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Sample records for bacteriophage t4 lysozyme

  1. Control of Bacteriophage T4 Tail Lysozyme Activity During the Infection Process

    SciTech Connect

    Kanamaru, Shuji; Ishiwata, Yasutaka; Suzuki, Toshiharu; Rossmann, Michael G.; Arisaka, Fumio

    2010-07-19

    Bacteriophage T4 has an efficient mechanism for injecting the host Escherichia coli cell with genomic DNA. Its gene product 5 (gp5) has a needle-like structure attached to the end of a tube through which the DNA passes on its way out of the head and into the host. The gp5 needle punctures the outer cell membrane and then digests the peptidoglycan cell wall in the periplasmic space. gp5 is normally post-translationally cleaved between residues 351 and 352. The function of this process in controlling the lysozyme activity of gp5 has now been investigated. When gp5 is over-expressed in E. coli, two mutants (S351H and S351A) showed a reduction of cleavage products and five other mutants (S351L, S351K, S351Y, S351Q, and S351T) showed no cleavage. Furthermore, in a complementation assay at 20 C, the mutants that had no cleavage of gp5 produced a reduced number of plaques compared to wild-type T4. The crystal structure of the non-cleavage phenotype mutant of gp5, S351L, complexed with gene product 27, showed that the 18 residues in the vicinity of the potential cleavage site (disordered in the wild-type structure) had visible electron density. The polypeptide around the potential cleavage site is exposed, thus allowing access for an E. coli protease. The lysozyme activity is inhibited in the wild-type structure by a loop from the adjacent gp5 monomer that binds into the substrate-binding site. The same inhibition is apparent in the mutant structure, showing that the lysozyme is inhibited before gp5 is cleaved and, presumably, the lysozyme is activated only after gp5 has penetrated the outer membrane.

  2. SRLS analysis of 15N relaxation from bacteriophage T4 lysozyme: a tensorial perspective that features domain motion.

    PubMed

    Meirovitch, Eva

    2012-05-31

    Bacteriophage T4L lysozyme (T4L) comprises two domains connected by a helical linker. Several methods detected ns domain motion associated with the binding of the peptidoglycan substrate. An ESR study of nitroxide-labeled T4L, based on the slowly relaxing local structure (SRLS) approach, detected ns local motion involving the nitroxide and the helix housing it. (15)N−H spin relaxation data from T4L acquired at magnetic fields of 11.7 and 18.8 T, and 298 K, were analyzed previously with the model-free (MF) method. The results did not detect domain motion. SRLS is the generalization of MF. Here, we apply it to the same data analyzed previously with MF. The restricted local N−H motion is described in terms of tilted axial local ordering (S) and local diffusion (D(2)) tensors; dynamical coupling to the global tumbling is accounted for. We find that D(2,⊥) is 1.62 × 10(7) (1.56 × 10(7)) s(−1) for the N-terminal (C-terminal) domain. This dynamic mode represents domain motion. For the linker D(2,⊥) is the same as the rate of global tumbling, given by (1.46 ± 0.04) × 10(7) s(−1). D(2,∥) is 1.3 × 10(9), 1.8 × 10(9) and 5.3 × 10(9) s(−1) for the N-terminal domain, the C-terminal domain, and the linker, respectively. This dynamic mode represents N−H bond vector fluctuations. The principal axis of D(2) is virtually parallel to the N−H bond. The order parameter, S(0)(2), is 0.910 ± 0.046 for most N−H bonds. The principal axis of S is tilted from the C(i−1)(α) −C(i)(α) axis by −2° to 6° for the N-, and C-terminal domains, and by 2.5° for the linker. The tensorial-perspective-based and mode-coupling-based SRLS picture provides new insights into the structural dynamics of bacteriophage T4 lysozyme. PMID:22568692

  3. Bacteriophage T4 Genome†

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Eric S.; Kutter, Elizabeth; Mosig, Gisela; Arisaka, Fumio; Kunisawa, Takashi; Rüger, Wolfgang

    2003-01-01

    Phage T4 has provided countless contributions to the paradigms of genetics and biochemistry. Its complete genome sequence of 168,903 bp encodes about 300 gene products. T4 biology and its genomic sequence provide the best-understood model for modern functional genomics and proteomics. Variations on gene expression, including overlapping genes, internal translation initiation, spliced genes, translational bypassing, and RNA processing, alert us to the caveats of purely computational methods. The T4 transcriptional pattern reflects its dependence on the host RNA polymerase and the use of phage-encoded proteins that sequentially modify RNA polymerase; transcriptional activator proteins, a phage sigma factor, anti-sigma, and sigma decoy proteins also act to specify early, middle, and late promoter recognition. Posttranscriptional controls by T4 provide excellent systems for the study of RNA-dependent processes, particularly at the structural level. The redundancy of DNA replication and recombination systems of T4 reveals how phage and other genomes are stably replicated and repaired in different environments, providing insight into genome evolution and adaptations to new hosts and growth environments. Moreover, genomic sequence analysis has provided new insights into tail fiber variation, lysis, gene duplications, and membrane localization of proteins, while high-resolution structural determination of the “cell-puncturing device,” combined with the three-dimensional image reconstruction of the baseplate, has revealed the mechanism of penetration during infection. Despite these advances, nearly 130 potential T4 genes remain uncharacterized. Current phage-sequencing initiatives are now revealing the similarities and differences among members of the T4 family, including those that infect bacteria other than Escherichia coli. T4 functional genomics will aid in the interpretation of these newly sequenced T4-related genomes and in broadening our understanding of the

  4. Structure and function of bacteriophage T4

    PubMed Central

    Yap, Moh Lan; Rossmann, Michael G

    2014-01-01

    Bacteriophage T4 is the most well-studied member of Myoviridae, the most complex family of tailed phages. T4 assembly is divided into three independent pathways: the head, the tail and the long tail fibers. The prolate head encapsidates a 172 kbp concatemeric dsDNA genome. The 925 Å-long tail is surrounded by the contractile sheath and ends with a hexagonal baseplate. Six long tail fibers are attached to the baseplate’s periphery and are the host cell’s recognition sensors. The sheath and the baseplate undergo large conformational changes during infection. X-ray crystallography and cryo-electron microscopy have provided structural information on protein–protein and protein–nucleic acid interactions that regulate conformational changes during assembly and infection of Escherichia coli cells. PMID:25517898

  5. Solid-state synthesis and mechanical unfolding of polymers of T4 lysozyme.

    PubMed

    Yang, G; Cecconi, C; Baase, W A; Vetter, I R; Breyer, W A; Haack, J A; Matthews, B W; Dahlquist, F W; Bustamante, C

    2000-01-01

    Recent advances in single molecule manipulation methods offer a novel approach to investigating the protein folding problem. These studies usually are done on molecules that are naturally organized as linear arrays of globular domains. To extend these techniques to study proteins that normally exist as monomers, we have developed a method of synthesizing polymers of protein molecules in the solid state. By introducing cysteines at locations where bacteriophage T4 lysozyme molecules contact each other in a crystal and taking advantage of the alignment provided by the lattice, we have obtained polymers of defined polarity up to 25 molecules long that retain enzymatic activity. These polymers then were manipulated mechanically by using a modified scanning force microscope to characterize the force-induced reversible unfolding of the individual lysozyme molecules. This approach should be general and adaptable to many other proteins with known crystal structures. For T4 lysozyme, the force required to unfold the monomers was 64 +/- 16 pN at the pulling speed used. Refolding occurred within 1 sec of relaxation with an efficiency close to 100%. Analysis of the force versus extension curves suggests that the mechanical unfolding transition follows a two-state model. The unfolding forces determined in 1 M guanidine hydrochloride indicate that in these conditions the activation barrier for unfolding is reduced by 2 kcal/mol. PMID:10618384

  6. T4 bacteriophage as a phage display platform.

    PubMed

    Gamkrelidze, Mariam; Dąbrowska, Krystyna

    2014-07-01

    Analysis of molecular events in T4-infected Escherichia coli has revealed some of the most important principles of biology, including relationships between structures of genes and their products, virus-induced acquisition of metabolic function, and morphogenesis of complex structures through sequential gene product interaction rather than sequential gene activation. T4 bacteriophages and related strains were applied in the first formulations of many fundamental biological concepts. These include the unambiguous recognition of nucleic acids as the genetic material, the definition of the gene by fine-structure mutation, recombinational and functional analyses, the demonstration that the genetic code is triplet, the discovery of mRNA, the importance of recombination and DNA replications, light-dependent and light-independent DNA repair mechanisms, restriction and modification of DNA, self-splicing of intron/exon arrangement in prokaryotes, translation bypassing and others. Bacteriophage T4 possesses unique features that make it a good tool for a multicomponent vaccine platform. Hoc/Soc-fused antigens can be assembled on the T4 capsid in vitro and in vivo. T4-based phage display combined with affinity chromatography can be applied as a new method for bacteriophage purification. The T4 phage display system can also be used as an attractive approach for cancer therapy. The data show the efficient display of both single and multiple HIV antigens on the phage T4 capsid and offer insights for designing novel particulate HIV or other vaccines that have not been demonstrated by other vector systems. PMID:24828789

  7. REDOR NMR Characterization of DNA Packaging in Bacteriophage T4

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Tsyr-Yan; Schaefer, Jacob

    2008-01-01

    Bacteriophage T4 is a large-tailed E. coli virus whose capsid is 120 × 86 nm. ATP-driven DNA packaging of the T4 capsid results in the loading of a 171-kb genome in less than 5 minutes during viral infection. We have isolated 50-mg quantities of uniform 15N and [ε-15N]lysine-labeled bacteriophage T4. We have also introduced 15NH4+ into filled, unlabeled capsids from synthetic medium by exchange. We have examined lyo- and cryoprotected lyophilized T4 using 15N{31P} and 31P{15N} rotational-echo double resonance. The results of these experiments have shown that: (i) packaged DNA is in an unperturbed duplex B-form conformation; (ii) the DNA phosphate negative charge is balanced by lysyl amines (3.2%), polyamines (5.8%), and monovalent cations (40%); and (iii) 11% of lysyl amines, 40% of –NH2 groups of polyamines, and 80% of monovalent cations within the lyophilized T4 capsid, are involved in the DNA charge balance. The NMR evidence suggests that DNA enters the T4 capsid in a charge-unbalanced state. We propose that electrostatic interactions may provide free energy to supplement the nanomotor-driven T4 DNA packaging. PMID:18703073

  8. The effect of alpha particles on bacteriophage T4Br+.

    PubMed

    Leont'eva, G A; Akoev, I G; Grigor'ev, A E

    1983-01-01

    It is generally accepted that heavy charged particles play an important part in generating the secondary flux of nuclear particles formed by the interaction of space hadrons with nuclei. It is assumed that these particles are responsible for the high biological efficiency of space hadrons in causing cellular damage by their strong interactions. To examine this assumption we investigated the effects of 5.3 MeV alpha particles on bacteriophage T4. This energy provides a LET value of 88.6 KeV/micrometer lying in the range of the highest biological efficiency. PMID:11542756

  9. Mechanisms of Spontaneous and Induced Frameshift Mutation in Bacteriophage T4

    PubMed Central

    Streisinger, George; Owen, Joyce Emrich

    1985-01-01

    Frequencies of spontaneous and proflavine-induced frameshift mutations increase dramatically as a function of the number of reiterated base pairs at each of two sites in the lysozyme gene of bacteriophage T4. At each site, proflavine induces addition mutations more frequently than deletion mutations. We confirm that the steroidal diamine, irehdiamine A, induces frameshift addition mutations. At sites of reiterated bases, we propose that base pairing is misaligned adjacent to a gap. The misaligned configuration is stabilized by the stacking of mutagen molecules around the extrahelical base, forming a sandwich. Proflavine induces addition mutations efficiently at a site without any reiterated bases. Mutagenesis at such sites may be due to mutagen-induced stuttering of the replication complex. PMID:3988038

  10. Genetic and Immunological Studies of Bacteriophage T4 Thymidylate Synthetase

    PubMed Central

    Krauss, S. W.; Stollar, B. D.; Friedkin, M.

    1973-01-01

    Thymidylate synthetase, which appears after infection of Escherichia coli with bacteriophage T4, has been partially purified. The phage enzyme is immunologically distinct from the host enzyme and has a molecular weight of 50,000 in comparison to 68,000 for the host enzyme. A system has been developed to characterize T4 td mutants previously known to have impaired expression of phage thymidylate synthetase. For this system, an E. coli host lacking thymidylate synthetase was isolated. Known genetic suppressors were transduced into this host. The resulting isogenic hosts were infected with phage T4 td mutants. The specific activities and amounts of cross-reacting material induced by several different types of phage mutants under conditions of suppression or non-suppression have been examined. The results show that the phage carries the structural gene specifying the thymidylate synthetase which appears after phage infection, and that the combination of plaque morphology, enzyme activity assays, and an assay for immunologically cross-reacting material provides a means for identifying true amber mutants of the phage gene. Images PMID:4575286

  11. Dynamics of the T4 Bacteriophage DNA Packasome Motor

    PubMed Central

    Dixit, Aparna; Ray, Krishanu; Lakowicz, Joseph R.; Black, Lindsay W.

    2011-01-01

    Conserved bacteriophage ATP-based DNA translocation motors consist of a multimeric packaging terminase docked onto a unique procapsid vertex containing a portal ring. DNA is translocated into the empty procapsid through the portal ring channel to high density. In vivo the T4 phage packaging motor deals with Y- or X-structures in the replicative concatemer substrate by employing a portal-bound Holliday junction resolvase that trims and releases these DNA roadblocks to packaging. Here using dye-labeled packaging anchored 3.7-kb Y-DNAs or linear DNAs, we demonstrate FRET between the dye-labeled substrates and GFP portal-containing procapsids and between GFP portal and single dye-labeled terminases. We show using FRET-fluorescence correlation spectroscopy that purified T4 gp49 endonuclease VII resolvase can release DNA compression in vitro in prohead portal packaging motor anchored and arrested Y-DNA substrates. In addition, using active terminases labeled at the N- and C-terminal ends with a single dye molecule, we show by FRET distance of the N-terminal GFP-labeled portal protein containing prohead at 6.9 nm from the N terminus and at 5.7 nm from the C terminus of the terminase. Packaging with a C-terminal fluorescent terminase on a GFP portal prohead, FRET shows a reduction in distance to the GFP portal of 0.6 nm in the arrested Y-DNA as compared with linear DNA; the reduction is reversed by resolvase treatment. Conformational changes in both the motor proteins and the DNA substrate itself that are associated with the power stroke of the motor are consistent with a proposed linear motor employing a terminal-to-portal DNA grip-and-release mechanism. PMID:21454482

  12. A promiscuous DNA packaging machine from bacteriophage T4.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhihong; Kottadiel, Vishal I; Vafabakhsh, Reza; Dai, Li; Chemla, Yann R; Ha, Taekjip; Rao, Venigalla B

    2011-01-01

    Complex viruses are assembled from simple protein subunits by sequential and irreversible assembly. During genome packaging in bacteriophages, a powerful molecular motor assembles at the special portal vertex of an empty prohead to initiate packaging. The capsid expands after about 10%-25% of the genome is packaged. When the head is full, the motor cuts the concatemeric DNA and dissociates from the head. Conformational changes, particularly in the portal, are thought to drive these sequential transitions. We found that the phage T4 packaging machine is highly promiscuous, translocating DNA into finished phage heads as well as into proheads. Optical tweezers experiments show that single motors can force exogenous DNA into phage heads at the same rate as into proheads. Single molecule fluorescence measurements demonstrate that phage heads undergo repeated initiations, packaging multiple DNA molecules into the same head. These results suggest that the phage DNA packaging machine has unusual conformational plasticity, powering DNA into an apparently passive capsid receptacle, including the highly stable virus shell, until it is full. These features probably led to the evolution of viral genomes that fit capsid volume, a strikingly common phenomenon in double-stranded DNA viruses, and will potentially allow design of a novel class of nanocapsid delivery vehicles. PMID:21358801

  13. Adsorption of T4 bacteriophages on planar indium tin oxide surface via controlled surface tailoring.

    PubMed

    Liana, Ayu Ekajayanthi; Chia, Ed Win; Marquis, Christopher P; Gunawan, Cindy; Gooding, J Justin; Amal, Rose

    2016-04-15

    The work investigates the influence of surface physicochemical properties of planar indium tin oxide (ITO) as a model substrate on T4 bacteriophage adsorption. A comparative T4 bacteriophage adsorption study shows a significant difference in bacteriophage adsorption observed on chemically modified planar ITO when compared to similarly modified particulate ITO, which infers that trends observed in virus-particle interaction studies are not necessarily transferrable to predict virus-planar surface adsorption behaviour. We also found that ITO surfaces modified with methyl groups, (resulting in increased surface roughness and hydrophobicity) remained capable of adsorbing T4 bacteriophage. The adsorption of T4 onto bare, amine and carboxylic functionalised planar ITO suggests the presence of a unique binding behaviour involving specific functional groups on planar ITO surface beyond the non-specific electrostatic interactions that dominate phage to particle interactions. The paper demonstrates the significance of physicochemical properties of surfaces on bacteriophage-surface interactions. PMID:26851452

  14. Functional heterogeneity as reflected by topological parameters in a classical protein molecular model: t4 phage lysozyme.

    PubMed

    Caruso, Lisa Beatrice; Giuliani, Alessandro; Colosimo, Alfredo

    2016-01-01

    A systematic comparison with the Wild-Type (WT) of one-point mutants of bacteriophage T4 lysozyme was carried out using as difference markers the topological parameters of the protein contact networks corresponding to each crystallographic structure. The investigation concerned changes at the resolution level of single residue along the protein sequence. The results were correlated with (reported) changes in functional properties and (observed) changes in the information provided by the energy dissipation algorithm of the "Turbine" software simulation tool. The critical factor leading to significant difference among mutants and WT is in most cases associated to the sensitivity towards mutation of relatively short windows in the amino acidic sequence not necessarily contiguous to the active site. PMID:26412794

  15. Excision repair and patch size in UV-irradiated bacteriophage T4

    SciTech Connect

    Yarosh, D.B.; Rosenstein, B.S.; Setlow, R.B.

    1981-11-01

    We determined the average size of excision repair patches in repair of UV lesions in bacteriophage T4 by measuring the photolysis of bromodeoxyuridine incorporated during repair. The average patch was small, approximately four nucleotides long. In control experiments with the denV1 excision-deficient mutant, we encountered an artifact, a protein(s) which remained bound to phenol-extracted DNA and prevented nicking by the UV-specific endonucleases of Micrococcus luteus and bacteriophage T4.

  16. Excision repair and patch size in UV-irradiated bacteriophage T4

    SciTech Connect

    Yarosh, D.B.; Rosenstein, B.S.; Setlow, R.B.

    1981-11-01

    We determined the average size of excision repair patches in repair of UV lesions in bacteriophage T4 by measuring the photolysis of bromodeoxyuridine incorporated during repair. The average patch was small, approximately four nucleotides long. In control, experiments with the denV/sub 1/ excision-deificient mutant, we encountered an artifact, a protein(s) which remained bound to phenol-extracted DNA and prevented nicking by the UV-specific endonucleases of Micrococcus luteus and bacteriophage T4.

  17. T4 phage lysozyme: a protein designed for understanding tryptophan photophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hudson, Bruce S.; Harris, Dan

    1990-05-01

    Bacteriophage T4 lysozyme in its wild type form contains three tryptophan residues (at sequence postions 126, 138 and 158). These three residues are in rather different environments in the protein: 126 and 158 are near the protein surface while residue 138 is more buried. T4 lysozyme has been genetically engineered to prepare all possible variants in which one or more of the tryptophan residues have been replaced by tyrosine. The available data supports the hypothesis that this substitution has, at most, a very minor effect on the structure of the protein. The three species with single tryptophan residues have been investigated in detail. The surface location of residue 126 compared to the buried location of residue 138 is reflected in the difference in collisional quenching observed with added potassium iodide. It is found that the spectral and radiative properties of the three proteins are very similar but that their radiationless decay properties are quite distinct. This is apparently due to short-range collisional quenching by neighboring side chains. Comparison with solution quenching measurements permits the identification of the specific quenching groups involved for each tryptophan residue and provides a semi-quantitative rationale for the radiationless decay rate. This collisional quenching interpretation is supported by mutational effects on fluorescence quantum yield. This simple picture of the behavior of these single-tryptophan proteins is clearly revealed in this particular case because of the unambiguous choice of collisional quenching groups. The time dependence of the fluorescence decay of each of these single-tryptophan proteins is quite complex. Several methods of analysis are presented and discussed in terms of their underlying physical basis. Internal collisional quenching, as suggested from the comparative studies, is expected to lead to non-exponential behavior. This is consistent with the observed time dependence. Analysis of the temporal

  18. Single-Molecule Measurements of T4 Lysozyme using Carbon Nanotube Electronic Circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sims, Patrick Craig

    Because of their unique electronic and chemical properties, single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) are attractive candidates for label-free, single-molecule sensing and detection applications. In this work, a field-effect transistor (FET) architecture comprised of an individual SWNT is used to transduce the conformational motion of a single T4 lysozyme protein, conjugated to the SWNT side wall, into a corresponding electrical current signal. The SWNTs are grown using chemical vapor deposition, and metal electrical contacts are formed using electron beam evaporation. Using N-(1-Pyrene)maleimide, the protein is conjugated to the SWNT side wall. After conjugation, the sensing area of the device is submerged in an electrolyte solution, and the source-drain current is measured while applying an electrolyte-gate. Analysis of the signal provided single-molecule resolution of the dynamical activity of lysozyme as it hydrolyzes macromolecular peptidoglycan, a component of bacterial cell walls. This analysis revealed seven different independent time scales that govern the activity of lysozyme, the pH dependence of these time scales, and a lower limit on the number rate-limiting steps in lysozyme's hinge opening and closing motions. Furthermore, the signals elucidated differences in how lysozyme traverses and catalyzes structurally varying peptidoglycan constructs.

  19. Bacteriophage T4 DNA Topoisomerase Mediates Illegitimate Recombination in vitro

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ikeda, Hideo

    1986-02-01

    We have found that purified T4 DNA topoisomerase promotes recombination between two phage λ DNA molecules in an in vitro system. In this cross, T4 DNA topoisomerase alone is able to catalyze the recombination and produce a linear monomer recombinant DNA that can be packaged in vitro. ATP is not required for this recombination, while oxolinic acid stimulates it. The recombinant DNA molecules contain duplications or deletions, and the crossovers take place between nonhomologous and nonspecific sequences of λ DNA. Therefore, the recombination mediated by the T4 DNA topoisomerase is an illegitimate recombination that is similar to that mediated by Escherichia coli DNA gyrase. A model was proposed previously in which DNA gyrase molecules that are bound to DNA associate with each other and lead to the exchange of DNA strands through the exchange of DNA gyrase subunits. This model is also applicable to the recombination mediated by T4 DNA topoisomerase.

  20. Bacteriophage T4 Virion Baseplate Thymidylate Synthetase and Dihydrofolate Reductase

    PubMed Central

    Kozloff, L. M.; Lute, M.; Crosby, L. K.

    1977-01-01

    Additional evidence is presented that both the phage T4D-induced thymidylate synthetase (gp td) and the T4D-induced dihydrofolate reductase (gp frd) are baseplate structural components. With regard to phage td it has been found that: (i) low levels of thymidylate synthetase activity were present in highly purified preparations of T4D ghost particles produced after infection with td+, whereas particles produced after infection with td− had no measurable enzymatic activity; (ii) a mutation of the T4D td gene from tdts to td+ simultaneously produced a heat-stable thymidylate synthetase enzyme and heat-stable phage particles (it should be noted that the phage baseplate structure determines heat lability); (iii) a recombinant of two T4D mutants constructed containing both tdts and frdts genes produced particles whose physical properties indicate that these two molecules physically interact in the baseplate. With regard to phage frd it has been found that two spontaneous revertants each of two different T4D frdts mutants to frd+ not only produced altered dihydrofolate reductases but also formed phage particles with heat sensitivities different from their parents. Properties of T4D particles produced after infection with parental T4D mutants presumed to have a deletion of the td gene and/or the frd gene indicate that these particles still retain some characteristics associated with the presence of both the td and the frd molecules. Furthermore, the particles produced by the deletion mutants have been found to be physically different from the parent particles. PMID:894793

  1. Encapsulation of T4 bacteriophage in electrospun poly(ethylene oxide)/cellulose diacetate fibers.

    PubMed

    Korehei, Reza; Kadla, John F

    2014-01-16

    Phage therapy is a potentially beneficial approach to food preservation and storage. Sustained delivery of bacteriophage can prevent bacterial growth on contaminated food surfaces. Using coaxial electrospinning bacteriophage can be encapsulated in electrospun fibers with high viability. The resulting bio-based electrospun fibers may have potential as a food packaging material. In the present work, T4 bacteriophage (T4 phage) was incorporated into core/shell electrospun fibers made from poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO), cellulose diacetate (CDA), and their blends. Fibers prepared using PEO as the shell polymer showed an immediate burst release of T4 phage upon submersion in buffer. The blending of CDA with PEO significantly decreased the rate of phage release, with no released T4 phage being detected from the solely CDA fibers. Increasing the PEO molecular weight increased the electrospun fiber diameter and viscosity of the releasing medium, which resulted in a relatively slower T4 phage release profile. SEM analyses of the electrospun fiber morphologies were in good agreement with the T4 phage release profiles. Depending on the PEO/CDA ratio, the post-release electrospun fiber morphologies varied from discontinuous fibers to minimally swollen fibers. From these results it is suggested that the T4 phage release mechanism is through solvent activation/polymer dissolution in the case of the PEO fibers and/or by diffusion control from the PEO/CDA blend fibers. PMID:24188849

  2. Pushing single molecule techniques to microsecond resolution proves that T4 Lysozyme is a Brownian ratchet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akhterov, Maxim V.; Choi, Yongki; Olsen, Tivoli J.; Sims, Patrick C.; Iftikhar, Mariam; Gul, O. Tolga; Corso, Brad L.; Weiss, Gregory A.; Collins, Philip G.

    2015-03-01

    Single-molecule techniques can monitor conformational dynamics of proteins, but such methods usually lack the resolution to directly observe conformational pathways or intermediate conformational states. We have recently described a single-molecule electronic technique that breaks this barrier. Using a 1 MHz-bandwidth carbon nanotube transistor, the transition pathways between open and closed conformations of T4 lysozyme have been recorded with a microsecond resolution. We directly resolve a smooth, continuous transition with an average duration of 37 microseconds. Unexpectedly, the mechanical closing and re-opening of the enzyme have identical distributions of transition durations, and the motion is independent of the enzyme catalyzing the substrate. These results illustrate the principle of microscopic reversibility applied to a Brownian ratchet, with lysozyme tracing a single pathway for closing and the reverse pathway for enzyme opening, regardless of its instantaneous catalytic productivity.

  3. Selective Gene Transcription in Bacteriophage T4 by Putrescine 1

    PubMed Central

    Shalitin, Channa

    1967-01-01

    Messenger ribonucleic acid (mRNA) preparations from T4-infected cells formed in the presence or absence of putrescine have been characterized and compared. Hybrid competition experiments indicate that these mRNA molecules are derived from distinct genetic loci. The results are consistent with the hypothesis that putrescine might control differential transcription of the phage genome during morphogenesis. The data are also in accord with previously observed changes in the population of mRNA formed at different times after infection. PMID:5623975

  4. Probing Single-Molecule T4 Lysozyme Conformational Dynamics by Intramolecular Fluorescence Energy Transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Yu; Hu, Dehong; Vorpagel, Erich R.; Lu, H PETER.

    2003-07-16

    We demonstrate the use of single-molecule spectroscopy to study enzyme conformational motions of T4 lysozyme under hydrolysis reaction of the polysaccharide walls of E. Coli B cells.By attaching a donoracceptor pair of dye molecules site-specifically to noninterfering sites on the enzyme, the hinge-bending motions of the enzyme are measured by monitoring the donor-acceptor emission intensity as a function of time. The overall enzymatic reaction rate constants are found to vary widely from molecule to molecule. The dominant contribution to this static inhomogeneity is attributed to enzyme searching for reactive sites on the substrate.

  5. Bacteriophage T4 whiskers: a rudimentary environment-sensing device.

    PubMed Central

    Conley, M P; Wood, W B

    1975-01-01

    The 400 A filaments or "whiskers," which extend outward from the collar region of the phage, control retraction and extension of the tail fibers in response to certain environmental conditions. The tail fibers of normal phage retract in the absence of a required adsorption cofactor, at low pH, at low ionic strength, at low temperature, and at high concentrations of polyethylene glycol. The tail fibers of mutant whiskerless (wac) phage still retract under the first two conditions, but not the last three. Antibodies to whiskers neutralize T4, probably by fixing tail fibers in the retracted configuration. Phage with retracted tail fibers adsorb poorly to host bacterial cells, and their adsorption rate increases as the fibers become extended. These results suggest that one function of the whiskers is to retract the tail fibers and thereby prevent adsorption to host cells under certain conditions that might be unfavorable for production of phage progeny following infection. PMID:242007

  6. Assembly and infection process of bacteriophage T4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arisaka, Fumio

    2005-12-01

    Bacterophage T4 consists of three parts, namely, a head, a tail, and six tail fibers, each of which is assembled along an independent pathway and then joined. In contrast to simple plant viruses such as tobacco mosaic virus, disassembly and reassembly of the virion is not possible. This is due mainly to the fact that the assembly involves not only irreversible steps such as cleavage of covalent bonds of some constituent proteins, but also that it requires a scaffold and involves the inner membrane of the host cell. Another unique feature of the assembly as a biological nanomachine is the involvement of specific protein devices such as a "ruler molecule," which determines the length of the tail, an ATP-driven DNA packaging protein complex, and phage-encoded molecular chaperones. Recent structural biological studies of the phage started to unveil the molecular mechanics of structural transformation of the tail upon infection.

  7. Restriction endonuclease inhibitor IPI* of bacteriophage T4

    PubMed Central

    Rifat, Dalin; Wright, Nathan T.; Varney, Kristen M.; Weber, David J.; Black, Lindsay W.

    2008-01-01

    SUMMARY Phage T4 protects its DNA from the two gene encoded gmrS/gmrD (glucose modified hydroxymethylcytosine (gHMC) restriction endonuclease) (CT), of pathogenic E. coli CT596, by injecting several hundred copies of the 76 amino acid residue nuclease inhibitor, IPI*, into the infected host. Here, the three-dimensional solution structure of mature IPI* is reported as determined by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) techniques using 1290 experimental NOE and dipolar coupling constraints (∼17 constraints/residue). Close examination of this oblate-shaped protein structure reveals a novel fold consisting of two small β-sheets (β1: B1, B2; β2: B3-B5), flanked at the N- and C-termini by alpha helices (H1 & H2). Such a fold is very compact in shape, and allows ejection of IPI* through the narrow 30Å portal and tail tube apertures of the virion without unfolding. Structural and dynamic measurements identify an exposed hydrophobic knob that is a putative gmrS/gmrD binding site. A single gene from the uropathogenic E. coli UT189, which codes for a gmrS/gmrD-like fusion protein (∼90% identity to the heterodimeric CT enzyme) has evolved IPI* inhibitor immunity. Analysis of the gmrS/gmrD restriction endonuclease enzyme family and its IPI* family phage antagonists reveals an evolutionary pathway that has elaborated a surprisingly diverse and specifically fitted set of co-evolving attack and defense structures. PMID:18037438

  8. Complete genome sequence of T4-Like Escherichia coli bacteriophage HX01.

    PubMed

    Tang, Fang; Li, Yanzhe; Zhang, Wei; Lu, Chengping

    2012-12-01

    Phage T4 is among the best-characterized biological systems (S. Kanamaru and F. Arisaka, Seikagaku 74:131-135, 2002; E. S. Miller et al., Microbiol. Mol. Biol. Rev. 67:86-156, 2003; W. B. Wood and H. R. Revel, Bacteriol. Rev. 40:847-868, 1976). To date, several genomes of T4-like bacteriophages are available in public databases but without any APEC bacteriophages (H. Jiang et al., Arch. Virol. 156:1489-1492, 2011; L. Kaliniene, V. Klausa, A. Zajanckauskaite, R. Nivinskas, and L. Truncaite, Arch. Virol. 156:1913-1916, 2011; J. H. Kim et al., Vet. Microbiol. 157:164-171, 2012; W. C. Liao et al., J. Virol. 85:6567-6578, 2011). We isolated a bacteriophage from a duck factory, named HX01, that infects avian pathogenic Escherichia coli (APEC). Sequence and morphological analyses revealed that phage HX01 is a T4-like bacteriophage and belongs to the family Myoviridae. Here, we announce the complete genome sequence of phage HX01 and report the results of our analysis. PMID:23166268

  9. Nuclear magnetic resonance observation and dynamics of specific amide protons in T4 lysozyme.

    PubMed

    Griffey, R H; Redfield, A G; Loomis, R E; Dahlquist, F W

    1985-02-12

    We have produced T4 lysozyme using a bacterial expression system which allows efficient incorporation of isotopically labeled amino acids in lysozyme. By using conditions that repress the expression of various transaminases, we have incorporated 15N-labeled amino acid into the five phenylalanine residues of the protein. The relatively large spin--spin coupling (87 +/- 3 Hz) between the 15N nucleus and the phenylalanine amide protons may then be exploited in a variety of ways to selectively observe the five phenylalanine amide proton resonances. These include a simple "echo difference" technique which displays the amide proton resonances in one dimension and a "forbidden echo" technique [Bax, A., Griffey, R. H., & Hawkins, B.L. (1983) J. Magn. Reson. 55, 301-335] which gives two-dimensional information allowing the proton and 15N chemical shifts of each amide to be determined. With these approaches, all five phenylalanine amide protons give resolved resonances. Deuterium exchange experiments demonstrate that three of the five resonances are slow to exchange (half-times of about 1 week at pH 5.5 and 4 degrees C) while the other two are rapid with complete exchange in hours or less. These observations correlate well with the secondary structure of the protein which shows three residues in alpha-helical regions and two residues in surface-exposed environments. This approach of isotopic substitution on nitrogen or carbon atoms is of general utility and should allow virtually any proton on a protein of molecular weight 20 000 or thereabout to be selectively observed. PMID:3888265

  10. The tight linkage between DNA replication and double-strand break repair in bacteriophage T4

    PubMed Central

    George, James W.; Stohr, Bradley A.; Tomso, Daniel J.; Kreuzer, Kenneth N.

    2001-01-01

    Double-strand break (DSB) repair and DNA replication are tightly linked in the life cycle of bacteriophage T4. Indeed, the major mode of phage DNA replication depends on recombination proteins and can be stimulated by DSBs. DSB-stimulated DNA replication is dramatically demonstrated when T4 infects cells carrying two plasmids that share homology. A DSB on one plasmid triggered extensive replication of the second plasmid, providing a useful model for T4 recombination-dependent replication (RDR). This system also provides a view of DSB repair in T4-infected cells and revealed that the DSB repair products had been replicated in their entirety by the T4 replication machinery. We analyzed the detailed structure of these products, which do not fit the simple predictions of any of three models for DSB repair. We also present evidence that the T4 RDR system functions to restart stalled or inactivated replication forks. First, we review experiments involving antitumor drug-stabilized topoisomerase cleavage complexes. The results suggest that forks blocked at cleavage complexes are resolved by recombinational repair, likely involving RDR. Second, we show here that the presence of a T4 replication origin on one plasmid substantially stimulated recombination events between it and a homologous second plasmid that did not contain a T4 origin. Furthermore, replication of the second plasmid was increased when the first plasmid contained the T4 origin. Our interpretation is that origin-initiated forks become inactivated at some frequency during replication of the first plasmid and are then restarted via RDR on the second plasmid. PMID:11459966

  11. Purification of phage display-modified bacteriophage T4 by affinity chromatography

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Affinity chromatography is one of the most efficient protein purification strategies. This technique comprises a one-step procedure with a purification level in the order of several thousand-fold, adaptable for various proteins, differentiated in their size, shape, charge, and other properties. The aim of this work was to verify the possibility of applying affinity chromatography in bacteriophage purification, with the perspective of therapeutic purposes. T4 is a large, icosahedral phage that may serve as an efficient display platform for foreign peptides or proteins. Here we propose a new method of T4 phage purification by affinity chromatography after its modification with affinity tags (GST and Histag) by in vivo phage display. As any permanent introduction of extraneous DNA into a phage genome is strongly unfavourable for medical purposes, integration of foreign motifs with the phage genome was not applied. The phage was propagated in bacteria expressing fusions of the phage protein Hoc with affinity tags from bacterial plasmids, independently from the phage expression system. Results Elution profiles of phages modified with the specific affinity motifs (compared to non-specific phages) document their binding to the affinity resins and effective elution with standard competitive agents. Non-specific binding was also observed, but was 102-105 times weaker than the specific one. GST-modified bacteriophages were also effectively released from glutathione Sepharose by proteolytic cleavage. The possibility of proteolytic release was designed at the stage of expression vector construction. Decrease in LPS content in phage preparations was dependent on the washing intensity; intensive washing resulted in preparations of 11-40 EU/ml. Conclusions Affinity tags can be successfully incorporated into the T4 phage capsid by the in vivo phage display technique and they strongly elevate bacteriophage affinity to a specific resin. Affinity chromatography can be

  12. Formation of the prohead core of bacteriophage T4 in vivo.

    PubMed Central

    Traub, F; Maeder, M

    1984-01-01

    Formation of the prohead core of bacteriophage T4 was not dependent on shell assembly. In mutant infections, where the production or assembly of active shell protein was not possible, naked core structures were formed. The particles were generally attached to the bacterial inner membrane and possessed defined prolate dimensions. The intracellular yield varied between 15 and 71% of a corresponding prohead yield and was dependent on the temperature of incubation. The products of genes 21 and 22 were found to be essential for in vivo core formation, whereas those of genes 20, 23, 24, 31, and 40, as well as the internal proteins I to III, were dispensable. Images PMID:6366245

  13. Probing the folded state and mechanical unfolding pathways of T4 lysozyme using all-atom and coarse-grained molecular simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Wenjun; Glenn, Paul

    2015-01-01

    The Bacteriophage T4 Lysozyme (T4L) is a prototype modular protein comprised of an N-terminal and a C-domain domain, which was extensively studied to understand the folding/unfolding mechanism of modular proteins. To offer detailed structural and dynamic insights to the folded-state stability and the mechanical unfolding behaviors of T4L, we have performed extensive equilibrium and steered molecular dynamics simulations of both the wild-type (WT) and a circular permutation (CP) variant of T4L using all-atom and coarse-grained force fields. Our all-atom and coarse-grained simulations of the folded state have consistently found greater stability of the C-domain than the N-domain in isolation, which is in agreement with past thermostatic studies of T4L. While the all-atom simulation cannot fully explain the mechanical unfolding behaviors of the WT and the CP variant observed in an optical tweezers study, the coarse-grained simulations based on the Go model or a modified elastic network model (mENM) are in qualitative agreement with the experimental finding of greater unfolding cooperativity in the WT than the CP variant. Interestingly, the two coarse-grained models predict different structural mechanisms for the observed change in cooperativity between the WT and the CP variant—while the Go model predicts minor modification of the unfolding pathways by circular permutation (i.e., preserving the general order that the N-domain unfolds before the C-domain), the mENM predicts a dramatic change in unfolding pathways (e.g., different order of N/C-domain unfolding in the WT and the CP variant). Based on our simulations, we have analyzed the limitations of and the key differences between these models and offered testable predictions for future experiments to resolve the structural mechanism for cooperative folding/unfolding of T4L.

  14. Probing the folded state and mechanical unfolding pathways of T4 lysozyme using all-atom and coarse-grained molecular simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Zheng, Wenjun Glenn, Paul

    2015-01-21

    The Bacteriophage T4 Lysozyme (T4L) is a prototype modular protein comprised of an N-terminal and a C-domain domain, which was extensively studied to understand the folding/unfolding mechanism of modular proteins. To offer detailed structural and dynamic insights to the folded-state stability and the mechanical unfolding behaviors of T4L, we have performed extensive equilibrium and steered molecular dynamics simulations of both the wild-type (WT) and a circular permutation (CP) variant of T4L using all-atom and coarse-grained force fields. Our all-atom and coarse-grained simulations of the folded state have consistently found greater stability of the C-domain than the N-domain in isolation, which is in agreement with past thermostatic studies of T4L. While the all-atom simulation cannot fully explain the mechanical unfolding behaviors of the WT and the CP variant observed in an optical tweezers study, the coarse-grained simulations based on the Go model or a modified elastic network model (mENM) are in qualitative agreement with the experimental finding of greater unfolding cooperativity in the WT than the CP variant. Interestingly, the two coarse-grained models predict different structural mechanisms for the observed change in cooperativity between the WT and the CP variant—while the Go model predicts minor modification of the unfolding pathways by circular permutation (i.e., preserving the general order that the N-domain unfolds before the C-domain), the mENM predicts a dramatic change in unfolding pathways (e.g., different order of N/C-domain unfolding in the WT and the CP variant). Based on our simulations, we have analyzed the limitations of and the key differences between these models and offered testable predictions for future experiments to resolve the structural mechanism for cooperative folding/unfolding of T4L.

  15. Covalent Modification of Bacteriophage T4 DNA Inhibits CRISPR-Cas9

    PubMed Central

    Bryson, Alexandra L.; Hwang, Young; Sherrill-Mix, Scott; Wu, Gary D.; Lewis, James D.; Black, Lindsay; Clark, Tyson A.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The genomic DNAs of tailed bacteriophages are commonly modified by the attachment of chemical groups. Some forms of DNA modification are known to protect phage DNA from cleavage by restriction enzymes, but others are of unknown function. Recently, the CRISPR-Cas nuclease complexes were shown to mediate bacterial adaptive immunity by RNA-guided target recognition, raising the question of whether phage DNA modifications may also block attack by CRISPR-Cas9. We investigated phage T4 as a model system, where cytosine is replaced with glucosyl-hydroxymethylcytosine (glc-HMC). We first quantified the extent and distribution of covalent modifications in T4 DNA by single-molecule DNA sequencing and enzymatic probing. We then designed CRISPR spacer sequences targeting T4 and found that wild-type T4 containing glc-HMC was insensitive to attack by CRISPR-Cas9 but mutants with unmodified cytosine were sensitive. Phage with HMC showed only intermediate sensitivity. While this work was in progress, another group reported examples of heavily engineered CRISRP-Cas9 complexes that could, in fact, overcome the effects of T4 DNA modification, indicating that modifications can inhibit but do not always fully block attack. PMID:26081634

  16. Cryo-electron microscopy study of bacteriophage T4 displaying anthrax toxin proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Fokine, Andrei; Bowman, Valorie D.; Battisti, Anthony J.; Li Qin; Chipman, Paul R.; Rao, Venigalla B.; Rossmann, Michael G.

    2007-10-25

    The bacteriophage T4 capsid contains two accessory surface proteins, the small outer capsid protein (Soc, 870 copies) and the highly antigenic outer capsid protein (Hoc, 155 copies). As these are dispensable for capsid formation, they can be used for displaying proteins and macromolecular complexes on the T4 capsid surface. Anthrax toxin components were attached to the T4 capsid as a fusion protein of the N-terminal domain of the anthrax lethal factor (LFn) with Soc. The LFn-Soc fusion protein was complexed in vitro with Hoc{sup -}Soc{sup -}T4 phage. Subsequently, cleaved anthrax protective antigen heptamers (PA63){sub 7} were attached to the exposed LFn domains. A cryo-electron microscopy study of the decorated T4 particles shows the complex of PA63 heptamers with LFn-Soc on the phage surface. Although the cryo-electron microscopy reconstruction is unable to differentiate on its own between different proposed models of the anthrax toxin, the density is consistent with a model that had predicted the orientation and position of three LFn molecules bound to one PA63 heptamer.

  17. Conformational selection and adaptation to ligand binding in T4 lysozyme cavity mutants.

    PubMed

    López, Carlos J; Yang, Zhongyu; Altenbach, Christian; Hubbell, Wayne L

    2013-11-12

    The studies presented here explore the relationship between protein packing and molecular flexibility using ligand-binding cavity mutants of T4 lysozyme. Although previously reported crystal structures of the mutants investigated show single conformations that are similar to the WT protein, site-directed spin labeling in solution reveals additional conformational substates in equilibrium exchange with a WT-like population. Remarkably, binding of ligands, including the general anesthetic halothane shifts the population to the WT-like state, consistent with a conformational selection model of ligand binding, but structural adaptation to the ligand is also apparent in one mutant. Distance mapping with double electron-electron resonance spectroscopy and the absence of ligand binding suggest that the new substates induced by the cavity-creating mutations represent alternate packing modes in which the protein fills or partially fills the cavity with side chains, including the spin label in one case; external ligands compete with the side chains for the cavity space, stabilizing the WT conformation. The results have implications for mechanisms of anesthesia, the response of proteins to hydrostatic pressure, and protein engineering. PMID:24167295

  18. Theoretical studies on solvation contribution to the thermodynamic stability of mutants of lysozyme T4.

    PubMed

    Deep, Shashank; Ahluwalia, J C

    2003-06-01

    Atomic solvation parameters (ASPs) are widely used to estimate the solvation contribution to the thermodynamic stability of proteins as well as the free energy of association for protein-ligand complexes. In view of discrepancies in the results of free energies of solvation of folding for various proteins obtained using different atomic solvation parameter sets, systematic studies have been carried out for the calculation of accessible surface area and the changes in free energy of solvation of folding (deltaG(s,f)) for mutants of lysozyme T4 where threonine 157 is replaced by amino acids: cysteine, aspartate, glutamate, phenylalanine, glycine, histidine, isoleucine, leucine, asparagine, arginine, serine and valine. The deviations of the calculated results from the experimental results are discussed to highlight the discrepancies in the atomic solvation parameter sets and possible reasons for them. The results are also discussed to throw light on the effect of chain free energy and hydrogen bonding on the stability of mutants. The octanol to water-based ASP sets 'Sch1' and 'EM' perform better than the vacuum to water-based ASP sets. The vacuum to water-based ASP sets 'Sch3' and 'WE' can be used to predict the stability of mutants if a proper method to calculate the hydrogen bond contribution to overall stability is in place. PMID:12874374

  19. Structure-relaxation mechanism for the response of T4 lysozyme cavity mutants to hydrostatic pressure.

    PubMed

    Lerch, Michael T; López, Carlos J; Yang, Zhongyu; Kreitman, Margaux J; Horwitz, Joseph; Hubbell, Wayne L

    2015-05-12

    Application of hydrostatic pressure shifts protein conformational equilibria in a direction to reduce the volume of the system. A current view is that the volume reduction is dominated by elimination of voids or cavities in the protein interior via cavity hydration, although an alternative mechanism wherein cavities are filled with protein side chains resulting from a structure relaxation has been suggested [López CJ, Yang Z, Altenbach C, Hubbell WL (2013) Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 110(46):E4306-E4315]. In the present study, mechanisms for elimination of cavities under high pressure are investigated in the L99A cavity mutant of T4 lysozyme and derivatives thereof using site-directed spin labeling, pressure-resolved double electron-electron resonance, and high-pressure circular dichroism spectroscopy. In the L99A mutant, the ground state is in equilibrium with an excited state of only ∼ 3% of the population in which the cavity is filled by a protein side chain [Bouvignies et al. (2011) Nature 477(7362):111-114]. The results of the present study show that in L99A the native ground state is the dominant conformation to pressures of 3 kbar, with cavity hydration apparently taking place in the range of 2-3 kbar. However, in the presence of additional mutations that lower the free energy of the excited state, pressure strongly populates the excited state, thereby eliminating the cavity with a native side chain rather than solvent. Thus, both cavity hydration and structure relaxation are mechanisms for cavity elimination under pressure, and which is dominant is determined by details of the energy landscape. PMID:25918400

  20. Structure-based statistical thermodynamic analysis of T4 lysozyme mutants: structural mapping of cooperative interactions.

    PubMed

    Hilser, V J; Townsend, B D; Freire, E

    1997-02-28

    The recent development of a structural parameterization of the energetics of protein folding has permitted the incorporation of the functions that describe the enthalpy, entropy and heat capacity changes, i.e. the individual components of the Gibbs energy, into a statistical thermodynamic formalism that describes the distribution of conformational states under equilibrium conditions. The goal of this approach is to construct with the computer a large ensemble of conformational states, and then to derive the most probable population distribution, i.e. the distribution of states that best accounts for a wide array of experimental observables. This analysis has been applied to four different mutants of T4 lysozyme (S44A, S44G, V131A, V131G). It is shown that the structural parameterization predicts well the stability of the protein and the effects of the mutations. The entire set of folding constants per residue has been calculated for the four mutants. In all cases, the effect of the mutations propagates beyond the mutation site itself through sequence and three-dimensional space. This phenomenon occurs despite the fact that the mutations are at solvent-exposed locations and do not directly affect other interactions in the protein. These results suggest that single amino acid mutations at solvent-exposed locations, or other locations that cause a minimal perturbation, can be used to identify the extent of cooperative interactions. The magnitude and extent of these effects and the accuracy of the algorithm can be tested by means of NMR-detected hydrogen exchange. PMID:9127939

  1. Effects of the T4 bacteriophage gene 32 product on the efficiency and fidelity of DNA amplification using T4 DNA polymerase.

    PubMed

    Sandhu, D K; Keohavong, P

    1994-06-24

    Two bacteriophage DNA polymerases (Pol), T4 Pol and modified T7 Pol, were used to catalyze DNA amplification in vitro by PCR, and their efficiency and fidelity in DNA amplification were examined in the presence and absence of the T4 bacteriophage gene 32-encoded protein (SSB32). The SSB32 protein significantly improved the efficiency of amplification by T4 Pol. Examination of the amplified DNA by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) revealed that the protein also reduced the rates of error produced by T4 Pol during PCR, from 6.3 x 10(-6) to 2.0 x 10(-6) errors per base duplication after 10(11)-fold amplification. This protein also improved, but to a lesser extent, the fidelity of modified T7 Pol, from 1.80 x 10(-5) to 1.15 x 10(-5) errors per base duplication. High fidelity polymerase chain reaction (hifi-PCR) is needed for studies requiring isolation of mutant sequences present as only a small fraction of the wild type in the amplified DNA. Although several thermostable Pol are currently available for use in automated PCR, their fidelity was found to be significantly lower than that of the thermosensitive T4 Pol. Therefore, T4 Pol is useful for studies requiring hifi-PCR, although this enzyme needs to be added in the reaction mixture during every cycle of PCR. PMID:8026758

  2. Structural and Thermodynamic Characterization of T4 Lysozyme Mutants and the Contribution of Internal Cavities to Pressure Denaturation

    PubMed Central

    Ando, Nozomi; Barstow, Buz; Baase, Walter A.; Fields, Andrew; Matthews, Brian W.

    2009-01-01

    Using small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) and tryptophan fluorescence spectroscopy, we have identified multiple compact denatured states of a series of T4 lysozyme mutants that are stabilized by high pressures. Recent studies imply that the mechanism of pressure denaturation is the penetration of water into the protein rather than the transfer of hydrophobic residues into water. To investigate water penetration and the volume change associated with pressure denaturation, we studied the solution behavior of four T4 lysozyme mutants having different cavity volumes at low and neutral pH up to a pressure of 400 MPa (0.1 MPa = 0.9869 atm). At low pH, L99A T4 lysozyme expanded from a compact folded state to a partially unfolded state with a corresponding change in radius of gyration from 17 to 32 Å. The volume change upon denaturation correlated well with the total cavity volume, indicating that all of the molecule's major cavities are hydrated with pressure. As a direct comparison to high-pressure crystal structures of L99A T4 lysozyme solved at neutral pH [Collins, M. D., Hummer, G., Quillin, M. L., Matthews, B. W., and Gruner, S. M. (2005), PNAS 102, 16668-16671], pressure denaturation of L99A and the structurally similar L99G/E108V mutant was studied at neutral pH. The pressure-denatured state at neutral pH is even more compact than at low pH, and the small volume changes associated with denaturation suggest that the preferential filling of large cavities is responsible for the compactness of the pressure-denatured state. These results confirm that pressure denaturation is characteristically distinct from thermal or chemical denaturation. PMID:18816066

  3. Structural remodeling of bacteriophage T4 and host membranes during infection initiation.

    PubMed

    Hu, Bo; Margolin, William; Molineux, Ian J; Liu, Jun

    2015-09-01

    The first stages of productive bacteriophage infections of bacterial host cells require efficient adsorption to the cell surface followed by ejection of phage DNA into the host cytoplasm. To achieve this goal, a phage virion must undergo significant structural remodeling. For phage T4, the most obvious change is the contraction of its tail. Here, we use skinny E. coli minicells as a host, along with cryo-electron tomography and mutant phage virions, to visualize key structural intermediates during initiation of T4 infection. We show for the first time that most long tail fibers are folded back against the tail sheath until irreversible adsorption, a feature compatible with the virion randomly walking across the cell surface to find an optimal site for infection. Our data confirm that tail contraction is triggered by structural changes in the baseplate, as intermediates were found with remodeled baseplates and extended tails. After contraction, the tail tube penetrates the host cell periplasm, pausing while it degrades the peptidoglycan layer. Penetration into the host cytoplasm is accompanied by a dramatic local outward curvature of the cytoplasmic membrane as it fuses with the phage tail tip. The baseplate hub protein gp27 and/or the ejected tape measure protein gp29 likely form the transmembrane channel for viral DNA passage into the cell cytoplasm. Building on the wealth of prior biochemical and structural information, this work provides new molecular insights into the mechanistic pathway of T4 phage infection. PMID:26283379

  4. Bacteriophage T4 polynucleotide kinase triggers degradation of mRNAs

    PubMed Central

    Durand, Sylvain; Richard, Graziella; Bontems, François; Uzan, Marc

    2012-01-01

    The bacteriophage T4-encoded RegB endoribonuclease is produced during the early stage of phage development and targets mostly (but not exclusively) the Shine–Dalgarno sequences of early genes. In this work, we show that the degradation of RegB-cleaved mRNAs depends on a functional T4 polynucleotide kinase/phosphatase (PNK). The 5′-OH produced by RegB cleavage is phosphorylated by the kinase activity of PNK. This modification allows host RNases G and E, with activity that is strongly stimulated by 5′-monophosphate termini, to attack mRNAs from the 5′-end, causing their destabilization. The PNK-dependent pathway of degradation becomes effective 5 min postinfection, consistent with our finding that several minutes are required for PNK to accumulate after infection. Our work emphasizes the importance of the nature of the 5′ terminus for mRNA stability and depicts a pathway of mRNA degradation with 5′- to 3′-polarity in cells devoid of 5′–3′ exonucleases. It also ascribes a role for T4 PNK during normal phage development. PMID:22499790

  5. Structural remodeling of bacteriophage T4 and host membranes during infection initiation

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Bo; Margolin, William; Molineux, Ian J.; Liu, Jun

    2015-01-01

    The first stages of productive bacteriophage infections of bacterial host cells require efficient adsorption to the cell surface followed by ejection of phage DNA into the host cytoplasm. To achieve this goal, a phage virion must undergo significant structural remodeling. For phage T4, the most obvious change is the contraction of its tail. Here, we use skinny E. coli minicells as a host, along with cryo-electron tomography and mutant phage virions, to visualize key structural intermediates during initiation of T4 infection. We show for the first time that most long tail fibers are folded back against the tail sheath until irreversible adsorption, a feature compatible with the virion randomly walking across the cell surface to find an optimal site for infection. Our data confirm that tail contraction is triggered by structural changes in the baseplate, as intermediates were found with remodeled baseplates and extended tails. After contraction, the tail tube penetrates the host cell periplasm, pausing while it degrades the peptidoglycan layer. Penetration into the host cytoplasm is accompanied by a dramatic local outward curvature of the cytoplasmic membrane as it fuses with the phage tail tip. The baseplate hub protein gp27 and/or the ejected tape measure protein gp29 likely form the transmembrane channel for viral DNA passage into the cell cytoplasm. Building on the wealth of prior biochemical and structural information, this work provides new molecular insights into the mechanistic pathway of T4 phage infection. PMID:26283379

  6. Bacteriophage T4 Mutants Hypersensitive to an Antitumor Agent That Induces Topoisomerase-DNA Cleavage Complexes

    PubMed Central

    Woodworth, D. L.; Kreuzer, K. N.

    1996-01-01

    Many antitumor agents and antibiotics affect cells by interacting with type II topoisomerases, stabilizing a covalent enzyme-DNA complex. A pathway of recombination can apparently repair this DNA damage. In this study, transposon mutagenesis was used to identify possible components of the repair pathway in bacteriophage T4. Substantial increases in sensitivity to the antitumor agent m-AMSA [4'-(9-acridinyl-amino) methanesulfon-m-anisidide] were found with transposon insertion mutations that inactivate any of six T4-encoded proteins: UvsY (DNA synaptase accessory protein), UvsW (unknown function), Rnh (RNase H and 5' to 3' DNA exonuclease), α-gt (α-glucosyl transferase), gp47.1 (uncharacterized), and NrdB (β subunit of ribonucleotide reductase). The role of the rnh gene in drug sensitivity was further characterized. First, an in-frame rnh deletion mutation was constructed and analyzed, providing evidence that the absence of Rnh protein causes hypersensitivity to m-AMSA. Second, the m-AMSA sensitivity of the rnh-deletion mutant was shown to require a drug-sensitive T4 topoisomerase. Third, analysis of double mutants suggested that uvsW and rnh mutations impair a common step in the recombinational repair pathway for m-AMSA-induced damage. Finally, the rnh-deletion mutant was found to be hypersensitive to UV, implicating Rnh in recombinational repair of UV-induced damage. PMID:8807283

  7. Evidence for an electrostatic mechanism of force generation by the bacteriophage T4 DNA packaging motor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Migliori, Amy D.; Keller, Nicholas; Alam, Tanfis I.; Mahalingam, Marthandan; Rao, Venigalla B.; Arya, Gaurav; Smith, Douglas E.

    2014-06-01

    How viral packaging motors generate enormous forces to translocate DNA into viral capsids remains unknown. Recent structural studies of the bacteriophage T4 packaging motor have led to a proposed mechanism wherein the gp17 motor protein translocates DNA by transitioning between extended and compact states, orchestrated by electrostatic interactions between complimentarily charged residues across the interface between the N- and C-terminal subdomains. Here we show that site-directed alterations in these residues cause force dependent impairments of motor function including lower translocation velocity, lower stall force and higher frequency of pauses and slips. We further show that the measured impairments correlate with computed changes in free-energy differences between the two states. These findings support the proposed structural mechanism and further suggest an energy landscape model of motor activity that couples the free-energy profile of motor conformational states with that of the ATP hydrolysis cycle.

  8. The tail sheath structure of bacteriophage T4: a molecular machine for infecting bacteria

    SciTech Connect

    Aksyuk, Anastasia A.; Leiman, Petr G.; Kurochkina, Lidia P.; Shneider, Mikhail M.; Kostyuchenko, Victor A.; Mesyanzhinov, Vadim V.; Rossmann, Michael G.

    2009-07-22

    The contractile tail of bacteriophage T4 is a molecular machine that facilitates very high viral infection efficiency. Its major component is a tail sheath, which contracts during infection to less than half of its initial length. The sheath consists of 138 copies of the tail sheath protein, gene product (gp) 18, which surrounds the central non-contractile tail tube. The contraction of the sheath drives the tail tube through the outer membrane, creating a channel for the viral genome delivery. A crystal structure of about three quarters of gp18 has been determined and was fitted into cryo-electron microscopy reconstructions of the tail sheath before and after contraction. It was shown that during contraction, gp18 subunits slide over each other with no apparent change in their structure.

  9. Autoinhibition of Bacteriophage T4 Mre11 by Its C-terminal Domain*

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Yang; Nelson, Scott W.

    2014-01-01

    Mre11 and Rad50 form a stable complex (MR) and work cooperatively in repairing DNA double strand breaks. In the bacteriophage T4, Rad50 (gene product 46) enhances the nuclease activity of Mre11 (gene product 47), and Mre11 and DNA in combination stimulate the ATPase activity of Rad50. The structural basis for the cross-activation of the MR complex has been elusive. Various crystal structures of the MR complex display limited protein-protein interfaces that mainly exist between the C terminus of Mre11 and the coiled-coil domain of Rad50. To test the role of the C-terminal Rad50 binding domain (RBD) in Mre11 activation, we constructed a series of C-terminal deletions and mutations in bacteriophage T4 Mre11. Deletion of the RBD in Mre11 eliminates Rad50 binding but only has moderate effect on its intrinsic nuclease activity; however, the additional deletion of the highly acidic flexible linker that lies between RBD and the main body of Mre11 increases the nuclease activity of Mre11 by 20-fold. Replacement of the acidic residues in the flexible linker with alanine elevates the Mre11 activity to the level of the MR complex when combined with deletion of RBD. Nuclease activity kinetics indicate that Rad50 association and deletion of the C terminus of Mre11 both enhance DNA substrate binding. Additionally, a short peptide that contains the flexible linker and RBD of Mre11 acts as an inhibitor of Mre11 nuclease activity. These results support a model where the Mre11 RBD and linker domain act as an autoinhibitory domain when not in complex with Rad50. Complex formation with Rad50 alleviates this inhibition due to the tight association of the RBD and the Rad50 coiled-coil. PMID:25077970

  10. Effects of bacteriophage T4-induced modification of Escherichia coli RNA polymerase on gene expression in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Mailhammer, R; Yang, H L; Reiness, G; Zubay, G

    1975-01-01

    After T4 bacteriophage infection of E. coli a complex series of events take place in the bacterium, including gross inhibition of host transcription and discrete changes in the classes of the genes of T4 that are transcribed. Accompanying these changes in the pattern of transcription one finds T4-induced changes in the RNA polymerase (EC 2.7.7.6; nucleosidetriphosphate:RNA nucleotidyltransferase). The effects of modified polymerase on transcription can be advantageously analyzed in a DNA-directed cell-free system for protein synthesis. In this system gene activity is measured indirectly by the amounts and types of proteins sythesized. In the DNA-directed cell-free system this modified polymerase, like normal polymerase, transcribes T4 DNA with a high efficiency but transcribes bacteriophage lambda and host DNA very poorly. Polymerase reconstruction experiments show that modification of the alpha subunit of the RNA polymerase is sufficient for inhibition of host transcription. Host transcription is also inhibited in vitro by T4 DNA. This latter type of inhibition is presumed to involve competition between host DNA and T4 DNA for some factor essential for transcription. The T4-modified polymerase transcribes from T4 DNA many of the same genes as normal unmodified polymerase; it also shows a capability for transcribing certain "non-early" T4 genes which is enhanced in the presence of protein-containing extracts from T4-infected cells. PMID:1108008

  11. Placing Single-Molecule T4 Lysozyme Enzymes on a Bacterial Cell Surface: Toward Probing Single-Molecule Enzymatic Reaction in Living Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, Dehong; Lu, H PETER.

    2004-07-01

    TheT4 lysozyme enzymatic hydrolyzation reaction of bacterial cell walls is an important biological process, and single-molecule enzymatic reaction dynamics had been studied under physiological condition using purified E. Coli cell walls as substrates. Here, we report progress toward characterizing the T4 lysozyme enzymatic reaction on a living bacterial cell wall using a combined single-molecule placement and spectroscopy. Placing a dye-labeled single T4 lysozyme molecule on a targeted cell wall by using a hydrodynamic micro-injection approach, we monitored single-molecule rotational motions during binding, attachment to, and dissociation from the cell wall by tracing single-molecule fluorescence intensity time trajectories and polarization. The single-molecule attachment duration of the T4 lysozyme to the cell wall during enzymatic reactions was typically shorter than photobleaching time under physiological conditions.

  12. In vitro synthesis of large peptide molecules using glucosylated single-stranded bacteriophage T4D DNA template.

    PubMed Central

    Hulen, C; Legault-Demare, J

    1975-01-01

    Denatured Bacteriophage T4D DNA is able to stimulate aminoacid incorporation into TCA-precipitable material in an in vitro protein synthesis system according to base DNA sequences. Newly synthesized polypeptides remain associated with ribosomes and have a molecular weight in range of 15,000 to 45,000 Daltons. PMID:1052527

  13. A bacteriophage T4 in vitro system to clone long DNA molecules. Final report, June 1, 1990--January 31, 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Rao, V.B.

    1997-09-01

    A summary is presented of the following objectives: development of a bacteriophage T4 in vitro system, and techniques to clone long segments of foreign DNA; development of a giant prohead DNA packaging system that could potentially be used to clone even a megabase size DNA; and development of techniques to rapidly map the cloned DNA inserts.

  14. Crystallization of the carboxy-terminal region of the bacteriophage T4 proximal long tail fibre protein gp34

    SciTech Connect

    Granell, Meritxell; Namura, Mikiyoshi; Alvira, Sara; Garcia-Doval, Carmela; Singh, Abhimanyu K.; Gutsche, Irina; Raaij, Mark J. van Kanamaru, Shuji

    2014-06-19

    The crystallization of three C-terminal fragments of the bacteriophage T4 protein gp34 is reported. Diffraction data have been obtained for three native crystal forms and two selenomethionine derivatives, one of which contained high-quality anomalous signal.

  15. Architecture of the bacteriophage T4 activator MotA/promoter DNA interaction during sigma appropriation.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, Meng-Lun; James, Tamara D; Knipling, Leslie; Waddell, M Brett; White, Stephen; Hinton, Deborah M

    2013-09-20

    Gene expression can be regulated through factors that direct RNA polymerase to the correct promoter sequence at the correct time. Bacteriophage T4 controls its development in this way using phage proteins that interact with host RNA polymerase. Using a process called σ appropriation, the T4 co-activator AsiA structurally remodels the σ(70) subunit of host RNA polymerase, while a T4 activator, MotA, engages the C terminus of σ(70) and binds to a DNA promoter element, the MotA box. Structures for the N-terminal (NTD) and C-terminal (CTD) domains of MotA are available, but no structure exists for MotA with or without DNA. We report the first molecular map of the MotA/DNA interaction within the σ-appropriated complex, which we obtained by using the cleaving reagent, iron bromoacetamidobenzyl-EDTA (FeBABE). We conjugated surface-exposed, single cysteines in MotA with FeBABE and performed cleavage reactions in the context of stable transcription complexes. The DNA cleavage sites were analyzed using ICM Molsoft software and three-dimensional physical models of MotA(NTD), MotA(CTD), and the DNA to investigate shape complementarity between the protein and the DNA and to position MotA on the DNA. We found that the unusual "double wing" motif present within MotA(CTD) resides in the major groove of the MotA box. In addition, we have used surface plasmon resonance to show that MotA alone is in a very dynamic equilibrium with the MotA element. Our results demonstrate the utility of fine resolution FeBABE mapping to determine the architecture of protein-DNA complexes that have been recalcitrant to traditional structure analyses. PMID:23902794

  16. Further Studies on Bacteriophage T4 DNA Synthesis in Sucrose-Plasmolyzed Cells

    PubMed Central

    Stafford, Mary E.; Reddy, G. Prem Veer; Mathews, Christopher K.

    1977-01-01

    This paper describes several technical improvements in the sucrose-plasmolyzed cell system used in earlier experiments on DNA synthesis in situ with Escherichia coli infected by DNA-defective mutants of bacteriophage T4 (W. L. Collinsworth and C. K. Mathews, J. Virol. 13:908-915, 1974). Using this system, which is based primarily on that of M. G. Wovcha et al. (Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 70:2196-2200, 1973), we reinvestigated the properties of mutants bearing lesions in genes 1, 41, and 62, and we resolved some disagreements with data reported from that laboratory. We also asked whether the DNA-delay phenotype of T4 mutants is related to possible early leakage of DNA precursors from infected cells. Such cells display defective DNA synthesis in situ, even when ample DNA precursors are made available. Thus, the lesions associated with these mutations seem to manifest themselves at the level of macromolecular metabolism. Similarly, we examined an E. coli mutant defective in its ability to support T4 production, apparently because of a lesion affecting DNA synthesis (L. Simon et al., Nature [London] 252:451-455). In the plasmolyzed cell system, reduced nucleotide incorporation is seen, indicating also that the genetic defect does not involve DNA precursor synthesis. The plasmolyzed cell system incorporates deoxynucleotide 5′-monophosphates into DNA severalfold more rapidly than the corresponding 5′-triphosphates. This is consistent with the idea that DNA precursor-synthesizing enzymes are functionally organized to shuttle substrates to their sites of utilization. PMID:328926

  17. Structure-function analysis of the DNA translocating portal of the bacteriophage T4 packaging machine.

    PubMed

    Padilla-Sanchez, Victor; Gao, Song; Kim, Hyung Rae; Kihara, Daisuke; Sun, Lei; Rossmann, Michael G; Rao, Venigalla B

    2014-03-01

    Tailed bacteriophages and herpesviruses consist of a structurally well conserved dodecameric portal at a special 5-fold vertex of the capsid. The portal plays critical roles in head assembly, genome packaging, neck/tail attachment, and genome ejection. Although the structures of portals from phages φ29, SPP1, and P22 have been determined, their mechanistic roles have not been well understood. Structural analysis of phage T4 portal (gp20) has been hampered because of its unusual interaction with the Escherichia coli inner membrane. Here, we predict atomic models for the T4 portal monomer and dodecamer, and we fit the dodecamer into the cryo-electron microscopy density of the phage portal vertex. The core structure, like that from other phages, is cone shaped with the wider end containing the "wing" and "crown" domains inside the phage head. A long "stem" encloses a central channel, and a narrow "stalk" protrudes outside the capsid. A biochemical approach was developed to analyze portal function by incorporating plasmid-expressed portal protein into phage heads and determining the effect of mutations on head assembly, DNA translocation, and virion production. We found that the protruding loops of the stalk domain are involved in assembling the DNA packaging motor. A loop that connects the stalk to the channel might be required for communication between the motor and the portal. The "tunnel" loops that project into the channel are essential for sealing the packaged head. These studies established that the portal is required throughout the DNA packaging process, with different domains participating at different stages of genome packaging. PMID:24126213

  18. Exclusion of small terminase mediated DNA threading models for genome packaging in bacteriophage T4.

    PubMed

    Gao, Song; Zhang, Liang; Rao, Venigalla B

    2016-05-19

    Tailed bacteriophages and herpes viruses use powerful molecular machines to package their genomes. The packaging machine consists of three components: portal, motor (large terminase; TerL) and regulator (small terminase; TerS). Portal, a dodecamer, and motor, a pentamer, form two concentric rings at the special five-fold vertex of the icosahedral capsid. Powered by ATPase, the motor ratchets DNA into the capsid through the portal channel. TerS is essential for packaging, particularly for genome recognition, but its mechanism is unknown and controversial. Structures of gear-shaped TerS rings inspired models that invoke DNA threading through the central channel. Here, we report that mutations of basic residues that line phage T4 TerS (gp16) channel do not disrupt DNA binding. Even deletion of the entire channel helix retained DNA binding and produced progeny phage in vivo On the other hand, large oligomers of TerS (11-mers/12-mers), but not small oligomers (trimers to hexamers), bind DNA. These results suggest that TerS oligomerization creates a large outer surface, which, but not the interior of the channel, is critical for function, probably to wrap viral genome around the ring during packaging initiation. Hence, models involving TerS-mediated DNA threading may be excluded as an essential mechanism for viral genome packaging. PMID:26984529

  19. Exclusion of small terminase mediated DNA threading models for genome packaging in bacteriophage T4

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Song; Zhang, Liang; Rao, Venigalla B.

    2016-01-01

    Tailed bacteriophages and herpes viruses use powerful molecular machines to package their genomes. The packaging machine consists of three components: portal, motor (large terminase; TerL) and regulator (small terminase; TerS). Portal, a dodecamer, and motor, a pentamer, form two concentric rings at the special five-fold vertex of the icosahedral capsid. Powered by ATPase, the motor ratchets DNA into the capsid through the portal channel. TerS is essential for packaging, particularly for genome recognition, but its mechanism is unknown and controversial. Structures of gear-shaped TerS rings inspired models that invoke DNA threading through the central channel. Here, we report that mutations of basic residues that line phage T4 TerS (gp16) channel do not disrupt DNA binding. Even deletion of the entire channel helix retained DNA binding and produced progeny phage in vivo. On the other hand, large oligomers of TerS (11-mers/12-mers), but not small oligomers (trimers to hexamers), bind DNA. These results suggest that TerS oligomerization creates a large outer surface, which, but not the interior of the channel, is critical for function, probably to wrap viral genome around the ring during packaging initiation. Hence, models involving TerS-mediated DNA threading may be excluded as an essential mechanism for viral genome packaging. PMID:26984529

  20. T4-Related Bacteriophage LIMEstone Isolates for the Control of Soft Rot on Potato Caused by ‘Dickeya solani’

    PubMed Central

    Adriaenssens, Evelien M.; Van Vaerenbergh, Johan; Vandenheuvel, Dieter; Dunon, Vincent; Ceyssens, Pieter-Jan; De Proft, Maurice; Kropinski, Andrew M.; Noben, Jean-Paul; Maes, Martine; Lavigne, Rob

    2012-01-01

    The bacterium ‘Dickeya solani’, an aggressive biovar 3 variant of Dickeya dianthicola, causes rotting and blackleg in potato. To control this pathogen using bacteriophage therapy, we isolated and characterized two closely related and specific bacteriophages, vB_DsoM_LIMEstone1 and vB_DsoM_LIMEstone2. The LIMEstone phages have a T4-related genome organization and share DNA similarity with Salmonella phage ViI. Microbiological and molecular characterization of the phages deemed them suitable and promising for use in phage therapy. The phages reduced disease incidence and severity on potato tubers in laboratory assays. In addition, in a field trial of potato tubers, when infected with ‘Dickeya solani’, the experimental phage treatment resulted in a higher yield. These results form the basis for the development of a bacteriophage-based biocontrol of potato plants and tubers as an alternative for the use of antibiotics. PMID:22413005

  1. Comparison of the cleavage of pyrimidine dimers by the bacteriophage T4 and Micrococcus luteus uv-specific endonucleases

    SciTech Connect

    Gordon, L.K.; Haseltine, W.A.

    1980-12-25

    A comparison was made of the activity of the uv-specific endonucleases of bacteriophage T4 (T4 endonuclease V) and of Micrococcus luteus on ultraviolet light-irradiated DNA substrates of defined sequence. The two enzyms cleave DNA at the site of pyrimidine dimers with the same frequency. The products of the cleavage reaction are the same. The pyrimidine dimer DNA-glycosylase activity of both enzymes is more active on double-stranded DNA than it is on single-stranded DNA.

  2. Characterization of the flexible lip regions in bacteriophage lambda lysozyme using MD simulations.

    PubMed

    Smith, Lorna J; van Gunsteren, Wilfred F; Hansen, Niels

    2015-05-01

    The upper and lower lip regions in lysozyme from bacteriophage lambda (λ-lysozyme) are flexible in solution and exhibit two different conformations in crystal structures of the protein. MD simulations have been used to characterize the structure and dynamics of these lip regions, which surround the active site. Ten different simulations have been run including those with restraining to experimental NOE distance and (1)H-(15)N order parameter data. The simulations show that the lower lip region, although undergoing considerable backbone fluctuations, contains two persistent β-strands. In the upper lip region, a wide range of conformations are populated and it is not clear from the available data whether some helical secondary structure is present. The work provides a clear example of the advantages of combining MD simulations with experimental data to obtain a structural interpretation of the latter. In this case, time-averaged order parameter restraining has played an essential role in enabling convergence between two different starting structures and identifying the extent to which flexible regions in solution can contain persistent secondary structure. PMID:25820531

  3. Cryo-EM structure of the bacteriophage T4 portal protein assembly at near-atomic resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Lei; Zhang, Xinzheng; Gao, Song; Rao, Prashant A.; Padilla-Sanchez, Victor; Chen, Zhenguo; Sun, Siyang; Xiang, Ye; Subramaniam, Sriram; Rao, Venigalla B.; Rossmann, Michael G.

    2015-07-01

    The structure and assembly of bacteriophage T4 has been extensively studied. However, the detailed structure of the portal protein remained unknown. Here we report the structure of the bacteriophage T4 portal assembly, gene product 20 (gp20), determined by cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM) to 3.6 Å resolution. In addition, analysis of a 10 Å resolution cryo-EM map of an empty prolate T4 head shows how the dodecameric portal assembly interacts with the capsid protein gp23 at the special pentameric vertex. The gp20 structure also verifies that the portal assembly is required for initiating head assembly, for attachment of the packaging motor, and for participation in DNA packaging. Comparison of the Myoviridae T4 portal structure with the known portal structures of φ29, SPP1 and P22, representing Podo- and Siphoviridae, shows that the portal structure probably dates back to a time when self-replicating microorganisms were being established on Earth.

  4. Cryo-EM structure of the bacteriophage T4 portal protein assembly at near-atomic resolution

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Lei; Zhang, Xinzheng; Gao, Song; Rao, Prashant A.; Padilla-Sanchez, Victor; Chen, Zhenguo; Sun, Siyang; Xiang, Ye; Subramaniam, Sriram; Rao, Venigalla B.; Rossmann, Michael G.

    2015-01-01

    The structure and assembly of bacteriophage T4 has been extensively studied. However, the detailed structure of the portal protein remained unknown. Here we report the structure of the bacteriophage T4 portal assembly, gene product 20 (gp20), determined by cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM) to 3.6 Å resolution. In addition, analysis of a 10 Å resolution cryo-EM map of an empty prolate T4 head shows how the dodecameric portal assembly interacts with the capsid protein gp23 at the special pentameric vertex. The gp20 structure also verifies that the portal assembly is required for initiating head assembly, for attachment of the packaging motor, and for participation in DNA packaging. Comparison of the Myoviridae T4 portal structure with the known portal structures of φ29, SPP1 and P22, representing Podo- and Siphoviridae, shows that the portal structure probably dates back to a time when self-replicating microorganisms were being established on Earth. PMID:26144253

  5. The Effects of T4 and A3/R Bacteriophages on Differentiation of Human Myeloid Dendritic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Bocian, Katarzyna; Borysowski, Jan; Zarzycki, Michał; Pacek, Magdalena; Weber-Dąbrowska, Beata; Machcińska, Maja; Korczak-Kowalska, Grażyna; Górski, Andrzej

    2016-01-01

    Bacteriophages (phages) are viruses of bacteria. Here we evaluated the effects of T4 and A3/R bacteriophages, as well as phage-generated bacterial lysates, on differentiation of human myeloid dendritic cells (DCs) from monocytes. Neither of the phages significantly reduced the expression of markers associated with differentiation of DCs and their role in the activation of T cells (CD40, CD80, CD83, CD86, CD1c, CD11c, MHC II, PD-L1, PD-L2, TLR2, TLR4, and CCR7) and phagocytosis receptors (CD64 and DEC-205). By contrast, bacterial lysate of T4 phage significantly decreased the percentages of DEC-205- and CD1c-positive cells. The percentage of DEC-205-positive cells was also significantly reduced in DCs differentiated in the presence of lysate of A3/R phage. Thus while bacteriophages do not substantially affect differentiation of DCs, some products of phage-induced lysis of bacterial cells may influence the differentiation and potentially also some functions of DCs. Our results have important implications for phage therapy of bacterial infections because during infections monocytes recruited to the site of inflammation are an important source of inflammatory DCs. PMID:27582733

  6. The Effects of T4 and A3/R Bacteriophages on Differentiation of Human Myeloid Dendritic Cells.

    PubMed

    Bocian, Katarzyna; Borysowski, Jan; Zarzycki, Michał; Pacek, Magdalena; Weber-Dąbrowska, Beata; Machcińska, Maja; Korczak-Kowalska, Grażyna; Górski, Andrzej

    2016-01-01

    Bacteriophages (phages) are viruses of bacteria. Here we evaluated the effects of T4 and A3/R bacteriophages, as well as phage-generated bacterial lysates, on differentiation of human myeloid dendritic cells (DCs) from monocytes. Neither of the phages significantly reduced the expression of markers associated with differentiation of DCs and their role in the activation of T cells (CD40, CD80, CD83, CD86, CD1c, CD11c, MHC II, PD-L1, PD-L2, TLR2, TLR4, and CCR7) and phagocytosis receptors (CD64 and DEC-205). By contrast, bacterial lysate of T4 phage significantly decreased the percentages of DEC-205- and CD1c-positive cells. The percentage of DEC-205-positive cells was also significantly reduced in DCs differentiated in the presence of lysate of A3/R phage. Thus while bacteriophages do not substantially affect differentiation of DCs, some products of phage-induced lysis of bacterial cells may influence the differentiation and potentially also some functions of DCs. Our results have important implications for phage therapy of bacterial infections because during infections monocytes recruited to the site of inflammation are an important source of inflammatory DCs. PMID:27582733

  7. Genetic effects of cosmic radiation on bacteriophage T4Br+ (on materials of biological experiment "Soyuz-Apollo").

    PubMed

    Yurov, S S; Akoev, I G; Akhmadieva, A K; Livanova, I A; Leont'eva, G A; Marennyi, A M; Popov, V I

    1979-01-01

    During the experiment "Spore-ring Forming Fungi Biorhythm" of the Apollo-Soyuz test project the Rhythm-1 apparatus contained a dried film culture of bacteriophage T4Br+, growing cultures of Actinomyces and plastic nuclear particle detectors. The following were studied: the frequency of induction of r mutations in the bacteriophage film per 2 X 10(4) surviving particles, the spectrum of mutant types obtained (rI, rII, rIII), and the possible molecular mechanisms for the occurrence of rII mutants with due regard to the registered tracks of heavy nuclear particles. The studies showed that the local radiation due to heavy nuclear particle tracks plays a major role in space radiation damage. PMID:12008698

  8. Structural refinement from restrained-ensemble simulations based on EPR/DEER data: application to T4 lysozyme.

    PubMed

    Islam, Shahidul M; Stein, Richard A; McHaourab, Hassane S; Roux, Benoît

    2013-05-01

    DEER (double electron-electron resonance) is a powerful pulsed ESR (electron spin resonance) technique allowing the determination of distance histograms between pairs of nitroxide spin-labels linked to a protein in a native-like solution environment. However, exploiting the huge amount of information provided by ESR/DEER histograms to refine structural models is extremely challenging. In this study, a restrained ensemble (RE) molecular dynamics (MD) simulation methodology is developed to address this issue. In RE simulation, the spin-spin distance distribution histograms calculated from a multiple-copy MD simulation are enforced, via a global ensemble-based energy restraint, to match those obtained from ESR/DEER experiments. The RE simulation is applied to 51 ESR/DEER distance histogram data from spin-labels inserted at 37 different positions in T4 lysozyme (T4L). The rotamer population distribution along the five dihedral angles connecting the nitroxide ring to the protein backbone is determined and shown to be consistent with available information from X-ray crystallography. For the purpose of structural refinement, the concept of a simplified nitroxide dummy spin-label is designed and parametrized on the basis of these all-atom RE simulations with explicit solvent. It is demonstrated that RE simulations with the dummy nitroxide spin-labels imposing the ESR/DEER experimental distance distribution data are able to systematically correct and refine a series of distorted T4L structures, while simple harmonic distance restraints are unsuccessful. This computationally efficient approach allows experimental restraints from DEER experiments to be incorporated into RE simulations for efficient structural refinement. PMID:23510103

  9. Comparison of bactericidal activity of six lysozymes at atmospheric pressure and under high hydrostatic pressure.

    PubMed

    Nakimbugwe, Dorothy; Masschalck, Barbara; Atanassova, Miroslava; Zewdie-Bosüner, Abebetch; Michiels, Chris W

    2006-05-01

    The antibacterial working range of six lysozymes was tested under ambient and high pressure, on a panel of five gram-positive (Enterococcus faecalis, Bacillus subtilis, Listeria innocua, Staphylococcus aureus and Micrococcus lysodeikticus) and five gram-negative bacteria (Yersinia enterocolitica, Shigella flexneri, Escherichia coli O157:H7, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Salmonella typhimurium). The lysozymes included two that are commercially available (hen egg white lysozyme or HEWL, and mutanolysin from Streptomyces globisporus or M1L), and four that were chromatographically purified (bacteriophage lambda lysozyme or LaL, bacteriophage T4 lysozyme or T4L, goose egg white lysozyme or GEWL, and cauliflower lysozyme or CFL). T4L, LaL and GEWL were highly pure as evaluated by silver staining of SDS-PAGE gels and zymogram analysis while CFL was only partially pure. At ambient pressure each gram-positive test organism displayed a specific pattern of sensitivity to the six lysozymes, but none of the gram-negative bacteria was sensitive to any of the lysozymes. High pressure treatment (130-300 MPa, 25 degrees C, 15 min) sensitised several gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria for one or more lysozymes. M. lysodeikticus and P. aeruginosa became sensitive to all lysozymes under high pressure, S. typhimurium remained completely insensitive to all lysozymes, and the other bacteria showed sensitisation to some of the lysozymes. The possible applications of the different lysozymes as biopreservatives, and the possible reasons for the observed differences in bactericidal specificity are discussed. PMID:16487612

  10. Cell wall substrate specificity of six different lysozymes and lysozyme inhibitory activity of bacterial extracts.

    PubMed

    Nakimbugwe, Dorothy; Masschalck, Barbara; Deckers, Daphne; Callewaert, Lien; Aertsen, Abram; Michiels, Chris W

    2006-06-01

    We have investigated the specificity of six different lysozymes for peptidoglycan substrates obtained by extraction of a number of gram-negative bacteria and Micrococcus lysodeikticus with chloroform/Tris-HCl buffer (chloroform/buffer). The lysozymes included two that are commercially available (hen egg white lysozyme or HEWL, and mutanolysin from Streptomyces globisporus or M1L), and four that were chromatographically purified (bacteriophage lambda lysozyme or LaL, bacteriophage T4 lysozyme or T4L, goose egg white lysozyme or GEWL, and cauliflower lysozyme or CFL). HEWL was much more effective on M. lysodeikticus than on any of the gram-negative cell walls, while the opposite was found for LaL. Also the gram-negative cell walls showed remarkable differences in susceptibility to the different lysozymes, even for closely related species like Escherichia coli and Salmonella Typhimurium. These differences could not be due to the presence of lysozyme inhibitors such as Ivy from E. coli in the cell wall substrates because we showed that chloroform extraction effectively removed this inhibitor. Interestingly, we found strong inhibitory activity to HEWL in the chloroform/buffer extracts of Salmonella Typhimurium, and to LaL in the extracts of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, suggesting that other lysozyme inhibitors than Ivy exist and are probably widespread in gram-negative bacteria. PMID:16684100

  11. Some properties of HU are modified after the infection of Escherichia coli by bacteriophage T4.

    PubMed Central

    Bensaid, A; Uzan, M; Jacq, A; Hibner, U; Brody, E; Rouvière-Yaniv, J

    1994-01-01

    Escherichia coli HU, an abundant, nucleoid-associated, DNA-binding protein, plays a role in several biological processes including DNA replication. Many other bacteria have well-conserved HU homologs, and there are several more-distantly related members of the family, including TF1, encoded by Bacillus subtilis phage SPO1. We have asked whether coliphage T4, like SPO1, encodes an HU homolog or whether it alters the properties of host HU. We have been unable to detect a T4-specified HU homolog, but we have shown that E. coli HU extracted from phage-infected cells differs in some properties from that extracted from uninfected cells. First, HU from uninfected cells inhibits a reconstituted T4 DNA replication system, whereas HU from infected cells does not. Second, HU from infected cells appears to bind a T4-encoded polypeptide, as shown by coimmunoprecipitation. We propose that such binding alters HU function in T4-infected cells. Images PMID:8132451

  12. Structure of the Three N-Terminal Immunoglobulin Domains of the Highly Immunogenic Outer Capsid Protein from a T4-Like Bacteriophage

    SciTech Connect

    Fokine, Andrei; Islam, Mohammad Z.; Zhang, Zhihong; Bowman, Valorie D.; Rao, Venigalla B.; Rossmann, Michael G.

    2011-09-16

    The head of bacteriophage T4 is decorated with 155 copies of the highly antigenic outer capsid protein (Hoc). One Hoc molecule binds near the center of each hexameric capsomer. Hoc is dispensable for capsid assembly and has been used to display pathogenic antigens on the surface of T4. Here we report the crystal structure of a protein containing the first three of four domains of Hoc from bacteriophage RB49, a close relative of T4. The structure shows an approximately linear arrangement of the protein domains. Each of these domains has an immunoglobulin-like fold, frequently found in cell attachment molecules. In addition, we report biochemical data suggesting that Hoc can bind to Escherichia coli, supporting the hypothesis that Hoc could attach the phage capsids to bacterial surfaces and perhaps also to other organisms. The capacity for such reversible adhesion probably provides survival advantages to the bacteriophage.

  13. The mechanism of transcriptional activation by the topologically DNA-linked sliding clamp of bacteriophage T4.

    PubMed

    Kolesky, Scott E; Ouhammouch, Mohamed; Geiduschek, E Peter

    2002-08-30

    Three viral proteins participate directly in transcription of bacteriophage T4 late genes: the sigma-family protein gp55 provides promoter recognition, gp33 is the co-activator, and gp45 is the activator of transcription; gp33 also represses transcription in the absence of gp45. Transcriptional activation by gp45, the toroidal sliding clamp of the T4 DNA polymerase holoenzyme, requires assembly at primer-template junctions by its clamp loader. The mechanism of transcriptional activation has been analyzed by examining rates of formation of open promoter complexes. The basal gp55-RNA polymerase holoenzyme is only weakly held in its initially formed closed promoter complex, which subsequently opens very slowly. Activation ( approximately 320-fold in this work) increases affinity in the closed complex and accelerates promoter opening. Promoter opening by gp55 is also thermo-irreversible: the T4 late promoter does not open at 0 degrees C, but once opened at 30 degrees C remains open upon shift to the lower temperature. At a hybrid promoter for sigma(70) and gp55-holoenzymes, only gp55 confers thermo-irreversibility of promoter opening. Interaction of gp45 with a C-terminal epitope of gp33 is essential for the co-activator function of gp33. PMID:12206760

  14. Bacteriophage T4D Head Morphogenesis. VIII. DNA-Protein Associations in Intermediate Head Structures That Accumulate in Gene 49− Mutant-Infected Cells

    PubMed Central

    Glinert, Susan J.; Luftig, Ronald B.

    1977-01-01

    We have utilized the gene 49− mutant-infected cells of bacteriophage T4D to accumulate large numbers of nucleic acid-protein intermediate head structures. These heads were used as substrates for experiments in the investigations of the mechanism of DNA packaging. Specifically, we have examined: (i) the susceptibility of the DNA in these structures to digestion by a variety of nucleases after a series of increasing temperature pulses from 25 to 100°C, (ii) the physicochemical characteristics of the DNA inside these heads, and (iii) the mechanism by which proteins are displaced from the interior of the head after treatment with basic proteins. We isolated DNA from these gene 49− heads by use of gradient centrifugation procedures. The DNA had a molecular weight of 8 × 106 and a density of 1.697 ± 0.005 g/cm3, and it contained a short resistant fraction (SRF) which, when associated with the gene 49− heads, exhibited AT-protected regions that were not susceptible to micrococcal nuclease digestion. Such a fraction may contain pieces which are important in the initial association of the DNA with the prohead. Exposure of the gene 49− intermediate capsid structures to basic proteins, such as bovine trypsin inhibitor, lysozyme, and l-polylysine-70, caused a displacement of an amorphous-appearing structure which may be a complex of the gene 49− DNA and interior components of the capsid (e.g., internal proteins, polyamines). Our general conclusion is that in the gene 49− intermediate head structures which are only partly filled with DNA, this DNA is held inside the head by strong electrostatic linkages with interior polypeptides and polyamines. Images PMID:875137

  15. Characterization of the novel T4-like Salmonella enterica bacteriophage STP4-a and its endolysin.

    PubMed

    Li, Meng; Li, Mengzhe; Lin, Hong; Wang, Jingxue; Jin, Yanqiu; Han, Feng

    2016-02-01

    While screening for new antimicrobial agents for multidrug-resistant Salmonella enterica, the novel lytic bacteriophage STP4-a was isolated and characterized. Phage morphology revealed that STP4-a belongs to the family Myoviridae. Bacterial challenge assays showed that different serovars of Salmonella enterica were susceptible to STP4-a infection. The genomic characteristics of STP4-a, containing 159,914 bp of dsDNA with an average GC content of 36.86 %, were determined. Furthermore, the endolysin of STP4-a was expressed and characterized. The novel endolysin, LysSTP4, has hydrolytic activity towards outer-membrane-permeabilized S. enterica and Escherichia coli. These results provide essential information for the development of novel phage-based biocontrol agents against S. enterica. PMID:26563319

  16. Structure and function of the small terminase component of the DNA packaging machine in T4-like bacteriophages

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Siyang; Gao, Song; Kondabagil, Kiran; Xiang, Ye; Rossmann, Michael G.; Rao, Venigalla B.

    2012-04-04

    Tailed DNA bacteriophages assemble empty procapsids that are subsequently filled with the viral genome by means of a DNA packaging machine situated at a special fivefold vertex. The packaging machine consists of a 'small terminase' and a 'large terminase' component. One of the functions of the small terminase is to initiate packaging of the viral genome, whereas the large terminase is responsible for the ATP-powered translocation of DNA. The small terminase subunit has three domains, an N-terminal DNA-binding domain, a central oligomerization domain, and a C-terminal domain for interacting with the large terminase. Here we report structures of the central domain in two different oligomerization states for a small terminase from the T4 family of phages. In addition, we report biochemical studies that establish the function for each of the small terminase domains. On the basis of the structural and biochemical information, we propose a model for DNA packaging initiation.

  17. Suppressors of Mutations in the rII Gene of Bacteriophage T4 Affect Promoter Utilization

    PubMed Central

    Hall, Dwight H.; Snyder, Ronald D.

    1981-01-01

    Homyk, Rodriguez and Weil (1976) have described T4 mutants, called sip, that partially suppress the inability of T4rII mutants to grow in λ lysogens. We have found that mutants sip1 and sip2 are resistant to folate analogs and overproduce FH2 reductase. The results of recombination and complementation studies indicate that sip mutations are in the mot gene. Like other mot mutations (Mattson, Richardson and Goodin 1974; Chace and Hall 1975; Sauerbier, Hercules and Hall 1976), the sip2 mutation affects the expression of many genes and appears to affect promoter utilization. The mot gene function is not required for T4 growth on most hosts, but we have found that it is required for good growth on E. coli CTr5X. Homyk, Rodriguez and Weil (1976) also described L mutations that reverse the effects of sip mutations. L2 decreases the folate analog resistance and the inability of sip2 to grow on CTr5X. L2 itself is partially resistant to a folate analog, and appears to reverse the effects of sip2 on gene expression. These results suggest that L2 affects another regulatory gene related to the mot gene. PMID:7262547

  18. The Riia Gene of Bacteriophage T4. II. Regulation of Its Messenger RNA Synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Daegelen, P.; Brody, E.

    1990-01-01

    When the rII genes are first introduced into cells which had been previously infected by T4 phage deleted for these genes, the kinetics of synthesis of rIIA and rIIB RNA are rapid and identical. We show that this rapid synthesis depends on a functional motA gene for rIIB, but not for rIIA, RNA synthesis. By primer-extension mapping of T4 messenger RNA, we find three promoters close to the rIIA gene. One of them is an early promoter just before the rIIA.1 gene; it is used under all conditions tested. Another is in the coding portion of the rIIA.1 gene; it is weak, primarily because of a 19-bp spacing between the -10 and -35 elements, and its use is stimulated by T4 functions. The third is a motA-dependent (middle) promoter which has an unusual CCCGCTT box at -33. We present results which suggest that none of these promoters is likely to be the site at which the motB and motC gene products exercise their major influence on rIIA RNA synthesis. PMID:2379818

  19. Highly Effective Soluble and Bacteriophage T4 Nanoparticle Plague Vaccines Against Yersinia pestis.

    PubMed

    Tao, Pan; Mahalingam, Marthandan; Rao, Venigalla B

    2016-01-01

    Plague caused by Yersinia pestis is an ancient disease, responsible for millions of deaths in human history. Unfortunately, there is no FDA-approved vaccine available. Recombinant subunit vaccines based on two major antigens, Caf 1 (F1) and LcrV (V), have been under investigation and showed promise. However, there are two main problems associated with these vaccines. First, the Yersinia capsular protein F1 has high propensity to aggregate, particularly when expressed in heterologous systems such as Escherichia coli, thus affecting vaccine quality and efficacy. Second, the subunit vaccines do not induce adequate cell-mediated immune responses that also appear to be essential for optimal protection against plague. We have developed two basic approaches, structure-based immunogen design and phage T4 nanoparticle delivery, to construct new plague vaccines that may overcome these problems. First, by engineering F1 protein, we generated a monomeric and soluble F1V mutant (F1mutV) which has similar immunogenicity as wild-type F1V. The NH2-terminal β-strand of F1 was transplanted to the COOH-terminus and the sequence flanking the β-strand was duplicated to retain a key CD4(+) T cell epitope. Second, we generated a nanoparticle plague vaccine that can induce balanced antibody- and cell-mediated immune responses. This was done by arraying the F1mutV on phage T4 via the small outer capsid (Soc) protein which binds to T4 capsid at nanomolar affinity. Preparation of these vaccines is described in detail and we hope that these would be considered as candidates for licensing a next-generation plague vaccine. PMID:27076150

  20. Transformation of a fragment of beta-structural bacteriophage T4 adhesin to stable alpha-helical trimer.

    PubMed

    Miroshnikov, K A; Sernova, N V; Shneider, M M; Mesyanzhinov, V V

    2000-12-01

    Gene product 12 of bacteriophage T4, adhesin, serves to adhere the virus to host cells. Adhesin is a fibrous homotrimer, and a novel tertiary structure element, a beta-helix, is supposed to be a major structural feature of this protein. We have constructed two truncated gp12 mutants, 12N1 and 12N2, containing 221 and 135 N-terminal residues, respectively. When expressed in E. coli cells, these gp12 fragments formed labile beta-structural trimers. Another hybrid protein, 12FN, containing 179 N-terminal amino acid residues of gp12 fused to the C-terminal domain (31 amino acids) of T4 fibritin, was shown to have a trimeric proteolytically resistant alpha-helical structure. This structure is probably similar to that of fibritin, which has a triple alpha-helical coiled-coil structure. Hence, we have demonstrated the possibility of global transformation of fibrous protein structure using fusion with a C-terminal domain that initiates trimerization. PMID:11173503

  1. Structure and Biophysical Properties of a Triple-Stranded Beta-Helix Comprising the Central Spike of Bacteriophage T4

    PubMed Central

    Buth, Sergey A.; Menin, Laure; Shneider, Mikhail M.; Engel, Jürgen; Boudko, Sergei P.; Leiman, Petr G.

    2015-01-01

    Gene product 5 (gp5) of bacteriophage T4 is a spike-shaped protein that functions to disrupt the membrane of the target cell during phage infection. Its C-terminal domain is a long and slender β-helix that is formed by three polypeptide chains wrapped around a common symmetry axis akin to three interdigitated corkscrews. The folding and biophysical properties of such triple-stranded β-helices, which are topologically related to amyloid fibers, represent an unsolved biophysical problem. Here, we report structural and biophysical characterization of T4 gp5 β-helix and its truncated mutants of different lengths. A soluble fragment that forms a dimer of trimers and that could comprise a minimal self-folding unit has been identified. Surprisingly, the hydrophobic core of the β-helix is small. It is located near the C-terminal end of the β-helix and contains a centrally positioned and hydrated magnesium ion. A large part of the β-helix interior comprises a large elongated cavity that binds palmitic, stearic, and oleic acids in an extended conformation suggesting that these molecules might participate in the folding of the complete β-helix. PMID:26295253

  2. The roles of the bacteriophage T4 r genes in lysis inhibition and fine-structure genetics: a new perspective.

    PubMed Central

    Paddison, P; Abedon, S T; Dressman, H K; Gailbreath, K; Tracy, J; Mosser, E; Neitzel, J; Guttman, B; Kutter, E

    1998-01-01

    Seldom has the study of a set of genes contributed more to our understanding of molecular genetics than has the characterization of the rapid-lysis genes of bacteriophage T4. For example, T4 rII mutants were used to define gene structure and mutagen effects at the molecular level and to help unravel the genetic code. The large-plaque morphology of these mutants reflects a block in expressing lysis inhibition (LIN), the ability to delay lysis for several hours in response to sensing external related phages attacking the cell, which is a unique and highly adaptive attribute of the T4 family of phages. However, surprisingly little is known about the mechanism of LIN, or how the various r genes affect its expression. Here, we review the extensive old literature about the r genes and the lysis process and try to sort out the major players affecting lysis inhibition. We confirm that superinfection can induce lysis inhibition even while infected cells are lysing, suggesting that the signal response is virtually instantaneous and thus probably the result of post-translational regulation. We identify the rI gene as ORF tk.-2, based on sequence analysis of canonical rI mutants. The rI gene encodes a peptide of 97 amino acids (Mr = 11.1 kD; pI = 4.8) that probably is secreted into the periplasmic space. This gene is widely conserved among T-even phage. We then present a model for LIN, postulating that rI is largely responsible for regulating the gpt holin protein in response to superinfection. The evidence suggests that the rIIA and B genes are not directly involved in lysis inhibition; rather, when they are absent, an alternate pathway for lysis develops which depends on the presence of genes from any of several possible prophages and is not sensitive to lysis inhibition. PMID:9560373

  3. Display of a PorA peptide from Neisseria meningitidis on the bacteriophage T4 capsid surface.

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, J; Abu-Shilbayeh, L; Rao, V B

    1997-01-01

    The exterior of bacteriophage T4 capsid is coated with two outer capsid proteins, Hoc (highly antigenic outer capsid protein; molecular mass, 40 kDa) and Soc (small outer capsid protein; molecular mass, 9 kDa), at symmetrical positions on the icosahedron (160 copies of Hoc and 960 copies of Soc per capsid particle). Both these proteins are nonessential for phage infectivity and viability and assemble onto the capsid surface after completion of capsid assembly. We developed a phage display system which allowed in-frame fusions of foreign DNA at a unique cloning site in the 5' end of hoc or soc. A DNA fragment corresponding to the 36-amino-acid PorA peptide from Neisseria meningitidis was cloned into the display vectors to generate fusions at the N terminus of Hoc or Soc. The PorA-Hoc and PorA-Soc fusion proteins retained the ability to bind to the capsid surface, and the bound peptide was displayed in an accessible form as shown by its reactivity with specific monoclonal antibodies in an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. By employing T4 genetic strategies, we show that more than one subtype-specific PorA peptide can be displayed on the capsid surface and that the peptide can also be displayed on a DNA-free empty capsid. Both the PorA-Hoc and PorA-Soc recombinant phages are highly immunogenic in mice and elicit strong antipeptide antibody titers even with a weak adjuvant such as Alhydrogel or no adjuvant at all. The data suggest that the phage T4 hoc-soc system is an attractive system for display of peptides on an icosahedral capsid surface and may emerge as a powerful system for construction of the next generation multicomponent vaccines. PMID:9353063

  4. Identification of a New Motif in Family B DNA Polymerases by Mutational Analyses of the Bacteriophage T4 DNA Polymerase

    PubMed Central

    Li, Vincent; Hogg, Matthew; Reha-Krantz, Linda J.

    2011-01-01

    Structure-based protein sequence alignments of family B DNA polymerases revealed a conserved motif that is formed from interacting residues between loops from the N-terminal and palm domains and between the N-terminal loop and a conserved proline residue. The importance of the motif for function of the bacteriophage T4 DNA polymerase was revealed by suppressor analysis. T4 DNA polymerases that form weak replicating complexes cannot replicate DNA when the dGTP pool is reduced. The conditional lethality provides the means to identify amino acid substitutions that restore replication activity under low dGTP conditions by either correcting the defect produced by the first amino acid substitution or by generally increasing the stability of polymerase complexes; the second type are global suppressors that can effectively counter the reduced stability caused by a variety of amino acid substitutions. Some amino acid substitutions that increase the stability of polymerase complexes produce a new phenotype - sensitivity to the antiviral drug phosphonoacetic acid. Amino acid substitutions that confer decreased ability to replicate DNA under low dGTP conditions or drug sensitivity were identified in the new motif, which suggests that the motif functions in regulating the stability of polymerase complexes. Additional suppressor analyses revealed an apparent network of interactions that link the new motif to the fingers domain and to two patches of conserved residues that bind DNA. The collection of mutant T4 DNA polymerases provides a foundation for future biochemical studies to determine how DNA polymerases remain stably associated with DNA while waiting for the next available dNTP, how DNA polymerases translocate, and the biochemical basis for sensitivity to antiviral drugs. PMID:20493878

  5. The Mechanism of Inactivation of T4 Bacteriophage by Tritium Decay

    PubMed Central

    Funk, Fred; Person, Stanley; Bockrath, Richard C.

    1968-01-01

    Coliphage T4 was used as a model system to study the mechanism of biological inactivation produced by tritium decay. Experimentally, tritiated precursors were incorporated into phage DNA (thymidine-3H) or into phage protein (3H-amino acids). The ratio of killing efficiencies for decays originating in phage DNA to those originating in phage protein was 2.6. Inactivation by decays from labeled amino acids was assumed to occur exclusively from β-particle irradiation of phage DNA. If decays originating in DNA are due solely to irradiation of DNA, then the killing efficiencies reflect the energy transfer paths in phage DNA for decays originating in phage DNA and in the protein coat. The energy transfer paths were determined for the two cases with the help of a computer and found to be very nearly equal to the experimentally determined ratio (2.6). The killing efficiencies for decays originating in phage DNA were 0.12 and for decays originating in protein 0.046. PMID:5678320

  6. Old, New, and Widely True: the Bacteriophage T4 DNA Packaging Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Black, Lindsay W.

    2015-01-01

    DNA packaging into empty viral procapsids by ATP-driven motor proteins applies widely among viruses. Recent fluorescence studies of phage T4 reveal: 1) the small terminase subunit (TerS) synapses pac homologs by a two ring mechanism to gauge DNA maturation and allow packaging by the large terminase subunit (TerL); 2) translocation of linear DNA is efficient by TerL acting alone; expansion of the procapsid is controlled by the portal-terminase assembly; 3) both ends of the packaged DNA are held at the portal, showing a loop of DNA is packaged; 4) transient spring-like compression of B form to A form-like DNA accompanies translocation; 5) the C-terminal domain of TerL is docked to the portal and moves toward it when stalled; 6) a portal bound resolvase can release stalled Y-DNA compression and allow translocation in vitro; and 7) ATP powered translocation on A form dsDNA is supported by recent hexameric helicase studies. PMID:25728298

  7. Domain organization, folding and stability of bacteriophage T4 fibritin, a segmented coiled-coil protein.

    PubMed

    Boudko, Sergei P; Londer, Yuri Y; Letarov, Andrei V; Sernova, Natalia V; Engel, Juergen; Mesyanzhinov, Vadim V

    2002-02-01

    Fibritin is a segmented coiled-coil homotrimer of the 486-residue product of phage T4 gene wac. This protein attaches to a phage particle by the N-terminal region and forms fibrous whiskers of 530 A, which perform a chaperone function during virus assembly. The short C-terminal region has a beta-annulus-like structure. We engineered a set of fibritin deletion mutants sequentially truncated from the N-termini, and the mutants were studied by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and CD measurements. The analysis of DSC curves indicates that full-length fibritin exhibits three thermal-heat-absorption peaks centred at 321 K (Delta H=1390 kJ x mol trimer(-1)), at 336 K (Delta H=7600 kJ x mol trimer(-1)), and at 345 K (Delta H=515 kJ x mol trimer(-1)). These transitions were assigned to the N-terminal, segmented coiled-coil, and C-terminal functional domains, respectively. The coiled-coil region, containing 13 segments, melts co-operatively as a single domain with a mean enthalpy Delta Hres=21 kJ x mol residue(-1). The ratio of Delta HVH/Delta Hcal for the coiled-coil part of the 120-, 182-, 258- and 281-residue per monomer mutants, truncated from the N-termini, and for full-length fibritin are 0.91, 0.88, 0.42, 0.39, and 0.13, respectively. This gives an indication of the decrease of the 'all-or-none' character of the transition with increasing protein size. The deletion of the 12-residue-long loop in the 120-residue fibritin increases the thermal stability of the coiled-coil region. According to CD data, full-length fibritin and all the mutants truncated from the N-termini refold properly after heat denaturation. In contrast, fibritin XN, which is deleted for the C-terminal domain, forms aggregates inside the cell. The XN protein can be partially refolded by dilution from urea and does not refold after heat denaturation. These results confirm that the C-terminal domain is essential for correct fibritin assembly both in vivo and in vitro and acts as a foldon. PMID

  8. Single substitution in bacteriophage T4 RNase H alters the ratio between its exo- and endonuclease activities.

    PubMed

    Kholod, Natalia; Sivogrivov, Dmitry; Latypov, Oleg; Mayorov, Sergey; Kuznitsyn, Rafail; Kajava, Andrey V; Shlyapnikov, Mikhail; Granovsky, Igor

    2015-11-01

    The article describes substitutions in bacteriophage T4 RNase H which provide so called das-effect. Phage T4 DNA arrest suppression (das) mutations have been described to be capable of partially suppressing the phage DNA arrest phenotype caused by a dysfunction in genes 46 and/or 47 (also known as Mre11/Rad50 complex). Genetic mapping of das13 (one of the das mutations) has shown it to be in the region of the rnh gene encoding RNase H. Here we report that Das13 mutant of RNase H has substitutions of valine 43 and leucine 242 with isoleucines. To investigate the influence of these mutations on RNase H nuclease properties we have designed a novel in vitro assay that allows us to separate and quantify exo- or endonuclease activities of flap endonuclease. The nuclease assay in vitro showed that V43I substitution increased the ratio between exonuclease/endonuclease activities of RNase H whereas L242I substitution did not affect the nuclease activity of RNase H in vitro. However, both mutations were necessary for the full das effect in vivo. Molecular modelling of the nuclease structure suggests that V43I substitution may lead to disposition of H4 helix, responsible for the interaction with the first base pairs of 5'end of branched DNA. These structural changes may affect unwinding of the first base pairs of gapped or nicked DNA generating a short flap and therefore may stabilize the DNA-enzyme complex. L242I substitution did not affect the structure of RNase H and its role in providing das-effect remains unclear. PMID:26432500

  9. Enhanced pyrimidine dimer repair in cultured murine epithelial cells transfected with the denV gene of bacteriophage T4.

    PubMed

    Kusewitt, D F; Budge, C L; Ley, R D

    1994-04-01

    The patch size for excision repair of ultraviolet radiation (UV)-induced pyrimidine dimers was determined in cultured murine epithelial cells with normal and enhanced pyrimidine dimer repair capabilities. Cells with enhanced pyrimidine dimer repair were produced by transfecting 308 cells with the denV gene of bacteriophage T4; this gene encodes the enzyme endonuclease V. Pyrimidine dimer repair following exposure to UV from an FS-40 sunlamp was determined by micrococcal dimer-specific nuclease digestion and alkaline sucrose ultracentrifugation. Patch size ws estimated based on the photolytic lability of bromodeoxyuridine-substituted DNA. Excision repair of UV-induced pyrimidine dimers in denV-transfected 308 cells was enhanced two- to threefold. Production of mRNA from the denV gene in cell lines with enhanced repair was confirmed by RNA blotting. In control cells, the patch size for excision repair of DNA photoproducts was estimated to be 34 nucleotides per photoproduct removed; in denV-transfected cells, a smaller average patch size of 10-16 nucleotides per photoproduct removed was calculated. Thus, endonuclease V activity appears to alter not only the extent, but also the nature of excision repair in UV-exposed mammalian epithelial cells. PMID:8151125

  10. Analyzing indirect secondary electron contrast of unstained bacteriophage T4 based on SEM images and Monte Carlo simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Ogura, Toshihiko

    2009-03-06

    The indirect secondary electron contrast (ISEC) condition of the scanning electron microscopy (SEM) produces high contrast detection with minimal damage of unstained biological samples mounted under a thin carbon film. The high contrast image is created by a secondary electron signal produced under the carbon film by a low acceleration voltage. Here, we show that ISEC condition is clearly able to detect unstained bacteriophage T4 under a thin carbon film (10-15 nm) by using high-resolution field emission (FE) SEM. The results show that FE-SEM provides higher resolution than thermionic emission SEM. Furthermore, we investigated the scattered electron area within the carbon film under ISEC conditions using Monte Carlo simulation. The simulations indicated that the image resolution difference is related to the scattering width in the carbon film and the electron beam spot size. Using ISEC conditions on unstained virus samples would produce low electronic damage, because the electron beam does not directly irradiate the sample. In addition to the routine analysis, this method can be utilized for structural analysis of various biological samples like viruses, bacteria, and protein complexes.

  11. Response of the bacteriophage T4 replisome to non-coding lesions and regression of a stalled replication fork

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, Scott W.; Benkovic, Stephen J.

    2010-01-01

    DNA is constantly damaged by endogenous and exogenous agents. The resulting DNA lesions have the potential to halt the progression of the replisome, possibly leading to replication fork collapse. Here, we examine the effect of a non-coding DNA lesion in either the leading or lagging strand template on the bacteriophage T4 replisome. A damaged base in the lagging strand template does not affect the progression of the replication fork. Instead, the stalled lagging strand polymerase recycles from the lesion and initiates synthesis of the new Okazaki fragment upstream from the damaged base. In contrast, when the replisome encounters a blocking lesion in the leading strand template, the replication fork only travels approximately 1 kb beyond the point of the DNA lesion before complete replication fork collapse. The primosome and lagging strand polymerase remain active during this period and an Okazaki fragment is synthesized beyond the point of the leading strand lesion. There is no evidence for a new priming event on the leading strand template. Instead, the DNA structure that is produced by the stalled replication fork is a substrate for the DNA repair helicase, UvsW. UvsW catalyzes the regression of a stalled replication fork into a “chicken foot” structure that has been postulated to be an intermediate in an error-free lesion bypass pathway. PMID:20600127

  12. The Structure of Gene Product 6 of Bacteriophage T4, the Hinge-Pin of the Baseplate

    SciTech Connect

    Aksyuk, Anastasia A.; Leiman, Petr G.; Shneider, Mikhail M.; Mesyanzhinov, Vadim V.; Rossmann, Michael G.

    2009-07-21

    The baseplate of bacteriophage T4 is a multicomponent protein complex, which controls phage attachment to the host. It assembles from six wedges and a central hub. During infection the baseplate undergoes a large conformational change from a dome-shaped to a flat, star-shaped structure. We report the crystal structure of the C-terminal half of gene product (gp) 6 and investigate its motion with respect to the other proteins during the baseplate rearrangement. Six gp6 dimers interdigitate, forming a ring that maintains the integrity of the baseplate in both conformations. One baseplate wedge contains an N-terminal dimer of gp6, whereas neighboring wedges are tied together through the C-terminal dimer of gp6. The dimeric interactions are preserved throughout the rearrangement of the baseplate. However, the hinge angle between the N- and C-terminal parts of gp6 changes by {approx}15{sup o}, accounting for a 10 {angstrom} radial increase in the diameter of the gp6 ring.

  13. Biochemical analysis of the substrate specificity and sequence preference of endonuclease IV from bacteriophage T4, a dC-specific endonuclease implicated in restriction of dC-substituted T4 DNA synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Hirano, Nobutaka; Ohshima, Hiroyuki; Takahashi, Hideo

    2006-01-01

    Endonuclease IV encoded by denB of bacteriophage T4 is implicated in restriction of deoxycytidine (dC)-containing DNA in the host Escherichia coli. The enzyme was synthesized with the use of a wheat germ cell-free protein synthesis system, given a lethal effect of its expression in E.coli cells, and was purified to homogeneity. The purified enzyme showed high activity with single-stranded (ss) DNA and denatured dC-substituted T4 genomic double-stranded (ds) DNA but exhibited no activity with dsDNA, ssRNA or denatured T4 genomic dsDNA containing glucosylated deoxyhydroxymethylcytidine. Characterization of Endo IV activity revealed that the enzyme catalyzed specific endonucleolytic cleavage of the 5′ phosphodiester bond of dC in ssDNA with an efficiency markedly dependent on the surrounding nucleotide sequence. The enzyme preferentially targeted 5′-dTdCdA-3′ but tolerated various combinations of individual nucleotides flanking this trinucleotide sequence. These results suggest that Endo IV preferentially recognizes short nucleotide sequences containing 5′-dTdCdA-3′, which likely accounts for the limited digestion of ssDNA by the enzyme and may be responsible in part for the indispensability of a deficiency in denB for stable synthesis of dC-substituted T4 genomic DNA. PMID:16971463

  14. Ergothioneine, histidine, and two naturally occurring histidine dipeptides as radioprotectors against gamma-irradiation inactivation of bacteriophages T4 and P22

    SciTech Connect

    Hartman, P.E.; Hartman, Z.; Citardi, M.J.

    1988-05-01

    Bacteriophages P22, T4+, and T4os (osmotic shock-resistant mutant with altered capsids) were diluted in 0.85% NaCl and exposed to gamma irradiation (2.79 Gy/min) at room temperature (24 degrees C). T4+ was more sensitive to inactivation than was P22, and the T4os mutant was even more sensitive than T4+. Catalase exhibited a strong protective effect and superoxide dismutase a weaker protection, indicating that H/sub 2/O/sub 2/ or some product derived therefrom was predominant in causing inactivation of plaque formation. Low but significant (0.1-0.3 mM) reduced glutathione (GSH) enhanced phage inactivation, but a higher (1 mM) GSH concentration protected. A similar effect was found for the polyamine, spermidine. In contrast, 0.1 mM L-ergothioneine (2-thiol-L-histidine betaine) exhibited strong protection and 1 mM afforded essentially complete protection. L-Ergothioneine is present in millimolar concentrations in some fungi and is conserved up to millimolar concentrations in critical tissues when consumed by man. L-Histidine and two histidine-containing dipeptides, carnosine and anserine, protected at a concentration of 1 mM, a level at which they are present in striated muscles of various animals.

  15. Semiconservative DNA replication is initiated at a single site in recombination-deficient gene 32 mutants of bacteriophage T4.

    PubMed Central

    Dannenberg, R; Mosig, G

    1981-01-01

    We have investigated, by electron microscopy, replicative intermediate produced early after infection of Escherichia coli with two phage T4 gene 32 mutants (amA453 and tsG26) which replicate their parental DNA but are defective in secondary replications and in moderating the activities of recombination nucleases. Under conditions completely restrictive for progeny production, both of these mutant produced replicative intermediates, each containing a single internal loop. Both branches of these loops were double stranded; i.e., both leading and lagging strands were synthesized. The replicative intermediates of these mutants qualitatively and quantitatively resembled early replicating wild-type T4 chromosomes after solitary infection of E. coli. However, in contrast to intracellular wild-type T4 DNA isolated from multiple infection, the mutant DNAs showed neither multiple branches nor multiple tandem loops. These results demonstrate that a truncated gene 32 protein which consists of less than one-third of the wild-type T4 helix-destabilizing protein can facilitate the functions of T4 replication proteins, specifically those of T4 DNA polymerase and priming proteins. Our results also support the hypothesis that the generation of multiple tandem loops or branches in vegetative T4 DNA depends on recombination (Mosig et al., in B. Alberts, ed., Mechanistic Studies of DNA Replication and Genetic Recombination, p. 527-543, Academic Press, Inc., New York, 1980). Images PMID:7321104

  16. Structural Determinants of Nitroxide Motion in Spin-labeled Proteins: Tertiary Contact and Solvent-inaccessible Sties in Helix G of T4 Lysozyme

    SciTech Connect

    Guo,Z.; Cascio, D.; Hideg, K.; Kalai, T.; Hubbell, W.

    2007-01-01

    A nitroxide side chain (R1) has been substituted at single sites along a helix-turn-helix motif in T4 lysozyme (residues 114-135). Together with previously published data, the new sites reported complete a continuous scan through the motif. Mutants with R1 at sites 115 and 118 were selected for crystallographic analysis to identify the structural origins of the corresponding two-component EPR spectra. At 115, R1 is shown to occupy two rotamers in the room temperature crystal structure, one of which has not been previously reported. The two components in the EPR spectrum apparently arise from differential interactions of the two rotamers with the surrounding structure, the most important of which is a hydrophobic interaction of the nitroxide ring. Interestingly, the crystal structure at 100 K reveals a single rotamer, emphasizing the possibility of rotamer selection in low-temperature crystal structures. Residue 118 is at a solvent-inaccessible site in the protein core, and the structure of 118R1, the first reported for the R1 side chain at a buried site, reveals how the side chain is accommodated in an overpacked core.

  17. Structural Determinants of Nitroxide Motion in Spin-Labeled Proteins: Solvent-Exposed Sites in Helix B of T4 Lysozyme

    SciTech Connect

    Guo,Z.; Cascio, D.; Hideg, K.; Hubbell, W.

    2008-01-01

    Site-directed spin labeling provides a means for exploring structure and dynamics in proteins. To interpret the complex EPR spectra that often arise, it is necessary to characterize the rotamers of the spin-labeled side chain and the interactions they make with the local environment in proteins of known structure. For this purpose, crystal structures have been determined for T4 lysozyme bearing a nitroxide side chain (R1) at the solvent-exposed helical sites 41 and 44 in the B helix. These sites are of particular interest in that the corresponding EPR spectra reveal two dynamic states of R1, one of which is relatively immobilized suggesting interactions of the nitroxide with the environment. The crystal structures together with the effect of mutagenesis of nearest neighbors on the motion of R1 suggest intrahelical interactions of 41R1 with the i + 4 residue and of 44R1 with the i + 1 residue. Such interactions appear to be specific to particular rotamers of the R1 side chain.

  18. A method for distance determination in proteins using a designed metal ion binding site and site-directed spin labeling: evaluation with T4 lysozyme.

    PubMed Central

    Voss, J; Salwiński, L; Kaback, H R; Hubbell, W L

    1995-01-01

    The use of molecular genetics to introduce both a metal ion binding site and a nitroxide spin label into the same protein opens the use of paramagnetic metalnitroxyl interactions to estimate intramolecular distances in a wide variety of proteins. In this report, a His-Xaa3-His metal ion binding motif was introduced at the N terminus of the long interdomain helix of T4 lysozyme (Lys-65 --> His/Gln-69 --> His) of three mutants, each containing a single nitroxide-labeled cysteine residue at position 71, 76, or 80. The results show that Cu(II)-induced relaxation effects on the nitroxide can be quantitatively analyzed in terms of interspin distance in the range of 10-25 A using Redfield theory, as first suggested by Leigh [Leigh, J.S. (1970) J. Chem. Phys. 52, 2608-2612]. Of particular interest is the observation that distances can be determined both under rigid lattice conditions in frozen solution and in the presence of motion of the spins at room temperature under physiological conditions. The method should be particularly attractive for investigating structure in membrane proteins that are difficult to crystallize. In the accompanying paper, the technique is applied to a polytopic membrane protein, lactose permease. Images Fig. 1 PMID:8618888

  19. Computational stability ranking of mutated hydrophobic cores in staphylococcal nuclease and T4 lysozyme using hard-sphere and stereochemical constraints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Virrueta, Alejandro; Zhou, Alice; O'Hern, Corey; Regan, Lynne

    2014-03-01

    Molecular dynamics methods have significantly advanced the understanding of protein folding and stability. However, current force-fields cannot accurately calculate and rank the stability of modified or de novo proteins. One possible reason is that current force-fields use knowledge-based corrections that improve dihedral angle sampling, but do not satisfy the stereochemical constraints for amino acids. I propose the use of simple hard-sphere models for amino acids with stereochemical constraints taken from high-resolution protein crystal structures. This model can enable a correct consideration of the entropy of side-chain rotations, and may be sufficient to predict the effects of single residue mutations in the hydrophobic cores of staphylococcal nuclease and T4 lysozyme on stability changes. I will computationally count the total number of allowed side-chain conformations Ω and calculate the associated entropy, S = kBln(Ω) , before and after each mutation. I will then rank the stability of the mutated cores based on my computed entropy changes, and compare my results with structural and thermodynamic data published by the Stites and Matthews groups. If successful, this project will provide a novel framework for the evaluation of entropic protein stabilities, and serve as a possible tool for computational protein design.

  20. Genes 55, alpha gt, 47 and 46 of bacteriophage T4: the genomic organization as deduced by sequence analysis.

    PubMed Central

    Gram, H; Rüger, W

    1985-01-01

    The nucleotide sequence of T4 genes 55, alpha gt, 47 and 46 was determined by a combination of 'classical' procedures and a shotgun approach. Small DNA fragments generated by frequent cleavage with restriction enzymes or by sonication of restriction fragments were cloned in phage M13 vectors and sequenced by the dideoxy method. The positions of the genes were determined by marker rescue between the corresponding T4 amber mutants and the cloned T4 DNA fragments used in the sequencing experiments. The sequence gives an insight into the organization of this 7.1-kb early region of the T4 genome and shows that genetically 'silent' portions within this region are not void of genetic information. PMID:4018026

  1. Interaction of Escherichia coli B and B/4 and Bacteriophage T4D with Berea Sandstone Rock in Relation to Enhanced Oil Recovery

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Philip L.; Yen, Teh Fu

    1984-01-01

    Much research and development is needed to recover oil reserves presently unattainable, and microbially enhanced oil recovery is a technology that may be used for this purpose. To address the problem of bacterial contamination in an oil field injection well region, we connected each end of a Teflon-sleeved Berea sandstone rock to a flask containing nutrient medium. By inoculating one flask with Escherichia coli B, we could observe bacterial growth in the uninoculated flask resulting from the transport and establishment of cells across the rock. Differences in bacterial populations occurred depending on whether bacteriophage T4D was first adsorbed to the rock. The results of these experiments indicate that the inhibition of bacterial establishment within a rock matrix is possible via lytic interaction. Some nonlytic effects are also implied by experiments with B/4 cells, which are T4D-resistant mutants of E. coli B. A 10 to 40% retention of T4 by the rock occurred when it was loaded with 105 to 106 PFU. We also describe a lysogenic system for possible use in microbially enhanced oil recovery techniques. PMID:16346492

  2. Interaction of Escherichia coli B and B/4 and Bacteriophage T4D with Berea Sandstone Rock in Relation to Enhanced Oil Recovery.

    PubMed

    Chang, P L; Yen, T F

    1984-03-01

    Much research and development is needed to recover oil reserves presently unattainable, and microbially enhanced oil recovery is a technology that may be used for this purpose. To address the problem of bacterial contamination in an oil field injection well region, we connected each end of a Teflon-sleeved Berea sandstone rock to a flask containing nutrient medium. By inoculating one flask with Escherichia coli B, we could observe bacterial growth in the uninoculated flask resulting from the transport and establishment of cells across the rock. Differences in bacterial populations occurred depending on whether bacteriophage T4D was first adsorbed to the rock. The results of these experiments indicate that the inhibition of bacterial establishment within a rock matrix is possible via lytic interaction. Some nonlytic effects are also implied by experiments with B/4 cells, which are T4D-resistant mutants of E. coli B. A 10 to 40% retention of T4 by the rock occurred when it was loaded with 10 to 10 PFU. We also describe a lysogenic system for possible use in microbially enhanced oil recovery techniques. PMID:16346492

  3. Identification of a family of bacteriophage T4 genes encoding proteins similar to those present in group I introns of fungi and phage.

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, M; Ellis, R L; Hinton, D M

    1992-01-01

    The bacteriophage T4 segA gene lies in a genetically unmapped region between the gene beta gt (beta-glucosyltransferase) and uvsX (recombination protein) and encodes a protein of 221 amino acids. We have found that the first 100 amino acids of the SegA protein are highly similar to the N termini of four other predicted T4 proteins, also of unknown function. Together these five proteins, SegA-E (similar to endonucleases of group I introns), contain regions of similarity to the endonuclease I-Tev I, which is encoded by the mobile group I intron of the T4 td gene, and to putative endonucleases of group I introns present in the mitochondria of Neurospora crassa, Podospora anserina, and Saccharomyces douglasii. Intron-encoded endonucleases are required for the movement (homing) of the intron DNA into an intronless gene, cutting at or near the site of intron insertion. Our in vitro assays indicate that SegA, like I-Tev I, is a Mg(2+)-dependent DNA endonuclease that has preferred sites for cutting. Unlike the I-Tev I gene, however, there is no evidence that segA (or the other seg genes) resides within introns. Thus, it is possible that segA encodes an endonuclease that is involved in the movement of the endonuclease-encoding DNA rather than in the homing of an intron. Images PMID:1631169

  4. Effect of freezing conditions on distances and their distributions derived from Double Electron Electron Resonance (DEER): A study of doubly-spin-labeled T4 lysozyme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Georgieva, Elka R.; Roy, Aritro S.; Grigoryants, Vladimir M.; Borbat, Petr P.; Earle, Keith A.; Scholes, Charles P.; Freed, Jack H.

    2012-03-01

    Pulsed dipolar ESR spectroscopy, DEER and DQC, require frozen samples. An important issue in the biological application of this technique is how the freezing rate and concentration of cryoprotectant could possibly affect the conformation of biomacromolecule and/or spin-label. We studied in detail the effect of these experimental variables on the distance distributions obtained by DEER from a series of doubly spin-labeled T4 lysozyme mutants. We found that the rate of sample freezing affects mainly the ensemble of spin-label rotamers, but the distance maxima remain essentially unchanged. This suggests that proteins frozen in a regular manner in liquid nitrogen faithfully maintain the distance-dependent structural properties in solution. We compared the results from rapidly freeze-quenched (⩽100 μs) samples to those from commonly shock-frozen (slow freeze, 1 s or longer) samples. For all the mutants studied we obtained inter-spin distance distributions, which were broader for rapidly frozen samples than for slowly frozen ones. We infer that rapid freezing trapped a larger ensemble of spin label rotamers; whereas, on the time-scale of slower freezing the protein and spin-label achieve a population showing fewer low-energy conformers. We used glycerol as a cryoprotectant in concentrations of 10% and 30% by weight. With 10% glycerol and slow freezing, we observed an increased slope of background signals, which in DEER is related to increased local spin concentration, in this case due to insufficient solvent vitrification, and therefore protein aggregation. This effect was considerably suppressed in slowly frozen samples containing 30% glycerol and rapidly frozen samples containing 10% glycerol. The assignment of bimodal distributions to tether rotamers as opposed to protein conformations is aided by comparing results using MTSL and 4-Bromo MTSL spin-labels. The latter usually produce narrower distance distributions.

  5. Effect of freezing conditions on distances and their distributions derived from Double Electron Electron Resonance (DEER): a study of doubly-spin-labeled T4 lysozyme.

    PubMed

    Georgieva, Elka R; Roy, Aritro S; Grigoryants, Vladimir M; Borbat, Petr P; Earle, Keith A; Scholes, Charles P; Freed, Jack H

    2012-03-01

    Pulsed dipolar ESR spectroscopy, DEER and DQC, require frozen samples. An important issue in the biological application of this technique is how the freezing rate and concentration of cryoprotectant could possibly affect the conformation of biomacromolecule and/or spin-label. We studied in detail the effect of these experimental variables on the distance distributions obtained by DEER from a series of doubly spin-labeled T4 lysozyme mutants. We found that the rate of sample freezing affects mainly the ensemble of spin-label rotamers, but the distance maxima remain essentially unchanged. This suggests that proteins frozen in a regular manner in liquid nitrogen faithfully maintain the distance-dependent structural properties in solution. We compared the results from rapidly freeze-quenched (≤100 μs) samples to those from commonly shock-frozen (slow freeze, 1 s or longer) samples. For all the mutants studied we obtained inter-spin distance distributions, which were broader for rapidly frozen samples than for slowly frozen ones. We infer that rapid freezing trapped a larger ensemble of spin label rotamers; whereas, on the time-scale of slower freezing the protein and spin-label achieve a population showing fewer low-energy conformers. We used glycerol as a cryoprotectant in concentrations of 10% and 30% by weight. With 10% glycerol and slow freezing, we observed an increased slope of background signals, which in DEER is related to increased local spin concentration, in this case due to insufficient solvent vitrification, and therefore protein aggregation. This effect was considerably suppressed in slowly frozen samples containing 30% glycerol and rapidly frozen samples containing 10% glycerol. The assignment of bimodal distributions to tether rotamers as opposed to protein conformations is aided by comparing results using MTSL and 4-Bromo MTSL spin-labels. The latter usually produce narrower distance distributions. PMID:22341208

  6. Cavity as a Source of Conformational Fluctuation and High-Energy State: High-Pressure NMR Study of a Cavity-Enlarged Mutant of T4Lysozyme

    PubMed Central

    Maeno, Akihiro; Sindhikara, Daniel; Hirata, Fumio; Otten, Renee; Dahlquist, Frederick W.; Yokoyama, Shigeyuki; Akasaka, Kazuyuki; Mulder, Frans A.A.; Kitahara, Ryo

    2015-01-01

    Although the structure, function, conformational dynamics, and controlled thermodynamics of proteins are manifested by their corresponding amino acid sequences, the natural rules for molecular design and their corresponding interplay remain obscure. In this study, we focused on the role of internal cavities of proteins in conformational dynamics. We investigated the pressure-induced responses from the cavity-enlarged L99A mutant of T4 lysozyme, using high-pressure NMR spectroscopy. The signal intensities of the methyl groups in the 1H/13C heteronuclear single quantum correlation spectra, particularly those around the enlarged cavity, decreased with the increasing pressure, and disappeared at 200 MPa, without the appearance of new resonances, thus indicating the presence of heterogeneous conformations around the cavity within the ground state ensemble. Above 200 MPa, the signal intensities of >20 methyl groups gradually decreased with the increasing pressure, without the appearance of new resonances. Interestingly, these residues closely matched those sensing a large conformational change between the ground- and high-energy states, at atmospheric pressure. 13C and 1H NMR line-shape simulations showed that the pressure-induced loss in the peak intensity could be explained by the increase in the high-energy state population. In this high-energy state, the aromatic side chain of F114 gets flipped into the enlarged cavity. The accommodation of the phenylalanine ring into the efficiently packed cavity may decrease the partial molar volume of the high-energy state, relative to the ground state. We suggest that the enlarged cavity is involved in the conformational transition to high-energy states and in the volume fluctuation of the ground state. PMID:25564860

  7. Two-dimensional gel analysis of rolling circle replication in the presence and absence of bacteriophage T4 primase.

    PubMed Central

    Belanger, K G; Mirzayan, C; Kreuzer, H E; Alberts, B M; Kreuzer, K N

    1996-01-01

    The rolling circle DNA replication structures generated by the in vitro phage T4 replication system were analyzed using two-dimensional agarose gels. Replication structures were generated in the presence or absence of T4 primase (gp61), permitting the analysis of replication forks with either duplex or single-stranded tails. A characteristic arc shape was visualized when forks with single-stranded tails were cleaved by a restriction enzyme with the help of an oligonucleotide that anneals to restriction sites in the single-stranded tail. After calibrating the gel system with this well-studied rolling circle replication reaction, we then analyzed the in vivo replication directed by a T4 replication origin cloned within a plasmid. DNA samples were generated from infections with either wild-type or primase-deletion mutant phage. The only replicative arc that could be detected in the wild-type sample corresponded to duplex Y forms, consistent with very efficient lagging strand synthesis. Surprisingly, we obtained evidence for both duplex and single-stranded DNA tails in the samples from the primase-deficient infection. We conclude that a relatively inefficient mechanism primes lagging strand DNA synthesis in vivo when gp61 is absent. PMID:8668550

  8. Partial replication of UV-irradiated T4 bacteriophage DNA results in amplification of specific genetic areas

    SciTech Connect

    Ling, S.; Vogelbacker, H.H.; Restifo, L.L.; Mattson, T.; Kozinski, A.W.

    1981-11-01

    Upon infection of Escherichia coli with bormodeoxyuridine-labeled T4 phage that had received 10 lethal hits of UV irradiation, a sizable amount of phage DNA was synthesized (approximately 36 phage equivalent units of DNA per infected bacterium), although very little multiplicity reactivation occurs. This progeny DNA was isolated and analyzed. This DNA was biased in its genetic representation, as shown by hybridization to cloned segments of the T4 genome immobilized on nitrocellulose filters. Preferentially amplified areas corresponded to regions containing origins of T4 DNA replication. The size of the progeny DNA increased with time after infection, possibly due to recombination between partial replicas and nonreplicated subunits or due to the gradual overcoming of the UV damage. As the size of the progeny DNA increased, all of the genes were more equally represented, resulting in a decrease in the genetic bias. Amplification of specific genetic areas was also observed upon infection with UV-irradiated, non-bromo-deoxyuridine-substituted (light) phage. However, the genetic bias observed in this case was not as great as that observed with bromodeoxyuridine-substituted phage. This is most likely due to the higher efficiency of multiplicity reactivation of the light phage.

  9. The MotA transcription factor from bacteriophage T4 contains a novel DNA-binding domain : the 'double wing' motif.

    SciTech Connect

    Li, N.; Sickmier, E. A.; Zhang, R.; Joachimiak, A.; White, S. W.; Biosciences Division; St. Jude Children's Research Hospital; Univ. of Tennessee Health Science Center; Corixa Inc.

    2002-01-01

    MotA is a transcription factor from bacteriophage T4 that helps adapt the host Escherichia coli transcription apparatus to T4 middle promoters. We have determined the crystal structure of the C-terminal DNA-binding domain of MotA (MotCF) to 1.6 A resolution using multiwavelength, anomalous diffraction methods. The structure reveals a novel DNA-binding alpha/beta motif that contains an exposed beta-sheet surface that mediates interactions with the DNA. Independent biochemical experiments have shown that MotCF binds to one surface of a single turn of DNA through interactions in adjacent major and minor grooves. We present a model of the interaction in which beta-ribbons at opposite corners of the six-stranded beta-sheet penetrate the DNA grooves, and call the motif a 'double wing' to emphasize similarities to the 'winged-helix' motif. The model is consistent with data on how MotA functions at middle promoters, and provides an explanation for why MotA can form non-specific multimers on DNA.

  10. Mapping the interactions of the single-stranded DNA binding protein of bacteriophage T4 (gp32) with DNA lattices at single nucleotide resolution: gp32 monomer binding.

    PubMed

    Jose, Davis; Weitzel, Steven E; Baase, Walter A; von Hippel, Peter H

    2015-10-30

    Combining biophysical measurements on T4 bacteriophage replication complexes with detailed structural information can illuminate the molecular mechanisms of these 'macromolecular machines'. Here we use the low energy circular dichroism (CD) and fluorescent properties of site-specifically introduced base analogues to map and quantify the equilibrium binding interactions of short (8 nts) ssDNA oligomers with gp32 monomers at single nucleotide resolution. We show that single gp32 molecules interact most directly and specifically near the 3'-end of these ssDNA oligomers, thus defining the polarity of gp32 binding with respect to the ssDNA lattice, and that only 2-3 nts are directly involved in this tight binding interaction. The loss of exciton coupling in the CD spectra of dimer 2-AP (2-aminopurine) probes at various positions in the ssDNA constructs, together with increases in fluorescence intensity, suggest that gp32 binding directly extends the sugar-phosphate backbone of this ssDNA oligomer, particularly at the 3'-end and facilitates base unstacking along the entire 8-mer lattice. These results provide a model (and 'DNA map') for the isolated gp32 binding to ssDNA targets, which serves as the nucleation step for the cooperative binding that occurs at transiently exposed ssDNA sequences within the functioning T4 DNA replication complex. PMID:26275775

  11. Two recombination-dependent DNA replication pathways of bacteriophage T4, and their roles in mutagenesis and horizontal gene transfer

    PubMed Central

    Mosig, Gisela; Gewin, John; Luder, Andreas; Colowick, Nancy; Vo, Daniel

    2001-01-01

    Two major pathways of recombination-dependent DNA replication, “join-copy” and “join-cut-copy,” can be distinguished in phage T4: join-copy requires only early and middle genes, but two late proteins, endonuclease VII and terminase, are uniquely important in the join-cut-copy pathway. In wild-type T4, timing of these pathways is integrated with the developmental program and related to transcription and packaging of DNA. In primase mutants, which are defective in origin-dependent lagging-strand DNA synthesis, the late pathway can bypass the lack of primers for lagging-strand DNA synthesis. The exquisitely regulated synthesis of endo VII, and of two proteins from its gene, explains the delay of recombination-dependent DNA replication in primase (as well as topoisomerase) mutants, and the temperature-dependence of the delay. Other proteins (e.g., the single-stranded DNA binding protein and the products of genes 46 and 47) are important in all recombination pathways, but they interact differently with other proteins in different pathways. These homologous recombination pathways contribute to evolution because they facilitate acquisition of any foreign DNA with limited sequence homology during horizontal gene transfer, without requiring transposition or site-specific recombination functions. Partial heteroduplex repair can generate what appears to be multiple mutations from a single recombinational intermediate. The resulting sequence divergence generates barriers to formation of viable recombinants. The multiple sequence changes can also lead to erroneous estimates in phylogenetic analyses. PMID:11459968

  12. P15 and P3, the Tail Completion Proteins of Bacteriophage T4, Both Form Hexameric Rings

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Li; Kanamaru, Shuji; Chaidirek, Chatree'chalerm; Arisaka, Fumio

    2003-01-01

    Two proteins, gp15 and gp3 (gp for gene product), are required to complete the assembly of the T4 tail. gp15 forms the connector which enables the tail to bind to the head, whereas gp3 is involved in terminating the elongation of the tail tube. In this work, genes 15 and 3 were cloned and overexpressed, and the purified gene products were studied by analytical ultracentrifugation, electron microscopy, and circular dichroism. Determination of oligomerization state by sedimentation equilibrium revealed that both gp15 and gp3 are hexamers of the respective polypeptide chains. Electron microscopy of the negatively stained P15 and P3 (P denotes the oligomeric state of the gene product) revealed that both proteins form hexameric rings, the diameter of which is close to that of the tail tube. The differential roles between gp15 and gp3 upon completion of the tail are discussed. PMID:12591887

  13. Selective inhibition by methoxyamine of the apurinic/apyrimidinic endonuclease activity associated with pyrimidine dimer-DNA glycosylases from Micrococcus luteus and bacteriophage T4

    SciTech Connect

    Liuzzi, M.; Weinfeld, M.; Paterson, M.C.

    1987-06-16

    The UV endonucleases from Micrococcus luteus and bacteriophage T4 possess two catalytic activities specific for the site of cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers in UV-irradiated DNA: a DNA glycosylase that cleaves the 5'-glycosyl bond of the dimerized pyrimidines and an apurinic/apyrimidinic (AP) endonuclease that thereupon incises the phosphodiester bond 3' to the resulting apyrimidinic site. The authors have explored the potential use of methoxyamine, a chemical that reacts at neutral pH with AP sites in DNA, as a selective inhibitor of the AP endonuclease activities residing in the M. luteus and T4 enzymes. The presence of 50 mM methoxyamine during incubation of UV-treated, (/sup 3/H)thymine-labeled poly(dA) x poly(dT) with either enzyme preparation was found to protect completely the irradiated copolymer from endonucleolytic attack at dimer sites, as assayed by yield of acid-soluble radioactivity. In contrast, the dimer-DNA glycosylase activity of each enzyme remained fully functional, as monitored retrospectively by release of free thymine after either photochemical-(5 kJ/m/sup 2/, 254 nm) or photoenzymic- (Escherichia coli photolyase plus visible light) induced reversal of pyrimidine dimers in the UV-damaged substrate. The data demonstrate that the inhibition of the strand-incision reaction arises because of chemical modification of the AP sites and is not due to inactivation of the enzyme by methoxyamine. The results, combined with earlier findings for 5'-acting AP endonucleases, strongly suggest that methoxyamine is a highly specific inhibitor of virtually all AP endonucleases, irrespective of their modes of action, and may therefore prove useful in a wide variety of DNA repair studies.

  14. In vitro binding of anthrax protective antigen on bacteriophage T4 capsid surface through Hoc-capsid interactions: A strategy for efficient display of large full-length proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Shivachandra, Sathish B.; Rao, Mangala; Janosi, Laszlo; Sathaliyawala, Taheri; Matyas, Gary R.; Alving, Carl R.; Leppla, Stephen H.; Rao, Venigalla B. . E-mail: rao@cua.edu

    2006-02-05

    An in vitro binding system is described to display large full-length proteins on bacteriophage T4 capsid surface at high density. The phage T4 icosahedral capsid features 155 copies of a nonessential highly antigenic outer capsid protein, Hoc, at the center of each major capsid protein hexon. Gene fusions were engineered to express the 83-kDa protective antigen (PA) from Bacillus anthracis fused to the N-terminus of Hoc and the 130-kDa PA-Hoc protein was expressed in Escherichia coli and purified. The purified PA-Hoc was assembled in vitro on hoc {sup -} phage particles. Binding was specific, stable, and of high affinity. This defined in vitro system allowed manipulation of the copy number of displayed PA and imposed no significant limitation on the size of the displayed antigen. In contrast to in vivo display systems, the in vitro approach allows all the capsid binding sites to be occupied by the 130-kDa PA-Hoc fusion protein. The PA-T4 particles were immunogenic in mice in the absence of an adjuvant, eliciting strong PA-specific antibodies and anthrax lethal toxin neutralizing antibodies. The in vitro display on phage T4 offers a novel platform for potential construction of customized vaccines against anthrax and other infectious diseases.

  15. Control of Escherichia coli O157 on beef at 37, 22 and 4 °C by T5-, T1-, T4-and O1-like bacteriophages.

    PubMed

    Liu, H; Niu, Y D; Meng, R; Wang, J; Li, J; Johnson, R P; McAllister, T A; Stanford, K

    2015-10-01

    Efficacy of four bacteriophages (phages) and a cocktail for biocontrol of Escherichia coli O157 was assessed on beef samples stored at 4, 22 and 37 °C. Samples (3 × 3 × 1 cm) were contaminated with E. coli O157 (10(4) CFU/cm(2)) and treated with single phages: T5-like (T5), T1-like (T1), T4-like (T4) and O1-like (O1), or a cocktail at two titers: multiplicity of infection (MOI) = 1000 and MOI = 10. In contrast to previous studies, use of virucidal solution prevented over-estimation of phage efficacy. Irrespective of temperature and MOIs, T5 was most (P < 0.001) and O1 least (P < 0.05) effective for biocontrol of E. coli O157, with relative efficacy of other phages temperature dependent. At 4 °C, T1 (P < 0.05) and cocktail (P < 0.001) were more effective than T4. In contrast, T4 was equally (P = 0.08, at 37 °C) or less effective (P = 0.003, at 22 °C) than T5. Phages were more effective (P < 0.001) against E. coli O157 at warmer temperatures and high MOI. As the beef supply chain includes hours of storage or transport at temperatures near 4 °C, this study demonstrates phages could significantly reduce E. coli O157 during this period. PMID:26187829

  16. Regulation of Two Nested Proteins from Gene 49 (Recombination Endonuclease Vii) and of a λ Rexa-like Protein of Bacteriophage T4

    PubMed Central

    Barth, K. A.; Powell, D.; Trupin, M.; Mosig, G.

    1988-01-01

    Phage T4 gene 49, encoding recombination endonuclease VII, specifies, by initiation from an AUG and an internal GUG codon, two in-frame overlapping peptides (of 18 and 12 kD). The gene is transcribed early and late, albeit from different promoters. The sequence predicts that in long early transcripts, initiated far upstream of the coding sequence, the Shine-Dalgarno sequence of the first ribosome binding site can be sequestered in a hairpin and/or cleaved. These processes might reduce initiation from the first AUG and facilitate initiation of the 12-kD peptide from the internal GUG. The potential of this hairpin to participate in Y structures or cruciforms suggests possible autoregulation. Shorter, more stable late transcripts initiated from a late promoter immediately upstream of the first ribosome binding site cannot form this hairpin. More efficient translation of the longer 18-kD gene 49 peptide from these late transcripts accounts for the strong dependence of endonuclease VII activity on late gene expression. An ORF downstream from gene 49 can be translated from a motA-dependent transcript that starts inside gene 49 as well as from the gene 49 transcripts. Its initiation codon overlaps the stop codon of gene 49, suggesting some coupling of translation. The deduced protein resembles, among others, the RexA protein of phage λ. Possible implications for T4 recombination and for the interference of λ lysogens with T4 gene 49 and rII mutants are discussed. PMID:2974005

  17. Mapping the interactions of the single-stranded DNA binding protein of bacteriophage T4 (gp32) with DNA lattices at single nucleotide resolution: polynucleotide binding and cooperativity

    PubMed Central

    Jose, Davis; Weitzel, Steven E.; Baase, Walter A.; Michael, Miya M.; von Hippel, Peter H.

    2015-01-01

    We here use our site-specific base analog mapping approach to study the interactions and binding equilibria of cooperatively-bound clusters of the single-stranded DNA binding protein (gp32) of the T4 DNA replication complex with longer ssDNA (and dsDNA) lattices. We show that in cooperatively bound clusters the binding free energy appears to be equi-partitioned between the gp32 monomers of the cluster, so that all bind to the ssDNA lattice with comparable affinity, but also that the outer domains of the gp32 monomers at the ends of the cluster can fluctuate on and off the lattice and that the clusters of gp32 monomers can slide along the ssDNA. We also show that at very low binding densities gp32 monomers bind to the ssDNA lattice at random, but that cooperatively bound gp32 clusters bind preferentially at the 5′-end of the ssDNA lattice. We use these results and the gp32 monomer-binding results of the companion paper to propose a detailed model for how gp32 might bind to and interact with ssDNA lattices in its various binding modes, and also consider how these clusters might interact with other components of the T4 DNA replication complex. PMID:26275774

  18. Mapping the interactions of the single-stranded DNA binding protein of bacteriophage T4 (gp32) with DNA lattices at single nucleotide resolution: polynucleotide binding and cooperativity.

    PubMed

    Jose, Davis; Weitzel, Steven E; Baase, Walter A; Michael, Miya M; von Hippel, Peter H

    2015-10-30

    We here use our site-specific base analog mapping approach to study the interactions and binding equilibria of cooperatively-bound clusters of the single-stranded DNA binding protein (gp32) of the T4 DNA replication complex with longer ssDNA (and dsDNA) lattices. We show that in cooperatively bound clusters the binding free energy appears to be equi-partitioned between the gp32 monomers of the cluster, so that all bind to the ssDNA lattice with comparable affinity, but also that the outer domains of the gp32 monomers at the ends of the cluster can fluctuate on and off the lattice and that the clusters of gp32 monomers can slide along the ssDNA. We also show that at very low binding densities gp32 monomers bind to the ssDNA lattice at random, but that cooperatively bound gp32 clusters bind preferentially at the 5'-end of the ssDNA lattice. We use these results and the gp32 monomer-binding results of the companion paper to propose a detailed model for how gp32 might bind to and interact with ssDNA lattices in its various binding modes, and also consider how these clusters might interact with other components of the T4 DNA replication complex. PMID:26275774

  19. Phage display of intact domains at high copy number: a system based on SOC, the small outer capsid protein of bacteriophage T4.

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Z. J.; Lewis, G. K.; Wingfield, P. T.; Locke, E. G.; Steven, A. C.; Black, L. W.

    1996-01-01

    Peptides fused to the coat proteins of filamentous phages have found widespread applications in antigen display, the construction of antibody libraries, and biopanning. However, such systems are limited in terms of the size and number of the peptides that may be incorporated without compromising the fusion proteins' capacity to self-assemble. We describe here a system in which the molecules to be displayed are bound to pre-assembled polymers. The polymers are T4 capsids and polyheads (tubular capsid variants) and the display molecules are derivatives of the dispensable capsid protein SOC. In one implementation, SOC and its fusion derivatives are expressed at high levels in Escherichia coli, purified in high yield, and then bound in vitro to separately isolated polyheads. In the other, a positive selection vector forces integration of the modified soc gene into a soc-deleted T4 genome, leading to in vivo binding of the display protein to progeny virions. The system is demonstrated as applied to C-terminal fusions to SOC of (1) a tetrapeptide; (2) the 43-residue V3 loop domain of gp120, the human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV-1) envelope glycoprotein; and (3) poliovirus VP1 capsid protein (312 residues). SOC-V3 displaying phage were highly antigenic in mice and produced antibodies reactive with native gp120. That the fusion protein binds correctly to the surface lattice was attested in averaged electron micrographs of polyheads. The SOC display system is capable of presenting up to approximately 10(3) copies per capsid and > 10(4) copies per polyhead of V3-sized domains. Phage displaying SOC-VP1 were isolated from a 1:10(6) mixture by two cycles of a simple biopanning procedure, indicating that proteins of at least 35 kDa may be accommodated. PMID:8880907

  20. Helicase assembly protein Gp59 of bacteriophage T4: fluorescence anisotropy and sedimentation studies of complexes formed with derivatives of Gp32, the phage ssDNA binding protein.

    PubMed

    Xu, H; Wang, Y; Bleuit, J S; Morrical, S W

    2001-06-26

    The gene 59 protein (gp59) of bacteriophage T4 performs a vital function in phage DNA replication by directing the assembly of gp41, the DNA helicase component of the T4 primosome, onto lagging strand ssDNA at nascent replication forks. The helicase assembly activity of gp59 is required for optimum efficiency of helicase acquisition by the replication fork during strand displacement DNA synthesis and is essential for helicase and primosome assembly during T4 recombination-dependent DNA replication transactions. Of central importance is the ability of gp59 to load the gp41 helicase onto ssDNA previously coated with cooperatively bound molecules of gp32, the T4 ssDNA binding protein. Gp59 heteroassociations with ssDNA, gp32, and gp41 all appear to be essential for this loading reaction. Previous studies demonstrated that a tripartite complex containing gp59 and gp32 simultaneously cooccupying ssDNA is an essential intermediate in gp59-dependent helicase loading; however, the biochemical and structural parameters of gp59-gp32 complexes with or without ssDNA are currently unknown. To better understand gp59-gp32 interactions, we performed fluorescence anisotropy and analytical ultracentrifugation experiments employing native or rhodamine-labeled gp59 species in combination with altered forms of gp32, allowing us to determine their binding parameters, shape parameters, and other hydrodynamic properties. Two truncated forms of gp32 were used: gp32-B, which lacks the N-terminal B-domain required for cooperative binding to ssDNA and for stable self-association, and A-domain fragment, which is the C-terminal peptide of gp32 lacking ssDNA binding ability. Results indicate that gp59 binds with high affinity to either gp32 derivative to form a 1:1 heterodimer. In both cases, heterodimer formation is accompanied by a conformational change in gp59 which correlates with decreased gp59-DNA binding affinity. Hydrodynamic modeling suggests an asymmetric prolate ellipsoid shape for gp

  1. Effect of the “Ribonucleic Acid Control” Locus in Escherichia coli on T4 Bacteriophage-Specific Ribonucleic Acid Synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Sköld, Ola

    1970-01-01

    Amino acid control of ribonucleic acid (RNA) synthesis in bacteria is known to be governed genetically by the rel locus. We investigated whether the rel gene of the host would also exert its effect on the regulation of phage-specific RNA synthesis in T4 phage-infected Escherichia coli cells. Since T-even phage infection completely shuts off host macromolecular synthesis, phage RNA synthesis could be followed specifically by the cumulative incorporation of radioactivity from labeled precursors into RNA of infected cells. Labeled uracil was shown to accumulate in phage-specific RNA for 30 to 35 min after infection, a phenomenon which probably reflects an expansion of the labile phage-RNA pool. Amino acid starvation was effected by the use of auxotrophic bacterial strains or thienylalanine. The latter substance is an amino acid analogue which induces a chemical auxotrophy by inhibiting the biosynthesis of phenylalanine, tyrosine, and tryptophan. Phage RNA synthesis was strictly dependent on the presence of amino acids, whereas phage deoxyribonucleic acid synthesis was not. By the use of several pairs of bacterial strains which were isogenic except for the rel gene, it was demonstrated that amino acid dependence was related to the allelic state of this gene. If the rel gene was mutated, amino acid starvation did not restrict phage RNA synthesis. PMID:4914097

  2. Measurement of steady-state kinetic parameters for DNA unwinding by the bacteriophage T4 Dda helicase: use of peptide nucleic acids to trap single-stranded DNA products of helicase reactions

    PubMed Central

    Nanduri, Bindu; Eoff, Robert L.; Tackett, Alan J.; Raney, Kevin D.

    2001-01-01

    Measurement of steady-state rates of unwinding of double-stranded oligonucleotides by helicases is hampered due to rapid reannealing of the single-stranded DNA products. Including an oligonucleotide in the reaction mixture which can hybridize with one of the single strands can prevent reannealing. However, helicases bind to single-stranded DNA, therefore the additional oligonucleotide can sequester the enzyme, leading to slower observed rates for unwinding. To circumvent this problem, the oligonucleotide that serves as a trap was replaced with a strand of peptide nucleic acid (PNA). Fluorescence polarization was used to determine that a 15mer PNA strand does not bind to the bacteriophage T4 Dda helicase. Steady-state kinetic parameters of unwinding catalyzed by Dda were determined by using PNA as a trapping strand. The substrate consisted of a partial duplex with 15 nt of single-stranded DNA and 15 bp. In the presence of 250 nM substrate and 1 nM Dda, the rate of unwinding in the presence of the DNA trapping strand was 0.30 nM s–1 whereas the rate was 1.34 nM s–1 in the presence of the PNA trapping strand. PNA prevents reannealing of single-stranded DNA products, but does not sequester the helicase. This assay will prove useful in defining the complete kinetic mechanism for unwinding of oligonucleotide substrates by this helicase. PMID:11433029

  3. Models for the Binary Complex of Bacteriophage T4 Gp59 Helicase Loading Protein. GP32 Single-Stranded DNA-Binding Protein and Ternary Complex with Pseudo-Y Junction DNA

    SciTech Connect

    Hinerman, Jennifer M.; Dignam, J. David; Mueser, Timothy C.

    2012-04-05

    The bacteriophage T4 gp59 helicase assembly protein (gp59) is required for loading of gp41 replicative helicase onto DNA protected by gp32 single-stranded DNA-binding protein. The gp59 protein recognizes branched DNA structures found at replication and recombination sites. Binding of gp32 protein (full-length and deletion constructs) to gp59 protein measured by isothermal titration calorimetry demonstrates that the gp32 protein C-terminal A-domain is essential for protein-protein interaction in the absence of DNA. Sedimentation velocity experiments with gp59 protein and gp32ΔB protein (an N-terminal B-domain deletion) show that these proteins are monomers but form a 1:1 complex with a dissociation constant comparable with that determined by isothermal titration calorimetry. Small angle x-ray scattering (SAXS) studies indicate that the gp59 protein is a prolate monomer, consistent with the crystal structure and hydrodynamic properties determined from sedimentation velocity experiments. SAXS experiments also demonstrate that gp32ΔB protein is a prolate monomer with an elongated A-domain protruding from the core. Moreover, fitting structures of gp59 protein and the gp32 core into the SAXS-derived molecular envelope supports a model for the gp59 protein-gp32ΔB protein complex. Our earlier work demonstrated that gp59 protein attracts full-length gp32 protein to pseudo-Y junctions. A model of the gp59 protein-DNA complex, modified to accommodate new SAXS data for the binary complex together with mutational analysis of gp59 protein, is presented in the accompanying article (Dolezal, D., Jones, C. E., Lai, X., Brister, J. R., Mueser, T. C., Nossal, N. G., and Hinton, D. M. (2012) J. Biol. Chem. 287, 18596–18607).

  4. Isolation of Lactococcus lactis Mutants Simultaneously Resistant to the Cell Wall-Active Bacteriocin Lcn972, Lysozyme, Nisin, and Bacteriophage c2

    PubMed Central

    Roces, Clara; Courtin, Pascal; Kulakauskas, Saulius; Rodríguez, Ana; Chapot-Chartier, Marie-Pierre

    2012-01-01

    Lactococcin 972 (Lcn972) is a nonlantibiotic bacteriocin that inhibits cell wall biosynthesis by binding to lipid II. In this work, two mutants resistant to Lcn972, Lactococcus lactis D1 and D1-20, with high (>320 arbitrary units [AU]/ml) and low (80 AU/ml) susceptibilities, respectively, have been isolated. Resistance to Lcn972 did not impose a burden to growth under laboratory conditions, nor did it substantially alter the physicochemical properties of the cell surface. However, the peptidoglycan of the mutants featured a higher content of muropeptides with tripeptide side chains than the wild-type strain, linking for the first time peptidoglycan remodelling to bacteriocin resistance. Moreover, L. lactis lacking a functional d,d-carboxypeptidase DacA (i.e., with a high content of pentapeptide side chain muropeptides) was shown to be more susceptible to Lcn972. Cross-resistance to lysozyme and nisin and enhanced susceptibility to penicillin G and bacitracin was also observed. Intriguingly, the Lcn972-resistant mutants were not infected by the lytic phage c2 and less efficiently infected by phage sk1. Lack of c2 infectivity was linked to a 22.6-kbp chromosomal deletion encompassing the phage receptor protein gene pip. The deletion also included maltose metabolic genes and the two-component system (TCS) F. However, a clear correlation between these genes and resistance to Lcn972 could not be clearly established, pointing to the presence of as-yet-unidentified mutations that account for Lcn972 resistance. PMID:22504807

  5. Structural analysis of bacteriophage-encoded peptidoglycan hydrolase domain KMV36C: crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Van Hecke, Kristof; Briers, Yves; Derua, Rita; Waelkens, Etienne; Lavigne, Rob; Van Meervelt, Luc

    2008-04-01

    Crystallization and X-ray data collection of the C-terminus of gp36 from bacteriophage ϕKMV (KMV36C) are reported. The C-terminus of gp36 of bacteriophage ϕKMV (KMV36C) functions as a particle-associated muramidase, presumably as part of the injection needle of the ϕKMV genome during infection. Crystals of KMV36C were obtained by hanging-drop vapour diffusion and diffracted to a resolution of 1.6 Å. The crystals belong to the cubic space group P432, with unit-cell parameters a = b = c = 102.52 Å. KMV36C shows 30% sequence identity to T4 lysozyme (PDB code)

  6. Bacteriophage replication modules.

    PubMed

    Weigel, Christoph; Seitz, Harald

    2006-05-01

    Bacteriophages (prokaryotic viruses) are favourite model systems to study DNA replication in prokaryotes, and provide examples for every theoretically possible replication mechanism. In addition, the elucidation of the intricate interplay of phage-encoded replication factors with 'host' factors has always advanced the understanding of DNA replication in general. Here we review bacteriophage replication based on the long-standing observation that in most known phage genomes the replication genes are arranged as modules. This allows us to discuss established model systems--f1/fd, phiX174, P2, P4, lambda, SPP1, N15, phi29, T7 and T4--along with those numerous phages that have been sequenced but not studied experimentally. The review of bacteriophage replication mechanisms and modules is accompanied by a compendium of replication origins and replication/recombination proteins (available as supplementary material online). PMID:16594962

  7. Lysozyme Crystal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    To the crystallographer, this may not be a diamond but it is just as priceless. A Lysozyme crystal grown in orbit looks great under a microscope, but the real test is X-ray crystallography. The colors are caused by polarizing filters. Proteins can form crystals generated by rows and columns of molecules that form up like soldiers on a parade ground. Shining X-rays through a crystal will produce a pattern of dots that can be decoded to reveal the arrangement of the atoms in the molecules making up the crystal. Like the troops in formation, uniformity and order are everything in X-ray crystallography. X-rays have much shorter wavelengths than visible light, so the best looking crystals under the microscope won't necessarily pass muster under the X-rays. In order to have crystals to use for X-ray diffraction studies, crystals need to be fairly large and well ordered. Scientists also need lots of crystals since exposure to air, the process of X-raying them, and other factors destroy them. Growing protein crystals in space has yielded striking results. Lysozyme's structure is well known and it has become a standard in many crystallization studies on Earth and in space.

  8. T4 test

    MedlinePlus

    ... in which the thyroid produces too much hormone) Hypothyroidism (underactive thyroid, in which the thyroid does not ... normal level of T4 may be due to: Hypothyroidism (including Hashimoto disease and other disorders involving an ...

  9. Antiviral effect of cationic compounds on bacteriophages

    PubMed Central

    Ly-Chatain, Mai H.; Moussaoui, Saliha; Vera, Annabelle; Rigobello, Véronique; Demarigny, Yann

    2013-01-01

    The antiviral activity of several cationic compounds – cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB), chitosan, nisin, and lysozyme – was investigated on the bacteriophage c2 (DNA head and non-contractile tail) infecting Lactococcus strains and the bacteriophage MS2 (F-specific RNA) infecting E. coli. Firstly, these activities were evaluated in a phosphate buffer pH 7 – 10 mM. The CTAB had a virucidal effect on the Lactococcus bacteriophages, but not on the MS2. After 1 min of contact with 0.125 mM CTAB, the c2 population was reduced from 6 to 1.5 log(pfu)/mL and completely deactivated at 1 mM. On the contrary, chitosan inhibited the MS2 more than it did the bacteriophages c2. No antiviral effect was observed for the nisin or the lysozyme on bacteriophages after 1 min of treatment. A 1 and 2.5 log reduction was respectively observed for nisin and lysozyme when the treatment time increased (5 or 10 min). These results showed that the antiviral effect depended both on the virus and structure of the antimicrobial compounds. The antiviral activity of these compounds was also evaluated in different physico-chemical conditions and in complex matrices. The antiviral activity of CTAB was impaired in acid pH and with an increase of the ionic strength. These results might be explained by the electrostatic interactions between cationic compounds and negatively charged particles such as bacteriophages or other compounds in a matrix. Milk proved to be protective suggesting the components of food could interfere with antimicrobial compounds. PMID:23487495

  10. Lysozyme synthesis in osteoclasts.

    PubMed

    Hilliard, T J; Meadows, G; Kahn, A J

    1990-12-01

    Osteoclasts may or may not be directly related to monocytes and macrophages, but it is well established that these cell types share a number of features in common. In the present study we sought to extend this comparison by assessing lysozyme synthesis in osteoclasts, an enzyme known to be produced and secreted in large amounts by monocytes and macrophages. Our data show that freshly isolated chicken osteoclasts and osteoclasts in situ contain an abundant amount of lysozyme and correspondingly high steady-state levels of the enzyme's messenger RNA. Marrow macrophages, at various stages of in vitro maturation, also possess lysozyme mRNA but in amounts approximately two to four times lower than osteoclasts. These observations reaffirm the monocyte-macrophage nature of the osteoclast but raise questions about the function of the lysozyme in this cell. At present, the role of the lysozyme in osteoclast activity remains unexplained. PMID:1706132

  11. A novel approach for separating bacteriophages from other bacteriophages using affinity chromatography and phage display

    PubMed Central

    Ceglarek, Izabela; Piotrowicz, Agnieszka; Lecion, Dorota; Miernikiewicz, Paulina; Owczarek, Barbara; Hodyra, Katarzyna; Harhala, Marek; Górski, Andrzej; Dąbrowska, Krystyna

    2013-01-01

    Practical applications of bacteriophages in medicine and biotechnology induce a great need for technologies of phage purification. None of the popular methods offer solutions for separation of a phage from another similar phage. We used affinity chromatography combined with competitive phage display (i) to purify T4 bacteriophage from bacterial debris and (ii) to separate T4 from other contaminating bacteriophages. In ‘competitive phage display’ bacterial cells produced both wild types of the proteins (expression from the phage genome) and the protein fusions with affinity tags (expression from the expression vectors). Fusion proteins were competitively incorporated into the phage capsid. It allowed effective separation of T4 from a contaminating phage on standard affinity resins. PMID:24225840

  12. Molecular Biology and Biotechnology of Bacteriophage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Onodera, Kazukiyo

    The development of the molecular biology of bacteriophage such as T4, lambda and filamentous phages was described and the process that the fundamental knowledge obtained in this field has subsequently led us to the technology of phage display was introduced.

  13. LPS-Activated Monocytes Are Unresponsive to T4 Phage and T4-Generated Escherichia coli Lysate

    PubMed Central

    Bocian, Katarzyna; Borysowski, Jan; Zarzycki, Michał; Wierzbicki, Piotr; Kłosowska, Danuta; Weber-Dąbrowska, Beata; Korczak-Kowalska, Grażyna; Górski, Andrzej

    2016-01-01

    A growing body of data shows that bacteriophages can interact with different kinds of immune cells. The objective of this study was to investigate whether T4 bacteriophage and T4-generated Escherichia coli lysate affect functions of monocytes, the key population of immune cells involved in antibacterial immunity. To that end, we evaluated how T4 and E. coli lysate influence the expression of main costimulatory molecules including CD40, CD80 and CD86, TLR2, TLR4 on monocytes, as well as the production of IL-6 and IL-12 in cultures of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs). Separate experiments were performed on unactivated and LPS-activated PBMCs cultures. Both studied preparations significantly increased the percentage of CD14+CD16-CD40+ and CD14+CD16-CD80+ monocytes in unactivated PBMCs cultures, as well as the concentration of IL-6 and IL-12 in culture supernates. However, neither purified T4 nor E. coli lysate had any significant effect on monocytes in LPS-activated PBMCs cultures. We conclude that LPS-activated monocytes are unresponsive to phages and products of phage-induced lysis of bacteria. This study is highly relevant to phage therapy because it suggests that in patients with infections caused by Gram-negative bacteria the administration of phage preparations to patients and lysis of bacteria by phages are not likely to overly stimulate monocytes.

  14. Rate of Lysozyme Crystallization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baird, J. K.; Clunie, J. C.

    1997-03-01

    We have observed the following: Free solution measurements of the electrophoretic mobility of hen egg-white lysozyme crystals grown in aqueous NaCl at 10 deg C at pH values between 3.6 and 5.7 demonstrate that the crystals are positively charged.(J.K. Baird, A.M. Holmes, and J.C. Clunie, Bull.Am.Phys.Soc. 41, 620 (1996)) (2) When the decaying concentration of uncrystallized lysozyme in the growth solution is monitored as a function of time, the log of the half-life decreases linearly with the square-root of the ionic strength. (3) Acid-base titration shows that lysozyme molecules in solution exist as highly charged cations.(R. Roxby and C. Tanford, Biochemistry 10, 3348 (1971)) These three observations combine to suggest that lysozyme crystallizes by addition of lysozyme cations to positively charged crystal nuclei and that the rate is accelerated by the presence of strong electrolytes.

  15. Chlamydia bacteriophages.

    PubMed

    Śliwa-Dominiak, Joanna; Suszyńska, Ewa; Pawlikowska, Małgorzata; Deptuła, Wiesław

    2013-11-01

    Phages are called "good viruses" due to their ability to infect and kill pathogenic bacteria. Chlamydia are small, Gram-negative (G-) microbes that can be dangerous to human and animals. In humans, these bacteria are etiological agents of diseases such as psittacosis or respiratory tract diseases, while in animals, the infection may result in enteritis in cattle and chronic bowel diseases, as well as miscarriages in sheep. The first-known representative of chlamydiaphages was Chp1. It was discovered in Chlamydia psittaci isolates. Since then, four more species of chlamydiaphages have been identified [Chp2, Chp3, φCPG1 φCPAR39 (φCpn1) and Chp4]. All of them were shown to infect Chlamydia species. This paper described all known chlamydiaphages. They were characterised in terms of origin, host range, and their molecular structure. The review concerns the characterisation of bacteriophages that infects pathogenic and dangerous bacteria with unusual, intracellular life cycles that are pathogenic. In the era of antibiotic resistance, it is difficult to cure chlamydophilosis. Those bacteriophages can be an alternative to antibiotics, but before this happens, we need to get to know chlamydiaphages better. PMID:23903989

  16. Template reporter bacteriophage platform and multiple bacterial detection assays based thereon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodridge, Lawrence (Inventor)

    2007-01-01

    The invention is a method for the development of assays for the simultaneous detection of multiple bacteria. A bacteria of interest is selected. A host bacteria containing plasmid DNA from a T even bacteriophage that infects the bacteria of interest is infected with T4 reporter bacteriophage. After infection, the progeny bacteriophage are plating onto the bacteria of interest. The invention also includes single-tube, fast and sensitive assays which utilize the novel method.

  17. Lysozyme mediated calcium carbonate mineralization.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaoqiang; Sun, Hailing; Xia, Yongqing; Chen, Cuixia; Xu, Hai; Shan, Honghong; Lu, Jian R

    2009-04-01

    Lysozyme, a major component of egg white proteins, has been speculated to participate in the calcification of avian eggshells. However, its detailed role during the eggshell formation is not well understood. In this work, the influence of lysozyme on the precipitation of CaCO(3) has been investigated using a combined study of FTIR, XRD, and SEM. The precipitation was produced from (NH(4))(2)CO(3) vapor diffusion into CaCl(2) aqueous solution using a specially built chamber. In the absence of lysozyme, hexagonal platelets of vaterite and their spherical aggregates dominated the precipitates during the first 3-12 h crystallization period studied, with the (001) crystal face well expressed in the hexagonal direction. In contrast, calcite was favored to precipitate in the presence of lysozyme during the same period and the effect was found to be proportional to lysozyme concentration. Furthermore, the (110) face of calcite was expressed in addition to the common (104) face, and the morphological modification was also lysozyme concentration dependent. We attributed these phenomena to the selective adsorption of ammonium ions and lysozyme onto different crystal faces. Our findings have clearly revealed the concentration and face dependent role of lysozyme in CaCO(3) precipitation. This, together with the abundance of lysozyme in the uterine fluid, implies its direct contribution to the hierarchical structures of calcite during the initial stage of eggshell formation. PMID:19167007

  18. [Cloning and expression of bacteriophage FMV lysocyme gene in cells of yeasts Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Pichia pastoris].

    PubMed

    Kozlov, D G; Cheperigin, S E; Chestkov, A V; Krylov, V N; Tsygankov, Iu D

    2010-03-01

    Cloning, sequencing, and expression of the gene for soluble lysozyme of bacteriophage FMV from Gram-negative Pseudomonas aeruginosa bacteria were conducted in yeast cells. Comparable efficiency of two lysozyme expression variants (as intracellular or secreted proteins) was estimated in cells of Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Pichia pastoris. Under laboratory conditions, yeast S. cerevisiae proved to be more effective producer of phage lysozyme than P. pastoris, the yield of the enzyme in the secreted form being significantly higher than that produced in the intracellular form. PMID:20391778

  19. Unravelling the structure of the pneumococcal autolytic lysozyme

    PubMed Central

    Monterroso, Begoña; López-Zumel, Consuelo; García, José L.; Sáiz, José L.; García, Pedro; Campillo, Nuria E.; Menéndez, Margarita

    2005-01-01

    The LytC lysozyme of Streptococcus pneumoniae forms part of the autolytic system of this important pathogen. This enzyme is composed of a C-terminal CM (catalytic module), belonging to the GH25 family of glycosyl hydrolases, and an N-terminal CBM (choline-binding module), made of eleven homologous repeats, that specifically recognizes the choline residues that are present in pneumococcal teichoic and lipoteichoic acids. This arrangement inverts the general assembly pattern of the major pneumococcal autolysin, LytA, and the lytic enzymes encoded by pneumococcal bacteriophages that place the CBM (made of six repeats) at the C-terminus. In the present paper, a three-dimensional model of LytC built by homology modelling of each module and consistent with spectroscopic and hydrodynamic studies is shown. In addition, the putative catalytic-pair residues are identified. Despite the inversion in the modular arrangement, LytC and the bacteriophage-encoded Cpl-1 lysozyme most probably adopt a similar global fold. However, the distinct choline-binding ability and their substrate-binding surfaces may reflect a divergent evolution directed by the different roles played by them in the host (LytC) or in the bacteriophage (Cpl-1). The tight binding of LytC to the pneumococcal envelope, mediated by the acquisition of additional choline-binding repeats, could facilitate the regulation of the potentially suicidal activity of this autolysin. In contrast, a looser attachment of Cpl-1 to the cell wall and the establishment of more favourable interactions between its highly negatively charged catalytic surface and the positively charged chains of pneumococcal murein could enhance the lytic activity of the parasite-encoded enzyme and therefore liberation of the phage progeny. PMID:15943581

  20. Structure of the Small Outer Capsid Protein, Soc: A Clamp for Stabilizing Capsids of T4-like Phages

    SciTech Connect

    Qin, Li; Fokine, Andrei; O'Donnell, Erin; Rao, Venigalla B.; Rossmann, Michael G.

    2010-07-22

    Many viruses need to stabilize their capsid structure against DNA pressure and for survival in hostile environments. The 9-kDa outer capsid protein (Soc) of bacteriophage T4, which stabilizes the virus, attaches to the capsid during the final stage of maturation. There are 870 Soc molecules that act as a 'glue' between neighboring hexameric capsomers, forming a 'cage' that stabilizes the T4 capsid against extremes of pH and temperature. Here we report a 1.9 {angstrom} resolution crystal structure of Soc from the bacteriophage RB69, a close relative of T4. The RB69 crystal structure and a homology model of T4 Soc were fitted into the cryoelectron microscopy reconstruction of the T4 capsid. This established the region of Soc that interacts with the major capsid protein and suggested a mechanism, verified by extensive mutational and biochemical studies, for stabilization of the capsid in which the Soc trimers act as clamps between neighboring capsomers. The results demonstrate the factors involved in stabilizing not only the capsids of T4-like bacteriophages but also many other virus capsids.

  1. BACTERIOPHAGE: BIOLOGY AND GENETICS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Bacteriophage are viruses that infect bacteria. Bacteriophage are very small and made up of a protein coat with an inner core containing their genetic material. They infect bacterium, by attaching to the bacterial cell and injecting their nucleic acids into the bacteria. The phages then use the bac...

  2. Bacteriophages Infecting Propionibacterium acnes

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Viruses specifically infecting bacteria, or bacteriophages, are the most common biological entity in the biosphere. As such, they greatly influence bacteria, both in terms of enhancing their virulence and in terms of killing them. Since the first identification of bacteriophages in the beginning of the 20th century, researchers have been fascinated by these microorganisms and their ability to eradicate bacteria. In this review, we will cover the history of the Propionibacterium acnes bacteriophage research and point out how bacteriophage research has been an important part of the research on P. acnes itself. We will further discuss recent findings from phage genome sequencing and the identification of phage sequence signatures in clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPRs). Finally, the potential to use P. acnes bacteriophages as a therapeutic strategy to combat P. acnes-associated diseases will be discussed. PMID:23691509

  3. The Tape Measure Protein of the Staphylococcus aureus Bacteriophage vB_SauS-phiIPLA35 Has an Active Muramidase Domain

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez-Rubio, Lorena; Gutiérrez, Dolores; Martínez, Beatriz; Rodríguez, Ana; Götz, Friedrich

    2012-01-01

    Tailed double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) bacteriophages frequently harbor structural proteins displaying peptidoglycan hydrolytic activities. The tape measure protein from Staphylococcus aureus bacteriophage vB_SauS-phiIPLA35 has a lysozyme-like and a peptidase_M23 domain. This report shows that the lysozyme-like domain (TG1) has muramidase activity and exhibits in vitro lytic activity against live S. aureus cells, an activity that could eventually find use in the treatment of infections. PMID:22729533

  4. Cloning and characterization of bacteriophage-like DNA from Haemophilus somnus homologous to phages P2 and HP1.

    PubMed Central

    Pontarollo, R A; Rioux, C R; Potter, A A

    1997-01-01

    In an attempt to identify and characterize components of a heme uptake system of Haemophilus somnus, an Escherichia coli cosmid library of H. somnus genomic DNA was screened for the ability to bind hemin (Hmb+). The Hmb+ phenotype was associated with a 7,814-bp HindIII fragment of H. somnus DNA that was subcloned and sequenced. Thirteen open reading frames (orfs) were identified, all transcribed in one direction, and transposon mutagenesis identified orf7 as the gene associated with the Hmb+ phenotype. Orf7 (178 amino acids) has extensive homology with the lysozymes of bacteriophages P-A2, P21, P22, PZA, phi-29, phi-vML3, T4, or HP1. The orf7 gene complemented the lytic function of the K gene of phage P2 and the R gene of phage lambda. A lysozyme assay using supernatants from whole-cell lysates of E. coli cultures harboring plasmid pRAP501 or pGCH2 (both of which express the orf7 gene product) exhibited significant levels of lysozyme activity. The orf6 gene upstream of orf7 has the dual start motif common to the holins encoded by lambdoid S genes, and the orf6 gene product has significant homology to the holins of phages HP1 and P21. When expressed from a tac promoter, the orf6 gene product caused immediate cell death without lysis, while cultures expressing the orf7 gene product grew at normal rates but lysed immediately after the addition of chloroform. Based on this data, we concluded that the Hmb+ phenotype was an artifact resulting from the expression of cloned lysis genes which were detrimental to the E. coli host. The DNA flanking the cloned lysis genes contains orfs that are similar to structural and DNA packaging genes of phage P2. Polyclonal antiserum against Orf2, which is homologous to the major capsid precursor protein (gpN) of phage P2, detected a 40,000-M(r) protein expressed from pRAP401 but did not detect Orf2 in H. somnus, lysates. The phage-like DNA was detected in the serum-susceptible preputial strains HS-124P and HS-127P but was absent from

  5. Protein determinants of phage T4 lysis inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Moussa, Samir H; Kuznetsov, Vladimir; Tran, Tram Anh T; Sacchettini, James C; Young, Ry

    2012-01-01

    Genetic studies have established that lysis inhibition in bacteriophage T4 infections occurs when the RI antiholin inhibits the lethal hole-forming function of the T holin. The T-holin is composed of a single N-terminal transmembrane domain and a ∼20 kDa periplasmic domain. It accumulates harmlessly throughout the bacteriophage infection cycle until suddenly causing permeabilization of the inner membrane, thereby initiating lysis. The RI antiholin has a SAR domain that directs its secretion to the periplasm, where it can either be inactivated and degraded or be activated as a specific inhibitor of T. Previously, it was shown that the interaction of the soluble domains of these two proteins within the periplasm was necessary for lysis inhibition. We have purified and characterized the periplasmic domains of both T and RI. Both proteins were purified in a modified host that allows disulfide bond formation in the cytoplasm, due to the functional requirement of conserved disulfide bonds. Analytical centrifugation and circular dichroism spectroscopy showed that RI was monomeric and exhibited ∼80% alpha-helical content. In contrast, T exhibited a propensity to oligomerize and precipitate at high concentrations. Incubation of RI with T inhibits this aggregation and results in a complex of equimolar T and RI content. Although gel filtration analysis indicated a complex mass of 45 kDa, intermediate between the predicted 30 kDa heterodimer and 60 kDa heterotetramer, sedimentation velocity analysis indicated that the predominant species is the former. These results suggest that RI binding to T is necessary and sufficient for lysis inhibition. PMID:22389108

  6. Structure of the T4 baseplate and its function in triggering sheath contraction.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Nicholas M I; Prokhorov, Nikolai S; Guerrero-Ferreira, Ricardo C; Shneider, Mikhail M; Browning, Christopher; Goldie, Kenneth N; Stahlberg, Henning; Leiman, Petr G

    2016-05-19

    Several systems, including contractile tail bacteriophages, the type VI secretion system and R-type pyocins, use a multiprotein tubular apparatus to attach to and penetrate host cell membranes. This macromolecular machine resembles a stretched, coiled spring (or sheath) wound around a rigid tube with a spike-shaped protein at its tip. A baseplate structure, which is arguably the most complex part of this assembly, relays the contraction signal to the sheath. Here we present the atomic structure of the approximately 6-megadalton bacteriophage T4 baseplate in its pre- and post-host attachment states and explain the events that lead to sheath contraction in atomic detail. We establish the identity and function of a minimal set of components that is conserved in all contractile injection systems and show that the triggering mechanism is universally conserved. PMID:27193680

  7. Bacteriophage therapy against Enterobacteriaceae.

    PubMed

    Xu, Youqiang; Liu, Yong; Liu, Yang; Pei, Jiangsen; Yao, Su; Cheng, Chi

    2015-02-01

    The Enterobacteriaceae are a class of gram-negative facultative anaerobic rods, which can cause a variety of diseases, such as bacteremia, septic arthritis, endocarditis, osteomyelitis, lower respiratory tract infections, skin and soft-tissue infections, urinary tract infections, intra-abdominal infections and ophthalmic infections, in humans, poultry, animals and fish. Disease caused by Enterobacteriaceae cause the deaths of millions of people every year, resulting in enormous economic loss. Drug treatment is a useful and efficient way to control Enterobacteriaceae infections. However, with the abuse of antibiotics, drug resistance has been found in growing number of Enterobacteriaceae infections and, as such, there is an urgent need to find new methods of control. Bacteriophage therapy is an efficient alternative to antibiotics as it employs a different antibacterial mechanism. This paper summarizes the history of bacteriophage therapy, its bacterial lytic mechanisms, and the studies that have focused on Enterobacteriaceae and bacteriophage therapy. PMID:25662887

  8. Hyperexpansion of RNA Bacteriophage Diversity

    PubMed Central

    Krishnamurthy, Siddharth R.; Janowski, Andrew B.; Zhao, Guoyan; Barouch, Dan; Wang, David

    2016-01-01

    Bacteriophage modulation of microbial populations impacts critical processes in ocean, soil, and animal ecosystems. However, the role of bacteriophages with RNA genomes (RNA bacteriophages) in these processes is poorly understood, in part because of the limited number of known RNA bacteriophage species. Here, we identify partial genome sequences of 122 RNA bacteriophage phylotypes that are highly divergent from each other and from previously described RNA bacteriophages. These novel RNA bacteriophage sequences were present in samples collected from a range of ecological niches worldwide, including invertebrates and extreme microbial sediment, demonstrating that they are more widely distributed than previously recognized. Genomic analyses of these novel bacteriophages yielded multiple novel genome organizations. Furthermore, one RNA bacteriophage was detected in the transcriptome of a pure culture of Streptomyces avermitilis, suggesting for the first time that the known tropism of RNA bacteriophages may include gram-positive bacteria. Finally, reverse transcription PCR (RT-PCR)-based screening for two specific RNA bacteriophages in stool samples from a longitudinal cohort of macaques suggested that they are generally acutely present rather than persistent. PMID:27010970

  9. Hyperexpansion of RNA Bacteriophage Diversity.

    PubMed

    Krishnamurthy, Siddharth R; Janowski, Andrew B; Zhao, Guoyan; Barouch, Dan; Wang, David

    2016-03-01

    Bacteriophage modulation of microbial populations impacts critical processes in ocean, soil, and animal ecosystems. However, the role of bacteriophages with RNA genomes (RNA bacteriophages) in these processes is poorly understood, in part because of the limited number of known RNA bacteriophage species. Here, we identify partial genome sequences of 122 RNA bacteriophage phylotypes that are highly divergent from each other and from previously described RNA bacteriophages. These novel RNA bacteriophage sequences were present in samples collected from a range of ecological niches worldwide, including invertebrates and extreme microbial sediment, demonstrating that they are more widely distributed than previously recognized. Genomic analyses of these novel bacteriophages yielded multiple novel genome organizations. Furthermore, one RNA bacteriophage was detected in the transcriptome of a pure culture of Streptomyces avermitilis, suggesting for the first time that the known tropism of RNA bacteriophages may include gram-positive bacteria. Finally, reverse transcription PCR (RT-PCR)-based screening for two specific RNA bacteriophages in stool samples from a longitudinal cohort of macaques suggested that they are generally acutely present rather than persistent. PMID:27010970

  10. PROTEOLYTIC REMOVAL OF THE CARBOXYL TERMINUS OF THE T4 GENE 32 HELIX-DESTABILIZING PROTEIN ALTERS THE T4 IN VITRO REPLICATION COMPLEX

    SciTech Connect

    Burke, R.L.; Alberts, B.M.; Hosoda, J.

    1980-07-01

    The proteolytic removal of about 60 amino acids from the COOH terminus of the bacteriophage T4 helix-destabilizing protein (gene 32 protein) produces 32*I, a 27,000-dalton fragment which still binds tightly and cooperatively to single-stranded DNA. The substitution of 32*I protein for intact 32 protein in the seven-protein T4 replication complex results in dramatic changes in some of the reactions catalyzed by this in vitro DNA replication system, while leaving others largely unperturbed. (1) Like intact 32 protein, the 32*I protein promotes DNA synthesis by the DNA polymerase when the T4 polymerase accessory proteins (gene 44/62 and 45 proteins) are also present. The host helix-destabilizing protein (Escherichia coli ssb protein) cannot replace the 32*I protein for this synthesis. (2) Unlike intact 32 protein, 32*I protein strongly inhibits DNA synthesis catalyzed by the T4 DNA polymerase alone on a primed single-stranded DNA template. (3) Unlike intact 32 protein, the 32*I protein strongly inhibits RNA primer synthesis catalyzed by the T4 gene 41 and 61 proteins and also reduces the efficiency of RNA primer utilization. As a result, de novo DNA chain starts are blocked completely in the complete T4 replication system, and no lagging strand DNA synthesis occurs. (4) The 32*I protein does not bind to either the T4 DNA polymerase or to the T4 gene 61 protein in the absence of DNA; these associations (detected with intact 32 protein) would therefore appear to be essential for the normal control of 32 protein activity, and to account at least in part for observations 2 and 3, above. We propose that the COOH-terminal domain of intact 32 protein functions to guide its interactions with the T4 DNA polymerase and the T4 gene 61 RNA-priming protein. When this domain is removed, as in 32*I protein, the helix destabilization induced by the protein is controlled inadequately, so that polymerizing enzymes tend to be displaced from the growing 3{prime}-OH end of a

  11. Bacteriophages of Clostridium perfringens

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The specific aims of the book chapter are to: (1) Briefly review the nomenclature of bacteriophages and how these agents are classified. (2) Discuss the problems associated with addition/removal of antibiotics in commercial animal feeds. (3) Provide a brief overview of Clostridium perfringens biolog...

  12. BACTERIOPHAGE THERAPY AND CAMPYLOBACTER

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The book chapter reports efforts to exploit Campylobacter-specific bacteriophages to reduce the numbers of Campylobacter jejuni and C. coli colonizing poultry and contaminating poultry meat products. Controlling campylobacters in poultry represents one of the greatest challenges to the agriculture a...

  13. Scientist prepare Lysozyme Protein Crystal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    Dan Carter and Charles Sisk center a Lysozyme Protein crystal grown aboard the USML-2 shuttle mission. Protein isolated from hen egg-white and functions as a bacteriostatic enzyme by degrading bacterial cell walls. First enzyme ever characterized by protein crystallography. It is used as an excellent model system for better understanding parameters involved in microgravity crystal growth experiments. The goal is to compare kinetic data from microgravity experiments with data from laboratory experiments to study the equilibrium.

  14. BACTERIOPHAGE T4 MULTIPLICATION IN A GLUCOSE-LIMITED ESCHERICHIA COLI BIOFILM. (R825503)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The perspectives, information and conclusions conveyed in research project abstracts, progress reports, final reports, journal abstracts and journal publications convey the viewpoints of the principal investigator and may not represent the views and policies of ORD and EPA. Concl...

  15. Core oligosaccharide of Escherichia coli B-the structure required for bacteriophage T4 recognition.

    PubMed

    Kaszowska, Marta; Niedziela, Tomasz; Maciejewska, Anna; Lukasiewicz, Jolanta; Jachymek, Wojciech; Lugowski, Czeslaw

    2015-09-01

    The structure of Escherichia coli B strain PCM 1935 core oligosaccharide has been investigated by (1)H and (13)C NMR spectroscopy, MALDI-TOF MS and ESI MS(n). It was concluded that the core oligosaccharide is a pentasaccharide with the following structure: ESI MS/MS analysis revealed that the glycine (a minor component) is linked to the →3,7)-l-α-d-Hepp-(1→ residue. PMID:26091777

  16. Characterization of the interactions between the bacteriophage T4 AsiA protein and RNA polymerase.

    PubMed

    Simeonov, Mario F; Bieber Urbauer, Ramona J; Gilmore, Joshua M; Adelman, Karen; Brody, Edward N; Niedziela-Majka, Anita; Minakhin, Leonid; Heyduk, Tomasz; Urbauer, Jeffrey L

    2003-07-01

    The anti-sigma factor AsiA effects a change in promoter specificity of the Escherichia coli RNA polymerase via interactions with two conserved regions of the sigma(70) subunit, denoted 4.1 and 4.2. Free AsiA is a symmetrical homodimer. Here, we show that AsiA is monomeric when bound to sigma(70) and that a subset of the residues that contribute to the homodimer interface also contributes to the interface with sigma(70). AsiA interacts primarily with C-terminal sections of regions 4.1 and 4.2, which show remarkable sequence similarity. An AsiA monomer can simultaneously, and apparently cooperatively, bind both isolated regions 4.1 and 4.2 at preferred, distinct subsites, whereas region 4.1 alone or region 4.2 alone can interact with either subsite. These results suggest structural and functional plasticity in the interaction of AsiA with sigma(70) and support the notion of discrete roles for regions 4.1 and 4.2 in transcription regulation by AsiA. Furthermore, we show that AsiA inhibits recognition of the -35 consensus promoter element by region 4 of sigma(70) indirectly, as the residues on region 4 responsible for AsiA binding are distinct from those involved in DNA binding. Finally, we show that AsiA must directly disrupt the interaction of region 4 with the RNA polymerase beta subunit flap domain, resulting in a distance change between region 2 and region 4 of sigma(70). Thus, a new paradigm for transcription regulation by AsiA is emerging, whereby the distance between the DNA binding domains in sigma(70) is regulated, and promoter recognition specificity is modulated, by mediating the interactions of the sigma region 4 with the beta subunit flap domain. PMID:12820881

  17. Problem-Solving Test: RNA and Protein Synthesis in Bacteriophage-Infected "E. coli" Cells

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Szeberenyi, Jozsef

    2008-01-01

    The classic experiment presented in this problem-solving test was designed to identify the template molecules of translation by analyzing the synthesis of phage proteins in "Escherichia coli" cells infected with bacteriophage T4. The work described in this test led to one of the most seminal discoveries of early molecular biology: it dealt a…

  18. The Relationship between Population T4/TSH Set Point Data and T4/TSH Physiology

    PubMed Central

    Fitzgerald, Stephen Paul; Bean, Nigel Geoffrey

    2016-01-01

    Context. Population studies of the distribution of T4/TSH set points suggest a more complex inverse relationship between T4 and TSH than that suggested by physiological studies. The reasons for the similarities and differences between the curves describing these relationships are unresolved. Methods. We subjected the curve, derived from empiric data, describing the TSH suppression response to T4, and the more mathematically derived curve describing the T4 response to TSH, to the different possible models of population variation. The implied consequences of these in terms of generating a population distribution of T4/TSH equilibrium points (a “population curve”) were generated and compared to the empiric population curve. The physiological responses to primary hypothyroidism and hyperthyroidism were incorporated into the analysis. Conclusions. Though the population curve shows a similarly inverse relationship, it is describing a different relationship than the curve describing the suppression of TSH by T4. The population curve is consistent with the physiological studies of the TSH response to T4 and implies a greater interindividual variation in the positive thyroid T4 response to TSH than in the central inhibitory TSH response to T4. The population curve in the dysthyroid states is consistent with known physiological responses to these states. PMID:27123359

  19. The Relationship between Population T4/TSH Set Point Data and T4/TSH Physiology.

    PubMed

    Fitzgerald, Stephen Paul; Bean, Nigel Geoffrey

    2016-01-01

    Context. Population studies of the distribution of T4/TSH set points suggest a more complex inverse relationship between T4 and TSH than that suggested by physiological studies. The reasons for the similarities and differences between the curves describing these relationships are unresolved. Methods. We subjected the curve, derived from empiric data, describing the TSH suppression response to T4, and the more mathematically derived curve describing the T4 response to TSH, to the different possible models of population variation. The implied consequences of these in terms of generating a population distribution of T4/TSH equilibrium points (a "population curve") were generated and compared to the empiric population curve. The physiological responses to primary hypothyroidism and hyperthyroidism were incorporated into the analysis. Conclusions. Though the population curve shows a similarly inverse relationship, it is describing a different relationship than the curve describing the suppression of TSH by T4. The population curve is consistent with the physiological studies of the TSH response to T4 and implies a greater interindividual variation in the positive thyroid T4 response to TSH than in the central inhibitory TSH response to T4. The population curve in the dysthyroid states is consistent with known physiological responses to these states. PMID:27123359

  20. Cytoplasmic bacteriophage display system

    DOEpatents

    Studier, F.W.; Rosenberg, A.H.

    1998-06-16

    Disclosed are display vectors comprising DNA encoding a portion of a structural protein from a cytoplasmic bacteriophage, joined covalently to a protein or peptide of interest. Exemplified are display vectors wherein the structural protein is the T7 bacteriophage capsid protein. More specifically, in the exemplified display vectors the C-terminal amino acid residue of the portion of the capsid protein is joined to the N-terminal residue of the protein or peptide of interest. The portion of the T7 capsid protein exemplified comprises an N-terminal portion corresponding to form 10B of the T7 capsid protein. The display vectors are useful for high copy number display or lower copy number display (with larger fusion). Compositions of the type described herein are useful in connection with methods for producing a virus displaying a protein or peptide of interest. 1 fig.

  1. Cytoplasmic bacteriophage display system

    DOEpatents

    Studier, F. William; Rosenberg, Alan H.

    1998-06-16

    Disclosed are display vectors comprising DNA encoding a portion of a structural protein from a cytoplasmic bacteriophage, joined covalently to a protein or peptide of interest. Exemplified are display vectors wherein the structural protein is the T7 bacteriophage capsid protein. More specifically, in the exemplified display vectors the C-terminal amino acid residue of the portion of the capsid protein is joined to the N-terminal residue of the protein or peptide of interest. The portion of the T7 capsid protein exemplified comprises an N-terminal portion corresponding to form 10B of the T7 capsid protein. The display vectors are useful for high copy number display or lower copy number display (with larger fusion). Compositions of the type described herein are useful in connection with methods for producing a virus displaying a protein or peptide of interest.

  2. Fluorescence Studies of Lysozyme Nucleation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pusey, Marc L.; Smith, Lori

    1998-01-01

    Fluorescence is one of the most powerful tools available for the study of macromolecules. For example, fluorescence can be used to study self association through methods such as anisotropy (the rotational rate of the molecule in solution), quenching (the accessibility of a bound probe to the bulk solution), and resonance energy transfer (measurement of the distance between two species). Fluorescence can also be used to study the local environment of the probe molecules, and the changes in that environment which accompany crystal nucleation and growth. However fluorescent techniques have been very much underutilized in macromolecular growth studies. One major advantage is that the fluorescent species generally must be at low concentration, typically ca 10-5 to 10-6 M. Thus one can study a very wide range of solution conditions, ranging from very high to very low protein concentration, he latter of which are not readily accessible to scattering techniques. We have prepared a number of fluorescent derivatives of chicken egg white lysozyme (CEWL). Fluorescent probes have been attached to two different sites, ASP 101 and the N-terrninal amine, with a sought for use in different lines of study. Preliminary resonance energy transfer studies have been -carried out using pyrene acetic acid (Ex 340 mn, Em 376 nm) lysozyme as a donor and cascade blue (Ex 377 run, Em 423 nm) labeled lysozyme as an acceptor. The emission of both the pyrene and cascade blue probes was followed as a function of the salt protein concentrations. The data show an increase in cascade blue and a concomitant decrease in the pyrene fluorescence as either the salt or protein concentrations are increased, suggesting that the two species are approaching each other close enough for resonance energy transfer to occur. This data can be analyzed to measure the distance between the probe molecules and, knowing their locations on the protein molecule their distances from and orientations with respect to each

  3. Morphogenesis of the T4 tail and tail fibers

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Remarkable progress has been made during the past ten years in elucidating the structure of the bacteriophage T4 tail by a combination of three-dimensional image reconstruction from electron micrographs and X-ray crystallography of the components. Partial and complete structures of nine out of twenty tail structural proteins have been determined by X-ray crystallography and have been fitted into the 3D-reconstituted structure of the "extended" tail. The 3D structure of the "contracted" tail was also determined and interpreted in terms of component proteins. Given the pseudo-atomic tail structures both before and after contraction, it is now possible to understand the gross conformational change of the baseplate in terms of the change in the relative positions of the subunit proteins. These studies have explained how the conformational change of the baseplate and contraction of the tail are related to the tail's host cell recognition and membrane penetration function. On the other hand, the baseplate assembly process has been recently reexamined in detail in a precise system involving recombinant proteins (unlike the earlier studies with phage mutants). These experiments showed that the sequential association of the subunits of the baseplate wedge is based on the induced-fit upon association of each subunit. It was also found that, upon association of gp53 (gene product 53), the penultimate subunit of the wedge, six of the wedge intermediates spontaneously associate to form a baseplate-like structure in the absence of the central hub. Structure determination of the rest of the subunits and intermediate complexes and the assembly of the hub still require further study. PMID:21129200

  4. Salivary lysozyme in smoking alcohol dependent persons.

    PubMed

    Waszkiewicz, Napoleon; Zalewska-Szajda, Beata; Zalewska, Anna; Waszkiewicz, Magdalena; Szajda, Slawomir Dariusz; Repka, Bernadeta; Szulc, Agata; Kepka, Alina; Minarowska, Alina; Ladny, Jerzy Robert; Zwierz, Krzysztof

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of chronic alcohol intoxication and smoking on the concentration and output of salivary lysozyme. Thirty seven men participated in the study, including 17 male smoking alcohol-dependent patients after chronic alcohol intoxication (AS), and 20 control non-smoking male social drinkers (CNS) with no history of alcohol abuse or smoking. The level of lysozyme was assessed by the radial immunodiffusion method. Significantly lower lysozyme output in the AS group compared to the CNS group was found. Moreover, gingival index was significantly higher in AS than in the CNS group. It appeared that the reduced salivary lysozyme output was more likely the result of ethanol action than smoking. In conclusion, persons addicted to alcohol and nicotine have a poorer periodontal status than non-smoking social drinkers, which may partially be due to the diminished protective effects of lysozyme present in the saliva. PMID:23264227

  5. Immunogenicity Studies of Proteins Forming the T4 Phage Head Surface

    PubMed Central

    Miernikiewicz, Paulina; Piotrowicz, Agnieszka; Hodyra, Katarzyna; Owczarek, Barbara; Lecion, Dorota; Kaźmierczak, Zuzanna; Letarov, Andrey; Górski, Andrzej

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Advances in phage therapy and novel applications of phages in biotechnology encourage interest in phage impact on human and animal immunity. Here we present comparative studies of immunogenic properties of T4 phage head surface proteins gp23*, gp24*, Hoc, and Soc, both as elements of the phage capsid and as isolated agents. Studies comprise evaluation of specific antibodies in the human population, analysis of the proteins' impact on the primary and secondary responses in mice, and the effect of specific antibodies on phage antibacterial activity in vitro and in vivo in mice. In humans, natural antibodies specific to T4-like phages were abundant (81% of investigated sera). Among those, significantly elevated levels of IgG antibodies only against major head protein (gp23*) were found, which probably reflected cross-reactions of T4 with antibodies induced by other T4-like phages. Both IgM and IgG antibodies were induced mostly by gp23* and Hoc, while weak (gp24*) and very weak (Soc) reactivities of other head proteins were noticed. Thus, T4 head proteins that markedly contribute to immunological memory to the phage are highly antigenic outer capsid protein (Hoc) and major capsid protein (gp23*). Specific anti-gp23* and anti-Hoc antibodies substantially decreased T4 phage activity in vitro and to some extent in vivo. Cooperating with antibodies, the immune complement system also contributed to annihilating phages. IMPORTANCE Current descriptions of phage immunogenicity and its biological consequences are still vague and incomplete; thus, the central problem of this work is timely and may have strong practical implications. Here is presented the very first description of the contribution of bacteriophage proteins to immunological memory of the phage. Understanding of interactions between phages and mammalian immunology may help in biotechnological adaptations of phages for therapeutic requirements as well as for better appreciation of phage ecology and their

  6. Lysozyme-Based Antibacterial Nanomotors.

    PubMed

    Kiristi, Melek; Singh, Virendra V; Esteban-Fernández de Ávila, Berta; Uygun, Murat; Soto, Fernando; Aktaş Uygun, Deniz; Wang, Joseph

    2015-09-22

    An effective and rapid bacterial killing nanotechnology strategy based on lysozyme-modified fuel-free nanomotors is demonstrated. The efficient antibacterial property of lysozyme, associated with the cleavage of glycosidic bonds of peptidoglycans present in the bacteria cell wall, has been combined with ultrasound (US)-propelled porous gold nanowire (p-AuNW) motors as biocompatible dynamic bacteria nanofighters. Coupling the antibacterial activity of the enzyme with the rapid movement of these p-AuNWs, along with the corresponding fluid dynamics, promotes enzyme-bacteria interactions and prevents surface aggregation of dead bacteria, resulting in a greatly enhanced bacteria-killing capability. The large active surface area of these nanoporous motors offers a significantly higher enzyme loading capacity compared to nonporous AuNWs, which results in a higher antimicrobial activity against Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. Detailed characterization studies and control experiments provide useful insights into the underlying factors controlling the antibacterial performance of the new dynamic bacteria nanofighters. Rapid and effective killing of the Gram-positive Micrococcus lysodeikticus bacteria (69-84% within 1-5 min) is demonstrated. PMID:26308491

  7. Bacteriophage application to control the contaminated water with Shigella.

    PubMed

    Jun, Jin Woo; Giri, Sib Sankar; Kim, Hyoun Joong; Yun, Sae Kil; Chi, Cheng; Chai, Ji Young; Lee, Byeong Chun; Park, Se Chang

    2016-01-01

    Shigella is one of the most important waterborne and foodborne pathogens around the world. Emergence of antibiotic-resistant Shigella has made the development of alternatives to conventional antibiotics necessary. In this study, a virulent Myoviridae bacteriophage, pSs-1 was isolated from environmental water in South Korea and showed infectivity to S. flexneri as well as S. sonnei strains. One-step growth analysis showed that pSs-1 has a short latent period (25 min) and a large burst size (97 PFU/cell). According to the genomic analysis, pSs-1 contains 164,999 bp of genome with a G + C content of 35.54% and it is considered as a member of the T4-like bacteriophage group. These results showed that pSs-1 may have potential as a biocontrol agent instead of conventional antibiotics for shigellosis. PMID:26971572

  8. Bacteriophage application to control the contaminated water with Shigella

    PubMed Central

    Jun, Jin Woo; Giri, Sib Sankar; Kim, Hyoun Joong; Yun, Sae Kil; Chi, Cheng; Chai, Ji Young; Lee, Byeong Chun; Park, Se Chang

    2016-01-01

    Shigella is one of the most important waterborne and foodborne pathogens around the world. Emergence of antibiotic-resistant Shigella has made the development of alternatives to conventional antibiotics necessary. In this study, a virulent Myoviridae bacteriophage, pSs-1 was isolated from environmental water in South Korea and showed infectivity to S. flexneri as well as S. sonnei strains. One-step growth analysis showed that pSs-1 has a short latent period (25 min) and a large burst size (97 PFU/cell). According to the genomic analysis, pSs-1 contains 164,999 bp of genome with a G + C content of 35.54% and it is considered as a member of the T4-like bacteriophage group. These results showed that pSs-1 may have potential as a biocontrol agent instead of conventional antibiotics for shigellosis. PMID:26971572

  9. Lysozyme

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    Protein isolated from hen egg-white and functions as a bacteriostatic enzyme by degrading bacterial cell walls. First enzyme ever characterized by protein crystallography. It is used as an excellent model system for better understanding parameters involved in microgravity experiments with data from laboratory experiments to study the equilibrium rate of hanging drop experiments in microgravity.

  10. Cloning and expression of autogenes encoding RNA poly,erases of T7-like bacteriophages

    DOEpatents

    Studier, F. William; Dubendorff, John W.

    1998-01-01

    This invention relates to the cloning and expression of autogenes encoding RNA polymerases of T7 and T7-like bacteriophages, in which the RNA polymerase gene is transcribed from a promoter which is recognized by the encoded RNA polymerase. Cloning of T7 autogenes was achieved by reducing the activity of the RNA polymerase sufficiently to permit host cell growth. T7 RNA polymerase activity was controlled by combining two independent methods: lac-repression of the recombinant lac operator-T7 promoter in the autogene and inhibition of the polymerase by T7 lysozyme. Expression systems for producing the RNA polymerases of T7 and other T7-like bacteriophages, and expression systems for producing selected gene products are described, as well as other related materials and methods.

  11. Cloning and expression of autogenes encoding RNA polymerases of T7-like bacteriophages

    DOEpatents

    Studier, F.W.; Dubendorff, J.W.

    1998-10-20

    This invention relates to the cloning and expression of autogenes encoding RNA polymerases of T7 and T7-like bacteriophages, in which the RNA polymerase gene is transcribed from a promoter which is recognized by the encoded RNA polymerase. Cloning of T7 autogenes was achieved by reducing the activity of the RNA polymerase sufficiently to permit host cell growth. T7 RNA polymerase activity was controlled by combining two independent methods: lac-repression of the recombinant lac operator-T7 promoter in the autogene and inhibition of the polymerase by T7 lysozyme. Expression systems for producing the RNA polymerases of T7 and other T7-like bacteriophages, and expression systems for producing selected gene products are described, as well as other related materials and methods. 12 figs.

  12. Cloning and expression of autogenes encoding RNA polymerases of T7-like bacteriophages

    DOEpatents

    Studier, F.W.; Dubendorff, J.W.

    1998-11-03

    This invention relates to the cloning and expression of autogenes encoding RNA polymerases of T7 and T7-like bacteriophages, in which the RNA polymerase gene is transcribed from a promoter which is recognized by the encoded RNA polymerase. Cloning of T7 autogenes was achieved by reducing the activity of the RNA polymerase sufficiently to permit host cell growth. T7 RNA polymerase activity was controlled by combining two independent methods: lac-repression of the recombinant lac operator-T7 promoter in the autogene and inhibition of the polymerase by T7 lysozyme. Expression systems for producing the RNA polymerases of T7 and other T7-like bacteriophages, and expression systems for producing selected gene products are described, as well as other related materials and methods. 12 figs.

  13. Cloning and expression of autogenes encoding RNA polymerases of T7-like bacteriophages

    DOEpatents

    Studier, F. William; Dubendorff, John W.

    1998-01-01

    This invention relates to the cloning and expression of autogenes encoding RNA polymerases of T7 and T7-like bacteriophages, in which the RNA polymerase gene is transcribed from a promoter which is recognized by the encoded RNA polymerase. Cloning of T7 autogenes was achieved by reducing the activity of the RNA polymerase sufficiently to permit host cell growth. T7 RNA polymerase activity was controlled by combining two independent methods: lac-repression of the recombinant lac operator-T7 promoter in the autogene and inhibition of the polymerase by T7 lysozyme. Expression systems for producing the RNA polymerases of T7 and other T7-like bacteriophages, and expression systems for producing selected gene products are described, as well as other related materials and methods.

  14. Genetic Dissection of T4 Lysis

    PubMed Central

    Moussa, Samir H.; Lawler, Jessica L.

    2014-01-01

    t is the holin gene for coliphage T4, encoding a 218-amino-acid (aa) protein essential for the inner membrane hole formation that initiates lysis and terminates the phage infection cycle. T is predicted to be an integral membrane protein that adopts an Nin-Cout topology with a single transmembrane domain (TMD). This holin topology is different from those of the well-studied holins S105 (3 TMDs; Nout-Cin) of the coliphage lambda and S68 (2 TMDs; Nin-Cin) of the lambdoid phage 21. Here, we used random mutagenesis to construct a library of lysis-defective alleles of t to discern residues and domains important for holin function and for the inhibition of lysis by the T4 antiholin, RI. The results show that mutations in all 3 topological domains (N-terminal cytoplasmic, TMD, and C-terminal periplasmic) can abrogate holin function. Additionally, several lysis-defective alleles in the C-terminal domain are no longer competent in binding RI. Taken together, these results shed light on the roles of the previously uncharacterized N-terminal and C-terminal domains in lysis and its real-time regulation. PMID:24706740

  15. Crystal Structure of the Phage T4 Recombinase UvsX and Its Functional Interaction with the T4 SF2 Helicase UvsW

    SciTech Connect

    Gajewski, Stefan; Webb, Michael R.; Galkin, Vitold; Egelman, Edward H.; Kreuzer, Kenneth N.; White, Stephen W.

    2012-07-11

    Bacteriophage T4 provides an important model system for studying the mechanism of homologous recombination. We have determined the crystal structure of the T4 UvsX recombinase, and the overall architecture and fold closely resemble those of RecA, including a highly conserved ATP binding site. Based on this new structure, we reanalyzed electron microscopy reconstructions of UvsX-DNA filaments and docked the UvsX crystal structure into two different filament forms: a compressed filament generated in the presence of ADP and an elongated filament generated in the presence of ATP and aluminum fluoride. In these reconstructions, the ATP binding site sits at the protomer interface, as in the RecA filament crystal structure. However, the environment of the ATP binding site is altered in the two filament reconstructions, suggesting that nucleotide cannot be as easily accommodated at the protomer interface of the compressed filament. Finally, we show that the phage helicase UvsW completes the UvsX-promoted strand-exchange reaction, allowing the generation of a simple nicked circular product rather than complex networks of partially exchanged substrates.

  16. Genetically modified bacteriophages.

    PubMed

    Sagona, Antonia P; Grigonyte, Aurelija M; MacDonald, Paul R; Jaramillo, Alfonso

    2016-04-18

    Phages or bacteriophages, viruses that infect and replicate inside bacteria, are the most abundant microorganisms on earth. The realization that antibiotic resistance poses a substantial risk to the world's health and global economy is revitalizing phage therapy as a potential solution. The increasing ease by which phage genomes can be modified, owing to the influx of new technologies, has led to an expansion of their natural capabilities, and a reduced dependence on phage isolation from environmental sources. This review will discuss the way synthetic biology has accelerated the construction of genetically modified phages and will describe the wide range of their applications. It will further provide insight into the societal and economic benefits that derive from the use of recombinant phages in various sectors, from health to biodetection, biocontrol and the food industry. PMID:26906932

  17. T4 Phage Tail Adhesin Gp12 Counteracts LPS-Induced Inflammation In Vivo.

    PubMed

    Miernikiewicz, Paulina; Kłopot, Anna; Soluch, Ryszard; Szkuta, Piotr; Kęska, Weronika; Hodyra-Stefaniak, Katarzyna; Konopka, Agnieszka; Nowak, Marcin; Lecion, Dorota; Kaźmierczak, Zuzanna; Majewska, Joanna; Harhala, Marek; Górski, Andrzej; Dąbrowska, Krystyna

    2016-01-01

    Bacteriophages that infect Gram-negative bacteria often bind to the bacterial surface by interaction of specific proteins with lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Short tail fiber proteins (tail adhesin, gp12) mediate adsorption of T4-like bacteriophages to Escherichia coli, binding surface proteins or LPS. Produced as a recombinant protein, gp12 retains its ability to bind LPS. Since LPS is able to exert a major impact on the immune response in animals and in humans, we have tested LPS-binding phage protein gp12 as a potential modulator of the LPS-induced immune response. We have produced tail adhesin gp12 in a bacterial expression system and confirmed its ability to form trimers and to bind LPS in vitro by dynamic light scattering. This product had no negative effect on mammalian cell proliferation in vitro. Further, no harmful effects of this protein were observed in mice. Thus, gp12 was used in combination with LPS in a murine model, and it decreased the inflammatory response to LPS in vivo, as assessed by serum levels of cytokines IL-1 alpha and IL-6 and by histopathological analysis of spleen, liver, kidney and lungs. Thus, in future studies gp12 may be considered as a potential tool for modulating and specifically for counteracting LPS-related physiological effects in vivo. PMID:27471503

  18. T4 Phage Tail Adhesin Gp12 Counteracts LPS-Induced Inflammation In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Miernikiewicz, Paulina; Kłopot, Anna; Soluch, Ryszard; Szkuta, Piotr; Kęska, Weronika; Hodyra-Stefaniak, Katarzyna; Konopka, Agnieszka; Nowak, Marcin; Lecion, Dorota; Kaźmierczak, Zuzanna; Majewska, Joanna; Harhala, Marek; Górski, Andrzej; Dąbrowska, Krystyna

    2016-01-01

    Bacteriophages that infect Gram-negative bacteria often bind to the bacterial surface by interaction of specific proteins with lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Short tail fiber proteins (tail adhesin, gp12) mediate adsorption of T4-like bacteriophages to Escherichia coli, binding surface proteins or LPS. Produced as a recombinant protein, gp12 retains its ability to bind LPS. Since LPS is able to exert a major impact on the immune response in animals and in humans, we have tested LPS-binding phage protein gp12 as a potential modulator of the LPS-induced immune response. We have produced tail adhesin gp12 in a bacterial expression system and confirmed its ability to form trimers and to bind LPS in vitro by dynamic light scattering. This product had no negative effect on mammalian cell proliferation in vitro. Further, no harmful effects of this protein were observed in mice. Thus, gp12 was used in combination with LPS in a murine model, and it decreased the inflammatory response to LPS in vivo, as assessed by serum levels of cytokines IL-1 alpha and IL-6 and by histopathological analysis of spleen, liver, kidney and lungs. Thus, in future studies gp12 may be considered as a potential tool for modulating and specifically for counteracting LPS-related physiological effects in vivo. PMID:27471503

  19. Incorporation of Deoxyribonucleic Acid Precursors by T4 Deoxyribonucleic Acid-Protein Complexes Retained on Glass Fiber Filters

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Robert C.; Kozinski, Andrzej W.

    1970-01-01

    Bacteriophage T4 deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA)-protein complexes were retained preferentially on glass fiber filters. DNA polymerase activity in the complex was detected through the incorporation of 3H-labeled DNA precursors. The primer-product DNA hybridized with both phage and Escherichia coli DNA. Density labeling experiments showed that about 30% of incorporated 3H-deoxyadenosine triphosphate was found in DNA which hybridized with phage DNA; this DNA was found to be covalently attached to the primer DNA. PMID:5497903

  20. Expression of the denV gene of coliphage T4 in UV-sensitive rad mutants of Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    SciTech Connect

    Valerie, K.; Fronko, G.; Henderson, E.E.; de Riel, J.K.

    1986-10-01

    A plasmid containing the denV gene from bacteriophage T4, under the control of the yeast alcohol dehydrogenase I (ADC1) promoter, conferred a substantial increase in UV resistance in the UV-sensitive Saccharomyces cerevisiae mutants rad1-2 and rad3-2. The UV resistance of the denV+ yeast cells was cell cycle dependent and correlated well with the level of the denV gene product as measured by immunoblotting and by a photoreversal assay for pyrimidine dimer-DNA glycosylase activity.

  1. Composite cryogels for lysozyme purification.

    PubMed

    Baydemir, Gözde; Türkoğlu, Emir Alper; Andaç, Müge; Perçin, Işık; Denizli, Adil

    2015-01-01

    Beads-embedded novel composite cryogel was synthesized to purify lysozyme (Lyz) from chicken egg white. The poly(hydroxyethyl methacrylate-N-methacryloyl-L-phenylalanine) (PHEMAPA) beads of smaller than 5 µm size were synthesized by suspension polymerization and then embedded into a poly(hydroxyethyl methacrylate) (PHEMA)-based cryogel column. The PHEMAPA bead-embedded cryogel (BEC) column was characterized by swelling tests, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), surface area measurements by the Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) method, elemental analysis, and flow dynamics. The specific surface area of the PHEMAPA BEC was found as 41.2 m(2) /g using BET measurements. Lyz-binding experiments were performed using aqueous solutions in different conditions such as initial Lyz concentration, pH, flow rate, temperature, and NaCl concentration of an aqueous medium. The PHEMAPA BEC column could be used after 10 adsorption-desorption studies without any significant loss in adsorption capacity of Lyz. The PHEMAPA BEC column was used to purify Lyz from chicken egg white, and gel electrophoresis was used to estimate the purity of Lyz. The chromatographic application of the PHEMAPA BEC column was also performed using fast protein liquid chromatography. PMID:24923509

  2. Observing lysozyme's closing and opening motions by high-resolution single-molecule enzymology.

    PubMed

    Akhterov, Maxim V; Choi, Yongki; Olsen, Tivoli J; Sims, Patrick C; Iftikhar, Mariam; Gul, O Tolga; Corso, Brad L; Weiss, Gregory A; Collins, Philip G

    2015-06-19

    Single-molecule techniques can monitor the kinetics of transitions between enzyme open and closed conformations, but such methods usually lack the resolution to observe the underlying transition pathway or intermediate conformational dynamics. We have used a 1 MHz bandwidth carbon nanotube transistor to electronically monitor single molecules of the enzyme T4 lysozyme as it processes substrate. An experimental resolution of 2 μs allowed the direct recording of lysozyme's opening and closing transitions. Unexpectedly, both motions required 37 μs, on average. The distribution of transition durations was also independent of the enzyme's state: either catalytic or nonproductive. The observation of smooth, continuous transitions suggests a concerted mechanism for glycoside hydrolysis with lysozyme's two domains closing upon the polysaccharide substrate in its active site. We distinguish these smooth motions from a nonconcerted mechanism, observed in approximately 10% of lysozyme openings and closings, in which the enzyme pauses for an additional 40-140 μs in an intermediate, partially closed conformation. During intermediate forming events, the number of rate-limiting steps observed increases to four, consistent with four steps required in the stepwise, arrow-pushing mechanism. The formation of such intermediate conformations was again independent of the enzyme's state. Taken together, the results suggest lysozyme operates as a Brownian motor. In this model, the enzyme traces a single pathway for closing and the reverse pathway for enzyme opening, regardless of its instantaneous catalytic productivity. The observed symmetry in enzyme opening and closing thus suggests that substrate translocation occurs while the enzyme is closed. PMID:25763461

  3. Acetylated Lysozyme as Impurity in Lysozyme Crystals: Constant Distribution Coefficient

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, B. R.; Chernov, A. A.

    2000-01-01

    Hen egg white lysozyme (HEWL) was acetylated to modify molecular charge keeping the molecular size and weight nearly constant. Two derivatives, A and B, more and less acetylated, respectively, were obtained, separated, purified and added to the solution from which crystals of tetragonal HEWL crystals were grown. Amounts of the A or B impurities added were 0.76, 0.38 and 0.1 milligram per millimeter while HEWL concentration were 20, 30 and 40 milligram per milliliter. The crystals grown in 18 experiments for each impurity were dissolved and quantities of A or B additives in these crystals were analyzed by cation exchange high performance liquid chromatography. All the data for each set of 18 samples with the different impurity and regular HEWL concentrations is well described by one distribution coefficient K = 2.15 plus or minus 0.13 for A and K = 3.42 plus or minus 0.25 for B. The observed independence of the distribution coefficient on both the impurity concentration and supersaturation is explained by the dilution model described in this paper. It shows that impurity adsorption and incorporation rate is proportional to the impurity concentration and that the growth rate is proportional to the crystallizing protein in solution. With the kinetic coefficient for crystallization, beta = 5.10(exp -7) centimeters per second, the frequency at which an impurity molecule near the growing interface irreversibly joins a molecular site on the crystal was found to be 3 1 per second, much higher than the average frequency for crystal molecules. For best quality protein crystals it is better to have low microheterogeneous protein impurity concentration and high supers aturation.

  4. Characterization of T-Even Bacteriophage Substructures

    PubMed Central

    Cummings, Donald J.; Kusy, A. R.; Chapman, V. A.; DeLong, S. S.; Stone, K. R.

    1970-01-01

    T-even bacteriophages were grown and purified in bulk quantities. The protein coats were disrupted into their component substructures by treatment with 67% dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO). Tail fibers and tubes were purified on glycerol-CsCl-D2O gradients and examined with respect to sedimentation properties, subunit molecular weights, amino acid composition, isoelectric points, and morphology. It was found that intact tail fibers had a sedimentation coefficient of 12 to 13S and that dissociated fibers consisted of three classes of proteins having molecular weights of 150 K ± 10, 42 K ± 4, and 28 K ± 3 daltons. A model was constructed in which the 150-K subunit folded back on itself twice to give a three-stranded rope. Each 150-K subunit then represented a half-fiber and it was proposed that the role of the 42- and 28-K subunits was to hold each half-fiber together as well as serve as a possible link with other substructures. Isoelectric point studies also indicated that there were three different proteins with pI values of 3.5, 5.7, and 8.0. Amino acid analyses indicated that fibers had a composition distinct from other phage substructures. In addition, a striking difference was noted in the content of tryptophan among the phages examined. T4B had three to five times more tryptophan than did T2L, T2H, T4D, and T6. Intact tail tubes had an S20,w of 31 to 38S and dissociated tubes consisted of three proteins of molecular weights 57 K ± 5, 38 K ± 4, and 25 K ± 3 daltons. Based on degradation studies with DMSO, it was proposed that these three proteins were arranged in a helical array yielding the tube structure. Isoelectric point studies indicated that there were three major proteins in the tube whose pI values were 5.1, 5.7, and 8.5. No significant differences were observed in the amino acid content of tubes obtained from all the T-even bacteriophages. Images PMID:5497900

  5. Bacteriophage-encoded cochaperonins can substitute for Escherichia coli’s essential GroES protein

    PubMed Central

    Keppel, France; Rychner, Monique; Georgopoulos, Costa

    2002-01-01

    The Escherichia coli chaperonin machine is composed of two members, GroEL and GroES. The GroEL chaperonin can bind 10–15% of E. coli’s unfolded proteins in one of its central cavities and help them fold in cooperation with the GroES cochaperonin. Both proteins are absolutely essential for bacterial growth. Several large, lytic bacteriophages, such as T4 and RB49, use the host-encoded GroEL in conjunction with their own bacteriophage-encoded cochaperonin for the correct assembly of their major capsid protein, suggesting a cochaperonin specificity for the in vivo folding of certain substrates. Here, we demonstrate that, when the cochaperonin of either bacteriophage T4 (Gp31) or RB49 (CocO) is expressed in E. coli, the otherwise essential groES gene can be deleted. Thus, it appears that, despite very little sequence identity with groES, the bacteriophage-encoded Gp31 and CocO proteins are capable of replacing GroES in the folding of E. coli’s essential, housekeeping proteins. PMID:12189177

  6. The Structure of the Phage T4 DNA Packaging Motor Suggests a Mechanism Dependent on Electrostatic Forces

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Siyang; Kondabagil, Kiran; Draper, Bonnie; Alam, Tanfis I.; Bowman, Valorie D.; Zhang, Zhihong; Hegde, Shylaja; Fokine, Andrei; Rossmann, Michael G.; Rao, Venigalla B.

    2009-06-30

    Viral genomes are packaged into procapsids by powerful molecular motors. We report the crystal structure of the DNA packaging motor protein, gene product 17 (gp17), in bacteriophage T4. The structure consists of an N-terminal ATPase domain, which provides energy for compacting DNA, and a C-terminal nuclease domain, which terminates packaging. We show that another function of the C-terminal domain is to translocate the genome into the procapsid. The two domains are in close contact in the crystal structure, representing a tensed state. A cryo-electron microscopy reconstruction of the T4 procapsid complexed with gp17 shows that the packaging motor is a pentamer and that the domains within each monomer are spatially separated, representing a relaxed state. These structures suggest a mechanism, supported by mutational and other data, in which electrostatic forces drive the DNA packaging by alternating between tensed and relaxed states. Similar mechanisms may occur in other molecular motors.

  7. T4-like phage Bp7, a potential antimicrobial agent for controlling drug-resistant Escherichia coli in chickens.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Can; Li, Wenli; Liu, Wenhua; Zou, Ling; Yan, Chen; Lu, Kai; Ren, Huiying

    2013-09-01

    Chicken-pathogenic Escherichia coli is severely endangering the poultry industry in China and worldwide, and antibiotic therapy is facing an increasing problem of antibiotic resistance. Bacteriophages can kill bacteria with no known activity in human or animal cells, making them an attractive alternative to antibiotics. In this study, we present the characteristics of a novel virulent bacteriophage, Bp7, specifically infecting pathogenic multidrug-resistant E. coli. Phage Bp7 was isolated from chicken feces. Bp7 belongs to the family Myoviridae, possessing an elongated icosahedral head and contractile sheathed tail. It has a 168-kb double-stranded DNA genome. For larger yields, its optimal multiplicity of infection (MOI) to infect E. coli was about 0.001. The latent period was 10 to 15 min, and the burst size was 90 PFU/infected cell. It was stable both at pH 5.0 to 10.0 and at 40°C or 50°C for at least 1 h. Bp7 could infect 46% of pathogenic clinical E. coli strains. Bp7 harbored 791 open reading frames (ORFs) and 263 possible genes. Among the 263 genes, 199 possessed amino acid sequence identities with ORFs of phage T4, 62 had identities with other T4-like phages, and only one lacked any database match. The genome of Bp7 manifested obvious division and rearrangement compared to phages T4, JS98, and IME08. Bp7 is a new member of the "T4-like" genus, family Myoviridae. Its wide host range, strong cell-killing activity, and high stability to pH make it an alternative to antimicrobials for controlling drug-resistant E. coli in chickens. PMID:23835183

  8. T-4G Simulator and T-4 Ground Training Devices in USAF Undergraduate Pilot Training.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woodruff, Robert R.; Smith, James F.

    The objective of the project was to investigate the utility of using an A/F37A-T4G T-37 flight simulator within the context of Air Force undergraduate pilot training. Twenty-one subjects, selected from three undergraduate pilot training classes, were given contact flight training in a TP4G/EPT simulator before going to T-37 aircraft for further…

  9. Lysogenic bacteriophage isolated from acidophilium

    DOEpatents

    Ward, Thomas W.; Bruhn, Debby F.; Bulmer, Deborah K.

    1992-01-01

    A bacteriophage identified as .phi.Ac1 capable of infecting acidophilic heterotropic bacteria (such as Acidiphilium sp.) and processes for genetically engineering acidophilic bacteria for biomining or sulfur removal from coal are disclosed. The bacteriophage is capable of growth in cells existing at pH at or below 3.0. Lytic forms of the phage introduced into areas experiencing acid drainage kill the bacteria causing such drainage. Lysogenic forms of the phase having genes for selective removal of metallic or nonmetallic elements can be introduced into acidophilic bacteria to effect removal of the desired element form ore or coal.

  10. Bacteriophage therapy: a regulatory perspective.

    PubMed

    Pelfrene, Eric; Willebrand, Elsa; Cavaleiro Sanches, Ana; Sebris, Zigmars; Cavaleri, Marco

    2016-08-01

    Despite the recognized problem of antibiotic multidrug resistance, very few antibacterial agents with new mechanisms of action are under development. Bacteriophage therapy could offer one alternative strategy to mitigate this challenge. Although widely used throughout the 20th century in Eastern Europe and the former Soviet Union, this potential therapy has not yet been investigated according to rigorous scientific standards. This paper reports on a multistakeholder meeting held at the EMA, which outlined the existing regulatory framework to which such therapy should adhere and reviewed the current obstacles and shortcomings in scientific development for bacteriophage therapy. PMID:27068400

  11. Structure and mechanism of the phage T4 recombination mediator protein UvsY

    PubMed Central

    Gajewski, Stefan; Waddell, Michael Brett; Vaithiyalingam, Sivaraja; Nourse, Amanda; Li, Zhenmei; Woetzel, Nils; Alexander, Nathan; Meiler, Jens; White, Stephen W.

    2016-01-01

    The UvsY recombination mediator protein is critical for efficient homologous recombination in bacteriophage T4 and is the functional analog of the eukaryotic Rad52 protein. During T4 homologous recombination, the UvsX recombinase has to compete with the prebound gp32 single-stranded binding protein for DNA-binding sites and UvsY stimulates this filament nucleation event. We report here the crystal structure of UvsY in four similar open-barrel heptameric assemblies and provide structural and biophysical insights into its function. The UvsY heptamer was confirmed in solution by centrifugation and light scattering, and thermodynamic analyses revealed that the UvsY–ssDNA interaction occurs within the assembly via two distinct binding modes. Using surface plasmon resonance, we also examined the binding of UvsY to both ssDNA and the ssDNA–gp32 complex. These analyses confirmed that ssDNA can bind UvsY and gp32 independently and also as a ternary complex. They also showed that residues located on the rim of the heptamer are required for optimal binding to ssDNA, thus identifying the putative ssDNA-binding surface. We propose a model in which UvsY promotes a helical ssDNA conformation that disfavors the binding of gp32 and initiates the assembly of the ssDNA–UvsX filament. PMID:26951671

  12. Recombinant goose-type lysozyme in channel catfish: lysozyme activity and efficacy as plasmid DNA immunostimulant against Aeromonas hydrophila infection

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The objectives of this study were: 1) to investigate whether recombinant channel catfish lysozyme g (CC-Lys-g) produced in E. coli expression system possesses any lysozyme activity; and 2) to evaluate whether channel catfish lysozyme g plasmid DNA could be used as an immunostimulant to protect chann...

  13. Recombinant goose-type lysozyme in channel catfish: Lysozyme activity and efficacy as plasmid DNA immunostimulant against Aeromonas hydrophila infection

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The objectives of this study were: 1) to investigate whether recombinant channel catfish lysozyme g (CC-Lys-g) produced in E. coli expression system possesses any lysozyme activity; and 2) to evaluate whether channel catfish lysozyme g plasmid DNA could be used as an immunostimulant to protect chann...

  14. Bacteriophage endolysins as novel antimicrobials

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Endolysins are enzymes used by bacteriophages at the end of their replication cycle to degrade the peptidoglycan of the bacterial host from within, resulting in cell lysis and release of progeny virions. Due to the absence of an outer membrane in the Gram-positive bacterial cell wall, endolysins can...

  15. Bacteriophage therapy in animal production

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Concerns over the consequences of bacterial resistance to antibiotics with the use of antibiotics in animal production have led to an increase in research on alternatives to antibiotics. Bacteriophages kill bacteria, are natural, safe, plentiful, self replicating, self limiting, can be used to spec...

  16. Evidence That the Heterogeneity of a T4 Population Is the Result of Heritable Traits

    PubMed Central

    Storms, Zachary J.; Sauvageau, Dominic

    2014-01-01

    Many bacteriophage populations display heterogeneity in their adsorption characteristics; a portion of the phage population remains free in solution throughout adsorption experiments (residual fraction). This residual fraction generally constitutes a minority of phages that exhibit significantly slower adsorption kinetics than the main phage stock (main fraction). While this phenomenon is likely the result of evolutionary driving forces, the present study demonstrates that the residual fraction is not always the result of phenotypic variations within a single genotype, as is generally thought. Experiments with phage T4 showed that two subgroups with distinct adsorption traits that were passed on to their progeny could be isolated from the original phage stock. Sequencing of genes involved in adsorption revealed two point mutations in gene 37 of residual fraction isolates, which resulted in modifications to the long tail-fiber, the organelle of attachment and host cell recognition. Adsorption studies consistently showed that T4 phage stocks amplified from residual fraction isolates had significantly lower adsorption efficiencies than those amplified from main fractions. The conducted experiments provide convincing evidence that the observed heterogeneity in T4 adsorption behavior is the result of conserved mutations to the phage genome and is not exclusively the result of phenotypic variations within the population. While it is believed high mutation rates exist to hasten phage adaptation, this study shows that this bet hedging strategy can also, in the short term, inadvertently handicap the phage's adsorption capabilities to a given host under normal infection conditions, resulting in the residual fraction observed in adsorption experiments. PMID:25551763

  17. [Equilibrium fluctuations in myoglobin and lysozyme].

    PubMed

    Krupianskiĭ, Iu F; Esin, S V; Mikhaĭliuk, M G; Vetrov, O D; Eshchenko, G V

    2004-01-01

    The angular dependencies of inelastic intensities of Rayleigh scattering of Moessbauer radiation were measured for myoglobin and lysozyme (in the hydration range h = 0.05-0.7). The data were fitted within the framework of model, when two types of intraglobular motions were taken into account: individual motions of small side-chain groups and cooperative motions of segments. The best agreement with the experiment at h > 0.05 was obtained when individual motions of small groups together with the cooperative motions of alpha-helices and beta-sheets for lysozyme, and alpha-helices for myoglobin were considered. At further hydration (h = 0.45), mean-square displacements (x2) of both types of motions strongly increase with the increase in hydration degree, while the motions with a large correlation radius (not less than macromolecule radius) remain nearly the same as for h = 0.05. The results of the study of the radial distribution function deduced by Fourier-transform from the diffuse x-ray measurements together with RSMR data allow one to conclude that the water during protein hydration competes with the intramolecular hydrogen bonds, loosens the protein and increases the internal dynamics. Concurrently, water arranges the ordering of macromolecule, which takes the native structure at h = 0.4-0.7. The analysis of auto and cross-correlation functions of bending fluctuations of alpha-helices in the large domain of lysozyme performed by molecular dynamics allows one to come to the final conclusion that it is the difference in the structural organization of myoglobin and lysozyme and not the presence of SS-bonds in lysozyme macromolecule that is responsible for different structural fluctuations in these proteins. PMID:15327199

  18. Crystal and cryoEM structural studies of a cell wall degrading enzyme in the bacteriophage [psi]29 tail

    SciTech Connect

    Xiang, Ye; Morais, Marc C.; Cohen, Daniel N.; Bowman, Valorie D.; Anderson, Dwight L.; Rossmann, Michael G.

    2009-08-28

    The small bacteriophage {phi}29 must penetrate the {approx}250-{angstrom} thick external peptidoglycan cell wall and cell membrane of the Gram-positive Bacillus subtilis, before ejecting its dsDNA genome through its tail into the bacterial cytoplasm. The tail of bacteriophage {phi}29 is noncontractile and {approx}380 {angstrom} long. A 1.8-{angstrom} resolution crystal structure of gene product 13 (gp13) shows that this tail protein has spatially well separated N- and C-terminal domains, whose structures resemble lysozyme-like enzymes and metallo-endopeptidases, respectively. CryoEM reconstructions of the WT bacteriophage and mutant bacteriophages missing some or most of gp13 shows that this enzyme is located at the distal end of the {phi}29 tail knob. This finding suggests that gp13 functions as a tail-associated, peptidoglycan-degrading enzyme able to cleave both the polysaccharide backbone and peptide cross-links of the peptidoglycan cell wall. Comparisons of the gp13{sup -} mutants with the {phi}29 mature and emptied phage structures suggest the sequence of events that occur during the penetration of the tail through the peptidoglycan layer.

  19. Subdiffusive motion of bacteriophage in mucosal surfaces increases the frequency of bacterial encounters

    PubMed Central

    Barr, Jeremy J.; Auro, Rita; Sam-Soon, Nicholas; Kassegne, Sam; Peters, Gregory; Bonilla, Natasha; Hatay, Mark; Mourtada, Sarah; Bailey, Barbara; Youle, Merry; Felts, Ben; Baljon, Arlette; Nulton, Jim; Salamon, Peter; Rohwer, Forest

    2015-01-01

    Bacteriophages (phages) defend mucosal surfaces against bacterial infections. However, their complex interactions with their bacterial hosts and with the mucus-covered epithelium remain mostly unexplored. Our previous work demonstrated that T4 phage with Hoc proteins exposed on their capsid adhered to mucin glycoproteins and protected mucus-producing tissue culture cells in vitro. On this basis, we proposed our bacteriophage adherence to mucus (BAM) model of immunity. Here, to test this model, we developed a microfluidic device (chip) that emulates a mucosal surface experiencing constant fluid flow and mucin secretion dynamics. Using mucus-producing human cells and Escherichia coli in the chip, we observed similar accumulation and persistence of mucus-adherent T4 phage and nonadherent T4∆hoc phage in the mucus. Nevertheless, T4 phage reduced bacterial colonization of the epithelium >4,000-fold compared with T4∆hoc phage. This suggests that phage adherence to mucus increases encounters with bacterial hosts by some other mechanism. Phages are traditionally thought to be completely dependent on normal diffusion, driven by random Brownian motion, for host contact. We demonstrated that T4 phage particles displayed subdiffusive motion in mucus, whereas T4∆hoc particles displayed normal diffusion. Experiments and modeling indicate that subdiffusive motion increases phage–host encounters when bacterial concentration is low. By concentrating phages in an optimal mucus zone, subdiffusion increases their host encounters and antimicrobial action. Our revised BAM model proposes that the fundamental mechanism of mucosal immunity is subdiffusion resulting from adherence to mucus. These findings suggest intriguing possibilities for engineering phages to manipulate and personalize the mucosal microbiome. PMID:26483471

  20. Subdiffusive motion of bacteriophage in mucosal surfaces increases the frequency of bacterial encounters.

    PubMed

    Barr, Jeremy J; Auro, Rita; Sam-Soon, Nicholas; Kassegne, Sam; Peters, Gregory; Bonilla, Natasha; Hatay, Mark; Mourtada, Sarah; Bailey, Barbara; Youle, Merry; Felts, Ben; Baljon, Arlette; Nulton, Jim; Salamon, Peter; Rohwer, Forest

    2015-11-01

    Bacteriophages (phages) defend mucosal surfaces against bacterial infections. However, their complex interactions with their bacterial hosts and with the mucus-covered epithelium remain mostly unexplored. Our previous work demonstrated that T4 phage with Hoc proteins exposed on their capsid adhered to mucin glycoproteins and protected mucus-producing tissue culture cells in vitro. On this basis, we proposed our bacteriophage adherence to mucus (BAM) model of immunity. Here, to test this model, we developed a microfluidic device (chip) that emulates a mucosal surface experiencing constant fluid flow and mucin secretion dynamics. Using mucus-producing human cells and Escherichia coli in the chip, we observed similar accumulation and persistence of mucus-adherent T4 phage and nonadherent T4∆hoc phage in the mucus. Nevertheless, T4 phage reduced bacterial colonization of the epithelium >4,000-fold compared with T4∆hoc phage. This suggests that phage adherence to mucus increases encounters with bacterial hosts by some other mechanism. Phages are traditionally thought to be completely dependent on normal diffusion, driven by random Brownian motion, for host contact. We demonstrated that T4 phage particles displayed subdiffusive motion in mucus, whereas T4∆hoc particles displayed normal diffusion. Experiments and modeling indicate that subdiffusive motion increases phage-host encounters when bacterial concentration is low. By concentrating phages in an optimal mucus zone, subdiffusion increases their host encounters and antimicrobial action. Our revised BAM model proposes that the fundamental mechanism of mucosal immunity is subdiffusion resulting from adherence to mucus. These findings suggest intriguing possibilities for engineering phages to manipulate and personalize the mucosal microbiome. PMID:26483471

  1. Genomic organization and evolution of ruminant lysozyme c genes

    PubMed Central

    IRWIN, David M

    2015-01-01

    Ruminant stomach lysozyme is a long established model of adaptive gene evolution. Evolution of stomach lysozyme function required changes in the site of expression of the lysozyme c gene and changes in the enzymatic properties of the enzyme. In ruminant mammals, these changes were associated with a change in the size of the lysozyme c gene family. The recent release of near complete genome sequences from several ruminant species allows a more complete examination of the evolution and diversification of the lysozyme c gene family. Here we characterize the size of the lysozyme c gene family in extant ruminants and demonstrate that their pecoran ruminant ancestor had a family of at least 10 lysozyme c genes, which included at least two pseudogenes. Evolutionary analysis of the ruminant lysozyme c gene sequences demonstrate that each of the four exons of the lysozyme c gene has a unique evolutionary history, indicating that they participated independently in concerted evolution. These analyses also show that episodic changes in the evolutionary constraints on the protein sequences occurred, with lysozyme c genes expressed in the abomasum of the stomach of extant ruminant species showing the greatest levels of selective constraints. PMID:25730456

  2. The Antimicrobial Peptide Lysozyme Is Induced after Multiple Trauma

    PubMed Central

    Klüter, Tim; Fitschen-Oestern, Stefanie; Lippross, Sebastian; Weuster, Matthias; Pufe, Thomas; Tohidnezhad, Mersedeh; Beyer, Andreas; Seekamp, Andreas; Varoga, Deike

    2014-01-01

    The antimicrobial peptide lysozyme is an important factor of innate immunity and exerts high potential of antibacterial activity. In the present study we evaluated the lysozyme expression in serum of multiple injured patients and subsequently analyzed their possible sources and signaling pathways. Expression of lysozyme was examined in blood samples of multiple trauma patients from the day of trauma until 14 days after trauma by ELISA. To investigate major sources of lysozyme, its expression and regulation in serum samples, different blood cells, and tissue samples were analysed by ELISA and real-time PCR. Neutrophils and hepatocytes were stimulated with cytokines and supernatant of Staphylococcus aureus. The present study demonstrates the induction and release of lysozyme in serum of multiple injured patients. The highest lysozyme expression of all tested cells and tissues was detected in neutrophils. Stimulation with trauma-related factors such as interleukin-6 and S. aureus induced lysozyme expression. Liver tissue samples of patients without trauma show little lysozyme expression compared to neutrophils. After stimulation with bacterial fragments, lysozyme expression of hepatocytes is upregulated significantly. Toll-like receptor 2, a classic receptor of Gram-positive bacterial protein, was detected as a possible target for lysozyme induction. PMID:25258475

  3. The antimicrobial peptide lysozyme is induced after multiple trauma.

    PubMed

    Klüter, Tim; Fitschen-Oestern, Stefanie; Lippross, Sebastian; Weuster, Matthias; Mentlein, Rolf; Steubesand, Nadine; Neunaber, Claudia; Hildebrand, Frank; Pufe, Thomas; Tohidnezhad, Mersedeh; Beyer, Andreas; Seekamp, Andreas; Varoga, Deike

    2014-01-01

    The antimicrobial peptide lysozyme is an important factor of innate immunity and exerts high potential of antibacterial activity. In the present study we evaluated the lysozyme expression in serum of multiple injured patients and subsequently analyzed their possible sources and signaling pathways. Expression of lysozyme was examined in blood samples of multiple trauma patients from the day of trauma until 14 days after trauma by ELISA. To investigate major sources of lysozyme, its expression and regulation in serum samples, different blood cells, and tissue samples were analysed by ELISA and real-time PCR. Neutrophils and hepatocytes were stimulated with cytokines and supernatant of Staphylococcus aureus. The present study demonstrates the induction and release of lysozyme in serum of multiple injured patients. The highest lysozyme expression of all tested cells and tissues was detected in neutrophils. Stimulation with trauma-related factors such as interleukin-6 and S. aureus induced lysozyme expression. Liver tissue samples of patients without trauma show little lysozyme expression compared to neutrophils. After stimulation with bacterial fragments, lysozyme expression of hepatocytes is upregulated significantly. Toll-like receptor 2, a classic receptor of Gram-positive bacterial protein, was detected as a possible target for lysozyme induction. PMID:25258475

  4. Oxidative refolding of reduced, denatured lysozyme in AOT reverse micelles.

    PubMed

    Fan, Jun-Bao; Chen, Jie; Liang, Yi

    2008-06-01

    The refolding kinetics of the reduced, denatured hen egg white lysozyme in sodium bis(2-ethylhexyl)sulfosuccinate (AOT)-isooctane-water reverse micelles at different water-to-surfactant molar ratios has been investigated by fluorescence spectroscopy and UV spectroscopy. The oxidative refolding of the confined lysozyme is biphasic in AOT reverse micelles. When the water-to-surfactant molar ratio (omega 0) is 12.6, the relative activity of encapsulated lysozyme after refolding for 24 h in AOT reverse micelles increases 46% compared with that in bulk water. Furthermore, aggregation of lysozyme at a higher concentration (0.2 mM) in AOT reverse micelles at omega 0 of 6.3 or 12.6 is not observed; in contrast, the oxidative refolding of lysozyme in bulk water must be at a lower protein concentration (5 microM) in order to avoid a serious aggregation of the protein. For comparison, we have also investigated the effect of AOT on lysozyme activity and found that the residual activity of lysozyme decreases with increasing the concentration of AOT from 1 to 5 mM. When AOT concentration is larger than 2 mM, lysozyme is almost completely inactivated by AOT and most of lysozyme activity is lost. Together, our data demonstrate that AOT reverse micelles with suitable water-to-surfactant molar ratios are favorable to the oxidative refolding of reduced, denatured lysozyme at a higher concentration, compared with bulk water. PMID:18377920

  5. Complete Genome Sequence of vB_EcoM_112, a T-Even-Type Bacteriophage Specific for Escherichia coli O157:H7

    PubMed Central

    Coffey, Brid; Ross, R. Paul; O’Flynn, Gary; O’Sullivan, Orla; Casey, Aidan; Callanan, Michael; Coffey, Aidan

    2014-01-01

    Bacteriophage vB_EcoM_112 (formerly e11/2) is an Escherichia coli phage with specificity for the O157:H7 serotype. The vB_EcoM_112 genome sequence shares high degrees of similarity with the phage T4 genome sequence. PMID:25395625

  6. Bacteriophage Procurement for Therapeutic Purposes.

    PubMed

    Weber-Dąbrowska, Beata; Jończyk-Matysiak, Ewa; Żaczek, Maciej; Łobocka, Małgorzata; Łusiak-Szelachowska, Marzanna; Górski, Andrzej

    2016-01-01

    Bacteriophages (phages), discovered 100 years ago, are able to infect and destroy only bacterial cells. In the current crisis of antibiotic efficacy, phage therapy is considered as a supplementary or even alternative therapeutic approach. Evolution of multidrug-resistant and pandrug-resistant bacterial strains poses a real threat, so it is extremely important to have the possibility to isolate new phages for therapeutic purposes. Our phage laboratory and therapy center has extensive experience with phage isolation, characterization, and therapeutic application. In this article we present current progress in bacteriophages isolation and use for therapeutic purposes, our experience in this field and its practical implications for phage therapy. We attempt to summarize the state of the art: properties of phages, the methods for their isolation, criteria of phage selection for therapeutic purposes and limitations of their use. Perspectives for the use of genetically engineered phages to specifically target bacterial virulence-associated genes are also briefly presented. PMID:27570518

  7. Bacteriophage Procurement for Therapeutic Purposes

    PubMed Central

    Weber-Dąbrowska, Beata; Jończyk-Matysiak, Ewa; Żaczek, Maciej; Łobocka, Małgorzata; Łusiak-Szelachowska, Marzanna; Górski, Andrzej

    2016-01-01

    Bacteriophages (phages), discovered 100 years ago, are able to infect and destroy only bacterial cells. In the current crisis of antibiotic efficacy, phage therapy is considered as a supplementary or even alternative therapeutic approach. Evolution of multidrug-resistant and pandrug-resistant bacterial strains poses a real threat, so it is extremely important to have the possibility to isolate new phages for therapeutic purposes. Our phage laboratory and therapy center has extensive experience with phage isolation, characterization, and therapeutic application. In this article we present current progress in bacteriophages isolation and use for therapeutic purposes, our experience in this field and its practical implications for phage therapy. We attempt to summarize the state of the art: properties of phages, the methods for their isolation, criteria of phage selection for therapeutic purposes and limitations of their use. Perspectives for the use of genetically engineered phages to specifically target bacterial virulence-associated genes are also briefly presented. PMID:27570518

  8. Bacteriophage biocontrol in wastewater treatment.

    PubMed

    Jassim, Sabah A A; Limoges, Richard G; El-Cheikh, Hassan

    2016-04-01

    Waterborne bacterial pathogens in wastewater remains an important public health concern, not only because of the environmental damage, morbidity and mortality that they cause, but also due to the high cost of disinfecting wastewater by using physical and chemical methods in treatment plants. Bacteriophages are proposed as bacterial pathogen indicators and as an alternative biological method for wastewater treatment. Phage biocontrol in large scale treatment requires adaptive and aggressive phages that are able to overcome the environmental forces that interfere with phage-host interactions while targeting unwanted bacterial pathogens and preventing biofilms and foaming. This review will shed light on aspects of using bacteriophage programming technology in wastewater plants to rapidly target and reduce undesirable bacteria without harming the useful bacteria needed for biodegradation. PMID:26941243

  9. Bacteriophage biocontrol of foodborne pathogens.

    PubMed

    Kazi, Mustafa; Annapure, Uday S

    2016-03-01

    Bacteriophages are viruses that only infect bacterial cells. Phages are categorized based on the type of their life cycle, the lytic cycle cause lysis of the bacterium with the release of multiple phage particles where as in lysogenic phase the phage DNA is incorporated into the bacterial genome. Lysogeny does not result in lysis of the host. Lytic phages have several potential applications in the food industry as biocontrol agents, biopreservatives and as tools for detecting pathogens. They have also been proposed as alternatives to antibiotics in animal health. Two unique features of phage relevant for food safety are that they are harmless to mammalian cells and high host specificity, keeping the natural microbiota undisturbed. However, the recent approval of bacteriophages as food additives has opened the discussion about 'edible viruses'. This article reviews in detail the application of phages for the control of foodborne pathogens in a process known as "biocontrol". PMID:27570260

  10. Understanding and exploiting 5T4 oncofoetal glycoprotein expression.

    PubMed

    Stern, Peter L; Brazzatti, Julie; Sawan, Saladin; McGinn, Owen J

    2014-12-01

    Oncofoetal antigens are present during foetal development with generally limited expression in the adult but are upregulated in cancer. These molecules can sometimes be used to diagnose or follow treatment of tumours or as a target for different immunotherapies. The 5T4 oncofoetal glycoprotein was identified by searching for shared surface molecules of human trophoblast and cancer cells with the rationale that they may function to allow survival of the foetus as a semi-allograft in the mother or a tumour in its host, potentially influencing growth, invasion or altered immune surveillance of the host. 5T4 tumour selective expression has stimulated the development of 5T4 vaccine, 5T4 antibody targeted-superantigen and 5T4 antibody-drug therapies through preclinical and into clinical studies. It is now apparent that 5T4 expression is a marker of the use (or not) of several cellular pathways relevant to tumour growth and spread. Thus 5T4 expression is mechanistically associated with the directional movement of cells through epithelial mesenchymal transition, facilitation of CXCL12/CXCR4 chemotaxis, blocking of canonical Wnt/beta-catenin while favouring non-canonical pathway signalling. These processes are highly regulated in development and in normal adult tissues but can contribute to the spread of cancer cells. Understanding the differential impact of these pathways marked by 5T4 can potentially improve existing, or aid development of novel cancer treatment strategies. PMID:25066861

  11. Elasticity and Strength of Biomacromolecular Crystals: Lysozyme

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holmes, A. M.; Witherow, W. K.; Chen, L. Q.; Chernov, A. A.

    2003-01-01

    The static Young modulus, E = 0.1 to 0.5 GPa, the crystal critical strength (sigma(sub c)) and its ratio to E,sigma(sub c)/E is approximately 10(exp 3), were measured for the first time for non cross-linked lysozyme crystals in solution. By using a triple point bending apparatus, we also demonstrated that the crystals were purely elastic. Softness of protein crystals built of hard macromolecules (26 GPa for lysozyme) is explained by the large size of the macromolecules as compared to the range of intermolecular forces and by the weakness of intermolecular bonds as compared to the peptide bond strength. The relatively large reported dynamic elastic moduli (approximately 8 GPa) from resonance light scattering should come from averaging over the moduli of intracrystalline water and intra- and intermolecular bonding.

  12. Elucidating the pH-Dependent Structural Transition of T7 Bacteriophage Endolysin.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Meenakshi; Kumar, Dinesh; Poluri, Krishna Mohan

    2016-08-23

    Bacteriophages are the most abundant and diverse biological entities on earth. Bacteriophage endolysins are unique peptidoglycan hydrolases and have huge potential as effective enzybiotics in various infectious models. T7 bacteriophage endolysin (T7L), also known as N-acetylmuramoyl-l-alanine amidase or T7 lysozyme, is a 17 kDa protein that lyses a range of Gram-negative bacteria by hydrolyzing the amide bond between N-acetylmuramoyl residues and the l-alanine of the peptidoglycan layer. Although the activity profiles of several of the T7 family members have been known for many years, the molecular basis for their pH-dependent differential activity is not clear. In this study, we explored the pH-induced structural, stability, and activity characteristics of T7L by applying a variety of biophysical techniques and protein nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. Our studies established a reversible structural transition of T7L below pH 6 and the formation of a partially denatured conformation at pH 3. This low-pH conformation is thermally stable and exposed its hydrophobic pockets. Further, NMR relaxation measurements and structural analysis unraveled that T7L is highly dynamic in its native state and a network of His residues are responsible for the observed pH-dependent conformational dynamics and transitions. As bacteriophage chimeric and engineered endolysins are being developed as novel therapeutics against multiple drug resistance pathogens, we believe that our results are of great help in designing these entities as broadband antimicrobial and/or antibacterial agents. PMID:27513288

  13. THz characterization of lysozyme at different conformations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Globus, Tatiana; Khromova, Tatyana; Lobo, Rebecca; Woolard, Dwight; Swami, Nathan; Fernandez, Erik

    2005-05-01

    This work demonstrates application of Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR) technique in the low terahertz frequency range of 10-25 cm-1 to discriminate between different protein conformations and evaluate possible application of THz spectroscopy for monitoring of protein folding-unfolding process. A specific procedure developed earlier for unfolding lysozyme by salt (KSCN) precipitation and refolding the lysozyme molecules by removing of KSCN and dissolving in sodium acetate was used to prepare three different forms of lysozyme. In addition, two standard procedures were used to prepare samples in unfolded conformation: denaturation at high temperature ~95° C followed by fast freezing, and dissolution in 6 M guanidine. Thin, air dried protein films were characterized as well as material in the form of gel. Spectra reveal resonance features in transmission which represent vibrational modes in the protein samples. A great variability of spectral features for the different conformational states showed the sensitivity of vibrational frequencies to the three dimensional structure of proteins. The results obtained on liquid (gel) samples indicate that THz transmission spectroscopy can be used for monitoring folding-unfolding process in a realistic, aqueous environment.

  14. Colorimetric and fluorometric dual-readout sensor for lysozyme.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Hanye; Qiu, Suyan; Xu, Kefeng; Luo, Linguang; Song, Yibiao; Lin, Zhenyu; Guo, Longhua; Qiu, Bin; Chen, Guonan

    2013-11-01

    A novel, highly sensitive and selective dual-readout sensor (colorimetric and fluorometric) for the detection of lysozyme was proposed. The fluorescence of triazolylcoumarin molecules was quenched by Au nanoparticles (AuNPs) initially through the fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET), after the addition of lysozyme, the stronger binding of lysozyme onto the surfaces of AuNPs made triazolylcoumarin molecules remove from the AuNPs surface and led to the recovery of the fluorescence of triazolylcoumarin molecules, and accompanied by the discernable color change of the solution from red to purple. The lowest detectable concentration for lysozyme was 50 ng mL(-1) by the naked eye, and the limit of detection (LOD) was 23 ng mL(-1) by fluorescence measurements. In addition, satisfactory results for lysozyme detection in hen egg white were confirmed in the study. Moreover, the presented sensor provides a reliable option to determine lysozyme with high sensitivity and selectivity. PMID:23978821

  15. Isolation of a lytic bacteriophage against virulent Aeromonas hydrophila from an organized equine farm.

    PubMed

    Anand, Taruna; Vaid, Rajesh Kumar; Bera, Bidhan Ch; Singh, Jitender; Barua, Sanjay; Virmani, Nitin; K, Rajukumar; Yadav, Neeraj Kumar; Nagar, Dinesh; Singh, Raj K; Tripathi, B N

    2016-04-01

    A bacteriophage (VTCCBPA6) against a pathogenic strain of Aeromonas hydrophila was isolated from the sewage of an organized equine breeding farm. On the basis of TEM analysis, phage belonged to family Myoviridae. PCR amplification and sequence analysis of gp23 gene (encoding for major capsid protein) revealed phylogenetic resemblance to T4 like virus genus. Protein profiling by SDS-PAGE also indicated its resemblance to T4 like phage group. However, the comparison of its gp23 gene sequence with previously reported phages showed similarity with T4-like phages infecting Enterobacteriaceae instead of Aeromonas spp. Thus, to our knowledge, this report points toward the fact that a novel/evolved phage might exist in equine environment against A. hydrophila, which can be potentially used as a biocontrol agent. PMID:26748732

  16. Immobilization of Active Bacteriophages on Polyhydroxyalkanoate Surfaces.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chanchan; Sauvageau, Dominic; Elias, Anastasia

    2016-01-20

    A rapid, efficient technique for the attachment of bacteriophages (phages) onto polyhydroxyalkanoate (PHA) surfaces has been developed and compared to three reported methods for phage immobilization. Polymer surfaces were modified to facilitate phage attachment using (1) plasma treatment alone, (2) plasma treatment followed by activation by 1-ethyl-3-(3-(dimethylamino)propyl)carbodiimide hydrochloride (EDC) and N-hydroxysulfosuccinimide (sulfo-NHS), (3) plasma-initiated acrylic acid grafting, or (4) plasma-initiated acrylic acid grafting with activation by EDC and sulfo-NHS. The impact of each method on the surface chemistry of PHA was investigated using contact angle analysis and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Each of the four treatments was shown to result in both increased hydrophilicity and in the modification of the surface functional groups. Modified surfaces were immersed in suspensions of phage T4 for immobilization. The highest level of phage binding was observed for the surfaces modified by plasma treatment alone. The change in chemical bond states observed for surfaces that underwent plasma treatment is suspected to be the cause of the increased binding of active phages. Plasma-treated surfaces were further analyzed through phage-staining and fluorescence microscopy to assess the surface density of immobilized phages and their capacity to capture hosts. The infective capability of attached phages was confirmed by exposing the phage-immobilized surfaces to the host bacteria Escherichia coli in both plaque and infection dynamic assays. Plasma-treated surfaces with immobilized phages displayed higher infectivity than surfaces treated with other methods; in fact, the equivalent initial multiplicity of infection was 2 orders of magnitude greater than with other methods. Control samples - prepared by immersing polymer surfaces in phage suspensions (without prior plasma treatment) - did not show any bacterial growth inhibition, suggesting they did not bind

  17. Sewage bacteriophage inactivation by cationic porphyrins: influence of light parameters.

    PubMed

    Costa, Liliana; Carvalho, Carla M B; Faustino, Maria A F; Neves, Maria G P M S; Tomé, João P C; Tomé, Augusto C; Cavaleiro, José A S; Cunha, Angela; Almeida, Adelaide

    2010-08-01

    Photodynamic therapy has been used to inactivate microorganisms through the use of targeted photosensitizers. Although the photoinactivation of microorganisms has already been studied under different conditions, a systematic evaluation of irradiation characteristics is still limited. The goal of this study was to test how the light dose, fluence rate and irradiation source affect the viral photoinactivation of a T4-like sewage bacteriophage. The experiments were carried out using white PAR light delivered by fluorescent PAR lamps (40 W m(-2)), sun light (600 W m(-2)) and an halogen lamp (40-1690 W m(-2)). Phage suspensions and two cationic photosensitizers (Tetra-Py(+)-Me, Tri-Py(+)-Me-PF) at concentrations of 0.5, 1.0 and 5.0 microM were used. The results showed that the efficacy of the bacteriophage photoinactivation is correlated not only with the sensitizer and its concentration but also with the light source, energy dose and fluence rate applied. Both photosensitizers at 5.0 microM were able to inactivate the T4-like phage to the limit of detection for each light source and fluence rate. However, depending of the light parameters, different irradiation times are required. The efficiency of photoinactivation is dependent on the spectral emission distribution of the light sources used. Considering the same light source and a fixed light dose applied at different fluence rates, phage inactivation was significantly higher when low fluence rates were used. In this way, the light source, fluence rate and total light dose play an important role in the effectiveness of the antimicrobial photodynamic therapy and should always be considered when establishing an optimal antimicrobial protocol. PMID:20563346

  18. 5T4 oncofetal antigen expression in ovarian carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Wrigley, E.; McGown, A.T.; Rennison, J.; Swindell, R.; Crowther, D.; Starzynska, T.; Stern, P.L.

    1995-07-01

    5T4 oncofetal antigen is defined by a monoclonal antibody raised against human placental trophoblast, and recognizes a 72 kD glycoprotein expressed in many different carcinomas but detected only at low levels in some normal epithelia. Analysis of the patterns of expression of 5T4 oncofetal antigen in colorectal carcinomas has indicated a significant association between the presence of the antigen in tumor cells and metastatic spread. The 5T4 antigen expression of 72 epithelial ovarian carcinomas has been investigated by immunohistochemistry; 71% of the carcinomas demonstrated positive 5T4 immunoreactivity in adenocarcinoma cells and/or associated stromal tissue. In order to assess any relationship to prognosis, the 5T4 phenotypes were analyzed with respect to various clinicopathologic features of the tumors and the clinical outcome of the patients assessed by survival and disease-free interval. There was a significant correlation between 5T4 expression and more advanced stage of disease (FIGO stages III and IV) (P < 0.001) and with poorly differentiated tumors (P = 0.036) compared to well or moderately differentiated tumors. Patients with tumors expressing 5T4 were less likely to respond well to adjuvant therapy (P = 0.030) and had a significantly worse outlook in terms of survival (P = 0.033) and disease-free interval (P = 0.033). This significance was not demonstrated as acting independently of FIGO stage and tumor differentiation. PMID:11578488

  19. Use of Bacteriophages to control bacterial pathogens

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Lytic bacteriophages can provide a natural method and an effective alternative to antibiotics to reduce bacterial pathogens in animals, foods, and other environments. Bacteriophages (phages) are viruses which infect bacterial cells and eventually kill them through lysis, and represent the most abun...

  20. Amino acid sequences of lysozymes newly purified from invertebrates imply wide distribution of a novel class in the lysozyme family.

    PubMed

    Ito, Y; Yoshikawa, A; Hotani, T; Fukuda, S; Sugimura, K; Imoto, T

    1999-01-01

    Lysozymes were purified from three invertebrates: a marine bivalve, a marine conch, and an earthworm. The purified lysozymes all showed a similar molecular weight of 13 kDa on SDS/PAGE. Their N-terminal sequences up to the 33rd residue determined here were apparently homologous among them; in addition, they had a homology with a partial sequence of a starfish lysozyme which had been reported before. The complete sequence of the bivalve lysozyme was determined by peptide mapping and subsequent sequence analysis. This was composed of 123 amino acids including as many as 14 cysteine residues and did not show a clear homology with the known types of lysozymes. However, the homology search of this protein on the protein or nucleic acid database revealed two homologous proteins. One of them was a gene product, CELF22 A3.6 of C. elegans, which was a functionally unknown protein. The other was an isopeptidase of a medicinal leech, named destabilase. Thus, a new type of lysozyme found in at least four species across the three classes of the invertebrates demonstrates a novel class of protein/lysozyme family in invertebrates. The bivalve lysozyme, first characterized here, showed extremely high protein stability and hen lysozyme-like enzymatic features. PMID:9914527

  1. Multiple specialised goose-type lysozymes potentially compensate for an exceptional lack of chicken-type lysozymes in Atlantic cod

    PubMed Central

    Seppola, Marit; Bakkemo, Kathrine Ryvold; Mikkelsen, Helene; Myrnes, Bjørnar; Helland, Ronny; Irwin, David M.; Nilsen, Inge W.

    2016-01-01

    Previous analyses of the Atlantic cod genome showed unique combinations of lacking and expanded number of genes for the immune system. The present study examined lysozyme activity, lysozyme gene distribution and expression in cod. Enzymatic assays employing specific bacterial lysozyme inhibitors provided evidence for presence of g-type, but unexpectedly not for c-type lysozyme activity. Database homology searches failed to identify any c-type lysozyme gene in the cod genome or in expressed sequence tags from cod. In contrast, we identified four g-type lysozyme genes (LygF1a-d) constitutively expressed, although differentially, in all cod organs examined. The active site glutamate residue is replaced by alanine in LygF1a, thus making it enzymatic inactive, while LygF1d was found in two active site variants carrying alanine or glutamate, respectively. In vitro and in vivo infection by the intracellular bacterium Francisella noatunensis gave a significantly reduced LygF1a and b expression but increased expression of the LygF1c and d genes as did also the interferon gamma (IFNγ) cytokine. These results demonstrate a lack of c-type lysozyme that is unprecedented among vertebrates. Our results further indicate that serial gene duplications have produced multiple differentially regulated cod g-type lysozymes with specialised functions potentially compensating for the lack of c-type lysozymes. PMID:27324690

  2. Multiple specialised goose-type lysozymes potentially compensate for an exceptional lack of chicken-type lysozymes in Atlantic cod.

    PubMed

    Seppola, Marit; Bakkemo, Kathrine Ryvold; Mikkelsen, Helene; Myrnes, Bjørnar; Helland, Ronny; Irwin, David M; Nilsen, Inge W

    2016-01-01

    Previous analyses of the Atlantic cod genome showed unique combinations of lacking and expanded number of genes for the immune system. The present study examined lysozyme activity, lysozyme gene distribution and expression in cod. Enzymatic assays employing specific bacterial lysozyme inhibitors provided evidence for presence of g-type, but unexpectedly not for c-type lysozyme activity. Database homology searches failed to identify any c-type lysozyme gene in the cod genome or in expressed sequence tags from cod. In contrast, we identified four g-type lysozyme genes (LygF1a-d) constitutively expressed, although differentially, in all cod organs examined. The active site glutamate residue is replaced by alanine in LygF1a, thus making it enzymatic inactive, while LygF1d was found in two active site variants carrying alanine or glutamate, respectively. In vitro and in vivo infection by the intracellular bacterium Francisella noatunensis gave a significantly reduced LygF1a and b expression but increased expression of the LygF1c and d genes as did also the interferon gamma (IFNγ) cytokine. These results demonstrate a lack of c-type lysozyme that is unprecedented among vertebrates. Our results further indicate that serial gene duplications have produced multiple differentially regulated cod g-type lysozymes with specialised functions potentially compensating for the lack of c-type lysozymes. PMID:27324690

  3. Resistance screening essay of wine lactic acid bacteria on lysozyme: efficacy of lysozyme in unclarified grape musts.

    PubMed

    Delfini, Claudio; Cersosimo, Manuela; Del Prete, Vincenzo; Strano, Morela; Gaetano, Giuseppe; Pagliara, Adolfo; Ambrò, Stefano

    2004-04-01

    In wine making, the bacteriolytic activity of lysozyme has primarily been used to control the malolactic fermentation in wines. The use of lysozyme in musts before settling and the beginning of the alcoholic fermentation to inhibit the growth of lactic acid bacteria could be very beneficial. In a resistance test carried out in MT/b broth, lysozyme had greater antimicrobial activity toward Oenococcus oeni than Lactobacillus species. Several strains of wine bacteria belonging to Oenococcus proved sensitive to the bacteriolytic activity of lysozyme at low concentrations in both synthetic medium (MT/b) (50 mg/L), white must, or red must made with or without the skins (100 mg/L). Lactobacillus and Pediococcus strains survived at lysozyme concentrations of 200-500 and 500 mg/L, respectively, in MT/b and musts. Suspended solids in unclarified musts may strongly bind to lysozyme thereby causing its removal by filtration or centrifugation. One hour after lysozyme was added to musts, it was quantified by HPLC and found after centrifugation to be 40-50% and only 10% in musts made with or without the skins, respectively. Although appreciable amounts of lysozyme were bound to wine components, this did not appear to be a serious hindrance to lysozyme activity. PMID:15053521

  4. Lysozyme Photochemistry as a Function of Temperature. The Protective Effect of Nanoparticles on Lysozyme Photostability.

    PubMed

    Oliveira Silva, Catarina; Petersen, Steffen B; Pinto Reis, Catarina; Rijo, Patrícia; Molpeceres, Jesús; Vorum, Henrik; Neves-Petersen, Maria Teresa

    2015-01-01

    The presence of aromatic residues and their close spatial proximity to disulphide bridges makes hen egg white lysozyme labile to UV excitation. UVB induced photo-oxidation of tryptophan and tyrosine residues leads to photochemical products, such as, kynurenine, N-formylkynurenine and dityrosine and to the disruption of disulphide bridges in proteins. We here report that lysozyme UV induced photochemistry is modulated by temperature, excitation power, illumination time, excitation wavelength and by the presence of plasmonic quencher surfaces, such as gold, and by the presence of natural fluorescence quenchers, such as hyaluronic acid and oleic acid. We show evidence that the photo-oxidation effects triggered by 295 nm at 20°C are reversible and non-reversible at 10°C, 25°C and 30°C. This paper provides evidence that the 295 nm damage threshold of lysozyme lies between 0.1 μW and 0.3 μW. Protein conformational changes induced by temperature and UV light have been detected upon monitoring changes in the fluorescence emission spectra of lysozyme tryptophan residues and SYPRO® Orange. Lysozyme has been conjugated onto gold nanoparticles, coated with hyaluronic acid and oleic acid (HAOA). Steady state and time resolved fluorescence studies of free and conjugated lysozyme onto HAOA gold nanoparticles reveals that the presence of the polymer decreased the rate of the observed photochemical reactions and induced a preference for short fluorescence decay lifetimes. Size and surface charge of the HAOA gold nanoparticles have been determined by dynamic light scattering and zeta potential measurements. TEM analysis of the particles confirms the presence of a gold core surrounded by a HAOA matrix. We conclude that HAOA gold nanoparticles may efficiently protect lysozyme from the photochemical effects of UVB light and this nanocarrier could be potentially applied to other proteins with clinical relevance. In addition, this study confirms that the temperature plays a

  5. Lysozyme Photochemistry as a Function of Temperature. The Protective Effect of Nanoparticles on Lysozyme Photostability

    PubMed Central

    Oliveira Silva, Catarina; Petersen, Steffen B.; Pinto Reis, Catarina; Rijo, Patrícia; Molpeceres, Jesús; Vorum, Henrik; Neves-Petersen, Maria Teresa

    2015-01-01

    The presence of aromatic residues and their close spatial proximity to disulphide bridges makes hen egg white lysozyme labile to UV excitation. UVB induced photo-oxidation of tryptophan and tyrosine residues leads to photochemical products, such as, kynurenine, N–formylkynurenine and dityrosine and to the disruption of disulphide bridges in proteins. We here report that lysozyme UV induced photochemistry is modulated by temperature, excitation power, illumination time, excitation wavelength and by the presence of plasmonic quencher surfaces, such as gold, and by the presence of natural fluorescence quenchers, such as hyaluronic acid and oleic acid. We show evidence that the photo-oxidation effects triggered by 295 nm at 20°C are reversible and non-reversible at 10°C, 25°C and 30°C. This paper provides evidence that the 295 nm damage threshold of lysozyme lies between 0.1 μW and 0.3 μW. Protein conformational changes induced by temperature and UV light have been detected upon monitoring changes in the fluorescence emission spectra of lysozyme tryptophan residues and SYPRO® Orange. Lysozyme has been conjugated onto gold nanoparticles, coated with hyaluronic acid and oleic acid (HAOA). Steady state and time resolved fluorescence studies of free and conjugated lysozyme onto HAOA gold nanoparticles reveals that the presence of the polymer decreased the rate of the observed photochemical reactions and induced a preference for short fluorescence decay lifetimes. Size and surface charge of the HAOA gold nanoparticles have been determined by dynamic light scattering and zeta potential measurements. TEM analysis of the particles confirms the presence of a gold core surrounded by a HAOA matrix. We conclude that HAOA gold nanoparticles may efficiently protect lysozyme from the photochemical effects of UVB light and this nanocarrier could be potentially applied to other proteins with clinical relevance. In addition, this study confirms that the temperature plays a

  6. Tetragonal Lysozyme, From Monomer to Crystal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pusey, Marc L.; Curreri, Peter A. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The data now leads us to a comprehensive model for the process by which tetragonal lysozyme crystals are nucleated and subsequently grow. Lysozyme is typically desolubilized by addition of ionic salts. The salt anions bind to basic and other sites on the protein and promote protein-protein interactions, i.e., initiate the nucleation self assembly process. Formation of protein-protein interactions occurs at the expense of the protein-anion interactions, with the anions being released to the solution. The association follows a defined pattern, forming the "head to side" interactions of the crystal 4(3) helix. The presence of the high salt also promotes hydrophobic interactions between the protein molecules, further tightening their interaction. The solute assembly process persists after crystal nucleation, and the 4(3) helical structures form the subsequent growth units. AFM measurements show that the growth units follow the dimensions of these helices, and that those on the surface are more compact about the c-axis than in the bulk crystal, with adjacent helices riot being in contact. This further supports the role of hydrophobic interactions, as the surface is still in contact with the bulk solution. Once buried within the crystal the protein:salt ratio radically changes and the hydrophobic interactions relax to those measured crystallographically. Thus the crystal growth process recapitulates the initial stages of the nucleation process, and the two seamlessly merge. Experimental evidence, based upon face growth rate, AFM, and fluorescence energy transfer data, for a postulated model of the nucleation of tetragonal lysozyme crystals and how it transitions into crystal growth will be presented.

  7. Gene Network Visualization and Quantitative Synteny Analysis of more than 300 Marine T4-Like Phage Scaffolds from the GOS Metagenome

    PubMed Central

    Comeau, André M.; Arbiol, Christine; Krisch, H.M.

    2010-01-01

    Bacteriophages (phages) are the most abundant biological entities in the biosphere and are the dominant “organisms” in marine environments, exerting an enormous influence on marine microbial populations. Metagenomic projects, such as the Global Ocean Sampling expedition (GOS), have demonstrated the predominance of tailed phages (Caudovirales), particularly T4 superfamily cyanophages (Cyano-T4s), in the marine milieu. Whereas previous metagenomic analyses were limited to gene content information, here we present a comparative analysis of over 300 phage scaffolds assembled from the viral fraction of the GOS data. This assembly permits the examination of synteny (organization) of the genes on the scaffolds and their comparison with the genome sequences from cultured Cyano-T4s. We employ comparative genomics and a novel usage of network visualization software to show that the scaffold phylogenies are similar to those of the traditional marker genes they contain. Importantly, these uncultured metagenomic scaffolds quite closely match the organization of the “core genome” of the known Cyano-T4s. This indicates that the current view of genome architecture in the Cyano-T4s is not seriously biased by being based on a small number of cultured phages, and we can be confident that they accurately reflect the diverse population of such viruses in marine surface waters. PMID:20231334

  8. Gene network visualization and quantitative synteny analysis of more than 300 marine T4-like phage scaffolds from the GOS metagenome.

    PubMed

    Comeau, André M; Arbiol, Christine; Krisch, H M

    2010-08-01

    Bacteriophages (phages) are the most abundant biological entities in the biosphere and are the dominant "organisms" in marine environments, exerting an enormous influence on marine microbial populations. Metagenomic projects, such as the Global Ocean Sampling expedition (GOS), have demonstrated the predominance of tailed phages (Caudovirales), particularly T4 superfamily cyanophages (Cyano-T4s), in the marine milieu. Whereas previous metagenomic analyses were limited to gene content information, here we present a comparative analysis of over 300 phage scaffolds assembled from the viral fraction of the GOS data. This assembly permits the examination of synteny (organization) of the genes on the scaffolds and their comparison with the genome sequences from cultured Cyano-T4s. We employ comparative genomics and a novel usage of network visualization software to show that the scaffold phylogenies are similar to those of the traditional marker genes they contain. Importantly, these uncultured metagenomic scaffolds quite closely match the organization of the "core genome" of the known Cyano-T4s. This indicates that the current view of genome architecture in the Cyano-T4s is not seriously biased by being based on a small number of cultured phages, and we can be confident that they accurately reflect the diverse population of such viruses in marine surface waters. PMID:20231334

  9. Action of egg white lysozyme on Clostridium tyrobutyricum.

    PubMed Central

    Wasserfall, F; Teuber, M

    1979-01-01

    A 500-U ml-1 portion of egg white lysozyme was able to kill 99% of 5 X 10(5) resting vegetative cells of Clostridium tyrobutyricum within 24 h of incubation at 25 degrees C. Spores were completely resistant to lysozyme. Proliferating vegetative cells were severely inhibited, although lysozyme-resistant cells developed in growing cultures in the presence of lysozyme. Whereas early stages of spore germination (loss of optical refractility and heat resistance) were not inhibited by lysozyme, the overall outgrowth of spore cells into vegetative cells was delayed by 1 day in the presence of 500 U of lysosyme ml-1. This delay was independent of the lysozyme sensitivity or resistance of the mother culture of the used spores. It is suggested that this inhibition by lysozyme of the outgrowth of spore cells into vegetative cells of the lactate-fermenting C. tyrobutyricum is the basis for the observation that lysozyme can substitute for nitrate in preventing the "late gas" defect of Edam- and Gouda-type cheeses. PMID:518083

  10. Immobilization of lysozyme on cotton fabrics; synthesis, characterication, and activity

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The antimicrobial activity of lysozyme derives from the hydrolysis of the bacterial cell wall polysaccharide at the glycosidic bond that links N-acetyl-glucosamine and N-acetyl-muramic acid. Maintaining the activity of lysozyme while bound to a cellulose substrate is a goal toward developing enzyme...

  11. Purification of Lysozyme by Intrinsically Shielded Hydrogel Beads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Cong; Zhang, R.; Wang, L.; Bowyer, A.; Eisenthal, R.; Shen, Yehua; Hubble, J.

    2013-07-01

    Macro-sized intrinsically shielded hydrogel beads have been prepared from BSA and CM-dextran grafted with CB using a technique based on freeze-thawing gelation method. The size of the beads lies in around 500 μm. Isothemal titration calorimetry (ITC) showed that the relative binding affinities of the lysozyme for CB, compared with BSA, at pH 3.0 was stronger than that at pH 7.4. They were employed for the affinity separation of lysozyme using chromatography column. Their adsorption capacity for lysozyme at pH 3.0 is higher than that at pH 9. In a binary mixture of lysozyme and ovalbumin, the beads showed very high selectivity toward lysozyme. Lysozyme of very high purity (> 93%) was obtained from a mixture of lysozyme and ovalbumin, and 85% from egg white solution. The results indicate that the macro-sized bead can be used for the separation, purification, and recovery of lysozyme in a chromatograph column.

  12. Adaptive functional diversification of lysozyme in insectivorous bats.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yang; He, Guimei; Xu, Huihui; Han, Xiuqun; Jones, Gareth; Rossiter, Stephen J; Zhang, Shuyi

    2014-11-01

    The role of gene duplication in generating new genes and novel functions is well recognized and is exemplified by the digestion-related protein lysozyme. In ruminants, duplicated chicken-type lysozymes facilitate the degradation of symbiotic bacteria in the foregut. Chicken-type lysozyme has also been reported to show chitinase-like activity, yet no study has examined the molecular evolution of lysozymes in species that specialize on eating insects. Insectivorous bats number over 900 species, and lysozyme expression in the mouths of some of these species is associated with the ingestion of insect cuticle, suggesting a chitinase role. Here, we show that chicken-type lysozyme has undergone multiple duplication events in a major family of insect-eating bats (Vespertilionidae) and that new duplicates have undergone molecular adaptation. Examination of duplicates from two insectivorous bats-Pipistrellus abramus and Scotophilus kuhlii-indicated that the new copy was highly expressed in the tongue, whereas the other one was less tissue-specific. Functional assays applied to pipistrelle lysozymes confirmed that, of the two copies, the tongue duplicate was more efficient at breaking down glycol chitin, a chitin derivative. These results suggest that the evolution of lysozymes in vespertilionid bats has likely been driven in part by natural selection for insectivory. PMID:25135943

  13. Regenerated cellulose fiber and film immobilized with lysozyme

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The present work reports an initial engineering approach for fabricating lysozyme-bound regenerated cellulose fiber and film. Glycine-esterified cotton was dissolved in an ionic liquid solvent 1–Butyl–3–methylimidazolium Chloride (BMIMCl) in which lysozyme was activated and covalently attached to c...

  14. Single molecule studies of DNA packaging by bacteriophages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuller, Derek Nathan

    The DNA packaging dynamics of bacteriophages φ29, gamma, and T4 were studied at the single molecule level using a dual trap optical tweezers. Also, a method for producing long DNA molecules by PCR for optical tweezers studies of protein DNA interactions is presented and thoroughly characterized. This DNA preparation technique provided DNA samples for the φ29 and T4 studies. In the studies of φ29, the role of charge was investigated by varying the ionic conditions of the packaging buffer. Ionic conditions in which the DNA charge was highly screened due to divalent and trivalent cations showed the lowest resistance to packaging of the DNA to high density. This confirmed the importance of counterions in shielding the DNA interstrand repulsion when packaged to high density. While the ionic nature of the packaging buffer had a strong effect on packaging velocities, there was no clear trend between the counterion-screened charge of the DNA and the maximum packaging velocity. The packaging studies of lambda and T4 served as systems for comparative studies with φ29. Each system showed similarities to the φ29 system and unique differences. Both the lambda and T4 packaging motors were capable of generating forces in excess of 50 pN and showed remarkably high processivity, similar to φ29. However, dynamic structural transitions were observed with lambda that are not observed with φ29. The packaging of the lambda genome showed capsid expansion at approximately 30 percent of the genome packaged and capsid rupture at 90 percent of the genome packaged in the absence of capsid stabilizing protein gpD. Unique to the T4 packaging motor, packaging dynamics showed a remarkable amount of variability in velocities. This variability was seen both within individual packaging phages and from one phage to the next. This is possibly due to different conformational states of the packaging machinery. Additionally, lambda and T4 had average packaging velocities under minimal load of 600

  15. Structure of the Bacteriophage [phi]KZ Lytic Transglycosylase gp144

    SciTech Connect

    Fokine, Andrei; Miroshnikov, Konstantin A.; Shneider, Mikhail M.; Mesyanzhinov, Vadim V.; Rossmann, Michael G.

    2008-04-02

    Lytic transglycosylases are enzymes that act on the peptidoglycan of bacterial cell walls. They cleave the glycosidic linkage between N-acetylmuramoyl and N-acetylglucosaminyl residues with the concomitant formation of a 1,6-anhydromuramoyl product. The x-ray structure of the lytic transglycosylase gp144 from the Pseudomonas bacteriophage {phi}KZ has been determined to 2.5-{angstrom} resolution. This protein is probably employed by the bacteriophage in the late stage of the virus reproduction cycle to destroy the bacterial cell wall to release the phage progeny. {phi}KZ gp144 is a 260-residue {alpha}-helical protein composed of a 70-residue N-terminal cell wall-binding domain and a C-terminal catalytic domain. The fold of the N-terminal domain is similar to the peptidoglycan-binding domain from Streptomyces albus G d-Ala-d-Ala carboxypeptidase and to the N-terminal prodomain of human metalloproteinases that act on extracellular matrices. The C-terminal catalytic domain of gp144 has a structural similarity to the catalytic domain of the transglycosylase Slt70 from Escherichia coli and to lysozymes. The gp144 catalytic domain has an elongated groove that can bind at least five sugar residues at sites A-E. As in other lysozymes, the peptidoglycan cleavage (catalyzed by Glu{sup 115} in gp144) occurs between sugar-binding subsites D and E. The x-ray structure of the {phi}KZ transglycosylase complexed with the chitotetraose (N-acetylglucosamine){sub 4} has been determined to 2.6-{angstrom} resolution. The N-acetylglucosamine residues of the chitotetraose bind in sites A-D.

  16. Bioengineered lysozyme in combination therapies for Pseudomonas aeruginosa lung infections.

    PubMed

    Griswold, Karl E; Bement, Jenna L; Teneback, Charlotte C; Scanlon, Thomas C; Wargo, Matthew J; Leclair, Laurie W

    2014-01-01

    There is increasing urgency in the battle against drug-resistant bacterial pathogens, and this public health crisis has created a desperate need for novel antimicrobial agents. Recombinant human lysozyme represents one interesting candidate for treating pulmonary infections, but the wild type enzyme is subject to electrostatic mediated inhibition by anionic biopolymers that accumulate in the infected lung. We have redesigned lysozyme's electrostatic potential field, creating a genetically engineered variant that is less susceptible to polyanion inhibition, yet retains potent bactericidal activity. A recent publication demonstrated that the engineered enzyme outperforms wild type lysozyme in a murine model of Pseudomonas aeruginosa lung infection. Here, we expand upon our initial studies and consider dual therapies that combine lysozymes with an antimicrobial peptide. Consistent with our earlier results, the charge modified lysozyme combination outperformed its wild type counterpart, yielding more than an order-of-magnitude reduction in bacterial burden following treatment with a single dose. PMID:24637705

  17. Determination of monomer concentrations in crystallizing lysozyme solutions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, L. J.; Pusey, Marc L.

    1992-01-01

    We have developed a non-optical technique for the study of aggregation in lysozyme and other protein solutions. By monitoring the rate at which lysozyme traverses a semipermeable membrane it was possible to quantitate the degree of aggregation in supersaturated solutions. Using this technique, we have measured the concentration of monomers and larger aggregates in under- and oversaturated lysozyme solutions, and in the presence of crystals, at pH 4.0 and 3 percent NaCl (0.1M NaAc). Comparison of these concentration profiles with (110) face growth rate data supports the theory that tetragonal lysozyme crystals grow by addition of preformed aggregates and not by monomer addition. The data suggest that a considerable population of aggregates larger than dimers are present at lysozyme concentrations above 22 mg/ml. Determination of dimer concentrations, and equilibrium constants for subsequent aggregation levels, are currently underway.

  18. Comparative genomics of the T4-Like Escherichia coli phage JS98: implications for the evolution of T4 phages.

    PubMed

    Chibani-Chennoufi, Sandra; Canchaya, Carlos; Bruttin, Anne; Brüssow, Harald

    2004-12-01

    About 130 kb of sequence information was obtained from the coliphage JS98 isolated from the stool of a pediatric diarrhea patient in Bangladesh. The DNA shared up to 81% base pair identity with phage T4. The most conserved regions between JS98 and T4 were the structural genes, but their degree of conservation was not uniform. The head genes showed the highest sequence conservation, followed by the tail, baseplate, and tail fiber genes. Many tail fiber genes shared only protein sequence identity. Except for the insertion of endonuclease genes in T4 and gene 24 duplication in JS98, the structural gene maps of the two phages were colinear. The receptor-recognizing tail fiber proteins gp37 and gp38 were only distantly related to T4, but shared up to 83% amino acid identity to other T6-like phages, suggesting lateral gene transfer. A greater degree of variability was seen between JS98 and T4 over DNA replication and DNA transaction genes. While most of these genes came in the same order and shared up to 76% protein sequence identity, a few rearrangements, insertions, and replacements of genes were observed. Many putative gene insertions in the DNA replication module of T4 were flanked by intron-related endonuclease genes, suggesting mobile DNA elements. A hotspot of genome diversification was located downstream of the DNA polymerase gene 43 and the DNA binding gene 32. Comparative genomics of 100-kb genome sequence revealed that T4-like phages diversify more by the accumulation of point mutations and occasional gene duplication events than by modular exchanges. PMID:15576776

  19. Lytic Clostridium perfringens Bacteriophage 39-O Genomic

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Screening for bacteriophages lytic for Clostridium perfringens was completed utilizing filtered samples obtained from poultry (intestinal material), soil, sewage and poultry processing drainage water. Following limit dilution cloning and three rounds of plaque purification lytic phage preparations ...

  20. Antibacterial functionalization of wool fabric via immobilizing lysozymes.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qiang; Fan, Xuerong; Hu, Yingjun; Yuan, Jiugang; Cui, Li; Wang, Ping

    2009-08-01

    Greater attention has been given to enzymatic processes of textiles as effective alternatives to conventional chemical treatments because of the non-toxic and eco-friendly characteristics of enzymes as well as the increasingly important requirement for reducing pollution in textile production. A new functionalization method for wool fabrics based on immobilization of lysozymes was investigated in this paper. Wool fabric was first activated with glutaraldehyde, and then employed to covalently immobilize lysozymes. Main immobilization parameters were optimized in terms of the activity of immobilized enzyme. A high activity of the immobilized enzyme was obtained when the fabric was activated at 25 degrees C for 6 h in a bath containing with 0.2% of glutaraldehyde followed by the immobilization at 4 degrees C and pH 7.0 for 6 h with 5 g l(-1) lysozyme. The scanning electron microscopy and staining tests based on modified Coomassie protein assay (Bradford method) revealed that the lysozyme was fixed covalently on the wool fabric. Wool fabrics immobilizing lysozymes presented a higher ratio of bacteriostasis to Staphylococcus aureus. The durability of antibacterial wool was assessed and the lysozyme immobilized on wool fabric retained ca. 43% of its activity after five cycles of use when taking the activity of the immobilized lysozyme before using as reference. PMID:19082843

  1. Lysozyme loading and release from Se doped hydroxyapatite nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yanhua; Hao, Hang; Zhang, Shengmin

    2016-04-01

    Element-substituted hydroxyapatite (HA) based nanocomposites have become a promising therapeutic material for improving bone defect repair. Selenium substituted HA nanoparticles can both induce apoptosis of bone tumor cells and enhance osteointegration. However, the effect of selenite ions on the proteins in combination with the HA nanoparticles remains to be elucidated. Here, we investigated the influence of selenium doping concentration on the loading and release of lysozyme (LSM) as a model protein drug. The selenium substituted HA-LSM composites with different doping concentrations were synthesized and characterized. The subsequent delivery of lysozyme was studied in a phosphate buffer solution (PBS). We found that selenium substituted HA-LSM composites with Se:P=10% showed the highest amount of lysozyme loading (41.7%), whereas the amount of lysozyme loaded in undoped HA nanoparticles was the lowest (34.1%). The doped selenium interacts with lysozyme molecules, which leads to the increase of β-sheet and unordered, and the decrease of self-association, α-helix and β-turns in protein structures. Moreover, selenium addition significantly slows the protein release from HA-LSM composites. The composites with Se:P=10% release lysozyme at the slightly slower rate among the samples with different Se doping concentrations. It also shows that the released lysozyme retains most of its enzymatic activity. PMID:26838882

  2. The Effects of Acetate Buffer Concentration on Lysozyme Solubility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Forsythe, Elizabeth L.; Pusey, Marc L.

    1996-01-01

    The micro-solubility column technique was employed to systematically investigate the effects of buffer concentration on tetragonal lysozyme solubility. While keeping the NaCl concentrations constant at 2%, 3%, 4%, 5% and 7%, and the pH at 4.0, we have studied the solubility of tetragonal lysozyme over an acetate buffer concentration range of 0.01M to 0.5M as a function of temperature. The lysozyme solubility decreased with increasing acetate concentration from 0.01M to 0.1M. This decrease may simply be due to the net increase in solvent ionic strength. Increasing the acetate concentration beyond 0.1M resulted in an increase in the lysozyme solubility, which reached a peak at - 0.3M acetate concentration. This increase was believed to be due to the increased binding of acetate to the anionic binding sites of lysozyme, preventing their occupation by chloride. In keeping with the previously observed reversal of the Hoffmeister series for effectiveness of anions in crystallizing lysozyme, acetate would be a less effective precipitant than chloride. Further increasing the acetate concentration beyond 0.3M resulted in a subsequent gradual decrease in the lysozyme solubility at all NaCl concentrations.

  3. Arthrobacter globiformis and its bacteriophage in soil

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Casida, L. E., Jr.; Liu, K.-C.

    1974-01-01

    An attempt was made to correlate bacteriophages for Arthrobacter globiformis with soils containing that bacterium. The phages were not detected unless the soil was nutritionally amended (with glucose or sucrose) and incubated for several days. Phage was continuously produced after amendment without the addition of host Arthrobacter. These results indicate that the bacteriophage is present in a masked state and that the bacteria are present in an insensitive form which becomes sensitive after addition of nutrient.

  4. Lysozyme contamination facilitates crystallization of a heterotrimeric cortactin–Arg–lysozyme complex

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Weizhi; MacGrath, Stacey M.; Koleske, Anthony J.; Boggon, Titus J.

    2012-01-01

    Crystallization of contaminating proteins is a frequently encountered problem for macromolecular crystallographers. In this study, an attempt was made to obtain a binary cocrystal structure of the SH3 domain of cortactin and a 17-­residue peptide from the Arg nonreceptor tyrosine kinase encompassing a PxxPxxPxxP (PxxP1) motif. However, cocrystals could only be obtained in the presence of trace amounts of a contaminating protein. A structure solution obtained by molecular replacement followed by ARP/wARP automatic model building allowed a ‘sequence-by-crystallography’ approach to discover that the contaminating protein was lysozyme. This 1.65 Å resolution crystal structure determination of a 1:1:1 heterotrimeric complex of Arg, cortactin and lysozyme thus provides an unusual ‘caveat emptor’ warning of the dangers that underpurified proteins harbor for macromolecular crystallographers. PMID:22297987

  5. Oral Application of T4 Phage Induces Weak Antibody Production in the Gut and in the Blood.

    PubMed

    Majewska, Joanna; Beta, Weronika; Lecion, Dorota; Hodyra-Stefaniak, Katarzyna; Kłopot, Anna; Kaźmierczak, Zuzanna; Miernikiewicz, Paulina; Piotrowicz, Agnieszka; Ciekot, Jarosław; Owczarek, Barbara; Kopciuch, Agnieszka; Wojtyna, Karolina; Harhala, Marek; Mąkosa, Mateusz; Dąbrowska, Krystyna

    2015-08-01

    A specific humoral response to bacteriophages may follow phage application for medical purposes, and it may further determine the success or failure of the approach itself. We present a long-term study of antibody induction in mice by T4 phage applied per os: 100 days of phage treatment followed by 112 days without the phage, and subsequent second application of phage up to day 240. Serum and gut antibodies (IgM, IgG, secretory IgA) were analyzed in relation to microbiological status of the animals. T4 phage applied orally induced anti-phage antibodies when the exposure was long enough (IgG day 36, IgA day 79); the effect was related to high dosage. Termination of phage treatment resulted in a decrease of IgA again to insignificant levels. Second administration of phage induces secretory IgA sooner than that induced by the first administrations. Increased IgA level antagonized gut transit of active phage. Phage resistant E. coli dominated gut flora very late, on day 92. Thus, the immunological response emerges as a major factor determining phage survival in the gut. Phage proteins Hoc and gp12 were identified as highly immunogenic. A low response to exemplary foreign antigens (from Ebola virus) presented on Hoc was observed, which suggests that phage platforms can be used in oral vaccine design. PMID:26308042

  6. Nucleation and Growth According to Lysozyme

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pusey, Marc L.; Curreri, Peter A. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    How does one take a molecule, strongly asymmetric in both shape and charge distribution, and assemble it into a crystal? We propose a model for the nucleation and crystal growth process for tetragonal lysozyme that may be very germane to other monomeric proteins. The first species formed is postulated to be a dimer. Through repeating associations involving the same intermolecular interactions this becomes the 4(sub 3) helix, that in turn serves as the basic unit for nucleation and crystal growth. High salt attenuates surface charges while promoting hydrophobic interactions. Symmetry facilitates helix self-association. Assembly stability is enhanced when a four helix structure is obtained, with each bound to two neighbors. Only two unique interactions are required. The first are those for helix formation, where the dominant interaction is the intermolecular bridging anion. The second is the anti-parallel side-by-side helix-helix interaction, guided by alternating pairs of symmetry related salt bridges along each side. At this stage all eight unique positions of the P4(sub 3)2(sub 1)2(sub 1) unit cell are filled. From the above, the process is one of a) attenuating the most strongly interacting groups, such that b) the molecules begin to self-associate in defined patterns, so that c) symmetry is obtained, which d) propagates as a growing crystal. Simple and conceptually obvious in hindsight, this tells much about what we are empirically doing when we crystallize macromolecules. By adjusting the solution parameters we are empirically balancing the intermolecular interactions, preferentially attenuating the dominant strong (for lysozyme the charged groups) while strengthening the lesser strong (hydrophobic) interactions. Lysozyme is atypical in the breadth of its crystallization conditions; many proteins only crystallize under narrowly defined conditions, pointing to the criticality of the empirical balancing process. Lack of a singularly defined association pathway

  7. Mesoscopic coarse-grained simulations of lysozyme adsorption.

    PubMed

    Yu, Gaobo; Liu, Jie; Zhou, Jian

    2014-05-01

    Coarse-grained simulations are adopted to study the adsorption behavior of lysozyme on different (hydrophobic, neutral hydrophilic, zwitterionic, negatively charged, and positively charged) surfaces at the mesoscopic microsecond time scale (1.2 μs). Simulation results indicate the following: (i) the conformation change of lysozyme on the hydrophobic surface is bigger than any other studied surfaces; (ii) the active sites of lysozyme are faced to the hydrophobic surface with a "top end-on" orientation, while they are exposed to the liquid phase on the hydrophilic surface with a "back-on" orientation; (iii) the neutral hydrophilic surface can induce the adsorption of lysozyme, while the nonspecific protein adsorption can be resisted by the zwitterionic surface; (iv) when the solution ionic strength is low, lysozyme can anchor on the negatively charged surface easily but cannot adsorb on the positively charged surface; (v) when the solution ionic strength is high, the positively charged lysozyme can also adsorb on the like-charged surface; (vi) the major positive potential center of lysozyme, especially the residue ARG128, plays a vital role in leading the adsorption of lysozyme on charged surfaces; (vii) when the ionic strength is high, a counterion layer is formed above the positively charged surface, which is the key factor why lysozyme can adsorb on a like-charged surface. The coarse-grained method based on the MARTINI force field for proteins and the BMW water model could provide an efficient way to understand protein interfacial adsorption behavior at a greater length scale and time scale. PMID:24785197

  8. Taking Bacteriophage Therapy Seriously: A Moral Argument

    PubMed Central

    Verbeken, Gilbert; Huys, Isabelle; Jennes, Serge; Chanishvili, Nina; Górski, Andrzej; De Vos, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    The excessive and improper use of antibiotics has led to an increasing incidence of bacterial resistance. In Europe the yearly number of infections caused by multidrug resistant bacteria is more than 400.000, each year resulting in 25.000 attributable deaths. Few new antibiotics are in the pipeline of the pharmaceutical industry. Early in the 20th century, bacteriophages were described as entities that can control bacterial populations. Although bacteriophage therapy was developed and practiced in Europe and the former Soviet republics, the use of bacteriophages in clinical setting was neglected in Western Europe since the introduction of traditional antibiotics. Given the worldwide antibiotic crisis there is now a growing interest in making bacteriophage therapy available for use in modern western medicine. Despite the growing interest, access to bacteriophage therapy remains highly problematic. In this paper, we argue that the current state of affairs is morally unacceptable and that all stakeholders (pharmaceutical industry, competent authorities, lawmakers, regulators, and politicians) have the moral duty and the shared responsibility towards making bacteriophage therapy urgently available for all patients in need. PMID:24868534

  9. Taking bacteriophage therapy seriously: a moral argument.

    PubMed

    Verbeken, Gilbert; Huys, Isabelle; Pirnay, Jean-Paul; Jennes, Serge; Chanishvili, Nina; Scheres, Jacques; Górski, Andrzej; De Vos, Daniel; Ceulemans, Carl

    2014-01-01

    The excessive and improper use of antibiotics has led to an increasing incidence of bacterial resistance. In Europe the yearly number of infections caused by multidrug resistant bacteria is more than 400.000, each year resulting in 25.000 attributable deaths. Few new antibiotics are in the pipeline of the pharmaceutical industry. Early in the 20th century, bacteriophages were described as entities that can control bacterial populations. Although bacteriophage therapy was developed and practiced in Europe and the former Soviet republics, the use of bacteriophages in clinical setting was neglected in Western Europe since the introduction of traditional antibiotics. Given the worldwide antibiotic crisis there is now a growing interest in making bacteriophage therapy available for use in modern western medicine. Despite the growing interest, access to bacteriophage therapy remains highly problematic. In this paper, we argue that the current state of affairs is morally unacceptable and that all stakeholders (pharmaceutical industry, competent authorities, lawmakers, regulators, and politicians) have the moral duty and the shared responsibility towards making bacteriophage therapy urgently available for all patients in need. PMID:24868534

  10. Host receptors for bacteriophage adsorption.

    PubMed

    Bertozzi Silva, Juliano; Storms, Zachary; Sauvageau, Dominic

    2016-02-01

    The adsorption of bacteriophages (phages) onto host cells is, in all but a few rare cases, a sine qua non condition for the onset of the infection process. Understanding the mechanisms involved and the factors affecting it is, thus, crucial for the investigation of host-phage interactions. This review provides a survey of the phage host receptors involved in recognition and adsorption and their interactions during attachment. Comprehension of the whole infection process, starting with the adsorption step, can enable and accelerate our understanding of phage ecology and the development of phage-based technologies. To assist in this effort, we have established an open-access resource--the Phage Receptor Database (PhReD)--to serve as a repository for information on known and newly identified phage receptors. PMID:26755501

  11. Bacteriophage endolysins as novel antimicrobials

    PubMed Central

    Schmelcher, Mathias; Donovan, David M; Loessner, Martin J

    2013-01-01

    Endolysins are enzymes used by bacteriophages at the end of their replication cycle to degrade the peptidoglycan of the bacterial host from within, resulting in cell lysis and release of progeny virions. Due to the absence of an outer membrane in the Gram-positive bacterial cell wall, endolysins can access the peptidoglycan and destroy these organisms when applied externally, making them interesting antimicrobial candidates, particularly in light of increasing bacterial drug resistance. This article reviews the modular structure of these enzymes, in which cell wall binding and catalytic functions are separated, as well as their mechanism of action, lytic activity and potential as antimicrobials. It particularly focuses on molecular engineering as a means of optimizing endolysins for specific applications, highlights new developments that may render these proteins active against Gram-negative and intracellular pathogens and summarizes the most recent applications of endolysins in the fields of medicine, food safety, agriculture and biotechnology. PMID:23030422

  12. Bacteriophage T5 transfer RNA

    SciTech Connect

    Hunt, C.; Desai, S.M.; Vaughan, J.; Weiss, S.B.

    1980-04-10

    Previous studies from this laboratory have provided a high resolution map for 16 tRNA genes located on the continuous heavy DNA strand of bacteriophage T5 DNA. All of the T5 tRNA genes were located in three clusters within the DNA C segment, except for tRNA/sup Arg/, which mapped on the left end of the DNA D segment. In this report, we present evidence for the presence of eight additional T5 tRNA species, five of which are located in two new loci within the DNA C segment. We also describe a two-dimensional gel electrophoresis system for the separation and isolation of T5 tRNA species from crude infected RNA preparations. The gel electrophoresis system separates tRNA isoacceptors specific for different amino acids; evidence is presented that the isoacceptors for isoleucine, histidine, and serine are coded by different T5 genes.

  13. Reentrant condensation of lysozyme: Implications for studying dynamics of lysozyme in aqueous solutions of lithium chloride

    SciTech Connect

    Mamontov, Eugene; O'Neill, Hugh Michael

    2014-01-01

    Recent studies have outlined the use of eutectic solution of lithium chloride in water to study microscopic dynamics of lysozyme in an aqueous solvent that is remarkably similar to pure water in many respects, yet allows experiments over a wide temperature range without the solvent crystallization. The eutectic point in (H2O)R(LiCl) system corresponds to R 7.3, and it is of interest to investigate whether less concentrated aqueous solutions of LiCl could be employed in low-temperature studies of a solvated protein. We have investigated a range of concentrations of lysozyme and LiCl in aqueous solutions to identify systems that do not show phase separation and avoid solvent crystallization on cooling down. Compared to the lysozyme concentration in solution, the concentration of LiCl in the aqueous solvent plays the major role in determining systems suitable for low-temperature studies. We have observed interesting and rich phase behavior reminiscent of reentrant condensation of proteins.

  14. [Critical appraisal: combined T3 and T4 replacement therapy is not better than replacement with T4 alone].

    PubMed

    Téllez T, Rafael

    2005-09-01

    Conflicting results have recently been published about the benefits of combined thyroxine (T4) and triiodothyronine (T3) in treating hypothyroid patients. However these studies may have been underpowered to detect differences in psychological well-being specifically related to thyroxine replacement. We conducted a large, double-blind, randomized controlled trial of partial substitution of 50 microg of T4 by 10 microg of T3 (T3) vs placebo (T4 alone - 50 microg of T4 replaced) in 697 hypothyroid patients. Thyroid function showed a rise in the TSH (132%), a fall in Free T4 (35%, P <0.001) and unchanged basal Free T3 levels (P=0.92). At 3 months there was a large (39%) improvement in defined by the General Health Questionnaire 12 score (GHQ 12) in the control group compared with baseline and this was sustained at 12 months. Differences vs the intervention (T3) group were more modest with improvements in GHQ caseness (OR - 0.61; 95% CI: 0.42, 0.90; P=0.01) and HADS anxiety scores at 3 months (P <0.03) but not GHQ Likert scores, HADS depression, thyroid symptoms or visual analog scales of mood and the initial differences were lost at 12 months. These results may be consistent with a subgroup of patients showing transient improvement following partial substitution with T3 but do not provide conclusive evidence of specific benefit from partial substitution of T4 by T3 in patients on thyroxine replacement. They also emphasize the large and sustained that can follow changes in thyroid hormone administration. PMID:16311707

  15. Purification and properties of rabbit alveolar macrophage lysozyme.

    PubMed Central

    Carroll, S F; Martinez, R J

    1979-01-01

    Lysozyme was isolated from Bacillus Calmette-Guerin-elicited rabbit alveolar macrophages by acid extraction and purified to homogeneity by a single-column procedure. Yields of the purified enzyme averaged between 20 and 30 mg per rabbit, values far in excess of those obtained with previously published methods. Rabbit lysozyme has a molecular weight of 14,300 and exhibits optimal lytic activity against Micrococcus lysodeikticus at an ionic strength of 0.04, pH 6.5. Our results indicate that lysozyme and other granule components can be fractionated from elicited alveolar macrophages by using simple techniques, suggesting methods for the bulk purification of lysosomal constituents. Images PMID:37167

  16. Fractal properties of lysozyme: a neutron scattering study.

    PubMed

    Lushnikov, S G; Svanidze, A V; Gvasaliya, S N; Torok, G; Rosta, L; Sashin, I L

    2009-03-01

    The spatial structure and dynamics of hen egg white lysozyme have been investigated by small-angle and inelastic neutron scattering. Analysis of the results was carried using the fractal approach, which allowed determination of the fractal and fracton dimensions of lysozyme, i.e., consideration of the protein structure and dynamics by using a unified approach. Small-angle neutron scattering studies of thermal denaturation of lysozyme have revealed changes in the fractal dimension in the vicinity of the thermal denaturation temperature that reflect changes in the spatial organization of protein. PMID:19391977

  17. T-4G Methodology: Undergraduate Pilot Training T-37 Phase.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woodruff, Robert R.; And Others

    The report's brief introduction describes the application of T-4G methodology to the T-37 instrument phase of undergraduate pilot training. The methodology is characterized by instruction in trainers, proficiency advancement, a highly structured syllabus, the training manager concept, early exposure to instrument training, and hands-on training.…

  18. Structural characteristics of hydration sites in lysozyme.

    PubMed

    Soda, Kunitsugu; Shimbo, Yudai; Seki, Yasutaka; Taiji, Makoto

    2011-06-01

    A new method is presented for determining the hydration site of proteins, where the effect of structural fluctuations in both protein and hydration water is explicitly considered by using molecular dynamics simulation (MDS). The whole hydration sites (HS) of lysozyme are composed of 195 single HSs and 38 clustered ones (CHS), and divided into 231 external HSs (EHS) and 2 internal ones (IHS). The largest CHSs, 'Hg' and 'Lβ', are the IHSs having 2.54 and 1.35 mean internal hydration waters respectively. The largest EHS, 'Clft', is located in the cleft region. The real hydration structure of a CHS is an ensemble of multiple structures. The transition between two structures occurs through recombinations of some H-bonds. The number of the experimental X-ray crystal waters is nearly the same as that of the estimated MDS hydration waters for 70% of the HSs, but significantly different for the rest of HSs. PMID:21435773

  19. The episodic evolution of fibritin: traces of ancient global environmental alterations may remain in the genomes of T4-like phages

    PubMed Central

    Letarov, A V; Krisch, H M

    2013-01-01

    The evolutionary adaptation of bacteriophages to their environment is achieved by alterations of their genomes involving a combination of both point mutations and lateral gene transfer. A phylogenetic analysis of a large set of collar fiber protein (fibritin) loci from diverse T4-like phages indicates that nearly all the modular swapping involving the C-terminal domain of this gene occurred in the distant past and has since ceased. In phage T4, this fibritin domain encodes the sequence that mediates both the attachment of the long tail fibers to the virion and also controls, in an environmentally sensitive way, the phage's ability to infect its host bacteria. Subsequent to its distant period of modular exchange, the evolution of fibritin has proceeded primarily by the slow vertical divergence mechanism. We suggest that ancient and sudden changes in the environment forced the T4-like phages to alter fibritin's mode of action or function. The genome's response to such episodes of rapid environmental change could presumably only be achieved quickly enough by employing the modular evolution mechanism. A phylogenetic analysis of the fibritin locus reveals the possible traces of such events within the T4 superfamily's genomes. PMID:24223296

  20. Characterization of tail sheath protein of giant bacteriophage phiKZ Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    SciTech Connect

    Kurochkina, Lidia P.; Sachkova, Maria Yu.; Sykilinda, Nina N.; Mesyanzhinov, Vadim V.

    2009-12-20

    The tail sheath protein of giant bacteriophage phiKZ Pseudomonas aeruginosa encoded by gene 29 was identified and its expression system was developed. Localization of the protein on the virion was confirmed by immunoelectron microscopy. Properties of gene product (gp) 29 were studied by electron microscopy, immunoblotting and limited trypsinolysis. Recombinant gp29 assembles into the regular tubular structures (polysheaths) of variable length. Trypsin digestion of gp29 within polysheaths or extended sheath of virion results in specific cleavage of the peptide bond between Arg135 and Asp136. However, this cleavage does not affect polymeric structure of polysheaths, sheaths and viral infectivity. Digestion by trypsin of the C-truncated gp29 mutant, lacking the ability to self-assemble, results in formation of a stable protease-resistant fragment. Although there is no sequence homology of phiKZ proteins to proteins of other bacteriophages, some characteristic biochemical properties of gp29 revealed similarities to the tail sheath protein of bacteriophage T4.

  1. Molecular interactions and residues involved in force generation in the T4 viral DNA packaging motor.

    PubMed

    Migliori, Amy D; Smith, Douglas E; Arya, Gaurav

    2014-12-12

    Many viruses utilize molecular motors to package their genomes into preformed capsids. A striking feature of these motors is their ability to generate large forces to drive DNA translocation against entropic, electrostatic, and bending forces resisting DNA confinement. A model based on recently resolved structures of the bacteriophage T4 motor protein gp17 suggests that this motor generates large forces by undergoing a conformational change from an extended to a compact state. This transition is proposed to be driven by electrostatic interactions between complementarily charged residues across the interface between the N- and C-terminal domains of gp17. Here we use atomistic molecular dynamics simulations to investigate in detail the molecular interactions and residues involved in such a compaction transition of gp17. We find that although electrostatic interactions between charged residues contribute significantly to the overall free energy change of compaction, interactions mediated by the uncharged residues are equally if not more important. We identify five charged residues and six uncharged residues at the interface that play a dominant role in the compaction transition and also reveal salt bridging, van der Waals, and solvent hydrogen-bonding interactions mediated by these residues in stabilizing the compact form of gp17. The formation of a salt bridge between Glu309 and Arg494 is found to be particularly crucial, consistent with experiments showing complete abrogation in packaging upon Glu309Lys mutation. The computed contributions of several other residues are also found to correlate well with single-molecule measurements of impairments in DNA translocation activity caused by site-directed mutations. PMID:25311860

  2. Location of Bromide Ions in Tetragonal Lysozyme Crystals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lim, Kap; Nadarajah, Arunan; Forsythe, Elizabeth L.; Pusey, Marc L.

    1998-01-01

    Anions have been shown to play a dominant role in the crystallization of chicken egg white lysozyme from salt solutions. Previous studies employing X-ray crystallography had found one chloride ion binding site in the tetragonal crystal form of the protein and four nitrate ion binding sites in the monoclinic form. In this study the anion positions in the tetragonal form were determined from the difference Fourier map obtained from lysozyme crystal grown in bromide and chloride solutions. Five possible anion binding sites were found in this manner. Some of these sites were in pockets containing basic residues while others were near neutral, but polar, residues. The sole chloride ion binding site found in previous studies was confirmed, while four of these sites corresponded to four binding sites found for nitrate ions in monoclinic crystals. The study suggests that most of the anion binding sites in lysozyme remain unchanged, even when different anions and different crystal forms of lysozyme are employed.

  3. Preliminary crystallographic examination of a novel fungal lysozyme from Chalaropsis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carter, Daniel C.; He, Xiao-Min; Lyne, James E.; Stubbs, Gerald; Hash, John H.

    1990-01-01

    The lysozyme from the fungus of the Chalaropsis species has been crystallized. This lysozyme displays no sequence homology with avian, phage, or mammalian lysozymes, however, preliminary studies indicate significant sequence homology with the bacterial lysozyme from Streptomyces. Both enzymes are unusual in possessing beta-1,4-N-acetylmuramidase and beta-1,4-N,6-O-diacetylmuramidase activity. The crystals grow from solutions of ammonium sulfate during growth periods from several months to a year. The space group is P2(1)2(1)2(1) with a = 34.0 A, b = 42.6 A, c = 122.1 A. Preliminary data indicate that there is 1 molecule/asymmetric unit.

  4. Destroying activity of magnetoferritin on lysozyme amyloid fibrils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kopcansky, Peter; Siposova, Katarina; Melnikova, Lucia; Bednarikova, Zuzana; Timko, Milan; Mitroova, Zuzana; Antosova, Andrea; Garamus, Vasil M.; Petrenko, Viktor I.; Avdeev, Mikhail V.; Gazova, Zuzana

    2015-03-01

    Presence of protein amyloid aggregates (oligomers, protofilaments, fibrils) is associated with many diseases as diabetes mellitus or Alzheimer's disease. The interaction between lysozyme amyloid fibrils and magnetoferritin loaded with different amount of iron atoms (168 or 532 atoms) has been investigated by small-angle X-rays scattering and thioflavin T fluorescence measurements. Results suggest that magnetoferritin caused an iron atom-concentration dependent reduction of lysozyme fibril size.

  5. Strong and Selective Adsorption of Lysozyme on Graphene Oxide

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Biosensing methods and devices using graphene oxide (GO) have recently been explored for detection and quantification of specific biomolecules from body fluid samples, such as saliva, milk, urine, and serum. For a practical diagnostics application, any sensing system must show an absence of nonselective detection of abundant proteins in the fluid matrix. Because lysozyme is an abundant protein in these body fluids (e.g., around 21.4 and 7 μg/mL of lysozyme is found in human milk and saliva from healthy individuals, and more than 15 or even 100 μg/mL in patients suffering from leukemia, renal disease, and sarcoidosis), it may interfere with detections and quantification if it has strong interaction with GO. Therefore, one fundamental question that needs to be addressed before any development of GO based diagnostics method is how GO interacts with lysozyme. In this study, GO has demonstrated a strong interaction with lysozyme. This interaction is so strong that we are able to subsequently eliminate and separate lysozyme from aqueous solution onto the surface of GO. Furthermore, the strong electrostatic interaction also renders the selective adsorption of lysozyme on GO from a mixture of binary and ternary proteins. This selectivity is confirmed by sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE), fluorescence spectroscopy, and UV–vis absorption spectroscopy. PMID:24684375

  6. Complete Genome Sequences of Five Bacteriophages That Infect Rhodobacter capsulatus.

    PubMed

    Bollivar, David W; Bernardoni, Brooke; Bockman, Matthew R; Miller, Brenda M; Russell, Daniel A; Delesalle, Veronique A; Krukonis, Gregory P; Hatfull, Graham F; Cross, Madeline R; Szewczyk, Marlena M; Eppurath, Atul

    2016-01-01

    Five bacteriophages that infect the Rhodobacter capsulatus strain YW1 were isolated from stream water near Bloomington, Illinois, USA. Two distinct genome types are represented in the newly isolated bacteriophages. These genomes are different from other bacteriophage genomes previously described. PMID:27231352

  7. Complete Genome Sequences of Five Bacteriophages That Infect Rhodobacter capsulatus

    PubMed Central

    Bernardoni, Brooke; Bockman, Matthew R.; Miller, Brenda M.; Russell, Daniel A.; Delesalle, Veronique A.; Krukonis, Gregory P.; Hatfull, Graham F.; Cross, Madeline R.; Szewczyk, Marlena M.; Eppurath, Atul

    2016-01-01

    Five bacteriophages that infect the Rhodobacter capsulatus strain YW1 were isolated from stream water near Bloomington, Illinois, USA. Two distinct genome types are represented in the newly isolated bacteriophages. These genomes are different from other bacteriophage genomes previously described. PMID:27231352

  8. Complete Genome Sequence of Bacillus thuringiensis Bacteriophage BMBtp2.

    PubMed

    Dong, Zhaoxia; Peng, Donghai; Wang, Yueying; Zhu, Lei; Ruan, Lifang; Sun, Ming

    2013-01-01

    Bacillus thuringiensis is an insect pathogen which has been widely used for biocontrol. During B. thuringiensis fermentation, lysogenic bacteriophages cause severe losses of yield. Here, we announce the complete genome sequence of a bacteriophage, BMBtp2, which is induced from B. thuringiensis strain YBT-1765, which may be helpful to clarify the mechanism involved in bacteriophage contamination. PMID:23405296

  9. Immunochemical Nature of Receptors of Pseudotuberculosis Diagnostic Bacteriophage.

    PubMed

    Byvalov, A A; Dudina, L G; Konyshev, I V; Litvinets, S G; Martinson, E A

    2016-03-01

    The effect of treatment of Yersinia pseudotuberculosis cells with antibodies of various specificities on adhesiveness of pseudotuberculosis bacteriophage was analyzed by competitive inhibition technique. Bacteriophage adsorption to bacteria was sterically inhibited by monoclonal antibodies to protein epitopes of Y. pseudotuberculosis outer membrane. These results suggest that receptors of pseudotuberculosis diagnostic bacteriophage are localized on the LPS core of microbial cell. PMID:27021089

  10. Interplay between the mechanics of bacteriophage fibers and the strength of virus-host links

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ares, P.; Garcia-Doval, C.; Llauró, A.; Gómez-Herrero, J.; van Raaij, M. J.; de Pablo, P. J.

    2014-05-01

    Viral fibers play a central role in many virus infection mechanisms since they recognize the corresponding host and establish a mechanical link to its surface. Specifically, bacteriophages have to anchor to bacteria through the fibers surrounding the tail before starting the viral DNA translocation into the host. The protein gene product (gp) 37 from bacteriophage T4 long tail fibers forms a fibrous parallel homotrimer located at the distal end of the long tail fibers. Biochemical data indicate that, at least, three of these fibers are required for initial host cell interaction but do not reveal why three and no other numbers are required. By using atomic force microscopy, we obtained high-resolution images of gp37 fibers adsorbed on a mica substrate in buffer conditions and probed their local mechanical properties. Our experiments of radial indentation at the nanometer scale provided a radial stiffness of ˜0.08 N/m and a breaking force of ˜120 pN. In addition, we performed finite element analysis and determined a Young's modulus of ˜20 MPa. From these mechanical parameters, we hypothesize that three viral fibers provide enough mechanical strength to prevent a T4 virus from being detached from the bacteria by the viral particle Brownian motion, delivering a biophysical justification for the previous biochemical data.

  11. Interplay between the mechanics of bacteriophage fibers and the strength of virus-host links.

    PubMed

    Ares, P; Garcia-Doval, C; Llauró, A; Gómez-Herrero, J; van Raaij, M J; de Pablo, P J

    2014-05-01

    Viral fibers play a central role in many virus infection mechanisms since they recognize the corresponding host and establish a mechanical link to its surface. Specifically, bacteriophages have to anchor to bacteria through the fibers surrounding the tail before starting the viral DNA translocation into the host. The protein gene product (gp) 37 from bacteriophage T4 long tail fibers forms a fibrous parallel homotrimer located at the distal end of the long tail fibers. Biochemical data indicate that, at least, three of these fibers are required for initial host cell interaction but do not reveal why three and no other numbers are required. By using atomic force microscopy, we obtained high-resolution images of gp37 fibers adsorbed on a mica substrate in buffer conditions and probed their local mechanical properties. Our experiments of radial indentation at the nanometer scale provided a radial stiffness of ∼ 0.08 N/m and a breaking force of ∼ 120 pN. In addition, we performed finite element analysis and determined a Young's modulus of ∼ 20 MPa. From these mechanical parameters, we hypothesize that three viral fibers provide enough mechanical strength to prevent a T4 virus from being detached from the bacteria by the viral particle Brownian motion, delivering a biophysical justification for the previous biochemical data. PMID:25353832

  12. Purification, Crystallization and Preliminary X-ray Diffraction Analysis of the Phage T4 Vertex Protein Gp24 and its Mutant Forms

    SciTech Connect

    Boeshans,K.; Liu, F.; Peng, G.; Idler, W.; Jang, S.; Marekov, L.; Black, L.; Ahvazi, B.

    2006-01-01

    The study of bacteriophage T4 assembly has revealed regulatory mechanisms pertinent not only to viruses but also to macromolecular complexes. The capsid of bacteriophage T4 is composed of the major capsid protein gp23, and a minor capsid protein gp24, which is arranged as pentamers at the vertices of the capsid. In this study the T4 capsid protein gp24 and its mutant forms were overexpressed and purified to homogeneity. The overexpression from plasmid vectors of all the constructs in Escherichia coli yields biologically active protein in vivo as determined by assembly of active virus following infection with inactivated gene 24 mutant viruses. The gp24 mutant was subjected to surface entropy reduction by mutagenesis and reductive alkylation in order to improve its crystallization properties and diffraction quality. To determine if surface mutagenesis targeting would result in diffractable crystals, two glutamate to alanine mutations (E89A,E90A) were introduced. We report here the biochemical observations and consequent mutagenesis experiment that resulted in improvements in the stability, crystallizability and crystal quality of gp24 without affecting the overall folding. Rational modification of the protein surface to achieve crystallization appears promising for improving crystallization behavior and crystal diffracting qualities. The crystal of gp24(E89A,E90A) diffracted to 2.6 {angstrom} resolution compared to wild-type gp24 at 3.80 {angstrom} resolution under the same experimental conditions. Surface mutation proved to be a better method than reductive methylation for improving diffraction quality of the gp24 crystals.

  13. Lysozyme dimer association: Similarities and differences compared with lysozyme monomer association

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Onuma, Kazuo; Inaka, Koji

    2008-03-01

    The protein with a molecular weight of 28.6 kDa in lysozyme solution, which has been recognized as a lysozyme dimer, was purified and its association was observed using time-resolved static light scattering and dynamic light scattering under the same buffer condition as that used in lysozyme monomer association. The chromatography results and SDS-PAGE analysis showed that the bonding state of each molecule in a dimer unit was not uniform, i.e., there were at least two kinds of bonds, strong and weak. Some of the weak-bonded dimmers dissociated to monomers (molecular weight: 14.3 kDa) in the SDS-PAGE process. The relative amount of weak-bonded dimers greatly affected the association kinetics. With a 99% pure dimer solution (1% monomers in SDS-PAGE), association proceeded in the same manner as that of a monomer solution: the Zimm-square plot had a concave shape with a maximum at a particular q2 for apparent protein concentrations, up to 2.4 mg/mL. The dynamic light-scattering data showed clear bimodal (dimer and aggregate), distributions. With a 95% pure dimer solution, the association behavior drastically changed when the apparent concentration exceeded 2.0 mg/mL. The Zimm-square plot had a bending point at a low q2, and two discrete lines fitted the plot. The particles in the solution were either oligomers or large aggregates, both of which had polydispersity distributions, and an amorphous phase formed from the aggregates. This was not observed for monomer association.

  14. Bacteriophages: antibacterials with a future?

    PubMed

    Broxmeyer, Lawrence

    2004-01-01

    The hypothesis as to whether a benign species of bacteria could kill a virulent kind has to this point been untested. Recently it was shown that in the macrophage, bacteriophages, when properly introduced through a nonvirulent microbe, had a killing rate for virulent AIDS Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Mycobacterium avium far in excess of modern day antibiotics. The study in effect brought a natural phenomena, lysogeny, whereby one bacterial colony kills another thru phage weaponry, to bear in the conquest of hard-to-kill, antibiotic resistant pathogens. This killing occurred intracellularly, within the white blood cell using Mycobacterium smegmatis, a benign bacterial species found generally in smegma secretions from human genitalia as well as soil, dust and water, and first identified in 1884. The subsequent treatment of M. avium-infected, as well as M. tuberculosis-infected RAW 264.7 macrophages, with M. smegmatis transiently infected with TM4 resulted in a unexpectedly large time- and titer-dependent reduction in the number of viable intracellular bacilli. In addition, the M. smegmatis vacuole harboring TM4 fused with the M. avium vacuole in macrophages. These results suggested a potentially novel concept to kill intracellular pathogenic bacteria and warrant future development. PMID:15142642

  15. Photodynamic Inactivation of Mammalian Viruses and Bacteriophages

    PubMed Central

    Costa, Liliana; Faustino, Maria Amparo F.; Neves, Maria Graça P. M. S.; Cunha, Ângela; Almeida, Adelaide

    2012-01-01

    Photodynamic inactivation (PDI) has been used to inactivate microorganisms through the use of photosensitizers. The inactivation of mammalian viruses and bacteriophages by photosensitization has been applied with success since the first decades of the last century. Due to the fact that mammalian viruses are known to pose a threat to public health and that bacteriophages are frequently used as models of mammalian viruses, it is important to know and understand the mechanisms and photodynamic procedures involved in their photoinactivation. The aim of this review is to (i) summarize the main approaches developed until now for the photodynamic inactivation of bacteriophages and mammalian viruses and, (ii) discuss and compare the present state of the art of mammalian viruses PDI with phage photoinactivation, with special focus on the most relevant mechanisms, molecular targets and factors affecting the viral inactivation process. PMID:22852040

  16. Droplet hydrodynamics during lysozyme protein crystallization.

    PubMed

    Pradhan, T; Asfer, M; Panigrahi, P K

    2012-11-01

    Various experimental studies in zero gravity have been reported in the literature for generation of superior quality crystals due to the importance of convective transport on protein crystal quality. However, limited experimental and numerical studies are available in the literature for a complete characterization of transport phenomena during the protein crystal growth process. The present investigation reports experimental results on convective motion inside the droplet during protein crystallization by the vapor diffusion method. Lysozyme crystals are grown using a sitting drop method and micro-particle image velocimetry is used for investigating the detailed hydrodynamics inside the droplet. Dynamic evolution of the flow field for the complete crystal growth process, i.e., during the prenucleation, nucleation, and postnucleation stage, is reported. Various flow transitions are observed during the complete cycle of the protein crystal growth process. Significant Marangoni convection is observed during the prenucleation period followed by buoyancy-driven convection during the postnucleation period. The Marangoni convection flow patterns observed during the prenucleation stage match those of evaporating droplets. The postnucleation convection patterns are similar to those of ethanol-water mixture evaporation with high ethanol concentration. PMID:23214788

  17. Bacteriophages with the ability to degrade uropathogenic Escherichia coli biofilms.

    PubMed

    Chibeu, Andrew; Lingohr, Erika J; Masson, Luke; Manges, Amee; Harel, Josée; Ackermann, Hans-W; Kropinski, Andrew M; Boerlin, Patrick

    2012-04-01

    Escherichia coli-associated urinary tract infections (UTIs) are among the most common bacterial infections in humans. UTIs are usually managed with antibiotic therapy, but over the years, antibiotic-resistant strains of uropathogenic E. coli (UPEC) have emerged. The formation of biofilms further complicates the treatment of these infections by making them resistant to killing by the host immune system as well as by antibiotics. This has encouraged research into therapy using bacteriophages (phages) as a supplement or substitute for antibiotics. In this study we characterized 253 UPEC in terms of their biofilm-forming capabilities, serotype, and antimicrobial resistance. Three phages were then isolated (vB_EcoP_ACG-C91, vB_EcoM_ACG-C40 and vB_EcoS_ACG-M12) which were able to lyse 80.5% of a subset (42) of the UPEC strains able to form biofilms. Correlation was established between phage sensitivity and specific serotypes of the UPEC strains. The phages' genome sequences were determined and resulted in classification of vB_EcoP_ACG-C91 as a SP6likevirus, vB_EcoM_ACG-C40 as a T4likevirus and vB_EcoS_ACG-M12 as T1likevirus. We assessed the ability of the three phages to eradicate the established biofilm of one of the UPEC strains used in the study. All phages significantly reduced the biofilm within 2-12 h of incubation. PMID:22590682

  18. Bacteriophages with the Ability to Degrade Uropathogenic Escherichia Coli Biofilms

    PubMed Central

    Chibeu, Andrew; Lingohr, Erika J.; Masson, Luke; Manges, Amee; Harel, Josée; Ackermann, Hans-W.; Kropinski, Andrew M.; Boerlin, Patrick

    2012-01-01

    Escherichia coli-associated urinary tract infections (UTIs) are among the most common bacterial infections in humans. UTIs are usually managed with antibiotic therapy, but over the years, antibiotic-resistant strains of uropathogenic E. coli (UPEC) have emerged. The formation of biofilms further complicates the treatment of these infections by making them resistant to killing by the host immune system as well as by antibiotics. This has encouraged research into therapy using bacteriophages (phages) as a supplement or substitute for antibiotics. In this study we characterized 253 UPEC in terms of their biofilm-forming capabilities, serotype, and antimicrobial resistance. Three phages were then isolated (vB_EcoP_ACG-C91, vB_EcoM_ACG-C40 and vB_EcoS_ACG-M12) which were able to lyse 80.5% of a subset (42) of the UPEC strains able to form biofilms. Correlation was established between phage sensitivity and specific serotypes of the UPEC strains. The phages’ genome sequences were determined and resulted in classification of vB_EcoP_ACG-C91 as a SP6likevirus, vB_EcoM_ACG-C40 as a T4likevirus and vB_EcoS_ACG-M12 as T1likevirus. We assessed the ability of the three phages to eradicate the established biofilm of one of the UPEC strains used in the study. All phages significantly reduced the biofilm within 2–12 h of incubation. PMID:22590682

  19. Bacteriophages as Potential Treatment for Urinary Tract Infections

    PubMed Central

    Sybesma, Wilbert; Zbinden, Reinhard; Chanishvili, Nino; Kutateladze, Mzia; Chkhotua, Archil; Ujmajuridze, Aleksandre; Mehnert, Ulrich; Kessler, Thomas M.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Urinary tract infections (UTIs) are among the most prevalent microbial diseases and their financial burden on society is substantial. The continuing increase of antibiotic resistance worldwide is alarming so that well-tolerated, highly effective therapeutic alternatives are urgently needed. Objective: To investigate the effect of bacteriophages on Escherichia coli and Klebsiella pneumoniae strains isolated from the urine of patients suffering from UTIs. Material and methods: Forty-one E. coli and 9 K. pneumoniae strains, isolated from the urine of patients suffering from UTIs, were tested in vitro for their susceptibility toward bacteriophages. The bacteriophages originated from either commercially available bacteriophage cocktails registered in Georgia or from the bacteriophage collection of the George Eliava Institute of Bacteriophage, Microbiology and Virology. In vitro screening of bacterial strains was performed by use of the spot-test method. The experiments were implemented three times by different groups of scientists. Results: The lytic activity of the commercial bacteriophage cocktails on the 41 E. coli strains varied between 66% (Pyo bacteriophage) and 93% (Enko bacteriophage). After bacteriophage adaptation of the Pyo bacteriophage cocktail, its lytic activity was increased from 66 to 93% and only one E. coli strain remained resistant. One bacteriophage of the Eliava collection could lyse all 9 K. pneumoniae strains. Conclusions: Based on the high lytic activity and the potential of resistance optimization by direct adaption of bacteriophages as reported in this study, and in view of the continuing increase of antibiotic resistance worldwide, bacteriophage therapy is a promising treatment option for UTIs highly warranting randomized controlled trials. PMID:27148173

  20. A new lysozyme from the eastern oyster, Crassostrea virginica, and a possible evolutionary pathway for i-type lysozymes in bivalves from host defense to digestion

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Lysozymes are enzymes that lyse bacterial cell walls, an activity widely used for host defense but also modified in some instances for digestion. The biochemical and evolutionary changes between these different functional forms has been well-studied in the c-type lysozymes of vertebrates, but less so in the i-type lysozymes prevalent in most invertebrate animals. Some bivalve molluscs possess both defensive and digestive lysozymes. Results We report a third lysozyme from the oyster Crassostrea virginica, cv-lysozyme 3. The chemical properties of cv-lysozyme 3 (including molecular weight, isoelectric point, basic amino acid residue number, and predicted protease cutting sites) suggest it represents a transitional form between lysozymes used for digestion and immunity. The cv-lysozyme 3 protein inhibited the growth of bacteria (consistent with a defensive function), but semi-quantitative RT-PCR suggested the gene was expressed mainly in digestive glands. Purified cv-lysozyme 3 expressed maximum muramidase activity within a range of pH (7.0 and 8.0) and ionic strength (I = 0.005-0.01) unfavorable for either cv-lysozyme 1 or cv-lysozyme 2 activities. The topology of a phylogenetic analysis of cv-lysozyme 3 cDNA (full length 663 bp, encoding an open reading frame of 187 amino acids) is also consistent with a transitional condition, as cv-lysozyme 3 falls at the base of a monophyletic clade of bivalve lysozymes identified from digestive glands. Rates of nonsynonymous substitution are significantly high at the base of this clade, consistent with an episode of positive selection associated with the functional transition from defense to digestion. Conclusion The pattern of molecular evolution accompanying the shift from defensive to digestive function in the i-type lysozymes of bivalves parallels those seen for c-type lysozymes in mammals and suggests that the lysozyme paralogs that enhance the range of physiological conditions for lysozyme activity may provide

  1. Folding Behaviors of Protein (Lysozyme) Confined in Polyelectrolyte Complex Micelle.

    PubMed

    Wu, Fu-Gen; Jiang, Yao-Wen; Chen, Zhan; Yu, Zhi-Wu

    2016-04-19

    The folding/unfolding behavior of proteins (enzymes) in confined space is important for their properties and functions, but such a behavior remains largely unexplored. In this article, we reported our finding that lysozyme and a double hydrophilic block copolymer, methoxypoly(ethylene glycol)5K-block-poly(l-aspartic acid sodium salt)10 (mPEG(5K)-b-PLD10), can form a polyelectrolyte complex micelle with a particle size of ∼30 nm, as verified by dynamic light scattering and transmission electron microscopy. The unfolding and refolding behaviors of lysozyme molecules in the presence of the copolymer were studied by microcalorimetry and circular dichroism spectroscopy. Upon complex formation with mPEG(5K)-b-PLD10, lysozyme changed from its initial native state to a new partially unfolded state. Compared with its native state, this copolymer-complexed new folding state of lysozyme has different secondary and tertiary structures, a decreased thermostability, and significantly altered unfolding/refolding behaviors. It was found that the native lysozyme exhibited reversible unfolding and refolding upon heating and subsequent cooling, while lysozyme in the new folding state (complexed with the oppositely charged PLD segments of the polymer) could unfold upon heating but could not refold upon subsequent cooling. By employing the heating-cooling-reheating procedure, the prevention of complex formation between lysozyme and polymer due to the salt screening effect was observed, and the resulting uncomplexed lysozyme regained its proper unfolding and refolding abilities upon heating and subsequent cooling. Besides, we also pointed out the important role the length of the PLD segment played during the formation of micelles and the monodispersity of the formed micelles. Furthermore, the lysozyme-mPEG(5K)-b-PLD10 mixtures prepared in this work were all transparent, without the formation of large aggregates or precipitates in solution as frequently observed in other protein

  2. Bacteriophage protein-protein interactions.

    PubMed

    Häuser, Roman; Blasche, Sonja; Dokland, Terje; Haggård-Ljungquist, Elisabeth; von Brunn, Albrecht; Salas, Margarita; Casjens, Sherwood; Molineux, Ian; Uetz, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Bacteriophages T7, λ, P22, and P2/P4 (from Escherichia coli), as well as ϕ29 (from Bacillus subtilis), are among the best-studied bacterial viruses. This chapter summarizes published protein interaction data of intraviral protein interactions, as well as known phage-host protein interactions of these phages retrieved from the literature. We also review the published results of comprehensive protein interaction analyses of Pneumococcus phages Dp-1 and Cp-1, as well as coliphages λ and T7. For example, the ≈55 proteins encoded by the T7 genome are connected by ≈43 interactions with another ≈15 between the phage and its host. The chapter compiles published interactions for the well-studied phages λ (33 intra-phage/22 phage-host), P22 (38/9), P2/P4 (14/3), and ϕ29 (20/2). We discuss whether different interaction patterns reflect different phage lifestyles or whether they may be artifacts of sampling. Phages that infect the same host can interact with different host target proteins, as exemplified by E. coli phage λ and T7. Despite decades of intensive investigation, only a fraction of these phage interactomes are known. Technical limitations and a lack of depth in many studies explain the gaps in our knowledge. Strategies to complete current interactome maps are described. Although limited space precludes detailed overviews of phage molecular biology, this compilation will allow future studies to put interaction data into the context of phage biology. PMID:22748812

  3. Bacteriophage lysis: mechanism and regulation.

    PubMed Central

    Young, R

    1992-01-01

    Bacteriophage lysis involves at least two fundamentally different strategies. Most phages elaborate at least two proteins, one of which is a murein hydrolase, or lysin, and the other is a membrane protein, which is given the designation holin in this review. The function of the holin is to create a lesion in the cytoplasmic membrane through which the murein hydrolase passes to gain access to the murein layer. This is necessary because phage-encoded lysins never have secretory signal sequences and are thus incapable of unassisted escape from the cytoplasm. The holins, whose prototype is the lambda S protein, share a common organization in terms of the arrangement of charged and hydrophobic residues, and they may all contain at least two transmembrane helical domains. The available evidence suggests that holins oligomerize to form nonspecific holes and that this hole-forming step is the regulated step in phage lysis. The correct scheduling of the lysis event is as much an essential feature of holin function as is the hole formation itself. In the second strategy of lysis, used by the small single-stranded DNA phage phi X174 and the single-stranded RNA phage MS2, no murein hydrolase activity is synthesized. Instead, there is a single species of small membrane protein, unlike the holins in primary structure, which somehow causes disruption of the envelope. These lysis proteins function by activation of cellular autolysins. A host locus is required for the lytic function of the phi X174 lysis gene E. Images PMID:1406491

  4. Bacteriophage Protein–Protein Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Häuser, Roman; Blasche, Sonja; Dokland, Terje; Haggård-Ljungquist, Elisabeth; von Brunn, Albrecht; Salas, Margarita; Casjens, Sherwood; Molineux, Ian

    2012-01-01

    Bacteriophages T7, λ, P22, and P2/P4 (from Escherichia coli), as well as ϕ29 (from Bacillus subtilis), are among the best-studied bacterial viruses. This chapter summarizes published protein interaction data of intraviral protein interactions, as well as known phage–host protein interactions of these phages retrieved from the literature. We also review the published results of comprehensive protein interaction analyses of Pneumococcus phages Dp-1 and Cp-1, as well as coliphages λ and T7. For example, the ≈55 proteins encoded by the T7 genome are connected by ≈43 interactions with another ≈15 between the phage and its host. The chapter compiles published interactions for the well-studied phages λ (33 intra-phage/22 phage-host), P22 (38/9), P2/P4 (14/3), and ϕ29 (20/2). We discuss whether different interaction patterns reflect different phage lifestyles or whether they may be artifacts of sampling. Phages that infect the same host can interact with different host target proteins, as exemplified by E. coli phage λ and T7. Despite decades of intensive investigation, only a fraction of these phage interactomes are known. Technical limitations and a lack of depth in many studies explain the gaps in our knowledge. Strategies to complete current interactome maps are described. Although limited space precludes detailed overviews of phage molecular biology, this compilation will allow future studies to put interaction data into the context of phage biology. PMID:22748812

  5. The bacteriophage DNA packaging machine.

    PubMed

    Feiss, Michael; Rao, Venigalla B

    2012-01-01

    Large dsDNA bacteriophages and herpesviruses encode a powerful ATP-driven DNA-translocating machine that encapsidates a viral genome into a preformed capsid shell or prohead. The key components of the packaging machine are the packaging enzyme (terminase, motor) and the portal protein that forms the unique DNA entrance vertex of prohead. The terminase complex, comprised of a recognition subunit (small terminase) and an endonuclease/translocase subunit (large terminase), cuts viral genome concatemers. The terminase-viral DNA complex docks on the portal vertex, assembling a motor complex containing five large terminase subunits. The pentameric motor processively translocates DNA until the head shell is full with one viral genome. The motor cuts the DNA again and dissociates from the full head, allowing head-finishing proteins to assemble on the portal, sealing the portal, and constructing a platform for tail attachment. A body of evidence from molecular genetics and biochemical, structural, and biophysical approaches suggests that ATP hydrolysis-driven conformational changes in the packaging motor (large terminase) power DNA motion. Various parts of the motor subunit, such as the ATPase, arginine finger, transmission domain, hinge, and DNA groove, work in concert to translocate about 2 bp of DNA per ATP hydrolyzed. Powerful single-molecule approaches are providing precise delineation of steps during each translocation event in a motor that has a speed as high as a millisecond/step. The phage packaging machine has emerged as an excellent model for understanding the molecular machines, given the mechanistic parallels between terminases, helicases, and numerous motor proteins. PMID:22297528

  6. [DSC and FTIR study of adsorbed lysozyme on hydrophobic surface].

    PubMed

    Lei, Zu-meng; Geng, Xin-peng; Dai, Li; Geng, Xin-du

    2008-09-01

    During a process of hen egg white lysozyme adsorption and folding on a moderately hydrophobic surface (PEG-600), the effects of salt((NH4)2SO4) concentrations, surface coverage and denaturant (guanidine hydrochloride, GuHCl) concentrations on thermal stability and the changes in the molecular conformation of adsorbed native and denatured lysozyme without aqueous solution were studied with a combination of differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) with FTIR spectroscopy. The results showed that temperature due to endothermic peaks was reduced and the disturbance increased at higher temperature with the increase in salt concentration and surface coverage of adsorbed protein. beta-Sheet and beta-Turn stucture increased while alpha-Helix structure decreased after the adsorption. The peaks corresponding to both C-C stretching frequency in 1400-1425 cm(-1) and amide I band frequency in 1650-1670 cm(-1) of adsorbed denatured lysozyme can be detected in FTIR spectra while that due to amide I band frequency of adsorbed native lysozyme almost can't be observed. Adsorption resulted in structural loss of adsorbed native lysozyme, whose performance was less stable. PMID:19093560

  7. [Lysozyme activity in the milk of sucking mares during lactation].

    PubMed

    Hatzipanagiotou, A; Rieland, E; Enbergs, H

    1998-04-01

    It was the aim of this project to investigate the changes of the lysozyme activity in the milk of mares during the lactation period. Further on the influence of race, date of conception and foaling, age and number of lactations on the lysozyme activities in milk was analysed. Milk samples were collected from 44 mares (trotters, warmblood, quarter horses) from eight farms between the 1st and 90th day p. p. The activity of the lysozyme was measured by a turbidometric method. Summarizing the following results are obtained: Lysozyme activities in mare milk of the 1st and 3rd day p. p. were higher than in mature milk. On average the highest lysozyme activity (Xa = 113.600 +/- 25.171 U/ml) was measured on the 3rd day p. p. Until the 9th day p. p. the activity decreased about 25%, afterwards there was only a slight decrease. The lowest activity (Xa = 57.509 +/- 14.606 U/ml) was measured at the 83rd day p. p. The influence of race and conception time proved to be statistically significant resp. highly significant. PMID:9618986

  8. Effects of Purification on the Crystallization of Lysozyme

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ewing, Felecia L.; Forsythe, Elizabeth L.; Van Der Woerd, Mark; Pusey, Marc L.

    1996-01-01

    We have additionally purified a commercial lysozyme preparation by cation exchange chromatography, followed by recrystallization. This material is 99.96% pure with respect to macromolecular impurities. At basic pH, the purified lysozyme gave only tetragonal crystals at 20 C. Protein used directly from the bottle, prepared by dialysis against distilled water, or which did not bind to the cation exchange column had considerably altered crystallization behavior. Lysozyme which did not bind to the cation exchange column was subsequently purified by size exclusion chromatography. This material gave predominately bundles of rod-shaped crystals with some small tetragonal crystals at lower pHs. The origin of the bundled rod habit was postulated to be a thermally dependent tetragonal- orthorhombic change in the protein structure. This was subsequently ruled out on the basis of crystallization behavior and growth rate experiments. This suggests that heterogeneous forms of lysozyme may be responsible. These results demonstrate three classes of impurities: (1) small molecules, which may be removed by dialysis; (2) macromolecules, which are removable by chromatographic techniques; and (3) heterogeneous forms of the protein, which can be removed in this case by cation exchange chromatography. Of these, heterogeneous forms of the lysozyme apparently have the greatest affect on its crystallization behavior.

  9. Killing of gram-negative bacteria by lactoferrin and lysozyme.

    PubMed Central

    Ellison, R T; Giehl, T J

    1991-01-01

    Although lactoferrin has antimicrobial activity, its mechanism of action is not full defined. Recently we have shown that the protein alters the Gram-negative outer membrane. As this membrane protects Gram-negative cells from lysozyme, we have studied whether lactoferrin's membrane effect could enhance the antibacterial activity of lysozyme. We have found that while each protein alone is bacteriostatic, together they can be bactericidal for strains of V. cholerae, S. typhimurium, and E. coli. The bactericidal effect is dose dependent, blocked by iron saturation of lactoferrin, and inhibited by high calcium levels, although lactoferrin does not chelate calcium. Using differing media, the effect of lactoferrin and lysozyme can be partially or completely inhibited; the degree of inhibition correlating with media osmolarity. Transmission electron microscopy shows that E. coli cells exposed to lactoferrin and lysozyme at 40 mOsm become enlarged and hypodense, suggesting killing through osmotic damage. Dialysis chamber studies indicate that bacterial killing requires direct contact with lactoferrin, and work with purified LPS suggests that this relates to direct LPS-binding by the protein. As lactoferrin and lysozyme are present together in high levels in mucosal secretions and neutrophil granules, it is probable that their interaction contributes to host defense. Images PMID:1918365

  10. Regulatory and Structural Genes for Lysozymes of Mice

    PubMed Central

    Hammer, Michael F.; Wilson, Allan C.

    1987-01-01

    The molecular and genetic basis of large differences in the concentration of P lysozyme in the small intestine has been investigated by crossing inbred strains of two species of house mouse (genus Mus). The concentration of P in domesticus is about 130-fold higher than in castaneus . An autosomal genetic element determining the concentration of P has been identified and named the P lysozyme regulator, Lzp-r . The level of P in interspecific hybrids (domesticus x castaneus) as well as in certain classes of backcross progeny is intermediate relative to parental levels, which shows that the two alleles of Lzp-r are inherited additively. There are two forms of P lysozyme in the intestine of the interspecific hybrid—one having the heat stability of domesticus P, the other being more stable and presumably the product of the castaneus P locus. These two forms occur in equal amounts, and it appears that Lzp-r acts in trans. The linkage of Lzp-r to three structural genes (Lzp-s, Lzm-s1, and Lzm-s2), one specifying P lysozyme and two specifying M lysozymes, was shown by electrophoretic analysis of backcrosses involving domesticus and castaneus and also domesticus and spretus . The role of regulatory mutations in evolution is discussed in light of these results. PMID:3569879

  11. Interaction of T4 AsiA with its target sites in the RNA polymerase sigma70 subunit leads to distinct and opposite effects on transcription.

    PubMed

    Minakhin, Leonid; Niedziela-Majka, Anita; Kuznedelov, Konstantin; Adelman, Karen; Urbauer, Jeffrey L; Heyduk, Tomasz; Severinov, Konstantin

    2003-02-21

    Bacteriophage T4 AsiA is a homodimeric protein that orchestrates a switch from the host and early viral transcription to middle viral transcription by binding to the sigma(70) subunit of Escherichia coli RNA polymerase holoenzyme (Esigma(70)) and preventing promoter complex formation on most E.coli and early T4 promoters. In addition, Esigma(70)AsiA, but not Esigma(70), is a substrate of transcription activation by T4-encoded DNA-binding protein MotA, a co-activator of transcription from middle viral promoters. The molecular determinants of sigma(70)-AsiA interaction necessary for transcription inhibition reside in the sigma(70) conserved region 4.2, which recognizes the -35 promoter consensus element. The molecular determinants of sigma(70)-AsiA interaction necessary for MotA-dependent transcription activation have not been identified. Here, we show that in the absence of sigma(70) region 4.2, AsiA interacts with sigma(70) conserved region 4.1 and activates transcription in a MotA-independent manner. Further, we show that the AsiA dimer must dissociate to interact with either region 4.2 or region 4.1 of sigma(70). We propose that MotA may co-activate transcription by restricting AsiA binding to sigma(70) region 4.1. PMID:12581632

  12. Interplay of bacteria, bacteriophage, and Berea sandstone rock in relation to enhanced oil recovery

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, P.L.

    1986-01-01

    Much research and development is needed to recovery oil reserves presently unattainable, and biologically enhanced oil recovery is a technology that may be used for this purpose. To address the problem of bacterial contamination in an oil field injection well region, each end of a Teflon-sleeved Berea sandstone rock was connected to a flask containing nutrient medium. By inoculation one flask with Escherichia coli B, observations of the bacterial growth in the uninoculated flask resulting from the transport and establishment of cells across the rock could be made. Differences in bacterial populations occurred depending on whether bacteriophage T4D was first adsorbed to the rock. The results of these experiments indicate that the inhibition of bacterial establishment within a rock matrix is possible via lytic interaction. Some nonlytic effects are also implied by experiments with B/4 cells, which are T4D-resistant mutants of E. coli B. A 10 to 40% retention of T4 by the rock occurred when it was loaded with 10/sup 5/ to 10/sup 6/ PFU. Also proposed is a lysogenic system for possible use in biologically enhanced oil recovery techniques. In addition to the model bacteria and phage system described above, measurements of the passage of Pseudomonas putida. 12633 and a phage-resistant mutant through Berea sandstone rock were also made. When bacteriophage gh-1 was adsorbed within the rock matrix, a reduction in the passage of the susceptible but no the resistant cells through the rock was observed. The use of P. putida and gh-1 represents a more realistic group of experiments since these pseudomonas are ubiquitous soil bacteria commonly found in oil rock regions. Preliminary work on the degradation of certain nitrogen compounds in the context of biologically enhanced oil recovery is also described in this dissertation.

  13. Effect of Lysozyme on Ionic Forms of Spores of Clostridium perfringens Type A

    PubMed Central

    Ando, Yoshiaki

    1975-01-01

    H spores of Clostridium perfringens type A (two strains) were more sensitive to germination by lysozyme than native spores. Resistance to lysozyme of H spores was restored by calcium loading. PMID:236284

  14. Nucleotide sequence of bacteriophage fd DNA.

    PubMed Central

    Beck, E; Sommer, R; Auerswald, E A; Kurz, C; Zink, B; Osterburg, G; Schaller, H; Sugimoto, K; Sugisaki, H; Okamoto, T; Takanami, M

    1978-01-01

    The sequence of the 6,408 nucleotides of bacteriophage fd DNA has been determined. This allows to deduce the exact organisation of the filamentous phage genome and provides easy access to DNA segments of known structure and function. PMID:745987

  15. ADSORPTION OF BACTERIOPHAGES ON CLAY MINERALS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Theability to predict the fate of microorganisms in soil is dependent on an understanding of the process of their sorption on soil and subsurface materials. Presently, we have focused on studying the thermodynamics of sorption of bacteriophages (T-2, MS-2, and

  16. Bacteriophage ecology in commercial sauerkraut fermentations

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The ecology of bacteriophages infecting lactic acid bacteria (LAB) in commercial sauerkraut fermentations was investigated. Brine samples were taken from four commercial sauerkraut fermentation tanks over a 60- or 100-day period in 2000 and 2001. A total of 171 independent phage isolates, including ...

  17. Comparative genomics of Shiga toxin encoding bacteriophages

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Stx bacteriophages are responsible for driving the dissemination of Stx toxin genes (stx) across their bacterial host range. Lysogens carrying Stx phages can cause severe, life-threatening disease and Stx toxin is an integral virulence factor. The Stx-bacteriophage vB_EcoP-24B, commonly referred to as Ф24B, is capable of multiply infecting a single bacterial host cell at a high frequency, with secondary infection increasing the rate at which subsequent bacteriophage infections can occur. This is biologically unusual, therefore determining the genomic content and context of Ф24B compared to other lambdoid Stx phages is important to understanding the factors controlling this phenomenon and determining whether they occur in other Stx phages. Results The genome of the Stx2 encoding phage, Ф24B was sequenced and annotated. The genomic organisation and general features are similar to other sequenced Stx bacteriophages induced from Enterohaemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC), however Ф24B possesses significant regions of heterogeneity, with implications for phage biology and behaviour. The Ф24B genome was compared to other sequenced Stx phages and the archetypal lambdoid phage, lambda, using the Circos genome comparison tool and a PCR-based multi-loci comparison system. Conclusions The data support the hypothesis that Stx phages are mosaic, and recombination events between the host, phages and their remnants within the same infected bacterial cell will continue to drive the evolution of Stx phage variants and the subsequent dissemination of shigatoxigenic potential. PMID:22799768

  18. An Undergraduate Laboratory Activity Demonstrating Bacteriophage Specificity†

    PubMed Central

    Allen, Mary E.; Gyure, Ruth A.

    2013-01-01

    Bacteriophage are among the most diverse and numerous microbes inhabiting our planet. Yet many laboratory activities fail to engage students in meaningful exploration of their diversity, unique characteristics, and abundance. In this curriculum activity students use a standard plaque assay to enumerate bacteriophage particles from a natural sample and use the scientific method to address questions about host specificity and diversity. A raw primary sewage sample is enriched for bacteriophage using hosts in the family Enterobacteriaceae. Students hypothesize about host specificity and use quantitative data (serial dilution and plaque assay) to test their hypotheses. Combined class data also help them answer questions about phage diversity. The exercise was field tested with a class of 47 students using pre- and posttests. For all learning outcomes posttest scores were higher than pretest scores at or below p = 0.01. Average individualized learning gain (G) was also calculated for each learning outcome. Students’ use of scientific language in reference to bacteriophage and host interaction significantly improved (p = 0.002; G = 0.50). Improved means of expression helped students construct better hypotheses on phage host specificity (G = 0.31, p = 0.01) and to explain the plaque assay method (G = 0.33, p = 0.002). At the end of the exercise students also demonstrated improved knowledge and understanding of phage specificity as related to phage therapy in humans (p < 0.001; G = 51). PMID:23858357

  19. Effect on catalysis by replacement of catalytic residue from hen egg white lysozyme to Venerupis philippinarum lysozyme.

    PubMed

    Abe, Yoshito; Kubota, Mitsuru; Takazaki, Shinya; Ito, Yuji; Yamamoto, Hiromi; Kang, Dongchon; Ueda, Tadashi; Imoto, Taiji

    2016-09-01

    Asn46Asp/Asp52Ser or Asn46Glu/Asp52Ser hen egg white lysozyme (HEL) mutant was designed by introducing the substituted catalytic residue Asp46 or Glu46, respectively, based on Venerupis philippinarum (Vp) lysozyme structure as a representative of invertebrate-type (i-type) lyzozyme. These mutations restored the bell-shaped pH-dependency of the enzyme activity from the sigmoidal pH-dependency observed for the Asp52Ser mutant. Furthermore both lysozyme mutants possessed retaining mechanisms like Vp lysozyme and HEL. The Asn46Glu/Asp52Ser mutant, which has a shorter distance between two catalytic residues, formed a glycosyl adduct in the reaction with the N-acetylglucosamine oligomer. Furthermore, we found the accelerated turnover through its glycosyl adduct formation and decomposition. The turnover rate estimated from the glycosyl formation and decomposition rates was only 20% of the observed hydrolysis rate of the substrate. Based on these results, we discussed the catalytic mechanism of lysozymes. PMID:27291073

  20. Nanopore analysis of amyloid fibrils formed by lysozyme aggregation.

    PubMed

    Martyushenko, Nikolay; Bell, Nicholas A W; Lamboll, Robin D; Keyser, Ulrich F

    2015-07-21

    The measurement of single particle size distributions of amyloid fibrils is crucial for determining mechanisms of growth and toxicity. Nanopore sensing is an attractive solution for this problem since it gives information on aggregates' shapes with relatively high throughput for a single particle technology. In this paper we study the translocation of lysozyme fibrils through quartz glass nanopores. We demonstrate that, under appropriate salt and pH conditions, lysozyme fibrils translocate through bare quartz nanopores without causing significant clogging. This enables us to measure statistics on tens of thousands of translocations of lysozyme fibrils with the same nanopore and track their development over a time course of aggregation spanning 24 h. Analysis of our events shows that the statistics are consistent with a simple bulk conductivity model for the passage of rods with a fixed cross sectional area through a conical glass nanopore. PMID:25994201

  1. Analysis of Monomer Aggregation and Crystal Growth Rates of Lysozyme

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nadarajah, Arunan

    1996-01-01

    This project was originally conceived to analyze the extensive data of tetragonal lysozyme crystal growth rates collected at NASA/MSFC by Dr. Marc L. Pusey's research group. At that time the lack of analysis of the growth rates was hindering progress in understanding the growth mechanism of tetragonal lysozyme and other protein crystals. After the project was initiated our initial analysis revealed unexpected complexities in the growth rate behavior. This resulted in an expansion in the scope of the project to include a comprehensive investigation of the growth mechanisms of tetragonal lysozyme crystals. A discussion of this research is included as well a list of presentations and publications resulting from the research. This project contributed significantly toward the education of several students and fostered extensive collaborations between investigators.

  2. Predicting Tensile Stretchability of Trimmed AA6111-T4 Sheets

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, Xiaohua; Sun, Xin; Golovashchenko, Sergey F.

    2014-02-15

    An integrated manufacturing process simulation framework has been developed to predict the trimmed edge tensile stretchability of AA6111-T4 sheets by incorporating the burr geometry, damage, and plastic strain from trimming simulations into subsequent tensile stretchability simulations. The influence of the trimming die clearances on the predicted tensile stretching ductility (stretchability) is studied and quantitatively compared with experimental measurements. Stretchability is found to decrease with increasing cutting clearances, and simulation results have successfully captured experimentally observed edge crack initiation and failure mode variations for different trimming clearances. Subsequent computational sensitivity studies reveal that while deburring of previously trimmed edges has little influence on tensile stretchability, removal of trimmed edge initial plastic strain may significantly enhance the subsequent trimmed edge stretchability.

  3. Magnetic diagnostics on the Lockheed Martin T4 Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rhoads, John

    2015-11-01

    The Lockheed Martin T4 Experiment is a magnetically encapsulated linear ring cusp confinement device designed to study the physics relevant to the Compact Fusion Reactor program. As part of the diagnostics suite, an invasive three-axis magnetic probe and several flux loops have been constructed and installed. The probe was designed to reduce electrostatic pick-up by differentially amplifying two counter-wound coils for each axis. The flux loops are designed to detect plasma diamagnetism after accounting for the flux due to the background magnetic field. This mandates that the temporal evolution of the background field must be properly taken into account in order to discern the plasma response. To this end, both hardware and software techniques have been employed. Diagnostic designs and preliminary measurements will be presented.

  4. HyShot-T4 Supersonic Combustion Experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paull, A.; Frost, M.; Alesi, H.

    2000-01-01

    A series of experiments were initiated to investigate the operation of a two-dimensional, hypersonic, airbreathing engine (scramjet) inclined at angles of attack to the freestream. The experiments were undertaken to obtain data for use in the Hyshot flight test program. Experiments on the Hyshot scramjet were under taken in the T4 shock tunnel. Experiments were made at a nominal total enthalpy of 3.0MJkg (exp -1) using a nozzle that produced flows with a Mach number of approximately 6.5. The conditions produced correspond to flight at Mach 7.6 at an altitude range of 35.7-21.4km. A summary of the flow conditions is included. The scramjet was tested at 0, plus 2, plus 4, minus 2 and minus 4 degrees angle of attack. Experiments were also undertaken at 2 and 4 degrees angle of skew.

  5. Use of wide-host-range bacteriophages to reduce Salmonella on poultry products

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Bacteriophages used to treat infections are typically amplified in a pathogenic host. However, this practice introduces the risk of administering any remaining bacteriophage-resistant pathogen during bacteriophage application if separate techniques are less than perfect. In this study, bacteriopha...

  6. Crystallization and Preliminary X-ray Analysis of Bacteriophasge T4 UvsY Recombination Mediator Protein

    SciTech Connect

    Xu,H.; Beernink, H.; Rould, M.; Morrical, S.

    2006-01-01

    Bacteriophage T4 UvsY protein is considered to be the prototype of recombination mediator proteins, a class of proteins which assist in the loading of recombinases onto DNA. Wild-type and Se-substituted UvsY protein have been expressed and purified and crystallized by hanging-drop vapor diffusion. The crystals diffract to 2.4 {angstrom} using in-house facilities and to 2.2 {angstrom} at NSLS, Brookhaven National Laboratory. The crystals belong to space group P422, P4{sub 2}22, P42{sub 1}2 or P4{sub 2}2{sub 1}2, the ambiguity arising from pseudo-centering, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 76.93, c = 269.8 {angstrom}. Previous biophysical characterization of UvsY indicates that it exists primarily as a hexamer in solution. Along with the absence of a crystallographic threefold, this suggests that the asymmetric unit of these crystals is likely to contain either three monomers, giving a solvent content of 71%, or six monomers, giving a solvent content of 41%.

  7. Spectrophotometric studies on the interaction between (-)-epigallocatechin gallate and lysozyme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, Kalyan Sundar; Sahoo, Bijaya Ketan; Dasgupta, Swagata

    2008-02-01

    Various reported antibacterial activities of (-)-epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG), the major polyphenol of green tea prompted us to study its binding with lysozyme. This has been investigated by fluorescence, circular dichroism (CD) and protein-ligand docking. The binding parameters were determined using a modified Stern-Volmer equation. The thermodynamic parameters are indicative of an initial hydrophobic association. The complex is, however, held together predominantly by van der Waals interactions and hydrogen bonding. CD studies do not indicate any significant changes in the secondary structure of lysozyme. Docking studies revealed that specific interactions are observed with residues Trp 62 and Trp 63.

  8. The solubility of hen egg-white lysozyme

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howard, Sandra B.; Twigg, Pamela J.; Baird, James K.; Meehan, Edward J.

    1988-01-01

    The equilibrium solubility of chicken egg-white lysozyme in the presence of crystalline solid state was determined as a function of NaCl concentration, pH, and temperature. The solubility curves obtained represent a region of the lysozyme phase diagram. This diagram makes it possible to determine the supersaturation of a given set of conditions or to achieve identical supersaturations by different combinations of parameters. The temperature dependence of the solubility permits the evaluation of Delta-H of crystallization. The data indicate a negative heat of crystallization for the tetragonal crystal form but a positive heat of crystallization for the high-temperature orthorhombic form.

  9. Evidence for Inhibition of Lysozyme Amyloid Fibrillization by Peptide Fragments from Human Lysozyme: A Combined Spectroscopy, Microscopy, and Docking Study.

    PubMed

    Kar, Rajiv K; Gazova, Zuzana; Bednarikova, Zuzana; Mroue, Kamal H; Ghosh, Anirban; Zhang, Ruiyan; Ulicna, Katarina; Siebert, Hans-Christian; Nifantiev, Nikolay E; Bhunia, Anirban

    2016-06-13

    Degenerative diseases, such as Alzheimer's and prion diseases, as well as type II diabetes, have a pathogenesis associated with protein misfolding, which routes with amyloid formation. Recent strategies for designing small-molecule and polypeptide antiamyloid inhibitors are mainly based on mature fibril structures containing cross β-sheet structures. In the present study, we have tackled the hypothesis that the rational design of antiamyloid agents that can target native proteins might offer advantageous prospect to design effective therapeutics. Lysozyme amyloid fibrillization was treated with three different peptide fragments derived from lysozyme protein sequence R(107)-R(115). Using low-resolution spectroscopic, high-resolution NMR, and STD NMR-restrained docking methods such as HADDOCK, we have found that these peptide fragments have the capability to affect lysozyme fibril formation. The present study implicates the prospect that these peptides can also be tested against other amyloid-prone proteins to develop novel therapeutic agents. PMID:27116396

  10. Evolution and the complexity of bacteriophages

    PubMed Central

    Serwer, Philip

    2007-01-01

    Background The genomes of both long-genome (> 200 Kb) bacteriophages and long-genome eukaryotic viruses have cellular gene homologs whose selective advantage is not explained. These homologs add genomic and possibly biochemical complexity. Understanding their significance requires a definition of complexity that is more biochemically oriented than past empirically based definitions. Hypothesis Initially, I propose two biochemistry-oriented definitions of complexity: either decreased randomness or increased encoded information that does not serve immediate needs. Then, I make the assumption that these two definitions are equivalent. This assumption and recent data lead to the following four-part hypothesis that explains the presence of cellular gene homologs in long bacteriophage genomes and also provides a pathway for complexity increases in prokaryotic cells: (1) Prokaryotes underwent evolutionary increases in biochemical complexity after the eukaryote/prokaryote splits. (2) Some of the complexity increases occurred via multi-step, weak selection that was both protected from strong selection and accelerated by embedding evolving cellular genes in the genomes of bacteriophages and, presumably, also archaeal viruses (first tier selection). (3) The mechanisms for retaining cellular genes in viral genomes evolved under additional, longer-term selection that was stronger (second tier selection). (4) The second tier selection was based on increased access by prokaryotic cells to improved biochemical systems. This access was achieved when DNA transfer moved to prokaryotic cells both the more evolved genes and their more competitive and complex biochemical systems. Testing the hypothesis I propose testing this hypothesis by controlled evolution in microbial communities to (1) determine the effects of deleting individual cellular gene homologs on the growth and evolution of long genome bacteriophages and hosts, (2) find the environmental conditions that select for the

  11. Science Study Aids 6: Lysozyme - The Cooperative Enzyme.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boeschen, John; Alderton, Gordon

    This publication is the sixth of a series of seven supplementary investigative materials for use in secondary science classes providing up-to-date research-related investigations. This unit is structured for grade levels 10 through 12. It is concerned with the crystallization of an enzyme, lysozyme, from egg white. The first part of this guide…

  12. Kinetic Roughening Transition and Energetics of Tetragonal Lysozyme Crystal Growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gorti, Sridhar; Forsythe, Elizabeth L.; Pusey, Marc L.

    2004-01-01

    Interpretation of lysozyme crystal growth rates using well-established physical theories enabled the discovery of a phenomenon possibly indicative of kinetic roughening. For example, lysozyme crystals grown above a critical supersaturation sigma, (where supersaturation sigma = ln c/c(sub eq), c = the protein concentration and c(sub eq) = the solubility concentration) exhibit microscopically rough surfaces due to the continuous addition of growth units anywhere on the surface of a crystal. The rate of crystal growth, V(sub c), for the continuous growth process is determined by the continuous flux of macromolecules onto a unit area of the crystal surface, a, from a distance, xi, per unit time due to diffusion, and a probability of attachment onto the crystal surface, expressed. Based upon models applied, the energetics of lysozyme crystal growth was determined. The magnitudes of the energy barriers of crystal growth for both the (110) and (101) faces of tetragonal lysozyme crystals are compared. Finally, evidence supportive of the kinetic roughening hypothesis is presented.

  13. Viscosity of human seminal fluid: role of lysozyme.

    PubMed

    Mendeluk, G R; Blanco, A M; Bregni, C

    1997-01-01

    The aim of this research was to evaluate the role of lysozyme in the phenomenon of seminal hyper-viscosity. The enzyme was determined in 142 samples of seminal plasma either leucospermic or not, with or without active macrophages classified according to their consistency (normal or high). The kinetic method with Micrococcus lysodeikticus as substrate was employed. No difference was found in enzymatic concentration expressed in nmol/L of enzymatic protein (mean +/- 2 SEM) on comparing normal and high seminal consistency groups, while differences proved highly significant in batches either leucospermic or not (n = 44, 197.2 +/- 51.3 vs. n = 98, 108.3 +/- 12.8; p < .0005). On subdividing the normal and high-consistency groups according to the count of polymorphonuclear leucocytes and the macrophagic responses, differences were also significant (p < .005 in both cases). Lysozyme concentration increases in presence of leucospermic reaction. In vitro lysozyme addition showed no significant effect on samples with high consistency. The results indicate that lysozyme plays no direct role in the phenomenon of seminal hyperviscosity, although its deficiency in cases of chronic infections may prove a factor aggravating the clinical picture. PMID:9017117

  14. Interaction of tear lipocalin with lysozyme and lactoferrin.

    PubMed

    Gasymov, O K; Abduragimov, A R; Yusifov, T N; Glasgow, B J

    1999-11-19

    The interaction of human tear lipocalin with lysozyme and lactoferrin was studied by electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy. TL mutants I98C and F99C were spin labeled with MTSL and its derivative. The spectra demonstrated that at sites C98 and C99 the mobility of the nitroxides was reduced in the presence of lysozyme, lactoferrin, but not albumin. The reduced mobility was manifested as a reduction in side chain motion and backbone fluctuations. The overall correlation time of tear lipocalin, measured by MTSL derivative-labeled F99C, was prolonged in the presence of lysozyme and lactoferrin indicating that the interaction involves direct contact. The effect was mitigated at high salt concentration suggesting an electrostatic interaction of the molecules. The reduction in side chain mobility at C98 and C99 of tear lipocalin was observed in tears. Taken together, the data indicate that tear lipocalin interacts with both lysozyme and lactoferrin and suggest that they may function in concert with one another. PMID:10558865

  15. The folding-unfolding transition of equine lysozyme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haezebrouck, P.; Van Dael, H.

    1993-03-01

    A detailed study of the chemical and thermal unfolding transition of equine lysozyme in the presence and in the absence of Ca 2+ gives evidence for a two-step unfolding process. The pretransition can be related to the transfer of exposed Trp groups to the protein interior.

  16. Locations of Bromide Ions in Tetragonal Lysozyme Crystals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lim, Kap; Nadarajah, Arunan; Forsythe, Elizabeth L.; Pusey, Marc L.

    1998-01-01

    Anions have been shown to play a dominant role in the crystallization of chicken egg-white lysozyme from salt solutions. Previous studies employing X-ray crystallography have found one chloride ion binding site in the tetragonal crystal form of the protein and four nitrate ion binding sites in the monoclinic form. In this study the anion positions in the tetragonal form were determined from the difference Fourier map obtained from lysozyme crystals grown in bromide and chloride solutions. Five possible anion-binding sites were found in this manner. Some of these sites were in pockets containing basic residues while others were near neutral, but polar, residues. The sole chloride ion binding site found in previous studies was confirmed, while four further sites were found which corresponded to the four binding sites found for nitrate ions in monoclinic crystals. The study suggests that most of the anion-binding sites in lysozyme remain unchanged even when different anions and different crystal forms of lysozyme are employed.

  17. Functional relationship between bacteriophages G4 and phi X174.

    PubMed Central

    Borrias, W E; Hagenaar, M; Van Den Brekel, R; Kühlemeijer, C; Weisbeek, P J

    1979-01-01

    Mutants of bacteriophage G4 were isolated and characterized, and their mutations were mapped. They constitute six different genes, namely, A, B, E, F, G, and H. The functional relationship with bacteriophage phi X174 was determined by complementation experiments using amber mutants of phi X and amber mutants of G4. Bacteriophage phi X was able to use the products of G4 genes E, F, G, and H. In bacteriophage G4, however, only the phi X gene H product was functional. Images PMID:480475

  18. Functional Characterization of a c-type Lysozyme from Indian Shrimp Fenneropenaeus indicus.

    PubMed

    Karthik, Viswanathan; Kamalakannan, Vijayan; Thomas, Ancy; Sudheer, Naduvilamuriparambu Saidumuhammed; Singh, Issac S Bright; Narayanan, Rangarajan Badri

    2014-06-01

    Lysozyme gene from Fenneropenaeus indicus was cloned, expressed in Escherichia coli and characterized. The cDNA consists of 477 base pairs and encodes amino acid sequence of 159 residues. F. indicus lysozyme had high identity (98%) with Fenneropenaeus merguiensis and Fenneropenaeus chinensis and exhibits low to moderate identities with lysozymes of other invertebrates and vertebrates. This lysozyme is presumed to be chicken types as it possesses two catalytic and eight cysteine residues that are conserved across c-type lysozymes and a c-terminal extension, which is a characteristic of lysozymes from marine invertebrates. Further, the antimicrobial properties of the recombinant lysozyme from F. indicus were determined in comparison with recombinant hen egg white lysozyme. This exhibited high activity against a Gram-negative pathogenic bacterium Salmonella typhimurium and two fungal strains Pichia pastoris and Saccharomyces cerevisiae in turbidimetric assay. Distribution of lysozyme gene and protein in tissues of shrimps infected with white spot syndrome virus revealed that the high levels of lysozyme are correlated with low and high viral load in abdominal muscle and tail, respectively. In conclusion, lysozyme from F. indicus has a broad spectrum of antimicrobial properties, which once again emphasizes its role in shrimp innate immune response. PMID:24676722

  19. Electrostatic self-assembly between biological polymers & macroions: Interactions of F-actin & DNA with lysozyme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanders, Lori K.; Matthews, Brian W.; Wong, Gerard C. L.

    2005-03-01

    The pathological self-assembly of polyelectrolytes such as DNA and F-actin with cationic antimicrobial proteins such as lysozyme may have significant clinical consequences in Cystic Fibrosis (CF) lung infections. Wild-type lysozyme is a compact, cationic, globular protein which carries a net charge of +9e at neutral pH. Our Small Angle X-ray Scattering (SAXS) experiments on F-actin-lysozyme complexes indicate that the wild-type lysozyme close packs into 1-D columns between hexagonally organized F-actin filaments. We will present SAXS results of the interactions of F-actin and DNA with genetically engineered lysozyme mutants that carry a reduced charge of +5e. We have also used fluorescence microscopy to investigate the morphologies and sizes of such bundles induced with divalent cations, wild-type lysozyme, and mutant lysozymes.

  20. Design of Synthetic Polymer Nanoparticles That Facilitate Resolubilization and Refolding of Aggregated Positively Charged Lysozyme.

    PubMed

    Nakamoto, Masahiko; Nonaka, Tadashi; Shea, Kenneth J; Miura, Yoshiko; Hoshino, Yu

    2016-04-01

    Designed polymer hydrogel nanoparticles (NPs) capable of facilitating resolubilization and refolding of an aggregated protein, positively charged lysozyme, are prepared. NPs designed to interact strongly with denatured lysozyme and relatively weakly with native lysozyme, facilitated resolubilization and refolding of aggregated lysozyme. Such NPs could be prepared by copolymerizing optimized combinations and populations of functional monomers. The refolded lysozyme showed native conformation and enzymatic activity. Eleven grams of aggregated protein was refolded by 1 g of NPs. However, NPs having low affinity to denatured lysozyme and NPs having high affinity to both denatured and native lysozyme showed relatively low facilitation activity. Our results suggest a potential strategy for the design of artificial chaperones with high facilitating activity. PMID:26891855

  1. Rapid and simple purification of lysozyme from the egg shell membrane.

    PubMed

    Kozuka, Miyuki; Murao, Sato; Yamane, Takuya; Inoue, Tsutomu; Ohkubo, Iwao; Ariga, Hiroyoshi

    2015-01-01

    Lysozyme (EC 3.2.1.17) is a hydrolytic enzyme that cleaves the β-(1,4)-glycosidic bond between N-acetylmuramic acid and N-acetylglucosamine in peptidoglycan, a major bacterial cell wall polymer. In the food industry, lysozyme is used as an additive mainly in the production of wine and beer. Lysozyme was found to be localized in the egg shell membrane. In this study, we found that lysozyme was easily purified from the egg shell membrane and that the enzyme also had antibacterial activity. Furthermore, we found that the antibacterial activity of purified lysozyme from the egg shell membrane was lower than that of purified lysozyme from the egg white at alkaline pH. The method for rapid purification of lysozyme developed in this study should contribute to the food industry. PMID:25994146

  2. Modeling tailed bacteriophage adsorption: Insight into mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Storms, Zachary J; Sauvageau, Dominic

    2015-11-01

    The process of a bacteriophage attaching to its host cell is a combination of physical diffusion, biochemical surface interactions, and reaction-induced conformational changes in receptor proteins. Local variations in the physico-chemical properties of the medium, the phage׳s mode of action, and the physiology of the host cell also all influence adsorption kinetics. These characteristics can affect a specific phage׳s binding capabilities and the susceptibility of the host cell to phage attack. Despite the complexity of this process, describing adsorption kinetics of a population of bacteriophages binding to a culture of cells has been accomplished with relatively simple equations governed by the laws of mass-action. Many permutations and modifications to the basic set of reactions have been suggested through the years. While no single solution emerges as a universal answer, this review provides the fundamentals of current phage adsorption modeling and will guide researchers in the selection of valid, appropriate models. PMID:26331682

  3. Does lysozyme play a role in the pathogenesis of COPD?

    PubMed

    Cantor, Jerome; Shteyngart, Bronislava

    2015-06-01

    Elastic fiber injury is an important process in the pathogenesis of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), particularly with regard to the development of pulmonary emphysema. Damage to these fibers results in uneven distribution of mechanical forces in the lung, leading to dilatation and rupture of alveolar walls. While the role of various enzymes and oxidants in this process has been well-documented, we propose that a previously unsuspected agent, lysozyme, may contribute significantly to the changes in elastic fibers observed in this disease. Studies from our laboratory have previously shown that lysozyme preferentially binds to elastic fibers in human emphysematous lungs. On the basis of this finding, it is hypothesized that the attachment of lysozyme to these fibers enhances their susceptibility to injury, and further impairs the transfer of mechanical forces in the lung, leading to increased alveolar wall damage and enhanced progression of COPD. The hypothesized effects of lysozyme are predicated on its interaction with hyaluronan (HA), a long-chain polysaccharide that is found in close proximity to elastic fibers. By preventing the binding of HA to elastic fibers in COPD, lysozyme may interfere with the protective effect of this polysaccharide against enzymes and oxidants that degrade these fibers. Furthermore, the loss of the hydrating effect of HA on these fibers may impair their elastic properties, greatly increasing the probability of their fragmentation in response to mechanical forces. The proposed hypothesis may explain why the content of HA is significantly lower in the lungs of COPD patients. It may also contribute to the design of clinical trials involving the use of exogenously administered HA as a potential treatment for COPD. PMID:25769706

  4. Does Warming a Lysozyme Solution Cook Ones Data?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pusey, Marc; Burke, Michael; Judge, Russell

    2000-01-01

    Chicken egg white lysozyme has a well characterized thermally driven phase transition. Between pH 4.0 and 5.2, the transition temperature, as defined by the point where the tetragonal and orthorhombic solubility are equal, is a function of the pH, salt (precipitant) type and concentration, and most likely of the buffer concentration as well. This phase transition can be carried out with protein solution alone, prior to the initiation of the crystallization process. We have now measured the kinetics of this process and investigated its reversibility. An aliquot of a stock protein solution is held at a given temperature, and at periodic intervals used to set up batch crystallization experiments. The batch solutions were incubated at 20 C until macroscopic crystals were obtained, at which point the number of crystals in each well were counted. The transition effects increased with temperature, slowly falling off at 30 C with a half time (time to approx. 1/2 the t = 0 number of crystals) of approx. 5 hours, and an estimated half time of approx. 0.5 hours at 43 C. Further, the process was not reversible by simple cooling. After holding a lysozyme solution at 37 C (prior to addition of precipitant) for 16 hours, then cooling and holding it at 4 C, no return to the pre-warmed nucleation kinetics are observed after at least 4 weeks. Thus every thermal excursion above the phase transition point results in a further decrease in the nucleation rate of that solution, the extent being a function of the time and temperature. Orthorhombic lysozyme crystals apparently do not undergo the flow-induced growth cessation of tetragonal lysozyme crystals. We have previously shown that putting the protein in the orthorhombic form does not affect the averaged face growth kinetics, only nucleation, for tetragonal crystals. We may be able to use this differential behavior to elucidate how flow affects tile lysozyme crystal growth process.

  5. Biogeography of bacteriophages at four hydrothermal vent sites in the Antarctic based on g23 sequence diversity.

    PubMed

    Millard, Andrew D; Pearce, David; Zwirglmaier, Katrin

    2016-04-01

    In this study, which was carried out within the ChEsSO consortium project (Chemosynthetically driven ecosystems south of the Polar Front), we sampled two hydrothermal vent sites on the East Scotia Ridge, Scotia Sea, one in the Kemp Caldera, South Sandwich Arc and one in the Bransfield Strait, north-west of the Antarctic Peninsula, which exhibit strong differences in their chemical characteristics. We compared a subset of their bacteriophage population by Sanger- and 454-sequencing of g23, which codes for the major capsid protein of T4likeviruses. We found that the sites differ vastly in their bacteriophage diversity, which reflects the differences in the chemical conditions and therefore putatively the differences in microbial hosts living at these sites. Comparing phage diversity in the vent samples to other aquatic samples, the vent samples formed a distinct separate cluster, which also included the non-vent control samples that were taken several hundred meters above the vent chimneys. This indicates that the influence of the vents on the microbial population and therefore also the bacteriophage population extends much further than anticipated. PMID:26903011

  6. Stability of actin-lysozyme complexes formed in cystic fibrosis disease.

    PubMed

    Mohammadinejad, Sarah; Ghamkhari, Behnoush; Abdolmaleki, Sarah

    2016-08-21

    Finding the conditions for destabilizing actin-lysozyme complexes is of biomedical importance in preventing infections in cystic fibrosis. In this manuscript, the effects of different charge-mutants of lysozyme and salt concentration on the stability of actin-lysozyme complexes are studied using Langevin dynamics simulation. A coarse-grained model of F-actin is used in which both its twist and bending rigidities are considered. We observe that the attraction between F-actins is stronger in the presence of wild-type lysozymes relative to the mutated lysozymes of lower charges. By calculating the potential of mean force between F-actins, we conclude that the stability of actin-lysozyme complexes is decreased by reducing the charge of lysozyme mutants. The distributions of different lysozyme charge-mutants show that wild-type (+9e) lysozymes are mostly accumulated in the center of triangles formed by three adjacent F-actins, while lysozyme mutants of charges +7e and +5e occupy the bridging regions between F-actins. Low-charge mutants of lysozyme (+3e) distribute uniformly around F-actins. A rough estimate of the electrostatic energy for these different distributions proves that the distribution in which lysozymes reside in the center of triangles leads to more stable complexes. Also our results in the presence of a salt suggest that at physiological salt concentration of airway, F-actin complexes are not formed by charge-reduced mutants of lysozyme. The findings are interesting because if we can design charge-reduced lysozyme mutants with considerable antibacterial activity, they are not sequestered inside F-actin aggregates and can play their role as antibacterial agents against airway infection. PMID:27436705

  7. Bacteriophages and bacteriophage-derived endolysins as potential therapeutics to combat Gram-positive spore forming bacteria.

    PubMed

    Nakonieczna, A; Cooper, C J; Gryko, R

    2015-09-01

    Since their discovery in 1915, bacteriophages have been routinely used within Eastern Europe to treat a variety of bacterial infections. Although initially ignored by the West due to the success of antibiotics, increasing levels and diversity of antibiotic resistance is driving a renaissance for bacteriophage-derived therapy, which is in part due to the highly specific nature of bacteriophages as well as their relative abundance. This review focuses on the bacteriophages and derived lysins of relevant Gram-positive spore formers within the Bacillus cereus group and Clostridium genus that could have applications within the medical, food and environmental sectors. PMID:26109320

  8. Chicken-type lysozyme in channel catfish: Expression analysis, lysozyme activity and efficacy as immunostimulant against Aeromonas hydrophila infection

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    To understand whether chicken-type lysozyme (Lys-c) in channel catfish was induced by infection of Aeromonas hydrophila, the transcriptional levels of Lys-c in skin, gut, liver, spleen, posterior kidney, and blood cells in healthy channel catfish was compared to that in channel catfish infected with...

  9. Chicken-type lysozyme in channel catfish: expression analysis, lysozyme activity, and efficacy as immunostimulant against Aeromonas hydrophila infection

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    To understand whether chicken-type lysozyme (Lys-c) in channel catfish was induced by infection of Aeromonas hydrophila, the transcriptional levels of Lys-c in skin, gut, liver, spleen, posterior kidney, and blood cells in healthy channel catfish was compared to that in channel catfish infected with...

  10. Genetically modified bacteriophages in applied microbiology.

    PubMed

    Bárdy, P; Pantůček, R; Benešík, M; Doškař, J

    2016-09-01

    Bacteriophages represent a simple viral model of basic research with many possibilities for practical application. Due to their ability to infect and kill bacteria, their potential in the treatment of bacterial infection has been examined since their discovery. With advances in molecular biology and gene engineering, the phage application spectrum has been expanded to various medical and biotechnological fields. The construction of bacteriophages with an extended host range or longer viability in the mammalian bloodstream enhances their potential as an alternative to conventional antibiotic treatment. Insertion of active depolymerase genes to their genomes can enforce the biofilm disposal. They can also be engineered to transfer various compounds to the eukaryotic organisms and the bacterial culture, applicable for the vaccine, drug or gene delivery. Phage recombinant lytic enzymes can be applied as enzybiotics in medicine as well as in biotechnology for pathogen detection or programmed cell death in bacterial expression strains. Besides, modified bacteriophages with high specificity can be applied as bioprobes in detection tools to estimate the presence of pathogens in food industry, or utilized in the control of food-borne pathogens as part of the constructed phage-based biosorbents. PMID:27321680

  11. Genome and Proteome of Campylobacter jejuni Bacteriophage NCTC 12673▿†

    PubMed Central

    Kropinski, Andrew M.; Arutyunov, Denis; Foss, Mary; Cunningham, Anna; Ding, Wen; Singh, Amit; Pavlov, Andrey R.; Henry, Matthew; Evoy, Stephane; Kelly, John; Szymanski, Christine M.

    2011-01-01

    Campylobacter jejuni continues to be the leading cause of bacterial food-borne illness worldwide, so improvements to current methods used for bacterial detection and disease prevention are needed. We describe here the genome and proteome of C. jejuni bacteriophage NCTC 12673 and the exploitation of its receptor-binding protein for specific bacterial detection. Remarkably, the 135-kb Myoviridae genome of NCTC 12673 differs greatly from any other proteobacterial phage genome described (including C. jejuni phages CP220 and CPt10) and instead shows closest homology to the cyanobacterial T4-related myophages. The phage genome contains 172 putative open reading frames, including 12 homing endonucleases, no visible means of packaging, and a putative trans-splicing intein. The phage DNA appears to be strongly associated with a protein that interfered with PCR amplification and estimation of the phage genome mass by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis. Identification and analyses of the receptor-binding protein (Gp48) revealed features common to the Salmonella enterica P22 phage tailspike protein, including the ability to specifically recognize a host organism. Bacteriophage receptor-binding proteins may offer promising alternatives for use in pathogen detection platforms. PMID:21965409

  12. Call for a dedicated European legal framework for bacteriophage therapy.

    PubMed

    Verbeken, Gilbert; Pirnay, Jean-Paul; Lavigne, Rob; Jennes, Serge; De Vos, Daniel; Casteels, Minne; Huys, Isabelle

    2014-04-01

    The worldwide emergence of antibiotic resistances and the drying up of the antibiotic pipeline have spurred a search for alternative or complementary antibacterial therapies. Bacteriophages are bacterial viruses that have been used for almost a century to combat bacterial infections, particularly in Poland and the former Soviet Union. The antibiotic crisis has triggered a renewed clinical and agricultural interest in bacteriophages. This, combined with new scientific insights, has pushed bacteriophages to the forefront of the search for new approaches to fighting bacterial infections. But before bacteriophage therapy can be introduced into clinical practice in the European Union, several challenges must be overcome. One of these is the conceptualization and classification of bacteriophage therapy itself and the extent to which it constitutes a human medicinal product regulated under the European Human Code for Medicines (Directive 2001/83/EC). Can therapeutic products containing natural bacteriophages be categorized under the current European regulatory framework, or should this framework be adapted? Various actors in the field have discussed the need for an adapted (or entirely new) regulatory framework for the reintroduction of bacteriophage therapy in Europe. This led to the identification of several characteristics specific to natural bacteriophages that should be taken into consideration by regulators when evaluating bacteriophage therapy. One important consideration is whether bacteriophage therapy development occurs on an industrial scale or a hospital-based, patient-specific scale. More suitable regulatory standards may create opportunities to improve insights into this promising therapeutic approach. In light of this, we argue for the creation of a new, dedicated European regulatory framework for bacteriophage therapy. PMID:24500660

  13. [Friedrich Mauz: T4 assessor and military psychiatrist].

    PubMed

    Silberzahn-Jandt, G; Schmuhl, H-W

    2012-03-01

    Friedrich Mauz is one of the medical perpetrators of the second tier whose biography is difficult to comprehend. Autobiographies from three different political systems exist - Weimar Republic, the Third Reich, and postwar Germany in which he constantly reinvented himself. While after 1933 he suddenly emphasized his participation in the civil war turmoil during the early period of the Weimar Republic and his patriotism, he then depicted himself after 1945 as an apolitical person characterized by Württemberg pietism who inwardly rejected the Nazi State but had found himself prepared to accept "all sorts of humiliating concessions." He claimed that he had always remained true to his scientific code of conduct and had distanced himself from psychiatric genetics. In point of fact, Mauz was among those exonerated in the denazification trial in 1946 and was able to pursue his career in the Federal Republic of Germany. However, if the sources are read against the grain, a different picture emerges. Mauz's career stalled in the 1930s, not because he had been politically offensive, but because his scientific work was flimsy and considered lacking originality, particularly since he had chosen constitution research and psychotherapy as his main fields of interest, which were overshadowed by research in genetic psychiatry in the 1930s. Mauz tendered his services to the Nazi policy of genetic health, served as a medical assessor in proceedings based on the "Law for the Prevention of Genetically Diseased Offspring," permitted himself to be recruited for the T4 program as a medical expert, even participated in the deliberations on a future "Law on Euthanasia," and as a consulting psychiatrist for the German Armed Forces contributed to military medicine. PMID:22399061

  14. Effect of secondary structure on the interactions of peptide T4 LYS (11-36) in mixtures of aqueous sodium chloride and 2,2,2,-Trifluoroethanol

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, Camille O.; Spiegelberg, Susanne; Prausnitz, John M.; Blanch, Harvey W.

    2001-10-01

    The potential of mean force for protein-protein interactions is key to the development of a statistical-mechanical model for salt-induced protein precipitation and crystallization, and for understanding certain disease states, including cataract formation and {beta}-amyloid pathology in Alzheimer's disease. Fluorescence anisotropy provides a method for quantitative characterization of intermolecular interactions due to reversible association. Monomer-dimer equilibria for the peptide T4 LYS(11-36) were studied by fluorescence anisotropy. This peptide, derived from the {beta}-sheet region of the T4 lysozyme molecule, has the potential to form amyloid fibrils. 2,2,2-trifluoroethanol (TFE) induces a change in peptide secondary structure, and was used in aqueous solutions at concentrations from 0 to 50% (v/v) at 25 and 37 C to examine the role of peptide conformation on peptide-peptide interactions. The association constant for dimerization increased with rising TFE concentration and with falling temperature. The peptide-peptide potential of mean force was computed from these association constants. Circular-dichroism measurements showed that the secondary structure of the peptide plays an important role in these strong attractive interactions due to intermolecular hydrogen-bond formation and hydrophobic interactions.

  15. Twenty-four hour hormone profiles of TSH, Free T3 and free T4 in hypothyroid patients on combined T3/T4 therapy.

    PubMed

    Saravanan, P; Siddique, H; Simmons, D J; Greenwood, R; Dayan, C M

    2007-04-01

    The benefits of using thyroxine (T4) plus triiodothyronine (T3) in combination in thyroid hormone replacement are unproven but many individuals continue to be treated with this regime. When T3 is used alone for hypothyroidism, it results in wide fluctuations of thyroid hormone levels. However, only limited data exists on combined T3/T4 therapy. In this study, we have compared 24-hour profiles of thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH), free T4 (fT4) and free T3 (fT3) and cardiovascular parameters in 10 hypothyroid patients who had been on once daily combined T3/T4 therapy for more than 3 months with 10 patients on T4 alone. Twenty patients, who were part of a larger study, investigating the long-term benefits of combined T3/T4 therapy, were recruited into this sub-study. Over 24-hours, 12 samples were taken for thyroid hormones. Their 24-hour pulse and BP is also monitored on a separate occasion. On T4 alone, a modest 16% rise in fT4 with no change in fT3 was seen in the first 4-hours post-dose. In contrast, on combined treatment, fT3 levels showed a marked rise of 42% within the first 4-hours post-dose (T3/T4:T4=6.24: 4.63 mU/L, p<0.001). Mean exposure to fT3 calculated by area under the curve (AUC) was higher (T3/T4:T4=1148:1062, p<0.0001) on T3. Circadian rhythm of TSH was maintained on both treatments. No difference in pulse or blood pressure over the 24-hours was seen between the groups. Our data suggests that despite chronic combined T3/T4 therapy, wide peak-to-trough variation in fT3 levels persists. Although no immediate cardiovascular effects were seen, the long-term consequences for patients on combined therapy are unknown. PMID:17479444

  16. Sinorhizobium meliloti Phage ΦM9 Defines a New Group of T4 Superfamily Phages with Unusual Genomic Features but a Common T=16 Capsid

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Matthew C.; Tatum, Kelsey B.; Lynn, Jason S.; Brewer, Tess E.; Lu, Stephen; Washburn, Brian K.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Relatively little is known about the phages that infect agriculturally important nitrogen-fixing rhizobial bacteria. Here we report the genome and cryo-electron microscopy structure of the Sinorhizobium meliloti-infecting T4 superfamily phage ΦM9. This phage and its close relative Rhizobium phage vB_RleM_P10VF define a new group of T4 superfamily phages. These phages are distinctly different from the recently characterized cyanophage-like S. meliloti phages of the ΦM12 group. Structurally, ΦM9 has a T=16 capsid formed from repeating units of an extended gp23-like subunit that assemble through interactions between one subunit and the adjacent E-loop insertion domain. Though genetically very distant from the cyanophages, the ΦM9 capsid closely resembles that of the T4 superfamily cyanophage Syn9. ΦM9 also has the same T=16 capsid architecture as the very distant phage SPO1 and the herpesviruses. Despite their overall lack of similarity at the genomic and structural levels, ΦM9 and S. meliloti phage ΦM12 have a small number of open reading frames in common that appear to encode structural proteins involved in interaction with the host and which may have been acquired by horizontal transfer. These proteins are predicted to encode tail baseplate proteins, tail fibers, tail fiber assembly proteins, and glycanases that cleave host exopolysaccharide. IMPORTANCE Despite recent advances in the phylogenetic and structural characterization of bacteriophages, only a small number of phages of plant-symbiotic nitrogen-fixing soil bacteria have been studied at the molecular level. The effects of phage predation upon beneficial bacteria that promote plant growth remain poorly characterized. First steps in understanding these soil bacterium-phage dynamics are genetic, molecular, and structural characterizations of these groups of phages. The T4 superfamily phages are among the most complex phages; they have large genomes packaged within an icosahedral head and a long

  17. Fast Screening of Whole Blood Samples and Pharmaceutical Compounds for Enantiorecognition of Free L-T3 , L-T4 , and D-T4.

    PubMed

    Mitrofan, Grigorina; Stefan-van Staden, Raluca-Ioana; Comnea-Stancu, Ionela Raluca; van Staden, Jacobus Frederick; Bazylak, Grzegorz; Kapnissi-Christodoulou, Constantina P; Aboul-Enein, Hassan Y

    2015-12-01

    A fast screening method of whole blood was proposed for enantiorecognition of free L-T3 , L-T4 , and D-T4 . Stochastic microsensors based on four inulins (IN, IQ, TEX, and HD) immobilized on diamond paste (DP) were used for recognition of free L-T3 , L-T4 , and D-T4 . For the enantiorecognition of free L-T4 and D-T4 in whole blood and pharmaceutical samples, the best microsensor was the one based on TEX/DP (wide linear concentration ranges, and low limits of quantification). The best limit of detection for the assay of free L-T3 (400 fmol/L) was recorded using the microsensors based on HD/DP, while for the assay of free L-T4, and D-T4 the best limit of determination (1 pmol/L) was recorded using the TX/DP-based microsensor. For the enantiorecognition of free L-T3 in whole blood and pharmaceutical samples the best microsensor was the one based on HD/DP (the wider linear concentration range, and the lower limit of quantification - of pmol/L magnitude order). For the enantiorecognition of free L-T3 in whole blood and pharmaceutical samples the best microsensor was the one based on HD/DP (the wider linear concentration range, and the lower limit of quantification - of pmol/L magnitude order). Free L-T3 , L-T4 , and D-T4 were recovered with high reliabilities in whole blood samples (recoveries higher than 99.00%, with RSD values lower than 1.00%) and pharmaceutical samples (recoveries higher than 95.00% with RSD values lower than 1.00%). PMID:26447904

  18. Regulation of autologous immunity to the mouse 5T4 oncofoetal antigen: implications for immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Castro, Fernanda V; Al-Muftah, Mariam; Mulryan, Kate; Jiang, Hui-Rong; Drijfhout, Jan-Wouter; Ali, Sumia; Rutkowski, Andrzej J; Kalaitsidou, Milena; Gilham, David E; Stern, Peter L

    2012-07-01

    Effective vaccination against tumour-associated antigens (TAA) such as the 5T4 oncofoetal glycoprotein may be limited by the nature of the T cell repertoire and the influence of immunomodulatory factors in particular T regulatory cells (Treg). Here, we identified mouse 5T4-specific T cell epitopes using a 5T4 knock out (5T4KO) mouse and evaluated corresponding wild-type (WT) responses as a model to refine and improve immunogenicity. We have shown that 5T4KO mice vaccinated by replication defective adenovirus encoding mouse 5T4 (Adm5T4) generate potent 5T4-specific IFN-γ CD8 and CD4 T cell responses which mediate significant protection against 5T4 positive tumour challenge. 5T4KO CD8 but not CD4 primed T cells also produced IL-17. By contrast, Adm5T4-immunized WT mice showed no tumour protection consistent with only low avidity CD8 IFN-γ, no IL-17 T cell responses and no detectable CD4 T cell effectors producing IFN-γ or IL-17. Treatment with anti-folate receptor 4 (FR4) antibody significantly reduced the frequency of Tregs in WT mice and enhanced 5T4-specific IFN-γ but reduced IL-10 T cell responses but did not reveal IL-17-producing effectors. This altered balance of effectors by treatment with FR4 antibody after Adm5T4 vaccination provided modest protection against autologous B16m5T4 melanoma challenge. The efficacy of 5T4 and some other TAA vaccines may be limited by the combination of TAA-specific T regs, the deletion and/or alternative differentiation of CD4 T cells as well as the absence of distinct subsets of CD8 T cells. PMID:22127365

  19. Potential of Bacteriophage to Prevent and Treat Poultry Diseases

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Bacteriophage are viruses plentiful in nature that kill bacteria, and represent a safe alternative to antibiotics. Bacteriophage lytic to Escherichia coli were isolated from municipal waste water treatment and poultry processing plants. This E. coli isolate is pathogenic to poultry, causing a sev...

  20. Complete Genome Sequences of Five Paenibacillus larvae Bacteriophages.

    PubMed

    Sheflo, Michael A; Gardner, Adam V; Merrill, Bryan D; Fisher, Joshua N B; Lunt, Bryce L; Breakwell, Donald P; Grose, Julianne H; Burnett, Sandra H

    2013-01-01

    Paenibacillus larvae is a pathogen of honeybees that causes American foulbrood (AFB). We isolated bacteriophages from soil containing bee debris collected near beehives in Utah. We announce five high-quality complete genome sequences, which represent the first completed genome sequences submitted to GenBank for any P. larvae bacteriophage. PMID:24233582

  1. Expression of a bioactive bacteriophage endolysin in Nicotiana benthamiana plants

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The emergence and spread of antibiotic-resistant pathogens has led to an increased interest in alternative antimicrobial treatments, such as bacteriophage, bacteriophage-encoded peptidoglycan hydrolases (endolysins) and antimicrobial peptides. In our study, the antimicrobial activity of the CP933 en...

  2. Immune Interference of Bacteriophage Efficacy When Treating Colibacillosis In Poultry

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A study was conducted to determine if prior exposure of broiler chickens with bacteriophage would limit the ability of the same bacteriophage to treat colibacillosis. There were 5 treatments with 3 replicate pens of 20 birds per pen. The treatments consisted of 1) control; 2) birds treated with ba...

  3. The effects of bacteriophage and nanoparticles on microbial processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moody, Austin L.

    There are approximately 1031 tailed phages in the biosphere, making them the most abundant organism. Bacteriophages are viruses that infect bacteria. Due to the large diversity and abundance, no two bacteriophages that have been isolated are genetically the same. Phage products have potential in disease therapy to solve bacteria-related problems, such as infections resulting from resistant strains of Staphylococcus aureus. A bacteriophage capable of infecting methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) was isolated from bovine hair. The bacteriophage, named JB phage, was characterized using purification, amplification, cesium chloride banding, scanning electron microscopy, and transmission electron microscopy. JB phage and nanoparticles were used in various in vitro and in vivo models to test their effects on microbial processes. Scanning and transmission electron microscopy studies revealed strong interactions between JB phage and nanoparticles, which resulted in increased bacteriophage infectivity. JB phage and nanoparticle cocktails were used as a therapeutic to treat skin and systemic infections in mice caused by MRSA.

  4. Heterogeneous Preferential Solvation of Water and Trifluoroethanol in Homologous Lysozymes

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Cytoplasmic osmolytes can significantly alter the thermodynamic and kinetic properties of proteins relative to those under dilute solution conditions. Spectroscopic experiments of lysozymes in cosolvents indicate that such changes may arise from the heterogeneous, site-specific hydrophobic interactions between protein surface residues and individual solvent molecules. In pursuit of an accurate and predictive model for explaining biomolecular interactions, we study the averaged structural characteristics of mixed solvents with homologous lysozyme solutes using all-atom molecular dynamics. By observing the time-averaged densities of different aqueous solutions of trifluoroethanol, we deduce trends in the heterogeneous solvent interactions over each protein’s surface, and investigate how the homology of protein structure does not necessarily translate to similarities in solvent structure and composition—even when observing identical side chains. PMID:24823618

  5. A biophysical model of lysozyme self-association.

    PubMed Central

    Hampe, O G; Tondo, C V; Hasson-Voloch, A

    1982-01-01

    The concentration dependence of the self-association of hen egg-white lysozyme was studied spectrophotometrically at pH 6, 25 degrees C, and low ionic strength within a concentration range of 2.5-50 micrograms/ml. Of several possible mathematical models, an ideal or nearly ideal two-stage model representing an equilibrium between monomers and dimers and between dimers and trimers best describes the data. The dimerization and trimerization constants were found to be 2.5 x 10(-2) and 38 x 10(-2). Dialysis experiments confirmed that the mechanism involves three associating species. A "head-to-tail" contact between the associating sites was inferred from dialysis studies of the effect of indole and imidazole derivatives on lysozyme self-association. PMID:7139037

  6. Locations of Halide Ions in Tetragonal Lysozyme Crystals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lim, Kap; Adimurthy, Ganapathi; Nadarajah, Arunan; Forsythe, Elizabeth L.; Pusey, Marc L.

    1998-01-01

    Anions play an important role in the crystallization of lysozyme, and are known to bind to the crystalline protein. Previous studies employing X-ray crystallography had found one chloride ion binding site in the tetragonal crystal form of the protein and four nitrate ion binding sites in the monoclinic form. Studies using other approaches have reported more chloride ion binding sites, but their locations were not known. Knowing the precise location of these anions is also useful in determining the correct electrostatic fields surrounding the protein. In the first part of this study the anion positions in the tetragonal form were determined from the difference Fourier map obtained from the lysozyme crystals grown in bromide and chloride solutions under identical conditions. The anion locations were then obtained from standard crystallographic methods and five possible anion binding sites were found in this manner. The sole chloride ion binding site found in previous studies was confirmed. The remaining four sites were new ones for tetragonal lysozyme crystals. However, three of these new sites and the previously found one corresponded to the four unique binding sites found for nitrate ions in monoclinic crystals. This suggests that most of the anion binding sites in lysozyme remain unchanged, even when different anions and different crystal forms of lysozyme are employed. It is unlikely that there are many more anions in the tetragonal lysozyme crystal structure. Assuming osmotic equilibrium it can be shown that there are at most three more anions in the crystal channels. Some of the new anion binding sites found in this study were, as expected, in pockets containing basic residues. However, some of them were near neutral, but polar, residues. Thus, the study also showed the importance of uncharged, but polar groups, on the protein surface in determining its electrostatic field. This was important for the second part of this study where the electrostatic field

  7. Elastic Properties of Lysozyme Confined in Nanoporous Polymer Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Haoyu; Akcora, Pinar

    Retaining the conformational structure and bioactivity of immobilized proteins is important for biosensor designs and drug delivery systems. It is known that confined media provide a protective environment to the encapsulated proteins and prevent diffusion of the denaturant. In this study, different types of proteins (streptavidin, lysozyme and fibrinogen) were chemically attached into the nanopores of poly(methyl methacrylate) thin films. Heterogeneous flat surfaces with varying cylinder pore sizes (10-50 nm) were used to confine proteins of different sizes and shapes. Stiffness of protein functionalized nanopores was measured in nanoindentation experiments. Our results showed that streptavidin behaved more stiffly when pore dimension changed from micron to nanosize. Further, it was found that lysozyme confined within nanopores showed higher specific bioactivity than proteins on flat surfaces. These results on surface elasticity and protein activity may help in understanding protein interactions with surfaces of different topologies and chemistry.

  8. Actin - Lysozyme Interactions in Model Cystic Fibrosis Sputum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanders, Lori; Slimmer, Scott; Angelini, Thomas; Wong, Gerard C. L.

    2003-03-01

    Cystic fibrosis sputum is a complex fluid consisting of mucin (a glycoprotein), lysozyme (a cationic polypeptide), water, salt, as well as a high concentration of a number of anionic biological polyelectrolytes such as DNA and F-actin. The interactions governing these components are poorly understood, but may have important clinical consequences. For example, the formation of these biological polyelectrolytes into ordered gel phases may contribute significantly to the observed high viscosity of CF sputum. In this work, a number of model systems containing actin, lysozyme, and KCl were created to simulate CF sputum in vitro. These model systems were studied using small angle x-ray scattering and confocal fluorescence microscopy. Preliminary results will be presented. This work was supported by NSF DMR-0071761, the Beckman Young Investigator Program, and the Cystic Fibrosis Foundation.

  9. Protein crystal growth - Growth kinetics for tetragonal lysozyme crystals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pusey, M. L.; Snyder, R. S.; Naumann, R.

    1986-01-01

    Results are reported from theoretical and experimental studies of the growth rate of lysozyme as a function of diffusion in earth-gravity conditions. The investigations were carried out to form a comparison database for future studies of protein crystal growth in the microgravity environment of space. A diffusion-convection model is presented for predicting crystal growth rates in the presence of solutal concentration gradients. Techniques used to grow and monitor the growth of hen egg white lysozyme are detailed. The model calculations and experiment data are employed to discuss the effects of transport and interfacial kinetics in the growth of the crystals, which gradually diminished the free energy in the growth solution. Density gradient-driven convection, caused by presence of the gravity field, was a limiting factor in the growth rate.

  10. Tetragonal Chicken Egg White Lysozyme Solubility in Sodium Chloride Solutions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Forsythe, Elizabeth L.; Judge, Russell A.; Pusey, Marc L.

    1998-01-01

    The solubility of chicken egg white lysozyme, crystallized in the tetragonal form was measured in sodium chloride solutions from 1.6 to 30.7 C, using a miniature column solubility apparatus. Sodium chloride solution concentrations ranged from 1 to 7% (w/v). The solutions were buffered with 0.1 M sodium acetate buffer with the solubility being measured at pH values in 0.2 pH unit increments in the range pH 4.0 to 5.4, with data also included at pH 4.5. Lysozyme solubility was found to increase with increases in temperature and decreasing salt concentration. Solution pH has a varied and unpredictable effect on solubility.

  11. Mouse lysozyme M gene: isolation, characterization, and expression studies.

    PubMed Central

    Cross, M; Mangelsdorf, I; Wedel, A; Renkawitz, R

    1988-01-01

    We have isolated and characterized both cDNA and genomic DNA of the mouse lysozyme M gene. Derivation of the amino acid sequence from the nucleotide sequences revealed six positions in the carboxyl terminus that differ from partial sequences previously published. The differential detection of specific mRNAs from the closely related lysozyme M and P genes has revealed different but overlapping tissue specificities of expression. The M gene is expressed weakly in myeloblasts, moderately in immature macrophages, and strongly in both mature macrophages and macrophage-rich tissues, while high levels of P transcripts are present only in small intestine. Sites of protein accumulation, rather than gene expression, have been identified by comparative quantitation of mRNA and enzyme levels. Images PMID:3413093

  12. Hydroxyl radicals do not crosslink a DNA-lysozyme complex

    SciTech Connect

    Werbin, H.; Cheng, C.J.

    1985-12-01

    The ionic complex between lysozyme and either Escherichia coli DNA or pBR322 DNA was not crosslinked by two systems capable of producing nanomolar amounts of hydroxyl radicals, the oxidation of xanthine by xanthine oxidase and the iron catalyzed oxidation of ascorbic acid. Nor did effective crosslinking occur with micromolar quantities of hydroxyl radicals raised by the addition of adenosine nucleotides to ferrous iron and hydrogen peroxide. In this case, radical content was estimated by colorimetric analysis of formaldehyde following hydroxyl radical oxidation of dimethyl sulfoxide. Similar amounts of radicals generated by pulse radiolysis in a nitrous oxide atmosphere failed also to induce crosslinking. These findings do not support a role for hydroxy radicals in the N-acetoxy-2-acetylaminofluorene induced crosslinking of DNA to lysozyme proposed earlier.

  13. Nucleotide sequences of five anti-lysozyme monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed Central

    Darsley, M J; Rees, A R

    1985-01-01

    The nucleotide sequences of the heavy and light chain immunoglobulin mRNAs derived from five hybridomas (Gloop 1-5) secreting IgGs specific for the loop region of hen egg lysozyme were determined. These monoclonal antibodies recognise three distinct but overlapping epitopes within the loop region. The sequences of two pairs of antibodies with indistinguishable fine specificities were similar in both chains whereas the sequences of antibodies of non-identical specificities were very different. It is proposed that the D-segments expressed in two of the antibodies (Gloop3 and Gloop4) are the products of one, or perhaps two, previously unidentified germ line D-genes. Gloop1 and Gloop2 use a D-segment previously identified in antibodies specific for the hapten 2-phenyloxazolone; however it is recombined in a different reading frame in the anti-lysozyme antibodies, producing a different amino acid sequence. PMID:2410256

  14. Lysozyme as a recognition element for monitoring of bacterial population.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Laibao; Wan, Yi; Yu, Liangmin; Zhang, Dun

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial infections remain a significant challenge in biomedicine and environment safety. Increasing worldwide demand for point-of-care techniques and increasing concern on their safe development and use, require a simple and sensitive bioanalysis for pathogen detection. However, this goal is not yet achieved. A design for fluorescein isothiocyanate-labeled lysozyme (FITC-LYZ), which provides quantitative binding information for gram-positive bacteria, Micrococcus luteus, and detects pathogen concentration, is presented. The functional lysozyme is used not only as the pathogenic detection platform, but also as a tracking reagent for microbial population in antibacterial tests. A nonlinear relationship between the system response and the logarithm of the bacterial concentration was observed in the range of 1.2×10(2)-1.2×10(5) cfu mL(-1). The system has a potential for further applications and provides a facile and simple method for detection of pathogenic bacteria. Meanwhile, the fluorescein isothiocyanate -labeled lysozyme is also employed as the tracking agent for antibacterial dynamic assay, which show a similar dynamic curve compared with UV-vis test. PMID:26695267

  15. Impact of lysozyme on stability mechanism of nanozirconia aqueous suspension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szewczuk-Karpisz, Katarzyna; Wiśniewska, Małgorzata

    2016-08-01

    The effect of lysozyme (LSZ) presence on the zirconium(IV) oxide (ZrO2) aqueous suspension stability was examined. The applied zirconia contains mesopores (with a diameter about 30 nm) and its mean particle size is about 100 nm. To determine the stability mechanism of ZrO2 suspension in the biopolymer presence, the adsorption and electrokinetic (surface charge density and zeta potential) measurements were performed in the pH range 3-10. The lysozyme adsorption on the nanozirconia surface proceeds mainly through electrostatic forces. Under solid-polymer repulsion conditions, there is no adsorption of lysozyme (pH < 6, CNaCl 0.01 mol/dm3). The increase of solution ionic strength to 0.2 mol/dm3 causes screening of unfavourable forces and biopolymer adsorption becomes possible. The LSZ addition to the ZrO2 suspension influences its stability. At pH 3, 4.6 and 7.6, slight improvement of the system stability was obtained. In turn, at pH 9 considerable destabilization of nanozirconia particles covered by polymeric layers occurs.

  16. On the adsorption of magnetite nanoparticles on lysozyme amyloid fibrils.

    PubMed

    Majorosova, Jozefina; Petrenko, Viktor I; Siposova, Katarina; Timko, Milan; Tomasovicova, Natalia; Garamus, Vasil M; Koralewski, Marceli; Avdeev, Mikhail V; Leszczynski, Błażej; Jurga, Stefan; Gazova, Zuzana; Hayryan, Shura; Hu, Chin-Kun; Kopcansky, Peter

    2016-10-01

    An adsorption of magnetic nanoparticles (MNP) from electrostatically stabilized aqueous ferrofluids on amyloid fibrils of hen egg white lysozyme (HEWL) in 2mg/mL acidic dispersions have been detected for the MNP concentration range of 0.01-0.1vol.%. The association of the MNP with amyloid fibrils has been characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) and magneto-optical measurements. It has been observed that the extent of adsorption is determined by the MNP concentration. When increasing the MNP concentration the formed aggregates of magnetic particles repeat the general rod-like structure of the fibrils. The effect is not observed when MNP are mixed with the solution of lysozyme monomers. The adsorption has been investigated with the aim to clarify previously found disaggregation activity of MNP in amyloid fibrils dispersions and to get deeper insight into interaction processes between amyloids and MNP. The observed effect is also discussed with respect to potential applications for ordering lysozyme amyloid fibrils in a liquid crystal phase under external magnetic fields. PMID:27451367

  17. Relationship Between Equilibrium Forms of Lysozyme Crystals and Precipitant Anions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nadarajah, Arunan

    1996-01-01

    Molecular forces, such as electrostatic, hydrophobic, van der Waals and steric forces, are known to be important in determining protein interactions. These forces are affected by the solution conditions and changing the pH, temperature or the ionic strength of the solution can sharply affect protein interactions. Several investigations of protein crystallization have shown that this process is also strongly dependent on solution conditions. As the ionic strength of the solution is increased, the initially soluble protein may either crystallize or form an amorphous precipitate at high ionic strengths. Studies done on the model protein hen egg white lysozyme have shown that different crystal forms can be easily and reproducibly obtained, depending primarily on the anion used to desolubilize the protein. In this study we employ pyranine to probe the effect of various anions on the water structure. Additionally, lysozyme crystallization was carried out at these conditions and the crystal form was determined by X-ray crystallography. The goal of the study was to understand the physico-chemical basis for the effect of changing the anion concentration on the equilibrium form of lysozyme crystals. It will also verify the hypothesis that the anions, by altering the bulk water structure in the crystallizing solutions, alter the surface energy of the between the crystal faces and the solution and, consequently, the equilibrium form of the crystals.

  18. Molecular Dissection of the Homotrimeric Sliding Clamp of T4 Phage: Two Domains of a Subunit Display Asymmetric Characteristics.

    PubMed

    Singh, Manika Indrajit; Jain, Vikas

    2016-01-26

    Sliding clamp proteins are circular dimers or trimers that encircle DNA and serve as processivity factors during DNA replication. Their presence in all the three domains of life and in bacteriophages clearly indicates their high level of significance. T4 gp45, besides functioning as the DNA polymerase processivity factor, also moonlights as the late promoter transcription determinant. Here we report a detailed biophysical analysis of gp45. The chemical denaturation of gp45 probed by circular dichroism spectroscopy, tryptophan fluorescence anisotropy, and blue-native polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis suggests that the protein follows a three-state denaturation profile and displays an intermediate molten globule-like state. The three-state transition was found to be the result of the sequential unfolding of the two domains, the N-terminal domain (NTD) and the C-terminal domain (CTD), of gp45. The experiments involving Trp fluorescence quenching by acrylamide demonstrate that the CTD undergoes substantial changes in conformation during formation of the intermediate state. Further biophysical dissection of the individual domain reveals contrasting properties of the two domains. The NTD unfolds at low urea concentrations and is also susceptible to protease cleavage, whereas the CTD resists urea-mediated denaturation and is not amenable to protease digestion even at higher urea concentrations. These experiments allow us to conclude that the two domains of gp45 differ in their dynamics. While the CTD shows stability and rigidity, we find that the NTD is unstable and flexible. We believe that the asymmetric characteristics of the two domains and the interface they form hold significance in gp45 structure and function. PMID:26735934

  19. M13 Bacteriophage Based Protein Sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Ju Hun

    Despite significant progress in biotechnology and biosensing, early detection and disease diagnosis remains a critical issue for improving patient survival rates and well-being. Many of the typical detection schemes currently used possess issues such as low sensitivity and accuracy and are also time consuming to run and expensive. In addition, multiplexed detection remains difficult to achieve. Therefore, developing advanced approaches for reliable, simple, quantitative analysis of multiple markers in solution that also are highly sensitive are still in demand. In recent years, much of the research has primarily focused on improving two key components of biosensors: the bio-recognition agent (bio-receptor) and the transducer. Particular bio-receptors that have been used include antibodies, aptamers, molecular imprinted polymers, and small affinity peptides. In terms of transducing agents, nanomaterials have been considered as attractive candidates due to their inherent nanoscale size, durability and unique chemical and physical properties. The key focus of this thesis is the design of a protein detection and identification system that is based on chemically engineered M13 bacteriophage coupled with nanomaterials. The first chapter provides an introduction of biosensors and M13 bacteriophage in general, where the advantages of each are provided. In chapter 2, an efficient and enzyme-free sensor is demonstrated from modified M13 bacteriophage to generate highly sensitive colorimetric signals from gold nanocrystals. In chapter 3, DNA conjugated M13 were used to enable facile and rapid detection of antigens in solution that also provides modalities for identification. Lastly, high DNA loadings per phage was achieved via hydrozone chemistry and these were applied in conjunction with Raman active DNA-gold/silver core/shell nanoparticles toward highly sensitive SERS sensing.

  20. Interaction of T4 UvsW helicase and single-stranded DNA binding protein gp32 through its carboxy terminal acidic tail

    PubMed Central

    Perumal, Senthil K.; Nelson, Scott W.; Benkovic, Stephen J.

    2013-01-01

    Bacteriophage T4 UvsW helicase contains both unwinding and annealing activities and displays some functional similarities to bacterial RecG and RecQ helicases. UvsW is involved in several DNA repair pathways, playing important roles in recombination-dependent DNA repair and the reorganization of stalled replication forks. The T4 single-stranded DNA binding protein, gp32, is a central player in nearly all DNA replication and repair processes and is thought to facilitate their coordination by recruiting and regulating the various proteins involved. Here, we show that the activities of the UvsW protein are modulated by gp32. UvsW catalyzed unwinding of recombination intermediates such as D-loops and static X-DNA (Holliday junction mimic) to ssDNA products is enhanced by the gp32 protein. The enhancement requires the presence of the protein interaction domain of gp32 (the acidic carboxy terminus), suggesting that a specific interaction between UvsW and gp32 is required. In the absence of this interaction, the ssDNA annealing and ATP-dependent translocation activities of UvsW are severely inhibited when gp32 coats the ssDNA lattice. However, when UvsW and gp32 do interact, UvsW is able to efficiently displace the gp32 protein from the ssDNA. This ability of UvsW to remove gp32 from ssDNA may explain its ability to enhance the strand invasion activity of the T4 recombinase (UvsX) and suggests a possible new role for UvsW in gp32-mediated DNA transactions. PMID:23732982

  1. Characterization of the murine 5T4 oncofoetal antigen: a target for immunotherapy in cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Woods, Andrew M; Wang, Who W; Shaw, David M; Ward, Christopher M; Carroll, Miles W; Rees, Buddug R; Stern, Peter L

    2002-01-01

    Human 5T4 oncofoetal antigen defined by the murine 5T4 monoclonal antibody is a highly glycosylated protein expressed by trophoblast and a few specialized adult epithelia. Up-regulation of 5T4 expression in some cancers is associated with poor clinical outcome; overexpression of human 5T4 cDNA in epithelial cells can alter their morphology and motility, supporting a role for such functions in cancer and development. A murine model to study 5T4 biology and tumour immunology would be useful. The production of m5T4-specific antibodies, their use in establishing transfected cells and documenting their biological properties in vitro are described. A rat monoclonal antibody specific for mouse 5T4 molecules by ELISA, flow cytometry, immunohistochemistry and immunoprecipitation was isolated and epitope mapped. Similar to its human counterpart, murine 5T4 antigen is a 72 kDa glycoprotein (immunoprecipitation and Western blot analysis) and exhibits punctate cell surface expression, dependent upon the integrity of the actin cytoskeleton. Likewise, overexpression of autologous murine 5T4 by B16 F10 melanoma cells and A9 L fibroblasts accentuates the 5T4 phenotype, which is characterized by a spindle-like morphology, increased motility, and reduced adhesion and proliferation rate. Immunohistochemical analysis of adult mouse tissues shows a restricted pattern of expression similar to that of human 5T4 antigen. The murine 5T4 antigen-expressing cell lines and antibody reagents are now being used to explore novel immunotherapies in pre-clinical models and the biology of 5T4 in development. PMID:12003637

  2. Characterization of the murine 5T4 oncofoetal antigen: a target for immunotherapy in cancer.

    PubMed

    Woods, Andrew M; Wang, Who W; Shaw, David M; Ward, Christopher M; Carroll, Miles W; Rees, Buddug R; Stern, Peter L

    2002-08-15

    Human 5T4 oncofoetal antigen defined by the murine 5T4 monoclonal antibody is a highly glycosylated protein expressed by trophoblast and a few specialized adult epithelia. Up-regulation of 5T4 expression in some cancers is associated with poor clinical outcome; overexpression of human 5T4 cDNA in epithelial cells can alter their morphology and motility, supporting a role for such functions in cancer and development. A murine model to study 5T4 biology and tumour immunology would be useful. The production of m5T4-specific antibodies, their use in establishing transfected cells and documenting their biological properties in vitro are described. A rat monoclonal antibody specific for mouse 5T4 molecules by ELISA, flow cytometry, immunohistochemistry and immunoprecipitation was isolated and epitope mapped. Similar to its human counterpart, murine 5T4 antigen is a 72 kDa glycoprotein (immunoprecipitation and Western blot analysis) and exhibits punctate cell surface expression, dependent upon the integrity of the actin cytoskeleton. Likewise, overexpression of autologous murine 5T4 by B16 F10 melanoma cells and A9 L fibroblasts accentuates the 5T4 phenotype, which is characterized by a spindle-like morphology, increased motility, and reduced adhesion and proliferation rate. Immunohistochemical analysis of adult mouse tissues shows a restricted pattern of expression similar to that of human 5T4 antigen. The murine 5T4 antigen-expressing cell lines and antibody reagents are now being used to explore novel immunotherapies in pre-clinical models and the biology of 5T4 in development. PMID:12003637

  3. Bacteriophage typing scheme for Salmonella infantis.

    PubMed Central

    Kasatiya, S; Caprioli, T; Champoux, S

    1979-01-01

    A bacteriophage typing system is described for Salmonella infantis. Nine phages were selected, of which three were isolated from sewage and six from human feces. All except 7 of the 546 strains collected between 1974 and 1978 could be classified into 23 different phage types. The five most common phage types comprised 26, 13, 9, 9, and 9% of all strains, respectively. Strains from humans, animals, food, and water isolated during nine episodes, or from given patients at different intervals of time, belonged to the same phage type. PMID:544631

  4. Bacteriophage lambda-based expression vectors.

    PubMed

    Christensen, A C

    2001-03-01

    Bacteriophage lambda has been in use as a cloning vector for over 25 years, and has been used extensively as an expression vector. The efficiency of packaging and infection, and the simplicity of plaque screening are advantages of lambda as a cloning vector. A number of ingenious modifications help overcome the disadvantages associated with its mode of growth and its size. Some lambda vectors have been designed to be readily converted into plasmids or phagemids, and there are a variety of promoters and fusions that can be used to drive expression of foreign genes. Screening lambda libraries with antibodies or ligands is a powerful way of identifying novel genes. PMID:11434310

  5. Bacterial genome remodeling through bacteriophage recombination.

    PubMed

    Menouni, Rachid; Hutinet, Geoffrey; Petit, Marie-Agnès; Ansaldi, Mireille

    2015-01-01

    Bacteriophages co-exist and co-evolve with their hosts in natural environments. Virulent phages lyse infected cells through lytic cycles, whereas temperate phages often remain dormant and can undergo lysogenic or lytic cycles. In their lysogenic state, prophages are actually part of the host genome and replicate passively in rhythm with host division. However, prophages are far from being passive residents: they can modify or bring new properties to their host. In this review, we focus on two important phage-encoded recombination mechanisms, i.e. site-specific recombination and homologous recombination, and how they remodel bacterial genomes. PMID:25790500

  6. Analysis of Two Lysozyme Genes and Antimicrobial Functions of Their Recombinant Proteins in Asian Seabass

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Gui Hong; Bai, Zhi Yi; Xia, Jun Hong; Liu, Feng; Liu, Peng; Yue, Gen Hua

    2013-01-01

    Lysozymes are important proteins of the innate immune system for the defense against bacterial infection. We cloned and analyzed chicken-type (c-type) and goose-type (g-type) lysozymes from Asian seabass (Lates calcarifer). The deduced amino acid sequence of the c-type lysozyme contained 144 residues and possessed typical structure residues, conserved catalytic residues (Glu50 and Asp67) and a “GSTDYGIFQINS” motif. The deduced g-type lysozyme contained 187 residues and possessed a goose egg white lysozyme (GEWL) domain containing three conserved catalytic residues (Glu71, Asp84, Asp95) essential for catalytic activity. Real time quantitative PCR (qRT-PCR) revealed that the two lysozyme genes were constitutively expressed in all the examined tissues. The c-type lysozyme was most abundant in liver, while the g-type lysozyme was predominantly expressed in intestine and weakly expressed in muscle. The c-type and g-type transcripts were up-regulated in the kidney, spleen and liver in response to a challenge with Vibrio harveyi. The up-regulation of the c-type lysozyme was much stronger than that of the g-type lysozyme in kidney and spleen. The recombinant proteins of the c-type and g-type lysozymes showed lytic activities against the bacterial pathogens Vibrio harveyi and Photobacterium damselae in a dosage-dependent manner. We identified single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the two lysozyme genes. There were significant associations of these polymorphisms with resistance to the big belly disease. These results suggest that the c- and g-type genes play an important role in resistance to bacterial pathogens in fish. The SNP markers in the two genes associated with the resistance to bacterial pathogens may facilitate the selection of Asian seabass resistant to bacterial diseases. PMID:24244553

  7. Biochemical characterization of lysozymes present in egg white of selected species of anatid birds.

    PubMed

    D'Surney, S J; deKloet, S R

    1985-01-01

    The isolation of lysozyme from the egg white of several representative species of waterfowl is described. The purified lysozymes were analyzed in order to determine the type and molecular weight of each enzyme. All enzymes found in duck egg whites were found to be of the c-type. In contrast all true geese, the Mute Swan as well as the Northern Blackneck Screamer contain lysozyme g in their egg white. PMID:4085215

  8. Biochemical characterization of lysozymes present in egg white of selected species of anatid birds.

    PubMed

    D'Surney, S J; deKloet, S R

    1985-01-01

    The isolation of lysozyme from the egg white of several representative species of waterfowl is described. The purified lysozymes were analyzed to determine the type and molecular weight of each enzyme. All enzymes found in duck egg whites were found to be of the c-type. In contrast all true geese, and the mute swan species as well as the northern blackneck screamer contain lysozyme g in their egg white. PMID:4042624

  9. Antibacterial activity of hen egg white lysozyme against Listeria monocytogenes Scott A in foods.

    PubMed

    Hughey, V L; Wilger, P A; Johnson, E A

    1989-03-01

    Egg white lysozyme killed or prevented growth of Listeria monocytogenes Scott A in several foods. Lysozyme was more active in vegetables than in animal-derived foods that we tested. For maximum activity in certain foods, EDTA was required in addition to lysozyme. Lysozyme with EDTA effectively killed inoculated populations of 10(4) L. monocytogenes per g in fresh corn, fresh green beans, shredded cabbage, shredded lettuce, and carrots during storage at 5 degrees C. Control incubations without lysozyme supported growth of L. monocytogenes to 10(6) to 10(7)/g. Lysozyme had less activity in animal-derived foods, including fresh pork sausage (bratwurst) and Camembert cheese. In bratwurst, lysozyme with EDTA prevented L. monocytogenes from growing for 2 to 3 weeks but did not kill significant numbers of cells and did not prevent eventual growth. The control sausages not containing lysozyme supported rapid and heavy growth, which indicated that lysozyme was bacteriostatic for 2 to 3 weeks in fresh pork sausage. We also prepared Camembert cheese containing 10(4) L. monocytogenes cells per g and investigated the changes during ripening in cheeses supplemented with lysozyme and EDTA. Cheeses with lysozyme by itself or together with EDTA reduced the L. monocytogenes population by approximately 10-fold over the first 3 to 4 weeks of ripening. In the same period, the control cheese wheels without added lysozyme with and without chelator slowly started to grown and eventually reached 10(6) to 10(7) CFU/g after 55 days of ripening.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:2494938

  10. Effects of different heat treatments on lysozyme quantity and antimicrobial activity of jenny milk.

    PubMed

    Cosentino, C; Labella, C; Elshafie, H S; Camele, I; Musto, M; Paolino, R; D'Adamo, C; Freschi, P

    2016-07-01

    Thermal treatments are used to improve milk microbial safety, shelf life, and biological activity of some of its components. However, thermal treatments can reduce the nutritional quality of milk, affecting the molecular structure of milk proteins, such as lysozyme, which is a very important milk component due to its antimicrobial effect against gram-positive bacteria. Jenny milk is characterized by high lysozyme content. For this reason, in the last few years, it has been used as an antimicrobial additive in dairy products as an alternative to hen egg white lysozyme, which can cause allergic reactions. This study aimed to investigate the effect of pasteurization and condensation on the concentration and antimicrobial activity of lysozyme in jenny milk. Furthermore, lysozyme quantity and activity were tested in raw and pasteurized milk after condensation at 40 and 20% of the initial volume. Reversed-phase HPLC was performed under fluorescence detection to monitor lysozyme in milk samples. We evaluated the antimicrobial activity of the tested milk against Bacillus megaterium, Bacillus mojavensis, Clavibacter michiganensis, Clostridium tyrobutyricum, Xanthomonas campestris, and Escherichia coli. Condensation and pasteurization did not affect the concentration or antimicrobial activity of lysozyme in jenny milk, except for B. mojaventis, which showed resistance to lysozyme in milk samples subjected to heat treatments. Moreover, lysozyme in jenny milk showed antimicrobial activity similar to synthetic antibiotics versus some gram-positive strains and also versus the gram-negative strain X. campestris. PMID:27157571

  11. A novel electrochemical aptamer-antibody sandwich assay for lysozyme detection.

    PubMed

    Ocaña, Cristina; Hayat, Akhtar; Mishra, Rupesh; Vasilescu, Alina; del Valle, Manel; Marty, Jean-Louis

    2015-06-21

    In this paper, we have reported a novel electrochemical aptamer-antibody based sandwich biosensor for the detection of lysozyme. In the sensing strategy, an anti-lysozyme aptamer was immobilized onto the carbon electrode surface by covalent binding via diazonium salt chemistry. After incubating with a target protein (lysozyme), a biotinylated antibody was used to complete the sandwich format. The subsequent additions of avidin-alkaline phosphatase as an enzyme label, and a 1-naphthyl phosphate substrate (1-NPP) allowed us to determine the concentration of lysozyme (Lys) via Differential Pulse Voltammetry (DPV) of the generated enzyme reaction product, 1-naphthol. Using this strategy, a wide detection range from 5 fM to 5 nM was obtained for a target lysozyme, with a detection limit of 4.3 fM. The control experiments were carried out by using bovine serum albumin (BSA), cytochrome c and casein. The results showed that the proposed biosensor had good specificity, stability and reproducibility for lysozyme analysis. In addition, the biosensor was applied for detecting lysozyme in spiked wine samples, and very good recovery rates were obtained in the range from 95.2 to 102.0% for lysozyme detection. This implies that the proposed sandwich biosensor is a promising analytical tool for the analysis of lysozyme in real samples. PMID:25905497

  12. L-T4 bioequivalence and hormone replacement studies via feedback control simulations.

    PubMed

    Eisenberg, Marisa; Samuels, Mary; DiStefano, Joseph J

    2006-12-01

    FDA Guidance for testing bioequivalence of levothyroxine (L-T(4)) preparations has been challenged by several groups, based on multiple issues. The efficacy of single versus combined hormone therapy also is receiving additional scrutiny. To examine these concerns, we developed a new nonlinear feedback system simulation model of whole-body regulation mechanisms involving dynamics of T(3), T(4), TSH, plasma protein binding, extravascular regulatory enzyme systems, and the hypothalamic-pituitary-thyroid axis, all quantified from human data. To address bioequivalence, we explored how to best account for varying and unmeasured endogenous T(4) following dosing with exogenous oral L-T(4) in euthyroid volunteers in required pharmacokinetic (PK) studies, by simulating various dosing scenarios and developing a new and simple correction method. We computed and assessed dosing error effects and baseline corrections using simulator-predicted endogenous T(4) level variations, due to actual closed-loop effects, and compared these with approximate corrections computed directly from PK data. Predicted dose-responses were quite linear, and for constant baseline, 7-day half-life, and our new formula-correction methods, we established some bounds on bioequivalent dosages. Simulated replacement after thyroidectomy required 141 microg L-T(4) only to normalize T(3) tissue levels and 162 microg L-T(4) to normalize plasma T(3) levels. A combined dose of approximately 103 microg L-T(4) plus approximately 6 microg T(3) ( approximately 18:1 ratio) was needed to normalize both plasma T(3) and T(4) and average tissue T(3) levels. However, simulated average tissue T(3) levels were normalized with standard L-T(4)-only therapy, and plasma T(3) levels were still within the normal range. We suggest a simple and more accurate correction for endogenous T(4) in PK studies. Current standard L-T(4)-only treatment is supported for routine replacement needs. PMID:17199439

  13. Recognition of bacterial lipopolysaccharide using bacteriophage-adhesin-coated long-period gratings.

    PubMed

    Brzozowska, Ewa; Śmietana, Mateusz; Koba, Marcin; Górska, Sabina; Pawlik, Krzysztof; Gamian, Andrzej; Bock, Wojtek J

    2015-05-15

    In this paper we present a new type of highly sensitive label-free sensor based on long-period gratings (LPG) coated with T4 bacteriophage (phage) adhesin. The adhesin (gp37) binds Escherichia coli B (E. coli B) by recognizing its bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS). The LPG biofunctionalization methodology is based on coating LPG surface with nickel ions capable of gp37 histidine tag reversible binding. For the first time recombinant adhesive phage protein has been used as a receptor molecule in biosensing scheme. The specificity of LPS binding by adhesin has been tested with LPG-based device and confirmed using Western blot, Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay (ELISA) and BIACORE methods. The LPG-based sensor can measure bacterial contamination in real time and with a high accuracy. We show that T4 phage adhesin binds E. coli B LPS in its native or denatured form. The binding is highly specific and irreversible. The applied procedure allows for obtaining reusable biosensors. PMID:25067838

  14. Forces during Bacteriophage DNA Packaging and Ejection

    PubMed Central

    Purohit, Prashant K.; Inamdar, Mandar M.; Grayson, Paul D.; Squires, Todd M.; Kondev, Jané; Phillips, Rob

    2005-01-01

    The conjunction of insights from structural biology, solution biochemistry, genetics, and single-molecule biophysics has provided a renewed impetus for the construction of quantitative models of biological processes. One area that has been a beneficiary of these experimental techniques is the study of viruses. In this article we describe how the insights obtained from such experiments can be utilized to construct physical models of processes in the viral life cycle. We focus on dsDNA bacteriophages and show that the bending elasticity of DNA and its electrostatics in solution can be combined to determine the forces experienced during packaging and ejection of the viral genome. Furthermore, we quantitatively analyze the effect of fluid viscosity and capsid expansion on the forces experienced during packaging. Finally, we present a model for DNA ejection from bacteriophages based on the hypothesis that the energy stored in the tightly packed genome within the capsid leads to its forceful ejection. The predictions of our model can be tested through experiments in vitro where DNA ejection is inhibited by the application of external osmotic pressure. PMID:15556983

  15. Bacteriophage recombination systems and biotechnical applications.

    PubMed

    Nafissi, Nafiseh; Slavcev, Roderick

    2014-04-01

    Bacteriophage recombination systems have been widely used in biotechnology for modifying prokaryotic species, for creating transgenic animals and plants, and more recently, for human cell gene manipulation. In contrast to homologous recombination, which benefits from the endogenous recombination machinery of the cell, site-specific recombination requires an exogenous source of recombinase in mammalian cells. The mechanism of bacteriophage evolution and their coexistence with bacterial cells has become a point of interest ever since bacterial viruses' life cycles were first explored. Phage recombinases have already been exploited as valuable genetic tools and new phage enzymes, and their potential application to genetic engineering and genome manipulation, vectorology, and generation of new transgene delivery vectors, and cell therapy are attractive areas of research that continue to be investigated. The significance and role of phage recombination systems in biotechnology is reviewed in this paper, with specific focus on homologous and site-specific recombination conferred by the coli phages, λ, and N15, the integrase from the Streptomyces phage, ΦC31, the recombination system of phage P1, and the recently characterized recombination functions of Yersinia phage, PY54. Key steps of the molecular mechanisms involving phage recombination functions and their application to molecular engineering, our novel exploitations of the PY54-derived recombination system, and its application to the development of new DNA vectors are discussed. PMID:24442504

  16. Respirable bacteriophages for the treatment of bacterial lung infections.

    PubMed

    Hoe, Susan; Semler, Diana D; Goudie, Amanda D; Lynch, Karlene H; Matinkhoo, Sadaf; Finlay, Warren H; Dennis, Jonathan J; Vehring, Reinhard

    2013-12-01

    This review article discusses the development of respiratory therapeutics containing bacteriophages indicated for lung infections, specifically those that have become increasingly difficult to treat because of antibiotic resistance. Recent achievements and remaining problems are presented for each step necessary to develop a bacteriophage-containing dosage form for respiratory drug delivery, including selection of appropriate bacteriophages for therapy, processing and purification of phage preparations, formulation into a stable, solid dosage form, and delivery device selection. Safety and efficacy studies in animals and human subjects are also reviewed. PMID:23597003

  17. Naturally resident and exogenously applied T4-like and T5-like bacteriophages can reduce Escherichia coli O157:H7 levels in sheep guts

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In preparing sheep for an in vivo Escherichia coli O157:H7 eradication trial, we found that 20/39 members of a single flock were naturally colonized by O157:H7-infecting phages. Characterization showed these were all one phage type (subsequently named CEV2) infecting 15/16 O157:H7, 7/72 ECOR, and c...

  18. Mapping the solid-state properties of crystalline lysozyme during pharmaceutical unit-operations.

    PubMed

    Mohammad, Mohammad Amin; Grimsey, Ian M; Forbes, Robert T

    2015-10-10

    Bulk crystallisation of protein therapeutic molecules towards their controlled drug delivery is of interest to the biopharmaceutical industry. The complexity of biotherapeutic molecules is likely to lead to complex material properties of crystals in the solid state and to complex transitions. This complexity is explored using batch crystallised lysozyme as a model. The effects of drying and milling on the solid-state transformations of lysozyme crystals were monitored using differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), X-ray powder diffraction (XRPD), FT-Raman, and enzymatic assay. XRPD was used to characterise crystallinity and these data supported those of crystalline lysozyme which gave a distinctive DSC thermogram. The apparent denaturation temperature (Tm) of the amorphous lysozyme was ∼201 °C, while the Tm of the crystalline form was ∼187 °C. Raman spectra supported a more α-helix rich structure of crystalline lysozyme. This structure is consistent with reduced cooperative unit sizes compared to the amorphous lysozyme and is consistent with a reduction in the Tm of the crystalline form. Evidence was obtained that milling also induced denaturation in the solid-state, with the denatured lysozyme showing no thermal transition. The denaturation of the crystalline lysozyme occurred mainly through its amorphous form. Interestingly, the mechanical denaturation of lysozyme did not affect its biological activity on dissolution. Lysozyme crystals on drying did not become amorphous, while milling-time played a crucial role in the crystalline-amorphous-denatured transformations of lysozyme crystals. DSC is shown to be a key tool to monitor quantitatively these transformations. PMID:26068908

  19. Lipoprotein LprI of Mycobacterium tuberculosis Acts as a Lysozyme Inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Sethi, Deepti; Mahajan, Sahil; Singh, Chaahat; Lama, Amrita; Hade, Mangesh Dattu; Gupta, Pawan; Dikshit, Kanak L

    2016-02-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis executes numerous defense strategies for the successful establishment of infection under a diverse array of challenges inside the host. One such strategy that has been delineated in this study is the abrogation of lytic activity of lysozyme by a novel glycosylated and surface-localized lipoprotein, LprI, which is exclusively present in M. tuberculosis complex. The lprI gene co-transcribes with the glbN gene (encoding hemoglobin (HbN)) and both are synchronously up-regulated in M. tuberculosis during macrophage infection. Recombinant LprI, expressed in Escherichia coli, exhibited strong binding (Kd ≤ 2 nm) with lysozyme and abrogated its lytic activity completely, thereby conferring protection to fluorescein-labeled Micrococcus lysodeikticus from lysozyme-mediated hydrolysis. Expression of the lprI gene in Mycobacterium smegmatis (8-10-fold) protected its growth from lysozyme inhibition in vitro and enhanced its phagocytosis and survival during intracellular infection of peritoneal and monocyte-derived macrophages, known to secrete lysozyme, and in the presence of exogenously added lysozyme in secondary cell lines where lysozyme levels are low. In contrast, the presence of HbN enhanced phagocytosis and intracellular survival of M. smegmatis only in the absence of lysozyme but not under lysozyme stress. Interestingly, co-expression of the glbN-lprI gene pair elevated the invasion and survival of M. smegmatis 2-3-fold in secondary cell lines in the presence of lysozyme in comparison with isogenic cells expressing these genes individually. Thus, specific advantage against macrophage-generated lysozyme, conferred by the combination of LprI-HbN during invasion of M. tuberculosis, may have vital implications on the pathogenesis of tuberculosis. PMID:26589796

  20. CXCR4 mediated chemotaxis is regulated by 5T4 oncofetal glycoprotein in mouse embryonic cells.

    PubMed

    Southgate, Thomas D; McGinn, Owen J; Castro, Fernanda V; Rutkowski, Andrzej J; Al-Muftah, Mariam; Marinov, Georgi; Smethurst, Graeme J; Shaw, David; Ward, Christopher M; Miller, Crispin J; Stern, Peter L

    2010-01-01

    5T4 oncofetal molecules are highly expressed during development and upregulated in cancer while showing only low levels in some adult tissues. Upregulation of 5T4 expression is a marker of loss of pluripotency in the early differentiation of embryonic stem (ES) cells and forms an integrated component of an epithelial-mesenchymal transition, a process important during embryonic development and metastatic spread of epithelial tumors. Investigation of the transcriptional changes in early ES differentiation showed upregulation of CXCL12 and down-regulation of a cell surface protease, CD26, which cleaves this chemokine. CXCL12 binds to the widely expressed CXCR4 and regulates key aspects of development, stem cell motility and tumour metastasis to tissues with high levels of CXCL12. We show that the 5T4 glycoprotein is required for optimal functional cell surface expression of the chemokine receptor CXCR4 and CXCL12 mediated chemotaxis in differentiating murine embryonic stem cells and embryo fibroblasts (MEF). Cell surface expression of 5T4 and CXCR4 molecules is co-localized in differentiating ES cells and MEF. By contrast, differentiating ES and MEF derived from 5T4 knockout (KO) mice show only intracellular CXCR4 expression but infection with adenovirus encoding mouse 5T4 restores CXCL12 chemotaxis and surface co-localization with 5T4 molecules. A series of chimeric constructs with interchanged domains of 5T4 and the glycoprotein CD44 were used to map the 5T4 sequences relevant for CXCR4 membrane expression and function in 5T4KO MEF. These data identified the 5T4 transmembrane domain as sufficient and necessary to enable CXCR4 cell surface expression and chemotaxis. Furthermore, some monoclonal antibodies against m5T4 can inhibit CXCL12 chemotaxis of differentiating ES cells and MEF which is not mediated by simple antigenic modulation. Collectively, these data support a molecular interaction of 5T4 and CXCR4 occurring at the cell surface which directly facilitates

  1. The amino acid sequence of Lady Amherst's pheasant (Chrysolophus amherstiae) and golden pheasant (Chrysolophus pictus) egg-white lysozymes.

    PubMed

    Araki, T; Kuramoto, M; Torikata, T

    1990-09-01

    The amino acids of Lady Amherst's pheasant and golden pheasant egg-white lysozymes have been sequenced. The carboxymethylated lysozymes were digested with trypsin followed by sequencing of the tryptic peptides. Lady Amherst's pheasant lysozyme proved to consist of 129 amino acid residues, and a relative molecular mass of 14,423 Da was calculated. This lysozyme had 6 amino acids substitutions when compared with hen egg-white lysozyme: Phe3 to Tyr, His15 to Leu, Gln41 to His, Asn77 to His, Gln 121 to Asn, and a newly found substitution of Ile124 to Thr. The amino acid sequence of golden pheasant lysozyme was identical to that of Lady Amherst's phesant lysozyme. The phylogenetic tree constructured by the comparison of amino acid sequences of phasianoid birds lysozymes revealed a minimum genetic distance between these pheasants and the turkey-peafowl group. PMID:1368578

  2. Bacteria vs. Bacteriophages: Parallel Evolution of Immune Arsenals

    PubMed Central

    Shabbir, Muhammad A. B.; Hao, Haihong; Shabbir, Muhammad Z.; Wu, Qin; Sattar, Adeel; Yuan, Zonghui

    2016-01-01

    Bacteriophages are the most common entities on earth and represent a constant challenge to bacterial populations. To fend off bacteriophage infection, bacteria evolved immune systems to avert phage adsorption and block invader DNA entry. They developed restriction–modification systems and mechanisms to abort infection and interfere with virion assembly, as well as newly recognized clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR). In response to bacterial immune systems, bacteriophages synchronously evolved resistance mechanisms, such as the anti-CRISPR systems to counterattack bacterial CRISPR-cas systems, in a continuing evolutionary arms race between virus and host. In turn, it is fundamental to the survival of the bacterial cell to evolve a system to combat bacteriophage immune strategies. PMID:27582740

  3. Antimicrobial bacteriophage-derived proteins and therapeutic applications

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Antibiotics have the remarkable power to control bacterial infections. Unfortunately, widespread use, whether regarded as prudent or not, has favored the emergence and persistence of antibiotic resistant strains of human pathogenic bacteria, resulting in a global health threat. Bacteriophages (pha...

  4. Bacteria vs. Bacteriophages: Parallel Evolution of Immune Arsenals.

    PubMed

    Shabbir, Muhammad A B; Hao, Haihong; Shabbir, Muhammad Z; Wu, Qin; Sattar, Adeel; Yuan, Zonghui

    2016-01-01

    Bacteriophages are the most common entities on earth and represent a constant challenge to bacterial populations. To fend off bacteriophage infection, bacteria evolved immune systems to avert phage adsorption and block invader DNA entry. They developed restriction-modification systems and mechanisms to abort infection and interfere with virion assembly, as well as newly recognized clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR). In response to bacterial immune systems, bacteriophages synchronously evolved resistance mechanisms, such as the anti-CRISPR systems to counterattack bacterial CRISPR-cas systems, in a continuing evolutionary arms race between virus and host. In turn, it is fundamental to the survival of the bacterial cell to evolve a system to combat bacteriophage immune strategies. PMID:27582740

  5. Structural Basis of Protein Oxidation Resistance: A Lysozyme Study

    PubMed Central

    Girod, Marion; Enjalbert, Quentin; Brunet, Claire; Antoine, Rodolphe; Lemoine, Jérôme; Lukac, Iva; Radman, Miroslav; Krisko, Anita; Dugourd, Philippe

    2014-01-01

    Accumulation of oxidative damage in proteins correlates with aging since it can cause irreversible and progressive degeneration of almost all cellular functions. Apparently, native protein structures have evolved intrinsic resistance to oxidation since perfectly folded proteins are, by large most robust. Here we explore the structural basis of protein resistance to radiation-induced oxidation using chicken egg white lysozyme in the native and misfolded form. We study the differential resistance to oxidative damage of six different parts of native and misfolded lysozyme by a targeted tandem/mass spectrometry approach of its tryptic fragments. The decay of the amount of each lysozyme fragment with increasing radiation dose is found to be a two steps process, characterized by a double exponential evolution of their amounts: the first one can be largely attributed to oxidation of specific amino acids, while the second one corresponds to further degradation of the protein. By correlating these results to the structural parameters computed from molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, we find the protein parts with increased root-mean-square deviation (RMSD) to be more susceptible to modifications. In addition, involvement of amino acid side-chains in hydrogen bonds has a protective effect against oxidation Increased exposure to solvent of individual amino acid side chains correlates with high susceptibility to oxidative and other modifications like side chain fragmentation. Generally, while none of the structural parameters alone can account for the fate of peptides during radiation, together they provide an insight into the relationship between protein structure and susceptibility to oxidation. PMID:24999730

  6. Lytic bacteriophages reduce Escherichia coli O157

    PubMed Central

    Ferguson, Sean; Roberts, Cheryl; Handy, Eric; Sharma, Manan

    2013-01-01

    The role of lytic bacteriophages in preventing cross contamination of produce has not been evaluated. A cocktail of three lytic phages specific for E. coli O157:H7 (EcoShield™) or a control (phosphate buffered saline, PBS) was applied to lettuce by either; (1) immersion of lettuce in 500 ml of EcoShield™ 8.3 log PFU/ml or 9.8 log PFU/ml for up to 2 min before inoculation with E. coli O157:H7; (2) spray-application of EcoShield™ (9.3 log PFU/ml) to lettuce after inoculation with E. coli O157:H7 (4.10 CFU/cm2) following exposure to 50 μg/ml chlorine for 30 sec. After immersion studies, lettuce was spot-inoculated with E. coli O157:H7 (2.38 CFU/cm2). Phage-treated, inoculated lettuce pieces were stored at 4°C for and analyzed for E. coli O157:H7 populations for up to 7 d. Immersion of lettuce in 9.8 log PFU/ml EcoShield™ for 2 min significantly (p < 0.05) reduced E. coli O157:H7 populations after 24 h when stored at 4°C compared with controls. Immersion of lettuce in suspensions containing high concentrations of EcoShield™ (9.8 log PFU/ml) resulted in the deposition of high concentrations (7.8 log log PFU/cm2) of bacteriophages on the surface of fresh cut lettuce, potentially contributing to the efficacy of the lytic phages on lettuce. Spraying phages on to inoculated fresh cut lettuce after being washed in hypochlorite solution was significantly more effective in reducing E. coli O157:H7 populations (2.22 log CFU/cm2) on day 0 compared with control treatments (4.10 log CFU/cm2). Both immersion and spray treatments provided protection from E. coli O157:H7 contamination on lettuce, but spray application of lytic bacteriophages to lettuce was more effective in immediately reducing E. coli O157:H7 populations fresh cut lettuce. PMID:23819106

  7. Prognostic significance of 5T4 oncofetal antigen expression in colorectal carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Starzynska, T; Marsh, P J; Schofield, P F; Roberts, S A; Myers, K A; Stern, P L

    1994-05-01

    The 5T4 oncofetal antigen is a 72 kDa glycoprotein defined by a monoclonal antibody raised against human placental trophoblast and is expressed in many different carcinomas but detected only at low levels in some normal epithelia. Immunohistochemical analysis of the patterns of expression in colorectal carcinomas has indicated a significant association between the presence of the antigen in tumour cells and metastatic spread. The 5T4 antigen phenotype of 72 colorectal cancers has been compared with the clinical outcome of the patients in order to assess its relationship with prognosis. Forty per cent of tumours were 5T4 positive; the remainder were either unlabelled or exhibited stroma-associated labelling only. There was a significant correlation between 5T4 expression in the malignant cells and unfavourable course of disease (P < 0.001). The 5 year survival with 5T4-positive tumours was 22% compared with 75% for patients with 5T4-negative tumours; median survival was 24 versus > 90 months respectively. Stratified analysis showed that 5T4 antigen tumour positivity was acting independently of each of stage, site of tumour, age or sex. There were significant differences in survival for patients with Dukes' B and C stage carcinomas (P = 0.001 and P = 0.034). The results suggest that in colorectal cancer immunohistochemical assessment of 5T4 expression may be useful in identifying patients at high risk for tumour recurrence and for whom additional treatment strategies might be most appropriate. PMID:8180020

  8. Control of solvent evaporation in hen egg white lysozyme crystallization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, L. J.; Suddath, F. L.

    1992-01-01

    An investigation of the role of solvent evaporation in tetragonal lysozyme crystallization was preformed with a device that employs N2(g) to control the evaporation of solvent from a micro-volume crystallization hanging drop. The number of crystals was found to vary with the rate at which the final supersaturation level was achieved. It was found that the more rapid the approach to supersaturation the larger the number of crystals. Accordingly, the crystals reached a smaller terminal size. Elongation of the (110) face parallel to the four-fold axis was observed with the slower evaporation rates.

  9. Lysozyme as an alternative to antibiotics improves growth performance and small intestinal morphology in nursery pigs

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Lysozyme is a 1,4-ß-N-acetylmuramidase that has antimicrobial properties. The objective of this experiment was to determine if lysozyme in nursery diets improved growth performance and gastrointestinal health of pigs weaned from the sow at 24 d of age. Two replicates of 96 pigs (192 total 96 males,...

  10. Lysozyme as an alternative to antibiotics improves performance in nursery pigs during an indirect immune challenge

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Lysozyme is a 1,4-ß-N-acetylmuramidase that has antimicrobial properties. The objective of this study was to determine the effect of lysozyme and antibiotics on growth performance and immune response during an indirect immune challenge. Two replicates of 600 pigs each were weaned from the sow at 2...

  11. Effect of lysozyme or antibiotics on fecal zoonotic pathogens in nursery pigs

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Lysozyme is a 1,4-ß-N-acetylmuramidase that has antimicrobial properties. The objective of this study was to determine the effect of lysozyme and antibiotics on zoonotic pathogen shedding in feces in nursery pigs housed without and with an indirect disease challenge. Two replicates of 600 pigs eac...

  12. Three in one: Identification, expression and enzymatic activity of lysozymes in amphioxus.

    PubMed

    Xu, Na; Pan, Junli; Liu, Shousheng; Xue, Qinggang; Zhang, Shicui

    2014-10-01

    The lysozymes identified so far in animals belong to the g-type, c-type, and i-type. Vertebrate animals possess only the former two types, i.e., g- and c-types, while all the three types have been reported in invertebrates. Here we demonstrate that (1) three cDNAs that encode g-, c-, and i-type lysozymes, respectively, were identified in a single species of the amphioxus Branchiostoma japonicum; (2) all the 3-type genes displayed distinct tissue-specific expression pattern; (3) recombinant g-, c-, and i-type lysozymes all exhibited enzymatic activities; and (4) native g-, c-, and i-type lysozymes were identified in the different tissues of amphioxus. Collectively, these results suggest the presence of all the 3-type lysozymes in a single animal species, first such data ever reported. The presence of biologically active i-type lysozyme in amphioxus also suggests that i-type lysozyme gene is retained at least in Protochordata, contrasting to the previous proposal that i-type lysozyme gene has been lost in a common ancestor of all chordates. PMID:24968076

  13. Sensitization of heat-treated Listeria monocytogenes to added lysozyme in milk.

    PubMed Central

    Kihm, D J; Leyer, G J; An, G H; Johnson, E A

    1994-01-01

    Listeria monocytogenes was highly resistant to hen egg white lysozyme in whole milk but was sensitive in media and in phosphate buffer. Methods to sensitize the pathogen to lysozyme in milk were investigated. Treatment of whole milk by cation exchange to remove minerals, particularly Ca2+ and Mg2+, slightly promoted inactivation of L. monocytogenes by lysozyme at 4 degrees C over a period of 6 days. Heat treatment (62.5 degrees C for 15 s) strongly sensitized L. monocytogenes to lysozyme in demineralized milk and in MES [2-(N-morpholino)ethanesulfonic acid] buffer. Addition of Ca2+ or Mg2+ to the demineralized milk restored resistance to lysozyme. Cells were more rapidly heat inactivated at 55 degrees C in demineralized milk containing lysozyme, and addition of Ca2+ to the demineralized milk restored the resistance to heat. The results indicate that minerals or mineral-associated components protect L. monocytogenes from inactivation by lysozyme and heat in milk, probably by increasing cell surface stability. The heat treatment of foods containing added lysozyme can probably play a significant role in producing microbiologically safe foods. Images PMID:7986052

  14. Isothermal Titration Calorimetry and Macromolecular Visualization for the Interaction of Lysozyme and Its Inhibitors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wei, Chin-Chuan; Jensen, Drake; Boyle, Tiffany; O'Brien, Leah C.; De Meo, Cristina; Shabestary, Nahid; Eder, Douglas J.

    2015-01-01

    To provide a research-like experience to upper-division undergraduate students in a biochemistry teaching laboratory, isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) is employed to determine the binding constants of lysozyme and its inhibitors, N-acetyl glucosamine trimer (NAG[subscript 3]) and monomer (NAG). The extremely weak binding of lysozyme/NAG is…

  15. Genetic control of the humoral immune response to avian egg white lysozymes in the chicken

    SciTech Connect

    Flanagan, M.P.

    1987-01-01

    Chickens from two closely related sublines, GHs-B6 and GHs-B13, differing serologically at the major histocompatibility complex, were significantly different in their humoral response to three avian egg white lysozymes. Specific antisera levels were measured by radioimmunoassay using /sup 125/I-labeled lysozymes. Antibodies elicited in response to these lysozymes are assumed to be directed against sites on these lysozymes where their amino acid sequence differs from that of the recipient G. domesticus egg white lysozyme (HEL). GHs-B6 birds produced a high level of antibody in response to immunization of turkey (TEL), pheasant (PhL) and guinea hen (GHL) lysozymes. GHs-B13 birds produced no detectable antibody to TEL, were intermediate in their response to PhL and equaled the antibody production of GHs-B6 birds in response to GHL. Antisera to each lysozyme were examined for crossreactivity with all other lysozymes by use of a competitive binding assay.

  16. Thermodynamic Exploration of Eosin-Lysozyme Binding: A Physical Chemistry and Biochemistry Laboratory Experiment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huisman, Andrew J.; Hartsell, Lydia R.; Krueger, Brent P.; Pikaart, Michael J.

    2010-01-01

    We developed a modular pair of experiments for use in the undergraduate physical chemistry and biochemistry laboratories. Both experiments examine the thermodynamics of the binding of a small molecule, eosin Y, to the protein lysozyme. The assay for binding is the quenching of lysozyme fluorescence by eosin through resonant energy transfer. In…

  17. Spectroscopic investigations on the interactions of AgTiO2 nanoparticles with lysozyme and its influence on the binding of lysozyme with drug molecule

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Revathi, R.; Rameshkumar, A.; Sivasudha, T.

    2016-01-01

    Binding of lysozyme with AgTiO2 nanoparticles was analyzed by using absorption, fluorescence, time resolved and synchronous fluorescence measurements. In the presence of AgTiO2 nanoparticles, the fluorescence intensity of lysozyme was decreased. Static type of binding was confirmed through lifetime and ground state absorption measurements. From the fluorescence quenching data, the binding constant and the number of binding sites were found to be 1.5 × 104 M-1 and 1.03, respectively. From the synchronous fluorescence spectroscopic measurements, tryptophan residue in lysozyme was found to have interaction with the nanoparticles. Further, the influence of AgTiO2 nanoparticles on the binding strength of lysozyme with a drug molecule was analyzed through fluorescence quenching methods. The presence of nanoparticles decreases the binding capability of drug with protein. Overall, the observed results will provide basic insights on the utilization of nanoparticles in drug delivery applications.

  18. Bacteriophage-based nanoprobes for rapid bacteria separation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Juhong; Duncan, Bradley; Wang, Ziyuan; Wang, Li-Sheng; Rotello, Vincent M.; Nugen, Sam R.

    2015-10-01

    The lack of practical methods for bacterial separation remains a hindrance for the low-cost and successful development of rapid detection methods from complex samples. Antibody-tagged magnetic particles are commonly used to pull analytes from a liquid sample. While this method is well-established, improvements in capture efficiencies would result in an increase of the overall detection assay performance. Bacteriophages represent a low-cost and more consistent biorecognition element as compared to antibodies. We have developed nanoscale bacteriophage-tagged magnetic probes, where T7 bacteriophages were bound to magnetic nanoparticles. The nanoprobe allowed the specific recognition and attachment to E. coli cells. The phage magnetic nanprobes were directly compared to antibody-conjugated magnetic nanoprobes. The capture efficiencies of bacteriophages and antibodies on nanoparticles for the separation of E. coli K12 at varying concentrations were determined. The results indicated a similar bacteria capture efficiency between the two nanoprobes.The lack of practical methods for bacterial separation remains a hindrance for the low-cost and successful development of rapid detection methods from complex samples. Antibody-tagged magnetic particles are commonly used to pull analytes from a liquid sample. While this method is well-established, improvements in capture efficiencies would result in an increase of the overall detection assay performance. Bacteriophages represent a low-cost and more consistent biorecognition element as compared to antibodies. We have developed nanoscale bacteriophage-tagged magnetic probes, where T7 bacteriophages were bound to magnetic nanoparticles. The nanoprobe allowed the specific recognition and attachment to E. coli cells. The phage magnetic nanprobes were directly compared to antibody-conjugated magnetic nanoprobes. The capture efficiencies of bacteriophages and antibodies on nanoparticles for the separation of E. coli K12 at varying

  19. Overexpression and potential targeting of the oncofoetal antigen 5T4 in malignant pleural mesothelioma.

    PubMed

    Al-Taei, Saly; Salimu, Josephine; Lester, Jason F; Linnane, Seamus; Goonewardena, Madusha; Harrop, Richard; Mason, Malcolm D; Tabi, Zsuzsanna

    2012-08-01

    Malignant pleural mesothelioma (MPM) is resistant to conventional treatments. Novel, targeted treatments are hampered by the relative lack of MPM-associated tumour antigens. The aim of this study was to evaluate the level of expression and the relevance of 5T4 as a tumour-associated antigen in MPM. 5T4 expression was assessed by Western blotting, flow cytometry, immuno-cytochemistry and -histochemistry in 11 mesothelioma cell lines, 21 tumour biopsies, and ex vivo tumour cells obtained from the pleural fluid (PF) of 10 patients. 5T4 antibody levels were also determined in the plasma of patients and healthy donors. The susceptibility of MPM cells to 5T4-specific T-cell-mediated killing was determined using an HLA-A2(+), CD8(+) T-cell line, developed against the 5T4(17-25) peptide. We report here that cell surface 5T4 expression was detected in all mesothelioma cell lines and PF cell samples. Mesothelin and CD200, a suggested mesothelioma marker, were co-expressed with 5T4 on tumour cells in PF. Immunohistochemistry confirmed overexpression of 5T4, similar to mesothelin, on tumour cells but not on reactive stroma in all tissue sections tested. Median 5T4 antibody levels were 46% higher in patient than in healthy donor plasma, indicating immune recognition. Importantly, 5T4-specific CD8(+) T-cells were able to kill four out of six HLA-A2(+) MPM cell lines but not an HLA-A2(-) cell line, demonstrating immune recognition of MPM-associated 5T4 antigen at the effector T-cell level. We conclude that 5T4 is a potential new antigen for targeted therapies such as immunotherapy in MPM, as it is overexpressed on mesothelioma cells and recognised by 5T4-specific cytotoxic T-cells. Our findings have been translated into a Phase II clinical trial applying 5T4-targeted therapies in MPM patients. PMID:22498111

  20. Molecular cloning and characterization of a lysozyme cDNA from the mole cricket Gryllotalpa orientalis (Orthoptera: Gryllotalpidae).

    PubMed

    Kwon, Hyojung; Bang, Kyeongrin; Lee, Minsup; Cho, Saeyoull

    2014-09-01

    A full-length lysozyme cDNA from Gryllotalpa orientalis was cloned and sequenced. The deduced amino acid sequence of the lysozyme protein was 143 amino acids in length, with a calculated molecular mass of 15.84 kDa and an isoelectric point of 4.74. Sequence motifs, together with alignment and phylogenetic results, confirmed that G. orientalis lysozyme belongs to the C (chicken)-type lysozyme family of proteins. The protein sequence of lysozyme from G. orientalis showed high identity to that of Drosophila melanogaster (51.7 %); however, in contrast to D. melanogaster lysozyme, G. orientalis lysozyme was immune inducible and expressed in a wide range of tissues. Expression of G. orientalis lysozyme mRNA was highest at 8 h post-infection and subsequently decreased with time after bacterial infection. We also expressed G. orientalis lysozyme protein in vitro using the pET expression system. Compared with the negative control, over-expressed G. orientalis lysozyme showed antimicrobial activity against Gram-negative bacteria Escherichia coli and Gram-positive bacteria Bacillus subtilis by radial diffusion assay, with minimal inhibitory concentration values of 30.3 and 7.55 µM, respectively. These results indicate that G. orientalis lysozyme may have stronger antimicrobial activity than other lysozymes against a broad range of microorganisms. PMID:24929538

  1. The Conformation of DNA Packaged in Bacteriophage G

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Mao; Serwer, Philip

    1997-01-01

    When packaged in a bacteriophage capsid, double-stranded DNA occupies a cavity whose volume is roughly twice the volume of the DNA double helix. The data thus far have not revealed whether the compactness of packaged bacteriophage DNA is achieved by folding of the DNA, unidirectional winding of the DNA, or a combination of both folding and winding. To assist in discriminating among these possibilities, the present study uses electron microscopy, together with ultraviolet light-induced DNA-DNA cross-linking, to obtain the following information about the conformation of DNA packaged in the comparatively large bacteriophage, G: 1) At the periphery of some negatively stained particles of bacteriophage G, electron microscopy reveals strands of DNA that are both parallel to each other and parallel to the polyhedral bacteriophage G capsid. However, these strands are not visible toward the center of the zone of packaged DNA. 2) Within some positively stained particles, electron microscopy reveals DNA-associated stain in relatively high concentration at comers of the polyhedral bacteriophage G capsid. 3) When cross-linked DNA is expelled from its capsid during preparation for electron microscopy, some DNA molecules consist primarily of a compacted central region, surrounded by DNA strands that appear to be unraveling at multiple positions uniformly distributed around the compacted DNA region. The above results are explained by a previously presented model in which DNA is compacted by folding to form 12 icosahedrally arranged pear-shaped rings. ImagesFIGURE 1FIGURE 2FIGURE 4 PMID:9017221

  2. Simulated hatchery system to assess bacteriophage efficacy against Vibrio harveyi.

    PubMed

    Raghu Patil, J; Desai, Srividya Narayanamurthy; Roy, Panchali; Durgaiah, Murali; Saravanan, R Sanjeev; Vipra, Aradhana

    2014-12-01

    Vibriosis caused by luminous Vibrio harveyi commonly contributes to poor survival in shrimp hatcheries and aquaculture ponds. Lytic bacteriophages pathogenic for V. harveyi are currently being investigated as an alternative to antibiotics to prevent vibriosis. Here, 8 bacteriophages were isolated from oysters and clams using V. harveyi strains as baiting hosts. Among these bacteriophages, 1 strain (VHP6b) identified as broadly pathogenic for 27 V. harveyi strains examined was further characterized by electron microscopy and genome sequence analysis. Phage VHP6b possessed a tail and morphology consistent with it being a member of the family Siphoviridae, and its genome and proteome were most closely related to the Vibrio phages SSP02 and MAR10. An integrase gene essential for lysogeny was not evident. The ability of bacteriophage VHP6b to protect shrimp postlarvae against vibriosis caused by V. harveyi strain VH6 was demonstrated in a model system designed to simulate typical hatchery conditions. Bacteriophage treatment improved survival of postlarvae by 40 to 60% under these conditions, so therapies based on this or other bacteriophages may be useful in shrimp hatcheries. PMID:25449322

  3. Smaller tumor size is associated with poor survival in T4b colon cancer

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Ben; Feng, Yang; Mo, Shao-Bo; Cai, San-Jun; Huang, Li-Yong

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To hypothesize that in patients with colon cancer showing heavy intestinal wall invasion without distant metastasis (T4bN0-2M0), small tumor size would correlate with more aggressive tumor behaviors and therefore poorer cancer-specific survival (CSS). METHODS: We analyzed T4bN0-2M0 colon cancer patients in the Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results (SEER) database. A preliminary analysis of T4bN0-2M0 colon cancer patients at the Fudan University Shanghai Cancer Center is also presented. RESULTS: A total of 1734 T4bN0-2M0 colon cancer patients from the SEER database were included. Kaplan-Meier analysis revealed decreasing CSS with decreasing tumor size (P < 0.001). Subgroup analysis showed a significant association between poorer CSS with smaller tumor size in T4bN0 patients (P = 0.024), and a trend of association in T4bN1 (P = 0.182) and T4bN2 patients (P = 0.191). Multivariate analysis identified tumor size as an independent prognostic factor for CSS in T4bN0-2M0 patients (P = 0.024). Preliminary analysis of Fudan University Shanghai Cancer Center samples suggested the 5-year CSS was 50.0%, 72.9% and 77.1% in patients with tumors ≤ 4.0 cm, 4.0-7.0 cm and ≥ 7.0 cm. CONCLUSION: Smaller tumor size is associated with poorer CSS in the T4bN0-2M0 subset of colon cancer, particularly in the T4bN0M0 subgroup. PMID:27547015

  4. Genomic characteristics and environmental distributions of the uncultivated Far-T4 phages

    PubMed Central

    Roux, Simon; Enault, François; Ravet, Viviane; Pereira, Olivier; Sullivan, Matthew B.

    2015-01-01

    Viral metagenomics (viromics) is a tremendous tool to reveal viral taxonomic and functional diversity across ecosystems ranging from the human gut to the world's oceans. As with microbes however, there appear vast swaths of “dark matter” yet to be documented for viruses, even among relatively well-studied viral types. Here, we use viromics to explore the “Far-T4 phages” sequence space, a neighbor clade from the well-studied T4-like phages that was first detected through PCR study in seawater and subsequently identified in freshwater lakes through 454-sequenced viromes. To advance the description of these viruses beyond this single marker gene, we explore Far-T4 genome fragments assembled from two deeply-sequenced freshwater viromes. Single gene phylogenetic trees confirm that the Far-T4 phages are divergent from the T4-like phages, genome fragments reveal largely collinear genome organizations, and both data led to the delineation of five Far-T4 clades. Three-dimensional models of major capsid proteins are consistent with a T4-like structure, and highlight a highly conserved core flanked by variable insertions. Finally, we contextualize these now better characterized Far-T4 phages by re-analyzing 196 previously published viromes. These suggest that Far-T4 are common in freshwater and seawater as only four of 82 aquatic viromes lacked Far-T4-like sequences. Variability in representation across the five newly identified clades suggests clade-specific niche differentiation may be occurring across the different biomes, though the underlying mechanism remains unidentified. While complete genome assembly from complex communities and the lack of host linkage information still bottleneck virus discovery through viromes, these findings exemplify the power of metagenomics approaches to assess the diversity, evolutionary history, and genomic characteristics of novel uncultivated phages. PMID:25852662

  5. Amyloid fibrillogenesis of lysozyme is suppressed by a food additive brilliant blue FCF.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yu-Han; Tseng, Chia-Ping; How, Su-Chun; Lo, Chun-Hsien; Chou, Wei-Lung; Wang, Steven S-S

    2016-06-01

    At least 30 different human proteins can fold abnormally to form the amyloid deposits that are associated with a number of degenerative diseases. The research presented here aimed at understanding the inhibitory potency of a food additive, brilliant blue FCF (BBF), on the amyloid fibril formation of lysozyme. Our results demonstrated that BBF was able to suppress the formation of lysozyme fibrils in a dose-dependent fashion. In addition, the structural features and conformational changes in the lysozyme samples upon the addition of BBF were further characterized using circular dichroism spectroscopy, nile red fluorescence spectroscopy, turbidity assay, and sodium dodecyl sulfate electrophoresis. Through molecular docking and molecular dynamics simulations, BBF's mechanism of action in lysozyme fibrillogenesis inhibition was found to be initiated by binding with the aggregation-prone region of the lysozyme. We believe the results from this research may contribute to the development of effective therapeutics for amyloidoses. PMID:26970823

  6. Interaction of Lysozyme with Rhodamine B: A combined analysis of spectroscopic & molecular docking.

    PubMed

    Millan, Sabera; Satish, Lakkoji; Kesh, Sandeep; Chaudhary, Yatendra S; Sahoo, Harekrushna

    2016-09-01

    The interaction of Rhodamine B (RB) with Lysozyme (Lys) was investigated by different optical spectroscopic techniques such as absorption, fluorescence, and circular-dichroism (CD), along with molecular docking studies. The fluorescence results (including steady-state and time-resolved mode) revealed that the addition of RB effectively causes strong quenching of intrinsic fluorescence in Lysozyme and mostly, by the static quenching mechanism. Different binding and thermodynamic parameters were calculated at different temperatures and the binding constant value was found to be 2963.54Lmol(-1) at 25°C. The average distance (r0) was found to be 3.31nm according to Förster's theory of non-radiative energy transfer between Lysozyme and RB. The conformational change in Lysozyme during interaction with RB was confirmed from absorbance, synchronous fluorescence, and circular dichroism measurements. Finally, molecular docking studies were done to confirm that the dye binds with Lysozyme. PMID:27390893

  7. Lysozyme net charge and ion binding in concentrated aqueous electrolyte solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Kuehner, Daniel E.; Engmann, Jan; Fergg, Florian; Wernick, Meredith; Blanch, Harvey W.; Prausnitz, John M.

    1999-02-01

    Hydrogen-ion titrations were conducted for hen-egg-white lysozyme in solutions of potassium chloride over the range pH 2.5--11.5 and for ionic strengths to 2.0 M. The dependence of lysozyme`s net proton charge, z{sub p}, on pH and ionic strength in potassium chloride solution is measured. From the ionic-strength dependence of z{sub p}, interactions of lysozyme with potassium and chloride ions are calculated using the molecular-thermodynamic theory of Fraaije and Lyklema. Lysozyme interacts preferentially with up to 12 chloride ions at pH 2.5. The observed dependence of ion-protein interactions on pH and ionic strength is explained in terms of electric-double-layer theory. New experimental pK{sub a} data are reported for 11 amino acids in potassium chloride solutions of ionic strength to 3.0 M.

  8. Gelatin/carboxymethyl cellulose mucoadhesive films with lysozyme: Development and characterization.

    PubMed

    Dekina, Svetlana; Romanovska, Irina; Ovsepyan, Ani; Tkach, Vasiliy; Muratov, Eugene

    2016-08-20

    The goal of our study is to develop and characterize mucoadhesive films with entrapped lysozyme based on gelatin/sodium carboxymethyl cellulose as perspective antimicrobial preparation. Lysozyme in mucoadhesive films retains more than 95% of its initial activity for 3 years of storage. Different physical-chemical and biochemical characteristics of entrapped enzyme were evaluated, such as film thickness, weight, time of dissolution in water, bioadhesive force, in vitro lysozyme release, pH- and thermoprofiles of hydrolytic activity, effect of γ-sterilization, etc. We have shown that gelatin/sodium carboxymethyl cellulose films have adhesive force on the level of 4380Pa. Scanning electron microscopy images shows the relative uniformity of the gelatin surface with entrapped lysozyme. Mucoadhesive films with lysozyme have 100% bactericidal effect on the test strain, Staphylococcus aureus ATCC 25923 F-49 and thus could be considered as a perspective antimicrobial preparation. PMID:27178926

  9. Identification and cloning of an invertebrate-type lysozyme from Eisenia andrei.

    PubMed

    Josková, Radka; Silerová, Marcela; Procházková, Petra; Bilej, Martin

    2009-08-01

    Lysozyme is a widely distributed antimicrobial protein having specificity for cleaving the beta-(1,4)-glycosidic bond between N-acetylmuramic acid (NAM) and N-acetylglucosamine (GlcNAc) of peptidoglycan of the bacterial cell walls and thus efficiently contributes to protection against infections caused mainly by Gram-positive bacteria. In the present study, we assembled a full-length cDNA of a novel invertebrate-type lysozyme from Eisenia andrei earthworm (EALys) by RT-PCR and RACE system. The primary structure of EALys shares high homology with other invertebrate lysozymes; however the highest, 72% identity, was shown for the destabilase I isolated from medicinal leech. Recombinant EALys expressed in Escherichia coli exhibited the lysozyme and isopeptidase activity. Moreover, real-time PCR revealed increased levels of lysozyme mRNA in coelomocytes of E. andrei after the challenge with both Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. PMID:19454335

  10. Equation to Line the Borders of the Folding-Unfolding Transition Diagram of Lysozyme.

    PubMed

    Mohammad, Mohammad Amin; Grimsey, Ian M; Forbes, Robert T

    2016-07-21

    It is important for the formulators of biopharmaceuticals to predict the folding-unfolding transition of proteins. This enables them to process proteins under predetermined conditions, without denaturation. Depending on the apparent denaturation temperature (Tm) of lysozyme, we have derived an equation describing its folding-unfolding transition diagram. According to the water content and temperature, this diagram was divided into three different areas, namely, the area of the water-folded lysozyme phase, the area of the water-folded lysozyme phase and the bulk water phase, and the area of the denatured lysozyme phase. The water content controlled the appearance and intensity of the Raman band at ∼1787 cm(-1) when lysozyme powders were thermally denatured at temperatures higher than Tm. PMID:27341101

  11. Design and evaluation of a novel nanoparticulate-based formulation encapsulating a HIP complex of lysozyme.

    PubMed

    Gaudana, Ripal; Gokulgandhi, Mitan; Khurana, Varun; Kwatra, Deep; Mitra, Ashim K

    2013-01-01

    Formulation development of protein therapeutics using polymeric nanoparticles has found very little success in recent years. Major formulation challenges include rapid denaturation, susceptibility to lose bioactivity in presence of organic solvents and poor encapsulation in polymeric matrix. In the present study, we have prepared hydrophobic ion pairing (HIP) complex of lysozyme, a model protein, using dextran sulfate (DS) as a complexing polymer. We have optimized the process of formation and dissociation of HIP complex between lysozyme and DS. The effect of HIP complexation on enzymatic activity of lysozyme was also studied. Nanoparticles were prepared and characterized using spontaneous emulsion solvent diffusion method. Furthermore, we have also investigated release of lysozyme from nanoparticles along with its enzymatic activity. Results of this study indicate that nanoparticles can sustain the release of lysozyme without compromising its enzymatic activity. HIP complexation using a polymer may also be employed to formulate sustained release dosage forms of other macromolecules with enhanced encapsulation efficiency. PMID:23137392

  12. The amino acid sequence of monal pheasant lysozyme and its activity.

    PubMed

    Araki, T; Matsumoto, T; Torikata, T

    1998-10-01

    The amino acid sequence of monal pheasant lysozyme and its activity were analyzed. Carboxymethylated lysozyme was digested with trypsin and the resulting peptides were sequenced. The established amino acid sequence had one amino acid substitution at position 102 (Arg to Gly) comparing with Indian peafowl lysozyme and four amino acid substitutions at positions 3 (Phe to Tyr), 15 (His to Leu), 41 (Gln to His), and 121 (Gln to His) with chicken lysozyme. Analysis of the time-courses of reaction using N-acetylglucosamine pentamer as a substrate showed a difference of binding free energy change (-0.4 kcal/mol) at subsites A between monal pheasant and Indian peafowl lysozyme. This was assumed to be caused by the amino acid substitution at subsite A with loss of a positive charge at position 102 (Arg102 to Gly). PMID:9836434

  13. Bacteriophage endolysins: applications for food safety.

    PubMed

    Schmelcher, Mathias; Loessner, Martin J

    2016-02-01

    Bacteriophage endolysins (peptidoglycan hydrolases) have emerged as a new class of antimicrobial agents useful for controlling bacterial infection or other unwanted contaminations in various fields, particularly in the light of the worldwide increasing frequency of drug-resistant pathogens. This review summarizes and discusses recent developments regarding the use of endolysins for food safety. Besides the use of native and engineered endolysins for controlling bacterial contamination at different points within the food production chain, this also includes the application of high-affinity endolysin-derived cell wall binding domains for rapid detection of pathogenic bacteria. Novel approaches to extend the lytic action of endolysins towards Gram-negative cells will also be highlighted. PMID:26707470

  14. Bacteriophage lambda: early pioneer and still relevant

    PubMed Central

    Casjens, Sherwood R.; Hendrix, Roger W.

    2015-01-01

    Molecular genetic research on bacteriophage lambda carried out during its golden age from the mid 1950's to mid 1980's was critically important in the attainment of our current understanding of the sophisticated and complex mechanisms by which the expression of genes is controlled, of DNA virus assembly and of the molecular nature of lysogeny. The development of molecular cloning techniques, ironically instigated largely by phage lambda researchers, allowed many phage workers to switch their efforts to other biological systems. Nonetheless, since that time the ongoing study of lambda and its relatives have continued to give important new insights. In this review we give some relevant early history and describe recent developments in understanding the molecular biology of lambda's life cycle. PMID:25742714

  15. Bacteriophage lambda: Early pioneer and still relevant.

    PubMed

    Casjens, Sherwood R; Hendrix, Roger W

    2015-05-01

    Molecular genetic research on bacteriophage lambda carried out during its golden age from the mid-1950s to mid-1980s was critically important in the attainment of our current understanding of the sophisticated and complex mechanisms by which the expression of genes is controlled, of DNA virus assembly and of the molecular nature of lysogeny. The development of molecular cloning techniques, ironically instigated largely by phage lambda researchers, allowed many phage workers to switch their efforts to other biological systems. Nonetheless, since that time the ongoing study of lambda and its relatives has continued to give important new insights. In this review we give some relevant early history and describe recent developments in understanding the molecular biology of lambda's life cycle. PMID:25742714

  16. Bacteriophage Lambda: a Paradigm Revisited ▿

    PubMed Central

    Fogg, Paul C. M.; Allison, Heather E.; Saunders, Jon R.; McCarthy, Alan J.

    2010-01-01

    Bacteriophage lambda has an archetypal immunity system, which prevents the superinfection of its Escherichia coli lysogens. It is now known that superinfection can occur with toxigenic lambda-like phages at a high frequency, and here we demonstrate that the superinfection of a lambda lysogen can lead to the acquisition of additional lambda genomes, which was confirmed by Southern hybridization and quantitative PCR. As many as eight integration events were observed but at a very low frequency (6.4 × 10−4) and always as multiple insertions at the established primary integration site in E. coli. Sequence analysis of the complete immunity region demonstrated that these multiply infected lysogens were not immunity mutants. In conclusion, although lambda superinfection immunity can be confounded, it is a rare event. PMID:20375161

  17. Why Be Temperate: Lessons from Bacteriophage λ.

    PubMed

    Gandon, Sylvain

    2016-05-01

    Many pathogens have evolved the ability to induce latent infections of their hosts. The bacteriophage λ is a classical model for exploring the regulation and the evolution of latency. Here, I review recent experimental studies on phage λ that identify specific conditions promoting the evolution of lysogenic life cycles. In addition, I present specific adaptations of phage λ that allow this virus to react plastically to variations in the environment and to reactivate its lytic life cycle. All of these different examples are discussed in the light of evolutionary epidemiology theory to disentangle the different evolutionary forces acting on temperate phages. Understanding phage λ adaptations yield important insights into the evolution of latency in other microbes, including several life-threatening human pathogens. PMID:26946976

  18. PlyC: A multimeric bacteriophage lysin

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, Daniel; Schuch, Raymond; Chahales, Peter; Zhu, Shiwei; Fischetti, Vincent A.

    2006-01-01

    Lysins are murein hydrolases produced by bacteriophage that act on the bacterial host cell wall to release progeny phage. When added extrinsically in their purified form, these enzymes produce total lysis of susceptible Gram-positive bacteria within seconds, suggesting a unique antimicrobial strategy. All known Gram-positive lysins are produced as a single polypeptide containing a catalytic activity domain, which cleaves one of the four major peptidoglycan bonds, and a cell-wall-binding domain, which may bind a species-specific carbohydrate epitope in the cell wall. Here, we have cloned and expressed a unique lysin from the streptococcal bacteriophage C1, termed PlyC. Molecular characterization of the plyC operon reveals that PlyC is, surprisingly, composed of two separate gene products, PlyCA and PlyCB. Based on biochemical and biophysical studies, the catalytically active PlyC holoenzyme is composed of eight PlyCB subunits for each PlyCA. Inhibitor studies predicted the presence of an active-site cysteine, and bioinformatic analysis revealed a cysteine, histidine-dependent amidohydrolase/peptidase domain within PlyCA. Point mutagenesis confirmed that PlyCA is responsible for the observed catalytic activity, and Cys-333 and His-420 are the active-site residues. PlyCB was found to self-assemble into an octamer, and this complex alone was able to direct streptococcal cell-wall-specific binding. Similar to no other proteins in sequence databases, PlyC defines a previously uncharacterized structural family of cell-wall hydrolases. PMID:16818874

  19. Bacteriophages of Leuconostoc, Oenococcus, and Weissella

    PubMed Central

    Kot, Witold; Neve, Horst; Heller, Knut J.; Vogensen, Finn K.

    2014-01-01

    Leuconostoc (Ln.), Weissella, and Oenococcus form a group of related genera of lactic acid bacteria, which once all shared the name Leuconostoc. They are associated with plants, fermented vegetable products, raw milk, dairy products, meat, and fish. Most of industrially relevant Leuconostoc strains can be classified as either Ln. mesenteroides or Ln. pseudomesenteroides. They are important flavor producers in dairy fermentations and they initiate nearly all vegetable fermentations. Therefore, bacteriophages attacking Leuconostoc strains may negatively influence the production process. Bacteriophages attacking Leuconostoc strains were first reported in 1946. Since then, the majority of described Leuconostoc phages was isolated from either dairy products or fermented vegetable products. Both lytic and temperate phages of Leuconostoc were reported. Most of Leuconostoc phages examined using electron microscopy belong to the Siphoviridae family and differ in morphological details. Hybridization and comparative genomic studies of Leuconostoc phages suggest that they can be divided into several groups, however overall diversity of Leuconostoc phages is much lower as compared to, e.g., lactococcal phages. Several fully sequenced genomes of Leuconostoc phages have been deposited in public databases. Lytic phages of Leuconostoc can be divided into two host species-specific groups with similarly organized genomes that shared very low nucleotide similarity. Phages of dairy Leuconostoc have rather limited host-ranges. The receptor binding proteins of two lytic Ln. pseudomesenteroides phages have been identified. Molecular tools for detection of dairy Leuconostoc phages have been developed. The rather limited data on phages of Oenococcus and Weissella show that (i) lysogeny seems to be abundant in Oenococcus strains, and (ii) several phages infecting Weissella cibaria are also able to productively infect strains of other Weissella species and even strains of the genus

  20. Bacteriophages show promise as antimicrobial agents.

    PubMed

    Alisky, J; Iczkowski, K; Rapoport, A; Troitsky, N

    1998-01-01

    The emergence of antibiotic-resistant bacteria has prompted interest in alternatives to conventional drugs. One possible option is to use bacteriophages (phage) as antimicrobial agents. We have conducted a literature review of all Medline citations from 1966-1996 that dealt with the therapeutic use of phage. There were 27 papers from Poland, the Soviet Union, Britain and the U.S.A. The Polish and Soviets administered phage orally, topically or systemically to treat a wide variety of antibiotic-resistant pathogens in both adults and children. Infections included suppurative wound infections, gastroenteritis, sepsis, osteomyelitis, dermatitis, empyemas and pneumonia; pathogens included Staphylococcus, Streptococcus, Klebsiella, Escherichia, Proteus, Pseudomonas, Shigella and Salmonella spp. Overall, the Polish and Soviets reported success rates of 80-95% for phage therapy, with rare, reversible gastrointestinal or allergic side effects. However, efficacy of phage was determined almost exclusively by qualitative clinical assessment of patients, and details of dosages and clinical criteria were very sketchy. There were also six British reports describing controlled trials of phage in animal models (mice, guinea pigs and livestock), measuring survival rates and other objective criteria. All of the British studies raised phage against specific pathogens then used to create experimental infections. Demonstrable efficacy against Escherichia, Acinetobacter, Pseudomonas and Staphylococcus spp. was noted in these model systems. Two U.S. papers dealt with improving the bioavailability of phage. Phage is sequestered in the spleen and removed from circulation. This can be overcome by serial passage of phage through mice to isolate mutants that resist sequestration. In conclusion, bacteriophages may show promise for treating antibiotic resistant pathogens. To facilitate further progress, directions for future research are discussed and a directory of authors from the reviewed

  1. Montmorillonite-induced Bacteriophage φ6 Disassembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trusiak, A.; Gottlieb, P.; Katz, A.; Alimova, A.; Steiner, J. C.; Block, K. A.

    2012-12-01

    It is estimated that there are 1031 virus particles on Earth making viruses an order of magnitude more prevalent in number than prokaryotes with the vast majority of viruses being bacteriophages. Clays are a major component of soils and aquatic sediments and can react with RNA, proteins and bacterial biofilms. The clays in soils serve as an important moderator between phage and their host bacteria, helping to preserve the evolutionary balance. Studies on the effects of clays on viral infectivity have given somewhat contradictory results; possibly a consequence of clay-virus interactions being dependent on the unique structure of particular viruses. In this work, the interaction between montmorillonite and the bacteriophage φ6 is investigated. φ6 is a member of the cystovirus family that infects Pseudomonas syringe, a common plant pathogen. As a member of the cystovirus family with an enveloped structure, φ6 serves as a model for reoviruses, a human pathogen. Experiments were conducted with φ6 suspended in dilute, purified homoionic commercial-grade montmorillonite over a range of virus:clay ratios. At a 1:100000 virus:clay ratio, the clay reduced viral infectivity by 99%. The minimum clay to virus ratio which results in a measurable reduction of P. syringae infection is 1:1. Electron microscopy demonstrates that mixed suspensions of smectite and virus co-aggregate to form flocs encompassing virions within the smectite. Both free viral particles as well as those imbedded in the flocs are seen in the micrographs to be missing the envelope- leaving only the nucleocapsid (NC) intact; indicating that smectite inactivates the virus by envelope disassembly. These results have strong implications in the evolution of both the φ6 virus and its P. syringae host cells. TEM of aggregate showing several disassembled NCs.

  2. The Anti-sigma Factor RsiV Is a Bacterial Receptor for Lysozyme: Co-crystal Structure Determination and Demonstration That Binding of Lysozyme to RsiV Is Required for σV Activation.

    PubMed

    Hastie, Jessica L; Williams, Kyle B; Bohr, Lindsey L; Houtman, Jon C; Gakhar, Lokesh; Ellermeier, Craig D

    2016-09-01

    σ factors provide RNA polymerase with promoter specificity in bacteria. Some σ factors require activation in order to interact with RNA polymerase and transcribe target genes. The Extra-Cytoplasmic Function (ECF) σ factor, σV, is encoded by several Gram-positive bacteria and is specifically activated by lysozyme. This activation requires the proteolytic destruction of the anti-σ factor RsiV via a process of regulated intramembrane proteolysis (RIP). In many cases proteases that cleave at site-1 are thought to directly sense a signal and initiate the RIP process. We previously suggested binding of lysozyme to RsiV initiated the proteolytic destruction of RsiV and activation of σV. Here we determined the X-ray crystal structure of the RsiV-lysozyme complex at 2.3 Å which revealed that RsiV and lysozyme make extensive contacts. We constructed RsiV mutants with altered abilities to bind lysozyme. We find that mutants that are unable to bind lysozyme block site-1 cleavage of RsiV and σV activation in response to lysozyme. Taken together these data demonstrate that RsiV is a receptor for lysozyme and binding of RsiV to lysozyme is required for σV activation. In addition, the co-structure revealed that RsiV binds to the lysozyme active site pocket. We provide evidence that in addition to acting as a sensor for the presence of lysozyme, RsiV also inhibits lysozyme activity. Thus we have demonstrated that RsiV is a protein with multiple functions. RsiV inhibits σV activity in the absence of lysozyme, RsiV binds lysozyme triggering σV activation and RsiV inhibits the enzymatic activity of lysozyme. PMID:27602573

  3. Interaction of lactoferrin and lysozyme with casein micelles.

    PubMed

    Anema, Skelte G; de Kruif, C G Kees

    2011-11-14

    On addition of lactoferrin (LF) to skim milk, the turbidity decreases. The basic protein binds to the caseins in the casein micelles, which is then followed by a (partial) disintegration of the casein micelles. The amount of LF initially binding to casein micelles follows a Langmuir adsorption isotherm. The kinetics of the binding of LF could be described by first-order kinetics and similarly the disintegration kinetics. The disintegration was, however, about 10 times slower than the initial adsorption, which allowed investigating both phenomena. Kinetic data were also obtained from turbidity measurements, and all data could be described with one equation. The disintegration of the casein micelles was further characterized by an activation energy of 52 kJ/mol. The initial increase in hydrodynamic size of the casein micelles could be accounted for by assuming that it would go as the cube root of the mass using the adsorption and disintegration kinetics as determined from gel electrophoresis. The results show that LF binds to casein micelles and that subsequently the casein micelles partly disintegrate. All micelles behave in a similar manner as average particle size decreases. Lysozyme also bound to the casein micelles, and this binding followed a Langmuir adsorption isotherm. However, lysozyme did not cause the disintegration of the casein micelles. PMID:21932853

  4. Influence of inhibitor binding on the internal motions of lysozyme.

    PubMed Central

    Cross, A J; Fleming, G R

    1986-01-01

    Time-resolved laser-induced fluorescence depolarization measurements of internal motions in lysozyme are presented. The fluorescent dye eosin binds in a one-to-one complex with the enzyme, and is used both to measure the overall tumbling time constants and to probe the motions of residues in the region of binding. The precision and accuracy of the present method for determining the overall tumbling time constants compare favorably with those from other methods used in the literature. The extent of the internal motions, as described by a model independent order parameter, S2, is temperature dependent, and changes when the inhibitor N,N',N"-triacetylchitotriose, (GlcNAc)3, is bound to the active site of the enzyme. The observed temperature dependence and changes in S2 upon binding of (GlcNAc)3 are interpreted in terms of a nonharmonic model of the effective potential that is consistent with the picture of concerted motions in the protein. The values of the parameters of the potential that reproduce the data with and without the bound inhibitor imply that (GlcNAc)3 binding causes an increase in the rigidity of the protein, which agree qualitatively with other results on the lysozyme-(GlcNAc)3 system. PMID:3756301

  5. Lysozyme Aggregation and Fibrillation Monitored by Dynamic Light Scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nemzer, Louis; Flanders, Bret; Schmit, Jeremy; Sorensen, Christopher

    2012-02-01

    The aggregation of amyloidogenic proteins provides a rich phase space with significant biomedical implications, including a link with several age-related diseases. We employed dynamic light scattering to monitor the aggregation of lysozyme, a model protein, from a monomeric state until the formation of micron-sized fibrils. For an aqueous lysozyme solution buffered at pH 2, the auto-correlation function of the scattered light intensity was found to be well-fit by a single exponential function with decay time τ = 1/(2Dq^2) = 0.25 ms, which corresponds to a mean hydrodynamic radius (RH) of 2.2 nm, very likely generated by monomers. Ethanol (4% v/v final concentration) induced a partial unfolding, to RH = 4.6 nm. The subsequent addition of 70 mM KCl was found to shrink the size back to RH = 2.5 nm, as expected when a denatured protein refolds due to partial screening of the intramolecular repulsion. However, further aggregation was not observed. At pH 4, using a low-salt acetate buffer, more ethanol (10% v/v) was required to initiate unfolding, but once it occurred, larger aggregates formed. These results are consistent with the model that partial unfolding, which exposes beta-motif secondary structure, is a prerequisite for aggregation and fibrillation, but the aggregation fate depends on the protein charge state (pH) and screening (salt concentration).

  6. A new membrane-based crystallization technique: tests on lysozyme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Curcio, Efrem; Profio, Gianluca Di; Drioli, Enrico

    2003-01-01

    The great importance of protein science both in industrial and scientific fields, in conjunction with the intrinsic difficulty to grow macromolecular crystals, stimulates the development of new observations and ideas that can be useful in initiating more systematic studies using novel approaches. In this regard, an innovative technique, based on the employment of microporous hydrophobic membranes in order to promote the formation of lysozyme crystals from supersaturated solutions, is introduced in this work. Operational principles and possible advantages, both in terms of controlled extraction of solvent by acting on the concentration of the stripping solution and reduced induction times, are outlined. Theoretical developments and experimental results concerning the mass transfer, in vapour phase, through the membrane are presented, as well as the results from X-ray diffraction to 1.7 Å resolution of obtained lysozyme crystals using NaCl as the crystallizing agent and sodium acetate as the buffer. Crystals were found to be tetragonal with unit cell dimensions of a= b=79.1 Å and c=37.9 Å; the overall Rmerge on intensities in the resolution range from 25 to 1.7 Å was, in the best case, 4.4%.

  7. Genetically Enhanced Lysozyme Evades a Pathogen Derived Inhibitory Protein

    PubMed Central

    Dostal, Sarah M.; Fang, Yongliang; Guerrette, Jonathan C.; Scanlon, Thomas C.; Griswold, Karl E.

    2015-01-01

    The accelerating spread of drug-resistant bacteria is creating demand for novel antibiotics. Bactericidal enzymes, such as human lysozyme (hLYZ), are interesting drug candidates due to their inherent catalytic nature and lack of susceptibility to the resistance mechanisms typically directed towards chemotherapeutics. However, natural antibacterial enzymes have their own limitations. For example, hLYZ is susceptible to pathogen derived inhibitory proteins, such as Escherichia coli Ivy. Here, we describe proof of concept studies demonstrating that hLYZ can be effectively redesigned to evade this potent lysozyme inhibitor. Large combinatorial libraries of hLYZ were analyzed using an innovative screening platform based on microbial co-culture in hydrogel microdroplets. Isolated hLYZ variants were orders of magnitude less susceptible to E. coli Ivy yet retained high catalytic proficiency and inherent antibacterial activity. Interestingly, the engineered escape variants showed a disadvantageous increase in susceptibility to the related Ivy ortholog from Pseudomonas aeruginosa as well as an unrelated E. coli inhibitory protein, MliC. Thus, while we have achieved our original objective with respect to escaping E. coli Ivy, engineering hLYZ for broad-spectrum evasion of proteinaceous inhibitors will require consideration of the complex and varied determinants that underlie molecular recognition by these emerging virulence factors. PMID:25607237

  8. Towards lysozyme nanotube and 3D hybrid self-assembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lara, Cecile; Handschin, Stephan; Mezzenga, Raffaele

    2013-07-01

    We report lysozyme self-assembly into nanotubes, under the effect of hydrolysis at pH 2 and 90 °C. We resolve the final steps of the fibrillation pathway, entailing the closure of multi-stranded helical ribbons into nanotubes, and we provide evidence of β-sheet arrangement within the nanotubes, demonstrating amyloid-like aggregation. Addition of chloroauric acid to the self-assembled structures can lead to generation of either gold single crystal nanoplatelets or gold nanoparticles (when a reducing agent is added) decorating the nanotube and ribbon surfaces. The crystal-based organic-inorganic hybrids further assemble into 3D ``sandwiched'' structures.We report lysozyme self-assembly into nanotubes, under the effect of hydrolysis at pH 2 and 90 °C. We resolve the final steps of the fibrillation pathway, entailing the closure of multi-stranded helical ribbons into nanotubes, and we provide evidence of β-sheet arrangement within the nanotubes, demonstrating amyloid-like aggregation. Addition of chloroauric acid to the self-assembled structures can lead to generation of either gold single crystal nanoplatelets or gold nanoparticles (when a reducing agent is added) decorating the nanotube and ribbon surfaces. The crystal-based organic-inorganic hybrids further assemble into 3D ``sandwiched'' structures. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Materials and methods, further images and FTIR data. See DOI: 10.1039/c3nr02194g

  9. A novel formulation of L-thyroxine (L-T4) reduces the problem of L-T4 malabsorption by coffee observed with traditional tablet formulations.

    PubMed

    Vita, Roberto; Saraceno, Giovanna; Trimarchi, Francesco; Benvenga, Salvatore

    2013-02-01

    The purpose of this work is to evaluate if the coffee-associated malabsorption of tablet levothyroxine (L-T4) is reduced by soft gel capsule. We recruited 8 patients with coffee-associated L-T4 malabsorption including one hypothyroid patient. For 6 months, the patients were switched to the capsule maintaining the L-T4 daily dose. Patients took the capsule with water, having coffee 1 h later (proper habit, PH) on days 1-90, or with coffee ≤ 5 min later (improper habit, IH) on days 91-180. After 6 months, 2 patients volunteered for an acute loading test of 600 μg L-T4 (capsule) ingested with water (PH) or with coffee (IH). In the single hypothyroid patient, the post-switch TSH ranged 0.06-0.16 mU/L (PH) versus 5.8-22.4 mU/L pre-switch (PH) and 0.025-0.29 mU/L (IH) versus 26-34 mU/L pre-switch (IH). In the other 7 patients, post-switch TSH was 0.41 ± 0.46 (PH) versus 0.28 ± 0.20 pre-switch (PH) (P = 0.61) and 0.34 ± 0.30 (IH) versus 1.23 ± 1.47 pre-switch (IH) (P < 0.001). Importantly, TSH levels in PH versus IH habit did not differ post-switch (P = 0.90), but they did pre-switch (P < 0.0001). The proportions of post-switch TSH levels <0.10 mU/L with PH (33.3 %) or with IH (33.3 %) were borderline significantly greater than the corresponding pre-switch levels with PH (10.3 %) (P = 0.088) or with IH (0 %) (P = 0.0096). In the two volunteers, the L-T4 loading test showed that coffee influenced L-T4 pharmacokinetics minimally. Soft gel capsules can be used in patients who are unable/unwilling to change their IH of taking L-T4. PMID:22932947

  10. Evaluation of alternative host bacteria as vehicles for oral administration of bacteriophages

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Survival of bacteriophages through the upper gastrointestinal tract (UGIT) and persistence in the lower gastrointestinal tract (LGIT) is essential for treatment of enteric bacterial infections. We have hypothesized that non-pathogenic Alternative Host Bacteriophage (AHB), originally isolated from p...

  11. TSH-Based Protocol, Tablet Instability, and Absorption Effects on L-T4 Bioequivalence

    PubMed Central

    DiStefano, Joseph J.

    2009-01-01

    Background FDA Guidance for pharmacokinetic (PK) testing of levothyroxine (L-T4) for interbrand bioequivalence has evolved recently. Concerns remain about efficacy and safety of the current protocol, based on PK analysis following supraphysiological L-T4 dosing in euthyroid volunteers, and recent recalls due to intrabrand manufacturing problems also suggest need for further refinement. We examine these interrelated issues quantitatively, using simulated what-if scenarios testing efficacy of a TSH-based protocol and tablet stability and absorption, to enhance precision of L-T4 bioequivalence methods. Methods We use an updated simulation model of human thyroid hormone regulation quantified and validated from data that span a wide range of normal and abnormal thyroid system function. Bioequivalence: We explored a TSH-based protocol, using normal replacement dosing in simulated thyroidectomized patients, switching brands after 8 weeks of full replacement dosing. We simulated effects of tablet potency differences and intestinal absorption differences on predicted plasma TSH, T4, and triiodothyronine (T3) dynamics. Stability: We simulated effects of potency decay and lot-by-lot differences in realistic scenarios, using actual tablet potency data spanning 2 years, comparing the recently reduced 95–105% FDA-approved potency range with the original 90–110% range. Results A simulated decrease as small as 10–15% in L-T4 or its absorption generated TSH concentrations outside the bioequivalence target range (0.5–2.5 mU/L TSH), whereas T3 and T4 plasma levels were maintained normal. For a 25% reduction, steady-state TSH changed 300% (from 1.5 to 6 mU/L) compared with <25% for both T4 and T3 (both within their reference ranges). Stability: TSH, T4, and T3 remained within normal ranges for most potency decay scenarios, but tablets of the same dose strength and brand were not bioequivalent between lots and between fresh and near-expired tablets. Conclusions A

  12. Bacteriophage cocktail for biocontrol of Salmonella in dried pet food.

    PubMed

    Heyse, Serena; Hanna, Leigh Farris; Woolston, Joelle; Sulakvelidze, Alexander; Charbonneau, Duane

    2015-01-01

    Human salmonellosis has been associated with contaminated pet foods and treats. Therefore, there is interest in identifying novel approaches for reducing the risk of Salmonella contamination within pet food manufacturing environments. The use of lytic bacteriophages shows promise as a safe and effective way to mitigate Salmonella contamination in various food products. Bacteriophages are safe, natural, highly targeted antibacterial agents that specifically kill bacteria and can be targeted to kill food pathogens without affecting other microbiota. In this study, we show that a cocktail containing six bacteriophages had a broadspectrum activity in vitro against a library of 930 Salmonella enterica strains representing 44 known serovars. The cocktail was effective against 95% of the strains in this tested library. In liquid culture dose-ranging experiments, bacteriophage cocktail concentrations of ≥10(8) PFU/ml inactivated more than 90% of the Salmonella population (10(1) to 10(3) CFU/ml). Dried pet food inoculated with a mixture containing equal proportions of Salmonella serovars Enteritidis (ATCC 4931), Montevideo (ATCC 8387), Senftenberg (ATCC 8400), and Typhimurium (ATCC 13311) and then surface treated with the six-bacteriophage cocktail (≥2.5 ± 1.5 × 10(6) PFU/g) achieved a greater than 1-log (P < 0.001) reduction compared with the phosphate-buffered saline-treated control in measured viable Salmonella within 60 min. Moreover, this bacteriophage cocktail reduced natural contamination in samples taken from an undistributed lot of commercial dried dog food that tested positive for Salmonella. Our results indicate that bacteriophage biocontrol of S. enterica in dried pet food is technically feasible. PMID:25581183

  13. Response of phage T4 polynucleotide kinase toward dinucleotides containing apurinic sites: Design of a sup 32 P-postlabeling assay for apurinic sites in DNA

    SciTech Connect

    Weinfeld, M.; Liuzzi, M.; Paterson, M.C. )

    1990-02-20

    The authors have examined the capacity of bacteriophage T4 polynucleotide kinase to phosphorylate the partially depurinated products of d-ApA, namely d-SpA and d-ApS (where S represents an apurinic deoxyribose group). It was observed that the enzyme acted only on the latter isomer. Since molecules of this type (d-NpS) are the sole apurinic site containing products resulting from the combined digestion of lightly depurinated DNA by snake venom phosphodiesterase and calf alkaline phosphatase they were able to devise a postlabeling assay for these biologically important DNA lesions. The method offers several advantages, including (a) elimination of the need for prelabeled DNA, (b) high (femtomole range) sensitivity, and (c) nearest-neighbor analysis of bases 5{prime} to apurinic/apyrimidinic sites. Using this assay, they obtained a value for the rate of depurination of form I pRSV neo plasmid DNA. The rate of depurination of poly(dA), treated in a similar fashion, was found to be {approximately}1 base per 10{sup 3} nucleotides per hour.

  14. Lysozyme activity in earthworm (Lumbricus terrestris) coelomic fluid and coelomocytes: Enzyme assay for immunotoxicity of xenobiotics

    SciTech Connect

    Goven, A.J.; Chen, S.C.; Fitzpatrick, L.C. . Dept. of Biological Sciences); Venables, B.J. . Dept. of Biological Sciences TRAC Laboratories Inc., Denton, TX )

    1994-04-01

    Lysozyme activity in earthworm (Lumbricus terrestris) coelomic fluid and coelomocytes appears sufficiently sensitive for use as a nonmammalian biomarker to detect toxic effects of sublethal body burdens of Cu[sup 2+]. Lysozyme, a phylogenetically conserved enzyme, is capable of bactericidal activity via action on peptidoglycan of gram-positive bacterial cell walls and functions as a component of an organism's innate antimicrobial defense mechanism. Coelomic fluid and coelomocyte lysozyme activities, which exhibit temperature-response patterns similar to those of human saliva, plasma, serum and leukocyte extracts, were sensitive to Cu[sup 2+] exposure. Lysozyme activity of coelomic fluid and coelomocyte extracts from earthworms exposed for 5 d to CuSO[sub 4], using filter paper contact exposure, decreased with increasing sublethal Cu[sup 2+] concentrations of 0.05 and 0.1 [mu]g/cm[sup 2]. Compared to controls, coelomic fluid lysozyme activity was suppressed significantly at both exposure concentrations, whereas coelomocyte extract lysozyme activity was suppressed significantly at the 0.1-[mu]g/cm[sup 2] exposure concentration. Low inherent natural variability and sensitivity to sublethal Cu[sup 2+] body burdens indicate that lysozyme activity has potential as a biomarker for assaying immunotoxicity of metals.

  15. The mucosal expression signatures of g-type lysozyme in turbot (Scophthalmus maximus) following bacterial challenge.

    PubMed

    Gao, Chengbin; Fu, Qiang; Zhou, Shun; Song, Lin; Ren, Yichao; Dong, Xiaoyu; Su, Baofeng; Li, Chao

    2016-07-01

    The mucosal surfaces constitute the first line of host defense against infection, and also serve as the dynamic interfaces that simultaneously mediate a diverse array of critical physiological processes, while in constantly contact with a wide range of pathogens. The lysozymes are considered as key components for innate immune response to pathogen infection with their strong antibacterial activities. But their activities in mucosal immune responses were always overlooked, especially for g-type lysozymes, whose expression patterns in mucosal tissues following bacterial challenge are still limited. Towards to this end, here, we characterized the g-type lysozymes, Lyg1 and Lyg2 in turbot, and determined their expression patterns in mucosal barriers following different bacterial infection. The phylogenetic analysis revealed the turbot g-type lysozyme genes showed the closest relationship to Cynoglossus semilaevis. The two lysozyme genes showed different expression patterns following challenge. Lyg2 was significantly up-regulated in mucosal tissues following Vibrio anguillarum and Streptococcus iniae challenge, while Lyg1 showed a general trend of down-regulation. The significant mucosal expression signatures of g-type lysozyme genes indicated their key roles to prevent pathogen attachment and entry in the first line of host defense system. Further functional studies should be carried out to better characterize the availability of utilization of g-type lysozyme to increase the disease resistance in the mucosal surfaces and facilitate the disease resistant breeding selection. PMID:27189917

  16. Molecular Cloning and Characterization of a New C-type Lysozyme Gene from Yak Mammary Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Ming Feng; Hu, Ming Jun; Ren, Hong Hui; Wang, Li

    2015-01-01

    Milk lysozyme is the ubiquitous enzyme in milk of mammals. In this study, the cDNA sequence of a new chicken-type (c-type) milk lysozyme gene (YML), was cloned from yak mammary gland tissue. A 444 bp open reading frames, which encodes 148 amino acids (16.54 kDa) with a signal peptide of 18 amino acids, was sequenced. Further analysis indicated that the nucleic acid and amino acid sequences identities between yak and cow milk lysozyme were 89.04% and 80.41%, respectively. Recombinant yak milk lysozyme (rYML) was produced by Escherichia coli BL21 and Pichia pastoris X33. The highest lysozyme activity was detected for heterologous protein rYML5 (M = 1,864.24 U/mg, SD = 25.75) which was expressed in P. pastoris with expression vector pPICZαA and it clearly inhibited growth of Staphylococcus aureus. Result of the YML gene expression using quantitative polymerase chain reaction showed that the YML gene was up-regulated to maximum at 30 day postpartum, that is, comparatively high YML can be found in initial milk production. The phylogenetic tree indicated that the amino acid sequence was similar to cow kidney lysozyme, which implied that the YML may have diverged from a different ancestor gene such as cow mammary glands. In our study, we suggest that YML be a new c-type lysozyme expressed in yak mammary glands that plays a role as host immunity. PMID:26580446

  17. Reverse micellar extraction and precipitation of lysozyme using sodium di(2-ethylhexyl) sulfosuccinate.

    PubMed

    Shin, Youn-Ok; Weber, Martin E; Vera, Juan H

    2003-01-01

    Sodium di(2-ethylhexyl) sulfosuccinate, referred to as Aerosol-OT or AOT, was used to remove lysozyme from an aqueous phase via reverse micellar extraction and precipitation method. For both methods, when the surfactant was in excess, a complete removal of lysozyme from the aqueous phase was obtained at the values of pH below the pI of lysozyme. However, for the reverse micellar method, a solubilization limit of lysozyme in the organic phase was observed, and a white precipitate was formed at the aqueous-organic interface. This observation suggested using AOT directly as a precipitating ligand. The lysozyme precipitated with AOT was fully recovered, with its original enzymatic activity, using acetone as a recovery solvent. A mechanism is suggested to explain the solubilization of lysozyme in an AOT reverse micellar system. It is shown that a direct precipitation method can be used with advantage instead of using the reverse micellar extraction method to recover lysozyme from an aqueous phase. PMID:12790659

  18. Bacteriophage Typing of Salmonella. I. Isolation and Host Range Study of Bacteriophages

    PubMed Central

    Ibrahim, Abdel Aziz E.

    1969-01-01

    A series of bacteriophages, lytic for bacteria belonging to the genera Escherichia and Salmonella, were isolated. The phages were isolated from fecal samples, intestinal contents of turkey poults, and carrier cultures of S. typhimurium, S. typhimurium var copenhagen, S. heidelberg, and E. coli. The feasibility of using different habitats as sources of Salmonella phages was evaluated. The carrier cultures were the most promising source for phages active on the serotypes for which the phages were sought. A host range study of the isolated phages was made. Eight phages were selected to develop a phage typing scheme for S. typhimurium, S. typhimurium var copenhagen, and S. heidelberg. PMID:4907005

  19. Steel tanks T5 and T4 with overhead pipeline between. Redwood ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Steel tanks T5 and T4 with overhead pipeline between. Redwood tanks seen in background - Hawaii Volcanoes National Park Water Collection System, Hawaii Volcanoes National Park, Volcano, Hawaii County, HI

  20. 40 CFR 180.1307 - Bacteriophage of Clavibacter michiganensis subspecies michiganensis; exemption from the...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Bacteriophage of Clavibacter... EXEMPTIONS FOR PESTICIDE CHEMICAL RESIDUES IN FOOD Exemptions From Tolerances § 180.1307 Bacteriophage of... exemption from the requirement of a tolerance is established for residues of lytic bacteriophage...

  1. 40 CFR 180.1307 - Bacteriophage of Clavibacter michiganensis subspecies michiganensis; exemption from the...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Bacteriophage of Clavibacter... EXEMPTIONS FOR PESTICIDE CHEMICAL RESIDUES IN FOOD Exemptions From Tolerances § 180.1307 Bacteriophage of... exemption from the requirement of a tolerance is established for residues of lytic bacteriophage...

  2. 40 CFR 180.1261 - Xanthomonas campestris pv. vesicatoria and Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato specific Bacteriophages.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... and Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato specific Bacteriophages. 180.1261 Section 180.1261 Protection of.... vesicatoria and Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato specific Bacteriophages. An exemption from the requirement of... syringae pv. tomato specific bacteriophages in or on pepper and tomato....

  3. 40 CFR 180.1261 - Xanthomonas campestris pv. vesicatoria and Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato specific Bacteriophages.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... and Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato specific Bacteriophages. 180.1261 Section 180.1261 Protection of.... vesicatoria and Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato specific Bacteriophages. An exemption from the requirement of... syringae pv. tomato specific bacteriophages in or on pepper and tomato....

  4. 40 CFR 180.1261 - Xanthomonas campestris pv. vesicatoria and Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato specific Bacteriophages.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... and Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato specific Bacteriophages. 180.1261 Section 180.1261 Protection of.... vesicatoria and Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato specific Bacteriophages. An exemption from the requirement of... syringae pv. tomato specific bacteriophages in or on pepper and tomato....

  5. 40 CFR 180.1307 - Bacteriophage of Clavibacter michiganensis subspecies michiganensis; exemption from the...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Bacteriophage of Clavibacter... EXEMPTIONS FOR PESTICIDE CHEMICAL RESIDUES IN FOOD Exemptions From Tolerances § 180.1307 Bacteriophage of... exemption from the requirement of a tolerance is established for residues of lytic bacteriophage...

  6. 40 CFR 180.1261 - Xanthomonas campestris pv. vesicatoria and Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato specific Bacteriophages.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... and Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato specific Bacteriophages. 180.1261 Section 180.1261 Protection of.... vesicatoria and Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato specific Bacteriophages. An exemption from the requirement of... syringae pv. tomato specific bacteriophages in or on pepper and tomato....

  7. 40 CFR 180.1261 - Xanthomonas campestris pv. vesicatoria and Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato specific Bacteriophages.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... and Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato specific Bacteriophages. 180.1261 Section 180.1261 Protection of.... vesicatoria and Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato specific Bacteriophages. An exemption from the requirement of... syringae pv. tomato specific bacteriophages in or on pepper and tomato....

  8. Control of electrostatic interactions between F-actin and genetically modified lysozyme in aqueous media

    PubMed Central

    Sanders, Lori K.; Xian, Wujing; Guáqueta, Camilo; Strohman, Michael J.; Vrasich, Chuck R.; Luijten, Erik; Wong, Gerard C. L.

    2007-01-01

    The aim for deterministic control of the interactions between macroions in aqueous media has motivated widespread experimental and theoretical work. Although it has been well established that like-charged macromolecules can aggregate under the influence of oppositely charged condensing agents, the specific conditions for the stability of such aggregates can only be determined empirically. We examine these conditions, which involve an interplay of electrostatic and osmotic effects, by using a well defined model system composed of F-actin, an anionic rod-like polyelectrolyte, and lysozyme, a cationic globular protein with a charge that can be genetically modified. The structure and stability of actin–lysozyme complexes for different lysozyme charge mutants and salt concentrations are examined by using synchrotron x-ray scattering and molecular dynamics simulations. We provide evidence that supports a structural transition from columnar arrangements of F-actin held together by arrays of lysozyme at the threefold interstitial sites of the actin sublattice to marginally stable complexes in which lysozyme resides at twofold bridging sites between actin. The reduced stability arises from strongly reduced partitioning of salt between the complex and the surrounding solution. Changes in the stability of actin–lysozyme complexes are of biomedical interest because their formation has been reported to contribute to the persistence of airway infections in cystic fibrosis by sequestering antimicrobials such as lysozyme. We present x-ray microscopy results that argue for the existence of actin–lysozyme complexes in cystic fibrosis sputum and demonstrate that, for a wide range of salt conditions, charge-reduced lysozyme is not sequestered in ordered complexes while retaining its bacterial killing activity. PMID:17911256

  9. The antibacterial protein lysozyme identified as the termite egg recognition pheromone.

    PubMed

    Matsuura, Kenji; Tamura, Takashi; Kobayashi, Norimasa; Yashiro, Toshihisa; Tatsumi, Shingo

    2007-01-01

    Social insects rely heavily on pheromone communication to maintain their sociality. Egg protection is one of the most fundamental social behaviours in social insects. The recent discovery of the termite-egg mimicking fungus 'termite-ball' and subsequent studies on termite egg protection behaviour have shown that termites can be manipulated by using the termite egg recognition pheromone (TERP), which strongly evokes the egg-carrying and -grooming behaviours of workers. Despite the great scientific and economic importance, TERP has not been identified because of practical difficulties. Herein we identified the antibacterial protein lysozyme as the TERP. We isolated the target protein using ion-exchange and hydrophobic interaction chromatography, and the MALDI-TOF MS analysis showed a molecular size of 14.5 kDa. We found that the TERP provided antibacterial activity against a gram-positive bacterium. Among the currently known antimicrobial proteins, the molecular size of 14.5 kDa limits the target to lysozyme. Termite lysozymes obtained from eggs and salivary glands, and even hen egg lysozyme, showed a strong termite egg recognition activity. Besides eggs themselves, workers also supply lysozyme to eggs through frequent egg-grooming, by which egg surfaces are coated with saliva containing lysozyme. Reverse transcript PCR analysis showed that mRNA of termite lysozyme was expressed in both salivary glands and eggs. Western blot analysis confirmed that lysozyme production begins in immature eggs in queen ovaries. This is the first identification of proteinaceous pheromone in social insects. Researchers have focused almost exclusively on hydrocarbons when searching for recognition pheromones in social insects. The present finding of a proteinaceous pheromone represents a major step forward in, and result in the broadening of, the search for recognition pheromones. This novel function of lysozyme as a termite pheromone illuminates the profound influence of pathogenic

  10. The Role of Lysozyme in the Prophenoloxidase Activation System of Manduca sexta: An in vitro approach

    PubMed Central

    Rao, Xiang-Jun; Ling, Erjun; Yu, Xiao-Qiang

    2009-01-01

    Activation of the prophenoloxidase (proPO) system and synthesis of antimicrobial peptides (including lysozyme) are two key defense mechanisms in arthropods. Activation of proPO involves a cascade of serine proteinases that eventually converts proPO to active phenoloxidase (PO). However, a trade-off between lysozyme/antibacterial activity and PO activity has been observed in some insects, and a mosquito lysozyme can inhibit melanization. It is not clear whether lysozyme can inhibit PO activity and/or proPO activation. In this study, we used in vitro assays to investigate the role of lysozyme in proPO activation in the tobacco hornworm Manduca sexta. We showed that lysozymes from M. sexta, human milk and hen egg white did not inhibit PO activity in the pre-activated naïve plasma of M. sexta larvae, but significantly inhibited proPO activation in the naïve plasma. Western blot analysis showed that direct incubation of M. sexta lysozyme with the naïve plasma prevented conversion of proPO to PO, but stimulated degradation of precursor proteins for serine proteinase homolog-2 (SPH2) and proPO-activating proteinase-1 (PAP1), two key components required for proPO activation. Far-western blot analysis showed that M. sexta lysozyme and proPO interacted with each other. Altogether, our results suggest that lysozymes may inhibit the proPO activation system by preventing conversion of proPO to PO via direct protein interaction with proPO. PMID:19835909

  11. Crystal structure of a ubiquitin-dependent degradation substrate: a three-disulfide form of lysozyme.

    PubMed Central

    Hill, C P; Johnston, N L; Cohen, R E

    1993-01-01

    Covalent attachment of ubiquitin marks substrates for proteolysis, but features that identify ubiquitination targets such as chicken egg white lysozyme are poorly understood. Recognition of lysozyme first requires reduction of Cys-6 Cys-127, one of its four native disulfide bonds, and Cys-6,Cys-127-carboxymethylated (6,127-rcm) lysozyme can mimic this three-disulfide intermediate. The 6,127-rcm form of lysozyme is known to retain a substantially native-like conformation in solution, and we demonstrate that it is this folded structure that is recognized for ubiquitination. Because native lysozyme is not a substrate, differences between the native and three-disulfide structures must include features responsible for selective ubiquitination. The 1.9-A resolution crystal structure of 6,127-rcm-lysozyme, reported here, affords a view of this ubiquitin-dependent degradation substrate. Two conformers of 6,127-rcm-lysozyme were obtained in the crystal. These differ uniquely from crystal forms of native lysozyme by displacement of the C-terminal residues. The structures suggest that localized unfolding at the C terminus of three-disulfide lysozyme allows the complex of E3 alpha (ubiquitin-protein ligase) and E2 (ubiquitin-carrier protein) to bind to a surface that includes Lys-1 and the putative ubiquitination site Lys-13. From this we infer that the N-terminal and internal substrate recognition sites on the E3 alpha.E2 complex are separated by approximately 20 A. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 5 PMID:8387211

  12. The Antibacterial Protein Lysozyme Identified as the Termite Egg Recognition Pheromone

    PubMed Central

    Matsuura, Kenji; Tamura, Takashi; Kobayashi, Norimasa; Yashiro, Toshihisa; Tatsumi, Shingo

    2007-01-01

    Social insects rely heavily on pheromone communication to maintain their sociality. Egg protection is one of the most fundamental social behaviours in social insects. The recent discovery of the termite-egg mimicking fungus ‘termite-ball’ and subsequent studies on termite egg protection behaviour have shown that termites can be manipulated by using the termite egg recognition pheromone (TERP), which strongly evokes the egg-carrying and -grooming behaviours of workers. Despite the great scientific and economic importance, TERP has not been identified because of practical difficulties. Herein we identified the antibacterial protein lysozyme as the TERP. We isolated the target protein using ion-exchange and hydrophobic interaction chromatography, and the MALDI-TOF MS analysis showed a molecular size of 14.5 kDa. We found that the TERP provided antibacterial activity against a gram-positive bacterium. Among the currently known antimicrobial proteins, the molecular size of 14.5 kDa limits the target to lysozyme. Termite lysozymes obtained from eggs and salivary glands, and even hen egg lysozyme, showed a strong termite egg recognition activity. Besides eggs themselves, workers also supply lysozyme to eggs through frequent egg-grooming, by which egg surfaces are coated with saliva containing lysozyme. Reverse transcript PCR analysis showed that mRNA of termite lysozyme was expressed in both salivary glands and eggs. Western blot analysis confirmed that lysozyme production begins in immature eggs in queen ovaries. This is the first identification of proteinaceous pheromone in social insects. Researchers have focused almost exclusively on hydrocarbons when searching for recognition pheromones in social insects. The present finding of a proteinaceous pheromone represents a major step forward in, and result in the broadening of, the search for recognition pheromones. This novel function of lysozyme as a termite pheromone illuminates the profound influence of pathogenic

  13. Control of electrostatic interactions between F-actin and genetically modified lysozyme in aqueous media

    SciTech Connect

    Sanders, Lori K.; Xian, Wujing; Guaqueta, Camilo; Strohman, Michael J.; Vrasich, Chuck R.; Luijten, Erik; Wong, Gerard C.L.

    2008-07-11

    The aim for deterministic control of the interactions between macroions in aqueous media has motivated widespread experimental and theoretical work. Although it has been well established that like-charged macromolecules can aggregate under the influence of oppositely charged condensing agents, the specific conditions for the stability of such aggregates can only be determined empirically. We examine these conditions, which involve an interplay of electrostatic and osmotic effects, by using a well defined model system composed of F-actin, an anionic rod-like polyelectrolyte, and lysozyme, a cationic globular protein with a charge that can be genetically modified. The structure and stability of actin-lysozyme complexes for different lysozyme charge mutants and salt concentrations are examined by using synchrotron x-ray scattering and molecular dynamics simulations. We provide evidence that supports a structural transition from columnar arrangements of F-actin held together by arrays of lysozyme at the threefold interstitial sites of the actin sublattice to marginally stable complexes in which lysozyme resides at twofold bridging sites between actin. The reduced stability arises from strongly reduced partitioning of salt between the complex and the surrounding solution. Changes in the stability of actin-lysozyme complexes are of biomedical interest because their formation has been reported to contribute to the persistence of airway infections in cystic fibrosis by sequestering antimicrobials such as lysozyme. We present x-ray microscopy results that argue for the existence of actin-lysozyme complexes in cystic fibrosis sputum and demonstrate that, for a wide range of salt conditions, charge-reduced lysozyme is not sequestered in ordered complexes while retaining its bacterial killing activity.

  14. Control of Electrostatic Interactions Between F-Actin And Genetically Modified Lysozyme in Aqueous Media

    SciTech Connect

    Sanders, L.K.; Xian, W.; Guaqueta, C.; Strohman, M.; Vrasich, C.R.; Luijten, E.; Wong, G.C.L.

    2009-06-04

    The aim for deterministic control of the interactions between macroions in aqueous media has motivated widespread experimental and theoretical work. Although it has been well established that like-charged macromolecules can aggregate under the influence of oppositely charged condensing agents, the specific conditions for the stability of such aggregates can only be determined empirically. We examine these conditions, which involve an interplay of electrostatic and osmotic effects, by using a well defined model system composed of F-actin, an anionic rod-like polyelectrolyte, and lysozyme, a cationic globular protein with a charge that can be genetically modified. The structure and stability of actin-lysozyme complexes for different lysozyme charge mutants and salt concentrations are examined by using synchrotron x-ray scattering and molecular dynamics simulations. We provide evidence that supports a structural transition from columnar arrangements of F-actin held together by arrays of lysozyme at the threefold interstitial sites of the actin sublattice to marginally stable complexes in which lysozyme resides at twofold bridging sites between actin. The reduced stability arises from strongly reduced partitioning of salt between the complex and the surrounding solution. Changes in the stability of actin-lysozyme complexes are of biomedical interest because their formation has been reported to contribute to the persistence of airway infections in cystic fibrosis by sequestering antimicrobials such as lysozyme. We present x-ray microscopy results that argue for the existence of actin-lysozyme complexes in cystic fibrosis sputum and demonstrate that, for a wide range of salt conditions, charge-reduced lysozyme is not sequestered in ordered complexes while retaining its bacterial killing activity.

  15. Biosynthesis of 3-Iodothyronamine From T4 in Murine Intestinal Tissue.

    PubMed

    Hoefig, Carolin S; Wuensch, Tilo; Rijntjes, Eddy; Lehmphul, Ina; Daniel, Hannelore; Schweizer, Ulrich; Mittag, Jens; Köhrle, Josef

    2015-11-01

    The endogenous metabolite 3-iodothyronamine (3-T1AM) induces strong hypothermia and bradycardia at pharmacological doses. Although its biosynthesis from thyroid hormone precursors appears likely, the sequence and sites of reactions are still controversial: studies in T4-substituted thyroid cancer patients lacking functional thyroid tissue suggested extrathyroidal 3-T1AM production, whereas studies using labeled T4 in mice indicated intrathyroidal formation. However, because the patients received T4 orally, whereas the mice were injected ip, we hypothesized that 3-T1AM synthesis requires the intestinal passage of T4. Using the everted gut sac model in combination with mass spectrometry, we demonstrate 3-T1AM production from T4 in mouse intestine via several deiodination and decarboxylation steps. Gene expression analysis confirmed the expression of all 3 deiodinases as well as ornithine decarboxylase (ODC) in intestine. Subsequent experiments employing purified human ODC revealed that this enzyme can in fact mediate decarboxylation of 3,5-T2 and T4 to the respective thyronamines (TAMs), demonstrating that the intestine expresses the entire molecular machinery required for 3-T1AM biosynthesis. Interestingly, TAM production was strongly affected by the antithyroid treatment methimazole and perchlorate independently of thyroid status, limiting the validity of the respective mouse models in this context. Taken together, our data demonstrate intestinal 3-T1AM biosynthesis from T4 involving decarboxylation through ODC with subsequent deiodination, and explain the apparent discrepancy between 3-T1AM serum levels in patients substituted orally and mice injected ip with T4. Identifying ODC as the first enzyme capable of decarboxylating thyroid hormone, our findings open the path to further investigations of TAM metabolism on molecular and cellular levels. PMID:26348473

  16. ["Low triiodothyronine (T3) syndrome": "thyroxine (T4) euthyroidism" evidence (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Wémeau, J L; Lefebvre, J; Linquette, M

    1979-02-01

    As first described in serious systemic illnesses isolated decreased T3 plasma concentration was related to impaired peripheral conversion of T4, to T3 with preferential production of reverse T3 (rT3). A "low T3 syndrome" was seen in 47 out of 109 patients with extra-thyroidal diseases. Metabolic state, TSH and TSH responses to TRH were normal despite of low T3 concentration. Euthyroidism seems mainly due to T4 itself in these patients. PMID:554102

  17. Bacteriophage Infection of Model Metal Reducing Bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weber, K. A.; Bender, K. S.; Gandhi, K.; Coates, J. D.

    2008-12-01

    Microbially-mediated metal reduction plays a significant role controlling contaminant mobility in aqueous, soil, and sedimentary environments. From among environmentally relevant microorganisms mediating metal reduction, Geobacter spp. have been identified as predominant metal-reducing bacteria under acetate- oxidizing conditions. Due to the significance of these bacteria in environmental systems, it is necessary to understand factors influencing their metabolic physiology. Examination of the annotated finished genome sequence of G. sulfurreducens PCA, G. uraniumreducens Rf4, G. metallireduceans GS-15 as well as a draft genome sequence of Geobacter sp. FRC-32 have identified gene sequences of putative bacteriophage origin. Presence of these sequences indicates that these bacteria are susceptible to phage infection. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) primer sets designed tested for the presence of 12 of 25 annotated phage-like sequences in G. sulfurreducens PCA and 9 of 17 phage-like sequences in FRC- 32. The following genes were successfully amplified in G. sulfurreducens PCA: prophage type transcription regulator, phage-induced endonuclease, phage tail sheath, 2 phage tail proteins, phage protein D, phage base plate protein, phage-related DNA polymerase, integrase, phage transcriptional regulator, and Cro-like transcription regulator. Nine of the following sequences were present in FRC-32: 4 separate phage- related proteins, phage-related tail component, viron core protein, phage Mu protein, phage base plate, and phage tail sheath. In addition to the bioinformatics evidence, incubation of G. sulfurreducens PCA with 1 μg mL-1 mytomycin C (mutagen stimulating prophage induction) during mid-log phase resulted in significant cell lysis relative to cultures that remained unamended. Cell lysis was concurrent with an increase in viral like particles enumerated using epifluorescent microscopy. In addition, samples collected following this lytic event (~44hours) were

  18. Development, characterization, and technical applications of a fish lysozyme-specific monoclonal antibody (mAb M24-2)

    PubMed Central

    Marsh, Marlee B.; Rice, Charles D.

    2009-01-01

    Lysozyme is one of several humoral and cellular factors associated with front line, innate immunity in all vertebrates. Historically, circulating lysozyme has been quantified in teleosts by measuring enzymatic activity against heat-killed Mycococcus lysodieticus using whole serum or plasma at a low pH. However, the amount of serum or plasma required for standard lysozyme activity exceeds that which can be easily acquired from small fish, thus making lysozyme a difficult endpoint to measure in limited sample volumes. Moreover, while circulating lysozyme is considered to be an indicator of proinflammatory phagocyte activity, the cellular source of this protein is not easily detected in fish. While several antibodies against lysozyme are commercially available for use in higher vertebrates, neither reacts with lysozyme in fish. In this study, a monoclonal antibody (mAb) for detecting and quantifying lysozyme was developed from mummichog, Fundulus heteroclitus, myeloid cells that also recognizes hen egg lysozyme (HEL), then tested for cross-reactivity in different species of teleosts, A single protein of ≈ 14–15 kDa mass was identified by the mAb in fish cell lysates and plasma samples, as well as denatured HEL. Total circulating lysozyme protein was compared to lysozyme activity using standard ELISA procedures and was found to correlate with enzymatic activity. Using mAb M24-2, intracellular lysozyme protein was detected in formalin-fixed and permeabilized lymphoid cells adhered to glass cover slips. Moreover, mAb M24-2 localizes lysozyme to myeloid cells. Finally, it was demonstrated that mAb M24-2 is suitable for immunohistochemistry in that lysozyme could be detected in plastic-embedded lymphoid tissues. PMID:19900707

  19. Structure of T4moF, the Toluene 4-Monooxygenase Ferredoxin Oxidoreductase.

    PubMed

    Acheson, Justin F; Moseson, Hannah; Fox, Brian G

    2015-09-29

    The 1.6 Å crystal structure of toluene 4-monooxygenase reductase T4moF is reported. The structure includes ferredoxin, flavin, and NADH binding domains. The position of the ferredoxin domain relative to the other two domains represents a new configuration for the iron-sulfur flavoprotein family. Close contacts between the C8 methyl group of FAD and [2Fe-2S] ligand Cys36-O represent a plausible pathway for electron transfer between the redox cofactors. Energy-minimized docking of NADH and calculation of hingelike motions between domains suggest how simple coordinated shifts of residues at the C-terminus of the enzyme could expose the N5 position of FAD for productive interaction with the nicotinamide ring. The domain configuration revealed by the T4moF structure provides an excellent steric and electrostatic match to the obligate electron acceptor, Rieske-type [2Fe-2S] ferredoxin T4moC. Protein-protein docking and energy minimization of the T4moFC complex indicate that T4moF [2Fe-2S] ligand Cys41 and T4moC [2Fe-2S] ligand His67, along with other electrostatic interactions between the protein partners, form the functional electron transfer interface. PMID:26309236

  20. The use of lysozyme modified with fluorescein for the detection of Gram-positive bacteria.

    PubMed

    Arabski, Michał; Konieczna, Iwona; Tusińska, Ewa; Wąsik, Sławomir; Relich, Inga; Zając, Krzysztof; Kamiński, Zbigniew J; Kaca, Wiesław

    2015-01-01

    Lysozyme (1,4-β-N-acetylmuramidase) is commonly applied in the food, medical, and pharmaceutical industries. In this study, we tested a novel application of fluorescein-modified lysozyme (using carboxyfluorescein with a triazine-based coupling reagent) as a new tool for the detection of Gram-positive soil bacteria. The results, obtained by cultivation methods, fluorescence analysis, and laser interferometry, showed that, after optimization, fluorescein-modified lysozyme could be used to evaluate the prevalence of Gram-positive bacteria essential in bioremediation of soils with low pH, such as those degraded by sulfur. PMID:24916601

  1. Human Interleukin-2 and Hen Egg White Lysozyme: Screening for Bacteriolytic Activity against Various Bacterial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Levashov, P. A.; Ovchinnikova, E. D.; Morozova, O. A.; Matolygina, D. A.; Osipova, H. E.; Cherdyntseva, T. A.; Savin, S. S.; Zakharova, G. S.; Alekseeva, A. A.; Belogurova, N. G.; Smirnov, S. A.; Tishkov, V. I.; Levashov, A. V.

    2016-01-01

    The bacteriolytic activity of interleukin-2 and hen egg white lysozyme against 34 different species of microorganisms has been studied. It was found that 6 species of microorganisms are lysed in the presence of interleukin-2. All interleukin-2-sensitive microorganisms belong either to the Enterobacteriaceae, Bacillaceae, or the Lactobacillaceae family. It was also found that 12 species of microorganisms are lysed in the presence of lysozyme, and 16 species of microorganisms are lysed in the presence of sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS). The bacteriolytic activity of interleukin-2 and lysozyme was studied at various pH values. PMID:27099789

  2. Structure and Stability of Self-Assembled Actin-Lysozyme Complexes in Salty Water

    SciTech Connect

    Sanders, Lori K.; Guaqueta, Camilo; Lee, Jae-Wook; Slimmer, Scott C.; Luijten, Erik; Angelini, Thomas E.; Wong, Gerard C.L.

    2005-09-02

    Interactions between actin, an anionic polyelectrolyte, and lysozyme, a cationic globular protein, have been examined using a combination of synchrotron small-angle x-ray scattering and molecular dynamics simulations. Lysozyme initially bridges pairs of actin filaments, which relax into hexagonally coordinated columnar complexes comprised of actin held together by incommensurate one-dimensional close-packed arrays of lysozyme macroions. These complexes are found to be stable even in the presence of significant concentrations of monovalent salt, which is quantitatively explained from a redistribution of salt between the condensed and the aqueous phases.

  3. Production of Lysozyme by Staphylococci and Its Correlation with Three Other Extracellular Substances1

    PubMed Central

    Jay, James M.

    1966-01-01

    Jay, James M. (Wayne State University, Detroit, Mich.). Production of lysozyme by staphylococci and its correlation with three other extracellular substances. J. Bacteriol. 91:1804–1810. 1966.—Lysozyme production was determined on plates containing 1 mg/ml of Lysozyme Substrate in Heart Infusion Agar with incubation at 37 C for 48 hr. Its production was compared with that of α-hemolysin and sheep hemolysin and egg-yolk precipitation, by use of both coagulase-positive and coagulase-negative strains of staphylococci. Of 126 coagulase-positive strains tested, 120 or 95.2% produced lysozyme, 117 or 92.9% produced α-hemolysin, 108 or 85.7% precipitated egg yolk, and 102 or 81% produced sheep hemolysin. Of the 49 coagulase-negative strains (which included 22 pathogens), only 4 or 8.1% produced lysozyme, 14 or 28.6% produced α-hemolysin, 13 or 26.5% produced sheep hemolysins, and 5 or 10.2% precipitated egg yolk. Only two of the six coagulase-positive strains which failed to produce lysozyme showed any consistent patterns in relation to the four characteristics determined. The four coagulase-negative strains which produced lysozyme were inconsistent for the other characteristics measured. It is suggested that lysozyme production is more a property of coagulase-positive staphylococci, and therefore a better ancillary test of pathogenicity, than either production of α-hemolysin or egg-yolk precipitation, because the incidence of lysozyme producers is higher among this group than among those producing the other substances and because fewer coagulase-negative staphylococci produced lysozyme than hemolysins or egg-yolk precipitation. Of 16 other species of bacteria and yeasts tested, all were found negative except Bacillus subtilis. Lysozyme production by staphylococci in heavily contaminated foods was not inhibited on plates containing sodium azide, whereas media containing 7.5% salt and sorbic acid were unsuitable. The possible relationship of lysozyme production to

  4. Bacteriophage Therapy To Reduce Salmonella Colonization of Broiler Chickens▿

    PubMed Central

    Atterbury, R. J.; Van Bergen, M. A. P.; Ortiz, F.; Lovell, M. A.; Harris, J. A.; De Boer, A.; Wagenaar, J. A.; Allen, V. M.; Barrow, P. A.

    2007-01-01

    Acute enteric infections caused by salmonellas remain a major public health burden worldwide. Poultry, particularly chickens, are known to be the main reservoir for this zoonotic pathogen. Although some progress has been made in reducing Salmonella colonization of broiler chickens by using biosecurity and antimicrobials, it still remains a considerable problem. The use of host-specific bacteriophages as a biocontrol is one possible intervention by which Salmonella colonization could be reduced. A total of 232 Salmonella bacteriophages were isolated from poultry farms, abattoirs, and wastewater in 2004 and 2005. Three phages exhibiting the broadest host ranges against Salmonella enterica serotypes Enteritidis, Hadar, and Typhimurium were characterized further by determining their morphology and lytic activity in vitro. These phages were then administered in antacid suspension to birds experimentally colonized with specific Salmonella host strains. The first phage reduced S. enterica serotype Enteritidis cecal colonization by ≥4.2 log10 CFU within 24 h compared with controls. Administration of the second phage reduced S. enterica serotype Typhimurium by ≥2.19 log10 CFU within 24 h. The third bacteriophage was ineffective at reducing S. enterica serotype Hadar colonization. Bacteriophage resistance occurred at a frequency commensurate with the titer of phage being administered, with larger phage titers resulting in a greater proportion of resistant salmonellas. The selection of appropriate bacteriophages and optimization of both the timing and method of phage delivery are key factors in the successful phage-mediated control of salmonellas in broiler chickens. PMID:17526794

  5. Alternative bacteriophage life cycles: the carrier state of Campylobacter jejuni.

    PubMed

    Siringan, Patcharin; Connerton, Phillippa L; Cummings, Nicola J; Connerton, Ian F

    2014-01-01

    Members of the genus Campylobacter are frequently responsible for human enteric disease, often through consumption of contaminated poultry products. Bacteriophages are viruses that have the potential to control pathogenic bacteria, but understanding their complex life cycles is key to their successful exploitation. Treatment of Campylobacter jejuni biofilms with bacteriophages led to the discovery that phages had established a relationship with their hosts typical of the carrier state life cycle (CSLC), where bacteria and bacteriophages remain associated in equilibrium. Significant phenotypic changes include improved aerotolerance under nutrient-limited conditions that would confer an advantage to survive in extra-intestinal environments, but a lack in motility eliminated their ability to colonize chickens. Under these circumstances, phages can remain associated with a compatible host and continue to produce free virions to prospect for new hosts. Moreover, we demonstrate that CSLC host bacteria can act as expendable vehicles for the delivery of bacteriophages to new host bacteria within pre-colonized chickens. The CSLC represents an important phase in the ecology of Campylobacter bacteriophage. PMID:24671947

  6. Modeling the Growth Rates of Tetragonal Lysozyme Crystal Faces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Meirong; Nadarajah, Arunan; Pusey, Marc L.

    1998-01-01

    The measured macroscopic growth rates of the (110) and (101) faces of tetragonal lysozyme show an unexpectedly complex dependence on the supersaturation. The growth rates decay asymptotically to zero when the supersaturation is lowered to zero and increase rapidly when the supersaturation is increased. When supersaturations are increased still further the growth rates attain a maximum before starting to decrease. However, growth of these crystals is known to proceed by the classical dislocation and 2D nucleation growth mechanisms. This anomaly can be explained if growth is assumed to occur not by monomer units but by lysozyme aggregates. Analysis of the molecular packing of these crystals revealed that they were constructed of strongly bonded 4(sub 3) helices, while weaker bonds were responsible for binding the helices to each other. It follows that during crystal growth the stronger bonds are formed before the weaker ones. Thus, the growth of these crystals could be viewed as a two step process: aggregate growth units corresponding to the 4(sub 3) helix are first formed in the bulk solution by stronger intermolecular bonds and then attached to the crystal face by weaker bonds on dislocation hillocks or 2D islands. This will lead to a distribution of aggregates in the solution with monomers and lower order aggregates being predominant at low supersaturations and higher order aggregates being predominant at high supersaturations. If the crystal grows mostly by higher order aggregates, such as tetramers and octamers, it would explain the anomalous dependence of the growth rates on the supersaturation. Besides the analysis of molecular packing, a comprehensive analysis of the measured (110) and (101) growth rates was also undertaken in this study. The distribution of aggregates in lysozyme nutrient solutions at various solution conditions were determined from reversible aggregation reactions at equilibrium. The supersaturation was defined for each aggregate species

  7. Hydration of lysozyme as observed by infrared spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Liltorp, K; Maréchal, Y

    2005-11-01

    Infrared spectra of a film of lysozyme 3 mum thick, immersed in an atmosphere displaying a relative humidity, or hygrometry, which spans the whole range from 0 to 1 at room temperature, are recorded. The evolution of the spectra with this relative humidity is quantitatively analyzed on the basis of a newly proposed method. It allows the precise measurement of the quantity of water that remains embedded inside the dried sample at each stage of hydration, and the definition, in terms of chemical reactions of the three hydration mechanisms that correspond to the three hydration spectra on which all experimental spectra can be decomposed. With respect to preceding similar studies, some refinements are introduced that allow improvement of the interpretation, but that also raise some new questions, which mainly concern the structure of the hydrogen-bond network around the carbonyl peptide groups. PMID:15986502

  8. Combined effects of lactoferrin and lysozyme on Streptococcus pneumoniae killing.

    PubMed

    André, G O; Politano, W R; Mirza, S; Converso, T R; Ferraz, L F C; Leite, L C C; Darrieux, M

    2015-12-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae is a common colonizer of the human nasopharynx, which can occasionally spread to sterile sites, causing diseases such as otitis media, sinusitis, pneumonia, meningitis and bacteremia. Human apolactoferrin (ALF) and lysozyme (LZ) are two important components of the mucosal innate immune system, exhibiting lytic effects against a wide range of microorganisms. Since they are found in similar niches of the host, it has been proposed that ALF and LZ could act synergistically in controlling bacterial spread throughout the mucosa. The combination of ALF and LZ has been shown to enhance killing of different pathogens in vitro, with ALF facilitating the latter action of LZ. The aim of the present work was to investigate the combined effects of ALF and LZ on S pneumoniae. Concomitant addition of ALF and LZ had a synergistic killing effect on one of the pneumococci tested. Furthermore, the combination of ALF and ALZ was more bactericidal than lysozyme alone in all pneumococcal strains. Pneumococcal surface protein A (PspA), an important vaccine candidate, partially protects pneumococci from ALF mediated killing, while antibodies against one PspA enhance killing of the homologous strain by ALF. However, the serological variability of this molecule could limit the effect of anti-PspA antibodies on different pneumococci. Therefore, we investigated the ability of anti-PspA antibodies to increase ALF-mediated killing of strains that express different PspAs, and found that antisera to the N-terminal region of PspA were able to increase pneumococcal lysis by ALF, independently of the sequence similarities between the molecule expressed on the bacterial surface and that used to produce the antibodies. LF binding to the pneumococcal surface was confirmed by flow cytometry, and found to be inhibited in presence of anti-PspA antibodies. On a whole, the results suggest a contribution of ALF and LZ to pneumococcal clearance, and confirm PspA's ability to interact

  9. Tetragonal Lysozyme Interactions Studied by Site Directed Mutagenesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crawford, Lisa; Karr, Laurel J.; Nadarajah, Arunan; Pusey, Marc

    1999-01-01

    A number of recent experimental and theoretical studies have indicated that tetragonal lysozyme crystal growth proceeds by the addition of aggregates, formed by reversible self association of the solute molecules in the bulk solution. Periodic bond chain and atomic force microscopy studies have indicated that the probable growth unit is at minimum a 43 tetramer, and most likely an octamer composed of two complete turns about the 43 axis. If these results are correct, then there are intermolecular interactions which are only formed in the solution and others only formed at the joining of the growth unit to the crystal surface. We have set out to study these interactions, and the correctness of this hypothesis, using site directed mutagenesis of specific amino acid residues involved in the different bonds. We had initially expressed wild type lysozyme in S. cervasiae with yields of approximately 5 mg/L, which were eventually raised to approximately 40 mg/L. We are now moving the expression to the Pichia system, with anticipated yields of 300 to (3)500 mg/L, comparable to what can be obtained from egg whites. An additional advantage of using recombinant protein is the greater genetic homogeneity of the material obtained and the absence of any other contaminating egg proteins. The first mutation experiments are TYR 23 (Registered) PHE or ALA and ASN 113 (Registered) ALA or ASP. Both TYR 23 and ASN 113 form part of the postulated dimerization intermolecular binding site which lead to the formation of the 43 helix. Tyrosine also participates in an intermolecular hydrogen bond with ARG 114. The results of these and subsequent experiments will be discussed.

  10. Tetragonal Lysozyme Interactions Studied by Site Directed Mutagenesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crawford, Lisa; Karr, Laurel; Pusey, Marc

    1998-01-01

    A number of recent experimental and theoretical studies have indicated that tetragonal lysozyme crystal growth proceeds by the addition of aggregates, formed by reversible self association of the solute molecules in the bulk'solution. Periodic bond chain and atomic force microscopy studies have indicated that the probable growth unit is at minimum a 43 tetramer, and most likely an octamer composed of two complete turns about the 4(sub 3) axis. If these results are correct, then there are intermolecular interactions which are only formed in the solution and others only formed at the joining of the growth unit to the crystal surface. We have set out to study these interactions, and the correctness of this hypothesis, using site directed mutagenesis of specific amino acid residues involved in the different bonds. We had initially expressed wild type lysozyme in S. cervasiae with yields of approximately 5 mg/L, which were eventually raised to approximately 40 mg/L. We are now moving the expression to the Pichia system, with anticipated yields of 300 to greater than 500 mg/L, comparable to what can be obtained from egg whites. An additional advantage of using recombinant protein is the greater genetic homogeneity of the material obtained and the absence of any other contaminating egg proteins. The first mutation experiments are TYR 23 yields PHE or ALA and ASN 113 yields ALA or ASP. Both TYR 23 and ASN 113 form part of the postulated dimerization intermolecular binding site which lead to the formation of the 4(sub 3) helix. Tyrosine also participates in an intermolecular hydrogen bond with ARG 114. The results of these and subsequent experiments will be discussed.

  11. The preparation of protected fragments of lysozyme for semisynthesis.

    PubMed Central

    Rees, A R; Offord, R E

    1976-01-01

    This paper reports the development of methods for preparing tryptic fragments of hen's-egg lysozyme in an appropriate state of protection for use in the chemical synthesis of modified polypeptides. 1. We describe the cleavage of the disulphide bridges of the enzyme and the simulatneous protection of the liberated thiol groups by S-sulphonation. Lysozyme resisted the usual conditions for this reaction. We have confirmed the stability of the S-sulphonyl group to the conditions met in peptide synthesis. 2. We describe the reversible protection of the amino groups of the enzyme by reaction with various anhydrides of 1,2-dicarboxylic acids. We conclude that 2-methylmaleic anhydride and exo-cis-3,6-endoxo-delta4-tetrahydrophthalic anhydride are unsuitable for our purpose but that maleic anhydride can, in spite of certain drawbacks, be used. 3. We describe the tryptic cleavage of the thiol- and amino-protected protein and the separation of the fragments. 4. We describe the reversible protection of the carboxylic acid groups (including the specific deprotection of the alpha-carboxyl group), the imidazolyl group and the aloph-amino groups of the fragments. Several alternative groups have been evaluated for most of these purposes. The side-chain amides did not present any serious problem of libility, 5. We describe experiments on the stability of the side chain of tryptophan, both protected by formylation and unprotected, to the acid conditions needed for the deprotection of the other functional groups in the peptide. We conclude that protection of tryptophan is unnecessary. We suggest that most of the methods described are of general application in peptide semisynthesis by fragment condensation. An Appendix is included to which points 6-ll appertain... PMID:1008811

  12. Crystallization of chicken egg white lysozyme from assorted sulfate salts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forsythe, Elizabeth L.; Snell, Edward H.; Malone, Christine C.; Pusey, Marc L.

    1999-01-01

    Chicken egg white lysozyme has been found to crystallize from ammonium, sodium, potassium, rubidium, magnesium, and manganese sulfates at acidic and basic pH, with protein concentrations from 60 to 190 mg/ml. Crystals have also been grown at 4°C in the absence of any other added salts using isoionic lysozyme which was titrated to pH 4.6 with dilute sulfuric acid. Four different crystal forms have been obtained, depending upon the temperature, protein concentration, and precipitating salt employed. Crystals grown at 15°C were generally tetragonal, with space group P4 32 12. Crystallization at 20°C typically resulted in the formation of orthorhombic crystals, space group P2 12 12 1. The tetragonal ↔ orthorhombic transition appeared to be a function of both the temperature and protein concentration, occurring between 15 and 20°C and between 100 and 125 mg/ml protein concentration. Crystallization from 1.2 M magnesium sulfate at pH 7.8 gave a trigonal crystal, space group P3 12 1, a= b=87.4, c=73.7, γ=120°, which diffracted to 2.8 Å. Crystallization from ammonium sulfate at pH 4.6, generally at lower temperatures, was also found to result in a monoclinic form, space group C2, a=65.6, b=95.0, c=41.2, β=119.2°. A crystal of ˜0.2×0.2×0.5 mm grown from bulk solution diffracted to ˜3.5 Å.

  13. Dynamics of lysozyme and its hydration water under electric field

    SciTech Connect

    Favi, Pelagie M; Zhang, Qiu; O'Neill, Hugh Michael; Mamontov, Eugene; Omar Diallo, Souleymane; Palmer, Jeremy

    2014-01-01

    The effects of static electric field on the dynamics of lysozyme and its hydration water have been investigated by means of incoherent quasi-elastic neutron scattering (QENS). Measurements were performed on lysozyme samples, hydrated respectively with heavy water (D2O) to capture the protein dynamics, and with light water (H2O), to probe the dynamics of the hydration shell, in the temperature range from 210 < T < 260 K. The hydration fraction in both cases was about 0.38 gram of water per gram of dry protein. The field strengths investigated were respectively 0 kV/mm and 2 kV/mm ( 2 106 V/m) for the protein hydrated with D2O and 0 kV and 1 kV/mm for the H2O-hydrated counterpart. While the overall internal protons dynamics of the protein appears to be unaffected by the application of electric field up to 2 kV/mm, likely due to the stronger intra-molecular interactions, there is also no appreciable quantitative enhancement of the diffusive dynamics of the hydration water, as would be anticipated based on our recent observations in water confined in silica pores under field values of 2.5 kV/mm. This may be due to the difference in surface interactions between water and the two adsorption hosts (silica and protein), or to the existence of a critical threshold field value Ec 2 3 kV/mm for increased molecular diffusion, for which electrical breakdown is a limitation for our sample.

  14. Crystallization of Chicken Egg White Lysozyme from Assorted Sulfate Salts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Forsythe, Elizabeth L.; Snell, Edward H.; Malone, Christine C.; Pusey, Marc L.

    1999-01-01

    Chicken egg white lysozyme has been found to crystallize from ammonium, sodium, potassium, rubidium, magnesium, and manganese sulfates at acidic and basic pH, with protein concentrations from 60 to 190 mg/ml. Crystals have also been grown at 4 C in the absence of any other added salts using isoionic lysozyme which was titrated to pH 4.6 with dilute sulfuric acid. Four different crystal forms have been obtained, depending upon the temperature, protein concentration, and precipitating salt employed. Crystals grown at 15 C were generally tetragonal, with space group P4(sub 3)2(sub 1)2. Crystallization at 20 C typically resulted in the formation of orthorhombic crystals, space group P2(sub 1)2(sub 1)2(sub 1). The tetragonal reversible reaction orthorhombic transition appeared to be a function of both the temperature and protein concentration, occurring between 15 and 20 C and between 100 and 125 mg/ml protein concentration. Crystallization from 1.2 M magnesium sulfate at pH 7.8 gave a trigonal crystal, space group P3(sub 1)2(sub 1), a = b = 87.4, c = 73.7, gamma = 120 deg, which diffracted to 2.8 A. Crystallization from ammonium sulfate at pH 4.6, generally at lower temperatures, was also found to result in a monoclinic form. space group C2, a = 65.6, b = 95.0, c = 41.2, beta = 119.2 deg. A crystal of approximately 0.2 x 0.2 x 0.5 mm grown from bulk solution diffracted to approximately 3.5 A.

  15. Crystallization of Chicken Egg White Lysozyme from Sulfate Salts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Forsythe, Elizabeth; Pusey, Marc

    1998-01-01

    It has been "known" that chicken egg white lysozyme does not crystallize from sulfate, particularly ammonium sulfate, salts, but instead gives amorphous precipitates. This has been the basis of several studies using lysozyme comparing macromolecule crystal nucleation and amorphous precipitation. Recently Ries-Kautt et al (Acta Cryst D50, (1994) 366) have shown that purified isoionic CEWL could be crystallized from low concentrations of sulfate at basic pH, and we subsequently showed that in fact CEWL could be purified in both the tetragonal and orthorhombic forms using ammonium sulfate over the pH range 4.0 to 7.8 (Acta Cryst D53, (1997) 795). We have now extended these observations to include a range of common sulfate salts, specifically sodium, potassium, rubidium, magnesium, and manganese sulfates. In all cases but the manganese sulfates both the familiar tetragonal and orthorhombic forms were obtained, with unit cell dimensions close to those known for the "classic" sodium chloride crystallized forms. Manganese sulfate has only yielded orthorhombic crystals to date. All crystallizations were carried out using low (typically less than or equal to 6 M) salt and high (greater than approximately 90 mg/ml) protein concentrations. As with ammonium sulfate, the tetragonal - orthorhombic phase shift appears to be a function of both the temperature and the protein concentration, with higher temperatures and concentrations favoring the orthorhombic and lower the tetragonal form. The phase change range is somewhat reduced for the sulfate salts, depending upon conditions being typically between approximately 15 - 20 C. Both the magnesium and manganese sulfates gave crystals at salt concentrations over 0.6 M as well, with magnesium sulfate giving a very slowly nucleating and growing hexagonal form. A triclinic crystal form, characterized by aggressively small crystals (typically 0.1 mm in size) has been occasionally obtained from ammonium sulfate. Finally, preliminary spot

  16. A bacteriophage endolysin that eliminates intracellular streptococci

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Yang; Barros, Marilia; Vennemann, Tarek; Gallagher, D Travis; Yin, Yizhou; Linden, Sara B; Heselpoth, Ryan D; Spencer, Dennis J; Donovan, David M; Moult, John; Fischetti, Vincent A; Heinrich, Frank; Lösche, Mathias; Nelson, Daniel C

    2016-01-01

    PlyC, a bacteriophage-encoded endolysin, lyses Streptococcus pyogenes (Spy) on contact. Here, we demonstrate that PlyC is a potent agent for controlling intracellular Spy that often underlies refractory infections. We show that the PlyC holoenzyme, mediated by its PlyCB subunit, crosses epithelial cell membranes and clears intracellular Spy in a dose-dependent manner. Quantitative studies using model membranes establish that PlyCB interacts strongly with phosphatidylserine (PS), whereas its interaction with other lipids is weak, suggesting specificity for PS as its cellular receptor. Neutron reflection further substantiates that PlyC penetrates bilayers above a PS threshold concentration. Crystallography and docking studies identify key residues that mediate PlyCB–PS interactions, which are validated by site-directed mutagenesis. This is the first report that a native endolysin can traverse epithelial membranes, thus substantiating the potential of PlyC as an antimicrobial for Spy in the extracellular and intracellular milieu and as a scaffold for engineering other functionalities. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.13152.001 PMID:26978792

  17. Sampling submicron T1 bacteriophage aerosols.

    PubMed

    Harstad, J B

    1965-11-01

    Liquid impingers, filter papers, and fritted bubblers were partial viable collectors of radioactive submicron T1 bacteriophage aerosols at 30, 55, and 85% relative humidity. Sampler differences for viable collection were due to incomplete physical collection (slippage) and killing of phage by the samplers. Dynamic aerosols of a mass median diameter of 0.2 mu were produced with a Dautrebande generator from concentrated aqueous purified phage suspensions containing extracellular soluble radioactive phosphate as a physical tracer. There was considerable destruction of phage by the Dautrebande generator; phage titers of the Dautrebande suspension decreased exponentially, but there was a progressive (linear) increase in tracer titers. Liquid impingers recovered the most viable phage but allowed considerable (30 to 48%) slippage, which varies inversely with the aerosol relative humidity. Filter papers were virtually complete physical collectors of submicron particles but were the most destructive. Fritted bubbler slippage was more than 80%. With all samplers, phage kill was highest at 85% relative humidity and lowest at 55% relative humidity. An electrostatic precipitator was used to collect aerosol samples for particle sizing with an electron microscope. The particle size was slightly larger at 85% relative humidity than at 30 or 55% relative humidity. PMID:5866038

  18. Characteristics of bacteriophages for Micromonospora purpurea.

    PubMed

    Kikuchi, M; Perlman, D

    1978-07-01

    Chemical and physical stabilities of bacteriophages øUW 21 and øUW 51 infecting Micromonospora purpurea ATCC 15835 were examined. Both phages were stable over the pH range of 5 to 8 and to heating at temperatures up to 50 degrees C and especially stable in buffer containing magnesium ion. Exposure to 1 M Ca(NO3)2 inactivated both phages, and phage øUW 51 was also susceptible to 1 M CaCl2, 0.1 M tris(hydroxymethyl)aminomethane, and 0.3% H2O2. Phage plating efficiency was highest on the cultures at logarithmic phase and sometimes much influenced by host growth. Phage øUW 51 has a latent period of 2 h at 34 degrees C and a burst size between 35 and 40. The latent period for phage øUW 21 is about 12 h, and the burst size is smaller than 30. PMID:29557

  19. Marine transducing bacteriophage attacking a luminous bacterium.

    PubMed

    Keynan, A; Nealson, K; Sideropoulos, H; Hastings, J W

    1974-08-01

    The isolation and partial characterization of a marine bacteriophage attacking a strain of luminous bacteria is described, including some physical, biological, and genetic properties. It is a DNA phage of density of 1.52 with a long flexible tail and an apparently icosohedral head. With respect to stability in suspension, it has a rather specific requirement for the sodium ion in high concentration; it is further stabilized by the addition of calcium and magnesium ions. These same ions are likewise all required for both good plating efficiency and plaque uniformity. Although it goes through a typical lytic growth cycle (about 45 min), with a burst size of 100, and no stable lysogens have been isolated, it is nevertheless a transducing phage specifically for the tryptophan region, transducing several, but not all, independently isolated Trp(-) auxotrophs to protrophy. No other auxotrophs of a variety of amino acids were transduced by this phage to prototrophy. Phage infection does not change the normal expression of the luminescent system, and light remains at near normal levels until cell lysis occurs. PMID:16789143

  20. Genome of Bacteriophage P1†

    PubMed Central

    Łobocka, Małgorzata B.; Rose, Debra J.; Plunkett, Guy; Rusin, Marek; Samojedny, Arkadiusz; Lehnherr, Hansjörg; Yarmolinsky, Michael B.; Blattner, Frederick R.

    2004-01-01

    P1 is a bacteriophage of Escherichia coli and other enteric bacteria. It lysogenizes its hosts as a circular, low-copy-number plasmid. We have determined the complete nucleotide sequences of two strains of a P1 thermoinducible mutant, P1 c1-100. The P1 genome (93,601 bp) contains at least 117 genes, of which almost two-thirds had not been sequenced previously and 49 have no homologs in other organisms. Protein-coding genes occupy 92% of the genome and are organized in 45 operons, of which four are decisive for the choice between lysis and lysogeny. Four others ensure plasmid maintenance. The majority of the remaining 37 operons are involved in lytic development. Seventeen operons are transcribed from σ70 promoters directly controlled by the master phage repressor C1. Late operons are transcribed from promoters recognized by the E. coli RNA polymerase holoenzyme in the presence of the Lpa protein, the product of a C1-controlled P1 gene. Three species of P1-encoded tRNAs provide differential controls of translation, and a P1-encoded DNA methyltransferase with putative bifunctionality influences transcription, replication, and DNA packaging. The genome is particularly rich in Chi recombinogenic sites. The base content and distribution in P1 DNA indicate that replication of P1 from its plasmid origin had more impact on the base compositional asymmetries of the P1 genome than replication from the lytic origin of replication. PMID:15489417

  1. The DNA ejection process in bacteriophage lambda

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grayson, Paul

    Bacteriophages have long served as model systems through which the nature of life may be explored. From a physical or mechanical point of view, phages are excellent examples of natural nanotechnology: they are nanometer-scale systems which depend critically on forces, pressures, velocities, and other fundamentally physical quantities for their biological functions. The study of the physical properties of phages has therefore provided an arena for application of physics to biology. In particular, recent studies of the motor responsible for packaging a phage gnome into a capsid showed a buildup of pressure within the capsid of tens of atmospheres. This thesis reports a combined theoretical and experimental study on various aspects of the genome ejection process, so that a comparison may be drawn with the packaging experiments. In particular, we examine various theoretical models of the forces within a phage capsid, deriving formulas both for the force driving genome ejection and for the velocity at which the genome is translocated into a host cell. We describe an experiment in which the force was measured as a function of the amount of genome within the phage capsid, and another where the genome ejection velocity was measured for single phages under the microscope. We make direct quantitative comparisons between the theory and experiments, stringently testing the extent to which we are able to model the genome ejection process.

  2. A bacteriophage endolysin that eliminates intracellular streptococci.

    PubMed

    Shen, Yang; Barros, Marilia; Vennemann, Tarek; Gallagher, D Travis; Yin, Yizhou; Linden, Sara B; Heselpoth, Ryan D; Spencer, Dennis J; Donovan, David M; Moult, John; Fischetti, Vincent A; Heinrich, Frank; Lösche, Mathias; Nelson, Daniel C

    2016-01-01

    PlyC, a bacteriophage-encoded endolysin, lyses Streptococcus pyogenes (Spy) on contact. Here, we demonstrate that PlyC is a potent agent for controlling intracellular Spy that often underlies refractory infections. We show that the PlyC holoenzyme, mediated by its PlyCB subunit, crosses epithelial cell membranes and clears intracellular Spy in a dose-dependent manner. Quantitative studies using model membranes establish that PlyCB interacts strongly with phosphatidylserine (PS), whereas its interaction with other lipids is weak, suggesting specificity for PS as its cellular receptor. Neutron reflection further substantiates that PlyC penetrates bilayers above a PS threshold concentration. Crystallography and docking studies identify key residues that mediate PlyCB-PS interactions, which are validated by site-directed mutagenesis. This is the first report that a native endolysin can traverse epithelial membranes, thus substantiating the potential of PlyC as an antimicrobial for Spy in the extracellular and intracellular milieu and as a scaffold for engineering other functionalities. PMID:26978792

  3. Lipopolysaccharide-specific bacteriophage for Klebsiella pneumoniae C3.

    PubMed Central

    Tomás, J M; Jofre, J T

    1985-01-01

    Bacteriophage FC3-1 is one of several specific bacteriophages of Klebsiella pneumoniae C3 isolated in our laboratory. Unlike receptors for other Klebsiella phages, the bacteriophage FC3-1 receptor was shown to be lipopolysaccharide, specifically the polysaccharide fraction (O-antigen and core region). We concluded that capsular polysaccharide, outer membrane proteins, and lipid A were not involved in phage binding. Mutants resistant to this phage were isolated and were found to be devoid of lipopolysaccharide O-antigen by several criteria but to contain capsular material serologically identical to that of the wild type. The polysaccharide fraction was concluded to be the primary phage receptor, indicating that it is available to the phage. Images PMID:3888963

  4. Effects of sunlight on bacteriophage viability and structure.

    PubMed Central

    Wommack, K E; Hill, R T; Muller, T A; Colwell, R R

    1996-01-01

    Current estimates of viral abundance in natural waters rely on direct counts of virus-like particles (VLPs), using either transmission or epifluorescence microscopy. Direct counts of VLPs, while useful in studies of viral ecology, do not indicate whether the observed VLPs are capable of infection and/or replication. Rapid decay in bacteriophage viability under environmental conditions has been observed. However, it has not been firmly established whether there is a corresponding degradation of the virus particles. To address this question, viable and direct counts were carried out employing two Chesapeake Bay bacteriophages in experimental microcosms incubated for 56 h at two depths in the York River estuary. Viruses incubated in situ in microcosms at the surface yielded decay rates in full sunlight of 0.11 and 0.06 h-1 for CB 38 phi and CB 7 phi, respectively. The number of infective particles in microcosms in the dark and at a depth of 1 m was not significantly different from laboratory controls, with decay rates averaging 0.052 h-1 for CB 38 phi and 0.037 h-1 for CB 7 phi. Direct counts of bacteriophages decreased in teh estuarine microcosms, albeit only at a rate of 0.028 h-1, and were independent of treatment. Destruction of virus particles is concluded to be a process separate from loss of infectivity. It is also concluded that strong sunlight affects the viability of bacteriophages in surface waters, with the result that direct counts of VLPs overestimate the number of bacteriophage capable of both infection and replication. However, in deeper waters, where solar radiation is not a significant factor, direct counts should more accurately estimate numbers of viable bacteriophage. PMID:8919794

  5. Bacteriophages as potential treatment option for antibiotic resistant bacteria.

    PubMed

    Bragg, Robert; van der Westhuizen, Wouter; Lee, Ji-Yun; Coetsee, Elke; Boucher, Charlotte

    2014-01-01

    The world is facing an ever-increasing problem with antibiotic resistant bacteria and we are rapidly heading for a post-antibiotic era. There is an urgent need to investigate alterative treatment options while there are still a few antibiotics left. Bacteriophages are viruses that specifically target bacteria. Before the development of antibiotics, some efforts were made to use bacteriophages as a treatment option, but most of this research stopped soon after the discovery of antibiotics. There are two different replication options which bacteriophages employ. These are the lytic and lysogenic life cycles. Both these life cycles have potential as treatment options. There are various advantages and disadvantages to the use of bacteriophages as treatment options. The main advantage is the specificity of bacteriophages and treatments can be designed to specifically target pathogenic bacteria while not negatively affecting the normal microbiota. There are various advantages to this. However, the high level of specificity also creates potential problems, the main being the requirement of highly specific diagnostic procedures. Another potential problem with phage therapy includes the development of immunity and limitations with the registration of phage therapy options. The latter is driving research toward the expression of phage genes which break the bacterial cell wall, which could then be used as a treatment option. Various aspects of phage therapy have been investigated in studies undertaken by our research group. We have investigated specificity of phages to various avian pathogenic E. coli isolates. Furthermore, the exciting NanoSAM technology has been employed to investigate bacteriophage replication and aspects of this will be discussed. PMID:24619620

  6. Investigation of the interactions of lysozyme and trypsin with biphenol A using spectroscopic methods.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yan-Qing; Chen, Ting-Ting; Zhang, Hong-Mei

    2010-03-01

    The interaction between bisphenol A (BPA) and lysozyme (or trypsin) was investigated by UV-vis absorption, fluorescence, synchronous fluorescence, and three-dimensional fluorescence spectra techniques under physiological pH 7.40. BPA effectively quenched the intrinsic fluorescence of lysozyme and trypsin via static quenching. H-bonds and van der Waals interactions played a major role in stabilizing the BPA-proteinase complex. The distance r between donor and acceptor was obtained to be 1.65 and 2.26 nm for BPA-lysozyme and BPA-trypsin complexes, respectively. The effect of BPA on the conformation of lysozyme and trypsin was analyzed using synchronous fluorescence and three-dimensional fluorescence spectra. PMID:20093070

  7. Investigation of the interactions of lysozyme and trypsin with biphenol A using spectroscopic methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yan-Qing; Chen, Ting-Ting; Zhang, Hong-Mei

    2010-03-01

    The interaction between bisphenol A (BPA) and lysozyme (or trypsin) was investigated by UV-vis absorption, fluorescence, synchronous fluorescence, and three-dimensional fluorescence spectra techniques under physiological pH 7.40. BPA effectively quenched the intrinsic fluorescence of lysozyme and trypsin via static quenching. H-bonds and van der Waals interactions played a major role in stabilizing the BPA-proteinase complex. The distance r between donor and acceptor was obtained to be 1.65 and 2.26 nm for BPA-lysozyme and BPA-trypsin complexes, respectively. The effect of BPA on the conformation of lysozyme and trypsin was analyzed using synchronous fluorescence and three-dimensional fluorescence spectra.

  8. Adsorption and desorption studies of lysozyme by Fe3O4-polymer nanocomposite via fluorescence spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koc, Kenan; Alveroglu, Esra

    2015-06-01

    The work have been undertaken in this study is to synthesis and characterize Fe3O4-polymer nanocomposites which are having different morphological properties. Also, investigation of the adsorption and desorption behaviour of lysozyme onto Fe3O4-polymer nanocomposites have been studied. Fe3O4 nanoparticles, synthesized by in situ in polyacrylamide hydrogels, show super-paramagnetic behaviour and saturation magnetization of composite material have been tuned by changing the hydrogel conformation. Adsorption and desorption studies of lysozyme were followed by using pure water at room temperature via fluorescence measurements. Fluorescence measurements showed that, the composite materials adsorbed lysozyme molecules less than 20 s and higher monomer concentration of composite materials cause faster adsorption. Besides, structure of lysozyme molecules were not changed during the adsorption and desorption. As a result Fe3O4-polymer nanocomposites could be used for drug delivery, protein separation and PAAm gels could be used for synthesis of magnetic composites with varying magnetic properties.

  9. Small angle neutron scattering study on the structural variation of lysozyme in bioprotectants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koda, Shota; Takayama, Haruki; Shibata, Tomohiko; Mori, Tatsuya; Kojima, Seiji; Park, In-Sung; Shin, Tae-Gyu

    2015-05-01

    The thermal denaturation and subsequent structural variation of lysozyme in various bioprotectant candidate solutions such as trehalose and choline acetate have been investigated by using small angle neutron scattering and differential scanning calorimetry. The gyration radius shows little change with the addition of additives in a native state at room temperature. On heating the lysozyme solution, a remarkable increase in the gyration radius is observed at temperatures above the denaturation temperature without any bioprotectants. Such an increase is suppressed by the additives owing to the intermolecular interactions between the lysozyme molecules and the bioprotectants of trehalose and choline acetate. The fractal dimension of lysozyme varies slightly with the addition of the bioprotectant solutions, and shows a remarkable drop in the vicinity of the denaturation temperature for all the solutions.

  10. Stability of lysozyme in aqueous extremolyte solutions during heat shock and accelerated thermal conditions.

    PubMed

    Avanti, Christina; Saluja, Vinay; van Streun, Erwin L P; Frijlink, Henderik W; Hinrichs, Wouter L J

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the stability of lysozyme in aqueous solutions in the presence of various extremolytes (betaine, hydroxyectoine, trehalose, ectoine, and firoin) under different stress conditions. The stability of lysozyme was determined by Nile red Fluorescence Spectroscopy and a bioactivity assay. During heat shock (10 min at 70°C), betaine, trehalose, ectoin and firoin protected lysozyme against inactivation while hydroxyectoine, did not have a significant effect. During accelerated thermal conditions (4 weeks at 55°C), firoin also acted as a stabilizer. In contrast, betaine, hydroxyectoine, trehalose and ectoine destabilized lysozyme under this condition. These findings surprisingly indicate that some extremolytes can stabilize a protein under certain stress conditions but destabilize the same protein under other stress conditions. Therefore it is suggested that for the screening extremolytes to be used for protein stabilization, an appropriate storage conditions should also be taken into account. PMID:24465983

  11. Lysozyme levels in rabbit lung after inhalation of nickel, cadmium, cobalt, and copper chlorides

    SciTech Connect

    Lundborg, M.; Camner, P.

    1984-08-01

    Groups of rabbits were exposed to chlorides of nickel, cadmium, copper, and cobalt at concentrations ranging from 0.2 to 0.6 mg/m/sup 3/ (as metal) for 4 to 6 weeks (5 days/weeks, 6 hr/day). Activity of lysozyme (muramidase) in lavage fluid, in alveolar macrophages, and in culture medium from macrophages incubated at 37/sup 0/C for 1 and 20 hr was estimated using the lyso-plate technique, agar plates with heat-killed Micrococcus lysodeikticus. In the nickel-exposed rabbits lysozyme activity in the mucous membrane from the left main bronchus was also estimated. Following nickel exposure the lysozyme level was significantly decreased in lavage fluid, macrophages, and in culture medium from incubated macrophages but remained unchanged in the mucous membrane. After exposure to cadmium, copper, and cobalt, lysozyme levels increased or were unchanged.

  12. Unfolding mechanism of lysozyme in various urea solutions: Insights from fluorescence spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Bang; Zhang, Hongjia; Xi, Wenying; Zhao, Liqing; Liang, Li; Chen, Yantao

    2014-11-01

    Fluorescence spectroscopic technique is very popular in exploring the folding/unfolding process of proteins. In this paper, unfolding process of hen egg-white lysozyme was investigated in various denaturing solutions. Firstly, polymer solution theory was employed to comprehend the dependence of fluorescence quenching effect on protein concentration, and dynamic contact concentration was suggested as a critical value for related fluorescence experiment. Secondly, it was found that urea alone could not completely unfold lysozyme but did when together with DTT or HCl. Lysozyme was destabilized in concentrated urea solution, but still could maintain its spatial structure. Phase diagram of fluorescence intensities revealed that HCl could enhance the denaturing capacity of urea, resulting in the emergence of intermediate state in the thermodynamic unfolding process of lysozyme.

  13. Potential of mean force for human lysozyme camelid vhh hl6 antibody interaction studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yeng-Tseng; Liao, Jun-Min; Chen, Cheng-Lung; Su, Zhi-Yuan; Chen, Chang-Hung; Hu, Jeu-Jiun

    2008-04-01

    Calculating antigen-antibody interaction energies is crucial for understanding antigen-antibody associations in immunology. To shed further light into this equation, we study a separation of human lysozyme-camelid vhh hl6 antibody (cAb-HuL6) complex. The c-terminal end-to-end stretching of the lysozyme-antibody complex structures have been studied using potential of mean force (PMF) calculations based on molecular dynamics (MD) and explicit water model. For the lysozyme-antibody complex, there are six important intermediates in the c-terminal extensions process. Inclusion of our simulations may help to understand the binding mechanics of lysozyme-cAb-HuL6 antibody complex.

  14. Preparation and evaluation of lysozyme-loaded nanoparticles coated with poly-γ-glutamic acid and chitosan.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yong; Sun, Yan; Xu, Yaoxing; Feng, Hai; Fu, Sida; Tang, Jiangwu; Liu, Wei; Sun, Dongchang; Jiang, Hua; Xu, Shaochun

    2013-08-01

    To improve the application of lysozymes, methods for coating lysozymes with poly-γ-glutamic acid and chitosan were studied. Several lysozyme-loaded chitosan/poly-γ-glutamic acid composite nanosystems for loading and controlling the release of lysozymes were established. The lysozyme loading content and efficiency of the different systems were examined. The antibacterial activity of the composite nanoparticles was also investigated. Results showed that when the lysozymes were coated with poly-γ-glutamic acid and further rewrapped with chitosan, smooth spherical composite nanoparticles were obtained; the loading efficiency and loading content reached 76% and 40%, respectively. The lysozyme release in vitro was slow and presented a two-stage programmed release. Antibacterial testing in vitro indicated that lysozyme-loaded nanoparticles coated with poly-γ-glutamic acid/chitosan had outstanding antibacterial activity. An obvious assembly of bacterial cells and composite nanoparticles was observed during co-incubation. Therefore, the poly-γ-glutamic acid/chitosan composite coating broadened the antibacterial spectrum of the composite lysozyme nanoreagent, and presented satisfactory antibacterial effect. The lysozyme-loaded chitosan/poly-γ-glutamic acid nanocoating system established in this research could provide reference for coating and controlled releasing of alkaline proteins. PMID:23628585

  15. Listeria monocytogenes Is Resistant to Lysozyme through the Regulation, Not the Acquisition, of Cell Wall-Modifying Enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Burke, Thomas P.; Loukitcheva, Anastasia; Zemansky, Jason; Wheeler, Richard; Boneca, Ivo G.

    2014-01-01

    Listeria monocytogenes is a Gram-positive facultative intracellular pathogen that is highly resistant to lysozyme, a ubiquitous enzyme of the innate immune system that degrades cell wall peptidoglycan. Two peptidoglycan-modifying enzymes, PgdA and OatA, confer lysozyme resistance on L. monocytogenes; however, these enzymes are also conserved among lysozyme-sensitive nonpathogens. We sought to identify additional factors responsible for lysozyme resistance in L. monocytogenes. A forward genetic screen for lysozyme-sensitive mutants led to the identification of 174 transposon insertion mutations that mapped to 13 individual genes. Four mutants were killed exclusively by lysozyme and not other cell wall-targeting molecules, including the peptidoglycan deacetylase encoded by pgdA, the putative carboxypeptidase encoded by pbpX, the orphan response regulator encoded by degU, and the highly abundant noncoding RNA encoded by rli31. Both degU and rli31 mutants had reduced expression of pbpX and pgdA, yet DegU and Rli31 did not regulate each other. Since pbpX and pgdA are also present in lysozyme-sensitive bacteria, this suggested that the acquisition of novel enzymes was not responsible for lysozyme resistance, but rather, the regulation of conserved enzymes by DegU and Rli31 conferred high lysozyme resistance. Each lysozyme-sensitive mutant exhibited attenuated virulence in mice, and a time course of infection revealed that the most lysozyme-sensitive strain was killed within 30 min of intravenous infection, a phenotype that was recapitulated in purified blood. Collectively, these data indicate that the genes required for lysozyme resistance are highly upregulated determinants of L. monocytogenes pathogenesis that are required for avoiding the enzymatic activity of lysozyme in the blood. PMID:25157076

  16. Complete genome sequence of Croceibacter bacteriophage P2559S.

    PubMed

    Kang, Ilnam; Kang, Dongmin; Cho, Jang-Cheon

    2012-08-01

    Croceibacter atlanticus HTCC2559(T), a marine bacterium isolated from the Sargasso Sea, is a phylogenetically unique member of the family Flavobacteriaceae. Strain HTCC2559(T) possesses genes related to interaction with primary producers, which makes studies on bacteriophages infecting the strain interesting. Here we report the genome sequence of bacteriophage P2559S, which was isolated off the coast of the Republic of Korea and lytically infects HTCC2559(T). Many genes predicted in the P2559S genome had their homologs in Bacteroides phages. PMID:22843867

  17. Engineered enzymatically active bacteriophages and methods of uses thereof

    DOEpatents

    Collins, James J; Kobayashi, Hideki; Kearn, Mads; Araki, Michihiro; Friedland, Ari; Lu, Timothy Kuan-Ta

    2012-05-22

    The present invention provides engineered bacteriophages that express at least one biofilm degrading enzyme on their surface and uses thereof for degrading bacterial biofilms. The invention also provides genetically engineered bacteriophages expressing the biofilm degrading enzymes and proteins necessary for the phage to replicate in different naturally occurring biofilm producing bacteria. The phages of the invention allow a method of biofilm degradation by the use of one or only a few administration of the phage because the system using these phages is self perpetuating, and capable of degrading biofilm even when the concentration of bacteria within the biofilm is low.

  18. Bacteriophages of Soft Rot Enterobacteriaceae-a minireview.

    PubMed

    Czajkowski, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Soft rot Enterobacteriaceae (Pectobacterium spp. and Dickeya spp., formerly pectinolytic Erwinia spp.) are ubiquitous necrotrophic bacterial pathogens that infect a large number of different plant species worldwide, including economically important crops. Despite the fact that these bacteria have been studied for more than 50 years, little is known of their corresponding predators: bacteriophages, both lytic and lysogenic. The aim of this minireview is to critically summarize recent ecological, biological and molecular research on bacteriophages infecting Pectobacterium spp. and Dickeya spp. with the main focus on current and future perspectives in that field. PMID:26626879

  19. Existence of lysogenic bacteriophages in Bacillus thuringiensis type strains.

    PubMed

    Roh, Jong Yul; Park, Jong Bin; Liu, Qin; Kim, Song Eun; Tao, Xueying; Choi, Tae Woong; Choi, Jae Young; Kim, Woo Jin; Jin, Byung Rae; Je, Yeon Ho

    2013-07-01

    We screened the existence of bacteriophages in 67 Bacillus thuringiensis type strains by phage DNA extraction and PCR using phage terminase small subunit (TerS)-specific primers to the supernatants and the precipitated pellets of Bt cultures, and by transmission electron microscopy. The various bacteriophages were observed from the supernatants of 22 type strains. Ten type strains showed the extracted phage DNAs and the amplified fragment by TerS PCR but 12 type strains showed only the phage DNAs. Their morphological characteristic suggests that they belong to Family Siphoviridae which had a long tail and symmetrical head. PMID:23632013

  20. Genetically engineered acidophilic heterotrophic bacteria by bacteriophage transduction

    SciTech Connect

    Ward, T.E.; Bruhn, D.F.; Bulmer, D.F.

    1989-05-10

    A bacteriophage capable of infecting acidophilic heterotrophic bacteria and processes for genetically engineering acidophilic bacteria for biomining or sulfur removal from coal are disclosed. The bacteriophage is capable of growth in cells existing at pH at or below 3.0. Lytic forms of the phage introduced into areas experiencing acid drainage kill the bacteria causing such drainage. Lysogenic forms of the phage having genes for selective removal of metallic or nonmetallic elements can be introduced into acidophilic bacteria to effect removal of the desired element from ore or coal. 1 fig., 1 tab.