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Sample records for bacterium magnetospirillum magnetotacticum

  1. Adverse effects of microgravity on the magnetotactic bacterium Magnetospirillum magnetotacticum.

    PubMed

    Urban, J E

    2000-11-01

    Bacteria that contain magnetosomes display magnetotaxis and align themselves to the earth's magnetic field. When magnetotactic bacteria were first isolated several decades ago it was presumed that geomagnetic orientation allowed magnetotactic bacteria to orient themselves downward towards sediments where the habitat is favorable to their growth and metabolism. As more species of magnetotactic bacteria have been isolated and studied, differences in magnetotactic responses have been observed which suggested that the primary role of magnetosomes might simply be to enhance a microorganism's response to gravity. To resolve if gravity influences magnetotactic behavior in bacteria, Magnetospirillum magnetotacticum was used to examine magnetotaxis in the absence of gravity. Experiments to compare the orientation of bacteria to north- or south-pole magnets were conducted in normal gravity and in the microgravity environments aboard the Space Shuttle and Space Station MIR. In each of the microgravity situations studied, bacteria were impaired in their ability to orient to magnets and the failure to exhibit magnetotaxis appeared to be a function of the loss of magnetosomes. The disappearance of aggregated magnetosomes seemed to correlate with a general loss of cellular integrity in microgravity. PMID:11543576

  2. Effect of Polyethylene Glycol on the Formation of Magnetic Nanoparticles Synthesized by Magnetospirillum magnetotacticum MS-1.

    PubMed

    Shimoshige, Hirokazu; Kobayashi, Hideki; Mizuki, Toru; Nagaoka, Yutaka; Inoue, Akira; Maekawa, Toru

    2015-01-01

    Magnetotactic bacteria (MTB) synthesize intracellular magnetic nanocrystals called magnetosomes, which are composed of either magnetite (Fe3O4) or greigite (Fe3S4) and covered with lipid membranes. The production of magnetosomes is achieved by the biomineralization process with strict control over the formation of magnetosome membrane vesicles, uptake and transport of iron ions, and synthesis of mature crystals. These magnetosomes have high potential for both biotechnological and nanotechnological applications, but it is still extremely difficult to grow MTB and produce a large amount of magnetosomes under the conventional cultural conditions. Here, we investigate as a first attempt the effect of polyethylene glycol (PEG) added to the culture medium on the increase in the yield of magnetosomes formed in Magnetospirillum magnetotacticum MS-1. We find that the yield of the formation of magnetosomes can be increased up to approximately 130 % by adding PEG200 to the culture medium. We also measure the magnetization of the magnetosomes and find that the magnetosomes possess soft ferromagnetic characteristics and the saturation mass magnetization is increased by 7 %. PMID:25993286

  3. Effect of Polyethylene Glycol on the Formation of Magnetic Nanoparticles Synthesized by Magnetospirillum magnetotacticum MS-1

    PubMed Central

    Shimoshige, Hirokazu; Kobayashi, Hideki; Mizuki, Toru; Nagaoka, Yutaka; Inoue, Akira; Maekawa, Toru

    2015-01-01

    Magnetotactic bacteria (MTB) synthesize intracellular magnetic nanocrystals called magnetosomes, which are composed of either magnetite (Fe3O4) or greigite (Fe3S4) and covered with lipid membranes. The production of magnetosomes is achieved by the biomineralization process with strict control over the formation of magnetosome membrane vesicles, uptake and transport of iron ions, and synthesis of mature crystals. These magnetosomes have high potential for both biotechnological and nanotechnological applications, but it is still extremely difficult to grow MTB and produce a large amount of magnetosomes under the conventional cultural conditions. Here, we investigate as a first attempt the effect of polyethylene glycol (PEG) added to the culture medium on the increase in the yield of magnetosomes formed in Magnetospirillum magnetotacticum MS-1. We find that the yield of the formation of magnetosomes can be increased up to approximately 130 % by adding PEG200 to the culture medium. We also measure the magnetization of the magnetosomes and find that the magnetosomes possess soft ferromagnetic characteristics and the saturation mass magnetization is increased by 7 %. PMID:25993286

  4. Magnetic guidance of the magnetotactic bacterium Magnetospirillum gryphiswaldense.

    PubMed

    Loehr, Johannes; Pfeiffer, Daniel; Schüler, Dirk; Fischer, Thomas M

    2016-04-21

    Magnetospirillum gryphiswaldense is a magnetotactic bacterium with a permanent magnetic moment capable of swimming using two bipolarly located flagella. In their natural environment these bacteria swim along the field lines of the homogeneous geomagnetic field in a typical run and reversal pattern and thereby create non-differentiable trajectories with sharp edges. In the current work we nevertheless achieve stable guidance along curved lines of mechanical instability by using a heterogeneous magnetic field of a garnet film. The successful guidance of the bacteria depends on the right balance between motility and the magnetic moment of the magnetosome chain. PMID:26972517

  5. Magnetospirillum caucaseum sp. nov., Magnetospirillum marisnigri sp. nov. and Magnetospirillum moscoviense sp. nov., freshwater magnetotactic bacteria isolated from three distinct geographical locations in European Russia.

    PubMed

    Dziuba, Marina; Koziaeva, Veronika; Grouzdev, Denis; Burganskaya, Ekaterina; Baslerov, Roman; Kolganova, Tatjana; Chernyadyev, Alexander; Osipov, Georgy; Andrianova, Ekaterina; Gorlenko, Vladimir; Kuznetsov, Boris

    2016-05-01

    Three strains of helical, magnetotactic bacteria, SO-1T, SP-1T and BB-1T, were isolated from freshwater sediments collected from three distinct locations in European Russia. Phylogenetic analysis showed that the strains belong to the genus Magnetospirillum. Strains SO-1T and SP-1T showed the highest 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity to Magnetospirillum magnetotacticum MS-1T (99.3 and 98.1 %, respectively), and strain BB-1T with Magnetospirillum gryphiswaldense MSR-1T (97.3 %). The tree based on concatenated deduced amino acid sequences of the MamA, B, K, M, O, P, Q and T proteins, which are involved in magnetosome formation, was congruent with the tree based on 16S rRNA gene sequences. The genomic DNA G+C contents of strains SO-1T, SP-1T and BB-1T were 65.9, 63.0 and 65.2 mol%, respectively. As major fatty acids, C18 : 1ω9, C16 : 1ω7c, C16 : 0 and C18 : 0 were detected. DNA-DNA hybridization values between the novel strains and their closest relatives in the genus Magnetospirillum were less than 51.7 ± 2.3 %. In contrast to M. magnetotacticum MS-1T, the strains could utilize butyrate and propionate; strains SO-1T and BB-1T could also utilize glycerol. Strain SP-1T showed strictly microaerophilic growth, whereas strains SO-1T and BB-1T were more tolerant of oxygen. The results of DNA-DNA hybridization and physiological tests allowed genotypic and phenotypic differentiation of the strains from each other as well as from the two species of Magnetospirillum with validly published names. Therefore, the strains represent novel species, for which we propose the names Magnetospirillum caucaseum sp. nov. (type strain SO-1T = DSM 28995T = VKM B-2936T), Magnetospirillum marisnigri sp. nov. (type strain SP-1T = DSM 29006T = VKM B-2938T) and Magnetospirillum moscoviense sp. nov. (type strain BB-1T = DSM 29455T = VKM B-2939T). PMID:26921147

  6. Studying the Transfer of Optical Orbital Angular Momentum to a Helical Bacterium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, Dana; Horton, Timothy; Reichman, Steven; Link, Justin; Schmitzer, Heidrun; Robbins, Jennifer; Engle, Dorothy

    2014-03-01

    The purpose of this research is to study how the angular momentum of an optical vortex created by a 1064 nm laser is transferred to a helical shaped bacterium. When under the influence of a laser in optical tweezers, the helical shape of the bacteria causes it to spin in the trap. A spatial light modulator reshapes the beam and is twisted either into a left handed or right handed helix. This results in an optical vortex with a diameter which can be adjusted from roughly half a micron to three microns. The rotational speed of a helical bacterium in this type of optical trap should depend on the handedness of the vortex and the handedness of the bacterium being tweezed. When both the tweezing beam and the bacterium have the same handedness, a slight reduction in rotational speed should be observed; when the tweezing beam has the opposite handedness of the bacterium, a slight increase in rotational speed should be expected. We present our first experiments with magnetospirillum magnetotacticum and rhodospirillum rubrum.

  7. Magnetospirillum bellicus sp. nov., a Novel Dissimilatory Perchlorate-Reducing Alphaproteobacterium Isolated from a Bioelectrical Reactor ▿

    PubMed Central

    Thrash, J. Cameron; Ahmadi, Sarir; Torok, Tamas; Coates, John D.

    2010-01-01

    Previously isolated dissimilatory perchlorate-reducing bacteria (DPRB) have been primarily affiliated with the Betaproteobacteria. Enrichments from the cathodic chamber of a bioelectrical reactor (BER) inoculated from creek water in Berkeley, CA, yielded a novel organism most closely related to a previously described strain, WD (99% 16S rRNA gene identity). Strain VDYT has 96% 16S rRNA gene identity to both Magnetospirillum gryphiswaldense and Magnetospirillum magnetotacticum, and along with strain WD, distinguishes a clade of perchlorate-reducing Magnetospirillum species in the Alphaproteobacteria. In spite of the phylogenetic location of VDYT, attempted PCR for the key magnetosome formation genes mamI and mamL was negative. Strain VDYT was motile, non-spore forming, and, in addition to perchlorate, could use oxygen, chlorate, nitrate, nitrite, and nitrous oxide as alternative electron acceptors with acetate as the electron donor. Transient chlorate accumulation occurred during respiration of perchlorate. The organism made use of fermentation end products, such as acetate and ethanol, as carbon sources and electron donors for heterotrophic growth, and in addition, strain VDYT could grow chemolithotrophically with hydrogen serving as the electron donor. VDYT contains a copy of the RuBisCo cbbM gene, which was expressed under autotrophic but not heterotrophic conditions. DNA-DNA hybridization with strain WD confirmed VDYT as a separate species (46.2% identity), and the name Magnetospirillum bellicus sp. nov. (DSM 21662, ATCC BAA-1730) is proposed. PMID:20495050

  8. Magnetospirillum bellicus sp. nov., a novel dissimilatory perchlorate-reducing alphaproteobacterium isolated from a bioelectrical reactor.

    PubMed

    Thrash, J Cameron; Ahmadi, Sarir; Torok, Tamas; Coates, John D

    2010-07-01

    Previously isolated dissimilatory perchlorate-reducing bacteria (DPRB) have been primarily affiliated with the Betaproteobacteria. Enrichments from the cathodic chamber of a bioelectrical reactor (BER) inoculated from creek water in Berkeley, CA, yielded a novel organism most closely related to a previously described strain, WD (99% 16S rRNA gene identity). Strain VDY(T) has 96% 16S rRNA gene identity to both Magnetospirillum gryphiswaldense and Magnetospirillum magnetotacticum, and along with strain WD, distinguishes a clade of perchlorate-reducing Magnetospirillum species in the Alphaproteobacteria. In spite of the phylogenetic location of VDY(T), attempted PCR for the key magnetosome formation genes mamI and mamL was negative. Strain VDY(T) was motile, non-spore forming, and, in addition to perchlorate, could use oxygen, chlorate, nitrate, nitrite, and nitrous oxide as alternative electron acceptors with acetate as the electron donor. Transient chlorate accumulation occurred during respiration of perchlorate. The organism made use of fermentation end products, such as acetate and ethanol, as carbon sources and electron donors for heterotrophic growth, and in addition, strain VDY(T) could grow chemolithotrophically with hydrogen serving as the electron donor. VDY(T) contains a copy of the RuBisCo cbbM gene, which was expressed under autotrophic but not heterotrophic conditions. DNA-DNA hybridization with strain WD confirmed VDY(T) as a separate species (46.2% identity), and the name Magnetospirillum bellicus sp. nov. (DSM 21662, ATCC BAA-1730) is proposed. PMID:20495050

  9. Photoemission electron microscopy and scanning electron microscopy of Magnetospirillum magnetotacticum’s magnetosome chains

    SciTech Connect

    Keutner, Christoph; von Bohlen, Alex; Berges, Ulf; Espeter, Philipp; Schneider, Claus M.; Westphal, Carsten

    2014-10-07

    Magnetotactic bacteria are of great interdisciplinary interest, since a vast field of applications from magnetic recording media to medical nanorobots is conceivable. A key feature for a further understanding is the detailed knowledge about the magnetosome chain within the bacteria. We report on two preparation procedures suitable for UHV experiments in reflective geometry. Further, we present the results of scanning electron microscopy, as well as the first photoemission electron microscopy experiments, both accessing the magnetosomes within intact magnetotactic bacteria and compare these to scanning electron microscopy data from the literature. From the images, we can clearly identify individual magnetosomes within their chains.

  10. Identification of Promoters for Efficient Gene Expression in Magnetospirillum gryphiswaldense▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Lang, Claus; Pollithy, Anna; Schüler, Dirk

    2009-01-01

    To develop an expression system for the magnetotactic bacterium Magnetospirillum gryphiswaldense, we compared gene expression from the widely used Escherichia coli Plac promoter with that from known and predicted genuine M. gryphiswaldense promoters. With the use of green fluorescent protein as a reporter, the highest expression level was observed with the magnetosomal PmamDC promoter. We demonstrate that this promoter can be used for the expression of modified magnetosome proteins to generate “antibody-binding” magnetosomes. PMID:19395573

  11. Draft Genome Sequences of Two Magnetotactic Bacteria, Magnetospirillum moscoviense BB-1 and Magnetospirillum marisnigri SP-1.

    PubMed

    Koziaeva, Veronika V; Dziuba, Marina V; Ivanov, Timophey M; Kuznetsov, Boris B; Skryabin, Konstantin G; Grouzdev, Denis S

    2016-01-01

    We report here the draft genome sequences of two recently isolated magnetotactic species, Magnetospirillum moscoviense BB-1 and Magnetospirillum marisnigri SP-1. The genome of M. moscoviense BB-1 has 4,164,497 bp, 65.2% G+C content, and comprises 207 contigs. The genome of M. marisnigri SP-1 consists of 131 contigs and has a length of 4,619,819 bp and 64.7% G+C content. PMID:27516508

  12. Draft Genome Sequences of Two Magnetotactic Bacteria, Magnetospirillum moscoviense BB-1 and Magnetospirillum marisnigri SP-1

    PubMed Central

    Koziaeva, Veronika V.; Dziuba, Marina V.; Ivanov, Timophey M.; Kuznetsov, Boris B.; Skryabin, Konstantin G.

    2016-01-01

    We report here the draft genome sequences of two recently isolated magnetotactic species, Magnetospirillum moscoviense BB-1 and Magnetospirillum marisnigri SP-1. The genome of M. moscoviense BB-1 has 4,164,497 bp, 65.2% G+C content, and comprises 207 contigs. The genome of M. marisnigri SP-1 consists of 131 contigs and has a length of 4,619,819 bp and 64.7% G+C content. PMID:27516508

  13. The homopentameric chlorite dismutase from Magnetospirillum sp.

    PubMed

    Freire, Diana M; Rivas, Maria G; Dias, André M; Lopes, Ana T; Costa, Cristina; Santos-Silva, Teresa; Van Doorslaer, Sabine; González, Pablo J

    2015-10-01

    Chlorite dismutase (Cld) is a b-type heme containing enzyme that catalyzes the reduction of chlorite into chloride plus dioxygen. This enzyme has gained attention because it can be used in the development of bioremediation processes, biosensors, and controlled dioxygen production. In the present work, Cld was purified from Magnetospirillum sp. cells cultured anaerobically with acetate/perchlorate until stationary phase. Biochemical, spectroscopic and X-ray crystallography methods showed that Cld from Magnetospirillum sp. is a ~140 kDa homopentamer comprising ~27.8 kDa monomers. Preliminary X-ray crystallography studies confirmed the quaternary structure and the presence of one b-type heme per monomer. The EPR spectroscopic signature of the as-purified Cld samples is affected by the buffer composition used during the purification. Potassium phosphate buffer is the only buffer that affected neither the spectral nor the kinetic properties of Cld. Kinetic studies in solution revealed that Cld from Magnetospirillum sp. decomposes chlorite at high turnover rates with optimal pH6.0. A temperature below 10 °C is required to avoid enzyme inactivation due to cofactor bleaching during turnover, and to achieve full substrate consumption. Cld kinetic parameters were not affected when kinetic assays were performed in the presence of air or under argon atmosphere, but chloride is a weak mixed inhibitor that modifies the EPR signal of as-prepared samples. PMID:26218477

  14. Alteration of the Magnetic Properties of Aquaspirillum magnetotacticum by a Pulse Magnetization Technique †

    PubMed Central

    Ricci, Juan C. Diaz; Woodford, Barbara J.; Kirschvink, Joseph L.; Hoffmann, Michael R.

    1991-01-01

    The presence of a narrow shape and size distribution for magnetite crystals within magnetotactic organisms suggests strongly that there are species-specific mechanisms that control the process of biomineralization. In order to explore the extent of this control, cultures of Aquaspirillum magnetotacticum in the exponential growth phase were exposed to increasing magnetic pulses with the aim of separating cell populations on the basis of their magnetic coercivities. Isothermal remanent magnetization and anhysteretic remanent magnetization studies were performed with freeze-dried magnetic cells after the remagnetization treatment. Subpopulations of A. magnetotacticum that showed an increase in coercivity correlated with the intensity of the magnetic pulses were isolated. After successive subcultures of the remaining north-seeking cells, a maximum bulk coercivity (Hbmax) of 40 mT was obtained after treatment with a 55-mT pulse. Although we obtained A. magnetotacticum variants displaying higher coercivities than the wild-type strain, changes in crystal size or shape of the magnetite crystals were below reliable detection limits with transmission electron microscopy. Attempts to shift the coercivity towards higher values caused it to decrease, a change which was accompanied by an increase in magnetostatic interactions of the magnetosome chains as well as an increase in the cell population displaying an abnormal distribution of the magnetosome chains. Ultrastructural analyses of cells and magnetosomes revealed the appearance of cystlike bodies which occasionally contained magnetosomes. The increase in cystlike cells and abnormal magnetosome chains when higher magnetic pulses were used suggested that magnetosomes were collapsing because of stronger interparticle magnetostatic forces. Images PMID:16348587

  15. Isolation and characterization of Magnetospirillum from saline lagoon.

    PubMed

    Revathy, T; Jacob, Jobin John; Jayasri, M A; Suthindhiran, K

    2016-07-01

    Magnetotactic bacteria (MTB) are aquatic prokaryotes that orient themselves to earth's magnetic field with the help of intracellular organelle magnetosomes. Although many species of MTB have been identified, the isolation of MTB is a challenging task due to the lack of systematic isolation procedure and/or commercial media. In this study, we are reporting the isolation of magnetotactic spirillum from the Pulicat lagoon, India using a systematic and selective procedure. Sampling site was chosen on the basis of physicochemical properties of the ecosystem and the catalysed reporter deposition fluorescence in situ hybridization (CARD-FISH) analysis of sediment samples. In the current study, a combination of techniques including 'capillary racetrack' Purification and gradient cultivation resulted in the isolation of magnetotactic spirilla from aquatic sediments. Based on the 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis, the strain was identified as Magnetospirillum and was designated as Magnetospirillum sp. VITRJS1. The genes responsible for magnetosome formation (mamA, B, E, F, K, M, O, P, Q, T) were successfully detected using PCR amplification. The presence of cbbM gene confirmed that the isolate is chemolithoautotroph and utilises reduced sulphur as an electron source. Furthermore, magnetosomes extracted from VITRJS1 found to be cubo-octahedral in shape and 45 nm in size. Our results indicate that the systematic procedure using sediment analysis, CARD-FISH, and a combination of isolation methods enables the selective and rapid isolation of MTB from aquatic sediment sample. PMID:27263004

  16. Insight into the Evolution of Magnetotaxis in Magnetospirillum spp., Based on mam Gene Phylogeny

    PubMed Central

    Lefèvre, Christopher T.; Schmidt, Marian L.; Viloria, Nathan; Trubitsyn, Denis; Schüler, Dirk

    2012-01-01

    Vibrioid- to helical-shaped magnetotactic bacteria phylogenetically related to the genus Magnetospirillum were isolated in axenic cultures from a number of freshwater and brackish environments located in the southwestern United States. Based on 16S rRNA gene sequences, most of the new isolates represent new Magnetospirillum species or new strains of known Magnetospirillum species, while one isolate appears to represent a new genus basal to Magnetospirillum. Partial sequences of conserved mam genes, genes reported to be involved in the magnetosome and magnetosome chain formation, and form II of the ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase gene (cbbM) were determined in the new isolates and compared. The cbbM gene was chosen for comparison because it is not involved in magnetosome synthesis; it is highly conserved and is present in all but possibly one of the genomes of the magnetospirilla and the new isolates. Phylogenies based on 16S rRNA, cbbM, and mam gene sequences were reasonably congruent, indicating that the genes involved in magnetotaxis were acquired by a common ancestor of the Magnetospirillum clade. However, in one case, magnetosome genes might have been acquired through horizontal gene transfer. Our results also extend the known diversity of the Magnetospirillum group and show that they are widespread in freshwater environments. PMID:22865076

  17. Ligand Binding to Chlorite Dismutase from Magnetospirillum sp.

    PubMed

    De Schutter, Amy; Correia, Hugo D; Freire, Diana M; Rivas, María G; Rizzi, Alberto; Santos-Silva, Teresa; González, Pablo J; Van Doorslaer, Sabine

    2015-10-29

    Chlorite dismutase (Cld) catalyzes the reduction of chlorite to chloride and dioxygen. Here, the ligand binding to Cld of Magnetospirillum sp. (MaCld) is investigated with X-ray crystallography and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR). EPR reveals a large heterogeneity in the structure of wild-type MaCld, showing a variety of low- and high-spin ferric heme forms. Addition of an axial ligand, such as azide or imidazole, removes this heterogeneity almost entirely. This is in line with the two high resolution crystal structures of MaCld obtained in the presence of azide and thiocyanate that show the coordination of the ligands to the heme iron. The crystal structure of the MaCld-azide complex reveals a single well-defined orientation of the azide molecule in the heme pocket. EPR shows, however, a pH-dependent heme structure, probably due to acid-base transitions of the surrounding amino-acid residues stabilizing azide. For the azide and imidazole complex of MaCld, the hyperfine and nuclear quadrupole interactions with the close-by (14)N and (1)H nuclei are determined using pulsed EPR. These values are compared to the corresponding data for the low-spin forms observed in the ferric wild-type MaCld and to existing EPR data on azide and imidazole complexes of other heme proteins. PMID:26287794

  18. Characterization of a Spontaneous Nonmagnetic Mutant of Magnetospirillum gryphiswaldense Reveals a Large Deletion Comprising a Putative Magnetosome Island

    PubMed Central

    Schübbe, Sabrina; Kube, Michael; Scheffel, André; Wawer, Cathrin; Heyen, Udo; Meyerdierks, Anke; Madkour, Mohamed H.; Mayer, Frank; Reinhardt, Richard; Schüler, Dirk

    2003-01-01

    Frequent spontaneous loss of the magnetic phenotype was observed in stationary-phase cultures of the magnetotactic bacterium Magnetospirillum gryphiswaldense MSR-1. A nonmagnetic mutant, designated strain MSR-1B, was isolated and characterized. The mutant lacked any structures resembling magnetosome crystals as well as internal membrane vesicles. The growth of strain MSR-1B was impaired under all growth conditions tested, and the uptake and accumulation of iron were drastically reduced under iron-replete conditions. A large chromosomal deletion of approximately 80 kb was identified in strain MSR-1B, which comprised both the entire mamAB and mamDC clusters as well as further putative operons encoding a number of magnetosome-associated proteins. A bacterial artificial chromosome clone partially covering the deleted region was isolated from the genomic library of wild-type M. gryphiswaldense. Sequence analysis of this fragment revealed that all previously identified mam genes were closely linked with genes encoding other magnetosome-associated proteins within less than 35 kb. In addition, this region was remarkably rich in insertion elements and harbored a considerable number of unknown gene families which appeared to be specific for magnetotactic bacteria. Overall, these findings suggest the existence of a putative large magnetosome island in M. gryphiswaldense and other magnetotactic bacteria. PMID:13129949

  19. Angle sensing in magnetotaxis of Magnetospirillum magneticum AMB-1.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Xuejun; Ge, Xin; Li, Ning; Wu, Long-Fei; Luo, Chunxiong; Ouyang, Qi; Tu, Yuhai; Chen, Guanjun

    2014-07-24

    The mechanism of how magnetotactic bacteria navigate along the magnetic field has been a puzzle. Two main models disagree on whether the magnetotactic behavior results from passive alignment with the magnetic field or active sensing of the magnetic force. Here, we quantitatively studied the swimming patterns of Magnetospirillum magneticum AMB-1 cells to understand the origin of their magnetotactic behaviors. Single-cell tracking and swimming pattern analysis showed that the cells follow a mixed run-reverse-tumble pattern. The average run time decreased with the angle between the cell's moving velocity and the external magnetic field. For mutant cells without the methyl-accepting chemotaxis protein (MCP) Amb0994, such dependence disappeared and bacteria failed to align with magnetic field lines. This dysfunction was recovered by complementary Amb0994 on a plasmid. At high magnetic field (>5 mT), all strains with intact magnetosome chains (including the Δamb0994-0995 strains) showed alignment with the external magnetic field. These results suggested that the mechanism for magnetotaxis is magnetic field dependent. Due to the magnetic dipole moment of the cell, the external magnetic field exerts a torque on the cell. In high magnetic fields, this torque is large enough to overcome the random re-orientation of the cell, and the cells align passively with the external magnetic field, much like a compass. In smaller (and biologically more relevant) external fields, the external force alone is not strong enough to align the cell mechanically. However, magnetotactic behaviors persist due to an active sensing mechanism in which the cell senses the torque by Amb0994 and actively regulates the flagella bias accordingly to align its orientation with the external magnetic field. Our results reconciled the two putative models for magnetotaxis and revealed a key molecular component in the underlying magneto-sensing pathway. PMID:24877161

  20. Angle Sensing in Magnetotaxis of Magnetospirillum magneticum AMB-1

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Xuejun; Ge, Xin; Li, Ning; Wu, Long-Fei; Luo, Chunxiong; Ouyang, Qi; Tu, Yuhai; Chen, Guanjun

    2014-01-01

    The mechanism of how magnetotactic bacteria navigate along magnetic field has been a puzzle. Two main models disagree on whether the magnetotactic behavior results from passive alignment to the magnetic field or active sensing of the magnetic force. Here, we quantitatively studied the swimming patterns of Magnetospirillum magneticum AMB-1 cells to understand the origin of their magnetotaxis behaviors. Single-cell tracking and swimming pattern analysis showed that the cells follow a mixed run/reverse/tumble pattern. The average run time decreased with the angle between the cell’s moving velocity and the external magnetic field. For mutant cells without the methyl-accepting chemotaxis protein (MCP) Amb0994, such dependence disappeared and bacteria failed to align to magnetic field lines. This dysfunction was recovered by complementary amb0994 on plasmid. At high magnetic field (>5mT), all strains with intact magnetosome chains (including the Δamb0994-0995 strain) showed alignment with the external magnetic field. These results suggested that the mechanism for magnetotaxis is magnetic field dependent. Due to the magnetic dipole moment of the cell, the external magnetic field exerts a torque on the cell. In high magnetic fields, this torque is large enough to overcome the random re-orientation of the cell, and the cells align passively with the external magnetic field, much like a compass. In smaller (and biologically more relevant) external fields, the external force alone is not strong enough to align the cell mechanically. However, magnetotactic behaviors persist due to an active sensing mechanism in which the cell senses the torque by Amb0994 and actively regulate the flagella bias accordingly to align its orientation with the external magnetic field. Our results reconciled the two putative models for magnetotaxis and revealed a key molecular component in the underlying magneto-sensing pathway. PMID:24877161

  1. Redox control of iron biomineralization in Magnetospirillum magneticum AMB-1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Stephanie Rhianon

    Magnetotactic bacteria have evolved complex subcellular machinery to construct linear chains of magnetite nanocrystals that allow the host cell to sense direction. Each mixed-valent iron nanoparticle is mineralized from soluble iron within a membrane-encapsulated vesicle termed the magnetosome, which serves as a specialized compartment that regulates the iron, redox, and pH environment of the growing mineral. In order to dissect the biological components that control this process, we have carried out genetic and biochemical studies of proteins proposed to function in iron mineralization in Magnetospirillum magneticum AMB-1. As iron biomineralization by magnetotactic bacteria represents a particularly interesting case for understanding how the production of nanomaterials can be programmed at the genetic level, we also apply synthetic biology techniques towards the production of new cellular materials and new cellular functions. As the production of magnetite requires both the formation of Fe(II) and Fe(III), the redox components of the magnetosome play an essential role in this process. Using genetic complementation studies, we show that the redox cofactors or heme sites of the two putative redox partners, MamP and MamT, are required for magnetite biomineralization in vivo and that removal of one or both sites leads to defects in mineralization. We develop and optimize a heterologous expression method in the E. coli periplasm to cleanly isolate fully heme-loaded MamP for biochemical studies. Spectrochemical redox titrations show that the reduction potential of MamP lies in a different range than other c-type cytochrome involved in either Fe(III) reduction or Fe(II) oxidation. Nonetheless, in vitro mineralization studies with MamP and Fe(II) show that it is able to catalyze the formation of mixed-valent Fe(II)/Fe(III) oxides such as green rust. Biomineralization also requires lattice-templating proteins that guide the growth of the functional crystalline material. We

  2. Characterizing and optimizing magnetosome production of Magnetospirillum sp. XM-1 isolated from Xi'an City Moat, China.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yinzhao; Lin, Wei; Li, Jinhua; Zhang, Tongwei; Li, Ying; Tian, Jiesheng; Gu, Lixin; Heyden, Yvan Vander; Pan, Yongxin

    2015-11-01

    Pure culture of magnetotactic bacteria is desirable to understand their physiology, evolution and biomineralization. Here, we report a new strain Magnetospirillum sp. XM-1 that was recently isolated and cultivated from the eutrophic city moat of Xi'an, China. Magnetosome biomineralization, crystallographic and magnetic properties of XM-1 were characterized by using a combination of transmission electron microscopy and rock magnetic methods. Cell growth and magnetite production was optimized by response surface methodology. We found that the Magnetospirillum strain XM-1 is different from the model strain Magnetospirillum magneticum AMB-1 in terms of magnetite magnetosomes, optimal growth temperature and nutrient requirements. Sodium succinate, sodium nitrate and ferric citrate are the three most significant factors associated with the optimization of cell growth and magnetosome production for XM-1. PMID:26376913

  3. Magnetite Biomineralization in Magnetospirillum magneticum Is Regulated by a Switch-like Behavior in the HtrA Protease MamE.

    PubMed

    Hershey, David M; Browne, Patrick J; Iavarone, Anthony T; Teyra, Joan; Lee, Eun H; Sidhu, Sachdev S; Komeili, Arash

    2016-08-19

    Magnetotactic bacteria are aquatic organisms that produce subcellular magnetic particles in order to orient in the earth's geomagnetic field. MamE, a predicted HtrA protease required to produce magnetite crystals in the magnetotactic bacterium Magnetospirillum magneticum AMB-1, was recently shown to promote the proteolytic processing of itself and two other biomineralization factors in vivo Here, we have analyzed the in vivo processing patterns of three proteolytic targets and used this information to reconstitute proteolysis with a purified form of MamE. MamE cleaves a custom peptide substrate with positive cooperativity, and its autoproteolysis can be stimulated with exogenous substrates or peptides that bind to either of its PDZ domains. A misregulated form of the protease that circumvents specific genetic requirements for proteolysis causes biomineralization defects, showing that proper regulation of its activity is required during magnetite biosynthesis in vivo Our results represent the first reconstitution of the proteolytic activity of MamE and show that its behavior is consistent with the previously proposed checkpoint model for biomineralization. PMID:27302060

  4. Synthesis of bacterial magnetic particles during cell cycle of Magnetospirillum magneticum AMB-1.

    PubMed

    Yang, C D; Takeyama, H; Tanaka, T; Hasegawa, A; Matsunaga, T

    2001-01-01

    We investigated the relationship between the synthesis of bacterial magnetic particles (BMPs) and the transcription of magA gene-encoding iron transport protein using synchronous culture of Magnetospirillum magneticum AMB-1. Synchronously cultured cells were subjected to transmission electron microscopic observation and fluorescence in situ hybridization. The average number of BMPs slowly increased in the cell with increasing cell size. A sharp increase in BMPs occurred just before cell division and resulted in maximum BMP production of 30 particles/cell. The transcription of magA was regulated immediately before and after cell division. PMID:11963844

  5. Isolation of Magnetospirillum magneticum AMB-1 mutants defective in bacterial magnetic particle synthesis by transposon mutagenesis.

    PubMed

    Wahyudi, A T; Takeyama, H; Matsunaga, T

    2001-01-01

    Nonmagnetic mutants of Magnetospirillum magneticum AMB-1 were recovered following mini-Tn5 transposon mutagenesis. Transconjugants with kanamycin resistance were obtained at a frequency of 2.7 x 10(-7) per recipient. Of 3327 transconjugants, 62 were defective for bacterial magnetic particle (BMP) synthesis. The frequency of independent transposition events for nonmagnetic mutants was about 1.4% in transconjugants. Further analysis of DNA sequences flanking transposon by inverted polymerase chain reaction allowed isolation of at least 10 genes or DNA sequences involved in BMP synthesis in M. magneticum AMB-1. PMID:11963843

  6. The chemical formula of a magnetotactic bacterium.

    PubMed

    Naresh, Mohit; Das, Sayoni; Mishra, Prashant; Mittal, Aditya

    2012-05-01

    Elucidation of the chemical logic of life is one of the grand challenges in biology, and essential to the progress of the upcoming field of synthetic biology. Treatment of microbial cells explicitly as a "chemical" species in controlled reaction (growth) environments has allowed fascinating discoveries of elemental formulae of a few species that have guided the modern views on compositions of a living cell. Application of mass and energy balances on living cells has proved to be useful in modeling of bioengineering systems, particularly in deriving optimized media compositions for growing microorganisms to maximize yields of desired bio-derived products by regulating intra-cellular metabolic networks. In this work, application of elemental mass balance during growth of Magnetospirillum gryphiswaldense in bioreactors has resulted in the discovery of the chemical formula of the magnetotactic bacterium. By developing a stoichiometric equation characterizing the formation of a magnetotactic bacterial cell, coupled with rigorous experimental measurements and robust calculations, we report the elemental formula of M. gryphiswaldense cell as CH(2.06)O(0.13)N(0.28)Fe(1.74×10(-3)). Remarkably, we find that iron metabolism during growth of this magnetotactic bacterium is much more correlated individually with carbon and nitrogen, compared to carbon and nitrogen with each other, indicating that iron serves more as a nutrient during bacterial growth rather than just a mineral. Magnetotactic bacteria have not only invoked some interest in the field of astrobiology for the last two decades, but are also prokaryotes having the unique ability of synthesizing membrane bound intracellular organelles. Our findings on these unique prokaryotes are a strong addition to the limited repertoire, of elemental compositions of living cells, aimed at exploring the chemical logic of life. PMID:22170293

  7. A mutation upstream of an ATPase gene significantly increases magnetosome production in Magnetospirillum gryphiswaldense.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jiangning; Ding, Yao; Jiang, Wei; Tian, Jiesheng; Li, Ying; Li, Jilun

    2008-12-01

    A mutant of Magnetospirillum gryphiswaldense, NPHB, was obtained from a conjugation experiment. An aberrant recombination occurred between a putative elongation factor-G gene (fus-like) of the bacterial chromosome and the chloramphenicol resistant gene (cat) of a suicide vector, pSUP202. Complementary experiments and transcription analysis of genes around the recombinant site showed that the cat promoter enhanced the expression of adenosine triphosphatase gene downstream. Adenosine triphosphate hydrolyzing activity in NPHB was 35% higher than in the wild-type strain (M. gryphiswaldense MSR-1). NPHB accumulated 71% less poly-beta-hydroxybutyrate and consumed 56% more oxygen and 40% more lactate than MSR-1. The magnetosome content of NPHB was 69% higher than MSR-1 in flask culture. NPHB cultured in a 7.5-L bioreactor gave a maximum yield of 58.4 +/- 6.4 mg magnetosomes per liter. PMID:18800186

  8. Transcriptome analysis reveals physiological characteristics required for magnetosome formation in Magnetospirillum gryphiswaldense MSR-1.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xu; Wang, Qing; Zhang, Yang; Wang, Yinjia; Zhou, Yuan; Zhang, Weijia; Wen, Tong; Li, Li; Zuo, Meiqing; Zhang, Ziding; Tian, Jiesheng; Jiang, Wei; Li, Ying; Wang, Lei; Li, Jilun

    2016-06-01

    Magnetosome synthesis ability of Magnetospirillum gryphiswaldense MSR-1 in an autofermentor can be precisely controlled through strict control of dissolved oxygen concentration. In this study, using transcriptome data we discovered gene transcriptional differences and compared physiological characteristics of MSR-1 cells cultured under aerobic (high-oxygen) and micro-aerobic (low-oxygen) conditions. The results showed that 77 genes were up-regulated and 95 genes were down-regulated significantly under micro-aerobic situation. These genes were involved primarily in the categories of cell metabolism, transport, regulation and unknown-function proteins. The nutrient transport and physiological metabolism were slowed down under micro-aerobic condition, whereas dissimilatory denitrification pathways were activated and it may supplemental energy was made available for magnetosome synthesis. The result suggested that the genes of magnetosome membrane proteins (Mam and Mms) are not directly regulated by oxygen level, or are constitutively expressed. A proposed regulatory network of differentially expressed genes reflects the complexity of physiological metabolism in MSR-1, and suggests that some yet-unknown functional proteins play important roles such as ferric iron uptake and transport during magnetosome synthesis. The transcriptome data provides a holistic view of the responses of MSR-1 cells to differing oxygen levels. This approach will give new insights into general principles of magnetosome formation. PMID:27043321

  9. A novel role for Crp in controlling magnetosome biosynthesis in Magnetospirillum gryphiswaldense MSR-1

    PubMed Central

    Wen, Tong; Guo, Fangfang; Zhang, Yunpeng; Tian, Jiesheng; Li, Ying; Li, Jilun; Jiang, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Magnetotactic bacteria (MTB) are specialized microorganisms that synthesize intracellular magnetite particles called magnetosomes. Although many studies have focused on the mechanism of magnetosome synthesis, it remains unclear how these structures are formed. Recent reports have suggested that magnetosome formation is energy dependent. To investigate the relationship between magnetosome formation and energy metabolism, a global regulator, named Crp, which mainly controls energy and carbon metabolism in most microorganisms, was genetically disrupted in Magnetospirillum gryphiswaldense MSR-1. Compared with the wild-type or complemented strains, the growth, ferromagnetism and intracellular iron content of crp-deficient mutant cells were dramatically decreased. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) showed that magnetosome synthesis was strongly impaired by the disruption of crp. Further gene expression profile analysis showed that the disruption of crp not only influenced genes related to energy and carbon metabolism, but a series of crucial magnetosome island (MAI) genes were also down regulated. These results indicate that Crp is essential for magnetosome formation in MSR-1. This is the first time to demonstrate that Crp plays an important role in controlling magnetosome biomineralization and provides reliable expression profile data that elucidate the mechanism of Crp regulation of magnetosome formation in MSR-1. PMID:26879571

  10. mamO and mamE genes are essential for magnetosome crystal biomineralization in Magnetospirillum gryphiswaldense MSR-1.

    PubMed

    Yang, Wei; Li, Ruiguo; Peng, Tao; Zhang, Yang; Jiang, Wei; Li, Ying; Li, Jilun

    2010-10-01

    Four non-magnetic mutants of Magnetospirillum gryphiswaldense strain MSR-1 were isolated by transposon mutagenesis and found to contain interruption of either the mamO or mamE gene within the mamAB operon. Studies indicated that mamO and mamE genes are essential for magnetosome crystal biomineralization in MSR-1. This is the first report of a single gene (mamO or mamE) whose mutation affects crystal biomineralization in MSR-1. PMID:20674739

  11. Sudden motility reversal indicates sensing of magnetic field gradients in Magnetospirillum magneticum AMB-1 strain

    PubMed Central

    González, Lina M; Ruder, Warren C; Mitchell, Aaron P; Messner, William C; LeDuc, Philip R

    2015-01-01

    Many motile unicellular organisms have evolved specialized behaviors for detecting and responding to environmental cues such as chemical gradients (chemotaxis) and oxygen gradients (aerotaxis). Magnetotaxis is found in magnetotactic bacteria and it is defined as the passive alignment of these cells to the geomagnetic field along with active swimming. Herein we show that Magnetospirillum magneticum (AMB-1) show a unique set of responses that indicates they sense and respond not only to the direction of magnetic fields by aligning and swimming, but also to changes in the magnetic field or magnetic field gradients. We present data showing that AMB-1 cells exhibit sudden motility reversals when we impose them to local magnetic field gradients. Our system employs permalloy (Ni80Fe20) islands to curve and diverge the magnetic field lines emanating from our custom-designed Helmholtz coils in the vicinity of the islands (creating a drop in the field across the islands). The three distinct movements we have observed as they approach the permalloy islands are: unidirectional, single reverse and double reverse. Our findings indicate that these reverse movements occur in response to magnetic field gradients. In addition, using a permanent magnet we found further evidence that supports this claim. Motile AMB-1 cells swim away from the north and south poles of a permanent magnet when the magnet is positioned less than ∼30 mm from the droplet of cells. All together, these results indicate previously unknown response capabilities arising from the magnetic sensing systems of AMB-1 cells. These responses could enable them to cope with magnetic disturbances that could in turn potentially inhibit their efficient search for nutrients. PMID:25478682

  12. Sudden motility reversal indicates sensing of magnetic field gradients in Magnetospirillum magneticum AMB-1 strain.

    PubMed

    González, Lina M; Ruder, Warren C; Mitchell, Aaron P; Messner, William C; LeDuc, Philip R

    2015-06-01

    Many motile unicellular organisms have evolved specialized behaviors for detecting and responding to environmental cues such as chemical gradients (chemotaxis) and oxygen gradients (aerotaxis). Magnetotaxis is found in magnetotactic bacteria and it is defined as the passive alignment of these cells to the geomagnetic field along with active swimming. Herein we show that Magnetospirillum magneticum (AMB-1) show a unique set of responses that indicates they sense and respond not only to the direction of magnetic fields by aligning and swimming, but also to changes in the magnetic field or magnetic field gradients. We present data showing that AMB-1 cells exhibit sudden motility reversals when we impose them to local magnetic field gradients. Our system employs permalloy (Ni(80)Fe(20)) islands to curve and diverge the magnetic field lines emanating from our custom-designed Helmholtz coils in the vicinity of the islands (creating a drop in the field across the islands). The three distinct movements we have observed as they approach the permalloy islands are: unidirectional, single reverse and double reverse. Our findings indicate that these reverse movements occur in response to magnetic field gradients. In addition, using a permanent magnet we found further evidence that supports this claim. Motile AMB-1 cells swim away from the north and south poles of a permanent magnet when the magnet is positioned less than ∼30 mm from the droplet of cells. All together, these results indicate previously unknown response capabilities arising from the magnetic sensing systems of AMB-1 cells. These responses could enable them to cope with magnetic disturbances that could in turn potentially inhibit their efficient search for nutrients. PMID:25478682

  13. Changes of cell growth and magnetosome biomineralization in Magnetospirillum magneticum AMB-1 after ultraviolet-B irradiation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yinzhao; Lin, Wei; Li, Jinhua; Pan, Yongxin

    2013-01-01

    Effects of ultraviolet radiation on microorganisms are of great interest in field of microbiology and planetary sciences. In the present study, we used Magnetospirillum magneticum AMB-1 as a model organism to examine the influence of ultraviolet-B (UV-B) radiation on cell growth and magnetite biomineralization of magnetotactic bacteria (MTB). Live AMB-1 cells were exposed to UV-B radiation for 60, 300 and 900 s, which correspond to radiation doses of 120 J/m(2), 600 J/m(2), and 1800 J/m(2), respectively. After irradiation, the amounts of cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers (CPD) and reactive oxygen species (ROS) of the cells were increased, and cell growth was stunted up to ~170 h, depending on the UV-B radiation doses. The UV-B irradiated cells also produced on average more magnetite crystals with larger grain sizes and longer chains, which results in changes of their magnetic properties. PMID:24391631

  14. Changes of cell growth and magnetosome biomineralization in Magnetospirillum magneticum AMB-1 after ultraviolet-B irradiation

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yinzhao; Lin, Wei; Li, Jinhua; Pan, Yongxin

    2013-01-01

    Effects of ultraviolet radiation on microorganisms are of great interest in field of microbiology and planetary sciences. In the present study, we used Magnetospirillum magneticum AMB-1 as a model organism to examine the influence of ultraviolet-B (UV-B) radiation on cell growth and magnetite biomineralization of magnetotactic bacteria (MTB). Live AMB-1 cells were exposed to UV-B radiation for 60, 300 and 900 s, which correspond to radiation doses of 120 J/m2, 600 J/m2, and 1800 J/m2, respectively. After irradiation, the amounts of cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers (CPD) and reactive oxygen species (ROS) of the cells were increased, and cell growth was stunted up to ~170 h, depending on the UV-B radiation doses. The UV-B irradiated cells also produced on average more magnetite crystals with larger grain sizes and longer chains, which results in changes of their magnetic properties. PMID:24391631

  15. Deletion of the ftsZ-like gene results in the production of superparamagnetic magnetite magnetosomes in Magnetospirillum gryphiswaldense.

    PubMed

    Ding, Yao; Li, Jinhua; Liu, Jiangning; Yang, Jing; Jiang, Wei; Tian, Jiesheng; Li, Ying; Pan, Yongxin; Li, Jilun

    2010-02-01

    Magnetotactic bacteria (MTB) synthesize unique organelles termed "magnetosomes," which are membrane-enclosed structures containing crystals of magnetite or greigite. Magnetosomes form a chain around MamK cytoskeletal filaments and provide the basis for the ability of MTB to navigate along geomagnetic field lines in order to find optimal microaerobic habitats. Genomes of species of the MTB genus Magnetospirillum, in addition to a gene encoding the tubulin-like FtsZ protein (involved in cell division), contain a second gene termed "ftsZ-like," whose function is unknown. In the present study, we found that the ftsZ-like gene of Magnetospirillum gryphiswaldense strain MSR-1 belongs to a 4.9-kb mamXY polycistronic transcription unit. We then purified the recombinant FtsZ-like protein to homogeneity. The FtsZ-like protein efficiently hydrolyzed ATP and GTP, with ATPase and GTPase activity levels of 2.17 and 5.56 mumol phosphorus per mol protein per min, respectively. The FtsZ-like protein underwent GTP-dependent polymerization into long filamentous bundles in vitro. To determine the role of the ftsZ-like gene, we constructed a ftsZ-like mutant (DeltaftsZ-like mutant) and its complementation strain (DeltaftsZ-like_C strain). Growth of DeltaftsZ-like cells was similar to that of the wild type, indicating that the DeltaftsZ-like gene is not involved in cell division. Transmission electron microscopic observations indicated that the DeltaftsZ-like cells, in comparison to wild-type cells, produced smaller magnetosomes, with poorly defined morphology and irregular alignment, including large gaps. Magnetic analyses showed that DeltaftsZ-like produced mainly superparamagnetic (SP) magnetite particles, whereas wild-type and DeltaftsZ-like_C cells produced mainly single-domain (SD) particles. Our findings suggest that the FtsZ-like protein is required for synthesis of SD particles and magnetosomes in M. gryphiswaldense. PMID:20023033

  16. Deletion of the ftsZ-Like Gene Results in the Production of Superparamagnetic Magnetite Magnetosomes in Magnetospirillum gryphiswaldense▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Yao; Li, Jinhua; Liu, Jiangning; Yang, Jing; Jiang, Wei; Tian, Jiesheng; Li, Ying; Pan, Yongxin; Li, Jilun

    2010-01-01

    Magnetotactic bacteria (MTB) synthesize unique organelles termed “magnetosomes,” which are membrane-enclosed structures containing crystals of magnetite or greigite. Magnetosomes form a chain around MamK cytoskeletal filaments and provide the basis for the ability of MTB to navigate along geomagnetic field lines in order to find optimal microaerobic habitats. Genomes of species of the MTB genus Magnetospirillum, in addition to a gene encoding the tubulin-like FtsZ protein (involved in cell division), contain a second gene termed “ftsZ-like,” whose function is unknown. In the present study, we found that the ftsZ-like gene of Magnetospirillum gryphiswaldense strain MSR-1 belongs to a 4.9-kb mamXY polycistronic transcription unit. We then purified the recombinant FtsZ-like protein to homogeneity. The FtsZ-like protein efficiently hydrolyzed ATP and GTP, with ATPase and GTPase activity levels of 2.17 and 5.56 μmol phosphorus per mol protein per min, respectively. The FtsZ-like protein underwent GTP-dependent polymerization into long filamentous bundles in vitro. To determine the role of the ftsZ-like gene, we constructed a ftsZ-like mutant (ΔftsZ-like mutant) and its complementation strain (ΔftsZ-like_C strain). Growth of ΔftsZ-like cells was similar to that of the wild type, indicating that the ΔftsZ-like gene is not involved in cell division. Transmission electron microscopic observations indicated that the ΔftsZ-like cells, in comparison to wild-type cells, produced smaller magnetosomes, with poorly defined morphology and irregular alignment, including large gaps. Magnetic analyses showed that ΔftsZ-like produced mainly superparamagnetic (SP) magnetite particles, whereas wild-type and ΔftsZ-like_C cells produced mainly single-domain (SD) particles. Our findings suggest that the FtsZ-like protein is required for synthesis of SD particles and magnetosomes in M. gryphiswaldense. PMID:20023033

  17. The magnetosome membrane protein, MmsF, is a major regulator of magnetite biomineralization in Magnetospirillum magneticum AMB-1

    PubMed Central

    Murat, Dorothée; Falahati, Veesta; Bertinetti, Luca; Csencsits, Roseann; Körnig, André; Downing, Kenneth; Faivre, Damien; Komeili, Arash

    2013-01-01

    Summary Magnetotactic bacteria (MTB) use magnetosomes, membrane bound crystals of magnetite or greigite, for navigation along geomagnetic fields. In Magnetospirillum magneticum sp. AMB-1, and other MTB, a magnetosome gene island (MAI) is essential for every step of magnetosome formation. An 8-gene region of the MAI encodes several factors implicated in control of crystal size and morphology in previous genetic and proteomic studies. We show that these factors play a minor role in magnetite biomineralization in vivo. In contrast, MmsF, a previously uncharacterized magnetosome membrane protein encoded within the same region plays a dominant role in defining crystal size and morphology and is sufficient for restoring magnetite synthesis in the absence of the other major biomineralization candidates. In addition, we show that the 18 genes of the mamAB gene cluster of the MAI are sufficient for the formation of an immature magnetosome organelle. Addition of MmsF to these 18 genes leads to a significant enhancement of magnetite biomineralization and an increase in the cellular magnetic response. These results define a new biomineralization protein and lay down the foundation for the design of autonomous gene cassettes for the transfer of the magnetic phenotype in other bacteria. PMID:22716969

  18. The magnetosome membrane protein, MmsF, is a major regulator of magnetite biomineralization in Magnetospirillum magneticum AMB-1.

    PubMed

    Murat, Dorothée; Falahati, Veesta; Bertinetti, Luca; Csencsits, Roseann; Körnig, André; Downing, Kenneth; Faivre, Damien; Komeili, Arash

    2012-08-01

    Magnetotactic bacteria (MTB) use magnetosomes, membrane-bound crystals of magnetite or greigite, for navigation along geomagnetic fields. In Magnetospirillum magneticum sp. AMB-1, and other MTB, a magnetosome gene island (MAI) is essential for every step of magnetosome formation. An 8-gene region of the MAI encodes several factors implicated in control of crystal size and morphology in previous genetic and proteomic studies. We show that these factors play a minor role in magnetite biomineralization in vivo. In contrast, MmsF, a previously uncharacterized magnetosome membrane protein encoded within the same region plays a dominant role in defining crystal size and morphology and is sufficient for restoring magnetite synthesis in the absence of the other major biomineralization candidates. In addition, we show that the 18 genes of the mamAB gene cluster of the MAI are sufficient for the formation of an immature magnetosome organelle. Addition of MmsF to these 18 genes leads to a significant enhancement of magnetite biomineralization and an increase in the cellular magnetic response. These results define a new biomineralization protein and lay down the foundation for the design of autonomous gene cassettes for the transfer of the magnetic phenotype in other bacteria. PMID:22716969

  19. Genetic and biochemical investigations of the role of MamP in redox control of iron biomineralization in Magnetospirillum magneticum

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Stephanie R.; Wilson, Tiffany D.; Brown, Margaret E.; Rahn-Lee, Lilah; Yu, Yi; Fredriksen, Laura L.; Ozyamak, Ertan; Komeili, Arash; Chang, Michelle C. Y.

    2015-01-01

    Magnetotactic bacteria have evolved complex subcellular machinery to construct linear chains of magnetite nanocrystals that allow the host cell to sense direction. Each mixed-valent iron nanoparticle is mineralized from soluble iron within a membrane-encapsulated vesicle termed the magnetosome, which serves as a specialized compartment that regulates the iron, redox, and pH environment of the growing mineral. To dissect the biological components that control this process, we have carried out a genetic and biochemical study of proteins proposed to function in iron mineralization. In this study, we show that the redox sites of c-type cytochromes of the Magnetospirillum magneticum AMB-1 magnetosome island, MamP and MamT, are essential to their physiological function and that ablation of one or both heme motifs leads to loss of function, suggesting that their ability to carry out redox chemistry in vivo is important. We also develop a method to heterologously express fully heme-loaded MamP from AMB-1 for in vitro biochemical studies, which show that its Fe(III)–Fe(II) redox couple is set at an unusual potential (−89 ± 11 mV) compared with other related cytochromes involved in iron reduction or oxidation. Despite its low reduction potential, it remains competent to oxidize Fe(II) to Fe(III) and mineralize iron to produce mixed-valent iron oxides. Finally, in vitro mineralization experiments suggest that Mms mineral-templating peptides from AMB-1 can modulate the iron redox chemistry of MamP. PMID:25775527

  20. Light scattering and birefrigence by magnetic bacteria

    SciTech Connect

    Johnston, R.G.; Jacobson, P.L.

    1990-01-01

    The bacterium Aquaspirillum magnetotacticum grows its own internal single domain magnets. For a number of reasons, these magnets make the bacterium an extremely interesting scattering particle. We are engaging in light scattering and birefringence studies on Aquaspirillum magnetotacticum. 9 refs., 4 figs.

  1. Magnetite magnetosome and fragmental chain formation of Magnetospirillum magneticum AMB-1: transmission electron microscopy and magnetic observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jinhua; Pan, Yongxin; Chen, Guanjun; Liu, Qingsong; Tian, Lanxiang; Lin, Wei

    2009-04-01

    Stable single-domain (SD) magnetite formed intracellularly by magnetotactic bacteria is of fundamental interest in sedimentary and environmental magnetism. In this study, we studied the time course of magnetosome growth and magnetosome chain formation (0-96 hr) in Magnetospirillum magneticum AMB-1 by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) observation and rock magnetism. The initial non-magnetic cells were microaerobically batch cultured at 26 °C in a modified magnetic spirillum growth medium. TEM observations indicated that between 20 and 24 hr magnetosome crystals began to mineralize simultaneously at multiple sites within the cell body, followed by a phase of rapid growth lasting up to 48 hr cultivation. The synthesized magnetosomes were found to be assembled into 3-5 subchains, which were linearly aligned along the long axis of the cell, supporting the idea that magnetosome vesicles were linearly anchored to the inner membrane of cell. By 96 hr cultivation, 14 cubo-octahedral magnetosome crystals in average with a mean grain size of ~44.5 nm were formed in a cell. Low-temperature (10-300 K) thermal demagnetization, room-temperature hysteresis loops and first-order reversal curves (FORCs) were conducted on whole cell samples. Both coercivity (4.7-18.1 mT) and Verwey transition temperature (100-106 K) increase with increasing cultivation time length, which can be explained by increasing grain size and decreasing non-stoichiometry of magnetite, respectively. Shapes of hysteresis loops and FORCs indicated each subchain behaving as an `ideal' uniaxial SD particle and extremely weak magnetostatic interaction fields between subchains. Low-temperature thermal demagnetization of remanence demonstrated that the Moskowitz test is valid for such linear subchain configurations (e.g. δFC/δZFC > 2.0), implying that the test is applicable to ancient sediments where magnetosome chains might have been broken up into short chains due to disintegration of the organic scaffold

  2. Crystallization and preliminary crystallographic analysis of the C-terminal domain of MamM, a magnetosome-associated protein from Magnetospirillum gryphiswaldense MSR-1

    PubMed Central

    Zeytuni, Natalie; Offer, Tal; Davidov, Geula; Zarivach, Raz

    2012-01-01

    MamM is a unique magnetosome-associated protein that shares substantial homology with cation diffusion facilitator (CDF) proteins, a group of heavy-metal-ion efflux transporters that participate in metal-ion homeostasis in all domains of life. Magnetotactic bacteria utilize CDF proteins in iron-oxide biomineralization and in magnetosome formation. Here, the crystallization and preliminary X-ray analysis of recombinant Magnetospirillum gryphiswaldense MamM is reported. The C-terminal domain of MamM was crystallized in the orthorhombic space group C2221, with unit-cell parameters a = 37.1, b = 94.0, c = 53.3 Å. X-ray diffraction data were collected to a resolution of 2.0 Å. PMID:22869124

  3. Single Bacterium Detection Using Sers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonchukov, S. A.; Baikova, T. V.; Alushin, M. V.; Svistunova, T. S.; Minaeva, S. A.; Ionin, A. A.; Kudryashov, S. I.; Saraeva, I. N.; Zayarny, D. A.

    2016-02-01

    This work is devoted to the study of a single Staphylococcus aureus bacterium detection using surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) and resonant Raman spectroscopy (RS). It was shown that SERS allows increasing sensitivity of predominantly low frequency lines connected with the vibrations of Amide, Proteins and DNA. At the same time the lines of carotenoids inherent to this kind of bacterium are well-detected due to the resonance Raman scattering mechanism. The reproducibility and stability of Raman spectra strongly depend on the characteristics of nanostructured substrate, and molecular structure and size of the tested biological object.

  4. The FtsZ-Like Protein FtsZm of Magnetospirillum gryphiswaldense Likely Interacts with Its Generic Homolog and Is Required for Biomineralization under Nitrate Deprivation

    PubMed Central

    Müller, Frank D.; Raschdorf, Oliver; Nudelman, Hila; Messerer, Maxim; Katzmann, Emanuel; Plitzko, Jürgen M.; Zarivach, Raz

    2014-01-01

    Midcell selection, septum formation, and cytokinesis in most bacteria are orchestrated by the eukaryotic tubulin homolog FtsZ. The alphaproteobacterium Magnetospirillum gryphiswaldense (MSR-1) septates asymmetrically, and cytokinesis is linked to splitting and segregation of an intracellular chain of membrane-enveloped magnetite crystals (magnetosomes). In addition to a generic, full-length ftsZ gene, MSR-1 contains a truncated ftsZ homolog (ftsZm) which is located adjacent to genes controlling biomineralization and magnetosome chain formation. We analyzed the role of FtsZm in cell division and biomineralization together with the full-length MSR-1 FtsZ protein. Our results indicate that loss of FtsZm has a strong effect on microoxic magnetite biomineralization which, however, could be rescued by the presence of nitrate in the medium. Fluorescence microscopy revealed that FtsZm-mCherry does not colocalize with the magnetosome-related proteins MamC and MamK but is confined to asymmetric spots at midcell and at the cell pole, coinciding with the FtsZ protein position. In Escherichia coli, both FtsZ homologs form distinct structures but colocalize when coexpressed, suggesting an FtsZ-dependent recruitment of FtsZm. In vitro analyses indicate that FtsZm is able to interact with the FtsZ protein. Together, our data suggest that FtsZm shares key features with its full-length homolog but is involved in redox control for magnetite crystallization. PMID:24272781

  5. Preparation and anti-tumor efficiency evaluation of doxorubicin-loaded bacterial magnetosomes: magnetic nanoparticles as drug carriers isolated from Magnetospirillum gryphiswaldense.

    PubMed

    Sun, Jian-Bo; Duan, Jin-Hong; Dai, Shun-Ling; Ren, Jun; Guo, Lin; Jiang, Wei; Li, Ying

    2008-12-15

    Bacterial magnetosomes (BMs) are commonly used as vehicles for certain enzymes, nucleic acids and antibodies, although they have never been considered drug carriers. To evaluate the clinical potential of BMs extracted from Magnetospirillum gryphiswaldense in cancer therapy, doxorubicin (DOX) was loaded onto the purified BMs at a ratio of 0.87 +/- 0.08 mg/mg using glutaraldehyde. The DOX-coupled BMs (DBMs) and BMs exhibited uniform sizes and morphology evaluated by TEM. The diameters of DBMs and BMs obtained by AFM were 71.02 +/- 6.73 and 34.93 +/- 8.24 nm, respectively. The DBMs released DOX slowly into serum and maintained at least 80% stability following 48 h of incubation. In vitro cytotoxic tests showed that the DBMs were cytotoxic to HL60 and EMT-6 cells, manifested as inhibition of cell proliferation and suppression in c-myc expression, consistent with DOX. These observations depicted in vitro antitumor property of DBMs similar to DOX. The approach of coupling DOX to magnetosomes may have clinical potential in anti-tumor drug delivery. PMID:18980188

  6. The Periplasmic Nitrate Reductase Nap Is Required for Anaerobic Growth and Involved in Redox Control of Magnetite Biomineralization in Magnetospirillum gryphiswaldense

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yingjie; Katzmann, Emanuel; Borg, Sarah

    2012-01-01

    The magnetosomes of many magnetotactic bacteria consist of membrane-enveloped magnetite crystals, whose synthesis is favored by a low redox potential. However, the cellular redox processes governing the biomineralization of the mixed-valence iron oxide have remained unknown. Here, we show that in the alphaproteobacterium Magnetospirillum gryphiswaldense, magnetite biomineralization is linked to dissimilatory nitrate reduction. A complete denitrification pathway, including gene functions for nitrate (nap), nitrite (nir), nitric oxide (nor), and nitrous oxide reduction (nos), was identified. Transcriptional gusA fusions as reporters revealed that except for nap, the highest expression of the denitrification genes coincided with conditions permitting maximum magnetite synthesis. Whereas microaerobic denitrification overlapped with oxygen respiration, nitrate was the only electron acceptor supporting growth in the entire absence of oxygen, and only the deletion of nap genes, encoding a periplasmic nitrate reductase, and not deletion of nor or nos genes, abolished anaerobic growth and also delayed aerobic growth in both nitrate and ammonium media. While loss of nosZ or norCB had no or relatively weak effects on magnetosome synthesis, deletion of nap severely impaired magnetite biomineralization and resulted in fewer, smaller, and irregular crystals during denitrification and also microaerobic respiration, probably by disturbing the proper redox balance required for magnetite synthesis. In contrast to the case for the wild type, biomineralization in Δnap cells was independent of the oxidation state of carbon substrates. Altogether, our data demonstrate that in addition to its essential role in anaerobic respiration, the periplasmic nitrate reductase Nap has a further key function by participating in redox reactions required for magnetite biomineralization. PMID:22730130

  7. Iron response regulator protein IrrB in Magnetospirillum gryphiswaldense MSR-1 helps control the iron/oxygen balance, oxidative stress tolerance, and magnetosome formation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qing; Wang, Meiwen; Wang, Xu; Guan, Guohua; Li, Ying; Peng, Youliang; Li, Jilun

    2015-12-01

    Magnetotactic bacteria are capable of forming nanosized, membrane-enclosed magnetosomes under iron-rich and oxygen-limited conditions. The complete genomic sequence of Magnetospirillum gryphiswaldense strain MSR-1 has been analyzed and found to contain five fur homologue genes whose protein products are predicted to be involved in iron homeostasis and the response to oxidative stress. Of these, only the MGMSRv2_3149 gene (irrB) was significantly downregulated under high-iron and low-oxygen conditions, during the transition of cell growth from the logarithmic to the stationary phase. The encoded protein, IrrB, containing the conserved HHH motif, was identified as an iron response regulator (Irr) protein belonging to the Fur superfamily. To investigate the function of IrrB, we constructed an irrB deletion mutant (ΔirrB). The levels of cell growth and magnetosome formation were lower in the ΔirrB strain than in the wild type (WT) under both high-iron and low-iron conditions. The ΔirrB strain also showed lower levels of iron uptake and H2O2 tolerance than the WT. Quantitative real-time reverse transcription-PCR analysis indicated that the irrB mutation reduced the expression of numerous genes involved in iron transport, iron storage, heme biosynthesis, and Fe-S cluster assembly. Transcription studies of the other fur homologue genes in the ΔirrB strain indicated complementary functions of the Fur proteins in MSR-1. IrrB appears to be directly responsible for iron metabolism and homeostasis and to be indirectly involved in magnetosome formation. We propose two IrrB-regulated networks (under high- and low-iron conditions) in MSR-1 cells that control the balance of iron and oxygen metabolism and account for the coexistence of five Fur homologues. PMID:26386052

  8. Iron Response Regulator Protein IrrB in Magnetospirillum gryphiswaldense MSR-1 Helps Control the Iron/Oxygen Balance, Oxidative Stress Tolerance, and Magnetosome Formation

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Qing; Wang, Meiwen; Wang, Xu; Guan, Guohua; Peng, Youliang; Li, Jilun

    2015-01-01

    Magnetotactic bacteria are capable of forming nanosized, membrane-enclosed magnetosomes under iron-rich and oxygen-limited conditions. The complete genomic sequence of Magnetospirillum gryphiswaldense strain MSR-1 has been analyzed and found to contain five fur homologue genes whose protein products are predicted to be involved in iron homeostasis and the response to oxidative stress. Of these, only the MGMSRv2_3149 gene (irrB) was significantly downregulated under high-iron and low-oxygen conditions, during the transition of cell growth from the logarithmic to the stationary phase. The encoded protein, IrrB, containing the conserved HHH motif, was identified as an iron response regulator (Irr) protein belonging to the Fur superfamily. To investigate the function of IrrB, we constructed an irrB deletion mutant (ΔirrB). The levels of cell growth and magnetosome formation were lower in the ΔirrB strain than in the wild type (WT) under both high-iron and low-iron conditions. The ΔirrB strain also showed lower levels of iron uptake and H2O2 tolerance than the WT. Quantitative real-time reverse transcription-PCR analysis indicated that the irrB mutation reduced the expression of numerous genes involved in iron transport, iron storage, heme biosynthesis, and Fe-S cluster assembly. Transcription studies of the other fur homologue genes in the ΔirrB strain indicated complementary functions of the Fur proteins in MSR-1. IrrB appears to be directly responsible for iron metabolism and homeostasis and to be indirectly involved in magnetosome formation. We propose two IrrB-regulated networks (under high- and low-iron conditions) in MSR-1 cells that control the balance of iron and oxygen metabolism and account for the coexistence of five Fur homologues. PMID:26386052

  9. A key time point for cell growth and magnetosome synthesis of Magnetospirillum gryphiswaldense based on real-time analysis of physiological factors

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jing; Li, Shuqi; Huang, Xiuliang; Tang, Tao; Jiang, Weizhong; Zhang, Tongwei; Li, Ying

    2013-01-01

    Pure culture of magnetotactic bacteria with high magnetosome yield has been achieved for only a few strains. The major obstacles involve the nutritional requirements and culture conditions of the cells. To increase cell density and magnetosome production, it is necessary to elucidate the physiological characteristics of a particular strain during cell growth and develop an appropriate artificial control strategy. Large-scale culture of Magnetospirillum gryphiswaldense strain MSR-1 was successfully performed for 48 h in a 42-L autofermentor, and several key physiological parameters were measured in real time. Maximal values of cell density (OD565) (19.4) and cell yield (dry weight) (4.76 g/L) were attained at 40 h. The key time point for cell growth and magnetosome formation was found to be 18–20 h. At this point, cells entered the log phase of growth, the maximal values of Cmag (1.78), iron content (0.47%), and magnetosome number (26 ± 3 per cell) were observed, superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity began to decrease more rapidly, ATP content dropped to an extremely low level (0.17 fmol), and reducing power (NADH/NAD+ ratio) began to increase very rapidly. Excessive levels of dissolved oxygen (≥20 ppb) and lactic acid in the medium caused notable cytotoxic effects after 20 h. Artificial control measures for fermentation must be based on realistic cell physiological conditions. At the key time point (18–20 h), cell density is high and magnetosomes have matured. The process of magnetosome synthesis involves a high consumption of ATP and reducing power, and the cells require replenishment of nutrients prior to the 18–20 h time point. Culture conditions that effectively minimize dissolved oxygen accumulation, lactic acid content, and reducing power at this point will enhance magnetosome yield without obvious inhibition of cell growth. PMID:23898327

  10. MamX encoded by the mamXY operon is involved in control of magnetosome maturation in Magnetospirillum gryphiswaldense MSR-1

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Magnetotactic bacteria produce membrane-enveloped magnetite crystals (magnetosomes) whose formation is controlled primarily by a gene island termed the magnetosome island (MAI). Characterization of single gene and operon function in MAI has elucidated in part the genetic basis of magnetosome formation. The mamX gene, located in the mamXY operon, is highly conserved in the MAI of all Magnetospirillum strains studied to date. Little is known regarding the function of mamX in the process of biomineralization. Results A mamX deletion mutant (∆mamX) and its complemented strain (CmamX) by conjugation in M. gryphiswaldense strain MSR-1 were constructed. There were no striking differences in cell growth among ∆mamX, CmamX, and wild-type strain (WT). ∆mamX displayed a much weaker magnetic response than WT. Transmission electron microscopy revealed the presence of irregular, superparamagnetic magnetite particles in ∆mamX, in contrast to regular, single-domain particles in WT and CmamX. The phenotype of ∆mamX was similar to that of an ftsZ-like deleted mutant and mamXY operon deleted mutant reported previously. Quantitative real-time RT-PCR (qPCR) results indicated that the deletion of mamX had differential effects on the transcription levels of the other three genes in the operon. Conclusions The MamX protein plays an important role in controlling magnetosome size, maturation, and crystal form. The four MamXY proteins appear to have redundant functions involved in magnetosome formation. Our findings provide new insights into the coordinated function of MAI genes and operons in magnetosome formation. PMID:24020498

  11. Interplay between Two Bacterial Actin Homologs, MamK and MamK-Like, Is Required for the Alignment of Magnetosome Organelles in Magnetospirillum magneticum AMB-1

    PubMed Central

    Abreu, Nicole; Mannoubi, Soumaya; Ozyamak, Ertan; Pignol, David; Ginet, Nicolas

    2014-01-01

    Many bacterial species contain multiple actin-like proteins tasked with the execution of crucial cell biological functions. MamK, an actin-like protein found in magnetotactic bacteria, is important in organizing magnetosome organelles into chains that are used for navigation along geomagnetic fields. MamK and numerous other magnetosome formation factors are encoded by a genetic island termed the magnetosome island. Unlike most magnetotactic bacteria, Magnetospirillum magneticum AMB-1 (AMB-1) contains a second island of magnetosome-related genes that was named the magnetosome islet. A homologous copy of mamK, mamK-like, resides within this islet and encodes a protein capable of filament formation in vitro. Previous work had shown that mamK-like is expressed in vivo, but its function, if any, had remained unknown. Though MamK-like is highly similar to MamK, it contains a mutation that in MamK and other actins blocks ATPase activity in vitro and filament dynamics in vivo. Here, using genetic analysis, we demonstrate that mamK-like has an in vivo role in assisting organelle alignment. In addition, MamK-like forms filaments in vivo in a manner that is dependent on the presence of MamK and the two proteins interact in a yeast two-hybrid assay. Surprisingly, despite the ATPase active-site mutation, MamK-like is capable of ATP hydrolysis in vitro and promotes MamK filament turnover in vivo. Taken together, these experiments suggest that direct interactions between MamK and MamK-like contribute to magnetosome alignment in AMB-1. PMID:24957623

  12. Interplay between two bacterial actin homologs, MamK and MamK-Like, is required for the alignment of magnetosome organelles in Magnetospirillum magneticum AMB-1.

    PubMed

    Abreu, Nicole; Mannoubi, Soumaya; Ozyamak, Ertan; Pignol, David; Ginet, Nicolas; Komeili, Arash

    2014-09-01

    Many bacterial species contain multiple actin-like proteins tasked with the execution of crucial cell biological functions. MamK, an actin-like protein found in magnetotactic bacteria, is important in organizing magnetosome organelles into chains that are used for navigation along geomagnetic fields. MamK and numerous other magnetosome formation factors are encoded by a genetic island termed the magnetosome island. Unlike most magnetotactic bacteria, Magnetospirillum magneticum AMB-1 (AMB-1) contains a second island of magnetosome-related genes that was named the magnetosome islet. A homologous copy of mamK, mamK-like, resides within this islet and encodes a protein capable of filament formation in vitro. Previous work had shown that mamK-like is expressed in vivo, but its function, if any, had remained unknown. Though MamK-like is highly similar to MamK, it contains a mutation that in MamK and other actins blocks ATPase activity in vitro and filament dynamics in vivo. Here, using genetic analysis, we demonstrate that mamK-like has an in vivo role in assisting organelle alignment. In addition, MamK-like forms filaments in vivo in a manner that is dependent on the presence of MamK and the two proteins interact in a yeast two-hybrid assay. Surprisingly, despite the ATPase active-site mutation, MamK-like is capable of ATP hydrolysis in vitro and promotes MamK filament turnover in vivo. Taken together, these experiments suggest that direct interactions between MamK and MamK-like contribute to magnetosome alignment in AMB-1. PMID:24957623

  13. Genetic Dissection of the mamAB and mms6 Operons Reveals a Gene Set Essential for Magnetosome Biogenesis in Magnetospirillum gryphiswaldense

    PubMed Central

    Lohße, Anna; Borg, Sarah; Raschdorf, Oliver; Kolinko, Isabel; Tompa, Éva; Pósfai, Mihály; Faivre, Damien; Baumgartner, Jens

    2014-01-01

    Biosynthesis of bacterial magnetosomes, which are intracellular membrane-enclosed, nanosized magnetic crystals, is controlled by a set of >30 specific genes. In Magnetospirillum gryphiswaldense, these are clustered mostly within a large conserved genomic magnetosome island (MAI) comprising the mms6, mamGFDC, mamAB, and mamXY operons. Here, we demonstrate that the five previously uncharacterized genes of the mms6 operon have crucial functions in the regulation of magnetosome biomineralization that partially overlap MamF and other proteins encoded by the adjacent mamGFDC operon. While all other deletions resulted in size reduction, elimination of either mms36 or mms48 caused the synthesis of magnetite crystals larger than those in the wild type (WT). Whereas the mms6 operon encodes accessory factors for crystal maturation, the large mamAB operon contains several essential and nonessential genes involved in various other steps of magnetosome biosynthesis, as shown by single deletions of all mamAB genes. While single deletions of mamL, -P, -Q, -R, -B, -S, -T, and -U showed phenotypes similar to those of their orthologs in a previous study in the related M. magneticum, we found mamI and mamN to be not required for at least rudimentary iron biomineralization in M. gryphiswaldense. Thus, only mamE, -L, -M, -O, -Q, and -B were essential for formation of magnetite, whereas a mamI mutant still biomineralized tiny particles which, however, consisted of the nonmagnetic iron oxide hematite, as shown by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) and the X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES). Based on this and previous studies, we propose an extended model for magnetosome biosynthesis in M. gryphiswaldense. PMID:24816605

  14. A Large Gene Cluster Encoding Several Magnetosome Proteins Is Conserved in Different Species of Magnetotactic Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Grünberg, Karen; Wawer, Cathrin; Tebo, Bradley M.; Schüler, Dirk

    2001-01-01

    In magnetotactic bacteria, a number of specific proteins are associated with the magnetosome membrane (MM) and may have a crucial role in magnetite biomineralization. We have cloned and sequenced the genes of several of these polypeptides in the magnetotactic bacterium Magnetospirillum gryphiswaldense that could be assigned to two different genomic regions. Except for mamA, none of these genes have been previously reported to be related to magnetosome formation. Homologous genes were found in the genome sequences of M. magnetotacticum and magnetic coccus strain MC-1. The MM proteins identified display homology to tetratricopeptide repeat proteins (MamA), cation diffusion facilitators (MamB), and HtrA-like serine proteases (MamE) or bear no similarity to known proteins (MamC and MamD). A major gene cluster containing several magnetosome genes (including mamA and mamB) was found to be conserved in all three of the strains investigated. The mamAB cluster also contains additional genes that have no known homologs in any nonmagnetic organism, suggesting a specific role in magnetosome formation. PMID:11571158

  15. Novel Waddlia Intracellular Bacterium in Artibeus intermedius Fruit Bats, Mexico

    PubMed Central

    Pierlé, Sebastián Aguilar; Morales, Cirani Obregón; Martínez, Leonardo Perea; Ceballos, Nidia Aréchiga; Rivero, Juan José Pérez; Díaz, Osvaldo López; Brayton, Kelly A.

    2015-01-01

    An intracellular bacterium was isolated from fruit bats (Artibeus intermedius) in Cocoyoc, Mexico. The bacterium caused severe lesions in the lungs and spleens of bats and intracytoplasmic vacuoles in cell cultures. Sequence analyses showed it is related to Waddlia spp. (order Chlamydiales). We propose to call this bacterium Waddlia cocoyoc. PMID:26583968

  16. Novel Waddlia Intracellular Bacterium in Artibeus intermedius Fruit Bats, Mexico.

    PubMed

    Pierlé, Sebastián Aguilar; Morales, Cirani Obregón; Martínez, Leonardo Perea; Ceballos, Nidia Aréchiga; Rivero, Juan José Pérez; Díaz, Osvaldo López; Brayton, Kelly A; Setién, Alvaro Aguilar

    2015-12-01

    An intracellular bacterium was isolated from fruit bats (Artibeus intermedius) in Cocoyoc, Mexico. The bacterium caused severe lesions in the lungs and spleens of bats and intracytoplasmic vacuoles in cell cultures. Sequence analyses showed it is related to Waddlia spp. (order Chlamydiales). We propose to call this bacterium Waddlia cocoyoc. PMID:26583968

  17. Ratoon stunting disease of sugarcane: isolation of the causal bacterium.

    PubMed

    Davis, M J; Gillaspie, A G; Harris, R W; Lawson, R H

    1980-12-19

    A small coryneform bacterium was consistently isolated from sugarcane with ratoon stunting disease and shown to be the causal agent. A similar bacterium was isolated from Bermuda grass. Both strains multiplied in sugarcane and Bermuda grass, but the Bermuda grass strain did not incite the symptoms of ratoon stunting disease in sugarcane. Shoot growth in Bermuda grass was retarded by both strains. PMID:17817853

  18. Agrobacterium tumefaciens is a diazotrophic bacterium

    SciTech Connect

    Kanvinde, L.; Sastry, G.R.K. )

    1990-07-01

    This is the first report that Agrobacterium tumefaciens can fix nitrogen in a free-living condition as shown by its abilities to grown on nitrogen-free medium, reduce acetylene to ethylene, and incorporate {sup 15}N supplied as {sup 15}N{sub 2}. As with most other well-characterized diazotrophic bacteria, the presence of NH{sub 4}{sup +} in the medium and aerobic conditions repress nitrogen fixation by A. tumefaciens. The system requires molybdenum. No evidence for nodulation was found with pea, peanut, or soybean plants. Further understanding of the nitrogen-fixing ability of this bacterium, which has always been considered a pathogen, should cast new light on the evolution of a pathogenic versus symbiotic relationship.

  19. Characterizations of intracellular arsenic in a bacterium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolfe-Simon, F.; Yannone, S. M.; Tainer, J. A.

    2011-12-01

    Life requires a key set of chemical elements to sustain growth. Yet, a growing body of literature suggests that microbes can alter their nutritional requirements based on the availability of these chemical elements. Under limiting conditions for one element microbes have been shown to utilize a variety of other elements to serve similar functions often (but not always) in similar molecular structures. Well-characterized elemental exchanges include manganese for iron, tungsten for molybdenum and sulfur for phosphorus or oxygen. These exchanges can be found in a wide variety of biomolecules ranging from protein to lipids and DNA. Recent evidence suggested that arsenic, as arsenate or As(V), was taken up and incorporated into the cellular material of the bacterium GFAJ-1. The evidence was interpreted to support As(V) acting in an analogous role to phosphate. We will therefore discuss our ongoing efforts to characterize intracellular arsenate and how it may partition among the cellular fractions of the microbial isolate GFAJ-1 when exposed to As(V) in the presence of various levels of phosphate. Under high As(V) conditions, cells express a dramatically different proteome than when grown given only phosphate. Ongoing studies on the diversity and potential role of proteins and metabolites produced in the presence of As(V) will be reported. These investigations promise to inform the role and additional metabolic potential for As in biology. Arsenic assimilation into biomolecules contributes to the expanding set of chemical elements utilized by microbes in unusual environmental niches.

  20. Detection of Salmonella bacterium in drinking water using microring resonator.

    PubMed

    Bahadoran, Mahdi; Noorden, Ahmad Fakhrurrazi Ahmad; Mohajer, Faeze Sadat; Abd Mubin, Mohamad Helmi; Chaudhary, Kashif; Jalil, Muhammad Arif; Ali, Jalil; Yupapin, Preecha

    2016-01-01

    A new microring resonator system is proposed for the detection of the Salmonella bacterium in drinking water, which is made up of SiO2-TiO2 waveguide embedded inside thin film layer of the flagellin. The change in refractive index due to the binding of the Salmonella bacterium with flagellin layer causes a shift in the output signal wavelength and the variation in through and drop port's intensities, which leads to the detection of Salmonella bacterium in drinking water. The sensitivity of proposed sensor for detecting of Salmonella bacterium in water solution is 149 nm/RIU and the limit of detection is 7 × 10(-4)RIU. PMID:25133457

  1. Genome Sequence of the Soil Bacterium Janthinobacterium sp. KBS0711.

    PubMed

    Shoemaker, William R; Muscarella, Mario E; Lennon, Jay T

    2015-01-01

    We present a draft genome of Janthinobacterium sp. KBS0711 that was isolated from agricultural soil. The genome provides insight into the ecological strategies of this bacterium in free-living and host-associated environments. PMID:26089434

  2. Genome Sequence of the Soil Bacterium Janthinobacterium sp. KBS0711

    PubMed Central

    Shoemaker, William R.; Muscarella, Mario E.

    2015-01-01

    We present a draft genome of Janthinobacterium sp. KBS0711 that was isolated from agricultural soil. The genome provides insight into the ecological strategies of this bacterium in free-living and host-associated environments. PMID:26089434

  3. Taxonomic characterization of the cellulose-degrading bacterium NCIB 10462

    SciTech Connect

    Dees, C.; Ringleberg, D.; Scott, T.C.; Phelps, T.

    1994-06-01

    The gram negative cellulase-producing bacterium NCIB 10462 has been previously named Pseudomonas fluorescens subsp. or var. cellulosa. Since there is renewed interest in cellulose-degrading bacteria for use in bioconversion of cellulose to chemical feed stocks and fuels, we re-examined the characteristics of this microorganism to determine its proper taxonomic characterization and to further define it`s true metabolic potential. Metabolic and physical characterization of NCIB 10462 revealed that this was an alkalophilic, non-fermentative, gram negative, oxidase positive, motile, cellulose-degrading bacterium. The aerobic substrate utilization profile of this bacterium was found to have few characteristics consistent with a classification of P. fluorescens with a very low probability match with the genus Sphingomonas. Total lipid analysis did not reveal that any sphingolipid bases are produced by this bacterium. NCIB 10462 was found to grow best aerobically but also grows well in complex media under reducing conditions. NCIB 10462 grew slowly under full anaerobic conditions on complex media but growth on cellulosic media was found only under aerobic conditions. Total fatty acid analysis (MIDI) of NCIB 10462 failed to group this bacterium with a known pseudomonas species. However, fatty acid analysis of the bacteria when grown at temperatures below 37{degrees}C suggest that the organism is a pseudomonad. Since a predominant characteristic of this bacterium is it`s ability to degrade cellulose, we suggest it be called Pseudomonas cellulosa.

  4. Pangenome Evolution in the Marine Bacterium Alteromonas

    PubMed Central

    López-Pérez, Mario; Rodriguez-Valera, Francisco

    2016-01-01

    We have examined a collection of the free-living marine bacterium Alteromonas genomes with cores diverging in average nucleotide identities ranging from 99.98% to 73.35%, i.e., from microbes that can be considered members of a natural clone (like in a clinical epidemiological outbreak) to borderline genus level. The genomes were largely syntenic allowing a precise delimitation of the core and flexible regions in each. The core was 1.4 Mb (ca. 30% of the typical strain genome size). Recombination rates along the core were high among strains belonging to the same species (37.7–83.7% of all nucleotide polymorphisms) but they decreased sharply between species (18.9–5.1%). Regarding the flexible genome, its main expansion occurred within the boundaries of the species, i.e., strains of the same species already have a large and diverse flexible genome. Flexible regions occupy mostly fixed genomic locations. Four large genomic islands are involved in the synthesis of strain-specific glycosydic receptors that we have called glycotypes. These genomic regions are exchanged by homologous recombination within and between species and there is evidence for their import from distant taxonomic units (other genera within the family). In addition, several hotspots for integration of gene cassettes by illegitimate recombination are distributed throughout the genome. They code for features that give each clone specific properties to interact with their ecological niche and must flow fast throughout the whole genus as they are found, with nearly identical sequences, in different species. Models for the generation of this genomic diversity involving phage predation are discussed. PMID:27189983

  5. Pangenome Evolution in the Marine Bacterium Alteromonas.

    PubMed

    López-Pérez, Mario; Rodriguez-Valera, Francisco

    2016-01-01

    We have examined a collection of the free-living marine bacterium Alteromonas genomes with cores diverging in average nucleotide identities ranging from 99.98% to 73.35%, i.e., from microbes that can be considered members of a natural clone (like in a clinical epidemiological outbreak) to borderline genus level. The genomes were largely syntenic allowing a precise delimitation of the core and flexible regions in each. The core was 1.4 Mb (ca. 30% of the typical strain genome size). Recombination rates along the core were high among strains belonging to the same species (37.7-83.7% of all nucleotide polymorphisms) but they decreased sharply between species (18.9-5.1%). Regarding the flexible genome, its main expansion occurred within the boundaries of the species, i.e., strains of the same species already have a large and diverse flexible genome. Flexible regions occupy mostly fixed genomic locations. Four large genomic islands are involved in the synthesis of strain-specific glycosydic receptors that we have called glycotypes. These genomic regions are exchanged by homologous recombination within and between species and there is evidence for their import from distant taxonomic units (other genera within the family). In addition, several hotspots for integration of gene cassettes by illegitimate recombination are distributed throughout the genome. They code for features that give each clone specific properties to interact with their ecological niche and must flow fast throughout the whole genus as they are found, with nearly identical sequences, in different species. Models for the generation of this genomic diversity involving phage predation are discussed. PMID:27189983

  6. Hydrogen Production by the Thermophilic Bacterium Thermotoga neapolitana.

    PubMed

    Pradhan, Nirakar; Dipasquale, Laura; d'Ippolito, Giuliana; Panico, Antonio; Lens, Piet N L; Esposito, Giovanni; Fontana, Angelo

    2015-01-01

    As the only fuel that is not chemically bound to carbon, hydrogen has gained interest as an energy carrier to face the current environmental issues of greenhouse gas emissions and to substitute the depleting non-renewable reserves. In the last years, there has been a significant increase in the number of publications about the bacterium Thermotoga neapolitana that is responsible for production yields of H2 that are among the highest achievements reported in the literature. Here we present an extensive overview of the most recent studies on this hyperthermophilic bacterium together with a critical discussion of the potential of fermentative production by this bacterium. The review article is organized into sections focused on biochemical, microbiological and technical issues, including the effect of substrate, reactor type, gas sparging, temperature, pH, hydraulic retention time and organic loading parameters on rate and yield of gas production. PMID:26053393

  7. Hydrogen Production by the Thermophilic Bacterium Thermotoga neapolitana

    PubMed Central

    Pradhan, Nirakar; Dipasquale, Laura; d’Ippolito, Giuliana; Panico, Antonio; Lens, Piet N. L.; Esposito, Giovanni; Fontana, Angelo

    2015-01-01

    As the only fuel that is not chemically bound to carbon, hydrogen has gained interest as an energy carrier to face the current environmental issues of greenhouse gas emissions and to substitute the depleting non-renewable reserves. In the last years, there has been a significant increase in the number of publications about the bacterium Thermotoga neapolitana that is responsible for production yields of H2 that are among the highest achievements reported in the literature. Here we present an extensive overview of the most recent studies on this hyperthermophilic bacterium together with a critical discussion of the potential of fermentative production by this bacterium. The review article is organized into sections focused on biochemical, microbiological and technical issues, including the effect of substrate, reactor type, gas sparging, temperature, pH, hydraulic retention time and organic loading parameters on rate and yield of gas production. PMID:26053393

  8. Extreme Ionizing-Radiation-Resistant Bacterium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vaishampayan, Parag A.; Venkateswaran, Kasthuri J.; Schwendner, Petra

    2013-01-01

    potential for transfer, and subsequent proliferation, on another solar body such as Mars and Europa. These organisms are more likely to escape planetary protection assays, which only take into account presence of spores. Hence, presences of extreme radiation-resistant Deinococcus in the cleanroom facility where spacecraft are assembled pose a serious risk for integrity of life-detection missions. The microorganism described herein was isolated from the surfaces of the cleanroom facility in which the Phoenix Lander was assembled. The isolated bacterial strain was subjected to a comprehensive polyphasic analysis to characterize its taxonomic position. This bacterium exhibits very low 16SrRNA similarity with any other environmental isolate reported to date. Both phenotypic and phylogenetic analyses clearly indicate that this isolate belongs to the genus Deinococcus and represents a novel species. The name Deinococcus phoenicis was proposed after the Phoenix spacecraft, which was undergoing assembly, testing, and launch operations in the spacecraft assembly facility at the time of isolation. D. phoenicis cells exhibited higher resistance to ionizing radiation (cobalt-60; 14 kGy) than the cells of the D. radiodurans (5 kGy). Thus, it is in the best interest of NASA to thoroughly characterize this organism, which will further assess in determining the potential for forward contamination. Upon the completion of genetic and physiological characteristics of D. phoenicis, it will be added to a planetary protection database to be able to further model and predict the probability of forward contamination.

  9. Extreme Ionizing-Radiation-Resistant Bacterium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vaishampayan, Parag A.; Venkateswaran, Kasthuri J.; Schwendner, Petra

    2012-01-01

    potential for transfer, and subsequent proliferation, on another solar body such as Mars and Europa. These organisms are more likely to escape planetary protection assays, which only take into account presence of spores. Hence, presences of extreme radiation-resistant Deinococcus in the cleanroom facility where spacecraft are assembled pose a serious risk for integrity of life-detection missions. The microorganism described herein was isolated from the surfaces of the cleanroom facility in which the Phoenix Lander was assembled. The isolated bacterial strain was subjected to a comprehensive polyphasic analysis to characterize its taxonomic position. This bacterium exhibits very low 16SrRNA similarity with any other environmental isolate reported to date. Both phenotypic and phylogenetic analyses clearly indicate that this isolate belongs to the genus Deinococcus and represents a novel species. The name Deinococcus phoenicis was proposed after the Phoenix spacecraft, which was undergoing assembly, testing, and launch operations in the spacecraft assembly facility at the time of isolation. D. phoenicis cells exhibited higher resistance to ionizing radiation (cobalt-60; 14 kGy) than the cells of the D. radiodurans (5 kGy). Thus, it is in the best interest of NASA to thoroughly characterize this organism, which will further assess in determining the potential for forward contamination. Upon the completion of genetic and physiological characteristics of D. phoenicis, it will be added to a planetary protection database to be able to further model and predict the probability of forward contamination.

  10. Microcalorimetric Measurements of Glucose Metabolism by Marine Bacterium Vibrio alginolyticus

    PubMed Central

    Gordon, Andrew S.; Millero, Frank J.; Gerchakov, Sol M.

    1982-01-01

    Microcalorimetric measurements of heat production from glucose by Vibrio alginolyticus were made to assess the viability of calorimetry as a technique for studying the metabolism of marine bacteria at organic nutrient concentrations found in marine waters. The results show that the metabolism of glucose by this bacterium can be measured by calorimetry at submicromolar concentrations. A linear correlation between glucose concentration and total heat production was observed over a concentration range of 8 mM to 0.35 μM. It is suggested that these data indicate a constant efficiency of metabolism for this bacterium over the wide range of glucose concentrations studied. PMID:16346131

  11. Biological colloid engineering: Self-assembly of dipolar ferromagnetic chains in a functionalized biogenic ferrofluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruder, Warren C.; Hsu, Chia-Pei D.; Edelman, Brent D.; Schwartz, Russell; LeDuc, Philip R.

    2012-08-01

    We have studied the dynamic behavior of nanoparticles in ferrofluids consisting of single-domain, biogenic magnetite (Fe3O4) isolated from Magnetospirillum magnetotacticum (MS-1). Although dipolar chains form in magnetic colloids in zero applied field, when dried upon substrates, the solvent front disorders nanoparticle aggregation. Using avidin-biotin functionalization of the particles and substrate, we generated self-assembled, linear chain motifs that resist solvent front disruption in zero-field. The engineered self-assembly process we describe here provides an approach for the creation of ordered magnetic structures that could impact fields ranging from micro-electro-mechanical systems development to magnetic imaging of biological structures.

  12. Draft Genome Sequence of Oral Bacterium Streptococcus mutans JH1140

    PubMed Central

    Escano, Jerome; Deng, Peng; Lu, Shi-En

    2016-01-01

    Streptococcus mutans JH1140 is an oral bacterium known to produce the bacteriocin mutacin 1140, and the strain has been genetically engineered to combat dental caries. Here, we report the 2.0-Mb draft genome of S. mutans JH1140. This genome provides new insights into the strain’s superior colonization properties and its utility in replacement therapy. PMID:27257196

  13. Complete Genome of the Cellulolytic Ruminal Bacterium Ruminococcus albus 7

    SciTech Connect

    Suen, Garret; Stevenson, David M; Bruce, David; Chertkov, Olga; Copeland, A; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Detter, J. Chris; Goodwin, Lynne A.; Han, Cliff; Hauser, Loren John; Ivanova, N; Kyrpides, Nikos C; Land, Miriam L; Lapidus, Alla L.; Lucas, Susan; Ovchinnikova, Galina; Pitluck, Sam; Tapia, Roxanne; Woyke, Tanja; Boyum, Julie; Mead, David; Weimer, Paul J

    2011-01-01

    Ruminococcus albus 7 is a highly cellulolytic ruminal bacterium that is a member of the phylum Firmicutes. Here, we describe the complete genome of this microbe. This genome will be useful for rumen microbiology and cellulosome biology and in biofuel production, as one of its major fermentation products is ethanol.

  14. Complete genome of the cellulolytic ruminal bacterium Ruminococcus albus 7

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Ruminococcus albus 7 is a highly cellulolytic rumen bacterium that is a member of the phylum Firmicutes. Here, we describe the complete genome for this microbe. This genome will be useful for rumen microbiology, cellulosome biology, and in biofuel production, as one of its major fermentation product...

  15. Draft Genome Sequence of Oral Bacterium Streptococcus mutans JH1140.

    PubMed

    Escano, Jerome; Deng, Peng; Lu, Shi-En; Smith, Lief

    2016-01-01

    Streptococcus mutans JH1140 is an oral bacterium known to produce the bacteriocin mutacin 1140, and the strain has been genetically engineered to combat dental caries. Here, we report the 2.0-Mb draft genome of S. mutans JH1140. This genome provides new insights into the strain's superior colonization properties and its utility in replacement therapy. PMID:27257196

  16. Isolation of a bacterium capable of degrading peanut hull lignin

    SciTech Connect

    Kerr, T.A.; Kerr, R.D.; Benner, R.

    1983-11-01

    Thirty-seven bacterial strains capable of degrading peanut hull lignin were isolated by using four types of lignin preparations and hot-water-extracted peanut hulls. One of the isolates, tentatively identified as Arthrobacter species, was capable of utilizing all four lignin preparations as well as extracted peanut hulls as a sole source of carbon. The bacterium was also capable of degrading specifically labeled (/sup 14/C) lignin-labeled lignocellulose and (/sup 14/C)cellulose-labeled lignocellulose from the cordgrass Spartina alterniflora and could also degrade (/sup 14/C) Kraft lignin from slash pine. After 10 days of incubation with (/sup 14/C) cellulose-labeled lignocellulose or (/sup 14/C) lignin-labeled lignocellulose from S. alterniflora, the bacterium mineralized 6.5% of the polysaccharide component and 2.9% of the lignin component. (Refs. 24).

  17. A Streamlined Strategy for Biohydrogen Production with an Alkaliphilic Bacterium

    SciTech Connect

    Elias, Dwayne A; Wall, Judy D.; Mormile, Dr. Melanie R.; Begemann, Matthew B

    2012-01-01

    Biofuels are anticipated to enable a shift from fossil fuels for renewable transportation and manufacturing fuels, with biohydrogen considered attractive since it could offer the largest reduction of global carbon budgets. Currently, biohydrogen production remains inefficient and heavily fossil fuel-dependent. However, bacteria using alkali-treated biomass could streamline biofuel production while reducing costs and fossil fuel needs. An alkaliphilic bacterium, Halanaerobium strain sapolanicus, is described that is capable of biohydrogen production at levels rivaling neutrophilic strains, but at pH 11 and hypersaline conditions. H. sapolanicus ferments a variety of 5- and 6- carbon sugars derived from hemicellulose and cellulose including cellobiose, and forms the end products hydrogen and acetate. Further, it can also produce biohydrogen from switchgrass and straw pretreated at temperatures far lower than any previously reported and in solutions compatible with growth. Hence, this bacterium can potentially increase the efficiency and efficacy of biohydrogen production from renewable biomass resources.

  18. Delta8(14)-steroids in the bacterium Methylococcus capsulatus.

    PubMed Central

    Bouvier, P; Rohmer, M; Benveniste, P; Ourisson, G

    1976-01-01

    The 4,4-dimethyl and 4alpha-methyl sterols of the bacterium Methylococcus capsulatus were identified as 4,4-dimethyl- and 4alpha-methyl-5alpha-cholest-8(14)-en-3beta-ol and 4,4-dimethyl- and 4alpha-methyl-5alpha-cholesta-8(14),24-dien-3beta-ol. Sterol biosynthesis is blocked at the level of 4alpha-methyl delta8(14)-sterols. PMID:999649

  19. Thermostable purified endoglucanase from thermophilic bacterium acidothermus cellulolyticus

    DOEpatents

    Tucker, Melvin P.; Grohmann, Karel; Himmel, Michael E.; Mohagheghi, Ali

    1992-01-01

    A substantially purified high molecular weight cellulase enzyme having a molecular weight of between about 156,000 to about 203,400 daltons isolated from the bacterium Acidothermus cellulolyticus (ATCC 43068) and a method of producing it are disclosed. The enzyme is water soluble, possesses both C.sub.1 and C.sub.x types of enzymatic activity, has a high degree of stability toward heat and exhibits both a high optimum temperature activity and high inactivation characteristics.

  20. Isolation and Characterization of a Chlorinated-Pyridinol-Degrading Bacterium

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Y.; Racke, K. D.; Bollag, J.

    1997-01-01

    The isolation of a pure culture of bacteria able to use 3,5,6-trichloro-2-pyridinol (TCP) as a sole source of carbon and energy under aerobic conditions was achieved for the first time. The bacterium was identified as a Pseudomonas sp. and designated ATCC 700113. [2,6-(sup14)C]TCP degradation yielded (sup14)CO(inf2), chloride, and unidentified polar metabolites. PMID:16535719

  1. An on-bacterium flow cytometric immunoassay for protein quantification.

    PubMed

    Lan, Wen-Jun; Lan, Wei; Wang, Hai-Yan; Yan, Lei; Wang, Zhe-Li

    2013-09-01

    The polystyrene bead-based flow cytometric immunoassay has been widely reported. However, the preparation of functional polystyrene bead is still inconvenient. This study describes a simple and easy on-bacterium flow cytometric immunoassay for protein quantification, in which Staphylococcus aureus (SAC) is used as an antibody-antigen carrier to replace the polystyrene bead. The SAC beads were prepared by carboxyfluorescein diacetate succinimidyl ester (CFSE) labeling, paraformaldehyde fixation and antibody binding. Carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) and cytokeratin-19 fragment (CYFRA 21-1) proteins were used as models in the test system. Using prepared SAC beads, biotinylated proteins, and streptavidin-phycoerythrin (SA-PE), the on-bacterium flow cytometric immunoassay was validated by quantifying CEA and CYFRA 21-1 in sample. Obtained data demonstrated a concordant result between the logarithm of the protein concentration and the logarithm of the PE mean fluorescence intensity (MFI). The limit of detection (LOD) in this immunoassay was at least 0.25 ng/ml. Precision and accuracy assessments appeared that either the relative standard deviation (R.S.D.) or the relative error (R.E.) was <10%. The comparison between this immunoassay and a polystyrene bead-based flow cytometric immunoassay showed a correlation coefficient of 0.998 for serum CEA or 0.996 for serum CYFRA 21-1. In conclusion, the on-bacterium flow cytometric immunoassay may be of use in the quantification of serum protein. PMID:23739299

  2. Influence of plaque-forming bacterium, Rhodobacteraceae sp. on the growth of Chlorella vulgaris.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhangran; Zhang, Jingyan; Lei, Xueqian; Zhang, Bangzhou; Cai, Guanjing; Zhang, Huajun; Li, Yi; Zheng, Wei; Tian, Yun; Xu, Hong; Zheng, Tianling

    2014-10-01

    Experiments were conducted to find out the molecular features, infection process of a special alga plaque-forming microorganism and its potential influence on the biomass of Chlorella vulgaris during the infection process. Direct contact between the algal cell and the bacterium may be the primary steps needed for the bacterium to lyse the alga. Addition of C. vulgaris cells into f/2 medium allowed us obtain the object bacterium. The 16S rRNA gene sequence comparisons results showed that the plaque-forming bacterium kept the closest relationship with Labrenzia aggregata IAM 12614(T) at 98.90%. The existence of the bacterium could influence both the dry weight and lipid content of C. vulgaris. This study demonstrated that direct cell wall disruption of C. vulgaris by the bacterium would be a potentially effective method to utilize the biomass of microalgae. PMID:25086475

  3. Fast Neutron Irradiation of the Highly Radioresistant Bacterium Deinococcus Radiodurans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Case, Diane Louise

    Fast neutron dose survival curves were generated for the bacterium Deinococcus radiodurans, which is renowned for its unusually high resistance to gamma, x-ray, and ultraviolet radiation, but for which fast neutron response was unknown. The fast neutrons were produced by the University of Massachusetts Lowell 5.5-MV, type CN Van de Graaff accelerator through the ^7Li(p,n)^7 Be reaction by bombarding a thick metallic lithium target with a 4-MeV proton beam. The bacteria were uniformly distributed on 150-mm agar plates and were exposed to the fast neutron beam under conditions of charged particle equilibrium. The plates were subdivided into concentric rings of increasing diameter from the center to the periphery of the plate, within which the average neutron dose was calculated as the product of the precisely known neutron fluence at the average radius of the ring and the neutron energy dependent kerma factor. The neutron fluence and dose ranged from approximately 3 times 1013 n cm^ {-2} to 1 times 1012 n cm^ {-2}, and 200 kilorad to 5 kilorad, respectively, from the center to the periphery of the plate. Percent survival for Deinococcus radiodurans as a function of fast neutron dose was derived from the ability of the irradiated cells to produce visible colonies within each ring compared to that of a nonirradiated control population. The bacterium Escherichia coli B/r (CSH) was irradiated under identical conditions for comparative purposes. The survival response of Deinococcus radiodurans as a result of cumulative fast neutron exposures was also investigated. The quantification of the ability of Deinococcus radiodurans to survive cellular insult from secondary charged particles, which are produced by fast neutron interactions in biological materials, will provide valuable information about damage and repair mechanisms under extreme cellular stress, and may provide new insight into the origin of this bacterium's unprecedented radiation resistance.

  4. The terminal oxidase in the marine bacterium Pseudomonas nautica 617.

    PubMed

    Simpson, H; Denis, M; Malatesta, F

    1997-06-01

    The molecular properties of a novel membrane quinol oxidase from the marine bacterium Pseudomonas nautica 617 are presented. The protein contains 2b hemes/mole which may be distinguished by EPR spectroscopy but not by optical spectroscopy and electrochemistry. Respiration, though being cyanide insensitive, is not inhibited by carbon monoxide and oxygen reduction is carried out only half-way with production of hydrogen peroxide. The terminal oxidase represents, therefore, a unique example in the large family of terminal oxidases known up to date. PMID:9337488

  5. Triazine herbicide resistance in the photosynthetic bacterium Rhodopseudomonas sphaeroides

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, A.E.; Gilbert, C.W.; Guy, R.; Arntzen, C.J.

    1984-10-01

    The photoaffinity herbicide azidoatrazine (2-azido-4-ethylamino-6-isopropylamino-s-triazine) selectively labels the L subunit of the reaction center of the photosynthetic bacterium Rhodopseudomonas sphaeroides. Herbicide-resistant mutants retain the L subunit and have altered binding properties for methylthio- and chloro-substituted triazines as well as altered equilibrium constants for electron transfer between primary and secondary electron acceptors. We suggest that a subtle alteration in the L subunit is responsible for herbicide resistance and that the L subunit is the functional analog of the 32-kDa Q/sub B/ protein of chloroplast membranes. 42 references, 6 figures, 1 table.

  6. Factors Affecting Zebra Mussel Kill by the Bacterium Pseudomonas fluorescens

    SciTech Connect

    Daniel P. Molloy

    2004-02-24

    The specific purpose of this research project was to identify factors that affect zebra mussel kill by the bacterium Pseudomonas fluorescens. Test results obtained during this three-year project identified the following key variables as affecting mussel kill: treatment concentration, treatment duration, mussel siphoning activity, dissolved oxygen concentration, water temperature, and naturally suspended particle load. Using this latter information, the project culminated in a series of pipe tests which achieved high mussel kill inside power plants under once-through conditions using service water in artificial pipes.

  7. Intracellular iron minerals in a dissimilatory iron-reducing bacterium.

    PubMed

    Glasauer, Susan; Langley, Sean; Beveridge, Terry J

    2002-01-01

    Among prokaryotes, there are few examples of controlled mineral formation; the formation of crystalline iron oxides and sulfides [magnetite (Fe3O4) or greigite (Fe3S4)] by magnetotactic bacteria is an exception. Shewanella putrefaciens CN32, a Gram-negative, facultative anaerobic bacterium that is capable of dissimilatory iron reduction, produced microscopic intracellular grains of iron oxide minerals during growth on two-line ferrihydrite in a hydrogen-argon atmosphere. The minerals, formed at iron concentrations found in the soil and sedimentary environments where these bacteria are active, could represent an unexplored pathway for the cycling of iron by bacteria. PMID:11778045

  8. Polysaccharide degradation systems of the saprophytic bacterium Cellvibrio japonicus.

    PubMed

    Gardner, Jeffrey G

    2016-07-01

    Study of recalcitrant polysaccharide degradation by bacterial systems is critical for understanding biological processes such as global carbon cycling, nutritional contributions of the human gut microbiome, and the production of renewable fuels and chemicals. One bacterium that has a robust ability to degrade polysaccharides is the Gram-negative saprophyte Cellvibrio japonicus. A bacterium with a circuitous history, C. japonicus underwent several taxonomy changes from an initially described Pseudomonas sp. Most of the enzymes described in the pre-genomics era have also been renamed. This review aims to consolidate the biochemical, structural, and genetic data published on C. japonicus and its remarkable ability to degrade cellulose, xylan, and pectin substrates. Initially, C. japonicus carbohydrate-active enzymes were studied biochemically and structurally for their novel polysaccharide binding and degradation characteristics, while more recent systems biology approaches have begun to unravel the complex regulation required for lignocellulose degradation in an environmental context. Also included is a discussion for the future of C. japonicus as a model system, with emphasis on current areas unexplored in terms of polysaccharide degradation and emerging directions for C. japonicus in both environmental and biotechnological applications. PMID:27263016

  9. Hydrogenomics of the Extremely Thermophilic Bacterium Caldicellulosiruptor saccharolyticus▿ †

    PubMed Central

    van de Werken, Harmen J. G.; Verhaart, Marcel R. A.; VanFossen, Amy L.; Willquist, Karin; Lewis, Derrick L.; Nichols, Jason D.; Goorissen, Heleen P.; Mongodin, Emmanuel F.; Nelson, Karen E.; van Niel, Ed W. J.; Stams, Alfons J. M.; Ward, Donald E.; de Vos, Willem M.; van der Oost, John; Kelly, Robert M.; Kengen, Servé W. M.

    2008-01-01

    Caldicellulosiruptor saccharolyticus is an extremely thermophilic, gram-positive anaerobe which ferments cellulose-, hemicellulose- and pectin-containing biomass to acetate, CO2, and hydrogen. Its broad substrate range, high hydrogen-producing capacity, and ability to coutilize glucose and xylose make this bacterium an attractive candidate for microbial bioenergy production. Here, the complete genome sequence of C. saccharolyticus, consisting of a 2,970,275-bp circular chromosome encoding 2,679 predicted proteins, is described. Analysis of the genome revealed that C. saccharolyticus has an extensive polysaccharide-hydrolyzing capacity for cellulose, hemicellulose, pectin, and starch, coupled to a large number of ABC transporters for monomeric and oligomeric sugar uptake. The components of the Embden-Meyerhof and nonoxidative pentose phosphate pathways are all present; however, there is no evidence that an Entner-Doudoroff pathway is present. Catabolic pathways for a range of sugars, including rhamnose, fucose, arabinose, glucuronate, fructose, and galactose, were identified. These pathways lead to the production of NADH and reduced ferredoxin. NADH and reduced ferredoxin are subsequently used by two distinct hydrogenases to generate hydrogen. Whole-genome transcriptome analysis revealed that there is significant upregulation of the glycolytic pathway and an ABC-type sugar transporter during growth on glucose and xylose, indicating that C. saccharolyticus coferments these sugars unimpeded by glucose-based catabolite repression. The capacity to simultaneously process and utilize a range of carbohydrates associated with biomass feedstocks is a highly desirable feature of this lignocellulose-utilizing, biofuel-producing bacterium. PMID:18776029

  10. Molybdate Reduction to Molybdenum Blue by an Antarctic Bacterium

    PubMed Central

    Ahmad, S. A.; Shukor, M. Y.; Shamaan, N. A.; Mac Cormack, W. P.; Syed, M. A.

    2013-01-01

    A molybdenum-reducing bacterium from Antarctica has been isolated. The bacterium converts sodium molybdate or Mo6+ to molybdenum blue (Mo-blue). Electron donors such as glucose, sucrose, fructose, and lactose supported molybdate reduction. Ammonium sulphate was the best nitrogen source for molybdate reduction. Optimal conditions for molybdate reduction were between 30 and 50 mM molybdate, between 15 and 20°C, and initial pH between 6.5 and 7.5. The Mo-blue produced had a unique absorption spectrum with a peak maximum at 865 nm and a shoulder at 710 nm. Respiratory inhibitors such as antimycin A, sodium azide, potassium cyanide, and rotenone failed to inhibit the reducing activity. The Mo-reducing enzyme was partially purified using ion exchange and gel filtration chromatography. The partially purified enzyme showed optimal pH and temperature for activity at 6.0 and 20°C, respectively. Metal ions such as cadmium, chromium, copper, silver, lead, and mercury caused more than 95% inhibition of the molybdenum-reducing activity at 0.1 mM. The isolate was tentatively identified as Pseudomonas sp. strain DRY1 based on partial 16s rDNA molecular phylogenetic assessment and the Biolog microbial identification system. The characteristics of this strain would make it very useful in bioremediation works in the polar and temperate countries. PMID:24381945

  11. Molybdate reduction to molybdenum blue by an Antarctic bacterium.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, S A; Shukor, M Y; Shamaan, N A; Mac Cormack, W P; Syed, M A

    2013-01-01

    A molybdenum-reducing bacterium from Antarctica has been isolated. The bacterium converts sodium molybdate or Mo⁶⁺ to molybdenum blue (Mo-blue). Electron donors such as glucose, sucrose, fructose, and lactose supported molybdate reduction. Ammonium sulphate was the best nitrogen source for molybdate reduction. Optimal conditions for molybdate reduction were between 30 and 50 mM molybdate, between 15 and 20°C, and initial pH between 6.5 and 7.5. The Mo-blue produced had a unique absorption spectrum with a peak maximum at 865 nm and a shoulder at 710 nm. Respiratory inhibitors such as antimycin A, sodium azide, potassium cyanide, and rotenone failed to inhibit the reducing activity. The Mo-reducing enzyme was partially purified using ion exchange and gel filtration chromatography. The partially purified enzyme showed optimal pH and temperature for activity at 6.0 and 20°C, respectively. Metal ions such as cadmium, chromium, copper, silver, lead, and mercury caused more than 95% inhibition of the molybdenum-reducing activity at 0.1 mM. The isolate was tentatively identified as Pseudomonas sp. strain DRY1 based on partial 16s rDNA molecular phylogenetic assessment and the Biolog microbial identification system. The characteristics of this strain would make it very useful in bioremediation works in the polar and temperate countries. PMID:24381945

  12. Biological Control of Meloidogyne hapla Using an Antagonistic Bacterium

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jiyeong; Seo, Yunhee; Kim, Young Ho

    2014-01-01

    We examined the efficacy of a bacterium for biocontrol of the root-knot nematode (RKN) Meloidogyne hapla in carrot (Daucus carota subsp. sativus) and tomato (Solanum lycopersicum). Among 542 bacterial isolates from various soils and plants, the highest nematode mortality was observed for treatments with isolate C1-7, which was identified as Bacillus cereus based on cultural and morphological characteristics, the Biolog program, and 16S rRNA sequencing analyses. The population density and the nematicidal activity of B. cereus C1-7 remained high until the end of culture in brain heart infusion broth, suggesting that it may have sustainable biocontrol potential. In pot experiments, the biocontrol efficacy of B. cereus C1-7 was high, showing complete inhibition of root gall or egg mass formation by RKN in carrot and tomato plants, and subsequently reducing RKN damage and suppressing nematode population growth, respectively. Light microscopy of RKN-infected carrot root tissues treated with C1-7 showed reduced formation of gall cells and fully developed giant cells, while extensive gall cells and fully mature giant cells with prominent cell wall ingrowths formed in the untreated control plants infected with RKNs. These histopathological characteristics may be the result of residual or systemic biocontrol activity of the bacterium, which may coincide with the biocontrol efficacies of nematodes in pots. These results suggest that B. cereus C1-7 can be used as a biocontrol agent for M. hapla. PMID:25289015

  13. Radiation response mechanisms of the extremely radioresistant bacterium Deinococcus radiodurans.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Yasuhiko; Narumi, Issay; Satoh, Katsuya; Funayama, Tomoo; Kikuchi, Masahiro; Kitayama, Shigeru; Watanabe, Hiroshi

    2004-11-01

    Effect of microgravity on recovery of bacterial cells from radiation damage was examined in IML-2, S/MM-4 and S/MM-9 experiments using the extremely radioresistant bacterium Deinococcus radiodurans. The cells were irradiated with gamma rays before the space flight and incubated on board the Space Shuttle. The survival of the wild type cells incubated in space increased compared with the ground controls, suggesting that the recovery of this bacterium from radiation damage was enhanced under the space environment. No difference was observed between the survivals of radiosensitive mutant rec30 cells incubated in space and on the ground. The amount of DNA-repair related RecA protein induced under microgravity was similar to those of ground controls, however, induction of PprA protein, product of a unique radiation-inducible gene (designated pprA) responsible for loss of radiation resistance in repair-deficient mutant, KH311, was enhanced under microgravity compared with ground controls. Recent investigation in vitro showed that PprA preferentially bound to double-stranded DNA carrying strand breaks, inhibited Escherichia coli exonuclease III activity, and stimulated the DNA end-joining reaction catalyzed by DNA ligases. These results suggest that D. radiodurans has a radiation-induced non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ) repair mechanism in which PprA plays a critical role. PMID:15858357

  14. Polysaccharide degradation systems of the saprophytic bacterium Cellvibrio japonicus

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Gardner, Jeffrey G.

    2016-06-04

    Study of recalcitrant polysaccharide degradation by bacterial systems is critical for understanding biological processes such as global carbon cycling, nutritional contributions of the human gut microbiome, and the production of renewable fuels and chemicals. One bacterium that has a robust ability to degrade polysaccharides is the Gram-negative saprophyte Cellvibrio japonicus. A bacterium with a circuitous history, C. japonicus underwent several taxonomy changes from an initially described Pseudomonas sp. Most of the enzymes described in the pre-genomics era have also been renamed. Furthermore, this review aims to consolidate the biochemical, structural, and genetic data published on C. japonicus and its remarkablemore » ability to degrade cellulose, xylan, and pectin substrates. Initially, C. japonicus carbohydrate-active enzymes were studied biochemically and structurally for their novel polysaccharide binding and degradation characteristics, while more recent systems biology approaches have begun to unravel the complex regulation required for lignocellulose degradation in an environmental context. Also included is a discussion for the future of C. japonicus as a model system, with emphasis on current areas unexplored in terms of polysaccharide degradation and emerging directions for C. japonicus in both environmental and biotechnological applications.« less

  15. Isolation and characterization of luminescent bacterium for sludge biodegradation.

    PubMed

    Zahaba, Maryam; Halmi, Mohd Izuan Effendi; Ahmad, Siti Aqlima; Shukor, Mohd Yunus; Syed, Mohd Arif

    2015-11-01

    Microtox is based on the inhibition of luminescence of the bacterium Vibrio fischeri by the toxicants. This technique has been accepted by the USEPA (United States Environmental Protection Agency) as a biomonitoring tool for remediation of toxicants such as hydrocarbon sludge. In the present study, a luminescent bacterium was isolated from yellow striped scad (Selaroides leptolepis) and was tentatively identified as Vibrio sp. isolate MZ. This aerobic isolate showed high luminescence activity in a broad range of temperature from 25 to 35 °C. In addition, optimal conditions for high bioluminescence activity in range of pH 7.5 to 8.5 and 10 gl(-1) of sodium chloride, 10 gl(-1) of peptone and 10 gl(-1) of sucrose as carbon source. Bench scale biodegradation 1% sludge (w/v) was set up and degradation was determined using gas chromatography with flame ionised detector (GC-FID). In this study, Rhodococcus sp. strain AQ5NOL2 was used to degrade the sludge. Based on the preliminary results obtained, Vibrio sp. isolate MZwas able to monitor the biodegradation of sludge. Therefore, Vibrio sp. isolate MZ has the potential to be used as a biomonitoring agent for biomonitoring of sludge biodegradation particularly in the tropical ranged environment. PMID:26688958

  16. Metabolism of threo-beta-methylmalate by a soil bacterium.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, S; Takeuchi, Y; Sasaki, K; Katsuki, H

    1976-10-01

    Studies on threo-beta-methylmalate metabolism in a soil bacterium of the genus Bacillus which can utilize threo-beta-methylmalate as a sole carbon source were carried out. When DL-threo-beta-methylmalate was incubated with a cell-free extract of the bacterium, citramalate was found to be formed. Similarly, formation of threo-beta-methylmalate from DL-citramalate was confirmed. These dicarbosylic acids were identified by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Examination of inducibility, substrate specificity, and cofactor requirement of the enzymes involved in the reactions showed the existence of two interconversion reactions between the threo-beta-methylmalate and citramalate. One was an interconversion reaction between L-threo-beta-methylmalate and L-citramalate via mesaconate and the other was an interconversion reaction between D-threo-beta-methylmalate and D-citramalate via citraconate. These reactions were both reversible and were catalyzed by distinct and inducible enzymes. It is suggested that the two reactions participate in the catabolism of threo-beta-methylmalate. PMID:1010849

  17. Structure and morphology of magnetite anaerobically-produced by a marine magnetotactic bacterium and a dissimilatory iron-reducing bacterium

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sparks, N.H.C.; Mann, S.; Bazylinski, D.A.; Lovley, D.R.; Jannasch, H.W.; Frankel, R.B.

    1990-01-01

    Intracellular crystals of magnetite synthesized by cells of the magnetotactic vibroid organism, MV-1, and extracellular crystals of magnetite produced by the non-magnetotactic dissimilatory iron-reducing bacterium strain GS-15, were examined using high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, electron diffraction and 57Fe Mo??ssbauer spectroscopy. The magnetotactic bacterium contained a single chain of approximately 10 crystals aligned along the long axis of the cell. The crystals were essentially pure stoichiometric magnetite. When viewed along the crystal long axis the particles had a hexagonal cross-section whereas side-on they appeared as rectangules or truncated rectangles of average dimension, 53 ?? 35 nm. These findings are explained in terms of a three-dimensional morphology comprising a hexagonal prism of {110} faces which are capped and truncated by {111} end faces. Electron diffraction and lattice imaging studies indicated that the particles were structurally well-defined single crystals. In contrast, magnetite particles produced by the strain, GS-15 were irregular in shape and had smaller mean dimensions (14 nm). Single crystals were imaged but these were not of high structural perfection. These results highlight the influence of intracellular control on the crystallochemical specificity of bacterial magnetites. The characterization of these crystals is important in aiding the identification of biogenic magnetic materials in paleomagnetism and in studies of sediment magnetization. ?? 1990.

  18. Draft Genome Sequence of Ensifer adhaerens M78, a Mineral-Weathering Bacterium Isolated from Soil.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yuanli; Chen, Wei; He, Linyan; Wang, Qi; Sheng, Xia-Fang

    2016-01-01

    Ensifer adhaerens M78, a bacterium isolated from soil, can weather potash feldspar and release Fe, Si, and Al from rock under nutrient-poor conditions. Here, we report the draft genome sequence of strain M78, which may facilitate a better understanding of the molecular mechanism involved in mineral weathering by the bacterium. PMID:27609930

  19. Genome Sequence of the Antarctic Psychrophile Bacterium Planococcus antarcticus DSM 14505

    PubMed Central

    Margolles, Abelardo; Gueimonde, Miguel

    2012-01-01

    Planococcus antarcticus DSM 14505 is a psychrophile bacterium that was isolated from cyanobacterial mat samples, originally collected from ponds in McMurdo, Antarctica. This orange-pigmented bacterium grows at 4°C and may possess interesting enzymatic activities at low temperatures. Here we report the first genomic sequence of P. antarcticus DSM 14505. PMID:22843594

  20. Kinetic study of trichloroethylene and toluene degradation by a bioluminescent reporter bacterium

    SciTech Connect

    Kelly, C.J.; Sanseverino, J.; Bienkowski, P.R.; Sayler, G.S.

    1995-12-31

    A constructed bioluminescent reporter bacterium, Pseudomonas putida B2, is very briefly described in this paper. The bacterium degrades toluene and trichloroethylene (TCE), and produces light in the presence of toluene. The light response is an indication of cellular viability and expression of the genes encoding toluene and TCE degrading enzymes.

  1. Near-complete genome sequence of the cellulolytic Bacterium Bacteroides (Pseudobacteroides) cellulosolvens ATCC 35603

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Dassa, Bareket; Utturkar, Sagar M.; Hurt, Richard A.; Klingeman, Dawn Marie; Keller, Martin; Xu, Jian; Reddy, Harish Kumar; Borovok, Ilya; Grinberg, Inna Rozman; Lamed, Raphael; et al

    2015-09-24

    We report the single-contig genome sequence of the anaerobic, mesophilic, cellulolytic bacterium, Bacteroides cellulosolvens. The bacterium produces a particularly elaborate cellulosome system, whereas the types of cohesin-dockerin interactions are opposite of other known cellulosome systems: cell-surface attachment is thus mediated via type-I interactions whereas enzymes are integrated via type-II interactions.

  2. FEEDING EXPERIMENTS WITH BACTERIUM PULLORUM. THE TOXICITY OF INFECTED EGGS.

    PubMed

    Rettger, L F; Hull, T G; Sturges, W S

    1916-04-01

    The problem of eradicating ovarian infection in the domestic fowl assumes still greater importance than heretofore, in the light of data recently acquired. Not only is it of great significance to eliminate the permanent carriers of Bacterium pullorum from all flocks of fowls from the standpoint of successful poultry breeding, but also because they constitute a possible source of danger to man. Eggs which harbor Bacterium pullorum in the yolk in large numbers may produce abnormal conditions, when fed, not only in young chicks, but in adult fowls, young rabbits, guinea pigs, and kittens. The toxicity for young rabbits is most pronounced, the infection usually resulting in the death of the animals. In kittens the most prominent symptoms are those of severe food-poisoning with members of the paratyphoid group of bacteria. The possibility of infected eggs causing serious disturbances in young children and in the sick and convalescent of all ages must therefore receive serious consideration. Ovarian infection of fowls is very common throughout this country. Hence, a large proportion of the marketed eggs are infected with Bacterium pullorum. When such eggs are allowed to remain in nests under broody hens, or in warm storage places, for comparatively few hours, they contain large numbers of the organism. Soft boiling, coddling, and frying on one side only do not necessarily render the yolks free from viable bacteria; therefore, eggs which have gone through these processes may, like raw eggs, be the cause of serious disturbances in persons who are particularly susceptible to such influences, and especially to infants. That no well authenticated instances of egg-poisoning of this kind are on record does not warrant the assumption that there have been no cases. The etiology of infantile stomach and intestinal disturbances is as yet too little understood; in fact, it may be said that many of these disorders have no known cause, and almost as much may be said regarding gastro

  3. Metabolic characterisation of a novel vanillylmandelate-degrading bacterium.

    PubMed

    Turner, J E; Allison, N; Fewson, C A

    1996-10-01

    A newly isolated gram-negative bacterium, possibly Brevundimonas diminuta, utilised D,L-vanillylmandelate (D,L-VMA) as a sole carbon and energy source. The organism converted D,L-VMA to vanillylglyoxylate using a soluble NAD-dependent dehydrogenase specific for D-VMA and a dye-linked, membrane-associated L-VMA dehydrogenase. Vanillylglyoxylate was further metabolised by decarboxylation, dehydrogenation and demethylation to protocatechuate. A 4,5-dioxygenase cleaved protocatechuate to 2-hydroxy-4-carboxymuconic semialdehyde. Partially purified d-VMA dehydrogenase exhibited optimal activity at 30 degrees C and pH 9.5 and had an apparent Km for D-VMA of 470 microM. Although induced by several substituted mandelates, the enzyme had a narrow substrate specificity range with virtually no activity towards D-mandelate. Such properties render the enzyme of potential use in both diagnostic and biosynthetic applications. PMID:8824148

  4. Fungal lysis by a soil bacterium fermenting cellulose.

    PubMed

    Tolonen, Andrew C; Cerisy, Tristan; El-Sayyed, Hafez; Boutard, Magali; Salanoubat, Marcel; Church, George M

    2015-08-01

    Recycling of plant biomass by a community of bacteria and fungi is fundamental to carbon flow in terrestrial ecosystems. Here we report how the plant fermenting, soil bacterium Clostridium phytofermentans enhances growth on cellulose by simultaneously lysing and consuming model fungi from soil. We investigate the mechanism of fungal lysis to show that among the dozens of different glycoside hydrolases C. phytofermentans secretes on cellulose, the most highly expressed enzymes degrade fungi rather than plant substrates. These enzymes, the GH18 Cphy1799 and Cphy1800, synergize to hydrolyse chitin, a main component of the fungal cell wall. Purified enzymes inhibit fungal growth and mutants lacking either GH18 grow normally on cellulose and other plant substrates, but have a reduced ability to hydrolyse chitinous substrates and fungal hyphae. Thus, C. phytofermentans boosts growth on cellulose by lysing fungi with its most highly expressed hydrolases, highlighting the importance of fungal interactions to the ecology of cellulolytic bacteria. PMID:24798076

  5. Characterization of the quinones in purple sulfur bacterium Thermochromatium tepidum.

    PubMed

    Kimura, Yuuka; Kawakami, Tomoaki; Yu, Long-Jiang; Yoshimura, Miku; Kobayashi, Masayuki; Wang-Otomo, Zheng-Yu

    2015-07-01

    Quinone distributions in the thermophilic purple sulfur bacterium Thermochromatium tepidum have been investigated at different levels of the photosynthetic apparatus. Here we show that, on average, the intracytoplasmic membrane contains 18 ubiquinones (UQ) and 4 menaquinones (MQ) per reaction center (RC). About one-third of the quinones are retained in the light-harvesting-reaction center core complex (LH1-RC) with a similar ratio of UQ to MQ. The numbers of quinones essentially remains unchanged during crystallization of the LH1-RC. There are 1-2 UQ and 1 MQ associated with the RC-only complex in the purified solution sample. Our results suggest that a large proportion of the quinones are confined to the core complex and at least five UQs remain invisible in the current LH1-RC crystal structure. PMID:26048701

  6. Mechanism of anaerobic degradation of triethanolamine by a homoacetogenic bacterium

    SciTech Connect

    Speranza, Giovanna . E-mail: giovanna.speranza@unimi.it; Morelli, Carlo F.; Cairoli, Paola; Mueller, Britta; Schink, Bernhard

    2006-10-20

    Triethanolamine (TEA) is converted into acetate and ammonia by a strictly anaerobic, gram-positive Acetobacterium strain LuTria3. Fermentation experiments with resting cell suspensions and specifically deuterated substrates indicate that in the acetate molecule the carboxylate and the methyl groups correspond to the alcoholic function and to its adjacent methylene group, respectively, of the 2-hydroxyethyl unit of TEA. A 1,2 shift of a hydrogen (deuterium) atom from -CH{sub 2} -O- to =N-CH{sub 2} - without exchange with the medium was observed. This fact gives evidence that a radical mechanism occurs involving the enzyme and/or coenzyme molecule as a hydrogen carrier. Such a biodegradation appears analogous to the conversion of 2-phenoxyethanol into acetate mediated by another strain of the anaerobic homoacetogenic bacterium Acetobacterium.

  7. A bacterium that degrades and assimilates poly(ethylene terephthalate).

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Shosuke; Hiraga, Kazumi; Takehana, Toshihiko; Taniguchi, Ikuo; Yamaji, Hironao; Maeda, Yasuhito; Toyohara, Kiyotsuna; Miyamoto, Kenji; Kimura, Yoshiharu; Oda, Kohei

    2016-03-11

    Poly(ethylene terephthalate) (PET) is used extensively worldwide in plastic products, and its accumulation in the environment has become a global concern. Because the ability to enzymatically degrade PET has been thought to be limited to a few fungal species, biodegradation is not yet a viable remediation or recycling strategy. By screening natural microbial communities exposed to PET in the environment, we isolated a novel bacterium, Ideonella sakaiensis 201-F6, that is able to use PET as its major energy and carbon source. When grown on PET, this strain produces two enzymes capable of hydrolyzing PET and the reaction intermediate, mono(2-hydroxyethyl) terephthalic acid. Both enzymes are required to enzymatically convert PET efficiently into its two environmentally benign monomers, terephthalic acid and ethylene glycol. PMID:26965627

  8. Isolation of a bacterium that reductively dechlorinates tetrachloroethene to ethene

    SciTech Connect

    Maymo-Gatell, X.; Chien, Yueh-tyng; Zinder, S.H.

    1997-06-06

    Tetrachloroethene is a prominent groundwater pollutant that can be reductively dechlorinated by mixed anaerobic microbial populations to the nontoxic product ethene. Strain 195, a coccoid bacterium that dechlorinates tetrachlorethene to ethene, was isolated and characterized. Growth of strain 195 with H{sub 2} and tetrachloroethene as the electron donor and acceptor pair required extracts from mixed microbial cultures. Growth of strain 195 was resistant to ampicillin and vancomycin; its cell wall did not react with a peptidoglycan-specific lectin and its ultrastructure resembled S-layers of Archaea. Analysis of the 16S ribosomal DNA sequence of strain 195 indicated that it is a eubacterium without close affiliation to any known groups. 24 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  9. The domestication of the probiotic bacterium Lactobacillus acidophilus

    PubMed Central

    Bull, Matthew J.; Jolley, Keith A.; Bray, James E.; Aerts, Maarten; Vandamme, Peter; Maiden, Martin C. J.; Marchesi, Julian R.; Mahenthiralingam, Eshwar

    2014-01-01

    Lactobacillus acidophilus is a Gram-positive lactic acid bacterium that has had widespread historical use in the dairy industry and more recently as a probiotic. Although L. acidophilus has been designated as safe for human consumption, increasing commercial regulation and clinical demands for probiotic validation has resulted in a need to understand its genetic diversity. By drawing on large, well-characterised collections of lactic acid bacteria, we examined L. acidophilus isolates spanning 92 years and including multiple strains in current commercial use. Analysis of the whole genome sequence data set (34 isolate genomes) demonstrated L. acidophilus was a low diversity, monophyletic species with commercial isolates essentially identical at the sequence level. Our results indicate that commercial use has domesticated L. acidophilus with genetically stable, invariant strains being consumed globally by the human population. PMID:25425319

  10. The capacity of phototrophic sulfur bacterium Thiocapsa roseopersicina for chemosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Kondratieva, E N; Zhukov, V G; Ivanovsky, R N; Petushkova, U P; Monosov, E Z

    1976-07-01

    Purple sulfur bacterium Thiocapsa roseopersicina strain BBS requiring vitamin B12 may grow in the dark in media containing no other organic compounds. Under such conditions the cells oxidize sulfide and thiosulfate with the use of O2 and assimilate carbon dioxide. After 10--30s assimilation of NaH14CO3 about 60% of radioactivity is found in phosphorylated compounds characteristic for the reductive pentose phosphate cycle. The possibility of the function of this cycle in the dark in the presence of O2 is confirmed by the capacity of cells grown under such conditions to synthesize ribulose-1,5-diphosphate carboxylase. All this evidence suggests the ability of T. roseopersicina to change from phototrophy to aerobic chemolithoautotrophy. PMID:942280

  11. Genome analysis of the Anerobic Thermohalophilic bacterium Halothermothrix orenii

    SciTech Connect

    Mavromatis, Konstantinos; Ivanova, Natalia; Anderson, Iain; Lykidis, Athanasios; Hooper, Sean D.; Sun, Hui; Kunin, Victor; Lapidus, Alla; Hugenholtz, Philip; Patel, Bharat; Kyrpides, Nikos C.

    2008-11-03

    Halothermothirx orenii is a strictly anaerobic thermohalophilic bacterium isolated from sediment of a Tunisian salt lake. It belongs to the order Halanaerobiales in the phylum Firmicutes. The complete sequence revealed that the genome consists of one circular chromosome of 2578146 bps encoding 2451 predicted genes. This is the first genome sequence of an organism belonging to the Haloanaerobiales. Features of both Gram positive and Gram negative bacteria were identified with the presence of both a sporulating mechanism typical of Firmicutes and a characteristic Gram negative lipopolysaccharide being the most prominent. Protein sequence analyses and metabolic reconstruction reveal a unique combination of strategies for thermophilic and halophilic adaptation. H. orenii can serve as a model organism for the study of the evolution of the Gram negative phenotype as well as the adaptation under thermohalophilic conditions and the development of biotechnological applications under conditions that require high temperatures and high salt concentrations.

  12. Ecology and metabolism of the beneficial intestinal commensal bacterium Faecalibacterium prausnitzii.

    PubMed

    Miquel, Sylvie; Martín, Rebeca; Bridonneau, Chantal; Robert, Véronique; Sokol, Harry; Bermúdez-Humarán, Luis G; Thomas, Muriel; Langella, Philippe

    2014-01-01

    Faecalibacterium prausnitzii is a major commensal bacterium, and its prevalence is often decreased in conditions of intestinal dysbiosis. The phylogenic identity of this bacterium was described only recently. It is still poorly characterized, and its specific growth requirements in the human gastrointestinal tract are not known. In this review, we consider F. prausnitzii metabolism, its ecophysiology in both humans and animals, and the effects of drugs and nutrition on its population. We list important questions about this beneficial and ubiquitous commensal bacterium that it would be valuable to answer. PMID:24637606

  13. Novel Trypanosomatid-Bacterium Association: Evolution of Endosymbiosis in Action

    PubMed Central

    Kostygov, Alexei Y.; Dobáková, Eva; Grybchuk-Ieremenko, Anastasiia; Váhala, Dalibor; Maslov, Dmitri A.; Votýpka, Jan

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT We describe a novel symbiotic association between a kinetoplastid protist, Novymonas esmeraldas gen. nov., sp. nov., and an intracytoplasmic bacterium, “Candidatus Pandoraea novymonadis” sp. nov., discovered as a result of a broad-scale survey of insect trypanosomatid biodiversity in Ecuador. We characterize this association by describing the morphology of both organisms, as well as their interactions, and by establishing their phylogenetic affinities. Importantly, neither partner is closely related to other known organisms previously implicated in eukaryote-bacterial symbiosis. This symbiotic association seems to be relatively recent, as the host does not exert a stringent control over the number of bacteria harbored in its cytoplasm. We argue that this unique relationship may represent a suitable model for studying the initial stages of establishment of endosymbiosis between a single-cellular eukaryote and a prokaryote. Based on phylogenetic analyses, Novymonas could be considered a proxy for the insect-only ancestor of the dixenous genus Leishmania and shed light on the origin of the two-host life cycle within the subfamily Leishmaniinae. PMID:26980834

  14. High cell density cultivation of the chemolithoautotrophic bacterium Nitrosomonas europaea.

    PubMed

    Papp, Benedek; Török, Tibor; Sándor, Erzsébet; Fekete, Erzsébet; Flipphi, Michel; Karaffa, Levente

    2016-05-01

    Nitrosomonas europaea is a chemolithoautotrophic nitrifier, a gram-negative bacterium that can obtain all energy required for growth from the oxidation of ammonia to nitrite, and this may be beneficial for various biotechnological and environmental applications. However, compared to other bacteria, growth of ammonia oxidizing bacteria is very slow. A prerequisite to produce high cell density N. europaea cultures is to minimize the concentrations of inhibitory metabolic by-products. During growth on ammonia nitrite accumulates, as a consequence, N. europaea cannot grow to high cell concentrations under conventional batch conditions. Here, we show that single-vessel dialysis membrane bioreactors can be used to obtain substantially increased N. europaea biomasses and substantially reduced nitrite levels in media initially containing high amounts of the substrate. Dialysis membrane bioreactor fermentations were run in batch as well as in continuous mode. Growth was monitored with cell concentration determinations, by assessing dry cell mass and by monitoring ammonium consumption as well as nitrite formation. In addition, metabolic activity was probed with in vivo acridine orange staining. Under continuous substrate feed, the maximal cell concentration (2.79 × 10(12)/L) and maximal dry cell mass (0.895 g/L) achieved more than doubled the highest values reported for N. europaea cultivations to date. PMID:26358065

  15. Bacterium organizes hierarchical amorphous structure in microbial cellulose

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koizumi, S.; Yue, Z.; Tomita, Y.; Kondo, T.; Iwase, H.; Yamaguchi, D.; Hashimoto, T.

    2008-05-01

    A pellicle, a gel film of microbial cellulose, is a supermolecular system containing 99% of water by weight, which is closely related to an amorphous structure in it. Using ultra-small-angle neutron scattering, in order to cover over a wide range of length scales from nm to 10μm, we examined the hierarchical amorphous structure in the microbial cellulose, which is synthesized by a bacterium (Acetobacter xylinum). The microbial cellulose swollen by water shows small-angle scattering that obeys a power law q -behavior according to q-α as a function of the magnitude of the scattering vector q . The power law, determined by scattering, is attributed to a mass fractal due to the distribution of the center of mass for the crystallite (microfibril) in amorphous cellulose swollen by water. As q increases, α takes the values of 2.5, 1, and 2.35, corresponding, respectively, to a gel network composed of bundles, a bundle composed of cellulose ribbons, and concentration fluctuations in a bundle. From the mass fractal q -behavior and its length scale limits, we evaluated a volume fraction of crystallite in microbial cellulose. It was found that 90% of the cellulose bundle is occupied by amorphous cellulose containing water.

  16. Fitness correlates with the extent of cheating in a bacterium.

    PubMed

    Jiricny, N; Diggle, S P; West, S A; Evans, B A; Ballantyne, G; Ross-Gillespie, A; Griffin, A S

    2010-04-01

    There is growing awareness of the importance of cooperative behaviours in microbial communities. Empirical support for this insight comes from experiments using mutant strains, termed 'cheats', which exploit the cooperative behaviour of wild-type strains. However, little detailed work has gone into characterising the competitive dynamics of cooperative and cheating strains. We test three specific predictions about the fitness consequences of cheating to different extents by examining the production of the iron-scavenging siderophore molecule, pyoverdin, in the bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa. We create a collection of mutants that differ in the amount of pyoverdin that they produce (from 1% to 96% of the production of paired wild types) and demonstrate that these production levels correlate with both gene activity and the ability to bind iron. Across these mutants, we found that (1) when grown in a mixed culture with a cooperative wild-type strain, the relative fitness of a mutant is negatively correlated with the amount of pyoverdin that it produces; (2) the absolute and relative fitness of the wild-type strain in the mixed culture is positively correlated with the amount of pyoverdin that the mutant produces; and (3) when grown in a monoculture, the absolute fitness of the mutant is positively correlated with the amount of pyoverdin that it produces. Overall, we demonstrate that cooperative pyoverdin production is exploitable and illustrate how variation in a social behaviour determines fitness differently, depending on the social environment. PMID:20210835

  17. P450 enzymes from the bacterium Novosphingobium aromaticivorans.

    PubMed

    Bell, Stephen G; Wong, Luet-Lok

    2007-08-31

    Twelve of the fifteen potential P450 enzymes from the bacterium Novosphingobium aromaticivorans, which is known to degrade a wide range of aromatic hydrocarbons, have been produced via heterologous expression in Escherichia coli. The enzymes were tested for their ability to bind a range of substrates including polyaromatic hydrocarbons. While two of the enzymes were found to bind aromatic compounds (CYP108D1 and CYP203A2), the others show binding with a variety of compounds including linear alkanes (CYP153C1) and mono- and sesqui-terpenoid compounds (CYP101B1, CYP101C1, CYP101D1, CYP101D2, CYP111A1, and CYP219A1). A 2Fe-2S ferredoxin (Arx-A), which is associated with CYP101D2, was also produced. The activity of five of the P450 enzymes (CYP101B1, CYP101C1, CYP101D1, CYP101D2, and CYP111A2) was reconstituted with Arx-A and putidaredoxin reductase (of the P450cam system from Pseudomonas putida) in a Class I type electron transfer system. Preliminary characterisation of the majority of the substrate oxidation products is reported. PMID:17618912

  18. Bioconversion of methane to lactate by an obligate methanotrophic bacterium

    PubMed Central

    Henard, Calvin A.; Smith, Holly; Dowe, Nancy; Kalyuzhnaya, Marina G.; Pienkos, Philip T.; Guarnieri, Michael T.

    2016-01-01

    Methane is the second most abundant greenhouse gas (GHG), with nearly 60% of emissions derived from anthropogenic sources. Microbial conversion of methane to fuels and value-added chemicals offers a means to reduce GHG emissions, while also valorizing this otherwise squandered high-volume, high-energy gas. However, to date, advances in methane biocatalysis have been constrained by the low-productivity and limited genetic tractability of natural methane-consuming microbes. Here, leveraging recent identification of a novel, tractable methanotrophic bacterium, Methylomicrobium buryatense, we demonstrate microbial biocatalysis of methane to lactate, an industrial platform chemical. Heterologous overexpression of a Lactobacillus helveticus L-lactate dehydrogenase in M. buryatense resulted in an initial titer of 0.06 g lactate/L from methane. Cultivation in a 5 L continuously stirred tank bioreactor enabled production of 0.8 g lactate/L, representing a 13-fold improvement compared to the initial titer. The yields (0.05 g lactate/g methane) and productivity (0.008 g lactate/L/h) indicate the need and opportunity for future strain improvement. Additionally, real-time analysis of methane utilization implicated gas-to-liquid transfer and/or microbial methane consumption as process limitations. This work opens the door to develop an array of methanotrophic bacterial strain-engineering strategies currently employed for biocatalytic sugar upgrading to “green” chemicals and fuels. PMID:26902345

  19. A serine sensor for multicellularity in a bacterium

    PubMed Central

    Subramaniam, Arvind R; DeLoughery, Aaron; Bradshaw, Niels; Chen, Yun; O’Shea, Erin; Losick, Richard; Chai, Yunrong

    2013-01-01

    We report the discovery of a simple environmental sensing mechanism for biofilm formation in the bacterium Bacillus subtilis that operates without the involvement of a dedicated RNA or protein. Certain serine codons, the four TCN codons, in the gene for the biofilm repressor SinR caused a lowering of SinR levels under biofilm-inducing conditions. Synonymous substitutions of these TCN codons with AGC or AGT impaired biofilm formation and gene expression. Conversely, switching AGC or AGT to TCN codons upregulated biofilm formation. Genome-wide ribosome profiling showed that ribosome density was higher at UCN codons than at AGC or AGU during biofilm formation. Serine starvation recapitulated the effect of biofilm-inducing conditions on ribosome occupancy and SinR production. As serine is one of the first amino acids to be exhausted at the end of exponential phase growth, reduced translation speed at serine codons may be exploited by other microbes in adapting to stationary phase. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.01501.001 PMID:24347549

  20. P450 enzymes from the bacterium Novosphingobium aromaticivorans

    SciTech Connect

    Bell, Stephen G. . E-mail: stephen.bell@chem.ox.ac.uk; Wong, Luet-Lok

    2007-08-31

    Twelve of the fifteen potential P450 enzymes from the bacterium Novosphingobium aromaticivorans, which is known to degrade a wide range of aromatic hydrocarbons, have been produced via heterologous expression in Escherichia coli. The enzymes were tested for their ability to bind a range of substrates including polyaromatic hydrocarbons. While two of the enzymes were found to bind aromatic compounds (CYP108D1 and CYP203A2), the others show binding with a variety of compounds including linear alkanes (CYP153C1) and mono- and sesqui-terpenoid compounds (CYP101B1, CYP101C1, CYP101D1, CYP101D2, CYP111A1, and CYP219A1). A 2Fe-2S ferredoxin (Arx-A), which is associated with CYP101D2, was also produced. The activity of five of the P450 enzymes (CYP101B1, CYP101C1, CYP101D1, CYP101D2, and CYP111A2) was reconstituted with Arx-A and putidaredoxin reductase (of the P450cam system from Pseudomonas putida) in a Class I type electron transfer system. Preliminary characterisation of the majority of the substrate oxidation products is reported.

  1. The acetylproteome of Gram-positive model bacterium Bacillus subtilis.

    PubMed

    Kim, Dooil; Yu, Byung Jo; Kim, Jung Ae; Lee, Yong-Jik; Choi, Soo-Geun; Kang, Sunghyun; Pan, Jae-Gu

    2013-05-01

    N(ε) -lysine acetylation, a reversible and highly regulated PTM, has been shown to occur in the model Gram-negative bacteria Escherichia coli and Salmonella enterica. Here, we extend this acetylproteome analysis to Bacillus subtilis, a model Gram-positive bacterium. Through anti-acetyllysine antibody-based immunoseparation of acetylpeptides followed by nano-HPLC/MS/MS analysis, we identified 332 unique lysine-acetylated sites on 185 proteins. These proteins are mainly involved in cellular housekeeping functions such as central metabolism and protein synthesis. Fifity-nine of the lysine-acetylated proteins showed homology with lysine-acetylated proteins previously identified in E. coli, suggesting that acetylated proteins are more conserved. Notably, acetylation was found at or near the active sites predicted by Prosite signature, including SdhA, RocA, Kbl, YwjH, and YfmT, indicating that lysine acetylation may affect their activities. In 2-amino-3-ketobutyrate CoA ligase Kbl, a class II aminotransferase, a lysine residue involved in pyridoxal phosphate attachment was found to be acetylated. This data set provides evidence for the generality of lysine acetylation in eubacteria and opens opportunities to explore the consequences of acetylation modification on the molecular physiology of B. subtilis. PMID:23468065

  2. Heavy Metal Induced Antibiotic Resistance in Bacterium LSJC7.

    PubMed

    Chen, Songcan; Li, Xiaomin; Sun, Guoxin; Zhang, Yingjiao; Su, Jianqiang; Ye, Jun

    2015-01-01

    Co-contamination of antibiotics and heavy metals prevails in the environment, and may play an important role in disseminating bacterial antibiotic resistance, but the selective effects of heavy metals on bacterial antibiotic resistance is largely unclear. To investigate this, the effects of heavy metals on antibiotic resistance were studied in a genome-sequenced bacterium, LSJC7. The results showed that the presence of arsenate, copper, and zinc were implicated in fortifying the resistance of LSJC7 towards tetracycline. The concentrations of heavy metals required to induce antibiotic resistance, i.e., the minimum heavy metal concentrations (MHCs), were far below (up to 64-fold) the minimum inhibition concentrations (MIC) of LSJC7. This finding indicates that the relatively low heavy metal levels in polluted environments and in treated humans and animals might be sufficient to induce bacterial antibiotic resistance. In addition, heavy metal induced antibiotic resistance was also observed for a combination of arsenate and chloramphenicol in LSJC7, and copper/zinc and tetracycline in antibiotic susceptible strain Escherichia coli DH5α. Overall, this study implies that heavy metal induced antibiotic resistance might be ubiquitous among various microbial species and suggests that it might play a role in the emergence and spread of antibiotic resistance in metal and antibiotic co-contaminated environments. PMID:26426011

  3. Anaerobic degradation of toluene by a denitrifying bacterium.

    PubMed Central

    Evans, P J; Mang, D T; Kim, K S; Young, L Y

    1991-01-01

    A denitrifying bacterium, designated strain T1, that grew with toluene as the sole source of carbon under anaerobic conditions was isolated. The type of agar used in solid media and the toxicity of toluene were determinative factors in the successful isolation of strain T1. Greater than 50% of the toluene carbon was oxidized to CO2, and 29% was assimilated into biomass. The oxidation of toluene to CO2 was stoichiometrically coupled to nitrate reduction and denitrification. Strain T1 was tolerant of and grew on 3 mM toluene after a lag phase. The rate of toluene degradation was 1.8 mumol min-1 liter-1 (56 nmol min-1 mg of protein-1) in a cell suspension. Strain T1 was distinct from other bacteria that oxidize toluene anaerobically, but it may utilize a similar biochemical pathway of oxidation. In addition, o-xylene was transformed to a metabolite in the presence of toluene but did not serve as the sole source of carbon for growth of strain T1. This transformation was dependent on the degradation of toluene. Images PMID:2059037

  4. Denitrification characteristics of a marine origin psychrophilic aerobic denitrifying bacterium.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Haiyan; Liu, Ying; Sun, Guangdong; Gao, Xiyan; Zhang, Qingling; Liu, Zhipei

    2011-01-01

    A psychrophilic aerobic denitrifying bacterium, strain S1-1, was isolated from a biological aerated filter conducted for treatment of recirculating water in a marine aquaculture system. Strain S1-1 was preliminarily identified as Psychrobacter sp. based on the analysis of its 16S rRNA gene sequence, which showed 100% sequence similarity to that of Psychrobacter sp. TSBY-70. Strain S1-1 grew well either in high nitrate or high nitrite conditions with a removal of 100% nitrate or 63.50% nitrite, and the total nitrogen removal rates could reach to 46.48% and 31.89%, respectively. The results indicated that nitrate was mainly reduced in its logarithmic growth phase with a very low level accumulation of nitrite, suggesting that the aerobic denitrification process of strain S1-1 occurred mainly in this phase. The GC-MS results showed that N2O was formed as the major intermediate during the aerobic denitrifying process of strain S1-1. Finally, factors affecting the growth of strain S1-1 and its aerobic denitrifying ability were also investigated. Results showed that the optimum aerobic denitrification conditions for strain S1-1 were sodium succinate as carbon source, C/N ratio15, salinity 10 g/L NaCl, incubation temperature 20 degrees C and initial pH 6.5. PMID:22432315

  5. Mechanisms of gold biomineralization in the bacterium Cupriavidus metallidurans.

    PubMed

    Reith, Frank; Etschmann, Barbara; Grosse, Cornelia; Moors, Hugo; Benotmane, Mohammed A; Monsieurs, Pieter; Grass, Gregor; Doonan, Christian; Vogt, Stefan; Lai, Barry; Martinez-Criado, Gema; George, Graham N; Nies, Dietrich H; Mergeay, Max; Pring, Allan; Southam, Gordon; Brugger, Joël

    2009-10-20

    While the role of microorganisms as main drivers of metal mobility and mineral formation under Earth surface conditions is now widely accepted, the formation of secondary gold (Au) is commonly attributed to abiotic processes. Here we report that the biomineralization of Au nanoparticles in the metallophillic bacterium Cupriavidus metallidurans CH34 is the result of Au-regulated gene expression leading to the energy-dependent reductive precipitation of toxic Au(III)-complexes. C. metallidurans, which forms biofilms on Au grains, rapidly accumulates Au(III)-complexes from solution. Bulk and microbeam synchrotron X-ray analyses revealed that cellular Au accumulation is coupled to the formation of Au(I)-S complexes. This process promotes Au toxicity and C. metallidurans reacts by inducing oxidative stress and metal resistances gene clusters (including a Au-specific operon) to promote cellular defense. As a result, Au detoxification is mediated by a combination of efflux, reduction, and possibly methylation of Au-complexes, leading to the formation of Au(I)-C-compounds and nanoparticulate Au(0). Similar particles were observed in bacterial biofilms on Au grains, suggesting that bacteria actively contribute to the formation of Au grains in surface environments. The recognition of specific genetic responses to Au opens the way for the development of bioexploration and bioprocessing tools. PMID:19815503

  6. Heavy Metal Induced Antibiotic Resistance in Bacterium LSJC7

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Songcan; Li, Xiaomin; Sun, Guoxin; Zhang, Yingjiao; Su, Jianqiang; Ye, Jun

    2015-01-01

    Co-contamination of antibiotics and heavy metals prevails in the environment, and may play an important role in disseminating bacterial antibiotic resistance, but the selective effects of heavy metals on bacterial antibiotic resistance is largely unclear. To investigate this, the effects of heavy metals on antibiotic resistance were studied in a genome-sequenced bacterium, LSJC7. The results showed that the presence of arsenate, copper, and zinc were implicated in fortifying the resistance of LSJC7 towards tetracycline. The concentrations of heavy metals required to induce antibiotic resistance, i.e., the minimum heavy metal concentrations (MHCs), were far below (up to 64-fold) the minimum inhibition concentrations (MIC) of LSJC7. This finding indicates that the relatively low heavy metal levels in polluted environments and in treated humans and animals might be sufficient to induce bacterial antibiotic resistance. In addition, heavy metal induced antibiotic resistance was also observed for a combination of arsenate and chloramphenicol in LSJC7, and copper/zinc and tetracycline in antibiotic susceptible strain Escherichia coli DH5α. Overall, this study implies that heavy metal induced antibiotic resistance might be ubiquitous among various microbial species and suggests that it might play a role in the emergence and spread of antibiotic resistance in metal and antibiotic co-contaminated environments. PMID:26426011

  7. Yersinia ruckeri sp. nov., the redmouth (RM) bacterium

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ewing, W.H.; Ross, A.J.; Brenner, Don J.; Fanning, G. R.

    1978-01-01

    Cultures of the redmouth (RM) bacterium, one of the etiological agents of redmouth disease in rainbow trout (Salmo gairdneri) and certain other fishes, were characterized by means of their biochemical reactions, by deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) hybridization, and by determination of guanine-plus-cytosine (G+C) ratios in DNA. The DNA relatedness studies confirmed the fact that the RM bacteria are members of the family Enterobacteriaceae and that they comprise a single species that is not closely related to any other species of Enterobacteriaceae. They are about 30% related to species of both Serratia and Yersinia. A comparison of the biochemical reactions of RM bacteria and serratiae indicated that there are many differences between these organisms and that biochemically the RM bacteria are most closely related to yersiniae. The G+C ratios of RM bacteria were approximated to be between 47.5 and 48.5% These values are similar to those of yersiniae but markedly different from those of serratiae. On the basis of their biochemical reactions and their G+C ratios, the RM bacteria are considered to be a new species of Yersinia, for which the name Yersinia ruckeri is proposed. Strain 2396-61 (= ATCC 29473) is designated the type strain of the species.

  8. Novel Rickettsiella Bacterium in the Leafhopper Orosius albicinctus (Hemiptera: Cicadellidae)

    PubMed Central

    Iasur-Kruh, Lilach; Weintraub, Phyllis G.; Mozes-Daube, Netta; Robinson, Wyatt E.; Perlman, Steve J.

    2013-01-01

    Bacteria in the genus Rickettsiella (Coxiellaceae), which are mainly known as arthropod pathogens, are emerging as excellent models to study transitions between mutualism and pathogenicity. The current report characterizes a novel Rickettsiella found in the leafhopper Orosius albicinctus (Hemiptera: Cicadellidae), a major vector of phytoplasma diseases in Europe and Asia. Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) and pyrosequencing were used to survey the main symbionts of O. albicinctus, revealing the obligate symbionts Sulcia and Nasuia, and the facultative symbionts Arsenophonus and Wolbachia, in addition to Rickettsiella. The leafhopper Rickettsiella is allied with bacteria found in ticks. Screening O. albicinctus from the field showed that Rickettsiella is highly prevalent, with over 60% of individuals infected. A stable Rickettsiella infection was maintained in a leafhopper laboratory colony for at least 10 generations, and fluorescence microscopy localized bacteria to accessory glands of the female reproductive tract, suggesting that the bacterium is vertically transmitted. Future studies will be needed to examine how Rickettsiella affects host fitess and its ability to vector phytopathogens. PMID:23645190

  9. Bioconversion of methane to lactate by an obligate methanotrophic bacterium.

    PubMed

    Henard, Calvin A; Smith, Holly; Dowe, Nancy; Kalyuzhnaya, Marina G; Pienkos, Philip T; Guarnieri, Michael T

    2016-01-01

    Methane is the second most abundant greenhouse gas (GHG), with nearly 60% of emissions derived from anthropogenic sources. Microbial conversion of methane to fuels and value-added chemicals offers a means to reduce GHG emissions, while also valorizing this otherwise squandered high-volume, high-energy gas. However, to date, advances in methane biocatalysis have been constrained by the low-productivity and limited genetic tractability of natural methane-consuming microbes. Here, leveraging recent identification of a novel, tractable methanotrophic bacterium, Methylomicrobium buryatense, we demonstrate microbial biocatalysis of methane to lactate, an industrial platform chemical. Heterologous overexpression of a Lactobacillus helveticus L-lactate dehydrogenase in M. buryatense resulted in an initial titer of 0.06 g lactate/L from methane. Cultivation in a 5 L continuously stirred tank bioreactor enabled production of 0.8 g lactate/L, representing a 13-fold improvement compared to the initial titer. The yields (0.05 g lactate/g methane) and productivity (0.008 g lactate/L/h) indicate the need and opportunity for future strain improvement. Additionally, real-time analysis of methane utilization implicated gas-to-liquid transfer and/or microbial methane consumption as process limitations. This work opens the door to develop an array of methanotrophic bacterial strain-engineering strategies currently employed for biocatalytic sugar upgrading to "green" chemicals and fuels. PMID:26902345

  10. Mutation of bacterium Vibrio gazogenes for selective preparation of colorants.

    PubMed

    Alihosseini, Farzaneh; Lango, Jozsef; Ju, Kou-San; Hammock, Bruce D; Sun, Gang

    2010-01-01

    A novel marine bacterium strain effectively produced prodiginine type pigments. These colorants could dye wool, silk and synthetic fabrics such as polyester and polyacrylic and also show antibacterial properties against Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus bacteria on the dyed products. Methyl nitrosoguanidine was used as a mutation agent to increase the genetic diversity and the production yield of the bacteria of the family of Vibrio gazogenes. The analysis of the mutated samples showed that two new main colorants as well as three previously found ones were produced. Liquid chromatography electro spray ionization mass spectrometry (LC-ESI-MS) and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopic techniques were used to elucidate the structures of the newly produced colorants. Mass measurements revealed that the colorants C1, C2, C3, C4 have molecular masses of 321, 323, 351, and 295 Da. One unstable colorant C5 with molecular mass of 309 Da was detected as well. The mutated bacteria strains increased the yield of pigment production by about 81% and produced prodigiosin in 97% purity. The antibiotic activities of pure colorants are discussed as well. Based on their bio-activity and excellent dyeing capabilities, these colorants could be employed in cosmetic and textile industries. PMID:19902486

  11. Mechanisms of gold biomineralization in the bacterium Cupriavidus metallidurans

    PubMed Central

    Reith, Frank; Etschmann, Barbara; Grosse, Cornelia; Moors, Hugo; Benotmane, Mohammed A.; Monsieurs, Pieter; Grass, Gregor; Doonan, Christian; Vogt, Stefan; Lai, Barry; Martinez-Criado, Gema; George, Graham N.; Nies, Dietrich H.; Mergeay, Max; Pring, Allan; Southam, Gordon; Brugger, Joël

    2009-01-01

    While the role of microorganisms as main drivers of metal mobility and mineral formation under Earth surface conditions is now widely accepted, the formation of secondary gold (Au) is commonly attributed to abiotic processes. Here we report that the biomineralization of Au nanoparticles in the metallophillic bacterium Cupriavidus metallidurans CH34 is the result of Au-regulated gene expression leading to the energy-dependent reductive precipitation of toxic Au(III)-complexes. C. metallidurans, which forms biofilms on Au grains, rapidly accumulates Au(III)-complexes from solution. Bulk and microbeam synchrotron X-ray analyses revealed that cellular Au accumulation is coupled to the formation of Au(I)-S complexes. This process promotes Au toxicity and C. metallidurans reacts by inducing oxidative stress and metal resistances gene clusters (including a Au-specific operon) to promote cellular defense. As a result, Au detoxification is mediated by a combination of efflux, reduction, and possibly methylation of Au-complexes, leading to the formation of Au(I)-C-compounds and nanoparticulate Au0. Similar particles were observed in bacterial biofilms on Au grains, suggesting that bacteria actively contribute to the formation of Au grains in surface environments. The recognition of specific genetic responses to Au opens the way for the development of bioexploration and bioprocessing tools. PMID:19815503

  12. Bioconversion of methane to lactate by an obligate methanotrophic bacterium

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Henard, Calvin A.; Smith, Holly; Dowe, Nancy; Kalyuzhnaya, Marina G.; Pienkos, Philip T.; Guarnieri, Michael T.

    2016-02-23

    Methane is the second most abundant greenhouse gas (GHG), with nearly 60% of emissions derived from anthropogenic sources. Microbial conversion of methane to fuels and value-added chemicals offers a means to reduce GHG emissions, while also valorizing this otherwise squandered high-volume, high-energy gas. However, to date, advances in methane biocatalysis have been constrained by the low-productivity and limited genetic tractability of natural methane-consuming microbes. Here, leveraging recent identification of a novel, tractable methanotrophic bacterium, Methylomicrobium buryatense, we demonstrate microbial biocatalysis of methane to lactate, an industrial platform chemical. Heterologous overexpression of a Lactobacillus helveticus L-lactate dehydrogenase in M. buryatense resultedmore » in an initial titer of 0.06 g lactate/L from methane. Cultivation in a 5 L continuously stirred tank bioreactor enabled production of 0.8 g lactate/L, representing a 13-fold improvement compared to the initial titer. The yields (0.05 g lactate/g methane) and productivity (0.008 g lactate/L/h) indicate the need and opportunity for future strain improvement. Additionally, real-time analysis of methane utilization implicated gas-to-liquid transfer and/or microbial methane consumption as process limitations. This work opens the door to develop an array of methanotrophic bacterial strain-engineering strategies currently employed for biocatalytic sugar upgrading to “green” chemicals and fuels.« less

  13. Gracilibacillus kimchii sp. nov., a halophilic bacterium isolated from kimchi.

    PubMed

    Oh, Young Joon; Lee, Hae-Won; Lim, Seul Ki; Kwon, Min-Sung; Lee, Jieun; Jang, Ja-Young; Park, Hae Woong; Nam, Young-Do; Seo, Myung-Ji; Choi, Hak-Jong

    2016-09-01

    A novel halophilic bacterium, strain K7(T), was isolated from kimchi, a traditional Korean fermented food. The strain is Gram-positive, motile, and produces terminal endospores. The isolate is facultative aerobic and grows at salinities of 0.0-25.0% (w/v) NaCl (optimum 10-15% NaCl), pH 5.5-8.5 (optimum pH 7.0-7.5), and 15-42°C (optimum 37°C). The predominant isoprenoid quinone in the strain is menaquinone-7 and the peptidoglycan of the strain is meso-diaminopimelic acid. The major fatty acids of the strain are anteisio-C15:0, iso-C15:0, and, C16:0 (other components were < 10.0%), while the major polar lipids are diphosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylcholine, and three unidentified lipids. A phylogenetic analysis of 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity showed that the isolated strain was a cluster of the genus Gracilibacillus. High levels of gene sequence similarity were observed between strain K7(T) and Gracilibacillus orientalis XH-63(T) (96.5%), and between the present strain and Gracilibacillus xinjiangensis (96.5%). The DNA G+C content of this strain is 37.7 mol%. Based on these findings, strain K7(T) is proposed as a novel species: Gracilibacillus kimchii sp. nov. The type strain is K7(T) (KACC 18669(T); JCM 31344(T)). PMID:27572507

  14. Hydrodynamics and collective behavior of the tethered bacterium Thiovulum majus

    PubMed Central

    Petroff, Alexander; Libchaber, Albert

    2014-01-01

    The ecology and dynamics of many microbial systems, particularly in mats and soils, are shaped by how bacteria respond to evolving nutrient gradients and microenvironments. Here we show how the response of the sulfur-oxidizing bacterium Thiovulum majus to changing oxygen gradients causes cells to organize into large-scale fronts. To study this phenomenon, we develop a technique to isolate and enrich these bacteria from the environment. Using this enrichment culture, we observe the formation and dynamics of T. majus fronts in oxygen gradients. We show that these dynamics can be understood as occurring in two steps. First, chemotactic cells moving up the oxygen gradient form a front that propagates with constant velocity. We then show, through observation and mathematical analysis, that this front becomes unstable to changes in cell density. Random perturbations in cell density create oxygen gradients. The response of cells magnifies these gradients and leads to the formation of millimeter-scale fluid flows that actively pull oxygenated water through the front. We argue that this flow results from a nonlinear instability excited by stochastic fluctuations in the density of cells. Finally, we show that the dynamics by which these modes interact can be understood from the chemotactic response of cells. These results provide a mathematically tractable example of how collective phenomena in ecological systems can arise from the individual response of cells to a shared resource. PMID:24459183

  15. Molecular study on cloned endoglucanase gene from rumen bacterium.

    PubMed

    Ozkose, Emin; Akyol, Ismail; Ekinci, Mehmet Sait

    2004-01-01

    An endoglucanase gene was subcloned from anaerobic rumen bacterium Ruminococcus flavefaciens strain 17. To express endoglucanase gene in Escherichia coli and Streptococcus bovis JB1, an endoglucanase gene fragment was inserted into pVA838-based shuttle vectors. Removal of endoglucanase gene promoter and expression of endoglucanase by promoter of S. bovis JB1 alpha-amylase gene (pACMCS) was also achieved. Survival of constructs pVACMCI, pTACMC and pACMCS, which carry endoglucanase gene, and stability of endoglucanase gene in S. bovis JB1, were observed. Maximal endoglucanase activities from S. bovis JB1/pVACMCI were 2- to 3-fold higher than from E. coli/pVACMCI. Specific cell activity of E. coli/pACMCS was found to be approximately 2- to -3 fold higher than the both E. coli/pVACMCI and E. coli/pTACMC. Specific cell activity of S. bovis JB1/pACMCS was also found to be approximately 2-fold higher than the both S. bovis/pVACMCI and S. bovis JB1/pTACMC. PMID:15925902

  16. Draft Genome Sequence of the Versatile Alkane-Degrading Bacterium Aquabacterium sp. Strain NJ1

    PubMed Central

    Shiwa, Yuh; Yoshikawa, Hirofumi; Zylstra, Gerben J.

    2014-01-01

    The draft genome sequence of a soil bacterium, Aquabacterium sp. strain NJ1, capable of utilizing both liquid and solid alkanes, was deciphered. This is the first report of an Aquabacterium genome sequence. PMID:25477416

  17. A new isolation method for labyrinthulids using a bacterium, Psychrobacter phenylpyruvicus.

    PubMed

    Yokochi, T; Nakahara, T; Higashihara, T; Yamaoka, M; Kurane, R

    2001-01-01

    A new isolation method for labyrinthulids, marine microbes with spindle-shaped vegetative cells and gliding movement, is presented. The method for isolating labyrinthulids has been found to be more difficult and less reproducible than that for thraustochytrids, classified in the same order. So far serum seawater agar fortified with antibiotics has been proposed to be the best for isolation of labyrinthulids. The method presented here involves placing plant samples on an agar medium on which a marine bacterium, Psychrobacter phenylpyruvicus, has been grown. The new method, which utilizes fallen mangrove leaves as source material, was more than twice as effective as isolation agar medium without the bacterium. The increased effectiveness appears to derive partly from the bacterial colonies' delaying extension of fungal mycelium. The bacterium was more effective for the isolation of labyrinthulids than either the bacterium Shewanella sp. or the yeast Rhodotorula rubra. PMID:14961392

  18. IN SITU RT-PCR WITH A SULFATE-REDUCING BACTERIUM ISOLATED FROM SEAGRASS ROOTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Bacteria considered to be obligate anaerobes internally colonize roots of the submerged macrophyte Halodule wrightii. A sulfate reducing bacterium, Summer lac 1, was isolated on lactate from H. wrightii roots. The isolate has physiological characteristics typical of Desulfovibri...

  19. Characterization of a Neochlamydia-like bacterium associated with epitheliocystis in cultured Arctic charr Salvelinus alpinus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Infections of branchial epithelium by intracellular gram-negative bacteria, termed epitheliocystis, have limited culture of Arctic char (Salvelinus alpinus). To characterize a bacterium associated with epitheliocystis in cultured char, gills were sampled for histopathologic examination, conventiona...

  20. Extracellular electron transfer of a highly adhesive and metabolically versatile bacterium.

    PubMed

    Liu, Huan; Ishikawa, Masahito; Matsuda, Shoichi; Kimoto, Yuki; Hori, Katsutoshi; Hashimoto, Kazuhito; Nakanishi, Shuji

    2013-08-01

    Bacterial adhesion to a solid plays a predominant role in mediating the extracellular electron transfer for genus Acinetobactor, a metabolically versatile bacterium that can couple toluene degradation and electricity generation. PMID:23813865

  1. Enhancement of xylose utilization from corn stover by a recombinant bacterium for ethanol production

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Recombinant ethanologenic Escherichia coli ferments glucose, xylose and arabinose to ethanol. However, the bacterium preferentially utilizes glucose first, then arabinose and finally xylose (sequential utilization of sugars) during fermentation of lignocellulosic hydrolyzates to ethanol making the p...

  2. Draft Genome Sequence of Erythrobacter vulgaris Strain O1, a Glycosyl Hydrolase-Producing Bacterium

    PubMed Central

    Yaakop, Amira Suriaty; Chan, Chia Sing; Kahar, Ummirul Mukminin; Ee, Robson

    2015-01-01

    Erythrobacter vulgaris strain O1, a moderate halophile, was isolated from a beach in Johor, Malaysia. Here, we present the draft genome and suggest potential applications of this bacterium. PMID:25977433

  3. Characterization of a Neochlamydia-like Bacterium Associated with Epitheliocystis in Cultured Artic Char Salvelinus alpinus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Infections of branchial epithelium by intracellular gram-negative bacteria, termed epitheliocystis, have limited culture of Arctic char (Salvelinus alpinus). To characterize a bacterium associated with epitheliocystis in cultured char, gills were sampled for histopathologic examination, conventional...

  4. Draft Genome Sequence of DLB, a Dyella-Like Bacterium from the Planthopper Hyalesthes obsoletus

    PubMed Central

    Lahav, Tamar; Zchori-Fein, Einat; Naor, Vered; Freilich, Shiri

    2016-01-01

    We report here the draft genome sequence of a Dyella-like bacterium (DLB) isolated from Hyalesthes obsoletus, the insect vector of the uncultivable mollicute bacterium “Candidatus Phytoplasma.” This isolate inhibits Spiroplasma melliferum, a cultivable mollicute. The draft genome of DLB consists of 4,196,214 bp, with a 68.6% G+C content, and 3,757 genes were predicted. PMID:27445378

  5. Complete genome of Martelella sp. AD-3, a moderately halophilic polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons-degrading bacterium.

    PubMed

    Cui, Changzheng; Li, Zhijie; Qian, Jiangchao; Shi, Jie; Huang, Ling; Tang, Hongzhi; Chen, Xin; Lin, Kuangfei; Xu, Ping; Liu, Yongdi

    2016-05-10

    Martelella sp. strain AD-3, a moderate halophilic bacterium, was isolated from a petroleum-contaminated soil with high salinity in China. Here, we report the complete genome of strain AD-3, which contains one circular chromosome and two circular plasmids. An array of genes related to metabolism of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and halophilic mechanism in this bacterium was identified by the whole genome analysis. PMID:26988395

  6. Endohyphal Bacterium Enhances Production of Indole-3-Acetic Acid by a Foliar Fungal Endophyte

    PubMed Central

    Hoffman, Michele T.; Gunatilaka, Malkanthi K.; Wijeratne, Kithsiri; Gunatilaka, Leslie; Arnold, A. Elizabeth

    2013-01-01

    Numerous plant pathogens, rhizosphere symbionts, and endophytic bacteria and yeasts produce the important phytohormone indole-3-acetic acid (IAA), often with profound effects on host plants. However, to date IAA production has not been documented among foliar endophytes -- the diverse guild of primarily filamentous Ascomycota that live within healthy, above-ground tissues of all plant species studied thus far. Recently bacteria that live within hyphae of endophytes (endohyphal bacteria) have been detected, but their effects have not been studied previously. Here we show not only that IAA is produced in vitro by a foliar endophyte (here identified as Pestalotiopsis aff. neglecta, Xylariales), but that IAA production is enhanced significantly when the endophyte hosts an endohyphal bacterium (here identified as Luteibacter sp., Xanthomonadales). Both the endophyte and the endophyte/bacterium complex appear to rely on an L-tryptophan dependent pathway for IAA synthesis. The bacterium can be isolated from the fungus when the symbiotic complex is cultivated at 36°C. In pure culture the bacterium does not produce IAA. Culture filtrate from the endophyte-bacterium complex significantly enhances growth of tomato in vitro relative to controls and to filtrate from the endophyte alone. Together these results speak to a facultative symbiosis between an endophyte and endohyphal bacterium that strongly influences IAA production, providing a new framework in which to explore endophyte-plant interactions. PMID:24086270

  7. Metabolomics evaluation of the impact of smokeless tobacco exposure on the oral bacterium Capnocytophaga sputigena.

    PubMed

    Sun, Jinchun; Jin, Jinshan; Beger, Richard D; Cerniglia, Carl E; Yang, Maocheng; Chen, Huizhong

    2016-10-01

    The association between exposure to smokeless tobacco products (STP) and oral diseases is partially due to the physiological and pathological changes in the composition of the oral microbiome and its metabolic profile. However, it is not clear how STPs affect the physiology and ecology of oral microbiota. A UPLC/QTof-MS-based metabolomics study was employed to analyze metabolic alterations in oral bacterium, Capnocytophaga sputigena as a result of smokeless tobacco exposure and to assess the capability of the bacterium to metabolize nicotine. Pathway analysis of the metabolome profiles indicated that smokeless tobacco extracts caused oxidative stress in the bacterium. The metabolomics data also showed that the arginine-nitric oxide pathway was perturbed by the smokeless tobacco treatment. Results also showed that LC/MS was useful in identifying STP constituents and additives, including caffeine and many flavoring compounds. No significant changes in levels of nicotine and its major metabolites were found when C. sputigena was cultured in a nutrient rich medium, although hydroxylnicotine and cotinine N-oxide were detected in the bacterial metabolites suggesting that nicotine metabolism might be present as a minor degradation pathway in the bacterium. Study results provide new insights regarding the physiological and toxicological effects of smokeless tobacco on oral bacterium C. sputigena and associated oral health as well as measuring the ability of the oral bacterium to metabolize nicotine. PMID:27480511

  8. Regulation of caffeate respiration in the acetogenic bacterium Acetobacterium woodii.

    PubMed

    Dilling, Sabrina; Imkamp, Frank; Schmidt, Silke; Müller, Volker

    2007-06-01

    The anaerobic acetogenic bacterium Acetobacterium woodii can conserve energy by oxidation of various substrates coupled to either carbonate or caffeate respiration. We used a cell suspension system to study the regulation and kinetics of induction of caffeate respiration. After addition of caffeate to suspensions of fructose-grown cells, there was a lag phase of about 90 min before caffeate reduction commenced. However, in the presence of tetracycline caffeate was not reduced, indicating that de novo protein synthesis is required for the ability to respire caffeate. Induction also took place in the presence of CO(2), and once a culture was induced, caffeate and CO(2) were used simultaneously as electron acceptors. Induction of caffeate reduction was also observed with H(2) plus CO(2) as the substrate, but the lag phase was much longer. Again, caffeate and CO(2) were used simultaneously as electron acceptors. In contrast, during oxidation of methyl groups derived from methanol or betaine, acetogenesis was the preferred energy-conserving pathway, and caffeate reduction started only after acetogenesis was completed. The differential flow of reductants was also observed with suspensions of resting cells in which caffeate reduction was induced prior to harvest of the cells. These cell suspensions utilized caffeate and CO(2) simultaneously with fructose or hydrogen as electron donors, but CO(2) was preferred over caffeate during methyl group oxidation. Caffeate-induced resting cells could reduce caffeate and also p-coumarate or ferulate with hydrogen as the electron donor. p-Coumarate or ferulate also served as an inducer for caffeate reduction. Interestingly, caffeate-induced cells reduced ferulate in the absence of an external reductant, indicating that caffeate also induces the enzymes required for oxidation of the methyl group of ferulate. PMID:17416687

  9. Jeongeupia chitinilytica sp. nov., a chitinolytic bacterium isolated from soil.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wen-Ming; Chang, Rey-Chang; Cheng, Chih-Yu; Shiau, Yu-Wen; Sheu, Shih-Yi

    2013-03-01

    A novel bacterium, designated strain Jchi(T), was isolated from soil in Taiwan and characterized using a polyphasic approach. Cells of strain Jchi(T) were aerobic, Gram-stain-negative, motile and rod-shaped. They contained poly-β-hydroxybutyrate granules and formed dark-yellow colonies. Growth occurred at 20-37 °C (optimum between 25 and 30 °C), at pH 6.0-8.0 (optimum between pH 7.0 and pH 8.0) and with 0-2 % NaCl (optimum between 0 and 1 %). Phylogenetic analyses based on 16S rRNA gene sequences indicated that strain Jchi(T) belonged to the genus Jeongeupia and that its closest neighbour was Jeongeupia naejangsanensis BIO-TAS4-2(T) (98.0 % sequence similarity). The major fatty acids (>10 %) of strain Jchi(T) were summed feature 3 (comprising C16 : 1ω7c and/or C16 : 1ω6c), C16 : 0 and C18 : 1ω7c. The major cellular hydroxy fatty acid was C12 : 0 3-OH. The isoprenoid quinone was Q-8 and the genomic DNA G+C content was 66.1 mol%. The polar lipid profile consisted of a mixture of phosphatidylethanolamine, phosphatidylglycerol, diphosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylserine and two unidentified phospholipids. The DNA-DNA relatedness value between strain Jchi(T) and J. naejangsanensis BIO-TAS4-2(T) was about 41.0 %. On the basis of the genotypic and phenotypic data, strain Jchi(T) represents a novel species in the genus Jeongeupia, for which the name Jeongeupia chitinilytica sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is Jchi(T) ( = BCRC 80367(T)  = KCTC 23701(T)). PMID:22659500

  10. Characterization of a rhodanese from the cyanogenic bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Cipollone, Rita; Bigotti, Maria Giulia; Frangipani, Emanuela; Ascenzi, Paolo; Visca, Paolo

    2004-12-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa, the rRNA group I type species of genus Pseudomonas, is a Gram-negative, aerobic bacterium responsible for serious infection in humans. P. aeruginosa pathogenicity has been associated with the production of several virulence factors, including cyanide. Here, the biochemical characterization of recombinant P. aeruginosa rhodanese (Pa RhdA), catalyzing the sulfur transfer from thiosulfate to a thiophilic acceptor, e.g., cyanide, is reported. Sequence homology analysis of Pa RhdA predicts the sulfur-transfer reaction to occur through persulfuration of the conserved catalytic Cys230 residue. Accordingly, the titration of active Pa RhdA with cyanide indicates the presence of one extra sulfur bound to the Cys230 Sgamma atom per active enzyme molecule. Values of K(m) for thiosulfate binding to Pa RhdA are 1.0 and 7.4mM at pH 7.3 and 8.6, respectively, and 25 degrees C. However, the value of K(m) for cyanide binding to Pa RhdA (=14 mM, at 25 degrees C) and the value of V(max) (=750 micromol min(-1)mg(-1), at 25 degrees C) for the Pa RhdA-catalyzed sulfur-transfer reaction are essentially pH- and substrate-independent. Therefore, the thiosulfate-dependent Pa RhdA persulfuration is favored at pH 7.3 (i.e., the cytosolic pH of the bacterial cell) rather than pH 8.6 (i.e., the standard pH for rhodanese activity assay). Within this pH range, conformational change(s) occur at the Pa RhdA active site during the catalytic cycle. As a whole, rhodanese may participate in multiple detoxification mechanisms protecting P. aeruginosa from endogenous and environmental cyanide. PMID:15522204

  11. Metabolic Evolution of a Deep-Branching Hyperthermophilic Chemoautotrophic Bacterium

    PubMed Central

    Braakman, Rogier; Smith, Eric

    2014-01-01

    Aquifex aeolicus is a deep-branching hyperthermophilic chemoautotrophic bacterium restricted to hydrothermal vents and hot springs. These characteristics make it an excellent model system for studying the early evolution of metabolism. Here we present the whole-genome metabolic network of this organism and examine in detail the driving forces that have shaped it. We make extensive use of phylometabolic analysis, a method we recently introduced that generates trees of metabolic phenotypes by integrating phylogenetic and metabolic constraints. We reconstruct the evolution of a range of metabolic sub-systems, including the reductive citric acid (rTCA) cycle, as well as the biosynthesis and functional roles of several amino acids and cofactors. We show that A. aeolicus uses the reconstructed ancestral pathways within many of these sub-systems, and highlight how the evolutionary interconnections between sub-systems facilitated several key innovations. Our analyses further highlight three general classes of driving forces in metabolic evolution. One is the duplication and divergence of genes for enzymes as these progress from lower to higher substrate specificity, improving the kinetics of certain sub-systems. A second is the kinetic optimization of established pathways through fusion of enzymes, or their organization into larger complexes. The third is the minimization of the ATP unit cost to synthesize biomass, improving thermodynamic efficiency. Quantifying the distribution of these classes of innovations across metabolic sub-systems and across the tree of life will allow us to assess how a tradeoff between maximizing growth rate and growth efficiency has shaped the long-term metabolic evolution of the biosphere. PMID:24516572

  12. Paenibacillus xylanilyticus sp. nov., an airborne xylanolytic bacterium.

    PubMed

    Rivas, Raúl; Mateos, Pedro F; Martínez-Molina, Eustoquio; Velázquez, Encarna

    2005-01-01

    During a search for xylan-degrading micro-organisms, a sporulating bacterium was recovered from xylan-containing agar plates exposed to air in a research laboratory (Salamanca University, Spain). The airborne isolate (designated strain XIL14T) was identified by 16S rRNA gene sequencing as representing a Paenibacillus species most closely related to Paenibacillus illinoisensis JCM 9907T (99.3 % sequence similarity) and Paenibacillus pabuli DSM 3036T (98 % sequence similarity). Phenotypic, chemotaxonomic and DNA-DNA hybridization data indicated that the isolate belongs to a novel species of the genus Paenibacillus. Cells of strain XIL14T were motile, sporulating, rod-shaped, Gram-positive and facultatively anaerobic. The predominant cellular fatty acids were anteiso-C(15 : 0) and C(16 : 0). The DNA G+C content of strain XIL14T was 50.5 mol%. Growth was observed with many carbohydrates, including xylan, as the only carbon source and gas production was not observed from glucose. Catalase was positive and oxidase was negative. The airborne isolate produced a variety of hydrolytic enzymes, including xylanases, amylases, gelatinase and beta-galactosidase. DNA-DNA hybridization levels between strain XIL14T and P. illinoisensis DSM 11733T and P. pabuli DSM 3036T were 43.3 and 36.3 %, respectively. According to the data obtained, strain XIL14T is considered to represent a novel species for which the name Paenibacillus xylanilyticus sp. nov. is proposed (=LMG 21957T=CECT 5839T). PMID:15653909

  13. Metabolic evolution of a deep-branching hyperthermophilic chemoautotrophic bacterium.

    PubMed

    Braakman, Rogier; Smith, Eric

    2014-01-01

    Aquifex aeolicus is a deep-branching hyperthermophilic chemoautotrophic bacterium restricted to hydrothermal vents and hot springs. These characteristics make it an excellent model system for studying the early evolution of metabolism. Here we present the whole-genome metabolic network of this organism and examine in detail the driving forces that have shaped it. We make extensive use of phylometabolic analysis, a method we recently introduced that generates trees of metabolic phenotypes by integrating phylogenetic and metabolic constraints. We reconstruct the evolution of a range of metabolic sub-systems, including the reductive citric acid (rTCA) cycle, as well as the biosynthesis and functional roles of several amino acids and cofactors. We show that A. aeolicus uses the reconstructed ancestral pathways within many of these sub-systems, and highlight how the evolutionary interconnections between sub-systems facilitated several key innovations. Our analyses further highlight three general classes of driving forces in metabolic evolution. One is the duplication and divergence of genes for enzymes as these progress from lower to higher substrate specificity, improving the kinetics of certain sub-systems. A second is the kinetic optimization of established pathways through fusion of enzymes, or their organization into larger complexes. The third is the minimization of the ATP unit cost to synthesize biomass, improving thermodynamic efficiency. Quantifying the distribution of these classes of innovations across metabolic sub-systems and across the tree of life will allow us to assess how a tradeoff between maximizing growth rate and growth efficiency has shaped the long-term metabolic evolution of the biosphere. PMID:24516572

  14. Interaction of Cadmium With the Aerobic Bacterium Pseudomonas Mendocina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schramm, P. J.; Haack, E. A.; Maurice, P. A.

    2006-05-01

    The fate of toxic metals in the environment can be heavily influenced by interaction with bacteria in the vadose zone. This research focuses on the interactions of cadmium with the strict aerobe Pseudomonas mendocina. P. mendocina is a gram-negative bacterium that has shown potential in the bioremediation of recalcitrant organic compounds. Cadmium is a common environmental contaminant of wide-spread ecological consequence. In batch experiments P. mendocina shows typical bacterial growth curves, with an initial lag phase followed by an exponential phase and a stationary to death phase; concomitant with growth was an increase in pH from initial values of 7 to final values at 96 hours of 8.8. Cd both delays the onset of the exponential phase and decreases the maximum population size, as quantified by optical density and microscopic cell counts (DAPI). The total amount of Cd removed from solution increases over time, as does the amount of Cd removed from solution normalized per bacterial cell. Images obtained with transmission electron microscopy (TEM) showed the production of a cadmium, phosphorus, and iron containing precipitate that was similar in form and composition to precipitates formed abiotically at elevated pH. However, by late stationary phase, the precipitate had been re-dissolved, perhaps by biotic processes in order to obtain Fe. Stressed conditions are suggested by TEM images showing the formation of pili, or nanowires, when 20ppm Cd was present and a marked decrease in exopolysaccharide and biofilm material in comparison to control cells (no cadmium added).

  15. Bacterium-Mimicking Nanoparticle Surface Functionalization with Targeting Motifs

    PubMed Central

    Lai, Mei-Hsiu; Clay, Nicholas E.; Kim, Dong Hyun; Kong, Hyunjoon

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, surface modification of nanocarriers with targeting motifs has been explored to modulate delivery of various diagnostic, sensing and therapeutic molecular cargos to desired sites of interest in in vitro bioengineering platforms and in vivo pathologic tissue. However, most surface functionalization approaches are often plagued by complex chemical modifications and effortful purifications. To resolve such challenges, this study demonstrates a unique method to immobilize antibodies that can act as targeting motifs on the surfaces of nanocarriers, inspired by a process that bacteria use for immobilization of the host’s antibodies. We hypothesized that alkylated Staphylococcus aureus protein A (SpA) would self-assemble with micelles and subsequently induce stable coupling of antibodies to the micelles. We examined this hypothesis by using poly(2-hydroxyethyl-co-octadecyl aspartamide) (PHEA-g-C18) as a model polymer to form micelles. The self-assembly between micelles and alkylated SpA became more thermodynamically favorable by increasing the degree of substitution of octadecyl chains to PHEA-g-C18, due to a positive entropy change. Lastly, the simple mixing of SpA-PA-coupled micelles with antibodies resulted in the micelles coated by antibodies, as confirmed with a fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) assay. The micelles coated by antibodies to VCAM-1 or integrin αv displayed higher binding affinity to a substrate coated by VCAM-1 and integrin αvβ3, respectively, than other controls, as evaluated with surface plasmon resonance (SPR) spectroscopy and a circulation-simulating flow chamber. We envisage this bacterium-inspired protein immobilization approach will be useful to improving the quality of targeted delivery of nanoparticles, and can be extended to modify the surface of a wide array of nanocarriers. PMID:25804130

  16. Carbonate biomineralization induced by soil bacterium Bacillus megaterium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lian, Bin; Hu, Qiaona; Chen, Jun; Ji, Junfeng; Teng, H. Henry

    2006-11-01

    Biogenic carbonates spawned from microbial activities are common occurrences in soils. Here, we investigate the carbonate biomineralization mediated by the bacterium Bacillus megaterium, a dominant strain separated from a loess profile in China. Upon completing bacterial cultivation, the ensuring products are centrifuged, and the resultant supernatant and the concentrated bacterial sludge as well as the un-separated culture are added separately into a Ca-CO 3 containing solution for crystallization experiments. Results of XRD and SEM analysis indicate that calcite is the dominant mineral phase formed when the bacteria are present. When the supernatant alone is used, however, a significant portion of vaterite is also precipitated. Experimental results further reveal that the bacteria have a strong tendency to colonize the center area of the calcite {1 0 1¯ 4} faces. Observed crystal morphology suggests that the bacterial colony may promote the growth normal to each individual {1 0 1¯ 4} face of calcite when the cell concentration is high, but may retard it or even cause dissolution of the immediate substrate surfaces when the concentration is low. SEM images taken at earlier stages of the crystallization experiments demonstrate the nucleation of calcite on the bacterial cell walls but do not show obvious morphological changes on the nanometer- to submicron-sized nuclei. δ 13C measurements unveil that the crystals grown in the presence of bacteria are further enriched in the heavy carbon isotope, implying that the bacterial metabolism may not be the carbon sources for the mineralization. Based upon these findings, we propose a mechanism for the B. megaterium mediated calcite mineralization and conclude that the whole process involves epi- and inter-cellular growth in the local microenvironments whose conditions may be controlled by cell sequestration and proton pumping during bacterial respiration.

  17. Competitive PCR for Quantitation of a Cytophaga-Flexibacter-Bacteroides Phylum Bacterium Associated with the Tuber borchii Vittad. Mycelium

    PubMed Central

    Barbieri, Elena; Riccioni, Giulia; Pisano, Anna; Sisti, Davide; Zeppa, Sabrina; Agostini, Deborah; Stocchi, Vilberto

    2002-01-01

    An uncultured bacterium associated with the ectomycorrhizal fungus Tuber borchii Vittad. was identified as a novel member of the Cytophaga-Flexibacter-Bacteroides group. Utilizing a quantitative PCR targeting the 16S rRNA gene, we relatively quantified this bacterium in the host. The estimated number of bacteria was found to be approximately 106 cells per 30-day-old T. borchii mycelium culture. This represents the first molecular attempt to enumerate an uncultured bacterium associated with a mycorrhizal fungus. PMID:12450871

  18. Regulation of Polyhydroxybutyrate Synthesis in the Soil Bacterium Bradyrhizobium diazoefficiens.

    PubMed

    Quelas, J I; Mesa, S; Mongiardini, E J; Jendrossek, D; Lodeiro, A R

    2016-07-15

    Polyhydroxybutyrate (PHB) is a carbon and energy reserve polymer in various prokaryotic species. We determined that, when grown with mannitol as the sole carbon source, Bradyrhizobium diazoefficiens produces a homopolymer composed only of 3-hydroxybutyrate units (PHB). Conditions of oxygen limitation (such as microoxia, oxic stationary phase, and bacteroids inside legume nodules) were permissive for the synthesis of PHB, which was observed as cytoplasmic granules. To study the regulation of PHB synthesis, we generated mutations in the regulator gene phaR and the phasin genes phaP1 and phaP4 Under permissive conditions, mutation of phaR impaired PHB accumulation, and a phaP1 phaP4 double mutant produced more PHB than the wild type, which was accumulated in a single, large cytoplasmic granule. Moreover, PhaR negatively regulated the expression of phaP1 and phaP4 as well as the expression of phaA1 and phaA2 (encoding a 3-ketoacyl coenzyme A [CoA] thiolases), phaC1 and phaC2 (encoding PHB synthases), and fixK2 (encoding a cyclic AMP receptor protein [CRP]/fumarate and nitrate reductase regulator [FNR]-type transcription factor of genes for microoxic lifestyle). In addition to the depressed PHB cycling, phaR mutants accumulated more extracellular polysaccharides and promoted higher plant shoot dry weight and competitiveness for nodulation than the wild type, in contrast to the phaC1 mutant strain, which is defective in PHB synthesis. These results suggest that phaR not only regulates PHB granule formation by controlling the expression of phasins and biosynthetic enzymes but also acts as a global regulator of excess carbon allocation and symbiosis by controlling fixK2 IMPORTANCE: In this work, we investigated the regulation of polyhydroxybutyrate synthesis in the soybean-nodulating bacterium Bradyrhizobium diazoefficiens and its influence in bacterial free-living and symbiotic lifestyles. We uncovered a new interplay between the synthesis of this carbon reserve polymer

  19. Photoactive yellow protein from the halophilic bacterium Salinibacter ruber.

    PubMed

    Memmi, Samy; Kyndt, John; Meyer, Terry; Devreese, Bart; Cusanovich, Michael; Van Beeumen, Jozef

    2008-02-19

    A gene for photoactive yellow protein (PYP) was identified from the genome sequence of the extremely halophilic aerobic bacterium Salinibacter ruber (Sr). The sequence is distantly related to the prototypic PYP from Halorhodospira halophila (Hh) (37% identity) and contains most of the amino acid residues identified as necessary for function. However, the Sr pyp gene is not flanked by its two biosynthetic genes as in other species. To determine as to whether the Sr pyp gene encodes a functional protein, we cloned and expressed it in Escherichia coli, along with the genes for chromophore biosynthesis from Rhodobacter capsulatus. The Sr PYP has a 31-residue N-terminal extension as compared to other PYPs that appears to be important for dimerization; however, truncation of these extra residues did not change the spectral and photokinetic properties. Sr PYP has an absorption maximum at 431 nm, which is at shorter wavelengths than the prototypical Hh PYP (at 446 nm). It is also photoactive, being reversibly bleached by either blue or white light. The kinetics of dark recovery is slower than any of the PYPs reported to date (4.27 x 10(-4) s(-1) at pH 7.5). Sr PYP appears to have a normal photocycle with the I1 and I2 intermediates. The presence of the I2' intermediate is also inferred on the basis of the effects of temperature and alchohol on recovery. Sr PYP has an intermediate spectral form in equilibrium with the 431 nm form, similar to R. capsulatus PYP and the Y42F mutant of Hh PYP. Increasing ionic strength stabilizes the 431 nm form at the expense of the intermediate spectral form, and the kinetics of recovery is accelerated 6.4-fold between 0 and 3.5 M salt. This is observed with ions from both the chaotropic and the kosmotropic series. Ionic strength also stabilizes PYP against thermal denaturation, as the melting temperature is increased from 74 degrees C in buffer alone to 92 degrees C in 2 M KCl. Sr accumulates KCl in the cytoplasm, like Halobacterium, to

  20. Further studies on a human intestinal bacterium Ruminococcus sp. END-1 for transformation of plant lignans to mammalian lignans.

    PubMed

    Jin, Jong-Sik; Hattori, Masao

    2009-08-26

    A human intestinal bacterium Ruminococcus (R.) sp. END-1 capable of oxidizing (-)-enterodiol to (-)-enterolactone, enantioselectively, was further investigated from the perspective of transformation of plant lignans to mammalian lignans; A cell-free extract of the bacterium transformed (-)-enterodiol to (-)-enterolactone through an intermediate, enterolactol. The bacterium showed not only oxidation but also demethylation and deglucosylation activities for plant lignans. Arctiin and secoisolariciresinol diglucoside were converted to (-)-dihydroxyenterolactone and (+)-dihydroxyenterodiol, respectively. Moreover, by coincubation with Eggerthella sp. SDG-2, the bacterium transformed arctiin and secoisolariciresinol diglucoside to (-)-enterolactone and (+)-enterodiol, respectively. PMID:19630415

  1. Complete Genome Sequence of a thermotolerant sporogenic lactic acid bacterium, Bacillus coagulans strain 36D1

    PubMed Central

    Rhee, Mun Su; Moritz, Brélan E.; Xie, Gary; Glavina del Rio, T.; Dalin, E.; Tice, H.; Bruce, D.; Goodwin, L.; Chertkov, O.; Brettin, T.; Han, C.; Detter, C.; Pitluck, S.; Land, Miriam L.; Patel, Milind; Ou, Mark; Harbrucker, Roberta; Ingram, Lonnie O.; Shanmugam, K. T.

    2011-01-01

    Bacillus coagulans is a ubiquitous soil bacterium that grows at 50-55 °C and pH 5.0 and ferments various sugars that constitute plant biomass to L (+)-lactic acid. The ability of this sporogenic lactic acid bacterium to grow at 50-55 °C and pH 5.0 makes this organism an attractive microbial biocatalyst for production of optically pure lactic acid at industrial scale not only from glucose derived from cellulose but also from xylose, a major constituent of hemicellulose. This bacterium is also considered as a potential probiotic. Complete genome sequence of a representative strain, B. coagulans strain 36D1, is presented and discussed. PMID:22675583

  2. Complete Genome Sequence of a thermotolerant sporogenic lactic acid bacterium, Bacillus coagulans strain 36D1

    SciTech Connect

    Xie, Gary; Dalin, Eileen; Tice, Hope; Chertkov, Olga; Land, Miriam L

    2011-01-01

    Bacillus coagulans is a ubiquitous soil bacterium that grows at 50-55 C and pH 5.0 and fer-ments various sugars that constitute plant biomass to L (+)-lactic acid. The ability of this sporogenic lactic acid bacterium to grow at 50-55 C and pH 5.0 makes this organism an attractive microbial biocatalyst for production of optically pure lactic acid at industrial scale not only from glucose derived from cellulose but also from xylose, a major constituent of hemi-cellulose. This bacterium is also considered as a potential probiotic. Complete genome squence of a representative strain, B. coagulans strain 36D1, is presented and discussed.

  3. Complete Genome Sequence of a thermotolerant sporogenic lactic acid bacterium, Bacillus coagulans strain 36D1

    SciTech Connect

    Rhee, Mun Su; Moritz, Brelan E.; Xie, Gary; Glavina Del Rio, Tijana; Dalin, Eileen; Tice, Hope; Bruce, David; Goodwin, Lynne A.; Chertkov, Olga; Brettin, Thomas S; Han, Cliff; Detter, J. Chris; Pitluck, Sam; Land, Miriam L; Patel, Milind; Ou, Mark; Harbrucker, Roberta; Ingram, Lonnie O.; Shanmugam, Keelnathan T.

    2011-01-01

    Bacillus coagulans is a ubiquitous soil bacterium that grows at 50-55 C and pH 5.0 and fer- ments various sugars that constitute plant biomass to L (+)-lactic acid. The ability of this spo- rogenic lactic acid bacterium to grow at 50-55 C and pH 5.0 makes this organism an attrac- tive microbial biocatalyst for production of optically pure lactic acid at industrial scale not only from glucose derived from cellulose but also from xylose, a major constituent of hemi- cellulose. This bacterium is also considered as a potential probiotic. Complete genome se- quence of a representative strain, B. coagulans strain 36D1, is presented and discussed.

  4. From Genome to Function: Systematic Analysis of the Soil Bacterium Bacillus Subtilis

    PubMed Central

    Crawshaw, Samuel G.; Wipat, Anil

    2001-01-01

    Bacillus subtilis is a sporulating Gram-positive bacterium that lives primarily in the soil and associated water sources. Whilst this bacterium has been studied extensively in the laboratory, relatively few studies have been undertaken to study its activity in natural environments. The publication of the B. subtilis genome sequence and subsequent systematic functional analysis programme have provided an opportunity to develop tools for analysing the role and expression of Bacillus genes in situ. In this paper we discuss analytical approaches that are being developed to relate genes to function in environments such as the rhizosphere. PMID:18628943

  5. Ammonificins C and D, Hydroxyethylamine Chromene Derivatives from a Cultured Marine Hydrothermal Vent Bacterium, Thermovibrio ammonificans

    PubMed Central

    Andrianasolo, Eric H.; Haramaty, Liti; Rosario-Passapera, Richard; Vetriani, Costantino; Falkowski, Paul; White, Eileen; Lutz, Richard

    2012-01-01

    Chemical and biological investigation of the cultured marine hydrothermal vent bacterium, Thermovibrio ammonifican led to the isolation of two hydroxyethylamine chromene derivatives, ammonificins C and D. Their structures were elucidated using combination of NMR and mass spectrometry. Absolute stereochemistry was ascertained by comparison of experimental and calculated CD spectra. Biological evaluation and assessment were determined using the patented ApopScreen cell-based screen for apoptosis-induction. Ammonificins C and D induce apoptosis in micromolar concentrations. To our knowledge, this finding is the first report of chemical compounds that induce apoptosis from the cultured deep-sea marine organism, hydrothermal vent bacterium, Thermovibrio ammonificans. PMID:23170085

  6. Investigations of Iron Minerals Formed by Dissimilatory Alkaliphilic Bacterium with {sup 57}Fe Moessbauer Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Chistyakova, N. I.; Rusakov, V. S.; Shapkin, A. A.; Zhilina, T. N.; Zavarzina, D. G.; Kohout, J.

    2010-07-13

    Anaerobic alkaliphilic bacterium of Geoalkalibacter ferrihydriticus type (strain Z-0531), isolated from a bottom sediment sample from the weakly mineralized soda Lake Khadyn, have been analyzed. The strain uses the amorphous Fe(III)-hydroxide (AFH) as an electron acceptor and acetate CH{sub 3}COO{sup -} as an electron donor. Moessbauer investigations of solid phase samples obtained during the process of the bacterium growth were carried out at room temperature, 77.8 K, 4.2 K without and with the presence of an external magnetic field (6 T) applied perpendicular to the {gamma}-bebam.

  7. Description of a bacterium associated with redmouth disease of rainbow trout (Salmo gairdneri)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    1966-01-01

    A description was given of a gram-negative, peritrichously flagellated, fermentative bacterium that was isolated on numerous occasions from kidney tissues of rainbow trout (Salmo gairdneri) afflicted with redmouth disease. Although the bacteria apparently were members of the family Enterobacteriaceae, it was impossible to determine their taxonomic position within the family with certainty. Hence it was recommended that their taxonomic position remain sub judice for the present. As a temporary designation RM bacterium was used. Redmouth disease was transmitted from infected to normal fish through the medium of water.

  8. Cadherin Domains in the Polysaccharide-Degrading Marine Bacterium Saccharophagus degradans 2-40 Are Carbohydrate-Binding Modules▿

    PubMed Central

    Fraiberg, Milana; Borovok, Ilya; Bayer, Edward A.; Weiner, Ronald M.; Lamed, Raphael

    2011-01-01

    The complex polysaccharide-degrading marine bacterium Saccharophagus degradans strain 2-40 produces putative proteins that contain numerous cadherin and cadherin-like domains involved in intercellular contact interactions. The current study reveals that both domain types exhibit reversible calcium-dependent binding to different complex polysaccharides which serve as growth substrates for the bacterium. PMID:21036994

  9. Genome Sequence of Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. lactis CNRZ327, a Dairy Bacterium with Anti-Inflammatory Properties

    PubMed Central

    El Kafsi, Hela; Binesse, Johan; Loux, Valentin; Buratti, Julien; Boudebbouze, Samira; Dervyn, Rozenn; Hammani, Amal; Maguin, Emmanuelle

    2014-01-01

    Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. lactis CNRZ327 is a dairy bacterium with anti-inflammatory properties both in vitro and in vivo. Here, we report the genome sequence of this bacterium, which appears to contain no less than 215 insertion sequence (IS) elements, an exceptionally high number regarding the small genome size of the strain. PMID:25035318

  10. Draft Genome Sequence of an Anaerobic and Extremophilic Bacterium, Caldanaerobacter yonseiensis, Isolated from a Geothermal Hot Stream

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sang-Jae; Lee, Yong-Jik; Park, Gun-Seok; Kim, Byoung-Chan; Lee, Sang Jun; Shin, Jae-Ho

    2013-01-01

    Caldanaerobacter yonseiensis is a strictly anaerobic, thermophilic, spore-forming bacterium, which was isolated from a geothermal hot stream in Indonesia. This bacterium utilizes xylose and produces a variety of proteases. Here, we report the draft genome sequence of C. yonseiensis, which reveals insights into the pentose phosphate pathway and protein degradation metabolism in thermophilic microorganisms. PMID:24201201

  11. Draft Genome Sequence of Arthrobacter sp. Strain SPG23, a Hydrocarbon-Degrading and Plant Growth-Promoting Soil Bacterium

    PubMed Central

    Gkorezis, Panagiotis; Bottos, Eric M.; Van Hamme, Jonathan D.; Thijs, Sofie; Rineau, Francois; Balseiro-Romero, Maria; Weyens, Nele

    2015-01-01

    We report here the 4.7-Mb draft genome of Arthrobacter sp. SPG23, a hydrocarbonoclastic Gram-positive bacterium belonging to the Actinobacteria, isolated from diesel-contaminated soil at the Ford Motor Company site in Genk, Belgium. Strain SPG23 is a potent plant growth promoter useful for diesel fuel remediation applications based on plant-bacterium associations. PMID:26701084

  12. Complete Genome Sequence of Sphingomonas sp. Strain NIC1, an Efficient Nicotine-Degrading Bacterium

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Xiongyu; Wang, Weiwei; Xu, Ping

    2016-01-01

    Sphingomonas sp. strain NIC1, an efficient nicotine-degrading bacterium, was isolated from tobacco leaves. Here, we present the complete genome sequence of strain NIC1, which contains one circular chromosome and two circular plasmids. The genomic information will provide insights into its molecular mechanism for nicotine degradation. PMID:27417841

  13. Complete Genome Sequence of the Cellulose-Degrading Bacterium Cellulosilyticum lentocellum

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, David A; Suen, Garret; Bruce, David; Copeland, A; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Detter, J. Chris; Goodwin, Lynne A.; Han, Cliff; Hauser, Loren John; Land, Miriam L; Lapidus, Alla L.; Lucas, Susan; Meincke, Linda; Pitluck, Sam; Tapia, Roxanne; Teshima, Hazuki; Woyke, Tanja; Fox, Brian G.; Angert, Esther R.; Currie, Cameron

    2011-01-01

    Cellulosilyticum lentocellum DSM 5427 is an anaerobic, endospore-forming member of the Firmicutes. We describe the complete genome sequence of this cellulose-degrading bacterium; originally isolated from estuarine sediment of a river that received both domestic and paper mill waste. Comparative genomics of cellulolytic clostridia will provide insight into factors that influence degradation rates.

  14. Effect of tannic acid on the transcriptome of the soil bacterium Pseudomonas protegens Pf-5

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Tannins are plant-produced organic compounds that are found in soils, are able to sequester iron, and have antimicrobial properties. We studied the effect of tannic acid on the molecular physiology of the soil-inhabiting biocontrol bacterium Pseudomonas protegens Pf-5 (formerly Pseudomonas fluoresce...

  15. Draft Genome Sequence of a Bacillus Bacterium from the Atacama Desert Wetlands Metagenome.

    PubMed

    Vilo, Claudia; Galetovic, Alexandra; Araya, Jorge E; Gómez-Silva, Benito; Dong, Qunfeng

    2015-01-01

    We report here the draft genome sequence of a Bacillus bacterium isolated from the microflora of Nostoc colonies grown at the Andean wetlands in northern Chile. We consider this genome sequence to be a molecular tool for exploring microbial relationships and adaptation strategies to the prevailing extreme conditions at the Atacama Desert. PMID:26294639

  16. Genome sequence of the mycorrhizal helper bacterium Pseudomonas fluorescens BBc6R8

    SciTech Connect

    Deveau, Aurelie; Grob, Harald; Morin, Emmanuelle; Karpinets, Tatiana V; Utturkar, Sagar M; Mehnaz, Samina; Kurz, Sven; Martin, Francis; Frey-Klett, Pascale; Labbe, Jessy L

    2014-01-01

    We report the draft genome sequence of the mycorrhiza helper bacterium Pseudomonas fluorescens strain BBc6R8 . Several traits which could be involved in the mycorrhiza helper ability of the bacterial strain such as multiple secretion systems, auxin metabolism and phosphate mobilization were evidenced in the genome.

  17. Draft Genome Sequence of “Candidatus Phytoplasma pruni” Strain CX, a Plant-Pathogenic Bacterium

    PubMed Central

    Shao, J.; Bottner-Parker, K. D.; Gundersen-Rindal, D. E.; Zhao, Y.; Davis, R. E.

    2015-01-01

    “Candidatus Phytoplasma pruni” strain CX, belonging to subgroup 16SrIII-A, is a plant-pathogenic bacterium causing economically important diseases in many fruit crops. Here, we report the draft genome sequence, which consists of 598,508 bases, with a G+C content of 27.21 mol%. PMID:26472824

  18. The construction of an engineered bacterium to remove cadmium from wastewater.

    PubMed

    Chang, S; Shu, H

    2014-01-01

    The removal of cadmium (Cd) from wastewater before it is released from factories is important for protecting human health. Although some researchers have developed engineered bacteria, the resistance of these engineered bacteria to Cd have not been improved. In this study, two key genes involved in glutathione synthesis (gshA and gshB), a serine acetyltransferase gene (cysE), a Thlaspi caerulescens phytochelatin synthase gene (TcPCS1), and a heavy metal ATPase gene (TcHMA3) were transformed into Escherichia coli BL21. The resistance of the engineered bacterium to Cd was significantly greater than that of the initial bacterium and the Cd accumulation in the engineered bacterium was much higher than in the initial bacterium. In addition, the Cd resistance of the bacteria harboring gshB, gshA, cysE, and TcPCS1 was higher than that of the bacteria harboring gshA, cysE, and TcPCS1. This finding demonstrated that gshB played an important role in glutathione synthesis and that the reaction catalyzed by glutathione synthase was the limiting step for producing phytochelatins. Furthermore, TcPCS1 had a greater specificity and a higher capacity for removing Cd than SpPCS1, and TcHMA3 not only played a role in T. caerulescens but also functioned in E. coli. PMID:25521138

  19. Five New Amicoumacins Isolated from a Marine-Derived Bacterium Bacillus subtilis

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yongxin; Xu, Ying; Liu, Lingli; Han, Zhuang; Lai, Pok Yui; Guo, Xiangrong; Zhang, Xixiang; Lin, Wenhan; Qian, Pei-Yuan

    2012-01-01

    Four novel amicoumacins, namely lipoamicoumacins A–D (1–4), and one new bacilosarcin analog (5) were isolated from culture broth of a marine-derived bacterium Bacillus subtilis, together with six known amicoumacins. Their structures were elucidated on the basis of extensive spectroscopic (2D NNR, IR, CD and MS) analysis and in comparison with data in literature. PMID:22412803

  20. Draft Genome Sequence of the Deinococcus-Thermus Bacterium Meiothermus ruber Strain A

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Thiel, Vera; Tomsho, Lynn P.; Burhans, Richard; Gay, Scott E.; Schuster, Stephan C.; Ward, David M.; Bryant, Donald A.

    2015-03-26

    The draft genome sequence of the Deinococcus-Thermus group bacterium Meiothermus ruber strain A, isolated from a cyanobacterial enrichment culture obtained from Octopus Spring (Yellowstone National Park, WY), comprises 2,968,099 bp in 170 contigs. It is predicted to contain 2,895 protein-coding genes, 44 tRNA-coding genes, and 2 rRNA operons.

  1. Genome Sequence of Bacillus mycoides B38V, a Growth-Promoting Bacterium of Sunflower.

    PubMed

    Ambrosini, Adriana; Sant'Anna, Fernando Hayashi; de Souza, Rocheli; Tadra-Sfeir, Michele; Faoro, Helisson; Alvarenga, Samuel M; Pedrosa, Fabio Oliveira; Souza, Emanuel Maltempi; Passaglia, Luciane M P

    2015-01-01

    Bacillus mycoides B38V is a bacterium isolated from the sunflower rhizosphere that is able to promote plant growth and N uptake. The genome of the isolate has approximately 5.80 Mb and presents sequence codifiers for plant growth-promoting characteristics, such as nitrate reduction and ammonification and iron-siderophore uptake. PMID:25838494

  2. Genome Sequence of Bacillus mycoides B38V, a Growth-Promoting Bacterium of Sunflower

    PubMed Central

    Ambrosini, Adriana; Sant’Anna, Fernando Hayashi; de Souza, Rocheli; Tadra-Sfeir, Michele; Faoro, Helisson; Alvarenga, Samuel M.; Pedrosa, Fabio Oliveira; Souza, Emanuel Maltempi

    2015-01-01

    Bacillus mycoides B38V is a bacterium isolated from the sunflower rhizosphere that is able to promote plant growth and N uptake. The genome of the isolate has approximately 5.80 Mb and presents sequence codifiers for plant growth-promoting characteristics, such as nitrate reduction and ammonification and iron-siderophore uptake. PMID:25838494

  3. Draft Genome Sequence of the Syntrophic Lactate-Degrading Bacterium Tepidanaerobacter syntrophicus JLT

    PubMed Central

    Matsuura, Norihisa; Ohashi, Akiko; Tourlousse, Dieter M.

    2016-01-01

    We report here a high-quality draft genome sequence of the type strain (JL) of Tepidanaerobacter syntrophicus, an obligately anaerobic and moderately thermophilic bacterium, which is able to perform syntrophic lactate degradation with hydrogenotrophic methanogens. The genome comprises 2.43 Mb in 9 scaffolds, with a G+C content of 38.6%. PMID:26868399

  4. Draft Genome Sequence of a Bacillus Bacterium from the Atacama Desert Wetlands Metagenome

    PubMed Central

    Vilo, Claudia; Galetovic, Alexandra; Araya, Jorge E.; Dong, Qunfeng

    2015-01-01

    We report here the draft genome sequence of a Bacillus bacterium isolated from the microflora of Nostoc colonies grown at the Andean wetlands in northern Chile. We consider this genome sequence to be a molecular tool for exploring microbial relationships and adaptation strategies to the prevailing extreme conditions at the Atacama Desert. PMID:26294639

  5. Draft Genome Sequence of Jeotgalibacillus soli DSM 23228, a Bacterium Isolated from Alkaline Sandy Soil

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Kok-Gan; Yaakop, Amira Suriaty; Chan, Chia Sing; Ee, Robson; Tan, Wen-Si; Gan, Han Ming

    2015-01-01

    Jeotgalibacillus soli, a bacterium capable of degrading N-acyl homoserine lactone, was isolated from a soil sample in Portugal. J. soli constitutes the only Jeotgalibacillus species isolated from a non-marine source. Here, the draft genome, several interesting glycosyl hydrolases, and its putative N-acyl homoserine lactonases are presented. PMID:25999554

  6. Draft Genome Sequence of the Radioresistant Bacterium Deinococcus grandis, Isolated from Freshwater Fish in Japan

    PubMed Central

    Onodera, Takefumi; Omoso, Kota; Takeda-Yano, Kiyoko; Katayama, Takeshi; Oono, Yutaka; Narumi, Issay

    2016-01-01

    Deinococcus grandis is a radioresistant bacterium isolated from freshwater fish in Japan. Here we reported the draft genome sequence of D. grandis (4.1 Mb), which will be useful for elucidating the common principles of radioresistance in Deinococcus species through the comparative analysis of genomic sequences. PMID:26868384

  7. Response to comments on "A bacterium that can grow using arsenic instead of phosphorus"

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wolfe-Simon, Felisa; Blum, Jodi Switzer; Kulp, Thomas R.; Gordon, Gwyneth W.; Hoeft, Shelley E.; Pett-Ridge, Jennifer; Stolz, John F.; Webb, Samuel M.; Weber, Peter K.; Davies, Paul C.W.; Anbar, Ariel D.; Oremland, Ronald S.

    2011-01-01

    Concerns have been raised about our recent study suggesting that arsenic (As) substitutes for phosphorus in major biomolecules of a bacterium that tolerates extreme As concentrations. We welcome the opportunity to better explain our methods and results and to consider alternative interpretations. We maintain that our interpretation of As substitution, based on multiple congruent lines of evidence, is viable.

  8. Complete genome sequence of the bioleaching bacterium Leptospirillum sp. group II strain CF-1.

    PubMed

    Ferrer, Alonso; Bunk, Boyke; Spröer, Cathrin; Biedendieck, Rebekka; Valdés, Natalia; Jahn, Martina; Jahn, Dieter; Orellana, Omar; Levicán, Gloria

    2016-03-20

    We describe the complete genome sequence of Leptospirillum sp. group II strain CF-1, an acidophilic bioleaching bacterium isolated from an acid mine drainage (AMD). This work provides data to gain insights about adaptive response of Leptospirillum spp. to the extreme conditions of bioleaching environments. PMID:26853478

  9. Draft Genome Sequence of Sphingobium yanoikuyae TJ, a Halotolerant Di-n-Butyl-Phthalate-Degrading Bacterium

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Decai; Zhu, Ying; Wang, Xinxin; Kong, Xiao; Liu, Huijun; Wang, Yafeng

    2016-01-01

    Sphingobium yanoikuyae TJ is a halotolerant di-n-butyl-phthalate-degrading bacterium, isolated from the Haihe estuary in Bohai Bay, Tianjin, China. Here, we report the 5.1-Mb draft genome sequence of this strain, which will provide insights into the diversity of Sphingobium spp. and the mechanism of phthalate ester degradation in the estuary. PMID:27313307

  10. Draft Genome Sequence and Annotation of the Entomopathogenic Bacterium Xenorhabdus nematophila Strain F1

    PubMed Central

    Lanois, Anne; Ogier, Jean-Claude; Gouzy, Jérome; Laroui, Christine; Rouy, Zoé; Givaudan, Alain

    2013-01-01

    We report the 4.3-Mb genome sequence of Xenorhabdus nematophila strain F1, a Gram-negative bacterium that is a symbiont of the entomopathogenic nematode Steinernema carpocapsae and pathogenic by direct injection for a wide variety of insects. PMID:23788541

  11. Draft Genome Sequence of Photorhabdus luminescens subsp. laumondii HP88, an Entomopathogenic Bacterium Isolated from Nematodes.

    PubMed

    Ghazal, Shimaa; Oshone, Rediet; Simpson, Stephen; Morris, Krystalynne; Abebe-Akele, Feseha; Thomas, W Kelley; Khalil, Kamal M; Tisa, Louis S

    2016-01-01

    Photorhabdus luminescens subsp. laumondii HP88 is an entomopathogenic bacterium that forms a symbiotic association with Heterorhabditis nematodes. We report here a 5.27-Mbp draft genome sequence for P. luminescens subsp. laumondii HP88, with a G+C content of 42.4% and containing 4,243 candidate protein-coding genes. PMID:26988056

  12. Draft Genome Sequence of Photorhabdus luminescens subsp. laumondii HP88, an Entomopathogenic Bacterium Isolated from Nematodes

    PubMed Central

    Ghazal, Shimaa; Oshone, Rediet; Simpson, Stephen; Morris, Krystalynne; Abebe-Akele, Feseha; Thomas, W. Kelley; Khalil, Kamal M.

    2016-01-01

    Photorhabdus luminescens subsp. laumondii HP88 is an entomopathogenic bacterium that forms a symbiotic association with Heterorhabditis nematodes. We report here a 5.27-Mbp draft genome sequence for P. luminescens subsp. laumondii HP88, with a G+C content of 42.4% and containing 4,243 candidate protein-coding genes. PMID:26988056

  13. Genome Sequence of Marichromatium gracile YL-28, a Purple Sulfur Bacterium with Bioremediation Potential

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiaobo; Zhao, Chungui; Hong, Xuan

    2016-01-01

    The draft genome sequence of Marichromatium gracile YL-28 contains 3,840,251 bp, with a G+C content of 68.84%. The annotated genome sequence provides the genetic basis for revealing its role as a purple sulfur bacterium in the harvesting of energy and the development of bioremediation applications. PMID:27151789

  14. Aerobic mineralization of vinyl chlorides by a bacterium of the order Actinomycetales

    SciTech Connect

    Phelps, T.J.; Malachowsky, K.; Schram, R.M. ); White, D.C. Oak Ridge National Lab., TN )

    1991-04-01

    A gram-positive branched bacterium isolated from a trichloroethylene-degrading consortium mineralized vinyl chloride in growing cultures and cell suspensions. Greater than 67% of the (1,2-{sup 14}C)vinyl chloride was mineralized to carbon dioxide, with approximately 10% of the radioactivity appearing in {sup 14}C-aqueous-phase products.

  15. Complete Genome Sequence of Enterobacter cloacae B2-DHA, a Chromium-Resistant Bacterium

    PubMed Central

    Rahman, Aminur; Nahar, Noor; Olsson, Björn

    2016-01-01

    Previously, we reported a chromium-resistant bacterium, Enterobacter cloacae B2-DHA, isolated from the landfills of tannery industries in Bangladesh. Here, we investigated its genetic composition using massively parallel sequencing and comparative analysis with other known Enterobacter genomes. Assembly of the sequencing reads revealed a genome of ~4.21 Mb in size. PMID:27257201

  16. Comment on "A bacterium that degrades and assimilates poly(ethylene terephthalate)".

    PubMed

    Yang, Yu; Yang, Jun; Jiang, Lei

    2016-08-19

    Yoshida et al (Report, 11 March 2016, p. 1196) reported that the bacterium Ideonella sakaiensis 201-F6 can degrade and assimilate poly(ethylene terephthalate) (PET). However, the authors exaggerated degradation efficiency using a low-crystallinity PET and presented no straightforward experiments to verify depolymerization and assimilation of PET. Thus, the authors' conclusions are rather misleading. PMID:27540159

  17. Draft Genome Sequence of Alcaligenes faecalis Strain IITR89, an Indole-Oxidizing Bacterium.

    PubMed

    Regar, Raj Kumar; Gaur, Vivek Kumar; Mishra, Gayatri; Jadhao, Sudhir; Kamthan, Mohan; Manickam, Natesan

    2016-01-01

    We report the draft genome sequence of Alcaligenes faecalis strain IITR89, a bacterium able to form indigo by utilizing indole as the sole carbon source. The Alcaligenes species is increasingly reported for biodegradation of diverse toxicants and thus complete sequencing may provide insight into biodegradation capabilities and other phenotypes. PMID:26941148

  18. Draft Genome Sequence of Alcaligenes faecalis Strain IITR89, an Indole-Oxidizing Bacterium

    PubMed Central

    Regar, Raj Kumar; Gaur, Vivek Kumar; Mishra, Gayatri; Jadhao, Sudhir; Kamthan, Mohan

    2016-01-01

    We report the draft genome sequence of Alcaligenes faecalis strain IITR89, a bacterium able to form indigo by utilizing indole as the sole carbon source. The Alcaligenes species is increasingly reported for biodegradation of diverse toxicants and thus complete sequencing may provide insight into biodegradation capabilities and other phenotypes. PMID:26941148

  19. Complete Genome Sequence of Lysinibacillus sphaericus B1-CDA, a Bacterium That Accumulates Arsenic

    PubMed Central

    Rahman, Aminur; Nahar, Noor; Jass, Jana; Olsson, Björn

    2016-01-01

    Here, we report the genomic sequence and genetic composition of an arsenic-resistant bacterium, Lysinibacillus sphaericus B1-CDA. Assembly of the sequencing reads revealed that the genome size is ~4.5 Mb, encompassing ~80% of the chromosomal DNA. PMID:26798084

  20. Draft Genome Sequence of an Anaerobic Ammonium-Oxidizing Bacterium, “Candidatus Brocadia sinica”

    PubMed Central

    Oshiki, Mamoru; Shinyako-Hata, Kaori; Satoh, Hisashi

    2015-01-01

    A draft genome sequence of an anaerobic ammonium-oxidizing (anammox) bacterium, “Candidatus Brocadia sinica,” was determined by pyrosequencing and by screening a fosmid library. A 4.07-Mb genome sequence comprising 3 contigs was assembled, in which 3,912 gene-coding regions, 47 tRNAs, and a single rrn operon were annotated. PMID:25883286

  1. Draft Genome Sequence of the Obligately Alkaliphilic Sulfate-Reducing Bacterium Desulfonatronum thiodismutans Strain MLF1

    PubMed Central

    Trubitsyn, Denis; Geurink, Corey; Pikuta, Elena; Lefèvre, Christopher T.; McShan, W. Michael; Gillaspy, Allison F.

    2014-01-01

    Desulfonatronum thiodismutans strain MLF1, an alkaliphilic bacterium capable of sulfate reduction, was isolated from Mono Lake, California. Here we report the 3.92-Mb draft genome sequence comprising 34 contigs and some results of its automated annotation. These data will improve our knowledge of mechanisms by which bacteria withstand extreme environments. PMID:25081260

  2. Draft Genome Sequence of a Thermophilic Desulfurization Bacterium, Geobacillus thermoglucosidasius Strain W-2

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Lin; Li, Mingchang; Guo, Shuyi

    2016-01-01

    Geobacillus thermoglucosidasius strain W-2 is a thermophilic bacterium isolated from a deep-subsurface oil reservoir in northern China, which is capable of degrading organosulfur compounds. Here, we report the draft genome sequence of G. thermoglucosidasius strain W-2, which may help to elucidate the genetic basis of biodegradation of organosulfur pollutants under heated conditions. PMID:27491977

  3. Draft Genome Sequence of Pontibacter sp. nov. BAB1700, a Halotolerant, Industrially Important Bacterium

    PubMed Central

    Joshi, M. N.; Sharma, A. C.; Pandya, R. V.; Patel, R. P.; Saiyed, Z. M.; Saxena, A. K.

    2012-01-01

    Pontibacter sp. nov. BAB1700 is a halotolerant, Gram-negative, rod-shaped, pink-pigmented, menaquinone-7-producing bacterium isolated from sediments of a drilling well. The draft genome sequence of the strain, consisting of one chromosome of 4.5 Mb, revealed vital gene clusters involved in vitamin biosynthesis and resistance against various metals and antibiotics. PMID:23105068

  4. Draft Genome Sequence of the Halophilic Bacterium Halobacillus sp. Strain BAB-2008

    PubMed Central

    Joshi, M. N.; Pandit, A. S.; Sharma, A.; Pandya, R. V.; Saxena, A. K.

    2013-01-01

    The Halobacillus sp. strain BAB-2008 is a moderately halophilic, rod-shaped, Gram-positive, orange-pigmented, carotenoid-producing bacterium isolated from saline soil near Zazam-Solar Park Road, Gujarat, India. Here we present the 3.7-Mb genome sequence to provide insights into its functional genomics and potential applications for carotenoid and enzyme production. PMID:23469348

  5. Draft genome sequence of Pontibacter sp. nov. BAB1700, a halotolerant, industrially important bacterium.

    PubMed

    Joshi, M N; Sharma, A C; Pandya, R V; Patel, R P; Saiyed, Z M; Saxena, A K; Bagatharia, S B

    2012-11-01

    Pontibacter sp. nov. BAB1700 is a halotolerant, Gram-negative, rod-shaped, pink-pigmented, menaquinone-7-producing bacterium isolated from sediments of a drilling well. The draft genome sequence of the strain, consisting of one chromosome of 4.5 Mb, revealed vital gene clusters involved in vitamin biosynthesis and resistance against various metals and antibiotics. PMID:23105068

  6. Draft Genome Sequence of the Halophilic Bacterium Halobacillus sp. Strain BAB-2008.

    PubMed

    Joshi, M N; Pandit, A S; Sharma, A; Pandya, R V; Saxena, A K; Bagatharia, S B

    2013-01-01

    The Halobacillus sp. strain BAB-2008 is a moderately halophilic, rod-shaped, Gram-positive, orange-pigmented, carotenoid-producing bacterium isolated from saline soil near Zazam-Solar Park Road, Gujarat, India. Here we present the 3.7-Mb genome sequence to provide insights into its functional genomics and potential applications for carotenoid and enzyme production. PMID:23469348

  7. Complete genome sequence of the xylan-degrading subseafloor bacterium Microcella alkaliphila JAM-AC0309.

    PubMed

    Kurata, Atsushi; Hirose, Yuu; Misawa, Naomi; Wakazuki, Sachiko; Kishimoto, Noriaki; Kobayashi, Tohru

    2016-03-10

    Here we report the complete genome sequence of Microcella alkaliphila JAM-AC0309, which was newly isolated from the deep subseafloor core sediment from offshore of the Shimokita Peninsula of Japan. An array of genes related to utilization of xylan in this bacterium was identified by whole genome analysis. PMID:26808869

  8. Genome Sequence of Marichromatium gracile YL-28, a Purple Sulfur Bacterium with Bioremediation Potential.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaobo; Zhao, Chungui; Hong, Xuan; Chen, Shicheng; Yang, Suping

    2016-01-01

    The draft genome sequence of Marichromatium gracile YL-28 contains 3,840,251 bp, with a G+C content of 68.84%. The annotated genome sequence provides the genetic basis for revealing its role as a purple sulfur bacterium in the harvesting of energy and the development of bioremediation applications. PMID:27151789

  9. Genome Sequence of the Spinosyns-Producing Bacterium Saccharopolyspora spinosa NRRL 18395 ▿

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Yuanlong; Yang, Xi; Li, Jing; Zhang, Ruifen; Hu, Yongfei; Zhou, Yuguang; Wang, Jun; Zhu, Baoli

    2011-01-01

    Saccharopolyspora spinosa is a Gram-positive bacterium that produces spinosad, a well-known biodegradable insecticide that is used for agricultural pest control and has an excellent environmental and mammalian toxicological profile. Here, we present the first draft genome sequence of the type strain Saccharopolyspora spinosa NRRL 18395, which consists of 22 scaffolds. PMID:21478350

  10. Draft Genome Sequence of Burkholderia cenocepacia Strain 869T2, a Plant-Beneficial Endophytic Bacterium.

    PubMed

    Ho, Ying-Ning; Huang, Chieh-Chen

    2015-01-01

    An endophytic bacterium, Burkholderia cenocepacia 869T2, isolated from vetiver grass, has shown its abilities for both in planta biocontrol and plant growth promotion. Its draft genome sequence was determined to provide insights into those metabolic pathways involved in plant-beneficial activity. This is the first genome report for endophytic B. cenocepacia. PMID:26564046

  11. Draft Genome Sequence and Gene Annotation of the Uropathogenic Bacterium Proteus mirabilis Pr2921

    PubMed Central

    Giorello, F. M.; Romero, V.; Farias, J.; Scavone, P.; Umpiérrez, A.; Zunino, P.

    2016-01-01

    Here, we report the genome sequence of Proteus mirabilis Pr2921, a uropathogenic bacterium that can cause severe complicated urinary tract infections. After gene annotation, we identified two additional copies of ucaA, one of the most studied fimbrial protein genes, and other fimbriae related-proteins that are not present in P. mirabilis HI4320. PMID:27340058

  12. Complete Genome Sequence of Enterobacter cloacae B2-DHA, a Chromium-Resistant Bacterium.

    PubMed

    Rahman, Aminur; Nahar, Noor; Olsson, Björn; Mandal, Abul

    2016-01-01

    Previously, we reported a chromium-resistant bacterium, Enterobacter cloacae B2-DHA, isolated from the landfills of tannery industries in Bangladesh. Here, we investigated its genetic composition using massively parallel sequencing and comparative analysis with other known Enterobacter genomes. Assembly of the sequencing reads revealed a genome of ~4.21 Mb in size. PMID:27257201

  13. Draft Genome Sequence of the Ionic Liquid-Tolerant Bacterium Bacillus amyloliquefaciens CMW1

    PubMed Central

    Hirose, Yuu; Misawa, Naomi; Hurunaka, Kohei; Kishimoto, Noriaki

    2014-01-01

    Here, we report the draft genome sequence of an ionic liquid-tolerant bacterium, Bacillus amyloliquefaciens CMW1, which is newly isolated from a Japanese fermented soybean paste. The genome sequence will allow for a characterization of the molecular mechanism of its ionic liquid tolerance. PMID:25323721

  14. Complete Genome Sequence of a γ-Hexachlorocyclohexane-Degrading Bacterium, Sphingobium sp. Strain MI1205

    PubMed Central

    Tabata, Michiro; Ohhata, Satoshi; Nikawadori, Yuki; Sato, Takuya; Kishida, Kouhei; Ohtsubo, Yoshiyuki; Tsuda, Masataka

    2016-01-01

    Here, we report the complete genome sequence of a γ-hexachlorocyclohexane (γ-HCH)-degrading bacterium, Sphingobium sp. strain MI1205. The genome of MI1205 consists of two chromosomes and four plasmids with sizes of 33 to 292 kb. All the lin genes for γ-HCH metabolism are dispersed on the four plasmids. PMID:27056230

  15. Complete Genome Sequence of the Type Strain of the Acetogenic Bacterium Moorella thermoacetica DSM 521T

    PubMed Central

    Poehlein, Anja; Bengelsdorf, Frank R.; Esser, Carola; Schiel-Bengelsdorf, Bettina; Daniel, Rolf

    2015-01-01

    Here we report the closed genome sequence of the type strain Moorella thermoacetica DSM 521T, an acetogenic bacterium, which is able to grow autotrophically on H2 + CO2 and/or CO, using the Wood-Ljungdahl pathway. The genome consists of a circular chromosome (2.53 Mb). PMID:26450731

  16. Draft Genome Sequence of Burkholderia cenocepacia Strain 869T2, a Plant-Beneficial Endophytic Bacterium

    PubMed Central

    Ho, Ying-Ning

    2015-01-01

    An endophytic bacterium, Burkholderia cenocepacia 869T2, isolated from vetiver grass, has shown its abilities for both in planta biocontrol and plant growth promotion. Its draft genome sequence was determined to provide insights into those metabolic pathways involved in plant-beneficial activity. This is the first genome report for endophytic B. cenocepacia. PMID:26564046

  17. Draft Genome Sequence of a Benzo[a]pyrene-Degrading Bacterium, Olleya sp. Strain ITB9

    PubMed Central

    Okai, Masahiko; Watanabe, Akihiro; Ishida, Masami

    2015-01-01

    Olleya sp. ITB9 is a benzo[a]pyrene-degrading bacterium, isolated from surface water near a waste treatment plant at Tokyo Bay, Japan. Here, we present the draft genome sequence of this strain, which consists of 58 contigs corresponding to 3.4 Mb and a G+C content of 31.2%. PMID:26564047

  18. Draft Genome Sequence of Perfluorooctane Acid-Degrading Bacterium Pseudomonas parafulva YAB-1

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Chongjian; Peng, Qingjing; Peng, Qingzhong

    2015-01-01

    Pseudomonas parafulva YAB-1, isolated from perfluorinated compound-contaminated soil, has the ability to degrade perfluorooctane acid (PFOA) compound. Here, we report the draft genome sequence and annotation of the PFOA-degrading bacterium P. parafulva YAB-1. The data provide the basis to investigate the molecular mechanism of PFOA metabolism. PMID:26337877

  19. Distribution, abundance and diversity of the extremely halophilic bacterium Salinibacter ruber

    PubMed Central

    Antón, Josefa; Peña, Arantxa; Santos, Fernando; Martínez-García, Manuel; Schmitt-Kopplin, Philippe; Rosselló-Mora, Ramon

    2008-01-01

    Since its discovery in 1998, representatives of the extremely halophilic bacterium Salinibacter ruber have been found in many hypersaline environments across the world, including coastal and solar salterns and solar lakes. Here, we review the available information about the distribution, abundance and diversity of this member of the Bacteroidetes. PMID:18957079

  20. Draft Genome Sequence of the Moderately Halophilic Bacterium Marinobacter lipolyticus Strain SM19

    PubMed Central

    Papke, R. Thane; de la Haba, Rafael R.; Infante-Domínguez, Carmen; Pérez, Dolores; Sánchez-Porro, Cristina; Lapierre, Pascal

    2013-01-01

    Marinobacter lipolyticus strain SM19, isolated from saline soil in Spain, is a moderately halophilic bacterium belonging to the class Gammaproteobacteria. Here, we report the draft genome sequence of this strain, which consists of a 4.0-Mb chromosome and which is able to produce the halophilic enzyme lipase LipBL. PMID:23814106

  1. First Insights into the Genome of the Moderately Thermophilic Bacterium Clostridium tepidiprofundi SG 508T.

    PubMed

    Poehlein, Anja; Friedrich, Ines; Krüger, Larissa; Daniel, Rolf

    2016-01-01

    The moderately thermophilic bacterium Clostridium tepidiprofundi is Gram-positive and belongs to clostridial cluster I. It was isolated from a hydrothermal vent chimney. Substrates utilized by C. tepidiprofundi include casein, peptone, tryptone, yeast extract, beef extract, starch, maltose, and glucose. The genome consists of one replicon (3.06 Mb). PMID:27174286

  2. Draft Genome Sequence of Potato ‘Zebra Chip’ Associated Bacterium ‘Candidatus Liberibacter solanacearum’

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A new species of Candidatus Liberibacter, ‘Ca. L. solanacearum’ (Lso) was recently confirmed to be associated with potato zebra chip (ZC) disease. The bacterium belongs to gram negative, phloem-limited, a-Proteobacteria. Because Koch’s postulates have not been fulfilled, information regarding the et...

  3. Robinsoniella peoriensis: A model anaerobic commensal bacterium for acquisition of antibiotic resistance?

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Background: R. peoriensis was characterized in our laboratories from swine manure and feces as a Gram-positive, anaerobic bacterium. Since then strains of this species have been identified from a variety of mammalian and other gastrointestinal (GI) tracts, suggesting it is a member of the commensal ...

  4. First Insights into the Genome of the Moderately Thermophilic Bacterium Clostridium tepidiprofundi SG 508T

    PubMed Central

    Poehlein, Anja; Friedrich, Ines; Krüger, Larissa

    2016-01-01

    The moderately thermophilic bacterium Clostridium tepidiprofundi is Gram-positive and belongs to clostridial cluster I. It was isolated from a hydrothermal vent chimney. Substrates utilized by C. tepidiprofundi include casein, peptone, tryptone, yeast extract, beef extract, starch, maltose, and glucose. The genome consists of one replicon (3.06 Mb). PMID:27174286

  5. Rapid detection of Flavobacterium columnare, the bacterium causing Columnaris Disease in fish

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Flavobacterium columnare is a ubiquitous bacterium that causes columnaris disease in a wide variety of fish resulting in devastating losses particularly in the commercial aquaculture industry worldwide. Timely diagnosis of disease is imperative for prevention of spread and to reduce the economic los...

  6. Genome Sequence of the Acetogenic Bacterium Moorella mulderi DSM 14980T

    PubMed Central

    Castillo Villamizar, Genis Andrés

    2016-01-01

    Here, we report the draft genome sequence of Moorella mulderi DSM 14980T, a thermophilic acetogenic bacterium, which is able to grow autotrophically on H2 plus CO2 using the Wood-Ljungdahl pathway. The genome consists of a circular chromosome (2.99 Mb). PMID:27231372

  7. Complete Genome Sequence of the Haloalkaliphilic, Hydrogen-Producing Bacterium Halanaerobium hydrogeniformans▿

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Steven D.; Begemann, Matthew B.; Mormile, Melanie R.; Wall, Judy D.; Han, Cliff S.; Goodwin, Lynne A.; Pitluck, Samuel; Land, Miriam L.; Hauser, Loren J.; Elias, Dwayne A.

    2011-01-01

    Halanaerobium hydrogenoformans is an alkaliphilic bacterium capable of biohydrogen production at pH 11 and 7% (wt/vol) salt. We present the 2.6-Mb genome sequence to provide insights into its physiology and potential for bioenergy applications. PMID:21602336

  8. Biological colloid engineering: Self-assembly of dipolar ferromagnetic chains in a functionalized biogenic ferrofluid.

    PubMed

    Ruder, Warren C; Hsu, Chia-Pei D; Edelman, Brent D; Schwartz, Russell; Leduc, Philip R

    2012-08-01

    We have studied the dynamic behavior of nanoparticles in ferrofluids consisting of single-domain, biogenic magnetite (Fe(3)O(4)) isolated from Magnetospirillum magnetotacticum (MS-1). Although dipolar chains form in magnetic colloids in zero applied field, when dried upon substrates, the solvent front disorders nanoparticle aggregation. Using avidin-biotin functionalization of the particles and substrate, we generated self-assembled, linear chain motifs that resist solvent front disruption in zero-field. The engineered self-assembly process we describe here provides an approach for the creation of ordered magnetic structures that could impact fields ranging from micro-electro-mechanical systems development to magnetic imaging of biological structures. PMID:22952408

  9. Preliminary evaluation of nanoscale biogenic magnetite-based ferromagnetic transduction mechanisms for mobile phone bioeffects.

    PubMed

    Cranfield, Charles; Wieser, Heinz Gregor; Al Madan, Jaffar; Dobson, Jon

    2003-03-01

    Ferromagnetic transduction models have been proposed as a potential mechanism for mobile phone bioeffects. These models are based on the coupling of RF and pulsed electromagnetic emissions to biogenic magnetite (Fe3O4) present in the human brain via either ferromagnetic resonance or mechanical activation of cellular ion channels. We have tested these models experimentally for the first time using a bacterial analogue (Magnetospirillum magnetotacticum) which produces intracellular biogenic magnetite similar to that present in the human brain. Experimental evaluation revealed that exposure to mobile phone emissions resulted in a consistent and significantly higher proportion of cell death in exposed cultures versus sham exposure (p = 0.037). Though there appears to be a repeatable trend toward higher cell mortality in magnetite-producing bacteria exposed to mobile phone emissions, it is not yet clear that this would extrapolate to a deleterious health effect in humans. PMID:15382422

  10. Competitive PCR for quantitation of a Cytophaga-Flexibacter-Bacteroides phylum bacterium associated with the Tuber borchii Vittad. mycelium.

    PubMed

    Barbieri, Elena; Riccioni, Giulia; Pisano, Anna; Sisti, Davide; Zeppa, Sabrina; Agostini, Deborah; Stocchi, Vilberto

    2002-12-01

    An uncultured bacterium associated with the ectomycorrhizal fungus Tuber borchii Vittad. was identified as a novel member of the Cytophaga-Flexibacter-Bacteroides group. Utilizing a quantitative PCR targeting the 16S rRNA gene, we relatively quantified this bacterium in the host. The estimated number of bacteria was found to be approximately 10(6) cells per 30-day-old T. borchii mycelium culture. This represents the first molecular attempt to enumerate an uncultured bacterium associated with a mycorrhizal fungus. PMID:12450871

  11. Single-bacterium nanomechanics in biomedicine: unravelling the dynamics of bacterial cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aguayo, S.; Donos, N.; Spratt, D.; Bozec, L.

    2015-02-01

    The use of the atomic force microscope (AFM) in microbiology has progressed significantly throughout the years since its first application as a high-resolution imaging instrument. Modern AFM setups are capable of characterizing the nanomechanical behaviour of bacterial cells at both the cellular and molecular levels, where elastic properties and adhesion forces of single bacterium cells can be examined under different experimental conditions. Considering that bacterial and biofilm-mediated infections continue to challenge the biomedical field, it is important to understand the biophysical events leading towards bacterial adhesion and colonization on both biological and non-biological substrates. The purpose of this review is to present the latest findings concerning the field of single-bacterium nanomechanics, and discuss future trends and applications of nanoindentation and single-cell force spectroscopy techniques in biomedicine.

  12. Isolation and biological characteristics of aerobic marine magnetotactic bacterium YSC-1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Jun; Pan, Hongmiao; Yue, Haidong; Song, Tao; Zhao, Yong; Chen, Guanjun; Wu, Longfei; Xiao, Tian

    2006-12-01

    Magnetotactic bacteria have become a hot spot of research in microbiology attracting intensive interest of researchers in multiple disciplinary fields. However, the studies were limited in few fastidious bacteria. The objective of this study aims at isolating new marine magnetic bacteria and better comprehension of magnetotactic bacteria. In this study, an aerobic magnetotactic bacterium YSC-1 was isolated from sediments in the Yellow Sea Cold Water Mass (YSCWM). In TEM, magnetic cells have one or several circular magnetosomes in diameter of 100nm, and consist of Fe and Co shown on energy dispersive X-ray spectrum. The biological and physiological characteristics of this bacterium were also described. The colour of YSC-1 colony is white in small rod. The gram stain is negative. Results showed that Strain YSC-1 differs from microaerophile magnetotactic bacteria MS-1 and WD-1 in biology.

  13. Crystal structure of ribosomal protein L1 from the bacterium Aquifex aeolicus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikonova, E. Yu.; Tishchenko, S. V.; Gabdulkhakov, A. G.; Shklyaeva, A. A.; Garber, M. B.; Nikonov, S. V.; Nevskaya, N. A.

    2011-07-01

    The crystal structure of ribosomal protein L1 from the bacterium Aquifex aeolicus was solved by the molecular-replacement method and refined to R cryst = 19.4% and R free = 25.1% at 2.1 Å protein consists of two domains linked together by a flexible hinge region. In the structure under consideration, the domains are in close proximity and adopt a closed conformation. Earlier, this conformation has been found in the structure of protein L1 from the bacterium Thermus thermophilus, whereas the structures of archaeal L1 proteins and the structures of all L1 proteins in the RNA-bound form have an open conformation. The fact that a closed conformation was found in the structures of two L1 proteins which crystallize in different space groups and belong to different bacteria suggests that this conformation is a characteristic feature of L1 bacterial proteins in the free form.

  14. Economic Game Theory to Model the Attenuation of Virulence of an Obligate Intracellular Bacterium

    PubMed Central

    Tago, Damian; Meyer, Damien F.

    2016-01-01

    Diseases induced by obligate intracellular pathogens have a large burden on global human and animal health. Understanding the factors involved in the virulence and fitness of these pathogens contributes to the development of control strategies against these diseases. Based on biological observations, a theoretical model using game theory is proposed to explain how obligate intracellular bacteria interact with their host. The equilibrium in such a game shows that the virulence and fitness of the bacterium is host-triggered and by changing the host's defense system to which the bacterium is confronted, an evolutionary process leads to an attenuated strain. Although, the attenuation procedure has already been conducted in practice in order to develop an attenuated vaccine (e.g., with Ehrlichia ruminantium), there was a lack of understanding of the theoretical basis behind this process. Our work provides a model to better comprehend the existence of different phenotypes and some underlying evolutionary mechanisms for the virulence of obligate intracellular bacteria. PMID:27610355

  15. Gene function analysis in extremophiles: the "nif" regulon of the strict iron oxidizing bacterium "Leptospirillum ferrooxidans"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parro, Victor; Moreno-Paz, Mercedes

    2004-03-01

    In Centro de Astrobiologia it has been considered the Tinto river as a model ecosystem to study life based on iron. The final goal is to study the biological and metabolic diversity in microorganisms living there, following a genomic approach, to get insights to the mechanisms of adaptation to this environment. The Gram-negative bacterium Leptospirillum ferrooxidans is one of the most abundant microorganisms in the river, and it is one of the main responsible in maintenance of pH balance and, as a consequence, the physico-chemical properties of the exosystem. We have constructed a Shotgun DNA microarrays from this bacterium and we have used it to studied its genetic capacity for nitrogen fixation. With this approach we have identified most of the genes necessary for dinitrogen (N2) reduction, confirming the capacity of L. ferrooxidans as a free diazotrophic (nitrogen fixer) microorganism.

  16. Economic Game Theory to Model the Attenuation of Virulence of an Obligate Intracellular Bacterium.

    PubMed

    Tago, Damian; Meyer, Damien F

    2016-01-01

    Diseases induced by obligate intracellular pathogens have a large burden on global human and animal health. Understanding the factors involved in the virulence and fitness of these pathogens contributes to the development of control strategies against these diseases. Based on biological observations, a theoretical model using game theory is proposed to explain how obligate intracellular bacteria interact with their host. The equilibrium in such a game shows that the virulence and fitness of the bacterium is host-triggered and by changing the host's defense system to which the bacterium is confronted, an evolutionary process leads to an attenuated strain. Although, the attenuation procedure has already been conducted in practice in order to develop an attenuated vaccine (e.g., with Ehrlichia ruminantium), there was a lack of understanding of the theoretical basis behind this process. Our work provides a model to better comprehend the existence of different phenotypes and some underlying evolutionary mechanisms for the virulence of obligate intracellular bacteria. PMID:27610355

  17. N-Acyl Dehydrotyrosines, Tyrosinase Inhibitors from the Marine Bacterium Thalassotalea sp. PP2-459.

    PubMed

    Deering, Robert W; Chen, Jianwei; Sun, Jiadong; Ma, Hang; Dubert, Javier; Barja, Juan L; Seeram, Navindra P; Wang, Hong; Rowley, David C

    2016-02-26

    Thalassotalic acids A-C and thalassotalamides A and B are new N-acyl dehydrotyrosine derivatives produced by Thalassotalea sp. PP2-459, a Gram-negative bacterium isolated from a marine bivalve aquaculture facility. The structures were elucidated via a combination of spectroscopic analyses emphasizing two-dimensional NMR and high-resolution mass spectrometric data. Thalassotalic acid A (1) displays in vitro inhibition of the enzyme tyrosinase with an IC50 value (130 μM) that compares favorably to the commercially used control compounds kojic acid (46 μM) and arbutin (100 μM). These are the first natural products reported from a bacterium belonging to the genus Thalassotalea. PMID:26824128

  18. Copper-binding characteristics of exopolymers from a freshwater-sediment bacterium

    SciTech Connect

    Mittelman, M.W.; Geesey, G.G.

    1985-04-01

    Copper-binding activity by exopolymers from adherent cells of freshwater-sediment bacterium was demonstrated by a combination of equilibrium dialysis and flameless atomic absorption spectrometry. Crude, cell-free exopolymer preparations containing protein and polysaccharide components bound up to 37 nmol of Cu per mg (dry weight). A highly purified exopolysaccharide preparation bound up to 253 nmol of Cu per mg of carbohydrate. The conditional stability constant for the crude exopolymer-Cu complex was 7.3 x 10/sup 8/. This value was similar to those obtained for Cu complexes formed with humic acids and xanthan, an exopolysaccharide produced by Xanthomonas campestris. Studies conducted at copper concentrations, pHs, and temperatures found in sediments from which the bacterium was isolated indicated that the exopolymers were capable of binding copper under natural conditions.

  19. Comparative genome analysis of Lysinibacillus B1-CDA, a bacterium that accumulates arsenics.

    PubMed

    Rahman, Aminur; Nahar, Noor; Nawani, Neelu N; Jass, Jana; Ghosh, Sibdas; Olsson, Björn; Mandal, Abul

    2015-12-01

    Previously, we reported an arsenic resistant bacterium Lysinibacillus sphaericus B1-CDA, isolated from an arsenic contaminated lands. Here, we have investigated its genetic composition and evolutionary history by using massively parallel sequencing and comparative analysis with other known Lysinibacillus genomes. Assembly of the sequencing reads revealed a genome of ~4.5 Mb in size encompassing ~80% of the chromosomal DNA. We found that the set of ordered contigs contains abundant regions of similarity with other Lysinibacillus genomes and clearly identifiable genome rearrangements. Furthermore, all genes of B1-CDA that were predicted be involved in its resistance to arsenic and/or other heavy metals were annotated. The presence of arsenic responsive genes was verified by PCR in vitro conditions. The findings of this study highlight the significance of this bacterium in removing arsenics and other toxic metals from the contaminated sources. The genetic mechanisms of the isolate could be used to cope with arsenic toxicity. PMID:26387925

  20. Methanogenesis from acetate: a nonmethanogenic bacterium from an anaerobic acetate enrichment.

    PubMed

    Ward, D M; Mah, R A; Kaplan, I R

    1978-06-01

    A methanogenic acetate enrichment was initiated by inoculation of an acetate-mineral salts medium with domestic anaerobic digestor sludge and maintained by weekly transfer for 2 years. The enrichment culture contained a Methanosarcina and several obligately anaerobic nonmethanogenic bacteria. These latter organisms formed varying degrees of association with the Methanosarcina, ranging from the nutritionally fastidious gram-negative rod called the satellite bacterium to the nutritionally nonfastidious Eubacterium limosum. The satellite bacterium had growth requirements for amino acids, a peptide, a purine base, vitamin B12, and other B vitamins. Glucose, mannitol, starch, pyruvate, cysteine, lysine, leucine, isoleucine, arginine, and asparagine stimulated growth and hydrogen production. Acetate was neither incorporated nor metabolized by the satellite organism. Since acetate was the sole organic carbon source in the enrichment culture, organism(s) which metabolize acetate (such as the Methanosarcina) must produce substrates and growth factors for associated organisms which do not metabolize acetate. PMID:677881

  1. A Streamlined Strategy for Biohydrogen Production with Halanaerobium hydrogeniformans, an Alkaliphilic Bacterium

    PubMed Central

    Begemann, Matthew B.; Mormile, Melanie R.; Sitton, Oliver C.; Wall, Judy D.; Elias, Dwayne A.

    2012-01-01

    Biofuels are anticipated to enable a shift from fossil fuels for renewable transportation and manufacturing fuels, with biohydrogen considered attractive since it could offer the largest reduction of global carbon budgets. Currently, lignocellulosic biohydrogen production remains inefficient with pretreatments that are heavily fossil fuel-dependent. However, bacteria using alkali-treated biomass could streamline biofuel production while reducing costs and fossil fuel needs. An alkaliphilic bacterium, Halanaerobium hydrogeniformans, is described that is capable of biohydrogen production at levels rivaling neutrophilic strains, but at pH 11 and hypersaline conditions. H. hydrogeniformans ferments a variety of 5- and 6-carbon sugars derived from hemicellulose and cellulose including cellobiose, and forms the end products hydrogen, acetate, and formate. Further, it can also produce biohydrogen from switchgrass and straw pretreated at temperatures far lower than any previously reported and in solutions compatible with growth. Hence, this bacterium can potentially increase the efficiency and efficacy of biohydrogen production from renewable biomass resources. PMID:22509174

  2. Isolation and Characterization of Strain MMB-1 (CECT 4803), a Novel Melanogenic Marine Bacterium.

    PubMed

    Solano, F; Garcia, E; Perez, D; Sanchez-Amat, A

    1997-09-01

    A novel marine melanogenic bacterium, strain MMB-1, was isolated from the Mediterranean Sea. The taxonomic characterization of this strain indicated that it belongs to the genus Alteromonas. Under in vivo conditions, L-tyrosine was the specific monophenolic precursor for melanin synthesis. This bacterium contained all types of activities associated with polyphenol oxidases (PPOs), cresolase (EC 1.18.14.1), catecholase (EC 1.10.3.1), and laccase (EC 1.10.3.2). These activities were due to the presence of two different PPOs. The first one showed all the enzymatic activities, but it was not involved in melanogenesis in vivo, since amelanogenic mutant strains obtained by nitrosoguanidine treatment contained levels of this PPO similar to that of the wild-type MMB-1 strain. The second PPO showed cresolase and catecholase activities but no laccase, and it was involved in melanogenesis, since this enzyme was lost in amelanogenic mutant strains. This PPO was strongly activated by sodium dodecyl sulfate below the critical micelle concentration, and it is a tyrosinase-like enzyme showing a lag period in its tyrosine hydroxylase activity that could be avoided by small amounts of L-dopa. This is the first report of a bacterium that contains two PPOs and also the first report of a pluripotent PPO showing all types of oxidase activities. The bacterium and the pluripotent PPO may be useful models for exploring the roles of PPOs in cellular physiology, aside from melanin formation. On the other hand, the high oxidizing capacity of the PPO for a wide range of substrates could make possible its application in phenolic biotransformations, food processing, or the cosmetic industry, where fungal and plant PPOs are being used. PMID:16535688

  3. Isolation and Characterization of Strain MMB-1 (CECT 4803), a Novel Melanogenic Marine Bacterium

    PubMed Central

    Solano, F.; Garcia, E.; Perez, De; Sanchez-Amat, A.

    1997-01-01

    A novel marine melanogenic bacterium, strain MMB-1, was isolated from the Mediterranean Sea. The taxonomic characterization of this strain indicated that it belongs to the genus Alteromonas. Under in vivo conditions, L-tyrosine was the specific monophenolic precursor for melanin synthesis. This bacterium contained all types of activities associated with polyphenol oxidases (PPOs), cresolase (EC 1.18.14.1), catecholase (EC 1.10.3.1), and laccase (EC 1.10.3.2). These activities were due to the presence of two different PPOs. The first one showed all the enzymatic activities, but it was not involved in melanogenesis in vivo, since amelanogenic mutant strains obtained by nitrosoguanidine treatment contained levels of this PPO similar to that of the wild-type MMB-1 strain. The second PPO showed cresolase and catecholase activities but no laccase, and it was involved in melanogenesis, since this enzyme was lost in amelanogenic mutant strains. This PPO was strongly activated by sodium dodecyl sulfate below the critical micelle concentration, and it is a tyrosinase-like enzyme showing a lag period in its tyrosine hydroxylase activity that could be avoided by small amounts of L-dopa. This is the first report of a bacterium that contains two PPOs and also the first report of a pluripotent PPO showing all types of oxidase activities. The bacterium and the pluripotent PPO may be useful models for exploring the roles of PPOs in cellular physiology, aside from melanin formation. On the other hand, the high oxidizing capacity of the PPO for a wide range of substrates could make possible its application in phenolic biotransformations, food processing, or the cosmetic industry, where fungal and plant PPOs are being used. PMID:16535688

  4. Complete genome sequence of Lactobacillus helveticus MB2-1, a probiotic bacterium producing exopolysaccharides.

    PubMed

    Li, Wei; Xia, Xiudong; Chen, Xiaohong; Rui, Xin; Jiang, Mei; Zhang, Qiuqin; Zhou, Jianzhong; Dong, Mingsheng

    2015-09-10

    Lactobacillus helveticus MB2-1 is a probiotic bacterium producing exopolysaccharides (EPS), which was isolated from traditional Sayram ropy fermented milk in southern Xinjiang, China. The genome consists of a circular 2,084,058bp chromosome with no plasmid. The genome sequence indicated that this strain includes a 15.20kb gene cluster involved in EPS biosynthesis. Genome sequencing information has provided the basis for understanding the potential molecular mechanism behind the EPS production. PMID:26065338

  5. Draft Genome Sequence of a Strictly Anaerobic Dichloromethane-Degrading Bacterium

    PubMed Central

    Higgins, Steven A.; Tsementzi, Despina; Konstantinidis, Konstantinos T.; Mack, E. Erin

    2016-01-01

    An anaerobic, dichloromethane-degrading bacterium affiliated with novel Peptococcaceae was maintained in a microbial consortium. The organism originated from pristine freshwater sediment collected from Rio Mameyes in Luquillo, Puerto Rico, in October 2009 (latitude 18°21′43.9″, longitude −65°46′8.4″). The draft genome sequence is 2.1 Mb and has a G+C content of 43.5%. PMID:26941136

  6. Halobacterium saccharovorum sp. nov., a carbohydrate-metabolizing, extremely halophilic bacterium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tomlinson, G. A.; Hochstein, L. I.

    1976-01-01

    The previously described extremely halophilic bacterium, strain M6, metabolizes a variety of carbohydrates with the production of acid. In addition, the organism produces nitrite (but no gas) from nitrate, is motile, and grows most rapidly at about 50 C. These characteristics distinguish it from all previously described halophilic bacteria in the genus Halobacterium. It is suggested that it be designated as a new species, Halobacterium saccharovorum.

  7. Complete Genome Sequence of the Thermophilic, Piezophilic, Heterotrophic Bacterium Marinitoga piezophila KA3

    SciTech Connect

    Lucas, Susan; Han, James; Lapidus, Alla L.; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Goodwin, Lynne A.; Pitluck, Sam; Peters, Lin; Mikhailova, Natalia; Teshima, Hazuki; Detter, J. Chris; Han, Cliff; Tapia, Roxanne; Land, Miriam L; Hauser, Loren John; Kyrpides, Nikos C; Ivanova, N; Pagani, Ioanna; Vannier, Pauline; Oger, Phil; Bartlett, Douglas; Noll, Kenneth M; Woyke, Tanja; Jebbar, Mohamed

    2012-01-01

    Marinitoga piezophila KA3 is a thermophilic, anaerobic, chemoorganotrophic, sulfur-reducing bacterium isolated from the Grandbonum deep-sea hydrothermal vent site at the East Pacific Rise (13 degrees N, 2,630-m depth). The genome of M. piezophila KA3 comprises a 2,231,407-bp circular chromosome and a 13,386-bp circular plasmid. This genome was sequenced within Department of Energy Joint Genome Institute CSP 2010.

  8. Draft Genome Sequence of the Extremely Halophilic Phototrophic Purple Sulfur Bacterium Halorhodospira halochloris

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Kumar Saurabh; Kirksey, Jared; Hoff, Wouter D.; Deole, Ratnakar

    2014-01-01

    Halorhodospira halochloris is an extremely halophilic bacterium isolated from hypersaline Wadi Nantrun lakes in Egypt. Here we report the draft genome sequence of this gammaproteobacteria (GI number: 589289709, GenBank Accession number: CP007268). The 3.5-Mb genome encodes for photosynthesis and biosynthesis of organic osmoprotectants. Comparison with the genome of H.halophila promises to yield insights into the evolution of halophilic adaptations. PMID:25057327

  9. Draft Genome Sequence of the Deinococcus-Thermus Bacterium Meiothermus ruber Strain A

    PubMed Central

    Thiel, Vera; Tomsho, Lynn P.; Burhans, Richard; Gay, Scott E.; Schuster, Stephan C.; Ward, David M.

    2015-01-01

    The draft genome sequence of the Deinococcus-Thermus group bacterium Meiothermus ruber strain A, isolated from a cyanobacterial enrichment culture obtained from Octopus Spring (Yellowstone National Park, WY), comprises 2,968,099 bp in 170 contigs. It is predicted to contain 2,895 protein-coding genes, 44 tRNA-coding genes, and 2 rRNA operons. PMID:25814606

  10. Draft Genome Sequence of the Deinococcus-Thermus Bacterium Meiothermus ruber Strain A.

    PubMed

    Thiel, Vera; Tomsho, Lynn P; Burhans, Richard; Gay, Scott E; Schuster, Stephan C; Ward, David M; Bryant, Donald A

    2015-01-01

    The draft genome sequence of the Deinococcus-Thermus group bacterium Meiothermus ruber strain A, isolated from a cyanobacterial enrichment culture obtained from Octopus Spring (Yellowstone National Park, WY), comprises 2,968,099 bp in 170 contigs. It is predicted to contain 2,895 protein-coding genes, 44 tRNA-coding genes, and 2 rRNA operons. PMID:25814606