Sample records for bacterial rrna extraction

  1. Direct Ribosome Isolation from Soil To Extract Bacterial rRNA for Community Analysis

    Microsoft Academic Search

    ANDREAS FELSKE; BERT ENGELEN; ULRICH NUBEL; ANDHORST BACKHAUS

    1996-01-01

    A simple method that combines an adapted ribosome isolation method and a common RNA extraction step has been developed for selective recovery of intact rRNA from natural microbial communities in soil. After mechanical cell lysis, ribosomes are separated by centrifugation steps, avoiding massive humic acid contam- ination and RNA degradation. The protocol accommodates the complex composition of soils by blocking

  2. The Influence of DNA Extraction Procedure and Primer Set on the Bacterial Community Analysis by Pyrosequencing of Barcoded 16S rRNA Gene Amplicons

    PubMed Central

    Starke, Ingo C.; Vahjen, Wilfried; Pieper, Robert; Zentek, Jürgen

    2014-01-01

    In this study, the effect of different DNA extraction procedures and primer sets on pyrosequencing results regarding the composition of bacterial communities in the ileum of piglets was investigated. Ileal chyme from piglets fed a diet containing different amounts of zinc oxide was used to evaluate a pyrosequencing study with barcoded 16S rRNA PCR products. Two DNA extraction methods (bead beating versus silica gel columns) and two primer sets targeting variable regions of bacterial 16S rRNA genes (8f-534r versus 968f-1401r) were considered. The SEED viewer software of the MG-RAST server was used for automated sequence analysis. A total of 5.2 × 105 sequences were used for analysis after processing for read length (150?bp), minimum sequence occurrence (5), and exclusion of eukaryotic and unclassified/uncultured sequences. DNA extraction procedures and primer sets differed significantly in total sequence yield. The distribution of bacterial order and main bacterial genera was influenced significantly by both parameters. However, this study has shown that the results of pyrosequencing studies using barcoded PCR amplicons of bacterial 16S rRNA genes depend on DNA extraction and primer choice, as well as on the manner of downstream sequence analysis. PMID:25120931

  3. Levels of Bacterial Community Diversity in Four Arid Soils Compared by Cultivation and 16S rRNA Gene Cloning

    PubMed Central

    Dunbar, John; Takala, Shannon; Barns, Susan M.; Davis, Jody A.; Kuske, Cheryl R.

    1999-01-01

    Techniques based on amplification of 16S rRNA genes for comparing bacterial communities are now widely used in microbial ecology, but calibration of these techniques with traditional tools, such as cultivation, has been conspicuously absent. In this study, we compared levels of bacterial community diversity in two pinyon rhizosphere soil samples and two between-tree (interspace) soil samples by analyzing 179 cultivated bacterial isolates and 801 16S rRNA genes amplified from extracted soil DNA. Phylotypes were defined by performing a restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis of 16S rRNA gene sequences with the enzymes RsaI and BstUI. The average level of 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity of members of a phylotype was 86.6% based on an analysis of partial sequences. A total of 498 phylotypes were identified among the 16S ribosomal DNA (rDNA) clones, while 34 phylotypes occurred among the cultivated isolates. Analysis of sequences from a subset of the phylotypes showed that at least seven bacterial divisions were represented in the clone libraries, whereas the isolates represented only three. The phylotype richness, frequency distribution (evenness), and composition of the four culture collections and the four clone libraries were investigated by using a variety of diversity indices. Although cultivation and 16S rRNA cloning analyses gave contradictory descriptions of the relative phylotype richness for one of the four environments, the two methods identified qualitatively consistent relationships when levels of evenness were compared. The levels of phylotype similarity between communities were uniformly low (15 to 31%). Both methods consistently indicated that one environment was distinct from the other three. Our data illustrate that while 16S rDNA cloning and cultivation generally describe similar relationships between soil microbial communities, significant discrepancies can occur. PMID:10103265

  4. Bacterial diversity of the Inner Mongolian Baer Soda Lake as revealed by 16S rRNA gene sequence analyses

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Yanhe Ma; Weizhou Zhang; Yanfen Xue; Peijin Zhou; Antonio Ventosa; William D. Grant

    2004-01-01

    Bacterial diversity associated with Baer Soda Lake in Inner Mongolia of China was investigated using a culture-independent method. Bacterial 16S rRNA gene libraries were generated using bacterial oligonucleotide primers, and 16S rRNA gene sequences of 58 clones were analyzed phylogenetically. The library was dominated by 16S rDNAs of Gram-negative bacteria (24% a-Proteobacteria, 31% ß-Proteobacteria, 33% ?-Proteobacteria, and 2% d-Proteobacteria), with

  5. Phylogeny of the Main Bacterial 16S rRNA Sequences in Drentse A Grassland Soils (The Netherlands)

    Microsoft Academic Search

    ANDREAS FELSKE; ARTHUR WOLTERINK; ROBERT VAN LIS; ANTOON D. L. AKKERMANS; Hesselink van Suchtelenweg

    1998-01-01

    The main bacteria in peaty, acid grassland soils in the Netherlands were investigated by ribosome isolation, temperature gradient gel electrophoresis, hybridization, cloning, and sequencing. Instead of using only 16S rDNA to determine the sequences present, we focused on rRNA to classify and quantify the most active bacteria. After direct ribosome isolation from soil, a partial amplicon of bacterial 16S rRNA

  6. Influence of DNA extraction on oral microbial profiles obtained via 16S rRNA gene sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Abusleme, Loreto; Hong, Bo-Young; Dupuy, Amanda K.; Strausbaugh, Linda D.; Diaz, Patricia I.

    2014-01-01

    Background and objective The advent of next-generation sequencing has significantly facilitated characterization of the oral microbiome. Despite great efforts in streamlining the processes of sequencing and data curation, upstream steps required for amplicon library generation could still influence 16S rRNA gene-based microbial profiles. Among upstream processes, DNA extraction is a critical step that could represent a great source of bias. Accounting for bias introduced by extraction procedures is important when comparing studies that use different methods. Identifying the method that best portrays communities is also desirable. Accordingly, the aim of this study was to evaluate bias introduced by different DNA extraction procedures on oral microbiome profiles. Design Four DNA extraction methods were tested on mock communities consisting of seven representative oral bacteria. Additionally, supragingival plaque samples were collected from seven individuals and divided equally to test two commonly used DNA extraction procedures. Amplicon libraries of the 16S rRNA gene were generated and sequenced via 454-pyrosequencing. Results Evaluation of mock communities revealed that DNA yield and bacterial species representation varied with DNA extraction methods. Despite producing the lowest yield of DNA, a method that included bead beating was the only protocol capable of detecting all seven species in the mock community. Comparison of the performance of two commonly used methods (crude lysis and a chemical/enzymatic lysis+column-based DNA isolation) on plaque samples showed no effect of extraction protocols on taxa prevalence but global community structure and relative abundance of individual taxa were affected. At the phylum level, the latter method improved the recovery of Actinobacteria, Bacteroidetes, and Spirochaetes over crude lysis. Conclusion DNA extraction distorts microbial profiles in simulated and clinical oral samples, reinforcing the importance of careful selection of a DNA extraction protocol to improve species recovery and facilitate data comparison across oral microbiology studies. PMID:24778776

  7. Taxonomic Classification of Bacterial 16S rRNA Genes Using Short Sequencing Reads: Evaluation of Effective Study Designs

    PubMed Central

    Mizrahi-Man, Orna; Davenport, Emily R.; Gilad, Yoav

    2013-01-01

    Massively parallel high throughput sequencing technologies allow us to interrogate the microbial composition of biological samples at unprecedented resolution. The typical approach is to perform high-throughout sequencing of 16S rRNA genes, which are then taxonomically classified based on similarity to known sequences in existing databases. Current technologies cause a predicament though, because although they enable deep coverage of samples, they are limited in the length of sequence they can produce. As a result, high-throughout studies of microbial communities often do not sequence the entire 16S rRNA gene. The challenge is to obtain reliable representation of bacterial communities through taxonomic classification of short 16S rRNA gene sequences. In this study we explored properties of different study designs and developed specific recommendations for effective use of short-read sequencing technologies for the purpose of interrogating bacterial communities, with a focus on classification using naïve Bayesian classifiers. To assess precision and coverage of each design, we used a collection of ?8,500 manually curated 16S rRNA gene sequences from cultured bacteria and a set of over one million bacterial 16S rRNA gene sequences retrieved from environmental samples, respectively. We also tested different configurations of taxonomic classification approaches using short read sequencing data, and provide recommendations for optimal choice of the relevant parameters. We conclude that with a judicious selection of the sequenced region and the corresponding choice of a suitable training set for taxonomic classification, it is possible to explore bacterial communities at great depth using current technologies, with only a minimal loss of taxonomic resolution. PMID:23308262

  8. Comparative metagenomic and rRNA microbial diversity characterization using Archaeal and Bacterial synthetic communities

    PubMed Central

    Shakya, Migun; Quince, Christopher; Campbell, James H.; Yang, Zamin K.; Schadt, Christopher W.; Podar, Mircea

    2013-01-01

    Summary Next generation sequencing has dramatically changed the landscape of microbial ecology, large-scale and in-depth diversity studies being now widely accessible. However, determining the accuracy of taxonomic and quantitative inferences and comparing results obtained with different approaches are complicated by incongruence of experimental and computational data types and also by lack of knowledge of the true ecological diversity. Here we used highly diverse bacterial and archaeal synthetic communities assembled from pure genomic DNAs to compare inferences from metagenomic and SSU rRNA amplicon sequencing. Both Illumina and 454 metagenomic data outperformed amplicon sequencing in quantifying the community composition, but the outcome was dependent on analysis parameters and platform. New approaches in processing and classifying amplicons can reconstruct the taxonomic composition of the community with high reproducibility within primer sets, but all tested primers sets lead to significant taxon-specific biases. Controlled synthetic communities assembled to broadly mimic the phylogenetic richness in target environments can provide important validation for fine-tuning experimental and computational parameters used to characterize natural communities. PMID:23387867

  9. Endophytic bacterial diversity in grapevine (Vitis vinifera L.) leaves described by 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis and length heterogeneity-PCR.

    PubMed

    Bulgari, Daniela; Casati, Paola; Brusetti, Lorenzo; Quaglino, Fabio; Brasca, Milena; Daffonchio, Daniele; Bianco, Piero Attilio

    2009-08-01

    Diversity of bacterial endophytes associated with grapevine leaf tissues was analyzed by cultivation and cultivation-independent methods. In order to identify bacterial endophytes directly from metagenome, a protocol for bacteria enrichment and DNA extraction was optimized. Sequence analysis of 16S rRNA gene libraries underscored five diverse Operational Taxonomic Units (OTUs), showing best sequence matches with gamma-Proteobacteria, family Enterobacteriaceae, with a dominance of the genus Pantoea. Bacteria isolation through cultivation revealed the presence of six OTUs, showing best sequence matches with Actinobacteria, genus Curtobacterium, and with Firmicutes genera Bacillus and Enterococcus. Length Heterogeneity-PCR (LH-PCR) electrophoretic peaks from single bacterial clones were used to setup a database representing the bacterial endophytes identified in association with grapevine tissues. Analysis of healthy and phytoplasma-infected grapevine plants showed that LH-PCR could be a useful complementary tool for examining the diversity of bacterial endophytes especially for diversity survey on a large number of samples. PMID:19763412

  10. A framework for establishing predictive relationships between specific bacterial 16S rRNA sequence abundances and biotransformation rates.

    PubMed

    Helbling, Damian E; Johnson, David R; Lee, Tae Kwon; Scheidegger, Andreas; Fenner, Kathrin

    2015-03-01

    The rates at which wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) microbial communities biotransform specific substrates can differ by orders of magnitude among WWTP communities. Differences in taxonomic compositions among WWTP communities may predict differences in the rates of some types of biotransformations. In this work, we present a novel framework for establishing predictive relationships between specific bacterial 16S rRNA sequence abundances and biotransformation rates. We selected ten WWTPs with substantial variation in their environmental and operational metrics and measured the in situ ammonia biotransformation rate constants in nine of them. We isolated total RNA from samples from each WWTP and analyzed 16S rRNA sequence reads. We then developed multivariate models between the measured abundances of specific bacterial 16S rRNA sequence reads and the ammonia biotransformation rate constants. We constructed model scenarios that systematically explored the effects of model regularization, model linearity and non-linearity, and aggregation of 16S rRNA sequences into operational taxonomic units (OTUs) as a function of sequence dissimilarity threshold (SDT). A large percentage (greater than 80%) of model scenarios resulted in well-performing and significant models at intermediate SDTs of 0.13-0.14 and 0.26. The 16S rRNA sequences consistently selected into the well-performing and significant models at those SDTs were classified as Nitrosomonas and Nitrospira groups. We then extend the framework by applying it to the biotransformation rate constants of ten micropollutants measured in batch reactors seeded with the ten WWTP communities. We identified phylogenetic groups that were robustly selected into all well-performing and significant models constructed with biotransformation rates of isoproturon, propachlor, ranitidine, and venlafaxine. These phylogenetic groups can be used as predictive biomarkers of WWTP microbial community activity towards these specific micropollutants. This work is an important step towards developing tools to predict biotransformation rates in WWTPs based on taxonomic composition. PMID:25594727

  11. Reverse Transcriptase-PCR Analysis of Bacterial rRNA for Detection and Characterization of Bacterial Species in Arthritis Synovial Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Kempsell, Karen E.; Cox, Charles J.; Hurle, Michael; Wong, Anthony; Wilkie, Scott; Zanders, Edward D.; Gaston, J. S. Hill; Crowe, J. Scott

    2000-01-01

    Onset of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is widely believed to be preceded by exposure to some environmental trigger such as bacterial infectious agents. The influence of bacteria on RA disease onset or pathology has to date been controversial, due to inconsistencies between groups in the report of bacterial species isolated from RA disease tissue. Using a modified technique of reverse transcriptase-PCR amplification, we have detected bacterial rRNA in the synovial tissue of late-stage RA and non-RA arthritis controls. This may be suggestive of the presence of live bacteria. Sequencing of cloned complementary rDNA (crDNA) products revealed a number of bacterial sequences in joint tissue from each patient, and from these analyses a comprehensive profile of the organisms present was compiled. This revealed a number of different organisms in each patient, some of which are common to both RA and non-RA controls and are probably opportunistic colonizers of previously diseased tissue and others which are unique species. These latter organisms may be candidates for a specific role in disease pathology and require further investigation to exclude them as causative agents in the complex bacterial millieu. In addition, many of the detected bacterial species have not been identified previously from synovial tissue or fluid from arthritis patients. These may not be easily cultivable, since they were not revealed in previous studies using conventional in vitro bacterial culture methods. In situ hybridization analyses have revealed the joint-associated bacterial rRNA to be both intra- and extracellular. The role of viable bacteria or their nucleic acids as triggers in disease onset or pathology in either RA or non-RA arthritis controls is unclear and requires further investigation. PMID:10992514

  12. DNA extraction protocols cause differences in 16S rRNA amplicon sequencing efficiency but not in community profile composition or structure.

    PubMed

    Rubin, Benjamin E R; Sanders, Jon G; Hampton-Marcell, Jarrad; Owens, Sarah M; Gilbert, Jack A; Moreau, Corrie S

    2014-12-01

    The recent development of methods applying next-generation sequencing to microbial community characterization has led to the proliferation of these studies in a wide variety of sample types. Yet, variation in the physical properties of environmental samples demands that optimal DNA extraction techniques be explored for each new environment. The microbiota associated with many species of insects offer an extraction challenge as they are frequently surrounded by an armored exoskeleton, inhibiting disruption of the tissues within. In this study, we examine the efficacy of several commonly used protocols for extracting bacterial DNA from ants. While bacterial community composition recovered using Illumina 16S rRNA amplicon sequencing was not detectably biased by any method, the quantity of bacterial DNA varied drastically, reducing the number of samples that could be amplified and sequenced. These results indicate that the concentration necessary for dependable sequencing is around 10,000 copies of target DNA per microliter. Exoskeletal pulverization and tissue digestion increased the reliability of extractions, suggesting that these steps should be included in any study of insect-associated microorganisms that relies on obtaining microbial DNA from intact body segments. Although laboratory and analysis techniques should be standardized across diverse sample types as much as possible, minimal modifications such as these will increase the number of environments in which bacterial communities can be successfully studied. PMID:25257543

  13. DNA extraction protocols cause differences in 16S rRNA amplicon sequencing efficiency but not in community profile composition or structure

    PubMed Central

    Rubin, Benjamin E R; Sanders, Jon G; Hampton-Marcell, Jarrad; Owens, Sarah M; Gilbert, Jack A; Moreau, Corrie S

    2014-01-01

    The recent development of methods applying next-generation sequencing to microbial community characterization has led to the proliferation of these studies in a wide variety of sample types. Yet, variation in the physical properties of environmental samples demands that optimal DNA extraction techniques be explored for each new environment. The microbiota associated with many species of insects offer an extraction challenge as they are frequently surrounded by an armored exoskeleton, inhibiting disruption of the tissues within. In this study, we examine the efficacy of several commonly used protocols for extracting bacterial DNA from ants. While bacterial community composition recovered using Illumina 16S rRNA amplicon sequencing was not detectably biased by any method, the quantity of bacterial DNA varied drastically, reducing the number of samples that could be amplified and sequenced. These results indicate that the concentration necessary for dependable sequencing is around 10,000 copies of target DNA per microliter. Exoskeletal pulverization and tissue digestion increased the reliability of extractions, suggesting that these steps should be included in any study of insect-associated microorganisms that relies on obtaining microbial DNA from intact body segments. Although laboratory and analysis techniques should be standardized across diverse sample types as much as possible, minimal modifications such as these will increase the number of environments in which bacterial communities can be successfully studied. PMID:25257543

  14. Comparison of Bacterial Extracellular Polymer Extraction Methods

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Melanie J.; Lester, John N.

    1980-01-01

    Five different bacterial extracellular polymer extraction methods and a combination of two of these methods were compared on cultures of activated sludge, synthetic activated sludge, and Klebsiella aerogenes. High-speed centrifugation was the most effective extraction method for the K. aerogenes culture, based on the comparatively small amount of cell disruption and the relatively high extracellular polymer yield. Steaming treatment was the most effective extraction method for the activated sludges, since it released a significant quantity of extracellular polymers from the flocs and caused less cellular disruption than ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid and sodium hydroxide treatments. Sodium hydroxide treatment caused extensive disruption in all cultures. Ultrasonication released low concentrations of extracellular polymers from all cultures. However, it caused no significant cell disruption and therefore may be useful as a preliminary treatment in conjunction with another extraction method. PMID:16345600

  15. Use of 16S rRNA Gene for Identification of a Broad Range of Clinically Relevant Bacterial Pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Srinivasan, Ramya; Karaoz, Ulas; Volegova, Marina; MacKichan, Joanna; Kato-Maeda, Midori; Miller, Steve; Nadarajan, Rohan; Brodie, Eoin L.; Lynch, Susan V.

    2015-01-01

    According to World Health Organization statistics of 2011, infectious diseases remain in the top five causes of mortality worldwide. However, despite sophisticated research tools for microbial detection, rapid and accurate molecular diagnostics for identification of infection in humans have not been extensively adopted. Time-consuming culture-based methods remain to the forefront of clinical microbial detection. The 16S rRNA gene, a molecular marker for identification of bacterial species, is ubiquitous to members of this domain and, thanks to ever-expanding databases of sequence information, a useful tool for bacterial identification. In this study, we assembled an extensive repository of clinical isolates (n = 617), representing 30 medically important pathogenic species and originally identified using traditional culture-based or non-16S molecular methods. This strain repository was used to systematically evaluate the ability of 16S rRNA for species level identification. To enable the most accurate species level classification based on the paucity of sequence data accumulated in public databases, we built a Naïve Bayes classifier representing a diverse set of high-quality sequences from medically important bacterial organisms. We show that for species identification, a model-based approach is superior to an alignment based method. Overall, between 16S gene based and clinical identities, our study shows a genus-level concordance rate of 96% and a species-level concordance rate of 87.5%. We point to multiple cases of probable clinical misidentification with traditional culture based identification across a wide range of gram-negative rods and gram-positive cocci as well as common gram-negative cocci. PMID:25658760

  16. Evaluation of 16SpathDB 2.0, an automated 16S rRNA gene sequence database, using 689 complete bacterial genomes.

    PubMed

    Teng, Jade L L; Ho, Tom C C; Yeung, Ronald S Y; Wong, Annette Y P; Wang, Haiyin; Chen, Chen; Fung, Kitty S C; Lau, Susanna K P; Woo, Patrick C Y

    2014-02-01

    Interpretation of 16S rRNA sequences is a difficult problem faced by clinical microbiologists and technicians. In this study, we evaluated the updated 16SpathDB 2.0 database, using 689 16S rRNA sequences from 689 complete genomes of medically important bacteria. Among these 689 16S rRNA sequences, none was wrongly identified, with 35.8% reported as a single bacterial species having >98% identity with the query sequence (category 1), 63.9% reported as more than 1 bacterial species having >98% identity with the query sequence (category 2), 0.3% reported to the genus level (category 3), and none reported as no match (category 4). For the 16S rRNA sequences of non-duplicated bacterial species reported as category 1 or 2, the percentage of bacterial species reported as category 1 was significantly higher for anaerobic Gram-positive/Gram-negative bacteria than aerobic/facultative anaerobic Gram-positive/Gram-negative bacteria. 16SpathDB 2.0 is a user-friendly and accurate database for 16S rRNA sequence interpretation in clinical laboratories. PMID:24295571

  17. Description of Drinking Water Bacterial Communities Using 16S rRNA Gene Sequence Analyses

    EPA Science Inventory

    Descriptions of bacterial communities inhabiting water distribution systems (WDS) have mainly been accomplished using culture-based approaches. Due to the inherent selective nature of culture-based approaches, the majority of bacteria inhabiting WDS remain uncharacterized. The go...

  18. Response of a Soil Bacterial Community to Grassland Succession as Monitored by 16S rRNA Levels of the Predominant Ribotypes

    PubMed Central

    Felske, Andreas; Wolterink, Arthur; Van Lis, Robert; De Vos, Willem M.; Akkermans, Antoon D. L.

    2000-01-01

    The composition of predominant soil bacteria during grassland succession was investigated in the Dutch Drentse A area. Five meadows, taken out of agricultural production at different time points, and one currently fertilized plot represented different stages of grassland succession. Since fertilization and agricultural production were stopped, the six plots showed a constant decline in the levels of nutrients and vegetation changes. The activity of the predominant bacteria was monitored by direct ribosome isolation from soil and temperature gradient gel electrophoresis of reverse transcription (RT)-PCR products generated from bacterial 16S rRNA. The amounts of 16S rRNA of 20 predominant ribosome types per gram of soil were monitored via multiple competitive RT-PCR in six plots at different succession stages. These ribosome types mainly represented Bacillus and members of the Acidobacterium cluster and the ? subclass of the class Proteobacteria. The 20 16S rRNA molecules monitored represented approximately half of all bacterial soil rRNA which was estimated by dot blot hybridizations of soil rRNA with the Bacteria probe EUB338. The grasslands showed highly reproducible and specific shifts of bacterial ribosome type composition. The total bacterial ribosome level increased during the first years after agricultural production and fertilization stopped. This correlated with the collapse of the dominant Lolium perenne population and an increased rate of mineralization of organic matter. The results indicate that there is a true correlation between the total activity of the bacterial community in soil and the amount of bacterial ribosomes. PMID:10966420

  19. Variability in abundance of the Bacterial and Archaeal 16S rRNA and amoA genes in water columns of northern South China Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, H.; Yang, C.; Chen, S.; Xie, W.; Wang, P.; Zhang, C. L.

    2014-12-01

    Recent advances in marine microbial ecology have shown that ammonia-oxidizing Archaea (AOA) are more abundant than ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB), although total Bacteria are more abundant than total Archaea in marine environments. This study aimed to examine the spatial distribution and abundance of planktonic archaeal and bacterial 16S rRNA- and amoA genes in the northern South China Sea. Water samples were collected at different depths at six stations (maximum depth ranging from 1800 m to 3200 m?with four stations (B2, B3, B6, B7) located along a transect from the northeastern continental slope to the Bashi Strait and the other two (D3, D5) located southwest of this transect. Quantitative PCR of the 16S rRNA- and amoA genes was used to estimate the abundances of total Archaea, total Bacteria, and AOA and AOB, respectively. At the B series stations, the abundance of bacterial 16S rRNA gene was twofold to 36fold higher than that of the archaeal 16S rRNA gene while fivefold lower to sixfold higher at the two D stations, with both genes showing peak values slightly below sea surface (5-75 m depths) at all stations. The archaeal amoA gene had similar variations with the archaeal 16S rRNA gene, but was 1-4 orders of magnitude lower than the archaeal 16S rRNA gene at all stations. Bacterial amoA gene was below the detection at all stations. Our results also show the difference in depth profiles among these stations, which may be caused by the difference in water movement between these regions. The non-detection of bacterial amoA gene indicates that ammonia-oxidizing Archaea are the dominant group of microorganisms in nitrification of the South China Sea, which is consistent with observations in other oceans.

  20. Macroalgal Extracts Induce Bacterial Assemblage Shifts and Sublethal Tissue Stress in Caribbean Corals

    PubMed Central

    Morrow, Kathleen M.; Ritson-Williams, Raphael; Ross, Cliff; Liles, Mark R.; Paul, Valerie J.

    2012-01-01

    Benthic macroalgae can be abundant on present-day coral reefs, especially where rates of herbivory are low and/or dissolved nutrients are high. This study investigated the impact of macroalgal extracts on both coral-associated bacterial assemblages and sublethal stress response of corals. Crude extracts and live algal thalli from common Caribbean macroalgae were applied onto the surface of Montastraea faveolata and Porites astreoides corals on reefs in both Florida and Belize. Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) of 16S rRNA gene amplicons was used to examine changes in the surface mucus layer (SML) bacteria in both coral species. Some of the extracts and live algae induced detectable shifts in coral-associated bacterial assemblages. However, one aqueous extract caused the bacterial assemblages to shift to an entirely new state (Lobophora variegata), whereas other organic extracts had little to no impact (e.g. Dictyota sp.). Macroalgal extracts more frequently induced sublethal stress responses in M. faveolata than in P. astreoides corals, suggesting that cellular integrity can be negatively impacted in selected corals when comparing co-occurring species. As modern reefs experience phase-shifts to a higher abundance of macroalgae with potent chemical defenses, these macroalgae are likely impacting the composition of microbial assemblages associated with corals and affecting overall reef health in unpredicted and unprecedented ways. PMID:23028648

  1. Antibacterial resistance, macrophage influx, and activation induced by bacterial rRNA with dimethyldioctadecylammonium bromide.

    PubMed Central

    Gonggrijp, R; Mullers, W J; Dullens, H F; van Boven, C P

    1985-01-01

    Intraperitoneally injected rRNA from Pseudomonas aeruginosa combined with dimethyldioctadecylammonium bromide (DDA) increased nonspecifically the resistance of mice against an intraperitoneal challenge with extracellular (P. aeruginosa, Escherichia coli) and intracellular (Listeria monocytogenes) bacteria. This study concerns the mechanism underlying the nonspecific resistance. RNA with DDA (RNA-DDA) induced a cell influx and activated peritoneal macrophages (M phi) as judged by the decreased 5'-nucleotidase and alkaline phosphodiesterase activities in M phi lysates, the enhanced O2- release, and the increased antitumor activity in comparison with unstimulated M phi. RNA without DDA did not enhance the resistance and did not influence the peritoneal cell numbers or M phi properties. DDA without RNA enhanced the resistance of mice only slightly; it induced a cell influx, yielding elicited M phi as judged by the decreased 5'-nucleotidase activity and increased alkaline phosphodiesterase activity, the slightly enhanced O2- release, and the absence of increased antitumor activity. Both RNA-DDA and DDA M phi showed an enhanced capacity to ingest and kill L. monocytogenes in vitro, DDA M phi being slightly less effective than RNA-DDA M phi with respect to killing. We conclude that the enhanced killing capacity of M phi for L. monocytogenes is characteristic of both elicited DDA M phi and activated RNA-DDA M phi. The relationship between nonspecific resistance, peritoneal cell numbers, and antibacterial M phi activity is discussed. In addition, it is shown that RNA and DDA retain their activity when they are injected apart, suggesting that they activate M phi by sequential action. PMID:2415454

  2. Bacterial communities in haloalkaliphilic sulfate-reducing bioreactors under different electron donors revealed by 16S rRNA MiSeq sequencing.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Jiemin; Zhou, Xuemei; Li, Yuguang; Xing, Jianmin

    2015-09-15

    Biological technology used to treat flue gas is useful to replace conventional treatment, but there is sulfide inhibition. However, no sulfide toxicity effect was observed in haloalkaliphilic bioreactors. The performance of the ethanol-fed bioreactor was better than that of lactate-, glucose-, and formate-fed bioreactor, respectively. To support this result strongly, Illumina MiSeq paired-end sequencing of 16S rRNA gene was applied to investigate the bacterial communities. A total of 389,971 effective sequences were obtained and all of them were assigned to 10,220 operational taxonomic units (OTUs) at a 97% similarity. Bacterial communities in the glucose-fed bioreactor showed the greatest richness and evenness. The highest relative abundance of sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) was found in the ethanol-fed bioreactor, which can explain why the performance of the ethanol-fed bioreactor was the best. Different types of SRB, sulfur-oxidizing bacteria, and sulfur-reducing bacteria were detected, indicating that sulfur may be cycled among these microorganisms. Because high-throughput 16S rRNA gene paired-end sequencing has improved resolution of bacterial community analysis, many rare microorganisms were detected, such as Halanaerobium, Halothiobacillus, Desulfonatronum, Syntrophobacter, and Fusibacter. 16S rRNA gene sequencing of these bacteria would provide more functional and phylogenetic information about the bacterial communities. PMID:25897699

  3. Sulfur-oxidizing bacterial endosymbionts: analysis of phylogeny and specificity by 16S rRNA sequences. [Calyptogena magnifica; Bathymodiolus thermophilus; Lucinoma annulata; Lucinoma aequizonata; Codakia orbicularis

    SciTech Connect

    Distel, D.L.; Lane, D.J.; Olsen, G.J.; Giovannoni, S.J.; Pace, B.; Pace, N.R.; Stahl, D.A.; Felbeck, H.

    1988-06-01

    The 16S rRNAs from the bacterial endosymbionts of six marine invertebrates from diverse environments were isolated and partially sequenced. These symbionts included the trophosome symbiont of Riftia pachyptila, the gill symbionts of Calyptogena magnifica and Bathymodiolus thermophilus (from deep-sea hydrothermal vents), and the gill symbionts of Lucinoma annulata, Lucinoma aequizonata, and Codakia orbicularis (from relatively shallow coastal environments). Only one type of bacterial 16S rRNA was detected in each symbiosis. Using nucleotide sequence comparisons, we showed that each of the bacterial symbionts is distinct from the others and that all fall within a limited domain of the gamma subdivision of the purple bacteria (one of the major eubacterial divisions previously defined by 16S rRNA analysis. Two host specimens were analyzed in five of the symbioses; in each case, identical bacterial rRNA sequences were obtained from conspecific host specimens. These data indicate that the symbioses examined are species specific and that the symbiont species are unique to and invariant within their respective host species.

  4. 16S rRNA phylogenetic analysis of the bacterial endosymbionts associated with cytoplasmic incompatibility in insects.

    PubMed Central

    O'Neill, S L; Giordano, R; Colbert, A M; Karr, T L; Robertson, H M

    1992-01-01

    Bacterial endosymbionts of insects have long been implicated in the phenomenon of cytoplasmic incompatibility, in which certain crosses between symbiont-infected individuals lead to embryonic death or sex ratio distortion. The taxonomic position of these bacteria has, however, not been known with any certainty. Similarly, the relatedness of the bacteria infecting various insect hosts has been unclear. The inability to grow these bacteria on defined cell-free medium has been the major factor underlying these uncertainties. We circumvented this problem by selective PCR amplification and subsequent sequencing of the symbiont 16S rRNA genes directly from infected insect tissue. Maximum parsimony analysis of these sequences indicates that the symbionts belong in the alpha-subdivision of the Proteobacteria, where they are most closely related to the Rickettsia and their relatives. They are all closely related to each other and are assigned to the type species Wolbachia pipientis. Lack of congruence between the phylogeny of the symbionts and their insect hosts suggest that horizontal transfer of symbionts between insect species may occur. Comparison of the sequences for W. pipientis and for Wolbachia persica, an endosymbiont of ticks, shows that the genus Wolbachia is polyphyletic. A PCR assay based on 16S primers was designed for the detection of W. pipientis in insect tissue, and initial screening of insects indicates that cytoplasmic incompatibility may be a more general phenomenon in insects than is currently recognized. Images PMID:1557375

  5. Bacterial and archaeal 16S rDNA and 16S rRNA dynamics during an acetate crisis in an anaerobic digestor ecosystem

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Céline Delbès; René Moletta; Jean-Jacques Godon

    2001-01-01

    The dynamics of bacterial and archaeal populations of a laboratory-scale anaerobic digestor were investigated during a crisis period of the process reflected by an accumulation of acetate. A culture-independent approach based on single strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP) analysis of total 16S rDNA and 16S rRNA amplification products was used. A spirochete and a Synergistes sp. showed high and changing activity

  6. Bacterial Community Shift in Treated Periodontitis Patients Revealed by Ion Torrent 16S rRNA Gene Amplicon Sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Jünemann, Sebastian; Prior, Karola; Szczepanowski, Rafael; Harks, Inga; Ehmke, Benjamin; Goesmann, Alexander; Stoye, Jens; Harmsen, Dag

    2012-01-01

    Periodontitis, one of the most common diseases in the world, is caused by a mixture of pathogenic bacteria and inflammatory host responses and often treated by antimicrobials as an adjunct to scaling and root planing (SRP). Our study aims to elucidate explorative and descriptive temporal shifts in bacterial communities between patients treated by SRP alone versus SRP plus antibiotics. This is the first metagenomic study using an Ion Torrent Personal Genome Machine (PGM). Eight subgingival plaque samples from four patients with chronic periodontitis, taken before and two months after intervention were analyzed. Amplicons from the V6 hypervariable region of the 16S rRNA gene were generated and sequenced each on a 314 chip. Sequencing reads were clustered into operational taxonomic units (OTUs, 3% distance), described by community metrics, and taxonomically classified. Reads ranging from 599,933 to 650,416 per sample were clustered into 1,648 to 2,659 non-singleton OTUs, respectively. Increased diversity (Shannon and Simpson) in all samples after therapy was observed regardless of the treatment type whereas richness (ACE) showed no correlation. Taxonomic analysis revealed different microbial shifts between both therapy approaches at all taxonomic levels. Most remarkably, the genera Porphyromonas, Tannerella, Treponema, and Filifactor all harboring periodontal pathogenic species were removed almost only in the group treated with SPR and antibiotics. For the species T. forsythia and P. gingivalis results were corroborated by real-time PCR analysis. In the future, hypothesis free metagenomic analysis could be the key in understanding polymicrobial diseases and be used for therapy monitoring. Therefore, as read length continues to increase and cost to decrease, rapid benchtop sequencers like the PGM might finally be used in routine diagnostic. PMID:22870235

  7. Bacterial diversity among small-subunit rRNA gene clones and cellular isolates from the same seawater sample.

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, M T; Rappé, M S; Haimberger, Z W; Winfield, H; Adair, N; Ströbel, J; Giovannoni, S J

    1997-01-01

    Numerous investigations applying the cloning and sequencing of rRNA genes (rDNAs) to the study of marine bacterioplankton diversity have shown that the sequences of genes cloned directly from environmental DNA do not correspond to the genes of cultured marine taxa. These results have been interpreted as support for the hypothesis that the most abundant heterotrophic marine bacterioplankton species are not readily culturable by commonly used methods. However, an alternative explanation is that marine bacterioplankton can be easily cultured but are not well represented in sequence databases. To further examine this question, we compared the small-subunit (SSU) rDNAs of 127 cellular clones isolated from a water sample collected off the Oregon coast to 58 bacterial SSU rDNAs cloned from environmental DNAs from the same water sample. The results revealed little overlap between partial SSU rDNA sequences from the cellular clones and the environmental clone library. An exception was the SSU rDNA sequence recovered from a cellular clone belonging to the Pseudomonas subgroup of the gamma subclass of the class Proteobacteria, which was related to a single gene cloned directly from the same water sample (OCS181) (similarity, 94.6%). In addition, partial SSU rDNA sequences from three of the cultured strains matched a novel rDNA clone related to the gamma subclass of the Proteobacteria found previously in an environmental clone library from marine aggregates (AGG53) (similarity, 94.3 to 99.6%). Our results support the hypothesis that many of the most abundant bacterioplankton species are not readily culturable by standard methods but also show that heterotrophic bacterioplankton that are culturable on media with high organic contents include many strains for which SSU rDNA sequences are not available in sequence databases. PMID:9055415

  8. Taxonomic Precision of Different Hypervariable Regions of 16S rRNA Gene and Annotation Methods for Functional Bacterial Groups in Biological Wastewater Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Feng; Ju, Feng; Cai, Lin; Zhang, Tong

    2013-01-01

    High throughput sequencing of 16S rRNA gene leads us into a deeper understanding on bacterial diversity for complex environmental samples, but introduces blurring due to the relatively low taxonomic capability of short read. For wastewater treatment plant, only those functional bacterial genera categorized as nutrient remediators, bulk/foaming species, and potential pathogens are significant to biological wastewater treatment and environmental impacts. Precise taxonomic assignment of these bacteria at least at genus level is important for microbial ecological research and routine wastewater treatment monitoring. Therefore, the focus of this study was to evaluate the taxonomic precisions of different ribosomal RNA (rRNA) gene hypervariable regions generated from a mix activated sludge sample. In addition, three commonly used classification methods including RDP Classifier, BLAST-based best-hit annotation, and the lowest common ancestor annotation by MEGAN were evaluated by comparing their consistency. Under an unsupervised way, analysis of consistency among different classification methods suggests there are no hypervariable regions with good taxonomic coverage for all genera. Taxonomic assignment based on certain regions of the 16S rRNA genes, e.g. the V1&V2 regions – provide fairly consistent taxonomic assignment for a relatively wide range of genera. Hence, it is recommended to use these regions for studying functional groups in activated sludge. Moreover, the inconsistency among methods also demonstrated that a specific method might not be suitable for identification of some bacterial genera using certain 16S rRNA gene regions. As a general rule, drawing conclusions based only on one sequencing region and one classification method should be avoided due to the potential false negative results. PMID:24146837

  9. Ultradeep 16S rRNA Sequencing Analysis of Geographically Similar but Diverse Unexplored Marine Samples Reveal Varied Bacterial Community Composition

    PubMed Central

    Karutha Pandian, Shunmugiah

    2013-01-01

    Background Bacterial community composition in the marine environment differs from one geographical location to another. Reports that delineate the bacterial diversity of different marine samples from geographically similar location are limited. The present study aims to understand whether the bacterial community compositions from different marine samples harbour similar bacterial diversity since these are geographically related to each other. Methods and Principal Findings In the present study, 16S rRNA deep sequencing analysis targeting V3 region was performed using Illumina bar coded sequencing. A total of 22.44 million paired end reads were obtained from the metagenomic DNA of Marine sediment, Rhizosphere sediment, Seawater and the epibacterial DNA of Seaweed and Seagrass. Diversity index analysis revealed that Marine sediment has the highest bacterial diversity and the least bacterial diversity was observed in Rhizosphere sediment. Proteobacteria, Actinobacteria and Bacteroidetes were the dominant taxa present in all the marine samples. Nearly 62–71% of rare species were identified in all the samples and most of these rare species were unique to a particular sample. Further taxonomic assignment at the phylum and genus level revealed that the bacterial community compositions differ among the samples. Conclusion This is the first report that supports the fact that, bacterial community composition is specific for specific samples irrespective of its similar geographical location. Existence of specific bacterial community for each sample may drive overall difference in bacterial structural composition of each sample. Further studies like whole metagenomic sequencing will throw more insights to the key stone players and its interconnecting metabolic pathways. In addition, this is one of the very few reports that depicts the unexplored bacterial diversity of marine samples (Marine sediment, Rhizosphere sediment, Seawater) and the host associated marine samples (Seaweed and Seagrass) at higher depths from uncharacterised coastal region of Palk Bay, India using next generation sequencing technology. PMID:24167548

  10. Bacterial community structure in the intestinal ecosystem of rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) as revealed by pyrosequencing-based analysis of 16S rRNA genes.

    PubMed

    Etyemez, Miray; Balcázar, José Luis

    2015-06-01

    In this study, we determined the diversity and composition of bacterial communities within the intestinal ecosystem of farmed rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss). Healthy rainbow trout, weighing between 520 and 750?g, were fed a commercial diet. Subsequently, genomic DNA was isolated from the intestinal mucus (n?=?16 fish samples) and combined into groups of four fish samples each for pyrosequencing analysis of bacterial 16S rRNA genes. The results revealed that the most abundant operational taxonomic units (OTUs) were affiliated to the genera Acinetobacter, Cetobacterium, Pseudomonas, and Psychrobacter, and to a lesser extent, the genera Aeromonas, Clostridium, Deefgea, Flavobacterium, Neptuniibacter, and Mycoplasma. These findings could be used as a baseline for further studies about the role of bacterial communities in normal and altered host physiological states. PMID:25843896

  11. Combination of 16S rRNA variable regions provides a detailed analysis of bacterial community dynamics in the lungs of cystic fibrosis patients

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Chronic bronchopulmonary bacterial infections remain the most common cause of morbidity and mortality among patients with cystic fibrosis (CF). Recent community sequencing work has now shown that the bacterial community in the CF lung is polymicrobial. Identifying bacteria in the CF lung through sequencing can be costly and is not practical for many laboratories. Molecular techniques such as terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism or amplicon length heterogeneity-polymerase chain reaction (LH-PCR) can provide many laboratories with the ability to study CF bacterial communities without costly sequencing. The aim of this study was to determine if the use of LH-PCR with multiple hypervariable regions of the 16S rRNA gene could be used to identify organisms found in sputum DNA. This work also determined if LH-PCR could be used to observe the dynamics of lung infections over a period of time. Nineteen samples were analysed with the V1 and the V1_V2 region of the 16S rRNA gene. Based on the amplicon size present in the V1_V2 region, Pseudomonas aeruginosa was confirmed to be in all 19 samples obtained from the patients. The V1 region provided a higher power of discrimination between bacterial profiles of patients. Both regions were able to identify trends in the bacterial population over a period of time. LH profiles showed that the CF lung community is dynamic and that changes in the community may in part be driven by the patient's antibiotic treatment. LH-PCR is a tool that is well suited for studying bacterial communities and their dynamics. PMID:20368138

  12. Bacterial and archaeal 16S rDNA and 16S rRNA dynamics during an acetate crisis in an anaerobic digestor ecosystem.

    PubMed

    Delbès, C; Moletta, R; Godon, J -J.

    2001-03-01

    The dynamics of bacterial and archaeal populations of a laboratory-scale anaerobic digestor were investigated during a crisis period of the process reflected by an accumulation of acetate. A culture-independent approach based on single strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP) analysis of total 16S rDNA and 16S rRNA amplification products was used. A spirochete and a Synergistes sp. showed high and changing activity levels during the study. A Clostridium sp. showed a transient increase in presence and activity concomitant with the highest acetate concentrations. A major shift in the most active archaeal populations from hydrogenotrophic to acetoclastic methanogens preceded the recovery of the reactor. PMID:11248386

  13. How much can we learn about the function of bacterial rRNA modification by mining large-scale experimental datasets?

    PubMed Central

    Sergiev, Petr V.; Golovina, Anna Y.; Sergeeva, Olga V.; Osterman, Ilya A.; Nesterchuk, Mikhail V.; Bogdanov, Alexey A.; Dontsova, Olga A.

    2012-01-01

    Modification of ribosomal RNA is ubiquitous among living organisms. Its functional role is well established for only a limited number of modified nucleotides. There are examples of rRNA modification involvement in the gene expression regulation in the cell. There is a need for large data set analysis in the search for potential functional partners for rRNA modification. In this study, we extracted phylogenetic profile, genome neighbourhood, co-expression and phenotype profile and co-purification data regarding Escherichia coli rRNA modification enzymes from public databases. Results were visualized as graphs using Cytoscape and analysed. Majority linked genes/proteins belong to translation apparatus. Among co-purification partners of rRNA modification enzymes are several candidates for experimental validation. Phylogenetic profiling revealed links of pseudouridine synthetases with RF2, RsmH with translation factors IF2, RF1 and LepA and RlmM with RdgC. Genome neighbourhood connections revealed several putative functionally linked genes, e.g. rlmH with genes coding for cell wall biosynthetic proteins and others. Comparative analysis of expression profiles (Gene Expression Omnibus) revealed two main associations, a group of genes expressed during fast growth and association of rrmJ with heat shock genes. This study might be used as a roadmap for further experimental verification of predicted functional interactions. PMID:22411911

  14. Identification of novel bacterial lineages as active members of microbial populations in a freshwater sediment using a rapid RNA extraction procedure and RT-PCR

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ian P. Miskin; P. Farrimond; Ian M. Head

    1999-01-01

    A rapid method for the extraction of RNA from the indigenous bacterial communities in environmental samples was developed. The method was tested using anoxic sediment samples from a productive freshwater lake (Priest Pot, Cumbria, UK). The simple protocol yielded rRNA and mRNA of a purity suitable for amplification by reverse transcriptase PCR (RT-PCR). The integrity of the RT-PCR was demonstrated

  15. Bacterial diversity among small-subunit rRNA gene clones and cellular isolates from the same seawater sample

    Microsoft Academic Search

    MARCELINO T. SUZUKI; MICHAEL S. RAPPE; ZARA W. HAIMBERGER

    1997-01-01

    Numerous investigations applying the cloning and sequencing of rRNA genes (rDNAs) to the study of marine bacterioplankton diversity have shown that the sequences of genes cloned directly from environmental DNA do not correspond to the genes of cultured marine taxa. These results have been interpreted as support for the hypothesis that the most abundant heterotrophic marine bacterioplankton species are not

  16. Characterization of bacterial community shift in human Ulcerative Colitis patients revealed by Illumina based 16S rRNA gene amplicon sequencing

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The healthy human intestine is represented by the presence of bacterial communities predominantly belonging to obligate anaerobes; however disparity and dysanaerobiosis in intestinal microflora may lead to the progression of ulcerative colitis (UC). The foremost aim of this study is to consider and compare the gut microbiota composition in patients suffering from different stages of UC. Methods This study represents data from the biopsy samples of six individuals suffering from UC. The samples were collected by colonoscopy and were processed immediately for isolation of DNA. Mucosal microbiota was analyzed by means of 16S rRNA gene-based Illumina high throughput sequencing. Quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) was performed to determine total bacterial abundances. Results Analysis of 23,927 OTUs demonstrated a significant reduction of bacterial diversity consistently from phylum to species level (p?bacterial count was detected in patients suffering from severe inflammatory stage (2.98 +/-0.49 E?+?09/ml) when compared with patients with moderate (1.03+/-0.29 E?+?08/ml) and mild (1.76 +/-0.34 E?+?08/ml) stages of inflammation. Conclusion The reduction of bacterial diversity with an increase in the total bacterial count indicates a shift of bacterial communities which signifies dysbiosis and dysanaerobiosis at the mucosal level for patients suffering from UC. PMID:25018784

  17. CpG motifs: the active ingredient in bacterial extracts?

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Arthur M Krieg

    2003-01-01

    The use of bacteria and bacterial extracts for immunotherapy has a checkered past. Recent developments in immunology reveal that these nonspecific immune activators actually work by triggering specific receptors that are expressed by subsets of immune cells. Identification of these receptors and the molecular signaling pathways that they activate has enabled a new era of specific targeted immunotherapy using chemically

  18. Bacterial Community Composition in the Gut Content and Ambient Sediment of Sea Cucumber Apostichopus japonicus Revealed by 16S rRNA Gene Pyrosequencing

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Fei; Li, Fenghui; Tan, Jie; Yan, Jingping; Sun, Huiling

    2014-01-01

    The composition of the bacterial communities in the contents of the foregut and hindgut of the sea cucumber Apostichopus japonicus and in the ambient surface sediment was surveyed by 16S rRNA gene 454-pyrosequencing. A total of 188,623 optimized reads and 15,527 operational taxonomic units (OTUs) were obtained from the ten gut contents samples and four surface sediment samples. The sequences in the sediments, foregut contents, and hindgut contents were assigned to 38.0±4.7, 31.2±6.2 and 27.8±6.5 phyla, respectively. The bacterial richness and Shannon diversity index were both higher in the ambient sediments than in the gut contents. Proteobacteria was the predominant phylum in both the gut contents and sediment samples. The predominant classes in the foregut, hindgut, and ambient sediment were Holophagae and Gammaproteobacteria, Deltaproteobacteria and Gammaproteobacteria, and Gammaproteobacteria and Deltaproteobacteria, respectively. The potential probiotics, including sequences related to Bacillus, lactic acid bacteria (Lactobacillus, Lactococcus, and Streptococcus) and Pseudomonas were detected in the gut of A. japonicus. Principle component analysis and heatmap figure showed that the foregut, hindgut, and ambient sediment respectively harbored different characteristic bacterial communities. Selective feeding of A. japonicus may be the primary source of the different bacterial communities between the foregut contents and ambient sediments. PMID:24967593

  19. Bacterial Community Composition in Central European Running Waters Examined by Temperature Gradient Gel Electrophoresis and Sequence Analysis of 16S rRNA Genes? †

    PubMed Central

    Beier, Sara; Witzel, Karl-Paul; Marxsen, Jürgen

    2008-01-01

    The bacterial community composition in small streams and a river in central Germany was examined by temperature gradient gel electrophoresis (TGGE) with PCR products of 16S rRNA gene fragments and sequence analysis. Complex TGGE band patterns suggested high levels of diversity of bacterial species in all habitats of these environments. Cluster analyses demonstrated distinct differences among the communities in stream and spring water, sandy sediments, biofilms on stones, degrading leaves, and soil. The differences between stream water and sediment were more significant than those between sites within the same habitat along the stretch from the stream source to the mouth. TGGE data from an entire stream course suggest that, in the upper reach of the stream, a special suspended bacterial community is already established and changes only slightly downstream. The bacterial communities in water and sediment in an acidic headwater with a pH below 5 were highly similar to each other but deviated distinctly from the communities at the other sites. As ascertained by nucleotide sequence analysis, stream water communities were dominated by Betaproteobacteria (one-third of the total bacteria), whereas sediment communities were composed mainly of Betaproteobacteria and members of the Fibrobacteres/Acidobacteria group (each accounting for about 25% of bacteria). Sequences obtained from bacteria from water samples indicated the presence of typical cosmopolitan freshwater organisms. TGGE bands shared between stream and soil samples, as well as sequences found in bacteria from stream samples that were related to those of soil bacteria, demonstrated the occurrence of some species in both stream and soil habitats. Changes in bacterial community composition were correlated with geographic distance along a stream, but in comparisons of different streams and rivers, community composition was correlated only with environmental conditions. PMID:18024682

  20. Conserved bacterial RNase YbeY plays key roles in 70S ribosome quality control and 16S rRNA maturation.

    PubMed

    Jacob, Asha Ivy; Köhrer, Caroline; Davies, Bryan William; RajBhandary, Uttam Lal; Walker, Graham Charles

    2013-02-01

    Quality control of ribosomes is critical for cellular function since protein mistranslation leads to severe physiological consequences. We report evidence of a previously unrecognized ribosome quality control system in bacteria that operates at the level of 70S to remove defective ribosomes. YbeY, a previously unidentified endoribonuclease, and the exonuclease RNase R act together by a process mediated specifically by the 30S ribosomal subunit, to degrade defective 70S ribosomes but not properly matured 70S ribosomes or individual subunits. Furthermore, there is essentially no fully matured 16S rRNA in a ?ybeY mutant at 45°C, making YbeY the only endoribonuclease to be implicated in the critically important processing of the 16S rRNA 3' terminus. These key roles in ribosome quality control and maturation indicate why YbeY is a member of the minimal bacterial gene set and suggest that it could be a potential target for antibacterial drugs. PMID:23273979

  1. Bacterial communities of traditional salted and fermented seafoods from Jeju Island of Korea using 16S rRNA gene clone library analysis.

    PubMed

    Kim, Min-Soo; Park, Eun-Jin

    2014-05-01

    Jeotgal, which is widely consumed as a nutritional supplement in Korea, is traditional type of preserved seafood that is prepared by salting and fermenting. Here, we report on the bacterial community structure and diversity of jeotgal obtained from the Korean island of Jeju, which has a subtropical climate. Two samples of Jeotgal were collected from Jeju, made from either damselfish (Chromis notata; jari-dom-jeot, J1 and J2) or silver-stripe round herring (Spratelloides gracilis; ggot-myulchi-jeot, K1 and K2). The physical characteristics (pH and salinity) were assessed and the bacterial communities characterized using 16S rRNA gene-clone library analysis and cultural isolation. No difference was found in the community composition between the J and K fermented seafoods. Both fermented seafoods had relatively high salinity (26% to 33%) and high pH values (pH 6.08 to 6.72). Based on the 16S rRNA gene sequences, the halophilic lactic-acid bacteria Tetragenococcus halophilus and T. muriaticus were observed to be dominant in the J and K fermented seafoods, accompanied by halophilic bacteria including Halanaerobium spp., Halomonas spp., and Chromohalobacter spp. When compared with 7 other types of fermented seafood from a previous study, the communities of the J and K fermented seafoods were separated by the most influential group, the genus Tetragenococcus. The results suggest that these 2 types of traditional salted fermented seafood from Jeju have distinct communities dominated by Tetragenococcus spp., which are derived from the raw ingredients and are dependent on the physical conditions. This may explain how the seafoods that are made in Jeju may differ from other jeotgals. PMID:24689962

  2. Bacterial Community Composition of South China Sea Sediments through Pyrosequencing-Based Analysis of 16S rRNA Genes

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Daochen; Tanabe, Shoko-Hosoi; Yang, Chong; Zhang, Weimin; Sun, Jianzhong

    2013-01-01

    Background Subseafloor sediments accumulate large amounts of organic and inorganic materials that contain a highly diverse microbial ecosystem. The aim of this study was to survey the bacterial community of subseafloor sediments from the South China Sea. Methodology/Principal Findings Pyrosequencing of over 265,000 amplicons of the V3 hypervariable region of the 16S ribosomal RNA gene was performed on 16 sediment samples collected from multiple locations in the northern region of the South China Sea from depths ranging from 35 to 4000 m. A total of 9,726 operational taxonomic units (OTUs; between 695 and 2819 unique OTUs per sample) at 97% sequence similarity level were generated. In total, 40 bacterial phyla including 22 formally described phyla and 18 candidate phyla, with Proteobacteria, Firmicutes, Planctomycetes, Actinobacteria and Chloroflexi being most diverse, were identified. The most abundant phylotype, accounting for 42.6% of all sequences, belonged to Gammaproteobacteria, which possessed absolute predominance in the samples analyzed. Among the 18 candidate phyla, 12 were found for the first time in the South China Sea. Conclusions This study provided a novel insight into the composition of bacterial communities of the South China Sea subseafloor. Furthermore, abundances and community similarity analysis showed that the compositions of the bacterial communities are very similar at phylum level at different depths from 35-4000 m. PMID:24205246

  3. Bacterial Etiology for Chronic Villitis Is Not Supported by Polymerase Chain Reaction for 16S rRNA DNA

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Linda M. Ernst; Jill Crouch; Henry Rinder; John Greg Howe

    2005-01-01

    Chronic villitis is characterized by chorionic villi infiltrated by lymphocytes, histiocytes, and sometimes plasma cells. In a small percentage of cases, an infectious agent can be demonstrated within areas of chronic villitis. However, the pathogenesis of most lesions is idiopathic. Chronic villitis may represent the direct spread of chronic endometrial infection by bacterial organisms that are particularly problematic for culture.

  4. [Dominant phylotypes in the 16S rRNA gene clone libraries from bacterial mats of the Uzon caldera (Kamchatka, Russia) hydrothermal springs].

    PubMed

    Akimov, V N; Podosokorskaia, O A; Shliapnikov, M G; Gal'chenko, V F

    2013-01-01

    In situ analysis of the 16S rRNA genes form bacterial mats of five hydrothermal springs (36-58 degrees C) in the Uzon caldera (Kamchatka, Russia) was carried out using clone libraries. Eight clone libraries contained 18 dominant phylotypes (over 4-5%). In most clone libraries, the phylotype of the green sulfur bacterium Chlorobaculum sp. was among the dominant ones. The phylotypes of the green nonsulfur bacteria Chloroflexus and Roseiflexus and of purple nonsulfur bacteria Rhodoblastus, Rhodopseudomonas, and Rhodoferax were also among the dominant ones. Cyanobacteria were represented by one dominant phylotype in a single spring. Among nonphototrophic bacteria, the dominant phylotypes belonged to Sulfyrihydrogenibium sp., Geothrixsp., Acidobacterium sp., Meiothermus sp., Thiomonas sp., Thiofaba sp., and Spirochaeta sp. Three phylotypes were not identified at the genus level. Most genera of phototrophic and nonphototrophic organisms corresponding to the phylotypes from Uzon hydrotherms have been previously revealed in the hydrotherms of volcanically active regions of America, Asia, and Europe. These results indicate predominance of bacterial mats carrying out anaerobic photosynthesis in the hydrotherms of the Uzon caldera. PMID:25509409

  5. Rapid 16S rRNA Next-Generation Sequencing of Polymicrobial Clinical Samples for Diagnosis of Complex Bacterial Infections

    PubMed Central

    Salipante, Stephen J.; Sengupta, Dhruba J.; Rosenthal, Christopher; Costa, Gina; Spangler, Jessica; Sims, Elizabeth H.; Jacobs, Michael A.; Miller, Samuel I.; Hoogestraat, Daniel R.; Cookson, Brad T.; McCoy, Connor; Matsen, Frederick A.; Shendure, Jay; Lee, Clarence C.; Harkins, Timothy T.; Hoffman, Noah G.

    2013-01-01

    Classifying individual bacterial species comprising complex, polymicrobial patient specimens remains a challenge for culture-based and molecular microbiology techniques in common clinical use. We therefore adapted practices from metagenomics research to rapidly catalog the bacterial composition of clinical specimens directly from patients, without need for prior culture. We have combined a semiconductor deep sequencing protocol that produces reads spanning 16S ribosomal RNA gene variable regions 1 and 2 (?360 bp) with a de-noising pipeline that significantly improves the fraction of error-free sequences. The resulting sequences can be used to perform accurate genus- or species-level taxonomic assignment. We explore the microbial composition of challenging, heterogeneous clinical specimens by deep sequencing, culture-based strain typing, and Sanger sequencing of bulk PCR product. We report that deep sequencing can catalog bacterial species in mixed specimens from which usable data cannot be obtained by conventional clinical methods. Deep sequencing a collection of sputum samples from cystic fibrosis (CF) patients reveals well-described CF pathogens in specimens where they were not detected by standard clinical culture methods, especially for low-prevalence or fastidious bacteria. We also found that sputa submitted for CF diagnostic workup can be divided into a limited number of groups based on the phylogenetic composition of the airway microbiota, suggesting that metagenomic profiling may prove useful as a clinical diagnostic strategy in the future. The described method is sufficiently rapid (theoretically compatible with same-day turnaround times) and inexpensive for routine clinical use. PMID:23734239

  6. Survey of Culture, GoldenGate Assay, Universal Biosensor Assay, and 16S rRNA Gene Sequencing as Alternative Methods of Bacterial Pathogen Detection

    PubMed Central

    Pop, Mihai; Antonio, Martin; Walker, Alan W.; Mai, Volker; Ahmed, Dilruba; Oundo, Joseph; Tamboura, Boubou; Panchalingam, Sandra; Levine, Myron M.; Kotloff, Karen; Li, Shan; Magder, Laurence S.; Paulson, Joseph N.; Liu, Bo; Ikumapayi, Usman; Ebruke, Chinelo; Dione, Michel; Adeyemi, Mitchell; Rance, Richard; Stares, Mark D.; Ukhanova, Maria; Barnes, Bret; Lewis, Ian; Ahmed, Firoz; Alam, Meer Taifur; Amin, Ruhul; Siddiqui, Sabbir; Ochieng, John B.; Ouma, Emmanuel; Juma, Jane; Mailu, Eunice; Omore, Richard; O'Reilly, Ciara E.; Hannis, James; Manalili, Sheri; DeLeon, Jonna; Yasuda, Irene; Blyn, Lawrence; Ranken, Raymond; Li, Feng; Housley, Roberta; Ecker, David J.; Hossain, M. Anowar; Breiman, Robert F.; Morris, J. Glenn; McDaniel, Timothy K.; Parkhill, Julian; Saha, Debasish; Sampath, Rangarajan; Stine, O. Colin; Nataro, James P.

    2013-01-01

    Cultivation-based assays combined with PCR or enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA)-based methods for finding virulence factors are standard methods for detecting bacterial pathogens in stools; however, with emerging molecular technologies, new methods have become available. The aim of this study was to compare four distinct detection technologies for the identification of pathogens in stools from children under 5 years of age in The Gambia, Mali, Kenya, and Bangladesh. The children were identified, using currently accepted clinical protocols, as either controls or cases with moderate to severe diarrhea. A total of 3,610 stool samples were tested by established clinical culture techniques: 3,179 DNA samples by the Universal Biosensor assay (Ibis Biosciences, Inc.), 1,466 DNA samples by the GoldenGate assay (Illumina), and 1,006 DNA samples by sequencing of 16S rRNA genes. Each method detected different proportions of samples testing positive for each of seven enteric pathogens, enteroaggregative Escherichia coli (EAEC), enterotoxigenic E. coli (ETEC), enteropathogenic E. coli (EPEC), Shigella spp., Campylobacter jejuni, Salmonella enterica, and Aeromonas spp. The comparisons among detection methods included the frequency of positive stool samples and kappa values for making pairwise comparisons. Overall, the standard culture methods detected Shigella spp., EPEC, ETEC, and EAEC in smaller proportions of the samples than either of the methods based on detection of the virulence genes from DNA in whole stools. The GoldenGate method revealed the greatest agreement with the other methods. The agreement among methods was higher in cases than in controls. The new molecular technologies have a high potential for highly sensitive identification of bacterial diarrheal pathogens. PMID:23884998

  7. Deep 16S rRNA pyrosequencing reveals a bacterial community associated with Banana Fusarium Wilt disease suppression induced by bio-organic fertilizer application.

    PubMed

    Shen, Zongzhuan; Wang, Dongsheng; Ruan, Yunze; Xue, Chao; Zhang, Jian; Li, Rong; Shen, Qirong

    2014-01-01

    Our previous work demonstrated that application of a bio-organic fertilizer (BIO) to a banana mono-culture orchard with serious Fusarium wilt disease effectively decreased the number of soil Fusarium sp. and controlled the soil-borne disease. Because bacteria are an abundant and diverse group of soil organisms that responds to soil health, deep 16 S rRNA pyrosequencing was employed to characterize the composition of the bacterial community to investigate how it responded to BIO or the application of other common composts and to explore the potential correlation between bacterial community, BIO application and Fusarium wilt disease suppression. After basal quality control, 137,646 sequences and 9,388 operational taxonomic units (OTUs) were obtained from the 15 soil samples. Proteobacteria, Acidobacteria, Bacteroidetes, Gemmatimonadetes and Actinobacteria were the most frequent phyla and comprised up to 75.3% of the total sequences. Compared to the other soil samples, BIO-treated soil revealed higher abundances of Gemmatimonadetes and Acidobacteria, while Bacteroidetes were found in lower abundance. Meanwhile, on genus level, higher abundances compared to other treatments were observed for Gemmatimonas and Gp4. Correlation and redundancy analysis showed that the abundance of Gemmatimonas and Sphingomonas and the soil total nitrogen and ammonium nitrogen content were higher after BIO application, and they were all positively correlated with disease suppression. Cumulatively, the reduced Fusarium wilt disease incidence that was seen after BIO was applied for 1-year might be attributed to the general suppression based on a shift within the bacteria soil community, including specific enrichment of Gemmatimonas and Sphingomonas. PMID:24871319

  8. Minimization of chloroplast contamination in 16S rRNA gene pyrosequencing of insect herbivore bacterial communities

    PubMed Central

    Hanshew, Alissa S.; Mason, Charles J.; Raffa, Kenneth F.; Currie, Cameron R.

    2014-01-01

    Chloroplast sequence contamination in 16S ribosomal RNA gene (16S) analyses can be particularly problematic when sampling microbial communities in plants and folivorous arthropods. We previously encountered high levels of plastid contamination in herbivorous insect samples when we used the predominant 454 pyrosequencing 16S methodologies described in the literature. 799F, a primer previously found to exclude chloroplast sequences, was modified to enhance its efficacy, and we describe, in detail, our methodology throughout amplicon pyrosequencing. Thirteen versions of 799F were assessed for the exclusion of chloroplast sequences from our samples. We found that a shift in the mismatch between 799F and chloroplast 16S resulted in significant reduction of chloroplast reads. Our results also indicate that amplifying sequences from environmental samples in a two-step PCR process, with the addition of the multiplex identifiers and 454 adapters in a second round of PCR, further improved primer specificity. Primers that included 3? phosphorothioate bonds, which were designed to block primer degradation, did not amplify consistently across samples. The different forward primers do not appear to bias the bacterial communities detected. We provide a methodological framework for reducing chloroplast reads in high-throughput sequencing data sets that can be applied to a number of environmental samples and sequencing techniques. PMID:23968645

  9. Evaluation and optimization of nucleic acid extraction methods for the molecular analysis of bacterial communities associated with corroded carbon steel.

    PubMed

    Marty, Florence; Ghiglione, Jean-François; Païssé, Sandrine; Gueuné, Hervé; Quillet, Laurent; van Loosdrecht, Mark C M; Muyzer, Gerard

    2012-01-01

    Different DNA and RNA extraction approaches were evaluated and protocols optimized on in situ corrosion products from carbon steel in marine environments. Protocols adapted from the PowerSoil DNA/RNA Isolation methods resulted in the best nucleic acid (NA) extraction performances (ie combining high NA yield, quality, purity, representativeness of microbial community and processing time efficiency). The PowerSoil RNA Isolation Kit was the only method which resulted in amplifiable RNA of good quality (ie intact 16S/23S rRNA). Sample homogenization and hot chemical (SDS) cell lysis combined with mechanical (bead-beating) lysis in presence of a DNA competitor (skim milk) contributed to improving substantially (around 23 times) the DNA yield of the PowerSoil DNA Isolation Kit. Apart from presenting NA extraction strategies for optimizing extraction parameters with corrosion samples from carbon steel, this study proposes DNA and RNA extraction procedures suited for comparative molecular analysis of total and active fractions of bacterial communities associated with carbon steel corrosion events, thereby contributing to improved MIC diagnosis and control. PMID:22500778

  10. A Computer-Simulated Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism Analysis of Bacterial Small-Subunit rRNA Genes: Efficacy of Selected Tetrameric Restriction Enzymes for Studies of Microbial Diversity in Nature

    Microsoft Academic Search

    CRAIG L. MOYER; JAMES M. TIEDJE; FRED C. DOBBS; ANDDAVID M. KARL

    An assessment of 10 tetrameric restriction enzymes (TREs) was conducted by using a computer-simulated restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) analysis for over 100 proximally and distally related bacterial small-subunit (SSU) rRNA gene sequences. Screening SSU rDNA clone libraries with TREs has become an effective strategy because of logistic simplicity, commercial availability, and economy. However, the rationale for selecting the type

  11. Structural motifs of the bacterial ribosomal proteins S20, S18 and S16 that contact rRNA present in the eukaryotic ribosomal proteins S25, S26 and S27A, respectively

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Alexey A. Malygin; Galina G. Karpova

    2010-01-01

    The majority of constitutive proteins in the bacterial 30S ribosomal subunit have orthologues in Eukarya and Archaea. The eukaryotic counterparts for the remainder (S6, S16, S18 and S20) have not been identified. We assumed that amino acid residues in the ribosomal proteins that contact rRNA are to be constrained in evolution and that the most highly conserved of them are

  12. Cultivation-independent population analysis of bacterial endophytes in three potato varieties based on eubacterial and Actinomycetes-specific PCR of 16S rRNA genes.

    PubMed

    Sessitsch, Angela; Reiter, Birgit; Pfeifer, Ulrike; Wilhelm, Eva

    2002-01-01

    Abstract Endophytic bacteria are ubiquitous in most plants and colonise plants without exhibiting pathogenicity. Studies on the diversity of bacterial endophytes have been mainly approached by characterisation of isolates obtained from internal tissues. Despite the broad application of culture-independent techniques for the analysis of microbial communities in a wide range of natural habitats, little information is available on the species diversity of endophytes. In this study, microbial communities inhabiting stems, roots and tubers of three potato varieties were analysed by 16S rRNA-based techniques such as terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis, denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis as well as 16S rDNA cloning and sequencing. Two individual plant experiments were conducted. In the first experiment plants suffered from light deficiency, whereas healthy and robust plants were obtained in the second experiment. Plants obtained from both experiments showed comparable endophytic populations, but healthy potato plants possessed a significantly higher diversity of endophytes than stressed plants. In addition, plant tissue and variety specific endophytes were detected. Sequence analysis of 16S rRNA genes indicated that a broad phylogenetic spectrum of bacteria is able to colonise plants internally including alpha-, beta-, and gamma-Proteobacteria, high-GC Gram-positives, microbes belonging to the Flexibacter/Cytophaga/Bacteroides group and Planctomycetales. Group-specific analysis of Actinomycetes indicated a higher abundance and diversity of Streptomyces scabiei-related species in the variety Mehlige Mühlviertler, which is known for its resistance against potato common scab caused by S. scabiei. PMID:19709181

  13. Synthesis of bacterial cellulose using hot water extracted wood sugars.

    PubMed

    Erbas Kiziltas, Esra; Kiziltas, Alper; Gardner, Douglas J

    2015-06-25

    Bacterial cellulose (BC), a type of nanopolymer produced by Acetobacter xylinum is a nanostructured material with unique properties and wide applicability. However, a standard medium used for the cultivation of BC, the Hestrin-Schramm medium, is expensive and prevents wide scale extension of BC applications. In this research, a relatively low-cost culture media was successfully developed from wood hot water extracts for the Acetobacter xylinus 23769 strain. Hot water extract (HWE) is a residual material originating from pulp mills and lignocellulosic biorefineries and consists of mainly monomeric sugars, organic acids and organics. The effects of different pH (5, 6, 7 and 8) and temperatures (26, 28 and 30°C) were also examined in this research. There were no significant differences in the crystallinity and the recorded I? fraction of cellulose produced between Hestrin-Schramm and the HWE medium. The maximum production of 0.15g/l of BC was obtained at a pH of 8 and temperature of 28°C. Glucose and xylose in the HWE were the main nutrient sources utilized in all BC cultivations based on high-pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC) results. HWE was shown to be a suitable carbon source for BC production, and a process was established for BC production from lignocellulosic feedstocks without using any modification of the HWE. HWE is an abundant and relatively inexpensive forest by-product. Using HWE for BC production could reduce burdens on the environment and also, achieve the goal of large scale BC production at low cost without using added culture nutrients. PMID:25839803

  14. Characterization of Chemoautotrophic Bacterial Symbionts in a Gutless Marine Worm (Oligochaeta, Annelida) by Phylogenetic 16S rRNA Sequence Analysis and In Situ Hybridization

    Microsoft Academic Search

    NICOLE DUBILIER; OLAV GIERE; DANIEL L. DISTEL; ANDCOLLEEN M. CAVANAUGH

    1995-01-01

    ThephylogeneticrelationshipsofchemoautotrophicendosymbiontsinthegutlessmarineoligochaeteInanid- rilus leukodermatus to chemoautotrophic ecto- and endosymbionts from other host phyla and to free-living bacteria were determined by comparative 16S rRNA sequence analysis. Fluorescent in situ hybridizations confirmed that the 16S rRNA sequence obtained from these worms originated from the symbionts. The symbiontsequenceisuniquetoI.leukodermatus.Inphylogenetictreesinferredbybothdistanceandparsimony methods, the oligochaete symbiont is peripherally associated with one of two clusters of chemoautotrophic symbionts that

  15. Expansion of the aminoglycoside-resistance 16S rRNA (m(1)A1408) methyltransferase family: expression and functional characterization of four hypothetical enzymes of diverse bacterial origin.

    PubMed

    Witek, Marta A; Conn, Graeme L

    2014-09-01

    The global dissemination, potential activity in diverse species and broad resistance spectrum conferred by the aminoglycoside-resistance ribosomal RNA methyltransferases make them a significant potential new threat to the efficacy of aminoglycoside antibiotics in the treatment of serious bacterial infections. The N1 methylation of adenosine 1408 (m(1)A1408) confers resistance to structurally diverse aminoglycosides, including kanamycin, neomycin and apramycin. The limited analyses to date of the enzymes responsible have identified common features but also potential differences in their molecular details of action. Therefore, with the goal of expanding the known 16S rRNA (m(1)A1408) methyltransferase family as a platform for developing a more complete mechanistic understanding, we report here the cloning, expression and functional analyses of four hypothetical aminoglycoside-resistance rRNA methyltransferases from recent genome sequences of diverse bacterial species. Each of the genes produced a soluble, folded protein with a secondary structure, as determined from circular dichroism (CD) spectra, consistent with enzymes for which high-resolution structures are available. For each enzyme, antibiotic minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) assays revealed a resistance spectrum characteristic of the known 16S rRNA (m(1)A1408) methyltransferases and the modified nucleotide was confirmed by reverse transcription as A1408. In common with other family members, higher binding affinity for the methylation reaction by-product S-adenosylhomocysteine (SAH) than the cosubstrate S-adenosyl-L-methionine (SAM) was observed for three methyltransferases, while one unexpectedly showed no measurable affinity for SAH. Collectively, these results confirm that each hypothetical enzyme is a functional 16S rRNA (m(1)A1408) methyltransferase but also point to further potential mechanistic variation within this enzyme family. PMID:24963996

  16. Evaluation of soil bacterial biomass using environmental DNA extracted by slow-stirring method

    Microsoft Academic Search

    H. Aoshima; A. Kimura; A. Shibutani; C. Okada; Y. Matsumiya; M. Kubo

    2006-01-01

    A simple and rapid method (slow-stirring method) for extracting environmental DNA (eDNA) from soils was constructed by physical mild stirring with chemical treatment. eDNA was extracted efficiently with minimal damage from various kinds of soil. The amount of eDNA and soil bacterial biomass showed a linear proportional relation [Y=(1.70×108)X, r\\u000a 2=0.96], indicating that bacterial biomass could be evaluated by quantifying

  17. 16S rRNA gene-based identification of cultured bacterial flora from host-seeking Ixodes ricinus, Dermacentor reticulatus and Haemaphysalis concinna ticks, vectors of vertebrate pathogens.

    PubMed

    Rudolf, I; Mendel, J; Sikutová, S; Svec, P; Masaríková, J; Nováková, D; Bunková, L; Sedlácek, I; Hubálek, Z

    2009-09-01

    A total of 151 bacterial isolates were recovered from different developmental stages (larvae, nymphs and adults) of field-collected ticks (67 strains from Ixodes ricinus, 38 from Dermacentor reticulatus, 46 from Haemaphysalis concinna). Microorganisms were identified by means of 16S rRNA gene sequencing. Almost 87 % of the strains belonged to G(+) bacteria with predominantly occurring genera Bacillus and Paenibacillus. Other G(+) strains included Arthrobacter, Corynebacterium, Frigoribacterium, Kocuria, Microbacterium, Micrococcus, Plantibacter, Rhodococcus, Rothia, and Staphylococcus. G(-) strains occurred less frequently, comprising genera Advenella, Pseudomonas, Rahnella, Stenotrophomonas, and Xanthomonas. Several strains of medical importance were found, namely Advenella incenata, Corynebacterium aurimucosum, Microbacterium oxydans, M. schleiferi, Staphylococcus spp., and Stenotrophomonas maltophilia. Data on cultivable microbial diversity in Eurasian tick species D. reticulatus and H. concinna are given, along with the extension of present knowledge concerning bacterial flora of I. ricinus. PMID:19937215

  18. Evidence for indigenous Streptomyces populations in a marine environment determined with a 16S rRNA probe.

    PubMed Central

    Moran, M A; Rutherford, L T; Hodson, R E

    1995-01-01

    A 16S rRNA genus-specific probe was used to determine whether Streptomyces populations are an indigenous component of marine sediment bacterial communities. Previous debates have suggested that marine Streptomyces isolates are derived not from resident populations but from spores of terrestrial species which have been physically transported to marine ecosystems but remain dormant until isolation. Rigorously controlled hybridization of rRNA extracted from coastal marsh sediments with the genus-specific probe indicated that Streptomyces rRNA accounted for 2 to 5% of the sediment community rRNA and that spores are not the source of the hybridization signal. Streptomyces populations must therefore be at least the 26th most abundant genus-level source of bacterial rRNA. the relative amounts of rRNAs from Streptomyces spp. and members of the Bacteria (69 to 79%) and Archaea (4 to 7%) domains were highly consistent in these marine sediments throughout an annual cycle, indicating that the species composition of sediment bacterial communities may be more stable than recent studies suggest for marine planktonic bacterial communities. Laboratory studies designed to investigate the possible functional roles of Streptomyces populations in coastal sediments demonstrated that population levels of this genus changed relatively rapidly (within a time frame of 6 weeks) in response to manipulation of substrate availability. Amendments of intact sediment cores with two compounds (vanillic acid and succinic acid) consistently resulted in Streptomyces populations contributing an increased percentage of rRNA (6 to 15%) to the total bacterial rRNA pool. PMID:7487005

  19. Supercritical Fluid Extraction of Bacterial and Archaeal Lipid Biomarkers from Anaerobically Digested Sludge

    PubMed Central

    Hanif, Muhammad; Atsuta, Yoichi; Fujie, Koichi; Daimon, Hiroyuki

    2012-01-01

    Supercritical fluid extraction (SFE) was used in the analysis of bacterial respiratory quinone (RQ), bacterial phospholipid fatty acid (PLFA), and archaeal phospholipid ether lipid (PLEL) from anaerobically digested sludge. Bacterial RQ were determined using ultra performance liquid chromatography (UPLC). Determination of bacterial PLFA and archaeal PLEL was simultaneously performed using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). The effects of pressure, temperature, and modifier concentration on the total amounts of RQ, PLFA, and PLEL were investigated by 23 experiments with five settings chosen for each variable. The optimal extraction conditions that were obtained through a multiple-response optimization included a pressure of 23.6 MPa, temperature of 77.6 °C, and 10.6% (v/v) of methanol as the modifier. Thirty nine components of microbial lipid biomarkers were identified in the anaerobically digested sludge. Overall, the SFE method proved to be more effective, rapid, and quantitative for simultaneously extracting bacterial and archaeal lipid biomarkers, compared to conventional organic solvent extraction. This work shows the potential application of SFE as a routine method for the comprehensive analysis of microbial community structures in environmental assessments using the lipid biomarkers profile. PMID:22489140

  20. Extraction of total nucleic acids from ticks for the detection of bacterial and viral pathogens.

    PubMed

    Crowder, Chris D; Rounds, Megan A; Phillipson, Curtis A; Picuri, John M; Matthews, Heather E; Halverson, Justina; Schutzer, Steven E; Ecker, David J; Eshoo, Mark W

    2010-01-01

    Ticks harbor numerous bacterial, protozoal, and viral pathogens that can cause serious infections in humans and domestic animals. Active surveillance of the tick vector can provide insight into the frequency and distribution of important pathogens in the environment. Nucleic-acid based detection of tick-borne bacterial, protozoan, and viral pathogens requires the extraction of both DNA and RNA (total nucleic acids) from ticks. Traditional methods for nucleic acid extraction are limited to extraction of either DNA or the RNA from a sample. Here we present a simple bead-beating based protocol for extraction of DNA and RNA from a single tick and show detection of Borrelia burgdorferi and Powassan virus from individual, infected Ixodes scapularis ticks. We determined expected yields for total nucleic acids by this protocol for a variety of adult tick species. The method is applicable to a variety of arthropod vectors, including fleas and mosquitoes, and was partially automated on a liquid handling robot. PMID:20180313

  1. Estimation of diversity and community structure through restriction fragment length polymorphism distribution analysis of bacterial 16S rRNA genes from a microbial mat at an active, hydrothermal vent system, Loihi Seamount, Hawaii.

    PubMed Central

    Moyer, C L; Dobbs, F C; Karl, D M

    1994-01-01

    PCR was used to amplify (eu)bacterial small-subunit (16S) rRNA genes from total-community genomic DNA. The source of total-community genomic DNA used for this culture-independent analysis was the microbial mats from a deep-sea, hydrothermal vent system, Pele's Vents, located at Loihi Seamount, Hawaii. Oligonucleotides complementary to conserved regions in the 16S rRNA-encoding DNA (rDNA) of bacteria were used to direct the synthesis of PCR products, which were then subcloned by blunt-end ligation into phagemid vector pBluescript II. Restriction fragment length polymorphism patterns, created by using tandem tetrameric restriction endonucleases, revealed the presence of 12 groups of 16S rRNA genes representing discrete operational taxonomic units (OTUs). The rank order abundance of these putative OTUs was measured, and the two most abundant OTUs accounted for 72.9% of all of the 16S rDNA clones. Among the remaining 27.1% of the 16S rDNA clones, none of the 10 OTUs was represented by more than three individual clones. The cumulative OTU distribution for 48 bacterial 16S rDNA clones demonstrated that the majority of taxa represented in the clone library were detected, a result which we assume to be an estimate of the diversity of bacteria in the native hydrothermal vent habitat. 16S rDNA fingerprinting of individual clones belonging to particular OTUs by using an oligonucleotide probe that binds to a universally conserved region of the 16S rDNA fragments was conducted to confirm OTU specificity and 16S rDNA identity. Images PMID:7512808

  2. A comparison of five methods for extraction of bacterial DNA from human faecal samples

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Alexandra L. McOrist; Michelle Jackson; Anthony R. Bird

    2002-01-01

    The purity of DNA extracted from faecal samples is a key issue in the sensitivity and usefulness of biological analyses such as PCR for infectious pathogens and non-pathogens. We have compared the relative efficacy of extraction of bacterial DNA (both Gram negative and positive origin) from faeces using four commercial kits (FastDNA® kit, Bio 101; Nucleospin® C+T kit, Macherey-Nagal; Quantum

  3. Effect of Urea on the Synthesis of Polynucleotides with Crude Bacterial Extracts

    Microsoft Academic Search

    F. Cramer; K. Randerath

    1962-01-01

    A CRUDE bacterial extract is normally not capable of catalysing a net synthesis of poly-A from ADP1, If, however, the myokinase-like enzymes are blocked by the addition of ATP one observes a considerable net synthesis of polynucleotides with crude extracts of Azotobacter vinelandii, as we have found recently2,3. In this way the degradation of ADP, which leads to nucleosides and

  4. The Inhibiting Effect of Aqueous Azadirachta indica (Neem) Extract Upon Bacterial Properties Influencing in vitro Plaque Formation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    L. E. Wolinsky; S. Mania; S. Nachnani; S. Ling

    1996-01-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to examine the inhibitory effects of aqueous extracts derived from the bark-containing sticks (Neem stick) of Azadirachta indica upon bacterial aggregation, growth, adhesion to hydroxyapatite, and production of insoluble glucan, which may affect in vitro plaque formation. Neem stick extracts were screened for minimal bacterial growth inhibition (MIC) against a panel of streptococci by

  5. Influence of DNA Extraction Method, 16S rRNA Targeted Hypervariable Regions, and Sample Origin on Microbial Diversity Detected by 454 Pyrosequencing in Marine Chemosynthetic Ecosystems

    PubMed Central

    Cruaud, Perrine; Vigneron, Adrien; Lucchetti-Miganeh, Céline; Ciron, Pierre Emmanuel; Godfroy, Anne

    2014-01-01

    Next-generation sequencing (NGS) opens up exciting possibilities for improving our knowledge of environmental microbial diversity, allowing rapid and cost-effective identification of both cultivated and uncultivated microorganisms. However, library preparation, sequencing, and analysis of the results can provide inaccurate representations of the studied community compositions. Therefore, all these steps need to be taken into account carefully. Here we evaluated the effects of DNA extraction methods, targeted 16S rRNA hypervariable regions, and sample origins on the diverse microbes detected by 454 pyrosequencing in marine cold seep and hydrothermal vent sediments. To assign the reads with enough taxonomic precision, we built a database with about 2,500 sequences from Archaea and Bacteria from deep-sea marine sediments, affiliated according to reference publications in the field. Thanks to statistical and diversity analyses as well as inference of operational taxonomic unit (OTU) networks, we show that (i) while DNA extraction methods do not seem to affect the results for some samples, they can lead to dramatic changes for others; and (ii) the choice of amplification and sequencing primers also considerably affects the microbial community detected in the samples. Thereby, very different proportions of pyrosequencing reads were obtained for some microbial lineages, such as the archaeal ANME-1, ANME-2c, and MBG-D and deltaproteobacterial subgroups. This work clearly indicates that the results from sequencing-based analyses, such as pyrosequencing, should be interpreted very carefully. Therefore, the combination of NGS with complementary approaches, such as fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH)/catalyzed reporter deposition (CARD)-FISH or quantitative PCR (Q-PCR), would be desirable to gain a more comprehensive picture of environmental microbial communities. PMID:24837380

  6. Dielectrophoretic separation of blood pathogens Bacterial extraction from biological samples using DEP forces

    E-print Network

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Dielectrophoretic separation of blood pathogens ou Bacterial extraction from biological samples., Journal Title, 2000, 35, 3523]. 1 Introduction Rapid detection and identification of pathogens from biolo of pathogens. For diagnosis of sepsis, traditio- nal techniques detection provide a measuring result after 48h

  7. Antibacterial activities of Turkish pollen and propolis extracts against plant bacterial pathogens

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Esin Basim; Hüseyin Basim; Musa Özcan

    2006-01-01

    The “in vitro” antibacterial activities of Turkish pollen and propolis extracts were investigated against 13 different species of agricultural bacterial pathogens including Agrobacterium tumefaciens, A. vitis, Clavibacter michiganensis subsp. michiganensis, Erwinia amylovora, E. carotovora pv. carotovora, Pseudomonas corrugata, P. savastanoi pv. savastanoi, P. syringae pv. phaseolicola, P. syringae pv. syringae, P. syringae pv. tomato, Ralstonia solanacearum, Xanthomonas campestris pv. campestris

  8. Antibacterial activity of plant extracts on foodborne bacterial pathogens and food spoilage bacteria

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Bacterial foodborne diseases are caused by consumption of foods contaminated with bacteria and/or their toxins. In this study, we evaluated antibacterial properties of twelve different extracts including turmeric, lemon and different kinds of teas against four major pathogenic foodborne bacteria inc...

  9. The bioactivity of plant extracts against representative bacterial pathogens of the lower respiratory tract

    PubMed Central

    Bocanegra-García, Virgilio; del Rayo Camacho-Corona, María; Ramírez-Cabrera, Mónica; Rivera, Gildardo; Garza-González, Elvira

    2009-01-01

    Background Lower respiratory tract infections are a major cause of illness and death. Such infections are common in intensive care units (ICU) and their lethality persists despite advances in diagnosis, treatment and prevention. In Mexico, some plants are used in traditional medicine to treat respiratory diseases or ailments such as cough, bronchitis, tuberculosis and other infections. Medical knowledge derived from traditional societies has motivated searches for new bioactive molecules derived from plants that show potent activity against bacterial pathogens. Therefore, the aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of hexanic, chloroformic (CLO), methanolic (MET) and aqueous extracts from various plants used in Mexican traditional medicine on various microorganisms associated with respiratory disease. Methods thirty-five extracts prepared from nine plants used in Mexican traditional medicine for the treatment of respiratory infections were evaluated against 15 control bacterial species and clinical isolates. Results Both chloroformic (CLO) and methanolic (MET) extracts of Larrea tridentata were active against Methicillin-resistant S. aureus, B. subtilis and L. monocytogenes. A MET extract of L. tridentata was also active against S. aureus, S. pneumoniae, S. maltophilia, E. faecalis and H. influenzae and the CLO extract was active against A. baumannii. An Aqueous extract of M. acumitata and a MET extract of N. officinale were active against S. pneumoniae. CLO and MET extracts of L. tridentata were active against clinical isolates of S. aureus, S. pneumoniae and E. faecalis. Conclusion Overall, our results support the potential use of L. tridentata as a source of antibacterial compounds. PMID:19486533

  10. Cultivation-independent population analysis of bacterial endophytes in three potato varieties based on eubacterial and Actinomycetes-specific PCR of 16S rRNA genes

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Angela Sessitsch; Birgit Reiter; Ulrike Pfeifer; Eva Wilhelm

    2002-01-01

    Endophytic bacteria are ubiquitous in most plants and colonise plants without exhibiting pathogenicity. Studies on the diversity of bacterial endophytes have been mainly approached by characterisation of isolates obtained from internal tissues. Despite the broad application of culture-independent techniques for the analysis of microbial communities in a wide range of natural habitats, little information is available on the species diversity

  11. Effect of DNA extraction and sample preservation method on rumen bacterial population.

    PubMed

    Fliegerova, Katerina; Tapio, Ilma; Bonin, Aurelie; Mrazek, Jakub; Callegari, Maria Luisa; Bani, Paolo; Bayat, Alireza; Vilkki, Johanna; Kope?ný, Jan; Shingfield, Kevin J; Boyer, Frederic; Coissac, Eric; Taberlet, Pierre; Wallace, R John

    2014-10-01

    The comparison of the bacterial profile of intracellular (iDNA) and extracellular DNA (eDNA) isolated from cow rumen content stored under different conditions was conducted. The influence of rumen fluid treatment (cheesecloth squeezed, centrifuged, filtered), storage temperature (RT, -80 °C) and cryoprotectants (PBS-glycerol, ethanol) on quality and quantity parameters of extracted DNA was evaluated by bacterial DGGE analysis, real-time PCR quantification and metabarcoding approach using high-throughput sequencing. Samples clustered according to the type of extracted DNA due to considerable differences between iDNA and eDNA bacterial profiles, while storage temperature and cryoprotectants additives had little effect on sample clustering. The numbers of Firmicutes and Bacteroidetes were lower (P < 0.01) in eDNA samples. The qPCR indicated significantly higher amount of Firmicutes in iDNA sample frozen with glycerol (P < 0.01). Deep sequencing analysis of iDNA samples revealed the prevalence of Bacteroidetes and similarity of samples frozen with and without cryoprotectants, which differed from sample stored with ethanol at room temperature. Centrifugation and consequent filtration of rumen fluid subjected to the eDNA isolation procedure considerably changed the ratio of molecular operational taxonomic units (MOTUs) of Bacteroidetes and Firmicutes. Intracellular DNA extraction using bead-beating method from cheesecloth sieved rumen content mixed with PBS-glycerol and stored at -80 °C was found as the optimal method to study ruminal bacterial profile. PMID:24125910

  12. Bacterial Communities in the Rhizosphere of Biofuel Crops Grown on Marginal Lands as Evaluated by 16S rRNA Gene Pyrosequences

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ederson da C. Jesus; Endang Susilawati; Stephanie L. Smith; Qiong Wang; Benli Chai; Ryan Farris; Jorge L. M. Rodrigues; Kurt D. Thelen; James M. Tiedje

    2010-01-01

    Microbes are key components of the soil environment and are important contributors to the sustainability of agricultural systems,\\u000a which is especially significant for biofuel crops growing on marginal lands. We studied bacterial communities in the rhizosphere\\u000a of five biofuel crops cultivated in four locations in Michigan to determine which factors were correlated to changes in the\\u000a structure of those communities.

  13. Assessing bacterial diversity in a seawater-processing wastewater treatment plant by 454-pyrosequencing of the 16S rRNA and amoA genes

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez, Olga; Ferrera, Isabel; González, Jose M; Mas, Jordi

    2013-01-01

    Summary The bacterial community composition of activated sludge from a wastewater treatment plant (Almería, Spain) with the particularity of using seawater was investigated by applying 454-pyrosequencing. The results showed that Deinococcus-Thermus, Proteobacteria, Chloroflexi and Bacteroidetes were the most abundant retrieved sequences, while other groups, such as Actinobacteria, Chlorobi, Deferribacteres, Firmicutes, Planctomycetes, Spirochaetes and Verrumicrobia were reported at lower proportions. Rarefaction analysis showed that very likely the diversity is higher than what could be described despite most of the unknown microorganisms probably correspond to rare diversity. Furthermore, the majority of taxa could not be classified at the genus level and likely represent novel members of these groups. Additionally, the nitrifiers in the sludge were characterized by pyrosequencing the amoA gene. In contrast, the nitrifying bacterial community, dominated by the genera Nitrosomonas, showed a low diversity and rarefaction curves exhibited saturation. These results suggest that only a few populations of low abundant but specialized bacteria are responsible for removal of ammonia in these saline wastewater systems. PMID:23574645

  14. CHARACTERIZATION OF BACTERIAL BIOMASS IN MARINE SEDIMENTS BENEATH THE ROSS ICE SHEET, ANTARCTICA BY PHOSPHOLIPIDS ANALYSIS AND 16S RRNA GENE SEQUENCING

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carr, S. A.; Glossner, A. W.; Dunbar, R. B.; Vogel, S. W.; Brandes, J.; Sahl, J. W.; Pepe-Ranney, C.; Spear, J. R.; Naish, T.; Powell, R. D.; Mandernack, K. W.

    2009-12-01

    As concerns regarding climate change increase, so does the importance of understanding the biogeochemical cycling of elements such as carbon. In the marine sediments of the Ross Sea, Antarctica, the in situ microbial community plays a significant role in the decomposition, mineralization and recycling of both organic and inorganic carbon. In this study, viable biomass for the top 155 cm below seafloor of sediment cores in the Ross Sea were estimated based on microbial phospholipid concentrations and Acridine Orange direct cell counts (AODC). Results for the biomass estimates suggest that both methods are able to accurately estimate viable biomass. Structural and isotopic analyses of phospholipid fatty acids (PLFAs) and phospholipid ether lipids (PELs), as well as isotopic analyses of carbon sources within sediment porewaters were used to identify changes in microbial metabolic pathways. The ?13C values of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) in porewaters ranged from -2.52‰ to -3.72‰ while corresponding ?13C values for sedimentary organic carbon (OC) varied from -26.25‰ to -23.12‰ in the surface and 155cm porewaters, respectively. The ?13C values of PLFAs are slightly lighter than the ?13C values of the organic carbon, ranging between -29‰ to -35‰ throughout the sediment core. 16S ribosomal RNA gene sequencing was preformed to classify the microbial species present at various depths. 16S sequences revealed that members of this microbial community include ?, ?, ?, and ? proteobacteria, acitobacteria, acidobacteria, and flavobacteria, all of which have been previously sequenced from other Antarctic continental shelf sediments. Archaea represent 1 to 3% of the microbial community which is similar to comparable studies. Amongst the sequenced organisms, many have been reported to utilize organic carbon sources such as amino acids, oligosaccharides, and lactose. These heterotropic organisms compliment the constant lipid isotope values and suggest that heterotrophic organisms dominate these sediments, with the implication that primary productivity is derived from above. Integrating structural analyses and ?13C values of phospholipids, porewater chemistry, ?13CDIC and ?13CDIC values with 16S rRNA gene sequences provides a more comprehensive understanding of the biogeochemical influences of microbial carbon cycling that occur beneath marine sediments of Antarctica and elsewhere.

  15. Different methods for extracting bacteria from freshwater sediment and a simple method to measure bacterial production in sediment samples

    Microsoft Academic Search

    André Luiz dos Santos Furtado; Peter Casper

    2000-01-01

    The efficiency of different treatments was tested to extract bacterial cells from freshwater sediment samples. The influence of sonication, density gradient centrifugation, fixation by formalin and centrifugation speed on bacterial recovery was investigated. The method developed by Smith and Azam [Mar. Microb. Food Webs 6 (1992) 107] to measure microbial activity on bacterioplankton (3H-leucine incorporation), was also evaluated in sediment

  16. Structure and dynamics of the bacterial communities in fermentation of the traditional Chinese post-fermented pu-erh tea revealed by 16S rRNA gene clone library.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Ming; Xiao, Wei; Ma, Yan; Sun, Tingting; Yuan, Wenxia; Tang, Na; Zhang, Donglian; Wang, Yongxia; Li, Yali; Zhou, Hongjie; Cui, Xiaolong

    2013-10-01

    Microbes are thought to have key roles in the development of the special properties of post-fermented pu-erh tea (pu-erh shucha), a well-known traditional Chinese tea; however, little is known about the bacteria during the fermentation. In this work, the structure and dynamics of the bacterial community involved in the production of pu-erh shucha were investigated using 16S rRNA gene clone libraries constructed from samples collected on days zero (LD-0), 5 (LD-5), 10 (LD-10), 15 (LD-15) and 20 (LD-20) of the fermentation. A total of 747 sequences with individual clone library containing 115-174 sequences and 4-20 unique operational taxonomic units (OTUs) were obtained. These OTUs were grouped into four phyla (Actinobacteria, Bacteroidetes, Firmicutes and Proteobacteria) and further identified as members of 10 families, such as Alcaligenaceae, Bacillaceae, Enterobacteriaceae, etc. The dominant bacteria were Enterobacteriaceae in the raw material (LD-0) and in the initial stages of fermentation (LD-5 and LD-10), which changed to Bacillaceae at the last stages of fermentation (LD-15 and LD-20) at a temperature of 40-60 °C. It is interesting that the dominant OTUs in libraries LD-15 and LD-20 were very closely related to Bacillus coagulans, which is a safe thermoduric probiotic. Together the bacterial diversity and dynamics during a fermentation of pu-erh shucha were demonstrated, and a worthy clue for artificial inoculation of B. coagulans to improve the health benefits of pu-erh shucha or produce probiotic pu-erh tea were provided. PMID:23591759

  17. Comparison of different DNA-extraction techniques to investigate the bacterial community of marine copepods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brandt, Petra; Gerdts, Gunnar; Boersma, Maarten; Wiltshire, Karen H.; Wichels, Antje

    2010-12-01

    Marine zooplanktic organisms, such as copepods, are usually associated with large numbers of bacteria. Some of these bacteria live attached to copepods’ exoskeleton, while others prevail in their intestine and faecal pellets. Until now, general conclusions concerning the identity of these bacteria are problematic since the majority of previous studies focused on cultivable bacteria only. Hence, to date little is known on whether copepod genera or species harbour distinct bacterial populations and about the nature of this association. To shed more light on these copepod/bacteria consortia, the focus of this study was the development and evaluation of a suitable approach to extract bacterial DNA from different North Sea copepod genera. Furthermore, the bacterial DNA was analysed by PCR-DGGE and subsequent sequencing of excised bands. The result of this work was an appropriate extraction method for batches of ten to one copepod specimens and offered first insights as to which bacteria are attached to the copepods Acartia sp . and Temora sp . from Helgoland Roads (German Bight) and a laboratory-grown Acartia tonsa culture. It revealed the prevalence of Alphaproteobacteria.

  18. Comparison of seven methods for extraction of bacterial DNA from fecal and cecal samples of mice.

    PubMed

    Ferrand, Janina; Patron, Kevin; Legrand-Frossi, Christine; Frippiat, Jean-Pol; Merlin, Christophe; Alauzet, Corentine; Lozniewski, Alain

    2014-10-01

    Analysis of bacterial DNA from fecal samples of mice is commonly performed in experimental studies. Although DNA extraction is a critical step in various molecular approaches, the efficiency of methods that may be used for DNA extraction from mice fecal samples has never been evaluated. We compared the efficiencies of six widely used commercial kits (MasterPure™ Gram Positive DNA Purification Kit, QIAamp® DNA Stool Mini Kit; NucliSENS® easyMAG®, ZR Fecal DNA MiniPrep™, FastDNA® SPIN Kit for Feces and FastDNA® SPIN Kit for Soil) and a non-commercial method for DNA isolation from mice feces and cecal contents. DNA quantity and quality were assessed by fluorometry, spectrophotometry, gel electrophoresis and qPCR. Cell lysis efficiencies were evaluated by qPCR targeting three relevant bacteria in spiked specimens. For both feces and intestinal contents, the most efficient extraction method was the FastDNA® SPIN Kit for Soil. PMID:25093756

  19. RNA Preservation Agents and Nucleic Acid Extraction Method Bias Perceived Bacterial Community Composition

    PubMed Central

    McCarthy, Ann; Chiang, Edna; Schmidt, Marian L.; Denef, Vincent J.

    2015-01-01

    Bias is a pervasive problem when characterizing microbial communities. An important source is the difference in lysis efficiencies of different populations, which vary depending on the extraction protocol used. To avoid such biases impacting comparisons between gene and transcript abundances in the environment, the use of one protocol that simultaneously extracts both types of nucleic acids from microbial community samples has gained popularity. However, knowledge regarding tradeoffs to combined nucleic acid extraction protocols is limited, particularly regarding yield and biases in the observed community composition. Here, we evaluated a commercially available protocol for simultaneous extraction of DNA and RNA, which we adapted for freshwater microbial community samples that were collected on filters. DNA and RNA yields were comparable to other commonly used, but independent DNA and RNA extraction protocols. RNA protection agents benefited RNA quality, but decreased DNA yields significantly. Choice of extraction protocol influenced the perceived bacterial community composition, with strong method-dependent biases observed for specific phyla such as the Verrucomicrobia. The combined DNA/RNA extraction protocol detected significantly higher levels of Verrucomicrobia than the other protocols, and those higher numbers were confirmed by microscopic analysis. Use of RNA protection agents as well as independent sequencing runs caused a significant shift in community composition as well, albeit smaller than the shift caused by using different extraction protocols. Despite methodological biases, sample origin was the strongest determinant of community composition. However, when the abundance of specific phylogenetic groups is of interest, researchers need to be aware of the biases their methods introduce. This is particularly relevant if different methods are used for DNA and RNA extraction, in addition to using RNA protection agents only for RNA samples. PMID:25798612

  20. Bacterial diversity analysis of Huanglongbing pathogen-infected citrus, using PhyloChip and 16S rRNA gene clone library sequencing

    SciTech Connect

    Shankar Sagaram, U.; DeAngelis, K.M.; Trivedi, P.; Andersen, G.L.; Lu, S.-E.; Wang, N.

    2009-03-01

    The bacterial diversity associated with citrus leaf midribs was characterized 1 from citrus groves that contained the Huanglongbing (HLB) pathogen, which has yet to be cultivated in vitro. We employed a combination of high-density phylogenetic 16S rDNA microarray and 16S rDNA clone library sequencing to determine the microbial community composition of symptomatic and asymptomatic citrus midribs. Our results revealed that citrus leaf midribs can support a diversity of microbes. PhyloChip analysis indicated that 47 orders of bacteria from 15 phyla were present in the citrus leaf midribs while 20 orders from phyla were observed with the cloning and sequencing method. PhyloChip arrays indicated that nine taxa were significantly more abundant in symptomatic midribs compared to asymptomatic midribs. Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus (Las) was detected at a very low level in asymptomatic plants, but was over 200 times more abundant in symptomatic plants. The PhyloChip analysis was further verified by sequencing 16S rDNA clone libraries, which indicated the dominance of Las in symptomatic leaves. These data implicate Las as the pathogen responsible for HLB disease. Citrus is the most important commercial fruit crop in Florida. In recent years, citrus Huanglongbing (HLB), also called citrus greening, has severely affected Florida's citrus production and hence has drawn an enormous amount of attention. HLB is one of the most devastating diseases of citrus (6,13), characterized by blotchy mottling with green islands on leaves, as well as stunting, fruit decline, and small, lopsided fruits with poor coloration. The disease tends to be associated with a phloem-limited fastidious {alpha}-proteobacterium given a provisional Candidatus status (Candidatus Liberobacter spp. later changed to Candidatus Liberibacter spp.) in nomenclature (18,25,34). Previous studies indicate that HLB infection causes disorder in the phloem and severely impairs the translocation of assimilates in host plants (5,27,40). Tatineni and colleagues discovered that the HLB bacteria were unevenly distributed in phloem of bark tissue, vascular tissue of the leaf midrib, roots, and different floral and fruit parts (43). Unsuccessful attempts in culturing the pathogen are notably hampering efforts to understand its biology and pathogenesis mechanism. Using a modified Koch's Postulates approach, Jagoueix and colleagues were able to re-infect periwinkle plants from a mixed microbial community harvested from HLB diseased plants (25). Emergence of the disease in otherwise healthy plants led to the conclusion that HLB was associated with Candidatus Liberibacter sp. based on its 16S rDNA sequence (18,25). Currently, three species of the pathogen are recognized from trees with HLB disease based on 16S rDNA sequence: Ca. Liberibacter asiaticus (Las), Ca. Liberibacter africanus (Laf), and Ca. Liberibacter americanus (Lam); Las is the most prevalent species among HLB diseased trees (5,12,18,25,44). Las is naturally transmitted to citrus by the psyllid, Diaphorina citri Kuwayama, and can be artificially transmitted by grafting from citrus to citrus and dodder (Cuscuta campestris) to periwinkle (Catharanthus roseus) or tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum Xanthi) (5). Based on current research regarding the associations of Liberibacter in planta there is not enough evidence to implicate Liberibacter as the definitive causal agent of HLB disease due to its resistance to cultivation in vitro. It is possible that HLB disease may be the result of complex etiology where Liberibacter interacts with other endophytic bacteria. However, there is not enough evidence regarding its association(s) in planta to make this conclusion, nor is it known whether associated microbial communities play a role in expression of pathogenic traits. The main objective of the study was to test the hypothesis that other bacteria besides Ca. Liberibacter spp. are associated with citrus greening disease. The differences between the relative abundance, species richness and phylogenetic diversity of the microbial communitie

  1. Electrochemical Biosensor for Rapid and Sensitive Detection of Magnetically Extracted Bacterial Pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Setterington, Emma B.; Alocilja, Evangelyn C.

    2012-01-01

    Biological defense and security applications demand rapid, sensitive detection of bacterial pathogens. This work presents a novel qualitative electrochemical detection technique which is applied to two representative bacterial pathogens, Bacillus cereus (as a surrogate for B. anthracis) and Escherichia coli O157:H7, resulting in detection limits of 40 CFU/mL and 6 CFU/mL, respectively, from pure culture. Cyclic voltammetry is combined with immunomagnetic separation in a rapid method requiring approximately 1 h for presumptive positive/negative results. An immunofunctionalized magnetic/polyaniline core/shell nano-particle (c/sNP) is employed to extract target cells from the sample solution and magnetically position them on a screen-printed carbon electrode (SPCE) sensor. The presence of target cells significantly inhibits current flow between the electrically active c/sNPs and SPCE. This method has the potential to be adapted for a wide variety of target organisms and sample matrices, and to become a fully portable system for routine monitoring or emergency detection of bacterial pathogens. PMID:25585629

  2. Liquid-liquid extraction and liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry detection of curcuminoids from bacterial culture medium.

    PubMed

    Tan, Suryani; Rupasinghe, Thusitha W T; Tull, Dedreia L; Augustin, Mary Ann; Gras, Sally L

    2015-04-15

    Liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) has been used to detect polyphenolic curcuminoids found in turmeric but studies of metabolism by bacterial and mammalian cells in vitro are compromised by poor recovery from the culture medium. We report a liquid-liquid extraction procedure with ethyl acetate and use LC-MS to quantify extracted curcuminoids. Ethyl acetate allows recoveries of ? 80-86% of curcuminoids from the bacterial growth medium, bacterial cell lysate and combined bacterial cell and growth medium matrices; a clear improvement over acetonitrile where recoveries were ? 25-66%. This optimised method will enable studies of curcuminoid metabolism and may be applicable to other hydrophobic polyphenolic compounds. PMID:25770788

  3. Antibacterial effect of Allium sativum and Ficus carica extracts on tomato bacterial pathogens

    Microsoft Academic Search

    G. M. Balestra; A. Heydari; D. Ceccarelli; E. Ovidi; A. Quattrucci

    2009-01-01

    Bacterial pathogens are a serious problem on tomato plants. Amongst them, Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato (Pst), Xanthomonas vesicatoria (Xv) and Clavibacter michiganensis subsp. michiganensis (Cmm), causal agents of bacterial speck, bacterial spot and bacterial canker, respectively, affect tomato production under greenhouse and field conditions. In in vitro tests with bacterial strains at a population density of 106 and 108cfu ml?1,

  4. Methods for the Measurement of a Bacterial Enzyme Activity in Cell Lysates and Extracts

    PubMed Central

    Mendz, George; Hazell, Stuart

    1998-01-01

    The kinetic characteristics and regulation of aspartate carbamoyltransferase activity were studied in lysates and cell extracts of Helicobacter pylori by three diffirent methods. Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, radioactive tracer analysis, and spectrophotometry were employed in conjunction to identify the properties of the enzyme activity and to validate the results obtained with each assay. NMR spectroscopy was the most direct method to provide proof of ACTase activity; radioactive tracer analysis was the most sensitive technique and a microtitre-based colorimetric assay was the most cost-and time-efficient for large scale analyses. Freeze-thawing was adopted as the preferred method for cell lysis in studying enzyme activity in situ. This study showed the benefits of employing several different complementary methods to investigate bacterial enzyme activity. PMID:12734591

  5. COMPARISON OF RAPID METHODS FOR THE EXTRACTION OF BACTERIAL DNA FROM COLONIC AND CECAL LUMEN CONTENTS OF THE PIG

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The increasing use of DNA methodologies to study the microflora of the pig gastrointestinal tract requires an efficient recovery of bacterial DNA from intestinal samples. Thus, the objective of this study was to determine which extraction methods are most effective for colonic and cecal lumen sampl...

  6. Seasonal and Spatial Variability in Lake Michigan Sediment Small-Subunit rRNA Concentrations

    PubMed Central

    MacGregor, Barbara J.; Moser, Duane P.; Baker, Brett J.; Alm, Elizabeth W.; Maurer, Max; Nealson, Kenneth H.; Stahl, David A.

    2001-01-01

    We have used molecular biological methods to study the distribution of microbial small-subunit rRNAs (SSU rRNAs), in relation to chemical profiles, in offshore Lake Michigan sediments. The sampling site is at a depth of 100 m, with temperatures of 2 to 4°C year-round. RNA extracted from sediment was probed with radiolabeled oligonucleotides targeting bacterial, archaeal, and eukaryotic SSU rRNAs, as well as with a universal probe. The coverage of these probes in relation to the present sequence database is discussed. Because ribosome production is growth rate regulated, rRNA concentrations are an indicator of the microbial populations active in situ. Over a 1-year period, changes in sedimentary SSU rRNA concentrations followed seasonal changes in surface water temperature and SSU rRNA concentration. Sedimentary depth profiles of oxygen, reduced manganese and iron, and sulfate changed relatively little from season to season, but the nitrate concentration was approximately fivefold higher in April and June 1997 than at the other times sampling was done. We propose that sediment microbial SSU rRNA concentrations at our sampling site are influenced by seasonal inputs from the water column, particularly the settling of the spring diatom bloom, and that the timing of this input may be modulated by grazers, such that ammonia becomes available to sediment microbes sooner than fresh organic carbon. Nitrate production from ammonia by autotrophic nitrifying bacteria, combined with low activity of heterotrophic denitrifying bacteria in the absence of readily degradable organic carbon, could account for the cooccurrence of high nitrate and low SSU rRNA concentrations. PMID:11525985

  7. Evaluation of antibacterial activity of crude protein extracts from seeds of six different medical plants against standard bacterial strains

    PubMed Central

    Al Akeel, Raid; Al-Sheikh, Yazeed; Mateen, Ayesha; Syed, Rabbani; Janardhan, K.; Gupta, V.C.

    2013-01-01

    A huge group of natural antimicrobial compounds are active against a large spectrum of bacterial strains causing infectious threat. The present study was conducted to investigate the crude extracts of antimicrobial protein and peptide efficacy from six medicinal plant seeds. Extraction was carried out in Sodium phosphate citrate buffer, and Sodium acetate buffer using different pH. Antimicrobial activities of these plants were determined by the microbiological technique using Agar well diffusion Assay. Extremely strong activity was observed in the seed extracts of Allium ascolinicum extracted in sodium phosphate citrate buffer at pH (5.8) against Proteus vulgaris, Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus with zone of inhibition 17 mm, 17 mm and 15 mm and Rumex vesicarius at pH (7.6), Ammi majus at pH (6.8), Cichorium intybus at pH (7.4) and Cucumis sativus at pH (7.8) also showed better sensitivity against the bacterial strains with zone of inhibition ranges 16–10 mm and some of the strains were found to be resistant. Antibacterial activity pattern of different plant extracts prepared in sodium acetate buffer pH (6.5), among all the plant seed extracts used Foeniculum vulgare had shown good inhibition in all the bacterial strains used, with zone of inhibition ranges 11–12.5 mm, The extracts of C. intybus and C. sativus were found to be effective with zone of inhibition 11–6 mm and some of the strains were found to be resistant. Most of the strains found to have shown better sensitivity compared with the standard antibiotic Chloramphenicol (25 mcg). Our results showed that the plants used for our study are the richest source for antimicrobial proteins and peptides and they may be used for industrial extraction and isolation of antimicrobial compounds which may find a place in medicine industry as constituents of antibiotics. PMID:24600307

  8. Search of environmental descriptors to explain the variability of the bacterial diversity from maize rhizospheres across a regional scale

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Thelma Castellanos; Anja B. Dohrmann; Gwenaël Imfeld; Susanne Baumgarte; Christoph C. Tebbe

    2009-01-01

    The regional scale variability of the bacterial community inhabiting the rhizosphere was studied with soil collected from maize fields located in the Santo Domingo Valley (SDV; Baja California Sur, Mexico), a semi-arid agricultural ecosystem of approximately 200 km2. The bacterial community structure was visualized by single-strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP) profiles of PCR-amplified partial 16S rRNA genes of directly extracted rhizosphere soil

  9. Identification of the Microbiota in Carious Dentin Lesions Using 16S rRNA Gene Sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Obata, Junko; Takeshita, Toru; Shibata, Yukie; Yamanaka, Wataru; Unemori, Masako; Akamine, Akifumi; Yamashita, Yoshihisa

    2014-01-01

    While mutans streptococci have long been assumed to be the specific pathogen responsible for human dental caries, the concept of a complex dental caries-associated microbiota has received significant attention in recent years. Molecular analyses revealed the complexity of the microbiota with the predominance of Lactobacillus and Prevotella in carious dentine lesions. However, characterization of the dentin caries-associated microbiota has not been extensively explored in different ethnicities and races. In the present study, the bacterial communities in the carious dentin of Japanese subjects were analyzed comprehensively with molecular approaches using the16S rRNA gene. Carious dentin lesion samples were collected from 32 subjects aged 4–76 years, and the 16S rRNA genes, amplified from the extracted DNA with universal primers, were sequenced with a pyrosequencer. The bacterial composition was classified into clusters I, II, and III according to the relative abundance (high, middle, low) of Lactobacillus. The bacterial composition in cluster II was composed of relatively high proportions of Olsenella and Propionibacterium or subdominated by heterogeneous genera. The bacterial communities in cluster III were characterized by the predominance of Atopobium, Prevotella, or Propionibacterium with Streptococcus or Actinomyces. Some samples in clusters II and III, mainly related to Atopobium and Propionibacterium, were novel combinations of microbiota in carious dentin lesions and may be characteristic of the Japanese population. Clone library analysis revealed that Atopobium sp. HOT-416 and P. acidifaciens were specific species associated with dentinal caries among these genera in a Japanese population. We summarized the bacterial composition of dentinal carious lesions in a Japanese population using next-generation sequencing and found typical Japanese types with Atopobium or Propionibacterium predominating. PMID:25083880

  10. Using Bacterial Extract along with Differential Gene Expression in Acropora millepora Larvae to Decouple the Processes of Attachment and Metamorphosis

    PubMed Central

    Siboni, Nachshon; Abrego, David; Seneca, Francois; Motti, Cherie A.; Andreakis, Nikos; Tebben, Jan; Blackall, Linda L.; Harder, Tilmann

    2012-01-01

    Biofilms of the bacterium Pseudoalteromonas induce metamorphosis of acroporid coral larvae. The bacterial metabolite tetrabromopyrrole (TBP), isolated from an extract of Pseudoalteromonas sp. associated with the crustose coralline alga (CCA) Neogoniolithon fosliei, induced coral larval metamorphosis (100%) with little or no attachment (0–2%). To better understand the molecular events and mechanisms underpinning the induction of Acropora millepora larval metamorphosis, including cell proliferation, apoptosis, differentiation, migration, adhesion and biomineralisation, two novel coral gene expression assays were implemented. These involved the use of reverse-transcriptase quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR) and employed 47 genes of interest (GOI), selected based on putative roles in the processes of settlement and metamorphosis. Substantial differences in transcriptomic responses of GOI were detected following incubation of A. millepora larvae with a threshold concentration and 10-fold elevated concentration of TBP-containing extracts of Pseudoalteromonas sp. The notable and relatively abrupt changes of the larval body structure during metamorphosis correlated, at the molecular level, with significant differences (p<0.05) in gene expression profiles of 24 GOI, 12 hours post exposure. Fourteen of those GOI also presented differences in expression (p<0.05) following exposure to the threshold concentration of bacterial TBP-containing extract. The specificity of the bacterial TBP-containing extract to induce the metamorphic stage in A. millepora larvae without attachment, using a robust, low cost, accurate, ecologically relevant and highly reproducible RT-qPCR assay, allowed partially decoupling of the transcriptomic processes of attachment and metamorphosis. The bacterial TBP-containing extract provided a unique opportunity to monitor the regulation of genes exclusively involved in the process of metamorphosis, contrasting previous gene expression studies that utilized cues, such as crustose coralline algae, biofilms or with GLW-amide neuropeptides that stimulate the entire onset of larval metamorphosis and attachment. PMID:22655067

  11. Using bacterial extract along with differential gene expression in Acropora millepora larvae to decouple the processes of attachment and metamorphosis.

    PubMed

    Siboni, Nachshon; Abrego, David; Seneca, Francois; Motti, Cherie A; Andreakis, Nikos; Tebben, Jan; Blackall, Linda L; Harder, Tilmann

    2012-01-01

    Biofilms of the bacterium Pseudoalteromonas induce metamorphosis of acroporid coral larvae. The bacterial metabolite tetrabromopyrrole (TBP), isolated from an extract of Pseudoalteromonas sp. associated with the crustose coralline alga (CCA) Neogoniolithon fosliei, induced coral larval metamorphosis (100%) with little or no attachment (0-2%). To better understand the molecular events and mechanisms underpinning the induction of Acropora millepora larval metamorphosis, including cell proliferation, apoptosis, differentiation, migration, adhesion and biomineralisation, two novel coral gene expression assays were implemented. These involved the use of reverse-transcriptase quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR) and employed 47 genes of interest (GOI), selected based on putative roles in the processes of settlement and metamorphosis. Substantial differences in transcriptomic responses of GOI were detected following incubation of A. millepora larvae with a threshold concentration and 10-fold elevated concentration of TBP-containing extracts of Pseudoalteromonas sp. The notable and relatively abrupt changes of the larval body structure during metamorphosis correlated, at the molecular level, with significant differences (p<0.05) in gene expression profiles of 24 GOI, 12 hours post exposure. Fourteen of those GOI also presented differences in expression (p<0.05) following exposure to the threshold concentration of bacterial TBP-containing extract. The specificity of the bacterial TBP-containing extract to induce the metamorphic stage in A. millepora larvae without attachment, using a robust, low cost, accurate, ecologically relevant and highly reproducible RT-qPCR assay, allowed partially decoupling of the transcriptomic processes of attachment and metamorphosis. The bacterial TBP-containing extract provided a unique opportunity to monitor the regulation of genes exclusively involved in the process of metamorphosis, contrasting previous gene expression studies that utilized cues, such as crustose coralline algae, biofilms or with GLW-amide neuropeptides that stimulate the entire onset of larval metamorphosis and attachment. PMID:22655067

  12. Characteristics and anticancer properties of bacterial cellulose films containing ethanolic extract of mangosteen peel.

    PubMed

    Taokaew, Siriporn; Nunkaew, Natthawut; Siripong, Pongpun; Phisalaphong, Muenduen

    2014-01-01

    Bacterial cellulose (BC) films containing an ethanolic extract of mangosteen peel were prepared and their physical, chemical, and anticancer properties were characterized. The cumulative absorption and release profiles of bioactive compounds in the films were determined based on total phenolic and ?-mangostin content. The BC films were filled with total phenolic compounds expressed as gallic acid equivalent varying from 4.72 to 275.91?mg/cm3 dried film, and ?-mangostin varying from 2.06 to 248.20?mg/cm3 dried film. A Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy evaluation showed that there were weak interactions between the functional groups of the extract and the BC. Decreases in the water absorption capacity and water vapor transmission rate of the modified films were detected. Release studies were performed using Franz diffusion cells. In a non-transdermal system, the release of bioactive compounds from the films depended on concentration, immersion time, and the pH of the dissolution medium. A transdermal diffusion study showed that 59-62% of total phenolic compounds that were initially loaded were released from the films and more than 95% of bioactive compounds released from the films were adsorbed into pig skin. Only very small amount of the bioactive compounds penetrated through pig skin and into phosphate and acetate buffers. In studies of anticancer abilities, the release of 2.0??g/ml ?-mangostin from the BC films could suppress the growth of B16F10 melanoma (approximately 31% survival). With the release of ?-mangostin at greater than 17.4-18.4??g/ml, less than 15 and 5% survival of B16F10 melanoma and MCF-7 breast cancer cells, respectively, was observed. PMID:24802115

  13. Bacterial extract (OM-89) specific and non specific immunomodulation in rheumatoid arthritis patients.

    PubMed

    Toussirot, Eric; Robinet, Eric; Saas, Philippe; Chabod, Jacqueline; Augé, Benoît; Cozma, Gabriel; Tiberghien, Pierre; Roudier, Jean; Wendling, Daniel

    2006-06-01

    The Escherichia Coli bacterial extract (OM-89) is used in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). We evaluated the immunological changes induced by oral administration of OM-89 in 12 RA patients (polyclonal T cell reactivity to PHA, T cell precursor frequencies specific for OM-89 and Tetanus toxoid (TT), a control antigen and the release of Th1 (IFN-gamma, TNF-alpha), Th2 (IL-4) and T regulatory 1 cell (Tr1) (IL-10) cytokines in the supernatants of PBMC cultures. Stimulation index in response to PHA decreased at month 3 as well as T cell precursor frequencies specific for TT with similar trends for OM-89-specific T cell precursor frequencies. OM-89 induced a strong production of IL-10, a significant decrease in IL-4 production while TNF-alpha and IFN-gamma production tended to decrease during the study. Our results suggest that OM-89 has immunomodulatory properties by inducing changes in PBMC cytokines release suggestive of an induced Tr1 response to OM-89. PMID:16891218

  14. Choice of bacterial DNA extraction method from fecal material influences community structure as evaluated by metagenomic analysis

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background In recent years, studies on the human intestinal microbiota have attracted tremendous attention. Application of next generation sequencing for mapping of bacterial phylogeny and function has opened new doors to this field of research. However, little attention has been given to the effects of choice of methodology on the output resulting from such studies. Results In this study we conducted a systematic comparison of the DNA extraction methods used by the two major collaborative efforts: The European MetaHIT and the American Human Microbiome Project (HMP). Additionally, effects of homogenizing the samples before extraction were addressed. We observed significant differences in distribution of bacterial taxa depending on the method. While eukaryotic DNA was most efficiently extracted by the MetaHIT protocol, DNA from bacteria within the Bacteroidetes phylum was most efficiently extracted by the HMP protocol. Conclusions Whereas it is comforting that the inter-individual variation clearly exceeded the variation resulting from choice of extraction method, our data highlight the challenge of comparing data across studies applying different methodologies. PMID:24949196

  15. Estimating Bacterial Diversity for Ecological Studies: Methods, Metrics, and Assumptions

    PubMed Central

    Birtel, Julia; Walser, Jean-Claude; Pichon, Samuel; Bürgmann, Helmut; Matthews, Blake

    2015-01-01

    Methods to estimate microbial diversity have developed rapidly in an effort to understand the distribution and diversity of microorganisms in natural environments. For bacterial communities, the 16S rRNA gene is the phylogenetic marker gene of choice, but most studies select only a specific region of the 16S rRNA to estimate bacterial diversity. Whereas biases derived from from DNA extraction, primer choice and PCR amplification are well documented, we here address how the choice of variable region can influence a wide range of standard ecological metrics, such as species richness, phylogenetic diversity, ?-diversity and rank-abundance distributions. We have used Illumina paired-end sequencing to estimate the bacterial diversity of 20 natural lakes across Switzerland derived from three trimmed variable 16S rRNA regions (V3, V4, V5). Species richness, phylogenetic diversity, community composition, ?-diversity, and rank-abundance distributions differed significantly between 16S rRNA regions. Overall, patterns of diversity quantified by the V3 and V5 regions were more similar to one another than those assessed by the V4 region. Similar results were obtained when analyzing the datasets with different sequence similarity thresholds used during sequences clustering and when the same analysis was used on a reference dataset of sequences from the Greengenes database. In addition we also measured species richness from the same lake samples using ARISA Fingerprinting, but did not find a strong relationship between species richness estimated by Illumina and ARISA. We conclude that the selection of 16S rRNA region significantly influences the estimation of bacterial diversity and species distributions and that caution is warranted when comparing data from different variable regions as well as when using different sequencing techniques. PMID:25915756

  16. Secondary Metabolites Control the Associated Bacterial Communities of Saprophytic Basidiomycotina Fungi

    PubMed Central

    de Carvalho, Maira Peres; Türck, Patrick; Abraham, Wolf-Rainer

    2015-01-01

    Fungi grow under humid conditions and are, therefore, prone to biofilm infections. A 16S rRNA fingerprint analysis was performed on 49 sporocarps of Basidiomycotina in order to determine whether they are able to control these biofilms. Ninety-five bacterial phylotypes, comprising 4 phyla and 10 families, were identified. While ectomycorrhizal fungi harbored the highest bacterial diversity, saprophytic fungi showed little or no association with bacteria. Seven fungal species were screened for antimicrobial and antibiofilm activities. Biofilm formation and bacterial growth was inhibited by extracts obtained from saprophytic fungi, which confirmed the hypothesis that many fungi modulate biofilm colonization on their sporocarps. PMID:25904019

  17. Bacterial diversity in an industrial wastewater bioreactor.

    PubMed

    Bramucci, M; Kane, H; Chen, M; Nagarajan, V

    2003-10-01

    Industrial wastewater bioreactors are potentially important sources of novel biocatalysts. However, the microbial populations in these bioreactors are not well characterized. The microbial community in an industrial wastewater bioreactor was surveyed by extracting DNA from a sample of activated sludge, followed by PCR amplification and sequencing of cloned 16S rRNA genes. A total of 407 cloned 16S rRNA gene sequences were compared with 88 bacterial isolates cultured from the same sample of sludge using a variety of standard media. Most of the bacteria detected by the PCR-based approach were beta-subdivision Proteobacteria, whereas most of the cultured bacteria were gamma-subdivision Proteobacteria. Only a few types of bacteria were detected by both approaches. These observations indicate that multiple techniques are necessary to characterize the microbial diversity in any complex ecosystem. PMID:12827322

  18. Detection and identification of Legionella species in hospital water supplies through Polymerase Chain Reaction (16S rRNA)

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Legionella spp. are important waterborne pathogens that are normally transmitted through aerosols. The present work was conducted to investigate the presence of Legionella spp. and its common species in hospital water supplies. Considering the limitations of culture method, polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assays were developed to detect the gene 16S rRNA irrespective of the bacterial serotype. Four well-established DNA extraction protocols (freeze & thaw and phenol-chloroform as two manual protocols and two commercial kits) were tested and evaluated to release DNA from bacterial cells. A total of 45 samples were collected from seven distinct hospitals’ sites during a period of 10 months. The PCR assay was used to amplify a 654-bp fragment of the 16S rRNA gene. Legionella were detected in 13 samples (28.9%) by all of the methods applied for DNA extraction. Significant differences were noted in the yield of extracted nucleic acids. Legionella were not detected in any of the samples when DNA extraction by freeze & thaw was used. Excluding this method and comparing manual protocol with commercial kits, Kappa coefficient was calculated as 0.619 with p?extraction with Bioneer kit exhibited a higher sensitivity than classical Qiagen. Showerheads and cold-water taps were the most and least contaminated sources with 55.5 and 9 percent positive samples, respectively. Moreover two positive samples were identified for species by DNA sequencing and submitted to the Gene Bank database with accession Nos. FJ480932 and FJ480933. The results obtained showed that despite the advantages of molecular assays in Legionella tracing in environmental sources, the use of optimised DNA extraction methods is critical. PMID:24860661

  19. Evaluation of antimicrobial activity of selected plant extracts by rapid XTT colorimetry and bacterial enumeration

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Amal G. Al-Bakri; Fatma U. Afifi

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this study was to screen and evaluate the antimicrobial activity of indigenous Jordanian plant extracts, dissolved in dimethylsulfoxide, using the rapid XTT assay and viable count methods. XTT rapid assay was used for the initial screening of antimicrobial activity for the plant extracts. Antimicrobial activity of potentially active plant extracts was further assessed using the “viable plate

  20. Evaluation of the Effect of Green Tea Extract on Mouth Bacterial Activity in the Presence of Propylene Glycol

    PubMed Central

    Moghbel, Abdolhossein; Farjzadeh, Ahmad; Aghel, Nasrin; Agheli, Homaun; Raisi, Nafiseh

    2012-01-01

    Background Compounds present in green tea have proved to inhibit the growth and activity of bacteria associated with infections. Objectives To assess the effects of green tea leaves extract in presence of propylene glycol on the aerobic mouth bacteria load. Materials and Methods Saliva of 25 volunteer girl students aging 20-25 years were selected and evaluated by a mouthwash sample containing 1% tannin, as the most effective antibacterial complex in green tea. Comparative studies were also conducted between green tea mouthwashes containing 1% tannin and a similar sample with 10% propylene glycol added during extraction. This comparison was applied for a chlorhexidine 0.2% sample as a chemical mouthwash brand, too. Results There was a meaningful difference between the green tea mouthwashes containing 10% propylene glycol and the simple green tea extract (P < 0.05). Significant difference was also seen between the herbal and chemical mouthwashes (P < 0.05). The extract 1% tannin containing 10% propylene glycol reduced the aerobic mouth bacterial load of the student salvia about 64 percent. The pH monotonousness in different days and temperatures approved the stability of tannin in liquid water medium. Conclusions Using green tea extract as a herbal mouthwash is safe and harmless specially for children and pregnant women. This result led us to suppose that green tea may prevent plaque formation on teeth, coming over halitosis due to mouth infection, too. These effects need to be approved in an in vivo trial as a second study. PMID:24624155

  1. Estimation of the Abundance of an Uncultured Soil Bacterial Strain by a Competitive Quantitative PCR Method

    Microsoft Academic Search

    SOO-YOUN LEE; JOHN BOLLINGER; DAVID BEZDICEK; ANDANDREW OGRAM

    1996-01-01

    Strain EA25 was identified in a clone library of bacterial 16S rRNA gene sequences that had been amplified from DNA extracted from soil collected in eastern Washington State. EA25 was subsequently shown to be related to members of the genera Planctomyces and Chlamydia and most closely related (93% similarity) to strain MC18, a strain identified in an Australian soil sample

  2. Illumina Amplicon Sequencing of 16S rRNA Tag Reveals Bacterial Community Development in the Rhizosphere of Apple Nurseries at a Replant Disease Site and a New Planting Site

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Jian; Zhang, Qiang; Zhou, Jia; Wei, Qinping

    2014-01-01

    We used a next-generation, Illumina-based sequencing approach to characterize the bacterial community development of apple rhizosphere soil in a replant site (RePlant) and a new planting site (NewPlant) in Beijing. Dwarfing apple nurseries of ‘Fuji’/SH6/Pingyitiancha trees were planted in the spring of 2013. Before planting, soil from the apple rhizosphere of the replant site (ReSoil) and from the new planting site (NewSoil) was sampled for analysis on the Illumina MiSeq platform. In late September, the rhizosphere soil from both sites was resampled (RePlant and NewPlant). More than 16,000 valid reads were obtained for each replicate, and the community was composed of five dominant groups (Proteobacteria, Acidobacteria, Bacteroidetes, Gemmatimonadetes and Actinobacteria). The bacterial diversity decreased after apple planting. Principal component analyses revealed that the rhizosphere samples were significantly different among treatments. Apple nursery planting showed a large impact on the soil bacterial community, and the community development was significantly different between the replanted and newly planted soils. Verrucomicrobia were less abundant in RePlant soil, while Pseudomonas and Lysobacter were increased in RePlant compared with ReSoil and NewPlant. Both RePlant and ReSoil showed relatively higher invertase and cellulase activities than NewPlant and NewSoil, but only NewPlant soil showed higher urease activity, and this soil also had the higher plant growth. Our experimental results suggest that planting apple nurseries has a significant impact on soil bacterial community development at both replant and new planting sites, and planting on new site resulted in significantly higher soil urease activity and a different bacterial community composition. PMID:25360786

  3. Analysis of the Intestinal Microflora in Hepialus gonggaensis Larvae Using 16S rRNA Sequences

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Hewei Yu; Zhongkang Wang; Li Liu; Yuxian Xia; Yueqing Cao; Youping Yin

    2008-01-01

    Gut microbial diversity provides insight into the basic function of a gut microbial ecosystem. In this study, restriction\\u000a fragment length polymorphism 16S rRNA sequences was used to detect the intestinal microbial diversity of Hepialus gonggaensis larvae. The total DNA of microorganisms was extracted from the intestinal contents and 16S rRNA was amplified. A nearly full-length\\u000a of 16S rRNA sequence library

  4. Cloning and Sequence Analysis of Two Copies of a 23S rRNA Gene from Helicobacter pylori and Association of Clarithromycin Resistance with 23S rRNA Mutations

    Microsoft Academic Search

    DIANE E. TAYLOR; ZHONGMING GE; DALE PURYCH; TONY LO; KOJI HIRATSUKA

    1997-01-01

    In this study, two identical copies of a 23S-5S gene cluster, which are separately situated within the Helicobacter pylori UA802 chromosome, were cloned and sequenced. Comparison of the DNA sequence of the H. pylori 23S rRNA gene with known sequences of other bacterial 23S rRNA genes indicated that the H. pylori UA802 23S rRNA genes are closely related to those

  5. Inhibition of bacterial quorum sensing by extracts from aquatic fungi: first report from marine endophytes.

    PubMed

    Martín-Rodríguez, Alberto J; Reyes, Fernando; Martín, Jesús; Pérez-Yépez, Juan; León-Barrios, Milagros; Couttolenc, Alan; Espinoza, César; Trigos, Angel; Martín, Víctor S; Norte, Manuel; Fernández, José J

    2014-11-01

    In our search for quorum-sensing (QS) disrupting molecules, 75 fungal isolates were recovered from reef organisms (endophytes), saline lakes and mangrove rhizosphere. Their QS inhibitory activity was evaluated in Chromobacterium violaceum CVO26. Four strains of endophytic fungi stood out for their potent activity at concentrations from 500 to 50 ?g mL-1. The molecular characterization, based on the internal transcribed spacer (ITS) region sequences (ITS1, 5.8S and ITS2) between the rRNA of 18S and 28S, identified these strains as belonging to four genera: Sarocladium (LAEE06), Fusarium (LAEE13), Epicoccum (LAEE14), and Khuskia (LAEE21). Interestingly, three came from coral species and two of them came from the same organism, the coral Diploria strigosa. Metabolic profiles obtained by Liquid Chromatography-High Resolution Mass Spectrometry (LC-HRMS) suggest that a combination of fungal secondary metabolites and fatty acids could be the responsible for the observed activities. The LC-HRMS analysis also revealed the presence of potentially new secondary metabolites. This is, to the best of our knowledge, the first report of QS inhibition by marine endophytic fungi. PMID:25415350

  6. Evaluation of antimicrobial activity of selected plant extracts by rapid XTT colorimetry and bacterial enumeration.

    PubMed

    Al-Bakri, Amal G; Afifi, Fatma U

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this study was to screen and evaluate the antimicrobial activity of indigenous Jordanian plant extracts, dissolved in dimethylsulfoxide, using the rapid XTT assay and viable count methods. XTT rapid assay was used for the initial screening of antimicrobial activity for the plant extracts. Antimicrobial activity of potentially active plant extracts was further assessed using the "viable plate count" method. Four degrees of antimicrobial activity (high, moderate, weak and inactive) against Bacillus subtilis, Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa, respectively, were recorded. The plant extracts of Hypericum triquetrifolium, Ballota undulata, Ruta chalepensis, Ononis natrix, Paronychia argentea and Marrubium vulgare had shown promising antimicrobial activity. This study showed that while both XTT and viable count methods are comparable when estimating the overall antimicrobial activity of experimental substances, there is no strong linear correlation between the two methods. PMID:16831479

  7. Office space bacterial abundance and diversity in three metropolitan areas.

    PubMed

    Hewitt, Krissi M; Gerba, Charles P; Maxwell, Sheri L; Kelley, Scott T

    2012-01-01

    People in developed countries spend approximately 90% of their lives indoors, yet we know little about the source and diversity of microbes in built environments. In this study, we combined culture-based cell counting and multiplexed pyrosequencing of environmental ribosomal RNA (rRNA) gene sequences to investigate office space bacterial diversity in three metropolitan areas. Five surfaces common to all offices were sampled using sterile double-tipped swabs, one tip for culturing and one for DNA extraction, in 30 different offices per city (90 offices, 450 total samples). 16S rRNA gene sequences were PCR amplified using bar-coded "universal" bacterial primers from 54 of the surfaces (18 per city) and pooled for pyrosequencing. A three-factorial Analysis of Variance (ANOVA) found significant differences in viable bacterial abundance between offices inhabited by men or women, among the various surface types, and among cities. Multiplex pyrosequencing identified more than 500 bacterial genera from 20 different bacterial divisions. The most abundant of these genera tended to be common inhabitants of human skin, nasal, oral or intestinal cavities. Other commonly occurring genera appeared to have environmental origins (e.g., soils). There were no significant differences in the bacterial diversity between offices inhabited by men or women or among surfaces, but the bacterial community diversity of the Tucson samples was clearly distinguishable from that of New York and San Francisco, which were indistinguishable. Overall, our comprehensive molecular analysis of office building microbial diversity shows the potential of these methods for studying patterns and origins of indoor bacterial contamination. "[H]umans move through a sea of microbial life that is seldom perceived except in the context of potential disease and decay." - Feazel et al. (2009). PMID:22666400

  8. Structure?Activity Relationships of Antimicrobial Gallic Acid Derivatives from Pomegranate and Acacia Fruit Extracts against Potato Bacterial Wilt Pathogen.

    PubMed

    Farag, Mohamed A; Al-Mahdy, Dalia A; Salah El Dine, Riham; Fahmy, Sherifa; Yassin, Aymen; Porzel, Andrea; Brandt, Wolfgang

    2015-06-01

    Bacterial wilts of potato, tomato, pepper, and or eggplant caused by Ralstonia solanacearum are among the most serious plant diseases worldwide. In this study, the issue of developing bactericidal agents from natural sources against R. solanacearum derived from plant extracts was addressed. Extracts prepared from 25 plant species with antiseptic relevance in Egyptian folk medicine were screened for their antimicrobial properties against the potato pathogen R. solancearum by using the disc-zone inhibition assay and microtitre plate dilution method. Plants exhibiting notable antimicrobial activities against the tested pathogen include extracts from Acacia arabica and Punica granatum. Bioactivity-guided fractionation of A. arabica and P. granatum resulted in the isolation of bioactive compounds 3,5-dihydroxy-4-methoxybenzoic acid and gallic acid, in addition to epicatechin. All isolates displayed significant antimicrobial activities against R. solanacearum (MIC values 0.5-9?mg/ml), with 3,5-dihydroxy-4-methoxybenzoic acid being the most effective one with a MIC value of 0.47?mg/ml. We further performed a structure-activity relationship (SAR) study for the inhibition of R. solanacearum growth by ten natural, structurally related benzoic acids. PMID:26080741

  9. Retrospective observational study to investigate Sinerga, a multifactorial nutritional product, and bacterial extracts in the prevention of recurrent respiratory infections in children.

    PubMed

    Nigro, A; Nicastro, A; Trodella, R

    2014-01-01

    In this retrospective observational clinical study, 167 children, aged 3 to 7 years, of both sexes, with a clinical history of recurrent respiratory infections, administered with bacterial extracts of first and second generation or Sinerga a nutritional product containing palmitoylethanolamide, bovine colostrum, phenylethylamine and the new generation of probiotic kluyveromyces FM B0399, were observed. The goal of the study was to compare the supplementation with Sinerga with the supplementation with bacterial extracts, for the effect on the frequency of episodes of respiratory infection that had resulted in a prescription for antibiotics. The study focused retrospectively on the months from March 2013 to November 2012. The results showed a greater reduction in the frequency of respiratory infections with antibiotic therapy in the group of children supplemented with Sinerga than in the group treated with bacterial extracts. In particular, it was observed that 49.3% of the children supplemented with Sinerga, against 5% of those supplemented with extracts, had no infectious episodes requiring the administration of an antibiotic. 100% of subjects supplemented with Sinerga have had no more than two episodes of respiratory infection, while this condition, in the cohort treated with bacterial extracts, was observed in only 51% of cases. PMID:25280039

  10. Bacterial mutagenicity of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in reconstituted mixtures and crude coal tar extracts and fractions

    E-print Network

    Onufrock, Amy Mildred

    1994-01-01

    suggestions to make subject entries in the NOTIS ystem for your work. SGREE RADUATION DATE ist key words or phrases which best describe the eportant areas of your work for entry into the OTIS system. NOTIS is the Online Information System n the TAMU... Library. lease give as many headings as you think would be seful to the cataloguers. Be specific. p&Jyz)p p'ken fw ' QH QpfN'P~~l~ C 0CJ - ~g?enid. (?~ rum ~~f8 ('kCf~~ " ~usa. )un', Cig&( Q ~~(/fdic yi~~P~ BACTERIAL MUTAGENICITY OF POLYCYCLIC...

  11. NAST: a multiple sequence alignment server for comparative analysis of 16S rRNA genes

    Microsoft Academic Search

    T. Z. DeSantis Jr.; Philip Hugenholtz; K. Keller; E. L. Brodie; N. Larsen; Y. M. Piceno; R. Phan; G. L. Andersen

    2006-01-01

    Microbiologists conducting surveys of bacterial and archaeal diversity often require comparative align- ments of thousands of 16S rRNA genes collected from a sample. The computational resources and bioinformatics expertise required to construct such an alignment has inhibited high-throughput analysis. It was hypothesized that an online tool could be dev- eloped to efficiently align thousands of 16S rRNA genes via the

  12. Interaction of Avilamycin with Ribosomes and Resistance Caused by Mutations in 23S rRNA

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Christine B. Kofoed; Birte Vester

    2002-01-01

    The antibiotic growth promoter avilamycin inhibits protein synthesis by binding to bacterial ribosomes. Here the binding site is further characterized on Escherichia coli ribosomes. The drug interacts with domain V of 23S rRNA, giving a chemical footprint at nucleotides A2482 and A2534. Selection of avilamycin-resistant Halobac- terium halobium cells revealed mutations in helix 89 of 23S rRNA. Furthermore, mutations in

  13. Dale C, Dunbar H, Moran NA, Ochman H. 2005. Extracting single genomes from heterogenous DNAsamples:Atest case with Carsonella ruddii, the bacterial symbiont of psyllids (Insecta). 6pp. Journal of Insect Science, 5:3,

    E-print Network

    Ochman, Howard

    .org Extracting single genomes from heterogenous DNA samples: A test case with Carsonella ruddii, the bacterialDale C, Dunbar H, Moran NA, Ochman H. 2005. Extracting single genomes from heterogenous DNAsamples to the study of many bacterial symbionts that live intracellularly in insects and other animals. To recover

  14. Effect of Dietary Supplementation with a Saccharomyces cerevisiae Mannan Oligosaccharide on the Bacterial Community Structure of Broiler Cecal Contents?†

    PubMed Central

    Corrigan, A.; Horgan, K.; Clipson, N.; Murphy, R. A.

    2011-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of dietary supplementation with a prebiotic mannan oligosaccharide (MOS) on broiler performance, bacterial community structure, and phylogenetic populations of cecal contents. Bird performance data were collected, and cecal samples were extracted from randomly caught poults from each treatment group every 7 days from hatching to the age of 42 days. Weight gain, feed consumption, and feed efficiency ratios did not differ significantly between groups. Automated ribosomal intergenic spacer analysis (ARISA) of the bacterial communities in birds receiving MOS-supplemented diets indicated that dietary supplementation with MOS at either of 2 levels significantly altered the bacterial community structure from that of the control group on all sample days. The phylogenetic identities of bacteria contained within the cecum were determined by constructing a 16S rRNA gene clone library. A total of 594 partial 16S rRNA gene sequences from the cecal contents were analyzed and compared for the three dietary treatments. The dominant bacteria of the cecum belonged to three phyla, Firmicutes, Bacteroidetes, and Proteobacteria; of these, Firmicutes were the most dominant in all treatment groups. Statistical analysis of the bacterial 16S rRNA gene clone libraries showed that the compositions of the clone libraries from broilers receiving MOS-supplemented diets were, in most cases, significantly different from that of the control group. It can be concluded that in this trial MOS supplementation significantly altered the cecal bacterial community structure. PMID:21803917

  15. Evaluation of novel carbon nano-tube particles in the bacterial and viral DNA and RNA extraction from the clinical samples

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Nguyen KC; Vo DXA; Hoang HN; Ho LTT; Pham HV

    2010-01-01

    Molecular techniques have become the most im- portant methods of detecting bacterial and viral pathogens. However, current genomic extraction methods are currently limited in term of automation. In this study, carbon nano-tube was used as the vector to trap DNA and RNA molecules. The capability of carbon nano-tube to trap DNA and RNA was evaluated using samples (TB and HBV

  16. A simple extraction method suitable for PCR-based analysis of plant, fungal, and bacterial DNA

    Microsoft Academic Search

    George S. Mahuku

    2004-01-01

    A simple and easy protocol for extracting high-quality DNA from microorganisms and plants is presented. The method involves\\u000a inactivating proteins by using SDS\\/proteinase K and precipitating polysaccharides in the presence of high salt. Further purification\\u000a is based on differential solubility of DNA and high-molecular-weight polysaccharides in aqueous media. The procedure does\\u000a not use the toxic and potentially hazardous phenol and

  17. Interaction of plant extracts of Ungernia victoris, Rhodiola rosea , and Polyscias filicifolia with a bacterial cell

    Microsoft Academic Search

    T. P. Pererva; A. Yu. Miryuta; L. P. Mozhylevskaya; V. A. Kunakh

    2010-01-01

    Components of three investigated plant extracts from the biomass of cultivated cells of Ungernia victoris, Rhodiola rosea, and Polyscias filicifolia interact with porin proteins OmpC and OmpF and reduce their receptor activity towards OmpC- and OmpF-dependent bacteriophages.\\u000a The influx of these components into cells optimizes the synthesis of a lipopolysaccharide (LPS) complex and contributes to\\u000a the enhancement of receptor activity

  18. Evaluation of PCR Amplification Bias by Terminal Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism Analysis of Small-Subunit rRNA and mcrA Genes by Using Defined Template Mixtures of Methanogenic Pure Cultures and Soil DNA Extracts

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Tillmann Lueders; Michael W. Friedrich

    2003-01-01

    Terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP) analysis is a widely used method for profiling microbial community structure in different habitats by targeting small-subunit (SSU) rRNA and also func- tional marker genes. It is not known, however, whether relative gene frequencies of individual community members are adequately represented in post-PCR amplicon frequencies as shown by T-RFLP. In this study, precisely defined

  19. Optimization of isolation and cultivation of bacterial endophytes through addition of plant extract to nutrient media.

    PubMed

    Eevers, N; Gielen, M; Sánchez-López, A; Jaspers, S; White, J C; Vangronsveld, J; Weyens, N

    2015-07-01

    Many endophytes have beneficial effects on plants and can be exploited in biotechnological applications. Studies hypothesize that only 0.001-1% of all plant-associated bacteria are cultivable. Moreover, even after successful isolations, many endophytic bacteria often show reduced regrowth capacity. This research aimed to optimize isolation processes and culturing these bacteria afterwards. We compared several minimal and complex media in a screening. Beside the media themselves, two gelling agents and adding plant extract to media were investigated to enhance the number and diversity of endophytes as well as the growth capacity when regrown after isolation. In this work, 869 medium delivered the highest numbers of cultivable bacteria, as well as the highest diversity. When comparing gelling agents, no differences were observed in the numbers of bacteria. Adding plant extract to the media lead to a slight increase in diversity. However, when adding plant extract to improve the regrowth capacity, sharp increases of viable bacteria occurred in both rich and minimal media. PMID:25997013

  20. Optimization of isolation and cultivation of bacterial endophytes through addition of plant extract to nutrient media

    PubMed Central

    Eevers, N; Gielen, M; Sánchez-López, A; Jaspers, S; White, J C; Vangronsveld, J; Weyens, N

    2015-01-01

    Many endophytes have beneficial effects on plants and can be exploited in biotechnological applications. Studies hypothesize that only 0.001–1% of all plant-associated bacteria are cultivable. Moreover, even after successful isolations, many endophytic bacteria often show reduced regrowth capacity. This research aimed to optimize isolation processes and culturing these bacteria afterwards. We compared several minimal and complex media in a screening. Beside the media themselves, two gelling agents and adding plant extract to media were investigated to enhance the number and diversity of endophytes as well as the growth capacity when regrown after isolation. In this work, 869 medium delivered the highest numbers of cultivable bacteria, as well as the highest diversity. When comparing gelling agents, no differences were observed in the numbers of bacteria. Adding plant extract to the media lead to a slight increase in diversity. However, when adding plant extract to improve the regrowth capacity, sharp increases of viable bacteria occurred in both rich and minimal media. PMID:25997013

  1. Simple DNA extraction protocol for a 16S rDNA study of bacterial diversity in tropical landfarm soil used for bioremediation of oil waste.

    PubMed

    Maciel, B M; Santos, A C F; Dias, J C T; Vidal, R O; Dias, R J C; Gross, E; Cascardo, J C M; Rezende, R P

    2009-01-01

    Landfarm soil is used to bioremediate oil wastes from petrochemical industries. We developed a simplified protocol for microbial DNA extraction of tropical landfarm soil using only direct lysis of macerated material. Two samples of tropical landfarm soil from a Brazilian refinery were analyzed by this protocol (one consisted of crude oil-contaminated soil; the other was continuously enriched for nine months with petroleum). The soil samples were lysed by maceration with liquid nitrogen, eliminating the need for detergents, organic solvents and enzymatic cell lysis. Then, the DNA from the lysed soil sample was extracted using phenol-chloroform-isoamyl alcohol or guanidium isothiocyanate, giving high DNA yields (more than 1 micro g DNA/g soil) from both soil types. This protocol compared favorably with an established method of DNA template preparation that included mechanical, chemical and enzymatic treatment for cell lysis. The efficiency of this extraction protocol was confirmed by polymerase chain reaction amplification of the 16S rRNA gene, denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis and cloning assays. Fifty-one different clones were obtained; their sequences were classified into at least seven different phyla of the Eubacteria group (Proteobacteria - alpha, gamma and delta, Chloroflexi, Actinobacteria, Acidobac teria, Planctomycetes, Bacteroidetes, and Firmicutes). Forty percent of the sequences could not be classified into these phyla, demonstrating the genetic diversity of this microbial community. Only eight isolates had sequences similar to known sequences of 16S rRNA of cultivable organisms or of known environmental isolates and therefore could be identified to the genus level. This method of DNA extraction is a useful tool for analysis of the bacteria responsible for petroleum degradation in contaminated environments. PMID:19440973

  2. Mosquitocidal properties of Calotropis gigantea (Family: Asclepiadaceae) leaf extract and bacterial insecticide, Bacillus thuringiensis, against the mosquito vectors.

    PubMed

    Kovendan, Kalimuthu; Murugan, Kadarkarai; Prasanna Kumar, Kanagarajan; Panneerselvam, Chellasamy; Mahesh Kumar, Palanisamy; Amerasan, Duraisamy; Subramaniam, Jayapal; Vincent, Savariar

    2012-08-01

    Calotropis gigantea leaf extract and Bacillus thuringiensis were tested first to fourth-instar larvae and pupae of Anopheles stephensi, Aedes aegypti, and Culex quinquefasciatus. The medicinal plants were collected from the area around Bharathiar University, Coimbatore, India. Calotropis gigantea leaf was washed with tap water and shade-dried at room temperature. An electrical blender powdered the dried plant materials (leaves). The powder 500 g of the leaf was extracted with 1.5 L of organic solvents of methanol for 8 h using a Soxhlet apparatus and filtered. The crude leaf extracts were evaporated to dryness in a rotary vacuum evaporator. The plant extract showed larvicidal and pupicidal effects after 24 h of exposure; no mortality was observed in the control group. For Calotropis gigantea, the median lethal concentration values (LC(50)) observed for the larvicidal and pupicidal activities against mosquito vector species Anopheles stephensi I to IV larval instars and pupae were 73.77, 89.64, 121.69, 155.49, and 213.79 ppm; Aedes aegypti values were 92.27, 106.60, 136.48, 164.01, and 202.56 ppm; and Culex quinquefasciatus values were 104.66, 127.71, 173.75, 251.65, and 314.70 ppm, respectively. For B. thuringiensis, the LC(50) values of I to IV larval instars and pupae of Anopheles stephensi were 37.24, 45.41, 57.82, 80.09, and 98.34 ppm; Aedes aegypti values were 42.38, 51.90, 71.02, 96.17, and 121.59 ppm; and Culex quinquefasciatus values were 55.85, 68.07, 94.11, 113.35, and 133.87 ppm, respectively. The study proved that the methanol leaf extract of Calotropis gigantea and bacterial insecticide B. thuringiensis has mosquitocidal property and was evaluated as target species of mosquito vectors. This is an ideal ecofriendly approach for the control of vector control programs. PMID:22382205

  3. A Duplex PCR-Based Assay for Measuring the Amount of Bacterial Contamination in a Nucleic Acid Extract from a Culture of Free-Living Protists

    PubMed Central

    Marron, Alan O.; Akam, Michael; Walker, Giselle

    2013-01-01

    Background Cultures of heterotrophic protists often require co-culturing with bacteria to act as a source of nutrition. Such cultures will contain varying levels of intrinsic bacterial contamination that can interfere with molecular research and cause problems with the collection of sufficient material for sequencing. Measuring the levels of bacterial contamination for the purposes of molecular biology research is non-trivial, and can be complicated by the presence of a diverse bacterial flora, or by differences in the relative nucleic acid yield per bacterial or eukaryotic cell. Principal Findings Here we describe a duplex PCR-based assay that can be used to measure the levels of contamination from marine bacteria in a culture of loricate choanoflagellates. By comparison to a standard culture of known target sequence content, the assay can be used to quantify the relative proportions of bacterial and choanoflagellate material in DNA or RNA samples extracted from a culture. We apply the assay to compare methods of purifying choanoflagellate cultures prior to DNA extraction, to determine their effectiveness in reducing bacterial contamination. Together with measurements of the total nucleic acid concentration, the assay can then be used as the basis for determining the absolute amounts of choanoflagellate DNA or RNA present in a sample. Conclusions The assay protocol we describe here is a simple and relatively inexpensive method of measuring contamination levels in nucleic acid samples. This provides a new way to establish quantification and purification protocols for molecular biology and genomics in novel heterotrophic protist species. Guidelines are provided to develop a similar protocol for use with any protistan culture. This assay method is recommended where qPCR equipment is unavailable, where qPCR is not viable because of the nature of the bacterial contamination or starting material, or where prior sequence information is insufficient to develop qPCR protocols. PMID:23593495

  4. Denaturing Gradient Gel Electrophoresis Analysis of the 16S rRNA Gene V1 Region To Monitor Dynamic Changes in the Bacterial Population during Fermentation of Italian Sausages

    PubMed Central

    Cocolin, Luca; Manzano, Marisa; Cantoni, Carlo; Comi, Giuseppe

    2001-01-01

    In this study, a PCR-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) protocol was used to monitor the dynamic changes in the microbial population during ripening of natural fermented sausages. The method was first optimized by using control strains from international collections, and a natural sausage fermentation was studied by PCR-DGGE and traditional methods. Total microbial DNA and RNA were extracted directly from the sausages and subjected to PCR and reverse transcription-PCR, and the amplicons obtained were analyzed by DGGE. Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) were present together with other organisms, mainly members of the family Micrococcaceae and meat contaminants, such as Brochothrix thermosphacta and Enterococcus sp., during the first 3 days of fermentation. After 3 days, LAB represented the main population, which was responsible for the acidification and proteolysis that determined the characteristic organoleptic profile of the Friuli Venezia Giulia fermented sausages. The PCR-DGGE protocol for studying sausage fermentation proved to be a good tool for monitoring the process in real time, and it makes technological adjustments possible when they are required. PMID:11679334

  5. Structure of ERA in complex with the 3 end of 16S rRNA: Implications for ribosome biogenesis

    E-print Network

    -binding KH domain, is essential for bacterial cell viability. It binds to 16S rRNA and the 30S ribosomal the CCUCC. GTPase KH domain 30S ribosomal subunit The bacterial ribosome (70S) is composed of a large (50S) and a small (30S) subunit. The 30S ribosomal subunit (r-subunit) contains an approximately 1,540-nucleotide

  6. Towards complete biodiversity assessment: an evaluation of the subterranean bacterial communities in the Oklo region of the sole surviving natural nuclear reactor

    Microsoft Academic Search

    R. H. Crozier; P.-M. Agapow; K. Pedersen

    1999-01-01

    Groundwater bacterial rRNA sequences extracted from the natural nuclear reactor region of Gabon are used to demonstrate the application of phylogenetic methods to biodiversity assessment. Clones were provisionally placed in `genera' using either the genus of the closest named EMBL entry, or by grouping clones at least 97.5% identical. The community is small, with 24 putative genera under the `closest-match'

  7. Quantification of Hyphomicrobium Populations in Activated Sludge from an Industrial Wastewater Treatment System as Determined by 16S rRNA Analysis

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. C. Layton; P. N. Karanth; C. A. Lajoie; A. J. Meyers; I. R. Gregory; R. D. Stapleton; D. E. Taylor; G. S. Sayler

    2000-01-01

    The bacterial community structure of the activated sludge from a 25 million-gal-per-day industrial waste- water treatment plant was investigated using rRNA analysis. 16S ribosomal DNA (rDNA) libraries were created from three sludge samples taken on different dates. Partial rRNA gene sequences were obtained for 46 rDNA clones, and nearly complete 16S rRNA sequences were obtained for 18 clones. Seventeen of

  8. PCR Detection and Identification of Bacterial Contaminants in Ocular Samples from Post-Operative Endophthalmitis

    PubMed Central

    Abrishami, Majid; Hashemi, Behnam; Abrishami, Mojtaba; Abnous, Khalil; Razavi-Azarkhiavi, Kamal

    2015-01-01

    Background: Bacterial endophthalmitis is a sight-threatening complication of ocular surgery which requires urgent medical consideration including comprehensive diagnosis. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) as a sensitive molecular method has been extensively used for detection of microbial species in clinical specimens. Aim: The aim of this study was to identify the causative organisms of endophthalmitis in our patient population using a procedure based on PCR. Materials and Methods: Vitreous samples from 32 patients with post-operative endophthalmitis were collected. Total vitreous DNA was extracted and then assessed by agarose gel electrophoresis. Bacterial 16S rRNA gene was amplified from genomic DNA using PCR with a pair of HAD2 universal primers. Library of PCR products from 16S rRNA, cloned into the pTZ57R/T vector. The ligated products were then transformed into E. coli DH5? strain and grown in the LB-ampicillin/X-Gal/IPTG plate. Results: From the total of 32 vitreous samples, 18 specimens were positive, illustrating the presence of bacterial infection (56.4 %). Twelve species including Escherichia coli, Enterobacter cloacae, Bacillus subtilis, Neisseria gonorrhoeae, Streptococcus pneumoniae, Haemophilus influenzae, Chlamydia trachomatis, Staphylococcus aureus, Neisseria meningitides, Staphylococcus epidermidis, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Bacillus cereus were identified using BLAST for known 16S rRNA sequences. Conclusion: Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) accompanied with cloning and sequencing approved to be sensitive and specific. The rapid molecular technique was useful in detection of 12 major microbial species, in infectious endophthalmitis. PMID:26023576

  9. Influence of First-Line Antibiotics on the Antibacterial Activities of Acetone Stem Bark Extract of Acacia mearnsii De Wild. against Drug-Resistant Bacterial Isolates

    PubMed Central

    Olajuyigbe, Olufunmiso O.; Coopoosamy, Roger M.

    2014-01-01

    Background. This study was aimed at evaluating the antibacterial activity of the acetone extract of A. mearnsii and its interactions with antibiotics against some resistant bacterial strains. Methods. The antibacterial susceptibility testing was determined by agar diffusion and macrobroth dilution methods while the checkerboard method was used for the determination of synergy between the antibiotics and the extract. Results. The results showed that the susceptibility of the different bacterial isolates was concentration dependent for the extract and the different antibiotics. With the exception of S. marcescens, the inhibition zones of the extract produced by 20?mg/mL ranged between 18 and 32?mm. While metronidazole did not inhibit any of the bacterial isolates, all the antibiotics and their combinations, except for ciprofloxacin and its combination, did not inhibit Enterococcus faecalis. The antibacterial combinations were more of being antagonistic than of being synergistic in the agar diffusion assay. From the macrobroth dilution, the extract and the antibiotics exerted a varied degree of inhibitory effect on the test organisms. The MIC values of the acetone extract which are in mg/mL are lower than those of the different antibiotics which are in ?g/mL. From the checkerboard assay, the antibacterial combinations showed varied degrees of interactions including synergism, additive, indifference, and antagonism interactions. While antagonistic and additive interactions were 14.44%, indifference interaction was 22.22% and synergistic interaction was 37.78% of the antibacterial combinations against the test isolates. While the additivity/indifference interactions indicated no interactions, the antagonistic interaction may be considered as a negative interaction that could result in toxicity and suboptimal bioactivity. Conclusion. The synergistic effects of the herbal-drug combinations may be harnessed for the discovery and development of more rational evidence-based drug combinations with optimized efficiency in the prevention of multidrug resistance and therapy of multifactorial diseases. PMID:25101132

  10. Genotoxic effects of crude juices from Brassica vegetables and juices and extracts from phytopharmaceutical preparations and spices of cruciferous plants origin in bacterial and mammalian cells

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Fekadu Kassie; Wolfram Parzefall; Stephen Musk; Ian Johnson; Günther Lamprecht; Gerhard Sontag; Siegfried Knasmüller

    1996-01-01

    Crude juices of eight Brassica vegetables as well as juices and extracts of spices and phytopharmaceutical preparations from cruciferous vegetables were tested for induction of point mutations in Salmonella TA98 and TA100, repairable DNA damage in E.coli K-12 cells and clastogenic effects in mammalian cells. In bacterial assays, all juices caused genotoxic effects in the absence of metabolic activation, the

  11. The Effect of Pomegranate Extract on Survival and Peritoneal Bacterial Load in Cecal Ligation and Perforation Model of Sepsis in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Tavasoli, Sanaz; Zarnani, Amir Hassan; Vafa, Mohamadreza; Moradi-Lakeh, Maziar; Pazoki-Toroudi, Hamidreza; Eghtesadi, Shahryar

    2014-01-01

    Background: Sepsis is one of the major causes of death in intensive care units. Oxidative stress and hyper-inflammation has been shown to be major cause of mortality and morbidity in septic cases. Pomegranate is a fruit considered for its antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties. The aim of this study is to evaluate the effect of a standard pomegranate fruit liquid extract (POMx), on mortality and peritoneal bacterial load in cecal ligation and perforation (CLP) sepsis model. Methods: Male wistar rats were divided into four groups of 24 each: sham; CLP; prevention (consumed POMx [250 mg of polyphenols/kg/day] for 4 weeks before CLP); treatment (received a single drink of POMx [250 mg of polyphenols/kg] after CLP). Each group was divided into three subgroups, each containing eight animals, for bacterial load and survival (with and without antibiotics) studies. Sepsis was induced by CLP surgery. Ten day survival rate was recorded. Peritoneal bacterial load was also assessed. Data were analyzed using Log-rank and Kruskal-Wallis tests. Results: There was no significant difference in survival rate of CLP, prevention and treatment groups, in subgroups without antibiotics. However, in subgroups with antibiotics, the prevention group had significantly lower survival rate than sham group (P < 0.05). Conversely, the bacterial load of prevention and treatment groups were significantly higher than sham group (P < 0.01). Conclusions: Our study demonstrates for the first time that pomegranate extract could increase mortality rate via increasing peritoneal cavity bacterial load, in CLP sepsis model. More studies to assess mechanisms of this effect are warranted. PMID:24554999

  12. Links between Plant and Rhizoplane Bacterial Communities in Grassland Soils, Characterized Using Molecular Techniques

    PubMed Central

    Nunan, Naoise; Daniell, Timothy J.; Singh, Brajesh K.; Papert, Artemis; McNicol, James W.; Prosser, James I.

    2005-01-01

    Molecular analysis of grassland rhizosphere soil has demonstrated complex and diverse bacterial communities, with resultant difficulties in detecting links between plant and bacterial communities. These studies have, however, analyzed “bulk” rhizosphere soil, rather than rhizoplane communities, which interact most closely with plants through utilization of root exudates. The aim of this study was to test the hypothesis that plant species was a major driver for bacterial rhizoplane community composition on individual plant roots. DNA extracted from individual roots was used to determine plant identity, by analysis of the plastid tRNA leucine (trnL) UAA gene intron, and plant-related bacterial communities. Bacterial communities were characterized by analysis of PCR-amplified 16S rRNA genes using two fingerprinting methods: terminal restriction fragment length polymorphisms (T-RFLP) and denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE). Links between plant and bacterial rhizoplane communities could not be detected by visual examination of T-RFLP patterns or DGGE banding profiles. Statistical analysis of fingerprint patterns did not reveal a relationship between bacterial community composition and plant species but did demonstrate an influence of plant community composition. The data also indicated that topography and other, uncharacterized, environmental factors are important in driving bacterial community composition in grassland soils. T-RFLP had greater potential resolving power than DGGE, but findings from the two methods were not significantly different. PMID:16269710

  13. Inhibitory activity of a standardized elderberry liquid extract against clinically-relevant human respiratory bacterial pathogens and influenza A and B viruses

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Black elderberries (Sambucus nigra L.) are well known as supportive agents against common cold and influenza. It is further known that bacterial super-infection during an influenza virus (IV) infection can lead to severe pneumonia. We have analyzed a standardized elderberry extract (Rubini, BerryPharma AG) for its antimicrobial and antiviral activity using the microtitre broth micro-dilution assay against three Gram-positive bacteria and one Gram-negative bacteria responsible for infections of the upper respiratory tract, as well as cell culture experiments for two different strains of influenza virus. Methods The antimicrobial activity of the elderberry extract was determined by bacterial growth experiments in liquid cultures using the extract at concentrations of 5%, 10%, 15% and 20%. The inhibitory effects were determined by plating the bacteria on agar plates. In addition, the inhibitory potential of the extract on the propagation of human pathogenic H5N1-type influenza A virus isolated from a patient and an influenza B virus strain was investigated using MTT and focus assays. Results For the first time, it was shown that a standardized elderberry liquid extract possesses antimicrobial activity against both Gram-positive bacteria of Streptococcus pyogenes and group C and G Streptococci, and the Gram-negative bacterium Branhamella catarrhalis in liquid cultures. The liquid extract also displays an inhibitory effect on the propagation of human pathogenic influenza viruses. Conclusion Rubini elderberry liquid extract is active against human pathogenic bacteria as well as influenza viruses. The activities shown suggest that additional and alternative approaches to combat infections might be provided by this natural product. PMID:21352539

  14. Inhibitory effects on bacterial growth and beta-ketoacyl-ACP reductase by different species of maple leaf extracts and tannic acid.

    PubMed

    Wu, Dan; Wu, Xiao-Dong; You, Xue-Fu; Ma, Xiao-Feng; Tian, Wei-Xi

    2010-01-01

    It is important to develop new antibiotics aimed at novel targets. The investigation found that the leaf extracts from five maples (Acer platanoides, Acer campestre, Acer rubrum, Acer saccharum and Acer truncatum Bunge collected in Denmark, Canada and China) and their component tannic acid displayed antibacterial ability against 24 standard bacteria strains with the minimum inhibitory concentration of 0.3-8.0 mg/mL. Unlike the standard antibiotic levofloxacin (LFX), these samples inhibited Gram-positive bacteria more effectively than they inhibited Gram-negative bacteria. These samples effectively inhibited two antidrug bacterial strains. The results show that these samples inhibit bacteria by a different mechanism from LFX. These samples potently inhibited b-ketoacyl-ACP reductase (FabG), which is an important enzyme in bacterial fatty acid synthesis. Tannic acid showed the strongest inhibition on FabG with a half inhibition concentration of 0.78 microM (0.81 microg/mL). Furthermore, tannic acid and two maple leaf extracts showed time-dependent irreversible inhibition of FabG. These three samples also exhibited better inhibition on bacteria. It is suggested that FabG is the antibacteria target of maple leaf extracts and tannic acid, and both reversible and irreversible inhibitions of FabG are important for the antibacterial effect. PMID:19444866

  15. The phenolic acids from bacterial degradation of the mangiferin aglycone are quantified in the feces of pigs after oral ingestion of an extract of Cyclopia genistoides (honeybush tea).

    PubMed

    Bock, Constance; Ternes, Waldemar

    2010-05-01

    Polyphenols are cleaved by bacterial enzymes to form phenolic acid metabolites in the colon, where they may exert physiologic effects. For norathyriol, the aglycone of mangiferin, one of the major phenolic compounds present in Cyclopia genistoides (honeybush), a further bacterial degradation is likely; but knowledge of the importance of this metabolic process is very limited. Based on a hypothesized cleavage of the middle ring of norathyriol, this study was designed to determine phenolic cleavage products in the feces of pigs fed an extract of C genistoides. Pigs received 74 mg mangiferin per kilogram of body weight daily for 11 days; feces fractions were collected on day 11 and on the first 2 days after the last intake of extract. Several phenolic acids were detected in the feces samples, including 3-hydroxyphenylacetic acid; 4-hydroxybenzoic acid; 3,4-dihydroxybenzoic acid; 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid; 2,4,6-trihydroxybenzoic acid; 3,4,5-trihydroxybenzoic acid (gallic acid); and phloroglucinol. However, in vivo formation was likely only for 3,4-dihydroxybenzoic acid; 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid; 2,4,6-trihydroxybenzoic acid; and 3,4,5-trihydroxybenzoic acid because these were not present in the blank feces, in the animals' normal diet, or in the C genistoides extract. The fact that these amounts were very low suggests further degradation of the metabolites by intestinal microflora or absorption of the cleavage products by the colon. PMID:20579527

  16. Culture-independent analysis of endophytic bacterial communities associated with Brazilian sugarcane.

    PubMed

    Magnani, G S; Cruz, L M; Weber, H; Bespalhok, J C; Daros, E; Baura, V; Yates, M G; Monteiro, R A; Faoro, H; Pedrosa, F O; Souza, E M

    2013-01-01

    Sugarcane is an economically important culture in Brazil. Endophytic bacteria live inside plants, and can provide many benefits to the plant host. We analyzed the bacterial diversity of sugarcane cultivar RB-72454 by cultivation-independent techniques. Total DNA from sugarcane stems from a commercial plantation located in Paraná State was extracted. Partial 16S rRNA genes were amplified and sequenced for library construction. Of 152 sequences obtained, 52% were similar to 16S rRNA from Pseudomonas sp, and 35.5% to Enterobacter sp. The genera Pantoea, Serratia, Citrobacter, and Klebsiella were also represented. The endophytic communities in these sugarcane samples were dominated by the families Enterobacteriaceae and Pseudomonadaceae (class Gammaproteobacteria). PMID:24222230

  17. Direct 5S rRNA Assay for Monitoring Mixed-Culture Bioprocesses

    PubMed Central

    Stoner, D. L.; Browning, C. K.; Bulmer, D. K.; Ward, T. E.; MacDonell, M. T.

    1996-01-01

    This study demonstrates the efficacy of a direct 5S rRNA assay for the characterization of mixed microbial populations by using as an example the bacteria associated with acidic mining environments. The direct 5S rRNA assay described herein represents a nonselective, direct molecular method for monitoring and characterizing the predominant, metabolically active members of a microbial population. The foundation of the assay is high-resolution denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE), which is used to separate 5S rRNA species extracted from collected biomass. Separation is based on the unique migration behavior of each 5S rRNA species during electrophoresis in denaturing gradient gels. With mixtures of RNA extracted from laboratory cultures, the upper practical limit for detection in the current experimental system has been estimated to be greater than 15 different species. With this method, the resolution was demonstrated to be effective at least to the species level. The strength of this approach was demonstrated by the ability to discriminate between Thiobacillus ferrooxidans ATCC 19859 and Thiobacillus thiooxidans ATCC 8085, two very closely related species. Migration patterns for the 5S rRNA from members of the genus Thiobacillus were readily distinguishable from those of the genera Acidiphilium and Leptospirillum. In conclusion, the 5S rRNA assay represents a powerful method by which the structure of a microbial population within acidic environments can be assessed. PMID:16535333

  18. Pyrosequencing of 16S rRNA genes in fecal samples reveals high diversity of hindgut microflora in horses and potential links to chronic laminitis

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The nutrition and health of horses is closely tied to their gastrointestinal microflora. Gut bacteria break down plant structural carbohydrates and produce volatile fatty acids, which are a major source of energy for horses. Bacterial communities are also essential for maintaining gut homeostasis and have been hypothesized to contribute to various diseases including laminitis. We performed pyrosequencing of 16S rRNA bacterial genes isolated from fecal material to characterize hindgut bacterial communities in healthy horses and those with chronic laminitis. Results Fecal samples were collected from 10 normal horses and 8 horses with chronic laminitis. Genomic DNA was extracted and the V4-V5 segment of the 16S rRNA gene was PCR amplified and sequenced on the 454 platform generating a mean of 2,425 reads per sample after quality trimming. The bacterial communities were dominated by Firmicutes (69.21% control, 56.72% laminitis) and Verrucomicrobia (18.13% control, 27.63% laminitis), followed by Bacteroidetes, Proteobacteria, and Spirochaetes. We observed more OTUs per individual in the laminitis group than the control group (419.6 and 355.2, respectively, P = 0.019) along with a difference in the abundance of two unassigned Clostridiales genera (P = 0.03 and P = 0.01). The most abundant bacteria were Streptococcus spp., Clostridium spp., and Treponema spp.; along with unassigned genera from Subdivision 5 of Verrucomicrobia, Ruminococcaceae, and Clostridiaceae, which together constituted ~ 80% of all OTUs. There was a high level of individual variation across all taxonomic ranks. Conclusions Our exploration of the equine fecal microflora revealed higher bacterial diversity in horses with chronic laminitis and identification of two Clostridiales genera that differed in abundance from control horses. There was large individual variation in bacterial communities that was not explained in our study. The core hindgut microflora was dominated by Streptococcus spp., several cellulytic genera, and a large proportion of uncharacterized OTUs that warrant further investigation regarding their function. Our data provide a foundation for future investigations of hindgut bacterial factors that may influence the development and progression of chronic laminitis. PMID:23186268

  19. Mechanism of the combined anti-bacterial effect of green tea extract and NaCl against Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli O157:H7

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Motokazu Nakayama; Naofumi Shigemune; Takashi Tsugukuni; Hitomi Jun; Tomoyo Matsushita; Youko Mekata; Masahiro Kurahachi; Takahisa Miyamoto

    The mechanism of the combined anti-bacterial effect of green tea extract (GTE) and NaCl against Staphylococcus aureus NBRC 13276 and Escherichia coli O157:H7 was investigated. After treatment for 1 h, GTE was more effective against S. aureus than E. coli O157:H7, and combined GTE\\/NaCl treatment caused greater cellular damage in S. aureus NBRC 13276, where it was bactericidal, than E. coli O157:H7. Compared to treatment

  20. Taxonomy of bacterial fish pathogens

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Bacterial taxonomy has progressed from reliance on highly artificial culture-dependent techniques involving the study of phenotype (including morphological, biochemical and physiological data) to the modern applications of molecular biology, most recently 16S rRNA gene sequencing, which gives an insight into evolutionary pathways (= phylogenetics). The latter is applicable to culture-independent approaches, and has led directly to the recognition of new uncultured bacterial groups, i.e. "Candidatus", which have been associated as the cause of some fish diseases, including rainbow trout summer enteritic syndrome. One immediate benefit is that 16S rRNA gene sequencing has led to increased confidence in the accuracy of names allocated to bacterial pathogens. This is in marked contrast to the previous dominance of phenotyping, and identifications, which have been subsequently challenged in the light of 16S rRNA gene sequencing. To date, there has been some fluidity over the names of bacterial fish pathogens, with some, for example Vibrio anguillarum, being divided into two separate entities (V. anguillarum and V. ordalii). Others have been combined, for example V. carchariae, V. harveyi and V. trachuri as V. harveyi. Confusion may result with some organisms recognized by more than one name; V. anguillarum was reclassified as Beneckea and Listonella, with Vibrio and Listonella persisting in the scientific literature. Notwithstanding, modern methods have permitted real progress in the understanding of the taxonomic relationships of many bacterial fish pathogens. PMID:21314902

  1. Profiling of the bacteria responsible for pyogenic liver abscess by 16S rRNA gene pyrosequencing.

    PubMed

    Song, Yun Gyu; Shim, Sang Gun; Kim, Kwang Min; Lee, Dong-Hae; Kim, Dae-Soo; Choi, Sang-Haeng; Song, Jae-Young; Kang, Hyung-Lyun; Baik, Seung-Chul; Lee, Woo-Kon; Cho, Myung-Je; Rhee, Kwang-Ho

    2014-06-01

    Pyogenic liver abscess (PLA) is a severe disease with considerable mortality and is often polymicrobial. Understanding the pathogens that cause PLA is the basis for PLA treatment. Here, we profiled the bacterial composition in PLA fluid by pyrosequencing the 16S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) gene based on next-generation sequencing (NGS) technology to identify etiological agents of PLA and to provide information of their 16S rRNA sequences for application to DNA-based techniques in the hospital. Twenty patients with PLA who underwent percutaneous catheter drainage, abscess culture, and blood culture for isolates were included. Genomic DNAs from abscess fluids were subjected to polymerase chain reaction and pyrosequencing of the 16S rRNA gene with a 454 GS Junior System. The abscess and blood cultures were positive in nine (45%) and four (20%) patients, respectively. Pyrosequencing of 16S rRNA gene showed that 90% of the PLA fluid samples contained single or multiple genera of known bacteria such as Klebsiella, Fusobacterium, Streptococcus, Bacteroides, Prevotella, Peptostreptococcus, unassigned Enterobacteriaceae, and Dialister. Klebsiella was predominantly found in the PLA fluid samples. All samples that carried unassigned bacteria had 26.8% reads on average. We demonstrated that the occurrence of PLA was associated with eight known bacterial genera as well as unassigned bacteria and that 16S rRNA gene sequencing was more useful than conventional culture methods for accurate identification of bacterial pathogens from PLA. PMID:24871976

  2. Comparison of three rapid and easy bacterial DNA extraction methods for use with quantitative real-time PCR

    Microsoft Academic Search

    S. P. van Tongeren; J. E. Degener; H. J. M. Harmsen

    The development of fast and easy on-site molecular detection and quantification methods for hazardous microbes on solid surfaces\\u000a is desirable for several applications where specialised laboratory facilities are absent. The quantification of bacterial\\u000a contamination necessitates the assessment of the efficiency of the used methodology as a whole, including the preceding steps\\u000a of sampling and sample processing. We used quantitative real-time

  3. The intestinal bacterial community in the food waste-reducing larvae of Hermetia illucens.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Hyunbum; Park, Soyoung; Choi, Jiyoung; Jeong, Gilsang; Lee, Sang-Beom; Choi, Youngcheol; Lee, Sung-Jae

    2011-05-01

    As it is known that food waste can be reduced by the larvae of Hermetia illucens (Black soldier fly, BSF), the scientific and commercial value of BSF larvae has increased recently. We hypothesised that the ability of catabolic degradation by BSF larvae might be due to intestinal microorganisms. Herein, we analysed the bacterial communities in the gut of BSF larvae by pyrosequencing of extracting intestinal metagenomic DNA from larvae that had been fed three different diets. The 16S rRNA sequencing results produced 9737, 9723 and 5985 PCR products from larval samples fed food waste, cooked rice and calf forage, respectively. A BLAST search using the EzTaxon program showed that the bacterial community in the gut of larvae fed three different diets was mainly composed of the four phyla with dissimilar proportions. Although the composition of the bacterial communities depended on the different nutrient sources, the identified bacterial strains in the gut of BSF larvae represented unique bacterial species that were unlike the intestinal microflora of other insects. Thus, our study analysed the structure of the bacterial communities in the gut of BSF larvae after three different feedings and assessed the application of particular bacteria for the efficient degradation of organic compounds. PMID:21267722

  4. Intragenomic heterogeneity in the 16S rRNA genes of Flavobacterium columnare and relevance to genomovar assignment

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Flavobacterium columnare is the causative agent of columnaris disease which severely impacts channel catfish production in the USA and may be emerging as an important pathogen in the rainbow trout industry. The 16S rRNA gene is a housekeeping gene commonly used for bacterial taxonomy and genotyping...

  5. Acceleration of the direct identification of Staphylococcus aureus versus coagulase-negative staphylococci from blood culture material: a comparison of six bacterial DNA extraction methods.

    PubMed

    Loonen, A J M; Jansz, A R; Kreeftenberg, H; Bruggeman, C A; Wolffs, P F G; van den Brule, A J C

    2011-03-01

    To accelerate differentiation between Staphylococcus aureus and coagulase-negative staphylococci (CNS), this study aimed to compare six different DNA extraction methods from two commonly used blood culture materials, i.e. BACTEC and BacT/ALERT. Furthermore, we analysed the effect of reduced blood culture incubation for the detection of staphylococci directly from blood culture material. A real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) duplex assay was used to compare the six different DNA isolation protocols on two different blood culture systems. Negative blood culture material was spiked with methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA). Bacterial DNA was isolated with automated extractor easyMAG (three protocols), automated extractor MagNA Pure LC (LC Microbiology Kit M(Grade)), a manual kit MolYsis Plus and a combination of MolYsis Plus and the easyMAG. The most optimal isolation method was used to evaluate reduced bacterial incubation times. Bacterial DNA isolation with the MolYsis Plus kit in combination with the specific B protocol on the easyMAG resulted in the most sensitive detection of S. aureus, with a detection limit of 10 CFU/ml, in BacT/ALERT material, whereas using BACTEC resulted in a detection limit of 100 CFU/ml. An initial S. aureus or CNS load of 1 CFU/ml blood can be detected after 5 h of incubation in BacT/ALERT 3D by combining the sensitive isolation method and the tuf LightCycler assay. PMID:20972809

  6. Determining Fungi rRNA Copy Number by PCR

    PubMed Central

    Black, Jonathan; Dean, Timothy; Byfield, Grace; Foarde, Karin; Menetrez, Marc

    2013-01-01

    The goal of this project is to improve the quantification of indoor fungal pollutants via the specific application of quantitative PCR (qPCR). Improvement will be made in the controls used in current qPCR applications. This work focuses on the use of two separate controls within a standard qPCR reaction. The first control developed was the internal standard control gene, benA. This gene encodes for ?-tubulin and was selected based on its single-copy nature. The second control developed was the standard control plasmid, which contained a fragment of the ribosomal RNA (rRNA) gene and produced a specific PCR product. The results confirm the multicopy nature of the rRNA region in several filamentous fungi and show that we can quantify fungi of unknown genome size over a range of spore extractions by inclusion of these two standard controls. Advances in qPCR have led to extremely sensitive and quantitative methods for single-copy genes; however, it has not been well established that the rRNA can be used to quantitate fungal contamination. We report on the use of qPCR, combined with two controls, to identify and quantify indoor fungal contaminants with a greater degree of confidence than has been achieved previously. Advances in indoor environmental health have demonstrated that contamination of the built environment by the filamentous fungi has adverse impacts on the health of building occupants. This study meets the need for more accurate and reliable methods for fungal identification and quantitation in the indoor environment. PMID:23543828

  7. Bacterial communities in the phylloplane of Prunus species.

    PubMed

    Jo, Yeonhwa; Cho, Jin Kyong; Choi, Hoseong; Chu, Hyosub; Lian, Sen; Cho, Won Kyong

    2015-04-01

    Bacterial populations in the phylloplane of four different Prunus species were investigated by 16 S rRNA pyrosequencing. Bioinformatic analysis identified an average of 510 operational taxonomic units belonging to 159 genera in 76 families. The two genera, Sphingomonas and Methylobacterium, were dominant in the phylloplane of four Prunus species. Twenty three genera were commonly identified in the four Prunus species, indicating a high level of bacterial diversity dependent on the plant species. Our study based on 16 S rRNA sequencing reveals the complexity of bacterial diversity in the phylloplane of Prunus species in detail. PMID:25515303

  8. The murine lung microbiome in relation to the intestinal and vaginal bacterial communities

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background This work provides the first description of the bacterial population of the lung microbiota in mice. The aim of this study was to examine the lung microbiome in mice, the most used animal model for inflammatory lung diseases such as COPD, cystic fibrosis and asthma. Bacterial communities from broncho-alveolar lavage fluids and lung tissue were compared to samples taken from fecal matter (caecum) and vaginal lavage fluid from female BALB/cJ mice. Results Using a customized 16S rRNA sequencing protocol amplifying the V3-V4 region our study shows that the mice have a lung microbiome that cluster separately from mouse intestinal microbiome (caecum). The mouse lung microbiome is dominated by Proteobacteria, Firmicutes, Actinobacteria, Bacteroidetes and Cyanobacteria overlapping the vaginal microbiome. We also show that removal of host tissue or cells from lung fluid during the DNA extraction step has an impact on the resulting bacterial community profile. Sample preparation needs to be considered when choosing an extraction method and interpreting data. Conclusions We have consistently amplified bacterial DNA from mouse lungs that is distinct from the intestinal microbiome in these mice. The gut microbiome has been extensively studied for its links to development of disease. Here we suggest that also the lung microbiome could be important in relation to inflammatory lung diseases. Further research is needed to understand the contribution of the lung microbiome and the gut-lung axis to the development of lung diseases such as COPD and asthma. PMID:24373613

  9. The impact of transcriptional tuning on in vitro integrated rRNA transcription and ribosome construction

    PubMed Central

    Fritz, Brian R.; Jewett, Michael C.

    2014-01-01

    In vitro ribosome construction could enable studies of ribosome assembly and function, provide a route toward constructing minimal cells for synthetic biology, and permit the construction of ribosome variants with new functions. Toward these long-term goals, we recently reported on an integrated, one-pot ribosomal RNA synthesis (rRNA), ribosome assembly, and translation technology (termed iSAT) for the construction of Escherichia coli ribosomes in crude ribosome-free S150 extracts. Here, we aimed to improve the activity of iSAT through transcriptional tuning. Specifically, we increased transcriptional efficiency through 3? modifications to the rRNA gene sequences, optimized plasmid and polymerase concentrations, and demonstrated the use of a T7-promoted rRNA operon for stoichiometrically balanced rRNA synthesis and native rRNA processing. Our modifications produced a 45-fold improvement in iSAT protein synthesis activity, enabling synthesis of 429 ± 15 nmol/l green fluorescent protein in 6 h batch reactions. Further, we show that the translational activity of ribosomes purified from iSAT reactions is about 20% the activity of native ribosomes purified directly from E. coli cells. Looking forward, we believe iSAT will enable unique studies to unravel the systems biology of ribosome biogenesis and open the way to new methods for making and studying ribosomal variants. PMID:24792158

  10. Bacterial diversity in a deep-subsurface clay environment.

    PubMed Central

    Boivin-Jahns, V; Ruimy, R; Bianchi, A; Daumas, S; Christen, R

    1996-01-01

    The presence of bacteria in a deep clay sediment was analyzed in a 20-m-long core horizontally drilled from a mine gallery at a depth of 224 m in the Boom clay formation (Mol, Belgium). This clay deposit is the result of a marine sedimentary process that occurred 35 million years ago. Bacterial activities were estimated by measuring respiration on [14C]glucose. Using the same samples, universal primers for the genes coding for eubacterial 16S rRNA were used to amplify extracted DNA. PCR products were then cloned, sequenced, and analyzed by molecular phylogeny. Our data showed a decrease in bacterial densities as a function of distance from the gallery, with few bacteria detectable by culture at more than 80 cm from the gallery wall. PCR experiments showed the presence of bacteria in all samples, and phylogenetic analyses were then used to tentatively identify these organisms. Because of low bacterial densities in deep clay samples, direct counts and enumeration of viable bacteria on diverse culture media remained negative. All experiments, both cultures and PCR, demonstrated the difficulty of analyzing samples that contain only a few poorly active bacteria as it is difficult to avoid a small contamination by active bacteria during sampling. Since the porosity of the Boom clay formation is less than the expected size of bacteria, it is possible that some of the bacteria present in this 35-million-year-old deep clay deposit derive from cells initially trapped during the sedimentation process. PMID:8795233

  11. Feature extraction by statistical contact potentials and wavelet transform for predicting subcellular localizations in gram negative bacterial proteins.

    PubMed

    Arango-Argoty, G A; Jaramillo-Garzón, J A; Castellanos-Domínguez, G

    2015-01-01

    Predicting the localization of a protein has become a useful practice for inferring its function. Most of the reported methods to predict subcellular localizations in Gram-negative bacterial proteins make use of standard protein representations that generally do not take into account the distribution of the amino acids and the structural information of the proteins. Here, we propose a protein representation based on the structural information contained in the pairwise statistical contact potentials. The wavelet transform decodes the information contained in the primary structure of the proteins, allowing the identification of patterns along the proteins, which are used to characterize the subcellular localizations. Then, a support vector machine classifier is trained to categorize them. Cellular compartments like periplasm and extracellular medium are difficult to predict, having a high false negative rate. The wavelet-based method achieves an overall high performance while maintaining a low false negative rate, particularly, on "periplasm" and "extracellular medium". Our results suggest the proposed protein characterization is a useful alternative to representing and predicting protein sequences over the classical and cutting edge protein depictions. PMID:25219623

  12. The effects of liquid versus spray-dried Laminaria digitata extract on selected bacterial groups in the piglet gastrointestinal tract (GIT) microbiota.

    PubMed

    Murphya, Padraigin; Dal Bello, Fabio; O'Doherty, John; Arendt, Elke K; Sweeney, Torres; Coffey, Aidan

    2013-06-01

    In this study, the effects of supplementing animal feed with a liquid and spray-dried fucoidan and laminarin extract, derived from the seaweed Laminaria digitata on the porcine gastrointestinal microbiota, specifically the communities of Lactobacillus, Bifidobacterium and enterobacteria were evaluated. Twenty four piglets were fed one of three diets over a 21-day period to determine the effect that each had on the bacterial communities. The dietary treatments were as follows; (1) control diet, (2) control diet plus spray-dried formulation of laminarin fucoidan (L/F-SD) extract, (3) control diet plus a liquid formulation of (L/F-WS) extract. Control diet consisted of wheat, soya bean meal, soya oil and a vitamin and mineral mixture. The L/F-SD and L/F-WS supplemented diets had equal proportion of 500 ppm laminarin and fucoidan. At the end of the 21 day feeding period all animals were sacrificed and samples were collected from the ileum, caecum and colon. Counts were determined for Lactobacillus, Bifidobacterium and enterobacteria. Plate count analysis revealed that the L/F-SD diet caused a statistically significant 1.5 log and 2 log increases in the Lactobacillus and Bifidobacterium counts of ileum samples respectively. A greater difference was observed with the L/F-WS diet in that Lactobacillus and Bifidobacterium increased by 2 log and 3 log respectively. Alterations in the Lactobacillus species composition of the gastrointestinal tract (GIT) were analysed using specific PCR - denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (PCR-DGGE). The DGGE profiles indicated that Lactobacillus species richness decreased along the gastrointestinal tract i.e. the number of dominant species detected in the colon was less than those detected in the ileum and caecum irrespective of the diet consumed. Consumption of both the L/F-SD and L/F-WS diets resulted in a richer Lactobacillus species composition in the ileum, with the L/F-SD diet being associated the emergence of Lactobacillus agilis in the colon. The study indicated that the L/F-WS extract was superior to the L/F-SD extract in increasing the titre of beneficial bacteria in the gastrointestinal tract (GIT). PMID:23542115

  13. Bacteriocin from Bacillus subtilis as a novel drug against diabetic foot ulcer bacterial pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Joseph, Baby; Dhas, Berlina; Hena, Vimalin; Raj, Justin

    2013-01-01

    Objective To isolate and identify Bacillus subtilis (B. subtilis) from soil and to characterize and partially purify the bacteriocin. To evaluate the antimicrobial activity against four diabetic foot ulcer bacterial pathogens. Methods Genotypic identification was done based on Bergey's manual of systemic bacteriology. Antimicrobial susceptibility test was done by Kirby-Bauer disc diffusion method. Colonies were identified by colony morphology and biochemical characterization and also compared with MTCC 121 strain. Further identification was done by 16S rRNA sequencing. Inhibitory activities of partially purified bacteriocin on all the DFU isolates were done by agar well diffusion method. The strain was identified to produce bacteriocin by stab overlay assay. Bacteriocin was extracted by organic solvent extraction using chloroform, further purified by HPLC and physical, and chemical characterization was performed. Results The four isolates showed high level of resistance to amoxyclav and sensitivity to ciprofloxacin. HPLC purification revealed that the extracts are bacteriocin. The phylogenetic tree analysis results showed that the isolate was 99% related to B. subtilis BSF01. The results reveled activity to all the four isolates and high level of activity was seen in case of Klebsiella sp. Conclusions Partially purified bacteriocin was found to have antimicrobial activity against the four diabetic foot ulcer bacterial pathogens, which can thus be applied as a better drug molecule on further studies. The strain B. subtilis are found to be safe for use and these antimicrobial peptides can be used as an antimicrobial in humans to treat DFU bacterial pathogens. PMID:24093784

  14. Identification of oral bacterial DNA in synovial fluid of arthritis patients with native and failed prosthetic joints

    PubMed Central

    Témoin, Stéphanie; Chakaki, Alia; Askari, Ali; El-Halaby, Ahmed; Fitzgerald, Steven; Marcus, Randall E.; Han, Yiping W.; Bissada, Nabil F.

    2013-01-01

    Objective We examined the presence of bacterial DNA in synovial fluids of native or aseptically failed prosthetic joints from patients having periodontal disease and arthritis to determine if there is bacterial spread from the oral cavity to the joints. Methods A total of 36 subjects were enrolled in the study. Among these, 11 were diagnosed with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), and 25 with osteoarthritis (OA). Eight patients with OA and are with RA had failed prostheses. Synovial fluid was aspirated from the affected hip or knee joint. Pooled subgingival plaque samples were collected followed by clinical periodontal examination. Bacterial DNA was extracted from the collected synovial fluid and dental plaque samples followed by polymerase chain reactions (PCR) and DNA sequence analysis of the 16S-23S rRNA genes. Results Of the 36 subjects, bacterial DNA was detected in the synovial fluid samples from five patients (13.9%), two with rheumatoid arthritis (one native and one failed prosthetic joints) and three with osteoarthritis (one native and two failed prosthetic joints). Of these five patients, two were diagnosed with periodontitis and had identical bacterial clones (Fusobacterium nucleatum and Serratia proteamaculans, respectively) detected in both the synovial fluid and dental plaque samples. Conclusions The present findings of this bacterial DNA in synovial fluid suggest the possibility of infection translocating from the periodontal tissue to the synovium. We suggest that patients with arthritis or failed prosthetic joints be examined for the presence of periodontal diseases and that be treated accordingly. PMID:22426587

  15. Patterns of bacterial diversity across a range of Antarctic terrestrial habitats.

    PubMed

    Yergeau, Etienne; Newsham, Kevin K; Pearce, David A; Kowalchuk, George A

    2007-11-01

    Although soil-borne bacteria represent the world's greatest source of biological diversity, it is not well understood whether extreme environmental conditions, such as those found in Antarctic habitats, result in reduced soil-borne microbial diversity. To address this issue, patterns of bacterial diversity were studied in soils sampled along a > 3200 km southern polar transect spanning a gradient of increased climate severity over 27 degrees of latitude. Vegetated and fell-field plots were sampled at the Falkland (51 degrees S), South Georgia (54 degrees S), Signy (60 degrees S) and Anchorage Islands (67 degrees S), while bare frost-sorted soil polygons were examined at Fossil Bluff (71 degrees S), Mars Oasis (72 degrees S), Coal Nunatak (72 degrees S) and the Ellsworth Mountains (78 degrees S). Bacterial 16S rRNA gene sequences were recovered subsequent to direct DNA extraction from soil, polymerase chain reaction amplification and cloning. Although bacterial diversity was observed to decline with increased latitude, habitat-specific patterns appeared to also be important. Namely, a negative relationship was found between bacterial diversity and latitude for fell-field soils, but no such pattern was observed for vegetated sites. The Mars Oasis site, previously identified as a biodiversity hotspot within this region, proved exceptional within the study transect, with unusually high bacterial diversity. In independent analyses, geographical distance and vegetation cover were found to significantly influence bacterial community composition. These results provide insight into the factors shaping the composition of bacterial communities in Antarctic terrestrial habitats and support the notion that bacterial diversity declines with increased climatic severity. PMID:17922752

  16. Genotoxic effects of crude juices from Brassica vegetables and juices and extracts from phytopharmaceutical preparations and spices of cruciferous plants origin in bacterial and mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Kassie, F; Parzefall, W; Musk, S; Johnson, I; Lamprecht, G; Sontag, G; Knasmüller, S

    1996-09-27

    Crude juices of eight Brassica vegetables as well as juices and extracts of spices and phytopharmaceutical preparations from cruciferous vegetables were tested for induction of point mutations in Salmonella TA98 and TA100, repairable DNA damage in E.coli K-12 cells and clastogenic effects in mammalian cells. In bacterial assays, all juices caused genotoxic effects in the absence of metabolic activation, the ranking order being: Brussels sprouts > white cabbage > cauliflower > green cabbage > kohlrabi > broccoli > turnip > black radish. In experiments with mammalian cells, six juices induced structural chromosome aberrations. Brussels sprouts, white and green cabbage caused the strongest effects (800 microliters of juice induced a 5-fold increase over the background). In sister chromatid exchange assays, positive results were measured as well, but the effects were less pronounced. With all juices the genotoxic effects seen in mammalian cells were paralleled by a pronounced decrease in cell viability. Column fractionation experiments showed that 70-80% of the total genotoxic activity of the juices is found in the fraction which contains isothiocyanates and other breakdown products of glucosinolates, whereas phenolics and flavonoids contributed to a lesser extent to the overall effects. On the basis of these findings, and considering the negative results obtained with non-cruciferous vegetables (tomato, carrot and green pepper), it seems likely that the genotoxic effects of the juices are due to specific constituents of cruciferous plants such as glucosinolates and/or their breakdown products, in particular, isothiocyanates, which we found previously to be potent genotoxins in bacterial and mammalian cells. Finally, spices (mustards and horse radish paste) and phytopharmaceutical preparations were tested in bacterial assays. Mustards and horse radish caused very weak effects while most of the pharmaceutical preparations gave negative results, except cabbage tablets, which caused a strong and dose dependent induction of his revertants in Salmonella TA100. The present findings clearly indicate that cruciferous vegetables contain DNA damaging constituents. These observations are in contrast to earlier findings, which emphasized the antimutagenic effects of vegetable juices and also raise the question whether greatly increased consumption of Brassica vegetables or their concentrated constituents as a means for cancer prevention is indeed recommendable. PMID:8827059

  17. Mulberry leaf extract mediated synthesis of gold nanoparticles and its anti-bacterial activity against human pathogens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adavallan, K.; Krishnakumar, N.

    2014-06-01

    Gold nanoparticles (Au-NPs) were synthesized at room temperature using Morus alba (mulberry) leaf extract as reducing and stabilizing agent. The development of plant mediated synthesis of nanoparticles is gaining importance due to its simplicity, low cost, non-toxicity, eco-friendliness, long term stability and reproducible aqueous synthesis method to obtain a self-assembly of nearly monodispersed Au-NPs. The formation and morphology of biosynthesized nanoparticles are investigated with the help of UV-Vis spectroscopy, dynamic light scattering (DLS), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), atomic force microscopy (AFM), x-ray diffraction (XRD), and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) techniques. Au-NPs formation was screened by UV-Vis spectroscopy through color conversion due to surface plasmon resonance band at 538 nm for Au-NPs. DLS studies revealed that the average size of Au-NPs was 50 nm. TEM studies showed the particles to be nearly spherical with few irregular shapes and particle size ranges 15?53 nm. The AFM image clearly shows the surface morphology of the well-dispersed Au-NPs with less than 50 nm. The high crystallinity of nanoparticles is evident from bright circular spots in the selected area electron diffraction (SAED) pattern. X-ray diffraction pattern showed high purity and face-centered cubic structure of Au-NPs. The FT-IR results indicate the presence of different functional groups present in the biomolecule capping the nanoparticles. Further, biosynthesized Au-NPs show strong zone of inhibition against Vibrio cholera (gram-negative) and Staphylococcus aureus (gram-positive) whereas, chemically synthesized Au-NPs and mulberry leaf extract exhibit a fair zone of inhibition.

  18. Analysis of the intestinal microbiota using SOLiD 16S rRNA gene sequencing and SOLiD shotgun sequencing

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Metagenomics seeks to understand microbial communities and assemblages by DNA sequencing. Technological advances in next generation sequencing technologies are fuelling a rapid growth in the number and scope of projects aiming to analyze complex microbial environments such as marine, soil or the gut. Recent improvements in longer read lengths and paired-sequencing allow better resolution in profiling microbial communities. While both 454 sequencing and Illumina sequencing have been used in numerous metagenomic studies, SOLiD sequencing is not commonly used in this area, as it is believed to be more suitable in the context of reference-guided projects. Results To investigate the performance of SOLiD sequencing in a metagenomic context, we compared taxonomic profiles of SOLiD mate-pair sequencing reads with Sanger paired reads and 454 single reads. All sequences were obtained from the bacterial 16S rRNA gene, which was amplified from microbial DNA extracted from a human fecal sample. Additionally, from the same fecal sample, complete genomic microbial DNA was extracted and shotgun sequenced using SOLiD sequencing to study the composition of the intestinal microbiota and the existing microbial metabolism. We found that the microbiota composition of 16S rRNA gene sequences obtained using Sanger, 454 and SOLiD sequencing provide results comparable to the result based on shotgun sequencing. Moreover, with SOLiD sequences we obtained more resolution down to the species level. In addition, the shotgun data allowed us to determine a functional profile using the databases SEED and KEGG. Conclusions This study shows that SOLiD mate-pair sequencing is a viable and cost-efficient option for analyzing a complex microbiome. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first time that SOLiD sequencing has been used in a human sample. PMID:24564472

  19. Bacterial and archaeal populations associated with freshwater ferromanganous micronodules and sediments.

    PubMed

    Stein, L Y; La Duc, M T; Grundl, T J; Nealson, K H

    2001-01-01

    Biology is believed to play a large role in the cycling of iron and manganese in many freshwater environments, but specific microbial groups indigenous to these systems have not been well characterized. To investigate the populations of Bacteria and Archaea associated with metal-rich sediments from Green Bay, WI, we extracted nucleic acids and analysed the phylogenetic relationships of cloned 16S rRNA genes. Because nucleic acids have not been routinely extracted from metal-rich samples, we investigated the bias inherent in DNA extraction and gene amplification from pure MnO2 using defined populations of whole cells or naked DNA. From the sediments, we screened for manganese-oxidizing bacteria using indicator media and found three isolates that were capable of manganese oxidation. In the phylogenetic analysis of bacterial 16S rRNA gene clones, we found two groups related to known metal-oxidizing genera, Leptothrix of the beta-Proteobacteria and Hyphomicrobium of the alpha-Proteobacteria, and a Fe(III)-reducing group related to the Magnetospirillum genus of the alpha-Proteobacteria. Groups related to the metal-reducing delta-Proteobacteria constituted 22% of the gene clones. In addition, gene sequences from one group of methanogens and a group of Crenarchaeota, identified in the archaeal gene clone library, were related to those found previously in Lake Michigan sediments. PMID:11225719

  20. The Ribosomal Database Project: improved alignments and new tools for rRNA analysis.

    PubMed

    Cole, J R; Wang, Q; Cardenas, E; Fish, J; Chai, B; Farris, R J; Kulam-Syed-Mohideen, A S; McGarrell, D M; Marsh, T; Garrity, G M; Tiedje, J M

    2009-01-01

    The Ribosomal Database Project (RDP) provides researchers with quality-controlled bacterial and archaeal small subunit rRNA alignments and analysis tools. An improved alignment strategy uses the Infernal secondary structure aware aligner to provide a more consistent higher quality alignment and faster processing of user sequences. Substantial new analysis features include a new Pyrosequencing Pipeline that provides tools to support analysis of ultra high-throughput rRNA sequencing data. This pipeline offers a collection of tools that automate the data processing and simplify the computationally intensive analysis of large sequencing libraries. In addition, a new Taxomatic visualization tool allows rapid visualization of taxonomic inconsistencies and suggests corrections, and a new class Assignment Generator provides instructors with a lesson plan and individualized teaching materials. Details about RDP data and analytical functions can be found at http://rdp.cme.msu.edu/. PMID:19004872

  1. Phylogenetic analysis of the genera Thiobacillus and Thiomicrospira by 5S rRNA sequences.

    PubMed

    Lane, D J; Stahl, D A; Olsen, G J; Heller, D J; Pace, N R

    1985-07-01

    5S rRNA nucleotide sequences from Thiobacillus neapolitanus, Thiobacillus ferrooxidans, Thiobacillus thiooxidans, Thiobacillus intermedius, Thiobacillus perometabolis, Thiobacillus thioparus, Thiobacillus versutus, Thiobacillus novellus, Thiobacillus acidophilus, Thiomicrospira pelophila, Thiomicrospira sp. strain L-12, and Acidiphilium cryptum were determined. A phylogenetic tree, based upon comparison of these and other related 5S rRNA sequences, is presented. The results place the thiobacilli, Thiomicrospira spp., and Acidiphilium spp. in the "purple photosynthetic" bacterial grouping which also includes the enteric, vibrio, pseudomonad, and other familiar eubacterial groups in addition to the purple photosynthetic bacteria. The genus Thiobacillus is not an evolutionarily coherent grouping but rather spans the full breadth of the purple photosynthetic bacteria. PMID:3924899

  2. Novel Bacterial Diversity in an Anchialine Blue Hole on Abaco Island, Bahamas 

    E-print Network

    Gonzalez, Brett Christopher

    2012-02-14

    within the platform. Dense microbial assemblages which occurred as mats on the cave walls below the halocline were investigated through construction of 16S rRNA clone libraries, finding representatives across several bacterial lineages including...

  3. Pyrosequence Read Length of 16S rRNA Gene Affects Phylogenetic Assignment of Plant-associated Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Okubo, Takashi; Ikeda, Seishi; Yamashita, Akifumi; Terasawa, Kimihiro; Minamisawa, Kiwamu

    2012-01-01

    Pyrosequence targeting of the 16S rRNA gene has been adopted for microbial communities associated with field-grown plants. To examine phylogenetic drifts according to read length and bioinformatic tools, original and chopped sequences (250–570 bp) covering the V1–V4 regions of 16S rRNA genes were compared using pyrosequence and Sanger reads of rice root microbiomes. The phylogenetic assignment at genus level depended on read length, especially in the genus Bradyrhizobium, which is one of the ecologically important bacterial genera associated with plants. We discuss the methodology of phylogenetic assignments of plant-associated bacteria by 16S rRNA pyrosequence. PMID:22791055

  4. Assessment of bacterial community structure in soil by polymerase chain reaction and denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Gelsomino, A; Keijzer-Wolters, A C; Cacco, G; van Elsas, J D

    1999-10-01

    Bacterial community structure was studied in a Flevo silt loam (FSL) soil microplot, as well as in 15 other soils, by using DNA extraction followed by molecular fingerprinting. Total community DNA was extracted and purified by a direct method, which yielded amplifiable DNA of high molecular weight for all soils. A variable region of the 16S rRNA gene was then amplified by PCR with bacterial primers, resulting in a mixture of amplicons separable via denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE). The DGGE profiles of FSL soil were indicative of dominant soil bacterial types, as evidenced by assessing the amplification of Enterobacter cloacae and Arthrobacter sp. targets in a soil DNA background. These targets produced barely detectable bands when present in soil DNA at roughly 5 x 10(6) genome equivalents per g dry soil, and strong bands at 27-fold higher levels. The PCR-DGGE analysis of the FSL soil was highly reproducible. Furthermore, different single versus composite topsoil samples yielded similar DGGE profiles with respect to major bands. In addition, samples taken along vertical soil cores (0-45 cm depth) revealed relative stability of the DGGE profiles. The profiles produced with DNA obtained from different aggregate size fractions of this soil were also similar with respect to the main bands. Moreover, FSL topsoil samples taken over a 1-year period (fallow soil) yielded stable profiles. These data suggested that the soil bacterial communities thus determined were dominated by a limited number of stable and ubiquitous types. The 16 soils, representing varying types and geographical locations, were assessed for differences in their bacterial DGGE profiles. There were striking differences between the profiles obtained for these soils. Evidence was found for the hypothesis that similar soil types tend to contain similar structures of the dominating bacterial types as revealed by the DGGE profiles. PMID:10520580

  5. Nested PCR Biases in Interpreting Microbial Community Structure in 16S rRNA Gene Sequence Datasets

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Guoqin; Fadrosh, Doug; Goedert, James J.; Ravel, Jacques; Goldstein, Alisa M.

    2015-01-01

    Background Sequencing of the PCR-amplified 16S rRNA gene has become a common approach to microbial community investigations in the fields of human health and environmental sciences. This approach, however, is difficult when the amount of DNA is too low to be amplified by standard PCR. Nested PCR can be employed as it can amplify samples with DNA concentration several-fold lower than standard PCR. However, potential biases with nested PCRs that could affect measurement of community structure have received little attention. Results In this study, we used 17 DNAs extracted from vaginal swabs and 12 DNAs extracted from stool samples to study the influence of nested PCR amplification of the 16S rRNA gene on the estimation of microbial community structure using Illumina MiSeq sequencing. Nested and standard PCR methods were compared on alpha- and beta-diversity metrics and relative abundances of bacterial genera. The effects of number of cycles in the first round of PCR (10 vs. 20) and microbial diversity (relatively low in vagina vs. high in stool) were also investigated. Vaginal swab samples showed no significant difference in alpha diversity or community structure between nested PCR and standard PCR (one round of 40 cycles). Stool samples showed significant differences in alpha diversity (except Shannon’s index) and relative abundance of 13 genera between nested PCR with 20 cycles in the first round and standard PCR (P<0.01), but not between nested PCR with 10 cycles in the first round and standard PCR. Operational taxonomic units (OTUs) that had low relative abundance (sum of relative abundance <0.167) accounted for most of the distortion (>27% of total OTUs in stool). Conclusions Nested PCR introduced bias in estimated diversity and community structure. The bias was more significant for communities with relatively higher diversity and when more cycles were applied in the first round of PCR. We conclude that nested PCR could be used when standard PCR does not work. However, rare taxa detected by nested PCR should be validated by other technologies. PMID:26196512

  6. Effects on enteric methane production and bacterial and archaeal communities by the addition of cashew nut shell extract or glycerol-an in vitro evaluation.

    PubMed

    Danielsson, Rebecca; Werner-Omazic, Anna; Ramin, Mohammad; Schnürer, Anna; Griinari, Mikko; Dicksved, Johan; Bertilsson, Jan

    2014-09-01

    The objective of the study was to evaluate the effect of cashew nut shell extract (CNSE) and glycerol (purity >99%) on enteric methane (CH4) production and microbial communities in an automated gas in vitro system. Microbial communities from the in vitro system were compared with samples from the donor cows, in vivo. Inoculated rumen fluid was mixed with a diet with a 60:40 forage:concentrate ratio and, in total, 5 different treatments were set up: 5mg of CNSE (CNSE-L), 10mg of CNSE (CNSE-H), 15mmol of glycerol/L (glycerol-L), and 30mmol of glycerol/L (glycerol-H), and a control without feed additive. Gas samples were taken at 2, 4, 8, 24, 32, and 48h of incubation, and the CH4 concentration was measured. Samples of rumen fluid were taken for volatile fatty acid analysis and for microbial sequence analyses after 8, 24, and 48h of incubation. In vivo rumen samples from the cows were taken 2h after the morning feeding at 3 consecutive days to compare the in vitro system with in vivo conditions. The gas data and data from microbial sequence analysis (454 sequencing) were analyzed using a mixed model and principal components analysis. These analyses illustrated that CH4 production was reduced with the CNSE treatment, by 8 and 18%, respectively, for the L and H concentration. Glycerol instead increased CH4 production by 8 and 12%, respectively, for the L and H concentration. The inhibition with CNSE could be due to the observed shift in bacterial population, possibly resulting in decreased production of hydrogen or formate, the methanogenic substrates. Alternatively the response could be explained by a shift in the methanogenic community. In the glycerol treatments, no main differences in bacterial or archaeal population were detected compared with the in vivo control. Thus, the increase in CH4 production may be explained by the increase in substrate in the in vitro system. The reduced CH4 production in vitro with CNSE suggests that CNSE can be a promising inhibitor of CH4 formation in the rumen of dairy cows. PMID:24996274

  7. Dynamics of bacterial and fungal communities associated with eggshells during incubation

    PubMed Central

    Grizard, Stéphanie; Dini-Andreote, Francisco; Tieleman, B Irene; Salles, Joana F

    2014-01-01

    Microorganisms are closely associated with eggs and may play a determinant role in embryo survival. Yet, the majority of studies focusing on this association relied on culture-based methodology, eventually leading to a skewed assessment of microbial communities. By targeting the 16S rRNA gene and internal transcribed spacer (ITS) region, we, respectively, described bacterial and fungal communities on eggshells of the homing pigeon Columba livia. We explored their structure, abundance, and composition. Firstly, we showed that sampling technique affected the outcome of the results. While broadly used, the egg swabbing procedure led to a lower DNA extraction efficiency and provided different profiles of bacterial communities than those based on crushed eggshell pieces. Secondly, we observed shifts in bacterial and fungal communities during incubation. At late incubation, bacterial communities showed a reduction in diversity, while their abundance increased, possibly due to the competitive advantage of some species. When compared to their bacterial counterparts, fungal communities also decreased in diversity at late incubation. In that case, however, the decline was associated with a diminution of their overall abundance. Conclusively, our results showed that although incubation might inhibit microbial growth when compared to unincubated eggs, we observed the selective growth of specific bacterial species during incubation. Moreover, we showed that fungi are a substantial component of the microbial communities associated with eggshells and require further investigations in avian ecology. Identifying the functional roles of these microorganisms is likely to provide news insights into the evolutionary strategies that control embryo survival. We aimed to describe the dynamics of bacterial and fungal communities on homing pigeon eggshell surfaces. We investigated these communities at early and late incubation stages. PMID:24772289

  8. Dynamics of bacterial and fungal communities associated with eggshells during incubation.

    PubMed

    Grizard, Stéphanie; Dini-Andreote, Francisco; Tieleman, B Irene; Salles, Joana F

    2014-04-01

    Microorganisms are closely associated with eggs and may play a determinant role in embryo survival. Yet, the majority of studies focusing on this association relied on culture-based methodology, eventually leading to a skewed assessment of microbial communities. By targeting the 16S rRNA gene and internal transcribed spacer (ITS) region, we, respectively, described bacterial and fungal communities on eggshells of the homing pigeon Columba livia. We explored their structure, abundance, and composition. Firstly, we showed that sampling technique affected the outcome of the results. While broadly used, the egg swabbing procedure led to a lower DNA extraction efficiency and provided different profiles of bacterial communities than those based on crushed eggshell pieces. Secondly, we observed shifts in bacterial and fungal communities during incubation. At late incubation, bacterial communities showed a reduction in diversity, while their abundance increased, possibly due to the competitive advantage of some species. When compared to their bacterial counterparts, fungal communities also decreased in diversity at late incubation. In that case, however, the decline was associated with a diminution of their overall abundance. Conclusively, our results showed that although incubation might inhibit microbial growth when compared to unincubated eggs, we observed the selective growth of specific bacterial species during incubation. Moreover, we showed that fungi are a substantial component of the microbial communities associated with eggshells and require further investigations in avian ecology. Identifying the functional roles of these microorganisms is likely to provide news insights into the evolutionary strategies that control embryo survival. We aimed to describe the dynamics of bacterial and fungal communities on homing pigeon eggshell surfaces. We investigated these communities at early and late incubation stages. PMID:24772289

  9. Bacterial communities in PAH contaminated soils at an electronic-waste processing center in China

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Wen Zhang; Hui Wang; Rui Zhang; Xie-Zhi Yu; Pei-Yuan Qian; M. H. Wong

    2010-01-01

    Surface soils from Guiyu, China (an intense e-waste processing center) were analyzed for persistent organic pollutants (POPs)\\u000a and variations in composition of the resident bacterial communities. Denaturing Gradient Gel Electrophoresis analysis of bacterial\\u000a 16S rRNA gene showed that e-waste pollution altered the bacterial community structure by promoting changes in species composition\\u000a and species richness. Bacterial diversity was not decreased at

  10. Novel extraction strategy of ribosomal RNA and genomic DNA from cheese for PCR-based investigations.

    PubMed

    Bonaïti, Catherine; Parayre, Sandrine; Irlinger, Françoise

    2006-03-15

    Cheese microorganisms, such as bacteria and fungi, constitute a complex ecosystem that plays a central role in cheeses ripening. The molecular study of cheese microbial diversity and activity is essential but the extraction of high quality nucleic acid may be problematic: the cheese samples are characterised by a strong buffering capacity which negatively influenced the yield of the extracted rRNA. The objective of this study is to develop an effective method for the direct and simultaneous isolation of yeast and bacterial ribosomal RNA and genomic DNA from the same cheese samples. DNA isolation was based on a protocol used for nucleic acids isolation from anaerobic digestor, without preliminary washing step with the combined use of the action of chaotropic agent (acid guanidinium thiocyanate), detergents (SDS, N-lauroylsarcosine), chelating agent (EDTA) and a mechanical method (bead beating system). The DNA purification was carried out by two washing steps of phenol-chloroform. RNA was isolated successfully after the second acid extraction step by recovering it from the phenolic phase of the first acid extraction. The novel method yielded pure preparation of undegraded RNA accessible for reverse transcription-PCR. The extraction protocol of genomic DNA and rRNA was applicable to complex ecosystem of different cheese matrices. PMID:16269194

  11. Comparing the identification of Clostridium spp. by two Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption Ionization-Time of Flight (MALDI-TOF) mass spectrometry platforms to 16S rRNA PCR sequencing as a reference standard: a detailed analysis of age of culture and sample preparation.

    PubMed

    Chean, Roy; Kotsanas, Despina; Francis, Michelle J; Palombo, Enzo A; Jadhav, Snehal R; Awad, Milena M; Lyras, Dena; Korman, Tony M; Jenkin, Grant A

    2014-12-01

    We compared the identification of Clostridium species using mass spectrometry by two different Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption Ionization Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) platforms (Bruker MS and Vitek MS) against 16S rRNA sequencing as the reference standard. We then examined the impact of different sample preparations and (on one of those platforms) age of bacterial colonial growth on the performance of the MALDI-TOF MS systems. We identified 10 different species amongst the 52 isolates by 16S rRNA sequencing, with Clostridium perfringens the most prevalent (n=30). Spectrometric analysis using Vitek MS correctly speciated 47/52 (90.4%) isolates and was not affected by the sample preparation used. Performance of the Bruker MS was dependent on sample preparation with correct speciation obtained for 36 of 52 (69.2%) isolates tested using the Direct Transfer [DT] protocol, but all 52 (100%) isolates were correctly speciated using either an Extended Direct Transfer [EDT] or a Full Formic Extraction [EX] protocol. We then examined the effect of bacterial colonial growth age on the performance of Bruker MS and found substantial agreement in speciation using DT (Kappa=0.62, 95% CI: 0.46-0.75), almost perfect agreement for EDT (Kappa=0.94, 95% CI: 0.86-1.00) and exact agreement for EX (Kappa=1.00) between different days. PMID:25230331

  12. Succession of Microbial Communities during Hot Composting as Detected by PCR-Single-Strand-Conformation Polymorphism-Based Genetic Profiles of Small-Subunit rRNA Genes

    Microsoft Academic Search

    SABINE PETERS; STEFANIE KOSCHINSKY; FRANK SCHWIEGER; CHRISTOPH C. TEBBE

    2000-01-01

    A cultivation-independent technique for genetic profiling of PCR-amplified small-subunit rRNA genes (SSU rDNA) was chosen to characterize the diversity and succession of microbial communities during composting of an organic agricultural substrate. PCR amplifications were performed with DNA directly extracted from compost samples and with primers targeting either (i) the V4-V5 region of eubacterial 16S rRNA genes, (ii) the V3 region

  13. Evaluation of Methods for the Extraction and Purification of DNA from the Human Microbiome

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Sanqing; Cohen, Dora B.; Ravel, Jacques; Abdo, Zaid; Forney, Larry J.

    2012-01-01

    Background DNA extraction is an essential step in all cultivation-independent approaches to characterize microbial diversity, including that associated with the human body. A fundamental challenge in using these approaches has been to isolate DNA that is representative of the microbial community sampled. Methodology/Principal Findings In this study, we statistically evaluated six commonly used DNA extraction procedures using eleven human-associated bacterial species and a mock community that contained equal numbers of those eleven species. These methods were compared on the basis of DNA yield, DNA shearing, reproducibility, and most importantly representation of microbial diversity. The analysis of 16S rRNA gene sequences from a mock community showed that the observed species abundances were significantly different from the expected species abundances for all six DNA extraction methods used. Conclusions/Significance Protocols that included bead beating and/or mutanolysin produced significantly better bacterial community structure representation than methods without both of them. The reproducibility of all six methods was similar, and results from different experimenters and different times were in good agreement. Based on the evaluations done it appears that DNA extraction procedures for bacterial community analysis of human associated samples should include bead beating and/or mutanolysin to effectively lyse cells. PMID:22457796

  14. Bacterial Sialidase

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    Data shows that elevated sialidase in bacterial vaginosis patients correlates to premature births in women. Bacterial sialidase also plays a significant role in the unusual colonization of Pseudomonas aeruginosa in cystic fibrosis patients. Crystals of Salmonella sialidase have been reproduced and are used for studying the inhibitor-enzyme complexes. These inhibitors may also be used to inhibit a trans-sialidase of Trypanosome cruzi, a very similar enzyme to bacterial sialidase, therefore preventing T. cruzi infection, the causitive agent of Chagas' disease. The Center for Macromolecular Crystallography suggests that inhibitors of bacterial sialidases can be used as prophylactic drugs to prevent bacterial infections in these critical cases.

  15. A mitochondrial rRNA dimethyladenosine methyltransferase in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Richter, Uwe; Kühn, Kristina; Okada, Sachiko; Brennicke, Axel; Weihe, Andreas; Börner, Thomas

    2010-01-01

    S-adenosyl-l-methionine-dependent rRNA dimethylases mediate the methylation of two conserved adenosines near the 3? end of the rRNA in the small ribosomal subunits of bacteria, archaea and eukaryotes. Proteins related to this family of dimethylases play an essential role as transcription factors (mtTFBs) in fungal and animal mitochondria. Human mitochondrial rRNA is methylated and human mitochondria contain two related mtTFBs, one proposed to act as rRNA dimethylase, the other as transcription factor. The nuclear genome of Arabidopsis thaliana encodes three dimethylase/mtTFB-like proteins, one of which, Dim1B, is shown here to be imported into mitochondria. Transcription initiation by mitochondrial RNA polymerases appears not to be stimulated by Dim1B in vitro. In line with this finding, phylogenetic analyses revealed Dim1B to be more closely related to a group of eukaryotic non-mitochondrial rRNA dimethylases (Dim1s) than to fungal and animal mtTFBs. We found that Dim1B was capable of substituting the E. coli rRNA dimethylase activity of KsgA. Moreover, we observed methylation of the conserved adenines in the 18S rRNA of Arabidopsis mitochondria; this modification was not detectable in a mutant lacking Dim1B. These data provide evidence: (i) for rRNA methylation in Arabidopsis mitochondria; and (ii) that Dim1B is the enzyme catalyzing this process. PMID:19929881

  16. Nonradioactive Method To Study Genetic Profiles of Natural Bacterial Communities by PCR-Single-Strand-Conformation Polymorphism

    Microsoft Academic Search

    DONG-HUN LEE; YOUNG-GUN ZO; ANDSANG-JONG KIM

    1996-01-01

    We describe a new method for studying the structure and diversity of bacterial communities in the natural ecosystem. Our approach is based on single-strand-conformation polymorphism (SSCP) analysis of PCR products of 16S rRNA genes from complex bacterial populations. A pair of eubacterial universal primers for amplification of the variable V3 region were designed from the 16S rRNA sequences of 1,262

  17. CHANGES IN BACTERIAL COMMUNITY STRUCTURE ASSOCIATED WITH COASTAL COPPER ENRICHMENT

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ana C. Morán; Martha B. Hengst; Rodrigo De la Iglesia; Santiago Andrade; Juan A. Correa; Bernardo González

    2008-01-01

    Marine bacterial communities isolated from the water column, sediment, the rock surface, and the green seaweed Ulva compressa were studied in an intertidal ecosystem. The study area included a coastal zone chronically affected by copper mine waste disposals. Bacterial community composition was analyzed by terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP) of 16S rRNA genes, and multivariate analyses of T-RFLP data

  18. Comparative analysis of bacterial community composition in bulk tank raw milk by culture-dependent and culture-independent methods using the viability dye propidium monoazide.

    PubMed

    Weber, Mareike; Geißert, Janina; Kruse, Myriam; Lipski, André

    2014-11-01

    Microbial diversity of 3 raw milk samples after 72 h of storage at 4 °C in a bulk tank was analyzed by culture-dependent and -independent methods. The culture-dependent approach was based on the isolation of bacteria on complex and selective media, chemotaxonomic differentiation of isolates, and subsequent identification by 16S rRNA gene sequencing. The culture-independent approach included the treatment of raw milk with the dye propidium monoazide before direct DNA extraction by mechanic and enzymatic cell lysis approaches, and cloning and sequencing of the 16S rRNA genes. The selective detection of viable bacteria improved the comparability between bacterial compositions of raw milk based on culture-dependent and -independent methods, which was the major objective of this study. Several bacterial species of the phyla Actinobacteria, Bacteroidetes, Firmicutes, and Proteobacteria were detected by the culture-dependent method, whereas mainly bacteria of the phylum Proteobacteria as well as low proportions of the phyla Bacteroidetes and Actinobacteria were detected by the culture-independent method. This led to the conclusion that the phylum Firmicutes was strongly discriminated by the culture-independent approach. Generally, species richness detected by the culture-dependent method was higher than that detected by the culture-independent method for all samples. However, few taxa could be detected solely by the direct DNA-based method. In conclusion, the combination of culture-dependent and -independent methods led to the detection of the highest bacterial diversity for the raw milk samples analyzed. It was shown that DNA extraction from raw milk as the essential step in culture-independent methods causes the discrimination of taxa by incomplete cell lysis. Treatment of raw milk with the viability dye propidium monoazide was optimized for the application in raw milk without former removal of milk ingredients and proved to be a suitable tool to ensure comparability of bacterial diversity depicted by both methods. PMID:25242425

  19. Species Identification and Profiling of Complex Microbial Communities Using Shotgun Illumina Sequencing of 16S rRNA Amplicon Sequences

    PubMed Central

    Lay, Christophe; Ho, Eliza Xin Pei; Low, Louie; Hibberd, Martin Lloyd; Nagarajan, Niranjan

    2013-01-01

    The high throughput and cost-effectiveness afforded by short-read sequencing technologies, in principle, enable researchers to perform 16S rRNA profiling of complex microbial communities at unprecedented depth and resolution. Existing Illumina sequencing protocols are, however, limited by the fraction of the 16S rRNA gene that is interrogated and therefore limit the resolution and quality of the profiling. To address this, we present the design of a novel protocol for shotgun Illumina sequencing of the bacterial 16S rRNA gene, optimized to amplify more than 90% of sequences in the Greengenes database and with the ability to distinguish nearly twice as many species-level OTUs compared to existing protocols. Using several in silico and experimental datasets, we demonstrate that despite the presence of multiple variable and conserved regions, the resulting shotgun sequences can be used to accurately quantify the constituents of complex microbial communities. The reconstruction of a significant fraction of the 16S rRNA gene also enabled high precision (>90%) in species-level identification thereby opening up potential application of this approach for clinical microbial characterization. PMID:23579286

  20. Rapid in situ hybridization technique using 16S rRNA segments for detecting and differentiating the closely related gram-positive organisms Bacillus polymyxa and Bacillus macerans.

    PubMed Central

    Jurtshuk, R J; Blick, M; Bresser, J; Fox, G E; Jurtshuk, P

    1992-01-01

    A rapid, sensitive, inexpensive in situ hybridization technique, using 30-mer 16S rRNA probes, can specifically differentiate two closely related Bacillus spp., B. polymyxa and B. macerans. The 16S rRNA probes were labeled with a rhodamine derivative (Texas Red), and quantitative fluorescence measurements were made on individual bacterial cells. The microscopic fields analyzed were selected by phase-contrast microscopy, and the fluorescence imaging analyses were performed on 16 to 67 individual cells. The labeled 16S rRNA probe, POL, whose sequence was a 100% match with B. polymyxa 16S rRNA but only a 60% match with B. macerans 16S rRNA, gave quantitative fluorescence ratio measurements that were 34.8-fold higher for B. polymyxa cells than for B. macerans cells. Conversely, the labeled probe, MAC, which matched B. polymyxa 16S rRNA in 86.6% of its positions and B. macerans 16S rRNA in 100% of its positions, gave quantitative fluorescence measurements that were 59.3-fold higher in B. macerans cells than in B. polymyxa cells. Control probes, whose 16S rRNA sequence segment (P-M) was present in both B. polymyxa and B. macerans as well as a panprokaryotic probe (16S), having a 100% match with all known bacteria, hybridized equally well with both organisms. These latter hybridizations generated very high fluorescence signals, but their comparative fluorescence ratios (the differences between two organisms) were low. The control paneukaryotic probe (28S), which had less than 30% identity for both B. macerans and B. polymyxa, did not hybridize with either organism. Images PMID:1381173

  1. Bacterial Vaginosis

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Funding About NIAID News & Events NIAID > Health & Research Topics > Bacterial Vaginosis Skip Website Tools Website Tools Print this page Order publications Volunteer for Clinical Studies Help people ...

  2. Effects of Functionalized and Raw Multi-Walled Carbon Nanotubes on Soil Bacterial Community Composition

    PubMed Central

    Kerfahi, Dorsaf; Tripathi, Binu M.; Singh, Dharmesh; Kim, Hyoki; Lee, Sujin; Lee, Junghoon; Adams, Jonathan M.

    2015-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are widely used in industry, but their environmental impacts on soil microbial communities are poorly known. In this paper, we compare the effect of both raw and acid treated or functionalized (fCNTs) multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) on soil bacterial communities, applying different concentrations of MWCNTs (0 µg/g, 50 µg/g, 500 µg/g and 5000 µg/g) to a soil microcosm system. Soil DNA was extracted at 0, 2 and 8 weeks and the V3 region of the 16S rRNA gene was PCR-amplified and sequenced using paired-end Illumina bar-coded sequencing. The results show that bacterial diversity was not affected by either type of MWCNT. However, overall soil bacterial community composition, as illustrated by NMDS, was affected only by fMWCNT at high concentrations. This effect, detectable at 2 weeks, remained equally strong by 8 weeks. In the case of fMWCNTs, overall changes in relative abundance of the dominant phyla were also found. The stronger effect of fMWCNTs could be explained by their intrinsically acidic nature, as the soil pH was lower at higher concentrations of fMWCNTs. Overall, this study suggests that fMWCNTs may at least temporarily alter microbial community composition on the timescale of at least weeks to months. It appears, by contrast, that raw MWCNTs do not affect soil microbial community composition. PMID:25825905

  3. Molecular Phylogenetic Diversity and Spatial Distribution of Bacterial Communities in Cooling Stage during Swine Manure Composting

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Yan; Zhang, Jinliang; Yan, Yongfeng; Wu, Jian; Zhu, Nengwu; Deng, Changyan

    2015-01-01

    Polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) and subsequent sub-cloning and sequencing were used in this study to analyze the molecular phylogenetic diversity and spatial distribution of bacterial communities in different spatial locations during the cooling stage of composted swine manure. Total microbial DNA was extracted, and bacterial near full-length 16S rRNA genes were subsequently amplified, cloned, RFLP-screened, and sequenced. A total of 420 positive clones were classified by RFLP and near-full-length 16S rDNA sequences. Approximately 48 operational taxonomic units (OTUs) were found among 139 positive clones from the superstratum sample; 26 among 149 were from the middle-level sample and 35 among 132 were from the substrate sample. Thermobifida fusca was common in the superstratum layer of the pile. Some Bacillus spp. were remarkable in the middle-level layer, and Clostridium sp. was dominant in the substrate layer. Among 109 OTUs, 99 displayed homology with those in the GenBank database. Ten OTUs were not closely related to any known species. The superstratum sample had the highest microbial diversity, and different and distinct bacterial communities were detected in the three different layers. This study demonstrated the spatial characteristics of the microbial community distribution in the cooling stage of swine manure compost. PMID:25925066

  4. The impact of date palm fruits and their component polyphenols, on gut microbial ecology, bacterial metabolites and colon cancer cell proliferation.

    PubMed

    Eid, Noura; Enani, Sumia; Walton, Gemma; Corona, Giulia; Costabile, Adele; Gibson, Glenn; Rowland, Ian; Spencer, Jeremy P E

    2014-01-01

    The fruit of the date palm (Phoenix dactylifera L.) is a rich source of dietary fibre and polyphenols. We have investigated gut bacterial changes induced by the whole date fruit extract (digested date extract; DDE) and its polyphenol-rich extract (date polyphenol extract; DPE) using faecal, pH-controlled, mixed batch cultures mimicking the distal part of the human large intestine, and utilising an array of microbial group-specific 16S rRNA oligonucleotide probes. Fluorescence microscopic enumeration indicated that there was a significant increase in the growth of bifidobacteria in response to both treatments, whilst whole dates also increased bacteroides at 24 h and the total bacterial counts at later fermentation time points when compared with DPE alone. Bacterial metabolism of whole date fruit led to the production of SCFA, with acetate significantly increasing following bacterial incubation with DDE. In addition, the production of flavonoid aglycones (myricetin, luteolin, quercetin and apigenin) and the anthocyanidin petunidin in less than 1 h was also observed. Lastly, the potential of DDE, DPE and metabolites to inhibit Caco-2 cell growth was investigated, indicating that both were capable of potentially acting as antiproliferative agents in vitro, following a 48 h exposure. This potential to inhibit growth was reduced following fermentation. Together these data suggest that consumption of date fruits may enhance colon health by increasing beneficial bacterial growth and inhibiting the proliferation of colon cancer cells. This is an early suggestion that date intake by humans may aid in the maintenance of bowel health and even the reduction of colorectal cancer development. PMID:26101614

  5. Up to Species-level Community Analysis of Human Gut Microbiota by 16S rRNA Amplicon Pyrosequencing

    PubMed Central

    NAKAYAMA, Jiro; JIANG, Jiahui; WATANABE, Koichi; CHEN, Kangting; NINXIN, Huang; MATSUDA, Kazunori; KURAKAWA, Takashi; TSUJI, Hirokazu; SONOMOTO, Kenji; LEE, Yuan-Kun

    2013-01-01

    Pyrosequencing-based 16S rRNA profiling has become a common powerful tool to obtain the community structure of gastrointestinal tract microbiota, but it is still hard to process the massive amount of sequence data into microbial composition data, especially at the species level. Here we propose a new approach in combining the quantitative insights into microbial ecology (QIIME), Mothur and ribosomal database project (RDP) programs to efficiently process 454 pyrosequence data to bacterial composition data up to the species level. It was demonstrated to precisely convert batch sequence data of 16S rRNA V6-V8 amplicons obtained from adult Singaporean fecal samples to taxonomically annotated biota data. PMID:24936364

  6. Different bacterial populations associated with the roots and rhizosphere of rice incorporate plant-derived carbon.

    PubMed

    Hernández, Marcela; Dumont, Marc G; Yuan, Quan; Conrad, Ralf

    2015-03-01

    Microorganisms associated with the roots of plants have an important function in plant growth and in soil carbon sequestration. Rice cultivation is the second largest anthropogenic source of atmospheric CH4, which is a significant greenhouse gas. Up to 60% of fixed carbon formed by photosynthesis in plants is transported below ground, much of it as root exudates that are consumed by microorganisms. A stable isotope probing (SIP) approach was used to identify microorganisms using plant carbon in association with the roots and rhizosphere of rice plants. Rice plants grown in Italian paddy soil were labeled with (13)CO2 for 10 days. RNA was extracted from root material and rhizosphere soil and subjected to cesium gradient centrifugation followed by 16S rRNA amplicon pyrosequencing to identify microorganisms enriched with (13)C. Thirty operational taxonomic units (OTUs) were labeled and mostly corresponded to Proteobacteria (13 OTUs) and Verrucomicrobia (8 OTUs). These OTUs were affiliated with the Alphaproteobacteria, Betaproteobacteria, and Deltaproteobacteria classes of Proteobacteria and the "Spartobacteria" and Opitutae classes of Verrucomicrobia. In general, different bacterial groups were labeled in the root and rhizosphere, reflecting different physicochemical characteristics of these locations. The labeled OTUs in the root compartment corresponded to a greater proportion of the 16S rRNA sequences (?20%) than did those in the rhizosphere (?4%), indicating that a proportion of the active microbial community on the roots greater than that in the rhizosphere incorporated plant-derived carbon within the time frame of the experiment. PMID:25616793

  7. Bacterial Community Shift in Two Sectors of a Tannery Plant and its Cr (VI) Removing Potential

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jian Chen; Yue-Qin Tang; Xiao-Lei Wu

    2012-01-01

    The bacterial community, analyzed by both 16S rRNA gene-based clone library and cultivation methods, changed in two different sectors of a tannery plant. Ten different bacterial phyla were detected through the clone library. The bacterial community of the tanning waste consisted of Gammaproteobacteria (34.8%), Bacteroidetes (20.9%), Betaproteobacteria (12.8%), Alphaproteobacteria (7.0%), Firmicutes (7.0%), Deinococcus-Thermus (7%), Planctomycetes (4.7%), Verrucomicrobia (2.3%), Epsilonproteobacteria (1.2%),

  8. Influence of commonly used primer systems on automated ribosomal intergenic spacer analysis of bacterial communities in environmental samples.

    PubMed

    Purahong, Witoon; Stempfhuber, Barbara; Lentendu, Guillaume; Francioli, Davide; Reitz, Thomas; Buscot, François; Schloter, Michael; Krüger, Dirk

    2015-01-01

    Due to the high diversity of bacteria in many ecosystems, their slow generation times, specific but mostly unknown nutrient requirements and syntrophic interactions, isolation based approaches in microbial ecology mostly fail to describe microbial community structure. Thus, cultivation independent techniques, which rely on directly extracted nucleic acids from the environment, are a well-used alternative. For example, bacterial automated ribosomal intergenic spacer analysis (B-ARISA) is one of the widely used methods for fingerprinting bacterial communities after PCR-based amplification of selected regions of the operon coding for rRNA genes using community DNA. However, B-ARISA alone does not provide any taxonomic information and the results may be severely biased in relation to the primer set selection. Furthermore, amplified DNA stemming from mitochondrial or chloroplast templates might strongly bias the obtained fingerprints. In this study, we determined the applicability of three different B-ARISA primer sets to the study of bacterial communities. The results from in silico analysis harnessing publicly available sequence databases showed that all three primer sets tested are specific to bacteria but only two primers sets assure high bacterial taxa coverage (1406f/23Sr and ITSF/ITSReub). Considering the study of bacteria in a plant interface, the primer set ITSF/ITSReub was found to amplify (in silico) sequences of some important crop species such as Sorghum bicolor and Zea mays. Bacterial genera and plant species potentially amplified by different primer sets are given. These data were confirmed when DNA extracted from soil and plant samples were analyzed. The presented information could be useful when interpreting existing B-ARISA results and planning B-ARISA experiments, especially when plant DNA can be expected. PMID:25749323

  9. Assessment of bacterial community structure in the deep sub-seafloor biosphere by 16S rDNA-based techniques: a cautionary tale.

    PubMed

    Webster, Gordon; Newberry, Carole J; Fry, John C; Weightman, Andrew J

    2003-10-01

    Investigations into the deep marine environment have demonstrated the presence of a significant microbial biomass buried deep within sediments on a global scale. It is now believed that this deep biosphere plays a major role in the global cycling of elements and contains a large reservoir of organic carbon. This paper reports the development of a DNA extraction protocol that addresses the particular problems faced in applying molecular ecological techniques to samples containing very low biomass. Sediment samples were collected from different geographical locations within the Pacific Ocean and include the Ocean Drilling Program (ODP) Leg 190, Nankai Trough Accretionary Prism. Seven DNA extraction protocols were tested and a commercially available DNA extraction kit with modifications was shown to produce higher yields of polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-amplifiable DNA than standard laboratory methods. Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) analysis of 16S rRNA gene diversity revealed that template DNA from these extremely low biomass sediment samples was susceptible to PCR bias and random amplification. We propose that it is essential to screen 16S rRNA gene products for bacterial diversity by DGGE or other rapid fingerprinting methods, prior to their use in establishing a representative clone library of deep sub-seafloor bacteria. This represents a cautionary approach to analysis of microbial diversity in such sub-seafloor ecosystems. PMID:14500007

  10. The inconstant gut microbiota of Drosophila species revealed by 16S rRNA gene analysis

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Adam C-N; Chaston, John M; Douglas, Angela E

    2013-01-01

    The gut microorganisms in some animals are reported to include a core microbiota of consistently associated bacteria that is ecologically distinctive and may have coevolved with the host. The core microbiota is promoted by positive interactions among bacteria, favoring shared persistence; its retention over evolutionary timescales is evident as congruence between host phylogeny and bacterial community composition. This study applied multiple analyses to investigate variation in the composition of gut microbiota in drosophilid flies. First, the prevalence of five previously described gut bacteria (Acetobacter and Lactobacillus species) in individual flies of 21 strains (10 Drosophila species) were determined. Most bacteria were not present in all individuals of most strains, and bacterial species pairs co-occurred in individual flies less frequently than predicted by chance, contrary to expectations of a core microbiota. A complementary pyrosequencing analysis of 16S rRNA gene amplicons from the gut microbiota of 11 Drosophila species identified 209 bacterial operational taxonomic units (OTUs), with near-saturating sampling of sequences, but none of the OTUs was common to all host species. Furthermore, in both of two independent sets of Drosophila species, the gut bacterial community composition was not congruent with host phylogeny. The final analysis identified no common OTUs across three wild and four laboratory samples of D. melanogaster. Our results yielded no consistent evidence for a core microbiota in Drosophila. We conclude that the taxonomic composition of gut microbiota varies widely within and among Drosophila populations and species. This is reminiscent of the patterns of bacterial composition in guts of some other animals, including humans. PMID:23719154

  11. Phylogenetic Diversity of Ultraplankton Plastid Small-Subunit rRNA Genes Recovered in Environmental Nucleic Acid Samples from the Pacific and Atlantic Coasts of the United States

    PubMed Central

    Rappé, Michael S.; Suzuki, Marcelino T.; Vergin, Kevin L.; Giovannoni, Stephen J.

    1998-01-01

    The scope of marine phytoplankton diversity is uncertain in many respects because, like bacteria, these organisms sometimes lack defining morphological characteristics and can be a challenge to grow in culture. Here, we report the recovery of phylogenetically diverse plastid small-subunit (SSU) rRNA gene (rDNA) clones from natural plankton populations collected in the Pacific Ocean off the mouth of Yaquina Bay, Oreg. (OCS clones), and from the eastern continental shelf of the United States off Cape Hatteras, N.C. (OM clones). SSU rRNA gene clone libraries were prepared by amplifying rDNAs from nucleic acids isolated from plankton samples and cloning them into plasmid vectors. The PCR primers used for amplification reactions were designed to be specific for bacterial SSU rRNA genes; however, plastid genes have a common phylogenetic origin with bacteria and were common in both SSU rRNA gene clone libraries. A combination of restriction fragment length polymorphism analyses, nucleic acid sequencing, and taxon-specific oligonucleotide probe hybridizations revealed that 54 of the 116 OCS gene clones were of plastid origin. Collectively, clones from the OCS and OM libraries formed at least eight unique lineages within the plastid radiation, including gene lineages related to the classes Bacillariophyceae, Cryptophyceae, Prymnesiophyceae, Chrysophyceae, and Prasinophyceae; for a number of unique clones, no close phylogenetic neighbors could be identified with confidence. Only a group of two OCS rRNA gene clones showed close identity to the plastid SSU rRNA gene sequence of a cultured organism [Emiliania huxleyi (Lohmann) Hay and Mohler; 99.8% similar]. The remaining clones could not be identified to the genus or species level. Although cryptic species are not as prevalent among phytoplankton as they are among their bacterial counterparts, this genetic survey nonetheless uncovered significant new information about phytoplankton diversity. PMID:9435081

  12. Phylogenetic relationship of phosphate solubilizing bacteria according to 16S rRNA genes.

    PubMed

    Javadi Nobandegani, Mohammad Bagher; Saud, Halimi Mohd; Yun, Wong Mui

    2015-01-01

    Phosphate solubilizing bacteria (PSB) can convert insoluble form of phosphorous to an available form. Applications of PSB as inoculants increase the phosphorus uptake by plant in the field. In this study, isolation and precise identification of PSB were carried out in Malaysian (Serdang) oil palm field (University Putra Malaysia). Identification and phylogenetic analysis of 8 better isolates were carried out by 16S rRNA gene sequencing in which as a result five isolates belong to the Beta subdivision of Proteobacteria, one isolate was related to the Gama subdivision of Proteobacteria, and two isolates were related to the Firmicutes. Bacterial isolates of 6upmr, 2upmr, 19upmnr, 10upmr, and 24upmr were identified as Alcaligenes faecalis. Also, bacterial isolates of 20upmnr and 17upmnr were identified as Bacillus cereus and Vagococcus carniphilus, respectively, and bacterial isolates of 31upmr were identified as Serratia plymuthica. Molecular identification and characterization of oil palm strains as the specific phosphate solubilizer can reduce the time and cost of producing effective inoculate (biofertilizer) in an oil palm field. PMID:25632387

  13. Phylogenetic Relationship of Phosphate Solubilizing Bacteria according to 16S rRNA Genes

    PubMed Central

    Javadi Nobandegani, Mohammad Bagher; Saud, Halimi Mohd; Yun, Wong Mui

    2015-01-01

    Phosphate solubilizing bacteria (PSB) can convert insoluble form of phosphorous to an available form. Applications of PSB as inoculants increase the phosphorus uptake by plant in the field. In this study, isolation and precise identification of PSB were carried out in Malaysian (Serdang) oil palm field (University Putra Malaysia). Identification and phylogenetic analysis of 8 better isolates were carried out by 16S rRNA gene sequencing in which as a result five isolates belong to the Beta subdivision of Proteobacteria, one isolate was related to the Gama subdivision of Proteobacteria, and two isolates were related to the Firmicutes. Bacterial isolates of 6upmr, 2upmr, 19upmnr, 10upmr, and 24upmr were identified as Alcaligenes faecalis. Also, bacterial isolates of 20upmnr and 17upmnr were identified as Bacillus cereus and Vagococcus carniphilus, respectively, and bacterial isolates of 31upmr were identified as Serratia plymuthica. Molecular identification and characterization of oil palm strains as the specific phosphate solubilizer can reduce the time and cost of producing effective inoculate (biofertilizer) in an oil palm field. PMID:25632387

  14. Phylogenetic diversity of aggregate-attached vs. free-living marine bacterial assemblages

    Microsoft Academic Search

    EDWARD F. DELONG; DIANA G. FRANKS; ALICE L. ALLDREDGE

    1993-01-01

    The phylogenetic diversity of macroaggregate-attached vs. free-living marine bacteria, co-occurring in the same water mass, was compared. Bacterial diversity and phylogcnetic identity were inferred by analyzing polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplified, cloned ribosomal RNA (rRNA) genes. Ribosomal RNA genes from macroaggregatc-associated bacteria were fundamentally different from those of free-living bacterio- plankton. Most rRNA types recovered from the free-living bacterioplankton were

  15. Chronic bacterial prostatitis: efficacy of short-lasting antibiotic therapy with prulifloxacin (Unidrox®) in association with saw palmetto extract, lactobacillus sporogens and arbutin (Lactorepens®)

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Bacterial prostatitis (BP) is a common condition accounting responsible for about 5-10% of all prostatitis cases; chronic bacterial prostatitis (CBP) classified as type II, are less common but is a condition that significantly hampers the quality of life, (QoL) because not only is it a physical condition but also a psychological distress. Commonly patients are treated with antibiotics alone, and in particular fluoroquinolones are suggested by the European Urology guidelines. This approach, although recommended, may not be enough. Thus, a multimodal approach to the prolonged antibiotic therapy may be helpful. Methods 210 patients affected by chronic bacterial prostatitis were enrolled in the study. All patients were positive to Meares-Stamey test and symptoms duration was?>?3 months. The purpose of the study was to evaluate the efficacy of a long lasting therapy with a fluoroquinolone in association with a nutraceutical supplement (prulifloxacin 600 mg for 21 days and an association of Serenoa repens 320 mg, Lactobacillus Sporogens 200 mg, Arbutin 100 mg for 30 days). Patients were randomized in two groups (A and B) receiving respectively antibiotic alone and an association of antibiotic plus supplement. Results Biological recurrence at 2 months in Group A was observed in 21 patients (27.6%) and in Group B in 6 patients (7.8%). Uropathogens found at the first follow-up were for the majority Gram – (E. coli and Enterobacter spp.). A statistically significant difference was found at the time of the follow-up between Group A and B in the NIH-CPSI questionnaire score, symptoms evidence and serum PSA. Conclusions Broad band, short-lasting antibiotic therapy in association with a nutritional supplement (serenoa repens, lactobacillus sporogens and arbutin) show better control and recurrence rate on patients affected by chronic bacterial prostatitits in comparison with antibiotic treatment alone. Trial registration NCT02130713 Date of trial Registration: 30/04/2014 PMID:25038794

  16. The Unique 16S rRNA Genes of Piezophiles Reflect both Phylogeny and Adaptation? †

    PubMed Central

    Lauro, Federico M.; Chastain, Roger A.; Blankenship, Lesley E.; Yayanos, A. Aristides; Bartlett, Douglas H.

    2007-01-01

    In the ocean's most extreme depths, pressures of 70 to 110 megapascals prevent the growth of all but the most hyperpiezophilic (pressure-loving) organisms. The physiological adaptations required for growth under these conditions are considered to be substantial. Efforts to determine specific adaptations permitting growth at extreme pressures have thus far focused on relatively few ?-proteobacteria, in part due to the technical difficulties of obtaining piezophilic bacteria in pure culture. Here, we present the molecular phylogenies of several new piezophiles of widely differing geographic origins. Included are results from an analysis of the first deep-trench bacterial isolates recovered from the southern hemisphere (9.9-km depth) and of the first gram-positive piezophilic strains. These new data allowed both phylogenetic and structural 16S rRNA comparisons among deep-ocean trench piezophiles and closely related strains not adapted to high pressure. Our results suggest that (i) the Circumpolar Deep Water acts as repository for hyperpiezophiles and drives their dissemination to deep trenches in the Pacific Ocean and (ii) the occurrence of elongated helices in the 16S rRNA genes increases with the extent of adaptation to growth at elevated pressure. These helix changes are believed to improve ribosome function under deep-sea conditions. PMID:17158629

  17. A multiphasic approach for the identification of endophytic bacterial in strawberry fruit and their potential for plant growth promotion.

    PubMed

    de Melo Pereira, Gilberto Vinícius; Magalhães, Karina Teixeira; Lorenzetii, Emi Rainildes; Souza, Thiago Pereira; Schwan, Rosane Freitas

    2012-02-01

    This study used a multiphasic approach, characterized by the simultaneous use of culture-dependent and culture-independent methods, to investigate endophytic bacterial communities in strawberry (Fragaria ananassa) fruit. A total of 92 bacterial endophytes were isolated and initially grouped by their repetitive extragenic palindromic (rep)-PCR banding pattern and biochemical features. Phylogenetic analysis of the 16S rRNA gene sequences of 45 representatives showed that the isolates belonged to the species Bacillus subtilis (eight isolates), Bacillus sp. (seven isolates), Enterobacter sp. (seven isolates), Enterobacter ludwigii (six isolates), Lactobacillus plantarum (six isolates), Pseudomonas sp. (five isolates), Pantoea punctata (three isolates), and Curtobacterium citreum (three isolates). Nucleic acids were extracted from the strawberry fruit and subjected to 16S rRNA gene directed polymerase chain reaction denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (16S rRNA PCR-DGGE). The species B. subtilis, Enterobacter sp., and Pseudomonas sp. were detected both by isolation and DGGE. The DGGE fingerprints of total bacterial DNA did not exhibit bands corresponding to several of the representative species isolated in the extinction dilution (L. plantarum, C. citreum, and P. punctata). In contrast, bands in the DGGE profile that were identified as relatives of Arthrobacter sp. and one uncultivable Erythrobacter sp. were not recovered by cultivation techniques. After isolation, the nitrogen fixation ability and the in vitro production of indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) equivalents and siderophores were evaluated. A high percentage of isolates were found to possess the ability to produce siderophores and IAA equivalents; however, only a few isolates belonging to the genera Pseudomonas and Enterobacter showed the ability to fix nitrogen. Plant growth promotion was evaluated under greenhouse conditions and revealed the ability of the Bacillus strains to enhance the number of leaves, shoot length, root dry weight, and shoot dry weight. The activity of the bacterial isolate identified as B. subtilis NA-108 exerted the greatest influence on strawberry growth and showed a 42.8% increase in number of leaves, 15.26% for high shoot, 43.5% increase in root dry weight, and a 77% increase in shoot dry weight when compared with untreated controls. PMID:21837472

  18. Bacterial Vaginosis

    MedlinePLUS

    ... 563-586. Related Content STDs & Pregnancy Fact Sheet Pregnancy and HIV, Viral Hepatitis, and STD Prevention Pelvic Inflammatory Disease ( ... Page Bacterial Vaginosis (BV) Chlamydia Gonorrhea Genital Herpes HIV/AIDS & STDs Human Papillomavirus ... STDs See Also Pregnancy Reproductive ...

  19. Effect of Elevated Tropospheric Ozone on the Structure of Bacterial Communities Inhabiting the Rhizosphere of Herbaceous Plants Native to Germany†

    PubMed Central

    Dohrmann, Anja B.; Tebbe, Christoph C.

    2005-01-01

    Current elevated concentrations of ozone in the atmosphere, as they are observed during summer seasons, can cause severe effects on plant vegetation. This study was initiated to analyze whether ozone-stressed plants also transfer signals below ground and thereby alter the bacterial community composition in their rhizospheres. Herbaceous plants, native to Germany, with tolerance (Anthoxanthum odoratum, Achillea millefolium, Poa pratensis, Rumex acetosa, and Veronica chamaedrys) and sensitivity (Matricaria chamomilla, Sonchus asper, and Tanacetum vulgare) to ozone, raised in the greenhouse, were exposed in open-top chambers to two different ozone regimes, i.e., “summer stress” and a normal ozone background. DNA of bacterial cells from the rhizospheres was directly extracted, and partial sequences of the 16S rRNA genes were PCR amplified with primers targeting the following phylogenetic groups: Bacteria, ?-Proteobacteria, Actinobacteria, and Pseudomonas, respectively. The diversity of the amplified products was analyzed by genetic profiling based on single-strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP). Neither the tolerant nor the sensitive plants, the latter with visible above-ground damage, showed ozone-induced differences in any of the SSCP profiles, with the single exception of Actinobacteria-targeted profiles from S. asper. To increase the stress, S. asper was germinated and raised in the continuous presence of an elevated level of ozone. SSCP profiles with Bacteria-specific primers combined with gene probe hybridizations indicated an ozone-related increase in a Xanthomonas-related 16S rRNA gene and a decrease in the respective gene from the plant plastids. The fact that only this latter unrealistic scenario caused a detectable effect demonstrated that ozone stress has a surprisingly small effect on the structural diversity of the bacterial community in rhizospheres. PMID:16332747

  20. Microbial community dynamics in Mediterranean nutrient-enriched seawater mesocosms: changes in the genetic diversity of bacterial populations

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Hendrik Schäfer; Laetitia Bernard; Claude Courties; Philippe Lebaron; Pierre Servais; Rüdiger Pukall; Erko Stackebrandt; Marc Troussellier; Teresa Guindulain; Josep Vives-Rego; Gerard Muyzer

    2001-01-01

    A mesocosm experiment was performed to study the influence of nutrients on activity and diversity of bacterial assemblages from the Mediterranean Sea. Changes in the diversity of the predominant bacterial populations were monitored by DGGE fingerprinting of PCR products derived from 16S rRNA encoding genes. Fluctuations in the diversity of the most active populations was inferred by performing the DGGE

  1. Pyrosequencing-based analysis of bacterial community and metabolites profiles in Korean traditional seafood fermentation: a flatfish-fermented seafood.

    PubMed

    Jung, Jaejoon; Lee, Se Hee; Jin, Hyun Mi; Jeon, Che Ok; Park, Woojun

    2014-01-01

    Bacterial community and metabolites were analyzed in a flatfish jeotgal, a Korean fermented seafood. Inverse relationship of pH and 16S rRNA gene copy number was identified during fermentation. Lactobacillus was the predominant bacterial genus. Increase of Firmicutes was a common characteristic shared by other fermented seafood. Fructose, glucose, and maltose were the major metabolites. PMID:25035997

  2. Assessment of microbial diversity in the river trout Salmo trutta fario L. intestinal tract identified by partial 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Vesta Skrodenyte-Arbaciauskiene; Aniolas Sruoga; Dalius Butkauskas

    2006-01-01

    The microbial diversity of the intestinal tract content of the river trout from two Lithuanian rivers has been investigated\\u000a by molecular methods: polymerase chain reaction amplification and sequencing of partial 16S rRNA genes. Predominant bacterial\\u000a populations detected in the river trout intestinal tract from the Skorblus River were Rahnella (21%), from the Žeimena River, Aeromonas (41.7%) and Plesiomonas (22.9%). Buttiauxella

  3. Small-Scale Vertical Distribution of Bacterial Biomass and Diversity in Biological Soil Crusts from Arid Lands in the Colorado Plateau

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Garcia-Pichel, F.; Johnson, S.L.; Youngkin, D.; Belnap, J.

    2003-01-01

    We characterized, at millimeter resolution, bacterial biomass, diversity, and vertical stratification of biological soil crusts in arid lands from the Colorado Plateau. Microscopic counts, extractable DNA, and plate counts of viable aerobic copiotrophs (VAC) revealed that the top centimeter of crusted soils contained atypically large bacterial populations, tenfold larger than those in uncrusted, deeper soils. The plate counts were not always consistent with more direct estimates of microbial biomass. Bacterial populations peaked at the immediate subsurface (1-2 mm) in light-appearing, young crusts, and at the surface (0-1 mm) in well-developed, dark crusts, which corresponds to the location of cyanobacterial populations. Bacterial abundance decreased with depth below these horizons. Spatially resolved DGGE fingerprints of Bacterial 16S rRNA genes demonstrated the presence of highly diverse natural communities, but we could detect neither trends with depth in bacterial richness or diversity, nor a difference in diversity indices between crust types. Fingerprints, however, revealed the presence of marked stratification in the structure of the microbial communities, probably a result of vertical gradients in physicochemical parameters. Sequencing and phylogenetic analyses indicated that most of the naturally occurring bacteria are novel types, with low sequence similarity (83-93%) to those available in public databases. DGGE analyses of the VAC populations indicated communities of lower diversity, with most types having sequences more than 94% similar to those in public databases. Our study indicates that soil crusts represent small-scale mantles of fertility in arid ecosystems, harboring vertically structured, little-known bacterial populations that are not well represented by standard cultivation methods.

  4. Selective phylogenetic analysis targeted at 16S rRNA genes of thermophiles and hyperthermophiles in deep-subsurface geothermal environments.

    PubMed

    Kimura, Hiroyuki; Sugihara, Maki; Kato, Kenji; Hanada, Satoshi

    2006-01-01

    Deep-subsurface samples obtained by deep drilling are likely to be contaminated with mesophilic microorganisms in the drilling fluid, and this could affect determination of the community structure of the geothermal microflora using 16S rRNA gene clone library analysis. To eliminate possible contamination by PCR-amplified 16S rRNA genes from mesophiles, a combined thermal denaturation and enzyme digestion method, based on a strong correlation between the G+C content of the 16S rRNA gene and the optimum growth temperatures of most known prokaryotic cultures, was used prior to clone library construction. To validate this technique, hot spring fluid (76 degrees C) and river water (14 degrees C) were used to mimic a deep-subsurface sample contaminated with drilling fluid. After DNA extraction and PCR amplification of the 16S rRNA genes from individual samples separately, the amplified products from river water were observed to be denatured at 82 degrees C and completely digested by exonuclease I (Exo I), while the amplified products from hot spring fluid remained intact after denaturation at 84 degrees C and enzyme digestion with Exo I. DNAs extracted from the two samples were mixed and used as a template for amplification of the 16S rRNA genes. The amplified rRNA genes were denatured at 84 degrees C and digested with Exo I before clone library construction. The results indicated that the 16S rRNA gene sequences from the river water were almost completely eliminated, whereas those from the hot spring fluid remained. PMID:16391020

  5. Culture-independent approach of the bacterial bioaerosol diversity in the standard swine confinement buildings, and assessment of the seasonal effect.

    PubMed

    Nehme, Benjamin; Létourneau, Valérie; Forster, Robert J; Veillette, Marc; Duchaine, Caroline

    2008-03-01

    The bacterial bioaerosol community of eight swine confinement buildings (SCB) was monitored during two visits in the winter, and one during the summer. To our knowledge, culture-independent approaches and molecular biology tools such as biomass quantification and biodiversity analyses have never been applied to swine building bioaerosol analyses. Total DNA of each sample was extracted and analysed by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction, denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) and phylogenetic analysis using primers targeting the bacterial 16S rRNA gene. Even though the total bacterial concentration was higher in winter than in summer, the total bacterial concentration for both seasons was 100 to1000 times higher than the total cultural bacteria. The concentration of bioaerosol was influenced by the temperature indoors, which was regulated with an electronic fan system driving warm air and particles outside of the SCB. Comparison of the DGGE profiles showed the same biodiversity in each SCB during both seasons. The phylogenetic analysis revealed a large number of sequences (93.8%) related to Gram-positive anaerobic bacteria, such as Clostridia, and dominated by the Clostridia cluster I (C. disporicum) and the Clostridia cluster XI (C. glycolycum). The bioaerosol diversity also contained also a low proportion of Bacteroidetes and Lactobacillales-Streptococcales sequences. Analyses of the global community and phylotype diversity showed that the main source of bioaerosols could come from the pig manure slurry. PMID:18237302

  6. The bacterial community associated with the leech Myzobdella lugubris Leidy 1851 (Hirudinea: Piscicolidae) from Lake Erie, Michigan, USA.

    PubMed

    Schulz, C; Faisal, M

    2010-06-01

    Leeches are widespread in the Great Lakes Basin, yet their potential to harbor disease-causing agents has not been investigated. The purpose of this study was to identify the bacterial community of the commonly occurring leech, Myzobdella lugubris, within the Lake Erie Watershed. Leech samples were collected from the pectoral fins of channel catfish, Ictalurus punctatus, and freshwater drum, Aplodinotus grunniens, from Lake Erie in commercial trap nets and pooled into two samples based on host attachment. Bacteria from within the viscera of M. lugubris were identified by sequencing their 16S rRNA (rDNA) gene of amplified community bacterial DNA extracted from pooled leech homogenate samples and were checked for similarity in two public databases: the Ribosomal Database Project and BLAST. Bacteria belonging to the phylum Bacteroidetes, beta-proteobacteria, Verrucomicrobia, and unclassified Bacteria were present in the leech samples. A large number of bacteria found within leeches attached to channel catfish consisted of sequences that could not be classified beyond the Domain Bacteria. However, many of these sequences were homologous (< 45%) to the phylum Bacteroidetes. One of the five genera detected in the leech homogenates was Flavobacterium psychrophilum, a serious fish pathogen that causes Bacterial Cold Water Disease. While the occurrence of genera varies, bacteria associated with the two fish species were similar. PMID:20597437

  7. Bacterial Origin and Community Composition in the Barley Phytosphere as a Function of Habitat and Presowing Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Normander, Bo; Prosser, Jim I.

    2000-01-01

    An understanding of the factors influencing colonization of the rhizosphere is essential for improved establishment of biocontrol agents. The aim of this study was to determine the origin and composition of bacterial communities in the developing barley (Hordeum vulgare) phytosphere, using denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) analysis of 16S rRNA genes amplified from extracted DNA. Discrete community compositions were identified in the endorhizosphere, rhizoplane, and rhizosphere soil of plants grown in an agricultural soil for up to 36 days. Cluster analysis revealed that DGGE profiles of the rhizoplane more closely resembled those in the soil than the profiles found in the root tissue or on the seed, suggesting that rhizoplane bacteria primarily originated from the surrounding soil. No change in bacterial community composition was observed in relation to plant age. Pregermination of the seeds for up to 6 days improved the survival of seed-associated bacteria on roots grown in soil, but only in the upper, nongrowing part of the rhizoplane. The potential occurrence of skewed PCR amplification was examined, and only minor cases of PCR bias for mixtures of two different DNA samples were observed, even when one of the samples contained plant DNA. The results demonstrate the application of culture-independent, molecular techniques in assessment of rhizosphere bacterial populations and the importance of the indigenous soil population in colonization of the rhizosphere. PMID:11010885

  8. A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial to assess the bacterial anti-adhesion effects of cranberry extract beverages.

    PubMed

    Kaspar, Kerrie L; Howell, Amy B; Khoo, Christina

    2015-04-01

    In this study, we examined the ex vivo urinary anti-adhesion activity of low-calorie cranberry extract beverages in both a pilot study (n = 10) and a randomized, double-blind, placebo controlled clinical trial (n = 59). In the pilot study, subjects consumed a cranberry extract beverage (CEB) or a cranberry extract and juice beverage (CEJB), compared to placebo. Both cranberry beverages utilized a standardized cranberry extract powder at a level equivalent to low-calorie cranberry juice cocktail (LCJC) on a PAC content basis. Clean-catch urine samples collected at baseline and post intervention were tested for anti-adhesion activity utilizing a mannose-resistant human red blood cell hemagglutination assay specific for P-fimbriated E. coli. Results from the pilot study indicated that ex vivo anti-adhesion activity for both cranberry treatments were higher (p < 0.05) than placebo. In the clinical trial, we compared CEJB to LCJC and a placebo beverage. Post-consumption urine from both cranberry treatment groups showed significantly higher (p < 0.05) anti-adhesion activity compared to placebo. There were no differences observed in anti-adhesion activity between CJEB and LCJC, indicating similar bioactivity. Therefore, acute beverage consumption of cranberry extract and/or juice provides ex vivo anti-adhesion activity, which may help to improve urinary tract health. PMID:25723356

  9. Pyrosequencing-derived bacterial, archaeal, and fungal diversity of spacecraft hardware destined for Mars.

    PubMed

    La Duc, Myron T; Vaishampayan, Parag; Nilsson, Henrik R; Torok, Tamas; Venkateswaran, Kasthuri

    2012-08-01

    Spacecraft hardware and assembly cleanroom surfaces (233 m(2) in total) were sampled, total genomic DNA was extracted, hypervariable regions of the 16S rRNA gene (bacteria and archaea) and ribosomal internal transcribed spacer (ITS) region (fungi) were subjected to 454 tag-encoded pyrosequencing PCR amplification, and 203,852 resulting high-quality sequences were analyzed. Bioinformatic analyses revealed correlations between operational taxonomic unit (OTU) abundance and certain sample characteristics, such as source (cleanroom floor, ground support equipment [GSE], or spacecraft hardware), cleaning regimen applied, and location about the facility or spacecraft. National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) cleanroom floor and GSE surfaces gave rise to a larger number of diverse bacterial communities (619 OTU; 20 m(2)) than colocated spacecraft hardware (187 OTU; 162 m(2)). In contrast to the results of bacterial pyrosequencing, where at least some sequences were generated from each of the 31 sample sets examined, only 13 and 18 of these sample sets gave rise to archaeal and fungal sequences, respectively. As was the case for bacteria, the abundance of fungal OTU in the GSE surface samples dramatically diminished (9× less) once cleaning protocols had been applied. The presence of OTU representative of actinobacteria, deinococci, acidobacteria, firmicutes, and proteobacteria on spacecraft surfaces suggests that certain bacterial lineages persist even following rigorous quality control and cleaning practices. The majority of bacterial OTU observed as being recurrent belonged to actinobacteria and alphaproteobacteria, supporting the hypothesis that the measures of cleanliness exerted in spacecraft assembly cleanrooms (SAC) inadvertently select for the organisms which are the most fit to survive long journeys in space. PMID:22729532

  10. Pyrosequencing-Derived Bacterial, Archaeal, and Fungal Diversity of Spacecraft Hardware Destined for Mars

    PubMed Central

    Vaishampayan, Parag; Nilsson, Henrik R.; Torok, Tamas; Venkateswaran, Kasthuri

    2012-01-01

    Spacecraft hardware and assembly cleanroom surfaces (233 m2 in total) were sampled, total genomic DNA was extracted, hypervariable regions of the 16S rRNA gene (bacteria and archaea) and ribosomal internal transcribed spacer (ITS) region (fungi) were subjected to 454 tag-encoded pyrosequencing PCR amplification, and 203,852 resulting high-quality sequences were analyzed. Bioinformatic analyses revealed correlations between operational taxonomic unit (OTU) abundance and certain sample characteristics, such as source (cleanroom floor, ground support equipment [GSE], or spacecraft hardware), cleaning regimen applied, and location about the facility or spacecraft. National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) cleanroom floor and GSE surfaces gave rise to a larger number of diverse bacterial communities (619 OTU; 20 m2) than colocated spacecraft hardware (187 OTU; 162 m2). In contrast to the results of bacterial pyrosequencing, where at least some sequences were generated from each of the 31 sample sets examined, only 13 and 18 of these sample sets gave rise to archaeal and fungal sequences, respectively. As was the case for bacteria, the abundance of fungal OTU in the GSE surface samples dramatically diminished (9× less) once cleaning protocols had been applied. The presence of OTU representative of actinobacteria, deinococci, acidobacteria, firmicutes, and proteobacteria on spacecraft surfaces suggests that certain bacterial lineages persist even following rigorous quality control and cleaning practices. The majority of bacterial OTU observed as being recurrent belonged to actinobacteria and alphaproteobacteria, supporting the hypothesis that the measures of cleanliness exerted in spacecraft assembly cleanrooms (SAC) inadvertently select for the organisms which are the most fit to survive long journeys in space. PMID:22729532

  11. Extract from Rumex acetosa L. for Prophylaxis of Periodontitis: Inhibition of Bacterial In Vitro Adhesion and of Gingipains of Porphyromonas gingivalis by Epicatechin-3-O-(4??8)-Epicatechin-3-O-Gallate (Procyanidin-B2-Di-Gallate)

    PubMed Central

    Schmuch, Jana; Beckert, Sabine; Brandt, Simone; Löhr, Gesine; Hermann, Fabian; Schmidt, Thomas J.; Beikler, Thomas; Hensel, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    Background The aerial parts of Rumex acetosa L. have been used in traditional European medicine for inflammatory diseases of the mouth epithelial tissue. The following study aimed to investigate the influence of a proanthocyanidin-enriched extract from R. acetosa extract against the adhesion of Porphyromonas gingivalis (P. gingivalis), a pathogen strongly involved in chronic and aggressive periodontitis. A further goal was to define the bioactive lead structures responsible for a potential antiadhesive activity and to characterize the underlying molecular mechanisms of the antiadhesive effects. Methodology An extract of R. acetosa (RA1) with a defined mixture of flavan-3-ols, oligomeric proanthocyanidins and flavonoids, was used. Its impact on P. gingivalis adhesion to KB cells was studied by flow cytometry, confocal laser scanning microscopy and in situ adhesion assay using murine buccal tissue. RA1 and its compounds 1 to 15 were further investigated for additional effects on gingipain activity, hemagglutination and gene expression by RT-PCR. Principal Findings RA1 (5 to 15 ?g/mL) reduced P. gingivalis adhesion in a dose-dependent manner to about 90%. Galloylated proanthocyanidins were confirmed to be responsible for this antiadhesive effect with epicatechin-3-O-gallate-(4?,8)-epicatechin-3’-O-gallate (syn. procyanidin B2-di-gallate) being the lead compound. Ungalloylated flavan-3-ols and oligomeric proanthocyanidins were inactive. RA1 and the galloylated proanthocyanidins strongly interact with the bacterial virulence factor Arg-gingipain, while the corresponding Lys-gingipain was hardly influenced. RA1 inhibited also hemagglutination. In silico docking studies indicated that epicatechin-3-O-gallate-(4?,8)-epicatechin-3’-O-gallate interacts with the active side of Arg-gingipain and hemaglutinin from P. gingivalis; the galloylation of the molecule seems to be responsible for fixation of the ligand to the protein. In conclusion, the proanthocyanidin-enriched extract RA1 and its main active constituent procyanidin B2-di-gallate protect cells from P. gingivalis infection by inhibiting bacterial adhesion to the host cell. RA1 and procyanidin B2-di-gallate appear to be promising candidates for future cytoprotective preparations for oral mouth care products. PMID:25803708

  12. Atmospheric cloud water contains a diverse bacterial community

    SciTech Connect

    Kourtev, P. S.; Hill, Kimberly A.; Shepson, Paul B.; Konopka, Allan

    2011-06-15

    Atmospheric cloud water contains an active microbial community which can impact climate, human health and ecosystem processes in terrestrial and aquatic systems. Most studies on the composition of microbial communities in clouds have been performed with orographic clouds that are typically in direct contact with the ground. We collected water samples from cumulus clouds above the upper U.S. Midwest. The cloud water was analyzed for the diversity of bacterial phylotypes by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) and sequencing of 16S rRNA gene amplicons. DGGE analyses of bacterial communities detected 17e21 bands per sample. Sequencing confirmed the presence of a diverse bacterial community; sequences from seven bacterial phyla were retrieved. Cloud water bacterial communities appeared to be dominated by members of the cyanobacteria, proteobacteria, actinobacteria and firmicutes.

  13. Phylogenetic analysis of the bacterial communities in marine sediments.

    PubMed Central

    Gray, J P; Herwig, R P

    1996-01-01

    For the phylogenetic analysis of microbial communities present in environmental samples microbial DNA can be extracted from the sample, 16S rDNA can be amplified with suitable primers and the PCR, and clonal libraries can be constructed. We report a protocol that can be used for efficient cell lysis and recovery of DNA from marine sediments. Key steps in this procedure include the use of a bead mill homogenizer for matrix disruption and uniform cell lysis and then purification of the released DNA by agarose gel electrophoresis. For sediments collected from two sites in Puget Sound, over 96% of the cells present were lysed. Our method yields high-molecular-weight DNA that is suitable for molecular studies, including amplification of 16S rRNA genes. The DNA yield was 47 micrograms per g (dry weight) for sediments collected from creosote-contaminated Eagle Harbor, Wash. Primers were selected for the PCR amplification of (eu)bacterial 16S rDNA that contained linkers with unique 8-base restriction sites for directional cloning. Examination of 22 16S rDNA clones showed that the surficial sediments in Eagle Harbor contained a phylogenetically diverse population of organisms from the Bacteria domain (G. J. Olsen, C. R. Woese, and R. Overbeek, J. Bacteriol. 176:1-6, 1994) with members of six major lineages represented: alpha, delta, and gamma Proteobacteria; the gram-positive high G+C content subdivision; clostridia and related organisms; and planctomyces and related organisms. None of the clones were identical to any representatives in the Ribosomal Database Project small subunit RNA database. The analysis of clonal representives in the first report using molecular techniques to determine the phylogenetic composition of the (eu)bacterial community present in coastal marine sediments. PMID:8899989

  14. Marine mesocosm bacterial colonisation of volcanic ash

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Witt, Verena; Cimarelli, Corrado; Ayris, Paul; Kueppers, Ulrich; Erpenbeck, Dirk; Dingwell, Donald; Woerheide, Gert

    2015-04-01

    Volcanic eruptions regularly eject large quantities of ash particles into the atmosphere, which can be deposited via fallout into oceanic environments. Such fallout has the potential to alter pH, light and nutrient availability at local scales. Shallow-water coral reef ecosystems - "rainforests of the sea" - are highly sensitive to disturbances, such as ocean acidification, sedimentation and eutrophication. Therefore, wind-delivered volcanic ash may lead to burial and mortality of such reefs. Coral reef ecosystem resilience may depend on pioneer bacterial colonisation of the ash layer, supporting subsequent establishment of the micro- and ultimately the macro-community. However, which bacteria are involved in pioneer colonisation remain unknown. We hypothesize that physico-chemical properties (i.e., morphology, mineralogy) of the ash may dictate bacterial colonisation. The effect of substrate properties on bacterial colonisation was tested by exposing five substrates: i) quartz sand ii) crystalline ash (Sakurajima, Japan) iii) volcanic glass iv) carbonate reef sand and v) calcite sand of similar grain size, in controlled marine coral reef aquaria under low light conditions for six months. Bacterial communities were screened every month by Automated Ribosomal Intergenic Spacer Analysis of the 16S-23S rRNA Internal Transcribed Spacer region. Multivariate statistics revealed discrete groupings of bacterial communities on substrates of volcanic origin (ash and glass) and reef origin (three sands). Analysis of Similarity supported significantly different communities associated with all substrates (p=0.0001), only quartz did not differ from both carbonate and calcite sands. The ash substrate exhibited the most diverse bacterial community with the most substrate-specific bacterial operational taxonomic units. Our findings suggest that bacterial diversity and community composition during colonisation of volcanic ash in a coral reef-like environment is controlled by the physico-chemical composition of the substrate. Knowledge on pioneer bacterial colonisation may increase our understanding on the resilience of coral reefs to natural "catastrophes", such as volcanic ash fallout.

  15. RNA-stable-isotope probing shows utilization of carbon from inulin by specific bacterial populations in the rat large bowel.

    PubMed

    Tannock, Gerald W; Lawley, Blair; Munro, Karen; Sims, Ian M; Lee, Julian; Butts, Christine A; Roy, Nicole

    2014-04-01

    Knowledge of the trophisms that underpin bowel microbiota composition is required in order to understand its complex phylogeny and function. Stable-isotope ((13)C)-labeled inulin was added to the diet of rats on a single occasion in order to detect utilization of inulin-derived substrates by particular members of the cecal microbiota. Cecal digesta from Fibruline-inulin-fed rats was collected prior to (0 h) and at 6, 12, 18 and 24 h following provision of the [(13)C]inulin diet. RNA was extracted from these cecal specimens and fractionated in isopycnic buoyant density gradients in order to detect (13)C-labeled nucleic acid originating in bacterial cells that had metabolized the labeled dietary constituent. RNA extracted from specimens collected after provision of the labeled diet was more dense than 0-h RNA. Sequencing of 16S rRNA genes amplified from cDNA obtained from these fractions showed that Bacteroides uniformis, Blautia glucerasea, Clostridium indolis, and Bifidobacterium animalis were the main users of the (13)C-labeled substrate. Culture-based studies of strains of these bacterial species enabled trophisms associated with inulin and its hydrolysis products to be identified. B. uniformis utilized Fibruline-inulin for growth, whereas the other species used fructo-oligosaccharide and monosaccharides. Thus, RNA-stable-isotope probing (RNA-SIP) provided new information about the use of carbon from inulin in microbiota metabolism. PMID:24487527

  16. RNA–Stable-Isotope Probing Shows Utilization of Carbon from Inulin by Specific Bacterial Populations in the Rat Large Bowel

    PubMed Central

    Lawley, Blair; Munro, Karen; Sims, Ian M.; Lee, Julian; Butts, Christine A.; Roy, Nicole

    2014-01-01

    Knowledge of the trophisms that underpin bowel microbiota composition is required in order to understand its complex phylogeny and function. Stable-isotope (13C)-labeled inulin was added to the diet of rats on a single occasion in order to detect utilization of inulin-derived substrates by particular members of the cecal microbiota. Cecal digesta from Fibruline-inulin-fed rats was collected prior to (0 h) and at 6, 12, 18 and 24 h following provision of the [13C]inulin diet. RNA was extracted from these cecal specimens and fractionated in isopycnic buoyant density gradients in order to detect 13C-labeled nucleic acid originating in bacterial cells that had metabolized the labeled dietary constituent. RNA extracted from specimens collected after provision of the labeled diet was more dense than 0-h RNA. Sequencing of 16S rRNA genes amplified from cDNA obtained from these fractions showed that Bacteroides uniformis, Blautia glucerasea, Clostridium indolis, and Bifidobacterium animalis were the main users of the 13C-labeled substrate. Culture-based studies of strains of these bacterial species enabled trophisms associated with inulin and its hydrolysis products to be identified. B. uniformis utilized Fibruline-inulin for growth, whereas the other species used fructo-oligosaccharide and monosaccharides. Thus, RNA–stable-isotope probing (RNA-SIP) provided new information about the use of carbon from inulin in microbiota metabolism. PMID:24487527

  17. Temporal dynamics of fibrolytic and methanogenic rumen microorganisms during in situ incubation of switchgrass determined by 16S rRNA gene profiling.

    PubMed

    Piao, Hailan; Lachman, Medora; Malfatti, Stephanie; Sczyrba, Alexander; Knierim, Bernhard; Auer, Manfred; Tringe, Susannah G; Mackie, Roderick I; Yeoman, Carl J; Hess, Matthias

    2014-01-01

    The rumen microbial ecosystem is known for its biomass-degrading and methane-producing phenotype. Fermentation of recalcitrant plant material, comprised of a multitude of interwoven fibers, necessitates the synergistic activity of diverse microbial taxonomic groups that inhabit the anaerobic rumen ecosystem. Although interspecies hydrogen (H2) transfer, a process during which bacterially generated H2 is transferred to methanogenic Archaea, has obtained significant attention over the last decades, the temporal variation of the different taxa involved in in situ biomass-degradation, H2 transfer and the methanogenesis process remains to be established. Here we investigated the temporal succession of microbial taxa and its effect on fiber composition during rumen incubation using 16S rRNA amplicon sequencing. Switchgrass filled nylon bags were placed in the rumen of a cannulated cow and collected at nine time points for DNA extraction and 16S pyrotag profiling. The microbial community colonizing the air-dried and non-incubated (0 h) switchgrass was dominated by members of the Bacilli (recruiting 63% of the pyrotag reads). During in situ incubation of the switchgrass, two major shifts in the community composition were observed: Bacilli were replaced within 30 min by members belonging to the Bacteroidia and Clostridia, which recruited 34 and 25% of the 16S rRNA reads generated, respectively. A second significant shift was observed after 16 h of rumen incubation, when members of the Spirochaetes and Fibrobacteria classes became more abundant in the fiber-adherent community. During the first 30 min of rumen incubation ~13% of the switchgrass dry matter was degraded, whereas little biomass degradation appeared to have occurred between 30 min and 4 h after the switchgrass was placed in the rumen. Interestingly, methanogenic members of the Euryarchaeota (i.e., Methanobacteria) increased up to 3-fold during this period of reduced biomass-degradation, with peak abundance just before rates of dry matter degradation increased again. We hypothesize that during this period microbial-mediated fibrolysis was temporarily inhibited until H2 was metabolized into CH4 by methanogens. Collectively, our results demonstrate the importance of inter-species interactions for the biomass-degrading and methane-producing phenotype of the rumen microbiome-both microbially facilitated processes with global significance. PMID:25101058

  18. Ribosomal protein biomarkers provide root nodule bacterial identification by MALDI-TOF MS.

    PubMed

    Ziegler, Dominik; Pothier, Joël F; Ardley, Julie; Fossou, Romain Kouakou; Pflüger, Valentin; de Meyer, Sofie; Vogel, Guido; Tonolla, Mauro; Howieson, John; Reeve, Wayne; Perret, Xavier

    2015-07-01

    Accurate identification of soil bacteria that form nitrogen-fixing associations with legume crops is challenging given the phylogenetic diversity of root nodule bacteria (RNB). The labor-intensive and time-consuming 16S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) sequencing and/or multilocus sequence analysis (MLSA) of conserved genes so far remain the favored molecular tools to characterize symbiotic bacteria. With the development of mass spectrometry (MS) as an alternative method to rapidly identify bacterial isolates, we recently showed that matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization (MALDI) time-of-flight (TOF) can accurately characterize RNB found inside plant nodules or grown in cultures. Here, we report on the development of a MALDI-TOF RNB-specific spectral database built on whole cell MS fingerprints of 116 strains representing the major rhizobial genera. In addition to this RNB-specific module, which was successfully tested on unknown field isolates, a subset of 13 ribosomal proteins extracted from genome data was found to be sufficient for the reliable identification of nodule isolates to rhizobial species as shown in the putatively ascribed ribosomal protein masses (PARPM) database. These results reveal that data gathered from genome sequences can be used to expand spectral libraries to aid the accurate identification of bacterial species by MALDI-TOF MS. PMID:25776061

  19. Wide Distribution and Diversity of Members of the Bacterial Kingdom Acidobacterium in the Environment

    PubMed Central

    Barns, Susan M.; Takala, Shannon L.; Kuske, Cheryl R.

    1999-01-01

    To assess the distribution and diversity of members of the recently identified bacterial kingdom Acidobacterium, members of this kingdom present in 43 environmental samples were surveyed by PCR amplification. A primer designed to amplify rRNA gene sequences (ribosomal DNAs [rDNAs]) from most known members of the kingdom was used to interrogate bulk DNA extracted from the samples. Positive PCR results were obtained with all temperate soil and sediment samples tested, as well as some hot spring samples, indicating that members of this kingdom are very widespread in terrestrial environments. PCR primers specific for four phylogenetic subgroups within the kingdom were used in similar surveys. All four subgroups were detected in most neutral soils and some sediments, while only two of the groups were seen in most low-pH environments. The combined use of these primers allowed identification of a novel lineage within the kingdom in a hot spring environment. Phylogenetic analysis of rDNA sequences from our survey and the literature outlines at least six major subgroups within the kingdom. Taken together, these data suggest that members of the Acidobacterium kingdom are as genetically and metabolically diverse, environmentally widespread and perhaps as ecologically important as the well-known Proteobacteria and gram-positive bacterial kingdoms. PMID:10103274

  20. Bacterial composition of soils of the Lake Wellman area, Darwin Mountains, Antarctica.

    PubMed

    Aislabie, Jackie M; Lau, Anna; Dsouza, Melissa; Shepherd, Charis; Rhodes, Phillippa; Turner, Susan J

    2013-09-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the bacterial composition of high latitude soils from the Darwin-Hatherton glacier region of Antarctica. Four soil pits on each of four glacial drift sheets were sampled for chemical and microbial analyses. The four drifts-Hatherton, Britannia, Danum, and Isca-ranged, respectively, from early Holocene (10 ky) to mid-Quaternary (ca 900 ky). Numbers of culturable bacteria were low, with highest levels detected in soils from the younger Hatherton drift. DNA was extracted and 16S rRNA gene clone libraries prepared from samples below the desert pavement for each of the four drift sheets. Between 31 and 262 clones were analysed from each of the Hatherton, Britannia, and Danum drifts. Bacterial sequences were dominated by members of the phyla Deinococcus-Thermus, Actinobacteria, and Bacteroidetes. Culturable bacteria, including some that clustered with soil clones (e.g., members of the genera Arthrobacter, Adhaeribacter, and Pontibacter), belonged to Actinobacteria and Bacteroidetes. The isolated bacteria are ideal model organisms for genomic and phenotypic investigations of those attributes that allow bacteria to survive and/or grow in Antarctic soils because they have close relatives that are not tolerant of these conditions. PMID:23820800

  1. Pyrosequencing 16S rRNA genes of bacteria associated with wild tiger mosquito Aedes albopictus: a pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Minard, Guillaume; Tran, Florence-Hélène; Dubost, Audrey; Tran-Van, Van; Mavingui, Patrick; Valiente Moro, Claire

    2014-01-01

    The Asian tiger mosquito Aedes (Stegomya) albopictus is an invasive species that has spread across the world in the last two decades, showing a great capacity to adapt to contrasting climates and environments. While demonstrated in many insects, the contribution of bacterial symbionts in Aedes ecology is a challenging aspect that needs to be investigated. Also some bacterial species have already been identified in Ae. albopictus using classical methods, but a more accurate survey of mosquito-associated bacterial diversity is needed to decipher the potential biological functions of bacterial symbionts in mediating or constraining insect adaptation. We surveyed the bacteria associated with field populations of Ae. albopictus from Madagascar by pyrosequencing 16S rRNA gene amplicons. Different aspects of amplicon preparation and sequencing depth were tested to optimize the breadth of bacterial diversity identified. The results revealed that all mosquitoes collected from different sites have a bacterial microbiota dominated by a single taxon, Wolbachia pipientis, which accounted for about 99% of all 92,615 sequences obtained. As Ae. albopictus is known to harbor two Wolbachia strains (wAlbA and wAlbB), a quantitative PCR was used to estimate the relative densities, (i.e., the bacteria-to-host gene ratios) of each strains in individual mosquitoes. Relative densities were between 6.25 × 100.01 and 5.47 × 100.1 for wAlbA and between 2.03 × 100.1 and 1.4 × 101 for wAlbB. Apart from Wolbachia, a total of 31 bacterial taxa were identified at the genus level using different method variations. Diversity index values were low and probably underestimated the true diversity due to the high abundance of Wolbachia sequences vastly outnumbering sequences from other taxa. Further studies should implement alternative strategies to specifically discard from analysis any sequences from Wolbachia, the dominant endosymbiotic bacterium in Ae. albopictus from this area. PMID:24860790

  2. Bacterial lipases

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Onno Misset; Margreet van Heuvel; Charles Colson; Bauke W. Dijkstra; Stéphane Ransac; Karl-Erich Jaeger

    1994-01-01

    Many different bacterial species produce lipases which hydrolyze esters of glycerol with preferably long-chain fatty acids. They act at the interface generated by a hydrophobic lipid substrate in a hydrophilic aqueous medium. A characteristic property of lipases is called interfacial activation, meaning a sharp increase in lipase activity observed when the substrate starts to form an emulsion, thereby presenting to

  3. [Bacterial Keratitis].

    PubMed

    Rachwalik, D; Pleyer, U

    2015-06-01

    Worldwide inflammatory corneal diseases are considered to be one of the leading causes of monocular blindness. Bacterial infectious are still predominant and are found in 80?% of patients with ulcerative keratitis. In recent years, both changes in risk conditions and changes in the bacterial spectrum can be observed. Contact lenses and refractive surgery are factors that have increased in importance according to some studies. Microorganisms especially Pseudomonas spp. and atypical mycobacteria are detectable in these patients. In contrast, the bacterial keratitis is observed less frequently after trauma. The broad, often unsighted use of highly effective antimicrobial agents, especially of fluoroquinolones is assumed to be a factor in the transformation of the microbial spectrum. Due to the frequent course of keratitis and a targeted, effective therapy to initiate a pathogen is desirable. The possibilities of diagnostics have been expanded in recent years by molecular biological techniques, but cannot replace established methods. The aim of this paper is to provide a positioning on current aspects of bacterial keratitis. PMID:26084962

  4. Lessons from an evolving rRNA: 16S and 23S rRNA structures from a comparative perspective

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gutell, R. R.; Larsen, N.; Woese, C. R.

    1994-01-01

    The 16S and 23S rRNA higher-order structures inferred from comparative analysis are now quite refined. The models presented here differ from their immediate predecessors only in minor detail. Thus, it is safe to assert that all of the standard secondary-structure elements in (prokaryotic) rRNAs have been identified, with approximately 90% of the individual base pairs in each molecule having independent comparative support, and that at least some of the tertiary interactions have been revealed. It is interesting to compare the rRNAs in this respect with tRNA, whose higher-order structure is known in detail from its crystal structure (36) (Table 2). It can be seen that rRNAs have as great a fraction of their sequence in established secondary-structure elements as does tRNA. However, the fact that the former show a much lower fraction of identified tertiary interactions and a greater fraction of unpaired nucleotides than the latter implies that many of the rRNA tertiary interactions remain to be located. (Alternatively, the ribosome might involve protein-rRNA rather than intramolecular rRNA interactions to stabilize three-dimensional structure.) Experimental studies on rRNA are consistent to a first approximation with the structures proposed here, confirming the basic assumption of comparative analysis, i.e., that bases whose compositions strictly covary are physically interacting. In the exhaustive study of Moazed et al. (45) on protection of the bases in the small-subunit rRNA against chemical modification, the vast majority of bases inferred to pair by covariation are found to be protected from chemical modification, both in isolated small-subunit rRNA and in the 30S subunit. The majority of the tertiary interactions are reflected in the chemical protection data as well (45). On the other hand, many of the bases not shown as paired in Fig. 1 are accessible to chemical attack (45). However, in this case a sizeable fraction of them are also protected against chemical modification (in the isolated rRNA), which suggests that considerable higher-order structure remains to be found (although all of it may not involve base-base interactions and so may not be detectable by comparative analysis). The agreement between the higher-order structure of the small-subunit rRNA and protection against chemical modification is not perfect, however; some bases shown to covary canonically are accessible to chemical modification (45).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 400 WORDS).

  5. 23S RRNA OPERON DIFFERENCES IN ISOLATES OF CAMPYLOBACTER SPP.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Lateral transfer of genes appears to occur between Campylobacter species, but the extent of that transfer is not fully appreciated. The presence or absence of an intervening sequence (IVS) in the 23S rRNA has been noted in Campylobacter coli and Campylobacter jejuni. As part of a survey, we used P...

  6. Salinity and Bacterial Diversity: To What Extent Does the Concentration of Salt Affect the Bacterial Community in a Saline Soil?

    PubMed Central

    Canfora, Loredana; Bacci, Giovanni; Pinzari, Flavia; Lo Papa, Giuseppe; Dazzi, Carmelo; Benedetti, Anna

    2014-01-01

    In this study, the evaluation of soil characteristics was coupled with a pyrosequencing analysis of the V2-V3 16S rRNA gene region in order to investigate the bacterial community structure and diversity in the A horizon of a natural saline soil located in Sicily (Italy). The main aim of the research was to assess the organisation and diversity of microbial taxa using a spatial scale that revealed physical and chemical heterogeneity of the habitat under investigation. The results provided information on the type of distribution of different bacterial groups as a function of spatial gradients of soil salinity and pH. The analysis of bacterial 16S rRNA showed differences in bacterial composition and diversity due to a variable salt concentration in the soil. The bacterial community showed a statistically significant spatial variability. Some bacterial phyla appeared spread in the whole area, whatever the salinity gradient. It emerged therefore that a patchy saline soil can not contain just a single microbial community selected to withstand extreme osmotic phenomena, but many communities that can be variously correlated to one or more environmental parameters. Sequences have been deposited to the SRA database and can be accessed on ID Project PRJNA241061. PMID:25188357

  7. Quantification of Hyphomicrobium Populations in Activated Sludge from an Industrial Wastewater Treatment System as Determined by 16S rRNA Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Layton, A. C.; Karanth, P. N.; Lajoie, C. A.; Meyers, A. J.; Gregory, I. R.; Stapleton, R. D.; Taylor, D. E.; Sayler, G. S.

    2000-01-01

    The bacterial community structure of the activated sludge from a 25 million-gal-per-day industrial wastewater treatment plant was investigated using rRNA analysis. 16S ribosomal DNA (rDNA) libraries were created from three sludge samples taken on different dates. Partial rRNA gene sequences were obtained for 46 rDNA clones, and nearly complete 16S rRNA sequences were obtained for 18 clones. Seventeen of these clones were members of the beta subdivision, and their sequences showed high homology to sequences of known bacterial species as well as published 16S rDNA sequences from other activated sludge sources. Sixteen clones belonged to the alpha subdivision, 7 of which showed similarity to Hyphomicrobium species. This cluster was chosen for further studies due to earlier work on Hyphomicrobium sp. strain M3 isolated from this treatment plant. A nearly full-length 16S rDNA sequence was obtained from Hyphomicrobium sp. strain M3. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that Hyphomicrobium sp. strain M3 was 99% similar to Hyphomicrobium denitrificans DSM 1869T in Hyphomicrobium cluster II. Three of the cloned sequences from the activated sludge samples also grouped with those of Hyphomicrobium cluster II, with a 96% sequence similarity to that of Hyphomicrobium sp. strain M3. The other four cloned sequences from the activated sludge sample were more closely related to those of the Hyphomicrobium cluster I organisms (95 to 97% similarity). Whole-cell fluorescence hybridization of microorganisms in the activated sludge with genus-specific Hyphomicrobium probe S-G-Hypho-1241-a-A-19 enhanced the visualization of Hyphomicrobium and revealed that Hyphomicrobium appears to be abundant both on the outside of flocs and within the floc structure. Dot blot hybridization of activated sludge samples from 1995 with probes designed for Hyphomicrobium cluster I and Hyphomicrobium cluster II indicated that Hyphomicrobium cluster II-positive 16S rRNA dominated over Hyphomicrobium cluster I-positive 16S rRNA by 3- to 12-fold. Hyphomicrobium 16S rRNA comprised approximately 5% of the 16S rRNA in the activated sludge. PMID:10698787

  8. Co-extraction of DNA and PLFA from soil samples.

    PubMed

    Brewer, Sheridan; Techtmann, Stephen M; Mahmoudi, Nagissa; Niang, Dijibril; Pfiffner, Susan; Hazen, Terry C

    2015-08-01

    Lipid/DNA co-extraction from one sample is attractive in limiting biases associated with microbial community analysis from separate extractions. We sought to enhance established co-extraction methods and use high-throughput 16S rRNA sequencing to identify preferentially extracted taxa from co-extracted DNA. Co-extraction results in low DNA yields and distinct community structure changes. PMID:26027542

  9. Jellyfish modulate bacterial dynamic and community structure.

    PubMed

    Tinta, Tinkara; Kogovšek, Tjaša; Malej, Alenka; Turk, Valentina

    2012-01-01

    Jellyfish blooms have increased in coastal areas around the world and the outbreaks have become longer and more frequent over the past few decades. The Mediterranean Sea is among the heavily affected regions and the common bloom-forming taxa are scyphozoans Aurelia aurita s.l., Pelagia noctiluca, and Rhizostoma pulmo. Jellyfish have few natural predators, therefore their carcasses at the termination of a bloom represent an organic-rich substrate that supports rapid bacterial growth, and may have a large impact on the surrounding environment. The focus of this study was to explore whether jellyfish substrate have an impact on bacterial community phylotype selection. We conducted in situ jellyfish-enrichment experiment with three different jellyfish species. Bacterial dynamic together with nutrients were monitored to assess decaying jellyfish-bacteria dynamics. Our results show that jellyfish biomass is characterized by protein rich organic matter, which is highly bioavailable to 'jellyfish-associated' and 'free-living' bacteria, and triggers rapid shifts in bacterial population dynamics and composition. Based on 16S rRNA clone libraries and denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) analysis, we observed a rapid shift in community composition from unculturable Alphaproteobacteria to culturable species of Gammaproteobacteria and Flavobacteria. The results of sequence analyses of bacterial isolates and of total bacterial community determined by culture independent genetic analysis showed the dominance of the Pseudoalteromonadaceae and the Vibrionaceae families. Elevated levels of dissolved proteins, dissolved organic and inorganic nutrient release, bacterial abundance and carbon production as well as ammonium concentrations characterized the degradation process. The biochemical composition of jellyfish species may influence changes in the amount of accumulated dissolved organic and inorganic nutrients. Our results can contribute insights into possible changes in bacterial population dynamics and nutrient pathways following jellyfish blooms which have important implications for ecology of coastal waters. PMID:22745726

  10. Jellyfish Modulate Bacterial Dynamic and Community Structure

    PubMed Central

    Tinta, Tinkara; Kogovšek, Tjaša; Malej, Alenka; Turk, Valentina

    2012-01-01

    Jellyfish blooms have increased in coastal areas around the world and the outbreaks have become longer and more frequent over the past few decades. The Mediterranean Sea is among the heavily affected regions and the common bloom - forming taxa are scyphozoans Aurelia aurita s.l., Pelagia noctiluca, and Rhizostoma pulmo. Jellyfish have few natural predators, therefore their carcasses at the termination of a bloom represent an organic-rich substrate that supports rapid bacterial growth, and may have a large impact on the surrounding environment. The focus of this study was to explore whether jellyfish substrate have an impact on bacterial community phylotype selection. We conducted in situ jellyfish - enrichment experiment with three different jellyfish species. Bacterial dynamic together with nutrients were monitored to assess decaying jellyfish-bacteria dynamics. Our results show that jellyfish biomass is characterized by protein rich organic matter, which is highly bioavailable to ‘jellyfish - associated’ and ‘free - living’ bacteria, and triggers rapid shifts in bacterial population dynamics and composition. Based on 16S rRNA clone libraries and denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) analysis, we observed a rapid shift in community composition from unculturable Alphaproteobacteria to culturable species of Gammaproteobacteria and Flavobacteria. The results of sequence analyses of bacterial isolates and of total bacterial community determined by culture independent genetic analysis showed the dominance of the Pseudoalteromonadaceae and the Vibrionaceae families. Elevated levels of dissolved proteins, dissolved organic and inorganic nutrient release, bacterial abundance and carbon production as well as ammonium concentrations characterized the degradation process. The biochemical composition of jellyfish species may influence changes in the amount of accumulated dissolved organic and inorganic nutrients. Our results can contribute insights into possible changes in bacterial population dynamics and nutrient pathways following jellyfish blooms which have important implications for ecology of coastal waters. PMID:22745726

  11. Diversity and distribution of 16S rRNA and phenol monooxygenase genes in the rhizosphere and endophytic bacteria isolated from PAH-contaminated sites.

    PubMed

    Peng, Anping; Liu, Juan; Ling, Wanting; Chen, Zeyou; Gao, Yanzheng

    2015-01-01

    This is the first investigation of the diversity and distribution of 16S rRNA and phenol monooxygenase (PHE) genes in endophytic and rhizosphere bacteria of plants at sites contaminated with different levels of PAHs. Ten PAHs at concentrations from 34.22 to 55.29 and 45.79 to 97.81?mg·kg(-1) were measured in rhizosphere soils of Alopecurus aequalis Sobol and Oxalis corniculata L., respectively. The diversity of 16S rRNA and PHE genes in rhizosphere soils or plants changed with varying PAH pollution levels, as shown based on PCR-DGGE data. Generally, higher Shannon-Weiner indexes were found in mild or moderate contaminated areas. A total of 82 different bacterial 16S rRNA gene sequences belonging to five phyla; namely, Acfinobacteria, Proteobacteria, Chloroflexi, Cyanophyta, and Bacteroidetes, were obtained from rhizosphere soils. For the 57 identified PHE gene sequences, 18 were excised from rhizosphere bacteria and 39 from endophytic bacteria. The copy numbers of 16S rRNA and PHE genes in rhizosphere and endophytic bacteria varied from 3.83?×?10(3) to 2.28?×?10(6) and 4.17?×?10(2) to 1.99?×?10(5), respectively. The copy numbers of PHE genes in rhizosphere bacteria were significantly higher than in endophytic bacteria. Results increase our understanding of the diversity of rhizosphere and endophytic bacteria from plants grown in PAH-contaminated sites. PMID:26184609

  12. Diversity and distribution of 16S rRNA and phenol monooxygenase genes in the rhizosphere and endophytic bacteria isolated from PAH-contaminated sites

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Anping; Liu, Juan; Ling, Wanting; Chen, Zeyou; Gao, Yanzheng

    2015-01-01

    This is the first investigation of the diversity and distribution of 16S rRNA and phenol monooxygenase (PHE) genes in endophytic and rhizosphere bacteria of plants at sites contaminated with different levels of PAHs. Ten PAHs at concentrations from 34.22 to 55.29 and 45.79 to 97.81?mg·kg?1 were measured in rhizosphere soils of Alopecurus aequalis Sobol and Oxalis corniculata L., respectively. The diversity of 16S rRNA and PHE genes in rhizosphere soils or plants changed with varying PAH pollution levels, as shown based on PCR-DGGE data. Generally, higher Shannon-Weiner indexes were found in mild or moderate contaminated areas. A total of 82 different bacterial 16S rRNA gene sequences belonging to five phyla; namely, Acfinobacteria, Proteobacteria, Chloroflexi, Cyanophyta, and Bacteroidetes, were obtained from rhizosphere soils. For the 57 identified PHE gene sequences, 18 were excised from rhizosphere bacteria and 39 from endophytic bacteria. The copy numbers of 16S rRNA and PHE genes in rhizosphere and endophytic bacteria varied from 3.83?×?103 to 2.28?×?106 and 4.17?×?102 to 1.99?×?105, respectively. The copy numbers of PHE genes in rhizosphere bacteria were significantly higher than in endophytic bacteria. Results increase our understanding of the diversity of rhizosphere and endophytic bacteria from plants grown in PAH-contaminated sites. PMID:26184609

  13. Novel Division Level Bacterial Diversity in a Yellowstone Hot Spring

    Microsoft Academic Search

    PHILIP HUGENHOLTZ; CHRISTIAN PITULLE; KAREN L. HERSHBERGER; NORMAN R. PACE

    1998-01-01

    A culture-independent molecular phylogenetic survey was carried out for the bacterial community in Obsidian Pool (OP), a Yellowstone National Park hot spring previously shown to contain remarkable archaeal diversity (S. M. Barns, R. E. Fundyga, M. W. Jeffries, and N. R. Page, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 91:1609-1613, 1994). Small-subunit rRNA genes (rDNA) were amplified directly from OP sediment DNA

  14. Divergent members of the bacterial division Verrucomicrobiales in a temperate freshwater lake 1 Publication 2291 of the Netherlands Institute of Ecology, Centre for Limnology, Nieuwersluis, The Netherlands. 1

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Gabriël Zwart; Raymond Huismans; Miranda P van Agterveld; Yves Van de Peer; Peter De Rijk; Hugo Eenhoorn; Gerard Muyzer; Erik J van Hannen; Herman J Gons; Hendrikus J Laanbroek

    1998-01-01

    Bacterial diversity in the water column of a freshwater lake in the Netherlands was investigated by analysis of 16S rRNA gene sequences recovered through PCR amplification from total community DNA. Among 23 unique cloned sequences, two appeared to belong to the recently described bacterial division Verrucomicrobiales. One of the two sequences was most similar to a group of environmental clones

  15. Partitioning of bacterial communities between seawater and healthy, black band diseased, and dead coral surfaces.

    PubMed

    Frias-Lopez, Jorge; Zerkle, Aubrey L; Bonheyo, George T; Fouke, Bruce W

    2002-05-01

    Distinct partitioning has been observed in the composition and diversity of bacterial communities inhabiting the surface and overlying seawater of three coral species infected with black band disease (BBD) on the southern Caribbean island of Curaçao, Netherlands Antilles. PCR amplification and sequencing of bacterial 16S rRNA genes (rDNA) with universally conserved primers have identified over 524 unique bacterial sequences affiliated with 12 bacterial divisions. The molecular sequences exhibited less than 5% similarity in bacterial community composition between seawater and the healthy, black band diseased, and dead coral surfaces. The BBD bacterial mat rapidly migrates across and kills the coral tissue. Clone libraries constructed from the BBD mat were comprised of eight bacterial divisions and 13% unknowns. Several sequences representing bacteria previously found in other marine and terrestrial organisms (including humans) were isolated from the infected coral surfaces, including Clostridium spp., Arcobacter spp., Campylobacter spp., Cytophaga fermentans, Cytophaga columnaris, and Trichodesmium tenue. PMID:11976091

  16. Characterization of a Bacterial Community in an Abandoned Semiarid Lead-Zinc Mine Tailing Site

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Monica O. Mendez; Julia W. Neilson; Raina M. Maier

    2008-01-01

    Bacterial diversity in mine tailing microbial communities has not been thoroughly investigated despite the correlations that have been observed between the relative microbial diversity and the success of revegetation efforts at tailing sites. This study employed phylogenetic analyses of 16S rRNA genes to compare the bacterial communities present in highly disturbed, extremely (pH 2.7) and moderately (pH 5.7) acidic lead-zinc

  17. Identification of bacteria on the surface of clinically infected and non-infected prosthetic hip joints removed during revision arthroplasties by 16S rRNA gene sequencing and by microbiological culture

    PubMed Central

    Dempsey, Kate E; Riggio, Marcello P; Lennon, Alan; Hannah, Victoria E; Ramage, Gordon; Allan, David; Bagg, Jeremy

    2007-01-01

    It has been postulated that bacteria attached to the surface of prosthetic hip joints can cause localised inflammation, resulting in failure of the replacement joint. However, diagnosis of infection is difficult with traditional microbiological culture methods, and evidence exists that highly fastidious or non-cultivable organisms have a role in implant infections. The purpose of this study was to use culture and culture-independent methods to detect the bacteria present on the surface of prosthetic hip joints removed during revision arthroplasties. Ten consecutive revisions were performed by two surgeons, which were all clinically and radiologically loose. Five of the hip replacement revision surgeries were performed because of clinical infections and five because of aseptic loosening. Preoperative and perioperative specimens were obtained from each patient and subjected to routine microbiological culture. The prostheses removed from each patient were subjected to mild ultrasonication to dislodge adherent bacteria, followed by aerobic and anaerobic microbiological culture. Bacterial DNA was extracted from each sonicate and the 16S rRNA gene was amplified with the universal primer pair 27f/1387r. All 10 specimens were positive for the presence of bacteria by both culture and PCR. PCR products were then cloned, organised into groups by RFLP analysis and one clone from each group was sequenced. Bacteria were identified by comparison of the 16S rRNA gene sequences obtained with those deposited in public access sequence databases. A total of 512 clones were analysed by RFLP analysis, of which 118 were sequenced. Culture methods identified species from the genera Leifsonia (54.3%), Staphylococcus (21.7%), Proteus (8.7%), Brevundimonas (6.5%), Salibacillus (4.3%), Methylobacterium (2.2%) and Zimmermannella (2.2%). Molecular detection methods identified a more diverse microflora. The predominant genus detected was Lysobacter, representing 312 (60.9%) of 512 clones analysed. In all, 28 phylotypes were identified: Lysobacter enzymogenes was the most abundant phylotype (31.4%), followed by Lysobacter sp. C3 (28.3%), gamma proteobacterium N4-7 (6.6%), Methylobacterium SM4 (4.7%) and Staphylococcus epidermidis (4.7%); 36 clones (7.0%) represented uncultivable phylotypes. We conclude that a diverse range of bacterial species are found within biofilms on the surface of clinically infected and non-infected prosthetic hip joints removed during revision arthroplasties. PMID:17501992

  18. Characterization of Halophilic Bacterial Communities in Turda Salt Mine (Romania)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carpa, Rahela; Keul, Anca; Muntean, Vasile; Dobrot?, Cristina

    2014-09-01

    Halophilic organisms are having adaptations to extreme salinity, the majority of them being Archaean, which have the ability to grow at extremely high salt concentrations, (from 3 % to 35 %). Level of salinity causes natural fluctuations in the halophilic populations that inhabit this particular habitat, raising problems in maintaining homeostasis of the osmotic pressure. Samples such as salt and water taken from Turda Salt Mine were analyzed in order to identify the eco-physiological bacterial groups. Considering the number of bacteria of each eco-physiological group, the bacterial indicators of salt quality (BISQ) were calculated and studied for each sample. The phosphatase, catalase and dehydrogenases enzymatic activities were quantitatively determined and the enzymatic indicators of salt quality (EISQ) were calculated. Bacterial isolates were analyzed using 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis. Universal bacterial primers, targeting the consensus region of the bacterial 16S rRNA gene were used. Analysis of a large fragment, of 1499 bp was performed to improve discrimination at the species level.

  19. Back to Basics – The Influence of DNA Extraction and Primer Choice on Phylogenetic Analysis of Activated Sludge Communities

    PubMed Central

    Kirkegaard, Rasmus H.; Nielsen, Per H.

    2015-01-01

    DNA extraction and primer choice have a large effect on the observed community structure in all microbial amplicon sequencing analyses. Although the biases are well known, no comprehensive analysis has been conducted in activated sludge communities. In this study we systematically explored the impact of a number of parameters on the observed microbial community: bead beating intensity, primer choice, extracellular DNA removal, and various PCR settings. In total, 176 samples were subjected to 16S rRNA amplicon sequencing, and selected samples were investigated through metagenomics and metatranscriptomics. Quantitative fluorescence in situ hybridization was used as a DNA extraction-independent method for qualitative comparison. In general, an effect on the observed community was found on all parameters tested, although bead beating and primer choice had the largest effect. The effect of bead beating intensity correlated with cell-wall strength as seen by a large increase in DNA from Gram-positive bacteria (up to 400%). However, significant differences were present at lower phylogenetic levels within the same phylum, suggesting that additional factors are at play. The best primer set based on in silico analysis was found to underestimate a number of important bacterial groups. For 16S rRNA gene analysis in activated sludge we recommend using the FastDNA SPIN Kit for Soil with four times the normal bead beating and V1-3 primers. PMID:26182345

  20. No evidence for an endosymbiotic bacterial origin of tetrodotoxin in the newt Taricha granulosa

    E-print Network

    Brodie III, Edmund D.

    No evidence for an endosymbiotic bacterial origin of tetrodotoxin in the newt Taricha granulosa Tetrodotoxin (TTX) is a potent neurotoxin which is known to occur in numerous taxa, including newts. The origin that specifically amplify 16S rRNA genes of bacteria, we examined tissues from rough-skin newts, Taricha granulosa

  1. Ten Cases of Actinobaculum schaalii Infection: Clinical Relevance, Bacterial Identification, and Antibiotic Susceptibility

    PubMed Central

    Reinhard, Mark; Prag, Jørgen; Kemp, Michael; Andresen, Keld; Klemmensen, Belinda; Højlyng, Niels; Sørensen, Susan Hildebrand; Christensen, Jens Jørgen

    2005-01-01

    Nine of 10 strains of Actinobaculum schaalii caused urinary tract infections in predisposed individuals. Identification included 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis and use of the API Coryne and Rapid ID32A test systems. A. schaalii is easily overlooked due to its slow growth in ambient air and its resemblance to the normal bacterial flora on skin and mucosa. PMID:16208004

  2. Molecular detection of novel anammox bacterial clusters in the sediments of the shallow freshwater Lake Taihu

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Yucheng Wu; Yan Xiang; Jianjun Wang; Qinglong L. Wu

    2012-01-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated the wide occurrence of anaerobic ammonium oxidizing (anammox) bacteria; however, there is very limited information on the distribution of these bacteria in freshwater habitats. In this study, the anammox bacterial communities were detected by molecular analysis targeting the 16S rRNA genes in the sediments of Lake Taihu, a large and shallow eutrophic freshwater lake in China.

  3. Metagenomic Evaluation of Bacterial and Archaeal Diversity in the Geothermal Hot Springs of Manikaran, India

    PubMed Central

    Pathak, Ashish; Green, Stefan J.; Joshi, Amit; Chauhan, Ashvini

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial and archaeal diversity in geothermal spring water were investigated using 16S rRNA gene amplicon metagenomic sequencing. This revealed the dominance of Firmicutes, Aquificae, and the Deinococcus-Thermus group in this thermophilic environment. A number of sequences remained taxonomically unresolved, indicating the presence of potentially novel microbes in this unique habitat. PMID:25700403

  4. Robust Computational Analysis of rRNA Hypervariable Tag Datasets

    PubMed Central

    Sipos, Maksim; Jeraldo, Patricio; Chia, Nicholas; Qu, Ani; Dhillon, A. Singh; Konkel, Michael E.; Nelson, Karen E.; White, Bryan A.; Goldenfeld, Nigel

    2010-01-01

    Next-generation DNA sequencing is increasingly being utilized to probe microbial communities, such as gastrointestinal microbiomes, where it is important to be able to quantify measures of abundance and diversity. The fragmented nature of the 16S rRNA datasets obtained, coupled with their unprecedented size, has led to the recognition that the results of such analyses are potentially contaminated by a variety of artifacts, both experimental and computational. Here we quantify how multiple alignment and clustering errors contribute to overestimates of abundance and diversity, reflected by incorrect OTU assignment, corrupted phylogenies, inaccurate species diversity estimators, and rank abundance distribution functions. We show that straightforward procedural optimizations, combining preexisting tools, are effective in handling large () 16S rRNA datasets, and we describe metrics to measure the effectiveness and quality of the estimators obtained. We introduce two metrics to ascertain the quality of clustering of pyrosequenced rRNA data, and show that complete linkage clustering greatly outperforms other widely used methods. PMID:21217830

  5. Identification of Polybacterial Communities in Patients with Postoperative, Posttraumatic, and Endogenous Endophthalmitis through 16S rRNA Gene Libraries

    PubMed Central

    Jayasudha, Rajagopalaboopathi; Narendran, Venkatapathy; Manikandan, Palanisamy

    2014-01-01

    Endophthalmitis is a potential vision-threatening complication following surgical procedures (postoperative endophthalmitis [POE]), trauma (posttraumatic endophthalmitis [PTE]), and bacteremic seeding of the eye from a distant infection site (endogenous endophthalmitis [EE]). Several studies have revealed the polybacterial characteristics of endophthalmitis, which make the administration of antibiotics to treat the disease challenging. However, until now, the polybacterial communities of POE, PTE, and EE have not been precisely studied. Hence, the present study was designed to identify the bacterial community of endophthalmitis through 16S rRNA gene libraries. Of the 40 intraocular samples tested, 30 libraries were constructed with bacterial nested-PCR-positive samples. The obtained recombinant clones were screened through amplified rRNA gene restriction analysis (ARDRA) to identify unique clones. The multiple types of ARDRA patterns (P = 0.345) and diverse bacterial sequences (P = 0.277) within the libraries revealed the polybacterial nature of infection in POE, PTE, and EE. Moreover, to the best of our knowledge, this is the first report on polybacterial infection in EE. Gram-positive bacteria, including Bacillus spp. (n = 19), Streptococcus spp. (n = 18), Staphylococcus spp. (n = 6), Exiguobacterium spp. (n = 3), Gemella spp. (n = 2), Enterococcus spp. (n = 2), a Lysinibacillus sp. (n = 1), a Clostridium sp. (n = 1), and a Nocardia sp. (n = 1), and Gram-negative bacteria, including Serratia spp. (n = 18), Pseudomonas spp. (n = 10), Enterobacter spp. (n = 8), Acinetobacter spp. (n = 3), Pantoea spp. (n = 3), a Haemophilus sp. (n = 1), and a Massilia sp. (n = 1), were identified. Interestingly, among them, 10 bacterial species were not previously reported to be associated with endophthalmitis or other ocular infections. Besides, the presence of 4 unidentifiable clones suggests the possibility of novel organisms that might cause eye infections. Therefore, it is recommended that, in addition to the polybacterial nature of POE, PTE, and EE infections, the spectrum of the pathogenic bacterial community identified in this work should be considered while administering antibiotic therapy in suspected endophthalmitis cases. PMID:24574297

  6. Extremely Acidophilic Protists from Acid Mine Drainage Host Rickettsiales-Lineage Endosymbionts That Have Intervening Sequences in Their 16S rRNA Genes

    PubMed Central

    Baker, Brett J.; Hugenholtz, Philip; Dawson, Scott C.; Banfield, Jillian F.

    2003-01-01

    During a molecular phylogenetic survey of extremely acidic (pH < 1), metal-rich acid mine drainage habitats in the Richmond Mine at Iron Mountain, Calif., we detected 16S rRNA gene sequences of a novel bacterial group belonging to the order Rickettsiales in the Alphaproteobacteria. The closest known relatives of this group (92% 16S rRNA gene sequence identity) are endosymbionts of the protist Acanthamoeba. Oligonucleotide 16S rRNA probes were designed and used to observe members of this group within acidophilic protists. To improve visualization of eukaryotic populations in the acid mine drainage samples, broad-specificity probes for eukaryotes were redesigned and combined to highlight this component of the acid mine drainage community. Approximately 4% of protists in the acid mine drainage samples contained endosymbionts. Measurements of internal pH of the protists showed that their cytosol is close to neutral, indicating that the endosymbionts may be neutrophilic. The endosymbionts had a conserved 273-nucleotide intervening sequence (IVS) in variable region V1 of their 16S rRNA genes. The IVS does not match any sequence in current databases, but the predicted secondary structure forms well-defined stem loops. IVSs are uncommon in rRNA genes and appear to be confined to bacteria living in close association with eukaryotes. Based on the phylogenetic novelty of the endosymbiont sequences and initial culture-independent characterization, we propose the name “Candidatus Captivus acidiprotistae.” To our knowledge, this is the first report of an endosymbiotic relationship in an extremely acidic habitat. PMID:12957940

  7. Characterization of microbial diversity by determining terminal restriction fragment length polymorphisms of genes encoding 16S rRNA.

    PubMed Central

    Liu, W T; Marsh, T L; Cheng, H; Forney, L J

    1997-01-01

    A quantitative molecular technique was developed for rapid analysis of microbial community diversity in various environments. The technique employed PCR in which one of the two primers used was fluorescently labeled at the 5' end and was used to amplify a selected region of bacterial genes encoding 16S rRNA from total community DNA. The PCR product was digested with restriction enzymes, and the fluorescently labeled terminal restriction fragment was precisely measured by using an automated DNA sequencer. Computer-simulated analysis of terminal restriction fragment length polymorphisms (T-RFLP) for 1,002 eubacterial sequences showed that with proper selection of PCR primers and restriction enzymes, 686 sequences could be PCR amplified and classified into 233 unique terminal restriction fragment lengths or "ribotypes." Using T-RFLP, we were able to distinguish all bacterial strains in a model bacterial community, and the pattern was consistent with the predicted outcome. Analysis of complex bacterial communities with T-RFLP revealed high species diversity in activated sludge, bioreactor sludge, aquifer sand, and termite guts; as many as 72 unique ribotypes were found in these communities, with 36 ribotypes observed in the termite guts. The community T-RFLP patterns were numerically analyzed and hierarchically clustered. The pattern derived from termite guts was found to be distinctly different from the patterns derived from the other three communities. Overall, our results demonstrated that T-RFLP is a powerful tool for assessing the diversity of complex bacterial communities and for rapidly comparing the community structure and diversity of different ecosystems. PMID:9361437

  8. High-throughput 16S rRNA gene sequencing reveals alterations of mouse intestinal microbiota after radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Kim, Young Suk; Kim, Jinu; Park, Soo-Je

    2015-06-01

    The mammalian gastrointestinal tract harbors a highly complex microbial community that comprises hundreds of different types of bacterial cells. The gastrointestinal microbiota plays an important role in the function of the host intestine. Most cancer patients undergoing pelvic irradiation experience side effects such as diarrhea; however, little is currently known about the effects of irradiation on the microorganisms colonizing the mucosal surfaces of the gastrointestinal tract. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of gamma irradiation on the compositions of the large and small intestinal microbiotas. The gut microbiotas in control mice and mice receiving irradiation treatment were characterized by high-throughput sequencing of the bacterial 16S rRNA gene. Irradiation treatment induced significant alterations in the bacterial compositions of the large and small intestines at the genus level. Unexpectedly, irradiation treatment increased the number of operational taxonomic units in the small intestine but not the large intestine. In particular, irradiation treatment increased the level of the genera Alistipes in the large intestine and increased the level of the genus Corynebacterium in the small intestine. By contrast, compared with that in the corresponding control group, the level of the genera Prevotella was lower in the irradiated large intestine, and the level of the genera Alistipes was lower in the irradiated small intestine. Overall, the data presented here reveal the potential microbiological effects of pelvic irradiation on the gastrointestinal tracts of cancer patients. PMID:25600706

  9. Bacterial diversity within the human subgingival crevice

    PubMed Central

    Kroes, Ian; Lepp, Paul W.; Relman, David A.

    1999-01-01

    Molecular, sequence-based environmental surveys of microorganisms have revealed a large degree of previously uncharacterized diversity. However, nearly all studies of the human endogenous bacterial flora have relied on cultivation and biochemical characterization of the resident organisms. We used molecular methods to characterize the breadth of bacterial diversity within the human subgingival crevice by comparing 264 small subunit rDNA sequences from 21 clone libraries created with products amplified directly from subgingival plaque, with sequences obtained from bacteria that were cultivated from the same specimen, as well as with sequences available in public databases. The majority (52.5%) of the directly amplified 16S rRNA sequences were <99% identical to sequences within public databases. In contrast, only 21.4% of the sequences recovered from cultivated bacteria showed this degree of variability. The 16S rDNA sequences recovered by direct amplification were also more deeply divergent; 13.5% of the amplified sequences were more than 5% nonidentical to any known sequence, a level of dissimilarity that is often found between members of different genera. None of the cultivated sequences exhibited this degree of sequence dissimilarity. Finally, direct amplification of 16S rDNA yielded a more diverse view of the subgingival bacterial flora than did cultivation. Our data suggest that a significant proportion of the resident human bacterial flora remain poorly characterized, even within this well studied and familiar microbial environment. PMID:10588742

  10. Phylogenetic Affiliation of SSU rRNA Genes Generated by Massively Parallel Sequencing: New Insights into the Freshwater Protist Diversity

    PubMed Central

    Taib, Najwa; Mangot, Jean-François; Domaizon, Isabelle; Bronner, Gisèle; Debroas, Didier

    2013-01-01

    Recent advances in next-generation sequencing (NGS) technologies spur progress in determining the microbial diversity in various ecosystems by highlighting, for example, the rare biosphere. Currently, high-throughput pyrotag sequencing of PCR-amplified SSU rRNA gene regions is mainly used to characterize bacterial and archaeal communities, and rarely to characterize protist communities. In addition, although taxonomic assessment through phylogeny is considered as the most robust approach, similarity and probabilistic approaches remain the most commonly used for taxonomic affiliation. In a first part of this work, a tree-based method was compared with different approaches of taxonomic affiliation (BLAST and RDP) of 18S rRNA gene sequences and was shown to be the most accurate for near full-length sequences and for 400 bp amplicons, with the exception of amplicons covering the V5-V6 region. Secondly, the applicability of this method was tested by running a full scale test using an original pyrosequencing dataset of 18S rRNA genes of small lacustrine protists (0.2–5 µm) from eight freshwater ecosystems. Our results revealed that i) fewer than 5% of the operational taxonomic units (OTUs) identified through clustering and phylogenetic affiliation had been previously detected in lakes, based on comparison to sequence in public databases; ii) the sequencing depth provided by the NGS coupled with a phylogenetic approach allowed to shed light on clades of freshwater protists rarely or never detected with classical molecular ecology approaches; and iii) phylogenetic methods are more robust in describing the structuring of under-studied or highly divergent populations. More precisely, new putative clades belonging to Mamiellophyceae, Foraminifera, Dictyochophyceae and Euglenida were detected. Beyond the study of protists, these results illustrate that the tree-based approach for NGS based diversity characterization allows an in-depth description of microbial communities including taxonomic profiling, community structuring and the description of clades of any microorganisms (protists, Bacteria and Archaea). PMID:23516585

  11. The phylogenetic position of Siboglinidae (Annelida) inferred from 18S rRNA, 28S rRNA and morphological data

    E-print Network

    Siddall, Mark E.

    The phylogenetic position of Siboglinidae (Annelida) inferred from 18S rRNA, 28S r and Vestimentifera, but now referred to Annelida) in parsimony analyses of 1100 bp from 18S rRNA, 320 bp from the D1). For a while, they were regarded as not being closely related to Annelida, but referred to as deuterostomes

  12. Bacterial penetration of restored cavities.

    PubMed

    Zivkovi?, S; Bojovi?, S; Pavlica, D

    2001-03-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the quality of the marginal seals of 7 restoratives by means of a bacterial penetration test in vitro. Sixty intact premolars and third molars that were scheduled for extraction were used in the test. There were 2 experimental groups of teeth, as follows: (1) A class V conventional cavity and a wedge erosion cavity were prepared on the buccal surface and the lingual surface, respectively, of each tooth. (2) A class V conventional cavity and a wedge erosion cavity were prepared on the buccal surface and the lingual surface, respectively, of each tooth with a completely removed enamel layer. The cavities were then reconstructed with different restorative materials. The quality of the marginal seals was evaluated by submerging the teeth in a bacterial suspension and incubating them in an anaerobic milieu at 37 degrees C for 20 hours. The teeth were subsequently processed for histologic data and bacterial staining. The best marginal sealing in both the wedge erosion and the class V cavities was provided by the Herculite/Optibond system and the Valux Plus/Scotchbond Multipurpose system. Bacterial penetration was slightly greater with the Luxat compomer and the Dyrect compomer, as well as with Vitremer glass ionomer cement and Fuji LC glass ionomer cement. The bacterial penetration test showed that the use of restorative material does not entirely eliminate microleakage. PMID:11250635

  13. Localization, mobility and fidelity of retrotransposed Group II introns in rRNA genes

    PubMed Central

    Conlan, Lori H.; Stanger, Matthew J.; Ichiyanagi, Kenji; Belfort, Marlene

    2005-01-01

    We previously showed that the group II Lactococcus lactis Ll.LtrB intron could retrotranspose into ectopic locations on the genome of its native host. Two integration events, which had been mapped to unique sequences, were localized in the present study to separate copies of the six L.lactis 23S rRNA genes, within operon B or D. Although further movement within the bacterial chromosome was undetectable, the retrotransposed introns were able to re-integrate into their original homing site provided on a plasmid. This finding indicates not only that retrotransposed group II introns retain mobility properties, but also that movement occurs back into sequence that is heterologous to the sequence of the chromosomal location. Sequence analysis of the retrotransposed introns and the secondary mobility events back to the homing site showed that the introns retain sequence integrity. These results are illuminating, since the reverse transcriptase (RT) of the intron-encoded protein, LtrA, has no known proofreading function, yet the mobility events have a low error rate. Enzymatic digests were used to monitor sequence changes from the wild-type intron. The results indicate that retromobility events have ?10?5 misincorporations per nucleotide inserted. In contrast to the high RT error rates for retroviruses that must escape host defenses, the infrequent mutations of group II introns would ensure intron spread through retention of sequences essential for mobility. PMID:16170154

  14. Pol5p, a novel binding partner to Cdc10p in fission yeast involved in rRNA production.

    PubMed

    Nadeem, Farzana Khaliq; Blair, Derek; McInerny, Christopher J

    2006-10-01

    Cdc10p is a major component of the cell cycle transcription factor complex MBF that controls G1-S phase specific gene expression in the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe. Here, we describe the identification of a new binding partner to Cdc10p and Pol5p. Pol5p was discovered through a 2-hybrid screen, with the direct interaction confirmed by in vitro "pull-down" experiments with bacterially expressed proteins. Pol5p appears to have no role in cell cycle gene expression, but is instead required for rRNA production. Pol5p is an essential gene, expressed constitutively throughout both the mitotic and meiotic life cycles, and localises to the nucleus. Over-expressing Pol5p has no phenotype, but reducing levels of Pol5p inhibits rRNA production. Pol5p is shown to bind to rDNA promoter fragments. Potentially, we have identified a mechanism by which Cdc10p controls rDNA gene expression, therefore linking the cell cycle with cellular growth. PMID:16816948

  15. Prevalence of Lysogeny among Soil Bacteria and Presence of 16S rRNA and trzN Genes in Viral-Community DNA?

    PubMed Central

    Ghosh, Dhritiman; Roy, Krishnakali; Williamson, Kurt E.; White, David C.; Wommack, K. Eric; Sublette, Kerry L.; Radosevich, Mark

    2008-01-01

    Bacteriophages are very abundant in the biosphere, and viral infection is believed to affect the activity and genetic diversity of bacterial communities in aquatic environments. Lysogenic conversion, for example, can improve host fitness and lead to phage-mediated horizontal gene transfer. However, little is known about lysogeny and transduction in the soil environment. In this study we employed atrazine-impregnated Bio-Sep beads (a cell immobilization matrix) to sample active microbiota from soils with prior pesticide exposure history. Once recovered from soil, the bead communities were induced with mitomycin C (MC), and viral and bacterial abundances were determined to evaluate the incidence of inducible prophage in soil bacteria. The inducible fraction calculated within bead communities was high (ca. 85%) relative to other studies in aquatic and sedimentary environments. Moreover, the bacterial genes encoding 16S rRNA and trzN, a chlorohydrolase gene responsible for dehalogenation of atrazine, were detected by PCR in the viral DNA fraction purified from MC-induced bead communities. A diverse collection of actinobacterial 16S rRNA gene sequences occurred within the viral DNA fraction of induced, water-equilibrated beads. Similar results were observed in induced atrazine-equilibrated beads, where 77% of the cloned sequences were derived from actinobacterial lineages. Heterogeneous 16S rRNA gene sequences consisting of fragments from two different taxa were detected in the clone libraries. The results suggest that lysogeny is a prevalent reproductive strategy among soil bacteriophages and that the potential for horizontal gene transfer via transduction is significant in soil microbial communities. PMID:17993550

  16. Molecular approaches: advantages and artifacts in assessing bacterial diversity.

    PubMed

    Pontes, Daniela Santos; Lima-Bittencourt, Cláudia Iracema; Chartone-Souza, Edmar; Amaral Nascimento, Andréa Maria

    2007-07-01

    Bacteria account for a major proportion of Earth's biological diversity. They play essential roles in quite diverse environments and there has been an increasing interest in bacterial biodiversity. Research using novel and efficient tools to identify and characterize bacterial communities has been the key for elucidating biological activities with potential for industrial application. The current approach used for defining bacterial species is based on phenotypic and genomic properties. Traditional and novel DNA-based molecular methods are improving our knowledge of bacterial diversity in nature. Advances in molecular biology have been important for studies of diversity, considerably improving our knowledge of morphological, physiological, and ecological features of bacterial taxa. DNA-DNA hybridization, which has been used for many years, is still considered the golden standard for bacteria species identification. PCR-based methods investigating 16S rRNA gene sequences, and other approaches, such as the metagenome, have been used to study the physiology and diversity of bacteria and to identify novel genes with potential pharmaceutical and other biotechnological applications. We examined the advantages and limitations of molecular methods currently used to analyze bacterial diversity; these are mainly based on the 16S rRNA gene. These methods have allowed us to examine microorganisms that cannot be cultivated by routine methods and have also been useful for phylogenetic studies. We also considered the importance of improvements in microbe culture techniques and how we can combine different methods to allow a more appropriate assessment of bacterial diversity and to determine their real potential for industrial applications. PMID:17476541

  17. Ice formation and growth shape bacterial community structure in Baltic Sea drift ice.

    PubMed

    Eronen-Rasimus, Eeva; Lyra, Christina; Rintala, Janne-Markus; Jürgens, Klaus; Ikonen, Vilma; Kaartokallio, Hermanni

    2015-02-01

    Drift ice, open water and under-ice water bacterial communities covering several developmental stages from open water to thick ice were studied in the northern Baltic Sea. The bacterial communities were assessed with 16S rRNA gene terminal-restriction fragment length polymorphism and cloning, together with bacterial abundance and production measurements. In the early stages, open water and pancake ice were dominated by Alphaproteobacteria and Actinobacteria, which are common bacterial groups in Baltic Sea wintertime surface waters. The pancake ice bacterial communities were similar to the open-water communities, suggesting that the parent water determines the sea-ice bacterial community in the early stages of sea-ice formation. In consolidated young and thick ice, the bacterial communities were significantly different from water bacterial communities as well as from each other, indicating community development in Baltic Sea drift ice along with ice-type changes. The thick ice was dominated by typical sea-ice genera from classes Flavobacteria and Gammaproteobacteria, similar to those in polar sea-ice bacterial communities. Since the thick ice bacterial community was remarkably different from that of the parent seawater, results indicate that thick ice bacterial communities were recruited from the rarer members of the seawater bacterial community. PMID:25764550

  18. Phylogenetic characterization of endosymbionts of the hydrothermal vent mussel Bathymodiolus azoricus by analysis of the 16S rRNA, cbb L, and pmo A genes

    Microsoft Academic Search

    E. M. Spiridonova; B. B. Kuznetsov; N. V. Pimenov; T. P. Tourova

    2006-01-01

    In order to assess the phylogenetic diversity of the endosymbiotic microbial community of the gills of marine bivalve Bathymodiolus azoricus, total DNA was extracted from the gills. The PCR fragments corresponding to the genes encoding 16S rRNA, ribulose-bisphosphate\\u000a carboxylase (cbbL), and particulate methane monooxygenase (pmoA) were amplified, cloned, and sequenced. For the 16S rDNA genes, only one phylotype was revealed;

  19. Direct detection of mecA, nuc and 16S rRNA genes in BacT\\/Alert blood culture bottles

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Paul Lem; Jamie Spiegelman; Baldwin Toye; Karam Ramotar

    2001-01-01

    A benzyl alcohol-guanidine hydrochloride extraction method was used to remove sodium polyanetholesulfonate present in BacT\\/Alert blood culture bottles. Multiplex PCR using touchdown annealing was used to detect the mecA,nuc, and 16S rRNA genes in bottles growing staphylococci. This direct PCR assay demonstrated excellent sensitivity, specificity and improved accuracy compared to routine phenotypic methods for determination of methicillin resistance in coagulase

  20. [Diversity of 16S rRNA genes in metagenomic community of the freshwater sponge Lubomirskia baicalensis].

    PubMed

    Kaliuzhnaia, O V; Krivich, A A; Itskovich, V B

    2012-08-01

    Phylogenetic analysis of the nucleotide sequences of 16S rRNA genes in the metagenomic community of Lubomirskia baicalensis has revealed taxonomic diversity of bacteria associated with the endemic freshwater sponge. Fifty-four operational taxonomic units (OTUs) belonging to six bacterial phyla (Actinobacteria, alpha-Proteobacteria, beta-Proteobacteria, Verrucomicrobia, Bacteroidetes, Cyanobacteria, and Nitrospiracea) have been identified. Actinobacteria, whose representatives are known as antibiotic producers, is the dominant phylum of the community (37%, 20 OTUs). All sequences detected shared the maximal homology with unculturable microorganisms from freshwater habitats. The wide diversity of bacteria closely coexisting with the Baikal sponge indicate the complex ecological relationships in the community formed under the unique conditions of Lake Baikal. PMID:23035553

  1. Detection of bacteria by hybridization of rRNA with DNA-latex and immunodetection of hybrids.

    PubMed Central

    Miller, C A; Patterson, W L; Johnson, P K; Swartzell, C T; Wogoman, F; Albarella, J P; Carrico, R J

    1988-01-01

    A novel nucleic acid hybridization assay with a DNA probe immobilized on 1.25-micron-diameter latex particles was developed. Hybridization of the immobilized probe DNA with sample rRNA was complete in 10 to 15 min. Alkaline phosphatase-labeled anti-DNA-RNA was allowed to bind to the DNA-RNA hybrids on the latex particles. Then the latex was collected on a small glass fiber filter pad, and bound alkaline phosphatase was quantitated by reflectance rate measurement. The method detected a broad range of bacterial species and had a detection limit of 500 cells per assay. The assay was used to screen urine samples for bacteriuria and had a sensitivity of 96.2% compared with conventional culture at a decision level of greater than or equal to 10(4) CFU/ml. The hybridization method could have broad application to the detection of bacteria and viruses. PMID:2457597

  2. Identification of Atypical Rhodococcus-Like Clinical Isolates as Dietzia spp. by 16S rRNA Gene Sequencing?

    PubMed Central

    Pilares, Lilian; Agüero, Jesús; Vázquez-Boland, José A.; Martínez-Martínez, Luis; Navas, Jesús

    2010-01-01

    Rhodococcus equi and Dietzia spp. are closely related actinomycetes that show similar phenotypic properties. In humans, R. equi is an opportunistic pathogen associated with severe immunodeficiency. Dietzia spp. are environmental bacteria that have been isolated recently from clinical material and are presumptively associated with human infections. During the last 5 years, 15 bacterial isolates from human clinical samples collected at the Hospital Marqués de Valdecilla, Santander, Spain, were identified as R. equi by the API Coryne test. 16S rRNA gene sequencing confirmed seven isolates to be true R. equi strains, whereas the other eight were identified as members of the genus Dietzia, including Dietzia maris (four isolates), Dietzia natronolimnaea (two isolates), and Dietzia timorensis and Dietzia sp. (one isolate each). The eight Dietzia isolates were highly sensitive to 12 antimicrobial compounds. PMID:20220156

  3. Environmental factors shape sediment anammox bacterial communities in hypernutrified Jiaozhou Bay, China.

    PubMed

    Dang, Hongyue; Chen, Ruipeng; Wang, Lin; Guo, Lizhong; Chen, Pingping; Tang, Zuwang; Tian, Fang; Li, Shaozheng; Klotz, Martin G

    2010-11-01

    Bacterial anaerobic ammonium oxidation (anammox) is an important process in the marine nitrogen cycle. Because ongoing eutrophication of coastal bays contributes significantly to the formation of low-oxygen zones, monitoring of the anammox bacterial community offers a unique opportunity for assessment of anthropogenic perturbations in these environments. The current study used targeting of 16S rRNA and hzo genes to characterize the composition and structure of the anammox bacterial community in the sediments of the eutrophic Jiaozhou Bay, thereby unraveling their diversity, abundance, and distribution. Abundance and distribution of hzo genes revealed a greater taxonomic diversity in Jiaozhou Bay, including several novel clades of anammox bacteria. In contrast, the targeting of 16S rRNA genes verified the presence of only "Candidatus Scalindua," albeit with a high microdiversity. The genus "Ca. Scalindua" comprised the apparent majority of active sediment anammox bacteria. Multivariate statistical analyses indicated a heterogeneous distribution of the anammox bacterial assemblages in Jiaozhou Bay. Of all environmental parameters investigated, sediment organic C/organic N (OrgC/OrgN), nitrite concentration, and sediment median grain size were found to impact the composition, structure, and distribution of the sediment anammox bacterial community. Analysis of Pearson correlations between environmental factors and abundance of 16S rRNA and hzo genes as determined by fluorescent real-time PCR suggests that the local nitrite concentration is the key regulator of the abundance of anammox bacteria in Jiaozhou Bay sediments. PMID:20833786

  4. Bacterial Communities in Women with Bacterial Vaginosis: High Resolution Phylogenetic Analyses Reveal Relationships of Microbiota to Clinical Criteria

    PubMed Central

    Srinivasan, Sujatha; Hoffman, Noah G.; Morgan, Martin T.; Matsen, Frederick A.; Fiedler, Tina L.; Hall, Robert W.; Ross, Frederick J.; McCoy, Connor O.; Bumgarner, Roger; Marrazzo, Jeanne M.; Fredricks, David N.

    2012-01-01

    Background Bacterial vaginosis (BV) is a common condition that is associated with numerous adverse health outcomes and is characterized by poorly understood changes in the vaginal microbiota. We sought to describe the composition and diversity of the vaginal bacterial biota in women with BV using deep sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene coupled with species-level taxonomic identification. We investigated the associations between the presence of individual bacterial species and clinical diagnostic characteristics of BV. Methodology/Principal Findings Broad-range 16S rRNA gene PCR and pyrosequencing were performed on vaginal swabs from 220 women with and without BV. BV was assessed by Amsel’s clinical criteria and confirmed by Gram stain. Taxonomic classification was performed using phylogenetic placement tools that assigned 99% of query sequence reads to the species level. Women with BV had heterogeneous vaginal bacterial communities that were usually not dominated by a single taxon. In the absence of BV, vaginal bacterial communities were dominated by either Lactobacillus crispatus or Lactobacillus iners. Leptotrichia amnionii and Eggerthella sp. were the only two BV-associated bacteria (BVABs) significantly associated with each of the four Amsel’s criteria. Co-occurrence analysis revealed the presence of several sub-groups of BVABs suggesting metabolic co-dependencies. Greater abundance of several BVABs was observed in Black women without BV. Conclusions/Significance The human vaginal bacterial biota is heterogeneous and marked by greater species richness and diversity in women with BV; no species is universally present. Different bacterial species have different associations with the four clinical criteria, which may account for discrepancies often observed between Amsel and Nugent (Gram stain) diagnostic criteria. Several BVABs exhibited race-dependent prevalence when analyzed in separate groups by BV status which may contribute to increased incidence of BV in Black women. Tools developed in this project can be used to study microbial ecology in diverse settings at high resolution. PMID:22719852

  5. Application of the 5? Fluorogenic Exonuclease Assay (TaqMan) for Quantitative Ribosomal DNA and rRNA Analysis in Sediments

    PubMed Central

    Stults, Jennie R.; Snoeyenbos-West, Oona; Methe, Barbara; Lovley, Derek R.; Chandler, Darrell P.

    2001-01-01

    In this study, we report on the development of quantitative PCR and reverse transcriptase PCR assays for the 16S rRNA of Geobacter spp. and identify key issues related to fluorogenic reporter systems for nucleic acid analyses of sediments. The lower detection limit of each assay was 5 to 50 fg of genomic DNA or ?2 pg of 16S rRNA. TaqMan PCR spectral traces from uncontaminated, amended aquifer sediments were significantly lower (P < 0.0002) than traces for the external standard curve. We also observed a similar, significant decrease in mean quencher emissions for undiluted extracts relative to those for diluted extracts (P < 0.0001). If PCR enumerations were based solely upon the undiluted sample eluant, the TaqMan assay generated an inaccurate result even though the threshold cycle (Ct) measurements were precise and reproducible in the sediment extracts. Assay accuracy was significantly improved by employing a system of replicate dilutions and replicate analyses for both DNA and rRNA quantitation. Our results clearly demonstrate that fluorescence quenching and autofluorescence can significantly affect TaqMan PCR enumeration accuracy, with subsequent implications for the design and implementation of TaqMan PCR to sediments and related environmental samples. PMID:11375195

  6. Culture dependent and independent analyses of 16S rRNA and ATP citrate lyase genes: a comparison of microbial communities from different black smoker chimneys on the Mid-Atlantic Ridge

    Microsoft Academic Search

    James W. Voordeckers; My H. Do; Michael Hügler; Vivian Ko; Stefan M. Sievert; Costantino Vetriani

    2008-01-01

    The bacterial and archaeal communities of three deep-sea hydrothermal vent systems located on the Mid-Atlantic Ridge (MAR;\\u000a Rainbow, Logatchev and Broken Spur) were investigated using an integrated culture-dependent and independent approach. Comparative\\u000a molecular phylogenetic analyses, using the 16S rRNA gene and the deduced amino acid sequences of the alpha and beta subunits\\u000a of the ATP citrate lyase encoding genes were

  7. Bacterial vaginosis.

    PubMed Central

    Spiegel, C A

    1991-01-01

    Bacterial vaginosis (BV) is the most common of the vaginitides affecting women of reproductive age. It appears to be due to an alteration in the vaginal ecology by which Lactobacillus spp., the predominant organisms in the healthy vagina, are replaced by a mixed flora including Prevotella bivia, Prevotella disiens, Porphyromonas spp., Mobiluncus spp., and Peptostreptococcus spp. All of these organisms except Mobiluncus spp. are also members of the endogenous vaginal flora. While evidence from treatment trials does not support the notion that BV is sexually transmitted, recent studies have shown an increased risk associated with multiple sexual partners. It has also been suggested that the pathogenesis of BV may be similar to that of urinary tract infections, with the rectum serving as a reservoir for some BV-associated flora. The organisms associated with BV have also been recognized as agents of female upper genital tract infection, including pelvic inflammatory disease, and the syndrome BV has been associated with adverse outcome of pregnancy, including premature rupture of membranes, chorioamnionitis, and fetal loss; postpartum endometritis; cuff cellulitis; and urinary tract infections. The mechanisms by which the BV-associated flora causes the signs of BV are not well understood, but a role for H2O2-producing Lactobacillus spp. in protecting against colonization by catalase-negative anaerobic bacteria has been recognized. These and other aspects of BV are reviewed. PMID:1747864

  8. Marine Mesocosm Bacterial Colonisation of Volcanic Ash

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Witt, V.; Cimarelli, C.; Ayris, P. M.; Kueppers, U.; Erpenbeck, D.; Dingwell, D. B.; Woerheide, G.

    2014-12-01

    Explosive volcanic eruptions regularly eject large quantities of ash particles into the atmosphere, which can be deposited via fallout into oceanic environments. Such fallout has the potential to alter pH, light and nutrient availability at local or regional scales. Shallow-water coral reef ecosystems - "rainforests of the sea" - are highly sensitive to disturbances, such as ocean acidification, sedimentation and eutrophication. Therefore, ash deposition may lead to burial and mortality of such reefs. Coral reef ecosystem resilience may depend on pioneer bacterial colonisation of the ash layer, supporting subsequent establishment of the micro- and ultimately the macro-community. However, it is currently unknown which bacteria are involved in pioneer colonisation. We hypothesize that physico-chemical properties (i.e., morphology, chemistry, mineralogy) of the ash may dictate bacterial colonisation. We have tested the effect of substrate properties on bacterial diversity and abundance colonising five substrates: i) quartz sand ii) crystalline ash from the Sakurajima volcano (Japan) iii) volcanic glass iv) carbonate reef sand and v) calcite sand of similar grain size - by incubation in a controlled marine mesocosm (coral reef aquarium) under low light conditions for three months. Bacterial communities were screened every month by Automated Ribosomal Intergenic Spacer Analysis of the 16S-23S rRNA Internal Transcribed Spacer region. Multivariate statistics revealed discrete groupings of bacterial communities on substrates of volcanic origin (ash and glass) and reef origin (three sands). Analysis Of Similarity supports significantly different communities associated with all substrates (p=0.0001), only quartz did not differ from both carbonate and calcite sands. The ash substrate exhibited the most diverse bacterial community and carried the most substrate-specific bacterial operational taxonomic units. Our findings suggest that bacterial diversity and community composition during colonisation of volcanic ash in a coral reef-like environment is controlled by the physico-chemical composition of the substrate. Knowledge on pioneer bacterial colonisation may increase our understanding on the resilience of coral reefs to natural "catastrophes", such as volcanic ash fallout.

  9. Intra- and Interspecific Comparisons of Bacterial Diversity and Community Structure Support Coevolution of Gut Microbiota and Termite Host

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Yuichi Hongoh; Pinsurang Deevong; Tetsushi Inoue; Shigeharu Moriya; S. Trakulnaleamsai; M. Ohkuma; C. Vongkaluang; N. Noparatnaraporn; T. Kudo

    2005-01-01

    We investigated the bacterial gut microbiota from 32 colonies of wood-feeding termites, comprising four Microcerotermes species (Termitidae) and four Reticulitermes species (Rhinotermitidae), using terminal restric- tion fragment length polymorphism analysis and clonal analysis of 16S rRNA. The obtained molecular community profiles were compared statistically between individuals, colonies, locations, and species of ter- mites. Both analyses revealed that the bacterial community

  10. A Multiphasic Approach for the Identification of Endophytic Bacterial in Strawberry Fruit and their Potential for Plant Growth Promotion

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Gilberto Vinícius de Melo Pereira; Karina Teixeira Magalhães; Emi Rainildes Lorenzetii; Thiago Pereira Souza; Rosane Freitas Schwan

    This study used a multiphasic approach, characterized by the simultaneous use of culture-dependent and culture-independent\\u000a methods, to investigate endophytic bacterial communities in strawberry (Fragaria ananassa) fruit. A total of 92 bacterial endophytes were isolated and initially grouped by their repetitive extragenic palindromic\\u000a (rep)-PCR banding pattern and biochemical features. Phylogenetic analysis of the 16S rRNA gene sequences of 45 representatives\\u000a showed

  11. Combining flow cytometry and 16S rRNA gene pyrosequencing: a promising approach for drinking water monitoring and characterization.

    PubMed

    Prest, E I; El-Chakhtoura, J; Hammes, F; Saikaly, P E; van Loosdrecht, M C M; Vrouwenvelder, J S

    2014-10-15

    The combination of flow cytometry (FCM) and 16S rRNA gene pyrosequencing data was investigated for the purpose of monitoring and characterizing microbial changes in drinking water distribution systems. High frequency sampling (5 min intervals for 1 h) was performed at the outlet of a treatment plant and at one location in the full-scale distribution network. In total, 52 bulk water samples were analysed with FCM, pyrosequencing and conventional methods (adenosine-triphosphate, ATP; heterotrophic plate count, HPC). FCM and pyrosequencing results individually showed that changes in the microbial community occurred in the water distribution system, which was not detected with conventional monitoring. FCM data showed an increase in the total bacterial cell concentrations (from 345 ± 15 × 10(3) to 425 ± 35 × 10(3) cells mL(-1)) and in the percentage of intact bacterial cells (from 39 ± 3.5% to 53 ± 4.4%) during water distribution. This shift was also observed in the FCM fluorescence fingerprints, which are characteristic of each water sample. A similar shift was detected in the microbial community composition as characterized with pyrosequencing, showing that FCM and genetic fingerprints are congruent. FCM and pyrosequencing data were subsequently combined for the calculation of cell concentration changes for each bacterial phylum. The results revealed an increase in cell concentrations of specific bacterial phyla (e.g., Proteobacteria), along with a decrease in other phyla (e.g., Actinobacteria), which could not be concluded from the two methods individually. The combination of FCM and pyrosequencing methods is a promising approach for future drinking water quality monitoring and for advanced studies on drinking water distribution pipeline ecology. PMID:25000200

  12. Mutations in 23S rRNA Are Associated with Clarithromycin Resistance inHelicobacter pylori

    Microsoft Academic Search

    JAMES VERSALOVIC; DEE SHORTRIDGE; KIRSTEN KIBLER; MAMIE V. GRIFFY; JILL BEYER; ROBERT K. FLAMM; S. KEN TANAKA; DAVID Y. GRAHAM; ANDMAE F. GO

    Twelve clarithromycin-resistantHelicobacter pyloriisolates (100% of resistant isolates examined) from seven different patients each contained an A3G transition mutation within a conserved loop of 23S rRNA. A3G transition mutations at positions cognate with Escherichia coli 23S rRNA positions 2058 and 2059 were identified.Clarithromycin-susceptibleH.pyloriisolatesfrom14differentpatientsdisplayednopolymorphisms in a conserved loop within domain V of 23S rRNA. The study is the first to report mutations

  13. Sequencing of 16S rRNA Gene: A Rapid Tool for Identification of Bacillus anthracis

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Claudio T. Sacchi; Anne M. Whitney; Leonard W. Mayer; Roger Morey; Arnold Steigerwalt; Arijana Boras; Robin S. Weyant; Tanja Popovic

    2002-01-01

    In a bioterrorism event, a tool is needed to rapidly differentiate Bacillus anthracis from other closely related spore-forming Bacillus species. During the recent outbreak of bioterrorism-associated anthrax, we sequenced the 16S rRNA genes from these species to evaluate the potential of 16S rRNA gene sequencing as a diagnostic tool. We found eight distinct 16S types among all 107 16S rRNA

  14. Intraspecific 5S rRNA gene variation in flax, Linum usitatissimum ( Linaceae )

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Richard G. Schneeberger; Christopher A. Cullis

    1992-01-01

    A relatively large proportion of the flax genome (~ 3%) is comprised of 5S rRNA genes. This study focuses on the intraspecific sequence variation among five distinct groups of 5S rRNA genes. The results indicate that group 1 and 2 5S rRNA genes most closely resemble other angiosperm 5S genes, while groups 3–5 are highly divergent. Sequence variation is higher

  15. Activity and bacterial diversity of snow around Russian Antarctic stations.

    PubMed

    Lopatina, Anna; Krylenkov, Vjacheslav; Severinov, Konstantin

    2013-11-01

    The diversity and temporal dynamics of bacterial communities in pristine snow around two Russian Antarctic stations was investigated. Taxonomic analysis of rDNA libraries revealed that snow communities were dominated by bacteria from a small number of operational taxonomic units (OTUs) that underwent dramatic swings in abundance between the 54th (2008-2009) and 55th (2009-2010) Russian Antarctic expeditions. Moreover, analysis of the 55th expedition samples indicated that there was very little, if any, correspondence in abundance of clones belonging to the same OTU present in rDNA and rRNA libraries. The latter result suggests that most rDNA clones originate from bacteria that are not alive and/or active and may have been deposited on the snow surface from the atmosphere. In contrast, clones most abundant in rRNA libraries (mostly belonging to Variovorax, Janthinobacterium, Pseudomonas, and Sphingomonas genera) may be considered as endogenous Antarctic snow inhabitants. PMID:24012540

  16. Sampling and pyrosequencing methods for characterizing bacterial communities in the human gut using 16S sequence tags

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Gary D Wu; James D Lewis; Christian Hoffmann; Ying-Yu Chen; Rob Knight; Kyle Bittinger; Jennifer Hwang; Jun Chen; Ronald Berkowsky; Lisa Nessel; Hongzhe Li; Frederic D Bushman

    2010-01-01

    Intense interest centers on the role of the human gut microbiome in health and disease, but optimal methods for analysis are still under development. Here we present a study of methods for surveying bacterial communities in human feces using 454\\/Roche pyrosequencing of 16S rRNA gene tags. We analyzed fecal samples from 10 individuals and compared methods for storage, DNA purification

  17. Emergence of Competitive Dominant Ammonia-Oxidizing Bacterial Populations in a Full-Scale Industrial Wastewater Treatment Plant

    PubMed Central

    Layton, Alice C.; Dionisi, Hebe; Kuo, H.-W.; Robinson, Kevin G.; Garrett, Victoria M.; Meyers, Arthur; Sayler, Gary S.

    2005-01-01

    Ammonia-oxidizing bacterial populations in an industrial wastewater treatment plant were investigated with amoA and 16S rRNA gene real-time PCR assays. Nitrosomonas nitrosa initially dominated, but over time RI-27-type ammonia oxidizers, also within the Nitrosomonas communis lineage, increased from below detection to codominance. This shift occurred even though nitrification remained constant. PMID:15691975

  18. Shifts in soil chemical properties and bacterial communities responding to biotransformed dry olive residue used as organic amendment.

    PubMed

    Siles, José A; Cajthaml, Tomas; Hernández, Paola; Pérez-Mendoza, Daniel; García-Romera, Inmaculada; Sampedro, Inmaculada

    2015-07-01

    Dry olive residue (DOR) is a waste product derived from olive oil extraction and has been proposed as an organic amendment. However, it has been demonstrated that a pre-treatment, such as its transformation by saprophytic fungi, is required before DOR soil application. A greenhouse experiment was designed where 0 and 50 g kg(-1) of raw DOR (DOR), Coriolopsis floccosa-transformed DOR (CORDOR) and Fusarium oxysporum-transformed DOR (FUSDOR) were added to soil. Analyses of the soil chemical properties as well as the structure and relative abundance of bacterial and actinobacterial communities were conducted after 0, 30 and 60 days following amendment. The different amendments produced a slight decrease in soil pH and significant increases in carbon fractions, C/N ratios, phenols and K, with these increases being more significant after DOR application. Quantitative PCR assays of the 16S rRNA gene and PLFA analyses showed that all amendments favoured bacterial growth at 30 and 60 days, although actinobacterial proliferation was more evident after CORDOR and FUSDOR application at 60 days. Bacterial and actinobacterial DGGE multivariate analyses showed that the amendments produced structural changes in both communities, especially after 60 days of amendment. PLFA data analysis identified changes in soil microbial communities according to the amendment considered, with FUSDOR and CORDOR being less disruptive than DOR. Finally, integrated analysis of all data monitored in the present study enabled us to conclude that the greatest impact on soil properties was caused by DOR at 30 days and that soil showed some degree of resilience after this time. PMID:25501891

  19. Consensus structure and evolution of 5S rRNA.

    PubMed Central

    Küntzel, H; Piechulla, B; Hahn, U

    1983-01-01

    A consensus structure model of 5S rRNA presenting all conserved nucleotides in fixed positions has been deduced from the primary and secondary structure of 71 eubacterial, archaebacterial, eukaryotic cytosolic and organellar molecules. Phylogenetically related groups of molecules are characterized by nucleotide deletions in helices III, IV and V, and by potential base pair interactions in helix IV. The group-specific deletions are correlated with the early branching pattern of a dendrogram calculated from nucleotide substitution data: the first major division separates the group of eubacterial and organellar molecules from a second group containing the common ancestors of archaebacterial and eukaryotic/cytosolic molecules. The earliest diverging branch of the eubacterial/organellar group includes molecules from Thermus thermophilus, T. aquaticus, Rhodospirillum rubrum, Paracoccus denitrificans and wheat mitochondria. PMID:6835839

  20. Plaque Bacterial Microbiome Diversity in Children Younger than 30 Months with or without Caries Prior to Eruption of Second Primary Molars

    PubMed Central

    Xu, He; Hao, Wenjing; Zhou, Qiong; Wang, Wenhong; Xia, Zhongkui; Liu, Chuan; Chen, Xiaochi; Qin, Man; Chen, Feng

    2014-01-01

    Objective Our primary objective is to phylogenetically characterize the supragingival plaque bacterial microbiome of children prior to eruption of second primary molars by pyrosequencing method for studying etiology of early childhood caries. Methods Supragingival plaque samples were collected from 10 caries children and 9 caries-free children. Plaque DNA was extracted, used to generate DNA amplicons of the V1–V3 hypervariable region of the bacterial 16S rRNA gene, and subjected to 454-pyrosequencing. Results On average, over 22,000 sequences per sample were generated. High bacterial diversity was noted in the plaque of children with caries [170 operational taxonomical units (OTU) at 3% divergence] and caries-free children (201 OTU at 3% divergence) with no significant difference. A total of 8 phyla, 15 classes, 21 orders, 30 families, 41 genera and 99 species were represented. In addition, five predominant phyla (Firmicute, Fusobacteria, Proteobacteria, Bacteroidetes and Actinobacteria) and seven genera (Leptotrichia, Streptococcus, Actinomyces, Prevotella, Porphyromonas, Neisseria, and Veillonella) constituted a majority of contents of the total microbiota, independent of the presence or absence of caries. Principal Component Analysis (PCA) presented that caries-related genera included Streptococcus and Veillonella; while Leptotrichia, Selenomonas, Fusobacterium, Capnocytophaga and Porphyromonas were more related to the caries-free samples. Neisseria and Prevotella presented approximately in between. In both groups, the degree of shared organism lineages (as defined by species-level OTUs) among individual supragingival plaque microbiomes was minimal. Conclusion Our study represented for the first time using pyrosequencing to elucidate and monitor supragingival plaque bacterial diversity at such young age with second primary molar unerrupted. Distinctions were revealed between caries and caries-free microbiomes in terms of microbial community structure. We observed differences in abundance for several microbial groups between the caries and caries-free host populations, which were consistent with the ecological plaque hypothesis. Our approach and findings could be extended to correlating microbiomic changes after occlusion establishment and caries treatment. PMID:24586647

  1. A Comparison between Droplet Digital and Quantitative PCR in the Analysis of Bacterial 16S Load in Lung Tissue Samples from Control and COPD GOLD 2

    PubMed Central

    Sze, Marc A.; Abbasi, Meysam; Hogg, James C.; Sin, Don D.

    2014-01-01

    Background Low biomass in the bacterial lung tissue microbiome utilizes quantitative PCR (qPCR) 16S bacterial assays at their limit of detection. New technology like droplet digital PCR (ddPCR) could allow for higher sensitivity and accuracy of quantification. These attributes are needed if specific bacteria within the bacterial lung tissue microbiome are to be evaluated as potential contributors to diseases such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). We hypothesize that ddPCR is better at quantifying the total bacterial load in lung tissue versus qPCR. Methods Control (n?=?16) and COPD GOLD 2 (n?=?16) tissue samples were obtained from patients who underwent lung resection surgery, were cut on a cryotome, and sections were assigned for use in quantitative histology or for DNA extraction. qPCR and ddPCR were performed on these samples using primers spanning the V2 region on the 16S rRNA gene along with negative controls. Total 16S counts were compared between the two methods. Both methods were assessed for correlations with quantitative histology measurements of the tissue. Results There was no difference in the average total 16S counts (P>0.05) between the two methods. However, the negative controls contained significantly lower counts in the ddPCR (0.55 ± 0.28 16S/uL) than in the qPCR assay (1.00 ± 0.70 16S copies) (P <0.05). The coefficient of variation was significantly lower for the ddPCR assay (0.18 ± 0.14) versus the qPCR assay (0.62 ± 0.29) (P<0.05). Conclusion Overall the ddPCR 16S assay performed better by reducing the background noise in 16S of the negative controls compared with 16S qPCR assay. PMID:25329701

  2. Pyrosequencing-based analysis of the bacterial community in Korean traditional seafood, ojingeo jeotgal.

    PubMed

    Jung, Jaejoon; Choi, Sungjong; Jeon, Che Ok; Park, Woojun

    2013-10-28

    Jeotgal fermentation is dependent upon a diverse microbial community, although a detailed understanding of its microbial composition is limited to a relatively small number of jeotgal. Pyrosequencing-based bacterial community analysis was performed in fermented squid, ojingeo jeotgal. Leuconostoc was identified as the predominant bacterial genus, with Bacillus and Staphylococcus also accounting for a large proportion of the bacterial community. Phylogenetic analysis with 16S rRNA genes of Leuconostoc type species indicated that L. citreum- and L. holzapfelii-like strains could be the major Leuconostoc strains in jeotgal. High concentrations of NaCl were thought to be an important factor determining the makeup of the bacterial community in the fermented squid; however, a genomic survey with osmotic stress-related genes suggests the existence of more complex factors selecting the dominant bacterial species in fermented squid. PMID:23851268

  3. Bacterial Communities in Polluted Seabed Sediments: A Molecular Biology Assay in Leghorn Harbor

    PubMed Central

    Verni, Franco; Petroni, Giulio

    2013-01-01

    Seabed sediments of commercial ports are often characterized by high pollution levels. Differences in number and distribution of bacteria in such areas can be related to distribution of pollutants in the port and to sediment conditions. In this study, the bacterial communities of five sites from Leghorn Harbor seabed were characterized, and the main bacterial groups were identified. T-RFLP was used for all samples; two 16S rRNA libraries and in silico digestion of clones were used to identify fingerprint profiles. Library data, phylogenetic analysis, and T-RFLP coupled with in silico digestion of the obtained sequences evidenced the dominance of Proteobacteria and the high percentage of Bacteroidetes in all sites. The approach highlighted similar bacterial communities between samples coming from the five sites, suggesting a modest differentiation among bacterial communities of different harbor seabed sediments and hence the capacity of bacterial communities to adapt to different levels and types of pollution. PMID:24227997

  4. Detection and identification of putative bacterial endosymbionts and endogenous viruses in tick cell lines?

    PubMed Central

    Alberdi, M. Pilar; Dalby, Matthew J.; Rodriguez-Andres, Julio; Fazakerley, John K.; Kohl, Alain; Bell-Sakyi, Lesley

    2012-01-01

    As well as being vectors of many viral, bacterial, and protozoan pathogens of medical and veterinary importance, ticks harbour a variety of microorganisms which are not known to be pathogenic for vertebrate hosts. Continuous cell lines established from ixodid and argasid ticks could be infected with such endosymbiotic bacteria and endogenous viruses, but to date very few cell lines have been examined for their presence. DNA and RNA extracted from over 50 tick cell lines deposited in the Roslin Wellcome Trust Tick Cell Biobank (http://tickcells.roslin.ac.uk) were screened for presence of bacteria and RNA viruses, respectively. Sequencing of PCR products amplified using pan-16S rRNA primers revealed the presence of DNA sequences from bacterial endosymbionts in several cell lines derived from Amblyomma and Dermacentor spp. ticks. Identification to species level was attempted using Rickettsia- and Francisella-specific primers. Pan-Nairovirus primers amplified PCR products of uncertain specificity in cell lines derived from Rhipicephalus, Hyalomma, Ixodes, Carios, and Ornithodoros spp. ticks. Further characterisation attempted with primers specific for Crimean-Congo haemorrhagic fever virus segments confirmed the absence of this arbovirus in the cells. A set of pan-Flavivirus primers did not detect endogenous viruses in any of the cell lines. Transmission electron microscopy revealed the presence of endogenous reovirus-like viruses in many of the cell lines; only 4 of these lines gave positive results with primers specific for the tick Orbivirus St Croix River virus, indicating that there may be additional, as yet undescribed ‘tick-only’ viruses inhabiting tick cell lines. PMID:22743047

  5. Rapid Identification of Lactobacillus acidophilus by Restriction Analysis of the 16S–23S rRNA Intergenic Spacer Region and Flanking 23S rRNA Gene

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Kyoung-Sik Han; Younghoon Kim; Seungkook Choi; Sejong Oh; Sae-Hun Kim; Kwang-Youn Whang

    2005-01-01

    A rapid molecular approach was developed for the initial identification of Lactobacillus acidophilus strains which are difficult to identify using a single biochemical test. The 16S–23S rRNA intergenic spacer regions and flanking 23S rRNA genes of 19 strains of lactobacilli were amplified and the nucleotide sequences and restriction site polymorphisms were analyzed. AluI was the most useful of the restriction

  6. Molecular kinetics of reviving bacterial spores.

    PubMed

    Segev, Einat; Rosenberg, Alex; Mamou, Gideon; Sinai, Lior; Ben-Yehuda, Sigal

    2013-05-01

    Bacterial spores can remain dormant for years, yet they possess a remarkable potential to rapidly resume a vegetative life form. Here, we identified a distinct phase at the onset of spore outgrowth, designated the ripening period. This transition phase is exploited by the germinating spore for molecular reorganization toward elongation and subsequent cell division. We have previously shown that spores of different ages, kept under various temperatures, harbor dissimilar molecular reservoirs (E. Segev, Y. Smith, and S. Ben-Yehuda, Cell 148:139-149, 2012). Utilizing this phenomenon, we observed that the length of the ripening period can vary according to the spore molecular content. Importantly, the duration of the ripening period was found to correlate with the initial spore rRNA content and the kinetics of rRNA accumulation upon exiting dormancy. Further, the synthesis of the ribosomal protein RplA and the degradation of the spore-specific protein SspA also correlated with the duration of the ripening period. Our data suggest that the spore molecular cargo determines the extent of the ripening period, a potentially crucial phase for a germinating spore in obtaining limited resources during revival. PMID:23417486

  7. An rRNA Fragment and Its Antisense Can Alter Decoding of Genetic Information

    Microsoft Academic Search

    ALEXEY L. ARKOV; ALEXANDER MANKIN; EMANUEL J. MURGOLA

    1998-01-01

    rRNA plays a central role in protein synthesis and is intimately involved in the initiation, elongation, and termination stages of translation. However, the mode of its participation in these reactions, particularly as to the decoding of genetic information, remains elusive. In this paper, we describe a new approach that allowed us to identify an rRNA segment whose function is likely

  8. Expression of mouse and frog rRNA genes: transcription and processing

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Barbara Sollner-Webb; Louise Pape; Kenneth Ryan; Edward B. Mougey; Regina Poretta; Emil Nikolov; Mark H. Paalman; Inara Lazdins; Cathy Martin

    1991-01-01

    This article summarizes a number of lines of investigation of rRNA gene expression that are ongoing in the laboratory. These studies focus on mouse and frog, two distant vertebrate species. One major conclusion is that the basic properties of rRNA gene expression appear remarkably well conserved in evolution, with only relatively minor perturbations between frog and mouse, contrary to the

  9. CONFLICTING PHYLOGEOGRAPHIC PATTERNS IN RRNA AND NIFD INDICATE REGIONALLY RESTRICTED GENE TRANSFER IN BRADYRHIZOBIUM

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Major differences in evolutionary relationships of the 16S rRNA gene and the nitrogenase alpha-subunit gene (nifD) were observed among 38 strains of Bradyrhizobium sp. nodule bacteria from North America, Central America, Asia and Australia. Two lineages were evident in the 16S rRNA phylogeny represe...

  10. Evaluating rRNA as an indicator of microbial activity in environmental communities: limitations and uses

    PubMed Central

    Blazewicz, Steven J; Barnard, Romain L; Daly, Rebecca A; Firestone, Mary K

    2013-01-01

    Microbes exist in a range of metabolic states (for example, dormant, active and growing) and analysis of ribosomal RNA (rRNA) is frequently employed to identify the ‘active' fraction of microbes in environmental samples. While rRNA analyses are no longer commonly used to quantify a population's growth rate in mixed communities, due to rRNA concentration not scaling linearly with growth rate uniformly across taxa, rRNA analyses are still frequently used toward the more conservative goal of identifying populations that are currently active in a mixed community. Yet, evidence indicates that the general use of rRNA as a reliable indicator of metabolic state in microbial assemblages has serious limitations. This report highlights the complex and often contradictory relationships between rRNA, growth and activity. Potential mechanisms for confounding rRNA patterns are discussed, including differences in life histories, life strategies and non-growth activities. Ways in which rRNA data can be used for useful characterization of microbial assemblages are presented, along with questions to be addressed in future studies. PMID:23823491

  11. Cysteine Methylation Controls Radical Generation in the Cfr Radical AdoMet rRNA Methyltransferase

    PubMed Central

    Challand, Martin R.; Salvadori, Enrico; Driesener, Rebecca C.; Kay, Christopher W. M.; Roach, Peter L.; Spencer, James

    2013-01-01

    The ‘radical S-adenosyl-L-methionine (AdoMet)’ enzyme Cfr methylates adenosine 2503 of the 23S rRNA in the peptidyltransferase centre (P-site) of the bacterial ribosome. This modification protects host bacteria, notably methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), from numerous antibiotics, including agents (e.g. linezolid, retapamulin) that were developed to treat such organisms. Cfr contains a single [4Fe-4S] cluster that binds two separate molecules of AdoMet during the reaction cycle. These are used sequentially to first methylate a cysteine residue, Cys338; and subsequently generate an oxidative radical intermediate that facilitates methyl transfer to the unreactive C8 (and/or C2) carbon centres of adenosine 2503. How the Cfr active site, with its single [4Fe-4S] cluster, catalyses these two distinct activities that each utilise AdoMet as a substrate remains to be established. Here, we use absorbance and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy to investigate the interactions of AdoMet with the [4Fe-4S] clusters of wild-type Cfr and a Cys338 Ala mutant, which is unable to accept a methyl group. Cfr binds AdoMet with high (? 10 µM) affinity notwithstanding the absence of the RNA cosubstrate. In wild-type Cfr, where Cys338 is methylated, AdoMet binding leads to rapid oxidation of the [4Fe-4S] cluster and production of 5'-deoxyadenosine (DOA). In contrast, while Cys338 Ala Cfr binds AdoMet with equivalent affinity, oxidation of the [4Fe-4S] cluster is not observed. Our results indicate that the presence of a methyl group on Cfr Cys338 is a key determinant of the activity of the enzyme towards AdoMet, thus enabling a single active site to support two distinct modes of AdoMet cleavage. PMID:23861844

  12. Impacts of Poultry House Environment on Poultry Litter Bacterial Community Composition

    PubMed Central

    Dumas, Michael D.; Polson, Shawn W.; Ritter, Don; Ravel, Jacques; Gelb, Jack; Morgan, Robin; Wommack, K. Eric

    2011-01-01

    Viral and bacterial pathogens are a significant economic concern to the US broiler industry and the ecological epicenter for poultry pathogens is the mixture of bedding material, chicken excrement and feathers that comprises the litter of a poultry house. This study used high-throughput sequencing to assess the richness and diversity of poultry litter bacterial communities, and to look for connections between these communities and the environmental characteristics of a poultry house including its history of gangrenous dermatitis (GD). Cluster analysis of 16S rRNA gene sequences revealed differences in the distribution of bacterial phylotypes between Wet and Dry litter samples and between houses. Wet litter contained greater diversity with 90% of total bacterial abundance occurring within the top 214 OTU clusters. In contrast, only 50 clusters accounted for 90% of Dry litter bacterial abundance. The sixth largest OTU cluster across all samples classified as an Arcobacter sp., an emerging human pathogen, occurring in only the Wet litter samples of a house with a modern evaporative cooling system. Ironically, the primary pathogenic clostridial and staphylococcal species associated with GD were not found in any house; however, there were thirteen 16S rRNA gene phylotypes of mostly Gram-positive phyla that were unique to GD-affected houses and primarily occurred in Wet litter samples. Overall, the poultry house environment appeared to substantially impact the composition of litter bacterial communities and may play a key role in the emergence of food-borne pathogens. PMID:21949751

  13. Analysis of a 5S rRNA gene cloned from Euplotes eurstomus

    SciTech Connect

    Roberson, A.E.; Wolffe, A.; Olins, D.E.

    1987-05-01

    The macronucleus of the hypotrichous ciliated protozoan Euplotes eurystomus lends itself to the study of eukaryotic gene and chromatin structure because native macronuclear DNA exists as linear, gene-sized fragments between 400 and 20,000 bp in length. The macronuclear chromatin, while arranged in a typical nucleosomal structure, is freely soluble in low ionic strength buffers without treatment by nucleases. Thus, specific genes may be enriched as native, intact chromatin molecules. The 5S rRNA gene from Euplotes has been cloned to facilitate investigation of 5S gene-chromatin following characterization of the gene at the DNA level. It has been demonstrated that the gene, while in circular or linear form, can be transcribed in vitro by a Xenopus oocyte nuclear extract. The transcript generated in vitro is 120 nucleotides in length and is synthesized by RNA polymerase III. Anti-Xenopus TFIIIA antibodies recognize a Euplotes macronuclear chromatin-associated protein which is approx. 80 KD in size. It has been established that the sequence of the telomere flanking the 5S gene in Euplotes eurystomus is the same telomeric sequence published for Euplotes aediculatus.

  14. Comparative Metagenomic Profiling of Symbiotic Bacterial Communities Associated with Ixodes persulcatus, Ixodes pavlovskyi and Dermacentor reticulatus Ticks

    PubMed Central

    Kurilshikov, Alexander; Livanova, Natalya N.; Fomenko, Nataliya V.; Tupikin, Alexey E.; Rar, Vera A.; Kabilov, Marsel R.; Livanov, Stanislav G.; Tikunova, Nina V.

    2015-01-01

    Ixodes persulcatus, Ixodes pavlovskyi, and Dermacentor reticulatus ticks inhabiting Western Siberia are responsible for the transmission of a number of etiological agents that cause human and animal tick-borne diseases. Because these ticks are abundant in the suburbs of large cities, agricultural areas, and popular tourist sites and frequently attack people and livestock, data regarding the microbiomes of these organisms are required. Using metagenomic 16S profiling, we evaluate bacterial communities associated with I. persulcatus, I. pavlovskyi, and D. reticulatus ticks collected from the Novosibirsk region of Russia. A total of 1214 ticks were used for this study. DNA extracted from the ticks was pooled according to tick species and sex. Sequencing of the V3-V5 domains of 16S rRNA genes was performed using the Illumina Miseq platform. The following bacterial genera were prevalent in the examined communities: Acinetobacter (all three tick species), Rickettsia (I. persulcatus and D. reticulatus) and Francisella (D. reticulatus). B. burgdorferi sensu lato and B. miyamotoi sequences were detected in I. persulcatus and I. pavlovskyi but not in D. reticulatus ticks. The pooled samples of all tick species studied contained bacteria from the Anaplasmataceae family, although their occurrence was low. DNA from A. phagocytophilum and Candidatus Neoehrlichia mikurensis was first observed in I. pavlovskyi ticks. Significant inter-species differences in the number of bacterial taxa as well as intra-species diversity related to tick sex were observed. The bacterial communities associated with the I. pavlovskyi ticks displayed a higher biodiversity compared with those of the I. persulcatus and D. reticulatus ticks. Bacterial community structure was also diverse across the studied tick species, as shown by permutational analysis of variance using the Bray-Curtis dissimilarity metric (p = 0.002). Between-sex variation was confirmed by PERMANOVA testing in I. persulcatus (p = 0.042) and I. pavlovskyi (p = 0.042) ticks. Our study indicated that 16S metagenomic profiling could be used for rapid assessment of the occurrence of medically important bacteria in tick populations inhabiting different natural biotopes and therefore the epidemic danger of studied foci. PMID:26154300

  15. An Assessment of Urea-Formaldehyde Fertilizer on the Diversity of Bacterial Communities in Onion and Sugar Beet

    PubMed Central

    Ikeda, Seishi; Suzuki, Keijiro; Kawahara, Makoto; Noshiro, Masao; Takahashi, Naokazu

    2014-01-01

    The impact of a urea-formaldehyde (UF) fertilizer on bacterial diversity in onion bulbs and main roots of sugar beet were examined using a 16S rRNA gene clone library. The UF fertilizer markedly increased bacterial diversity in both plants. The results of principal coordinates analysis (PCoA) revealed that nearly 30% of the variance observed in bacterial diversity in both the onion and sugar beet was attributed to the fertilization conditions and also that the community structures in both plants shifted unidirectionally in response to the UF fertilizer. PMID:24882062

  16. Soil bacterial community succession during long-term ecosystem development.

    PubMed

    Jangid, Kamlesh; Whitman, William B; Condron, Leo M; Turner, Benjamin L; Williams, Mark A

    2013-06-01

    The physicochemical and biological gradients of soil and vegetative succession along the Franz Josef chrono sequence in New Zealand were used to test whether bacterial communities show patterns of change associated with long-term ecosystem development. Pyrosequencing was conducted on soil-derived 16S rRNA genes at nine stages of ecosystem progression and retrogression, ranging in age from 60 to c. 120 000 years since glacial retreat. Bray–Curtis ordination indicated that the bacterial communities showed clear patterns of change that were closely aligned with ecosystem development, pedogenesis and vegetative succession (Mantel test; r = 0.58; P < 0.001). Eighty per cent (80%) of the explained variability in bacterial community structure was observed during the first c.1000 years of development, when bacterial richness (Simpson's 1/D) declined from 130 to 30. The relatively high turnover of soil bacterial communities corresponded with an integrative 'plant–microbial successional feedback' model that predicts primarily negative feedbacks between plants and soil bacterial communities during progression and early pedogenesis. Positive feedbacks, similar to those of the plant community, could explain the long periods of community stability during later retrogressive stages of ecosystem development. This hypothesized model provides a consistent description linking below ground communities to ecosystem development and succession. The research, using deep sequencing technology, provides the first evidence for soil bacterial community change associated with the process of long-term ecosystem development. How these bacterial community changes are linked to the processes of primary ecosystem succession is not known and needs further investigation. PMID:24624422

  17. Trans-splicing and RNA editing of LSU rRNA in Diplonema mitochondria

    PubMed Central

    Valach, Matus; Moreira, Sandrine; Kiethega, Georgette N.; Burger, Gertraud

    2014-01-01

    Mitochondrial ribosomal RNAs (rRNAs) often display reduced size and deviant secondary structure, and sometimes are fragmented, as are their corresponding genes. Here we report a mitochondrial large subunit rRNA (mt-LSU rRNA) with unprecedented features. In the protist Diplonema, the rnl gene is split into two pieces (modules 1 and 2, 534- and 352-nt long) that are encoded by distinct mitochondrial chromosomes, yet the rRNA is continuous. To reconstruct the post-transcriptional maturation pathway of this rRNA, we have catalogued transcript intermediates by deep RNA sequencing and RT-PCR. Gene modules are transcribed separately. Subsequently, transcripts are end-processed, the module-1 transcript is polyuridylated and the module-2 transcript is polyadenylated. The two modules are joined via trans-splicing that retains at the junction ?26 uridines, resulting in an extent of insertion RNA editing not observed before in any system. The A-tail of trans-spliced molecules is shorter than that of mono-module 2, and completely absent from mitoribosome-associated mt-LSU rRNA. We also characterize putative antisense transcripts. Antisense-mono-modules corroborate bi-directional transcription of chromosomes. Antisense-mt-LSU rRNA, if functional, has the potential of guiding concomitantly trans-splicing and editing of this rRNA. Together, these findings open a window on the investigation of complex regulatory networks that orchestrate multiple and biochemically diverse post-transcriptional events. PMID:24259427

  18. Pyrosequencing of Tagged 16S rRNA Gene Amplicons for Rapid Deciphering of the Microbiomes of Fermented Foods Such as Pearl Millet Slurries?

    PubMed Central

    Humblot, Christèle; Guyot, Jean-Pierre

    2009-01-01

    Pearl millet slurries, mixed with groundnuts or not, were chosen as a model to investigate the feasibility of obtaining a rapid overview of community structure and population dynamics of fermented foods using pyrosequencing of tagged 16S rRNA gene amplicons. From 14 fermented samples collected either in a traditional small-scale processing unit in Burkina Faso or at laboratory scale, 137,469 sequences of bacterial 16S rRNA gene amplicons were characterized. Except for a few Proteobacteria, almost all the bacterial sequences were attributed to cultivable bacteria. This approach enabled 80.7% of the sequences to be attributed to a family and 70% to a genus but did not enable identification to the species level. The bacterial sequences were assigned to four phyla, with Firmicutes representing the highest diversity, followed by Proteobacteria, Actinobacteria, and Bacteroidetes, which were found only in the slurries prepared in traditional production units. Most of the Firmicutes were lactic acid bacteria, mainly represented by members of the Lactobacillus, Pediococcus, Leuconostoc, and Weissella genera, whose ratio varied from the onset to the end of the fermentation. The other bacteria present at the beginning of fermentation were generally no longer detected at the end, which is consistent with already-known patterns in the microbial ecology of fermented foods. In conclusion, this method seems very promising for rapid and preliminary microbial characterization in many samples of an unknown food sample, by determining numerous nucleic sequences simultaneously without the need for cloning and cultivation-dependent methods. PMID:19411407

  19. Partial Methylation at Am100 in 18S rRNA of Baker's Yeast Reveals Ribosome Heterogeneity on the Level of Eukaryotic rRNA Modification

    PubMed Central

    Kellner, Stefanie; Oswald, Stefanie; Paetzold, Melanie; Peifer, Christian; Watzinger, Peter; Schrader, Jens; Helm, Mark; Entian, Karl-Dieter

    2014-01-01

    Ribosome heterogeneity is of increasing biological significance and several examples have been described for multicellular and single cells organisms. In here we show for the first time a variation in ribose methylation within the 18S rRNA of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Using RNA-cleaving DNAzymes, we could specifically demonstrate that a significant amount of S. cerevisiae ribosomes are not methylated at 2?-O-ribose of A100 residue in the 18S rRNA. Furthermore, using LC-UV-MS/MS of a respective 18S rRNA fragment, we could not only corroborate the partial methylation at A100, but could also quantify the methylated versus non-methylated A100 residue. Here, we exhibit that only 68% of A100 in the 18S rRNA of S.cerevisiae are methylated at 2?-O ribose sugar. Polysomes also contain a similar heterogeneity for methylated Am100, which shows that 40S ribosome subunits with and without Am100 participate in translation. Introduction of a multicopy plasmid containing the corresponding methylation guide snoRNA gene SNR51 led to an increased A100 methylation, suggesting the cellular snR51 level to limit the extent of this modification. Partial rRNA modification demonstrates a new level of ribosome heterogeneity in eukaryotic cells that might have substantial impact on regulation and fine-tuning of the translation process. PMID:24586927

  20. Nucleotide sequence of the region between the 18S rRNA sequence and the 28S rRNA sequence of rat ribosomal DNA.

    PubMed Central

    Subrahmanyam, C S; Cassidy, B; Busch, H; Rothblum, L I

    1982-01-01

    The DNA sequence of the intragenic region of the rat 45S ribosomal RNA precursor was determined. This sequence contains 2282 nucleotides and extends from the conserved EcoR I site near the 3' terminus of 18S rRNA to 69 nucleotides downstream of the 5' terminus of 28S rRNA. The sequences corresponding to 18S and 5.8S rRNA were identified by comparison with previously published data. The 5' terminus of rat 28S rRNA was identified by S1 nuclease protection and reverse transcriptase elongation assays. The internal transcribed spacers were found to be 1066 and 765 nucleotides long and had little homology with those of Xenopus and yeast. Regions of sequence homology between rat and Xenopus were found at the junctions of the internal transcribed spacers with 18S, 5.8S and 28S rRNA. These homologies suggest that these sequences may function as recognition sites for the processing of the ribosomal precursor RNA. Images PMID:6287418

  1. Activity profiles of fourteen selected medicinal plants from Rural Venda communities in South Africa against fifteen clinical bacterial species

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Fourteen plants used in traditional medicine in the Venda region of South Africa were screened for activity against fifteen bacterial species. Methanol, acetone and hexane extracts and in some cases essential oils were tested using the disc diffusion and the microdilution methods. Most of the extracts were active against at least one bacterial species. Methanol and acetone extracts were the

  2. Soil bacterial diversity patterns and drivers along an elevational gradient on Shennongjia Mountain, China.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yuguang; Cong, Jing; Lu, Hui; Li, Guangliang; Xue, Yadong; Deng, Ye; Li, Hui; Zhou, Jizhong; Li, Diqiang

    2015-07-01

    Understanding biological diversity elevational pattern and the driver factors are indispensable to develop the ecological theories. Elevational gradient may minimize the impact of environmental factors and is the ideal places to study soil microbial elevational patterns. In this study, we selected four typical vegetation types from 1000 to 2800?m above the sea level on the northern slope of Shennongjia Mountain in central China, and analysed the soil bacterial community composition, elevational patterns and the relationship between soil bacterial diversity and environmental factors by using the 16S rRNA Illumina sequencing and multivariate statistical analysis. The results revealed that the dominant bacterial phyla were Acidobacteria, Actinobacteria, Alphaproteobacteria, Betaproteobacteria, Gammaproteobacteria and Verrucomicrobia, which accounted for over 75% of the bacterial sequences obtained from tested samples, and the soil bacterial operational taxonomic unit (OTU) richness was a significant monotonous decreasing (P?bacterial population composition decreased significantly (P?bacterial community. Therefore, the soil bacterial diversity on Shennongjia Mountain had a significant and different elevational pattern, and plant diversity and soil pH may be the key factors in shaping the soil bacterial spatial pattern. PMID:26032124

  3. Soil bacterial diversity patterns and drivers along an elevational gradient on Shennongjia Mountain, China

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yuguang; Cong, Jing; Lu, Hui; Li, Guangliang; Xue, Yadong; Deng, Ye; Li, Hui; Zhou, Jizhong; Li, Diqiang

    2015-01-01

    Understanding biological diversity elevational pattern and the driver factors are indispensable to develop the ecological theories. Elevational gradient may minimize the impact of environmental factors and is the ideal places to study soil microbial elevational patterns. In this study, we selected four typical vegetation types from 1000 to 2800?m above the sea level on the northern slope of Shennongjia Mountain in central China, and analysed the soil bacterial community composition, elevational patterns and the relationship between soil bacterial diversity and environmental factors by using the 16S rRNA Illumina sequencing and multivariate statistical analysis. The results revealed that the dominant bacterial phyla were Acidobacteria, Actinobacteria, Alphaproteobacteria, Betaproteobacteria, Gammaproteobacteria and Verrucomicrobia, which accounted for over 75% of the bacterial sequences obtained from tested samples, and the soil bacterial operational taxonomic unit (OTU) richness was a significant monotonous decreasing (P?bacterial population composition decreased significantly (P?bacterial community. Therefore, the soil bacterial diversity on Shennongjia Mountain had a significant and different elevational pattern, and plant diversity and soil pH may be the key factors in shaping the soil bacterial spatial pattern. PMID:26032124

  4. Bacterial diversity in different regions of gastrointestinal tract of Giant African Snail (Achatina fulica)

    PubMed Central

    Pawar, Kiran D; Banskar, Sunil; Rane, Shailendra D; Charan, Shakti S; Kulkarni, Girish J; Sawant, Shailesh S; Ghate, Hemant V; Patole, Milind S; Shouche, Yogesh S

    2012-01-01

    The gastrointestinal (GI) tract of invasive land snail Achatina fulica is known to harbor metabolically active bacterial communities. In this study, we assessed the bacterial diversity in the different regions of GI tract of Giant African snail, A. fulica by culture-independent and culture-dependent methods. Five 16S rRNA gene libraries from different regions of GI tract of active snails indicated that sequences affiliated to phylum ?-Proteobacteria dominated the esophagus, crop, intestine, and rectum libraries, whereas sequences affiliated to Tenericutes dominated the stomach library. On phylogenetic analysis, 30, 27, 9, 27, and 25 operational taxonomic units (OTUs) from esophagus, crop, stomach, intestine, and rectum libraries were identified, respectively. Estimations of the total bacterial diversity covered along with environmental cluster analysis showed highest bacterial diversity in the esophagus and lowest in the stomach. Thirty-three distinct bacterial isolates were obtained, which belonged to 12 genera of two major bacterial phyla namely ?-Proteobacteria and Firmicutes. Among these, Lactococcus lactis and Kurthia gibsonii were the dominant bacteria present in all GI tract regions. Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) analysis indicated significant differences in bacterial load in different GI tract regions of active and estivating snails. The difference in the bacterial load between the intestines of active and estivating snail was maximum. Principal component analysis (PCA) of terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism suggested that bacterial community structure changes only in intestine when snail enters estivation state. PMID:23233413

  5. [Cloning and sequencing of 16S rRNA gene of Phytoplasma CWB1 strain associated with cactus witches' broom].

    PubMed

    Cai, H; Li, F; Kong, B; Chen, H

    2001-12-01

    A 1.5 kb DNA fragment was amplified in DNA samples extracted from Opuntia salmiana porm showed witches'-broom symptom. The result indicates the existence of phytoplasma associated with this disease and this phytoplasma was designated as CWB1. The amplified fragment was ligated to pGEM-T easy vector and then transformed into JM109 strain of E. coli. Cloned DNA fragments were verified by PCR, restriction endonuclease (EcoRI) digestion and sequence analysis. The result revealed that the 16S rRNA gene of CWB1 consists of 1489 bp and shared 99.7% homology with Faba bean phyllody which belongs to phytoplasma 16S rII-C subgroup. So we can classify this strain into phytoplasma 16S rII-C subgroup. PMID:12552825

  6. Evidence for successional development in Antarctic hypolithic bacterial communities

    PubMed Central

    Makhalanyane, Thulani P; Valverde, Angel; Birkeland, Nils-Kåre; Cary, Stephen C; Marla Tuffin, I; Cowan, Don A

    2013-01-01

    Hypoliths (cryptic microbial assemblages that develop on the undersides of translucent rocks) are significant contributors to regional C and N budgets in both hot and cold deserts. Previous studies in the Dry Valleys of Eastern Antarctica have reported three morphologically distinct hypolithic community types: cyanobacteria dominated (type I), fungus dominated (type II) and moss dominated (type III). Here we present terminal-restriction fragment length polymorphism analyses to elucidate the bacterial community structure in hypolithons and the surrounding soils. We show clear and robust distinction in bacterial composition between bulk surface soils and hypolithons. Moreover, the bacterial assemblages were similar in types II and III hypolithons and clearly distinct from those found in type I. Through 16S rRNA gene 454 pyrosequencing, we show that Proteobacteria dominated all three types of hypolithic communities. As expected, Cyanobacteria were more abundant in type I hypolithons, whereas Actinobacteria were relatively more abundant in types II and III hypolithons, and were the dominant group in soils. Using a probabilistic dissimilarity metric and random sampling, we demonstrate that deterministic processes are more important in shaping the structure of the bacterial community found in types II and III hypolithons. Most notably, the data presented in this study suggest that hypolithic bacterial communities establish via a successional model, with the type I hypolithons acting as the basal development state. PMID:23765099

  7. Bacterial diversity characterization in petroleum samples from Brazilian reservoirs

    PubMed Central

    de Oliveira, Valéria Maia; Sette, Lara Durães; Simioni, Karen Christina Marques; dos Santos Neto, Eugênio Vaz

    2008-01-01

    This study aimed at evaluating potential differences among the bacterial communities from formation water and oil samples originated from biodegraded and non-biodegraded Brazilian petroleum reservoirs by using a PCR-DGGE based approach. Environmental DNA was isolated and used in PCR reactions with bacterial primers, followed by separation of 16S rDNA fragments in the DGGE. PCR products were also cloned and sequenced, aiming at the taxonomic affiliation of the community members. The fingerprints obtained allowed the direct comparison among the bacterial communities from oil samples presenting distinct degrees of biodegradation, as well as between the communities of formation water and oil sample from the non-biodegraded reservoir. Very similar DGGE band profiles were observed for all samples, and the diversity of the predominant bacterial phylotypes was shown to be low. Cloning and sequencing results revealed major differences between formation water and oil samples from the non-biodegraded reservoir. Bacillus sp. and Halanaerobium sp. were shown to be the predominant components of the bacterial community from the formation water sample, whereas the oil sample also included Alicyclobacillus acidoterrestris, Rhodococcus sp., Streptomyces sp. and Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans. The PCR-DGGE technique, combined with cloning and sequencing of PCR products, revealed the presence of taxonomic groups not found previously in these samples when using cultivation-based methods and 16S rRNA gene library assembly, confirming the need of a polyphasic study in order to improve the knowledge of the extent of microbial diversity in such extreme environments. PMID:24031244

  8. The bacterial diversity in an anaerobic ammonium-oxidizing (anammox) reactor community

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Xiao-Ran Li; Bing Du; Hai-Xia Fu; Ruo-Fan Wang; Jin-Huan Shi; Yue Wang; Mike S. M. Jetten; Zhe-Xue Quan

    2009-01-01

    An anaerobic ammonium-oxidation (anammox) reactor was operated for more than 500 days and the anammox activity of the biomass in the reactor reached 0.58kg Ntotal\\/kg VSSd. The removal ratios of NO2?-N to NH4+-N in both reactor and activity tests were nearly 1.1. The bacterial diversity in the reactor was investigated by analysis of 16S rRNA gene clone libraries and quantitative

  9. Detection and in situ identification of representatives of a widely distributed new bacterial phylum

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Wolfgang Ludwig; Stephan H. Bauer; Marc Bauer; Iris Held; Gudrun Kirchhof; Renate Schulze; Ingrid Huber; Stefan Spring; Anton Hartmann; Karl Heinz Schleifer

    1997-01-01

    16S rRNA gene libraries were prepared by polymerase chain reaction amplification and cloning from soil samples taken periodically from a field with genetically modified plants. Sequence analyses of the cloned rDNAs indicated that 140 of them clustered apart from known bacterial phyla. Based on 31 full sequences a new phylum could be defined. It includes Holophaga foetida, `Geothrix fermentans' and

  10. Bile tolerant Lactobacillus reuteri isolated from pig feces inhibits enteric bacterial pathogens and porcine rotavirus

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Byeong Joo Seo; Mi Ran Mun; Rejish Kumar V. J; Chul-Joong Kim; Insun Lee; Young-Hyo Chang; Yong-Ha Park

    2010-01-01

    Lactic acid producing bacterial strain Probio-16 was isolated from the swine excrements under anaerobic conditions and characterized\\u000a by morphology and biochemical characteristics. The strain was further identified by 16S rRNA gene sequencing and phylogeneitc\\u000a analysis. The antimicrobial activity of the strain was assayed by testing for growth inhibition of thirteen pathogenic microorganisms.\\u000a The strain was tested for antiviral activity against

  11. Putative probiotic Lactobacillus spp. from porcine gastrointestinal tract inhibit transmissible gastroenteritis coronavirus and enteric bacterial pathogens

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Rejish Kumar V. J; Byeong Joo Seo; Mi Ran Mun; Chul-Joong Kim; Insun Lee; Hongik Kim; Yong-Ha Park

    2010-01-01

    A total of 310 bacterial strains isolated from the porcine gastrointestinal tract were tested for their activity against transmissible\\u000a gastroenteritis (TGE) coronavirus and other enteric pathogens. Based on activity, the strains Probio-38 and Probio-37 were\\u000a selected as potential probiotics and identified as Lactobacillus plantarum Probio-38 and Lactobacillus salivarius Probio-37 respectively by 16S rRNA gene sequencing. Supernatants of these strains inhibited

  12. Diversity and Succession of the Intestinal Bacterial Community of the Maturing Broiler Chicken

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jiangrang Lu; Umelaalim Idris; Barry Harmon; Charles Hofacre; John J. Maurer; Margie D. Lee

    2003-01-01

    The diversity of bacterial floras in the ilea and ceca of chickens that were fed a vegetarian corn-soy broiler diet devoid of feed additives was examined by analysis of 1,230 partial 16S rRNA gene sequences. Nearly 70% of sequences from the ileum were related to those of Lactobacillus, with the majority of the rest being related to Clostridiaceae (11%), Streptococcus

  13. Bacterial Communities of the Coronal Sulcus and Distal Urethra of Adolescent Males

    Microsoft Academic Search

    David E. Nelson; Qunfeng Dong; Barbara Van Der Pol; Evelyn Toh; Baochang Fan; Barry P. Katz; Deming Mi; Ruichen Rong; George M. Weinstock; Erica Sodergren; J. Dennis Fortenberry

    2012-01-01

    Lactobacillus-dominated vaginal microbiotas are associated with reproductive health and STI resistance in women, whereas altered microbiotas are associated with bacterial vaginosis (BV), STI risk and poor reproductive outcomes. Putative vaginal taxa have been observed in male first-catch urine, urethral swab and coronal sulcus (CS) specimens but the significance of these observations is unclear. We used 16 S rRNA sequencing to

  14. The complete genomic sequence of Mycoplasma penetrans, an intracellular bacterial pathogen in humans

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Yuko Sasaki; Jun Ishikawa; Atsushi Yamashita; Kenshiro Oshima; Tsuyoshi Kenri; Keiko Furuya; Chie Yoshino; Atsuko Horino; Tadayoshi Shiba; Tsuguo Sasaki; Masahira Hattori

    2002-01-01

    The complete genomic sequence of an intracellular bacterial pathogen, Mycoplasma penetrans HF-2 strain, was determined. The HF-2 genome consists of a 1 358 633 bp single circular chromosome con- taining 1038 predicted coding sequences (CDSs), one set of rRNA genes and 30 tRNA genes. Among the 1038 CDSs, 264 predicted proteins are common to the Mycoplasmataceae sequenced thus far and

  15. Endophytic Bacterial Communities in Ginseng and their Antifungal Activity Against Pathogens

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Kye Man Cho; Su Young Hong; Sun Mi Lee; Yong Hee Kim; Goon Gjung Kahng; Yong Pyo Lim; Hoon Kim; Han Dae Yun

    2007-01-01

    Plant roots are associated with diverse communities of endophytic bacteria which do not exert adverse effects. The diversity\\u000a of bacterial endophytes associated with ginseng roots cultivated in three different areas in Korea was investigated. Sixty-three\\u000a colonies were isolated from the interior of ginseng roots. Phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA gene sequences showed that\\u000a the isolates belonged to three major

  16. Prevalence of A2143G mutation of H. pylori-23S rRNA in Chinese subjects with and without clarithromycin use history

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Zhuoqi; Shen, Jing; Zhang, Lian; Shen, Lin; Li, Qiang; Zhang, Baozhen; Zhou, Jing; Gu, Liankun; Feng, Guoshuang; Ma, Junling; You, Wei-Cheng; Deng, Dajun

    2008-01-01

    Background A2143G mutation of 23S rRNA gene of H. pylori results in clarithromycin (CLR) resistance. To investigate the prevalence of the CLR resistance-related A2143G mutation of the H. pylori-specific 23S rRNA gene in Chinese subjects with and without CLR use history, 307 subjects received the treatment with amoxicillin and omeprazole (OA) and 310 subjects received a placebo in 1995, and 153 subjects received a triple therapy with OA and CLR (OAC) in 2000. DNA was extracted from fasting gastric juice at the end of the intervention trial in 2003. H. pylori infection was determined by H. pylori-specific 23S rRNA PCR, ELISA, and13C-urea breath test assays. Mutations of the 23S rRNA gene were detected by RFLP assays. Results The presence of 23S rRNA due to H. pylori infection in the OA group remained lower than that in the placebo group 7.3 yrs after OA-therapy [51.1% (157/307) vs. 83.9% (260/310), p = 0.0000]. In the OAC group, the 23S rRNA detection rate was 26.8% (41/153) three yrs after OAC-treatment. The A2143G mutation rate among the 23S rRNA-positive subjects in the OAC group [31.7% (13/41)] was significantly higher than that in the OA group [10.2% (16/157)] and the placebo group [13.8% (36/260)]. The frequency of the AAGGG ? CTTCA (2222–2226) and AACC ? GAAG (2081–2084) sequence alterations in the OAC group was also significantly higher than those in the OA group and the placebo group. Conclusion Primary prevalence of the A2143G mutation was 10~14% among Chinese population without history of CLR therapy. Administration of CLR to eliminate H. pylori infection increased the prevalence of the A2143G mutation in Chinese subjects (32%) significantly. PMID:18507832

  17. Molecular analysis of bacterial communities in uranium ores and surrounding soils from Banduhurang open cast uranium mine, India: A comparative study

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ekramul Islam; Paltu K. Dhal; Sufia K. Kazy; Pinaki Sar

    2011-01-01

    Bacterial community structure of heavy metal rich- uranium ores and surrounding soils was explored using 16S rRNA gene based clone library analysis and denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) to provide baseline microbial diversity data on autochthonous communities. Sequence analysis of major ribotypes and\\/or DGGE bands revealed Proteobacteria and Acidobacteria as the two most frequently present bacterial phyla across the samples,

  18. Characterization of Bacterial Community Diversity in Cystic Fibrosis Lung Infections by Use of 16S Ribosomal DNA Terminal Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism Profiling

    Microsoft Academic Search

    G. B. Rogers; M. P. Carroll; D. J. Serisier; P. M. Hockey; G. Jones; K. D. Bruce

    2004-01-01

    Progressive loss of lung function resulting from the inflammatory response to bacterial colonization is the leading cause of mortality in cystic fibrosis (CF) patients. A greater understanding of these bacterial infections is needed to improve lung disease management. As culture-based diagnoses are associated with fundamental drawbacks, we used terminal restriction fragment (T-RF) length polymorphism profiling and 16S rRNA clone data

  19. Analysis of the dynamics of bacterial communities in the rhizosphere of the Chrysanthemum via denaturing gradient gel eletrophoresis and substrate utilization patterns

    Microsoft Academic Search

    BERNADETTE M. DUINEVELD; ALEXANDRE S. ROSADO; JAN DIRK VAN ELSAS; JOHANNES A. VAN VEEN

    1998-01-01

    In order to gain a better understanding of the spatial and temporal dynamics of bacterial communities of the rhizosphere of the chrysanthemum, two complementary methods were used: a molecular bacterial community profiling method, i.e., 16S rRNA gene-based PCR followed by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE), and an agar plate method in which 11 sole-carbon-source utilization tests were used. The DGGE

  20. Identification of Bacteriology and Risk Factor Analysis of Asymptomatic Bacterial Colonization in Pacemaker Replacement Patients

    PubMed Central

    Chu, Xian-Ming; Yu, Hua; Sun, Xue-Xia; An, Yi; Li, Bing; Li, Xue-Bin

    2015-01-01

    Background Recent researches revealed that asymptomatic bacterial colonization on PMs might be ubiquitous and increase the risk of clinical PM infection. Early diagnosis of patients with asymptomatic bacterial colonization could provide opportunity for targeted preventive measures. Objective The present study explores the incidence of bacterial colonization of generator pockets in pacemaker replacement patients without signs of infection, and to analyze risk factors for asymptomatic bacterial colonization. Methods From June 2011 to December 2013, 118 patients underwent pacemaker replacement or upgrade. Identification of bacteria was carried out by bacterial culture and 16S rRNA sequencing. Clinical risk characteristics were analyzed. Results The total bacterial positive rate was 37.3% (44 cases), and the coagulase-negative Staphylococcus aureus detection rate was the highest. Twenty two (18.6%) patients had positive bacterial culture results, of which 50% had coagulase-negative staphylococcus. The bacterial DNA detection rate was 36.4 % (43 cases). Positive bacterial DNA results from pocket tissues and the surface of the devices were 22.0% and 29.7%, respectively. During follow-up (median, 27.0 months), three patients (6.8%, 3/44) became symptomatic with the same genus of microorganism, S. aureus (n=2) and S. epidermidis (n=1). Multivariable logistic regression analysis showed that history of bacterial infection, use of antibiotics, application of antiplatelet drugs, replacement frequency were independent risk factors for asymptomatic bacterial colonization. Conclusion There was a high incidence of asymptomatic bacterial colonization in pacemaker patients with independent risk factors. Bacterial culture combined genetic testing could improve the detection rate. PMID:25768661

  1. Bacterial and archaeal communities in the acid pit lake sediments of a chalcopyrite mine.

    PubMed

    Lucheta, A R; Otero, X L; Macías, F; Lambais, M R

    2013-11-01

    Bacterial and archaeal community structures and diversity of three different sedimentary environments (BH1A, BH2A and BH3A) in the acid pit lake of a chalcopyrite mine at Touro (Spain) were determined by 16S rRNA gene PCR-DGGE and sequencing of clone libraries. DGGE of bacterial and archaeal amplicons showed that the sediments harbor different communities. Bacterial 16S rRNA gene sequences were assigned to Acidobacteria, Actinobacteria, Cyanobacteria, Planctomycetes, Proteobacteria, Chloroflexi and uncultured bacteria, after clustering into 42 operational taxonomic units (OTUs). OTU 2 represented approximately 37, 42 and 37 % of all sequences from sediments BH1A, BH2A and BH3A, respectively, and was phylogenetically related to uncultured Chloroflexi. Remaining OTUs were phylogenetically related to heterotrophic bacteria, including representatives of Ferrithrix and Acidobacterium genera. Archaeal 16S rRNA gene sequences were clustered into 54 OTUs. Most of the sequences from the BH1A sediment were assigned to Euryarchaeota, whereas those from BH2A sediment were assigned to Crenarchaeota. The majority of the sequences from BH3A sediment were assigned to unclassified Archaea, and showed similarities to uncultured and unclassified environmental clones. No sequences related to Acidithiobacillus and Leptospirillum, commonly associated with acid mine drainage, were detected in this study. PMID:23963670

  2. Identification of bacterial endophytes associated with traditional medicinal plant Tridax procumbens Linn.

    PubMed Central

    Preveena, Jagadesan; Bhore, Subhash J.

    2013-01-01

    Background: In traditional medicine, Tridax procumbens Linn. is used in the treatment of injuries and wounds. The bacterial endophytes (BEs) of medicinal plants could produce medicinally important metabolites found in their hosts; and hence, the involvement of BEs in conferring wound healing properties to T. Procumbens cannot be ruled out. But, we do not know which types of BEs are associated with T. Procumbens. Objective: The objective of this study was to investigate the fast growing and cultivable BEs associated with T. procumbens. Materials and Methods: Leaves and stems of healthy T. Procumbens plants were collected and cultivable BEs were isolated from surface-sterilized leaf and stem tissue samples using Luria-Bertani (LB) agar (medium) at standard conditions. A polymerase chain reaction was employed to amplify 16S rRNA coding gene fragments from the isolates. Cultivable endophytic bacterial isolates (EBIs) were identified using 16S rRNA gene nucleotide sequence similarity based method of bacterial identification. Results: Altogether, 50 culturable EBIs were isolated. 16S rRNA gene nucleotide sequences analysis using the Basic Local Alignment Search Tool (BLAST) revealed identities of the EBIs. Analysis reveals that cultivable Bacillus spp., Cronobacter sakazakii, Enterobacter spp., Lysinibacillus sphaericus, Pantoea spp., Pseudomonas spp. and Terribacillus saccharophilus are associated with T. Procumbens. Conclusion: Based on the results, we conclude that 24 different types of culturable BEs are associated with traditionally used medicinal plant, T. Procumbens, and require further study. PMID:24501447

  3. Global dispersion of bacterial cells on Asian dust

    PubMed Central

    Yamaguchi, Nobuyasu; Ichijo, Tomoaki; Sakotani, Akiko; Baba, Takashi; Nasu, Masao

    2012-01-01

    The atmospheric dispersion of bacteria over long distances is an important facet of microbial ecology. Certain groups of dispersed bacteria can adapt to their new location and affect established ecosystems. Aeolian dust particles are known to be carriers of microbes but further research is needed to expand our understanding of this field of microbiology. Here we showed the potential of aeolian dust to global migration of bacterial cells. We demonstrated the presence of microbial cells on dust particles directly by bio-imaging. Bacterial abundance on dust particles declined from 105 to less than 103 cells/m3 as the dust event subsided. Taxonomically diverse bacteria were identified by 16S rRNA gene sequencing and some of these bacteria retained growth potential. Our results confirm that bacteria can attach to aeolian dust particles and they have the potential to migrate globally during dust events and thus can contribute to the diversity of downwind ecosystems. PMID:22826803

  4. Use of 16S rRNA, 23S rRNA, and gyrB gene sequence analysis to determine phylogenetic relationships of Bacillus cereus group.

    SciTech Connect

    Bayvkin, S. G.; Lysov, Y. P.; Zakhariev, V.; Kelly, J. J.; Jackman, J.; Stahl, D. A.; Cherni, A.; Engelhardt Inst. of Molecular Biology; Loyola Univ.; Johns Hopkins Univ.; Univ. of Washington

    2004-08-01

    In order to determine if variations in rRNA sequence could be used for discrimination of the members of the Bacillus cereus group, we analyzed 183 16S rRNA and 74 23S rRNA sequences for all species in the B. cereus group. We also analyzed 30 gyrB sequences for B. cereus group strains with published 16S rRNA sequences. Our findings indicated that the three most common species of the B. cereus group, B. cereus, Bacillus thuringiensis, and Bacillus mycoides, were each heterogeneous in all three gene sequences, while all analyzed strains of Bacillus anthracis were found to be homogeneous. Based on analysis of 16S and 23S rRNA sequence variations, the microorganisms within the B. cereus group were divided into seven subgroups, Anthracis, Cereus A and B, Thuringiensis A and B, and Mycoides A and B, and these seven subgroups were further organized into two distinct clusters. This classification of the B. cereus group conflicts with current taxonomic groupings, which are based on phenotypic traits. The presence of B. cereus strains in six of the seven subgroups and the presence of B. thuringiensis strains in three of the subgroups do not support the proposed unification of B. cereus and B. thuringiensis into one species. Analysis of the available phenotypic data for the strains included in this study revealed phenotypic traits that may be characteristic of several of the subgroups. Finally, our results demonstrated that rRNA and gyrB sequences may be used for discriminating B. anthracis from other microorganisms in the B. cereus group.

  5. Spatial and Vertical Variability in Bacterial Community Structure in the Sediment of the South China Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, P.; Xie, W.; Chen, S.; Zhang, C. L.

    2014-12-01

    The ocean subsurface contains one of the largest pools of reactive carbon and nitrogen on earth, and thus serves as the largest realm for microbial life. However, the microbial communities that drive deep-subsurface geochemical processes are vastly unexplored. In this study, the bacterial community structure in the subsurface of the South China Sea were examined using sediment cores collected from shelf (water depth 667 m) to slope (water depth 3840 m). High-throughput sequencing of the bacterial 16S rRNA genes from the sediment samples resulted in a total of 270,000 sequences with each sample averaging about 10,000 sequences. In all sediment cores, the 16S rRNA gene copies of bacteria were highest in the surface sediment and decreased with the core depth. The bacterial community was dominated by Proteobacteria, Bacteroidetes, Actinobacteria, and Firmicutes. In most of the sediment cores, Proteobacteria dominated surface sediment samples and decreased with depth. The community structure showed no significant difference among the stations at different water depths, which indicates that bacterial distribution in the sediment is not influenced by the water column above. However, stations along the transect from Pearl River canyon to the deep basin were grouped together by cluster analysis, which indicates that bacterial community structure at these stations may bear the same consequence of sedimentary processes of the deep South China Sea.

  6. Molecular profiling of rhizosphere bacterial communities associated with Prosopis juliflora and Parthenium hysterophorus.

    PubMed

    Jothibasu, K; Chinnadurai, C; Sundaram, Sp; Kumar, K; Balachandar, Dananjeyan

    2012-03-01

    Prosopis juliflora and Parthenium hysterophorus are the two arid, exotic weeds of India that are characterized by distinct, profuse growth even in nutritionally poor soils and environmentally stressed conditions. Owing to the exceptional growth nature of these two plants, they are believed to harbor some novel bacterial communities with wide adaptability in their rhizosphere. Hence, in the present study, the bacterial communities associated with the rhizosphere of Prosopis and Parthenium were characterized by clonal 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis. The culturable microbial counts in the rhizosphere of these two plants were higher than bulk soils, possibly influenced by the root exudates of these two plants. The phylogenetic analysis of V1_V2 domains of the 16S rRNA gene indicated a wider range of bacterial communities present in the rhizosphere of these two plants than in bulk soils and the predominant genera included Acidobacteria, Gammaproteobacteria, and Bacteriodetes in the rhizosphere of Prosopis, and Acidobacteria, Betaproteobacteria, and Nitrospirae in the Parthenium rhizosphere. The diversity of bacterial communities was more pronounced in the Parthenium rhizosphere than in the Prosopis rhizosphere. This culture-independent bacterial analysis offered extensive possibilities of unraveling novel microbes in the rhizospheres of Prosopis and Parthenium with genes for diverse functions, which could be exploited for nutrient transformation and stress tolerance in cultivated crops. PMID:22450784

  7. Biomineralization of calcium carbonate polymorphs by the bacterial strains isolated from calcareous sites.

    PubMed

    Dhami, Navdeep Kaur; Reddy, M Sudhakara; Mukherjee, Abhijit

    2013-05-01

    Microbially induced calcium carbonate precipitation (MICCP) is a naturally occurring biological process that has various applications in remediation and restoration of a range of building materials. In the present investigation, five ureolytic bacterial isolates capable of inducing calcium carbonate precipitation were isolated from calcareous soils on the basis of production of urease, carbonic anhydrase, extrapolymeric substances, and biofilm. Bacterial isolates were identified as Bacillus megaterium, B. cereus, B. thuringiensis, B. subtilis, and Lysinibacillus fusiformis based on 16S rRNA analysis. The calcium carbonate polymorphs produced by various bacterial isolates were analyzed by scanning electron microscopy, confocal laser scanning microscopy, X ray diffraction, and Fourier transmission infra red spectroscopy. A strainspecific precipitation of calcium carbonate forms was observed from different bacterial isolates. Based on the type of polymorph precipitated, the technology of MICCP can be applied for remediation of various building materials. PMID:23648862

  8. [Analysis of bacterial communities of two Lake Baikal endemic sponge species].

    PubMed

    2014-01-01

    Bacterial diversity of two Lake Baikal endemic sponges characterized by different life forms, branching Lubomirskia baicalensis and cortical Baikalospongia sp., was studied using the method of 454 pyrosequencing of the 16S rRNA gene fragments. In the communities associated with L. baicalensis and Baikalospongia sp., 426 and 428 OTUs, respectively, were identified. In microbial associations of these spong- es, 24 bacterial phyla were identified, with predominance of Bacteroidetes, Proteobacteria, and Actinobacteria. Analysis of the taxonomic composition of bacterial communities of the sponges was carried out by search of the dominant phylotypes within the phylum level cluster. Comparison of bacterial associations of the sponges with Lake Baikal bacterioplankton revealed both the shared OTUs and the unique ones characteristic of the studied species. PMID:25941718

  9. Removal of 2,4,5-trichlorophenol by bacterial isolates from the secondary sludge of pulp and paper mill.

    PubMed

    Karn, Santosh Kr; Reddy, M Sudhakara

    2013-09-01

    2,4,5-trichlorophenol (2,4,5-TCP) mineralizing bacteria were isolated from the secondary sludge of pulp and paper industry. These isolates used 2,4,5-TCP as a source of carbon and energy and were capable of degrading this compound, as indicated by stoichimetric release of chloride and biomass formation. Based on 16S rRNA sequence analysis, these bacteria were identified as Kocuria sp. (CL2), Bacillus pumillus (CL5), Pseudomonas stutzeri (CL7). HPLC analysis revealed that these isolates were able to degrade 2,4,5-TCP at higher concentrations (600?mg/l or 3.0?mM). A consortia of these isolates completely removed 2,4,5-TCP from the sludge obtained from pulp and paper mill within 2 weeks when supplemented at a rate of 100?mg l(-1) . Bacterial consortium also significantly reduced absorbable organic halogen (AOX) and extractable organic halogen (EOX) by 61% and 63%, respectively from the sludge. These isolates have high potential to remove 2,4,5-TCP and may be used for remediation of pulp paper mill waste containing 2,4,5-TCP. PMID:22961799

  10. Defining the Normal Bacterial Flora of the Oral Cavity

    PubMed Central

    Aas, Jørn A.; Paster, Bruce J.; Stokes, Lauren N.; Olsen, Ingar; Dewhirst, Floyd E.

    2005-01-01

    More than 700 bacterial species or phylotypes, of which over 50% have not been cultivated, have been detected in the oral cavity. Our purposes were (i) to utilize culture-independent molecular techniques to extend our knowledge on the breadth of bacterial diversity in the healthy human oral cavity, including not-yet-cultivated bacteria species, and (ii) to determine the site and subject specificity of bacterial colonization. Nine sites from five clinically healthy subjects were analyzed. Sites included tongue dorsum, lateral sides of tongue, buccal epithelium, hard palate, soft palate, supragingival plaque of tooth surfaces, subgingival plaque, maxillary anterior vestibule, and tonsils. 16S rRNA genes from sample DNA were amplified, cloned, and transformed into Escherichia coli. Sequences of 16S rRNA genes were used to determine species identity or closest relatives. In 2,589 clones, 141 predominant species were detected, of which over 60% have not been cultivated. Thirteen new phylotypes were identified. Species common to all sites belonged to the genera Gemella, Granulicatella, Streptococcus, and Veillonella. While some species were subject specific and detected in most sites, other species were site specific. Most sites possessed 20 to 30 different predominant species, and the number of predominant species from all nine sites per individual ranged from 34 to 72. Species typically associated with periodontitis and caries were not detected. There is a distinctive predominant bacterial flora of the healthy oral cavity that is highly diverse and site and subject specific. It is important to fully define the human microflora of the healthy oral cavity before we can understand the role of bacteria in oral disease. PMID:16272510

  11. Mutations in the 16S rRNA Genes of Helicobacter pylori Mediate Resistance to Tetracycline

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Catharine A. Trieber; Diane E. Taylor

    2002-01-01

    Low-cost and rescue treatments for Helicobacter pylori infections involve combinations of several drugs including tetracycline. Resistance to tetracycline has recently emerged in H. pylori. The 16S rRNA gene sequences of two tetracycline-resistant clinical isolates (MIC 64 g\\/ml) were determined and compared to the consensus H. pylori 16S rRNA sequence. One isolate had four nucleotide substitutions, and the other had four

  12. Fine mapping of 28S rRNA sites specifically cleaved in cells undergoing apoptosis.

    PubMed Central

    Houge, G; Robaye, B; Eikhom, T S; Golstein, J; Mellgren, G; Gjertsen, B T; Lanotte, M; Døskeland, S O

    1995-01-01

    Bona fide apoptosis in rat and human leukemia cells, rat thymocytes, and bovine endothelial cells was accompanied by limited and specific cleavage of polysome-associated and monosome-associated 28S rRNA, with 18S rRNA being spared. Specific 28S rRNA cleavage was observed in all instances of apoptotic death accompanied by internucleosomal DNA fragmentation, with cleavage of 28S rRNA and of DNA being linked temporally. This indicates that 28S rRNA fragmentation may be as general a feature of apoptosis as internucleosomal DNA fragmentation and that concerted specific cleavage of intra- and extranuclear polynucleotides occurs in apoptosis. Apoptosis-associated cleavage sites were mapped to the 28S rRNA divergent domains D2, D6 (endothelial cells), and D8. The D2 cuts occurred in hairpin loop junctions considered to be buried in the intact ribosome, suggesting that this rRNA region becomes a target for RNase attack in apoptotic cells. D8 was cleaved in two exposed UU(U) sequences in bulge loops. Treatment with agents causing necrotic cell death or aging of cell lysates failed to produce any detectable limited D2 cleavage but did produce a more generalized cleavage in the D8 region. Of potential functional interest was the finding that the primary cuts in D2 exactly flanked a 0.3-kb hypervariable subdomain (D2c), allowing excision of the latter. The implication of hypervariable rRNA domains in apoptosis represents the first association of any functional process with these enigmatic parts of the ribosomes. PMID:7891700

  13. Transcription Analysis of Two Disparate rRNA Operons in the Halophilic Archaeon Haloarcula marismortui

    Microsoft Academic Search

    PATRICK P. DENNIS; SONIA ZIESCHE; SHANTHINI MYLVAGANAM

    1998-01-01

    The genome of the halophilic archaeon Haloarcula marismortui contains two rRNA operons designated rrnA and rrnB. Genomic clones of the two operons and their flanking regions have been sequenced, and primary transcripts and processing intermediates derived from each operon have been characterized. The 16S, 23S, and 5S genes from the two operons were found to differ at 74 of 1,472

  14. Quantitative comparisons of 16S rRNA gene sequence libraries from environmental samples.

    PubMed

    Singleton, D R; Furlong, M A; Rathbun, S L; Whitman, W B

    2001-09-01

    To determine the significance of differences between clonal libraries of environmental rRNA gene sequences, differences between homologous coverage curves, CX(D), and heterologous coverage curves, CXY(D), were calculated by a Cramér-von Mises-type statistic and compared by a Monte Carlo test procedure. This method successfully distinguished rRNA gene sequence libraries from soil and bioreactors and correctly failed to find differences between libraries of the same composition. PMID:11526051

  15. Development of an Argopecten- Specific 18S rRNA Targeted Genetic Probe

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Marc E. Frischer; Jean M. Danforth; Libby C. Tyner; Jay R. Leverone; Dan C. Marelli; William S. Arnold; Norman J. Blake

    2000-01-01

    :   Comparison of 18S ribosomal RNA gene sequences between diverse bivalve species, including eight scallop species, allowed\\u000a the design of an 18S rRNA targeted oligonucleotide probe (BS-1364) that was specific for scallops belonging to the genus Argopecten (bay and calico scallops). The high sequence similarity of the 18S rRNA gene between Argopecten irradians and Argopecten gibbus (98.8%) prevented the design

  16. A renaissance for the pioneering 16S rRNA gene

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Susannah G Tringe; Philip Hugenholtz

    2008-01-01

    Culture-independent molecular surveys using the 16S rRNA gene have become a mainstay for characterizing microbial community structure over the last quarter century. More recently this approach has been overshadowed by metagenomics, which provides a global overview of a community's functional potential rather than just an inventory of its inhabitants. However, the pioneering 16S rRNA gene is making a comeback in

  17. Quantitative Comparisons of 16S rRNA Gene Sequence Libraries from Environmental Samples

    Microsoft Academic Search

    DAVID R. SINGLETON; MICHELLE A. FURLONG; STEPHEN L. RATHBUN; WILLIAM B. WHITMAN

    2001-01-01

    To determine the significance of differences between clonal libraries of environmental rRNA gene sequences, differences between homologous coverage curves, CX(D), and heterologous coverage curves, CXY(D), were cal- culated by a Cramer-von Mises-type statistic and compared by a Monte Carlo test procedure. This method successfully distinguished rRNA gene sequence libraries from soil and bioreactors and correctly failed to find differences between

  18. Low Pore Connectivity Increases Bacterial Diversity in Soil?

    PubMed Central

    Carson, Jennifer K.; Gonzalez-Quiñones, Vanesa; Murphy, Daniel V.; Hinz, Christoph; Shaw, Jeremy A.; Gleeson, Deirdre B.

    2010-01-01

    One of soil microbiology's most intriguing puzzles is how so many different bacterial species can coexist in small volumes of soil when competition theory predicts that less competitive species should decline and eventually disappear. We provide evidence supporting the theory that low pore connectivity caused by low water potential (and therefore low water content) increases the diversity of a complex bacterial community in soil. We altered the pore connectivity of a soil by decreasing water potential and increasing the content of silt- and clay-sized particles. Two textures were created, without altering the chemical properties or mineral composition of the soil, by adding silt- and clay-sized particles of quartz to a quartz-based sandy soil at rates of 0% (sand) or 10% (silt+clay). Both textures were incubated at several water potentials, and the effect on the active bacterial communities was measured using terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (TRFLP) of bacterial 16S rRNA. Bacterial richness and diversity increased as water potential decreased and soil became drier (P < 0.012), but they were not affected by texture (P > 0.553). Bacterial diversity increased at water potentials of ?2.5 kPa in sand and ?4.0 kPa in silt+clay, equivalent to ?56% water-filled pore space (WFPS) in both textures. The bacterial community structure in soil was affected by both water potential and texture (P < 0.001) and was correlated with WFPS (sum of squared correlations [?2] = 0.88, P < 0.001). These findings suggest that low pore connectivity is commonly experienced by soil bacteria under field conditions and that the theory of pore connectivity may provide a fundamental principle to explain the high diversity of bacteria in soil. PMID:20418420

  19. Effect of postharvest UV-C treatment on the bacterial diversity of Ataulfo mangoes by PCR-DGGE, survival of E. coli and antimicrobial activity.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Suárez, Rocío; Ramírez-Villatoro, Guadalupe; Díaz-Ruiz, Gloria; Eslava, Carlos; Calderón, Montserrat; Navarro-Ocaña, Arturo; Trejo-Márquez, Andrea; Wacher, Carmen

    2013-01-01

    Since Mexico is the second largest exporter of mangoes, its safety assurance is essential. Research in microbial ecology and knowledge of complex interactions among microbes must be better understood to achieve maximal control of pathogens. Therefore, we investigated the effect of UV-C treatments on bacterial diversity of the Ataulfo mangoes surface using PCR-DGGE analysis of variable region V3 of 16S rRNA genes, and the survival of E. coli, by plate counting. The UV-C irradiation reduced the microbial load on the surface of mangoes immediately after treatment and the structure of bacterial communities was modified during storage. We identified the key members of the bacterial communities on the surface of fruits, predominating Enterobacter genus. Genera as Lactococcus and Pantoea were only detected on the surface of non-treated (control) mangoes. This could indicate that these genera were affected by the UV-C treatment. On the other hand, the treatment did not have a significant effect on survival of E. coli. However, genera that have been recognized as antagonists against foodborne pathogens were identified in the bands patterns. Also, phenolic compounds were determined by HPLC and antimicrobial activity was assayed according to the agar diffusion method. The main phenolic compounds were chlorogenic, gallic, and caffeic acids. Mango peel methanol extracts (UV-C treated and control mangoes) showed antimicrobial activity against strains previously isolated from mango, detecting significant differences (P < 0.05) among treated and control mangoes after 4 and 12 days of storage. Ps. fluorescens and Ps. stutszeri were the most sensitive. PMID:23761788

  20. Effect of postharvest UV-C treatment on the bacterial diversity of Ataulfo mangoes by PCR-DGGE, survival of E. coli and antimicrobial activity

    PubMed Central

    Fernández-Suárez, Rocío; Ramírez-Villatoro, Guadalupe; Díaz-Ruiz, Gloria; Eslava, Carlos; Calderón, Montserrat; Navarro-Ocaña, Arturo; Trejo-Márquez, Andrea; Wacher, Carmen

    2013-01-01

    Since Mexico is the second largest exporter of mangoes, its safety assurance is essential. Research in microbial ecology and knowledge of complex interactions among microbes must be better understood to achieve maximal control of pathogens. Therefore, we investigated the effect of UV-C treatments on bacterial diversity of the Ataulfo mangoes surface using PCR-DGGE analysis of variable region V3 of 16S rRNA genes, and the survival of E. coli, by plate counting. The UV-C irradiation reduced the microbial load on the surface of mangoes immediately after treatment and the structure of bacterial communities was modified during storage. We identified the key members of the bacterial communities on the surface of fruits, predominating Enterobacter genus. Genera as Lactococcus and Pantoea were only detected on the surface of non-treated (control) mangoes. This could indicate that these genera were affected by the UV-C treatment. On the other hand, the treatment did not have a significant effect on survival of E. coli. However, genera that have been recognized as antagonists against foodborne pathogens were identified in the bands patterns. Also, phenolic compounds were determined by HPLC and antimicrobial activity was assayed according to the agar diffusion method. The main phenolic compounds were chlorogenic, gallic, and caffeic acids. Mango peel methanol extracts (UV-C treated and control mangoes) showed antimicrobial activity against strains previously isolated from mango, detecting significant differences (P < 0.05) among treated and control mangoes after 4 and 12 days of storage. Ps. fluorescens and Ps. stutszeri were the most sensitive. PMID:23761788

  1. Effective Recovery of Bacterial DNA and Percent-Guanine-Plus- Cytosine-Based Analysis of Community Structure in the Gastrointestinal Tract of Broiler Chickens

    Microsoft Academic Search

    JUHA H. A. APAJALAHTI; LAURA K. SARKILAHTI; BRITA R. E. MAKI; J. PEKKA HEIKKINEN; PAIVI H. NURMINEN; WILLIAM E. HOLBEN

    1998-01-01

    A DNA-based, direct method for initial characterization of the total bacterial community in ileum and cecum of the chicken gastrointestinal (GI) tract was developed. The efficiencies of bacterial extraction and lysis were >95 and >99%, respectively, and therefore the DNA recovered should accurately reflect the bacterial com- munities of the ileal and cecal digesta. Total bacterial DNA samples were fractionated

  2. MRM2 encodes a novel yeast mitochondrial 21S rRNA methyltransferase

    PubMed Central

    Pintard, Lionel; Bujnicki, Janusz M.; Lapeyre, Bruno; Bonnerot, Claire

    2002-01-01

    Mitochondria of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae assemble their ribosomes from ribosomal proteins, encoded by the nuclear genome (with one exception), and rRNAs of 15S and 21S, encoded by the mitochondrial genome. Unlike cytoplasmic rRNA, which is highly modified, mitochondrial rRNA contains only three modified nucleotides: a pseudouridine (?2918) and two 2?-O-methylated riboses (Gm2270 and Um2791) located at the peptidyl transferase centre of 21S rRNA. We demonstrate here that the yeast nuclear genome encodes a mitochondrial protein, named Mrm2, which is required for methylating U2791 of 21S rRNA, both in vivo and in vitro. Deletion of the MRM2 gene causes thermosensitive respiration and leads to rapid loss of mitochondrial DNA. We propose that Mrm2p belongs to a new class of three eukaryotic RNA-modifying enzymes and is the orthologue of FtsJ/RrmJ, which methylates a nucleotide of the peptidyl transferase centre of Escherichia coli 23S rRNA that is homologous to U2791 of 21S rRNA. Our data suggest that this universally conserved modified nucleotide plays an important function in vivo, possibly by inducing conformational rearrangement of the peptidyl transferase centre. PMID:11867542

  3. The arthropod, but not the vertebrate host or its environment, dictates bacterial community composition of fleas and ticks

    PubMed Central

    Hawlena, Hadas; Rynkiewicz, Evelyn; Toh, Evelyn; Alfred, Andrew; Durden, Lance A; Hastriter, Michael W; Nelson, David E; Rong, Ruichen; Munro, Daniel; Dong, Qunfeng; Fuqua, Clay; Clay, Keith

    2013-01-01

    Bacterial community composition in blood-sucking arthropods can shift dramatically across time and space. We used 16S rRNA gene amplification and pyrosequencing to investigate the relative impact of vertebrate host-related, arthropod-related and environmental factors on bacterial community composition in fleas and ticks collected from rodents in southern Indiana (USA). Bacterial community composition was largely affected by arthropod identity, but not by the rodent host or environmental conditions. Specifically, the arthropod group (fleas vs ticks) determined the community composition of bacteria, where bacterial communities of ticks were less diverse and more dependent on arthropod traits—especially tick species and life stage—than bacterial communities of fleas. Our data suggest that both arthropod life histories and the presence of arthropod-specific endosymbionts may mask the effects of the vertebrate host and its environment. PMID:22739493

  4. Diversity of bacterial communities of fitness center surfaces in a U.S. metropolitan area.

    PubMed

    Mukherjee, Nabanita; Dowd, Scot E; Wise, Andy; Kedia, Sapna; Vohra, Varun; Banerjee, Pratik

    2014-12-01

    Public fitness centers and exercise facilities have been implicated as possible sources for transmitting community-acquired bacterial infections. However, the overall diversity of the bacterial community residing on the surfaces in these indoor environments is still unknown. In this study, we investigated the overall bacterial ecology of selected fitness centers in a metropolitan area (Memphis, TN, USA) utilizing culture-independent pyrosequencing of the 16S rRNA genes. Samples were collected from the skin-contact surfaces (e.g., exercise instruments, floor mats, handrails, etc.) within fitness centers. Taxonomical composition revealed the abundance of Firmicutes phyla, followed by Proteobacter and Actinobacteria, with a total of 17 bacterial families and 25 bacterial genera. Most of these bacterial genera are of human and environmental origin (including, air, dust, soil, and water). Additionally, we found the presence of some pathogenic or potential pathogenic bacterial genera including Salmonella, Staphylococcus, Klebsiella, and Micrococcus. Staphylococcus was found to be the most prevalent genus. Presence of viable forms of these pathogens elevates risk of exposure of any susceptible individuals. Several factors (including personal hygiene, surface cleaning and disinfection schedules of the facilities) may be the reasons for the rich bacterial diversity found in this study. The current finding underscores the need to increase public awareness on the importance of personal hygiene and sanitation for public gym users. PMID:25479039

  5. Co-habiting amphibian species harbor unique skin bacterial communities in wild populations.

    PubMed

    McKenzie, Valerie J; Bowers, Robert M; Fierer, Noah; Knight, Rob; Lauber, Christian L

    2012-03-01

    Although all plant and animal species harbor microbial symbionts, we know surprisingly little about the specificity of microbial communities to their hosts. Few studies have compared the microbiomes of different species of animals, and fewer still have examined animals in the wild. We sampled four pond habitats in Colorado, USA, where multiple amphibian species were present. In total, 32 amphibian individuals were sampled from three different species including northern leopard frogs (Lithobates pipiens), western chorus frogs (Pseudacris triseriata) and tiger salamanders (Ambystoma tigrinum). We compared the diversity and composition of the bacterial communities on the skin of the collected individuals via barcoded pyrosequencing of the 16S rRNA gene. Dominant bacterial phyla included Acidobacteria, Actinobacteria, Bacteriodetes, Cyanobacteria, Firmicutes and Proteobacteria. In total, we found members of 18 bacterial phyla, comparable to the taxonomic diversity typically found on human skin. Levels of bacterial diversity varied strongly across species: L. pipiens had the highest diversity; A. tigrinum the lowest. Host species was a highly significant predictor of bacterial community similarity, and co-habitation within the same pond was not significant, highlighting that the skin-associated bacterial communities do not simply reflect those bacterial communities found in their surrounding environments. Innate species differences thus appear to regulate the structure of skin bacterial communities on amphibians. In light of recent discoveries that some bacteria on amphibian skin have antifungal activity, our finding suggests that host-specific bacteria may have a role in the species-specific resistance to fungal pathogens. PMID:21955991

  6. Diversity of Bacterial Communities of Fitness Center Surfaces in a U.S. Metropolitan Area

    PubMed Central

    Mukherjee, Nabanita; Dowd, Scot E.; Wise, Andy; Kedia, Sapna; Vohra, Varun; Banerjee, Pratik

    2014-01-01

    Public fitness centers and exercise facilities have been implicated as possible sources for transmitting community-acquired bacterial infections. However, the overall diversity of the bacterial community residing on the surfaces in these indoor environments is still unknown. In this study, we investigated the overall bacterial ecology of selected fitness centers in a metropolitan area (Memphis, TN, USA) utilizing culture-independent pyrosequencing of the 16S rRNA genes. Samples were collected from the skin-contact surfaces (e.g., exercise instruments, floor mats, handrails, etc.) within fitness centers. Taxonomical composition revealed the abundance of Firmicutes phyla, followed by Proteobacter and Actinobacteria, with a total of 17 bacterial families and 25 bacterial genera. Most of these bacterial genera are of human and environmental origin (including, air, dust, soil, and water). Additionally, we found the presence of some pathogenic or potential pathogenic bacterial genera including Salmonella, Staphylococcus, Klebsiella, and Micrococcus. Staphylococcus was found to be the most prevalent genus. Presence of viable forms of these pathogens elevates risk of exposure of any susceptible individuals. Several factors (including personal hygiene, surface cleaning and disinfection schedules of the facilities) may be the reasons for the rich bacterial diversity found in this study. The current finding underscores the need to increase public awareness on the importance of personal hygiene and sanitation for public gym users. PMID:25479039

  7. Higher-Level Snake Phylogeny Inferred from Mitochondrial DNA Sequences of 12s rRNA and 16s rRNA Genes

    E-print Network

    Hedges, Blair

    Higher-Level Snake Phylogeny Inferred from Mitochondrial DNA Sequences of 12s rRNA and 16s r sequenced to determine the phylogenetic relationships among the major clades of snakes. Thirty-six species families of lizards. Snakes were found to constitute a monophyletic group (confidence probability [CP] = 96

  8. IDENTIFICATION OF ACTIVE BACTERIAL COMMUNITIES IN A MODEL DRINKING WATER BIOFILM SYSTEM USING 16S RRNA-BASED CLONE LIBRARIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Recent phylogenetic studies have used DNA as the target molecule for the development of environmental 16S rDNA clone libraries. As DNA may persist in the environment, DNA-based libraries cannot be used to identify metabolically active bacteria in water systems. In this study, a...

  9. The bacterial community composition of the bovine rumen detected using pyrosequencing of 16S rRNA genes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The rumen as a complex microbial ecosystem plays a critical role in sustainable agriculture. Rumen microorganisms perform important biochemical conversions, including the fermentation of plant fiber to small molecules such as short-chain fatty acids for meat and dairy production. In this study, we s...

  10. Chimeric 16S rRNA sequence formation and detection in Sanger and 454-pyrosequenced PCR amplicons

    PubMed Central

    Haas, Brian J.; Gevers, Dirk; Earl, Ashlee M.; Feldgarden, Mike; Ward, Doyle V.; Giannoukos, Georgia; Ciulla, Dawn; Tabbaa, Diana; Highlander, Sarah K.; Sodergren, Erica; Methé, Barbara; DeSantis, Todd Z.; Petrosino, Joseph F.; Knight, Rob; Birren, Bruce W.

    2011-01-01

    Bacterial diversity among environmental samples is commonly assessed with PCR-amplified 16S rRNA gene (16S) sequences. Perceived diversity, however, can be influenced by sample preparation, primer selection, and formation of chimeric 16S amplification products. Chimeras are hybrid products between multiple parent sequences that can be falsely interpreted as novel organisms, thus inflating apparent diversity. We developed a new chimera detection tool called Chimera Slayer (CS). CS detects chimeras with greater sensitivity than previous methods, performs well on short sequences such as those produced by the 454 Life Sciences (Roche) Genome Sequencer, and can scale to large data sets. By benchmarking CS performance against sequences derived from a controlled DNA mixture of known organisms and a simulated chimera set, we provide insights into the factors that affect chimera formation such as sequence abundance, the extent of similarity between 16S genes, and PCR conditions. Chimeras were found to reproducibly form among independent amplifications and contributed to false perceptions of sample diversity and the false identification of novel taxa, with less-abundant species exhibiting chimera rates exceeding 70%. Shotgun metagenomic sequences of our mock community appear to be devoid of 16S chimeras, supporting a role for shotgun metagenomics in validating novel organisms discovered in targeted sequence surveys. PMID:21212162

  11. Seasonal and regional diversity of maple sap microbiota revealed using community PCR fingerprinting and 16S rRNA gene clone libraries.

    PubMed

    Filteau, Marie; Lagacé, Luc; LaPointe, Gisèle; Roy, Denis

    2010-04-01

    An arbitrary primed community PCR fingerprinting technique based on capillary electrophoresis was developed to study maple sap microbial community characteristics among 19 production sites in Québec over the tapping season. Presumptive fragment identification was made with corresponding fingerprint profiles of bacterial isolate cultures. Maple sap microbial communities were subsequently compared using a representative subset of 13 16S rRNA gene clone libraries followed by gene sequence analysis. Results from both methods indicated that all maple sap production sites and flow periods shared common microbiota members, but distinctive features also existed. Changes over the season in relative abundance of predominant populations showed evidence of a common pattern. Pseudomonas (64%) and Rahnella (8%) were the most abundantly and frequently represented genera of the 2239 sequences analyzed. Janthinobacterium, Leuconostoc, Lactococcus, Weissella, Epilithonimonas and Sphingomonas were revealed as occasional contaminants in maple sap. Maple sap microbiota showed a low level of deep diversity along with a high variation of similar 16S rRNA gene sequences within the Pseudomonas genus. Predominance of Pseudomonas is suggested as a typical feature of maple sap microbiota across geographical regions, production sites, and sap flow periods. PMID:20202776

  12. Analysis of 16S rRNA and mxaF genes revealing insights into Methylobacterium niche-specific plant association

    PubMed Central

    Dourado, Manuella Nóbrega; Andreote, Fernando Dini; Dini-Andreote, Francisco; Conti, Raphael; Araújo, Janete Magali; Araújo, Welington Luiz

    2012-01-01

    The genus Methylobacterium comprises pink-pigmented facultative methylotrophic (PPFM) bacteria, known to be an important plant-associated bacterial group. Species of this group, described as plant-nodulating, have the dual capacity of producing cytokinin and enzymes, such as pectinase and cellulase, involved in systemic resistance induction and nitrogen fixation under specific plant environmental conditions. The aim hereby was to evaluate the phylogenetic distribution of Methylobacterium spp. isolates from different host plants. Thus, a comparative analysis between sequences from structural (16S rRNA) and functional mxaF (which codifies for a subunit of the enzyme methanol dehydrogenase) ubiquitous genes, was undertaken. Notably, some Methylobacterium spp. isolates are generalists through colonizing more than one host plant, whereas others are exclusively found in certain specific plant-species. Congruency between phylogeny and specific host inhabitance was higher in the mxaF gene than in the 16S rRNA, a possible indication of function-based selection in this niche. Therefore, in a first stage, plant colonization by Methylobacterium spp. could represent generalist behavior, possibly related to microbial competition and adaptation to a plant environment. Otherwise, niche-specific colonization is apparently impelled by the host plant. PMID:22481887

  13. Assessment of Microbial Diversity in Four Southwestern United States Soils by 16S rRNA Gene Terminal Restriction Fragment Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Dunbar, John; Ticknor, Lawrence O.; Kuske, Cheryl R.

    2000-01-01

    The ability of terminal restriction fragment (T-RFLP or TRF) profiles of 16S rRNA genes to provide useful information about the relative diversity of complex microbial communities was investigated by comparison with other methods. Four soil communities representing two pinyon rhizosphere and two between-tree (interspace) soil environments were compared by analysis of 16S rRNA gene clone libraries and culture collections (Dunbar et al., Appl. Environ. Microbiol. 65:1662–1669, 1998) and by analysis of 16S rDNA TRF profiles of community DNA. The TRF method was able to differentiate the four communities in a manner consistent with previous comparisons of the communities by analysis of 16S rDNA clone libraries. TRF profiles were not useful for calculating and comparing traditional community richness or evenness values among the four soil environments. Statistics calculated from RsaI, HhaI, HaeIII, and MspI profiles of each community were inconsistent, and the combined data were not significantly different between samples. The detection sensitivity of the method was tested. In standard PCRs, a seeded population comprising 0.1 to 1% of the total community could be detected. The combined results demonstrate that TRF analysis is an excellent method for rapidly comparing the relationships between bacterial communities in environmental samples. However, for highly complex communities, the method appears unable to provide classical measures of relative community diversity. PMID:10877790

  14. Singly modified amikacin and tobramycin derivatives show increased rRNA A-site binding and higher potency against resistant bacteria.

    PubMed

    Fair, Richard J; McCoy, Lisa S; Hensler, Mary E; Aguilar, Bernice; Nizet, Victor; Tor, Yitzhak

    2014-09-01

    Semisynthetic derivatives of the clinically useful aminoglycosides tobramycin and amikacin were prepared by selectively modifying their 6'' positions with a variety of hydrogen bond donors and acceptors. Their binding to the rRNA A-site was probed using an in vitro FRET-based assay, and their antibacterial activities against several resistant strains (e.g., Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Klebsiella pneumonia, MRSA) were quantified by determining minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs). The most potent derivatives were evaluated for their eukaryotic cytotoxicity. Most analogues displayed higher affinity for the bacterial A-site than the parent compounds. Although most tobramycin analogues exhibited no improvement in antibacterial activity, several amikacin analogues showed potent and broad-spectrum antibacterial activity against resistant bacteria. Derivatives tested for eukaryotic cytotoxicity exhibited minimal toxicity, similar to the parent compounds. PMID:25055981

  15. Diagnosis and follow-up of Whipple's disease by amplification of the 16S rRNA gene of Tropheryma whippelii.

    PubMed

    Pron, B; Poyart, C; Abachin, E; Fest, T; Belanger, C; Bonnet, C; Capelle, P; Bretagne, J F; Fabianek, A; Girard, L; Hagège, H; Berche, P

    1999-01-01

    Amplification of the 16S rRNA gene of Tropheryma whippelii was performed in eight patients with Whipple's disease and 34 control patients to confirm a diagnosis of Whipple's disease and to monitor the course of disease. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) tests were positive before treatment in 13 of 15 tissue samples from Whipple's disease patients (gut 8/8; lymph nodes 2/2; bone marrow 1/2; peripheral blood 2/3), in contrast to none of 54 tissue samples from controls. PCR tests converted to negative within 4-6 months in six of the Whipple's disease patients undergoing therapy. These results show that PCR is a reliable and useful tool for diagnosis of Whipple's disease and for monitoring bacterial elimination during antibiotic therapy. PMID:10192717

  16. Bacterial Community Composition Associated with Chironomid Egg Masses

    PubMed Central

    Senderovich, Yigal; Halpern, Malka

    2012-01-01

    Chironomids (Diptera: Chironomidae) are the most widely distributed and often the most abundant insect in freshwater. They undergo a complete metamorphosis of four life stages, of which the egg, larva, and pupae are aquatic and the adult is terrestrial. Chironomid egg masses were found to be natural reservoirs of Vibrio cholerae and Aeromonas species. To expand the knowledge of the endogenous bacterial community associated with chironomid egg masses, denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis and clone analysis of 16S rRNA gene libraries were used in this study. Bacterial community composition associated with chironomid egg masses was found to be stable among different sampling periods. Cloned libraries of egg masses revealed that about 40% of the clones were related to bacteria known to degrade various toxicants. These findings were further supported when bacterial species that showed resistance to different toxic metals were isolated from egg masses and larval samples. Chironomids are found under a wide range of water conditions and are able to survive pollutants. However, little is known about their protective mechanisms under these conditions. Chironomid egg masses are inhabited by a stable endogenous bacterial community, which may potentially play a role in protecting chironomids from toxicants in polluted environments. Further study is needed to support this hypothesis. PMID:23461272

  17. Molecular detection of bacterial contamination in gnotobiotic rodent units

    PubMed Central

    Packey, Christopher D; Shanahan, Michael T; Manick, Sayeed; Bower, Maureen A; Ellermann, Melissa; Tonkonogy, Susan L; Carroll, Ian M; Sartor, R Balfour

    2013-01-01

    Gnotobiotic rodents provide an important technique to study the functional roles of commensal bacteria in host physiology and pathophysiology. To ensure sterility, these animals must be screened frequently for contamination. The traditional screening approaches of culturing and Gram staining feces have inherent limitations, as many bacteria are uncultivable and fecal Gram stains are difficult to interpret. Thus, we developed and validated molecular methods to definitively detect and identify contamination in germ-free (GF) and selectively colonized animals. Fresh fecal pellets were collected from rodents housed in GF isolators, spontaneously contaminated ex-GF isolators, selectively colonized isolators and specific pathogen-free (SPF) conditions. DNA isolated from mouse and rat fecal samples was amplified by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and subjected to quantitative PCR (qPCR) using universal primers that amplify the 16S rRNA gene from all bacterial groups. PCR products were sequenced to identify contaminating bacterial species. Random amplification of polymorphic DNA (RAPD) PCR profiles verified bacterial inoculation of selectively colonized animals. These PCR techniques more accurately detected and identified GF isolator contamination than current standard approaches. These molecular techniques can be utilized to more definitively screen GF and selectively colonized animals for bacterial contamination when Gram stain and/or culture results are un-interpretable or inconsistent. PMID:23887190

  18. Bacterial succession in a glacier foreland of the High Arctic

    PubMed Central

    Schütte, Ursel M.E.; Abdo, Zaid; Bent, Stephen J.; Williams, Christopher J.; Schneider, G. Maria; Solheim, Bjørn; Forney, Larry J.

    2009-01-01

    Succession is defined as changes in biological communities over time. It has been extensively studied in plant communities, but little is known about bacterial succession, in particular in environments such as High Arctic glacier forelands. Bacteria carry out key processes in the development of soil, biogeochemical cycling, and facilitating plant colonization. In this study we sampled two roughly parallel chronosequences in the foreland of Midre Lovén glacier on Svalbard, Norway and tested whether any of several factors were associated with changes in the structure of bacterial communities, including time after glacier retreat, horizontal variation caused by the distance between chronosequences, and vertical variation at two soil depths. The structures of soil bacterial communities at different locations were compared using terminal restriction fragment length polymorphisms (T-RFLP) of 16S rRNA genes, and the data were analyzed by sequential analysis of log-linear statistical models. While no significant differences in community structure were detected between the two chronosequences, statistically significant differences between sampling locations in the surface and mineral soils could be demonstrated even though glacier forelands are patchy and dynamic environments. These findings suggest bacterial succession occurs in High Arctic glacier forelands but may differ in different soil depths. PMID:19587774

  19. Determining the culturability of the rumen bacterial microbiome

    PubMed Central

    Creevey, Christopher J; Kelly, William J; Henderson, Gemma; Leahy, Sinead C

    2014-01-01

    The goal of the Hungate1000 project is to generate a reference set of rumen microbial genome sequences. Toward this goal we have carried out a meta-analysis using information from culture collections, scientific literature, and the NCBI and RDP databases and linked this with a comparative study of several rumen 16S rRNA gene-based surveys. In this way we have attempted to capture a snapshot of rumen bacterial diversity to examine the culturable fraction of the rumen bacterial microbiome. Our analyses have revealed that for cultured rumen bacteria, there are many genera without a reference genome sequence. Our examination of culture-independent studies highlights that there are few novel but many uncultured taxa within the rumen bacterial microbiome. Taken together these results have allowed us to compile a list of cultured rumen isolates that are representative of abundant, novel and core bacterial species in the rumen. In addition, we have identified taxa, particularly within the phylum Bacteroidetes, where further cultivation efforts are clearly required. This information is being used to guide the isolation efforts and selection of bacteria from the rumen microbiota for sequencing through the Hungate1000. PMID:24986151

  20. Bacterial succession in a glacier foreland of the High Arctic.

    PubMed

    Schütte, Ursel M E; Abdo, Zaid; Bent, Stephen J; Williams, Christopher J; Schneider, G Maria; Solheim, Bjørn; Forney, Larry J

    2009-11-01

    Succession is defined as changes in biological communities over time. It has been extensively studied in plant communities, but little is known about bacterial succession, in particular in environments such as High Arctic glacier forelands. Bacteria carry out key processes in the development of soil, biogeochemical cycling and facilitating plant colonization. In this study we sampled two roughly parallel chronosequences in the foreland of Midre Lovén glacier on Svalbard, Norway and tested whether any of several factors were associated with changes in the structure of bacterial communities, including time after glacier retreat, horizontal variation caused by the distance between chronosequences and vertical variation at two soil depths. The structures of soil bacterial communities at different locations were compared using terminal restriction fragment length polymorphisms of 16S rRNA genes, and the data were analyzed by sequential analysis of log-linear statistical models. Although no significant differences in community structure were detected between the two chronosequences, statistically significant differences between sampling locations in the surface and mineral soils could be demonstrated even though glacier forelands are patchy and dynamic environments. These findings suggest that bacterial succession occurs in High Arctic glacier forelands but may differ in different soil depths. PMID:19587774

  1. Empirical and Theoretical Bacterial Diversity in Four Arizona Soils

    PubMed Central

    Dunbar, John; Barns, Susan M.; Ticknor, Lawrence O.; Kuske, Cheryl R.

    2002-01-01

    Understanding patterns of biodiversity in microbial communities is severely constrained by the difficulty of adequately sampling these complex systems. We illustrate the problem with empirical data from small surveys (200-member 16S rRNA gene clone libraries) of four bacterial soil communities from two locations in Arizona. Among the four surveys, nearly 500 species-level groups (Dunbar et al., Appl. Environ. Microbiol. 65:662-1669, 1999) and 21 bacterial divisions were documented, including four new candidate divisions provisionally designated SC1, SC2, SC3, and SC4. We devised a simple approach to constructing theoretical null models of bacterial species abundance. These null models provide, for the first time, detailed descriptions of soil bacterial community structure that can be used to guide experimental design. Models based on a lognormal distribution were consistent with the observed sizes of the four communities and the richness of the clone surveys. Predictions from the models showed that the species richness of small surveys from complex communities is reproducible, whereas the species composition is not. By using the models, we can now estimate the required survey scale to document specified fractions of community diversity. For example, documentation of half the species in each model community would require surveys of 16,284 to 44,000 individuals. However, quantitative comparisons of half the species in two communities would require surveys at least 10-fold larger for each community. PMID:12039765

  2. Inactivation of the cluster of rRNA genes in the second chromosomal pair of the Aleutian mink

    SciTech Connect

    Grafodatskii, A.S.; Lushnikova, T.P.; Vorob'eva, N.V.

    1985-11-01

    The authors present the results of their in situ mapping of the RNA genes in the chromosomes of Aleutian mink. The ribosomal RNA was extracted from the mink liver and analyzed electrophoretically. The 28S and 18S rRNA fractions were separated in 5-25% sucrose gradient containing 10 mM Tris-HCl, pH 7.4, 1.0 mM EDTA, and 100 mM NaCl. Centrifugation was done at 2/sup 0/C for 20 h in rotor SW-27 at 21,000 rpm. The 18S rRNA was used to synthesize cDNA in the system of RNA-dependent DNA polymerase of Escherichia coli with the exception that the template concentration was raised to 40 micrograms/ml and that of enzyme to 1080 units of activity/ml. The electrophoretic analysis in polyacrylamide gel with formamide showed that the size of /sup 3/H-cDNA was 4-10S. Specific radioactivity was 10/sup 8/ disintegrations min x microgram. Hybridization on the chromosomal preparations was done by the method described earlier. /sup 3/H-cDNA of the 18S mink RNA was applied to the preparation at the concentration of 0.05 micrograms/ml and hybridized in 3 x SSC for 24 h at 65/sup 0/C. The preparations were covered with photoemulsion type M and exposed for 4 months. The chromosomal preparations were made from the bone marrow cells by the standard method. The silver-staining of the nucleolus organizing regions (NOR) was done by the method of Bloom and Goodpasture.

  3. B chromosomes showing active ribosomal RNA genes contribute insignificant amounts of rRNA in the grasshopper Eyprepocnemis plorans.

    PubMed

    Ruiz-Estévez, Mercedes; Badisco, Liesbeth; Broeck, Jozef Vanden; Perfectti, Francisco; López-León, María Dolores; Cabrero, Josefa; Camacho, Juan Pedro M

    2014-12-01

    The genetic inertness of supernumerary (B) chromosomes has recently been called into question after finding several cases of gene activity on them. The grasshopper Eyprepocnemis plorans harbors B chromosomes containing large amounts of ribosomal DNA (rDNA) units, some of which are eventually active, but the amount of rRNA transcripts contributed by B chromosomes, compared to those of the standard (A) chromosomes, is unknown. Here, we address this question by means of quantitative PCR (qPCR) for two different ITS2 amplicons, one coming from rDNA units located in both A and B chromosomes (ITS2(A+B)) and the other being specific to B chromosomes (ITS2(B)). We analyzed six body parts in nine males showing rDNA expression in their B chromosomes in the testis. Amplification of the ITS2(B) amplicon was successful in RNA extracted from all six body parts analyzed, but showed relative quantification (RQ) values four orders of magnitude lower than those obtained for the ITS(A+B) amplicon. RQ values differed significantly between body parts for the two amplicons, with testis, accessory gland and wing muscle showing threefold higher values than head, gastric cecum and hind leg. We conclude that the level of B-specific rDNA expression is extremely low even in individuals where B chromosome rDNA is not completely silenced. Bearing in mind that B chromosomes carry the largest rDNA cluster in the E. plorans genome, we also infer that the relative contribution of B chromosome rRNA genes to ribosome biogenesis is insignificant, at least in the body parts analyzed. PMID:24997085

  4. Evaluation of composition and individual variability of rumen microbiota in yaks by 16S rRNA high-throughput sequencing technology.

    PubMed

    Guo, Wei; Li, Ying; Wang, Lizhi; Wang, Jiwen; Xu, Qin; Yan, Tianhai; Xue, Bai

    2015-08-01

    The Yak (Bos grunniens) is a unique species of ruminant animals that is important to agriculture of the Tibetan plateau, and has a complex intestinal microbial community. The objective of the present study was to characterize the composition and individual variability of microbiota in the rumen of yaks using 16S rRNA gene high-throughput sequencing technique. Rumen samples used in the present study were obtained from grazing adult male yaks (n = 6) in a commercial farm in Ganzi Autonomous Prefecture of Sichuan Province, China. Universal prokaryote primers were used to target the V4-V5 hypervariable region of 16S rRNA gene. A total of 7200 operational taxonomic units (OTUs) were obtained after sequence filtering and chimera removal. Within these OTUs, 0.56% belonged to Archaea (40 OTUs), 7.19% to unassigned species (518 OTUs), and the remaining OTUs (6642) in all samples were of bacterial origin. When examining the community structure of bacteria, we identified 23 phyla within 159 families after taxonomic summarization. Bacteroidetes and Firmicutes were the predominant phyla accounting for 39.68% (SD = 0.05) and 45.90% (SD = 0.06), respectively. Moreover, 3764 OTUs were identified as shared OTUs (i.e. represented in all yaks) and belonged to 35 genera, exhibiting highly variable abundance across individual samples. Phylogenetic placement of these genera across individual samples was examined. In addition, we evaluated the distance among the 6 rumen samples by adding taxon phylogeny using UniFrac, representing 24.1% of average distance. In summary, the current study reveals a shared rumen microbiome and phylogenetic lineage and presents novel information on composition and individual variability of the bacterial community in the rumen of yaks. PMID:25911445

  5. Spatial distribution of bacterial communities driven by multiple environmental factors in a beach wetland of the largest freshwater lake in China

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Xia; Peng, Xiao-Jue; Jin, Bin-Song; Xiao, Ming; Chen, Jia-Kuan; Li, Bo; Fang, Chang-Ming; Nie, Ming

    2015-01-01

    The spatial distributions of bacterial communities may be driven by multiple environmental factors. Thus, understanding the relationships between bacterial distribution and environmental factors is critical for understanding wetland stability and the functioning of freshwater lakes. However, little research on the bacterial communities in deep sediment layers exists. In this study, thirty clone libraries of 16S rRNA were constructed from a beach wetland of the Poyang Lake along both horizontal (distance to the water-land junction) and vertical (sediment depth) gradients to assess the effects of sediment properties on bacterial community structure and diversity. Our results showed that bacterial diversity increased along the horizontal gradient and decreased along the vertical gradient. The heterogeneous sediment properties along gradients substantially affected the dominant bacterial groups at the phylum and species levels. For example, the NH+4 concentration decreased with increasing depth, which was positively correlated with the relative abundance of Alphaproteobacteria. The changes in bacterial diversity and dominant bacterial groups showed that the top layer had a different bacterial community structure than the deeper layers. Principal component analysis revealed that both gradients, not each gradient independently, contributed to the shift in the bacterial community structure. A multiple linear regression model explained the changes in bacterial diversity and richness along the depth and distance gradients. Overall, our results suggest that spatial gradients associated with sediment properties shaped the bacterial communities in the Poyang Lake beach wetland. PMID:25767466

  6. Contrasting spatial patterns and ecological attributes of soil bacterial and archaeal taxa across a landscape

    PubMed Central

    Constancias, Florentin; Saby, Nicolas P A; Terrat, Sébastien; Dequiedt, Samuel; Horrigue, Wallid; Nowak, Virginie; Guillemin, Jean-Philippe; Biju-Duval, Luc; Chemidlin Prévost-Bouré, Nicolas; Ranjard, Lionel

    2015-01-01

    Even though recent studies have clarified the influence and hierarchy of environmental filters on bacterial community structure, those constraining bacterial populations variations remain unclear. In consequence, our ability to understand to ecological attributes of soil bacteria and to predict microbial community response to environmental stress is therefore limited. Here, we characterized the bacterial community composition and the various bacterial taxonomic groups constituting the community across an agricultural landscape of 12 km2, by using a 215 × 215 m systematic grid representing 278 sites to precisely decipher their spatial distribution and drivers at this scale. The bacterial and Archaeal community composition was characterized by applying 16S rRNA gene pyrosequencing directly to soil DNA from samples. Geostatistics tools were used to reveal the heterogeneous distribution of bacterial composition at this scale. Soil physical parameters and land management explained a significant amount of variation, suggesting that environmental selection is the major process shaping bacterial composition. All taxa systematically displayed also a heterogeneous and particular distribution patterns. Different relative influences of soil characteristics, land use and space were observed, depending on the taxa, implying that selection and spatial processes might be differentially but not exclusively involved for each bacterial phylum. Soil pH was a major factor determining the distribution of most of the bacterial taxa and especially the most important factor explaining the spatial patterns of ?-Proteobacteria and Planctomycetes. Soil texture, organic carbon content and quality were more specific to a few number of taxa (e.g., ?-Proteobacteria and Chlorobi). Land management also influenced the distribution of bacterial taxa across the landscape and revealed different type of response to cropping intensity (positive, negative, neutral or hump-backed relationships) according to phyla. Altogether, this study provided valuable clues about the ecological behavior of soil bacterial and archaeal taxa at an agricultural landscape scale and could be useful for developing sustainable strategies of land management. PMID:25922908

  7. Evolution of bacterial consortia in spontaneously started rye sourdoughs during two months of daily propagation.

    PubMed

    Bessmeltseva, Marianna; Viiard, Ene; Simm, Jaak; Paalme, Toomas; Sarand, Inga

    2014-01-01

    The evolution of bacterial consortia was studied in six semi-solid rye sourdoughs during long-term backslopping at different temperatures. Each rye sourdough was started spontaneously in a laboratory (dough yield 200), propagated at either 20°C or 30°C, and renewed daily at an inoculation rate of 1?10 for 56 days. The changes in bacterial diversity over time were followed by both DGGE coupled with partial 16S rRNA gene sequencing and pyrosequencing of bar-coded 16S rRNA gene amplicons. Four species from the genus Lactobacillus (brevis, crustorum, plantarum, and paralimentarius) were detected in different combinations in all sourdoughs after 56 propagation cycles. Facultative heterofermentative lactic acid bacteria dominated in sourdoughs fermented at 30°C, while both obligate and facultative heterofermentative LAB were found to dominate in sourdoughs fermented at 20°C. After 56 propagation cycles, Kazachstania unispora (formerly Saccharomyces unisporus) was identified as the only yeast species that dominated in sourdoughs fermented at 20°C, while different combinations of strains from four yeast species (Kazachstania unispora, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Candida krusei and Candida glabrata) were detected in sourdoughs propagated at 30°C. The evolution of bacterial communities in sourdoughs fermented at the same temperature did not follow the same time course and changes in the composition of dominant and subdominant bacterial communities occurred even after six weeks of backslopping. PMID:24748058

  8. Bacterial diversity and biogeography in deep-sea surface sediments of the South Atlantic Ocean.

    PubMed

    Schauer, Regina; Bienhold, Christina; Ramette, Alban; Harder, Jens

    2010-02-01

    Microbial biogeographic patterns in the deep sea depend on the ability of microorganisms to disperse. One possible limitation to microbial dispersal may be the Walvis Ridge that separates the Antarctic Lower Circumpolar Deep Water from the North Atlantic Deep Water. We examined bacterial communities in three basins of the eastern South Atlantic Ocean to determine diversity and biogeography of bacterial communities in deep-sea surface sediments. The analysis of 16S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) gene clone libraries in each basin revealed a high diversity, representing 521 phylotypes with 98% identity in 1051 sequences. Phylotypes affiliated with Gammaproteobacteria, Deltaproteobacteria and Acidobacteria were present in all three basins. The distribution of these shared phylotypes seemed to be influenced neither by the Walvis Ridge nor by different deep water masses, suggesting a high dispersal capability, as also indicated by low distance-decay relationships. However, the total bacterial diversity showed significant differences between the basins, based on 16S rRNA gene sequences as well as on terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism fingerprints. Noticeably, both geographic distance and environmental heterogeneity influenced bacterial diversity at intermediate (10-3000 km) and large scales (>3000 km), indicating a complex interplay of local contemporary environmental effects and dispersal limitation. PMID:19829317

  9. Composition, uniqueness and variability of the epiphytic bacterial community of the green alga Ulva australis

    PubMed Central

    Burke, Catherine; Thomas, Torsten; Lewis, Matt; Steinberg, Peter; Kjelleberg, Staffan

    2011-01-01

    Green Ulvacean marine macroalgae are distributed worldwide in coastal tidal and subtidal ecosystems. As for many living surfaces in the marine environment, little is known concerning the epiphytic bacterial biofilm communities that inhabit algal surfaces. This study reports on the largest published libraries of near full-length 16S rRNA genes from a marine algal surface (5293 sequences from six samples) allowing for an in-depth assessment of the diversity and phylogenetic profile of the bacterial community on a green Ulvacean alga. Large 16S rRNA gene libraries of surrounding seawater were also used to determine the uniqueness of this bacterial community. The surface of Ulva australis is dominated by sequences of Alphaproteobacteria and the Bacteroidetes, especially within the Rhodobacteriaceae, Sphingomonadaceae, Flavobacteriaceae and Sapropiraceae families. Seawater libraries were also dominated by Alphaproteobacteria and Bacteroidetes sequences, but were shown to be clearly distinct from U. australis libraries through the clustering of sequences into operational taxonomic units and Bray–Curtis similarity analysis. Almost no similarity was observed between these two environments at the species level, and only minor similarity was observed at levels of sequence clustering representing clades of bacteria within family and genus taxonomic groups. Variability between libraries of U. australis was relatively high, and a consistent sub-population of bacterial species was not detected. The competitive lottery model, originally derived to explain diversity in coral reef fishes, may explain the pattern of colonization of this algal surface. PMID:21048801

  10. Mechanisms of bacterial pathogenicity

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, J; Schurr, M; LeBlanc, C; Ramamurthy, R; Buchanan, K; Nickerson, C

    2002-01-01

    Pathogenic bacteria utilise a number of mechanisms to cause disease in human hosts. Bacterial pathogens express a wide range of molecules that bind host cell targets to facilitate a variety of different host responses. The molecular strategies used by bacteria to interact with the host can be unique to specific pathogens or conserved across several different species. A key to fighting bacterial disease is the identification and characterisation of all these different strategies. The availability of complete genome sequences for several bacterial pathogens coupled with bioinformatics will lead to significant advances toward this goal. PMID:11930024

  11. Bacterial challenges in food

    PubMed Central

    Collee, J. G.

    1974-01-01

    Qualitative and quantitative aspects of bacterial challenges that might be encountered in food are discussed with reference to recognized and relatively unrecognized hazards. Mechanisms of pathogenicity are reviewed and the populations at risk are noted. The bacterial content of food as it is served at table merits more study. The challenge of prevention by education is discussed. Indirect bacterial challenges in our food are considered. The real challenge of diagnosis depends upon an awareness of a complex range of conditions; the importance of effective communication with efficient laboratory and epidemiological services is stressed. There is an increasing need for care in the preparation and distribution of food. PMID:4467860

  12. Performance of 18S rRNA in littorinid phylogeny (Gastropoda: Caenogastropoda).

    PubMed

    Winnepenninckx, B M; Reid, D G; Backeljau, T

    1998-11-01

    In the past, 18S rRNA sequences have proved to be very useful for tracing ancient divergences but were rarely used for resolving more recent ones. Moreover, it was suggested that the molecule does not contain useful information to resolve divergences which took place during less than 40 Myr. The present paper takes littorinid phylogeny as a case study to reevaluate the utility of the molecule for resolving recent divergences. Two data sets for nine species of the snail family Littorinidae were analyzed, both separately and combined. One data set comprised 7 new complete 18S rRNA sequences aligned with 2 published littorinid sequences; the other comprised 12 morphological, 1 biochemical, and 2 18S rRNA secondary structure characters. On the basis of its ability to confirm generally accepted relationships and the congruence of results derived from the different data sets, it is concluded that 18S rRNA sequences do contain information to resolve "rapid" cladogenetic events, provided that they occurred in the not too distant past. 18S rRNA sequences yielded support for (1) the branching order (L. littorea, (L. obtusata, (L. saxatilis, L. compressa))) and (2) the basal position of L. striata in the Littorina clade. PMID:9797409

  13. Deep sequencing of subseafloor eukaryotic rRNA reveals active Fungi across marine subsurface provinces.

    PubMed

    Orsi, William; Biddle, Jennifer F; Edgcomb, Virginia

    2013-01-01

    The deep marine subsurface is a vast habitat for microbial life where cells may live on geologic timescales. Because DNA in sediments may be preserved on long timescales, ribosomal RNA (rRNA) is suggested to be a proxy for the active fraction of a microbial community in the subsurface. During an investigation of eukaryotic 18S rRNA by amplicon pyrosequencing, unique profiles of Fungi were found across a range of marine subsurface provinces including ridge flanks, continental margins, and abyssal plains. Subseafloor fungal populations exhibit statistically significant correlations with total organic carbon (TOC), nitrate, sulfide, and dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC). These correlations are supported by terminal restriction length polymorphism (TRFLP) analyses of fungal rRNA. Geochemical correlations with fungal pyrosequencing and TRFLP data from this geographically broad sample set suggests environmental selection of active Fungi in the marine subsurface. Within the same dataset, ancient rRNA signatures were recovered from plants and diatoms in marine sediments ranging from 0.03 to 2.7 million years old, suggesting that rRNA from some eukaryotic taxa may be much more stable than previously considered in the marine subsurface. PMID:23418556

  14. Deep Sequencing of Subseafloor Eukaryotic rRNA Reveals Active Fungi across Marine Subsurface Provinces

    PubMed Central

    Orsi, William; Biddle, Jennifer F.; Edgcomb, Virginia

    2013-01-01

    The deep marine subsurface is a vast habitat for microbial life where cells may live on geologic timescales. Because DNA in sediments may be preserved on long timescales, ribosomal RNA (rRNA) is suggested to be a proxy for the active fraction of a microbial community in the subsurface. During an investigation of eukaryotic 18S rRNA by amplicon pyrosequencing, unique profiles of Fungi were found across a range of marine subsurface provinces including ridge flanks, continental margins, and abyssal plains. Subseafloor fungal populations exhibit statistically significant correlations with total organic carbon (TOC), nitrate, sulfide, and dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC). These correlations are supported by terminal restriction length polymorphism (TRFLP) analyses of fungal rRNA. Geochemical correlations with fungal pyrosequencing and TRFLP data from this geographically broad sample set suggests environmental selection of active Fungi in the marine subsurface. Within the same dataset, ancient rRNA signatures were recovered from plants and diatoms in marine sediments ranging from 0.03 to 2.7 million years old, suggesting that rRNA from some eukaryotic taxa may be much more stable than previously considered in the marine subsurface. PMID:23418556

  15. Sequence and phylogenetic analysis of SSU rRNA gene of five microsporidia.

    PubMed

    Dong, ShiNan; Shen, ZhongYuan; Xu, Li; Zhu, Feng

    2010-01-01

    The complete small subunit rRNA (SSU rRNA) gene sequences of five microsporidia including Nosema heliothidis, and four novel microsporidia isolated from Pieris rapae, Phyllobrotica armta, Hemerophila atrilineata, and Bombyx mori, respectively, were obtained by PCR amplification, cloning, and sequencing. Two phylogenetic trees based on SSU rRNA sequences had been constructed by using Neighbor-Joining of Phylip software and UPGMA of MEGA4.0 software. The taxonomic status of four novel microsporidia was determined by analysis of phylogenetic relationship, length, G+C content, identity, and divergence of the SSU rRNA sequences. The results showed that the microsporidia isolated from Pieris rapae, Phyllobrotica armta, and Hemerophila atrilineata have close phylogenetic relationship with the Nosema, while another microsporidium isolated from Bombyx mori is closely related to the Endoreticulatus. So, we temporarily classify three novel species of microsporidia to genus Nosema, as Nosema sp. PR, Nosema sp. PA, Nosema sp. HA. Another is temporarily classified into genus Endoreticulatus, as Endoreticulatus sp. Zhenjiang. The result indicated as well that it is feasible and valuable to elucidate phylogenetic relationships and taxonomic status of microsporidian species by analyzing information from SSU rRNA sequences of microsporidia. PMID:19768503

  16. The effect of the macrolide antibiotic tylosin on microbial diversity in the canine small intestine as demonstrated by massive parallel 16S rRNA gene sequencing

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Recent studies have shown that the fecal microbiota is generally resilient to short-term antibiotic administration, but some bacterial taxa may remain depressed for several months. Limited information is available about the effect of antimicrobials on small intestinal microbiota, an important contributor to gastrointestinal health. The antibiotic tylosin is often successfully used for the treatment of chronic diarrhea in dogs, but its exact mode of action and its effect on the intestinal microbiota remain unknown. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of tylosin on canine jejunal microbiota. Tylosin was administered at 20 to 22 mg/kg q 24 hr for 14 days to five healthy dogs, each with a pre-existing jejunal fistula. Jejunal brush samples were collected through the fistula on days 0, 14, and 28 (14 days after withdrawal of tylosin). Bacterial diversity was characterized using massive parallel 16S rRNA gene pyrosequencing. Results Pyrosequencing revealed a previously unrecognized species richness in the canine small intestine. Ten bacterial phyla were identified. Microbial populations were phylogenetically more similar during tylosin treatment. However, a remarkable inter-individual response was observed for specific taxa. Fusobacteria, Bacteroidales, and Moraxella tended to decrease. The proportions of Enterococcus-like organisms, Pasteurella spp., and Dietzia spp. increased significantly during tylosin administration (p < 0.05). The proportion of Escherichia coli-like organisms increased by day 28 (p = 0.04). These changes were not accompanied by any obvious clinical effects. On day 28, the phylogenetic composition of the microbiota was similar to day 0 in only 2 of 5 dogs. Bacterial diversity resembled the pre-treatment state in 3 of 5 dogs. Several bacterial taxa such as Spirochaetes, Streptomycetaceae, and Prevotellaceae failed to recover at day 28 (p < 0.05). Several bacterial groups considered to be sensitive to tylosin increased in their proportions. Conclusion Tylosin may lead to prolonged effects on the composition and diversity of jejunal microbiota. However, these changes were not associated with any short-term clinical signs of gastrointestinal disease in healthy dogs. Our results illustrate the complexity of the intestinal microbiota and the challenges associated with evaluating the effect of antibiotic administration on the various bacterial groups and their potential interactions. PMID:19799792

  17. Object extraction Object extraction

    E-print Network

    Giger, Christine

    (is a grass-roof a vegetation area?) · object ontologies are hierarchical (tree / forrest / vegetation · buildings · vegetation · roads #12;Interactive object extraction #12;Interactive object extraction angles in man-made structures · measurement accuracy of human operator is lower than that of automatic

  18. High bacterial diversity in epilithic biofilms of oligotrophic mountain lakes.

    PubMed

    Bartrons, Mireia; Catalan, Jordi; Casamayor, Emilio O

    2012-11-01

    Benthic microbial biofilms attached to rocks (epilithic) are major sites of carbon cycling and can dominate ecosystem primary production in oligotrophic lakes. We studied the bacterial community composition of littoral epilithic biofilms in five connected oligotrophic high mountain lakes located at different altitudes by genetic fingerprinting and clone libraries of the 16S rRNA gene. Different intra-lake samples were analyzed, and consistent changes in community structure (chlorophyll a and organic matter contents, and bacterial community composition) were observed along the altitudinal gradient, particularly related with the location of the lake above or below the treeline. Epilithic biofilm genetic fingerprints were both more diverse among lakes than within lakes and significantly different between montane (below the tree line) and alpine lakes (above the tree line). The genetic richness in the epilithic biofilm was much higher than in the plankton of the same lacustrine area studied in previous works, with significantly idiosyncratic phylogenetic composition (specifically distinct from lake plankton or mountain soils). Data suggest the coexistence of aerobic, anaerobic, phototrophic, and chemotrophic microorganisms in the biofilm, Bacteroidetes and Cyanobacteria being the most important bacterial taxa, followed by Alpha-, Beta-, Gamma-, and Deltaproteobacteria, Chlorobi, Planctomycetes, and Verrucomicrobia. The degree of novelty was especially high for epilithic Bacteroidetes, and up to 50 % of the sequences formed monophyletic clusters distantly related to any previously reported sequence. More than 35 % of the total sequences matched at <95 % identity to any previously reported 16S rRNA gene, indicating that alpine epilithic biofilms are unexplored habitats that contain a substantial degree of novelty within a short geographical distance. Further research is needed to determine whether these communities are involved in more biogeochemical pathways than previously thought. PMID:22622765

  19. Bacterial community analysis of drinking water biofilms in southern Sweden.

    PubMed

    Lührig, Katharina; Canbäck, Björn; Paul, Catherine J; Johansson, Tomas; Persson, Kenneth M; Rådström, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Next-generation sequencing of the V1-V2 and V3 variable regions of the 16S rRNA gene generated a total of 674,116 reads that described six distinct bacterial biofilm communities from both water meters and pipes. A high degree of reproducibility was demonstrated for the experimental and analytical work-flow by analyzing the communities present in parallel water meters, the rare occurrence of biological replicates within a working drinking water distribution system. The communities observed in water meters from households that did not complain about their drinking water were defined by sequences representing Proteobacteria (82-87%), with 22-40% of all sequences being classified as Sphingomonadaceae. However, a water meter biofilm community from a household with consumer reports of red water and flowing water containing elevated levels of iron and manganese had fewer sequences representing Proteobacteria (44%); only 0.6% of all sequences were classified as Sphingomonadaceae; and, in contrast to the other water meter communities, markedly more sequences represented Nitrospira and Pedomicrobium. The biofilm communities in pipes were distinct from those in water meters, and contained sequences that were identified as Mycobacterium, Nocardia, Desulfovibrio, and Sulfuricurvum. The approach employed in the present study resolved the bacterial diversity present in these biofilm communities as well as the differences that occurred in biofilms within a single distribution system, and suggests that next-generation sequencing of 16S rRNA amplicons can show changes in bacterial biofilm communities associated with different water qualities. PMID:25739379

  20. Development and Characterization of Stable Sediment-Free Anaerobic Bacterial Enrichment Cultures That Dechlorinate Aroclor 1260

    PubMed Central

    Bedard, Donna L.; Bailey, Jessica J.; Reiss, Brandon L.; Jerzak, Greta Van Slyke

    2006-01-01

    We have developed sediment-free anaerobic enrichment cultures that dechlorinate a broad spectrum of highly chlorinated polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs). The cultures were developed from Aroclor 1260-contaminated sediment from the Housatonic River in Lenox, MA. Sediment slurries were primed with 2,6-dibromobiphenyl to stimulate Process N dechlorination (primarily meta dechlorination), and sediment was gradually removed by successive transfers (10%) to minimal medium. The cultures grow on pyruvate, butyrate, or acetate plus H2. Gas chromatography-electron capture detector analysis demonstrated that the cultures extensively dechlorinate 50 to 500 ?g/ml of Aroclor 1260 at 22 to 24°C by Dechlorination Process N. Triplicate cultures of the eighth transfer without sediment dechlorinated 76% of the hexa- through nonachlorobiphenyls in Aroclor 1260 (250 ?g/ml) to tri- through pentachlorobiphenyls in 110 days. At least 64 PCB congeners, all of which are chlorinated on both rings and 47 of which have six or more chlorines, were substrates for this dechlorination. To characterize the bacterial diversity in the enrichments, we used eubacterial primers to amplify and clone 16S rRNA genes from DNA extracted from cultures grown on acetate plus H2. Restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis of 107 clones demonstrated the presence of Thauera-like Betaproteobacteria, Geobacter-like Deltaproteobacteria, Pseudomonas species, various Clostridiales, Bacteroidetes, Dehalococcoides of the Chloroflexi group, and unclassified Eubacteria. Our development of highly enriched, robust, stable, sediment-free cultures that extensively dechlorinate a highly chlorinated commercial PCB mixture is a major and unprecedented breakthrough in the field. It will enable intensive study of the organisms and genes responsible for a major PCB dechlorination process that occurs in the environment and could also lead to effective remediation applications. PMID:16597944

  1. Primary and secondary structures of Tetrahymena and aphid 5.8S rRNAs: structural features of 5.8S rRNA which interacts with the 28S rRNA containing the hidden break.

    PubMed

    Fujiwara, H; Ishikawa, H

    1982-09-11

    The Tetrahymena 5.8S rRNA is 154 nucleotides long, the shortest so far reported except for the split 5.8S rRNAs of Diptera (m5.8S plus 2S rRNA). In this molecule several nucleotides are deleted in the helix e (GC-rich stem) region. Upon constructing the secondary structure in accordance with "burp-gun" model, the Tetrahymena 5.8S rRNA forms a wide-open "muzzle" of the terminal regions due to both extra nucleotides and several unpaired bases. The aphid 5.8S rRNA consists of 161 nucleotides and can form stable helices in both terminal and helix e regions. As a whole, the secondary structure of Tetrahymena 5.8S rRNA resembles that of Bombyx 5.8S molecule while the aphid 5.8S rRNA shares several structural features with the HeLa 5.8S molecule. Likely, the 5.8S rRNA attached to the 28S rRNA with the hidden break differs in structure from those interacting with the 28S partners without the break. Nucleotide sequences of 5.8S rRNA in insects as well as in protozoans are not so conservative evolutionarily as in vertebrates. PMID:6815618

  2. Different bulk and active bacterial communities in cryoconite from the margin and interior of the Greenland ice sheet.

    PubMed

    Stibal, Marek; Schostag, Morten; Cameron, Karen A; Hansen, Lars H; Chandler, David M; Wadham, Jemma L; Jacobsen, Carsten S

    2015-04-01

    Biological processes in the supraglacial ecosystem, including cryoconite, contribute to nutrient cycling within the cryosphere and may affect surface melting, yet little is known of the diversity of the active microbes in these environments. We examined the bacterial abundance and community composition of cryoconite over a melt season at two contrasting sites at the margin and in the interior of the Greenland ice sheet, using sequence analysis and quantitative polymerase chain reaction of coextracted 16S rDNA and rRNA. Significant differences were found between bulk (rDNA) and potentially active (rRNA) communities, and between communities sampled from the two sites. Higher concentrations of rRNA than rDNA were detected at the interior site, whereas at the margin several orders of magnitude less rRNA was found compared with rDNA, which may be explained by a lower proportion of active bacteria at the margin site. The rRNA communities at both sites were dominated by a few taxa of Cyanobacteria and Alpha- and/or Betaproteobacteria. The bulk alpha diversity was higher in the margin site community, suggesting that local sources may be contributing towards the gene pool in addition to long distance transport. PMID:25405749

  3. Dynamic bacterial communities on reverse-osmosis membranes in a full-scale desalination plant.

    PubMed

    Manes, C-L de O; West, N; Rapenne, S; Lebaron, P

    2011-01-01

    To better understand biofouling of seawater reverse osmosis (SWRO) membranes, bacterial diversity was characterized in the intake water, in subsequently pretreated water and on SWRO membranes from a full-scale desalination plant (FSDP) during a 9 month period. 16S rRNA gene fingerprinting and sequencing revealed that bacterial communities in the water samples and on the SWRO membranes were very different. For the different sampling dates, the bacterial diversity of the active and the total bacterial fractions of the water samples remained relatively stable over the sampling period whereas the bacterial community structure on the four SWRO membrane samples was significantly different. The richness and evenness of the SWRO membrane bacterial communities increased with usage time with an increase in the Shannon diversity index of 2.2 to 3.7. In the oldest SWRO membrane (330 days), no single operational taxonomic unit (OTU) dominated and the majority of the OTUs fell into the Alphaproteobacteria or the Planctomycetes. In striking contrast, a Betaproteobacteria OTU affiliated to the genus Ideonella was dominant and exclusively found in the membrane used for the shortest time (10 days). This suggests that bacteria belonging to this genus could be one of the primary colonizers of the SWRO membrane. Knowledge of the dominant bacterial species on SWRO membranes and their dynamics should help guide culture studies for physiological characterization of biofilm forming species. PMID:21108068

  4. Submerged macrophytes modify bacterial community composition in sediments in a large, shallow, freshwater lake.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Da-Yong; Liu, Peng; Fang, Chao; Sun, Yi-Meng; Zeng, Jin; Wang, Jian-Qun; Ma, Ting; Xiao, Yi-Hong; Wu, Qinglong L

    2013-04-01

    Submerged aquatic macrophytes are an important part of the lacustrine ecosystem. In this study, the bacterial community compositions in the rhizosphere sediments from three kinds of submerged macrophytes (Ceratophyllum demersum, Potamogeton crispus, and Vallisneria natans) were investigated to determine whether submerged macrophytes could drive the variation of bacterial community in the eutrophic Taihu Lake, China. Molecular techniques, including terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP) of PCR-amplified 16S rRNA gene and clone libraries, were employed to analyze the bacterial community compositions. Remarkable differences of the T-RFLP patterns were observed among the different samples, and the results of LIBSHUFF analysis also confirmed that the bacterial community compositions in the rhizosphere sediments of three kinds of submerged macrophytes were statistically different from that of the unvegetated sediment. Acidobacteria, Deltaproteobacteria, and Betaproteobacteria were the dominant bacterial groups in the rhizosphere sediments of Ceratophyllum demersum, Potamogeton crispus, and Vallisneria natans, respectively, accounting for 15.38%, 29.03%, and 18.00% of the total bacterial abundances. Our study demonstrated that submerged macrophytes could influence the bacterial community compositions in their rhizosphere sediments, suggesting that macrophytes have an effect on the cycling and transportation of nutrients in the freshwater lake ecosystem. PMID:23586747

  5. Bacterial Communities in Malagasy Soils with Differing Levels of Disturbance Affecting Botanical Diversity

    PubMed Central

    Blasiak, Leah C.; Schmidt, Alex W.; Andriamiarinoro, Honoré; Mulaw, Temesgen; Rasolomampianina, Rado; Applequist, Wendy L.; Birkinshaw, Chris; Rejo-Fienena, Félicitée; Lowry, Porter P.; Schmidt, Thomas M.; Hill, Russell T.

    2014-01-01

    Madagascar is well-known for the exceptional biodiversity of its macro-flora and fauna, but the biodiversity of Malagasy microbial communities remains relatively unexplored. Understanding patterns of bacterial diversity in soil and their correlations with above-ground botanical diversity could influence conservation planning as well as sampling strategies to maximize access to bacterially derived natural products. We present the first detailed description of Malagasy soil bacterial communities from a targeted 16S rRNA gene survey of greater than 290,000 sequences generated using 454 pyrosequencing. Two sampling plots in each of three forest conservation areas were established to represent different levels of disturbance resulting from human impact through agriculture and selective exploitation of trees, as well as from natural impacts of cyclones. In parallel, we performed an in-depth characterization of the total vascular plant morphospecies richness within each plot. The plots representing different levels of disturbance within each forest did not differ significantly in bacterial diversity or richness. Changes in bacterial community composition were largest between forests rather than between different levels of impact within a forest. The largest difference in bacterial community composition with disturbance was observed at the Vohibe forest conservation area, and this difference was correlated with changes in both vascular plant richness and soil pH. These results provide the first survey of Malagasy soil bacterial diversity and establish a baseline of botanical diversity within important conservation areas. PMID:24465484

  6. Bacterial dynamics within the mucus, tissue and skeleton of the coral Porites lutea during different seasons

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jie; Chen, Qi; Long, Li-Juan; Dong, Jun-De; Yang, Jian; Zhang, Si

    2014-01-01

    Investigation of the response of coral microbial communities to seasonal ecological environment at the microscale will advance our understanding of the relationship between coral-associated bacteria community and coral health. In this study, we examined bacteria community composition from mucus, tissue and skeleton of Porites lutea and surrounding seawater every three months for 1 year on Luhuitou fringing reef. The bacterial communities were analyzed using pyrosequencing of the V1-V2 region of the 16S rRNA gene, which demonstrated diverse bacterial consortium profiles in corals. The bacterial communities in all three coral compartments studied were significantly different from the surrounding seawater. Moreover, they had a much more dynamic seasonal response compared to the seawater communities. The bacterial communities in all three coral compartments collected in each seasonal sample tended to cluster together. Analysis of the relationship between bacterial assemblages and the environmental parameters showed that the bacterial community correlated to dissolved oxygen and rainfall significantly at our study site. This study highlights a dynamic relationship between the high complexity of coral associated bacterial community and seasonally varying ecosystem parameters. PMID:25475855

  7. Changes in epiphytic bacterial communities of intertidal seaweeds modulated by host, temporality, and copper enrichment.

    PubMed

    Hengst, Martha B; Andrade, Santiago; González, Bernardo; Correa, Juan A

    2010-08-01

    This study reports on the factors involved in regulating the composition and structure of bacterial communities epiphytic on intertidal macroalgae, exploring their temporal variability and the role of copper pollution. Culture-independent, molecular approaches were chosen for this purpose and three host species were used as models: the ephemeral Ulva spp. (Chlorophyceae) and Scytosiphon lomentaria (Phaeophyceae) and the long-living Lessonia nigrescens (Phaeophyceae). The algae were collected from two coastal areas in Northern Chile, where the main contrast was the concentration of copper in the seawater column resulting from copper-mine waste disposals. We found a clear and strong effect in the structure of the bacterial communities associated with the algal species serving as host. The structure of the bacterial communities also varied through time. The effect of copper on the structure of the epiphytic bacterial communities was significant in Ulva spp., but not on L. nigrescens. The use of 16S rRNA gene library analysis to compare bacterial communities in Ulva revealed that they were composed of five phyla and six classes, with approximately 35 bacterial species, dominated by members of Bacteroidetes (Cytophaga-Flavobacteria-Bacteroides) and ?-Proteobacteria, in both non-polluted and polluted sites. Less common groups, such as the Verrucomicrobiae, were exclusively found in polluted sites. This work shows that the structure of bacterial communities epiphytic on macroalgae is hierarchically determined by algal species > temporal changes > copper levels. PMID:20333374

  8. Microfluidics for bacterial chemotaxis

    E-print Network

    Ahmed, Tanvir, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2011-01-01

    Bacterial chemotaxis, a remarkable behavioral trait which allows bacteria to sense and respond to chemical gradients in the environment, has implications in a broad range of fields including but not limited to disease ...

  9. Asphalt Showing Bacterial Degeneration 

    E-print Network

    Unknown

    2011-08-17

    Widely considered in the medical field as the last of the golden anti-microbial drugs, fluorinated quinolones provide a "last defense" for the attack on bacterial infections. The drugs are useful for treating gram negative and some gram positive...

  10. Bacterial Nasal Infections

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Version Ear, Nose, and Throat Disorders Nose and Sinus Disorders Bacterial Nasal Infections Nasal vestibulitis Nasal furuncles ... Version DOCTORS: Go to Professional Version Nose and Sinus Disorders Introduction to Nose and Sinus Disorders Deviated ...

  11. Growth of Bacterial Colonies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warren, Mya; Hwa, Terence

    2013-03-01

    On hard agar gel, there is insufficient surface hydration for bacteria to swim or swarm. Instead, growth occurs in colonies of close-packed cells, which expand purely due to repulsive interactions: individual bacteria push each other out of the way through the force of their growth. In this way, bacterial colonies represent a new type of ``active'' granular matter. In this study, we investigate the physical, biochemical, and genetic elements that determine the static and dynamic aspects of this mode of bacterial growth for E. coli. We characterize the process of colony expansion empirically, and use discrete and continuum models to examine the extent to which our observations can be explained by the growth characteristics of non-communicating cells, coupled together by physical forces, nutrients, and waste products. Our results challenge the commonly accepted modes of bacterial colony growth and provide insight into sources of growth limitation in crowded bacterial communities.

  12. Antibacterial activity of Artemisia nilagirica leaf extracts against clinical and phytopathogenic bacteria

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Abdul R Ahameethunisa; Waheeta Hopper

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The six organic solvent extracts of Artemisia nilagirica were screened for the potential antimicrobial activity against phytopathogens and clinically important standard reference bacterial strains. METHODS: The agar disk diffusion method was used to study the antibacterial activity of A. nilagirica extracts against 15 bacterial strains. The Minimum Inhibitory Concentration (MIC) of the plant extracts were tested using two fold

  13. Antimicrobial Efficacy of Henna Extracts

    PubMed Central

    Al-Rubiay, Kathem K.; Jaber, Nawres N; Alrubaiy, Laith K.

    2008-01-01

    Lawsonia inermis (henna plant) has been used in herbal medicine for ages. However, the medical benefits of this plant have been discussed in only a few publications. In this study, the antibacterial effects of water, alcoholic and oily extracts of Lawsonia inermis leaves against bacterial cultures isolated from various skin diseases were investigated and compared with Tetracycline, Ampicillin, Gentamicin and Ciprofloxacin antibiotics. Cultures of Staphylococcus aureus Staphylococcus epidermidis (Co-agulase negative staphylococci or CONS), ß-hemolytic streptococci and Pseudomonas aeruginosa species were obtained from 74 (35 females, 39 males) patients with different skin infections who attended the Dermatology outpatient clinic in Basra General Hospital. The bacterial isolates were treated with L. inermis extracts in vitro. Alcoholic and oily extracts were more effective than the water extract which had no effects using standard method of NCCL, 2000. Alcoholic extracts had the highest antibacterial activity with a MIC of 0.125-0.150 µg/ml against ß-hemolytic streptococci and against CONS was 0.125-175 µg/ml .Oily extracts had a MIC of 0.25-0.30 µg/ml against Staphylococcus epidermidis (cons). Both alcoholic and oily extracts had the same MIC (0.5 µg/ml) on Staphylococcus aureus. However, alcoholic extracts were more effective on Pseudomonas aeruginosa with a MIC of 0.5-0.57 µg/ml than oily extract (MIC of 0.20-0.28 µg/ml). However, there were no statically differences between the effects of oily and alcoholic henna extracts (p= 0.050). When comparing the extracts’ MICs with those of antibiotics, alcoholic extracts showed pronounced antibacterial effects against the isolated bacteria in vitro but oily extracts had much similar MICs to those of antibiotics and there are significant difference between effect of both extracts and antibiotics p>0.050. PMID:22334837

  14. Comparison of rpoB gene sequencing, 16S rRNA gene sequencing, gyrB multiplex PCR, and the VITEK2 system for identification of Acinetobacter clinical isolates.

    PubMed

    Lee, Min Jung; Jang, Sook Jin; Li, Xue Min; Park, Geon; Kook, Joong-Ki; Kim, Min Jung; Chang, Young-Hyo; Shin, Jong Hee; Kim, Soo Hyun; Kim, Dong-Min; Kang, Seong-Ho; Moon, Dae-Soo

    2014-01-01

    Since accurate identification of species is necessary for proper treatment of Acinetobacter infections, we compared the performances of 4 bacterial identification methods using 167 Acinetobacter clinical isolates to identify the best identification method. To secure more non-baumannii Acinetobacter (NBA) strains as target strains, we first identified Acinetobacter baumannii in a total of 495 Acinetobacter clinical isolates identified using the VITEK 2 system. Because 371 of 495 strains were identified as A. baumannii using gyrB multiplex 1 PCR and blaOXA51-like PCR, we performed rpoB gene sequencing and 16S rRNA gene sequencing on remaining 124 strains belonging to NBA and 52 strains of A. baumannii. For identification of Acinetobacter at the species level, the accuracy rates of rpoB gene sequencing, 16S rRNA gene sequencing, gyrB multiplex PCR, and the VITEK 2 were 98.2%, 93.4%, 77.2%, and 35.9%, respectively. The gyrB multiplex PCR seems to be very useful for the detection of ACB complex because its concordance rates to the final identification of strains of ACB complex were 100%. Both the rpoB gene sequencing and the 16S rRNA gene sequencing may be useful in identifying Acinetobacter. PMID:24157058

  15. Comparative analysis of midgut bacterial communities of Aedes aegypti mosquito strains varying in vector competence to dengue virus.

    PubMed

    Charan, Shakti S; Pawar, Kiran D; Severson, David W; Patole, Milind S; Shouche, Yogesh S

    2013-07-01

    Differences in midgut bacterial communities of Aedes aegypti, the primary mosquito vector of dengue viruses (DENV), might influence the susceptibility of these mosquitoes to infection by DENV. As a first step toward addressing this hypothesis, comparative analysis of bacterial communities from midguts of mosquito strains with differential genetic susceptibility to DENV was performed. 16S rRNA gene libraries and real-time PCR approaches were used to characterize midgut bacterial community composition and abundance in three Aedes aegypti strains: MOYO, MOYO-R, and MOYO-S. Although Pseudomonas spp.-related clones were predominant across all libraries, some interesting and potentially significant differences were found in midgut bacterial communities among the three strains. Pedobacter sp.- and Janthinobacterium sp.-related phylotypes were identified only in the MOYO-R strain libraries, while Bacillus sp. was detected only in the MOYO-S strain. Rahnella sp. was found in MOYO-R and MOYO strains libraries but was absent in MOYO-S libraries. Both 16S rRNA gene library and real-time PCR approaches confirmed the presence of Pedobacter sp. only in the MOYO-R strain. Further, real-time PCR-based quantification of 16S rRNA gene copies showed bacterial abundance in midguts of the MOYO-R strain mosquitoes to be at least 10-100-folds higher than in the MOYO-S and MOYO strain mosquitoes. Our study identified some putative bacteria with characteristic physiological properties that could affect the infectivity of dengue virus. This analysis represents the first report of comparisons of midgut bacterial communities with respect to refractoriness and susceptibility of Aedes aegypti mosquitoes to DENV and will guide future efforts to address the potential interactive role of midgut bacteria of Aedes aegypti mosquitoes in determining vectorial capacity for DENV. PMID:23636307

  16. Independent Studies Using Deep Sequencing Resolve the Same Set of Core Bacterial Species Dominating Gut Communities of Honey Bees

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Zakee L. Sabree; Allison K. Hansen; Nancy A. Moran

    2012-01-01

    Starting in 2003, numerous studies using culture-independent methodologies to characterize the gut microbiota of honey bees have retrieved a consistent and distinctive set of eight bacterial species, based on near identity of the 16S rRNA gene sequences. A recent study [Mattila HR, Rios D, Walker-Sperling VE, Roeselers G, Newton ILG (2012) Characterization of the active microbiotas associated with honey bees

  17. Partitioning of bacterial communities between travertine depositional facies at Mammoth Hot Springs, Yellowstone National Park, U.S.A

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Bruce W. Fouke; George T. Bonheyo; Beth Sanzenbacher; Jorge Frias-Lopez

    2003-01-01

    Bruce W. Fouke, George T. Bonheyo, Beth Sanzenbacher, and Jorge Frias-Lopez Abstract: A culture-independent molecular survey indicates that the composition of bacterial communities is distinctly partitioned between travertine depositional facies in the surface drainage system of Spring AT-1 at Angel Terrace, Mammoth Hot Springs, Yellowstone National Park. PCR (polymerase chain reaction) amplification and sequencing of 16S rRNA genes with universally

  18. Bacterial communities of the marine sponges Hymeniacidon heliophila and Polymastia janeirensis and their environment in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Aline S. Turque; Alexander M. Cardoso; Cynthia B. Silveira; Ricardo P. Vieira; Flávia A. D. Freitas; Rodolpho M. Albano; Alessandra M. Gonzalez; Rodolfo Paranhos; Guilherme Muricy; Orlando B. Martins

    2008-01-01

    In this study we performed a survey of the bacterial communities associated with the Western Atlantic demosponges Hymeniacidon heliophila and Polymastia janeirensis, based on 16S rRNA sequencing and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). We compared diversity and composition of the sponge-associated\\u000a bacteria to those of environmental bacteria, represented by free-living bacterioplankton and by bacteria attached to organic\\u000a particulate matter in superficial

  19. Bacterial Populations Active in Metabolism of C1 Compounds in the Sediment of Lake Washington, a Freshwater Lake

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Olivier Nercessian; Emma Noyes; Marina G. Kalyuzhnaya; Mary E. Lidstrom; L. Chistoserdova

    2005-01-01

    Active members of the bacterial community in the sediment of Lake Washington, with special emphasis on C1 utilizers, were identified by employing two complementary culture-independent approaches: reverse tran- scription of environmental mRNA and 16S rRNA combined with PCR (RT-PCR) and stable-isotope probing (SIP) of DNA with the 13C-labeled C1 substrates methanol, methylamine, formaldehyde, and formate. Analysis of RT-PCR-amplified fragments of

  20. Broad-range PCR-TTGE for the first-line detection of bacterial pathogen DNA in ticks

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Lénaïg Halos; Maria Mavris; Gwenaël Vourc’h; Renaud Maillard; Jacques Barnouin; Henri-Jean Boulouis; Muriel Vayssier-Taussat

    2006-01-01

    Ticks are known or suspected vectors for a wide range of bacterial pathogens. One of the first steps for tick-borne risk assessment is the detection of these pathogens in their vectors. In the present study, a broad-range PCR amplification of the eubacterial gene encoding the 16S rRNA gene combined with Temporal Temperature Gradient gel Electrophoresis (TTGE) was evaluated as a

  1. Bacterial Diversity in Human Subgingival Plaque

    PubMed Central

    Paster, Bruce J.; Boches, Susan K.; Galvin, Jamie L.; Ericson, Rebecca E.; Lau, Carol N.; Levanos, Valerie A.; Sahasrabudhe, Ashish; Dewhirst, Floyd E.

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the bacterial diversity in the human subgingival plaque by using culture-independent molecular methods as part of an ongoing effort to obtain full 16S rRNA sequences for all cultivable and not-yet-cultivated species of human oral bacteria. Subgingival plaque was analyzed from healthy subjects and subjects with refractory periodontitis, adult periodontitis, human immunodeficiency virus periodontitis, and acute necrotizing ulcerative gingivitis. 16S ribosomal DNA (rDNA) bacterial genes from DNA isolated from subgingival plaque samples were PCR amplified with all-bacterial or selective primers and cloned into Escherichia coli. The sequences of cloned 16S rDNA inserts were used to determine species identity or closest relatives by comparison with sequences of known species. A total of 2,522 clones were analyzed. Nearly complete sequences of approximately 1,500 bases were obtained for putative new species. About 60% of the clones fell into 132 known species, 70 of which were identified from multiple subjects. About 40% of the clones were novel phylotypes. Of the 215 novel phylotypes, 75 were identified from multiple subjects. Known putative periodontal pathogens such as Porphyromonas gingivalis, Bacteroides forsythus, and Treponema denticola were identified from multiple subjects, but typically as a minor component of the plaque as seen in cultivable studies. Several phylotypes fell into two recently described phyla previously associated with extreme natural environments, for which there are no cultivable species. A number of species or phylotypes were found only in subjects with disease, and a few were found only in healthy subjects. The organisms identified only from diseased sites deserve further study as potential pathogens. Based on the sequence data in this study, the predominant subgingival microbial community consisted of 347 species or phylotypes that fall into 9 bacterial phyla. Based on the 347 species seen in our sample of 2,522 clones, we estimate that there are 68 additional unseen species, for a total estimate of 415 species in the subgingival plaque. When organisms found on other oral surfaces such as the cheek, tongue, and teeth are added to this number, the best estimate of the total species diversity in the oral cavity is approximately 500 species, as previously proposed. PMID:11371542

  2. Sequence variation of human 28S rRNA and expression of variants in different tissues

    SciTech Connect

    Sylvester, J.E.; Gonzalez, I.L.; Gillespie, D.A. [Hahnemann Univ., Philadelphia, PA (United States)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    There are 400 or so copies of the ribosomal RNA (rRNA) gene in humans. Previous studies have shown that human 28S encoding rDNA, and therefore rRNAs, vary in sequence at specific locations termed variable regions; these variations appear in a population and within an individual. This study asked the following questions regarding one variable region (V5) within 28S rRNA gene sequence variation in a single individual: (1) what is the extent and nature of the sequence variation at the DNA level?; (2) are these variant rRNA genes expressed?; (3) does rRNA gene sequence variation result in rRNA structural variation?; (4) is there evidence of differential expression of variant rRNA genes?. To address these four questions, genomic copies of the V5 region were cloned from the individual and sequenced. Six unique sequences were found among seven V5 clones, each differing only in the number of repeats of simple sequences (CGG), (TG), (T), and (C) at a specific site of the V5 region. Computer-generated secondary structure models of each of these variants indicated that the basic structure was not compromised. To test for V5 variant expression in different tissues of an individual, RNAs isolated from different tissues were used to protect each of the cloned V5 variant probes in the RNase protection assay (RPA). We conclude from the RPA results that different variants are present in proportionately different amounts in each tissue tested; however, the relative proportion of variants are similar in these tissues.

  3. Taxonomic Resolutions Based on 18S rRNA Genes: A Case Study of Subclass Copepoda

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Shu; Xiong, Jie; Yu, Yuhe

    2015-01-01

    Biodiversity studies are commonly conducted using 18S rRNA genes. In this study, we compared the inter-species divergence of variable regions (V1–9) within the copepod 18S rRNA gene, and tested their taxonomic resolutions at different taxonomic levels. Our results indicate that the 18S rRNA gene is a good molecular marker for the study of copepod biodiversity, and our conclusions are as follows: 1) 18S rRNA genes are highly conserved intra-species (intra-species similarities are close to 100%); and could aid in species-level analyses, but with some limitations; 2) nearly-whole-length sequences and some partial regions (around V2, V4, and V9) of the 18S rRNA gene can be used to discriminate between samples at both the family and order levels (with a success rate of about 80%); 3) compared with other regions, V9 has a higher resolution at the genus level (with an identification success rate of about 80%); and 4) V7 is most divergent in length, and would be a good candidate marker for the phylogenetic study of Acartia species. This study also evaluated the correlation between similarity thresholds and the accuracy of using nuclear 18S rRNA genes for the classification of organisms in the subclass Copepoda. We suggest that sample identification accuracy should be considered when a molecular sequence divergence threshold is used for taxonomic identification, and that the lowest similarity threshold should be determined based on a pre-designated level of acceptable accuracy. PMID:26107258

  4. Compact organization of rRNA genes in the filamentous fungus Ashbya gossypii.

    PubMed

    Wendland, J; Pöhlmann, R; Dietrich, F; Steiner, S; Mohr, C; Philippsen, P

    1999-07-01

    The rDNA cluster in the phytopathogenic fungus Ashbya gossypii consists of approximately 50 tandem repeat units of 8197 bp. Each unit carries a gene for the 35S pre-rRNA, processed into 18S, 5.8S and 25S rRNA, and a divergently transcribed gene for 5S rRNA. The well-characterized rDNA of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is the only other example of a completely sequenced rDNA unit (9137 bp) carrying both a 35S pre-rRNA and a 5S rRNA gene. The coding regions for the 5S, 5.8S, 18S and 25S rRNAs are 95-100% identical whereas transcribed and non-transcribed spacers show 43-66% sequence identity. Functionally characterized rDNA and rRNA elements of S. cerevisiae can be unambiguously recognized in the A. gossypii sequence, including the RNA polymerase-I transcription start site, two Reb1p enhancer binding sites and numerous recognition sequences for rRNA modification and processing. In addition to these functionally characterized sequences eight highly conserved elements from 10 to 71 bp were detected in the over 600-bp transcribed region upstream of the 18S rRNA gene which most likely play as yet uncharacterized functions at the DNA or RNA level. In addition to this work we started to identify A. gossypii homologs of S. cerevisiae nucleolar proteins involved in rDNA maturation. PMID:10467006

  5. The human 18S rRNA base methyltransferases DIMT1L and WBSCR22-TRMT112 but not rRNA modification are required for ribosome biogenesis.

    PubMed

    Zorbas, Christiane; Nicolas, Emilien; Wacheul, Ludivine; Huvelle, Emmeline; Heurgué-Hamard, Valérie; Lafontaine, Denis L J

    2015-06-01

    At the heart of the ribosome lie rRNAs, whose catalytic function in translation is subtly modulated by posttranscriptional modifications. In the small ribosomal subunit of budding yeast, on the 18S rRNA, two adjacent adenosines (A1781/A1782) are N(6)-dimethylated by Dim1 near the decoding site, and one guanosine (G1575) is N(7)-methylated by Bud23-Trm112 at a ridge between the P- and E-site tRNAs. Here we establish human DIMT1L and WBSCR22-TRMT112 as the functional homologues of yeast Dim1 and Bud23-Trm112. We report that these enzymes are required for distinct pre-rRNA processing reactions leading to synthesis of 18S rRNA, and we demonstrate that in human cells, as in budding yeast, ribosome biogenesis requires the presence of the modification enzyme rather than its RNA-modifying catalytic activity. We conclude that a quality control mechanism has been conserved from yeast to human by which binding of a methyltransferase to nascent pre-rRNAs is a prerequisite to processing, so that all cleaved RNAs are committed to faithful modification. We further report that 18S rRNA dimethylation is nuclear in human cells, in contrast to yeast, where it is cytoplasmic. Yeast and human ribosome biogenesis thus have both conserved and distinctive features. PMID:25851604

  6. Mitochondrial Ribosomal RNA (rRNA) Methyltransferase Family Members Are Positioned to Modify Nascent rRNA in Foci near the Mitochondrial DNA Nucleoid*

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Ken-Wing; Okot-Kotber, Cynthia; LaComb, Joseph F.; Bogenhagen, Daniel F.

    2013-01-01

    We have identified RNMTL1, MRM1, and MRM2 (FtsJ2) as members of the RNA methyltransferase family that may be responsible for the three known 2?-O-ribose modifications of the 16 S rRNA core of the large mitochondrial ribosome subunit. These proteins are confined to foci located in the vicinity of mtDNA nucleoids. They show distinct patterns of association with mtDNA nucleoids and/or mitochondrial ribosomes in cell fractionation studies. We focused on the role of the least studied protein in this set, RNMTL1, to show that this protein interacts with the large ribosomal subunit as well as with a series of non-ribosomal proteins that may be involved in coupling of the rate of rRNA transcription and ribosome assembly in mitochondria. siRNA-directed silencing of RNMTL1 resulted in a significant inhibition of translation on mitochondrial ribosomes. Our results are consistent with a role for RNMTL1 in methylation of G1370 of human 16 S rRNA. PMID:24036117

  7. Biofuel components change the ecology of bacterial volatile petroleum hydrocarbon degradation in aerobic sandy soil.

    PubMed

    Elazhari-Ali, Abdulmagid; Singh, Arvind K; Davenport, Russell J; Head, Ian M; Werner, David

    2013-02-01

    We tested the hypothesis that the biodegradation of volatile petroleum hydrocarbons (VPHs) in aerobic sandy soil is affected by the blending with 10 percent ethanol (E10) or 20 percent biodiesel (B20). When inorganic nutrients were scarce, competition between biofuel and VPH degraders temporarily slowed monoaromatic hydrocarbon degradation. Ethanol had a bigger impact than biodiesel, reflecting the relative ease of ethanol compared to methyl ester biodegradation. Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) of bacterial 16S rRNA genes revealed that each fuel mixture selected for a distinct bacterial community, each dominated by Pseudomonas spp. Despite lasting impacts on soil bacterial ecology, the overall effects on VHP biodegradation were minor, and average biomass yields were comparable between fuel types, ranging from 0.40 ± 0.16 to 0.51 ± 0.22 g of biomass carbon per gram of fuel carbon degraded. Inorganic nutrient availability had a greater impact on petroleum hydrocarbon biodegradation than fuel composition. PMID:23202642

  8. Identification of the bacterial endosymbionts in leaf nodules of Pavetta (Rubiaceae).

    PubMed

    Lemaire, Benny; Van Oevelen, Sandra; De Block, Petra; Verstraete, Brecht; Smets, Erik; Prinsen, Els; Dessein, Steven

    2012-01-01

    Three genera in the Rubiaceae (Pavetta, Psychotria and Sericanthe) harbour bacterial endosymbionts within leaf nodules or galls. The present paper identifies the bacterial endophytes in three leaf-nodulating Pavetta species. In order to reveal their identity and assess their phylogenetic position, 16S rRNA, recA and gyrB genes were sequenced from an extensive sampling of Burkholderia strains. This multigene approach results in a robust phylogeny, which places the bacterial endosymbionts of Pavetta at two distinct positions within the genus Burkholderia (class Betaproteobacteria), suggesting that leaf-nodulating endosymbionts within Pavetta have different origins. The endophytes of nodulated Psychotria species were recognized as the closest relatives to the Pavetta endosymbionts. Our results suggest that the endosymbionts of Pavetta represent novel species, which can be classified as 'Candidatus Burkholderia hispidae', 'Candidatus Burkholderia rigidae' and 'Candidatus Burkholderia schumannianae'. PMID:21378132

  9. Initial community and environment determine the response of bacterial communities to dispersant and oil contamination.

    PubMed

    Ortmann, Alice C; Lu, YueHan

    2015-01-15

    Bioremediation of seawater by natural bacterial communities is one potential response to coastal oil spills, but the success of the approach may vary, depending on geographical location, oil composition and the timing of spill. The short term response of coastal bacteria to dispersant, oil and dispersed oil was characterized using 16S rRNA gene tags in two mesocosm experiments conducted two months apart. Despite differences in the amount of oil-derived alkanes across the treatments and experiments, increases in the contributions of hydrocarbon degrading taxa and decreases in common estuarine bacteria were observed in response to dispersant and/or oil. Between the two experiments, the direction and rates of changes in particulate alkane concentrations differed, as did the magnitude of the bacterial response to oil and/or dispersant. Together, our data underscore large variability in bacterial responses to hydrocarbon pollutants, implying that bioremediation success varies with starting biological and environmental conditions. PMID:25487088

  10. Evidence for a bacterial mechanism for group-specific social odors among hyenas

    PubMed Central

    Theis, Kevin R.; Schmidt, Thomas M.; Holekamp, Kay E.

    2012-01-01

    Symbiotic microbes can benefit their animal hosts by enhancing the diversity of communication signals available to them. The fermentation hypothesis for chemical recognition posits that 1) fermentative bacteria in specialized mammalian scent glands generate odorants that mammals co-opt to communicate with one another, and 2) that variation in scent gland odors is due to underlying variation in the structure of bacterial communities within scent glands. For example, group-specific social odors are suggested to be due to members of the same social group harboring more similar bacterial communities in their scent glands than do members of different social groups. We used 16S rRNA gene surveys to show that 1) the scent secretions of spotted hyenas are densely populated by fermentative bacteria whose closest relatives are well-documented odor producers, and that 2) these bacterial communities are more similar among hyenas from the same social group than among those from different groups. PMID:22937224

  11. Use of the T-RFLP technique to assess spatial and temporal changes in the bacterial community structure within an agricultural soil planted with transgenic and non-transgenic potato plants

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Thomas Lukow; Peter F Dunfield; Werner Liesack

    2000-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine whether the terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP) analysis represents an appropriate technique for monitoring highly diverse soil bacterial communities, i.e. to assess spatial and\\/or temporal effects on bacterial community structure. The T-RFLP method, a recently described fingerprinting technique, is based on terminal restriction fragment length polymorphisms between distinct small-subunit rRNA gene

  12. Ribosomal RNA-based analysis of the bacterial flora from the conjunctivae of cattle with bovine keratoconjunctivitis (BKC).

    PubMed

    Hare, William R; Hoyt, Phillip G; Hohn, Christina; Higgins, James A

    2008-10-15

    Bovine keratoconjunctivitis (BKC), colloquially referred to as 'pinkeye', is a disease affecting cattle worldwide; it costs cattle producers millions of dollars in economic loss annually. While Moraxella spp. are the primary etiologic agent of pinkeye, surveys of flora from the conjunctivae of livestock from around the world have indicated that a variety of bacterial commensals occupy this niche. We used molecular biology-based methods to determine the composition of bacterial flora in the conjunctivae of normal dairy and beef cattle from Maryland (n=113), and beef cattle with clinical BKC from Louisiana (n=42). Three regimens were used: 16S rRNA PCR and DGGE analysis of amplicons; 16S rRNA PCR and cloning of amplicons into Escherichia coli followed by screening and sequencing of clones harboring inserts; and culture of bacteria on chromogenic agar followed by 16S rRNA PCR and sequencing. Most taxa were comprised of saprophytes found in the environment, such as Bacillus, Pantoea, E. coli, and Exiguobacterium. Moraxella spp. were infrequently observed. Some species, such as Propionibacterium acnes, represent taxa not previously associated with the conjunctivae. Bacillus pumilus and Bacillus licheniformis isolates from the conjunctivae of Maryland cattle were genetically distinct from isolates previously implicated in septic infections in cattle at the same location. We conclude that employing 16S rRNA-based methods for bacterial identification can be useful in defining the flora present in the conjunctivae of normal cattle, and those with BKC. PMID:18513895

  13. Longitudinal Changes in the Bacterial Community Composition of the Danube River: a Whole-River Approach? †

    PubMed Central

    Winter, Christian; Hein, Thomas; Kavka, Gerhard; Mach, Robert L.; Farnleitner, Andreas H.

    2007-01-01

    The Danube River is the second longest river in Europe, and its bacterial community composition has never been studied before over its entire length. In this study, bacterial community composition was determined by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) analysis of PCR-amplified portions of the bacterial 16S rRNA gene from a total of 98 stations on the Danube River (73 stations) and its major tributaries (25 stations), covering a distance of 2,581 km. Shifts in the bacterial community composition were related to changes in environmental conditions found by comparison with physicochemical parameters (e.g., temperature and concentration of nutrients) and the concentration of chlorophyll a (Chl a). In total, 43 distinct DGGE bands were detected. Sequencing of selected bands revealed that the phylotypes were associated with typical freshwater bacteria. Apparent bacterial richness in the Danube varied between 18 and 32 bands and correlated positively with the concentration of P-PO4 (r = 0.56) and negatively with Chl a (r = ?0.52). An artificial neural network-based model explained 90% of the variation of apparent bacterial richness using the concentrations of N-NO2 and P-PO4 and the distance to the Black Sea as input parameters. Between the cities of Budapest and Belgrade, apparent bacterial richness was significantly lower than that of other regions of the river, and Chl a showed a pronounced peak. Generally, the bacterial community composition developed gradually; however, an abrupt and clear shift was detected in the section of the phytoplankton bloom. Large impoundments did not have a discernible effect on the bacterial community of the water column. In conclusion, the riverine bacterial community was largely influenced by intrinsic factors. PMID:17085708

  14. A Cross-Taxon Analysis of Insect-Associated Bacterial Diversity

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Ryan Thomas; Sanchez, Leticia Gonzales; Fierer, Noah

    2013-01-01

    Although it is well known that plants and animals harbor microbial symbionts that can influence host traits, the factors regulating the structure of these microbial communities often remain largely undetermined. This is particularly true for insect-associated microbial communities, as few cross-taxon comparisons have been conducted to date. To address this knowledge gap and determine how host phylogeny and ecology affect insect-associated microbial communities, we collected 137 insect specimens representing 39 species, 28 families, and 8 orders, and characterized the bacterial communities associated with each specimen via 16S rRNA gene sequencing. Bacterial taxa within the phylum Proteobacteria were dominant in nearly all insects sampled. On average, the insect-associated bacterial communities were not very diverse, with individuals typically harboring fewer than 8 bacterial phylotypes. Bacterial communities also tended to be dominated by a single phylotype; on average, the most abundant phylotype represented 54.7% of community membership. Bacterial communities were significantly more similar among closely related insects than among less-related insects, a pattern driven by within-species community similarity but detected at every level of insect taxonomy tested. Diet was a poor predictor of bacterial community composition. Individual insect species harbored remarkably unique communities: the distribution of 69.0% of bacterial phylotypes was limited to unique insect species, whereas only 5.7% of phylotypes were detected in more than five insect species. Together these results suggest that host characteristics strongly regulate the colonization and assembly of bacterial communities across insect lineages, patterns that are driven either by co-evolution between insects and their symbionts or by closely related insects sharing conserved traits that directly select for similar bacterial communities. PMID:23613815

  15. Bacterial ‘cosmopolitanism’ and importance of local environmental factors for community composition in remote high-altitude lakes

    PubMed Central

    SOMMARUGA, RUBEN; CASAMAYOR, EMILIO O.

    2010-01-01

    SUMMARY In October 2004, plankton samples were collected from six permanent lakes located between 4960 and 5440 m a.s.l. in the Mount Everest region (Nepal) to assess how spatial and local environmental factors affect natural bacterial community composition. Fingerprinting analysis of the bacterial 16S rRNA gene fragment was done by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE). The number of DGGE bands (range: 12–23) was not correlated with lake area or remoteness, but there was a strong negative correlation with the ratio of catchment to lake area (r = ?0.826, P < 0.05), suggesting that hydraulic retention time affects the establishment of the bacterial community in these seepage lakes. Most dominant sequences belonged to Betaproteobacteria except in two lakes where members of Bacteroidetes made the largest relative contribution. Up to 81% of the phylotypes had high similarity (>98 to 100%) in partial 16S rRNA gene sequence to those reported from other alpine lakes and glaciers around the world, suggesting the presence of ‘cosmopolitan’ bacteria. An analysis based on dissimilarity matrices and the Mantel test revealed the existence of dissimilarities in bacterial community composition related to geographical distance over a small spatial scale (<6 km), but determined by local environmental constraints. Our results suggest that several bacterial phylotypes are ubiquitous in the freshwater aquatic realm, but taxon sorting by local environmental constraints is important. PMID:20543908

  16. Bacterial 'cosmopolitanism' and importance of local environmental factors for community composition in remote high-altitude lakes.

    PubMed

    Sommaruga, Ruben; Casamayor, Emilio O

    2009-05-01

    In October 2004, plankton samples were collected from six permanent lakes located between 4960 and 5440 m a.s.l. in the Mount Everest region (Nepal) to assess how spatial and local environmental factors affect natural bacterial community composition. Fingerprinting analysis of the bacterial 16S rRNA gene fragment was done by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE).The number of DGGE bands (range: 12-23) was not correlated with lake area or remoteness, but there was a strong negative correlation with the ratio of catchment to lake area (r = -0.826, P < 0.05), suggesting that hydraulic retention time affects the establishment of the bacterial community in these seepage lakes.Most dominant sequences belonged to Betaproteobacteria except in two lakes where members of Bacteroidetes made the largest relative contribution. Up to 81% of the phylotypes had high similarity (>98 to 100%) in partial 16S rRNA gene sequence to those reported from other alpine lakes and glaciers around the world, suggesting the presence of 'cosmopolitan' bacteria.An analysis based on dissimilarity matrices and the Mantel test revealed the existence of dissimilarities in bacterial community composition related to geographical distance over a small spatial scale (<6 km), but determined by local environmental constraints.Our results suggest that several bacterial phylotypes are ubiquitous in the freshwater aquatic realm, but taxon sorting by local environmental constraints is important. PMID:20543908

  17. Pyrosequencing analysis of the bacterial communities in the guts of honey bees Apis cerana and Apis mellifera in Korea.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Jae-Hyung; Hong, In-Pyo; Bok, Jeung-Im; Kim, Byung-Yong; Song, Jaekyeong; Weon, Hang-Yeon

    2012-10-01

    The bacterial communities in the guts of the adults and larvae of the Asian honey bee Apis cerana and the European honey bee Apis mellifera were surveyed by pyrosequencing the 16S rRNA genes. Most of the gut bacterial 16S rRNA gene sequences were highly similar to the known honey bee-specific ones and affiliated with Pasteurellaceae or lactic acid bacteria (LAB). The numbers of operational taxonomic units (OTUs, defined at 97% similarity) were lower in the larval guts (6 or 9) than in the adult guts (18 or 20), and the frequencies of Pasteurellaceae-related OTUs were higher in the larval guts while those of LAB-related OTUs in the adult guts. The frequencies of Lactococcus, Bartonella, Spiroplasma, Enterobacteriaceae, and Flavobacteriaceae-related OTUs were much higher in A. cerana guts while Bifidobacterium and Lachnospiraceae-related OTUs were more abundant in A. mellfera guts. The bacterial community structures in the midguts and hindguts of the adult honey bees were not different for A. cerana, but significantly different for A. mellifera. The above results substantiated the previous observation that honey bee guts are dominated by several specific bacterial groups, and also showed that the relative abundances of OTUs could be markedly changed depending on the developmental stage, the location within the gut, and the honey bee species. The possibility of using the gut bacterial community as an indicator of honey bee health was discussed. PMID:23124740

  18. Characterization of the bacterial archaeal diversity in hydrocarbon-contaminated soil.

    PubMed

    Zhang, De-Chao; Mörtelmaier, Christoph; Margesin, Rosa

    2012-04-01

    A polyphasic approach combining culture-based methods with molecular methods is useful to expand knowledge on microbial diversity in contaminated soil. Microbial diversity was examined in soil samples from a former industrial site in the European Alps (mainly used for aluminum production and heavily contaminated with petroleum hydrocarbons) by culture-dependent and culture-independent methods. The physiologically active eubacterial community, as revealed by fluorescence-in-situ-hybridization (FISH), accounted for 6.7% of the total (DAPI-stained) bacterial community. 4.4% and 2.0% of the DAPI-stained cells could be attributed to culturable, heterotrophic bacteria able to grow at 20°C and 10°C, respectively. The majority of culturable bacterial isolates (34/48) belonged to the Proteobacteria (with a predominance of Alphaproteobacteria and Gammaproteobacteria), while the remaining isolates were affiliated with the Actinobacteria, Cytophaga-Flavobacterium-Bacteroides and Firmicutes. A high fraction of the culturable, heterotrophic bacterial population was able to utilize hydrocarbons. Actinobacteria were the most versatile and efficient degraders of diesel oil, n-alkanes, phenol and PAHs. The bacterial 16S rRNA gene clone library contained 390 clones that grouped into 68 phylotypes related to the Proteobacteria, Bacteroidetes, Actinobacteria and Spirochaetes. The archaeal 16S rRNA gene library contained 202 clones and 15 phylotypes belonging to the phylum Euryarchaeota; sequences were closely related to those of methanogenic archaea of the orders Methanomicrobiales, Methanosarcinales, Methanobacteriales and Thermoplasmatales. A number of bacterial and archaeal phylotypes in the clone libraries shared high similarities with strains previously described to be involved in hydrocarbon biodegradation. Knowledge of the bacterial and archaeal diversity in the studied soil is important in order to get a better insight into the microbial structure of contaminated environments and to better exploit the bioremediation potential by identifying potential hydrocarbon degraders and consequently developing appropriate bioremediation strategies. PMID:22386232

  19. Influence of pharmaceutical residues on the structure of activated sludge bacterial communities in wastewater treatment bioreactors.

    PubMed

    Kraigher, Barbara; Kosjek, Tina; Heath, Ester; Kompare, Boris; Mandic-Mulec, Ines

    2008-11-01

    Concern is growing over contamination of the environment with pharmaceuticals because of their widespread use and incomplete removal during wastewater treatment, where microorganisms drive the key processes. The influence of pharmaceuticals on bacterial community structure in activated sludge was assessed in small-scale wastewater treatment bioreactors containing different concentrations (5, 50, 200 and 500microgL(-1)) of several commonly used pharmaceuticals (ibuprofen, naproxen, ketoprofen, diclofenac and clofibric acid). T-RFLP analyses of the bacterial 16S rRNA genes indicated a minor but consistent shift in the bacterial community structure in the bioreactor R50 supplied with pharmaceuticals at a concentration of 50microgL(-1), compared to the control reactor R0, which was operated without addition of pharmaceuticals. In the reactors operated with higher concentrations of pharmaceuticals, a greater structural divergence was observed. Bacterial community composition was further investigated by preparation of two clone libraries of bacterial 16S rRNA genes from reactors R0 and R50. Most clones in both libraries belonged to the Betaproteobacteria, among which Thauera, Sphaerotilus, Ideonella and Acidovorax-related spp. dominated. Nitrite-oxidizing bacteria of the genus Nitrospira sp., which are key organisms for the second stage of nitrification in wastewater treatment plants, were found only in the clone library of the reactor without pharmaceuticals. In addition, diversity indices were calculated for the two clone libraries, indicating a reduced diversity of activated sludge bacterial community in the reactor supplied with 50microgL(-1) of each of selected pharmaceuticals. PMID:18786690

  20. Chromium (VI) reduction by cell free extract of Ochrobactrum anthropi isolated from tannery effluent.

    PubMed

    Sultan, Sikander; Hasnain, Shahida

    2012-07-01

    Chromium-resistant bacteria isolated from industrial wastes can be used to detoxify toxic chromium from contaminated sources. From effluent of Shafiq Tannery, Kasur, Pakistan, bacterial strain STCr-1 that could endure 40 mg mL(-1) of potassium chromate in nutrient agar medium was isolated. STCr-1, identified as Ochrobactrum anthropi by 16S rRNA gene sequence homology, demonstrated substantial Cr(VI) reduction at pH 7 and temperature 37°C. It completely reduced 250 ?g mL(-1) of Cr(VI) and showed 71.2 % Cr(VI) reduction at Cr(VI) concentrations of 550 ?g mL(-1). Rate of Cr(VI) reduction increased with increase in cell and Cr(VI) concentration. The presence of Cu(2+), Co(2+) and Mn(2+) significantly stimulated Cr(VI) reduction. Assay with cell free extracts clearly indicated that Cr(VI) reduction was solely associated with the soluble fraction of the cell. PMID:22526999

  1. BACTERIAL OXIDATION OF DIPICOLINIC ACID

    PubMed Central

    Kobayashi, Yasuo; Arima, Kei

    1962-01-01

    Kobayashi, Yasuo (University of Tokyo, Tokyo, Japan) and Kei Arima. Bacterial oxidation of dipicolinic acid. II. Identification of ?-ketoglutaric acid and 3-hydroxydipicolinic acid and some properties of cell-free extracts. J. Bacteriol. 84:765–771. 1962—When a dipicolinic acid (DPA)-decomposing bacterium, Achromobacter strain 1–2, was incubated at 30 C with shaking in a DPA solution containing 10?3m arsenite, a keto acid was accumulated. The 2,4-dinitrophenylhydrazone of this acid was synthesized and identified as ?-ketoglutaric acid by paper chromatography, visible absorption spectrum, infrared analysis, elemental analysis, and mixed melting point. During this incubation, oxalic acid equivalent to the consumed dipicolinic acid was produced. A fluorescent material was also isolated from culture fluid and identified as 3-hydroxydipicolinic acid by paper chromatography and the ultraviolet absorption spectrum. Further, cell-free extracts were prepared by sonic oscillation. Ferrous ion and a reduced di- or triphosphopyridine nucleotide-generating system were proven to be required for enzymic oxidation of DPA. And 3-hydroxydipicolinic acid was also oxidized by this preparation. From the results obtained, a possible metabolic pathway of dipicolinic acid was proposed. PMID:14033954

  2. Identification and characterization of bacterial isolates from the Mir space station.

    PubMed

    Song, Bo; Leff, Laura G

    2005-01-01

    Twenty bacterial isolates (supplied by NASA) from the Mir space station water system were identified using Vitek GNI+ test card, API 20NE, and 16S rRNA gene sequencing. The identification of only one isolate agreed among the three techniques. The utility of the API 20NE and Vitek GNI+ test card approaches for identifying these isolates was Limited. Although 16S rRNA gene sequencing effectively identified many of the bacteria to the genus level, 74% of the isolates could not be identified to the species level. Isolates were also characterized based on motility and hydrophobicity. About 40% of the isolates were motile and four isolates were hydrophobic, suggesting that many of the bacteria have the potential to colonize surfaces and form biofilms. These findings demonstrate the difficulties in identifying bacteria from some environments to the species level and have implications for determining the risks of contamination in water systems of space shuttles and stations. PMID:15881827

  3. Distribution and diversity of bacteria in a saline meromictic lake as determined by PCR-DGGE of 16S rRNA gene fragments.

    PubMed

    Gugliandolo, Concetta; Lentini, Valeria; Maugeri, Teresa L

    2011-01-01

    The variations in vertical distribution and composition of bacteria in the meromictic Lake Faro (Messina, Italy) were analysed by culture-independent methods in two different mixing conditions. Water samples were collected from a central station from the surface to the bottom (30 m depth) on two different sampling dates--the first characterised by a well-mixed water mass and the second by a marked stratification. A 'red-water' layer, caused by a dense growth of photosynthetic sulphur bacteria, was present at a depth of 25 m in December 2005 and at 15 m in August 2006, defining two different zones in terms of their physicochemical properties. The vertical distribution of bacterioplankton showed that the interface zones were more densely populated than others. In both sampling periods, the highest numbers of live cells were observed within 'red water' layers. The dominant phylotypes of the bacterial community were determined by sequencing the Denaturing Gradient Gel Electrophoresis (DGGE) bands resulting from PCR amplification of 16S rRNA gene fragments. The number of DGGE bands, considered indicative of the total species richness, did not vary predictably across the two different sampling periods. Proteobacteria (?-, ?-, ?- and ? subclass members), Cytophaga-Flavobacterium-Bacteroides, green sulphur bacteria and Cyanobacteria were retrieved from Lake Faro. Most of the bands showed DNA sequences that did not match with other previously described organisms, suggesting the presence of new indigenous bacterial phylotypes. PMID:20544199

  4. The role of bacterial biomineralization on the pedogenesis of magnetic Apennines paleosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mocali, Stefano; Chiellini, Carolina; Cardelli, Valeria; Cocco, Stefania; Corti, Giuseppe

    2015-04-01

    It is known that the soil magnetic properties are sensitive indicators of soil-forming processes. However, even where soils have developed on the same substrate and over the same timescale, great differences in magnetic properties can result over short distances. A soil may become magnetically enhanced if there is conversion of some of the weakly magnetic Fe-oxyhydroxides or other Fe sources into strongly ferrimagnetic minerals such as magnetite and maghemite. There are many theories explaining soil magnetic susceptibility: chemical weathering, sedimentary rocks, inherited magnetite, fires, and bacterial mineralization. Although the biological contribution to pedogenic magnetic content is well documented, the metabolic processes of Fe-reducing bacteria are still largely unknown. In this work soils evolved from ammonitic limestone dating back 170-183 million years ago (Middle/Early Jurassic, Aalenian/Toarcian stage) and characterized by opposite magnetic properties were collected from Mount Zuccarello in Central Apennines (Italy), from 880 to 990 m a.s.l. and investigated for their chemical properties, morphological characteristics and microstructures of magnetic minerals, powder X-ray diffractometry (XRD), X-Ray fluorescence with DP-6000 Delta Premium PXRF (Olympus-Innov-X, Waltham, MA USA) and microscopy (SEM-EDX). The magnetic soil revealed a higher content of maghemite as compared to the non-magnetic soil, likely derived from magnetite oxidation. Furthermore, the correlation between the contents of magnetic minerals and organic matter suggests that an efficient Fe3+ reduction occurred, with a consequent magnetite formation. This would have been made possible because of an adequate supply of oxidizable organic matter. As Fe2+ production occurs upon (temporary) wetting of soil portions and subsequent respiratory depletion of oxygen, investigation of the bacteria population harbouring these soils occurred after their isolation under both aerobic and anaerobic (microaerophilic) conditions. Both types of bacteria were identified and characterized for their ability to bind and reduce Fe3+. Furthermore, the total DNA was extracted and the entire bacterial community was assessed by means of pyrosequencing of the 16S rRNA genes.

  5. Bacterial diversity in a glacier foreland of the high Arctic.

    PubMed

    Schütte, Ursel M E; Abdo, Zaid; Foster, James; Ravel, Jacques; Bunge, John; Solheim, Bjørn; Forney, Larry J

    2010-03-01

    Over the past 100 years, Arctic temperatures have increased at almost twice the global average rate. One consequence is the acceleration of glacier retreat, exposing new habitats that are colonized by microorganisms whose diversity and function are unknown. Here, we characterized bacterial diversity along two approximately parallel chronosequences in an Arctic glacier forefield that span six time points following glacier retreat. We assessed changes in phylotype richness, evenness and turnover rate through the analysis of 16S rRNA gene sequences recovered from 52 samples taken from surface layers along the chronosequences. An average of 4500 sequences was obtained from each sample by 454 pyrosequencing. Using parametric methods, it was estimated that bacterial phylotype richness was high, and that it increased significantly from an average of 4000 (at a threshold of 97% sequence similarity) at locations exposed for 5 years to an average of 7050 phylotypes per 0.5 g of soil at sites that had been exposed for 150 years. Phylotype evenness also increased over time, with an evenness of 0.74 for 150 years since glacier retreat reflecting large proportions of rare phylotypes. The bacterial species turnover rate was especially high between sites exposed for 5 and 19 years. The level of bacterial diversity present in this High Arctic glacier foreland was comparable with that found in temperate and tropical soils, raising the question whether global patterns of bacterial species diversity parallel that of plants and animals, which have been found to form a latitudinal gradient and be lower in polar regions compared with the tropics. PMID:20331770

  6. 16S rRNA gene pyrosequencing reveals shift in patient faecal microbiota during high-dose chemotherapy as conditioning regimen for bone marrow transplantation.

    PubMed

    Montassier, Emmanuel; Batard, Eric; Massart, Sébastien; Gastinne, Thomas; Carton, Thomas; Caillon, Jocelyne; Le Fresne, Sophie; Caroff, Nathalie; Hardouin, Jean Benoit; Moreau, Philippe; Potel, Gilles; Le Vacon, Françoise; de La Cochetière, Marie France

    2014-04-01

    Gastrointestinal disturbances are a side-effect frequently associated with haematological malignancies due to the intensive cytotoxic treatment given in connection with bone marrow transplantation (BMT). However, intestinal microbiota changes during chemotherapy remain poorly described, probably due to the use of culture-based and low-resolution molecular methods in previous studies. The objective of our study was to apply a next generation DNA sequencing technology to analyse chemotherapy-induced changes in faecal microbiota. We included eight patients with non-Hodgkin's lymphoma undergoing one course of BMT conditioning chemotherapy. We collected a prechemotherapy faecal sample, the day before chemotherapy was initiated, and a postchemotherapy sample, collected 1 week after the initiation of chemotherapy. Total DNA was extracted from faecal samples, denaturing high-performance liquid chromatography based on amplification of the V6 to V8 region of the 16S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) gene, and 454-pyrosequencing of the 16 S rRNA gene, using PCR primers targeting the V5 and V6 hypervariable 16S rRNA gene regions were performed. Raw sequence data were screened, trimmed, and filtered using the QIIME pipeline. We observed a steep reduction in alpha diversity and significant differences in the composition of the intestinal microbiota in response to chemotherapy. Chemotherapy was associated with a drastic drop in Faecalibacterium and accompanied by an increase of Escherichia. The chemotherapy-induced shift in the intestinal microbiota could induce severe side effects in immunocompromised cancer patients. Our study is a first step in identifying patients at risk for gastrointestinal disturbances and to promote strategies to prevent this drastic shift in intestinal microbiota. PMID:24402367

  7. Patterned progression of bacterial populations in the premature infant gut

    PubMed Central

    La Rosa, Patricio S.; Warner, Barbara B.; Zhou, Yanjiao; Weinstock, George M.; Sodergren, Erica; Hall-Moore, Carla M.; Stevens, Harold J.; Bennett, William E.; Shaikh, Nurmohammad; Linneman, Laura A.; Hoffmann, Julie A.; Hamvas, Aaron; Deych, Elena; Shands, Berkley A.; Shannon, William D.; Tarr, Phillip I.

    2014-01-01

    In the weeks after birth, the gut acquires a nascent microbiome, and starts its transition to bacterial population equilibrium. This early-in-life microbial population quite likely influences later-in-life host biology. However, we know little about the governance of community development: does the gut serve as a passive incubator where the first organisms randomly encountered gain entry and predominate, or is there an orderly progression of members joining the community of bacteria? We used fine interval enumeration of microbes in stools from multiple subjects to answer this question. We demonstrate via 16S rRNA gene pyrosequencing of 922 specimens from 58 subjects that the gut microbiota of premature infants residing in a tightly controlled microbial environment progresses through a choreographed succession of bacterial classes from Bacilli to Gammaproteobacteria to Clostridia, interrupted by abrupt population changes. As infants approach 33–36 wk postconceptional age (corresponding to the third to the twelfth weeks of life depending on gestational age at birth), the gut is well colonized by anaerobes. Antibiotics, vaginal vs. Caesarian birth, diet, and age of the infants when sampled influence the pace, but not the sequence, of progression. Our results suggest that in infants in a microbiologically constrained ecosphere of a neonatal intensive care unit, gut bacterial communities have an overall nonrandom assembly that is punctuated by microbial population abruptions. The possibility that the pace of this assembly depends more on host biology (chiefly gestational age at birth) than identifiable exogenous factors warrants further consideration. PMID:25114261

  8. Foliar bacterial communities of trembling aspen in a common garden.

    PubMed

    Mason, Charles J; Pfammatter, Jesse A; Holeski, Liza M; Raffa, Kenneth F

    2015-02-01

    Microbial associations with plants are widely distributed and are structured by a number of biotic and physical factors. Among biotic factors, the host plant genotype may be integral to these plant-microbe interactions. Trees in the genus Populus have become models for studies in scaling effects of host plant genetics and in plant-microbe interactions. Using 454 pyrosequencing of the 16S rRNA gene, we assessed the foliar bacterial community of 7 genotypes of mature trembling aspen trees (Populus tremuloides Michx.) grown in a common garden. Trees were selected based on prior analyses showing clonal variation in their concentration of chemicals conferring resistance against insect herbivores. At broad taxonomic designations, the bacterial community of trembling aspen was similar across all plant genotypes. At a finer taxonomic scale, the foliage of these trees varied in their community composition, but there was no distinct pattern to colonization or abundance related to plant genotype. The most abundant operational taxonomic units (OTUs) were classified as Ralstonia, Bradyrhizobium, Pseudomonas, and Brucella. These OTUs varied across the common garden, but there was no significant effect of host plant genotype or spatial position on the abundance of these members. Our results suggest that aspen genotype is less important in the structuring of its foliar bacterial communities than are other, poorly understood processes. PMID:25602743

  9. Spt6 Is Essential for rRNA Synthesis by RNA Polymerase I.

    PubMed

    Engel, Krysta L; French, Sarah L; Viktorovskaya, Olga V; Beyer, Ann L; Schneider, David A

    2015-07-01

    Spt6 (suppressor of Ty6) has many roles in transcription initiation and elongation by RNA polymerase (Pol) II. These effects are mediated through interactions with histones, transcription factors, and the RNA polymerase. Two lines of evidence suggest that Spt6 also plays a role in rRNA synthesis. First, Spt6 physically associates with a Pol I subunit (Rpa43). Second, Spt6 interacts physically and genetically with Spt4/5, which directly affects Pol I transcription. Utilizing a temperature-sensitive allele, spt6-1004, we show that Spt6 is essential for Pol I occupancy of the ribosomal DNA (rDNA) and rRNA synthesis. Our data demonstrate that protein levels of an essential Pol I initiation factor, Rrn3, are reduced when Spt6 is inactivated, leading to low levels of Pol I-Rrn3 complex. Overexpression of RRN3 rescues Pol I-Rrn3 complex formation; however, rRNA synthesis is not restored. These data suggest that Spt6 is involved in either recruiting the Pol I-Rrn3 complex to the rDNA or stabilizing the preinitiation complex. The findings presented here identify an unexpected, essential role for Spt6 in synthesis of rRNA. PMID:25918242

  10. Phylogenetic Analysis of Cryptosporidium Parasites Based on the Small-Subunit rRNA Gene Locus

    Microsoft Academic Search

    LIHUA XIAO; LILLIAN ESCALANTE; CHUNFU YANG; IRSHAD SULAIMAN; ANANNIAS A. ESCALANTE; RICHARD J. MONTALI; RONALD FAYER; ALTAF A. LAL

    1999-01-01

    Biological data support the hypothesis that there are multiple species in the genus Cryptosporidium, but a recent analysis of the available genetic data suggested that there is insufficient evidence for species differen- tiation. In order to resolve the controversy in the taxonomy of this parasite genus, we characterized the small-subunit rRNA genes of Cryptosporidium parvum, Cryptosporidium baileyi, Cryptosporidium muris, and

  11. Evolution of Green Plants as Deduced from 5S rRNA Sequences

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Hiroshi Hori; Byung-Lak Lim; Syozo Osawa

    1985-01-01

    We have constructed a phylogenic tree for green plants by comparing 5S rRNA sequences. The tree suggests that the emergence of most of the uni- and multicellular green algae such as Chlamydomonas, Spirogyra, Ulva, and Chlorella occurred in the early stage of green plant evolution. The branching point of Nitella is a little earlier than that of land plants and

  12. Ribosome origins: The relative age of 23S rRNA Domains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hury, James; Nagaswamy, Uma; Larios-Sanz, Maia; Fox, George E.

    2006-08-01

    The modern ribosome and its component RNAs are quite large and it is likely that at an earlier time they were much smaller. Hence, not all regions of the modern ribosomal RNAs (rRNA) are likely to be equally old. In the work described here, it is hypothesized that the oldest regions of the RNAs will usually be highly integrated into the machinery. When this is the case, an examination of the interconnectivity between local RNA regions can provide insight to the relative age of the various regions. Herein, we describe an analysis of all known long-range RNA/RNA interactions within the 23S rRNA and between the 23S rRNA and the 16S rRNA in order to assess the interconnectivity between the usual Domains as defined by secondary structure. Domain V, which contains the peptidyl transferase center is centrally located, extensively connected, and therefore likely to be the oldest region. Domain IV and Domain II are extensively interconnected with both themselves and Domain V. A portion of Domain IV is also extensively connected with the 30S subunit and hence Domain IV may be older than Domain II. These results are consistent with other evidence relating to the relative age of RNA regions. Although the relative time of addition of the GTPase center can not be reliably deduced it is pointed out that the development of this may have dramatically affected the progenotes that preceded the last common ancestor.

  13. Multiple exoribonucleases catalyze maturation of the 3' terminus of 16S ribosomal RNA (rRNA).

    PubMed

    Sulthana, Shaheen; Deutscher, Murray P

    2013-05-01

    Processing of ribosomal RNA (rRNA) precursors is an important component of RNA metabolism in all cells. However, in no system have we yet identified all the RNases involved in this process. Here, we show that four 3'?5'-exoribonucleases, RNases II, R, and PH, and polynucleotide phosphorylase (PNPase), participate in maturation of the 3' end of 16S rRNA. In their absence, 16S precursor molecules with 33 extra 3'-nt accumulate; however, the presence of any one of the four RNases is sufficient to allow processing to occur, although with different efficiencies. Additionally, we find that in the absence of 3' maturation, 5' processing proceeds much less efficiently. Moreover, mutant 30S particles, containing immature 16S rRNA, form 70S ribosomes very poorly. These findings, together with the earlier discovery that RNases E and G are the 5'-processing enzymes, completes the catalogue of RNases involved in maturation of Escherichia coli 16S rRNA. PMID:23532845

  14. Phylogeny of Hydradephagan Water Beetles Inferred from 18S rRNA Sequences

    E-print Network

    Ribera, Ignacio

    Phylogeny of Hydradephagan Water Beetles Inferred from 18S rRNA Sequences Ignacio Ribera,1 James E (burrowing water beetles, 270 species), Halipli- dae (crawling water beetles, 220 species), and two mo- cies). Diving beetles spend most of their life cycle in the water, with only the pupae terrestrial

  15. vitroinitiates rRNA gene transcription Extensive purification of a putative RNA polymerase I holoenzyme from plants that accurately

    E-print Network

    Pikaard, Craig

    polymerase I holoenzyme from plants that accurately initiates rRNA gene transcription in vitro (nucleolus rDNAvitroinitiates rRNA gene transcription Extensive purification of a putative RNA polymerase I) inflores- cence that supports promoter-dependent RNA pol I transcrip- tion in vitro. The transcription

  16. Bacterial avirulence genes.

    PubMed

    Leach, J E; White, F F

    1996-01-01

    Although more than 30 bacterial avirulence genes have been cloned and characterized, the function of the gene products in the elictitation of resistance is unknown in all cases but one. The product of avrD from Pseudomonas syringae pv. glycinea likely functions indirectly to elicit resistance in soybean, that is, evidence suggests the gene product is an enzyme involved in elicitor production. In most if not all cases, bacterial avirulence gene function is dependent on interactions with the hypersensitive response and pathogenicity (hrp) genes. Many hrp genes are similar to genes involved in delivery of pathogenicity factors in mammalian bacterial pathogens. Thus, analogies between mammalian and plant pathogens may provide needed clues to elucidate how virulence gene products control induction of resistance. PMID:15012539

  17. Microbial Community Composition and Diversity via 16S rRNA Gene Amplicons: Evaluating the Illumina Platform

    PubMed Central

    Sinclair, Lucas; Osman, Omneya Ahmed; Bertilsson, Stefan; Eiler, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    As new sequencing technologies become cheaper and older ones disappear, laboratories switch vendors and platforms. Validating the new setups is a crucial part of conducting rigorous scientific research. Here we report on the reliability and biases of performing bacterial 16S rRNA gene amplicon paired-end sequencing on the MiSeq Illumina platform. We designed a protocol using 50 barcode pairs to run samples in parallel and coded a pipeline to process the data. Sequencing the same sediment sample in 248 replicates as well as 70 samples from alkaline soda lakes, we evaluated the performance of the method with regards to estimates of alpha and beta diversity. Using different purification and DNA quantification procedures we always found up to 5-fold differences in the yield of sequences between individually barcodes samples. Using either a one-step or a two-step PCR preparation resulted in significantly different estimates in both alpha and beta diversity. Comparing with a previous method based on 454 pyrosequencing, we found that our Illumina protocol performed in a similar manner – with the exception for evenness estimates where correspondence between the methods was low. We further quantified the data loss at every processing step eventually accumulating to 50% of the raw reads. When evaluating different OTU clustering methods, we observed a stark contrast between the results of QIIME with default settings and the more recent UPARSE algorithm when it comes to the number of OTUs generated. Still, overall trends in alpha and beta diversity corresponded highly using both clustering methods. Our procedure performed well considering the precisions of alpha and beta diversity estimates, with insignificant effects of individual barcodes. Comparative analyses suggest that 454 and Illumina sequence data can be combined if the same PCR protocol and bioinformatic workflows are used for describing patterns in richness, beta-diversity and taxonomic composition. PMID:25647581

  18. Microbial community composition and diversity via 16S rRNA gene amplicons: evaluating the illumina platform.

    PubMed

    Sinclair, Lucas; Osman, Omneya Ahmed; Bertilsson, Stefan; Eiler, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    As new sequencing technologies become cheaper and older ones disappear, laboratories switch vendors and platforms. Validating the new setups is a crucial part of conducting rigorous scientific research. Here we report on the reliability and biases of performing bacterial 16S rRNA gene amplicon paired-end sequencing on the MiSeq Illumina platform. We designed a protocol using 50 barcode pairs to run samples in parallel and coded a pipeline to process the data. Sequencing the same sediment sample in 248 replicates as well as 70 samples from alkaline soda lakes, we evaluated the performance of the method with regards to estimates of alpha and beta diversity. Using different purification and DNA quantification procedures we always found up to 5-fold differences in the yield of sequences between individually barcodes samples. Using either a one-step or a two-step PCR preparation resulted in significantly different estimates in both alpha and beta diversity. Comparing with a previous method based on 454 pyrosequencing, we found that our Illumina protocol performed in a similar manner - with the exception for evenness estimates where correspondence between the methods was low. We further quantified the data loss at every processing step eventually accumulating to 50% of the raw reads. When evaluating different OTU clustering methods, we observed a stark contrast between the results of QIIME with default settings and the more recent UPARSE algorithm when it comes to the number of OTUs generated. Still, overall trends in alpha and beta diversity corresponded highly using both clustering methods. Our procedure performed well considering the precisions of alpha and beta diversity estimates, with insignificant effects of individual barcodes. Comparative analyses suggest that 454 and Illumina sequence data can be combined if the same PCR protocol and bioinformatic workflows are used for describing patterns in richness, beta-diversity and taxonomic composition. PMID:25647581

  19. Profiling bacterial diversity in a limestone cave of the western Loess Plateau of China

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Yucheng; Tan, Liangcheng; Liu, Wuxing; Wang, Baozhan; Wang, Jianjun; Cai, Yanjun; Lin, Xiangui

    2015-01-01

    Bacteria and archaea sustain subsurface cave ecosystems by dominating primary production and fueling biogeochemical cyclings, despite the permanent darkness and shortage of nutrients. However, the heterogeneity and underlying mechanism of microbial diversity in caves, in particular those well connect to surface environment are largely unexplored. In this study, we examined the bacterial abundance and composition in Jinjia Cave, a small and shallow limestone cave located on the western Loess Plateau of China, by enumerating and pyrosequencing small subunit rRNA genes. The results clearly reveal the contrasting bacterial community compositions in relation to cave habitat types, i.e., rock wall deposit, aquatic sediment, and sinkhole soil, which are differentially connected to the surface environment. The deposits on the cave walls were dominated by putative cave-specific bacterial lineages within the ?-Proteobacteria or Actinobacteria that are routinely found on cave rocks around the world. In addition, sequence identity with known functional groups suggests enrichments of chemolithotrophic bacteria potentially involved in autotrophic C fixation and inorganic N transformation on rock surfaces. By contrast, bacterial communities in aquatic sediments were more closely related to those in the overlying soils. This is consistent with the similarity in elemental composition between the cave sediment and the overlying soil, implicating the influence of mineral chemistry on cave microhabitat and bacterial composition. These findings provide compelling molecular evidence of the bacterial community heterogeneity in an East Asian cave, which might be controlled by both subsurface and surface environments. PMID:25870592

  20. Profiling bacterial diversity in a limestone cave of the western Loess Plateau of China.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yucheng; Tan, Liangcheng; Liu, Wuxing; Wang, Baozhan; Wang, Jianjun; Cai, Yanjun; Lin, Xiangui

    2015-01-01

    Bacteria and archaea sustain subsurface cave ecosystems by dominating primary production and fueling biogeochemical cyclings, despite the permanent darkness and shortage of nutrients. However, the heterogeneity and underlying mechanism of microbial diversity in caves, in particular those well connect to surface environment are largely unexplored. In this study, we examined the bacterial abundance and composition in Jinjia Cave, a small and shallow limestone cave located on the western Loess Plateau of China, by enumerating and pyrosequencing small subunit rRNA genes. The results clearly reveal the contrasting bacterial community compositions in relation to cave habitat types, i.e., rock wall deposit, aquatic sediment, and sinkhole soil, which are differentially connected to the surface environment. The deposits on the cave walls were dominated by putative cave-specific bacterial lineages within the ?-Proteobacteria or Actinobacteria that are routinely found on cave rocks around the world. In addition, sequence identity with known functional groups suggests enrichments of chemolithotrophic bacteria potentially involved in autotrophic C fixation and inorganic N transformation on rock surfaces. By contrast, bacterial communities in aquatic sediments were more closely related to those in the overlying soils. This is consistent with the similarity in elemental composition between the cave sediment and the overlying soil, implicating the influence of mineral chemistry on cave microhabitat and bacterial composition. These findings provide compelling molecular evidence of the bacterial community heterogeneity in an East Asian cave, which might be controlled by both subsurface and surface environments. PMID:25870592

  1. Rapid antimicrobial susceptibility testing with electrokinetics enhanced biosensors for diagnosis of acute bacterial infections.

    PubMed

    Liu, Tingting; Lu, Yi; Gau, Vincent; Liao, Joseph C; Wong, Pak Kin

    2014-11-01

    Rapid pathogen detection and antimicrobial susceptibility testing (AST) are required in diagnosis of acute bacterial infections to determine the appropriate antibiotic treatment. Molecular approaches for AST are often based on the detection of known antibiotic resistance genes. Phenotypic culture analysis requires several days from sample collection to result reporting. Toward rapid diagnosis of bacterial infection in non-traditional healthcare settings, we have developed a rapid AST approach that combines phenotypic culture of bacterial pathogens in physiological samples and electrochemical sensing of bacterial 16S rRNA. The assay determines the susceptibility of pathogens by detecting bacterial growth under various antibiotic conditions. AC electrokinetic fluid motion and Joule heating induced temperature elevation are optimized to enhance the sensor signal and minimize the matrix effect, which improve the overall sensitivity of the assay. The electrokinetics enhanced biosensor directly detects the bacterial pathogens in blood culture without prior purification. Rapid determination of the antibiotic resistance profile of Escherichia coli clinical isolates is demonstrated. PMID:24889716

  2. Differences in bacterial community structure on Hydrilla verticillata and Vallisneria americana in a freshwater spring.

    PubMed

    Gordon-Bradley, Nadine; Lymperopoulou, Despoina S; Williams, Henry Neal

    2014-01-01

    The phylogenetic composition of the epiphytic bacterial community of an invasive aquatic plant (Hydrilla verticillata) and a native species (Vallisneria americana [eelgrass]) of the Wakulla Spring (Florida) was investigated, along with the water column bacterial composition, using clone libraries of the 16S rRNA genes. The bacterial clones from three clone libraries were classified into 182 operational taxonomic units (OTUs), most of which were affiliated with bacterial divisions commonly found in freshwater ecosystems. Based on the identified classes, the bacterial communities on eelgrass and Hydrilla were distinct, such that Planctomycetes, Cyanobacteria, Bacilli and Actinobacteria were found on eelgrass and in the water column but not on Hydrilla. On the other hand, Deltaproteobacteria and Verrucomicrobiae were found on Hydrilla and in the water column but not on eelgrass. Further distinctions observed were that Armatimonadia and Deinococci were found only on Hydrilla while Gemmatimonadetes was found only on eelgrass. Our results indicated differences between the epiphytic bacterial community on the two plants and the water column at the species level, but an even representation of the most abundant phylogenetic taxa (classes) in all three libraries was revealed. Statistical comparison of the retrieved sequences confirmed that the three libraries did not differ significantly at the community level (LIBSHUFF, p <0.05). PMID:24553106

  3. A Meta-Analysis of the Bacterial and Archaeal Diversity Observed in Wetland Soils

    PubMed Central

    Lv, Xiaofei; Yu, Junbao; Fu, Yuqin; Ma, Bin; Qu, Fanzhu; Ning, Kai; Wu, Huifeng

    2014-01-01

    This study examined the bacterial and archaeal diversity from a worldwide range of wetlands soils and sediments using a meta-analysis approach. All available 16S rRNA gene sequences recovered from wetlands in public databases were retrieved. In November 2012, a total of 12677 bacterial and 1747 archaeal sequences were collected in GenBank. All the bacterial sequences were assigned into 6383 operational taxonomic units (OTUs 0.03), representing 31 known bacterial phyla, predominant with Proteobacteria (2791 OTUs), Bacteroidetes (868 OTUs), Acidobacteria (731 OTUs), Firmicutes (540 OTUs), and Actinobacteria (418 OTUs). The genus Flavobacterium (11.6% of bacterial sequences) was the dominate bacteria in wetlands, followed by Gp1, Nitrosospira, and Nitrosomonas. Archaeal sequences were assigned to 521 OTUs from phyla Euryarchaeota and Crenarchaeota. The dominating archaeal genera were Fervidicoccus and Methanosaeta. Rarefaction analysis indicated that approximately 40% of bacterial and 83% of archaeal diversity in wetland soils and sediments have been presented. Our results should be significant for well-understanding the microbial diversity involved in worldwide wetlands. PMID:24982954

  4. Highly Heterogeneous Bacterial Communities Associated with the South China Sea Reef Corals Porites lutea, Galaxea fascicularis and Acropora millepora

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jie; Chen, Qi; Zhang, Si; Huang, Hui; Yang, Jian; Tian, Xin-Peng; Long, Li-Juan

    2013-01-01

    Coral harbor diverse and specific bacteria play significant roles in coral holobiont function. Bacteria associated with three of the common and phylogenetically divergent reef-building corals in the South China Sea, Porites lutea, Galaxea fascicularis and Acropora millepora, were investigated using 454 barcoded-pyrosequencing. Three colonies of each species were sampled, and 16S rRNA gene libraries were constructed individually. Analysis of pyrosequencing libraries showed that bacterial communities associated with the three coral species were more diverse than previous estimates based on corals from the Caribbean Sea, Indo-Pacific reefs and the Red Sea. Three candidate phyla, including BRC1, OD1 and SR1, were found for the first time in corals. Bacterial communities were separated into three groups: P. lutea and G. fascicular, A. millepora and seawater. P. lutea and G. fascicular displayed more similar bacterial communities, and bacterial communities associated with A. millepora differed from the other two coral species. The three coral species shared only 22 OTUs, which were distributed in Alphaproteobacteria, Deltaproteobacteria, Gammaproteobacteria, Chloroflexi, Actinobacteria, Acidobacteria and an unclassified bacterial group. The composition of bacterial communities within each colony of each coral species also showed variation. The relatively small common and large specific bacterial communities in these corals implies that bacterial associations may be structured by multiple factors at different scales and that corals may associate with microbes in terms of similar function, rather than identical species. PMID:23940737

  5. Molecular and Phenetic Characterization of the Bacterial Assemblage of Hot Lake, WA, an Environment with High Concentrations of Magnesium Sulfate, and Its Relevance to Mars

    PubMed Central

    Kilmer, Brian R.; Eberl, Timothy C.; Cunderla, Brent; Chen, Fei; Clark, Benton C.; Schneegurt, Mark A.

    2014-01-01

    Hot Lake (Oroville, WA) is an athalassohaline epsomite lake that can have precipitating concentrations of MgSO4 salts, mainly epsomite. Little biotic study has been done on epsomite lakes and it was unclear whether microbes isolated from epsomite lakes and their margins would fall within recognized halotolerant genera, common soil genera, or novel phyla. Our initial study cultivated and characterized epsotolerant bacteria from the lake and its margins. Approximately 100 aerobic heterotrophic microbial isolates were obtained by repetitive streak-plating in high-salt media including either 10% NaCl or 2 M MgSO4. The collected isolates were all bacteria, nearly evenly divided between Gram-positive and Gram-negative clades, the most abundant genera being Halomonas, Idiomarina, Marinobacter, Marinococcus, Nesterenkonia, Nocardiopsis, and Planococcus. Bacillus, Corynebacterium, Exiguobacterium, Kocuria, and Staphylococcus also were cultured. This initial study included culture-independent community analysis of direct DNA extracts of lake margin soil using PCR-based clone libraries and 16S rRNA gene phylogeny. Clones assigned Gram-positive bacterial clades (70% of total clones) were dominated by sequences related to uncultured actinobacteria. There were abundant Deltaproteobacteria clones related to bacterial sulfur metabolisms and clones of Legionella and Coxiella. These epsomite lake microbial communities seem to be divided between bacteria primarily associated with hyperhaline environments rich in NaCl and salinotolerant relatives of common soil organisms. Archaea appear to be in low abundance and none were isolated, despite near-saturated salinities. Growth of microbes at very high concentrations of magnesium and other sulfates has relevance to planetary protection and life-detection missions to Mars, where scant liquid water may form as deliquescent brines and appear as eutectic liquids. PMID:24748851

  6. Molecular analysis of bacterial microbiota associated with oysters (Crassostrea gigas and Crassostrea corteziensis) in different growth phases at two cultivation sites.

    PubMed

    Trabal, Natalia; Mazón-Suástegui, José M; Vázquez-Juárez, Ricardo; Asencio-Valle, Felipe; Morales-Bojórquez, Enrique; Romero, Jaime

    2012-08-01

    Microbiota presumably plays an essential role in inhibiting pathogen colonization and in the maintenance of health in oysters, but limited data exist concerning their different growth phases and conditions. We analyzed the bacterial microbiota composition of two commercial oysters: Crassostrea gigas and Crassostrea corteziensis. Differences in microbiota were assayed in three growth phases: post-larvae at the hatchery, juvenile, and adult at two grow-out cultivation sites. Variations in the microbiota were assessed by PCR analysis of the 16S rRNA gene in DNA extracted from depurated oysters. Restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) profiles were studied using Dice's similarity coefficient (Cs) and statistical principal component analysis (PCA). The microbiota composition was determined by sequencing temperature gradient gel electrophoresis (TGGE) bands. The RFLP analysis of post-larvae revealed homology in the microbiota of both oyster species (Cs > 88 %). Dice and PCA analyses of C. corteziensis but not C. gigas showed differences in the microbiota according to the cultivation sites. The sequencing analysis revealed low bacterial diversity (primarily ?-Proteobacteria, Firmicutes, and Spirochaetes), with Burkholderia cepacia being the most abundant bacteria in both oyster species. This study provides the first description of the microbiota in C. corteziensis, which was shown to be influenced by cultivation site conditions. During early growth, we observed that B. cepacia colonized and remained strongly associated with the two oysters, probably in a symbiotic host-bacteria relationship. This association was maintained in the three growth phases and was not altered by environmental conditions or the management of the oysters at the grow-out site. PMID:22450510

  7. Detection of Carcinogens as Mutagens: Bacterial Tester Strains with R Factor Plasmids

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Joyce McCann; Neil E. Spingarn; Joan Kobori; Bruce N. Ames

    1975-01-01

    We described previously a simple test on petri plates for detecting chemical carcinogens as mutagens, using an especially sensitive set of bacterial strains to detect mutagenic activity and a mammalian liver extract for carcinogen activation. We now extend the utility of the method by introducing two new bacterial strains which can detect with great sensitivity many carcinogens which we did

  8. [Bacterial overgrowth syndrome].

    PubMed

    Stein, J M; Schneider, A R

    2007-07-01

    Small bowel bacterial overgrowth is a syndrome caused by an abnormal number of bacteria in the upper part of the small bowel and associated with a complex array of clinical symptoms, i. e., chronic diarrhoea, steatorrhoea, macrocytic anaemia, weight loss, and less commonly, protein-losing enteropathy. The most common underlying factors are small intestinal stagnation or dysmotility, intestinal obstruction, blind or afferent loops, and decreased gastric secretion. The treatment usually consists in the eradication of bacterial overgrowth with repeated courses of antimicrobials, correction of associated nutritional deficiencies and, when possible, correction of the underlying predisposing conditions. PMID:17620228

  9. [Bacterial vaginosis and pregnancy].

    PubMed

    Canova, I; Caputo, S; Ciardo, A; Stragapede, B

    2002-01-01

    Premature rupture of membranes (PROM) occurs in approximately 5-10% of all pregnancies and is implicated in approximately one third of preterm births. PROM is associated with increased risks of perinatal as well as maternal morbidity and mortality at every gestational age. Much information suggest that the presence of bacterial vaginosis may be implicated in the occurrence of PROM and subsequent preterm delivery in significant numbers of pregnant women. We will briefly review clinical and pathophysiologic information linking bacterial vaginosis and PROM. PMID:12510420

  10. The role of human ribosomal proteins in the maturation of rRNA and ribosome production

    PubMed Central

    Robledo, Sara; Idol, Rachel A.; Crimmins, Dan L.; Ladenson, Jack H.; Mason, Philip J.; Bessler, Monica

    2008-01-01

    Production of ribosomes is a fundamental process that occurs in all dividing cells. It is a complex process consisting of the coordinated synthesis and assembly of four ribosomal RNAs (rRNA) with about 80 ribosomal proteins (r-proteins) involving more than 150 nonribosomal proteins and other factors. Diamond Blackfan anemia (DBA) is an inherited red cell aplasia caused by mutations in one of several r-proteins. How defects in r-proteins, essential for proliferation in all cells, lead to a human disease with a specific defect in red cell development is unknown. Here, we investigated the role of r-proteins in ribosome biogenesis in order to find out whether those mutated in DBA have any similarities. We depleted HeLa cells using siRNA for several individual r-proteins of the small (RPS6, RPS7, RPS15, RPS16, RPS17, RPS19, RPS24, RPS25, RPS28) or large subunit (RPL5, RPL7, RPL11, RPL14, RPL26, RPL35a) and studied the effect on rRNA processing and ribosome production. Depleting r-proteins in one of the subunits caused, with a few exceptions, a decrease in all r-proteins of the same subunit and a decrease in the corresponding subunit, fully assembled ribosomes, and polysomes. R-protein depletion, with a few exceptions, led to the accumulation of specific rRNA precursors, highlighting their individual roles in rRNA processing. Depletion of r-proteins mutated in DBA always compromised ribosome biogenesis while affecting either subunit and disturbing rRNA processing at different levels, indicating that the rate of ribosome production rather than a specific step in ribosome biogenesis is critical in patients with DBA. PMID:18697920

  11. Oral Microbiome Profiles: 16S rRNA Pyrosequencing and Microarray Assay Comparison

    PubMed Central

    Paster, Bruce J.; Ganly, Ian; Morris, Luc; Pei, Zhiheng; Hayes, Richard B.

    2011-01-01

    Objectives The human oral microbiome is potentially related to diverse health conditions and high-throughput technology provides the possibility of surveying microbial community structure at high resolution. We compared two oral microbiome survey methods: broad-based microbiome identification by 16S rRNA gene sequencing and targeted characterization of microbes by custom DNA microarray. Methods Oral wash samples were collected from 20 individuals at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center. 16S rRNA gene survey was performed by 454 pyrosequencing of the V3–V5 region (450 bp). Targeted identification by DNA microarray was carried out with the Human Oral Microbe Identification Microarray (HOMIM). Correlations and relative abundance were compared at phylum and genus level, between 16S rRNA sequence read ratio and HOMIM hybridization intensity. Results The major phyla, Firmicutes, Proteobacteria, Bacteroidetes, Actinobacteria, and Fusobacteria were identified with high correlation by the two methods (r?=?0.70?0.86). 16S rRNA gene pyrosequencing identified 77 genera and HOMIM identified 49, with 37 genera detected by both methods; more than 98% of classified bacteria were assigned in these 37 genera. Concordance by the two assays (presence/absence) and correlations were high for common genera (Streptococcus, Veillonella, Leptotrichia, Prevotella, and Haemophilus; Correlation?=?0.70–0.84). Conclusion Microbiome community profiles assessed by 16S rRNA pyrosequencing and HOMIM were highly correlated at the phylum level and, when comparing the more commonly detected taxa, also at the genus level. Both methods are currently suitable for high-throughput epidemiologic investigations relating identified and more common oral microbial taxa to disease risk; yet, pyrosequencing may provide a broader spectrum of taxa identification, a distinct sequence-read record, and greater detection sensitivity. PMID:21829515

  12. Effect of Phytogenic Feed Additives in Soybean Meal on In vitro Swine Fermentation for Odor Reduction and Bacterial Community Comparison.

    PubMed

    Alam, M J; Mamuad, L L; Kim, S H; Jeong, C D; Sung, H G; Cho, S B; Jeon, C O; Lee, K; Lee, Sang S

    2013-02-01

    The effect of different phytogenic feed additives on reducing odorous compounds in swine was investigated using in vitro fermentation and analyzed their microbial communities. Soybean meal (1%) added with 0.1% different phytogenic feed additives (FA) were in vitro fermented using swine fecal slurries and anaerobically incubated for 12 and 24 h. The phytogenic FAs used were red ginseng barn powder (Panax ginseng C. A. Meyer, FA1), persimmon leaf powder (Diospyros virginiana L., FA2), ginkgo leaf powder (Ginkgo biloba L., FA3), and oregano lippia seed oil extract (Lippia graveolens Kunth, OL, FA4). Total gas production, pH, ammonia-nitrogen (NH3-N), hydrogen sulfide (H2S), nitrite-nitrogen (NO2 (-)-N), nitrate-nitrogen (NO3 (-)-N), sulfate (SO4 (--)), volatile fatty acids (VFA) and other metabolites concentration were determined. Microbial communities were also analyzed using 16S rRNA DGGE. Results showed that the pH values on all treatments increased as incubation time became longer except for FA4 where it decreased. Moreover, FA4 incubated for 12 and 24 h was not detected in NH3-N and H2S. Addition of FAs decreased (p<0.05) propionate production but increased (p<0.05) the total VFA production. Ten 16S rRNA DGGE bands were identified which ranged from 96 to 100% identity which were mostly isolated from the intestine. Similarity index showed three clearly different clusters: I (FA2 and FA3), II (Con and FA1), and III (FA4). Dominant bands which were identified closest to Eubacterium limosum (ATCC 8486T), Uncultured bacterium clone PF6641 and Streptococcus lutetiensis (CIP 106849T) were present only in the FA4 treatment group and were not found in other groups. FA4 had a different bacterial diversity compared to control and other treatments and thus explains having lowest odorous compounds. Addition of FA4 to an enriched protein feed source for growing swine may effectively reduce odorous compounds which are typically associated with swine production. PMID:25049786

  13. Effect of Phytogenic Feed Additives in Soybean Meal on In vitro Swine Fermentation for Odor Reduction and Bacterial Community Comparison

    PubMed Central

    Alam, M. J.; Mamuad, L. L.; Kim, S. H.; Jeong, C. D.; Sung, H. G.; Cho, S. B.; Jeon, C. O.; Lee, K.; Lee, Sang S.

    2013-01-01

    The effect of different phytogenic feed additives on reducing odorous compounds in swine was investigated using in vitro fermentation and analyzed their microbial communities. Soybean meal (1%) added with 0.1% different phytogenic feed additives (FA) were in vitro fermented using swine fecal slurries and anaerobically incubated for 12 and 24 h. The phytogenic FAs used were red ginseng barn powder (Panax ginseng C. A. Meyer, FA1), persimmon leaf powder (Diospyros virginiana L., FA2), ginkgo leaf powder (Ginkgo biloba L., FA3), and oregano lippia seed oil extract (Lippia graveolens Kunth, OL, FA4). Total gas production, pH, ammonia-nitrogen (NH3-N), hydrogen sulfide (H2S), nitrite-nitrogen (NO2?-N), nitrate-nitrogen (NO3?-N), sulfate (SO4??), volatile fatty acids (VFA) and other metabolites concentration were determined. Microbial communities were also analyzed using 16S rRNA DGGE. Results showed that the pH values on all treatments increased as incubation time became longer except for FA4 where it decreased. Moreover, FA4 incubated for 12 and 24 h was not detected in NH3-N and H2S. Addition of FAs decreased (p<0.05) propionate production but increased (p<0.05) the total VFA production. Ten 16S rRNA DGGE bands were identified which ranged from 96 to 100% identity which were mostly isolated from the intestine. Similarity index showed three clearly different clusters: I (FA2 and FA3), II (Con and FA1), and III (FA4). Dominant bands which were identified closest to Eubacterium limosum (ATCC 8486T), Uncultured bacterium clone PF6641 and Streptococcus lutetiensis (CIP 106849T) were present only in the FA4 treatment group and were not found in other groups. FA4 had a different bacterial diversity compared to control and other treatments and thus explains having lowest odorous compounds. Addition of FA4 to an enriched protein feed source for growing swine may effectively reduce odorous compounds which are typically associated with swine production. PMID:25049786

  14. Assessment of denitrifying bacterial composition in activated sludge.

    PubMed

    Srinandan, C S; Shah, Mrinal; Patel, Bhavita; Nerurkar, Anuradha S

    2011-10-01

    The abundance and structure of denitrifying bacterial community in different activated sludge samples were assessed, where the abundance of denitrifying functional genes showed nirS in the range of 10(4)-10(5), nosZ with 10(4)-10(6) and 16S rRNA gene in the range 10(9)-10(10) copy number per ml of sludge. The culturable approach revealed Pseudomonas sp. and Alcaligenes sp. to be numerically high, whereas culture independent method showed betaproteobacteria to dominate the sludge samples. Comamonas sp. and Pseudomonas fluorescens isolates showed efficient denitrification, while Pseudomonas mendocina, Pseudomonas stutzeri and Brevundimonas diminuta accumulated nitrite during denitrification. Numerically dominant RFLP OTUs of the nosZ gene from the fertilizer factory sludge samples clustered with the known isolates of betaproteobacteria. The data also suggests the presence of different truncated denitrifiers with high numbers in sludge habitat. PMID:21868215

  15. Bacterial and archaeal communities in Lake Nyos (Cameroon, Central Africa)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tiodjio, Rosine E.; Sakatoku, Akihiro; Nakamura, Akihiro; Tanaka, Daisuke; Fantong, Wilson Y.; Tchakam, Kamtchueng B.; Tanyileke, Gregory; Ohba, Takeshi; Hell, Victor J.; Kusakabe, Minoru; Nakamura, Shogo; Ueda, Akira

    2014-08-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the microbial diversity associated with Lake Nyos, a lake with an unusual chemistry in Cameroon. Water samples were collected during the dry season on March 2013. Bacterial and archaeal communities were profiled using Polymerase Chain Reaction-Denaturing Gradient Gel Electrophoresis (PCR-DGGE) approach of the 16S rRNA gene. The results indicate a stratification of both communities along the water column. Altogether, the physico-chemical data and microbial sequences suggest a close correspondence of the potential microbial functions to the physico-chemical pattern of the lake. We also obtained evidence of a rich microbial diversity likely to include several novel microorganisms of environmental importance in the large unexplored microbial reservoir of Lake Nyos.

  16. Development and Application of Small-Subunit rRNA Probes for Assessment of Selected Thiobacillus Species and Members of the Genus Acidiphilium

    PubMed Central

    Peccia, Jordan; Marchand, Eric A.; Silverstein, Joann; Hernandez, Mark

    2000-01-01

    Culture-dependent studies have implicated sulfur-oxidizing bacteria as the causative agents of acid mine drainage and concrete corrosion in sewers. Thiobacillus species are considered the major representatives of the acid-producing bacteria in these environments. Small-subunit rRNA genes from all of the Thiobacillus and Acidiphilium species catalogued by the Ribosomal Database Project were identified and used to design oligonucleotide DNA probes. Two oligonucleotide probes were synthesized to complement variable regions of 16S rRNA in the following acidophilic bacteria: Thiobacillus ferrooxidans and T. thiooxidans (probe Thio820) and members of the genus Acidiphilium (probe Acdp821). Using 32P radiolabels, probe specificity was characterized by hybridization dissociation temperature (Td) with membrane-immobilized RNA extracted from a suite of 21 strains representing three groups of bacteria. Fluorochrome-conjugated probes were evaluated for use with fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) at the experimentally determined Tds. FISH was used to identify and enumerate bacteria in laboratory reactors and environmental samples. Probing of laboratory reactors inoculated with a mixed culture of acidophilic bacteria validated the ability of the oligonucleotide probes to track specific cell numbers with time. Additionally, probing of sediments from an active acid mine drainage site in Colorado demonstrated the ability to identify numbers of active bacteria in natural environments that contain high concentrations of metals, associated precipitates, and other mineral debris. PMID:10877807

  17. The human urinary microbiome; bacterial DNA in voided urine of asymptomatic adults

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, Debbie A.; Brown, Richard; Williams, Jon; White, Paul; Jacobson, S. Kim; Marchesi, Julian R.; Drake, Marcus J.

    2013-01-01

    The urinary microbiome of healthy individuals and the way it alters with ageing have not been characterized and may influence disease processes. Conventional microbiological methods have limited scope to capture the full spectrum of urinary bacterial species. We studied the urinary microbiota from a population of healthy individuals, ranging from 26 to 90 years of age, by amplification of the 16S rRNA gene, with resulting amplicons analyzed by 454 pyrosequencing. Mid-stream urine (MSU) was collected by the “clean-catch” method. Quantitative PCR of 16S rRNA genes in urine samples, allowed relative enumeration of the bacterial loads. Analysis of the samples indicates that females had a more heterogeneous mix of bacterial genera compared to the male samples and generally had representative members of the phyla Actinobacteria and Bacteroidetes. Analysis of the data leads us to conclude that a “core” urinary microbiome could potentially exist, when samples are grouped by age with fluctuation in abundance between age groups. The study also revealed age-specific genera Jonquetella, Parvimonas, Proteiniphilum, and Saccharofermentans. In conclusion, conventional microbiological methods are inadequate to fully identify around two-thirds of the bacteria identified in this study. Whilst this proof-of-principle study has limitations due to the sample size, the discoveries evident in this sample data are strongly suggestive that a larger study on the urinary microbiome should be encouraged and that the identification of specific genera at particular ages may be relevant to pathogenesis of clinical conditions. PMID:23967406

  18. The vaginal bacterial communities of Japanese women resemble those of women in other racial groups.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xia; Hansmann, Melanie A; Davis, Catherine C; Suzuki, Haruo; Brown, Celeste J; Schütte, Ursel; Pierson, Jacob D; Forney, Larry J

    2010-03-01

    To determine whether different racial groups shared common types of vaginal microbiota, we characterized the composition and structure of vaginal bacterial communities in asymptomatic and apparently healthy Japanese women in Tokyo, Japan, and compared them with those of White and Black women from North America. The composition of vaginal communities was compared based on community profiles of terminal restriction fragments of 16S rRNA genes and phylogenetic analysis of cloned 16S rRNA gene sequences of the numerically dominant bacterial populations. The types of vaginal communities found in Japanese women were similar to those of Black and White women. As with White and Black women, most vaginal communities were dominated by lactobacilli, and only four species of Lactobacillus (Lactobacillus iners, Lactobacillus crispatus, Lactobacillus jensenii, and Lactobacillus gasseri) were commonly found. Communities dominated by multiple species of lactobacilli were common in Japanese and White women, but rare in Black women. The incidence, in Japanese women, of vaginal communities with several non-Lactobacillus species at moderately high frequencies was intermediate between Black women and White women. The limited number of community types found among women in different ethnic groups suggests that host genetic factors, including the innate and adaptive immune systems, may be more important in determining the species composition of vaginal bacterial communities than are cultural and behavioral differences. PMID:19912342

  19. Bacterial microbiome of Coptotermes curvignathus (Isoptera: Rhinotermitidae) reflects the coevolution of species and dietary pattern.

    PubMed

    King, Jie Hung Patricia; Mahadi, Nor Muhammad; Bong, Choon Fah Joseph; Ong, Kian Huat; Hassan, Osman

    2014-10-01

    Coptotermes curvignathus Holmgren is capable of feeding on living trees. This ability is attributed to their effective digestive system that is furnished by the termite's own cellulolytic enzymes and cooperative enzymes produced by their gut microbes. In this study, the identity of an array of diverse microbes residing in the gut of C. curvignathus was revealed by sequencing the near-full-length 16S rRNA genes. A total of 154 bacterial phylotypes were found. The Bacteroidetes was the most abundant phylum and accounted for about 65% of the gut microbial profile. This is followed by Firmicutes, Actinobacteria, Spirochetes, Proteobacteria, TM7, Deferribacteres, Planctomycetes, Verrucomicrobia, and Termite Group 1. Based on the phylogenetic study, this symbiosis can be a result of long coevolution of gut enterotypes with the phylogenic distribution, strong selection pressure in the gut, and other speculative pressures that determine bacterial biome to follow. The phylogenetic distribution of cloned rRNA genes in the bacterial domain that was considerably different from other termite reflects the strong selection pressures in the gut where a proportional composition of gut microbiome of C. curvignathus has established. The selection pressures could be linked to the unique diet preference of C. curvignathus that profoundly feeds on living trees. The delicate gut microbiome composition may provide available nutrients to the host as well as potential protection against opportunistic pathogen. PMID:24123989

  20. DNA-based stable isotope probing enables the identification of active bacterial endophytes in potatoes.

    PubMed

    Rasche, Frank; Lueders, Tillmann; Schloter, Michael; Schaefer, Sabine; Buegger, Franz; Gattinger, Andreas; Hood-Nowotny, Rebecca C; Sessitsch, Angela

    2009-03-01

    A (13)CO2 (99 atom-%, 350 ppm) incubation experiment was performed to identify active bacterial endophytes in two cultivars of Solanum tuberosum, cultivars Desirée and Merkur. We showed that after the assimilation and photosynthetic transformation of (13)CO2 into (13)C-labeled metabolites by the plant, the most directly active, cultivar specific heterotrophic endophytic bacteria that consume these labeled metabolite scan be identified by DNA stable isotope probing (DNA-SIP).Density-resolved DNA fractions obtained from SIP were subjected to 16S rRNA gene-based community analysis using terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis and sequencing of generated gene libraries.Community profiling revealed community compositions that were dominated by plant chloroplast and mitochondrial 16S rRNA genes for the 'light' fractions of (13)CO2-incubated potato cultivars and of potato cultivars not incubated with (13)CO2. In the 'heavy' fractions of the (13)CO2-incubated endophyte DNA, a bacterial 492-bp terminal restriction fragment became abundant, which could be clearly identified as Acinetobacter and Acidovorax spp. in cultivars Merkur and Desirée,respectively, indicating cultivar-dependent distinctions in (13)C-label flow. These two species represent two common potato endophytes with known plant-beneficial activities.The approach demonstrated the successful detection of active bacterial endophytes in potato. DNA-SIP therefore offers new opportunities for exploring the complex nature of plant-microbe interactions and plant-dependent microbial metabolisms within the endosphere. PMID:19140937

  1. Anterior Foregut Microbiota of the Glassy-Winged Sharpshooter Explored Using Deep 16S rRNA Gene Sequencing from Individual Insects

    PubMed Central

    Rogers, Elizabeth E.; Backus, Elaine A.

    2014-01-01

    The glassy-winged sharpshooter (GWSS) is an invasive insect species that transmits Xylella fastidiosa, the bacterium causing Pierce's disease of grapevine and other leaf scorch diseases. X. fastidiosa has been shown to colonize the anterior foregut (cibarium and precibarium) of sharpshooters, where it may interact with other naturally-occurring bacterial species. To evaluate such interactions, a comprehensive list of bacterial species associated with the sharpshooter cibarium and precibarium is needed. Here, a survey of microbiota associated with the GWSS anterior foregut was conducted. Ninety-six individual GWSS, 24 from each of 4 locations (Bakersfield, CA; Ojai, CA; Quincy, FL; and a laboratory colony), were characterized for bacteria in dissected sharpshooter cibaria and precibaria by amplification and sequencing of a portion of the 16S rRNA gene using Illumina MiSeq technology. An average of approximately 150,000 sequence reads were obtained per insect. The most common genus detected was Wolbachia; sequencing of the Wolbachia ftsZ gene placed this strain in supergroup B, one of two Wolbachia supergroups most commonly associated with arthropods. X. fastidiosa was detected in all 96 individuals examined. By multilocus sequence typing, both X. fastidiosa subspecies fastidiosa and subspecies sandyi were present in GWSS from California and the colony; only subspecies fastidiosa was detected in GWSS from Florida. In addition to Wolbachia and X. fastidiosa, 23 other bacterial genera were detected at or above an average incidence of 0.1%; these included plant-associated microbes (Methylobacterium, Sphingomonas, Agrobacterium, and Ralstonia) and soil- or water-associated microbes (Anoxybacillus, Novosphingobium, Caulobacter, and Luteimonas). Sequences belonging to species of the family Enterobacteriaceae also were detected but it was not possible to assign these to individual genera. Many of these species likely interact with X. fastidiosa in the cibarium and precibarium. PMID:25184624

  2. Immunopotentiation for bacterial biodefense.

    PubMed

    Skyberg, Jerod A

    2014-01-01

    Activation of the innate immune system can enhance resistance to a variety of bacterial and viral infections. In situations where the etiological agent of disease is unknown, such as a bioterror attack, stimulation of innate immunity may be particularly useful as induced immune responses are often capable of providing protection against a broad range of pathogens. In particular, the threat of an intentional release of a highly virulent bacterial pathogen that is either intrinsically resistant to antibiotics, or has been weaponized via the introduction of antibiotic resistance, makes immunopotentiation an attractive complementary or alternative strategy to enhance resistance to bacterial biothreat agents. Francisella tularensis, Yersinia pestis, Bacillus anthracis, and Burkholderia mallei or pseudomallei can all be easily disseminated via the respiratory route and infections can result in high mortality rates. Therefore, there has been a marked increase in research on immunotherapeutics against these Tier 1 select agents over the last 10 years that will be covered in this review. In addition, immunopotentiation against non-Tier 1 select agents such as Brucella spp., and Coxiella burnetii has also been studied and will be reviewed here. In particular, we will focus on cellular targets, such as toll-like receptors (TLRs), carbohydrate receptors and cytokine receptors, which have been exploited by immunomodulatory regimens that confer broad-spectrum protection against virulent bacterial pathogens. PMID:25373479

  3. Bacterial leaf spot

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Bacterial leaf spot has been reported in Australia (Queensland), Egypt, El Salvador, India, Japan, Nicaragua, Sudan, and the United States (Florida, Iowa, Kansas, Maryland, and Wisconsin). It occasionally causes locally severe defoliation and post-emergence damping-off and stunting. The disease is...

  4. Bacterial social engagements

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jennifer M. Henke; Bonnie L. Bassler

    2004-01-01

    Quorum sensing is a process that enables bacteria to communicate using secreted signaling molecules called autoinducers. This process enables a population of bac- teria to regulate gene expression collectively and, there- fore, control behavior on a community-wide scale. Quorum sensing is widespread in the bacterial world and, generally, processes controlled by quorum sensing are unproductive when undertaken by an individual

  5. Bacterial microflora of nectarines

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Microflora of fruit surfaces has been the best source of antagonists against fungi causing postharvest decays of fruit. However, there is little information on microflora colonizing surfaces of fruits other than grapes, apples, and citrus fruit. We characterized bacterial microflora on nectarine f...

  6. Zinc contamination decreases the bacterial diversity of agricultural soil

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Bruce F Moffett; Fiona A Nicholson; Nnanna C Uwakwe; Brian J Chambers; James A Harris; Tom C. J Hill

    2003-01-01

    Around half a million tonnes of biosolids (sewage sludge dry solids) are applied to agricultural land in the United Kingdom each year, and this may increase to 732?000 t by 2005\\/6. The heavy metals contained in biosolids may permanently degrade the microbial decomposer communities of agricultural soils. We used amplified ribosomal DNA restriction analysis of the extractable bacterial fraction to

  7. Red bacterial cellulose production by fermentation of Monascus purpureus

    Microsoft Academic Search

    B. Wonganu; S. Kongruang

    2010-01-01

    Red and yellow pigments are secondary metabolic products secreted by Monascus purpureus strains on bacterial cellulose Acetobacter xylinum TISTR 975. In this paper, we study pigments secreted by the strains M. purpureus TISTR 3002, M. purpureus TISTR 3180 and M. purpureus TISTR 3385 grown in Modified Yeast Malt Extract. The experiment was carried out on a rotating shaker at 250

  8. Strategy for microbiome analysis using 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis on the Illumina sequencing platform.

    PubMed

    Ram, Jeffrey L; Karim, Aos S; Sendler, Edward D; Kato, Ikuko

    2011-06-01

    Understanding the identity and changes of organisms in the urogenital and other microbiomes of the human body may be key to discovering causes and new treatments of many ailments, such as vaginosis. High-throughput sequencing technologies have recently enabled discovery of the great diversity of the human microbiome. The cost per base of many of these sequencing platforms remains high (thousands of dollars per sample); however, the Illumina Genome Analyzer (IGA) is estimated to have a cost per base less than one-fifth of its nearest competitor. The main disadvantage of the IGA for sequencing PCR-amplified 16S rRNA genes is that the maximum read-length of the IGA is only 100 bases; whereas, at least 300 bases are needed to obtain phylogenetically informative data down to the genus and species level. In this paper we describe and conduct a pilot test of a multiplex sequencing strategy suitable for achieving total reads of?>?300 bases per extracted DNA molecule on the IGA. Results show that all proposed primers produce products of the expected size and that correct sequences can be obtained, with all proposed forward primers. Various bioinformatic optimization of the Illumina Bustard analysis pipeline proved necessary to extract the correct sequence from IGA image data, and these modifications of the data files indicate that further optimization of the analysis pipeline may improve the quality rankings of the data and enable more sequence to be correctly analyzed. The successful application of this method could result in an unprecedentedly deep description (800,000 taxonomic identifications per sample) of the urogenital and other microbiomes in a large number of samples at a reasonable cost per sample. PMID:21361774

  9. Evaluation of four methods of assigning species and genus to medically important bacteria using 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis.

    PubMed

    Park, Geon; Jin, Won-Young; Jang, Sook-Jin; Kook, Joong-Ki; Choi, Ji Ae; Park, Gyun Cheol; Lee, Min-Jung; Park, Soon-Nang; Li, Xue Min; Cho, Seong-Sig; Jang, Chul Ho; Kang, Seong-Ho; Moon, Dae-Soo

    2015-05-01

    The four methods for assigning bacterial species are the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI), modified CLSI (mCLSI), phylogenetic analysis (PA) and closest match (CM) methods, these are used to identify the genus and species using 16S rRNA gene sequence results. In this study, the results of identification by these four methods of 37 aerobic reference strains, 30 anaerobic reference strains, 15 Acinetobacter reference strains and 167 Acinetobacter clinical strains were compared. The rates of accurate identification to the species level using the CLSI, mCLSI, PA and CM methods were as follows: 24.3, 86.5, 86.5 and 89.2%, respectively, for the 37 aerobic reference strains; 73.3%, 96.7%, 90.0% and 93.3%, respectively, for the 30 anaerobic reference strains; 40.0%, 93.3%, 100% and 93.3%, respectively, for the 15 Acinetobacter reference strains; and 53.9%, 90.4%, 95.8% and 90.4%, respectively, for the 167 Acinetobacter clinical strains. The rates of accurate identification to the genus level using the CLSI, mCLSI, PA, and CM methods were as follows: 91.9%, 91.9%, 94.6% and 91.9%, respectively, for the 37 aerobic reference strains; 100%, 100%, 100% and 100%, respectively, for all of the 30 anaerobic reference strains, 15 Acinetobacter reference strains and the 167 Acinetobacter clinical strains. The mCLSI is the most practical and pragmatic method for identification of species based on 16S rRNA sequences for hospital, research or industry laboratories because it performs well and involves a simple procedure. PMID:25786669

  10. Corticosteroids for Bacterial Keratitis

    PubMed Central

    Srinivasan, Muthiah; Mascarenhas, Jeena; Rajaraman, Revathi; Ravindran, Meenakshi; Lalitha, Prajna; Glidden, David V.; Ray, Kathryn J.; Hong, Kevin C.; Oldenburg, Catherine E.; Lee, Salena M.; Zegans, Michael E.; McLeod, Stephen D.; Lietman, Thomas M.; Acharya, Nisha R.

    2013-01-01

    Objective To determine whether there is a benefit in clinical outcomes with the use of topical corticosteroids as adjunctive therapy in the treatment of bacterial corneal ulcers. Methods Randomized, placebo-controlled, double-masked, multicenter clinical trial comparing prednisolone sodium phosphate, 1.0%, to placebo as adjunctive therapy for the treatment of bacterial corneal ulcers. Eligible patients had a culture-positive bacterial corneal ulcer and received topical moxifloxacin for at least 48 hours before randomization. Main Outcome Measures The primary outcome was best spectacle-corrected visual acuity (BSCVA) at 3 months from enrollment. Secondary outcomes included infiltrate/scar size, reepithelialization, and corneal perforation. Results Between September 1, 2006, and February 22, 2010, 1769 patients were screened for the trial and 500 patients were enrolled. No significant difference was observed in the 3-month BSCVA (?0.009 logarithm of the minimum angle of resolution [logMAR]; 95% CI, ?0.085 to 0.068; P = .82), infiltrate/scar size (P = .40), time to reepithelialization (P = .44), or corneal perforation (P > .99). A significant effect of corticosteroids was observed in subgroups of baseline BSCVA (P = .03) and ulcer location (P = .04). At 3 months, patients with vision of counting fingers or worse at baseline had 0.17 logMAR better visual acuity with corticosteroids (95% CI, ?0.31 to ?0.02; P = .03) compared with placebo, and patients with ulcers that were completely central at baseline had 0.20 logMAR better visual acuity with corticosteroids (?0.37 to ?0.04; P = .02). Conclusions We found no overall difference in 3-month BSCVA and no safety concerns with adjunctive corticosteroid therapy for bacterial corneal ulcers. Application to Clinical Practice Adjunctive topical corticosteroid use does not improve 3-month vision in patients with bacterial corneal ulcers. PMID:21987582

  11. Biofilm forming ability of a new bacterial isolate from dental caries: An atomic force microscopic study

    PubMed Central

    Arul, A. Sri Kennath J.; Palanivelu, Peramachi

    2014-01-01

    Background: Dental plaque being one of the most-studied biofilm communities, is particularly complex because it consists of thousands of bacterial species, and new species are still being isolated and characterized. The aim of the present study is to characterize surface topography of the biofilm formed by a new bacterial isolate, obtained from the dental caries lesion using atomic force microscopy. Materials and Methods: Ten clinical isolates were obtained from five teeth with carious lesions involving dentine. Quantification of the biofilm forming ability of the clinical isolates was performed using microtiter plate assay. Bacterial isolate exhibiting maximum biofilm formation was subjected to phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA gene sequencing and atomic force microscopic analysis. Results: The bacterial strain JKAS-CD2 displayed the highest similarity to 16S rRNA gene sequences of members of the family Streptococcaceae. It shared 95.3-99.3% similarity to the type strains of genus Streptococcus and 99.9% sequence similarity to the type strain Streptococcus infantarius. Atomic Force Microscopic analysis confirmed that the sucrose dependent bacterial adhesion for stable biofilm development has increased over a time-span on the thin film of enamel. Major structural components of plaque such as clumping of colonies and slime layer were clearly visualized by surface image of JKAS-CD2 cells grown on the enamel powder coated glass surface. Conclusion: JKAS-CD2 emerged as an obligate biofilm forming microbe under sucrose-dependent condition; a mechanism for adherence that determines the survival and persistence of the bacteria in the oral cavity and thus implicated with the dental caries. PMID:25097398

  12. Universal bacterial identification by mass spectrometry of 16S ribosomal RNA cleavage products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackson, George W.; McNichols, Roger J.; Fox, George E.; Willson, Richard C.

    2007-03-01

    The public availability of over 180,000 bacterial 16S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) sequences has facilitated microbial identification and classification using nucleic acid hybridization and other molecular approaches. Species-specific PCR, microarrays, and in situ hybridization are based on the presence of unique subsequences in the target sequence and therefore require prior knowledge of what organisms are likely to be present in a sample. Mass spectrometry is not limited by a pre-synthesized inventory of probe/primer sequences. It has already been demonstrated that organism identification can be recovered from mass spectra using various methods including base-specific cleavage of nucleic acids. The feasibility of broad bacterial identification by comparing such mass spectral patterns to predictive databases derived from virtually all previously sequenced strains has yet to be demonstrated, however. Herein, we present universal bacterial identification by base-specific cleavage, mass spectrometry, and an efficient coincidence function for rapid spectral scoring against a large database of predicted "mass catalogs". Using this approach in conjunction with universal PCR of the 16S rDNA gene, four bacterial isolates and an uncultured clone were successfully identified against a database of predicted cleavage products derived 6rom over 47,000 16S rRNA sequences representing all major bacterial taxaE At present, the conventional DNA isolation and PCR steps require approximately 2 h, while subsequent transcription, enzymatic cleavage, mass spectrometric analysis, and database comparison require less than 45 min. All steps are amenable to high-throughput implementation.

  13. Bacterial communities in the rhizosphere of Vitis vinifera L. cultivated under distinct agricultural practices in Argentina.

    PubMed

    Vega-Avila, A D; Gumiere, T; Andrade, P A M; Lima-Perim, J E; Durrer, A; Baigori, M; Vazquez, F; Andreote, F D

    2015-02-01

    Plants interact with a myriad of microbial cells in the rhizosphere, an environment that is considered to be important for plant development. However, the differential structuring of rhizosphere microbial communities due to plant cultivation under differential agricultural practices remains to be described for most plant species. Here we describe the rhizosphere microbiome of grapevine cultivated under conventional and organic practices, using a combination of cultivation-independent approaches. The quantification of bacterial 16S rRNA and nifH genes, by quantitative PCR (qPCR), revealed similar amounts of these genes in the rhizosphere in both vineyards. PCR-DGGE was used to detect differences in the structure of bacterial communities, including both the complete whole communities and specific fractions, such as Alphaproteobacteria, Betaproteobacteria, Actinobacteria, and those harboring the nitrogen-fixing related gene nifH. When analyzed by a multivariate approach (redundancy analysis), the shifts observed in the bacterial communities were poorly explained by variations in the physical and chemical characteristics of the rhizosphere. These approaches were complemented by high-throughput sequencing (67,830 sequences) based on the V6 region of the 16S rRNA gene, identifying the major bacterial groups present in the rhizosphere of grapevines: Proteobacteria, Actinobacteria, Firmicutes, Bacteriodetes, Acidobacteria, Cloroflexi, Verrucomicrobia and Planctomycetes, which occur in distinct proportions in the rhizosphere from each vineyard. The differences might be related to the selection of plant metabolism upon distinct reservoirs of microbial cells found in each vineyard. The results fill a gap in the knowledge of the rhizosphere of grapevines and also show distinctions in these bacterial communities due to agricultural practices. PMID:25527391

  14. Comparison of Diversities and Compositions of Bacterial Populations Inhabiting Natural Forest Soils

    PubMed Central

    Hackl, Evelyn; Zechmeister-Boltenstern, Sophie; Bodrossy, Levente; Sessitsch, Angela

    2004-01-01

    The diversity and composition of soil bacterial communities were compared among six Austrian natural forests, including oak-hornbeam, spruce-fir-beech, and Austrian pine forests, using terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP, or TRF) analysis and sequence analysis of 16S rRNA genes. The forests studied differ greatly in soil chemical characteristics, microbial biomass, and nutrient turnover rates. The aim of this study was to relate these differences to the composition of the bacterial communities inhabiting the individual forest soils. Both TRF profiling and clone sequence analysis revealed that the bacterial communities in soils under Austrian pine forests, representing azonal forest types, were distinct from those in soils under zonal oak-hornbeam and spruce-fir-beech forests, which were more similar in community composition. Clones derived from an Austrian pine forest soil were mostly affiliated with high-G+C gram-positive bacteria (49%), followed by members of the ?-Proteobacteria (20%) and the Holophaga/Acidobacterium group (12%). Clones in libraries from oak-hornbeam and spruce-fir-beech forest soils were mainly related to the Holophaga/Acidobacterium group (28 and 35%), followed by members of the Verrucomicrobia (24%) and the ?-Proteobacteria (27%), respectively. The soil bacterial communities in forests with distinct vegetational and soil chemical properties appeared to be well differentiated based on 16S rRNA gene phylogeny. In particular, the outstanding position of the Austrian pine forests, which are determined by specific soil conditions, was reflected in the bacterial community composition. PMID:15345382

  15. Microbiome changes in healthy volunteers treated with GSK1322322, a novel antibiotic targeting bacterial peptide deformylase.

    PubMed

    Arat, Seda; Spivak, Aaron; Van Horn, Stephanie; Thomas, Elizabeth; Traini, Christopher; Sathe, Ganesh; Livi, George P; Ingraham, Karen; Jones, Lori; Aubart, Kelly; Holmes, David J; Naderer, Odin; Brown, James R

    2015-02-01

    GSK1322322 is a novel antibacterial agent under development, and it has known antibacterial activities against multidrug-resistant respiratory and skin pathogens through its inhibition of the bacterial peptide deformylase. Here, we used next-generation sequencing (NGS) of the bacterial 16S rRNA genes from stool samples collected from 61 healthy volunteers at the predosing and end-of-study time points to determine the effects of GSK1322322 on the gastrointestinal (GI) microbiota in a phase I, randomized, double-blind, and placebo-controlled study. GSK1322322 was administered either intravenously (i.v.) only or in an oral-i.v. combination in single- and repeat-dose-escalation infusions. Analysis of the 16S rRNA sequence data found no significant changes in the relative abundances of GI operational taxonomic units (OTUs) between the prestudy and end-of-study samples for either the placebo- or i.v.-only-treated subjects. However, oral-i.v. treatment resulted in significant decreases in some bacterial taxa, the Firmicutes and Bacteroidales, and increases in others, the Betaproteobacteria, Gammaproteobacteria, and Bifidobacteriaceae. Microbiome diversity plots clearly differentiated the end-of-study oral-i.v.-dosed samples from all others collected. The changes in genome function as inferred from species composition suggest an increase in bacterial transporter and xenobiotic metabolism pathways in these samples. A phylogenetic analysis of the peptide deformylase protein sequences collected from the published genomes of clinical isolates previously tested for GSK1322322 in vitro susceptibility and GI bacterial reference genomes suggests that antibiotic target homology is one of several factors that influences the response of GI microbiota to this antibiotic. Our study shows that dosing regimen and target class are important factors when considering the impact of antibiotic usage on GI microbiota. (This clinical trial was registered at the GlaxoSmithKline Clinical Study Register under study identifier PDF 113376.). PMID:25487798

  16. Comparison of 16S rRNA gene sequences of genus Methanobrevibacter

    PubMed Central

    Dighe, Abhijit S; Jangid, Kamlesh; González, José M; Pidiyar, Vyankatesh J; Patole, Milind S; Ranade, Dilip R; Shouche, Yogesh S

    2004-01-01

    Background The phylogeny of the genus Methanobrevibacter was established almost 25 years ago on the basis of the similarities of the 16S rRNA oligonucleotide catalogs. Since then, many 16S rRNA gene sequences of newly isolated strains or clones representing the genus Methanobrevibacter have been deposited. We tried to reorganize the 16S rRNA gene sequences of this genus and revise the taxonomic affiliation of the isolates and clones representing the genus Methanobrevibacter. Results The phylogenetic analysis of the genus based on 786 bp aligned region from fifty-four representative sequences of the 120 available sequences for the genus revealed seven multi-member groups namely, Ruminantium, Smithii, Woesei, Curvatus, Arboriphilicus, Filiformis, and the Termite gut symbionts along with three separate lineages represented by Mbr. wolinii, Mbr. acididurans, and termite gut flagellate symbiont LHD12. The cophenetic correlation coefficient, a test for the ultrametric properties of the 16S rRNA gene sequences used for the tree was found to be 0.913 indicating the high degree of goodness of fit of the tree topology. A significant relationship was found between the 16S rRNA sequence similarity (S) and the extent of DNA hybridization (D) for the genus with the correlation coefficient (r) for logD and logS, and for [ln(-lnD) and ln(-lnS)] being 0.73 and 0.796 respectively. Our analysis revealed that for this genus, when S = 0.984, D would be <70% at least 99% of the times, and with 70% D as the species "cutoff", any 16S rRNA gene sequence showing <98% sequence similarity can be considered as a separate species. In addition, we deduced group specific signature positions that have remained conserved in evolution of the genus. Conclusions A very significant relationship between D and S was found to exist for the genus Methanobrevibacter, implying that it is possible to predict D from S with a known precision for the genus. We propose to include the termite gut flagellate symbiont LHD12, the methanogenic endosymbionts of the ciliate Nyctotherus ovalis, and rat feces isolate RT reported earlier, as separate species of the genus Methanobrevibacter. PMID:15128464

  17. Intraspecific Variation in Small-Subunit rRNA Sequences in GenBank: Why Single Sequences May Not Adequately Represent Prokaryotic Taxa

    Microsoft Academic Search

    REBECCA A. CLAYTON; GRANGER SUTTON; PAUL S. HINKLE; CAROL BULT

    Small-subunit rRNA (SSU rRNA) sequencing is a powerful tool to detect, identify, and classify prokaryotic organisms, and there is currently an explosion of SSU rRNA sequencing in the microbiology community. We report unexpectedly high levels of intraspecific variation (within and between strains) of prokaryote SSU rRNA sequences deposited in GenBank. A total of 82% of the prokaryote species with two

  18. Novel division level bacterial diversity in a Yellowstone hot spring.

    PubMed

    Hugenholtz, P; Pitulle, C; Hershberger, K L; Pace, N R

    1998-01-01

    A culture-independent molecular phylogenetic survey was carried out for the bacterial community in Obsidian Pool (OP), a Yellowstone N