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Sample records for bad news bbn

  1. Creating COMFORT: A Communication-Based Model for Breaking Bad News

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Villagran, Melinda; Goldsmith, Joy; Wittenberg-Lyles, Elaine; Baldwin, Paula

    2010-01-01

    This study builds upon existing protocols for breaking bad news (BBN), and offers an interaction-based approach to communicating comfort to patients and their families. The goal was to analyze medical students' (N = 21) videotaped standardized patient BBN interactions after completing an instructional unit on a commonly used BBN protocol, commonly…

  2. Delivering bad news to patients.

    PubMed

    Monden, Kimberley R; Gentry, Lonnie; Cox, Thomas R

    2016-01-01

    When physicians lack proper training, breaking bad news can lead to negative consequences for patients, families, and physicians. A questionnaire was used to determine whether a didactic program on delivering bad news was needed at our institution. Results revealed that 91% of respondents perceived delivering bad news as a very important skill, but only 40% felt they had the training to effectively deliver such news. We provide a brief review of different approaches to delivering bad news and advocate for training physicians in a comprehensive, structured model. PMID:26722188

  3. The Trouble with Bad News.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haskins, Jack B.

    1981-01-01

    Subjective comments from veteran news reporters, media critics, and the public give the impression that bad or negative news is becoming a major problem in this country. This impression raises major questions concerning how much is really known about bad news, including whether the media present an accurate or distorted picture of reality in…

  4. Breaking Bad News to Parents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Susan A.

    1996-01-01

    Discusses the difficulty of breaking bad news to parents, whether the news pertains to center policy or a child's behavior. Provides strategies for presenting news and for helping parents to overcome difficult situations, including gathering facts in advance, arranging an appropriate time, and having resource materials available for parents. (MOK)

  5. How to Tell Bad News

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Long, Nicholas J.

    2012-01-01

    Therapists, physicians, police officers, and emergency staff often are the messengers of bad news. They have to tell a patient, a parent, or a loved one about a death, an accident, a school shooting, a life-threatening diagnosis, a terrorist attack, or a suicide. Usually the messenger bears a heavy responsibility but has little training and seeks…

  6. Saudi mothers' preferences about breaking bad news concerning newborns: a structured verbal questionnaire

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Breaking bad news (BBN) to parents whose newborn has a major disease is an ethical dilemma. In Saudi Arabia, BBN about newborns is performed according to the parental preferences that have been reported from non-Arabic/non-Islamic countries. Saudi mothers' preferences about BBN have not yet been studied. Therefore, we aimed to elicit the preferences of Saudi mothers about BBN concerning newborns. Methods We selected a convenience sample of 402 Saudi mothers, aged 18-50 years, who had no previous experience with BBN. We selected them via a simple number-randomization scheme from the premises of a level III Saudi hospital between October of 2009 and January of 2011. We used a hypothetical situation (BBN about trisomy 21) to elicit their preferences about BBN concerning newborns via a structured verbal questionnaire composed of 12 multiple-choice questions. We expressed their preferences as percentages (95% confidence interval), and we used the Kendall's W test (W) to assess the degree of agreement in preferences. Results The Saudi mothers preferred that BBN be conducted with both parents together (64% [60-69]), albeit with weak levels of agreement (W = 0.29). They showed moderate agreement in their preferences that BBN should be conducted early (79% [75-83], W = 0.48), in detail (81% [77-85], W = 0.52), in person (88% [85-91], W = 0.58), and in a quiet setting (86% [83-90], W = 0.53). With extremely weak agreement, they preferred to have a known person present for support during BBN (56% [51-61], W = 0.01), to have close bodily contact with their babies (66% [61-70], W = 0.10), and to have no another patients present (64% [59-68], W = 0.08). They showed moderate levels of agreement in their desires to detail, in advance, their preferences about process of BBN by giving a reversible, written informed consent that could be utilized for guidance, if needed (80% [76-84], W = 0.36). Conclusions In our experience, Saudi mothers' preferences about BBN concerning

  7. [Breaking bad news in clinical practice].

    PubMed

    Herrera, Andrea; Ríos, Matías; Manríquez, José Manuel; Rojas, Gonzalo

    2014-10-01

    Breaking bad news is a complex task that requires multiple communication skills from health professionals. Clinical practice demands to communicate all type of bad news, from a diagnosis of cancer to adverse effects of a treatment. On the other hand, since the beginning of the health reform in 2003, the need to improve the quality of services was proposed, among which the concern about the rights and duties of patients stands out. Therefore, the health care provider-patient relationship becomes again the subject of discussion and study, and a topic of great importance for clinical work. We revise the consequences of breaking bad news for the patient and for the health care provider, as well as the current protocols available for this purpose. The importance of developing communication skills both for future health professionals as for those who currently work in the area is emphasized. PMID:25601116

  8. Breaking Bad News to Togolese Patients.

    PubMed

    Kpanake, Lonzozou; Sorum, Paul Clay; Mullet, Etienne

    2016-11-01

    The aim of this study was to map Togolese people's positions regarding the breaking of bad news to elderly patients. Two hundred eleven participants who had in the past received bad medical news were presented with 72 vignettes depicting communication of bad news to elderly female patients and asked to indicate the acceptability of the physician's conduct in each case. The vignettes were all combinations of five factors: (a) the severity of the disease, (b) the patient's wishes about disclosure, (c) the level of social support during hospitalization, (d) the patient's psychological robustness, and (e) the physician's decision about how to communicate the bad news. Five qualitatively different positions were found. Two percent of the participants preferred that the physician always tell the full truth to both the patient and her relatives, 8% preferred that the truth be told depending on the physician's perception of the situation, 15% preferred that the physician tell the truth but understood that in some cases nondisclosure to the patient was not inappropriate, 33% preferred that the physician tell the full truth to the relatives but not as much information to the patient, and 42% preferred that the physician tell the full truth to the relatives only. These findings present a challenge to European physicians taking care of African patients living in Europe or working in African hospitals, and to African physicians trained in Europe and now working in their home countries. If these physicians respect the imperative of always telling the truth directly to their patients, their behavior may trigger anger and considerable misunderstanding among African patients and their families. PMID:27030138

  9. Bad news: delivery, dialogue, and dilemmas.

    PubMed

    Quill, T E; Townsend, P

    1991-03-01

    The narrative from a real patient encounter is used to illustrate the powerful effect that delivering bad news can have on both patient and physician. The meaning of bad news to the patient may be quite different than the medical or the personal meaning to the physician. Differences in perception must be explored and understood before the common ground necessary for joint decision making is established. Initial patient responses can be divided into three categories: (1) basic psychophysiologic (fight-flight or conservation-withdrawal), (2) cognitive, and (3) affective. Responses vary considerably depending on the meaning of the diagnosis to the patient, the degree of immediate threat, and the patient's previous experience with illness. Desired outcomes of the initial meeting include (1) minimizing aloneness and isolation for both patient and physician; (2) achieving a common perception of the problem; (3) giving information tailored to the immediate needs of the patient; (4) addressing immediate medical needs, including the risk of suicide; (5) responding to immediate discomforts; and (6) ensuring a basic plan for follow-up. Though all clinicians deliver bad news, few have had formal training or open exploration of the profound potential impact of the experience. PMID:2001128

  10. Displaying fairness while delivering bad news: Testing the effectiveness of organizational bad news training in the layoff context.

    PubMed

    Richter, Manuela; König, Cornelius J; Koppermann, Christopher; Schilling, Michael

    2016-06-01

    Although giving bad news at work is a stressful experience, managers are often underprepared for this challenging task. As a solution, we introduce organizational bad news training that integrates (a) principles of delivering bad news from the context of health care (i.e., bad news delivery component), and (b) principles of organizational justice theory (i.e., fairness component). We argue that both the formal and fair delivery of bad news at work can be enhanced with the help of training to mitigate distress both for the messenger and the recipient. We tested the effectiveness of training for the delivery of a layoff as a typical bad news event at work. In 2 studies, we compared the performance of a training group (receiving both components of training) with that of a control group (Study 1, Study 2) and a basics group (receiving the bad news delivery component only; Study 2) during a simulated dismissal notification meeting. In general, the results supported our hypotheses: Training improved the formal delivery of bad news and predicted indicators of procedural fairness during the conversation in both studies. In Study 2, we also considered layoff victims' negativity after the layoff and found that training significantly reduced negative responses. This relationship was fully mediated by layoff victims' fairness perceptions. Despite preparation, however, giving bad news remained a challenging task in both studies. In summary, we recommend that organizations provide managers with organizational bad news training in order to promote professional and fair bad news conversations at work. (PsycINFO Database Record PMID:26882444

  11. Positive Organizational Behavior: A Buffer for Bad News

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    French, Sandra L.; Holden, Tracey Quigley

    2012-01-01

    Most communication research on bad news messages focuses on crisis communication, where attention is often limited to image repair strategies. The authors argue that a key indicator of an organization's effectiveness in communicating "bad news" messages is its organizational culture. Developing an organizational culture that values positive…

  12. [Breaking bad news in oncology: the Belgian experience].

    PubMed

    Delevallez, F; Lienard, A; Gibon, A-S; Razavi, D

    2014-10-01

    Breaking bad news is a complex and frequent clinical task for physicians working in oncology. It can have a negative impact on patients and their relatives who are often present during breaking bad news consultations. Many factors influence how the delivery of bad news will be experienced especially the communication skills used by physicians. A three-phase process (post-delivery phase, delivery phase, pre-delivery phase) has been developed to help physician to handle this task more effectively. Communication skills and specific breaking bad news training programs are both necessary and effective. A recent study conducted in Belgium has shown their impact on the time allocated to each of the three phases of this process, on the communication skills used, on the inclusion of the relative in the consultation and on physicians' physiological arousal. These results underscore the importance of promoting intensive communication skills and breaking bad news training programs for health care professionals. PMID:25391507

  13. Breaking bad news: issues relating to nursing practice.

    PubMed

    Warnock, Clare

    2014-07-15

    The breaking of bad news was traditionally regarded to be the time when a doctor and nurse sat down with a patient and family members to provide information about, for example, a life-limiting diagnosis or a poor prognosis. However, breaking bad news is now generally accepted as a process, not a one-off event, and is considered to refer to any bad, sad or difficult information that alters patients' perceptions of their present and future. Nurses have an important role in the process of providing information and helping patients prepare for, receive, understand and cope with the bad news they have been given. This article aims to help nurses understand the process of breaking bad news and discuss the challenges and difficulties that nurses can face when they are involved with patients who have been given bad news. It also provides guidance with regard to preparing for breaking bad news, giving difficult information, responding to possible reactions, and supporting patients and their relatives after they have received bad news. PMID:25005417

  14. Breaking Bad News: An essential skill for doctors.

    PubMed

    Abdul Hafidz, M I; Zainudin, L D

    2016-02-01

    Breaking bad news is a process of delivering news, which may negatively affect a patient's view of the future, however is an essential skill for doctors. There are a multitude of benefits if doctors can execute this task well, and will improve the disease journey for the patient. There are several published models including the SPIKES and ABCDE models to help guide the doctor to break bad news effectively. This important skill can be taught through various methods but the most effective may be actually observing a session by senior clinicians. PMID:27130740

  15. How to Break Bad News: Physicians’ and Nurses’ Attitudes

    PubMed Central

    Roozdar, Ava; Taher, Mohammad; Shirzad, Samira; Arjmand, Mohsen; Mohammadi, Mohammad Reza; Nejatisafa, Ali-Akbar; Tahmasebi, Mamak; Roozdar, Alale

    2010-01-01

    Objective Bad news disclosure is one of the most complex tasks of physicians. Recent evidences indicate that patients' and physicians' attitude toward breaking bad news has been changed since few years ago. The evidence of breaking bad news is different across cultures. The aim of this study is to evaluate the attitude of medical staff toward breaking bad news to provide a clinical guideline in Iran. Methods A descriptive study was conducted during 2008-2009 on a sample of 100 medical staff (50 physicians and 50 nurses) at Cancer Institute of Imam Khomeini hospital. The subjects' demographic characteristics and their attitudes toward the manner of revealing the diagnosis were registered in a questionnaire. Results The majority of the physicians (86%, n=43) and nurses (74%, n=37), mostly the older and more experienced, tended to reveal the diagnosis to patients. Only a few physicians (8%, n=4) had been trained how to disclose bad news, which discloused diagnosis more than non trained ones. Physicians and nurses preferred to inform the patients about the diagnosis when either the patients were alone or in the presence of their spouse respectively. Only a few physicians (14%) and nurses (24%) agreed to explain life expectancy to patients. Conclusion Compared to past, physicians and nurses are more willing to share cancer diagnosis with patients. However, lack of adequate communication skills in caregivers, and their concerns about managing patients’ emotional reactions reduce their tendency to disclose bad news to the patients. Therefore, training physicians and nurses to expose bad news to the patients seems to be necessary. PMID:22952506

  16. "Good News" Tune Makes Discussion of "Bad News" Sing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sneed, Don

    1984-01-01

    Recommends playing Anne Murray's recording of "A Little Good News" to promote discussion about the nature of news and Bobbie Gentry's "Ode to Billy Joe" for discussion on writing news stories about suicides. (CRH)

  17. Stimulating reflective practice using collaborative reflective training in breaking bad news simulations.

    PubMed

    Kim, Lana; Hernandez, Barbara Couden; Lavery, Adrian; Denmark, T Kent

    2016-06-01

    Medical simulation has long been used as a way to immerse trainees in realistic practice scenarios to help them consolidate their formal medical knowledge and develop teamwork, communication, and technical skills. Debriefing is regarded as a critical aspect of simulation training. With a skilled debriefing facilitator, trainees are able to go beyond a rote review of the skills and steps taken to explore their internal process and self-reflect on how their experience during the simulation shaped their decision making and behavior. However, the sense of vulnerability is an aspect of experiential training that can raise a trainee's defensiveness. Anxiety increases when trainees anticipate being evaluated for their performance, or when the simulation scenario pertains to complex interpersonal activities such as learning how to break bad news (BBN), a commonly encountered aspect of medical practice with inadequate training. Thus, collaborative reflective training (CRT), developed out of ideas based in family therapy, was designed as an approach for facilitating open dialogue and greater self-reflection while receiving training in BBN. This article will discuss the conceptual framework of CRT, explain how it was developed, and describe the nature of how it was used with a team of neonatology and pediatric fellows and medical family therapy interns. (PsycINFO Database Record PMID:27077393

  18. Human development of the ability to learn from bad news.

    PubMed

    Moutsiana, Christina; Garrett, Neil; Clarke, Richard C; Lotto, R Beau; Blakemore, Sarah-Jayne; Sharot, Tali

    2013-10-01

    Humans show a natural tendency to discount bad news while incorporating good news into beliefs (the "good news-bad news effect"), an effect that may help explain seemingly irrational risk taking. Understanding how this bias develops with age is important because adolescents are prone to engage in risky behavior; thus, educating them about danger is crucial. We reveal a striking valence-dependent asymmetry in how belief updating develops with age. In the ages tested (9-26 y), younger age was associated with inaccurate updating of beliefs in response to undesirable information regarding vulnerability. In contrast, the ability to update beliefs accurately in response to desirable information remained relatively stable with age. This asymmetry was mediated by adequate computational use of positive but not negative estimation errors to alter beliefs. The results are important for understanding how belief formation develops and might help explain why adolescents do not respond adequately to warnings. PMID:24019466

  19. Communicating bad news: a model for emergency mental health helpers.

    PubMed

    Nardi, Thomas J; Keefe-Cooperman, Kathleen

    2006-01-01

    This article addresses the concerns of the messenger/helper who must convey tragic news to individuals and families. It offers a model to be used as a guide to ease the stress on both the deliverer and receiver of bad news. The model uses the mnemonic, PEWTER (Prepare, Evaluate, Warn, Tell, Emotional Response, Regroup), to represent the six components of the communication process. PMID:16944793

  20. When good news leads to bad choices.

    PubMed

    McDevitt, Margaret A; Dunn, Roger M; Spetch, Marcia L; Ludvig, Elliot A

    2016-01-01

    Pigeons and other animals sometimes deviate from optimal choice behavior when given informative signals for delayed outcomes. For example, when pigeons are given a choice between an alternative that always leads to food after a delay and an alternative that leads to food only half of the time after a delay, preference changes dramatically depending on whether the stimuli during the delays are correlated with (signal) the outcomes or not. With signaled outcomes, pigeons show a much greater preference for the suboptimal alternative than with unsignaled outcomes. Key variables and research findings related to this phenomenon are reviewed, including the effects of durations of the choice and delay periods, probability of reinforcement, and gaps in the signal. We interpret the available evidence as reflecting a preference induced by signals for good news in a context of uncertainty. Other explanations are briefly summarized and compared. PMID:26781050

  1. [Perceptions of newborns' families about the communication of bad news].

    PubMed

    Pinheiro, Eliana Moreira; Balbino, Flávia Simphronio; Balieiro, Maria Magda Ferreira Gomes; De Domenico, Edvane Birelo Lopes; Avena, Marta José

    2009-03-01

    The present study aims to describe how families perceive the communication of bad news about hospitalized newborns given by professionals. A qualitative and descriptive study was carried out with families of hospitalized newborns in the neonatal unit. Five mothers and one father were interviewed The thematic analysis of data revealed four categories: Message content in relation to clarity, detailing and not disclosed information. The way the news was transmitted: leads to ambiguity in reactions. Families' perceptions aboutprofessionals' attitudes to transmit the news: sometimes attitudes are different depending on the professional's experience and involvement with the customer. Use of communication strategies for message transmission: considered by the families as a mean to minimize the gravity of the baby's problem. The results pointed out the use of a non symmetrical communication between professional-family The adoption of a team practice, which incorporates it in its interventions, may meet the families' needs of information and social support. PMID:19653559

  2. The Art of Breaking Bad News: Lessons Learned at a Large Public University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Head, Joe F.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to reflect on how to break bad news. The style in which one breaks bad news at the collegiate level has implications both for the individual and for the institution. If not managed well by enrollment professionals, negative news can taint prospects, applicants, parents, and current students, blemishing the…

  3. Does emotional intelligence predict breaking bad news skills in pediatric interns? A pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Reed, Suzanne; Kassis, Karyn; Nagel, Rollin; Verbeck, Nicole; Mahan, John D.; Shell, Richard

    2015-01-01

    Background While both patients and physicians identify communication of bad news as an area of great challenge, the factors underlying this often complex task remain largely unknown. Emotional intelligence (EI) has been positively correlated with good general communication skills and successful leadership, but there is no literature relating EI to the delivery of bad news. Purpose Our objectives were to determine: 1) performance of first-year pediatric residents in the delivery of bad news in a standardized patient (SP) setting; and 2) the role of EI in these assessments. Our hypothesis was that pediatric trainees with higher EI would demonstrate more advanced skills in this communication task. Methods Forty first- year residents participated. Skill in bad news delivery was assessed via SP encounters using a previously published assessment tool (GRIEV_ING Death Notification Protocol). Residents completed the Emotional and Social Competency Inventory (ESCI) as a measure of EI. Results Residents scored poorly on bad news delivery skills but scored well on EI. Intraclass correlation coefficients indicated moderate to substantial inter-rater reliability among raters using the delivering bad news assessment tool. However, no correlation was found between bad news delivery performance and EI. Conclusions We concluded that first-year pediatric residents have inadequate skills in the delivery of bad news. In addition, our data suggest that higher EI alone is not sufficient to effectively deliver death news and more robust skill training is necessary for residents to gain competence and acquire mastery in this important communication domain. PMID:26286897

  4. Delivering Bad News: An Approach According to Jewish Scriptures

    PubMed Central

    Naimer, Sody A.; Prero, Moshe

    2014-01-01

    Despite a preoccupation in the medical literature with developing an effective approach for breaking bad news, the sources are based on personal opinion alone and only in some instances on qualitative research. Recognizing the gravity of this topic coupled with respect for the wisdom of the written and oral Jewish scriptures, this work is an attempt to delve into the diverse ancient writings to draw conclusions regarding a recommended methodology to guide and inform this task. It is interesting to learn that most elements related to this topic have previously been raised in various forms in the scriptures. The issues range from where, when, and how the bearer of bad news should undertake this duty, to details such as the environment, the format, the speed, and depth of the details to be disclosed. The essence of this paper is to enrich the reader using both positive and negative examples found in the Jewish heritage. Adopting these principles will hopefully provide an effective method for performing this unpleasant obligation, with the goal of limiting harmful consequences as much as possible. PMID:25120920

  5. [Breaking bad news--a challenge for every physician].

    PubMed

    Schilling, G; Mehnert, A

    2014-11-01

    Breaking bad news is one of the most important and challenging physician's duties in routine daily work. It is not unusual that such dialogues take place at the very beginning of a doctor-patient relationship and positively or negatively influence the further course. In cases of critically ill patients or in emergency situations clinicians mostly interact with family members who have to cope with their own distress and with uncertainties of their loved one's disease. It is well accepted that good communication can significantly improve coping with the disease and promote patient compliance as well as better fulfilling family needs. Particular difficulties are the often minimal or lacking information on the counterpart and the family network, the expectations of patients and their families and the inability to predict their reactions. It is always a challenge to honestly deliver bad news to a patient and relatives without destroying their hope. Despite often limited time resources a bond of trust should be built up and the patient should be empowered to participate in shared decision making. PMID:23712179

  6. Delivering bad news: an approach according to jewish scriptures.

    PubMed

    Naimer, Sody A; Prero, Moshe

    2014-07-01

    Despite a preoccupation in the medical literature with developing an effective approach for breaking bad news, the sources are based on personal opinion alone and only in some instances on qualitative research. Recognizing the gravity of this topic coupled with respect for the wisdom of the written and oral Jewish scriptures, this work is an attempt to delve into the diverse ancient writings to draw conclusions regarding a recommended methodology to guide and inform this task. It is interesting to learn that most elements related to this topic have previously been raised in various forms in the scriptures. The issues range from where, when, and how the bearer of bad news should undertake this duty, to details such as the environment, the format, the speed, and depth of the details to be disclosed. The essence of this paper is to enrich the reader using both positive and negative examples found in the Jewish heritage. Adopting these principles will hopefully provide an effective method for performing this unpleasant obligation, with the goal of limiting harmful consequences as much as possible. PMID:25120920

  7. Educating the delivery of bad news in medicine: Preceptorship versus simulation.

    PubMed

    Jacques, Andrew P; Adkins, Eric J; Knepel, Sheri; Boulger, Creagh; Miller, Jessica; Bahner, David P

    2011-07-01

    Simulation experiences have begun to replace traditional education models of teaching the skill of bad news delivery in medical education. The tiered apprenticeship model of medical education emphasizes experiential learning. Studies have described a lack of support in bad news delivery and inadequacy of training in this important clinical skill as well as poor familial comprehension and dissatisfaction on the part of physicians in training regarding the resident delivery of bad news. Many residency training programs lacked a formalized training curriculum in the delivery of bad news. Simulation teaching experiences may address these noted clinical deficits in the delivery of bad news to patients and their families. Unique experiences can be role-played with this educational technique to simulate perceived learner deficits. A variety of scenarios can be constructed within the framework of the simulation training method to address specific cultural and religious responses to bad news in the medical setting. Even potentially explosive and violent scenarios can be role-played in order to prepare physicians for these rare and difficult situations. While simulation experiences cannot supplant the model of positive, real-life clinical teaching in the delivery of bad news, simulation of clinical scenarios with scripting, self-reflection, and peer-to-peer feedback can be powerful educational tools. Simulation training can help to develop the skills needed to effectively and empathetically deliver bad news to patients and families in medical practice. PMID:22229135

  8. Delivering and Receiving Bad News: What School Psychologists Need to Know

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frost, Megan; Rogers, Margaret R.; O'Bryon, Elisabeth C.; Perry, Kimberly Hill

    2010-01-01

    Delivering bad news to students, teachers, and parents is not an uncommon occurrence for school psychologists. Skillfully communicating bad news requires sensitivity, thoughtful wording, and an awareness of the potential effect on the recipients. Despite the importance of this skill, school psychology has devoted little attention to what is…

  9. Nurses' perspectives on breaking bad news to patients and their families: a qualitative content analysis.

    PubMed

    Abbaszadeh, Abbas; Ehsani, Seyyedeh Roghayeh; Begjani, Jamal; Kaji, Mohammad Akbari; Dopolani, Fatemeh Nemati; Nejati, Amir; Mohammadnejad, Esmaeil

    2014-01-01

    Breaking bad news is quite often not done in an effective manner in clinical settings due to the medical staff lacking the skills necessary for speaking to patients and their families. Bad news is faced with similar reactions on the part of the news receiver in all cultures and nations. The purpose of this study was to explore the perspectives of Iranian nurses on breaking bad news to patients and their families. In this research, a qualitative approach was adopted. In-depth and semi-structured interviews were conducted with 19 nurses who had at least one year work experience in the ward, and content analysis was performed to analyze the data. Five major categories emerged from data analysis, including effective communication with patients and their families, preparing the ground for delivering bad news, minimizing the negativity associated with the disease, passing the duty to physicians, and helping patients and their families make logical treatment decisions. The results of this study show that according to the participants, it is the physicians' duty to give bad news, but nurses play an important role in delivering bad news to patients and their companions and should therefore be trained in clinical and communicative skills to be able to give bad news in an appropriate and effective manner. PMID:25512837

  10. Nurses’ perspectives on breaking bad news to patients and their families: a qualitative content analysis

    PubMed Central

    Abbaszadeh, Abbas; Ehsani, Seyyedeh Roghayeh; begjani, Jamal; Kaji, Mohammad Akbari; Dopolani, Fatemeh Nemati; Nejati, Amir; Mohammadnejad, Esmaeil

    2014-01-01

    Breaking bad news is quite often not done in an effective manner in clinical settings due to the medical staff lacking the skills necessary for speaking to patients and their families. Bad news is faced with similar reactions on the part of the news receiver in all cultures and nations. The purpose of this study was to explore the perspectives of Iranian nurses on breaking bad news to patients and their families. In this research, a qualitative approach was adopted. In-depth and semi-structured interviews were conducted with 19 nurses who had at least one year work experience in the ward, and content analysis was performed to analyze the data. Five major categories emerged from data analysis, including effective communication with patients and their families, preparing the ground for delivering bad news, minimizing the negativity associated with the disease, passing the duty to physicians, and helping patients and their families make logical treatment decisions. The results of this study show that according to the participants, it is the physicians’ duty to give bad news, but nurses play an important role in delivering bad news to patients and their companions and should therefore be trained in clinical and communicative skills to be able to give bad news in an appropriate and effective manner. PMID:25512837

  11. Use of interactive theater and role play to develop medical students' skills in breaking bad news.

    PubMed

    Skye, Eric P; Wagenschutz, Heather; Steiger, Jeffrey A; Kumagai, Arno K

    2014-12-01

    Creative arts have been increasingly implemented in medical education. This study investigated the use of interactive theater and role play with professional actors in teaching breaking bad news to medical students. The objectives were to explore the contexts, approaches, experiences, and reactions in giving and receiving bad news. Second-year medical students participated in a required educational session that utilized interactive theater which helps students learn about the issues of breaking bad news to a patient with cancer. Following the interactive theater piece, professional actors provided students role play experiences in small groups with breaking bad news. Anonymous evaluation surveys were given out to all second-year medical students at the conclusion of the breaking bad news session. Surveys contained quantitative and qualitative responses. Three years of evaluations were analyzed. A total of 451 (88 %) students completed the evaluations. Comments were thematically analyzed. Ninety-four percent agreed that the theater piece prompted reflection on patient-provider communications, and 89 % agreed that it stimulated discussion on complex issues with breaking bad news. The two most common themes in student comments concerned the importance of realism in the theater piece, and the value of experiencing multiple perspectives. Use of professional actors during the role play exercises enhances the realism and pushed the students out of their own "comfort zones" in ways that may more closely approximate real life clinical situations. Interactive theater can be a potentially powerful tool to teach breaking bad news during medical school. PMID:24683056

  12. [Participation in cardiac rehabilitation after coronary bypass surgery: good news, bad news].

    PubMed

    Henkin, Yaakov

    2012-09-01

    Cardiac rehabilitation programs have the potential to decrease morbidity and mortality and increase quality of life after acute coronary events and coronary bypass surgery (CABG). Unfortunately, the proportion of eligible patients that participate in cardiac rehabilitation remains low, despite coverage of such programs by the Israeli National Health Insurance. A low participation rate is especially prominent in women, elderly, minorities and low socioeconomic classes. In this edition of Harefuah, Gendler et at conducted an interventional study aimed at increasing the participation of patients in cardiac rehabilitation programs after CABG in 5 cardiothoracic wards across Israel. They interviewed 489 patients in the intervention arm and 472 patients in the control arm before surgery and a year later. The intervention included dissemination of information on cardiac rehabilitation to the medical staff and patients. Following the intervention, cardiac rehabilitation increased almost twofold in veteran-Israeli males and females. Although it increased significantly in USSR-born male immigrants, their absolute rate of participation remained low (13.6%). No USSR-born female participated in rehabilitation, either before or after the intervention. The good news is that a simple, inexpensive intervention can increase participation in cardiac rehabilitation after CABG surgery. The bad news is that this potentially lifesaving activity remains unattended by most USSR-born immigrants, and particularly by females. Additional research is required to explore the cultural, social and economic barriers of this phenomenon. PMID:23367745

  13. National survey of psychologists' training and practice in breaking bad news: a mixed methods study of the MUM effect.

    PubMed

    Merker, Brad M; Hanson, William E; Poston, John M

    2010-09-01

    Research on breaking bad news has involved undergraduates, medical students, and physicians. However, to date, no studies have examined how, or whether, psychologists are trained to break bad news, as well as their current practice of breaking bad news. This mixed methods study explored the training and practice of 329 licensed psychologists/APA members in breaking bad news, using the MUM effect as a theoretical backdrop. Results suggest (1) psychologists are, as hypothesized, significantly more reluctant to break bad news than good news, (2) anxiety accounts for 30.6% of the variance in their reluctance, and (3) three-out-of-four psychologists break bad news "to some extent" or more, most typically related to a patient's psychological health, major Axis I diagnosis, or learning disability. Results also suggest most psychologists are not trained to break bad news, with only 2.7% being familiar with existing recommendations and guidelines; and anxiety, concerns for self/other, context, and norms play an important role in the bad news breaking process. Implications for theory, research, and practice are discussed and a training model is proposed. PMID:20499268

  14. A mapping of people's positions regarding the breaking of bad news to patients.

    PubMed

    Igier, Valérie; Muñoz Sastre, María Teresa; Sorum, Paul Clay; Mullet, Etienne

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to map people's positions regarding the breaking of bad news to patients. One hundred forty adults who had in the past received bad medical news or whose elderly relatives had in the past received bad news, 25 nurses, and 28 nurse's aides indicated the acceptability of physicians' conduct in 72 vignettes of giving bad news to elderly patients. Vignettes were all combinations of five factors: (a) the severity of the disease (severe but not lethal, extremely severe and possibly lethal, or incurable), (b) the patient's wishes (insists on knowing the full truth vs. does not insist), (c) the level of social support during hospitalization, (d) the patient's psychological robustness, and (e) the physician's decision about communicating bad news (tell the patient that the illness is not severe and minimize the severity of the illness when talking to the patient's relatives, tell the full truth to her relatives, or tell the full truth to both the elderly patient and her relatives). Four qualitatively different positions were found. Twenty-eight percent of participants preferred the full truth to be told; 36% preferred the truth to be told but understood that the physician would inform the family first; 13% did not think that telling the full truth is best for patients; and 23% understood that the full truth would be told in some cases and not in others, depending on the physician's perception of the situation. The present mapping could be used to detect the position held by each patient and act accordingly. This would be made easier if breaking bad news was conceived as a communication process involving a range of health care professionals, rather than as a single occurrence in time. PMID:25186427

  15. Creation and Assessment of a Bad News Delivery Simulation Curriculum for Pediatric Emergency Medicine Fellows.

    PubMed

    Chumpitazi, Corrie E; Rees, Chris A; Chumpitazi, Bruno P; Hsu, Deborah C; Doughty, Cara B; Lorin, Martin I

    2016-01-01

    Background  Bad news in the context of health care has been broadly defined as significant information that negatively alters people's perceptions of the present or future. Effectively delivering bad news (DBN) in the setting of the emergency department requires excellent communication skills. Evidence shows that bad news is frequently given inadequately. Studies show that trainees need to devote more time to developing this skill through formalized training. This program's objectives were to utilize trained standardized patients in a simulation setting to assist pediatric emergency medicine (PEM) fellows in the development of effective, sensitive, and compassionate communication with patients and family members when conveying bad news, and to recognize and respond to the patient/parent's reaction to such news. Methods PEM fellows participated in a novel curriculum utilizing simulated patients (SPs) acting as the patient's parent and immersive techniques in a realistic and supportive environment. A baseline survey was conducted to ascertain participant demographics and previous experience with simulation and DBN. Experienced, multi-disciplinary faculty participated in a training workshop with the SPs one week prior to course delivery. Three scenarios were developed for bad news delivery. Instructors watched via remote video feed while the fellows individually interacted with the SPs and then participated in a confidential debriefing. Fellows later joined for group debriefing. Fellow characteristics, experience, and self-perceived comfort pre/post-course were collected.   Results Baseline data demonstrated that 78% of fellows reported DBN two or more times per month. Ninety-three percent of fellows in this study were present during the delivery of news about the death of a child to a parent or family member in the six-month period preceding this course. Fellows' self-reported comfort level in DBN to a patient/family and dealing with patient and parent emotions

  16. Creation and Assessment of a Bad News Delivery Simulation Curriculum for Pediatric Emergency Medicine Fellows

    PubMed Central

    Rees, Chris A; Chumpitazi, Bruno P; Hsu, Deborah C; Doughty, Cara B; Lorin, Martin I

    2016-01-01

    Background  Bad news in the context of health care has been broadly defined as significant information that negatively alters people’s perceptions of the present or future. Effectively delivering bad news (DBN) in the setting of the emergency department requires excellent communication skills. Evidence shows that bad news is frequently given inadequately. Studies show that trainees need to devote more time to developing this skill through formalized training. This program’s objectives were to utilize trained standardized patients in a simulation setting to assist pediatric emergency medicine (PEM) fellows in the development of effective, sensitive, and compassionate communication with patients and family members when conveying bad news, and to recognize and respond to the patient/parent’s reaction to such news. Methods PEM fellows participated in a novel curriculum utilizing simulated patients (SPs) acting as the patient’s parent and immersive techniques in a realistic and supportive environment. A baseline survey was conducted to ascertain participant demographics and previous experience with simulation and DBN. Experienced, multi-disciplinary faculty participated in a training workshop with the SPs one week prior to course delivery. Three scenarios were developed for bad news delivery. Instructors watched via remote video feed while the fellows individually interacted with the SPs and then participated in a confidential debriefing. Fellows later joined for group debriefing. Fellow characteristics, experience, and self-perceived comfort pre/post-course were collected.   Results Baseline data demonstrated that 78% of fellows reported DBN two or more times per month. Ninety-three percent of fellows in this study were present during the delivery of news about the death of a child to a parent or family member in the six-month period preceding this course. Fellows’ self-reported comfort level in DBN to a patient/family and dealing with patient and parent

  17. Keeping It Real: Exploring an Interdisciplinary Breaking Bad News Role-Play as an Integrative Learning Opportunity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sweeney, Catherine; O'Sullivan, Eleanor; McCarthy, Marian

    2015-01-01

    Palliative care is a complex area of healthcare best delivered by an interdisciplinary team approach. Breaking bad news is an inherent part of caring for people with life-limiting conditions. This study aims to explore an interdisciplinary breaking bad news role-play in a palliative care module. Participants were undergraduate medical and nursing…

  18. Breaking bad news revisited: the push for negotiated disclosure and changing practice implications.

    PubMed

    Arber, Anne; Gallagher, Ann

    2003-04-01

    This article revisits the ethical, legal, professional and emotional issues involved with disclosing bad news. The authors examine the push for disclosure that has come from a number of quarters in the UK, including ethical and legal challenges, in particular the Bristol Royal Inquiry Report, professional codes of conduct, health policy and the expectations of the public. The contribution of nurses to breaking bad news is not widely discussed in the literature. With the development of new nursing roles and evidence-based practice it is timely to consider the role of nurses in this process. The article highlights some limitations with current guidelines for breaking bad news, in particular, that these guidelines tend to be constructed from a professional standpoint and lack patient-centred evidence. The issue of emotional labour and how it relates to giving bad news is discussed with respect to professional staff and patients. The article concludes by raising some practice implications, including: the importance of context and continuity; the significance of information and support; the desirable qualities of the professional; and issues to consider in determining patient preferences. PMID:12734453

  19. Breaking Bad News in Counseling: Applying the PEWTER Model in the School Setting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keefe-Cooperman, Kathleen; Brady-Amoon, Peggy

    2013-01-01

    Breaking bad news is a stressful experience for counselors and clients. In this article, the PEWTER (Prepare, Evaluate, Warning, Telling, Emotional Response, Regrouping) model (Nardi & Keefe-Cooperman, 2006) is used as a guide to facilitate the process of a difficult conversation and promote client growth in a school setting. In this…

  20. Balancing Patient Care and Student Education: Learning to Deliver Bad News in an Optometry Teaching Clinic

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spafford, Marlee M.; Schryer, Catherine F.; Creutz, Stefan

    2009-01-01

    Learning to counsel patients in a teaching clinic or hospital occurs in the presence of the competing agendas of patient care and student education. We wondered about the challenges that these tensions create for clinical novices learning to deliver bad news to patients. In this preliminary study, we audio-taped and transcribed the interviews of…

  1. Breaking Bad News in Healthcare Organizations: Application of the Spikes Protocol

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    VonBergen, C. W.; Stevens, Robert E.; Loudon, David

    2011-01-01

    Organizational downsizing has increased exponentially worldwide and is also affecting the healthcare industry. It is one thing to speak abstractly of the need to reduce costs and quite another to actually tell a worker the bad news that he or she has been laid off. This paper offers practical advice to healthcare managers on conducting unpleasant…

  2. Breaking bad news and discussing goals of care in the intensive care unit.

    PubMed

    Hollyday, Sheryl L; Buonocore, Denise

    2015-01-01

    The intensive care unit is a high-stakes environment in which nurses, including advanced practice registered nurses (APRNs), often assist patients and families to navigate life and death situations. These high-stakes situations often require discussions that include bad news and discussions about goals of care or limiting aggressive care, and APRNs must develop expertise and techniques to be skilled communicators for conducting these crucial conversations. This article explores the art of communication, the learned skill of delivering bad news in the health care setting, and the incorporation of this news into a discussion about goals of care for patients. As APRNs learn to incorporate effective communication skills into practice, patient care and communication will ultimately be enhanced. PMID:25898881

  3. A Synthesis of the Literature on Breaking Bad News or Truth Telling: Potential for Research in India

    PubMed Central

    Martis, Lawrence; Westhues, Anne

    2013-01-01

    The high incidence of fatal diseases, inequitable access to health care, and socioeconomic disparities in India generate plentiful clinical bad news including diagnosis of a life-limiting disease, poor prognosis, treatment failure, and impending death. These contexts compel health care professionals to become the messengers of bad news to patients and their families. In global literature on breaking bad news, there is very little about such complex clinical interactions occurring in India or guiding health care providers to do it well. The purpose of this article is to identify the issues for future research that would contribute to the volume, comprehensiveness, and quality of empirical literature on breaking bad news in clinical settings across India. Towards this end, we have synthesized the studies done across the globe on breaking bad news, under four themes: (a) deciding the amount of bad news to deliver; (b) attending to cultural and ethical issues; (c) managing psychological distress; and (d) producing competent messengers of bad news. We believe that robust research is inevitable to build an indigenous knowledge base, enhance communicative competence among health care professionals, and thereby to improve the quality of clinical interactions in India. PMID:23766589

  4. Breaking bad news to a pregnant woman with a fetal abnormality on ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Greiner, Andrea L; Conklin, Jona

    2015-01-01

    Ultrasound is a common procedure performed in pregnancy. Most obstetric patients have an ultrasound between 18 and 20 weeks' gestation. While there is debate regarding the utility of this ultrasound, it has become a routine part of prenatal care. Discovery of a fetal anomaly on ultrasound is most commonly an unexpected, emotionally devastating event for pregnant women. Counseling these women about the ultrasound findings requires empathy and sensitivity. This task falls on the physicians caring for pregnant women: maternal-fetal medicine specialists, radiologists, generalist obstetricians, and family medicine physicians. Their training regarding breaking bad news is varied. Therefore, the purpose of this article is to provide a framework to break bad news of an anomalous fetus for physicians caring for pregnant women using the SPIKES protocol. The SPIKES acronym stands for setting, perception, invitation, knowledge, empathize, summary, and strategy. PMID:25616346

  5. Teaching midwife students how to break bad news using the cinema: an Italian qualitative study.

    PubMed

    Fieschi, Laura; Burlon, Barbara; De Marinis, Maria Grazia

    2015-03-01

    Delivering bad news is a difficult task that involves all healthcare professionals, including midwives. The hypothesis is that, in order to learn how to disclose and to discuss bad news, students need a phase of personal reflection, of awareness of their own emotional processes. The use of films in healthcare education can foster this process evoking different emotions concerning suffering and disease, in a "safety zone". This study examines the effects that a course, which uses reflection as a method of learning and the cinema as a teaching tool, produces on a little group of Italian third-year Midwifery students. From the content analysis (supported by Atlas-Ti(®) software) of the texts produced by the students after the vision of two entire films, it appears that they correctly identified many elements related to good and poor communication of bad news and that they were able to describe the emotions felt while watching the film, but still revealed a certain difficulty to interpret them. The course helped students to recognize the value of reflection on their emotions to better understand others, to empathize with people who suffer, but also to recognize their difficulties and compete with their own limits. PMID:25665460

  6. Breaking bad news of cancer diagnosis – Perception of the cancer patients in a rural community in Malaysia

    PubMed Central

    Bain, Mathew Gabriel; Lian, Cheah Whye; Thon, Chang Ching

    2014-01-01

    Context: Breaking of bad news is an important component in the management of cancer patients. Aims: This study aimed to assess the perceptions of breaking bad news of cancer diagnosis. Settings and Design: It was a cross-sectional study using Breaking Bad News Assessment Schedule (BAS) questionnaire on cancer patients in Serian district. Materials and Methods: Using snowballing sampling method, a total of 134 patients were interviewed face-to-face after the consent was obtained from each of the respondents. Statistical Analysis Used: Data was entered and analyzed using SPSS version 19.0. Results: Majority were comfortable with the current method of breaking bad news. The main aspects found to be the areas of concern were the importance of the usage of body language, management of time and identifying patients’ key area of concerns. There were significant difference between sex and “information giving” (P = 0.028) and “general consideration” (P = 0.016) and also between “the age and setting the scene” (P = 0.042). Significant difference was also found between the types of cancer and “the setting of scene” (P = 0.018), “breaking bad news technique” (P = 0.010), “eliciting concerns” (P = 0.003) and “information giving” (P = 0.004). Conclusion: Good and effective communication skill of breaking bad news is vital in the management of cancer patients. As the incidence of new cases of cancer increase every year, breaking of bad news has become a pertinent to the medical professionals’ role. Specific aspects of communication skills based on local characteristics should be more emphasized in the formulation of training for doctors. PMID:24818107

  7. Social worker assessment of bad news delivery by emergency medicine residents: a novel direct-observation milestone assessment.

    PubMed

    Min, Alice Ann; Spear-Ellinwood, Karen; Berman, Melissa; Nisson, Peyton; Rhodes, Suzanne Michelle

    2016-09-01

    The skill of delivering bad news is difficult to teach and evaluate. Residents may practice in simulated settings; however, this may not translate to confidence or competence during real experiences. We investigated the acceptability and feasibility of social workers as evaluators of residents' delivery of bad news during patient encounters, and assessed the attitudes of both groups regarding this process. From August 2013 to June 2014, emergency medicine residents completed self-assessments after delivering bad news. Social workers completed evaluations after observing these conversations. The Assessment tools were designed by modifying the global Breaking Bad News Assessment Scale. Residents and social workers completed post-study surveys. 37 evaluations were received, 20 completed by social workers and 17 resident self-evaluations. Social workers reported discussing plans with residents prior to conversations 90 % of the time (18/20, 95 % CI 64.5, 97.8). Social workers who had previously observed the resident delivering bad news reported that the resident was more skilled on subsequent encounters 90 % of the time (95 % CI 42.2, 99). Both social workers and residents felt that prior training or experience was important. First-year residents valued advice from social workers less than advice from attending physicians, whereas more experienced residents perceived advice from social workers to be equivalent with that of attending physicians (40 versus 2.9 %, p = 0.002). Social worker assessment of residents' abilities to deliver bad news is feasible and acceptable to both groups. This formalized self-assessment and evaluation process highlights the importance of social workers' involvement in delivery of bad news, and the teaching of this skill. This method may also be used as direct-observation for resident milestone assessment. PMID:26892405

  8. The Effect of Bad News and CEO Apology of Corporate on User Responses in Social Media.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hoh; Park, Jaram; Cha, Meeyoung; Jeong, Jaeseung

    2015-01-01

    While social media has become an important platform for social reputation, the emotional responses of users toward bad news have not been investigated thoroughly. We analyzed a total of 20,773 Twitter messages by 15,513 users to assess the influence of bad news and public apology in social media. Based on both computerized, quantitative sentiment analysis and in-depth qualitative analysis, we found that rapid public apology effectively and immediately reduced the level of negative sentiment, where the degree of change in sentiments differed by the type of interactions users engaged in. The majority of users who directly conversed with corporate representatives on the new media were not typical consumers, but experts and practitioners. We extend the existing cognitive model and suggest the audiences' psychological reaction model to describe the information processing process during and after an organizational crisis and response. We also discuss various measures through which companies can respond to a crisis properly in social media in a fashion that is different from conventional mass media. PMID:25951231

  9. The Effect of Bad News and CEO Apology of Corporate on User Responses in Social Media

    PubMed Central

    Cha, Meeyoung; Jeong, Jaeseung

    2015-01-01

    While social media has become an important platform for social reputation, the emotional responses of users toward bad news have not been investigated thoroughly. We analyzed a total of 20,773 Twitter messages by 15,513 users to assess the influence of bad news and public apology in social media. Based on both computerized, quantitative sentiment analysis and in-depth qualitative analysis, we found that rapid public apology effectively and immediately reduced the level of negative sentiment, where the degree of change in sentiments differed by the type of interactions users engaged in. The majority of users who directly conversed with corporate representatives on the new media were not typical consumers, but experts and practitioners. We extend the existing cognitive model and suggest the audiences’ psychological reaction model to describe the information processing process during and after an organizational crisis and response. We also discuss various measures through which companies can respond to a crisis properly in social media in a fashion that is different from conventional mass media. PMID:25951231

  10. Developing Guidelines for Disclosure or Non-Disclosure of Bad News around Life-Limiting Illness and Death to People with Intellectual Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tuffrey-Wijne, Irene; Giatras, Nikoletta; Butler, Gary; Cresswell, Amanda; Manners, Paula; Bernal, Jane

    2013-01-01

    Background: There is insufficient evidence to guide decisions around (non-)disclosure of bad news of life-limiting illness and death to people with intellectual disabilities. Aim: The aim of this study was to develop guidelines for decisions about (non-)disclosure of bad news around life-limiting illness and death to people with intellectual…

  11. Good News, Bad News.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baratz-Snowden, Joan

    1987-01-01

    The performance of black students on standardized tests is still significantly below that of their white counterparts. Data on black performance on standardized tests and trends on the factors that affect that performance are examined. The OERI study on Poverty, Achievement and the Distribution of Compensatory Education Services is discussed. (MLW)

  12. ["I am sorry, I have bad news... "- principles in informing patients on the gravity of a disease and the treatment].

    PubMed

    Dimitrijević, I; Kalezić, N; Ristić, J; Stefanović, D; Milićević, M; Bumbasirević, M; Subotić, D; Pavlović, D; Vucetić, C; Ivanovski, P

    2007-01-01

    The discovery of the appearance of a serious disease, and the necessity for diagnostics, treatment and rehabilitation, particularly when malignity is involved, represents exceptionally stressful news for the patient and his family. Most often this is a task for the physician. In this paper the authors consider the meaning of bad news in unexpected life events which significantly disturb the individual psycho-social ballance of the patient, as well as the familly dynamics and structure. It presents a review of available literature on the subject of the definition of so-called "bad news", the development of approaches in announcement, and current practical approaches and models which assist physicians in helping suffering patients in professional and humane ways. It points out inadequacies in the education of phisicians for this kind of task, and the variety of approaches. With the aim of improving the education of phisicians, and especially clinicians in surgical fields, the authors recommend a number of educational programs: education in the area od psychological and psychiatric aspects of learning of a serious disease, including acute reactions such as depressive states, reactive psychotic states, consumption of alcohol, etc.; education in the area of the family life cycle, and the effect of the disease as an unexpected life crisis on the family dinamic; education in the area of fundamental principles of psycho-and pharmaco-therapy, as well as the provision of support to the patient and his familly; training in the skills of announcing bad news to the patient and his familly through the explanatory presentation of the case and supervised simulation of sessions. PMID:18044324

  13. Bad News Comes in Threes: Stochastic Structure in Random Events (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newman, W. I.; Turcotte, D. L.; Malamud, B. D.

    2013-12-01

    Plots of random numbers have been known for nearly a century to show repetitive peak-to-peak sequences with an average length of 3. Geophysical examples include events such as earthquakes, geyser eruptions, and magnetic substorms. We consider a classic model in statistical physics, the Langevin equation x[n+1] = α*x[n] + η[n], where x[n] is the nth value of a measured quantity and η[n] is a random number, commonly a Gaussian white noise. Here, α is a parameter that ranges from 0, corresponding to independent random data, to 1, corresponding to Brownian motion which preserves memory of past steps. We show that, for α = 0, the mean peak-to-peak sequence length is 3 while, for α = 1, the mean sequence length is 4. We obtain the physical and mathematical properties of this model, including the distribution of peak-to-peak sequence lengths that can be expected. We compare the theory with observations of earthquake magnitudes emerging from large events, observations of the auroral electrojet index as a measure of global electrojet activity, and time intervals observed between successive eruptions of Old Faithful Geyser in Yellowstone National Park. We demonstrate that the largest earthquake events as described by their magnitudes are consistent with our theory for α = 0, thereby confronting the aphorism (and our analytic theory) that "bad news comes in threes." Electrojet activity, on the other hand, demonstrates some memory effects, consistent with the intuitive picture of the magnetosphere presenting a capacitor-plate like system that preserves memory. Old Faithful Geyser, finally, shows strong antipersistence effects between successive events, i.e. long-time intervals are followed by short ones, and vice versa. As an additional application, we apply our theory to the observed 3-4 year mammalian population cycles.

  14. Trait-agreeableness influences individual reactions to a physician's affiliative behavior in a simulated bad news delivery.

    PubMed

    Cousin, Gaëtan; Schmid Mast, Marianne

    2016-01-01

    We tested whether the personality trait of agreeableness predicts different individual reactions to the level of nonverbal affiliativeness shown by a physician, in the context of a simulated bad news delivery. We predicted that individuals with high levels of agreeableness would react better to a physician adopting a highly affiliative communication style compared to individuals with low levels of agreeableness. We used an experimental design with analogue patients. Eighty participants (40 men/40 women) were randomly assigned to watch a video of a physician who communicated a bad diagnosis either in a highly affiliative or in a less affiliative way. Participants reported their reactions of anger and trust in the physician, and completed the agreeableness scale of the NEO Five-Factor Inventory (NEO-FFI). In accordance with our predictions, the higher the agreeableness score of the participants, the less anger and the more trust they reported after viewing the high as compared to the low affiliative physician. These results suggest that people with high levels of agreeableness may be especially sensitive to highly affiliative physician nonverbal behavior when receiving bad news. PMID:26305190

  15. Good, Bad or Absent: Discourses of Parents with Disabilities in Australian News Media

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fraser, Vikki; Llewellyn, Gwynnyth

    2015-01-01

    Background: News media frames public perceptions. As such, news media becomes a useful source of analysis to understand the presence (or otherwise) of people with disabilities, particularly intellectual disabilities, within parenting discourses in Australia. Method: Using Critical Discourse Analysis, this article examines major Australian…

  16. How bad can a crisis be if it does not top the news?

    PubMed

    Mazur, Allan

    2009-06-01

    Sudden onset of front-page news about the U.S. financial crisis, beginning September 6, 2008, may have exacerbated underlying financial problems and facilitated the spread of risk panic to other nations. PMID:19392677

  17. Social Responsibility in Stem Cell Research - Is the News All Bad?

    PubMed

    Benjaminy, Shelly; Lo, Cody; Illes, Judy

    2016-06-01

    Transparent public discourse about translational stem cell research promotes informed hope about scientific progress and the sustainable development of biotechnologies. Using an a priori coding scheme, we surveyed articles from leading news media about stem cell interventions for neurodegenerative diseases (1991-2014) from United States (n = 83), Canada (n = 29), and United Kingdom (n = 65). While, this analysis of translational contexts in the news demonstrates a lingering tendency to celebrate the benefits of research with little context of its caveats even for chronic neurologic diseases, in a departure from many previous studies, the data also reveal conscientious reporting about stem cell tourism and timeframe estimates for the development of relevant therapeutics. PMID:26815726

  18. Considering Patients' Mental Capacity When Giving Them Bad News May Help Their Well-Being: A Case of Suicide Attempt after Being Informed of Lung Cancer Diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Kato, Satoshi; Takeuchi, Mitsuo

    2014-01-01

    Mental capacity is a central determinant of patients' ability to make autonomous decisions about their care and deal with bad news. Physicians should be cognizant of this when giving patients bad news in efforts to help them to cope with the illness and to avoid a deterioration of their mental well-being. To show the importance of this concept, a case of suicide attempt with lung cancer is exemplified. A 76-year-old woman attempted suicide after receiving a diagnosis of lung cancer. Her recent life had been emotionally turbulent and she did not have sufficient mental capacity to accept and cope with this truth. She developed depression before attempting suicide. PMID:24963431

  19. Good news and bad news.

    PubMed

    Hagler, Donald J

    2016-09-01

    Current delivery systems for the Sapien XT valve for the native pulmonary valve are unacceptable stiff and poorly design for implantation in the pulmonary outflow tract. This report details improvisation of the Melody Ensemble for easier pulmonary outflow tract delivery of the Sapien XT valve. The unacceptable cost of the utilization of two delivery systems for valve implantation, requires industry development of an safe, effective delivery system appropriate for the pulmonary outflow tract. PMID:27619747

  20. Bad News: Analysis of the Quality of Information on Influenza Prevention Returned by Google in English and Italian

    PubMed Central

    Maki, Ali; Evans, Roger; Ghezzi, Pietro

    2015-01-01

    Information available to the public influences the approach of the population toward vaccination against influenza compared with other preventative approaches. In this study, we have analyzed the first 200 websites returned by searching Google on two topics (prevention of influenza and influenza vaccine), in English and Italian. For all the four searches above, websites were classified according to their typology (government, commercial, professional, portals, etc.) and for their trustworthiness as defined by the Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA) score, which assesses whether they provide some basic elements of information quality (IQ): authorship, currency, disclosure, and references. The type of information described was also assessed to add another dimension of IQ. Websites on influenza prevention were classified according to the type of preventative approach mentioned (vaccine, lifestyle, hygiene, complementary medicine, etc.), whether the approaches were in agreement with evidence-based medicine (EBM) or not. Websites on influenza vaccination were classified as pro- or anti-vaccine, or neutral. The great majority of websites described EBM approaches to influenza prevention and had a pro-vaccine orientation. Government websites mainly pointed at EBM preventative approaches and had a pro-vaccine orientation, while there was a higher proportion of commercial websites among those which promote non-EBM approaches. Although the JAMA score was lower in commercial websites, it did not correlate with the preventative approaches suggested or the orientation toward vaccines. For each of the four search engine result pages (SERP), only one website displayed the health-of-the-net (HON) seal. In the SERP on vaccines, journalistic websites were the most abundant category and ranked higher than average in both languages. Analysis using natural language processing showed that journalistic websites were mostly reporting news about two specific topics (different

  1. News

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2004-03-01

    Italy’s Physics Olympiad creates greater interest and motivation House of Experiments: 'humour helps in the teaching of science' Science takes stage in Germany PPARC news: guide and awards Schools newspaper competition focuses on Venus Website offers practical advice SHAP workshop will sharpen up teachers' skills Students will soon use Faulkes Telescope North to see the stars Talk takes a tour of the universe ASE 2004 Welsh physicists share secrets Switch students on to physics Teachers Awards 2004 recognize quality of teaching AAPT spends winter in Miami sun Schools Physics Group meeting will take place at Rugby School

  2. News

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2001-07-01

    AWARDS Presentations to top students; PHYSICS IN PRIMARY SCIENCE Amaze and inspire; WEB RESOURCES PhysicsClub goes live; EVENTS GIREP develops thinking; RESEARCH FRONTIERS Carbon dating may not run to time; CURRICULUM DEVELOPMENT Vocational qualifications; CURRICULUM DEVELOPMENT Flanders gears up for curriculum change; EXHIBITIONS Building the Universe; EVENTS Physics Discipline Network VII; SPECIAL NEWS FEATURE Progress in UK post-16 courses; Teaching Advancing Physics... the story so far; An outside observer's view of Advancing Physics; Student views of SHAP; Results from the SHAP pilot: successful and girl-friendly; AWARDS Royal visit to publisher;

  3. The BBN Byblos Hindi OCR system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Natarajan, Premkumar S.; MacRostie, Ehry; Decerbo, Michael

    2005-01-01

    The BBN Byblos OCR system implements a script-independent methodology for OCR using Hidden Markov Models (HMMs). We have successfully ported the system to Arabic, English, Chinese, Pashto, and Japanese. In this paper, we report on our recent effort in training the system to perform recognition of Hindi (Devanagari) documents. The initial experiments reported in this paper were performed using a corpus of synthetic (computer-generated) document images along with slightly degraded versions of the same that were generated by scanning printed versions of the document images and by scanning faxes of the printed versions. On a fair test set consisting of synthetic images alone we measured a character error rate of 1.0%. The character error rate on a fair test set consisting of scanned images (scans of printed versions of the synthetic images) was 1.40% while the character error rate on a fair test set of fax images (scans of printed and faxed versions of the synthetic images) was 8.7%.

  4. The BBN Byblos Hindi OCR system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Natarajan, Premkumar S.; MacRostie, Ehry; Decerbo, Michael

    2004-12-01

    The BBN Byblos OCR system implements a script-independent methodology for OCR using Hidden Markov Models (HMMs). We have successfully ported the system to Arabic, English, Chinese, Pashto, and Japanese. In this paper, we report on our recent effort in training the system to perform recognition of Hindi (Devanagari) documents. The initial experiments reported in this paper were performed using a corpus of synthetic (computer-generated) document images along with slightly degraded versions of the same that were generated by scanning printed versions of the document images and by scanning faxes of the printed versions. On a fair test set consisting of synthetic images alone we measured a character error rate of 1.0%. The character error rate on a fair test set consisting of scanned images (scans of printed versions of the synthetic images) was 1.40% while the character error rate on a fair test set of fax images (scans of printed and faxed versions of the synthetic images) was 8.7%.

  5. The BBN Byblos Hindi OCR System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Natarajan, Prem; Macrostie, Ehry; Decerbo, Michael

    The BBN Byblos OCR system implements a script-independent methodology for OCR using hidden Markov models (HMMs). We have successfully ported the system to Arabic, English, Chinese, Pashto, and Japanese. In this chapter, we report on our recent effort in training the system to perform recognition of Hindi (Devanagari) documents. The initial experiments reported in this chapter were performed using a corpus of synthetic (computer-generated) document images along with slightly degraded versions of the same that were generated by scanning printed versions of the document images and by scanning faxes of the printed versions. On a fair test set consisting of synthetic images alone we measured a character error rate of 1.0%. The character error rate on a fair test set consisting of scanned images (scans of printed versions of the synthetic images) was 1.40% while the character error rate on a fair test set of fax images (scans of printed and faxed versions of the synthetic images) was 8.7%.

  6. News

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2001-09-01

    EPS AWARD WINNERS Award for outreach to Physics Education authors; TEACHER TRAINING Helping teachers specialize in physics; AAPT SUMMER MEETING The science of light; AAPT SUMMER MEETING Do you believe in skepticism?; E-LEARNING Massive investment in Swedish online learning; UK SCIENCE YEAR News from Science Year; 11-16 CURRICULUM Naming the energy parts; TEACHER TRAINING Electronic Discussion Group for Trainee Teachers; PUBLICATIONS Physics on Course 2002; WALES Physics in Powys; HIGHER EDUCATION HE solutions to the physics teacher shortage; SCOTLAND The 27th Scottish Stirling Meeting; NORTHERN IRELAND Belfast physics teachers' meeting; SCOTLAND Physics Summer School, Edinburgh 2001; AAPT SUMMER MEETING Physics education research: massive growth; AAPT SUMMER MEETING Just-In-Time Teaching;

  7. Good News and Bad News on Parenting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Caplan, Bryan

    2009-01-01

    Sociologists focus on the theory that parents spend less time with their kids than they used to. But fact-checking popular perceptions about the evolution of parenting indicates that fathers spend much more time with their children than they used to (from a weekly average of 3 hours of primary child care in 1965, to seven hours in 2000.). A more…

  8. "I'm afraid I have bad news for you…" Estimating the impact of different health impairments on subjective well-being.

    PubMed

    Binder, Martin; Coad, Alex

    2013-06-01

    Bad health decreases individuals' happiness, but few studies measure the impact of specific illnesses. We apply matching estimators to examine how changes in different (objective) conditions of bad health affect subjective well-being for a sample of 100,265 observations from the British Household Panel Survey (BHPS) database (1996-2006). The strongest effect is for alcohol and drug abuse, followed by anxiety, depression and other mental illnesses, stroke and cancer. Adaptation to health impairments varies across health impairments. There is also a puzzling asymmetry: strong adverse reactions to deteriorations in health appear alongside weak increases in well-being after health improvements. In conclusion, our analysis offers a more detailed account of how bad health influences happiness than accounts focusing on how bad self-assessed health affects individual well-being. PMID:23631791

  9. BBN and the CMB constrain neutrino coupled light WIMPs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nollett, Kenneth M.; Steigman, Gary

    2015-04-01

    In the presence of a light weakly interacting massive particle (WIMP) with mass mχ≲30 MeV , there are degeneracies among the nature of the WIMP (fermion or boson), its couplings to the standard model particles (to electrons, positrons, and photons, or only to neutrinos), its mass mχ, and the number of equivalent (additional) neutrinos, Δ Nν. These degeneracies cannot be broken by the cosmic microwave background (CMB) constraint on the effective number of neutrinos, Neff. However, since big bang nucleosynthesis (BBN) is also affected by the presence of a light WIMP and equivalent neutrinos, complementary BBN and CMB constraints can help to break some of these degeneracies. In a previous paper [K. M. Nollett and G. Steigman, Phys. Rev. D 89, 083508 (2014)] the combined BBN and Planck [P. A. R. Ade et al. (Planck Collaboration), Astron. Astrophys. 571, A16 (2014)] CMB constraints were used to explore the allowed ranges for mχ, Δ Nν, and Neff in the case where the light WIMPs annihilate electromagnetically (EM) to photons and/or e± pairs. In this paper the BBN predictions for the primordial abundances of deuterium and 4He (along with 3He and 7Li) in the presence of a light WIMP that only couples (annihilates) to neutrinos [either standard model (SM) only or both SM and equivalent] are calculated. Recent observational estimates of the relic abundances of D and 4He are used to limit the light WIMP mass, the number of equivalent neutrinos, the effective number of neutrinos, and the present Universe baryon density (ΩBh2 ). Allowing for a neutrino coupled light WIMP and Δ Nν equivalent neutrinos, the combined BBN and CMB data provide lower limits to the WIMP mass that depend very little on the nature of the WIMP (Majorana or Dirac fermion, real or complex scalar boson), with a best fit mχ≳35 MeV , equivalent to no light WIMP at all. The analysis here excludes all neutrino coupled WIMPs with masses below a few MeV, with specific limits varying from 4 to 9 Me

  10. Light WIMPs, equivalent neutrinos, BBN, and the CMB

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steigman, Gary; Nollett, Kenneth M.

    Recent updates to the observational determinations of the primordial abundances of helium (4He) and deuterium are compared to the predictions of BBN to infer the universal ratio of baryons to photons, eta 10 equiv 1010(n_B/ngamma )0 (or, the present Universe baryon mass density parameter, {Ω_B h^{2} = eta 10/273.9) as well as to constrain the effective number of neutrinos ({N_eff) and the number of equivalent neutrinos ({ΔN_ν}). These BBN results are compared to those derived independently from the Planck CMB data. In the absence of a light WIMP ({m_χ} ⪆ 20 MeV), {N_eff = 3.05(1 + ensuremath {DeltaN_ nu }/3). In this case, there is excellent agreement between BBN and the CMB but, the joint fit reveals that {ΔN_ν} = 0.40±0.17, disfavoring standard big bang nucleosynthesis (SBBN) ({ΔN_ν} = 0) at ˜ 2.4 sigma , as well as a sterile neutrino ({ΔN_ν} = 1) at ˜ 3.5 sigma . In the presence of a light WIMP ({m_χ} ⪉ 20 MeV), the relation between {N_eff and {ΔN_&nu}; depends on the WIMP mass, leading to degeneracies among {N_eff, {ΔN_ν}, and {m_χ}. The complementary and independent BBN and CMB data can break some of these degeneracies. Depending on the nature of the light WIMP (Majorana or Dirac fermion, real or complex scalar) the joint BBN + CMB analyses set a lower bound to {m_χ} in the range 0.5 - 5 MeV (mchi /me ⪆ 1 - 10) and, they identify best fit values for {m_χ} in the range 5 - 10 MeV. The joint BBN + CMB analyses find a best fit value for the number of equivalent neutrinos, {ΔN_ν} ≈ 0.65, nearly independent of the nature of the WIMP. The best fit still disfavors the absence of dark radiation ({ΔN_ν} = 0 at ˜ 95% confidence), while allowing for the presence of a sterile neutrino ({ΔN_ν} = 1 at ⪉ 1 sigma ). For all cases considered here, the lithium problem persists. These results, presented at the Rencontres de l'Observatoire de Paris 2013 - ESO Workshop and summarized in these proceedings, are based on \\citet{kngs}.

  11. Could Spuds Be Bad for Blood Pressure?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Español You Are Here: Home → Latest Health News → Article URL of this page: https://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/news/fullstory_158878.html Could Spuds Be Bad for Blood Pressure? Eating potatoes 4 or more ...

  12. Turning Bad News into a Teaching Moment: Using the Exploring Humanitarian Law Curriculum to Teach about the Impact of War and Natural Disaster

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morgan, Mat

    2010-01-01

    After a disaster, or in the midst of a conflict, the news that finds its way into people's homes has a uniquely powerful effect on their psyche. Vulnerable people are caught in destructive forces beyond their control. The scenes people see are post-apocalyptic. The stories are gripping, spanning themes of luck, loss, hope, love, and wild fear,…

  13. Bad Breath

    MedlinePlus

    ... mouth and between your teeth produce the bad odor. Other problems in your mouth, such as gum ... and medicines are associated with a specific breath odor. Having good dental habits, like brushing and flossing ...

  14. Bad Breath

    MedlinePlus

    ... hygiene leads to bad breath because when food particles are left in your mouth, they can rot ... Flossing once a day helps get rid of particles wedged between your teeth. Also, visit your dentist ...

  15. Bad Breath

    MedlinePlus

    ... tiny bits of food that can rot and smell bad. Replace your toothbrush every three to four ... foods and drinks that can leave behind strong smells, like cabbage, garlic, raw onions, and coffee. If ...

  16. Delivering difficult news in psychiatric settings.

    PubMed

    Cleary, Michelle; Hunt, Glenn E; Horsfall, Jan

    2009-01-01

    Communication research and investigations into the delivery of bad news are uncommon in psychiatry versus other medical specialties. The question of delivering "bad" diagnostic news in psychiatry has been focused on dementia rather than actual psychiatric disorders and their sequelae. Common problems are that psychiatrists avoid dealing with patients' emotional reactions to bad news and that they avoid providing a clear diagnosis for fear that patients or carers will be distressed. This article aims to provide an overview of key elements of the "breaking bad news" literature, teasing out factors that are relevant to psychiatric practice. Topics explored include: definitions; clinical considerations for delivering difficult news within medical and psychiatric settings; protocols and guidelines; evidence about patient information needs and communication preferences; research into actual delivery of such news; and areas for future education and research. PMID:19832045

  17. Obesity May Be Bad for The Brain, Too

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_160349.html Obesity May Be Bad for the Brain, Too Study ... that of a 60-year-old lean person. "Obesity is associated with a host of biological processes ...

  18. The Underground Nuclear Astrophysics in the Precision Era of BBN: Present Results and Future Perspectives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gustavino, C.

    2016-01-01

    The abundance of light isotopes such as D, 3He, 4He, 6Li and 7Li produced during Big Bang Nucleosynthesis (BBN) only depends on particle physics, baryon density and relevant nuclear processes. At BBN energies (0.01 ÷ 1 MeV) the cross section of many BBN processes is very low because of the Coulomb repulsion between the interacting nuclei. As low-energy measurements on earth's surface are predominantly hampered by the effects of cosmic rays in the detectors, it is convenient to study the relevant reactions with facilities operating deep underground. Starting from the present uncertainty of the relevant parameters in BBN (i.e. baryon density, observed abundance of isotopes and nuclear cross-sections), it will be shown that the study of several reactions of the BBN chain, with existing or proposed underground accelerator facilities, can improve the accuracy of BBN calculations, providing a powerful tool to constrain astrophysics, cosmology and particle physics. In particular, a precise measurement of D(p, γ)3He reaction at BBN energies is of primary importance to calculate the baryon density of universe with an accuracy similar to the one obtained by Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) experiments, and to constrain the number of active neutrino species. For what concern the so called ’’Lithium problems”, i.e. the disagreement between computed and observed abundances of the 7Li and 6Li isotopes, it will be also shown the importance of a renewed study of the D(α, γ) 6Li reaction.

  19. When Bad News Bursts the Bubble

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    North, Terri A.

    2005-01-01

    With the No Child Left Behind Act (NCLB) now a constant in education and accountability linked specifically to standards that must be met by all students, the chances are likely that good schools--or even schools with a great academic reputation--will be thrust before the general public and labeled inadequate. Many such schools will be left to…

  20. Research News

    MedlinePlus

    Research News - National Multiple Sclerosis Society Skip to navigation Skip to content Menu Navigation National Multiple Sclerosis ... Email Home Research Research News & Progress Research News Research News Share Smaller Text Larger Text Print Read ...

  1. Good news and bad news for US rivers

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1987-04-01

    Since the early 1970s over $100 billion have been spent in controlling water pollution in the US. The first major study to gauge the resulting water quality shows that there has been considerable success in reducing lead (achieved primarily from cuts in the use of leaded gasoline) and fecal bacteria (most probably because of improved treatment of municipal waste). But overall trends for a number of other water pollutants show the effects of increasing agricultural and urban run-off, a less-controllable source of pollution, and of atmospheric deposition. Nitrates, from both fertilizers and the atmosphere, are dramatically increasing overall. Increases were like-wise found for the toxic elements arsenic and cadmium, which are deposited from the atmosphere after fossil-fuel combustion, and in the salinity of natural waters, in part because of increased use of road salt.

  2. Scandal Clouds News Corporation's Move into Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Quillen, Ian

    2011-01-01

    When News Corporation announced last fall its entry into the education technology market, some observers said the media conglomerate led by Rupert Murdoch was a bad fit for education. Between the ownership of conservative-leaning outlets like Fox News and a reputation for identifying opportunities to generate lots of revenue very quickly, News…

  3. What Causes Bad Breath?

    MedlinePlus

    ... I Help a Friend Who Cuts? What Causes Bad Breath? KidsHealth > For Teens > What Causes Bad Breath? Print A A A Text Size en ... Qué es lo que provoca el mal aliento? Bad breath, or halitosis , can be a major problem, ...

  4. Focus on Healthy Foods, Not Avoiding 'Bad' Ones, for Heart Health

    MedlinePlus

    ... Healthy Foods, Not Avoiding 'Bad' Ones, for Heart Health: Study Fewer heart attacks, strokes and deaths seen ... on: Diets Nutrition Recent Health News Related MedlinePlus Health Topics Diets Nutrition About MedlinePlus Site Map FAQs ...

  5. BBN with electron-sterile neutrino oscillations — the finest leptometer

    SciTech Connect

    Kirilova, Daniela

    2012-06-01

    A relic lepton asymmetry orders of magnitude bigger than the baryon one may hide in the relic neutrino background. No direct theoretical or experimental limitations on its magnitude and sign are known. Only indirect cosmological constraints exist ranging from |L| < 0.01 to L < 10. Here we discuss a Big Bang Nucleosynthesis (BBN) model with late electron-sterile neutrino oscillations. The influence of L on neutrino oscillations and on nucleons freezing in the pre-BBN epoch is numerically analyzed in the full range of the oscillation parameters of the model and for |L| ≥ 10{sup −10}. The asymmetry-oscillations interplay is studied in detail and the behavior of L for different oscillation parameters is found. L effect on the primordially produced {sup 4}He is precisely studied. It is shown that this BBN model is a fine leptometer, capable of feeling extremely small relic lepton asymmetry — |L| > 10{sup −8}. The case of oscillations generated asymmetry by late electron-sterile oscillations and its effect on the primordial {sup 4}He is also briefly discussed. The instability region of the asymmetry growth is obtained.

  6. The path to metallicity: Synthesis of CNO elements in standard BBN

    SciTech Connect

    Iocco, Fabio; Mangano, G.; Miele, G.; Pisanti, O.; Serpico, P.D.; /Fermilab

    2007-02-01

    We perform a reanalysis of the production of CNO elements in a standard Big Bang Nucleosynthesis scenario. The CNO yields in BBN are suppressed by the low density of the plasma, Coulomb barrier effects and the short time scales involved. Yet, the inclusion of nuclides and reactions traditionally disregarded may lead to an increase relevant enough to affect the pristine Population III stars. After a critical reanalysis and upgrade of the nuclear network our results show no major discrepancies with the ones obtained using a smaller nuclear network. The robustness of the standard predictions--the early generation of star developed in a metal-free environment--is confirmed.

  7. Hydroacoustic propagation grids for the CTBT knowledge databaes BBN technical memorandum W1303

    SciTech Connect

    J. Angell

    1998-05-01

    The Hydroacoustic Coverage Assessment Model (HydroCAM) has been used to develop components of the hydroacoustic knowledge database required by operational monitoring systems, particularly the US National Data Center (NDC). The database, which consists of travel time, amplitude correction and travel time standard deviation grids, is planned to support source location, discrimination and estimation functions of the monitoring network. The grids will also be used under the current BBN subcontract to support an analysis of the performance of the International Monitoring System (IMS) and national sensor systems. This report describes the format and contents of the hydroacoustic knowledgebase grids, and the procedures and model parameters used to generate these grids. Comparisons between the knowledge grids, measured data and other modeled results are presented to illustrate the strengths and weaknesses of the current approach. A recommended approach for augmenting the knowledge database with a database of expected spectral/waveform characteristics is provided in the final section of the report.

  8. Superconductivity in bad metals

    SciTech Connect

    Emery, V.J.; Kivelson, S.A.

    1995-12-31

    It is argued that many synthetic metals, including high temperature superconductors are ``bad metals`` with such a poor conductivity that the usual mean-field theory of superconductivity breaks down because of anomalously large classical and quantum fluctuations of the phase of the superconducting order parameter. Some consequences for high temperature superconductors are described.

  9. Bad Ideas Revisited.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Horn, Royal

    2000-01-01

    Supplements a previous column's laundry list of bad technology ideas with further provisos: fixating on processor speed; relying on user support; developing non-visionary long-range technology plans; leaving people out of long-range planning; and concentrating technology at the center of a network. (MLH)

  10. Eggs: good or bad?

    PubMed

    Griffin, Bruce A

    2016-08-01

    Eggs have one of the lowest energy to nutrient density ratios of any food, and contain a quality of protein that is superior to beef steak and similar to dairy. From a nutritional perspective, this must qualify eggs as 'good'. The greater burden of proof has been to establish that eggs are not 'bad', by increasing awareness of the difference between dietary and blood cholesterol, and accumulating sufficient evidence to exonerate eggs from their associations with CVD and diabetes. After 60 years of research, a general consensus has now been reached that dietary cholesterol, chiefly from eggs, exerts a relatively small effect on serum LDL-cholesterol and CVD risk, in comparison with other diet and lifestyle factors. While dietary guidelines have been revised worldwide to reflect this view, associations between egg intake and the incidence of diabetes, and increased CVD risk in diabetes, prevail. These associations may be explained, in part, by residual confounding produced by other dietary components. The strength of evidence that links egg intake to increased CVD risk in diabetes is also complicated by variation in the response of serum LDL-cholesterol to eggs and dietary cholesterol in types 1 and 2 diabetes. On balance, the answer to the question as to whether eggs are 'bad', is probably 'no', but we do need to gain a better understanding of the effects of dietary cholesterol and its association with CVD risk in diabetes. PMID:27126575

  11. It is good news that health journalism is striving to improve.

    PubMed

    2011-08-10

    To say that journalism is getting a bad press would be a major understatement. Practices exposed at the late News of the World may not be common, but just as stories of bad nursing cause widespread fear for patients, the phone hacking scandal taints every part of this industry. PMID:27316805

  12. NCLB and Its Wake: Bad News for Democracy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meens, David E.; Howe, Kenneth R.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Local control has historically been a prominent principle in education policymaking and governance. Culminating with the passage of No Child Left Behind (NCLB), however, the politics of education have been nationalized to an unprecedented degree, and local control has all but disappeared as a principle framing education policymaking.…

  13. I Might Have Some Bad News: Disclosing Preliminary Pathology Results.

    PubMed

    Roh, Michael H; Shuman, Andrew G

    2016-01-01

    Cytopathology is a subspecialty of pathology in which pathologists frequently interact directly with patients. Often this interaction is in the context of fine needle aspiration (FNA) procedures performed at the bedside by the cytopathologist or by another clinician with the cytopathologist present. Patient requests for preliminary results in such settings raise fundamental questions about professional scope of practice and communication of uncertainty that apply not merely to pathologists but to all clinicians. In certain settings, cytopathologists may share preliminary diagnostic impressions directly with patients. Essential to these conversations is the need to articulate potential uncertainty about both the diagnosis and next steps. In addition, the involvement and notification of the referring physician is obligatory, both for care coordination and to ensure that patients receive a consistent message. PMID:27550561

  14. The Bad News and the Good about Nuclear Careers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Basta, Nicholas

    1986-01-01

    Traces the changes in the nuclear energy field since World War II, citing distinct periods of growth in the nuclear industry, as well as downtrends. Analyzes the reasons for the changes in public support for nuclear energy and the impact upon careers in the field. (TW)

  15. Tax decisions bring good and bad news for hospitals.

    PubMed

    Bromberg, R S

    1980-12-01

    Three recent court decisions denying tax exemptions to shared hospital laundry service organizations should dispel the belief that tax exemptions will automatically be granted to shared service organizations. Two other decisions on the sale of goods and services to persons other than hospitals suggest that the IRS is moving toward a position that accepts certain services as indigenous to the exempt functions of a modern community hospital. PMID:10249267

  16. Breaking Bad News of Cancer to People with Learning Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McEnhill, Linda S.

    2008-01-01

    Since the 1970s, medical staff have routinely disclosed the diagnosis of cancer to their patients. However, this has often been carried out unskilfully causing distress to the patient and impairing their ability to comply with treatment. In response, the government has invested in "Advanced Communication Skills training" for oncology staff.…

  17. Climate change - Bad news for montane forest herb layer species?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patsias, Kathrin; Bruelheide, Helge

    2013-07-01

    Global warming presents a threat to plant species distributed at montane or alpine altitudes if the topography does not allow upward shifts in distribution ranges. Nevertheless, the species might also benefit from increasing temperatures and secondary effects on dominant species (e.g. bark beetle outbreaks or summer drought affecting the canopy species). As a consequence, disturbance frequency in montane forests might increase and light availability for herb layer species will increase. We addressed these interactions in a common garden experiment in Central Germany at different altitudes, representing cold and moist vs. warm and dry conditions. We investigated three montane species with different life forms, including a herb (Trientalis europaea), a grass (Calamagrostis villosa) and a dwarf shrub (Vaccinium myrtillus) under three shading treatments (3%, 28% and 86% of full sunlight). We hypothesized that montane species are at a disadvantage in the lowland, with the dwarf shrub suffering more than the grass. Furthermore, we hypothesized an antagonistic interaction of increased temperature and increased light conditions. While T. europaea and V. myrtillus showed only slightly responses to low altitude conditions, C. villosa displayed a nearly fifteen fold increase in biomass production, despite higher observed herbivory levels in the lowland. We failed to show an antagonistic effect of increased temperature and increased light availability, as all study species suffered from deep shade conditions and grew best under full light conditions at both sites. In conclusion, both improved temperature and light conditions might be principally beneficial for the investigated boreal species, in particular for the grass species C. villosa.

  18. Big Black Holes Mean Bad News for Stars (diagram)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Poster Version Suppression of Star Formation from Supermassive Black Holes

    This diagram illustrates research from NASA's Galaxy Evolution Explorer showing that black holes -- once they reach a critical size -- can put the brakes on new star formation in elliptical galaxies.

    In this graph, galaxies and their supermassive black holes are indicated by the drawings (the black circle at the center of each galaxy represents the black hole). The relative masses of the galaxies and their black holes are reflected in the sizes of the drawings. Blue indicates that the galaxy has new stars, while red means the galaxy does not have any detectable new stars.

    The Galaxy Evolution Explorer observed the following trend: the biggest galaxies and black holes (shown in upper right corner) are more likely to have no observable star formation (red) than the smaller galaxies with smaller black holes. This is evidence that black holes can create environments unsuitable for stellar birth.

    The white line in the diagram illustrates that, for any galaxy no matter what the mass, its black hole must reach a critical size before it can shut down star formation.

  19. Breaking bad (news) death-telling in the emergency department.

    PubMed

    Bogle, Angela M; Go, Steven

    2015-01-01

    Many physicians struggle with death-telling in sudden death. Families can be negatively impacted by suboptimal death-telling. Appropriate preparation and education can make death notification less stressful for the physician and may help decrease the development of pathologic grief in the surviving family members that can occur when death is unexpected. Although still controversial, there is a growing body of evidence that family witnessed resuscitation may be beneficial to the grieving process and desired by the public. A previously healthy 21-year-old male comes toyour community emergency department (ED) for a cough that started 4 days ago. He denies fever, shortness of breath, and chest pain. He does admit to a remote history of drug abuse. He states he is feeling "OK" and is only here because his family insisted he come because they were worried he might have pneumonia. His vital signs are normal and he appears well; therefore, he is triaged to the waiting room. About 30 minutes lates the patient complains of shortness of breath and he is brought back to an exam room. The patient is now hypotensive, tachycardic, and pulse oximetry is noted to be 87% on room air. A chest x-ray reveals severe pulmonary edema and an EKG shows ST segment elevation in multiple leads. The patient is taken to the cardiac catheterization lab by the interventional cardiologist, who makes the diagnosis of a ruptured aortic valve due to damage from endocarditis. The patient is returned to the ED to await emergent transfer to a tertiary facility; however, the patient rapidly decompensates and a Code Blue is called. Despite the absence of return of spontaneous circulation, resuscitation efforts are prolonged while the ED social worker attempts to contact the patient's family to come to the ED. Finally, the resuscitation is terminated and the patient is pronounced dead. Several hours later the patient's elderly mother arrives and asks you: "What's going on with Mikey?" PMID:25812264

  20. NEWS: Institute news

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2000-07-01

    Department of Physics and Astronomy at the University of Leeds. Physics at Work Exhibition: 12-14 September, University of Cambridge The year 2000 Exhibition will be the 16th organized by Brenda Jennison. The exhibition will be held at the Cavendish Laboratory and further details can be obtained from Brenda at the University (tel: 01223 332888, fax: 01223 332894 or e-mail: bmj10@cam.ac.uk). News on GNVQ science The Institute of Physics and the Royal Society of Chemistry are currently financing the compilation of a directory of resources to assist teachers in identifying and selecting suitable materials for teaching the new GNVQ science specifications. Work on the first part of the directory will soon be completed and it is hoped to publish the material in both print and electronic forms before the end of the summer term. This first part covers resources - all evaluated by practising GNVQ teachers - supporting the teaching of the compulsory units for Advanced GNVQ Science. A small team comprising a physics teacher, a chemistry teacher and a biology teacher, all involved with GNVQ programmes and led by Dr Ken Gadd, has carried out the work. They have established a network of teachers around the country to help with the evaluation of curriculum materials. The next part of the project will be to examine the feasibility of providing a similar listing for the optional units at this level. Future development, depending on the availability of funds, will extend the project to Intermediate level programmes in science, including the Part One, once its structure has been agreed at QCA. Further information about the Directory and the next phase of development will be available in the autumn. Activities Physics on Stage The future of science, technology and the ensuing wealth creation potential for Britain will depend on the quality of science education in schools today. Yet the numbers studying physics, which underpins science and engineering, are falling. This problem is currently

  1. Messengers of Bad News or Bad Apples? Student Debt and College Accountability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Darolia, Rajeev

    2015-01-01

    Student loan debt and defaults have been steadily rising, igniting public worry about the associated public and private risks. This has led to controversial regulatory attempts to curb defaults by holding colleges, particularly those in the for-profit sector, increasingly accountable for the student loan repayment behavior of their students. Such…

  2. The International Efficiency of American Education: The Bad and the Not-So-Bad News

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heyneman, Stephen P.

    2013-01-01

    There is ample evidence to suggest that American schools perform worse than schools in many other countries. The U.S. ranks toward the bottom of the industrialized nations on international tests of academic achievement in science and mathematics. Not only may American schools perform worse but they may do so at the same time as they use more…

  3. Bad Astronomy Goes Hollywood

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plait, P.

    2003-05-01

    It can be argued that astronomy is the oldest of all the sciences, so you'd think that after all this time people would have a pretty good understanding of it. In reality, however, misconceptions about astronomy abound, and even basic concepts are misunderstood. There are many sources of these cosmic misconceptions, including incorrect textbooks, parents and/or teachers who don't understand astronomy and therefore spread misinformation, urban legends, and so on. Perhaps the most pervasive source of bad astronomy is Hollywood. Science fiction movies are enormously popular, but are commonly written and directed by people who don't have even a passing familiarity with astronomy. The smash hit "Armageddon" (the number one box office movie of 1998), for example, used vast quantities of incorrect astronomy in the plot. It reinforced such popular misconceptions as huge asteroids impacting the Earth with little warning, small meteorites being hot when they impact, air existing in space, and that a simple bomb can blow up an asteroid the size of a small moon (even when the bomb is buried only 800 feet deep!). However, movie scenes can be used as a hook that engages the student, helping them learn and remember the correct science. In this talk, I will light-heartedly discuss specific examples of common misinformation, using movie clips, diagrams, and a splash of common sense to show just where Hollywood gets it wrong, and what you can do to help students and the public get it right.

  4. What's News?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hobbs, Renee

    2005-01-01

    News analysis and entertainment media is part of a media literacy that helps students access, analyze, evaluate and create messages using media in various forms. Media literacy is a key asset in a democracy as well as a bridge to reading comprehension, as skillful media use and script-reading activities can support the English acquisition skills,…

  5. Society News

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Stuart; Goward, Ken; Davenhall, Clive

    2005-03-01

    Council Meeting, February; The Antiquarian Astronomer; Joint WHS/SHA meeting in Bath, Saturday 5 March 2005; Future meetings; Spring conference and AGM; Summer picnic; Sir Robert Ball Library News; New SHA Library manual; Formal opening of the Sir Robert Ball Library; Visit to the ROE Library.

  6. Computer News

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Science Activities: Classroom Projects and Curriculum Ideas, 2007

    2007-01-01

    This article presents several news stories about computers and technology. (1) Applied Science Associates of Narragansett, Rhode Island is providing computer modeling technology to help locate the remains to the USS Bonhomme Richard, which sank in 1779 after claiming a Revolutionary War victory. (2) Whyville, the leading edu-tainment virtual world…

  7. A syn-Selective Aza-Aldol Reaction of Boron Aza-Enolates Generated from N-Sulfonyl-1,2,3-Triazoles and 9-BBN-H.

    PubMed

    Miura, Tomoya; Nakamuro, Takayuki; Miyakawa, Sho; Murakami, Masahiro

    2016-07-18

    A syn-selective aza-aldol reaction of boron aza-enolates, generated from N-sulfonyl-1,2,3-triazoles and 9-BBN-H, is reported. It provides a sequential one-pot procedure for the stereoselective construction of 1,3-amino alcohols, having contiguous stereocenters, starting from terminal alkynes. PMID:27258810

  8. Bad Arguments Defending Racial Preference

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cohen, Carl

    2008-01-01

    Professor Cohen describes the arduous path to the passage of Proposition 2 in Michigan in 2006. In considering the reasons for its victory, he shows how claims (sometimes well-intended) "for" preferences rest on truly bad arguments. (Contains 8 footnotes.)

  9. Researching Television News Archives.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilhoit, Frances Goins

    To demonstrate the uses and efficiency of major television news archives, a study was conducted to describe major archival programs and to compare the Vanderbilt University Television News Archives and the CBS News Index. Network coverage of an annual news event, the 1983 State of the Union address, is traced through entries in both. The findings…

  10. Measuring News Media Literacy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maksl, Adam; Ashley, Seth; Craft, Stephanie

    2015-01-01

    News media literacy refers to the knowledge and motivations needed to identify and engage with journalism. This study measured levels of news media literacy among 500 teenagers using a new scale measure based on Potter's model of media literacy and adapted to news media specifically. The adapted model posits that news media literate individuals…

  11. 7 CFR 51.1223 - Badly misshapen.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ..., CERTIFICATION, AND STANDARDS) United States Standards for Grades of Peaches Definitions § 51.1223 Badly misshapen. “Badly misshapen” means that the peach is so decidedly deformed that its appearance is...

  12. 7 CFR 51.1223 - Badly misshapen.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ..., CERTIFICATION, AND STANDARDS) United States Standards for Grades of Peaches Definitions § 51.1223 Badly misshapen. “Badly misshapen” means that the peach is so decidedly deformed that its appearance is...

  13. Ambiguity and judgments of obese individuals: no news could be bad news.

    PubMed

    Ross, Kathryn M; Shivy, Victoria A; Mazzeo, Suzanne E

    2009-08-01

    Stigmatization towards obese individuals has not decreased despite the increasing prevalence of obesity. Nonetheless, stigmatization remains difficult to study, given concerns about social desirability. To address this issue, this study used paired comparisons and cluster analysis to examine how undergraduates (n=189) categorized scenarios describing the health-related behaviors of obese individuals. The cluster analysis found that the scenarios were categorized into two distinct clusters. The first cluster included all scenarios with health behaviors indicating high responsibility for body weight. These individuals were perceived as unattractive, lazy, less likeable, less disciplined, and more deserving of their condition compared to individuals in the second cluster, which included all scenarios with health behaviors indicating low responsibility for body weight. Four scenarios depicted obese individuals with ambiguous information regarding health behaviors; three out of these four individuals were categorized in the high-responsibility cluster. These findings suggested that participants viewed these individuals as negatively as those who were responsible for their condition. These results have practical implications for reducing obesity bias, as the etiology of obesity is typically not known in real-life situations. PMID:19665097

  14. Work-Based Learning: Good News, Bad News and Hope. Research Brief.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bottoms, Gene; Presson, Alice

    The effects of work-based learning on student achievement were examined by analyzing data from the 1996 High Schools That Work (HSTW) assessment. The comparison focused on the experiences of 12th-graders in structured work-based learning programs and 12th-graders with after-school jobs. A larger percentage of students earning school credit for…

  15. Managed care: future good news or bad news for vascular surgeons.

    PubMed

    Hallett, J W

    1998-08-01

    Recently, William W. McGuire, Chief Executive Officer of United Health-Care, emphasized that the key from the patient's viewpoint is access. He stated, "We use the term gateway rather than gatekeeper." He emphasizes the importance of direct access of the patient to the right physician, whether it be a specialist or a generalist. Although some health care strategists believe that patients should initially see a generalist before receiving specialty care, this approach may not save dollars in the long run. Managed care is likely to have a major impact on vascular surgeons. Currently, business purchasing cooperatives are one model for containing costs of expensive invasive procedures among the working population. Such cooperatives are likely to achieve a stronger penetration in the health care market and to negotiate aggressively for packaged fee contracts for specialized cardiovascular care and procedures. Because the vast majority of vascular patients are more than 65 years of age, the movement of Medicare toward managed care may also affect vascular surgery in a major way. If vascular surgeons are to survive financially in the managed care environment, they must continue to provide evidence-based solutions to clinical problems at a reasonable cost and with good outcomes. They must also understand that involvement in the administrative and political leadership of health care is essential to maintaining some influence on the future reimbursement for our services. PMID:9719337

  16. Drug Use, Dependence, and Addiction at a British Columbia University: Good News and Bad News.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alexander, Bruce K.

    1985-01-01

    Two studies of perceived and actual drug use at Simon Fraser University found students estimating greater drug use among friends than for themselves, but 31 percent reported dependence and 5 percent reported current addiction, especially to caffeine and nicotine. An approach to drug abuse focusing on familiar substances is recommended. (MSE)

  17. Origin of the U87MG glioma cell line: Good news and bad news.

    PubMed

    Allen, Marie; Bjerke, Mia; Edlund, Hanna; Nelander, Sven; Westermark, Bengt

    2016-08-31

    Human tumor-derived cell lines are indispensable tools for basic and translational oncology. They have an infinite life span and are easy to handle and scalable, and results can be obtained with high reproducibility. However, a tumor-derived cell line may not be authentic to the tumor of origin. Two major questions emerge: Have the identity of the donor and the actual tumor origin of the cell line been accurately determined? To what extent does the cell line reflect the phenotype of the tumor type of origin? The importance of these questions is greatest in translational research. We have examined these questions using genetic profiling and transcriptome analysis in human glioma cell lines. We find that the DNA profile of the widely used glioma cell line U87MG is different from that of the original cells and that it is likely to be a bona fide human glioblastoma cell line of unknown origin. PMID:27582061

  18. A Response to Robert Maranto's Review of "Bad Students, Not Bad Schools"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weissberg, Robert

    2012-01-01

    This article presents the author's response to Robert Maranto's review of "Bad Students, Not Bad Schools". The author begins by thanking Professor Maranto for his thoughtful review of his "Bad Students, Not Bad Schools" (2010). Professor Maranto is the first professional educator to acknowledge the book's existence, a fact that says much about…

  19. Debating Robert Weissberg: Why We Should Read but Not Accept "Bad Students, Not Bad Schools"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maranto, Robert

    2012-01-01

    This article presents the author's critique on Robert Weissberg's book titled "Bad Students, Not Bad Schools". The author argues that Weissberg's readable, controversial "Bad Students, Not Bad Schools" (2010) is funny, acerbic, bold, and slaughters more than a few sacred cows of what Weissberg calls the "failed educational industrial complex." As…

  20. 42 CFR 413.178 - Bad debts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Bad debts. 413.178 Section 413.178 Public Health...) Services and Organ Procurement Costs § 413.178 Bad debts. (a) CMS will reimburse each facility its allowable Medicare bad debts, as defined in § 413.89(b), up to the facility's costs, as determined...

  1. 42 CFR 413.178 - Bad debts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Bad debts. 413.178 Section 413.178 Public Health...) Services and Organ Procurement Costs § 413.178 Bad debts. (a) CMS will reimburse each facility its allowable Medicare bad debts, as defined in § 413.89(b), up to the facility's costs, as determined...

  2. 2 CFR 200.426 - Bad debts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 2 Grants and Agreements 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Bad debts. 200.426 Section 200.426 Grants... REQUIREMENTS FOR FEDERAL AWARDS Cost Principles General Provisions for Selected Items of Cost § 200.426 Bad debts. Bad debts (debts which have been determined to be uncollectable), including losses...

  3. News & Announcements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2001-09-01

    Helge H. Wehmeier, President and Chief Executive Office of Bayer Corporation, is the recipient of the 2001 Leadership in Education Award from the Keystone Center. Wehmeier was cited for his support in spearheading ongoing education and volunteer efforts such as Bayer's Making Science Make Sense program, which, in partnership with NSF, advances science literacy through hands-on, inquiry-based science learning.

    You are invited to send contributions to the News & Announcements column. They should be sent to Elizabeth A. Moore, Associate Editor, by email or by mail at Journal of Chemical Education, 209 N. Brooks St., Madison, WI 53715-1116. Contributions should be concise, to the point, and appropriate for the Journal's audience. They may be edited for clarity, timeliness, appropriateness, or length.

  4. National Cancer Institute News

    MedlinePlus

    ... Workshop NCI Annual Fact Book NCI Visuals Online Social Media @NCIMedia NCI YouTube Subscribe to NCI News Releases ... posts Subscribe Events Scientific Meetings and Lectures Conferences Social Media Events News Archive 2015 2014 2013 2012 2011 ...

  5. News: A Consumer's Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Doig, Ivan; Doig, Carol

    A guide to news media, this book describes how to tell when a report is biased; provides tips on spotting hoaxes and public relations ploys in the news; gives standards to judge expert opinion and reliable sources; lists critics and other sources of help for the news consumer; discusses the endless contest among politicians, newsmen, and…

  6. Newton's constant in f(R,R{sub {mu}}{sub {nu}}R{sup {mu}}{sup {nu}},{open_square}R) theories of gravity and constraints from BBN

    SciTech Connect

    Nesseris, Savvas; Mazumdar, Anupam

    2009-05-15

    We consider corrections to the Einstein-Hilbert action, which contain both higher order and nonlocal terms. We derive an effective Newtonian gravitational constant applicable at the weak field limit and use the primordial nucleosynthesis (BBN) bound and the local gravity constraints on G{sub eff} in order to test the viability of several cases of our general Lagrangian. We will also provide a BBN constrain on the {open_square}R gravitational correction.

  7. News & Announcements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2001-08-01

    News from Journal House

    National Chemistry Week (NCW)

    National Chemistry Week Celebrating Chemistry and Art is the theme of NCW 2001, to be held November 4-10, 2001. As you make plans for participating in the celebrations in your area, keep in mind that JCE is developing special materials on this theme, which will appear in our October issue: Classroom Activities, a comprehensive Illustrated Resource Paper, Report from Online, specially written brief articles illustrated in color, articles related to the theme, and CLIPs (Chemical Laboratory Information Profiles).

    Awards Announced

    Passer Award

    Passer Award recipients from the April 1 closing date are:
    • George Bennett, Millikin University, Decatur, IL
    • Daniel Berger, Bluffton College, Bluffton, OH
    • Karen Dunlap, Sierra College, Rocklin, CA
    • Myung-Hoon Kim, Georgia Perimeter College, Dunwoody, GA
    • Cheryl Longfellow, Philadelphia University, Philadelphia, PA
    • Jerry Maas, Oakton Community College, Des Plaines, IL
    • Tim Royappa, University of West Florida, Pensacola, FL

    Visiting Scientist Award, Western Connecticut Section

    Diane Bunce, The Catholic University of America, has been selected as the 2001 Visiting Scientist of the Western Connecticut Section of the ACS. The award, presented annually since 1967, brings an outstanding chemical educator to visit high schools in Fairfield County, CT. In May, Bunce visited three high schools, Christian Heritage School, Fairfield High School, and Greenwich High School, where she interacted with teachers and students and presented lectures and demonstrations to several chemistry classes. She was also keynote speaker at the ACS local section's Education Night. The awardee is selected by a committee of university and high school teachers, industrial chemists, and the previous Visiting Scientist

  8. News & Announcements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2001-08-01

    News from Journal House

    National Chemistry Week (NCW)

    National Chemistry Week Celebrating Chemistry and Art is the theme of NCW 2001, to be held November 4-10, 2001. As you make plans for participating in the celebrations in your area, keep in mind that JCE is developing special materials on this theme, which will appear in our October issue: Classroom Activities, a comprehensive Illustrated Resource Paper, Report from Online, specially written brief articles illustrated in color, articles related to the theme, and CLIPs (Chemical Laboratory Information Profiles).

    Awards Announced

    Passer Award

    Passer Award recipients from the April 1 closing date are:
    • George Bennett, Millikin University, Decatur, IL
    • Daniel Berger, Bluffton College, Bluffton, OH
    • Karen Dunlap, Sierra College, Rocklin, CA
    • Myung-Hoon Kim, Georgia Perimeter College, Dunwoody, GA
    • Cheryl Longfellow, Philadelphia University, Philadelphia, PA
    • Jerry Maas, Oakton Community College, Des Plaines, IL
    • Tim Royappa, University of West Florida, Pensacola, FL

    Visiting Scientist Award, Western Connecticut Section

    Diane Bunce, The Catholic University of America, has been selected as the 2001 Visiting Scientist of the Western Connecticut Section of the ACS. The award, presented annually since 1967, brings an outstanding chemical educator to visit high schools in Fairfield County, CT. In May, Bunce visited three high schools, Christian Heritage School, Fairfield High School, and Greenwich High School, where she interacted with teachers and students and presented lectures and demonstrations to several chemistry classes. She was also keynote speaker at the ACS local section's Education Night. The awardee is selected by a committee of university and high school teachers, industrial chemists, and the previous Visiting Scientist

  9. News & Announcements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2000-01-01

    News from Journal House

    Guidelines for Submission The Journal's current Guide to Submissions can be found on pages 29-30 of this issue. They have been streamlined a bit and also include a handy check list. This information is also available on JCE Online at http://jchemed.chem.wisc.edu/Journal/Authors/. Wanted: Demo Checkers The Tested Demonstrations column needs people who like to try out demos. Column editor Ed Vitz is looking for additional volunteers to serve as "checkers" for manuscripts that have been submitted to the Journal for possible publication as Tested Demonstrations. A checker is expected to perform two functions: to review the manuscript for accuracy and novelty, and to attempt to perform the demonstration according to the procedure supplied by the author. Checkers may suggest important improvements in demonstration procedures, and for their efforts they are cited in the byline when the manuscript is published. For instance, the demo showing the yellow cascading precipitates (lead iodide) made from potassium iodide and lead nitrate was submitted by Wobbe de Vos and checked by Kim Kostka. The (yellow) cascading precipitates are from "Using Large Glass Cylinders To Demonstrate Chemical Reactions" that appeared in the April 1999 issue of JCE. We prefer that checkers begin the review process (which may in some cases involve procuring supplies) very soon after being contacted so that their review can be completed in the timely manner that authors deserve. Checkers are usually teachers who routinely present lecture demonstrations in their classes in either high school or colleges. We try not to call on checkers more often than once a year, which is one of the reasons for this request. Another is that we lose many highly valued, experienced checkers to retirement or other endeavors. Prospective checkers may want to look at a copy of the JCE Tested Demonstration Evaluation Form. It can be found on the Web at http://www.kutztown.edu/ vitz

  10. 27 CFR 70.101 - Bad checks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Bad checks. 70.101 Section 70.101 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT OF....101 Bad checks. If any check or money order in payment of any amount receivable under Title 26 of...

  11. 25 CFR 11.421 - Bad checks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Bad checks. 11.421 Section 11.421 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR LAW AND ORDER COURTS OF INDIAN OFFENSES AND LAW AND ORDER CODE Criminal Offenses § 11.421 Bad checks. (a) A person who issues or passes a check or similar sight order...

  12. 25 CFR 11.421 - Bad checks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Bad checks. 11.421 Section 11.421 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR LAW AND ORDER COURTS OF INDIAN OFFENSES AND LAW AND ORDER CODE Criminal Offenses § 11.421 Bad checks. (a) A person who issues or passes a check or similar sight order...

  13. 27 CFR 70.101 - Bad checks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 2 2012-04-01 2011-04-01 true Bad checks. 70.101 Section 70.101 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT OF....101 Bad checks. If any check or money order in payment of any amount receivable under Title 26 of...

  14. 25 CFR 11.421 - Bad checks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Bad checks. 11.421 Section 11.421 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR LAW AND ORDER COURTS OF INDIAN OFFENSES AND LAW AND ORDER CODE Criminal Offenses § 11.421 Bad checks. (a) A person who issues or passes a check or similar sight order...

  15. 27 CFR 70.101 - Bad checks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 2 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Bad checks. 70.101 Section 70.101 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT OF....101 Bad checks. If any check or money order in payment of any amount receivable under Title 26 of...

  16. 25 CFR 11.421 - Bad checks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2012-04-01 2011-04-01 true Bad checks. 11.421 Section 11.421 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR LAW AND ORDER COURTS OF INDIAN OFFENSES AND LAW AND ORDER CODE Criminal Offenses § 11.421 Bad checks. (a) A person who issues or passes a check or similar sight order...

  17. 27 CFR 70.101 - Bad checks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Bad checks. 70.101 Section 70.101 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT OF....101 Bad checks. If any check or money order in payment of any amount receivable under Title 26 of...

  18. 27 CFR 70.101 - Bad checks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Bad checks. 70.101 Section 70.101 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT OF....101 Bad checks. If any check or money order in payment of any amount receivable under Title 26 of...

  19. 25 CFR 11.421 - Bad checks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Bad checks. 11.421 Section 11.421 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR LAW AND ORDER COURTS OF INDIAN OFFENSES AND LAW AND ORDER CODE Criminal Offenses § 11.421 Bad checks. (a) A person who issues or passes a check or similar sight order...

  20. News & Announcements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2000-01-01

    News from Journal House

    Guidelines for Submission The Journal's current Guide to Submissions can be found on pages 29-30 of this issue. They have been streamlined a bit and also include a handy check list. This information is also available on JCE Online at http://jchemed.chem.wisc.edu/Journal/Authors/. Wanted: Demo Checkers The Tested Demonstrations column needs people who like to try out demos. Column editor Ed Vitz is looking for additional volunteers to serve as "checkers" for manuscripts that have been submitted to the Journal for possible publication as Tested Demonstrations. A checker is expected to perform two functions: to review the manuscript for accuracy and novelty, and to attempt to perform the demonstration according to the procedure supplied by the author. Checkers may suggest important improvements in demonstration procedures, and for their efforts they are cited in the byline when the manuscript is published. For instance, the demo showing the yellow cascading precipitates (lead iodide) made from potassium iodide and lead nitrate was submitted by Wobbe de Vos and checked by Kim Kostka. The (yellow) cascading precipitates are from "Using Large Glass Cylinders To Demonstrate Chemical Reactions" that appeared in the April 1999 issue of JCE. We prefer that checkers begin the review process (which may in some cases involve procuring supplies) very soon after being contacted so that their review can be completed in the timely manner that authors deserve. Checkers are usually teachers who routinely present lecture demonstrations in their classes in either high school or colleges. We try not to call on checkers more often than once a year, which is one of the reasons for this request. Another is that we lose many highly valued, experienced checkers to retirement or other endeavors. Prospective checkers may want to look at a copy of the JCE Tested Demonstration Evaluation Form. It can be found on the Web at http://www.kutztown.edu/ vitz

  1. News & Announcements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1999-08-01

    News from Journal House Perspective on JCE Online Recently a reader asked us for a perspective on JCE Onlinehow the chemical education community is receiving it and how the Journal staff itself views it. We share our responses below. Subscriber Numbers How many people subscribe to JCE Online+? As of June 1, 1999, our records show that 13% of individual JCE subscriptions in the USA include JCE Online+. This percentage has increased significantly during the past year- in June 1998 it was approximately 4% and December 1998 about 7%. Almost all subscribers to JCE Online subscribe to print as well. Since JCE Online has only very recently been made available to institutional subscribers, there are no numbers to report. There has been considerable interest in online from libraries. Given that JCE Online+ is a fairly recent subscriber option and that many subscribers have a wait-and-see approach to any new option, we feel that the numbers above are quite high. The steady growth is encouraging. Online Usage How many people visit our Web site? Statistics for the period January 1, 1999, through May 31, 1999, that may be of interest include:

    Total Pages Served 361,115

    Total Visits 138,377

    Total Unique Visitors 51,744

    Total Repeat Visitors 11,536

    Average Visit Length 03:05

    Average Requests/Visit 10.8

    Average Pages/Visit 2.6

    Average Daily Visits 916 Online Rationale and Expectations JCE Online is a very important part of the whole Journal, but we do not expect it to supplant print: online and print are very different media. Usage of JCE Online is growing steadily; our subscribers are realizing what we have learned: it is not possible to deliver the Journal in the print medium alone- print is no longer adequate to accomplish our mission. Examples of things not possible in print include:

    ·JCE Index to all 76

  2. News & Announcements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2000-02-01

    News from Journal House

    Journal Ambassadors, 1999 What do the people listed below have in common? A search of our records indicates that each has been a participant in our Journal Ambassador program during 1999.
    • Guy Anderson
    • Jim Becvar
    • Jerry Bell
    • Jim Birk
    • Diane Bunce
    • Ann Cartwright
    • Thomas Clark
    • Jane Crosby
    • Maria Dean
    • Art Ellis
    • Donald Elswick
    • Tommy Franklin
    • Babu George
    • Paul Heath
    • Angela Hoffman
    • Lynn Hogue
    • J. J. Lagowski
    • Frank Lambert
    • Dorothy Lehmkuhl
    • George Lelevre
    • Scott Luaders
    • Jane McMullen
    • Marci Merritt
    • Carl Minnier
    • Richard Narske
    • Ron Perkins
    • Gabriel Pinto
    • Dick Potts
    • Herb Retcofsky
    • Jerry Sarquis
    • Elke Schoffers
    • Sara Selfe
    • Uni Susskind
    • J. Mark Tolman
    • John Varine
    • Dawn Wakeley
    • Marla White
    Those who are a part of this program take materials about the Journal to workshops, outreach programs, seminars, regional meetings, award nights, short courses, and other events at home and abroad, places where people who are interested in chemical education gather. Given about three weeks notice, we can outfit you with a variety of materials that will help others get tuned in to the good things that are happening in chemical education. We can send you an assortment of Journal issues, subscription forms, our Publications/Software Catalog, reprints from the Viewpoints series, copies of Classroom Activities, or JCE Gift Award Certificates, assuming that supplies are available. Of course we can arrange for the group to have temporary access to JCE Online. We can send you a brochure about the Ambassador program or answer any questions - just ask: email to jce@chem.wisc.edu; phone 1-800-991-5534 (U.S.) or 608-262-5153 (non-U.S.); fax 608-265-8094. If by chance you were a Journal Ambassador in 1999 but your name was not included, just let us know so that you can be recognized in a future column. Gift

  3. Voice technology and BBN

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wolf, Jared J.

    1977-01-01

    The following research was discussed: (1) speech signal processing; (2) automatic speech recognition; (3) continuous speech understanding; (4) speaker recognition; (5) speech compression; (6) subjective and objective evaluation of speech communication system; (7) measurement of the intelligibility and quality of speech when degraded by noise or other masking stimuli; (8) speech synthesis; (9) instructional aids for second-language learning and for training of the deaf; and (10) investigation of speech correlates of psychological stress. Experimental psychology, control systems, and human factors engineering, which are often relevant to the proper design and operation of speech systems are described.

  4. News & Announcements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1999-08-01

    News from Journal House Perspective on JCE Online Recently a reader asked us for a perspective on JCE Onlinehow the chemical education community is receiving it and how the Journal staff itself views it. We share our responses below. Subscriber Numbers How many people subscribe to JCE Online+? As of June 1, 1999, our records show that 13% of individual JCE subscriptions in the USA include JCE Online+. This percentage has increased significantly during the past year- in June 1998 it was approximately 4% and December 1998 about 7%. Almost all subscribers to JCE Online subscribe to print as well. Since JCE Online has only very recently been made available to institutional subscribers, there are no numbers to report. There has been considerable interest in online from libraries. Given that JCE Online+ is a fairly recent subscriber option and that many subscribers have a wait-and-see approach to any new option, we feel that the numbers above are quite high. The steady growth is encouraging. Online Usage How many people visit our Web site? Statistics for the period January 1, 1999, through May 31, 1999, that may be of interest include:

    Total Pages Served 361,115

    Total Visits 138,377

    Total Unique Visitors 51,744

    Total Repeat Visitors 11,536

    Average Visit Length 03:05

    Average Requests/Visit 10.8

    Average Pages/Visit 2.6

    Average Daily Visits 916 Online Rationale and Expectations JCE Online is a very important part of the whole Journal, but we do not expect it to supplant print: online and print are very different media. Usage of JCE Online is growing steadily; our subscribers are realizing what we have learned: it is not possible to deliver the Journal in the print medium alone- print is no longer adequate to accomplish our mission. Examples of things not possible in print include:

    ·JCE Index to all 76

  5. Radiochemical investigations of (99m)Tc-N(3)S-X-BBN[7-14]NH(2): an in vitro/in vivo structure-activity relationship study where X = 0-, 3-, 5-, 8-, and 11-carbon tethering moieties.

    PubMed

    Smith, C Jeffrey; Gali, Hariprasad; Sieckman, Gary L; Higginbotham, Chris; Volkert, Wynn A; Hoffman, Timothy J

    2003-01-01

    Bombesin (BBN), a 14 amino acid peptide, is an analogue of human gastrin releasing peptide (GRP) that binds to GRP receptors (GRPr) with high affinity and specificity. The GRPr is overexpressed on a variety of human cancer cells, including prostate, breast, lung, and pancreatic cancers. The specific aim of this study was to develop (99m)Tc-radiolabeled BBN analogues that maintain high specificity for the GRPr in vivo. A preselected synthetic sequence via solid-phase peptide synthesis (SPPS) was designed to produce N(3)S-BBN (N(3)S = dimethylglycyl-l-seryl-l-cysteinylglycinamide) conjugates with the following general structure: DMG-S-C-G-X-Q-W-A-V-G-H-L-M-(NH(2)), where the spacer group, X = 0 (no spacer), omega-NH(2)(CH(2))(2)COOH, omega-NH(2)(CH(2))(4)COOH, omega-NH(2)(CH(2))(7)COOH, or omega-NH(2)-(CH(2))(10)COOH. The new BBN constructs were purified by reversed phase-HPLC (RP-HPLC). Electrospray mass spectrometry (ES-MS) was used to characterize the nonmetalated BBN conjugates. Re(V)-BBN conjugates were prepared by the reaction of Re(V)gluconate with N(3)S-X-BBN[7-14]NH(2) (X = 0 carbons, beta-Ala (beta-alanine), 5-Ava (5-aminovaleric acid), 8-Aoc (8-aminooctanoic acid), and 11-Aun (11-aminoundecanoic acid)) with gentle heating. Re-N(3)S-5-Ava-BBN[7-14]NH(2) was also prepared by the reaction of [Re(V)dimethylglycyl-l-seryl-l-cysteinylglycinamide] with 5-Ava-BBN[7-14]NH(2). ES-MS was used to determine the molecular constitution of the new Re(V) conjugates. The (99m)Tc conjugates were prepared at the tracer level by each the prelabeling, post-conjugation and pre-conjugation, postlabeling approaches from the reaction of Na[(99m)TcO(4)] with excess SnCl(2), sodium gluconate, and corresponding ligand. The (99m)Tc and Re(V) conjugates behaved similarly under identical RP-HPLC conditions. In vitro and in vivo models demonstrated biological integrity of the new conjugates. PMID:12526698

  6. News & Announcements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2000-02-01

    News from Journal House

    Journal Ambassadors, 1999 What do the people listed below have in common? A search of our records indicates that each has been a participant in our Journal Ambassador program during 1999.
    • Guy Anderson
    • Jim Becvar
    • Jerry Bell
    • Jim Birk
    • Diane Bunce
    • Ann Cartwright
    • Thomas Clark
    • Jane Crosby
    • Maria Dean
    • Art Ellis
    • Donald Elswick
    • Tommy Franklin
    • Babu George
    • Paul Heath
    • Angela Hoffman
    • Lynn Hogue
    • J. J. Lagowski
    • Frank Lambert
    • Dorothy Lehmkuhl
    • George Lelevre
    • Scott Luaders
    • Jane McMullen
    • Marci Merritt
    • Carl Minnier
    • Richard Narske
    • Ron Perkins
    • Gabriel Pinto
    • Dick Potts
    • Herb Retcofsky
    • Jerry Sarquis
    • Elke Schoffers
    • Sara Selfe
    • Uni Susskind
    • J. Mark Tolman
    • John Varine
    • Dawn Wakeley
    • Marla White
    Those who are a part of this program take materials about the Journal to workshops, outreach programs, seminars, regional meetings, award nights, short courses, and other events at home and abroad, places where people who are interested in chemical education gather. Given about three weeks notice, we can outfit you with a variety of materials that will help others get tuned in to the good things that are happening in chemical education. We can send you an assortment of Journal issues, subscription forms, our Publications/Software Catalog, reprints from the Viewpoints series, copies of Classroom Activities, or JCE Gift Award Certificates, assuming that supplies are available. Of course we can arrange for the group to have temporary access to JCE Online. We can send you a brochure about the Ambassador program or answer any questions - just ask: email to jce@chem.wisc.edu; phone 1-800-991-5534 (U.S.) or 608-262-5153 (non-U.S.); fax 608-265-8094. If by chance you were a Journal Ambassador in 1999 but your name was not included, just let us know so that you can be recognized in a future column. Gift

  7. With News Search Engines

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gunn, Holly

    2005-01-01

    Although there are many news search engines on the Web, finding the news items one wants can be challenging. Choosing appropriate search terms is one of the biggest challenges. Unless one has seen the article that one is seeking, it is often difficult to select words that were used in the headline or text of the article. The limited archives of…

  8. Bad Science and Its Social Implications.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zeidler, Dana L.; Sadler, Troy D.; Berson, Michael J.; Fogelman, Aimee L.

    2002-01-01

    Investigates three types of bad science: (1) cultural prejudice based on scientific errors (polygenism, phrenology, reification through intelligence testing); (2) unethical science (Tuskegee syphilis experiments, tobacco companies and research); and (3) unwitting errors (pesticides, chlorofluorocarbons). (Contains 50 references.) (SK)

  9. The psychological benefits of bad poetry.

    PubMed

    Capps, Donald

    2010-12-01

    The author was the founder and secretary pro-tem of the Bad Poets Society at Princeton Theological Seminary. This distinction does not appear on his official resume. The Society did not have meetings but it had a newsletter that came out several times a year comprised of bad poetry written by members of the faculty and staff. These poetic works included reflections on institutional matters. This article contains bad poetry by the author relating to such matters. This poetry illustrates Sigmund Freud's (Jokes and Their Relation to the Unconscious. Norton, New York, 1960) view of humor as saving in the expenditure of painful emotions, costly inhibitions, and difficult thinking. The parasitical nature of bad poetry is also noted and illustrated with the author's own poems. PMID:20556517

  10. Throwing the book at bad ideas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ball, Philip

    2015-12-01

    Several eminent science authors have recently claimed that bad scientific ideas "held back" good ones throughout human history, delaying the progress of science. But as Philip Ball argues, it just isn't that simple.

  11. 26 CFR 1.166-1 - Bad debts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Bad debts. 1.166-1 Section 1.166-1 Internal... TAXES (CONTINUED) Itemized Deductions for Individuals and Corporations § 1.166-1 Bad debts. (a... shall be allowed in respect of bad debts owed to the taxpayer. For this purpose, bad debts...

  12. 26 CFR 1.166-1 - Bad debts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 2 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Bad debts. 1.166-1 Section 1.166-1 Internal... TAXES (CONTINUED) Itemized Deductions for Individuals and Corporations § 1.166-1 Bad debts. (a... shall be allowed in respect of bad debts owed to the taxpayer. For this purpose, bad debts...

  13. 26 CFR 1.166-1 - Bad debts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Bad debts. 1.166-1 Section 1.166-1 Internal... TAXES (CONTINUED) Itemized Deductions for Individuals and Corporations § 1.166-1 Bad debts. (a... shall be allowed in respect of bad debts owed to the taxpayer. For this purpose, bad debts...

  14. 26 CFR 1.166-1 - Bad debts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Bad debts. 1.166-1 Section 1.166-1 Internal... TAXES (CONTINUED) Itemized Deductions for Individuals and Corporations § 1.166-1 Bad debts. (a... shall be allowed in respect of bad debts owed to the taxpayer. For this purpose, bad debts...

  15. 26 CFR 1.166-1 - Bad debts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Bad debts. 1.166-1 Section 1.166-1 Internal... TAXES (CONTINUED) Itemized Deductions for Individuals and Corporations § 1.166-1 Bad debts. (a... shall be allowed in respect of bad debts owed to the taxpayer. For this purpose, bad debts...

  16. The Origins of Borrowed News.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Riffe, Daniel

    A study was conducted to assess the indications in print of news borrowing (reporting news distributed by second hand or government controlled sources) in the 1970s, and to examine the relationship between borrowed news and the restrictions and reductions in newspapers' overseas news staff. The "New York Times" and the "Chicago Tribune" were…

  17. An Exploratory Study on 99mTc-RGD-BBN Peptide Scintimammography in the Assessment of Breast Malignant Lesions Compared to 99mTc-3P4-RGD2

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Qianqian; Ma, Qingjie; Chen, Minglong; Chen, Bin; Wen, Qiang; Jia, Bing; Wang, Fan; Sun, Butong; Gao, Shi

    2015-01-01

    Purpose This study aimed to explore the diagnostic performance of single photon emission computed tomography / computerized tomography (SPECT/CT) using a new radiotracer 99mTc-RGD-BBN for breast malignant tumor compared with 99mTc-3P4-RGD2. Methods 6 female patients with breast malignant tumors diagnosed by fine needle aspiration cytology biopsy (FNAB) who were scheduled to undergo surgery were included in the study. 99mTc-3P4-RGD2 and 99mTc-RGD-BBN were performed with single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) at 1 hour after intravenous injection of 299 ± 30 MBq and 293 ± 32 MBq of radiotracers respectively at separate day. The results were evaluated by the Tumor to non-Tumor ratios (T/NT). 99mTc-RGD-BBN and 99mTc-3P4-RGD2 SPECT/CT images were interpreted independently by 3 experienced nuclear medicine physicians using a 3-point scale system. All of the samples were analyzed immunohistochemically to evaluate the integrin αvβ3 and gastrin-releasing peptide receptor (GRPR) expression. The safety, biodistribution and radiation dosimetry of 99mTc-RGD-BBN were also evaluated in the healthy volunteers. Results No serious adverse events were reported in any of the patients during the study. The effective radiation dose entirely conformed to the relevant standards. A total of 6 palpable malignant lesions were detected using 99mTc-RGD-BBN SPECT/CT with clear uptake. All malignant lesions were also detected using 99mTc-3P4-RGD2 SPECT/CT. The results showed that five malignant lesions were with clear uptake and the other one with barely an uptake. 4 malignant cases were found with both αvβ3 and GRPR expression, 1 case with only GRPR positive expression (integrin αvβ3 negative) and 1 case with only integrin αvβ3 positive expression (GRPR negative). Conclusion 99mTc-RGD-BBN is a safe agent for detecting breast cancer. 99mTc-RGD-BBN may have the potential to make up for the deficiency of 99mTc-3P4-RGD2 in the detection of breast cancer with only GRPR positive

  18. Bad apples, bad cases, and bad barrels: meta-analytic evidence about sources of unethical decisions at work.

    PubMed

    Kish-Gephart, Jennifer J; Harrison, David A; Treviño, Linda Klebe

    2010-01-01

    As corporate scandals proliferate, practitioners and researchers alike need a cumulative, quantitative understanding of the antecedents associated with unethical decisions in organizations. In this meta-analysis, the authors draw from over 30 years of research and multiple literatures to examine individual ("bad apple"), moral issue ("bad case"), and organizational environment ("bad barrel") antecedents of unethical choice. Findings provide empirical support for several foundational theories and paint a clearer picture of relationships characterized by mixed results. Structural equation modeling revealed the complexity (multidetermined nature) of unethical choice, as well as a need for research that simultaneously examines different sets of antecedents. Moderator analyses unexpectedly uncovered better prediction of unethical behavior than of intention for several variables. This suggests a need to more strongly consider a new "ethical impulse" perspective in addition to the traditional "ethical calculus" perspective. Results serve as a data-based foundation and guide for future theoretical and empirical development in the domain of behavioral ethics. PMID:20085404

  19. Bad Actors Criticality Assessment for Pipeline system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nasir, Meseret; Chong, Kit wee; Osman, Sabtuni; Siaw Khur, Wee

    2015-04-01

    Failure of a pipeline system could bring huge economic loss. In order to mitigate such catastrophic loss, it is required to evaluate and rank the impact of each bad actor of the pipeline system. In this study, bad actors are known as the root causes or any potential factor leading to the system downtime. Fault Tree Analysis (FTA) is used to analyze the probability of occurrence for each bad actor. Bimbaum's Importance and criticality measure (BICM) is also employed to rank the impact of each bad actor on the pipeline system failure. The results demonstrate that internal corrosion; external corrosion and construction damage are critical and highly contribute to the pipeline system failure with 48.0%, 12.4% and 6.0% respectively. Thus, a minor improvement in internal corrosion; external corrosion and construction damage would bring significant changes in the pipeline system performance and reliability. These results could also be useful to develop efficient maintenance strategy by identifying the critical bad actors.

  20. Understanding Health News

    MedlinePlus

    ... U V W X Y Z Know the Science: The Facts About Health News Stories Understanding Health ... only on animals without explaining that such basic science may have little immediate significance to people. For ...

  1. Water Power Program News

    SciTech Connect

    2012-01-19

    News stories about conventional hydropower and marine and hydrokinetic technologies from the U.S. Department of Energy, the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, the Wind and Water Power Program, and other federal agencies.

  2. National PKU News

    MedlinePlus

    ... and History Staff & Board How Much Phe Guthrie-Koch Scholarship Books Resources Support Us Contact Us Donors ... new Amino Acid Analysis Results This Year’s Guthrie-Koch PKU Scholarship Winners © 2016 National PKU News

  3. In the News.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reece, Lauren

    2000-01-01

    A board member in an Iowa district explains the importance of presenting 4-minute summaries of educational news and trends at board meetings. In choosing items for presentation, she considers relevance, context, perspective, terminology, awareness, and national political developments. (MLH)

  4. Turning News into Literature.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Otten, Nick; Stelmach, Majorie

    1987-01-01

    Suggests young people can respond to news stories and political issues they feel strongly about through poetry, and presents one student's effective use of satire which lets his emotions "leak through" to the reader. (NH)

  5. Rainmakers: why bad weather means good productivity.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jooa Julia; Gino, Francesca; Staats, Bradley R

    2014-05-01

    People believe that weather conditions influence their everyday work life, but to date, little is known about how weather affects individual productivity. Contrary to conventional wisdom, we predict and find that bad weather increases individual productivity and that it does so by eliminating potential cognitive distractions resulting from good weather. When the weather is bad, individuals appear to focus more on their work than on alternate outdoor activities. We investigate the proposed relationship between worse weather and higher productivity through 4 studies: (a) field data on employees' productivity from a bank in Japan, (b) 2 studies from an online labor market in the United States, and (c) a laboratory experiment. Our findings suggest that worker productivity is higher on bad-, rather than good-, weather days and that cognitive distractions associated with good weather may explain the relationship. We discuss the theoretical and practical implications of our research. PMID:24417552

  6. Linking Financial Market Dynamics and the Impact of News

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nacher, J. C.; Ochiai, T.

    2011-09-01

    In financial markets, he behavior of investors determines the prices of financial products. However, these investors can also be influenced by good and bad news. Here, we present a mathematical model to reproduce the price dynamics in real financial markets affected by news. The model has both positive and negative feed-back mechanisms. Furthermore, the behavior of the model is examined by considering two different types of noise. Our results show that the dynamic balance of positive and negative feed-back mechanisms with the noise effect determines the asset price movement. For comparison with real market, we have used the Forex data corresponding to the time period of the recent Tohoku-Kanto earthquake in Japan.

  7. News and Views.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Journal of Blacks in Higher Education, 2002

    2002-01-01

    These articles include such topics as: affirmative action and black student dropouts; declines in black faculty nationwide; the travails of a small black college; the first black woman to head a U.S. medical school; African American college athletes; black college Web sites; why early decision programs are bad for blacks; and Bob Jones University…

  8. National Tests: Interesting Theory, Bad Practice.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sizer, Theodore

    1997-01-01

    The President's proposal for national testing of public school students may be a bad idea that leaves locals and parents out of important decisions. The paper notes that most standardized tests have serious limitations and recommends compromising by balancing parental rights, state control, and independent authority of teachers to create schools…

  9. 42 CFR 413.178 - Bad debts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... PRINCIPLES OF REASONABLE COST REIMBURSEMENT; PAYMENT FOR END-STAGE RENAL DISEASE SERVICES; OPTIONAL... payment at the end of the facility's cost reporting period. (b) A facility must attempt to collect... under the composite rate. (d) Bad debts arising from covered ESRD services paid under a...

  10. Synchronizing Heavily Encoded Data in Bad Weather

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swanson, L.

    1985-01-01

    Deep space missions choose a data rate to ensure reliable communication under most conditions. Certain critical data can be more heavily encoded, to be decoded under particularly bad atmospheric conditions. It is shown that, in such a system, finding and synchronizing critical data will not be a problem.

  11. Science News of the Year.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Science News, 1982

    1982-01-01

    Highlights major science news stories of 1982 reported in "Science News." Categories include space/astronomy, biology, chemistry, medicine, energy, physics, anthropology/paleontology, earth sciences, technology, behavior, science/society, and the environment. (JN)

  12. Science News of the Year.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Science News, 1983

    1983-01-01

    Highlights important 1983 news stories reported in Science News. Stories are categorized under: anthropology/paleontology; behavior; biology; chemistry; earth sciences; energy; environment; medicine; physics; science and society; space sciences and astronomy; and technology and computers. (JN)

  13. News | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    News about scientific advances in cancer prevention, program activities, and new projects are included here in NCI press releases and fact sheets, articles from the NCI Cancer Bulletin, and Clinical Trial News from the NCI website.

  14. Perplexity Analysis of Obesity News Coverage

    PubMed Central

    McFarlane, Delano J.; Elhadad, Noémie; Kukafka, Rita

    2009-01-01

    An important task performed during the analysis of health news coverage is the identification of news articles that are related to a specific health topic (e.g. obesity). This is often done using a combination of keyword searching and manual encoding of news content. Statistical language models and their evaluation metric, perplexity, may help to automate this task. A perplexity study of obesity news was performed to evaluate perplexity as a measure of the similarity of news corpora to obesity news content. The results of this study showed that perplexity increased as news coverage became more general relative to obesity news (obesity news ≈ 187, general health news ≈ 278, general news ≈ 378, general news across multiple publishers ≈ 382). This indicates that language model perplexity can measure the similarity news content to obesity news coverage, and could be used as the basis for an automated health news classifier. PMID:20351893

  15. 48 CFR 31.205-3 - Bad debts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Bad debts. 31.205-3... REQUIREMENTS CONTRACT COST PRINCIPLES AND PROCEDURES Contracts With Commercial Organizations 31.205-3 Bad debts. Bad debts, including actual or estimated losses arising from uncollectible accounts receivable...

  16. 48 CFR 31.205-3 - Bad debts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Bad debts. 31.205-3... REQUIREMENTS CONTRACT COST PRINCIPLES AND PROCEDURES Contracts With Commercial Organizations 31.205-3 Bad debts. Bad debts, including actual or estimated losses arising from uncollectible accounts receivable...

  17. 48 CFR 31.205-3 - Bad debts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Bad debts. 31.205-3... REQUIREMENTS CONTRACT COST PRINCIPLES AND PROCEDURES Contracts With Commercial Organizations 31.205-3 Bad debts. Bad debts, including actual or estimated losses arising from uncollectible accounts receivable...

  18. 48 CFR 31.205-3 - Bad debts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Bad debts. 31.205-3... REQUIREMENTS CONTRACT COST PRINCIPLES AND PROCEDURES Contracts With Commercial Organizations 31.205-3 Bad debts. Bad debts, including actual or estimated losses arising from uncollectible accounts receivable...

  19. 48 CFR 31.205-3 - Bad debts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Bad debts. 31.205-3... REQUIREMENTS CONTRACT COST PRINCIPLES AND PROCEDURES Contracts With Commercial Organizations 31.205-3 Bad debts. Bad debts, including actual or estimated losses arising from uncollectible accounts receivable...

  20. The Sources of Radio News.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whitney, D. Charles

    To examine the production of programing material in a radio newsroom, a study was undertaken of the sources presented to the newsroom, of sources within the sources, of sources actively sought by the news staff, of degrees of processing of news items, and of the sources comprising the news output. Information in each of these areas was collected…

  1. TV News Flow Studies Revisited.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hjarvard, Stig

    1995-01-01

    Compares different theoretical approaches to the study of international news. Finds many comparative studies of the foreign news output of national broadcasters and few studies analyzing the actual flow of television news between actors at the wholesale level and the flow between wholesale and retail level. Suggests a better framework for the…

  2. Science News of the Year

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Science News, 1976

    1976-01-01

    Presented is a review of important science news stories reported in Science News during 1976. Most items include a volume and page number reference to the issue of Science News in which the article appeared. Items are grouped under general major headings such as: space, astronomy, medicine, chemistry, etc. (SL)

  3. Political News and Political Consciousness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schertges, Claudia

    2007-01-01

    This article deals with mass media in modern democratic societies, using the example of Israeli news reports in German television (TV) news. Central to this interest are processes of mediating politics: political socialisation and education; that is to say, empowering citizens via TV news to participate in democratic processes. The article…

  4. Automatic Association of News Items.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carrick, Christina; Watters, Carolyn

    1997-01-01

    Discussion of electronic news delivery systems and the automatic generation of electronic editions focuses on the association of related items of different media type, specifically photos and stories. The goal is to be able to determine to what degree any two news items refer to the same news event. (Author/LRW)

  5. Good News, Bad News and Actions for Helping Students Complete a Challenging Program of Study. Research Brief.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bottoms, Gene; Cobbs, Mary

    The 1996 "High Schools That Work" Assessment report contains positive and negative findings about the effectiveness of the high school advisement process in guiding career-bound students into challenging academic programs that will equip them for work and postsecondary study. The assessment of reading, mathematics and science performance was given…

  6. Long residence times - bad tracer tests?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghergut, Julia; Behrens, Horst; Sauter, Martin

    2015-04-01

    process, and later on during sample aeration); the adsorbed and/or co-precipitated tracer amounts appear to be non-zero, but their accurate metering was not completed to date. Thus, a conservative estimate of cumulative tracer recovery amounts to (at least) 2 parts-per-thousand for the first 700,000 m3 of fluid turnover within the geothermal well doublet. Neither do such recovery values automatically imply 'bad news' (poor inter-well connectivity), nor do they appear as implausibly low (cf. fig. 2 of [3]), considering the possibility of major vertical drainage along the large-scale fault zone that isolates the 'aquifer basin' around the re-injection well from the 'aquifer catchment' around the production well, along with the prospect of transport-effective porosity and/or thickness within these 'aquifers' being rather high, due to extensive fissuring/fracturing. In more general terms, we argue that (a) inter-well flow-path spikings are still worthwhile being conducted even in large-scale hydrothermal reservoirs; (b) results gained from single-well tests [3] can never serve as a substitute for the kind of information (primarily: residence time distribution RTD, or flow-storage repartition FSR) being expected from inter-well tests; (c) tracer species that are 'novel' in terms of thermo-/reactivity/sorptivity/exchange at phase interfaces and thus involve some transport-retarding process cannot alleviate the frustration associated with long RT; (d) augmenting the tracer quantity Minj to use for inter-well spiking might render the tracer signal detectable, say, one or two years earlier, but it does not make FSR available sooner, since Minj cannot alter the RTD of fluids traveling through the reservoir; moreover, for inter-well configurations and reservoir structures typical of the Upper Rhine Rift Valley, the Minj augmenting factors necessary to render tracer signals detectable 1 or 2 years earlier mostly range beyond the limits of the reasonably-recommendable (e. g., for

  7. Inexpensive News Sources.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Briscoe, Ellen D.; Wall, Catherine

    1992-01-01

    Describes consumer or business-oriented online services that provide access to current news information and offers a less expensive alternative to standard online databases. Online clipping services are discussed, their costs are examined, and profiles of five services are compared: CompuServe, CompuServe as a gateway to IQuest, DELPHI, DIALCOM,…

  8. News of the Year.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    St. Lifer, Evan; And Others

    1994-01-01

    This section includes three articles that review library news from the past year. Highlights include public library budgets, examined by geographic regions; government programs; flood damage; library school closings; school library media programs; publishing industry concerns, including mergers, broadening markets, and on-demand printing; and…

  9. Parent News Offline, 2000.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robertson, Anne S., Ed.

    2000-01-01

    This document is comprised of the two issues in volume 2 of "Parent News Offline," a publication of the National Parent Information Network (NPIN) designed to introduce those without Internet access to the activities and information available through NPIN. The Spring 2000 issue contains the following articles: (1) "'Zero Tolerance': What Parents…

  10. NewsWire, 2002.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Byrom, Elizabeth, Ed.; Bingham, Margaret, Ed.; Bowman, Gloria, Ed.; Shoemaker, Dan, Ed.

    2002-01-01

    This document presents the 3 2002 issues of the newsletter "NewsWire," (volume 5). Issue Number One focuses on collaborative Web projects. This issue begins with descriptions of four individual projects: "iEARN"; "Operation RubyThroat"; "Follow the Polar Huskies!"; and "Log in Your Animal Roadkill!" Features that follow include: "Bringing the…

  11. News & Issues, 1999.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oshinsky, Carole J., Ed.

    1999-01-01

    This publication is comprised of the two 1999 issues of "News and Issues," a newsletter devoted to identifying and promoting strategies to reduce the young child poverty rate, and to improve the life chances of children still living in poverty. The Winter/Spring issue includes the following articles: (1) "Innovative Strategies Help Families Cope…

  12. E News: Report highlights

    SciTech Connect

    1995-01-01

    Three technologies are highlighted in this issue: a rooftop ice storage system for small commercial loads; chlorofluorocarbon-free electric chillers and their expected market; and the FlashBake oven, a commercial-sized oven that uses high intensity quartz lamps to cook food quickly. Regular columns on Member News and Work in Progress are included.

  13. News of the Year.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    St. Lifer, Evan; Olson, Renee; Milliot, Jim; Bing, Jonathan

    1998-01-01

    Reviews library news for 1997. Highlights public library budgets, examined by number of patrons served; Internet filters and censorship; librarians and the media; private and government funding sources; outsourcing; expectations for growth in the publishing industry, emphasizing the Asian economic crisis; and new ideas from the next generation of…

  14. Smart Start News, 1999.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harris, Monica, Ed.

    1999-01-01

    Smart Start is a comprehensive public-private initiative to help all North Carolina children enter school healthy and ready to succeed, and provides children from birth to age five access to high-quality and affordable child care, health care, and other critical services. This document comprises the first two issues of "Smart Start News," a…

  15. Parent News Offline, 1999.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robertson, Anne S., Ed.

    1999-01-01

    This document is comprised of the two issues published in volume 1 (1999) of "Parent News Offline," a newsletter of the National Parent Information Network (NPIN), designed to introduce those without Internet access to the activities and information available through NPIN. The spring 1999 issue contains the following articles: (1) "Child Care: How…

  16. New Suncook News.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kanehl, Bob

    The newspaper program at the New Suncook School, Lovell, Maine, is a multi-level, language arts based unit designed to develop in students strong writing and interpersonal relationship skills, and to bring relevance to writing. The monthly newspaper features interviews, surveys, news, and some fiction stories written by students. The newspaper is…

  17. The News, Fall 2002.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Giles, Ray, Ed.

    2002-01-01

    This fall 2002 newsletter from the Community College League of California contains several articles, news stories, and the brochure from the 2002 Annual Convention, "Celebrating the Way California LEARNS." Articles include: (1) "Nursing Shortage Poses Dilemma for Colleges: Access vs. Efficiency," a discussion of the debate over how to increase the…

  18. Biofantasies: genetics and medicine in the print news media.

    PubMed

    Petersen, A

    2001-04-01

    The contemporary news media is an important site for exploring the diverse and complex cultural images of genetics and its medical possibilities, and of the mechanisms by which these images are (re) produced and sustained. This article investigates how the print news media 'frames' stories on genetics and medicine. It is based on a discourse analysis of articles appearing in three Australian newspapers in the late 1990s. Gene stories were found to be prominent in each of the newspapers, and to emphasise the medical benefits of genetic research. Stories frequently cite and quote scientists, who explain the nature and significance of the research and/or its implications for treatment or prevention. Many stories focus on new genetic discoveries, and portray genetic researchers as involved in a quest to unlock nature's secrets. Stories of hope, and depictions of geneticists as warriors or heroes, appear regularly. The positive vision of genetics is supported by the use of particular metaphors, accompanying illustrative material, 'human interest' stories, and reference to credible sources. There is rarely mention of the influence of non-genetic factors and 'multifactorial' interactions on disorders, or questioning of the goals, direction, methods, or value of genetic research. Scientists made extensive use of the media in their efforts to maintain a positive image of research in the face of public concerns about scientists 'going too far', following the announcement of the cloning of Dolly. Boundaries were drawn between 'therapeutic cloning'--implicitly defined as 'good', useful, and legitimate--and 'reproductive cloning'--seen as 'bad', dangerous, and illegitimate. By framing news stories as they do, the print news media are likely to exert a powerful influence on public responses to health problems. With new genetic technologies becoming more integrated in preventive medicine and public health, it is important to investigate how news stories help shape the agenda for

  19. GCM (general circulation model)-data intercomparison: The good news and the bad

    SciTech Connect

    Grotch, S.L.

    1990-09-01

    General circulation models (GCMs) are being actively used to assess possible climate change due to increasing greenhouse gas concentrations. Because such simulations provide detailed climatic predictions at a wide range of scales, they are of particular interest to those making regional assessments of climatic change. It is especially important that workers using the results of such simulations be aware of some of the limitations of these results. In this study some of the positive results from these model simulations will be shown and some of the deficiencies will also be highlighted. Following an introductory section describing the nature of GCM climate simulations the issue of the spatial scales of such simulations is examined. A comparison of the results of seven GCM simulations of the current climate and the predictions of these models for the changes due to a doubling of CO{sub 2} will be discussed. In these intercomparisons, the spatial scale over which the results are compared varies from global to zonal (longitudinally averaged at a given latitude) to individual slices through the data along specified latitudes or longitudes. Finally, the dangers and pitfalls of relying on simple averages will be highlighted. 19 refs., 9 figs., 1 tab.

  20. Revisiting the Role of Bad News in Maintaining Human Observing Behavior

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fantino, Edmund; Silberberg, Alan

    2010-01-01

    Results from studies of observing responses have suggested that stimuli maintain observing owing to their special relationship to primary reinforcement (the conditioned- reinforcement hypothesis), and not because they predict the availability and nonavailability of reinforcement (the information hypothesis). The present article first reviews a…

  1. Parental risk management in relation to offspring defence: bad news for kids

    PubMed Central

    Mahr, Katharina; Riegler, Georg; Hoi, Herbert

    2015-01-01

    Do parents defend their offspring whenever necessary, and do self-sacrificing parents really exist? Studies recognized that parent defence is dynamic, mainly depending on the threat predators pose. In this context, parental risk management should consider the threat to themselves and to their offspring. Consequently, the observed defence should be a composite of both risk components. Surprisingly, no study so far has determined the influence of these two threat components on parental decision rules. In a field experiment, we investigated parental risk taking in relation to the threat posed to themselves and their offspring. To disentangle the two threat components, we examined defence behaviours of parent blue tits Cyanistes caeruleus towards three different predators and during different nestling developmental stages. Nest defence strategies in terms of alarm call intensity and nearest predator approach differed between the three predators. Defence intensity was only partly explained by threat level. Most importantly, parental risk management varied in relation to their own, but not offspring risk. Parent defence investment was independent of nestling risk when parents followed a high-risk strategy. However, parents considered nestling as well as parental risk when following a low-risk strategy. Our findings could have general implications for the economy of risk management and decision-making strategies in living beings, including humans. PMID:25392467

  2. Bad News: How the Press Covers (or Doesn't Cover) Hispanics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heller, Michele A.

    1992-01-01

    Analyzes newspaper coverage of Hispanics during a seven-day period in Los Angeles, San Antonio, New York, Chicago, and Washington, D.C. Discusses media bias. Rates stories "positive" or "negative" in business, culture, crime, public issues, and people. Discusses elements affecting Hispanic coverage, including newspapers' readerships, staffs, and…

  3. Good news–bad news: the Yin and Yang of immune privilege in the eye

    PubMed Central

    Forrester, John V.; Xu, Heping

    2012-01-01

    The eye and the brain are prototypical tissues manifesting immune privilege (IP) in which immune responses to foreign antigens, particularly alloantigens are suppressed, and even completely inhibited. Explanations for this phenomenon are numerous and mostly reflect our evolving understanding of the molecular and cellular processes underpinning immunological responses generally. IP is now viewed as a property of many tissues and the level of expression of IP varies not only with the tissue but with the nature of the foreign antigen and changes in the limited conditions under which privilege can operate as a mechanism of immunological tolerance. As a result, IP functions normally as a homeostatic mechanism preserving normal function in tissues, particularly those with highly specialized function and limited capacity for renewal such as the eye and brain. However, IP is relatively easily bypassed in the face of a sufficiently strong immunological response, and the privileged tissues may be at greater risk of collateral damage because its natural defenses are more easily breached than in a fully immunocompetent tissue which rapidly rejects foreign antigen and restores integrity. This two-edged sword cuts its swathe through the eye: under most circumstances, IP mechanisms such as blood–ocular barriers, intraocular immune modulators, induction of T regulatory cells, lack of lymphatics, and other properties maintain tissue integrity; however, when these are breached, various degrees of tissue damage occur from severe tissue destruction in retinal viral infections and other forms of uveoretinal inflammation, to less severe inflammatory responses in conditions such as macular degeneration. Conversely, ocular IP and tumor-related IP can combine to permit extensive tumor growth and increased risk of metastasis thus threatening the survival of the host. PMID:23230433

  4. A Spoonful of Fairness: Training in Fairness Principles Helps Communicate Bad News

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Streicher, Bernhard; Graupmann, Verena; Weisweiler, Silke

    2014-01-01

    Fairness training was examined in its effect on resulting third party perceptions of communicating a negative outcome. Twenty-nine students were videotaped communicating an unfavourable decision twice within a one-week interval: before and after having participated in fairness training, or--in the control group--remaining untrained. Results showed…

  5. Will They Report It? Ethical Attitude of Graduate Software Engineers in Reporting Bad News

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sajeev, A. S. M.; Crnkovic, Ivica

    2012-01-01

    Hiding critical information has resulted in disastrous failures of some major software projects. This paper investigates, using a subset of Keil's test, how graduates (70% of them with work experience) from different cultural backgrounds who are enrolled in a postgraduate course on global software development would handle negative information that…

  6. Greasy roads: the impact of bad financial news on road traffic accidents.

    PubMed

    Vandoros, Sotiris; Kavetsos, Georgios; Dolan, Paul

    2014-03-01

    We use evidence from a natural experiment in Greece to study the effect of the announcement of austerity measures on road traffic accidents (RTAs). We use daily RTA data from 2010 and 2011, during which a number of austerity measures were announced, including salary and pension cuts and an increase in direct and indirect taxes. We find that controlling for other factors potentially influencing RTAs, the number of RTAs increased significantly on the first two days following the announcements of austerity measures. We put forward some tentative suggestions for why this happens. PMID:24117892

  7. Coping with bad news: the physician executive's role in a lawsuit.

    PubMed

    Gorney, Mark

    2002-01-01

    In these days of doctors, lawyers and lawsuits, chances of an American physician finishing his or her career without a malpractice claim are growing more remote. Every physician executive overseeing the activities of a group of peers knows this and should be prepared to assist the physician who is sued. Examine four key ways to help your physicians deal with the stress of a lawsuit. PMID:11957406

  8. California. Universities hit by new round of cuts; more bad news ahead.

    PubMed

    Stokstad, Erik

    2003-08-15

    A new, belt-tightening budget for 2003-04 approved on 2 August by the governor of California has forced University of California administrators to draw up plans to raise tuition by 30%, slash outreach and other programs, and shrink the number of faculty and support-staff positions. PMID:12920268

  9. Computational approaches for isoform detection and estimation: good and bad news

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The main goal of the whole transcriptome analysis is to correctly identify all expressed transcripts within a specific cell/tissue - at a particular stage and condition - to determine their structures and to measure their abundances. RNA-seq data promise to allow identification and quantification of transcriptome at unprecedented level of resolution, accuracy and low cost. Several computational methods have been proposed to achieve such purposes. However, it is still not clear which promises are already met and which challenges are still open and require further methodological developments. Results We carried out a simulation study to assess the performance of 5 widely used tools, such as: CEM, Cufflinks, iReckon, RSEM, and SLIDE. All of them have been used with default parameters. In particular, we considered the effect of the following three different scenarios: the availability of complete annotation, incomplete annotation, and no annotation at all. Moreover, comparisons were carried out using the methods in three different modes of action. In the first mode, the methods were forced to only deal with those isoforms that are present in the annotation; in the second mode, they were allowed to detect novel isoforms using the annotation as guide; in the third mode, they were operating in fully data driven way (although with the support of the alignment on the reference genome). In the latter modality, precision and recall are quite poor. On the contrary, results are better with the support of the annotation, even though it is not complete. Finally, abundance estimation error often shows a very skewed distribution. The performance strongly depends on the true real abundance of the isoforms. Lowly (and sometimes also moderately) expressed isoforms are poorly detected and estimated. In particular, lowly expressed isoforms are identified mainly if they are provided in the original annotation as potential isoforms. Conclusions Both detection and quantification of all isoforms from RNA-seq data are still hard problems and they are affected by many factors. Overall, the performance significantly changes since it depends on the modes of action and on the type of available annotation. Results obtained using complete or partial annotation are able to detect most of the expressed isoforms, even though the number of false positives is often high. Fully data driven approaches require more attention, at least for complex eucaryotic genomes. Improvements are desirable especially for isoform quantification and for isoform detection with low abundance. PMID:24885830

  10. Parental risk management in relation to offspring defence: bad news for kids.

    PubMed

    Mahr, Katharina; Riegler, Georg; Hoi, Herbert

    2015-01-01

    Do parents defend their offspring whenever necessary, and do self-sacrificing parents really exist? Studies recognized that parent defence is dynamic, mainly depending on the threat predators pose. In this context, parental risk management should consider the threat to themselves and to their offspring. Consequently, the observed defence should be a composite of both risk components. Surprisingly, no study so far has determined the influence of these two threat components on parental decision rules. In a field experiment, we investigated parental risk taking in relation to the threat posed to themselves and their offspring. To disentangle the two threat components, we examined defence behaviours of parent blue tits Cyanistes caeruleus towards three different predators and during different nestling developmental stages. Nest defence strategies in terms of alarm call intensity and nearest predator approach differed between the three predators. Defence intensity was only partly explained by threat level. Most importantly, parental risk management varied in relation to their own, but not offspring risk. Parent defence investment was independent of nestling risk when parents followed a high-risk strategy. However, parents considered nestling as well as parental risk when following a low-risk strategy. Our findings could have general implications for the economy of risk management and decision-making strategies in living beings, including humans. PMID:25392467

  11. Awareness of bad news, environmental attitudes, and subjective estimates of coastal pollution

    SciTech Connect

    Eiser, J.R.; Reicher, S.D.; Podpadec, T.J. )

    1994-12-01

    Questionnaires distributed to 154 holiday-makers on beaches in Southwest England assessed awareness of local hazards or incidents associated with either the electricity supply industry or the water and sewage industry and examined the relationship between awareness and evaluations of the industry, current and future levels of pollution on the beach in question, and general levels of concern about environmental pollution. With respect to electricity, those respondents who were more aware of reports claiming a higher incidence of childhood leukemia in the vicinity of a nearby nuclear plant evaluated the electricity industry as less competent or trustworthy, showed higher levels of environmental concern, and were more pessimistic in their estimates of present and future levels of specific pollutants on their beach. With respect to the water industry, similar effects were associated with greater awareness of an accident at a water treatment plant and agricultural pollution of a nearby estuary. These findings are interpreted as suggesting a cyclical relationship between risk awareness and concern. On the one hand, reports about environmental hazards may lead to generalized concern across specific contexts; on the other hand, greater levels of concern may sensitize individuals to such reports. 10 refs., 1 tab.

  12. Contact: Releasing the news

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinotti, Roberto

    The problem of mass behavior after man's future contacts with other intelligences in the universe is not only a challenge for social scientists and political leaders all over the world, but also a cultural time bomb as well. In fact, since the impact of CETI (Contact with Extraterrestrial Intelligence) on human civilization, with its different cultures, might cause a serious socio-anthropological shock, a common and predetermined worldwide strategy is necessary in releasing the news after the contact, in order to keep possible manifestations of fear, panic and hysteria under control. An analysis of past studies in this field and of parallel historical situations as analogs suggests a definite "authority crisis" in the public as a direct consequence of an unexpected release of the news, involving a devastating "chain reaction" process (from both the psychological and sociological viewpoints) of anomie and maybe the collapse of today's society. The only way to prevent all this is to prepare the world's public opinion concerning contact before releasing the news, and to develop a long-term strategy through the combined efforts of scientists, political leaders, intelligence agencies and the mass media, in order to create the cultural conditions in which a confrontation with ETI won't affect mankind in a traumatic way. Definite roles and tasks in this multi-level model are suggested.

  13. Research of IRFPAs' reliability evaluation by bad pixel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hao, Lichao; Huang, Aibo; Lai, Canxiong; Chen, Xing; Hao, Mingming; Chen, Honglei; Lu, Guoguang; Huang, Yun; En, Yunfei

    2015-10-01

    Reliability is an important index to ensure the application of infrared focal plane arrays (IRFPAs) in complex environment, and it becomes a major bottleneck problem of IRFPAs' development. Because of the characteristics such as type, nature, quantity, location and distribution et al, bad pixel which contains initial bad pixel and used bad pixel has outstanding advantage for failure analysis and reliability evaluation of IRFPAs. In this paper, the structure of IRPFAs has been introduced in detail, and the damage mechanisms of used bad pixel also have been analyzed deeply. At the same time, the feasibility to study IRPFAs' damage stress, failure position, damage mechanism has been discussed all around. The research of bad pixel can be used to optimize the structure and process, meanwhile it also can improve the accuracy of bad pixel identification and replacements.

  14. Antisocial features and "faking bad": A critical note.

    PubMed

    Niesten, Isabella J M; Nentjes, Lieke; Merckelbach, Harald; Bernstein, David P

    2015-01-01

    We critically review the literature on antisocial personality features and symptom fabrication (i.e., faking bad; e.g., malingering). A widespread assumption is that these constructs are intimately related. Some studies have, indeed, found that antisocial individuals score higher on instruments detecting faking bad, but others have been unable to replicate this pattern. In addition, studies exploring whether antisocial individuals are especially talented in faking bad have generally come up with null results. The notion of an intrinsic link between antisocial features and faking bad is difficult to test and research in this domain is sensitive to selection bias. We argue that research on faking bad would profit from further theoretical articulation. One topic that deserves scrutiny is how antisocial features affect the cognitive dissonance typically induced by faking bad. We illustrate our points with preliminary data and discuss their implications. PMID:25843907

  15. Video games: good, bad, or other?

    PubMed

    Prot, Sara; McDonald, Katelyn A; Anderson, Craig A; Gentile, Douglas A

    2012-06-01

    Video games are a pervasive pastime among children and adolescents. The growing popularity of video games has instigated a debate among parents, researchers, video game producers, and policymakers concerning potential harmful and helpful effects of video games on children. This article provides an overview of research findings on the positive and negative effects of video games, thus providing an empirical answer to the question, are video games good or bad? The article also provides some guidelines to help pediatricians, parents, and other caregivers protect children from negative effects and to maximize positive effects of video games. PMID:22643171

  16. Competition in Healthcare: Good, Bad or Ugly?

    PubMed Central

    Goddard, Maria

    2015-01-01

    The role of competition in healthcare is much debated. Despite a wealth of international experience in relation to competition, evidence is mixed and contested and the debate about the potential role for competition is often polarised. This paper considers briefly some of the reasons for this, focusing on what is meant by "competition in healthcare" and why it is more valuable to think about the circumstances in which competition is more and less likely to be a good tool to achieve benefits, rather than whether or not it is "good" or "bad," per se.M PMID:26340484

  17. International News Bowwowing: A Trend Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Riffe, Daniel

    1984-01-01

    Concludes that the increased "borrowing" of news from foreign news agencies may not be due to the declining number of United States foreign correspondents but to Third World restrictions on access to news. (FL)

  18. Discursive Positioning in a Fifth-Grade Writing Lesson: The Making of a "Bad, Bad Boy"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Collins, Kathleen M.

    2011-01-01

    In this article the author draws on the concept of positioning to examine how language is used during one particular fifth-grade writing lesson to construct both the lesson and the participants. The author's analysis of the classroom interactions makes visible how participants colluded to position one student in particular, Larnell, as a "bad, bad…

  19. Bad Kids and Bad Feelings: What Children's Literature Teaches about ADHD, Creativity, and Openness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stearns, Clio

    2015-01-01

    This paper uses data from children's literature and classroom narratives to consider hyperactivity, inattention, and other non-normative behaviors in children. It encourages educational thinkers and childhood mental health professionals to take a historical perspective on children's badness rather than consigning it to the realm of pathology.…

  20. Global warming, bad weather, insurance losses and the global economy

    SciTech Connect

    Low, N.C.; Shen, S.

    1996-09-01

    Global warming causes extremely bad weather in the near term. The impact on the insurance industry is described. Why global warming in the near term causes very bad weather is explained. The continuing trend of very bad weather and the future impact on the insurance industry is explored. How very bad weather can affect the global financial market is explained. Taking a historical view of the development of the modern economy, the authors describe in the near term the impact of global warming on the global economy. The long term impact of global warming on the global economy and the human race is explored. Opportunities presented by global warming are described.

  1. A Survey of Electronic News Gathering and Television News Coverage.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stone, Vernon A.; DiCioccio, John P.

    A 1977 national survey of 216 television stations that use electronic news gathering (ENG) and of 224 stations that still use only film for camera reporting showed little difference in the types of news the two kinds of operations covered, although stations using ENG shot more stories than did those still using only film. The persons making…

  2. Least bad solutions to the 'drugs problem'.

    PubMed

    Mugford, S

    1991-01-01

    This paper examines the current difficulties being faced in Australia by policy-makers attempting to regulate the non-medical use of illegal drugs, and it is suggested that the difficulties centre upon two aspects. First, existing prohibitions are unsuccessful, with use levels rising and, in some arenas (e.g. cocaine use in the USA), quite out of control. On the other hand, a move towards decriminalization or legalization is difficult because past propaganda has been so vehement that a change now apparently risks sending the wrong messages to young people. This dilemma means that there is no solution, including inertia, which is risk-free, nor is there one free of difficulties. It is thus relevant to think in terms of 'least bad' rather than 'best' when formulating a system to face these problems. The exploration of what this least bad solution might be begins with the examination of the prominent myths (such as 'the drug-free society', 'the evil pusher', 'the user as victim' and 'the young person as cultural dope') that hinder our reasoning. Secondly, by suggesting that, in a climate of increasing crime related to drugs, inability of prohibitions to control that use and escalating health risks attendant on use (including the AIDS problem), the central policy thrust must be harm reduction and damage minimization rather than illusory goals such as widespread abstinence. The paper concludes with a discussion of some relevant evidence on alternative options. PMID:16818303

  3. Synthesis and Biological Evaluation of Copper-64 Radiolabeled [DUPA-6-Ahx-(NODAGA)-5-Ava-BBN(7-14)NH2], a Novel Bivalent Targeting Vector Having Affinity for Two Distinct Biomarkers (GRPr/PSMA) of Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Bandari, Rajendra Prasad; Jiang, Zongrun; Reynolds, Tamila Stott; Bernskoetter, Nicole E.; Szczodroski, Ashley F.; Bassuner, Kurt J.; Kirkpatrick, Daniel L.; Rold, Tammy L.; Sieckman, Gary L.; Hoffman, Timothy J.; Connors, James P.; Smith, Charles J.

    2014-01-01

    Gastrin-releasing peptide receptors (GRPr) and prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA) are two identifying biomarkers expressed in very high numbers on prostate cancer cells and could serve as a useful tool for molecular targeting and diagnosis of disease via positron-emission tomography (PET). The aim of this study was to produce the multipurpose, bivalent [DUPA-6-Ahx-(64Cu-NODAGA)-5-Ava-BBN(7-14)NH2] radioligand for prostate cancer imaging, where DUPA = 2-[3-(1,3-Bis-tertbutoxycarbonylpropyl)-ureido]pentanedioic acid, a small-molecule, PSMA-targeting probe, 6Ahx = 6-aminohexanoic acid, 5-Ava = 5-aminovaleric acid, NODAGA = [2-(4,7-biscarboxymethyl)-1,4,7-(triazonan-1-yl)pentanedioic acid] (a derivative of NOTA (1,4,7-triazacyclononane-1,4,7-triacetic acid)), and BBN(7-14)NH2 = bombesin or BBN, a GRPr-specific peptide targeting probe. Methods The PSMA/GRPr dual targeting ligand precursor [DUPA-6-Ahx-K-5-Ava-BBN(7-14)NH2], was synthesized by solid-phase and manual peptide synthesis, after which NODAGA was added via manual conjugation to the ε-amine of lysine (K). The new bivalent GRPr/PSMA targeting vector was purified by reversed-phase high performance liquid chromatography (RP-HPLC), characterized by electrospray-ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS), and metallated with 64CuCl2 and natCuCl2. The receptor binding affinity was evaluated in human, prostate, PC-3 (GRPr-positive) and LNCaP (PSMA-positive) cells and the tumor-targeting efficacy determined in severe combined immunodeficient (SCID) and athymic nude mice bearing PC-3 and LNCaP tumors. Whole-body maximum intensity microPET/CT images of PC-3/LNCaP tumor-bearing mice were obtained 18 h post-injection (p.i.). Results Competitive binding assays in PC-3 and LNCaP cells indicated high receptor binding affinity for the [DUPA-6-Ahx-(natCu-NODAGA)-5-Ava-BBN(7-14)NH2] conjugate. MicroPET scintigraphy in PC-3/LNCaP tumor-bearing mice indicated that xenografted tumors were visible at 18 h p.i. with collateral

  4. Meta-analysis of the Alpha/Beta Ratio for Prostate Cancer in the Presence of an Overall Time Factor: Bad News, Good News, or No News?

    SciTech Connect

    Vogelius, Ivan R.; Bentzen, Soren M.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To present a novel method for meta-analysis of the fractionation sensitivity of tumors as applied to prostate cancer in the presence of an overall time factor. Methods and Materials: A systematic search for radiation dose-fractionation trials in prostate cancer was performed using PubMed and by manual search. Published trials comparing standard fractionated external beam radiation therapy with alternative fractionation were eligible. For each trial the {alpha}/{beta} ratio and its 95% confidence interval (CI) were extracted, and the data were synthesized with each study weighted by the inverse variance. An overall time factor was included in the analysis, and its influence on {alpha}/{beta} was investigated. Results: Five studies involving 1965 patients were included in the meta-analysis of {alpha}/{beta}. The synthesized {alpha}/{beta} assuming no effect of overall treatment time was -0.07 Gy (95% CI -0.73-0.59), which was increased to 0.47 Gy (95% CI -0.55-1.50) if a single highly weighted study was excluded. In a separate analysis, 2 studies based on 10,808 patients in total allowed extraction of a synthesized estimate of a time factor of 0.31 Gy/d (95% CI 0.20-0.42). The time factor increased the {alpha}/{beta} estimate to 0.58 Gy (95% CI -0.53-1.69)/1.93 Gy (95% CI -0.27-4.14) with/without the heavily weighted study. An analysis of the uncertainty of the {alpha}/{beta} estimate showed a loss of information when the hypofractionated arm was underdosed compared with the normo-fractionated arm. Conclusions: The current external beam fractionation studies are consistent with a very low {alpha}/{beta} ratio for prostate cancer, although the CIs include {alpha}/{beta} ratios up to 4.14 Gy in the presence of a time factor. Details of the dose fractionation in the 2 trial arms have critical influence on the information that can be extracted from a study. Studies with unfortunate designs will supply little or no information about {alpha}/{beta} regardless of the number of subjects enrolled.

  5. Next Step toward Optimization of GRP Receptor Avidities: Determination of the Minimal Distance between BBN(7-14) Units in Peptide Homodimers.

    PubMed

    Fischer, G; Lindner, S; Litau, S; Schirrmacher, R; Wängler, B; Wängler, C

    2015-08-19

    As the gastrin releasing peptide receptor (GRPR) is overexpressed on several tumor types, it represents a promising target for the specific in vivo imaging of these tumors using positron emission tomography (PET). We were able to show that PESIN-based peptide multimers can result in substantially higher GRPR avidities, highly advantageous in vivo pharmacokinetics and tumor imaging properties compared to the respective monomers. However, the minimal distance between the peptidic binders, resulting in the lowest possible system entropy while enabling a concomitant GRPR binding and thus optimized receptor avidities, has not been determined so far. Thus, we aimed here to identify the minimal distance between two GRPR-binding peptides in order to provide the basis for the development of highly avid GRPR-specific PET imaging agents. We therefore synthesized dimers of the GRPR-binding bombesin analogue BBN(7-14) on a dendritic scaffold, exhibiting different distances between both peptide binders. The homodimers were further modified with the chelator NODAGA, radiolabeled with (68)Ga, and evaluated in vitro regarding their GRPR avidity. We found that the most potent of the newly developed radioligands exhibits GRPR avidity twice as high as the most potent reference compound known so far, and that a minimal distance of 62 bond lengths between both peptidic binders within the homodimer can result in concomitant peptide binding and optimal GRPR avidities. These findings answer the question as to what molecular design should be chosen when aiming at the development of highly avid homobivalent peptidic ligands addressing the GRPR. PMID:26200324

  6. What Turns Events into News?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tukachinsky, Riva

    2013-01-01

    "The New York Times" is known for its slogan ''All the News That's Fit to Print.'' But how do gatekeepers decide which events meet this criterion? Although some individuals might believe that the news constitutes an undistorted reflection of the social reality, students in communication courses have the…

  7. Science News of the Year.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Science News, 1987

    1987-01-01

    Provides a review of science news stories reported in "Science News" during 1987. References each item to the volume and page number in which the subject was addressed. Contains references on astronomy, behavior, biology, biomedicine, chemistry, earth sciences, environment, mathematics and computers, paleontology and anthropology, physics, science…

  8. Science News of the Year.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Science News, 1984

    1984-01-01

    Reviews important science news stories reported during 1984 in "Science News" magazine. These stories are in the categories of: anthropology and paleontology; behavior; biology; chemistry; computers; mathematics; earth science; the environment; medicine; physics; science and society; space sciences and astronomy; and technology. (JN)

  9. International News Flows in the Post-Cold War World: Mapping the News and the News Producers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sreberny-Mohammadi, Annabelle

    1995-01-01

    Reviews the global political environment, major global news providers, and technologies of global news production. Argues for a multinational comparative mapping of international news representation in the 1990s. Outlines a major international venture to update and elaborate the 1979 UNESCO/IAMCR study of foreign news in the media of 29 countries,…

  10. Mentoring Graduate Students: The Good, Bad, and Gray

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ballantine, Jeanne H.; Jolly-Ballantine, John-Andrew

    2015-01-01

    Good mentoring of graduate students influences their perseverance and success to completion, whereas bad mentoring can result in negative outcomes, including delayed degree completion or non-completion. What the authors refer to as the gray zone is that which falls between good and bad mentoring. Examples are partial mentoring or changes in…

  11. HOW TO MANAGE DATA BADLY (PART 1 & 2)

    EPA Science Inventory

    In a landmark article in The American Statistician, Howard Wainer (1994) presented ideas for (a) "How to Display Data Badly," wherein good data are ruined by bad graphics. Wainer presumed too much. In this essay, I extend his concept by presenting ideas and examples of how scient...

  12. Thematic and Content Analysis of Idiopathic Nightmares and Bad Dreams

    PubMed Central

    Robert, Geneviève; Zadra, Antonio

    2014-01-01

    Study Objectives: To conduct a comprehensive and comparative study of prospectively collected bad dream and nightmare reports using a broad range of dream content variables. Design: Correlational and descriptive. Setting: Participants' homes. Participants: Three hundred thirty-one adult volunteers (55 men, 275 women, 1 not specified; mean age = 32.4 ± 14.8 y). Interventions: N/A. Measurement and Results: Five hundred seventy-two participants kept a written record of all of their remembered dreams in a log for 2 to 5 consecutive weeks. A total of 9,796 dream reports were collected and the content of 253 nightmares and 431 bad dreams reported by 331 participants was investigated. Physical aggression was the most frequently reported theme in nightmares, whereas interpersonal conflicts predominated in bad dreams. Nightmares were rated by participants as being substantially more emotionally intense than were bad dreams. Thirty-five percent of nightmares and 55% of bad dreams contained primary emotions other than fear. When compared to bad dreams, nightmares were more bizarre and contained substantially more aggressions, failures, and unfortunate endings. Conclusions: The results have important implications on how nightmares are conceptualized and defined and support the view that when compared to bad dreams, nightmares represent a somewhat rarer—and more severe—expression of the same basic phenomenon. Citation: Robert G; Zadra A. Thematic and content analysis of idiopathic nightmares and bad dreams. SLEEP 2014;37(2):409-417. PMID:24497669

  13. 48 CFR 2131.205-3 - Bad debts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 6 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Bad debts. 2131.205-3 Section 2131.205-3 Federal Acquisition Regulations System OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT, FEDERAL... PRINCIPLES AND PROCEDURES Contracts With Commercial Organizations 2131.205-3 Bad debts. Erroneous...

  14. 48 CFR 1631.205-71 - FEHBP bad debts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 6 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false FEHBP bad debts. 1631.205-71 Section 1631.205-71 Federal Acquisition Regulations System OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT FEDERAL... AND PROCEDURES Contracts With Commercial Organizations 1631.205-71 FEHBP bad debts. Erroneous...

  15. 26 CFR 301.6657-1 - Bad checks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 18 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Bad checks. 301.6657-1 Section 301.6657-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) PROCEDURE AND... Additions to the Tax and Additional Amounts § 301.6657-1 Bad checks. (a) In general. Except as provided...

  16. 48 CFR 1631.205-71 - FEHBP bad debts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 6 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false FEHBP bad debts. 1631.205-71 Section 1631.205-71 Federal Acquisition Regulations System OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT FEDERAL... AND PROCEDURES Contracts With Commercial Organizations 1631.205-71 FEHBP bad debts. Erroneous...

  17. 26 CFR 301.6657-1 - Bad checks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 18 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Bad checks. 301.6657-1 Section 301.6657-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) PROCEDURE AND... Additions to the Tax and Additional Amounts § 301.6657-1 Bad checks. (a) In general. Except as provided...

  18. 48 CFR 1631.205-71 - FEHBP bad debts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 6 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false FEHBP bad debts. 1631.205-71 Section 1631.205-71 Federal Acquisition Regulations System OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT FEDERAL... AND PROCEDURES Contracts With Commercial Organizations 1631.205-71 FEHBP bad debts. Erroneous...

  19. 48 CFR 1631.205-71 - FEHBP bad debts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 6 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false FEHBP bad debts. 1631.205-71 Section 1631.205-71 Federal Acquisition Regulations System OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT FEDERAL... AND PROCEDURES Contracts With Commercial Organizations 1631.205-71 FEHBP bad debts. Erroneous...

  20. 26 CFR 301.6657-1 - Bad checks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 18 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Bad checks. 301.6657-1 Section 301.6657-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) PROCEDURE AND... Additions to the Tax and Additional Amounts § 301.6657-1 Bad checks. (a) In general. Except as provided...

  1. 48 CFR 2131.205-3 - Bad debts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 6 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Bad debts. 2131.205-3 Section 2131.205-3 Federal Acquisition Regulations System OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT, FEDERAL... PRINCIPLES AND PROCEDURES Contracts With Commercial Organizations 2131.205-3 Bad debts. Erroneous...

  2. 26 CFR 1.166-4 - Reserve for bad debts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Reserve for bad debts. 1.166-4 Section 1.166-4...) INCOME TAXES (CONTINUED) Itemized Deductions for Individuals and Corporations § 1.166-4 Reserve for bad debts. (a) Allowance of deduction. A taxpayer who has established the reserve method of treating...

  3. 26 CFR 301.6657-1 - Bad checks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 18 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Bad checks. 301.6657-1 Section 301.6657-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) PROCEDURE AND... Additions to the Tax and Additional Amounts § 301.6657-1 Bad checks. (a) In general. Except as provided...

  4. 26 CFR 1.166-4 - Reserve for bad debts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Reserve for bad debts. 1.166-4 Section 1.166-4...) INCOME TAXES (CONTINUED) Itemized Deductions for Individuals and Corporations § 1.166-4 Reserve for bad debts. (a) Allowance of deduction. A taxpayer who has established the reserve method of treating...

  5. 26 CFR 1.166-4 - Reserve for bad debts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Reserve for bad debts. 1.166-4 Section 1.166-4...) INCOME TAXES (CONTINUED) Itemized Deductions for Individuals and Corporations § 1.166-4 Reserve for bad debts. (a) Allowance of deduction. A taxpayer who has established the reserve method of treating...

  6. 48 CFR 2131.205-3 - Bad debts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 6 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 true Bad debts. 2131.205-3 Section 2131.205-3 Federal Acquisition Regulations System OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT, FEDERAL... PRINCIPLES AND PROCEDURES Contracts With Commercial Organizations 2131.205-3 Bad debts. Erroneous...

  7. 26 CFR 301.6657-1 - Bad checks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 18 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Bad checks. 301.6657-1 Section 301.6657-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) PROCEDURE AND... Additions to the Tax and Additional Amounts § 301.6657-1 Bad checks. (a) In general. Except as provided...

  8. 48 CFR 2131.205-3 - Bad debts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 6 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Bad debts. 2131.205-3 Section 2131.205-3 Federal Acquisition Regulations System OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT, FEDERAL... PRINCIPLES AND PROCEDURES Contracts With Commercial Organizations 2131.205-3 Bad debts. Erroneous...

  9. 48 CFR 2131.205-3 - Bad debts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 6 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Bad debts. 2131.205-3 Section 2131.205-3 Federal Acquisition Regulations System OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT, FEDERAL... PRINCIPLES AND PROCEDURES Contracts With Commercial Organizations 2131.205-3 Bad debts. Erroneous...

  10. 26 CFR 1.166-4 - Reserve for bad debts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Reserve for bad debts. 1.166-4 Section 1.166-4...) INCOME TAXES (CONTINUED) Itemized Deductions for Individuals and Corporations § 1.166-4 Reserve for bad debts. (a) Allowance of deduction. A taxpayer who has established the reserve method of treating...