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Sample records for balanced chromosome rearrangements

  1. Uniparental disomy analysis in carriers of balanced chromosome rearrangements

    SciTech Connect

    May, K.M.; Pettay, D.; Muralidharan, K.

    1994-09-01

    Although most individuals who carry a balanced familial chromosome rearrangement are phenotypically normal, those who are clinically abnormal raise the question of whether or not the rearrangement plays a causative role. One possible mechanism involves meiotic segregation of a normal homolog along with the rearranged chromosome(s) such that a trisomic conception occurs. Subsequent loss by mitotic nondisjunction of the structurally normal chromosome contributed by the non-carrier parent would then result in uniparental disomy (UPD) in a conceptus carrying a balanced rearrangement. UPD for chromosomes 14 and 15 has been demonstrated in several clinically abnormal individuals who carry a familial Robertsonian translocation. We have extended this type of analysis to include other forms of balanced chromosome rearrangements. We report the results of UPD analysis of 14 families who have a phenotypically abnormal child with an apparently balanced rearrangement. The series includes 4 reciprocal translocations, 4 Robertsonian translocations, 2 X;autosome translocations, and 4 inversions. High resolution chromosomes were used to compare breakpoints between parent and offspring to exclude the possibility of further rearrangements. Parental origin of the chromosome(s) involved was determined by DNA polymorphism analysis using PCR or Southern blotting techniques. We found no evidence of UPD in any of the 14 cases. Our data suggest that UPD is not a common explanation for phenotypically abnormal carriers of balanced chromosome rearrangements.

  2. Characterization of Apparently Balanced Chromosomal Rearrangements from the Developmental Genome Anatomy Project

    PubMed Central

    Higgins, Anne W.; Alkuraya, Fowzan S.; Bosco, Amy F.; Brown, Kerry K.; Bruns, Gail A.P.; Donovan, Diana J.; Eisenman, Robert; Fan, Yanli; Farra, Chantal G.; Ferguson, Heather L.; Gusella, James F.; Harris, David J.; Herrick, Steven R.; Kelly, Chantal; Kim, Hyung-Goo; Kishikawa, Shotaro; Korf, Bruce R.; Kulkarni, Shashikant; Lally, Eric; Leach, Natalia T.; Lemyre, Emma; Lewis, Janine; Ligon, Azra H.; Lu, Weining; Maas, Richard L.; MacDonald, Marcy E.; Moore, Steven D.P.; Peters, Roxanna E.; Quade, Bradley J.; Quintero-Rivera, Fabiola; Saadi, Irfan; Shen, Yiping; Shendure, Jay; Williamson, Robin E.; Morton, Cynthia C.

    2008-01-01

    Apparently balanced chromosomal rearrangements in individuals with major congenital anomalies represent natural experiments of gene disruption and dysregulation. These individuals can be studied to identify novel genes critical in human development and to annotate further the function of known genes. Identification and characterization of these genes is the goal of the Developmental Genome Anatomy Project (DGAP). DGAP is a multidisciplinary effort that leverages the recent advances resulting from the Human Genome Project to increase our understanding of birth defects and the process of human development. Clinically significant phenotypes of individuals enrolled in DGAP are varied and, in most cases, involve multiple organ systems. Study of these individuals' chromosomal rearrangements has resulted in the mapping of 77 breakpoints from 40 chromosomal rearrangements by FISH with BACs and fosmids, array CGH, Southern-blot hybridization, MLPA, RT-PCR, and suppression PCR. Eighteen chromosomal breakpoints have been cloned and sequenced. Unsuspected genomic imbalances and cryptic rearrangements were detected, but less frequently than has been reported previously. Chromosomal rearrangements, both balanced and unbalanced, in individuals with multiple congenital anomalies continue to be a valuable resource for gene discovery and annotation. PMID:18319076

  3. Complex reorganization and predominant non-homologous repair following chromosomal breakage in karyotypically balanced germline rearrangements and transgenic integration

    PubMed Central

    Chiang, Colby; Jacobsen, Jessie C.; Ernst, Carl; Hanscom, Carrie; Heilbut, Adrian; Blumenthal, Ian; Mills, Ryan E.; Kirby, Andrew; Lindgren, Amelia M.; Rudiger, Skye R.; McLaughlan, Clive J.; Bawden, C. Simon; Reid, Suzanne J.; Faull, Richard L. M.; Snell, Russell G.; Hall, Ira M.; Shen, Yiping; Ohsumi, Toshiro K.; Borowsky, Mark L.; Daly, Mark J.; Lee, Charles; Morton, Cynthia C.; MacDonald, Marcy E.; Gusella, James F.; Talkowski, Michael E.

    2012-01-01

    We defined the genetic landscape of balanced chromosomal rearrangements at nucleotide resolution by sequencing 141 breakpoints from cytogenetically-interpreted translocations and inversions. We confirm that the recently described phenomenon of “chromothripsis” (massive chromosomal shattering and reorganization) is not unique to cancer cells but also occurs in the germline where it can resolve to a karyotypically balanced state with frequent inversions. We detected a high incidence of complex rearrangements (19.2%) and substantially less reliance on microhomology (31%) than previously observed in benign CNVs. We compared these results to experimentally-generated DNA breakage-repair by sequencing seven transgenic animals, and revealed extensive rearrangement of the transgene and host genome with similar complexity to human germline alterations. Inversion is the most common rearrangement, suggesting that a combined mechanism involving template switching and non-homologous repair mediates the formation of balanced complex rearrangements that are viable, stably replicated and transmitted unaltered to subsequent generations. PMID:22388000

  4. De novo balanced chromosome rearrangements and extra marker chromosomes identified at prenatal diagnosis: clinical significance and distribution of breakpoints.

    PubMed Central

    Warburton, D

    1991-01-01

    A questionnaire sent to major cytogenetics laboratories in the United States and Canada over a 10-year period collected data on the frequency and outcome of cases with either apparently balanced de novo rearrangements or de novo supernumerary marker chromosomes detected at amniocentesis. Of 377,357 reported amniocenteses, approximately 1/2,000 had a de novo reciprocal translocation, 1/9,000 a Robertsonian translocation, 1/10,000 a de novo inversion, and 1/2,500 an extra structurally abnormal chromosome of unidentifiable origin. The risk of a serious congenital anomaly was estimated to be 6.1% (n = 163) for de novo reciprocal translocations, 3.7% (n = 51) for Robertsonian translocations, and 9.4% (n = 32) for inversions. The combined risk for reciprocal translocations and inversions was 6.7% (95% confidence limits 3.1%-10.3%). The risk of abnormality for extra nonsatellited marker chromosomes was 14.7% (n = 68), and that for satellited marker chromosomes was 10.9% (n = 55). In non-Robertsonian rearrangements, distribution of breakpoints among chromosomes was not as would be expected strictly on the basis of length. Most breaks were stated to occur within G-negative bands, but there was little evidence of particular hot spots among these bands. Nevertheless, there did appear to be a correlation between those bands in which breakage was observed most often and those bands where common or rare fragile sites have been described. PMID:1928105

  5. Prenatally diagnosed de novo apparently balanced complex chromosome rearrangements: Two new cases and review of the literature

    SciTech Connect

    Ruiz, C.; Grubs, R.E.; Jewett, T.

    1996-08-23

    Complex chromosome rearrangements (CCR) are rare structural rearrangements. Currently six cases of prenatally diagnosed balanced de novo CCR have been described. We present two new cases of prenatally ascertained balanced de novo CCR. In the first case, an amniocentesis revealed a balanced de novo three-way CCR involving chromosomes 5,6, and 11 with a pericentric inversion of chromosome 5 [four breaks]. In the second case a balanced de novo rearrangement was identified by amniocentesis which involved a reciprocal translocation between chromosomes 3 and 8 and a CCR involving chromosomes 6,7, and 18 [six breaks]. The use of whole chromosome painting helped elucidate the nature of these rearrangements. A review of the postnatally ascertained cases suggests that most patients have congenital anomalies, minor anomalies, and/or developmental delay/mental retardation. In addition, there appears to be a relationship between the number of chromosome breaks and the extent of phenotypic effects. The paucity of information regarding prenatally diagnosed CCR and the bias of ascertainment of postnatal CCR cases poses a problem in counseling families. 38 refs., 3 figs., 4 tabs.

  6. Meiotic Recombination Analyses in Pigs Carrying Different Balanced Structural Chromosomal Rearrangements

    PubMed Central

    Mary, Nicolas; Barasc, Harmonie; Ferchaud, Stéphane; Priet, Aurélia; Calgaro, Anne; Loustau-Dudez, Anne-Marie; Bonnet, Nathalie; Yerle, Martine; Ducos, Alain; Pinton, Alain

    2016-01-01

    Correct pairing, synapsis and recombination between homologous chromosomes are essential for normal meiosis. All these events are strongly regulated, and our knowledge of the mechanisms involved in this regulation is increasing rapidly. Chromosomal rearrangements are known to disturb these processes. In the present paper, synapsis and recombination (number and distribution of MLH1 foci) were studied in three boars (Sus scrofa domestica) carrying different chromosomal rearrangements. One (T34he) was heterozygote for the t(3;4)(p1.3;q1.5) reciprocal translocation, one (T34ho) was homozygote for that translocation, while the third (T34Inv) was heterozygote for both the translocation and a pericentric inversion inv(4)(p1.4;q2.3). All three boars were normal for synapsis and sperm production. This particular situation allowed us to rigorously study the impact of rearrangements on recombination. Overall, the rearrangements induced only minor modifications of the number of MLH1 foci (per spermatocyte or per chromosome) and of the length of synaptonemal complexes for chromosomes 3 and 4. The distribution of MLH1 foci in T34he was comparable to that of the controls. Conversely, the distributions of MLH1 foci on chromosome 4 were strongly modified in boar T34Inv (lack of crossover in the heterosynaptic region of the quadrivalent, and crossover displaced to the chromosome extremities), and also in boar T34ho (two recombination peaks on the q-arms compared with one of higher magnitude in the controls). Analyses of boars T34he and T34Inv showed that the interference was propagated through the breakpoints. A different result was obtained for boar T34ho, in which the breakpoints (transition between SSC3 and SSC4 chromatin on the bivalents) seemed to alter the transmission of the interference signal. Our results suggest that the number of crossovers and crossover interference could be regulated by partially different mechanisms. PMID:27124413

  7. Disease associated balanced chromosome rearrangements: a resource for large scale genotype-phenotype delineation in man

    PubMed Central

    Bugge, M.; Bruun-Petersen, G.; Brondum-Nielsen, K.; Friedrich, U.; Hansen, J.; Jensen, G.; Jensen, P.; Kristoffersson, U.; Lundsteen, C.; Niebuhr, E.; Rasmussen, K.; Rasmussen, K.; Tommerup, N.

    2000-01-01

    Disease associated balanced chromosomal rearrangements (DBCRs), which truncate, delete, or otherwise inactivate specific genes, have been instrumental for positional cloning of many disease genes. A network of cytogenetic laboratories, Mendelian Cytogenetics Network (MCN), has been established to facilitate the identification and mapping of DBCRs. To get an estimate of the potential of this approach, we surveyed all cytogenetic archives in Denmark and southern Sweden, with a population of ~6.6 million. The nine laboratories have performed 71 739 postnatal cytogenetic tests. Excluding Robertsonian translocations and chromosome 9 inversions, we identified 216 DBCRs (~0.3%), including a minimum estimate of 114 de novo reciprocal translocations (0.16%) and eight de novo inversions (0.01%). Altogether, this is six times more frequent than in the general population, suggesting a causal relationship with the traits involved in most of these cases. Of the identified cases, only 25 (12%) have been published, including 12 cases with known syndromes and 13 cases with unspecified mental retardation/congenital malformations. The remaining DBCRs were associated with a plethora of traits including mental retardation, dysmorphic features, major congenital malformations, autism, and male and female infertility. Several of the unpublished DBCRs defined candidate breakpoints for nail-patella, Prader-Willi, and Schmidt syndromes, ataxia, and ulna aplasia. The implication of the survey is apparent when compared with MCN; altogether, the 292 participating laboratories have performed >2.5 million postnatal analyses, with an estimated ~7500 DBCRs stored in their archives, of which more than half might be causative mutations. In addition, an estimated 450-500 novel cases should be detected each year. Our data illustrate that DBCRs and MCN are resources for large scale establishment of phenotype-genotype relationships in man.


Keywords: translocations; inversions; abnormal

  8. FISH Mapping of De Novo Apparently Balanced Chromosome Rearrangements Identifies Characteristics Associated with Phenotypic Abnormality

    PubMed Central

    Fantes, J.A.; Boland, E.; Ramsay, J.; Donnai, D.; Splitt, M.; Goodship, J.A.; Stewart, H.; Whiteford, M.; Gautier, P.; Harewood, L.; Holloway, S.; Sharkey, F.; Maher, E.; van Heyningen, V.; Clayton-Smith, J.; Fitzpatrick, D.R.; Black, G.C.M.

    2008-01-01

    We report fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) mapping of 152, mostly de novo, apparently balanced chromosomal rearrangement (ABCR) breakpoints in 76 individuals, 30 of whom had no obvious phenotypic abnormality (control group) and 46 of whom had an associated disease (case group). The aim of this study was to identify breakpoint characteristics that could discriminate between these groups and which might be of predictive value in de novo ABCR (DN-ABCR) cases detected antenatally. We found no difference in the proportion of breakpoints that interrupted a gene, although in three cases, direct interruption or deletion of known autosomal-dominant or X-linked recessive Mendelian disease genes was diagnostic. The only significant predictor of phenotypic abnormality in the group as a whole was the localization of one or both breakpoints to an R-positive (G-negative) band with estimated predictive values of 0.69 (95% CL 0.54–0.81) and 0.90 (95% CL 0.60–0.98), respectively. R-positive bands are known to contain more genes and have a higher guanine-cytosine (GC) content than do G-positive (R-negative) bands; however, whether a gene was interrupted by the breakpoint or the GC content in the 200kB around the breakpoint had no discriminant ability. Our results suggest that the large-scale genomic context of the breakpoint has prognostic utility and that the pathological mechanism of mapping to an R-band cannot be accounted for by direct gene inactivation. PMID:18374296

  9. Interstitial Chromosome 3p14.1 Deletion due to a Maternal Insertion: Phenotype and Association with Balanced Parental Rearrangement.

    PubMed

    Hajek, Catherine; Wang, Jia-Chi; Mahon, Loretta W; Martinez, Ariadna; Saitta, Sulagna C

    2016-04-01

    Interstitial deletions of 3p14p12 are rare chromosome abnormalities. We present a patient with multiple congenital anomalies and a 15.4-Mb interstitial loss of chromosome 3p14p12 detected by chromosomal microarray (CMA). Our patient shared many phenotypic features with other reported cases involving the same region including prominent forehead, short palpebral fissures, hand and foot anomalies, genital abnormalities, and bilateral hearing loss. Given the clinical similarity of these cases with significant overlap of the deleted regions, it is likely that the phenotype is related to the deletion of specific genes within the region. Further molecular cytogenetic investigation revealed that our patient's rearrangement was derived from a cryptic insertion of a segment of chromosome 3p into chromosome 18q in the mother, which was balanced and therefore not visible on the mother's CMA. To our knowledge, this finding has not been previously reported. This case illustrates the importance of using molecular cytogenetics for structural analysis and parental studies. CMA is commonly the first-line study in patients with multiple congenital anomalies; however, it is not the appropriate modality to define a structural rearrangement that may be the cause of a deletion. The use of adjunct studies to define the mechanism of an identified copy number aberration has direct clinical application: to identify the underlying cause of the chromosomal abnormality and to define the recurrence risk. Additionally, this case adds to the current body of work regarding a recurrent phenotype that can be attributed to interstitial chromosome 3p deletions, which may help define the phenotypic implications of deletions in this region and support early clinical management. PMID:27194973

  10. Balanced into array: genome-wide array analysis in 54 patients with an apparently balanced de novo chromosome rearrangement and a meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Feenstra, Ilse; Hanemaaijer, Nicolien; Sikkema-Raddatz, Birgit; Yntema, Helger; Dijkhuizen, Trijnie; Lugtenberg, Dorien; Verheij, Joke; Green, Andrew; Hordijk, Roel; Reardon, William; Vries, Bert de; Brunner, Han; Bongers, Ernie; Leeuw, Nicole de; van Ravenswaaij-Arts, Conny

    2011-01-01

    High-resolution genome-wide array analysis enables detailed screening for cryptic and submicroscopic imbalances of microscopically balanced de novo rearrangements in patients with developmental delay and/or congenital abnormalities. In this report, we added the results of genome-wide array analysis in 54 patients to data on 117 patients from seven other studies. A chromosome imbalance was detected in 37% of all patients with two-breakpoint rearrangements. In 49% of these patients, the imbalances were located in one or both breakpoint regions. Imbalances were more frequently (90%) found in complex rearrangements, with the majority (81%) having deletions in the breakpoint regions. The size of our own cohort enabled us to relate the presence of an imbalance to the clinical features of the patients by using a scoring system, the De Vries criteria, that indicates the complexity of the phenotype. The median De Vries score was significantly higher (P=0.002) in those patients with an imbalance (5, range 1–9) than in patients with a normal array result (3, range 0–7). This study provides accurate percentages of cryptic imbalances that can be detected by genome-wide array analysis in simple and complex de novo microscopically balanced chromosome rearrangements and confirms that these imbalances are more likely to occur in patients with a complex phenotype. PMID:21712853

  11. Exceptional complex chromosomal rearrangements in three generations.

    PubMed

    Kartapradja, Hannie; Marzuki, Nanis Sacharina; Pertile, Mark D; Francis, David; Suciati, Lita Putri; Anggaratri, Helena Woro; Ambarwati, Debby Dwi; Idris, Firman Prathama; Lesmana, Harry; Trimarsanto, Hidayat; Paramayuda, Chrysantine; Harahap, Alida Roswita

    2015-01-01

    We report an exceptional complex chromosomal rearrangement (CCR) found in three individuals in a family that involves 4 chromosomes with 5 breakpoints. The CCR was ascertained in a phenotypically abnormal newborn with additional chromosomal material on the short arm of chromosome 4. Maternal karyotyping indicated that the mother carried an apparently balanced CCR involving chromosomes 4, 6, 11, and 18. Maternal transmission of the derivative chromosome 4 resulted in partial trisomy for chromosomes 6q and 18q and a partial monosomy of chromosome 4p in the proband. Further family studies found that the maternal grandmother carried the same apparently balanced CCR as the proband's mother, which was confirmed using the whole chromosome painting (WCP) FISH. High resolution whole genome microarray analysis of DNA from the proband's mother found no evidence for copy number imbalance in the vicinity of the CCR translocation breakpoints, or elsewhere in the genome, providing evidence that the mother's and grandmother's CCRs were balanced at a molecular level. This structural rearrangement can be categorized as an exceptional CCR due to its complexity and is a rare example of an exceptional CCR being transmitted in balanced and/or unbalanced form across three generations. PMID:25722897

  12. Exceptional Complex Chromosomal Rearrangements in Three Generations

    PubMed Central

    Kartapradja, Hannie; Marzuki, Nanis Sacharina; Pertile, Mark D.; Francis, David; Suciati, Lita Putri; Anggaratri, Helena Woro; Ambarwati, Debby Dwi; Idris, Firman Prathama; Lesmana, Harry; Trimarsanto, Hidayat; Paramayuda, Chrysantine; Harahap, Alida Roswita

    2015-01-01

    We report an exceptional complex chromosomal rearrangement (CCR) found in three individuals in a family that involves 4 chromosomes with 5 breakpoints. The CCR was ascertained in a phenotypically abnormal newborn with additional chromosomal material on the short arm of chromosome 4. Maternal karyotyping indicated that the mother carried an apparently balanced CCR involving chromosomes 4, 6, 11, and 18. Maternal transmission of the derivative chromosome 4 resulted in partial trisomy for chromosomes 6q and 18q and a partial monosomy of chromosome 4p in the proband. Further family studies found that the maternal grandmother carried the same apparently balanced CCR as the proband's mother, which was confirmed using the whole chromosome painting (WCP) FISH. High resolution whole genome microarray analysis of DNA from the proband's mother found no evidence for copy number imbalance in the vicinity of the CCR translocation breakpoints, or elsewhere in the genome, providing evidence that the mother's and grandmother's CCRs were balanced at a molecular level. This structural rearrangement can be categorized as an exceptional CCR due to its complexity and is a rare example of an exceptional CCR being transmitted in balanced and/or unbalanced form across three generations. PMID:25722897

  13. Chromosome rearrangements and transposable elements.

    PubMed

    Lonnig, Wolf-Ekkehard; Saedler, Heinz

    2002-01-01

    There has been limited corroboration to date for McClintock's vision of gene regulation by transposable elements (TEs), although her proposition on the origin of species by TE-induced complex chromosome reorganizations in combination with gene mutations, i.e., the involvement of both factors in relatively sudden formations of species in many plant and animal genera, has been more promising. Moreover, resolution is in sight for several seemingly contradictory phenomena such as the endless reshuffling of chromosome structures and gene sequences versus synteny and the constancy of living fossils (or stasis in general). Recent wide-ranging investigations have confirmed and enlarged the number of earlier cases of TE target site selection (hot spots for TE integration), implying preestablished rather than accidental chromosome rearrangements for nonhomologous recombination of host DNA. The possibility of a partly predetermined generation of biodiversity and new species is discussed. The views of several leading transposon experts on the rather abrupt origin of new species have not been synthesized into the macroevolutionary theory of the punctuated equilibrium school of paleontology inferred from thoroughly consistent features of the fossil record. PMID:12429698

  14. Transposable elements as catalysts for chromosome rearrangements.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jianbo; Yu, Chuanhe; Krishnaswamy, Lakshminarasimhan; Peterson, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    Barbara McClintock first showed that transposable elements in maize can induce major chromosomal rearrangements, including duplications, deletions, inversions, and translocations. More recently, researchers have made significant progress in elucidating the mechanisms by which transposons can induce genome rearrangements. For the Ac/Ds transposable element system, rearrangements are generated when the termini of different elements are used as substrates for transposition. The resulting alternative transposition reaction directly generates a variety of rearrangements. The size and type of rearrangements produced depend on the location and orientation of transposon insertion. A single locus containing a pair of alternative transposition-competent elements can produce a virtually unlimited number of genome rearrangements. With a basic understanding of the mechanisms involved, researchers are beginning to utilize both naturally occurring and in vitro-generated configurations of transposable elements in order to manipulate chromosome structure. PMID:21181539

  15. Methods for Detecting Chromosome Rearrangements in Gibberella Zeae

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Chromosome rearrangements between fungal strains may reduce fertility in sexual crosses through the production of genetically inviable recombinant progeny. As such, rearrangements can be important postzygotic reproductive barriers that contribute to the speciation process. The presence of chromosom...

  16. Chromosomal Rearrangements in Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhi Strains Isolated from Asymptomatic Human Carriers

    PubMed Central

    Matthews, T. David; Rabsch, Wolfgang; Maloy, Stanley

    2011-01-01

    ABSTRACT Host-specific serovars of Salmonella enterica often have large-scale chromosomal rearrangements that occur by recombination between rrn operons. Two hypotheses have been proposed to explain these rearrangements: (i) replichore imbalance from horizontal gene transfer drives the rearrangements to restore balance, or (ii) the rearrangements are a consequence of the host-specific lifestyle. Although recent evidence has refuted the replichore balance hypothesis, there has been no direct evidence for the lifestyle hypothesis. To test this hypothesis, we determined the rrn arrangement type for 20 Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi strains obtained from human carriers at periodic intervals over multiple years. These strains were also phage typed and analyzed for rearrangements that occurred over long-term storage versus routine culturing. Strains isolated from the same carrier at different time points often exhibited different arrangement types. Furthermore, colonies isolated directly from the Dorset egg slants used to store the strains also had different arrangement types. In contrast, colonies that were repeatedly cultured always had the same arrangement type. Estimated replichore balance of isolated strains did not improve over time, and some of the rearrangements resulted in decreased replicore balance. Our results support the hypothesis that the restricted lifestyle of host-specific Salmonella is responsible for the frequent chromosomal rearrangements in these serovars. PMID:21652779

  17. Chromosomal rearrangements in cattle and pigs revealed by chromosome microdissection and chromosome painting

    PubMed Central

    Pinton, Alain; Ducos, Alain; Yerle, Martine

    2003-01-01

    A pericentric inversion of chromosome 4 in a boar, as well as a case of (2q-;5p+) translocation mosaicism in a bull were analysed by chromosome painting using probes generated by conventional microdissection. For the porcine inversion, probes specific for p arms and q arms were produced and hybridised simultaneously on metaphases of a heterozygote carrier. In the case of the bovine translocation, two whole chromosome probes (chromosome 5, and derived chromosome 5) were elaborated and hybridised independently on chromosomal preparations of the bull who was a carrier of the mosaic translocation. The impossibility of differentiating chromosomes 2 and der(2) from other chromosomes of the metaphases did not allow the production of painting probes for these chromosomes. For all experiments, the quality of painting was comparable to that usually observed with probes obtained from flow-sorted chromosomes. The results obtained allowed confirmation of the interpretations proposed with G-banding karyotype analyses. In the bovine case, however, the reciprocity of the translocation could not be proven. The results presented in this paper show the usefulness of the microdissection technique for characterising chromosomal rearrangements in species for which commercial probes are not available. They also confirmed that the main limiting factor of the technique is the quality of the chromosomal preparations, which does not allow the identification of target chromosomes or chromosome fragments in all cases. PMID:14604515

  18. A New Case of a Complex Small Supernumerary Marker Chromosome: A Der(9)t(7;9)(p22;q22) due to a Maternal Balanced Rearrangement.

    PubMed

    Manvelyan, Marine; Simonyan, Izabella; Hovhannisyan, Galina; Aroutiounian, Rouben; Hamid, Ahmed B; Liehr, Thomas

    2015-12-01

    Complex small supernumerary marker chromosomes (sSMCs) constitute one of the smallest subsets within the patients with an sSMC. Complex sSMCs consist of chromosomal material derived from more than one chromosome, for example, the derivative der(22)t(11;22)(q23;q11.2) in Emanuel syndrome. Here, a yet unreported case of a complex sSMC formed due to a t(7;9)(p22;q22)mat is presented. PMID:27617132

  19. A Girl with Pervasive Developmental Disorder and Complex Chromosome Rearrangement Involving 8p and 10p

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zwaigenbaum, L; Sonnenberg, L. K.; Heshka, T.; Eastwood, S.; Xu, J.

    2005-01-01

    We report a 4-year-old girl with a "de novo", apparently balanced complex chromosome rearrangement. She initially presented for assessment of velopharyngeal insufficiency due to hypernasal speech. She has distinctive facial features (long face, broad nasal bridge, and protuberant ears with simplified helices), bifid uvula, strabismus, and joint…

  20. Rapid identification of chromosomal rearrangements by PRINS technique

    SciTech Connect

    Pellestor, F.; Giradet, A.; Andreo, B.

    1994-09-01

    Chromosomal rearrangements contribute significantly to human reproductive failure, malformation/mental retardation syndromes and carcinogenesis. The variety of structural rearrangements is almost infinite and an identification by conventional cytogenetics is often labor intensive and may remain doubtful. Recent advances in molecular cytogenetics have provided new tools for detecting chromosomal abnormalities. The fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) procedure is actually the most employed technique and has led to numerous clinical applications. However, techniques required to produce suitable probes are time consuming and not accessible to all cytogenetics laboratories. The PRimed In Situ labeling (PRINS) method provides an alternate way for in situ chromosome screening. In this procedure, the chromosomal detection is performed by in situ annealing of a specific primer and subsequent primer extension by a Taq DNA polymerase in the presence of labeled nucleotides. Application of PRINS in clinical diagnosis is still limited. We have developed a semi-automatic PRINS protocol and used it to identify the origin of several chromosomal abnormalities. We report here the results of studies of three structural rearrangements: a translocation t(21;21), a supernumerary ring marker chromosome 18 and a complex chromosome 13 mosaicism involving a 13;13 Robertsonian translocation and a ring chromosome 13.

  1. Engineering the Drosophila Genome: Chromosome Rearrangements by Design

    PubMed Central

    Golic, K. G.; Golic, M. M.

    1996-01-01

    We show that site-specific recombination can be used to engineer chromosome rearrangements in Drosophila melanogaster. The FLP site-specific recombinase acts on chromosomal target sites located within specially constructed P elements to provide an easy screen for the recovery of rearrangements with breakpoints that can be chosen in advance. Paracentric and pericentric inversions are easily recovered when two elements lie in the same chromosome in opposite orientation. These inversions are readily reversible. Duplications and deficiencies can be recovered by recombination between two elements that lie in the same orientation on the same chromosome or on homologues. We observe that the frequency of recombination between FRTs at ectopic locations decreases as the distance that separates those FRTs increases. We also describe methods to determine the absolute orientation of these P elements within the chromosome. The ability to produce chromosome rearrangements precisely between preselected sites provides a powerful new tool for investigations into the relationships between chromosome arrangement, structure, and function. PMID:8978056

  2. One-Step Generation of Chromosomal Rearrangements in Rice.

    PubMed

    Murata, Minoru; Kanatani, Asaka; Kashihara, Kazunari

    2016-01-01

    The combination of the DNA sequence-specific recombination system Cre/LoxP and the DNA transposon system Activator (Ac)/Dissociation (Ds) has been used for insertional and deletional mutagenesis, as well as for the generation of artificial ring chromosomes in model plants such as Arabidopsis and tobacco. However, it takes a long time to complete this process, even in Arabidopsis. To overcome this issue, a new binary vector, pDLHC, has been developed to induce chromosomal rearrangements for a short time in rice. pDLHC has been found to be effective in the induction of deletions between two LoxPs in the T2 generation of "Nihon bare" expressing Ac TPase. pDLHC has potential for the efficient generation of various types of chromosomal rearrangements including deletions, inversions, translocations and artificial ring chromosomes in plants, and the detailed protocol for rice is described here. PMID:27557686

  3. A versatile reporter system for CRISPR-mediated chromosomal rearrangements.

    PubMed

    Li, Yingxiang; Park, Angela I; Mou, Haiwei; Colpan, Cansu; Bizhanova, Aizhan; Akama-Garren, Elliot; Joshi, Nik; Hendrickson, Eric A; Feldser, David; Yin, Hao; Anderson, Daniel G; Jacks, Tyler; Weng, Zhiping; Xue, Wen

    2015-01-01

    Although chromosomal deletions and inversions are important in cancer, conventional methods for detecting DNA rearrangements require laborious indirect assays. Here we develop fluorescent reporters to rapidly quantify CRISPR/Cas9-mediated deletions and inversions. We find that inversion depends on the non-homologous end-joining enzyme LIG4. We also engineer deletions and inversions for a 50 kb Pten genomic region in mouse liver. We discover diverse yet sequence-specific indels at the rearrangement fusion sites. Moreover, we detect Cas9 cleavage at the fourth nucleotide on the non-complementary strand, leading to staggered instead of blunt DNA breaks. These reporters allow mechanisms of chromosomal rearrangements to be investigated. PMID:26018130

  4. The Manifestation of Chromosome Rearrangements in Unordered Asci of Neurospora

    PubMed Central

    Perkins, David D.

    1974-01-01

    Rapid, effective techniques have been developed for detecting and characterizing chromosome aberrations in Neurospora by visual inspection of ascospores and asci. Rearrangements that are detectable by the presence of deficient, nonblack ascospores in test crosses make up 5 to 10% of survivors after UV doses giving 10-55% survival. Over 135 rearrangements have been diagnosed by classifying unordered asci according to numbers of defective spores. (These include 15 originally identified or analyzed by other workers.) About 100 reciprocal translocations (RT's) have been confirmed and mapped genetically, involving all combinations of the seven chromosomes. Thirty-three other rearrangements generate viable nontandem duplications in meiosis. These consist of insertional translocations (IT's) (15 confirmed), and of rearrangements that involve a chromosome tip (10 translocations and 3 pericentric inversions). No inversion has been found that does not include the centromere. A reciprocal translocation was found within one population in nature. When pairs of RT's that involve the same two chromosome arms were intercrossed, viable duplications were produced if the breakpoints overlapped in such a way that pairing resembled that of insertional translocations (27 combinations).—The rapid analytical technique depends on the following. Deficiency ascospores are usually nonblack (W: "white") and inviable, while nondeficient ascospores, even those that include duplications, are black (B) and viable. Thus RT's typically produce 50% black spores, and IT's 75% black. Asci are shot spontaneously from ripe perithecia, and can be collected in large numbers as groups of eight ascospores representing unordered tetrads, which fall into five classes: 8B:0W; 6B:2W, 4B:4W, 2B:6B, 0B:8W. In isosequential crosses, 90-95% of tetrads are 8:0. When a rearrangement is heterozygous, the frequencies of tetrad classes are diagnostic of the type of rearrangement, and provide information also on the

  5. Chromosome painting defines genomic rearrangements between red howler monkey subspecies.

    PubMed

    Consigliere, S; Stanyon, R; Koehler, U; Agoramoorthy, G; Wienberg, J

    1996-06-01

    We hybridized whole human chromosome-specific DNA libraries to chromosomes of two supposed subspecies of Alouatta seniculus: Alouatta seniculus sara and Alouatta seniculus arctoides. The number of hybridization signals per haploid set is 42 in A. s. sara and 43 in A. s. arctoidea; the two karyotypes differ by at least 16 chromosomal rearrangements, including numerous translocations. An unusual sex chromosome system is shared by both taxa. The sex chromosome system results from a Y translocation with a chromosome homologous to parts of human chromosome 3/15 and can be described as X1X2Y1Y2/X1X1X2X2 (male/female). Both red howlers also have microchromosomes, a highly unusual karyological trait not found in other higher primates. These microchromosomes are not hybridized by any human chromosome paint and therefore are probably composed of repetitive DNA. It is well known that New World monkeys have high karyological variability. It is probable that molecular cytogenetic analyses including chromosome painting will permit an accurate reconstruction of the phylogeny of these monkeys and help establish the ancestral karyotype for higher primates. PMID:8817065

  6. Multiple cellular mechanisms prevent chromosomal rearrangements involving repetitive DNA

    PubMed Central

    George, Carolyn M.; Alani, Eric

    2012-01-01

    Repetitive DNA is present in the eukaryotic genome in the form of segmental duplications, tandem and interspersed repeats, and satellites. Repetitive sequences can be beneficial by serving specific cellular functions (e.g. centromeric and telomeric DNA) and by providing a rapid means for adaptive evolution. However, such elements are also substrates for deleterious chromosomal rearrangements that affect fitness and promote human disease. Recent studies analyzing the role of nuclear organization in DNA repair and factors that suppress non-allelic homologous recombination have provided insights into how genome stability is maintained in eukaryotes. In this review we outline the types of repetitive sequences seen in eukaryotic genomes and how recombination mechanisms are regulated at the DNA sequence, cell organization, chromatin structure, and cell cycle control levels to prevent chromosomal rearrangements involving these sequences. PMID:22494239

  7. Using Chromosomes to Teach Evolution: Chromosomal Rearrangements in Speciation Events.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Offner, Susan

    1994-01-01

    Uses diagrams to aid in discussing how the English map of the human chromosomes, published by Offner in 1993, can be used to illustrate some important questions in evolution, as well as give students a glimpse into some of the mechanisms underlying evolutionary change. (ZWH)

  8. FISH analysis in the derivation of a 12, 15, 21 complex chromosomal rearrangement

    SciTech Connect

    Stein, C.K.; Muscolino, D.; Baird, N.

    1994-09-01

    Cytogenetic analysis was performed for a couple referred for recurrent pregnancy loss. Routine GTG banded studies revealed a 46,XY karyotype for the husband, but in the woman, an apparently balanced complex rearrangement involving chromosomes 12, 15, and 21 was detected. The 46,XX,t(12;15)(q13.3;q23),t(12;21)(q21;q11.2) karyotype is the consequence of 2 translocation events resulting in 3 rearranged chromosomes: (1) a derivative 12 arising from the exchange of the short arms of 12 and 21; (2) a derivative chromosome 15 consisting of segments of the long arms of chromosomes 12 and 15; and (3) a complex derivative chromosome 21 which includes the short arm and centromere of 21, and portions of the long arms of both chromosomes 12 and 15. Because the 12;21 translocation occurred at the centromeric region on both chromosomes, it was not possible to cytogenetically differentiate the derivative chromosomes 12 and 21. To clarify this issue, fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) was performed utilizing a 13/21 alpha-satellite probe. The location of the FITC signal clearly indicated a chromosome 21 centromere present on the derivative containing portions of all three chromosomes. A family history of spontaneous fetal losses suggested the possibility of a familial translocation. However, the likelihood of transmission of such a complex set of translocations is low, leading to the hypothesis that only one of the translocations was inherited with the second a de novo event in this individual. Karyotype analysis of both parents revealed no cytogenetic anomalies. Therefore, the extremely unusual occurrence of two independent translocations involving 3 chromosomes arose de novo in this patient.

  9. Prenatally diagnosed de novo complex chromosome rearrangements: Two new cases and review of the literature

    SciTech Connect

    Ruiz, C.; Grubs, R.E.; Jewett, T.

    1994-09-01

    Complex chromosome rearrangements (CCR) are rare structural rearrangements involving at least three chromosomes with three or more breakpoints. Although there have been numerous reports of individuals with CCR, most have been ascertained through the presence of multiple congenital anomalies, recurrent pregnancy loss, or infertility. Few cases have been ascertained prenatally. We present two new cases of prenatally ascertained CCR. In the first case, an amniocentesis revealed an apparently balanced de novo rearrangement in which chromosomes 5, 6 and 11 were involved in a three-way translocation: 46,XY,t(6;5)(5;11)(q23;p14.3;q15;p13). The pregnancy was unevenful. Recently, at the age of 9 months, a physical and developmental evaluation were normal but, height, weight, and head circumference were below the 5th percentile. In the second case an amniocentesis revealed an unbalanced de novo rearrangement involving separate translocations and an interstitial deletion: 46,XY,del(6)(q25.3q27),t(3;8)(p13;q21.3),t(6;18)(p11.2;q11.2). A meconium plug was present at birth and at 6 months of age surgery for Hirschsprung`s disease was required. Currently, at 10 months of age, the patient has hypotonia and developmental delay. The paucity of information regarding prenatally diagnosed CCR poses a problem in counseling families. Of the four prenatally diagnosed balanced de novo CCR cases, three had abnormal outcomes. In a review of the literature, approximately 70% of the postnatally ascertained balanced de novo CCR cases were associated with congenital anomalies, growth retardation and/or mental retardation. More information regarding the outcome of prenatally ascertained balanced de novo CCR is required for accurate risk assessment.

  10. Chromosome-specific staining to detect genetic rearrangements

    DOEpatents

    Gray, Joe W.; Pinkel, Daniel; Tkachuk, Douglas; Westbrook, Carol

    2013-04-09

    Methods and compositions for staining based upon nucleic acid sequence that employ nucleic acid probes are provided. Said methods produce staining patterns that can be tailored for specific cytogenetic analyzes. Said probes are appropriate for in situ hybridization and stain both interphase and metaphase chromosomal material with reliable signals. The nucleic acid probes are typically of a complexity greater than 50 kb, the complexity depending upon the cytogenetic application. Methods and reagents are provided for the detection of genetic rearrangements. Probes and test kits are provided for use in detecting genetic rearrangements, particularly for use in tumor cytogenetics, in the detection of disease related loci, specifically cancer, such as chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) and for biological dosimetry. Methods and reagents are described for cytogenetic research, for the differentiation of cytogenetically similar but genetically different diseases, and for many prognostic and diagnostic applications.

  11. Chromosomal rearrangement in autotetraploid plants of Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Weiss, H; Maluszynska, J

    2000-01-01

    Recent development of cytogenetic techniques has facilitated significant progress in Arabidopsis thaliana karyotype studies. Double-target FISH with rRNA genes provides makers that allow individual chromosome in the genome to be distinguished. Those studies have revealed that the number and position of rDNA loci is ecotype-specific. Arabidopsis is believed to be a true diploid (x = 5) with numerous ecotypes (accessions) and only a very few natural polyploid populations reported. Few studies were undertaken to induce polyploidy in Arabidopsis, however none of those gave the cytogenetic characteristics of polyploid plants. Our analysis of chromosome pairing of colchicine-induced autotetraploid Arabidopsis (Wilna ecotype) revealed preferential bivalent pairing in PMCs (pollen mother cells). In order to attempt to explain this phenomenon, first of all more detailed cytogenetic studies of autopolyploid plants have been undertaken. The localization of 45S and 5S rDNA loci in the diploid and autotetraploid plants revealed that Wilna ecotypes belongs to the group of Arabidopsis accessions with only two 5S rDNA loci present in a genome. Furthermore, the rearrangement of 45S rDNA locus in autopolyploid, when compared to the diploid plants of the same ecotype, was revealed. These results are interesting also in the context of the recently emphasised role of polyploidy in plant evolution and speciation. Arabidopsis, despite having small chromosomes, is a good system to study chromosome behaviour in relation to diploidization of autopolyploids and to evaluate the degree of chromosomal rearrangements during this process. PMID:11433970

  12. Complex Chromosomal Rearrangements Induced in Vivo by Heavy Ions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Durante, M.; Ando, K.; Furusawa, G.; Obe, G.; George, K.; Cucinotta, F. A.

    2004-01-01

    It has been suggested that the ratio complex/simple exchanges can be used as a biomarker of exposure to high-LET radiation. We tested this hypothesis in vivo, by considering data from several studies that measured complex exchanges in peripheral blood from humans exposed to mixed fields of low- and high-LET radiation. In particular, we studied data from astronauts involved in long-term missions in low-Earth-orbit, and uterus cancer patients treated with accelerated carbon ions. Data from two studies of chromosomal aberrations in astronauts used blood samples obtained before and after space flight, and a third study used blood samples from patients before and after radiotherapy course. Similar methods were used in each study, where lymphocytes were stimulated to grow in vitro, and collected after incubation in either colcemid or calyculin A. Slides were painted with whole-chromosome DNA fluorescent probes (FISH), and complex and simple chromosome exchanges in the painted genome were classified separately. Complex-type exchanges were observed at low frequencies in control subjects, and in our test subjects before the treatment. No statistically significant increase in the yield of complex-type exchanges was induced by the space flight. Radiation therapy induced a high fraction of complex exchanges, but no significant differences could be detected between patients treated with accelerated carbon ions or X-rays. Complex chromosomal rearrangements do not represent a practical biomarker of radiation quality in our test subjects. Copyright 2003 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  13. Chromosomal rearrangements and karyotype evolution in carnivores revealed by chromosome painting.

    PubMed

    Nie, W; Wang, J; Su, W; Wang, D; Tanomtong, A; Perelman, P L; Graphodatsky, A S; Yang, F

    2012-01-01

    Chromosomal evolution in carnivores has been revisited extensively using cross-species chromosome painting. Painting probes derived from flow-sorted chromosomes of the domestic dog, which has one of the most rearranged karyotypes in mammals and the highest dipoid number (2n=78) in carnivores, are a powerful tool in detecting both evolutionary intra- and inter-chromosomal rearrangements. However, only a few comparative maps have been established between dog and other non-Canidae species. Here, we extended cross-species painting with dog probes to seven more species representing six carnivore families: Eurasian lynx (Lynx lynx), the stone marten (Martes foina), the small Indian civet (Viverricula indica), the Asian palm civet (Paradoxurus hermaphrodites), Javan mongoose (Hepestes javanicas), the raccoon (Procyon lotor) and the giant panda (Ailuropoda melanoleuca). The numbers and positions of intra-chromosomal rearrangements were found to differ among these carnivore species. A comparative map between human and stone marten, and a map among the Yangtze finless porpoise (Neophocaena phocaenoides asiaeorientalis), stone marten and human were also established to facilitate outgroup comparison and to integrate comparative maps between stone marten and other carnivores with such maps between human and other species. These comparative maps give further insight into genome evolution and karyotype phylogenetic relationships among carnivores, and will facilitate the transfer of gene mapping data from human, domestic dog and cat to other species. PMID:22086079

  14. Chromosomal rearrangements and karyotype evolution in carnivores revealed by chromosome painting

    PubMed Central

    Nie, W; Wang, J; Su, W; Wang, D; Tanomtong, A; Perelman, P L; Graphodatsky, A S; Yang, F

    2012-01-01

    Chromosomal evolution in carnivores has been revisited extensively using cross-species chromosome painting. Painting probes derived from flow-sorted chromosomes of the domestic dog, which has one of the most rearranged karyotypes in mammals and the highest dipoid number (2n=78) in carnivores, are a powerful tool in detecting both evolutionary intra- and inter-chromosomal rearrangements. However, only a few comparative maps have been established between dog and other non-Canidae species. Here, we extended cross-species painting with dog probes to seven more species representing six carnivore families: Eurasian lynx (Lynx lynx), the stone marten (Martes foina), the small Indian civet (Viverricula indica), the Asian palm civet (Paradoxurus hermaphrodites), Javan mongoose (Hepestes javanicas), the raccoon (Procyon lotor) and the giant panda (Ailuropoda melanoleuca). The numbers and positions of intra-chromosomal rearrangements were found to differ among these carnivore species. A comparative map between human and stone marten, and a map among the Yangtze finless porpoise (Neophocaena phocaenoides asiaeorientalis), stone marten and human were also established to facilitate outgroup comparison and to integrate comparative maps between stone marten and other carnivores with such maps between human and other species. These comparative maps give further insight into genome evolution and karyotype phylogenetic relationships among carnivores, and will facilitate the transfer of gene mapping data from human, domestic dog and cat to other species. PMID:22086079

  15. On the association between chromosomal rearrangements and genic evolution in humans and chimpanzees

    PubMed Central

    Marques-Bonet, Tomàs; Sànchez-Ruiz, Jesús; Armengol, Lluís; Khaja, Razi; Bertranpetit, Jaume; Lopez-Bigas, Núria; Rocchi, Mariano; Gazave, Elodie; Navarro, Arcadi

    2007-01-01

    Background The role that chromosomal rearrangements might have played in the speciation processes that have separated the lineages of humans and chimpanzees has recently come into the spotlight. To date, however, results are contradictory. Here we revisit this issue by making use of the available human and chimpanzee genome sequence to study the relationship between chromosomal rearrangements and rates of DNA sequence evolution. Results Contrary to previous findings for this pair of species, we show that genes located in the rearranged chromosomes that differentiate the genomes of humans and chimpanzees, especially genes within rearrangements themselves, present lower divergence than genes elsewhere in the genome. Still, there are considerable differences between individual chromosomes. Chromosome 4, in particular, presents higher divergence in genes located within its rearrangement. Conclusion A first conclusion of our analysis is that divergence is lower for genes located in rearranged chromosomes than for those in colinear chromosomes. We also report that non-coding regions within rearranged regions tend to have lower divergence than non-coding regions outside them. These results suggest an association between chromosomal rearrangements and lower non-coding divergence that has not been reported before, even if some chromosomes do not follow this trend and could be potentially associated with a speciation episode. In summary, without excluding it, our results suggest that chromosomal speciation has not been common along the human and chimpanzee lineage. PMID:17971225

  16. Familial Constitutional Rearrangement of Chromosomes 4 & 8: Phenotypically Normal Mother and Abnormal Progeny

    PubMed Central

    Kunwar, Fulesh

    2016-01-01

    Balanced chromosome translocations carriers mostly do not have recognizable phenotypic expression but may have more risk of recurrent spontaneous abortions &/or children with serious birth defects due to unbalanced chromosome complements. Unbalanced chromosomal rearrangements have variable clinical expression and are rare. We present here a case report of three siblings affected with intellectual disability and minor dysmorphic features of face and limbs, born to a non-consanguineous couple in which mother had 5 abortions. The constitutional chromosome analysis revealed balanced translocation t (4;8) in mother and all the three siblings were karyotypically normal. Chromosomal microarray in one of the probands revealed partial monosomy 8pter-p23 and a partial trisomy 4pter-p16. Phenotypic features were recorded in 3 probands using Human Phenotype Ontology terms to query web-based tool Phenomizer. The harmonized description using globally accepted ontology is very important especially in case of rare genetic conditions and the heterogeneous phenotypes which make it even more challenging. The prevalence of sub-microscopic unbalanced translocations may be under-reported due to lesser use of molecular genetic analysis. The familial expression of abnormal phenotypes including intellectual disability make the individuals candidate for molecular genetic analysis and phenotyping to help defer the status of idiopathic mental retardation and identify sub-entity of genetic condition. PMID:27190830

  17. Impact of rearrangements of function and position of chromosomes in the interphase nucleus: Relevance to karyotype-phenotype correlation, birth defects, and other human pathologic conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Oumsiyeh, M.B.

    1994-09-01

    There has been considerable work on the interphase nuclear architecture in the 100 years since the suggestion that chromosomes occupy specific domains in the interphase nucleus. The arrangement of chromatin in the interphase nucleus plays a significant role in gene replication, recombination, and transcription. Here I present data relevant to the question of chromosome rearrangements and nuclear stability. Specifically I show that: (1) balanced chromosome rearrangement associated with congenital anomalies result in nuclear instability/micronucleus formation (data on a patient with frontonasal dysplasia and a complex balanced translocation), (2) gene amplification as homogeneously staining regions is associated with nuclear instability (studies in a hamster cell lines following rounds of amplification), (3) the presence of one rearrangement predisposes to acquiring additional rearrangements (statistical studies), and (4) autosomal imbalance syndromes (deletions and duplications) exert part of their effects by changing nuclear architecture (FISH studies) and thus cause differential gene expression. My observations are related to earlier work demonstrating changes in nuclear structures with cell differentiation, aging, cell cycle events, and certain pathologic conditions. I suggest that position changes after chromosomes go through meiosis or mitosis could explain why some balanced rearrangements result in a phenotypic expression while others don`t. Data from chromosome lengths support this hypothesis. The result of the synthesis of these data and published information provides evidence that chromosome position changes play a role in mental retardation, phenotypic effects of rearrangements, and cancer progression.

  18. Characterization of a complex chromosomal rearrangement using chromosome, FISH, and microarray assays in a girl with multiple congenital abnormalities and developmental delay

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Complex chromosomal rearrangements (CCRs) are balanced or unbalanced structural rearrangements involving three or more cytogenetic breakpoints on two or more chromosomal pairs. The phenotypic anomalies in such cases are attributed to gene disruption, superimposed cryptic imbalances in the genome, and/or position effects. We report a 14-year-old girl who presented with multiple congenital anomalies and developmental delay. Chromosome and FISH analysis indicated a highly complex chromosomal rearrangement involving three chromosomes (3, 7 and 12), seven breakpoints as a result of one inversion, two insertions, and two translocations forming three derivative chromosomes. Additionally, chromosomal microarray study (CMA) revealed two submicroscopic deletions at 3p12.3 (467 kb) and 12q13.12 (442 kb). We postulate that microdeletion within the ROBO1 gene at 3p12.3 may have played a role in the patient’s developmental delay, since it has potential activity-dependent role in neurons. Additionally, factors other than genomic deletions such as loss of function or position effects may also contribute to the abnormal phenotype in our patient. PMID:25478007

  19. History of chromosome rearrangements reflects the spatial organization of yeast chromosomes.

    PubMed

    Khrameeva, Ekaterina E; Fudenberg, Geoffrey; Gelfand, Mikhail S; Mirny, Leonid A

    2016-04-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) organization of genomes affects critical cellular processes such as transcription, replication, and deoxyribo nucleic acid (DNA) repair. While previous studies have investigated the natural role, the 3D organization plays in limiting a possible set of genomic rearrangements following DNA repair, the influence of specific organizational principles on this process, particularly over longer evolutionary time scales, remains relatively unexplored. In budding yeast S.cerevisiae, chromosomes are organized into a Rabl-like configuration, with clustered centromeres and telomeres tethered to the nuclear periphery. Hi-C data for S.cerevisiae show that a consequence of this Rabl-like organization is that regions equally distant from centromeres are more frequently in contact with each other, between arms of both the same and different chromosomes. Here, we detect rearrangement events in Saccharomyces species using an automatic approach, and observe increased rearrangement frequency between regions with higher contact frequencies. Together, our results underscore how specific principles of 3D chromosomal organization can influence evolutionary events. PMID:27021249

  20. Conserved synteny between pig chromosome 8 and human chromosome 4 but rearranged and distorted linkage maps

    SciTech Connect

    Ellegren, H.; Edfors-Lilja, I.; Anderson, L. ); Wintero, A.K. )

    1993-09-01

    The porcine genes encoding interleukin 2, alcohol dehydrogenase (class I) gamma polypeptide, and osteopontin were mapped to chromosome 8 by linkage analysis. Together with previous assignments to this chromosome (the albumin, platelet-derived growth factor receptor A, and fibrinogen genes), an extensive syntenic homology with human chromosome 4 was discovered. Loci from about three-quarters of the q arm of human chromosome 4 are on pig chromosome 8. However, the linear order of the markers is not identical in the two species, and there are several examples of interspecific differences in the recombination fractions between adjacent markers. The conserved synteny between man and the pig gives strong support to a previous suggestion that a synteny group present in the ancestor of mammalian species has been retained on human chromosome 4q. Since loci from this synteny group are found on two cattle chromosomes, the bovine rearrangement must have occurred after the split of Suidae and Bovidae within Artiodactyla. 29 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  1. Rearrangement hotspots in the sex chromosome of the Palearctic black fly Simulium bergi (Diptera, Simuliidae)

    PubMed Central

    Adler, Peter H.; Yildirim, Alparslan; Onder, Zuhal; Tasci, G. Taskin; Duzlu, Onder; Arslan, M. Ozkan; Ciloglu, Arif; Sari, Baris; Parmaksizoglu, Nilgun; Inci, Abdullah

    2016-01-01

    Abstract An extreme example of nonrandom rearrangements, especially inversion breaks, is described in the polytene chromosomes of the black fly Simulium bergi Rubtsov, 1956 from Armenia and Turkey. A total of 48 rearrangements was discovered, relative to the standard banding sequence for the subgenus Simulium Latreille, 1802. One rearrangement, an inversion (IIS-C) in the short arm of the second chromosome, was fixed. Six (12.5%) of the rearrangements were autosomal polymorphisms, and the remaining 41 (85.4%) were sex linked. More than 40 X- and Y-linked rearrangements, predominantly inversions, were clustered in the long arm of the second chromosome (IIL), representing about 15% of the total complement. The pattern conforms to a nonrandom model of chromosome breakage, perhaps associated with an underlying molecular mechanism. PMID:27551350

  2. Maternal complex chromosomal rearrangement leads to TCF12 microdeletion in a patient presenting with coronal craniosynostosis and intellectual disability.

    PubMed

    Le Tanno, Pauline; Poreau, Brice; Devillard, Francoise; Vieville, Gaëlle; Amblard, Florence; Jouk, Pierre-Simon; Satre, Véronique; Coutton, Charles

    2014-06-01

    We report on a young child with intellectual disability and unilateral coronal craniosynostosis leading to craniofacial malformations. Standard karyotype showed an apparently balanced translocation between chromosomes 2 and 15 [t(2;15)(q21;q21.3)], inherited from his mother. Interestingly, array-CGH 180K showed a 3.64 Mb de novo deletion on chromosome 15 in the region 15q21.3q22.2, close to the chromosome 15 translocation breakpoints. This deletion leads to haploinsufficiency of TCF12 gene that can explain the coronal craniosynostosis described in the patient. Additional FISH analyses showed a complex balanced maternal chromosomal rearrangement combining the reciprocal translocation t(2;15)(q21;q21.3), and an insertion of the 15q22.1 segment into the telomeric region of the translocated 15q fragment. The genomic imbalance in the patient is likely caused by a crossing-over that occurs in the recombination loop formed during the maternal meiosis resulting in the deletion of the inserted fragment. This original case of a genomic microdeletion of TCF12 exemplifies the importance of array-CGH in the clinical investigation of apparently balanced rearrangements but also the importance of FISH analysis to identify the chromosomal mechanism causing the genomic imbalance. PMID:24648389

  3. Role of chromosomal rearrangement in N. gonorrhoeae pilus phase variation.

    PubMed

    Segal, E; Billyard, E; So, M; Storzbach, S; Meyer, T F

    1985-02-01

    N. gonorrhoeae undergoes pilus phase and antigenic variation. During phase variation, the pilin gene is turned on and off at high frequencies. Two loci on the gonococcal chromosome from strain MS11 function as expression sites for the pilin gene (pilE1 and pilE2); many other sites apparently contain silent variant pilin sequences. We reported previously that during pilus phase variation, when cells switch from the pilus expressing state (P+) to the nonexpressing state (P-), genome rearrangement occurs. We have examined phase variation in more detail, and we report that in most P+ to P- switches a deletion of pilin gene information occurs in one or both expression sites. This deletion is due to either a simple or a multiple-step recombination event involving directly repeated sequences in the expression loci. The deletion explains the state of some P- cells, but not all. In the latter cells pilin expression is probably controlled by an undefined regulator. PMID:2857113

  4. Dynamic Large-Scale Chromosomal Rearrangements Fuel Rapid Adaptation in Yeast Populations

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Shang-Lin; Lai, Huei-Yi; Tung, Shu-Yun; Leu, Jun-Yi

    2013-01-01

    Large-scale genome rearrangements have been observed in cells adapting to various selective conditions during laboratory evolution experiments. However, it remains unclear whether these types of mutations can be stably maintained in populations and how they impact the evolutionary trajectories. Here we show that chromosomal rearrangements contribute to extremely high copper tolerance in a set of natural yeast strains isolated from Evolution Canyon (EC), Israel. The chromosomal rearrangements in EC strains result in segmental duplications in chromosomes 7 and 8, which increase the copy number of genes involved in copper regulation, including the crucial transcriptional activator CUP2 and the metallothionein CUP1. The copy number of CUP2 is correlated with the level of copper tolerance, indicating that increasing dosages of a single transcriptional activator by chromosomal rearrangements has a profound effect on a regulatory pathway. By gene expression analysis and functional assays, we identified three previously unknown downstream targets of CUP2: PHO84, SCM4, and CIN2, all of which contributed to copper tolerance in EC strains. Finally, we conducted an evolution experiment to examine how cells maintained these changes in a fluctuating environment. Interestingly, the rearranged chromosomes were reverted back to the wild-type configuration at a high frequency and the recovered chromosome became fixed in less selective conditions. Our results suggest that transposon-mediated chromosomal rearrangements can be highly dynamic and can serve as a reversible mechanism during early stages of adaptive evolution. PMID:23358723

  5. Complex Chromosomal Rearrangements in B-Cell Lymphoma: Evidence of Chromoanagenesis? A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Ortega, Veronica; Chaubey, Alka; Mendiola, Christina; Ehman, William; Vadlamudi, Kumari; Dupont, Barbara; Velagaleti, Gopalrao

    2016-01-01

    Genomic instability is a well-known hallmark of cancer. Recent genome sequencing studies have led to the identification of novel phenomena called chromothripsis and chromoanasynthesis in which complex genomic rearrangements are thought to be derived from a single catastrophic event rather than by several incremental steps. A new term chromoanagenesis or chromosomal rebirth was coined recently to group these two one-step catastrophic events together. These phenomena suggest an evolutionary modality for cancer cells to circumvent individual mutational events with one simultaneous shattering of chromosomes resulting in the random reassembling of segmented genetic material to form complex derivative chromosomes. We report a case of possible chromoanagenesis in a patient with diffuse large B-cell lymphoma. Chromosome analysis from the biopsy showed a complex karyotype with multiple numerical and structural rearrangements including a translocation of chromosomes 3 and 7 involving the BCL6 gene region, with the derivative chromosome further rearranging with chromosomes 14, 7, and 22 with involvement of the IGH gene region. Fluorescence in situ hybridization studies confirmed these findings. Chromosomal microarray studies showed multiple complex copy number variations including a chromosome 12 abnormality, the complexity of which appears to suggest the phenomenon of chromoanagenesis. Our case further illustrates that lymphomagenesis can be complex and may arise from a catastrophic event resulting in multiple complex chromosome rearrangements. PMID:27108385

  6. Complex Chromosomal Rearrangements in B-Cell Lymphoma: Evidence of Chromoanagenesis? A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Ortega, Veronica; Chaubey, Alka; Mendiola, Christina; Ehman, William; Vadlamudi, Kumari; Dupont, Barbara; Velagaleti, Gopalrao

    2016-04-01

    Genomic instability is a well-known hallmark of cancer. Recent genome sequencing studies have led to the identification of novel phenomena called chromothripsis and chromoanasynthesis in which complex genomic rearrangements are thought to be derived from a single catastrophic event rather than by several incremental steps. A new term chromoanagenesis or chromosomal rebirth was coined recently to group these two one-step catastrophic events together. These phenomena suggest an evolutionary modality for cancer cells to circumvent individual mutational events with one simultaneous shattering of chromosomes resulting in the random reassembling of segmented genetic material to form complex derivative chromosomes. We report a case of possible chromoanagenesis in a patient with diffuse large B-cell lymphoma. Chromosome analysis from the biopsy showed a complex karyotype with multiple numerical and structural rearrangements including a translocation of chromosomes 3 and 7 involving the BCL6 gene region, with the derivative chromosome further rearranging with chromosomes 14, 7, and 22 with involvement of the IGH gene region. Fluorescence in situ hybridization studies confirmed these findings. Chromosomal microarray studies showed multiple complex copy number variations including a chromosome 12 abnormality, the complexity of which appears to suggest the phenomenon of chromoanagenesis. Our case further illustrates that lymphomagenesis can be complex and may arise from a catastrophic event resulting in multiple complex chromosome rearrangements. PMID:27108385

  7. Isolated trisomy 7q21.2-31.31 resulting from a complex familial rearrangement involving chromosomes 7, 9 and 10

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Genotype-phenotype correlations for chromosomal imbalances are often limited by overlapping effects of partial trisomy and monosomy resulting from unbalanced translocations and by poor resolution of banding analysis for breakpoint designation. Here we report the clinical features of isolated partial trisomy 7q21.2 to 7q31.31 without overlapping phenotypic effects of partial monosomy in an 8 years old girl. The breakpoints of the unbalanced rearranged chromosome 7 could be defined precisely by array-CGH and a further imbalance could be excluded. The breakpoints of the balanced rearranged chromosomes 9 and 10 were identified by microdissection of fluorescence labelled derivative chromosomes 9 and 10. Results The proband's mother showed a complex balanced translocation t(9;10)(p13;q23) with insertion of 7q21.2-31.31 at the translocation breakpoint at 9p13. The daughter inherited the rearranged chromosomes 9 and 10 but the normal chromosome 7 from her mother, resulting in partial trisomy 7q21.2 to 7q31.31. The phenotype of the patient consisted of marked developmental retardation, facial dysmorphism, short stature, strabism, and hyperextensible metacarpophalangeal joints. Discussion For better understanding of genotype-phenotype correlation a new classification of 7q duplications which will be based on findings of molecular karyotyping is needed. Therefore, the description of well-defined patients is valuable. This case shows that FISH-microdissection is of great benefit for precise breakpoint designation in balanced rearrangements. PMID:22136633

  8. Diagnosis of Familial Wolf-Hirschhorn Syndrome due to a Paternal Cryptic Chromosomal Rearrangement by Conventional and Molecular Cytogenetic Techniques

    PubMed Central

    Venegas-Vega, Carlos A.; Zepeda, Luis M.; Garduño-Zarazúa, Luz M.; Berumen, Jaime; Kofman, Susana; Cervantes, Alicia

    2013-01-01

    The use of conventional cytogenetic techniques in combination with fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) and single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) microarrays is necessary for the identification of cryptic rearrangements in the diagnosis of chromosomal syndromes. We report two siblings, a boy of 9 years and 9 months of age and his 7-years- and 5-month-old sister, with the classic Wolf-Hirschhorn syndrome (WHS) phenotype. Using high-resolution GTG- and NOR-banding karyotypes, as well as FISH analysis, we characterized a pure 4p deletion in both sibs and a balanced rearrangement in their father, consisting in an insertion of 4p material within a nucleolar organizing region of chromosome 15. Copy number variant (CNV) analysis using SNP arrays showed that both siblings have a similar size of 4p deletion (~6.5 Mb). Our results strongly support the need for conventional cytogenetic and FISH analysis, as well as high-density microarray mapping for the optimal characterization of the genetic imbalance in patients with WHS; parents must always be studied for recognizing cryptic balanced chromosomal rearrangements for an adequate genetic counseling. PMID:23484094

  9. Diagnosis of familial Wolf-Hirschhorn syndrome due to a paternal cryptic chromosomal rearrangement by conventional and molecular cytogenetic techniques.

    PubMed

    Venegas-Vega, Carlos A; Fernández-Ramírez, Fernando; Zepeda, Luis M; Nieto-Martínez, Karem; Gómez-Laguna, Laura; Garduño-Zarazúa, Luz M; Berumen, Jaime; Kofman, Susana; Cervantes, Alicia

    2013-01-01

    The use of conventional cytogenetic techniques in combination with fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) and single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) microarrays is necessary for the identification of cryptic rearrangements in the diagnosis of chromosomal syndromes. We report two siblings, a boy of 9 years and 9 months of age and his 7-years- and 5-month-old sister, with the classic Wolf-Hirschhorn syndrome (WHS) phenotype. Using high-resolution GTG- and NOR-banding karyotypes, as well as FISH analysis, we characterized a pure 4p deletion in both sibs and a balanced rearrangement in their father, consisting in an insertion of 4p material within a nucleolar organizing region of chromosome 15. Copy number variant (CNV) analysis using SNP arrays showed that both siblings have a similar size of 4p deletion (~6.5 Mb). Our results strongly support the need for conventional cytogenetic and FISH analysis, as well as high-density microarray mapping for the optimal characterization of the genetic imbalance in patients with WHS; parents must always be studied for recognizing cryptic balanced chromosomal rearrangements for an adequate genetic counseling. PMID:23484094

  10. Chromosome-specific staining to detect genetic rearrangements associated with chromosome 3 and/or chromosome 17

    DOEpatents

    Gray, Joe W.; Pinkel, Daniel; Kallioniemi, Olli-Pekka; Kallioniemi, Anne; Sakamoto, Masaru

    2002-01-01

    Methods and compositions for staining based upon nucleic acid sequence that employ nudeic acid probes are provided. Said methods produce staining patterns that can be tailored for specific cytogenetic analyses. Said probes are appropriate for in situ hybridization and stain both interphase and metaphase chromosomal material with reliable signals. The nucleic acid probes are typically of a complexity greater than 50 kb, the complexity depending upon the cytogenetic application. Methods and reagents are provided for the detection of genetic rearrangements. Probes and test kits are provided for use in detecting genetic rearrangements, particularly for use in tumor cytogenetics, in the detection of disease related loci, specifically cancer, such as chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML), retinoblastoma, ovarian and uterine cancers, and for biological dosimetry. Methods and reagents are described for cytogenetic research, for the differentiation of cytogenetically similar but genetically different diseases, and for many prognostic and diagnostic applications.

  11. Chromosome-specific staining to detect genetic rearrangements associated with chromosome 3 and/or chromosome 17

    DOEpatents

    Gray, Joe W.; Pinkel, Daniel; Kallioniemi, Olli-Pekka; Kallioniemi, Anne; Sakamoto, Masaru

    2008-09-09

    Methods and compositions for staining based upon nucleic acid sequence that employ nucleic acid probes are provided. Said methods produce staining patterns that can be tailored for specific cytogenetic analyses. Said probes are appropriate for in situ hybridization and stain both interphase and metaphase chromosomal material with reliable signals. The nucleic acid probes are typically of a complexity greater than 50 kb, the complexity depending upon the cytogenetic application. Methods and reagents are provided for the detection of genetic rearrangements. Probes and test kits are provided for use in detecting genetic rearrangements, particularly for use in tumor cytogenetics, in the detection of disease related loci, specifically cancer, such as chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML), retinoblastoma, ovarian and uterine cancers, and for biological dosimetry. Methods and reagents are described for cytogenetic research, for the differentiation of cytogenetically similar but genetically different diseases, and for many prognostic and diagnostic applications.

  12. Chromosome-specific staining to detect genetic rearrangements associated with chromosome 3 and/or chromosome 17

    DOEpatents

    Gray, Joe W.; Pinkel, Daniel; Kallioniemi, Olli-Pekka; Kallioniemi, Anne; Sakamoto, Masaru

    2009-10-06

    Methods and compositions for staining based upon nucleic acid sequence that employ .[.nudeic.]. .Iadd.nucleic .Iaddend.acid probes are provided. Said methods produce staining patterns that can be tailored for specific cytogenetic analyses. Said probes are appropriate for in situ hybridization and stain both interphase and metaphase chromosomal material with reliable signals. The nucleic acid probes are typically of a complexity greater than 50 kb, the complexity depending upon the cytogenetic application. Methods and reagents are provided for the detection of genetic rearrangements. Probes and test kits are provided for use in detecting genetic rearrangements, particularly for use in tumor cytogenetics, in the detection of disease related loci, specifically cancer, such as chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML), retinoblastoma, ovarian and uterine cancers, and for biological dosimetry. Methods and reagents are described for cytogenetic research, for the differentiation of cytogenetically similar but genetically different diseases, and for many prognostic and diagnostic applications.

  13. Large Chromosomal Rearrangements during a Long-Term Evolution Experiment with Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Raeside, Colin; Gaffé, Joël; Deatherage, Daniel E.; Tenaillon, Olivier; Briska, Adam M.; Ptashkin, Ryan N.; Cruveiller, Stéphane; Médigue, Claudine; Lenski, Richard E.; Barrick, Jeffrey E.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Large-scale rearrangements may be important in evolution because they can alter chromosome organization and gene expression in ways not possible through point mutations. In a long-term evolution experiment, twelve Escherichia coli populations have been propagated in a glucose-limited environment for over 25 years. We used whole-genome mapping (optical mapping) combined with genome sequencing and PCR analysis to identify the large-scale chromosomal rearrangements in clones from each population after 40,000 generations. A total of 110 rearrangement events were detected, including 82 deletions, 19 inversions, and 9 duplications, with lineages having between 5 and 20 events. In three populations, successive rearrangements impacted particular regions. In five populations, rearrangements affected over a third of the chromosome. Most rearrangements involved recombination between insertion sequence (IS) elements, illustrating their importance in mediating genome plasticity. Two lines of evidence suggest that at least some of these rearrangements conferred higher fitness. First, parallel changes were observed across the independent populations, with ~65% of the rearrangements affecting the same loci in at least two populations. For example, the ribose-utilization operon and the manB-cpsG region were deleted in 12 and 10 populations, respectively, suggesting positive selection, and this inference was previously confirmed for the former case. Second, optical maps from clones sampled over time from one population showed that most rearrangements occurred early in the experiment, when fitness was increasing most rapidly. However, some rearrangements likely occur at high frequency and may have simply hitchhiked to fixation. In any case, large-scale rearrangements clearly influenced genomic evolution in these populations. PMID:25205090

  14. The effects of chromosome rearrangements on the expression of heterochromatic genes in chromosome 2L of Drosophila melanogaster

    SciTech Connect

    Wakimoto, B.T.; Hearn, M.G. )

    1990-05-01

    The light (lt) gene of Drosophila melanogaster is located at the base of the left arm of chromosome 2, within or very near centromeric heterochromatin (2Lh). Chromosome rearrangements that move the lt{sup +} gene from its normal proximal position and place the gene in distal euchromatin result in mosaic or variegated expression of the gene. The cytogenetic and genetic properties of 17 lt-variegated rearrangements induced by X radiation are described in this report. The authors show that five of the heterochromatic genes adjacent to lt are subject to inactivation by these rearrangements and that the euchromatic loci in proximal 2L are not detectably affected. The properties of the rearrangements suggest that proximity to heterochromatin is an important regulatory requirement for at least six 2Lh genes. They discuss how the properties of the position effects on heterochromatic genes relate to other proximity-dependent phenomena such as transvection.

  15. Marfan syndrome with a complex chromosomal rearrangement including deletion of the FBN1 gene

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The majority of Marfan syndrome (MFS) cases is caused by mutations in the fibrillin-1 gene (FBN1), mapped to chromosome 15q21.1. Only few reports on deletions including the whole FBN1 gene, detected by molecular cytogenetic techniques, were found in literature. Results We report here on a female patient with clinical symptoms of the MFS spectrum plus craniostenosis, hypothyroidism and intellectual deficiency who presents a 1.9 Mb deletion, including the FBN1 gene and a complex rearrangement with eight breakpoints involving chromosomes 6, 12 and 15. Discussion This is the first report of MFS with a complex chromosome rearrangement involving a deletion of FBN1 and contiguous genes. In addition to the typical clinical findings of the Marfan syndrome due to FBN1 gene haploinsufficiency, the patient presents features which may be due to the other gene deletions and possibly to the complex chromosome rearrangement. PMID:22260333

  16. DNA sequence of human chromosome 17 and analysis of rearrangement in the human lineage.

    PubMed

    Zody, Michael C; Garber, Manuel; Adams, David J; Sharpe, Ted; Harrow, Jennifer; Lupski, James R; Nicholson, Christine; Searle, Steven M; Wilming, Laurens; Young, Sarah K; Abouelleil, Amr; Allen, Nicole R; Bi, Weimin; Bloom, Toby; Borowsky, Mark L; Bugalter, Boris E; Butler, Jonathan; Chang, Jean L; Chen, Chao-Kung; Cook, April; Corum, Benjamin; Cuomo, Christina A; de Jong, Pieter J; DeCaprio, David; Dewar, Ken; FitzGerald, Michael; Gilbert, James; Gibson, Richard; Gnerre, Sante; Goldstein, Steven; Grafham, Darren V; Grocock, Russell; Hafez, Nabil; Hagopian, Daniel S; Hart, Elizabeth; Norman, Catherine Hosage; Humphray, Sean; Jaffe, David B; Jones, Matt; Kamal, Michael; Khodiyar, Varsha K; LaButti, Kurt; Laird, Gavin; Lehoczky, Jessica; Liu, Xiaohong; Lokyitsang, Tashi; Loveland, Jane; Lui, Annie; Macdonald, Pendexter; Major, John E; Matthews, Lucy; Mauceli, Evan; McCarroll, Steven A; Mihalev, Atanas H; Mudge, Jonathan; Nguyen, Cindy; Nicol, Robert; O'Leary, Sinéad B; Osoegawa, Kazutoyo; Schwartz, David C; Shaw-Smith, Charles; Stankiewicz, Pawel; Steward, Charles; Swarbreck, David; Venkataraman, Vijay; Whittaker, Charles A; Yang, Xiaoping; Zimmer, Andrew R; Bradley, Allan; Hubbard, Tim; Birren, Bruce W; Rogers, Jane; Lander, Eric S; Nusbaum, Chad

    2006-04-20

    Chromosome 17 is unusual among the human chromosomes in many respects. It is the largest human autosome with orthology to only a single mouse chromosome, mapping entirely to the distal half of mouse chromosome 11. Chromosome 17 is rich in protein-coding genes, having the second highest gene density in the genome. It is also enriched in segmental duplications, ranking third in density among the autosomes. Here we report a finished sequence for human chromosome 17, as well as a structural comparison with the finished sequence for mouse chromosome 11, the first finished mouse chromosome. Comparison of the orthologous regions reveals striking differences. In contrast to the typical pattern seen in mammalian evolution, the human sequence has undergone extensive intrachromosomal rearrangement, whereas the mouse sequence has been remarkably stable. Moreover, although the human sequence has a high density of segmental duplication, the mouse sequence has a very low density. Notably, these segmental duplications correspond closely to the sites of structural rearrangement, demonstrating a link between duplication and rearrangement. Examination of the main classes of duplicated segments provides insight into the dynamics underlying expansion of chromosome-specific, low-copy repeats in the human genome. PMID:16625196

  17. Copy number variation, chromosome rearrangement, and their association with recombination during avian evolution

    PubMed Central

    Völker, Martin; Backström, Niclas; Skinner, Benjamin M.; Langley, Elizabeth J.; Bunzey, Sydney K.; Ellegren, Hans; Griffin, Darren K.

    2010-01-01

    Chromosomal rearrangements and copy number variants (CNVs) play key roles in genome evolution and genetic disease; however, the molecular mechanisms underlying these types of structural genomic variation are not fully understood. The availability of complete genome sequences for two bird species, the chicken and the zebra finch, provides, for the first time, an ideal opportunity to analyze the relationship between structural genomic variation (chromosomal and CNV) and recombination on a genome-wide level. The aims of this study were therefore threefold: (1) to combine bioinformatics, physical mapping to produce comprehensive comparative maps of the genomes of chicken and zebra finch. In so doing, this allowed the identification of evolutionary chromosomal rearrangements distinguishing them. The previously reported interchromosomal conservation of synteny was confirmed, but a larger than expected number of intrachromosomal rearrangements were reported; (2) to hybridize zebra finch genomic DNA to a chicken tiling path microarray and identify CNVs in the zebra finch genome relative to chicken; 32 interspecific CNVs were identified; and (3) to test the hypothesis that there is an association between CNV, chromosomal rearrangements, and recombination by correlating data from (1) and (2) with recombination rate data from a high-resolution genetic linkage map of the zebra finch. We found a highly significant association of both chromosomal rearrangements and CNVs with elevated recombination rates. The results thus provide support for the notion of recombination-based processes playing a major role in avian genome evolution. PMID:20357050

  18. Diagnosis of a constitutional five-chromosome rearrangement by fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH)

    SciTech Connect

    Tsien, F.; Shapira, E.; Carvalho, T.

    1994-09-01

    Complex chromosomal rearrangements are structural rearrangements involving at least three chromosomes and three or more chromosome breakpoints. Such karyotypes are often acquired during cancer multi-step development and in chromosome instability syndromes. However, extremely rare constitutional forms have been reported, most of which are incompatible with life. We present a 2-year-old female with de novo complex rearrangement consisting of five chromosomes and nine breakpoints. Clinical evaluation at two years of age revealed a weight of 5 kg, length of 66 cm, and had circumference of 38 cm, all below the 5th percentile, microcephaly, trigonocephaly, epicanthal folds, inguinal hernia, left clubfoot, hypertonicity, and developmental delay. The neurological examination revealed chorea-acanthocytosis and psychomotor delay. Cultured lymphocytes and fibroblasts revealed a karyotype consisting of five derivative chromosomes. The metaphases were further analyzed by FISH using chromosome-specific libraries and telomeric probes in order to delineate the composition of the rearranged chromosomes; FISH results demonstrated a karyotype of: 46,XX,1pter{r_arrow}1q25::1q42.1{r_arrow}1qter, 2pter{r_arrow}q32.3::1q32.3{r_arrow}2q41::2q37.3{r_arrow}2qter, 7qter{r_arrow}7q21.2::6q22.3{r_arrow}6qter::1q31{r_arrow}1q32.3::6p23{r_arrow}6q22.3, 7pter{r_arrow}7q21.1::6p23{r_arrow}6pter, 2q33{r_arrow}2q37, 1::9p21{r_arrow}9qter. This analysis demonstrates the usefulness of FISH in characterizing complex chromosome rearrangements otherwise difficult to correctly interpret using classical cytogenetics alone.

  19. Replication stress in early S phase generates apparent micronuclei and chromosome rearrangement in fission yeast

    PubMed Central

    Sabatinos, Sarah A.; Ranatunga, Nimna S.; Yuan, Ji-Ping; Green, Marc D.; Forsburg, Susan L.

    2015-01-01

    DNA replication stress causes genome mutations, rearrangements, and chromosome missegregation, which are implicated in cancer. We analyze a fission yeast mutant that is unable to complete S phase due to a defective subunit of the MCM helicase. Despite underreplicated and damaged DNA, these cells evade the G2 damage checkpoint to form ultrafine bridges, fragmented centromeres, and uneven chromosome segregations that resembles micronuclei. These micronuclei retain DNA damage markers and frequently rejoin with the parent nucleus. Surviving cells show an increased rate of mutation and chromosome rearrangement. This first report of micronucleus-like segregation in a yeast replication mutant establishes underreplication as an important factor contributing to checkpoint escape, abnormal chromosome segregation, and chromosome instability. PMID:26246602

  20. Mapping genomic rearrangements in titi monkeys by chromosome flow sorting and multidirectional in-situ hybridization.

    PubMed

    Dumas, F; Bigoni, F; Stone, G; Sineo, L; Stanyon, R

    2005-01-01

    We developed chromosome painting probes for Callicebus pallescens from flow-sorted chromosomes and used multidirectional chromosome painting to investigate the genomic rearrangements in C. cupreus and C. pallescens. Multidirectional painting provides information about chromosomal homologies at the subchromosomal level and rearrangement break points, allowing chromosomes to be used as cladistic markers. Chromosome paints of C. pallescens were hybridized to human metaphases and 43 signals were detected. Then, both human and C. pallescens probes were hybridized to the chromosomes of another titi monkey, C. cupreus. The human chromosome paints detected 45 segments in the haploid karyotype of C. cupreus. We found that all the syntenic associations proposed for the ancestral platyrrhine karyotype are present in C. cupreus and in C. pallescens. The rearrangements differentiating C. pallescens from C. cupreus re one inversion, one fission and three fusions (two tandem and one Robertsonian)that occurred on the C. cupreus lineage. Our results support the hypothesis that karyological evolution in titi monkeys has resulted in reduction in diploid number and that species with higher diploid numbers (with less derived, more ancestral karyotypes)are localized in the centre of the geographic range of the genera, while more derived species appear to occupy the periphery. PMID:15791414

  1. Rearrangement of a common cellular DNA domain on chromosome 4 in human primary liver tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Pasquinelli, C.; Garreau, F.; Bougueleret, L.; Cariani, E.; Thiers, V.; Croissant, O.; Hadchouel, M.; Tiollais, P.; Brechot, C. ); Grzeschik, K.H. )

    1988-02-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) DNA integration has been shown to occur frequently in human hepatocellular carcinomas. The authors have investigated whether common cellular DNA domains might be rearranged, possibly by HBV integration, in human primary liver tumors. Unique cellular DNA sequences adjacent to an HBV integration site were isolated from a patient with hepatitis B surface antigen-positive hepatocellular carcinoma. These probes detected rearrangement of this cellular region of chromosomal DNA in 3 of 50 additional primary liver tumors studied. Of these three tumor samples, two contained HBV DNA, without an apparent link between the viral DNA and the rearranged allele; HBV DNA sequences were not detected in the third tumor sample. By use of a panel of somatic cell hybrids, these unique cellular DNA sequences were shown to be located on chromosome 4. Therefore, this region of chromosomal DNA might be implicated in the formation of different tumors at one step of liver cell transformation, possible related to HBV integration.

  2. Chromosomal Rainbows’ Detect Oncogenic Rearrangements of Signaling Molecules in Thyroid Tumors

    PubMed Central

    O’Brien, Benjamin; Jossart, Gregg H.; Ito, Yuko; Greulich-Bode, Karin M.; Weier, Jingly F.; Munne, Santiago; Clark, Orlo H.; Weier, Heinz-Ulrich G.

    2011-01-01

    Altered signal transduction can be considered a hallmark of many solid tumors. In thyroid cancers the receptor tyrosine kinase (rtk) genes NTRK1 (Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man = OMIM *191315, also known as ‘TRKA’), RET (‘Rearranged during Transfection protooncogene’, OMIM *164761) and MET (OMIM *164860) have been reported as activated, rearranged or overexpressed. In many cases, a combination of cytogenetic and molecular techniques allows elucidation of cellular changes that initiate tumor development and progression. While the mechanisms leading to overexpression of the rtk MET gene remain largely unknown, a variety of chromosomal rearrangements of the RET or NTKR1 gene could be demonstrated in thyroid cancer. Abnormal expressions in these tumors seem to follow a similar pattern: the rearrangement translocates the 3′- end of the rtk gene including the entire catalytic domain to an expressed gene leading to a chimeric RNA and protein with kinase activity. Our research was prompted by an increasing number of reports describing translocations involving ret and previously unknown translocation partners. We developed a high resolution technique based on fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) to allow rapid screening for cytogenetic rearrangements which complements conventional chromosome banding analysis. Our technique applies simultaneous hybridization of numerous probes labeled with different reporter molecules which are distributed along the target chromosome allowing the detection of cytogenetic changes at near megabasepair (Mbp) resolution. Here, we report our results using a probe set specific for human chromosome 10, which is altered in a significant portion of human thyroid cancers (TC’s). While rendering accurate information about the cytogenetic location of rearranged elements, our multi-locus, multi-color analysis was developed primarily to overcome limitations of whole chromosome painting (WCP) and chromosome banding techniques for fine

  3. Chromosomal Rainbows detect Oncogenic Rearrangements of Signaling Molecules in Thyroid Tumors

    SciTech Connect

    O'Brien, Benjamin; Jossart, Gregg H.; Ito, Yuko; Greulich-Bode, Karin M.; Weier, Jingly F.; Munne, Santiago; Clark, Orlo H.; Weier, Heinz-Ulrich G.

    2010-08-19

    Altered signal transduction can be considered a hallmark of many solid tumors. In thyroid cancers the receptor tyrosine kinase (rtk) genes NTRK1 (Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man = OMIM *191315, also known as 'TRKA'), RET ('Rearranged during Transfection protooncogene', OMIM *164761) and MET (OMIM *164860) have been reported as activated, rearranged or overexpressed. In many cases, a combination of cytogenetic and molecular techniques allows elucidation of cellular changes that initiate tumor development and progression. While the mechanisms leading to overexpression of the rtk MET gene remain largely unknown, a variety of chromosomal rearrangements of the RET or NTKR1 gene could be demonstrated in thyroid cancer. Abnormal expressions in these tumors seem to follow a similar pattern: the rearrangement translocates the 3'-end of the rtk gene including the entire catalytic domain to an expressed gene leading to a chimeric RNA and protein with kinase activity. Our research was prompted by an increasing number of reports describing translocations involving ret and previously unknown translocation partners. We developed a high resolution technique based on fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) to allow rapid screening for cytogenetic rearrangements which complements conventional chromosome banding analysis. Our technique applies simultaneous hybridization of numerous probes labeled with different reporter molecules which are distributed along the target chromosome allowing the detection of cytogenetic changes at near megabase-pair (Mbp) resolution. Here, we report our results using a probe set specific for human chromosome 10, which is altered in a significant portion of human thyroid cancers (TC's). While rendering accurate information about the cytogenetic location of rearranged elements, our multi-locus, multi-color analysis was developed primarily to overcome limitations of whole chromosome painting (WCP) and chromosome banding techniques for fine mapping of

  4. 'Chromosomal Rainbows' Detect Oncogenic Rearrangements of Signaling Molecules in Thyroid Tumors.

    PubMed

    O'Brien, Benjamin; Jossart, Gregg H; Ito, Yuko; Greulich-Bode, Karin M; Weier, Jingly F; Munne, Santiago; Clark, Orlo H; Weier, Heinz-Ulrich G

    2010-01-01

    Altered signal transduction can be considered a hallmark of many solid tumors. In thyroid cancers the receptor tyrosine kinase (rtk) genes NTRK1 (Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man = OMIM *191315, also known as 'TRKA'), RET ('Rearranged during Transfection protooncogene', OMIM *164761) and MET (OMIM *164860) have been reported as activated, rearranged or overexpressed. In many cases, a combination of cytogenetic and molecular techniques allows elucidation of cellular changes that initiate tumor development and progression. While the mechanisms leading to overexpression of the rtk MET gene remain largely unknown, a variety of chromosomal rearrangements of the RET or NTKR1 gene could be demonstrated in thyroid cancer. Abnormal expressions in these tumors seem to follow a similar pattern: the rearrangement translocates the 3'- end of the rtk gene including the entire catalytic domain to an expressed gene leading to a chimeric RNA and protein with kinase activity. Our research was prompted by an increasing number of reports describing translocations involving ret and previously unknown translocation partners.We developed a high resolution technique based on fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) to allow rapid screening for cytogenetic rearrangements which complements conventional chromosome banding analysis. Our technique applies simultaneous hybridization of numerous probes labeled with different reporter molecules which are distributed along the target chromosome allowing the detection of cytogenetic changes at near megabasepair (Mbp) resolution. Here, we report our results using a probe set specific for human chromosome 10, which is altered in a significant portion of human thyroid cancers (TC's). While rendering accurate information about the cytogenetic location of rearranged elements, our multi-locus, multi-color analysis was developed primarily to overcome limitations of whole chromosome painting (WCP) and chromosome banding techniques for fine mapping of

  5. Gross chromosome rearrangements are occurring in an accession of the grass Lolium rigidum.

    PubMed

    Thomas, H M; Harper, J A; Morgan, W G

    2001-01-01

    Chromosome structure was analysed at mitosis in root tip meristems of eight genotypes of Lolium rigidum. FISH revealed changed positions in the rDNA sites indicating extensive chromosome rearrangements; indeed no two genotypes were the same. In one genotype, there were differences between cells within individual root tips. The changed positions of the rDNA sites appear to be reflections of chromosome translocations and this was confirmed by the presence of quadrivalents at metaphase I of meiosis. Possible mechanisms are discussed for this exceptional level of chromosome instability. PMID:11721955

  6. A complex chromosomal rearrangement involving chromosomes 2, 5, and X in autism spectrum disorder.

    PubMed

    Griesi-Oliveira, Karina; Moreira, Danielle de Paula; Davis-Wright, Nicole; Sanders, Stephan; Mason, Christopher; Orabona, Guilherme Müller; Vadasz, Estevão; Bertola, Débora Romeo; State, Matthew W; Passos-Bueno, Maria Rita

    2012-07-01

    Here, we describe a female patient with autism spectrum disorder and dysmorphic features that harbors a complex genetic alteration, involving a de novo balanced translocation t(2;X)(q11;q24), a 5q11 segmental trisomy and a maternally inherited isodisomy on chromosome 5. All the possibly damaging genetic effects of such alterations are discussed. In light of recent findings on ASD genetic causes, the hypothesis that all these alterations might be acting in orchestration and contributing to the phenotype is also considered. PMID:22592906

  7. Chromosome-specific staining to detect genetic rearrangements associated with chromosome 3 and/or chromosome 17

    DOEpatents

    Gray, Joe W.; Pinkel, Daniel; Kallioniemi, Olli-Pekka; Kallioniemi, Anne; Sakamoto, Masaru

    2009-10-06

    Methods and compositions for staining based upon nucleic acid sequence that employ nudeic nucleic acid probes are provided. Said methods produce staining patterns that can be tailored for specific cytogenetic analyses. Said probes are appropriate for in situ hybridization and stain both interphase and metaphase chromosomal material with reliable signals. The nucleic acid probes are typically of a complexity greater than 50 kb, the complexity depending upon the cytogenetic application. Methods and reagents are provided for the detection of genetic rearrangements. Probes and test kits are provided for use in detecting genetic rearrangements, particularly for use in tumor cytogenetics, in the detection of disease related loci, specifically cancer, such as chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML), retinoblastoma, ovarian and uterine cancers, and for biological dosimetry. Methods and reagents are described for cytogenetic research, for the differentiation of cytogenetically similar but genetically different diseases, and for many prognostic and diagnostic applications.

  8. Chromosomal rearrangements underlying karyotype differences between Chinese pangolin (Manis pentadactyla) and Malayan pangolin (Manis javanica) revealed by chromosome painting.

    PubMed

    Nie, Wenhui; Wang, Jinhuan; Su, Weiting; Wang, Yingxiang; Yang, Fengtang

    2009-01-01

    The Chinese pangolin (Manis pentadactyla), a representative species of the order Pholidota, has been enlisted in the mammalian whole-genome sequencing project mainly because of its phylogenetic importance. Previous studies showed that the diploid number of M. pentadactyla could vary from 2n = 36 to 42. To further characterize the genome organization of M. pentadactyla and to elucidate chromosomal mechanism underlying the karyotype diversity of Pholidota, we flow-sorted the chromosomes of 2n = 40 M. pentadactyla, and generated a set of chromosome-specific probes by DOP-PCR amplification of flow-sorted chromosomes. A comparative chromosome map between M. pentadactyla and the Malayan pangolin (Manis javanica, 2n = 38), as well as between human and M. pentadactyla, was established by chromosome painting for the first time. Our results demonstrate that seven Robertsonian rearrangements, together with considerable variations in the quantity of heterochromatin and in the number of nucleolar organizer regions (NORs) differentiate the karyotypes of 2n = 38 M. javanica and 2n = 40 M. pentadactyla. Moreover, we confirm that the M. javanica Y chromosome bears one NOR. Comparison of human homologous segment associations found in the genomes of M. javanica and M. pentadactyla revealed seven shared associations (HSA 1q/11, 2p/5, 2q/10q, 4p+q/20, 5/13, 6/19p and 8q/10p) that could constitute the potential Pholidota-specific signature rearrangements. PMID:19283495

  9. Generation and Analysis of Transposon Ac/Ds-Induced Chromosomal Rearrangements in Rice Plants.

    PubMed

    Xuan, Yuan Hu; Peterson, Thomas; Han, Chang-Deok

    2016-01-01

    Closely-located transposable elements (TEs) have been known to induce chromosomal breakage and rearrangements via alternative transposition. To study genome rearrangements in rice, an Ac/Ds system has been employed. This system comprises an immobile Ac element expressed under the control of CaMV 35S promoter, and a modified Ds element. A starter line carried Ac and a single copy of Ds at the OsRLG5 (Oryza sativa receptor-like gene 5). To enhance the transpositional activity, seed-derived calli were cultured and regenerated into plants. Among 270 lines regenerated from the starter, one line was selected that contained a pair of inversely-oriented Ds elements at the OsRLG5 (Oryza sativa receptor-like gene 5). The selected line was again subjected to tissue culture to obtain a regenerant population. Among 300 regenerated plants, 107 (36 %) contained chromosomal rearrangements including deletions, duplications, and inversions of various sizes. From 34 plants, transposition mechanisms leading to such genomic rearrangements were analyzed. The rearrangements were induced by sister chromatid transposition (SCT), homologous recombination (HR), and single chromatid transposition (SLCT). Among them, 22 events (65 %) were found to be transmitted to the next generation. These results demonstrate a great potential of tissue culture regeneration and the Ac/Ds system in understanding alternative transposition mechanisms and in developing chromosome engineering in plants. PMID:27557685

  10. A new approach to the elucidation of complex chromosome rearrangements illustrated by a case of Rieger syndrome.

    PubMed Central

    Ogilvie, C M; Raymond, F L; Harrison, R H; Scriven, P N; Docherty, Z

    1998-01-01

    A patient with a complex chromosome rearrangement and unilateral Rieger syndrome is presented. This rearrangement involves four chromosomes and six breakpoints, one of which is at 4q25, the candidate region for Rieger syndrome. We discuss a novel approach to the elucidation of this case using a multiprobe fluorescence in situ hybridisation method to show rearrangements unpredictable from G banded analysis, and the clear and unambiguous presentation of the karyotype using computer generated colour ideograms. Images PMID:9541109

  11. Molecular Mechanisms and Diagnosis of Chromosome 22q11.2 Rearrangements

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Emanuel, Beverly S.

    2008-01-01

    Several recurrent, constitutional genomic disorders are present on chromosome 22q. These include the translocations and deletions associated with DiGeorge and velocardiofacial syndrome and the translocations that give rise to the recurrent t(11;22) supernumerary der(22) syndrome (Emanuel syndrome). The rearrangement breakpoints on 22q cluster…

  12. Chromothripsis-like chromosomal rearrangements induced by ionizing radiation using proton microbeam irradiation system.

    PubMed

    Morishita, Maki; Muramatsu, Tomoki; Suto, Yumiko; Hirai, Momoki; Konishi, Teruaki; Hayashi, Shin; Shigemizu, Daichi; Tsunoda, Tatsuhiko; Moriyama, Keiji; Inazawa, Johji

    2016-03-01

    Chromothripsis is the massive but highly localized chromosomal rearrangement in response to a one-step catastrophic event, rather than an accumulation of a series of subsequent and random alterations. Chromothripsis occurs commonly in various human cancers and is thought to be associated with increased malignancy and carcinogenesis. However, the causes and consequences of chromothripsis remain unclear. Therefore, to identify the mechanism underlying the generation of chromothripsis, we investigated whether chromothripsis could be artificially induced by ionizing radiation. We first elicited DNA double-strand breaks in an oral squamous cell carcinoma cell line HOC313-P and its highly metastatic subline HOC313-LM, using Single Particle Irradiation system to Cell (SPICE), a focused vertical microbeam system designed to irradiate a spot within the nuclei of adhesive cells, and then established irradiated monoclonal sublines from them, respectively. SNP array analysis detected a number of chromosomal copy number alterations (CNAs) in these sublines, and one HOC313-LM-derived monoclonal subline irradiated with 200 protons by the microbeam displayed multiple CNAs involved locally in chromosome 7. Multi-color FISH showed a complex translocation of chromosome 7 involving chromosomes 11 and 12. Furthermore, whole genome sequencing analysis revealed multiple de novo complex chromosomal rearrangements localized in chromosomes 2, 5, 7, and 20, resembling chromothripsis. These findings suggested that localized ionizing irradiation within the nucleus may induce chromothripsis-like complex chromosomal alterations via local DNA damage in the nucleus. PMID:26862731

  13. Chromothripsis-like chromosomal rearrangements induced by ionizing radiation using proton microbeam irradiation system

    PubMed Central

    Morishita, Maki; Muramatsu, Tomoki; Suto, Yumiko; Hirai, Momoki; Konishi, Teruaki; Hayashi, Shin; Shigemizu, Daichi; Tsunoda, Tatsuhiko; Moriyama, Keiji; Inazawa, Johji

    2016-01-01

    Chromothripsis is the massive but highly localized chromosomal rearrangement in response to a one-step catastrophic event, rather than an accumulation of a series of subsequent and random alterations. Chromothripsis occurs commonly in various human cancers and is thought to be associated with increased malignancy and carcinogenesis. However, the causes and consequences of chromothripsis remain unclear. Therefore, to identify the mechanism underlying the generation of chromothripsis, we investigated whether chromothripsis could be artificially induced by ionizing radiation. We first elicited DNA double-strand breaks in an oral squamous cell carcinoma cell line HOC313-P and its highly metastatic subline HOC313-LM, using Single Particle Irradiation system to Cell (SPICE), a focused vertical microbeam system designed to irradiate a spot within the nuclei of adhesive cells, and then established irradiated monoclonal sublines from them, respectively. SNP array analysis detected a number of chromosomal copy number alterations (CNAs) in these sublines, and one HOC313-LM-derived monoclonal subline irradiated with 200 protons by the microbeam displayed multiple CNAs involved locally in chromosome 7. Multi-color FISH showed a complex translocation of chromosome 7 involving chromosomes 11 and 12. Furthermore, whole genome sequencing analysis revealed multiple de novo complex chromosomal rearrangements localized in chromosomes 2, 5, 7, and 20, resembling chromothripsis. These findings suggested that localized ionizing irradiation within the nucleus may induce chromothripsis-like complex chromosomal alterations via local DNA damage in the nucleus. PMID:26862731

  14. FASEB Summer Research Conference. Genetic Recombination and Chromosome Rearrangements

    SciTech Connect

    Jinks-Robertson, Sue

    2002-02-01

    The 2001 meeting entitled ''Genetic Recombination and Genome Rearrangements'' was held July 21-26 in Snowmass, Colorado. The goal of the meeting was to bring together scientists using diverse approaches to study all aspects of genetic recombination. This goal was achieved by integrating talks covering the genetics, biochemistry and structural biology of homologous recombination, site-specific recombination, and nonhomologous recombination. The format of the meeting consisted of a keynote address on the opening evening, two formal plenary sessions on each of the four full meeting days, a single afternoon workshop consisting of short talks chosen from among submitted abstracts, and afternoon poster sessions on each of the four full meeting days. The eight plenary session were entitled: (1) Recombination Mechanisms, (2) Prokaryotic Recombination, (3) Repair and Recombination, (4) Site-specific Recombination and Transposition, (5) Eukaryotic Recombination I, (6) Genome Rearrangements, (7) Meiosis, and (8) Eukaryotic Recombination II. Each session included a mix of genetic, biochemical and structural talks; talks were limited to 20 minutes, followed by 10 minutes of very lively, general discussion. Much of the data presented in the plenary sessions was unpublished, thus providing attendees with the most up-to-date knowledge of this rapidly-moving field.

  15. Chromosomal Rearrangements as Barriers to Genetic Homogenization between Archaic and Modern Humans.

    PubMed

    Rogers, Rebekah L

    2015-12-01

    Chromosomal rearrangements, which shuffle DNA throughout the genome, are an important source of divergence across taxa. Using a paired-end read approach with Illumina sequence data for archaic humans, I identify changes in genome structure that occurred recently in human evolution. Hundreds of rearrangements indicate genomic trafficking between the sex chromosomes and autosomes, raising the possibility of sex-specific changes. Additionally, genes adjacent to genome structure changes in Neanderthals are associated with testis-specific expression, consistent with evolutionary theory that new genes commonly form with expression in the testes. I identify one case of new-gene creation through transposition from the Y chromosome to chromosome 10 that combines the 5'-end of the testis-specific gene Fank1 with previously untranscribed sequence. This new transcript experienced copy number expansion in archaic genomes, indicating rapid genomic change. Among rearrangements identified in Neanderthals, 13% are transposition of selfish genetic elements, whereas 32% appear to be ectopic exchange between repeats. In Denisovan, the pattern is similar but numbers are significantly higher with 18% of rearrangements reflecting transposition and 40% ectopic exchange between distantly related repeats. There is an excess of divergent rearrangements relative to polymorphism in Denisovan, which might result from nonuniform rates of mutation, possibly reflecting a burst of transposable element activity in the lineage that led to Denisovan. Finally, loci containing genome structure changes show diminished rates of introgression from Neanderthals into modern humans, consistent with the hypothesis that rearrangements serve as barriers to gene flow during hybridization. Together, these results suggest that this previously unidentified source of genomic variation has important biological consequences in human evolution. PMID:26399483

  16. Major Chromosomal Rearrangements Distinguish Willow and Poplar After the Ancestral "Salicoid" Genome Duplication.

    PubMed

    Hou, Jing; Ye, Ning; Dong, Zhongyuan; Lu, Mengzhu; Li, Laigeng; Yin, Tongming

    2016-01-01

    Populus (poplar) and Salix (willow) are sister genera in the Salicaceae family. In both lineages extant species are predominantly diploid. Genome analysis previously revealed that the two lineages originated from a common tetraploid ancestor. In this study, we conducted a syntenic comparison of the corresponding 19 chromosome members of the poplar and willow genomes. Our observations revealed that almost every chromosomal segment had a parallel paralogous segment elsewhere in the genomes, and the two lineages shared a similar syntenic pinwheel pattern for most of the chromosomes, which indicated that the two lineages diverged after the genome reorganization in the common progenitor. The pinwheel patterns showed distinct differences for two chromosome pairs in each lineage. Further analysis detected two major interchromosomal rearrangements that distinguished the karyotypes of willow and poplar. Chromosome I of willow was a conjunction of poplar chromosome XVI and the lower portion of poplar chromosome I, whereas willow chromosome XVI corresponded to the upper portion of poplar chromosome I. Scientists have suggested that Populus is evolutionarily more primitive than Salix. Therefore, we propose that, after the "salicoid" duplication event, fission and fusion of the ancestral chromosomes first give rise to the diploid progenitor of extant Populus species. During the evolutionary process, fission and fusion of poplar chromosomes I and XVI subsequently give rise to the progenitor of extant Salix species. This study contributes to an improved understanding of genome divergence after ancient genome duplication in closely related lineages of higher plants. PMID:27352946

  17. Major Chromosomal Rearrangements Distinguish Willow and Poplar After the Ancestral “Salicoid” Genome Duplication

    PubMed Central

    Hou, Jing; Ye, Ning; Dong, Zhongyuan; Lu, Mengzhu; Li, Laigeng; Yin, Tongming

    2016-01-01

    Populus (poplar) and Salix (willow) are sister genera in the Salicaceae family. In both lineages extant species are predominantly diploid. Genome analysis previously revealed that the two lineages originated from a common tetraploid ancestor. In this study, we conducted a syntenic comparison of the corresponding 19 chromosome members of the poplar and willow genomes. Our observations revealed that almost every chromosomal segment had a parallel paralogous segment elsewhere in the genomes, and the two lineages shared a similar syntenic pinwheel pattern for most of the chromosomes, which indicated that the two lineages diverged after the genome reorganization in the common progenitor. The pinwheel patterns showed distinct differences for two chromosome pairs in each lineage. Further analysis detected two major interchromosomal rearrangements that distinguished the karyotypes of willow and poplar. Chromosome I of willow was a conjunction of poplar chromosome XVI and the lower portion of poplar chromosome I, whereas willow chromosome XVI corresponded to the upper portion of poplar chromosome I. Scientists have suggested that Populus is evolutionarily more primitive than Salix. Therefore, we propose that, after the “salicoid” duplication event, fission and fusion of the ancestral chromosomes first give rise to the diploid progenitor of extant Populus species. During the evolutionary process, fission and fusion of poplar chromosomes I and XVI subsequently give rise to the progenitor of extant Salix species. This study contributes to an improved understanding of genome divergence after ancient genome duplication in closely related lineages of higher plants. PMID:27352946

  18. The evolution of vertebrate somatostatin receptors and their gene regions involves extensive chromosomal rearrangements

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Somatostatin and its related neuroendocrine peptides have a wide variety of physiological functions that are mediated by five somatostatin receptors with gene names SSTR1-5 in mammals. To resolve their evolution in vertebrates we have investigated the SSTR genes and a large number of adjacent gene families by phylogeny and conserved synteny analyses in a broad range of vertebrate species. Results We find that the SSTRs form two families that belong to distinct paralogons. We observe not only chromosomal similarities reflecting the paralogy relationships between the SSTR-bearing chromosome regions, but also extensive rearrangements between these regions in teleost fish genomes, including fusions and translocations followed by reshuffling through intrachromosomal rearrangements. These events obscure the paralogy relationships but are still tractable thanks to the many genomes now available. We have identified a previously unrecognized SSTR subtype, SSTR6, previously misidentified as either SSTR1 or SSTR4. Conclusions Two ancestral SSTR-bearing chromosome regions were duplicated in the two basal vertebrate tetraploidizations (2R). One of these ancestral SSTR genes generated SSTR2, -3 and -5, the other gave rise to SSTR1, -4 and -6. Subsequently SSTR6 was lost in tetrapods and SSTR4 in teleosts. Our study shows that extensive chromosomal rearrangements have taken place between related chromosome regions in teleosts, but that these events can be resolved by investigating several distantly related species. PMID:23194088

  19. Alternative Ac/Ds transposition induces major chromosomal rearrangements in maize.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jianbo; Yu, Chuanhe; Pulletikurti, Vinay; Lamb, Jonathan; Danilova, Tatiana; Weber, David F; Birchler, James; Peterson, Thomas

    2009-03-15

    Barbara McClintock reported that the Ac/Ds transposable element system can generate major chromosomal rearrangements (MCRs), but the underlying mechanism has not been determined. Here, we identified a series of chromosome rearrangements derived from maize lines containing pairs of closely linked Ac transposable element termini. Molecular and cytogenetic analyses showed that the MCRs in these lines comprised 17 reciprocal translocations and two large inversions. The breakpoints of all 19 MCRs are delineated by Ac termini and characteristic 8-base-pair target site duplications, indicating that the MCRs were generated by precise transposition reactions involving the Ac termini of two closely linked elements. This alternative transposition mechanism may have contributed to chromosome evolution and may also occur during V(D)J recombination resulting in oncogenic translocations. PMID:19299561

  20. A girl with pervasive developmental disorder and complex chromosome rearrangement involving 8p and 10p.

    PubMed

    Zwaigenbaum, L; Sonnenberg, L K; Heshka, T; Eastwood, S; Xu, J

    2005-06-01

    We report a 4-year-old girl with a de novo, apparently balanced complex chromosome rearrangement. She initially presented for assessment of velopharyngeal insufficiency due to hypernasal speech. She has distinctive facial features (long face, broad nasal bridge, and protuberant ears with simplified helices), bifid uvula, strabismus, and joint laxity. She is developmentally delayed, with language and cognitive skills approximately 2 SD below the mean expected for her age, and meets ADI, ADOS, and DSM-IV criteria for pervasive developmental disorder. She has poor eye contact, atypical communication and social interaction, repetitive behaviours and significant difficulties with processing sensory input. Her karyotype is characterized by the presence of two derivative chromosomes; 46,XX, der(8)(10pter- >10pl2.32::8p12- >8qter), der(l0)(8pter- >8p21.3::10p12.32- >10p11.23::8p21.3- > 8p12::10p11.23- >l0qter). The der(8) is a result of translocation of the segment 10p12.32-pter onto 8p12. The der(l0) has two 8p segments collectively from 8p12-pter in that the segment 8p21.3-pter is translocated onto 10p12.32 and the segment 8p12-p21.3 is inserted at 10p11.23. FISH analysis showed no microdeletion of the major locus at 22q11.2 nor for the minor locus at 10p13p14. This case suggests that aberrations at 8p12, 8p21.3, 10p11.23 and/or 10p12.32 may result in pervasive developmental disorder, associated with mild cognitive delay and specific facial anomalies. PMID:16119480

  1. Crossing-over in rearranging chromosomes of Drosophila: The role of delayed pairing

    SciTech Connect

    Chadov, B.F.; Chadova, E.V.; Khotskina, E.A.

    1995-11-01

    A Df(2R)MS2-10 deletion of pericentromeric heterochromatin and an Is(Y;2L)419 insertion of Y material in the region 34A, as well as nondisjunction of chromosomes 2 in 2/F(2L); F(2R) females did not directly prevent chromosome arms in chromosome 2 of Drosophila from pairing. However, these events resulted in (1) two- to four-fold decrease in the rate of crossing-over in chromosome 2; (2) a decreased proportion of exchange tetrads two to three times greater for multiple-exchange tetrads than for single-exchange ones; and (3) a decreased rate of crossing-over throughout the entire chromosome arm enhanced in a proximal direction. An In(1)dl-49+B{sup M1}inversion in the X chromosome cancelled the suppression of crossing-over. Crossing-over increased due to an increasing proportion of single-exchange tretrads. The changes in crossing-over found cannot be explained by asynapsis in the chromosomes with rearrangements. According to the authors, these changes are probably accounted for by a delayed pairing of these chromosomes. The delayed pairing of individual chromosome regions or the whole chromosome is considered the most common type of pairing disturbance. It effects on meiosis are discussed. 39 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  2. Stacked thin layers of metaphase chromatin explain the geometry of chromosome rearrangements and banding

    PubMed Central

    Daban, Joan-Ramon

    2015-01-01

    The three-dimensional organization of tightly condensed chromatin within metaphase chromosomes has been one of the most challenging problems in structural biology since the discovery of the nucleosome. This study shows that chromosome images obtained from typical banded karyotypes and from different multicolour cytogenetic analyses can be used to gain information about the internal structure of chromosomes. Chromatin bands and the connection surfaces in sister chromatid exchanges and in cancer translocations are planar and orthogonal to the chromosome axis. Chromosome stretching produces band splitting and even the thinnest bands are orthogonal and well defined, indicating that short stretches of DNA can occupy completely the chromosome cross-section. These observations impose strong physical constraints on models that attempt to explain chromatin folding in chromosomes. The thin-plate model, which consists of many stacked layers of planar chromatin perpendicular to the chromosome axis, is compatible with the observed orientation of bands, with the existence of thin bands, and with band splitting; it is also compatible with the orthogonal orientation and planar geometry of the connection surfaces in chromosome rearrangements. The results obtained provide a consistent interpretation of the chromosome structural properties that are used in clinical cytogenetics for the diagnosis of hereditary diseases and cancers. PMID:26446309

  3. Mapping autism risk loci using genetic linkage and chromosomal rearrangements

    PubMed Central

    Szatmari, Peter; Paterson, Andrew; Zwaigenbaum, Lonnie; Roberts, Wendy; Brian, Jessica; Liu, Xiao-Qing; Vincent, John; Skaug, Jennifer; Thompson, Ann; Senman, Lili; Feuk, Lars; Qian, Cheng; Bryson, Susan; Jones, Marshall; Marshall, Christian; Scherer, Stephen; Vieland, Veronica; Bartlett, Christopher; Mangin, La Vonne; Goedken, Rhinda; Segre, Alberto; Pericak-Vance, Margaret; Cuccaro, Michael; Gilbert, John; Wright, Harry; Abramson, Ruth; Betancur, Catalina; Bourgeron, Thomas; Gillberg, Christopher; Leboyer, Marion; Buxbaum, Joseph; Davis, Kenneth; Hollander, Eric; Silverman, Jeremy; Hallmayer, Joachim; Lotspeich, Linda; Sutcliffe, James; Haines, Jonathan; Folstein, Susan; Piven, Joseph; Wassink, Thomas; Sheffield, Val; Geschwind, Daniel; Bucan, Maja; Brown, Ted; Cantor, Rita; Constantino, John; Gilliam, Conrad; Herbert, Martha; Lajonchere, Clara; Ledbetter, David; Lese-Martin, Christa; Miller, Janet; Nelson, Stan; Samango-Sprouse, Carol; Spence, Sarah; State, Matthew; Tanzi, Rudolph; Coon, Hilary; Dawson, Geraldine; Devlin, Bernie; Estes, Annette; Flodman, Pamela; Klei, Lambertus; Mcmahon, William; Minshew, Nancy; Munson, Jeff; Korvatska, Elena; Rodier, Patricia; Schellenberg, Gerard; Smith, Moyra; Spence, Anne; Stodgell, Chris; Tepper, Ping Guo; Wijsman, Ellen; Yu, Chang-En; Rogé, Bernadette; Mantoulan, Carine; Wittemeyer, Kerstin; Poustka, Annemarie; Felder, Bärbel; Klauck, Sabine; Schuster, Claudia; Poustka, Fritz; Bölte, Sven; Feineis-Matthews, Sabine; Herbrecht, Evelyn; Schmötzer, Gabi; Tsiantis, John; Papanikolaou, Katerina; Maestrini, Elena; Bacchelli, Elena; Blasi, Francesca; Carone, Simona; Toma, Claudio; Van Engeland, Herman; De Jonge, Maretha; Kemner, Chantal; Koop, Frederieke; Langemeijer, Marjolein; Hijmans, Channa; Staal, Wouter; Baird, Gillian; Bolton, Patrick; Rutter, Michael; Weisblatt, Emma; Green, Jonathan; Aldred, Catherine; Wilkinson, Julie-Anne; Pickles, Andrew; Le Couteur, Ann; Berney, Tom; Mcconachie, Helen; Bailey, Anthony; Francis, Kostas; Honeyman, Gemma; Hutchinson, Aislinn; Parr, Jeremy; Wallace, Simon; Monaco, Anthony; Barnby, Gabrielle; Kobayashi, Kazuhiro; Lamb, Janine; Sousa, Ines; Sykes, Nuala; Cook, Edwin; Guter, Stephen; Leventhal, Bennett; Salt, Jeff; Lord, Catherine; Corsello, Christina; Hus, Vanessa; Weeks, Daniel; Volkmar, Fred; Tauber, Maïté; Fombonne, Eric; Shih, Andy; Meyer, Kacie

    2007-01-01

    Autism spectrum disorders (ASD) are common, heritable neurodevelopmental conditions. The genetic architecture of ASD is complex, requiring large samples to overcome heterogeneity. Here we broaden coverage and sample size relative to other studies of ASD by using Affymetrix 10K single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) arrays and 1168 families with ≥ 2 affected individuals to perform the largest linkage scan to date, while also analyzing copy number variation (CNV) in these families. Linkage and CNV analyses implicate chromosome 11p12-p13 and neurexins, respectively, amongst other candidate loci. Neurexins team with previously-implicated neuroligins for glutamatergic synaptogenesis, highlighting glutamate-related genes as promising candidates for ASD. PMID:17322880

  4. Delineating Rearrangements in Single Yeast Artificial Chromosomes by Quantitative DNA Fiber Mapping

    SciTech Connect

    Weier, Heinz-Ulrich G.; Greulich-Bode, Karin M.; Wu, Jenny; Duell, Thomas

    2009-09-18

    Cloning of large chunks of human genomic DNA in recombinant systems such as yeast or bacterial artificial chromosomes has greatly facilitated the construction of physical maps, the positional cloning of disease genes or the preparation of patient-specific DNA probes for diagnostic purposes. For this process to work efficiently, the DNA cloning process and subsequent clone propagation need to maintain stable inserts that are neither deleted nor otherwise rearranged. Some regions of the human genome; however, appear to have a higher propensity than others to rearrange in any host system. Thus, techniques to detect and accurately characterize such rearrangements need to be developed. We developed a technique termed 'Quantitative DNA Fiber Mapping (QDFM)' that allows accurate tagging of sequence elements of interest with near kilobase accuracy and optimized it for delineation of rearrangements in recombinant DNA clones. This paper demonstrates the power of this microscopic approach by investigating YAC rearrangements. In our examples, high-resolution physical maps for regions within the immunoglobulin lambda variant gene cluster were constructed for three different YAC clones carrying deletions of 95 kb and more. Rearrangements within YACs could be demonstrated unambiguously by pairwise mapping of cosmids along YAC DNA molecules. When coverage by YAC clones was not available, distances between cosmid clones were estimated by hybridization of cosmids onto DNA fibers prepared from human genomic DNA. In addition, the QDFM technology provides essential information about clone stability facilitating closure of the maps of the human genome as well as those of model organisms.

  5. Array-CGH and multipoint FISH to decode complex chromosomal rearrangements

    PubMed Central

    Darai-Ramqvist, Eva; de Ståhl, Teresita Diaz; Sandlund, Agneta; Mantripragada, Kiran; Klein, George; Dumanski, Jan; Imreh, Stefan; Kost-Alimova, Maria

    2006-01-01

    Background Recently, several high-resolution methods of chromosome analysis have been developed. It is important to compare these methods and to select reliable combinations of techniques to analyze complex chromosomal rearrangements in tumours. In this study we have compared array-CGH (comparative genomic hybridization) and multipoint FISH (mpFISH) for their ability to characterize complex rearrangements on human chromosome 3 (chr3) in tumour cell lines. We have used 179 BAC/PAC clones covering chr3 with an approximately 1 Mb resolution to analyze nine carcinoma lines. Chr3 was chosen for analysis, because of its frequent rearrangements in human solid tumours. Results The ploidy of the tumour cell lines ranged from near-diploid to near-pentaploid. Chr3 locus copy number was assessed by interphase and metaphase mpFISH. Totally 53 chr3 fragments were identified having copy numbers from 0 to 14. MpFISH results from the BAC/PAC clones and array-CGH gave mainly corresponding results. Each copy number change on the array profile could be related to a specific chromosome aberration detected by metaphase mpFISH. The analysis of the correlation between real copy number from mpFISH and the average normalized inter-locus fluorescence ratio (ANILFR) value detected by array-CGH demonstrated that copy number is a linear function of parameters that include the variable, ANILFR, and two constants, ploidy and background normalized fluorescence ratio. Conclusion In most cases, the changes in copy number seen on array-CGH profiles reflected cumulative chromosome rearrangements. Most of them stemmed from unbalanced translocations. Although our chr3 BAC/PAC array could identify single copy number changes even in pentaploid cells, mpFISH provided a more accurate analysis in the dissection of complex karyotypes at high ploidy levels. PMID:17196103

  6. Reproductive Incompatibility Involving Senegalese Aedes aegypti (L) Is Associated with Chromosome Rearrangements

    PubMed Central

    Dickson, Laura B.; Sharakhova, Maria V.; Timoshevskiy, Vladimir A.; Fleming, Karen L.; Caspary, Alex; Sylla, Massamba; Black, William C.

    2016-01-01

    was used to identify AT-rich regions, chromomycin A3 following pretreatment with barium hydroxide stained for GC-rich regions and stained the ribosomal RNA locus and YOYO-1 was used to test for differential staining. Chromosome patterns in SenAae strains revealed by these three stains differed from those in IB12. For FISH, 40 BAC clones previously physically mapped on Aaa chromosomes were used to test for chromosome rearrangements in SenAae relative to IB12. Differences in the order of markers identified two chromosomal rearrangements between IB12 and SenAae strains. The first rearrangement involves two overlapping pericentric (containing the centromere) inversions in chromosome 3 or an insertion of a large fragment into the 3q arm. The second rearrangement is close to the centromere on the p arm of chromosome 2. Linkage analysis of the SDL and the white-eye locus identified a likely chromosomal rearrangement on chromosome 1. The reproductive incompatibility observed within SenAae and between SenAae and Aaa may be generally associated with chromosome rearrangements on all three chromosomes and specifically caused by pericentric inversions on chromosomes 2 and 3. PMID:27105225

  7. Reproductive Incompatibility Involving Senegalese Aedes aegypti (L) Is Associated with Chromosome Rearrangements.

    PubMed

    Dickson, Laura B; Sharakhova, Maria V; Timoshevskiy, Vladimir A; Fleming, Karen L; Caspary, Alex; Sylla, Massamba; Black, William C

    2016-04-01

    used to identify AT-rich regions, chromomycin A3 following pretreatment with barium hydroxide stained for GC-rich regions and stained the ribosomal RNA locus and YOYO-1 was used to test for differential staining. Chromosome patterns in SenAae strains revealed by these three stains differed from those in IB12. For FISH, 40 BAC clones previously physically mapped on Aaa chromosomes were used to test for chromosome rearrangements in SenAae relative to IB12. Differences in the order of markers identified two chromosomal rearrangements between IB12 and SenAae strains. The first rearrangement involves two overlapping pericentric (containing the centromere) inversions in chromosome 3 or an insertion of a large fragment into the 3q arm. The second rearrangement is close to the centromere on the p arm of chromosome 2. Linkage analysis of the SDL and the white-eye locus identified a likely chromosomal rearrangement on chromosome 1. The reproductive incompatibility observed within SenAae and between SenAae and Aaa may be generally associated with chromosome rearrangements on all three chromosomes and specifically caused by pericentric inversions on chromosomes 2 and 3. PMID:27105225

  8. Distribution of Telomeric Sequences (TTAGGG)n in Rearranged Chromosomes of Phyllotine Rodents (Cricetidae, Sigmodontinae).

    PubMed

    Lanzone, Cecilia; Labaroni, Carolina; Suárez, Natalia; Rodríguez, Daniela; Herrera, Macarena L; Bolzán, Alejandro D

    2015-01-01

    Phyllotines are sigmodontine rodents endemic to South America with broad genetic variability, Robertsonian polymorphisms being the most frequent. Moreover, this taxon includes a species with multiple sex chromosomes, which is infrequent in mammals. However, molecular cytogenetic techniques have never been applied to phyllotines to elucidate their karyotypic evolution. We studied the chromosomes of 4 phyllotine species using FISH with a pantelomeric probe (TTAGGG)n. Graomys griseoflavus, Eligmodontia puerulus, and E. morgani are polymorphic for Robertsonian translocations, whereas Salinomys delicatus possesses XX/ XY1Y2 sex chromosomes. Telomeric signals were detected at both ends of all chromosomes of the studied species. In S. delicatus interstitial telomeric sequences (ITS) were observed in the 3 major chromosome pairs, which are equidistant from one of the telomeres in these chromosomes. These results suggest that ITS are important in the reshuffling of the highly derived karyotype of S. delicatus. Considering the phylogeny of phyllotines, the Robertsonian rearrangements of G. griseoflavus, E. puerulus, and E. morgani possibly represent chromosome fusions which have occurred independently. The pericentromeric regions of the biarmed chromosomes of these species do not contain telomeric sequences characteristic for strict fusions of recent origin, suggesting a common pattern of telomeric repeat loss during chromosomal evolution of these rodents. PMID:27035350

  9. Comparative genomics reveals conserved positioning of essential genomic clusters in highly rearranged Thermococcales chromosomes

    PubMed Central

    Cossu, Matteo; Da Cunha, Violette; Toffano-Nioche, Claire; Forterre, Patrick; Oberto, Jacques

    2015-01-01

    The genomes of the 21 completely sequenced Thermococcales display a characteristic high level of rearrangements. As a result, the prediction of their origin and termination of replication on the sole basis of chromosomal DNA composition or skew is inoperative. Using a different approach based on biologically relevant sequences, we were able to determine oriC position in all 21 genomes. The position of dif, the site where chromosome dimers are resolved before DNA segregation could be predicted in 19 genomes. Computation of the core genome uncovered a number of essential gene clusters with a remarkably stable chromosomal position across species, in sharp contrast with the scrambled nature of their genomes. The active chromosomal reorganization of numerous genes acquired by horizontal transfer, mainly from mobile elements, could explain this phenomenon. PMID:26166067

  10. Genetic differentiation within and away from the chromosomal rearrangements characterising hybridising chromosomal races of the western house mouse (Mus musculus domesticus).

    PubMed

    Förster, Daniel W; Jones, Eleanor P; Jóhannesdóttir, Fríða; Gabriel, Sofia I; Giménez, Mabel D; Panithanarak, Thadsin; Hauffe, Heidi C; Searle, Jeremy B

    2016-05-01

    The importance of chromosomal rearrangements for speciation can be inferred from studies of genetic exchange between hybridising chromosomal races within species. Reduced fertility or recombination suppression in karyotypic hybrids has the potential to maintain or promote genetic differentiation in genomic regions near rearrangement breakpoints. We studied genetic exchange between two hybridising groups of chromosomal races of house mouse in Upper Valtellina (Lombardy, Italy), using microsatellites. These groups differ by Robertsonian fusions and/or whole-arm reciprocal translocations such that F1 hybrids have a chain-of-five meiotic configuration. Previous studies showed genetic differentiation in two chromosomes in the chain-of-five (10 and 12) close to their centromeres (i.e. the rearrangement breakpoints); we have shown here that the centromeric regions of the other two chromosomes in the chain (2 and 8) are similarly differentiated. The internal chromosomes of the chain (8 and 12) show the greatest differentiation, which may reflect pairing and recombination properties of internal and external elements in a meiotic chain. Importantly, we found that centromeric regions of some non-rearranged chromosomes also showed genetic differentiation between the hybridising groups, indicating a complex interplay between chromosomal rearrangements and other parts of the genome in maintaining or promoting differentiation and potentially driving speciation between chromosomal races. PMID:27048372

  11. Describing Sequencing Results of Structural Chromosome Rearrangements with a Suggested Next-Generation Cytogenetic Nomenclature

    PubMed Central

    Ordulu, Zehra; Wong, Kristen E.; Currall, Benjamin B.; Ivanov, Andrew R.; Pereira, Shahrin; Althari, Sara; Gusella, James F.; Talkowski, Michael E.; Morton, Cynthia C.

    2014-01-01

    With recent rapid advances in genomic technologies, precise delineation of structural chromosome rearrangements at the nucleotide level is becoming increasingly feasible. In this era of “next-generation cytogenetics” (i.e., an integration of traditional cytogenetic techniques and next-generation sequencing), a consensus nomenclature is essential for accurate communication and data sharing. Currently, nomenclature for describing the sequencing data of these aberrations is lacking. Herein, we present a system called Next-Gen Cytogenetic Nomenclature, which is concordant with the International System for Human Cytogenetic Nomenclature (2013). This system starts with the alignment of rearrangement sequences by BLAT or BLAST (alignment tools) and arrives at a concise and detailed description of chromosomal changes. To facilitate usage and implementation of this nomenclature, we are developing a program designated BLA(S)T Output Sequence Tool of Nomenclature (BOSToN), a demonstrative version of which is accessible online. A standardized characterization of structural chromosomal rearrangements is essential both for research analyses and for application in the clinical setting. PMID:24746958

  12. Palindrome-Mediated Translocations in Humans: A New Mechanistic Model for Gross Chromosomal Rearrangements

    PubMed Central

    Inagaki, Hidehito; Kato, Takema; Tsutsumi, Makiko; Ouchi, Yuya; Ohye, Tamae; Kurahashi, Hiroki

    2016-01-01

    Palindromic DNA sequences, which can form secondary structures, are widely distributed in the human genome. Although the nature of the secondary structure—single-stranded “hairpin” or double-stranded “cruciform”—has been extensively investigated in vitro, the existence of such unusual non-B DNA in vivo remains controversial. Here, we review palindrome-mediated gross chromosomal rearrangements possibly induced by non-B DNA in humans. Recent advances in next-generation sequencing have not yet overcome the difficulty of palindromic sequence analysis. However, a dozen palindromic AT-rich repeat (PATRR) sequences have been identified at the breakpoints of recurrent or non-recurrent chromosomal translocations in humans. The breakages always occur at the center of the palindrome. Analyses of polymorphisms within the palindromes indicate that the symmetry and length of the palindrome affect the frequency of the de novo occurrence of these palindrome-mediated translocations, suggesting the involvement of non-B DNA. Indeed, experiments using a plasmid-based model system showed that the formation of non-B DNA is likely the key to palindrome-mediated genomic rearrangements. Some evidence implies a new mechanism that cruciform DNAs may come close together first in nucleus and illegitimately joined. Analysis of PATRR-mediated translocations in humans will provide further understanding of gross chromosomal rearrangements in many organisms. PMID:27462347

  13. Detection of Chromosomal Rearrangements Derived From Homeologous Recombination in Four Mapping Populations of Brassica napus L.

    PubMed Central

    Udall, Joshua A.; Quijada, Pablo A.; Osborn, Thomas C.

    2005-01-01

    Genetic maps of Brassica napus were constructed from four segregating populations of doubled haploid lines. Each mapping population had the same male parent and used the same set of RFLP probes, facilitating the construction of a consensus map. Chromosomal rearrangements were identified in each population by molecular marker analysis and were classified as de novo homeologous nonreciprocal transpositions (HNRTs), preexisting HNRTs, and homeologous reciprocal transpositions (HRTs). Ninety-nine de novo HNRTs were identified by the presence of a few lines having duplication of a chromosomal region and loss of the corresponding homeologous region. These de novo HNRTs were more prevalent in one population that had a resynthesized B. napus as a parent. Preexisting HNRTs were identified by fragment duplication or fragment loss in many DH lines due to the segregation of HNRTs preexisting in one of the parents. Nine preexisting HNRTs were identified in the three populations involving natural B. napus parents, which likely originated from previous homeologous exchanges. The male parent had a previously described HRT between N7 and N16, which segregated in each population. These data suggest that chromosomal rearrangements caused by homeologous recombination are widespread in B. napus. The effects of these rearrangements on allelic and phenotypic diversity are discussed. PMID:15520255

  14. Quantification of Somatic Chromosomal Rearrangements in Circulating Cell-Free DNA from Ovarian Cancers

    PubMed Central

    Harris, Faye R.; Kovtun, Irina V.; Smadbeck, James; Multinu, Francesco; Jatoi, Aminah; Kosari, Farhad; Kalli, Kimberly R.; Murphy, Stephen J.; Halling, Geoffrey C.; Johnson, Sarah H.; Liu, Minetta C.; Mariani, Andrea; Vasmatzis, George

    2016-01-01

    Recently, the use of a liquid biopsy has shown promise in monitoring tumor burden. While point mutations have been extensively studied, chromosomal rearrangements have demonstrated greater tumor specificity. Such rearrangements can be identified in the tumor and subsequently detected in the plasma of patients using quantitative PCR (qPCR). In this study we used a whole-genome mate-pair protocol to characterize a landscape of genomic rearrangements in the primary tumors of ten ovarian cancer patients. Individualized tumor-specific primer panels of aberrant chromosomal junctions were identified for each case and detected by qPCR within the cell-free DNA. Selected chromosomal junctions were detected in pre-surgically drawn blood in eight of the ten patients. Of these eight, three demonstrated the continued presence of circulating tumor DNA (ctDNA) post-surgery, consistent with their documented presence of disease, and in five ctDNA was undetectable in the post-surgical blood collection, consistent with their lack of detectable disease. The ctDNA fraction was calculated using a novel algorithm designed for the unique challenges of quantifying ctDNA using qPCR to allow observations of real-time tumor dynamics. In summary, a panel of individualized junctions derived from tumor DNA could be an effective way to monitor cancer patients for relapse and therapeutic efficacy using cfDNA. PMID:27436510

  15. Palindrome-Mediated Translocations in Humans: A New Mechanistic Model for Gross Chromosomal Rearrangements.

    PubMed

    Inagaki, Hidehito; Kato, Takema; Tsutsumi, Makiko; Ouchi, Yuya; Ohye, Tamae; Kurahashi, Hiroki

    2016-01-01

    Palindromic DNA sequences, which can form secondary structures, are widely distributed in the human genome. Although the nature of the secondary structure-single-stranded "hairpin" or double-stranded "cruciform"-has been extensively investigated in vitro, the existence of such unusual non-B DNA in vivo remains controversial. Here, we review palindrome-mediated gross chromosomal rearrangements possibly induced by non-B DNA in humans. Recent advances in next-generation sequencing have not yet overcome the difficulty of palindromic sequence analysis. However, a dozen palindromic AT-rich repeat (PATRR) sequences have been identified at the breakpoints of recurrent or non-recurrent chromosomal translocations in humans. The breakages always occur at the center of the palindrome. Analyses of polymorphisms within the palindromes indicate that the symmetry and length of the palindrome affect the frequency of the de novo occurrence of these palindrome-mediated translocations, suggesting the involvement of non-B DNA. Indeed, experiments using a plasmid-based model system showed that the formation of non-B DNA is likely the key to palindrome-mediated genomic rearrangements. Some evidence implies a new mechanism that cruciform DNAs may come close together first in nucleus and illegitimately joined. Analysis of PATRR-mediated translocations in humans will provide further understanding of gross chromosomal rearrangements in many organisms. PMID:27462347

  16. Scoliosis and vertebral anomalies: additional abnormal phenotypes associated with chromosome 16p11.2 rearrangement.

    PubMed

    Al-Kateb, Hussam; Khanna, Geetika; Filges, Isabel; Hauser, Natalie; Grange, Dorothy K; Shen, Joseph; Smyser, Christopher D; Kulkarni, Shashikant; Shinawi, Marwan

    2014-05-01

    The typical chromosome 16p11.2 rearrangements are estimated to occur at a frequency of approximately 0.6% of all samples tested clinically and have been identified as a major cause of autism spectrum disorders, developmental delay, behavioral abnormalities, and seizures. Careful examination of patients with these rearrangements revealed association with abnormal head size, obesity, dysmorphism, and congenital abnormalities. In this report, we extend this list of phenotypic abnormalities to include scoliosis and vertebral anomalies. We present detailed characterization of phenotypic and radiological data of 10 new patients, nine with the 16p11.2 deletion and one with the duplication within the coordinates chr16:29,366,195 and 30,306,956 (hg19) with a minimal size of 555 kb. We discuss the phenotypical and radiological findings in our patients and review 5 previously reported patients with 16p11.2 rearrangement and similar skeletal abnormalities. Our data suggest that patients with the recurrent 16p11.2 rearrangement have increased incidence of scoliosis and vertebral anomalies. However, additional studies are required to confirm this observation and to establish the incidence of these anomalies. We discuss the potential implications of our findings on the diagnosis, surveillance and genetic counseling of patients with 16p11.2 rearrangement. PMID:24458548

  17. Appearance and evolution of the specific chromosomal rearrangements associated with malignant transformation of mouse m5S cells

    SciTech Connect

    Kodama, S.; Okumura, Y.; Komatsu, K.; Sasaki, M.S. )

    1991-06-01

    Chromosomal alterations were studied during the acquisition of malignant phenotypes in two karyotypically distinct cells isolated from transformed foci induced by x-irradiation in mouse m5S cells. Because the transformants, despite foci origin, showed low ability to grow in agar, they were cultured in vitro with serial transfer schedules to allow further cell generations and assayed for anchorage independence (AI) at each passage level. The AI frequency increased with the cell doubling numbers. Chromosome analysis showed that a focus was one cell origin, but the transformants showed karyotypic instability during cell proliferation, giving rise to the rearrangements clustered in the distal region of the specific chromosomes. These rearrangements appeared to be directed toward the acquisition of malignant phenotypes. Analysis of the types and sites of rearrangements indicated that a mechanism exists that induces frequent rearrangements of the specific region of a chromosome during the process of transformation into the malignant state.

  18. Chromosome-Specific Staining To Detect Genetic Rearrangements Associated With Chromosome 3 And/Or Chromosone 17

    DOEpatents

    Gray; Joe W.; Pinkel; Daniel; Kallioniemi; Olli-Pekka; Kallioniemi; Anne; Sakamoto; Masaru

    2002-02-05

    Methods and compositions for staining based upon nucleic acid sequence that employ nucleic acid probes are provided. Said methods produce staining patterns that can be tailored for specific cytogenetic analyses. Said probes are appropriate for in situ hybridization and stain both interphase and metaphase chromosomal material with reliable signals. The nucleic acid probes are typically of a complexity greater than 50 kb, the complexity depending upon the cytogenetic application. Methods and reagents are provided for the detection of genetic rearrangements. Probes and test kits are provided for use in detecting genetic rearrangements, particularly for use in tumor cytogenetics, in the detection of disease related loci, specifically cancer, such as chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML), retinoblastoma, ovarian and uterine cancers, and for biological dosimetry. Methods and reagents are described for cytogenetic research, for the differentiation of cytogenetically similar but genetically different diseases, and for many prognostic and diagnostic applications.

  19. Analysis of spontaneous chromosomal rearrangements in neuroblasts of genetically unstable mutant lines of Drosophila melanogaster

    SciTech Connect

    Derzhavets, E.M.; Kim, A.I.; Aslanyan, M.M.

    1988-11-01

    The spectrum and frequency of chromosomal aberrations in the somatic cells of III instar larvae of Drosophila melanogaster mutator line were studied using three of its derivatives (sbt, if, and w/sup a/) and line w as control. It has been demonstrated that the frequency of anaphases with bridges and acentric fragments increases in the neuroblast of flies of the mutator line as well as in the neuroblasts of the larvae of the lines sbt, if, and w/sup a/. The metaphase analysis revealed that the mutator line and its derivatives are characterized by higher frequencies of chromosomal aberrations as compared to the control. Chromatid breaks are predominant type of rearrangements. These results, suggest probably presence of the specific mutator factor or factors in the line studied, affecting chromosomal structure and, possibly, activating migration of the mobile genetic elements in the mutator line.

  20. Transposition of reversed Ac element ends generates chromosome rearrangements in maize.

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jianbo; Peterson, Thomas

    2004-01-01

    In classical "cut-and-paste" transposition, transposons are excised from donor sites and inserted at new locations. We have identified an alternative pathway in which transposition involves the 5' end of an intact Ac element and the 3' end of a nearby terminally deleted fAc (fractured Ac). The Ac and fAc elements are inserted at the maize p1 locus on chromosome 1s in the same orientation; the adjacent ends of the separate elements are thus in reversed orientation with respect to each other and are separated by a distance of approximately 13 kb. Transposition involving the two ends in reversed orientation generates inversions, deletions, and a novel type of local rearrangement. The rearrangement breakpoints are bounded by the characteristic footprint or target site duplications typical of Ac transposition reactions. These results demonstrate a new intramolecular transposition mechanism by which transposons can greatly impact genome evolution. PMID:15342530

  1. In vivo engineering of oncogenic chromosomal rearrangements with the CRISPR/Cas9 system

    PubMed Central

    Maddalo, Danilo; Manchado, Eusebio; Concepcion, Carla P.; Bonetti, Ciro; Vidigal, Joana A.; Han, Yoon-Chi; Ogrodowski, Paul; Crippa, Alessandra; Rekhtman, Natasha; de Stanchina, Elisa; Lowe, Scott W.; Ventura, Andrea

    2014-01-01

    Chromosomal rearrangements play a central role in the pathogenesis of human cancers and often result in the expression of therapeutically actionable gene fusions1. A recently discovered example is a fusion between the Echinoderm Microtubule-associated Protein-like 4 (EML4) and the Anaplastic Lymphoma Kinase (ALK) genes, generated by an inversion on the short arm of chromosome 2: inv(2)(p21p23). The EML4-ALK oncogene is detected in a subset of human non-small cell lung cancers (NSCLC)2 and is clinically relevant because it confers sensitivity to ALK inhibitors3. Despite their importance, modeling such genetic events in mice has proven challenging and requires complex manipulation of the germline. Here we describe an efficient method to induce specific chromosomal rearrangements in vivo using viral-mediated delivery of the CRISPR/Cas9 system to somatic cells of adult animals. We apply it to generate a mouse model of Eml4-Alk-driven lung cancer. The resulting tumors invariably harbor the Eml4-Alkinversion, express the Eml4-Alk fusion gene, display histo-pathologic and molecular features typical of ALK+ human NSCLCs, and respond to treatment with ALK-inhibitors. The general strategy described here substantially expands our ability to model human cancers in mice and potentially in other organisms. PMID:25337876

  2. High level of chromosomal instability in circulating tumor cells of ROS1-rearranged non-small-cell lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Pailler, E.; Auger, N.; Lindsay, C. R.; Vielh, P.; Islas-Morris-Hernandez, A.; Borget, I.; Ngo-Camus, M.; Planchard, D.; Soria, J.-C.; Besse, B.; Farace, F.

    2015-01-01

    Background Genetic aberrations affecting the c-ros oncogene 1 (ROS1) tyrosine kinase gene have been reported in a small subset of patients with non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). We evaluated whether ROS1-chromosomal rearrangements could be detected in circulating tumor cells (CTCs) and examined tumor heterogeneity of CTCs and tumor biopsies in ROS1-rearranged NSCLC patients. Patients and methods Using isolation by size of epithelial tumor cells (ISET) filtration and filter-adapted-fluorescence in situ hybridization (FA-FISH), ROS1 rearrangement was examined in CTCs from four ROS1-rearranged patients treated with the ROS1-inhibitor, crizotinib, and four ROS1-negative patients. ROS1-gene alterations observed in CTCs at baseline from ROS1-rearranged patients were compared with those present in tumor biopsies and in CTCs during crizotinib treatment. Numerical chromosomal instability (CIN) of CTCs was assessed by DNA content quantification and chromosome enumeration. Results ROS1 rearrangement was detected in the CTCs of all four patients with ROS1 rearrangement previously confirmed by tumor biopsy. In ROS1-rearranged patients, median number of ROS1-rearranged CTCs at baseline was 34.5 per 3 ml blood (range, 24–55). In ROS1-negative patients, median background hybridization of ROS1-rearranged CTCs was 7.5 per 3 ml blood (range, 7–11). Tumor heterogeneity, assessed by ROS1 copy number, was significantly higher in baseline CTCs compared with paired tumor biopsies in the three patients experiencing PR or SD (P < 0.0001). Copy number in ROS1-rearranged CTCs increased significantly in two patients who progressed during crizotinib treatment (P < 0.02). CTCs from ROS1-rearranged patients had a high DNA content and gain of chromosomes, indicating high levels of aneuploidy and numerical CIN. Conclusion We provide the first proof-of-concept that CTCs can be used for noninvasive and sensitive detection of ROS1 rearrangement in NSCLC patients. CTCs from ROS1-rearranged

  3. Femoral facial syndrome associated with a de novo complex chromosome 2q37 rearrangement.

    PubMed

    Spielmann, Malte; Marx, Sylvie; Barbi, Gotthold; Flöttmann, Ricarda; Kehrer-Sawatzki, Hildegard; König, Rainer; Horn, Denise; Mundlos, Stefan; Nader, Sean; Borck, Guntram

    2016-05-01

    The femoral facial syndrome (FFS) is a rare congenital anomaly syndrome characterized by bilateral femoral hypoplasia and facial dysmorphism. The etiology of FFS is currently unknown but maternal/gestational diabetes has been proposed as a strong risk factor for syndromic femoral hypoplasia. In affected children born to non-diabetic mothers, a genetic contribution to FFS is suspected; however, no chromosomal anomalies or gene mutations have been identified so far. Here, we report on a girl with FFS and a de novo complex chromosome rearrangement of terminal chromosome 2q37.2. Radiographs of the pelvis and lower limbs showed bilateral shortening and bowing of the femur and radiographs of hands and feet revealed a brachydactyly type E (BDE). Using high resolution array-CGH, qPCR, and FISH, we detected a ∼1.9 Mb duplication in the chromosomal region 2q37.2 and a ∼5.4 Mb deletion on chromosome 2q37.3 that were absent in the parents. The duplication contains six genes and the deletion encompasses 68 genes; the latter has previously been shown to cause BDE (through haploinsufficiency for HDAC4) but not femoral hypoplasia. Therefore, we propose that the duplication 2q37.2 could be causative for the femur phenotype. To the best of our knowledge, our report is the first to propose a genetic cause in a case of FFS. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26822876

  4. Chromosomal locus rearrangements are a rapid response to formation of the allotetraploid Arabidopsis suecica genome

    PubMed Central

    Pontes, Olga; Neves, Nuno; Silva, Manuela; Lewis, Michelle S.; Madlung, Andreas; Comai, Luca; Viegas, Wanda; Pikaard, Craig S.

    2004-01-01

    Allopolyploidy is a significant evolutionary process, resulting in new species with diploid or greater chromosome complements derived from two or more progenitor species. We examined the chromosomal consequences of genomic merger in Arabidopsis suecica, the allotetraploid hybrid of Arabidopsis thaliana and Arabidopsis arenosa. Fluorescence in situ hybridization with centromere, nucleolus organizer region (NOR), and 5S rRNA gene probes reveals the expected numbers of progenitor chromosomes in natural A. suecica, but one pair of A. thaliana NORs and one pair of A. arenosa-derived 5S gene loci are missing. Similarly, in newly formed synthetic A. suecica-like allotetraploids, pairs of A. thaliana NORs are gained de novo, lost, and/or transposed to A. arenosa chromosomes, with genotypic differences apparent between F3 siblings of the same F2 parent and between independent lines. Likewise, pairs of A. arenosa 5S genes are lost and novel linkages between 5S loci and NORs arise in synthetic allotetraploids. By contrast, the expected numbers of A. arenosa-derived NORs and A. thaliana-derived 5S loci are found in both natural and synthetic A. suecica. Collectively, these observations suggest that some, but not all, loci are unstable in newly formed A. suecica allotetraploids and can participate in a variety of alternative rearrangements, some of which resemble chromosomal changes found in nature. PMID:15604143

  5. Chromosomal locus rearrangements are a rapid response to formation of the allotetraploid Arabidopsis suecica genome.

    PubMed

    Pontes, Olga; Neves, Nuno; Silva, Manuela; Lewis, Michelle S; Madlung, Andreas; Comai, Luca; Viegas, Wanda; Pikaard, Craig S

    2004-12-28

    Allopolyploidy is a significant evolutionary process, resulting in new species with diploid or greater chromosome complements derived from two or more progenitor species. We examined the chromosomal consequences of genomic merger in Arabidopsis suecica, the allotetraploid hybrid of Arabidopsis thaliana and Arabidopsis arenosa. Fluorescence in situ hybridization with centromere, nucleolus organizer region (NOR), and 5S rRNA gene probes reveals the expected numbers of progenitor chromosomes in natural A. suecica, but one pair of A. thaliana NORs and one pair of A. arenosa-derived 5S gene loci are missing. Similarly, in newly formed synthetic A. suecica-like allotetraploids, pairs of A. thaliana NORs are gained de novo, lost, and/or transposed to A. arenosa chromosomes, with genotypic differences apparent between F(3) siblings of the same F(2) parent and between independent lines. Likewise, pairs of A. arenosa 5S genes are lost and novel linkages between 5S loci and NORs arise in synthetic allotetraploids. By contrast, the expected numbers of A. arenosa-derived NORs and A. thaliana-derived 5S loci are found in both natural and synthetic A. suecica. Collectively, these observations suggest that some, but not all, loci are unstable in newly formed A. suecica allotetraploids and can participate in a variety of alternative rearrangements, some of which resemble chromosomal changes found in nature. PMID:15604143

  6. Chromosomal rearrangement-A rare cause of complement factor I associated atypical haemolytic uraemic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Gleeson, Patrick J; Wilson, Valerie; Cox, Thomas E; Sharma, Seema D; Smith-Jackson, Kate; Strain, Lisa; Lappin, David; McHale, Teresa; Kavanagh, David; Goodship, Timothy H J

    2016-10-01

    Chromosomal rearrangements affecting the genes encoding complement factor H and the factor H related proteins have been described in aHUS patients. To date such disorders have not been described in other aHUS associated genes. We describe here a heterozygous 875,324bp deletion encompassing the gene (CFI) encoding complement factor I and ten other genes. The index case presented with aHUS and did not recover renal function. No abnormalities were detected on Sanger sequencing of CFI but a low factor I level led to a multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification assay being undertaken. This showed a complete heterozygous deletion of CFI. The extent of the deletion and the breakpoint was defined. In the Newcastle aHUS cohort we have identified and report here 32 different CFI variants in 56 patients but to date this is the only deletion that we have identified. This finding although rare does suggest that screening for chromosomal rearrangements affecting CFI should be undertaken in all aHUS patients particularly if the factor I level is unexplainably low. PMID:27268256

  7. A critical component of meiotic drive in Neurospora is located near a chromosome rearrangement.

    PubMed

    Harvey, Austin M; Rehard, David G; Groskreutz, Katie M; Kuntz, Danielle R; Sharp, Kevin J; Shiu, Patrick K T; Hammond, Thomas M

    2014-08-01

    Neurospora fungi harbor a group of meiotic drive elements known as Spore killers (Sk). Spore killer-2 (Sk-2) and Spore killer-3 (Sk-3) are two Sk elements that map to a region of suppressed recombination. Although this recombination block is limited to crosses between Sk and Sk-sensitive (Sk(S)) strains, its existence has hindered Sk characterization. Here we report the circumvention of this obstacle by combining a classical genetic screen with next-generation sequencing technology and three-point crossing assays. This approach has allowed us to identify a novel locus called rfk-1, mutation of which disrupts spore killing by Sk-2. We have mapped rfk-1 to a 45-kb region near the right border of the Sk-2 element, a location that also harbors an 11-kb insertion (Sk-2(INS1)) and part of a >220-kb inversion (Sk-2(INV1)). These are the first two chromosome rearrangements to be formally identified in a Neurospora Sk element, providing evidence that they are at least partially responsible for Sk-based recombination suppression. Additionally, the proximity of these chromosome rearrangements to rfk-1 (a critical component of the spore-killing mechanism) suggests that they have played a key role in the evolution of meiotic drive in Neurospora. PMID:24931406

  8. “Islands of Divergence” in the Atlantic Cod Genome Represent Polymorphic Chromosomal Rearrangements

    PubMed Central

    Sodeland, Marte; Jorde, Per Erik; Lien, Sigbjørn; Jentoft, Sissel; Berg, Paul R.; Grove, Harald; Kent, Matthew P.; Arnyasi, Mariann; Olsen, Esben Moland; Knutsen, Halvor

    2016-01-01

    In several species genetic differentiation across environmental gradients or between geographically separate populations has been reported to center at “genomic islands of divergence,” resulting in heterogeneous differentiation patterns across genomes. Here, genomic regions of elevated divergence were observed on three chromosomes of the highly mobile fish Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua) within geographically fine-scaled coastal areas. The “genomic islands” extended at least 5, 9.5, and 13 megabases on linkage groups 2, 7, and 12, respectively, and coincided with large blocks of linkage disequilibrium. For each of these three chromosomes, pairs of segregating, highly divergent alleles were identified, with little or no gene exchange between them. These patterns of recombination and divergence mirror genomic signatures previously described for large polymorphic inversions, which have been shown to repress recombination across extensive chromosomal segments. The lack of genetic exchange permits divergence between noninverted and inverted chromosomes in spite of gene flow. For the rearrangements on linkage groups 2 and 12, allelic frequency shifts between coastal and oceanic environments suggest a role in ecological adaptation, in agreement with recently reported associations between molecular variation within these genomic regions and temperature, oxygen, and salinity levels. Elevated genetic differentiation in these genomic regions has previously been described on both sides of the Atlantic Ocean, and we therefore suggest that these polymorphisms are involved in adaptive divergence across the species distributional range. PMID:26983822

  9. "Islands of Divergence" in the Atlantic Cod Genome Represent Polymorphic Chromosomal Rearrangements.

    PubMed

    Sodeland, Marte; Jorde, Per Erik; Lien, Sigbjørn; Jentoft, Sissel; Berg, Paul R; Grove, Harald; Kent, Matthew P; Arnyasi, Mariann; Olsen, Esben Moland; Knutsen, Halvor

    2016-01-01

    In several species genetic differentiation across environmental gradients or between geographically separate populations has been reported to center at "genomic islands of divergence," resulting in heterogeneous differentiation patterns across genomes. Here, genomic regions of elevated divergence were observed on three chromosomes of the highly mobile fish Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua) within geographically fine-scaled coastal areas. The "genomic islands" extended at least 5, 9.5, and 13 megabases on linkage groups 2, 7, and 12, respectively, and coincided with large blocks of linkage disequilibrium. For each of these three chromosomes, pairs of segregating, highly divergent alleles were identified, with little or no gene exchange between them. These patterns of recombination and divergence mirror genomic signatures previously described for large polymorphic inversions, which have been shown to repress recombination across extensive chromosomal segments. The lack of genetic exchange permits divergence between noninverted and inverted chromosomes in spite of gene flow. For the rearrangements on linkage groups 2 and 12, allelic frequency shifts between coastal and oceanic environments suggest a role in ecological adaptation, in agreement with recently reported associations between molecular variation within these genomic regions and temperature, oxygen, and salinity levels. Elevated genetic differentiation in these genomic regions has previously been described on both sides of the Atlantic Ocean, and we therefore suggest that these polymorphisms are involved in adaptive divergence across the species distributional range. PMID:26983822

  10. Unusual Large-Scale Chromosomal Rearrangements in Mycobacterium tuberculosis Beijing B0/W148 Cluster Isolates

    PubMed Central

    Shitikov, Egor A.; Bespyatykh, Julia A.; Ischenko, Dmitry S.; Alexeev, Dmitry G.; Karpova, Irina Y.; Kostryukova, Elena S.; Isaeva, Yulia D.; Nosova, Elena Y.; Mokrousov, Igor V.; Vyazovaya, Anna A.; Narvskaya, Olga V.; Vishnevsky, Boris I.; Otten, Tatiana F.; Zhuravlev, Valery Y.; Yablonsky, Peter K.; Ilina, Elena N.; Govorun, Vadim M.

    2014-01-01

    The Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) Beijing family isolates are geographically widespread, and there are examples of Beijing isolates that are hypervirulent and associated with drug resistance. One-fourth of Beijing genotype isolates found in Russia belong to the B0/W148 group. The aim of the present study was to investigate features of these endemic strains on a genomic level. Four Russian clinical isolates of this group were sequenced, and the data obtained was compared with published sequences of various MTB strain genomes, including genome of strain W-148 of the same B0/W148 group. The comparison of the W-148 and H37Rv genomes revealed two independent inversions of large segments of the chromosome. The same inversions were found in one of the studied strains after deep sequencing using both the fragment and mate-paired libraries. Additionally, inversions were confirmed by RFLP hybridization analysis. The discovered rearrangements were verified by PCR in all four newly sequenced strains in the study and in four additional strains of the same Beijing B0/W148 group. The other 32 MTB strains from different phylogenetic lineages were tested and revealed no inversions. We suggest that the initial largest inversion changed the orientation of the three megabase (Mb) segment of the chromosome, and the second one occurred in the previously inverted region and partly restored the orientation of the 2.1 Mb inner segment of the region. This is another remarkable example of genomic rearrangements in the MTB in addition to the recently published of large-scale duplications. The described cases suggest that large-scale genomic rearrangements in the currently circulating MTB isolates may occur more frequently than previously considered, and we hope that further studies will help to determine the exact mechanism of such events. PMID:24416324

  11. Mechanisms of Origin, Phenotypic Effects and Diagnostic Implications of Complex Chromosome Rearrangements

    PubMed Central

    Poot, Martin; Haaf, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Complex chromosome rearrangements (CCRs) are currently defined as structural genome variations that involve more than 2 chromosome breaks and result in exchanges of chromosomal segments. They are thought to be extremely rare, but their detection rate is rising because of improvements in molecular cytogenetic technology. Their population frequency is also underestimated, since many CCRs may not elicit a phenotypic effect. CCRs may be the result of fork stalling and template switching, microhomology-mediated break-induced repair, breakage-fusion-bridge cycles, or chromothripsis. Patients with chromosomal instability syndromes show elevated rates of CCRs due to impaired DNA double-strand break responses during meiosis. Therefore, the putative functions of the proteins encoded by ATM, BLM, WRN, ATR, MRE11, NBS1, and RAD51 in preventing CCRs are discussed. CCRs may exert a pathogenic effect by either (1) gene dosage-dependent mechanisms, e.g. haploinsufficiency, (2) mechanisms based on disruption of the genomic architecture, such that genes, parts of genes or regulatory elements are truncated, fused or relocated and thus their interactions disturbed - these mechanisms will predominantly affect gene expression - or (3) mixed mutation mechanisms in which a CCR on one chromosome is combined with a different type of mutation on the other chromosome. Such inferred mechanisms of pathogenicity need corroboration by mRNA sequencing. Also, future studies with in vitro models, such as inducible pluripotent stem cells from patients with CCRs, and transgenic model organisms should substantiate current inferences regarding putative pathogenic effects of CCRs. The ramifications of the growing body of information on CCRs for clinical and experimental genetics and future treatment modalities are briefly illustrated with 2 cases, one of which suggests KDM4C (JMJD2C) as a novel candidate gene for mental retardation. PMID:26732513

  12. Sequence divergence and chromosomal rearrangements during the evolution of human pseudoautosomal genes and their mouse homologs

    SciTech Connect

    Ellison, J.; Li, X.; Francke, U.

    1994-09-01

    The pseudoautosomal region (PAR) is an area of sequence identity between the X and Y chromosomes and is important for mediating X-Y pairing during male meiosis. Of the seven genes assigned to the human PAR, none of the mouse homologs have been isolated by a cross-hybridization strategy. Two of these homologs, Csfgmra and II3ra, have been isolated using a functional assay for the gene products. These genes are quite different in sequence from their human homologs, showing only 60-70% sequence similarity. The Csfgmra gene has been found to further differ from its human homolog in being isolated not on the sex chromosomes, but on a mouse autosome (chromosome 19). Using a mouse-hamster somatic cell hybrid mapping panel, we have mapped the II3ra gene to yet another mouse autosome, chromosome 14. Attempts to clone the mouse homolog of the ANT3 locus resulted in the isolation of two related genes, Ant1 and Ant2, but failed to yield the Ant3 gene. Southern blot analysis of the ANT/Ant genes showed the Ant1 and Ant2 sequences to be well-conserved among all of a dozen mammals tested. In contrast, the ANT3 gene only showed hybridization to non-rodent mammals, suggesting it is either greatly divergent or has been deleted in the rodent lineage. Similar experiments with other human pseudoautosomal probes likewise showed a lack of hybridization to rodent sequences. The results show a definite trend of extensive divergence of pseudoautosomal sequences in addition to chromosomal rearrangements involving X;autosome translocations and perhaps gene deletions. Such observations have interesting implications regarding the evolution of this important region of the sex chromosomes.

  13. Kinase Expression and Chromosomal Rearrangements in Papillary Thyroid Cancer Tissues: Investigations at the Molecular and Microscopic Levels

    SciTech Connect

    Weier, Heinz-Ulrich; Kwan, Johnson; Lu, Chun-Mei; Ito, Yuko; Wang, Mei; Baumgartner, Adolf; Hayward, Simon W.; Weier, Jingly F.; Zitzelsberger, Horst F.

    2009-07-07

    Structural chromosome aberrations are known hallmarks of many solid tumors. In the papillary form of thyroid cancer (PTC), for example, activation of the receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK) genes, ret or the neurotrophic tyrosine kinase receptor type I (NTRK1) by intra- or interchromosomal rearrangements have been suggested as a cause of the disease. The 1986 accident at the nuclear power plant in Chernobyl, USSR, led to the uncontrolled release of high levels of radioisotopes. Ten years later, the incidence of childhood papillary thyroid cancer (chPTC) near Chernobyl had risen by two orders of magnitude. Tumors removed from some of these patients showed aberrant expression of the ret RTK gene due to a ret/PTC1 or ret/PTC3 rearrangement involving chromosome 10. However, many cultured chPTC cells show a normal G-banded karyotype and no ret rearrangement. We hypothesize that the 'ret-negative' tumors inappropriately express a different oncogene or have lost function of a tumor suppressor as a result of chromosomal rearrangements, and decided to apply molecular and cytogenetic methods to search for potentially oncogenic chromosomal rearrangements in Chernobyl chPTC cases. Knowledge of the kind of genetic alterations may facilitate the early detection and staging of chPTC as well as provide guidance for therapeutic intervention.

  14. The accumulation of stable cytogenetic rearrangements with age-determined by chromosome painting

    SciTech Connect

    Ramsey, M.J.; Lee, D.A.; Senft, J.R.; Briner, J.F.; Moore, D.H. II; Tucker, J.D.

    1994-12-31

    Chromosome painting is a rapid method of quantifying structural chromosomal rearrangements. The method is particularly useful for detecting stable aberrations which are difficult and expensive to quantify with classical methods. Translocations, being inherently stable, can be used as a biodosimeter for chronic and temporally-displaced exposure to radiation. Translocations may also be useful for quantifying chronic exposure to environmentally related agents which may result in an accumulation of cytogenetic damage with age. Because most chemical exposures are low and chronic, conventional cytogenetic methods are not expected to be informative. To understand the extent that age and lifestyle factors impact the frequency of stable aberrations, we used chromosome painting in healthy individuals who have not been occupationally or accidentally exposed to radiation or chemicals, and who have not received chemo- or radiotherapy. To date we have analyzed 15 umbilical cord bloods as well as peripheral blood samples from 83 adults aged up to 77 years. Because stable aberrations are rare in unexposed people, we have scored large numbers of cells from each subject. Thus far we have analyzed the equivalent of more than 78,000 metaphases from these 83 people, and have observed an average of 0.75% of cells with translocations or stable insertions. A significant curvilinear relationship with age is apparent (R{sup 2} = 0.69, p <0.00001). No effect with smoking was seen.

  15. Familial mental retardation in a family with an inherited chromosome rearrangement

    PubMed Central

    Chudley, A. E.; Bauder, F.; Ray, M.; McAlpine, Phyllis J.; Pena, S. D. J.; Hamerton, J. L.

    1974-01-01

    A family of three generations has been described with an insertional type of chromosome rearrangement involving chromosomes 11 and 18[46,XX or XY, ins(11;18)(p15;q11q21)] detected by G-banding using a trypsin digestion method. Four members of this family with clinical features of 18q− have inherited the der(18) from their father and are thus deficient for (18)(q11q21). Three other family members have inherited the der(11) and thus have a duplication of the same segment [(18)(q11q21)]. Genetic marker studies on this family, show no significant segregation of any of the markers studied with either the der(11) or der(18). Eight family members had the PepA8PepA1 genotype and four of these were carrying the der(18), indicating that the PepA locus which had been previously assigned to chromosome 18, does not lie in the segment q11→q21. Images PMID:4140909

  16. The DNA rearrangement that generates the TRK-T3 oncogene involves a novel gene on chromosome 3 whose product has a potential coiled-coil domain.

    PubMed Central

    Greco, A; Mariani, C; Miranda, C; Lupas, A; Pagliardini, S; Pomati, M; Pierotti, M A

    1995-01-01

    Oncogenic rearrangements of the NTRK1 gene (also designated TRKA), encoding one of the receptors for the nerve growth factor, are frequently detected in thyroid carcinomas. Such rearrangements fuse the NTRK1 tyrosine kinase domain to 5'-end sequences belonging to different genes. In previously reported studies we have demonstrated that NTRK1 oncogenic activation involves two genes, TPM3 and TPR, both localized similarly to the receptor tyrosine kinase, on the q arm of chromosome 1. Here we report the characterization of a novel NTRK1-derived thyroid oncogene, named TRK-T3. A cDNA clone, capable of transforming activity, was isolated from a transformant cell line. Sequence analysis revealed that TRK-T3 contains 1,412 nucleotides of NTRK1 preceded by 598 nucleotides belonging to a novel gene that we have named TFG (TRK-fused gene). The TRK-T3 amino acid sequence displays, within the TFG region, a coiled-coil motif that could endow the oncoprotein with the capability to form complexes. The TRK-T3 oncogene encodes a 68-kDa cytoplasmic protein reacting with NTRK1-specific antibodies. By sedimentation gradient experiments the TRK-T3 oncoprotein was shown to form, in vivo, multimeric complexes, most likely trimers or tetramers. The TFG gene is ubiquitously expressed and is located on chromosome 3. The breakpoint producing the TRK-T3 oncogene occurs within exons of both the TFG gene and the NTRK1 gene and produces a chimeric exon that undergoes alternative splicing. Molecular analysis of the NTRK1 rearranged fragments indicated that the chromosomal rearrangement is reciprocal and balanced and involves loss of a few nucleotides of germ line sequences. PMID:7565764

  17. Human ETS2 gene on chromosome 21 is not rearranged in Alzheimer disease

    SciTech Connect

    Sacchi, N.; Nalbantoglu, J.; Sergovich, F.R.; Papas, T.S. )

    1988-10-01

    The human ETS2 gene, a member of the ETS gene family, with sequence homology with the retroviral ets sequence of the avian erythroblastosis retrovirus E26 is located on chromosome 21. Molecular genetic analysis of Down syndrome (DS) patients with partial trisomy 21 allowed us to reinforce the supposition that ETS2 may be a gene of the minimal DS genetic region. It was originally proposed that a duplication of a portion of the DS region represents the genetic basis of Alzheimer disease, a condition associated also with DS. No evidence of either rearrangements or duplications of ETS2 could be detected in DNA from fibroblasts and brain tissue of Alzheimer disease patients with either the sporadic or the familiar form of the disease. Thus, an altered ETS2 gene dosage does not seem to be a genetic cause or component of Alzheimer disease.

  18. Complex chromosomal rearrangement and associated counseling issues in a family with Pelizaeus-Merzbacher disease.

    PubMed

    Woodward, Karen; Cundall, Maria; Palmer, Rodger; Surtees, Robert; Winter, Robin M; Malcolm, Sue

    2003-04-01

    We report cytogenetic and molecular findings in a family in which Pelizaeus-Merzbacher disease has arisen by a sub-microscopic duplication of the proteolipid protein (PLP1) gene involving the insertion of approximately 600 kb from Xq22 into Xq26.3. The duplication arose in an asymptomatic mother on a paternally derived X chromosome and was inherited by her son, the proband, who is affected with Pelizaeus-Merzbacher disease. The mother also carries a large interstitial deletion of approximately 70 Mb extending from Xq21.1 to Xq27.3, which is present in a mosaic form. In lymphocytes, the mother has no normal cells, having one population with three copies of the PLP1gene (one normal X and one duplication X chromosome) and the other population having only one copy of the PLP1 gene (one normal X and one deleted X chromosome). Her karyotype is 46,XX.ish dup (X) (Xpter --> Xq26.3::Xq22 --> Xq22::Xq26.3 --> Xqter)(PLP++)/46,X,del(X)(q21.1q27.3).ish del(X)(q21.1q27.3)(PLP-). Both ends of the deletion have been mapped by fluorescence in situ hybridization using selected DNA clones and neither involves the PLP1 gene or are in the vicinity of the duplication breakpoints. Prenatal diagnosis was carried out in a recent pregnancy and the complex counseling issues associated with these chromosomal rearrangements are discussed. PMID:12605435

  19. Structural rearrangements of chromosome 15 satellites resulting in Prader-Willi syndrome suggest a complex mechanism for uniparental disomy

    SciTech Connect

    Toth-Fijel, S.; Gunter, K.; Olson, S.

    1994-09-01

    We report two cases of PWS in which there was abnormal meiosis I segregation of chromosome 15 following a rare translocation event between the heteromorphic satellite regions of chromosomes 14 and 15 and an apparent meiotic recombination in the unstable region of 15q11.2. PWS and normal appearing chromosomes in case one prompted a chromosome 15 origin analysis. PCR analysis indicated maternal isodisomy for the long arm of chromosome. However, only one chromosome 15 had short arm heteromorphisms consistent with either paternal or maternal inheritance. VNTR DNA analysis and heteromorphism data suggest that a maternal de novo translocation between chromosome 14 and 15 occurred prior to meiosis I. This was followed by recombination between D15Z1 and D15S11 and subsequent meiosis I nondisjunction. Proband and maternal karyotype display a distamycin A-DAPI positive region on the chromosome 14 homolog involved in the translocation. Fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) analyses of ONCOR probes D15S11, SNRPN, D15S11 and GABRB 3 were normal, consistent with the molecular data. Case two received a Robertsonian translocation t(14;15)(p13;p13) of maternal origin. Chromosome analysis revealed a meiosis I error producing UPD. FISH analysis of the proband and parents showed normal hybridization of ONCOR probes D15Z1, D15S11, SNRPN, D15S10 and GABRB3. In both cases the PWS probands received a structurally altered chromosome 15 that had rearranged with chromosome 14 prior to meiosis. If proper meiotic segregation is dependent on the resolution of chiasmata and/or the binding to chromosome-specific spindle fibers, then it may be possible that rearrangements of pericentric or unstable regions of the genome disrupt normal disjunction and lead to uniparental disomy.

  20. Chromosome rearrangements, recombination suppression, and limited segregation distortion in hybrids between Yellowstone cutthroat trout (Oncorhynchus clarkii bouvieri) and rainbow trout (O. mykiss)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ostberg, Carl O.; Hauser, Lorenz; Pritchard, Victoria L.; Garza, John C.; Naish, Kerry A.

    2013-01-01

    Chromosome rearrangements suppressed recombination in the hybrids. This result supports several previous findings demonstrating that recombination suppression restricts gene flow between chromosomes that differ by arrangement. Conservation of synteny and map order between the hybrid and rainbow trout maps and minimal segregation distortion in the hybrids suggest rainbow and Yellowstone cutthroat trout genomes freely introgress across chromosomes with similar arrangement. Taken together, these results suggest that rearrangements impede introgression. Recombination suppression across rearrangements could enable large portions of non-recombined chromosomes to persist within admixed populations.

  1. Report of a female patient with mental retardation and tall stature due to a chromosomal rearrangement disrupting the OPHN1 gene on Xq12

    PubMed Central

    Menten, Björn; Buysse, Karen; Vermeulen, Stefan; Meersschaut, Valerie; Vandesompele, Jo; Ng, Bee L.; P.Carter, Nigel; Mortier, Geert R.; Speleman, Frank

    2009-01-01

    We report on a patient with mental retardation, seizures and tall stature with advanced bone age in whom a de novo apparently balanced chromosomal rearrangement 46,XX,t(X;9)(q12;p13.3) was identified. Using array CGH on flow-sorted derivative chromosomes (array painting) and subsequent FISH and qPCR analysis, we mapped and sequenced both breakpoints. The Xq12 breakpoint was located within the gene coding for oligophrenin 1 (OPHN1) whereas the 9p13.3 breakpoint was assigned to a non-coding segment within a gene dense region. Disruption of OPHN1 by the Xq12 breakpoint was considered the major cause of the abnormal phenotype observed in the proband. PMID:17845870

  2. Genome-wide amplifications caused by chromosomal rearrangements play a major role in the adaptive evolution of natural yeast.

    PubMed Central

    Infante, Juan J; Dombek, Kenneth M; Rebordinos, Laureana; Cantoral, Jesús M; Young, Elton T

    2003-01-01

    The relative importance of gross chromosomal rearrangements to adaptive evolution has not been precisely defined. The Saccharomyces cerevisiae flor yeast strains offer significant advantages for the study of molecular evolution since they have recently evolved to a high degree of specialization in a very restrictive environment. Using DNA microarray technology, we have compared the genomes of two prominent variants of S. cerevisiae flor yeast strains. The strains differ from one another in the DNA copy number of 116 genomic regions that comprise 38% of the genome. In most cases, these regions are amplicons flanked by repeated sequences or other recombination hotspots previously described as regions where double-strand breaks occur. The presence of genes that confer specific characteristics to the flor yeast within the amplicons supports the role of chromosomal rearrangements as a major mechanism of adaptive evolution in S. cerevisiae. We propose that nonallelic interactions are enhanced by ethanol- and acetaldehyde-induced double-strand breaks in the chromosomal DNA, which are repaired by pathways that yield gross chromosomal rearrangements. This mechanism of chromosomal evolution could also account for the sexual isolation shown among the flor yeast. PMID:14704163

  3. Chaos of Rearrangements in the Mating-Type Chromosomes of the Anther-Smut Fungus Microbotryum lychnidis-dioicae

    PubMed Central

    Badouin, Hélène; Hood, Michael E.; Gouzy, Jérôme; Aguileta, Gabriela; Siguenza, Sophie; Perlin, Michael H.; Cuomo, Christina A.; Fairhead, Cécile; Branca, Antoine; Giraud, Tatiana

    2015-01-01

    Sex chromosomes in plants and animals and fungal mating-type chromosomes often show exceptional genome features, with extensive suppression of homologous recombination and cytological differentiation between members of the diploid chromosome pair. Despite strong interest in the genetics of these chromosomes, their large regions of suppressed recombination often are enriched in transposable elements and therefore can be challenging to assemble. Here we show that the latest improvements of the PacBio sequencing yield assembly of the whole genome of the anther-smut fungus, Microbotryum lychnidis-dioicae (the pathogenic fungus causing anther-smut disease of Silene latifolia), into finished chromosomes or chromosome arms, even for the repeat-rich mating-type chromosomes and centromeres. Suppressed recombination of the mating-type chromosomes is revealed to span nearly 90% of their lengths, with extreme levels of rearrangements, transposable element accumulation, and differentiation between the two mating types. We observed no correlation between allelic divergence and physical position in the nonrecombining regions of the mating-type chromosomes. This may result from gene conversion or from rearrangements of ancient evolutionary strata, i.e., successive steps of suppressed recombination. Centromeres were found to be composed mainly of copia-like transposable elements and to possess specific minisatellite repeats identical between the different chromosomes. We also identified subtelomeric motifs. In addition, extensive signs of degeneration were detected in the nonrecombining regions in the form of transposable element accumulation and of hundreds of gene losses on each mating-type chromosome. Furthermore, our study highlights the potential of the latest breakthrough PacBio chemistry to resolve complex genome architectures. PMID:26044594

  4. Three chromosomal rearrangements promote genomic divergence between migratory and stationary ecotypes of Atlantic cod.

    PubMed

    Berg, Paul R; Star, Bastiaan; Pampoulie, Christophe; Sodeland, Marte; Barth, Julia M I; Knutsen, Halvor; Jakobsen, Kjetill S; Jentoft, Sissel

    2016-01-01

    Identification of genome-wide patterns of divergence provides insight on how genomes are influenced by selection and can reveal the potential for local adaptation in spatially structured populations. In Atlantic cod - historically a major marine resource - Northeast-Arctic- and Norwegian coastal cod are recognized by fundamental differences in migratory and non-migratory behavior, respectively. However, the genomic architecture underlying such behavioral ecotypes is unclear. Here, we have analyzed more than 8.000 polymorphic SNPs distributed throughout all 23 linkage groups and show that loci putatively under selection are localized within three distinct genomic regions, each of several megabases long, covering approximately 4% of the Atlantic cod genome. These regions likely represent genomic inversions. The frequency of these distinct regions differ markedly between the ecotypes, spawning in the vicinity of each other, which contrasts with the low level of divergence in the rest of the genome. The observed patterns strongly suggest that these chromosomal rearrangements are instrumental in local adaptation and separation of Atlantic cod populations, leaving footprints of large genomic regions under selection. Our findings demonstrate the power of using genomic information in further understanding the population dynamics and defining management units in one of the world's most economically important marine resources. PMID:26983361

  5. Three chromosomal rearrangements promote genomic divergence between migratory and stationary ecotypes of Atlantic cod

    PubMed Central

    Berg, Paul R.; Star, Bastiaan; Pampoulie, Christophe; Sodeland, Marte; Barth, Julia M. I.; Knutsen, Halvor; Jakobsen, Kjetill S.; Jentoft, Sissel

    2016-01-01

    Identification of genome-wide patterns of divergence provides insight on how genomes are influenced by selection and can reveal the potential for local adaptation in spatially structured populations. In Atlantic cod – historically a major marine resource – Northeast-Arctic- and Norwegian coastal cod are recognized by fundamental differences in migratory and non-migratory behavior, respectively. However, the genomic architecture underlying such behavioral ecotypes is unclear. Here, we have analyzed more than 8.000 polymorphic SNPs distributed throughout all 23 linkage groups and show that loci putatively under selection are localized within three distinct genomic regions, each of several megabases long, covering approximately 4% of the Atlantic cod genome. These regions likely represent genomic inversions. The frequency of these distinct regions differ markedly between the ecotypes, spawning in the vicinity of each other, which contrasts with the low level of divergence in the rest of the genome. The observed patterns strongly suggest that these chromosomal rearrangements are instrumental in local adaptation and separation of Atlantic cod populations, leaving footprints of large genomic regions under selection. Our findings demonstrate the power of using genomic information in further understanding the population dynamics and defining management units in one of the world’s most economically important marine resources. PMID:26983361

  6. Evidence for Stabilizing Selection on Codon Usage in Chromosomal Rearrangements of Drosophila pseudoobscura

    PubMed Central

    Fuller, Zachary L.; Haynes, Gwilym D.; Zhu, Dianhui; Batterton, Matthew; Chao, Hsu; Dugan, Shannon; Javaid, Mehwish; Jayaseelan, Joy C.; Lee, Sandra; Li, Mingmei; Ongeri, Fiona; Qi, Sulan; Han, Yi; Doddapaneni, Harshavardhan; Richards, Stephen; Schaeffer, Stephen W.

    2014-01-01

    There has been a renewed interest in investigating the role of stabilizing selection acting on genome-wide traits such as codon usage bias. Codon bias, when synonymous codons are used at unequal frequencies, occurs in a wide variety of taxa. Standard evolutionary models explain the maintenance of codon bias through a balance of genetic drift, mutation and weak purifying selection. The efficacy of selection is expected to be reduced in regions of suppressed recombination. Contrary to observations in Drosophila melanogaster, some recent studies have failed to detect a relationship between the recombination rate, intensity of selection acting at synonymous sites, and the magnitude of codon bias as predicted under these standard models. Here, we examined codon bias in 2798 protein coding loci on the third chromosome of D. pseudoobscura using whole-genome sequences of 47 individuals, representing five common third chromosome gene arrangements. Fine-scale recombination maps were constructed using more than 1 million segregating sites. As expected, recombination was demonstrated to be significantly suppressed between chromosome arrangements, allowing for a direct examination of the relationship between recombination, selection, and codon bias. As with other Drosophila species, we observe a strong mutational bias away from the most frequently used codons. We find the rate of synonymous and nonsynonymous polymorphism is variable between different amino acids. However, we do not observe a reduction in codon bias or the strength of selection in regions of suppressed recombination as expected. Instead, we find that the interaction between weak stabilizing selection and mutational bias likely plays a role in shaping the composition of synonymous codons across the third chromosome in D. pseudoobscura. PMID:25326424

  7. De Novo microdeletion on an inherited Robertsonian translocation chromosome: A cause for dysmorphism in the apparently balanced translocation carrier

    SciTech Connect

    Bonthron, D.T.; Smith, S.J.L.; Fantes, J.; Gosden, C.M.

    1993-09-01

    Robertsonian translocations are usually ascertained through abnormal children, making proposed phenotypic effects of apparently balanced translocations difficult to study in an unbiased way. From molecular genetic studies, though, some apparently balanced rearrangments are now known to be associated with phenotypic abnormalities resulting from uniparental disomy. Molecular explanations for other cases in which abnormality is seen in a balanced translocation carrier are being sought. In the present paper, an infant is described who has retarded growth, developmental delay, gross muscular hypotonia, slender habitus, frontal bossing, micrognathia, hooked nose, abundant wispy hair, and blue sclerae. Cytogenetically, she appeared to be a carrier of a balanced, paternally derived 14;21 Robertsonian translocation. Analysis of DNA polymorphisms showed that she had no paternal allele at the D14S13 locus (14q32). Study of additional DNA markers within 14q32 revealed that her previously undescribed phenotype results from an interstitial microdeletion within 14q32. Fluorescent in situ hybridization was used to show that this microdeletion had occurred de novo on the Robertsonian translocation chromosome. These observations may reactivate old suspicions of a causal association between Robertsonian translocations and de novo rearrangements in offspring; a systematic search for similar subcytogentic rearrangements in other families, in which there are phenotypically abnormal children with apparently balanced translocations, may be fruitful. The clinical and molecular genetic data presented also define a new contiguous gene syndrome due to interstitial 14q32 deletion. 42 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  8. Intrachromosomal rearrangements in two representatives of the genus Saltator (Thraupidae, Passeriformes) and the occurrence of heteromorphic Z chromosomes.

    PubMed

    dos Santos, Michelly da Silva; Kretschmer, Rafael; Silva, Fabio Augusto Oliveira; Ledesma, Mario Angel; O'Brien, Patricia C M; Ferguson-Smith, Malcolm A; Del Valle Garnero, Analía; de Oliveira, Edivaldo Herculano Corrêa; Gunski, Ricardo José

    2015-10-01

    Saltator is a genus within family Thraupidae, the second largest family of Passeriformes, with more than 370 species found exclusively in the New World. Despite this, only a few species have had their karyotypes analyzed, most of them only with conventional staining. The diploid number is close to 80, and chromosome morphology is similar to the usual avian karyotype. Recent studies using cross-species chromosome painting have shown that, although the chromosomal morphology and number are similar to many species of birds, Passeriformes exhibit a complex pattern of paracentric and pericentric inversions in the chromosome homologous to GGA1q in two different suborders, Oscines and Suboscines. Hence, considering the importance and species richness of Thraupidae, this study aims to analyze two species of genus Saltator, the golden-billed saltator (S. aurantiirostris) and the green-winged saltator (S. similis) by means of classical cytogenetics and cross-species chromosome painting using Gallus gallus and Leucopternis albicollis probes, and also 5S and 18S rDNA and telomeric sequences. The results show that the karyotypes of these species are similar to other species of Passeriformes. Interestingly, the Z chromosome appears heteromorphic in S. similis, varying in morphology from acrocentric to metacentric. 5S and 18S probes hybridize to one pair of microchromosomes each, and telomeric sequences produce signals only in the terminal regions of chromosomes. FISH results are very similar to the Passeriformes already analyzed by means of molecular cytogenetics (Turdus species and Elaenia spectabilis). However, the paracentric and pericentric inversions observed in Saltator are different from those detected in these species, an observation that helps to explain the probable sequence of rearrangements. As these rearrangements are found in both suborders of Passeriformes (Oscines and Suboscines), we propose that the fission of GGA1 and inversions in GGA1q have occurred very

  9. Persistence of X-ray-induced chromosomal rearrangements in long-term cultures of human diploid fibroblasts

    SciTech Connect

    Kano, Y.; Little, J.B.

    1984-09-01

    As part of a long-term study of mechanisms of human cell neoplastic transformation, the authors have examined the change in the frequencies of X-ray-induced chromosome rearrangements in density-inhibited human foreskin fibroblasts as a function of subculture time. In nonproliferating cells, the frequency of chromosomal aberrations declined within 24 to 48 hr but still remained at a relatively high level up to 43 days after irradiation. Aberrations disappeared rapidly, however, when the cells were allowed to proliferate, indicating that these lesions are lethal to dividing cells. The frequency of induced translocations, as determined by analysis of G-banded karyotypes, was dose dependent and remained stable up to 20 mean population doublings after irradiation. When subculture of density-inhibited cultures was delayed for 4 hr after irradiation (confluent holding), the frequency of chromosomal aberrations in the first mitosis declined, whereas the translocation frequencies at later passage were elevated as compared with cells subcultured immediately. This correlates with the reported increase in the frequency of transformation under similar conditions. These findings support the hypothesis that chromosomal rearrangements induced by DNA damage may be involved in the initiation of cancer.

  10. HMGI(Y) activation by chromosome 6p21 rearrangements in multilineage mesenchymal cells from pulmonary hamartoma.

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, S.; Lux, M. L.; Reeves, R.; Hudson, T. J.; Fletcher, J. A.

    1997-01-01

    The chromosome band 6p21 high-mobility group gene, HMGI(Y), encodes DNA-binding proteins with both chromatin structural and gene regulatory roles. Although HMGI(Y) expression is associated with neoplastic transformation, no oncogenic HMGI(Y) mutations have been identified. We report pulmonary chondroid hamartoma chromosome 6p21 aberrations targeting HMGI(Y). Several pulmonary chondroid hamartomas had chromosome rearrangements mapping within 100 kb of HMGI(Y), and one pulmonary chondroid hamartoma contained an intragenic fusion juxtaposing HMGI(Y) A.T book DNA-binding domains with a laminin alpha 4 chain epidermal-growth-factor-like/ zinc-finger-like motif. These findings demonstrate an oncogenic role for HMGI(Y) and for laminin chain transcriptional regulatory motifs. Images Figure 1 Figure 4 Figure 5 PMID:9060828

  11. Rapid generation of region-specific probes by chromosome microdissection: Application to the identification of chromosomal rearrangements

    SciTech Connect

    Trent, J.M.; Guan, X.Y.; Zang, J.; Meltzer, P.S. )

    1993-01-01

    The authors present results using a novel strategy for chromosome microdissection and direct in vitro amplification of specific chromosomal regions, to identify cryptic chromosome alterations, and to rapidly generate region-specific genomic probes. First, banded chromosomes are microdissected and directly PCR amplified by a procedure which eliminates microchemistry (Meltzer, et al., Nature Genetics, 1:24, 1992). The resulting PCR product can be used for several applications including direct labeling for fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) to normal metaphase chromosomes. A second application of this procedure is the extremely rapid generation of chromosome region-specific probes. This approach has been successfully used to determine the derivation of chromosome segments unidentifiable by standard chromosome banding analysis. In selected instances these probes have also been used on interphase nuclei and provides the potential for assessing chromosome abnormalities in a variety of cell lineages. The microdissection probes (which can be generated in <24 hours) have also been utilized in direct library screening and provide the possibility of acquiring a significant number of region-specific probes for any chromosome band. This procedure extends the limits of conventional cytogenetic analysis by providing an extremely rapid source of numerous band-specific probes, and by enabling the direct analysis of essentially any unknown chromosome region.

  12. Expanding the clinical spectrum of the 16p11.2 chromosomal rearrangements: three patients with syringomyelia

    PubMed Central

    Schaaf, Christian P; Goin-Kochel, Robin P; Nowell, Kerri P; Hunter, Jill V; Aleck, Kirk A; Cox, Sarah; Patel, Ankita; Bacino, Carlos A; Shinawi, Marwan

    2011-01-01

    16p11.2 rearrangements are associated with developmental delay, cognitive impairment, autism spectrum disorder, behavioral problems (especially attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder), seizures, obesity, dysmorphic features, and abnormal head size. In addition, congenital anomalies and abnormal brain findings were frequently observed in patients with these rearrangements. We identified and performed a detailed microarray, phenotypic, and radiological characterization of three new patients with 16p11.2 rearrangements: two deletion patients and one patient with the reciprocal duplication. All patients have a heterozygous loss (deletion) or gain (duplication) corresponding to chromosomal coordinates (chr16: 29 528 190–30 107 184) with a minimal size of 579 kb. The deletion patients had language delay and learning disabilities and one met criteria for pervasive developmental disorder not otherwise specified. The duplication patient received a diagnosis of autism and had academic deficits and behavioral problems. The patients with deletion had long cervicothoracic syringomyelia and the duplication patient had long thoracolumbar syringomyelia. The syringomyelia in one patient with deletion was associated with Chiari malformation. Our findings highlight the broad spectrum of clinical and neurological manifestations in patients with 16p11.2 rearrangements. Our observation suggests that genes (or a single gene) within the implicated interval have significant roles in the pathogenesis of syringomyelia. A more comprehensive and systematic research is warranted to study the frequency and spectrum of malformations in the central nervous system in these patients. PMID:20959866

  13. Reconstruction of genomic rearrangements in great apes and gibbons by chromosome painting.

    PubMed Central

    Jauch, A; Wienberg, J; Stanyon, R; Arnold, N; Tofanelli, S; Ishida, T; Cremer, T

    1992-01-01

    The homology between hylobatid chromosomes and other primates has long remained elusive. We used chromosomal in situ suppression hybridization of all human chromosome-specific DNA libraries to "paint" the chromosomes of primates and establish homologies between the human, great ape (chimpanzee, gorilla, and orangutan), and gibbon karyotypes (Hylobates lar species group, 2n = 44). The hybridization patterns unequivocally demonstrate the high degree of chromosomal homology and synteny of great ape and human chromosomes. Relative to human, no translocations were detected in great apes, except for the well-known fusion-origin of human chromosome 2 and a 5;17 translocation in the gorilla. In contrast, numerous translocations were detected that have led to the massive reorganization of the gibbon karyotype: the 22 autosomal human chromosomes have been divided into 51 elements to compose the 21 gibbon autosomes. Molecular cytogenetics promises to finally allow hylobatids to be integrated into the overall picture of chromosomal evolution in the primates. Images PMID:1528869

  14. BAC-FISH assays delineate complex chromosomal rearrangements in a case of post-Chernobyl childhood thyroid cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Kwan, Johnson; Baumgartner, Adolf; Lu, Chun-Mei; Wang, Mei; Weier, Jingly F.; Zitzelsberger, Horst F.; Weier, Heinz-Ulrich G.

    2009-03-09

    Structural chromosome aberrations are known hallmarks of many solid tumors. In the papillary form of thyroid cancer (PTC), for example, activation of the receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK) genes, RET and neurotrophic tyrosine kinase receptor type I (NTRK1) by intra- and interchromosomal rearrangements has been suggested as a cause of the disease. However, many phenotypically similar tumors do not carry an activated RET or NTRK-1 gene or express abnormal ret or NTRK-1 transcripts. Thus, we hypothesize that other cellular RTK-type genes are aberrantly expressed in these tumors. Using fluorescence in situ hybridization-based methods, we are studying karyotype changes in a relatively rare subgroup of PTCs, i.e., tumors that arose in children following the 1986 nuclear accident in Chernobyl, Ukraine. Here, we report our technical developments and progress in deciphering complex chromosome aberrations in case S48TK, an aggressively growing PTC cell line, which shows an unusual high number of unbalanced translocations.

  15. Speeding up chromosome evolution in Phaseolus: multiple rearrangements associated with a one-step descending dysploidy.

    PubMed

    Fonsêca, Artur; Ferraz, Maria Eduarda; Pedrosa-Harand, Andrea

    2016-06-01

    The genus Phaseolus L. has been subject of extensive cytogenetic studies due to its global economic importance. It is considered karyotypically stable, with most of its ca. 75 species having 2n = 22 chromosomes, and only three species (Phaseolus leptostachyus, Phaseolus macvaughii, and Phaseolus micranthus), which form the Leptostachyus clade, having 2n = 20. To test whether a simple chromosomal fusion was the cause of this descending dysploidy, mitotic chromosomes of P. leptostachyus (2n = 20) were comparatively mapped by fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) using bacterial artificial chromosomes (BACs) and ribosomal DNA (rDNA) probes. Our results corroborated the conservation of the 5S and 45S rDNA sites on ancestral chromosomes 10 and 6, respectively. The reduction from x = 11 to x = 10 was the result of the insertion of chromosome 10 into the centromeric region of chromosome 11, supporting a nested chromosome fusion (NCF) as the main cause of this dysploidy. Additionally, the terminal region of the long arm of chromosome 6 was translocated to this larger chromosome. Surprisingly, the NCF was accompanied by several additional translocations and inversions previously unknown for the genus, suggesting that the dysploidy may have been associated to a burst of genome reorganization in this otherwise stable, diploid plant genus. PMID:26490170

  16. Transposon-mediated chromosomal rearrangements and gene duplications in the formation of the maize R-r complex.

    PubMed Central

    Walker, E L; Robbins, T P; Bureau, T E; Kermicle, J; Dellaporta, S L

    1995-01-01

    R-r controls the production of anthocyanin pigment in plant parts and the aleurone layer of seeds through the production of a family of related transcriptional activating proteins of the helix-loop-helix type. The R-r complex comprises a series of repeated, homologous components arranged in both direct and inverted orientations. These include the P component, a simple R gene that confers pigmentation of plant parts, and the S subcomplex that consists of a truncated inactive R gene called q, and two functional R genes, S1 and S2, that pigment the aleurone. The S genes are arranged in an unusual inverted head-to-head orientation. The identity of each functional component was confirmed by microprojectile bombardment of intact maize tissues with cloned genomic DNA and by analysis of in vivo mRNA populations. Sequence analysis suggests that the S subcomplex was derived through the rearrangement of a simple P-like progenitor element. At the rearrangement breakpoints, features typical of the CACTA family of transposable elements were found. The location and arrangement of these CACTA element sequences implies that this element may have mediated the chromosomal rearrangements that led to the formation of the R-r complex. The unusual structure of R-r explains much of the meiotic instability of the complex. Images PMID:7774593

  17. Chromosomal rearrangements and evolution of recombination: comparison of chiasma distribution patterns in standard and robertsonian populations of the house mouse.

    PubMed Central

    Dumas, David; Britton-Davidian, Janice

    2002-01-01

    The effects of chromosomal rearrangements on recombination rates were tested by the analysis of chiasma distribution patterns in wild house mice. Males and females of two chromosomal races from Tunisia differing by nine pairs of Robertsonian (Rb) fusions (standard all-acrocentric, 2N = 40 and 2N = 22) were studied. A significant decrease in chiasma number (CN) was observed in Rb mice compared to standard ones for both sexes. The difference in CN was due to a reduction in the number of proximal chiasmata and was associated with an overall more distal redistribution. These features were related to distance of chiasmata to the centromere, suggesting that the centromere effect was more pronounced in Rb fusions than in acrocentric chromosomes. These modifications were interpreted in terms of structural meiotic constraints, although genic factors were likely involved in patterning the observed differences between sexes within races. Thus, the change in chromosomal structure in Rb mice was associated with a generalized decrease in recombination due to a reduction in diploid number, a lower CN, and a decrease in the efficiency of recombination. The effects of such modifications on patterns of genic diversity are discussed in the light of models of evolution of recombination. PMID:12454079

  18. Testis development in the absence of SRY: chromosomal rearrangements at SOX9 and SOX3

    PubMed Central

    Vetro, Annalisa; Dehghani, Mohammad Reza; Kraoua, Lilia; Giorda, Roberto; Beri, Silvana; Cardarelli, Laura; Merico, Maurizio; Manolakos, Emmanouil; Parada-Bustamante, Alexis; Castro, Andrea; Radi, Orietta; Camerino, Giovanna; Brusco, Alfredo; Sabaghian, Marjan; Sofocleous, Crystalena; Forzano, Francesca; Palumbo, Pietro; Palumbo, Orazio; Calvano, Savino; Zelante, Leopoldo; Grammatico, Paola; Giglio, Sabrina; Basly, Mohamed; Chaabouni, Myriam; Carella, Massimo; Russo, Gianni; Bonaglia, Maria Clara; Zuffardi, Orsetta

    2015-01-01

    Duplications in the ~2 Mb desert region upstream of SOX9 at 17q24.3 may result in familial 46,XX disorders of sex development (DSD) without any effects on the XY background. A balanced translocation with its breakpoint falling within the same region has also been described in one XX DSD subject. We analyzed, by conventional and molecular cytogenetics, 19 novel SRY-negative unrelated 46,XX subjects both familial and sporadic, with isolated DSD. One of them had a de novo reciprocal t(11;17) translocation. Two cases carried partially overlapping 17q24.3 duplications ~500 kb upstream of SOX9, both inherited from their normal fathers. Breakpoints cloning showed that both duplications were in tandem, whereas the 17q in the reciprocal translocation was broken at ~800 kb upstream of SOX9, which is not only close to a previously described 46,XX DSD translocation, but also to translocations without any effects on the gonadal development. A further XX male, ascertained because of intellectual disability, carried a de novo cryptic duplication at Xq27.1, involving SOX3. CNVs involving SOX3 or its flanking regions have been reported in four XX DSD subjects. Collectively in our cohort of 19 novel cases of SRY-negative 46,XX DSD, the duplications upstream of SOX9 account for ~10.5% of the cases, and are responsible for the disease phenotype, even when inherited from a normal father. Translocations interrupting this region may also affect the gonadal development, possibly depending on the chromatin context of the recipient chromosome. SOX3 duplications may substitute SRY in some XX subjects. PMID:25351776

  19. Testis development in the absence of SRY: chromosomal rearrangements at SOX9 and SOX3.

    PubMed

    Vetro, Annalisa; Dehghani, Mohammad Reza; Kraoua, Lilia; Giorda, Roberto; Beri, Silvana; Cardarelli, Laura; Merico, Maurizio; Manolakos, Emmanouil; Parada-Bustamante, Alexis; Castro, Andrea; Radi, Orietta; Camerino, Giovanna; Brusco, Alfredo; Sabaghian, Marjan; Sofocleous, Crystalena; Forzano, Francesca; Palumbo, Pietro; Palumbo, Orazio; Calvano, Savino; Zelante, Leopoldo; Grammatico, Paola; Giglio, Sabrina; Basly, Mohamed; Chaabouni, Myriam; Carella, Massimo; Russo, Gianni; Bonaglia, Maria Clara; Zuffardi, Orsetta

    2015-08-01

    Duplications in the ~2 Mb desert region upstream of SOX9 at 17q24.3 may result in familial 46,XX disorders of sex development (DSD) without any effects on the XY background. A balanced translocation with its breakpoint falling within the same region has also been described in one XX DSD subject. We analyzed, by conventional and molecular cytogenetics, 19 novel SRY-negative unrelated 46,XX subjects both familial and sporadic, with isolated DSD. One of them had a de novo reciprocal t(11;17) translocation. Two cases carried partially overlapping 17q24.3 duplications ~500 kb upstream of SOX9, both inherited from their normal fathers. Breakpoints cloning showed that both duplications were in tandem, whereas the 17q in the reciprocal translocation was broken at ~800 kb upstream of SOX9, which is not only close to a previously described 46,XX DSD translocation, but also to translocations without any effects on the gonadal development. A further XX male, ascertained because of intellectual disability, carried a de novo cryptic duplication at Xq27.1, involving SOX3. CNVs involving SOX3 or its flanking regions have been reported in four XX DSD subjects. Collectively in our cohort of 19 novel cases of SRY-negative 46,XX DSD, the duplications upstream of SOX9 account for ~10.5% of the cases, and are responsible for the disease phenotype, even when inherited from a normal father. Translocations interrupting this region may also affect the gonadal development, possibly depending on the chromatin context of the recipient chromosome. SOX3 duplications may substitute SRY in some XX subjects. PMID:25351776

  20. Karyotype evolution in South American subterranean rodents Ctenomys magellanicus (Rodentia: Octodontidae): chromosome rearrangements and (TTAGGG)n telomeric sequence localization in 2n=34 and 2n=36 chromosomal forms.

    PubMed

    Lizarralde, Marta; Bolzan, Alejandro; Bianchi, Martha

    2003-01-01

    Ctenomys is the most numerous genus of South American subterranean rodents and one of the most karyotypically diverse clades of mammals known. Ctenomys magellanicus is the southernmost species of the group and the only one living in Isla Grande de Tierra del Fuego (Argentina). This species presents two chromosomal forms, i.e. 2n=34, and 2n=36 (FN=68). Recent studies suggest that genetic divergence between both karyotypic forms resulted from a chromosomal speciation process. In order to identify the chromosomal rearrangement involved in the process of karyotype evolution in this species, we used chromosome banding techniques and fluorescence in situ hybridization with a telomeric probe to metaphase chromosomes of the two chromosomal forms of Ctenomys magellanicus. Chromosome analysis of Giemsa-stained and G-banding preparations showed that Cm34 and Cm36 karyotypes differ in one rearrangement involving chromosomes A9 from Cm34 and B12 and B17 from Cm36. In addition FISH analysis showed that all of the chromosomes from both chromosomal forms exhibit a telomeric-only distribution pattern of the (TTAGGG)n sequence, indicating that none of the chromosomal forms of Ctenomys magellanicus has true telocentric chromosomes. Our results suggest that a chromosome fission event would have occurred during the process of karyotype evolution in this species. PMID:14641468

  1. Molecular analysis of chromosomal rearrangements using pulsed field gel electrophoresis and somatic cell hybrids

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, L.M. )

    1991-01-01

    Many human genetic diseases, including some cancers, are characterized by consistent chromosome abnormalities, such as deletions and translocations. Analyses of these mutations often prove crucial to the eventual cloning and characterization of the gene(s) responsible for the disease. Two methods for analyzing these chromosome abnormalities have been developed in recent years: somatic cell hybridization and pulsed field gel electrophoresis (PFGE). Somatic cell hybridization is a technique for segregating an aberrant chromosome from its normal homologue in a cell derived from an unrelated species, which is usually a rodent. Demonstrations of these analytic techniques are presented, using as an example chromosomal abnormalities involving human chromosome band 11p13, the locus for the Wilms' tumor, aniridia, genitourinary abnormality, and mental retardation (WAGR) syndrome.

  2. Activation of the c-H-ras proto-oncogene by retrovirus insertion and chromosomal rearrangement in a Moloney leukemia virus-induced T-cell leukemia.

    PubMed Central

    Ihle, J N; Smith-White, B; Sisson, B; Parker, D; Blair, D G; Schultz, A; Kozak, C; Lunsford, R D; Askew, D; Weinstein, Y

    1989-01-01

    A rearrangement of the c-H-ras locus was detected in a T-cell line (DA-2) established from a Moloney leukemia virus-induced tumor. This rearrangement was associated with the high-level expression of H-ras RNA and the H-ras gene product, p21. DNA from DA-2 cells transformed fibroblasts in DNA transfection experiments, and the transformed fibroblasts contained the rearranged H-ras locus. The rearrangement involved one allele and was present in tissue from the primary tumor from which the cell line was isolated. Cloning and sequencing of the rearranged allele and comparison with the normal allele demonstrated that the rearrangement was complex and probably resulted from the integration of a retrovirus in the H-ras locus between a 5' noncoding exon and the first coding exon and a subsequent homologous recombination between this provirus and another newly acquired provirus also located on chromosome 7. These events resulted in the translocation of the coding exons of the H-ras locus away from the 5' noncoding exon region to a new genomic site on chromosome 7. Sequencing of the coding regions of the gene failed to detect mutations in the 12th, 13th, 59th, or 61st codons. The possible reasons for the complexity of the rearrangement and the significance of the activation of the H-ras locus to T-cell transformation are discussed. Images PMID:2542606

  3. Molecular characterization of the t(4;12)(q27~28;q14~15) chromosomal rearrangement in lipoma

    PubMed Central

    Agostini, Antonio; Gorunova, Ludmila; Bjerkehagen, Bodil; Lobmaier, Ingvild; Heim, Sverre; Panagopoulos, Ioannis

    2016-01-01

    Lipomas are common benign soft tissue tumors whose genetic and cytogenetic features are well characterized. The karyotype is usually near- or pseudodiploid with characteristic structural chromosomal aberrations. The most common rearrangements target the high mobility group AT-hook 2 (HMGA2) gene in 12q14.3, with breakpoints occurring within or outside of the gene locus leading to deregulation of HMGA2. The most common fusion partner for HMGA2 in lipoma is lipoma-preferred partner (3q27), but also other genes frequently recombine with HMGA2. Furthermore, truncated HMGA2 transcripts are recurrently observed in lipomas. The present study describes 5 lipomas carrying the translocation t(4;12)(q27~28;q14~15) as the sole chromosomal anomaly, as well as 1 lipoma in which the three-way translocation t(1;4;12)(q21;q27~28;q14~15) was identified. Molecular analyses performed on 4 of these cases detected 4 truncated forms of HMGA2. In 3 tumors, the HMGA2 truncated transcripts included sequences originating from the chromosomal sub-band 4q28.1. Notably, in 2 of these cases, the fourth exon of HMGA2 was fused to transposable elements located in 4q28.1. PMID:27588119

  4. Chromosomal rearrangements in patients with clinical features of Silver-Russell syndrome.

    PubMed

    Fokstuen, Siv; Kotzot, Dieter

    2014-06-01

    Silver-Russell syndrome (SRS) is characterized by pre- and postnatal growth retardation, relative macrocephaly, asymmetry, and a triangular facial gestalt. In 5-10% of the patients the phenotype is caused by maternal UPD 7, and 38-64% of the patients present with hypomethylation at the imprinting center region 1 (ICR1) on 11p15.5. The etiology of the remaining cases is so far not known and various (sub-)microscopic chromosome aberrations with a phenotype resembling SRS have been published, especially duplication 11p15 (n = 15), deletion 12q14 (n = 19), ring chromosome 15, deletion 15qter, and various other mostly unique chromosomal aberrations (n = 30). In this study the phenotypes of these chromosomal aberrations were revisited and compared with the phenotypes of maternal UPD 7 and hypomethylation at ICR1 on 11p15.5. In some patients with a unique chromosomal aberration even the hallmarks of SRS were missing. Patients with duplication 11p15 show a more variable occipitofrontal head circumference at birth, a higher frequency of intellectual disability, and additional anomalies not reported in SRS. Deletion 12q14 is characterized by less severe pre- and postnatal growth retardation and less impressive relative macrocephaly. Patients with ring chromosome 15 and deletion 15qter have no relative macrocephaly (mostly even microcephaly) and more severe intellectual disability. Finally, deletion 15qter lacks the triangular facial gestalt. In summary, as SRS seems not an adequate diagnosis in many of these patients, diagnosis should focus on the chromosomal aberration than on SRS. PMID:24664587

  5. Chromosome painting shows that skunks (Mephitidae, Carnivora) have highly rearranged karyotypes.

    PubMed

    Perelman, P L; Graphodatsky, A S; Dragoo, J W; Serdyukova, N A; Stone, G; Cavagna, P; Menotti, A; Nie, W; O'Brien, P C M; Wang, J; Burkett, S; Yuki, K; Roelke, M E; O'Brien, S J; Yang, F; Stanyon, R

    2008-01-01

    The karyotypic relationships of skunks (Mephitidae) with other major clades of carnivores are not yet established. Here, multi-directional chromosome painting was used to reveal the karyological relationships among skunks and between Mephitidae (skunks) and Procyonidae (raccoons). Representative species from three genera of Mephitidae (Mephitis mephitis, 2n = 50; Mephitis macroura, 2n = 50; Conepatus leuconotus, 2n = 46; Spilogale gracilis, 2n = 60) and one species of Procyonidae (Procyon lotor, 2n = 38) were studied. Chromosomal homology was mapped by hybridization of five sets of whole-chromosome paints derived from stone marten (Martes foina, 2n = 38), cat, skunks (M. mephitis; M. macroura) and human. The karyotype of the raccoon is highly conserved and identical to the hypothetical ancestral musteloid karyotype, suggesting that procyonids have a particular importance for establishing the karyological evolution within the caniforms. Ten fission events and five fusion events are necessary to generate the ancestral skunk karyotype from the ancestral carnivore karyotype. Our results show that Mephitidae joins Canidae and Ursidae as the third family of carnivores that are characterized by a high rate of karyotype evolution. Shared derived chromosomal fusion of stone marten chromosomes 6 and 14 phylogenetically links the American hog-nosed skunk and eastern spotted skunk. PMID:19051045

  6. Familial four breakpoint complex chromosomal rearrangement as a cause of monosomy 9p22-->pter and trisomy 10p11.2-->pter and 11q21 analysed by dual and triple colour FISH.

    PubMed Central

    Stankiewicz, P; Kostyk, E; Bocian, E; Stańczak, H; Parczewska, J; Piatkowska, E; Mazurczak, T; Pietrzyk, J J

    1997-01-01

    A familial four breakpoint complex chromosomal rearrangement involving chromosomes 9, 10, and 11 was ascertained through a child with dysmorphic features, hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, and hypotonia. A cryptic insertion, invisible in G banded chromosomes was identified by fluorescence in situ hybridisation (FISH) using chromosome specific libraries. Possible mechanisms of its formation as well as karyotype-phenotype correlation are discussed. Images PMID:9279768

  7. Massive Amplification at an Unselected Locus Accompanies Complex Chromosomal Rearrangements in Yeast.

    PubMed

    Thierry, Agnès; Khanna, Varun; Dujon, Bernard

    2016-01-01

    Gene amplification has been observed in different organisms in response to environmental constraints, such as limited nutrients or exposure to a variety of toxic compounds, conferring them with specific phenotypic adaptations via increased expression levels. However, the presence of multiple gene copies in natural genomes has generally not been found in the absence of specific functional selection. Here, we show that the massive amplification of a chromosomal locus (up to 880 copies per cell) occurs in the absence of any direct selection, and is associated with low-order amplifications of flanking segments in complex chromosomal alterations. These results were obtained from mutants with restored phenotypes that spontaneously appeared from genetically engineered strains of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae suffering from severe fitness reduction. Grossly extended chromosomes (macrotene) were formed, with complex structural alterations but sufficient stability to propagate unchanged over successive generations. Their detailed molecular analysis, including complete genome sequencing, identification of sequence breakpoints, and comparisons between mutants, revealed novel mechanisms causing their formation, whose combined action underlies the astonishing dynamics of eukaryotic chromosomes and their consequences. PMID:26945028

  8. Massive Amplification at an Unselected Locus Accompanies Complex Chromosomal Rearrangements in Yeast

    PubMed Central

    Thierry, Agnès; Khanna, Varun; Dujon, Bernard

    2016-01-01

    Gene amplification has been observed in different organisms in response to environmental constraints, such as limited nutrients or exposure to a variety of toxic compounds, conferring them with specific phenotypic adaptations via increased expression levels. However, the presence of multiple gene copies in natural genomes has generally not been found in the absence of specific functional selection. Here, we show that the massive amplification of a chromosomal locus (up to 880 copies per cell) occurs in the absence of any direct selection, and is associated with low-order amplifications of flanking segments in complex chromosomal alterations. These results were obtained from mutants with restored phenotypes that spontaneously appeared from genetically engineered strains of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae suffering from severe fitness reduction. Grossly extended chromosomes (macrotene) were formed, with complex structural alterations but sufficient stability to propagate unchanged over successive generations. Their detailed molecular analysis, including complete genome sequencing, identification of sequence breakpoints, and comparisons between mutants, revealed novel mechanisms causing their formation, whose combined action underlies the astonishing dynamics of eukaryotic chromosomes and their consequences. PMID:26945028

  9. Did sex chromosome turnover promote divergence of the major mammal groups?: De novo sex chromosomes and drastic rearrangements may have posed reproductive barriers between monotremes, marsupials and placental mammals.

    PubMed

    Graves, Jennifer A M

    2016-08-01

    Comparative mapping and sequencing show that turnover of sex determining genes and chromosomes, and sex chromosome rearrangements, accompany speciation in many vertebrates. Here I review the evidence and propose that the evolution of therian mammals was precipitated by evolution of the male-determining SRY gene, defining a novel XY sex chromosome pair, and interposing a reproductive barrier with the ancestral population of synapsid reptiles 190 million years ago (MYA). Divergence was reinforced by multiple translocations in monotreme sex chromosomes, the first of which supplied a novel sex determining gene. A sex chromosome-autosome fusion may have separated eutherians (placental mammals) from marsupials 160 MYA. Another burst of sex chromosome change and speciation is occurring in rodents, precipitated by the degradation of the Y. And although primates have a more stable Y chromosome, it may be just a matter of time before the same fate overtakes our own lineage. Also watch the video abstract. PMID:27334831

  10. Rearrangements in human chromosome 1 visualized by arm-specific probes in the progeny of blood lymphocytes exposed to iron ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manti, L.; Bertucci, A.; Gialanella, G.; Grossi, G.; Pignalosa, D.; Pugliese, M.; Scampoli, P.; Durante, M.

    The objective of this study was to measure differences in the chromosomal rearrangements found in the progeny of cells exposed to the same dose of X-rays or energetic iron ions, with emphasis on intra-chromosomal exchanges. We hybridized metaphase cells with human DNA probes specific for the p and q arms of the chromosome 1. The arm-specific probes allow a fast and reliable detection of both symmetrical and asymmetrical inter-chromosomal exchanges and inter-arm intra-changes (pericentric inversions) in the painted chromosome pair. We used this method to score aberrations in human peripheral blood lymphocytes exposed to 1 Gy of either 250 kVp X-rays or 1 GeV/n Fe-ions and harvested following 120 h in culture, including 2 h in colcemid for metaphase-block. Although iron ions are much more effective than X-rays in the induction of chromosomal aberrations formed during the first post-exposure cell cycle, we found that the effectiveness drops when daughter cells are scored at a late harvest time. In fact, no significant difference in the yield of simple interchanges or intra-changes was found for the two radiation qualities. On the other hand, complex-type exchanges, including rearrangements involving both intra- and inter-chromosomal exchanges, were much more frequent in the progeny of the population exposed to Fe-nuclei than to photons.

  11. Estimation of the proportion of genetically unbalanced spermatozoa in the semen of boars carrying chromosomal rearrangements using FISH on sperm nuclei

    PubMed Central

    Pinton, Alain; Ducos, Alain; Yerle, Martine

    2004-01-01

    Many chromosomal rearrangements are detected each year in France on young boars candidates for reproduction. The possible use of these animals requires a good knowledge of the potential effect of the rearrangements on the prolificacy of their mates. This effect can be estimated by an accurate determination of the rate of unbalanced spermatozoa in the semen of boars which carry the rearrangements. Indeed, these spermatozoa exhibiting normal fertilizing ability are responsible for an early embryonic mortality, and then, for a decrease of the litter sizes. The "spermFISH" technique, i.e. fluorescent in situ hybridization on decondensed sperm heads, has been used on several occasions in Man, in this perspective. In livestock species, this method was formerly used mainly for semen sexing purposes. We used it, for the first time, to estimate the rates of imbalance in the semen of four boars carrying chromosomal rearrangements: two reciprocal translocations, rcp(3;15)(q27;q13) and rcp(12;14)(q13;q21), as well as two independent cases of trisomy 18 mosaicism. The rates of unbalanced gametes were relatively high for the two reciprocal translocations (47.83% and 24.33%, respectively). These values differed from the apparent effects of the rearrangements estimated using a limited number of litters: a decrease in prolificacy of 23% (estimation obtained using the results of 6 litters) and 39% (57 litters), respectively for the 3/15 and 12/14 translocations. The imbalance rates were much lower for the trisomy mosaics (0.58% and 1.13%), suggesting a very moderate effect of this special kind of chromosomal rearrangement. PMID:14713414

  12. Chromosome Rearrangements in Cornelia de Lange Syndrome (CdLS): Report of a der(3)t(3;12)(p25.3;p13.3) in Two Half Sibs With Features of CdLS and Review of Reported CdLS Cases With Chromosome Rearrangements

    PubMed Central

    DeScipio, Cheryl; Kaur, Maninder; Yaeger, Dinah; Innis, Jeffrey W.; Spinner, Nancy B.; Jackson, Laird G.; Krantz, Ian D.

    2016-01-01

    Cornelia de Lange syndrome (CdLS; OMIM 122470) is a dominantly inherited disorder characterized by multisystem involvement, cognitive delay, limb defects, and characteristic facial features. Recently, mutations in NIPBL have been found in ~50% of individuals with CdLS. Numerous chromosomal rearrangements have been reported in individuals with CdLS. These rearrangements may be causative of a CdLS phenotype, result in a phenocopy, or be unrelated to the observed phenotype. We describe two half siblings with a der(3)t(3;12)(p25.3;p13.3) chromosomal rearrangement, clinical features resembling CdLS, and phenotypic overlap with the del(3)(p25) phenotype. Region-specific BAC probes were used to fine-map the breakpoint region by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). FISH analysis places the chromosome 3 breakpoint distal to RP11-115G3 on 3p25.3; the chromosome 12 breakpoint is distal to BAC RP11-88D16 on 12p13.3. A review of published cases of terminal 3p deletions and terminal 12p duplications indicates that the findings in these siblings are consistent with the del(3)(p25) phenotype. Given the phenotypic overlap with CdLS, we have reviewed the reported cases of chromosomal rearrangements involved in CdLS to better elucidate other potential loci that could harbor additional CdLS genes. Additionally, to identify chromosome rearrangements, genome-wide array comparative genomic hybridization (CGH) was performed on eight individuals with typical CdLS and without identifiable deletion or mutation of NIPBL. No pathologic rearrangements were identified. PMID:16075459

  13. A balanced t(5;17) (p15;q22-23) in chondroblastoma: frequency of the re-arrangement and analysis of the candidate genes

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Chondroblastoma is a benign cartilaginous tumour of bone that predominantly affects the epiphysis of long bones in young males. No recurrent chromosomal re-arrangements have so far been observed. Methods: We identified an index case with a balanced translocation by Combined Binary Ratio-Fluorescent in situ Hybridisation (COBRA-FISH) karyotyping followed by breakpoint FISH mapping and array-Comparative Genomic Hybridisation (aCGH). Candidate region re-arrangement and candidate gene expression were subsequently investigated by interphase FISH and immunohistochemistry in another 14 cases. Results A balanced t(5;17)(p15;q22-23) was identified. In the index case, interphase FISH showed that the translocation was present only in mononucleated cells and was absent in the characteristic multinucleated giant cells. The t(5;17) translocation was not observed in the other cases studied. The breakpoint in 5p15 occurred close to the steroid reductase 5α1 (SRD5A1) gene. Expression of the protein was found in all cases tested. Similar expression was found for the sex steroid signalling-related molecules oestrogen receptor alpha and aromatase, while androgen receptors were only found in isolated cells in a few cases. The breakpoint in 17q22-23 was upstream of the carbonic anhydrase × (CA10) gene region and possibly involved gene-regulatory elements, which was indicated by the lack of CA10 protein expression in the index case. All other cases showed variable levels of CA10 expression, with low expression in three cases. Conclusion We report a novel t(5;17)(p15;q22-23) translocation in chondroblastoma without involvement of any of the two chromosomal regions in other cases studied. Our results indicate that the characteristic multinucleated giant cells in chondroblastoma do not have the same clonal origin as the mononuclear population, as they do not harbour the same translocation. We therefore hypothesise that they might be either reactive or originate from a distinct

  14. Asplenia syndrome in a child with a balanced reciprocal translocation of chromosomes 11 and 20 [46,XX,t(11;20)(q13.1;q13.13)

    SciTech Connect

    Freeman, S.B.; May, K.M.; Blackston, R.D.; Muralidharan, K.

    1996-02-02

    We present a 6-year-old girl with a balanced 11;20 translocation [46,XX,t(11;20)(q13.1;q13.13)pat], asplenia, pulmonic stenosis, Hirschsprung disease, minor anomalies, and mental retardation. This case represents the second report of an individual with situs abnormalities and a balanced chromosome rearrangement involving a breakpoint at 11q13. Segregation analysis of markers in the 11q13 region in the proposita and her phenotypically normal carrier sibs did not show a unique combination of maternal and paternal alleles in the patient. We discuss several possible explanations for the simultaneous occurrence of situs abnormalities and a balanced 11;20 translocation. These include (1) chance, (2) a further chromosome rearrangement in the patient, (3) gene disruption and random situs determination, and (4) gene disruption plus transmission of a recessive or imprinted allele from the mother. 30 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  15. Rare recombination events generate sequence diversity among balancer chromosomes in Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Danny E.; Cook, Kevin R.; Yeganeh Kazemi, Nazanin; Smith, Clarissa B.; Cockrell, Alexandria J.; Hawley, R. Scott; Bergman, Casey M.

    2016-01-01

    Multiply inverted balancer chromosomes that suppress exchange with their homologs are an essential part of the Drosophila melanogaster genetic toolkit. Despite their widespread use, the organization of balancer chromosomes has not been characterized at the molecular level, and the degree of sequence variation among copies of balancer chromosomes is unknown. To map inversion breakpoints and study potential diversity in descendants of a structurally identical balancer chromosome, we sequenced a panel of laboratory stocks containing the most widely used X chromosome balancer, First Multiple 7 (FM7). We mapped the locations of FM7 breakpoints to precise euchromatic coordinates and identified the flanking sequence of breakpoints in heterochromatic regions. Analysis of SNP variation revealed megabase-scale blocks of sequence divergence among currently used FM7 stocks. We present evidence that this divergence arose through rare double-crossover events that replaced a female-sterile allele of the singed gene (snX2) on FM7c with a sequence from balanced chromosomes. We propose that although double-crossover events are rare in individual crosses, many FM7c chromosomes in the Bloomington Drosophila Stock Center have lost snX2 by this mechanism on a historical timescale. Finally, we characterize the original allele of the Bar gene (B1) that is carried on FM7, and validate the hypothesis that the origin and subsequent reversion of the B1 duplication are mediated by unequal exchange. Our results reject a simple nonrecombining, clonal mode for the laboratory evolution of balancer chromosomes and have implications for how balancer chromosomes should be used in the design and interpretation of genetic experiments in Drosophila. PMID:26903656

  16. Mapping Breakpoints of Complex Chromosome Rearrangements Involving a Partial Trisomy 15q23.1-q26.2 Revealed by Next Generation Sequencing and Conventional Techniques

    PubMed Central

    Han, Liangrong; Jing, Xin; Liu, Hailiang; Yang, Chuanchun; Zhang, Fengting; Hu, Yue; Yue, Hongni; Ning, Ying

    2016-01-01

    Complex chromosome rearrangements (CCRs), which are rather rare in the whole population, may be associated with aberrant phenotypes. Next-generation sequencing (NGS) and conventional techniques, could be used to reveal specific CCRs for better genetic counseling. We report the CCRs of a girl and her mother, which were identified using a combination of NGS and conventional techniques including G-banding, fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) and PCR. The girl demonstrated CCRs involving chromosomes 3 and 8, while the CCRs of her mother involved chromosomes 3, 5, 8, 11 and 15. HumanCytoSNP-12 Chip analysis identified a 35.4 Mb duplication on chromosome 15q21.3-q26.2 in the proband and a 1.6 Mb microdeletion at chromosome 15q21.3 in her mother. The proband inherited the rearranged chromosomes 3 and 8 from her mother, and the duplicated region on chromosome 15 of the proband was inherited from the mother. Approximately one hundred genes were identified in the 15q21.3-q26.2 duplicated region of the proband. In particular, TPM1, SMAD6, SMAD3, and HCN4 may be associated with her heart defects, and HEXA, KIF7, and IDH2 are responsible for her developmental and mental retardation. In addition, we suggest that a microdeletion on the 15q21.3 region of the mother, which involved TCF2, TCF12, ADMA10 and AQP9, might be associated with mental retardation. We delineate the precise structures of the derivative chromosomes, chromosome duplication origin and possible molecular mechanisms for aberrant phenotypes by combining NGS data with conventional techniques. PMID:27218255

  17. Mapping Breakpoints of Complex Chromosome Rearrangements Involving a Partial Trisomy 15q23.1-q26.2 Revealed by Next Generation Sequencing and Conventional Techniques.

    PubMed

    Pan, Qiong; Hu, Hao; Han, Liangrong; Jing, Xin; Liu, Hailiang; Yang, Chuanchun; Zhang, Fengting; Hu, Yue; Yue, Hongni; Ning, Ying

    2016-01-01

    Complex chromosome rearrangements (CCRs), which are rather rare in the whole population, may be associated with aberrant phenotypes. Next-generation sequencing (NGS) and conventional techniques, could be used to reveal specific CCRs for better genetic counseling. We report the CCRs of a girl and her mother, which were identified using a combination of NGS and conventional techniques including G-banding, fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) and PCR. The girl demonstrated CCRs involving chromosomes 3 and 8, while the CCRs of her mother involved chromosomes 3, 5, 8, 11 and 15. HumanCytoSNP-12 Chip analysis identified a 35.4 Mb duplication on chromosome 15q21.3-q26.2 in the proband and a 1.6 Mb microdeletion at chromosome 15q21.3 in her mother. The proband inherited the rearranged chromosomes 3 and 8 from her mother, and the duplicated region on chromosome 15 of the proband was inherited from the mother. Approximately one hundred genes were identified in the 15q21.3-q26.2 duplicated region of the proband. In particular, TPM1, SMAD6, SMAD3, and HCN4 may be associated with her heart defects, and HEXA, KIF7, and IDH2 are responsible for her developmental and mental retardation. In addition, we suggest that a microdeletion on the 15q21.3 region of the mother, which involved TCF2, TCF12, ADMA10 and AQP9, might be associated with mental retardation. We delineate the precise structures of the derivative chromosomes, chromosome duplication origin and possible molecular mechanisms for aberrant phenotypes by combining NGS data with conventional techniques. PMID:27218255

  18. In situ hybridization (FISH) maps chromosomal homologies between Alouatta belzebul (Platyrrhini, Cebidae) and other primates and reveals extensive interchromosomal rearrangements between howler monkey genomes.

    PubMed

    Consigliere, S; Stanyon, R; Koehler, U; Arnold, N; Wienberg, J

    1998-01-01

    We hybridized whole human chromosome specific probes to metaphases of the black-and-red howler monkey Alouatta belzebul in order to establish chromosomal homology between humans and black-and-red howlers. The results show that the black-and-red howler monkey has a highly rearranged genome and that the human chromosome homologs are often fragmented and translocated. The number of hybridization signals we obtained per haploid set was 40. Nine human chromosome probes gave multiple signals on different howler chromosomes, showing that their synteny is disturbed in A. belzebul. Fourteen black-and-red howler autosomes were completely hybridized by one human autosomal paint, six had two signals, three had three signals, and one chromosome had four signals. Howler chromosomes with multiple signals have produced 12 chromosomal syntenies or hybridization associations which differ from those found in humans: 1/2, 2/20, 3/21, 4/15, 4/16, 5/7, 5/11, 8/18, 9/12, 10/16, 14/15, and 15/22. The hybridization pattern was then compared with those found in two red howler taxa and other mammals. The comparison shows that even within the genus Alouatta numerous interchromosomal rearrangements differentiate each taxa: A. belzebul has six unique apomorphic associations, A. seniculus sara and A. seniculus arctoidea share seven derived associations, and additionally A. seniculus sara has four apomorphic associations and A. seniculus arctoidea seven apomorphic associations. A. belzebul appears to have a more conserved karyotype than the red howlers. Both red and black-and-red howlers are characterized by Y-autosome translocations; the peculiar chromosomal sex system found in the red howler taxa could be considered a further transformation of the A. belzebul sex system. The finding that apparently morphologically similar or even identical taxa have such extreme genomic differences has important implications for speciation theory and neotropical primate conservation. PMID:9773675

  19. A Chromosomal Rearrangement Hotspot Can Be Identified from Population Genetic Variation and Is Coincident with a Hotspot for Allelic Recombination

    PubMed Central

    Lindsay, Sarah J.; Khajavi, Mehrdad; Lupski, James R.; Hurles, Matthew E.

    2006-01-01

    Insights into the origins of structural variation and the mutational mechanisms underlying genomic disorders would be greatly improved by a genomewide map of hotspots of nonallelic homologous recombination (NAHR). Moreover, our understanding of sequence variation within the duplicated sequences that are substrates for NAHR lags far behind that of sequence variation within the single-copy portion of the genome. Perhaps the best-characterized NAHR hotspot lies within the 24-kb-long Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 1A (CMT1A)–repeats (REPs) that sponsor deletions and duplications that cause peripheral neuropathies. We investigated structural and sequence diversity within the CMT1A-REPs, both within and between species. We discovered a high frequency of retroelement insertions, accelerated sequence evolution after duplication, extensive paralogous gene conversion, and a greater than twofold enrichment of SNPs in humans relative to the genome average. We identified an allelic recombination hotspot underlying the known NAHR hotspot, which suggests that the two processes are intimately related. Finally, we used our data to develop a novel method for inferring the location of an NAHR hotspot from sequence variation within segmental duplications and applied it to identify a putative NAHR hotspot within the LCR22 repeats that sponsor velocardiofacial syndrome deletions. We propose that a large-scale project to map sequence variation within segmental duplications would reveal a wealth of novel chromosomal-rearrangement hotspots. PMID:17033965

  20. Complex rearrangement of chromosomes 19, 21, and 22 in Ewing sarcoma involving a novel reciprocal inversion-insertion mechanism of EWS-ERG fusion gene formation: a case analysis and literature review.

    PubMed

    Maire, Georges; Brown, Christopher W; Bayani, Jane; Pereira, Carlos; Gravel, Denis H; Bell, John C; Zielenska, Maria; Squire, Jeremy A

    2008-03-01

    EWS-ERG Ewing sarcoma (ES) gene fusions often result from complex chromosomal rearrangements. We report an unusually aggressive case of ES with an EWS-ERG fusion gene that appeared to be a result of a simple balanced and reciprocal translocation, t(19;22)(q13.2;q12.2). Subsequent molecular investigation of the primary tumor, the metastasis, and a cell line generated from this ES permitted reconstruction of each genomic step in the evolution of this complex EWS-ERG fusion. We elucidated a new mechanism of reciprocal insertion inversion between chromosome 21 and 22, involving cryptic alterations to both the ERG and EWS genes. Molecular cytogenetic investigation, using systematic analysis with locus-specific probes, identified the cognate genomic breakpoints within chromosome 21 and 22, mandatory for the excision and exchange of both 3'ERG and 3'EWS, resulting in the formation of the EWS-ERG fusion gene present on the der(22). Array comparative genomic hybridization and fluorescence in situ hybridization studies of the ES cell line derived from this tumor identified additional acquired chromosomal and genomic abnormalities, likely associated with establishment and adaptation to in vitro growth. Notably, the cell line had lost one copy of the RB1 gene within the 13q13.1 approximately q14.2 region, and also had a near-tetraploid karyotype. The significance of these findings and their relationship to other reports of variant and complex ES translocations involving the ERG gene are reviewed. PMID:18295659

  1. A mouse chromosome 4 balancer ENU-mutagenesis screen isolates eleven lethal lines

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    ENU-mutagenesis is a powerful technique to identify genes regulating mammalian development. To functionally annotate the distal region of mouse chromosome 4, we performed an ENU-mutagenesis screen using a balancer chromosome targeted to this region of the genome. We isolated 11 lethal lines that map...

  2. Role of H2O2 in RET/PTC1 chromosomal rearrangement produced by ionizing radiation in human thyroid cells.

    PubMed

    Ameziane-El-Hassani, Rabii; Boufraqech, Myriem; Lagente-Chevallier, Odile; Weyemi, Urbain; Talbot, Monique; Métivier, Didier; Courtin, Françoise; Bidart, Jean-Michel; El Mzibri, Mohammed; Schlumberger, Martin; Dupuy, Corinne

    2010-05-15

    During childhood, the thyroid gland is one of the most sensitive organs to the carcinogenetic effects of ionizing radiation that may lead to papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC) associated with RET/PTC oncogene rearrangement. Exposure to ionizing radiation induces a transient "oxidative burst" through radiolysis of water, which can cause DNA damage and mediates part of the radiation effects. H(2)O(2) is a potent DNA-damaging agent that induces DNA double-strand breaks, and consequently, chromosomal aberrations. Irradiation by 5 Gy X-ray increased extracellular H(2)O(2). Therefore, we investigated the implication of H(2)O(2) in the generation of RET/PTC1 rearrangement after X-ray exposure. We developed a highly specific and sensitive nested reverse transcription-PCR method. By using the human thyroid cell line HTori-3, previously found to produce RET/PTC1 after gamma-irradiation, we showed that H(2)O(2), generated during a 5 Gy X-ray irradiation, causes DNA double-strand breaks and contributes to RET/PTC1 formation. Pretreatment of cells with catalase, a scavenger of H(2)O(2), significantly decreased RET/PTC1 rearrangement formation. Finally, RET/PTC chromosomal rearrangement was detected in HTori-3.1 cells after exposure of cells to H(2)O(2) (25 micromol/L), at a dose that did not affect the cell viability. This study shows for the first time that H(2)O(2) is able to cause RET/PTC1 rearrangement in thyroid cells and consequently highlights that oxidative stress could be responsible for the occurrence of RET/PTC1 rearrangement found in thyroid lesions even in the absence of radiation exposure. PMID:20424115

  3. Recurrent Rearrangements of Chromosome 1q21.1 and Variable Pediatric Phenotypes

    PubMed Central

    Mefford, Heather C.; Sharp, Andrew J.; Baker, Carl; Itsara, Andy; Jiang, Zhaoshi; Buysse, Karen; Huang, Shuwen; Maloney, Viv K.; Crolla, John A.; Baralle, Diana; Collins, Amanda; Mercer, Catherine; Norga, Koen; de Ravel, Thomy; Devriendt, Koen; Bongers, Ernie M.H.F.; de Leeuw, Nicole; Reardon, William; Gimelli, Stefania; Bena, Frederique; Hennekam, Raoul C.; Male, Alison; Gaunt, Lorraine; Clayton-Smith, Jill; Simonic, Ingrid; Park, Soo Mi; Mehta, Sarju G.; Nik-Zainal, Serena; Woods, C. Geoffrey; Firth, Helen V.; Parkin, Georgina; Fichera, Marco; Reitano, Santina; Giudice, Mariangela Lo; Li, Kelly E.; Casuga, Iris; Broomer, Adam; Conrad, Bernard; Schwerzmann, Markus; Räber, Lorenz; Gallati, Sabina; Striano, Pasquale; Coppola, Antonietta; Tolmie, John L.; Tobias, Edward S.; Lilley, Chris; Armengol, Lluis; Spysschaert, Yves; Verloo, Patrick; De Coene, Anja; Goossens, Linde; Mortier, Geert; Speleman, Frank; van Binsbergen, Ellen; Nelen, Marcel R.; Hochstenbach, Ron; Poot, Martin; Gallagher, Louise; Gill, Michael; McClellan, Jon; King, Mary-Claire; Regan, Regina; Skinner, Cindy; Stevenson, Roger E.; Antonarakis, Stylianos E.; Chen, Caifu; Estivill, Xavier; Menten, Björn; Gimelli, Giorgio; Gribble, Susan; Schwartz, Stuart; Sutcliffe, James S.; Walsh, Tom; Knight, Samantha J.L.; Sebat, Jonathan; Romano, Corrado; Schwartz, Charles E.; Veltman, Joris A.; de Vries, Bert B.A.; Vermeesch, Joris R.; Barber, John C.K.; Willatt, Lionel; Tassabehji, May; Eichler, Evan E.

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND Duplications and deletions in the human genome can cause disease or predispose persons to disease. Advances in technologies to detect these changes allow for the routine identification of submicroscopic imbalances in large numbers of patients. METHODS We tested for the presence of microdeletions and microduplications at a specific region of chromosome 1q21.1 in two groups of patients with unexplained mental retardation, autism, or congenital anomalies and in unaffected persons. RESULTS We identified 25 persons with a recurrent 1.35-Mb deletion within 1q21.1 from screening 5218 patients. The microdeletions had arisen de novo in eight patients, were inherited from a mildly affected parent in three patients, were inherited from an apparently unaffected parent in six patients, and were of unknown inheritance in eight patients. The deletion was absent in a series of 4737 control persons (P = 1.1×10−7). We found considerable variability in the level of phenotypic expression of the microdeletion; phenotypes included mild-to-moderate mental retardation, microcephaly, cardiac abnormalities, and cataracts. The reciprocal duplication was enriched in the nine children with mental retardation or autism spectrum disorder and other variable features (P = 0.02). We identified three deletions and three duplications of the 1q21.1 region in an independent sample of 788 patients with mental retardation and congenital anomalies. CONCLUSIONS We have identified recurrent molecular lesions that elude syndromic classification and whose disease manifestations must be considered in a broader context of development as opposed to being assigned to a specific disease. Clinical diagnosis in patients with these lesions may be most readily achieved on the basis of genotype rather than phenotype. PMID:18784092

  4. Quercetin induces structural chromosomal aberrations and uncommon rearrangements in bovine cells transformed by the E7 protein of bovine papillomavirus type 4.

    PubMed

    Leal, A M; Ferraz, O P; Carvalho, C; Freitas, A C; Beniston, R G; Beçak, W; Campo, M S; Stocco dos Santos, R C

    2003-03-01

    Bovine papillomavirus type 4 (BPV-4) and bracken fern are cofactors in the carcinogenesis of the upper gastrointestinal (GI) tract of cattle. An experimental in vitro model system has been developed to analyse the co-operation between the viral transforming protein E7, the cellular ras oncogene and quercetin, one of the mutagens of bracken fern, during neoplastic progression of primary bovine cells. We now report cytogenetic studies of these cells at different stages of malignant transformation: parental primary non-transformed PalF cells; E7R cells transformed by BPV-4 E7 and activated ras but not tumorigenic, and tumorigenic E7Q cells derived from E7R cells after treatment with quercetin. All cell lines presented increased numbers of aneuploid cells. The rate of structural chromosomal aberrations observed was increased in transformed cells. In addition, E7Q cells showed chromosomes with peculiar rearrangements, which resulted in metacentric and submetacentric marker chromosomes, with an increase in the mean chromosome arm number. These markers were the products of possible centric fusions. These aberrations and rearrangements were distributed throughout the karyotype, no specific chromosome was involved and the heterochromatic centromeric regions appeared to be preserved. PMID:19379326

  5. Genetic Mapping in a Natural Population of Collared Flycatchers (Ficedula albicollis): Conserved Synteny but Gene Order Rearrangements on the Avian Z Chromosome

    PubMed Central

    Backström, Niclas; Brandström, Mikael; Gustafsson, Lars; Qvarnström, Anna; Cheng, Hans; Ellegren, Hans

    2006-01-01

    Data from completely sequenced genomes are likely to open the way for novel studies of the genetics of nonmodel organisms, in particular when it comes to the identification and analysis of genes responsible for traits that are under selection in natural populations. Here we use the draft sequence of the chicken genome as a starting point for linkage mapping in a wild bird species, the collared flycatcher—one of the most well-studied avian species in ecological and evolutionary research. A pedigree of 365 flycatchers was established and genotyped for single nucleotide polymorphisms in 23 genes selected from (and spread over most of) the chicken Z chromosome. All genes were also found to be located on the Z chromosome in the collared flycatcher, confirming conserved synteny at the level of gene content across distantly related avian lineages. This high degree of conservation mimics the situation seen for the mammalian X chromosome and may thus be a general feature in sex chromosome evolution, irrespective of whether there is male or female heterogamety. Alternatively, such unprecedented chromosomal conservation may be characteristic of most chromosomes in avian genome evolution. However, several internal rearrangements were observed, meaning that the transfer of map information from chicken to nonmodel bird species cannot always assume conserved gene orders. Interestingly, the rate of recombination on the Z chromosome of collared flycatchers was only ∼50% that of chicken, challenging the widely held view that birds generally have high recombination rates. PMID:16783008

  6. Extensive Pericentric Rearrangements in the Bread Wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) Genotype “Chinese Spring” Revealed from Chromosome Shotgun Sequence Data

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Jian; Stiller, Jiri; Wei, Yuming; Zheng, You-Liang; Devos, Katrien M.; Doležel, Jaroslav; Liu, Chunji

    2014-01-01

    The bread wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) genotype “Chinese Spring” (“CS”) is the reference base in wheat genetics and genomics. Pericentric rearrangements in this genotype were systematically assessed by analyzing homoeoloci for a set of nonredundant genes from Brachypodium distachyon, Triticum urartu, and Aegilops tauschii in the CS chromosome shotgun sequence obtained from individual chromosome arms flow-sorted from CS aneuploid lines. Based on patterns of their homoeologous arm locations, 551 genes indicated the presence of pericentric inversions in at least 10 of the 21 chromosomes. Available data from deletion bin-mapped expressed sequence tags and genetic mapping in wheat indicated that all inversions had breakpoints in the low-recombinant gene-poor pericentromeric regions. The large number of putative intrachromosomal rearrangements suggests the presence of extensive structural differences among the three subgenomes, at least some of which likely occurred during the production of the aneuploid lines of this hexaploid wheat genotype. These differences could have significant implications in wheat genome research where comparative approaches are used such as in ordering and orientating sequence contigs and in gene cloning. PMID:25349265

  7. A rare balanced nonrobertsonian translocation involving acrocentric chromosomes: Chromosome abnormality of t(13;15)(p11.2;q22.1)

    PubMed Central

    Rupa, Dalvi; Neeraja, Koppaka; Deepak, Chavan; Swarna, Mandava

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Balanced non-robertsonian translocation (RT), involving acrocentric chromosomes, is a rare event and only a few cases are reported. Most of the RTs are balanced involving acrocentric chromosomes with the breakpoints (q10;q10). MATERIALS AND METHODS: Chromosome analysis was performed as per standard procedure – Giemsa-trypsin banding with 500 band resolution was analyzed for chromosome identification. RESULTS: In the present study, we report a rare balanced non-RTs involving chromosomes 13 and 15 with cytogenetic finding of 46, XX, t(13;15) (p11.2;q22.1). CONCLUSION: To the best of our knowledge, this is the first such report of an unusual non-RT of t(13:15) with (p11.2;q22.1) break points. PMID:27382241

  8. Rearrangements in human chromosome 1 visualized by arm-specific probes in the progeny of blood lymphocytes exposed to iron ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manti, L.; Bertucci, A.; Gialanella, G.; Grossi, G.; Pugliese, M.; Scampoli, P.; Durante, M.

    It is well known that heavy ions are more effective than sparsely ionizing radiation in the induction of chromosomal aberrations in heavy ions However most of the complex rearrangements induced by densely ionizing radiation ultimately lead to cell death For risk assessment it is more important to measure the residual cytotgenetic damage in cells surviving the exposure and able to proliferate This analyses will be strongly influenced by the technique used to visualize the chromosomes and consequently on the aberrations scored For instance symmetrical exchanges have higher transmission probability than asymmetrical exchanges Multi-fuor FISH including mBAND mFISH or RxFISH allows the detection of many different aberrations with high resolution but it is slow and expensive thus affecting the statistical power of the study In this study we hybridized metaphase cells with human DNA probes specific for the p and q arms of the chromosome 1 The arm-specific probes allow a fast and reliable detection of both symmetrical and asymmetrical inter-chromosomal exchanges and inter-arm intra-changes in the painted chromosome pair We used this method to score aberrations in human lymphocytes exposed to 1 Gy of either 250 kVp X-rays or 1 GeV n Fe-ions LET 145 keV mu m and harvested following 120 h in culture including 2 h in colcemid for metaphase-block Although iron ions are much more effective than X-rays in the induction of chromosomal aberrations formed during the first post-exposure cell-cycle we found that the effectiveness drops when

  9. Chromosomal rearrangements, phenotypic variation and modularity: a case study from a contact zone between house mouse Robertsonian races in Central Italy.

    PubMed

    Franchini, Paolo; Colangelo, Paolo; Meyer, Axel; Fruciano, Carmelo

    2016-03-01

    The Western European house mouse, Mus musculus domesticus, is well-known for the high frequency of Robertsonian fusions that have rapidly produced more than 50 karyotipic races, making it an ideal model for studying the mechanisms of chromosomal speciation. The mouse mandible is one of the traits studied most intensively to investigate the effect of Robertsonian fusions on phenotypic variation within and between populations. This complex bone structure has also been widely used to study the level of integration between different morphogenetic units. Here, with the aim of testing the effect of different karyotypic assets on the morphology of the mouse mandible and on its level of modularity, we performed morphometric analyses of mice from a contact area between two highly metacentric races in Central Italy. We found no difference in size, while the mandible shape was found to be different between the two Robertsonian races, even after accounting for the genetic relationships among individuals and geographic proximity. Our results support the existence of two modules that indicate a certain degree of evolutionary independence, but no difference in the strength of modularity between chromosomal races. Moreover, the ascending ramus showed more pronounced interpopulation/race phenotypic differences than the alveolar region, an effect that could be associated to their different polygenic architecture. This study suggests that chromosomal rearrangements play a role in the house mouse phenotypic divergence, and that the two modules of the mouse mandible are differentially affected by environmental factors and genetic makeup. PMID:26855768

  10. Is the Karyotype of Neotropical Boid Snakes Really Conserved? Cytotaxonomy, Chromosomal Rearrangements and Karyotype Organization in the Boidae Family

    PubMed Central

    Viana, Patrik F.; Ribeiro, Leila B.; Souza, George Myller; Chalkidis, Hipócrates de Menezes; Gross, Maria Claudia; Feldberg, Eliana

    2016-01-01

    Boids are primitive snakes from a basal lineage that is widely distributed in Neotropical region. Many of these species are both morphologically and biogeographically divergent, and the relationship among some species remains uncertain even with evolutionary and phylogenetic studies being proposed for the group. For a better understanding of the evolutionary relationship between these snakes, we cytogenetically analysed 7 species and 3 subspecies of Neotropical snakes from the Boidae family using different chromosomal markers. The karyotypes of Boa constrictor occidentalis, Corallus hortulanus, Eunectes notaeus, Epicrates cenchria and Epicrates assisi are presented here for the first time with the redescriptions of the karyotypes of Boa constrictor constrictor, B. c. amarali, Eunectes murinus and Epicrates crassus. The three subspecies of Boa, two species of Eunectes and three species of Epicrates exhibit 2n = 36 chromosomes. In contrast, C. hortulanus presented a totally different karyotype composition for the Boidae family, showing 2n = 40 chromosomes with a greater number of macrochromosomes. Furthermore, chromosomal mapping of telomeric sequences revealed the presence of interstitial telomeric sites (ITSs) on many chromosomes in addition to the terminal markings on all chromosomes of all taxa analysed, with the exception of E. notaeus. Thus, we demonstrate that the karyotypes of these snakes are not as highly conserved as previously thought. Moreover, we provide an overview of the current cytotaxonomy of the group. PMID:27494409

  11. Identification and characterization of marker chromosomes, de novo rearrangements and microdeletions in 100 cases with fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH)

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, S.M.; Liu, Y.; Papenhausen, P.R.

    1994-09-01

    Results of molecular cytogenetic analysis are presented for 100 cases in which fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) was used as an adjunct to standard cytogenetics. Commercially available centromeric, telomeric, chromosome painting and unique sequence probes were used. Cases were from a 12-month period (June 1993-May 1994) and included examples of sex chromosome abnormalities (8), duplications (5), de novo translocations (6), satellited (12) and non-satellited (7) markers, and microdeletion syndromes (62). Satellited marker chromosomes were evaluated using a combination of DAPI/Distamycin A staining, hybridization with a classical satellite probe for chromosome 15 and hybridization with alpha-satellite probes for chromosomes 13, 14, 21 and 22. Markers positive for the chromosome 15 probe were further evaluated using unique sequence probes for the Prader-Willi/Angelman region. Microdeletion analysis was performed for Prader-Willi/Angelman (49) and DiGeorge/VCF (13) syndromes. Seven cases evaluated for Prader-Willi/Angelman syndrome demonstrated evidence of a deletion within this region. Uniparental disomy analysis was available in cases where a deletion was not detected by FISH, yet follow-up was clinically indicated. Two cases evaluated for DiGeorge/VCF syndrome demonstrated molecular evidence of a deletion. Included in our analysis is an example of familial DiGeorge syndrome.

  12. Is the Karyotype of Neotropical Boid Snakes Really Conserved? Cytotaxonomy, Chromosomal Rearrangements and Karyotype Organization in the Boidae Family.

    PubMed

    Viana, Patrik F; Ribeiro, Leila B; Souza, George Myller; Chalkidis, Hipócrates de Menezes; Gross, Maria Claudia; Feldberg, Eliana

    2016-01-01

    Boids are primitive snakes from a basal lineage that is widely distributed in Neotropical region. Many of these species are both morphologically and biogeographically divergent, and the relationship among some species remains uncertain even with evolutionary and phylogenetic studies being proposed for the group. For a better understanding of the evolutionary relationship between these snakes, we cytogenetically analysed 7 species and 3 subspecies of Neotropical snakes from the Boidae family using different chromosomal markers. The karyotypes of Boa constrictor occidentalis, Corallus hortulanus, Eunectes notaeus, Epicrates cenchria and Epicrates assisi are presented here for the first time with the redescriptions of the karyotypes of Boa constrictor constrictor, B. c. amarali, Eunectes murinus and Epicrates crassus. The three subspecies of Boa, two species of Eunectes and three species of Epicrates exhibit 2n = 36 chromosomes. In contrast, C. hortulanus presented a totally different karyotype composition for the Boidae family, showing 2n = 40 chromosomes with a greater number of macrochromosomes. Furthermore, chromosomal mapping of telomeric sequences revealed the presence of interstitial telomeric sites (ITSs) on many chromosomes in addition to the terminal markings on all chromosomes of all taxa analysed, with the exception of E. notaeus. Thus, we demonstrate that the karyotypes of these snakes are not as highly conserved as previously thought. Moreover, we provide an overview of the current cytotaxonomy of the group. PMID:27494409

  13. A 6-Mb yeast artificial chromosome contig and long-range physical map encompassing the region on chromosome 12q15 frequently rearranged in a variety of benign solid tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Schoenmakers, E.F.P.M.; Geurts, J.M.W.; Kools, P.F.J.; Mols, R.

    1995-10-10

    Cytogenetic analysis of a variety of benign solid tumors, among which uterine leiomyoma, lipoma, pleomorphic salivary gland adenoma, and pulmonary chondroid hamartoma, has indicated that these tumors often display chromosome breakpoints in region q13-q15 of chromosome 12. In previous studies, we have reported that these breakpoints map between locus D12S8 and the CHOP gene, the latter of which has been shown to be consistently rearranged in myxoid liposarcomas with t(12;16)(q13;p11). Here, we report directional chromosome walking studies starting from D12S8 and resulting in the construction of a YAC contig of about 6 Mb. This YAC contig, whose orientation on chromosome 12 was determined by double-color fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) analysis, has at least double coverage and consists of 75 overlapping YAC clones, all isolated from CEPH YAC libraries. Their insert sizes were estimated by contour-clamped homogeneous electric field (CHEF) gel electrophoresis. On the basis of YAC end-derived DNA markers and sequence-tagged sites (STSs), with an average spacing of approximately 70 kb, as well as restriction enzyme analysis, a long-range physical map was established for the 6-Mb DNA region of chromosome 12 covered by the YAC contig. Within the YAC contig, the relative positions of various known genes, an expressed sequence-tagged site, and a number of CEPH/Genethon polymorphic markers were determined. The latter data allow full integration of our mapping data with those obtained by CEPH/Genethon as well as those reported at the Second International Workshop on Human Chromosome 12 Mapping. Finally, this YAC contig constitutes the basis for the construction of a transcriptional map of this region and is likely to facilitate identification of genes involved in the formation of various benign solid tumor types. 56 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  14. An Unbalanced Rearrangement of Chromosomes 4:20 is Associated with Childhood Osteoporosis and Reduced Caspase-3 Levels.

    PubMed

    Kinning, Esther; McMillan, Martin; Shepherd, Sheila; Helfrich, Miep; Hof, Rob Vant; Adams, Christopher; Read, Heather; Wall, Daniel M; Ahmed, S Faisal

    2016-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the association of a chromosome 4:20 imbalance with osteoporosis in three related children. Bone biochemistry, bone turnover markers, and dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) scanning were performed in all three cases and bone biopsy and histomorphometry in one. The chromosome imbalance was delineated by array comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH) and analyzed for candidate genes. A potential candidate gene within the deleted region is caspase-3, previously linked to low bone mineral density (BMD) in heterozygous mice thus caspase-3 activity was measured in cases and controls. Routine bone biochemistry and markers of bone turnover did not reveal any abnormality. DXA showed reduced total and lumbar spine bone mineral content. aCGH showed an 8 megabase (Mb) deletion of terminal chromosome 4q incorporating a region previously linked to low BMD and a 15 Mb duplication of terminal chromosome 20p. Bone biopsy showed a high bone turnover state, trabecularisation of cortical bone and numerous small osteoclasts coupled with normal bone formation. Basal serum caspase-3 activity was lower in cases compared with controls. We conclude that the early-onset osteoporosis with low basal levels of caspase-3 and abnormal osteoclasts is a feature of this chromosomal translocation. Further investigation of the role of the deleted and duplicated genes and especially caspase-3 is required. PMID:27617159

  15. Sister chromatid exchanges, hyperdiploidy and chromosomal rearrangements studied in cells from melanoma-prone individuals belonging to families with the dysplastic nevus syndrome.

    PubMed

    Jaspers, N G; Roza-de Jongh, E J; Donselaar, I G; Van Velzen-Tillemans, J T; van Hemel, J O; Rümke, P; van der Kamp, A W

    1987-01-01

    Cytogenetic investigations were performed on 25 individuals belonging to six melanoma-prone families with multiple melanocytic lesions (the dysplastic nevus syndrome, DNS). Patients having DNS with or without a history of melanoma were compared with clinically normal relatives and unrelated normal controls. The results indicate normal frequencies of hyperdiploidy and spontaneous sister chromatid exchanges in the fibroblasts of all individuals studied. Karyotypic analyses were carried out on the members of one family. The patients with DNS had a normal constitutional karyotype. In lymphocytes or fibroblasts from five patients, however, increased frequencies of cells with random chromosomal rearrangements were observed. These abnormalities, mainly translocations and inversions, were not found in two of the patients' spouses and in six clinically normal relatives. In the fibroblast cultures considerable clonal selection of cytogenetically abnormal cells occurred. PMID:3791172

  16. The prognostic value of FISH as an adjunct to conventional cytogenetics for the detection of cryptic gene rearrangements on chromosome 16. A retrospective investigation of 13 patients from Northern Ireland diagnosed with M4Eo acute myeloid leukaemia.

    PubMed

    McGrattan, P; Humphreys, M W

    2003-05-01

    M4Eo acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) patients with the typical chromosome 16 abnormalities have a favourable prognosis. These subtle 16q22 gene rearrangements can be difficult to detect by conventional cytogenetic methods and if missed could lead to the incorrect assignment of prognostic group and hence subsequent treatment strategies. We retrospectively studied 13 patients diagnosed with M4Eo AML for such chromosome 16 abnormalities comparing conventional cytogenetic (G-banding) and molecular (FISH) methods. G-banded analysis detected only 2 patients with definite chromosome 16 abnormalities whereas FISH detected 4 patients, one with the typical inversion and three with the typical chromosome 16 translocation. FISH analysis also confirmed a false +ve G-banded result in one patient and a false -ve G-banded result in another patient. Finally, FISH confirmed a deletion of one chromosome 16 homologue in another patient indicating a poor prognosis. The overall survival of patients with the typical 16q22 rearrangements (n=4) was also significantly better (P=0.007) than patients with normal chromosome 16 homologues or having other numerical and/or structural abnormalities (n=9). This set of data shows that FISH is a more accurate method for the detection of cryptic 16q22 gene rearrangements and because of the prognostic implications has become a mandatory test along with conventional cytogenetics for all newly diagnosed M4Eo AML patients in Northern Ireland. PMID:12868698

  17. Third Chromosome Balancer Inversions Disrupt Protein-Coding Genes and Influence Distal Recombination Events in Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Miller, Danny E; Cook, Kevin R; Arvanitakis, Alexandra V; Hawley, R Scott

    2016-01-01

    Balancer chromosomes are multiply inverted chromosomes that suppress meiotic crossing over and prevent the recovery of crossover products. Balancers are commonly used in Drosophila melanogaster to maintain deleterious alleles and in stock construction. They exist for all three major chromosomes, yet the molecular location of the breakpoints and the exact nature of many of the mutations carried by the second and third chromosome balancers has not been available. Here, we precisely locate eight of 10 of the breakpoints on the third chromosome balancer TM3, six of eight on TM6, and nine of 11 breakpoints on TM6B We find that one of the inversion breakpoints on TM3 bisects the highly conserved tumor suppressor gene p53-a finding that may have important consequences for a wide range of studies in Drosophila We also identify evidence of single and double crossovers between several TM3 and TM6B balancers and their normal-sequence homologs that have created genetic diversity among these chromosomes. Overall, this work demonstrates the practical importance of precisely identifying the position of inversion breakpoints of balancer chromosomes and characterizing the mutant alleles carried by them. PMID:27172211

  18. Third Chromosome Balancer Inversions Disrupt Protein-Coding Genes and Influence Distal Recombination Events in Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Danny E.; Cook, Kevin R.; Arvanitakis, Alexandra V.; Hawley, R. Scott

    2016-01-01

    Balancer chromosomes are multiply inverted chromosomes that suppress meiotic crossing over and prevent the recovery of crossover products. Balancers are commonly used in Drosophila melanogaster to maintain deleterious alleles and in stock construction. They exist for all three major chromosomes, yet the molecular location of the breakpoints and the exact nature of many of the mutations carried by the second and third chromosome balancers has not been available. Here, we precisely locate eight of 10 of the breakpoints on the third chromosome balancer TM3, six of eight on TM6, and nine of 11 breakpoints on TM6B. We find that one of the inversion breakpoints on TM3 bisects the highly conserved tumor suppressor gene p53—a finding that may have important consequences for a wide range of studies in Drosophila. We also identify evidence of single and double crossovers between several TM3 and TM6B balancers and their normal-sequence homologs that have created genetic diversity among these chromosomes. Overall, this work demonstrates the practical importance of precisely identifying the position of inversion breakpoints of balancer chromosomes and characterizing the mutant alleles carried by them. PMID:27172211

  19. Chromosome

    MedlinePlus

    ... if you are born a boy or a girl (your gender). They are called sex chromosomes: Females have 2 X chromosomes. Males have 1 X and 1 Y chromosome. The mother gives an X chromosome to the ... baby is a girl or a boy. The remaining chromosomes are called ...

  20. Incorporation of 5-ethynyl-2'-deoxyuridine (EdU) as a novel strategy for identification of the skewed X inactivation pattern in balanced and unbalanced X-rearrangements.

    PubMed

    Sisdelli, Luiza; Vidi, Angela Cristina; Moysés-Oliveira, Mariana; Di Battista, Adriana; Bortolai, Adriana; Moretti-Ferreira, Danilo; da Silva, Magnus R Dias; Melaragno, Maria Isabel; Carvalheira, Gianna

    2016-02-01

    X-chromosome inactivation occurs randomly in normal female cells. However, the inactivation can be skewed in patients with alterations in X-chromosome. In balanced X-autosome translocations, normal X is preferentially inactivated, while in unbalanced X alterations, the aberrant X is usually inactivated. Here, we present a novel strategy to verify the skewed X inactivation pattern through the incorporation of 5-ethynyl-2'-deoxyuridine (EdU) into cells, in 11 patients: five carriers of balanced X-autosome translocations and six of unbalanced X-chromosome alterations. Since EdU is a labeled nucleoside analog of thymidine, its incorporation during DNA synthesis can reveal late replication regions and the inactive X-chromosome. All EdU findings were validated by the human androgen receptor gene (HUMARA) assay. The late replication regions were easily and quickly visualized in all cells, where inactive Xs are marked with strong green fluorescence. It was observed that the normal X-chromosome was preferentially inactivated in patients with balanced X-autosome translocations; while the aberrant X-chromosome was inactivated in most cells from patients with unbalanced alterations. By performing the fluorescence-based EdU assay, the differences between the active and inactive X-chromosomes are more easily recognizable than by classic cytogenetic methods. Furthermore, EdU incorporation allows the observation of the late replication regions in autosomal segments present in X derivatives from X-autosome translocations. Therefore, EdU assay permits an accurate and efficient cytogenetic evaluation of the X inactivation pattern with a low-cost, easy to perform and highly reproducible technique. PMID:26670424

  1. Chromosome

    MedlinePlus

    ... genes . It is the building block of the human body. Chromosomes also contain proteins that help DNA exist ... come in pairs. Normally, each cell in the human body has 23 pairs of chromosomes (46 total chromosomes). ...

  2. Association of a Chromosomal Rearrangement Event with Mouse Posterior Polymorphous Corneal Dystrophy and Alterations in Csrp2bp, Dzank1, and Ovol2 Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Anna L.; Moran, Susan A.; Glover, Edward A.; Drinkwater, Norman R.; Swearingen, Rebecca E.; Teixeira, Leandro B.; Bradfield, Christopher A.

    2016-01-01

    We have previously described a mouse model of human posterior polymorphous corneal dystrophy (PPCD) and localized the causative mutation to a 6.2 Mbp region of chromosome 2, termed Ppcd1. We now show that the gene rearrangement linked to mouse Ppcd1 is a 3.9 Mbp chromosomal inversion flanked by 81 Kbp and 542 bp deletions. This recombination event leads to deletion of Csrp2bp Exons 8 through 11, Dzank1 Exons 20 and 21, and the pseudogene Znf133. In addition, we identified translocation of novel downstream sequences to positions adjacent to Csrp2bp Exon 7 and Dzank1 Exon 20. Twelve novel fusion transcripts involving Csrp2bp or Dzank1 linked to downstream sequences have been identified. Eight are expressed at detectable levels in PPCD1 but not wildtype eyes. Upregulation of two Csrp2bp fusion transcripts, as well as upregulation of the adjacent gene, Ovol2, was observed. Absence of the PPCD1 phenotype in animals haploinsufficient for Csrp2bp or both Csrp2bp and Dzank1 rules out haploinsufficiency of these genes as a cause of mouse PPCD1. Complementation experiments confirm that PPCD1 embryonic lethality is due to disruption of Csrp2bp expression. The ocular expression pattern of Csrp2bp is consistent with a role for this protein in corneal development and pathogenesis of PPCD1. PMID:27310661

  3. Dynamics of Genome Rearrangement in Bacterial Populations

    PubMed Central

    Darling, Aaron E.; Miklós, István; Ragan, Mark A.

    2008-01-01

    Genome structure variation has profound impacts on phenotype in organisms ranging from microbes to humans, yet little is known about how natural selection acts on genome arrangement. Pathogenic bacteria such as Yersinia pestis, which causes bubonic and pneumonic plague, often exhibit a high degree of genomic rearrangement. The recent availability of several Yersinia genomes offers an unprecedented opportunity to study the evolution of genome structure and arrangement. We introduce a set of statistical methods to study patterns of rearrangement in circular chromosomes and apply them to the Yersinia. We constructed a multiple alignment of eight Yersinia genomes using Mauve software to identify 78 conserved segments that are internally free from genome rearrangement. Based on the alignment, we applied Bayesian statistical methods to infer the phylogenetic inversion history of Yersinia. The sampling of genome arrangement reconstructions contains seven parsimonious tree topologies, each having different histories of 79 inversions. Topologies with a greater number of inversions also exist, but were sampled less frequently. The inversion phylogenies agree with results suggested by SNP patterns. We then analyzed reconstructed inversion histories to identify patterns of rearrangement. We confirm an over-representation of “symmetric inversions”—inversions with endpoints that are equally distant from the origin of chromosomal replication. Ancestral genome arrangements demonstrate moderate preference for replichore balance in Yersinia. We found that all inversions are shorter than expected under a neutral model, whereas inversions acting within a single replichore are much shorter than expected. We also found evidence for a canonical configuration of the origin and terminus of replication. Finally, breakpoint reuse analysis reveals that inversions with endpoints proximal to the origin of DNA replication are nearly three times more frequent. Our findings represent the

  4. DNA rearrangements in Euplotes crassus coincide with discrete periods of DNA replication during the polytene chromosome stage of macronuclear development.

    PubMed Central

    Frels, J S; Jahn, C L

    1995-01-01

    Macronuclear development in Euplotes crassus begins with polytenization of micronuclear chromosomes and is accompanied by highly precise excision of DNA sequences known as internal eliminated sequences and transposon-like elements (Tecs). Quantitation of radiolabeled-precursor incorporation into DNA indicates that DNA synthesis during formation of polytene chromosomes is not continuous and occurs during two distinct periods. We demonstrate that the timing of Tec excision coincides with these replication periods and that excision can occur during both periods even at a single locus. We also show that Tec and internal eliminated sequence excisions are coincident in the second replication period, thus providing further evidence for similarity in their excision mechanism. Inhibition of DNA synthesis with hydroxyurea diminishes Tec element excision, indicating that replication is an important aspect of the excision process. PMID:8524213

  5. Role of Fanconi Anemia FANCG in Preventing Double-Strand Breakage and Chromosomal Rearrangement during DNA Replication

    SciTech Connect

    Tebbs, R S; Hinz, J M; Yamada, N A; Wilson, J B; Jones, N J; Salazar, E P; Thomas, C B; Jones, I M; Thompson, L H

    2003-10-04

    The Fanconi anemia (FA) proteins overlap with those of homologous recombination through FANCD1/BRCA2, but the biochemical functions of other FA proteins are unknown. By constructing and characterizing a null fancg mutant of hamster CHO cells, we present several new insights for FA. The fancg cells show a broad sensitivity to genotoxic agents, not supporting the conventional concept of sensitivity to only DNA crosslinking agents. The aprt mutation rate is normal, but hprt mutations are reduced, which we ascribe to the lethality of large deletions. CAD and dhfr gene amplification rates are increased, implying excess chromosomal breakage during DNA replication, and suggesting amplification as a contributing factor to cancer-proneness in FA patients. In S-phase cells, both spontaneous and mutagen-induced Rad51 nuclear foci are elevated. These results support a model in which FancG protein helps to prevent collapse of replication forks by allowing translesion synthesis or lesion bypass through homologous recombination.

  6. The cytogenetics of mammalian autosomal rearrangements

    SciTech Connect

    Daniel, A. )

    1988-01-01

    This book is covered under the following topics: Ascertainment and risks of recombinant progeny; Infertility, gametic selection, and fetal loss; origin of chromosome rearrangements; and Some implications of chromosome breakpoints.

  7. Comparative mapping of the wild perennial Glycine latifolia and soybean (G. max) reveals extensive chromosome rearrangements in the genus Glycine.

    PubMed

    Chang, Sungyul; Thurber, Carrie S; Brown, Patrick J; Hartman, Glen L; Lambert, Kris N; Domier, Leslie L

    2014-01-01

    Soybean (Glycine max L. Mer.), like many cultivated crops, has a relatively narrow genetic base and lacks diversity for some economically important traits. Glycine latifolia (Benth.) Newell & Hymowitz, one of the 26 perennial wild Glycine species related to soybean in the subgenus Glycine Willd., shows high levels of resistance to multiple soybean pathogens and pests including Alfalfa mosaic virus, Heterodera glycines Ichinohe and Sclerotinia sclerotiorum (Lib.) de Bary. However, limited information is available on the genomes of these perennial Glycine species. To generate molecular resources for gene mapping and identification, high-density linkage maps were constructed for G. latifolia using single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) markers generated by genotyping by sequencing and evaluated in an F2 population and confirmed in an F5 population. In each population, greater than 2,300 SNP markers were selected for analysis and segregated to form 20 large linkage groups. Marker orders were similar in the F2 and F5 populations. The relationships between G. latifolia linkage groups and G. max and common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) chromosomes were examined by aligning SNP-containing sequences from G. latifolia to the genome sequences of G. max and P. vulgaris. Twelve of the 20 G. latifolia linkage groups were nearly collinear with G. max chromosomes. The remaining eight G. latifolia linkage groups appeared to be products of multiple interchromosomal translocations relative to G. max. Large syntenic blocks also were observed between G. latifolia and P. vulgaris. These experiments are the first to compare genome organizations among annual and perennial Glycine species and common bean. The development of molecular resources for species closely related to G. max provides information into the evolution of genomes within the genus Glycine and tools to identify genes within perennial wild relatives of cultivated soybean that could be beneficial to soybean production. PMID

  8. Nuclear volume differences between balanced and unbalanced spermatozoa in chromosomal translocation carriers.

    PubMed

    Rouen, Alexandre; Lavillaureix, Alinoë; Hyon, Capucine; Heide, Solveig; Clède, Sylvain; Balet, Richard; Kott, Esther; Cassuto, Nino Guy; Siffroi, Jean-Pierre

    2015-03-01

    While chromosomal translocations are usually associated with a normal phenotype, they can still cause male infertility as well as recurrent miscarriages and fetal malformations related to their transmission in an unbalanced state. The distinction between balanced and unbalanced spermatozoa on morphological criteria is still unfeasible. However, we previously showed that: i) spermatozoa with an unbalanced content have a higher rate of DNA fragmentation; and ii) that density gradient centrifugation partially separates balanced from unbalanced sperm cells. We hypothesized that a chromosomal imbalance could alter the fine spermatic nuclear architecture and consequently the condensation of DNA, thus modifying normal sperm density. Spermatic nuclear volumes in four translocation carriers were analyzed using confocal microscopy. Secondarily, FISH analysis was used to establish the segregation mode of each spermatozoon. We found the average spermatic nuclei size to be higher among unbalanced spermatozoa in all patients but one. All the unbalanced modes were associated with larger nuclei in two patients, while this was the case for the 3:1 mode only in the other two, suggesting an abnormal condensation. This could be the first step in elaborating a procedure to completely eliminate unbalanced spermatozoa from semen prior to in vitro fertilization. PMID:25599825

  9. A cloned DNA segment from the telomeric region of human chromosome 4p is not detectably rearranged in Huntington disease patients.

    PubMed Central

    Pritchard, C; Casher, D; Bull, L; Cox, D R; Myers, R M

    1990-01-01

    Genetic linkage studies have mapped the Huntington disease (HD) mutation to the distal region of the short arm of human chromosome 4. Analysis of recombination events in this region has produced contradictory locations for HD. One possible location is in the region distal to the D4S90 marker, which is located within 300 kilobases of the telomere. Other crossover events predict a more centromeric position for HD. Here we analyze the telomeric region of 4p in detail. Cloned DNA segments were derived from this region by utilizing a radiation-induced somatic cell hybrid as a source of DNA combined with preparative pulsed-field gel electrophoresis to enrich for the telomeric fraction. Additional DNA was obtained by using the cloned segments as multiple start points for cosmid walks. This strategy proved to be an effective method for cloning 250 kilobases of DNA in the region telomeric to D4S90. Hybridization analysis with the cloned DNA did not provide any evidence for the presence of rearrangements of 100 base pairs or greater in the DNA of individuals affected with HD. We also found no change in the size or structure of the 4p telomere in these samples. Images PMID:2144903

  10. A cloned DNA segment from the telomeric region of human chromosome 4p is not detectably rearranged in Huntington disease patients.

    PubMed

    Pritchard, C; Casher, D; Bull, L; Cox, D R; Myers, R M

    1990-09-01

    Genetic linkage studies have mapped the Huntington disease (HD) mutation to the distal region of the short arm of human chromosome 4. Analysis of recombination events in this region has produced contradictory locations for HD. One possible location is in the region distal to the D4S90 marker, which is located within 300 kilobases of the telomere. Other crossover events predict a more centromeric position for HD. Here we analyze the telomeric region of 4p in detail. Cloned DNA segments were derived from this region by utilizing a radiation-induced somatic cell hybrid as a source of DNA combined with preparative pulsed-field gel electrophoresis to enrich for the telomeric fraction. Additional DNA was obtained by using the cloned segments as multiple start points for cosmid walks. This strategy proved to be an effective method for cloning 250 kilobases of DNA in the region telomeric to D4S90. Hybridization analysis with the cloned DNA did not provide any evidence for the presence of rearrangements of 100 base pairs or greater in the DNA of individuals affected with HD. We also found no change in the size or structure of the 4p telomere in these samples. PMID:2144903

  11. The Two Stem Cell MicroRNA Gene Clusters C19MC and miR-371-3 Are Activated by Specific Chromosomal Rearrangements in a Subgroup of Thyroid Adenomas

    PubMed Central

    Rippe, Volkhard; Dittberner, Lea; Lorenz, Verena N.; Drieschner, Norbert; Nimzyk, Rolf; Sendt, Wolfgang; Junker, Klaus; Belge, Gazanfer; Bullerdiek, Jörn

    2010-01-01

    Thyroid adenomas are common benign human tumors with a high prevalence of about 5% of the adult population even in iodine sufficient areas. Rearrangements of chromosomal band 19q13.4 represent a frequent clonal cytogenetic deviation in these tumors making them the most frequent non-random chromosomal translocations in human epithelial tumors at all. Two microRNA (miRNA) gene clusters i.e. C19MC and miR-371-3 are located in close proximity to the breakpoint region of these chromosomal rearrangements and have been checked for a possible up-regulation due to the genomic alteration. In 4/5 cell lines established from thyroid adenomas with 19q13.4 rearrangements and 5/5 primary adenomas with that type of rearrangement both the C19MC and miR-371-3 cluster were found to be significantly overexpressed compared to controls lacking that particular chromosome abnormality. In the remaining cell line qRT-PCR revealed overexpression of members of the miR-371-3 cluster only which might be due to a deletion accompanying the chromosomal rearrangement in that case. In depth molecular characterization of the breakpoint in a cell line from one adenoma of this type reveals the existence of large Pol-II mRNA fragments as the most likely source of up-regulation of the C19MC cluster. The up-regulation of the clusters is likely to be causally associated with the pathogenesis of the corresponding tumors. Of note, the expression of miRNAs miR-520c and miR-373 is known to characterize stem cells and in terms of molecular oncology has been implicated in invasive growth of epithelial cells in vitro and in vivo thus allowing to delineate a distinct molecular subtype of thyroid adenomas. Besides thyroid adenomas rearrangements of 19q13.4 are frequently found in other human neoplasias as well, suggesting that activation of both clusters might be a more general phenomenon in human neoplasias. PMID:20209130

  12. Unique double de novo structural rearrangements for chromosome 11 with 46,XX,del(11)(q13q23)/46,XX,inv dup(11)(q13q23) in an infant with minor congenital abnormalities and delayed development

    SciTech Connect

    Tharapel, A.T.; Zhao, J.; Smith, M.E.

    1994-09-01

    Reported here is a patient with two most unusual structural rearrangements, both involving chromosome 11. The first cell line showed an interstitial deletion of a chromosome 11 with a 46,XX,del(11)(q13q23) chromosome complement. In the second cell line, one of the chromosome 11s had a duplication for the exact region, (11)(q13q23), that was deleted in the first cell line. This duplication also appeared to be inverted with karyotype 46,XX,inv dup(11)(q13q23). Interestingly, chromosome analysis did not reveal a normal cell line and the two abnormal cell lines were present in a 1:1 ratio. Parental chromosome analyses showed normal karyotypes. The patient was referred for genetic evaluation because of developmental delay. Minor congenital anomalies presented on physical examination included: weight and height at or below the 5th percentile, microcephaly, downward slanting palpebral fissures, severe clinodactyly of one toe, bilateral short fifth fingers and a broad based gait. Results of the MRI and urine metabolic screen were normal. Two hypotheses are advanced to explain the origin of the abnormality. It is most likely that the abnormality arose as a postzygotic event at the very early zygotic division. During the first DNA synthesis after fertilization and before the zygotic division, DNA synthesis errors could result in two chromatids, one with a deletion and the other with a duplication. It is also possible that after the DNA synthesis prior to the first cell division, the chromatids of the same chromosome 11 for unknown reasons were involved in uneven double somatic crossing over events resulting in deleted and duplicated chromatids, respectively. The 1:1 cell ratio found in the patient and the apparent non-existence of a normal cell line further suggest that the origin of the abnormality was post-zygotic.

  13. An atypical human induced pluripotent stem cell line with a complex, stable, and balanced genomic rearrangement including a large de novo 1q uniparental disomy.

    PubMed

    Steichen, Clara; Maluenda, Jérôme; Tosca, Lucie; Luce, Eléanor; Pineau, Dominique; Dianat, Noushin; Hannoun, Zara; Tachdjian, Gérard; Melki, Judith; Dubart-Kupperschmitt, Anne

    2015-03-01

    Human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) hold great promise for cell therapy through their use as vital tools for regenerative and personalized medicine. However, the genomic integrity of hiPSCs still raises some concern and is one of the barriers limiting their use in clinical applications. Numerous articles have reported the occurrence of aneuploidies, copy number variations, or single point mutations in hiPSCs, and nonintegrative reprogramming strategies have been developed to minimize the impact of the reprogramming process on the hiPSC genome. Here, we report the characterization of an hiPSC line generated by daily transfections of modified messenger RNAs, displaying several genomic abnormalities. Karyotype analysis showed a complex genomic rearrangement, which remained stable during long-term culture. Fluorescent in situ hybridization analyses were performed on the hiPSC line showing that this karyotype is balanced. Interestingly, single-nucleotide polymorphism analysis revealed the presence of a large 1q region of uniparental disomy (UPD), demonstrating for the first time that UPD can occur in a noncompensatory context during nonintegrative reprogramming of normal fibroblasts. PMID:25650439

  14. Complex de novo chromosomal rearrangement at 15q11-q13 involving an intrachromosomal triplication in a patient with a severe neuropsychological phenotype: clinical report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Castronovo, Chiara; Crippa, Milena; Bestetti, Ilaria; Rusconi, Daniela; Russo, Silvia; Larizza, Lidia; Sangermani, Roberto; Bonati, Maria Teresa; Finelli, Palma

    2015-01-01

    Interstitial triplications of 15q11-q13, leading to tetrasomy of the involved region, are very rare, with only 11 cases reported to date. Their pathogenicity is independent of the parental origin of the rearranged chromosome. The associated phenotype resembles, but is less severe, than that of patients bearing inv dup(15) marker chromosomes. Here, we describe a boy of 3 years and 9 months of age who exhibited very mild craniofacial dysmorphism (arched eyebrows, hypertelorism, and a wide mouth), developmental delay, generalized hypotonia, ataxic gait, severe intellectual disability, and autism. Array comparative genomic hybridization (CGH) analysis identified a heterozygous duplication of 1.1 Mb at 15q11.2 (between low-copy repeats BP1 and BP2), and a heterozygous triplication of 6.8 Mb at 15q11.2-q13.1 (BP2-BP4). Both acquisitions were de novo and contiguous. Microsatellite polymorphism analysis revealed the maternal origin of the triplication and the involvement of both maternal chromosomes 15. Furthermore, fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) analysis using BAC clones revealed that the rearrangement was complex, containing three differently sized tandem repeats of which the middle one was inverted. Our study confirms and extends the model proposed to explain the formation of intrachromosomal triplications through recombination events between non-allelic duplicons. The comparison of the proband's clinical presentation with those of previously described cases attests the existence of endophenotypes due to the parental origin of the 15q11-q13 triplicated segment and suggests a timetable for achievement of developmental milestones, thereby contributing to improved genotype-phenotype correlations. PMID:25339188

  15. Recombinant chromosome 14 due to maternal pericentric inversion.

    PubMed

    Sliuzas, Vytautas; Utkus, Algirdas; Kucinskas, Vaidutis

    2008-01-01

    Chromosome 14 is often involved in various chromosome rearrangements, most of them balanced. Human chromosome 14 is acrocentric, so its pericentric inversions are extremely rare (only few cases have been described in the literature). Here we report on a boy with congenital malformations and recombinant chromosome 14 inherited from his mother carrying a pericentric inversion. The proband's G-banded chromosome analysis revealed derivative chromosome 14. Comparative genomic hybridization analysis identified duplication of the terminal part of chromosome 14q ish cgh dup(14)(q32.1qter). This abnormality has been confirmed by custom BAC FISH analysis. His mother's karyotype was 46,XX,inv(14)(p11.2q32.1). PMID:18436995

  16. Karyotype-phenotype insights from 11q14.1-q23.2 interstitial deletions: FZD4 haploinsufficiency and exudative vitreoretinopathy in a patient with a complex chromosome rearrangement.

    PubMed

    Li, Peining; Zhang, Hui Z; Huff, Shannon; Nimmakayalu, Manjunath; Qumsiyeh, Mazin; Yu, Jingwei; Szekely, Anna; Xu, Tian; Pober, Barbara R

    2006-12-15

    We detected a unique de novo complex chromosome rearrangement (CCR) in a patient with multiple abnormalities including growth retardation, facial anomalies, exudative vitreoretinopathy (EVR), cleft palate, and minor digital anomalies. Cytogenetic analysis, fluorescent in situ hybridization, and microsatellite genotyping showed a reciprocal translocation between chromosomes 5 and 8, and a complex translocation-deletion-inversion process in the formation of derivative chromosomes 11 and 16. High-density whole-genome oligonucleotide array comparative genomic hybridization (oaCGH) defined a 35-megabase interstitial deletion of 11q14.1-q23.2 and a 1 megabase deletion of 16q22.3-q23.1. The Frizzled-4 (FZD4) gene is located within this 11q deletion. Parental studies and sequencing analysis confirmed that the patient was hemizygous for FZD4 due to the loss of a paternal allele on the derivative chromosome 11. Mutations in FZD4 are known to cause autosomal dominant exudative vitreoretinopathy (EVR1). Our patient's findings suggest that haploinsufficiency of the FZD4 gene product can also be a disease-causing mechanism for EVR1. We reviewed the clinical manifestations of 23 cases with 11q14-q23 interstitial deletions, with particular scrutiny of the present case and four reported cases characterized by molecular cytogenetics. These findings were used to construct a regional deletion map consisting of a haplosufficient segment at 11q14.3, a flanking centromeric segment at 11q14.1-q14.2, and a flanking telomeric segment at 11q21-q23.3. We propose that deletions of the FZD4 gene located within the centromeric segment cause retinal dysgenesis, while deletions within the telomeric segment account for dysmorphic craniofacial features, growth and mental retardation, and mild digital anomalies. These results provide insight into karyotype-phenotype correlations and prompt a rational analytic approach to cases with interstitial deletions of the 11q14-q23 region. PMID:17103440

  17. Variant complex translocations involving chromosomes 1, 9, 9, 15 and 17 in acute promyelocytic leukemia without RAR alpha/PML gene fusion rearrangement.

    PubMed

    Gogineni, S K; Shah, H O; Chester, M; Lin, J H; Garrison, M; Alidina, A; Bayani, E; Verma, R S

    1997-04-01

    Acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL;M3) is specifically characterized by a predominance of malignant promyelocytes having atypical reciprocal translocation involving chromosome 15 and 17 [t(15;17)(q22;q11)] resulting in the fusion of retinoic acid receptor alpha (RAR alpha) on chromosome 17 and the putative transcription factor gene PML, ie the translocation generates two fusion transcripts, PML/RAR alpha and RAR alpha/PML. We describe a patient with clinical and morphologic characteristics of atypical APL but with a previously undescribed variant translocation. A 35-year-old Hispanic having atypical APL was referred for cytogenetic evaluation. The cytogenetic findings with GTG-banding coupled with FISH analysis revealed the following karyotype: 46,XX,der(9)t(1;9)(q25;q34)der(9)t(9;?)(q34;?), t(15;17)(q22;q11)ish. der(9)t(1;9)(q25;q34)(WCP1+,WCP9+),t(9;17;15)(q34;q11;q22) (WCP9+,WCP15+,PML+;WCP17+,RAR alpha +;WCP15+,WCP17+,PML-)[20]/46,XX[5]. The chromosome 17q was translocated to the chromosome 15q. However, chromosome 15q including the PML gene normally translocating to 17q and creating the RAR alpha/PML fusion gene, translocated to chromosome 9q. Does this patient have another subset of APL? Or is the genetics of APL different in cases with variant translocations as opposed to those with atypical t(15;17) translocation, though in the majority of the cases their clinical presentation remains the same. PMID:9096691

  18. A rearrangement of the Z chromosome topology influences the sex-linked gene display in the European corn borer, Ostrinia nubilalis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The sex determination system of Lepidoptera is comprised of heterogametic females (ZW) and homogametic males (ZZ), where voltinism (Volt) and the male pheromone response traits (Resp) are controlled by genes housed on the Z-chromosome. Volt and Resp determine traits that lead to ecotype differentia...

  19. Supernumerary chromosome marker Der(22)t(11;22) resulting from a maternal balanced translocation.

    PubMed

    Hou, Jia-Woei

    2003-01-01

    Derivative 22 [der(22)] syndrome is a rare disorder associated with multiple congenital anomalies including pre-auricular skin tags or pits, conotruncal heart defects, and profound mental retardation. Der(22)t(11;22) is one of the causes of supernumerary chromosome markers (mar) in humans. We present a boy with developmental delay and multiple anomalies consistent with the supernumerary der(22) syndrome. Cytogenetic analysis showed an abnormal chromosome complement of 47, XY, +mar in all 50 cells analyzed. The karyotype of his mother showed a reciprocal translocation over the distal bands 11q23 and 22q11, respectively, i.e., 46,XX,t( 11;22)(q23.3;q11.2), and that of his father was 46,XY. Thus, the nature of the supernumerary chromosome markers was of der(22)t(11 ;22)(q23.3;q11.2). The clinical features, including craniofacial dysmorphism, hypotonia, psychomotor retardation, heart defects, and urogenital anomalies, were the combined effects of partial trisomies for both distal 11q and pericentromeric 22q. PMID:12656309

  20. Polymorphism, duplication, and IS1-mediated rearrangement in the chromosomal his-rfb-gnd region of Escherichia coli strains with group IA and capsular K antigens.

    PubMed

    Drummelsmith, J; Amor, P A; Whitfield, C

    1997-05-01

    Individual Escherichia coli strains produce several cell surface polysaccharides. In E. coli E69, the his region of the chromosome contains the rfb (serotype O9 lipopolysaccharide O-antigen biosynthesis) and cps (serotype K30 group IA capsular polysaccharide biosynthesis) loci. Polymorphisms in this region of the Escherichia coli chromosome reflect extensive antigenic diversity in the species. Previously, we reported a duplication of the manC-manB genes, encoding enzymes involved in GDP-mannose formation, upstream of rfb in strain E69 (P. Jayaratne et al., J. Bacteriol. 176:3126-3139, 1994). Here we show that one of the manC-manB copies is flanked by IS1 elements, providing a potential mechanism for the gene duplication. Adjacent to manB1 on the IS1-flanked segment is a further open reading frame (ugd), encoding uridine-5'-diphosphoglucose dehydrogenase. The Ugd enzyme is responsible for the production of UDP-glucuronic acid, a precursor required for K30 antigen synthesis. Construction of a chromosomal ugd::Gm(r) insertion mutation demonstrated the essential role for Ugd in the biosynthesis of the K30 antigen and confirmed that there is no additional functional ugd copy in strain E69. PCR amplification and Southern hybridization were used to examine the distribution of IS1 elements and ugd genes in the vicinity of rfb in other E. coli strains, producing different group IA K antigens. The relative order of genes and, where present, IS1 elements was established in these strains. The regions adjacent to rfb in these strains are highly variable in both size and gene order, but in all cases where a ugd homolog was present, it was found near rfb. The presence of IS1 elements in the rfb regions of several of these strains provides a potential mechanism for recombination and deletion events which could contribute to the antigenic diversity seen in surface polysaccharides. PMID:9150218

  1. AID-deficient Bcl-xL transgenic mice develop delayed atypical plasma cell tumors with unusual Ig/Myc chromosomal rearrangements.

    PubMed

    Kovalchuk, Alexander L; duBois, Wendy; Mushinski, Elizabeth; McNeil, Nicole E; Hirt, Carsten; Qi, Chen-Feng; Li, Zhaoyang; Janz, Siegfried; Honjo, Tasuku; Muramatsu, Masamichi; Ried, Thomas; Behrens, Timothy; Potter, Michael

    2007-11-26

    Activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID) is required for immunoglobulin (Ig) class switch recombination and somatic hypermutation, and has also been implicated in translocations between Ig switch regions and c-Myc in plasma cell tumors in mice. We asked if AID is required for accelerated tumor development in pristane-treated Bcl-xL transgenic BALB/c mice deficient in AID (pBxAicda-/-). pBxAicda-/- mice developed tumors with a lower frequency (24 vs. 62%) and a longer mean latency (108 vs. 36 d) than AID-sufficient mice. The tumors appeared in oil granuloma tissue and did not form ascites. By interphase fluorescence in situ hybridization, six out of nine pBxAicda-/- primary tumors had T(12;15) and one had T(6;15) chromosomal translocations. Two tumors were transplantable and established as stable cell lines. Molecular and cytogenetic analyses showed that one had an unusual unbalanced T(12;15) translocation, with IgH Cmu and Pvt-1 oriented head to tail at the breakpoint, resulting in an elevated expression of c-Myc. In contrast, the second was T(12;15) negative, but had an elevated N-Myc expression caused by a paracentric inversion of chromosome 12. Thus, novel mechanisms juxtapose Ig and Myc-family genes in AID-deficient plasma cell tumors. PMID:17998390

  2. Genetic markers on chromosome 7.

    PubMed Central

    Tsui, L C

    1988-01-01

    Chromosome 7 is frequently associated with chromosome aberrations, rearrangements, and deletions. It also contains many important genes, gene families, and disease loci. This brief review attempts to summarise these and other interesting aspects of chromosome 7. With the rapid accumulation of cloned genes and polymorphic DNA fragments, this chromosome has become an excellent substrate for molecular genetic studies. PMID:3290488

  3. BALANCE

    DOEpatents

    Carmichael, H.

    1953-01-01

    A torsional-type analytical balance designed to arrive at its equilibrium point more quickly than previous balances is described. In order to prevent external heat sources creating air currents inside the balance casing that would reiard the attainment of equilibrium conditions, a relatively thick casing shaped as an inverted U is placed over the load support arms and the balance beam. This casing is of a metal of good thernnal conductivity characteristics, such as copper or aluminum, in order that heat applied to one portion of the balance is quickly conducted to all other sensitive areas, thus effectively preventing the fornnation of air currents caused by unequal heating of the balance.

  4. Tyrosine kinase gene rearrangements in epithelial malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Shaw, Alice T.; Hsu, Peggy P.; Awad, Mark M.; Engelman, Jeffrey A.

    2014-01-01

    Chromosomal rearrangements that lead to oncogenic kinase activation are observed in many epithelial cancers. These cancers express activated fusion kinases that drive the initiation and progression of malignancy, and often have a considerable response to small-molecule kinase inhibitors, which validates these fusion kinases as ‘druggable’ targets. In this Review, we examine the aetiologic, pathogenic and clinical features that are associated with cancers harbouring oncogenic fusion kinases, including anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK), ROS1 and RET. We discuss the clinical outcomes with targeted therapies and explore strategies to discover additional kinases that are activated by chromosomal rearrangements in solid tumours. PMID:24132104

  5. Cloning a balanced t(9;11)(p24;q23.1) chromosomal translocation breakpoint segregating with bipolar affective disorder in a small pedigree

    SciTech Connect

    Duggan, D.J.; Baysal, B.E.; Gollin, S.M.

    1994-09-01

    A small multigenerational pedigree was previously identified in which a balanced 9;11 chromosomal translocation was cosegregating with bipolar affective disorder. We hypothesize that genes or gene regulatory sequences disrupted by the translocation are contributing to bipolar affective disorder in a dominant fashion. The general strategy involves (1) using somatic cell hybrids containing the derivative 9 or 11 chromosomes to identify the closest chromosome 9 and 11 flanking markers, (2) using the nearest markers as PCR and hybridization probes to isolate both normal DNA (YAC) and patient DNA (cosmid) adjacent to and incorporating the translocation breakpoint, and (3) identifying expressed sequences in the genomic DNA that may be disrupted by the translocation. From a fusion of the translocation patient cell line and a recipient hamster cell line, somatic cell hybrids were isolated which contain either the human derivative 9 or derivative 11 chromosome. Using PCR-based STS assays with these hybrids, the location of the translocation breakpoint was localized to an estimated 500 kb region at chromosome 11 band q23.1 and a 1 cM region in 9 band p24 (more telomeric than originally reported). From a large set of CEPH and Roswell Park yeast artificial chromosomes (YACs), six chromosome 11 YACs spanning the 11q23.1 breakpoint have now been identified. A combination of pulsed field gel eletrophoresis and YAC mapping has narrowed the chromosome 11 region to less than 430 kb. Current efforts are focused on generating new chromosome 11 probes within the flanking markers, mapping these probes back to the der(9) and der(11) containing hybrids and the chromosome 11 YAC mapping panel. As the region is physically narrowed, we will identify candidate genes whose expression may be altered by this t(9:11) translocation.

  6. Aneuploidy in spermatids of Robertsonian (Rb) chromosome heterozygous mice.

    PubMed

    Manieu, Catalina; González, Marisel; López-Fenner, Julio; Page, Jesús; Ayarza, Eliana; Fernández-Donoso, Raúl; Berríos, Soledad

    2014-12-01

    Rb translocations are chromosomal rearrangements frequently found in natural populations of the house mouse Mus musculus domesticus. The standard diploid karyotype of the house mouse consisting of 40 telocentric chromosomes may be reduced by the emergence of metacentric Rb chromosomes. Multiple simple Rb heterozygotes form trivalents exhibiting higher anaphase nondisjunction frequency and consequently higher number of unbalanced gametes than in normal males. This work will attempt to establish whether frequencies of aneuploidy observed in heterozygote spermatids of the house mouse M. musculus domesticus show differences in chromosomes derived from different trivalents. Towards this goal, the number and distribution frequency of aneuploidy was assessed via FISH staining of specific chromosomes of spermatids derived from 2n = 32 individuals. Our results showed that for a given set of target chromosomes, 90% of the gametes were balanced, resulting from alternate segregation, and that there were no differences (approx. 10%) in aneuploidy frequencies in chromosomes derived from different trivalents. These observations suggest that segregation effectiveness does not depend on the type of chromosomes involved in trivalents. As a consequence of the trivalent's configuration, joint segregation of the telocentric chromosomes occurs thus favoring their appearance together in early spermatids. Our data suggest that Rb chromosomes and their telocentric homologs are subject to architectural constraints placing them close to each other. This proximity may ultimately facilitate fusion between them, hence contributing to a prevalence of Rb metacentric chromosomes. PMID:25385393

  7. Involvement of interstitial telomeric sequences in two new cases of mosaicism for autosomal structural rearrangements.

    PubMed

    Lévy, Jonathan; Receveur, Aline; Jedraszak, Guillaume; Chantot-Bastaraud, Sandra; Renaldo, Florence; Gondry, Jean; Andrieux, Joris; Copin, Henri; Siffroi, Jean-Pierre; Portnoï, Marie-France

    2015-02-01

    Mosaicism for an autosomal structural rearrangement that does not involve ring or marker chromosomes is rare. The mechanisms responsible for genome instability have not always been explained. Several studies have shown that interstitial telomeric sequences (ITSs), involved in some mosaic constitutional anomalies, are potent sources of genomic instability. Here we describe two cases of mosaicism for uncommon constitutional autosomal rearrangements, involving ITSs, identified by karyotyping and characterized by FISH and SNP-array analysis. The first patient, a boy with global developmental delay, had a rare type of pure distal 1q inverted duplication (1q32-qter), attached to the end of the short arm of the same chromosome 1, in approximately 35% of his cells. The second patient, a phenotypically normal man, was diagnosed as having mosaic for a balanced non-reciprocal translocation of the distal segment of 7q (7q33qter), onto the terminal region of the short arm of a whole chromosome 12, in approximately 80% of his cells. The remaining 20% of the cells showed an unbalanced state of the translocation, with only the der(7) chromosome. He was ascertained through his malformed fetus carrying a non-mosaic partial monosomy 7q, identified at prenatal diagnosis. We show that pan-telomeric and subtelomeric sequences were observed at the interstitial junction point of the inv dup(1q) and of the der(12)t(7;12), respectively. The present cases and review of the literature suggest that the presence of ITSs at internal sites of the chromosomes may explain mechanisms of the patients's mosaic structural rearrangements. PMID:25428228

  8. Genome rearrangements caused by interstitial telomeric sequences in yeast

    PubMed Central

    Aksenova, Anna Y.; Greenwell, Patricia W.; Dominska, Margaret; Shishkin, Alexander A.; Kim, Jane C.; Petes, Thomas D.; Mirkin, Sergei M.

    2013-01-01

    Interstitial telomeric sequences (ITSs) are present in many eukaryotic genomes and are linked to genome instabilities and disease in humans. The mechanisms responsible for ITS-mediated genome instability are not understood in molecular detail. Here, we use a model Saccharomyces cerevisiae system to characterize genome instability mediated by yeast telomeric (Ytel) repeats embedded within an intron of a reporter gene inside a yeast chromosome. We observed a very high rate of small insertions and deletions within the repeats. We also found frequent gross chromosome rearrangements, including deletions, duplications, inversions, translocations, and formation of acentric minichromosomes. The inversions are a unique class of chromosome rearrangement involving an interaction between the ITS and the true telomere of the chromosome. Because we previously found that Ytel repeats cause strong replication fork stalling, we suggest that formation of double-stranded DNA breaks within the Ytel sequences might be responsible for these gross chromosome rearrangements. PMID:24191060

  9. Molecular rearrangements of superelectrophiles

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Summary Superelectrophiles are multiply charged cationic species (dications, trications, etc.) which are characterized by their reactions with weak nucleophiles. These reactive intermediates may also undergo a wide variety of rearrangement-type reactions. Superelectrophilic rearrangements are often driven by charge–charge repulsive effects, as these densely charged ions react so as to maximize the distances between charge centers. These rearrangements involve reaction steps similar to monocationic rearrangements, such as alkyl group shifts, Wagner–Meerwein shifts, hydride shifts, ring opening reactions, and other skeletal rearrangements. This review will describe these types of superelectrophilic reactions. PMID:21512598

  10. Effects of a Balanced Translocation between Chromosomes 1 and 11 Disrupting the DISC1 Locus on White Matter Integrity

    PubMed Central

    Whalley, Heather C.; Dimitrova, Rali; Sprooten, Emma; Dauvermann, Maria R.; Romaniuk, Liana; Duff, Barbara; Watson, Andrew R.; Moorhead, Bill; Bastin, Mark; Semple, Scott I.; Giles, Stephen; Hall, Jeremy; Thomson, Pippa; Roberts, Neil; Hughes, Zoe A.; Brandon, Nick J.; Dunlop, John; Whitcher, Brandon; Blackwood, Douglas H. R.; McIntosh, Andrew M.; Lawrie, Stephen M.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Individuals carrying rare, but biologically informative genetic variants provide a unique opportunity to model major mental illness and inform understanding of disease mechanisms. The rarity of such variations means that their study involves small group numbers, however they are amongst the strongest known genetic risk factors for major mental illness and are likely to have large neural effects. DISC1 (Disrupted in Schizophrenia 1) is a gene containing one such risk variant, identified in a single Scottish family through its disruption by a balanced translocation of chromosomes 1 and 11; t(1;11) (q42.1;q14.3). Method Within the original pedigree, we examined the effects of the t(1;11) translocation on white matter integrity, measured by fractional anisotropy (FA). This included family members with (n = 7) and without (n = 13) the translocation, along with a clinical control sample of patients with psychosis (n = 34), and a group of healthy controls (n = 33). Results We report decreased white matter integrity in five clusters in the genu of the corpus callosum, the right inferior fronto-occipital fasciculus, acoustic radiation and fornix. Analysis of the mixed psychosis group also demonstrated decreased white matter integrity in the above regions. FA values within the corpus callosum correlated significantly with positive psychotic symptom severity. Conclusions We demonstrate that the t(1;11) translocation is associated with reduced white matter integrity in frontal commissural and association fibre tracts. These findings overlap with those shown in affected patients with psychosis and in DISC1 animal models and highlight the value of rare but biologically informative mutations in modeling psychosis. PMID:26102360

  11. Balancing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harteveld, Casper

    At many occasions we are asked to achieve a “balance” in our lives: when it comes, for example, to work and food. Balancing is crucial in game design as well as many have pointed out. In games with a meaningful purpose, however, balancing is remarkably different. It involves the balancing of three different worlds, the worlds of Reality, Meaning, and Play. From the experience of designing Levee Patroller, I observed that different types of tensions can come into existence that require balancing. It is possible to conceive of within-worlds dilemmas, between-worlds dilemmas, and trilemmas. The first, the within-world dilemmas, only take place within one of the worlds. We can think, for example, of a user interface problem which just relates to the world of Play. The second, the between-worlds dilemmas, have to do with a tension in which two worlds are predominantly involved. Choosing between a cartoon or a realistic style concerns, for instance, a tension between Reality and Play. Finally, the trilemmas are those in which all three worlds play an important role. For each of the types of tensions, I will give in this level a concrete example from the development of Levee Patroller. Although these examples come from just one game, I think the examples can be exemplary for other game development projects as they may represent stereotypical tensions. Therefore, to achieve harmony in any of these forthcoming games, it is worthwhile to study the struggles we had to deal with.

  12. Algorithm to search for genomic rearrangements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nałecz-Charkiewicz, Katarzyna; Nowak, Robert

    2013-10-01

    The aim of this article is to discuss the issue of comparing nucleotide sequences in order to detect chromosomal rearrangements (for example, in the study of genomes of two cucumber varieties, Polish and Chinese). Two basic algorithms for detecting rearrangements has been described: Smith-Waterman algorithm, as well as a new method of searching genetic markers in combination with Knuth-Morris-Pratt algorithm. The computer program in client-server architecture was developed. The algorithms properties were examined on genomes Escherichia coli and Arabidopsis thaliana genomes, and are prepared to compare two cucumber varieties, Polish and Chinese. The results are promising and further works are planned.

  13. Osteosarcoma With Apparent Ewing Sarcoma Gene Rearrangement.

    PubMed

    Mathias, Melissa D; Chou, Alexander J; Meyers, Paul; Shukla, Neerav; Hameed, Meera; Agaram, Narasimhan; Wang, Lu; Berger, Michael F; Walsh, Michael; Kentsis, Alex

    2016-07-01

    Poorly differentiated round cell sarcomas present diagnostic challenges because of their variable morphology and lack of specific immunophenotypic markers. We present a case of a 15-year-old female with a tibial tumor that exhibited features of Ewing-like sarcoma, including apparent rearrangement of the EWSR1 gene. Hybridization capture-based next-generation DNA sequencing showed evidence of complex genomic rearrangements, absence of known pathogenic Ewing-like chromosome translocations, and deletions RB1, PTCH1, and ATRX, supporting the diagnosis of osteosarcoma. This illustrates the potential of clinical genomic profiling to improve diagnosis and enable specifically targeted therapies for cancers with complex pathologies. PMID:27352193

  14. Nucleotide resolution analysis of TMPRSS2 and ERG rearrangements in prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Weier, Christopher; Haffner, Michael C.; Mosbruger, Timothy; Esopi, David M.; Hicks, Jessica; Zheng, Qizhi; Fedor, Helen; Isaacs, William B.; De Marzo, Angelo M.; Nelson, William G.; Yegnasubramanian, Srinivasan

    2013-01-01

    TMPRSS2-ERG rearrangements occur in approximately 50% of prostate cancers and therefore represent one of the most frequently observed structural rearrangements in all cancers. However, little is known about the genomic architecture of such rearrangements. We therefore designed and optimized a pipeline involving target-capture of TMPRSS2 and ERG genomic sequences coupled with paired-end next generation sequencing to resolve genomic rearrangement breakpoints in TMPRSS2 and ERG at nucleotide resolution in a large series of primary prostate cancer specimens (n = 83). This strategy showed >90% sensitivity and specificity in identifying TMPRSS2-ERG rearrangements, and allowed identification of intra- and inter-chromosomal rearrangements involving TMPRSS2 and ERG with known and novel fusion partners. Our results indicate that rearrangement breakpoints show strong clustering in specific intronic regions of TMPRSS2 and ERG. The observed TMPRSS2-ERG rearrangements often exhibited complex chromosomal architecture associated with several intra- and inter-chromosomal rearrangements. Nucleotide resolution analysis of breakpoint junctions revealed that the majority of TMPRSS2 and ERG rearrangements (~88%) occurred at or near regions of microhomology or involved insertions of one or more base pairs. This architecture implicates nonhomologous end joining (NHEJ) and microhomology mediated end joining (MMEJ) pathways in the generation of such rearrangements. These analyses have provided important insights into the molecular mechanisms involved in generating prostate cancer-specific recurrent rearrangements. PMID:23447416

  15. Degradations and Rearrangement Reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jianbo

    This section deals with recent reports concerning degradation and rearrangement reactions of free sugars as well as some glycosides. The transformations are classified in chemical and enzymatic ways. In addition, the Maillard reaction will be discussed as an example of degradation and rearrangement transformation and its application in current research in the fields of chemistry and biology.

  16. Chromosomal Microarray versus Karyotyping for Prenatal Diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Wapner, Ronald J.; Martin, Christa Lese; Levy, Brynn; Ballif, Blake C.; Eng, Christine M.; Zachary, Julia M.; Savage, Melissa; Platt, Lawrence D.; Saltzman, Daniel; Grobman, William A.; Klugman, Susan; Scholl, Thomas; Simpson, Joe Leigh; McCall, Kimberly; Aggarwal, Vimla S.; Bunke, Brian; Nahum, Odelia; Patel, Ankita; Lamb, Allen N.; Thom, Elizabeth A.; Beaudet, Arthur L.; Ledbetter, David H.; Shaffer, Lisa G.; Jackson, Laird

    2013-01-01

    Background Chromosomal microarray analysis has emerged as a primary diagnostic tool for the evaluation of developmental delay and structural malformations in children. We aimed to evaluate the accuracy, efficacy, and incremental yield of chromosomal microarray analysis as compared with karyotyping for routine prenatal diagnosis. Methods Samples from women undergoing prenatal diagnosis at 29 centers were sent to a central karyotyping laboratory. Each sample was split in two; standard karyotyping was performed on one portion and the other was sent to one of four laboratories for chromosomal microarray. Results We enrolled a total of 4406 women. Indications for prenatal diagnosis were advanced maternal age (46.6%), abnormal result on Down’s syndrome screening (18.8%), structural anomalies on ultrasonography (25.2%), and other indications (9.4%). In 4340 (98.8%) of the fetal samples, microarray analysis was successful; 87.9% of samples could be used without tissue culture. Microarray analysis of the 4282 nonmosaic samples identified all the aneuploidies and unbalanced rearrangements identified on karyotyping but did not identify balanced translocations and fetal triploidy. In samples with a normal karyotype, microarray analysis revealed clinically relevant deletions or duplications in 6.0% with a structural anomaly and in 1.7% of those whose indications were advanced maternal age or positive screening results. Conclusions In the context of prenatal diagnostic testing, chromosomal microarray analysis identified additional, clinically significant cytogenetic information as compared with karyotyping and was equally efficacious in identifying aneuploidies and unbalanced rearrangements but did not identify balanced translocations and triploidies. (Funded by the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development and others; ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT01279733.) PMID:23215555

  17. Fractionation, rearrangement and subgenome dominance

    PubMed Central

    Sankoff, David; Zheng, Chunfang

    2012-01-01

    Motivation: Fractionation is arguably the greatest cause of gene order disruption following whole genome duplication, causing severe biases in chromosome rearrangement-based estimates of evolutionary divergence. Results: We show how to correct for this bias almost entirely by means of a ‘consolidation’ algorithm for detecting and suitably transforming identifiable regions of fractionation. We characterize the process of fractionation and the performance of the algorithm through realistic simulations. We apply our method to a number of core eudicot genomes, we and by studying the fractionation regions detected, are able to address topical issues in polyploid evolution. Availability and implementation: Code for the consolidation algorithm, and sample data, is available at: http://137.122.149.195/Software/Fractionation/fractionation.html Contact: sankoff@uottawa.ca PMID:22962459

  18. Delayed chromosomal instability induced by DNA damage.

    PubMed Central

    Marder, B A; Morgan, W F

    1993-01-01

    DNA damage induced by ionizing radiation can result in gene mutation, gene amplification, chromosome rearrangements, cellular transformation, and cell death. Although many of these changes may be induced directly by the radiation, there is accumulating evidence for delayed genomic instability following X-ray exposure. We have investigated this phenomenon by studying delayed chromosomal instability in a hamster-human hybrid cell line by means of fluorescence in situ hybridization. We examined populations of metaphase cells several generations after expanding single-cell colonies that had survived 5 or 10 Gy of X rays. Delayed chromosomal instability, manifested as multiple rearrangements of human chromosome 4 in a background of hamster chromosomes, was observed in 29% of colonies surviving 5 Gy and in 62% of colonies surviving 10 Gy. A correlation of delayed chromosomal instability with delayed reproductive cell death, manifested as reduced plating efficiency in surviving clones, suggests a role for chromosome rearrangements in cytotoxicity. There were small differences in chromosome destabilization and plating efficiencies between cells irradiated with 5 or 10 Gy of X rays after a previous exposure to 10 Gy and cells irradiated only once. Cell clones showing delayed chromosomal instability had normal frequencies of sister chromatid exchange formation, indicating that at this cytogenetic endpoint the chromosomal instability was not apparent. The types of chromosomal rearrangements observed suggest that chromosome fusion, followed by bridge breakage and refusion, contributes to the observed delayed chromosomal instability. Images PMID:8413263

  19. Reconstruction of ancestral chromosome architecture and gene repertoire reveals principles of genome evolution in a model yeast genus.

    PubMed

    Vakirlis, Nikolaos; Sarilar, Véronique; Drillon, Guénola; Fleiss, Aubin; Agier, Nicolas; Meyniel, Jean-Philippe; Blanpain, Lou; Carbone, Alessandra; Devillers, Hugo; Dubois, Kenny; Gillet-Markowska, Alexandre; Graziani, Stéphane; Huu-Vang, Nguyen; Poirel, Marion; Reisser, Cyrielle; Schott, Jonathan; Schacherer, Joseph; Lafontaine, Ingrid; Llorente, Bertrand; Neuvéglise, Cécile; Fischer, Gilles

    2016-07-01

    Reconstructing genome history is complex but necessary to reveal quantitative principles governing genome evolution. Such reconstruction requires recapitulating into a single evolutionary framework the evolution of genome architecture and gene repertoire. Here, we reconstructed the genome history of the genus Lachancea that appeared to cover a continuous evolutionary range from closely related to more diverged yeast species. Our approach integrated the generation of a high-quality genome data set; the development of AnChro, a new algorithm for reconstructing ancestral genome architecture; and a comprehensive analysis of gene repertoire evolution. We found that the ancestral genome of the genus Lachancea contained eight chromosomes and about 5173 protein-coding genes. Moreover, we characterized 24 horizontal gene transfers and 159 putative gene creation events that punctuated species diversification. We retraced all chromosomal rearrangements, including gene losses, gene duplications, chromosomal inversions and translocations at single gene resolution. Gene duplications outnumbered losses and balanced rearrangements with 1503, 929, and 423 events, respectively. Gene content variations between extant species are mainly driven by differential gene losses, while gene duplications remained globally constant in all lineages. Remarkably, we discovered that balanced chromosomal rearrangements could be responsible for up to 14% of all gene losses by disrupting genes at their breakpoints. Finally, we found that nonsynonymous substitutions reached fixation at a coordinated pace with chromosomal inversions, translocations, and duplications, but not deletions. Overall, we provide a granular view of genome evolution within an entire eukaryotic genus, linking gene content, chromosome rearrangements, and protein divergence into a single evolutionary framework. PMID:27247244

  20. {open_quotes}Balanced{close_quotes} karyotypes in six abnormal offspring of balanced reciprocal translocation normal carrier parents

    SciTech Connect

    Wenger, S.L.; Steele, M.W.; Boone, L.Y.

    1995-01-02

    Among 6800 consecutive blood samples studies for clinical cytogenetic diagnosis, we identified 30 families in which one parent of the proband had a balanced reciprocal autosomal translocation (excluding Robertsonian rearrangements). Twenty-eight of the 30 families had a malformed and/or mentally retarded proband: 19 with an unbalanced derived chromosome, 3 with abnormalities involving chromosomes other than those in the translocation, 5 with a {open_quotes}balanced{close_quotes} reciprocal translocation, and 1 with a normal karyotype. We hypothesize that a latter 6 affected probands with {open_quotes}balanced{close_quotes} karyotypes could be abnormal due to submicroscopic deletions and duplications as was originally suggested by Jacobs. Particularly in these 6 families, 83% of translocation breakpoints were associated with fragile sites, more than expected by chance (P < 0.025). This supports the report of an association between fragile sites and constitutional chromosome breakpoints by Hecht and Hecht. To explain these findings, we propose that autosomal fragile sites are unstable areas which predispose to breaks and unequal crossing over near the fragile site breakpoints creating minute duplications and deletions. Consequently, newborn infants inheriting a seemingly {open_quotes}balanced{close_quotes} karyotype from a normal parent with a balanced reciprocal translocation may still be at an increased risk of being malformed and/or developmentally delayed because of submicroscopic chromosomal imbalances. 19 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs.

  1. Rearrangements of Cycloalkenyl Aryl Ethers.

    PubMed

    Törincsi, Mercedesz; Nagy, Melinda; Bihari, Tamás; Stirling, András; Kolonits, Pál; Novak, Lajos

    2016-01-01

    Rearrangement reactions of cycloalkenyl phenol and naphthyl ethers and the acid-catalyzed cyclization of the resulting product were investigated. Claisen rearrangement afforded 2-substituted phenol and naphthol derivatives. Combined Claisen and Cope rearrangement resulted in the formation of 4-substituted phenol and naphthol derivatives. In the case of cycloocthylphenyl ether the consecutive Claisen and Cope rearrangements were followed by an alkyl migration. The mechanism of this novel rearrangement reaction is also discussed. PMID:27104504

  2. Chromosomal control of pig populations in France: 2002–2006 survey

    PubMed Central

    Ducos, Alain; Berland, Hélène-Marie; Bonnet, Nathalie; Calgaro, Anne; Billoux, Sébastien; Mary, Nicolas; Garnier-Bonnet, Amélie; Darré, Roland; Pinton, Alain

    2007-01-01

    The chromosomal control of pig populations has been widely developed in France over the last ten years. By December 31st, 2006, 13 765 individuals had been karyotyped in our laboratory, 62% of these since 2002. Ninety percent were young purebred boars controlled before service in artificial insemination centres, and 3% were hypoprolific boars. So far, 102 constitutional structural chromosomal rearrangements (67 since 2002) have been described. Fifty-six were reciprocal translocations and 8 peri- or paracentric inversions. For the first time since the beginning of the programme and after more than 11 000 pigs had been karyotyped, one Robertsonian translocation was identified in 2005 and two others in 2006. The estimated prevalence of balanced structural chromosomal rearrangements in a sample of more than 7700 young boars controlled before service was 0.47%. Twenty-one of the 67 rearrangements described since 2002 were identified in hypoprolific boars. All were reciprocal translocations. Twelve mosaics (XX/XY in 11 individuals, XY/XXY in one individual) were also diagnosed. Two corresponded to hypoprolific boars, and three to intersexed animals. The results presented in this communication would justify an intensification of the chromosomal control of French and, on a broader scale, European and North-American pig populations. PMID:17897598

  3. B-chromosome evolution.

    PubMed Central

    Camacho, J P; Sharbel, T F; Beukeboom, L W

    2000-01-01

    B chromosomes are extra chromosomes to the standard complement that occur in many organisms. They can originate in a number of ways including derivation from autosomes and sex chromosomes in intra- and interspecies crosses. Their subsequent molecular evolution resembles that of univalent sex chromosomes, which involves gene silencing, heterochromatinization and the accumulation of repetitive DNA and transposons. B-chromosome frequencies in populations result from a balance between their transmission rates and their effects on host fitness. Their long-term evolution is considered to be the outcome of selection on the host genome to eliminate B chromosomes or suppress their effects and on the B chromosome's ability to escape through the generation of new variants. Because B chromosomes interact with the standard chromosomes, they can play an important role in genome evolution and may be useful for studying molecular evolutionary processes. PMID:10724453

  4. Chromosomes, conflict, and epigenetics: chromosomal speciation revisited.

    PubMed

    Brown, Judith D; O'Neill, Rachel J

    2010-01-01

    Since Darwin first noted that the process of speciation was indeed the "mystery of mysteries," scientists have tried to develop testable models for the development of reproductive incompatibilities-the first step in the formation of a new species. Early theorists proposed that chromosome rearrangements were implicated in the process of reproductive isolation; however, the chromosomal speciation model has recently been questioned. In addition, recent data from hybrid model systems indicates that simple epistatic interactions, the Dobzhansky-Muller incompatibilities, are more complex. In fact, incompatibilities are quite broad, including interactions among heterochromatin, small RNAs, and distinct, epigenetically defined genomic regions such as the centromere. In this review, we will examine both classical and current models of chromosomal speciation and describe the "evolving" theory of genetic conflict, epigenetics, and chromosomal speciation. PMID:20438362

  5. The cubyl cation rearrangements.

    PubMed

    Jalife, Said; Mondal, Sukanta; Cabellos, Jose Luis; Martinez-Guajardo, Gerardo; Fernandez-Herrera, Maria A; Merino, Gabriel

    2016-02-25

    Born-Oppenheimer molecular dynamics simulations and high-level ab initio computations predict that the cage-opening rearrangement of the cubyl cation to the 7H(+)-pentalenyl cation is feasible in the gas phase. The rate-determining step is the formation of the cuneyl cation with an activation barrier of 25.3 kcal mol(-1) at the CCSD(T)/def2-TZVP//MP2/def2-TZVP level. Thus, the cubyl cation is kinetically stable enough to be formed and trapped at moderate temperatures, but it may be rearranged at higher temperatures. PMID:26880646

  6. Molecular studies of translocations and trisomy involving chromosome 13

    SciTech Connect

    Robinson, W.P.; Bernasconi, F.; Dutly, F.; Schinzel, A.A.

    1996-01-11

    Twenty-four cases of trisomy 13 and one case with disomy 13, but a de novo dic(13,13)(p12p12) chromosome, were examined with molecular markers to determine the origin of the extra (or rearranged) chromosome. Twenty-one of 23 informative patients were consistent with a maternal origin of the extra chromosome. Lack of a third allele at any locus in both paternal origin cases indicate a somatic duplication of the paternal chromosome occurred. Five cases had translocation trisomy. The patient with a paternal rob(13q14q) had a maternal meiotic origin of the trisomy; thus, the paternal inheritance of the translocation chromosome was purely coincidental. Since there is not a significantly increased risk for unbalanced offspring of a t(13q14q) carrier and most trisomies are maternal in origin, this result should not be surprising; however, it illustrates that one cannot infer the origin of translocation trisomy based on parental origin of the translocation. Lack of a third allele at any locus in one of the three t(13q13q) cases indicates that it was most likely an isochromosome of postmeiotic origin, whereas the other two cases showed evidence of recombination. One balanced (nontrisomic) case with a nonmosaic 45, -13, -13, +t(13;13) karyotype was also investigated and was determined to be a somatic Robertsonian translocation between the maternal and paternal homologues, as has been found for all balanced homologous Robertsonian translocations so far investigated. Thus, it is also incorrect to assume in de novo translocation cases that the two involved chromosomes are even from the same parent. Despite a maternal origin of the trisomy, we cannot therefore infer anything about the parental origin of the chromosomes 13 and 14 involved in the translocation in the de novo t(13q14q) case nor for the two t(13;13) chromosomes showing a meiotic origin of the trisomy. 30 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  7. Chromosome speciation: Humans, Drosophila, and mosquitoes

    PubMed Central

    Ayala, Francisco J.; Coluzzi, Mario

    2005-01-01

    Chromosome rearrangements (such as inversions, fusions, and fissions) may play significant roles in the speciation between parapatric (contiguous) or partly sympatric (geographically overlapping) populations. According to the “hybrid-dysfunction” model, speciation occurs because hybrids with heterozygous chromosome rearrangements produce dysfunctional gametes and thus have low reproductive fitness. Natural selection will, therefore, promote mutations that reduce the probability of intercrossing between populations carrying different rearrangements and thus promote their reproductive isolation. This model encounters a disabling difficulty: namely, how to account for the spread in a population of a chromosome rearrangement after it first arises as a mutation in a single individual. The “suppressed-recombination” model of speciation points out that chromosome rearrangements act as a genetic filter between populations. Mutations associated with the rearranged chromosomes cannot flow from one to another population, whereas genetic exchange will freely occur between colinear chromosomes. Mutations adaptive to local conditions will, therefore, accumulate differentially in the protected chromosome regions so that parapatric or partially sympatric populations will genetically differentiate, eventually evolving into different species. The speciation model of suppressed recombination has recently been tested by gene and DNA sequence comparisons between humans and chimpanzees, between Drosophila species, and between species related to Anopheles gambiae, the vector of malignant malaria in Africa. PMID:15851677

  8. Pure chromosome-specific PCR libraries from single sorted chromosomes.

    PubMed Central

    VanDevanter, D R; Choongkittaworn, N M; Dyer, K A; Aten, J; Otto, P; Behler, C; Bryant, E M; Rabinovitch, P S

    1994-01-01

    Chromosome-specific DNA libraries can be very useful in molecular and cytogenetic genome mapping studies. We have developed a rapid and simple method for the generation of chromosome-specific DNA sequences that relies on polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification of a single flow-sorted chromosome or chromosome fragment. Previously reported methods for the development of chromosome libraries require larger numbers of chromosomes, with preparation of pure chromosomes sorted by flow cytometry, generation of somatic cell hybrids containing targeted chromosomes, or a combination of both procedures. These procedures are labor intensive, especially when hybrid cell lines are not already available, and this has limited the generation of chromosome-specific DNA libraries from nonhuman species. In contrast, a single sorted chromosome is a pure source of DNA for library production even when flow cytometric resolution of chromosome populations is poor. Furthermore, any sorting cytometer may be used with this technique. Using this approach, we demonstrate the generation of PCR libraries suitable for both molecular and fluorescence in situ hybridization studies from individual baboon and canine chromosomes, separate human homologues, and a rearranged marker chromosome from a transformed cell line. PCR libraries specific to subchromosomal regions have also been produced by sorting a small chromosome fragment. This simple and rapid technique will allow generation of nonhuman linkage maps and probes for fluorescence in situ hybridization and the characterization of marker chromosomes from solid tumors. In addition, allele-specific libraries generated by this strategy may also be useful for mapping genetic diseases. Images PMID:8016078

  9. Familial transmission of a deletion of chromosome 21 derived from a translocation between chromosome 21 and an inverted chromosome 22.

    PubMed

    Aviv, H; Lieber, C; Yenamandra, A; Desposito, F

    1997-06-27

    Chromosome analysis of a newborn boy with Down syndrome resulted in the identification of a family with an unusual derivative chromosome 22. The child has 46 chromosomes, including two chromosomes 21, one normal chromosome 22, and a derivative chromosome 22. Giemsa banding and fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) studies show that the derivative chromosome is chromosome 22 with evidence of both paracentric and pericentric inversions, joined to the long arm of chromosome 21 from 21q21.2 to qter. The rearrangement results in partial trisomy 21 extending from 21q21.2 to 21q terminus in the patient. The child's mother, brother, maternal aunt, and maternal grandmother are all carriers of the derivative chromosome. All have 45 chromosomes, with one normal chromosome 21, one normal chromosome 22, and the derivative chromosome 22. The rearrangement results in the absence of the short arm, the centromere, and the proximal long arm of chromosome 21 (del 21pter-21q21.2) in carriers. Carriers of the derivative chromosome in this family have normal physical appearance, mild learning disabilities and poor social adjustment. PMID:9182781

  10. Molecular cytotaxonomy of primates by chromosomal in situ suppression hybridization.

    PubMed

    Wienberg, J; Jauch, A; Stanyon, R; Cremer, T

    1990-10-01

    A new strategy for analyzing chromosomal evolution in primates is presented using chromosomal in situ suppression (CISS) hybridization. Biotin-labeled DNA libraries from flow-sorted human chromosomes are hybridized to chromosome preparations of catarrhines, platyrrhines, and prosimians. By this approach rearrangements of chromosomes that occurred during hominoid evolution are visualized directly at the level of DNA sequences, even in primate species with pronounced chromosomal shuffles. PMID:2249853

  11. Phosphonate–phosphinate rearrangement.

    PubMed

    Qian, Renzhe; Roller, Alexander; Hammerschmidt, Friedrich

    2015-01-16

    LiTMP metalated dimethyl N-Boc-phosphoramidates derived from 1-phenylethylamine and 1,2,3,4-tetrahydronaphthalen-1-ylamine highly selectively at the CH3O group to generate short-lived oxymethyllithiums. These isomerized to diastereomeric hydroxymethylphosphonamidates (phosphate–phosphonate rearrangement). However, s-BuLi converted the dimethyl N-Boc-phosphoramidate derived from 1-phenylethylamine to the N-Boc α-aminophosphonate preferentially. Only s-BuLi deprotonated dimethyl hydroxymethylphosphonamidates at the benzylic position and dimethyl N-Boc α-aminophosphonates at the CH3O group to induce phosphonate–phosphinate rearrangements. In the former case, the migration of the phosphorus substituent from the nitrogen to the carbon atom followed a retentive course with some racemization because of the involvement of a benzyllithium as an intermediate. PMID:25525945

  12. Combined Use of Cytogenetic and Molecular Methods in Prenatal Diagnostics of Chromosomal Abnormalities

    PubMed Central

    Stomornjak-Vukadin, Meliha; Kurtovic-Basic, Ilvana; Mehinovic, Lejla; Konjhodzic, Rijad

    2015-01-01

    Aim: The aim of prenatal diagnostics is to provide information of the genetic abnormalities of the fetus early enough for the termination of pregnancy to be possible. Chromosomal abnormalities can be detected in an unborn child through the use of cytogenetic, molecular- cytogenetic and molecular methods. In between them, central spot is still occupied by cytogenetic methods. In cases where use of such methods is not informative enough, one or more molecular cytogenetic methods can be used for further clarification. Combined use of the mentioned methods improves the quality of the final findings in the diagnostics of chromosomal abnormalities, with classical cytogenetic methods still occupying the central spot. Material and methods: Conducted research represent retrospective-prospective study of a four year period, from 2008 through 2011. In the period stated, 1319 karyotyping from amniotic fluid were conducted, along with 146 FISH analysis. Results: Karyotyping had detected 20 numerical and 18 structural aberrations in that period. Most common observed numerical aberration were Down syndrome (75%), Klinefelter syndrome (10%), Edwards syndrome, double Y syndrome and triploidy (5% each). Within observed structural aberrations more common were balanced chromosomal aberrations then non balanced ones. Most common balanced structural aberrations were as follows: reciprocal translocations (60%), Robertson translocations (13.3%), chromosomal inversions, duplications and balanced de novo chromosomal rearrangements (6.6% each). Conclusion: With non- balanced aberrations observed in the samples of amniotic fluid, non- balanced translocations, deletions and derived chromosomes were equally represented. Number of detected aneuploidies with FISH, prior to obtaining results with karyotyping, were 6. PMID:26005269

  13. Subtelomere FISH analysis of 11 688 cases: an evaluation of the frequency and pattern of subtelomere rearrangements in individuals with developmental disabilities

    PubMed Central

    Ravnan, J B; Tepperberg, J H; Papenhausen, P; Lamb, A N; Hedrick, J; Eash, D; Ledbetter, D H; Martin, C L

    2006-01-01

    Background Subtelomere fluorescence in situ hybridisation (FISH) analysis has increasingly been used as an adjunct to routine cytogenetic testing in order to detect small rearrangements. Previous reports have estimated an overall abnormality rate of 6%, with a range of 2–29% because of different inclusion criteria. Methods This study presents data compiled from 11 688 cases referred for subtelomere FISH testing in three clinical cytogenetic laboratories. Results In this study population, the detection rate for clinically significant subtelomere abnormalities was approximately 2.5%, with an additional 0.5% detection of presumed familial variants. Approximately half of the clinically significant abnormalities identified were terminal deletions, the majority of which were de novo. Most of the remaining cases were unbalanced translocations between two chromosomes or two arms of the same chromosome. Approximately 60% of the unbalanced translocations were inherited from a parent carrying a balanced form of the rearrangement. Other abnormalities identified included tandem duplications, apparently balanced translocations, partial deletions, and insertions. Interestingly, 9 cases (0.08%) were found to have interstitial deletions of non‐telomeric control loci, either BCR on 22q or PML on 15q. The most common clinically significant imbalances found were deletions of 1p, 22q, 4p, 9q, 8p, 2q and 20p. The most common familial variants were a deletion or duplication of 10q, deletion of 4q, deletion of Yq, and duplication of X/Yp onto Xq. Conclusions This study of subtelomere rearrangements is a 20 fold increase in number over the previously reported largest study and represents an unbiased analysis of subtelomere rearrangements in a large, unselected patient population. PMID:16199540

  14. Gene expression homeostasis and chromosome architecture

    PubMed Central

    Seshasayee, Aswin Sai Narain

    2014-01-01

    In rapidly growing populations of bacterial cells, including those of the model organism Escherichia coli, genes essential for growth - such as those involved in protein synthesis - are expressed at high levels; this is in contrast to many horizontally-acquired genes, which are maintained at low transcriptional levels.1 This balance in gene expression states between 2 distinct classes of genes is established by a galaxy of transcriptional regulators, including the so-called nucleoid associated proteins (NAP) that contribute to shaping the chromosome.2 Besides these active players in gene regulation, it is not too far-fetched to anticipate that genome organization in terms of how genes are arranged on the chromosome,3 which is the result of long-drawn transactions among genome rearrangement processes and selection, and the manner in which it is structured inside the cell, plays a role in establishing this balance. A recent study from our group has contributed to the literature investigating the interplay between global transcriptional regulators and genome organization in establishing gene expression homeostasis.4 In particular, we address a triangle of functional interactions among genome organization, gene expression homeostasis and horizontal gene transfer. PMID:25997086

  15. Oncogenic rearrangements driving ionizing radiation–associated human cancer

    PubMed Central

    Santoro, Massimo; Carlomagno, Francesca

    2013-01-01

    The Chernobyl nuclear disaster has caused a remarkable increase in radiation-induced papillary thyroid carcinoma in children and young adults. In this issue of the JCI, Ricarte-Filho and colleagues demonstrate that chromosomal rearrangements are the oncogenic “drivers” in most post-Chernobyl carcinomas and that they often lead to unscheduled activation of the MAPK signaling pathway. These findings represent a major step forward in our understanding of radiation-induced carcinogenesis and suggest various hypotheses about the mechanisms underlying the formation and selection of gene rearrangements during cancer cell evolution. PMID:24162670

  16. Unlocking Holocentric Chromosomes: New Perspectives from Comparative and Functional Genomics?

    PubMed Central

    Mandrioli, Mauro; Manicardi, Gian Carlo

    2012-01-01

    The presence of chromosomes with diffuse centromeres (holocentric chromosomes) has been reported in several taxa since more than fifty years, but a full understanding of their origin is still lacking. Comparative and functional genomics are nowadays furnishing new data to better understand holocentric chromosome evolution thus opening new perspectives to analyse karyotype rearrangements in species with holocentric chromosomes in particular evidencing unusual common features, such as the uniform GC content and gene distribution along chromosomes. PMID:23372420

  17. Organization of the bacterial chromosome.

    PubMed Central

    Krawiec, S; Riley, M

    1990-01-01

    Recent progress in studies on the bacterial chromosome is summarized. Although the greatest amount of information comes from studies on Escherichia coli, reports on studies of many other bacteria are also included. A compilation of the sizes of chromosomal DNAs as determined by pulsed-field electrophoresis is given, as well as a discussion of factors that affect gene dosage, including redundancy of chromosomes on the one hand and inactivation of chromosomes on the other hand. The distinction between a large plasmid and a second chromosome is discussed. Recent information on repeated sequences and chromosomal rearrangements is presented. The growing understanding of limitations on the rearrangements that can be tolerated by bacteria and those that cannot is summarized, and the sensitive region flanking the terminator loci is described. Sources and types of genetic variation in bacteria are listed, from simple single nucleotide mutations to intragenic and intergenic recombinations. A model depicting the dynamics of the evolution and genetic activity of the bacterial chromosome is described which entails acquisition by recombination of clonal segments within the chromosome. The model is consistent with the existence of only a few genetic types of E. coli worldwide. Finally, there is a summary of recent reports on lateral genetic exchange across great taxonomic distances, yet another source of genetic variation and innovation. PMID:2087223

  18. Skeletal overgrowth syndrome caused by overexpression of C-type natriuretic peptide in a girl with balanced chromosomal translocation, t(1;2)(q41;q37.1).

    PubMed

    Ko, Jung Min; Bae, Jun-Seok; Choi, Jin Sun; Miura, Kohji; Lee, Hye Ran; Kim, Ok-Hwa; Kim, Nayoung K D; Oh, Sun Kyung; Ozono, Keiichi; Lee, Choon-Ki; Choi, In Ho; Park, Woong-Yang; Cho, Tae-Joon

    2015-05-01

    Chromosomal translocation of 2q37.1 just distal to the NPPC gene coding for C-type natriuretic peptide (CNP) and subsequent overproduction of CNP have been reported to cause a skeletal overgrowth syndrome. Loeys-Dietz syndrome (LDS) is one of marfanoid overgrowth syndromes, of which subtype IV is caused by haploinsufficiency of transforming growth factor beta 2 (TGFB2). We report on a girl with clinical phenotypes of overgrowth syndrome, including long and slim body habitus, macrodactyly of the big toe, scoliosis, ankle valgus deformity, coxa valga, slipped capital femoral epiphysis, and aortic root dilatation. Karyotyping revealed a balanced chromosomal translocation between 1q41 and 2q37.1, and the breakpoints could be mapped by targeted resequencing analysis. On chromosome 2q37.1, the translocation took place 200,365 bp downstream of NPPC, and serum level of the amino terminal of CNP was elevated. The contralateral site of translocation on chromosome 1q41 disrupted TGFB2 gene, presumed to cause its haploinsufficiency. This case supports the concept that NPPC is overexpressed because of the loss of a specific negative regulatory control in the normal chromosomal location, and demonstrates the effectiveness of targeted resequencing in the mapping of breakpoints. PMID:25728306

  19. Molecular mechanism in the formation of a human ring chromosome 21

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, C.; Kazazian, H.H. Jr.; Stetten, G.; Earnshaw, W.C.; Antonarakis, S.E. ); Van Keuren, M.L. )

    1989-03-01

    The authors have characterized the structural rearrangements of a chromosome 21 that led to the de novo formation of a human ring chromosome 21 (r(21)). Molecular cloning and chromosomal localization of the DNA regions flanking the ring junction provide evidence for a long arm to long arm fusion in formation of the r(21). In addition, the centromere and proximal long arm region of a maternal chromosome 21 are duplicated in the r(21). Therefore, the mechanism in formation of the r(21) was complex involving two sequential chromosomal rearrangements. (i) Duplication of the centromere and long arm of one maternal chromosome 21 occurred forming a rearranged intermediate. (ii) Chromosomal breaks in both the proximal and telomeric long arm regions on opposite arms of this rearranged chromosome occurred with subsequent reunion producing the r(21).

  20. Chromosome size in diploid eukaryotic species centers on the average length with a conserved boundary

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Understanding genome and chromosome evolution is important for understanding genetic inheritance and evolution. Universal events comprising DNA replication, transcription, repair, mobile genetic element transposition, chromosome rearrangements, mitosis, and meiosis underlie inheritance and variation...

  1. Tracking Chromosome Evolution in Southern African Gerbils Using Flow-Sorted Chromosome Paints

    PubMed Central

    Knight, L.I.; Ng, B.L.; Cheng, W.; Fu, B.; Yang, F.; Rambau, R.V.

    2013-01-01

    Desmodillus and Gerbilliscus (formerly Tatera) comprise a monophyletic group of gerbils (subfamily Gerbillinae) which last shared an ancestor approximately 8 million years ago; diploid chromosome number variation among the species ranges from 2n = 36 to 2n = 50. In an attempt to shed more light on chromosome evolution and speciation in these rodents, we compared the karyotypes of 7 species, representing 3 genera, based on homology data revealed by chromosome painting with probes derived from flow-sorted chromosomes of the hairy footed gerbil, Gerbillurus paeba (2n = 36). The fluorescent in situ hybridization data revealed remarkable genome conservation: these species share a high proportion of conserved chromosomes, and differences are due to 10 Robertsonian (Rb) rearrangements (3 autapomorphies, 3 synapomorphies and 4 hemiplasies/homoplasies). Our data suggest that chromosome evolution in Desmodillus occurred at a rate of ∼1.25 rearrangements per million years (Myr), and that the rate among Gerbilliscus over a time period spanning 8 Myr is also ∼1.25 rearrangements/Myr. The recently diverged Gerbillurus (G. tytonis and G. paeba) share an identical karyotype, while Gerbilliscus kempi, G. afra and G. leucogaster differ by 6 Rb rearrangements (a rate of ∼1 rearrangement/Myr). Thus, our data suggests a very slow rate of chromosomal evolution in Southern African gerbils. PMID:23652816

  2. Tracking chromosome evolution in southern African gerbils using flow-sorted chromosome paints.

    PubMed

    Knight, L I; Ng, B L; Cheng, W; Fu, B; Yang, F; Rambau, R V

    2013-01-01

    Desmodillus and Gerbilliscus (formerly Tatera) comprise a monophyletic group of gerbils (subfamily Gerbillinae) which last shared an ancestor approximately 8 million years ago; diploid chromosome number variation among the species ranges from 2n = 36 to 2n = 50. In an attempt to shed more light on chromosome evolution and speciation in these rodents, we compared the karyotypes of 7 species, representing 3 genera, based on homology data revealed by chromosome painting with probes derived from flow-sorted chromosomes of the hairy footed gerbil, Gerbillurus paeba (2n = 36). The fluorescent in situ hybridization data revealed remarkable genome conservation: these species share a high proportion of conserved chromosomes, and differences are due to 10 Robertsonian (Rb) rearrangements (3 autapomorphies, 3 synapomorphies and 4 hemiplasies/homoplasies). Our data suggest that chromosome evolution in Desmodillus occurred at a rate of ~1.25 rearrangements per million years (Myr), and that the rate among Gerbilliscus over a time period spanning 8 Myr is also ~1.25 rearrangements/Myr. The recently diverged Gerbillurus (G. tytonis and G. paeba) share an identical karyotype, while Gerbilliscus kempi, G. afra and G. leucogaster differ by 6 Rb rearrangements (a rate of ~1 rearrangement/Myr). Thus, our data suggests a very slow rate of chromosomal evolution in Southern African gerbils. PMID:23652816

  3. Consensus Statement: Chromosomal Microarray Is a First-Tier Clinical Diagnostic Test for Individuals with Developmental Disabilities or Congenital Anomalies

    PubMed Central

    Miller, David T.; Adam, Margaret P.; Aradhya, Swaroop; Biesecker, Leslie G.; Brothman, Arthur R.; Carter, Nigel P.; Church, Deanna M.; Crolla, John A.; Eichler, Evan E.; Epstein, Charles J.; Faucett, W. Andrew; Feuk, Lars; Friedman, Jan M.; Hamosh, Ada; Jackson, Laird; Kaminsky, Erin B.; Kok, Klaas; Krantz, Ian D.; Kuhn, Robert M.; Lee, Charles; Ostell, James M.; Rosenberg, Carla; Scherer, Stephen W.; Spinner, Nancy B.; Stavropoulos, Dimitri J.; Tepperberg, James H.; Thorland, Erik C.; Vermeesch, Joris R.; Waggoner, Darrel J.; Watson, Michael S.; Martin, Christa Lese; Ledbetter, David H.

    2010-01-01

    Chromosomal microarray (CMA) is increasingly utilized for genetic testing of individuals with unexplained developmental delay/intellectual disability (DD/ID), autism spectrum disorders (ASD), or multiple congenital anomalies (MCA). Performing CMA and G-banded karyotyping on every patient substantially increases the total cost of genetic testing. The International Standard Cytogenomic Array (ISCA) Consortium held two international workshops and conducted a literature review of 33 studies, including 21,698 patients tested by CMA. We provide an evidence-based summary of clinical cytogenetic testing comparing CMA to G-banded karyotyping with respect to technical advantages and limitations, diagnostic yield for various types of chromosomal aberrations, and issues that affect test interpretation. CMA offers a much higher diagnostic yield (15%–20%) for genetic testing of individuals with unexplained DD/ID, ASD, or MCA than a G-banded karyotype (∼3%, excluding Down syndrome and other recognizable chromosomal syndromes), primarily because of its higher sensitivity for submicroscopic deletions and duplications. Truly balanced rearrangements and low-level mosaicism are generally not detectable by arrays, but these are relatively infrequent causes of abnormal phenotypes in this population (<1%). Available evidence strongly supports the use of CMA in place of G-banded karyotyping as the first-tier cytogenetic diagnostic test for patients with DD/ID, ASD, or MCA. G-banded karyotype analysis should be reserved for patients with obvious chromosomal syndromes (e.g., Down syndrome), a family history of chromosomal rearrangement, or a history of multiple miscarriages. PMID:20466091

  4. Detection of Gene Rearrangements in Targeted Clinical Next-Generation Sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Abel, Haley J.; Al-Kateb, Hussam; Cottrell, Catherine E.; Bredemeyer, Andrew J.; Pritchard, Colin C.; Grossmann, Allie H.; Wallander, Michelle L.; Pfeifer, John D.; Lockwood, Christina M.; Duncavage, Eric J.

    2015-01-01

    The identification of recurrent gene rearrangements in the clinical laboratory is the cornerstone for risk stratification and treatment decisions in many malignant tumors. Studies have reported that targeted next-generation sequencing assays have the potential to identify such rearrangements; however, their utility in the clinical laboratory is unknown. We examine the sensitivity and specificity of ALK and KMT2A (MLL) rearrangement detection by next-generation sequencing in the clinical laboratory. We analyzed a series of seven ALK rearranged cancers, six KMT2A rearranged leukemias, and 77 ALK/KMT2A rearrangement–negative cancers, previously tested by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). Rearrangement detection was tested using publicly available software tools, including Breakdancer, ClusterFAST, CREST, and Hydra. Using Breakdancer and ClusterFAST, we detected ALK rearrangements in seven of seven FISH-positive cases and KMT2A rearrangements in six of six FISH-positive cases. Among the 77 ALK/KMT2A FISH-negative cases, no false-positive identifications were made by Breakdancer or ClusterFAST. Further, we identified one ALK rearranged case with a noncanonical intron 16 breakpoint, which is likely to affect its response to targeted inhibitors. We report that clinically relevant chromosomal rearrangements can be detected from targeted gene panel–based next-generation sequencing with sensitivity and specificity equivalent to that of FISH while providing finer-scale information and increased efficiency for molecular oncology testing. PMID:24813172

  5. Inheritance of a Chromosome 3 and 21 Translocation in the Fetuses, with One also Having Trisomy 21, in Three Pregnancies in One Family.

    PubMed

    Pazarbasi, A; Demirhan, O; Alptekin, D; Ozgunen, Ft; Ozpak, L; Yilmaz, Mb; Nazlican, E; Tanriverdi, N; Luleyap, U; Gümürdülü, D

    2013-12-01

    The majority of chromosome rearrangements are balanced reciprocal and Robertsonian translocations. It is now known that such abnormalities cause no phenotypic effect on the carrier but lead to increased risk of producing unbalanced gametes. Here, we report the inheritance of a translocation between chromosomes 3 and 21 in a family with one of two fetuses with Down Syndrome carrying the same translocation and the other also carrying the same translocation without the additional chromosome 21. Chromosomal analysis from fetal amniotic fluid and peripheral blood lymphocytes from the family were performed at the Çukurova University Hospital at Adana, Turkey. We assessed a family in which the translocation between chromosomes 3 and 21 segregates: one of the three progenies carried the 47,XX,+21,t(3;21)(q21;q22) karyotype and presented with Down Syndrome; another of the three progenies carried the 46,XX,t(3;21) (q21;q22) karyotype and the third had the 46,XY karyotype. Their mother is phenotypically normal. Apparently this rearrangement occurred due to an unbalanced chromosome segregation of the mother [t(3;21)(q21;q22)mat]. This family will enable us to explain the behavior of segregation patterns and the mechanism for each type of translocation from carrier to carrier and their effects on reproduction and numerical aberrations. These findings can be used in clinical genetics and may be used as an effective tool for reproductive guidance and genetic counseling. PMID:24778571

  6. Analysis of chromosome conservation in Lemur catta studied by chromosome paints and BAC/PAC probes.

    PubMed

    Cardone, Maria Francesca; Ventura, Mario; Tempesta, Sergio; Rocchi, Mariano; Archidiacono, Nicoletta

    2002-12-01

    A panel of human chromosome painting probes and bacterial and P1 artificial chromosome (BAC/PAC) clones were used in fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) experiments to investigate the chromosome conservation of the ring-tailed lemur (Lemur catta, LCA) with respect to human. Whole chromosome paints specific for human chromosomes 7, 9, 11, 13, 14, 17, 18, 20, 21, and X were found to identify a single chromosome or an uninterrupted chromosomal region in LCA. A large set of partial chromosome paints and BAC/PAC probes were then used to refine the characterization of the rearrangements differentiating the two karyotypes. The results were also used to reconstruct the ancestral Lemuridae karyotype. Lemur catta, indeed, can be used as an outgroup, allowing symplesiomorphic (ancestral) rearrangements to be distinguished from apomorphic (derived) rearrangements in lemurs. Some LCA chromosomes are difficult to distinguish morphologically. The 'anchorage' of most LCA chromosomes to specific probes will contribute to the standardization of the karyotype of this species. PMID:12474064

  7. Claisen thermally rearranged (CTR) polymers.

    PubMed

    Tena, Alberto; Rangou, Sofia; Shishatskiy, Sergey; Filiz, Volkan; Abetz, Volker

    2016-07-01

    Thermally rearranged (TR) polymers, which are considered the next-generation of membrane materials because of their excellent transport properties and high thermal and chemical stability, are proven to have significant drawbacks because of the high temperature required for the rearrangement and low degree of conversion during this process. We demonstrate that using a [3,3]-sigmatropic rearrangement, the temperature required for the rearrangement of a solid glassy polymer was reduced by 200°C. Conversions of functionalized polyimide to polybenzoxazole of more than 97% were achieved. These highly mechanically stable polymers were almost five times more permeable and had more than two times higher degrees of conversion than the reference polymer treated under the same conditions. Properties of these second-generation TR polymers provide the possibility of preparing efficient polymer membranes in a form of, for example, thin-film composite membranes for various gas and liquid membrane separation applications. PMID:27482538

  8. Claisen thermally rearranged (CTR) polymers

    PubMed Central

    Tena, Alberto; Rangou, Sofia; Shishatskiy, Sergey; Filiz, Volkan; Abetz, Volker

    2016-01-01

    Thermally rearranged (TR) polymers, which are considered the next-generation of membrane materials because of their excellent transport properties and high thermal and chemical stability, are proven to have significant drawbacks because of the high temperature required for the rearrangement and low degree of conversion during this process. We demonstrate that using a [3,3]-sigmatropic rearrangement, the temperature required for the rearrangement of a solid glassy polymer was reduced by 200°C. Conversions of functionalized polyimide to polybenzoxazole of more than 97% were achieved. These highly mechanically stable polymers were almost five times more permeable and had more than two times higher degrees of conversion than the reference polymer treated under the same conditions. Properties of these second-generation TR polymers provide the possibility of preparing efficient polymer membranes in a form of, for example, thin-film composite membranes for various gas and liquid membrane separation applications. PMID:27482538

  9. Radical Smiles Rearrangement: An Update.

    PubMed

    Allart-Simon, Ingrid; Gérard, Stéphane; Sapi, Janos

    2016-01-01

    Over the decades the Smiles rearrangement and its variants have become essential synthetic tools in modern synthetic organic chemistry. In this mini-review we summarized some very recent results of the radical version of these rearrangements. The selected examples illustrate the synthetic power of this approach, especially if it is incorporated into a domino process, for the preparation of polyfunctionalized complex molecules. PMID:27399654

  10. Chromosomal Conditions

    MedlinePlus

    ... 150 babies is born with a chromosomal condition. Down syndrome is an example of a chromosomal condition. Because ... all pregnant women be offered prenatal tests for Down syndrome and other chromosomal conditions. A screening test is ...

  11. Molecular cytogenetic dissection of human chromosomes 3 and 21 evolution

    PubMed Central

    Müller, S.; Stanyon, R.; Finelli, P.; Archidiacono, N.; Wienberg, J.

    2000-01-01

    Chromosome painting in placental mammalians illustrates that genome evolution is marked by chromosomal synteny conservation and that the association of chromosomes 3 and 21 may be the largest widely conserved syntenic block known for mammals. We studied intrachromosomal rearrangements of the syntenic block 3/21 by using probes derived from chromosomal subregions with a resolution of up to 10–15 Mbp. We demonstrate that the rearrangements visualized by chromosome painting, mostly translocations, are only a fraction of the actual chromosomal changes that have occurred during evolution. The ancestral segment order for both primates and carnivores is still found in some species in both orders. From the ancestral primate/carnivore condition an inversion is needed to derive the pig homolog, and a fission of chromosome 21 and a pericentric inversion is needed to derive the Bornean orangutan condition. Two overlapping inversions in the chromosome 3 homolog then would lead to the chromosome form found in humans and African apes. This reconstruction of the origin of human chromosome 3 contrasts with the generally accepted scenario derived from chromosome banding in which it was proposed that only one pericentric inversion was needed. From the ancestral form for Old World primates (now found in the Bornean orangutan) a pericentric inversion and centromere shift leads to the chromosome ancestral for all Old World monkeys. Intrachromosomal rearrangements, as shown here, make up a set of potentially plentiful and informative markers that can be used for phylogenetic reconstruction and a more refined comparative mapping of the genome. PMID:10618396

  12. Immunoglobulin λ Gene Rearrangement Can Precede κ Gene Rearrangement

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Berg, Jörg; Mcdowell, Mindy; Jäck, Hans-Martin; Wabl, Matthias

    1990-01-01

    Imore » mmunoglobulin genes are generated during differentiation of B lymphocytes by joining gene segments. A mouse pre-B cell contains a functional immunoglobulin heavy-chain gene, but no light-chain gene. Although there is only one heavy-chain locus, there are two lightchain loci: κ and λ .It has been reported that κ loci in the germ-line configuration are never (in man) or very rarely (in the mouse) present in cells with functionally rearranged λ -chain genes. Two explanations have been proposed to explain this: (a) the ordered rearrangement theory, which postulates that light-chain gene rearrangement in the pre-B cell is first attempted at the κ locus, and that only upon failure to produce a functional κ chain is there an attempt to rearrange the λ locus; and (b) the stochastic theory, which postulates that rearrangement at the λ locus proceeds at a rate that is intrinsically much slower than that at the κ locus. We show here that λ -chain genes are generated whether or not the κ locus has lost its germ-line arrangement, a result that is compatible only with the stochastic theory.« less

  13. C-Banding of Plant Chromosomes.

    PubMed

    Jellen, Eric N

    2016-01-01

    C-banding is used to differentially stain metaphase chromosomes in organisms having appreciable amounts of constitutive heterochromatin. Its primary benefits are that it is an inexpensive and a relatively fast method of identifying individual chromosomes and morphological or karyotypic variation, including large chromosomal rearrangements and aneuploidies. We currently employ this technique with considerable effect in genome analysis of oat (Avena sativa) and related grass species, though it has been most extensively used for chromosome analysis of wheat (Triticum aestivum) and its relatives of the Triticeae. PMID:27511162

  14. Lives in the Balance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Our Children, 1997

    1997-01-01

    Changes in the workplace that would provide flexibility for working parents are slowly developing and receiving government, business, and societal attention. A sidebar, "Mother, Professional, Volunteer: One Woman's Balancing Act," presents an account of how one woman rearranged her professional life to enable her to do full-time parenting. (SM)

  15. Lager yeasts possess dynamic genomes that undergo rearrangements and gene amplification in response to stress.

    PubMed

    James, Tharappel C; Usher, Jane; Campbell, Susan; Bond, Ursula

    2008-03-01

    A long-term goal of the brewing industry is to identify yeast strains with increased tolerance to the stresses experienced during the brewing process. We have characterised the genomes of a number of stress-tolerant mutants, derived from the lager yeast strain CMBS-33, that were selected for tolerance to high temperatures and to growth in high specific gravity wort. Our results indicate that the heat-tolerant strains have undergone a number of gross chromosomal rearrangements when compared to the parental strain. To determine if such rearrangements can spontaneously arise in response to exposure to stress conditions experienced during the brewing process, we examined the chromosome integrity of both the stress-tolerant strains and their parent during a single round of fermentation under a variety of environmental stresses. Our results show that the lager yeast genome shows tremendous plasticity during fermentation, especially when fermentations are carried out in high specific gravity wort and at higher than normal temperatures. Many localised regions of gene amplification were observed especially at the telomeres and at the rRNA gene locus on chromosome XII, and general chromosomal instability was evident. However, gross chromosomal rearrangements were not detected, indicating that continued selection in the stress conditions are required to obtain clonal isolates with stable rearrangements. Taken together, the data suggest that lager yeasts display a high degree of genomic plasticity and undergo genomic changes in response to environmental stress. PMID:18183398

  16. Telomerase activation by genomic rearrangements in high-risk neuroblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Peifer, Martin; Hertwig, Falk; Roels, Frederik; Dreidax, Daniel; Gartlgruber, Moritz; Menon, Roopika; Krämer, Andrea; Roncaioli, Justin L.; Sand, Frederik; Heuckmann, Johannes M.; Ikram, Fakhera; Schmidt, Rene; Ackermann, Sandra; Engesser, Anne; Kahlert, Yvonne; Vogel, Wenzel; Altmüller, Janine; Nürnberg, Peter; Thierry-Mieg, Jean; Thierry-Mieg, Danielle; Mariappan, Aruljothi; Heynck, Stefanie; Mariotti, Erika; Henrich, Kai-Oliver; Glöckner, Christian; Bosco, Graziella; Leuschner, Ivo; Schweiger, Michal R.; Savelyeva, Larissa; Watkins, Simon C.; Shao, Chunxuan; Bell, Emma; Höfer, Thomas; Achter, Viktor; Lang, Ulrich; Theissen, Jessica; Volland, Ruth; Saadati, Maral; Eggert, Angelika; de Wilde, Bram; Berthold, Frank; Peng, Zhiyu; Zhao, Chen; Shi, Leming; Ortmann, Monika; Büttner, Reinhard; Perner, Sven; Hero, Barbara; Schramm, Alexander; Schulte, Johannes H.; Herrmann, Carl; O’Sullivan, Roderick J.; Westermann, Frank; Thomas, Roman K.; Fischer, Matthias

    2016-01-01

    Neuroblastoma is a malignant paediatric tumour of the sympathetic nervous system1. Roughly half of these tumours regress spontaneously or are cured by limited therapy. By contrast, high-risk neuroblastomas have an unfavourable clinical course despite intensive multimodal treatment, and their molecular basis has remained largely elusive2–4. Here we have performed whole-genome sequencing of 56 neuroblastomas (high-risk, n = 39; low-risk, n = 17) and discovered recurrent genomic rearrangements affecting a chromosomal region at 5p15.33 proximal of the telomerase reverse transcriptase gene (TERT). These rearrangements occurred only in high-risk neuroblastomas (12/39, 31%) in a mutually exclusive fashion with MYCN amplifications and ATRX mutations, which are known genetic events in this tumour type1,2,5. In an extended case series (n = 217), TERT rearrangements defined a subgroup of high-risk tumours with particularly poor outcome. Despite a large structural diversity of these rearrangements, they all induced massive transcriptional upregulation of TERT. In the remaining high-risk tumours, TERT expression was also elevated in MYCN-amplified tumours, whereas alternative lengthening of telomeres was present in neuroblastomas without TERT or MYCN alterations, suggesting that telomere lengthening represents a central mechanism defining this subtype. The 5p15.33 rearrangements juxtapose the TERT coding sequence to strong enhancer elements, resulting in massive chromatin remodelling and DNA methylation of the affected region. Supporting a functional role of TERT, neuroblastoma cell lines bearing rearrangements or amplified MYCN exhibited both upregulated TERT expression and enzymatic telomerase activity. In summary, our findings show that remodelling of the genomic context abrogates transcriptional silencing of TERT in high-risk neuroblastoma and places telomerase activation in the centre of transformation in a large fraction of these tumours. PMID:26466568

  17. Telomerase activation by genomic rearrangements in high-risk neuroblastoma.

    PubMed

    Peifer, Martin; Hertwig, Falk; Roels, Frederik; Dreidax, Daniel; Gartlgruber, Moritz; Menon, Roopika; Krämer, Andrea; Roncaioli, Justin L; Sand, Frederik; Heuckmann, Johannes M; Ikram, Fakhera; Schmidt, Rene; Ackermann, Sandra; Engesser, Anne; Kahlert, Yvonne; Vogel, Wenzel; Altmüller, Janine; Nürnberg, Peter; Thierry-Mieg, Jean; Thierry-Mieg, Danielle; Mariappan, Aruljothi; Heynck, Stefanie; Mariotti, Erika; Henrich, Kai-Oliver; Gloeckner, Christian; Bosco, Graziella; Leuschner, Ivo; Schweiger, Michal R; Savelyeva, Larissa; Watkins, Simon C; Shao, Chunxuan; Bell, Emma; Höfer, Thomas; Achter, Viktor; Lang, Ulrich; Theissen, Jessica; Volland, Ruth; Saadati, Maral; Eggert, Angelika; de Wilde, Bram; Berthold, Frank; Peng, Zhiyu; Zhao, Chen; Shi, Leming; Ortmann, Monika; Büttner, Reinhard; Perner, Sven; Hero, Barbara; Schramm, Alexander; Schulte, Johannes H; Herrmann, Carl; O'Sullivan, Roderick J; Westermann, Frank; Thomas, Roman K; Fischer, Matthias

    2015-10-29

    Neuroblastoma is a malignant paediatric tumour of the sympathetic nervous system. Roughly half of these tumours regress spontaneously or are cured by limited therapy. By contrast, high-risk neuroblastomas have an unfavourable clinical course despite intensive multimodal treatment, and their molecular basis has remained largely elusive. Here we have performed whole-genome sequencing of 56 neuroblastomas (high-risk, n = 39; low-risk, n = 17) and discovered recurrent genomic rearrangements affecting a chromosomal region at 5p15.33 proximal of the telomerase reverse transcriptase gene (TERT). These rearrangements occurred only in high-risk neuroblastomas (12/39, 31%) in a mutually exclusive fashion with MYCN amplifications and ATRX mutations, which are known genetic events in this tumour type. In an extended case series (n = 217), TERT rearrangements defined a subgroup of high-risk tumours with particularly poor outcome. Despite a large structural diversity of these rearrangements, they all induced massive transcriptional upregulation of TERT. In the remaining high-risk tumours, TERT expression was also elevated in MYCN-amplified tumours, whereas alternative lengthening of telomeres was present in neuroblastomas without TERT or MYCN alterations, suggesting that telomere lengthening represents a central mechanism defining this subtype. The 5p15.33 rearrangements juxtapose the TERT coding sequence to strong enhancer elements, resulting in massive chromatin remodelling and DNA methylation of the affected region. Supporting a functional role of TERT, neuroblastoma cell lines bearing rearrangements or amplified MYCN exhibited both upregulated TERT expression and enzymatic telomerase activity. In summary, our findings show that remodelling of the genomic context abrogates transcriptional silencing of TERT in high-risk neuroblastoma and places telomerase activation in the centre of transformation in a large fraction of these tumours. PMID:26466568

  18. Chromosome evolution in malaria mosquitoes inferred from physically mapped genome assemblies.

    PubMed

    Sharakhov, Igor V; Artemov, Gleb N; Sharakhova, Maria V

    2016-04-01

    Polymorphic inversions in mosquitoes are distributed nonrandomly among chromosomes and are associated with ecological, behavioral, and physiological adaptations related to pathogen transmission. Despite their significance, the patterns and mechanism of genome rearrangements are not well understood. Recent sequencing and physical mapping of the genomes for 16 Anopheles mosquito species provided an opportunity to study chromosome evolution at the highest resolution. New studies revealed that fixed rearrangement accumulated [Formula: see text]3 times faster on the X chromosome than on autosomes. The highest densities of transposable elements (TEs) and satellites of different sizes have also been found on the X chromosome, suggesting a mechanism for the inversion generation. The high rate of X chromosome rearrangements is in sharp contrast with the paucity of polymorphic inversions on the X in the majority of anopheline species. This paper highlights the advances in understanding chromosome evolution in malaria vectors and discusses possible future directions in studying mechanisms and biological roles of genome rearrangements. PMID:27021248

  19. Molecular Cytogenetic Characterization of Multiple Intrachromosomal Rearrangements in Two Representatives of the Genus Turdus (Turdidae, Passeriformes)

    PubMed Central

    Kretschmer, Rafael; Gunski, Ricardo José; Garnero, Analía Del Valle; Furo, Ivanete de Oliveira; O'Brien, Patricia C. M.; Ferguson-Smith, Malcolm A.; de Oliveira, Edivaldo Herculano Corrêa

    2014-01-01

    Turdus rufiventris and Turdus albicollis, two songbirds belonging to the family Turdidae (Aves, Passeriformes) were studied by C-banding, 18S rDNA, as well as the use of whole chromosome probes derived from Gallus gallus (GGA) and Leucopternis albicollis (LAL). They showed very similar karyotypes, with 2n = 78 and the same pattern of distribution of heterochromatic blocks and hybridization patterns. However, the analysis of 18/28S rDNA has shown differences in the number of NOR-bearing chromosomes and ribosomal clusters. The hybridization pattern of GGA macrochromosomes was similar to the one found in songbirds studied by Fluorescent in situ hybridization, with fission of GGA 1 and GGA 4 chromosomes. In contrast, LAL chromosome paintings revealed a complex pattern of intrachromosomal rearrangements (paracentric and pericentric inversions) on chromosome 2, which corresponds to GGA1q. The first inversion changed the chromosomal morphology and the second and third inversions changed the order of chromosome segments. Karyotype analysis in Turdus revealed that this genus has derived characteristics in relation to the putative avian ancestral karyotype, highlighting the importance of using new tools for analysis of chromosomal evolution in birds, such as the probes derived from L. albicollis, which make it possible to identify intrachromosomal rearrangements not visible with the use of GGA chromosome painting solely. PMID:25058578

  20. Asplenia syndrome in a child with a reciprocal translocation of chromosomes 11 and 20 [46,XX,t(11;20)(q13.1;q13.13)

    SciTech Connect

    Freeman, S.B.; Muraldharan, K.; Pettay, D.

    1994-09-01

    Failure to establish the left-right embryonic axis results in abnormalities of laterality; situs solitus is replaced by situs inversus totalis or various degrees of heterotaxy involving the heart, great vessels, lungs, liver, spleen, and/or bowel. Laterality syndromes are likely to be genetically heterogeneous although specific human genes have not been identified. Families with dominant, recessive, and X-linked laterality syndromes have been reported as well as individuals with situs abnormalities and chromosome rearrangements. The latter offer the possibility of narrowing the gene search to specific chromosome regions. A recent report described an infant with polysplenia syndrome and a paracentric inversion of chromosome 11 [46,XX,inv(11)(q13q25)pat]. We report the second case of a child with laterality abnormalities and a chromosome rearrangement involving a similar breakpoint on chromosome 11. The proband is a 6 y/o female with mental retardation, dysmorphic features, pulmonic stenosis, asplenia, Hirschsprung disease, and a balanced, reciprocal translocation involving chromosomes 11 and 20 [46,XX,t(11;20)(q13,1;q13.13)pat]. Using DNA probes we have excluded uniparental disomy for chromosomes 11 and 20. If a gene for determination of laterality lies in the 11q13 region, the proband`s abnormalities could be the result of her receiving an allele disrupted by the paternal translocation as well as a mutant allele from her mother. To investigate this possibility, we are studying the segregation of maternal chromosome 11 markers in the proband and her balanced carrier and non-carrier siblings.

  1. Azacitidine treatment for patients with myelodysplastic syndrome and acute myeloid leukemia with chromosome 3q abnormalities.

    PubMed

    Wanquet, Anne; Prebet, Thomas; Berthon, Céline; Sebert, Marie; Roux, Clémence; Kulasekararaj, Austin; Micol, Jean-Baptiste; Esterni, Benjamin; Itzykson, Raphael; Thepot, Sylvain; Recher, Christian; Delaunay, Jacques; Dreyfus, François; Mufti, Ghulam; Fenaux, Pierre; Vey, Norbert

    2015-10-01

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia (AML) and myelodysplasia (MDS) with chromosome 3q abnormalities have a dismal outcome either untreated or with conventional treatments. Azacitidine (AZA) is now considered as the standard of care in high-risk MDS and oligoblastic AML patients. The objective of this study was to evaluate the impact of azacitine treatment in this cytogenetic subgroup. We report here a multicentre retrospective study of 157 patients treated with AZA for AML/MDS with chromosome 3q abnormalities and 27 patients with isolated EVI-1 overexpression. Median age was 65 years, 40 patients (25%) had inv(3)(q21q26.2) or t(3;3)(q21;q26.2), 36 patients (23%) had other balanced 3q26 rearrangements, 8 patients (5%) had balanced 3q21 rearrangements and 73 patients (46%) had other 3q abnormalities. The overall response rate was 50% (29% CR). Median overall survival was 10.6 months. By multivariate analysis, patients with lower bone marrow blast counts, higher platelet counts, non-complex cytogenetics, and absence of prior treatment with intensive chemotherapy had a better outcome. 27 patients were allo-transplanted and achieved a 21-month median OS. Balanced 3q21 translocations were associated with a better response rate and overall survival. Outcome of patients with isolated EVI-1 overexpression was comparable to that of patients with chromosome 3q lesions. Thus, AML/MDS patients with 3q abnormalities appear to be a heterogeneous group in their response to AZA, and AZA may represent a suitable option in particular as a bridge to allogeneic transplantation. PMID:26113240

  2. The IgG Fc receptor, FcγRIIB, is a target for deregulation by chromosomal translocation in malignant lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Callanan, Mary B.; Le Baccon, Patricia; Mossuz, Pascal; Duley, Samuel; Bastard, Christian; Hamoudi, Rifat; Dyer, Martin J.; Klobeck, Gustav; Rimokh, Ruth; Sotto, Jean Jacques; Leroux, Dominique

    2000-01-01

    Rearrangement of chromosomal bands 1q21–23 is one of the most frequent chromosomal aberrations observed in hematological malignancy. The genes affected by these rearrangements remain poorly characterized. Typically, 1q21–23 rearrangements arise during tumor evolution and accompany disease-specific chromosomal rearrangements such as t(14;18) (BCL2) and t(8;14) (MYC), where they are thus thought to play an important role in tumor progression. The pathogenetic basis of this 1q21–23-associated disease progression is currently unknown. In this setting, we surveyed our series of follicular lymphoma for evidence of recurring 1q21–23 breaks and identified three cases in which a t(14;18)(q32;q21) was accompanied by a novel balanced t(1;22)(q22;q11). Molecular cloning of the t(1;22) in a cell line (B593) derived from one of these cases and detailed fluorescent in situ hybridization mapping in the two remaining cases identified the FCGR2B gene, which encodes the immunoreceptor tyrosine-based inhibition motif-bearing IgG Fc receptor, FcγRIIB, as the target gene of the t(1;22)(q22;q11). We demonstrate deregulation of FCGR2B leading to hyperexpression of FcγRIIb2 as the principal consequence of the t(1;22). This is evidence that IgG Fc receptors can be targets for deregulation through chromosomal translocation in lymphoma. It suggests that dysregulation of FCGR2B may play a role in tumor progression in follicular lymphoma. PMID:10618414

  3. RNA-Mediated Epigenetic Programming of Genome Rearrangements

    PubMed Central

    Nowacki, Mariusz; Shetty, Keerthi; Landweber, Laura F.

    2012-01-01

    RNA, normally thought of as a conduit in gene expression, has a novel mode of action in ciliated protozoa. Maternal RNA templates provide both an organizing guide for DNA rearrangements and a template that can transport somatic mutations to the next generation. This opportunity for RNA-mediated genome rearrangement and DNA repair is profound in the ciliate Oxytricha, which deletes 95% of its germline genome during development in a process that severely fragments its chromosomes and then sorts and reorders the hundreds of thousands of pieces remaining. Oxytricha’s somatic nuclear genome is therefore an epigenome formed through RNA templates and signals arising from the previous generation. Furthermore, this mechanism of RNA-mediated epigenetic inheritance can function across multiple generations, and the discovery of maternal template RNA molecules has revealed new biological roles for RNA and has hinted at the power of RNA molecules to sculpt genomic information in cells. PMID:21801022

  4. Low rate of interchromosomal rearrangements during old radiation of gekkotan lizards (Squamata: Gekkota).

    PubMed

    Johnson Pokorná, Martina; Trifonov, Vladimir A; Rens, Willem; Ferguson-Smith, Malcolm A; Kratochvíl, Lukáš

    2015-06-01

    Gekkotan lizards are a highly specious (∼1600 described species) clade of squamate lizards with nearly cosmopolitan distribution in warmer areas. The clade is primarily nocturnal and forms an ecologically dominant part of the world nocturnal herpetofauna. However, molecular cytogenetic methods to study the evolution of karyotypes have not been widely applied in geckos. Our aim here was to uncover the extent of chromosomal rearrangements across the whole group Gekkota and to search for putative synapomorphies supporting the newly proposed phylogenetic relationships within this clade. We applied cross-species chromosome painting with the recently derived whole-chromosomal probes from the gekkonid species Gekko japonicus to members of the major gekkotan lineages. We included members of the families Diplodactylidae, Carphodactylidae, Pygopodidae, Eublepharidae, Phyllodactylidae and Gekkonidae. Our study demonstrates relatively high chromosome conservatism across the ancient group of gekkotan lizards. We documented that many changes in chromosomal shape across geckos can be attributed to intrachromosomal rearrangements. The documented rearrangements are not totally in agreement with the recently newly erected family Phyllodactylidae. The results also pointed to homoplasy, particularly in the reuse of chromosome breakpoints, in the evolution of gecko karyotypes. PMID:25665924

  5. Multiple genetic loci within 11p15 defined by Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome rearrangement breakpoints and subchromosomal transferable fragments.

    PubMed Central

    Hoovers, J M; Kalikin, L M; Johnson, L A; Alders, M; Redeker, B; Law, D J; Bliek, J; Steenman, M; Benedict, M; Wiegant, J

    1995-01-01

    Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome (BWS) involves fetal overgrowth and predisposition to a wide variety of embryonal tumors of childhood. We have previously found that BWS is genetically linked to 11p15 and that this same band shows loss of heterozygosity in the types of tumors to which children with BWS are susceptible. However, 11p15 contains > 20 megabases, and therefore, the BWS and tumor suppressor genes could be distinct. To determine the precise physical relationship between these loci, we isolated yeast artificial chromosomes, and cosmid libraries from them, within the region of loss of heterozygosity in embryonal tumors. Five germ-line balanced chromosomal rearrangement breakpoint sites from BWS patients, as well as a balanced chromosomal translocation breakpoint from a rhabdoid tumor, were isolated within a 295- to 320-kb cluster defined by a complete cosmid contig crossing these breakpoints. This breakpoint cluster terminated approximately 100 kb centromeric to the imprinted gene IGF2 and 100 kb telomeric to p57KIP2, an inhibitor of cyclin-dependent kinases, and was located within subchromosomal transferable fragments that suppressed the growth of embryonal tumor cells in genetic complementation experiments. We have identified 11 transcribed sequences in this BWS/tumor suppressor coincident region, one of which corresponded to p57KIP2. However, three additional BWS breakpoints were > 4 megabases centromeric to the other five breakpoints and were excluded from the tumor suppressor region defined by subchromosomal transferable fragments. Thus, multiple genetic loci define BWS and tumor suppression on 11p15. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 3 PMID:8618920

  6. Breakpoint Features of Genomic Rearrangements in Neuroblastoma with Unbalanced Translocations and Chromothripsis

    PubMed Central

    Daveau, Romain; Combaret, Valérie; Pierre-Eugène, Cécile; Cazes, Alex; Louis-Brennetot, Caroline; Schleiermacher, Gudrun; Ferrand, Sandrine; Pierron, Gaëlle; Lermine, Alban; Frio, Thomas Rio; Raynal, Virginie; Vassal, Gilles; Barillot, Emmanuel; Delattre, Olivier; Janoueix-Lerosey, Isabelle

    2013-01-01

    Neuroblastoma is a pediatric cancer of the peripheral nervous system in which structural chromosome aberrations are emblematic of aggressive tumors. In this study, we performed an in-depth analysis of somatic rearrangements in two neuroblastoma cell lines and two primary tumors using paired-end sequencing of mate-pair libraries and RNA-seq. The cell lines presented with typical genetic alterations of neuroblastoma and the two tumors belong to the group of neuroblastoma exhibiting a profile of chromothripsis. Inter and intra-chromosomal rearrangements were identified in the four samples, allowing in particular characterization of unbalanced translocations at high resolution. Using complementary experiments, we further characterized 51 rearrangements at the base pair resolution that revealed 59 DNA junctions. In a subset of cases, complex rearrangements were observed with templated insertion of fragments of nearby sequences. Although we did not identify known particular motifs in the local environment of the breakpoints, we documented frequent microhomologies at the junctions in both chromothripsis and non-chromothripsis associated breakpoints. RNA-seq experiments confirmed expression of several predicted chimeric genes and genes with disrupted exon structure including ALK, NBAS, FHIT, PTPRD and ODZ4. Our study therefore indicates that both non-homologous end joining-mediated repair and replicative processes may account for genomic rearrangements in neuroblastoma. RNA-seq analysis allows the identification of the subset of abnormal transcripts expressed from genomic rearrangements that may be involved in neuroblastoma oncogenesis. PMID:23991058

  7. Chromosomal phylogeny and evolution of gibbons (Hylobatidae).

    PubMed

    Müller, Stefan; Hollatz, Melanie; Wienberg, Johannes

    2003-11-01

    Although human and gibbons are classified in the same primate superfamily (Hominoidae), their karyotypes differ by extensive chromosome reshuffling. To date, there is still limited understanding of the events that shaped extant gibbon karyotypes. Further, the phylogeny and evolution of the twelve or more extant gibbon species (lesser apes, Hylobatidae) is poorly understood, and conflicting phylogenies have been published. We present a comprehensive analysis of gibbon chromosome rearrangements and a phylogenetic reconstruction of the four recognized subgenera based on molecular cytogenetics data. We have used two different approaches to interpret our data: (1) a cladistic reconstruction based on the identification of ancestral versus derived chromosome forms observed in extant gibbon species; (2) an approach in which adjacent homologous segments that have been changed by translocations and intra-chromosomal rearrangements are treated as discrete characters in a parsimony analysis (PAUP). The orangutan serves as an "outgroup", since it has a karyotype that is supposed to be most similar to the ancestral form of all humans and apes. Both approaches place the subgenus Bunopithecus as the most basal group of the Hylobatidae, followed by Hylobates, with Symphalangus and Nomascus as the last to diverge. Since most chromosome rearrangements observed in gibbons are either ancestral to all four subgenera or specific for individual species and only a few common derived rearrangements at subsequent branching points have been recorded, all extant gibbons may have diverged within relatively short evolutionary time. In general, chromosomal rearrangements produce changes that should be considered as unique landmarks at the divergence nodes. Thus, molecular cytogenetics could be an important tool to elucidate phylogenies in other species in which speciation may have occurred over very short evolutionary time with not enough genetic (DNA sequence) and other biological divergence to

  8. Comparative chromosome painting in Carnivora and Pholidota.

    PubMed

    Perelman, P L; Beklemisheva, V R; Yudkin, D V; Petrina, T N; Rozhnov, V V; Nie, W; Graphodatsky, A S

    2012-01-01

    The order of Carnivora has been very well characterized with over 50 species analyzed by chromosome painting and with painting probe sets made for 9 Carnivora species. Representatives of almost all families have been studied with few exceptions (Otariidae, Odobenidae, Nandiniidae, Prionodontidae). The patterns of chromosome evolution in Carnivora are discussed here. Overall, many Carnivora species retained karyotypes that only slightly differ from the ancestral carnivore karyotype. However, there are at least 3 families in which the ancestral carnivore karyotype has been severely rearranged - Canidae, Ursidae and Mephitidae. Here we report chromosome painting of yet another Carnivora species with a highly rearranged karyotype, Genetta pardina. Recurrent rearrangements make it difficult to define the ancestral chromosomal arrangement in several instances. Only 2 species of pangolins (Pholidota), a sister order of Carnivora, have been studied by chromosome painting. Future use of whole-genome sequencing data is discussed in the context of solving the questions that are beyond resolution of conventional banding techniques and chromosome painting. PMID:22889959

  9. Molecular analysis of DNA rearrangements in leukemias and non-Hodgkin's lymphomas.

    PubMed

    Longtine, J; Fox, E; Reynolds, C; Sklar, J

    2001-05-01

    Genetic markers for leukemias and lymphomas include chromosomal translocations and antigen-receptor gene rearrangements. Clonal rearrangements of immunoglobulin or T cell receptor (TCR) genes reflect clonal proliferations of lymphocytes, a characteristic feature of lymphoid neoplasia. These rearrangements can be detected as described in this unit by Southern blot hybridization or, in many instances, the polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Specific chromosomal translocations can also serve as markers for clonality, for malignant transformation, and for various defined subtypes of hematopoietic cancers. PCR protocols are described for detection of the two most commonly assayed translocations, t(9;22) of chronic myelogenous leukemia or acute lymphoblastic leukemia, and t(14;18) of follicular lymphomas. PMID:18428241

  10. Novel Cryptic Rearrangements in Adult B-Cell Precursor Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia Involving the MLL Gene.

    PubMed

    Othman, Moneeb A K; Grygalewicz, Beata; Pienkowska-Grela, Barbara; Rincic, Martina; Rittscher, Katharina; Melo, Joana B; Carreira, Isabel M; Meyer, Britta; Marzena, Watek; Liehr, Thomas

    2015-05-01

    MLL (mixed-lineage-leukemia) gene rearrangements are typical for acute leukemia and are associated with an aggressive course of disease, with a worse outcome than comparable case, and thus require intensified treatment. Here we describe a 69-year-old female with adult B cell precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemia (BCP-ALL) with hyperleukocytosis and immunophenotype CD10- and CD19+ with cryptic MLL rearrangements. G-banding at the time of diagnosis showed a normal karyotype: 46,XX. Molecular cytogenetics using multitude multicolor banding (mMCB) revealed a complex rearrangement of the two copies of chromosome 11. However, a locus-specific probe additionally identified that the MLL gene at 11q23.3 was disrupted, and that the 5' region was inserted into the chromosomal sub-band 4q21; thus the aberration involved three chromosomes and five break events. Unfortunately, the patient died six months after the initial diagnosis from serious infections and severe complications. Overall, the present findings confirm that, by far not all MLL aberrations are seen by routine chromosome banding techniques and that fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) should be regarded as standard tool to access MLL rearrangements in patients with BCP-ALL. PMID:25699572

  11. Biotransformation and Rearrangement of Laromustine.

    PubMed

    Nassar, Alaa-Eldin F; Wisnewski, Adam V; King, Ivan

    2016-08-01

    This review highlights the recent research into the biotransformations and rearrangement of the sulfonylhydrazine-alkylating agent laromustine. Incubation of [(14)C]laromustine with rat, dog, monkey, and human liver microsomes produced eight radioactive components (C-1 to C-8). There was little difference in the metabolite profile among the species examined, partly because NADPH was not required for the formation of most components, which instead involved decomposition and/or hydrolysis. The exception was C-7, a hydroxylated metabolite, largely formed by CYP2B6 and CYP3A4/5. Liquid chromatography-multistage mass spectrometry (LC-MS(n)) studies determined that collision-induced dissociation, and not biotransformation or enzyme catalysis, produced the unique mass spectral rearrangement. Accurate mass measurements performed with a Fourier-transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometer (FTICR-MS) significantly aided determination of the elemental compositions of the fragments and in the case of laromustine revealed the possibility of rearrangement. Further, collision-induced dissociation produced the loss of nitrogen (N2) and methylsulfonyl and methyl isocyanate moieties. The rearrangement, metabolite/decomposition products, and conjugation reactions were analyzed utilizing hydrogen-deuterium exchange, exact mass, (13)C-labeled laromustine, nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR), and LC-MS(n) experiments to assist with the assignments of these fragments and possible mechanistic rearrangement. Such techniques produced valuable insights into these functions: 1) Cytochrome P450 is involved in C-7 formation but plays little or no role in the conversion of [(14)C]laromustine to C-1 through C-6 and C-8; 2) the relative abundance of individual degradation/metabolite products was not species-dependent; and 3) laromustine produces several reactive intermediates that may produce the toxicities seen in the clinical trials. PMID:27278961

  12. Evolution of genomic structures on Mammalian sex chromosomes.

    PubMed

    Katsura, Yukako; Iwase, Mineyo; Satta, Yoko

    2012-04-01

    Throughout mammalian evolution, recombination between the two sex chromosomes was suppressed in a stepwise manner. It is thought that the suppression of recombination led to an accumulation of deleterious mutations and frequent genomic rearrangements on the Y chromosome. In this article, we review three evolutionary aspects related to genomic rearrangements and structures, such as inverted repeats (IRs) and palindromes (PDs), on the mammalian sex chromosomes. First, we describe the stepwise manner in which recombination between the X and Y chromosomes was suppressed in placental mammals and discuss a genomic rearrangement that might have led to the formation of present pseudoautosomal boundaries (PAB). Second, we describe ectopic gene conversion between the X and Y chromosomes, and propose possible molecular causes. Third, we focus on the evolutionary mode and timing of PD formation on the X and Y chromosomes. The sequence of the chimpanzee Y chromosome was recently published by two groups. Both groups suggest that rapid evolution of genomic structure occurred on the Y chromosome. Our re-analysis of the sequences confirmed the species-specific mode of human and chimpanzee Y chromosomal evolution. Finally, we present a general outlook regarding the rapid evolution of mammalian sex chromosomes. PMID:23024603

  13. Mechanisms of Chromosome Number Evolution in Yeast

    PubMed Central

    Gordon, Jonathan L.; Byrne, Kevin P.; Wolfe, Kenneth H.

    2011-01-01

    The whole-genome duplication (WGD) that occurred during yeast evolution changed the basal number of chromosomes from 8 to 16. However, the number of chromosomes in post-WGD species now ranges between 10 and 16, and the number in non-WGD species (Zygosaccharomyces, Kluyveromyces, Lachancea, and Ashbya) ranges between 6 and 8. To study the mechanism by which chromosome number changes, we traced the ancestry of centromeres and telomeres in each species. We observe only two mechanisms by which the number of chromosomes has decreased, as indicated by the loss of a centromere. The most frequent mechanism, seen 8 times, is telomere-to-telomere fusion between two chromosomes with the concomitant death of one centromere. The other mechanism, seen once, involves the breakage of a chromosome at its centromere, followed by the fusion of the two arms to the telomeres of two other chromosomes. The only mechanism by which chromosome number has increased in these species is WGD. Translocations and inversions have cycled telomere locations, internalizing some previously telomeric genes and creating novel telomeric locations. Comparison of centromere structures shows that the length of the CDEII region is variable between species but uniform within species. We trace the complete rearrangement history of the Lachancea kluyveri genome since its common ancestor with Saccharomyces and propose that its exceptionally low level of rearrangement is a consequence of the loss of the non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) DNA repair pathway in this species. PMID:21811419

  14. Amplification of large artificial chromosomes.

    PubMed Central

    Smith, D R; Smyth, A P; Moir, D T

    1990-01-01

    Yeast artificial chromosome cloning is an attractive technology for genomic mapping studies because very large DNA segments can be readily propagated. However, detailed analyses often require the extensive application of blotting-hybridization techniques because artificial chromosomes are normally present at only one copy per haploid genome. We have developed a cloning vector and host strain that alleviate this problem by permitting copy number amplification of artificial chromosomes. The vector includes a conditional centromere that can be turned on or off by changing the carbon source. Strong selective pressure for extra copies of the artificial chromosome can be applied by selecting for the expression of a heterologous thymidine kinase gene. When this system was used, artificial chromosomes ranging from about 100 to 600 kilobases in size were readily amplified 10- to 20-fold. The selective conditions did not induce obvious rearrangements in any of the clones tested. Reactivation of the centromere in amplified artificial chromosome clones resulted in stable maintenance of an elevated copy number for 20 generations. Applications of copy number control to various aspects of artificial chromosome analysis are addressed. Images PMID:2236036

  15. Catastrophic chromosomal restructuring during genome elimination in plants.

    PubMed

    Tan, Ek Han; Henry, Isabelle M; Ravi, Maruthachalam; Bradnam, Keith R; Mandakova, Terezie; Marimuthu, Mohan Pa; Korf, Ian; Lysak, Martin A; Comai, Luca; Chan, Simon Wl

    2015-01-01

    Genome instability is associated with mitotic errors and cancer. This phenomenon can lead to deleterious rearrangements, but also genetic novelty, and many questions regarding its genesis, fate and evolutionary role remain unanswered. Here, we describe extreme chromosomal restructuring during genome elimination, a process resulting from hybridization of Arabidopsis plants expressing different centromere histones H3. Shattered chromosomes are formed from the genome of the haploid inducer, consistent with genomic catastrophes affecting a single, laggard chromosome compartmentalized within a micronucleus. Analysis of breakpoint junctions implicates breaks followed by repair through non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) or stalled fork repair. Furthermore, mutation of required NHEJ factor DNA Ligase 4 results in enhanced haploid recovery. Lastly, heritability and stability of a rearranged chromosome suggest a potential for enduring genomic novelty. These findings provide a tractable, natural system towards investigating the causes and mechanisms of complex genomic rearrangements similar to those associated with several human disorders. PMID:25977984

  16. Identification of disrupted AUTS2 and EPHA6 genes by array painting in a patient carrying a de novo balanced translocation t(3;7) with intellectual disability and neurodevelopment disorder.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Anouck; Puechberty, Jacques; Ng, Bee Ling; Coubes, Christine; Gatinois, Vincent; Tournaire, Magali; Girard, Manon; Dumont, Bruno; Bouret, Pauline; Magnetto, Julia; Baghdadli, Amaria; Pellestor, Franck; Geneviève, David

    2015-12-01

    Intellectual disability (ID) is a frequent feature but is highly clinically and genetically heterogeneous. The establishment of the precise diagnosis in patients with ID is challenging due to this heterogeneity but crucial for genetic counseling and appropriate care for the patients. Among the etiologies of patients with ID, apparently balanced de novo rearrangements represent 0.6%. Several mechanisms explain the ID in patients with apparently balanced de novo rearrangement. Among them, disruption of a disease gene at the breakpoint, is frequently evoked. In this context, technologies recently developed are used to characterize precisely such chromosomal rearrangements. Here, we report the case of a boy with ID, facial features and autistic behavior who is carrying a de novo balanced reciprocal translocation t(3;7)(q11.2;q11.22)dn. Using microarray analysis, array painting (AP) technology combined with molecular study, we have identified the interruption of the autism susceptibility candidate 2 gene (AUTS2) and EPH receptor A6 gene (EPHA6). We consider that the disruption of AUTS2 explains the phenotype of the patient; the exact role of EPHA6 in human pathology is not well defined. Based on the observation of recurrent germinal and somatic translocations involving AUTS2 and the molecular environment content, we put forward the hypothesis that the likely chromosomal mechanism responsible for the translocation could be due either to replicative stress or to recombination-based mechanisms. PMID:26333717

  17. The cytogenetics of mammalian autosomal rearrangements

    SciTech Connect

    Daniel, A.

    1988-01-01

    Combining data from animal and clinical studies with classical cytogenetic observations, the volume provides information on various aspects of mammalian autosomal rearrangements. Topics range from the reproductive consequences to carriers of autosomal rearrangements to the application of structural rearrangements and DNA probes to gene mapping. In addition, the book presents an overview of new perspectives and future directions for research.

  18. Detection and molecular cytogenetic characterization of a novel ring chromosome in a histological variant of Ewing sarcoma.

    PubMed

    Szuhai, Károly; IJszenga, Marije; Tanke, Hans J; Taminiau, Antonie H M; de Schepper, Arthur; van Duinen, Sjoerd G; Rosenberg, Carla; Hogendoorn, Pancras C W

    2007-01-01

    Ewing sarcoma/peripheral primitive neuro-ectodermal tumor (PNET) is a round-cell sarcoma that may show varying degrees of neuro-ectodermal differentiation. These tumors are identified by a characteristic round-cell morphology and immunohistochemical profile, as well as by specific translocations involving the EWS gene on chromosome 22 and the 3' portion of the E26 transformation-specific family of transcription factors. These translocations result in fusion proteins that act as aberrant transcription factors. The majority of Ewing sarcoma cases are characterized by a balanced t(11;22). Specific chromosomal abnormalities often correlate with distinct morphologic or phenotypic subtypes of tumors and play an important role in prognosis. Here we describe the molecular cytogenetic investigation of a case of Ewing sarcoma in the proximal humerus of a 39-year-old male using COBRA (combined binary ratio labelling) fluorescent in situ hybridization karyotyping, array comparative genomic hybridization, and EWS-gene specific fluorescence in situ hybridization. Multiple chromosomal aberrations were identified, including a der(22)r(20;22), resulting in an amplification of the proximal region of the EWS gene. This is the first time that both translocation and amplification involving the EWS gene and an unidentified gene are described. This case adds to the spectrum of both morphology and genetic rearrangements in Ewing sarcoma, and shows the importance of combined molecular cytogenetic approaches in identifying uncommon rearrangements in sarcomas. PMID:17175374

  19. Chromosome heteromorphism quantified by high-resolution bivariate flow karyotyping.

    PubMed

    Trask, B; van den Engh, G; Mayall, B; Gray, J W

    1989-11-01

    Maternal and paternal homologues of many chromosome types can be differentiated on the basis of their peak position in Hoechst 33258 versus chromomycin A3 bivariate flow karyotypes. We demonstrate here the magnitude of DNA content differences among normal chromosomes of the same type. Significant peak-position differences between homologues were observed for an average of four chromosome types in each of the karyotypes of 98 different individuals. The frequency of individuals with differences in homologue peak positions varied among chromosome types: e.g., chromosome 15, 61%; chromosome 3, 4%. Flow karyotypes of 33 unrelated individuals were compared to determine the range of peak position among normal chromosomes. Chromosomes Y, 21, 22, 15, 16, 13, 14, and 19 were most heteromorphic, and chromosomes 2-8 and X were least heteromorphic. The largest chromosome 21 was 45% larger than the smallest 21 chromosome observed. The base composition of the variable regions differed among chromosome types. DNA contents of chromosome variants determined from flow karyotypes were closely correlated to measurements of DNA content made of gallocyanin chrome alum-stained metaphase chromosomes on slides. Fluorescence in situ hybridization with chromosome-specific repetitive sequences indicated that variability in their copy number is partly responsible for peak-position variability in some chromosomes. Heteromorphic chromosomes are identified for which parental flow karyotype information will be essential if de novo rearrangements resulting in small DNA content changes are to be detected with flow karyotyping. PMID:2479266

  20. Chromosome heteromorphism quantified by high-resolution bivariate flow karyotyping.

    PubMed Central

    Trask, B; van den Engh, G; Mayall, B; Gray, J W

    1989-01-01

    Maternal and paternal homologues of many chromosome types can be differentiated on the basis of their peak position in Hoechst 33258 versus chromomycin A3 bivariate flow karyotypes. We demonstrate here the magnitude of DNA content differences among normal chromosomes of the same type. Significant peak-position differences between homologues were observed for an average of four chromosome types in each of the karyotypes of 98 different individuals. The frequency of individuals with differences in homologue peak positions varied among chromosome types: e.g., chromosome 15, 61%; chromosome 3, 4%. Flow karyotypes of 33 unrelated individuals were compared to determine the range of peak position among normal chromosomes. Chromosomes Y, 21, 22, 15, 16, 13, 14, and 19 were most heteromorphic, and chromosomes 2-8 and X were least heteromorphic. The largest chromosome 21 was 45% larger than the smallest 21 chromosome observed. The base composition of the variable regions differed among chromosome types. DNA contents of chromosome variants determined from flow karyotypes were closely correlated to measurements of DNA content made of gallocyanin chrome alum-stained metaphase chromosomes on slides. Fluorescence in situ hybridization with chromosome-specific repetitive sequences indicated that variability in their copy number is partly responsible for peak-position variability in some chromosomes. Heteromorphic chromosomes are identified for which parental flow karyotype information will be essential if de novo rearrangements resulting in small DNA content changes are to be detected with flow karyotyping. Images Figure 5 PMID:2479266

  1. Comprehensive molecular cytogenetic investigation of chromosomal abnormalities in human medulloblastoma cell lines and xenograft.

    PubMed Central

    Aldosari, Naji; Wiltshire, Rodney N.; Dutra, Amalia; Schrock, Evelin; McLendon, Roger E.; Friedman, Henry S.; Bigner, Darell D.; Bigner, Sandra H.

    2002-01-01

    Cell lines and xenografts derived from medulloblastomas are useful tools to investigate the chromosomal changes in these tumors. Here we used G-banding, fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH), spectral karyotyping (SKY), and comparative genomic hybridization to study 4 medulloblastoma cell lines and 1 xenograft. Cell line D-425 Med had a relatively simple karyotype, with a terminal deletion of 10q and amplification of MYC in double-minutes (dmins). FISH demonstrated that an apparent isochromosome (17q) by routine karyotyping was actually an unbalanced translocation between 2 copies of chromosome 17. Cell line D-556 Med also had a simple near-diploid stemline with an unbalanced 1;13 translocation resulting in a gain of 1q, an isochromosome (17q), and dmins. These findings were initially described using routine G-banded preparations, and FISH showed that the dmins were an amplification of MYC and the i(17q) was an isodicentric 17q chromosome. The other finding was confirmed by FISH, SKY, and comparative genomic hybridization. Cell lines D-721 Med and D-581 Med had complex karyotypic patterns that could be completely characterized only when FISH and SKY were used. Xenograft D-690 Med also had a complex pattern that FISH and SKY were helpful in completely elucidating. Interestingly, balanced reciprocal translocations were seen as well as complicated unbalanced translocations and marker chromosomes. Comparative genomic hybridization demonstrated only a deletion of 10q22-10q24, supporting the idea that despite the complexity of the chromosomal rearrangements, minimal alterations in the overall chromosomal content had occurred. This study demonstrates that routine cytogenetic preparations are adequate to describe chromosomal abnormalities in occasional medulloblastoma samples, but a broader spectrum of molecular cytogenetic methods is required to completely analyze most of these tumor samples. PMID:11916498

  2. Rapid generation of whole chromosome painting probes (WCPs) by chromosome microdissection

    SciTech Connect

    Guan, X.Y.; Meltzer, P.S.; Trent, J.M.

    1994-07-01

    A strategy for rapid construction of whole chromosome painting probes (WCPs) by chromosome microdissection has recently been developed. WCPs were prepared from 20 copies of each target chromosome microdissected from normal human metaphase chromosomes and then directly amplified by PCR using a universal primer. Fifteen WCPs, including chromosomes 1, 3, 6, 7, 9, 12, 13, 14, 15, 17, 19, 20, 21, 22, and X, have been generated using this strategy. The probe complexity and hybridization specificity of these WCPs have been characterized by gel electrophoresis and fluorescence in situ hybridization. Analysis of WCPs constructed by chromosome microdissection indicated that microdissected WCPs invariably provide strong and uniform signal intensity with no cytologically apparent cross-hybridization. To demonstrate the application of WCPs generated from microdissection, the authors have used these probes to detect complex chromosome rearrangements in a melanoma cell line, UM93-007. Two different translocations involving three chromosomes [t(1;3;13) and t(1;7;13)] have been identified, both of which were undetectable by conventional banding analysis. Further application of these WCPs (including generation of WCPs from mouse and other species) should greatly facilitate the cytogenetic analysis of complex chromosome rearrangements. 35 refs., 4 figs.

  3. An apparently de novo translocation in a neonate involving chromosomes 3 and 19 [t(3:19)(p21;q13.1)

    SciTech Connect

    Shah, H.O.; Buttice, L.S.; Chester, M.

    1994-09-01

    A 7 1/2-week-old infant female was referred for cytogenetic evaluation after she developed a left inguinal hernia containing a gonadal mass. She had been born to a 25-year-old mother after approximately 31 weeks gestation. This was the couple`s first pregnancy. She was small for gestational age. Her weight was 835 g, length was 32 cm, head circumference was 26 cm at birth. She developed hypothyroidism requiring synthroid. There were no other obvious dysmorphisms. The cytogenetic findings with G-banding revealed an apparently-balanced translocation involving chromosomes 3 and 19. The patient`s karyotype revealed 46,XX,t(3;19)(q21;q13.1). Parental chromosomes were found to be normal. Because of the increased risk for developmental and other congenital problems in an individual with a {open_quotes}de novo translocation{close_quotes} (even when the rearrangement appears balanced), this infant is being followed regularly. Evaluation at 5 months of age revealed a small but thriving female infant who is alert and developmentally appropriate. She is still receiving synthroid. We are in the process of analyzing this case further using chromosome paint probes for chromosomes 3 and 19 to identify the break points more precisely. This would allow us to assess with greater accuracy if this is a {open_quotes}balanced{close_quotes} translocation.

  4. Chromosome aberrations of clonal origin are present in astronauts' blood lymphocytes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    George, K.; Durante, M.; Willingham, V.; Cucinotta, F. A.

    2004-01-01

    Radiation-induced chromosome translocations remain in peripheral blood cells over many years, and can potentially be used to measure retrospective doses or prolonged low-dose rate exposures. However, several recent studies have indicated that some individuals possess clones of cells with balanced chromosome abnormalities, which can result in an overestimation of damage and, therefore, influence the accuracy of dose calculations. We carefully examined the patterns of chromosome damage found in the blood lymphocytes of twelve astronauts, and also applied statistical methods to screen for the presence of potential clones. Cells with clonal aberrations were identified in three of the twelve individuals. These clonal cells were present in samples collected both before and after space flight, and yields are higher than previously reported for healthy individuals in this age range (40-52 years of age). The frequency of clonal damage appears to be even greater in chromosomes prematurely condensed in interphase, when compared with equivalent analysis in metaphase cells. The individuals with clonal aberrations were followed-up over several months and the yields of all clones decreased during this period. Since clonal aberrations may be associated with increased risk of tumorigenesis, it is important to accurately identify cells containing clonal rearrangements for risk assessment as well as biodosimetry. Copyright 2003 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  5. Meiosis and chromosome painting of sex chromosome systems in Ceboidea.

    PubMed

    Mudry, M D; Rahn, I M; Solari, A J

    2001-06-01

    The identity of the chromosomes involved in the multiple sex system of Alouatta caraya (Aca) and the possible distribution of this system among other Ceboidea were investigated by chromosome painting of mitotic cells from five species and by analysis of meiosis at pachytene in two species. The identity of the autosome #7 (X2) involved in the multiple system of Aca and its breakage points were demonstrated by both meiosis and chromosome painting. These features are identical to those described by Consigliere et al. [1996] in Alouatta seniculus sara (Assa) and Alouatta seniculus arctoidea (Asar). This multiple system was absent in the other four Ceboidea species studied here. However, data from the literature strongly suggest the presence of this multiple in other members of this genus. The presence of this multiple system among several species and subspecies that show high levels of chromosome rearrangements may suggest a special selective value of this multiple. The meiotic features of the sex systems of Aca and Cebus apella paraguayanus (Cap) are strikingly different at pachytene, as the latter system is similar to the sex pair of man and other primates. The relatively large genetic distances between species presently showing this multiple system suggest that its origin is not recent. Other members of the same genus should be investigated at meiosis and by chromosome painting in order to know the extent and distribution of this complex sex-chromosome system. PMID:11376445

  6. Characterization of gene rearrangements resulted from genomic structural aberrations in human esophageal squamous cell carcinoma KYSE150 cells.

    PubMed

    Hao, Jia-Jie; Gong, Ting; Zhang, Yu; Shi, Zhi-Zhou; Xu, Xin; Dong, Jin-Tang; Zhan, Qi-Min; Fu, Song-Bin; Wang, Ming-Rong

    2013-01-15

    Chromosomal rearrangements and involved genes have been reported to play important roles in the development and progression of human malignancies. But the gene rearrangements in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) remain to be identified. In the present study, array-based comparative genomic hybridization (array-CGH) was performed on the ESCC cell line KYSE150. Eight disrupted genes were detected according to the obviously distinct unbalanced breakpoints. The splitting of these genes was validated by dual-color fluorescence in-situ hybridization (FISH). By using rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE), genome walking and sequencing analysis, we further identified gene disruptions and rearrangements. A fusion transcript DTL-1q42.2 was derived from an intrachromosomal rearrangement of chromosome 1. Highly amplified segments of DTL and PTPRD were self-rearranged. The sequences on either side of the junctions possess micro-homology with each other. FISH results indicated that the split DTL and PTPRD were also involved in comprising parts of the derivative chromosomes resulted from t(1q;9p;12p) and t(9;1;9). Further, we found that regions harboring DTL (1q32.3) and PTPRD (9p23) were also splitting in ESCC tumors. The data supplement significant information on the existing genetic background of KYSE150, which may be used as a model for studying these gene rearrangements. PMID:23026210

  7. A contiguous clone map over 3 Mb on the long arm of chromosome 11 across a balanced translocation associated with schizophrenia

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, K.L.; Shibasaki, Yoshiro; Devon, R.S.; He, Lin

    1995-08-10

    Forty-nine clones derived by microdissection of a schizophrenia-associated t(1;11)(q42.1;q14.3) breakpoint region have been assigned by somatic cell hybrid mapping to seven discrete intervals on the long arm of human chromosome 11. Eleven of the clones were shown to map to a small region immediately distal to the translocation breakpoint on 11q. A 3-Mb contiguous clone map of this region was established by isolation of corresponding YAC recombinants. The contig was oriented and shown to traverse the translocation breakpoint by FISH and microsatellite marker analysis. This contig will facilitate the isolation of candidate sequences whose expression may be affected by the translocation. 28 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

  8. Chromosome abnormalities in glioma

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Y.S.; Ramsay, D.A.; Fan, Y.S.

    1994-09-01

    Cytogenetic studies were performed in 25 patients with gliomas. An interesting finding was a seemingly identical abnormality, an extra band on the tip of the short arm of chromosome 1, add(1)(p36), in two cases. The abnormality was present in all cells from a patient with a glioblastoma and in 27% of the tumor cells from a patient with a recurrent irradiated anaplastic astrocytoma; in the latter case, 7 unrelated abnormal clones were identified except 4 of those clones shared a common change, -Y. Three similar cases have been described previously. In a patient with pleomorphic astrocytoma, the band 1q42 in both homologues of chromosome 1 was involved in two different rearrangements. A review of the literature revealed that deletion of the long arm of chromosome 1 including 1q42 often occurs in glioma. This may indicate a possible tumor suppressor gene in this region. Cytogenetic follow-up studies were carried out in two patients and emergence of unrelated clones were noted in both. A total of 124 clonal breakpoints were identified in the 25 patients. The breakpoints which occurred three times or more were: 1p36, 1p22, 1q21, 1q25, 3q21, 7q32, 8q22, 9q22, 16q22, and 22q13.

  9. Interpreting Chromosome Aberration Spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levy, Dan; Reeder, Christopher; Loucas, Bradford; Hlatky, Lynn; Chen, Allen; Cornforth, Michael; Sachs, Rainer

    2007-01-01

    Ionizing radiation can damage cells by breaking both strands of DNA in multiple locations, essentially cutting chromosomes into pieces. The cell has enzymatic mechanisms to repair such breaks; however, these mechanisms are imperfect and, in an exchange process, may produce a large-scale rearrangement of the genome, called a chromosome aberration. Chromosome aberrations are important in killing cells, during carcinogenesis, in characterizing repair/misrepair pathways, in retrospective radiation biodosimetry, and in a number of other ways. DNA staining techniques such as mFISH ( multicolor fluorescent in situ hybridization) provide a means for analyzing aberration spectra by examining observed final patterns. Unfortunately, an mFISH observed final pattern often does not uniquely determine the underlying exchange process. Further, resolution limitations in the painting protocol sometimes lead to apparently incomplete final patterns. We here describe an algorithm for systematically finding exchange processes consistent with any observed final pattern. This algorithm uses aberration multigraphs, a mathematical formalism that links the various aspects of aberration formation. By applying a measure to the space of consistent multigraphs, we will show how to generate model-specific distributions of aberration processes from mFISH experimental data. The approach is implemented by software freely available over the internet. As a sample application, we apply these algorithms to an aberration data set, obtaining a distribution of exchange cycle sizes, which serves to measure aberration complexity. Estimating complexity, in turn, helps indicate how damaging the aberrations are and may facilitate identification of radiation type in retrospective biodosimetry.

  10. Cloning of BWS-associated chromosomal breakpoints

    SciTech Connect

    Mannens, M.; Hoovers, J.; Redeker, E.

    1994-09-01

    The Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome (BWS) is characterized by numerous growth abnormalities and is thought to be subject to {open_quotes}parental imprinting{close_quotes}. There is a striking increased incidence of different types of childhood tumors found in BWS patients of 7.5%. The syndrome is localized to chromosome region 11p15.3-p15.5. A contiguous map of this region of over 10 Mb was constructed and all 25 known genes from this region were localized to this map, including known imprinted genes like IGF2 and H19, or candidate tumor suppressor genes like WEE1, ST5 and rhombotin. In addition, we were able to place the breakpoints of 8 different balanced chromosomal rearrangements, associated with the Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome, onto this map in two distinct regions that are now known to contain childhood tumor suppressor genes. In one of these BWS clusters (BWSCR1) 5/5 translocation breakpoints could be identified with overlapping cosmids for each breakpoint. A 6.7 kb transcript in all adult tissues tested was identified by several of these cosmids. This transcript was less abundant in fetal tissue. Preliminary results suggest the presence of zinc-finger protein motifs in this gene. This, however, has to be confirmed by sequence analysis. Two breakpoints in the more proximal BWS region (BWSCR2) were associated with clinically distinct BWS phenotypes, of which hemihypertrophy and Wilms` tumor are the most pronounced clinical findings. These breakpoints were found to be overlapped by the same cosmid. In this region, zinc-finger motifs flanking the breakpoints were identified by genomic sequence analysis.

  11. Distribution of X-ray-induced chromosome breakpoints in Down syndrome lymphocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Shafik, H.M.; Au, W.W.; Whorton, E.B. Jr.; Legator, M.S. )

    1990-01-01

    Down syndrome (DS) individuals are known to be predisposed to develop leukemia and their lymphocytes are highly sensitive to the induction of chromosome aberrations by X-rays. A study was conducted to identify the chromosome breakpoints and to evaluate whether site specificity for chromosome breakage and rearrangement may exist which may explain the predisposition phenomenon. DS lymphocytes at the G1 phase of the cell cycle were irradiated with 300, 450, and 600 rad of X-rays. Cells were harvested after 3 days in culture and 193 G-banded karyotypes were analyzed to identify the induced chromosome abnormalities. Out of 273 breakpoints identified, 122 were involved in the formation of stable chromosome rearrangements and 151 in the formation of unstable abnormalities. The Poisson analysis of these breakpoints demonstrated that 16 chromosome bands located in chromosomes 1, 3, 7, 12, 17, 19 and X were preferentially involved in breakage and rearrangement (P less than 0.05). These 16 bands are also found to be locations of cancer breakpoints, oncogenes, or fragile sites. Many abnormal cells were observed to carry stable chromosome rearrangements only. Therefore, these cells are presumed to be compatible with survival and to be initiated in the transformation process. We propose that similar stable and site-specific chromosome rearrangements may exist in proliferating cells in DS individuals after exposure to clastogens and that this abnormality predisposes them to develop leukemia.

  12. Frequent intragenic rearrangements of DPYD in colorectal tumours.

    PubMed

    van Kuilenburg, A B P; Etienne-Grimaldi, M-C; Mahamat, A; Meijer, J; Laurent-Puig, P; Olschwang, S; Gaub, M-P; Hennekam, R C M; Benchimol, D; Houry, S; Letoublon, C; Gilly, F-N; Pezet, D; Andre, T; Faucheron, J-L; Abderrahim-Ferkoune, A; Vijzelaar, R; Pradere, B; Milano, G

    2015-06-01

    Dihydropyrimidine dehydrogenase is a crucial enzyme for the degradation of 5-fluorouracil (5FU). DPYD, which encodes dihydropyrimidine dehydrogenase, is prone to acquire genomic rearrangements because of the presence of an intragenic fragile site FRA1E. We evaluated DPYD copy number variations (CNVs) in a prospective series of 242 stage I-III colorectal tumours (including 87 patients receiving 5FU-based treatment). CNVs in one or more exons of DPYD were detected in 27% of tumours (deletions or amplifications of one or more DPYD exons observed in 17% and 10% of cases, respectively). A significant relationship was observed between the DPYD intragenic rearrangement status and dihydropyrimidine dehydrogenase (DPD) mRNA levels (both at the tumour level). The presence of somatic DPYD aberrations was not associated with known prognostic or predictive biomarkers, except for LOH of chromosome 8p. No association was observed between DPYD aberrations and patient survival, suggesting that assessment of somatic DPYD intragenic rearrangement status is not a powerful biomarker to predict the outcome of 5FU-based chemotherapy in patients with colorectal cancer. PMID:25348620

  13. Cryptic genomic imbalances in patients with de novo or familial apparently balanced translocations and abnormal phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Sismani, Carolina; Kitsiou-Tzeli, Sofia; Ioannides, Marios; Christodoulou, Christodoulos; Anastasiadou, Violetta; Stylianidou, Goula; Papadopoulou, Eleftheria; Kanavakis, Emanuel; Kosmaidou-Aravidou, Zoe; Patsalis, Philippos C

    2008-01-01

    Background Carriers of apparently balanced translocations are usually phenotypically normal; however in about 6% of de novo cases, an abnormal phenotype is present. In the current study we investigated 12 patients, six de novo and six familial, with apparently balanced translocations and mental retardation and/or congenital malformations by applying 1 Mb resolution array-CGH. In all de novo cases, only the patient was a carrier of the translocation and had abnormal phenotype. In five out of the six familial cases, the phenotype of the patient was abnormal, although the karyotype appeared identical to other phenotypically normal carriers of the family. In the sixth familial case, all carriers of the translocations had an abnormal phenotype. Results Chromosomal and FISH analyses suggested that the rearrangements were "truly balanced" in all patients. However, array-CGH, revealed cryptic imbalances in three cases (3/12, 25%), two de novo (2/12, 33.3%) and one familial (1/12, 16.6%). The nature and type of abnormalities differed among the cases. In the first case, what was identified as a de novo t(9;15)(q31;q26.1), a complex rearrangement was revealed involving a ~6.1 Mb duplication on the long arm of chromosome 9, an ~10 Mb deletion and an inversion both on the long arm of chromosome 15. These imbalances were located near the translocation breakpoints. In the second case of a de novo t(4;9)(q25;q21.2), an ~6.6 Mb deletion was identified on the short arm of chromosome 7 which is unrelated to the translocation. In the third case, of a familial, t(4;7)(q13.3;p15.3), two deletions of ~4.3 Mb and ~2.3 Mb were found, each at one of the two translocation breakpoints. In the remaining cases the translocations appeared balanced at 1 Mb resolution. Conclusion This study investigated both de novo and familial apparently balanced translocations unlike other relatively large studies which are mainly focused on de novo cases. This study provides additional evidence that cryptic

  14. Compositions and methods for detecting gene rearrangements and translocations

    DOEpatents

    Rowley, Janet D.; Diaz, Manuel O.

    2000-01-01

    Disclosed is a series of nucleic acid probes for use in diagnosing and monitoring certain types of leukemia using, e.g., Southern and Northern blot analyses and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). These probes detect rearrangements, such as translocations involving chromosome band 11q23 with other chromosomes bands, including 4q21, 6q27, 9p22, 19p13.3, in both dividing leukemic cells and interphase nuclei. The breakpoints in all such translocations are clustered within an 8.3 kb BamHI genomic region of the MLL gene. A novel 0.7 kb BamH1 cDNA fragment derived from this gene detects rearrangements on Southern blot analysis with a single BamHI restriction digest in all patients with the common 11q23 translocations and in patients with other 11q23 anomalies. Northern blot analyses are presented demonstrating that the MLL gene has multiple transcripts and that transcript size differentiates leukemic cells from normal cells. Also disclosed are MLL fusion proteins, MLL protein domains and anti-MLL antibodies.

  15. Partial Trisomy of Chromosome 11: A Case Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Falk Rena E.; And Others

    1973-01-01

    A case of partial trisomy of the short arms of chromosome number 11 resulting in profound retardation and multiple physical defects was confirmed by means of fluorescent karyotyping of the chromosomally balanced carrier father. (Author)

  16. Programmed Rearrangement in Ciliates: Paramecium.

    PubMed

    Betermier, Mireille; Duharcourt, Sandra

    2014-12-01

    Programmed genome rearrangements in the ciliate Paramecium provide a nice illustration of the impact of transposons on genome evolution and plasticity. During the sexual cycle, development of the somatic macronucleus involves elimination of ∼30% of the germline genome, including repeated DNA (e.g., transposons) and ∼45,000 single-copy internal eliminated sequences (IES). IES excision is a precise cut-and-close process, in which double-stranded DNA cleavage at IES ends depends on PiggyMac, a domesticated piggyBac transposase. Genome-wide analysis has revealed that at least a fraction of IESs originate from Tc/mariner transposons unrelated to piggyBac. Moreover, genomic sequences with no transposon origin, such as gene promoters, can be excised reproducibly as IESs, indicating that genome rearrangements contribute to the control of gene expression. How the system has evolved to allow elimination of DNA sequences with no recognizable conserved motif has been the subject of extensive research during the past two decades. Increasing evidence has accumulated for the participation of noncoding RNAs in epigenetic control of elimination for a subset of IESs, and in trans-generational inheritance of alternative rearrangement patterns. This chapter summarizes our current knowledge of the structure of the germline and somatic genomes for the model species Paramecium tetraurelia, and describes the DNA cleavage and repair factors that constitute the IES excision machinery. We present an overview of the role of specialized RNA interference machineries and their associated noncoding RNAs in the control of DNA elimination. Finally, we discuss how RNA-dependent modification and/or remodeling of chromatin may guide PiggyMac to its cognate cleavage sites. PMID:26104450

  17. Advances in understanding paternally transmitted Chromosomal Abnormalities

    SciTech Connect

    Marchetti, F; Sloter, E; Wyrobek, A J

    2001-03-01

    Multicolor FISH has been adapted for detecting the major types of chromosomal abnormalities in human sperm including aneuploidies for clinically-relevant chromosomes, chromosomal aberrations including breaks and rearrangements, and other numerical abnormalities. The various sperm FISH assays have been used to evaluate healthy men, men of advanced age, and men who have received mutagenic cancer therapy. The mouse has also been used as a model to investigate the mechanism of paternally transmitted genetic damage. Sperm FISH for the mouse has been used to detect chromosomally abnormal mouse sperm, while the PAINT/DAPI analysis of mouse zygotes has been used to evaluate the types of chromosomal defects that can be paternally transmitted to the embryo and their effects on embryonic development.

  18. Complex genomic rearrangements in the dystrophin gene due to replication-based mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Baskin, Berivan; Stavropoulos, Dimitri J; Rebeiro, Paige A; Orr, Jennifer; Li, Martin; Steele, Leslie; Marshall, Christian R; Lemire, Edmond G; Boycott, Kym M; Gibson, William; Ray, Peter N

    2014-01-01

    Genomic rearrangements such as intragenic deletions and duplications are the most prevalent type of mutations in the dystrophin gene resulting in Duchenne and Becker muscular dystrophy (D/BMD). These copy number variations (CNVs) are nonrecurrent and can result from either nonhomologous end joining (NHEJ) or microhomology-mediated replication-dependent recombination (MMRDR). We characterized five DMD patients with complex genomic rearrangements using a combination of MLPA/mRNA transcript analysis/custom array comparative hybridization arrays (CGH) and breakpoint sequence analysis to investigate the mechanisms for these rearrangements. Two patients had complex rearrangements that involved microhomologies at breakpoints. One patient had a noncontiguous insertion of 89.7 kb chromosome 4 into intron 43 of DMD involving three breakpoints with 2–5 bp microhomology at the junctions. A second patient had an inversion of exon 44 flanked by intronic deletions with two breakpoint junctions each showing 2 bp microhomology. The third patient was a female with an inherited deletion of exon 47 in DMD on the maternal allele and a de novo noncontiguous duplication of exons 45–49 in DMD and MID1 on the paternal allele. The other two patients harbored complex noncontiguous duplications within the dystrophin gene. We propose a replication-based mechanisms for all five complex DMD rearrangements. This study identifies additional underlying mechanisms in DMD, and provides insight into the molecular bases of these genomic rearrangements. PMID:25614876

  19. [Phenomenon of the evolution of clonal chromosomal abnormalities in childhood acute myeloid leukemia].

    PubMed

    Andreeva, S V; Drozdova, V D; Kavardakova, N V

    2010-01-01

    Analysis of chromosomal abnormalities in bone marrow cells in 116 children with diagnosis of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) was performed. Frequency of evolution of clonal chromosome abnormalities in AML constituted 42,3%. The most abundant among them were numerical abnormalities of chromosomes 8, 9, and 21 as well as secondary structural abnormalities in region 12p12, 9p22, 9q22, 9q34, 11q14-23, and 16q22. Numerical abnormalities were registered in 26,7% cases. The basic mechanism of leukemic clone evolution was trisomy, deletion and monosomy. The frequency of evolution was 7 times higher in the age group up to 2 years and twice higher in the age group up to 5 years. The high frequency of evolution was established at t(15;17)(q22;q22) and the absence at inv(16)(p13q22). The patients with clonal evolution died earlier, before reaching remission, that can be connected with heavy initial state and high frequency of relapse. Conception of abnormality clone evolution was proposed at some stages: I--appearance of balanced rearrangement; II--trisomy; III--lose of chromosomal material. Appearance of unbalanced genome in evolution possess an advantage in proliferate activity and can be connected with the answer on chemotherapy. Identity of abnormal chromosome structure at diagnosis and relapse of disease can be an evidence of the influence of chemical agent on establishment of some types of evolution of chromosome abnormalities in leukemic cells in AML in children. PMID:20608159

  20. The Inference of Phased Haplotypes for the Immunoglobulin H Chain V Region Gene Loci by Analysis of VDJ Gene Rearrangements

    PubMed Central

    Kidd, Marie J.; Chen, Zhiliang; Wang, Yan; Jackson, Katherine J.; Zhang, Lyndon; Boyd, Scott D.; Fire, Andrew Z.; Tanaka, Mark M.; Gaëta, Bruno A.; Collins, Andrew M.

    2014-01-01

    The existence of many highly similar genes in the lymphocyte receptor gene loci makes them difficult to investigate, and the determination of phased “haplotypes” has been particularly problematic. However, V(D)J gene rearrangements provide an opportunity to infer the association of Ig genes along the chromosomes. The chromosomal distribution of H chain genes in an Ig genotype can be inferred through analysis of VDJ rearrangements in individuals who are heterozygous at points within the IGH locus. We analyzed VDJ rearrangements from 44 individuals for whom sufficient unique rearrangements were available to allow comprehensive genotyping. Nine individuals were identified who were heterozygous at the IGHJ6 locus and for whom sufficient suitable VDJ rearrangements were available to allow comprehensive haplotyping. Each of the 18 resulting IGHV|IGHD|IGHJ haplotypes was unique. Apparent deletion polymorphisms were seen that involved as many as four contiguous, functional IGHV genes. Two deletion polymorphisms involving multiple contiguous IGHD genes were also inferred. Three previously unidentified gene duplications were detected, where two sequences recognized as allelic variants of a single gene were both inferred to be on a single chromosome. Phased genomic data brings clarity to the study of the contribution of each gene to the available repertoire of rearranged VDJ genes. Analysis of rearrangement frequencies suggests that particular genes may have substantially different yet predictable propensities for rearrangement within different haplotypes. Together with data highlighting the extent of haplotypic variation within the population, this suggests that there may be substantial variability in the available Ab repertoires of different individuals. PMID:22205028

  1. Regulation of immunoglobulin gene rearrangement and expression.

    PubMed

    Taussig, M J; Sims, M J; Krawinkel, U

    1989-05-01

    The molecular genetic events leading to Ig expression and their control formed the topic of a recent EMBO workshop. This report by Michael Taussig, Martin Sims and Ulrich Krawinkel discusses contributions dealing with genes expressed in early pre-B cells, the mechanism of rearrangement, aberrant rearrangements seen in B cells of SCID mice, the feedback control of rearrangement as studied in transgenic mice, the control of Ig expression at the transcriptional and post-transcriptional levels, and class switching. PMID:2787158

  2. Synthesis of a tricyclic lactam via Beckmann rearrangement and ring-rearrangement metathesis as key steps

    PubMed Central

    Ravikumar, Ongolu; Majhi, Jadab

    2015-01-01

    Summary A tricyclic lactam is reported in a four step synthesis sequence via Beckmann rearrangement and ring-rearrangement metathesis as key steps. Here, we used a simple starting material such as dicyclopentadiene. PMID:26425207

  3. Chromosomal Flexibility

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Journal of College Science Teaching, 2005

    2005-01-01

    Scientists have shown that a genetic element on one chromosome may direct gene activity on another. Howard Hughes Medical Institute (HHMI) researchers report that a multitasking master-control region appears to over-see both a set of its own genes and a related gene on a nearby chromosome. The findings reinforce the growing importance of location…

  4. Paracentric inversion of chromosome 2 associated with cryptic duplication of 2q14 and deletion of 2q37 in a patient with autism

    PubMed Central

    Devillard, Françoise; Guinchat, Vincent; Moreno-De-Luca, Daniel; Tabet, Anne-Claude; Gruchy, Nicolas; Guillem, Pascale; Nguyen Morel, Marie-Ange; Leporrier, Nathalie; Leboyer, Marion; Jouk, Pierre-Simon; Lespinasse, James; Betancur, Catalina

    2010-01-01

    We describe a patient with autism and a paracentric inversion of chromosome 2q14.2q37.3, with a concurrent duplication of the proximal breakpoint at 2q14.1q14.2 and a deletion of the distal breakpoint at 2q37.3. The abnormality was derived from his mother with a balanced paracentric inversion. The inversion in the child appeared to be cytogenetically balanced but subtelomere FISH revealed a cryptic deletion at the 2q37.3 breakpoint. High-resolution single nucleotide polymorphism array confirmed the presence of a 3.5 Mb deletion that extended to the telomere, and showed a 4.2 Mb duplication at 2q14.1q14.2. FISH studies using a 2q14.2 probe showed that the duplicated segment was located at the telomeric end of chromosome 2q. This recombinant probably resulted from breakage of a dicentric chromosome. The child had autism, mental retardation, speech and language delay, hyperactivity, growth retardation with growth hormone deficiency, insulin-dependent diabetes, and mild facial dysmorphism. Most of these features have been previously described in individuals with simple terminal deletion of 2q37. Pure duplications of the proximal chromosome 2q are rare and no specific syndrome has been defined yet, so the contribution of the 2q14.1q14.2 duplication to the phenotype of the patient is unknown. These findings underscore the need to explore apparently balanced chromosomal rearrangements inherited from a phenotypically normal parent in subjects with autism and/or developmental delay. In addition, they provide further evidence indicating that chromosome 2q terminal deletions are among the most frequently reported cytogenetic abnormalities in individuals with autism. PMID:20684015

  5. A Novel de novo Balanced Reciprocal Translocation t(18;22) Associated with Recurrent Miscarriages: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Dutta, Usha R.; Ponnala, Rajitha; Dalal, Ashwin

    2014-01-01

    Background Recurrent miscarriage is a major concern in the couples with reproductive problems. The chromosomal abnormalities, mainly balanced rearrangements are reported in variable phenotypes and the prevalence of them is 2-8% in such couples. Case Presentation In this study, the clinical, cytogenetic and molecular cytogenetic evaluations were performed on a couple with RM. The cytogenetic analysis of the husband revealed a balanced reciprocal translocation of t(18;22)(q21.1;q12) whereas wife had a normal karyotype of 46,XX. Further spectral karyotyping was performed to rule out the involvement of any other chromosomal aberrations present in the genome. Additional whole chromosome paint FISH (Fluorescence in situ hybridization) with paint probes 18 and 22 confirmed the translocation. Conclusion To our knowledge, this is the first report of a novel (18;22) translocation with unique breakpoints and their association with RM. The reciprocal translocations provide a good opportunity for the identification of disease associated genes. However, in recurrent miscarriages, most of them do not disrupt any gene at the breakpoint but can lead to unbalanced gametes and hence poor reproductive outcome like RM or birth of a child with malformations and intellectual disability. The translocation breakpoints might be risk factors for RM. Moreover, the impact of the balanced translocations in association with RM is discussed in this report. PMID:24918085

  6. X-linked intellectual disability related genes disrupted by balanced X-autosome translocations.

    PubMed

    Moysés-Oliveira, Mariana; Guilherme, Roberta Santos; Meloni, Vera Ayres; Di Battista, Adriana; de Mello, Claudia Berlim; Bragagnolo, Silvia; Moretti-Ferreira, Danilo; Kosyakova, Nadezda; Liehr, Thomas; Carvalheira, Gianna Maria; Melaragno, Maria Isabel

    2015-12-01

    Detailed molecular characterization of chromosomal rearrangements involving X-chromosome has been a key strategy in identifying X-linked intellectual disability-causing genes. We fine-mapped the breakpoints in four women with balanced X-autosome translocations and variable phenotypes, in order to investigate the corresponding genetic contribution to intellectual disability. We addressed the impact of the gene interruptions in transcription and discussed the consequences of their functional impairment in neurodevelopment. Three patients presented with cognitive impairment, reinforcing the association between the disrupted genes (TSPAN7-MRX58, KIAA2022-MRX98, and IL1RAPL1-MRX21/34) and intellectual disability. While gene expression analysis showed absence of TSPAN7 and KIAA2022 expression in the patients, the unexpected expression of IL1RAPL1 suggested a fusion transcript ZNF611-IL1RAPL1 under the control of the ZNF611 promoter, gene disrupted at the autosomal breakpoint. The X-chromosomal breakpoint definition in the fourth patient, a woman with normal intellectual abilities, revealed disruption of the ZDHHC15 gene (MRX91). The expression assays did not detect ZDHHC15 gene expression in the patient, thus questioning its involvement in intellectual disability. Revealing the disruption of an X-linked intellectual disability-related gene in patients with balanced X-autosome translocation is a useful tool for a better characterization of critical genes in neurodevelopment. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26290131

  7. Physical chromosome mapping of repetitive DNA sequences in Nile tilapia Oreochromis niloticus: evidences for a differential distribution of repetitive elements in the sex chromosomes.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Irani A; Martins, Cesar

    2008-06-01

    Repetitive DNAs have been extensively applied as physical chromosome markers on comparative studies, identification of chromosome rearrangements and sex chromosomes, chromosome evolution analysis, and applied genetics. Here we report the characterization of repetitive DNA sequences from the Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus) genome by construction and screening of plasmid library enriched with repetitive DNAs, analysis of a BAC-based physical map, and hybridization to chromosomes. The physical mapping of BACs enriched with repetitive sequences and C(o)t-1 DNA (DNA enriched for highly and moderately repetitive DNA sequences) to chromosomes using FISH showed a predominant distribution of repetitive elements in the centromeric and telomeric regions and along the entire length of the largest chromosome pair (X and Y sex chromosomes) of the species. The distribution of repetitive DNAs differed significantly between the p arm of X and Y chromosomes. These findings suggest that repetitive DNAs have had an important role in the differentiation of sex chromosomes. PMID:17395473

  8. Interpolation schemes for peptide rearrangements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauer, Marianne S.; Strodel, Birgit; Fejer, Szilard N.; Koslover, Elena F.; Wales, David J.

    2010-02-01

    A variety of methods (in total seven) comprising different combinations of internal and Cartesian coordinates are tested for interpolation and alignment in connection attempts for polypeptide rearrangements. We consider Cartesian coordinates, the internal coordinates used in CHARMM, and natural internal coordinates, each of which has been interfaced to the OPTIM code and compared with the corresponding results for united-atom force fields. We show that aligning the methylene hydrogens to preserve the sign of a local dihedral angle, rather than minimizing a distance metric, provides significant improvements with respect to connection times and failures. We also demonstrate the superiority of natural coordinate methods in conjunction with internal alignment. Checking the potential energy of the interpolated structures can act as a criterion for the choice of the interpolation coordinate system, which reduces failures and connection times significantly.

  9. Interpolation schemes for peptide rearrangements.

    PubMed

    Bauer, Marianne S; Strodel, Birgit; Fejer, Szilard N; Koslover, Elena F; Wales, David J

    2010-02-01

    A variety of methods (in total seven) comprising different combinations of internal and Cartesian coordinates are tested for interpolation and alignment in connection attempts for polypeptide rearrangements. We consider Cartesian coordinates, the internal coordinates used in CHARMM, and natural internal coordinates, each of which has been interfaced to the OPTIM code and compared with the corresponding results for united-atom force fields. We show that aligning the methylene hydrogens to preserve the sign of a local dihedral angle, rather than minimizing a distance metric, provides significant improvements with respect to connection times and failures. We also demonstrate the superiority of natural coordinate methods in conjunction with internal alignment. Checking the potential energy of the interpolated structures can act as a criterion for the choice of the interpolation coordinate system, which reduces failures and connection times significantly. PMID:20136299

  10. [Identification of chromosomal aberration in esophageal cancer cells by mixed BAC DNA probes of chromosome arms and regions].

    PubMed

    Jiajie, Hao; Chunli, Wang; Wenyue, Gu; Xiaoyu, Cheng; Yu, Zhang; Xin, Xu; Yan, Cai; Mingrong, Wang

    2014-06-01

    Chromosomal aberration is an important genetic feature of malignant tumor cells. This study aimed to clarify whether BAC DNA could be used to identify chromosome region and arm alterations. For each chromosome region, five to ten 1 Mb BAC DNA clones were selected to construct mixed BAC DNA clones for the particular region. All of the mixed clones from regions which could cover the whole chromosome arm were then mixed to construct mixed BAC DNA clones for the arms. Mixed BAC DNA probes of arms and regions were labeled by degenerate oligonucleotide primed PCR (DOP-PCR) and Nick translation techniques, respectively. The specificities of these probes were validated by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) on the metaphase chromosomes of normal human peripheral blood lymphocytes. FISH with arm-specific mixed BAC DNA probes showed that chromosomal rearrangements and involved chromosome arms were confirmed in several esophageal cancer cells. By using region-specific mixed probes, the breakpoint on 1q from the derivative chromosome t(1q;7q) was identified in 1q32-q41 in esophageal KYSE140 cells. In conclusion, we established an effective labeling method for 1 Mb BAC DNA mixed clone probes, and chromosome arm and region rearrangements could be identified in several esophageal cancer cells by using these probes. Our study provides a more precise method for identification of chromosomal aberration by M-FISH, and the established method may also be applied to the karyotype analysis of hematological malignancies and prenatal diagnosis. PMID:24929514

  11. Complex Variant of Philadelphia Translocation Involving Chromosomes 9, 12, and 22 in a Case with Chronic Myeloid Leukaemia

    PubMed Central

    Malvestiti, F.; Agrati, C.; Chinetti, S.; Di Meco, A.; Cirrincione, S.; Oggionni, M.; Grimi, B.; Maggi, F.; Simoni, G.; Grati, F. R.

    2014-01-01

    Chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) is a hematopoietic stem cell disorder included in the broader diagnostic category of myeloproliferative neoplasms, associated with fusion by BCR gene at chromosome 22q11 to ABL1 gene at chromosome 9q34 with the formation of the Philadelphia (Ph) chromosome. In 2–10% of CML cases, the fusion gene arises in connection with a variant translocation, involving chromosomes 9, 22, and one or more different chromosomes; consequently, the Ph chromosome could be masked within a complex chromosome rearrangement. In cases with variant Ph translocation a deletion on der(9) may be more frequently observed than in cases with the classical one. Herein we describe a novel case of CML with complex variant Ph translocation involving chromosomes 9, 12, and 22. We present the hematologic response and cytogenetic response after Imatinib treatment. We also speculated the mechanism which had originated the chromosome rearrangement. PMID:25045550

  12. Rearrangement of sulfonamidyl radicals with hydrogen migration

    SciTech Connect

    Troyanskii, E.I.; Lazareva, M.I.; Nikishin, G.I.

    1987-01-20

    One-step outlying oxidative chlorination of alkanesulfonamides by the action of the Na/sub 2/S/sub 2/O/sub 8/-CuCl/sub 2/ system via intermediate sulfonamidyl radicals gives 3- and 4-chloroalkanesulfonamides. Rearrangements of sulfonamidyl radicals with H atom migration from the sulfonyl segment predominates over rearrangement with H atom migration from the amide segment.

  13. Inspiring Examples in Rearrangements of Infinite Products

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ramasinghe, W.

    2007-01-01

    It is well known that simple examples are really encouraging in the understanding of rearrangements of infinite series. In this paper a similar role is played by simple examples in the case of infinite products. Iterated products of double products seem to have a similar spirit of rearrangements of products, although they are not the same.…

  14. Molecular screening of pituitary adenomas for gene mutations and rearrangements

    SciTech Connect

    Herman, V.; Drazin, N.Z.; Gonskey, R.; Melmed, S. )

    1993-07-01

    Although pituitary tumors arise as benign monoclonal neoplasms, genetic alterations have not readily been identified in these adenomas. The authors studied restriction fragment abnormalities involving the GH gene locus, and mutations in the p53 and H-, K-, and N-ras genes in 22 human GH cell adenomas. Twenty two nonsecretory adenomas were also examined for p53 and ras gene mutations. Seven prolactinoma DNA samples were tested for deletions in the multiple endocrine neoplasia-1 (MEN-1) locus, as well as for rearrangements in the hst gene, a member of the fibroblast growth factor family. In DNA from GH-cell adenomas, identical GH restriction patterns were detected in both pituitary and lymphocyte DNA in all patients and in one patient with a mixed GH-TSH cell adenoma. Using polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-single stranded conformation polymorphism analysis, no mutations were detected in exons 5, 6, 7 and 8 of the p53 gene in GH cell adenomas nor in 22 nonsecretory adenomas. Codons 12/13 and 61 of H-ras, K-ras, and N-ras genes were also intact on GH cell adenomas and in nonsecretory adenomas. Site-specific probes for chromosome 11q13 including, PYGM, D11S146, and INT2 were used in 7 sporadic PRL-secreting adenomas to detect deletions of the MEN-1 locus on chromosome 11. One patient was identified with a loss of 11p, and the remaining 6 patients did not demonstrate loss of heterozygosity in the pituitary 11q13 locus, compared to lymphocyte DNA. None of these patients demonstrated hst gene rearrangements which also maps to this locus. These results show that p53 and ras gene mutations are not common events in the pathogenesis of acromegaly and nonsecretory tumors. Although hst gene rearrangements and deletions of 11q13 are not associated with sporadic PRl-cell adenoma formation, a single patient was detected with a partial loss of chromosome 11, including the putative MEN-1 site. 31 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  15. Lack of feedback inhibition of V kappa gene rearrangement by productively rearranged alleles.

    PubMed

    Harada, K; Yamagishi, H

    1991-02-01

    Circular DNAs excised by immunoglobulin kappa chain gene rearrangements were cloned and characterized. 16 of 17 clones examined were double recombination products containing a V kappa-J kappa rearrangement (coding joint) as well as the reciprocal element (signal joint) of another V kappa-J kappa rearrangement. These products suggested multiple recombination, primary inversion, and secondary excision. In primary events, 5 of 16 translational reading frames were in-phase. Thus, V kappa gene rearrangement may not be inhibited by the presence of a productively rearranged allele. An unusually large trinucleotide (P) insertion forming a palindrome of 12 nucleotides was also observed in one of the coding joints. PMID:1988542

  16. Rearrangements of organic peroxides and related processes

    PubMed Central

    Yaremenko, Ivan A; Vil’, Vera A; Demchuk, Dmitry V

    2016-01-01

    Summary This review is the first to collate and summarize main data on named and unnamed rearrangement reactions of peroxides. It should be noted, that in the chemistry of peroxides two types of processes are considered under the term rearrangements. These are conventional rearrangements occurring with the retention of the molecular weight and transformations of one of the peroxide moieties after O–O-bond cleavage. Detailed information about the Baeyer−Villiger, Criegee, Hock, Kornblum−DeLaMare, Dakin, Elbs, Schenck, Smith, Wieland, and Story reactions is given. Unnamed rearrangements of organic peroxides and related processes are also analyzed. The rearrangements and related processes of important natural and synthetic peroxides are discussed separately. PMID:27559418

  17. Group 3 chromosome bin maps of wheat and their relationship to rice chromosome 1.

    PubMed

    Munkvold, J D; Greene, R A; Bermudez-Kandianis, C E; La Rota, C M; Edwards, H; Sorrells, S F; Dake, T; Benscher, D; Kantety, R; Linkiewicz, A M; Dubcovsky, J; Akhunov, E D; Dvorák, J; Miftahudin; Gustafson, J P; Pathan, M S; Nguyen, H T; Matthews, D E; Chao, S; Lazo, G R; Hummel, D D; Anderson, O D; Anderson, J A; Gonzalez-Hernandez, J L; Peng, J H; Lapitan, N; Qi, L L; Echalier, B; Gill, B S; Hossain, K G; Kalavacharla, V; Kianian, S F; Sandhu, D; Erayman, M; Gill, K S; McGuire, P E; Qualset, C O; Sorrells, M E

    2004-10-01

    The focus of this study was to analyze the content, distribution, and comparative genome relationships of 996 chromosome bin-mapped expressed sequence tags (ESTs) accounting for 2266 restriction fragments (loci) on the homoeologous group 3 chromosomes of hexaploid wheat (Triticum aestivum L.). Of these loci, 634, 884, and 748 were mapped on chromosomes 3A, 3B, and 3D, respectively. The individual chromosome bin maps revealed bins with a high density of mapped ESTs in the distal region and bins of low density in the proximal region of the chromosome arms, with the exception of 3DS and 3DL. These distributions were more localized on the higher-resolution group 3 consensus map with intermediate regions of high-mapped-EST density on both chromosome arms. Gene ontology (GO) classification of mapped ESTs was not significantly different for homoeologous group 3 chromosomes compared to the other groups. A combined analysis of the individual bin maps using 537 of the mapped ESTs revealed rearrangements between the group 3 chromosomes. Approximately 232 (44%) of the consensus mapped ESTs matched sequences on rice chromosome 1 and revealed large- and small-scale differences in gene order. Of the group 3 mapped EST unigenes approximately 21 and 32% matched the Arabidopsis coding regions and proteins, respectively, but no chromosome-level gene order conservation was detected. PMID:15514041

  18. A consensus map in cultivated hexaploid oat reveals conserved grass synteny with substantial sub-genome rearrangement

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Hexaploid oat (Avena sativa, 2n = 6x = 42) is a member of the Poaceae family with a very large genome (~13 Gb) containing 21 chromosome pairs: seven from each of two similar ancestral diploids (A and D) and seven from a more diverged ancestral diploid (C). Physical rearrangements among ancestral oat...

  19. Competition between Different Variegating Rearrangements for Limited Heterochromatic Factors in Drosophila Melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Lloyd, V. K.; Sinclair, D. A.; Grigliatti, T. A.

    1997-01-01

    Position effect variegation (PEV) results from the juxtaposition of a euchromatic gene to heterochromatin. In its new position the gene is inactivated in some cells and not in others. This mosaic expression is consistent with variability in the spread of heterochromatin from cell to cell. As many components of heterochromatin are likely to be produced in limited amounts, the spread of heterochromatin into a normally euchromatic region should be accompanied by a concomitant loss or redistribution of the protein components from other heterochromatic regions. We have shown that this is the case by simultaneously monitoring variegation of a euchromatic and a heterochromatic gene associated with a single chromosome rearrangement. Secondly, if several heterochromatic regions of the genome share limited components of heterochromatin, then some variegating rearrangements should compete for these components. We have examined this hypothesis by testing flies with combinations of two or more different variegating rearrangements. Of the nine combinations of pairs of variegating rearrangements we studied, seven showed nonreciprocal interactions. These results imply that many components of heterochromatin are both shared and present in limited amounts and that they can transfer between chromosomal sites. Consequently, even nonvariegation portions of the genome will be disrupted by re-allocation of heterochromatic proteins associated with PEV. These results have implications for models of PEV. PMID:9093849

  20. The Glanville fritillary genome retains an ancient karyotype and reveals selective chromosomal fusions in Lepidoptera

    PubMed Central

    Ahola, Virpi; Lehtonen, Rainer; Somervuo, Panu; Salmela, Leena; Koskinen, Patrik; Rastas, Pasi; Välimäki, Niko; Paulin, Lars; Kvist, Jouni; Wahlberg, Niklas; Tanskanen, Jaakko; Hornett, Emily A.; Ferguson, Laura C.; Luo, Shiqi; Cao, Zijuan; de Jong, Maaike A.; Duplouy, Anne; Smolander, Olli-Pekka; Vogel, Heiko; McCoy, Rajiv C.; Qian, Kui; Chong, Wong Swee; Zhang, Qin; Ahmad, Freed; Haukka, Jani K.; Joshi, Aruj; Salojärvi, Jarkko; Wheat, Christopher W.; Grosse-Wilde, Ewald; Hughes, Daniel; Katainen, Riku; Pitkänen, Esa; Ylinen, Johannes; Waterhouse, Robert M.; Turunen, Mikko; Vähärautio, Anna; Ojanen, Sami P.; Schulman, Alan H.; Taipale, Minna; Lawson, Daniel; Ukkonen, Esko; Mäkinen, Veli; Goldsmith, Marian R.; Holm, Liisa; Auvinen, Petri; Frilander, Mikko J.; Hanski, Ilkka

    2014-01-01

    Previous studies have reported that chromosome synteny in Lepidoptera has been well conserved, yet the number of haploid chromosomes varies widely from 5 to 223. Here we report the genome (393 Mb) of the Glanville fritillary butterfly (Melitaea cinxia; Nymphalidae), a widely recognized model species in metapopulation biology and eco-evolutionary research, which has the putative ancestral karyotype of n=31. Using a phylogenetic analyses of Nymphalidae and of other Lepidoptera, combined with orthologue-level comparisons of chromosomes, we conclude that the ancestral lepidopteran karyotype has been n=31 for at least 140 My. We show that fusion chromosomes have retained the ancestral chromosome segments and very few rearrangements have occurred across the fusion sites. The same, shortest ancestral chromosomes have independently participated in fusion events in species with smaller karyotypes. The short chromosomes have higher rearrangement rate than long ones. These characteristics highlight distinctive features of the evolutionary dynamics of butterflies and moths. PMID:25189940

  1. Comparative mapping identifies the fusion point of an ancient mammalian X-autosomal rearrangement

    SciTech Connect

    Wilcox, S.A.; Watson, J.M.; Spencer, J.A.

    1996-07-01

    Previous comparisons of gene location in the three major groups of mammals (eutherians, marsupials, and monotremes) have suggested that the long arm of the human X represents the ancestral mammalian X chromosome, whereas the short arm represents an autosomal region(s) recently added to the eutherian X chromosome. To identify the fusion point of this ancient X-autosome rearrangement, we have mapped four genes, three of which map near the centromere of the human Xp, in marsupials and in a monotreme. We found that ARAF1, and GATA1 are located on the X chromosome in marsupials, and ALA2 and GATA1 are also located on the X in the platypus. This implies that the proximal short arm of the human X chromosome, including the centromere, was part of the ancestral mammalian X chromosome. The fusion point between the conserved region and the recently added regions therefore maps to human Xp11.23, although gene order on the human X indicates that there has been some rearrangement of this region. 26 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  2. Chromosome Abnormalities

    MedlinePlus

    ... decade, newer techniques have been developed that allow scientists and doctors to screen for chromosomal abnormalities without using a microscope. These newer methods compare the patient's DNA to a normal DNA ...

  3. Further delineation of nonhomologous-based recombination and evidence for subtelomeric segmental duplications in 1p36 rearrangements.

    PubMed

    D'Angelo, Carla S; Gajecka, Marzena; Kim, Chong A; Gentles, Andrew J; Glotzbach, Caron D; Shaffer, Lisa G; Koiffmann, Célia P

    2009-06-01

    The mechanisms involved in the formation of subtelomeric rearrangements are now beginning to be elucidated. Breakpoint sequencing analysis of 1p36 rearrangements has made important contributions to this line of inquiry. Despite the unique architecture of segmental duplications inherent to human subtelomeres, no common mechanism has been identified thus far and different nonexclusive recombination-repair mechanisms seem to predominate. In order to gain further insights into the mechanisms of chromosome breakage, repair, and stabilization mediating subtelomeric rearrangements in humans, we investigated the constitutional rearrangements of 1p36. Cloning of the breakpoint junctions in a complex rearrangement and three non-reciprocal translocations revealed similarities at the junctions, such as microhomology of up to three nucleotides, along with no significant sequence identity in close proximity to the breakpoint regions. All the breakpoints appeared to be unique and their occurrence was limited to non-repetitive, unique DNA sequences. Several recombination- or cleavage-associated motifs that may promote non-homologous recombination were observed in close proximity to the junctions. We conclude that NHEJ is likely the mechanism of DNA repair that generates these rearrangements. Additionally, two apparently pure terminal deletions were also investigated, and the refinement of the breakpoint regions identified two distinct genomic intervals ~25-kb apart, each containing a series of 1p36 specific segmental duplications with 90-98% identity. Segmental duplications can serve as substrates for ectopic homologous recombination or stimulate genomic rearrangements. PMID:19271239

  4. Rearrangement of mitochondrial tRNA genes in flat bugs (Hemiptera: Aradidae).

    PubMed

    Song, Fan; Li, Hu; Shao, Renfu; Shi, Aimin; Bai, Xiaoshuan; Zheng, Xiaorong; Heiss, Ernst; Cai, Wanzhi

    2016-01-01

    The typical insect mitochondrial (mt) genome organization, which contains a single chromosome with 37 genes, was found in the infraorder Pentatomomorpha (suborder Heteroptera). The arrangement of mt genes in these true bugs is usually the same as the ancestral mt gene arrangement of insects. Rearrangement of transfer RNA (tRNA) genes, however, has been found in two subfamilies of flat bugs (Mezirinae and Calisiinae, family Aradidae). In this study, we sequenced the complete mt genomes of four species from three other subfamilies (Aradinae, Carventinae and Aneurinae). We found tRNA gene rearrangement in all of these four species. All of the rearranged tRNA genes are located between the mitochondrial control region and cox1, indicating this region as a hotspot for gene rearrangement in flat bugs; the rearrangement is likely caused by events of tandem duplication and random deletion of genes. Furthermore, our phylogenetic and dating analyses indicated that the swap of positions between trnQ and trnI occurred ~162 million years ago (MYA) in the most recent common ancestor of the five subfamilies of flat bugs investigated to date, whereas the swap of positions between trnC and trnW occurred later in the lineage leading to Calisiinae, and the translocation of trnC and trnY occurred later than 134 MYA in the lineage leading to Aradinae. PMID:27180804

  5. Rearrangement of mitochondrial tRNA genes in flat bugs (Hemiptera: Aradidae)

    PubMed Central

    Song, Fan; Li, Hu; Shao, Renfu; Shi, Aimin; Bai, Xiaoshuan; Zheng, Xiaorong; Heiss, Ernst; Cai, Wanzhi

    2016-01-01

    The typical insect mitochondrial (mt) genome organization, which contains a single chromosome with 37 genes, was found in the infraorder Pentatomomorpha (suborder Heteroptera). The arrangement of mt genes in these true bugs is usually the same as the ancestral mt gene arrangement of insects. Rearrangement of transfer RNA (tRNA) genes, however, has been found in two subfamilies of flat bugs (Mezirinae and Calisiinae, family Aradidae). In this study, we sequenced the complete mt genomes of four species from three other subfamilies (Aradinae, Carventinae and Aneurinae). We found tRNA gene rearrangement in all of these four species. All of the rearranged tRNA genes are located between the mitochondrial control region and cox1, indicating this region as a hotspot for gene rearrangement in flat bugs; the rearrangement is likely caused by events of tandem duplication and random deletion of genes. Furthermore, our phylogenetic and dating analyses indicated that the swap of positions between trnQ and trnI occurred ~162 million years ago (MYA) in the most recent common ancestor of the five subfamilies of flat bugs investigated to date, whereas the swap of positions between trnC and trnW occurred later in the lineage leading to Calisiinae, and the translocation of trnC and trnY occurred later than 134 MYA in the lineage leading to Aradinae. PMID:27180804

  6. Diverse, Biologically Relevant, and Targetable Gene Rearrangements in Triple-Negative Breast Cancer and Other Malignancies.

    PubMed

    Shaver, Timothy M; Lehmann, Brian D; Beeler, J Scott; Li, Chung-I; Li, Zhu; Jin, Hailing; Stricker, Thomas P; Shyr, Yu; Pietenpol, Jennifer A

    2016-08-15

    Triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) and other molecularly heterogeneous malignancies present a significant clinical challenge due to a lack of high-frequency "driver" alterations amenable to therapeutic intervention. These cancers often exhibit genomic instability, resulting in chromosomal rearrangements that affect the structure and expression of protein-coding genes. However, identification of these rearrangements remains technically challenging. Using a newly developed approach that quantitatively predicts gene rearrangements in tumor-derived genetic material, we identified and characterized a novel oncogenic fusion involving the MER proto-oncogene tyrosine kinase (MERTK) and discovered a clinical occurrence and cell line model of the targetable FGFR3-TACC3 fusion in TNBC. Expanding our analysis to other malignancies, we identified a diverse array of novel and known hybrid transcripts, including rearrangements between noncoding regions and clinically relevant genes such as ALK, CSF1R, and CD274/PD-L1 The over 1,000 genetic alterations we identified highlight the importance of considering noncoding gene rearrangement partners, and the targetable gene fusions identified in TNBC demonstrate the need to advance gene fusion detection for molecularly heterogeneous cancers. Cancer Res; 76(16); 4850-60. ©2016 AACR. PMID:27231203

  7. Dysregulation of the DNA Damage Response and KMT2A Rearrangement in Fetal Liver Hematopoietic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Nanya, Mai; Sato, Masaki; Tanimoto, Kousuke; Tozuka, Minoru; Mizutani, Shuki; Takagi, Masatoshi

    2015-01-01

    Etoposide, a topoisomerase 2 (TOP2) inhibitor, is associated with the development of KMT2A (MLL)-rearranged infant leukemia. An epidemiological study suggested that in utero exposure to TOP2 inhibitors may be involved in generation of KMT2A (MLL) rearrangement. The present study examined the mechanism underlying the development of KMT2A (MLL)-rearranged infant leukemia in response to in utero exposure to etoposide in a mouse model. Fetal liver hematopoietic stem cells were more susceptible to etoposide than maternal bone marrow mononuclear cells. Etoposide-induced Kmt2a breakage was detected in fetal liver hematopoietic stem cells using a newly developed chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assay. Assessment of etoposide-induced chromosomal translocation by next-generation RNA sequencing (RNA-seq) identified several chimeric fusion messenger RNAs that were generated by etoposide treatment. However, Kmt2a (Mll)-rearranged fusion mRNA was detected in Atm-knockout mice, which are defective in the DNA damage response, but not in wild-type mice. The present findings suggest that in utero exposure to TOP2 inhibitors induces Kmt2a rearrangement when the DNA damage response is defective. PMID:26657054

  8. Reversed end Ds element: a novel tool for chromosome engineering in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Krishnaswamy, Lakshminarasimhan; Zhang, Jianbo; Peterson, Thomas

    2008-11-01

    The maize Ac/Ds transposable element (TE) transposes by a "cut and paste" mechanism. Previous studies in maize showed that when the TE ends are in reversed orientation with respect to each other, alternative transposition reactions can occur resulting in large scale genome rearrangements including deletions and inversions. To test whether similar genome rearrangements can also occur in other plants, we studied the efficacy of such alternative transposition-mediated genome rearrangements in Arabidopsis. Here we present our analysis of 33 independent chromosome rearrangements. Transposition at the reversed ends Ds element can cause deletions over 1 Mbp, and inversions up to 2.4 Mbp in size. We identified additional rearrangements including a reciprocal translocation and a putative ring chromosome. Some of the deletions and inversions are germinally transmitted. PMID:18685955

  9. The speed of topological rearrangements in foam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thoroddsen, S. T.; Tan, E.

    1999-11-01

    Coarsening of dry foam is characterized by a slow diffusion of gas across the fluid films separating adjacent foam cells, punctuated by rapid topological rearrangements of the polyhedral network. In this work we measure and model the speed of a typical rearrangement event, which has been reproduced on an adjustable metal frame. The interstitial liquid viscosity is varied by adding glycerin to the water/soap solution and is found to reduce the speed only at high viscosities. Marangoni effects play on the other hand a pivotal role for the lowest soap concentrations, greatly slowing down the rearrangements.

  10. Untangling Membrane Rearrangement in the Nidovirales

    PubMed Central

    Angelini, Megan Mary; Neuman, Benjamin William

    2014-01-01

    All known positive sense single-stranded RNA viruses induce host cell membrane rearrangement for purposes of aiding viral genome replication and transcription. Members of the Nidovirales order are no exception, inducing intricate regions of double membrane vesicles and convoluted membranes crucial for the production of viral progeny. Although these structures have been well studied for some members of this order, much remains unclear regarding the biogenesis of these rearranged membranes. Here, we discuss what is known about these structures and their formation, compare some of the driving viral proteins behind this process across the nidovirus order, and examine possible routes of mechanism by which membrane rearrangement may occur. PMID:24410069

  11. Patterns of Chromosomal Evolution in Sigmodon, Evidence from Whole Chromosome Paints

    PubMed Central

    Swier, V.J.; Bradley, R.D.; Rens, W.; Elder, F.F.B.; Baker, R.J.

    2009-01-01

    Of the superfamily Muroidea (31 genera, 1578 species), the Sigmodontinae (74 genera, 377 species) is the second largest subfamily in number of species and represents a significant radiation of rodent biodiversity. Only 2 of the 74 genera are found in both North and South America (Sigmodon and Oryzomys) and the remainder are exclusively from South America. In recent molecular studies, the genus Sigmodon (Cricetidae, Sigmodontinae) has been considered sister to many other South American Sigmodontines [Steppan et al., 2004]. We examine the chromosomal evolution of 9 species of Sigmodon utilizing chromosomal paints isolated from S. hispidus, proposed to be similar to the ancestral karyotype [Elder, 1980]. Utilizing a phylogenetic hypothesis of a molecular phylogeny of Sigmodon [Henson and Bradley, 2009], we mapped shared chromosomal rearrangements of taxa on a molecular tree to estimate the evolutionary position of each rearrangement. For several species (S. hirsutus, S. leucotis, S. ochrognathus, S. peruanus, and S. toltecus), the karyotype accumulated few or no changes, but in three species (S. arizonae, S. fulviventer, and S. mascotensis) numerous karyotype rearrangements were observed. These rearrangements involved heterochromatic additions, centric fusions, tandem fusions, pericentric inversions, as well as the addition of interstitial DNA not identified by chromosome paints or C-banding. The hypothesis that the ancestral karyotype for this complex had a diploid number of 52, a fundamental number of 52, and a G-band pattern of which most, if not all are similar to that present in modern day S. hispidus fails to be rejected. This hypothesis remains viable as an explanation of chromosomal evolution in Sigmodontine rodents. PMID:19617697

  12. Engineering mouse chromosomes with Cre-loxP: range, efficiency, and somatic applications.

    PubMed

    Zheng, B; Sage, M; Sheppeard, E A; Jurecic, V; Bradley, A

    2000-01-01

    Chromosomal rearrangements are important resources for genetic studies. Recently, a Cre-loxP-based method to introduce defined chromosomal rearrangements (deletions, duplications, and inversions) into the mouse genome (chromosome engineering) has been established. To explore the limits of this technology systematically, we have evaluated this strategy on mouse chromosome 11. Although the efficiency of Cre-loxP-mediated recombination decreases with increasing genetic distance when the two endpoints are on the same chromosome, the efficiency is not limiting even when the genetic distance is maximized. Rearrangements encompassing up to three quarters of chromosome 11 have been constructed in mouse embryonic stem (ES) cells. While larger deletions may lead to ES cell lethality, smaller deletions can be produced very efficiently both in ES cells and in vivo in a tissue- or cell-type-specific manner. We conclude that any chromosomal rearrangement can be made in ES cells with the Cre-loxP strategy provided that it does not affect cell viability. In vivo chromosome engineering can be potentially used to achieve somatic losses of heterozygosity in creating mouse models of human cancers. PMID:10611243

  13. Automatic aberration scoring using whole chromosome F. I. S. H

    SciTech Connect

    Piper, J.; Bayley, R.; Boyle, S.; Fantes, J.A.; Green, D.K.; Gordon, J.; Hill, W.; Ji, L.; Malloy, P.; Perry, P.; Rutovitz, D.; Stark, M.; Whale, D. )

    1993-01-01

    A radiation-induced rearrangement involving a painted and a non-painted chromosome will usually result in two partly-painted chromosomes, typically either a dicentric chromosome and associated fragment, or a reciprocal translocation pair. A consequence of such a rearrangement is that the number of painted image regions in the metaphase is increased by one, and their size distribution is altered. More complex rearrangements are uncommon, particularly at low doses. A high proportion of damaged cells can therefore be registered simply by detecting when the distribution of painted components differs from the expected number and size. A system has been constructed to pre-screen for damaged cells. It comprises automatic fluorescence metaphase finding followed by relocation and digitization of probe and counterstain channels at high resolution. Fully automatic segmentation in counterstain discriminates chromosomes from interphase nuclei and determines whether a metaphase is approximately diploid. The painted regions are segmented and their relative sizes estimated. Rules are applied which reduce the false positives due to artifacts such as overlapped painted chromosomes. More than 70% of cells with radiation damage involving painted and unpainted chromosomes were detected in a preliminary experiment using a small data set, with a low false positive rate. Results from a larger experiment in progress are presented.

  14. Systematic Identification of Balanced Transposition Polymorphisms in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Faddah, Dina A.; Ganko, Eric W.; McCoach, Caroline; Pickrell, Joseph K.; Hanlon, Sean E.; Mann, Frederick G.; Mieczkowska, Joanna O.; Jones, Corbin D.; Lieb, Jason D.; Vision, Todd J.

    2009-01-01

    High-throughput techniques for detecting DNA polymorphisms generally do not identify changes in which the genomic position of a sequence, but not its copy number, varies among individuals. To explore such balanced structural polymorphisms, we used array-based Comparative Genomic Hybridization (aCGH) to conduct a genome-wide screen for single-copy genomic segments that occupy different genomic positions in the standard laboratory strain of Saccharomyces cerevisiae (S90) and a polymorphic wild isolate (Y101) through analysis of six tetrads from a cross of these two strains. Paired-end high-throughput sequencing of Y101 validated four of the predicted rearrangements. The transposed segments contained one to four annotated genes each, yet crosses between S90 and Y101 yielded mostly viable tetrads. The longest segment comprised 13.5 kb near the telomere of chromosome XV in the S288C reference strain and Southern blotting confirmed its predicted location on chromosome IX in Y101. Interestingly, inter-locus crossover events between copies of this segment occurred at a detectable rate. The presence of low-copy repetitive sequences at the junctions of this segment suggests that it may have arisen through ectopic recombination. Our methodology and findings provide a starting point for exploring the origins, phenotypic consequences, and evolutionary fate of this largely unexplored form of genomic polymorphism. PMID:19503594

  15. Adults with Chromosome 18 Abnormalities.

    PubMed

    Soileau, Bridgette; Hasi, Minire; Sebold, Courtney; Hill, Annice; O'Donnell, Louise; Hale, Daniel E; Cody, Jannine D

    2015-08-01

    The identification of an underlying chromosome abnormality frequently marks the endpoint of a diagnostic odyssey. However, families are frequently left with more questions than answers as they consider their child's future. In the case of rare chromosome conditions, a lack of longitudinal data often makes it difficult to provide anticipatory guidance to these families. The objective of this study is to describe the lifespan, educational attainment, living situation, and behavioral phenotype of adults with chromosome 18 abnormalities. The Chromosome 18 Clinical Research Center has enrolled 483 individuals with one of the following conditions: 18q-, 18p-, Tetrasomy 18p, and Ring 18. As a part of the ongoing longitudinal study, we collect data on living arrangements, educational level attained, and employment status as well as data on executive functioning and behavioral skills on an annual basis. Within our cohort, 28 of the 483 participants have died, the majority of whom have deletions encompassing the TCF4 gene or who have unbalanced rearrangement involving other chromosomes. Data regarding the cause of and age at death are presented. We also report on the living situation, educational attainment, and behavioral phenotype of the 151 participants over the age of 18. In general, educational level is higher for people with all these conditions than implied by the early literature, including some that received post-high school education. In addition, some individuals are able to live independently, though at this point they represent a minority of patients. Data on executive function and behavioral phenotype are also presented. Taken together, these data provide insight into the long-term outcome for individuals with a chromosome 18 condition. This information is critical in counseling families on the range of potential outcomes for their child. PMID:25403900

  16. Glycolytic regulation of cell rearrangement in angiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Cruys, Bert; Wong, Brian W.; Kuchnio, Anna; Verdegem, Dries; Cantelmo, Anna Rita; Conradi, Lena-Christin; Vandekeere, Saar; Bouché, Ann; Cornelissen, Ivo; Vinckier, Stefan; Merks, Roeland M. H.; Dejana, Elisabetta; Gerhardt, Holger; Dewerchin, Mieke; Bentley, Katie; Carmeliet, Peter

    2016-01-01

    During vessel sprouting, endothelial cells (ECs) dynamically rearrange positions in the sprout to compete for the tip position. We recently identified a key role for the glycolytic activator PFKFB3 in vessel sprouting by regulating cytoskeleton remodelling, migration and tip cell competitiveness. It is, however, unknown how glycolysis regulates EC rearrangement during vessel sprouting. Here we report that computational simulations, validated by experimentation, predict that glycolytic production of ATP drives EC rearrangement by promoting filopodia formation and reducing intercellular adhesion. Notably, the simulations correctly predicted that blocking PFKFB3 normalizes the disturbed EC rearrangement in high VEGF conditions, as occurs during pathological angiogenesis. This interdisciplinary study integrates EC metabolism in vessel sprouting, yielding mechanistic insight in the control of vessel sprouting by glycolysis, and suggesting anti-glycolytic therapy for vessel normalization in cancer and non-malignant diseases. PMID:27436424

  17. Glycolytic regulation of cell rearrangement in angiogenesis.

    PubMed

    Cruys, Bert; Wong, Brian W; Kuchnio, Anna; Verdegem, Dries; Cantelmo, Anna Rita; Conradi, Lena-Christin; Vandekeere, Saar; Bouché, Ann; Cornelissen, Ivo; Vinckier, Stefan; Merks, Roeland M H; Dejana, Elisabetta; Gerhardt, Holger; Dewerchin, Mieke; Bentley, Katie; Carmeliet, Peter

    2016-01-01

    During vessel sprouting, endothelial cells (ECs) dynamically rearrange positions in the sprout to compete for the tip position. We recently identified a key role for the glycolytic activator PFKFB3 in vessel sprouting by regulating cytoskeleton remodelling, migration and tip cell competitiveness. It is, however, unknown how glycolysis regulates EC rearrangement during vessel sprouting. Here we report that computational simulations, validated by experimentation, predict that glycolytic production of ATP drives EC rearrangement by promoting filopodia formation and reducing intercellular adhesion. Notably, the simulations correctly predicted that blocking PFKFB3 normalizes the disturbed EC rearrangement in high VEGF conditions, as occurs during pathological angiogenesis. This interdisciplinary study integrates EC metabolism in vessel sprouting, yielding mechanistic insight in the control of vessel sprouting by glycolysis, and suggesting anti-glycolytic therapy for vessel normalization in cancer and non-malignant diseases. PMID:27436424

  18. Thermal rearrangement of tert-butylsulfinamide

    PubMed Central

    Gorentla, Laxminarasimhulu; Dubey, Pramod Kumar

    2011-01-01

    Summary tert-Butylsulfinamides are unstable above room temperature, and in chlorinated solvents they undergo rearrangement to form the more stable N-(tert-butylthio)-tert-butylsulfonamide. PMID:21286388

  19. Synthetic chromosomes.

    PubMed

    Schindler, Daniel; Waldminghaus, Torsten

    2015-11-01

    What a living organism looks like and how it works and what are its components-all this is encoded on DNA, the genetic blueprint. Consequently, the way to change an organism is to change its genetic information. Since the first pieces of recombinant DNA have been used to transform cells in the 1970s, this approach has been enormously extended. Bigger and bigger parts of the genetic information have been exchanged or added over the years. Now we are at a point where the construction of entire chromosomes becomes a reachable goal and first examples appear. This development leads to fundamental new questions, for example, about what is possible and desirable to build or what construction rules one needs to follow when building synthetic chromosomes. Here we review the recent progress in the field, discuss current challenges and speculate on the appearance of future synthetic chromosomes. PMID:26111960

  20. Chromosome and cell genetics

    SciTech Connect

    Sharma, A.K.; Sharma, A.

    1985-01-01

    This book contains 11 chapters. Some of the titles are: Chromosomes in differentiation; Chromosome axis; Nuclear and organelle split genes; Chemical mutagenesis; and Chromosome architecture and additional elements.

  1. Nuclear dynamics and genetic rearrangement in heterokaryotic colonies of Fusarium oxysporum.

    PubMed

    Shahi, Shermineh; Beerens, Bas; Bosch, Martin; Linmans, Jasper; Rep, Martijn

    2016-06-01

    Recent studies have shown horizontal transfer of chromosomes to be a potential key contributor to genome plasticity in asexual fungal pathogens. However, the mechanisms behind horizontal chromosome transfer in eukaryotes are not well understood. Here we investigated the role of conidial anastomosis in heterokaryon formation between incompatible strains of Fusarium oxysporum and determined the importance of heterokaryons for horizontal chromosome transfer. Using live-cell imaging we demonstrate that conidial pairing of incompatible strains under carbon starvation can result in the formation of viable heterokaryotic hyphae in F. oxysporum. Nuclei of the parental lines presumably fuse at some stage as conidia with a single nucleus harboring both marker histones (GFP- and RFP-tagged) are produced. Upon colony formation, this hybrid offspring is subject to progressive and gradual genome rearrangement. The parental genomes appear to become spatially separated and RFP-tagged histones, deriving from one of the strains, Fol4287, are eventually lost. With a PCR-based method we showed that markers for most of the chromosomes of this strain are lost, indicating a lack of Fol4287 chromosomes. This leaves offspring with the genomic background of the other strain (Fo47), but in some cases together with one or two chromosomes from Fol4287, including the chromosome that confers pathogenicity towards tomato. PMID:27013267

  2. Molecular Mapping of Wheat: Major Genes and Rearrangements in Homoeologous Groups 4, 5, and 7

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, J. C.; Sorrells, M. E.; Van-Deynze, A. E.; Lu, Y. H.; Atkinson, M.; Bernard, M.; Leroy, P.; Faris, J. D.; Anderson, J. A.

    1995-01-01

    A molecular-marker linkage map of hexaploid wheat (Triticum aestivum L. em. Thell) provides a framework for integration with the classical genetic map and a record of the chromosomal rearrangements involved in the evolution of this crop species. We have constructed restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) maps of the A-, B-, and D-genome chromosomes of homoeologous groups 4, 5, and 7 of wheat using 114 F(7) lines from a synthetic X cultivated wheat cross and clones from 10 DNA libraries. Chromosomal breakpoints for known ancestral reciprocal translocations involving these chromosomes and for a known pericentric inversion on chromosome 4A were localized by linkage and aneuploid analysis. Known genes mapped include the major vernalization genes Vrn1 and Vrn3 on chromosome arms 5AL and 5DL, the red-coleoptile gene Rc1 on 7AS, and presumptively the leaf-rust (Puccinia recondita f.sp. tritici) resistance gene Lr34 on 7DS and the kernel-hardness gene Ha on 5DS. RFLP markers previously obtained for powdery-mildew (Blumeria graminis f.sp. tritici) resistance genes Pm2 and Pm1 were localized on chromosome arms 5DS and 7AL. PMID:8647405

  3. Comparative chromosome painting in mammals: Human and the Indian muntjac (Muntiacus muntjak vaginalis)

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Fengtang; Mueller, S.; Ferguson-Smith, M.A.

    1997-02-01

    We have used human chromosome-specific painting probes for in situ hybridization on Indian muntjac (Muntiacus muntjak vaginalis, 2n = 6, 7) metaphase chromosomes to identify the homologous chromosome regions of the entire human chromosome set. Chromosome rearrangements that have been involved in the karyotype evolution of these two species belonging to different mammalian orders were reconstructed based on hybridization patterns. Although, compared to human chromosomes, the karyotype of the Indian muntjac seems to be highly rearranged, we could identify a limited number of highly conserved homologous chromosome regions for each of the human chromosome-specific probes. We identified 48 homologous autosomal chromosome segments, which is in the range of the numbers found in other artiodactyls and carnivores recently analyzed by chromosome painting. The results demonstrate that the reshuffling of the muntjac karyotype is mostly due to fusions of huge blocks of entire chromosomes. This is in accordance with previous chromosome painting analyses between various Muntjac species and contrasts the findings for some other mammals (e.g., gibbons, mice) that show exceptional chromosome reshuffling due to multiple reciprocal translocation events. 21 refs., 3 figs.

  4. Cytogenetic effects of radiotherapy. Breakpoint distribution in induced chromosome aberrations

    SciTech Connect

    Barrios, L.; Miro, R.; Caballin, M.R.; Fuster, C.; Guedea, F.; Subias, A.; Egozcue, J. )

    1989-08-01

    A total of 660 breakpoints were identified in the chromosome aberrations detected in lymphocytes from cancer patients after radiotherapy. The results show that chromosomes 1, 3, and 7 were significantly more affected than other chromosomes by ionizing radiation in vivo. Chromosome arms 1p, 1q, 7q, and 11p were also significantly more affected. Some bands also showed a special sensitivity to radiation, and band 1q32 was the most affected. This band is proposed as a hot point for the clastogenic effect of ionizing radiation. A significant clustering of breakpoints in G bands was also found, especially at the telomeres, as previously described by other authors. Clustering of breakpoints was also observed in bands where fragile sites, protooncogenes, breakpoints involved in chromosomal cancer rearrangements, and breakpoints involved in chromosomal evolution of the Hominoidea are located.

  5. Correlation of physical and genetic maps of human chromosome 16

    SciTech Connect

    Sutherland, G.R.

    1991-01-01

    This project aimed to divide chromosome 16 into approximately 50 intervals of {approximately}2Mb in size by constructing a series of mouse/human somatic cell hybrids each containing a rearranged chromosome 16. Using these hybrids, DNA probes would be regionally mapped by Southern blot or PCR analysis. Preference would be given to mapping probes which demonstrated polymorphisms for which the CEPH panel of families had been typed. This would allow a correlation of the physical and linkage maps of this chromosome. The aims have been substantially achieved. 49 somatic cell hybrids have been constructed which have allowed definition of 46, and potentially 57, different physical intervals on the chromosome. 164 loci have been fully mapped into these intervals. A correlation of the physical and genetic maps of the chromosome is in an advanced stage of preparation. The somatic cell hybrids constructed have been widely distributed to groups working on chromosome 16 and other genome projects.

  6. The DNA sequence and biological annotation of human chromosome 1.

    PubMed

    Gregory, S G; Barlow, K F; McLay, K E; Kaul, R; Swarbreck, D; Dunham, A; Scott, C E; Howe, K L; Woodfine, K; Spencer, C C A; Jones, M C; Gillson, C; Searle, S; Zhou, Y; Kokocinski, F; McDonald, L; Evans, R; Phillips, K; Atkinson, A; Cooper, R; Jones, C; Hall, R E; Andrews, T D; Lloyd, C; Ainscough, R; Almeida, J P; Ambrose, K D; Anderson, F; Andrew, R W; Ashwell, R I S; Aubin, K; Babbage, A K; Bagguley, C L; Bailey, J; Beasley, H; Bethel, G; Bird, C P; Bray-Allen, S; Brown, J Y; Brown, A J; Buckley, D; Burton, J; Bye, J; Carder, C; Chapman, J C; Clark, S Y; Clarke, G; Clee, C; Cobley, V; Collier, R E; Corby, N; Coville, G J; Davies, J; Deadman, R; Dunn, M; Earthrowl, M; Ellington, A G; Errington, H; Frankish, A; Frankland, J; French, L; Garner, P; Garnett, J; Gay, L; Ghori, M R J; Gibson, R; Gilby, L M; Gillett, W; Glithero, R J; Grafham, D V; Griffiths, C; Griffiths-Jones, S; Grocock, R; Hammond, S; Harrison, E S I; Hart, E; Haugen, E; Heath, P D; Holmes, S; Holt, K; Howden, P J; Hunt, A R; Hunt, S E; Hunter, G; Isherwood, J; James, R; Johnson, C; Johnson, D; Joy, A; Kay, M; Kershaw, J K; Kibukawa, M; Kimberley, A M; King, A; Knights, A J; Lad, H; Laird, G; Lawlor, S; Leongamornlert, D A; Lloyd, D M; Loveland, J; Lovell, J; Lush, M J; Lyne, R; Martin, S; Mashreghi-Mohammadi, M; Matthews, L; Matthews, N S W; McLaren, S; Milne, S; Mistry, S; Moore, M J F; Nickerson, T; O'Dell, C N; Oliver, K; Palmeiri, A; Palmer, S A; Parker, A; Patel, D; Pearce, A V; Peck, A I; Pelan, S; Phelps, K; Phillimore, B J; Plumb, R; Rajan, J; Raymond, C; Rouse, G; Saenphimmachak, C; Sehra, H K; Sheridan, E; Shownkeen, R; Sims, S; Skuce, C D; Smith, M; Steward, C; Subramanian, S; Sycamore, N; Tracey, A; Tromans, A; Van Helmond, Z; Wall, M; Wallis, J M; White, S; Whitehead, S L; Wilkinson, J E; Willey, D L; Williams, H; Wilming, L; Wray, P W; Wu, Z; Coulson, A; Vaudin, M; Sulston, J E; Durbin, R; Hubbard, T; Wooster, R; Dunham, I; Carter, N P; McVean, G; Ross, M T; Harrow, J; Olson, M V; Beck, S; Rogers, J; Bentley, D R; Banerjee, R; Bryant, S P; Burford, D C; Burrill, W D H; Clegg, S M; Dhami, P; Dovey, O; Faulkner, L M; Gribble, S M; Langford, C F; Pandian, R D; Porter, K M; Prigmore, E

    2006-05-18

    The reference sequence for each human chromosome provides the framework for understanding genome function, variation and evolution. Here we report the finished sequence and biological annotation of human chromosome 1. Chromosome 1 is gene-dense, with 3,141 genes and 991 pseudogenes, and many coding sequences overlap. Rearrangements and mutations of chromosome 1 are prevalent in cancer and many other diseases. Patterns of sequence variation reveal signals of recent selection in specific genes that may contribute to human fitness, and also in regions where no function is evident. Fine-scale recombination occurs in hotspots of varying intensity along the sequence, and is enriched near genes. These and other studies of human biology and disease encoded within chromosome 1 are made possible with the highly accurate annotated sequence, as part of the completed set of chromosome sequences that comprise the reference human genome. PMID:16710414

  7. The DNA sequence and analysis of human chromosome 13

    PubMed Central

    Dunham, A.; Matthews, L. H.; Burton, J.; Ashurst, J. L.; Howe, K. L.; Ashcroft, K. J.; Beare, D. M.; Burford, D. C.; Hunt, S. E.; Griffiths-Jones, S.; Jones, M. C.; Keenan, S. J.; Oliver, K.; Scott, C. E.; Ainscough, R.; Almeida, J. P.; Ambrose, K. D.; Andrews, D. T.; Ashwell, R. I. S.; Babbage, A. K.; Bagguley, C. L.; Bailey, J.; Bannerjee, R.; Barlow, K. F.; Bates, K.; Beasley, H.; Bird, C. P.; Bray-Allen, S.; Brown, A. J.; Brown, J. Y.; Burrill, W.; Carder, C.; Carter, N. P.; Chapman, J. C.; Clamp, M. E.; Clark, S. Y.; Clarke, G.; Clee, C. M.; Clegg, S. C. M.; Cobley, V.; Collins, J. E.; Corby, N.; Coville, G. J.; Deloukas, P.; Dhami, P.; Dunham, I.; Dunn, M.; Earthrowl, M. E.; Ellington, A. G.; Faulkner, L.; Frankish, A. G.; Frankland, J.; French, L.; Garner, P.; Garnett, J.; Gilbert, J. G. R.; Gilson, C. J.; Ghori, J.; Grafham, D. V.; Gribble, S. M.; Griffiths, C.; Hall, R. E.; Hammond, S.; Harley, J. L.; Hart, E. A.; Heath, P. D.; Howden, P. J.; Huckle, E. J.; Hunt, P. J.; Hunt, A. R.; Johnson, C.; Johnson, D.; Kay, M.; Kimberley, A. M.; King, A.; Laird, G. K.; Langford, C. J.; Lawlor, S.; Leongamornlert, D. A.; Lloyd, D. M.; Lloyd, C.; Loveland, J. E.; Lovell, J.; Martin, S.; Mashreghi-Mohammadi, M.; McLaren, S. J.; McMurray, A.; Milne, S.; Moore, M. J. F.; Nickerson, T.; Palmer, S. A.; Pearce, A. V.; Peck, A. I.; Pelan, S.; Phillimore, B.; Porter, K. M.; Rice, C. M.; Searle, S.; Sehra, H. K.; Shownkeen, R.; Skuce, C. D.; Smith, M.; Steward, C. A.; Sycamore, N.; Tester, J.; Thomas, D. W.; Tracey, A.; Tromans, A.; Tubby, B.; Wall, M.; Wallis, J. M.; West, A. P.; Whitehead, S. L.; Willey, D. L.; Wilming, L.; Wray, P. W.; Wright, M. W.; Young, L.; Coulson, A.; Durbin, R.; Hubbard, T.; Sulston, J. E.; Beck, S.; Bentley, D. R.; Rogers, J.; Ross, M. T.

    2009-01-01

    Chromosome 13 is the largest acrocentric human chromosome. It carries genes involved in cancer including the breast cancer type 2 (BRCA2) and retinoblastoma (RB1) genes, is frequently rearranged in B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukaemia, and contains the DAOA locus associated with bipolar disorder and schizophrenia. We describe completion and analysis of 95.5 megabases (Mb) of sequence from chromosome 13, which contains 633 genes and 296 pseudogenes. We estimate that more than 95.4% of the protein-coding genes of this chromosome have been identified, on the basis of comparison with other vertebrate genome sequences. Additionally, 105 putative non-coding RNA genes were found. Chromosome 13 has one of the lowest gene densities (6.5 genes per Mb) among human chromosomes, and contains a central region of 38 Mb where the gene density drops to only 3.1 genes per Mb. PMID:15057823

  8. The DNA sequence and analysis of human chromosome 13.

    PubMed

    Dunham, A; Matthews, L H; Burton, J; Ashurst, J L; Howe, K L; Ashcroft, K J; Beare, D M; Burford, D C; Hunt, S E; Griffiths-Jones, S; Jones, M C; Keenan, S J; Oliver, K; Scott, C E; Ainscough, R; Almeida, J P; Ambrose, K D; Andrews, D T; Ashwell, R I S; Babbage, A K; Bagguley, C L; Bailey, J; Bannerjee, R; Barlow, K F; Bates, K; Beasley, H; Bird, C P; Bray-Allen, S; Brown, A J; Brown, J Y; Burrill, W; Carder, C; Carter, N P; Chapman, J C; Clamp, M E; Clark, S Y; Clarke, G; Clee, C M; Clegg, S C M; Cobley, V; Collins, J E; Corby, N; Coville, G J; Deloukas, P; Dhami, P; Dunham, I; Dunn, M; Earthrowl, M E; Ellington, A G; Faulkner, L; Frankish, A G; Frankland, J; French, L; Garner, P; Garnett, J; Gilbert, J G R; Gilson, C J; Ghori, J; Grafham, D V; Gribble, S M; Griffiths, C; Hall, R E; Hammond, S; Harley, J L; Hart, E A; Heath, P D; Howden, P J; Huckle, E J; Hunt, P J; Hunt, A R; Johnson, C; Johnson, D; Kay, M; Kimberley, A M; King, A; Laird, G K; Langford, C J; Lawlor, S; Leongamornlert, D A; Lloyd, D M; Lloyd, C; Loveland, J E; Lovell, J; Martin, S; Mashreghi-Mohammadi, M; McLaren, S J; McMurray, A; Milne, S; Moore, M J F; Nickerson, T; Palmer, S A; Pearce, A V; Peck, A I; Pelan, S; Phillimore, B; Porter, K M; Rice, C M; Searle, S; Sehra, H K; Shownkeen, R; Skuce, C D; Smith, M; Steward, C A; Sycamore, N; Tester, J; Thomas, D W; Tracey, A; Tromans, A; Tubby, B; Wall, M; Wallis, J M; West, A P; Whitehead, S L; Willey, D L; Wilming, L; Wray, P W; Wright, M W; Young, L; Coulson, A; Durbin, R; Hubbard, T; Sulston, J E; Beck, S; Bentley, D R; Rogers, J; Ross, M T

    2004-04-01

    Chromosome 13 is the largest acrocentric human chromosome. It carries genes involved in cancer including the breast cancer type 2 (BRCA2) and retinoblastoma (RB1) genes, is frequently rearranged in B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukaemia, and contains the DAOA locus associated with bipolar disorder and schizophrenia. We describe completion and analysis of 95.5 megabases (Mb) of sequence from chromosome 13, which contains 633 genes and 296 pseudogenes. We estimate that more than 95.4% of the protein-coding genes of this chromosome have been identified, on the basis of comparison with other vertebrate genome sequences. Additionally, 105 putative non-coding RNA genes were found. Chromosome 13 has one of the lowest gene densities (6.5 genes per Mb) among human chromosomes, and contains a central region of 38 Mb where the gene density drops to only 3.1 genes per Mb. PMID:15057823

  9. Chromosome-length polymorphism in fungi.

    PubMed Central

    Zolan, M E

    1995-01-01

    The examination of fungal chromosomes by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis has revealed that length polymorphism is widespread in both sexual and asexual species. This review summarizes characteristics of fungal chromosome-length polymorphism and possible mitotic and meiotic mechanisms of chromosome length change. Most fungal chromosome-length polymorphisms are currently uncharacterized with respect to content and origin. However, it is clear that long tandem repeats, such as tracts of rRNA genes, are frequently variable in length and that other chromosomal rearrangements are suppressed during normal mitotic growth. Dispensable chromosomes and dispensable chromosome regions, which have been well documented for some fungi, also contribute to the variability of the fungal karyotype. For sexual species, meiotic recombination increases the overall karyotypic variability in a population while suppressing genetic translocations. The range of karyotypes observed in fungi indicates that many karyotypic changes may be genetically neutral, at least under some conditions. In addition, new linkage combinations of genes may also be advantageous in allowing adaptation of fungi to new environments. PMID:8531892

  10. Genetic Rearrangements of Six Wheat–Agropyron cristatum 6P Addition Lines Revealed by Molecular Markers

    PubMed Central

    Su, Junji; Zhang, Jinpeng; Song, Liqiang; Gao, Ainong; Yang, Xinming; Li, Xiuquan; Liu, Weihua; Li, Lihui

    2014-01-01

    Agropyron cristatum (L.) Gaertn. (2n = 4x = 28, PPPP) not only is cultivated as pasture fodder but also could provide many desirable genes for wheat improvement. It is critical to obtain common wheat–A. cristatum alien disomic addition lines to locate the desired genes on the P genome chromosomes. Comparative analysis of the homoeologous relationships between the P genome chromosome and wheat genome chromosomes is a key step in transferring different desirable genes into common wheat and producing the desired alien translocation line while compensating for the loss of wheat chromatin. In this study, six common wheat–A. cristatum disomic addition lines were produced and analyzed by phenotypic examination, genomic in situ hybridization (GISH), SSR markers from the ABD genomes and STS markers from the P genome. Comparative maps, six in total, were generated and demonstrated that all six addition lines belonged to homoeologous group 6. However, chromosome 6P had undergone obvious rearrangements in different addition lines compared with the wheat chromosome, indicating that to obtain a genetic compensating alien translocation line, one should recombine alien chromosomal regions with homoeologous wheat chromosomes. Indeed, these addition lines were classified into four types based on the comparative mapping: 6PI, 6PII, 6PIII, and 6PIV. The different types of chromosome 6P possessed different desirable genes. For example, the 6PI type, containing three addition lines, carried genes conferring high numbers of kernels per spike and resistance to powdery mildew, important traits for wheat improvement. These results may prove valuable for promoting the development of conventional chromosome engineering techniques toward molecular chromosome engineering. PMID:24595330

  11. Paternal uniparental isodisomy for human chromosome 20 and absence of external ears

    SciTech Connect

    Spinner, N.B.; Rand, E.; McDonald-McGinn, D.M.

    1994-09-01

    Uniparental disomy can cause disease if the involved chromosomal region contains imprinted genes. Uniparental disomy for portions of human chromosomes 6, 7, 9, 11, 14 and 15 have been associated with abnormal phenotypes. We studied a patient with multiple abnormalities including an absent left ear with a small right ear remnant, microcephaly, congenital heart disease and Hirschprung`s disease. Cytogenetics revealed a 45,XY,-20,-20,+ter rea(20;20)(p13;p13) in 10/10 cells from bone marrow and 20/20 cells from peripheral blood. Analysis of a skin culture revealed a second cell line with trisomy 20 resulting from an apparently normal chromosome 20 in addition to the terminally rearranged chromosome, in 8/100 cells studied. The unusual phenotype of our patient was not consistent with previously reported cases of deletions of 20p or mosaic trisomy 20. We hypothesized that the patient`s phenotype could either result from deletion of both copies of a gene near the p arm terminus of chromosome 20 or from uniparental disomy of chromosome 20. There were no alterations or rearrangements of PTP-alpha (which maps to distal 20p) by Southern or Northern blot analysis. A chromosome 20 sub-telomeric probe was found to be present on the rearranged 20 by FISH suggesting that subtelomeric sequences have not been lost as a consequece of this rearrangement. To determine the parental origin of the 2 chromosome 20`s in the terminal rearrangement, we studied the genotypes of the proband and his parents in lymphoblastoid cell lines at 8 polymorphic loci. Genotypes at D20S115, D20S186, and D20S119 indicated that there was paternal isodisomy. Other loci were uninformative. This is the first example of uniparental disomy for chromosome 20. Further studies are warranted to correlate phenotype with uniparental inheritance of this chromosome.

  12. Chromosome differentiation patterns during cichlid fish evolution

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Cichlid fishes have been the subject of increasing scientific interest because of their rapid adaptive radiation which has led to an extensive ecological diversity and their enormous importance to tropical and subtropical aquaculture. To increase our understanding of chromosome evolution among cichlid species, karyotypes of one Asian, 22 African, and 30 South American cichlid species were investigated, and chromosomal data of the family was reviewed. Results Although there is extensive variation in the karyotypes of cichlid fishes (from 2n = 32 to 2n = 60 chromosomes), the modal chromosome number for South American species was 2n = 48 and the modal number for the African ones was 2n = 44. The only Asian species analyzed, Etroplus maculatus, was observed to have 46 chromosomes. The presence of one or two macro B chromosomes was detected in two African species. The cytogenetic mapping of 18S ribosomal RNA (18S rRNA) gene revealed a variable number of clusters among species varying from two to six. Conclusions The karyotype diversification of cichlids seems to have occurred through several chromosomal rearrangements involving fissions, fusions and inversions. It was possible to identify karyotype markers for the subfamilies Pseudocrenilabrinae (African) and Cichlinae (American). The karyotype analyses did not clarify the phylogenetic relationship among the Cichlinae tribes. On the other hand, the two major groups of Pseudocrenilabrinae (tilapiine and haplochromine) were clearly discriminated based on the characteristics of their karyotypes. The cytogenetic mapping of 18S ribosomal RNA (18S rRNA) gene did not follow the chromosome diversification in the family. The dynamic evolution of the repeated units of rRNA genes generates patterns of chromosomal distribution that do not help follows the phylogenetic relationships among taxa. The presence of B chromosomes in cichlids is of particular interest because they may not be represented in the reference genome

  13. Geographic distribution of chromosome and microsatellite DNA polymorphisms in Oncorhynchus mykiss native to western Washington

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ostberg, C.O.; Thorgaard, G.H.

    1999-01-01

    Chromosome studies of native populations of Oncorhynchus mykiss (steelhead and rainbow trout) in western Washington and southern British Columbia revealed the presence of two evolutionarily distinct chromosome lineages. Populations between, and including, the Elwha River, Washington, and Chilliwack River, British Columbia, contained 2n = 60 chromosomes. Populations on the central Washington coast contained 2n = 58 chromosomes. The north Washington coast and western Strait of Juan de Fuca contained individuals with 58, 59, or 60 chromosomes, suggesting this is a transition zone between 58 and 60 chromosome groups. The differences in chromosomal structure between 2n = 58 and 2n = 60 groups are presumably a Robertsonian rearrangement and an inversion. Allelic variation at three microsatellite loci (One ??6, One ??11 and Omy 77) also was examined, and no significant variation was detected among the 58 and 60 chromosome races. A hypothesis is presented concerning the origin of the 60 chromosome lineage.

  14. Genetic and clinical characterization of 45 acute leukemia patients with MLL gene rearrangements from a single institution.

    PubMed

    Cerveira, Nuno; Lisboa, Susana; Correia, Cecília; Bizarro, Susana; Santos, Joana; Torres, Lurdes; Vieira, Joana; Barros-Silva, João D; Pereira, Dulcineia; Moreira, Cláudia; Meyer, Claus; Oliva, Tereza; Moreira, Ilídia; Martins, Ângelo; Viterbo, Luísa; Costa, Vítor; Marschalek, Rolf; Pinto, Armando; Mariz, José M; Teixeira, Manuel R

    2012-10-01

    Chromosomal rearrangements affecting the MLL gene are associated with high-risk pediatric, adult and therapy-associated acute leukemia. In this study, conventional cytogenetic, fluorescence in situ hybridization, and molecular genetic studies were used to characterize the type and frequency of MLL rearrangements in a consecutive series of 45 Portuguese patients with MLL-related leukemia treated in a single institution between 1998 and 2011. In the group of patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia and an identified MLL fusion partner, 47% showed the presence of an MLL-AFF1 fusion, as a result of a t(4;11). In the remaining cases, a MLL-MLLT3 (27%), a MLL-MLLT1 (20%), or MLL-MLLT4 (7%) rearrangement was found. The most frequent rearrangement found in patients with acute myeloid leukemia was the MLL-MLLT3 fusion (42%), followed by MLL-MLLT10 (23%), MLL-MLLT1 (8%), MLL-ELL (8%), MLL-MLLT4 (4%), and MLL-MLLT11 (4%). In three patients, fusions involving MLL and a septin family gene (SEPT2, SEPT6, and SEPT9), were identified. The most frequently identified chromosomal rearrangements were reciprocal translocations, but insertions and deletions, some cryptic, were also observed. In our series, patients with MLL rearrangements were shown to have a poor prognosis, regardless of leukemia subtype. Interestingly, children with 1 year or less showed a statistically significant better overall survival when compared with both older children and adults. The use of a combined strategy in the initial genetic evaluation of acute leukemia patients allowed us to characterize the pattern of MLL rearrangements in our institution, including our previous discovery of two novel MLL fusion partners, the SEPT2 and CT45A2 genes, and a very rare MLL-MLLT4 fusion variant. PMID:22846743

  15. Balance Problems

    MedlinePlus

    ... version of this page please turn Javascript on. Balance Problems About Balance Problems Have you ever felt dizzy, lightheaded, or ... dizziness problem during the past year. Why Good Balance is Important Having good balance means being able ...

  16. Sequencing papaya X and Yh chromosomes reveals molecular basis of incipient sex chromosome evolution.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jianping; Na, Jong-Kuk; Yu, Qingyi; Gschwend, Andrea R; Han, Jennifer; Zeng, Fanchang; Aryal, Rishi; VanBuren, Robert; Murray, Jan E; Zhang, Wenli; Navajas-Pérez, Rafael; Feltus, F Alex; Lemke, Cornelia; Tong, Eric J; Chen, Cuixia; Wai, Ching Man; Singh, Ratnesh; Wang, Ming-Li; Min, Xiang Jia; Alam, Maqsudul; Charlesworth, Deborah; Moore, Paul H; Jiang, Jiming; Paterson, Andrew H; Ming, Ray

    2012-08-21

    Sex determination in papaya is controlled by a recently evolved XY chromosome pair, with two slightly different Y chromosomes controlling the development of males (Y) and hermaphrodites (Y(h)). To study the events of early sex chromosome evolution, we sequenced the hermaphrodite-specific region of the Y(h) chromosome (HSY) and its X counterpart, yielding an 8.1-megabase (Mb) HSY pseudomolecule, and a 3.5-Mb sequence for the corresponding X region. The HSY is larger than the X region, mostly due to retrotransposon insertions. The papaya HSY differs from the X region by two large-scale inversions, the first of which likely caused the recombination suppression between the X and Y(h) chromosomes, followed by numerous additional chromosomal rearrangements. Altogether, including the X and/or HSY regions, 124 transcription units were annotated, including 50 functional pairs present in both the X and HSY. Ten HSY genes had functional homologs elsewhere in the papaya autosomal regions, suggesting movement of genes onto the HSY, whereas the X region had none. Sequence divergence between 70 transcripts shared by the X and HSY revealed two evolutionary strata in the X chromosome, corresponding to the two inversions on the HSY, the older of which evolved about 7.0 million years ago. Gene content differences between the HSY and X are greatest in the older stratum, whereas the gene content and order of the collinear regions are identical. Our findings support theoretical models of early sex chromosome evolution. PMID:22869747

  17. Sequencing papaya X and Yh chromosomes reveals molecular basis of incipient sex chromosome evolution

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jianping; Na, Jong-Kuk; Yu, Qingyi; Gschwend, Andrea R.; Han, Jennifer; Zeng, Fanchang; Aryal, Rishi; VanBuren, Robert; Murray, Jan E.; Zhang, Wenli; Navajas-Pérez, Rafael; Feltus, F. Alex; Lemke, Cornelia; Tong, Eric J.; Chen, Cuixia; Man Wai, Ching; Singh, Ratnesh; Wang, Ming-Li; Min, Xiang Jia; Alam, Maqsudul; Charlesworth, Deborah; Moore, Paul H.; Jiang, Jiming; Paterson, Andrew H.; Ming, Ray

    2012-01-01

    Sex determination in papaya is controlled by a recently evolved XY chromosome pair, with two slightly different Y chromosomes controlling the development of males (Y) and hermaphrodites (Yh). To study the events of early sex chromosome evolution, we sequenced the hermaphrodite-specific region of the Yh chromosome (HSY) and its X counterpart, yielding an 8.1-megabase (Mb) HSY pseudomolecule, and a 3.5-Mb sequence for the corresponding X region. The HSY is larger than the X region, mostly due to retrotransposon insertions. The papaya HSY differs from the X region by two large-scale inversions, the first of which likely caused the recombination suppression between the X and Yh chromosomes, followed by numerous additional chromosomal rearrangements. Altogether, including the X and/or HSY regions, 124 transcription units were annotated, including 50 functional pairs present in both the X and HSY. Ten HSY genes had functional homologs elsewhere in the papaya autosomal regions, suggesting movement of genes onto the HSY, whereas the X region had none. Sequence divergence between 70 transcripts shared by the X and HSY revealed two evolutionary strata in the X chromosome, corresponding to the two inversions on the HSY, the older of which evolved about 7.0 million years ago. Gene content differences between the HSY and X are greatest in the older stratum, whereas the gene content and order of the collinear regions are identical. Our findings support theoretical models of early sex chromosome evolution. PMID:22869747

  18. Assignment of Rainbow Trout Linkage Groups to Specific Chromosomes

    PubMed Central

    Phillips, Ruth B.; Nichols, Krista M.; DeKoning, Jenefer J.; Morasch, Matthew R.; Keatley, Kimberly A.; Rexroad, Caird; Gahr, Scott A.; Danzmann, Roy G.; Drew, Robert E.; Thorgaard, Gary H.

    2006-01-01

    The rainbow trout genetic linkage groups have been assigned to specific chromosomes in the OSU (2N = 60) strain using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) with BAC probes containing genes mapped to each linkage group. There was a rough correlation between chromosome size and size of the genetic linkage map in centimorgans for the genetic maps based on recombination from the female parent. Chromosome size and structure have a major impact on the female:male recombination ratio, which is much higher (up to 10:1 near the centromeres) on the larger metacentric chromosomes compared to smaller acrocentric chromosomes. Eighty percent of the BAC clones containing duplicate genes mapped to a single chromosomal location, suggesting that diploidization resulted in substantial divergence of intergenic regions. The BAC clones that hybridized to both duplicate loci were usually located in the distal portion of the chromosome. Duplicate genes were almost always found at a similar location on the chromosome arm of two different chromosome pairs, suggesting that most of the chromosome rearrangements following tetraploidization were centric fusions and did not involve homeologous chromosomes. The set of BACs compiled for this research will be especially useful in construction of genome maps and identification of QTL for important traits in other salmonid fishes. PMID:16951085

  19. Durable Clinical Response to Entrectinib in NTRK1-Rearranged Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Le, Long P.; Zheng, Zongli; Muzikansky, Alona; Drilon, Alexander; Patel, Manish; Bauer, Todd M.; Liu, Stephen V.; Ou, Sai-Hong I.; Jackman, David; Costa, Daniel B.; Multani, Pratik S.; Li, Gary G.; Hornby, Zachary; Chow-Maneval, Edna; Luo, David; Lim, Jonathan E.; Iafrate, Anthony J.; Shaw, Alice T.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Chromosomal rearrangements involving neurotrophic tyrosine kinase 1 (NTRK1) occur in a subset of non-small cell lung cancers (NSCLCs) and other solid tumor malignancies, leading to expression of an oncogenic TrkA fusion protein. Entrectinib (RXDX-101) is an orally available tyrosine kinase inhibitor, including TrkA. We sought to determine the frequency of NTRK1 rearrangements in NSCLC and to assess the clinical activity of entrectinib. Methods: We screened 1378 cases of NSCLC using anchored multiplex polymerase chain reaction (AMP). A patient with an NTRK1 gene rearrangement was enrolled onto a Phase 1 dose escalation study of entrectinib in adult patients with locally advanced or metastatic tumors (NCT02097810). We assessed safety and response to treatment. Results: We identified NTRK1 gene rearrangements at a frequency of 0.1% in this cohort. A patient with stage IV lung adenocrcinoma with an SQSTM1-NTRK1 fusion transcript expression was treated with entrectinib. Entrectinib was well tolerated, with no grade 3–4 adverse events. Within three weeks of starting on treatment, the patient reported resolution of prior dyspnea and pain. Restaging CT scans demonstrated a RECIST partial response (PR) and complete resolution of all brain metastases. This patient has continued on treatment for over 6 months with an ongoing PR. Conclusions: Entrectinib demonstrated significant anti-tumor activity in a patient with NSCLC harboring an SQSTM1-NTRK1 gene rearrangement, indicating that entrectinib may be an effective therapy for tumors with NTRK gene rearrangements, including those with central nervous system metastases. PMID:26565381

  20. The clinical significance of 8q24/MYC rearrangement in chronic lymphocytic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Li, Yan; Hu, Shimin; Wang, Sa A; Li, Shaoying; Huh, Yang O; Tang, Zhenya; Medeiros, L Jeffrey; Tang, Guilin

    2016-05-01

    Chromosome 8q24/MYC rearrangement is associated with Burkitt lymphoma and some aggressive B-cell lymphomas, but is rare in chronic lymphocytic leukemia. We here report a cohort of 20 chronic lymphocytic leukemia patients with 8q24/MYC rearrangement, 3 detected at time of initial diagnosis and 17 acquired after a median interval of 48 months. At the time when 8q24/MYC arrangement was detected, 18 patients had B-symptoms, 17 had lymphadenopathy, and 17 had splenomegaly. Histologically, typical chronic lymphocytic leukemia morphology was seen in six patients, increased prolymphocytes in nine and Richter's transformation in five patients. Eighteen patients had karyotypic information available that showed t(8;v) in a complex karyotype in 12 patients and in a non-complex karyotype in 6 patients. Fluorescence in situ hybridization confirmed MYC rearrangement in 17/17 patients. All patients required therapy after 8q24/MYC rearrangement was detected. At last follow-up, five of six patients with a non-complex karyotype were alive after a median of 74 months (10~143 months) from the detection of 8q24/MYC rearrangement. In contrast, 10 of 12 patients with a complex karyotype died with a median survival of 5.5 months. We conclude that 8q24/MYC rearrangement in chronic lymphocytic leukemia is rare and often acquired during the course of disease. If it is presented in a complex karyotype, it is often associated with Richter's transformation, refractory to therapy and an aggressive clinical course; on the other hand, if it is present in a non-complex karyotype, patients often respond to risk-adapted therapies and achieve remission. PMID:26916070

  1. X and Y chromosome behavior in brain tumors: Pieces in a puzzle

    SciTech Connect

    Hecht, B.K.; Chatel, M; Gioanni, J.

    1994-09-01

    Sex chromosome behavior in selected somatic cells is baffling. We serendipitously encountered this sex chromosome shuffle while studying malignant gliomas. Tumor specimens from 3/10 (30%) females and 15/27 (56%) males had sex chromosome abnormalities. Specimens from females showed X loss in 2 cases and possible X gain in 1 case. In 2 cases with autosomal abnormalities, only XX cells were found, suggesting that sex chromosome changes are independent of autosomal changes. Specimens from males showed Y rearrangements in 3 cases, Y loss in 15 cases, XX in 3 cases and autosomal abnormalities in 9 cases. The Y rearrangements may provide a route to Y loss whereas the advent of XX clones in male tumors bespeaks X isodisomy, a mechanism for adding an extra active X. The autosomal changes were rearrangements against a pseudo-diploid background in 5 cases and near-triploidy/tetraploidy in 4 cases. The cases with autosomal changes tended not to have sex chromosome abnormalities (p<0.01) and, the converse, cases with sex chromosome anomalies were without autosomal abnormalities (p<0.05). The process of sex chromosome changes appears independent of the process of autosomal changes. The conventional interpretation: the sex chromosome changes in brain tumors are in non-malignant cells. An unconventional interpretation: sex chromosome changes represent an alternative avenue to malignancy.

  2. Chromosomal abnormalities in a psychiatric population

    SciTech Connect

    Lewis, K.E.; Lubetsky, M.J.; Wenger, S.L.; Steele, M.W.

    1995-02-27

    Over a 3.5 year period of time, 345 patients hospitalized for psychiatric problems were evaluated cytogenetically. The patient population included 76% males and 94% children with a mean age of 12 years. The criteria for testing was an undiagnosed etiology for mental retardation and/or autism. Cytogenetic studies identified 11, or 3%, with abnormal karyotypes, including 4 fragile X positive individuals (2 males, 2 females), and 8 with chromosomal aneuploidy, rearrangements, or deletions. While individuals with chromosomal abnormalities do not demonstrate specific behavioral, psychiatric, or developmental problems relative to other psychiatric patients, our results demonstrate the need for an increased awareness to order chromosomal analysis and fragile X testing in those individuals who have combinations of behavioral/psychiatric, learning, communication, or cognitive disturbance. 5 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  3. Chromosome evolution in new world monkeys (Platyrrhini).

    PubMed

    de Oliveira, E H C; Neusser, M; Müller, S

    2012-01-01

    During the last decades, New World monkey (NWM, Platyrrhini, Anthropoideae) comparative cytogenetics has shed light on many fundamental aspects of genome organisation and evolution in this fascinating, but also highly endangered group of neotropical primates. In this review, we first provide an overview about the evolutionary origin of the inferred ancestral NWM karyotype of 2n = 54 chromosomes and about the lineage-specific chromosome rearrangements resulting in the highly divergent karyotypes of extant NWM species, ranging from 2n = 16 in a titi monkey to 2n = 62 in a woolly monkey. Next, we discuss the available data on the chromosome phylogeny of NWM in the context of recent molecular phylogenetic analyses. In the last part, we highlight some recent research on the molecular mechanisms responsible for the large-scale evolutionary genomic changes in platyrrhine monkeys. PMID:22699158

  4. Fusion of platelet-derived growth receptor {beta} to a novel ets-like gene, tel, in chronic myelomonocytic leukemia with t(5;12) chromosomal translocation

    SciTech Connect

    Golub, T.; Barker, G.; Gilliland, D.G.

    1994-09-01

    Chronic myelomonocytic leukemia (CMML) is a myelodysplastic syndrome characterized by abnormal clonal myeloid proliferation, and by progression to acute myelogenous leukemia (AML). A recently recognized subgroup of CMML has a t(5;12) (q33;p13) balanced translocation. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) localized the translocation breakpoint near the CSF1 receptor (CSF1R) locus on chromosome 5q. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis confirmed rearrangements near CSF1R, but involvement of CSF1R itself was excluded. Southern blotting showed a rearrangement within the closely linked PDGF receptor {beta} (PDGFR{beta}) gene. Ribonuclease protection assays localized the translocation breakpoint to nucleotide 1766 in PDGFR{beta} RNA. Anchored PCR was used to identify the chromosome 12 fusion partner, a novel ets-like protein, tel. Tel contains a highly conserved carboxy terminal ets-like DNA-binding domain, and an amino terminal domain with a predicted helix-loop-helix (HLH) secondary structure. The consequence of the t(5;12) translocation is fusion of the tel HLH domain to the PDGFR{beta} transmembrane and tyrosine kinase domains. The tel HLH domain may contribute a dimerization motif which serves to constitutively activate PDGFR{beta} tyrosine kinase activity. The tel-PDGFR{beta} fusion demonstrates the oncogenic potential of PDGFR{beta}, and may provide a paradigm for early events in the pathogenesis of AML.

  5. [Development and synthetic application of epoxysilane rearrangement].

    PubMed

    Sasaki, Michiko

    2008-08-01

    O-Silyl cyanohydrins of beta-silyl-alpha,beta-epoxyaldehyde can function as a highly functionalized homoenolate equivalent via a tandem sequence involving base-promoted ring opening, Brook rearrangement, and alkylation at the allylic position. We named this rearrangement epoxysilane rearrangement. Based on results of mechanistic studies involving competitive experiments using diastereomeric cyanohydrins, we propose a reaction pathway involving a silicate intermediate formed by a concerted process via an anti-opening of the epoxide followed by the formation of an O-Si bond. Moreover, results of mechanistic studies on the rearrangement led to a conceptually novel approach to the chirality transfer in which epoxide chirality can be transferred into carbanion. We demonstrate the usefulness of the rearrangement through application to the following reactions: (1) reaction of gamma-p-toluenesulfonyl-alpha,beta-epoxysilane with alkyl halides and aldehydes followed by treatment with n-Bu4NF, which affords alpha,beta-unsaturated aldehydes (2) reaction of gamma-phosphonio-alpha,beta-epoxysilane with aldehydes, which affords dienol silyl ether derivatives (3) reaction of an enoate bearing an eposysilane moiety at the alpha-position with lithium enolate of 2-chloroacetamide, which affords highly functionalized cyclopropane derivatives. PMID:18670182

  6. FLNA genomic rearrangements cause periventricular nodular heterotopia

    PubMed Central

    Clapham, K.R.; Yu, T.W.; Ganesh, V.S.; Barry, B.; Chan, Y.; Mei, D.; Parrini, E.; Funalot, B.; Dupuis, L.; Nezarati, M.M.; du Souich, C.; van Karnebeek, C.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To identify copy number variant (CNV) causes of periventricular nodular heterotopia (PNH) in patients for whom FLNA sequencing is negative. Methods: Screening of 35 patients from 33 pedigrees on an Affymetrix 6.0 microarray led to the identification of one individual bearing a CNV that disrupted FLNA. FLNA-disrupting CNVs were also isolated in 2 other individuals by multiplex ligation probe amplification. These 3 cases were further characterized by high-resolution oligo array comparative genomic hybridization (CGH), and the precise junctional breakpoints of the rearrangements were identified by PCR amplification and sequencing. Results: We report 3 cases of PNH caused by nonrecurrent genomic rearrangements that disrupt one copy of FLNA. The first individual carried a 113-kb deletion that removes all but the first exon of FLNA. A second patient harbored a complex rearrangement including a deletion of the 3′ end of FLNA accompanied by a partial duplication event. A third patient bore a 39-kb deletion encompassing all of FLNA and the neighboring gene EMD. High-resolution oligo array CGH of the FLNA locus suggests distinct molecular mechanisms for each of these rearrangements, and implicates nearby low copy repeats in their pathogenesis. Conclusions: These results demonstrate that FLNA is prone to pathogenic rearrangements, and highlight the importance of screening for CNVs in individuals with PNH lacking FLNA point mutations. Neurology® 2012;78:269–278 PMID:22238415

  7. Chromosome Microarray.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Sharon

    2016-01-01

    Over the last half century, knowledge about genetics, genetic testing, and its complexity has flourished. Completion of the Human Genome Project provided a foundation upon which the accuracy of genetics, genomics, and integration of bioinformatics knowledge and testing has grown exponentially. What is lagging, however, are efforts to reach and engage nurses about this rapidly changing field. The purpose of this article is to familiarize nurses with several frequently ordered genetic tests including chromosomes and fluorescence in situ hybridization followed by a comprehensive review of chromosome microarray. It shares the complexity of microarray including how testing is performed and results analyzed. A case report demonstrates how this technology is applied in clinical practice and reveals benefits and limitations of this scientific and bioinformatics genetic technology. Clinical implications for maternal-child nurses across practice levels are discussed. PMID:27276104

  8. Novel Insights into Chromosome Evolution in Birds, Archosaurs, and Reptiles

    PubMed Central

    Farré, Marta; Narayan, Jitendra; Slavov, Gancho T.; Damas, Joana; Auvil, Loretta; Li, Cai; Jarvis, Erich D.; Burt, David W.; Griffin, Darren K.; Larkin, Denis M.

    2016-01-01

    Homologous synteny blocks (HSBs) and evolutionary breakpoint regions (EBRs) in mammalian chromosomes are enriched for distinct DNA features, contributing to distinct phenotypes. To reveal HSB and EBR roles in avian evolution, we performed a sequence-based comparison of 21 avian and 5 outgroup species using recently sequenced genomes across the avian family tree and a newly-developed algorithm. We identified EBRs and HSBs in ancestral bird, archosaurian (bird, crocodile, and dinosaur), and reptile chromosomes. Genes involved in the regulation of gene expression and biosynthetic processes were preferably located in HSBs, including for example, avian-specific HSBs enriched for genes involved in limb development. Within birds, some lineage-specific EBRs rearranged genes were related to distinct phenotypes, such as forebrain development in parrots. Our findings provide novel evolutionary insights into genome evolution in birds, particularly on how chromosome rearrangements likely contributed to the formation of novel phenotypes. PMID:27401172

  9. Novel Insights into Chromosome Evolution in Birds, Archosaurs, and Reptiles.

    PubMed

    Farré, Marta; Narayan, Jitendra; Slavov, Gancho T; Damas, Joana; Auvil, Loretta; Li, Cai; Jarvis, Erich D; Burt, David W; Griffin, Darren K; Larkin, Denis M

    2016-01-01

    Homologous synteny blocks (HSBs) and evolutionary breakpoint regions (EBRs) in mammalian chromosomes are enriched for distinct DNA features, contributing to distinct phenotypes. To reveal HSB and EBR roles in avian evolution, we performed a sequence-based comparison of 21 avian and 5 outgroup species using recently sequenced genomes across the avian family tree and a newly-developed algorithm. We identified EBRs and HSBs in ancestral bird, archosaurian (bird, crocodile, and dinosaur), and reptile chromosomes. Genes involved in the regulation of gene expression and biosynthetic processes were preferably located in HSBs, including for example, avian-specific HSBs enriched for genes involved in limb development. Within birds, some lineage-specific EBRs rearranged genes were related to distinct phenotypes, such as forebrain development in parrots. Our findings provide novel evolutionary insights into genome evolution in birds, particularly on how chromosome rearrangements likely contributed to the formation of novel phenotypes. PMID:27401172

  10. Cryptic and Complex Chromosomal Aberrations in Early-Onset Neuropsychiatric Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Brand, Harrison; Pillalamarri, Vamsee; Collins, Ryan L.; Eggert, Stacey; O’Dushlaine, Colm; Braaten, Ellen B.; Stone, Matthew R.; Chambert, Kimberly; Doty, Nathan D.; Hanscom, Carrie; Rosenfeld, Jill A.; Ditmars, Hillary; Blais, Jessica; Mills, Ryan; Lee, Charles; Gusella, James F.; McCarroll, Steven; Smoller, Jordan W.; Talkowski, Michael E.; Doyle, Alysa E.

    2014-01-01

    Structural variation (SV) is a significant component of the genetic etiology of both neurodevelopmental and psychiatric disorders; however, routine guidelines for clinical genetic screening have been established only in the former category. Genome-wide chromosomal microarray (CMA) can detect genomic imbalances such as copy-number variants (CNVs), but balanced chromosomal abnormalities (BCAs) still require karyotyping for clinical detection. Moreover, submicroscopic BCAs and subarray threshold CNVs are intractable, or cryptic, to both CMA and karyotyping. Here, we performed whole-genome sequencing using large-insert jumping libraries to delineate both cytogenetically visible and cryptic SVs in a single test among 30 clinically referred youth representing a range of severe neuropsychiatric conditions. We detected 96 SVs per person on average that passed filtering criteria above our highest-confidence resolution (6,305 bp) and an additional 111 SVs per genome below this resolution. These SVs rearranged 3.8 Mb of genomic sequence and resulted in 42 putative loss-of-function (LoF) or gain-of-function mutations per person. We estimate that 80% of the LoF variants were cryptic to clinical CMA. We found myriad complex and cryptic rearrangements, including a “paired” duplication (360 kb, 169 kb) that flanks a 5.25 Mb inversion that appears in 7 additional cases from clinical CNV data among 47,562 individuals. Following convergent genomic profiling of these independent clinical CNV data, we interpreted three SVs to be of potential clinical significance. These data indicate that sequence-based delineation of the full SV mutational spectrum warrants exploration in youth referred for neuropsychiatric evaluation and clinical diagnostic SV screening more broadly. PMID:25279985

  11. Chromosome Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    Perceptive Scientific Instruments, Inc., provides the foundation for the Powergene line of chromosome analysis and molecular genetic instrumentation. This product employs image processing technology from NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory and image enhancement techniques from Johnson Space Center. Originally developed to send pictures back to earth from space probes, digital imaging techniques have been developed and refined for use in a variety of medical applications, including diagnosis of disease.

  12. Chironomus group classification according to the mapping of polytene chromosomes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salleh, Syafinaz; Kutty, Ahmad Abas

    2013-11-01

    Chironomus is one of the important genera in Chironomidae family since they are widely diverse and abundance in aquatic ecosystem. Since Chironomus is very diverse, taxonomic work on this genus is very difficult and incomplete. Objective of this study is to form group classification of Chironomus according to the polytene chromosome mapping. The specific characteristics of polytene chromosomes in the salivary gland appeared to be particularly promising for taxonomic diagnosis of chironomid species. Chironomid larvae were collected from pristine sites at Sg. Langat and cultured in laboratory to reach fourth instar stage. The salivary glands were removed from larvae and chromosomes were stained with aceto orcein. Results showed that polytene chromosomes of Chironomus comprise of three long metacentric or submetacentric arms (BF, CD and AE arms) and one short acrocentric (G arm). In regards to nucleolar organizing region (NOR), Balbiani ring (BR), puffings and chromosome rearrangement, a number of four groups of different banding patterns were found. Two groups called as G group A and B have common NOR on arm BF and BR on arm G. However, group A has rearrangement pattern on arm CD and not in group B. This makes group B separated from group A. Another two groups called as groups C and D do not have common NOR on arm BF and also BR on arm G. Groups C and D were separated using arms G and arm AE. At arm G, only group C rearrangement pattern at unit 23c whereas group D was found to have large NOR at arm G and as well as arm AE, only group D has rearrangement pattern at unit 12c. This study indicates that chromosome arrangement could aid in revealing Chironomus diversity.

  13. Unscrambling the genomic chaos of osteosarcoma reveals extensive transcript fusion, recurrent rearrangements and frequent novel TP53 aberrations.

    PubMed

    Lorenz, Susanne; Barøy, Tale; Sun, Jinchang; Nome, Torfinn; Vodák, Daniel; Bryne, Jan-Christian; Håkelien, Anne-Mari; Fernandez-Cuesta, Lynnette; Möhlendick, Birte; Rieder, Harald; Szuhai, Karoly; Zaikova, Olga; Ahlquist, Terje C; Thomassen, Gard O S; Skotheim, Rolf I; Lothe, Ragnhild A; Tarpey, Patrick S; Campbell, Peter; Flanagan, Adrienne; Myklebost, Ola; Meza-Zepeda, Leonardo A

    2016-02-01

    In contrast to many other sarcoma subtypes, the chaotic karyotypes of osteosarcoma have precluded the identification of pathognomonic translocations. We here report hundreds of genomic rearrangements in osteosarcoma cell lines, showing clear characteristics of microhomology-mediated break-induced replication (MMBIR) and end-joining repair (MMEJ) mechanisms. However, at RNA level, the majority of the fused transcripts did not correspond to genomic rearrangements, suggesting the involvement of trans-splicing, which was further supported by typical trans-splicing characteristics. By combining genomic and transcriptomic analysis, certain recurrent rearrangements were identified and further validated in patient biopsies, including a PMP22-ELOVL5 gene fusion, genomic structural variations affecting RB1, MTAP/CDKN2A and MDM2, and, most frequently, rearrangements involving TP53. Most cell lines (7/11) and a large fraction of tumor samples (10/25) showed TP53 rearrangements, in addition to somatic point mutations (6 patient samples, 1 cell line) and MDM2 amplifications (2 patient samples, 2 cell lines). The resulting inactivation of p53 was demonstrated by a deficiency of the radiation-induced DNA damage response. Thus, TP53 rearrangements are the major mechanism of p53 inactivation in osteosarcoma. Together with active MMBIR and MMEJ, this inactivation probably contributes to the exceptional chromosomal instability in these tumors. Although rampant rearrangements appear to be a phenotype of osteosarcomas, we demonstrate that among the huge number of probable passenger rearrangements, specific recurrent, possibly oncogenic, events are present. For the first time the genomic chaos of osteosarcoma is characterized so thoroughly and delivered new insights in mechanisms involved in osteosarcoma development and may contribute to new diagnostic and therapeutic strategies. PMID:26672768

  14. Unscrambling the genomic chaos of osteosarcoma reveals extensive transcript fusion, recurrent rearrangements and frequent novel TP53 aberrations

    PubMed Central

    Lorenz, Susanne; Barøy, Tale; Sun, Jinchang; Nome, Torfinn; Vodák, Daniel; Bryne, Jan-Christian; Håkelien, Anne-Mari; Fernandez-Cuesta, Lynnette; Möhlendick, Birte; Rieder, Harald; Szuhai, Karoly; Zaikova, Olga; Ahlquist, Terje C.; Thomassen, Gard O. S.; Skotheim, Rolf I.; Lothe, Ragnhild A.; Tarpey, Patrick S.; Campbell, Peter; Flanagan, Adrienne

    2016-01-01

    In contrast to many other sarcoma subtypes, the chaotic karyotypes of osteosarcoma have precluded the identification of pathognomonic translocations. We here report hundreds of genomic rearrangements in osteosarcoma cell lines, showing clear characteristics of microhomology-mediated break-induced replication (MMBIR) and end-joining repair (MMEJ) mechanisms. However, at RNA level, the majority of the fused transcripts did not correspond to genomic rearrangements, suggesting the involvement of trans-splicing, which was further supported by typical trans-splicing characteristics. By combining genomic and transcriptomic analysis, certain recurrent rearrangements were identified and further validated in patient biopsies, including a PMP22-ELOVL5 gene fusion, genomic structural variations affecting RB1, MTAP/CDKN2A and MDM2, and, most frequently, rearrangements involving TP53. Most cell lines (7/11) and a large fraction of tumor samples (10/25) showed TP53 rearrangements, in addition to somatic point mutations (6 patient samples, 1 cell line) and MDM2 amplifications (2 patient samples, 2 cell lines). The resulting inactivation of p53 was demonstrated by a deficiency of the radiation-induced DNA damage response. Thus, TP53 rearrangements are the major mechanism of p53 inactivation in osteosarcoma. Together with active MMBIR and MMEJ, this inactivation probably contributes to the exceptional chromosomal instability in these tumors. Although rampant rearrangements appear to be a phenotype of osteosarcomas, we demonstrate that among the huge number of probable passenger rearrangements, specific recurrent, possibly oncogenic, events are present. For the first time the genomic chaos of osteosarcoma is characterized so thoroughly and delivered new insights in mechanisms involved in osteosarcoma development and may contribute to new diagnostic and therapeutic strategies. PMID:26672768

  15. Thermal Claisen rearrangement of N-allylanilines

    SciTech Connect

    Abdrakhmanov, I.B.; Saraeva, Z.N.; Nigmatullin, N.G.; Tolstikov, G.A.

    1986-08-20

    Thermal Claisen rearrangement of N-allylanilines in undecane is accompanied by a parallel reaction involving elimination of the allyl fragment. The former reaction proceeds according to a (3,3)-sigmatropic mechanism with a varied structure of transition state, depending on the nature of the allyl substituent. The rearrangement of N-(2-chloro-1-methyl-2-butenyl)aniline has an autocatalytic nature on account of the HCl formed on elimination of the allyl fragment. The initial formation of an unreactive complex with composition (amine):(HCl) = 2:1, which decomposes by the action of a second HCl molecule, is postulated.

  16. Detection of {open_quotes}cryptic{close_quotes}karyotypic rearrangements in closely related primate species by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) using human subtelomeric DNA probes

    SciTech Connect

    Youngblom, J.J.; Trask, B.J.; Friedman, C.

    1994-09-01

    Specific human subtelomeric DNA probes were used to reveal cryptic chromosomal rearrangements that cannot be detected by conventional high resolution cytogenetic techniques, or by chromosomal in situ suppression hybridization using whole chromosome paint analysis. Two cosmids containing different subtelomeric DNA sequences were derived from human chromosome 19 and designated as 7501 and 16432. Cosmid 7501 was hybridized to chromosomes from humans, chimpanzee, gorilla and orangutan. In humans, 7501 consistently labeled chromosomes 3q, 15q, and 19p. Additional chromosomes were labeled in different individuals, indicating a polymorphic distribution of this sequence in the human genome. In contrast, 7501 consistently and strongly labeled only the q arm terminus of chromosome 3 in both chimp and gorilla. The identification of the chromosome was made by two-color FISH analysis using human chromosome 4-specific paint and homologous to human chromosome 4. None of the human subjects showed labeling of chromosome 4 with 7501. This finding suggests that in the course of human evolution, subsequent to the divergence of humans and African apes, a cryptic translocation occurred between the ancestral human chromosome 4 and one or more of the other human chromosomes that now contain this DNA segment. In orangutan, 7501 labeled a single acrocentric chromosome pair, a distinctly different chromosome than that labeled in chimp and gorilla. Comparison of chromosome sites labeled with cosmid 16432 showed the distribution of signals on chromosome 1q arm is the same for humans and chimp, but different in the gorilla. Humans and chimps show distinct labeling on sites 1q terminus and 1q41-42. In gorilla, there is instead a large cluster of intense signal near the terminus of 1q that clearly does not extend all the way to the terminus. A paracentric inversion or an unequal cross-over event may account for the observed difference between these species.

  17. The nucleus is the target for radiation-induced chromosomal instability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaplan, M. I.; Morgan, W. F.

    1998-01-01

    We have previously described chromosomal instability in cells of a human-hamster hybrid cell line after exposure to X rays. Chromosomal instability in these cells is characterized by the appearance of novel chromosomal rearrangements multiple generations after exposure to ionizing radiation. To identify the cellular target(s) for radiation-induced chromosomal instability, cells were treated with 125I-labeled compounds and frozen. Radioactive decays from 125I cause damage to the cell primarily at the site of their decay, and freezing the cells allows damage to accumulate in the absence of other cellular processes. We found that the decay of 125I-iododeoxyuridine, which is incorporated into the DNA, caused chromosomal instability. While cell killing and first-division chromosomal rearrangements increased with increasing numbers of 125I decays, the frequency of chromosomal instability was independent of dose. Chromosomal instability could also be induced from incorporation of 125I-iododeoxyuridine without freezing the cells for accumulation of decays. This indicates that DNA double-strand breaks in frozen cells resulting from 125I decays failed to lead to instability. Incorporation of an 125I-labeled protein (125I-succinyl-concanavalin A), which was internalized into the cell and/or bound to the plasma membrane, neither caused chromosomal instability nor potentiated chromosomal instability induced by 125I-iododeoxyuridine. These results show that the target for radiation-induced chromosomal instability in these cells is the nucleus.

  18. On the significance of germline cytogenetic rearrangements at MYCN locus in neuroblastoma

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background MYCN oncogene amplification is the most important prognostic factor in neuroblastoma. 25% neuroblastoma tumors have somatic amplifications at this locus but little is known about its constitutional aberrations and their potential role in carcinogenesis. Here, we have performed an array-CGH and qPCR characterization of two patients with constitutional partial 2p trisomy including MYCN genomic region. Results One of the patients had congenital neuroblastoma and showed presence of minute areas of gains and losses within the common fragile site FRA2C at 2p24 encompassing MYCN. The link between 2p24 germline rearrangements and neuroblastoma development was reassessed by reviewing similar cases in the literature. Conclusions It appears that constitutional rearrangements involving chromosome 2p24 may play role in NB development. PMID:24131700

  19. Balance Problems

    MedlinePlus

    ... our e-newsletter! Aging & Health A to Z Balance Problems Basic Facts & Information What are Balance Problems? Having good balance means being able to ... Only then can you “keep your balance.” Why Balance is Important Your feelings of dizziness may last ...

  20. Noninvolvement of the X chromosome in radiation-induced chromosome translocations in the human lymphoblastoid cell line TK6

    SciTech Connect

    Jordan, R.; Schwartz, J.L. )

    1994-03-01

    Fluorescence in situ hybridization procedures were used to examine the influence of chromosome locus on the frequency and type of chromosome aberrations induced by [sup 60]Co [gamma] rays in the human lymphoblastoid cell line TK6. Aberrations involving the X chromosome were compared to those involving the similarly sized autosome chromosome 7. When corrected for DNA content, acentric fragments were induced with equal frequency in the X and 7 chromosomes. Dose-dependent increases in chromosomal interchanges involving chromosome 7 were noted, and the frequencies of balanced translocations and dicentrics produced were approximately equal. Chromosome interchanges involving the X chromosome were rare and showed no apparent dose dependence. Thus, while chromosomes 7 and X are equally sensitive to the induction of chromosome breaks, the X chromosome is much less likely to interact with autosomes than chromosome 7. The noninvolvement of the X chromosome in translocations with autosomes may reflect a more peripheral and separate location for the X chromosome in the mammalian nucleus. 20 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  1. Chromosome transplantation as a novel approach for correcting complex genomic disorders

    PubMed Central

    Paulis, Marianna; Castelli, Alessandra; Susani, Lucia; Lizier, Michela; Lagutina, Irina; Focarelli, Maria Luisa; Recordati, Camilla; Uva, Paolo; Faggioli, Francesca; Neri, Tui; Scanziani, Eugenio; Galli, Cesare; Lucchini, Franco; Villa, Anna; Vezzoni, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    Genomic disorders resulting from large rearrangements of the genome remain an important unsolved issue in gene therapy. Chromosome transplantation, defined as the perfect replacement of an endogenous chromosome with a homologous one, has the potential of curing this kind of disorders. Here we report the first successful case of chromosome transplantation by replacement of an endogenous X chromosome carrying a mutation in the Hprt gene with a normal one in mouse embryonic stem cells (ESCs), correcting the genetic defect. The defect was also corrected by replacing the Y chromosome with an X chromosome. Chromosome transplanted clones maintained in vitro and in vivo features of stemness and contributed to chimera formation. Genome integrity was confirmed by cytogenetic and molecular genome analysis. The approach here proposed, with some modifications, might be used to cure various disorders due to other X chromosome aberrations in induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells derived from affected patients. PMID:26485770

  2. A new region of conservation is defined between human and mouse X chromosomes

    SciTech Connect

    Dinulos, M.B.; Disteche, C.M.; Bassi, M.T.

    1996-07-01

    Comparative mapping of the X chromosome in eutherian mammals have revealed distinct regions of conservation as well as evolutionary rearrangements between human and mouse. Recently, we and others mapped the murine homologue of CLCN4 (Chloride channel 4) to band F4 of the X chromosome in Mus spretus but to chromosome 7 in laboratory strains. We now report the mapping of the murine homologues of APXL (Apical protein Xenopus laevis-like) and OA1 (Ocular albinism type I), two genes that are located on the human X chromosome at band p22.3 and in close proximity to CLCN4. Interestingly, Oa1 and Apxl map to bands F2-F3 in both M. spretus and the laboratory strain C57BL/6J, defining a new rearrangement between human and mouse X chromosomes. 17 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  3. Alternative lengthening of telomeres: recurrent cytogenetic aberrations and chromosome stability under extreme telomere dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Sakellariou, Despoina; Chiourea, Maria; Raftopoulou, Christina; Gagos, Sarantis

    2013-11-01

    Human tumors using the alternative lengthening of telomeres (ALT) exert high rates of telomere dysfunction. Numerical chromosomal aberrations are very frequent, and structural rearrangements are widely scattered among the genome. This challenging context allows the study of telomere dysfunction-driven chromosomal instability in neoplasia (CIN) in a massive scale. We used molecular cytogenetics to achieve detailed karyotyping in 10 human ALT neoplastic cell lines. We identified 518 clonal recombinant chromosomes affected by 649 structural rearrangements. While all human chromosomes were involved in random or clonal, terminal, or pericentromeric rearrangements and were capable to undergo telomere healing at broken ends, a differential recombinatorial propensity of specific genomic regions was noted. We show that ALT cells undergo epigenetic modifications rendering polycentric chromosomes functionally monocentric, and because of increased terminal recombinogenicity, they generate clonal recombinant chromosomes with interstitial telomeric repeats. Losses of chromosomes 13, X, and 22, gains of 2, 3, 5, and 20, and translocation/deletion events involving several common chromosomal fragile sites (CFSs) were recurrent. Long-term reconstitution of telomerase activity in ALT cells reduced significantly the rates of random ongoing telomeric and pericentromeric CIN. However, the contribution of CFS in overall CIN remained unaffected, suggesting that in ALT cells whole-genome replication stress is not suppressed by telomerase activation. Our results provide novel insights into ALT-driven CIN, unveiling in parallel specific genomic sites that may harbor genes critical for ALT cancerous cell growth. PMID:24339742

  4. Facility rearrangement scoping study: Draft letter report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1987-04-17

    We assessed the feasibility of designing the salt repository layouts so that shafts, surface structures and facilities would be totally within the north-east (NE) and center-east (CE) (one square mile) sections of the 9 square mile Deaf Smith site. With the latest version of the SCP-Conceptual Design as the basis, rearrangement analyses were conducted for the surface and subsurface layouts. For the rearranged layouts that were workable, impact assessments, relative to the SCP-Conceptual Design, were performed. This study concluded that, on a qualitative basis, the salt repository surface facilities can be relocated to within the north-east and center-east sections of the site. A suitable subsurface layout can be designed to accommodate this rearrangement. The resultant surface rearrangement is depicted. The two study sections (NE and CE) are emphasized on this figure. For reference, the location of the surface facilities in the SCP-Conceptual Design is also shown. 11 refs., 1 tab.

  5. Balance Problems

    MedlinePlus

    ... it could be a sign of a balance problem. Balance problems can make you feel unsteady or as if ... related injuries, such as hip fracture. Some balance problems are due to problems in the inner ear. ...

  6. Balance Problems

    MedlinePlus

    ... often, it could be a sign of a balance problem. Balance problems can make you feel unsteady or as ... fall-related injuries, such as hip fracture. Some balance problems are due to problems in the inner ...

  7. Analysis of ATP6 sequence diversity in the Triticum-Aegilops group of species reveals the crucial role of rearrangement in mitochondrial genome evolution

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Mutation and chromosomal rearrangements are the two main forces of increasing genetic diversity for natural selection to act upon, and ultimately drive the evolutionary process. Although genome evolution is a function of both forces, simultaneously, the ratio of each can be varied among different ge...

  8. Deep cytoplasmic rearrangements in ventralized Xenopus embryos

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, E. E.; Denegre, J. M.; Danilchik, M. V.

    1993-01-01

    Following fertilization in Xenopus, dramatic rearrangements of the egg cytoplasm relocalize maternally synthesized egg components. During the first cell cycle the vegetal yolk mass rotates relative to the egg surface, toward the sperm entry point (SEP) (J. P. Vincent, G. F. Oster, and J. C. Gerhart, 1986, Dev. Biol. 113, 484-500), while concomitant deep cytoplasmic rearrangements occur in the animal hemisphere (M. V. Danilchik and J. M. Denegre, 1991, Development 111, 845-856). In this paper we examine the role of vegetal yolk mass rotation in producing the animal cytoplasmic rearrangements. We inhibited rotation by uv-irradiating embryos during the first cell cycle, a treatment that yields an extremely ventralized phenotype. Both uv-irradiated embryos and unirradiated control embryos show cytoplasmic rearrangements in the animal hemisphere during the first cell cycle. Cytoplasmic rearrangements on the SEP side of the embryo associated with the path of the sperm pronucleus, plus a swirl on the anti-SEP (dorsal) side, are seen, whether or not yolk mass rotation has occurred. This result suggests a role for the expanding sperm aster in directing animal hemisphere cytoplasmic movements. In unirradiated control embryos the anti-SEP (dorsal) swirl is larger than that in uv-irradiated embryos and often extends into the vegetal hemisphere, consistent with the animal cytoplasm having been pulled dorsally and vegetally by the sliding vegetal yolk mass. Thus the yolk mass rotation may normally enhance the dorsalward cytoplasmic movement, begun by the sperm aster, enough to induce normal axis formation. We extended our observations of unirradiated control and uv-irradiated embryos through early cleavages. The vegetal extent of the anti-SEP (dorsal) swirl pattern seen in control embryos persists through the early cleavage period, such that labeled animal cytoplasm extends deep into dorsal third-tier blastomeres at the 32-cell stage. Significantly, in uv-irradiated embryos

  9. Molecular genetics of childhood papillary thyroid carcinomas after irradiation: high prevalence of RET rearrangement.

    PubMed

    Rabes, H M; Klugbauer, S

    1998-01-01

    Epidemiological studies have revealed a connection between thyroid carcinogenesis and a history of radiation. The molecular mechanisms involved are not well understood. It has been claimed that RAS, p53 or GSP mutations and RET or TRK rearrangements might play a role in adult thyroid tumors. In childhood, the thyroid gland is particularly sensitive to ionizing radiation. The reactor accident in Chernobyl provided a unique chance to study molecular genetic aberrations in a cohort of children who developed papillary thyroid carcinomas after a short latency time after exposure to high doses of radioactive iodine isotopes. According to the concepts of molecular genetic epidemiology, exposure to a specific type of irradiation might result in a typical molecular lesion. Childhood papillary thyroid tumors after Chernobyl exhibit a high prevalence of RET rearrangement as almost the only molecular alteration. The majority showed RET/PTC3 (i.e., ELE/RET rearrangements), including several subtypes. Less frequently, RET/PTC1 (i.e., H4/RET rearrangements), and a novel type (RET/PTC5, i.e., RFG5/RET) were observed. Proof of reciprocal transcripts suggests that a balanced intrachromosomal inversion leads to this rearrangement. Breakpoint analyses revealed short homologous nucleotide stretches at the fusion points. In all types of rearrangement, the RET tyrosine kinase domain becomes controlled by 5' fused regulatory sequences of ubiquitously expressed genes that display coiled-coil regions with dimerization potential. Oncogenic activation of RET is apparently due to ligand-independent constitutive ectopic RET tyrosine kinase activity. The analysis of this cohort of children with radiation-induced thyroid tumors after Chernobyl provides insights into typical molecular aberrations in relation to a specific mode of environmental exposure and may serve as a paradigm for molecular genetic epidemiology. PMID:10027005

  10. Physical mapping of DNA markers in the q13-q22 region of the human X chromosome

    SciTech Connect

    Philippe, C.; Chery, M.; Abbadi, N.; Gilgenkrantz, S. ); Cremers, F.P.M.; Bach, I.; Ropers, H.H. )

    1993-07-01

    DNA probe screening of somatic cell hybrids derived from females with X; autosome translocations has enabled definition of eight new breakpoints within the Xq13-q22 region. Together with other X-chromosome rearrangements that have been described earlier, these breakpoints subdivide the Xq21-q22 region into 20 intervals. This panel refines the physical assignment of 40 probes in the Xq21-q22 segment. Thus, these X-chromosome rearrangements are useful tools for ordering X-linked markers and genes on the proximal long arm of the human X chromosome. 26 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs.

  11. Dean flow fractionation of chromosomes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hockin, Matt; Sant, Himanshu J.; Capecchi, Mario; Gale, Bruce K.

    2016-03-01

    Efforts to transfer intact mammalian chromosomes between cells have been attempted for more than 50 years with the consistent result being transfer of sub unit length pieces regardless of method. Inertial microfluidics is a new field that has shown much promise in addressing the fractionation of particles in the 2-20 μm size range (with unknown limits) and separations are based upon particles being carried by curving confined flows (within a spiral shaped, often rectangular flow chamber) and migrating to stable "equilibrium" positions of varying distance from a chamber wall depending on the balance of dean and lift forces. We fabricated spiral channels for inertial microfluidic separations using a standard soft lithography process. The concentration of chromosomes, small contaminant DNA and large cell debris in each outlets were evaluated using microscope (60X) and a flow cytometer. Using Dean Flow Fractionation, we were able to focus 4.5 times more chromosomes in outlet 2 compared to outlet 4 where most of the large debris is found. We recover 16% of the chromosomes in outlet #1- 50% in 2, 23% in 3 and 11% in 4. It should be noted that these estimates of recovery do not capture one piece of information- it actually may be that the chromosomes at each outlet are physically different and work needs to be done to verify this potential.

  12. Catastrophic chromosomal restructuring during genome elimination in plants

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Ek Han; Henry, Isabelle M; Ravi, Maruthachalam; Bradnam, Keith R; Mandakova, Terezie; Marimuthu, Mohan PA; Korf, Ian; Lysak, Martin A; Comai, Luca; Chan, Simon WL

    2015-01-01

    Genome instability is associated with mitotic errors and cancer. This phenomenon can lead to deleterious rearrangements, but also genetic novelty, and many questions regarding its genesis, fate and evolutionary role remain unanswered. Here, we describe extreme chromosomal restructuring during genome elimination, a process resulting from hybridization of Arabidopsis plants expressing different centromere histones H3. Shattered chromosomes are formed from the genome of the haploid inducer, consistent with genomic catastrophes affecting a single, laggard chromosome compartmentalized within a micronucleus. Analysis of breakpoint junctions implicates breaks followed by repair through non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) or stalled fork repair. Furthermore, mutation of required NHEJ factor DNA Ligase 4 results in enhanced haploid recovery. Lastly, heritability and stability of a rearranged chromosome suggest a potential for enduring genomic novelty. These findings provide a tractable, natural system towards investigating the causes and mechanisms of complex genomic rearrangements similar to those associated with several human disorders. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.06516.001 PMID:25977984

  13. Muscular dystrophy in an X; 1 translocation female suggests that Duchenne locus is on X chromosome short arm.

    PubMed Central

    Lindenbaum, R H; Clarke, G; Patel, C; Moncrieff, M; Hughes, J T

    1979-01-01

    A unique combination of a Duchenne-like muscular dystrophy in a girl with a translocation-inversion rearrangement involving an X chromosome and a no 1 chromosome appeared as a result of both gene mutation and chromosome mutation in the mother. The X-autosome rearrangement would permit full expression of an X-linked recessive gene, such as that for Duchenne muscular dystrophy, in a female, and this would satisfactorily explain the characteristic Duchenne-like course of our patient's illness. The simultaneous de novo appearance of the Duchenne mutation and the X;1 rearrange suggests possible sites for the Duchenne locus on the X chromosome short arm (at Xp1106 or Xp2107). Images PMID:513085

  14. Patterns of Neutral Genetic Variation on Recombining Sex Chromosomes

    PubMed Central

    Kirkpatrick, Mark; Guerrero, Rafael F.; Scarpino, Samuel V.

    2010-01-01

    Many animals and plants have sex chromosomes that recombine over much of their length. Here we develop coalescent models for neutral sites on these chromosomes. The emphasis is on expected coalescence times (proportional to the expected amount of neutral genetic polymorphism), but we also derive some results for linkage disequilibria between neutral sites. We analyze the standard neutral model, a model with polymorphic Y chromosomes under balancing selection, and the invasion of a neo-Y chromosome. The results may be useful for testing hypotheses regarding how new sex chromosomes originate and how selection acts upon them. PMID:20124026

  15. X-chromosome tiling path array detection of copy number variants in patients with chromosome X-linked mental retardation

    PubMed Central

    Madrigal, I; Rodríguez-Revenga, L; Armengol, L; González, E; Rodriguez, B; Badenas, C; Sánchez, A; Martínez, F; Guitart, M; Fernández, I; Arranz, JA; Tejada, MI; Pérez-Jurado, LA; Estivill, X; Milà, M

    2007-01-01

    Background Aproximately 5–10% of cases of mental retardation in males are due to copy number variations (CNV) on the X chromosome. Novel technologies, such as array comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH), may help to uncover cryptic rearrangements in X-linked mental retardation (XLMR) patients. We have constructed an X-chromosome tiling path array using bacterial artificial chromosomes (BACs) and validated it using samples with cytogenetically defined copy number changes. We have studied 54 patients with idiopathic mental retardation and 20 controls subjects. Results Known genomic aberrations were reliably detected on the array and eight novel submicroscopic imbalances, likely causative for the mental retardation (MR) phenotype, were detected. Putatively pathogenic rearrangements included three deletions and five duplications (ranging between 82 kb to one Mb), all but two affecting genes previously known to be responsible for XLMR. Additionally, we describe different CNV regions with significant different frequencies in XLMR and control subjects (44% vs. 20%). Conclusion This tiling path array of the human X chromosome has proven successful for the detection and characterization of known rearrangements and novel CNVs in XLMR patients. PMID:18047645

  16. Karyotype evolution in apomictic Boechera and the origin of the aberrant chromosomes.

    PubMed

    Mandáková, Terezie; Schranz, M Eric; Sharbel, Timothy F; de Jong, Hans; Lysak, Martin A

    2015-06-01

    Chromosome rearrangements may result in both decrease and increase of chromosome numbers. Here we have used comparative chromosome painting (CCP) to reconstruct the pathways of descending and ascending dysploidy in the genus Boechera (tribe Boechereae, Brassicaceae). We describe the origin and structure of three Boechera genomes and establish the origin of the previously described aberrant Het and Del chromosomes found in Boechera apomicts with euploid (2n = 14) and aneuploid (2n = 15) chromosome number. CCP analysis allowed us to reconstruct the origin of seven chromosomes in sexual B. stricta and apomictic B. divaricarpa from the ancestral karyotype (n = 8) of Brassicaceae lineage I. Whereas three chromosomes (BS4, BS6, and BS7) retained their ancestral structure, five chromosomes were reshuffled by reciprocal translocations to form chromosomes BS1-BS3 and BS5. The reduction of the chromosome number (from x = 8 to x = 7) was accomplished through the inactivation of a paleocentromere on chromosome BS5. In apomictic 2n = 14 plants, CCP identifies the largely heterochromatic chromosome (Het) being one of the BS1 homologues with the expansion of pericentromeric heterochromatin. In apomictic B. polyantha (2n = 15), the Het has undergone a centric fission resulting in two smaller chromosomes - the submetacentric Het' and telocentric Del. Here we show that new chromosomes can be formed by a centric fission and can be fixed in populations due to the apomictic mode of reproduction. PMID:25864414

  17. Mechanisms for nonrecurrent genomic rearrangements associated with CMT1A or HNPP: rare CNVs as a cause for missing heritability.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Feng; Seeman, Pavel; Liu, Pengfei; Weterman, Marian A J; Gonzaga-Jauregui, Claudia; Towne, Charles F; Batish, Sat Dev; De Vriendt, Els; De Jonghe, Peter; Rautenstrauss, Bernd; Krause, Klaus-Henning; Khajavi, Mehrdad; Posadka, Jan; Vandenberghe, Antoon; Palau, Francesc; Van Maldergem, Lionel; Baas, Frank; Timmerman, Vincent; Lupski, James R

    2010-06-11

    Genomic rearrangements involving the peripheral myelin protein gene (PMP22) in human chromosome 17p12 are associated with neuropathy: duplications cause Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 1A (CMT1A), whereas deletions lead to hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies (HNPP). Our previous studies showed that >99% of these rearrangements are recurrent and mediated by nonallelic homologous recombination (NAHR). Rare copy number variations (CNVs) generated by nonrecurrent rearrangements also exist in 17p12, but their underlying mechanisms are not well understood. We investigated 21 subjects with rare CNVs associated with CMT1A or HNPP by oligonucleotide-based comparative genomic hybridization microarrays and breakpoint sequence analyses, and we identified 17 unique CNVs, including two genomic deletions, ten genomic duplications, two complex rearrangements, and three small exonic deletions. Each of these CNVs includes either the entire PMP22 gene, or exon(s) only, or ultraconserved potential regulatory sequences upstream of PMP22, further supporting the contention that PMP22 is the critical gene mediating the neuropathy phenotypes associated with 17p12 rearrangements. Breakpoint sequence analysis reveals that, different from the predominant NAHR mechanism in recurrent rearrangement, various molecular mechanisms, including nonhomologous end joining, Alu-Alu-mediated recombination, and replication-based mechanisms (e.g., FoSTeS and/or MMBIR), can generate nonrecurrent 17p12 rearrangements associated with neuropathy. We document a multitude of ways in which gene function can be altered by CNVs. Given the characteristics, including small size, structural complexity, and location outside of coding regions, of selected rare CNVs, their identification remains a challenge for genome analysis. Rare CNVs may potentially represent an important portion of "missing heritability" for human diseases. PMID:20493460

  18. RET/PTC rearrangements preferentially occurred in papillary thyroid cancer among atomic bomb survivors exposed to high radiation dose.

    PubMed

    Hamatani, Kiyohiro; Eguchi, Hidetaka; Ito, Reiko; Mukai, Mayumi; Takahashi, Keiko; Taga, Masataka; Imai, Kazue; Cologne, John; Soda, Midori; Arihiro, Koji; Fujihara, Megumu; Abe, Kuniko; Hayashi, Tomayoshi; Nakashima, Masahiro; Sekine, Ichiro; Yasui, Wataru; Hayashi, Yuzo; Nakachi, Kei

    2008-09-01

    A major early event in papillary thyroid carcinogenesis is constitutive activation of the mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling pathway caused by alterations of a single gene, typically rearrangements of the RET and NTRK1 genes or point mutations in the BRAF and RAS genes. In childhood papillary thyroid cancer, regardless of history of radiation exposure, RET/PTC rearrangements are a major event. Conversely, in adult-onset papillary thyroid cancer among the general population, the most common molecular event is BRAF(V600E) point mutation, not RET/PTC rearrangements. To clarify which gene alteration, chromosome aberration, or point mutation preferentially occurs in radiation-associated adult-onset papillary thyroid cancer, we have performed molecular analyses on RET/PTC rearrangements and BRAF(V600E) mutation in 71 papillary thyroid cancer cases among atomic bomb survivors (including 21 cases not exposed to atomic bomb radiation), in relation to radiation dose as well as time elapsed since atomic bomb radiation exposure. RET/PTC rearrangements showed significantly increased frequency with increased radiation dose (P(trend) = 0.002). In contrast, BRAF(V600E) mutation was less frequent in cases exposed to higher radiation dose (P(trend) < 0.001). Papillary thyroid cancer subjects harboring RET/PTC rearrangements developed this cancer earlier than did cases with BRAF(V600E) mutation (P = 0.03). These findings were confirmed by multivariate logistic regression analysis. These results suggest that RET/PTC rearrangements play an important role in radiation-associated thyroid carcinogenesis. PMID:18757433

  19. Relationships between chromosome structure and chromosomal aberrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eidelman, Yuri; Andreev, Sergey

    An interphase nucleus of human lymphocyte was simulated by the novel Monte Carlo tech-nique. The main features of interphase chromosome structure and packaging were taken into account: different levels of chromatin organisation; nonrandom localisation of chromosomes within a nucleus; chromosome loci dynamics. All chromosomes in a nucleus were modelled as polymer globules. A dynamic pattern of intra/interchromosomal contacts was simulated. The detailed information about chromosomal contacts, such as distribution of intrachromoso-mal contacts over the length of each chromosome and dependence of contact probability on genomic separation between chromosome loci, were calculated and compared to the new exper-imental data obtained by the Hi-C technique. Types and frequencies of simple and complex radiation-induced chromosomal exchange aberrations (CA) induced by X-rays were predicted with taking formation and decay of chromosomal contacts into account. Distance dependence of exchange formation probability was calculated directly. mFISH data for human lymphocytes were analysed. The calculated frequencies of simple CA agreed with the experimental data. Complex CA were underestimated despite the dense packaging of chromosome territories within a nucleus. Possible influence of chromosome-nucleus structural organisation on the frequency and spectrum of radiation-induced chromosome aberrations is discussed.

  20. Frequent FOS Gene Rearrangements in Epithelioid Hemangioma: A Molecular Study of 58 Cases With Morphologic Reappraisal.

    PubMed

    Huang, Shih-Chiang; Zhang, Lei; Sung, Yun-Shao; Chen, Chun-Liang; Krausz, Thomas; Dickson, Brendan C; Kao, Yu-Chien; Agaram, Narasimhan P; Fletcher, Christopher D M; Antonescu, Cristina R

    2015-10-01

    Epithelioid hemangioma (EH) is a unique benign vasoformative tumor composed of epithelioid endothelial cells. Although a small subset of EHs with atypical features harbor ZFP36-FOSB fusions, no additional genetic abnormalities have been found to date in the remaining cases. On the basis of a novel FOS-LMNA gene fusion identified by RNA sequencing in an index case of a skeletal EH with typical morphology, we sought to investigate the prevalence of FOS rearrangement in a large cohort of EHs. Thus 57 additional EH cases lacking FOSB rearrangements were studied for FOS gene abnormalities by fluorescence in situ hybridization, and results were correlated with morphologic appearance and clinical presentation. The EHs were subclassified as typical (n=25), cellular (n=21), and angiolymphoid hyperplasia with eosinophilia (ALHE) (n=12) variants. The ALHE was defined as an EH with a vascular "blow-out" pattern associated with a variable degree of inflammation. There were 17 (29%) cases bearing FOS gene rearrangements among 58 cases tested, including 12 male and 5 female patients, with a mean age of 42 years. Most FOS-rearranged EHs occurred in the bone (10) and soft tissue (6), whereas only 1 case was cutaneous. The predominant anatomic site was the extremity (12), followed by trunk (3), head and neck (1), and penis (1). The incidence of FOS rearrangement was significantly higher in bone (59%, P=0.006) and lower in head and neck (5%, P=0.009). Twelve of the FOS-rearranged cases were cellular EH (P=0.001) associated with moderate mitotic activity (2 to 5/10 HPF) and milder inflammatory background. All 12 ALHE cases lacked FOS gene abnormalities, suggesting different pathogenesis. In conclusion, FOS rearrangement was present in a third of EHs across different locations and histologic variants; however, it was more prevalent in cellular EH and intraosseous lesions, compared with those in skin, soft tissue, and head and neck. This genetic abnormality can be useful in challenging

  1. Comparative genomics: tracking chromosome evolution in the family ursidae using reciprocal chromosome painting.

    PubMed

    Nash, W G; Wienberg, J; Ferguson-Smith, M A; Menninger, J C; O'Brien, S J

    1998-01-01

    The Ursidae family includes eight species, the karyotype of which diverges somewhat, in both chromosome number and morphology, from that of other families in the order Carnivora. The combination of consensus molecular phylogeny and high-resolution trypsin G-banded karyotype analysis has suggested that ancestral chromosomal fissions and at least two fusion events are associated with the development of the different ursid species. Here, we revisit this hypothesis by hybridizing reciprocal chromosome painting probes derived from the giant panda (Ailuropoda melanoleuca), domestic cat (Felis catus), and man (Homo sapiens) to representative bear species karyotypes. Comparative analysis of the different chromosome segment homologies allowed reconstruction of the genomic composition of a putative ancestral bear karyotype based upon the recognition of 39 chromosome segments defined by painting as the smallest conserved evolutionary unit segments (pSCEUS) among these species. The different pSCEUS combinations occurring among modern bear species support and extend the postulated sequence of chromosomal rearrangements and provide a framework to propose patterns of genome reorganization among carnivores and other mammal radiations. PMID:10072575

  2. Sampling and counting genome rearrangement scenarios

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Background Even for moderate size inputs, there are a tremendous number of optimal rearrangement scenarios, regardless what the model is and which specific question is to be answered. Therefore giving one optimal solution might be misleading and cannot be used for statistical inferring. Statistically well funded methods are necessary to sample uniformly from the solution space and then a small number of samples are sufficient for statistical inferring. Contribution In this paper, we give a mini-review about the state-of-the-art of sampling and counting rearrangement scenarios, focusing on the reversal, DCJ and SCJ models. Above that, we also give a Gibbs sampler for sampling most parsimonious labeling of evolutionary trees under the SCJ model. The method has been implemented and tested on real life data. The software package together with example data can be downloaded from http://www.renyi.hu/~miklosi/SCJ-Gibbs/ PMID:26452124

  3. Cytogenetic evidences of genome rearrangement and differential epigenetic chromatin modification in the sea lamprey (Petromyzon marinus).

    PubMed

    Covelo-Soto, Lara; Morán, Paloma; Pasantes, Juan J; Pérez-García, Concepción

    2014-12-01

    This work explores both the chromatin loss and the differential genome methylation in the sea lamprey (Petromyzon marinus) from a molecular cytogenetic point of view. Fluorescent in situ hybridization experiments on meiotic bivalents and mitotic chromosomes corroborate the chromatin loss previously observed during the development of the sea lamprey and demonstrate that the elimination affects not only to Germ1 sequences but also to the rpt200 satellite DNA and most part of the major ribosomal DNA present on the germinal line. 5-Methylcytosine immunolocation revealed that the GC-rich heterochromatin is highly methylated in the germ line but significantly less in somatic chromosomes. These findings not only support previous observations about genome rearrangements but also give new information about epigenetic changes in P. marinus. The key position of lampreys in the vertebrate phylogenetic tree makes them an interesting taxon to provide relevant information about genome evolution in vertebrates. PMID:25432678

  4. An alignment-free method to find and visualise rearrangements between pairs of DNA sequences

    PubMed Central

    Pratas, Diogo; Silva, Raquel M.; Pinho, Armando J.; Ferreira, Paulo J.S.G.

    2015-01-01

    Species evolution is indirectly registered in their genomic structure. The emergence and advances in sequencing technology provided a way to access genome information, namely to identify and study evolutionary macro-events, as well as chromosome alterations for clinical purposes. This paper describes a completely alignment-free computational method, based on a blind unsupervised approach, to detect large-scale and small-scale genomic rearrangements between pairs of DNA sequences. To illustrate the power and usefulness of the method we give complete chromosomal information maps for the pairs human-chimpanzee and human-orangutan. The tool by means of which these results were obtained has been made publicly available and is described in detail. PMID:25984837

  5. An alignment-free method to find and visualise rearrangements between pairs of DNA sequences.

    PubMed

    Pratas, Diogo; Silva, Raquel M; Pinho, Armando J; Ferreira, Paulo J S G

    2015-01-01

    Species evolution is indirectly registered in their genomic structure. The emergence and advances in sequencing technology provided a way to access genome information, namely to identify and study evolutionary macro-events, as well as chromosome alterations for clinical purposes. This paper describes a completely alignment-free computational method, based on a blind unsupervised approach, to detect large-scale and small-scale genomic rearrangements between pairs of DNA sequences. To illustrate the power and usefulness of the method we give complete chromosomal information maps for the pairs human-chimpanzee and human-orangutan. The tool by means of which these results were obtained has been made publicly available and is described in detail. PMID:25984837

  6. Rearrangements in 2-Dimensional Foam Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schiemann, Dylan; Tewari, Shubha; Liu, Andrea; Knobler, Charles; Durian, Douglas; Dennin, Michael; Langer, Stephen

    1998-03-01

    Foam is a collection of densely-packed polydisperse gas bubbles in liquid. Upon shear, the total interaction energy between bubbles fluctuates: it builds up and then is released via intermittent rearrangements of the bubbles. There is presently no effective experimental method for measuring these energy releases. However, it is possible to observe the relaxation of sheared foam through the analysis of topological rearrangements, or neighbor-switching events (T1 events) footnote A.D. Gopal and D.J. Durian, Phys. Rev. Lett. 75 2610 (1995) footnote M. Dennin and C.M. Knobler, Phys. Rev. Lett. 78 2485 (1997) We have used a simple two-dimensional model of foam proposed by Durian footnote D.J. Durian, Phys. Rev. Lett. 75 4780 (1995) to study rearrangements under steady-state shear flow. The aim is to study the connection between T1 events, which are typically measured experimentally, and the distribution of energy releases, which is typically measured from simulations. We find that T1 events tend to correspond to the largest energy releases. We present results as a function of strain rate and area fraction of bubbles.

  7. Breakage-fusion-bridge Cycles and Large Insertions Contribute to the Rapid Evolution of Accessory Chromosomes in a Fungal Pathogen

    PubMed Central

    Croll, Daniel; Zala, Marcello; McDonald, Bruce A.

    2013-01-01

    Chromosomal rearrangements are a major driver of eukaryotic genome evolution, affecting speciation, pathogenicity and cancer progression. Changes in chromosome structure are often initiated by mis-repair of double-strand breaks in the DNA. Mis-repair is particularly likely when telomeres are lost or when dispersed repeats misalign during crossing-over. Fungi carry highly polymorphic chromosomal complements showing substantial variation in chromosome length and number. The mechanisms driving chromosome polymorphism in fungi are poorly understood. We aimed to identify mechanisms of chromosomal rearrangements in the fungal wheat pathogen Zymoseptoria tritici. We combined population genomic resequencing and chromosomal segment PCR assays with electrophoretic karyotyping and resequencing of parents and offspring from experimental crosses to show that this pathogen harbors a highly diverse complement of accessory chromosomes that exhibits strong global geographic differentiation in numbers and lengths of chromosomes. Homologous chromosomes carried highly differentiated gene contents due to numerous insertions and deletions. The largest accessory chromosome recently doubled in length through insertions totaling 380 kb. Based on comparative genomics, we identified the precise breakpoint locations of these insertions. Nondisjunction during meiosis led to chromosome losses in progeny of three different crosses. We showed that a new accessory chromosome emerged in two viable offspring through a fusion between sister chromatids. Such chromosome fusion is likely to initiate a breakage-fusion-bridge (BFB) cycle that can rapidly degenerate chromosomal structure. We suggest that the accessory chromosomes of Z. tritici originated mainly from ancient core chromosomes through a degeneration process that included BFB cycles, nondisjunction and mutational decay of duplicated sequences. The rapidly evolving accessory chromosome complement may serve as a cradle for adaptive evolution in

  8. The Nature of Genetic Recombination near the Third Chromosome Centromere of DROSOPHILA MELANOGASTER

    PubMed Central

    Denell, R. E.; Keppy, D. O.

    1979-01-01

    Previous studies have indicated that recombination near the third chromosome centromere is associated with negative chromosome interference, a phenomenon for which Green (1975) and Sinclair (1975) suggested gene conversion as a possible mechanism. In this report, we demonstrate that negative chromosome interference is still observed when deficiencies or translocation breakpoints are scored as the middle markers in recombination experiments and the rate of recombination is increased by interchromosomal effect. We argue that these chromosomal rearrangement breakpoints are not subject to conversion. Since neither successive premeiotic and meiotic exchanges, nor negative chromatid interference, can by themselves account for the negative chromosome interference, we conclude that a greater than expected frequency of multiple exchanges actually occurs. We further suggest that negative chromosome interference may be characteristic of all chromosomal regions normally showing very little exchange in relation to physical length. PMID:121288

  9. Characterization of chromosome 1 abnormalities in malignant melanomas.

    PubMed

    Smedley, D; Sidhar, S; Birdsall, S; Bennett, D; Herlyn, M; Cooper, C; Shipley, J

    2000-05-01

    Chromosome 1 abnormalities are the most commonly detected aberrations in many cancers including malignant melanomas. Specific breakpoints are reported for malignant melanomas throughout the chromosome but especially at 1p36 and at several sites throughout 1p22-q21. In addition, partial deletions and loss of heterozygosity have been found on 1p indicating the possible location of tumor suppressor genes. Here we have characterized the involvement of chromosome 1 in a series of seven malignant melanoma cell lines. Initial chromosome painting studies revealed that six of the cell lines had chromosome 1 rearrangements. Deletions involving 1p10-32, 1q11-44, and 1q25-44 were observed. The other rearrangement breakpoints included three in the 1q10-p11 region with the rest at 1p36, 1p34, 1p32, 1p31, 1p12-13, 1q21, and 1q23. The breaks at 1q10-p11 were investigated further using an alpha-satellite 1 centromere probe and yeast artificial chromosomes (YACs) from the region. Two of the 1q10-p11 breaks mapped in the centromeric region, while the others mapped to variable sites. This suggests that the role of these rearrangements in the pathogenesis of melanomas does not involve the alteration of specific oncogenes in the breakpoint region. During the YAC mapping a previously undetected, small (<1 Mbp) del(1)(p10p11) was identified. This deletion lies within minimal overlapping deleted regions reported in head and neck as well as breast carcinomas and it could therefore facilitate the isolation of a carcinoma-associated tumor suppressor gene. PMID:10738310

  10. Chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) with variant Philadelphia chromosome

    SciTech Connect

    Lorch, C.A.; Burkart, P.T.; Estman, A.

    1994-09-01

    Approximately 95% of patients with CML have the Philadelphia chromosome (Ph). Less than 10% of these have variant translocations. A 39-year-old male was diagnosed with CML after bone marrow examination. Cytogenetic studies showed a variant Ph chromosome, 46,X,t(16;22)(p13,q11), with chromosome 9 appearing cytogenetically normal. Southern blot analysis of peripheral blood showed BCR rearrangement within the 5.8 kb major breakpoint region. Reverse transriptase PCR (RT-PCR) studies confirmed the involvement of the C-ABL gene from chromosome 9. One year later, prior to matched unrelated transplant, a repeat marrow showed t(3;21) in addition to the variant Ph chromosome. Five months post-transplant, bone marrow showed only normal 46,XX donor cells and BCR rearrangement was not detectable by secondary RT-PCR. Two months later, a nodule, which proved to be a chloroma, was removed from the skin. Molecular studies of nodular DNA showed BCR rearrangement and cytogenetic studies showed karyotypic progression: 45,XY,t(3;21),t(4;8),t(16;22),-7. The patient`s marrow continued to show normal 46,XX donor chromosomes, but secondary RT-PCR studies showed marrow involvement. The disease progressed and the patient died. This case is remarkable for the rare variant Ph translocation, the extramedullary and skin disease progression, and the monitoring with secondary RT-PCR studies, along with cytogenetic analysis. These techniques, combined, lead to a more accurate assessment and follow-up of the disease progression.

  11. The finished DNA sequence of human chromosome 12.

    PubMed

    Scherer, Steven E; Muzny, Donna M; Buhay, Christian J; Chen, Rui; Cree, Andrew; Ding, Yan; Dugan-Rocha, Shannon; Gill, Rachel; Gunaratne, Preethi; Harris, R Alan; Hawes, Alicia C; Hernandez, Judith; Hodgson, Anne V; Hume, Jennifer; Jackson, Andrew; Khan, Ziad Mohid; Kovar-Smith, Christie; Lewis, Lora R; Lozado, Ryan J; Metzker, Michael L; Milosavljevic, Aleksandar; Miner, George R; Montgomery, Kate T; Morgan, Margaret B; Nazareth, Lynne V; Scott, Graham; Sodergren, Erica; Song, Xing-Zhi; Steffen, David; Lovering, Ruth C; Wheeler, David A; Worley, Kim C; Yuan, Yi; Zhang, Zhengdong; Adams, Charles Q; Ansari-Lari, M Ali; Ayele, Mulu; Brown, Mary J; Chen, Guan; Chen, Zhijian; Clerc-Blankenburg, Kerstin P; Davis, Clay; Delgado, Oliver; Dinh, Huyen H; Draper, Heather; Gonzalez-Garay, Manuel L; Havlak, Paul; Jackson, Laronda R; Jacob, Leni S; Kelly, Susan H; Li, Li; Li, Zhangwan; Liu, Jing; Liu, Wen; Lu, Jing; Maheshwari, Manjula; Nguyen, Bao-Viet; Okwuonu, Geoffrey O; Pasternak, Shiran; Perez, Lesette M; Plopper, Farah J H; Santibanez, Jireh; Shen, Hua; Tabor, Paul E; Verduzco, Daniel; Waldron, Lenee; Wang, Qiaoyan; Williams, Gabrielle A; Zhang, Jingkun; Zhou, Jianling; Allen, Carlana C; Amin, Anita G; Anyalebechi, Vivian; Bailey, Michael; Barbaria, Joseph A; Bimage, Kesha E; Bryant, Nathaniel P; Burch, Paula E; Burkett, Carrie E; Burrell, Kevin L; Calderon, Eliana; Cardenas, Veronica; Carter, Kelvin; Casias, Kristal; Cavazos, Iracema; Cavazos, Sandra R; Ceasar, Heather; Chacko, Joseph; Chan, Sheryl N; Chavez, Dean; Christopoulos, Constantine; Chu, Joseph; Cockrell, Raynard; Cox, Caroline D; Dang, Michelle; Dathorne, Stephanie R; David, Robert; Davis, Candi Mon'Et; Davy-Carroll, Latarsha; Deshazo, Denise R; Donlin, Jeremy E; D'Souza, Lisa; Eaves, Kristy A; Egan, Amy; Emery-Cohen, Alexandra J; Escotto, Michael; Flagg, Nicole; Forbes, Lisa D; Gabisi, Abdul M; Garza, Melissa; Hamilton, Cerissa; Henderson, Nicholas; Hernandez, Omar; Hines, Sandra; Hogues, Marilyn E; Huang, Mei; Idlebird, DeVincent G; Johnson, Rudy; Jolivet, Angela; Jones, Sally; Kagan, Ryan; King, Laquisha M; Leal, Belita; Lebow, Heather; Lee, Sandra; LeVan, Jaclyn M; Lewis, Lakeshia C; London, Pamela; Lorensuhewa, Lorna M; Loulseged, Hermela; Lovett, Demetria A; Lucier, Alice; Lucier, Raymond L; Ma, Jie; Madu, Renita C; Mapua, Patricia; Martindale, Ashley D; Martinez, Evangelina; Massey, Elizabeth; Mawhiney, Samantha; Meador, Michael G; Mendez, Sylvia; Mercado, Christian; Mercado, Iracema C; Merritt, Christina E; Miner, Zachary L; Minja, Emmanuel; Mitchell, Teresa; Mohabbat, Farida; Mohabbat, Khatera; Montgomery, Baize; Moore, Niki; Morris, Sidney; Munidasa, Mala; Ngo, Robin N; Nguyen, Ngoc B; Nickerson, Elizabeth; Nwaokelemeh, Ogechi O; Nwokenkwo, Stanley; Obregon, Melissa; Oguh, Maryann; Oragunye, Njideka; Oviedo, Rodolfo J; Parish, Bridgette J; Parker, David N; Parrish, Julia; Parks, Kenya L; Paul, Heidie A; Payton, Brett A; Perez, Agapito; Perrin, William; Pickens, Adam; Primus, Eltrick L; Pu, Ling-Ling; Puazo, Maria; Quiles, Miyo M; Quiroz, Juana B; Rabata, Dina; Reeves, Kacy; Ruiz, San Juana; Shao, Hongmei; Sisson, Ida; Sonaike, Titilola; Sorelle, Richard P; Sutton, Angelica E; Svatek, Amanda F; Svetz, Leah Anne; Tamerisa, Kavitha S; Taylor, Tineace R; Teague, Brian; Thomas, Nicole; Thorn, Rachel D; Trejos, Zulma Y; Trevino, Brenda K; Ukegbu, Ogechi N; Urban, Jeremy B; Vasquez, Lydia I; Vera, Virginia A; Villasana, Donna M; Wang, Ling; Ward-Moore, Stephanie; Warren, James T; Wei, Xuehong; White, Flower; Williamson, Angela L; Wleczyk, Regina; Wooden, Hailey S; Wooden, Steven H; Yen, Jennifer; Yoon, Lillienne; Yoon, Vivienne; Zorrilla, Sara E; Nelson, David; Kucherlapati, Raju; Weinstock, George; Gibbs, Richard A

    2006-03-16

    Human chromosome 12 contains more than 1,400 coding genes and 487 loci that have been directly implicated in human disease. The q arm of chromosome 12 contains one of the largest blocks of linkage disequilibrium found in the human genome. Here we present the finished sequence of human chromosome 12, which has been finished to high quality and spans approximately 132 megabases, representing approximately 4.5% of the human genome. Alignment of the human chromosome 12 sequence across vertebrates reveals the origin of individual segments in chicken, and a unique history of rearrangement through rodent and primate lineages. The rate of base substitutions in recent evolutionary history shows an overall slowing in hominids compared with primates and rodents. PMID:16541075

  12. Frequent, unconventional structural changes of the human Y chromosome

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, T.R.

    1994-09-01

    Six human cell lines in which the Y/autosome translocations were suspected by the conventional chromosome banding study exhibited unconventional, complex structural rearrangements of the Y chromosome. These translocations included Yqter{r_arrow}Yq12::Ycen{r_arrow}Yp11 (or Yq11{r_arrow}Ycen)::9pter{r_arrow}9qter; insertion of Ycen interstitially to an autosome; interstitial insertion of two Yq12 segments separated by an euchromatic non-Y segment; and multiple Y/autosomal translocations containing unequal Yq12 segments. These markers required three or more breaks/reunions. Loci of breaks and retaining segments of the Y chromosome were identified by the combination of conventional chromosome bandings, fluorescence in situ hybridization, and Southern blot DNA analyses. Extensive structural rearrangements involving the Y chromosome were evident. The heterochromatic Y segments retained in cell lines of male donor origins at a distinctively higher rate than the euchromatic Y arms. The Y/A markers were present in all cells and paired Y/As were found in some cell lines. These facts strongly suggested that at least some of these markers were present in the tissue explant, but not entirely derived newly in vitro. These naturally occurring structural changes of the Y chromosomes are very complex, and often rather unique. Therefore, a single Y/A marker chromosome may be used solely to identify a cell line; cell lines with the unique aberration(s) can be collated to construct a Y segment sequential panel for mapping genes; and the unique Y/A translocations can be used to discriminate a DNA segment at multiple sites on the Y chromosome arm simultaneously.

  13. Absence of subtelomeric rearrangements in selected patients with mental retardation as assessed by multiprobe T FISH

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Mental retardation (MR) is a heterogeneous condition that affects 2-3% of the general population and is a public health problem in developing countries. Chromosomal abnormalities are an important cause of MR and subtelomeric rearrangements (STR) have been reported in 4-35% of individuals with idiopathic MR or an unexplained developmental delay, depending on the screening tests and patient selection criteria used. Clinical checklists such as that suggested by de Vries et al. have been used to improve the predictive value of subtelomeric screening. Findings Fifteen patients (1–20 years old; five females and ten males) with moderate to severe MR from a genetics outpatient clinic of the Gaffrée and Guinle Teaching Hospital (HUGG) of the Federal University of Rio de Janeiro State (UNIRIO) were screened with Multiprobe T FISH after normal high resolution karyotyping. No subtelomeric rearrangements were detected even though the clinical score of the patients ranged from four to seven. Conclusion In developing countries, FISH-based techniques such as Multiprobe T FISH are still expensive. Although Multiprobe T FISH is a good tool for detecting STR, in this study it did not detect STR in patients with unexplained MR/developmental delay even though these patients had a marked chromosomal imbalance. Our findings also show that clinical scores are not reliable predictors of STR. PMID:23259705

  14. Cytogenetic Insights into the Evolution of Chromosomes and Sex Determination Reveal Striking Homology of Turtle Sex Chromosomes to Amphibian Autosomes.

    PubMed

    Montiel, Eugenia E; Badenhorst, Daleen; Lee, Ling S; Literman, Robert; Trifonov, Vladimir; Valenzuela, Nicole

    2016-01-01

    Turtle karyotypes are highly conserved compared to other vertebrates; yet, variation in diploid number (2n = 26-68) reflects profound genomic reorganization, which correlates with evolutionary turnovers in sex determination. We evaluate the published literature and newly collected comparative cytogenetic data (G- and C-banding, 18S-NOR, and telomere-FISH mapping) from 13 species spanning 2n = 28-68 to revisit turtle genome evolution and sex determination. Interstitial telomeric sites were detected in multiple lineages that underwent diploid number and sex determination turnovers, suggesting chromosomal rearrangements. C-banding revealed potential interspecific variation in centromere composition and interstitial heterochromatin at secondary constrictions. 18S-NORs were detected in secondary constrictions in a single chromosomal pair per species, refuting previous reports of multiple NORs in turtles. 18S-NORs are linked to ZW chromosomes in Apalone and Pelodiscus and to X (not Y) in Staurotypus. Notably, comparative genomics across amniotes revealed that the sex chromosomes of several turtles, as well as mammals and some lizards, are homologous to components of Xenopus tropicalis XTR1 (carrying Dmrt1). Other turtle sex chromosomes are homologous to XTR4 (carrying Wt1). Interestingly, all known turtle sex chromosomes, except in Trionychidae, evolved via inversions around Dmrt1 or Wt1. Thus, XTR1 appears to represent an amniote proto-sex chromosome (perhaps linked ancestrally to XTR4) that gave rise to turtle and other amniote sex chromosomes. PMID:27423490

  15. Genomic restructuring in the Tasmanian devil facial tumour: chromosome painting and gene mapping provide clues to evolution of a transmissible tumour.

    PubMed

    Deakin, Janine E; Bender, Hannah S; Pearse, Anne-Maree; Rens, Willem; O'Brien, Patricia C M; Ferguson-Smith, Malcolm A; Cheng, Yuanyuan; Morris, Katrina; Taylor, Robyn; Stuart, Andrew; Belov, Katherine; Amemiya, Chris T; Murchison, Elizabeth P; Papenfuss, Anthony T; Graves, Jennifer A Marshall

    2012-01-01

    Devil facial tumour disease (DFTD) is a fatal, transmissible malignancy that threatens the world's largest marsupial carnivore, the Tasmanian devil, with extinction. First recognised in 1996, DFTD has had a catastrophic effect on wild devil numbers, and intense research efforts to understand and contain the disease have since demonstrated that the tumour is a clonal cell line transmitted by allograft. We used chromosome painting and gene mapping to deconstruct the DFTD karyotype and determine the chromosome and gene rearrangements involved in carcinogenesis. Chromosome painting on three different DFTD tumour strains determined the origins of marker chromosomes and provided a general overview of the rearrangement in DFTD karyotypes. Mapping of 105 BAC clones by fluorescence in situ hybridisation provided a finer level of resolution of genome rearrangements in DFTD strains. Our findings demonstrate that only limited regions of the genome, mainly chromosomes 1 and X, are rearranged in DFTD. Regions rearranged in DFTD are also highly rearranged between different marsupials. Differences between strains are limited, reflecting the unusually stable nature of DFTD. Finally, our detailed maps of both the devil and tumour karyotypes provide a physical framework for future genomic investigations into DFTD. PMID:22359511

  16. Genomic Restructuring in the Tasmanian Devil Facial Tumour: Chromosome Painting and Gene Mapping Provide Clues to Evolution of a Transmissible Tumour

    PubMed Central

    Pearse, Anne-Maree; Rens, Willem; O'Brien, Patricia C. M.; Ferguson-Smith, Malcolm A.; Cheng, Yuanyuan; Morris, Katrina; Taylor, Robyn; Stuart, Andrew; Belov, Katherine; Amemiya, Chris T.; Murchison, Elizabeth P.; Papenfuss, Anthony T.; Marshall Graves, Jennifer A.

    2012-01-01

    Devil facial tumour disease (DFTD) is a fatal, transmissible malignancy that threatens the world's largest marsupial carnivore, the Tasmanian devil, with extinction. First recognised in 1996, DFTD has had a catastrophic effect on wild devil numbers, and intense research efforts to understand and contain the disease have since demonstrated that the tumour is a clonal cell line transmitted by allograft. We used chromosome painting and gene mapping to deconstruct the DFTD karyotype and determine the chromosome and gene rearrangements involved in carcinogenesis. Chromosome painting on three different DFTD tumour strains determined the origins of marker chromosomes and provided a general overview of the rearrangement in DFTD karyotypes. Mapping of 105 BAC clones by fluorescence in situ hybridisation provided a finer level of resolution of genome rearrangements in DFTD strains. Our findings demonstrate that only limited regions of the genome, mainly chromosomes 1 and X, are rearranged in DFTD. Regions rearranged in DFTD are also highly rearranged between different marsupials. Differences between strains are limited, reflecting the unusually stable nature of DFTD. Finally, our detailed maps of both the devil and tumour karyotypes provide a physical framework for future genomic investigations into DFTD. PMID:22359511

  17. Genome Rearrangements Detected by SNP Microarrays in Individuals with Intellectual Disability Referred with Possible Williams Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Pani, Ariel M.; Hobart, Holly H.; Morris, Colleen A.; Mervis, Carolyn B.; Bray-Ward, Patricia; Kimberley, Kendra W.; Rios, Cecilia M.; Clark, Robin C.; Gulbronson, Maricela D.; Gowans, Gordon C.; Gregg, Ronald G.

    2010-01-01

    Background Intellectual disability (ID) affects 2–3% of the population and may occur with or without multiple congenital anomalies (MCA) or other medical conditions. Established genetic syndromes and visible chromosome abnormalities account for a substantial percentage of ID diagnoses, although for ∼50% the molecular etiology is unknown. Individuals with features suggestive of various syndromes but lacking their associated genetic anomalies pose a formidable clinical challenge. With the advent of microarray techniques, submicroscopic genome alterations not associated with known syndromes are emerging as a significant cause of ID and MCA. Methodology/Principal Findings High-density SNP microarrays were used to determine genome wide copy number in 42 individuals: 7 with confirmed alterations in the WS region but atypical clinical phenotypes, 31 with ID and/or MCA, and 4 controls. One individual from the first group had the most telomeric gene in the WS critical region deleted along with 2 Mb of flanking sequence. A second person had the classic WS deletion and a rearrangement on chromosome 5p within the Cri du Chat syndrome (OMIM:123450) region. Six individuals from the ID/MCA group had large rearrangements (3 deletions, 3 duplications), one of whom had a large inversion associated with a deletion that was not detected by the SNP arrays. Conclusions/Significance Combining SNP microarray analyses and qPCR allowed us to clone and sequence 21 deletion breakpoints in individuals with atypical deletions in the WS region and/or ID or MCA. Comparison of these breakpoints to databases of genomic variation revealed that 52% occurred in regions harboring structural variants in the general population. For two probands the genomic alterations were flanked by segmental duplications, which frequently mediate recurrent genome rearrangements; these may represent new genomic disorders. While SNP arrays and related technologies can identify potentially pathogenic deletions and

  18. Angelman syndrome associated with an inversion of chromosome 15q11.2q24.3

    SciTech Connect

    Greger, V.; Knoll, J.H.M.; Wagstaff, J.; Lalande, M.

    1997-03-01

    Angelman syndrome (AS) most frequently results from large ({ge}5 Mb) de novo deletions of chromosome 15q11-q13. The deletions are exclusively of maternal origin, and a few cases of paternal uniparental disomy of chromosome 15 have been reported. The latter finding indicates that AS is caused by the absence of a maternal contribution to the imprinted 15q11-q13 region. Failure to inherit a paternal 15q11-q13 contribution results in the clinically distinct disorder of Prader-Willi syndrome. Cases of AS resulting from translocations or pericentric inversions have been observed to be associated with deletions, and there have been no confirmed reports of balanced rearrangements in AS. We report the first such case involving a paracentric inversion with a breakpoint located {approximately}25 kb proximal to the reference marker D15S10. This inversion has been inherited from a phenotypically normal mother. No deletion is evident by molecular analysis in this case, by use of cloned fragments mapped to within {approximately}1 kb of the inversion breakpoint. Several hypotheses are discussed to explain the relationship between the inversion and the AS phenotype. 47 refs., 3 figs.

  19. Comparative cytogenetics of six Indo-Pacific moray eels (Anguilliformes: Muraenidae) by chromosomal banding and fluorescence in situ hybridization.

    PubMed

    Coluccia, E; Deidda, F; Cannas, R; Lobina, C; Cuccu, D; Deiana, A M; Salvadori, S

    2015-09-01

    A comparative cytogenetic analysis, using both conventional staining techniques and fluorescence in situ hybridization, of six Indo-Pacific moray eels from three different genera (Gymnothorax fimbriatus, Gymnothorax flavimarginatus, Gymnothorax javanicus, Gymnothorax undulatus, Echidna nebulosa and Gymnomuraena zebra), was carried out to investigate the chromosomal differentiation in the family Muraenidae. Four species displayed a diploid chromosome number 2n = 42, which is common among the Muraenidae. Two other species, G. javanicus and G. flavimarginatus, were characterized by different chromosome numbers (2n = 40 and 2n = 36). For most species, a large amount of constitutive heterochromatin was detected in the chromosomes, with species-specific C-banding patterns that enabled pairing of the homologous chromosomes. In all species, the major ribosomal genes were localized in the guanine-cytosine-rich region of one chromosome pair, but in different chromosomal locations. The (TTAGGG)n telomeric sequences were mapped onto chromosomal ends in all muraenid species studied. The comparison of the results derived from this study with those available in the literature confirms a substantial conservation of the diploid chromosome number in the Muraenidae and supports the hypothesis that rearrangements have occurred that have diversified their karyotypes. Furthermore, the finding of two species with different diploid chromosome numbers suggests that additional chromosomal rearrangements, such as Robertsonian fusions, have occurred in the karyotype evolution of the Muraenidae. PMID:26242690

  20. A new class of rearrangeable interconnection networks

    SciTech Connect

    Douglass, B.G.

    1989-01-01

    With the current interest in general purpose multiprocessing systems and distributed processing networks, a need exists for rearrangeable interconnection networks. These networks can simultaneously transmit information from all sources to all destinations, for all possible combinations of destinations. Such networks exist, and among these the Benes network is of asymptotically optimal hardware complexity. However, this network requires excessive time to recompute the switch settings each time a new set of transmissions is requested by the source processors. Some algorithms exist to reduce this time overhead but they require excessive hardware to compute the settings. This thesis introduces a new class of rearrangeable networks, called reduced networks, based on an extension of Clos three-stage networks. It is shown that the switches in the first and third stages of Clos networks can be constructed as unique path logarithmic networks. Only the center-stage switches must be rearrangeable. This fact is then used to develop a compact network structure. The routing properties of this structure are defined, and it is shown that there is a connectivity in the setting of the switches for any Clos network. An upper and lower bound on this connectivity are established, leading to a fast routing algorithm, with a trade off between the routing time and the network hardware complexity. This can be exploited by the network designer to achieve the best combination of hardware cost and data transfer rate for the particular application. For network sizes contemplated within the foreseeable future, the resulting design will in most cases be closer to the ideal combination than any other network.

  1. A general heuristic for genome rearrangement problems.

    PubMed

    Dias, Ulisses; Galvão, Gustavo Rodrigues; Lintzmayer, Carla Négri; Dias, Zanoni

    2014-06-01

    In this paper, we present a general heuristic for several problems in the genome rearrangement field. Our heuristic does not solve any problem directly, it is rather used to improve the solutions provided by any non-optimal algorithm that solve them. Therefore, we have implemented several algorithms described in the literature and several algorithms developed by ourselves. As a whole, we implemented 23 algorithms for 9 well known problems in the genome rearrangement field. A total of 13 algorithms were implemented for problems that use the notions of prefix and suffix operations. In addition, we worked on 5 algorithms for the classic problem of sorting by transposition and we conclude the experiments by presenting results for 3 approximation algorithms for the sorting by reversals and transpositions problem and 2 approximation algorithms for the sorting by reversals problem. Another algorithm with better approximation ratio can be found for the last genome rearrangement problem, but it is purely theoretical with no practical implementation. The algorithms we implemented in addition to our heuristic lead to the best practical results in each case. In particular, we were able to improve results on the sorting by transpositions problem, which is a very special case because many efforts have been made to generate algorithms with good results in practice and some of these algorithms provide results that equal the optimum solutions in many cases. Our source codes and benchmarks are freely available upon request from the authors so that it will be easier to compare new approaches against our results. PMID:24969750

  2. Rearranged Anaplastic Lymphoma Kinase (ALK) Gene in Adult-Onset Papillary Thyroid Cancer Amongst Atomic Bomb Survivors

    PubMed Central

    Mukai, Mayumi; Takahashi, Keiko; Hayashi, Yuzo; Nakachi, Kei; Kusunoki, Yoichiro

    2012-01-01

    Background We previously noted that among atomic bomb survivors (ABS), the relative frequency of cases of adult papillary thyroid cancer (PTC) with chromosomal rearrangements (mainly RET/PTC) was significantly greater in those with relatively higher radiation exposure than those with lower radiation exposure. In contrast, the frequency of PTC cases with point mutations (mainly BRAFV600E) was significantly lower in patients with relatively higher radiation exposure than those with lower radiation exposure. We also found that among ABS, the frequency of PTC cases with no detectable gene alterations in RET, neurotrophic tyrosine kinase receptor 1 (NTRK1), BRAF, or RAS was significantly higher in patients with relatively higher radiation exposure than those with lower radiation exposure. However, in ABS with PTC, the relationship between the presence of the anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) gene fused with other gene partners and radiation exposure has received little study. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that the relative frequency of rearranged ALK in ABS with PTC, and with no detectable gene alterations in RET, NTRK1, BRAF, or RAS, would be greater in those having relatively higher radiation exposures. Methods The 105 subjects in the study were drawn from the Life Span Study cohort of ABS of Hiroshima and Nagasaki who were diagnosed with PTC between 1956 and 1993. Seventy-nine were exposed (>0 mGy), and 26 were not exposed to A-bomb radiation. In the 25 ABS with PTC, and with no detectable gene alterations in RET, NTRK1, BRAF, or RAS, we examined archival, formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded PTC specimens for rearrangement of ALK using reverse transcription–polymerase chain reaction and 5′ rapid amplification of cDNA ends (5′ RACE). Results We found rearranged ALK in 10 of 19 radiation-exposed PTC cases, but none among 6 patients with PTC with no radiation exposure. In addition, solid/trabecular-like architecture in PTC was closely associated with ALK

  3. Nonclassical 21-Homododecahedryl Cation Rearrangement Revisited.

    PubMed

    Jalife, Said; Mondal, Sukanta; Osorio, Edison; Cabellos, José Luis; Martínez-Guajardo, Gerardo; Fernández-Herrera, María A; Merino, Gabriel

    2016-03-01

    The degenerate rearrangement in the 21-homododecahedryl cation (1) has been studied via density functional theory computations and Born-Oppenheimer Molecular Dynamics simulations. Compound 1 can be described as a highly fluxional hyperconjugated carbocation. Complete scrambling of 1 can be achieved by the combination of two unveiled barrierless processes. The first one is a "rotation" of one of the six-membered rings via a 0.8 kcal·mol(-1) barrier, and the second one is a slower interconvertion between two hyperconjomers via an out-of-plane methine bending (ΔG(⧧) = 4.0 kcal·mol(-1)). PMID:26862680

  4. Catalytic Environmentally Friendly Protocol for Achmatowicz Rearrangement.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhilong; Tong, Rongbiao

    2016-06-01

    The increasing interest in Achmatowicz rearrangement in organic synthesis calls for a more environmentally friendly protocol since the most popular oxidants m-CPBA and NBS produced stoichiometric organic side product (m-chlorobenzoic acid or succinimide). Mechanism-guided analysis enables us to develop a new catalytic method (Oxone/KBr) for AchR in excellent yield with K2SO4 as the only side product, which greatly facilitates the purification. This protocol was integrated with other transformations, leading to a rapid access to the highly functionalized dihydropyranones. PMID:27167167

  5. Cinteny: flexible analysis and visualization of synteny and genome rearrangements in multiple organisms

    PubMed Central

    Sinha, Amit U; Meller, Jaroslaw

    2007-01-01

    Background Identifying syntenic regions, i.e., blocks of genes or other markers with evolutionary conserved order, and quantifying evolutionary relatedness between genomes in terms of chromosomal rearrangements is one of the central goals in comparative genomics. However, the analysis of synteny and the resulting assessment of genome rearrangements are sensitive to the choice of a number of arbitrary parameters that affect the detection of synteny blocks. In particular, the choice of a set of markers and the effect of different aggregation strategies, which enable coarse graining of synteny blocks and exclusion of micro-rearrangements, need to be assessed. Therefore, existing tools and resources that facilitate identification, visualization and analysis of synteny need to be further improved to provide a flexible platform for such analysis, especially in the context of multiple genomes. Results We present a new tool, Cinteny, for fast identification and analysis of synteny with different sets of markers and various levels of coarse graining of syntenic blocks. Using Hannenhalli-Pevzner approach and its extensions, Cinteny also enables interactive determination of evolutionary relationships between genomes in terms of the number of rearrangements (the reversal distance). In particular, Cinteny provides: i) integration of synteny browsing with assessment of evolutionary distances for multiple genomes; ii) flexibility to adjust the parameters and re-compute the results on-the-fly; iii) ability to work with user provided data, such as orthologous genes, sequence tags or other conserved markers. In addition, Cinteny provides many annotated mammalian, invertebrate and fungal genomes that are pre-loaded and available for analysis at . Conclusion Cinteny allows one to automatically compare multiple genomes and perform sensitivity analysis for synteny block detection and for the subsequent computation of reversal distances. Cinteny can also be used to interactively browse

  6. Prospective screening for subtelomeric rearrangements in children with mental retardation of unknown aetiology: the Amsterdam experience

    PubMed Central

    van Karnebeek, C D M; Koevoets, C; Sluijter, S; Bijlsma, E; Smeets, D; Redeker, E; Hennekam, R; Hoovers, J

    2002-01-01

    Objective: The frequency of subtelomeric rearrangements in patients with unexplained mental retardation (MR) is uncertain, as most studies have been retrospective and case retrieval may have been biased towards cases more likely to have a chromosome anomaly. To ascertain the frequency of cytogenetic anomalies, including subtelomeric rearrangements, we prospectively screened a consecutive cohort of cases with unexplained MR in an academic tertiary centre. Methods: Inclusion criteria were: age <18 years at referral, IQ<85, no aetiological diagnosis after complete examination, which included karyotyping with high resolution banding (HRB). Results: In 266 karyotyped children, anomalies were detected in 20 (7.5%, seven numerical, 13 structural); 39 cases were analysed by FISH for specific interstitial microdeletions, and anomalies were found in nine (23%). FISH analyses for subtelomeric microdeletions were performed in 184 children (44% moderate-profound MR, 51% familial MR), and one rearrangement (0.5%) was identified in a non-familial MR female with mild MR (de novo deletion 12q24.33-qter). The number of probable polymorphisms was considerable: 2qter (n=7), Xpter (n=3), and Ypter (n=1). A significantly higher total number of malformations and minor anomalies was present in the cytogenetic anomaly group compared to the group without cytogenetic anomalies. Conclusions: The total frequency of cytogenetic anomalies in this prospective study was high (1:10), but the frequency of subtelomeric rearrangements was low. The most likely explanations are the high quality of HRB cytogenetic studies and the lack of clinical selection bias. Conventional cytogenetic analyses, combined with targeted microdeletion testing, remain the single most effective way of additional investigation in mentally retarded children, also in a tertiary centre. PMID:12161591

  7. The Precarious Prokaryotic Chromosome

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Evolutionary selection for optimal genome preservation, replication, and expression should yield similar chromosome organizations in any type of cells. And yet, the chromosome organization is surprisingly different between eukaryotes and prokaryotes. The nuclear versus cytoplasmic accommodation of genetic material accounts for the distinct eukaryotic and prokaryotic modes of genome evolution, but it falls short of explaining the differences in the chromosome organization. I propose that the two distinct ways to organize chromosomes are driven by the differences between the global-consecutive chromosome cycle of eukaryotes and the local-concurrent chromosome cycle of prokaryotes. Specifically, progressive chromosome segregation in prokaryotes demands a single duplicon per chromosome, while other “precarious” features of the prokaryotic chromosomes can be viewed as compensations for this severe restriction. PMID:24633873

  8. The precarious prokaryotic chromosome.

    PubMed

    Kuzminov, Andrei

    2014-05-01

    Evolutionary selection for optimal genome preservation, replication, and expression should yield similar chromosome organizations in any type of cells. And yet, the chromosome organization is surprisingly different between eukaryotes and prokaryotes. The nuclear versus cytoplasmic accommodation of genetic material accounts for the distinct eukaryotic and prokaryotic modes of genome evolution, but it falls short of explaining the differences in the chromosome organization. I propose that the two distinct ways to organize chromosomes are driven by the differences between the global-consecutive chromosome cycle of eukaryotes and the local-concurrent chromosome cycle of prokaryotes. Specifically, progressive chromosome segregation in prokaryotes demands a single duplicon per chromosome, while other "precarious" features of the prokaryotic chromosomes can be viewed as compensations for this severe restriction. PMID:24633873

  9. SCRaMbLE generates designed combinatorial stochastic diversity in synthetic chromosomes

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Yue; Stracquadanio, Giovanni; Wang, Yun; Yang, Kun; Mitchell, Leslie A.; Xue, Yaxin; Cai, Yizhi; Chen, Tai; Dymond, Jessica S.; Kang, Kang; Gong, Jianhui; Zeng, Xiaofan; Zhang, Yongfen; Li, Yingrui; Feng, Qiang; Xu, Xun; Wang, Jun; Wang, Jian; Yang, Huanming; Boeke, Jef D.; Bader, Joel S.

    2016-01-01

    Synthetic chromosome rearrangement and modification by loxP-mediated evolution (SCRaMbLE) generates combinatorial genomic diversity through rearrangements at designed recombinase sites. We applied SCRaMbLE to yeast synthetic chromosome arm synIXR (43 recombinase sites) and then used a computational pipeline to infer or unscramble the sequence of recombinations that created the observed genomes. Deep sequencing of 64 synIXR SCRaMbLE strains revealed 156 deletions, 89 inversions, 94 duplications, and 55 additional complex rearrangements; several duplications are consistent with a double rolling circle mechanism. Every SCRaMbLE strain was unique, validating the capability of SCRaMbLE to explore a diverse space of genomes. Rearrangements occurred exclusively at designed loxPsym sites, with no significant evidence for ectopic rearrangements or mutations involving synthetic regions, the 99% nonsynthetic nuclear genome, or the mitochondrial genome. Deletion frequencies identified genes required for viability or fast growth. Replacement of 3′ UTR by non-UTR sequence had surprisingly little effect on fitness. SCRaMbLE generates genome diversity in designated regions, reveals fitness constraints, and should scale to simultaneous evolution of multiple synthetic chromosomes. PMID:26566658

  10. SCRaMbLE generates designed combinatorial stochastic diversity in synthetic chromosomes.

    PubMed

    Shen, Yue; Stracquadanio, Giovanni; Wang, Yun; Yang, Kun; Mitchell, Leslie A; Xue, Yaxin; Cai, Yizhi; Chen, Tai; Dymond, Jessica S; Kang, Kang; Gong, Jianhui; Zeng, Xiaofan; Zhang, Yongfen; Li, Yingrui; Feng, Qiang; Xu, Xun; Wang, Jun; Wang, Jian; Yang, Huanming; Boeke, Jef D; Bader, Joel S

    2016-01-01

    Synthetic chromosome rearrangement and modification by loxP-mediated evolution (SCRaMbLE) generates combinatorial genomic diversity through rearrangements at designed recombinase sites. We applied SCRaMbLE to yeast synthetic chromosome arm synIXR (43 recombinase sites) and then used a computational pipeline to infer or unscramble the sequence of recombinations that created the observed genomes. Deep sequencing of 64 synIXR SCRaMbLE strains revealed 156 deletions, 89 inversions, 94 duplications, and 55 additional complex rearrangements; several duplications are consistent with a double rolling circle mechanism. Every SCRaMbLE strain was unique, validating the capability of SCRaMbLE to explore a diverse space of genomes. Rearrangements occurred exclusively at designed loxPsym sites, with no significant evidence for ectopic rearrangements or mutations involving synthetic regions, the 99% nonsynthetic nuclear genome, or the mitochondrial genome. Deletion frequencies identified genes required for viability or fast growth. Replacement of 3' UTR by non-UTR sequence had surprisingly little effect on fitness. SCRaMbLE generates genome diversity in designated regions, reveals fitness constraints, and should scale to simultaneous evolution of multiple synthetic chromosomes. PMID:26566658

  11. Chromosome Evolution and Genome Miniaturization in Minifish

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Shaojun; Hui, Tan Heok; Tan, Sze Ley; Hong, Yunhan

    2012-01-01

    Background Paedocypris is a newly established genus of fish in Southeast Asia. Paedocypris is characterized by several unique features, including a tiny adult size (thus named miniature fish or minifish), fragmentary habitats of acidic peat blackwater swamps, an unusual reproduction mode and truncated development. These peculiarities lend themselves excellent for studying chromosome evolution and rapid speciation in vertebrates but also make them highly controversial for the phylogenetic position. Methodology and Principal Findings We have established an organ procedure to prepare chromosome spreads from tiny organs of minifish and performed a cytogenetic study on two species of the genus Paedocypris, namely P. carbunculus (Pc) and P. sp. “Singkep” (Ps). We found 30 and 34 chromosomes in diploid cells of Pc and Ps, respectively, which are unusual in teleost fishes. The diploid metaphase has 5 pairs of metacentrics and 7 pairs of subtelocentrics in Pc compared to 3 pairs of metacentrics and 11 pairs of subtelocentrics in Ps, whereas the haploid metaphase contains 5 metacentrics and 7 subtelocentrics in Pc compared to 3 metacentrics and 11 subtelocentrics Ps. Chromosome behavior in first meiosis revealed the presence of a chromosomal ring consisting of 2 metacentrics in Pc, suggesting that centric fusion rather than fission was responsible for the karyotypic evolution from Ps to Pc. Flow cytometry revealed that Pc had a 45% nuclear staining intensity relative to medaka whose genome is 700 Mb in size and contains 0.81 pg DNA. The Pc genome should have 315 Mb in length and 0.36 pg of DNA, which represent one of the smallest values in vertebrates, suggesting genome miniaturization in this organism. Conclusions Our data demonstrate that gross chromosome rearrangements and genome miniaturization have accompanied the evolution of Paedocypris fishes. Our data also place Paedocypris outside currently described taxa of the Cypriniformes. PMID:22615970

  12. Rearrangements and deletions of immunoglobulin heavy chain genes in the double-producing B cell lymphoma I.29.

    PubMed Central

    Stavnezer, J; Marcu, K B; Sirlin, S; Alhadeff, B; Hammerling, U

    1982-01-01

    The B cell lymphoma I.29 consists of a mixture of cells expressing membrane-bound immunoglobulin M (IgM) (lambda) and IgA (lambda) of identical idiotypes. Whereas most of the cells express either IgM or IgA alone, 1 to 5% of the cells in this tumor express IgM and IgA simultaneously within the cytoplasm and on the cell membrane (R. Sitia et al., J. Immunol. 127:1388-1394, 1981; R. Sitia, unpublished data). When IgM+ cells are purified from the lymphoma and passaged in mice or cultured, a portion of the cells convert to IgA+. These properties suggest that some cells of the I.29 lymphoma may undergo immunoglobulin heavy chain switching, although it is also possible that the mixed population was derived by a prior switching event in a clone of cells. We performed Southern blotting experiments on genomic DNAs isolated from populations of I.29 cells containing variable proportions of IgM+ and IgA+ cells and on a number of cell lines derived from the lymphoma. The results were consistent with the deletion model for heavy chain switching, as the IgM+ cells contained rearranged mu genes and alpha genes in the germ line configuration on both the expressed and nonexpressed heavy chain chromosomes, whereas the IgA+ cells had deleted both mu genes and contained one rearranged and one germ line alpha gene. In addition, segments of DNA located within the intervening sequence 5' to the mu gene, near the site of switch recombination, were deleted from both the expressed and the nonexpressed chromosomes. Although mu genes were deleted from both chromosomes in the IgA+ cells, the sites of DNA recombination differed on the two chromosomes. On the expressed chromosome, Smu sequences were recombined with S alpha sequences, whereas on the nonexpressed chromosome, Smu sequences were recombined with S gamma 3 sequences. Images PMID:6290869

  13. Structures of Local Rearrangements in Soft Colloidal Glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Xiunan; Liu, Rui; Yang, Mingcheng; Wang, Wei-Hua; Chen, Ke

    2016-06-01

    We image local structural rearrangements in soft colloidal glasses under small periodic perturbations induced by thermal cycling. Local structural entropy S2 positively correlates with observed rearrangements in colloidal glasses. The high S2 values of the rearranging clusters in glasses indicate that fragile regions in glasses are structurally less correlated, similar to structural defects in crystalline solids. Slow-evolving high S2 spots are capable of predicting local rearrangements long before the relaxations occur, while fluctuation-created high S2 spots best correlate with local deformations right before the rearrangement events. Local free volumes are also found to correlate with particle rearrangements at extreme values, although the ability to identify relaxation sites is substantially lower than S2. Our experiments provide an efficient structural identifier for the fragile regions in glasses and highlight the important role of structural correlations in the physics of glasses.

  14. Structures of Local Rearrangements in Soft Colloidal Glasses.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xiunan; Liu, Rui; Yang, Mingcheng; Wang, Wei-Hua; Chen, Ke

    2016-06-10

    We image local structural rearrangements in soft colloidal glasses under small periodic perturbations induced by thermal cycling. Local structural entropy S_{2} positively correlates with observed rearrangements in colloidal glasses. The high S_{2} values of the rearranging clusters in glasses indicate that fragile regions in glasses are structurally less correlated, similar to structural defects in crystalline solids. Slow-evolving high S_{2} spots are capable of predicting local rearrangements long before the relaxations occur, while fluctuation-created high S_{2} spots best correlate with local deformations right before the rearrangement events. Local free volumes are also found to correlate with particle rearrangements at extreme values, although the ability to identify relaxation sites is substantially lower than S_{2}. Our experiments provide an efficient structural identifier for the fragile regions in glasses and highlight the important role of structural correlations in the physics of glasses. PMID:27341261

  15. The Stereochemical Course of the α-Hydroxyphosphonate–Phosphate Rearrangement

    PubMed Central

    Pallitsch, Katharina; Roller, Alexander; Hammerschmidt, Friedrich

    2015-01-01

    The phosphonate–phosphate rearrangement is an isomerisation of α-hydroxyphosphonates bearing electron-withdrawing substituents at the α-carbon atom. We studied the stereochemical course of this rearrangement with respect to phosphorus. A set of four diastereomeric α-hydroxyphosphonates was prepared by a Pudovik reaction from two diastereomeric cyclic phosphites. The hydroxyphosphonates were separated and rearranged with Et3N as base. In analogy to trichlorphon, which was the first reported compound undergoing this rearrangement. All four hydroxyphosphonates could be rearranged to 2,2-dichlorovinyl phosphates. Single-crystal X-ray structure analyses of the α-hydroxyphosphonates and the corresponding phosphates allowed us to show that the rearrangement proceeds with retention of configuration on the phosphorus atom. PMID:26059025

  16. The telomeric sync model of speciation: species-wide telomere erosion triggers cycles of transposon-mediated genomic rearrangements, which underlie the saltatory appearance of nonadaptive characters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stindl, Reinhard

    2014-03-01

    Charles Darwin knew that the fossil record is not overwhelmingly supportive of genetic and phenotypic gradualism; therefore, he developed the core of his theory on the basis of breeding experiments. Here, I present evidence for the existence of a cell biological mechanism that strongly points to the almost forgotten European concept of saltatory evolution of nonadaptive characters, which is in perfect agreement with the gaps in the fossil record. The standard model of chromosomal evolution has always been handicapped by a paradox, namely, how speciation can occur by spontaneous chromosomal rearrangements that are known to decrease the fertility of heterozygotes in a population. However, the hallmark of almost all closely related species is a differing chromosome complement and therefore chromosomal rearrangements seem to be crucial for speciation. Telomeres, the caps of eukaryotic chromosomes, erode in somatic tissues during life, but have been thought to remain stable in the germline of a species. Recently, a large human study spanning three healthy generations clearly found a cumulative telomere effect, which is indicative of transgenerational telomere erosion in the human species. The telomeric sync model of speciation presented here is based on telomere erosion between generations, which leads to identical fusions of chromosomes and triggers a transposon-mediated genomic repatterning in the germline of many individuals of a species. The phenotypic outcome of the telomere-triggered transposon activity is the saltatory appearance of nonadaptive characters simultaneously in many individuals. Transgenerational telomere erosion is therefore the material basis of aging at the species level.

  17. Programmed genome rearrangements in the ciliate Oxytricha

    PubMed Central

    Yerlici, V. Talya; Landweber, Laura F.

    2015-01-01

    The ciliate Oxytricha is a microbial eukaryote with two genomes, one of which experiences extensive genome remodeling during development. Each round of conjugation initiates a cascade of events that construct a transcriptionally active somatic genome from a scrambled germline genome, with considerable help from both long and small noncoding RNAs. This process of genome remodeling entails massive DNA deletion and reshuffling of remaining DNA segments to form functional genes from their interrupted and scrambled germline precursors. The use of Oxytricha as a model system provides an opportunity to study an exaggerated form of programmed genome rearrangement. Furthermore, studying the mechanisms that maintain nuclear dimorphism and mediate genome rearrangement has demonstrated a surprising plasticity and diversity of non-coding RNA pathways, with new roles that go beyond conventional gene silencing. Another aspect of ciliate genetics is their unorthodox patterns of RNA-mediated, epigenetic inheritance, that rival Mendelian inheritance. This review takes the reader through the key experiments in a model eukaryote that led to fundamental discoveries in RNA biology and pushes the biological limits of DNA processing. PMID:26104449

  18. TERT rearrangements are frequent in neuroblastoma and identify aggressive tumors.

    PubMed

    Valentijn, Linda J; Koster, Jan; Zwijnenburg, Danny A; Hasselt, Nancy E; van Sluis, Peter; Volckmann, Richard; van Noesel, Max M; George, Rani E; Tytgat, Godelieve A M; Molenaar, Jan J; Versteeg, Rogier

    2015-12-01

    Whole-genome sequencing detected structural rearrangements of TERT in 17 of 75 high-stage neuroblastomas, with five cases resulting from chromothripsis. Rearrangements were associated with increased TERT expression and targeted regions immediately up- and downstream of TERT, positioning a super-enhancer close to the breakpoints in seven cases. TERT rearrangements (23%), ATRX deletions (11%) and MYCN amplifications (37%) identify three almost non-overlapping groups of high-stage neuroblastoma, each associated with very poor prognosis. PMID:26523776

  19. Dynamic behavior of rearranging carbocations – implications for terpene biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Hare, Stephanie R

    2016-01-01

    Summary This review describes unexpected dynamical behaviors of rearranging carbocations and the modern computational methods used to elucidate these aspects of reaction mechanisms. Unique potential energy surface topologies associated with these rearrangements have been discovered in recent years that are not only of fundamental interest, but also provide insight into the way Nature manipulates chemical space to accomplish specific chemical transformations. Cautions for analyzing both experimental and theoretical data on carbocation rearrangements are included throughout. PMID:27340434

  20. Lamellar rearrangement of internal lipids from human hair.

    PubMed

    Coderch, L; Méndez, S; Barba, C; Pons, R; Martí, M; Parra, J L

    2008-09-01

    The internal lipids were extracted from untreated hair without surface lipids. Liposomes were formed with the internal lipids at different hydration levels to determine the organization of these lipids and the influence of the water content on the lamellar structure of the hair fibres by X-ray Scattering (SAXS). Two structures of hair lipids were observed at 4.5 and approximately 9.0 nm with a different behaviour as a function of water content: the largest bilayer being the one that showed a capacity to retain water inside its structure. SAXS was also applied directly to three samples: a packed swatch of hair fibres at 60% RH, fibres soaked in water and delipidized fibres. Only the lamella at 9.0 nm was slightly affected by water content. Moreover, there was a small diminution in intensity probably due to a high permeability of wet fibres which could give rise to a disorder of the lipid structure. These two lamellar rearrangements are probably made up of lipids with a different and specific hydrophilic/hydrophobic balance. PMID:18619428

  1. Dispersion-Energy-Driven Wagner–Meerwein Rearrangements in Oligosilanes

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The installation of structural complex oligosilanes from linear starting materials by Lewis acid induced skeletal rearrangement reactions was studied under stable ion conditions. The produced cations were fully characterized by multinuclear NMR spectroscopy at low temperature, and the reaction course was studied by substitution experiments. The results of density functional theory calculations indicate the decisive role of attractive dispersion forces between neighboring trimethylsilyl groups for product formation in these rearrangement reactions. These attractive dispersion interactions control the course of Wagner–Meerwein rearrangements in oligosilanes, in contrast to the classical rearrangement in hydrocarbon systems, which are dominated by electronic substituent effects such as resonance and hyperconjugation. PMID:27195490

  2. Dispersion-Energy-Driven Wagner-Meerwein Rearrangements in Oligosilanes.

    PubMed

    Albers, Lena; Rathjen, Saskia; Baumgartner, Judith; Marschner, Christoph; Müller, Thomas

    2016-06-01

    The installation of structural complex oligosilanes from linear starting materials by Lewis acid induced skeletal rearrangement reactions was studied under stable ion conditions. The produced cations were fully characterized by multinuclear NMR spectroscopy at low temperature, and the reaction course was studied by substitution experiments. The results of density functional theory calculations indicate the decisive role of attractive dispersion forces between neighboring trimethylsilyl groups for product formation in these rearrangement reactions. These attractive dispersion interactions control the course of Wagner-Meerwein rearrangements in oligosilanes, in contrast to the classical rearrangement in hydrocarbon systems, which are dominated by electronic substituent effects such as resonance and hyperconjugation. PMID:27195490

  3. Exceptional chromosomal mutations in a rodent population are not strongly underdominant.

    PubMed Central

    Nachman, M W; Myers, P

    1989-01-01

    The observation of karyotypic uniformity in most species has led to the widespread belief that selection limits chromosomal change. We report an unprecedented amount of chromosomal variation in a natural population of the South American marsh rat Holochilus brasiliensis. This variation consists of four distinct classes of chromosomal rearrangements: whole-arm translocations, pericentric inversions, variation in the amount of euchromatin, and variation in number and kind of supernumerary (B) chromosomes. Twenty-six karyotypes are present among 42 animals. Observations of the natural population over a 7-year period and breeding experiments with captive animals indicate that heterozygous individuals suffer no detectable reduction in fitness. This is at odds with a central assumption in current models of chromosomal speciation and provides a firm rejection of the view that selection necessarily restricts chromosomal change. Images PMID:2771951

  4. Sex chromosome variation and cytotaxonomy of the onchocerciasis vector Simulium squamosum in Cameroon and Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Traore-Lamizana, M; Somiari, S; Mafuyai, H B; Vajime, C G; Post, R J

    2001-06-01

    On the basis of sex chromosome variation, three cytotypes of Simulium squamosum (Enderlein) (Diptera: Simuliidae) are described from Cameroon and Nigeria. Simulium squamosum A is the typical form as originally described by Vajime & Dunbar (1975) with chromosome I as the sex chromosome. It occurs throughout most of Cameroon and south-east Nigeria. A second cytotype, S. squamosum B, is described from the river Sanaga (Cameroon). It also has chromosome I as the sex chromosome, but the nature of the sex differential region is different. Simulium squamosum C has no sex-linked chromosomal rearrangements. It is widespread in Nigeria and occurs near Mount Cameroon, where it seems to hybridize with S. squamosum A. PMID:11434559

  5. Karyotype and chromosome variability in the armadillo Chaetophractus villosus in Argentina.

    PubMed

    Rossi, L F; Luaces, J P; Alonso, F M; Merani, M S

    2014-01-01

    Karyotype and cytotype variations for the large hairy armadillo (Chaetophractus villosus) were studied throughout the species' Argentine distribution. Peripheral blood lymphocyte cultures of 421 animals were used to obtain mitotic metaphases. Preparations were subjected to conventional staining, G- and C-banding, and FISH involving a telomeric probe. Meiotic analysis was performed on testis material from 10 adults. Spermatocytes were examined for synaptonemal complexes in microspreads. The karyotype (2n = 60 XX/XY; FN = 84 without XY) showed an autosomal complement of 6 metacentric and 7 submetacentric chromosomes; the remainder was acrocentric. The X chromosome was submetacentric and the Y acrocentric. Centromeric C+ marks were observed in all chromosomes except pair 16. Three NOR signals were detected in 6q, 12p, and 26p. Two chromosomal rearrangements were characterized in chromosome pair 1 a pericentric inversion seen in the material from Jacinto Aráuz, General Madariaga and Pellegrini and a deletion in the material from Loma Verde. Interstitial telomeric signals were observed in chromosome pairs 4, 12, 16, and 26. Pachytene spermatocyte analysis confirmed the basic chromosome number and morphologies observed in mitotic karyotypes. The evolution of C. villosus involved chromosomal rearrangements as recorded for other species of its superorder. The present results establish the basis for the cytogenetic characterization of this species. PMID:24457264

  6. Chromosome 10q tetrasomy: First reported case

    SciTech Connect

    Blackston, R.D.; May, K.M.; Jones, F.D.

    1994-09-01

    While there are several reports of trisomy 10q (at least 35), we are not aware of previous cases of 10q tetrasomy. We present what we believe to be the initial report of such a case. R.J. is a 6 1/2 year old white male who presented with multiple dysmorphic features, marked articulation problems, hyperactivity, and developmental delays. He is the product of a term uncomplicated pregnancy. There was a normal spontaneous vaginal delivery with a birth weight of 6 lbs. 4oz. and length was 19 1/2 inch. Dysmorphic features include small size, an asymmetrically small head, low set ears with overfolded helixes, bilateral ptosis, downslanting eyes, right eye esotropia, prominent nose, asymmetric facies, high palate, mild pectus excavatum deformity of chest, and hyperextensible elbow joints. The patient is in special needs classes for mildly mentally handicapped students. Chromosome analysis at a resolution of 800 bands revealed a complex rearrangement of chromosomes 10 and 11. The segment 10q25.3 to q16.3 appears to be inverted and duplicated within the long arm of chromosome 10 at band q25.3 and the same segment of chromosome 10 is present on the terminal end of the short arm of chromosome 11. There is no visible loss of material from chromosome 11. Fluorescence in situ hybridization was performed with a chromosome 10 specific {open_quotes}paint{close_quotes} to confirm that all of the material on the abnormal 10 and the material on the terminal short arm of 11 was from chromosome 10. Thus, it appears that the segment 10q25.3 to q26.3 is present in four copies. Parental chromosome studies are normal. We compared findings which differ in that the case of 10q tetrasomy did not have prenatal growth deficiency, microphthalmia, cleft palate, digital anomalies, heart, or renal defects. Whereas most cases of 10q trisomy are said to have severe mental deficiency, our case of 10q tetrasomy was only mildly delayed. We report this first apparent cited case of 10q tetrasomy.

  7. Laser microdissection-based analysis of the Y sex chromosome of the Antarctic fish Chionodraco hamatus (Notothenioidei, Channichthyidae)

    PubMed Central

    Cocca, Ennio; Petraccioli, Agnese; Morescalchi, Maria Alessandra; Odierna, Gaetano; Capriglione, Teresa

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Microdissection, DOP-PCR amplification and microcloning were used to study the large Y chromosome of Chionodraco hamatus, an Antarctic fish belonging to the Notothenioidei, the dominant component of the Southern Ocean fauna. The species has evolved a multiple sex chromosome system with digametic males showing an X1YX2 karyotype and females an X1X1X2X2 karyotype. Fluorescence in situ hybridization, performed with a painting probe made from microdissected Y chromosomes, allowed a deeper insight on the chromosomal rearrangement, which underpinned the fusion event that generated the Y. Then, we used a DNA library established by microdissection and microcloning of the whole Y chromosome of Chionodraco hamatus for searching sex-linked sequences. One clone provided preliminary information on the presence on the Y chromosome of the CHD1 gene homologue, which is sex-linked in birds but in no other vertebrates. Several clones from the Y-chromosome mini-library contained microsatellites and transposable elements, one of which mapped to the q arm putative fusion region of the Y chromosome. The findings confirm that interspersed repetitive sequences might have fostered chromosome rearrangements and the emergence of the Y chromosome in Chionodraco hamatus. Detection of the CHD1 gene in the Y sex-determining region could be a classical example of convergent evolution in action. PMID:25893071

  8. Multiple Ty-mediated chromosomal translocations lead to karyotype changes in a wine strain of Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Rachidi, N; Barre, P; Blondin, B

    1999-06-01

    Enological strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae display a high level of chromosome length polymorphism, but the molecular basis of this phenomenon has not yet been clearly defined. In order to gain further insight into the molecular mechanisms responsible for the karyotypic variability, we examined the chromosomal constitution of a strain known to possess aberrant chromosomes. Our data revealed that the strain carries four rearranged chromosomes resulting from two reciprocal translocations between chromosomes III and I, and chromosomes III and VII. The sizes of the chromosomal fragments exchanged through translocation range from 40 to 150 kb. Characterization of the breakpoints indicated that the translocations involved the RAHS of chromosome III, a transposition hot-spot on the right arm of chromosome I and a region on the left arm of chromosome VII. An analysis of the junctions showed that in all cases Ty elements were present and suggested that the translocations result from recombination between transposable Ty elements. The evidence for multiple translocations mediated by Ty elements in a single strain suggests that spontaneous Ty-driven rearrangement could be quite common and may play a major role in the alteration of karyotypes in natural and industrial yeasts. PMID:10394922

  9. A 15 Mb large paracentric chromosome 21 inversion identified in Czech population through a pair of flanking duplications

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Inversions are balanced structural chromosome rearrangements, which can influence gene expression and the risk of unbalanced chromosome constitution in offspring. Many examples of inversion polymorphisms exist in human, affecting both heterochromatic regions and euchromatin. Results We describe a novel, 15 Mb long paracentric inversion, inv(21)(q21.1q22.11), affecting more than a third of human 21q. Despite of its length, the inversion cannot be detected using karyotyping due to similar band patterns on the normal and inverted chromosomes, and is therefore likely to escape attention. Its identification was aided by the repeated observation of the same pair of 150 kb long duplications present in cis on chromosome 21 in three Czech families subjected to microarray analysis. The finding prompted us to hypothesise that this co-occurrence of two remote duplications could be associated with an inversion of the intervening segment, and this speculation turned out to be right. The inversion was confirmed in a series of FISH experiments which also showed that the second copy of each of the duplications was always located at the opposite end of the inversion. The presence of the same pair of duplications in additional individuals reported in public databases indicates that the inversion may also be present in other populations. Three out of the total of about 4000 chromosomes 21 examined in our sample carried the duplications and were inverted, corresponding to carrier frequency of about 1/660. Although the breakpoints affect protein-coding genes, the occurrence of the inversion in normal parents and siblings of our patients and the occurrence of the duplications in unaffected controls in databases indicate that this rare variant is rather non-pathogenic. The inverted segment carried an identical shared haplotype in the three families studied. The haplotypes, however, diverged very rapidly in the flanking regions, possibly pointing to an ancient founder event at

  10. Abnormal human sex chromosome constitutions

    SciTech Connect

    1993-12-31

    Chapter 22, discusses abnormal human sex chromosome constitution. Aneuploidy of X chromosomes with a female phenotype, sex chromosome aneuploidy with a male phenotype, and various abnormalities in X chromosome behavior are described. 31 refs., 2 figs.

  11. Chromosomal Disorders and Autism.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gillberg, Christopher

    1998-01-01

    This paper reviews the literature on chromosomal aberrations in autism, especially possible gene markers. It notes that Chromosome 15 and numerical and structural abnormalities of the sex chromosomes have been most frequently reported as related to the genesis of autism. (Author/DB)

  12. Chromosomal development of cancer

    SciTech Connect

    1993-12-31

    Chapter 30, describes the chromosomal development of cancer. It has been established through cytological research that the number of chromosomes in cancer cells often deviates greatly from the usual number in healthy cells of the host organism. This chapter includes discussions on chromosome studies in ascites tumors, stemline and tumor development, mitotic aberrations in cancer, and selection and tumor progression. 25 refs., 2 figs.

  13. Homoploid hybrid speciation and genome evolution via chromosome sorting

    PubMed Central

    Lukhtanov, Vladimir A.; Shapoval, Nazar A.; Anokhin, Boris A.; Saifitdinova, Alsu F.; Kuznetsova, Valentina G.

    2015-01-01

    Genomes of numerous diploid plant and animal species possess traces of interspecific crosses, and many researches consider them as support for homoploid hybrid speciation (HHS), a process by which a new reproductively isolated species arises through hybridization and combination of parts of the parental genomes, but without an increase in ploidy. However, convincing evidence for a creative role of hybridization in the origin of reproductive isolation between hybrid and parental forms is extremely limited. Here, through studying Agrodiaetus butterflies, we provide proof of a previously unknown mode of HHS based on the formation of post-zygotic reproductive isolation via hybridization of chromosomally divergent parental species and subsequent fixation of a novel combination of chromosome fusions/fissions in hybrid descendants. We show that meiotic segregation, operating in the hybrid lineage, resulted in the formation of a new diploid genome, drastically rearranged in terms of chromosome number. We also demonstrate that during the heterozygous stage of the hybrid species formation, recombination was limited between rearranged chromosomes of different parental origin, representing evidence that the reproductive isolation was a direct consequence of hybridization. PMID:25925097

  14. Homoploid hybrid speciation and genome evolution via chromosome sorting.

    PubMed

    Lukhtanov, Vladimir A; Shapoval, Nazar A; Anokhin, Boris A; Saifitdinova, Alsu F; Kuznetsova, Valentina G

    2015-05-22

    Genomes of numerous diploid plant and animal species possess traces of interspecific crosses, and many researches consider them as support for homoploid hybrid speciation (HHS), a process by which a new reproductively isolated species arises through hybridization and combination of parts of the parental genomes, but without an increase in ploidy. However, convincing evidence for a creative role of hybridization in the origin of reproductive isolation between hybrid and parental forms is extremely limited. Here, through studying Agrodiaetus butterflies, we provide proof of a previously unknown mode of HHS based on the formation of post-zygotic reproductive isolation via hybridization of chromosomally divergent parental species and subsequent fixation of a novel combination of chromosome fusions/fissions in hybrid descendants. We show that meiotic segregation, operating in the hybrid lineage, resulted in the formation of a new diploid genome, drastically rearranged in terms of chromosome number. We also demonstrate that during the heterozygous stage of the hybrid species formation, recombination was limited between rearranged chromosomes of different parental origin, representing evidence that the reproductive isolation was a direct consequence of hybridization. PMID:25925097

  15. M-BAND Study of Radiation-Induced Chromosome Aberrations in Human Epithelial Cells: Radiation Quality and Dose Rate Effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hada, Megumi; Cucinotta, Francis; Wu, Honglu

    2009-01-01

    The advantage of the multicolor banding in situ hybridization (mBAND) technique is its ability to identify both inter- (translocation to unpainted chromosomes) and intra- (inversions and deletions within a single painted chromosome) chromosome aberrations simultaneously. To study the detailed rearrangement of low- and high-LET radiation induced chromosome aberrations in human epithelial cells (CH184B5F5/M10) in vitro, we performed a series of experiments with Cs-137 gamma rays of both low and high dose rates, neutrons of low dose rate and 600 MeV/u Fe ions of high dose rate, with chromosome 3 painted with multi-binding colors. We also compared the chromosome aberrations in both 2- and 3-dimensional cell cultures. Results of these experiments revealed the highest chromosome aberration frequencies after low dose rate neutron exposures. However, detailed analysis of the radiation induced inversions revealed that all three radiation types induced a low incidence of simple inversions. Most of the inversions in gamma-ray irradiated samples were accompanied by other types of intra-chromosomal aberrations but few inversions were accompanied by inter-chromosomal aberrations. In contrast, neutrons and Fe ions induced a significant fraction of inversions that involved complex rearrangements of both inter- and intrachromosomal exchanges. The location of the breaks involved in chromosome exchanges was analyzed along the painted chromosome. The breakpoint distribution was found to be randomly localized on chromosome 3 after neutron or Fe ion exposure, whereas non-random distribution with clustering breakpoints was observed after -ray exposure. Our comparison of chromosome aberration yields between 2- and 3-dimensional cell cultures indicated a significant difference for gamma exposures, but not for Fe ion exposures. These experimental results indicated that the track structure of the radiation and the cellular/chromosome structure can both affect radiation-induced chromosome

  16. Common Gene Rearrangements in Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Rubin, Mark A.; Maher, Christopher A.; Chinnaiyan, Arul M.

    2011-01-01

    Prostate cancer is a common heterogeneous disease, and most patients diagnosed in the post prostate-specific antigen (PSA) era present with clinically localized disease, the majority of which do well regardless of treatment regimen undertaken. Overall, those with advanced prostate cancer at time of diagnosis do poorly after androgen withdrawal therapy. Understanding the biologic underpinning of prostate cancer is necessary to best determine the risk of disease progression and would be advantageous for the development of novel therapeutic approaches to impede or prevent disease. This review focuses on the recently identified common ETS and non-ETS gene rearrangements in prostate cancer. Although multiple molecular alterations have been detected in prostate cancer, a detailed understanding of gene fusion prostate cancer should help explain the clinical and biologic diversity, providing a rationale for a molecular subclassification of the disease. PMID:21859993

  17. New progress in snake mitochondrial gene rearrangement.

    PubMed

    Chen, Nian; Zhao, Shujin

    2009-08-01

    To further understand the evolution of snake mitochondrial genomes, the complete mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) sequences were determined for representative species from two snake families: the Many-banded krait, the Banded krait, the Chinese cobra, the King cobra, the Hundred-pace viper, the Short-tailed mamushi, and the Chain viper. Thirteen protein-coding genes, 22-23 tRNA genes, 2 rRNA genes, and 2 control regions were identified in these mtDNAs. Duplication of the control region and translocation of the tRNAPro gene were two notable features of the snake mtDNAs. These results from the gene rearrangement comparisons confirm the correctness of traditional classification schemes and validate the utility of comparing complete mtDNA sequences for snake phylogeny reconstruction. PMID:19479623

  18. Cytoplasmic rearrangements associated with amphibian egg symmetrization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Malacinski, G. M.

    1984-01-01

    Cytoplasmic rearrangements which follow fertilization were mentioned in normal and inverted eggs. A set of yolk compartments was resolved by cytological analyses of both normally oriented and inverted eggs. Those compartments were characterized by their yolk platelet compositions and movement during egg inversion. It is found that during egg inversion the yolk compartments shift minor cytoplasmic compartments which line the egg cortex. Those yolk mass shifts occurred only after the inverted egg was activated. The direction of shift of the major yolk components, rather than the sperm entrance site, determines the dorsal/ventral polarity of the inverted egg. Among different spawnings the rate of shift varied. Eggs that displayed the fastest rate of shift exhibited the highest frequency of developmental abnormalities during organogenesis. Interpretation of novel observations on cytoplasmic organization provide criticism of some earlier models. A new density compartment model is presented as a coherent way to view the organization of the egg cytoplasm and the development of bilateral symmetry.

  19. Minimal distortion pathways in polyhedral rearrangements.

    PubMed

    Casanova, David; Cirera, Jordi; Llunell, Miquel; Alemany, Pere; Avnir, David; Alvarez, Santiago

    2004-02-18

    A definition of minimum distortion paths between two polyhedra in terms of continuous shape measures (CShM) is presented. A general analytical expression deduced for such pathways makes use of one parameter, the minimum distortion constant, that can be easily obtained through the CShM methodology and is herein tabulated for pairs of polyhedra having four to eight vertexes. The work presented here also allows us to obtain representative model molecular structures along the interconversion pathways. Several commonly used polytopal rearrangement pathways are shown to be in fact minimum distortion pathways: the spread path leading from the tetrahedron to the square, the Berry pseudorotation that interconverts a square pyramid and a trigonal bipyramid, and the Bailar twist for the interconversion of the octahedron and the trigonal prism. Examples of applications to the analysis of the stereochemistries of several families of metal complexes are presented. PMID:14871107

  20. Association of specific chromosome alterations with tumour phenotype in posterior uveal melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Sisley, K; Parsons, M A; Garnham, J; Potter, A M; Curtis, D; Rees, R C; Rennie, I G

    2000-01-01

    Posterior uveal melanomas have recurrent alterations of chromosomes 1, 3, 6 and 8. In particular, changes of chromosomes 3 and 8 occur in association, appear to characterize those tumours with a ciliary body component, and have been shown to be of prognostic significance. The relevance of other chromosome alterations is less certain. We have performed cytogenetic analysis on 42 previously untreated primary posterior uveal melanomas. Of interest was the observation that as tumour size increased the involvement of specific chromosome changes, and the amount of chromosome abnormalities likewise increased. Loss, or partial deletions, of the short arm of chromosome 1 were found to associate with larger ciliary body melanomas; typically, loss of the short arm resulted from unbalanced translocations, the partners of which varied. Trisomy of chromosome 21 occurred more often in ciliary body melanomas, whilst rearrangements of chromosomes 6 and 11 were primarily related to choroidal melanomas. Our results imply that alterations of chromosome 1 are important in the progression of some uveal melanomas, and that other chromosome abnormalities, besides those of chromosomes 3 and 8, are associated with ocular tumours of particular locations. © 2000 Cancer Research Campaign PMID:10646885

  1. Karyotype and identification of all homoeologous chromosomes of allopolyploid Brassica napus and its diploid progenitors.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Zhiyong; Pires, J Chris

    2011-01-01

    Investigating recombination of homoeologous chromosomes in allopolyploid species is central to understanding plant breeding and evolution. However, examining chromosome pairing in the allotetraploid Brassica napus has been hampered by the lack of chromosome-specific molecular probes. In this study, we establish the identification of all homoeologous chromosomes of allopolyploid B. napus by using robust molecular cytogenetic karyotypes developed for the progenitor species Brassica rapa (A genome) and Brassica oleracea (C genome). The identification of every chromosome among these three Brassica species utilized genetically mapped bacterial artificial chromosomes (BACs) from B. rapa as probes for fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH). With this BAC-FISH data, a second karyotype was developed using two BACs that contained repetitive DNA sequences and the ubiquitous ribosomal and pericentromere repeats. Using this diagnostic probe mix and a BAC that contained a C-genome repeat in two successive hybridizations allowed for routine identification of the corresponding homoeologous chromosomes between the A and C genomes of B. napus. When applied to the B. napus cultivar Stellar, we detected one chromosomal rearrangement relative to the parental karyotypes. This robust novel chromosomal painting technique will have biological applications for the understanding of chromosome pairing, homoeologous recombination, and genome evolution in the genus Brassica and will facilitate new applied breeding technologies that rely upon identification of chromosomes. PMID:21041557

  2. Mapping strategies: Chromosome 16 workshop

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-01-01

    The following topics from a workshop on chromosome 16 are briefly discussed: genetic map of chromosome 16; chromosome breakpoint map of chromosome 16; integrated physical/genetic map of chromosome 16; pulsed field map of the 16p13.2--p13.3 region (3 sheets); and a report of the HGM10 chromosome 16 committee.

  3. Enantioselective Claisen rearrangements with a hydrogen-bond donor catalyst.

    PubMed

    Uyeda, Christopher; Jacobsen, Eric N

    2008-07-23

    N,N'-Diphenylguanidinium ion associated with the noncoordinating BArF counterion is shown to be an effective catalyst for the [3,3]-sigmatropic rearrangement of a variety of substituted allyl vinyl ethers. Highly enantioselective catalytic Claisen rearrangements of ester-substituted allyl vinyl ethers are then documented using a new C2-symmetric guanidinium ion derivative. PMID:18576616

  4. The presence of extra chromosomes leads to genomic instability.

    PubMed

    Passerini, Verena; Ozeri-Galai, Efrat; de Pagter, Mirjam S; Donnelly, Neysan; Schmalbrock, Sarah; Kloosterman, Wigard P; Kerem, Batsheva; Storchová, Zuzana

    2016-01-01

    Aneuploidy is a hallmark of cancer and underlies genetic disorders characterized by severe developmental defects, yet the molecular mechanisms explaining its effects on cellular physiology remain elusive. Here we show, using a series of human cells with defined aneuploid karyotypes, that gain of a single chromosome increases genomic instability. Next-generation sequencing and SNP-array analysis reveal accumulation of chromosomal rearrangements in aneuploids, with break point junction patterns suggestive of replication defects. Trisomic and tetrasomic cells also show increased DNA damage and sensitivity to replication stress. Strikingly, we find that aneuploidy-induced genomic instability can be explained by the reduced expression of the replicative helicase MCM2-7. Accordingly, restoring near-wild-type levels of chromatin-bound MCM helicase partly rescues the genomic instability phenotypes. Thus, gain of chromosomes triggers replication stress, thereby promoting genomic instability and possibly contributing to tumorigenesis. PMID:26876972

  5. Local adaptation and the evolution of chromosome fusions.

    PubMed

    Guerrero, Rafael F; Kirkpatrick, Mark

    2014-10-01

    We use forward and coalescent models of population genetics to study chromosome fusions that reduce the recombination between two locally adapted loci. Under a continent-island model, a fusion spreads and reaches a polymorphic equilibrium when it causes recombination between locally adapted alleles to be less than their selective advantage. In contrast, fusions in a two-deme model always spread; whether it reaches a polymorphic equilibrium or becomes fixed depends on the relative recombination rates of fused homozygotes and heterozygotes. Neutral divergence around fusion polymorphisms is markedly increased, showing peaks at the point of fusion and at the locally adapted loci. Local adaptation could explain the evolution of many of chromosome fusions, which are some of the most common chromosome rearrangements in nature. PMID:24964074

  6. The presence of extra chromosomes leads to genomic instability

    PubMed Central

    Passerini, Verena; Ozeri-Galai, Efrat; de Pagter, Mirjam S.; Donnelly, Neysan; Schmalbrock, Sarah; Kloosterman, Wigard P.; Kerem, Batsheva; Storchová, Zuzana

    2016-01-01

    Aneuploidy is a hallmark of cancer and underlies genetic disorders characterized by severe developmental defects, yet the molecular mechanisms explaining its effects on cellular physiology remain elusive. Here we show, using a series of human cells with defined aneuploid karyotypes, that gain of a single chromosome increases genomic instability. Next-generation sequencing and SNP-array analysis reveal accumulation of chromosomal rearrangements in aneuploids, with break point junction patterns suggestive of replication defects. Trisomic and tetrasomic cells also show increased DNA damage and sensitivity to replication stress. Strikingly, we find that aneuploidy-induced genomic instability can be explained by the reduced expression of the replicative helicase MCM2-7. Accordingly, restoring near-wild-type levels of chromatin-bound MCM helicase partly rescues the genomic instability phenotypes. Thus, gain of chromosomes triggers replication stress, thereby promoting genomic instability and possibly contributing to tumorigenesis. PMID:26876972

  7. Correlation of physical and genetic maps of human chromosome 16

    SciTech Connect

    Sutherland, G.R.

    1990-01-01

    This project is now progressing strongly. Thirteen somatic cell hybrids containing rearranged {number sign}16 chromosomes have been constructed, bringing the total number of hybrids constructed by the group to 27 which divides chromosome 16 into 29 regions. 170 probes have been mapped into these regions. Although this is the second progress report for this contract it essentially contains all the work carried out since the first progress report covered a period of less than three months during which little had been done other than setting up. The project has been progressing very well and has led to numerous collaborations with other groups involved in mapping this chromosome or studying genes on it. 7 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  8. Paracentric inversions do not normally generate monocentric recombinant chromosomes

    SciTech Connect

    Sutherland, G.R.; Callen, D.F.; Gardner, R.J.M.

    1995-11-20

    Dr. Pettenati et al. recently reported a review of paracentric inversions in humans in which they concluded that carriers of these have a 3.8% risk of viable offspring with recombinant