not present in high enough concentrations to act as toxic agents. Reference is made to a study by Grant et al. (1979), which found that exposing acid forest soil to 1 ppm of NO2 did not cause the soil pH to drop. The results presented here show that at low concentrations of NO and NO2, the NO is bacteriostatic for some organisms and not for others, whereas NO2 may protect some bacteria from the inhibitory effects of NO. Since it has been shown that bacteria can divide while airborne (Dimmick et al., 1979), the present results suggest that NO at the low concentrations found in the atmosphere can select for resistant bacteria in the air and affect the viable airborne bacterial population.

  6. Lubricating bacteria model for the growth of bacterial colonies exposed to ultraviolet radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Shengli; Zhang Lei; Liang Run; Zhang Erhu; Liu Yachao; Zhao Shumin [Department of Applied Physics, Xi'an Jiaotong University, Xi'an 710049 (China)

    2005-11-01

    In this paper, we study the morphological transition of bacterial colonies exposed to ultraviolet radiation by modifying the bacteria model proposed by Delprato et al. Our model considers four factors: the lubricant fluid generated by bacterial colonies, a chemotaxis initiated by the ultraviolet radiation, the intensity of the ultraviolet radiation, and the bacteria's two-stage destruction rate with given radiation intensities. Using this modified model, we simulate the ringlike pattern formation of the bacterial colony exposed to uniform ultraviolet radiation. The following is shown. (1) Without the UV radiation the colony forms a disklike pattern and reaches a constant front velocity. (2) After the radiation is switched on, the bacterial population migrates to the edge of the colony and forms a ringlike pattern. As the intensity of the UV radiation is increased the ring forms faster and the outer velocity of the colony decreases. (3) For higher radiation intensities the total population decreases, while for lower intensities the total population increases initially at a small rate and then decreases. (4) After the UV radiation is switched off, the bacterial population grows both outward as well as into the inner region, and the colony's outer front velocity recovers to a constant value. All these results agree well with the experimental observations [Phys. Rev. Lett. 87, 158102 (2001)]. Along with the chemotaxis, we find that lubricant fluid and the two-stage destruction rate are critical to the dynamics of the growth of the bacterial colony when exposed to UV radiation, and these were not previously considered.

  7. Bacterial exopolysaccharide and biofilm formation stimulate chickpea growth and soil aggregation under salt stress.

    PubMed

    Qurashi, Aisha Waheed; Sabri, Anjum Nasim

    2012-07-01

    To compensate for stress imposed by salinity, biofilm formation and exopolysaccharide production are significant strategies of salt tolerant bacteria to assist metabolism. We hypothesized that two previously isolated salt-tolerant strains Halomonas variabilis (HT1) and Planococcus rifietoensis (RT4) have an ability to improve plant growth, These strains can form biofilm and accumulate exopolysacharides at increasing salt stress. These results showed that bacteria might be involved in developing microbial communities under salt stress and helpful in colonizing of bacterial strains to plant roots and soil particles. Eventually, it can add to the plant growth and soil structure. We investigated the comparative effect of exopolysacharide and biofilm formation in two bacterial strains Halomonas variabilis (HT1) and Planococcus rifietoensis (RT4) in response to varying salt stress. We found that biofilm formation and exopolysaccharide accumulation increased at higher salinity. To check the effect of bacterial inoculation on the plant (Cicer arietinum Var. CM-98) growth and soil aggregation, pot experiment was conducted by growing seedlings under salt stress. Inoculation of both strains increased plant growth at elevated salt stress. Weight of soil aggregates attached with roots and present in soil were added at higher salt concentrations compared to untreated controls. Soil aggregation was higher at plant roots under salinity. These results suggest the feasibility of using above strains in improving plant growth and soil fertility under salinity. PMID:24031943

  8. Bacterial exopolysaccharide and biofilm formation stimulate chickpea growth and soil aggregation under salt stress

    PubMed Central

    Qurashi, Aisha Waheed; Sabri, Anjum Nasim

    2012-01-01

    To compensate for stress imposed by salinity, biofilm formation and exopolysaccharide production are significant strategies of salt tolerant bacteria to assist metabolism. We hypothesized that two previously isolated salt-tolerant strains Halomonas variabilis (HT1) and Planococcus rifietoensis (RT4) have an ability to improve plant growth, These strains can form biofilm and accumulate exopolysacharides at increasing salt stress. These results showed that bacteria might be involved in developing microbial communities under salt stress and helpful in colonizing of bacterial strains to plant roots and soil particles. Eventually, it can add to the plant growth and soil structure. We investigated the comparative effect of exopolysacharide and biofilm formation in two bacterial strains Halomonas variabilis (HT1) and Planococcus rifietoensis (RT4) in response to varying salt stress. We found that biofilm formation and exopolysaccharide accumulation increased at higher salinity. To check the effect of bacterial inoculation on the plant (Cicer arietinum Var. CM-98) growth and soil aggregation, pot experiment was conducted by growing seedlings under salt stress. Inoculation of both strains increased plant growth at elevated salt stress. Weight of soil aggregates attached with roots and present in soil were added at higher salt concentrations compared to untreated controls. Soil aggregation was higher at plant roots under salinity. These results suggest the feasibility of using above strains in improving plant growth and soil fertility under salinity. PMID:24031943

  9. Culturable bacterial endophytes isolated from Mangrove tree (Rhizophora apiculata Blume) enhance seedling growth in Rice

    PubMed Central

    Deivanai, Subramanian; Bindusara, Amitraghata Santhanam; Prabhakaran, Guruswamy; Bhore, Subhash Janardhan

    2014-01-01

    Background: Endophytic bacteria do have several potential applications in medicine and in other various sectors of biotechnology including agriculture. Bacterial endophytes need to be explored for their potential applications in agricultural biotechnology. One of the potential applications of bacterial endophytes in agricultural is to enhance the growth of the agricultural crops. Hence, this study was undertaken to explore the plant growth promoting potential application of bacterial endophytes. Objective: The objective of this study was to examine the effect of endophytic bacteria from mangrove tree (Rhizophora apiculata Blume) for their efficacy in promoting seedling growth in rice. Materials and Methods: Eight endophytic bacterial isolates (EBIs) isolated from twig and petiole tissues of the mangrove were identified based on their 16S ribosomal ribonucleic acid (rRNA) gene sequence homology. Separately, surface sterilized paddy seeds were treated with cell-free broth and cell suspension of the EBIs. Rice seedlings were analyzed by various bioassays and data was recorded. Results: The gene sequences of the isolates were closely related to two genera namely, Bacillus and Pantoea. Inoculation of EBIs from R. apiculata with rice seeds resulted in accelerated root and shoot growth with significant increase in chlorophyll content. Among the isolates, Pantoea ananatis (1MSE1) and Bacillus amyloliquefaciens (3MPE1) had shown predominance of activity. Endophytic invasion was recognized by the non-host by rapid accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and was counteracted by the production of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and lipid peroxide. The results demonstrated that EBIs from mangrove tree can increase the fitness of the rice seedlings under controlled conditions. Conclusion: These research findings could be useful to enhance the seedling growth and could serve as foundation in further research on enhancing the growth of the rice crop using endophytic bacteria. PMID:25097431

  10. Bacterial growth in a simulated Martian subsurface environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kronyak, R. E.; Pavlov, A.; House, C. H.

    2013-12-01

    The ability of microorganisms to grow under Martian conditions has implications in both the search for life and habitability of Mars as well as the potential contamination of Mars by landing spacecraft. Factors that inhibit the growth of organisms on Mars include UV radiation, low pressure and temperature, CO2 atmosphere, lack of liquid water, and extreme desiccation. Yet a possible biozone capable of supporting microbial life on Mars exists in the shallow subsurface where there is protection from harsh UV rays. In addition, the presence of widespread subsurface ice, confirmed by the Phoenix Lander, offers a water source as the ice sublimates through the upper soil. Here we will determine the ability of the organism Halomonas desiderata strain SP1 to grow in the simulated Martian subsurface environment. Halomonas was chosen as the bacteria of interest due to its tolerance to extreme environments, including carrying salt concentrations and pH. Experiments were carried out in the Mars Simulation Chamber, where temperatures, pressures, and atmospheric composition can be closely monitored to simulate Martian conditions. A series of stress experiments were conducted to observe Halomonas's ability to withstand exposure to a Mars analog soil, freezing temperatures, anoxic conditions, and low pressures. We have determined that Halomonas is able to survive exposures to low temperatures, pressures, and anoxic conditions. We will report on the survival and growth of Halomonas in the simulated Martian permafrost under low (6-10 mbar) atmospheric pressures.

  11. Growth Curve Models for the Analysis of Phenotype Arrays for a Systems Biology Overview of Yersinia pestis

    SciTech Connect

    Fodor, I K; Holtz-Morris, A E; McCutchen-Maloney, S L

    2005-09-08

    The Phenotype MicroArray technology of Biolog, Inc. (Hayward, CA) measures the respiration of cells as a function of time in thousands of microwells simultaneously, and thus provides a high-throughput means of studying cellular phenotypes. The microwells contain compounds involved in a number of biochemical pathways, as well as chemicals that test the sensitivity of cells against antibiotics and stress. While the PM experimental workflow is completely automated, statistical methods to analyze and interpret the data are lagging behind. To take full advantage of the technology, it is essential to develop efficient analytical methods to quantify the information in the complex datasets resulting from PM experiments. We propose the use of statistical growth-curve models to rigorously quantify observed differences in PM experiments, in the context of the growth and metabolism of Yersinia pestis cells grown under different physiological conditions. The information from PM experiments complement genomic and proteomic results and can be used to identify gene function and in drug development. Successful coupling of phenomics results with genomics and proteomics will lead to an unprecedented ability to characterize bacterial function at a systems biology level.

  12. Modelling individual growth and competition in plant populations: growth curves of Chenopodium album at two densities

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Christian Damgaard; Jacob Weiner; Hisae Nagashima

    2002-01-01

    Summary 1 We modelled the growth in estimated biomass of individuals in experimental popu- lations of Chenopodium album grown at two densities and measured sequentially nine times over 128 days. Competition is modelled by coupling individual growth equations and, within the population, the growth rate of a plant at any point in time is a function of its size to

  13. Morphological Instability and Dynamics of Fronts in Bacterial Growth Models with Nonlinear Diffusion

    E-print Network

    J. Mueller; W. van Saarloos

    2002-11-21

    It has been argued that there is biological and modeling evidence that a non-linear diffusion coefficient of the type D(b) = D_0 b^{k} underlies the formation of a number of growth patterns of bacterial colonies. We study a reaction-diffusion system with a non-linear diffusion coefficient introduced by Ben-Jacob et al. Due to the fact that the bacterial diffusion coefficient vanishes when the bacterial density b -> 0, the standard linear stability analysis for fronts cannot be used. We introduce an extension of the stability analysis which can be applied to such singular fronts, map out the region of stability in the D-k-plane and derive an interfacial approximation in some limits. Our linear stability analysis and sharp interface formulation will also be applicable to other examples of interface formation due to nonlinear diffusion, like in porous media or in the problem of vortex motion in superconductors.

  14. The effects of a low-intensity red laser on bacterial growth, filamentation and plasmid DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roos, C.; Santos, J. N.; Guimarães, O. R.; Geller, M.; Paoli, F.; Fonseca, A. S.

    2013-07-01

    Exposure of nonphotosynthesizing microorganisms to light could increase cell division in cultures, a phenomenon denominated as biostimulation. However, data concerning the importance of the genetic characteristics of cells on this effect are as yet scarce. The aim of this work was to evaluate the effects of a low-intensity red laser on the growth, filamentation and plasmids in Escherichia coli cells proficient and deficient in DNA repair. E. coli cultures were exposed to a laser (658 nm, 10 mW, 1 and 8 J cm?2) to study bacterial growth and filamentation. Also, bacterial cultures hosting pBSK plasmids were exposed to the laser to study DNA topological forms from the electrophoretic profile in agarose gels. Data indicate the low-intensity red laser: (i) had no effect on the growth of E. coli wild type and exonuclease III deficient cells; (ii) induced bacterial filamentation, (iii) led to no alteration in the electrophoretic profile of plasmids from exonuclease III deficient cells, but plasmids from wild type cells were altered. A low-intensity red laser at the low fluences used in phototherapy has no effect on growth, but induces filamentation and alters the topological forms of plasmid DNA in E. coli cultures depending on the DNA repair mechanisms.

  15. Bacterial-Feeding Nematode Growth and Preference for Biocontrol Isolates of the Bacterium Burkholderia cepacia

    PubMed Central

    Carta, Lynn K.

    2000-01-01

    The potential of different bacterial-feeding Rhabditida to consume isolates of Burkholderia cepacia with known agricultural biocontrol ability was examined. Caenorhabditis elegans, Diploscapter sp., Oscheius myriophila, Pelodera strongyloides, Pristionchus pacificus, Zeldia punctata, Panagrellus redivivus, and Distolabrellus veechi were tested for growth on and preference for Escherichia coli OP50 or B. cepacia maize soil isolates J82, BcF, M36, Bc2, and PHQM100. Considerable growth and preference variations occurred between nematode taxa on individual bacterial isolates, and between different bacterial isolates on a given nematode. Populations of Diploscapter sp. and P. redivivus were most strongly suppressed. Only Z. punctata and P. pacificus grew well on all isolates, though Z. punctata preferentially accumulated on all isolates and P. pacificus had no preference. Oscheius myriophila preferentially accumulated on growth-supportive Bc2 and M36, and avoided less supportive J82 and PHQM100. Isolates with plant-parasitic nematicidal properties and poor fungicidal properties supported the best growth of three members of the Rhabditidae, C. elegans, O. myriophila, and P. strongyloides. Distolabrellus veechi avoided commercial nematicide M36 more strongly than fungicide J82. PMID:19270990

  16. Diamagnetic levitation enhances growth of liquid bacterial cultures by increasing oxygen availability

    PubMed Central

    Dijkstra, Camelia E.; Larkin, Oliver J.; Anthony, Paul; Davey, Michael R.; Eaves, Laurence; Rees, Catherine E. D.; Hill, Richard J. A.

    2011-01-01

    Diamagnetic levitation is a technique that uses a strong, spatially varying magnetic field to reproduce aspects of weightlessness, on the Earth. We used a superconducting magnet to levitate growing bacterial cultures for up to 18 h, to determine the effect of diamagnetic levitation on all phases of the bacterial growth cycle. We find that diamagnetic levitation increases the rate of population growth in a liquid culture and reduces the sedimentation rate of the cells. Further experiments and microarray gene analysis show that the increase in growth rate is owing to enhanced oxygen availability. We also demonstrate that the magnetic field that levitates the cells also induces convective stirring in the liquid. We present a simple theoretical model, showing how the paramagnetic force on dissolved oxygen can cause convection during the aerobic phases of bacterial growth. We propose that this convection enhances oxygen availability by transporting oxygen around the liquid culture. Since this process results from the strong magnetic field, it is not present in other weightless environments, e.g. in Earth orbit. Hence, these results are of significance and timely to researchers considering the use of diamagnetic levitation to explore effects of weightlessness on living organisms and on physical phenomena. PMID:20667843

  17. Effects of Benzalkonium Chloride on Planktonic Growth and Biofilm Formation by Animal Bacterial Pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Ebrahimi, Azizollah; Hemati, Majid; Shabanpour, Ziba; Habibian Dehkordi, Saeed; Bahadoran, Shahab; Lotfalian, Sharareh; Khubani, Shahin

    2015-01-01

    Background: Resistance toward quaternary ammonium compounds (QACs) is widespread among a diverse range of microorganisms and is facilitated by several mechanisms such as biofilm formation. Objectives: In this study, the effects of benzalkonium chloride on planktonic growth and biofilm formation by some field isolates of animal bacterial pathogens were investigated. Materials and Methods: Forty clinical isolates of Escherichia coli, Salmonella serotypes, Staphylococcus aureus and Streptococcus agalactiae (10 isolates of each) were examined for effects of benzalkonium chloride on biofilm formation and planktonic growth using microtiter plates. For all the examined strains in the presence of benzalkonium chloride, biofilm development and planktonic growth were affected at the same concentrations of disinfectant. Results: The means of strains growth increase after the minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) were significant in all the bacteria (except for E. coli in 1/32 and S. agalactiae in of 1/8 MIC). Biofilm formation increased with decrease of antiseptics concentration; a significant increase was found in all the samples. The most turbidity related to S. aureus and the least to Salmonella. Conclusions: Bacterial resistance against quaternary ammonium compounds is increasing which can increase the bacterial biofilm formation.

  18. Coal Fly Ash Impairs Airway Antimicrobial Peptides and Increases Bacterial Growth

    PubMed Central

    Borcherding, Jennifer A.; Chen, Haihan; Caraballo, Juan C.; Baltrusaitis, Jonas; Pezzulo, Alejandro A.; Zabner, Joseph; Grassian, Vicki H.; Comellas, Alejandro P.

    2013-01-01

    Air pollution is a risk factor for respiratory infections, and one of its main components is particulate matter (PM), which is comprised of a number of particles that contain iron, such as coal fly ash (CFA). Since free iron concentrations are extremely low in airway surface liquid (ASL), we hypothesize that CFA impairs antimicrobial peptides (AMP) function and can be a source of iron to bacteria. We tested this hypothesis in vivo by instilling mice with Pseudomonas aeruginosa (PA01) and CFA and determine the percentage of bacterial clearance. In addition, we tested bacterial clearance in cell culture by exposing primary human airway epithelial cells to PA01 and CFA and determining the AMP activity and bacterial growth in vitro. We report that CFA is a bioavailable source of iron for bacteria. We show that CFA interferes with bacterial clearance in vivo and in primary human airway epithelial cultures. Also, we demonstrate that CFA inhibits AMP activity in vitro, which we propose as a mechanism of our cell culture and in vivo results. Furthermore, PA01 uses CFA as an iron source with a direct correlation between CFA iron dissolution and bacterial growth. CFA concentrations used are very relevant to human daily exposures, thus posing a potential public health risk for susceptible subjects. Although CFA provides a source of bioavailable iron for bacteria, not all CFA particles have the same biological effects, and their propensity for iron dissolution is an important factor. CFA impairs lung innate immune mechanisms of bacterial clearance, specifically AMP activity. We expect that identifying the PM mechanisms of respiratory infections will translate into public health policies aimed at controlling, not only concentration of PM exposure, but physicochemical characteristics that will potentially cause respiratory infections in susceptible individuals and populations. PMID:23469047

  19. Bacterial Population in Intestines of the Black Tiger Shrimp (Penaeus monodon) under Different Growth Stages

    PubMed Central

    Rungrassamee, Wanilada; Klanchui, Amornpan; Chaiyapechara, Sage; Maibunkaew, Sawarot; Tangphatsornruang, Sithichoke; Jiravanichpaisal, Pikul; Karoonuthaisiri, Nitsara

    2013-01-01

    Intestinal bacterial communities in aquaculture have been drawn to attention due to potential benefit to their hosts. To identify core intestinal bacteria in the black tiger shrimp (Penaeus monodon), bacterial populations of disease-free shrimp were characterized from intestines of four developmental stages (15-day-old post larvae (PL15), 1- (J1), 2- (J2), and 3-month-old (J3) juveniles) using pyrosequencing, real-time PCR and denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) approaches. A total of 25,121 pyrosequencing reads (reading length?=?442±24 bases) were obtained, which were categorized by barcode for PL15 (7,045 sequences), J1 (3,055 sequences), J2 (13,130 sequences) and J3 (1,890 sequences). Bacteria in the phyla Bacteroides, Firmicutes and Proteobacteria were found in intestines at all four growth stages. There were 88, 14, 27, and 20 bacterial genera associated with the intestinal tract of PL15, J1, J2 and J3, respectively. Pyrosequencing analysis revealed that Proteobacteria (class Gammaproteobacteria) was a dominant bacteria group with a relative abundance of 89% for PL15 and 99% for J1, J2 and J3. Real-time PCR assay also confirmed that Gammaproteobacteria had the highest relative abundance in intestines from all growth stages. Intestinal bacterial communities from the three juvenile stages were more similar to each other than that of the PL shrimp based on PCA analyses of pyrosequencing results and their DGGE profiles. This study provides descriptive bacterial communities associated to the black tiger shrimp intestines during these growth development stages in rearing facilities. PMID:23577162

  20. Spatial and Temporal Features of the Growth of a Bacterial Species Colonizing the Zebrafish Gut

    PubMed Central

    Jemielita, Matthew; Taormina, Michael J.; Burns, Adam R.; Hampton, Jennifer S.; Rolig, Annah S.; Guillemin, Karen

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT The vertebrate intestine is home to microbial ecosystems that play key roles in host development and health. Little is known about the spatial and temporal dynamics of these microbial communities, limiting our understanding of fundamental properties, such as their mechanisms of growth, propagation, and persistence. To address this, we inoculated initially germ-free zebrafish larvae with fluorescently labeled strains of an Aeromonas species, representing an abundant genus in the zebrafish gut. Using light sheet fluorescence microscopy to obtain three-dimensional images spanning the gut, we quantified the entire bacterial load, as founding populations grew from tens to tens of thousands of cells over several hours. The data yield the first ever measurements of the growth kinetics of a microbial species inside a live vertebrate intestine and show dynamics that robustly fit a logistic growth model. Intriguingly, bacteria were nonuniformly distributed throughout the gut, and bacterial aggregates showed considerably higher growth rates than did discrete individuals. The form of aggregate growth indicates intrinsically higher division rates for clustered bacteria, rather than surface-mediated agglomeration onto clusters. Thus, the spatial organization of gut bacteria both relative to the host and to each other impacts overall growth kinetics, suggesting that spatial characterizations will be an important input to predictive models of host-associated microbial community assembly. PMID:25516613

  1. GROWTH AND METABOLISM OF INDIVIDUAL BACTERIAL CELLS UTILIZING NANOSIMS

    SciTech Connect

    NEALSON, H. K.

    2007-08-03

    This work involved the use of the Nano-SIMS Instrument at Lawrence Livermore Laboratory, in an effort to utilize this unique tool for experiments in Biology. The work consisted primarily of experiments to measure in real time, C and N fixation in cyanobacteria. The work revealed a number of the difficulties in using the nano-SIMS approach with biological material, but with collaboration from a number of individuals at USC and LLNL, major progress was made. The collaborators from LLNL were from the Chemistry Group (Dr. Peter Weber), and the Biology Group (Dr. Jennifer Pett-Ridge). In addition, there were a number of other scientists involved from LLNL. The USC group consisted of Dr. K.H. Nealson, the PI on the grant, Dr. R. Popa, a postdoctoral fellow and research associate at USC, Professor Douglas Capone, and Juliet Finze, a graduate student in biology. Two major experiments were done, both of which yielded new and exciting data. (1) We studied nitrogen and carbon fixation in Anabaena, demonstrating that fixation ofN occurred rapidly in the heterocysts, and that the fixed N was transported rapidly and completely to the vegetative cells. C fixation occurred in the vegetative cells, with labeled C remaining in these cells in support of their growth and metabolism. This work was accepted in the ISME Journal (Nature Publication), and published last month. (2) We studied nitrogen and carbon fixation in Trichodesmium, a non-heterocystous cyanobacterium that also fixes nitrogen. Interestingly, the nitrogen fixation was confined to regions within the filaments that seem to be identical to the so-called cyanophycaen granules. The fixed N is then transported to other parts of the cyanobacterium, as judged by movement of the heavy N throughout the filaments. On the basis of these very exciting results, we have applied for funding from the NSF to continue the collaboration with LLNL. The results of both studies were presented in the summer of 2007 at the Gordon Research Conference (Applied Environmental Microbiol.).

  2. On the analysis of Canadian Holstein dairy cow lactation curves using standard growth functions.

    PubMed

    López, S; France, J; Odongo, N E; McBride, R A; Kebreab, E; AlZahal, O; McBride, B W; Dijkstra, J

    2015-04-01

    Six classical growth functions (monomolecular, Schumacher, Gompertz, logistic, Richards, and Morgan) were fitted to individual and average (by parity) cumulative milk production curves of Canadian Holstein dairy cows. The data analyzed consisted of approximately 91,000 daily milk yield records corresponding to 122 first, 99 second, and 92 third parity individual lactation curves. The functions were fitted using nonlinear regression procedures, and their performance was assessed using goodness-of-fit statistics (coefficient of determination, residual mean squares, Akaike information criterion, and the correlation and concordance coefficients between observed and adjusted milk yields at several days in milk). Overall, all the growth functions evaluated showed an acceptable fit to the cumulative milk production curves, with the Richards equation ranking first (smallest Akaike information criterion) followed by the Morgan equation. Differences among the functions in their goodness-of-fit were enlarged when fitted to average curves by parity, where the sigmoidal functions with a variable point of inflection (Richards and Morgan) outperformed the other 4 equations. All the functions provided satisfactory predictions of milk yield (calculated from the first derivative of the functions) at different lactation stages, from early to late lactation. The Richards and Morgan equations provided the most accurate estimates of peak yield and total milk production per 305-d lactation, whereas the least accurate estimates were obtained with the logistic equation. In conclusion, classical growth functions (especially sigmoidal functions with a variable point of inflection) proved to be feasible alternatives to fit cumulative milk production curves of dairy cows, resulting in suitable statistical performance and accurate estimates of lactation traits. PMID:25648814

  3. Volatile hydrocarbon biodegradation by a mixed-bacterial culture during growth on crude oil

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J D Van Hamme; O P Ward

    2001-01-01

      Volatile hydrocarbon biodegradation by a mixed-bacterial culture during growth on Bow River crude oil was investigated using\\u000a solid phase microextraction (SPME). Inoculum treatments were examined in relation to C5–C11 hydrocarbon degradation. Up to 1600 mg\\/l biomass (dry weight) was tested without achieving significant volatile hydrocarbon\\u000a partitioning and affecting analysis. Inoculum age rather than concentration had the most profound impact on

  4. Effect of plant growth promoting rhizobacteria on bacterial canker of tomato

    Microsoft Academic Search

    N Girish; S Umesha

    2005-01-01

    Use of plant growth promoting rhizobacteria in managing bacterial canker disease of tomato was studied in the present work. Tomato seeds were treated with PGPR strains viz., Bacillus pumilus INR7, Bacillus pumilus SE34, Bacillus pumilus T4, Bacillus subtilis GBO3, Bacillus amyloliquefaciens IN937a and Brevibacillus brevis IPC11 were subjected for seed germination and seedling vigor. Among the PGPR strains tested, only

  5. Differential susceptibility of pumpkins to bacterial wilt related to plant growth stage and cultivar

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Gerald E. Brust

    1997-01-01

    Fifteen jack-o'-lantern and three processing-pie pumpkin (Cucurbita pepo L.) cultivars were tested in the greenhouse and field for their susceptibility at different growth stages to Erwinia tracheiphila, the causal agent of bacterial wilt. The bacterium is vectored by cucumber beetles (Acalymma vittatum (F) and Diabrotica undecimpunctata howardi Barber). Each variety was artificially inoculated with E. tracheiphila in the greenhouse at

  6. A free dendritic growth model accommodating curved phase boundaries and high Peclet number conditions

    SciTech Connect

    DiVenuti, A.G. [Tufts Univ., Medford, MA (United States). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering; Ando, T. [Northeastern Univ., Boston, MA (United States). Dept. of Mechanical, Industrial and Mfg. Engineering

    1998-12-01

    A steady-state free dendrite growth model accommodating nonlocal equilibrium tip conditions and curved liquidus and solidus has been developed. The developed model assumes a dendrite tip of a paraboloid of revolution and is applicable to dendrite growth in dilute binary alloys for all values of P{sub c}, and reduces to the BCT model for linear liquidus and solidus. The marginal stability criterion of Trivedi and Kurz is shown to apply even in the presence of kinetic undercooling and curved phase boundaries when used with an appropriate concentration-dependent liquidus slope. The model is applied to Sn-Pb alloys to predict the tip velocity, tip radius, solute trapping, and four components of undercooling in the quasi-solutal, solutal-to-thermal transition and quasi-thermal regions.

  7. Two bacterial entophytes eliciting both plant growth promotion and plant defense on pepper (Capsicum annuum L.).

    PubMed

    Kang, Seung Hoon; Cho, Hyun-Soo; Cheong, Hoon; Ryu, Choong-Min; Kim, Jihyun F; Park, Seung-Hwan

    2007-01-01

    Plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR) have the potential to be used as microbial inoculants to reduce disease incidence and severity and to increase crop yield. Some of the PGPR have been reported to be able to enter plant tissues and establish endophytic populations. Here, we demonstrated an approach to screen bacterial endophytes that have the capacity to promote the growth of pepper seedlings and protect pepper plants against a bacterial pathogen. Initially, out of 150 bacterial isolates collected from healthy stems of peppers cultivated in the Chungcheong and Gyeongsang provinces of Korea, 23 putative endophytic isolates that were considered to be predominating and representative of each pepper sample were selected. By phenotypic characterization and partial 16S rDNA sequence analysis, the isolates were identified as species of Ochrobacterium, Pantoea, Pseudomonas, Sphingomonas, Janthinobacterium, Ralstonia, Arthrobacter, Clavibacter, Sporosarcina, Acidovorax, and Brevundimonas. Among them, two isolates, PS4 and PS27, were selected because they showed consistent colonizing capacity in pepper stems at the levels of 10(6)-10(7) CFU/g tissue, and were found to be most closely related to Pseudomonas rhodesiae and Pantoea ananatis, respectively, by additional analyses of their entire 16S rDNA sequences. Drenching application of the two strains on the pepper seedlings promoted significant growth of peppers, enhancing their root fresh weight by 73.9% and 41.5%, respectively. The two strains also elicited induced systemic resistance of plants against Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. vesicatoria. PMID:18051359

  8. In-depth characterization of wastewater bacterial community in response to algal growth using pyrosequencing.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jangho; Lee, Juyoun; Lee, Tae Kwon; Woo, Sung-Geun; Baek, Gyu Seok; Park, Joonhong

    2013-10-28

    Microalgae have been regarded as a natural resource for sustainable materials and fuels, as well as for removal of nutrients and micropollutants from wastewater, and their interaction with bacteria in wastewater is a critical factor to consider because of the microbial diversity and complexity in a variety of wastewater conditions. Despite their importance, very little is known about the ecological interactions between algae and bacteria in a wastewater environment. In this study, we characterized the wastewater bacterial community in response to the growth of a Selenastrum gracile UTEX 325 population in a real municipal wastewater environment. The Roche 454 GS-FLX Titanium pyrosequencing technique was used for indepth analysis of amplicons of 16S rRNA genes from different conditions in each reactor, with and without the algal population. The algal growth reduced the bacterial diversity and affected the bacterial community structure in the wastewater. The following in-depth analysis of the deep-sequenced amplicons showed that the algal growth selectively stimulated Sphingobacteria class members, especially the Sediminibacterium genus population, in the municipal wastewater environment. PMID:23867704

  9. Geometry dependence of crack growth resistance curves in thin sheet aluminum alloys

    E-print Network

    Stricklin, Lance Lee

    1988-01-01

    . 4, 6 . 8 LO L2 L4 Is ae - Inches P Fig. 3. Data from Ernst showing the use of JM theory can reduce the geometry dependence of material resistance curves [321. 15 zone. ASTM standard E 1152-87 contains specimen and crack growth limits for using... at the crack tip. There is a large difFerence between the Irwin correction and the secant method, about 15%. This could mean that further correction is needed or that some other mechanism is at work. In this case there was considerable apparent growth due...

  10. Two bacterial strains isolated from a Zn-polluted soil enhance plant growth and mycorrhizal efficiency under Zn-toxicity

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. Vivas; B. Biró; J. M. Ruíz-Lozano; J. M. Barea; R. Azcón

    2006-01-01

    In this study we investigated the interactions among plant, rhizosphere microorganisms and Zn pollution. We tested the influence of two bacterial strains isolated from a Zn-polluted soil on plant growth and on the symbiotic efficiency of native arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) under Zn toxicity. The two bacterial strains exhibited Zn tolerance when cultivated under increasing Zn levels in the medium.

  11. Bacterial growth rates are influenced by cellular characteristics of individual species when immersed in electromagnetic fields.

    PubMed

    Tessaro, Lucas W E; Murugan, Nirosha J; Persinger, Michael A

    2015-03-01

    Previous studies have shown that exposure to extremely low-frequency electromagnetic fields (ELF-EMFs) have negative effects on the rate of growth of bacteria. In the present study, two Gram-positive and two Gram-negative species were exposed to six magnetic field conditions in broth cultures. Three variations of the 'Thomas' pulsed frequency-modulated pattern; a strong-static "puck" magnet upwards of 5000G in intensity; a pair of these magnets rotating opposite one another at ?30rpm; and finally a strong dynamic magnetic field generator termed the 'Resonator' with an average intensity of 250?T were used. Growth rate was discerned by optical density (OD) measurements every hour at 600nm. ELF-EMF conditions significantly affected the rates of growth of the bacterial cultures, while the two static magnetic field conditions were not statistically significant. Most interestingly, the 'Resonator' dynamic magnetic field increased the rates of growth of three species (Staphylococcus epidermidis, Staphylococcus aureus, and Escherichia coli), while slowing the growth of one (Serratia marcescens). We suggest that these effects are due to individual biophysical characteristics of the bacterial species. PMID:25721476

  12. Tropical freshwater ecosystems have lower bacterial growth efficiency than temperate ones

    PubMed Central

    Amado, André M.; Meirelles-Pereira, Frederico; Vidal, Luciana O.; Sarmento, Hugo; Suhett, Albert L.; Farjalla, Vinicius F.; Cotner, James B.; Roland, Fabio

    2013-01-01

    Current models and observations indicate that bacterial respiration should increase and growth efficiency (BGE) should decrease with increasing temperatures. However, these models and observations are mostly derived from data collected in temperate regions, and the tropics are under-represented. The aim of this work was to compare bacterial metabolism, namely bacterial production (BP) and respiration (BR), bacterial growth efficiency (BGE) and bacterial carbon demand (BCD) between tropical and temperate ecosystems via a literature review and using unpublished data. We hypothesized that (1) tropical ecosystems have higher metabolism than temperate ones and, (2) that BGE is lower in tropical relative to temperate ecosystems. We collected a total of 498 coupled BP and BR observations (Ntotal = 498; Ntemperate = 301; Ntropical = 197), calculated BGE (BP/(BP+BR)) and BCD (BP+BR) for each case and examined patterns using a model II regression analysis and compared each parameter between the two regions using non-parametric Mann–Whitney U test. We observed a significant positive linear regression between BR and BP for the whole dataset, and also for tropical and temperate data separately. We found that BP, BR and BCD were higher in the tropics, but BGE was lower compared to temperate regions. Also, BR rates per BP unit were at least two fold higher in the tropics than in temperate ecosystems. We argue that higher temperature, nutrient limitation, and light exposure all contribute to lower BGE in the tropics, mediated through effects on thermodynamics, substrate stoichiometry, nutrient availability and interactions with photochemically produced compounds. More efforts are needed in this study area in the tropics, but our work indicates that bottom-up (nutrient availability and resource stoichiometry) and top-down (grazer pressure) processes, coupled with thermodynamic constraints, might contribute to the lower BGE in the tropics relative to temperate regions. PMID:23801986

  13. [Effects of growth years of Paeonia lactiflora on bacterial community in rhizosphere soil and paeoniflorin content].

    PubMed

    Yuan, Xiao-Feng; Peng, San-Mei; Wang, Bo-Lin; Ding, Zhi-Shan

    2014-08-01

    To explore the relationship between microecological environment and Paeonia lactiflora the effects of growth years of P. lactillora on rhizosphere bacterial communities were studied by PCR-DGGE and the paeoniflorin content determined by HPLC. Results showed that the soil pH increased with growing years of P. lactillora. In the fourth year, soil pH and enzyme activity reached the highest level, while organic matter content was the lowest. The bacterial diversity had a positive correlation with growing years varied from 3.38 to 3.61. Sequencing results demonstrated that Gammaproteobacteria, llphaproteobacteria, Actinobacteria, Acidobacte- ria and Firmicutes were predominant bacteria kinds in the soil of P. lactillora. Gammaproteobacteria was only detected in the bulk soil, while llphaproteobacteria, Acidobacteria G1l, Actinobacteria were only in the rhizosphere soil and the bacterial community among different growing years were similar except few species. HLPC results showed that paeoniflorin content was 3.26%, 3.30%, 3.36%, 3.41% separately from one to four-year-old P. lactiflora with an upward trend. The correlation analysis indicated that the paeoniflorin content had a positive correlation with soil pH and bacterial diversity, conversely, had a negative correlation with organic matter con- tent. During the growth years the rhizosphere bacterial diversity increased without changes of predominant bacteria and the paeoniflorin content increased without significant differences while its production increased significantly, which was different from the plants showing replanting diseases. This is in line with the farming practice choosing 4-year-old P. lactllora, but not the 1-3 year old one. In addition, the accumulation of paeoniflorin is closely related to soil pH, organic matter content and bacteria diversity, confirming that the geoherblism of P. lactiflora is closely related with microbial environment in the soil. PMID:25423827

  14. [Effects of growth years of Paeonia lactiflora on bacterial community in rhizosphere soil and paeoniflorin content].

    PubMed

    Yuan, Xiao-Feng; Peng, San-Mei; Wang, Bo-Lin; Ding, Zhi-Shan

    2014-08-01

    To explore the relationship between microecological environment and Paeonia lactiflora the effects of growth years of P. lactillora on rhizosphere bacterial communities were studied by PCR-DGGE and the paeoniflorin content determined by HPLC. Results showed that the soil pH increased with growing years of P. lactillora. In the fourth year, soil pH and enzyme activity reached the highest level, while organic matter content was the lowest. The bacterial diversity had a positive correlation with growing years varied from 3.38 to 3.61. Sequencing results demonstrated that Gammaproteobacteria, llphaproteobacteria, Actinobacteria, Acidobacte- ria and Firmicutes were predominant bacteria kinds in the soil of P. lactillora. Gammaproteobacteria was only detected in the bulk soil, while llphaproteobacteria, Acidobacteria G1l, Actinobacteria were only in the rhizosphere soil and the bacterial community among different growing years were similar except few species. HLPC results showed that paeoniflorin content was 3.26%, 3.30%, 3.36%, 3.41% separately from one to four-year-old P. lactiflora with an upward trend. The correlation analysis indicated that the paeoniflorin content had a positive correlation with soil pH and bacterial diversity, conversely, had a negative correlation with organic matter con- tent. During the growth years the rhizosphere bacterial diversity increased without changes of predominant bacteria and the paeoniflorin content increased without significant differences while its production increased significantly, which was different from the plants showing replanting diseases. This is in line with the farming practice choosing 4-year-old P. lactllora, but not the 1-3 year old one. In addition, the accumulation of paeoniflorin is closely related to soil pH, organic matter content and bacteria diversity, confirming that the geoherblism of P. lactiflora is closely related with microbial environment in the soil. PMID:25507549

  15. Flotillin-1 (Reggie-2) Contributes to Chlamydia pneumoniae Growth and Is Associated with Bacterial Inclusion

    PubMed Central

    Korhonen, Juha T.; Puolakkainen, Mirja; Häivälä, Reetta; Penttilä, Tuula; Haveri, Anu; Markkula, Eveliina

    2012-01-01

    Chlamydiae are obligate intracellular pathogens replicating only inside the eukaryotic host. Here, we studied the effect of human flotillin-1 protein on Chlamydia pneumoniae growth in human line (HL) and A549 epithelial cell lines. RNA interference was applied to disrupt flotillin-1-mediated endocytosis. Host-associated bacteria were detected by quantitative PCR, and C. pneumoniae growth was evaluated by inclusion counts. C. pneumoniae attachment to host cells was unaffected, but bacterial intracellular growth was attenuated in the flotillin-1-silenced cells. By using confocal microscopy, we detected flotillin-1 colocalized with the inclusion membrane protein A (IncA) in the C. pneumoniae inclusion membranes. In addition, flotillin-1 was associated with IncA in detergent-resistant membrane microdomains (DRMs) in biochemical fractioning. These results suggest that flotillin-1 localizes to the C. pneumoniae inclusion membrane and plays an important role for intracellular growth of C. pneumoniae. PMID:22215737

  16. Effect of bacterial growth period on the sensitivity of the MTT assay for silver.

    PubMed

    Halmi, M I E; Ahmad, F; Hashim, A K; Shamaan, N A; Syed, M A; Shukor, M Y

    2014-03-01

    Respiratory activity inhibition by toxic compounds in bacteria and yeast has been used to detect toxic compounds in the environment. Often the age of culture contributes towards the sensitivity of detection. In the present work, the effect of growth period on the sensitivity of an inhibitive assay for heavy metals using bacterial respiratory assay system based on the reduction of the water soluble tetrazolium dye MTT is reported. A silver-sensitive isolate was discovered to exhibit different sensitivities towards silver at different growth periods. An exponential decay model adequately described the inhibition due to silver. Analysis using ANOVA with post-hoc Tukey's test showed that the IC50 obtained by strain DRYS8 grown at the 12 hr- period in nutrient broth at 28 degrees C gave the lowest value compared to other growth periods. This study highlights the importance of taking into accounts growth conditions and age of culture in developing cellular-based bioassays. PMID:24665761

  17. Factor XI-Deficient Mice Display Reduced Inflammation, Coagulopathy, and Bacterial Growth during Listeriosis

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Deyan; Szaba, Frank M.; Kummer, Lawrence W.; Johnson, Lawrence L.; Tucker, Erik I.; Gruber, Andras; Gailani, David

    2012-01-01

    In mice infected sublethally with Listeria monocytogenes, fibrin is deposited at low levels within hepatic tissue, where it functions protectively by limiting bacterial growth and suppressing hemorrhagic pathology. Here we demonstrate that mice infected with lethal doses of L. monocytogenes produce higher levels of fibrin and display evidence of systemic coagulopathy (i.e., thrombocytopenia, fibrinogen depletion, and elevated levels of thrombin-antithrombin complexes). When the hepatic bacterial burden exceeds 1 × 106 CFU, levels of hepatic fibrin correlate with the bacterial burden, which also correlates with levels of hepatic mRNA encoding the hemostatic enzyme factor XI (FXI). Gene-targeted FXI-deficient mice show significantly improved survival upon challenge with high doses of L. monocytogenes and also display reduced levels of hepatic fibrin, decreased evidence of coagulopathy, and diminished cytokine production (interleukin-6 [IL-6] and IL-10). While fibrin limits the bacterial burden during sublethal listeriosis in wild-type mice, FXI-deficient mice display a significantly improved capacity to restrain the bacterial burden during lethal listeriosis despite their reduced fibrin levels. They also show less evidence of hepatic necrosis. In conjunction with suboptimal antibiotic therapy, FXI-specific monoclonal antibody 14E11 improves survival when administered therapeutically to wild-type mice challenged with high doses of L. monocytogenes. Together, these findings demonstrate the utility of murine listeriosis as a model for dissecting qualitative differences between protective and pathological host responses and reveal novel roles for FXI in exacerbating inflammation and pathogen burden during a lethal bacterial infection. PMID:22006565

  18. Impact of ZnO and Ag Nanoparticles on Bacterial Growth and Viability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olson, M. S.; Digiovanni, K. A.

    2007-12-01

    Hundreds of consumer products containing nanomaterials are currently available in the U.S., including computers, clothing, cosmetics, sports equipment, medical devices and product packaging. Metallic nanoparticles can be embedded in or coated on product surfaces to provide antimicrobial, deodorizing, and stain- resistant properties. Although these products have the potential to provide significant benefit to the user, the impact of these products on the environment remains largely unknown. The purpose of this project is to study the effect of metallic nanoparticles released to the environment on bacterial growth and viability. Inhibition of bacterial growth was tested by adding doses of suspended ZnO and Ag nanoparticles into luria broth prior to inoculation of Escherichia coli cells. ZnO particles (approximately 40 nm) were obtained commercially and Ag particles (12-14 nm) were fabricated by reduction of silver nitrate with sodium borohydride. Toxicity assays were performed to test the viability of E. coli cells exposed to both ZnO and Ag nanoparticles using the LIVE/DEAD BacLight bacterial viability kit (Invitrogen). Live cells stain green whereas cells with compromised membranes that are considered dead or dying stain red. Cells were first grown, stained, and exposed to varying doses of metallic nanoparticles, and then bacterial viability was measured hourly using fluorescence microscopy. Results indicate that both ZnO and Ag nanoparticles inhibit the growth of E. coli in liquid media. Preliminary results from toxicity assays confirm the toxic effect of ZnO and Ag nanoparticles on active cell cultures. Calculated death rates resulting from analyses of toxicity studies will be presented.

  19. Preventing bacterial growth on implanted device with an interfacial metallic film and penetrating X-rays.

    PubMed

    An, Jincui; Sun, An; Qiao, Yong; Zhang, Peipei; Su, Ming

    2015-02-01

    Device-related infections have been a big problem for a long time. This paper describes a new method to inhibit bacterial growth on implanted device with tissue-penetrating X-ray radiation, where a thin metallic film deposited on the device is used as a radio-sensitizing film for bacterial inhibition. At a given dose of X-ray, the bacterial viability decreases as the thickness of metal film (bismuth) increases. The bacterial viability decreases with X-ray dose increases. At X-ray dose of 2.5 Gy, 98% of bacteria on 10 nm thick bismuth film are killed; while it is only 25% of bacteria are killed on the bare petri dish. The same dose of X-ray kills 8% fibroblast cells that are within a short distance from bismuth film (4 mm). These results suggest that penetrating X-rays can kill bacteria on bismuth thin film deposited on surface of implant device efficiently. PMID:25631261

  20. Bacterial growth efficiency in a tropical estuary: seasonal variability subsidized by allochthonous carbon.

    PubMed

    Pradeep Ram, A S; Nair, Shanta; Chandramohan, D

    2007-05-01

    Bacterial growth efficiency (BGE) is a key factor in understanding bacterial influence on carbon flow in aquatic ecosystems. We report intra-annual variability in BGE, and bacteria-mediated carbon flow in the tropical Mandovi and Zuari estuaries (southwest India) and the adjoining coastal waters (Arabian Sea). BGE ranged from 3% to 61% and showed clear temporal variability with significantly (ANOVA, p < 0.01) higher values in the estuaries (mean, 28 +/- 14%) than coastal waters (mean, 12 +/- 6%). The greater variability of BGE in the estuaries than coastal waters suggest some systematic response to nutrient composition and the variability of dissolved organic matter pools, as BGE was governed by bacterial secondary production (BP). Monsoonal rains and its accompanied changes brought significant variability in BGE and bacterial productivity/primary productivity (BP/PP) ratio when compared to nonmonsoon seasons in the estuaries and coastal waters. High BP/PP ratio (>1) together with high carbon flux through bacteria (>100% of primary productivity) in the estuarine and coastal waters suggests that bacterioplankton consumed dissolved organic carbon in excess of the amount produced in situ by phytoplankton of this region, which led to the mismatch between primary production of carbon and amount of carbon consumed by bacteria. Despite the two systems being subsidized by allochthonous inputs, the low BGE in the coastal waters may be attributable to the nature and time interval in the supply of allochthonous carbon. PMID:17356948

  1. Control of bacterial biofilm growth on surfaces by nanostructural mechanics and geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Epstein, A. K.; Hochbaum, A. I.; Kim, Philseok; Aizenberg, J.

    2011-12-01

    Surface-associated communities of bacteria, called biofilms, pervade natural and anthropogenic environments. Mature biofilms are resistant to a wide range of antimicrobial treatments and therefore pose persistent pathogenic threats. The use of surface chemistry to inhibit biofilm growth has been found to only transiently affect initial attachment. In this work, we investigate the tunable effects of physical surface properties, including high-aspect-ratio (HAR) surface nanostructure arrays recently reported to induce long-range spontaneous spatial patterning of bacteria on the surface. The functional parameters and length scale regimes that control such artificial patterning for the rod-shaped pathogenic species Pseudomonas aeruginosa are elucidated through a combinatorial approach. We further report a crossover regime of biofilm growth on a HAR nanostructured surface versus the nanostructure effective stiffness. When the 'softness' of the hair-like nanoarray is increased beyond a threshold value, biofilm growth is inhibited as compared to a flat control surface. This result is consistent with the mechanoselective adhesion of bacteria to surfaces. Therefore by combining nanoarray-induced bacterial patterning and modulating the effective stiffness of the nanoarray—thus mimicking an extremely compliant flat surface—bacterial mechanoselective adhesion can be exploited to control and inhibit biofilm growth.

  2. Analysis of bacterial growth by UV/Vis spectroscopy and laser reflectometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peña-Gomar, Mary Carmen; Viramontes-Gamboa, Gonzalo; Peña-Gomar, Grethel; Ortiz Gutiérrez, Mauricio; Hernández Ramírez, Mariano

    2012-10-01

    This work presents a preliminary study on an experimental analysis of the lactobacillus bacterial growth in liquid medium with and without the presence of silver nanoparticles. The study aims to quantify the bactericidal effect of nanoparticles. Quantification of bacterial growth at different times was analyzed by spectroscopy UV/visible and laser reflectometry near the critical angle. From these two techniques the best results were obtained by spectroscopy, showing that as the concentration of silver nanoparticles increases, it inhibits the growth of bacteria, it only grows 63% of the population. Regarding Laser Reflectometry, the variation of reflectance near the critical angle is measured in real time. The observed results at short times are reasonable, since they indicate a gradual growth of the bacteria and the stabilization stage of the population. But at long time, the observed results show abrupt changes caused by temperature effects. The bacteria were isolated from samples taken from commercial yougurth, and cultured in MRS broth at pH 6.5, and controlled with citric acid and constant temperature of 32 °C. Separately, silver nanoparticles were synthesized at 3 °C from aqueous solutions of 1.0 mM silver nitrate and chemically reduced with sodium borohydride to 2.0 mM, with magnetic stirring.

  3. Association of Growth Substrates and Bacterial Genera with Benzo[a]pyrene Mineralization in Contaminated Soil.

    PubMed

    Jones, Maiysha D; Rodgers-Vieira, Elyse A; Hu, Jing; Aitken, Michael D

    2014-12-01

    Benzo[a]pyrene (BaP) is a carcinogenic polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) that is not known to be a bacterial growth substrate. Organisms capable of cometabolizing BaP in complex field-contaminated systems have not previously been identified. We evaluated BaP mineralization by a bacterial community from a bioreactor treating PAH-contaminated soil during coincubation with or after pre-enrichment on various PAHs as growth substrates. Pyrosequence libraries of 16S rRNA genes were used to identify bacteria that were enriched on the added growth substrate as a means of associating specific organisms with BaP mineralization. Coincubating the bioreactor-treated soil with naphthalene, phenanthrene, or pyrene inhibited BaP mineralization, whereas pre-enriching the soil on the same three PAHs enhanced BaP mineralization. Combined, these results suggest that bacteria in the bioreactor community that are capable of growing on naphthalene, phenanthrene, and/or pyrene can metabolize BaP, with coincubation competitively inhibiting BaP metabolism. Anthracene, fluoranthene, and benz[a]anthracene had little effect on BaP mineralization compared to incubations without an added growth substrate under either coincubation or pre-enrichment conditions. Substantial increases in relative abundance after pre-enrichment with phenanthrene, naphthalene, or pyrene, but not the other PAHs, suggest that members of the genera Cupriavidus and Luteimonas may have been associated with BaP mineralization. PMID:25469077

  4. Characteristics of bacterial and fungal growth in plastic bottled beverages under a consuming condition model.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Maiko; Ohnishi, Takahiro; Araki, Emiko; Kanda, Takashi; Tomita, Atsuko; Ozawa, Kazuhiro; Goto, Keiichi; Sugiyama, Kanji; Konuma, Hirotaka; Hara-Kudo, Yukiko

    2014-01-01

    Microbial contamination in unfinished beverages can occur when drinking directly from the bottle. Various microorganisms, including foodborne pathogens, are able to grow in these beverages at room temperature or in a refrigerator. In this study, we elucidated the characteristics of microorganism growth in bottled beverages under consuming condition models. Furthermore, we provide insight into the safety of partially consumed bottled beverages with respect to food hygiene. We inoculated microorganisms, including foodborne pathogens, into various plastic bottled beverages and analysed the dynamic growth of microorganisms as well as bacterial toxin production in the beverages. Eight bottled beverage types were tested in this study, namely green tea, apple juice drink, tomato juice, carbonated drink, sport drink, coffee with milk, isotonic water and mineral water, and in these beverages several microorganism types were used: nine bacteria including three toxin producers, three yeasts, and five moulds. Following inoculation, the bottles were incubated at 35°C for 48 h for bacteria, 25°C for 48 h for yeasts, and 25°C for 28 days for moulds. During the incubation period, the number of bacteria and yeasts and visible changes in mould-growth were determined over time. Our results indicated that combinations of the beverage types and microorganism species correlated with the degree of growth. Regarding factors that affect the growth and toxin-productivity of microorganisms in beverages, it is speculated that the pH, static/shaking culture, temperature, additives, or ingredients, such as carbon dioxide or organic matter (especially of plant origin), may be important for microorganism growth in beverages. Our results suggest that various types of unfinished beverages have microorganism growth and can include food borne pathogens and bacterial toxins. Therefore, our results indicate that in terms of food hygiene it is necessary to consume beverages immediately after opening the bottle. PMID:24679089

  5. Inhibition of Bacterial Growth and Biofilm Production by Constituents from Hypericum spp

    PubMed Central

    Sarkisian, S.A.; Janssen, M.J.; Matta, H.; Henry, G.E.; LaPlante, K.L.; Rowley, D.C.

    2011-01-01

    Biofilm embedded bacterial pathogens such as Staphylococcus spp., Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Acinetobacter baumannii are difficult to eradicate and are major sources of bacterial infections. New drugs are needed to combat these pathogens. Hypericum is a plant genus that contains species known to have antimicrobial properties. However, the specific constituents responsible for the antimicrobial properties are not entirely known, nor have most compounds been tested as inhibitors of biofilm development. The investigation presented here tested seven secondary metabolites isolated from the species Hypericum densiflorum, Hypericumellipticum, Hypericum prolificum and Hypericum punctatum as inhibitors of bacterial growth and biofilm production. Assays were conducted against Staphylococcus epidermidis, Staphylococcusaureus, clinical methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Escherichia coli, and Acinetobacter baumannii. Five of the seven compounds demonstrated growth inhibition against the Gram-positive bacteria with minimum inhibitory concentrations (MIC) ranging from 1.95 ?g/mL to 7.81 ?g/mL. Four of the secondary metabolites inhibited biofilm production by certain Gram-positive strains at sub-MIC concentrations. PMID:22170780

  6. Measuring the stiffness of bacterial cells from growth rates in hydrogels of tunable elasticity

    PubMed Central

    Tuson, Hannah H.; Auer, George K.; Renner, Lars D.; Hasebe, Mariko; Tropini, Carolina; Salick, Max; Crone, Wendy C.; Gopinathan, Ajay; Huang, Kerwyn Casey; Weibel, Douglas B.

    2012-01-01

    Summary Although bacterial cells are known to experience large forces from osmotic pressure differences and their local microenvironment, quantitative measurements of the mechanical properties of growing bacterial cells have been limited. We provide an experimental approach and theoretical framework for measuring the mechanical properties of live bacteria. We encapsulated bacteria in agarose with a user-defined stiffness, measured the growth rate of individual cells, and fit data to a thin-shell mechanical model to extract the effective longitudinal Young's modulus of the cell envelope of Escherichia coli (50–150 MPa), Bacillus subtilis (100–200 MPa), and Pseudomonas aeruginosa (100–200 MPa). Our data provide estimates of cell wall stiffness similar to values obtained via the more labor-intensive technique of atomic force microscopy. To address physiological perturbations that produce changes in cellular mechanical properties, we tested the effect of A22-induced MreB depolymerization on the stiffness of E. coli. The effective longitudinal Young's modulus was not significantly affected by A22 treatment at short time scales, supporting a model in which the interactions between MreB and the cell wall persist on the same time scale as growth. Our technique therefore enables the rapid determination of how changes in genotype and biochemistry affect the mechanical properties of the bacterial envelope. PMID:22548341

  7. Effects of Eyjafjallajökull Volcanic Ash on Innate Immune System Responses and Bacterial Growth in Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Baltrusaitis, Jonas; Powers, Linda S.; Borcherding, Jennifer A.; Caraballo, Juan C.; Mudunkotuwa, Imali; Peate, David W.; Walters, Katherine; Thompson, Jay M.; Grassian, Vicki H.; Gudmundsson, Gunnar; Comellas, Alejandro P.

    2013-01-01

    Background: On 20 March 2010, the Icelandic volcano Eyjafjallajökull erupted for the first time in 190 years. Despite many epidemiological reports showing effects of volcanic ash on the respiratory system, there are limited data evaluating cellular mechanisms involved in the response to ash. Epidemiological studies have observed an increase in respiratory infections in subjects and populations exposed to volcanic eruptions. Methods: We physicochemically characterized volcanic ash, finding various sizes of particles, as well as the presence of several transition metals, including iron. We examined the effect of Eyjafjallajökull ash on primary rat alveolar epithelial cells and human airway epithelial cells (20–100 µg/cm2), primary rat and human alveolar macrophages (5–20 µg/cm2), and Pseudomonas aeruginosa (PAO1) growth (3 µg/104 bacteria). Results: Volcanic ash had minimal effect on alveolar and airway epithelial cell integrity. In alveolar macrophages, volcanic ash disrupted pathogen-killing and inflammatory responses. In in vitro bacterial growth models, volcanic ash increased bacterial replication and decreased bacterial killing by antimicrobial peptides. Conclusions: These results provide potential biological plausibility for epidemiological data that show an association between air pollution exposure and the development of respiratory infections. These data suggest that volcanic ash exposure, while not seriously compromising lung cell function, may be able to impair innate immunity responses in exposed individuals. PMID:23478268

  8. Longitudinal Growth Curves of Brain Function Underlying Inhibitory Control through Adolescence

    PubMed Central

    Foran, William; Velanova, Katerina; Luna, Beatriz

    2013-01-01

    Neuroimaging studies suggest that developmental improvements in inhibitory control are primarily supported by changes in prefrontal executive function. However, studies are contradictory with respect to how activation in prefrontal regions changes with age, and they have yet to analyze longitudinal data using growth curve modeling, which allows characterization of dynamic processes of developmental change, individual differences in growth trajectories, and variables that predict any interindividual variability in trajectories. In this study, we present growth curves modeled from longitudinal fMRI data collected over 302 visits (across ages 9 to 26 years) from 123 human participants. Brain regions within circuits known to support motor response control, executive control, and error processing (i.e., aspects of inhibitory control) were investigated. Findings revealed distinct developmental trajectories for regions within each circuit and indicated that a hierarchical pattern of maturation of brain activation supports the gradual emergence of adult-like inhibitory control. Mean growth curves of activation in motor response control regions revealed no changes with age, although interindividual variability decreased with development, indicating equifinality with maturity. Activation in certain executive control regions decreased with age until adolescence, and variability was stable across development. Error-processing activation in the dorsal anterior cingulate cortex showed continued increases into adulthood and no significant interindividual variability across development, and was uniquely associated with task performance. These findings provide evidence that continued maturation of error-processing abilities supports the protracted development of inhibitory control over adolescence, while motor response control regions provide early-maturing foundational capacities and suggest that some executive control regions may buttress immature networks as error processing continues to mature. PMID:24227721

  9. Longitudinal growth curves of brain function underlying inhibitory control through adolescence.

    PubMed

    Ordaz, Sarah J; Foran, William; Velanova, Katerina; Luna, Beatriz

    2013-11-13

    Neuroimaging studies suggest that developmental improvements in inhibitory control are primarily supported by changes in prefrontal executive function. However, studies are contradictory with respect to how activation in prefrontal regions changes with age, and they have yet to analyze longitudinal data using growth curve modeling, which allows characterization of dynamic processes of developmental change, individual differences in growth trajectories, and variables that predict any interindividual variability in trajectories. In this study, we present growth curves modeled from longitudinal fMRI data collected over 302 visits (across ages 9 to 26 years) from 123 human participants. Brain regions within circuits known to support motor response control, executive control, and error processing (i.e., aspects of inhibitory control) were investigated. Findings revealed distinct developmental trajectories for regions within each circuit and indicated that a hierarchical pattern of maturation of brain activation supports the gradual emergence of adult-like inhibitory control. Mean growth curves of activation in motor response control regions revealed no changes with age, although interindividual variability decreased with development, indicating equifinality with maturity. Activation in certain executive control regions decreased with age until adolescence, and variability was stable across development. Error-processing activation in the dorsal anterior cingulate cortex showed continued increases into adulthood and no significant interindividual variability across development, and was uniquely associated with task performance. These findings provide evidence that continued maturation of error-processing abilities supports the protracted development of inhibitory control over adolescence, while motor response control regions provide early-maturing foundational capacities and suggest that some executive control regions may buttress immature networks as error processing continues to mature. PMID:24227721

  10. Continuous monitoring of bacterial biofilm growth using uncoated Thickness-Shear Mode resonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castro, P.; Resa, P.; Durán, C.; Maestre, J. R.; Mateo, M.; Elvira, L.

    2012-12-01

    Quartz Crystal Microbalances (QCM) were used to nondestructively monitor in real time the microbial growth of the bacteria Staphylococcus epidermidis (S. epidermidis) in a liquid broth. QCM, sometimes referred to as Thickness-Shear Mode (TSM) resonators, are highly sensitive sensors not only able to measure very small mass, but also non-gravimetric contributions of viscoelastic media. These devices can be used as biosensors for bacterial detection and are employed in many applications including their use in the food industry, water and environment monitoring, pharmaceutical sciences and clinical diagnosis. In this work, three strains of S. epidermidis (which differ in the ability to produce biofilm) have been continuously monitored using an array of piezoelectric TSM resonators, at 37 °C in a selective culturing media. Microbial growth was followed by measuring the changes in the crystal resonant frequency and bandwidth at several harmonics. It was shown that microbial growth can be monitored in real time using multichannel and multiparametric QCM sensors.

  11. Effect of media components on cell growth and bacterial cellulose production from Acetobacter aceti MTCC 2623.

    PubMed

    Dayal, Manmeet Singh; Goswami, Navendu; Sahai, Anshuman; Jain, Vibhor; Mathur, Garima; Mathur, Ashwani

    2013-04-15

    Acetobacter aceti MTCC 2623 was studied as an alternative microbial source for bacterial cellulose (BC) production. Effect of media components on cell growth rate, BC production and cellulose characteristics were studied. FTIR results showed significant variations in cellulose characteristics produced by A. aceti in different media. Results have shown the role of fermentation time on crystallinity ratio of BC in different media. Further, effect of six different media components on cell growth and BC production was studied using fractional factorial design. Citric acid was found to be the most significant media component for cell growth rate (95% confidence level, R(2)=0.95). However, direct role of these parameters on cellulose production was not established (p-value>0.05). PMID:23544503

  12. Scaling laws governing stochastic growth and division of single bacterial cells

    E-print Network

    Iyer-Biswas, Srividya; Henry, Jonathan T; Lo, Klevin; Burov, Stanislav; Lin, Yihan; Crooks, Gavin E; Crosson, Sean; Dinner, Aaron R; Scherer, Norbert F

    2014-01-01

    Uncovering the quantitative laws that govern the growth and division of single cells remains a major challenge. Using a unique combination of technologies that yields unprecedented statistical precision, we find that the sizes of individual Caulobacter crescentus cells increase exponentially in time. We also establish that they divide upon reaching a critical multiple ($\\approx$1.8) of their initial sizes, rather than an absolute size. We show that when the temperature is varied, the growth and division timescales scale proportionally with each other over the physiological temperature range. Strikingly, the cell-size and division-time distributions can both be rescaled by their mean values such that the condition-specific distributions collapse to universal curves. We account for these observations with a minimal stochastic model that is based on an autocatalytic cycle. It predicts the scalings, as well as specific functional forms for the universal curves. Our experimental and theoretical analysis reveals a ...

  13. Thermal design and turbidity sensor for autonomous bacterial growth measurements in spaceflight.

    PubMed

    van Benthem, Roel; Krooneman, Janneke; de Grave, Wubbo; Hammenga-Dorenbos, Hilma

    2009-04-01

    For application of biological air filters in manned spacecraft, research on bacterial growth is carried out under microgravity conditions. For the BIOFILTER experiment, flown in 2005 on FOTON M2, eight turbidity sensors to measure the growth rate of the bacterium Xanthobacter autotrophicus GJ10 were used. Also thermal management provisions were implemented to control the internal temperature. The design and performance of the BIOFILTER equipment as well as results of the biological ground reference experiments performed in 2006 are discussed. High-performance thermal (vacuum) insulation (lambda= 0.7 mW/mK) and phase change material were implemented, keeping the BIOFILTER internal temperature below 16 degrees C during the 4-day integration period between transport and launch. After launch, in microgravity, the growth of X. autotrophicus GJ10 was successfully triggered by a temperature increase by using an internal heater to 26 degrees C. Although the operation of the sensor electronics was not fully satisfying, the bacterial growth was measured with the sensors, revealing growth rates between 0.046 and 0.077 h(-1) in microgravity, that is, approximately 1.5-2.5 times slower than routinely measured on Earth under optimal laboratory conditions. For the ground-reference experiments the equipment box, containing the eight sensors, was placed on a random positioning machine performing random rotations at 0.5 degrees /min (settling compensation) and 90 degrees /min (microgravity simulation) while the environment was controlled, accurately repeating the BIOFILTER internal temperature profile. Despite the rotation speed differences, growth rates of 0.115 h(-1) were confirmed by both the ground reference experiments. Biological interpretation of the measurements is, however, compromised owing to poor mixing and other unknown physical and biological phenomena that need to be addressed for further space experiments using these kinds of systems. PMID:19426313

  14. Causal factors and consequences of parent involvement growth: the second-order latent growth curve model

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Varaporn Yamtim

    The purposes of this research were to 1) assess the training needs of teachers and parents in parent involvement and 3M principle roles (M1: moral supporter, M2: monitor, and M3: mentor), 2) investigate the results of the school-based training on the teachers' skills, and 3) examine the effects of causal factors and the consequences of the parent involvement growth on

  15. Growth curves of anthropometric indices in a general population of French children and comparison with reference data

    Microsoft Academic Search

    B Heude; A Kettaneh; B de Lauzon Guillain; A Lommez; J-M Borys; P Ducimetière; M-A Charles

    2006-01-01

    Background:The description of growth patterns of the different anthropometric measurements mainly used in epidemiological studies is useful to better understand the development of obesity in children and its consequences.Objective:Our aim was to establish growth curves of anthropometric indices in a general population of French children born during the 1980s and to compare them with the French reference curves based on

  16. Carboxyl-modified single-walled carbon nanotubes negatively affect bacterial growth and denitrification activity

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Xiong; Su, Yinglong; Chen, Yinguang; Wan, Rui; Li, Mu; Wei, Yuanyuan; Huang, Haining

    2014-01-01

    Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) have been used in a wide range of fields, and the surface modification via carboxyl functionalization can further improve their physicochemical properties. However, whether carboxyl-modified SWNT poses potential risks to microbial denitrification after its release into the environment remains unknown. Here we present the possible effects of carboxyl-modified SWNT on the growth and denitrification activity of Paracoccus denitrificans (a model denitrifying bacterium). It was found that carboxyl-modified SWNT were present both outside and inside the bacteria, and thus induced bacterial growth inhibition at the concentrations of 10 and 50?mg/L. After 24?h of exposure, the final nitrate concentration in the presence of 50?mg/L carboxyl-modified SWNT was 21-fold higher than that in its absence, indicating that nitrate reduction was substantially suppressed by carboxyl-modified SWNT. The transcriptional profiling revealed that carboxyl-modified SWNT led to the transcriptional activation of the genes encoding ribonucleotide reductase in response to DNA damage and also decreased the gene expressions involved in glucose metabolism and energy production, which was an important reason for bacterial growth inhibition. Moreover, carboxyl-modified SWNT caused the significant down-regulation and lower activity of nitrate reductase, which was consistent with the decreased efficiency of nitrate reduction. PMID:25008009

  17. Carboxyl-modified single-walled carbon nanotubes negatively affect bacterial growth and denitrification activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Xiong; Su, Yinglong; Chen, Yinguang; Wan, Rui; Li, Mu; Wei, Yuanyuan; Huang, Haining

    2014-07-01

    Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) have been used in a wide range of fields, and the surface modification via carboxyl functionalization can further improve their physicochemical properties. However, whether carboxyl-modified SWNT poses potential risks to microbial denitrification after its release into the environment remains unknown. Here we present the possible effects of carboxyl-modified SWNT on the growth and denitrification activity of Paracoccus denitrificans (a model denitrifying bacterium). It was found that carboxyl-modified SWNT were present both outside and inside the bacteria, and thus induced bacterial growth inhibition at the concentrations of 10 and 50 mg/L. After 24 h of exposure, the final nitrate concentration in the presence of 50 mg/L carboxyl-modified SWNT was 21-fold higher than that in its absence, indicating that nitrate reduction was substantially suppressed by carboxyl-modified SWNT. The transcriptional profiling revealed that carboxyl-modified SWNT led to the transcriptional activation of the genes encoding ribonucleotide reductase in response to DNA damage and also decreased the gene expressions involved in glucose metabolism and energy production, which was an important reason for bacterial growth inhibition. Moreover, carboxyl-modified SWNT caused the significant down-regulation and lower activity of nitrate reductase, which was consistent with the decreased efficiency of nitrate reduction.

  18. Bacterial Growth Rates and Competition Affect Nodulation and Root Colonization by Rhizobium meliloti

    PubMed Central

    Li, De-Ming; Alexander, Martin

    1986-01-01

    The addition of streptomycin to nonsterile soil suppressed the numbers of bacterial cells in the rhizosphere of alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.) for several days, resulted in the enhanced growth of a streptomycin-resistant strain of Rhizobium meliloti, and increased the numbers of nodules on the alfalfa roots. A bacterial mixture inoculated into sterile soil inhibited the colonization of alfalfa roots by R. meliloti, caused a diminution in the number of nodules, and reduced plant growth. Enterobacter aerogenes, Pseudomonas marginalis, Acinetobacter sp., and Klebsiella pneumoniae suppressed the colonization by R. meliloti of roots grown on agar and reduced nodulation by R. meliloti, the suppression of nodulation being statistically significant for the first three species. Bradyrhizobium sp. and “Sarcina lutea” did not suppress root colonization nor nodulation by R. meliloti. The doubling times in the rhizosphere for E. aerogenes, P. marginalis, Acinetobacter sp., and K. pneumoniae were less and the doubling times for Bradyrhizobium sp. and “S. lutea” were greater than the doubling time of R. meliloti. Under the same conditions, Arthrobacter citreus injured alfalfa roots. We suggest that competition by soil bacteria reduces nodulation by rhizobia in soil and that the extent of inhibition is related to the growth rates of the rhizosphere bacteria. PMID:16347173

  19. Simulations of bacterial growth in the shallow subsurface on planets with tenuous atmospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavlov, A.; Bochnowski, A.; Kronyak, R.

    2012-12-01

    Atmospheric pressure is an important unknown parameter, which can affect potential habitability of an earth-like planet. It has been suggested that low pressure by itself can inhibit growth of terrestrial microbes on the surface of Mars however the exact mechanisms for such inhibition was never explained. We performed laboratory simulations of the survival and replication of E. Coli in the Martian simulation chamber. E. Coli was introduced into JSC-Mars-1A soil samples saturated with ~30% of H2O by weight with necessary amounts of nutrients and maintained at soil temperatures of 16-20 C - to ensure that neither water content, nutrients nor temperatures would impede bacterial growth. Several experimental runs were performed with atmospheric pressures as low as 17 mbars. We discovered that E.Coli (a non-extremophilic terrestrial microorganism) could grow within 1 cm from the planetary surface even if the atmospheric pressures are Martian-like. We conclude that low atmospheric pressure by itself is not inhibiting for bacterial growth on earth-like planets with tenuous atmospheres.

  20. Vaginal lactobacilli inhibiting growth of Gardnerella vaginalis, Mobiluncus and other bacterial species cultured from vaginal content of women with bacterial vaginosis.

    PubMed

    Skarin, A; Sylwan, J

    1986-12-01

    On a solid agar medium the growth-inhibitory effect of 9 Lactobacillus strains cultured from vaginal content was tested on bacteria cultured from vaginal content of women with bacterial vaginosis: Mobiluncus, Gardnerella vaginalis, Bacteroides and anaerobic cocci. Inhibition zones were observed in the growth of all of the strains isolated from women with bacterial vaginosis around all lactobacilli. The inhibitory effect of the lactobacilli was further tested on various anaerobic and facultatively anaerobic species, both type strains and fresh extragenitally cultured strains. Four Bacteroides fragilis strains as well as 2 out of 4 Staphylococcus aureus strains were clearly inhibited by the lactobacilli. The inhibition zones were generally wider at pH 5.5 than at 6.0. For all inhibited strains, (the S. aureus excepted) a low pH on the agar around the lactobacilli correlated to wider growth-inhibition zones. PMID:3494379

  1. Ammonia produced by bacterial colonies promotes growth of ampicillin-sensitive Serratia sp. by means of antibiotic inactivation.

    PubMed

    Cepl, Jaroslav; Blah?šková, Anna; Cvr?ková, Fatima; Markoš, Anton

    2014-05-01

    Volatiles produced by bacterial cultures are known to induce regulatory and metabolic alterations in nearby con-specific or heterospecific bacteria, resulting in phenotypic changes including acquisition of antibiotic resistance. We observed unhindered growth of ampicillin-sensitive Serratia rubidaea and S. marcescens on ampicillin-containing media, when exposed to volatiles produced by dense bacterial growth. However, this phenomenon appeared to result from pH increase in the medium caused by bacterial volatiles rather than alterations in the properties of the bacterial cultures, as alkalization of ampicillin-containing culture media to pH 8.5 by ammonia or Tris exhibited the same effects, while pretreatment of bacterial cultures under the same conditions prior to antibiotic exposure did not increase ampicillin resistance. Ampicillin was readily inactivated at pH 8.5, suggesting that observed bacterial growth results from metabolic alteration of the medium, rather than an active change in the target bacterial population (i.e. induction of resistance or tolerance). However, even such seemingly simple mechanism may provide a biologically meaningful basis for protection against antibiotics in microbial communities growing on semi-solid media. PMID:24716667

  2. Journal of Theoretical Biology 244 (2007) 326348 Bacterial gene regulation in diauxic and non-diauxic growth

    E-print Network

    Pilyugin, Sergei S.

    Journal of Theoretical Biology 244 (2007) 326­348 Bacterial gene regulation in diauxic and non-diauxic growth Atul Naranga,�, Sergei S. Pilyuginb a Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Florida growth-limiting substrates, they exhibit a rich spectrum of substrate consumption patterns including

  3. Curved-lattice epitaxial growth of In(x)Al(1-x)N nanospirals with tailored chirality.

    PubMed

    Hsiao, Ching-Lien; Magnusson, Roger; Palisaitis, Justinas; Sandström, Per; Persson, Per O Å; Valyukh, Sergiy; Hultman, Lars; Järrendahl, Kenneth; Birch, Jens

    2015-01-14

    Chirality, tailored by external morphology and internal composition, has been realized by controlled curved-lattice epitaxial growth of In(x)Al(1-x)N nanospirals. The curved morphology of the spiral segments is a result of a lateral compositional gradient while maintaining a preferred crystallographic growth direction, implying a lateral gradient in optical properties. Individual nanospirals show an asymmetric core-shell structure with curved basal planes. Mueller matrix spectroscopic ellipsometry shows that the tailored chirality is manifested in the polarization state of light reflected off the nanospirals. PMID:25427233

  4. Growth and location of bacterial colonies within dairy foods using microscopy techniques: a review

    PubMed Central

    Hickey, Cian D.; Sheehan, Jeremiah J.; Wilkinson, Martin G.; Auty, Mark A. E.

    2015-01-01

    The growth, location, and distribution of bacterial colonies in dairy products are important factors for the ripening and flavor development of cheeses, yogurts, and soured creams. Starter, non-starter, spoilage, and pathogenic bacteria all become entrapped in the developing casein matrix of dairy foods. In order to visualize these bacterial colonies and the environments surrounding them, microscopy techniques are used. The use of various microscopy methods allow for the rapid detection, enumeration, and distribution of starter, non-starter and pathogenic bacteria in dairy foods. Confocal laser scanning microscopy is extensively utilized to identify bacteria location via the use of fluorescent dyes. Further study is needed in relation to the development of micro- gradients and localized ripening parameters in dairy products due to the location of bacteria at the protein–fat interface. Development in the area of bacterial discrimination using microscopy techniques and fluorescent dyes/tags is needed as the benefits of rapidly identifying spoilage/pathogenic bacteria early in product manufacture would be of huge benefit in relation to both safety and financial concerns. PMID:25741328

  5. Zinc-Triggered Hydrogelation of Self-assembled Small Molecules to Inhibit Bacterial Growth

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Chao; Cai, Yanbin; Ren, Chunhua; Gao, Jie; Hao, Jihui

    2015-01-01

    There is a significant need to develop antibacterial materials that could be applied locally and directly to the places surrounded by large amount of bacteria, in order to address the problems of bacterial antibiotic-resistance or irreversible biofilm formation. Hydrogels are thought to be suitable candidates due to their versatile applications in biomedical field. Among them, small molecular hydrogels have been paid lots of attention because they are easy to design and fabricate and often sensitive to external stimuli. Meanwhile, the antibacterial activity of metal ions are attracting more and more attention because resistance to them are not yet found within bacteria. We therefore designed the zinc ion binding peptide of Nap-GFFYGGGHGRGD, who can self-assemble into hydrogels after binds Zn2+ and inhibit the growth of bacteria due to the excellent antibacterial activity of Zn2+. Upon the addition of zinc ions, solutions containing Nap-GFFYGGGHGRGD transformed into supramolecular hydrogels composed of network of long nano-fibers. Bacterial tests revealed an antibacterial effect of the zinc triggered hydrogels on E. coli. The studied small molecular hydrogel shows great potential in locally addressing bacterial infections. PMID:25583430

  6. Zinc-Triggered Hydrogelation of Self-assembled Small Molecules to Inhibit Bacterial Growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Chao; Cai, Yanbin; Ren, Chunhua; Gao, Jie; Hao, Jihui

    2015-01-01

    There is a significant need to develop antibacterial materials that could be applied locally and directly to the places surrounded by large amount of bacteria, in order to address the problems of bacterial antibiotic-resistance or irreversible biofilm formation. Hydrogels are thought to be suitable candidates due to their versatile applications in biomedical field. Among them, small molecular hydrogels have been paid lots of attention because they are easy to design and fabricate and often sensitive to external stimuli. Meanwhile, the antibacterial activity of metal ions are attracting more and more attention because resistance to them are not yet found within bacteria. We therefore designed the zinc ion binding peptide of Nap-GFFYGGGHGRGD, who can self-assemble into hydrogels after binds Zn2+ and inhibit the growth of bacteria due to the excellent antibacterial activity of Zn2+. Upon the addition of zinc ions, solutions containing Nap-GFFYGGGHGRGD transformed into supramolecular hydrogels composed of network of long nano-fibers. Bacterial tests revealed an antibacterial effect of the zinc triggered hydrogels on E. coli. The studied small molecular hydrogel shows great potential in locally addressing bacterial infections.

  7. Growth and location of bacterial colonies within dairy foods using microscopy techniques: a review.

    PubMed

    Hickey, Cian D; Sheehan, Jeremiah J; Wilkinson, Martin G; Auty, Mark A E

    2015-01-01

    The growth, location, and distribution of bacterial colonies in dairy products are important factors for the ripening and flavor development of cheeses, yogurts, and soured creams. Starter, non-starter, spoilage, and pathogenic bacteria all become entrapped in the developing casein matrix of dairy foods. In order to visualize these bacterial colonies and the environments surrounding them, microscopy techniques are used. The use of various microscopy methods allow for the rapid detection, enumeration, and distribution of starter, non-starter and pathogenic bacteria in dairy foods. Confocal laser scanning microscopy is extensively utilized to identify bacteria location via the use of fluorescent dyes. Further study is needed in relation to the development of micro- gradients and localized ripening parameters in dairy products due to the location of bacteria at the protein-fat interface. Development in the area of bacterial discrimination using microscopy techniques and fluorescent dyes/tags is needed as the benefits of rapidly identifying spoilage/pathogenic bacteria early in product manufacture would be of huge benefit in relation to both safety and financial concerns. PMID:25741328

  8. Functional properties of peanut fractions on the growth of probiotics and foodborne bacterial pathogens.

    PubMed

    Peng, Mengfei; Bitsko, Elizabeth; Biswas, Debabrata

    2015-03-01

    Various compounds found in peanut (Arachis hypogaea) have been shown to provide multiple benefits to human health and may influence the growth of a broad range of gut bacteria. In this study, we investigated the effects of peanut white kernel and peanut skin on 3 strains of Lactobacillus and 3 major foodborne enteric bacterial pathogens. Significant (P < 0.05) growth stimulation of Lactobacillus casei and Lactobacillus rhamnosus was observed in the presence of 0.5% peanut flour (PF) made from peanut white kernel, whereas 0.5% peanut skin extract (PSE) exerted the inhibitory effect on the growth of these beneficial microbes. We also found that within 72 h, PF inhibited growth of enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli O157:H7 (EHEC), while PSE significantly (P < 0.05) inhibited Listeria monocytogenes but promoted the growth of both EHEC and Salmonella Typhimurium. The cell adhesion and invasion abilities of 3 pathogens to the host cells were also significantly (P < 0.05) reduced by 0.5% PF and 0.5% PSE. These results suggest that peanut white kernel might assist in improving human gut flora as well as reducing EHEC, whereas the beneficial effects of peanut skins require further research and investigation. PMID:25627431

  9. Theoretical and Computational Investigation of Flagellin Translocation and Bacterial Flagellum Growth

    PubMed Central

    Tanner, David E.; Ma, Wen; Chen, Zhongzhou; Schulten, Klaus

    2011-01-01

    The bacterial flagellum is a self-assembling filament, which bacteria use for swimming. It is built from tens of thousands of flagellin monomers in a self-assembly process that involves translocation of the monomers through the flagellar interior, a channel, to the growing tip. Flagellum monomers are pumped into the filament at the base, move unfolded along the channel and then bind to the tip of the filament, thereby extending the growing flagellum. The flagellin translocation process, due to the flagellum maximum length of 20 ?m, is an extreme example of protein transport through channels. Here, we derive a model for flagellin transport through the long confining channel, testing the key assumptions of the model through molecular dynamics simulations that also furnish system parameters needed for quantitative description. Together, mathematical model and molecular dynamics simulations explain why the growth rate of flagellar filaments decays exponentially with filament length and why flagellum growth ceases at a certain maximum length. PMID:21641299

  10. Asynchrony in the growth and motility responses to environmental changes by individual bacterial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Umehara, Senkei [Department of Life Sciences, Graduate School of Arts and Sciences, The University of Tokyo (Japan); Hattori, Akihiro [Department of Biomedical Information, Division of Biosystems, Institute of Biomaterials and Bioengineering, Tokyo Medical and Dental University (Japan); Inoue, Ippei [Department of Life Sciences, Graduate School of Arts and Sciences, The University of Tokyo (Japan); Yasuda, Kenji [Department of Biomedical Information, Division of Biosystems, Institute of Biomaterials and Bioengineering, Tokyo Medical and Dental University (Japan)]. E-mail: yasuda.bmi@tmd.ac.jp

    2007-05-04

    Knowing how individual cells respond to environmental changes helps one understand phenotypic diversity in a bacterial cell population, so we simultaneously monitored the growth and motility of isolated motile Escherichia coli cells over several generations by using a method called on-chip single-cell cultivation. Starved cells quickly stopped growing but remained motile for several hours before gradually becoming immotile. When nutrients were restored the cells soon resumed their growth and proliferation but remained immotile for up to six generations. A flagella visualization assay suggested that deflagellation underlies the observed loss of motility. This set of results demonstrates that single-cell transgenerational study under well-characterized environmental conditions can provide information that will help us understand distinct functions within individual cells.

  11. Determining Cloud Parameters with the Curve-Of-Growth: Application Eta Car

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vieira, G. L.; Gull, T. R.; Bruhweiler, F.; Nielsen, K. E.; Verner, E. M.

    2004-01-01

    We have investigated the NUV part of the Eta Car spectrum, using data with high spatial and high spectral resolving power obtained with the HST/STIS under the Treasury Program. The NUV spectrum of Eta Car Shows a great contribution of absorption features from neutral and singly ionized elements along the line-of-sight. A large number of velocity systems have been observed. The two most prominent, with Doppler shifts corresponding to -146 and -513 km/s respectively, are shown to be useful for investigations of the gaseous environments responsible for the absorption. The -146 and the -513 km/s velocity systems display different characteristics regarding the ionization state and spectral line width, which suggest that they originate at different distances from the central object. We have investigated the absorption structures before the spectroscopic minimum, occurring during the summer of 2003, with a standard curve-of-growth. We have independently derived the column density and the b-value for the Fe II (-146 km/s) and Ti II (-513 km/s) velocity systems. The excitation temperature has been determined for the -146 km/s velocity system using the photo-ionization code \\textsc(cloudy). The -146 km/s velocity structure shows noticeable variation over the spectroscopic minimum. The sudden appearance and disappearance of Ti II and V II are astonishing. We have made an attempt to analyze these variations with the curve-of-growth method and will present preliminary results.

  12. Alcohol, Intestinal Bacterial Growth, Intestinal Permeability to Endotoxin, and Medical Consequences

    PubMed Central

    Purohit, Vishnudutt; Bode, J. Christian; Bode, Christiane; Brenner, David A.; Choudhry, Mashkoor A.; Hamilton, Frank; Kang, Y. James; Keshavarzian, Ali; Rao, Radhakrishna; Sartor, R. Balfour; Swanson, Christine; Turner, Jerrold R.

    2008-01-01

    This report is a summary of the symposium on Alcohol, Intestinal Bacterial Growth, Intestinal Permeability to Endotoxin, and Medical Consequences, organized by National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, Office of Dietary Supplements, and National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases of National Institutes of Health in Rockville, Maryland, October 11, 2006. Alcohol exposure can promote the growth of Gram negative bacteria in the intestine which may result in accumulation of endotoxin. In addition, alcohol metabolism by Gram negative bacteria and intestinal epithelial cells can result in accumulation of acetaldehyde, which in turn can increase intestinal permeability to endotoxin by increasing tyrosine phosphorylation of tight junction and adherens junction proteins. Alcohol-induced generation of nitric oxide may also contribute to increased permeability to endotoxin by reacting with tubulin, which may cause damage to microtubule cytoskeleton and subsequent disruption of intestinal barrier function. Increased intestinal permeability can lead to increased transfer of endotoxin from the intestine to the liver and general circulation where endotoxin may trigger inflammatory changes in the liver and other organs. Alcohol may also increase intestinal permeability to peptidoglycan which can initiate inflammatory response in liver and other organs. In addition, acute alcohol exposure may potentiate the effect of burn injury on intestinal bacterial growth and permeability. Decreasing the number of Gram negative bacteria in the intestine can result in decreased production of endotoxin as well as acetaldehyde which is expected to decrease intestinal permeability to endotoxin. In addition, intestinal permeability may be preserved by administering epidermal growth factor, L-glutamine, oats supplementation, or zinc thereby preventing the transfer of endotoxin to the general circulation. Thus reducing the number of intestinal Gram negative bacteria and preserving intestinal permeability to endotoxin may attenuate alcoholic liver and other organ injuries. PMID:18504085

  13. Effect of Humic Substance Photodegradation on Bacterial Growth and Respiration in Lake Water

    PubMed Central

    Anesio, Alexandre M.; Granéli, Wilhelm; Aiken, George R.; Kieber, David J.; Mopper, Kenneth

    2005-01-01

    This study addresses how humic substance (HS) chemical composition and photoreactivity affect bacterial growth, respiration, and growth efficiency (BGE) in lake water. Aqueous solutions of HSs from diverse aquatic environments representing different dissolved organic matter sources (autochthonous and allochthonous) were exposed to artificial solar UV radiation. These solutions were added to lake water passed through a 0.7-?m-pore-size filter (containing grazer-free lake bacteria) followed by dark incubation for 5, 43, and 65 h. For the 5-h incubation, several irradiated HSs inhibited bacterial carbon production (BCP) and this inhibition was highly correlated with H2O2 photoproduction. The H2O2 decayed in the dark, and after 43 h, nearly all irradiated HSs enhanced BCP (average 39% increase relative to nonirradiated controls, standard error = 7.5%, n = 16). UV exposure of HSs also increased bacterial respiration (by ?18%, standard error = 5%, n = 4), but less than BCP, resulting in an average increase in BGE of 32% (standard error = 10%, n = 4). Photoenhancement of BCP did not correlate to HS bulk properties (i.e., elemental and chemical composition). However, when the photoenhancement of BCP was normalized to absorbance, several trends with HS origin and extraction method emerged. Absorbance-normalized hydrophilic acid and humic acid samples showed greater enhancement of BCP than hydrophobic acid and fulvic acid samples. Furthermore, absorbance-normalized autochthonous samples showed ?10-fold greater enhancement of BCP than allochthonous-dominated samples, indicating that the former are more efficient photoproducers of biological substrates. PMID:16204548

  14. Effect of humic substance photodegradation on bacterial growth and respiration in lake water

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Anesio, A.M.; Graneli, W.; Aiken, G.R.; Kieber, D.J.; Mopper, K.

    2005-01-01

    This study addresses how humic substance (HS) chemical composition and photoreactivity affect bacterial growth, respiration, and growth efficiency (BGE) in lake water. Aqueous solutions of HSs from diverse aquatic environments representing different dissolved organic matter sources (autochthonous and allochthonous) were exposed to artificial solar UV radiation. These solutions were added to lake water passed through a 0.7-??m-pore-size filter (containing grazer-free lake bacteria) followed by dark incubation for 5, 43, and 65 h. For the 5-h incubation, several irradiated HSs inhibited bacterial carbon production (BCP) and this inhibition was highly correlated with H 2O2 photoproduction. The H2O2 decayed in the dark, and after 43 h, nearly all irradiated HSs enhanced BCP (average 39% increase relative to nonirradiated controls, standard error = 7.5%, n = 16). UV exposure of HSs also increased bacterial respiration (by ???18%, standard error = 5%, n = 4), but less than BCP, resulting in an average increase in BGE of 32% (standard error = 10%, n = 4). Photoenhancement of BCP did not correlate to HS bulk properties (i.e., elemental and chemical composition). However, when the photoenhancement of BCP was normalized to absorbance, several trends with HS origin and extraction method emerged. Absorbance-normalized hydrophilic acid and humic acid samples showed greater enhancement of BCP than hydrophobic acid and fulvic acid samples. Furthermore, absorbance-normalized autochthonous samples showed ???10-fold greater enhancement of BCP than allochthonous-dominated samples, indicating that the former are more efficient photoproducers of biological substrates. Copyright ?? 2005, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  15. Bursts of sectors in expanding bacterial colonies as a possible model for tumor growth and metastases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ron, Ilan G.; Golding, Ido; Lifsitz-Mercer, Beatrice; Ben-Jacob, Eshel

    2003-03-01

    All kinds of hypotheses have been proposed to explain the mechanism of tumorigenesis. Up until now, we have not had any generally acknowledged model that helps us understand the process. However, it is well accepted that cancer development and progression is dictated by a series of alterations in genes such as oncogenes, tumor suppressor genes, DNA replication genes and others. Segregation of cell populations is a key question in evolution theory. One important aspect when observing cell proliferation in general or bacterial colonies in particular is the relation between spatial organization and the composition of the populations. Here we study a specific example-sectors in expanding bacterial colonies. Such sectors are spatially segregated sub-populations of mutants. Bursts of sectors are observed during compact growth and during branching growth. For theoretical studies of these bursts we employ two mathematical models. Using these models we investigate the amount of segregation achieved by a neutral mutation, as well as by mutations having some advantage over the wild type.

  16. Bacterial growth in the cold: Evidence for an enhanced substrate requirement

    SciTech Connect

    Wiebe, W.J.; Sheldon, W.M. Jr.; Pomeroy, L.R. (Univ. of Georgia, Athens (United States))

    1992-01-01

    Growth responses and biovolume changes for four facultatively psychrophilic bacterial isolates from Conception Bay, Newfoundland, and the Arctic Ocean were examined at temperatures from {minus}1.5 to 35C, with substrate concentrations of 0.15, 1.5, and 1,500 mg of proteose peptone-yeast extract per liter. For two cultures, growth in 0.1, 1.0, and 1,000 mg of proline per liter was also examined. At 10 to 15C and above, growth rates showed no marked effect of substrate concentration, while at {minus}1.5 and 0C, there was an increasing requirement for organic nutrients, with generation times in low-nutrient media that were two to three times longer than in high-nutrient media. Biovolume showed a clear dependence on substrate concentration and quality; the largest cells were in the highest-nutrient media. Biovolume was also affected by temperature; the largest cells were found at the lowest temperatures. These data have implications for both food web structure and carbon flow in cold waters and for the effects of global climate change, since the change in growth rate is most dramatic at the lowest temperatures.

  17. Assessment of bacterial growth and total organic carbon removal on granular activated carbon contactors.

    PubMed Central

    Bancroft, K; Maloney, S W; McElhaney, J; Suffet, I H; Pipes, W O

    1983-01-01

    The overall growth rate of bacteria on granular activated carbon (GAC) contactors at the Philadelphia Torresdale Water Treatment Pilot Plant facility was found to decrease until steady state was reached. The growth rate was found to fluctuate between 6.94 X 10(-3) and 8.68 X 10(-4) doublings per h. The microbiological removal of total organic carbon (TOC) was calculated by considering the GAC contactors as semiclosed continuous culture systems and using growth yield factors determined in laboratory experiments. After ozonation, the average TOC entering the contactors was 1,488 micrograms/liter, and the average effluent TOC was 497 micrograms/liter. Microbiological TOC removal was found to average 240 micrograms/liter on GAC contactors, which was not significantly different from microbiological TOC (220 micrograms/liter) removal across a parallel sand contactor where no adsorption took place. Thus, GAC did not appear to enhance biological TOC removal. Bacterial growth and maintenance was responsible for approximately 24% of the TOC removal on GAC under the conditions of this study. PMID:6639023

  18. Essays on the predictability of oil shocks and yield curves for real-time output growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlton, Amelie B.

    This dissertation is a collection of three essays that revisits the long-standing puzzle of the apparently disproportionate effect of oil prices in the economy by examining output growth predictability with real-time data. Each study of the predictive content of oil shocks is from a different perspective by using newly developed real-time datasets, which allows for replicating the economic environment faced by policymakers in real time. The first study extends the conventional set of models of output growth determination by investigating predictability of models that incorporate various functional forms of oil prices and real-time data. The results are supportive of the relationship of GDP and oil in the context of Granger causality with real-time data. In the second essay, I use oil shocks to predict the economy is changing direction earlier than would be predicted by solely using initial GDP releases. The model provides compelling evidence of negative GDP growth predictability in response to oil price shocks, which could shorten the "recognition lag" for successful implementation of discretionary counter-cyclical policies. In the third essay, I evaluate short-horizon output growth predictability using real-time data for different sample periods. I find strong evidence of predictability at the one-quarter and four-quarter horizon for the United States. The major result of the paper is that we reject the null hypothesis of no predictability against an alternative hypothesis of predictability with oil shocks that include yield curves in the forecasting regression. This relationship suggests the combination of monetary policy and oil shocks are important for subsequent GDP growth.

  19. 7, 787822, 2010 Increased bacterial

    E-print Network

    Poggiale, Jean-Christophe

    BGD 7, 787­822, 2010 Increased bacterial growth efficiency with environmental variability M if available. Increased bacterial growth efficiency with environmental variability: results from DOC­822, 2010 Increased bacterial growth efficiency with environmental variability M. Eichinger et al. Title

  20. Identifying longitudinal growth trajectories of learning domains in problem-based learning: a latent growth curve modeling approach using SEM.

    PubMed

    Wimmers, Paul F; Lee, Ming

    2015-05-01

    To determine the direction and extent to which medical student scores (as observed by small-group tutors) on four problem-based-learning-related domains change over nine consecutive blocks during a two-year period (Domains: Problem Solving/Use of Information/Group Process/Professionalism). Latent growth curve modeling is used to analyze performance trajectories in each domain of two cohorts of 1st and 2nd year students (n = 296). Slopes of the growth trajectories show similar linear increments in the first three domains. Further analysis revealed relative strong individual variability in initial scores but not in their later increments. Professionalism, on the other hand, shows low variability and has very small, insignificant slope increments. In this study, we showed that the learning domains (Problem Solving, Use of Information, and Group Process) observed during PBL tutorials are not only related to each other but also develop cumulatively over time. Professionalism, in contrast to the other domains studied, is less affected by the curriculum suggesting that this represents a stable characteristic. The observation that the PBL tutorial has an equal benefit to all students is noteworthy and needs further investigation. PMID:25118860

  1. Latent growth curve analyses of peer and parent influences on smoking progression among early adolescents.

    PubMed

    Simons-Morton, Bruce; Chen, Rusan; Abroms, Lorien; Haynie, Denise L

    2004-11-01

    Social influences on smoking uptake were examined in latent growth curve analyses of data from 1,320 youths assessed 5 times during 6th to 9th grade. Initial smoking stage predicted increases in number of friends who smoked, indicating selection; however, initial number of friends who smoked did not predict smoking stage progression, indicating no significant effect of socialization. Associations over time among smoking stage progression, affiliation with friends who smoke, and parenting behaviors were significant, suggesting dynamic, reciprocal relationships. Parental involvement, monitoring, and expectations provided direct protective effects against smoking progression as well as indirect effects, by limiting increases in number of friends who smoke. These results are consistent with the peer selection hypothesis, confirm the powerful association over time of social influences with smoking, and provide the first evidence that parenting behavior may protect against smoking progression by limiting increases in number of friends who smoke. PMID:15546229

  2. Agarose particle-templated porous bacterial cellulose and its application in cartilage growth in vitro.

    PubMed

    Yin, Na; Stilwell, Matthew D; Santos, Thiago M A; Wang, Huaping; Weibel, Douglas B

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial cellulose (BC) is a biocompatible hydrogel with a three-dimensional (3-D) structure formed by a dense network of cellulose nanofibers. A limitation of using BC for applications in tissue engineering is that the pore size of the material (?0.02-10?m) is smaller than the dimensions of mammalian cells and prevents cells from penetrating into the material and growing into 3-D structures that mimic tissues. This paper describes a new route to porous bacterial cellulose (pBC) scaffolds by cultivating Acetobacter xylinum in the presence of agarose microparticles deposited on the surface of a growing BC pellicle. Monodisperse agarose microparticles with a diameter of 300-500?m were created using a microfluidic technique, layered on growing BC pellicles and incorporated into the polymer as A. xylinum cells moved upward through the growing pellicle. Removing the agarose microparticles by autoclaving produced BC gels containing a continuous, interconnected network of pores with diameters ranging from 300 to 500?m. Human P1 chondrocytes seeded on the scaffolds, replicated, invaded the 3-D porous network and distributed evenly throughout the substrate. Chondrocytes grown on pBC substrates displayed a higher viability compared to growth on the surface of unmodified BC substrates. The approach described in this paper introduces a new method for creating pBC substrates with user-defined control over the physical dimensions of the pore network, and demonstrates the application of these materials for tissue engineering. PMID:25449918

  3. Conditional quantile regression models of melanoma tumor growth curves for assessing treatment effect in small sample studies.

    PubMed

    Revzin, Ella; Majumdar, Dibyen; Bassett, Gilbert W

    2014-12-20

    Tumor growth curves provide a simple way to understand how tumors change over time. The traditional approach to fitting such curves to empirical data has been to estimate conditional mean regression functions, which describe the average effect of covariates on growth. However, this method ignores the possibility that tumor growth dynamics are different for different quantiles of the possible distribution of growth patterns. Furthermore, typical individual preclinical cancer drug study designs have very small sample sizes and can have lower power to detect a statistically significant difference in tumor volume between treatment groups. In our work, we begin to address these issues by combining several independent small sample studies of an experimental cancer treatment with differing study designs to construct quantile tumor growth curves. For modeling, we use a Penalized Fixed Effects Quantile Regression with added study effects to control for study differences. We demonstrate this approach using data from a series of small sample studies that investigated the effect of a naturally derived biological peptide, P28, on tumor volumes in mice grafted with human melanoma cells. We find a statistically significant quantile treatment effect on tumor volume trajectories and baseline values. In particular, the experimental treatment and a corresponding conventional chemotherapy had different effects on tumor growth by quantile. The conventional treatment, Dacarbazine (DTIC), tended to inhibit growth for smaller quantiles, while the experimental treatment P28 produced slower rates of growth in the upper quantiles, especially in the 95th quantile. PMID:25231497

  4. Hydroxyapatite bioactivated bacterial cellulose promotes osteoblast growth and the formation of bone nodules

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    The goal of this study was to investigate the feasibility of bacterial cellulose (BC) scaffold to support osteoblast growth and bone formation. BC was produced by culturing Acetobacter xylinum supplemented with hydroxyapatite (HA) to form BC membranes (without HA) and BC/HA membranes. Membranes were subjected to X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) analysis to determine surface element composition. The membranes were further used to evaluate osteoblast growth, alkaline phosphatase activity and bone nodule formation. BC was free of calcium and phosphate. However, XPS analysis revealed the presence of both calcium (10%) and phosphate (10%) at the surface of the BC/HA membrane. Osteoblast culture showed that BC alone was non-toxic and could sustain osteoblast adhesion. Furthermore, osteoblast adhesion and growth were significantly (p ?0.05) increased on BC/HA membranes as compared to BC alone. Both BC and BC/HA membranes improved osteoconductivity, as confirmed by the level of alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity that increased from 2.5 mM with BC alone to 5.3 mM with BC/HA. BC/HA membranes also showed greater nodule formation and mineralization than the BC membrane alone. This was confirmed by Alizarin red staining (ARS) and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX). This work demonstrates that both BC and BC/HA may be useful in bone tissue engineering. PMID:23174338

  5. Effects of Gypsophila saponins on bacterial growth kinetics and on selection of subterranean clover rhizosphere bacteria.

    PubMed

    Fons, F; Amellal, N; Leyval, C; Saint-Martin, N; Henry, M

    2003-06-01

    Plant secondary metabolites, such as saponins, have a considerable impact in agriculture because of their allelopathic effects. They also affect the growth of soil microorganisms, especially fungi. We investigated the influence of saponins on rhizosphere bacteria in vitro and in soil conditions. The effects of gypsophila saponins on the growth kinetics of rhizosphere bacteria were studied by monitoring the absorbance of the cultures in microtiter plates. Gypsophila saponins (1%) increased the lag phase of bacterial growth. The impact of gypsophila saponins on subterranean clover rhizosphere was also investigated in a pot experiment. The addition of gypsophila saponins did not modify clover biomass but significantly increased (twofold with 1% saponins) the weight of adhering soil. The number of culturable heterotrophic bacteria of the clover rhizosphere was not affected by the addition of gypsophila saponins. Nevertheless, the phenotypical characterization of the dominant Gram-negative strains of the clover rhizosphere, using the Biolog system, showed qualitative and quantitative differences induced by 1% saponins. With the addition of saponins, the populations of Chryseomonas spp. and Acinetobacter spp., the two dominant culturable genera of control clover, were no longer detectable or were significantly decreased, while that of Aquaspirillum dispar increased and Aquaspirillum spp. became the major genus. Aquaspirillum dispar and Aquaspirillum spp. were also the dominant rhizosphere bacteria of Gypsophila paniculata, which greatly accumulates these saponins in its roots. These results suggest that saponins may control rhizosphere bacteria in soil through rhizodeposition mechanisms. PMID:14569290

  6. Btcd, a mouse protein that binds to curved DNA, can substitute in Escherichia coli for H-NS, a bacterial nucleoid protein.

    PubMed Central

    Timchenko, T; Bailone, A; Devoret, R

    1996-01-01

    In an Escherichia coli mutant devoid of H-NS, a bacterial nucleoid protein, mouse protein Btcd was able to substitute for H-NS in two tested functions. It restored cell motility and repression of the expression of the bgl operon. Btcd1, a mutant Btcd protein deleted of its zinc finger and thus having reduced DNA binding, failed to substitute for H-NS. Mouse protein Btcd was shown to repress the bgl operon at the level of transcription initiation and to bind preferentially to a curved DNA fragment encompassing the bgl promoter. These effects of Btcd on bacterial gene transcription can be accounted for by the binding of Btcd or H-NS to a curved DNA sequence near a promoter. A few mammalian proteins have been shown to substitute for their Escherichia prototypes involved in DNA and RNA transactions. The efficiency of Btcd protein in substituting for H-NS in Escherichia suggests its possible involvement in regulating gene expression in mouse cells. Images PMID:8670903

  7. Altering the growth conditions of Gluconacetobacter xylinus to maximize the yield of bacterial cellulose.

    PubMed

    Ruka, Dianne R; Simon, George P; Dean, Katherine M

    2012-06-20

    An extensive matrix of different growth conditions including media, incubation time, inoculum volume, surface area and media volume were investigated in order to maximize the yield of bacterial cellulose produced by Gluconacetobacter xylinus, which will be used as reinforcement material to produce fully biodegradable composites. Crystallinity was shown to be controllable depending on the media and conditions employed. Samples with significant difference in crystallinity in a range from 50% to 95% were produced. Through experimental design, the yield of cellulose was maximized; primarily this involved reactor surface area design, optimized media and the use of mannitol being the highest cellulose-producing carbon source. Increasing the volume of the media did achieve a higher cellulose yield, however this increase was not found to be cost or time effective. PMID:24750766

  8. Effects of Engineered Cerium Oxide Nanoparticles on Bacterial Growth and Viability?†

    PubMed Central

    Pelletier, Dale A.; Suresh, Anil K.; Holton, Gregory A.; McKeown, Catherine K.; Wang, Wei; Gu, Baohua; Mortensen, Ninell P.; Allison, David P.; Joy, David C.; Allison, Martin R.; Brown, Steven D.; Phelps, Tommy J.; Doktycz, Mitchel J.

    2010-01-01

    Interest in engineered nanostructures has risen in recent years due to their use in energy conservation strategies and biomedicine. To ensure prudent development and use of nanomaterials, the fate and effects of such engineered structures on the environment should be understood. Interactions of nanomaterials with environmental microorganisms are inevitable, but the general consequences of such interactions remain unclear, due to a lack of standard methods for assessing such interactions. Therefore, we have initiated a multianalytical approach to understand the interactions of synthesized nanoparticles with bacterial systems. These efforts are focused initially on cerium oxide nanoparticles and model bacteria in order to evaluate characterization procedures and the possible fate of such materials in the environment. The growth and viability of the Gram-negative species Escherichia coli and Shewanella oneidensis, a metal-reducing bacterium, and the Gram-positive species Bacillus subtilis were examined relative to cerium oxide particle size, growth media, pH, and dosage. A hydrothermal synthesis approach was used to prepare cerium oxide nanoparticles of defined sizes in order to eliminate complications originating from the use of organic solvents and surfactants. Bactericidal effects were determined from MIC and CFU measurements, disk diffusion tests, and live/dead assays. For E. coli and B. subtilis, clear strain- and size-dependent inhibition was observed, whereas S. oneidensis appeared to be unaffected by the particles. Transmission electron microscopy along with microarray-based transcriptional profiling was used to understand the response mechanism of the bacteria. Use of multiple analytical approaches adds confidence to toxicity assessments, while the use of different bacterial systems highlights the potential wide-ranging effects of nanomaterial interactions in the environment. PMID:20952651

  9. A New Method to Compare Statistical Tree Growth Curves: The PL-GMANOVA Model and Its Application with Dendrochronological Data

    PubMed Central

    Ricker, Martin; Peña Ramírez, Víctor M.; von Rosen, Dietrich

    2014-01-01

    Growth curves are monotonically increasing functions that measure repeatedly the same subjects over time. The classical growth curve model in the statistical literature is the Generalized Multivariate Analysis of Variance (GMANOVA) model. In order to model the tree trunk radius (r) over time (t) of trees on different sites, GMANOVA is combined here with the adapted PL regression model Q?=?A·T+E, where for and for , A?=? initial relative growth to be estimated, , and E is an error term for each tree and time point. Furthermore, Ei[–b·r] ?=?, , with TPR being the turning point radius in a sigmoid curve, and at is an estimated calibrating time-radius point. Advantages of the approach are that growth rates can be compared among growth curves with different turning point radiuses and different starting points, hidden outliers are easily detectable, the method is statistically robust, and heteroscedasticity of the residuals among time points is allowed. The model was implemented with dendrochronological data of 235 Pinus montezumae trees on ten Mexican volcano sites to calculate comparison intervals for the estimated initial relative growth . One site (at the Popocatépetl volcano) stood out, with being 3.9 times the value of the site with the slowest-growing trees. Calculating variance components for the initial relative growth, 34% of the growth variation was found among sites, 31% among trees, and 35% over time. Without the Popocatépetl site, the numbers changed to 7%, 42%, and 51%. Further explanation of differences in growth would need to focus on factors that vary within sites and over time. PMID:25402427

  10. Using Reactive Transport Modeling to Understand Changes in Electrical Conductivity Associated with Bacterial Growth and Respiration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Regberg, A. B.; Singha, K.; Picardal, F.; Brantley, S. L.

    2011-12-01

    Previous research has linked measured changes in the bulk electrical conductivity (?b) of water-saturated sediments to the respiration and growth of anaerobic bacteria. If the mechanism causing this signal is understood and characterized it could be used to identify and monitor zones of bacterial activity in the subsurface. The 1-D reactive transport model PHREEQC was used to understand ?b signals by modeling chemical gradients within two column reactors and corresponding changes in effluent chemistry. The flow-through column reactors were packed with Fe(III)-bearing sediment from Oyster, VA and inoculated with an environmental consortia of microorganisms. Influent in the first reactor was amended with 1mM Na-acetate to encourage the growth of iron-reducing bacteria. Influent in the second reactor was amended with 0.1mM Na-Acetate and 2mM NaNO3 to encourage the growth of nitrate-reducing bacteria. While effluent concentrations of acetate, Fe(II), NO3-, NO2-, and NH4+ remained at steady state, we measured a 3-fold increase (0.055 S/m - 0.2 S/m) in ?b in the iron-reducing column and a 10-fold increase in ?b (0.07 S/m - 0.8 S/m) in the nitrate-reducing column over 198 days. The ionic strength in both reactors remained constant through time indicating that the measured increases in ?b were not caused by changing effluent concentrations. PHREEQC successfully matched the measured changes in effluent concentrations for both columns when the reaction database was modified in the following manner. For the iron-reducing column, kinetic expressions governing the rate of iron reduction, the rate of bacterial growth, and the production of methane were added to the reaction database. Additionally, surface adsorption and cation exchange reactions were added so that the model was consistent with measured effluent chemistry. For the nitrate-reducing column, kinetic expressions governing nitrate reduction and bacterial growth were added to the reaction database. Additionally, immobile porosity was added along with adsorption and cation exchange reactions. Although the model revealed the existence of chemical and biological gradients within the columns that were not discernable as changes in effluent concentrations, none of the chemical reactions or gradients could explain the measured ?b increases in either column. This result is not consistent with chemical gradients within the column reactor causing the measured changes in ?b. To test the alternate hypothesis that microbial biofilms are electrically conductive, we used the output from PHREEQC to calculate the amount of biomass produced within the column reactors. If biofilm causes the ?b changes, our model is consistent with an electrical conductivity for biomass in the iron-reducing column between 2.75 and 220 S/m. The model is also consistent with an electrical conductivity for biomass in the nitrate-reducing column between 350 and 35,000 S/m. These estimates of biomass electrical conductivity are poorly constrained but represent a first step towards understanding the electrical properties associated with respiring biofilms.

  11. Influence of untreated and bacterial-treated Yamuna water on the plant growth of Zea mays L

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Pragati Saini; Ajay Kumar; J. N. Shrivastava

    In present study an attempt has been made to study the pollution level of river Yamuna at Agra, by analyzing the physico-chemical parameters of untreated and bacterial-treated water and its effect on the growth of maize plant. Among different concentrations (25, 50, 75 and 100%) of treated water, the 100% concentration of treated water sample showed good effect on the

  12. IN VITRO BACTERIAL GROWTH AND IN VIVO RUMEN MICROBIOTA POPULATIONS ASSOCIATED WITH BLOAT IN STEERS GRAZING WHEAT FORAGE

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The role of rumen bacteria in the frothy bloat complex common to cattle grazing winter wheat has not been previously elucidated. A series of in vitro and in vivo experiments were designed to elucidate the effect of fresh wheat forage on the bacterial growth, bio-film complexes, rumen fermentation e...

  13. BIODEGRADATION DURING CONTAMINANT TRANSPORT IN POROUS MEDIA. 4. IMPACT OF MICROBIAL LAG AND BACTERIAL CELL GROWTH. (R825415)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Abstract Miscible-displacement experiments were conducted to examine the impact of microbial lag and bacterial cell growth on the transport of salicylate, a model hydrocarbon compound. The impacts of these processes were examined separately, as well as jointly, to dete...

  14. Secreted Pyomelanin of Legionella pneumophila Promotes Bacterial Iron Uptake and Growth under Iron-Limiting Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Huaixin; Chatfield, Christa H.; Liles, Mark R.

    2013-01-01

    Iron acquisition is critical to the growth and virulence of Legionella pneumophila. Previously, we found that L. pneumophila uses both a ferrisiderophore pathway and ferrous iron transport to obtain iron. We now report that two molecules secreted by L. pneumophila, homogentisic acid (HGA) and its polymerized variant (HGA-melanin, a pyomelanin), are able to directly mediate the reduction of various ferric iron salts. Furthermore, HGA, synthetic HGA-melanin, and HGA-melanin derived from bacterial supernatants enhanced the ability of L. pneumophila and other species of Legionella to take up radiolabeled iron. Enhanced iron uptake was not observed with a ferrous iron transport mutant. Thus, HGA and HGA-melanin mediate ferric iron reduction, with the resulting ferrous iron being available to the bacterium for uptake. Upon further testing of L. pneumophila culture supernatants, we found that significant amounts of ferric and ferrous iron were associated with secreted HGA-melanin. Importantly, a pyomelanin-containing fraction obtained from a wild-type culture supernatant was able to stimulate the growth of iron-starved legionellae. That the corresponding supernatant fraction obtained from a nonpigmented mutant culture did not stimulate growth demonstrated that HGA-melanin is able to both promote iron uptake and enhance growth under iron-limiting conditions. Indicative of a complementary role in iron acquisition, HGA-melanin levels were inversely related to the levels of siderophore activity. Compatible with a role in the ecology and pathogenesis of L. pneumophila, HGA and HGA-melanin were effective at reducing and releasing iron from both insoluble ferric hydroxide and the mammalian iron chelates ferritin and transferrin. PMID:23980114

  15. Spontaneous elaboration of transforming growth factor beta suppresses host defense against bacterial infection in autoimmune MRL/lpr mice

    PubMed Central

    1994-01-01

    Infection with gram-negative and gram-positive bacteria remains a leading cause of death in patients with systemic lupus erythematosis (SLE), even in the absence of immunosuppressive therapy. To elucidate the mechanisms that underly the increased risk of infection observed in patients with systemic autoimmunity, we have investigated host defense against bacterial infection in a murine model of autoimmunity, the MRL/Mp-lpr/lpr (MRL/lpr) mouse. Our previous study implicated transforming growth factor beta (TGF-beta) in a novel acquired defect in neutrophil function in MRL/lpr but not congenic MRL/Mp-+/+ (MRL/n) mice (Gresham, H.D., C.J. Ray, and F.K. O'Sullivan. 1991. J. Immunol. 146:3911). We hypothesized from these observations that MRL/lpr mice would have defects in host defense against bacterial infection and that they would have constitutively higher local and systemic levels of active TGF-beta which would be responsible, at least in part, for the defect in host defense. We show in this paper that spontaneous elaboration of active TGF-beta adversely affects host defense against both gram-negative and gram-positive bacterial infection in MRL/lpr mice. Our data indicate that MRL/lpr mice, as compared with congenic MRL/n mice, exhibit decreased survival in response to bacterial infection, that polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN) from MRl/lpr mice fail to migrate to the site of infection during the initial stages of infection, that MRL/lpr mice have a significantly increased bacterial burden at the site of infection and at other tissue sites, and that this increased bacterial growth occurs at a time (> 20 h after infection) when PMN influx is greatly enhanced in MRL/lpr mice. Most intriguingly, the alteration in PMN extravasation during the initial stages of infection and failure to restrict bacterial growth in vivo could be duplicated in MRL/n mice with a parenteral injection of active TGF-beta 1 at the time of bacterial challenge. Moreover, these alterations in host defense, including survival in response to lethal infection, could be ameliorated in MRL/lpr mice by the parenteral administration of a monoclonal antibody that neutralizes the activity of TGF-beta. These data indicate that elaboration of TGF-beta as a result of autoimmune phenomenon suppresses host defense against bacterial infection and that such a mechanism could be responsible for the increased risk of bacterial infection observed in patients with autoimmune diseases. PMID:7964455

  16. Environmental considerations on solar disinfection of wastewater and the subsequent bacterial (re)growth.

    PubMed

    Giannakis, Stefanos; Darakas, Efthymios; Escalas-Cañellas, Antoni; Pulgarin, César

    2015-03-01

    In this work, solar disinfection of wastewater was studied, focusing on the effect of selected environmental variables, namely light intensity, continuous/intermittent light delivery, and post-irradiation storage as well as dilution in lake water. These variables were studied for their effect on the disinfection efficiency and on post-irradiation survival/regrowth in undiluted wastewater and in wastewater diluted in lake water at different dilution rates. The bacterial inactivation curves were studied, and distinct kinetic phases were identified and interpreted. The dose primarily influenced the demonstration of phases and total inactivation times, independently of the irradiance. Intermittent illumination unevenly prolonged the required exposure time and highlighted the need for extended illumination times when unstable weather conditions are expected. Post-irradiation survival/regrowth in undiluted wastewater showed three distinct kinetic profiles, with transitions among them largely determined by the applied light dose. Lower doses resulted in similar inactivation profiles to the higher ones, when irradiation was followed by prolonged storage at high dilution rates in lake water. The studied factors show significant design and operation implications for solar wastewater applications based on local environmental conditions and water receptor restrictions. PMID:25539093

  17. Developmental changes in group climate in two types of group therapy for binge-eating disorder: A growth curve analysis

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Giorgio A. Tasca; Louise Balfour; Kerri Ritchie; Hany Bissada

    2006-01-01

    The development of group climate across 16 sessions of group psychodynamic–interpersonal psychotherapy (GPIP) and group cognitive–behavioral therapy (GCBT) for 65 female treatment completers with binge-eating disorder (BED) was assessed. Engaged scale growth for GPIP patients varied across sessions and was best represented by a cubic growth curve. This suggested that GPIP progressed in definable phases that reflected a rupture and

  18. Production of fungal and bacterial growth modulating secondary metabolites is widespread among mycorrhiza-associated streptomycetes

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Studies on mycorrhiza associated bacteria suggest that bacterial-fungal interactions play important roles during mycorrhiza formation and affect plant health. We surveyed Streptomyces Actinobacteria, known as antibiotic producers and antagonists of fungi, from Norway spruce mycorrhizas with predominantly Piloderma species as the fungal partner. Results Fifteen Streptomyces isolates exhibited substantial variation in inhibition of tested mycorrhizal and plant pathogenic fungi (Amanita muscaria, Fusarium oxysporum, Hebeloma cylindrosporum, Heterobasidion abietinum, Heterobasidion annosum, Laccaria bicolor, Piloderma croceum). The growth of the mycorrhiza-forming fungus Laccaria bicolor was stimulated by some of the streptomycetes, and Piloderma croceum was only moderately affected. Bacteria responded to the streptomycetes differently than the fungi. For instance the strain Streptomyces sp. AcM11, which inhibited most tested fungi, was less inhibitory to bacteria than other tested streptomycetes. The determined patterns of Streptomyces-microbe interactions were associated with distinct patterns of secondary metabolite production. Notably, potentially novel metabolites were produced by strains that were less antagonistic to fungi. Most of the identified metabolites were antibiotics (e.g. cycloheximide, actiphenol) and siderophores (e.g. ferulic acid, desferroxiamines). Plant disease resistance was activated by a single streptomycete strain only. Conclusions Mycorrhiza associated streptomycetes appear to have an important role in inhibiting the growth of fungi and bacteria. Additionally, our study indicates that the Streptomyces strains, which are not general antagonists of fungi, may produce still un-described metabolites. PMID:22852578

  19. A new model for the spectral induced polarization signature of bacterial growth in porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Revil, A.; Atekwana, E.; Zhang, C.; Jardani, A.; Smith, S.

    2012-09-01

    The complex conductivity of porous materials and colloidal suspensions comprises two components: an in-phase conductivity associated with electromigration of the charge carriers and a quadrature conductivity associated with the reversible storage of the charges at some polarization length scales. We developed a quantitative model to investigate the frequency domain induced polarization response of suspensions of bacteria and bacteria growth in porous media. Induced polarization of bacteria (? polarization) is related to the properties of the electrical double layer of the bacteria. Surface conductivity and ? polarization are due to the Stern layer of counterions occurring in a brush of polymers coating the surface of the bacteria. These phenomena can be related to their cation exchange capacity. The mobility of the counterions in this Stern layer is found to be very small (4.7 × 10-10 m2 s-1 V-1 at 25°C). This implies a very low relaxation frequency for the ?polarization of the bacteria cells (typically around 0.1-5 Hz), in agreement with experimental observations. This new model can be coupled to reactive transport modeling codes in which the evolution of bacterial populations are usually described by Monod kinetics. We show that the growth rate and endogenous decay coefficients of bacteria in a porous sand can be inferred nonintrusively from time-lapse frequency domain induced polarization data.

  20. Are leaf glandular trichomes of oregano hospitable habitats for bacterial growth?

    PubMed

    Karamanoli, K; Thalassinos, G; Karpouzas, D; Bosabalidis, A M; Vokou, D; Constantinidou, H-I

    2012-05-01

    Phyllospheric bacteria were isolated from microsites around essential-oil-containing glands of two oregano (Origanum vulgare subsp. hirtum) lines. These bacteria, 20 isolates in total, were subjected to bioassays to examine their growth potential in the presence of essential oils at different concentrations. Although there were qualitative and quantitative differences in the essential oil composition between the two oregano lines, no differences were recorded in their antibacterial activity. In disk diffusion bioassays, four of the isolated strains could grow almost unrestrained in the presence of oregano oil, another five proved very sensitive, and the remaining 11 showed intermediate sensitivity. The strain least inhibited by oregano essential oil was further identified by complete16s rRNA gene sequencing as Pseudomonas putida. It was capable of forming biofilms even in the presence of oregano oil at high concentrations. Resistance of P. putida to oregano oil was further elaborated by microwell dilution bioassays, and its topology on oregano leaves was studied by electron microscopy. When inoculated on intact oregano plants, P. putida was able not only to colonize sites adjacent to essential oil-containing glands, but even to grow intracellularly. This is the first time that such prolific bacterial growth inside the glands has been visually observed. Results of this study further revealed that several bacteria can be established on oregano leaves, suggesting that these bacteria have attributes that allow them to tolerate or benefit from oregano secondary metabolites. PMID:22527057

  1. Biocontrol of Fusarium graminearum Growth and Deoxynivalenol Production in Wheat Kernels with Bacterial Antagonists

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Cuijuan; Yan, Peisheng; Li, Jiafei; Wu, Hanqi; Li, Qianwei; Guan, Shanshan

    2014-01-01

    Fusarium graminearum is the main causal pathogen affecting small-grain cereals, and it produces deoxynivalenol, a kind of mycotoxin, which displays a wide range of toxic effects in human and animals. Bacterial strains isolated from peanut shells were investigated for their activities against F. graminearum by dual-culture plate and tip-culture assays. Among them, twenty strains exhibited potent inhibition to the growth of F. graminearum, and the inhibition rates ranged from 41.41% to 54.55% in dual-culture plate assay and 92.70% to 100% in tip-culture assay. Furthermore, eighteen strains reduced the production of deoxynivalenol by 16.69% to 90.30% in the wheat kernels assay. Finally, the strains with the strongest inhibitory activity were identified by morphological, physiological, biochemical methods and also 16S rDNA and gyrA gene analysis as Bacillus amyloliquefaciens. The current study highlights the potential application of antagonistic microorganisms and their metabolites in the prevention of fungal growth and mycotoxin production in wheat kernels. As a biological strategy, it might avoid safety problems and nutrition loss which always caused by physical and chemical strategies. PMID:24441510

  2. N-acetyl-L-cysteine affects growth, extracellular polysaccharide production, and bacterial biofilm formation on solid surfaces.

    PubMed

    Olofsson, Ann-Cathrin; Hermansson, Malte; Elwing, Hans

    2003-08-01

    N-Acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC) is used in medical treatment of patients with chronic bronchitis. The positive effects of NAC treatment have primarily been attributed to the mucus-dissolving properties of NAC, as well as its ability to decrease biofilm formation, which reduces bacterial infections. Our results suggest that NAC also may be an interesting candidate for use as an agent to reduce and prevent biofilm formation on stainless steel surfaces in environments typical of paper mill plants. Using 10 different bacterial strains isolated from a paper mill, we found that the mode of action of NAC is chemical, as well as biological, in the case of bacterial adhesion to stainless steel surfaces. The initial adhesion of bacteria is dependent on the wettability of the substratum. NAC was shown to bind to stainless steel, increasing the wettability of the surface. Moreover, NAC decreased bacterial adhesion and even detached bacteria that were adhering to stainless steel surfaces. Growth of various bacteria, as monocultures or in a multispecies community, was inhibited at different concentrations of NAC. We also found that there was no detectable degradation of extracellular polysaccharides (EPS) by NAC, indicating that NAC reduced the production of EPS, in most bacteria tested, even at concentrations at which growth was not affected. Altogether, the presence of NAC changes the texture of the biofilm formed and makes NAC an interesting candidate for use as a general inhibitor of formation of bacterial biofilms on stainless steel surfaces. PMID:12902275

  3. Influence of dietary fiber on microbial growth in vitro and bacterial translocation after burn injury in mice.

    PubMed

    Nelson, J L; Alexander, J W; Gianotti, L; Chalk, C L; Pyles, T

    1994-01-01

    Translocation of enteric bacteria from the gut to the mesenteric lymph nodes and beyond can cause life-threatening infection and multiple-organ failure in immunocompromised and traumatized patients. One of the conditions that promotes bacterial translocation is disruption of the normal gut flora, which results in bacterial overgrowth. In vitro methods were used to determine whether the fibers pectin, cellulose, chitosan, kaolin, lignin, or soy had bactericidal properties. Our results indicated that only chitosan and lignin significantly reduce microbial growth in vitro. A burned mouse model (20% total-body surface area) was used to study the effects of dietary lignin, cellulose, pectin, and chitosan on burn-induced bacterial translocation. Animals were fed a standard mouse diet containing no fiber, pectin, cellulose, lignin, or chitosan (10% of diet) for 14 days ad libitum. On day 14, all animals were burned. Four hours later the animals were killed and the mesenteric lymph nodes, spleen, liver, and cecum were aseptically harvested for determination of quantitative aerobic microbial growth. The animals which received chitosan, and lignin to a lesser extent, added to their diet had significantly lower levels of bacteria in the cecum, mesenteric lymph nodes, and liver. We suggest that addition of chitosan and possibly lignin to the diet may reduce the amount of bacterial translocation after burn injury, presumably by reducing the bacterial population of the cecum. PMID:8199420

  4. Ice formation and growth shape bacterial community structure in Baltic Sea drift ice.

    PubMed

    Eronen-Rasimus, Eeva; Lyra, Christina; Rintala, Janne-Markus; Jürgens, Klaus; Ikonen, Vilma; Kaartokallio, Hermanni

    2015-02-01

    Drift ice, open water and under-ice water bacterial communities covering several developmental stages from open water to thick ice were studied in the northern Baltic Sea. The bacterial communities were assessed with 16S rRNA gene terminal-restriction fragment length polymorphism and cloning, together with bacterial abundance and production measurements. In the early stages, open water and pancake ice were dominated by Alphaproteobacteria and Actinobacteria, which are common bacterial groups in Baltic Sea wintertime surface waters. The pancake ice bacterial communities were similar to the open-water communities, suggesting that the parent water determines the sea-ice bacterial community in the early stages of sea-ice formation. In consolidated young and thick ice, the bacterial communities were significantly different from water bacterial communities as well as from each other, indicating community development in Baltic Sea drift ice along with ice-type changes. The thick ice was dominated by typical sea-ice genera from classes Flavobacteria and Gammaproteobacteria, similar to those in polar sea-ice bacterial communities. Since the thick ice bacterial community was remarkably different from that of the parent seawater, results indicate that thick ice bacterial communities were recruited from the rarer members of the seawater bacterial community. PMID:25764550

  5. Differential School Effects among Low, Middle, and High Social Class Composition Schools: A Multiple Group, Multilevel Latent Growth Curve Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Palardy, Gregory J.

    2008-01-01

    This study uses large-scale survey data and a multiple group, multilevel latent growth curve model to examine differential school effects between low, middle, and high social class composition public schools. The results show that the effects of school inputs and school practices on learning differ across the 3 subpopulations. Moreover, student…

  6. Testing a Dynamic Model of Student and School Effectiveness with a Multivariate Multilevel Latent Growth Curve Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van der Werf, Greetje; Opdenakker, Marie-Christine; Kuyper, Hans

    2008-01-01

    This article addresses whether students' achievement motivation changes over time, the relationship between changes in motivation and changes in educational attainment, and the between-school differences in these changes and their interrelationships. Also gender differences were studied. Multivariate multilevel latent growth curve analysis was…

  7. Modeling Latent Growth Curves With Incomplete Data Using Different Types of Structural Equation Modeling and Multilevel Software

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ferrer, Emilio; Hamagami, Fumiaki; McArdle, John J.

    2004-01-01

    This article offers different examples of how to fit latent growth curve (LGC) models to longitudinal data using a variety of different software programs (i.e., LISREL, Mx, Mplus, AMOS, SAS). The article shows how the same model can be fitted using both structural equation modeling and multilevel software, with nearly identical results, even in…

  8. Enhancing the Psychological Well-Being of Elderly Individuals through Tai Chi Exercise: A Latent Growth Curve Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Li, Fuzhong; Duncan, Terry E.; Duncan, Susan C.; McAuley, Edward; Chaumeton, Nigel R.; Harmer, Peter

    2001-01-01

    Examined whether a Tai Chi exercise program enhanced the psychological well-being of 98 elderly individuals. Analyzed repeated measures data about participants using latent growth curve analysis. Results indicate the beneficial effects of participation in the Tai Chi program. Discusses implications related to the exercise-psychological health…

  9. Nitrifying bacterial growth inhibition in the presence of algae and cyanobacteria.

    PubMed

    Choi, Okkyoung; Das, Atreyee; Yu, Chang-Ping; Hu, Zhiqiang

    2010-12-15

    Nitrifying bacteria, cyanobacteria, and algae are important microorganisms in open pond wastewater treatment systems. Nitrification involving the sequential oxidation of ammonia to nitrite and nitrate, mainly due to autotrophic nitrifying bacteria, is essential to biological nitrogen removal in wastewater and global nitrogen cycling. A continuous flow autotrophic bioreactor was initially designed for nitrifying bacterial growth only. In the presence of cyanobacteria and algae, we monitored both the microbial activity by measuring specific oxygen production rate (SOPR) for microalgae and cyanobacteria and specific oxygen uptake rate (SOUR) for nitrifying bacteria. The growth of cyanobacteria and algae inhibited the maximum nitrification rate by a factor of 4 although the ammonium nitrogen fed to the reactor was almost completely removed. Terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP) analysis indicated that the community structures of nitrifying bacteria remained unchanged, containing the dominant Nitrosospira, Nitrospira, and Nitrobacter species. PCR amplification coupled with cloning and sequencing analysis resulted in identifying Chlorella emersonii and an uncultured cyanobacterium as the dominant species in the autotrophic bioreactor. Notwithstanding their fast growth rate and their toxicity to nitrifiers, microalgae and cyanobacteria were more easily lost in effluent than nitrifying bacteria because of their poor settling characteristics. The microorganisms were able to grow together in the bioreactor with constant individual biomass fractions because of the uncoupled solids retention times for algae/cyanobacteria and nitrifiers. The results indicate that compared to conventional wastewater treatment systems, longer solids retention times (e.g., by a factor of 4) should be considered in phototrophic bioreactors for complete nitrification and nitrogen removal. PMID:20632370

  10. Methods for Intense Aeration, Growth, Storage, and Replication of Bacterial Strains in Microtiter Plates

    PubMed Central

    Duetz, Wouter A.; Rüedi, Lorenz; Hermann, Robert; O'Connor, Kevin; Büchs, Jochen; Witholt, Bernard

    2000-01-01

    Miniaturized growth systems for heterogeneous culture collections are not only attractive in reducing demands for incubation space and medium but also in making the parallel handling of large numbers of strains more practicable. We report here on the optimization of oxygen transfer rates in deep-well microtiter plates and the development of a replication system allowing the simultaneous and reproducible sampling of 96 frozen glycerol stock cultures while the remaining culture volume remains frozen. Oxygen transfer rates were derived from growth curves of Pseudomonas putida and from rates of oxygen disappearance due to the cobalt-catalyzed oxidation of sulfite. Maximum oxygen transfer rates (38 mmol liter?1 h?1, corresponding to a mass transfer coefficient of 188 h?1) were measured during orbital shaking at 300 rpm at a shaking diameter of 5 cm and a culture volume of 0.5 ml. A shaking diameter of 2.5 cm resulted in threefold-lower values. These high oxygen transfer rates allowed P. putida to reach a cell density of approximately 9 g (dry weight) liter?1 during growth on a glucose mineral medium at culture volumes of up to 1 ml. The growth-and-replication system was evaluated for a culture collection consisting of aerobic strains, mainly from the genera Pseudomonas, Rhodococcus, and Alcaligenes, using mineral media and rich media. Cross-contamination and excessive evaporation during vigorous aeration were adequately prevented by the use of a sandwich cover of spongy silicone and cotton wool on top of the microtiter plates. PMID:10831450

  11. Geometric and kinematic modeling of detachment folds with growth strata based on Bézier curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Chun; Zhang, Yikun; Shi, Bin

    2009-03-01

    In our geometric modeling, the inner layer of competent rock units in a detachment fold is approximated by several quadratic Bézier curves, which are joined together according to some geometrical rules, whereas the outer layers are calculated from the inner layer by parallel folding mechanism. In this model, an ideal fold is determined by three parameters: w, half of the distance between the locations of the fold's two limbs where their dips are measured, ?1 and ?2, the dip angles of its two limbs. Two more parameters, respectively the axial lift-up ratio ( u) and the limb elongation ( E) may be used to change the ideal fold shape, if necessary. In kinematic modeling, downward deflection in the two synclines flanking an anticline is assumed to maintain constant area during folding. Both mathematical derivation and numerical simulation show that the reduction of the balanced area ( Ar) is directly proportional to the downward deflection angle ( ?), and there is an approximate linear relationship between the detachment depth and the downward deflection angle. Based on this relationship, an iterative method is used to find the approximate value of ?. Furthermore, syn-folding growth strata can be modeled through calculating the velocity field above a detachment fold during folding. The method is applied to three seismic interpretation cross-sections of detachment folds respectively in Tarim Basin (western China), Zagros fold-belt (Iran) and Niger delta (western Africa). Variations of ? with the development of the detachment folds indicate the transfer of rock materials between the synclinal and anticlinal areas of the folds.

  12. Listeria monocytogenes virulence factor Listeriolysin O favors bacterial growth in co-culture with the ciliate Tetrahymena pyriformis, causes protozoan encystment and promotes bacterial survival inside cysts

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The gram-positive pathogenic bacterium Listeria monocytogenes is widely spread in the nature. L. monocytogenes was reported to be isolated from soil, water, sewage and sludge. Listeriolysin O (LLO) is a L. monocytogenes major virulence factor. In the course of infection in mammals, LLO is required for intracellular survival and apoptosis induction in lymphocytes. In this study, we explored the potential of LLO to promote interactions between L. monocytogenes and the ubiquitous inhabitant of natural ecosystems bacteriovorous free-living ciliate Tetrahymena pyriformis. Results Wild type L. monocytogenes reduced T. pyriformis trophozoite counts and stimulated encystment. The effects were observed starting from 48 h of co-incubation. On the day 14, trophozoites were eliminated from the co-culture while about 5 × 104 cells/ml remained in the axenic T. pyriformis culture. The deficient in the LLO-encoding hly gene L. monocytogenes strain failed to cause mortality among protozoa and to trigger protozoan encystment. Replenishment of the hly gene in the mutant strain restored toxicity towards protozoa and induction of protozoan encystment. The saprophytic non-haemolytic species L. innocua transformed with the LLO-expressing plasmid caused extensive mortality and encystment in ciliates. During the first week of co-incubation, LLO-producing L. monocytogenes demonstrated higher growth rates in association with T. pyriformis than the LLO-deficient isogenic strain. At latter stages of co-incubation bacterial counts were similar for both strains. T. pyriformis cysts infected with wild type L. monocytogenes caused listerial infection in guinea pigs upon ocular and oral inoculation. The infection was proved by bacterial plating from the internal organs. Conclusions The L. monocytogenes virulence factor LLO promotes bacterial survival and growth in the presence of bacteriovorous ciliate T. pyriformis. LLO is responsible for L. monocytogenes toxicity for protozoa and induction of protozoan encystment. L. monocytogenes entrapped in cysts remained viable and virulent. In whole, LLO activity seems to support bacterial survival in the natural habitat outside of a host. PMID:20109168

  13. Discrete cyclic di-GMP-dependent control of bacterial predation versus axenic growth in Bdellovibrio bacteriovorus.

    PubMed

    Hobley, Laura; Fung, Rowena K Y; Lambert, Carey; Harris, Maximilian A T S; Dabhi, Jayesh M; King, Simon S; Basford, Sarah M; Uchida, Kaoru; Till, Robert; Ahmad, Rashidah; Aizawa, Shin-Ichi; Gomelsky, Mark; Sockett, R Elizabeth

    2012-02-01

    Bdellovibrio bacteriovorus is a Delta-proteobacterium that oscillates between free-living growth and predation on Gram-negative bacteria including important pathogens of man, animals and plants. After entering the prey periplasm, killing the prey and replicating inside the prey bdelloplast, several motile B. bacteriovorus progeny cells emerge. The B. bacteriovorus HD100 genome encodes numerous proteins predicted to be involved in signalling via the secondary messenger cyclic di-GMP (c-di-GMP), which is known to affect bacterial lifestyle choices. We investigated the role of c-di-GMP signalling in B. bacteriovorus, focussing on the five GGDEF domain proteins that are predicted to function as diguanylyl cyclases initiating c-di-GMP signalling cascades. Inactivation of individual GGDEF domain genes resulted in remarkably distinct phenotypes. Deletion of dgcB (Bd0742) resulted in a predation impaired, obligately axenic mutant, while deletion of dgcC (Bd1434) resulted in the opposite, obligately predatory mutant. Deletion of dgcA (Bd0367) abolished gliding motility, producing bacteria capable of predatory invasion but unable to leave the exhausted prey. Complementation was achieved with wild type dgc genes, but not with GGAAF versions. Deletion of cdgA (Bd3125) substantially slowed predation; this was restored by wild type complementation. Deletion of dgcD (Bd3766) had no observable phenotype. In vitro assays showed that DgcA, DgcB, and DgcC were diguanylyl cyclases. CdgA lacks enzymatic activity but functions as a c-di-GMP receptor apparently in the DgcB pathway. Activity of DgcD was not detected. Deletion of DgcA strongly decreased the extractable c-di-GMP content of axenic Bdellovibrio cells. We show that c-di-GMP signalling pathways are essential for both the free-living and predatory lifestyles of B. bacteriovorus and that obligately predatory dgcC- can be made lacking a propensity to survive without predation of bacterial pathogens and thus possibly useful in anti-pathogen applications. In contrast to many studies in other bacteria, Bdellovibrio shows specificity and lack of overlap in c-di-GMP signalling pathways. PMID:22319440

  14. Organic carbon and mineral nutrient limitation of oxygen consumption, bacterial growth and efficiency in the Norwegian Sea

    Microsoft Academic Search

    L. Antonio Cuevas; Jorun K. Egge; T. Frede Thingstad; Birte Töpper

    2011-01-01

    To evaluate the role of bacteria in the transformation of organic matter in subarctic waters, we investigated the effect of\\u000a mineral nutrients (ammonia and phosphate) and organic carbon (glucose) enrichment on heterotrophic bacterial processes and\\u000a community structure. Eight experiments were done in the Norwegian Sea during May and June 2008. The growth-limiting factor\\u000a (carbon or mineral nutrient) for heterotrophic bacteria

  15. Analysis of bacterial communities in rhizosphere soil of healthy and diseased cotton ( Gossypium sp.) at different plant growth stages

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Yan Zhang; Bing-Hai Du; Zhi-gang Jin; Zheng-hua Li; Hong-ning Song; Yan-Qin Ding

    2011-01-01

    Bacterial communities in rhizosphere soil of healthy and diseased cotton (infected by the pathogenic fungus Verticillium dahliae Kleb.) were examined at different plant growth stages using T-RFLP and 16S rDNA clone library. At flowering and bolling,\\u000a soil samples from the rhizosphere of healthy cotton had the highest richness, whereas the highest evenness was found in the\\u000a rhizosphere of diseased cotton

  16. Subsurface bacterial growth and grazing impact revealed by an in situ experiment in a shallow aquifer

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Kazuyo Nagaosa; Tomoko Maruyama; Nihal Welikala; Yohei Yamashita; Yui Saito; Danielle Fortin; Kenji Nanba; Iku Miyasaka; Sakae Fukunaga; Kenji Kato

    To elucidate bacterial population dynamics in an aquifer, we attempted to reveal the impact of protozoan grazing on bacterial productivity and community structure by an in situ incubation experiment using a diffusion chamber. The abundance and vertical distribution of bacteria and protozoa in the aquifer were revealed using wells that were drilled in a sedimentary rock system in Itako, Ibaraki,

  17. Bacterial Succession in Glacial Forefield Soils Characterized by Community Structure, Activity and Opportunistic Growth Dynamics

    Microsoft Academic Search

    W. V. Sigler; S. Crivii; J. Zeyer

    2002-01-01

    The succession of bacterial communities inhabiting the forefield of the Dammaglacier (Switzerland) was investigated in soils ranging in successional age from 0 to 100 years since deglaciation. Overall activity per bacterial cell was estimated by the amount of fluorescein diacetate (FDA) hydrolyzed per DAPI-stained cell, and an index of \\

  18. Television Viewing and Adolescents’ Judgment of Sexual Request Scripts: A Latent Growth Curve Analysis in Early and Middle Adolescence

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Steven Eggermont

    2006-01-01

    A longitudinal study was conducted to explore the relationship between television viewing and beliefs about expressing sexual\\u000a desire in dating situations. In three consecutive years, a panel of early adolescents (N?=?883) and a panel of middle adolescents (N?=?651) rated the effectiveness of a sexual approach and a romantic approach. Latent growth curve analyses indicate that between\\u000a the ages of 12

  19. Human Capital, Social Support, and Economic Well-being among Rural, Low-income Mothers: A Latent Growth Curve Analysis

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Leigh Ann Simmons; Bonnie Braun; David W. Wright; Scott R. Miller

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to better understand human capital and social support in the long-term economic well-being of\\u000a rural, low-income mothers in the US. Three waves of data from a multi-state, longitudinal investigation tracking the well-being\\u000a of rural families, known as “Rural Families Speak,” were used to test two latent growth curve models of economic well-being.\\u000a Results indicated

  20. A Model to Explain Plant Growth Promotion Traits: A Multivariate Analysis of 2,211 Bacterial Isolates

    PubMed Central

    da Costa, Pedro Beschoren; Granada, Camille E.; Ambrosini, Adriana; Moreira, Fernanda; de Souza, Rocheli; dos Passos, João Frederico M.; Arruda, Letícia; Passaglia, Luciane M. P.

    2014-01-01

    Plant growth-promoting bacteria can greatly assist sustainable farming by improving plant health and biomass while reducing fertilizer use. The plant-microorganism-environment interaction is an open and complex system, and despite the active research in the area, patterns in root ecology are elusive. Here, we simultaneously analyzed the plant growth-promoting bacteria datasets from seven independent studies that shared a methodology for bioprospection and phenotype screening. The soil richness of the isolate's origin was classified by a Principal Component Analysis. A Categorical Principal Component Analysis was used to classify the soil richness according to isolate's indolic compound production, siderophores production and phosphate solubilization abilities, and bacterial genera composition. Multiple patterns and relationships were found and verified with nonparametric hypothesis testing. Including niche colonization in the analysis, we proposed a model to explain the expression of bacterial plant growth-promoting traits according to the soil nutritional status. Our model shows that plants favor interaction with growth hormone producers under rich nutrient conditions but favor nutrient solubilizers under poor conditions. We also performed several comparisons among the different genera, highlighting interesting ecological interactions and limitations. Our model could be used to direct plant growth-promoting bacteria bioprospection and metagenomic sampling. PMID:25542031

  1. Effects of High Hydrostatic Pressure on Bacterial Growth on Human Ossicles Explanted from Cholesteatoma Patients

    PubMed Central

    Ostwald, Jürgen; Lindner, Tobias; Zautner, Andreas Erich; Arndt, Kathleen; Pau, Hans Wilhelm; Podbielski, Andreas

    2012-01-01

    Background High hydrostatic pressure (HHP) treatment can eliminate cholesteatoma cells from explanted human ossicles prior to re-insertion. We analyzed the effects of HHP treatment on the microbial flora on ossicles and on the planktonic and biofilm states of selected isolates. Methodology Twenty-six ossicles were explanted from cholesteatoma patients. Five ossicles were directly analyzed for microbial growth without further treatment. Fifteen ossicles were cut into two pieces. One piece was exposed to HHP of 350 MPa for 10 minutes. Both the treated and untreated (control) pieces were then assessed semi-quantitatively. Three ossicles were cut into two pieces and exposed to identical pressure conditions with or without the addition of one of two different combinations of antibiotics to the medium. Differential effects of 10-minute in vitro exposure of planktonic and biofilm bacteria to pressures of 100 MPa, 250 MPa, 400 MPa and 540 MPa in isotonic and hypotonic media were analyzed using two patient isolates of Staphylococcus epidermidis and Neisseria subflava. Bacterial cell inactivation and biofilm destruction were assessed by colony counting and electron microscopy. Principal Findings A variety of microorganisms were isolated from the ossicles. Irrespective of the medium, HHP treatment at 350 MPa for 10 minutes led to satisfying but incomplete inactivation especially of Gram-negative bacteria. The addition of antibiotics increased the efficacy of elimination. A comparison of HHP treatment of planktonic and biofilm cells showed that the effects of HPP were reduced by about one decadic logarithmic unit when HPP was applied to biofilms. High hydrostatic pressure conditions that are suitable to inactivate cholesteatoma cells fail to completely sterilize ossicles even if antibiotics are added. As a result of the reduced microbial load and the viability loss of surviving bacteria, however, there is a lower risk of re-infection after re-insertion. PMID:22291908

  2. Bacterial growth at the high concentrations of magnesium sulfate found in martian soils.

    PubMed

    Crisler, J D; Newville, T M; Chen, F; Clark, B C; Schneegurt, M A

    2012-02-01

    The martian surface environment exhibits extremes of salinity, temperature, desiccation, and radiation that would make it difficult for terrestrial microbes to survive. Recent evidence suggests that martian soils contain high concentrations of MgSO? minerals. Through warming of the soils, meltwater derived from subterranean ice-rich regolith may exist for an extended period of time and thus allow the propagation of terrestrial microbes and create significant bioburden at the near surface of Mars. The current report demonstrates that halotolerant bacteria from the Great Salt Plains (GSP) of Oklahoma are capable of growing at high concentrations of MgSO? in the form of 2 M solutions of epsomite. The epsotolerance of isolates in the GSP bacterial collection was determined, with 35% growing at 2 M MgSO?. There was a complex physiological response to mixtures of MgSO? and NaCl coupled with other environmental stressors. Growth also was measured at 1 M concentrations of other magnesium and sulfate salts. The complex responses may be partially explained by the pattern of chaotropicity observed for high-salt solutions as measured by agar gelation temperature. Select isolates could grow at the high salt concentrations and low temperatures found on Mars. Survival during repetitive freeze-thaw or drying-rewetting cycles was used as other measures of potential success on the martian surface. Our results indicate that terrestrial microbes might survive under the high-salt, low-temperature, anaerobic conditions on Mars and present significant potential for forward contamination. Stringent planetary protection requirements are needed for future life-detection missions to Mars. PMID:22248384

  3. Bacterial growth and motility in sub-micron constrictions Jaan Mannik, Rosalie Driessen, Peter Galajda, Juan E. Keymer, and Cees Dekker1

    E-print Network

    Dekker, Cees

    , in microbial pathogenesis, bacterial growth and penetration is a problem, for example in dental implants (5 sterile, it has recently been found that numerous bacteria can pass through these membranes and grow

  4. Effects of Bacillus subtilis KN-42 on Growth Performance, Diarrhea and Faecal Bacterial Flora of Weaned Piglets

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Yuanliang; Dun, Yaohao; Li, Shenao; Zhao, Shumiao; Peng, Nan; Liang, Yunxiang

    2014-01-01

    This research focused on the effects of different doses of Bacillus subtilis KN-42 on the growth performance, diarrhea incidence, faecal bacterial flora, and the relative number of Lactobacillus and Escherichia coli in faeces of weaned piglets to determine whether the strain can serve as a candidate antimicrobial growth promoter. A total of 360 piglets (initial body weight 7.14±0.63 kg) weaned at 26±2 days of age were randomly allotted to 5 treatment groups (4 pens per treatment with 18 pigs per pen) for a 28-day trial. Dietary treatments were basal diet without any antimicrobial (negative control; NC), basal diet supplemented with 120 mg/kg feed of neomycin sulfate (positive control; PC) and basal diet supplemented with 2×109 (L), 4×109 (M) and 20×109 (H) CFU/kg feed of B. subtilis KN-42. During the overall period, average daily gain and feed efficiency of piglets were higher in groups PC, M, and H than those in group NC (p<0.05), and all probiotics and antibiotics groups had a lower diarrhea index than group NC (p<0.05). The 16S rDNA gene-based methods were used to analyze faecal bacterial flora on day 28 of experiment. The result of denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis analysis showed that supplementation of B. subtilis KN-42 to the diet changed the bacterial communities, with a higher bacterial diversity and band number in group M than in the other four groups. Real-time polymerase chain reaction analysis showed that the relative number of Lactobacillus were higher in groups PC and H than in group NC (p<0.05), and the supplemented B. subtilis KN-42 to the diet also reduced the relative number of E. coli (p<0.05). These results suggest that dietary addition of B. subtilis KN-42 can improve the growth performance and gastrointestinal health of piglets. PMID:25083107

  5. Root ethylene signalling is involved in Miscanthus sinensis growth promotion by the bacterial endophyte Herbaspirillum frisingense GSF30T

    PubMed Central

    Ludewig, Uwe

    2013-01-01

    The bacterial endophyte Herbaspirillum frisingense GSF30T is a colonizer of several grasses grown in temperate climates, including the highly nitrogen-efficient perennial energy grass Miscanthus. Inoculation of Miscanthus sinensis seedlings with H. frisingense promoted root and shoot growth but had only a minor impact on nutrient concentrations. The bacterium affected the root architecture and increased fine-root structures. Although H. frisingense has the genetic requirements to fix nitrogen, only minor changes in nitrogen concentrations were observed. Herbaspirillum agglomerates were identified primarily in the root apoplast but also in the shoots. The short-term (3h) and long-term (3 weeks) transcriptomic responses of the plant to bacterial inoculation revealed that H. frisingense induced rapid changes in plant hormone signalling, most prominent in jasmonate signalling. Ethylene signalling pathways were also affected and persisted after 3 weeks in the root. Growth stimulation of the root by the ethylene precursor 1-aminocyclopropane 1-carboxylic acid was dose dependent and was affected by H. frisingense inoculation. Minor changes in the proteome were identified after 3 weeks. This study suggests that H. frisingense improves plant growth by modulating plant hormone signalling pathways and provides a framework to understand the beneficial effects of diazotrophic plant-growth-promoting bacteria, such as H. frisingense, on the biomass grass Miscanthus. PMID:24043849

  6. Growth models of the continuous bacterial leaching of iron pyrite by Thiobacillus ferrooxidans

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Yun Chea Chang; Allan S. Myerson

    1982-01-01

    In recent years there has been increasing interest in the bacterial leaching of low grade metal ores and the bacterial leaching of pyritic sulfur from coal. The leaching of iron pyrite by Thiobacillus ferrooxidans was studied in a continuous stirred tank reactor at a variety of dilution rates (0.012-0.22 h⁻¹), pyrite surface areas (18-194 m²\\/L), and inlet soluble substrate (Fe\\/sup

  7. Endophytic bacterial communities of field-grown potato plants and their plant-growth-promoting and antagonistic abilities.

    PubMed

    Sessitsch, Angela; Reiter, Birgit; Berg, Gabriele

    2004-04-01

    To study the effect of plant growth on potato-associated bacteria, the composition and properties of bacteria colonizing the endosphere of field-grown potato were analyzed by a multiphasic approach. The occurrence and diversity of potato-associated bacteria were monitored by a cultivation-independent approach, using terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis of 16S rDNA. The patterns obtained revealed a high heterogeneity of community composition and suggested the existence of plant-specific communities. However, endophytic populations correlated to a certain extent with plant growth performance. Endophytes were also isolated from plants that grew well or grew poorly and were identified by partial sequencing of the 16S rRNA genes. A broad phylogenetic spectrum was found among isolates and differently growing plants hosted different bacterial populations. In an approach to investigate the plant-growth-promoting potential of potato-associated bacteria, a total of 35 bacteria were screened by dual testing for in vitro antagonism towards (i) the fungal pathogens Verticillium dahliae, Rhizoctonia solani, Sclerotinia sclerotiorum, and Phytophthora cactorum and (ii) the bacterial pathogens Erwinia carotovora, Streptomyces scabies, and Xanthomonas campestris. The proportion of isolates with antagonistic activity was highest against Streptomyces sp. (43%) followed by those against Xanthomonas sp. (29%). As all plants showed more or less severe disease symptoms of scab disease caused by Streptomyces scabies, we assume that the presence of the pathogen induced the colonization of antagonists. The antifungal activity of the isolates was generally low. The biotechnological potential of endophytic isolates assessed by their antagonistic activity and by in vitro production of enzymes, antibiotics, siderophores, and the plant growth hormone indole-1,3-acetic acid was generally high. Overall, seven endophytes were found to antagonize fungal as well as bacterial pathogens and showed a high production of active compounds and were therefore considered promising biological control agents. PMID:15213748

  8. Multiplex bacterial growth monitoring in 24-well microplates using a dual optical sensor for dissolved oxygen and pH.

    PubMed

    Kocincová, Anna S; Nagl, Stefan; Arain, Sarina; Krause, Christian; Borisov, Sergey M; Arnold, Matthias; Wolfbeis, Otto S

    2008-06-15

    Non-invasive, simultaneous optical monitoring of oxygen and pH during bacterial cultivation in 24-well microplates is presented using an integrated dual sensor for dissolved oxygen and pH values. The dual sensor is based on oxygen-sensitive organosilica microparticles and pH-sensitive microbeads from a polymethacrylate derivative embedded into a polyurethane hydrogel. The readout is based on a phase-domain fluorescence lifetime-based method referred to as modified frequency domain dual lifetime referencing using a commercially available detector system for 24-well microplates. The sensor was used for monitoring the growth of Pseudomonas putida bacterial cultures. The method is suitable for parallelized, miniaturized bioprocessing, and cell-based high-throughput screening applications. PMID:18383124

  9. Bacterial Growth Kinetics under a Novel Flexible Methacrylate Dressing Serving as a Drug Delivery Vehicle for Antiseptics

    PubMed Central

    Forstner, Christina; Leitgeb, Johannes; Schuster, Rupert; Dosch, Verena; Kramer, Axel; Cutting, Keith F.; Leaper, David J.; Assadian, Ojan

    2013-01-01

    A flexible methacrylate powder dressing (Altrazeal®) transforms into a wound contour conforming matrix once in contact with wound exudate. We hypothesised that it may also serve as a drug delivery vehicle for antiseptics. The antimicrobial efficacy and influence on bacterial growth kinetics in combination with three antiseptics was investigated in an in vitro porcine wound model. Standardized in vitro wounds were contaminated with Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA; ATCC 33591) and divided into six groups: no dressing (negative control), methacrylate dressing alone, and combinations with application of 0.02% Polyhexamethylene Biguanide (PHMB), 0.4% PHMB, 0.1% PHMB + 0.1% betaine, 7.7 mg/mL Povidone-iodine (PVP-iodine), and 0.1% Octenidine-dihydrochloride (OCT) + 2% phenoxyethanol. Bacterial load per gram tissue was measured over five days. The highest reduction was observed with PVP-iodine at 24 h to log10 1.43 cfu/g, followed by OCT at 48 h to log10 2.41 cfu/g. Whilst 0.02% PHMB resulted in a stable bacterial load over 120 h to log10 4.00 cfu/g over 120 h, 0.1% PHMB + 0.1% betaine inhibited growth during the first 48 h, with slightly increasing bacterial numbers up to log10 5.38 cfu/g at 120 h. These results indicate that this flexible methacrylate dressing can be loaded with various antiseptics serving as drug delivery system. Depending on the selected combination, an individually shaped and controlled antibacterial effect may be achieved using the same type of wound dressing. PMID:23698780

  10. Bacterial Growth Kinetics under a Novel Flexible Methacrylate Dressing Serving as a Drug Delivery Vehicle for Antiseptics.

    PubMed

    Forstner, Christina; Leitgeb, Johannes; Schuster, Rupert; Dosch, Verena; Kramer, Axel; Cutting, Keith F; Leaper, David J; Assadian, Ojan

    2013-01-01

    A flexible methacrylate powder dressing (Altrazeal®) transforms into a wound contour conforming matrix once in contact with wound exudate. We hypothesised that it may also serve as a drug delivery vehicle for antiseptics. The antimicrobial efficacy and influence on bacterial growth kinetics in combination with three antiseptics was investigated in an in vitro porcine wound model. Standardized in vitro wounds were contaminated with Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA; ATCC 33591) and divided into six groups: no dressing (negative control), methacrylate dressing alone, and combinations with application of 0.02% Polyhexamethylene Biguanide (PHMB), 0.4% PHMB, 0.1% PHMB + 0.1% betaine, 7.7 mg/mL Povidone-iodine (PVP-iodine), and 0.1% Octenidine-dihydrochloride (OCT) + 2% phenoxyethanol. Bacterial load per gram tissue was measured over five days. The highest reduction was observed with PVP-iodine at 24 h to log10 1.43 cfu/g, followed by OCT at 48 h to log10 2.41 cfu/g. Whilst 0.02% PHMB resulted in a stable bacterial load over 120 h to log10 4.00 cfu/g over 120 h, 0.1% PHMB + 0.1% betaine inhibited growth during the first 48 h, with slightly increasing bacterial numbers up to log10 5.38 cfu/g at 120 h. These results indicate that this flexible methacrylate dressing can be loaded with various antiseptics serving as drug delivery system. Depending on the selected combination, an individually shaped and controlled antibacterial effect may be achieved using the same type of wound dressing. PMID:23698780

  11. Predicting Individual Bacterium Cell Growth Behavior from Population Information We explore the kinetics of bacterial cells to predict the dependency of growth and division rates on cell length and

    E-print Network

    Watkins, Joseph C.

    Predicting Individual Bacterium Cell Growth Behavior from Population Information Abstract We explore the kinetics of bacterial cells to predict the dependency of growth and division rates on cell is to understand how growth and division depend on the cell's length and age. This care and time necessary

  12. Appropriate Fe (II) Addition Significantly Enhances Anaerobic Ammonium Oxidation (Anammox) Activity through Improving the Bacterial Growth Rate

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yiwen; Ni, Bing-Jie

    2015-01-01

    The application of anaerobic ammonium oxidation (Anammox) process is often limited by the slow growth rate of Anammox bacteria. As the essential substrate element that required for culturing Anammox sludge, Fe (II) is expected to affect Anammox bacterial growth. This work systematically studied the effects of Fe (II) addition on Anammox activity based on the kinetic analysis of specific growth rate using data from batch tests with an enriched Anammox sludge at different dosing levels. Results clearly demonstrated that appropriate Fe (II) dosing (i.e., 0.09?mM) significantly enhanced the specific Anammox growth rate up to 0.172?d?1 compared to 0.118?d?1 at regular Fe (II) level (0.03?mM). The relationship between Fe (II) concentration and specific Anammox growth rate was found to be well described by typical substrate inhibition kinetics, which was integrated into currently well-established Anammox model to describe the enhanced Anammox growth with Fe (II) addition. The validity of the integrated Anammox model was verified using long-term experimental data from three independent Anammox reactors with different Fe (II) dosing levels. This Fe (II)-based approach could be potentially implemented to enhance the process rate for possible mainstream application of Anammox technology, in order for an energy autarchic wastewater treatment. PMID:25644239

  13. Effects of Interactions of Auxin-Producing Bacteria and Bacterial-Feeding Nematodes on Regulation of Peanut Growths

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Li; Xu, Wensi; Jiang, Ying; Hu, Feng; Li, Huixin

    2015-01-01

    The influences of an IAA (indole-3-acetic acid)-producing bacterium (Bacillus megaterium) and two bacterial-feeding nematodes (Cephalobus sp. or Mesorhabditis sp.) on the growth of peanut (Arachis hypogaea L. cv. Haihua 1) after various durations of time were investigated in natural soils. The addition of bacteria and nematodes and incubation time all significantly affected plant growth, plant root growth, plant nutrient concentrations, soil nutrient concentrations, soil microorganisms and soil auxin concentration. The addition of nematodes caused greater increases in these indices than those of bacteria, while the addition of the combination of bacteria and nematodes caused further increases. After 42-day growth, the increases in soil respiration differed between the additions of two kinds of nematodes because of differences in their life strategies. The effects of the bacteria and nematodes on the nutrient and hormone concentrations were responsible for the increases in plant growth. These results indicate the potential for promoting plant growth via the addition of nematodes and bacteria to soil. PMID:25867954

  14. Appropriate Fe (II) Addition Significantly Enhances Anaerobic Ammonium Oxidation (Anammox) Activity through Improving the Bacterial Growth Rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yiwen; Ni, Bing-Jie

    2015-02-01

    The application of anaerobic ammonium oxidation (Anammox) process is often limited by the slow growth rate of Anammox bacteria. As the essential substrate element that required for culturing Anammox sludge, Fe (II) is expected to affect Anammox bacterial growth. This work systematically studied the effects of Fe (II) addition on Anammox activity based on the kinetic analysis of specific growth rate using data from batch tests with an enriched Anammox sludge at different dosing levels. Results clearly demonstrated that appropriate Fe (II) dosing (i.e., 0.09 mM) significantly enhanced the specific Anammox growth rate up to 0.172 d-1 compared to 0.118 d-1 at regular Fe (II) level (0.03 mM). The relationship between Fe (II) concentration and specific Anammox growth rate was found to be well described by typical substrate inhibition kinetics, which was integrated into currently well-established Anammox model to describe the enhanced Anammox growth with Fe (II) addition. The validity of the integrated Anammox model was verified using long-term experimental data from three independent Anammox reactors with different Fe (II) dosing levels. This Fe (II)-based approach could be potentially implemented to enhance the process rate for possible mainstream application of Anammox technology, in order for an energy autarchic wastewater treatment.

  15. Study on Growth Curves of Longissimus dorsi Muscle Area, Backfat Thickness and Body Conformation for Hanwoo (Korean Native) Cows

    PubMed Central

    Lee, J. H.; Oh, S.-H.; Lee, Y. M.; Kim, Y. S.; Son, H. J.; Jeong, D. J.; Whitley, N. C.; Kim, J. J.

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this study was to estimate the parameters of Gompertz growth curves with the measurements of body conformation, real-time ultrasound longissimus dorsi muscle area (LMA) and backfat thickness (BFT) in Hanwoo cows. The Hanwoo cows (n = 3,373) were born in 97 Hanwoo commercial farms in the 17 cities or counties of Gyeongbuk province, Korea, between 2000 and 2007. A total of 5,504 ultrasound measurements were collected for the cows at the age of 13 to 165 months in 2007 and 2008. Wither height (HW), rump height (HR), the horizontal distance between the top of the hips (WH), and girth of chest (GC) were also measured. Analysis of variance was conducted to investigate variables affecting LMA and BFT. The effect of farm nested in location was included in the statistical model, as well as the effects of HW, HR, WH, and GC as covariates. All of the effects were significant in the analysis of variance for LMA and BFT (p<0.01), except for the HR effect for LMA. The two ultrasound measures and the four body conformation traits were fitted to a Gompertz growth curve function to estimate parameters. Upper asymptotic weights were estimated as 54.0 cm2, 7.67 mm, 125.6 cm, 126.4 cm, 29.3 cm, and 184.1 cm, for LMA, BFT, HW, HR, WH, and GC, respectively. Results of ultrasound measurements showed that Hanwoo cows had smaller LMA and greater BFT than other western cattle breeds, suggesting that care must be taken to select for thick BFT rather than an increase of only beef yield. More ultrasound records per cow are needed to get accurate estimates of growth curve, which, thus, helps producers select animals with high accuracy. PMID:25178367

  16. A Three-Level Hierarchical Linear Model Using Student Growth Curve Modeling and Contextual Data

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Giorgio, Dorian

    2012-01-01

    Educational experts have criticized status models of school accountability, as required by the No Child Left Behind Act (NCLB), describing them as ineffectual in measuring achievement because their one-time assessment of student knowledge ignores student growth. Research on student achievement has instead identified growth models as superior…

  17. Different Acute in vivo Effects of Bacterial Derived and Pituitary Growth Hormone Preparations on Plasma Levels of Glucagon, Insulin and Free Fatty Acids in Rabbits

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jørgen Knudtzon; Paul D. Edminson; Karl Ludvig Reichelt

    1985-01-01

    Intravenous injection of high doses of bacterial derived growth hormone (1 and 2 mg Somatonorm®) did not affect the plasma levels of glucagon, insulin and free fatty acids in fasted and fed rabbits. On the other hand, 1 and 2 mg human extracted growth hormone (Crescormon®) had stimulatory effects on plasma levels of glucagon, insulin and free fatty acids. These

  18. Synthesis of fluorescent D-amino acids and their use for probing peptidoglycan synthesis and bacterial growth in situ.

    PubMed

    Kuru, Erkin; Tekkam, Srinivas; Hall, Edward; Brun, Yves V; Van Nieuwenhze, Michael S

    2015-01-01

    Fluorescent D-amino acids (FDAAs) are efficiently incorporated into the peptidoglycans (PGs) of diverse bacterial species at the sites of PG biosynthesis, allowing specific and covalent probing of bacterial growth with minimal perturbation. Here we provide a protocol for the synthesis of four FDAAs emitting light in blue (HCC-amino-D-alanine, HADA), green (NBD-amino-D-alanine, NADA, and fluorescein-D-lysine, FDL) or red (TAMRA-D-lysine, TDL) and for their use in PG labeling of live bacteria. Our modular synthesis protocol gives easy access to a library of different FDAAs made with commercially available fluorophores and diamino acid starting materials. Molecules can be synthesized in a typical chemistry laboratory in 2-3 d using standard chemical transformations. The simple labeling procedure involves the addition of the FDAAs to a bacterial sample for the desired labeling duration and stopping further label incorporation by fixing the cells with cold 70% (vol/vol) ethanol or by washing away excess dye. We discuss several scenarios for the use of these labels in fluorescence microscopy applications, including short or long labeling durations, and the combination of different labels in pure culture (e.g., for 'virtual time-lapse' microscopy) or in situ labeling of complex environmental samples. Depending on the experiment, FDAA labeling can take as little as 30 s for a rapidly growing species such as Escherichia coli. PMID:25474031

  19. Effects of chemical and biological pesticides on plant growth parameters and rhizospheric bacterial community structure in Vigna radiata.

    PubMed

    Singh, Sunil; Gupta, Rashi; Sharma, Shilpi

    2015-06-30

    With increasing application of pesticides in agriculture, their non-target effects on soil microbial communities are critical to soil health maintenance. The present study aimed to evaluate the effects of chemical pesticides (chlorpyrifos and cypermethrin) and a biological pesticide (azadirachtin) on growth parameters and the rhizospheric bacterial community of Vigna radiata. Qualitative and quantitative analysis by PCR-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) and q-PCR, respectively, of the 16S rRNA gene and transcript were performed to study the impact of these pesticides on the resident and active rhizospheric bacterial community. While plant parameters were not affected significantly by the pesticides, a shift in the bacterial community structure was observed with an adverse effect on the abundance of 16S rRNA gene and transcripts. Chlorpyrifos showed almost complete degradation toward the end of the experiment. These non-target impacts on soil ecosystems and the fact that the effects of the biopesticide mimic those of chemical pesticides raise serious concerns regarding their application in agriculture. PMID:25791643

  20. Plant growth promotion potential is equally represented in diverse grapevine root-associated bacterial communities from different biopedoclimatic environments.

    PubMed

    Marasco, Ramona; Rolli, Eleonora; Fusi, Marco; Cherif, Ameur; Abou-Hadid, Ayman; El-Bahairy, Usama; Borin, Sara; Sorlini, Claudia; Daffonchio, Daniele

    2013-01-01

    Plant-associated bacteria provide important services to host plants. Environmental factors such as cultivar type and pedoclimatic conditions contribute to shape their diversity. However, whether these environmental factors may influence the plant growth promoting (PGP) potential of the root-associated bacteria is not widely understood. To address this issue, the diversity and PGP potential of the bacterial assemblage associated with the grapevine root system of different cultivars in three Mediterranean environments along a macrotransect identifying an aridity gradient were assessed by culture-dependent and independent approaches. According to 16S rRNA gene PCR-DGGE, the structure of endosphere and rhizosphere bacterial communities was highly diverse (P = 0.03) and was associated with a cultivar/latitudinal/climatic effect. Despite being diverse, the bacterial communities associated with Egyptian grapevines shared a higher similarity with the Tunisian grapevines than those cultivated in North Italy. A similar distribution, according to the cultivar/latitude/aridity gradients, was observed for the cultivable bacteria. Many isolates (23%) presented in vitro multiple stress resistance capabilities and PGP activities, the most frequent being auxin synthesis (82%), insoluble phosphate solubilisation (61%), and ammonia production (70%). The comparable numbers and types of potential PGP traits among the three different environmental settings indicate a strong functional homeostasis of beneficial bacteria associated with grape root. PMID:23878810

  1. Synthesis of fluorescent D-amino acids (FDAAs) and their use for probing peptidoglycan synthesis and bacterial growth in situ

    PubMed Central

    Kuru, Erkin; Tekkam, Srinivas; Hall, Edward

    2015-01-01

    Fluorescent D-amino acids (FDAAs) are efficiently incorporated into the peptidoglycan of diverse bacterial species at the sites of active peptidoglycan biosynthesis, allowing specific and covalent probing of bacterial growth with minimal perturbation. Here, we provide a protocol for the synthesis of four FDAAs emitting light in blue, green or red and for their use in peptidoglycan labeling of live bacteria. Our modular synthesis protocol gives easy access to a library of different FDAAs made with commercially available fluorophores. FDAAs can be synthesized in a typical chemistry laboratory in 2–3 days. The simple labeling procedure involves addition of the FDAAs to the bacterial sample for the desired labeling duration and stopping further label incorporation by fixation or by washing away excess dye. We discuss several scenarios for the use of these labels including short or long labeling durations, and the combination of different labels in pure culture or complex environmental samples. Depending on the experiment, FDAA labeling can take as little as 30 s for a rapidly growing species such as Escherichia coli. PMID:25474031

  2. Individual differences in the onset of tense marking: a growth-curve analysis.

    PubMed

    Hadley, Pamela A; Holt, Janet K

    2006-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore individual differences in children's tense onset growth trajectories and to determine whether any within- or between-child predictors could account for these differences. Twenty-two children with expressive vocabulary abilities in the low-average to below-average range participated. Sixteen children were at risk for specific language impairment (SLI), and 6 children had low-average language abilities. Spontaneous language samples, obtained at 3-month intervals between 2;0 and 3;0, were analyzed to examine change in a cumulative productivity score for 5 tense morphemes: third person singular present, past tense, copula BE, auxiliary BE, and auxiliary DO. Hierarchical linear modeling was used to model intercept and linear growth at 30 months and quadratic growth overall. A growth model that included mean length of utterance (MLU) and MLU growth better explained within-child productivity score growth trajectories than a parallel model with vocabulary and vocabulary growth. Significant linear growth in productivity scores remained even after a control for MLU was in place. When between-child predictors were added in the final conditional model, only positive family history approached statistical significance, improving the overall estimation of the model's growth parameters. The findings support theoretical models of language acquisition that claim relative independence of tense marking from other more general aspects of vocabulary development and sentence length. The trends for family history are also consistent with proposals implicating faulty genetic mechanisms underlying developmental language disorders. Systematic use of familial risk data is recommended in future investigations examining the relationship between late-talking children and children at risk for SLI. PMID:17077210

  3. Influence of Molecular Noise on the Growth of Single Cells and Bacterial Populations

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Mischa Schmidt; Martin Creutziger; Peter Lenz

    2012-01-01

    During the last decades experimental studies have revealed that single cells of a growing bacterial population are significantly exposed to molecular noise. Important sources for noise are low levels of metabolites and enzymes that cause significant statistical variations in the outcome of biochemical reactions. In this way molecular noise affects biological processes such as nutrient uptake, chemotactic tumbling behavior, or

  4. Bacterial succession in glacial forefield soils characterized by community structure, activity and opportunistic growth dynamics.

    PubMed

    Sigler, W V; Crivii, S; Zeyer, J

    2002-11-01

    The succession of bacterial communities inhabiting the forefield of the Dammaglacier (Switzerland) was investigated in soils ranging in successional age from 0 to 100 years since deglaciation. Overall activity per bacterial cell was estimated by the amount of fluorescein diacetate (FDA) hydrolyzed per DAPI-stained cell, and an index of "opportunism" was determined from the ratio of culturable to total cells (C:T ratio). Ribosomal intergenic spacer analysis (RISA) was used to estimate the richness of dominant phylotypes and to construct rank-abundance plots of the dominant populations. We observed a biphasic trend in specific cellular activity, which exhibited minima in the 0- and 100-year-old soils while a maximum activity per cell was reached in the 70-y soil. On average, the C:T ratio showed the same trend as the specific activity, although we observed some differences between the two sampling transects. RISA revealed a decrease in dominant phylotype richness as successional age increased, and rank-abundance plots indicated that the evenness of the dominant bacterial phylotypes significantly decreased with successional age. The combination of specific cellular activity and C:T ratio results suggested the presence of an r-K continuum of bacteria while RISA showed that richness and evenness of dominant phylotypes decreased with successional age. We conclude that bacterial succession in the glacier forefield was a dynamic process with adaptation to the differing stages of succession occurring on both the individual and community levels. PMID:12399899

  5. Comparison of Three Nonlinear and Spline Regression Models for Describing Chicken Growth Curves1

    Microsoft Academic Search

    S. E. Aggrey

    This study compared three non-linear growthmodels(Richards,Gompertz,andlogistic)andthe spline linear regression model using BW measurements from an unselected, randombred chicken population. Based on the goodness offit criteria, the nonlinear models (NLM) fitted the data better than the spline regression model. The four-parameter Richards model was expected to have the best overall fit; however, because the shape parameterpredictedwascloseto1.0,whichcorresponded with the Gompertz curve, there

  6. Evaluation of free-stall mattress bedding treatments to reduce mastitis bacterial growth

    SciTech Connect

    Kristula, M.A.; Dou, Z.; Toth, J.D.; Smith, B.I.; Harvey, N.; Sabo, M. [University of Penn, Kennett Square, PA (United States)

    2008-05-15

    Bacterial counts were compared in free-stall mattresses and teat ends exposed to 5 treatments in a factorial study design on 1 dairy farm. Mattresses in five 30-cow groups were subjected to 1 of 5 bedding treatments every other day: 0.5 kg of hydrated limestone, 120 mL of commercial acidic conditioner, 1 kg of coal fly ash, 1 kg of kiln-dried wood shavings, and control (no bedding). Counts of coliforms, Klebsiella spp., Escherichia coli, and Streptococcus spp. were lowest on mattresses bedded with lime. Mattresses bedded with the commercial acidic conditioner had the next lowest counts for coliforms, Klebsiella spp., and Streptococcus spp. Wood shavings and the no-bedding control had the highest counts for coliform and Klebsiella spp. Compared with wood shavings or control, fly ash reduced the counts of coliforms, whereas for the other 3 bacterial groups, the reduction was not always significant. Streptococcus spp. counts were greatest in the control group and did not differ among the shavings and fly ash groups. Teat swab results indicated that hydrated lime was the only bedding treatment that significantly decreased the counts of both coliforms and Klebsiella spp. There were no differences in Streptococcus spp. numbers on the teats between any of the bedding treatments. Bacterial populations grew steadily on mattresses and were generally higher at 36 to 48 h than at 12 to 24 h, whereas bacterial populations on teats grew rapidly by 12 h and then remained constant. Hydrated lime was the only treatment that significantly reduced bacterial counts on both mattresses and teat ends, but it caused some skin irritation.

  7. CONSEQUENCES OF PROTIST-STIMULATED BACTERIAL PRODUCTION FOR ESTIMATING PROTIST GROWTH EFFICIENCIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The trophic link between bacteria and bacterivorous protists is a complex interaction that involves feedback of inorganic nutrients and growth substrates that are immediately available for prey growth. These interactions were examined in the laboratory and in incubations of conce...

  8. Nonlinear estimation of Monod growth kinetic parameters from a single substrate depletion curve.

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, J A; Tiedje, J M

    1983-01-01

    Monod growth kinetic parameters were estimated by fitting sigmoidal substrate depletion data to the integrated Monod equation, using nonlinear least-squares analysis. When the initial substrate concentration was in the mixed-order region, nonlinear estimation of simulated data sets containing known measurement errors provided accurate estimates of the mu max, Ks, and Y values used to create these data. Nonlinear regression analysis of sigmoidal substrate depletion data was also evaluated for H2-limited batch growth of Desulfovibrio sp. strain G11. The integrated Monod equation can be more convenient for the estimation of growth kinetic parameters, particularly for gaseous substrates, but it must be recognized that the estimates of mu max, Ks, and Y obtained may be influenced by the growth rate history of the inoculum. PMID:6870238

  9. The Australian yield curve as a leading indicator of consumption growth

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Bruce Felmingham

    1998-01-01

    The purpose of the reported research is to determine if Australia's real consumption growth is predicted by real and\\/or nominal yield spreads. To this end, a model of the relationship between consumption growth and interest rates is derived from neoclassical, utility maximizing premises. This theoretical foundation is applied to quarterly Australian data over the period 1983:4 to 1995:4. The time

  10. Anthocyanin Incorporated Dental Copolymer: Bacterial Growth Inhibition, Mechanical Properties, and Compound Release Rates and Stability by 1H NMR

    PubMed Central

    Hrynash, Halyna; Pilly, Vinay Kumar; Mankovskaia, Alexandra; Xiong, Yaoyang; Nogueira Filho, Getulio; Bresciani, Eduardo; Lévesque, Céline Marie

    2014-01-01

    Objective. To evaluate bacterial growth inhibition, mechanical properties, and compound release rate and stability of copolymers incorporated with anthocyanin (ACY; Vaccinium macrocarpon). Methods. Resin samples were prepared (Bis-GMA/TEGDMA at 70/30?mol%) and incorporated with 2 w/w% of either ACY or chlorhexidine (CHX), except for the control group. Samples were individually immersed in a bacterial culture (Streptococcus mutans) for 24?h. Cell viability (n = 3) was assessed by counting the number of colony forming units on replica agar plates. Flexural strength (FS) and elastic modulus (E) were tested on a universal testing machine (n = 8). Compound release and chemical stability were evaluated by UV spectrophotometry and 1H NMR (n = 3). Data were analyzed by one-way ANOVA and Tukey's test (? = 0.05). Results. Both compounds inhibited S. mutans growth, with CHX being most effective (P < 0.05). Control resin had the lowest FS and E values, followed by ACY and CHX, with statistical difference between control and CHX groups for both mechanical properties (P < 0.05). The 24?h compound release rates were ACY: 1.33??g/mL and CHX: 1.92??g/mL. 1H NMR spectra suggests that both compounds remained stable after being released in water. Conclusion. The present findings indicate that anthocyanins might be used as a natural antibacterial agent in resin based materials. PMID:24693287

  11. Visible bands of ammonia: band strengths, curves of growth, and the spatial distribution of ammonia on Jupiter

    SciTech Connect

    Lutz, B.L.; Owen, T.

    1980-01-01

    We report room-temperature laboratory studies of the 5520 A (6..nu../sub 1/) and 6475 A (5..nu../sub 1/) bands of self-broadened ammonia at column densities ranging from 1.7--435.7 meter-amagats (m-am). Detailed equivalent-width measurements at 24 different pressure-pathlength combinations corresponding to four pressures between 44 and 689 torr and pathlengths between 32 and 512 m are used to determin curves of growth and integrated band strengths. The band strengths for the 6..nu../sub 1/ and 5..nu../sub 1/ overtones are 5520 A: S=0.096 +- 0.005 cm/sup -1/(m-am)/sup -1/ and 6475 A: S=0.63 +- 0.03 cm/sup -1/(m-am)/sup -1/, respectively.Using these band strengths and curves of growth, we analyze new spatially resolved spectra of Jupiter showing a nonhomogeneous distribution of ammonia in the Jovian atmosphere. The observed variations in the CH/sub 4//NH/sub 3/ mixing ratio are interpreted as evidence of altitude-dependent depletion of ammonia in the atmosphere.

  12. Self-Esteem and Delinquency Revisited (Again): A Test of Kaplan's Self-Derogation Theory of Delinquency Using Latent Growth Curve Modeling.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mason, W. Alex

    2001-01-01

    Studied the relationship between self-esteem and delinquency using latent growth curve modeling. Analyses of panel data for 2,213 adolescent boys from the Youth in Transition Study supported Kaplan's self-derogation theory of delinquency (H. Kaplan, 1978) by showing that delinquency was positively associated with growth in self-esteem among…

  13. Effects of monofunctional platinum agents on bacterial growth: a retrospective study.

    PubMed

    Johnstone, Timothy C; Alexander, Sarah M; Lin, Wei; Lippard, Stephen J

    2014-01-01

    The effect of the novel and potent monofunctional platinum(II) agent phenanthriplatin on Escherichia coli and bacteriophage ? lysogens is reported. E. coli filamentation was observed by light microscopy when cells were grown in the presence of phenanthriplatin, cis-[Pt(NH3)2(Am)Cl](+) where Am is phenanthridine. Treatment of lysogenic bacteria with this compound resulted in lysis and the production of viral particles, as indicated by plaque formation in a bacterial lawn. The results obtained with phenanthriplatin are contextualized by comparison with those obtained using cisplatin as well as other, less active, monofunctional compounds such as [Pt(NH3)3Cl](+) and cis-[Pt(NH3)2(py)Cl](+), where py is pyridine. The ability of phenanthriplatin to induce bacterial filamentation and initiate lysis in lysogenic bacteria corroborates the hypothesis that the biological activity of this complex is mediated by its interaction with DNA. PMID:24364388

  14. Impact of Genome Reduction on Bacterial Metabolism and Its Regulation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Eva Yus; Tobias Maier; Konstantinos Michalodimitrakis; Vera van Noort; Takuji Yamada; Wei-Hua Chen; Judith A. H. Wodke; Marc Güell; Sira Martínez; Ronan Bourgeois; Sebastian Kühner; Emanuele Raineri; Ivica Letunic; Olga V. Kalinina; Michaela Rode; Richard Herrmann; Ricardo Gutiérrez-Gallego; Robert B. Russell; Anne-Claude Gavin; Peer Bork; Luis Serrano

    2009-01-01

    To understand basic principles of bacterial metabolism organization and regulation, but also the impact of genome size, we systematically studied one of the smallest bacteria, Mycoplasma pneumoniae. A manually curated metabolic network of 189 reactions catalyzed by 129 enzymes allowed the design of a defined, minimal medium with 19 essential nutrients. More than 1300 growth curves were recorded in the

  15. Growth curve analyses of the relationship between early maternal age and children's mathematics and reading performance.

    PubMed

    Torres, D Diego

    2015-03-01

    Regarding the methods used to examine the early maternal age-child academic outcomes relationship, the extant literature has tended to examine change using statistical analyses that fail to appreciate that individuals vary in their rates of growth. Of the one study I have been able to find that employs a true growth model to estimate this relationship, the authors only controlled for characteristics of the maternal household after family formation; confounding background factors of mothers that might select them into early childbearing, a possible source of bias, were ignored. The authors' findings nonetheless suggested an inverse relationship between early maternal age, i.e., a first birth between the ages of 13 and 17, and Canadian adolescents' mean math performance at age 10. Early maternal age was not related to the linear slope of age. To elucidate whether the early maternal age-child academic outcomes association, treated in a growth context, is consistent with this finding, the present study built on it using US data and explored children's mathematics and reading trajectories from age 5 on. Its unique contribution is that it further explicitly controlled for maternal background factors and employed a three-level growth model with repeated measures of children nested within their mothers. Though the strength of the relationship varied between mean initial academic performance and mean academic growth, results confirmed that early maternal age was negatively related to children's mathematics and reading achievement, net of post-teen first birth child-specific and maternal household factors. Once maternal background factors were included, there was no statistically significant relationship between early maternal age and either children's mean initial mathematics and reading scores or their mean mathematics and reading growth. PMID:25592941

  16. Evaluation of the growth inhibitory activities of Triphala against common bacterial isolates from HIV infected patients.

    PubMed

    Srikumar, R; Parthasarathy, N Jeya; Shankar, E M; Manikandan, S; Vijayakumar, R; Thangaraj, R; Vijayananth, K; Sheeladevi, R; Rao, Usha Anand

    2007-05-01

    The isolation of microbial agents less susceptible to regular antibiotics and the rising trend in the recovery rates of resistant bacteria highlights the need for newer alternative principles. Triphala has been used in traditional medicine practice against certain diseases such as jaundice, fever, cough, eye diseases etc. In the present study phytochemical (phenolic, flavonoid and carotenoid) and antibacterial activities of aqueous and ethanol extracts of Triphala and its individual components (Terminalia chebula, Terminalia belerica and Emblica officinalis) were tested against certain bacterial isolates (Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Shigella sonnei, S. flexneri, Staphylococcus aureus, Vibrio cholerae, Salmonella paratyphi-B, Escherichia coli, Enterococcus faecalis, Salmonella typhi) obtained from HIV infected patients using Kirby-Bauer's disk diffusion and minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) methods. T. chebula was found to possess high phytochemical content followed by T. belerica and E. officinalis in both aqueous and ethanol extracts. Further, most of the bacterial isolates were inhibited by the ethanol and aqueous extracts of T. chebula followed by T. belerica and E. officinalis by both disk diffusion and MIC methods. The present study revealed that both individual and combined aqueous and ethanol extracts of Triphala have antibacterial activity against the bacterial isolates tested. PMID:17273983

  17. Marine microbial ecology off East Antarctica (30 - 80°E): Rates of bacterial and phytoplankton growth and grazing by heterotrophic protists

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pearce, Imojen; Davidson, Andrew T.; Thomson, Paul G.; Wright, Simon; van den Enden, Rick

    2010-05-01

    Marine microbes (<200 ?m) contribute most of the living matter and carbon flow in the Southern Ocean, yet the factors that control the composition and function of these microbial communities are not well understood. To determine the importance of microbial grazers in controlling microbial abundance, we determined microbial standing stocks and rates of herbivory and bacterivory in relation to the physical environment off East Antarctica during the Baseline Research on Oceanography, Krill and the Environment: West (BROKE-West) survey, which covered waters from the Polar Front to the coast between 30 and 80°E. Concentrations of heterotrophic nanoflagellates (HNF) (˜2 to 20 ?m), microzooplankton (˜20 to 200 ?m), bacteria, and chlorophyll a (Chl a) were determined and the growth and grazing mortality of phytoplankton and bacteria were estimated using the grazing dilution technique at 22 sites along the survey. Results showed that microzooplankton and HNF consumed on average 52% of bacterial production d -1 and 62% primary production d -1 but consumed >100% d -1 at the western ice-edge sites. Rates of bacterivory ranged from 0.4 - 2.6 d -1 and were correlated with bacterial concentrations, bacterial growth rates and longitude. Rates were highest in the eastern-most part of the survey, which was sampled last, reflecting the transition along the successional continuum toward a respiration-based, senescent, microbial community. Rates of herbivory ranged from 0.3 to 2.4 d -1 and were correlated with concentrations of microzooplankton and HNF combined, rates of phytoplankton growth, and latitude. Rates were highest at southern ice edge sites where concentrations of prey (as represented by Chl a) and microzooplankton were also highest. Cluster analysis of the concentrations of marine microbes and their rates of growth and grazing mortality identified 5 groups of sample sites that conveniently summarised the variability in the composition and function of the microbial community. Cluster groups differentiated between low Chl a (˜0.3 ?g l -1) open ocean Antarctic Circumpolar Current (ACC) communities; and high Chl a (˜2.4 ?g l -1) ice-associated coastal blooms at various stages between bloom formation and senescence. This partitioning of cluster groups can be used to determine spatial and temporal patterns of carbon transfer by the microbial loop within the BROKE-West survey area.

  18. New technique for assessing fetal heart growth using three-dimensional ultrasonography: description of the technique and reference curves.

    PubMed

    Barreto, Enoch Quinderé de Sá; Araujo Júnior, Edward; Martins, Wellington P; Rolo, Liliam Cristine; Milani, Hérbene José Figuinha; Nardozza, Luciano Marcondes Machado; Moron, Antonio Fernandes

    2014-07-28

    Abstract Objective: To describe a new technique for assessing fetal growth using three-dimensional ultrasonography (3DUS) using the extended imaging virtual organ computer-aided analysis (XI VOCAL) software and its respective reference curves. Methods: We conducted a cross-sectional study on 303 normal singleton pregnancies between their 20th and 34th weeks. To assess fetal heart growth, we used the XI VOCAL software with 10 planes in which the reference lines (beginning and end) were placed at the cardiac apex, the output level of the vessels and the base above the diaphragm, respectively. To assess the correlation between distance and interval, polynomial regressions were performed with adjustments using the coefficient of determination (R(2)). To assess the inter-observer reproducibility, we used the intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC). Results: The mean distance between the apex and the base of the fetal heart ranged from 14.41?±?1.24?mm to 26.24?±?2.62?mm between the 20th and 34th weeks, respectively. The mean interval between the apex and the base of the fetal heart ranged from 1.56?±?0.13?mm and 2.94?±?0.30?mm between the 20th and 34th weeks, respectively. We observed good correlation of distance and interval with the gestational age, with R(2)?=?0.73 and 0.74, respectively. We observed a good inter-observer to the interval and distance with ICC?=?0.983 and 0.996, respectively. Conclusion: We described a new technique for assessing fetal heart growth using 3DUS and determined reference curves for the distance and interval between the 20th and 34th weeks of pregnancy. PMID:25005859

  19. Assessment of Bacterial and Fungal Growth on Natural Substrates: Consequences for Preserving Caves with Prehistoric Paintings

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Francesca Stomeo; Maria C. Portillo; Juan M. Gonzalez

    2009-01-01

    The most representative bacterium (Pseudonocardia sp.) and fungus (Fusarium sp.) from the microbial communities of a cave containing paleolithic paintings were isolated and their growth on natural\\u000a substrates assessed. Growth was tested at the in situ and optimal, laboratory growth temperature. Development was analyzed\\u000a with and without supplemented nutrients (glucose, ammonium, phosphate, peptone). Results showed that the assayed bacterium\\u000a on

  20. Individual Differences in the Onset of Tense Marking: A Growth-Curve Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hadley, Pamela A.; Holt, Janet K.

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore individual differences in children's tense onset growth trajectories and to determine whether any within- or between-child predictors could account for these differences. Twenty-two children with expressive vocabulary abilities in the low-average to below-average range participated. Sixteen children were at…

  1. Level and Change of Bullying Behavior during High School: A Multilevel Growth Curve Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nocentini, Annalaura; Menesini, Ersilia; Salmivalli, Christina

    2013-01-01

    The development of bullying behavior was examined across three years in a sample of 515 adolescents (46% females) from 41 classrooms. At time 1, the students were in grades 9 and 10 (mean age = 14.5 years; SD = 0.54). Results of a multilevel growth model showed that both baseline level and change of bullying varied significantly across individuals…

  2. Structural equation modeling of latent growth curves of weight gain among treated tuberculosis patients.

    PubMed

    Vasantha, Mahalingam; Venkatesan, Perumal

    2014-01-01

    Tuberculosis still remains a major public health problem even though it is treatable and curable. Weight gain measurement during anti tuberculosis (TB) treatment period is an important component to assess the progress of TB patients. In this study, Latent Growth Models (LGMs) were implemented in a longitudinal design to predict the change in weight of TB patients who were given three different regimens under randomized controlled clinical trial for anti-TB treatment. Linear and Quadratic LGMs were fitted using Mplus software. The age, sex and treatment response of the TB patients were used as time invariant independent variables of the growth trajectories. The quadratic trend was found to be better in explaining the changes in weight without grouping than the quadratic model for three group comparisons. A significant increase in the change of weight over time was identified while a significant quadratic effect indicated that weights were sustained over time. The growth rate was similar in both the groups. The treatment response had significant association with the growth rate of weight scores of the patients. PMID:24618577

  3. Structural Equation Modeling of Latent Growth Curves of Weight Gain among Treated Tuberculosis Patients

    PubMed Central

    Vasantha, Mahalingam; Venkatesan, Perumal

    2014-01-01

    Tuberculosis still remains a major public health problem even though it is treatable and curable. Weight gain measurement during anti tuberculosis (TB) treatment period is an important component to assess the progress of TB patients. In this study, Latent Growth Models (LGMs) were implemented in a longitudinal design to predict the change in weight of TB patients who were given three different regimens under randomized controlled clinical trial for anti-TB treatment. Linear and Quadratic LGMs were fitted using Mplus software. The age, sex and treatment response of the TB patients were used as time invariant independent variables of the growth trajectories. The quadratic trend was found to be better in explaining the changes in weight without grouping than the quadratic model for three group comparisons. A significant increase in the change of weight over time was identified while a significant quadratic effect indicated that weights were sustained over time. The growth rate was similar in both the groups. The treament response had significant association with the growth rate of weight scores of the patients. PMID:24618577

  4. A possible mechanism of action of plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR) strain Bacillus pumilus WP8 via regulation of soil bacterial community structure.

    PubMed

    Kang, Yijun; Shen, Min; Wang, Huanli; Zhao, Qingxin

    2013-01-01

    According to the traditional view, establishment and maintenance of critical population densities in the rhizosphere was the premise of PGPR to exert growth-promoting effects. In light of the facts that soil bacterial community structures can be changed by some PGPR strains including Bacillus pumilus WP8, we hypothesize that regulation of soil bacterial community structure is one of the plant growth-promoting mechanisms of B. pumilus WP8, rather than depending on high-density cells in soil. In this study, denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (PCR-DGGE) was performed to evaluate the relationship between changes in soil bacterial community structure and growth-promoting effect on the seedling growth of fava beans (Vicia faba L.) during three successive cultivations. We found that B. pumilus WP8 lacks capacity to reproduce in large enough numbers to survive in bulk soil more than 40 days, yet the bacterial community structures were gradually influenced by inoculation of WP8, especially on dominant populations. Despite WP8 being short-lived, it confers the ability of steadily promoting fava bean seedling growth on soil during the whole growing period for at least 90 days. Pseudomonas chlororaphis RA6, another tested PGPR strain, exists in large numbers for at least 60 days but less than 90 days, whilst giving rise to slight influence on bacterial community structure. In addition, along with the extinction of RA6 cells in bulk soils, the effect of growth promotion disappeared simultaneously. Furthermore, the increment of soil catalase activity from WP8 treatment implied the ability to stimulate soil microbial activity, which may be the reason why the dominant population changed and increased as time passed. Our study suggests that regulation of treated soil bacterial community structure may be another possible action mechanism. PMID:24005176

  5. Arsenic in the sera of gallium arsenide-exposed mice inhibits bacterial growth and increases host resistance.

    PubMed

    Burns, L A; McCay, J A; Brown, R; Munson, A E

    1993-05-01

    The objective of the present investigations was to evaluate whether the presence of gallium arsenide (GaAs) in the sera of exposed mice was sufficient to retard bacterial growth. Host resistance studies demonstrated that exposure of GaAs (50-200 mg/kg) produced an increased resistance to Streptococcus pneumoniae and Listeria monocytogenes (50-100 mg/kg GaAs) when microbial challenge occurred 24 hr after exposure. In contrast, exposed mice exhibited a profound and dose-related decrease in resistance to the B16F10 melanoma. Serial dilutions of GaAs (0.039-5 mg/ml) were added to BHI broth and cultures were innoculated with either S. pneumoniae or L. monocytogenes. GaAs slowed the growth of both organisms with a minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) of 0.625 mg/ml. Sera from mice euthanized at various time intervals after exposure to vehicle (0.05% Tween 80 in saline) or GaAs (200 mg/kg) was also capable of retarding the growth of both organisms with the maximal inhibition noted for euthanization 24 hr after exposure. However, sera from GaAs-exposed mice (24 hr after exposure) was incapable of slowing the growth of the B16F10 melanoma. Addition of the arsenic-binding compound meso-2,3-dimercaptosuccinic acid (100 microM) to sera from mice exposed to GaAs followed by innoculation with L. monocytogenes resulted in growth of this organism, which was comparable to growth observed in vehicle cultures.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8496824

  6. CURVED WALLS: GRAIN GROWTH, SETTLING, AND COMPOSITION PATTERNS IN T TAURI DISK DUST SUBLIMATION FRONTS

    SciTech Connect

    McClure, M. K.; Calvet, N.; Hartmann, L.; Ingleby, L. [Department of Astronomy, The University of Michigan, 500 Church Street, 830 Dennison Building., Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); D'Alessio, P. [Centro de Radioastronomía y Astrofísica, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, 58089 Morelia, Michoacán (Mexico); Espaillat, C. [Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Sargent, B. [Center for Imaging Science and Laboratory for Multiwavelength Astrophysics, Rochester Institute of Technology, 54 Lomb Memorial Drive, Rochester, NY 14623 (United States); Watson, D. M. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Rochester, Rochester, NY 14627 (United States); Hernández, J., E-mail: melisma@umich.edu, E-mail: ncalvet@umich.edu, E-mail: lhartm@umich.edu, E-mail: lingleby@umich.edu, E-mail: p.dalessio@astrosmo.unam.mx, E-mail: cespaillat@cfa.harvard.edu, E-mail: baspci@rit.edu, E-mail: dmw@pas.rochester.edu, E-mail: hernandj@cida.ve [Centro de Investigaciones de Astronomía (CIDA), Mérida 5101-A (Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of)

    2013-10-01

    The dust sublimation walls of disks around T Tauri stars represent a directly observable cross-section through the disk atmosphere and midplane. Their emission properties can probe the grain size distribution and composition of the innermost regions of the disk, where terrestrial planets form. Here we calculate the inner dust sublimation wall properties for four classical T Tauri stars with a narrow range of spectral types and inclination angles and a wide range of mass accretion rates to determine the extent to which the walls are radially curved. Best fits to the near- and mid-IR excesses are found for curved, two-layer walls in which the lower layer contains larger, hotter, amorphous pyroxene grains with Mg/(Mg+Fe) = 0.6 and the upper layer contains submicron, cooler, mixed amorphous olivine and forsterite grains. As the mass accretion rates decrease from 10{sup –8} to 10{sup –10} M{sub ?} yr{sup –1}, the maximum grain size in the lower layer decreases from ?3 to 0.5 ?m. We attribute this to a decrease in fragmentation and turbulent support for micron-sized grains with decreasing viscous heating. The atmosphere of these disks is depleted of dust with dust-gas mass ratios 1 × 10{sup –4} of the interstellar medium (ISM) value, while the midplane is enhanced to eight times the ISM value. For all accretion rates, the wall contributes at least half of the flux in the optically thin 10 ?m silicate feature. Finally, we find evidence for an iron gradient in the disk, suggestive of that found in our solar system.

  7. BacSim, a simulator for individual-based modelling of bacterial colony growth

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jan-Ulrich Kreft; Ginger Booth; Julian W. T. Wimpenny

    1998-01-01

    The generic, quantitative, spatially explicit, individual-based model BacSim was developed to simulate growth and behaviour of bacteria. The potential of this approach is in relating the properties of microscopic entities - cells - to the properties of macroscopic, complex systems such as biofilms. Here, the growth of a single Escherichia coli cell into a colony was studied. The object-oriented program

  8. Effects of gypsophila saponins on bacterial growth kinetics and on selection of subterranean clover rhizosphere bacteria

    Microsoft Academic Search

    F. Fons; N. Amellal; C. Leyval; N. Saint-Martin; M. Henry

    2003-01-01

    Plant secondary metabolites, such as saponins, have a considerable impact in agriculture because of their allelopathic effects. They also affect the growth of soil microorganisms, especially fungi. We investigated the influence of saponins on rhizosphere bacteria in vitro and in soil conditions. The effects of gypsophila saponins on the growth kinetics of rhizosphere bacteria were studied by monitoring the absorbance

  9. Noninvasive Quantitative Measurement of Bacterial Growth in Porous Media Under Unsaturated-Flow Conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Yarwood, Rocky (Oregon State University) [Oregon State University; Rockhold, Mark L.(BATTELLE (PACIFIC NW LAB)) [BATTELLE (PACIFIC NW LAB); Niemet, Mike (Oregon State University) [Oregon State University; Selker, John S.(VISITORS) [VISITORS; Bottomley, Peter J.(Oregon State University) [Oregon State University

    2002-07-01

    Glucose-dependent growth of the luxCDABE reporter bacterium Pseudomonas fluorescens HK44 was monitored noninvasively in quartz sand under unsaturated-flow conditions within a 45- by 56- by 1-cm two-dimensional light transmission chamber. The spatial and temporal development of growth were mapped daily over 7 days by quantifying salicylate-induced bioluminescence. A nonlinear model relating the rate of increase in light emission after salicylate exposure to microbial density successfully predicted growth over 4 orders of magnitude (r{sup 2}=0.95). Total model-predicted growth agreed with growth calculated from the mass balance of the system by using previously determined growth parameters of HK44 (predicted, 1.2 x 10{sup 12} cells; calculated, 1.7 x 10{sup 12} cells). Colonization expanded in all directions from the inoculation region, including upward migration against the liquid flow. Both the daily rate of expansion of the colonized zone and the population density of the first day's growth in each newly colonized region remained relatively constant throughout the experiment. Nonetheless, substantial growth continued to occur on subsequent days in the older regions of the colonized zone. The proportion of daily potential growth that remained within the chamber declined progressively between days 2 and 7 (from 97 to 13%). A densely populated, anoxic region developed in the interior of the colonized zone even though the sand was unsaturated and fresh growth medium continued to flow through the colonized zone. These data illustrate the potential of a light transmission chamber, bioluminescent bacteria, and sensitive digital camera technology to noninvasively study real-time hydrology-microbiology interactions associated with unsaturated flow in porous media.

  10. The importance of growth kinetic analysis in determining bacterial susceptibility against antibiotics and silver nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Theophel, Karsten; Schacht, Veronika J.; Schlüter, Michael; Schnell, Sylvia; Stingu, Catalina-Suzana; Schaumann, Reiner; Bunge, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Routine antibiotics susceptibility testing still relies on standardized cultivation-based analyses, including measurement of inhibition zones in conventional agar diffusion tests and endpoint turbidity-based measurements. Here, we demonstrate that common off-line monitoring and endpoint determination after 18–24 h could be insufficient for reliable growth-dependent evaluation of antibiotic susceptibility. Different minimal inhibitory concentrations were obtained in 20- and 48 h microdilution plate tests using an Enterococcus faecium clinical isolate (strain UKI-MB07) as a model organism. Hence, we used an on-line kinetic assay for simultaneous cultivation and time-resolved growth analysis in a 96-well format instead of off-line susceptibility testing. Growth of the Enterococcus test organism was delayed up to 30 h in the presence of 0.25 ?g mL-1 of vancomycin and 8 ?g mL-1 of fosfomycin, after which pronounced growth was observed. Despite the delayed onset of growth, treatment with fosfomycin, daptomycin, fusidic acid, cefoxitin, or gentamicin resulted in higher maximum growth rates and/or higher final optical density values compared with antibiotic-free controls, indicating that growth stimulation and hormetic effects may occur with extended exposure to sublethal antibiotic concentrations. Whereas neither maximum growth rate nor final cell density correlated with antibiotic concentration, the lag phase duration for some antibiotics was a more meaningful indicator of dose-dependent growth inhibition. Our results also reveal that non-temporal growth profiles are only of limited value for cultivation-based antimicrobial silver nanoparticle susceptibility testing. The exposure to Ag(0) nanoparticles led to plasma membrane damage in a concentration-dependent manner and induced oxidative stress in Enterococcus faecium UKI-MB07, as shown by intracellular ROS accumulation. PMID:25426104

  11. Noninvasive Quantitative Measurement of Bacterial Growth in Porous Media under Unsaturated-Flow Conditions †

    PubMed Central

    Yarwood, R. R.; Rockhold, M. L.; Niemet, M. R.; Selker, J. S.; Bottomley, P. J.

    2002-01-01

    Glucose-dependent growth of the luxCDABE reporter bacterium Pseudomonas fluorescens HK44 was monitored noninvasively in quartz sand under unsaturated-flow conditions within a 45- by 56- by 1-cm two-dimensional light transmission chamber. The spatial and temporal development of growth were mapped daily over 7 days by quantifying salicylate-induced bioluminescence. A nonlinear model relating the rate of increase in light emission after salicylate exposure to microbial density successfully predicted growth over 4 orders of magnitude (r2 = 0.95). Total model-predicted growth agreed with growth calculated from the mass balance of the system by using previously established growth parameters of HK44 (predicted, 1.2 × 1012 cells; calculated, 1.7 × 1012 cells). Colonization expanded in all directions from the inoculation region, including upward migration against the liquid flow. Both the daily rate of expansion of the colonized zone and the population density of the first day's growth in each newly colonized region remained relatively constant throughout the experiment. Nonetheless, substantial growth continued to occur on subsequent days in the older regions of the colonized zone. The proportion of daily potential growth that remained within the chamber declined progressively between days 2 and 7 (from 97 to 13%). A densely populated, anoxic region developed in the interior of the colonized zone even though the sand was unsaturated and fresh growth medium continued to flow through the colonized zone. These data illustrate the potential of a light transmission chamber, bioluminescent bacteria, and sensitive digital camera technology to noninvasively study real-time hydrology-microbiology interactions associated with unsaturated flow in porous media. PMID:12089048

  12. Increased bacterial growth efficiency with environmental variability: results from DOC degradation by bacteria in pure culture experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eichinger, M.; Sempéré, R.; Grégori, G.; Charrière, B.; Poggiale, J. C.; Lefèvre, D.

    2010-02-01

    This paper assesses how considering variation in DOC availability and cell maintenance in bacterial models affects Bacterial Growth Efficiency (BGE) estimations. For this purpose, we conducted two biodegradation experiments simultaneously. In experiment one, a given amount of substrate was added to the culture at the start of the experiment whilst in experiment two, the same amount of substrate was added, but using periodic pulses over the time course of the experiment. Three bacterial models, with different levels of complexity, (the Monod, Marr-Pirt and the dynamic energy budget (DEB) model), were used, and calibrated using the above experiments. BGE has been estimated using the experimental values obtained from discrete samples and from model generated data. Cell maintenance was derived experimentally, from respiration rate measurements. The results showed that the Monod model did not reproduce the experimental data accurately, whereas the Marr-Pirt and DEB models demonstrated a good level of reproducibility, probably because cell maintenance was built into their formula. Whatever estimation method was used, the BGE value was always higher in experiment two (the periodically pulsed substrate) as compared to the initially one-pulsed-substrate experiment. Moreover, BGE values estimated without considering cell maintenance (Monod model and empirical formula) were always smaller than BGE values obtained from models taking cell maintenance into account. Since BGE is commonly estimated using constant experimental systems and ignore maintenance, we conclude that these typical methods underestimate BGE values. On a larger scale, and for biogeochemical cycles, this would lead to the conclusion that, for a given DOC supply rate and a given DOC consumption rate, these BGE estimation methods overestimate the role of bacterioplankton as CO2 producers.

  13. Increased bacterial growth efficiency with environmental variability: results from DOC degradation by bacteria in pure culture experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eichinger, M.; Sempéré, R.; Grégori, G.; Charrière, B.; Poggiale, J. C.; Lefèvre, D.

    2010-06-01

    This paper assesses how considering variation in DOC availability and cell maintenance in bacterial models affects Bacterial Growth Efficiency (BGE) estimations. For this purpose, we conducted two biodegradation experiments simultaneously. In experiment one, a given amount of substrate was added to the culture at the start of the experiment whilst in experiment two, the same amount of substrate was added, but using periodic pulses over the time course of the experiment. Three bacterial models, with different levels of complexity, (the Monod, Marr-Pirt and the dynamic energy budget - DEB - models), were used and calibrated using the above experiments. BGE has been estimated using the experimental values obtained from discrete samples and from model generated data. Cell maintenance was derived experimentally, from respiration rate measurements. The results showed that the Monod model did not reproduce the experimental data accurately, whereas the Marr-Pirt and DEB models demonstrated a good level of reproducibility, probably because cell maintenance was built into their formula. Whatever estimation method was used, the BGE value was always higher in experiment two (the periodically pulsed substrate) as compared to the initially one-pulsed-substrate experiment. Moreover, BGE values estimated without considering cell maintenance (Monod model and empirical formula) were always smaller than BGE values obtained from models taking cell maintenance into account. Since BGE is commonly estimated using constant experimental systems and ignore maintenance, we conclude that these typical methods underestimate BGE values. On a larger scale, and for biogeochemical cycles, this would lead to the conclusion that, for a given DOC supply rate and a given DOC consumption rate, these BGE estimation methods overestimate the role of bacterioplankton as CO2 producers.

  14. Effects of Pore-Scale Heterogeneity and Transverse Mixing on Bacterial Growth in Porous Media

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Changyong; Kang, Qinjun; Wang, Xing; Zilles, Julie L.; Muller, Roland H.; Werth, Charles J.

    2010-04-13

    Microbial degradation of contaminants in the subsurface requires the availability of nutrients; this is impacted by porous media heterogeneity and the degree of transverse mixing. Two types of microfluidic pore structures etched into silicon wafers (i.e., micromodels), i) a homogeneous distribution of cylindrical posts and ii) aggregates of large and small cylindrical posts, were used to evaluate the impact of heterogeneity on growth of a pure culture (Delftia acidovorans) that degrades (R)-2-(2,4-dichlorophenoxy)propionate (R-2,4-DP). Following inoculation, dissolved O2 and R-2,4-DP were introduced as two parallel streams that mixed transverse to the direction of flow. In the homogeneous micromodel, biomass growth was uniform in pore bodies along the center mixing line, while in the aggregate micromodel, preferential growth occurred between aggregates and slower less dense growth occurred throughout aggregates along the center mixing line. The homogeneous micromodel had more rapid growth overall (2X), and more R-2,4-DP degradation (9.5%) than the aggregate pore structure (5.7%). Simulation results from a pore-scale reactive transport model indicate mass transfer limitations within aggregates along the center mixing line decreased overall reaction; hence, slower biomass growth rates relative to the homogeneous micromodel are expected. Results from this study contribute to a better understanding of the coupling between mass transfer, reaction rates, and biomass growth in complex porous media, and suggest successful implementation and analysis of bioremediation systems requires knowledge of subsurface heterogeneity.

  15. Effects of pore-scale heterogeneity and transverse mixing on bacterial growth in porous media.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Changyong; Kang, Qinjun; Wang, Xing; Zilles, Julie L; Müller, Roland H; Werth, Charles J

    2010-04-15

    Microbial degradation of contaminants in the subsurface requires the availability of nutrients; this is impacted by porous media heterogeneity and the degree of transverse mixing. Two types of microfluidic pore structures etched into silicon wafers (i.e., micromodels), (i) a homogeneous distribution of cylindrical posts and (ii) aggregates of large and small cylindrical posts, were used to evaluate the impact of heterogeneity on growth of a pure culture (Delftia acidovorans) that degrades (R)-2-(2,4-dichlorophenoxy)propionate (R-2,4-DP). Following inoculation, dissolved O2 and R-2,4-DP were introduced as two parallel streams that mixed transverse to the direction of flow. In the homogeneous micromodel, biomass growth was uniform in pore bodies along the center mixing line, while in the aggregate micromodel, preferential growth occurred between aggregates and slower less dense growth occurred throughout aggregates along the center mixing line. The homogeneous micromodel had more rapid growth overall (2 times) and more R-2,4-DP degradation (9.5%) than the aggregate pore structure (5.7%). Simulation results from a pore-scale reactive transport model indicate mass transfer limitations within aggregates along the center mixing line decreased overall reaction; hence, slower biomass growth rates relative to the homogeneous micromodel are expected. Results from this study contribute to a better understanding of the coupling between mass transfer, reaction rates, and biomass growth in complex porous media and suggest successful implementation and analysis of bioremediation systems requires knowledge of subsurface heterogeneity. PMID:20192171

  16. Macrophage arginase-1 controls bacterial growth and pathology in hypoxic tuberculosis granulomas

    PubMed Central

    Duque-Correa, María A.; Kühl, Anja A.; Rodriguez, Paulo C.; Zedler, Ulrike; Schommer-Leitner, Sandra; Rao, Martin; Weiner, January; Hurwitz, Robert; Qualls, Joseph E.; Kosmiadi, George A.; Murray, Peter J.; Kaufmann, Stefan H. E.; Reece, Stephen T.

    2014-01-01

    Lung granulomas develop upon Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) infection as a hallmark of human tuberculosis (TB). They are structured aggregates consisting mainly of Mtb-infected and -uninfected macrophages and Mtb-specific T cells. The production of NO by granuloma macrophages expressing nitric oxide synthase-2 (NOS2) via l-arginine and oxygen is a key protective mechanism against mycobacteria. Despite this protection, TB granulomas are often hypoxic, and bacterial killing via NOS2 in these conditions is likely suboptimal. Arginase-1 (Arg1) also metabolizes l-arginine but does not require oxygen as a substrate and has been shown to regulate NOS2 via substrate competition. However, in other infectious diseases in which granulomas occur, such as leishmaniasis and schistosomiasis, Arg1 plays additional roles such as T-cell regulation and tissue repair that are independent of NOS2 suppression. To address whether Arg1 could perform similar functions in hypoxic regions of TB granulomas, we used a TB murine granuloma model in which NOS2 is absent. Abrogation of Arg1 expression in macrophages in this setting resulted in exacerbated lung granuloma pathology and bacterial burden. Arg1 expression in hypoxic granuloma regions correlated with decreased T-cell proliferation, suggesting that Arg1 regulation of T-cell immunity is involved in disease control. Our data argue that Arg1 plays a central role in the control of TB when NOS2 is rendered ineffective by hypoxia. PMID:25201986

  17. Adequate Th2-Type Response Associates with Restricted Bacterial Growth in Latent Mycobacterial Infection of Zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Hammarén, Milka Marjut; Luukinen, Bruno Vincent; Pesu, Marko; Rämet, Mika; Parikka, Mataleena

    2014-01-01

    Tuberculosis is still a major health problem worldwide. Currently it is not known what kind of immune responses lead to successful control and clearance of Mycobacterium tuberculosis. This gap in knowledge is reflected by the inability to develop sufficient diagnostic and therapeutic tools to fight tuberculosis. We have used the Mycobacterium marinum infection model in the adult zebrafish and taken advantage of heterogeneity of zebrafish population to dissect the characteristics of adaptive immune responses, some of which are associated with well-controlled latency or bacterial clearance while others with progressive infection. Differences in T cell responses between subpopulations were measured at the transcriptional level. It was discovered that a high total T cell level was usually associated with lower bacterial loads alongside with a T helper 2 (Th2)-type gene expression signature. At late time points, spontaneous reactivation with apparent symptoms was characterized by a low Th2/Th1 marker ratio and a substantial induction of foxp3 reflecting the level of regulatory T cells. Characteristic gata3/tbx21 has potential as a biomarker for the status of mycobacterial disease. PMID:24968056

  18. Effects of space flight and mixing on bacterial growth in low volume cultures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kacena, M. A.; Manfredi, B.; Todd, P.

    1999-01-01

    Previous investigations have shown that liquid suspension bacterial cultures grow to higher cell concentrations in spaceflight than on Earth. None of these studies included ground-control experiments designed to evaluate the fluid effects potentially responsible for the reported increases. Therefore, the emphasis of this research was to both confirm differences in final cell concentration between 1g and microgravity cultures, and to examine the effects of mixing as a partial explanation for this difference. Flight experiments were performed in the Fluid Processing Apparatus (FPA), aboard Space Shuttle Missions STS-63 and STS-69, with simultaneous 1g static and agitated controls. Additional static 1g, agitated, and clino-rotated controls were performed in 9-ml culture tubes. This research revealed that both E. coli and B. subtilis samples cultured in space flight grew to higher final cell densities (120-345% increase) than simultaneous static 1g controls. The final cell concentration of E. coli cells cultured under agitation was 43% higher than in static 1g cultures and was 102% higher with clino-rotation. However, for B. subtilis cultures grown while being agitated on a shaker or clino-rotated, the final cell concentrations were nearly identical to those of the simultaneous static 1g controls. Therefore, these data suggest that the unique fluid quiescence in the microgravity environment (lack of sedimentation, creating unique transfer of nutrients and waste products), was responsible for the enhanced bacterial proliferation reported in this and other studies.

  19. Plankton metabolism and bacterial growth efficiency in offshore waters along a latitudinal transect between the UK and Svalbard

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García-Martín, E. E.; McNeill, S.; Serret, P.; Leakey, R. J. G.

    2014-10-01

    Euphotic zone gross primary production, community respiration and net community production were determined from in vitro changes of dissolved oxygen, and from in vivo INT reduction capacity fractionated into two size classes, in offshore waters along a latitudinal transect crossing the North, Norwegian and Greenland Seas between the UK and Svalbard. Rates of gross primary production were higher and more variable than community respiration, so net autotrophy prevailed in the euphotic zone with an average net community production of 164±64 mmol O2 m-2 d-1. Respiration seemed to be mainly attributed to large eukaryotic cells (>0.8 ?m) with smaller cells, mainly bacteria, accounting for a mean of 25% (range 5-48%) of community respiration. Estimates of bacterial growth efficiency were very variable (range 7-69%) due to uncoupling between bacterial respiration and production. Larger cells tended to contribute more towards total respiration in communities with high gross primary production and low community respiration, while bacteria contributed more towards total respiration in communities with lower gross primary production, typical of microbial-dominated systems. This suggests that community respiration is related to the size structure of the plankton community.

  20. The effect of physical activity on depression in adolescence and emerging adulthood: A growth-curve analysis.

    PubMed

    McPhie, Meghan L; Rawana, Jennine S

    2015-04-01

    This study examined the influence of physical activity on the trajectory of depression from adolescence through emerging adulthood (EA). Using data from the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health (Waves I to IV), latent growth curve modeling was performed to assess how physical activity and gender influenced depression across adolescence and EA. Higher levels of physical activity in mid-adolescence were associated with lower levels of depression during mid-adolescence and slower inclines and declines in depression over time. Boys had lower levels of depression in mid-adolescence and slower inclines and declines in depression over time compared to girls. Findings provide evidence that current theories on understanding depression and mental health prevention programs may be enhanced by the inclusion of physical activity. PMID:25721258

  1. Effect of autochthonous bacteriocin-producing Lactococcus lactis on bacterial population dynamics and growth of halotolerant bacteria in Brazilian charqui.

    PubMed

    Biscola, Vanessa; Abriouel, Hikmate; Todorov, Svetoslav Dimitrov; Capuano, Verena Sant'Anna Cabral; Gálvez, Antonio; Franco, Bernadette Dora Gombossy de Melo

    2014-12-01

    Charqui is a fermented, salted and sun-dried meat product, widely consumed in Brazil and exported to several countries. Growth of microorganisms in this product is unlikely due to reduced Aw, but halophilic and halotolerant bacteria may grow and cause spoilage. Charqui is a good source of lactic acid bacteria able to produce antimicrobial bacteriocins. In this study, an autochthonous bacteriocinogenic strain (Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis 69), isolated from charqui, was added to the meat used for charqui manufacture and evaluated for its capability to prevent the growth of spoilage bacteria during storage up to 45 days. The influence of L. lactis 69 on the bacterial diversity during the manufacturing of the product was also studied, using denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE). L. lactis 69 did not affect the counts and diversity of lactic acid bacteria during manufacturing and storage, but influenced negatively the populations of halotolerant microorganisms, reducing the spoilage potential. The majority of tested virulence genes was absent, evidencing the safety and potential technological application of this strain as an additional hurdle to inhibit undesirable microbial growth in this and similar fermented meat products. PMID:25084676

  2. Aerobic Growth on Nitroglycerin as the Sole Carbon, Nitrogen, and Energy Source by a Mixed Bacterial Culture

    PubMed Central

    Accashian, John V.; Vinopal, Robert T.; Kim, Byung-Joon; Smets, Barth F.

    1998-01-01

    Nitroglycerin (glycerol trinitrate [GTN]), an explosive and vasodilatory compound, was metabolized by mixed microbial cultures from aeration tank sludge previously exposed to GTN. Aerobic enrichment cultures removed GTN rapidly in the absence of a supplemental carbon source. Complete denitration of GTN, provided as the sole C and N source, was observed in aerobic batch cultures and proceeded stepwise via the dinitrate and mononitrate isomers, with successive steps occurring at lower rates. The denitration of all glycerol nitrate esters was found to be concomitant, and 1,2-glycerol dinitrate (1,2-GDN) and 2-glycerol mononitrate (2-GMN) were the primary GDN and GMN isomers observed. Denitration of GTN resulted in release of primarily nitrite-N, indicating a reductive denitration mechanism. Biomass growth at the expense of GTN was verified by optical density and plate count measurements. The kinetics of GTN biotransformation were 10-fold faster than reported for complete GTN denitration under anaerobic conditions. A maximum specific growth rate of 0.048 ± 0.005 h?1 (mean ± standard deviation) was estimated for the mixed culture at 25°C. Evidence of GTN toxicity was observed at GTN concentrations above 0.3 mM. To our knowledge, this is the first report of complete denitration of GTN used as a primary growth substrate by a bacterial culture under aerobic conditions. PMID:9726874

  3. Nonmalignant T cells stimulate growth of T-cell lymphoma cells in the presence of bacterial toxins

    PubMed Central

    Woetmann, Anders; Lovato, Paola; Eriksen, Karsten W.; Krejsgaard, Thorbjørn; Labuda, Tord; Zhang, Qian; Mathiesen, Anne-Merethe; Geisler, Carsten; Svejgaard, Arne; Wasik, Mariusz A.

    2007-01-01

    Bacterial toxins including staphylococcal enterotoxins (SEs) have been implicated in the pathogenesis of cutaneous T-cell lymphomas (CTCLs). Here, we investigate SE-mediated interactions between nonmalignant T cells and malignant T-cell lines established from skin and blood of CTCL patients. The malignant CTCL cells express MHC class II molecules that are high-affinity receptors for SE. Although treatment with SE has no direct effect on the growth of the malignant CTCL cells, the SE-treated CTCL cells induce vigorous proliferation of the SE-responsive nonmalignant T cells. In turn, the nonmalignant T cells enhance proliferation of the malignant cells in an SE- and MHC class II–dependent manner. Furthermore, SE and, in addition, alloantigen presentation by malignant CTCL cells to irradiated nonmalignant CD4+ T-cell lines also enhance proliferation of the malignant cells. The growth-promoting effect depends on direct cell-cell contact and soluble factors such as interleukin-2. In conclusion, we demonstrate that SE triggers a bidirectional cross talk between nonmalignant T cells and malignant CTCL cells that promotes growth of the malignant cells. This represents a novel mechanism by which infections with SE-producing bacteria may contribute to pathogenesis of CTCL. PMID:17179233

  4. Consideration of probability of bacterial growth for Jovian planets and their satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, D. M.; Berkman, R. M.; Divine, N.

    1974-01-01

    Environmental parameters affecting growth of bacteria are compared with current atmospheric models for Jupiter and Saturn, and with the available physical data for their satellites. Different zones of relative probability of growth are identified for Jupiter and Saturn. Of the more than two dozen satellites, only the largest (Io, Europa, Ganymede, Callisto, and Titan) are found to be interesting biologically. Titan's atmosphere may produce a substantial greenhouse effect providing increased surface temperatures. Models predicting a dense atmosphere are compatible with microbial growth for a range of pressures at Titan's surface. For Titan's surface the probability of growth would be enhanced if: (1) the surface is entirely or partially liquid; (2) volcanism is present; or (3) access to internal heat sources is significant.

  5. PRODUCTION OF PLANT GROWTH PROMOTING SUBSTANCES IN BACTERIAL ISOLATES FROM THE SEAGRASS RHIZOSPHERE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Plants and rhizosphere bacteria have evolved chemical signals that enable their mutual growth. These relationships have been well investigated with agriculturally important plants, but not in seagrasses, which are important to the stability of estuaries. Seagrasses are rooted in ...

  6. A heterogeneous population model for the analysis of bacterial growth kinetics

    Microsoft Academic Search

    R. C. McKellar

    1997-01-01

    A two-compartment, heterogeneous population model (HPM) was derived using the simulation software SB ModelMaker© to describe the growth of Listeria monocytogenes in bacteriological media at 5–35 °C. The model assumed that, at time t = 0, the inoculum was distributed between two distinct compartments, Non-Growing and Growing, and that growth could be described by four parameters: initial total cell population

  7. Heterologous expression of a bacterial haemoglobin improves the growth properties of recombinant Escherichia coli

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Chaitan Khosla; James E. Bailey

    1988-01-01

    Rational design of novel as well as improved cellular biocatalysts by genetic manipulation of cellular metabolism has recently attracted considerable interest. A wide range of bacteria have been genetically modified by integrating new enzymatic functions into their metabolic network1-7. A central problem in the aerobic growth of any cell culture is the maintenance of dissolved oxygen (DO) concentrations above growth-limiting

  8. Growth kinetics of a diesel-degrading bacterial strain from petroleum-contaminated soil.

    PubMed

    Dahalan, S F A; Yunus, I; Johari, W L W; Shukor, M Y; Halmi, M I E; Shamaan, N A; Syed, M A

    2014-03-01

    A diesel-degrading bacterium was isolated from a diesel-contaminated site in Selangor, Malaysia. The isolate was tentatively identified as Acinetobacter sp. strain DRY12 based on partial 16S rDNA molecular phylogeny and Biolog GN microplate panels and Microlog database. Optimum growth occurred from 3 to 5% diesel and the strain was able to tolerate as high as 8% diesel. The optimal pH that supported growth of the bacterium was between pH 7.5 to 8.0. The isolate exhibited optimal growth in between 30 and 35 degrees C. The best nitrogen source was potassium nitrate (between 0.6 and 0.9% (w/v)) followed by ammonium chloride, sodium nitrite and ammonium sulphate in descending order. An almost complete removal of diesel components was seen from the reduction in hydrocarbon peaks observed using Solid Phase Microextraction Gas Chromatography analysis after 10 days of incubation. The best growth kinetic model to fit experimental data was the Haldane model of substrate inhibiting growth with a correlation coefficient value of 0.97. The maximum growth rate- micromax was 0.039 hr(-1) while the saturation constant or half velocity constant Ks and inhibition constant Ki, were 0.387% and 4.46%, respectively. MATH assays showed that 75% of the bacterium was found in the hexadecane phase indicating that the bacterium was hydrophobic. The characteristics of this bacterium make it useful for bioremediation works in the Tropics. PMID:24665769

  9. Selenium hyperaccumulators harbor a diverse endophytic bacterial community characterized by high selenium resistance and plant growth promoting properties.

    PubMed

    Sura-de Jong, Martina; Reynolds, Ray J B; Richterova, Klara; Musilova, Lucie; Staicu, Lucian C; Chocholata, Iva; Cappa, Jennifer J; Taghavi, Safiyh; van der Lelie, Daniel; Frantik, Tomas; Dolinova, Iva; Strejcek, Michal; Cochran, Alyssa T; Lovecka, Petra; Pilon-Smits, Elizabeth A H

    2015-01-01

    Selenium (Se)-rich plants may be used to provide dietary Se to humans and livestock, and also to clean up Se-polluted soils or waters. This study focused on endophytic bacteria of plants that hyperaccumulate selenium (Se) to 0.5-1% of dry weight. Terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP) analysis was used to compare the diversity of endophytic bacteria of hyperaccumulators Stanleya pinnata (Brassicaceae) and Astragalus bisulcatus (Fabaceae) with those from related non-accumulators Physaria bellii (Brassicaceae) and Medicago sativa (Fabaceae) collected on the same, seleniferous site. Hyperaccumulators and non-accumulators showed equal T-RF diversity. Parsimony analysis showed that T-RFs from individuals of the same species were more similar to each other than to those from other species, regardless of plant Se content or spatial proximity. Cultivable endophytes from hyperaccumulators S. pinnata and A. bisulcatus were further identified and characterized. The 66 bacterial morphotypes were shown by MS MALDI-TOF Biotyper analysis and 16S rRNA gene sequencing to include strains of Bacillus, Pseudomonas, Pantoea, Staphylococcus, Paenibacillus, Advenella, Arthrobacter, and Variovorax. Most isolates were highly resistant to selenate and selenite (up to 200 mM) and all could reduce selenite to red elemental Se, reduce nitrite and produce siderophores. Seven isolates were selected for plant inoculation and found to have plant growth promoting properties, both in pure culture and when co-cultivated with crop species Brassica juncea (Brassicaceae) or M. sativa. There were no effects on plant Se accumulation. We conclude that Se hyperaccumulators harbor an endophytic bacterial community in their natural seleniferous habitat that is equally diverse to that of comparable non-accumulators. The hyperaccumulator endophytes are characterized by high Se resistance, capacity to produce elemental Se and plant growth promoting properties. PMID:25784919

  10. Selenium hyperaccumulators harbor a diverse endophytic bacterial community characterized by high selenium resistance and plant growth promoting properties

    PubMed Central

    Sura-de Jong, Martina; Reynolds, Ray J. B.; Richterova, Klara; Musilova, Lucie; Staicu, Lucian C.; Chocholata, Iva; Cappa, Jennifer J.; Taghavi, Safiyh; van der Lelie, Daniel; Frantik, Tomas; Dolinova, Iva; Strejcek, Michal; Cochran, Alyssa T.; Lovecka, Petra; Pilon-Smits, Elizabeth A. H.

    2015-01-01

    Selenium (Se)-rich plants may be used to provide dietary Se to humans and livestock, and also to clean up Se-polluted soils or waters. This study focused on endophytic bacteria of plants that hyperaccumulate selenium (Se) to 0.5–1% of dry weight. Terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP) analysis was used to compare the diversity of endophytic bacteria of hyperaccumulators Stanleya pinnata (Brassicaceae) and Astragalus bisulcatus (Fabaceae) with those from related non-accumulators Physaria bellii (Brassicaceae) and Medicago sativa (Fabaceae) collected on the same, seleniferous site. Hyperaccumulators and non-accumulators showed equal T-RF diversity. Parsimony analysis showed that T-RFs from individuals of the same species were more similar to each other than to those from other species, regardless of plant Se content or spatial proximity. Cultivable endophytes from hyperaccumulators S. pinnata and A. bisulcatus were further identified and characterized. The 66 bacterial morphotypes were shown by MS MALDI-TOF Biotyper analysis and 16S rRNA gene sequencing to include strains of Bacillus, Pseudomonas, Pantoea, Staphylococcus, Paenibacillus, Advenella, Arthrobacter, and Variovorax. Most isolates were highly resistant to selenate and selenite (up to 200 mM) and all could reduce selenite to red elemental Se, reduce nitrite and produce siderophores. Seven isolates were selected for plant inoculation and found to have plant growth promoting properties, both in pure culture and when co-cultivated with crop species Brassica juncea (Brassicaceae) or M. sativa. There were no effects on plant Se accumulation. We conclude that Se hyperaccumulators harbor an endophytic bacterial community in their natural seleniferous habitat that is equally diverse to that of comparable non-accumulators. The hyperaccumulator endophytes are characterized by high Se resistance, capacity to produce elemental Se and plant growth promoting properties. PMID:25784919

  11. Effects of Porous Media Heterogeneity and Transverse Mixing on Bacterial Growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Werth, C. J.; Zhang, C.; Zilles, J.; Mueller, R.; Kang, Q.

    2009-12-01

    Microbial degradation of contaminants in the subsurface depends to a large extent on the availability of nutrients, which is impacted by porous media heterogeneity and the degree of transverse mixing. The growth of a pure culture (Delftia acidovorans strain R39bR) that degrades (R)-2-(2,4-dichlorophenoxy)propionate (R-2,4-DP) was evaluated in two types of microfluidic pore structures etched into silicon wafers (i.e., micromodels): i) a homogeneous distribution of cylindrical posts, and ii) aggregates of large and small cylindrical posts. Each micromodel was inoculated with suspended cells of R39bR for 5-8 days. Next, aqueous phase O2 and R-2,4-DP were introduced as two separate and parallel streams that mixed transverse to the direction of flow along the centerline of each pore structure. In the homogeneous micromodel, biomass growth was observed as a narrow line along the centerline; in the aggregate micromodel, preferential microbial growth was observed in the inter-aggregate pore spaces. Image analysis indicates the initial rate (i.e., over first 30 days) of microbial growth is greater in the homogeneous micromodel than the aggregate micromodel. Effluent samples were collected and results showed higher R-2,4-DP degradation in the homogeneous pore structure than in the aggregate pore structure. A pore scale reactive transport model was used to simulate flow and substrates distribution in the two different pore structures. Simulation results indicate that biomass growth in intra-aggregate pore structures is limited by diffusion, and preferential growth occurs in inter-aggregate pores due to the high mass flux of nutrients in these spaces. Results from this study contribute to a better understanding of biomass growth in complex porous media systems and will help designing more effective bioremediation systems.

  12. Heterotrophic bacterial growth on hoses in a neonatal water distribution system.

    PubMed

    Buffet-Bataillon, Sylvie; Bonnaure-Mallet, Martine; de la Pintiere, Armelle; Defawe, Guy; Gautier-Lerestif, Anne-Lise; Fauveau, Severine; Minet, Jacques

    2010-04-01

    After preliminary tests indicated an increased number of heterotrophic bacteria, we investigated possible sources of contamination in a neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) water distribution system. Scanning electron microscopic examination of flexible metallic hoses associated with the system revealed the presence of a biofilm; partial 16S rDNA sequencing revealed that the biofilm contained Blastomonas natatoria. Purgation of the water system three times a day, reinforced faucet cleaning, decreasing the cold water temperature to 12 degrees , and six repeated chlorinations at concentrations as high as 2 mg/L were not sufficient to eradicate the bacterial contamination. Replacing all of the rubber-interior flexible metallic hoses with teflon-lined hoses followed by heating the water to 70 degrees successfully controlled the bacteria. PMID:20467253

  13. Illustration of year-to-year variation in wheat spectral profile crop growth curves. [Kansas, Oklahoma, North Dakota and South Dakota

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gonzalez, P.; Jones, C. (principal investigators)

    1980-01-01

    Data previously compiled on the year to year variability of spectral profile crop growth parameters for spring and winter wheat in Kansas, Oklahoma, and the Dakotas were used with a profile model to develop graphs illustrating spectral profile crop growth curves for a number of years and a number of spring and winter wheat segments. These curves show the apparent variability in spectral profiles for wheat from one year to another within the same segment and from one segment to another within the same year.

  14. Bacterial manganese reduction and growth with manganese oxide as the sole electron acceptor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Myers, Charles R.; Nealson, Kenneth H.

    1988-01-01

    Microbes that couple growth to the reduction of manganese could play an important role in the biogeochemistry of certain anaerobic environments. Such a bacterium, Alteromonas putrefaciens MR-1, couples its growth to the reduction of manganese oxides only under anaerobic conditions. The characteristics of this reduction are consistent with a biological, and not an indirect chemical, reduction of manganese, which suggest that this bacterium uses manganic oxide as a terminal electron acceptor. It can also utilize a large number of other compounds as terminal electron acceptors; this versatility could provide a distinct advantage in environments where electron-acceptor concentrations may vary.

  15. Growth Curves and Clearance Rates of Virulent and Benign Venezuelan Encephalitis Viruses in Hamsters

    PubMed Central

    Jahrling, Peter B.; Scherer, William F.

    1973-01-01

    Four virulent strains of Venezuelan encephalitis virus attained higher concentrations of infectious virus in bloods of adult hamsters than two benign strains when given subcutaneously. One benign virus, the attenuated TC83 vaccine strain, reached higher concentrations in bone marrow and Peyer's patches than virulent subtype I strains, and another benign virus, subtype IV, grew to lower levels. When inoculated intracranially, the two benign viruses attained high concentrations in brain, but did not significantly alter in lethality although morbidity was increased. Intracardiac inoculation failed to increase virus concentrations of two benign viruses in blood or hematopoietic tissues above those found after subcutaneous inoculation, nor did it increase lethalities to those of virulent virus. Three benign virus strains were cleared more rapidly from hamster plasmas than six virulent strains. Differences in clearance rates were apparently not due to destruction of benign viruses by blood or tissue components. Thus viral concentrations in blood correlated directly and clearance rates inversely with hamster virulence, whereas the rate and extent of growth of a VE virus in hematopoietic or brain tissues did not correlate with ability to kill hamsters. PMID:4125784

  16. Induction of Purple Sulfur Bacterial Growth in Dairy Wastewater Lagoons by Circulation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Aims: To determine if circulation of diary wastewater induces the growth of phototrophic purple sulfur bacteria (PSB). Methods and Results: Two dairy wastewater lagoons that were similar in size, geographic location, number and type of cattle loading the lagoons were chosen. The only obvious diffe...

  17. Consideration of probability of bacterial growth for Jovian planets and their satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, D. M.; Berkman, R. M.; Divine, N.

    1975-01-01

    Environmental parameters affecting growth of bacteria (e.g., moisture, temperature, pH, and chemical composition) were compared with current atmospheric models for Jupiter and Saturn, and with the available physical data for their satellites. Different zones of relative probability of growth were identified for Jupiter and Saturn, with the highest in pressure regions of 1-10 million N/sq m (10 to 100 atmospheres) and 3-30 million N/sq m (30 to 300 atmospheres), respectively. Of the more than two dozen satellites, only the largest (Io, Europa, Ganymede, Callisto, and Titan) were found to be interesting biologically. Titan's atmosphere may produce a substantial greenhouse effect providing increased surface temperatures. Models predicting a dense atmosphere are compatible with microbial growth for a range of pressures at Titan's surface. For Titan's surface the probability of growth would be enhanced if (1) the surface is entirely or partially liquid (water), (2) volcanism (in an ice-water-steam system) is present, or (3) access to internal heat sources is significant.

  18. Measurement of bacterial growth rates in subsurface sediments using the incorporation of tritiated thymidine into DNA

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Patti M. Thorn; Roy M. Ventullo

    1988-01-01

    Microbial growth rates in subsurface sediment from three sites were measured using incorporation of tritiated thymidine into DNA. Sampling sites included Lula, Oklahoma, Traverse City, Michigan, and Summit Lake, Wisconsin. Application of the thymidine method to subsurface sediments required (1) thymidine concentrations greater than 125 nM, (2) incubation periods of less than 4 hours, (3) addition of SDS and EDTA

  19. A flow cytometry based oligotrophic pollutant exposure test to detect bacterial growth inhibition and cell injury.

    PubMed

    Czechowska, Kamila; van der Meer, Jan Roelof

    2011-07-01

    Toxicity of chemical pollutants in aquatic environments is often addressed by assays that inquire reproductive inhibition of test microorganisms, such as algae or bacteria. Those tests, however, assess growth of populations as a whole via macroscopic methods such as culture turbidity or colony-forming units. Here we use flow cytometry to interrogate the fate of individual cells in low-density populations of the bacterium Pseudomonas fluorescens SV3 exposed or not under oligotrophic conditions to a number of common pollutants, some of which derive from oil contamination. Cells were stained at regular time intervals during the exposure assay with fluorescent dyes that detect membrane injury (i.e., live-dead assay). Reduction of population growth rates was observed upon toxicant insult and depended on the type of toxicant. Modeling and cell staining indicate that population growth rate decrease is a combined effect of an increased number of injured cells that may or may not multiply, and live cells dividing at normal growth rates. The oligotrophic assay concept presented here could be a useful complement for existing biomarker assays in compliance with new regulations on chemical effect studies or, more specifically, for judging recovery after exposure to fluctuating toxicant conditions. PMID:21657560

  20. Assessment of the extent of bacterial growth in reverse osmosis system for improving drinking water quality

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Se-keun Park; Jiang Yong Hu

    2010-01-01

    This study was carried out to assess reverse osmosis (RO) treatment efficacy of drinking water in terms of biological stability in the distribution system. Two flat-sheet RO membranes were used in this study. Experiments were designed to investigate the growth of biofilm and bulk phase bacteria for the RO-treated water flowing through a model distribution system under controlled conditions without

  1. Improving protein delivery of fibroblast growth factor-2 from bacterial inclusion bodies used as cell culture substrates.

    PubMed

    Seras-Franzoso, Joaquin; Peebo, Karl; García-Fruitós, Elena; Vázquez, Esther; Rinas, Ursula; Villaverde, Antonio

    2014-03-01

    Bacterial inclusion bodies (IBs) have recently been used to generate biocompatible cell culture interfaces, with diverse effects on cultured cells such as cell adhesion enhancement, stimulation of cell growth or induction of mesenchymal stem cell differentiation. Additionally, novel applications of IBs as sustained protein delivery systems with potential applications in regenerative medicine have been successfully explored. In this scenario, with IBs gaining significance in the biomedical field, the fine tuning of this functional biomaterial is crucial. In this work, the effect of temperature on fibroblast growth factor-2 (FGF-2) IB production and performance has been evaluated. FGF-2 was overexpressed in Escherichia coli at 25 and 37 °C, producing IBs with differences in size, particle structure and biological activity. Cell culture topographies made with FGF-2 IBs biofabricated at 25 °C showed higher levels of biological activity as well as a looser supramolecular structure, enabling a higher protein release from the particles. In addition, the controlled use of FGF-2 protein particles enabled the generation of functional topographies with multiple biological activities being effective on diverse cell types. PMID:24361427

  2. Evolution of cooperation in microbial biofilms - A stochastic model for the growth and survival of bacterial mats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knebel, Johannes; Cremer, Jonas; Melbinger, Anna; Frey, Erwin

    2012-02-01

    Cooperative behavior is essential for microbial biofilms. The structure and composition of a biofilm change over time and thereby influence the evolution of cooperation within the system. In turn, the level of cooperation affects the growth dynamics of the biofilm. Here, we investigate this coupling for an experimentally well-defined situation in which mutants of the Pseudomonas fluorescens strain form a mat at the liquid-air interface by the production of an extra-cellular matrix [1]. We model the occurrence of cooperation in this bacterial population by taking into account the formation of the mat. The presence of cooperators enhances the growth of the mat, but at the same time cheaters can infiltrate the population and put the viability of the mat at risk. We find that the survival time of the mat crucially depends on its initial dynamics which is subject to demographic fluctuations [2]. More generally, our work provides conceptual insights into the requirements and mechanisms for the evolution of cooperation.[1] P. Rainey et al., Nature 425, 72 (2003).[2] A. Melbinger et al., PRL 105, 178101 (2010).

  3. Bacterial adhesion and growth reduction by novel rubber-derived oligomers

    PubMed Central

    Badawy, Hope T.; Pasetto, Pamela; Mouget, Jean-Luc; Pilard, Jean-François; Cutright, Teresa J.

    2013-01-01

    In the medical field, attached bacteria can cause infections associated with catheters, incisions, burns, and medical implants especially in immunocompromised patients. The problem is exacerbated by the fact that attached bacteria are ~1000 times more resistant to antibiotics than planktonic cells. The rapid spread of antibiotic resistance in these and other organisms has led to a significant need to find new methods for preventing bacterial attachment. The goal of this research was to evaluate the effectiveness of novel polymer coatings to prevent the attachment of three medically relevant bacteria. Tests were conducted with Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Staphylococcus epidermidis, and Staphylococcus aureus for oligomers derived from modifications of natural rubber (cis 1,4-polyisoprene). The different oligomers were: PP04, with no quaternary ammonium (QA); MV067, one QA; PP06, three QA groups. In almost all experiments, cell attachment was inhibited to various extents as long as the oligomers were used. PP06 was the most effective as it decreased the planktonic cell numbers by at least 50% for all bacteria. Differences between species sensitivity were also observed. P. aeruginosa was the most resistant bacteria tested, S. aureus, the most sensitive. Further experiments are required to understand the full extent and mode of the antimicrobial properties of these surfaces. PMID:23921230

  4. Bacterial adhesion and growth reduction by novel rubber-derived oligomers.

    PubMed

    Badawy, Hope T; Pasetto, Pamela; Mouget, Jean-Luc; Pilard, Jean-François; Cutright, Teresa J; Milsted, Amy

    2013-09-01

    In the medical field, attached bacteria can cause infections associated with catheters, incisions, burns, and medical implants especially in immunocompromised patients. The problem is exacerbated by the fact that attached bacteria are ?1000 times more resistant to antibiotics than planktonic cells. The rapid spread of antibiotic resistance in these and other organisms has led to a significant need to find new methods for preventing bacterial attachment. The goal of this research was to evaluate the effectiveness of novel polymer coatings to prevent the attachment of three medically relevant bacteria. Tests were conducted with Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Staphylococcus epidermidis, and Staphylococcus aureus for oligomers derived from modifications of natural rubber (cis 1,4-polyisoprene). The different oligomers were: PP04, with no quaternary ammonium (QA); MV067, one QA; PP06, three QA groups. In almost all experiments, cell attachment was inhibited to various extents as long as the oligomers were used. PP06 was the most effective as it decreased the planktonic cell numbers by at least 50% for all bacteria. Differences between species sensitivity were also observed. P. aeruginosa was the most resistant bacteria tested, S. aureus, the most sensitive. Further experiments are required to understand the full extent and mode of the antimicrobial properties of these surfaces. PMID:23921230

  5. Bayesian prediction of bacterial growth temperature range based on genome sequences

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The preferred habitat of a given bacterium can provide a hint of which types of enzymes of potential industrial interest it might produce. These might include enzymes that are stable and active at very high or very low temperatures. Being able to accurately predict this based on a genomic sequence, would thus allow for an efficient and targeted search for production organisms, reducing the need for culturing experiments. Results This study found a total of 40 protein families useful for distinction between three thermophilicity classes (thermophiles, mesophiles and psychrophiles). The predictive performance of these protein families were compared to those of 87 basic sequence features (relative use of amino acids and codons, genomic and 16S rDNA AT content and genome size). When using naïve Bayesian inference, it was possible to correctly predict the optimal temperature range with a Matthews correlation coefficient of up to 0.68. The best predictive performance was always achieved by including protein families as well as structural features, compared to either of these alone. A dedicated computer program was created to perform these predictions. Conclusions This study shows that protein families associated with specific thermophilicity classes can provide effective input data for thermophilicity prediction, and that the naïve Bayesian approach is effective for such a task. The program created for this study is able to efficiently distinguish between thermophilic, mesophilic and psychrophilic adapted bacterial genomes. PMID:23282160

  6. Bacterial growth at -15 °C; molecular insights from the permafrost bacterium Planococcus halocryophilus Or1.

    PubMed

    Mykytczuk, Nadia C S; Foote, Simon J; Omelon, Chris R; Southam, Gordon; Greer, Charles W; Whyte, Lyle G

    2013-06-01

    Planococcus halocryophilus strain Or1, isolated from high Arctic permafrost, grows and divides at -15 °C, the lowest temperature demonstrated to date, and is metabolically active at -25 °C in frozen permafrost microcosms. To understand how P. halocryophilus Or1 remains active under the subzero and osmotically dynamic conditions that characterize its native permafrost habitat, we investigated the genome, cell physiology and transcriptomes of growth at -15 °C and 18% NaCl compared with optimal (25 °C) temperatures. Subzero growth coincides with unusual cell envelope features of encrustations surrounding cells, while the cytoplasmic membrane is significantly remodeled favouring a higher ratio of saturated to branched fatty acids. Analyses of the 3.4 Mbp genome revealed that a suite of cold and osmotic-specific adaptive mechanisms are present as well as an amino acid distribution favouring increased flexibility of proteins. Genomic redundancy within 17% of the genome could enable P. halocryophilus Or1 to exploit isozyme exchange to maintain growth under stress, including multiple copies of osmolyte uptake genes (Opu and Pro genes). Isozyme exchange was observed between the transcriptome data sets, with selective upregulation of multi-copy genes involved in cell division, fatty acid synthesis, solute binding, oxidative stress response and transcriptional regulation. The combination of protein flexibility, resource efficiency, genomic plasticity and synergistic adaptation likely compensate against osmotic and cold stresses. These results suggest that non-spore forming P. halocryophilus Or1 is specifically suited for active growth in its Arctic permafrost habitat (ambient temp. ?-16 °C), indicating that such cryoenvironments harbor a more active microbial ecosystem than previously thought. PMID:23389107

  7. Bacterial growth at ?15?°C; molecular insights from the permafrost bacterium Planococcus halocryophilus Or1

    PubMed Central

    Mykytczuk, Nadia C S; Foote, Simon J; Omelon, Chris R; Southam, Gordon; Greer, Charles W; Whyte, Lyle G

    2013-01-01

    Planococcus halocryophilus strain Or1, isolated from high Arctic permafrost, grows and divides at ?15?°C, the lowest temperature demonstrated to date, and is metabolically active at ?25?°C in frozen permafrost microcosms. To understand how P. halocryophilus Or1 remains active under the subzero and osmotically dynamic conditions that characterize its native permafrost habitat, we investigated the genome, cell physiology and transcriptomes of growth at ?15?°C and 18% NaCl compared with optimal (25?°C) temperatures. Subzero growth coincides with unusual cell envelope features of encrustations surrounding cells, while the cytoplasmic membrane is significantly remodeled favouring a higher ratio of saturated to branched fatty acids. Analyses of the 3.4?Mbp genome revealed that a suite of cold and osmotic-specific adaptive mechanisms are present as well as an amino acid distribution favouring increased flexibility of proteins. Genomic redundancy within 17% of the genome could enable P. halocryophilus Or1 to exploit isozyme exchange to maintain growth under stress, including multiple copies of osmolyte uptake genes (Opu and Pro genes). Isozyme exchange was observed between the transcriptome data sets, with selective upregulation of multi-copy genes involved in cell division, fatty acid synthesis, solute binding, oxidative stress response and transcriptional regulation. The combination of protein flexibility, resource efficiency, genomic plasticity and synergistic adaptation likely compensate against osmotic and cold stresses. These results suggest that non-spore forming P. halocryophilus Or1 is specifically suited for active growth in its Arctic permafrost habitat (ambient temp. ??16?°C), indicating that such cryoenvironments harbor a more active microbial ecosystem than previously thought. PMID:23389107

  8. Growth responses of ciliate protozoa to the abundance of their bacterial prey

    Microsoft Academic Search

    William D. Taylor

    1977-01-01

    The growth rate or numerical response of five species of bactivorous ciliates to the abundance ofEnterobacter aerogenes was examined in monoxenic culture. The ciliatesColpidium campylum, C. colpoda, Glaucoma scintillons, G. frontata, andCyclidium glaucoma were isolated from a small pond. Four were grown in shaken cultures, while three were grown in cultures in which the bacteria were allowed to settle on

  9. Plant growth promotion by inoculation with selected bacterial strains versus mineral soil supplements.

    PubMed

    Wernitznig, S; Adlassnig, W; Sprocati, A R; Turnau, K; Neagoe, A; Alisi, C; Sassmann, S; Nicoara, A; Pinto, V; Cremisini, C; Lichtscheidl, I

    2014-06-01

    In the process of remediation of mine sites, the establishment of a vegetation cover is one of the most important tasks. This study tests two different approaches to manipulate soil properties in order to facilitate plant growth. Mine waste from Ingurtosu, Sardinia, Italy rich in silt, clay, and heavy metals like Cd, Cu, and Zn was used in a series of greenhouse experiments. Bacteria with putative beneficial properties for plant growth were isolated from this substrate, propagated and consortia of ten strains were used to inoculate the substrate. Alternatively, sand and volcanic clay were added. On these treated and untreated soils, seeds of Helianthus annuus, of the native Euphorbia pithyusa, and of the grasses Agrostis capillaris, Deschampsia flexuosa and Festuca rubra were germinated, and the growth of the seedlings was monitored. The added bacteria established well under all experimental conditions and reduced the extractability of most metals. In association with H. annuus, E. pithyusa and D. flexuosa bacteria improved microbial activity and functional diversity of the original soil. Their effect on plant growth, however, was ambiguous and usually negative. The addition of sand and volcanic clay, on the other hand, had a positive effect on all plant species except E. pithyusa. Especially the grasses experienced a significant benefit. The effects of a double treatment with both bacteria and sand and volcanic clay were rather negative. It is concluded that the addition of mechanical support has great potential to boost revegetation of mining sites though it is comparatively expensive. The possibilities offered by the inoculation of bacteria, on the other hand, appear rather limited. PMID:23990253

  10. The Impact of Salient Role Stress on Trajectories of Health in Late Life among Survivors of a Seven-Year Panel Study: Analyses of Individual Growth Curves

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shaw, Benjamin A.; Krause, Neal

    2002-01-01

    The purpose of this study is twofold: 1) to model changes in health over time among older adults; and 2) to assess the degree to which stress arising in salient social roles accounts for individual variation in these changes. Individual growth curve analyses using Hierarchical Linear Modeling (HLM) software were employed with longitudinal data…

  11. Curves of growth of spectral lines emitted by a laser-induced plasma: influence of the temporal evolution and spatial inhomogeneity of the plasma

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. A. Aguilera; J. Bengoechea; C. Aragón

    2003-01-01

    The curves of growth (COG) of five Fe I lines emitted from a laser-induced plasma, generated with Fe–Ni alloys in air at atmospheric pressure, have been investigated. Spectral lines with different energy levels and line widths, emitted with a broad range of optical depths, have been included in the study in order to check the validity of theoretical models proposed

  12. Growth curves of crossbred cows sired by Hereford, Angus, Belgian Blue, Brahman, Boran, and Tuli bulls, and the fraction of mature weight and height at puberty

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the growth curves of females to determine if mature size and relative rates of maturing amongst breeds differed. Body weight and hip height data were fit to the nonlinear function: BW = f(t) = A – Bek(age) where A is an estimate of mature BW and k determi...

  13. Studies on 4 C stored frozen-reconstituted red blood cells. I. Bacterial growth.

    PubMed

    Myhre, B A; Nakasako, Y Y; Schott, R

    1977-01-01

    A knowledge of the growth rates of various organisms at the storage temperature of 4 C in the different suspending media used for red blood cells would aid the extension of the thawed storage time of frozen-reconstituted blood beyond the 24 hours allowed by the Food and Drug Administration. Knowing these rates, a prediction could be made that the growth rate would be sufficiently slow and the unit (sterile or minimally contaminated) could be given safely after a longer storage period. The studies reported show that the pathogenic organisms S. aureus, Ps. aeruginosa, E. coli, Klebsiella sp. and Enterobacter sp. grow at such a slow rate at 4 C that they do not represent any great hazard to the recipient unless introduced in great numbers. The studies further show that in the process of washing frozen blood the number of organisms is reduced by between one and two orders of magnitude (base 10). Therefore, extension of frozen red blood cell storage life to at least 72 hours should be considered. PMID:410123

  14. Utility of phenomenological models for describing temperature dependence of bacterial growth.

    PubMed Central

    Heitzer, A; Kohler, H P; Reichert, P; Hamer, G

    1991-01-01

    We compared three unstructured mathematical models, the master reaction, the square root, and the damage/repair models, for describing the relationship between temperature and the specific growth rates of bacteria. The models were evaluated on the basis of several criteria: applicability, ease of use, simple interpretation of model parameters, problem-free determination of model parameters, statistical evaluation of goodness of fit (chi 2 test), and biological relevance. Best-fit parameters for the master reaction model could be obtained by using two consecutive nonlinear least-square fits. The damage/repair model proved to be unsuited for the data sets considered and was judged markedly overparameterized. The square root model allowed nonproblematical parameter estimation by a nonlinear least-square procedure and, together with the master reaction model, was able to describe the temperature dependence of the specific growth rates of Klebsiella pneumoniae NCIB 418, Escherichia coli NC3, Bacillus sp. strain NCIB 12522, and the thermotolerant coccobacillus strain NA17. The square root and master reaction models were judged to be equally valid and superior to the damage/repair model, even though the square root model is devoid of a conceptual basis. PMID:1768141

  15. Autoinducer 2: A concentration-dependent signal for mutualistic bacterial biofilm growth

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rickard, A.H.; Palmer, R.J., Jr.; Blehert, D.S.; Campagna, S.R.; Semmelhack, M.F.; Egland, P.G.; Bassler, B.L.; Kolenbrander, P.E.

    2006-01-01

    4,5-dihydroxy-2,3-pentanedione (DPD), a product of the LuxS enzyme in the catabolism of S-ribosylhomocysteine, spontaneously cyclizes to form autoinducer 2 (AI-2). AI-2 is proposed to be a universal signal molecule mediating interspecies communication among bacteria. We show that mutualistic and abundant biofilm growth in flowing saliva of two human oral commensal bacteria, Actinomyces naeslundii T14V and Streptococcus oralis 34, is dependent upon production of AI-2 by S. oralis 34. A luxS mutant of S. oralis 34 was constructed which did not produce AI-2. Unlike wild-type dual-species biofilms, A. naeslundii T14V and an S. oralis 34 luxS mutant did not exhibit mutualism and generated only sparse biofilms which contained a 10-fold lower biomass of each species. Restoration of AI-2 levels by genetic or chemical (synthetic AI-2 in the form of DPD) complementation re-established the mutualistic growth and high biomass characteristic for the wild-type dual-species biofilm. Furthermore, an optimal concentration of DPD was determined, above and below which biofilm formation was suppressed. The optimal concentration was 100-fold lower than the detection limit of the currently accepted AI-2 assay. Thus, AI-2 acts as an interspecies signal and its concentration is critical for mutualism between two species of oral bacteria grown under conditions that are representative of the human oral cavity. ?? 2006 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  16. Latent growth curve analysis of fear during a speech task before and after treatment for social phobia.

    PubMed

    Price, Matthew; Anderson, Page L

    2011-11-01

    Models of social phobia highlight the importance of anticipatory anxiety in the experience of fear during a social situation. Anticipatory anxiety has been shown to be highly correlated with performance anxiety for a variety of social situations. A few studies show that average ratings of anxiety during the anticipation and performance phases of a social situation decline following treatment. Evidence also suggests that the point of confrontation with the feared stimulus is the peak level of fear. No study to date has evaluated the pattern of anxious responding across the anticipation, confrontation, and performance phases before and after treatment, which is the focus of the current study. Socially phobic individuals (N = 51) completed a behavioral avoidance task before and after two types of manualized cognitive behavioral therapy, and gave ratings of fear during the anticipation and performance phases. Results from latent growth curve analysis were the same for the two treatments and suggested that before treatment, anxiety sharply increased during the anticipation phase, was highly elevated at the confrontation, and gradually increased during the performance phase. After treatment, anxiety increased during the anticipation phase, although at a much slower rate than at pretreatment, peaked at confrontation, and declined during the performance phase. The findings suggest that anticipatory experiences are critical to the experience of fear for public speaking and should be incorporated into exposures. PMID:21907972

  17. Analyzing latent state-trait and multiple-indicator latent growth curve models as multilevel structural equation models

    PubMed Central

    Geiser, Christian; Bishop, Jacob; Lockhart, Ginger; Shiffman, Saul; Grenard, Jerry L.

    2013-01-01

    Latent state-trait (LST) and latent growth curve (LGC) models are frequently used in the analysis of longitudinal data. Although it is well-known that standard single-indicator LGC models can be analyzed within either the structural equation modeling (SEM) or multilevel (ML; hierarchical linear modeling) frameworks, few researchers realize that LST and multivariate LGC models, which use multiple indicators at each time point, can also be specified as ML models. In the present paper, we demonstrate that using the ML-SEM rather than the SL-SEM framework to estimate the parameters of these models can be practical when the study involves (1) a large number of time points, (2) individually-varying times of observation, (3) unequally spaced time intervals, and/or (4) incomplete data. Despite the practical advantages of the ML-SEM approach under these circumstances, there are also some limitations that researchers should consider. We present an application to an ecological momentary assessment study (N = 158 youths with an average of 23.49 observations of positive mood per person) using the software Mplus (Muthén and Muthén, 1998–2012) and discuss advantages and disadvantages of using the ML-SEM approach to estimate the parameters of LST and multiple-indicator LGC models. PMID:24416023

  18. Some triple-filament lead isotope ratio measurements and an absolute growth curve for single-stage leads

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stacey, J.S.; Delevaux, M.E.; Ulrych, T.J.

    1969-01-01

    Triple-filament analyses of three standard lead samples are used to calibrate a mass spectrometer in an absolute sense. The bias we measure is 0.0155 percent per mass unit, and the precision (for 95% confidence limits) is ??0.13% or less for all ratios relative to 204Pb. Although its precision is not quite so good as that of the lead-tetramethyl method in the analysis of large samples, the triple-filament method is less complex and is an attractive alternative for smaller sample sizes down to 500 ??g. Triple-filament data are presented for six possibly single-stage lead ores and one feldspar. These new data for ores are combined with corrected tetramethyl data for stratiform lead deposits to compute absolute parameters for a universal single-stage lead isotope growth curve. Absolute isotopic ratios for primeval lead have been determined by Oversby and because all the previous data for both meteorites and lead ores were similarly fractionated, the absolute value of 238U 204Pb = 9.09 ?? 0.06 for stratiform leads is little different from the value 8.99 ?? 0.05 originally computed by Ostic, Russell and Stanton. Absolute values for lead isotope ratios for all interlaboratory standard samples presently available from the literature are tabulated. ?? 1969.

  19. Influence of Asthma on the Longitudinal Trajectories of Cigarette Use Behaviors From Adolescence to Adulthood Using Latent Growth Curve Models

    PubMed Central

    Bae, Jisuk

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: While epidemiologic research indicates that the prevalence of risk-taking behaviors including cigarette smoking among young people with asthma is substantial, the longitudinal patterns of cigarette smoking in this vulnerable population have received little attention. The aim of this study was to evaluate differences in the longitudinal trajectories of cigarette use behaviors from adolescence to adulthood between young people with and without asthma. Methods: Data from the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent to Adult Health (Add Health) during the years 1994 to 1995 (Wave I, adolescence), 2001 to 2002 (Wave III, young adulthood), and 2007 to 2008 (Wave IV, adulthood) were analyzed (n=12 244). Latent growth curve models were used to examine the longitudinal trajectories of cigarette use behaviors during the transition to adulthood according to asthma status. Results: Regardless of asthma status, the trajectory means of cigarette use behaviors were found to increase, and then slightly decrease from adolescence to adulthood. In total participants, there were no statistically significant differences in initial levels and changes in cigarette use behaviors according to asthma status. However, in select sex and race subgroups (i.e., females and non-whites), former asthmatics showed greater escalation in cigarette use behaviors than did non-asthmatics or current asthmatics. Conclusions: This study indicated that the changing patterns of cigarette use behaviors during the transition to adulthood among young people with asthma are comparable to or even more drastic than those among young people without asthma. PMID:25857649

  20. Pressate from peat dewatering as a substrate for bacterial growth. [Rhizopus arrhizus; Xanthomonas campestris; Aureobasidium

    SciTech Connect

    Mulligan, C.N.; Cooper, D.G.

    1985-07-01

    This study considered the possibility of using water expressed during the drying of fuel-grade peat as a substrate for microbial growth. Highly humified peat pressed for 2.5 min at 1.96 MPa produced water with a chemical oxygen demand of 690 mg/liter. Several biological compounds could be produced by using the organic matter inexpressed peat water as a substrate. These included polymers such as chitosan, contained in the cell wall of Rhizopus arrhizus, and two extracellular polysaccharides, xanthan gum and pullulan, produced by Bacillus subtilis grown in the expressed water. Small additions of nutrients to the peat pressate were necessary to obtain substantial yields of products. The addition of peptone, yeast extract, and glucose improved production of the various compounds. Biological treatment improved the quality of the expressed water to the extent that in an industrial process it could be returned to the environment.

  1. Synergistic Effects of the Lactobacillus acidophilus Surface Layer and Nisin on Bacterial Growth ?

    PubMed Central

    Prado-Acosta, Mariano; Ruzal, Sandra M.; Allievi, Mariana C.; Palomino, María Mercedes; Sanchez Rivas, Carmen

    2010-01-01

    We have previously described a murein hydrolase activity for the surface layer (S-layer) of Lactobacillus acidophilus ATCC 4356. Here we show that, in combination with nisin, this S-layer acts synergistically to inhibit the growth of pathogenic Gram-negative Salmonella enterica and potential pathogenic Gram-positive bacteria, Staphylococcus aureus and Bacillus cereus. In addition, bacteriolytic effects were observed for the Gram-positive species tested. We postulate that the S-layer enhances the access of nisin into the cell membrane by enabling it to cross the cell wall, while nisin provides the sudden ion-nonspecific dissipation of the proton motive force required to enhance the S-layer murein hydrolase activity. PMID:19948852

  2. CdTe-TiO2 nanocomposite: an impeder of bacterial growth and biofilm.

    PubMed

    Gholap, Haribhau; Patil, Rajendra; Yadav, Prasad; Banpurkar, Arun; Ogale, Satishchandra; Gade, Wasudeo

    2013-05-17

    The resurgence of infectious diseases and associated issues related to antibiotic resistance has raised enormous challenges which may possibly be confronted primarily by nanotechnology routes. One key need of critical significance in this context is the development of an agent capable of inhibiting quorum sensing mediated biofilm formation in pathogenic organisms. In this work we examine the possible use of a nanocomposite, CdTe-TiO2, as an impeder of growth and biofilm. In the presence of CdTe-TiO2, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) analysis shows exposed cells without the surrounding matrix. Confocal laser scanning microscopy shows spatially distributed fluorescence, a typical indication of an impeded biofilm, as opposed to the control which shows matrix-covered cells and continuous fluorescence, typical of biofilm formation. Quantitatively, the inhibition of biofilm was ?57%. CdTe-TiO2 also exhibits good antibacterial properties against Gram positive and Gram negative organisms by virtue of the generation of reactive oxygen species inside the cells, reflected by a ruptured appearance in the SEM analysis. PMID:23579550

  3. CdTe-TiO2 nanocomposite: an impeder of bacterial growth and biofilm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gholap, Haribhau; Patil, Rajendra; Yadav, Prasad; Banpurkar, Arun; Ogale, Satishchandra; Gade, Wasudeo

    2013-05-01

    The resurgence of infectious diseases and associated issues related to antibiotic resistance has raised enormous challenges which may possibly be confronted primarily by nanotechnology routes. One key need of critical significance in this context is the development of an agent capable of inhibiting quorum sensing mediated biofilm formation in pathogenic organisms. In this work we examine the possible use of a nanocomposite, CdTe-TiO2, as an impeder of growth and biofilm. In the presence of CdTe-TiO2, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) analysis shows exposed cells without the surrounding matrix. Confocal laser scanning microscopy shows spatially distributed fluorescence, a typical indication of an impeded biofilm, as opposed to the control which shows matrix-covered cells and continuous fluorescence, typical of biofilm formation. Quantitatively, the inhibition of biofilm was ˜57%. CdTe-TiO2 also exhibits good antibacterial properties against Gram positive and Gram negative organisms by virtue of the generation of reactive oxygen species inside the cells, reflected by a ruptured appearance in the SEM analysis.

  4. Effects of Bacillus amyloliquefaciens FZB42 on lettuce growth and health under pathogen pressure and its impact on the rhizosphere bacterial community.

    PubMed

    Chowdhury, Soumitra Paul; Dietel, Kristin; Rändler, Manuela; Schmid, Michael; Junge, Helmut; Borriss, Rainer; Hartmann, Anton; Grosch, Rita

    2013-01-01

    The soil-borne pathogen Rhizoctonia solani is responsible for crop losses on a wide range of important crops worldwide. The lack of effective control strategies and the increasing demand for organically grown food has stimulated research on biological control. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the rhizosphere competence of the commercially available inoculant Bacillus amyloliquefaciens FZB42 on lettuce growth and health together with its impact on the indigenous rhizosphere bacterial community in field and pot experiments. Results of both experiments demonstrated that FZB42 is able to effectively colonize the rhizosphere (7.45 to 6.61 Log 10 CFU g(-1) root dry mass) within the growth period of lettuce in the field. The disease severity (DS) of bottom rot on lettuce was significantly reduced from severe symptoms with DS category 5 to slight symptom expression with DS category 3 on average through treatment of young plants with FZB42 before and after planting. The 16S rRNA gene based fingerprinting method terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP) showed that the treatment with FZB42 did not have a major impact on the indigenous rhizosphere bacterial community. However, the bacterial community showed a clear temporal shift. The results also indicated that the pathogen R. solani AG1-IB affects the rhizosphere microbial community after inoculation. Thus, we revealed that the inoculant FZB42 could establish itself successfully in the rhizosphere without showing any durable effect on the rhizosphere bacterial community. PMID:23935892

  5. Effects of Bacillus amyloliquefaciens FZB42 on Lettuce Growth and Health under Pathogen Pressure and Its Impact on the Rhizosphere Bacterial Community

    PubMed Central

    Rändler, Manuela; Schmid, Michael; Junge, Helmut; Borriss, Rainer; Hartmann, Anton; Grosch, Rita

    2013-01-01

    The soil-borne pathogen Rhizoctonia solani is responsible for crop losses on a wide range of important crops worldwide. The lack of effective control strategies and the increasing demand for organically grown food has stimulated research on biological control. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the rhizosphere competence of the commercially available inoculant Bacillus amyloliquefaciens FZB42 on lettuce growth and health together with its impact on the indigenous rhizosphere bacterial community in field and pot experiments. Results of both experiments demonstrated that FZB42 is able to effectively colonize the rhizosphere (7.45 to 6.61 Log 10 CFU g?1 root dry mass) within the growth period of lettuce in the field. The disease severity (DS) of bottom rot on lettuce was significantly reduced from severe symptoms with DS category 5 to slight symptom expression with DS category 3 on average through treatment of young plants with FZB42 before and after planting. The 16S rRNA gene based fingerprinting method terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP) showed that the treatment with FZB42 did not have a major impact on the indigenous rhizosphere bacterial community. However, the bacterial community showed a clear temporal shift. The results also indicated that the pathogen R. solani AG1-IB affects the rhizosphere microbial community after inoculation. Thus, we revealed that the inoculant FZB42 could establish itself successfully in the rhizosphere without showing any durable effect on the rhizosphere bacterial community. PMID:23935892

  6. Actin filaments and the growth, movement, and spread of the intracellular bacterial parasite, Listeria monocytogenes

    PubMed Central

    1989-01-01

    Listeria monocytogenes was used as a model intracellular parasite to study stages in the entry, growth, movement, and spread of bacteria in a macrophage cell line. The first step in infection is phagocytosis of the Listeria, followed by the dissolution of the membrane surrounding the phagosome presumably mediated by hemolysin secreted by Listeria as nonhemolytic mutants remain in intact vacuoles. Within 2 h after infection, each now cytoplasmic Listeria becomes encapsulated by actin filaments, identified as such by decoration of the actin filaments with subfragment 1 of myosin. These filaments are very short. The Listeria grow and divide and the actin filaments rearrange to form a long tail (often 5 microns in length) extending from only one end of the bacterium, a "comet's tail," in which the actin filaments appear randomly oriented. The Listeria "comet" moves to the cell surface with its tail oriented towards the cell center and becomes incorporated into a cell extension with the Listeria at the tip of the process and its tail trailing into the cytoplasm behind it. This extension contacts a neighboring macrophage that phagocytoses the extension of the first macrophage. Thus, within the cytoplasm of the second macrophage is a Listeria with its actin tail surrounded by a membrane that in turn is surrounded by the phagosome membrane of the new host. Both these membranes are then solubilized by the Listeria and the cycle is repeated. Thus, once inside a host cell, the infecting Listeria and their progeny can spread from cell to cell by remaining intracellular and thus bypass the humoral immune system of the organism. To establish if actin filaments are essential for the spread of Listeria from cell to cell, we treated infected macrophages with cytochalasin D. The Listeria not only failed to spread, but most were found deep within the cytoplasm, rather than near the periphery of the cell. Thin sections revealed that the net of actin filaments is not formed nor is a "comet" tail produced. PMID:2507553

  7. Bacterial mortality and the fate of bacterial production

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Michael L. Pace; Mary Flagler Cary Arboretum

    1988-01-01

    Knowledge of the rates of bacterial mortality, particularly predatory mortality, is important in determining the fate of bacterial\\u000a production. Communities of planktonic bacteria have specific growth rates on the order of 1 d?1, but there is relatively little variation in bacterial abundance, implying that growth and mortality are closely coupled.\\u000a A review of the mechanisms of bacterial mortality suggests that

  8. A new logistic model for Escherichia coli growth at constant and dynamic temperatures

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Hiroshi Fujikawa; Akemi Kai; Satoshi Morozumi

    2004-01-01

    A new logistic model for bacterial growth was developed in this study. The model, which is based on the logistic model, contains an additional term for expression of the very low rate of growth during a lag phase, in its differential equation. The model successfully described sigmoidal growth curves of Escherichia coli at various initial cell concentrations and constant temperatures.

  9. Paclobutrazol and plant-growth promoting bacterial endophyte Pantoea sp. enhance copper tolerance of guinea grass ( Panicum maximum ) in hydroponic culture

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Wei HuoChun-hua; Chun-hua Zhuang; Ya Cao; Meng Pu; Hui Yao; Lai-qing Lou; Qing-sheng Cai

    As most gramineous plants, guinea grass (Panicum maximum) comprise cellulosic biomass, which may be used as a feedstock for bioenergy. In order to develop such potential energy plants\\u000a on copper-polluted lands, the hydroponic experiments with Cu, Paclobutrazol (PP333, a kind of antigibberellin) and plant growth-promoting\\u000a bacterial endophyte (PGPB) treatments were carried out in a greenhouse. The seedlings of two cultivars

  10. Effects of Intercropping and Melon Sowing Date on Crop Growth, Soil MicroEnvironment and Rhizosphere Fungi and Bacterial Populations of Maize and Cassava

    Microsoft Academic Search

    F. O. Olasantan; O. A. Babalola

    2007-01-01

    The rhizosphere fungi and bacterial populations, soil micro-environment and crop growth during the late-season cropping of 2002 and 2003 in south-western Nigeria were studied by assessing the effects of melon grown in monoculture or in mixed stands with maize or cassava. Melon was sown on 28 August, 11 September and 25 September 2002, and on 20 September and 4 October

  11. OppA of Listeria monocytogenes, an Oligopeptide-Binding Protein Required for Bacterial Growth at Low Temperature and Involved in Intracellular Survival

    PubMed Central

    Borezee, Elise; Pellegrini, Elisabeth; Berche, Patrick

    2000-01-01

    We identified a new oligopeptide permease operon in the pathogen Listeria monocytogenes. This opp operon consists of five genes (oppA, oppB, oppC, oppD, and oppF) and displays the same genetic organization as those of several bacterial species. The first gene of this operon, oppA, encodes a 62-kDa protein sharing 33% identity with OppA of Bacillus subtilis and is expressed predominantly during exponential growth. The function of oppA was studied by constructing an oppA deletion mutant. The phenotype analysis of this mutant revealed that OppA mediates the transport of oligopeptides and is required for bacterial growth at low temperature. The wild-type phenotype was restored by complementing the mutant with oppA. We also found that OppA is involved in intracellular survival in macrophages and in bacterial growth in organs of mice infected with L. monocytogenes, although the level of virulence was not altered in the mutant. These results show the major role of OppA in the uptake of oligopeptides and the pleiotropic effects of this oligopeptide-binding protein on the behavior of this pathogen in the environment and in its host. PMID:11083832

  12. RELATIONS BETWEEN BACTERIAL NITROGEN METABOLISM AND GROWTH EFFICIENCY IN AN ESTUARINE AND AN OPEN-WATER ECOSYSTEM

    EPA Science Inventory

    Bacterial uptake or release of dissolved nitrogen compounds (amino nitrogen, urea, ammonium and nitrate) were examined in 0.8 |m filtered water from an estuary (Santa Rosa Sound [SRS], northwestern Florida) and an open-water location in the Gulf of Mexico [GM]. The bacterial nutr...

  13. Modeling of Ductile Crack Growth in Reactor Pressure-Vessel Steels and Determination of J R Curves

    Microsoft Academic Search

    B. Z. Margolin; V. I. Kostylev; A. I. Minkin; A. V. Il'in

    2002-01-01

    A method is presented for predicting JR curves for reactor pressure-vessel steels. The authors propose a procedure for determining the ductile fracture model parameters from the test results for smooth and notched cylindrical specimens. The stress and strain fields at the tip of a stationary and propagating cracks are studied by the finite-element method. The predicted JR curves are compared

  14. Optimized polymeric film-based nitric oxide delivery inhibits bacterial growth in a mouse burn wound model.

    PubMed

    Brisbois, Elizabeth J; Bayliss, Jill; Wu, Jianfeng; Major, Terry C; Xi, Chuanwu; Wang, Stewart C; Bartlett, Robert H; Handa, Hitesh; Meyerhoff, Mark E

    2014-10-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) has many biological roles (e.g. antimicrobial agent, promoter of angiogenesis, prevention of platelet activation) that make NO releasing materials desirable for a variety of biomedical applications. Localized NO release can be achieved from biomedical grade polymers doped with diazeniumdiolated dibutylhexanediamine (DBHD/N2O2) and poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA). In this study, the optimization of this chemistry to create film/patches that can be used to decrease microbial infection at wound sites is examined. Two polyurethanes with different water uptakes (Tecoflex SG-80A (6.2±0.7wt.%) and Tecophilic SP-60D-20 (22.5±1.1wt.%)) were doped with 25wt.% DBHD/N2O2 and 10wt.% of PLGA with various hydrolysis rates. Films prepared with the polymer that has the higher water uptake (SP-60D-20) were found to have higher NO release and for a longer duration than the polyurethane with the lower water uptake (SG-80A). The more hydrophilic polymer enhances the hydrolysis rate of the PLGA additive, thereby providing a more acidic environment that increases the rate of NO release from the NO donor. The optimal NO releasing and control SG-80A patches were then applied to scald burn wounds that were infected with Acinetobacter baumannii. The NO released from these patches applied to the wounds is shown to significantly reduce the A. baumannii infection after 24h (?4 log reduction). The NO release patches are also able to reduce the level of transforming growth factor-? in comparison to controls, which can enhance re-epithelialization, decrease scarring and reduce migration of bacteria. The combined DBHD/N2O2 and PLGA-doped polymer patches, which could be replaced periodically throughout the wound healing process, demonstrate the potential to reduce risk of bacterial infection and promote the overall wound healing process. PMID:24980058

  15. Molecular characterization of RNA and protein synthesis during a one-step growth curve of bovine viral diarrhoea virus in ovine (SFT-R) cells

    Microsoft Academic Search

    N. Mishra; B. S. Mathapati; K. Rajukumar; R. K. Nema; S. P. Behera; S. C. Dubey

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the kinetics of noncytopathic bovine viral diarrhoea virus (BVDV) multiplication and synthesis of BVDV specific RNA and proteins in ovine cells (SFT-R) during a one-step growth curve. The virus titre and RNA level were determined by focus-forming assay and real time RT-PCR. The RNA synthesis was detected by Northern blot while synthesis

  16. THE EFFECT OF PH ON MAXIMUM BACTERIAL GROWTH RATE AND ITS POSSIBLE ROLE AS A DETERMINANT OF BACTERIAL COMPETITION IN THE RUMEN

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. B. Russell; W. M. Sharp; R. L. Baldwin

    SUMMARY Five rumen bacteria were inoculated into media with pH values ranging from 6.7 to 4.7 to determine effects on maximum growth rate. Streptococcus boris, Bacteroides ruminicola, and Selenomanas ruminantium appeared to be more resistant to low pH than either Butyrivib- rio fibrisolvens or Megasphaera elsdenii. S. Boris, B. ruminicola, and S. ruminantium showed gradual decreases in maximum growth rate

  17. The use of multivariate curve resolution methods to improve the analysis of muramic acid as bacterial marker using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry: an alternative method to gas chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Moazeni-Pourasil, Roudabeh Sadat; Piri, Farhad; Ghassempour, Alireza; Jalali-Heravi, Mehdi

    2014-02-15

    In analysis of muramic acid (MA) as bacterial marker, two dominant disturbing factors lead the researchers to use gas chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (GC-MS/MS) technique instead of gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). These factors are the trace concentration of MA and fundamental disturbance of base line mass channels in GC-MS technique. This study aimed to utilize multivariate curve resolution (MCR) methods combined with GC-MS to improve the analysis of MA. First, the background and noise in GC-MS analysis were corrected and reduced using MCR methods. In addition, the MA overlapped peaks were resolved to its pure chromatographic and mass spectral profiles. Then the two-way response of each component was reconstructed by the outer product of the pure chromatographic and mass spectral profiles. The overall volume integration (OVI) method was used for quantitative determination. The MA peak area was decreased dramatically after the background correction and noise reduction. The findings severely ratify the appropriateness of using MCR techniques combined with GC-MS analysis as a simple, fast and inexpensive method for the analysis of MA in complex mixtures. The proposed method may be considered as an alternative method to GC-MS/MS for thorough analysis of the bacterial marker. PMID:24441017

  18. Fabrication of a platform to isolate the influences of surface nanotopography from chemistry on bacterial attachment and growth.

    PubMed

    Pegalajar-Jurado, Adoracion; Easton, Christopher D; Crawford, Russell J; McArthur, Sally L

    2015-01-01

    Billions of dollars are spent annually worldwide to combat the adverse effects of bacterial attachment and biofilm formation in industries as varied as maritime, food, and health. While advances in the fabrication of antifouling surfaces have been reported recently, a number of the essential aspects responsible for the formation of biofilms remain unresolved, including the important initial stages of bacterial attachment to a substrate surface. The reduction of bacterial attachment to surfaces is a key concept in the prevention or minimization of biofilm formation. The chemical and physical characteristics of both the substrate and bacteria are important in understanding the attachment process, but substrate modification is likely the most practical route to enable the extent of bacterial attachment taking place to be effectively controlled. The microtopography and chemistry of the surface are known to influence bacterial attachment. The role of surface chemistry versus nanotopography and their interplay, however, remain unclear. Most methods used for imparting nanotopographical patterns onto a surface also induce changes in the surface chemistry and vice versa. In this study, the authors combine colloidal lithography and plasma polymerization to fabricate homogeneous, reproducible, and periodic nanotopographies with a controllable surface chemistry. The attachment of Escherichia coli bacteria onto carboxyl (plasma polymerized acrylic acid, ppAAc) and hydrocarbon (plasma polymerized octadiene, ppOct) rich plasma polymer films on either flat or colloidal array surfaces revealed that the surface chemistry plays a critical role in bacterial attachment, whereas the effect of surface nanotopography on the bacterial attachment appears to be more difficult to define. This platform represents a promising approach to allow a greater understanding of the role that surface chemistry and nanotopography play on bacterial attachment and the subsequent biofouling of the surface. PMID:25720764

  19. Using Fractal Geometry and Universal Growth Curves as Diagnostics for Comparing Tumor Vasculature and Metabolic Rate With Healthy Tissue and for Predicting Responses to Drug Therapies

    PubMed Central

    Savage, Van M.; Herman, Alexander B.; West, Geoffrey B.; Leu, Kevin

    2013-01-01

    Healthy vasculature exhibits a hierarchical branching structure in which, on average, vessel radius and length change systematically with branching order. In contrast, tumor vasculature exhibits less hierarchy and more variability in its branching patterns. Although differences in vasculature have been highlighted in the literature, there has been very little quantification of these differences. Fractal analysis is a natural tool for comparing tumor and healthy vasculature, especially because it has already been used extensively to model healthy tissue. In this paper, we provide a fractal analysis of existing vascular data, and we present a new mathematical framework for predicting tumor growth trajectories by coupling: (1) the fractal geometric properties of tumor vascular networks, (2) metabolic properties of tumor cells and host vascular systems, and (3) spatial gradients in resources and metabolic states within the tumor. First, we provide a new analysis for how the mean and variation of scaling exponents for ratios of vessel radii and lengths in tumors differ from healthy tissue. Next, we use these characteristic exponents to predict metabolic rates for tumors. Finally, by combining this analysis with general growth equations based on energetics, we derive universal growth curves that enable us to compare tumor and ontogenetic growth. We also extend these growth equations to include necrotic, quiescent, and proliferative cell states and to predict novel growth dynamics that arise when tumors are treated with drugs. Taken together, this mathematical framework will help to anticipate and understand growth trajectories across tumor types and drug treatments. PMID:24204201

  20. Comparative analysis of quantitative trait loci for body weight, growth rate and growth curve parameters from 3 to 72 weeks of age in female chickens of a broiler–layer cross

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Comparisons of quantitative trait loci (QTL) for growth and parameters of growth curves assist in understanding the genetics and ultimately the physiology of growth. Records of body weight at 3, 6, 12, 24, 48 and 72 weeks of age and growth rate between successive age intervals of about 500 F2 female chickens of the Roslin broiler-layer cross were available for analysis. These data were analysed to detect and compare QTL for body weight, growth rate and parameters of the Gompertz growth function. Results Over 50 QTL were identified for body weight at specific ages and most were also detected in the nearest preceding and/or subsequent growth stage. The sum of the significant and suggestive additive effects for bodyweight at specific ages accounted for 23-43% of the phenotypic variation. A single QTL for body weight on chromosome 4 at 48 weeks of age had the largest additive effect (550.4?±?68.0 g, 11.5% of the phenotypic variation) and a QTL at a similar position accounted 14.5% of the phenotypic variation at 12 weeks of age. Age specific QTL for growth rate were detected suggesting that there are specific genes that affect developmental processes during the different stages of growth. Relatively few QTL influencing Gompertz growth curve parameters were detected and overlapped with loci affecting growth rate. Dominance effects were generally not significant but from 12 weeks of age they exceeded the additive effect in a few cases. No evidence for epistatic QTL pairs was found. Conclusions The results confirm the location for body weight and body weight gain during growth that were identified in previous studies and were consistent with QTL for the parameters of the Gompertz growth function. Chromosome 4 explained a relatively large proportion of the observed growth variation across the different ages, and also harboured most of the detected QTL for Gompertz parameters, confirming its importance in controlling growth. Very few QTL were detected for body weight or gain at 48 and 72 weeks of age, probably reflecting the effect of differences in reproduction and random environmental effects. PMID:23496818

  1. 4, 37993828, 2007 Bacterial production

    E-print Network

    Boyer, Edmond

    limiting bacterial growth was investigated along vertical and longitudinal gradients across the SouthBGD 4, 3799­3828, 2007 Bacterial production limitation in the South Pacific Gyre F. Van Wambeke et forum of Biogeosciences Factors limiting heterotrophic bacterial production in the southern Pacific

  2. Effect of dietary supplementation of fructooligosaccharide (FOS) on growth performance, survival, lactobacillus bacterial population and hemato-immunological parameters of stellate sturgeon (Acipenser stellatus) juvenile.

    PubMed

    Akrami, Reza; Iri, Yousef; Rostami, Hosseinali Khoshbavar; Razeghi Mansour, Majid

    2013-10-01

    The dietary supplementation of fructooligosaccharide (FOS) in stellate sturgeon juvenile, Acipenser stellatus (with mean initial body weight of 30.16 ± 0.14 g) was evaluated for the effect on growth, autochthonous intestinal microbiata and hemato-immunological parameters for 11 weeks. FOS was added at a level of 0, 1% and 2% to the commercial pellet diet (BioMar). At the end of the experiment, growth parameters, survival rate, lactobacillus bacterial population, hematological and immunological parameters were determined. The fish fed on 1% FOS significantly showed higher final weight, WG%, SGR and PER and lower FCR compared to those of the control group (P < 0.05). Survival rate did not significantly differ between the treatments (P > 0.05). However, FOS administration resulted in lower survival. The serum lysozyme activity was significantly affected by dietary 1% FOS (P < 0.05), while respiratory burst activity was not significantly affected by dietary treatments (P > 0.05). In fish fed on the diet with 1% FOS showed a significant increase of total heterotrophic autochthonous bacterial and presumptive LAB levels (P < 0.05) compared with those fed on the diets supplemented with prebiotics. In addition to increase in WBC, RBC, MCV, hematocrit, hemoglobin and lymphocyte levels were observed in this group. These results indicated that dietary supplementation of FOS at a dose of 1% improved growth performance, beneficial intestinal microbiata and stimulate immune response of stellate sturgeon juvenile. PMID:23973846

  3. Multilevel Growth Curve Analyses of Treatment Effects of a Web-Based Intervention for Stress Reduction: Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Raeder, Sabine; Kraft, Pål; Bjørkli, Cato Alexander

    2013-01-01

    Background Stress is commonly experienced by many people and it is a contributing factor to many mental and physical health conditions, However, few efforts have been made to develop and test the effects of interventions for stress. Objective The aim of this study was to examine the effects of a Web-based stress-reduction intervention on stress, investigate mindfulness and procrastination as potential mediators of any treatment effects, and test whether the intervention is equally effective for females as males, all ages, and all levels of education. Methods We employed a randomized controlled trial in this study. Participants were recruited online via Facebook and randomly assigned to either the stress intervention or a control condition. The Web-based stress intervention was fully automated and consisted of 13 sessions over 1 month. The controls were informed that they would get access to the intervention after the final data collection. Data were collected at baseline and at 1, 2, and 6 months after intervention onset by means of online questionnaires. Outcomes were stress, mindfulness, and procrastination, which were all measured at every measurement occasion. Results A total of 259 participants were included and were allocated to either the stress intervention (n=126) or the control condition (n=133). Participants in the intervention and control group were comparable at baseline; however, results revealed that participants in the stress intervention followed a statistically different (ie, cubic) developmental trajectory in stress levels over time compared to the controls. A growth curve analysis showed that participants in the stress intervention (unstandardized beta coefficient [B]=–3.45, P=.008) recovered more quickly compared to the control group (B=–0.81, P=.34) from baseline to 1 month. Although participants in the stress intervention did show increases in stress levels during the study period (B=2.23, P=.008), long-term stress levels did decrease again toward study end at 6 months (B=–0.28, P=.009). Stress levels in the control group, however, remained largely unchanged after 1 month (B=0.29, P=.61) and toward 6 months (B=–0.03, P=.67). Mediation analyses showed nonlinear (ie, cubic) specific indirect effects of mindfulness and a linear specific indirect effect of procrastination on stress. In simple terms, the intervention increased mindfulness and decreased procrastination, which was related to lower stress levels. Finally, the effect of the stress intervention was independent of participants’ gender, age, or education. Conclusions The results from this randomized controlled trial suggest that a Web-based intervention can reduce levels of stress in a normal population and that both mindfulness and procrastination may be important components included in future eHealth interventions for stress. Trial Registration International Standard Randomized Controlled Trial Number (ISRCTN): 25619675; http://controlled-trials.com/ISRCTN25619675 (Archived by Webcite at http://www.webcitation.org/6FxB1gOKY) PMID:23607962

  4. Ogive Curves

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    2008-01-01

    This page contains a discussion of ogive curves, logistic regression curves, and architecture. Nice photographs of architectural applications are included. The classic Birthday Problems is included as an example of an ogive curve.

  5. Hierarchical Bayesian analysis to incorporate age uncertainty in growth curve analysis and estimates of age from length: Florida manatee (Trichechus manatus) carcasses

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schwarz, L.K.; Runge, M.C.

    2009-01-01

    Age estimation of individuals is often an integral part of species management research, and a number of ageestimation techniques are commonly employed. Often, the error in these techniques is not quantified or accounted for in other analyses, particularly in growth curve models used to describe physiological responses to environment and human impacts. Also, noninvasive, quick, and inexpensive methods to estimate age are needed. This research aims to provide two Bayesian methods to (i) incorporate age uncertainty into an age-length Schnute growth model and (ii) produce a method from the growth model to estimate age from length. The methods are then employed for Florida manatee (Trichechus manatus) carcasses. After quantifying the uncertainty in the aging technique (counts of ear bone growth layers), we fit age-length data to the Schnute growth model separately by sex and season. Independent prior information about population age structure and the results of the Schnute model are then combined to estimate age from length. Results describing the age-length relationship agree with our understanding of manatee biology. The new methods allow us to estimate age, with quantified uncertainty, for 98% of collected carcasses: 36% from ear bones, 62% from length.

  6. Bdellovibrio and like organisms enhanced growth and survival of Penaeus monodon and altered bacterial community structures in its rearing water.

    PubMed

    Li, Huanhuan; Chen, Cheng; Sun, Qiuping; Liu, Renliang; Cai, Junpeng

    2014-10-01

    In this study, a 96-h laboratory reduction test was conducted with strain BDHSH06 (GenBank accession no. EF011103) as the test strain for Bdellovibrio and like organisms (BALOs) and 20 susceptible marine bacterial strains forming microcosms as the targets. The results showed that BDHSH06 reduced the levels of approximately 50% of prey bacterial strains within 96 h in the seawater microcosms. An 85-day black tiger shrimp (Penaeus monodon) rearing experiment was performed. The shrimp survival rate, body length, and weight in the test tanks were 48.1% ± 1.2%, 99.8 ± 10.0 mm, and 6.36 ± 1.50 g, respectively, which were values significantly (P < 0.05) higher than those for the control, viz., 31.0% ± 2.1%, 86.0 ± 11.1 mm, and 4.21 ± 1.56 g, respectively. With the addition of BDHSH06, total bacterial and Vibrio numbers were significantly reduced (P < 0.05) by 1.3 to 4.5 log CFU · ml(-1) and CFU · g(-1) in both water and shrimp intestines, respectively, compared to those in the control. The effect of BDHSH06 on bacterial community structures in the rearing water was also examined using PCR amplification of the 16S rRNA gene and denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE). The DGGE profiles of rearing water samples from the control and test tanks revealed that the amounts of 44% of the bacterial species were reduced when BDHSH06 was added to the rearing water over the 85-day rearing period, and among these, approximately 57.1% were nonculturable. The results of this study demonstrated that BDHSH06 can be used as a biocontrol/probiotic agent in P. monodon culture. PMID:25107962

  7. Bdellovibrio and Like Organisms Enhanced Growth and Survival of Penaeus monodon and Altered Bacterial Community Structures in Its Rearing Water

    PubMed Central

    Li, Huanhuan; Chen, Cheng; Sun, Qiuping; Liu, Renliang

    2014-01-01

    In this study, a 96-h laboratory reduction test was conducted with strain BDHSH06 (GenBank accession no. EF011103) as the test strain for Bdellovibrio and like organisms (BALOs) and 20 susceptible marine bacterial strains forming microcosms as the targets. The results showed that BDHSH06 reduced the levels of approximately 50% of prey bacterial strains within 96 h in the seawater microcosms. An 85-day black tiger shrimp (Penaeus monodon) rearing experiment was performed. The shrimp survival rate, body length, and weight in the test tanks were 48.1% ± 1.2%, 99.8 ± 10.0 mm, and 6.36 ± 1.50 g, respectively, which were values significantly (P < 0.05) higher than those for the control, viz., 31.0% ± 2.1%, 86.0 ± 11.1 mm, and 4.21 ± 1.56 g, respectively. With the addition of BDHSH06, total bacterial and Vibrio numbers were significantly reduced (P < 0.05) by 1.3 to 4.5 log CFU · ml?1 and CFU · g?1 in both water and shrimp intestines, respectively, compared to those in the control. The effect of BDHSH06 on bacterial community structures in the rearing water was also examined using PCR amplification of the 16S rRNA gene and denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE). The DGGE profiles of rearing water samples from the control and test tanks revealed that the amounts of 44% of the bacterial species were reduced when BDHSH06 was added to the rearing water over the 85-day rearing period, and among these, approximately 57.1% were nonculturable. The results of this study demonstrated that BDHSH06 can be used as a biocontrol/probiotic agent in P. monodon culture. PMID:25107962

  8. Modeling Surface Growth of Escherichia coli on Agar Plates

    PubMed Central

    Fujikawa, Hiroshi; Morozumi, Satoshi

    2005-01-01

    Surface growth of Escherichia coli cells on a membrane filter placed on a nutrient agar plate under various conditions was studied with a mathematical model. The surface growth of bacterial cells showed a sigmoidal curve with time on a semilogarithmic plot. To describe it, a new logistic model that we presented earlier (H.?Fujikawa et al., Food Microbiol. 21:501-509, 2004) was modified. Growth curves at various constant temperatures (10 to 34°C) were successfully described with the modified model (model III). Model III gave better predictions of the rate constant of growth and the lag period than a modified Gompertz model and the Baranyi model. Using the parameter values of model III at the constant temperatures, surface growth at various temperatures was successfully predicted. Surface growth curves at various initial cell numbers were also sigmoidal and converged to the same maximum cell numbers at the stationary phase. Surface growth curves at various nutrient levels were also sigmoidal. The maximum cell number and the rate of growth were lower as the nutrient level decreased. The surface growth curve was the same as that in a liquid, except for the large curvature at the deceleration period. These curves were also well described with model III. The pattern of increase in the ATP content of cells grown on a surface was sigmoidal, similar to that for cell growth. We discovered several characteristics of the surface growth of bacterial cells under various growth conditions and examined the applicability of our model to describe these growth curves. PMID:16332768

  9. Bacterial community compositions of tomato (Lycopersicum esculentum Mill.) seeds and plant growth promoting activity of ACC deaminase producing Bacillus subtilis (HYT-12-1) on tomato seedlings.

    PubMed

    Xu, Mingshuang; Sheng, Jiping; Chen, Lin; Men, Yejun; Gan, Lin; Guo, Shuntang; Shen, Lin

    2014-03-01

    Study of endophytic bacteria within plant seeds is very essential and meaningful on account of their heritability and versatility. This study investigated Bacillus bacterial communities within the seeds of four commercial tomato varieties, by 16S rRNA gene PCR-RFLP (restriction fragment length polymorphism). Phylogenetic analysis of 16S rRNA gene sequences indicated that the 22 representative isolates belonged to five species of genus Bacillus and the bacterial compositions showed remarkable differences among tomato varieties. Isolates exhibited multiple plant growth promoting (PGP) traits: 37 % of indole-3-acetic acid production; 37 % of phosphate solubilization; 24 % of siderophores production; 85 % of potential nitrogen fixation and 6 % of 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylate (ACC) deaminase activity. Isolate HYT-12-1 was shown to have highest ACC deaminase activity (112.02 nmol ?-ketobutyrate mg?¹ protein h?¹) among the five ACC deamiase producing strains. 16S rRNA gene sequencing indicated that the isolate HYT-12-1 shared the highest sequence similarity (100 %) with B. subtilis. PGP experiments under gnotobiotic and greenhouse conditions revealed the ability of strain HYT-12-1 to enhance the growth of tomato seedlings. This is the first study to describe endophytic Bacillus communities within tomato seeds, and the results suggest that B. subtilis strain HYT-12-1 would have a great potential for industrial application as biofertilizer in the future. PMID:24114316

  10. N-Acetyl-L-Cysteine Affects Growth, Extracellular Polysaccharide Production, and Bacterial Biofilm Formation on Solid Surfaces

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ann-Cathrin Olofsson; Malte Hermansson; Hans Elwing

    2003-01-01

    N-Acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC) is used in medical treatment of patients with chronic bronchitis. The positive effects of NAC treatment have primarily been attributed to the mucus-dissolving properties of NAC, as well as its ability to decrease biofilm formation, which reduces bacterial infections. Our results suggest that NAC also may be an interesting candidate for use as an agent to reduce and

  11. Indoor-Biofilter Growth and Exposure to Airborne Chemicals Drive Similar Changes in Plant Root Bacterial Communities

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Yi; Chau, Linh; Pauliushchyk, Margarita; Anastopoulos, Ioannis; Anandan, Shivanthi; Waring, Michael S.

    2014-01-01

    Due to the long durations spent inside by many humans, indoor air quality has become a growing concern. Biofiltration has emerged as a potential mechanism to clean indoor air of harmful volatile organic compounds (VOCs), which are typically found at concentrations higher indoors than outdoors. Root-associated microbes are thought to drive the functioning of plant-based biofilters, or biowalls, converting VOCs into biomass, energy, and carbon dioxide, but little is known about the root microbial communities of such artificially grown plants, how or whether they differ from those of plants grown in soil, and whether any changes in composition are driven by VOCs. In this study, we investigated how bacterial communities on biofilter plant roots change over time and in response to VOC exposure. Through 16S rRNA amplicon sequencing, we compared root bacterial communities from soil-grown plants with those from two biowalls, while also comparing communities from roots exposed to clean versus VOC-laden air in a laboratory biofiltration system. The results showed differences in bacterial communities between soil-grown and biowall-grown plants and between bacterial communities from plant roots exposed to clean air and those from VOC-exposed plant roots. Both biowall-grown and VOC-exposed roots harbored enriched levels of bacteria from the genus Hyphomicrobium. Given their known capacities to break down aromatic and halogenated compounds, we hypothesize that these bacteria are important VOC degraders. While different strains of Hyphomicrobium proliferated in the two studied biowalls and our lab experiment, strains were shared across plant species, suggesting that a wide range of ornamental houseplants harbor similar microbes of potential use in living biofilters. PMID:24878602

  12. Suppression of growth of Ralstonia solanacearum, tomato bacterial wilt agent, on\\/in tomato seedlings cultivated in a suppressive soil

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Masaya Nishiyama; Yoshitaka Shiomi; Sae Suzuki; Takuya Marumoto

    1999-01-01

    To identify the sites responsible for the suppressiveness of tomato bacterial wilt in a suppressive soil, population dynamics of {iRalstonia solanacearum} in non-rhizosphere soil, roots and stems of tomato plants was compared between a wilt-conducive soil and a suppressive soil both of which were artificially infested with the pathogenic strain SL8. Rhizobacteria were recovered as two fractions; root fraction-l obtained

  13. Proceedings of the IEEE International Conference on Systems, Man and Cybernetics, Oct. 7-10, 2007, Montral. Abstract--The field of robotics is on a growth curve, with

    E-print Network

    Berleant, Daniel

    uncertainty. This paper introduces the use of Information Gap Theory as a way to enable robots to make robust for robots to make decisions in highly uncertain circumstances. Information-Gap Theory is an approach, Montréal. Abstract-- The field of robotics is on a growth curve, with most of the growth expected

  14. Aging, Maturation and Growth of Sauropodomorph Dinosaurs as Deduced from Growth Curves Using Long Bone Histological Data: An Assessment of Methodological Constraints and Solutions

    PubMed Central

    Griebeler, Eva Maria; Klein, Nicole; Sander, P. Martin

    2013-01-01

    Information on aging, maturation, and growth is important for understanding life histories of organisms. In extinct dinosaurs, such information can be derived from the histological growth record preserved in the mid-shaft cortex of long bones. Here, we construct growth models to estimate ages at death, ages at sexual maturity, ages at which individuals were fully-grown, and maximum growth rates from the growth record preserved in long bones of six sauropod dinosaur individuals (one indeterminate mamenchisaurid, two Apatosaurus sp., two indeterminate diplodocids, and one Camarasaurus sp.) and one basal sauropodomorph dinosaur individual (Plateosaurus engelhardti). Using these estimates, we establish allometries between body mass and each of these traits and compare these to extant taxa. Growth models considered for each dinosaur individual were the von Bertalanffy model, the Gompertz model, and the logistic model (LGM), all of which have inherently fixed inflection points, and the Chapman-Richards model in which the point is not fixed. We use the arithmetic mean of the age at the inflection point and of the age at which 90% of asymptotic mass is reached to assess respectively the age at sexual maturity or the age at onset of reproduction, because unambiguous indicators of maturity in Sauropodomorpha are lacking. According to an AIC-based model selection process, the LGM was the best model for our sauropodomorph sample. Allometries established are consistent with literature data on other Sauropodomorpha. All Sauropodomorpha reached full size within a time span similar to scaled-up modern mammalian megaherbivores and had similar maximum growth rates to scaled-up modern megaherbivores and ratites, but growth rates of Sauropodomorpha were lower than of an average mammal. Sauropodomorph ages at death probably were lower than that of average scaled-up ratites and megaherbivores. Sauropodomorpha were older at maturation than scaled-up ratites and average mammals, but younger than scaled-up megaherbivores. PMID:23840575

  15. Destruction of bacterial viruses in serum by heat and radiation under conditions that sustain the ability of serum to support growth of cells in suspended culture.

    PubMed Central

    Ward, R L

    1979-01-01

    Methods for inactivating bacterial viruses in serum were developed through the use of heat and ionizing radiation, and the effects of these treatments on the growth rates of cultured cells were tested. Viruses chosen for this study were the radiation-resistant bacteriphage f2 and heat-resistant phage T4. The viabilities of these phages were reduced more than 2 and 4 orders of magnitude, respectively, by a treatment at 60 degrees C for 30 min followed by 420 krads of ionizing radiation. Simultaneous application of heat and radiation caused a considerably greater reduction in viability of both phages in serum, but also caused a significant decrease in the growth rates of L cells in medium supplemented with serum treated in this manner. Treatment of serum with these same doses but given in the sequential fashion of heat followed by radiation caused little or no change in the growth rates of L cells. Finally, it was found that simultaneous treatment of serum with these doses of heat and radiation had little effect on the growth rates of either HeLa or Chinese hamster cells. PMID:544633

  16. Expression of the bacterial type III effector DspA/E in Saccharomyces cerevisiae down-regulates the sphingolipid biosynthetic pathway leading to growth arrest.

    PubMed

    Siamer, Sabrina; Guillas, Isabelle; Shimobayashi, Mitsugu; Kunz, Caroline; Hall, Michael N; Barny, Marie-Anne

    2014-06-27

    Erwinia amylovora, the bacterium responsible for fire blight, relies on a type III secretion system and a single injected effector, DspA/E, to induce disease in host plants. DspA/E belongs to the widespread AvrE family of type III effectors that suppress plant defense responses and promote bacterial growth following infection. Ectopic expression of DspA/E in plant or in Saccharomyces cerevisiae is toxic, indicating that DspA/E likely targets a cellular process conserved between yeast and plant. To unravel the mode of action of DspA/E, we screened the Euroscarf S. cerevisiae library for mutants resistant to DspA/E-induced growth arrest. The most resistant mutants (?sur4, ?fen1, ?ipt1, ?skn1, ?csg1, ?csg2, ?orm1, and ?orm2) were impaired in the sphingolipid biosynthetic pathway. Exogenously supplied sphingolipid precursors such as the long chain bases (LCBs) phytosphingosine and dihydrosphingosine also suppressed the DspA/E-induced yeast growth defect. Expression of DspA/E in yeast down-regulated LCB biosynthesis and induced a rapid decrease in LCB levels, indicating that serine palmitoyltransferase (SPT), the first and rate-limiting enzyme of the sphingolipid biosynthetic pathway, was repressed. SPT down-regulation was mediated by dephosphorylation and activation of Orm proteins that negatively regulate SPT. A ?cdc55 mutation affecting Cdc55-PP2A protein phosphatase activity prevented Orm dephosphorylation and suppressed DspA/E-induced growth arrest. PMID:24828506

  17. A Growth Curve Analysis of Literacy Performance among Second-Grade, Spanish-Speaking, English-Language Learners

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gutiierrez, Gabriel; Vanderwood, Mike L.

    2013-01-01

    The literacy growth of 260 second-grade English learners (ELs) with varying degrees of English language proficiency (e.g., Beginning, Early Intermediate, Intermediate, Early Advanced and Advanced English language proficiency) was assessed with English literacy skill assessments. Dynamic Indicators of Basic Early Literacy Skills measures were…

  18. Career Education: An Application of Latent Growth Curve Modelling to Career Information-Seeking Behaviour of School Pupils

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shevlin, Mark; Millar, Rob

    2006-01-01

    Background: This study applied the theory of planned behaviour (TPB) in an attempt to predict longitudinal growth of career exploratory behaviour in school pupils. The importance of information for making considered career decisions is indicated in theories of career development and choice, career education programmes, and concepts of career…

  19. Soil Bacterial Diversity Responses to Root Colonization by an Ectomycorrhizal Fungus are not Root-Growth-Dependent

    E-print Network

    Thioulouse, Jean

    Fungus are not Root-Growth-Dependent Komi Assigbetse1 , Mariama Gueye1 , Jean Thioulouse2 and Robin addition of the ectomycorrhizal fungus or N/P/K fertilization (to reproduce the fungal effect on root effect is not root- growth-dependent but is mainly due to the presence of the ectomycorrhizal fungus

  20. Interspecific prediction of photosynthetic light response curves using specific leaf mass and leaf nitrogen content: effects of differences in soil fertility and growth irradiance

    PubMed Central

    Lachapelle, Pierre-Philippe; Shipley, Bill

    2012-01-01

    Background and Aims Previous work has shown that the entire photosynthetic light response curve, based on both Mitscherlich and Michaelis–Menten functions, could be predicted in an interspecific context through allometric relations linking the parameters of these functions to two static leaf traits: leaf nitrogen (N) content and leaf mass per area (LMA). This paper describes to what extent these allometric relations are robust to changes in soil fertility and the growth irradiance of the plants. Methods Plants of 25 herbaceous species were grown under controlled conditions in factorial combinations of low/high soil fertility and low/high growth irradiance. Net photosynthetic rates per unit dry mass were measured at light intensities ranging from 0 to 700 µmol m?2 s?1 photosynthetically active radiation (PAR). Key Results The differing growth environments induced large changes in N, LMA and in each of the parameter estimates of the Mitscherlich and Michaelis–Menten functions. However, the differing growth environments induced only small (although significant) changes in the allometric relationships linking N and LMA to the parameters of the two functions. As a result, 88 % (Mitcherlich) and 89 % (Michaelis–Menten) of the observed net photosynthetic rates over the full range of light intensities (0–700 µmol m?2 s?1 PAR) and across all four growth environments could be predicted using only N and LMA using the same allometric relations. Conclusions These results suggest the possibility of predicting net photosynthetic rates in nature across species over the full range of light intensities using readily available data. PMID:22442344

  1. Overcoming the anaerobic hurdle in phenotypic microarrays: Generation and visualization of growth curve data for Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Sharon Borglin; Dominique Joyner; Janet Jacobsen; Aindrila Mukhopadhyay; Terry C. Hazen

    2009-01-01

    Growing anaerobic microorganisms in phenotypic microarrays (PM) and 96-well microtiter plates is an emerging technology that allows high throughput survey of the growth and physiology and\\/or phenotype of cultivable microorganisms. For non-model bacteria, a method for phenotypic analysis is invaluable, not only to serve as a starting point for further evaluation, but also to provide a broad understanding of the

  2. Quorum sensing and bacterial cooperation Anand Pai

    E-print Network

    Wolpert, Robert L

    Quorum sensing and bacterial cooperation Anand Pai CTMS Graduate Fellow of cooperation benefits bacteria. Fig. 1: Schematic of bacterial communication The equation depicts the dynamics of population density N under logistic growth. Its

  3. SIMPLAS: A Simulation of Bacterial Plasmid Maintenance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dunn, A.; And Others

    1988-01-01

    This article describes a computer simulation of bacterial physiology during growth in a chemostat. The program was designed to help students to appreciate and understand the related effects of parameters which influence plasmid persistence in bacterial populations. (CW)

  4. Marine Heterotrophic Bacteria in Continuous Culture, the Bacterial Carbon Growth Efficiency, and Mineralization at Excess Substrate and Different Temperatures

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Alejandrina Jiménez-Mercado; Ramón Cajal-Medrano; Helmut Maske

    2007-01-01

    To model the physiological potential of marine heterotrophic bacteria, their role in the food web, and in the biogeochemical\\u000a carbon cycle, we need to know their growth efficiency response within a matrix of different temperatures and degrees of organic\\u000a substrate limitation. In this work, we present one part of this matrix, the carbon growth efficiencies of marine bacteria\\u000a under different

  5. An In Vitro Study on Bacterial Growth Interactions and Intestinal Epithelial Cell Adhesion Characteristics of Probiotic Combinations

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Mahta MoussaviMichelle; Michelle Catherine Adams

    2010-01-01

    The aims of this study were to examine long-term growth interactions of five probiotic strains (Lactobacillus casei 01, Lactobacillus plantarum HA8, Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG, Lactobacillus reuteri ATCC 55730 and Bifidobacterium lactis Bb12) either alone or in combination with Propionibacterium jensenii 702 in a co-culture system and to determine their adhesion ability to human colon adenocarcinoma cell line Caco-2. Growth\\u000a patterns

  6. The metabolism of neonicotinoid insecticide thiamethoxam by soil enrichment cultures, and the bacterial diversity and plant growth-promoting properties of the cultured isolates.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Guang-Can; Wang, Ying; Ma, Yuan; Zhai, Shan; Zhou, Ling-Yan; Dai, Yi-Jun; Yuan, Sheng

    2014-06-01

    A soil enrichment culture (SEC) rapidly degraded 96% of 200 mg L(-1) neonicotinoid insecticide thiamethoxam (TMX) in MSM broth within 30 d; therefore, its metabolic pathway of TMX, bacterial diversity and plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR) activities of the cultured isolates were studied. The SEC transformed TMX via the nitro reduction pathway to form nitrso, urea metabolites and via cleavage of the oxadiazine cycle to form a new metabolite, hydroxyl CLO-tri. In addition, 16S rRNA gene-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis analysis revealed that uncultured rhizobacteria are predominant in the SEC broth and that 77.8% of the identified bacteria belonged to uncultured bacteria. A total of 31 cultured bacterial strains including six genera (Achromobacter, Agromyces, Ensifer, Mesorhizobium, Microbacterium and Pseudoxanthomonas) were isolated from the SEC broth. The 12 strains of Ensifer adhaerens have the ability to degrade TMX. All six selected bacteria showed PGPR activities. E. adhaerens TMX-23 and Agromyces mediolanus TMX-25 produced indole-3-acetic acid, whereas E. adhaerens TMX-23 and Mesorhizobium alhagi TMX-36 are N2-fixing bacteria. The six-isolated microbes were tolerant to 200 mg L(-1) TMX, and the growth of E. adhaerens was significantly enhanced by TMX, whereas that of Achromobacter sp. TMX-5 and Microbacterium sp.TMX-6 were enhanced slightly. The present study will help to explain the fate of TMX in the environment and its microbial degradation mechanism, as well as to facilitate future investigations of the mechanism through which TMX enhances plant vigor. PMID:24762175

  7. Stimulated Bacterial Growth under Elevated pCO2: Results from an Off-Shore Mesocosm Study

    PubMed Central

    Endres, Sonja; Galgani, Luisa; Riebesell, Ulf; Schulz, Kai-Georg; Engel, Anja

    2014-01-01

    Marine bacteria are the main consumers of freshly produced organic matter. Many enzymatic processes involved in the bacterial digestion of organic compounds were shown to be pH sensitive in previous studies. Due to the continuous rise in atmospheric CO2 concentration, seawater pH is presently decreasing at a rate unprecedented during the last 300 million years but the consequences for microbial physiology, organic matter cycling and marine biogeochemistry are still unresolved. We studied the effects of elevated seawater pCO2 on a natural plankton community during a large-scale mesocosm study in a Norwegian fjord. Nine Kiel Off-Shore Mesocosms for Future Ocean Simulations (KOSMOS) were adjusted to different pCO2 levels ranging initially from ca. 280 to 3000 µatm and sampled every second day for 34 days. The first phytoplankton bloom developed around day 5. On day 14, inorganic nutrients were added to the enclosed, nutrient-poor waters to stimulate a second phytoplankton bloom, which occurred around day 20. Our results indicate that marine bacteria benefit directly and indirectly from decreasing seawater pH. During the first phytoplankton bloom, 5–10% more transparent exopolymer particles were formed in the high pCO2 mesocosms. Simultaneously, the efficiency of the protein-degrading enzyme leucine aminopeptidase increased with decreasing pH resulting in up to three times higher values in the highest pCO2/lowest pH mesocosm compared to the controls. In general, total and cell-specific aminopeptidase activities were elevated under low pH conditions. The combination of enhanced enzymatic hydrolysis of organic matter and increased availability of gel particles as substrate supported up to 28% higher bacterial abundance in the high pCO2 treatments. We conclude that ocean acidification has the potential to stimulate the bacterial community and facilitate the microbial recycling of freshly produced organic matter, thus strengthening the role of the microbial loop in the surface ocean. PMID:24941307

  8. Curved Mirrors

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Michael Horton

    2009-05-30

    This inquiry activity will be used before discussing curved mirrors in class. Students will discover how curved mirrors act and how the size and the orientation of the image are related to the distance from the mirror. Ray diagrams for curved mirrors are

  9. A Hidden Markov Model for identifying essential and growth-defect regions in bacterial genomes from transposon insertion sequencing data

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Knowledge of which genes are essential to the survival of an organism is critical to understanding the function of genes, and for the identification of potential drug targets for antimicrobial treatment. Previous statistical methods for assessing essentiality based on sequencing of tranposon libraries have usually limited their assessment to strict 'essential’ or 'non-essential’ categories. However, this binary view of essentiality does not accurately represent the more nuanced ways the growth of an organism might be affected by the disruption of its genes. In addition, these methods often limit their analysis to open-reading frames. We propose a novel method for analyzing sequence data from transposon mutant libraries using a Hidden Markov Model (HMM), along with formulas to adapt the parameters of the model to different datasets for robustness. This approach allows for the clustering of insertion sites into distinct regions of essentiality across the entire genome in a statistically rigorous manner, while also allowing for the detection of growth-defect and growth-advantage regions. Results We evaluate the performance of a 4-state HMM on a sequence dataset of M. tuberculosis transposon mutants. We also test the HMM on several synthetic datasets representing different levels of transposon insertion density and sequence coverage. We show that the HMM produces results that are highly correlated with previous assignments of essentiality for this organism. We also show that it detects growth-defect and growth-advantage genes previously shown to impair or enhance growth when disrupted. Conclusions A 4-state HMM provides an improved way of analyzing Tn-seq data and assessing different levels of essentiality that enables not only the characterization of essential and non-essential genes, but also genes whose disruption leads to impairment (or enhancement) of growth. PMID:24103077

  10. Parametric Curves parametric curves (Splines)

    E-print Network

    Treuille, Adrien

    curves (Splines) · polygonal meshes #12;2 Roller coaster · Next programming assignment involves creating a 3D roller coaster animation · We must model the 3D curve describing the roller coaster, but how

  11. Bacterial Sialidase

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    Data shows that elevated sialidase in bacterial vaginosis patients correlates to premature births in women. Bacterial sialidase also plays a significant role in the unusual colonization of Pseudomonas aeruginosa in cystic fibrosis patients. Crystals of Salmonella sialidase have been reproduced and are used for studying the inhibitor-enzyme complexes. These inhibitors may also be used to inhibit a trans-sialidase of Trypanosome cruzi, a very similar enzyme to bacterial sialidase, therefore preventing T. cruzi infection, the causitive agent of Chagas' disease. The Center for Macromolecular Crystallography suggests that inhibitors of bacterial sialidases can be used as prophylactic drugs to prevent bacterial infections in these critical cases.

  12. Fungal biodegradation of dibutyl phthalate and toxicity of its breakdown products on the basis of fungal and bacterial growth.

    PubMed

    Ahuactzin-Pérez, M; Torres, J L; Rodríguez-Pastrana, B R; Soriano-Santos, J; Díaz-Godínez, G; Díaz, R; Tlecuitl-Beristain, S; Sánchez, C

    2014-11-01

    Phthalates are esters of phthalic acid that give flexibility to polyvinyl chloride. Diverse studies have reported that these compounds might be carcinogenic, mutagenic and/or teratogenic. Radial growth rate, biomass, hyphal thickness of Neurospora sitophyla, Trichoderma harzianum and Aspergillus niger, grown in two different concentrations of dibutyl phthalate (DBP) (500 and 1,000 mg/l) in agar and in submerged fermentation were studied. The inhibitory concentration (IC50) and the constant of biodegradation of dibutyl phthalate in Escherichia coli cultures were used to evaluate toxicity. The radial growth rate and thickness of the hypha were positively correlated with the concentration of phthalate. The pH of the cultures decreased as the fermentation proceeded. It is shown that these fungi are able to degrade DBP to non-toxic compounds and that these can be used as sole carbon and energy sources by this bacterium. It is demonstrated that the biodegradation of the DBP is directly correlated with the IC50. This is the first study that reports a method to determine the biodegradation of DBP on the basis of the IC50 and fungal growth, and the effect of this phthalate on the growth and thickness of hyphae of filamentous fungi in agar and in submerged fermentation. PMID:25063688

  13. Overcoming the anaerobic hurdle in phenotypic microarrays: Generation andvisualization of growth curve data for Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough

    SciTech Connect

    Borglin, Sharon E; Joyner, Dominique; Jacobsen, Janet; Mukhopadhyay, Aindrila; Hazen, Terry C.

    2008-10-04

    Growing anaerobic microorganisms in phenotypic microarrays (PM) and 96-well microtiter plates is an emerging technology that allows high throughput survey of the growth and physiology and/or phenotype of cultivable microorganisms. For non-model bacteria, a method for phenotypic analysis is invaluable, not only to serve as a starting point for further evaluation, but also to provide a broad understanding of the physiology of an uncharacterized wild-type organism or the physiology/phenotype of a newly created mutant of that organism. Given recent advances in genetic characterization and targeted mutations to elucidate genetic networks and metabolic pathways, high-throughput methods for determining phenotypic differences are essential. Here we outline challenges presented in studying the physiology and phenotype of a sulfate reducing anaerobic delta proteobacterium, Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough. Modifications of the commercially available OmniLog(TM) system (Hayward, CA) for experimental setup, and configuration, as well as considerations in PM data analysis are presented. Also highlighted here is data viewing software that enables users to view and compare multiple PM data sets. The PM method promises to be a valuable strategy in our systems biology approach to D. vulgaris studies and is readily applicable to other anaerobic and aerobic bacteria.

  14. SIMULATION OF SINGLE-SPECIES BACTERIAL-BIOFILM GROWTH USING THE GLAZIER-GRANER-HOGEWEG MODEL AND THE COMPUCELL3D MODELING ENVIRONMENT

    PubMed Central

    Pop?awski, Nikodem J.; Shirinifard, Abbas; Swat, Maciej; Glazier, James A.

    2008-01-01

    The CompuCell3D modeling environment provides a convenient platform for biofilm simulations using the Glazier-Graner-Hogeweg (GGH) model, a cell-oriented framework designed to simulate growth and pattern formation due to biological cells’ behaviors. We show how to develop such a simulation, based on the hybrid (continuum-discrete) model of Picioreanu, van Loosdrecht, and Heijnen (PLH), simulate the growth of a single-species bacterial biofilm, and study the roles of cell-cell and cell-field interactions in determining biofilm morphology. In our simulations, which generalize the PLH model by treating cells as spatially extended, deformable bodies, differential adhesion between cells, and their competition for a substrate (nutrient), suffice to produce a fingering instability that generates the finger shapes of biofilms. Our results agree with most features of the PLH model, although our inclusion of cell adhesion, which is difficult to implement using other modeling approaches, results in slightly different patterns. Our simulations thus provide the groundwork for simulations of medically and industrially important multispecies biofilms. PMID:18613738

  15. Growth of Tl 2Ba 2CaCu 2O 8 superconducting thin films on curved substrates for metamaterials applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Speller, S. C.; Dinner, R. B.; Grovenor, C. R. M.

    2008-08-01

    Recent developments in the field of magnetic metamaterials have shown that coupled resonator structures can manipulate magnetic fields on a scale shorter than the wavelength of the electromagnetic radiation [E. Shamonina, V.A. Kalinin, K.H. Ringhofer, L. Solymar, J. Appl. Phys. 92 (10) (2002) 6252]. Major improvements in the sensitivity of such devices could be achieved by fabricating the resonating elements from high temperature superconducting (HTS) films on appropriate dielectric substrates. In order to produce a stack of superconducting/dielectric resonator structures, the ideal method involves patterning them into an HTS film grown on the curved surface of a dielectric cylinder. We report here our initial attempts at the growth of Tl 2Ba 2CaCu 2O 8 (Tl-2212) thin films on the surface of LaAlO 3 and MgO single-crystal cylinders. We have found that Tl-2212 thin films grow epitaxially on LaAlO 3 cylinders with Tl-2212 [0 0 1] aligned with the closest LaAlO 3 pseudocubic <1 0 0> direction, resulting in abrupt changes in Tl-2212 plate orientation at four positions around the cylinder. In contrast, Tl-2212 films grow smoothly on MgO cylinders, with Tl-2212 [0 0 1] aligned roughly parallel to the surface normal at all positions around the cylinder. This smooth growth on MgO leads to higher critical current values than epitaxial growth, making HTS on MgO a promising candidate for metamaterial device applications.

  16. Quantum Curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwarz, Albert

    2015-02-01

    One says that a pair (P, Q) of ordinary differential operators specify a quantum curve if {[P,Q]=hbar} . If a pair of difference operators (K, L) obey the relation KL = q LK, where {q =e^{hbar}} , we say that they specify a discrete quantum curve. This terminology is prompted by well known results about commuting differential and difference operators, relating pairs of such operators with pairs of meromorphic functions on algebraic curves obeying some conditions. The goal of this paper is to study the moduli spaces of quantum curves. We will relate the moduli spaces for different {hbar} . We will show how to quantize a pair of commuting differential or difference operators (i.e., to construct the corresponding quantum curve or discrete quantum curve).

  17. Novel Bacterial and Archaeal Lineages from an In Situ Growth Chamber Deployed at a Mid-Atlantic Ridge Hydrothermal Vent

    Microsoft Academic Search

    ANNA-LOUISE REYSENBACH; KRISTA LONGNECKER; JULIE KIRSHTEIN

    2000-01-01

    The phylogenetic diversity was determined for a microbial community obtained from an in situ growth chamber placed on a deep-sea hydrothermal vent on the Mid-Atlantic Ridge (23°22* N, 44°57* W). The chamber was deployed for 5 days, and the temperature within the chamber gradually decreased from 70 to 20°C. Upon retrieval of the chamber, the DNA was extracted and the

  18. Comparative study of wild and transformed salt tolerant bacterial strains on Triticum aestivum growth under salt stress

    PubMed Central

    Afrasayab, Shazia; Faisal, Muhammad; Hasnain, Shahida

    2010-01-01

    Eleven salt tolerant bacteria isolated from different sources (soil, plants) and their transformed strains were used to study their influence on Triticum aestivum var. Inqlab-91 growth under salt (100 mM NaCl) stress. Salt stress caused reduction in germination (19.4%), seedling growth (46%) and fresh weight (39%) in non-inoculated plants. In general, both wild and transformed strains stimulated germination, seedling growth and fresh weight in salt free and salt stressed conditions. At 100 mM NaCl, Staphylococcus xylosus ST-1 caused 25% increments in seedling length over respective control. Soluble protein content significantly enhanced (49%) under salt stress as compared to salt free control. At 100 mM NaCl parental strain PT-5 resulted about 32% enhancement in protein content over respective control treatment. Salt stress induced the promotion of auxin content in seedlings. Overall, Bacillus subtilis HAa2 and transformed E. coli -SP-7-T, caused 33% and 30% increases in auxin content, respectively, were recorded under salt stress in comparison to control. PMID:24031574

  19. A Novel Mouse Model of Soft-Tissue Infection Using Bioluminescence Imaging Allows Noninvasive, Real-Time Monitoring of Bacterial Growth

    PubMed Central

    Yoshioka, Kenji; Ishii, Ken; Kuramoto, Tetsuya; Nagai, Shigenori; Funao, Haruki; Ishihama, Hiroko; Shiono, Yuta; Sasaki, Aya; Aizawa, Mamoru; Okada, Yasunori; Koyasu, Shigeo; Toyama, Yoshiaki; Matsumoto, Morio

    2014-01-01

    Musculoskeletal infections, including surgical-site and implant-associated infections, often cause progressive inflammation and destroy areas of the soft tissue. Treating infections, especially those caused by multi-antibiotic resistant bacteria such as methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) remains a challenge. Although there are a few animal models that enable the quantitative evaluation of infection in soft tissues, these models are not always reproducible or sustainable. Here, we successfully established a real-time, in vivo, quantitative mouse model of soft-tissue infection in the superficial gluteus muscle (SGM) using bioluminescence imaging. A bioluminescent strain of MRSA was inoculated into the SGM of BALB/c adult male mice, followed by sequential measurement of bacterial photon intensity and serological and histological analyses of the mice. The mean photon intensity in the mice peaked immediately after inoculation and remained stable until day 28. The serum levels of interleukin-6, interleukin-1 and C-reactive protein at 12 hours after inoculation were significantly higher than those prior to inoculation, and the C-reactive protein remained significantly elevated until day 21. Histological analyses showed marked neutrophil infiltration and abscesses containing necrotic and fibrous tissues in the SGM. With this SGM mouse model, we successfully visualized and quantified stable bacterial growth over an extended period of time with bioluminescence imaging, which allowed us to monitor the process of infection without euthanizing the experimental animals. This model is applicable to in vivo evaluations of the long-term efficacy of novel antibiotics or antibacterial implants. PMID:25184249

  20. Bacterial vaginosis

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jane R. Schwebke

    2000-01-01

    Bacterial vaginosis, the most prevalent cause of vaginal discharge in the United States, is characterized microbiologically\\u000a by a shift in the vagina away from a lactobacillus-predominant flora and toward a predominantly anaerobic milieu. The cause\\u000a of bacterial vaginosis is unknown, but the epidemiology of the syndrome suggests that it is sexually associated. Bacterial\\u000a vaginosis has been associated with various complications,

  1. Adaptive acid tolerance response of Vibrio parahaemolyticus as affected by acid adaptation conditions, growth phase, and bacterial strains.

    PubMed

    Chiang, Ming-Lun; Chou, Cheng-Chun; Chen, Hsi-Chia; Tseng, Yu-Ting; Chen, Ming-Ju

    2012-08-01

    Vibrio parahaemolyticus strain 690 was isolated from gastroenteritis patients. Its thermal and ethanol stress responses have been reported in our previous studies. In this study, we further investigated the effects of various acid adaptation conditions including pH (5.0-6.0) and time (30-90?min) on the acid tolerance in different growth phases of V. parahaemolyticus 690. Additionally, the adaptive acid tolerance among different V. parahaemolyticus strains was compared. Results indicated that the acid tolerance of V. parahaemolyticus 690 was significantly increased after acid adaptation at pH 5.5 and 6.0 for 30-90?min. Among the various acid adaptation conditions examined, V. parahaemolyticus 690 acid-adapted at pH 5.5 for 90?min exhibited the highest acid tolerance. The acid adaptation also influenced the acid tolerance of V. parahaemolyticus 690 in different growth phases with late-exponential phase demonstrating the greatest acid tolerance response (ATR) than other phases. Additionally, the results also showed that the induction of adaptive ATR varied with different strains of V. parahaemolyticus. An increase in acid tolerance of V. parahaemolyticus was observed after prior acid adaptation in five strains (556, 690, BCRC 13023, BCRC 13025, and BCRC 12864), but not in strains 405 and BCRC 12863. PMID:22827515

  2. Social dynamics of health inequalities: a growth curve analysis of aging and self assessed health in the British household panel survey 1991–2001

    PubMed Central

    Sacker, A.; Clarke, P.; Wiggins, R.; Bartley, M.

    2005-01-01

    Objectives: To study how social inequalities change as people age, this paper presents a growth curve model of self assessed health, which accommodates changes in occupational class and individual health with age. Design: Nationally representative interview based longitudinal survey of adults in Great Britain. Setting: Representative members of private households of Great Britain in 1991. Participants: Survey respondents (n = 6705), aged 21–59 years in 1991 and followed up annually until 2001. Main outcome measure: Self assessed health. Results: On average, self assessed health declines slowly from early adulthood to retirement age. No significant class differences in health were observed at age 21. Health inequalities emerged later in life with the gap between mean levels of self assessed health of those in managerial and professional occupations and routine occupations widening approaching retirement. Individual variability in health trajectories increased between ages 40 and 59 years so that this widening of mean differences between occupational classes was not significant. When the analysis is confined to people whose occupational class remained constant over time, a far greater difference in health trajectories between occupational classes was seen. Conclusions: The understanding of social inequalities in health at the population level is enriched by an analysis of individual variation in age related declines by social position. PMID:15911646

  3. On the Perils of Curve-of-Growth Analysis: Systematic Abundance Underestimates for the Gas in Gamma-Ray Burst Host Galaxies

    E-print Network

    Jason X. Prochaska

    2006-06-22

    We examine the practice of deriving interstellar medium (ISM) abundances from low-resolution spectroscopy of GRB afterglows. We argue that the multi-ion single-component curve-of-growth analysis technique systematically underestimates the column densities of the metal-line profiles commonly observed for GRB. This systematic underestimate is accentuated by the fact that many GRB line-profiles (e.g. GRB 050730, GRB 050820, GRB 051111) are comprised of `clouds' with a bi-modal distribution of column density. Such line-profiles may be characteristic of a sightline which penetrates both a high density star-forming region and more distant, ambient ISM material. Our analysis suggests that the majority of abundances reported in the literature are systematically underestimates and that the reported errors are frequently over-optimistic. Further, we demonstrate that one cannot even report precise relative abundances with confidence. The implications are profound for our current understanding on the metallicity, dust-to-gas ratio, and chemical abundances of the ISM in GRB host galaxies. For example, we argue that all but a few sightlines allow for the gas to have at least solar metallicity. Finally, we suggests new approaches for constraining the abundances.

  4. Using multilevel growth curve modeling to examine emotional modulation of temporal summation of pain (TS-pain) and the nociceptive flexion reflex (TS-NFR).

    PubMed

    Rhudy, Jamie L; Martin, Satin L; Terry, Ellen L; Delventura, Jennifer L; Kerr, Kara L; Palit, Shreela

    2012-11-01

    Emotion can modulate pain and spinal nociception, and correlational data suggest that cognitive-emotional processes can facilitate wind-up-like phenomena (ie, temporal summation of pain). However, there have been no experimental studies that manipulated emotion to determine whether within-subject changes in emotion influence temporal summation of pain (TS-pain) and the nociceptive flexion reflex (TS-NFR, a physiological measure of spinal nociception). The present study presented a series of emotionally charged pictures (mutilation, neutral, erotic) during which electric stimuli at 2 Hz were delivered to the sural nerve to evoke TS-pain and TS-NFR. Participants (n=46 healthy; 32 female) were asked to rate their emotional reactions to pictures as a manipulation check. Pain outcomes were analyzed using statistically powerful multilevel growth curve models. Results indicated that emotional state was effectively manipulated. Further, emotion modulated the overall level of pain and NFR; pain and NFR were highest during mutilation and lowest during erotic pictures. Although pain and NFR both summated in response to the 2-Hz stimulation series, the magnitude of pain summation (TS-pain) and NFR summation (TS-NFR) was not modulated by picture-viewing. These results imply that, at least in healthy humans, within-subject changes in emotions do not promote central sensitization via amplification of temporal summation. However, future studies are needed to determine whether these findings generalize to clinical populations (eg, chronic pain). PMID:22920754

  5. Spectrophotometric Analysis of Bacterial Contamination in Water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spence, Sarah

    2010-10-01

    Bacterial contamination in water is a hazard everywhere from wells in third world countries to reclaimed water on the International Space Station. Traditional lab techniques detect bacteria in approximately 48 hours, while optical techniques can detect bacteria in as little as six hours. The Beer-Lambert Law states that absorption of light is directly correlated to the concentration of a solute in a solution. By passing light through a sample of contaminated broth, the transmittance and in turn the absorption of the solution can be observed. The transmittance data alone follows the inverse of the bacterial growth curve. A sharp drop in transmittance represents the exponential growth phase of bacteria. This drop is observed between six and eight hours following the inoculation of the laboratory samples with Escherichia coli, using both a standard lab monochrometer as well as a device designed for this study. The Optical Bacteria Detection (OBD) was designed to be effective and inexpensive, with a limited use of consumables and minimum waste generation. The OBD device uses a phototransistor as a sensor and an LED with wavelength of approximately 500 nm. Data from the monochrometer shows the sudden decrease in transmittance is most pronounced at this wavelength. The OBD can be tuned to test for other bacteria, such as Salmonella and Vibrio fisheri by changing the wavelength of the LED light source.

  6. Physics of Bacterial Morphogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Sean X.; Jiang, Hongyuan

    2011-01-01

    Summary: Bacterial cells utilize three-dimensional (3D) protein assemblies to perform important cellular functions such as growth, division, chemoreception, and motility. These assemblies are composed of mechanoproteins that can mechanically deform and exert force. Sometimes, small-nucleotide hydrolysis is coupled to mechanical deformations. In this review, we describe the general principle for an understanding of the coupling of mechanics with chemistry in mechanochemical systems. We apply this principle to understand bacterial cell shape and morphogenesis and how mechanical forces can influence peptidoglycan cell wall growth. We review a model that can potentially reconcile the growth dynamics of the cell wall with the role of cytoskeletal proteins such as MreB and crescentin. We also review the application of mechanochemical principles to understand the assembly and constriction of the FtsZ ring. A number of potential mechanisms are proposed, and important questions are discussed. PMID:22126993

  7. Light Curves

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    2013-02-12

    This is a game about light curves that will test your ability to figure out things about an asteroid from just a graph of its brightness. Astronomers use telescopes to collect light curves - measurements of the brightness of distant asteroids over time. It is part of the Killer Asteroids Web Site. The site also features a background overview of the differences between asteroids and comets, information on different types of asteroids (rubble piles vs monoliths), a discussion of how at risk Earth really is to an asteroid or comet impact, and background information on light curves.

  8. Changes in Bacterial Growth Rate Govern Expression of the Borrelia burgdorferi OspC and Erp Infection-Associated Surface Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Jutras, Brandon L.; Chenail, Alicia M.

    2013-01-01

    The Lyme disease spirochete controls production of its OspC and Erp outer surface proteins, repressing protein synthesis during colonization of vector ticks but increasing expression when those ticks feed on vertebrate hosts. Early studies found that the synthesis of OspC and Erps can be stimulated in culture by shifting the temperature from 23°C to 34°C, leading to a hypothesis that Borrelia burgdorferi senses environmental temperature to determine its location in the tick-mammal infectious cycle. However, borreliae cultured at 34°C divide several times faster than do those cultured at 23°C. We developed methods that disassociate bacterial growth rate and temperature, allowing a separate evaluation of each factor's impacts on B. burgdorferi gene and protein expression. Altogether, the data support a new paradigm that B. burgdorferi actually responds to changes in its own replication rate, not temperature per se, as the impetus to increase the expression of the OspC and Erp infection-associated proteins. PMID:23222718

  9. Bacterial vaginosis

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jeff Wang

    2000-01-01

    Bacterial vaginosis is the most common cause of vaginitis, affecting over 3 million women in the United States annually. Depopulation of lactobacilli from the normal vaginal flora and overgrowth of Gardnerella vaginalis and other anaerobic species are the presumed etiology. To date, no scientific evidence shows that bacterial vaginosis is a sexually transmitted disease. Malodorous vaginal discharge is the most

  10. Role of p38 MAP kinase and transforming growth factor-beta signaling in transepithelial migration of invasive bacterial pathogens.

    PubMed

    Beisswenger, Christoph; Coyne, Carolyn B; Shchepetov, Mikhail; Weiser, Jeffrey N

    2007-09-28

    Streptococcus pneumoniae and Haemophilus influenzae are human pathogens that often asymptomatically colonize the mucosal surface of the upper respiratory tract, but also occasionally cause invasive disease. The ability of these species to traverse the epithelium of the airway mucosa was modeled in vitro using polarized respiratory epithelial cells in culture. Migration across the epithelial barrier was preceded by loss of transepithelial resistance. Membrane products of S. pneumoniae that included lipoteichoic acid induced disruption of the epithelial barrier in a Toll-like receptor 2-dependent manner. This result correlates with a recent genetic study that associates increased TLR2 signaling with increased rates of invasive pneumococcal disease in humans. Loss of transepithelial resistance by the TLR2 ligand correlated with activation of p38 MAP kinase and transforming growth factor (TGF)-beta signaling. Activation of p38 MAPK and TGF-beta signaling in epithelial cells upon nasal infection with S. pneumoniae was also demonstrated in vivo. Inhibition of either p38 MAPK or TGF-beta signaling was sufficient to inhibit the migration of S. pneumoniae or H. influenzae. Our data shows that diverse bacteria utilize common mechanisms, including MAPK and TGF-beta signaling pathways to disrupt epithelial barriers and promote invasion. PMID:17650505

  11. High-pressure-temperature gradient instrument: use for determining the temperature and pressure limits of bacterial growth.

    PubMed Central

    Yayanos, A A; van Boxtel, R; Dietz, A S

    1984-01-01

    A pressurized temperature gradient instrument allowed a synoptic determination of the effects of temperature and pressure on the reproduction of bacteria. The instrument consisted of eight pressure vessels housed parallel to each other in an insulated aluminum block in which a linear temperature gradient was supported. For a given experiment, eight pressures between 1 and 1,100 bars were chosen; the linear temperature gradient was established over an interval within -20 to 100 degrees C. Pure cultures and natural populations were studied in liquid or solid medium either in short (ca. 2-cm) culture tubes or in long (76.2-cm) glass capillaries. In the case of a pure culture, experiments with the pressurized temperature gradient instrument determined values of temperature and pressure that bounded its growth. Feasibility experiments with mixed populations of bacteria from water samples from a shallow depth of the sea showed that the instrument may be useful in identifying the extent to which a natural population is adapted to the temperatures and pressures at the locale of origin of the sample. Additional conceived uses of the instrument included synoptic determinations of cell functions other than reproduction and of biochemical activities. Images PMID:6391378

  12. Simplified Capacitance Monitoring for the Determination of Campylobacter spp. Growth Rates

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Capacitance monitoring is commonly used as an efficient means to measure growth curves of bacterial pathogens. However, the use of capacitance monitoring with Campylobacter spp. was previously determined difficult due to the complexity of the required media. We investigated capacitance monitoring ...

  13. Staphylococcus epidermidis SrrAB Regulates Bacterial Growth and Biofilm Formation Differently under Oxic and Microaerobic Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Youcong; Wu, Yang; Zhu, Tao; Han, Haiyan; Liu, Huayong; Xu, Tao; Francois, Patrice; Fischer, Adrien; Bai, Li; Götz, Friedrich

    2014-01-01

    SrrAB expression in Staphylococcus epidermidis strain 1457 (SE1457) was upregulated during a shift from oxic to microaerobic conditions. An srrA deletion (?srrA) mutant was constructed for studying the regulatory function of SrrAB. The deletion resulted in retarded growth and abolished biofilm formation both in vitro and in vivo and under both oxic and microaerobic conditions. Associated with the reduced biofilm formation, the ?srrA mutant produced much less polysaccharide intercellular adhesion (PIA) and showed decreased initial adherence capacity. Microarray analysis showed that the srrA mutation affected transcription of 230 genes under microaerobic conditions, and 51 genes under oxic conditions. Quantitative real-time PCR confirmed this observation and showed downregulation of genes involved in maintaining the electron transport chain by supporting cytochrome and quinol-oxidase assembly (e.g., qoxB and ctaA) and in anaerobic metabolism (e.g., pflBA and nrdD). In the ?srrA mutant, the expression of the biofilm formation-related gene icaR was upregulated under oxic conditions and downregulated under microaerobic conditions, whereas icaA was downregulated under both conditions. An electrophoretic mobility shift assay further revealed that phosphorylated SrrA bound to the promoter regions of icaR, icaA, qoxB, and pflBA, as well as its own promoter region. These findings demonstrate that in S. epidermidis SrrAB is an autoregulator and regulates biofilm formation in an ica-dependent manner. Under oxic conditions, SrrAB modulates electron transport chain activity by positively regulating qoxBACD transcription. Under microaerobic conditions, it regulates fermentation processes and DNA synthesis by modulating the expression of both the pfl operon and nrdDG. PMID:25404696

  14. Human Milk Oligosaccharides Promote the Growth of Staphylococci

    PubMed Central

    Hunt, K. M.; Preuss, J.; Nissan, C.; Davlin, C. A.; Williams, J. E.; Shafii, B.; Richardson, A. D.; McGuire, M. K.; Bode, L.

    2012-01-01

    Human milk oligosaccharides (HMO), which constitute a major component of human milk, promote the growth of particular bacterial species in the infant's gastrointestinal tract. We hypothesized that HMO also interact with the bacterial communities present in human milk. To test this hypothesis, two experiments were conducted. First, milk samples were collected from healthy women (n = 16); culture-independent analysis of the bacterial communities was performed, HMO content was analyzed, and the relation between these factors was investigated. A positive correlation was observed between the relative abundance of Staphylococcus and total HMO content (r = 0.66). In a follow-up study, we conducted a series of in vitro growth curve experiments utilizing Staphylococcus aureus or Staphylococcus epidermidis and HMO isolated from human milk. HMO exhibited stimulatory effects on bacterial growth under various nutritional conditions. Analysis of culture supernatants from these experiments revealed that HMO did not measurably disappear from the culture medium, indicating that the growth-enhancing effects were not a result of bacterial metabolism of the HMO. Instead, stimulation of growth caused greater utilization of amino acids in minimal medium. Collectively, the data provide evidence that HMO may promote the growth of Staphylococcus species in the lactating mammary gland. PMID:22562995

  15. Curves of growth of spectral lines emitted by a laser-induced plasma: influence of the temporal evolution and spatial inhomogeneity of the plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aguilera, J. A.; Bengoechea, J.; Aragón, C.

    2003-02-01

    The curves of growth (COG) of five Fe I lines emitted from a laser-induced plasma, generated with Fe-Ni alloys in air at atmospheric pressure, have been investigated. Spectral lines with different energy levels and line widths, emitted with a broad range of optical depths, have been included in the study in order to check the validity of theoretical models proposed for COG generation, based in the radiative transfer within a plasma in local thermodynamic equilibrium. The COGs have been measured at time windows of 4-5 ?s and 15-18 ?s. The Stark widths of the Fe I lines have been obtained, and the line widths have been determined by measuring the plasma electron density at the time windows selected. It is shown that at a time window of 4-5 ?s, the inhomogeneity of the plasma magnitudes has an important influence on the COGs of intense lines. For this time window, a two-region model of the plasma has been used to generate theoretical COGs that describe satisfactorily the experimental curves of all the lines using a single set of plasma parameters. The results reveal the existence of considerable gradients between the inner and the outer plasma regions in the temperature (9400-7800 K) and in the density of Fe atoms (4×10 16-0.02×10 16 cm -3 for a sample with 100% Fe). On the contrary, at the time window 15-18 ?s, at which the plasma has suffered most of its expansion and cooling process, the COGs of all the lines may be described by a single-region model, corresponding to a plasma with uniform temperature (6700 K) and density of Fe atoms (0.06×10 16 cm -3 for a sample with 100% Fe). It is also shown that at initial times, the plasma inhomogeneity has an important effect in the line profiles of intense spectral lines, which are described by using the two-region model of the laser-induced plasma.

  16. Protective effect of Growth Hormone-Releasing Hormone agonist in bacterial toxin-induced pulmonary barrier dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Czikora, Istvan; Sridhar, Supriya; Gorshkov, Boris; Alieva, Irina B.; Kasa, Anita; Gonzales, Joyce; Potapenko, Olena; Umapathy, Nagavedi S.; Pillich, Helena; Rick, Ferenc G.; Block, Norman L.; Verin, Alexander D.; Chakraborty, Trinad; Matthay, Michael A.; Schally, Andrew V.; Lucas, Rudolf

    2014-01-01

    Rationale: Antibiotic treatment of patients infected with G? or G+ bacteria promotes release of the toxins lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and pneumolysin (PLY) in their lungs. Growth Hormone-releasing Hormone (GHRH) agonist JI-34 protects human lung microvascular endothelial cells (HL-MVEC), expressing splice variant 1 (SV-1) of the receptor, from PLY-induced barrier dysfunction. We investigated whether JI-34 also blunts LPS-induced hyperpermeability. Since GHRH receptor (GHRH-R) signaling can potentially stimulate both cAMP-dependent barrier-protective pathways as well as barrier-disruptive protein kinase C pathways, we studied their interaction in GHRH agonist-treated HL-MVEC, in the presence of PLY, by means of siRNA-mediated protein kinase A (PKA) depletion. Methods: Barrier function measurements were done in HL-MVEC monolayers using Electrical Cell substrate Impedance Sensing (ECIS) and VE-cadherin expression by Western blotting. Capillary leak was assessed by Evans Blue dye (EBD) incorporation. Cytokine generation in broncho-alveolar lavage fluid (BALF) was measured by multiplex analysis. PKA and PKC-? activity were assessed by Western blotting. Results: GHRH agonist JI-34 significantly blunts LPS-induced barrier dysfunction, at least in part by preserving VE-cadherin expression, while not affecting inflammation. In addition to activating PKA, GHRH agonist also increases PKC-? activity in PLY-treated HL-MVEC. Treatment with PLY significantly decreases resistance in control siRNA-treated HL-MVEC, but does so even more in PKA-depleted monolayers. Pretreatment with GHRH agonist blunts PLY-induced permeability in control siRNA-treated HL-MVEC, but fails to improve barrier function in PKA-depleted PLY-treated monolayers. Conclusions: GHRH signaling in HL-MVEC protects from both LPS and PLY-mediated endothelial barrier dysfunction and concurrently induces a barrier-protective PKA-mediated and a barrier-disruptive PKC-?-induced pathway in the presence of PLY, the former of which dominates the latter. PMID:25076911

  17. Proteomics of bacterial pathogens.

    PubMed

    Cash, Phillip

    2003-01-01

    The rapid growth of proteomics that has been built upon the available bacterial genome sequences has opened provided new approaches to the analysis of bacterial functional genomics. In the study of pathogenic bacteria the combined technologies of genomics, proteomics and bioinformatics has provided valuable tools for the study of complex phenomena determined by the action of multiple gene sets. The review considers some of the recent developments in the establishment of proteomic databases as well as attempts to define pathogenic determinants at the level of the proteome for some of the major human pathogens. Proteomics can also provide practical applications through the identification of immunogenic proteins that may be potential vaccine targets as well as in extending our understanding of antibiotic action. There is little doubt that proteomics has provided us with new and valuable information on bacterial pathogens and will continue to be an important source of information in the coming years. PMID:12934927

  18. Growth curves of crossbred cows sired by Hereford, Angus, Belgian Blue, Brahman, Boran, and Tuli bulls, and the fraction of mature body weight and height at puberty.

    PubMed

    Freetly, H C; Kuehn, L A; Cundiff, L V

    2011-08-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the growth curves of females to determine if mature size and relative rates of maturation among breeds differed. Body weight and hip height data were fitted to the nonlinear function BW = f(age) = A - Be(k×age), where A is an estimate of mature BW and k determines the rate that BW or height moves from B to A. Cows represented progeny from 28 Hereford, 38 Angus, 25 Belgian Blue, 34 Brahman, 8 Boran, and 9 Tuli sires. Bulls from these breeds were mated by AI to Angus, Hereford, and MARC III composite (1/4 Angus, 1/4 Hereford, 1/4 Red Poll, and 1/4 Pinzgauer) cows to produce calves in 1992, 1993, and 1994. These matings resulted in 516 mature cows whose growth curves were subsequently evaluated. Hereford-sired cows tended to have heavier mature BW, as estimated by parameter A, than Angus- (P=0.09) and Brahman-sired cows (P=0.06), and were heavier than the other breeds (P < 0.001). Angus-sired cows were heavier than Boran- (P < 0.001) and Tuli-sired cows (P < 0.001), and tended to be heavier than Belgian Blue-sired cows (P=0.097). Angus-sired cows did not differ from Brahman-sired cows (P=0.94). Brahman-sired cows had a heavier mature BW than Boran- (P < 0.001), Tuli- (P < 0.001), and Belgian Blue-sired cows (P < 0.04). Angus-sired cows matured faster (k) than cows sired by Hereford (P=0.03), Brahman (P < 0.001), Boran (P=0.03), and Tuli (P < 0.001) sires, but did not differ from Belgian Blue-sired (P=0.13) cows. Brahman-sired cows took longer to mature than Boran- (P=0.03) or Belgian Blue-sired cows (P=0.003). Belgian Blue-sired cows were faster maturing than Tuli-sired cows (P=0.02). Brahman-sired cows had reached a greater proportion of their mature BW at puberty than had Hereford- (P < 0.001), Tuli- (P=0.003), and Belgian Blue-sired cows (P=0.001). Boran-sired cows tended to have reached a greater proportion of their mature BW at puberty than had Angus-sired cows (P=0.09), and had reached a greater proportion of their mature BW at puberty than had Hereford- (P < 0.001), Tuli- (P < 0.001), and Belgian Blue-sired cows (P < 0.001). Within species of cattle, the relative range in proportion of mature BW at puberty (Bos taurus 0.56 through 0.58, and Bos indicus 0.60) was highly conserved, suggesting that proportion of mature BW is a more robust predictor of age at puberty across breeds than is absolute weight or age. PMID:21531851

  19. The influence of bacterial metabolites on the motility of stallion spermatozoa

    E-print Network

    Rideout, Merry Ilene

    1979-01-01

    Standard growth curve of Klebsiella t ' (g "t 1' Standard growth curve of Proteus mirabilis. Standard growth curve of Pseudomonas ~*' 10 Standard growth curve of Escherichia cali Standard growth curve of Stre tococcus 12 Standard growth curve of Stre...' ) f'lt t on spermatozoa motility expressed as a percentage of the extended semen plus filtered tryptose broth control. 47 The effect of four concentrations of Proteus mirabilis filtrate on spermatozoa motility expressed as a percentage...

  20. Bacterial Vaginosis

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Archive STDs Home Page Bacterial Vaginosis (BV) Chlamydia Gonorrhea Genital Herpes HIV/AIDS & STDs Human Papillomavirus (HPV) ... of getting other STDs, such as chlamydia and gonorrhea . These bacteria can sometimes cause pelvic inflammatory disease ( ...

  1. Effects of Pleurotus eryngii polysaccharides on bacterial growth, texture properties, proteolytic capacity, and angiotensin-I-converting enzyme-inhibitory activities of fermented milk.

    PubMed

    Li, Siqian; Shah, Nagendra P

    2015-05-01

    Pleurotus eryngii is one of the most favored oyster mushrooms and contains various beneficial bioactive compounds. Polysaccharide extracted from P. eryngii (PEPS) was added as a natural-source ingredient to milk before fermentation, and the effects of additional PEPS on fermented milk were investigated in this study. The PEPS were extracted and added to reconstituted skim milk (12%, wt/vol) at 0.5, 0.25, and 0.125% (wt/vol) and fermented by a non-exopolysaccharide-producing strain, Streptococcus thermophilus Australian Starter Culture Collection (ASCC) 1303 (ST 1303), or an exopolysaccharide-producing Strep. thermophilus ASCC 1275 (ST 1275). Bacterial growth, texture properties, microstructure, proteolytic capacity, and angiotensin-I-converting enzyme-inhibitory activities of fermented milk (FM) were determined during refrigerated storage at 4°C for 21d. Viable counts of starter bacteria in FM with 0.5% PEPS added were the highest. Changes in pH were consistent with changes in titratable acidities for all samples. The FM samples with added PEPS showed denser protein aggregates containing larger serum pores in confocal micrographs compared with those without PEPS at d 0 and 21during refrigerated storage. The values for spontaneous whey separation of FM with added PEPS were significantly higher than those of FM fermented by ST 1303 or ST 1275 without PEPS. The proteolytic activities of ST 1303 of FM with added PEPS were higher than those of FM fermented by ST 1303 without PEPS. The FM with added 0.125% PEPS had similar angiotensin-I-converting enzyme-inhibitory activity to that fermented by ST 1303 without PEPS; both were higher than those of other samples during refrigerated storage. Firmness and gumminess values of FM with added PEPS were higher than those of FM fermented by ST 1303 or ST 1275 without PEPS. PMID:25747830

  2. Curved Knives

    Microsoft Academic Search

    W. F. Sinclair

    1897-01-01

    IT may interest your correspondent, Dr. Otis T. Mason, to know that the curved ``drawing-knife'' described by him has representatives in Western (British) India. The Kolis (fishing races) of the Bombay coast wore lately, and some still wear, knives made by local blacksmiths, of which the blade, 2 to 3 inches long, was shaped and edged like that of an

  3. Modeling Microbial Growth

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Ethel D. Stanley (Beloit College; Biology)

    2006-05-20

    Is bacterial growth always exponential? Do bacteria with the fastest rate of growth always have the largest populations? Biota models offer extended opportunities to observe population growth over time. What are the factors that affect growth? Explore continuous, chaotic, and cyclic growth models. * examine the dynamics of growth for populations of virtual bacteria with differing growth rates and carrying capacities

  4. 4-(3-Chloro-5-(trifluoromethyl)pyridin-2-yl)-N-(4-methoxypyridin-2-yl)piperazine-1-carbothioamide (ML267), a Potent Inhibitor of Bacterial Phosphopantetheinyl Transferase That Attenuates Secondary Metabolism and Thwarts Bacterial Growth

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    4?-Phosphopantetheinyl transferases (PPTases) catalyze a post-translational modification essential to bacterial cell viability and virulence. We present the discovery and medicinal chemistry optimization of 2-pyridinyl-N-(4-aryl)piperazine-1-carbothioamides, which exhibit submicromolar inhibition of bacterial Sfp-PPTase with no activity toward the human orthologue. Moreover, compounds within this class possess antibacterial activity in the absence of a rapid cytotoxic response in human cells. An advanced analogue of this series, ML267 (55), was found to attenuate production of an Sfp-PPTase-dependent metabolite when applied to Bacillus subtilis at sublethal doses. Additional testing revealed antibacterial activity against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, and chemical genetic studies implicated efflux as a mechanism for resistance in Escherichia coli. Additionally, we highlight the in vitro absorption, distribution, metabolism, and excretion and in vivo pharmacokinetic profiles of compound 55 to further demonstrate the potential utility of this small-molecule inhibitor. PMID:24450337

  5. Bacterial Wilt

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Howard F. Schwartz; David H. Gent; Gary D. Franc; Robert M. Harveson

    Bacterial wilt is caused by the bacterium Curtobacterium flaccumfaciens subsp. flaccumfaciens. This pathogen grows throughout the water conducting tissues of the plant and impedes water movement, resulting in a wilt. Symptom development is favored by temperatures greater than 90°F. Infection is often caused by the planting of infected seed, but the pathogen may also survive in infested crop debris. Wilt

  6. Bacterial vaginosis

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Phillip Hay

    2010-01-01

    Bacterial vaginosis is the commonest cause of abnormal vaginal discharge in women of childbearing age, with a prevalence as high as 50% in some communities. The symptoms of discharge and offensive smell can cause considerable distress, although 50% of women are asymptomatic when diagnosed. Microbiologically the usually dominant lactobacillus flora is overwhelmed by an overgrowth of predominantly anaerobic organisms, accompanied

  7. Bacterial vaginosis

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Phillip Hay

    2005-01-01

    Bacterial vaginosis is a common cause of abnormal discharge in women of child-bearing age. It is present in 10–20% women in the UK, and may recur or regress spontaneously. It is not regarded as an STI because it can occur in virgin women, but it is more common in sexually active women. Other associations include smoking, partner change, having a

  8. Curved Space or Curved Vacuum?

    E-print Network

    Eric V. Linder

    2005-10-11

    While the simple picture of a spatially flat, matter plus cosmological constant universe fits current observation of the accelerated expansion, strong consideration has also been given to models with dynamical vacuum energy. We examine the tradeoff of ``curving'' the vacuum but retaining spatial flatness, vs. curving space but retaining the cosmological constant. These different breakdowns in the simple picture could readily be distinguished by combined high accuracy supernovae and cosmic microwave background distance measurements. If we allow the uneasy situation of both breakdowns, the curvature can still be measured to 1%, but at the price of degrading estimation of the equation of state time variation by 60% or more, unless additional information (such as weak lensing data or a tight matter density prior) is included.

  9. Rapid Antimicrobial Susceptibility Testing with Electrokinetics Enhanced Biosensors for Diagnosis of Acute Bacterial Infections

    E-print Network

    Wong, Pak Kin

    of bacterial 16S rRNA. The assay determines the susceptibility of pathogens by detecting bacterial growth under,26 Conventional cul- ture-based analysis, however, requires at least 2­3 days for bacterial growth and could of Acute Bacterial Infections TINGTING LIU,1 YI LU,1 VINCENT GAU,2 JOSEPH C. LIAO,3,4 and PAK KIN WONG 1 1

  10. Lethal protein produced in response to competition between sibling bacterial colonies

    E-print Network

    Ariel, Gil

    -regulation of colony growth might not be limited to P. dendritiformis. bacterial competition bacterial growthLethal protein produced in response to competition between sibling bacterial colonies Avraham Be 24, 2009) Sibling Paenibacillus dendritiformis bacterial colonies grown on low-nutrient agar medium

  11. Growth

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    Introduction to models of economic growth with a great deal of focus on the Solow Growth Model both its theory and testing it with data. Also contains a discussion of the effects of the Greenspan Put. From a macroeconomics course at the the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.

  12. Equine platelets inhibit E. coli growth and can be activated by bacterial lipopolysaccharide and lipoteichoic acid although superoxide anion production does not occur and platelet activation is not associated with enhanced production by neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Aktan, I; Dunkel, B; Cunningham, F M

    2013-04-15

    Activated platelets can contribute to host defense through release of products with bactericidal actions such as antimicrobial peptides and reactive oxygen species (ROS), as well as by forming heterotypic aggregates with neutrophils and enhancing their antimicrobial properties. Whilst release of vasoactive mediators from equine platelets in response to stimuli including bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) has been documented, neither ROS production, nor the effects of activated platelets on equine neutrophil ROS production, have been reported. This study first sought evidence that activated equine platelets inhibit bacterial growth. Platelet superoxide production in response to stimuli including Escherichia coli-derived LPS and lipoteichoic acid (LTA) from Staphylococcus aureus was then determined. The ability of LPS and LTA to up-regulate platelet P-selectin expression and induce platelet-neutrophil aggregate formation was investigated and the effect of co-incubating activated platelets with neutrophils on superoxide production measured. Growth of E. coli was inhibited in a time-dependent manner, and to a similar extent, by addition of platelet rich plasma (PRP) or platelet poor plasma (PPP) obtained by centrifugation of PRP. Activation of platelets in PRP by addition of thrombin led to a significant increase in the inhibitory action between 0.5 and 2h. Although phorbol myristate acetate (PMA) caused superoxide production by equine platelets in a protein kinase C-dependent manner, thrombin, platelet activating factor (PAF), LPS, LTA and formyl-methionyl-leucyl phenylalanine (FMLP) were without effect. LPS and LTA did induce platelet activation, measured as an increase in P-selectin expression (% positive cells: 17±3 (un-stimulated); 63±6 (1?g/ml LPS); 64±6 (1?g/ml LTA); n=5) but not platelet superoxide production or heterotypic aggregate formation. Co-incubation of activated platelets with neutrophils did not increase neutrophil superoxide production. This study has demonstrated for the first time that when activated, equine platelets, like those of other species, are capable of releasing ROS that could assist in bacterial killing. However, the findings suggest that neither superoxide production by platelets nor enhancement of production by neutrophils is likely to play a significant role. Nevertheless, as has been reported in man, equine PPP and PRP did inhibit E. coli growth in vitro, and addition of thrombin significantly increased the inhibitory effect of PRP. This suggests that products released from activated platelets could contribute to antimicrobial activity in the horse. The factors in equine plasma and released by activated platelets that are responsible for inhibiting bacterial growth have yet to be determined. PMID:23332730

  13. BACTERIAL INDICATORS OF RECREATIONAL WATER QUALITY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The selection of bacterial indicators of recreational water quality are considered with respect to suggested ideal characteristics, such as association with pathogens, growth in aquatic environments, resistance to disinfection and ease of enumeration, and through the use of epide...

  14. Helical insertion of peptidoglycan produces chiral ordering of the bacterial cell wall

    E-print Network

    Zhuang, Xiaowei

    principles of cell growth link the molecular structure of the bacterial cytoskeleton, mechanisms of wall synthesis, and the coordination of cell-wall architecture. growth dynamics biophysical modeling Bacterial-wall structure and growth dynamics are critical to our understanding of bacterial physiology and cell biology

  15. Curves and Their Properties.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yates, Robert C.

    This volume, a reprinting of a classic first published in 1952, presents detailed discussions of 26 curves or families of curves, and 17 analytic systems of curves. For each curve the author provides a historical note, a sketch or sketches, a description of the curve, a discussion of pertinent facts, and a bibliography. Depending upon the curve

  16. Growth condition and bacterial community for maximum hydrolysis of suspended organic materials in anaerobic digestion of food waste-recycling wastewater.

    PubMed

    Kim, Man Deok; Song, Minkyung; Jo, Minho; Shin, Seung Gu; Khim, Jee Hyeong; Hwang, Seokhwan

    2010-02-01

    This paper reports the effects of changing pH (5-7) and temperature (T, 40-60 degrees C) on the efficiencies of bacterial hydrolysis of suspended organic matter (SOM) in wastewater from food waste recycling (FWR) and the changes in the bacterial community responsible for this hydrolysis. Maximum hydrolysis efficiency (i.e., 50.5% reduction of volatile suspended solids) was predicted to occur at pH 5.7 and T = 44.5 degrees C. Changes in short-chain volatile organic acid profiles and in acidogenic bacterial communities were investigated under these conditions. Propionic and butyric acids concentrations increased rapidly during the first 2 days of incubation. Several band sequences consistent with Clostridium spp. were detected using denaturing gel gradient electrophoresis. Clostridium thermopalmarium and Clostridium novyi seemed to contribute to butyric acid production during the first 1.5 days of acidification of FWR wastewater, and C. thermopalmarium was a major butyric acid producer afterward. C. novyi was an important propionic acid producer. These two species appear to be important contributors to hydrolysis of SOM in the wastewater. Other acidogenic anaerobes, Aeromonas sharmana, Bacillus coagulans, and Pseudomonas plecoglossicida, were also indentified. PMID:19894044

  17. The Dynamics of Cooperative Bacterial Virulence in the Field

    E-print Network

    West, Stuart

    growth and virulence of pathogenic bacteria often depends on cooperation be- tween bacterial cells (1The Dynamics of Cooperative Bacterial Virulence in the Field Ben Raymond,1 * Stuart A. West,2 themselves (2, 6, 7). Many bacterial virulence factors must be secreted to facilitate successful host

  18. Quorum-sensing and cheating in bacterial biofilms

    E-print Network

    West, Stuart

    ; spatial structure; cooperation; cheating 1. INTRODUCTION The growth and success of bacterial populationsQuorum-sensing and cheating in bacterial biofilms Roman Popat1,, Shanika A. Crusz1, Marco Messina1 is sometimes termed the public goods dilemma. We tested this idea in the opportunistic bacterial patho- gen

  19. Phenotypic and genetic relationships between growth and feed intake curves and feed efficiency and amino acid requirements in the growing pig.

    PubMed

    Saintilan, R; Brossard, L; Vautier, B; Sellier, P; Bidanel, J; van Milgen, J; Gilbert, H

    2015-01-01

    Improvement of feed efficiency in pigs has been achieved essentially by increasing lean growth rate, which resulted in lower feed intake (FI). The objective was to evaluate the impact of strategies for improving feed efficiency on the dynamics of FI and growth in growing pigs to revisit nutrient recommendations and strategies for feed efficiency improvement. In 2010, three BWs, at 35±2, 63±9 and 107±7 kg, and daily FI during this period were recorded in three French test stations on 379 Large White and 327 French Landrace from maternal pig populations and 215 Large White from a sire population. Individual growth and FI model parameters were obtained with the InraPorc® software and individual nutrient requirements were computed. The model parameters were explored according to feed efficiency as measured by residual feed intake (RFI) or feed conversion ratio (FCR). Animals were separated in groups of better feed efficiency (RFI- or FCR-), medium feed efficiency and poor feed efficiency. Second, genetic relationships between feed efficiency and model parameters were estimated. Despite similar average daily gains (ADG) during the test for all RFI groups, RFI- pigs had a lower initial growth rate and a higher final growth rate compared with other pigs. The same initial growth rate was found for all FCR groups, but FCR- pigs had significantly higher final growth rates than other pigs, resulting in significantly different ADG. Dynamic of FI also differed between RFI or FCR groups. The calculated digestible lysine requirements, expressed in g/MJ net energy (NE), showed the same trends for RFI or FCR groups: the average requirements for the 25% most efficient animals were 13% higher than that of the 25% least efficient animals during the whole test, reaching 0.90 to 0.95 g/MJ NE at the beginning of the test, which is slightly greater than usual feed recommendations for growing pigs. Model parameters were moderately heritable (0.30±0.13 to 0.56±0.13), except for the precocity of growth (0.06±0.08). The parameter representing the quantity of feed at 50 kg BW showed a relatively high genetic correlation with RFI (0.49±0.14), and average protein deposition between 35 and 110 kg had the highest correlation with FCR (-0.76±0.08). Thus, growth and FI dynamics may be envisaged as breeding tools to improve feed efficiency. Furthermore, improvement of feed efficiency should be envisaged jointly with new feeding strategies. PMID:25192352

  20. Testing the Importance of Individual Growth Curves in Predicting Performance on a High-Stakes Reading Comprehension Test in Florida. Summary. REL 2014-006

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Petscher, Yaacov; Kershaw, Sarah; Koon, Sharon; Foorman, Barbara R.

    2014-01-01

    Districts and schools use progress monitoring to assess student progress, to identify students who fail to respond to intervention, and to further adapt instruction to student needs. Researchers and practitioners often use progress monitoring data to estimate student achievement growth (slope) and evaluate changes in performance over time for…

  1. Testing the Importance of Individual Growth Curves in Predicting Performance on a High-Stakes Reading Comprehension Test in Florida. REL 2014-006

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Petscher, Yaacov; Kershaw, Sarah; Koon, Sharon; Foorman, Barbara R.

    2014-01-01

    Districts and schools use progress monitoring to assess student progress, to identify students who fail to respond to intervention, and to further adapt instruction to student needs. Researchers and practitioners often use progress monitoring data to estimate student achievement growth (slope) and evaluate changes in performance over time for…

  2. Parent and Child Personality Traits and Children's Externalizing Problem Behavior from Age 4 to 9 Years: A Cohort-Sequential Latent Growth Curve Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prinzie, P.; Onghena, P.; Hellinckx, W.

    2005-01-01

    Cohort-sequential latent growth modeling was used to analyze longitudinal data for children's externalizing behavior from four overlapping age cohorts (4, 5, 6, and 7 years at first assessment) measured at three annual time points. The data included mother and father ratings on the Child Behavior Checklist and the Five-Factor Personality Inventory…

  3. A Latent Growth Curve Modeling Approach Using an Accelerated Longitudinal Design: The Ontogeny of Boys' and Girls' Talent Perceptions and Intrinsic Values through Adolescence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watt, Helen M. G.

    2008-01-01

    This article presents latent growth modeling, a particular application of multilevel modeling, to examine the development of adolescents' math- and English-related talent perceptions and intrinsic values which are emphasized by Expectancy-Value theory as important precursors to a range of achievement-related outcomes. The longitudinal…

  4. Development of Morphological Awareness and Vocabulary Knowledge in Spanish-Speaking Language Minority Learners: A Parallel Process Latent Growth Curve Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kieffer, Michael J.; Lesaux, Nonie K.

    2012-01-01

    Despite acknowledgement of the limited English vocabularies demonstrated by many language minority (LM) learners, few studies have identified skills that relate to variation in vocabulary growth in this population. This study investigated the concurrent development of morphological awareness (i.e., students' understanding of complex words as…

  5. Evaluation of rhizosphere bacterial antagonists for their potential to bioprotect potato ( Solanum tuberosum) against bacterial wilt ( Ralstonia solanacearum)

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Naser Aliye; Chemeda Fininsa; Yaynu Hiskias

    2008-01-01

    Bacterial wilt (Ralstonia solanacearum) is one of the production constraints of potato (Solanum tuberosum). The intent of the study was to evaluate potential of bacterial antagonists to suppress bacterial wilt disease development and evaluate the role of the strains as plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR) in potato. One hundred-twenty rhizosphere bacterial isolates were screened against virulent strain of Ralstonia solanacearum PPRC-Rs.

  6. Inhibitory effects on bacterial growth and beta-ketoacyl-ACP reductase by different species of maple leaf extracts and tannic acid.

    PubMed

    Wu, Dan; Wu, Xiao-Dong; You, Xue-Fu; Ma, Xiao-Feng; Tian, Wei-Xi

    2010-01-01

    It is important to develop new antibiotics aimed at novel targets. The investigation found that the leaf extracts from five maples (Acer platanoides, Acer campestre, Acer rubrum, Acer saccharum and Acer truncatum Bunge collected in Denmark, Canada and China) and their component tannic acid displayed antibacterial ability against 24 standard bacteria strains with the minimum inhibitory concentration of 0.3-8.0 mg/mL. Unlike the standard antibiotic levofloxacin (LFX), these samples inhibited Gram-positive bacteria more effectively than they inhibited Gram-negative bacteria. These samples effectively inhibited two antidrug bacterial strains. The results show that these samples inhibit bacteria by a different mechanism from LFX. These samples potently inhibited b-ketoacyl-ACP reductase (FabG), which is an important enzyme in bacterial fatty acid synthesis. Tannic acid showed the strongest inhibition on FabG with a half inhibition concentration of 0.78 microM (0.81 microg/mL). Furthermore, tannic acid and two maple leaf extracts showed time-dependent irreversible inhibition of FabG. These three samples also exhibited better inhibition on bacteria. It is suggested that FabG is the antibacteria target of maple leaf extracts and tannic acid, and both reversible and irreversible inhibitions of FabG are important for the antibacterial effect. PMID:19444866

  7. A cbb(3)-type cytochrome C oxidase contributes to Ralstonia solanacearum R3bv2 growth in microaerobic environments and to bacterial wilt disease development in tomato.

    PubMed

    Colburn-Clifford, Jennifer; Allen, Caitilyn

    2010-08-01

    Ralstonia solanacearum race 3 biovar 2 (R3bv2) is an economically important soilborne plant pathogen that causes bacterial wilt disease by infecting host plant roots and colonizing the xylem vessels. Little is known about R3bv2 behavior in the host rhizosphere and early in bacterial wilt pathogenesis. To explore this part of the disease cycle, we used a novel taxis-based promoter-trapping strategy to identify pathogen genes induced in the plant rhizosphere. This screen identified several rex (root exudate expressed) genes whose promoters were upregulated in the presence of tomato root exudates. One rex gene encodes an assembly protein for a high affinity cbb(3)-type cytochrome c oxidase (cbb(3)-cco) that enables respiration in low-oxygen conditions in other bacteria. R3bv2 cbb(3)-cco gene expression increased under low-oxygen conditions, and a cbb(3)-cco mutant strain grew more slowly in a microaerobic environment (0.5% O(2)). Although the cco mutant could still wilt tomato plants, symptom onset was significantly delayed relative to the wild-type parent strain. Further, the cco mutant did not colonize host stems or adhere to roots as effectively as wild type. These results suggest that R3bv2 encounters low-oxygen environments during its interactions with host plants and that the pathogen depends on this oxidase to help it succeed in planta. PMID:20615115

  8. Sculpting the Bacterial Cell

    PubMed Central

    Margolin, William

    2014-01-01

    Prokaryotes come in a wide variety of shapes, determined largely by natural selection, physical constraints, and patterns of cell growth and division. Because of their relative simplicity, bacterial cells are excellent models for how genes and proteins can directly determine morphology. Recent advances in cytological methods for bacteria have shown that distinct cytoskeletal filaments composed of actin and tubulin homologs are important for guiding growth patterns of the cell wall in bacteria, and that the glycan strands that constitute the wall are generally perpendicular to the direction of growth. This cytoskeleton-directed cell wall patterning is strikingly reminiscent of how plant cell wall growth is regulated by microtubules. In rod-shaped bacilli, helical cables of actin-like MreB protein stretch along the cell length and orchestrate elongation of the cell wall, whereas the tubulin-like FtsZ protein directs formation of the division septum and the resulting cell poles. The overlap and interplay between these two systems and the peptidoglycan-synthesizing enzymes they recruit are the major driving forces of cylindrical shapes. Round cocci, on the other hand, have lost their MreBcables and instead mustgrowmainly via their division septum, giving them their characteristic round or ovoid shapes. Other bacteria that lack MreB homologs or even cell walls usedistinct cytoskeletal systemsto maintain their distinct shapes. Here I review what is known about the mechanisms that determine the shape of prokaryotic cells. PMID:19906583

  9. Isolated Curves for Hyperelliptic Curve Cryptography

    E-print Network

    Wang, Wenhan

    2012-01-01

    We introduce the notion of isolated genus two curves. As there is no known efficient algorithm to explicitly construct isogenies between two genus two curves with large conductor gap, the discrete log problem (DLP) cannot be efficiently carried over from an isolated curve to a large set of isogenous curves. Thus isolated genus two curves might be more secure for DLP based hyperelliptic curve cryptography. We establish results on explicit expressions for the index of an endomorphism ring in the maximal CM order, and give conditions under which the index is a prime number or an almost prime number for three different categories of quartic CM fields. We also derived heuristic asymptotic results on the densities and distributions of isolated genus two curves with CM by any fixed quartic CM field. Computational results, which are also shown for three explicit examples, agree with heuristic prediction with errors within a tolerable range.

  10. Ashley Richards Dissertation Proposal 2013 Eukaryotic post-translational modification of bacterial effectors

    E-print Network

    Heller, Paul

    . pneumophila in order to promote growth and replication. Many injected bacterial effectors are modified of bacterial effectors Keywords: asparagine hydroxylation, Legionella pneumophila, Yersinia pestis, bacterial can also be found in other injected bacterial effectors such as, the Outer Protein M (Yop

  11. Multiple Forms of Bacterial Hydrogenases

    PubMed Central

    Ackrell, B. A. C.; Asato, R. N.; Mower, H. F.

    1966-01-01

    Ackrell, B. A. C. (University of Hawaii, Honolulu), R. N. Asato, and H. F. Mower. Multiple forms of bacterial hydrogenases. J. Bacteriol. 92:828–838. 1966.—Extracts of certain bacterial species have been shown by disc electrophoresis on polyacrylamide gel to contain multiple hydrogenase systems. The hydrogenase enzymes comprising these systems have different electrophoretic mobilities and produce a band pattern that is unique for each bacterial species. Of 20 bacterial species known to possess hydrogenase activity and which were examined by this technique, only the activities of Clostridium tetanomorphum and C. thermosaccharolyticum could be attributed, at pH 8.3, to a single hydrogenase enzyme. This multiplicity of hydrogenase forms was found both in bacteria which contain mostly soluble hydrogenases and in those where the hydrogenase is predominantly associated with particulate material. When solubilization of this particulate material could be effected, at least two solubilized hydrogenases were released, and, of these, one would have the same electrophoretic properties (i.e., RF) as one of the soluble hydrogenases already present in small amounts within the cell. Different growth conditions for various types of bacteria, such as the nitrogen source, the degree of aeration, and photosynthetic versus aerobic growth in the dark, as well as the conditions under which the cells were stored, markedly affected the hydrogenase activity of the cells, but not their hydrogenase band pattern. The disc electrophoresis technique proved to be 10 times more sensitive than the manometric technique in detecting hydrogenase activity. PMID:5926752

  12. Bacterial Enteritides of Poultry

    Microsoft Academic Search

    ROBERT E. PORTER

    Enteric bacterial infections in poultry pose a threat to intestinal health and can contribute to poor feed efficiency and livability of a flock. A variety of enteric bacterial diseases are recognized in poultry. Three of these bacterial diseases, necrotic enteritis, ulcerative enteritis, and spirochetosis, primarily infect the intestine, whereas other bacterial diseases, such as salmonellosis, colibacillosis, mycobacteriosis, erysipelas, and fowl

  13. Fitting Richards' curve to data of diverse origins

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Johnson, D.H.; Sargeant, A.B.; Allen, S.H.

    1975-01-01

    Published techniques for fitting data to nonlinear growth curves are briefly reviewed, most techniques require knowledge of the shape of the curve. A flexible growth curve developed by Richards (1959) is discussed as an alternative when the shape is unknown. The shape of this curve is governed by a specific parameter which can be estimated from the data. We describe in detail the fitting of a diverse set of longitudinal and cross-sectional data to Richards' growth curve for the purpose of determining the age of red fox (Vulpes vulpes) pups on the basis of right hind foot length. The fitted curve is found suitable for pups less than approximately 80 days old. The curve is extrapolated to pre-natal growth and shown to be appropriate only for about 10 days prior to birth.

  14. Regulation of cell growth during serum starvation and bacterial survival in macrophages by the bifunctional enzyme SpoT in Helicobacter pylori.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yan Ning; Coleman, William G; Yang, Zhaoxu; Yang, Yi; Hodgson, Nathaniel; Chen, Fuxiang; Jin, Ding Jun

    2008-12-01

    In Helicobacter pylori the stringent response is mediated solely by spoT. The spoT gene is known to encode (p)ppGpp synthetase activity and is required for H. pylori survival in the stationary phase. However, neither the hydrolase activity of the H. pylori SpoT protein nor the role of SpoT in the regulation of growth during serum starvation and intracellular survival of H. pylori in macrophages has been determined. In this study, we examined the effects of SpoT on these factors. Our results showed that the H. pylori spoT gene encodes a bifunctional enzyme with both a hydrolase activity and the previously described (p)ppGpp synthetase activity, as determined by introducing the gene into Escherichia coli relA and spoT defective strains. Also, we found that SpoT mediates a serum starvation response, which not only restricts the growth but also maintains the helical morphology of H. pylori. Strikingly, a spoT null mutant was able to grow to a higher density in serum-free medium than the wild-type strain, mimicking the "relaxed" growth phenotype of an E. coli relA mutant during amino acid starvation. Finally, SpoT was found to be important for intracellular survival in macrophages during phagocytosis. The unique role of (p)ppGpp in cell growth during serum starvation, in the stress response, and in the persistence of H. pylori is discussed. PMID:18835987

  15. Methane oxidation activity and bacterial community composition in a simulated landfill cover soil is influenced by the growth of Chenopodium album L

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Yunlong Wang; Weixiang Wu; Ying Ding; Wei Liu; Anton Perera; Yingxu Chen; Medha Devare

    2008-01-01

    Oxygen availability in landfill cover soil is a major limitation to the growth and activity of methanotrophs as methane oxidation is an aerobic microbial process. Plants tolerant to high concentrations of landfill gas (LFG) may play an important role in improving methane oxidation within landfill cover soil and reducing emission of methane, a greenhouse gas, from it. In this study,

  16. Protein Secretion in Bacterial Cells

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Christos Stathopoulos; Yihfen T. Yen; Casey Tsang; Todd Cameron

    Approximately 20% of the proteins synthesized in a bacterial cell are transported outside of the cytoplasm. These proteins\\u000a are localized either within the different compartments of the cell envelope or are released into the extracellular growth\\u000a medium. Bacteria have evolved multiple pathways to secrete proteins across their cell envelopes. In this chapter, we examine\\u000a similarities and differences among the several

  17. Elliptic Curves An Introduction

    E-print Network

    Babinkostova, Liljana

    . The growing practical relevance of elliptic curves in modern cryptography is another issue missing. This listElliptic Curves ­ An Introduction ­ Expanded notes from a mini-workshop held at Mary Immaculate. Group law on the cubic curve 29 4. Theta Functions 53 5. Rank two vector bundles on elliptic curves 75

  18. Elliptic Curves Number Theory

    E-print Network

    Babinkostova, Liljana

    Elliptic Curves Number Theory and Cryptography Second Edition © 2008 by Taylor & Francis Group, LLC Washington, Lawrence C. Elliptic curves : number theory and cryptography / Lawrence C. Washington. -- 2nd ed, elliptic curves started being used in cryptography and elliptic curve techniques were developed

  19. Application of artificial neural networks as a non-linear modular modeling technique to describe bacterial growth in chilled food products

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. H. Geeraerd; C. H. Herremans; C. Cenens; J. F. Van Impe

    1998-01-01

    In many chilled, prepared food products, the effects of temperature, pH and %NaCl on microbial activity interact and this should be taken into account. A grey box model for prediction of microbial growth is developed. The time dependence is modeled by a Gompertz model-based, non-linear differential equation. The influence of temperature, pH and %NaCl reflected in the model parameters is

  20. Growth hormone deficiency - children

    MedlinePLUS

    ... the child's growth curve on a growth chart . Children with growth hormone deficiency have a slow or flat rate of ... Growth hormone therapy does not work for all children. Left untreated, growth hormone deficiency may lead to short stature and delayed ...