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Sample records for balanced salt solution

  1. In vitro corrosion of ZEK100 plates in Hank's Balanced Salt Solution

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background In recent years magnesium alloys have been intensively investigated as potential resorbable materials with appropriate mechanical and corrosion properties. Particularly in orthopedic research magnesium is interesting because of its mechanical properties close to those of natural bone, the prevention of both stress shielding and removal of the implant after surgery. Methods ZEK100 plates were examined in this in vitro study with Hank's Balanced Salt Solution under physiological conditions with a constant laminar flow rate. After 14, 28 and 42 days of immersion the ZEK100 plates were mechanically tested via four point bending test. The surfaces of the immersed specimens were characterized by SEM, EDX and XRD. Results The four point bending test displayed an increased bending strength after 6 weeks immersion compared to the 2 week group and 4 week group. The characterization of the surface revealed the presence of high amounts of O, P and Ca on the surface and small Mg content. This indicates the precipitation of calcium phosphates with low solubility on the surface of the ZEK100 plates. Conclusions The results of the present in vitro study indicate that ZEK100 is a potential candidate for degradable orthopedic implants. Further investigations are needed to examine the degradation behavior. PMID:22413949

  2. Absorption of 308-nm excimer laser radiation by balanced salt solution, sodium hyaluronate, and human cadaver eyes

    SciTech Connect

    Keates, R.H.; Bloom, R.T.; Schneider, R.T.; Ren, Q.; Sohl, J.; Viscardi, J.J. )

    1990-11-01

    Absorption of the excimer laser radiations of 193-nm argon fluorine and 308-nm xenon chloride in balanced salt solution, sodium hyaluronate, and human cadaver eyes was measured. The absorption of these materials as considerably different for the two wavelengths; we found that 308-nm light experienced much less absorption than the 193-nm light. The extinction coefficient (k) for 308 nm was k = 0.19/cm for balanced salt solution and k = 0.22/cm for sodium hyaluronate. In contrast to this, the extinction coefficient for 193 nm was k = 140/cm for balanced salt solution and k = 540/cm for sodium hyaluronate. Two 1-day-old human phakic cadaver eyes showed complete absorption with both wavelengths. Using aphakic eyes, incomplete absorption was noted at the posterior pole with 308 nm and complete absorption was noted with 193 nm. The extinction in the anterior part of aphakic eyes (the first 6 mm) was 4.2/cm for 308 nm, meaning that the intensity of the light is reduced by a factor of 10 after traveling the first 5.5 mm. However, we observed that the material in the eye fluoresces, meaning the 308 nm is transformed into other (longer) wavelengths that travel through the total eye with minimal absorption. Conclusions drawn from this experiment are that the use of the 308-nm wavelength may have undesirable side effects, while the use of the 193-nm wavelength should be consistent with ophthalmic use on both the cornea and the lens.

  3. Corrosion performance of MAO coatings on AZ31 Mg alloy in simulated body fluid vs. Earle's Balance Salt Solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilke, Benjamin M.; Zhang, Lei; Li, Weiping; Ning, Chengyun; Chen, Cheng-fu; Gu, Yanhong

    2016-02-01

    Earle's Balance Salt Solution (EBSS) provides an alternative to the conventional simulated body fluids (c-SBF) and has been shown to better simulate the corrosion conditions in vivo. In this work, a series of tests were conducted to explore the corrosion performance of MAO-coated AZ31 samples in EBSS vs. c-SBF. Samples were produced by varying MAO process parameters and then immersed up to 21 days in both EBSS and c-SBF. The corrosion rates were evaluated by the electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and potentiodynamic scanning. Scanning electron microscope (SEM) was used to compare the progression of microcracks across the surface of the coatings. The evaluation of cross-sectional thickness showed an increase in MAO coating thickness with the process voltage. MAO samples with a thicker coating generally have higher impedance and lower current density at the initial immersion time point of 0.5 h. Samples in EBSS showed higher initial impedance and lower current density values as compared to c-SBF counterparts for all process groups. Samples in EBSS demonstrated a much slower corrosion rate than c-SBF samples because of the decreased chloride content and CO2 buffering mechanism of the EBSS.

  4. Electrochemical Investigations of Polycaprolactone-Coated AZ31 Mg Alloy in Earle's Balance Salt Solution and Conventional Simulated Body Fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilke, Benjamin M.; Zhang, Lei

    2016-06-01

    Polycaprolactone (PCL) coating has been shown to increase the corrosion resistance of magnesium alloys when exposed to a simulated body fluid. A PCL dip coating was applied to AZ31 Mg alloy. Samples were immersed in both Earle's Balance Salt Solution (EBSS) and conventional simulated body fluids (c-SBF) up to 14 days. Microscopic morphology, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy, and potentiodynamic polarization tests were performed to evaluate the corrosion behavior changes of PCL coatings against immersion times in EBSS and c-SBF as compared to the uncoated AZ31 substrate. PCL-coated samples demonstrated improved corrosion resistance compared to bare AZ31 in both EBSS and c-SBF, indicating that the PCL coating exhibited good corrosion protection of AZ31 in simulated body fluid. Samples immersed in EBSS showed significantly higher electrochemical impedance values and slower corrosion progression as compared to the samples in c-SBF, because of the decreased chloride content and CO2 buffering mechanism of the EBSS.

  5. A balanced salt solution that prevents agglomeration of nano iron oxo-hydroxides in serum-free cellular assays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pereira, Dora I. A.; Lederer, Bianca; Powell, Jonathan J.

    2015-01-01

    Nano iron oxo-hydroxides have numerous and increasing applications in biology and medicine. Assessment of their uptake and toxicity often requires cell culture but maintaining iron oxides uniformly nano-dispersed in such conditions can be challenging. We describe a balanced salt solution (BSS) compatible with cellular assays for use in such investigations. We determined hydrodynamic particle size and dispersibility of nano iron in BSS. The BSS, containing 130 mM NaCl, 10 mM KCl, 1 mM MgSO4, 5 mM glucose and 1.8 mM CaCl2 in 10 mM PIPES buffer (pH 7.4), was capable of maintaining nanoparticulate tartrate-modified Fe(III) oxo-hydroxide (i.e. nano Fe) mono-disperse (≥95% nanoparticulate) with a mean hydrodynamic particle diameter of 6.1 ± 0.3 nm. This size was similar to the native form of the nano Fe material (i.e. as synthesized) with a mean hydrodynamic particle diameter of 4.3 ± 0.1 nm in water. Furthermore, we show that BSS also adequately maintains nano Fe dispersion when supplemented with inhibitors of particle uptake or lysosomal acidification, namely chloropromazine and monensin, and when used at pHs 6.5 or 5.8. In conclusion, we provide a method for nanodispersion of iron oxo-hydroxides that is suitable for short term (1-3 h) cellular exposure investigations.

  6. Electrochromic salts, solutions, and devices

    DOEpatents

    Burrell, Anthony K.; Warner, Benjamin P.; McClesky,7,064,212 T. Mark

    2006-06-20

    Electrochromic salts. Electrochromic salts of dicationic viologens such as methyl viologen and benzyl viologen associated with anions selected from bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide, bis(perfluoroethylsulfonyl)imide, and tris(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)methide are produced by metathesis with the corresponding viologen dihalide. They are highly soluble in molten quarternary ammonium salts and together with a suitable reductant provide electrolyte solutions that are used in electrochromic windows.

  7. Electrochromic Salts, Solutions, and Devices

    DOEpatents

    Burrell, Anthony K.; Warner, Benjamin P.; McClesky, T. Mark

    2008-10-14

    Electrochromic salts. Electrochromic salts of dicationic viologens such as methyl viologen and benzyl viologen associated with anions selected from bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide, bis(perfluoroethylsulfonyl)imide, and tris(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)methide are produced by metathesis with the corresponding viologen dihalide. They are highly soluble in molten quarternary ammonium salts and together with a suitable reductant provide electrolyte solutions that are used in electrochromic windows.

  8. Electrochromic Salts, Solutions, and Devices

    DOEpatents

    Burrell, Anthony K.; Warner, Benjamin P.; McClesky, T. Mark

    2008-11-11

    Electrochromic salts. Electrochromic salts of dicationic viologens such as methyl viologen and benzyl viologen associated with anions selected from bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide, bis(perfluoroethylsulfonyl)imide, and tris(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)methide are produced by metathesis with the corresponding viologen dihalide. They are highly soluble in molten quarternary ammonium salts and together with a suitable reductant provide electrolyte solutions that are used in electrochromic windows.

  9. Protein aggregation in salt solutions

    PubMed Central

    Kastelic, Miha; Kalyuzhnyi, Yurij V.; Hribar-Lee, Barbara; Dill, Ken A.; Vlachy, Vojko

    2015-01-01

    Protein aggregation is broadly important in diseases and in formulations of biological drugs. Here, we develop a theoretical model for reversible protein–protein aggregation in salt solutions. We treat proteins as hard spheres having square-well-energy binding sites, using Wertheim’s thermodynamic perturbation theory. The necessary condition required for such modeling to be realistic is that proteins in solution during the experiment remain in their compact form. Within this limitation our model gives accurate liquid–liquid coexistence curves for lysozyme and γ IIIa-crystallin solutions in respective buffers. It provides good fits to the cloud-point curves of lysozyme in buffer–salt mixtures as a function of the type and concentration of salt. It than predicts full coexistence curves, osmotic compressibilities, and second virial coefficients under such conditions. This treatment may also be relevant to protein crystallization. PMID:25964322

  10. Development of in vitro fertilized feline embryos in a modified Earle's balanced salt solution: influence of protein supplements and culture dishes on fertilization success and blastocyst formation.

    PubMed

    Kanda, M; Miyazaki, T; Kanda, M; Nakao, H; Tsutsui, T

    1998-04-01

    The effects of protein supplements and culture dish type on in vitro fertilization (IVF) and embryo development in culture were examined in the domestic cat. In Experiment I, follicular oocytes were fertilized and cultured in either 1) modified Earle's balanced salt solution, designated MK-1, supplemented with one of the following: 10% human serum (HS), 10% FCS or 0.4% BSA, or 2) Medium 199 (M-199) supplemented with 10% FCS. Fertilization rates were lower (P < 0.01) in MK-1 + BSA (74.4%), MK-1 + FCS (56.1%), and M-199 + FCS (51.4%) than in MK-1 + HS (94.7%). A greater (P < 0.01) percentage of blastocysts was obtained in MK-1 + HS (50.0%) than in other treatment groups (range, 4.3-17.2%). In Experiment II, the effect of dish type (tissue culture dish, TCD, versus suspension culture dish, SCD) on embryo development was evaluated in MK-1 supplemented with either HS or BSA. Significantly higher proportions of IVF-derived embryos developed to blastocysts at 120 and 144 hr post-insemination, respectively, when cultured in HS/SCD (47.2 and 71.7%) than in BSA/SCD (11.4 and 27.3%) or BSA/TCD (10.4 and 25.0%). At 120 hr post-insemination, there was a lower (P < 0.01) percentage of blastocysts in HS/TCD (22.2%) than in HS/SCD. In Experiment III, six embryos per cat were transferred to the uterine horns of 17 recipients at 144 hr after hCG treatment. Five of 7 recipients which received late morulae cultured in MK-1 + BSA (SCD) for 120 hr became pregnant (71.4%). Eight of 10 recipients which received early blastocysts cultured in MK-1 + HS (SCD) for 120 hr became pregnant (80.0%). We conclude that MK-1 containing HS is highly beneficial for overcoming the in vitro developmental block of IVF-derived feline embryos and increasing the success rate of IVF/ET. PMID:9592713

  11. [Structure and Activity of Fungal Lipases in Bile Salt Solutions].

    PubMed

    Bogdanova, L R; Bakirova, D R; Valiullina, Yu A; Idiyatullin, B Z; Faizullin, D A; Zueva, O S; Zuev, Yu F

    2016-01-01

    The changes in structure and catalytic properties of fungal lipases (Candida rugosa, Rhizomucor miehei, Mucor javanicus) were investigated in micellar solutions of bile salts that differ in hydrophilic-lypophilic balance and reaction medium properties. The methods of circular dichroism and tryptophan fluorescence were applied to estimate the changes in peptide structure within complexes with bile salt micelles. Bile salts do not exert a significant influence on the structure of the enzymes under study: in Rh. miehei and M. javanicus lipases the alpha helix content slightly decreased, the influence of bile salts on the C. rugosa structure was not revealed. Despite negligible structural modifications in the enzymes, in bile salt solutions a considerable change in their catalytic properties was observed: an abrupt decrease in catalytic effectiveness. Substrate-bile salts micelles complex formation was demonstrated by the NMR self-diffusion method. The model of a regulation of fungal lipase activity was proposed. PMID:27192825

  12. Salting-out and Salting-in in Polyelectrolyte Solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Pengfei; Wu, Jianzhong; Wang, Zhen-Gang

    The phase behavior of polyelectrolyte (PE) solutions is governed by complicated interplay involving the mixing entropy, excluded volume, chain connectivity, and electrostatic interactions. Here we study the phase behavior of PE solutions in both salt-free condition and with added salt using a liquid-state (LS) theory based thermodynamic model. The LS model accounts or the hard-core repulsion by the Canahan-Starling equation of state, correlations due to chain connectivity by the first-order thermodynamic perturbation theory, and electrostatic correlations by the mean-spherical approximation. In comparison to the prediction from the well-known Voorn-Overbeek theory, the LS model predicts loop-type binodal curves in the salt-PE concentration diagram at temperatures slightly above the critical temperature of PE solution in salt-free case, consistent with the experimental study. The phase separated region shrinks with increasing temperature. Three scenarios of salting-out and salting-in phenomenon are predicted with addition of salts based, depending on the PE concentration.

  13. SEPARATION OF INORGANIC SALTS FROM ORGANIC SOLUTIONS

    DOEpatents

    Katzin, L.I.; Sullivan, J.C.

    1958-06-24

    A process is described for recovering the nitrates of uranium and plutonium from solution in oxygen-containing organic solvents such as ketones or ethers. The solution of such salts dissolved in an oxygen-containing organic compound is contacted with an ion exchange resin whereby sorption of the entire salt on the resin takes place and then the salt-depleted liquid and the resin are separated from each other. The reaction seems to be based on an anion formation of the entire salt by complexing with the anion of the resin. Strong base or quaternary ammonium type resins can be used successfully in this process.

  14. Ammonia Solubility in High Concentration Salt Solutions

    SciTech Connect

    HEDENGREN, D.C.

    2000-02-01

    Solubility data for ammonia in water and various dilute solutions are abundant in the literature. However, there is a noticeable lack of ammonia solubility data for high salt, basic solutions of various mixtures of salts including those found in many of the Hanford Washington underground waste tanks. As a result, models based on solubility data for dilute salt solutions have been used to extrapolate to high salt solutions. These significant extrapolations need to be checked against actual laboratory data. Some indirect vapor measurements have been made. A more direct approach is to determine the ratio of solubility of ammonia in water to its solubility in high salt solutions. In various experiments, pairs of solutions, one of which is water and the other a high salt solution, are allowed to come to equilibrium with a common ammonia vapor pressure. The ratio of concentrations of ammonia in the two solutions is equal to the ratio of the respective ammonia solubilities (Henry's Law constants) at a given temperature. This information can then be used to refine the models that predict vapor space compositions of ammonia. Ammonia at Hanford is of concern because of its toxicity in the environment and its contribution to the flammability of vapor space gas mixtures in waste tanks.

  15. Coordination chemistry in fused-salt solutions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gruen, D. M.

    1969-01-01

    Spectrophotometric work on structural determinations with fused-salt solutions is reviewed. Constraints placed on the method, as well as interpretation of the spectra, are discussed with parallels drawn to aqueous spectrophotometric curves of the same materials.

  16. Solubility of uranium in alkaline salt solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Hobbs, D.T.; Edwards, T.B.

    1994-03-29

    The solubility of uranium in alkaline salt solutions was investigated to screen for significant factors and interactions among the major salt components and temperature. The components included in the study were the sodium salts of hydroxide, nitrate, nitrite, aluminate, sulfate, and carbonate. General findings from the study included: (1) uranium solubilities are very low (1-20 mg/L) for all solution compositions at hydroxide concentrations from 0.1 to 17 molar (2) carbonate, sulfate, and aluminate are not effective complexants for uranium at high hydroxide concentration, (3) uranium solubility decreases with increasing temperature for most alkaline salt solutions, and (4) uranium solubility increases with changes in solution chemistry that reflect aging of high level waste (increase in nitrite and carbonate concentrations, decrease in nitrate and hydroxide concentrations). A predictive model for the concentration of uranium as a function of component concentrations and temperature was fitted to the data. All of the solution components and temperature were found to be significant. There is a significant lack of fit for the model, which suggests that the dependence on the uranium solubility over the wide range of solution compositions is non-linear and/or that there are other uncontrolled parameters which are important to the uranium solubility.

  17. Scattering by solutions of major sea salts.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaodong; Hu, Lianbo; Twardowski, Michael S; Sullivan, James M

    2009-10-26

    Increased scattering by seawater relative to that by pure water is primarily due to additional fluctuation of the refractive index contributed by sea salts. Salts with different ionic weight and sizes, while barely affecting the scattering that is due to density fluctuations, have a significant effect on the scattering that is due to concentration fluctuations. And this explains the major differences of their total scattering that would be observed. Scattering by solutions of NaCl, the major sea salt, is consistently about 6.7% and 4% lower than seawater of the same mass concentration and of the same refractive index, respectively. Because of ionic interactions, the molecular scattering does not follow the simple addition rule that applies to bulk inherent optical properties, with the total less than the summation of the parts. The possible values of scattering by waters of, such as, Dead Sea or Orca Basin, which have different salt composition from seawater, are discussed. PMID:19997177

  18. Americium separations from high salt solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Mary E. Barr; Gordon D. Jarvinen; Louis D. Schulte; Peter C. Stark; Rebecca M. Chamberlin; Kent D. Abney; Thomas E. Ricketts; Yvette E. Valdez; Richard A. Bartsch

    2000-03-01

    Americium (III) exhibits an unexpectedly high affinity for anion-exchange material from the high-salt evaporator bottoms solutions--an effect which has not been duplicated using simple salt solutions. Similar behavior is observed for its lanthanide homologue, Nd(III), in complex evaporator bottoms surrogate solutions. There appears to be no single controlling factor--acid concentration, total nitrate concentration or solution ionic strength--which accounts for the approximately 2-fold increase in retention of the trivalent ions from complex solutions relative to simple solutions. Calculation of species activities (i.e., water, proton and nitrate) in such concentrated mixed salt solutions is difficult and of questionable accuracy, but it is likely that the answer to forcing formation of anionic nitrate complexes of americium lies in the relative activities of water and nitrate. From a practical viewpoint, the modest americium removal needs (ca. 50--75%) from nitric acid evaporator bottoms allow sufficient latitude for the use of non-optimized conditions such as running existing columns filled with older, well-used Reillex HPQ. Newer materials, such as HPQ-100 and the experimental bifunctional resins, which exhibit higher distribution coefficients, would allow for either increased Am removal or the use of smaller columns. It is also of interest that one of the experimental neutral-donor solid-support extractants, DHDECMP, exhibits a similarly high level of americium (total alpha) removal from EV bottoms and is much less sensitive to total acid content than commercially-available material.

  19. HORSMIC. Horizontal Salt Solution Mining Model

    SciTech Connect

    Russo, A.J.

    1994-01-01

    The code HORSMIC was written to solve the problem of calculating the shape of hydrocarbon (gas or liquid) storage caverns formed by solution mining in bedded salt formations. In the past many storage caverns have been formed by vertically drilling into salt dome formations and solution mining large-aspect-ratio, vertically axisymmetric caverns. This approach is generally not satisfactory for shallow salt beds because it would result in geomechanically-unstable, pancake-shaped caverns. In order to produce a high aspect ratio cavern in the horizontal direction a more complicated strategy must be employed. This code was developed to implement such a strategy, and can be used to estimate the shape of the cavern produced by a prescribed leaching schedule. Multiple trials can then be used to investigate the effects of various pipe hole configurations in order to optimize over the cavern shape.

  20. Oscillations in a Linearly Stratified Salt Solution

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heavers, Richard M.

    2007-01-01

    Our physics students like to watch a ball bouncing underwater. They do this by dropping a weighted plastic ball into a 1000-ml cylinder filled with a linearly stratified salt-water solution at room temperature. The ball oscillates and comes to rest at about mid-depth. Its motion is analogous to the damped vertical oscillations of a mass hanging…

  1. Comparative evaluation of maintenance of cell viability of an experimental transport media “coconut water” with Hank's balanced salt solution and milk, for transportation of an avulsed tooth: An in vitro cell culture study

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Toby; Gopikrishna, Velayutham; Kandaswamy, Deivanayagam

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the efficiency of a new storage medium, coconut water, in comparison with other traditional storage media like Hank's balanced salt solution (HBBS) and milk, in maintaining the viability of an established cell line BHK-21/C13 (baby hamster kidney fibroblasts) using the direct suspension cell culture technique. The storage media tested in the study were divided into three major groups and two control groups - Group A: HBBS, Group B: milk, and Group C: coconut water. The positive and negative controls corresponded to 0-minute and 24-hour dry times respectively. The three groups were then divided into five subgroups, each denoting the storage time periods 15 min, 30 min, 45 min, 60 min and 120 min respectively. The cell line BHK-21/C13 was subcultured and the number of cells was standardized by making a cell suspension using Minimal Essential Medium in five culture plates. One ml of each experimental group (HBBS, milk and coconut water) was added to eight wells of each culture plate. The culture plates containing the cells and the experimental groups were incubated for the respective time periods. The cells were then counted with a Neubauer counting chamber, under light microscope. The results were statistically analyzed using One-way ANOVA and Multiple Range Test using the Tukey-HSD procedure to identify the significant groups at p ≤ 0.05. Within the parameters of this study, it appears that coconut water may be a better alternative to HBSS or milk, in terms of maintaining cell viability. Coconut water can be used as a superior transport medium for avulsed teeth. PMID:20142880

  2. Exact solutions of population balance equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Fubiao; Flood, Adrian E.; Meleshko, Sergey V.

    2016-07-01

    Population balance equations have been used to model a wide range of processes including polymerization, crystallization, cloud formation, and cell dynamics, but the lack of analytical solutions necessitates the use of numerical techniques. The one-dimensional homogeneous population balance equation with time dependent but size independent growth rate and time dependent nucleation rate is investigated. The corresponding system of equations is solved analytically in this paper.

  3. Method for preparing salt solutions having desired properties

    DOEpatents

    Ally, Moonis R.; Braunstein, Jerry

    1994-01-01

    The specification discloses a method for preparing salt solutions which exhibit desired thermodynamic properties. The method enables prediction of the value of the thermodynamic properties for single and multiple salt solutions over a wide range of conditions from activity data and constants which are independent of concentration and temperature. A particular application of the invention is in the control of salt solutions in a process to provide a salt solution which exhibits the desired properties.

  4. SOLUTION MINING IN SALT DOMES OF THE GULF COAST EMBAYMENT

    SciTech Connect

    Griswold, G. B.

    1981-02-01

    Following a description of salt resources in the salt domes of the gulf coast embayment, mining, particularly solution mining, is described. A scenario is constructed which could lead to release of radioactive waste stored in a salt dome via inadvertent solution mining and the consequences of this scenario are analyzed.

  5. Selenium mass balance in the Great Salt Lake, Utah

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Diaz, X.; Johnson, W.P.; Naftz, D.L.

    2009-01-01

    A mass balance for Se in the south arm of the Great Salt Lake was developed for September 2006 to August 2007 of monitoring for Se loads and removal flows. The combined removal flows (sedimentation and volatilization) totaled to a geometric mean value of 2079??kg Se/yr, with the estimated low value being 1255??kg Se/yr, and an estimated high value of 3143??kg Se/yr at the 68% confidence level. The total (particulates + dissolved) loads (via runoff) were about 1560??kg Se/yr, for which the error is expected to be ?? 15% for the measured loads. Comparison of volatilization to sedimentation flux demonstrates that volatilization rather than sedimentation is likely the major mechanism of selenium removal from the Great Salt Lake. The measured loss flows balance (within the range of uncertainties), and possibly surpass, the measured annual loads. Concentration histories were modeled using a simple mass balance, which indicated that no significant change in Se concentration was expected during the period of study. Surprisingly, the measured total Se concentration increased during the period of the study, indicating that the removal processes operate at their low estimated rates, and/or there are unmeasured selenium loads entering the lake. The selenium concentration trajectories were compared to those of other trace metals to assess the significance of selenium concentration trends. ?? 2008 Elsevier B.V.

  6. Solubility of pllutonium in alkaline salt solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Hobbs, D.T.; Edwards, T.B.

    1993-02-26

    Plutonium solubility data from several studies have been evaluated. For each data set, a predictive model has been developed where appropriate. In addition, a statistical model and corresponding prediction intervals for plutonium solubility as a quadratic function of the hydroxide concentration have been developed. Because of the wide range of solution compositions, the solubility of plutonium can vary by as much as three orders of magnitude for any given hydroxide concentration and still remain within the prediction interval. Any nuclear safety assessments that depend on the maximum amount of plutonium dissolved in alkaline salt solutions should use concentrations at least as great as the upper prediction limits developed in this study. To increase the confidence in the prediction model, it is recommended that additional solubility tests be conducted at low hydroxide concentrations and with all of the other solution components involved. To validate the model for application to actual waste solutions, it is recommended that the plutonium solubilities in actual waste solutions be determined and compared to the values predicted by the quadratic model.

  7. Ion aggregation in high salt solutions. III. Computational vibrational spectroscopy of HDO in aqueous salt solutions.

    PubMed

    Choi, Jun-Ho; Kim, Heejae; Kim, Seongheun; Lim, Sohee; Chon, Bonghwan; Cho, Minhaeng

    2015-05-28

    The vibrational frequency, frequency fluctuation dynamics, and transition dipole moment of the O-D stretch mode of HDO molecule in aqueous solutions are strongly dependent on its local electrostatic environment and hydrogen-bond network structure. Therefore, the time-resolved vibrational spectroscopy the O-D stretch mode has been particularly used to investigate specific ion effects on water structure. Despite prolonged efforts to understand the interplay of O-D vibrational dynamics with local water hydrogen-bond network and ion aggregate structures in high salt solutions, still there exists a gap between theory and experiment due to a lack of quantitative model for accurately describing O-D stretch frequency in high salt solutions. To fill this gap, we have performed numerical simulations of Raman scattering and IR absorption spectra of the O-D stretch mode of HDO in highly concentrated NaCl and KSCN solutions and compared them with experimental results. Carrying out extensive quantum chemistry calculations on not only water clusters but also ion-water clusters, we first developed a distributed vibrational solvatochromic charge model for the O-D stretch mode in aqueous salt solutions. Furthermore, the non-Condon effect on the vibrational transition dipole moment of the O-D stretch mode was fully taken into consideration with the charge response kernel that is non-local polarizability density. From the fluctuating O-D stretch mode frequencies and transition dipole vectors obtained from the molecular dynamics simulations, the O-D stretch Raman scattering and IR absorption spectra of HDO in salt solutions could be calculated. The polarization effect on the transition dipole vector of the O-D stretch mode is shown to be important and the asymmetric line shapes of the O-D stretch Raman scattering and IR absorption spectra of HDO especially in highly concentrated NaCl and KSCN solutions are in quantitative agreement with experimental results. We anticipate that this

  8. Ion aggregation in high salt solutions. III. Computational vibrational spectroscopy of HDO in aqueous salt solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, Jun-Ho; Lim, Sohee; Chon, Bonghwan; Cho, Minhaeng; Kim, Heejae; Kim, Seongheun

    2015-05-28

    The vibrational frequency, frequency fluctuation dynamics, and transition dipole moment of the O—D stretch mode of HDO molecule in aqueous solutions are strongly dependent on its local electrostatic environment and hydrogen-bond network structure. Therefore, the time-resolved vibrational spectroscopy the O—D stretch mode has been particularly used to investigate specific ion effects on water structure. Despite prolonged efforts to understand the interplay of O—D vibrational dynamics with local water hydrogen-bond network and ion aggregate structures in high salt solutions, still there exists a gap between theory and experiment due to a lack of quantitative model for accurately describing O—D stretch frequency in high salt solutions. To fill this gap, we have performed numerical simulations of Raman scattering and IR absorption spectra of the O—D stretch mode of HDO in highly concentrated NaCl and KSCN solutions and compared them with experimental results. Carrying out extensive quantum chemistry calculations on not only water clusters but also ion-water clusters, we first developed a distributed vibrational solvatochromic charge model for the O—D stretch mode in aqueous salt solutions. Furthermore, the non-Condon effect on the vibrational transition dipole moment of the O—D stretch mode was fully taken into consideration with the charge response kernel that is non-local polarizability density. From the fluctuating O—D stretch mode frequencies and transition dipole vectors obtained from the molecular dynamics simulations, the O—D stretch Raman scattering and IR absorption spectra of HDO in salt solutions could be calculated. The polarization effect on the transition dipole vector of the O—D stretch mode is shown to be important and the asymmetric line shapes of the O—D stretch Raman scattering and IR absorption spectra of HDO especially in highly concentrated NaCl and KSCN solutions are in quantitative agreement with experimental results. We

  9. Surface viscoelasticity of concentrated salt solutions: specific ion effects.

    PubMed

    Safouane, Mahassine; Langevin, Dominique

    2009-01-12

    Herein, we study the viscoelastic response of concentrated salt solutions using surface waves excited by electrocapillarity. We show that the hydrodynamic behaviour of the solutions is similar to that of water at concentrations up to 2 m-well above the concentration C*, at which inhibition of bubble coalescence occurs in these solutions. This result excludes the occurrence of changes in the slip conditions at C*, postulated to explain this inhibition. Our study is carried out on salts that both increase and decrease the surface tension. We observe that the salt that decreases the tension does not change the surface behaviour at all, whereas the other two salts essentially produce negative contributions to the surface viscoelasticity at very high salt concentrations. The effects observed are quite large and remain to be explained. PMID:19072821

  10. Salt extraction from hydrogen-sulfide scrubber solution using electrodialysis

    SciTech Connect

    Jamaluddin, A.K.M.; Kennedy, M.W.; McManus, D.; Nazarko, T.W.

    1995-05-01

    The buildup of undesirable sulfur compounds (sulfates and thiosulfates) reduces the scrubbing effectiveness of the LO-CAT I autocirculation sulfur recovery process from acid-gas stream. Among various processes, withdrawing and disposing of a portion of the scrubber solution and replacing this blowdown with fresh solution have been the practice in the industry. The application of the electrodialysis system to recycle the blowdown is presented. Experiments were carried out using electrodialysis to separate salts (sulfates and thiosulfates) from the LO-CAT I autocirculation scrubber solution containing organic chelating agents, iron, and various alkali-metal inorganic salts. The results indicated that the electrodialysis was successful in removing 50% of the salts from the scrubber solution with less than 8% loss of organic and 8% loss of carbonates. The fluxes of the undesired salt species were high even at low current densities (200 to 400 A/m{sup 2}).

  11. Hemodynamics and Salt-and-Water Balance Link Sodium Storage and Vascular Dysfunction in Salt-Sensitive Subjects.

    PubMed

    Laffer, Cheryl L; Scott, Robert C; Titze, Jens M; Luft, Friedrich C; Elijovich, Fernando

    2016-07-01

    We investigated 24-hour hemodynamic changes produced by salt loading and depletion in 8 salt-sensitive (SS) and 13 salt-resistant (SR) normotensive volunteers. After salt loading, mean arterial pressure was higher in SS (96.5±2.8) than in SR (84.2±2.7 mm Hg), P<0.01, owing to higher total peripheral resistance in SS (1791±148) than in SR (1549±66 dyn*cm(-5)*s), P=0.05, whereas cardiac output was not different between groups (SS 4.5±0.3 versus SR 4.4±0.2 L/min, not significant). Following salt depletion, cardiac output was equally reduced in both groups. Total peripheral resistance increased 24±6% (P<0.001) in SR, whose mean arterial pressure remained unchanged. In contrast, total peripheral resistance did not change in SS (1±6%, not significant). Thus, their mean arterial pressure was reduced, abolishing the mean arterial pressure difference between groups. SS had higher E/e' ratios than SR in both phases of the protocol. In these 21 subjects and in 32 hypertensive patients, Na(+) balance was similar in SR and SS during salt loading or depletion. However, SR did not gain weight during salt retention (-158±250 g), whereas SS did (819±204), commensurate to iso-osmolar water retention. During salt depletion, SR lost the expected amount of weight for iso-osmolar Na(+) excretion, whereas SS lost a greater amount that failed to fully correct the fluid retention from the previous day. We conclude that SS are unable to modulate total peripheral resistance in response to salt depletion, mirroring their inability to vasodilate in response to salt loading. We suggest that differences in water balance between SS and SR indicate differences in salt-and-water storage in the interstitial compartment that may relate to vascular dysfunction in SS. PMID:27160204

  12. METHOD AND APPARATUS FOR CALCINING SALT SOLUTIONS

    DOEpatents

    Lawroski, S.; Jonke, A.A.; Taecker, R.G.

    1961-10-31

    A method is given for converting uranyl nitrate solution into solid UO/ sub 3/, The solution is sprayed horizontally into a fluidized bed of UO/sub 3/ particles at 310 to 350 deg C by a nozzle of the coaxial air jet type at about 26 psig, Under these conditions the desired conversion takes place, and caking in the bed is avoided.

  13. Properties of alkali-halide salt solutions about polarizable nanoparticle solutes for different ion models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wynveen, Aaron; Bresme, Fernando

    2010-10-01

    We investigate the distributions of various salts about large hydrophobic polarizable solutes in aqueous electrolyte solutions. The solutes are modeled as nanometer-sized cylindrical objects, a scale relevant to biomolecules and nanomaterials, and particularly high aspect ratio nanoparticles. Interactions, including image charge forces arising from the finite polarizability of the solute, between explicit solvent/ions and the solute are computed explicitly using a molecular dynamics simulation methodology we have recently introduced. Comparisons are made between several salt species and different models of the force fields for each ionic component of the salt. We find evidence that both small cations, Li+, and large anions, I-, adsorb at hydrophobic interfaces. Our results indicate that the ion structure about the solute is strongly dependent on the force field investigated, suggesting that ion selectivity is quite sensitive to the respective parameters defining the ion's size and binding energy as well as to the polarizability of the solute.

  14. High-Oxygen-Balance Furazan Anions: A Good Choice for High-Performance Energetic Salts.

    PubMed

    Huang, Haifeng; Shi, Yameng; Liu, Yanfang; Yang, Jun

    2016-06-01

    3,4-Diaminofurazan was conveniently converted into energetic salts of 3,4-dinitraminofurazan that were paired with nitrogen-rich cations in fewer than three steps. Seven energetic salts were prepared and fully characterized by multinuclear ((1) H, (13) C) NMR and IR spectroscopy, differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), and elemental analysis. In addition, the structures of the ammonium salt (2), hydrazinium salt (4), hydroxylammonium salt (5), aminoguanidinium salt (7), diaminoguanidinium salt (8) and triaminoguanidinium salt of 3,4-dinitraminofurazan (9) were further confirmed by single-crystal X-ray diffraction. The densities of these salts were between 1.673 (8) and 1.791 g cm(-3) (5), whilst their oxygen balances were between -48.20 % (9) and -6.25 % (5). These salts showed high thermal stabilities, with decomposition temperatures between 179 (5) and 283 °C (6). Their sensitivities towards impact and friction were measured by BAM equipment to be between <1 J (9) and >40 J (6-8) and 64 N (9) and >360 N (6), respectively. The detonation performance of these compounds, which was calculated by using the EXPLO5 program, revealed detonation pressures of between 28.0 (6) and 40.5 GPa (5) and detonation velocities of between 8404 (6) and 9407 m s(-1) (5). PMID:26956777

  15. Salt Effects on Surface Tethered Peptides in Solution

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Jun; Wong, Ka-Yiu; Lynch, Gillian C.; Gao, Xiaolian; Pettitt, B. Montgomery

    2009-01-01

    The capability to manipulate proteins/peptide fragments at liquid-solid interfaces has led to tremendous applications in detectors and biotechnology. Therefore, understanding the detailed molecular behavior of proteins and peptides tethered on a hard material surface is an interesting and important topic. The inhomogeneity presented by surfaces as well as ions in the solution plays an important role in the thermodynamics and kinetics of the tethered proteins. In this study, we perform a series of molecular dynamics simulations of a pentapeptide RHSVV, a p53 epitope, tethered on a prepared microarray surface in various salt concentrations (0 M, 0.14 M, 0.5 M, and 1M NaCl), as well as free in ionic solution (0M, 0.5M, and 1M). The conformational space the tethered peptide visits largely overlaps with the free peptide in solution. However, surface tethering as well as the salt concentration changes both the thermodynamics and kinetics of the peptide. Frequent conformational changes are observed during the simulations, and tend to be slowed down by both increasing the salt concentration and surface tethering. The local composition of ions at different salt concentrations is also compared between the tethered and free peptide. PMID:19548651

  16. Photoionization of Sodium Salt Solutions in a Liquid Jet

    SciTech Connect

    Grieves, G. A.; Petrik, Nikolay G.; Herring-Captain, J.; Olanrewaju, B.; Aleksandrov, A.; Tonkyn, Russell G.; Barlow, Stephan E.; Kimmel, Gregory A.; Orlando, Thomas M.

    2008-06-05

    A liquid microjet was employed to examine the gas/liquid interface of aqueous sodium halide (Na+X-, X=Cl, Br, I) salt solutions. Laser excitation at 193 nm produced and removed cations of the form H+(H2O)n and Na+(H2O)m from liquid jet surfaces containing either NaCl, NaBr or NaI. The protonated water cluster yield varied inversely with increasing salt concentration, while the solvated sodium ion cluster yield varied by anion type. The distribution of H+(H2O)n at low salt concentration is identical to that observed from low-energy electron irradiated amorphous ice and the production of these clusters can be accounted for using a localized ionization/Coulomb expulsion model. Production of Na+(H2O)m is not accounted for by this model but requires ionization of solvation shell waters and a contact ion/Coulomb expulsion mechanism. The reduced yields of Na+(H2O)m from high concentration (10-2 and 10-1 M) NaBr and NaI solutions indicate a propensity for Br- and I- at the solution surfaces and interfaces. This is supported by the observation of multiphoton induced production and desorption of Br+ and I+ from the 10-2 and 10-1 M solution surfaces.

  17. Fabrication of CPA Salt Pill with Circulating Solution Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoshino, A.; Tokoi, K.; Ishisaki, Y.; Shinozaki, K.; McCammon, D.

    2008-05-01

    We report results on fabrication of a Chromium Potassium Alum (CPA) salt pill. CPA is a typical paramagnetic salt used as refrigerant of Adiabatic Demagnetization Refrigerator (ADR) because of its low Curie point, 4 11 mK. We made an test model of CPA salt pill by fast crystallizing method, namely circulating solution between 36°C and 15°C. The crystallizing rate was 0.5 g h-1, and 40 g of CPA crystal was obtained inside a stainless steel cylinder equipped with 160 copper wires. The cooling test was operated utilizing a commercial ADR system. We attached three thermometers and four heaters to the salt pill, in order to measure thermal conductance among different parts of the pill. It is confirmed that our salt pill was cooled down from B/ T=4 T/2 K to 64 mK at zero magnetic field. We suspect the cause of limiting the cooling temperature in the present level to be the dehydration of CPA, non-uniformity of magnetic field, and stainless steel of the pill which has large heat capacity below 0.1 K.

  18. CRITICALITY SAFETY OF PROCESSING SALT SOLUTION AT SRS

    SciTech Connect

    Stephens, K; Davoud Eghbali, D; Michelle Abney, M

    2008-01-15

    High level radioactive liquid waste generated as a result of the production of nuclear material for the United States defense program at the Savannah River Site has been stored as 36 million gallons in underground tanks. About ten percent of the waste volume is sludge, composed of insoluble metal hydroxides primarily hydroxides of Mn, Fe, Al, Hg, and most radionuclides including fission products. The remaining ninety percent of the waste volume is saltcake, composed of primarily sodium (nitrites, nitrates, and aluminates) and hydroxides. Saltcakes account for 30% of the radioactivity while the sludge accounts for 70% of the radioactivity. A pilot plant salt disposition processing system has been designed at the Savannah River Site for interim processing of salt solution and is composed of two facilities: the Actinide Removal Process Facility (ARPF) and the Modular Caustic Side Solvent Extraction Unit (MCU). Data from the pilot plant salt processing system will be used for future processing salt at a much higher rate in a new salt processing facility. Saltcake contains significant amounts of actinides, and other long-lived radioactive nuclides such as strontium and cesium that must be extracted prior to disposal as low level waste. The extracted radioactive nuclides will be mixed with the sludge from waste tanks and vitrified in another facility. Because of the presence of highly enriched uranium in the saltcake, there is a criticality concern associated with concentration and/or accumulation of fissionable material in the ARP and MCU.

  19. Catchment salt balances in the Queensland Murray-Darling Basin, Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biggs, Andrew J. W.; Silburn, D. Mark; Power, R. Edward

    2013-09-01

    Catchment salt mass balances and export/import ratios were calculated for 55 gauging stations in nine major catchments across the Queensland Murray-Darling Basin (QMDB), Australia. Salt inputs were comprised of atmospheric, groundwater and inter-basin transfer contributions, while exports were derived from model runs calibrated to streamflow data and flow-salt relationships. Catchment atmospheric salt inputs were larger than groundwater inputs in the major catchments, with the exception of the Condamine catchment. Across the whole QMDB, the magnitude of atmospheric and groundwater inputs is potentially equal. Average annual streamflow salt export is generally much less than salt input, even when atmospheric inputs alone are considered, and is strongly influenced by episodic, large events. The exceptions to this are some smaller salt-affected upland catchments in the eastern QMDB where flow is more continual (i.e. baseflow occurs) and stream salinity is higher - a result of long-term land use change impacts. Variability in catchment salt export/import ratio (E/I) as a result of different calculation methods for both inputs and outputs creates a wide range in possible E/I for some sites, but trends remain the same. Losses of stream water to floodplains, seepage and extractions in lower portions of catchments leads to significant reductions in E/I with distance downstream. It appears that in general, the natural status of the QMDB is one of salt accumulation and significant hydrologic changes - as represented through salt mass balance calculations - are largely confined to the eastern half of the Basin, although further change may yet express in the landscape.

  20. Intravenous balanced solutions: from physiology to clinical evidence.

    PubMed

    Langer, Thomas; Santini, Alessandro; Scotti, Eleonora; Van Regenmortel, Niels; Malbrain, Manu L N G; Caironi, Pietro

    2015-01-01

    "Balanced" solutions are commonly defined as intravenous fluids having an electrolyte composition close to that of plasma. As such, they should minimally affect acid-base equilibrium, as compared to the commonly reported 0.9% NaCl-related hyperchloremic metabolic acidosis. Recently, the term "balanced" solution has been also employed to indicate intravenous fluids with low chloride content, being the concentration of this electrolyte the most altered and supra-physiologic in 0.9% NaCl as compared to plasma, and based upon a suggested detrimental effect on renal function associated with hyperchloremia. Despite efforts for its identification, the ideal balanced solution, with minimal effects on acid-base status, low chloride content, and adequate tonicity, is not yet available. After the accumulation of pre-clinical and clinical physiologic data, in the last three years, several clinical trials, mostly observational and retrospective, have addressed the question of whether the use of balanced solutions has beneficial effects as compared to the standard of care, sometimes even suggesting an improvement in survival. Nonetheless, the first large randomized controlled trial comparing the effects of a balanced vs. unbalanced solution on renal function in critically-ill patients (SPLIT trial, the 0.9% Saline vs Plasma-Lyte 148 for Intensive Cate Unit Fluid Therapy), just recently published, showed identical equipoise between the two treatments. In the present review, we offer a comprehensive and updated summary on this issue, firstly, by providing a full physiological background of balanced solutions, secondly, by summarizing their potential pathophysiologic effects, and lastly, by presenting the clinical evidence available to support, at the moment, their use. PMID:26588483

  1. Scaling Equations for a Biopolymer in Salt Solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geissler, Erik; Hecht, Anne-Marie; Horkay, Ferenc

    2007-12-01

    The effect of the simultaneous presence of monovalent and divalent cations on the thermodynamics of polyelectrolyte solutions is an incompletely solved problem. In physiological conditions, combinations of these ions affect structure formation in biopolymer systems. Dynamic light scattering measurements of the collective diffusion coefficient D and the osmotic compressibility of semidilute hyaluronan solutions containing different ratios of sodium and calcium ions are compared with simple polyelectrolyte models. Scaling relationships are proposed in terms of polymer concentration and ionic strength J of the added salt. Differences in the effects of sodium and calcium ions are found to be expressed only through J.

  2. SODIUM ALUMINOSILICATE FOULING AND CLEANING OF DECONTAMINATED SALT SOLUTION COALESCERS

    SciTech Connect

    Poirier, M; Thomas Peters, T; Fernando Fondeur, F; Samuel Fink, S

    2008-10-28

    During initial non-radioactive operations at the Modular Caustic Side Solvent Extraction Unit (MCU), the pressure drop across the decontaminated salt solution coalescer reached {approx}10 psi while processing {approx}1250 gallons of salt solution, indicating possible fouling or plugging of the coalescer. An analysis of the feed solution and the 'plugged coalescer' concluded that the plugging was due to sodium aluminosilicate solids. MCU personnel requested Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) to investigate the formation of the sodium aluminosilicate solids (NAS) and the impact of the solids on the decontaminated salt solution coalescer. Researchers performed developmental testing of the cleaning protocols with a bench-scale coalescer container 1-inch long segments of a new coalescer element fouled using simulant solution. In addition, the authors obtained a 'plugged' Decontaminated Salt Solution coalescer from non-radioactive testing in the MCU and cleaned it according to the proposed cleaning procedure. Conclusions from this testing include the following: (1) Testing with the bench-scale coalescer showed an increase in pressure drop from solid particles, but the increase was not as large as observed at MCU. (2) Cleaning the bench-scale coalescer with nitric acid reduced the pressure drop and removed a large amount of solid particles (11 g of bayerite if all aluminum is present in that form or 23 g of sodium aluminosilicate if all silicon is present in that form). (3) Based on analysis of the cleaning solutions from bench-scale test, the 'dirt capacity' of a 40 inch coalescer for the NAS solids tested is calculated as 450-950 grams. (4) Cleaning the full-scale coalescer with nitric acid reduced the pressure drop and removed a large amount of solid particles (60 g of aluminum and 5 g of silicon). (5) Piping holdup in the full-scale coalescer system caused the pH to differ from the target value. Comparable hold-up in the facility could lead to less effective

  3. Effects of ion exchange on stream solute fluxes in a basin receiving highway deicing salts

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Shanley, J.B.

    1994-01-01

    At Fever Brook, a 1260-ha forested basin in central Massachusetts, highway deicing salt application increased the solute flux in streamflow by 120% above background flux (equivalent basis) during a 2-yr period. Attempts to isolate the nonsalt component of stream solute fluxes have commonly subtracted salt contributions based on the net Cl flux (Cl output in streamflow minus Cl input in precipitation). In these studies, any net Na flux in excess of the amount needed to balance the net Cl flux has been attributed to weathering. At Fever Brook, however, the net output of Na was less than the net output of Cl, suggesting a loss of Na within the basin. The Na sink was inferred to be cation exchange of Na for Ca and Mg in the soil. A method was developed to quantify the exchange based on a Na budget, which included an independent estimate of the Na flux from weathering. The amount of exchange was apportioned to Ca and Mg based on their relative concentrations in the stream. The background fluxes of Ca and Mg (i.e., those that would occur in the absence of deicing salts) were calculated by subtracting the amounts from ion exchange plus the much smaller direct contributions in deicing salts from the observed fluxes. Ion exchange and direct salt contributions increased the net output fluxes of Ca and Mg, each by 44% above background. In basins that receive deicing salts, failure to account for cation exchange thus may result in an underestimate of the flux of Na from weathering and overestimates of the fluxes of Ca and Mg from weathering.

  4. Electrical conductivity of aqueous solutions of aluminum salts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vila, J.; Rilo, E.; Segade, L.; Cabeza, O.; Varela, L. M.

    2005-03-01

    We present experimental measurements of the specific electrical conductivity (σ) in aqueous solutions of aluminum salts at different temperatures, covering all salt concentrations from saturation to infinite dilution. The salts employed were AlCl3 , AlBr3 , AlI3 , and Al(NO3)3 , which present a 1:3 relationship between the electrical charges of anion and cation. In addition, we have measured the density in all ranges of concentrations of the four aqueous electrolyte solutions at 298.15K . The measured densities show an almost linear behavior with concentration, and we have fitted it to a second order polynomial with very high degree of approximation. The measurement of the specific conductivity at constant temperature reveals the existence of maxima in the conductivity vs concentration curves at molar concentrations around 1.5M for the three halide solutions studied, and at approximately 2M for the nitrate. We present a theoretical foundation for the existence of these maxima, based on the classical Debye-Hückel-Onsager hydrodynamic mean-field framework for electrical transport and its high concentration extensions, and also a brief consideration of ionic frictional coefficients using mode-coupling theory. We also found that the calculated values of the equivalent conductance vary in an approximately linear way with the square root of the concentration at concentrations as high as those where the maximum of σ appears. Finally, and for completeness, we have measured the temperature dependence of the electrical conductivity at selected concentrations from 283to353K , and performed a fit to an exponential equation of the Vogel-Fulcher-Tamman type. The values of the calculated temperatures of null mobility of the four salts are reported.

  5. Faraday Discussion 160 Introductory Lecture: Interpreting and Predicting Hofmeister Salt Ion and Solute Effects on Biopolymer and Model Processes Using the Solute Partitioning Model

    PubMed Central

    Record, M. Thomas; Guinn, Emily; Pegram, Laurel; Capp, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Understanding how Hofmeister salt ions and other solutes interact with proteins, nucleic acids, other biopolymers and water and thereby affect protein and nucleic acid processes as well as model processes (e.g solubility of model compounds) in aqueous solution is a longstanding goal of biophysical research. Empirical Hofmeister salt and solute “m-values” (derivatives of the observed standard free energy change for a model or biopolymer process with respect to solute or salt concentration m3) are equal to differences in chemical potential derivatives: m-value = Δ(dμ2/dm3) = Δμ23 which quantify the preferential interactions of the solute or salt with the surface of the biopolymer or model system (component 2) exposed or buried in the process. Using the SPM, we dissect μ23 values for interactions of a solute or Hofmeister salt with a set of model compounds displaying the key functional groups of biopolymers to obtain interaction potentials (called α-values) that quantify the interaction of the solute or salt per unit area of each functional group or type of surface. Interpreted using the SPM, these α-values provide quantitative information about both the hydration of functional groups and the competitive interaction of water and the solute or salt with functional groups. The analysis corroborates and quantifies previous proposals that the Hofmeister anion and cation series for biopolymer processes are determined by ion-specific, mostly unfavorable interactions with hydrocarbon surfaces; the balance between these unfavorable nonpolar interactions and often-favorable interactions of ions with polar functional groups determine the series null points. The placement of urea and glycine betaine (GB) at opposite ends of the corresponding series of nonelectrolytes results from the favorable interactions of urea, and unfavorable interactions of GB, with many (but not all) biopolymer functional groups. Interaction potentials and local-bulk partition coefficients

  6. 21 CFR 864.2875 - Balanced salt solutions or formulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Cell And Tissue Culture Products § 864.2875... of most cell culture systems. This media component controls for pH, osmotic pressure, energy...

  7. 21 CFR 864.2875 - Balanced salt solutions or formulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Cell And Tissue Culture Products § 864.2875... of most cell culture systems. This media component controls for pH, osmotic pressure, energy...

  8. 21 CFR 864.2875 - Balanced salt solutions or formulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Cell And Tissue Culture Products § 864.2875... of most cell culture systems. This media component controls for pH, osmotic pressure, energy...

  9. 21 CFR 864.2875 - Balanced salt solutions or formulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Cell And Tissue Culture Products § 864.2875... of most cell culture systems. This media component controls for pH, osmotic pressure, energy...

  10. 21 CFR 864.2875 - Balanced salt solutions or formulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Cell And Tissue Culture Products § 864.2875... of most cell culture systems. This media component controls for pH, osmotic pressure, energy...

  11. Simulation of osmotic pressure in concentrated aqueous salt solutions.

    SciTech Connect

    Luo, Y.; Roux, B.; Univ. of Chicago

    2010-01-01

    Accurate force fields are critical for meaningful simulation studies of highly concentrated electrolytes. The ion models that are widely used in biomolecular simulations do not necessarily reproduce the correct behavior at finite concentrations. In principle, the osmotic pressure is a key thermodynamic property that could be used to test and refine force field parameters for concentrated solutions. Here we describe a novel, simple, and practical method to compute the osmotic pressure directly from molecular dynamics (MD) simulation of concentrated aqueous solutions by introducing an idealized semipermeable membrane. Simple models for Na+, K+, and Cl- are tested and calibrated to accurately reproduce the experimental osmotic pressure at high salt concentration, up to the solubility limit of 4-5 M. The methodology is general and can be extended to any type of solute as well as nonadditive polarizable force fields.

  12. Is Perioperative Fluid and Salt Balance a Contributing Factor in Postoperative Worsening of Obstructive Sleep Apnea?

    PubMed

    Lam, Thach; Singh, Mandeep; Yadollahi, Azadeh; Chung, Frances

    2016-05-01

    An understanding of the potential mechanisms underlying recurrent upper airway collapse may help anesthesiologists better manage patients in the postoperative period. There is convincing evidence in the sleep medicine literature to suggest that a positive fluid and salt balance can worsen upper airway collapse in patients with obstructive sleep apnea through the redistribution of fluid from the legs into the neck and upper airway while supine, in a process known as "rostral fluid shift." According to this theory, during the day the volume from a fluid bolus or from fluid overload states (i.e., heart failure and chronic kidney disease) accumulates in the legs due to gravity, and when a person lies supine at night, the fluid shifts rostrally to the neck, also owing to gravity. The fluid in the neck can increase the extraluminal pressure around the upper airways, causing the upper airways to narrow and predisposing to upper airway collapse. Similarly, surgical patients also incur large fluid and salt balance shifts, and when recovered supine, this may promote fluid redistribution to the neck and upper airways. In this commentary, we summarize the sleep medicine literature on the impact of fluid and salt balance on obstructive sleep apnea severity and discuss the potential anesthetic implications of excessive fluid and salt volume on worsening sleep apnea. PMID:27101494

  13. Blending Of Radioactive Salt Solutions In Million Gallon Tanks

    SciTech Connect

    Leishear, Robert A.; Lee, Si Y.; Fowley, Mark D.; Poirier, Michael R.

    2012-12-10

    Research was completed at Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) to investigate processes related to the blending of radioactive, liquid waste, salt solutions in 4920 cubic meter, 25.9 meter diameter storage tanks. One process was the blending of large salt solution batches (up to 1135 ? 3028 cubic meters), using submerged centrifugal pumps. A second process was the disturbance of a settled layer of solids, or sludge, on the tank bottom. And a third investigated process was the settling rate of sludge solids if suspended into slurries by the blending pump. To investigate these processes, experiments, CFD models (computational fluid dynamics), and theory were applied. Experiments were performed using simulated, non-radioactive, salt solutions referred to as supernates, and a layer of settled solids referred to as sludge. Blending experiments were performed in a 2.44 meter diameter pilot scale tank, and flow rate measurements and settling tests were performed at both pilot scale and full scale. A summary of the research is presented here to demonstrate the adage that, ?One good experiment fixes a lot of good theory?. Experimental testing was required to benchmark CFD models, or the models would have been incorrectly used. In fact, CFD safety factors were established by this research to predict full-scale blending performance. CFD models were used to determine pump design requirements, predict blending times, and cut costs several million dollars by reducing the number of required blending pumps. This research contributed to DOE missions to permanently close the remaining 47 of 51 SRS waste storage tanks.

  14. Blending of Radioactive Salt Solutions in Million Gallon Tanks - 13002

    SciTech Connect

    Leishear, Robert A.; Lee, Si Y.; Fowley, Mark D.; Poirier, Michael R.

    2013-07-01

    Research was completed at Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) to investigate processes related to the blending of radioactive, liquid waste, salt solutions in 4920 cubic meter, 25.9 meter diameter storage tanks. One process was the blending of large salt solution batches (up to 1135 - 3028 cubic meters), using submerged centrifugal pumps. A second process was the disturbance of a settled layer of solids, or sludge, on the tank bottom. And a third investigated process was the settling rate of sludge solids if suspended into slurries by the blending pump. To investigate these processes, experiments, CFD models (computational fluid dynamics), and theory were applied. Experiments were performed using simulated, non-radioactive, salt solutions referred to as supernates, and a layer of settled solids referred to as sludge. Blending experiments were performed in a 2.44 meter diameter pilot scale tank, and flow rate measurements and settling tests were performed at both pilot scale and full scale. A summary of the research is presented here to demonstrate the adage that, 'One good experiment fixes a lot of good theory'. Experimental testing was required to benchmark CFD models, or the models would have been incorrectly used. In fact, CFD safety factors were established by this research to predict full-scale blending performance. CFD models were used to determine pump design requirements, predict blending times, and cut costs several million dollars by reducing the number of required blending pumps. This research contributed to DOE missions to permanently close the remaining 47 of 51 SRS waste storage tanks. (authors)

  15. Discontinuous hygroscopic growth of an aqueous surfactant/salt aerosol particle levitated in an electrodynamic balance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soonsin, V.; Krieger, U. K.; Peter, T.

    2010-12-01

    Organic compounds are a major fraction of tropospheric aerosol. The organic fraction is usually internally mixed with inorganic salts. Surface-active organic matter or surfactants, enriched in the oceanic surface layer and transferred to the atmosphere by bubble-bursting processes, are the most likely candidates to contribute the observed organic fraction in sea salt aerosol [1, 2]. If the organic substance is a surfactant, it will lower the surface tension. In addition aggregates of the organic monomers, called micelles, will form if the concentration of the organic exceeds a certain limit (critical micelle concentration). These aggregates do have different morphology (spheres or globular or rod like micelles, or spherical bilayer vesicles etc.) and size, depending on the nature of the organic molecule, its concentration and the concentration of inorganic salts [3]. These aggregate may promote solubilisation of organic compounds in aqueous atmospheric aerosol. We performed measurements of ternary aqueous solution particles consisting of tetraethylene glycol monooctyl ether (C8E4) as organic surfactant and sodium chloride (NaCl) as inorganic salt and water (H2O) using single levitated aerosol particles in an electrodynamic balance. The particles can be stored contact-free in a temperature and humidity controlled chamber and optical resonance spectroscopy is used to monitor radius change [4]. Mie resonance spectra of ternary droplets show discontinuous growth with increasing relative humidity (RH) and also discontinuous shrinkage with decreasing relative humidity. We observe this behavior at temperatures and RHs at which the salt is completely deliquesced and the concentration of the organic surfactant is larger than the critical micelle concentration. Independent measurements of particle mass show also discontinuous water uptake. We speculate that this discontinuous, step-like, growth is caused by disaggregation of a micelle needed to conserve the monolayer of

  16. Silica precipitation in acidic solutions: mechanism, pH effect, and salt effect.

    PubMed

    Gorrepati, Elizabeth A; Wongthahan, Pattanapong; Raha, Sasanka; Fogler, H Scott

    2010-07-01

    This study is the first to show that silica precipitation under very acidic conditions ([HCl] = 2-8 M) proceeds through two distinct steps. First, the monomeric form of silica is quickly depleted from solution as it polymerizes to form primary particles approximately 5 nm in diameter. Second, the primary particles formed then flocculate. A modified Smoluchowski equation that incorporates a geometric population balance accurately describes the exponential growth of silica flocs. Variation of the HCl concentration between 2 and 8 M further showed that polymerization to form primary particles and subsequent particle flocculation become exponentially faster with increasing acid concentration. The effect of salt was also studied by adding 1 M chloride salts to the solutions; it was found that salts accelerated both particle formation and growth rates in the order: AlCl(3) > CaCl(2) > MgCl(2) > NaCl > CsCl > no salt. It was also found that ionic strength, over cation identity, determines silica polymerization and particle flocculation rates. This research reveals that precipitation of silica products from acid dissolution of minerals can be studied apart from the mineral dissolution process. Thus, silica product precipitation from mineral acidization follows a two-step process--formation of 5 nm primary particles followed by particle flocculation--which becomes exponentially faster with increasing HCl concentration and with salts accelerating the process in the above order. This result has implications for any study of acid dissolution of aluminosilicate or silicate material. In particular, the findings are applicable to the process of acidizing oil-containing rock formations, a common practice of the petroleum industry where silica dissolution products encounter a low-pH, salty environment within the oil well. PMID:20536253

  17. Surface Potential of DPPC Monolayers on Concentrated Aqueous Salt Solutions.

    PubMed

    Casper, Clayton B; Verreault, Dominique; Adams, Ellen M; Hua, Wei; Allen, Heather C

    2016-03-01

    The presence and exchange of electrical charges on the surfaces of marine aerosols influence their ability to act as cloud condensation nuclei and play a role in thundercloud electrification. Although interactions exist between surface-active inorganic ions and organic compounds, their role in surface charging of marine aerosols is not well understood. In this study, the surface potential of dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC) monolayers, a zwitterionic phospholipid found in the sea surface microlayer, is measured on concentrated (0.3-2.0 M) chloride salt solutions containing marine-relevant cations (Na(+), K(+), Mg(2+), Ca(2+)) to model and elucidate the electrical properties of organic-covered marine aerosols. Monovalent cations show only a weak effect on the surface potential of DPPC monolayers in the condensed phase compared to water. In contrast, Mg(2+) and Ca(2+) increase the surface potential, indicating different cation binding modes and affinities for the PC headgroup. Moreover, it is found that for divalent chloride salt solutions, the PC headgroup and interfacial water molecules make the largest dipolar contribution to the surface potential. This study shows that for equal charge concentrations, divalent cations impact surface potential of DPPC monolayers more strongly than monovalents likely through changes in the PC headgroup orientation induced by their complexation along with the lesser ordering of interfacial water molecules caused by phosphate group charge screening. PMID:26761608

  18. Effects of subfornical organ extracts on salt-water balance in the rat

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Summy-Long, J. Y.; Crawford, I. L.; Severs, W. B.

    1976-01-01

    The subfornical organ (SFO) is a circumventricular structure located at the junction of the lamina terminalis and the tela choroidea of the third cerebral ventricle. SFO is histologically regarded as a neurosecretory structure, although the physiological effects or biochemical nature of such secretions are not yet ascertained. Results are presented for an experimental study designed to determine whether SFO extracts alter parameters associated with salt-water balance in the rat. The data obtained support the conclusion that SFO contains some water-soluble substance(s), easily released by incubation, dialyzable and heat stable, which influences the salt-water balance after injection into ventricular cerebrospinal fluid. Whether other brain tissues or plasma contains the same or similar material is not yet convincingly established. The observation that one or more active constituents are easily released from SFO upon incubation in potassium-enriched medium may be of value.

  19. Balanced Sediment Fluxes in Southern California's Mediterranean-climate Zone Salt Marshes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosencranz, J. A.; Dickhudt, P.; Ganju, N. K.; Thorne, K.; Takekawa, J.; Ambrose, R. F.; Guntenspergen, G. R.; Brosnahan, S.; MacDonald, G. M.

    2015-12-01

    Salt marsh elevation and geomorphic stability depends on mineral sedimentation. Many southern California, USA salt marshes import sediment during El Niño storm events, but sediment fluxes and mechanisms during dry weather are also potentially important for marsh stability. We calculated tidal creek sediment fluxes within a sediment starved 1.5 km2 salt marsh (Seal Beach) and a less modified 1 km2 marsh (Mugu) with a watershed sediment supply. We measured salt marsh plain suspended sediment concentration and vertical accretion using single stage samplers and marker horizons. At Seal Beach, a 2014 storm yielded 39 and 28 g/s mean sediment fluxes and imported 12000 and 8800 kg in a western channel. This offset 8700 kg export during two months of dry weather, while landward net fluxes in the eastern channel accounted for 33% of the import. During the storm, suspended sediment concentrations on the marsh plain increased by a factor of four; accretion was 1-2 mm near creek levees. An exceptionally high tide sequence at Mugu yielded 4.4 g/s mean sediment flux, importing 1700 kg, accounting for 20% of dry weather fluxes. Overall, low sediment fluxes were observed, suggesting that these salt marshes are currently geomorphically stable. Our results suggest that storms and exceptionally high lunar tides may play large roles, importing sediment and maintaining dry weather sediment flux balances for southern California salt marshes. However, under future climate change and sea-level rise scenarios, results suggest that balanced sediment fluxes may lead to marsh elevational instability, based on estimated mineral sediment deficits.

  20. The springs of Lake Pátzcuaro: chemistry, salt-balance, and implications for the water balance of the lake

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bischoff, James L.; Israde-Alcántara, Isabel; Garduno-Monroy, Victor H.; Shanks, Wayne C., III

    2004-01-01

    Lake Pa??tzcuaro, the center of the ancient Tarascan civilization located in the Mexican altiplano west of the city of Morelia, has neither river input nor outflow. The relatively constant lake-salinity over the past centuries indicates the lake is in chemical steady state. Springs of the south shore constitute the primary visible input to the lake, so influx and discharge must be via sub-lacustrine ground water. The authors report on the chemistry and stable isotope composition of the springs, deeming them representative of ground-water input. The springs are dominated by Ca, Mg and Na, whereas the lake is dominated by Na. Combining these results with previously published precipitation/rainfall measurements on the lake, the authors calculate the chemical evolution from spring water to lake water, and also calculate a salt balance of the ground-water-lake system. Comparing Cl and ??18O compositions in the springs and lake water indicates that 75-80% of the spring water is lost evaporatively during evolution toward lake composition. During evaporation Ca and Mg are lost from the water by carbonate precipitation. Each liter of spring water discharging into the lake precipitates about 18.7 mg of CaCO3. Salt balance calculations indicate that ground water input to the lake is 85.9??106 m3/a and ground water discharge from the lake is 23.0??106 m3/a. Thus, the discharge is about 27% of the input, with the rest balanced by evaporation. A calculation of time to reach steady-state ab initio indicates that the Cl concentration of the present day lake would be reached in about 150 a. ?? 2004 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Balanced-Viscosity solutions for multi-rate systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mielke, Alexander; Rossi, Riccarda; Savaré, Giuseppe

    2016-06-01

    Several mechanical systems are modeled by the static momentum balance for the displacement u coupled with a rate-independent flow rule for some internal variable z. We consider a class of abstract systems of ODEs which have the same structure, albeit in a finite-dimensional setting, and regularize both the static equation and the rate-independent flow rule by adding viscous dissipation terms with coefficients εα and ε, where 0 < ε « 1 and α > 0 is a fixed parameter. Therefore for α ≠ 1 u and z have different relaxation rates. We address the vanishing-viscosity analysis as ε ↓ 0 of the viscous system. We prove that, up to a subsequence, (reparameterized) viscous solutions converge to a parameterized curve yielding a Balanced Viscosity solution to the original rate-independent system, and providing an accurate description of the system behavior at jumps. We also give a reformulation of the notion of Balanced Viscosity solution in terms of a system of subdifferential inclusions, showing that the viscosity in u and the one in z are involved in the jump dynamics in different ways, according to whether α > 1, α =1, and α є (0,1).

  2. Collapse of sodium polyacrylate chains in calcium salt solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schweins, R.; Huber, K.

    The sodium salt of polyacrylic acid (NaPA) precipitates in the presence of Ca^{2+}-ions. This phase behaviour can be represented by a phase diagram where the critical NaPA concentration is plotted versus the critical Ca^{2+} concentration resulting in a straight line as a phase boundary. The location of this phase boundary is influenced by the presence of an inert monovalent salt like NaCl. The present contribution focuses on the coil dimensions of NaPA chains in dilute aqueous solution corresponding to the one phase region of such a phase diagram. A variety of parameters with which the size and shape of the polyelectrolyte chains can be modulated are revealed. Approaching the phase boundary by decreasing the NaPA concentration at a constant Ca^{2+} content leads to a collapse of the NaPA chains. Combined static and dynamic light scattering suggests a compact spherical shape as the final state of this transition, both in 0.1 M NaCl and in 0.01 M NaCl. In the lower NaCl concentration, indication is presented for the existence of a cigar or pearl necklace like intermediate. Most strikingly, the collapsed chains can be reexpanded by increasing the concentration of inert NaCl at constant content of NaPA and Ca^{2+}. Clearly, excessive Na+-ions displace the Ca^{2+}-ions from the NaPA chains.

  3. Analysis of bacterial migration; 1: Numerical solution of balance equation

    SciTech Connect

    Frymier, P.D.; Ford, R.M.; Cummings, P.T. . Dept. of Chemical Engineering)

    1994-04-01

    Chemotaxis describes the ability of motile bacteria to bias their motion in the direction of increasing gradients of chemicals, usually energy sources, known as attractants. In experimental studies of the migration of chemotactic bacteria, 1-D phenomenological cell balance equations have been used to quantitatively analyze experimental observations. While attractive for their simplicity and the ease of solution, they are limited in the strict mathematical sense to the situation in which individual bacteria are confined to motion in one dimension and respond to attractant gradients in one dimension only. Recently, Ford and Cummings (1992) reduced the general 3-D cell balance equation of Alt (1980) to obtain an equation describing the migration of a bacterial population in response to a 1-D attractant gradient. Solutions of this equation for single gradients of attractants are compared to those of 1-D balance equations, results from cellular dynamics simulations, and experimental data from the authors' laboratory for E. coli responding to [alpha]-methylaspartate. The authors also investigate two aspects of the experimentally derived expression for the tumbling probability: the effect of different models for the down-gradient swimming behavior of the bacteria and the validity of ignoring the temporal derivative of the attractant concentration.

  4. Water and solute balances as a basis for sustainable irrigation agriculture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pla-Sentís, Ildefonso

    2015-04-01

    The growing development of irrigated agriculture is necessary for the sustainable production of the food required by the increasing World's population. Such development is limited by the increasing scarcity and low quality of the available water resources and by the competitive use of the water for other purposes. There are also increasing problems of contamination of surface and ground waters to be used for other purposes by the drainage effluents of irrigated lands. Irrigation and drainage may cause drastic changes in the regime and balance of water and solutes (salts, sodium, contaminants) in the soil profile, resulting in problems of water supply to crops and problems of salinization, sodification and contamination of soils and ground waters. This is affected by climate, crops, soils, ground water depth, irrigation and groundwater composition, and by irrigation and drainage management. In order to predict and prevent such problems for a sustainable irrigated agriculture and increased efficiency in water use, under each particular set of conditions, there have to be considered both the hydrological, physical and chemical processes determining such water and solute balances in the soil profile. In this contribution there are proposed the new versions of two modeling approaches (SOMORE and SALSODIMAR) to predict those balances and to guide irrigation water use and management, integrating the different factors involved in such processes. Examples of their application under Mediterranean and tropical climate conditions are also presented.

  5. Polyimide Composites from 'Salt-Like' Solution Precursors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cano, Roberto J.; Hou, Tan H.; Weiser, Erik S.; SaintClair, Terry L.

    2001-01-01

    Four NASA Langley-developed polyimide matrix resins, LaRC(TM)-IA, LaRC(TM)-IAX, LaRC(TM)-8515 and LaRC(TM)-PETI-5, were produced via a 'saltlike' process developed by Unitika Ltd. The salt-like solutions (65% solids in NMP) were prepregged onto Hexcel IM7 carbon fiber using the NASA LaRC multipurpose tape machine. Process parameters were determined and composite panels fabricated. The temperature dependent volatile depletion rates, the thermal crystallization behavior and the resin rheology were characterized. Composite molding cycles were developed which consistently yielded well consolidated, void-free laminated parts. Composite mechanical properties such as the short beam shear strength; the longitudinal and transverse flexural strength and flexural modulus; the longitudinal compression strength and modulus; and the open hole compression strength and compression after impact strength were measured at room temperature and elevated temperatures. The processing characteristics and the composite mechanical properties of the four intermediate modulus carbon fiber/polyimide matrix composites were compared to existing data on the same polyimide resin systems and IM7 carbon fiber manufactured via poly(amide acid) solutions (30-35% solids in NMP). This work studies the effects of varying the synthetic route on the processing and mechanical properties of the polyimide composites.

  6. The Surface Structure of Concentrated Aqueous salt Solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Sloutskin,E.; Baumert, J.; Ocko, B.; Kuzmenko, I.; Checco, A.; Tamam, L.; Ofer, E.; Gog, T.; Deutsch, M.

    2007-01-01

    The surface-normal electron density profile {rho}{sub s}(z) of concentrated aqueous salt solutions of RbBr, CsCl, LiBr, RbCl, and SrCl{sub 2} was determined by x-ray reflectivity (XR). For all but RbBr and SrCl{sub 2} {rho}{sub s}(z) increases monotonically with depth z from {rho}{sub s}(z)=0 in the vapor (z<0) to {rho}{sub s}(z) = {rho}{sub b} of the bulk (z>0) over a width of a few angstroms. The width is commensurate with the expected interface broadening by thermally excited capillary waves. Anomalous (resonant) XR of RbBr reveals a depletion at the surface of Br{sup -} ions to a depth of {approx}10 A. For SrCl{sub 2}, the observed {rho}{sub s}(z)>{rho}{sub b} may imply a similar surface depletion of Cl{sup -} ions to a depth of a few angstroms. However, as the deviations of the XRs of RbBr and SrCl{sub 2} from those of the other solutions are small, the evidence for a different ion composition in the surface and the bulk is not strongly conclusive. Overall, these results contrast earlier theoretical and simulational results and nonstructural measurements, where significant surface layering of alternate, oppositely charged, ions is concluded.

  7. The effect of divalent salt in chondroitin sulfate solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aranghel, D.; Badita, C. R.; Radulescu, A.; Moldovan, L.; Craciunescu, O.; Balasoiu, M.

    2016-03-01

    Chondroitin-4 sulfate (CS4) is the main glycosaminoglycan extracted from bovine trachea. CS4 play an important role in osteoarthritis treatment, anticoagulant activity, reduces the degradation of cartilage matrix components, reduces necrosis and apoptosis of chondrocytes and reduces the activity of collagenase. Chondroitin sulfate is also responsible for proteoglycans degradation. Chondroitin sulfate can bind calcium ions with different affinities, depending on their sulfation position. The purpose of this study was to determine the structural properties and the influence of Ca2+ cations. We carried out measurements on CS4 solutions and mixtures of liquid CS4 with Ca2+ by Small-Angle Neutron Scattering (SANS). CS4 have a mass fractal behavior and the addition of a salt (CaCl2) in CS4 solutions generates the appearance of a correlation peak due to local ordering between adjacent chains with inter-chain distances between 483 Å and 233 Å for a calcium concentration of 0.01% w/w.

  8. Experiments on the heat-induced salt balance changes in cow's milk.

    PubMed

    Pouliot, Y; Boulet, M; Paquin, P

    1989-01-01

    The heat-induced changes in salt balance between the colloidal phase of milk and its serum were studied using an ultrafiltration technique. Milk permeate was isolated at the heating temperature by means of a hollow fibre ultrafiltration cartridge coupled with a stainless steel heat exchanger unit. The milk samples initially at 4 degrees C were heated to 20, 40, 60, 80 or 90 degrees C. Ca, P, Mg and citrate contents of the permeates were determined. The decreases in Ca and P were proportional to the increase in temperature. Smaller losses in Mg and citrate were observed. An initial sharp decrease in concentration occurred within the first seconds of holding time and was followed by a slower and smaller decrease. The possible occurrence of a two-stage mechanism for the heat-induced salt precipitation is discussed. The precipitation of dicalcium phosphate is believed to occur together with some tricalcium citrate precipitation. PMID:2760306

  9. Hydrology and Salt Balance in a Large, Hypersaline Coastal Lagoon: Lagoa de Araruama, Brazil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kjerfve, Björn; Schettini, C. A. F.; Knoppers, Bastiaan; Lessa, Guilherme; Ferreira, H. O.

    1996-06-01

    Lagoa de Araruama in the state of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, is a hypersaline coastal lagoon as a result of semi-arid climate conditions, a small drainage basin and a choked entrance channel. The lagoon has been continuously hypersaline for at least 4·5 centuries, but the mean salinity has varied substantially. It has recently decreased from 57 to 52 as indicated by density (salinity) measurements between 1965 and 1990. Analysis of more than 20 years of salinity time series data, in addition to monthly lagoon cruises to measure the spatial salinity distribution, indicate that the lagoon salinity largely fluctuates in response to the difference between evaporation and precipitation. The major factor explaining the long-term trend of decreasing salinity in the lagoon is the constant pumping of 1 m 3s -1of freshwater to the communities surrounding the lagoon from an adjacent watershed, and subsequent discharge of this water into Lagoa de Araruama. The net salt budget is primarily a balance between the advective import of salt from the coastal ocean and eddy diffusive export of salt to the ocean, although the extensive mining of salt from the lagoon during past decades is also a small but significant contribution to the salt budget. The flushing half-life is proposed as a useful time scale of water exchange, is calculated based on a combination of hydrological and tidal processes, and is excellent for comparison of lagoons and assessing water quality changes. The flushing half-life measures 83·5 days for Lagoa de Araruama, considerably longer than for most other coastal lagoons. The proposed dredging of a second ocean channel to Lagoa de Araruama is probably not a good idea. It is likely to accelerate the decrease of lagoon salinity and somewhat improve the lagoon water exchange. At the same time, this will eliminate the apparent buffering capacity provided by the hypersaline environment, and thus may potentially cause water quality problems.

  10. Salt balance: From space experiments to revolutionizing new clinical concepts on earth - A historical review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerzer, Rupert

    2014-11-01

    For a long time, sodium balance appeared to be a “done deal” and was thought to be well understood. However, experiments in preparation of space missions showed that the concept of osmotic sodium storage and close correlations of sodium with water balance are only part of the regulatory mechanisms of body salt. By now it has turned out that the human skin is an important storage place and regulator for sodium, that sodium storage involves macrophages which in turn salt-dependently co-regulate blood pressure, that body sodium also strongly influences bone and protein metabolism, and that immune functions are also strongly influenced by sodium. In addition, the aging process appears to lead to increased body sodium storage, which in turn might influence the aging process of the human body. The current review article summarizes the developments that have led to these revolutionizing new findings and concepts as well as consequences deriving from these findings. Therefore, it is not intended in this article to give a complete literature overview over the whole field but to focus on such key literature and considerations that led to the respective developments.

  11. ISOPAR L Release Rates from Saltstone Using Simulated Salt Solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Bronikowski, M

    2006-02-06

    The Modular Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction (CSSX) Unit (MCU) and the Salt Waste Processing Facility (SWPF) will produce a Deactivated Salt Solution (DSS) that will go to the Saltstone Production Facility (SPF). Recent information indicates that solvent entrainment in the DSS is larger than expected. The main concern is with Isopar{reg_sign} L, the diluent in the solvent mixture, and its flammability in the saltstone vault. If it is assumed that all the Isopar{reg_sign} L is released instantaneously into the vault from the curing grout before each subsequent pour; the Isopar{reg_sign} L in the vault headspace is well mixed; and each pour displaces an equivalent volume of headspace, the allowable concentration of Isopar{reg_sign} L in the DSS sent to SPF has been calculated at approximately 4 ppm. The amount allowed would be higher, if the release from grout were significantly less. The Savannah River National Laboratory was tasked with determining the release of Isopar{reg_sign} L from saltstone prepared with a simulated DSS with Isopar{reg_sign} L concentrations ranging from 50 mg/L to 200 mg/L in the salt fraction and with test temperatures ranging from ambient to 95 C. The results from the curing of the saltstone showed that the Isopar{reg_sign} L release data can be treated as a percentage of initial concentration in the concentration range studied. The majority of the Isopar{reg_sign} L that was released over the test duration was released in the first few days. The release of Isopar{reg_sign} L begins immediately and the rate of release decreases over time. At higher temperatures the immediate release is larger than at lower temperatures. In one test at 95 C essentially all of the Isopar{reg_sign} L was released in three months. Initial curing temperature was found to be very important as slight variations during the first few days affected the final Isopar{reg_sign} L amount released. Short scoping tests at 95 C with solvent containing all components (Isopar

  12. ISOPAR L RELEASE RATES FROM SALTSTONE USING SIMULATED SALT SOLUTIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Zamecnik, J; Michael Bronikowski, M; Alex Cozzi, A; Russell Eibling, R; Charles Nash, C

    2008-07-31

    The Modular Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction (CSSX) Unit (MCU) and the Salt Waste Processing Facility (SWPF) will produce a Decontaminated Salt Solution (DSS) that will go to the Saltstone Production Facility (SPF). Recent information indicates that solvent entrainment in the DSS is larger than expected. The main concern is with Isopar{reg_sign} L, the diluent in the solvent mixture, and its flammability in the saltstone vault. If it is assumed that all the Isopar{reg_sign} L is released instantaneously into the vault from the curing grout before each subsequent pour, the Isopar{reg_sign} L in the vault headspace is well mixed, and each pour displaces an equivalent volume of headspace, the maximum concentration of Isopar{reg_sign} L in the DSS to assure 25% of the lower flammable limit is not exceeded has been determined to be about 4 ppm. The amount allowed would be higher if the release from grout were significantly less. The Savannah River National Laboratory was tasked with determining the release of Isopar{reg_sign} L from saltstone prepared with a simulated DSS with Isopar{reg_sign} L concentrations ranging from 50 to 200 mg/L in the salt fraction and with test temperatures ranging from ambient to 95 C. The results from the curing of the saltstone showed that the amount of Isopar{reg_sign} L released versus time can be treated as a percentage of initial amount present; there was no statistically significant dependence of the release rate on the initial concentration. The majority of the Isopar{reg_sign} L that was released over the test duration was released in the first few days. The release of Isopar{reg_sign} L begins immediately and the rate of release decreases over time. At higher temperatures the immediate release rate is larger than at lower temperatures. Initial curing temperature was found to be very important as slight variations during the first few hours or days had a significant effect on the amount of Isopar{reg_sign} L released. Short scoping

  13. A Study of Novel Hexavalent Phosphazene Salts as Draw Solutes in Forward Osmosis

    SciTech Connect

    Mark L. Stone; Aaron D. Wilson; Mason K. Harrup; Frederick F. Stewart

    2013-03-01

    Two novel multi-valent salts based on phosphazene chemistry have been synthesized and characterized as forward osmosis (FO) draw solutes. Commercially obtained hexachlorocyclotriphosphazene was reacted with the sodium salt of 4-ethylhydroxybenzoate to yield hexa(4-ethylcarboxylatophenoxy)phosphazene. Hydrolysis, followed by and neutralization with NaOH or LiOH, of the resulting acidic moieties yielded water soluble sodium and lithium phosphazene salts, respectively. Degrees of dissociation were determined through osmometry over the range of 0.05-0.5 m, giving degrees of 3.08-4.95 per mole, suggesting a high osmotic potential. The Li salt was found to be more ionized in solution than the sodium salt, and this was reflected in FO experiments where the Li salt gave higher initial fluxes (~ 7 L/m2h) as compared to the sodium salt (~6 L/m2h) at identical 0.07 m draw solution concentrations at 30 °C. Longer term experiments revealed no detectable degradation of the salts; however some hydrolysis of the cellulose acetate membrane was observed, presumably due to the pH of the phosphazene salt draw solution (pH = ~8).

  14. Salt weathering in Egyptian limestone after laboratory simulations with continuous flow of salt solutions at different temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aly, Nevin; Gomez-Heras, Miguel; Hamed, Ayman; Alvarez de Buergo, Monica

    2013-04-01

    weathering in Egyptian limestone after laboratory simulations with continuous flow of salt solutions at different temperatures Nevin Aly Mohamed (1), Miguel Gomez - Heras(2), Ayman Hamed Ahmed (1), and Monica Alvarez de Buergo(2). (1) Faculty of Pet. & Min. Engineering- Suez Canal University, Suez, Egypt, (2) Instituto de Geociencias (CSIC-UCM) Madrid. Spain. Limestone is one of the most frequent building stones in Egypt and is used since the time of ancient Egyptians and salt weathering is one of the main threats to its conservation. Most of the limestone used in historical monuments in Cairo is a biomicrite extracted from the Mid-Eocene Mokattam Group. During this work, cylindrical samples (2.4 cm diameter and approx. 4.8 cm length) were subjected, in a purpose-made simulation chamber, to simulated laboratory weathering tests with fixed salt concentration (10% weight NaCl solution), at different temperatures, which were kept constant throughout each test (10, 20, 30, 40 oC). During each test, salt solutions flowed continuously imbibing samples by capilarity. Humidity within the simulation chamber was reduced using silica gel to keep it low and constant to increase evaporation rate. Temperature, humidity inside the simulation chamber and samples weight were digitally monitored during each test. Results show the advantages of the proposed experimental methodology using a continuous flow of salt solutions and shed light on the effect of temperature on the dynamics of salt crystallization on and within samples. Research funded by mission sector of high education ministry, Egypt and Geomateriales S2009/MAT-1629.

  15. Concentration and precipitation of NaCl and KCl from salt cake leach solutions by electrodialysis

    SciTech Connect

    Sreenivasarao, K; Patsiogiannis, F.; Hryn, J.N.

    1997-02-09

    Electrodialysis was investigated for cost-effective recovery of salt from salt cake leach solutions. (Salt cake is a waste stream generated by the aluminum industry during treatment of aluminum drosses and scrap.) We used a pilot-scale electrodialysis stack of 5 membrane pairs, each with an effective area of 0.02 m{sup 2}. The diluate stream contained synthetic NaCl, KCl,mixtures of NaCl and KCl, and actual salt cake leach solutions (mainly NaCl and KCl, with small amounts of MgCl{sub 2}). We concentrated and precipitated NaCl and KCl salts from the concentrate steam when the initial diluate stream concentration was 21.5 to 28.8 wt% NaCl and KCl. We found that water transferring through the membranes was a significant factor in overall efficiency of salt recovery by electrodialysis.

  16. Testing of stripping columns for the removal of benzene from aqueous radioactive salt solution

    SciTech Connect

    Georgeton, G.K.; Taylor, G.A.; Gaughan, T.P.

    1995-06-27

    Radioactive high level wastes (HLW) generated from production of special nuclear materials at the Savannah River Site (SRS) are held in interim storage in 51 underground, million gallon tanks. Radioactive cesium ({sup 137}Cs) is segregated by evaporation of aqueous waste solution for interim storage in a salt matrix comprised of Na and K salts or in concentrated salt solution. The saltcake will be dissolved and {sup 137}Cs will be separated from the nonradioactive salts in solution in the In-Tank Precipitation (ITP) Process. The cesium will be combined with other radioactive species and glass formers to be melted and poured into stainless steel canisters in the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF). The salt solution remaining after decontamination in the ITP process will be incorporated into grout for disposal at the site`s Saltstone facility. In the ITP facility, sodium tetraphenylborate (STPB) will be added to precipitate the cesium. Potassium in the waste solution also reacts with STPB and precipitates. Due to radiolytic and chemical degradation of the tetraphenylborate (TPB) precipitate, benzene is generated. The benzene dissolves into the decontaminated salt solution (DSS) and into water (WW) used to {open_quotes}wash{close_quotes} the precipitate to lower the soluble salt content of the slurry. Safety and processing requirements for disposal of the DSS and for temporary storage of the WW dictate that the benzene concentration be reduced.

  17. Modeling of Flow, Transport and Controlled Sedimentation Phenomena during Mixing of Salt Solutions in Complex Porous Formations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skouras, Eugene D.; Jaho, Sofia; Pavlakou, Efstathia I.; Sygouni, Varvara; Petsi, Anastasia; Paraskeva, Christakis A.

    2015-04-01

    The deposition of salts in porous media is a major engineering phenomenon encountered in a plethora of industrial and environmental applications where in some cases is desirable and in other not (oil production, geothermal systems, soil stabilization etc). Systematic approach of these problems requires knowledge of the key mechanisms of precipitating salts within the porous structures, in order to develop new methods to control the process. In this work, the development and the solution of spatiotemporally variable mass balances during salt solution mixing along specific pores were performed. Both analytical models and finite differences CFD models were applied for the study of flow and transport with simultaneous homogeneous and heterogeneous nucleation (by crystal growth on the surface of the pores) in simple geometries, while unstructured finite elements and meshless methods were developed and implemented for spatial discretization, reconstruction, and solution of transport equations and homogeneous / heterogeneous reactions in more complex geometries. At initial stages of this work, critical problem parameters were identified, such as the characteristics of the porosity, the number of dissolved components, etc. The parameters were then used for solving problems which correspond to available experimental data. For each combination of ions and materials, specific data and process characteristics were included: (a) crystal kinetics (nucleation, growth rates or reaction surface rates of crystals, critical suspension concentrations), (b) physico-chemical properties (bulk density, dimensions of generated crystals, ion diffusion coefficients in the solution), (c) operating parameters (macroscopic velocity, flow, or pressure gradient of the solution, ion concentration) (d) microfluidic data (geometry, flow area), (e) porosity data in Darcy description (initial porosity, specific surface area, tortuosity). During the modeling of flow and transport in three

  18. Novel, electrolyte solutions comprising fully inorganic salts with high anodic stability for rechargeable magnesium batteries

    SciTech Connect

    Doe, RE; Han, R; Hwang, J; Gmitter, AJ; Shterenberg, I; Yoo, HD; Pour, N; Aurbach, D

    2014-01-01

    Herein the first inorganic magnesium salt solution capable of highly reversible magnesium electrodeposition is presented. Synthesized by acid-base reaction of MgCl2 and Lewis acidic compounds such as AlCl3, this salt class demonstrates upwards of 99% Coulombic efficiency, deposition overpotential of <200 mV, and anodic stability of 3.1 V.

  19. Location of microseismic swarms induced by salt solution mining

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kinscher, J.; Bernard, P.; Contrucci, I.; Mangeney, A.; Piguet, J. P.; Bigarre, P.

    2015-01-01

    Ground failures, caving processes and collapses of large natural or man-made underground cavities can produce significant socio-economic damages and represent a serious risk envisaged by the mine managements and municipalities. In order to improve our understanding of the mechanisms governing such a geohazard and to test the potential of geophysical methods to prevent them, the development and collapse of a salt solution mining cavity was monitored in the Lorraine basin in northeastern France. During the experiment, a huge microseismic data set (˜50 000 event files) was recorded by a local microseismic network. 80 per cent of the data comprised unusual swarming sequences with complex clusters of superimposed microseismic events which could not be processed through standard automatic detection and location routines. Here, we present two probabilistic methods which provide a powerful tool to assess the spatio-temporal characteristics of these swarming sequences in an automatic manner. Both methods take advantage of strong attenuation effects and significantly polarized P-wave energies at higher frequencies (>100 Hz). The first location approach uses simple signal amplitude estimates for different frequency bands, and an attenuation model to constrain the hypocentre locations. The second approach was designed to identify significantly polarized P-wave energies and the associated polarization angles which provide very valuable information on the hypocentre location. Both methods are applied to a microseismic data set recorded during an important step of the development of the cavity, that is, before its collapse. From our results, systematic spatio-temporal epicentre migration trends are observed in the order of seconds to minutes and several tens of meters which are partially associated with cyclic behaviours. In addition, from spatio-temporal distribution of epicentre clusters we observed similar epicentre migration in the order of hours and days. All together, we

  20. Students' Misconceptions in Electrochemistry: Current Flow in Electrolyte Solutions and the Salt Bridge.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sanger, Michael J.; Greenbowe, Thomas J.

    1997-01-01

    Examines students' misconceptions and proposed mechanisms related to current flow in electrolyte solutions and the salt bridge. Confirms reported misconceptions and identifies several new ones. Discusses probable sources of misconceptions and some methods for preventing them. Contains 27 references. (JRH)

  1. Marathon without a colon: salt and water balance in endurance running ileostomates.

    PubMed Central

    Isaacs, P.

    1984-01-01

    Five trained ileostomates completed a marathon in a cool environment without ill effect. During the race, the ileostomy losses of sodium (1.0-2.7 mmol.h-1) and of water (9.2-19 ml.h-1) were small, but urinary excretion of sodium was very low (0.2-0.75 mmol.h-1) despite drinking a combination of water and glucose-electrolyte solution. The concentration of potassium in the ileostomy discharge tended to increase, also suggesting a sodium retaining state. Healthy ileostomates after suitable training are successful marathon runners, but the prevalence of mild salt depletion in ileostomates generally suggests that it may be advisable for them to take only glucose-electrolyte solutions when competing at any ambient temperature or when preparing for a marathon which is to take place in a warm environment. Images p295-a PMID:6525499

  2. Nuclear magnetic resonance in water solutions of inorganic salts in vitreous and liquid states

    SciTech Connect

    Lundin, A. G. Koryavko, N. A.; Chichikov, S. A.

    2013-05-15

    Peculiarities of the behavior of water solutions of inorganic salts at temperatures of {approx}(120-150) K are examined. At these temperatures the solutions are in the vitreous state. At higher temperatures (up to 240 K) the solutions may be in metastable liquid, crystalline, or usual liquid states.

  3. Materials and methods for stabilizing nanoparticles in salt solutions

    DOEpatents

    Robinson, David Bruce; Zuckermann, Ronald; Buffleben, George M.

    2013-06-11

    Sequence-specific polymers are proving to be a powerful approach to assembly and manipulation of matter on the nanometer scale. Ligands that are peptoids, or sequence-specific N-functional glycine oligomers, allow precise and flexible control over the arrangement of binding groups, steric spacers, charge, and other functionality. We have synthesized short peptoids that can prevent the aggregation of gold nanoparticles in high-salt environments including divalent salt, and allow co-adsorption of a single DNA molecule. This degree of precision and versatility is likely to prove essential in bottom-up assembly of nanostructures and in biomedical applications of nanomaterials.

  4. Salt-Finger Convection in a Stratified Fluid Layer Induced by Thermal and Solutal Capillary Motion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Chuan F.; Chan, Cho Lik

    1996-01-01

    Salt-finger convection in a double-diffusive system is a motion driven by the release of gravitational potential due to different diffusion rates. Normally, when the gravitational field is reduced, salt-finger convection together with other convective motions driven by buoyancy forces will be rapidly suppressed. However, because the destabilizing effect of the concentration gradient is amplified by the Lewis number, with values varying from 10(exp 2) for aqueous salt solutions to 10 (exp 4) for liquid metals, salt-finger convection may be generated at much reduced gravity levels. In the microgravity environment, the surface tension gradient assumes a dominant role in causing fluid motion. In this paper, we report on some experimental results showing the generation of salt-finger convection due to capillary motio on the surface of a stratified fluid layer. A numerical simulation is presented to show the cause of salt-finger convection.

  5. Pesticide Removal from Aqueous Solutions by Adding Salting Out Agents

    PubMed Central

    Moscoso, Fátima; Deive, Francisco J.; Esperança, José M. S. S.; Rodríguez, Ana

    2013-01-01

    Phase segregation in aqueous biphasic systems (ABS) composed of four hydrophilic ionic liquids (ILs): 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium methylsulfate and 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium methylsulfate (CnC1im C1SO4, n = 2 and 4), tributylmethyl phosphonium methylsulfate (P4441 C1SO4) and methylpyridinium methylsulfate (C1Py C1SO4) and two high charge density potassium inorganic salts (K2CO3 and K2HPO4) were determined by the cloud point method at 298.15 K. The influence of the addition of the selected inorganic salts to aqueous mixtures of ILs was discussed in the light of the Hofmeister series and in terms of molar Gibbs free energy of hydration. The effect of the alkyl chain length of the cation on the methylsulfate-based ILs has been investigated. All the solubility data were satisfactorily correlated to several empirical equations. A pesticide (pentachlorophenol, PCP) extraction process based on the inorganic salt providing a greater salting out effect was tackled. The viability of the proposed process was analyzed in terms of partition coefficients and extraction efficiencies. PMID:24145747

  6. Water and solute mass balance of five small, relatively undisturbed watersheds in the U.S.

    PubMed

    Peters, N E; Shanley, J B; Aulenbach, B T; Webb, R M; Campbell, D H; Hunt, R; Larsen, M C; Stallard, R F; Troester, J; Walker, J F

    2006-04-01

    Geochemical mass balances were computed for water years 1992-1997 (October 1991 through September 1997) for the five watersheds of the U.S. Geological Survey Water, Energy, and Biogeochemical Budgets (WEBB) Program to determine the primary regional controls on yields of the major dissolved inorganic solutes. The sites, which vary markedly with respect to climate, geology, physiography, and ecology, are: Allequash Creek, Wisconsin (low-relief, humid continental forest); Andrews Creek, Colorado (cold alpine, taiga/tundra, and subalpine boreal forest); Río Icacos, Puerto Rico (lower montane, wet tropical forest); Panola Mountain, Georgia (humid subtropical piedmont forest); and Sleepers River, Vermont (humid northern hardwood forest). Streamwater output fluxes were determined by constructing empirical multivariate concentration models including discharge and seasonal components. Input fluxes were computed from weekly wet-only or bulk precipitation sampling. Despite uncertainties in input fluxes arising from poorly defined elevation gradients, lack of dry-deposition and occult-deposition measurements, and uncertain sea-salt contributions, the following was concluded: (1) for solutes derived primarily from rock weathering (Ca, Mg, Na, K, and H(4)SiO(4)), net fluxes (outputs in streamflow minus inputs in deposition) varied by two orders of magnitude, which is attributed to a large gradient in rock weathering rates controlled by climate and geologic parent material; (2) the net flux of atmospherically derived solutes (NH(4), NO(3), SO(4), and Cl) was similar among sites, with SO(4) being the most variable and NH(4) and NO(3) generally retained (except for NO(3) at Andrews); and (3) relations among monthly solute fluxes and differences among solute concentration model parameters yielded additional insights into comparative biogeochemical processes at the sites. PMID:15978657

  7. Water and solute mass balance of five small, relatively undisturbed watersheds in the U.S.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Peters, N.E.; Shanley, J.B.; Aulenbach, Brent T.; Webb, R.M.; Campbell, D.H.; Hunt, R.; Larsen, M.C.; Stallard, R.F.; Troester, J.; Walker, J.F.

    2006-01-01

    Geochemical mass balances were computed for water years 1992-1997 (October 1991 through September 1997) for the five watersheds of the U.S. Geological Survey Water, Energy, and Biogeochemical Budgets (WEBB) Program to determine the primary regional controls on yields of the major dissolved inorganic solutes. The sites, which vary markedly with respect to climate, geology, physiography, and ecology, are: Allequash Creek, Wisconsin (low-relief, humid continental forest); Andrews Creek, Colorado (cold alpine, taiga/tundra, and subalpine boreal forest); Ri??o Icacos, Puerto Rico (lower montane, wet tropical forest); Panola Mountain, Georgia (humid subtropical piedmont forest); and Sleepers River, Vermont (humid northern hardwood forest). Streamwater output fluxes were determined by constructing empirical multivariate concentration models including discharge and seasonal components. Input fluxes were computed from weekly wet-only or bulk precipitation sampling. Despite uncertainties in input fluxes arising from poorly defined elevation gradients, lack of dry-deposition and occult-deposition measurements, and uncertain sea-salt contributions, the following was concluded: (1) for solutes derived primarily from rock weathering (Ca, Mg, Na, K, and H4SiO4), net fluxes (outputs in streamflow minus inputs in deposition) varied by two orders of magnitude, which is attributed to a large gradient in rock weathering rates controlled by climate and geologic parent material; (2) the net flux of atmospherically derived solutes (NH4, NO3, SO4, and Cl) was similar among sites, with SO4 being the most variable and NH4 and NO3 generally retained (except for NO 3 at Andrews); and (3) relations among monthly solute fluxes and differences among solute concentration model parameters yielded additional insights into comparative biogeochemical processes at the sites. ?? 2005 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Heat-induced formation of myosin oligomer-soluble filament complex in high-salt solution.

    PubMed

    Shimada, Masato; Takai, Eisuke; Ejima, Daisuke; Arakawa, Tsutomu; Shiraki, Kentaro

    2015-02-01

    Heat-induced aggregation of myosin into an elastic gel plays an important role in the water-holding capacity and texture of meat products. Here, we investigated thermal aggregation of porcine myosin in high-salt solution over a wide temperature range by dynamic light scattering experiments. The myosin samples were readily dissolved in 1.0 M NaCl at 25 °C followed by dilution into various salt concentrations. The diluted solutions consistently contained both myosin monomers and soluble filaments. The filament size decreased with increasing salt concentration and temperature. High temperatures above Tm led to at least partial dissociation of soluble filaments and thermal unfolding, resulting in the formation of soluble oligomers and binding to the persistently present soluble filaments. Such a complex formation between the oligomers and filaments has never been observed. Our results provide new insight into the heat-induced myosin gelation in high-salt solution. PMID:25445683

  9. Hydrogen Sulfide Regulates Salt Tolerance in Rice by Maintaining Na(+)/K(+) Balance, Mineral Homeostasis and Oxidative Metabolism Under Excessive Salt Stress.

    PubMed

    Mostofa, Mohammad G; Saegusa, Daisuke; Fujita, Masayuki; Tran, Lam-Son Phan

    2015-01-01

    Being a salt sensitive crop, rice growth and development are frequently affected by soil salinity. Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) has been recently explored as an important priming agent regulating diverse physiological processes of plant growth and development. Despite its enormous prospects in plant systems, the role of H2S in plant stress tolerance is still elusive. Here, a combined pharmacological, physiological and biochemical approach was executed aiming to examine the possible mechanism of H2S in enhancement of rice salt stress tolerance. We showed that pretreating rice plants with H2S donor sodium bisulfide (NaHS) clearly improved, but application of H2S scavenger hypotaurine with NaHS decreased growth and biomass-related parameters under salt stress. NaHS-pretreated salt-stressed plants exhibited increased chlorophyll, carotenoid and soluble protein contents, as well as suppressed accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), contributing to oxidative damage protection. The protective mechanism of H2S against oxidative stress was correlated with the elevated levels of ascorbic acid, glutathione, redox states, and the enhanced activities of ROS- and methylglyoxal-detoxifying enzymes. Notably, the ability to decrease the uptake of Na(+) and the Na(+)/K(+) ratio, as well as to balance mineral contents indicated a role of H2S in ion homeostasis under salt stress. Altogether, our results highlight that modulation of the level of endogenous H2S genetically or exogenously could be employed to attain better growth and development of rice, and perhaps other crops, under salt stress. Furthermore, our study reveals the importance of the implication of gasotransmitters like H2S for the management of salt stress, thus assisting rice plants to adapt to adverse environmental changes. PMID:26734015

  10. Hydrogen Sulfide Regulates Salt Tolerance in Rice by Maintaining Na+/K+ Balance, Mineral Homeostasis and Oxidative Metabolism Under Excessive Salt Stress

    PubMed Central

    Mostofa, Mohammad G.; Saegusa, Daisuke; Fujita, Masayuki; Tran, Lam-Son Phan

    2015-01-01

    Being a salt sensitive crop, rice growth and development are frequently affected by soil salinity. Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) has been recently explored as an important priming agent regulating diverse physiological processes of plant growth and development. Despite its enormous prospects in plant systems, the role of H2S in plant stress tolerance is still elusive. Here, a combined pharmacological, physiological and biochemical approach was executed aiming to examine the possible mechanism of H2S in enhancement of rice salt stress tolerance. We showed that pretreating rice plants with H2S donor sodium bisulfide (NaHS) clearly improved, but application of H2S scavenger hypotaurine with NaHS decreased growth and biomass-related parameters under salt stress. NaHS-pretreated salt-stressed plants exhibited increased chlorophyll, carotenoid and soluble protein contents, as well as suppressed accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), contributing to oxidative damage protection. The protective mechanism of H2S against oxidative stress was correlated with the elevated levels of ascorbic acid, glutathione, redox states, and the enhanced activities of ROS- and methylglyoxal-detoxifying enzymes. Notably, the ability to decrease the uptake of Na+ and the Na+/K+ ratio, as well as to balance mineral contents indicated a role of H2S in ion homeostasis under salt stress. Altogether, our results highlight that modulation of the level of endogenous H2S genetically or exogenously could be employed to attain better growth and development of rice, and perhaps other crops, under salt stress. Furthermore, our study reveals the importance of the implication of gasotransmitters like H2S for the management of salt stress, thus assisting rice plants to adapt to adverse environmental changes. PMID:26734015

  11. Ion aggregation in high salt solutions: Ion network versus ion cluster

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Seongheun; Kim, Heejae; Choi, Jun-Ho; Cho, Minhaeng

    2014-09-28

    The critical aggregation phenomena are ubiquitous in many self-assembling systems. Ions in high salt solutions could also spontaneously form larger ion aggregates, but their effects on hydrogen-bond structures in water have long been controversial. Here, carrying out molecular dynamics (MD) simulation studies of high salt solutions and comparing the MD simulation results with infrared absorption and pump-probe spectroscopy of O–D stretch mode of HDO in highly concentrated salt solutions and {sup 13}C-NMR chemical shift of S{sup 13}CN{sup −} in KSCN solutions, we find evidence on the onset of ion aggregate and large-scale ion-ion network formation that concomitantly breaks water hydrogen-bond structure in certain salt solutions. Despite that these experimental results cannot provide direct evidence on the three-dimensional morphological structures of ion aggregates, they serve as reference data for verifying MD simulation methods. The MD results suggest that disrupted water hydrogen-bond network is intricately intertwined with ion-ion network. This further shows morphological variation of ion aggregate structures from ion cluster to ion network in high salt solutions that are interrelated to the onset of macroscopic aggregate formation and the water hydrogen-bond structure making and breaking processes induced by Hofmeister ions.

  12. Ion aggregation in high salt solutions: Ion network versus ion cluster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Seongheun; Kim, Heejae; Choi, Jun-Ho; Cho, Minhaeng

    2014-09-01

    The critical aggregation phenomena are ubiquitous in many self-assembling systems. Ions in high salt solutions could also spontaneously form larger ion aggregates, but their effects on hydrogen-bond structures in water have long been controversial. Here, carrying out molecular dynamics (MD) simulation studies of high salt solutions and comparing the MD simulation results with infrared absorption and pump-probe spectroscopy of O-D stretch mode of HDO in highly concentrated salt solutions and 13C-NMR chemical shift of S13CN- in KSCN solutions, we find evidence on the onset of ion aggregate and large-scale ion-ion network formation that concomitantly breaks water hydrogen-bond structure in certain salt solutions. Despite that these experimental results cannot provide direct evidence on the three-dimensional morphological structures of ion aggregates, they serve as reference data for verifying MD simulation methods. The MD results suggest that disrupted water hydrogen-bond network is intricately intertwined with ion-ion network. This further shows morphological variation of ion aggregate structures from ion cluster to ion network in high salt solutions that are interrelated to the onset of macroscopic aggregate formation and the water hydrogen-bond structure making and breaking processes induced by Hofmeister ions.

  13. Length Scale Dependence of the Dynamic Properties of Hyaluronic Acid Solutions in the Presence of Salt

    SciTech Connect

    Horkay, Ferenc; Falus, Peter; Hecht, Anne-Marie; Geissler, Erik

    2010-12-07

    In solutions of the charged semirigid biopolymer hyaluronic acid in salt-free conditions, the diffusion coefficient D{sub NSE} measured at high transfer momentum q by neutron spin echo is more than an order of magnitude smaller than that determined by dynamic light scattering, D{sub DLS}. This behavior contrasts with neutral polymer solutions. With increasing salt content, D{sub DLS} approaches D{sub NSE}, which is independent of ionic strength. Contrary to theoretical expectation, the ion-polymer coupling, which dominates the low q dynamics of polyelectrolyte solutions, already breaks down at distance scales greater than the Debye-Hueckel length.

  14. Preparation of silver nanoparticles in solution from a silver salt by laser irradiation.

    PubMed

    Abid, J P; Wark, A W; Brevet, P F; Girault, H H

    2002-04-01

    A new method is proposed for the fabrication of a well-defined size and shape distribution of silver nanoparticles in solution; the method employs direct laser irradiation of an aqueous solution containing a silver salt and a surfactant in the absence of reducing agents. PMID:12119726

  15. Fluid-loading solutions and plasma volume: Astro-ade and salt tablets with water

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fortney, Suzanne M.; Seinmann, Laura; Young, Joan A.; Hoskin, Cherylynn N.; Barrows, Linda H.

    1994-01-01

    Fluid loading with salt and water is a countermeasure used after space flight to restore body fluids. However, gastrointestinal side effects have been frequently reported in persons taking similar quantities of salt and water in ground-based studies. The effectiveness of the Shuttle fluid-loading countermeasure (8 gms salt, 0.97 liters of water) was compared to Astro-ade (an isotonic electrolyte solution), to maintain plasma volume (PV) during 4.5 hrs of resting fluid restriction. Three groups of healthy men (n=6) were studied: a Control Group (no drinking), an Astro-ade Group, and a Salt Tablet Group. Changes in PV after drinking were calculated from hematocrit and hemoglobin values. Both the Salt Tablet and Astro-ade Groups maintained PV at 2-3 hours after ingestion compared to the Control Group, which had a 6 percent decline. Side effects (thirst, stomach cramping, and diarrhea) were noted in at least one subject in both the Astro-ade and Salt Tablet Groups. Nausea and vomiting were reported in one subject in the Salt Tablet Group. It was concluded that Astro-ade may be offered as an alternate fluid-loading countermeasure but further work is needed to develop a solution that is more palatable and has fewer side effects.

  16. Temperature- and salt-responsive polyoxometalate-poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) hybrid macromolecules in aqueous solution.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Jing; Yin, Panchao; Chen, Xinyue; Hu, Lang; Liu, Tianbo

    2015-11-14

    Polyoxometalate (POM) polar head groups were covalently functionalized with poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (PNIPAM) tails. The macromolecular hybrid demonstrates solution behavior of hydrophilic macroions by self-assembling into blackberry structures at room temperature. The hybrid behaves like an amphiphilic surfactant by forming a vesicular structure when the temperature is above the phase transition of PNIPAM. The reversible self-assembly is also salt-sensitive and the salt-induced smaller vesicular formation results from counterion-association. PMID:26383608

  17. Laser etching of metals in neutral salt solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Datta, M.; Romankiw, L. T.; Vigliotti, D. R.; von Gutfeld, R. J.

    1987-12-01

    We report new findings that relate to rapid maskless laser etching of steel and stainless steel in neutral solutions of sodium chloride, sodium nitrate, and potassium sulfate. Etch rates have been determined as a function of laser power, laser on-time, and solution concentration. The morphology of laser-etched holes obtained in these solutions was compared with holes obtained in pure water. Results indicate that some controlled melting occurs under certain laser conditions in addition to the metal dissolution process induced by the locally intense heat of the laser beam.

  18. Isoconversional Kinetics of Nonisothermal Crystallization of Salts from Solutions.

    PubMed

    Stanford, Victoria L; McCulley, Calla M; Vyazovkin, Sergey

    2016-06-30

    In this study, differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) has been applied to measure the kinetics of nonisothermal crystallization of potassium nitrate and ammonium perchlorate from unsaturated and saturated aqueous solutions. DSC data have been analyzed by an advanced isoconversional method that demonstrates that the process is represented by negative values of the effective activation energy, which varies with the progress of crystallization. The classical nucleation model can be used to predict and understand the experimentally observed variation in the effective activation energy. The saturated and unsaturated solutions have demonstrated distinctly different crystallization kinetics. It is suggested that the unsaturated solutions undergo a change in crystallization mechanism from homogeneous to heterogeneous nucleation. PMID:27305831

  19. Conformational changes of bovine plasma albumin prior to the salting-out of protein in concentrated salt solution.

    PubMed

    Sogami, M; Inouye, H; Nagaoka, S; Era, S

    1982-09-01

    By working at very low protein concentration (ca. 0.003%), it is possible to measure tryptophyl fluorescence intensity at 350 nm (F350) of bovine plasma albumin (BPA) as a function of pH under precipitating conditions (acidic concentrated salt solutions). Under such conditions, distinct changes in F350 were seen before the starting of precipitation of BPA and no further changes in F350 over the precipitating pH range. Comparison of pH-profiles monitored by F350 with those by solubility in the presence of various salts at various concentrations indicated that the change of solubility is observed after definite changes in conformation of the protein. PMID:7129758

  20. Continuous electrolytic decarbonation and recovery of a carbonate salt solution from a metal-contaminated carbonate solution.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kwang-Wook; Kim, Yeon-Hwa; Lee, Se-Yoon; Lee, Eil-Hee; Song, Kyusuk; Song, Kee-Chan

    2009-11-15

    This work studied the characteristic changes of a continuous electrolytic decarbonation and recovery of a carbonate salt solution from a metal-contaminated carbonate solution with changes of operational variables in an electrolytic system which consisted of a cell-stacked electrolyzer equipped with a cation exchange membrane and a gas absorber. The system could completely recover the carbonate salt solution from a uranyl carbonato complex solution in a continuous operation. The cathodic feed rate could control the carbonate concentration of the recovered solution and it affected the most transient pH drop phenomenon of a well type within the gas absorber before a steady state was reached, which caused the possibility of a CO(2) gas slip from the gas absorber. The pH drop problem could be overcome by temporarily increasing the OH(-) concentration of the cathodic solution flowing down within the gas absorber only during the time required for a steady state to be obtained in the case without the addition of outside NaOH. An overshooting peak of the carbonate concentration in the recovered solution before a steady state was observed, which was ascribed to the decarbonation of the initial solution filled within the stacked cells by a redundant current leftover from the complete decarbonation of the feeding carbonate solution. PMID:19604641

  1. Redox condition in molten salts and solute behavior: A first-principles molecular dynamics study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nam, Hyo On; Morgan, Dane

    2015-10-01

    Molten salts technology is of significant interest for nuclear, solar, and other energy systems. In this work, first-principles molecular dynamics (FPMD) was used to model the solute behavior in eutectic LiCl-KCl and FLiBe (Li2BeF4) melts at 773 K and 973 K, respectively. The thermo-kinetic properties for solute systems such as the redox potential, solute diffusion coefficients and structural information surrounding the solute were predicted from FPMD modeling and the calculated properties are generally in agreement with the experiments. In particular, we formulate an approach to model redox energetics vs. chlorine (or fluorine) potential from first-principles approaches. This study develops approaches for, and demonstrates the capabilities of, FPMD to model solute properties in molten salts.

  2. Acemetacin cocrystals and salts: structure solution from powder X-ray data and form selection of the piperazine salt

    PubMed Central

    Sanphui, Palash; Bolla, Geetha; Nangia, Ashwini; Chernyshev, Vladimir

    2014-01-01

    Acemetacin (ACM) is a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID), which causes reduced gastric damage compared with indomethacin. However, acemetacin has a tendency to form a less soluble hydrate in the aqueous medium. We noted difficulties in the preparation of cocrystals and salts of acemetacin by mechanochemical methods, because this drug tends to form a hydrate during any kind of solution-based processing. With the objective to discover a solid form of acemetacin that is stable in the aqueous medium, binary adducts were prepared by the melt method to avoid hydration. The coformers/salt formers reported are pyridine carboxamides [nicotinamide (NAM), isonicotinamide (INA), and picolinamide (PAM)], caprolactam (CPR), p-aminobenzoic acid (PABA), and piperazine (PPZ). The structures of an ACM–INA cocrystal and a binary adduct ACM–PABA were solved using single-crystal X-ray diffraction. Other ACM cocrystals, ACM–PAM and ACM–CPR, and the piperazine salt ACM–PPZ were solved from high-resolution powder X-ray diffraction data. The ACM–INA cocrystal is sustained by the acid⋯pyridine heterosynthon and N—H⋯O catemer hydrogen bonds involving the amide group. The acid⋯amide heterosynthon is present in the ACM–PAM cocrystal, while ACM–CPR contains carboxamide dimers of caprolactam along with acid–carbonyl (ACM) hydrogen bonds. The cocrystals ACM–INA, ACM–PAM and ACM–CPR are three-dimensional isostructural. The carboxyl⋯carboxyl synthon in ACM–PABA posed difficulty in assigning the position of the H atom, which may indicate proton disorder. In terms of stability, the salts were found to be relatively stable in pH 7 buffer medium over 24 h, but the cocrystals dissociated to give ACM hydrate during the same time period. The ACM–PPZ salt and ACM–nicotinamide cocrystal dissolve five times faster than the stable hydrate form, whereas the ACM–PABA adduct has 2.5 times faster dissolution rate. The pharmaceutically acceptable piperazine

  3. Stochastic solution of population balance equations for reactor networks

    SciTech Connect

    Menz, William J.; Akroyd, Jethro; Kraft, Markus

    2014-01-01

    This work presents a sequential modular approach to solve a generic network of reactors with a population balance model using a stochastic numerical method. Full-coupling to the gas-phase is achieved through operator-splitting. The convergence of the stochastic particle algorithm in test networks is evaluated as a function of network size, recycle fraction and numerical parameters. These test cases are used to identify methods through which systematic and statistical error may be reduced, including by use of stochastic weighted algorithms. The optimal algorithm was subsequently used to solve a one-dimensional example of silicon nanoparticle synthesis using a multivariate particle model. This example demonstrated the power of stochastic methods in resolving particle structure by investigating the transient and spatial evolution of primary polydispersity, degree of sintering and TEM-style images. Highlights: •An algorithm is presented to solve reactor networks with a population balance model. •A stochastic method is used to solve the population balance equations. •The convergence and efficiency of the reported algorithms are evaluated. •The algorithm is applied to simulate silicon nanoparticle synthesis in a 1D reactor. •Particle structure is reported as a function of reactor length and time.

  4. A salt-bridge structure in solution revealed by 2D-IR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Huerta-Viga, Adriana; Domingos, Sérgio R; Amirjalayer, Saeed; Woutersen, Sander

    2014-08-14

    Salt bridges are important interactions for the stability of protein conformations, but up to now it has been difficult to determine salt-bridge geometries in solution. Here we characterize the spatial structure of a salt bridge between guanidinium (Gdm(+)) and acetate (Ac(-)) using two-dimensional vibrational (2D-IR) spectroscopy. We find that as a result of salt bridge formation there is a significant change in the infrared response of Gdm(+) and Ac(-), and cross peaks between them appear in the 2D-IR spectrum. From the 2D-IR spectrum we determine the relative orientation of the transition-dipole moments of the vibrational modes of Gdm(+) and Ac(-), as well as the coupling between them. PMID:24676430

  5. Thermodynamics of extraction by solutions of amines and salts of substituted ammonium bases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ochkin, A. V.; Sergievskii, V. V.

    1989-09-01

    Extraction systems containing amines and their salts are widely used to concentrate and separate metals. From the theoretical viewpoint, these systems are among the most complex, because of the variety of intermolecular interactions in the organic phase. The explanation and quantitative description of the observed regularities of extraction became possible only as a result of progress in the study of the thermodynamics of binary and multicomponent solutions of salts of substituted ammonium bases in non-polar organic solvents, which make it possible to distinguish the contribution of each type of interaction to the non-ideal character of the solutions. All known "anomalous" features are due to the influence of the hydration of the salts of the substituted ammonium bases on their activity. The bibliography contains 113 references.

  6. A new class of draw solutions for minimizing reverse salt flux to improve forward osmosis desalination.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Hau Thi; Nguyen, Nguyen Cong; Chen, Shiao-Shing; Ngo, Huu Hao; Guo, Wenshan; Li, Chi-Wang

    2015-12-15

    The applications of forward osmosis (FO) have been hindered because of the lack of an optimal draw solution. The reverse salt flux from the draw solution not only reduces the water flux but also increases the cost of draw solute replenishment. Therefore, in this study, Tergitol NP7 and NP9 with a long straight carbon chain and low critical micelle concentration (CMC) were coupled with highly charged ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) as an innovative draw solution to minimize reverse salt diffusion in FO for the first time. The results showed that the lowest reverse salt flux of 0.067 GMH was observed when 0.1M EDTA-2Na coupled with 15mM NP7 was used as a draw solution and deionized water was used as a feed solution in FO mode (active layer facing with the feed solution). This is due to the hydrophobic interaction between the tails of NP7 and the FO membrane, thus creating layers on the membrane surface and constricting the FO membrane pores. Moreover, 1M EDTA-2Na coupled with 15mM NP7 is promising as an optimal draw solution for brackish water and sea water desalination. Average water fluxes of 7.68, 6.78, and 5.95 LMH were achieved when brackish water was used as a feed solution (5, 10, and 20g/L NaCl), and an average water flux of 3.81 LMH was achieved when sea water was used as a feed solution (35g/L NaCl). The diluted draw solution was recovered using a nanofiltration (NF-TS80) membrane with a high efficiency of 95% because of the high charge and large size of the draw solution. PMID:26298255

  7. Elastic properties of swollen polyelectrolyte gels in aqueous salt solutions.

    PubMed

    Sasaki, Shigeo

    2006-03-01

    The elastic relaxation responding to a uniaxially stretched poly(acrylic acid) rodlike gel in the aqueous NaCl solution was investigated. The relaxation elucidated the shear (mu) and bulk (K) moduli and the frictional coefficients (sigma) of the fully ionized gel at pH above 9 as functions of the degree of swelling, which was controlled by the NaCl concentration (C(S)) of the solution. Two gels, cross-linked chains of which consist of 500 (GelA500) and 50 (GelA50) monomeric units, were examined to investigate the effect of the chain length on the elastic behavior. The moduli of GelA500 increased with swelling at C(S) below 100 mM and decreased at C(S) above it. The mu values of both gels can be characterized by the power function of gel diameter, d as mu proportional, variantd(beta). The beta values being -1 at C(S) above 100 mM transitionally changed to 1.2 at C(S) about 100 mM. That is, the dimensionality of space for the chains to distribute, n(dim) [= (beta+5)/(beta+2) according to the conventional theory [Sasaki et al., J. Chem. Phys. 102, 5694 (1995)

  8. Electrosorption of inorganic salts from aqueous solution using carbon aerogels.

    PubMed

    Gabelich, Christopher J; Tran, Tri D; Suffet, I H Mel

    2002-07-01

    Capacitive deionization (CDI) with carbon aerogels has been shown to remove various inorganic species from aqueous solutions, though no studies have shown the electrosorption behavior of multisolute systems in which ions compete for limited surface area. Several experiments were conducted to determine the ion removal capacity and selectivity of carbon aerogel electrodes, using both laboratory and natural waters. Although carbon aerogel electrodes have been treated as electrical double-layer capacitors, this study showed that ion sorption followed a Langmuir isotherm, indicating monolayer adsorption. The sorption capacity of carbon aerogel electrodes was approximately 1.0-2.0 x 10(-4) equiv/g aerogel, with ion selectivity being based on ionic hydrated radius. Monovalent ions (e.g., sodium) with smaller hydrated radii were preferentially removed from solution over multivalent ions (e.g., calcium) on a percent or molar basis. Because of the relatively small average pore size (4-9 nm) of the carbon aerogel material, only 14-42 m2/g aerogel surface area was available for ion sorption. Natural organic matter may foul the aerogel surface and limit CDI effectiveness in treating natural waters. PMID:12144279

  9. Results of Analysis of Macrobatch 3 Decontaminated Salt Solution Coalescer from May 2010

    SciTech Connect

    Peters, T. B.; Fink, S. D.

    2012-12-18

    SRNL analyzed the Decontamination Salt Solution (DSS) coalescer from MCU by several analytical methods. This unit was removed from service in May 2010. The results of these analyses indicate that there is very little evidence of fouling via excessive solids, either from the leaching studies or X-Ray Diffraction (XRD) analysis.

  10. Methods for predicting properties and tailoring salt solutions for industrial processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ally, Moonis R.

    1993-01-01

    An algorithm developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory accurately and quickly predicts thermodynamic properties of concentrated aqueous salt solutions. This algorithm is much simpler and much faster than other modeling schemes and is unique because it can predict solution behavior at very high concentrations and under varying conditions. Typical industrial applications of this algorithm would be in manufacture of inorganic chemicals by crystallization, thermal storage, refrigeration and cooling, extraction of metals, emissions controls, etc.

  11. Stochastic solution of population balance equations for reactor networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menz, William J.; Akroyd, Jethro; Kraft, Markus

    2014-01-01

    This work presents a sequential modular approach to solve a generic network of reactors with a population balance model using a stochastic numerical method. Full-coupling to the gas-phase is achieved through operator-splitting. The convergence of the stochastic particle algorithm in test networks is evaluated as a function of network size, recycle fraction and numerical parameters. These test cases are used to identify methods through which systematic and statistical error may be reduced, including by use of stochastic weighted algorithms. The optimal algorithm was subsequently used to solve a one-dimensional example of silicon nanoparticle synthesis using a multivariate particle model. This example demonstrated the power of stochastic methods in resolving particle structure by investigating the transient and spatial evolution of primary polydispersity, degree of sintering and TEM-style images.

  12. Hydration structure of salt solutions from ab initio molecular dynamics.

    PubMed

    Bankura, Arindam; Carnevale, Vincenzo; Klein, Michael L

    2013-01-01

    The solvation structures of Na(+), K(+), and Cl(-) ions in aqueous solution have been investigated using density functional theory (DFT) based Car-Parrinello (CP) molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. CPMD trajectories were collected for systems containing three NaCl or KCl ion pairs solvated by 122 water molecules using three different but commonly employed density functionals (BLYP, HCTH, and PBE) with electron correlation treated at the level of the generalized gradient approximation (GGA). The effect of including dispersion forces was analyzed through the use of an empirical correction to the DFT-GGA scheme. Special attention was paid to the hydration characteristics, especially the structural properties of the first solvation shell of the ions, which was investigated through ion-water radial distribution functions, coordination numbers, and angular distribution functions. There are significant differences between the present results obtained from CPMD simulations and those provided by classical MD based on either the CHARMM force field or a polarizable model. Overall, the computed structural properties are in fair agreement with the available experimental results. In particular, the observed coordination numbers 5.0-5.5, 6.0-6.4, and 6.0-6.5 for Na(+), K(+), and Cl(-), respectively, are consistent with X-ray and neutron scattering studies but differ somewhat from some of the many other recent computational studies of these important systems. Possible reasons for the differences are discussed. PMID:23298049

  13. pH in physiological salt solutions: direct measurements.

    PubMed

    Abrahamsen, J; Norrie, B; Andersen, P K; Stokke, D B; Nedergaard, O A

    1990-11-01

    Calculations of pH in modified Krebs solutions by inserting PCO2 and total-CO2 in the Henderson-Hasselbalch (H.-H.) equation are obvious as the equation originally served for this purpose. An exact calculation of the relation between pH and PCO2 is complicated as the concentration of bicarbonate, the dissociation constant and the solubility of CO2 change. Furthermore, the dissociation constant in the H.-H. equation is constant only if activities are used in the equation instead of stoichiometric concentrations. We therefore investigated the influence of different carbon dioxide tensions and bicarbonate concentrations on directly measured pH of organ baths aerated with mass-spectrometric analyzed O2-CO2 gases. For reference precision buffers were used. The measured pH values differed distinctly from calculated pH values in the acidic and alkaline parts of the pH interval investigated (6.57-8.15). Measurements of actual pH with proper calibration standards therefore seem mandatory. PMID:2177306

  14. Hydration structure of salt solutions from ab initio molecular dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Bankura, Arindam; Carnevale, Vincenzo; Klein, Michael L.

    2013-01-07

    The solvation structures of Na{sup +}, K{sup +}, and Cl{sup -} ions in aqueous solution have been investigated using density functional theory (DFT) based Car-Parrinello (CP) molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. CPMD trajectories were collected for systems containing three NaCl or KCl ion pairs solvated by 122 water molecules using three different but commonly employed density functionals (BLYP, HCTH, and PBE) with electron correlation treated at the level of the generalized gradient approximation (GGA). The effect of including dispersion forces was analyzed through the use of an empirical correction to the DFT-GGA scheme. Special attention was paid to the hydration characteristics, especially the structural properties of the first solvation shell of the ions, which was investigated through ion-water radial distribution functions, coordination numbers, and angular distribution functions. There are significant differences between the present results obtained from CPMD simulations and those provided by classical MD based on either the CHARMM force field or a polarizable model. Overall, the computed structural properties are in fair agreement with the available experimental results. In particular, the observed coordination numbers 5.0-5.5, 6.0-6.4, and 6.0-6.5 for Na{sup +}, K{sup +}, and Cl{sup -}, respectively, are consistent with X-ray and neutron scattering studies but differ somewhat from some of the many other recent computational studies of these important systems. Possible reasons for the differences are discussed.

  15. Hydration structure of salt solutions from ab initio molecular dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bankura, Arindam; Carnevale, Vincenzo; Klein, Michael L.

    2013-01-01

    The solvation structures of Na^+, K^+, and Cl^- ions in aqueous solution have been investigated using density functional theory (DFT) based Car-Parrinello (CP) molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. CPMD trajectories were collected for systems containing three NaCl or KCl ion pairs solvated by 122 water molecules using three different but commonly employed density functionals (BLYP, HCTH, and PBE) with electron correlation treated at the level of the generalized gradient approximation (GGA). The effect of including dispersion forces was analyzed through the use of an empirical correction to the DFT-GGA scheme. Special attention was paid to the hydration characteristics, especially the structural properties of the first solvation shell of the ions, which was investigated through ion-water radial distribution functions, coordination numbers, and angular distribution functions. There are significant differences between the present results obtained from CPMD simulations and those provided by classical MD based on either the CHARMM force field or a polarizable model. Overall, the computed structural properties are in fair agreement with the available experimental results. In particular, the observed coordination numbers 5.0-5.5, 6.0-6.4, and 6.0-6.5 for Na^+, K^+, and Cl^-, respectively, are consistent with X-ray and neutron scattering studies but differ somewhat from some of the many other recent computational studies of these important systems. Possible reasons for the differences are discussed.

  16. Explicit-water theory for the salt-specific effects and Hofmeister series in protein solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalyuzhnyi, Yuriy V.; Vlachy, Vojko

    2016-06-01

    Effects of addition of salts on stability of aqueous protein solutions are studied theoretically and the results are compared with experimental data. In our approach, all the interacting species, proteins, ions, and water molecules, are accounted for explicitly. Water molecules are modeled as hard spheres with four off-center attractive square-well sites. These sites serve to bind either another water or to solvate the ions or protein charges. The ions are represented as charged hard spheres, and decorated by attractive sites to allow solvation. Spherical proteins simultaneously possess positive and negative groups, represented by charged hard spheres, attached to the surface of the protein. The attractive square-well sites, mimicking the protein-protein van der Waals interaction, are located on the surface of the protein. To obtain numerical results, we utilized the energy route of Wertheim's associative mean spherical approximation. From measurable properties, we choose to calculate the second virial coefficient B2, which is closely related to the tendency of proteins to aggregate and eventually crystalize. Calculations are in agreement with experimental trends: (i) For low concentration of added salt, the alkali halide salts follow the inverse Hofmeister series. (ii) At higher concentration of added salt, the trend is reversed. (iii) When cations are varied, the salts follow the direct Hofmeister series. (iv) In contrast to the colloidal theories, our approach correctly predicts the non-monotonic behavior of B2 upon addition of salts. (v) With respect to anions, the theory predicts for the B2 values to follow different sequences below and above the iso-ionic point, as also confirmed experimentally. (vi) A semi-quantitative agreement between measured and calculated values for the second virial coefficient, as functions of pH of solution and added salt type and concentration, is obtained.

  17. Explicit-water theory for the salt-specific effects and Hofmeister series in protein solutions.

    PubMed

    Kalyuzhnyi, Yuriy V; Vlachy, Vojko

    2016-06-01

    Effects of addition of salts on stability of aqueous protein solutions are studied theoretically and the results are compared with experimental data. In our approach, all the interacting species, proteins, ions, and water molecules, are accounted for explicitly. Water molecules are modeled as hard spheres with four off-center attractive square-well sites. These sites serve to bind either another water or to solvate the ions or protein charges. The ions are represented as charged hard spheres, and decorated by attractive sites to allow solvation. Spherical proteins simultaneously possess positive and negative groups, represented by charged hard spheres, attached to the surface of the protein. The attractive square-well sites, mimicking the protein-protein van der Waals interaction, are located on the surface of the protein. To obtain numerical results, we utilized the energy route of Wertheim's associative mean spherical approximation. From measurable properties, we choose to calculate the second virial coefficient B2, which is closely related to the tendency of proteins to aggregate and eventually crystalize. Calculations are in agreement with experimental trends: (i) For low concentration of added salt, the alkali halide salts follow the inverse Hofmeister series. (ii) At higher concentration of added salt, the trend is reversed. (iii) When cations are varied, the salts follow the direct Hofmeister series. (iv) In contrast to the colloidal theories, our approach correctly predicts the non-monotonic behavior of B2 upon addition of salts. (v) With respect to anions, the theory predicts for the B2 values to follow different sequences below and above the iso-ionic point, as also confirmed experimentally. (vi) A semi-quantitative agreement between measured and calculated values for the second virial coefficient, as functions of pH of solution and added salt type and concentration, is obtained. PMID:27276970

  18. Impact of co-digestion on existing salt and nutrient mass balances for a full-scale dairy energy project.

    PubMed

    Camarillo, Mary Kay; Stringfellow, William T; Spier, Chelsea L; Hanlon, Jeremy S; Domen, Jeremy K

    2013-10-15

    Anaerobic digestion of manure and other agricultural waste streams with subsequent energy production can result in more sustainable dairy operations; however, importation of digester feedstocks onto dairy farms alters previously established carbon, nutrient, and salinity mass balances. Salt and nutrient mass balance must be maintained to avoid groundwater contamination and salination. To better understand salt and nutrient contributions of imported methane-producing substrates, a mass balance for a full-scale dairy biomass energy project was developed for solids, carbon, nitrogen, sulfur, phosphorus, chloride, and potassium. Digester feedstocks, consisting of thickened manure flush-water slurry, screened manure solids, sudan grass silage, and feed-waste, were tracked separately in the mass balance. The error in mass balance closure for most elements was less than 5%. Manure contributed 69.2% of influent dry matter while contributing 77.7% of nitrogen, 90.9% of sulfur, and 73.4% of phosphorus. Sudan grass silage contributed high quantities of chloride and potassium, 33.3% and 43.4%, respectively, relative to the dry matter contribution of 22.3%. Five potential off-site co-digestates (egg waste, grape pomace, milk waste, pasta waste, whey wastewater) were evaluated for anaerobic digestion based on salt and nutrient content in addition to bio-methane potential. Egg waste and wine grape pomace appeared the most promising co-digestates due to their high methane potentials relative to bulk volume. Increasing power production from the current rate of 369 kW to the design value of 710 kW would require co-digestion with either 26800 L d(-1) egg waste or 60900 kg d(-1) grape pomace. However, importation of egg waste would more than double nitrogen loading, resulting in an increase of 172% above the baseline while co-digestion with grape pomace would increase potassium by 279%. Careful selection of imported co-digestates and management of digester effluent is required to

  19. A traditional Japanese-style salt field is a niche for haloarchaeal strains that can survive in 0.5% salt solution

    PubMed Central

    Fukushima, Tadamasa; Usami, Ron; Kamekura, Masahiro

    2007-01-01

    Background Most of the haloarchaeal strains have been isolated from hypersaline environments such as solar evaporation ponds, salt lakes, or salt deposits, and they, with some exceptions, lyse or lose viability in very low-salt concentrations. There are no salty environments suitable for the growth of haloarchaea in Japan. Although Natrialba asiatica and Haloarcula japonica were isolated many years ago, the question, "Are haloarchaea really thriving in natural environments of Japan?" has remained unanswered. Results Ten strains were isolated from a traditional Japanese-style salt field at Nie, Noto Peninsula, Japan by plating out the soil samples directly on agar plates containing 30% (w/v) salts and 0.5% yeast extract. They were most closely related to strains of three genera, Haladaptatus, Halococcus, and Halogeometricum. Survival rates in 3% and 0.5% SW (Salt Water, solutions containing salts in approximately the same proportions as found in seawater) solutions at 37°C differed considerably depending on the strains. Two strains belonging to Halogeometricum as well as the type strain Hgm. borinquense died and lysed immediately after suspension. Five strains that belonged to Halococcus and a strain that may be a member of Halogeometricum survived for 1–2 days in 0.5% SW solution. Two strains most closely related to Haladaptatus possessed extraordinary strong tolerance to low salt conditions. About 20 to 34% of the cells remained viable in 0.5% SW after 9 days incubation. Conclusion In this study we have demonstrated that haloarchaea are really thriving in the soil of Japanese-style salt field. The haloarchaeal cells, particularly the fragile strains are suggested to survive in the micropores of smaller size silt fraction, one of the components of soil. The inside of the silt particles is filled with concentrated salt solution and kept intact even upon suspension in rainwater. Possible origins of the haloarchaea isolated in this study are discussed. PMID

  20. Modeling Solute Thermokinetics in LiCI-KCI Molten Salt for Nuclear Waste Separation

    SciTech Connect

    Morgan, Dane; Eapen, Jacob

    2013-10-01

    Recovery of actinides is an integral part of a closed nuclear fuel cycle. Pyrometallurgical nuclear fuel recycling processes have been developed in the past for recovering actinides from spent metallic and nitride fuels. The process is essentially to dissolve the spent fuel in a molten salt and then extract just the actinides for reuse in a reactor. Extraction is typically done through electrorefining, which involves electrochemical reduction of the dissolved actinides and plating onto a cathode. Knowledge of a number of basic thermokinetic properties of salts and salt-fuel mixtures is necessary for optimizing present and developing new approaches for pyrometallurgical waste processing. The properties of salt-fuel mixtures are presently being studied, but there are so many solutes and varying concentrations that direct experimental investigation is prohibitively time consuming and expensive (particularly for radioactive elements like Pu). Therefore, there is a need to reduce the number of required experiments through modeling of salt and salt-fuel mixture properties. This project will develop first-principles-based molecular modeling and simulation approaches to predict fundamental thermokinetic properties of dissolved actinides and fission products in molten salts. The focus of the proposed work is on property changes with higher concentrations (up to 5 mol%) of dissolved fuel components, where there is still very limited experimental data. The properties predicted with the modeling will be density, which is used to assess the amount of dissolved material in the salt; diffusion coefficients, which can control rates of material transport during separation; and solute activity, which determines total solubility and reduction potentials used during electrorefining. The work will focus on La, Sr, and U, which are chosen to include the important distinct categories of lanthanides, alkali earths, and actinides, respectively. Studies will be performed using LiCl-KCl salt

  1. BALANCE

    DOEpatents

    Carmichael, H.

    1953-01-01

    A torsional-type analytical balance designed to arrive at its equilibrium point more quickly than previous balances is described. In order to prevent external heat sources creating air currents inside the balance casing that would reiard the attainment of equilibrium conditions, a relatively thick casing shaped as an inverted U is placed over the load support arms and the balance beam. This casing is of a metal of good thernnal conductivity characteristics, such as copper or aluminum, in order that heat applied to one portion of the balance is quickly conducted to all other sensitive areas, thus effectively preventing the fornnation of air currents caused by unequal heating of the balance.

  2. Salt-water-freshwater transient upconing - An implicit boundary-element solution

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kemblowski, M.

    1985-01-01

    The boundary-element method is used to solve the set of partial differential equations describing the flow of salt water and fresh water separated by a sharp interface in the vertical plane. In order to improve the accuracy and stability of the numerical solution, a new implicit scheme was developed for calculating the motion of the interface. The performance of this scheme was tested by means of numerical simulation. The numerical results are compared to experimental results for a salt-water upconing under a drain problem. ?? 1985.

  3. Investigation of the Ionic Hydration in Aqueous Salt Solutions by Soft X-ray Emission Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Jeyachandran, Y L; Meyer, F; Benkert, A; Bär, M; Blum, M; Yang, W; Reinert, F; Heske, C; Weinhardt, L; Zharnikov, M

    2016-08-11

    Understanding the molecular structure of the hydration shells and their impact on the hydrogen bond (HB) network of water in aqueous salt solutions is a fundamentally important and technically relevant question. In the present work, such hydration effects were studied for a series of representative salt solutions (NaCl, KCl, CaCl2, MgCl2, and KBr) by soft X-ray emission spectroscopy (XES) and resonant inelastic soft X-ray scattering (RIXS). The oxygen K-edge XES spectra could be described with three components, attributed to initial state HB configurations in pure water, water molecules that have undergone an ultrafast dissociation initiated by the X-ray excitation, and water molecules in contact with salt ions. The behavior of the individual components, as well as the spectral shape of the latter component, has been analyzed in detail. In view of the role of ions in such effects as protein denaturation (i.e., the Hofmeister series), we discuss the ion-specific nature of the hydration shells and find that the results point to a predominant role of anions as compared to cations. Furthermore, we observe a concentration-dependent suppression of ultrafast dissociation in all salt solutions, associated with a significant distortion of intact HB configurations of water molecules facilitating such a dissociation. PMID:27442708

  4. Water balance and N-metabolism in broccoli (Brassica oleracea L. var. Italica) plants depending on nitrogen source under salt stress and elevated CO2.

    PubMed

    Zaghdoud, Chokri; Carvajal, Micaela; Ferchichi, Ali; Del Carmen Martínez-Ballesta, María

    2016-11-15

    Elevated [CO2] and salinity in the soils are considered part of the effects of future environmental conditions in arid and semi-arid areas. While it is known that soil salinization decreases plant growth, an increased atmospheric [CO2] may ameliorate the negative effects of salt stress. However, there is a lack of information about the form in which inorganic nitrogen source may influence plant performance under both conditions. Single factor responses and the interactive effects of two [CO2] (380 and 800ppm), three different NO3(-)/NH4(+) ratios in the nutrient solution (100/0, 50/50 and 0/100, with a total N concentration of 3.5mM) and two NaCl concentrations (0 and 80mM) on growth, leaf gas exchange parameters in relation to root hydraulic conductance and N-assimilating enzymes of broccoli (Brassica oleracea L. var. Italica) plants were determined. The results showed that a reduced NO3(-) or co-provision of NO3(-) and NH4(+) could be an optimal source of inorganic N for broccoli plants. In addition, elevated [CO2] ameliorated the effect of salt exposure on the plant growth through an enhanced rate of photosynthesis, even at low N-concentration. However, NO3(-) or NO3(-)/NH4(+) co-provision display differential plant response to salt stress regarding water balance, which was associated to N metabolism. The results may contribute to our understanding of N-fertilization modes under increasing atmospheric [CO2] to cope with salt stress, where variations in N nutrition significantly influenced plant response. PMID:27450252

  5. Solution Asymmetry and Salt Expand Fluid-Fluid Coexistence Regions of Charged Membranes.

    PubMed

    Kubsch, Bastian; Robinson, Tom; Lipowsky, Reinhard; Dimova, Rumiana

    2016-06-21

    Liquid-liquid phase separation in giant unilamellar vesicles (GUVs) leads to the formation of intramembrane domains. To mimic charged biological membranes, we studied phase separation and domain formation in GUVs of ternary lipid mixtures composed of egg sphingomyelin, cholesterol, and the negatively charged lipid dioleoylphosphatidylglycerol. The GUVs were exposed to solutions of sucrose and high-saline buffer. The phase diagram was determined using epifluorescence microscopy for vesicle populations with symmetric and asymmetric solution compositions across the membranes. Trans-membrane solution asymmetry was found to affect the membrane phase state. Furthermore, compared to the case of salt-free conditions, the phase diagram in the presence of high-saline buffer (both symmetrically or asymmetrically present across the membrane) was found to exhibit a significantly extended region of liquid-ordered and liquid-disordered coexistence. These observations were confirmed on single GUVs using microfluidics and confocal microscopy. Moreover, we found that the miscibility temperatures markedly increased for vesicles in the presence of symmetric and asymmetric salt solutions. Our results demonstrate a substantial effect of salt and solution asymmetry on the phase behavior of charged membranes, which has direct implications for protein adsorption onto these membranes and for the repartitioning of proteins within the membrane domains. PMID:27288275

  6. Films, Preimpregnated Tapes and Composites Made from Polyimide "Salt-Like" Solutions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cano, Roberto J. (Inventor); Weiser, Erik S. (Inventor); St.Clair, Terry L. (Inventor); Echigo, Yoshiaki (Inventor); Kaneshiro, Hisayasu (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    High quality films, preimpregnated tape (prepegs), and composites have been fabricated from polyimide precursor 'saltlike' solutions. These salt-like solutions have a low viscosity (5,000 to 10,000 cp) and a high solids content (50-65% by weight) and can be coated onto reinforcing fiber to produce prepegs with excellent tack and drape at 12-15% residual solvent (approximately 4-6% water from thermal imidization reaction). The processing of these types of prepegs significantly overcomes solvent removal problems and allows excellent fiber wet out. In addition, the physical characteristics of the polyimide precursor salt-like solutions permits processing into high-performance materials through the use of standard prepregging and composite fabrication equipment. The resultant composites are of high quality.

  7. Molecular dynamics simulations of the surface tension and structure of salt solutions and clusters.

    PubMed

    Sun, Lu; Li, Xin; Hede, Thomas; Tu, Yaoquan; Leck, Caroline; Ågren, Hans

    2012-03-15

    Sodium halides, which are abundant in sea salt aerosols, affect the optical properties of aerosols and are active in heterogeneous reactions that cause ozone depletion and acid rain problems. Interfacial properties, including surface tension and halide anion distributions, are crucial issues in the study of the aerosols. We present results from molecular dynamics simulations of water solutions and clusters containing sodium halides with the interatomic interactions described by a conventional force field. The simulations reproduce experimental observations that sodium halides increase the surface tension with respect to pure water and that iodide anions reach the outermost layer of water clusters or solutions. It is found that the van der Waals interactions have an impact on the distribution of the halide anions and that a conventional force field with optimized parameters can model the surface tension of the salt solutions with reasonable accuracy. PMID:22352372

  8. Solution-derived sodalite made with Si- and Ge-ethoxide precursors for immobilizing electrorefiner salt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riley, Brian J.; Lepry, William C.; Crum, Jarrod V.

    2016-01-01

    Chlorosodalite has the general form of Na8(AlSiO4)6Cl2 and this paper describes experiments conducted to synthesize sodalite with a solution-based approach to immobilize a simulated spent electrorefiner salt solution containing a mixture of alkali, alkaline earth, and lanthanide chlorides. The reactants used were the salt solution, NaAlO2, and either Si(OC2H5)4 or Ge(OC2H5)4. Additionally, seven different glass sintering aids (at loadings of 5 mass%) were evaluated as sintering aids for consolidating the as-made powders using a cold-press-and-sinter technique. This process of using alkoxide additives for the Group IV component can be used to produce large quantities of sodalite at near-room temperature as compared to a method where colloidal silica was used as the silica source. However, the small particle sizes inhibited densification during heat treatments.

  9. Analysis of frozen salt solutions with laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy under Martian conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schröder, S.; Pavlov, S. G.; Hübers, H.-W.; Rauschenbach, I.; Jessberger, E. K.

    2010-05-01

    Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) is a powerful analytical technique for determining the elemental composition of materials. It can be applied in-situ to geological surfaces on planetary missions. Since pure liquid water is unstable at the current surface conditions on Mars, i.e. low surface pressure and temperatures ranging from 140 K to 300 K, salt solutions or brines are of particular interest. It has been suggested that salts could stabilize liquid water on Mars lowering the freezing point of the solution and suppressing evaporation rates. The appropriate salts have been found on Mars in different locations. In this study LIBS is employed for the investigation of frozen sulphate and chloride solutions under Martian conditions in a dedicated simulation chamber. For the laboratory experiments, various salt solutions were prepared with different concentrations. To produce ice with only little inclusions of air, the samples were degassed before freezing them in a copper container. The measurements were performed at 240 K by cooling with liquid nitrogen and controlled heating. A constant flow of a Martian atmosphere-like gas mixture at a pressure of approximately 6 hPa was maintained through the chamber during the measurements. A Q-switched Nd:YAG laser operating at 1064nm and at 10 Hz was used to ablate material and to generate a plasma on the frozen sample's surface. The emitted light of the plasma was collected into the entrance slit of an echelle spectrometer (LTB Aryelle Butterfly) by a toroid mirror. A time-gated ICCD camera (Andor) at the exit of the spectrometer recorded the plasma emission signal. The laser beam was focused at a new position for each measurement. The delay time and the integration time of the spectrometer have been optimized to obtain good signal-to-noise ratios up to 150 while at the same time not losing signals from fast recombining ions. First, the spectra of several frozen salt solutions were investigated qualitatively

  10. Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy for analysis of frozen salt solutions under Martian conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schröder, Susanne; Pavlov, Sergey; Hübers, Heinz-Wilhelm; Rauschenbach, Isabelle; Jessberger, Elmar K.

    Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) is a powerful analytical technique for determin-ing the elemental composition of materials. It can be applied in-situ to geological surfaces on planetary missions. Since pure liquid water is unstable at the current surface conditions on Mars, i.e. low surface pressure and temperatures ranging from 140 K to 300 K, salt solutions or brines are of particular interest. It has been suggested that salts could stabilize liquid water on Mars lowering the freezing point of the solution and suppressing evaporation rates. The ap-propriate salts have been found on Mars in different locations. In this study LIBS is employed for the investigation of frozen sulphate and chloride solutions under Martian conditions in a dedicated simulation chamber. For the laboratory experiments, various salt solutions were prepared with different concen-trations. To produce ice with only little inclusions of air, the samples were degassed before freezing them in a copper container. The measurements were performed at 240 K by cooling with liquid nitrogen and controlled heating. A constant flow of a Martian atmosphere-like gas mixture at a pressure of approximately 6 hPa was maintained through the chamber during the measurements. A Q-switched Nd:YAG laser operating at 1064nm and at 10 Hz was used to ablate material and to generate a plasma on the frozen sample's surface. The emitted light of the plasma was collected into the entrance slit of an echelle spectrometer (LTB Aryelle But-terfly) by a toroid mirror. A time-gated ICCD camera (Andor) at the exit of the spectrometer recorded the plasma emission signal. The laser beam was focused at a new position for each measurement. The delay time and the integration time of the spectrometer have been optimized to obtain good signal-to-noise ratios up to 150 while at the same time not losing signals from fast recombining ions. First, the spectra of several frozen salt solutions were investigated qualitatively

  11. TOTAL SALT, SPECIFIC ION, AND FERTILIZER ELEMENT CONCENTRATIONS AND BALANCES IN THE IRRIGATION AND DRAINAGE WATERS OF THE TWIN FALLS TRACT IN SOUTHERN IDAHO, 1973

    EPA Science Inventory

    The nitrate-nitrogen, phosphate, and total salt concentrations were measured in irrigation and drainage waters on the Twin Falls Canal Company irrigation tract in southern Idaho (17040212). This information was combined with a water balance to estimate input-output balances for ...

  12. Effect of the liquorice root derivatives on salt and water balance in a teleost fish, rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss).

    PubMed

    Chen, Chun Chih; Kolosov, Dennis; Kelly, Scott P

    2015-02-01

    The effect of liquorice root derivatives (LRDs) glycyrrhizic acid (GL) and glycyrrhetinic acid (18βGA) on salt and water balance and end points of gill ion transport in a freshwater teleost, (rainbow trout) was examined after feeding fish diets containing GL or 18βGA (0, 5, 50 or 500 µg/g diet) for a two week period. Serum cortisol levels and gill 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 2 mRNA abundance decreased in fish fed GL but increased (at select doses) in fish fed 18βGA. At higher doses of GL, gill Na(+)-K(+)-ATPase and H(+)-ATPase activity increased, while cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator type II mRNA abundance significantly decreased at the lowest dose of GL. End points of gill transcellular ion transport were not significantly altered in fish fed 18βGA, except for a reduction in Na(+)-K(+)-ATPase activity at a 50 µg/g dose. In contrast, high doses of GL and 18βGA increased gill transcript abundance of the tight junction protein claudin-31 (cldn-31). Other end points of gill paracellular transport differed in fishes fed LRDs. Tricellulin mRNA abundance was increased by high dose GL and decreased by high dose 18βGA, and cldn-23a and cldn-27b mRNA abundance significantly decreased in response to GL irrespective of dose. Despite the above observations, systemic end points of salt and water balance (i.e. serum [Na(+)] and [Cl(-)] as well as muscle moisture) were unaffected by LRDs. Therefore data suggest that LRDs can alter end points of ion transport in fishes but that overall salt and water balance need not be perturbed. PMID:25460830

  13. Identification of frozen salt solutions combining LIBS and multivariate analysis methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schröder, S.; Pavlov, S.; Jessberger, E.; Hübers, H.

    2012-12-01

    Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) is an emission spectroscopy technique and relies on evaporating material from the target by focusing radiation from a pulsed laser onto the sample surface. The generated plasma is analyzed spectroscopically and information about the elemental composition is obtained from specific atomic or ionic transitions and the associated emanating photons, which result in characteristic spectral lines. For the geochemical investigation of extraterrestrial surfaces LIBS has been suggested as a powerful analytical tool and is part of the payload on NASA's rover MSL (Mars Science Laboratory), which landed in the Gale crater on Mars in August 2012. This is the first time that LIBS is used for planetary science. In this study, salts, which are considered relevant for Martian geochemistry were investigated, including sulfates, chlorides, and perchlorates. An infrared Nd:YAG laser (1064 nm wavelength, up to 220 mJ, 8 ns pulse duration, 10 Hz repetition rate) generated the plasma at distances < 1 m. The plasma emission was detected with an echelle spectrometer with a time-gated intensified CCD enabling a continuous coverage from 280 nm to 900 nm. The salts were investigated in their pure form and in frozen salt solutions under simulated Martian atmospheric conditions with an appropriate gas mixture composed of 95.55 % Vol. CO2 at a pressure of 7 mbar. The influence of different gating parameters for time-resolved detection of the plasma was studied and parameters best suited for the LIBS analysis of ices were determined. The emission lines of metals are detectable with LIBS with high signal-to-noise ratios, which facilitates a relatively straightforward identification of the type of the cation. Due to weak excitation of the high-energy levels required for efficient radiative transitions of both sulfur and chlorine ions, their emission lines are typically weak and hardly detectable, in particular in the LIBS spectra of the ices. This

  14. Salt effects in extraction of ethanol, 1-butanol and acetone from aqueous solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Malinowski, J.J.; Daugulis, A.J. . Dept. of Chemical Engineering)

    1994-09-01

    Experimental studies were performed to assess the effect of salt addition on the extraction of 1-butanol, ethanol and acetone from dilute aqueous solutions using cyclopentanol, n-valeraldehyde, tert-amyl alcohol, and Adol 85NF as extractants. The liquid-liquid partitioning was examined for a few strong electrolytes in a broad range of concentrations. Results demonstrate that the distribution coefficient and selectivity in systems with reduced water activity resulting from salt addition were markedly increased. These observations can be qualitatively explained on the basis of the hydration theory. It was also determined that strong electrolytes added to the aqueous feed reduced extractant solubility in the aqueous phase, thus contributing to lower solvent losses. The results showed that the extraction efficiency was not significantly affected by increasing salt content beyond a level that reduces the water activity to a value of 0.92.

  15. Effect of heat stable salts on MDEA solution corrosivity: Part 2

    SciTech Connect

    Rooney, P.C.; DuPart, M.S.; Bacon, T.R.

    1997-04-01

    A comprehensive coupon corrosion testing program was undertaken to address the effect of various heat stable salts on methyldiethanolamine (MDEA) corrosivity to carbon steel and various stainless steels. Corrosion rates of carbon steel, 304SS, 316SS and 410SS liquid and vapor coupons towards MDEA, and MDEA containing various anions, at 180 F and 250 F, were measured in a reactor. Corrosion results of two refinery plant solutions before and after caustic neutralization were also performed. Based on these results, guidelines were determined for heat stable amine salt (HSAS) levels of oxalates, sulfates, formates, acetates and thiosulfates. In addition, caustic neutralization guidelines for MDEA heat stable salts were determined. Ongoing results include MDEA corrosivity with succinates, and malonates, glycolates, SO{sub 2} and ammonia.

  16. Effects of temperature and salt concentration on the structural and dynamical features in aqueous solutions of charged triblock copolymers.

    PubMed

    Kjøniksen, Anna-Lena; Zhu, Kaizheng; Behrens, Manja A; Pedersen, Jan Skov; Nyström, Bo

    2011-03-17

    Effects of temperature and salt addition on the association behavior in aqueous solutions of a series of charged thermosensitive methoxypoly(ethylene glycol)-block-poly(N-isopropylacrylamide)-block-poly(4-styrenesulfonic acid sodium) triblock copolymers (MPEG(45)-b-P(NIPAAM)(n)-b-P(SSS)(22)) with different lengths of the PNIPAAM block (n=17, 48, and 66) have been studied with the aid of turbidity, small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS), and dynamic light scattering (DLS). Increasing temperature and salinity as well as longer PNIPAAM blocks are all factors that promote the formation of association structures. The SAXS data show that, for the copolymers with n=48 and n=66, increasing temperature and salt concentration induce interchain associations and higher values of the aggregation number, whereas no aggregation was observed for the copolymer with the shortest PNIPAAM chain. However, DLS measurements reveal the presence of larger association clusters. The cloud point is found to decrease with raising salinity and longer PNIPAAM block. The general picture that emerges is the delicate interplay between repulsive electrostatic forces and hydrophobic interactions and that this balance can be tuned by changing the temperature, salinity, and the length of the PNIPAAM block. PMID:21338148

  17. The role of saline solution properties on porous limestone salt weathering by magnesium and sodium sulfates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruiz-Agudo, E.; Mees, F.; Jacobs, P.; Rodriguez-Navarro, C.

    2007-03-01

    Saline solution properties, viscosity in particular, are shown to be critical in salt weathering associated with sodium and magnesium sulfate crystallization in porous limestone. The crystallization of sodium and magnesium sulfate within a porous limestone has been studied at a macro- and microscale using different techniques, including mercury intrusion porosimetry, environmental scanning microscopy and X-ray computed tomography. Such analysis enabled the visualization of the crystallization process in situ, and at high magnification, yielding critical information as to where and how salts crystallize. Sodium sulfate decahydrate (mirabilite) tends to crystallize in large pores as euhedral micron-sized crystals formed at low supersaturation near to the surface of the stone. In contrast, magnesium sulfate heptahydrate (epsomite) tends to precipitate as anhedral wax-like aggregates formed at high supersaturation and distributed homogeneously throughout the stone pore system filling large and small pores. While the former crystallization behavior resulted in scale formation, the latter led to crack development throughout the bulk stone. Ultimately, the contrasting weathering behavior of the two sulfates is explained by considering differences in flow dynamics of solutions within porous materials that are mainly connected with the higher viscosity of magnesium sulfate saturated solution (7.27 cP) when compared with sodium sulfate saturated solution (1.83 cP). On the basis of such results, new ways to tackle salt weathering, particularly in the field of cultural heritage conservation, are discussed.

  18. Solution-Derived Sodalite Made with Si- and Ge-Ethoxide Precursors for Immobilizing electrorefiner salt

    SciTech Connect

    Riley, Brian J.; Lepry, William C.; Crum, Jarrod V.

    2016-01-01

    Chlorosodalite has the general form of Na8(AlSiO4)6Cl2 and this paper describes experiments conducted to synthesize sodalite to immobilize a mixed chloride salt using solution-based techniques. Sodalites were made using different Group IV contributions from either Si(OC2H5)4 or Ge(OC2H5)4, NaAlO2, and a simulated spent electrorefiner salt solution containing a mixture of alkali, alkaline earth, and lanthanide chlorides. Additionally, 6 glass binders at low loadings of 5 mass% were evaluated as sintering aids for the consolidation process. The approach of using the organic Group IV additives can be used to produce large quantities of sodalite at room temperature and shows promise over a method where colloidal silica is used as the silica source. However, the small particle sizes inhibited densification during pressure-less sintering.

  19. Prediction of subsidence resulting from creep closure of solutioned-mined caverns in salt domes

    SciTech Connect

    Neal, J.T.

    1991-01-01

    The prediction of subsidence rates over a range of areal configurations of solution-mined caverns in salt domes is possible, based on some fifty years of history in solution mining. Several approaches contribute to predictions: site-specific observations obtained from subsidence monitoring; numerical modeling, now becoming more practicable and credible; salt-creep data from testing; and rule-of-thumb methods, based on experience. All of these approaches contribute to understanding subsidence but none are totally reliable alone. The example of subsidence occurring at the Strategic Petroleum Reserve sites demonstrates several principles of cavern creep closure, the main cause of the subsidence, and shows that reliable projections of future subsidence are possible. 13 refs., 6 figs.

  20. Characterization of Swollen States of Polyelectrolyte Brushes in Salt Solution by Neutron Reflectivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, Motoyasu; Mitamura, Koji; Terada, Masami; Yamada, Norifumi L.; Takahara, Atsushi

    2011-01-01

    Cationic and zwitterionic polyelectrolyte brushes on quartz substrate were synthesized by surface-initiated atom transfer radical polymerization of 2-(methacryloyloxy)-ethyltrimethylammonium chloride (MTAC) and 2-(methacryloyloxy)ethyl phosphorylcholine (MPC). The effects of ionic strength on brush structure are investigated by neutron reflectivity (NR) in NaCl deuterium oxide (D2O) solutions. We observed that poly(MTAC) chains were drastically shrunk at concentrations above 0.1 M NaCl/D2O, which may be the change in charge-screening effect against ions on poly(MTAC). On the other hand, effect of salt concentration on a swollen state of poly(MPC) brush was negligible, even at the high concentration (5.0 M) close to saturation. The behaviour of poly(MPC) in salt aqueous solution is completely different from that of poly(MTAC), which may arise from the unique interaction properties, neutral nature, and hydrated water structure of phosphorylcholine units.

  1. Salt II: Toward Security or Danger? A Balanced Account of the Key Issues in the Debate.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Irwin, Wallace, Jr., Ed.; And Others

    Facts and controversial issues concerning SALT II (Strategic Arms Limitations Talks) are examined. The intent of the document is to enable non-specialists in military/strategic matters to arrive at their own conclusions. Central questions explored are: Is it possible to arrive at an agreement that will stabilize strategic arms competition and…

  2. Inefficacy of osmotic backwash induced by sodium chloride salt solution in controlling SWRO membrane fouling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farooque, A. Mohammed; Al-Jeshi, Subhi; Saeed, Mohamed O.; Alreweli, Ali

    2014-12-01

    A study was conducted to evaluate the efficacy of osmotic backwash induced by high salt (NaCl) concentration solution on feed side of seawater reverse osmosis (SWRO) membranes, online and offline, in controlling membrane fouling and therefore minimizing/eliminating the need for chemical cleaning. SWRO membranes were deliberately fouled by feeding seawater from an open intake located on the Arabian Gulf Coast without dosing chemicals. The fouled membranes were subjected to offline cleaning with the salt solution of up to 25 % concentration. Despite the partial removal of foulants from the membrane surface, SWRO membrane performance could not be restored, indicating the ineffectiveness of osmotic backwash in aiding offline salt cleaning. Similarly, online osmotic backwash was found to be not only ineffective in removing foulants from membrane surfaces but actually increased the fouling rate, as indicated by faster fouling rates compared to other cases. Although the driving force required for the osmotic backwash existed, the generated back flow proved to be insufficient to detach foulants from membrane surfaces. During the study period, the average SWRO membrane flux was maintained between 19 and 23 LMH, whereas the average generated back flow flux by high salt concentration solution was only 11 LMH, which was not adequate to remove foulants from membrane surfaces. Moreover, it seems that the membrane configuration as well as inherent microstructure of SWRO membrane places certain constraints on the osmotic backwash process and renders osmotic backwash ineffective in tackling SWRO membrane fouling. Hence, chemical cleaning is essential to restore SWRO membrane performance whenever fouling occurs, and the use of highly concentrated salt solution does not have any significant benefit. Membrane autopsy revealed only an insignificant accumulation of biofouling layer despite the absence of disinfection. However, it was shown that culturable biofilm bacteria species

  3. Ice crystallization in ultrafine water-salt aerosols: nucleation, ice-solution equilibrium, and internal structure.

    PubMed

    Hudait, Arpa; Molinero, Valeria

    2014-06-01

    Atmospheric aerosols have a strong influence on Earth's climate. Elucidating the physical state and internal structure of atmospheric aqueous aerosols is essential to predict their gas and water uptake, and the locus and rate of atmospherically important heterogeneous reactions. Ultrafine aerosols with sizes between 3 and 15 nm have been detected in large numbers in the troposphere and tropopause. Nanoscopic aerosols arising from bubble bursting of natural and artificial seawater have been identified in laboratory and field experiments. The internal structure and phase state of these aerosols, however, cannot yet be determined in experiments. Here we use molecular simulations to investigate the phase behavior and internal structure of liquid, vitrified, and crystallized water-salt ultrafine aerosols with radii from 2.5 to 9.5 nm and with up to 10% moles of ions. We find that both ice crystallization and vitrification of the nanodroplets lead to demixing of pure water from the solutions. Vitrification of aqueous nanodroplets yields nanodomains of pure low-density amorphous ice in coexistence with vitrified solute rich aqueous glass. The melting temperature of ice in the aerosols decreases monotonically with an increase of solute fraction and decrease of radius. The simulations reveal that nucleation of ice occurs homogeneously at the subsurface of the water-salt nanoparticles. Subsequent ice growth yields phase-segregated, internally mixed, aerosols with two phases in equilibrium: a concentrated water-salt amorphous mixture and a spherical cap-like ice nanophase. The surface of the crystallized aerosols is heterogeneous, with ice and solution exposed to the vapor. Free energy calculations indicate that as the concentration of salt in the particles, the advance of the crystallization, or the size of the particles increase, the stability of the spherical cap structure increases with respect to the alternative structure in which a core of ice is fully surrounded by

  4. Aqueous Biphasic Systems Based on Salting-Out Polyethylene Glycol or Ionic Solutions: Strategies for Actinide or Fission Product Separations

    SciTech Connect

    Rogers, Robin D.; Gutowski, Keith E.; Griffin, Scott T.; Holbrey, John D.

    2004-03-29

    Aqueous biphasic systems can be formed by salting-out (with kosmotropic, waterstructuring salts) water soluble polymers (e.g., polyethylene glycol) or aqueous solutions of a wide range of hydrophilic ionic liquids based on imidazolium, pyridinium, phosphonium and ammonium cations. The use of these novel liquid/liquid biphases for separation of actinides or other fission products associated with nuclear wastes (e.g., pertechnetate salts) has been demonstrated and will be described in this presentation.

  5. An empirical correlation between the enthalpy of solution of aqueous salts and their ability to form hydrates

    SciTech Connect

    Pandelov, S.; Werhahn, Jasper C.; Pilles, Bert M.; Xantheas, Sotiris S.; Iglev, H.

    2010-09-30

    The ability of aqueous salt solutions to form hydrates by cooling them at ambient pressure is probed by infrared (IR) spectroscopy by examining the structure of the spectra in the hydrogen-bonding region (3,000 - 3,800 cm-1). A collection of 75 organic and inorganic salts in saturated solutions are examined. We have found a correlation between the enthalpy of solution of the salt and its ability to form a hydrate, namely that the salt’s enthalpy of solution is lower than the standard enthalpy of fusion of ice (6 kJ/mol). This observation can serve as an empirical rule that determines whether a salt will form a hydrate upon cooling from its aqueous solution.

  6. USING MINED SPACE FOR LONG-TERM RETENTION OF NONRADIOACTIVE HAZARDOUS WASTE. VOLUME 2. SOLUTION MINED SALT CAVERNS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This two-volume report assesses the current status of using mined-space for long-term retention of nonradioactive hazardous waste. Volume 2 expands the definition of mined space to include that created by solution mining of salt. This report examines the extent of salt deposits i...

  7. Balance between salt stress and endogenous hormones influence dry matter accumulation in Jerusalem artichoke.

    PubMed

    Shao, Tianyun; Li, Lingling; Wu, Yawen; Chen, Manxia; Long, Xiaohua; Shao, Hongbo; Liu, Zhaopu; Rengel, Zed

    2016-10-15

    Salinity is one of the most serious environmental stresses limiting agricultural production. Production of Jerusalem artichoke on saline land is strategically important for using saline land resources. The interaction between plant hormones and salinity stress in governing Jerusalem artichoke (Helianthus tuberosus) growth is unclear. Jerusalem artichoke (variety Nanyu-1) was grown under variable salinity stress in the field, and a role of endogenous hormones [zeatin (ZT), auxins (IAA), gibberellins (GA3) and abscisic acid (ABA)] in regulating sugar and dry matter accumulation in tubers was characterized. Under mild salt stress (≤2.2gNaClkg(-1) soil), Nanyu-1 grew well with no significant alteration of dry matter distribution to stems and tubers. In contrast, under moderate salt stress (2.7gNaClkg(-1) soil), the distribution to stem decreased and to tubers decreased significantly. Mild salt stress induced sugar accumulation in tubers at the beginning of the tuber-expansion period, but significantly inhibited (i) transfer of non-reducing sugars to tubers, and (ii) polymerization and accumulation of fructan during the tuber-expansion stage. Under different salinity stress, before the stolon growth, the ratio of IAA/ABA in leaves increased significantly and that of GA3/ABA increased slightly; during tuber development, these ratios continued to decrease and reached the minimum late in the tuber-expansion period. While, salt stress inhibited (i) underground dry matter accumulation, (ii) tuber dry matter accumulation efficiency, (iii) transport of non-reducing sugars to tubers, and (iv) fructan accumulation efficiency during the tuber-expansion period; these effects were accompanied by significantly decreased tuber yield with an increase in salinity. With soil salinity increasing, the synthesis of IAA and GA3 was inhibited in leaves and tubers, while ABA synthesis was stimulated. In brief, tuber yield would significantly decreased with the increase of salinity. PMID

  8. Water--Problems and Solutions. A Report Concerning the Problems and Solutions of Negative Water Balance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ewert, Alan

    Outdoor leaders constantly face problems created by water shortage and, to act effectively, must thoroughly understand the body's use of water and the ways to delay dehydration when water shortage occurs. Dehydration begins when there is a negative water balance, or more water lost than ingested, and progresses from the stage of dryness, to the…

  9. Molecular Thermodynamics for Swelling of a Mesoscopic Ionomer Gelin 1:1 Salt Solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Victorov, Alexey; Radke, Clayton; Prausnitz,John

    2005-06-15

    For a microphase-separated diblock copolymer ionic gel swollen in salt solution, a molecular-thermodynamic model is based on the self-consistent field theory in the limit of strongly segregated copolymer subchains. The geometry of microdomains is described using the Milner generic wedge construction neglecting the packing frustration. Thermodynamic functions are expressed analytically for gels of lamellar, bicontinuous, cylindrical and spherical morphologies. Molecules are characterized by chain composition, length, rigidity, degree of ionization, and by effective polymer-polymer and polymer-solvent interaction parameters. The model predicts equilibrium solvent uptakes and the equilibrium microdomain spacing for gels swollen in salt solutions. Results are given for details of the gel structure: distribution of mobile ions and polymer segments, and the electric potential across microdomains. Apart from effects obtained by coupling classical Flory-Rehner theory with Donnan equilibria, viz., increased swelling with polyelectrolyte charge and shrinking of gel upon addition of salt, the model predicts the effects of microphase morphology on swelling.

  10. Molecular dynamics study of salt–solution interface: Solubility and surface charge of salt in water

    SciTech Connect

    Kobayashi, Kazuya; Liang, Yunfeng E-mail: matsuoka@earth.kumst.kyoto-u.ac.jp; Matsuoka, Toshifumi E-mail: matsuoka@earth.kumst.kyoto-u.ac.jp; Sakka, Tetsuo

    2014-04-14

    The NaCl salt–solution interface often serves as an example of an uncharged surface. However, recent laser-Doppler electrophoresis has shown some evidence that the NaCl crystal is positively charged in its saturated solution. Using molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, we have investigated the NaCl salt–solution interface system, and calculated the solubility of the salt using the direct method and free energy calculations, which are kinetic and thermodynamic approaches, respectively. The direct method calculation uses a salt–solution combined system. When the system is equilibrated, the concentration in the solution area is the solubility. In the free energy calculation, we separately calculate the chemical potential of NaCl in two systems, the solid and the solution, using thermodynamic integration with MD simulations. When the chemical potential of NaCl in the solution phase is equal to the chemical potential of the solid phase, the concentration of the solution system is the solubility. The advantage of using two different methods is that the computational methods can be mutually verified. We found that a relatively good estimate of the solubility of the system can be obtained through comparison of the two methods. Furthermore, we found using microsecond time-scale MD simulations that the positively charged NaCl surface was induced by a combination of a sodium-rich surface and the orientation of the interfacial water molecules.

  11. Protein-protein and protein-salt interactions in aqueous protein solutions containing concentrated electrolytes

    SciTech Connect

    Curtis, R.A.; Blanch, H.W.; Prausnitz, J.M.

    1998-01-05

    Protein-protein and protein-salt interactions have been obtained for ovalbumin in solutions of ammonium sulfate and for lysozyme in solutions of ammonium sulfate, sodium chloride, potassium isothiocyanate, and potassium chloride. The two-body interactions between ovalbumin molecules in concentrated ammonium-sulfate solutions can be described by the DLVO potentials plus a potential that accounts for the decrease in free volume available to the protein due to the presence of the salt ions. The interaction between ovalbumin and ammonium sulfate is unfavorable, reflecting the kosmotropic nature of sulfate anions. Lysozyme-lysozyme interactions cannot be described by the above potentials because anion binding to lysozyme alters these interactions. Lysozyme-isothiocyanate complexes are strongly attractive due to electrostatic interactions resulting from bridging by the isothiocyanate ion. Lysozyme-lysozyme interactions in sulfate solutions are more repulsive than expected, possibly resulting from a larger excluded volume of a lysozyme-sulfate bound complex or perhaps, hydration forces between the lysozyme-sulfate complexes.

  12. Ionic conductivity of dual-phase polymer electrolytes comprised of NBR/SBR latex films swollen with lithium salt solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Matsumoto, Morihiko; Ichino, Toshihiro; Rutt, J.S.; Nishi, Shiro . NTT Interdisciplinary Research Lab.)

    1994-08-01

    Dual-phase polymer electrolytes (DPE) with high ionic conductivity and good mechanical strength were prepared by swelling poly(acrylonitrile-co-butadiene) rubber (NBR) and poly(styrene-co-butadiene) rubber (SBR) mixed latex films with lithium salt solutions (e.g., 1M LiClO[sub 4]/[gamma]-butyrolactone). The latex films retain particle morphology in the solid state. The NBR phase (formed from fused NBR latex particles) is polar and is impregnated selectively with polar lithium salt solutions, yielding ion-conductive channels, whereas the SBR phase (formed from fused SBR latex particles) is nonpolar and is not impregnated, providing a mechanically supportive matrix. The ionic conductivity of the DPE increased dramatically with increasing content of lithium salt solution, and higher amounts of solution were imbibed with increasing content of NBR relative to SBR. Several factors which affect the ionic conductivity of this system were examined, and the highest ionic conductivity (>10[sup [minus]3] S/cm) was obtained when either an NBR/SBR 70/30 (w/w) or a 50/50 (w/w) latex film was saturated with 1M LiClO[sub 4]/[gamma]-BL solution or 1M LiClO[sub 4]/[gamma]-BL/DME solution. Ion-conductive behavior changed critically with increasing lithium salt solution uptake. At low levels of lithium salt solution uptake, evidence suggested that ionic conductivity of the absorbed lithium salt solution was strongly influenced by the presence of the NBR in the ion-conductive channel, but at higher levels, the effects of the NBR were reduced and free'' lithium salt solution was present.

  13. A simple field test for assessing salt balance in heat-stressed miners

    SciTech Connect

    Cross, R.B.; Galton-Fenzi, B.; Jordan, L. )

    1989-08-01

    A simple colorimetric test for urinary chloride (Fantus test) corrected for urine specific gravity (measured by refractometry) enabled 24-hour urinary sodium excretion rates to be predicted accurately from a single spot sample of urine. In 29 acclimatized miners working in an environment in excess of 40 degrees C, salt-conserving mechanisms, involving renin and aldosterone, were not active until the urinary sodium excretion rate fell below 50 mmol/24 h. A predicted sodium excretion rate greater than 50 mmol/24 h indicates that dietary sodium supplementation is not necessary.

  14. RESULTS OF ANALYSES OF MACROBATCH 3 DECONTAMINATED SALT SOLUTION (DSS) COALESCER AND PRE-FILTERS

    SciTech Connect

    Peters, T.; Fondeur, F.; Fink, S.

    2012-06-13

    SRNL analyzed the pre-filter and Decontamination Salt Solution (DSS) coalescer from MCU by several analytical methods. The results of these analyses indicate that overall there is light to moderate solids fouling of both the coalescer and pre-filter elements. The majority of the solids contain aluminum, sodium, silicon, and titanium, in oxide and/or hydroxide forms that we have noted before. The titanium is presumably precipitated from leached, dissolved monosodium titanate (MST) or fines from MST at ARP, and the quantity we find is significantly greater than in the past. A parallel report discusses potential causes for the increased leaching rate of MST, showing that increases in free hydroxide concentration of the feed solutions and of chemical cleaning solutions lead to faster leaching of titanium.

  15. Iron salts in solid state and in frozen solutions as dosimeters for low irradiation temperatures.

    PubMed

    Martínez, T; Lartigue, J; Ramos-Bernal, S; Ramos, A; Mosqueira, G F; Negrón-Mendoza, A

    2005-01-01

    The aim of this work is to study the irradiation of iron salts in solid state (heptahydrated ferrous sulfate) and in frozen acid solutions. The study is focused on finding their possible use as dosimeters for low temperature irradiations and high doses. The analysis of the samples was made by UV-visible and Mössbauer spectroscopies. The output signal was linear from 0 to 10 MGy for the solid samples, and 0-600 Gy for the frozen solutions. The obtained data is reproducible and easy to handle. For these reasons, heptahydrate iron sulfate is a suitable dosimeter for low temperature and high irradiation doses, in solid state, and in frozen solution. PMID:15985374

  16. Effects of electrolyte and nutrient solutions on performance and metabolic balance.

    PubMed

    Johnson, H L; Nelson, R A; Consolazio, C F

    1988-02-01

    Three commercial sport drinks, solutions of their individual minerals and glucose, and water were used to maintain water balances in six men during 4 h of physical activity in a 35 degrees C room. Each solution was provided for 5 consecutive days to each man during the 12-wk study. Complete mineral and water balances (including sweat losses) were conducted. Oxygen consumption and carbon dioxide production were measured during two levels of sub-maximal and during a maximal treadmill performance test. All of the solutions, including water, were equally effective in maintaining water and mineral balances, and moderate physical performance while the men were consuming an adequate all liquid diet. All of the solutions containing carbohydrates increased respiratory exchange ratios. These increases were significant during maximal performance for only two of the commercial products. These two products also produced the higher values for most of the performance evaluations, although they were not generally significantly different from values obtained while other solutions or water were consumed. The major benefit of these commercial sport drinks are their prevention of hypohydration due to an increase in voluntary fluid intakes. PMID:3343913

  17. Decontamination of Dissolved Salt Solution from Tank 19F Using Duolite CS-100 and Amberlite IRC-718 Resins

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, L.M.

    2001-10-17

    In this study actual Savannah River Plant liquid supernate solutions were processed to refine and verify these synthetic solution studies. The main objectives were: (1) confirm high decontamination factors (DFs) for cesium-137 and strontium-90 using Duolite CS-100 and Amberlite IRC-718 ion exchange resins, (2) obtain DFs for other minor radioactive isotopes such as plutonium, technetium and ruthenium, (3) provide ion exchange elutriant containing cesium-137, strontium-90 and other radioactive isotopes for ''hot'' melter studies, (4) determine the quality of the decontaminated salt solution, and (5) provide actual decontaminated salt solution for saltcrete development programs.

  18. Evaluating Battery-like Reactions to Harvest Energy from Salinity Differences using Ammonium Bicarbonate Salt Solutions.

    PubMed

    Kim, Taeyoung; Rahimi, Mohammad; Logan, Bruce E; Gorski, Christopher A

    2016-05-10

    Mixing entropy batteries (MEBs) are a new approach to generate electricity from salinity differences between two aqueous solutions. To date, MEBs have only been prepared from solutions containing chloride salts, owing to their relevance in natural salinity gradients created from seawater and freshwater. We hypothesized that MEBs could capture energy using ammonium bicarbonate (AmB), a thermolytic salt that can be used to convert waste heat into salinity gradients. We examined six battery electrode materials. Several of the electrodes were unstable in AmB solutions or failed to produce expected voltages. Of the electrode materials tested, a cell containing a manganese oxide electrode and a metallic lead electrode produced the highest power density (6.3 mW m(-2) ). However, this power density is still low relative to previously reported NaCl-based MEBs and heat recovery systems. This proof-of-concept study demonstrated that MEBs could indeed be used to generate electricity from AmB salinity gradients. PMID:27030080

  19. Equilibrium, kinetic and thermodynamic study of cesium adsorption onto nanocrystalline mordenite from high-salt solution.

    PubMed

    Lee, Keun-Young; Park, Minsung; Kim, Jimin; Oh, Maengkyo; Lee, Eil-Hee; Kim, Kwang-Wook; Chung, Dong-Yong; Moon, Jei-Kwon

    2016-05-01

    In this study, the equilibrium, kinetics and thermodynamics of cesium adsorption by nanocrystalline mordenite were investigated under cesium contamination with high-salt solution, simulating the case of an operation and decommissioning of nuclear facilities or an accident during the processes. The adsorption rate constants were determined using a pseudo second-order kinetic model. The kinetic results strongly demonstrated that the cesium adsorption rate of nano mordenite is extremely fast, even in a high-salt solution, and much faster than that of micro mordenite. In the equilibrium study, the Langmuir isotherm model fit the cesium adsorption data of nano mordenite better than the Freundlich model, which suggests that cesium adsorption onto nano mordenite is a monolayer homogeneous adsorption process. The obtained thermodynamic parameters indicated that the adsorption involved a very stable chemical reaction. In particular, the combination of rapid particle dispersion and rapid cesium adsorption of the nano mordenite in the solution resulted in a rapid and effective process for cesium removal without stirring, which may offer great advantages for low energy consumption and simple operation. PMID:26683820

  20. Cosolute effect on crystallization of two dinucleotide complexes of bovine seminal ribonuclease from concentrated salt solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sica, Filomena; Adinolfi, Salvatore; Vitagliano, Luigi; Zagari, Adriana; Capasso, Sante; Mazzarella, Lelio

    1996-10-01

    Two complexes of bovine seminal ribonuclease with dinucleotides, uridylyl(2'-5')adenosine (UpA) and 2'-deoxycytidylyl(3'-5')-2'-deoxyadenosine (d(CpA)), were crystallized under unusual conditions involving a liquid-liquid phase separation. This phenomenon was induced by adding small aliquots of organic cosolutes to highly concentrated ammonium sulfate solutions. The liquid-liquid interface acts as a source of nucleation centers for growth of large crystals. Among the cosolutes tested in these salt-mediated crystallizations, 2-methyl-2,4-pentanediol was found to be the most efficient.

  1. Super-absorbency and phase transition of gels in physiological salt solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yong-Qing; Tanaka, Toyoichi; Shibayama, Mitsuhiro

    1992-11-01

    IONIC gels with the ability to absorb many times their dry weight of water have found widespread use as absorbents in medical, chemical and agricultural applications1. The dramatic swelling power of these super-absorbent gels results from both the electrostatic repulsion between the charges on the polymer chains, and the osmotic pressure of the counter-ions2. In salt solutions such as saline, urine or blood, however, excess Na+ and Cl- ions screen the polymer charges and eliminate the osmotic imbalance, effectively changing the properties of the material to that of a non-ionic gel3: this greatly diminishes the swelling power, and hence the utility of these materials under physiological conditions. Here we report the development of a system combining a non-ionic gel with ionized surfactants, which shows super-absorbent behaviour even in the presence of salt. In water, the hydrophobic gel facilitates the formation of spherical surfactant micelles, which mimic the charged sites of an ionic gel. As the salt concentration is increased, the micelles become rod-like, maintaining the electrostatic repulsion along the polymer chains and thereby preserving the swelling power of the gel.

  2. Balancing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harteveld, Casper

    At many occasions we are asked to achieve a “balance” in our lives: when it comes, for example, to work and food. Balancing is crucial in game design as well as many have pointed out. In games with a meaningful purpose, however, balancing is remarkably different. It involves the balancing of three different worlds, the worlds of Reality, Meaning, and Play. From the experience of designing Levee Patroller, I observed that different types of tensions can come into existence that require balancing. It is possible to conceive of within-worlds dilemmas, between-worlds dilemmas, and trilemmas. The first, the within-world dilemmas, only take place within one of the worlds. We can think, for example, of a user interface problem which just relates to the world of Play. The second, the between-worlds dilemmas, have to do with a tension in which two worlds are predominantly involved. Choosing between a cartoon or a realistic style concerns, for instance, a tension between Reality and Play. Finally, the trilemmas are those in which all three worlds play an important role. For each of the types of tensions, I will give in this level a concrete example from the development of Levee Patroller. Although these examples come from just one game, I think the examples can be exemplary for other game development projects as they may represent stereotypical tensions. Therefore, to achieve harmony in any of these forthcoming games, it is worthwhile to study the struggles we had to deal with.

  3. The activity-composition relationship of oxygen and hydrogen isotopes in aqueous salt solutions: II. Vapor-liquid water equilibration of mixed salt solutions from 50 to 100°C and geochemical implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horita, Juske; Cole, David R.; Wesolowski, David J.

    1993-10-01

    The difference between oxygen and hydrogen isotope activity and composition ratios of water in mixed salt solutions in the system Na-K-Mg-Ca-Cl-SO 4-H 2O was determined by means of a vaporliquid water equilibration method over the temperature range of 50 to 100°C. The observed isotope salt effects in complex mixed salt solutions to very high ionic strengths agree quantitatively with calculations based on the assumption of a simple additive property of the isotope salt effects of the individual salts in the solutions. SOFER and GAT (1972, 1975) and HORITA and GAT (1989) also observed that this simple mixing rule applies to synthetic and natural chloride-mixed salt solutions at room temperature. Equations to convert between the isotope activity and composition scales for brines and fractionation factors between brines and other substances are presented. For most geochemical interactions between brines and other phases (vapor, gases, minerals) such as evaporation/boiling, mineral precipitation, and mineral/rock alteration, the isotope activity scale should be used. The isotope composition scale, on the other hand, is most useful for studies of mixing of different brines and formation of brines by mineral dissolution. Misusage of the two isotopic scales of brines will, and probably in the literature has, lead to incorrect conclusions in many isotopic studies of brine-dominated systems (origin of brines, temperature of mineral formation, isotope ratios of fossil fluids).

  4. Evaluation of poly (aspartic acid sodium salt) as a draw solute for forward osmosis.

    PubMed

    Gwak, Gimun; Jung, Bokyung; Han, Sungsoo; Hong, Seungkwan

    2015-09-01

    Poly (aspartic acid sodium salt) (PAspNa) was evaluated for its potential as a novel draw solute in forward osmosis (FO). The inherent advantages of PAspNa, such as good water solubility, high osmotic pressure, and nontoxicity, were first examined through a series of physicochemical analyses and atomic-scale molecular dynamics simulations. Then, lab-scale FO tests were performed to evaluate its suitability in practical processes. Compared to other conventional inorganic solutes, PAspNa showed comparable water flux but significantly lower reverse solute flux, demonstrating its suitability as a draw solute. Moreover, fouling experiments using synthetic wastewater as a feed solution demonstrated that PAspNa reversely flowed to the feed side reduced inorganic scaling on the membrane active layer. The recyclability of PAspNa was studied using both nanofiltration (NF) and membrane distillation (MD) processes, and the results exhibited its ease of recovery. This research reported the feasibility and applicability of FO-NF or FO-MD processes using PAspNa for wastewater reclamation and brackish water desalination. PMID:26005789

  5. Composite Properties of Polyimide Resins Made From "Salt-Like" Solution Precursors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cano, Roberto J.; Weiser, Erik S.; SaintClair, Terry L.; Echigo, Yoshiaki; Kaneshiro, Hisayasu

    1997-01-01

    Recent work in high temperature materials at NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC (trademark)) have led to the development of new polyimide resin systems with very attractive properties. The majority of the work done with these resin systems has concentrated on determining engineering mechanical properties of composites prepared from a poly(amide acid) precursor. Three NASA Langley-developed polyimide matrix resins, LaRC (trademark) -IA, LaRC (trademark) -IAX, and LaRC (trademark) -8515, were produced via a salt-like process developed by Unitika Ltd. The 'salt-like' solutions (sixty-five percent solids in NMP) were prepregged onto Hexcel IM7 carbon fiber using the NASA LaRC Multipurpose Tape Machine. Process parameters were determined and composite panels fabricated. Mechanical properties are presented for these three intermediate modulus carbon fiber/polyimide matrix composites and compared to existing data on the same polyimide resin systems and IM7 carbon fiber manufactured via poly(amide acid) solutions (thirty-five percent solids in NMP). This work studies the effects of varying the synthetic route on the processing and mechanical properties of polyimide composites.

  6. Comparison of peak shape in hydrophilic interaction chromatography using acidic salt buffers and simple acid solutions.

    PubMed

    Heaton, James C; Russell, Joseph J; Underwood, Tim; Boughtflower, Robert; McCalley, David V

    2014-06-20

    The retention and peak shape of neutral, basic and acidic solutes was studied on hydrophilic interaction chromatography (HILIC) stationary phases that showed both strong and weak ionic retention characteristics, using aqueous-acetonitrile mobile phases containing either formic acid (FA), ammonium formate (AF) or phosphoric acid (PA). The effect of organic solvent concentration on the results was also studied. Peak shape was good for neutrals under most mobile phase conditions. However, peak shapes for ionised solutes, particularly for basic compounds, were considerably worse in FA than AF. Even neutral compounds showed deterioration in performance with FA when the mobile phase water concentration was reduced. The poor performance in FA cannot be entirely attributed to the negative impact of ionic retention on ionised silanols on the underlying silica base materials, as results using PA at lower pH (where their ionisation is suppressed) were inferior to those in AF. Besides the moderating influence of the salt cation on ionic retention, it is likely that salt buffers improve peak shape due to the increased ionic strength of the mobile phase and its impact on the formation of the water layer on the column surface. PMID:24813934

  7. Estimating diffusivity from the mixed layer heat and salt balances in the North Pacific

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cronin, Meghan F.; Pelland, Noel A.; Emerson, Steven R.; Crawford, William R.

    2015-11-01

    Data from two National Oceanographic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) surface moorings in the North Pacific, in combination with data from satellite, Argo floats and glider (when available), are used to evaluate the residual diffusive flux of heat across the base of the mixed layer from the surface mixed layer heat budget. The diffusion coefficient (i.e., diffusivity) is then computed by dividing the diffusive flux by the temperature gradient in the 20 m transition layer just below the base of the mixed layer. At Station Papa in the NE Pacific subpolar gyre, this diffusivity is 1 × 10-4 m2/s during summer, increasing to ˜3 × 10-4 m2/s during fall. During late winter and early spring, diffusivity has large errors. At other times, diffusivity computed from the mixed layer salt budget at Papa correlate with those from the heat budget, giving confidence that the results are robust for all seasons except late winter-early spring and can be used for other tracers. In comparison, at the Kuroshio Extension Observatory (KEO) in the NW Pacific subtropical recirculation gyre, somewhat larger diffusivities are found based upon the mixed layer heat budget: ˜ 3 × 10-4 m2/s during the warm season and more than an order of magnitude larger during the winter, although again, wintertime errors are large. These larger values at KEO appear to be due to the increased turbulence associated with the summertime typhoons, and weaker wintertime stratification.

  8. Estimating diffusivity from the mixed layer heat and salt balances in the North Pacific

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cronin, M. F.; Pelland, N.; Emerson, S. R.; Crawford, W. R.

    2015-12-01

    Data from two National Oceanographic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) surface moorings in the North Pacific, in combination with data from satellite, Argo floats and glider (when available), are used to evaluate the residual diffusive flux of heat across the base of the mixed layer from the surface mixed layer heat budget. The diffusion coefficient (i.e., diffusivity) is then computed by dividing the diffusive flux by the temperature gradient in the 20-m transition layer just below the base of the mixed layer. At Station Papa in the NE Pacific subpolar gyre, this diffusivity is 1×10-4 m2/s during summer, increasing to ~3×10-4 m2/s during fall. During late winter and early spring, diffusivity has large errors. At other times, diffusivity computed from the mixed layer salt budget at Papa correlate with those from the heat budget, giving confidence that the results are robust for all seasons except late winter-early spring and can be used for other tracers. In comparison, at the Kuroshio Extension Observatory (KEO) in the NW Pacific subtropical recirculation gyre, somewhat larger diffusivity are found based upon the mixed layer heat budget: ~ 3×10-4 m2/s during the warm season and more than an order of magnitude larger during the winter, although again, wintertime errors are large. These larger values at KEO appear to be due to the increased turbulence associated with the summertime typhoons, and weaker wintertime stratification.

  9. The energy balance relation for weak solutions of the density-dependent Navier-Stokes equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leslie, T. M.; Shvydkoy, R.

    2016-09-01

    We consider the incompressible inhomogeneous Navier-Stokes equations with constant viscosity coefficient and density which is bounded and bounded away from zero. We show that the energy balance relation for this system holds for weak solutions if the velocity, density, and pressure belong to a range of Besov spaces of smoothness 1/3. A density-dependent version of the classical Kármán-Howarth-Monin relation is derived.

  10. Effect of Protein-Lipid-Salt Interactions on Sodium Availability in the Mouth and Consequent Perception of Saltiness: In Solutions.

    PubMed

    Yucel, Umut; Peterson, Devin G

    2015-09-01

    The influence of protein-sodium interactions on the availability of sodium in the aqueous phase of liquid samples and consequently on the perception of saltiness was investigated. The aqueous effluents of casein and casein emulsion-salt solutions were monitored for sodium availability from a tongue column system. In the aqueous protein-salt solutions, increasing the protein/salt ratio from 1:1 to 5:1 or 10:1 significantly decreased the initial salt concentration in the effluent and resulted in a higher salt concentration in the effluent over time. Sensory analysis was in agreement. Samples with increased protein were rated as having significantly lower initial saltiness and a higher salty aftertaste. However, when casein was formulated as an emulsion, the initial release of sodium in the effluent was enhanced (compared to nonemulsified protein). Increasing the emulsion interfacial area (more hydrophilic segments of the protein were structured into the aqueous phase) resulted in a higher salt concentration in the aqueous phase and greater perceived saltiness intensity. In summary, protein interactions, specifically ionic, were reported as food interactions that influence salt perception and provide a basis to develop higher flavor quality low-sodium food products. PMID:26255631

  11. Water Uptake by Mars Salt Analogs: An Investigation of Stable Aqueous Solutions Using Raman Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nuding, Danielle L.

    Liquid water processes that may occur on the surface and near-subsurface of Mars have important implications for the present-day water cycle, habitability, and planetary protection policies. The presence of salts on Mars plays a role in surface-atmosphere interactions as salts enhance the soil's ability to retain water. This thesis explores the phase transitions of water upon interaction with Mars relevant salt analogs. Water uptake and loss properties of a single and complex Mars analog are examined using a Raman microscope equipped with an environmental cell. The effect of the hygroscopic salts on bacterial spores was evaluated with a focus on potential terrestrial contamination on outbound spacecraft and its influence on planetary protection concerns. Calcium perchlorate (Ca(ClO4)2) is a highly deliquescent salt that may exist on the surface of present-day Mars. Here, we quantify the deliquescent relative humidity (DRH) and efflorescent relative humidity (ERH) of Ca(ClO4)2 as a function of temperature (223 K to 273 K) to elucidate its behavior on the surface of Mars. Mars relevant temperature and relative humidity (RH) conditions were simulated and deliquescence (solid to aqueous) and efflorescence (aqueous to solid) phase transitions of Ca(ClO4)2 were characterized. Experimental DRH values were compared to a thermodynamic model for three hydration states of Ca(ClO 4)2. Calcium perchlorate was found to supersaturate, with lower ERH values than DRH values. Additionally, we conducted a 17-hour experiment to simulate a subsurface relative humidity and temperature diurnal cycle. This demonstrated that aqueous Ca(ClO4)2 solutions can persist without efflorescing for the majority of a martian sol, up to 17 hours under Mars temperature heating rates and RH conditions. Applying these experimental results to martian surface and subsurface heat and mass transfer models, we find that aqueous Ca(ClO4)2 solutions could persist for most of the martian sol under present

  12. Hydrology of the Bonneville Salt Flats, northwestern Utah, and simulation of ground-water flow and solute transport in the shallow-brine aquifer

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mason, James L.; Kipp, Kenneth L.

    1998-01-01

    This report describes the hydrologic system of the Bonneville Salt Flats with emphasis on the mechanisms of solute transport. Variable-density, three-dimensional computer simulations of the near-surface part of the ground-water system were done to quantify both the transport of salt dissolved in subsurface brine that leaves the salt-crust area and the salt dissolved and precipitated on the land surface. The study was designed to define the hydrology of the brine ground-water system and the natural and anthropogenic processes causing salt loss, and where feasible, to quantify these processes. Specific areas of study include the transport of salt in solution by ground-water flow and the transport of salt in solution by wind-driven ponds and the subsequent salt precipitation on the surface of the playa upon evaporation or seepage into the subsurface. In addition, hydraulic and chemical changes in the hydrologic system since previous studies were documented.

  13. Self-organization of poly(ethylene oxide) on the surface of aqueous salt solutions.

    PubMed

    Fuchs, Christian; Hussain, Hazrat; Amado, Elkin; Busse, Karsten; Kressler, Joerg

    2015-01-01

    It is demonstrated that stable Langmuir films of poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO) can be formed up to surface pressures of 30 mN m(-1) when potassium carbonate K2CO3 is added to the aqueous subphase. Generally, PEO homopolymer cannot stay on the water surface at a surface pressure ≥10 mN m(-1) due to its high water solubility. To prepare stable monolayer films, PEO can be modified with hydrophobic moieties. However, by exploiting the salting out effect by adding certain salts (K2CO3 or MgSO4) into the aqueous subphase, not only very stable films but also unusual self-organization can be achieved by the PEO homopolymer on the surface of the aqueous solution. Thus, a series of OH-terminated PEOs is found to form a stable monolayer at K2CO3 concentrations of 2 M and above in the aqueous subphase, and the stability of the film increases with an increase in K2CO3 concentration. Hysteresis experiments are also carried out. During the phase transition induced by progressive compression, self-organization into well-defined domains with sizes in the micrometer range are observed, and with further compression and holding of the film for 30 min and above the microdomains transform into a crystalline morphology as visualized by Brewster angle microscopy. PMID:25269665

  14. Hydrogen generation in microbial reverse-electrodialysis electrolysis cells using a heat-regenerated salt solution.

    PubMed

    Nam, Joo-Youn; Cusick, Roland D; Kim, Younggy; Logan, Bruce E

    2012-05-01

    Hydrogen gas can be electrochemically produced in microbial reverse-electrodialysis electrolysis cells (MRECs) using current derived from organic matter and salinity-gradient energy such as river water and seawater solutions. Here, it is shown that ammonium bicarbonate salts, which can be regenerated using low-temperature waste heat, can also produce sufficient voltage for hydrogen gas generation in an MREC. The maximum hydrogen production rate was 1.6 m(3) H(2)/m(3)·d, with a hydrogen yield of 3.4 mol H(2)/mol acetate at a salinity ratio of infinite. Energy recovery was 10% based on total energy applied with an energy efficiency of 22% based on the consumed energy in the reactor. The cathode overpotential was dependent on the catholyte (sodium bicarbonate) concentration, but not the salinity ratio, indicating high catholyte conductivity was essential for maximizing hydrogen production rates. The direction of the HC and LC flows (co- or counter-current) did not affect performance in terms of hydrogen gas volume, production rates, or stack voltages. These results show that the MREC can be successfully operated using ammonium bicarbonate salts that can be regenerated using conventional distillation technologies and waste heat making the MREC a useful method for hydrogen gas production from wastes. PMID:22463373

  15. Light Emission from Porous Silicon Photoetched in Aqueous Alkali Salt Solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adachi, Sadao; Miyazaki, Takayuki; Inoue, Kazufumi; Sodezawa, Shingo

    2007-07-01

    An interband-transition model was applied to explain the emission mechanism in porous silicon (PSi) fabricated by photoetching in aqueous HF and salt (NaF and KF) solutions. The HF-formed samples show a yellow photoluminescence band at ˜2 eV. The salt-formed samples, on the other hand, show an ultraviolet (UV) emission peak at ˜3.3 eV with a spectral width of ˜0.1 eV, together with a broad emission band at ˜2.7 eV. The broad emission bands at ˜2 and ˜2.7 eV can be explained by the quantum-mechanical confinement effect, i.e., a relaxation of the momentum conservation at and above the indirect-absorption edge (supra-EgID emission). This effect may also lead to a change in the E1 critical point (CP) from the two-dimensional M0 to the zero-dimensional CP with decreasing nanocrystalline size. The change in the E1-CP dimensionality makes possible an emission in the UV region with a narrow spectral width.

  16. Pointwise time asymptotic behavior of solutions to a general class of hyperbolic balance laws

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Yanni; Chen, Jiao

    2016-04-01

    In this paper we are interested in a general class of hyperbolic balance laws. Within the frame work of existence of a convex entropy function that symmetrizes the system in certain sense and the Kawashima-Shizuta condition, we study the large time behavior of the solution to the Cauchy problem in one space dimension. For a solution around a constant equilibrium state, we predetermine the asymptotic solution as a superposition of the constant state and diffusion waves along the equilibrium characteristic directions. We estimate the remainder in the pointwise sense both in space and in time. The decay rates in various directions are optimal, which further give the optimal Lp rates with 1 ≤ p ≤ ∞. Applications to several examples including the Kerr-Debye model are given.

  17. In situ X-ray microprobe study of salt layers during anodic dissolution of stainless steel in chloride solution

    SciTech Connect

    Isaacs, H.S.; Cho, J.H.; Rivers, M.L.; Sutton, S.R.

    1995-04-01

    Salt layers play an important role in many electrochemical dissolution processes. The composition of salt films formed on austenitic stainless steel have, for the first time, been determined using in situ energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence microanalysis during dissolution in a chloride solution. The electrode was the cross section of a nickel/chromium steel foil sandwiched between plastic sheets. The foil was electrochemically dissolved producing a pit 1.6 mm deep. The electrode configuration simulated localized corrosion with a one-dimensional diffusion geometry. X-ray fluorescence intensities of chromium K{sub {alpha}}, iron K{sub {alpha}}, an nickel K{sub {beta}} energies were measured as the steel/solution interface traversed a 6 {mu}m, polychromatic, high-intensity X-ray beam. Qualitative determinations were made of the composition of the salt layer and the composition of the saturated solution. Salt layer thickness was found to increase with increased applied potentials. The salt layer was found to be rich in iron and depleted in nickel and, particularly, chromium. The effective diffusion coefficients of the dissolved species were determined from the composition of the saturated solution at the interface. Nickel showed the highest and chromium the lowest effective diffusion coefficient.

  18. Electrophysical methods of separation of metal cations in the moving salts solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gofman, V. N.; Tuksov, I. V.; Timchenko, S. N.; Shamanin, I. V.; Poberezhnikov, A. D.; Kazaryan, M. A.

    2016-07-01

    The results of experiments on the excitation of the phenomenon of selective drift of solvated ions under the influence of an external "asymmetric" electric field to the circulating solution of calcium chloride and magnesium salts in a polar liquid dielectric - water are shown. The purpose of the experiments was to determine the influence of the field frequency and amplitude of the field strength on the excitation phenomenon, and the study of the operating characteristics of the testing apparatus - a dividing cell. The dependences of the separation efficiency of solvated cations from the frequency of the external field and the excitation threshold of the phenomenon from the field strength in the separation cell are defined.

  19. Molecular dynamics study of charged dendrimers in salt-free solution: Effect of counterions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gurtovenko, Andrey A.; Lyulin, Sergey V.; Karttunen, Mikko; Vattulainen, Ilpo

    2006-03-01

    Polyamidoamine dendrimers, being protonated under physiological conditions, represent a promising class of nonviral, nanosized vectors for drug and gene delivery. We performed extensive molecular dynamics simulations of a generic model dendrimer in a salt-free solution with dendrimer's terminal beads positively charged. Solvent molecules as well as counterions were explicitly included as interacting beads. We find that the size of the charged dendrimer depends nonmonotonically on the strength of electrostatic interactions demonstrating a maximum when the Bjerrum length equals the diameter of a bead. Many other structural and dynamic characteristics of charged dendrimers are also found to follow this pattern. We address such a behavior to the interplay between repulsive interactions of the charged terminal beads and their attractive interactions with oppositely charged counterions. The former favors swelling at small Bjerrum lengths and the latter promotes counterion condensation. Thus, counterions can have a dramatic effect on the structure and dynamics of charged dendrimers and, under certain conditions, cannot be treated implicitly.

  20. Factors influencing the formation of polybromide monoanions in solutions of ionic liquid bromide salts.

    PubMed

    Easton, Max E; Ward, Antony J; Chan, Bun; Radom, Leo; Masters, Anthony F; Maschmeyer, Thomas

    2016-03-01

    Six different bromide salts - tetraethylammonium bromide ([N2,2,2,2]Br, Br), 1-ethyl-1-methylpiperidinium bromide ([C2MPip]Br, Br), 1-ethyl-1-methylpyrrolidinium bromide ([C2MPyrr]Br, Br), 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium bromide ([C2MIm]Br, Br), 1-ethylpyridinium bromide ([C2Py]Br, Br), and 1-(2-hydroxyethyl)pyridinium bromide ([C2OHPy]Br, Br) - were studied in regards to their capacity to form polybromide monoanion products on addition of molecular bromine in acetonitrile solutions. Using complementary spectroscopic and computational methods for the examination of tribromide and pentabromide anion formation, key factors influencing polybromide sequestration were identified. Here, we present criteria for the targeted synthesis of highly efficient bromine sequestration agents. PMID:26890026

  1. Designing voltage multipliers with nanofluidic diodes immersed in aqueous salt solutions.

    PubMed

    Ramirez, P; Gomez, V; Verdia-Baguena, C; Nasir, S; Ali, M; Ensinger, W; Mafe, S

    2016-02-01

    Membranes with nanofluidic diodes allow the selective control of molecules in physiological salt solutions at ambient temperature. The electrical coupling of the membranes with conventional electronic elements such as capacitors suggests opportunities for the external monitoring of sensors and actuators. We demonstrate experimentally and theoretically the voltage multiplier functionality of simple electrical networks composed of membranes with conical nanopores coupled to load capacitors. The robust operation of half and full wave voltage multipliers is achieved in a broad range of experimental conditions (single pore and multipore membranes, electrolyte concentrations, voltage amplitudes, and solid-state capacitances). The designed voltage multipliers operate in the liquid state and can be used in sensing devices because different electrical, optical, and chemical inputs are known to modulate the individual nanofluidic diode resistances in the electrical network. PMID:26771033

  2. Micro-Arc oxidation of Ti in a solution of sulfuric acid and Ti +3 salt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ragalevičius, Rimas; Stalnionis, Giedrius; Niaura, Gediminas; Jagminas, Arūnas

    2008-01-01

    A comparative study was performed on the behavior of titanium electrode in a sulfuric acid solution with and without Ti +3 during micro-arc oxidation under the constant current density control regime. The composition and microstructure of the obtained micro-arc films were analyzed using scanning electron microscopy, glancing-angle X-ray diffractometry, Raman and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopies. We have shown that addition of a Ti +3 salt extends the region of current densities ( ja) can be used for micro-arc oxidation of Ti and results in an obvious change of sparking behavior from extensive, large and long-played sparks to numerous, small and short sparks. As a consequence, the titania films formed in the Ti +3-containing solutions are relatively thick, more uniform, composed of almost pure crystalline anatase and rutile phases of TiO 2, and contain a network of evenly distributed small pores. It has also been shown that these films are promising for applications in catalysis, sensors and optoelectronics. The Raman spectra indicate that an increase in the electrolysis time of titanium in the Ti +3-containing solution leads to the increase in rutile content, as expected.

  3. The subtle balance of weak supramolecular interactions: The hierarchy of halogen and hydrogen bonds in haloanilinium and halopyridinium salts.

    PubMed

    Raatikainen, Kari; Cametti, Massimo; Rissanen, Kari

    2010-01-01

    THE SERIES OF HALOANILINIUM AND HALOPYRIDINIUM SALTS: 4-IPhNH₃Cl (1), 4-IPhNH₃Br (5), 4-IPhNH₃H₂PO₄ (6), 4-ClPhNH₃H₂PO₄ (8), 3-IPyBnCl (9), 3-IPyHCl (10) and 3-IPyH-5NIPA (3-iodopyridinium 5-nitroisophthalate, 13), where hydrogen or/and halogen bonding represents the most relevant non-covalent interactions, has been prepared and characterized by single crystal X-ray diffraction. This series was further complemented by extracting some relevant crystal structures: 4-BrPhNH₃Cl (2, CCDC ref. code TAWRAL), 4-ClPhNH₃Cl (3, CURGOL), 4-FPhNH₃Cl (4, ANLCLA), 4-BrPhNH₃H₂PO₄, (7, UGISEI), 3-BrPyHCl, (11, CIHBAX) and 3-ClPyHCl, (12, VOQMUJ) from Cambridge Structural Database for sake of comparison. Based on the X-ray data it was possible to highlight the balance between non-covalent forces acting in these systems, where the relative strength of the halogen bonding C-X...A⁻ (X = I, Br or Cl) and the ratio between the halogen and hydrogen bonds [C-X...A⁻ : D-H...A⁻] varied across the series. PMID:20502514

  4. Mechanical Behavior of Salt Caverns: Closed-Form Solutions vs Numerical Computations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Linlin; Bérest, Pierre; Brouard, Benoît

    2015-11-01

    Creep closure and structural stability of a cylindrical elongated cavern leached out from a salt formation are discussed. The Norton-Hoff creep law, or "power law", is used to capture the main features of salt rheological behavior. Two failure criteria are considered: (1) shear stresses must not be larger than a certain fraction of the mean stress (dilation criterion); and (2) the effective stress at the cavern wall (actual stress plus cavern fluid pressure) must not be tensile. The case of a brine-filled cavern whose pressure is kept constant is discussed first. It is proved that creep closure reaches a steady state such that stresses in the rock mass remain constant. However, decades are needed to reach such a state. During the transient phase that results from the slow redistribution of stresses in the rock mass, deviatoric stresses decrease at the vicinity of the cavern wall, and onset of dilation is less and less likely. At this point, the case of a rapid brine pressure increase, typical of a tightness test, is considered. It is proved that during such a swift pressure increase, cavern behavior is almost perfectly elastic; there is no risk of dilation onset. However, even when cavern pressure remains significantly smaller than geostatic, the effective stress at cavern wall can become tensile. These results, obtained through numerical computations, are confirmed by closed-form solutions obtained in the case of an idealized perfectly cylindrical cavern; these solutions provide a better insight into the main structural features of the behavior of the cavern.

  5. Chain dimensions in free and immobilized brush states of polysulfobetaine in aqueous solution at various salt concentrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terayama, Y.; Arita, H.; Ishikawa, T.; Kikuchi, M.; Mitamura, K.; Kobayashi, M.; Yamada, N. L.; Takahara, A.

    2011-01-01

    The chain dimensions of free and immobilized polysulfobetaine in aqueous solution at various salt concentrations were investigated by size-exclusion chromatography with multiangle light scattering and neutron reflectivity measurement, respectively. The dependence of the z-average mean square radius of gyration (z1/2) on the weight-average molecular weight (Mw) of free poly(3-(N-2-methacryloyloxyethyl-N,N-dimethyl)ammonatopropanesulfo-nate) (MAPS) in aqueous solution at salt concentrations of 74, 100, 200, and 500 mM was described by the perturbed wormlike chain model using the chain stiffness parameter λ-1 the molar mass per unit contour length ML, and the excluded volume effect B. B increased from 0 to 1.8 nm with increasing salt concentration to 500 mM due to the screening of attractive electrostatic interaction between ammonium cations and sulfonyl anions by salt ions. The swollen structure of the poly(MAPS) brush in D2O changed from a shrunken state to a relatively extended state with increasing salt concentration from 0 to 500 mM NaCl/D2O solution. The thickness of the swollen poly(MAPS) brush in 500 mM NaCl/D2O was 9.0 times greater than 2z1/2 of free poly(MAPS) due to high osmotic pressure generated by the excluded volume effect of densely grafted polymer chains.

  6. Structure of salts solution in polar dielectric liquids and electrically induced separation of solvated ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shamanin, Igor V.; Kazaryan, Mishik A.; Sachkov, Victor I.

    2015-12-01

    The aim of study is to demonstrate that separation of solvated ions in solution of mix of salts under the action of external periodic electric field happens because of around ions there are formed clusters consisting of molecules of solvent and the sizes of such clusters have dimensions ~ 0.1 μm. In investigations the sizes of clusters theoretically were defined and experimentally value of frequency of external electric field which action excites the effect of separation of the solvated ions was defined. Experiments were done in the Technical Physics Chair of the National Research Tomsk Polytechnic University. At theoretical determination of the dimensions of clusters Poisson's equation was solved and was considered that polar molecules of solvent are oriented under the action of electric field of an ion. The chemical composition of samples of solutions was determined by means of the spectrophotometry and he X-ray excited fluorescent radiation analysis method. Theoretical estimates and results of experiments confirmed the assumption that clusters which are formed around ions in solutions have the dimensions ~ 0.1 μm. Results of investigation testify that placing of volume distributed electric charge of ion in dielectric liquid is accompanied by formation of the supramolecular particles, which we called "clusters", linear sizes of which is significantly more than first and second radiuses of solvation (~ 1 Angstrom) and reach size ~ 0.1 μm. At such sizes inertial properties of clusters and their natural frequencies give the chance to operate their movement by means of action of external electric field on solution.

  7. A mass-balance model to separate and quantify colloidal and solute redistributions in soil

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bern, C.R.; Chadwick, O.A.; Hartshorn, A.S.; Khomo, L.M.; Chorover, J.

    2011-01-01

    Studies of weathering and pedogenesis have long used calculations based upon low solubility index elements to determine mass gains and losses in open systems. One of the questions currently unanswered in these settings is the degree to which mass is transferred in solution (solutes) versus suspension (colloids). Here we show that differential mobility of the low solubility, high field strength (HFS) elements Ti and Zr can trace colloidal redistribution, and we present a model for distinguishing between mass transfer in suspension and solution. The model is tested on a well-differentiated granitic catena located in Kruger National Park, South Africa. Ti and Zr ratios from parent material, soil and colloidal material are substituted into a mixing equation to quantify colloidal movement. The results show zones of both colloid removal and augmentation along the catena. Colloidal losses of 110kgm-2 (-5% relative to parent material) are calculated for one eluviated soil profile. A downslope illuviated profile has gained 169kgm-2 (10%) colloidal material. Elemental losses by mobilization in true solution are ubiquitous across the catena, even in zones of colloidal accumulation, and range from 1418kgm-2 (-46%) for an eluviated profile to 195kgm-2 (-23%) at the bottom of the catena. Quantification of simultaneous mass transfers in solution and suspension provide greater specificity on processes within soils and across hillslopes. Additionally, because colloids include both HFS and other elements, the ability to quantify their redistribution has implications for standard calculations of soil mass balances using such index elements. ?? 2011.

  8. Cryochemical method for forming spherical metal oxide particles from metal salt solutions

    DOEpatents

    Tinkle, M.C.

    1973-12-01

    A method is described of preparing small metal oxide spheres cryochemically utilizing metal salts (e.g., nitrates) that cannot readily be dried and calcined without loss of sphericity of the particles. Such metal salts are cryochemically formed into small spheres, partially or completely converted to an insoluble salt, and dried and calcined. (Official Gazette)

  9. A relationship between ion balance and the chemical compounds of salt inclusions found in the Greenland Ice Core Project and Dome Fuji ice cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iizuka, Yoshinori; Horikawa, Shinichiro; Sakurai, Toshimitsu; Johnson, Sigfus; Dahl-Jensen, Dorthe; Steffensen, JøRgen Peder; Hondoh, Takeo

    2008-04-01

    We have proposed a method of deducing the chemical compounds found in deep polar ice cores by analyzing the balance between six major ions (Cl-, NO3-, SO42-, Na+, Mg2+, and Ca2+). The method is demonstrated for the Holocene and last glacial maximum regions of the Dome Fuji and GRIP ice cores. The dominant compounds depend only on the ion balance and the sequence of chemical reactions. In priority order, the principle salts are calcium sulfate, other sulfates, nitrate, chloride, and carbonate. The chemical abundances deduced by this method agree well with the results of Raman spectroscopy on individual salt inclusions. The abundances in the ice cores are shown to reflect differences in climatic periods (the acidic environment of the Holocene versus the reductive environment of the last glacial maximum) and regional conditions (the marine environment of Antarctica versus the continental environment of Greenland).

  10. Adaptive resolution simulation of an atomistic DNA molecule in MARTINI salt solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zavadlav, J.; Podgornik, R.; Melo, M. N.; Marrink, S. J.; Praprotnik, M.

    2016-07-01

    We present a dual-resolution model of a deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) molecule in a bathing solution, where we concurrently couple atomistic bundled water and ions with the coarse-grained MARTINI model of the solvent. We use our fine-grained salt solution model as a solvent in the inner shell surrounding the DNA molecule, whereas the solvent in the outer shell is modeled by the coarse-grained model. The solvent entities can exchange between the two domains and adapt their resolution accordingly. We critically asses the performance of our multiscale model in adaptive resolution simulations of an infinitely long DNA molecule, focusing on the structural characteristics of the solvent around DNA. Our analysis shows that the adaptive resolution scheme does not produce any noticeable artifacts in comparison to a reference system simulated in full detail. The effect of using a bundled-SPC model, required for multiscaling, compared to the standard free SPC model is also evaluated. Our multiscale approach opens the way for large scale applications of DNA and other biomolecules which require a large solvent reservoir to avoid boundary effects.

  11. The deliquescence behaviour, solubilities, and densities of aqueous solutions of five methyl- and ethyl-aminium sulphate salts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clegg, Simon L.; Qiu, Chong; Zhang, Renyi

    2013-07-01

    We report measured solubilities of five aminium (i.e., monomethyl, dimethyl, trimethyl, diethyl, and triethyl) sulphate salts in water at 24 °C, and the densities of their aqueous solutions. Using these results, we have converted hygroscopic growth factors determined by Qiu and Zhang (Environ. Sci. Technol. 2012, 46, 4474-4480) to a moles of water per mole of solute basis, and obtained the relationships between concentration and equilibrium relative humidity (water activity) for solutions of the five salts. The results are compared with values predicted using the Extended Aerosol Inorganics Model (E-AIM) of Clegg and co-workers (J. Geophys. Res. 2002, 107, D14, Art. No. 4207). It is assumed in this model that ion and water activities in the solutions are the same as those for aqueous (NH4)2SO4 at the same molality. The experimental and modelled growth factors agree well in all cases, within the uncertainties of the data, which supports this assumption. Equations for the apparent molar volumes of the aminium sulphate salts in aqueous solutions are presented (based upon the measured densities and literature data), and also activity products of the salts in saturated aqueous solutions (based upon the measured solubilities and assumption of similarity with (NH4)2SO4). Simulations of the deliquescence curves of 1:1 and 1:9 mass ratio mixtures of monomethyl and dimethyl aminium sulphate with (NH4)2SO4 are shown to agree well with the measurements. The treatment of amines and aminium salts in the E-AIM model is described.

  12. Rubidium-87 NMR studies of rubidium salts and complexes with 18-crown-6 and cryptand-222 in solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khazaeli, Sadegh; Dye, James L.; Popov, Alexander I.

    Rubidium-87 NMR measurements were used to study the behavior of the Rb + ion in water, methanol, and propylene carbonate solutions. In aqueous solutions the 87Rb chemical shift varies linearly with the mean activity of the salt. In methanol and propylene carbonate solutions the relationship is linear only at high salt concentrations. The resonance lines are broad and vary from ˜ 150 Hz (at half height) in water to ˜ 1000 Hz in propylene carbonate. Additions of macrocyclic ligands 18C6 and C222 to Rb + solutions in the three solvents result in further broadening of the resonance line so that variations in the resonance frequency cannot be measured with a reasonable precision.

  13. REAL-TIME MONITORING OF A SALT SOLUTION MINING CAVERN: FROM PRECURSORY SIGNS TO GENERAL COLLAPSE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klein, E.; Contrucci, I.; Cao, N.; Bigarré, P.

    2009-12-01

    In order to improve our understanding in brutal large scale ground failure phenomenon, a salt solution mining cavern was instrumented in 2004 previously to its expected collapse as part of its mining scheme. A permanent early warning system was set up, including a high resolution microseismic monitoring network linked to a surface field displacement measurement system. The important amount of data collected during this 5 years experiment offered real-time insight of the evolution of the geological system. The complete data set recorded during the experiment made it possible to track with precision the main stages in the evolution of the cavern. The early signs of failure were detected by high resolution microseismic monitoring during spring 2008: a shift in microseismic background regime as well as recurrent microseismic episodes were undoubtedly associated to a general process of rock failure due to the salt cavern extending up to a critical size. This was accompanied by a few episodes of massive roof falls while the upper part of the overburden remained elastic, with no ground surface movement detected. During a second and last stage of evolution, on-line processing and analysis of a sudden intense microseismic activity allowed the interpretation of the rapid, energetic failure of a thin and very stiff bed rock underlying 120 meters deep. After this failure, the ground surface measurements indicated an irreversible acceleration of the subsidence up to the general collapse 24 hours later. As it will be shown, the in-depth analysis of the whole data set enables to characterize the dynamic process of rupture and its associated precursory signs. It provides also essential knowledge and feedback experience for operational monitoring of underground operations carried out on other sensitive mining sites.

  14. Estimation of salt water upconing using a steady-state solution for partial completion of a pumped well.

    PubMed

    Garabedian, Stephen P

    2013-01-01

    A new steady-state analytical solution to the two-dimensional radial-flow equation was developed for drawdown (head) conditions in an aquifer with constant transmissivity, no-flow conditions at the top and bottom, constant head conditions at a known radial distance, and a partially completed pumping well. The solution was evaluated for accuracy by comparison to numerical simulations using MODFLOW. The solution was then used to estimate the rise of the salt water-fresh water interface (upconing) that occurs under a pumping well, and to calculate the critical pumping rate at which the interface becomes unstable, allowing salt water to enter the pumping well. The analysis of salt water-fresh water interface rise assumed no significant effect on upconing by recharge; this assumption was tested and supported using results from a new steady-state analytical solution developed for recharge under two-dimensional radial-flow conditions. The upconing analysis results were evaluated for accuracy by comparison to those from numerical simulations using SEAWAT for salt water-fresh water interface positions under mild pumping conditions. The results from the equation were also compared with those of a published numerical sharp-interface model applied to a case on Cape Cod, Massachusetts. This comparison indicates that estimating the interface rise and maximum allowable pumping rate using the analytical method will likely be less conservative than the maximum allowable pumping rate and maximum stable interface rise from a numerical sharp-interface model. PMID:23336341

  15. Saturated salt solution method: a useful cadaver embalming for surgical skills training.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Shogo; Homma, Hiroshi; Naito, Munekazu; Oda, Jun; Nishiyama, Takahisa; Kawamoto, Atsuo; Kawata, Shinichi; Sato, Norio; Fukuhara, Tomomi; Taguchi, Hirokazu; Mashiko, Kazuki; Azuhata, Takeo; Ito, Masayuki; Kawai, Kentaro; Suzuki, Tomoya; Nishizawa, Yuji; Araki, Jun; Matsuno, Naoto; Shirai, Takayuki; Qu, Ning; Hatayama, Naoyuki; Hirai, Shuichi; Fukui, Hidekimi; Ohseto, Kiyoshige; Yukioka, Tetsuo; Itoh, Masahiro

    2014-12-01

    This article evaluates the suitability of cadavers embalmed by the saturated salt solution (SSS) method for surgical skills training (SST). SST courses using cadavers have been performed to advance a surgeon's techniques without any risk to patients. One important factor for improving SST is the suitability of specimens, which depends on the embalming method. In addition, the infectious risk and cost involved in using cadavers are problems that need to be solved. Six cadavers were embalmed by 3 methods: formalin solution, Thiel solution (TS), and SSS methods. Bacterial and fungal culture tests and measurement of ranges of motion were conducted for each cadaver. Fourteen surgeons evaluated the 3 embalming methods and 9 SST instructors (7 trauma surgeons and 2 orthopedists) operated the cadavers by 21 procedures. In addition, ultrasonography, central venous catheterization, and incision with cauterization followed by autosuture stapling were performed in some cadavers. The SSS method had a sufficient antibiotic effect and produced cadavers with flexible joints and a high tissue quality suitable for SST. The surgeons evaluated the cadavers embalmed by the SSS method to be highly equal to those embalmed by the TS method. Ultrasound images were clear in the cadavers embalmed by both the methods. Central venous catheterization could be performed in a cadaver embalmed by the SSS method and then be affirmed by x-ray. Lungs and intestines could be incised with cauterization and autosuture stapling in the cadavers embalmed by TS and SSS methods. Cadavers embalmed by the SSS method are sufficiently useful for SST. This method is simple, carries a low infectious risk, and is relatively of low cost, enabling a wider use of cadavers for SST. PMID:25501070

  16. Saturated Salt Solution Method: A Useful Cadaver Embalming for Surgical Skills Training

    PubMed Central

    Hayashi, Shogo; Homma, Hiroshi; Naito, Munekazu; Oda, Jun; Nishiyama, Takahisa; Kawamoto, Atsuo; Kawata, Shinichi; Sato, Norio; Fukuhara, Tomomi; Taguchi, Hirokazu; Mashiko, Kazuki; Azuhata, Takeo; Ito, Masayuki; Kawai, Kentaro; Suzuki, Tomoya; Nishizawa, Yuji; Araki, Jun; Matsuno, Naoto; Shirai, Takayuki; Qu, Ning; Hatayama, Naoyuki; Hirai, Shuichi; Fukui, Hidekimi; Ohseto, Kiyoshige; Yukioka, Tetsuo; Itoh, Masahiro

    2014-01-01

    Abstract This article evaluates the suitability of cadavers embalmed by the saturated salt solution (SSS) method for surgical skills training (SST). SST courses using cadavers have been performed to advance a surgeon's techniques without any risk to patients. One important factor for improving SST is the suitability of specimens, which depends on the embalming method. In addition, the infectious risk and cost involved in using cadavers are problems that need to be solved. Six cadavers were embalmed by 3 methods: formalin solution, Thiel solution (TS), and SSS methods. Bacterial and fungal culture tests and measurement of ranges of motion were conducted for each cadaver. Fourteen surgeons evaluated the 3 embalming methods and 9 SST instructors (7 trauma surgeons and 2 orthopedists) operated the cadavers by 21 procedures. In addition, ultrasonography, central venous catheterization, and incision with cauterization followed by autosuture stapling were performed in some cadavers. The SSS method had a sufficient antibiotic effect and produced cadavers with flexible joints and a high tissue quality suitable for SST. The surgeons evaluated the cadavers embalmed by the SSS method to be highly equal to those embalmed by the TS method. Ultrasound images were clear in the cadavers embalmed by both the methods. Central venous catheterization could be performed in a cadaver embalmed by the SSS method and then be affirmed by x-ray. Lungs and intestines could be incised with cauterization and autosuture stapling in the cadavers embalmed by TS and SSS methods. Cadavers embalmed by the SSS method are sufficiently useful for SST. This method is simple, carries a low infectious risk, and is relatively of low cost, enabling a wider use of cadavers for SST. PMID:25501070

  17. Salt-enhanced removal of 2-ethyl-1-hexanol from aqueous solutions by adsorption on activated carbon.

    PubMed

    Chang, Ganggang; Bao, Zongbi; Zhang, Zhiguo; Xing, Huabin; Su, Baogen; Yang, Yiwen; Ren, Qilong

    2013-12-15

    2-Ethyl-1-hexanol has extensive industrial applications in solvent extraction, however, in view of its potential pollution to environment, the removal and recovery of 2-ethyl-1-hexanol is considered an essential step toward its sustainable use in the future. In this work, we report the removal of 2-ethyl-1-hexanol from aqueous solutions containing salts in high concentrations by adsorption on a coal-based activated carbon. Adsorption thermodynamics showed that the experimental isotherms were conformed well to the Langmuir equation. Also it was found that inorganic salts, i.e. MgCl2 and CaCl2 in high concentration significantly enhanced the adsorption capacity from 223 mg/g in the deionized water to 277 mg/g in a saline water. This phenomenon of adsorption enhancement could be ascribed to the salt-out effect. Kinetic analysis indicated that adsorption kinetics follows the pseudo-second-order equation and the adsorption rate constants increase with the salt concentration. The dynamic breakthrough volume and adsorbed amount of 2-ethyl-1-hexanol were significantly elevated when the salt is present in the water. The dynamic saturated adsorption amount increased from 218.3mg/g in the deionized water to 309.5mg/g in a salt lake brine. The Tomas model was well applied to predict the breakthrough curves and determine the characteristics parameters of the adsorption column. PMID:24144367

  18. The on-line removal of non-regenerable salts from amine solutions using the UCARSEP{reg_sign} Process

    SciTech Connect

    Burns, D.; Gregory, R.A.

    1995-11-01

    Amine unit contamination with non-regenerable salts, whether as a result of acid or inorganic salt incursion, or solvent degradation, is a common industry problem. In MEA systems this is usually addressed by the use of a reclaimer but this is not a practical solution for DEA, MDEA or formulated solvents. Similarly, the old approach of purging solvent is no longer economically or environmentally justifiable. Neutralization of amine salts with a strong base can significantly prolong the useful life of the amine solution but eventually some of the salt may have to be removed, especially if mechanical losses are low. Electrodialysis (ED) has recently been applied to this problem and has been found to overcome many of the disadvantages of vacuum distillation and ion exchange technologies, both of which have been used in recent years for solvent clean-up. Union Carbide adapted ED technology to the unique conditions encountered in an amine system and developed the UCARSEP{reg_sign} Process. A mobile UCARSEP{reg_sign} unit has been built to achieve on-line salt removal rates of 40 lbmol/day (about 3,300 lb/day). This has been successfully used to clean up UCARSOL{reg_sign} solvents as well as DEA. Case studies are presented and the relative merits of this and other clean-up options are discussed.

  19. SAVANNAH RIVER SITE INCIPIENT SLUDGE MIXING IN RADIOACTIVE LIQUID WASTE STORAGE TANKS DURING SALT SOLUTION BLENDING

    SciTech Connect

    Leishear, R.; Poirier, M.; Lee, S.; Steeper, T.; Fowley, M.; Parkinson, K.

    2011-01-12

    This paper is the second in a series of four publications to document ongoing pilot scale testing and computational fluid dynamics (CFD) modeling of mixing processes in 85 foot diameter, 1.3 million gallon, radioactive liquid waste, storage tanks at Savannah River Site (SRS). Homogeneous blending of salt solutions is required in waste tanks. Settled solids (i.e., sludge) are required to remain undisturbed on the bottom of waste tanks during blending. Suspension of sludge during blending may potentially release radiolytically generated hydrogen trapped in the sludge, which is a safety concern. The first paper (Leishear, et. al. [1]) presented pilot scale blending experiments of miscible fluids to provide initial design requirements for a full scale blending pump. Scaling techniques for an 8 foot diameter pilot scale tank were also justified in that work. This second paper describes the overall reasons to perform tests, and documents pilot scale experiments performed to investigate disturbance of sludge, using non-radioactive sludge simulants. A third paper will document pilot scale CFD modeling for comparison to experimental pilot scale test results for both blending tests and sludge disturbance tests. That paper will also describe full scale CFD results. The final paper will document additional blending test results for stratified layers in salt solutions, scale up techniques, final full scale pump design recommendations, and operational recommendations. Specifically, this paper documents a series of pilot scale tests, where sludge simulant disturbance due to a blending pump or transfer pump are investigated. A principle design requirement for a blending pump is UoD, where Uo is the pump discharge nozzle velocity, and D is the nozzle diameter. Pilot scale test results showed that sludge was undisturbed below UoD = 0.47 ft{sup 2}/s, and that below UoD = 0.58 ft{sup 2}/s minimal sludge disturbance was observed. If sludge is minimally disturbed, hydrogen will not be

  20. Protein-salt binding data from potentiometric titrations of lysozyme in aqueous solutions containing KCl

    SciTech Connect

    Engmann, J.; Blanch, H.W.; Prausnitz, J.M. |

    1997-03-01

    An existing method for potentiometric titrations of proteins was improved, tested and applied to titrations of the enzyme hen-egg-white lysozyme in aqueous solutions containing KCl at ionic strengths from 0.1 M to 2.0 M at 25 C. Information about the protein`s net charge dependence on pH and ionic strength were obtained and salt binding numbers for the system were calculated using a linkage concept. For the pH range 2.5--11.5, the net charge slightly but distinctly increases with increasing ionic strength between 0.1 M and 2.0 M. The differences are most distinct in the pH region below 5. Above pH 11.35, the net charge decreases with increasing ionic strength. Preliminary calculation of binding numbers from titration curves at 0.1 M and 1.0 M showed selective association of chloride anions and expulsion of potassium ions at low pH. Ion-binding numbers from this work will be used to evaluate thermodynamic properties and to correlate crystallization or precipitation phase-equilibrium data in terms of a model based on the integral-equation theory of fluids which is currently under development.

  1. Experimental study of natural convection melting of ice in salt solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Fang, L.J.; Cheung, F.B.; Linehan, J.H.; Pedersen, D.R.

    1984-01-01

    The solid-liquid interface morphology and the micro-physical process near the moving phase boundary during natural convection melting of a horizontal layer of ice by an overlying pool of salt solution were studied experimentally. A cathetometer which amplifies the interface region was used to measure the ice melting rate. Also measured were the temperature transients of the liquid pool. Within the temperature and the density ratio ranges explored, the ice melting rate was found to be very sensitive to the ratio of pool-to-ice melt density but independent of pool-to-ice temperature difference. By varying the density ratio, three different flow regimes and morphologies of the solid-liquid interface were observed, with melt streamers emanating from the crests of the wavy interface into the pool in all three cases. The measured wavelengths (spacing) between the streamers for four different pairs of materials were correlated with the density ratio and found to agree favorably with the predictions of Taylor instability theory.

  2. Salt Solutions in Carbon Nanotubes: The Role of Cation- π Interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pham, Tuan Anh; Mortuza, Golam; Wood, Brandon; Lau, Edmond; Ogitsu, Tadashi; Buchsbaum, Steven; Siwy, Zuzanna; Fornasiero, Francesco; Schwegler, Eric

    Understanding the structure of aqueous electrolytes at interfaces is essential for predicting and optimizing device performances for a wide variety of emerging energy and environmental technologies. In this work, we investigate the structure of two common salt solutions, NaCl and KCl, at a hydrophobic interface within narrow carbon nanotubes (CNTs). Using a combination of first-principles and classical molecular dynamics simulations, we find that the solvation structure of the cations in the CNTs can deviate substantially from the conventional weakly interacting hydrophobic picture. Instead, interactions between solvated ions and the π-orbitals of the CNTs are found to play a critically important role, with the ion solvation structure ultimately determined by a subtle interplay between cation- π interactions and the intrinsic flexibility of the solvation shell. In the case of K+, these effects result in an unusually strong propensity to partially desolvate and reside closer to the carbon wall than either Na+ and Cl-, in sharp contrast to the known ion ordering at the water-vapor interface. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by LLNL under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  3. Influence and hydrolysis kinetics in titanyl sulfate solution from the sodium hydroxide molten salt method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Weijing; Chen, Desheng; Chu, Jinglong; Li, Jie; Xue, Tianyan; Wang, Lina; Wang, Dong; Qi, Tao

    2013-10-01

    Hydrated titanium dioxide (HTD) was precipitated by thermal hydrolysis in purified titanyl sulfate solution (TSS) obtained through the sodium hydroxide molten salt clean method. Various factors including the stirring speed and initial concentrations of TiOSO4, sulfuric acid, and sodium ion were studied. The main influence factors in the hydrolysis process were the initial concentrations of TiOSO4 and sulfuric acid. Contrary to the ferrous ion, the sodium ion improved the ionic activity of Ti4+, but did not decrease the crystal size. The Boltzman growth model (x=A2+(A1-A2)/{1+exp[(t-t0)/dt)]}, which focuses on two main parameters (CTiOSO4 and CH2SO4), fits the hydrolysis process well with R2>0.97. An increase in sulfuric acid concentration negatively affected the hydrolysis rates and the value of A2, while t0 increased. An increase in titanyl sulfate concentration directly reduced the hydrolysis rates and particle size of HTD, contrary to the trend for the value of t0. A simulation software called 1stopt was used to observe the relationship between Z (A1, A2, t0, dt) and a, b (CTiO2 and CH2SO4).

  4. Synergistic effects of inorganic salt and surfactant on phenanthrene removal from aqueous solution by sediment.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaoyan; Wu, Yaoguo; Hu, Sihai; Lu, Cong

    2014-01-01

    The economic and effective application of surfactant enhanced remediation (SER) technology in a sediment-freshwater/saline water system was investigated by batch method using the combined effects of inorganic salt (sodium chloride, NaCl) and anionic surfactant (sodium dodecylbenzene sulfonate (SDBS)) on phenanthrene (PHE) removal via sorption by sediment. In all cases, PHE sorption followed a linear equation and partition as the main mechanism for PHE removal from aqueous solution. Separate addition of SDBS (2 mmol L(-1)) and NaCl (2-100 mmol L(-1)) moderately enhanced PHE removal, while with their combined addition the enhancement was substantial, and the removal efficiency achieved a peak of 92.8%. The combined effect expressed a synergy, and the sorption enhancement increased by factors of 2.7, 3.2 and 3.4 when compared with the sum of the separate entities at elevated salinity. This was because the sorbed SDBS, with increasing amount and a high packing conformation at elevated salinity, outcompeted aqueous SDBS for PHE partition. Moreover, a combination of 2 mmol L(-1) SDBS and 2 mmol L(-1) NaCl was optimal for PHE removal. Therefore, SER technology appears more effective for PHE removal in saline water than in freshwater, and preliminary water quality monitoring is essential for economic and efficient SER application. PMID:25353936

  5. Different sodium salts cause different solute accumulation in the halophyte Prosopis strombulifera.

    PubMed

    Llanes, A; Bertazza, G; Palacio, G; Luna, V

    2013-01-01

    The success of Prosopis strombulifera in growing under high NaCl concentrations involves a carefully controlled balance among different processes, including compartmentation of Cl(-) and Na(+) in leaf vacuoles, exclusion of Na(+) in roots, osmotic adjustment and low transpiration. In contrast, Na(2) SO(4) causes growth inhibition and toxicity. We propose that protection of the cytoplasm can be achieved through production of high endogenous levels of specific compatible solutes. To test our hypothesis, we examined endogenous levels of compatible solutes in roots and leaves of 29-, 40- and 48-day-old P. strombulifera plants grown in media containing various concentrations of NaCl, Na(2) SO(4) or in mixtures of both, with osmotic potentials of -1.0,-1.9 and -2.6 MPa, as correlated with changes in hydric parameters. At 24 h after the last pulse plants grown in high NaCl concentrations had higher relative water content and relatively higher osmotic potential than plants grown in Na(2) SO(4) (at 49 days). These plants also had increased synthesis of proline, pinitol and mannitol in the cytoplasm, accompanied by normal carbon metabolism. When the sulphate anion is present in the medium, the capacities for ion compartmentalisation and osmotic adjustment are reduced, resulting in water imbalance and symptoms of toxicity due to altered carbon metabolism, e.g. synthesis of sorbitol instead of mannitol, reduced sucrose production and protein content. This inhibition was partially mitigated when both anions were present together in the solution, demonstrating a detrimental effect of the sulphate ion on plant growth. PMID:22747518

  6. Extreme ductile deformation of fine-grained salt by coupled solution-precipitation creep and microcracking: Microstructural evidence from perennial Zechstein sequence (Neuhof salt mine, Germany)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Závada, Prokop; Desbois, Guillaume; Schwedt, Alexander; Lexa, Ondrej; Urai, Janos L.

    2012-04-01

    Microstructural study revealed that the ductile flow of intensely folded fine-grained salt exposed in an underground mine (Zechstein-Werra salt sequence, Neuhof mine, Germany) was accommodated by coupled activity of solution-precipitation (SP) creep and microcracking of the halite grains. The grain cores of the halite aggregates contain remnants of sedimentary microstructures with straight and chevron shaped fluid inclusion trails (FITs) and are surrounded by two concentric mantles reflecting different events of salt precipitation. Numerous intra-granular or transgranular microcracks originate at the tips of FITs and propagate preferentially along the interface between sedimentary cores and the surrounding mantle of reprecipitated halite. These microcracks are interpreted as tensional Griffith cracks. Microcracks starting at grain boundary triple junctions or grain boundary ledges form due to stress concentrations generated by grain boundary sliding (GBS). Solid or fluid inclusions frequently alter the course of the propagating microcracks or the cracks terminate at these inclusions. Because the inner mantle containing the microcracks is corroded and is surrounded by microcrack-free outer mantle, microcracking is interpreted to reflect transient failure of the aggregate. Microcracking is argued to play a fundamental role in the continuation and enhancement of the SP-GBS creep during halokinesis of the Werra salt, because the transgranular cracks (1) provide the ingress of additional fluid in the grain boundary network when cross-cutting the FITs and (2) decrease grain size by splitting the grains. More over, the ingress of additional fluids into grain boundaries is also provided by non-conservative grain boundary migration that advanced into FITs bearing cores of grains. Described readjustments of the microstructure and mechanical and chemical feedbacks for the grain boundary diffusion flow in halite-brine system are proposed to be comparable to other rock-fluid or

  7. Steady-state solutions of a diffusive energy-balance climate model and their stability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ghil, M.

    1975-01-01

    A diffusive energy-balance climate model, governed by a nonlinear parabolic partial differential equation, was studied. Three positive steady-state solutions of this equation are found; they correspond to three possible climates of our planet: an interglacial (nearly identical to the present climate), a glacial, and a completely ice-covered earth. Models similar to the main one are considered, and the number of their steady states was determined. All the models have albedo continuously varying with latitude and temperature, and entirely diffusive horizontal heat transfer. The stability under small perturbations of the main model's climates was investigated. A stability criterion is derived, and its application shows that the present climate and the deep freeze are stable, whereas the model's glacial is unstable. The dependence was examined of the number of steady states and of their stability on the average solar radiation.

  8. Growth of single crystals of organic salts with large second-order optical nonlinearities by solution processes for devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leslie, Thomas M.

    1995-01-01

    Data obtained from the electric field induced second harmonic generation (EFISH) and Kurtz Powder Methods will be provided to MSFC for further refinement of their method. A theoretical model for predicting the second-order nonlinearities of organic salts is being worked on. Another task is the synthesis of a number of salts with various counterions. Several salts with promising SHG activities and new salts will be tested for the presence of two crystalline forms. The materials will be recrystallized from dry and wet solvents and compared for SHG efficiency. Salts that have a high SHG efficiency and no tendency to form hydrates will be documented. The synthesis of these materials are included in this report. A third task involves method to aid in the growth of large, high quality single crystals by solution processes. These crystals will be characterized for their applicability in the fabrication of devices that will be incorporated into optical computers in future programs. Single crystals of optimum quality may be obtained by crystal growth in low-gravity. The final task is the design of a temperature lowering single crystal growth apparatus for ground based work. At least one prototype will be built.

  9. Hormonal adaptation to the stresses imposed upon sodium balance by pregnancy and lactation in the Yanomama Indians: a culture without salt

    SciTech Connect

    Oliver, W.J.; Neel, J.V.; Grekin, R.J.; Cohen, E.L.

    1981-01-01

    The Yanomama Indians of northern Brazil and southern Venezuela have been identified as a no salt culture. In this study, data were obtained to determine in this population the adjustments of sodium-related hormones to the stresses imposed upon sodium balance by pregnancy and prolonged lactation. Controls against the possibility that findings in the Yanomama were ethnic rather than dietary were provided by similar observations in the Guaymi Indians of Panama, who have free access to salt. Urinary concentrations of sodium were approximately 1 mEq/l in male and female Yanomama, with 24-h excretion rates in the males averaging 1 mEq, similar to our prior observations. The pregnant Yanomama had exceeding high urinary concentrations of aldosterone. These were associated with higher plasma renin activities and serum aldosterone concentrations than in all other subjects. Although pregnant Guaymi had elevations of serum and urinary aldosterone, these were significantly lower (p < 0.001) than those of the Yanomama. Prolonged lactation in the Yanomama was associated with elevation of plasma renin activity and serum and urinary aldosterone concentration compared with the Guaymi, but were not higher than those in nonlactating Yanomama females. The findings suggest that pregnancy in a salt-poor environment is associated with an exaggerated augmentation of hormonal responses that enhance positive sodium balance.

  10. Ion aggregation in high salt solutions. V. Graph entropy analyses of ion aggregate structure and water hydrogen bonding network.

    PubMed

    Choi, Jun-Ho; Cho, Minhaeng

    2016-05-28

    Dissolved ions in water tend to form polydisperse ion aggregates such as ion pairs, relatively compact ion clusters, and even spatially extended ion networks with increasing salt concentration. Combining molecular dynamics simulation and graph theoretical analysis methods, we recently studied morphological structures of ion aggregates with distinctively different characteristics. They can be distinguished from each other by calculating various spectral graph theoretical properties such as eigenvalues and eigenvectors of adjacency matrices of ion aggregates and water hydrogen-bonding networks, minimum path lengths, clustering coefficients, and degree distributions. Here, we focus on percolation and graph entropic properties of ion aggregates and water hydrogen-bonding networks in high salt solutions. Ion network-forming K(+) and SCN(-) ions at high concentrations show a percolating behavior in their aqueous solutions, but ion cluster-forming ions in NaCl solutions do not show such a transition from isolated ion aggregates to percolating ion-water mixture morphology. Despite that the ion aggregate structures are strikingly different for either cluster- or network-forming ions in high salt solutions, it is interesting that the water structures remain insensitive to the electrostatic properties, such as charge densities and polydentate properties, of dissolved ions, and morphological structures of water H-bonding networks appear to be highly robust regardless of the nature and concentration of salt. We anticipate that the present graph entropy analysis results would be of use in understanding a variety of anomalous behaviors of interfacial water around biomolecules as well as electric conductivities of high electrolyte solutions. PMID:27250298

  11. Ion aggregation in high salt solutions. V. Graph entropy analyses of ion aggregate structure and water hydrogen bonding network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Jun-Ho; Cho, Minhaeng

    2016-05-01

    Dissolved ions in water tend to form polydisperse ion aggregates such as ion pairs, relatively compact ion clusters, and even spatially extended ion networks with increasing salt concentration. Combining molecular dynamics simulation and graph theoretical analysis methods, we recently studied morphological structures of ion aggregates with distinctively different characteristics. They can be distinguished from each other by calculating various spectral graph theoretical properties such as eigenvalues and eigenvectors of adjacency matrices of ion aggregates and water hydrogen-bonding networks, minimum path lengths, clustering coefficients, and degree distributions. Here, we focus on percolation and graph entropic properties of ion aggregates and water hydrogen-bonding networks in high salt solutions. Ion network-forming K+ and SCN- ions at high concentrations show a percolating behavior in their aqueous solutions, but ion cluster-forming ions in NaCl solutions do not show such a transition from isolated ion aggregates to percolating ion-water mixture morphology. Despite that the ion aggregate structures are strikingly different for either cluster- or network-forming ions in high salt solutions, it is interesting that the water structures remain insensitive to the electrostatic properties, such as charge densities and polydentate properties, of dissolved ions, and morphological structures of water H-bonding networks appear to be highly robust regardless of the nature and concentration of salt. We anticipate that the present graph entropy analysis results would be of use in understanding a variety of anomalous behaviors of interfacial water around biomolecules as well as electric conductivities of high electrolyte solutions.

  12. Development of tropine-salt aqueous two-phase systems and removal of hydrophilic ionic liquids from aqueous solution.

    PubMed

    Wu, Haoran; Yao, Shun; Qian, Guofei; Song, Hang

    2016-08-26

    A novel aqueous two-phase systems (ATPS) composed of a small molecule organic compound tropine and an organic or inorganic salt aqueous solution has been developed for the first time. The phase behavior of tropine-salt ATPS was systemically investigated and the phase equilibrium data were measured in different temperatures and concentrations and correlated by the Merchuk equation with satisfactory results. The detection of the conductivity and particle size proved the formation of micelle in the process of forming tropine-salt ATPS. The separation application of the ATPS was assessed with the removal of hydrophilic benzothiazolium-based ionic liquids (ILs) from aqueous solution. The result showed that ILs were effectively extracted into the top tropine-rich phase. Finally, ILs in the top tropine-rich phase were further separated by the means of adsorption-desorption with DM301 macroporous resin and ethanol. The method of novel tropine-salt ATPS combined with adsorption-desorption is demonstrated a promising alternative thought and approach for the removal or recovery of hydrophilic compounds from aqueous media and also could provide a potential application for bio-separation. PMID:27485150

  13. A novel method of non-violent dissolution of sodium metal in a concentrated aqueous solution of Epsom salt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lakshmanan, A. R.; Prasad, M. V. R.; Ponraju, D.; Krishnan, H.

    2004-10-01

    A new technique of non-violent and fast dissolution of sodium metal in a concentrated aqueous solution of Epsom salt (MgSO4.7H2O) at room temperature (RT) has been developed. The dissolution process is mildly exothermic but could be carried out even in a glass beaker in air under swift stirring condition. The reaction products consist of mixed salts of MgSO4 and Na2SO4 as well as Mg(OH)2 which are only mildly alkaline and hence are non-corrosive and non-hazardous unlike NaOH. A 50 mL solution having Epsom salt concentration of 2 M was found to give the optimal composition for disposal of 1 g of sodium. Supersaturated (>2.7 M), as well as dilute (<1.1 M) solutions, however, cause violent reactions and hence should be avoided. Repeated sodium dissolution in Epsom solution produced a solid waste of 4.7 g per g of sodium dissolved which is comparable with the waste (4 g) produced in 8 M NaOH solution. A 1.4 M Epsom solution sprayed with a high-pressure jet cleaner at RT in air easily removed the sodium blocked inside a metal pipe made of mild steel. The above jet also dissolved peacefully residual sodium collected on the metal tray after a sodium fire experiment. No sodium fire or explosion was observed during this campaign. The Epsom solution spray effectively neutralized the minor quantity of sodium aerosol produced during this campaign. This novel technique would hence be quite useful for draining sodium from fast breeder reactor components and bulk processing of sodium as well as for sodium fire fighting.

  14. Probing the electron-accepting reactivity of isomeric bis(pyrrolidinium) fullerene salts in aqueous solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Guldi, D.M.

    2000-02-24

    A series of water-soluble isomer bis(pyrrolidinium) salts, with C{sub 60}(C{sub 4}H{sub 10}N{sup +}){sub 2} as cationic moiety (2a--2d), were probed in radical- and light-induced reduction studies and compared to bis(carboxylates) C{sub 60}[C(COO{sup {minus}}){sub 2}]{sub 2} and to {gamma}-CD-encapsulated C{sub 60}. Pulse radiolytic reduction of 2a--2d with hydrated electrons and (CH{sub 3}){sub 2}{sup {sm{underscore}bullet}}COH radicals leads to the formation of the fullerene {pi}-radical anion, exhibiting fingerprint absorption characteristics in the near-IR region. Because of the electron-withdrawing nature of the pyrrolidinium groups the electron-acceptor properties of the investigated bis(pyrrolidinium) salts are markedly improved relative to the bis(carboxylates) (C{sub 60}[C(COO{sup {minus}}){sub 2}]{sub 2}) and also relative to C{sub 60}. For example, the rate constants for the fullerene reduction of 2a--2d with hydrated electrons ((0.88--2.2) x 10{sup 10} M{sup {minus}1} s{sup {minus}1}) and (CH{sub 3}){sub 2}{sm{underscore}bullet}COH radicals ((4.7--7.1) x 10{sup 8} M{sup {minus}1} s{sup {minus}1}) are clearly faster than those noted for C{sub 60}[C(COO{sup {minus}}){sub 2}]{sub 2} (e{sub aq}{sup {minus}}: (0.19--0.34) x 10{sup 10} M{sup {minus}1} s{sup {minus}1}; (CH{sub 3}){sub 2}{sup {sm{underscore}bullet}}COH: (0.9--2.2) x 10{sup 8}M{sup {minus}1} s{sup {minus}1}), and C{sub 60} (e{sub aq}{sup {minus}}: 1.8 x 10{sup 10} M{sup {minus}1} s{sup {minus}1}; (CH{sub 3}){sub 2}{sup {sm{underscore}bullet}}COH: 2.7 x 10{sup 8} M{sup {minus}1} s{sup {minus}1}). Photolysis of 2a--2d gives rise to singlet excited state absorptions that closely resemble earlier observations for the pyrrolidine precursor, e.g., C{sub 60}(C{sub 3}H{sub 7}N){sub 2} (1a--1d) in deoxygenated toluene solutions. The triplet lifetimes of 2a--2d, as measured by nanosecond-resolved photolysis, are typically around 33 {mu}s, similar to the triplet lifetimes of truly monomeric fullerene

  15. Electrochemical activation of carbon cloth in aqueous inorganic salt solution for superior capacitive performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Dong; Yu, Yao; Tang, Jie; Liu, Lin; Wu, Yue

    2016-05-01

    Carbon cloth (CC) is an inexpensive and highly conductive textile with excellent mechanical flexibility and strength; it holds great promise as an electrode material for flexible supercapacitors. However, pristine CC has such a low surface area and poor electrochemical activity that the energy storage capability is usually very poor. Herein, we report a green method, two-step electrochemical activation in an aqueous solution of inorganic salts, to significantly enhance the capacitance of CC for supercapacitor application. Micro-cracks, exfoliated carbon fiber shells, and oxygen-containing functional groups (OFGs) were introduced onto the surface of the carbon filament. This resulted in an enhancement of over two orders of magnitude in capacitance compared to that of the bare CC electrode, reaching up to a maximum areal capacitance of 505.5 mF cm-2 at the current density of 6 mA cm-2 in aqueous H2SO4 electrolyte. Electrochemical reduction of CC electrodes led to the removal of most electrochemically unstable surface OFGs, resulting in superior charging/discharging rate capability and excellent cycling stability. Although the activated CC electrode contained a high-level of surface oxygen functional groups (~15 at%), it still exhibited a remarkable charging-discharging rate capability, retaining ~88% of the capacitance when the charging rate increased from 6 to 48 mA cm-2. Moreover, the activated CC electrode exhibited excellent cycling stability with ~97% capacitance remaining after 10 000 cycles at a current density of 24 mA cm-2. A symmetrical supercapacitor based on the activated CC exhibited an ideal capacitive behavior and fast charge-discharge properties. Such a simple, environment-friendly, and cost-effective strategy to activate CC shows great potential in the fabrication of high-performance flexible supercapacitors.Carbon cloth (CC) is an inexpensive and highly conductive textile with excellent mechanical flexibility and strength; it holds great promise as

  16. Effects of solution mining of salt on wetland hydrology as inferred from tree rings

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Yanosky, T.M.; Kappel, W.M.

    1997-01-01

    Radial growth and concentrations of selected elements within rings were studied in white pine (Pinus strobus) trees from a wetland in central New York approximately 5 km north of a salt-solution mining field that operated from 1889 to 1988. Trees seemingly document three sequential episodes of mine-induced alterations of groundwater discharge irrigating the wetland during the 100-year period. The radial growth of trees established before the onset of mining declined abruptly in the early 1890s and remained suppressed until about 1960, as did growth of numerous other trees that became established after the onset of mining. Suppressed pre-1960 radial growth coincided with the interval that surface water was injected into the saltbeds, suggesting that losses of injected water to the bedrock and/or unconsolidated deposits increased groundwater flow into the wetland. An abrupt and sustained enhancement of radial growth beginning about 1960 indicates that the wetland became drier, and thus more conducive to tree growth, when injection practices were discontinued in the late 1950s despite the continued pumping of brine. Following the cessation of mining in the late 1980s, head pressures again increased in the upper valley, driving chloride-enriched flow northward along regional bedding-plane fractures and into the wetland. Large concentrations of chloride were detected within the most recently formed rings of some trees. As the result of chloride-enriched irrigation, the radial growth of some trees declined, and some trees died. Thus trees have preserved evidence of a century of hydrologic alterations, unobtainable by other means, where the effects of brine mining have not been documented previously.

  17. The inhibitive effect of some quaternary ammonium salts towards corrosion of aluminium in hydrochloric acid solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohamed, A.-M. K.; Al-Nadjm, A.; Fouda, A.-A. S.

    1998-10-01

    The inhibitive action of some quaternary ammonium salts towards the corrosion of aluminium in hydrochloric acid was tested by thermometric, mass loss and polarization measurements. Parallelism between the different methods was established. It is suggested that the tested compounds act as cathodic inhibitors. The inhibitors appear to function through adsorption, following the Temkin adsorption isotherm. The values of free energy of adsorption have been calculated and discussed. The inhibitor character of the additives depends upon the concentration as well as the composition of the inhibitor. Within the given homolegous series the contribution of the functional group to adsorption increases with the length of the chain. The aim of this article is to throw some light on the mechanism of inhibition of these bulky molecules on the corrosion of aluminium in hydrochloric acid. L'action inhibitrice de certains sels d'ammonium quaternaires vis-à-vis de la corrosion de l'aluminium dans l'acide chlorhydrique en solution a été testée par des mesures thermiques de perte de matière et de polarisation. Il est suggéré que les composés testés agissent comme des inhibiteurs cathodiques, fonctionnant par adsorption suivant l'isotherme de Temkin. Les énergies libres d'adsorption ont été calculées et discutées. Le caractère inhibiteur des additifs dépend aussi bien de leur concentration que de leur composition. Pour une série d'inhibiteurs homologues, la contribution à l'adsorption du groupe fonctionnel augmente avec la longueur de la chaîne. Le but de cet article est de mieux comprendre le mécanisme d'inhibition de ces grosses molécules sur la corrosion de l'aluminium dans l'acide chlorhydrique.

  18. Electrochemical activation of carbon cloth in aqueous inorganic salt solution for superior capacitive performance.

    PubMed

    Ye, Dong; Yu, Yao; Tang, Jie; Liu, Lin; Wu, Yue

    2016-05-21

    Carbon cloth (CC) is an inexpensive and highly conductive textile with excellent mechanical flexibility and strength; it holds great promise as an electrode material for flexible supercapacitors. However, pristine CC has such a low surface area and poor electrochemical activity that the energy storage capability is usually very poor. Herein, we report a green method, two-step electrochemical activation in an aqueous solution of inorganic salts, to significantly enhance the capacitance of CC for supercapacitor application. Micro-cracks, exfoliated carbon fiber shells, and oxygen-containing functional groups (OFGs) were introduced onto the surface of the carbon filament. This resulted in an enhancement of over two orders of magnitude in capacitance compared to that of the bare CC electrode, reaching up to a maximum areal capacitance of 505.5 mF cm(-2) at the current density of 6 mA cm(-2) in aqueous H2SO4 electrolyte. Electrochemical reduction of CC electrodes led to the removal of most electrochemically unstable surface OFGs, resulting in superior charging/discharging rate capability and excellent cycling stability. Although the activated CC electrode contained a high-level of surface oxygen functional groups (∼15 at%), it still exhibited a remarkable charging-discharging rate capability, retaining ∼88% of the capacitance when the charging rate increased from 6 to 48 mA cm(-2). Moreover, the activated CC electrode exhibited excellent cycling stability with ∼97% capacitance remaining after 10 000 cycles at a current density of 24 mA cm(-2). A symmetrical supercapacitor based on the activated CC exhibited an ideal capacitive behavior and fast charge-discharge properties. Such a simple, environment-friendly, and cost-effective strategy to activate CC shows great potential in the fabrication of high-performance flexible supercapacitors. PMID:27141910

  19. Geobacter sp. SD-1 with enhanced electrochemical activity in high-salt concentration solutions.

    PubMed

    Sun, Dan; Call, Douglas; Wang, Aijie; Cheng, Shaoan; Logan, Bruce E

    2014-12-01

    An isolate, designated strain SD-1, was obtained from a biofilm dominated by Geobacter sulfurreducens in a microbial fuel cell. The electrochemical activity of strain SD-1 was compared with type strains, G. sulfurreducens PCA and Geobacter metallireducens GS-15, and a mixed culture in microbial electrolysis cells. SD-1 produced a maximum current density of 290 ± 29 A m−3 in a high-concentration phosphate buffer solution (PBS-H, 200 mM). This current density was significantly higher than that produced by the mixed culture (189 ± 44 A m−3) or the type strains (< 70 A m−3). In a highly saline water (SW; 50 mM PBS and 650 mM NaCl), current by SD-1 (158 ± 4 A m−3) was reduced by 28% compared with 50 mM PBS (220 ± 4 A m−3), but it was still higher than that of the mixed culture (147 ± 19 A m−3), and strains PCA and GS-15 did not produce any current. Electrochemical tests showed that the improved performance of SD-1 was due to its lower charge transfer resistance and more negative potentials produced at higher current densities. These results show that the electrochemical activity of SD-1 was significantly different than other Geobacter strains and mixed cultures in terms of its salt tolerance. PMID:25756125

  20. Photochemical intracomplex reaction between [beta]-cyclodextrin and anthraquinone-2,6-disulfonic acid disodium salt in water solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrova, S. S.; Kruppa, A. I.; Leshina, T. V.

    2005-05-01

    1D and 2D 1H NMR studies of anthraquinone-2,6-disulfonic acid disodium salt in the β-cyclodextrin solution have identified the inclusion complex formation. The association constant of AQDS-β-CD inclusion complex was determined as 800 ± 100 M -1. The selective intra-complex photo-oxidation of β-cyclodextrin at C6 position was detected by CIDNP method.

  1. highly selective amino acid salt solutions as absorption liquid for CO(2) capture in gas-liquid membrane contactors.

    PubMed

    Simons, Katja; Nijmeijer, Kitty; Mengers, Harro; Brilman, Wim; Wessling, Matthias

    2010-08-23

    The strong anthropogenic increase in the emission of CO(2) and the related environmental impact force the developments towards sustainability and carbon capture and storage (CCS). In the present work, we combine the high product yields and selectivities of CO(2) absorption processes with the advantages of membrane technology in a membrane contactor for the separation of CO(2) from CH(4) using amino acid salt solutions as competitive absorption liquid to alkanol amine solutions. Amino acids, such as sarcosine, have the same functionality as alkanol amines (e.g., monoethanolamine=MEA), but in contrast, they exhibit a better oxidative stability and resistance to degradation. In addition, they can be made nonvolatile by adding a salt functionality, which significantly reduces the liquid loss due to evaporation at elevated temperatures in the desorber. Membrane contactor experiments using CO(2)/CH(4) feed mixtures to evaluate the overall process performance, including a full absorption/desorption cycle show that even without a temperature difference between absorber and desorber, a CO(2)/CH(4) selectivity of over 70 can be easily achieved with the sarcosine salt solution as absorption liquid. This selectivity reaches values of 120 at a temperature difference between absorber and desorber of 35 degrees C, compared to a value of only 60 for MEA under the same conditions. Although CO(2) permeance values are somewhat lower than the values obtained for MEA, the results clearly show the potential of amino acid salt solutions as competitive absorption liquids for the energy efficient removal of CO(2). In addition, due to the low absorption of CH(4) in sarcosine compared to MEA, the loss of CH(4) is reduced and significantly higher CH(4) product yields can be obtained. PMID:20623726

  2. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Studies of Aluminosilicate Gels Prepared in High-Alkaline and Salt-Concentrated Solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Li Q.; Mattigod, Shas V.; Parker, Kent E.; Hobbs, David T.; McCready, David E.

    2005-01-11

    We have examined the formation of aluminosilicate in high alkaline and salt concentrated solutions characteristic of nuclear tank wastes. Information on the mechanism and kinetics of the phase formation under hydrothermal conditions was obtained by characterization the structures of gel phases as a function of time and composition using multinuclear NMR techniques in combination with x-ray diffraction. This work offers a new insight into the aluminum and aluminosilicate chemistry in simulated nuclear tank wastes.

  3. Counter-ion specificity explored in abnormal expansion of supra-molecular aggregates in aqueous solution of alkaline metal salts.

    PubMed

    Huang, Ningdong; Tao, Jiaojiao; Wei, Shenghui; Chen, Mingming; Wei, Chengsha; Li, Liangbin

    2015-09-21

    Ionic effects in aqueous solution of macro-ions showing specificity and unconventional characters, respectively, receive a lot of interests recently; however, the complexity of specific ion effects in unconventional phenomena remains ambiguous. In this study, the effects of univalent ions on aggregation of supra-molecular nano-fibrils with charged carboxylate groups on the surface as a prototype of macro-ions are investigated by Small Angle X-ray Scattering (SAXS) in aqueous solutions of alkaline metal chlorides. It is found that the columnar bundles of charged fibrils are expanded in certain salt concentration range contradicting the conventional screening effects of salts. The degree of expansion is dominated by cations as Na(+) induces drastic effects in comparison to rather gentle changes from K(+) and Cs(+). The specific cations effects observed by SAXS correlate with the pH behavior of the solutions, an indicator of surface charge, or number of carboxylate groups along the supra-molecular fibrils. It is postulated that while Na(+) with stronger affinity to carboxylates apparently reduces the surface charge, K(+) and Cs(+) only weakly interact with carboxylates and induce minor changes, accounting for the cation-sensitive aggregation behavior of fibrils observed by SAXS. By probing the bundling aggregation of charged supra-molecular nano-fibrils in salty water, we provide direct evidence of specific counter-ion effects in unusual expansion caused by univalent salts. PMID:26395732

  4. Solid solutions of platinum(II) and palladium(II) oxalato-complex salt as precursors of nanoalloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zadesenets, A. V.; Asanova, T. I.; Vikulova, E. S.; Filatov, E. Yu.; Plyusnin, P. E.; Baidina, I. A.; Asanov, I. P.; Korenev, S. V.

    2013-03-01

    A solid solution of platinum (II) and palladium (II) oxalato-complex salt, (NH4)2[Pt0.5Pd0.5(C2O4)2]·2H2O, has been synthesized and studied as a precursor for preparing bimetallic PtPd nanoparticles through its thermal decomposition. The smallest homogenous bimetallic PtPd nanoparticles were found to form in hydrogen and helium atmospheres. The annealing temperature and time have low effect on the bimetallic particles size. Comparative analysis of structural and thermal properties of the solid solution and individual Pt, Pd oxalato-complex salts was performed to investigate a mechanism of thermal decomposition of (NH4)2[Pt0.5Pd0.5(C2O4)2]·2H2O. Based on in situ X-ray photoemission spectroscopy investigation it was proposed a mechanism of formation of bimetallic PtPd nanoparticles from the solid-solution oxalato-complex salt during thermal decomposition.

  5. Thermodynamics of binding water and solute to powdered long-chain salts of fatty acids.

    PubMed

    Mahapatra, P K; Chattoraj, D K

    1994-10-01

    Hydration of powdered fatty acids and their salts has been studied both in presence and absence of neutral salts, sucrose and urea using the isopiestic vapour pressure technique. Moles of water vapour adsorbed per mole or kg of soaps like sodium palmitate, sodium stearate, sodium myristate and sodium laurate have been measured in presence and absence of salts and compared with that of detergents (SDS, CTAB, DTAB and MTAB). For each case of positive excess adsorption of water vapour and negative excess adsorption of inorganic salts, urea and sucrose to different soaps, the standard free energy change (delta G degrees) per kg of substrate in bringing the bulk mole fraction from zero to unity have been calculated using an appropriate thermodynamic equation and the values so obtained have been compared critically. PMID:7851944

  6. Soft X-ray absorption spectra of aqueous salt solutions with highly charged cations in liquid microjets

    SciTech Connect

    Schwartz, Craig P.; Uejio, Janel S.; Duffin, Andrew M.; Drisdell, Walter S.; Smith, Jared D.; Saykally, Richard J.

    2010-03-11

    X-ray absorption spectra of 1M aqueous solutions of indium (III) chloride, yttrium (III) bromide, lanthanum (III) chloride, tin (IV) chloride and chromium (III) chloride have been measured at the oxygen K-edge. Relatively minor changes are observed in the spectra compared to that of pure water. SnCl{sub 4} and CrCl{sub 3} exhibit a new onset feature which is attributed to formation of hydroxide or other complex molecules in the solution. At higher energy, only relatively minor, but salt-specific changes in the spectra occur. The small magnitude of the observed spectral changes is ascribed to offsetting perturbations by the cations and anions.

  7. Rheological and kinetic study of the ultrasonic degradation of locust bean gum in aqueous saline and salt-free solutions.

    PubMed

    Li, Ruoshi; Feke, Donald L

    2015-11-01

    The ultrasonic degradation of locust bean gum (LBG) in aqueous solutions has been studied at 25°C for ultrasonication times up to 120 min. Although LBG is not a polyelectrolyte, the degradation extent and kinetics were found to be somewhat sensitive to the ionic conditions in solution, and this is attributed to changes in molecular conformation that can occur in different salt environments. Ultrasonic degradation was tracked by rheological measurements that lead to the determination of intrinsic viscosity for the LBG molecules. A kinetic model was also developed and successfully applied to characterize and predict the degradation results. PMID:26186852

  8. Dynamics of salt playa polygons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goehring, L.; Fourrière, A.

    2014-12-01

    In natural salt playa or in evaporation pools for the salt extraction industry, one can sometimes see surprising regular structures formed by ridges of salt. These ridges connect together to form a self-organized network of polygons one to two meters in diameter, which we call salt polygons. Here we propose a mechanism based on porous media convection of salty water in soil to explain the formation and the scaling of the salt polygons. Surface evaporation causes a steady upward flow of salty water, which can cause precipitation near the surface. A vertical salt gradient then builds up in the porous soil, with heavy salt-saturated water lying over the less salty source water. This can drive convection when a threshold is reached, given by a critical Rayleigh number of about 7. We suggest that the salt polygons are the surface expression of the porous medium convection, with salt crystallizing along the positions of the convective downwellings. To study this instability directly, we developed a 2D analogue experiment using a Hele-Shaw cell filled with a porous medium saturated with a salt solution and heated from above. We perform a linear stability analysis of this system, and find that it is unstable to convection, with a most unstable wavelength that is set by a balance between salt diffusion and water evaporation. The Rayleigh number in our experiment is controlled by the particle size of our model soil, and the evaporation rate. We obtain results that scale with the observation of natural salt polygons. Using dye, we observe the convective movement of salty water and find downwelling convective plumes underneath the spots where surface salt ridges form, as shown in the attached figure.

  9. Estimation of free acid content in lanthanide salt solutions used for potentiometric determination of stability constant of lanthanide complexes with organic ligands

    SciTech Connect

    Zheltvai, T.I.; Tishchenko, M.A.

    1985-08-20

    This paper studies the possibility of alkalimetric titration of free acid after binding the metal ions by the disodium salt of ethylenediaminetetraacetic (complexone III). The proposed method of free acid determination in lanthanide salt solutions is very simple and helps to avoid gross methodical errors in works involving determination of stability constants of lanthanide complexes.

  10. Real-time monitoring of a salt solution mining cavern: view from microseismic and levelling monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Contrucci, Isabelle; Cao, Ngoc-Tuyen; Klein, Emmanuelle; Daupley, Xavier; Bigarre, Pascal

    2010-05-01

    In 2004, in order to better understand processes involved in large-scale mine collapse, an instrumentation was settled in the surrounding of a salt cavern located at a depth of 180 m in NE France. The cavern was mined by solution mining until the large-scale ground failure occurred. A high resolution multi-parameter monitoring system was deployed in the framework of the GISOS (Scientific Interest Group on the Impact and Safety of Underground Structures formed by INERIS, BRGM, INPL and ENSG). Instrumentation, installed by INERIS, consisted of a microseismic network, coupled to automatic-measurement system for levelling (Tacheometer and RTK GPS). Quasi real time transmission of the data to INERIS, at Nancy, enabled rock mass activity of the site to be monitored on a few hours basis. Also, the various recorded observations, in the beginning of spring 2008, led the operator to cause the collapse in February 2009. This was done by intensive extraction of the brine contained in the cavern, which was considered to be at limit equilibrium. On the second day of pumping sudden increase in microseismic activity indicated the start of collapse, followed by manifestation of a surface crater about 35 hours later. All the data and information collected during this experiment are now being processed and back-analysed aimed at ensuring high quality of interpretation. In particular, the space-time distribution of the failures and the evolution of the waveforms enlighten the changing conditions in the geological overburden. When correlated with the measurements of the movement and the known geology, the microseismic data enable a precise description of the failure mechanism(s), and especially of the complex and major role of the overlying bedrock. Similarly, feedback from this experience should lead to practical recommendations concerning collapse phenomena monitoring in such a mining context. While the preliminary results already indicate the exceptional quality of this data set

  11. Insights to caving processes from localization of microseismic swarms induced by salt solution mining

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lennart Kinscher, Jannes; Bernard, Pascal; Contrucci, Isabelle; Mangeney, Anne; Piguet, Jack Pierre; Bigarre, Pascal

    2014-05-01

    In order to improve our understanding of hazardous ground failures, caving processes, and collapses of large natural or man-made underground cavities, we studied microseismicity induced by the development and collapse of a salt solution mining cavity with a diameter of ~ 200 m at Cerville-Buissoncourt in Lorraine, France. Microseismicity was recorded as part of a large geophysical, multi-parameter monitoring research project (GISOS) by a local, high resolution, triggered 40 Hz geophone monitoring system consisting of five one-component and four three-component borehole stations located around and in the center of the cavity. The recorded microseismic events are very numerous (~ 50.000 recorded event files) where the major portion (~ 80 %) appear in unusual swarming sequences constituted by complex clusters of superimposed microseismic events. Body wave phase based routine tools for microseismic event detection and localization face strong limitations in the treatment of these signals. To overcome these shortcomings, we developed two probabilistic methods being able to assess the spatio-temporal characteristics in a semi-automatic manner. The first localization approach uses simple signal amplitude estimates on different frequency bands, and an attenuation model to constrain hypocenter source location. The second approach was designed to identify significantly polarized P wave energies and the associated polarization angles. Both approaches and its probabilistic conjunction were applied to the data of a two months lasting microseismic crisis occurring one year before the final collapse that was related to caving processes leading to a maximal growth of ~ 50 m of the cavity roof. The obtained epicenter locations show systematic spatio-temporal migration trends observed for different time scales. During three phases of major swarming activity, epicenter migration trends appear in the order of several seconds to minutes, are spatially constrained, and show partially a

  12. Ultra fast cooling of hot steel plate by air atomized spray with salt solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohapatra, Soumya S.; Ravikumar, Satya V.; Jha, Jay M.; Singh, Akhilendra K.; Bhattacharya, Chandrima; Pal, Surjya K.; Chakraborty, Sudipto

    2014-05-01

    In the present study, the applicability of air atomized spray with the salt added water has been studied for ultra fast cooling (UFC) of a 6 mm thick AISI-304 hot steel plate. The investigation includes the effect of salt (NaCl and MgSO4) concentration and spray mass flux on the cooling rate. The initial temperature of the steel plate before the commencement of cooling is kept at 900 °C or above, which is usually observed as the "finish rolling temperature" in the hot strip mill of a steel plant. The heat transfer analysis shows that air atomized spray with the MgSO4 salt produces 1.5 times higher cooling rate than atomized spray with the pure water, whereas air atomized spray with NaCl produces only 1.2 times higher cooling rate. In transition boiling regime, the salt deposition occurs which causes enhancement in heat transfer rate by conduction. Moreover, surface tension is the governing parameter behind the vapour film instability and this length scale increases with increase in surface tension of coolant. Overall, the achieved cooling rates produced by both types of salt added air atomized spray are found to be in the UFC regime.

  13. Ion aggregation in high salt solutions. IV. Graph-theoretical analyses of ion aggregate structure and water hydrogen bonding network.

    PubMed

    Choi, Jun-Ho; Cho, Minhaeng

    2015-09-14

    Ions in high salt solutions form a variety of ion aggregates, from ion pairs to clusters and networks. Their influences on water hydrogen bonding (H-bonding) network structures have long been of great interest. Recently, we have shown that the morphological structures of ion aggregates can be analyzed by using a spectral graph analysis theory, where each ion cluster or ion network is represented by a properly defined graph with edges and vertices. Here, to further examine the network properties of ion aggregates and water H-bonding networks in high salt solutions, we consider a few representative graph-theoretical descriptors: clustering coefficient, minimum path length, global efficiency, and degree distribution of ion aggregates. From the molecular dynamics trajectories, these graph theoretical properties of ion aggregates and water structures in NaCl and kosmotropic solutions are calculated and shown to be strongly dependent on the two types of ion aggregate structures, i.e., ion cluster and ion network. Ion clusters in high NaCl solutions exhibit typical behaviors of scale free network. The corresponding graph theoretical properties of ion networks in high KSCN solutions are notably different from those of NaCl ion clusters and furthermore they are very similar to those of water hydrogen-bonding network. The present graph-theoretical analysis results indicate that the high solubility limits of KSCN and other ion-network-forming salts might originate from their ability to form a large scale morphological network that can be intertwined with co-existing water H-bonding network. Furthermore, it is shown that the graph-theoretical properties of water H-bonding network structures do not strongly depend on the nature of dissolved ions nor on the morphological structures of ion aggregates, indicating that water's H-bonding interaction and network-forming capability are highly robust. We anticipate that the present graph-theoretical analysis results of high salt

  14. Ion aggregation in high salt solutions. IV. Graph-theoretical analyses of ion aggregate structure and water hydrogen bonding network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Jun-Ho; Cho, Minhaeng

    2015-09-01

    Ions in high salt solutions form a variety of ion aggregates, from ion pairs to clusters and networks. Their influences on water hydrogen bonding (H-bonding) network structures have long been of great interest. Recently, we have shown that the morphological structures of ion aggregates can be analyzed by using a spectral graph analysis theory, where each ion cluster or ion network is represented by a properly defined graph with edges and vertices. Here, to further examine the network properties of ion aggregates and water H-bonding networks in high salt solutions, we consider a few representative graph-theoretical descriptors: clustering coefficient, minimum path length, global efficiency, and degree distribution of ion aggregates. From the molecular dynamics trajectories, these graph theoretical properties of ion aggregates and water structures in NaCl and kosmotropic solutions are calculated and shown to be strongly dependent on the two types of ion aggregate structures, i.e., ion cluster and ion network. Ion clusters in high NaCl solutions exhibit typical behaviors of scale free network. The corresponding graph theoretical properties of ion networks in high KSCN solutions are notably different from those of NaCl ion clusters and furthermore they are very similar to those of water hydrogen-bonding network. The present graph-theoretical analysis results indicate that the high solubility limits of KSCN and other ion-network-forming salts might originate from their ability to form a large scale morphological network that can be intertwined with co-existing water H-bonding network. Furthermore, it is shown that the graph-theoretical properties of water H-bonding network structures do not strongly depend on the nature of dissolved ions nor on the morphological structures of ion aggregates, indicating that water's H-bonding interaction and network-forming capability are highly robust. We anticipate that the present graph-theoretical analysis results of high salt

  15. On the appearance of vorticity and gradient shear bands in wormlike micellar solutions of different CPCl/salt systems

    SciTech Connect

    Mütze, Annekathrin Heunemann, Peggy; Fischer, Peter

    2014-11-01

    Wormlike micellar salt/surfactant solutions (X-salicylate, cetylpyridinium chloride) are studied with respect to the applied shear stress, concentration, temperature, and composition of the counterions (X = lithium, sodium, potassium, magnesium, and calcium) of the salicylate salt solute to determine vorticity and gradient shear bands. A combination of rheological measurements, laser technique, video analysis, and rheo-small-angle neutron scattering allow for a detailed exploration of number and types of shear bands. Typical flow curves of the solutions show Newtonian, shear-thinning, and shear-thickening flow behavior. In the shear-thickening regime, the solutions show vorticity and gradient shear bands simultaneously, in which vorticity shear bands dominate the visual effect, while gradient shear bands always coexist and predominate the rheological response. It is shown that gradient shear bands change their phases (turbid, clear) with the same frequency as the shear rate oscillates, whereas vorticity shear bands change their phases with half the frequency of the shear rate. Furthermore, we show that with increasing molecular mass of the counterions the number of gradient shear bands increases, while the number of vorticity shear bands remains constant. The variation of temperature, shear stress, concentration, and counterions results in a predictable change in the rheological behavior and therefore allows adjustment of the number of vorticity shear bands in the shear band regime.

  16. Computer simulation studies of Aβ37-42 aggregation thermodynamics and kinetics in water and salt solution.

    PubMed

    Yang, Y Isaac; Gao, Yi Qin

    2015-01-22

    In vivo self-assembly of proteins into aggregates known as amyloids is related to many diseases. Although a large number of studies have been performed on the formation of amyloid, the molecular mechanism of polypeptide aggregation remains largely unclear. In this paper, we studied the aggregation of amyloid-forming peptide Aβ37-42 using all-atom molecular dynamics simulations. Using the integrated temperature sampling (ITS) simulation method, we observed the reversible formation of Aβ37-42 oligomers. The free-energy landscape for the polypeptide association was calculated, and aggregated states were then defined based on the landscape. To explore the kinetics and especially salt effects on the process of polypeptide aggregation, normal MD simulations were performed in pure water and NaCl solution, respectively. We then used the transition path theory (TPT) to analyze the transition network of polypeptide aggregation in solution. The dominant pathways of Aβ37-42 aggregation were found to differ significantly in pure water and the salt solution, indicating the change of molecular mechanism of polypeptide aggregation with the solution conditions. PMID:24861904

  17. Self-consistent field theory investigation of the behavior of hyaluronic acid chains in aqueous salt solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nogovitsin, E. A.; Budkov, Yu. A.

    2012-04-01

    In this work we continue to develop a field-theoretic methodology, which combines the technique of Gaussian equivalent representation for the calculation of functional integrals with the continuous Gaussian thread model of flexible polymers for solving statistical-mechanical problems of polyelectrolyte solutions. We present new analytic expressions for the osmotic pressure, the potential of mean force, and the monomer-monomer pair distribution function, and employ them to investigate the structural and thermodynamic quantities of the polyelectrolyte system. We demonstrate the applicability of the method for systems of polyelectrolyte chains in which the monomers interact via a Yukawa-type pair potential. As a specific example, the present work focuses on aqueous solutions of hyaluronic acid with added salts NaCl and CaCl2. Hyaluronic acid is a high molecular weight linear polysaccharide, which has a multitude of roles in biological tissues. We conclude that the effect of sodium chloride and calcium chloride on the osmotic properties of hyaluronic acid solutions can be accounted for by their contributions to the ionic strength. Nevertheless, the effects of coiling and self-association can be stimulated in solution by added salt.

  18. Bathing in a magnesium-rich Dead Sea salt solution improves skin barrier function, enhances skin hydration, and reduces inflammation in atopic dry skin.

    PubMed

    Proksch, Ehrhardt; Nissen, Hans-Peter; Bremgartner, Markus; Urquhart, Colin

    2005-02-01

    Magnesium salts, the prevalent minerals in Dead Sea water, are known to exhibit favorable effects in inflammatory diseases. We examined the efficacy of bathing atopic subjects in a salt rich in magnesium chloride from deep layers of the Dead Sea (Mavena(R) Dermaline Mg(46) Dead Sea salt, Mavena AG, Belp, Switzerland). Volunteers with atopic dry skin submerged one forearm for 15 min in a bath solution containing 5% Dead Sea salt. The second arm was submerged in tap water as control. Before the study and at weeks 1-6, transepidermal water loss (TEWL), skin hydration, skin roughness, and skin redness were determined. We found one subgroup with a normal and one subgroup with an elevated TEWL before the study. Bathing in the Dead Sea salt solution significantly improved skin barrier function compared with the tap water-treated control forearm in the subgroup with elevated basal TEWL. Skin hydration was enhanced on the forearm treated with the Dead Sea salt in each group, which means the treatment moisturized the skin. Skin roughness and redness of the skin as a marker for inflammation were significantly reduced after bathing in the salt solution. This demonstrates that bathing in the salt solution was well tolerated, improved skin barrier function, enhanced stratum corneum hydration, and reduced skin roughness and inflammation. We suggest that the favorable effects of bathing in the Dead Sea salt solution are most likely related to the high magnesium content. Magnesium salts are known to bind water, influence epidermal proliferation and differentiation, and enhance permeability barrier repair. PMID:15689218

  19. Sensitivity of red oak (Quercus rubra L.) and American beech (Fagus grandifolia Ehrh.) seedlings to sodium salts in solution culture.

    PubMed

    Thorton, F C; Schaedle, M; Raynal, D J

    1988-06-01

    Sodium salt sensitivity of red oak (Quercus rubra L.) and American beech (Fagus grandifolia Ehrh.) was evaluated in solution culture. Both species showed symptoms of salt injury when grown in the presence of less than 10 mM Na. In red oak, leaf symptoms first appeared at a sodium concentration of 6.0 mM and leaf weight was significantly reduced at 7.5 mM Na. Leaf, stem and root dry weights of American beech were significantly reduced in the presence of 4.0 mM sodium. In both species, browning of leaf margins and necrosis were evident in the Na-treated plants. The observed symptoms were associated with high concentrations of sodium in the tissues. Neither species appears to have control over sodium uptake and translocation. PMID:14972826

  20. Dissipation behavior of organophosphorus pesticides during the cabbage pickling process: residue changes with salt and vinegar content of pickling solution.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yuele; Yang, Zhonghua; Shen, Luyao; Liu, Zhenmin; Zhou, Zhiqiang; Diao, Jinling

    2013-03-01

    In this experiment, the behavior of 10 pesticides in three different cabbage pickling treatments has been studied. The brine used for pickling was made up with different salt and vinegar contents to determine the influence of different pickling solutions on pesticide dissipation and distribution. A modified QuECHERS and SPE method was established for the analysis of the pesticides in the cabbage and brine. It was found that different pesticides showed different dissipation patterns and finally represented dissimilar residue levels in the cabbage and brine. Statistical analysis was performed to compare the distinctions of these pesticides between each treatment and proved that salt content and pH value had certain influence on the dissipation and distribution of these pesticides during the pickling process. The data from this experiment would help to control pesticide residues in pickled cabbage and prevent potential risk to human health and environmental safety. PMID:23402557

  1. Molecular-scale hydrophilicity induced by solute: molecular-thick charged pancakes of aqueous salt solution on hydrophobic carbon-based surfaces.

    PubMed

    Shi, Guosheng; Shen, Yue; Liu, Jian; Wang, Chunlei; Wang, Ying; Song, Bo; Hu, Jun; Fang, Haiping

    2014-01-01

    We directly observed molecular-thick aqueous salt-solution pancakes on a hydrophobic graphite surface under ambient conditions employing atomic force microscopy. This observation indicates the unexpected molecular-scale hydrophilicity of the salt solution on graphite surfaces, which is different from the macroscopic wetting property of a droplet standing on the graphite surface. Interestingly, the pancakes spontaneously displayed strong positively charged behavior. Theoretical studies showed that the formation of such positively charged pancakes is attributed to cation-π interactions between Na(+) ions in the aqueous solution and aromatic rings on the graphite surface, promoting the adsorption of water molecules together with cations onto the graphite surface; i.e., Na(+) ions as a medium adsorbed to the graphite surface through cation-π interactions on one side while at the same time bonding to water molecules through hydration interaction on the other side at a molecular scale. These findings suggest that actual interactions regarding carbon-based graphitic surfaces including those of graphene, carbon nanotubes, and biochar may be significantly different from existing theory and they provide new insight into the control of surface wettability, interactions and related physical, chemical and biological processes. PMID:25348642

  2. Molecular-scale Hydrophilicity Induced by Solute: Molecular-thick Charged Pancakes of Aqueous Salt Solution on Hydrophobic Carbon-based Surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Guosheng; Shen, Yue; Liu, Jian; Wang, Chunlei; Wang, Ying; Song, Bo; Hu, Jun; Fang, Haiping

    2014-01-01

    We directly observed molecular-thick aqueous salt-solution pancakes on a hydrophobic graphite surface under ambient conditions employing atomic force microscopy. This observation indicates the unexpected molecular-scale hydrophilicity of the salt solution on graphite surfaces, which is different from the macroscopic wetting property of a droplet standing on the graphite surface. Interestingly, the pancakes spontaneously displayed strong positively charged behavior. Theoretical studies showed that the formation of such positively charged pancakes is attributed to cation–π interactions between Na+ ions in the aqueous solution and aromatic rings on the graphite surface, promoting the adsorption of water molecules together with cations onto the graphite surface; i.e., Na+ ions as a medium adsorbed to the graphite surface through cation–π interactions on one side while at the same time bonding to water molecules through hydration interaction on the other side at a molecular scale. These findings suggest that actual interactions regarding carbon-based graphitic surfaces including those of graphene, carbon nanotubes, and biochar may be significantly different from existing theory and they provide new insight into the control of surface wettability, interactions and related physical, chemical and biological processes. PMID:25348642

  3. A Solution to the C-Value Paradox and the Function of Junk DNA: The Genome Balance Hypothesis.

    PubMed

    Freeling, Michael; Xu, Jie; Woodhouse, Margaret; Lisch, Damon

    2015-06-01

    The Genome Balance Hypothesis originated from a recent study that provided a mechanism for the phenomenon of genome dominance in ancient polyploids: unique 24nt RNA coverage near genes is greater in genes on the recessive subgenome irrespective of differences in gene expression. 24nt RNAs target transposons. Transposon position effects are now hypothesized to balance the expression of networked genes and provide spring-like tension between pericentromeric heterochromatin and microtubules. The balance (coordination) of gene expression and centromere movement is under selection. Our hypothesis states that this balance can be maintained by many or few transposons about equally well. We explain known balanced distributions of junk DNA within genomes and between subgenomes in allopolyploids (and our hypothesis passes "the onion test" for any so-called solution to the C-value paradox). Importantly, when the allotetraploid maize chromosomes delete redundant genes, their nearby transposons are also lost; this result is explained if transposons near genes function. The Genome Balance Hypothesis is hypothetical because the position effect mechanisms implicated are not proved to apply to all junk DNA, and the continuous nature of the centromeric and gene position effects have not yet been studied as a single phenomenon. PMID:25743198

  4. RESULTS OF ROUTINE STRIP EFFLUENT HOLD TANK AND DECONTAMINATED SALT SOLUTION HOLD TANK SAMPLES FROM MODULAR CAUSTIC-SIDE SOLVENT EXTRACTION UNIT DURING MACROBATCH 3 OPERATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Peters, T.; Fink, S.

    2011-06-10

    Strip Effluent Hold Tank (SEHT) and Decontaminated Salt Solution Hold Tank (DSSHT) samples from several of the 'microbatches' of Integrated Salt Disposition Project (ISDP) Salt Batch ('Macrobatch') 3 have been analyzed for {sup 238}Pu, {sup 90}Sr, {sup 137}Cs, and by Inductively Coupled Plasma Emission Spectroscopy (ICPES). The results indicate good decontamination performance within process design expectations. While the data set is sparse, the results of this set and the previous set of results for Macrobatch 3 samples indicate consistent operations. However, the Decontamination Factors for plutonium and strontium removal have declined in Macrobatch 3, compared to Macrobatch 2. This may be due to the differences in the Pu concentration or the bulk chemical concentrations in the feed material. SRNL is considering the possible reasons for this decline. The DSSHT samples show continued presence of titanium, likely from leaching of the monosodium titanate in ARP. During operation of the ISDP, quantities of salt waste are processed through the Actinide Removal Process (ARP) and MCU in batches of {approx}3800 gallons. Monosodium titanate (MST) is used in ARP to adsorb actinides and strontium from the salt waste and the waste slurry is then filtered prior to sending the clarified salt solution to MCU. The MCU uses solvent extraction technology to extract cesium from salt waste and concentrate cesium in an acidic aqueous stream (Strip Effluent - SE), leaving a decontaminated caustic salt aqueous stream (Decontaminated Salt Solution - DSS). Sampling occurs in the Decontaminated Salt Solution Hold Tank (DSSHT) and Strip Effluent Hold Tank (SEHT) in the MCU process. The MCU sample plan requires that batches be sampled and analyzed for plutonium and strontium content by Savannah River National Lab (SRNL) to determine MST effectiveness. The cesium measurement is used to monitor cesium removal effectiveness and the inductively coupled plasma emission spectroscopy (ICPES) is

  5. An elastic rod model to evaluate effects of ionic concentration on equilibrium configuration of DNA in salt solution.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Ye; Huang, Zaixing; Wang, Shengnan

    2014-03-01

    As a coarse-gained model, a super-thin elastic rod subjected to interfacial interactions is used to investigate the condensation of DNA in a multivalent salt solution. The interfacial traction between the rod and the solution environment is determined in terms of the Young-Laplace equation. Kirchhoff's theory of elastic rod is used to analyze the equilibrium configuration of a DNA chain under the action of the interfacial traction. Two models are established to characterize the change of the interfacial traction and elastic modulus of DNA with the ionic concentration of the salt solution, respectively. The influences of the ionic concentration on the equilibrium configuration of DNA are discussed. The results show that the condensation of DNA is mainly determined by competition between the interfacial energy and elastic strain energy of the DNA itself, and the interfacial traction is one of forces that drive DNA condensation. With the change of concentration, the DNA segments will undergo a series of alteration from the original configuration to the condensed configuration, and the spiral-shape appearing in the condensed configuration of DNA is independent of the original configuration. PMID:24691983

  6. Preparation of porous monolayer film by immersing the stearic acid Langmuir-Blodgett monolayer on mica in salt solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, S.; Li, Y. L.; Zhao, H. L.; Liang, H.; Liu, B.; Pan, S.

    2012-11-01

    Porous materials have drawn attention from scientists in many fields such as life sciences, catalysis and photonics since they can be used to induce some materials growth as expected. Especially, porous Langmuir-Blodgett (LB) film is an ideal material with controlled thickness and flat surface. In this paper, stearic acid (SA), which has been extensively explored in LB film technique, is chosen as the template material with known parameters to prepare the LB film, and then the porous SA monolayer film is obtained by means of etching in salt solution. The main etching mechanism is suggested that the cations in the solution block the electrostatic interaction between the polar carboxyl group of SA and the electronegative mica surface. The influencing factors (such as concentration of salt solution, valence of cation and surface pressure) of the porous SA film are systematically studied in this work. The novel method proposed in this paper makes it convenient to prepare porous monolayer film for designed material growth or cell culture.

  7. History and future of human cadaver preservation for surgical training: from formalin to saturated salt solution method.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Shogo; Naito, Munekazu; Kawata, Shinichi; Qu, Ning; Hatayama, Naoyuki; Hirai, Shuichi; Itoh, Masahiro

    2016-01-01

    Traditionally, surgical training meant on-the-job training with live patients in an operating room. However, due to advancing surgical techniques, such as minimally invasive surgery, and increasing safety demands during procedures, human cadavers have been used for surgical training. When considering the use of human cadavers for surgical training, one of the most important factors is their preservation. In this review, we summarize four preservation methods: fresh-frozen cadaver, formalin, Thiel's, and saturated salt solution methods. Fresh-frozen cadaver is currently the model that is closest to reality, but it also presents myriad problems, including the requirement of freezers for storage, limited work time because of rapid putrefaction, and risk of infection. Formalin is still used ubiquitously due to its low cost and wide availability, but it is not ideal because formaldehyde has an adverse health effect and formalin-embalmed cadavers do not exhibit many of the qualities of living organs. Thiel's method results in soft and flexible cadavers with almost natural colors, and Thiel-embalmed cadavers have been appraised widely in various medical disciplines. However, Thiel's method is relatively expensive and technically complicated. In addition, Thiel-embalmed cadavers have a limited dissection time. The saturated salt solution method is simple, carries a low risk of infection, and is relatively low cost. Although more research is needed, this method seems to be sufficiently useful for surgical training and has noteworthy features that expand the capability of clinical training. The saturated salt solution method will contribute to a wider use of cadavers for surgical training. PMID:26670696

  8. Effects of high calcium diet on arterial smooth muscle function and electrolyte balance in mineralocorticoid-salt hypertensive rats.

    PubMed Central

    Arvola, P.; Ruskoaho, H.; Pörsti, I.

    1993-01-01

    1. The effects of a high calcium diet (2.5%) on blood pressure, electrolyte balance, plasma and tissue atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP), cytosolic free Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]i), and arterial smooth muscle responses were studied in one-kidney deoxycorticosterone (DOC)-NaCl hypertensive Wistar rats. 2. Calcium supplementation for 8 weeks markedly attenuated the development of DOC-NaCl hypertension and the associated cardiac hypertrophy, and prevented the DOC-NaCl-induced sodium-volume retention as judged by reduced plasma Na+, and decreased plasma and ventricular ANP concentrations in high calcium-fed DOC-NaCl rats. However, calcium supplementation did not affect the DOC-NaCl-induced rise in platelet [Ca2+]i. 3. Smooth muscle contractions of isolated mesenteric arterial rings in response to depolarization by K+ (20-30 mM) were enhanced in DOC-NaCl-treated rats, this enhancement being abolished by concurrent oral calcium loading. The Ca2+ entry blocker nifedipine (10 nM) inhibited the contractions induced by K+ (30-125 mM) more effectively in DOC-NaCl rats than in controls, while the inhibition in calcium-loaded DOC-NaCl rats was significantly greater than in controls only with 30 mM K+. 4. The contractions of mesenteric arterial rings induced by omission of K+ from the organ baths were used to evaluate cell membrane permeability to ions. In chemically denervated rings the onset of the gradual rise in contractile force in K(+)-free medium occurred earlier, and the rate of the contraction was faster in DOC-NaCl-treated rats than in controls and high calcium-fed DOC-NaCl rats. Smooth muscle relaxation induced by 0.5 mM K+ upon K(+)-free contractions was clearly slower in DOC-NaCl rats than in controls and calcium-supplemented DOC-NaCl rats. 5. The functions of arterial smooth muscle Na+, Ca2+ exchange and Ca(2+)-ATPase were evaluated by the aortic contractions elicited by low Na+ medium, and the subsequent relaxation responses induced by Ca(2+)-free solution (in the

  9. Spiropyran salts and their neutral precursors: synthesis, crystal structure, photochromic transformations in solutions and solid state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yurieva, E. A.; Aldoshin, S. M.

    2015-06-01

    This review covers investigations of spiropyran iodides with N-substituted indoline fragment, and with the pyran cycle being annelated to N-methylated pyridine ring. The schemes of synthesis of iodides and their neutral precursors, as well as results of X-ray analysis and photochemical study of the crystals of the obtained compounds are presented. Based on our and literature data, the relationship between the structure and photochromic properties has been discussed for a series of salts and neutral pyridospiropyrans.

  10. Viscosity Behavior of α-Amino Acids in Acetate Salt Solutions at Temperatures (303.15 to 323.15) K

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siddique, Jamal Akhter; Naqvi, Saeeda

    2012-01-01

    Viscosities of l-lysine monohydrochloride, l-histidine, and l-arginine in 1 m (mol · kg-1) aqueous solutions of sodium acetate, potassium acetate, and calcium acetate salts has been determined at (303.15, 308.15, 313.15, 318.15, and 323.15) K. The Falkenhagen coefficient, A, and Jones-Dole coefficient, B, relative viscosity, and specific viscosity of the solutions have also been determined using the measured viscosities. The results are interpreted in terms of solute-solute and solute-solvent interactions occurring in the system under investigation and also discussed in terms of the structure-making/breaking ability of the solute in these salt solutions. The structure making/breaking abilities of the solutes in the studied systems are strongly influenced by temperature.

  11. Dielectric relaxation and underlying dynamics of electrolyte solutions and solvent-molten salt mixtures using terahertz time-domain transmission spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asaki, Melanie Lynette Thongs

    Terahertz (THz) transmission spectroscopy is used to obtain the frequency dependent complex dielectric constants of water, methanol, and propylene carbonate, and solutions of lithium salts in these solvents, as well as mixtures of acetonitrile and a room-temperature molten salt. The behavior of the pure solvents is modeled with either two (water and acetonitrile) or three (methanol and propylene carbonate) Debye relaxations. For solutions of lithium salts, the effects of ionic solvation on the relaxation behavior of the solvents is discussed in terms of modifications to the values of the Debye parameters of the pure solvents. In this way we obtain estimates for numbers of irrotationally bound solvent molecules, the numbers of bonds broken or formed, and the effects of ions on the higher frequency relaxations. The same information was obtained for molten salt-acetonitrile systems. In addition, it was determined that at low molten salt concentrations, the mixtures behave like electrolyte solutions of a crystalline salt dissolved in a solvent. At higher molten salt concentrations, the behavior is that of a mixture of two liquids.

  12. The combination of mannitol and albumin in the priming solution reduces positive intraoperative fluid balance during cardiopulmonary bypass.

    PubMed

    Jenkins, I R; Curtis, A P

    1995-09-01

    During cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) an adequate reservoir volume is maintained by the addition of crystalloid, colloid or packed cells to the reservoir. This volume contributes to the overall perioperative positive fluid balance. We studied the effect of the preoperative addition of either 75 g albumin, or 50 g mannitol followed by 50 g at commencement of rewarming or both of the above to a bypass circuit prime of lactated Ringer's solution (LR) on intraoperative fluid balance, postoperative indices of oxygenation and time to extubation. The study was a prospective, randomized, single-blinded controlled trial of 103 patients undergoing cardiac surgery requiring CPB. There was a large and highly significant reduction in volume of fluid added to the reservoir during CPB (2137 +/- 1499 ml versus 144 +/- 230 ml), the fluid balance during bypass, including prime volume (3236 +/- 650 ml versus 5876 +/- 1465 ml), and perioperative fluid balance (4470 +/- 936 ml versus 7023 +/- 1760 ml) in the group receiving both mannitol and albumin in the pump prime compared with the group receiving only lactated Ringer's solution. There were no differences between the groups with respect to both measured indices of oxygenation measured on return to ICU (alveolar-arterial oxygen tension difference (DA-aO2) or arterial oxygen tension to inspired oxygen fraction ratio (PaO2/FiO2), or time from ICU admission to extubation. PMID:8601041

  13. Performance evaluation of ant colony optimization-based solution strategies on the mixed-model assembly line balancing problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akpinar, Sener; Mirac Bayhan, G.

    2014-06-01

    The aim of this article is to compare the performances of iterative ant colony optimization (ACO)-based solution strategies on a mixed-model assembly line balancing problem of type II (MMALBP-II) by addressing some particular features of real-world assembly line balancing problems such as parallel workstations and zoning constraints. To solve the problem, where the objective is to minimize the cycle time (i.e. maximize the production rate) for a predefined number of workstations in an existing assembly line, two ACO-based approaches which differ in the mission assigned to artificial ants are used. Furthermore, each ACO-based approach is conducted with two different pheromone release strategies: global and local pheromone updating rules. The four ACO-based approaches are used for solving 20 representative MMALBP-II to compare their performance in terms of computational time and solution quality. Detailed comparison results are presented.

  14. Limitations of amorphous content quantification by isothermal calorimetry using saturated salt solutions to control relative humidity: alternative methods.

    PubMed

    Khalef, Nawel; Pinal, Rodolfo; Bakri, Aziz

    2010-04-01

    Despite the high sensitivity of isothermal calorimetry (IC), reported measurements of amorphous content by this technique show significant variability even for the same compound. An investigation into the reasons behind such variability is presented using amorphous lactose and salbutamol sulfate as model compounds. An analysis was carried out on the heat evolved as a result of the exchange of water vapor between the solid sample during crystallization and the saline solution reservoir. The use of saturated salt solutions as means of control of the vapor pressure of water within sealed ampoules bears inherent limitations that lead in turn to the variability associated with the IC technique. We present an alternative IC method, based on an open cell configuration that effectively addresses the limitations encountered with the sealed ampoule system. The proposed approach yields an integral whose value is proportional to the amorphous content in the sample, thus enabling reliable and consistent quantifications. PMID:19774655

  15. Solution-based approaches for making high-density sodalite waste forms to immobilize spent electrochemical salts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lepry, William C.; Riley, Brian J.; Crum, Jarrod V.; Rodriguez, Carmen P.; Pierce, David A.

    2013-11-01

    Three different solution-based approaches were taken to make sodalite minerals as a host for a mixed salt simulating the waste in the electrochemical separations process of nuclear fuel reprocessing. The methods used an aqueous solution of mixed chlorides (simulated waste) but the other reactants varied: (1) Al(OH)3 + NaOH + CS, (2) NaAlO2 + CS, and (3) Al2Si2O7 + NaOH, (CS = colloidal silica). The products were dried, ground, pressed into pellets, and fired at 650-950 °C. In some cases, either 5 or 10 mass% of a Si-Na-B oxide glass sintering aid was introduced at different stages in the process. Method (2) proved the most successful at producing high sodalite fractions (up to 100%) with minimal sintering aid additions and showed high consolidation potential (up to 91.4% of theoretical density) at reduced firing temperatures.

  16. Inclusion of two push-pull N-methylpyridinium salts in anionic surfactant solutions: a comprehensive photophysical investigation.

    PubMed

    Cesaretti, Alessio; Carlotti, Benedetta; Consiglio, Giuseppe; Del Giacco, Tiziana; Spalletti, Anna; Elisei, Fausto

    2015-06-01

    Two N-methylpyridinium salts with push-pull properties have been investigated in the aqueous solution of anionic micelles of sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) and potassium p-(octyloxy)benzenesulfonate (pOoBSK) surfactants. These molecules are known to be extremely sensitive to the local environment, with their absorption spectrum being subjected to a net negative solvatochromism. These compounds are also characterized by an excited state deactivation strictly dependent on the physical properties of the chemical surrounding, with the formation of intramolecular charge-transfer (ICT) states accordingly stabilized. Thanks to steady-state and femtosecond resolved spectroscopic techniques, the photophysical properties of these molecules in the presence of anionic micelles have been fully characterized and an efficient permeation within the micellar aggregates can thus be inferred. The extent of the changes in the photophysical properties of these molecules (with respect to what is observed in water) is an indicator of the medium experienced in the nanoheterogeneous solutions: enhanced fluorescence emissions, reduced Stokes shifts and slowed-down excited state decays strongly confirm the confinement within a scarcely polar and restraining environment. The slightly different behavior shown in the two types of micelles can be ascribed to a peculiar interaction between the aromatic moiety of the surfactant and that of the cations. Additionally, the inclusion promotes the solubilization of these poorly water-soluble salts, which is alluring in their promising use as DNA binders for antitumor purposes. Thus, the anionic micelles allowed the solubilization of the pyridinium salts under investigation, which in turn allowed the characterization of the nonhomogeneous medium established by the micellar aggregates. PMID:25945687

  17. Water Uptake By Mars Salt Analogs: An Investigation Of Stable Aqueous Solutions On Mars Using Raman Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nuding, D.; Gough, R. V.; Jorgensen, S. K.; Tolbert, M. A.

    2013-12-01

    To understand the formation of briny aqueous solutions on Mars, a salt analog was developed to closely match the individual cation and anion concentrations as reported by the Wet Chemistry Laboratory aboard the Phoenix Lander. ';Instant Mars' is a salt analog developed to fully encompass the correct concentrations of magnesium, calcium, potassium, sodium, perchlorate, chloride, and sulfate ions. Using environmental Raman microscopy, we have studied the water uptake by the Instant Mars analog as a function of temperature and relative humidity. Water uptake was monitored using Raman spectroscopy in combination with optical microscopy. A MicroJet droplet generator was used to generate 30 μm diameter particles that were deposited onto a quartz disc. The particles undergo visual transformations as the relative humidity (RH) is increased and the presence of water uptake is confirmed by Raman spectroscopy. At -30° C, water uptake begins at ~ 35% RH as humidity is increased. The water uptake is marked by the growth of a sulfate peak at 990 cm-1, an indicator that sulfate has undergone a phase transition into an aqueous state. As the RH continues to increase, the peak in the O-H region (~3500 cm-1) broadens as more liquid water accumulates in the particles. The Instant Mars particles achieve complete deliquescence at 68% RH, indicated both visually and with Raman spectroscopy. The gradual water uptake observed suggests that deliquescence of the Instant Mars particles is not an immediate process, but that it occurs in steps marked by the deliquescence of the individual salts. Perhaps of even more significance is the tendency for the Instant Mars particles to remain aqueous at low humidity as RH is decreased. Raman spectra indicate that liquid water is present as low as 2% RH at -30° C. Ongoing work will examine the phase of Instant Mars particles under simulated Martian surface and subsurface conditions to gain insight into the possibility for aqueous solutions on Mars

  18. Generalized chloride mass balance: Forward and inverse solutions for one-dimensional tracer convection under transient flux

    SciTech Connect

    Ginn, T.R.; Murphy, E.M.

    1996-12-01

    Forward and inverse solutions are provided for analysis of inert tracer profiles resulting from one-dimensional convective transport under fluxes which vary with time and space separately. The developments are displayed as an extension of conventional chloride mass balance (CMB) techniques to account for transient as well as space-dependent water fluxes. The conventional chloride mass balance has been used over two decades to estimate recharge over large time scales in arid environments. In this mass balance approach, the chloride concentration in the pore water, originating from atmospheric fallout, is inversely proportional to the flux of water through the sediments. The CMB method is especially applicable to arid and semi-arid regions where evapotranspirative enrichment of the pore water produces a distinct chloride profile in the unsaturated zone. The solutions presented allow incorporation of transient fluxes and boundary conditions in CMB analysis, and allow analysis of tracer profile data which is not constant with depth below extraction zone in terms of a rational water transport model. A closed-form inverse solution is derived which shows uniqueness of model parameter and boundary condition (including paleoprecipitation) estimation, for the specified flow model. Recent expressions of the conventional chloride mass balance technique are derived from the general model presented here; the conventional CMB is shown to be fully compatible with this transient flow model and it requires the steady-state assumption on chloride mass deposition only (and not on water fluxes or boundary conditions). The solutions and results are demonstrated on chloride profile data from west central New Mexico.

  19. Ice VII from aqueous salt solutions: From a glass to a crystal with broken H-bonds.

    PubMed

    Klotz, S; Komatsu, K; Pietrucci, F; Kagi, H; Ludl, A-A; Machida, S; Hattori, T; Sano-Furukawa, A; Bove, L E

    2016-01-01

    It has been known for decades that certain aqueous salt solutions of LiCl and LiBr readily form glasses when cooled to below ≈160 K. This fact has recently been exploited to produce a « salty » high-pressure ice form: When the glass is compressed at low temperatures to pressures higher than 4 GPa and subsequently warmed, it crystallizes into ice VII with the ionic species trapped inside the ice lattice. Here we report the extreme limit of salt incorporation into ice VII, using high pressure neutron diffraction and molecular dynamics simulations. We show that high-pressure crystallisation of aqueous solutions of LiCl∙RH2O and LiBr∙RH2O with R = 5.6 leads to solids with strongly expanded volume, a destruction of the hydrogen-bond network with an isotropic distribution of water-dipole moments, as well as a crystal-to-amorphous transition on decompression. This highly unusual behaviour constitutes an interesting pathway from a glass to a crystal where translational periodicity is restored but the rotational degrees of freedom remaining completely random. PMID:27562476

  20. Ice VII from aqueous salt solutions: From a glass to a crystal with broken H-bonds

    PubMed Central

    Klotz, S.; Komatsu, K.; Pietrucci, F.; Kagi, H.; Ludl, A.-A.; Machida, S.; Hattori, T.; Sano-Furukawa, A.; Bove, L. E.

    2016-01-01

    It has been known for decades that certain aqueous salt solutions of LiCl and LiBr readily form glasses when cooled to below ≈160 K. This fact has recently been exploited to produce a « salty » high-pressure ice form: When the glass is compressed at low temperatures to pressures higher than 4 GPa and subsequently warmed, it crystallizes into ice VII with the ionic species trapped inside the ice lattice. Here we report the extreme limit of salt incorporation into ice VII, using high pressure neutron diffraction and molecular dynamics simulations. We show that high-pressure crystallisation of aqueous solutions of LiCl∙RH2O and LiBr∙RH2O with R = 5.6 leads to solids with strongly expanded volume, a destruction of the hydrogen-bond network with an isotropic distribution of water-dipole moments, as well as a crystal-to-amorphous transition on decompression. This highly unusual behaviour constitutes an interesting pathway from a glass to a crystal where translational periodicity is restored but the rotational degrees of freedom remaining completely random. PMID:27562476

  1. Aggregation and antigenicity of virus like particle in salt solution--A case study with hepatitis B surface antigen.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yi; Zhang, Yan; Quan, Can; Luo, Jian; Yang, Yanli; Yu, Mengran; Kong, Yingjun; Ma, Guanghui; Su, Zhiguo

    2015-08-20

    The phenomenon of aggregation of virus-like particles (VLPs) in salt solution and the corresponding effect upon antigenicity was reported. Asymmetrical flow field-flow fractionation (AF4) combined with multi-angle laser light scattering (MALLS) was used to characterize the size and the aggregation behavior of hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg). The average diameter of HBsAg VLP was 22.8±0.4 nm and it tended to aggregate in salt solution to form large particles and the antigenicity changed accordingly. In 0-4 M NaCl solution, part of HBsAg molecules aggregated rapidly into oligomeric particles (OP), whose diameter distributed from 25 to 40 nm, and the antigenicity slightly decreased about 10%. The aggregation reaction is reversible. After removing NaCl, both size and antigenicity could recover to normal level (92-96%). By contrast, the aggregation process is more complicated in (NH4)2SO4 solution. Most of HBsAg particles aggregated into OP and further aggregated into polymeric particles (PP). The diameter of the PP could reach 40 to 140 nm. The concentration of (NH4)2SO4 had remarkable influence upon the rate of aggregation. When concentration of (NH4)2SO4 was below 1 M, most of HBsAg aggregated only into OP in 1 h. While with concentration of (NH4)2SO4 above 1 M, most of particles formed PP within 1 h. The aggregation process to PP was irreversible. After removing (NH4)2SO4, the large aggregates could not recover to normal particles and the remaining antigenicity was below 30%. PMID:25862298

  2. Biomass production in agroforestry and forestry systems on salt-affected soils in South Asia: exploration of the GHG balance and economic performance of three case studies.

    PubMed

    Wicke, Birka; Smeets, Edward M W; Akanda, Razzaque; Stille, Leon; Singh, Ranjay K; Awan, Abdul Rasul; Mahmood, Khalid; Faaij, Andre P C

    2013-09-30

    This study explores the greenhouse gas balance and the economic performance (i.e. net present value (NPV) and production costs) of agroforestry and forestry systems on salt-affected soils (biosaline (agro)forestry) based on three case studies in South Asia. The economic impact of trading carbon credits generated by biosaline (agro)forestry is also assessed as a potential additional source of income. The greenhouse gas balance shows carbon sequestration over the plantation lifetime of 24 Mg CO2-eq. ha(-1) in a rice-Eucalyptus camaldulensis agroforestry system on moderately saline soils in coastal Bangladesh (case study 1), 6 Mg CO2-eq. ha(-1) in the rice-wheat- Eucalyptus tereticornis agroforestry system on sodic/saline-sodic soils in Haryana state, India (case study 2), and 96 Mg CO2-eq. ha(-1) in the compact tree (Acacia nilotica) plantation on saline-sodic soils in Punjab province of Pakistan. The NPV at a discount rate of 10% is 1.1 k€ ha(-1) for case study 1, 4.8 k€ ha(-1) for case study 2, and 2.8 k€ ha(-1) for case study 3. Carbon sequestration translates into economic values that increase the NPV by 1-12% in case study 1, 0.1-1% in case study 2, and 2-24% in case study 3 depending on the carbon credit price (1-15 € Mg(-1) CO2-eq.). The analysis of the three cases indicates that the economic performance strongly depends on the type and severity of salt-affectedness (which affect the type and setup of the agroforestry system, the tree species and the biomass yield), markets for wood products, possibility of trading carbon credits, and discount rate. PMID:23810966

  3. Salting-out in the aqueous single-protein solution: the effect of shape factor.

    PubMed

    Chang, Bong Ho; Bae, Young Chan

    2003-06-01

    A molecular-thermodynamic model is developed to describe salt-induced protein precipitation. The protein-protein interaction goes through the potential of mean force. An equation of state is derived based on the generalized van der Waals partition function. The attractive term including the potential of mean force is perturbed by the statistical mechanical perturbation theory. The precipitation behaviors are studied by calculating the partition coefficient with various conditions such as the ionic strength and the shape of protein. Our results show that the protein shape plays a significant role in the protein precipitation behavior. PMID:12878319

  4. Poly(amidoamine) salt form: effect on pH-dependent membrane activity and polymer conformation in solution.

    PubMed

    Wan, Ka-Wai; Malgesini, Beatrice; Verpilio, Ilario; Ferruti, Paolo; Griffiths, Peter C; Paul, Alison; Hann, Anthony C; Duncan, Ruth

    2004-01-01

    On exposure to an acidic pH, linear poly(amidoamine)s (PAAs) cause membrane perturbation and consequently have potential as endosomolytic polymers for the intracellular delivery of genes and toxins. Previous studies used PAAs in the hydrochloride form only. The aim of this study was to investigate systematically the effect of the PAA counterion on pH-dependent membrane activity, general cytotoxicity, and PAA solution properties to help guide optimization of PAA structure for further development of PAA-protein conjugates. PAAs (ISA 1, 4, 22, and 23; M(w) 10000-50000 g/mol) were synthesized to provide a library of PAAs having different counterions including the acetate, citrate, hydrochloride, lactate, phosphate, and sulfate salts. pH-Dependent membrane activity was assessed using a rat red blood cell haemolysis assay (conducted at a starting pH of 7.4, 6.5, or 5.5; 1 mg/mL; 1 h), and general cytotoxicity was investigated using a murine melanoma cell line (B16F10) and a human bladder endothelial-like cell line (ECV-304). Whereas poly(ethyleneimine) was haemolytic at the starting pH of 7.4 at 1 h [ approximately 50% haemoglobin (Hb) release], none of the PAA salts were haemolytic at a starting pH of 7.4 or 6.5. Although PAA acetate, citrate, and lactate were also non-haemolytic at the starting pH of 5.5, the sulfate and hydrochloride forms caused significant haemolysis (up to 80% Hb release) and ISA 22 and 23 phosphate were also markedly haemolytic ( approximately 70% Hb release). These counterion-specific differences were also clearly visible using scanning electron microscopy, which was used to visualize the red blood cell morphology. All PAAs were relatively nontoxic (IC(50) >or= 300-5000 microg/mL) compared to poly-l-lysine (IC(50) = 2-10 microg/mL), the PAA hydrochloride salts produced the greatest cytotoxicity, and the B16F10 cells were more sensitive than the ECV-304 cells. Small-angle neutron scattering suggested that ISA 23 hydrochloride had a larger

  5. Water dynamics in aqueous solutions of tetra-n-alkylammonium salts: hydrophobic and Coulomb interactions disentangled.

    PubMed

    van der Post, Sietse T; Scheidelaar, Stefan; Bakker, Huib J

    2013-12-01

    We studied the effects of tetra-n-alkylammonium bromide (N(C(n)H(2n+1))(4)(+)Br(-)) salts on the dynamics of water using polarization-resolved femtosecond infrared spectroscopy. With this technique, we are capable of distinguishing the response of water solvating the hydrophobic cations from that of water solvating the bromide anion. We observe that both types of ions slow down the orientational dynamics of the water molecules in their solvation shells. However, the nature of this slowdown is different for both ions. For the hydrophobic cation, we find an increasing number of retarded water molecules, scaling with the alkyl chain length. Water in the bromide solvation shell experiences a partial decay of its orientation by a fast wobbling motion, after which the remaining anisotropy decays much slower. The dynamics of the wobbling motion are observed to be dependent on the nature of the cation. For Me(4)NBr, the slow reorientation time is not concentration-dependent, and no aggregation is observed. This is in contrast to the tetra-n-alkylammonium salts with longer alkyl chains, for which the slow reorientation time of bromide-bound water molecules increases dramatically with concentration, and clusters of cations and anions appear to be formed. PMID:24228939

  6. Synthesis and characterization of vinylimidazolium salts: Solution state study to realize the influence of different anions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suresh, Paladugu; Samanta, Arpan; Sathyanarayana, Arruri; Prabusankar, Ganesan

    2012-09-01

    New vinylimidazolium salts, [9,10-bis{(N-vinylimidazolium)methyl}anthracene] bistetrafluoroborate (2) and [9,10-bis{(N-vinylimidazolium)methyl}anthracene] bishexafluorophosphate (3) have been prepared by the N alkylation of 9,10-bis(chloromethyl)anthracene with 1-vinylimidazole in 1,4-dioxane at 70 °C followed by the anion exchange reaction between [9,10-bis{(N-vinylimidazolium)methyl}anthracene] dichloride (1) and ammonium salt of tetrafluoroborate (for 2) or hexafluorophosphate (for 3). The interaction of tribromide anion with 1-3 has been studied with the help of 1H NMR and fluorescence spectra. Notably, the tribromide anion exhibits very strong fluorescent quenching effects towards 2 than 1 and 3. Similarly, 2 shows very strong fluorescent quenching effect in the presence of tribromide anion compare to bromide anion. Moreover the proton of imidazolium cation, Nsbnd CHsbnd N in 2 undergoes considerable downfield shift in the presence of tribromide anion, while the vinyl group depicts strong upfield shift due to the possible interaction of tribromide with vinylimidazolium unit.

  7. Non-monotonic course of protein solubility in aqueous polymer-salt solutions can be modeled using the sol-mxDLVO model.

    PubMed

    Herhut, Marcel; Brandenbusch, Christoph; Sadowski, Gabriele

    2016-02-01

    Protein purification is often performed using cost-intensive chromatographic steps. To discover economic alternatives (e.g., crystallization), knowledge on protein solubility as a function of temperature, pH, and additives in solution as well as their concentration is required. State-of-the-art models for predicting protein solubility almost exclusively consider aqueous salt systems, whereas "salting-in" and "salting-out" effects induced by the presence of an additional polymer are not considered. Thus, we developed the sol-mxDLVO model. Using this newly developed model, protein solubility in the presence of one salt and one polymer, especially the non-monotonic course of protein solubility, could be predicted. Systems considered included salts (NaCl, Na-p-Ts, (NH(4))(2) SO(4)) and the polymer polyethylene glycol (MW: 2000 g/mol, 12000 g/mol) and proteins lysozyme from chicken egg white (pH 4 to 5.5) and D-xylose ketol-isomerase (pH 7) at 298.15 K. The results show that by using the sol-mxDLVO model, protein solubility in polymer-salt solutions can be modeled in good agreement with the experimental data for both proteins considered. The sol-mxDLVO model can describe the non-monotonic course of protein solubility as a function of polymer concentration and salt concentration, previously not covered by state-of-the-art models. PMID:26579880

  8. Molten-salt synthesis and composition-dependent luminescent properties of barium tungsto-molybdate-based solid solution phosphors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiang-Hong, He; Zhao-Lian, Ye; Ming-Yun, Guan; Ning, Lian; Jian-Hua, Sun

    2016-02-01

    Pr3+-activated barium tungsto-molybdate solid solution phosphor Ba(Mo1-zWz)O4:Pr3+ is successfully fabricated via a facile molten-salt approach. The as-synthesized microcrystal is of truncated octahedron and exhibits deep-red-emitting upon blue light excitation. Powder x-ray diffraction and Raman spectroscopy techniques are utilized to investigate the formation of solid solution phosphor. The luminescence behaviors depend on the resulting composition of the microcrystals with fixed Pr3+-doping concentration, while the host lattices remain in a scheelite structure. The forming solid solution via the substitution of [WO4] for [MoO4] can significantly enhance its luminescence, which may be due to the fact that Ba(Mo1-zWz)O4:Pr3+ owns well-defined facets and uniform morphologies. Owing to its properties of high phase purity, well-defined facets, highly uniform morphologies, exceptional chemical and thermal stabilities, and stronger emission intensity, the resulting solid solution phosphor is expected to find potential applications in phosphor-converted white light-emitting diodes (LEDs). Project supported by the Construction Fund for Science and Technology Innovation Group from Jiangsu University of Technology, China, the Key Laboratory of Atmospheric Environment Monitoring and Pollution Control, China (Grant No. KHK1409), the Priority Academic Program Development of Jiangsu Higher Education Institutions, China, and the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 21373103).

  9. Results Of Routine Strip Effluent Hold Tank And Decontaminated Salt Solution Hold Tank Samples From Modular Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction Unit During Macrobatch 5 Operations

    SciTech Connect

    Peters, T. B.; Fondeur, F. F.

    2013-04-30

    Strip Effluent Hold Tank (SEHT) and Decontaminated Salt Solution Hold Tank (DSSHT) samples from several of the ''microbatches'' of Integrated Salt Disposition Project (ISDP) Salt Batch (''Macrobatch'') 5 have been analyzed for {sup 238}Pu, {sup 90}Sr, {sup 137}Cs, and by Inductively Coupled Plasma Emission Spectroscopy (ICPES). The results indicate good decontamination performance within process design expectations. While the data set is sparse, the results of this set and the previous set of results for Macrobatch 4 samples indicate generally consistent operations. The DSSHT samples show continued presence of titanium, likely from leaching of the monosodium titanate in the Actinide Removal process (ARP).

  10. Technology Solutions Case Study: Balancing Hydronic Systems in Multifamily Buildings, Chicago, Illinois

    SciTech Connect

    2014-09-01

    In multifamily building hydronic systems, temperature imbalance may be caused by undersized piping, improperly adjusted balancing valves, inefficient water temperature and flow levels, and owner/occupant interaction with the boilers, distribution and controls. The effects of imbalance include tenant discomfort, higher energy use intensity and inefficient building operation. In this case study , Partnership for Advanced Residential Retrofit and Elevate Energy. explores cost-effective distribution upgrades and balancing measures in multifamily hydronic systems, providing a resource to contractors, auditors, and building owners on best practices to improve tenant comfort and lower operating costs.

  11. Conformation dynamics and polarization effect of α,α-trehalose in a vacuum and in aqueous and salt solutions.

    PubMed

    Kan, Zigui; Yan, Xiufen; Ma, Jing

    2015-03-01

    Conformational changes of α,α-trehalose in a vacuum, water, and 0-20 wt % NaCl solutions were investigated by means of molecular dynamics (MD) simulations at different levels of density function theory (DFT) and with fixed-charge nonpolarizable and variable-charge force fields (FFs), respectively. The relative thermodynamic stability of trehalose is enhanced by the formation of intercycle and/or intracycle hydrogen bonds, but some thermodynamically unfavorable structures can be sampled in the DFT-based ab initio MD simulation. The polarization effects of polar trehalose molecule in aqueous and NaCl solutions were studied by a series of MD simulations with both the conventional nonpolarizable and polarizable force field models. In the polarizable model, the partial charges of trehalose were updated every 2 ps using DFT calculations and fused with the other FF parameters for the energy calculation and MD simulation. Around the trehalose, water molecules located in an asymmetry model and trehalose have a stronger tendency to bind with water molecules than Na(+) and Cl(-) ions. When the trehalose concentration is increased from 3.26 to 6.31 wt % in salt aqueous solution, the two trehalose molecules periodically approach each other in a nearly anhydrate state and leave a way to keep the favorable hydration structure with the mean trehalose-trehalose distance of 8.6 Å. The similarity between the solvated dimer packing styles (shoulder-by-shoulder or head-to-head) and crystal stacking can be used to make an extrapolation to higher sugar concentrations and to rationalize the bioprotection function of trehalose in high salt concentration. PMID:25506668

  12. On the hydrophilicity of polyzwitterion poly (N,N-dimethyl-N-(3-(methacrylamido)propyl)ammoniopropane sulfonate) in water, deuterated water, and aqueous salt solutions.

    PubMed

    Hildebrand, Viet; Laschewsky, André; Zehm, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    A series of zwitterionic model polymers with defined molar masses up to 150,000 Da and defined end groups are prepared from sulfobetaine monomer N,N-dimethyl-N-(3-(methacrylamido)propyl)ammoniopropanesulfonate (SPP). Polymers are synthesized by reversible addition-fragmentation chain transfer polymerization (RAFT) using a functional chain transfer agent labeled with a fluorescent probe. Their upper critical solution temperature-type coil-to-globule phase transition in water, deuterated water, and various salt solutions is studied by turbidimetry. Cloud points increase with polyzwitterion concentration and molar mass, being considerably higher in D2O than in H2O. Moreover, cloud points are strongly affected by the amount and nature of added salts. Typically, they increase with increasing salt concentration up to a maximum value, whereas further addition of salt lowers the cloud points again, mostly down to below freezing point. The different salting-in and salting-out effects of the studied anions can be correlated with the Hofmeister series. In physiological sodium chloride solution and in phosphate buffered saline (PBS), the cloud point is suppressed even for high molar mass samples. Accordingly, SPP-polymers behave strongly hydrophilic under most conditions encountered in biomedical applications. However, the direct transfer of results from model studies in D2O, using, e.g. (1)H NMR or neutron scattering techniques, to 'normal' systems in H2O is not obvious. PMID:25058808

  13. Frictional properties of the end-grafted polymer layer in presence of salt solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raftari, Maryam; Zhang, Zhenyu; Leggett, Graham J.; Geoghegan, Mark

    2012-02-01

    We have studied the frictional behaviour of grafted poly[2-(dimethylamino)ethyl methacrylate] (PDMAEMA) films using friction force microscopy (FFM). The films were prepared on native oxide-terminated silicon substrates using the technique of atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP). These brushes had constant grafting density (1.18 nm2), and of a thickness of ˜66 nm, as measured by ellipsometry. We show that single asperity contact mechanics (Johnson-Kendall-Roberts (JKR) and Derjaguin-M"uller-Toporov (DMT) models) as well as a linear (Amontons) relation between applied load and frictional load all apply to these systems depending on the concentration of salt and the nature of the FFM probe. Measurements were made using gold-coating and polymer functionalized silicon nitride triangular probes. Polymer functionalized probe included growth the PDMAEMA with same method on tips. The frictional behaviour are investigated between PDMAEMA and gold coated and PDMAEMA tips immersed in different concentrations of KCl, KBr and KI.

  14. Electrophoretic mobilities of neutral analytes and electroosmotic flow markers in aqueous solutions of Hofmeister salts.

    PubMed

    Křížek, Tomáš; Kubíčková, Anna; Hladílková, Jana; Coufal, Pavel; Heyda, Jan; Jungwirth, Pavel

    2014-03-01

    Small neutral organic compounds have traditionally the role of EOF markers in electrophoresis, as they are expected to have zero electrophoretic mobility in external electric fields. The BGE contains, however, ions that have unequal affinities to the neutral molecules, which in turn results in their mobilization. In this study we focused on two EOF markers-thiourea and DMSO, as well as on N-methyl acetamide (NMA) as a model of the peptide bond. By means of CE and all atom molecular dynamics simulations we explored mobilization of these neutral compounds in large set of Hofmeister salts. Employing a statistical mechanics approach, we were able to reproduce by simulations the experimental electrophoretic mobility coefficients. We also established the role of the chemical composition of marker and the BGE on the measured electrophoretic mobility coefficient. For NMA, we interpreted the results in terms of the relative affinities of cations versus anions to the peptide bond. PMID:24338984

  15. Use of alkali metal salts to prepare high purity single-walled carbon nanotube solutions and thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashour, Rakan F.

    Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) display interesting electronic and optical properties desired for many advanced thin film applications, such as transparent conductive electrodes or thin-film transistors. Large-scale production of SWCNTs generally results in polydispersed mixtures of nanotube structures. Since SWCNT electronic character (conducting or semiconducting nature) depends on the nanotube structure, application performance is being held back by this inability to discretely control SWCNT synthesis. Although a number of post-production techniques are able to separate SWCNTs based on electronic character, diameter, or chirality, most still suffer from the disadvantage of high costs of materials, equipment, or labor intensity to be relevant for large-scale production. On the other hand, chromatographic separation has emerged as a method that is compatible with large scale separation of metallic and semiconducting SWCNTs. In this work, SWCNTs, in an aqueous surfactant suspension of sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS), are separated by their electronic character using a gel chromatography process. Metallic SWCNTs (m-SWCNTs) are collected as initial fractions since they show minimum interaction with the gel medium, whereas, semiconducting SWCNTs (sc- SWCNTs) remain adsorbed to the gel. The process of sc-SWCNT retention in the gel is found to be driven by the packing density of SDS around the SWCNTs. Through a series of separation experiments, it is shown that sc-SWCNTs can be eluted from the gel simply by disturbing the configuration of the SDS/SWCNT micellar structure. This is achieved by either introducing a solution containing a co-surfactant, such as sodium cholate (SC), or solutions of alkali metal ionic salts. Analysis of SWCNT suspensions by optical absorption provides insights into the effect of changing the metal ion (M+ = Li+, Na+, and K+) in the eluting solution. Salts with smaller metal ions (e.g. Li+) require higher concentrations to achieve

  16. Results of Hg speciation testing on MCU strip effluent hold tank (SEHT) and decontaminated salt solution hold tank (DSSHT) materials

    SciTech Connect

    Bannochie, C. J.

    2015-09-17

    The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) was tasked with preparing and shipping samples for Hg speciation by Eurofins Frontier Global Sciences, Inc. in Seattle, WA on behalf of the Savannah River Remediation (SRR) Mercury Task Team.i,ii The tenth shipment of samples was designated to include Modular Caustic Side Solvent Extraction Unit (MCU) Strip Effluent Hold Tank (SEHT) and MCU Decontaminated Salt Solution Hold Tank (DSSHT) materials from processing Salt Batch 7b. The MCU SEHT (MCU-15-722) and DSSHT (MCU-15-709) samples were pulled on June 15, 2015. All MCU samples were received at SRNL on June 16, 2015. The DSSHT sample was moved the same day to refrigeration, while the SEHT sample was placed in the Shielded Cells. On July 9, 2015 it was opened and an aliquot diluted 1:100 with Eurofins deionized water and a portion of the diluted sample transferred to a Teflon® bottle prior to moving it to refrigeration that same day. All samples were kept in the dark and refrigerated until final dilutions were prepared for shipment to Eurofins.

  17. Water purification using organic salts

    DOEpatents

    Currier, Robert P.

    2004-11-23

    Water purification using organic salts. Feed water is mixed with at least one organic salt at a temperature sufficiently low to form organic salt hydrate crystals and brine. The crystals are separated from the brine, rinsed, and melted to form an aqueous solution of organic salt. Some of the water is removed from the aqueous organic salt solution. The purified water is collected, and the remaining more concentrated aqueous organic salt solution is reused.

  18. Effect of laser irradiation of nanoparticles in aqueous uranium salt solutions on nuclide activity

    SciTech Connect

    Simakin, Aleksandr V; Shafeev, Georgii A

    2011-07-31

    This paper presents an experimental study of the effect of laser irradiation of aqueous uranyl chloride solutions containing gold nanoparticles on the activity of the uranium series radionuclides {sup 234}Th, {sup 234m}Pa, and {sup 235}U. The solutions were exposed to femtosecond Ti:sapphire laser pulses and to the second or third harmonic of a Nd:YAG laser (150-ps pulses) at a peak intensity in the medium of {approx}10{sup 12} W cm{sup -2}. The activities of the radionuclides in the irradiated solutions were shown to differ markedly from their equilibrium values. The sign of the deviation depends on the laser wavelength. The measured activity deviations can be interpreted as evidence that laser exposure of nanoparticles accelerates the alpha and beta decays of the radionuclides. The observed effects are accounted for in terms of a mechanism that involves resonant enhancement of optical waves by metallic nanoparticles. (interaction of laser radiation with matter)

  19. Experimental study of evaporation of horizontal films of water-salt solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elistratov, S. L.; Morozov, V. S.

    2015-01-01

    The present studies were carried out for the horizontal films (thin layers) of water and water solutions of NaCl, CaCl2, LiCl, and LiBr with different solubility characteristics, as well as with specific features of formation and decay of water hydrates. Required volume of solution Vo of given weight concentration ξo, preliminary heated to the working surface temperature, was put in one step on the horizontal bottom of the bowl, heated to working temperature tCT, by means of volume batchers Thermo Scientific. After evaporation completion, the final mass of solution and form of their residue were registered. At the final stage of evaporation formation of NaCl crystals and water hydrates of CaCl2 · 2H2O, LiCl · H2O, and LiBr · 2H2O occurred.

  20. Effect of salt identity on the phase diagram for a globularprotein in aqueous electrolyte solution

    SciTech Connect

    Bostrom, Mathias; Tavares, Frederico W.; Ninham, Barry W.; Prausnitz, John M.

    2006-02-22

    Monte Carlo simulations are used to establish the potential of mean force between two globular proteins in an aqueous electrolyte solution. This potential includes nonelectrostatic contributions arising from dispersion forces first, between the globular proteins, and second, between ions in solution and between each ion and the globular protein. These latter contributions are missing from standard models. The potential of mean force, obtained from simulation, is fitted to an analytic equation. Using our analytic potential of mean force and Barker-Henderson perturbation theory, we obtain phase diagrams for lysozyme solutions that include stable and metastable fluid-fluid and solid-fluid phases when the electrolyte is 0.2 M NaSCN or NaI or NaCl. The nature of the electrolyte has a significant effect on the phase diagram.

  1. Long-living nanobubbles of dissolved gas in aqueous solutions of salts and erythrocyte suspensions.

    PubMed

    Bunkin, Nikolai F; Ninham, Barry W; Ignatiev, Pavel S; Kozlov, Valery A; Shkirin, Alexey V; Starosvetskij, Artem V

    2011-03-01

    Results of experiments combining laser modulation interference microscopy and Mueller matrix scatterometry show that macroscopic scatterers of light are present in liquids free of external solid impurities. Experimental data on distilled water and aqueous NaCl solutions of various concentrations as well as physiological saline solution are reported. The experimental data can be interpreted by using a model of micron-scale clusters composed of polydisperse air nanobubbles having effective radii of 70-100 nm. Their concentration increases with the growth of ionic content. We hypothesize that under certain conditions those clusters of nanobubbles can affect the erythrocyte structure. PMID:21287687

  2. Report on variation of electrical conductivity during steam injection in unconsolidated sand saturated with a salt solution

    SciTech Connect

    Vaughan, P.; Udell, K.S.; Wilt, M.

    1992-04-01

    Geophysical electrical methods are useful in evaluating the performance of certain classes of enhanced oil recovery (EOR) operations and also remediation operations for contaminant spills. Electrical resistivity is sensitive to the concentration of ionic species in solution in fluids present in the subsurface zone. Such fluids are displaced during oil recovery operations and contaminant remediation. If the resistivity of the displacing fluid differs from the in situ fluid, then a geophysical method for detecting resistivity variations may be capable of tracking the advance of the displacing fluid. This report presents the results of experiments designed to determine the variations in resistivity that occur when steam is injected into a homogeneous, fully-saturated sand. These experiments were simple, one-dimensional laboratory steam injection experiments. They were performed using a glass tube filled with a tightly-packed sand and fitted with an injection port at one end and an exit port at the other In each experiment, the sand pack was initially saturated with a brine and then steam was introduced at one end of the tube. Analytic solutions for the steam front velocity, steam temperature, steam distribution, salt concentration profile, and liquid saturation are presented and are used with appropriate correlations of electrical conductivity to describe the observed behavior. The results of these experiments should provide experimental justification for the electrical conductivity variations that are calculated from the analytic solutions. In addition, the experiments may yield new information regarding features of the data that may not result from the analytical modelling.

  3. Economic feasibility and performance study of a solar-powered absorption cycle using some aqueous salt solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Malik, I.H.; Siddiqui, M.A.

    1997-02-01

    Economic analyses of solar collectors, for optimizing generator temperatures in the absorption cycle using aqueous solutions of LiBr, LiBr-ZnBr{sub 2}, LiBr-ZnBr{sub 2}-LiCl, and LiBr-ZnCl{sub 2}-CaBr{sub 2} salts, have been carried out for a wide range of the operating conditions. Ordinary collectors with two glass covers and evacuated-tubular collectors have been selected as the sources of energy for providing hot liquid in the generator of the absorption cycle. Of the four solutions, as the working fluids in the absorption cycles, those having better coefficients of performance are the LiBr/H{sub 2}O at the low evaporator temperatures, and the (LiBr-ZnBr{sub 2}-LiCl)/H{sub 2}O as well as the (LiBr-ZnCl{sub 2}-CaBr{sub 2})/H{sub 2}O at the high evaporator temperatures. Similarly, costs of the solar collectors are low, at low evaporation temperatures for the LiBr/H{sub 2}O and at high temperatures for the other two solutions: the (LiBr-ZnBr{sub 2})/H{sub 2}O, on the other hand, have relatively low COP and high operating costs.

  4. Effect of plasticizer on surface of free films prepared from aqueous solutions of salts of cationic polymers with different plasticizers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bajdik, János; Fehér, Máté; Pintye-Hódi, Klára

    2007-06-01

    Acquisition of a more detailed understanding of all technological processes is currently a relevant tendency in pharmaceutical technology and hence in industry. A knowledge of film formation from dispersion of polymers is very important during the coating of solid dosage forms. This process and the structure of the film can be influenced by different additives. In the present study, taste-masking films were prepared from aqueous citric acid solutions of a cationic polymer (Eudragit ® E PO) with various hydrophilic plasticizers (glycerol, propylene glycol and different poly(ethylene glycols)). The mechanical properties, film thickness, wetting properties and surface free energy of the free films were studied. The aim was to evaluate the properties of surface of free films to predict the arrangement of macromolecules in films formed from aqueous solutions of salts of cationic polymers. A high molecular weight of the plasticizer decreased the work of deformation. The surface free energy and the polarity were highest for the film without plasticizer; the hydrophilic additives decreased these parameters. The direction of the change in polarity (a hydrophilic component caused a decrease in the polarity) was unexpected. It can be explained by the change in orientation of the macromolecules, a hydrophobic surface being formed. Examination of the mechanical properties and film thickness can furnish additional results towards a knowledge of film formation by this not frequently applied type of polymer from aqueous solution.

  5. Effects of solution conditions and surface chemistry on the adsorption of three recombinant botulinum neurotoxin antigens to aluminum salt adjuvants.

    PubMed

    Vessely, Christina; Estey, Tia; Randolph, Theodore W; Henderson, Ian; Nayar, Rajiv; Carpenter, John F

    2007-09-01

    Botulinum neurotoxin (BoNT) is a biological warfare threat. Protein antigens have been developed against the seven major BoNT serotypes for the development of a recombinant protein vaccine. This study is an evaluation of adsorption profiles for three of the recombinant protein antigens to aluminum salt adjuvants in the development of a trivalent vaccine against BoNT. Adsorption profiles were obtained over a range of protein concentrations. The results document that charge-charge interactions dominate the adsorption of antigen to adjuvant. Optimal conditions for adsorption were determined. However, potency studies and solution stability studies indicated the necessity of using aluminum hydroxide adjuvant at low pH. To improve the adsorption profiles to AlOH adjuvant, phosphate ions were introduced into the adsorption buffers. The resulting change in the adjuvant chemistry led to an improvement of adsorption of the BoNT antigens to aluminum hydroxide adjuvant while maintaining potency. Competitive adsorption profiles were also determined, and showed changes in maximum adsorption from mixed solutions compared to adsorption from individual protein solutions. The adsorption profiles for each protein varied due to differences in adsorption mechanism and affinity for the adjuvant surface. These results emphasize the importance of evaluating competitive adsorption in the development of multivalent vaccine products. PMID:17518359

  6. Growth of lithium triborate single crystals from molten salt solution under various temperature gradients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guretskii, S. A.; Ges, A. P.; Zhigunov, D. I.; Ignatenko, A. A.; Kalanda, N. A.; Kurnevich, L. A.; Luginets, A. M.; Milovanov, A. S.; Molchan, P. V.

    1995-12-01

    Single crystals of lithium triborate LiB 3O 5 (LBO) have been grown by the top-seeded solution growth method with B 2O 3 as a solvent using different temperature gradients in the zone of crystallization. Optical and nonlinear optical properties of LBO single crystals have been investigated. The influence of post-growth thermal treatment in oxygen atmosphere on the optical properties has been studied.

  7. Mechanism of Pitting Corrosion Prevention by Nitrite in Carbon Steel Exposed to Dilute Salt Solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Philip E. Zapp; John W. Van Zee

    2002-02-01

    The research has developed a broad fundamental understanding of the inhibition action of nitrite ions in preventing nitrate pitting corrosion of carbon steel tanks containing high-level radioactive waste. This fundamental understanding can be applied to specific situations during waste removal for permanent disposition and waste tank closure to ensure that the tanks are maintained safely. The results of the research provide the insight necessary to develop solutions that prevent further degradation.

  8. Tank Waste Transport Stability: Summaries of Hanford Slurry and Salt-Solution Studies in FY 2000

    SciTech Connect

    Welch, T.D.

    2002-07-08

    This report is a collection of summary articles on FY 2000 studies of slurry transport and salt-well pumping related to Hanford tank waste transfers. These studies are concerned with the stability (steady, uninterrupted flow) of tank waste transfers, a subset of the Department of Energy (DOE) Tanks Focus Area Tank (TFA) Waste Chemistry effort. This work is a collaborative effort of AEA Technology plc, the Diagnostic Instrumentation and Analysis Laboratory at Mississippi State University (DIAL-MSU), the Hemispheric Center for Environmental Technology at Florida International University (HCET-FIU), Numatec Hanford Corporation (NHC), and the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The purpose of this report is to provide, in a single document, an overview of these studies to help the reader identify contacts and resources for obtaining more detailed information and to help promote useful interchanges between researchers and users. Despite over 50 years of experience in transporting radioactive tank wastes to and from equipment and tanks at the Department of Energy's Hanford, Savannah River, and Oak Ridge sites, waste slurry transfer pipelines and process piping become plugged on occasion. At Hanford, several tank farm pipelines are no longer in service because of plugs. At Savannah River, solid deposits in the outlet line of the 2H evaporator have resulted in an unplanned extended downtime. Although waste transfer criteria and guidelines intended to prevent pipeline plugging are in place, they are not always adequate. To avoid pipeline plugging in the future, other factors that are not currently embodied in the transfer criteria may need to be considered. The work summarized here is being conducted to develop a better understanding of the chemical and waste flow dynamics during waste transfer. The goal is to eliminate pipeline plugs by improving analysis and engineering tools in the field that incorporate this understanding.

  9. The type-1 cannabinoid receptor modulates the hydroelectrolytic balance independently of the energy homeostasis during salt load.

    PubMed

    Vechiato, F M V; Rivas, P M S; Ruginsk, S G; Borges, B C; Elias, L L K; Antunes-Rodrigues, J

    2016-02-01

    Hydroelectrolytic imbalances, such as saline load (SL), trigger behavioral and neuroendocrine responses, such as thirst, hypophagia, vasopressin (AVP) and oxytocin (OT) release and hypothalamus–pituitary–adrenal (HPA) axis activation. To investigate the participation of the type-1 cannabinoid receptor (CB1R) in these homeostatic mechanisms,male adult Wistar rats were subjected to SL (0.3MNaCl) for four days. SL induced not only increases in the water intake and plasma levels of AVP, OT and corticosterone, as previously described, but also increases in CB1R expression in the lamina terminalis, which integrates sensory afferents, aswell as in the hypothalamus, the main integrative and effector area controlling hydroelectrolytic homeostasis. A more detailed analysis revealed that CB1R-positive terminals are in close apposition with not only axons but also dendrites and secretory granules of magnocellular neurons, particularly vasopressinergic cells. In satiated and euhydrated animals, the intracerebroventricular administration of the CB1R selective agonist ACEA (0.1 μg/5 μL) promoted hyperphagia, but this treatment did not reverse the hyperosmolality-induced hypophagia in the SL group. Furthermore, ACEA pretreatment potentiated water intake in the SL animals during rehydration as well as enhanced the corticosterone release and prevented the increase in AVP and OT secretion induced by SL. The same parameters were not changed by ACEA in the animals whose daily food intake was matched to that of the SL group (Pair-Fed). These data indicate that CB1Rs modulate the hydroelectrolytic balance independently of the food intake during sustained hyperosmolality and hypovolemia. PMID:26497248

  10. Comparative ion insertion study into a nanostructured vanadium oxide in aqueous salt solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Yuan, Q.; Ren, S. L.; Zukowski, J.; Pomeroy, M.; Soghomonian, V.

    2014-07-07

    We present a comparative study for the electrochemical insertion of different cations into a nanostructured vanadium oxide material. The oxide is hydrothemally synthesized and electrically characterized by variable temperature measurements. The electrochemical reactions are performed in aqueous chloride solutions of lithium, sodium, potassium, and ammonium, and the electrochemical behavior of various cycles are correlated with visual changes in the vanadium oxide nanosheets as observed by scanning electron microscopy. We note an increase in the specific charge per cycle in the cases of sodium and ammonium ions only, correlated with minimal physical changes to the nanosheets. The differing behavior of the various ions has implications for their use in electrical energy storage applications.

  11. Process for preparing chemically modified micas for removal of cesium salts from aqueous solution

    SciTech Connect

    Yates, Stephen Frederic; DeFilippi, Irene; Gaita, Romulus; Clearfield, Abraham; Bortun, Lyudmila; Bortun, Anatoly

    2000-09-05

    A chemically modified mica composite formed by heating a trioctahedral mica in an aqueous solution of sodium chloride having a concentration of at least 1 mole/liter at a temperature greater than 180 degrees Centigrade for at least 20 hours, thereby replacing exchangeable ions in the mica with sodium. Formation is accomplished at temperatures and pressures which are easily accessed by industrial equipment. The reagent employed is inexpensive and non-hazardous, and generates a precipitate which is readily separated from the modified mica.

  12. A Platinum-Dithiolene Monoanionic Salt Exhibiting Multiproperties, Including Room-Temperature Proton-Dependent Solution Luminescence.

    PubMed

    Attar, Salahuddin; Espa, Davide; Artizzu, Flavia; Mercuri, M Laura; Serpe, Angela; Sessini, Elisa; Concas, Giorgio; Congiu, Francesco; Marchiò, Luciano; Deplano, Paola

    2016-06-01

    The platinum salt C[PtL2], where C = [(R)-Ph(Me)HC*-NMe3](+) and [PtL2](-) = radical monoanion based on [4', 5': 5, 6][1, 4]dithiino[2,3-b]quinoxaline-1',3'dithiolato, shows a variety of properties both in solution and in the solid state thanks to the electronic and/or structural features of the ligand. The complex crystallizes in the chiral space group P1 due to the presence of the enantiopure cation (R)-Ph(Me)HC*-NMe3(+), and it shows paramagnetic behavior relatable to the [PtL2](-) radical monoanion. This anionic complex is redox active and shows a strong near-infrared absorbance peak at 1085 nm tunable with the oxidation state of the complex. This complex exhibits a proton-dependent emission at 572 nm in solution at room temperature. The excitation band corresponds to the HOMO-1 (π-orbitals of the S2C2S2 system) → LUMO (π-orbitals of the quinoxaline and benzene-like moieties) transition suggesting that emission is mainly ligand centered in character. The luminescent properties are highly unusual, since the emission falls well above the energy of the lowest energy absorption (anti-Kasha behavior). Joint experimental and density functional theory (DFT) and time-dependent DFT studies are discussed to provide a satisfactory structure/property relationship. PMID:27163727

  13. Partitioning of mobile ions between ion exchange polymers and aqueous salt solutions: importance of counter-ion condensation.

    PubMed

    Kamcev, Jovan; Galizia, Michele; Benedetti, Francesco M; Jang, Eui-Soung; Paul, Donald R; Freeman, Benny D; Manning, Gerald S

    2016-02-17

    Equilibrium partitioning of ions between a membrane and a contiguous external solution strongly influences transport properties of polymeric membranes used for water purification and energy generation applications. This study presents a theoretical framework to quantitatively predict ion sorption from aqueous electrolytes (e.g., NaCl, MgCl2) into charged (i.e., ion exchange) polymers. The model was compared with experimental NaCl, MgCl2, and CaCl2 sorption data in commercial cation and anion exchange membranes. Ion sorption in charged polymers was modeled using a thermodynamic approach based on Donnan theory coupled with Manning's counter-ion condensation theory to describe non-ideal behavior of ions in the membrane. Ion activity coefficients in solution were calculated using the Pitzer model. The resulting model, with no adjustable parameters, provides remarkably good agreement with experimental values of membrane mobile salt concentration. The generality of the model was further demonstrated using literature data for ion sorption of various electrolytes in charged polymers, including HCl sorption in Nafion. PMID:26840776

  14. Ion pairing in aqueous lithium salt solutions with monovalent and divalent counter-anions.

    PubMed

    Pluhařová, Eva; Mason, Philip E; Jungwirth, Pavel

    2013-11-21

    Molecular dynamics simulations of concentrated aqueous solutions of LiCl and Li2SO4 were conducted in order to provide molecular insight into recent neutron scattering data. The structures predicted from the molecular dynamics simulations using standard nonpolarizable force fields provided a very poor fit to the experiment; therefore, refinement was needed. The electronic polarizability of the medium was effectively accounted for by implementing the electronic continuum correction, which practically means rescaling the ionic charges. Consistent with previous studies, we found that this approach in each case provided a significantly improved fit to the experimental data, which was further enhanced by slightly adjusting the radius of the lithium ion. The polarization effect was particularly pronounced in the Li2SO4 solution where the ions in the nonpolarizable simulations tended to cluster unphysically. With the above alterations, the employed force field displayed an excellent fit to the neutron scattering data and provided a useful interpretative framework for the experimental measurements. At the same time, the present study underlines the importance of solvent polarization effects in hydration of ions with high charge density. PMID:23581250

  15. Photoemission spectra of aqueous solutions of salts from many-body perturbation theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaiduk, Alex P.; Skone, Jonathan H.; Govoni, Marco; Galli, Giulia

    The computational design of electrode materials for energy conversion and storage processes requires an accurate description of the energy levels of the electrolyte and of electrolyte/electrode interfaces. Conventional density-functional approximations are in general not well suited for this task as they yield inaccurate orbital energies. Many-body perturbation theory (MBPT) predicts vertical ionization potentials and energy gaps in better agreement with experiments, providing the possibility for an accurate description of the electronic properties of electrolytes. We coupled ab initio molecular dynamics with MBPT calculations to investigate the photoemission spectra of a 1 M aqueous solution of NaCl. For the first time we were able to determine the absolute positions of the spectra peaks, with excellent agreement with experiments for both the solute and solvent peak positions. The best results were obtained using wavefunctions obtained from dielectric-dependent hybrid calculations as a starting point for MBPT. Work supported by DOE BES DE-SC0008938. Computer time provided by the Argonne Leadership Computing Facility through the INCITE program.

  16. Drug and vehicle deposition from topical applications: use of in vitro mass balance technique with minoxidil solutions.

    PubMed

    Tsai, J C; Cappel, M J; Flynn, G L; Weiner, N D; Kreuter, J; Ferry, J J

    1992-08-01

    The disposition of minoxidil and propylene glycol from topical solutions was measured by using an in vitro mass balance technique. The experimental approach included assessment of the following compartments of the skin and the diffusion cell as a function of time: (1) donor compartment; (2) hairless mouse skin surface, epidermis, and dermis; and (3) receiver compartment. Excellent mass balance was achieved for minoxidil at three doses. However, the recovery of propylene glycol depended on both application volume and time. The experiment involving the evaporation of propylene glycol and water from the propylene glycol:ethanol:water (20:60:20, v/v) mixture, which was placed in the well of a tissue culture plate at room temperature and 37 degrees C, substantiated the loss of vehicles to the air. When a thin application of 20 microL/cm2 was used, 60% of the propylene glycol was unaccounted for after 16 h. The evaporation of propylene glycol concentrated the solution to supersaturation, precipitated out the drug, and then stabilized the thermodynamic activity of the drug in the vehicle. The amount of formulation applied influences the rate of concentration and, thus, the time at which minoxidil precipitates. The precipitation limits the amount of minoxidil that can be absorbed and leads to poor percutaneous absorption of drug from the formulation. PMID:1403715

  17. Heat Transfer from Optically Excited Gold Nanostructures into Water, Sugar, and Salt Solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Green, Andrew J.

    coherence length associated with the liquid-liquid transition. The second topic will measure the change in heat dissipation with respect to solute adhesion onto the nanoheater. A small amount of aqueous solute molecules (1 solute molecule in 550 water molecules) dramatically increases the heat dissipation from a nanoparticle into the surrounding liquid. This result is consistent with a thermal conductance that is limited by an interface interaction where minority aqueous components significantly alter the surface properties and heat transport through the interface. The increase in heat dissipation can be used to make an extremely sensitive molecular detector that can be scaled to give single molecule detection without amplification or utilizing fluorescence labels.

  18. Spectroscopic Investigation of the Formation of Radiolysis By-Products By 13/9 MeV Linear Accelerator of Electrons (LAE) in Salt Solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Paviet-Hartmann, P.; Dziewinski, J.; Hartmann, T.; Marczak, S.; Lu, N.; Walthall, M.; Rafalski, A.; Zagorski, Z. P.

    2002-02-26

    In the near-field chemistry of a salt repository, the radiolytically-induced redox reactions in concentrated saline solution are of particular importance because the radiolysis of saline solutions results in oxidizing chlorine-containing species, which may oxidize actinide species to higher oxidation states. If the brines are irradiated, the solutions containing radiolytic species such as hypochlorite, hypochlorous acid or hydrogen peroxide, their pH and Eh may be altered. The oxidation and complexation states of actinides, which might be present in the salt brine, will change thus influencing their speciation and consequently their mobility. Furthermore, radiolytically formed oxidizing species such as ClO- or H2O2 may enhance the corrosion of the canister material. Therefore, radiation effects on salt brines must be integrated into the database, which described the chemical processes near a disposal site. Investigations in that context usually focus on the radiation chemistry of solid NaCl however our focus is on the radiolytic products, which are formed when salt brines are irradiated by a 10 MeV linear accelerator of electrons (LAE). We attempt to quantify the irradiation-induced formation of typical radiolysis by-products such as the hypochlorite ion (OCl-) by using a 13/9 MeV LAE with doses between 120 KGy to 216 KGy while monitoring the pH of the brine solutions.

  19. Use of a liter-scale microbial desalination cell as a platform to study bioelectrochemical desalination with salt solution or artificial seawater.

    PubMed

    Jacobson, Kyle S; Drew, David M; He, Zhen

    2011-05-15

    Bioelectrochemical desalination is potentially advantageous because of bioenergy production and integrated wastewater treatment and desalination. In this work, the performance and energy benefits of a liter-scale upflow microbial desalination cell (UMDC) were evaluated. The UMDC desalinated both salt solution (NaCl) and artificial seawater, and the removal rate of total dissolved solid (TDS) increased with an increased hydraulic retention time, although TDS reduction in artificial seawater was lower than that in salt solution. Our analysis suggested that electricity generation was a predominant factor in removing TDS (more than 70%), and that other factors, like water osmosis and unknown processes, also contributed to TDS reduction. It was more favorable given the high energy efficiency, when treating salt solution, to operate the UMDC under the condition of high power output compared with that of high current generation because of the amount of energy production; while high current generation was more desired with seawater desalination because of lower salinity in the effluent. Under the condition of the high power output and the assumption of the UMDC as a predesalination in connection with a reversal osmosis (RO) system, the UMDC could produce electrical energy that might potentially account for 58.1% (salt solution) and 16.5% (artificial seawater) of the energy required by the downstream RO system. Our results demonstrated the great potential of bioelectrochemical desalination. PMID:21526816

  20. SPECTROSCOPIC INVESTIGATION OF THE FORMATION OF RADIOLYSIS BY-PRODUCTS BY 13/9 MEV LINEAR ACCELERATOR OF ELECTRONS (LAE) IN SALT SOLUTIONS.

    SciTech Connect

    Paviet-Hartmann, P.; Dziewinski, J. J.; Marczak, Stanislaw; Lu, N.; Walthall, M.

    2001-01-01

    In the near-field chemistry of a salt repository, the radiolytically-induced redox reactions in concentrated saline solution are of particular importance because the radiolysis of saline solutions results in oxidizing chlorine-containing species, which may oxidize actinide species to higher oxidation states. If the brines are irradiated, the solutions containing radiolytic species such as hypochlorite, hypochlorous acid or hydrogen peroxide, their pH and Eh may be altered. The oxidation and complexation states of actinides, which might be present in the salt brine, will change thus influencing their speciation and consequently their mobility. Furthermore, radiolytically formed oxidizing species such as ClO- or H2O2 may enhance the corrosion of the canister material. Therefore, radiation effects on salt brines must be integrated into the database, which described the chemical processes near a disposal site. Investigations in that context usually focus on the radiation chemistry of solid NaCl however our focus is on the radiolytic products, which are formed when salt brines are irradiated by a 10 MeV linear accelerator of electrons (LAE). We attempt to quantify the irradiation-induced formation of typical radiolysis by-products such as the hypochlorite ion (OCl-) by using a 13/9 MeV LAE with doses between 120 KGy to 216 KGy while monitoring the pH of the brine solutions

  1. Studies on Nylon-66 membrane using aqueous solutions of potassium and lead nitrate salts as permeants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Manoj; Ram, Bali

    2015-03-01

    Measurements on hydrodynamic and electro-osmotic permeability of water and aqueous solutions of KNO3 and Pb(NO3)2 in the concentration (C) range of 10 -4 10^{-4} M to 10 -3 10^{-3} M are made across the Nylon-66 membrane. The data obtained are used to ascertain the form of transport equation using the theory of non-equilibrium thermodynamics. Conductance of membrane equilibrated with water and aqueous solutions are measured and the data are used to estimate phenomenological coefficients. These phenomenological coefficients are used to determine the average pore radius, the average number of pores and the membrane constant. Zeta potentials are evaluated using electro-osmotic permeability and membrane-permeant conductance data to understand the electrical nature of the membrane-permeant interface. It is observed that hydrodynamic permeability and electro-osmotic permeability depend linearly on the applied pressure difference and the potential difference, respectively.

  2. Water and solute transfer between a prairie wetland and adjacent uplands, 1. Water balance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayashi, Masaki; van der Kamp, Garth; Rudolph, Dave L.

    1998-06-01

    The hydrology and water quality of lakes and wetlands are controlled by the exchange of water and solutes with adjacent uplands. We studied a small catchment in Saskatchewan, Canada, to evaluate the mechanisms of water and solute transfer between the wetland and the surrounding upland. Detailed measurements of hydrologic processes (precipitation, runoff, evapotranspiration, and subsurface flow) and chloride distribution are combined to improve the estimate of the transfer flux. This paper describes hydrologic processes and Part 2 describes the solute transport processes. Large snowmelt runoff occurs in the catchment, which transfer 30-60% of winter precipitation on the upland into the wetland to form a pond in the center. Snowmelt water and summer precipitation infiltrate under the central pond. Infiltration accounts for 75% of water leaving the central pond and evapotranspiration accounts for 25%. Most of the infiltrated water flows laterally in the shallow subsurface to the wet margin of the pond and further to the upland, where it is consumed by evapotranspiration without recharging deep groundwater. The net recharge rate of the aquifer underlying the catchment is only 1-3 mm year -1. Snowmelt runoff transfers water from the upland to the wetland, and shallow subsurface flow transfers water in the opposite direction. When the two processes are combined, they provide the paths for cyclic transport of solutes.

  3. Effect of hyperosmotic solutions on salt excretion and thirst in rats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schoorlemmer, G. H.; Johnson, A. K.; Thunhorst, R. L.

    2000-01-01

    We investigated urinary changes and thirst induced by infusion of hyperosmotic solutions in freely moving rats. Intracarotid infusions of 0.3 M NaCl (4 ml/20 min, split between both internal carotid arteries) caused a larger increase in excretion of Na(+) and K(+) than intravenous infusions, indicating that cephalic sensors were involved in the response to intracarotid infusions. Intravenous and intracarotid infusions of hyperosmotic glycerol or urea (300 mM in 150 mM NaCl) had little or no effect, suggesting the sensors were outside the blood-brain barrier (BBB). Intracarotid infusion of hypertonic mannitol (300 mM in 150 mM NaCl) was more effective than intravenous infusion, suggesting that cell volume rather than Na(+) concentration of the blood was critical. Similarly, intracarotid infusion (2 ml/20 min, split between both sides), but not intravenous infusion of hypertonic NaCl or mannitol caused thirst. Hyperosmotic glycerol, infused intravenously or into the carotid arteries, did not cause thirst. We conclude that both thirst and electrolyte excretion depend on a cell volume sensor that is located in the head, but outside the BBB.

  4. Interfacial behavior of perchlorate versus chloride ions in saturated aqueous salt solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Ghosal, S; Kuo, I W; Baer, M D; Bluhm, H

    2009-04-14

    In recent years combination of theoretical and experimental work have presented a novel view of the aqueous interface wherein hard and/or multiply charged ions are excluded from the interface, but large polarizable anions show interfacial enhancement relative to the bulk. The observed trend in the propensity of anions to adsorb at the air/water interface appears to be reverse of the Hofmeister series for anions. This study focuses on experimental and theoretical examination of the partitioning behavior of perchlorate (ClO{sub 4}{sup -}) and chloride (Cl{sup -}) ions at the air/water interface. We have used ambient pressure X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy technique to directly probe the interfacial concentrations of ClO{sub 4}{sup -} and Cl{sup -} ions in sodium perchlorate and sodium chloride solutions, respectively. Experimental observations are compared with first principles molecular dynamics simulations. Both experimental and simulation results show enhancement of ClO{sub 4}{sup -} ion at the interface, compared with the absence of such enhancement in the case of Cl{sup -} ion. These observations are in agreement with the expected trend in the interfacial propensity of anions based on the Hofmeister series.

  5. Dissolution of nickel ferrite in aqueous solutions containing oxalic acid and ferrous salts

    SciTech Connect

    Figueroa, C.A.; Sileo, E.E.; Morando, P.J.; Blesa, M.A.

    2000-05-15

    The dissolution of nickel ferrite in oxalic acid and in ferrous oxalate-oxalic acid aqueous solution was studied. Nickel ferrite was synthesized by thermal decomposition of a mixed tartrate; the particles were shown to be coated with a thin ferric oxide layer. Dissolution takes place in two stages, the first one corresponding to the dissolution of the ferric oxide outer layer and the second one being the dissolution of Ni{sub 1.06}Fe{sub 1.96}O{sub 4}. The kinetics of dissolution during this first stage is typical of ferric oxides: in oxalic acid, both a ligand-assisted and a redox mechanism operates, whereas in the presence of ferrous ions, redox catalysis leads to a faster dissolution. The rate dependence on both oxalic acid and on ferrous ion is described by the Langmuir-Hinshelwood equation. In the second stage, Langmuir-Hinshelwood kinetics also describes the dissolution of iron and nickel from nickel ferrite. It may be concluded that oxalic acid operates to dissolve iron, and the ensuing disruption of the solid framework accelerates the release of nickel.

  6. Structure Formation in Salt-Free Solutions of Amphiphilic Sulfonated Polyelectrolytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bockstaller, Michael; Koehler, Werner

    2000-03-01

    Self-assembled systems have long attracted attention due to their practical importance in many technical and biological fields. Dodecyl-substituted poly(para-phenylen)sulfonates (abbreviated PPPS) are highly charged polyelectrolytes which in the uncharged state have been investigated extensively and an intrinsic persistence length of 15 nm has been reported. Due to their hydrophobic side chains, PPPS are compatible with water only as micellar aggregates and tend to form supramolecular structures even at concentrations as low as 10-5mol_mon.units/l. Because of the rodlike conformation of PPPS, this self-assembly leads to aggregates of anisotropic shape. Therefore, depolarized light scattering was employed to yield complementary information about structure and dynamics of these complex fluids. Aqueous solutions of PPPS at room temperature undergo a structural transition at a critical concentration of c_crit.=0.016 g/l. This transition is characterized by a strong increase of scattered intensity in forward direction and dynamic depolarized scattering. Above c_crit. the cylindrical micelles (L=310 nm, d=3.1 nm, N_radial=12) self assembly into large ellipsoidal clusters of size in the μ m range. Due to the strong increase of depolarized scattered intensity there has to be a preferential orientation of the micelles inside those clusters, which thus represent a lyotropic mesophase. By combining static and dynamic light scattering for the low q-range as well as small angle x-ray scattering for the higher q-range it is possible to determine size and shape of each aggregation step. Decreasing the molecular weight of the PPPS has profound influence on the micellar length and hence on c_crit. which is close to the overlap concentration (c ~ 1/L^3) allowing for the observation of the polyelectrolyte effect.

  7. Effects of flaxseed, raw soybeans and calcium salts of fatty acids on apparent total tract digestibility, energy balance and milk fatty acid profile of transition cows.

    PubMed

    Gandra, J R; Mingoti, R D; Barletta, R V; Takiya, C S; Verdurico, L C; Freitas, J E; Paiva, P G; Jesus, E F; Calomeni, G D; Rennó, F P

    2016-08-01

    Oilseeds offer some protection to the access of ruminal microorganisms and may be an alternative to calcium salts of fatty acids (FA), which are not fully inert in the ruminal environment. This study aimed to evaluate the effects of different sources of FA supplementation on apparent total tract nutrient digestibility, milk yield and composition, and energy balance (EB) of cows during the transition period and early lactation. We compared diets rich in C18:2 and C18:3 FA. Multiparous Holstein cows were randomly assigned to receive one of the four diets: control (n=11); whole flaxseed (WF, n=10), 60 and 80 g/kg (diet dry matter (DM) basis) of WF during the prepartum and postpartum periods, respectively; whole raw soybeans (WS, n=10), 120 and 160 g/kg (diet DM basis) of WS during the prepartum and postpartum periods, respectively; and calcium salts of unsaturated fatty acids (CSFA, n=11), 24 and 32 g/kg (diet DM basis) of CSFA during the prepartum and postpartum periods, respectively. Dry cows fed WF had higher DM and net energy of lactation (NEL) intake than those fed WS or CSFA. The FA supplementation did not alter DM and NDF apparent total tract digestibility, dry cows fed WF exhibited greater NDF total tract digestion than cows fed WS or CSFA. Feeding WS instead of CSFA did not alter NEL intake and total tract digestion of nutrients, but increased milk fat yield and concentration. Calculated efficiency of milk yield was not altered by diets. FA supplementation increased EB during the postpartum period. Experimental diets increased long-chain FA (saturated and unsaturated FA) in milk. In addition, cows fed WS and CSFA had higher C18:1 trans-11 FA and C18:2 cis, and lower C18:3 FA in milk than those fed WF. Furthermore, cows fed CSFA had higher C18:1 trans-11 and cis-9, trans-11 FA than cows fed WS. Although supplemental C18:2 and C18:3 FA did not influence the milk yield of cows, they positively affected EB and increased unsaturated long-chain FA in milk fat. PMID

  8. Water dynamics in salt solutions studied with ultrafast two-dimensional infrared (2D IR) vibrational echo spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Fayer, Michael D; Moilanen, David E; Wong, Daryl; Rosenfeld, Daniel E; Fenn, Emily E; Park, Sungnam

    2009-09-15

    with another pulse, the local oscillator. Heterodyne detection provides phase and amplitude information, which are both necessary to perform the two Fourier transforms that take the data from the time domain to a two-dimensional frequency domain spectrum. The time dependence of a series of 2D IR vibrational echo spectra provides direct information on system dynamics. Here, we use two types of 2D IR vibrational echo experiments to examine the influence that charged species have on water hydrogen-bond dynamics. Solutions of NaBr and NaBF(4) are studied. The NaBr solutions are studied as a function of the concentration using vibrational echo measurements of spectral diffusion and polarization-selective IR pump-probe measurements of orientational relaxation. Both types of measurements show the slowing of hydrogen-bond network structural evolution with an increasing salt concentration. NaBF(4) is studied using vibrational echo chemical-exchange spectroscopy. In these experiments, it is possible to directly observe the chemical exchange of water molecules switching their hydrogen-bond partners between BF(4)(-) and other water molecules. The results demonstrate that water interacting with ions has slower hydrogen-bond dynamics than pure water, but the slowing is a factor of 3 or 4 rather than orders of magnitude. PMID:19378969

  9. Studies of Quaternary saline lakes - III. Mineral, chemical, and isotopic evidence of salt solution and crystallization processes in Owens Lake, California, 1969-1971

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, George I.; Friedman, Irving; McLaughlin, Robert J.

    1987-04-01

    deposition, some salts reacted in situ to form other minerals in less than one month, and all salts (except halite) decomposed or recrystallized at least once in response to seasons. (3) Warming in early 1971 caused solution of all the mirabilite and some of the natron deposited a few months earlier, a deepening of the lake (though the lake-surface lowered), and an increase in dissolved solids. (4) Phase and solubility-index data suggest that at the close of desiccation, Na 2CO 3·7H 2O, never reported as a mineral, could have been the next phase to crystallize.

  10. Studies of Quaternary saline lakes-III. Mineral, chemical, and isotopic evidence of salt solution and crystallization processes in Owens Lake, California, 1969-1971

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Smith, G.I.; Friedman, I.; McLaughlin, R.J.

    1987-01-01

    deposition, some salts reacted in situ to form other minerals in less than one month, and all salts (except halite) decomposed or recrystallized at least once in response to seasons. (3) Warming in early 1971 caused solution of all the mirabilite and some of the natron deposited a few months earlier, a deepening of the lake (though the lake-surface lowered), and an increase in dissolved solids. (4) Phase and solubility-index data suggest that at the close of desiccation, Na2CO3??7H2O, never reported as a mineral, could have been the next phase to crystallize. ?? 1987.

  11. Effects of 1.5% glycine solution with and without 1% ethanol on the fluid balance in elderly men.

    PubMed

    Hahn, R G; Stalberg, H P; Ekengren, J; Rundgren, M

    1991-11-01

    Ten male patients scheduled for transurethral prostatic resection (aged 57-79) were given irrigating fluid by intravenous infusion at 50 ml.min-1 over 20 min. Each patient was subjected to two infusions: 1.5% glycine in water on one occasion, and the same solution but with 1% ethanol added on the other. Urine and blood samples were collected at regular intervals for up to 2 h after infusion, and the changes in the distribution of water and electrolytes between fluid compartments were calculated. Transient prickling skin sensations were frequently reported effects of the infusions. Two patients experienced visual disturbances. There were no changes in the blood ammonia and plasma vasopressin levels. During the infusions, the estimated blood volume and the total plasma sodium and potassium content increased. The solutions produced osmotic diuresis with increased urinary excretion of water and electrolytes. After ending the fluid administration, blood volume was rapidly restored. Over the following 120 min the irrigant water was redistributed intracellularly or removed by urinary excretion. The addition of ethanol did not alter the overall effects of glycine solution on the fluid balance. PMID:1722375

  12. Atomistic molecular dynamics simulations of the structure of symmetric Polyelectrolyte block copolymer micelle in salt-free aqueous solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chockalingam, Rajalakshmi; Natarajan, Upendra

    2014-03-01

    The structure of a symmetric polystyrene- b - poly(acrylic acid) (PS- b - PAA) micelle in salt-free aqueous solution as a function of degree-of-neutralization (or ionization, f) of the PAA is studied via explicit-atom-ion MD simulations, for the first time for a polyelectrolyte block copolymer in a polar solvent. Micelle size increases with fin agreement with experimental observations in literature, due to extension of PAA at higher ionization. Pair RDF's with respect to water oxygens show that corona-water interaction becomes stronger with f due to an increase in number density of carboxylate (COO-) groups on the chain. Water-PAA coordination (carboxylate O's) increases with ionization. H-bonding between PAA and water increases with f due to greater extent of corona-water affinity. With increase in f, atom and counter-ion ρ profiles confirm extension of corona blocks and micelle existing in the ``osmotic regime,'' and a decrease in scattering peak intensity, in agreement with neutron scattering experiments and mean-field theory in literature. Inter-chain distance in PS core is found to decrease with ionization. Macromolecular Simulation and Modeling Laboratory, Dept. of Chemical Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology Madras, Chennai 600036.

  13. Monte Carlo simulation for the potential of mean force between ionic colloids in solutions of asymmetric salts

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, J.Z.; Bratko, D.; Blanch, H.W.; Prausnitz, J.M. |

    1999-10-01

    A new technique for Monte Carlo sampling of the hard-sphere collision force has been applied to study the interaction between a pair of spherical macroions in primitive-model electrolyte solutions with valences 1:2, 2:1, and 2:2. Macroions of the same charge can attract each other in the presence of divalent counterions, in analogy with earlier observations for planar and cylindrical geometries. The attraction is most significant at intermediate counterion concentrations. In contrast to the entropic depletion force between neutral particles, attraction between macroions is of energetic origin. The entropic contribution to the potential of mean force is generally repulsive at conditions corresponding to aqueous colloids with or without salt. For systems with divalent counterions, the potentials of mean force predicted by mean-field approximations like the Derjaguin{endash}Landau{endash}Verwey{endash}Overbeek (DLVO) theory or the Sogami{endash}Ise (SI) theory are qualitatively different from those observed in the simulations. However, for systems with monovalent counterions, predictions of DLVO theory are in fair agreement with simulation results. {copyright} {ital 1999 American Institute of Physics.}

  14. A better GRACE solution for improving the regional Greenland mass balance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schrama, E.; Xu, Z.

    2012-04-01

    In most GRACE based researches, a variety of smoothing methods is employed to remove alternating bands of positive and negative stripes stretching in the north-south direction. Many studies have suggested to smooth the GRACE maps, on which mass variations are represented as equivalent water height (EWH). Such maps are capable of exposing the redistribution of earth surface mass over time. In Greenland the shrinking of the ice cap becomes significant in the last decade. Our present study confirms that the dominating melting trends are in the east and southeast coastal zones, however, the smoothed signals along the coastline in these areas do not represent the original but averaged measurements from GRACE satellites which means the signal strength indicating that negative mass variations are mixed with some positive signals that are very close to this area. An exact identification of the topographic edge is not possible and visually the EWH maps appear to be blurred. To improve this, we firstly used spherical harmonic coefficients of GRACE level-2 data from CSR-RL04 and produced a smoothed EWH map. Empirical Orthogonal Functions(EOF)/Principal Component Analysis(PCA) have been introduced as well, in order to extract the melting information associated with the recent warming climate. Next, the Greenland area is redefined by 16 basins and the corresponding melting zones are quantified respectively. Least Squares methods are invoked to interpolate the mass distribution function on each basin. In this way we are able to estimate more accurately regional ice melting rate and we sharpen the EWH map. After comparing our results with a hydrological model the combination SMB - D is established which contains the surface mass balance (SMB) and ice-discharge (D). A general agreement can be reached and it turns out this method is capable to enhance our understanding of the shrinking global cryosphere

  15. Salt-Induced Universal Slowing Down of the Short-Time Self-Diffusion of a Globular Protein in Aqueous Solution

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Grimaldo, Marco; Roosen-Runge, Felix; Hennig, Marcus; Zanini, Fabio; Zhang, Fajun; Zamponi, Michaela; Jalarvo, Niina; Schreiber, Frank; Seydel, Tilo

    2015-06-17

    The short-time self-diffusion D of the globular model protein bovine serum albumin in aqueous (D2O) solutions has been measured comprehensively as a function of the protein and trivalent salt (YCl3) concentration, noted cp and cs, respectively. We observe that D follows a universal master curve D(cs,cp) = D(cs = 0,cp) g(cs/cp), where D(cs= 0,cp) is the diffusion coefficient in the absence of salt and g(cs/cp) is a scalar function solely depending on the ratio of the salt and protein concentration. This observation is consistent with a universal scaling of the bonding probability in a picture of cluster formation of patchymore » particles. In conclusion, the finding corroborates the predictive power of the description of proteins as colloids with distinct attractive ion-activated surface patches.« less

  16. Electrical conductivity of polyelectrolyte solutions in the presence of added salt: The role of the solvent quality factor in light of a scaling approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bordi, F.; Cametti, C.; Gili, T.

    2003-07-01

    The effects of added salt on the electrical conductivity behavior of a polyelectrolyte solution are described in light of the scaling approach recently proposed by Dobrynin and Rubinstein [Macromolecules 28, 1859 (1995); 32, 915 (1999)], taking into account the influence of the solvent quality factor. The coupling between the conformation of the chain and the local charge distribution, giving rise to different conductometric behaviors, has been investigated under different conditions, in a wide concentration range of added salt. The polyion equivalent conductances λp have been evaluated in different concentration regimes for a hydrophilic polyion in good solvent condition and compared with the experimental values obtained from electrical conductivity measurements. The agreement is rather good in the wide range of concentration of the added salt investigated. In the case of poor solvent conditions, we find the appropriate expressions for the electrical conductivity when the polyion chain consists into collapsed beads alternating with stretched segments in the framework of the necklace globule model.

  17. Salt-Induced Universal Slowing Down of the Short-Time Self-Diffusion of a Globular Protein in Aqueous Solution.

    PubMed

    Grimaldo, Marco; Roosen-Runge, Felix; Hennig, Marcus; Zanini, Fabio; Zhang, Fajun; Zamponi, Michaela; Jalarvo, Niina; Schreiber, Frank; Seydel, Tilo

    2015-07-01

    The short-time self-diffusion D of the globular model protein bovine serum albumin in aqueous (D2O) solutions has been measured comprehensively as a function of the protein and trivalent salt (YCl3) concentration, noted cp and cs, respectively. We observe that D follows a universal master curve D(cs,cp) = D(cs = 0,cp) g(cs/cp), where D(cs = 0,cp) is the diffusion coefficient in the absence of salt and g(cs/cp) is a scalar function solely depending on the ratio of the salt and protein concentration. This observation is consistent with a universal scaling of the bonding probability in a picture of cluster formation of patchy particles. The finding corroborates the predictive power of the description of proteins as colloids with distinct attractive ion-activated surface patches. PMID:26266736

  18. Designing Solutions for the Retirement System – In Search of Balance between Economy and Health

    PubMed Central

    Romaniuk, Piotr; Brukało, Katarzyna

    2016-01-01

    Social security system currently faces a number of difficulties arising of changes in the demographic structure of societies, like the decrease in fertility, lengthening of life expectancy, and unfavorable change in the proportion of the population receiving retirement benefits to the population in working age. In result, social security systems are being subjected to transition aimed at securing their financial stability, part of which is a tendency to rise the retirement age and eliminate all the incentives to prematurely exit the labor market. On the other hand, this process of transition, as observed in Poland, is being driven mainly by political processes and due to economic reasons, while lacking public health evidence. This raises a danger that in final result the financial savings will be illusory only and that the final configuration of the system will be inconsistent with the actual social needs of the population and will not efficiently protect against the social risks. In this article, we present arguments for using the Healthy Life Years indicator in analyses relating to the performance of social security systems. The indicator may help to reflect differences in health status of different professional groups and adjust system’s solutions to conditions characterizing these groups, in terms of both risk protection and prevention.

  19. Tipping Points and Balancing Acts: Grand Challenges and Synergistic Opportunities of Integrating Research and Education, Science and Solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCaffrey, M. S.; Stroeve, J. C.

    2011-12-01

    thousands of US high schools that integrate climate science and solutions in a way that inspires and informs youth, and similar programs exist internationally. Other approaches to prepare vulnerable communities, especially young people, for natural hazards and human-induced environmental change include programs such as Plan International's "Child Centered Disaster Risk Reduction- Building Resilience Through Participation," and their "Weathering the Storm" project, focusing on integrating the needs of teenage girls with climate change adaptation and risk reduction. While minimizing global environmental and climate change is crucial, these and related programs that weave research with education, science with solutions offer the potential for addressing the "Grand Challenges" by better preparing for societal and environmental tipping points through a more balanced and integrated approach to addressing change."

  20. Laboratory studies of the low-temperature deliquescence of calcium chloride salts: Relevance to aqueous solutions on Mars and in the Antarctic Dry Valleys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gough, R. V.; Chevrier, V.; Tolbert, M. A.

    2013-12-01

    There is significant interest in the possible existence of liquid water on current Mars. This water would likely exist as a brine in order to be stable on Mars today. It has been proposed that soil salts could form aqueous solutions through either the melting of ice by low-eutectic salts, or by the deliquescence of hygroscopic salts present in the Martian soil. The focus thus far has largely been on perchlorate species, which can melt ice at temperatures as low as 206 K and can deliquesce at relative humidity values as low as 38% RH. A Mars-relevant salt that has been neglected thus far is calcium chloride (CaCl2). Calcium has been reported to be an abundant cation at the Phoenix landing site and Mars Science Laboratory instruments have recently identified calcium as well. Simulations suggest subsurface CaCl2 is an ideal candidate to produce brines with seasonality consistent with observed recurring slope lineae (RSL) (Chevrier et al., 2012). Finally, the only terrestrial site where RSL-like features have been observed (near Don Juan Pond in the Antarctic Dry Valleys) contains abundant CaCl2. These seasonal slope streaks are thought to form when CaCl2 in the soil deliquesces due to contact with atmospheric water vapor (Dickson et al., 2013). It is important to understand how this CaCl2 interacts with water vapor at low temperatures relevant to Mars and the Martian analog sites. Here we use a Raman microscope and environmental cell to monitor the low-temperature (223 - 273 K) deliquescence (solid to aqueous phase transition) and efflorescence (aqueous to solid phase transition) of three hydration states of CaCl2 (dihydrate, tetrahydrate, hexahydrate). We have found that the deliquescence relative humidity (DRH) increases with increasing hydration state, which is an expected result. Average DRH values over the temperature range studied are 20.0 × 2.6% RH for the dihydrate, 31.8 × 6.3% RH for the tetrahydrate and 60.7 × 1.6% RH for the hexahydrate. Once the aqueous

  1. Molten salt technology

    SciTech Connect

    Lovering, D.G.

    1982-01-01

    In this volume, the historical background, scope, problems, economics, and future applications of molten salt technologies are discussed. Topics presented include molten salts in primary production of aluminum, general principles and handling and safety of the alkali metals, first-row transition metals, group VIII metals and B-group elements, solution electrochemistry, transport phenomena, corrosion in different molten salts, cells with molten salt electrolytes and reactants, fuel cell design, hydrocracking and liquefaction, heat storage in phase change materials, and nuclear technologies.

  2. Factors affecting acid neutralizing capacity in the Adirondack region of New York: a solute mass balance approach.

    PubMed

    Ito, Mari; Mitchell, Myron J; Driscoll, Charles T; Roy, Karen M

    2005-06-01

    -watersheds with low DOC (IV) were probably due to the mobilization of Al as an ANC source in these watersheds that were highly sensitive to strong acid inputs. Our analysis of various drainage lakes across the Adirondacks on the basis of solute mass balances, coupled with the use of a lake classification system and GIS data, demonstrates that the lake-watersheds characterized by shallow deposits of glacial till are highly sensitive to acidic deposition not only in the southwestern Adirondack region where previous field-based studies were intensively conducted but also across the entire Adirondack region. Moreover, the supply of organic acids and Al mobilization substantially modify the acid-base status of surface waters. PMID:15984785

  3. Condensation of Self-Assembled Lyotropic Chromonic Liquid Crystal Sunset Yellow in Aqueous Solutions Crowded with Polyethylene Glycol and Doped with Salt

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Heung-Shik; Kang, Shin-Woong; Tortora, Luana; Kumar, Satyendra; Lavrentovich, Oleg D.

    2012-10-10

    We use optical and fluorescence microscopy, densitometry, cryo-transmission electron microscopy (cryo-TEM), spectroscopy, and synchrotron X-ray scattering to study the phase behavior of the reversible self-assembled chromonic aggregates of an anionic dye Sunset Yellow (SSY) in aqueous solutions crowded with an electrically neutral polymer polyethylene glycol (PEG) and doped with the salt NaCl. PEG causes the isotropic SSY solutions to condense into a liquid-crystalline region with a high concentration of SSY aggregates, coexisting with a PEG-rich isotropic (I) region. PEG added to the homogeneous nematic (N) phase causes separation into the coexisting N and I domains; the SSY concentration in the N domains is higher than the original concentration of PEG-free N phase. Finally, addition of PEG to the highly concentrated homogeneous N phase causes separation into the coexisting columnar hexagonal (C) phase and I phase. This behavior can be qualitatively explained by the depletion (excluded volume) effects that act at two different levels: at the level of aggregate assembly from monomers and short aggregates and at the level of interaggregate packing. We also show a strong effect of a monovalent salt NaCl on phase diagrams that is different for high and low concentrations of SSY. Upon the addition of salt, dilute I solutions of SSY show appearance of the condensed N domains, but the highly concentrated C phase transforms into a coexisting I and N domains. We suggest that the salt-induced screening of electric charges at the surface of chromonic aggregates leads to two different effects: (a) increase of the scission energy and the contour length of aggregates and (b) decrease of the persistence length of SSY aggregates.

  4. Modelling the dynamics of fish contamination by Chernobyl radiocaesium: an analytical solution based on potassium mass balance.

    PubMed

    Koulikov, Alexei O; Meili, Markus

    2003-01-01

    After the sudden fallout from the Chernobyl nuclear accident in 1986, activities and bioaccumulation factors of radiocaesium ((137)Cs, (134)Cs) fluctuated strongly over several years before reaching quasi-equilibrium, with patterns significantly differing among organisms. To model these dynamic relaxation processes based on ecological mechanisms we developed mass balance equations for (137)Cs in an aquatic food chain on the following basis: (a). potassium acts as a biogeochemical analogue ("carrier") of caesium; (b). the concentration of potassium in fish and other animals is effectively constant; (c). the main source of potassium in freshwater fish is the dietary uptake. The model is applicable to linear food chains of any number of trophic levels, while solutions evaluated here include the following food chain compartments: water, invertebrates (fish food), non-piscivorous fish, and piscivorous fish. The activity concentration in the water, which is considered as the secondary source of (137)Cs, is described by multi-component first-order decay function, although two components (fast and slow) are often sufficient to provide agreement with empirical data. In every compartment the turnover rate of caesium is considered as a constant over time. The analytical solution of the model equations describes the (137)Cs activity concentration in every compartment as a series of exponential functions, of which some are derived from the source pattern, and the others determined by the (137)Cs turnover rate in each food chain compartment. The model was tested with post-Chernobyl data from several long-term studies in lakes and provided a reasonable description of important radioecological aspects. PMID:12600762

  5. Alloy 22 Localized Corrosion Susceptibility In Aqueous Solutions Of Chloride And Nitrate Salts Of Sodium And Potassium At 110 - 150?C

    SciTech Connect

    Felker, S; Hailey, P D; Lian, T; Staggs, K J; Gdowski, G E

    2006-01-17

    Alloy 22 (a nickel-chromium-molybdenum-tungsten alloy) is being investigated for use as the outer barrier of waste containers for a high-level nuclear waste repository in the thick unsaturated zone at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. Experiments were conducted to assess crevice corrosion of Alloy 22 in de-aerated aqueous solutions of chloride and nitrate salts of potassium and sodium in the temperature range 110-150 C (some limited testing was also conducted at 90 C). Electrochemical tests were run in neutral salt solutions without acid addition and others were run in salt solutions with an initial hydrogen ion concentration of 10{sup -4} molal. The Alloy 22 specimens were weld prism specimens and de-aeration was performed with nitrogen gas. No evidence of crevice corrosion was observed in the range 125-150 C. In the 120 to 160 C temperature range, the anionic concentration of stable aqueous solutions is dominated by nitrate relative to chloride. At nominally 120 C, the minimum nitrate to chloride ratio is about 4.5, and it increases to about 22 at nominally 155 C. The absence of localized corrosion susceptibility in these solutions is attributed to the known inhibiting effect of the nitrate anion. At 110 C, aqueous solutions can have dissolved chloride in excess of nitrate. Localized corrosion was observed at nitrate to chloride ratios up to 1.0, the highest ratio tested. The extent of localized corrosion was confined to the crevice region of the samples, and was limited for nitrate to chloride ratios greater than or equal to 0.3. Aqueous solution chemistry studies indicate that nitrate to chloride ratios of less than 0.5 are possible for temperatures up to nominally 116 C. However, the exact upper temperature limit is unknown and no electrochemical testing was done at these temperatures. Limited comparison between 8 m Cl aqueous solutions of Na + K on the one hand and Ca on the other indicated similar electrochemical E{sub crit} values and similar morphology of attack

  6. Cumulates, Dykes and Pressure Solution in the Ice-Salt Mantle of Europa: Geological Consequences of Pressure Dependent Liquid Compositions and Volume Changes During Ice-Salt Melting Reactions.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Day, S.; Asphaug, E.; Bruesch, L.

    2002-12-01

    Water-salt analogue experiments used to investigate cumulate processes in silicate magmas, along with observations of sea ice and ice shelf behaviour, indicate that crystal-melt separation in water-salt systems is a rapid and efficient process even on scales of millimetres and minutes. Squeezing-out of residual melts by matrix compaction is also predicted to be rapid on geological timescales. We predict that the ice-salt mantle of Europa is likely to be strongly stratified, with a layered structure predictable from density and phase relationships between ice polymorphs, aqueous saline solutions and crystalline salts such as hydrated magnesium sulphates (determined experimentally by, inter alia, Hogenboom et al). A surface layer of water ice flotation cumulate will be separated from denser salt cumulates by a cotectic horizon. This cotectic horizon will be both the site of subsequent lowest-temperature melting and a level of neutral buoyancy for the saline melts produced. Initial melting will be in a narrow depth range owing to increasing melting temperature with decreasing pressure: the phase relations argue against direct melt-though to the surface unless vesiculation occurs. Overpressuring of dense melts due to volume expansion on cotectic melting is predicted to lead to lateral dyke emplacement and extension above the dyke tips. Once the liquid leaves the cotectic, melting of water ice will involve negative volume change. Impact-generated melts will drain downwards through the fractured zones beneath crater floors. A feature in the complex crater Mannan'an, with elliptical ring fractures around a conical depression with a central pit, bears a close resemblance to Icelandic glacier collapse cauldrons produced by subglacial eruptions. Other structures resembling Icelandic cauldrons occur along Europan banded structures, while resurgence of ice rubble within collapse structures may produce certain types of chaos region. More general contraction of the ice mantle

  7. Experimental Microbiology of Saturated Salt Solutions and Other Harsh Environments. III. Growth of Salt-Tolerant Penicillium notatum in Boron-Rich Media 1

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, Karen; Siegel, S. M.

    1967-01-01

    A stress-tolerant strain of Penicillium notatum, isolated by passage through a nutrient solution saturated with calcium acetate, was found to have a tolerance to boron in several states of oxidation. Growth in the presence of elementary boron, saturating amounts of boric acid, and with various concentrations of sodium borohydride was observed and mycelial mats were spectrographically analyzed for boron accumulation. PMID:6076112

  8. Efficacy of a solution-based approach for making sodalite waste forms for an oxide reduction salt utilized in the reprocessing of used uranium oxide fuel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riley, Brian J.; Pierce, David A.; Frank, Steven M.; Matyáš, Josef; Burns, Carolyne A.

    2015-04-01

    This paper describes the various approaches evaluated for making solution-derived sodalite with a LiCl-Li2O oxide reduction salt selected to dissolve used uranium oxide fuel so the uranium can be recovered and recycled. The approaches include modified sol-gel and solution-based synthesis processes. As-made products were mixed with 5 and 10 mass% of a Na2O-B2O3-SiO2 glass binder and these, along with product without a binder, were heated using either a cold-press-and-sinter method or hot uniaxial pressing. The results demonstrate the limitation of sodalite yield due to the fast intermediate reactions between Na+ and Cl- to form halite in solution and Li2O and SiO2 to form lithium silicates (e.g., Li2SiO3 or Li2Si2O5) in the calcined and sintered pellets. The results show that pellets can be made with high sodalite fractions in the crystalline product (∼92 mass%) and low porosities using a solution-based approach and this LiCl-Li2O salt but that the incorporation of Li into the sodalite is low.

  9. Groundwater fluxes in a shallow seasonal wetland pond: The effect of bathymetric uncertainty on predicted water and solute balances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trigg, Mark A.; Cook, Peter G.; Brunner, Philip

    2014-09-01

    The successful management of groundwater dependent shallow seasonal wetlands requires a sound understanding of groundwater fluxes. However, such fluxes are hard to quantify. Water volume and solute mass balance models can be used in order to derive an estimate of groundwater fluxes within such systems. This approach is particularly attractive, as it can be undertaken using measurable environmental variables, such as; rainfall, evaporation, pond level and salinity. Groundwater fluxes estimated from such an approach are subject to uncertainty in the measured variables as well as in the process representation and in parameters within the model. However, the shallow nature of seasonal wetland ponds means water volume and surface area can change rapidly and non-linearly with depth, requiring an accurate representation of the wetland pond bathymetry. Unfortunately, detailed bathymetry is rarely available and simplifying assumptions regarding the bathymetry have to be made. However, the implications of these assumptions are typically not quantified. We systematically quantify the uncertainty implications for eight different representations of wetland bathymetry for a shallow seasonal wetland pond in South Australia. The predictive uncertainty estimation methods provided in the Model-Independent Parameter Estimation and Uncertainty Analysis software (PEST) are used to quantify the effect of bathymetric uncertainty on the modelled fluxes. We demonstrate that bathymetry can be successfully represented within the model in a simple parametric form using a cubic Bézier curve, allowing an assessment of bathymetric uncertainty due to measurement error and survey detail on the derived groundwater fluxes compared with the fixed bathymetry models. Findings show that different bathymetry conceptualisations can result in very different mass balance components and hence process conceptualisations, despite equally good fits to observed data, potentially leading to poor management

  10. Degradation of the herbicide 2, 4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D) dimethylamine salt by gamma radiation from cobalt-60 in aqueous solution containing humic acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campos, Sandro X.; Vieira, Eny M.; Cordeiro, Paulo J. M.; Rodrigues-Fo, Edson; Murgu, Michael

    2003-12-01

    In this study, gamma radiation from cobalt-60 was used to degrade the herbicide 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D) dimethylamine salt in water in the presence of humic acid. The 2,4-D dimethylamine salt 1.13×10 -4 mol dm -3 solution was irradiated with different doses. HPLC was used as an analytical technique to determine the degradation rate of herbicide studied. The results showed that the herbicide was completely degraded at an absorbed dose of 3 kGy. Degradation decreased when humic acid was added to all the doses. ESI/MS and MS/MS were used to identify the radiolytic degradation products. A fragmentation path for production of 4.6-dichlororesorcinol, is suggested. The radiolytic yields ( G) were calculated.

  11. A Hypermedia Environment To Explore and Negotiate Students' Conceptions: Animation of the Solution Process of Table Salt.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ebenezer, Jazlin V.

    2001-01-01

    Describes the characteristics and values of hypermedia for learning chemistry. Reports on how a hypermedia environment was used to explore a group of 11th grade chemistry students' conceptions of table salt dissolving in water. Indicates that a hypermedia environment can be used to explore, negotiate, and assess students' conceptions of…

  12. Lorentz Force on Sodium and Chlorine Ions in a Salt Water Solution Flow under a Transverse Magnetic Field

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    De Luca, R.

    2009-01-01

    It is shown that, by applying elementary concepts in electromagnetism and electrochemistry to a system consisting of salt water flowing in a thin rectangular pipe at an average velocity v[subscript A] under the influence of a transverse magnetic field B[subscript 0], an electromotive force generator can be conceived. In fact, the Lorentz force…

  13. Basic trends and chief products in the electrolysis of methanolic solutions of monomethyl adipate and its alkali salts

    SciTech Connect

    Shul'zhenko, G.I.; Freidlin, G.N.; Kovsman, E.P.; Vasil'ev, Yu. B.

    1986-08-01

    Preparative electrolysis under galvanostatic conditions was used to study the effect of the principal adjustable process parameters, such as temperature, the water content of the original electrolyte, current density, electrolysis time, and the concentration of monoester salt, on the formation of methyl valerate and methyl allylacetate. The character of the influence of these parameters was established.

  14. Analytical chemistry of aluminum salt cake

    SciTech Connect

    Graczyk, D.G.; Essling, A.M.; Huff, E.A.; Smith, F.P.; Snyder, C.T.

    1997-02-01

    Component phases of Al salt cake or products from processing salt cake, resist dissolution, a key first step in most analysis procedures. In this work (analysis support to a study of conversion of salt cake fines to value-added oxide products), analysis methods were adapted or devised for determining leachable salt, total halides (Cl and F), Al metal, and elemental composition. Leaching of salt cake fines was by ultrasonic agitation with deionized water. The leachate was analyzed for anions by ion chromatography and for cations by ICP-atomic emission spectroscopy. Only chloride could be measured in the anions, and charge balances between cations and chloride were near unity, indicating that all major dissolved species were chloride salts. For total halides, the chloride and fluorides components were first decomposed by KOH fusion, and the dissolved chloride and fluoride were measured by ion chromatography. Al metal in the fines was determined by a hydrogen evolution procedure adapted for submilligram quantities of metallic Al: the Al was reacted with HCl in a closed system containing a measured amount of high-purity He. After reaction, the H/He ratio was measured by mass spectroscopy. Recoveries of Al metal standards (about 30mg) averaged 93%. Comparison of the acid evolution with caustic reaction of the Al metal showed virtually identical results, but reaction was faster in the acid medium. Decomposition of the salt cake with mineral acids left residues that had to be dissolved by fusion with Na carbonate. Better dissolution was obtained by fusing the salt cake with Li tetraborate; the resulting solution could be used for accurate Al assay of salt cake materials by classical 8-hydroxyquinolate gravimetry.

  15. Efficacy of a solution-based approach for making sodalite waste forms for an oxide reduction salt utilized in the reprocessing of used uranium oxide fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Riley, Brian J.; Pierce, David A.; Frank, Steven M.; Matyáš, Josef; Burns, Carolyne A.

    2015-04-01

    This paper describes the various approaches attempted to make solution-derived sodalite with a LiCl-Li2O oxide reduction salt used to dissolve used uranium oxide fuel so the uranium can be recovered and recycled. The approaches include modified sol-gel and solutionbased synthesis processes. As-made products were mixed with 5 and 10 mass% of a Na2O-B2O3- SiO2 glass binder and these, along with product without a binder, were heated using either a cold-press-and-sinter method or hot uniaxial pressing. The results demonstrate the limitation of sodalite yield due to the fast intermediate reactions between Na+ and Cl- to form halite in solution and Li2O and SiO2 to form lithium silicates (e.g., Li2SiO3 or Li2Si2O5) in the calcined and sintered pellets. The results show that pellets can be made with high sodalite fractions in the crystalline product (~92 mass%) and low porosities using a solution-based approach and this LiCl-Li2O salt but that the incorporation of Li into the sodalite is low.

  16. Efficacy of a solution-based approach for making sodalite waste forms for an oxide reduction salt utilized in the reprocessing of used uranium oxide fuel

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Riley, Brian J.; Pierce, David A.; Frank, Steven M.; Matyáš, Josef; Burns, Carolyne A.

    2015-04-01

    This paper describes the various approaches attempted to make solution-derived sodalite with a LiCl-Li2O oxide reduction salt used to dissolve used uranium oxide fuel so the uranium can be recovered and recycled. The approaches include modified sol-gel and solutionbased synthesis processes. As-made products were mixed with 5 and 10 mass% of a Na2O-B2O3- SiO2 glass binder and these, along with product without a binder, were heated using either a cold-press-and-sinter method or hot uniaxial pressing. The results demonstrate the limitation of sodalite yield due to the fast intermediate reactions between Na+ and Cl- to form halite in solution and Li2Omore » and SiO2 to form lithium silicates (e.g., Li2SiO3 or Li2Si2O5) in the calcined and sintered pellets. The results show that pellets can be made with high sodalite fractions in the crystalline product (~92 mass%) and low porosities using a solution-based approach and this LiCl-Li2O salt but that the incorporation of Li into the sodalite is low.« less

  17. Efficacy of a Solution-Based Approach for Making Sodalite Waste Forms for an Oxide Reduction Salt Utilized in the Reprocessing of Used Uranium Oxide Fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Riley, Brian J.; Pierce, David A.; Frank, Steven M.; Matyas, Josef; Burns, Carolyn A.

    2015-04-01

    This paper describes various approaches for making sodalite with a LiCl-Li2O oxide reduction salt used to recover uranium from used oxide fuel. The approaches include sol-gel and solution-based synthesis processes. As-made products were mixed with 5 and 10 mass% of a Na2O-B2O3-SiO2 glass binder and these, along with product without a binder, were heated using either a cold-press-and-sinter method or hot uniaxial pressing. The results demonstrate the limitation of sodalite yield due to the fast intermediate reactions between Na+ and Cl- to form halite in solution and Li2O and SiO2 to form lithium silicates (e.g., Li2SiO3 or Li2Si2O5) in the calcined and sintered pellets. The results show that pellets can be made with high sodalite fractions (~92 mass%) and low porosities using a solution-based approach and this LiCl-Li2O salt.

  18. Swelling and Surface Interactions of End-Grafted Poly(2-vinylpyridine) Layers in Acidic Solution: Influence of Grafting Density and Salt Concentration.

    PubMed

    Elmahdy, Mahdy M; Drechsler, Astrid; Uhlmann, Petra; Stamm, Manfred

    2016-06-01

    In previous studies, the authors found that end-grafted layers of the weak polybase poly(2-vinylpyridine) (P2VP) in aqueous solutions do not only swell and collapse if the pH value and salt concentration are varied but also exhibit a pH- and salinity-dependent adhesion to microsized silica spheres. For a better understanding of these effects, in situ force measurements using the AFM colloidal probe technique were applied to end-grafted P2VP layers of different grafting densities in NaCl solutions at pH 2.5. Although a mushroom-to-brush transition could be seen in the dry state, the layers were in the brush regime in aqueous solutions at all NaCl concentrations and grafting densities. We observed an increase of the brush height with increasing grafting density and a salinity-dependent collapse and reswelling of the brushes. The adhesion between the P2VP layer and a silica sphere depended on both grafting density and salinity. At low salt concentrations, the adhesion reached its highest value at the intermediate grafting density and disappeared with denser brushes. Maximum adhesion was obtained for high NaCl concentrations and the lowest grafting density. From a detailed analysis of the experiments, we gained insight into chain stretching and density profiles under complex ionic conditions and into the mechanism of adhesion of polyelectrolytes to solid surfaces. PMID:27172173

  19. Data on energy-band-gap characteristics of composite nanoparticles obtained by modification of the amorphous potassium polytitanate in aqueous solutions of transition metal salts.

    PubMed

    Zimnyakov, D A; Sevrugin, A V; Yuvchenko, S A; Fedorov, F S; Tretyachenko, E V; Vikulova, M A; Kovaleva, D S; Krugova, E Y; Gorokhovsky, A V

    2016-06-01

    Here we present the data on the energy-band-gap characteristics of composite nanoparticles produced by modification of the amorphous potassium polytitanate in aqueous solutions of different transition metal salts. Band gap characteristics are investigated using diffuse reflection spectra of the obtained powders. Calculated logarithmic derivative quantity of the Kubelka-Munk function reveals a presence of local maxima in the regions 0.5-1.5 eV and 1.6-3.0 eV which correspond to band gap values of the investigated materials. The values might be related to the constituents of the composite nanoparticles and intermediate products of their chemical interaction. PMID:27158654

  20. Pressure-tuning spectroscopy of charge-transfer salts. X-ray crystallography and comparative studies in solution and in the solid state

    SciTech Connect

    Bockman, T.M.; Kochi, J.K. ); Chang, H.R.; Drickamer, H.G. )

    1990-11-01

    The highly colored pyridinium (P{sup +}) and cobaltocenium (C{sup +}) iodides are charge-transfer salts by virtue of the new electronic absorption bands that follow Mulliken theory. X-ray crystallography establishes the relevant interionic separation and steric orientation of the cation/anion pairs P{sup +}I{sup {minus}} and C{sup +}I{sup {minus}} constrained for optimum charge-transfer interaction in the crystal lattice. Spectral comparisons of the charge-transfer (CT) transitions by absorption (solution) and by diffuse reflectance (solid-state) measurements reveals the commonality of contact ion pairs (CIP) in aprotic nonpolar solvents (dichloromethane) with those extant in crystalline charge-transfer salts. As such, the compression of the charge-transfer salts P{sup +}I{sup {minus}} in the solid state by the application of pressures up to 140 kbar leads to unusual red shifts of the CT bands indicative of the dominance of destabilizing charge-transfer interactions.

  1. Salt-Induced Universal Slowing Down of the Short-Time Self-Diffusion of a Globular Protein in Aqueous Solution

    SciTech Connect

    Grimaldo, Marco; Roosen-Runge, Felix; Hennig, Marcus; Zanini, Fabio; Zhang, Fajun; Zamponi, Michaela; Jalarvo, Niina; Schreiber, Frank; Seydel, Tilo

    2015-06-17

    The short-time self-diffusion D of the globular model protein bovine serum albumin in aqueous (D2O) solutions has been measured comprehensively as a function of the protein and trivalent salt (YCl3) concentration, noted cp and cs, respectively. We observe that D follows a universal master curve D(cs,cp) = D(cs = 0,cp) g(cs/cp), where D(cs= 0,cp) is the diffusion coefficient in the absence of salt and g(cs/cp) is a scalar function solely depending on the ratio of the salt and protein concentration. This observation is consistent with a universal scaling of the bonding probability in a picture of cluster formation of patchy particles. In conclusion, the finding corroborates the predictive power of the description of proteins as colloids with distinct attractive ion-activated surface patches.

  2. A mass and solute balance model for tear volume and osmolarity in the normal and the dry eye.

    PubMed

    Gaffney, E A; Tiffany, J M; Yokoi, N; Bron, A J

    2010-01-01

    Tear hyperosmolarity is thought to play a key role in the mechanism of dry eye, a common symptomatic condition accompanied by visual disturbance, tear film instability, inflammation and damage to the ocular surface. We have constructed a model for the mass and solute balance of the tears, with parameter estimation based on extensive data from the literature which permits the influence of tear evaporation, lacrimal flux and blink rate on tear osmolarity to be explored. In particular the nature of compensatory events has been estimated in aqueous-deficient (ADDE) and evaporative (EDE) dry eye. The model reproduces observed osmolarities of the tear meniscus for the healthy eye and predicts a higher concentration in the tear film than meniscus in normal and dry eye states. The differential is small in the normal eye, but is significantly increased in dry eye, especially for the simultaneous presence of high meniscus concentration and low meniscus radius. This may influence the interpretation of osmolarity values obtained from meniscus samples since they need not fully reflect potential damage to the ocular surface caused by tear film hyperosmolarity. Interrogation of the model suggests that increases in blink rate may play a limited role in compensating for a rise in tear osmolarity in ADDE but that an increase in lacrimal flux, together with an increase in blink rate, may delay the development of hyperosmolarity in EDE. Nonetheless, it is predicted that tear osmolarity may rise to much higher levels in EDE than ADDE before the onset of tear film breakup, in the absence of events at the ocular surface which would independently compromise tear film stability. Differences in the predicted responses of the pre-ocular tears in ADDE compared to EDE or hybrid disease to defined conditions suggest that no single, empirically-accessible variable can act as a surrogate for tear film concentration and the potential for ocular surface damage. This emphasises the need to measure

  3. Hunting liquid micro-pockets in snow and ice: Phase transition in salt solutions at the bulk and interface with X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartels-Rausch, Thorsten; Orlando, Fabrizio; Kong, Xiangrui; Waldner, Astrid; Artiglia, Luca; Ammann, Markus; Huthwelker, Thomas

    2016-04-01

    Sea salt, and in particular chloride, is an important reactant in the atmosphere. Chloride in air-borne sea salt aerosol is - once chemically converted to a molecular halogen (Cl2, BrCl) and released to the atmosphere - well known as important atmospheric reactant, driving large-scale changes to the atmospheric composition and in particular to ozone levels in remote areas, but also in coastal mega cities. Similar chemistry has been proposed for sea salt deposits in polar snow covers. A crucial factor determining the overall reactivity is the local physical environment of the chloride ion. For example, the reactivity of liquid aerosols decreases significantly upon crystallization. Surprisingly, the phases of NaCl-containing systems are still under debate, partially due to the limited availability of in situ measurements directly probing the local environment at the surface of frozen NaCl-water binary systems. Using core electron spectroscopy of the oxygen atoms in water, we previously showed that these systems follow the phase rules at the air-ice interface. This finding contrasts some earlier observations, where the presence of liquid below the eutectic point of bulk solutions was postulated. In the present study, we present new electron yield near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy (NEXAFS) data obtained at near-ambient pressures up to 20 mbar of NaCl frozen solutions. The method is sensitive to small changes in the local environment of the chlorine atom. The measurements were performed at the PHOENIX beamline at SLS. The study indicates frapant differences in the phases of NaCl - water mixtures at temperatures blow the freezing point for the surface of the ice vs. the bulk. This has significant impact on modelling chemical reactions in snow or ice and it's environmental consequences.

  4. Long-term cement corrosion in chloride-rich solutions relevant to radioactive waste disposal in rock salt - Leaching experiments and thermodynamic simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bube, C.; Metz, V.; Bohnert, E.; Garbev, K.; Schild, D.; Kienzler, B.

    Low- and intermediate-level radioactive wastes are frequently solidified in a cement matrix. In a potential repository for nuclear wastes, the cementitious matrix is altered upon contact with solution and the resulting secondary phases may provide for significant retention of the radionuclides incorporated in the wastes. In order to assess the secondary phases formed upon corrosion in chloride-rich solutions, which are relevant for nuclear waste disposal in rock salt, leaching experiments were performed. Conventional laboratory batch experiments using powdered hardened cement paste in MgCl2-rich solutions were left to equilibrate for up to three years and full-scale cemented waste products were exposed to NaCl-rich and MgCl2-rich solutions for more than twenty years, respectively. Solid phase analyses revealed that corrosion of hardened cement in MgCl2-rich solutions advanced faster than in NaCl-rich solutions due to the extensive exchange of Mg from solution against Ca from the cementitious solid. Thermodynamic equilibrium simulations compared well to results at the final stages of the respective experiments indicating that close to equilibrium conditions were reached. At high cement product to brine ratios (>0.65 g mL-1), the solution composition in the laboratory-scale experiments was close to that of the full-scale experiments (cement to brine ratio of 2.5 g mL-1) in the MgCl2 systems. The present study demonstrates the applicability of thermodynamic methods used in this approach to adequately describe full-scale long-term experiments with cemented waste simulates.

  5. Effect of the oxygen content in a salt solution on the characteristics of sodium-reduced tantalum powders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolosov, V. N.; Orlov, V. M.; Miroshnichenko, M. N.; Prokhorova, T. Yu.; Masloboeva, S. M.; Belyaevskii, A. T.

    2009-02-01

    The characteristics of the tantalum powders produced by sodium thermal reduction from salt melts based on K2TaF7 and NaCl with various amounts of added oxycompounds K3TaOF6 and K2Ta2O3F6 are studied. At a molar ratio of oxygen to tantalum of 1.25 in the initial melt, capacitor tantalum powders with a specific surface area more than 3 m2/g are produced. The specific capacitance of the anodes made from these powders reaches 58 mC/g.

  6. Perioperative use of crystalloids in patients undergoing open radical cystectomy: balanced Ringer’s maleate versus a glucose 5%/potassium-based balanced solution: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The optimal crystalloid solution to use perioperatively in patients undergoing open radical cystectomy remains unclear. Many of the fluids used for intravenous hydration contain supraphysiologic concentrations of chloride, which can induce hyperchloremia and metabolic acidosis, resulting in renal vasoconstriction and decreased renal function. In addition, patients receiving less fluid and less sodium show faster recovery of gastrointestinal (GI) function after colonic surgery. Methods and design This is an investigator-initiated, single-center, randomized, controlled, parallel group trial with assessor-blinded outcome assessment, in the Department of Urology, University Hospital Bern, Switzerland. The study will involve 44 patients with bladder cancer scheduled for radical cystectomy and urinary diversion. The primary outcome is the duration between the end of surgery and the return of the GI function (first defecation). Secondary outcomes are fluid balance (body weight difference postoperatively versus preoperatively) and the incidence of kidney function disorders according to the Risk – Injury – Failure – Loss - End Stage Renal Disease (RIFLE classification). An equal number of patients are allocated to receive Ringerfundin® solution or a glucose/potassium-based balanced crystalloid solution as baseline infusion during the entire time that intravenous administration of fluid is necessary during the perioperative period. The randomized crystalloid solution is infused at a rate of 1 ml/kg/h until the bladder has been removed, followed by 3 ml/kg/h until the end of surgery. Postoperative hydration is identical in both groups and consists of 1,500 ml of the randomized crystalloid solution per 24 hours. Postoperative patient care is identical in both groups; patients are allowed to drink clear fluids immediately after surgery, and liquid diet is started on postoperative day 1, as well as active mobilization and the use of chewing gum. Body weight

  7. Metals removal from spent salts

    DOEpatents

    Hsu, Peter C.; Von Holtz, Erica H.; Hipple, David L.; Summers, Leslie J.; Brummond, William A.; Adamson, Martyn G.

    2002-01-01

    A method and apparatus for removing metal contaminants from the spent salt of a molten salt oxidation (MSO) reactor is described. Spent salt is removed from the reactor and analyzed to determine the contaminants present and the carbonate concentration. The salt is dissolved in water, and one or more reagents may be added to precipitate the metal oxide and/or the metal as either metal oxide, metal hydroxide, or as a salt. The precipitated materials are filtered, dried and packaged for disposal as waste or can be immobilized as ceramic pellets. More than about 90% of the metals and mineral residues (ashes) present are removed by filtration. After filtration, salt solutions having a carbonate concentration >20% can be spray-dried and returned to the reactor for re-use. Salt solutions containing a carbonate concentration <20% require further clean-up using an ion exchange column, which yields salt solutions that contain less than 1.0 ppm of contaminants.

  8. Actinide removal from spent salts

    DOEpatents

    Hsu, Peter C.; von Holtz, Erica H.; Hipple, David L.; Summers, Leslie J.; Adamson, Martyn G.

    2002-01-01

    A method for removing actinide contaminants (uranium and thorium) from the spent salt of a molten salt oxidation (MSO) reactor is described. Spent salt is removed from the reactor and analyzed to determine the contaminants present and the carbonate concentration. The salt is dissolved in water, and one or more reagents are added to precipitate the thorium as thorium oxide and/or the uranium as either uranium oxide or as a diuranate salt. The precipitated materials are filtered, dried and packaged for disposal as radioactive waste. About 90% of the thorium and/or uranium present is removed by filtration. After filtration, salt solutions having a carbonate concentration >20% can be dried and returned to the reactor for re-use. Salt solutions containing a carbonate concentration <20% require further clean-up using an ion exchange column, which yields salt solutions that contain less than 0.1 ppm of thorium or uranium.

  9. Solubility of hydrogen sulfide in aqueous solutions of the single salts sodium sulfate, ammonium sulfate, sodium chloride, and ammonium chloride at temperatures from 313 to 393 K and total pressures up to 10 MPa

    SciTech Connect

    Xia, J.; Kamps, A.P.S.; Rumpf, B.; Maurer, G.

    2000-04-01

    New experimental results for the solubility of hydrogen sulfide in aqueous solutions of the single salts sodium sulfate, ammonium sulfate, sodium chloride, and ammonium chloride at temperatures from 313 to 393 K and total pressures up to 10 MPa are reported. As in the salt-free system, a second-hydrogen sulfide-rich--liquid phase is observed at high hydrogen sulfide concentrations. A model to describe the phase equilibrium is presented. Calculations are compared to the new experimental data.

  10. Association constants in solutions of lithium salts in butyrolactone and a mixture of propylene carbonate with 1,2-dimethoxyethane (1 : 1), according to conductometric data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chernozhuk, T. V.; Sherstyuk, Yu. S.; Novikov, D. O.; Kalugin, O. N.

    2016-02-01

    A conductometric study is performed with solutions of lithium bis(oxalato)borate (LiBOB) in γ-butyrolactone (γ-BL) at 278.15-388.15 K and lithium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide (LiTFSI), LiBOB, and lithium tetrafluoroborate (LiBF4) in mixtures of propylene carbonate and 1,2-dimethoxyethane (PC + 1,2-DME) (1 : 1) at 278.15-348.15 K. Limiting molar electrical conductivities (LMECs) and association constants ( K a) in the studied solutions of electrolytes are determined using the Lee-Wheaton equation. The effect temperature, the nature of the solvent, and the properties of the anion have on the conductivity and interparticle interactions in solutions of lithium salts in γ-BL and PC + 1,2-DME (1 : 1) is established. It was concluded that the studied solutions are characterized by low values of their association constants. It was found that the BOB;- anion destroys the structure of the solvent.The thickness of the dynamic solvation shell of ions (Δ R) remains constant for both solvents over the studied range of temperatures, and Δ R is significantly greater for Li+ than for other ions.

  11. Chemical equilibrium model for interfacial activity of crude oil in aqueous alkaline solution: the effects of pH, alkali and salt

    SciTech Connect

    Chan, M.; Yen, T.F.

    1980-11-01

    A chemical equilibrium model for interfacial activity of crude in aqueous alkaline solution is proposed. The model predicts the observed effects of pH and concentrations of alkali and salt on the interfacial tension (IFT). The model proposed was shown to describe the observed effects of acid content, pH, and sodium ions on the interfacial activity of crude oil in water. Once the pH of the interface reaches the pKa of the acids, sometimes with the help of addition of some salt, the IFT experiences a sudden steep drop to the range of 10/sup -2/ dynes/cm. After that, further addition of sodium either in the form of NaOH or NaCl is going to increase the IFT due to a shift of equilibriumn to the formation of undissociated soap. This was confirmed by the difference in the observed effect of sodium on the IFT of the extracted soap molecules which are dissociated easily and those which are associated highly and precipitated easily. These soap molecules have dissociation constant values ranging from below 10/sup -2/ to above one. 13 references.

  12. The effects of steam injection on the electrical conductivity of an unconsolidated sand saturated with a salt solution

    SciTech Connect

    Vaughan, P.J.; Udell, K.S. ); Wilt, M.J. )

    1993-01-10

    The spatial and temporal variation of electrical conductivity in saturated sands during steam injection has been measured and modeled. Experiments consisted of introducing steam into one end of a tube filled with sand saturated with a slightly saline solution. A steam condensation front formed, separating the mixed-phase steam zone from the liquid zone. Measurements of electrical conductivity were made at 10 locations along the tube using a four-electrode technique. Results show that conductivity starts at a constant value, decreases before the steam front arrives and then, immediately prior to the steam front arrival, goes through a maximum before dropping by a factor of about 25. These variations can be explained by first, a dilution of the interstitial solution causing the initial drop in conductivity; second, an increase in temperature of the solution immediately prior to the arrival of the steam front causing the conductivity maximum; and finally, the large drop in conductivity due to the combined effects of a decrease in saturation and dilution of the residual liquid in the two-phase zone. Mathematical solutions of a set of differential equations that take into consideration all of these effects are presented. These solutions reproduce the significant features of the conductivity data. This study suggests that the measurement of changes in the subsurface conductivity field during steam injection operations may indicate the location of ionic concentration, temperature, and steam saturation fields. 28 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

  13. Photochemistry of triarylsulfonium salts

    SciTech Connect

    Dektar, J.L.; Hacker, N.P. )

    1990-08-01

    The photolysis of triphenylsulfonium, tris(4-methylphenyl)sulfonium, tris(4-chlorophenyl)sulfonium, several monosubstituted (4-F, 4-Cl, 4-Me, 4-MeO, 4-PhS, and 4-PhCO), and disubstituted (4,4{prime}-Me{sub 2} and 4,4{prime}-(MeO){sub 2}) triphenylsulfonium salts was examined in solution. It was found that direct irradiation of triphenylsulfonium salts produced new rearrangement products, phenylthiobiphenyls, along with diphenyl sulfide, which had been previously reported. Similarly, the triarylsulfonium salts, with the exception of the (4-(phenylthio)phenyl)diphenylsulfonium salts produced new rearrangement products, phenylthiobiphenyls, along with diphenyl sulfide, which had been previously reported. Similarly, the triarylsulfonium salts, with the exception of the (4-(phenylthio)phenyl)diphenylsulfonium salts, gave the new rearrangement products. The mechanism for direct photolysis is proposed to occur from the singlet excited states to give a predominant heterolytic cleavage along with some homolytic cleavage.

  14. Effects of Amendment of Biochar and Pyroligneous Solution from wheat straw pyrolysis on Yield and soil and crop salinity in a Salt stressed cropland from Central China Great Plain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, L.; Liu, Y.; Pan, W.; Pan, G.; Zheng, J.; Zheng, J.; Zhang, X.

    2012-04-01

    Crop production has been subject to salt stress in large areas of world croplands. Organic and/or bio-fertilizers have been applied as soil amendments for alleviating salt stress and enhancing crop productivity in these salt-stressed croplands. While biochar production systems using pyrolysis of crop straw materials have been well developed in the world, there would be a potential measure to use materials from crop straw pyrolysis as organic amendments in depressing salt stress in agriculture. In this paper, a field experiment was conducted on the effect of biochar and pyroligneous solution from cropstraw pyrolysis on soil and crop salinity, and wheat yield in a moderately salt stressed Entisol from the Central Great Plain of North China. Results indicated that: biochar and pyroligneous solution increased soil SOC, total nitrogen, available potassium and phosphorous by 43.77%, 6.50%, 45.54% and 108.01%, respectively. While Soil bulk density was decreased from 1.30 to 1.21g cm-3; soil pH (H2O) was decreased from 8.23 to 7.94 with a decrease in soluble salt content by 38.87%. Wheat yield was doubled over the control without amendment. In addition, sodium content was sharply declined by 78.80% in grains, and by 70.20% and 67.00% in shoot and root, respectively. Meanwhile, contents of potassium and phosphorus in plant tissue were seen also increased despite of no change in N content. Therefore, the combined amendment of biochar with pyroligneous solution would offer an effective measure to alleviate the salt stress and improving crop productivity in world croplands. Keywords: biochar, salt affected soils, wheat, crop productivity, salinity

  15. Precipitation of jarosite-type double salts from spent acid solutions from a chemical coal cleaning process

    SciTech Connect

    Norton, G.

    1990-09-21

    The precipitation of jarosite compounds to remove Na, K, Fe, and SO{sub 4}{sup 2{minus}} impurities from spent acid solutions from a chemical coal cleaning process was studied. Simple heating of model solutions containing Fe{sub 2}(SO{sub 4}){sub 3}, Na{sub 2}SO{sub 4}, and K{sub 2}SO{sub 4} caused jarosite (KFe{sub 3}(SO{sub 4}){sub 2}(OH){sub 6}) to form preferentially to natrojarosite (NaFe{sub 3}(SO{sub 4}){sub 2}(OH){sub 6}). Virtually all of the K, about 90% of the Fe, and about 30% of the SO{sub 4}{sup 2{minus}} could be precipitated from those solutions at 95{degree}C, while little or no Na was removed. However, simple heating of model solutions containing only Fe{sub 2}(SO{sub 4}){sub 3} and Na{sub 2}SO{sub 4} up to 95{degree}C for {le}12 hours produced low yields of jarosite compounds, and the Fe concentration in the solution had to be increased to avoid the formation of undesirable Fe compounds. Precipitate yields could be increased dramatically in model solutions of Na{sub 2}SO{sub 4}/Fe{sub 2}(SO{sub 4}){sub 3} containing excess Fe by using either CaCO{sub 3}, Ca(OH){sub 2}, or ZnO to neutralize H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} released during hydrolysis of the Fe{sub 2}(SO{sub 4}){sub 3} and during the precipitation reactions. Results obtained from the studies with model solutions were applied to spent acids produced during laboratory countercurrent washing of coal which had been leached with a molten NaOH/KOH mixture. Results indicated that jarosite compounds can be precipitated effectively from spent acid solutions by heating for 6 hours at 80{degree}C while maintaining a pH of about 1.5 using CaCO{sub 3}.

  16. Characteristic of the Nanoparticles Formed on the Carbon Steel Surface Contacting with 3d-Metal Water Salt Solutions in the Open-Air System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lavrynenko, O. M.; Pavlenko, O. Yu; Shchukin, Yu S.

    2016-02-01

    The contact of a steel electrode with water dispersion medium in an open-air system leads to the development of various polymorphic iron oxides and oxyhydroxides on the steel surface. Whereas the usage of distilled water causes the obtaining of Fe(II)-Fe(III) layered double hydroxides (green rust) as a primary mineral phase, but in the presence of inorganic 3d-metal water salt solutions, mixed layered double hydroxides (LDHs) together with non-stoichiometric spinel ferrite nanoparticles are formed on the steel surface. Mixed LDHs keep stability against further oxidation and complicate the obtaining of spinel ferrite nanoparticles. Thermal treatment of mixed LDHs among other mineral phases formed via the rotation-corrosion dispergation process at certain temperatures permits to obtain homogenous nanoparticles of spinel ferrites as well as maghemite or hematite doped by 3d-metal cations.

  17. Microstructure and corrosion behavior of die-cast AM60B magnesium alloys in a complex salt solution. A slow positron beam study

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Y. F.; Yang, W.; Qin, Q. L.; Wen, W.; Zhai, T.; Yu, B.; Liu, D. Y.; Luo, A.; Song, GuangLing

    2013-12-15

    The microstructure and corrosion behavior of high pressure die-cast (HPDC) and super vacuum die-cast (SVDC) AM60B magnesium alloys were investigated in a complex salt solution using slow positron beam technique and potentiodynamic polarization tests. The experiments revealed that a CaCO3 film was formed on the surface of the alloys and that the rate of CaCO3 formation for the SVDC alloy with immersion time was slower than that of the HPDC alloy. The larger volume fraction of b-phase in the skin layer of the SVDC alloy than that of the HPDC alloy was responsible for the better corrosion resistance.

  18. Characteristic of the Nanoparticles Formed on the Carbon Steel Surface Contacting with 3d-Metal Water Salt Solutions in the Open-Air System.

    PubMed

    Lavrynenko, O M; Pavlenko, O Yu; Shchukin, Yu S

    2016-12-01

    The contact of a steel electrode with water dispersion medium in an open-air system leads to the development of various polymorphic iron oxides and oxyhydroxides on the steel surface. Whereas the usage of distilled water causes the obtaining of Fe(II)-Fe(III) layered double hydroxides (green rust) as a primary mineral phase, but in the presence of inorganic 3d-metal water salt solutions, mixed layered double hydroxides (LDHs) together with non-stoichiometric spinel ferrite nanoparticles are formed on the steel surface. Mixed LDHs keep stability against further oxidation and complicate the obtaining of spinel ferrite nanoparticles. Thermal treatment of mixed LDHs among other mineral phases formed via the rotation-corrosion dispergation process at certain temperatures permits to obtain homogenous nanoparticles of spinel ferrites as well as maghemite or hematite doped by 3d-metal cations. PMID:26847693

  19. Behavior of Zn2+, Cd2+, Ba2+ and Pb2+ cations in ferromanganese crusts from the Marcus Wake seamount (Pacific Ocean) in aqueous solutions of metal salts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novikov, G. V.; Bogdanova, O. Yu.; Melnikov, M. E.; Lobus, N. V.; Drozdova, A. N.; Shulga, N. A.

    2016-01-01

    The behavior of heavy-metal cations in ore minerals of cobalt-rich ferromanganese crusts from the Marcus Wake seamount in aqueous solutions of metal salts was studied in experiments. The Zn2+ and Cd2+ cations showed high reactivity and Ba2+ and Pb2+ showed low reactivity. It was found that Zn2+ and Cd2+ cations within the ore mineral composition are mainly absorbed (up to 66%) whereas Pb2+ and Ba2+ are chemically bound (up to 70%). Ore minerals in the crusts are characterized by sorption properties and high ionexchange capacity by these cations (1.94-2.62 mg-equiv/g). The capacity values by heavy-metal cations for ore minerals of the crusts from different areas of the Marcus Wake seamount are close to each other.

  20. Data on energy-band-gap characteristics of composite nanoparticles obtained by modification of the amorphous potassium polytitanate in aqueous solutions of transition metal salts

    PubMed Central

    Zimnyakov, D.A.; Sevrugin, A.V.; Yuvchenko, S.A.; Fedorov, F.S.; Tretyachenko, E.V.; Vikulova, M.A.; Kovaleva, D.S.; Krugova, E.Y.; Gorokhovsky, A.V.

    2016-01-01

    Here we present the data on the energy-band-gap characteristics of composite nanoparticles produced by modification of the amorphous potassium polytitanate in aqueous solutions of different transition metal salts. Band gap characteristics are investigated using diffuse reflection spectra of the obtained powders. Calculated logarithmic derivative quantity of the Kubelka–Munk function reveals a presence of local maxima in the regions 0.5–1.5 eV and 1.6–3.0 eV which correspond to band gap values of the investigated materials. The values might be related to the constituents of the composite nanoparticles and intermediate products of their chemical interaction. PMID:27158654

  1. Lowering Salt in Your Diet

    MedlinePlus

    ... needs some salt to function. Also known as sodium chloride, salt helps maintain the body's balance of fluids. ... select foods that provide 5% or less for sodium, per serving. back to ... substitutes contain potassium chloride and can be used by individuals to replace ...

  2. Calculation of amorphous silica solubilities at 25° to 300°C and apparent cation hydration numbers in aqueous salt solutions using the concept of effective density of water

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fournier, Robert O.; Williams, Marshall L.

    1983-01-01

    The solubility of amorphous silica in aqueous salt solutions at 25° to 300°C can be calculated using information on its solubility in pure water and a model in which the activity of water in the salt solution is defined to equal the effective density. pe, of “free” water in that solution. At temperatures of 100°C and above, pe closely equals the product of the density of the solution times the weight fraction of water in the solution. At 25°C, a correction parameter must be applied to pe that incorporates a term called the apparent cation hydration number, h. Because of the many assumptions and other uncertainties involved in determining values of h, by the model used here, the reported numbers are not necessarily real hydration numbers even though they do agree with some published values determined by activity and diffusion methods. Whether or not h is a real hydration number, it would appear to be useful in its inclusion within a more extensive activity coefficient term that describes the departure of silica solubilities in concentrated salt solutions from expected behavior according to the model presented here. Values of h can be calculated from measured amorphous silica solubilities in salt solutions at 25°C provided there is no complexing of dissolved silica with the dissolved salt, or if the degree of complexing is known. The previously postulated aqueous silica-sulfate complexing in aqueous Na2SO4 solutions is supported by results of the present effective density of water model

  3. Kinetics of the reversible reaction of CO2(aq) and HCO3(-) with sarcosine salt in aqueous solution.

    PubMed

    Xiang, Qunyang; Fang, Mengxiang; Yu, Hai; Maeder, Marcel

    2012-10-25

    Aqueous sarcosine salts are fast carbon dioxide (CO(2)) absorbents suitable for use in postcombustion CO(2) capture in coal-fired power plants. We have developed a detailed reaction scheme including all the reactions in the sarcosine-CO(2)-water system. All unknown rate and equilibrium constants were obtained by global data fitting. We investigated the temperature-dependent rate and equilibrium constants of the reaction between aqueous CO(2) and sarcosine using stopped-flow spectrophotometry, by following the pH changes over the wavelength range 400-700 nm via coupling to pH indicators. The corresponding rate and equilibrium constants ranged from 15.0 to 45.0 °C and were analyzed in terms of Arrhenius, Eyring, and van't Hoff relationships. The rate constant for the reaction between CO(2) and sarcosine to form the carbamate at 25.0 °C is 18.6(6) × 10(3) M(-1) s(-1), which is very high for an acyclic amine; its activation enthalpy is 59(1) kJ mol(-1) and the entropy is 33(4) J mol(-1) K(-1). In addition, we investigated the slow reaction between bicarbonate and sarcosine using (1)H nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and report the corresponding rate and equilibrium constants at 25.0 °C. This rate constant is 5.9 × 10(-3) M(-1) s(-1). PMID:22992127

  4. Report on variation of electrical conductivity during steam injection in unconsolidated sand saturated with a salt solution

    SciTech Connect

    Vaughn, P.; Udell, K.S.; Wilt, M.

    1992-07-01

    The spatial and temporal variation electrical conductivity in saturated sands during steam injection has been measured and modeled. Experiments consisted of introducing steam into an end of a tube filled with a sand saturated with a slightly saline solution. Measurements of electrical conductivity were then made every 10 seconds at 10 locations along the tube using a four electrode technique. After injection a steam condensation front forms ahead of the steam front that separates the mixed-phase steam zone from the liquid zone. Conductivity measurements at a specific position in the tube throughout time show that the electrical conductivity starts at a constant value, decreases before the steam front arrives and then, immediately prior to the steam front arrival, goes through a maximum before dropping by a factor about 25. These variations can be explained by first: a dilution of the interstitial solution ahead of the steam front thereby causing the initial drop in conductivity; second, an increase in temperature of the solution immediately prior to the arrival of the steam front causing the conductivity maximum; and finally the large drop in conductivity due to the combined effects of a decrease in saturation and dilution of the residual liquid in the two-phase zone. Mathematical solutions of a set of differential equations that take into consideration all of these effects are presented. These solutions reproduce the significant features of the conductivity data, and help to explain the physical phenomenon. The study suggests that the measurements of changes in the subsurface conductivity field during steam injection operations may indicate the location of ionic concentration, temperature, and steam saturation fields.

  5. Exact period-four solutions of a family of n-dimensional quadratic maps via harmonic balance and Gröbner bases.

    PubMed

    D'Amico, María Belén; Calandrini, Guillermo L

    2015-11-01

    Analytical solutions of the period-four orbits exhibited by a classical family of n-dimensional quadratic maps are presented. Exact expressions are obtained by applying harmonic balance and Gröbner bases to a single-input single-output representation of the system. A detailed study of a generalized scalar quadratic map and a well-known delayed logistic model is included for illustration. In the former example, conditions for the existence of bistability phenomenon are also introduced. PMID:26627573

  6. Influence of an acetate- and a lactate-based balanced infusion solution on acid base physiology and hemodynamics: an observational pilot study

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The current pilot study compares the impact of an intravenous infusion of Ringer’s lactate to an acetate-based solution with regard to acid–base balance. The study design included the variables of the Stewart approach and focused on the effective strong ion difference. Because adverse hemodynamic effects have been reported when using acetate buffered solutions in hemodialysis, hemodynamics were also evaluated. Methods Twenty-four women who had undergone abdominal gynecologic surgery and who had received either Ringer’s lactate (Strong Ion Difference 28 mmol/L; n = 12) or an acetate-based solution (Strong Ion Difference 36.8 mmol/L; n = 12) according to an established clinical protocol and its precursor were included in the investigation. After induction of general anesthesia, a set of acid–base variables, hemodynamic values and serum electrolytes was measured three times during the next 120 minutes. Results Patients received a mean dose of 4,054 ± 450 ml of either one or the other of the solutions. In terms of mean arterial blood pressure and norepinephrine requirements there were no differences to observe between the study groups. pH and serum HCO3- concentration decreased slightly but significantly only with Ringer’s lactate. In addition, the acetate-based solution kept the plasma effective strong ion difference more stable than Ringer’s lactate. Conclusions Both of the solutions provided hemodynamic stability. Concerning consistency of acid base parameters none of the solutions seemed to be inferior, either. Whether the slight advantages observed for the acetate-buffered solution in terms of stability of pH and plasma HCO3- are clinically relevant, needs to be investigated in a larger randomized controlled trial. PMID:22769740

  7. High performance organic thin film transistors with solution processed TTF-TCNQ charge transfer salt as electrodes.

    PubMed

    Mukherjee, Biswanath; Mukherjee, Moumita

    2011-09-01

    Fabrication of high-performance organic thin film transistors (OTFTs) with solution processed organic charge transfer complex (TTF-TCNQ) film as bottom contact source-drain electrodes is reported. A novel capillary based method was used to deposit the source-drain electrodes from solution and to create the channel between the electrodes. Both p- and n-type OTFTs have been fabricated with solution deposited organic charge transfer film as contact electrodes. Comparison of the device performances between OTFTs with TTF-TCNQ as source-drain electrodes and those with Au electrodes (both top and bottom contact) indicate that better results have been obtained in organic complex film contacted OTFT. The high mobility, low threshold voltage, and efficient carrier injection in both types of OTFTs implies the potential use of the TTF-TCNQ based complex material as low-cost contact electrodes. The lower work function of the TTF-TCNQ electrode and better contact of the complex film with the organic thin film owing to the organic-organic interface results in efficient charge transfer into the semiconductor yielding high device performance. The present method having organic metal as contact materials promises great potential for the fabrication of all-organics and plastic electronics devices with high throughput and low-cost processing. PMID:21812432

  8. Ion Enrichment on the Hydrophobic Carbon-based Surface in Aqueous Salt Solutions due to Cation-π Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Guosheng; Liu, Jian; Wang, Chunlei; Song, Bo; Tu, Yusong; Hu, Jun; Fang, Haiping

    2013-01-01

    By incorporating cation-π interactions to classic all-atoms force fields, we show that there is a clear enrichment of Na+ on a carbon-based π electron-rich surface in NaCl solutions using molecular dynamics simulations. Interestingly, Cl− is also enriched to some extend on the surface due to the electrostatic interaction between Na+ and Cl−, although the hydrated Cl−-π interaction is weak. The difference of the numbers of Na+ and Cl− accumulated at the interface leads to a significant negatively charged behavior in the solution, especially in nanoscale systems. Moreover, we find that the accumulation of the cations at the interfaces is universal since other cations (Li+, K+, Mg2+, Ca2+, Fe2+, Co2+, Cu2+, Cd2+, Cr2+, and Pb2+) have similar adsorption behaviors. For comparison, as in usual force field without the proper consideration of cation-π interactions, the ions near the surfaces have a similar density of ions in the solution. PMID:24310448

  9. Statistical mechanics of sum frequency generation spectroscopy for the liquid-vapor interface of dilute aqueous salt solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Noah-Vanhoucke, Joyce; Smith, Jared D.; Geissler, Phillip L.

    2009-01-02

    We demonstrate a theoretical description of vibrational sum frequency generation (SFG) at the boundary of aqueous electrolyte solutions. This approach identifies and exploits a simple relationship between SFG lineshapes and the statistics of molecular orientation and electric field. Our computer simulations indicate that orientational averages governing SFG susceptibility do not manifest ion-specific shifts in local electric field, but instead, ion-induced polarization of subsurface layers. Counterbalancing effects are obtained for monovalent anions and cations at the same depth. Ions held at different depths induce an imbalanced polarization, suggesting that ion-specific effects can arise from weak, long ranged influence on solvent organization.

  10. The effects of replacing the water model while decoupling water-water and water-solute interactions on computed properties of simple salts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jicun; Wang, Feng

    2016-07-01

    The effects of decoupling the water-water and water-solute interactions are studied with selected mono-valent ions as the solute. Using the ion-water cross terms developed for the BLYPSP-4F water model, we replaced the water potential with WAIL, TIP4P, and TIP3P without changing the ion-water parameters. When the adaptive force matching (AFM) derived BLYPSP-4F model is replaced by the other AFM derived WAIL model, the difference in ion properties, such as hydration free energies, radial distribution functions, relative diffusion constants, is negligible, demonstrating the feasibility for combining AFM parameters from different sources. Interestingly, when the AFM-derived ion-water cross-terms are used with a non-AFM based water model, only small changes in the ion properties are observed. The final combined models with TIP3P or TIP4P water reproduce the salt hydration free energies within 6% of experiments. The feasibility of combining AFM models with other non-AFM models is of significance since such combinations allow more complex systems to be studied without specific parameterization. In addition, the study suggests an interesting prospect of reusing the cross-terms when a part of a general force field is replaced with a different model. The prevailing practice, which is to re-derive all cross-terms with combining rules, may not have been optimal.

  11. Dynamics of dilute solutions of poly(aspartic acid) and its sodium salt elucidated from atomistic molecular dynamics simulations with explicit water.

    PubMed

    Ramachandran, Sanoop; Katha, Anki Reddy; Kolake, Subramanya Mayya; Jung, Bokyung; Han, Sungsoo

    2013-11-01

    The use of forward osmosis (FO) process for seawater desalination has attracted tremendous interest in recent years. Besides the manufacture of suitable membranes, the major technical challenge in the efficient deployment of the FO technology lies in the development of a suitable "draw solute". Owing to its inherent advantages, poly(aspartic acid) has arisen to be an attractive candidate for this purpose. However, an investigation of its molecular level properties has not been studied in detail. In this paper, the dynamics of poly(aspartic acid) and its sodium salt in the dilute concentration regime have been reported. The quantification of the polymer conformational properties, its solvation behavior, and the counterion dynamics are studied. The neutral polymer shows a preferentially coiled structure whereas the fully ionized polymer has an extended structure. Upon comparing with poly(acrylic acid) polymer, another polymer which has been used as a draw solute, poly(aspartic acid) forms more number of hydrogen bonds as well as fewer ion pairs. PMID:24099271

  12. Voltammetry and conductivity of a polyether-pyridinium room temperature molten salt electrolyte and of its polymer electrolyte solutions in polydimethylsiloxane

    SciTech Connect

    Pyati, R.; Murray, R.W.

    1996-02-01

    This report describes the synthesis, microelectrode voltammetry, and ionic conductivity of a new room temperature molten salt N-(methoxy(ethoxy){sub 2}ethyl)pyridinium p-toluene sulfonate (abbreviated as[Py(E{sub 3}M){sup +}][Tos{sup {minus}}]) and of its solution in a hydroxy-terminated polydimethylsiloxane. Both ionically conductive liquids (conductivity = 1 {times} 10{sup {minus}4} {Omega}{sup {minus}1} cm{sup {minus}1}) exhibit voltammetric potential windows of about 1.5 V. The negative potential limit is determined by the reduction of the [Py(E{sub 3}M){sup +}] pyridinium species, with subsequent radical coupling to form a voltammetrically observed viologen dimer. The estimated diffusivities of the [Py(E{sub 3}M){sup +}] species, of a diethyleneglycol-tailed ferrocene redox solute studied, and by application of Nernst-Einstein relation to the ionic charge carriers, all lie in the 10{sup {minus}7} to 10{sup {minus}8} cm{sup 2}/s range. Viscosities and glass transition thermal observations are reported as is the fit of the temperature dependencies of ionic conductivity in [Py(E{sub 3}M){sup +}][Tos{sup {minus}}] and in [Py(E{sub 3}M){sup +}][TOS{sup {minus}}]/PDMS mixtures to Vogel-Tamman-Fulcher predictions.

  13. Synthesis of luminescent SnO2:Eu3+ nanorods via a salt-assisted solution combustion process.

    PubMed

    Chen, Weifan; Liu, Ming; Liu, Yue; Lin, Yucui; Yu, Lixing; Hong, Jianming

    2014-07-01

    SnO2:Eu3+ nanorods have been successfully synthesized by annealing products from microwave-induced KCl-assisted solution combustion reaction, which uses tin (IV) chloride pentahydrate and europium nitrate as cationic source, ethyl glycol as fuel and ammonium nitrate as combustion-supporting agent. The structural and photoluminescent properties of SnO2:Eu3+ nanorods were investigated by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), selected area electron diffractometry (SAED), X-ray diffractometry (XRD) and photoluminescence spectroscopy. The phase transformation in the synthetic process was observed by X-ray diffraction pattern. Accordingly, the growth mechanism of SnO2:Eu3+ nanorods was discussed. The results showed that the SnO2:Eu3+ nanorods were rutile-structured single crystals with 10-15 nm in diameter and 200-250 nm in length. Proper addition of KCl into redox mixture solution is critical to the formation of SnO2:Eu3+ nanorods. The doped Eu3+ concentration has obvious effect on the photoluminescence of SnO2:Eu3+ nanorods. The approach is convenient, inexpensive and efficient for the high yield preparation of SnO2:Eu3+ nanorods. PMID:24758061

  14. Regulation of ion homeostasis by aminolevulinic acid in salt-stressed wheat seedlings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Türk, Hülya; Genişel, Mucip; Erdal, Serkan

    2016-04-01

    Salinity is regarded as a worldwide agricultural threat, as it seriously limits plant development and productivity. Salt stress reduces water uptake in plants by disrupting the osmotic balance of soil solution. In addition, it creates a damaged metabolic process by causing ion imbalance in cells. In this study, we aim to examine the negative effects of 5-aminolevulinic acid (ALA) (20 mg/l) on the ion balance in wheat seedling leaves exposed to salt stress (150 mM). Sodium is known to be highly toxic for plant cells at high concentrations, and is significantly increased by salt stress. However, it can be reduced by combined application of ALA and salt, compared to salt application alone. On the other hand, while the K+/Na+ ratio was reduced by salt stress, ALA application changed this ratio in favor of K+. Manganese, iron, and copper were also able to reduce stress. However, ALA pre-treatment resulted in mineral level increments. Conversely, the stress-induced rise in magnesium, potassium, calcium, phosphorus, zinc, and molybdenum were further improved by ALA application. These data clearly show that ALA has an important regulatory effect of ion balance in wheat leaves.

  15. Charged nanoparticle attraction in multivalent salt solution: A classical-fluids density functional theory and molecular dynamics study

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Salerno, K. Michael; Frischknecht, Amalie L.; Stevens, Mark J.

    2016-04-08

    Here, negatively charged nanoparticles (NPs) in 1:1, 1:2, and 1:3 electrolyte solutions are studied in a primitive ion model using molecular dynamics (MD) simulations and classical density functional theory (DFT). We determine the conditions for attractive interactions between the like-charged NPs. Ion density profiles and NP–NP interaction free energies are compared between the two methods and are found to be in qualitative agreement. The NP interaction free energy is purely repulsive for monovalent counterions, but can be attractive for divalent and trivalent counterions. Using DFT, the NP interaction free energy for different NP diameters and charges is calculated. The depthmore » and location of the minimum in the interaction depend strongly on the NPs’ charge. For certain parameters, the depth of the attractive well can reach 8–10 kBT, indicating that kinetic arrest and aggregation of the NPs due to electrostatic interactions is possible. Rich behavior arises from the geometric constraints of counterion packing at the NP surface. Layering of counterions around the NPs is observed and, as secondary counterion layers form the minimum of the NP–NP interaction free energy shifts to larger separation, and the depth of the free energy minimum varies dramatically. We find that attractive interactions occur with and without NP overcharging.« less

  16. Charged Nanoparticle Attraction in Multivalent Salt Solution: A Classical-Fluids Density Functional Theory and Molecular Dynamics Study.

    PubMed

    Salerno, K Michael; Frischknecht, Amalie L; Stevens, Mark J

    2016-07-01

    Negatively charged nanoparticles (NPs) in 1:1, 1:2, and 1:3 electrolyte solutions are studied in a primitive ion model using molecular dynamics (MD) simulations and classical density functional theory (DFT). We determine the conditions for attractive interactions between the like-charged NPs. Ion density profiles and NP-NP interaction free energies are compared between the two methods and are found to be in qualitative agreement. The NP interaction free energy is purely repulsive for monovalent counterions, but can be attractive for divalent and trivalent counterions. Using DFT, the NP interaction free energy for different NP diameters and charges is calculated. The depth and location of the minimum in the interaction depend strongly on the NPs' charge. For certain parameters, the depth of the attractive well can reach 8-10 kBT, indicating that kinetic arrest and aggregation of the NPs due to electrostatic interactions is possible. Rich behavior arises from the geometric constraints of counterion packing at the NP surface. Layering of counterions around the NPs is observed and, as secondary counterion layers form the minimum of the NP-NP interaction free energy shifts to larger separation, and the depth of the free energy minimum varies dramatically. We find that attractive interactions occur with and without NP overcharging. PMID:27057763

  17. Microbial life at high salt concentrations: phylogenetic and metabolic diversity

    PubMed Central

    Oren, Aharon

    2008-01-01

    Halophiles are found in all three domains of life. Within the Bacteria we know halophiles within the phyla Cyanobacteria, Proteobacteria, Firmicutes, Actinobacteria, Spirochaetes, and Bacteroidetes. Within the Archaea the most salt-requiring microorganisms are found in the class Halobacteria. Halobacterium and most of its relatives require over 100–150 g/l salt for growth and structural stability. Also within the order Methanococci we encounter halophilic species. Halophiles and non-halophilic relatives are often found together in the phylogenetic tree, and many genera, families and orders have representatives with greatly different salt requirement and tolerance. A few phylogenetically coherent groups consist of halophiles only: the order Halobacteriales, family Halobacteriaceae (Euryarchaeota) and the anaerobic fermentative bacteria of the order Halanaerobiales (Firmicutes). The family Halomonadaceae (Gammaproteobacteria) almost exclusively contains halophiles. Halophilic microorganisms use two strategies to balance their cytoplasm osmotically with their medium. The first involves accumulation of molar concentrations of KCl. This strategy requires adaptation of the intracellular enzymatic machinery, as proteins should maintain their proper conformation and activity at near-saturating salt concentrations. The proteome of such organisms is highly acidic, and most proteins denature when suspended in low salt. Such microorganisms generally cannot survive in low salt media. The second strategy is to exclude salt from the cytoplasm and to synthesize and/or accumulate organic 'compatible' solutes that do not interfere with enzymatic activity. Few adaptations of the cells' proteome are needed, and organisms using the 'organic-solutes-in strategy' often adapt to a surprisingly broad salt concentration range. Most halophilic Bacteria, but also the halophilic methanogenic Archaea use such organic solutes. A variety of such solutes are known, including glycine betaine

  18. Microbial life at high salt concentrations: phylogenetic and metabolic diversity.

    PubMed

    Oren, Aharon

    2008-01-01

    Halophiles are found in all three domains of life. Within the Bacteria we know halophiles within the phyla Cyanobacteria, Proteobacteria, Firmicutes, Actinobacteria, Spirochaetes, and Bacteroidetes. Within the Archaea the most salt-requiring microorganisms are found in the class Halobacteria. Halobacterium and most of its relatives require over 100-150 g/l salt for growth and structural stability. Also within the order Methanococci we encounter halophilic species. Halophiles and non-halophilic relatives are often found together in the phylogenetic tree, and many genera, families and orders have representatives with greatly different salt requirement and tolerance. A few phylogenetically coherent groups consist of halophiles only: the order Halobacteriales, family Halobacteriaceae (Euryarchaeota) and the anaerobic fermentative bacteria of the order Halanaerobiales (Firmicutes). The family Halomonadaceae (Gammaproteobacteria) almost exclusively contains halophiles. Halophilic microorganisms use two strategies to balance their cytoplasm osmotically with their medium. The first involves accumulation of molar concentrations of KCl. This strategy requires adaptation of the intracellular enzymatic machinery, as proteins should maintain their proper conformation and activity at near-saturating salt concentrations. The proteome of such organisms is highly acidic, and most proteins denature when suspended in low salt. Such microorganisms generally cannot survive in low salt media. The second strategy is to exclude salt from the cytoplasm and to synthesize and/or accumulate organic 'compatible' solutes that do not interfere with enzymatic activity. Few adaptations of the cells' proteome are needed, and organisms using the 'organic-solutes-in strategy' often adapt to a surprisingly broad salt concentration range. Most halophilic Bacteria, but also the halophilic methanogenic Archaea use such organic solutes. A variety of such solutes are known, including glycine betaine

  19. Balance Problems

    MedlinePlus

    ... version of this page please turn Javascript on. Balance Problems About Balance Problems Have you ever felt dizzy, lightheaded, or ... dizziness problem during the past year. Why Good Balance is Important Having good balance means being able ...

  20. Effects of Na2SO4 or NaCl on sonochemical degradation of phenolic compounds in an aqueous solution under Ar: Positive and negative effects induced by the presence of salts.

    PubMed

    Uddin, Md Helal; Nanzai, Ben; Okitsu, Kenji

    2016-01-01

    Sonochemical degradation of 4-chlorophenol, phenol, catechol and resorcinol was studied under Ar at 200 kHz in the absence and presence of Na2SO4 or NaCl. The rates of sonochemical degradation in the absence of salts decreased in the order 4-chlorophenol>phenol>catechol>resorcinol and this order was in good agreement with the order of log P (partition coefficient) value of each phenolic compound. The effects of salts on the rates of sonochemical degradation consisted of no effect or slight negative or positive effects. We discussed these unclear results based on two viewpoints: one was based on the changes in pseudo hydrophobicity and/or diffusion behavior of phenolic compounds and the other was based on the changes in solubility of Ar gas. The measured log P value of each phenolic compound slightly increased with increasing salt concentration. In addition, the dynamic surface tension for 4-chlorophenol aqueous solution in the absence and presence of Na2SO4 or NaCl suggested that phenolic compounds more easily accumulated at the interface region of bubbles at higher salt concentration. These results indicated that the rates of sonochemical degradation should be enhanced by the addition of salts. On the other hand, the calculated Ar gas solubility was confirmed to decrease with increasing salt concentration. The yield of H2O2 formed in the presence of Na2SO4 or NaCl decreased with increasing salt concentration. These results suggested that sonochemical efficiency decreased with decreasing gas amount in aqueous solution: a negative effect of salts was observed. Because negative and positive effects were induced simultaneously, we concluded that the effects of salts on the rates of sonochemical degradation of phenolic compounds became unclear. The products formed from sonochemical degradation of 4-chlorophenol were also characterized by HPLC analysis. The formation of phenol and 4-chloro-1,3-dihydroxy benzene was confirmed and these concentrations were affected by the

  1. Influence of the anions on the N-cationic benzethonium salts in the solid state and solution: Chloride, bromide, hydroxide and citrate hydrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paradies, Henrich H.; Reichelt, Hendrik

    2016-06-01

    The crystal structures of the hydrated cationic surfactant benzethonium (Bzth) chloride, bromide, hydroxide, and citrate have been determined by X-ray diffraction analysis and compared with their structures in solution well above their critical micelle concentration. The differences in the nature of the various anions of the four Bzth-X materials lead to unique anion environments and 3-D molecular arrangements. The water molecule in the monoclinic Bzth-Cl or Bzth-Br forms is hydrogen bonded to the halides and particularly to the hydrogens of the methoxy groups of the Bzth moiety notwithstanding the weak Brønsted acidity of the methoxy hydrogens. The citrate strongly interacts with the hydrogens of the methoxy group forming an embedded anionic spherical cluster of a radius of 2.6 Å. The Bzth-OH crystallizes in a hexagonal lattice with two water molecules and reveals free water molecules forming hydrogen bonded channels through the Bzth-OH crystal along the c-axis. The distances between the cationic nitrogen and the halides are 4.04 Å and 4.20 Å, significantly longer than expected for typical van der Waals distances of 3.30 Å. The structures show weakly interacting, alternating apolar and polar layers, which run parallel to the crystallographic a-b planes or a-c planes. The Bzth-X salts were also examined in aqueous solution containing 20% (v/v) ethanol and 1.0 % (v/v) glycerol well above their critical micelle concentration by small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) and wide-angle X-ray scattering (WAXS). The [1,1,1] planes for the Bzth Cl or Br, the [0,0,2] and [1,1,0] planes for the Bzth-citrate, the [2,-1,0] planes and the [0,0,1] planes for the Bzth-OH found in the crystalline phase were also present in the solution phase, accordingly, the preservation of these phases are a strong indication of periodicity in the solution phase.

  2. The Effect of Evaporated Salt Solutions on the Optical Dating Properties of JSC Mars-1: "Seasoning" for a Mars Soil Simulant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lepper, Kenneth

    2009-08-01

    Optically stimulated luminescence dating, or optical dating, is an established terrestrial geochronometric technique that is being adapted to date sedimentary deposits and landforms on the surface of Mars. Recent discoveries have highlighted the astrobiological significance and occurrence of halite on the surface of Mars. The objective of the experiments in this study was to create a simplistic analogue of the sedimentary material that would result from evaporation of ion-containing pore water out of martian regolith and evaluate the influence the evaporated salts would have on in situ optical dating of silicate sediments. The radiation dose response, as measured by infrared stimulated luminescence (IRSL), from evaporated mixtures of JSC Mars-1 and solutions of sodium chloride and calcium sulfate was documented. The results suggest that the presence of CaSO4 and NaCl within the aggregated particles does not have adverse effects on IRSL dose response and that aggregates of this type exhibit dose response characteristics that are appropriate for optical dating.

  3. The effect of evaporated salt solutions on the optical dating properties of JSC Mars-1: "seasoning" for a Mars soil simulant.

    PubMed

    Lepper, Kenneth

    2009-01-01

    Optically stimulated luminescence dating, or optical dating, is an established terrestrial geochronometric technique that is being adapted to date sedimentary deposits and landforms on the surface of Mars. Recent discoveries have highlighted the astrobiological significance and occurrence of halite on the surface of Mars. The objective of the experiments in this study was to create a simplistic analogue of the sedimentary material that would result from evaporation of ion-containing pore water out of martian regolith and evaluate the influence the evaporated salts would have on in situ optical dating of silicate sediments. The radiation dose response, as measured by infrared stimulated luminescence (IRSL), from evaporated mixtures of JSC Mars-1 and solutions of sodium chloride and calcium sulfate was documented. The results suggest that the presence of CaSO(4) and NaCl within the aggregated particles does not have adverse effects on IRSL dose response and that aggregates of this type exhibit dose response characteristics that are appropriate for optical dating. PMID:19586394

  4. Attractive forces between hydrophobic solid surfaces measured by AFM on the first approach in salt solutions and in the presence of dissolved gases.

    PubMed

    Azadi, Mehdi; Nguyen, Anh V; Yakubov, Gleb E

    2015-02-17

    Interfacial gas enrichment of dissolved gases (IGE) has been shown to cover hydrophobic solid surfaces in water. The atomic force microscopy (AFM) data has recently been supported by molecular dynamics simulation. It was demonstrated that IGE is responsible for the unexpected stability and large contact angle of gaseous nanobubbles at the hydrophobic solid-water interface. Here we provide further evidence of the significant effect of IGE on an attractive force between hydrophobic solid surfaces in water. The force in the presence of dissolved gas, i.e., in aerated and nonaerated NaCl solutions (up to 4 M), was measured by the AFM colloidal probe technique. The effect of nanobubble bridging on the attractive force was minimized or eliminated by measuring forces on the first approach of the AFM probe toward the flat hydrophobic surface and by using high salt concentrations to reduce gas solubility. Our results confirm the presence of three types of forces, two of which are long-range attractive forces of capillary bridging origin as caused by either surface nanobubbles or gap-induced cavitation. The third type is a short-range attractive force observed in the absence of interfacial nanobubbles that is attributed to the IGE in the form of a dense gas layer (DGL) at hydrophobic surfaces. Such a force was found to increase with increasing gas saturation and to decrease with decreasing gas solubility. PMID:25627159

  5. A new equation of state of a flexible-chain polyelectrolyte solution: Phase equilibria and osmotic pressure in the salt-free case

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Budkov, Yu. A.; Kolesnikov, A. L.; Georgi, N.; Nogovitsyn, E. A.; Kiselev, M. G.

    2015-05-01

    We develop a first-principle equation of state of salt-free polyelectrolyte solution in the limit of infinitely long flexible polymer chains in the framework of a field-theoretical formalism beyond the linear Debye-Hueckel theory and predict a liquid-liquid phase separation induced by a strong correlation attraction. As a reference system, we choose a set of two subsystems—charged macromolecules immersed in a structureless oppositely charged background created by counterions (polymer one component plasma) and counterions immersed in oppositely charged background created by polymer chains (hard-core one component plasma). We calculate the excess free energy of polymer one component plasma in the framework of modified random phase approximation, whereas a contribution of charge densities' fluctuations of neutralizing backgrounds we evaluate at the level of Gaussian approximation. We show that our theory is in a very good agreement with the results of Monte Carlo and MD simulations for critical parameters of liquid-liquid phase separation and osmotic pressure in a wide range of monomer concentration above the critical point, respectively.

  6. Mixtures of l-Amino Acids as Reaction Medium for Formation of Iron Nanoparticles: The Order of Addition into a Ferrous Salt Solution Matters

    PubMed Central

    Šišková, Karolína M.; Machala, Libor; Tuček, Jiři; Kašlík, Josef; Mojzeš, Peter; Zbořil, Radek

    2013-01-01

    Owing to Mössbauer spectroscopy, an advanced characterization technique for iron-containing materials, the present study reveals previously unknown possibilities using l-amino acids for the generation of magnetic particles. Based on our results, a simple choice of the order of l-amino acids addition into a reaction mixture containing ferrous ions leads to either superparamagnetic ferric oxide/oxyhydroxide particles, or magnetically strong Fe0-Fe2O3/FeOOH core-shell particles after chemical reduction. Conversely, when ferric salts are employed with the addition of selected l-amino acids, only Fe0-Fe2O3/FeOOH core-shell particles are observed, regardless of the addition order. We explain this phenomenon by a specific transient/intermediate complex formation between Fe2+ and l-glutamic acid. This type of complexation prevents ferrous ions from spontaneous oxidation in solutions with full air access. Moreover, due to surface-enhanced Raman scattering spectroscopy we show that the functional groups of l-amino acids are not destroyed during the borohydride-induced reduction. These functionalities can be further exploited for (i) attachment of l-amino acids to the as-prepared magnetic particles, and (ii) for targeted bio- and/or environmental applications where the surface chemistry needs to be tailored and directed toward biocompatible species. PMID:24071943

  7. Multiple solutions and numerical analysis to the dynamic and stationary models coupling a delayed energy balance model involving latent heat and discontinuous albedo with a deep ocean.

    PubMed

    Díaz, J I; Hidalgo, A; Tello, L

    2014-10-01

    We study a climatologically important interaction of two of the main components of the geophysical system by adding an energy balance model for the averaged atmospheric temperature as dynamic boundary condition to a diagnostic ocean model having an additional spatial dimension. In this work, we give deeper insight than previous papers in the literature, mainly with respect to the 1990 pioneering model by Watts and Morantine. We are taking into consideration the latent heat for the two phase ocean as well as a possible delayed term. Non-uniqueness for the initial boundary value problem, uniqueness under a non-degeneracy condition and the existence of multiple stationary solutions are proved here. These multiplicity results suggest that an S-shaped bifurcation diagram should be expected to occur in this class of models generalizing previous energy balance models. The numerical method applied to the model is based on a finite volume scheme with nonlinear weighted essentially non-oscillatory reconstruction and Runge-Kutta total variation diminishing for time integration. PMID:25294969

  8. Multiple solutions and numerical analysis to the dynamic and stationary models coupling a delayed energy balance model involving latent heat and discontinuous albedo with a deep ocean

    PubMed Central

    Díaz, J. I.; Hidalgo, A.; Tello, L.

    2014-01-01

    We study a climatologically important interaction of two of the main components of the geophysical system by adding an energy balance model for the averaged atmospheric temperature as dynamic boundary condition to a diagnostic ocean model having an additional spatial dimension. In this work, we give deeper insight than previous papers in the literature, mainly with respect to the 1990 pioneering model by Watts and Morantine. We are taking into consideration the latent heat for the two phase ocean as well as a possible delayed term. Non-uniqueness for the initial boundary value problem, uniqueness under a non-degeneracy condition and the existence of multiple stationary solutions are proved here. These multiplicity results suggest that an S-shaped bifurcation diagram should be expected to occur in this class of models generalizing previous energy balance models. The numerical method applied to the model is based on a finite volume scheme with nonlinear weighted essentially non-oscillatory reconstruction and Runge–Kutta total variation diminishing for time integration. PMID:25294969

  9. Effect of Azotobacter vinelandii and compatible solutes on germination wheat seeds and root concentrations of sodium and potassium under salt stress.

    PubMed

    Silini, A; Silini-Chérif, H; Ghoul, M

    2012-02-01

    The effect of plant growth-promoting Rhizobacteria (PGPR) and exogenous application of compatible solutes on seed germination and root concentrations of sodium and potassium of two wheat varieties (Triticum durum L.) were evaluated under saline stress. In this experiment, Azotobacter vinelandii strain DSM85, glycine betaine and proline were used. Inoculated seeds for each variety were placed on Whatman paper in 9 cm Petri dishes containing 15 mL of distilled water or NaCl solutions at various concentrations (control, 100, 200, 300 mM) supplemented with or without glycine betaine (GB) or proline at 5 mM. The results indicated that addition of proline (5 mM) stimulated the production of indol acetic acid and the growth of A. vinelandii at 200 and 300 mM NaCl, respectively. The germination rate index and the germination final percentage decreased significantly (p < 0.05) with increasing salinity level. The germination was significantly diminished at 300 mM with significant variation among varieties and Waha variety had higher germination percentage than Bousselam variety. Inoculation of seeds by A. vinelandii and exogenous application of proline had significantly positive effect on the germination at this concentration of NaCl. The rate of accumulation of Na+ in roots was important at 100 mM and increased at 200 mM. The concentration of K+ decreased when salinity increased. The effect of inoculation or inoculation with proline decreased the accumulation of Na' and reduced the loss of K+ under salt stress. From the present study we can conclude that the use of A. vinelandii strain DSM85 and external application of low concentrations of proline on seeds might be considered as a strategy for the protection of plants under saline stress. PMID:22866543

  10. Nucleus accumbens shell, but not core, tracks motivational value of salt.

    PubMed

    Loriaux, Amy L; Roitman, Jamie D; Roitman, Mitchell F

    2011-09-01

    To appropriately respond to an affective stimulus, we must be able to track its value across changes in both the external and internal environment. The nucleus accumbens (NAc) is a critical component of reward circuitry, but recent work suggests that the NAc encodes aversion as well as reward. It remains unknown whether differential NAc activity reflects flexible changes in stimulus value when it is altered due to a change in physiological state. We measured the activity of individual NAc neurons when rats were given intraoral infusions of a hypertonic salt solution (0.45 M NaCl) across multiple sessions in which motivational state was manipulated. This normally nonpreferred taste was made rewarding via sodium depletion, which resulted in a strong motivation to seek out and consume salt. Recordings were made in three conditions: while sodium replete (REP), during acute sodium depletion (DEP), and following replenishment of salt to normal sodium balance (POST). We found that NAc neurons in the shell and core subregions responded differently across the three conditions. In the shell, we observed overall increases in NAc activity when the salt solution was nonpreferred (REP) but decreases when the salt solution was preferred (DEP). In the core, overall activity was significantly altered only after sodium balance was restored (POST). The results lend further support to the selective encoding of affective stimuli by the NAc and suggest that NAc shell is particularly involved in flexibly encoding stimulus value based on motivational state. PMID:21697439

  11. Dynamic salt effect on intramolecular charge-transfer reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu Jianjun; Ma Rong; Lu Yan; Stell, George

    2005-12-08

    The dynamic salt effect in charge-transfer reactions is investigated theoretically in this paper. Free-energy surfaces are derived based on a nonequilibrium free-energy functional. Reaction coordinates are clearly defined. The solution of the reaction-diffusion equation leads to a rate constant depending on the time correlation function of the reaction coordinates. The time correlation function of the ion-atmosphere coordinate is derived from the solution of the Debye-Falkenhagen equation. It is shown that the dynamic salt effect plays an important role in controlling the rate of charge-transfer reactions in the narrow-window limit but is balanced by the energetics and the dynamics of the polar-solvent coordinate. The simplest version of the theory is compared with an experiment, and the agreement is fairly good. The theory can also be extended to charge-transfer in the class of electrolytes that has come to be called 'ionic fluids'.

  12. Crushed Salt Constitutive Model

    SciTech Connect

    Callahan, G.D.

    1999-02-01

    The constitutive model used to describe the deformation of crushed salt is presented in this report. Two mechanisms -- dislocation creep and grain boundary diffusional pressure solution -- are combined to form the basis for the constitutive model governing the deformation of crushed salt. The constitutive model is generalized to represent three-dimensional states of stress. Upon complete consolidation, the crushed-salt model reproduces the Multimechanism Deformation (M-D) model typically used for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) host geological formation salt. New shear consolidation tests are combined with an existing database that includes hydrostatic consolidation and shear consolidation tests conducted on WIPP and southeastern New Mexico salt. Nonlinear least-squares model fitting to the database produced two sets of material parameter values for the model -- one for the shear consolidation tests and one for a combination of the shear and hydrostatic consolidation tests. Using the parameter values determined from the fitted database, the constitutive model is validated against constant strain-rate tests. Shaft seal problems are analyzed to demonstrate model-predicted consolidation of the shaft seal crushed-salt component. Based on the fitting statistics, the ability of the model to predict the test data, and the ability of the model to predict load paths and test data outside of the fitted database, the model appears to capture the creep consolidation behavior of crushed salt reasonably well.

  13. Balance Problems

    MedlinePlus

    ... our e-newsletter! Aging & Health A to Z Balance Problems Basic Facts & Information What are Balance Problems? Having good balance means being able to ... Only then can you “keep your balance.” Why Balance is Important Your feelings of dizziness may last ...

  14. Oil content of sediments in the sump of a salt dome solution-mined cavern used for crude oil storage. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Niederhoff, P.; Giles, H.N.

    1981-09-01

    The studies reported herein were conducted to ascertain if petroleum hydrocarbons are likely to accumulate in the sump sediments of a salt dome solution cavern used for crude oil storage and, if so, which hydrocarbons and in what concentrations. Cavern K 117 at Etzel, West Germany was selected for sampling because considerable data were available pertaining to the cavern and its crude oil inventory as a result of earlier studies. Mineralogical analyses of the sump samples revealed that they predominantly consist of uncemented halite crystals, ranging up to several centimeters in length, with subordinate anhydrite, and traces of gypsum and clay. Some of the mineral particles are colorless and translucent, while others are noticeably contaminated with oil. The samples exuded a distinct petroleum odor. Gas chromatographic analysis of an evolved gas sample showed the presence of the normal-paraffins propane through octane. Gas chromatographic analyses of a solvent extract of the sediment showed hydrocarbon and sulfur-compound distributions typical of crude oil. An infrared spectrum of the extract was also characteristic of a weathered or topped crude oil. The hydrocarbon content of the sediment samples was determined to be 780 ppM on the basis of a tetrachloromethane extract. It is believed that the petroleum present in the sump sediments principally results from cavern workover operations involving the pulling and resetting of the brine tubing string. When the brine string is reset it fills with oil because a packer is not used. To displace this oil, river water is pumped down the tubing at a moderately high rate. During this flushing process, clay particles dispersed in the river water adsorb a film of oil. As the oil-filmed clay particles enter the brine in the cavern they electrolytically flocculate and oil is sedimented to the cavern sump.

  15. Free energetics of carbon nanotube association in aqueous inorganic NaI salt solutions: Temperature effects using all-atom molecular dynamics simulations.

    PubMed

    Ou, Shu-Ching; Cui, Di; Wezowicz, Matthew; Taufer, Michela; Patel, Sandeep

    2015-06-15

    In this study, we examine the temperature dependence of free energetics of nanotube association using graphical processing unit-enabled all-atom molecular dynamics simulations (FEN ZI) with two (10,10) single-walled carbon nanotubes in 3 m NaI aqueous salt solution. Results suggest that the free energy, enthalpy and entropy changes for the association process are all reduced at the high temperature, in agreement with previous investigations using other hydrophobes. Via the decomposition of free energy into individual components, we found that solvent contribution (including water, anion, and cation contributions) is correlated with the spatial distribution of the corresponding species and is influenced distinctly by the temperature. We studied the spatial distribution and the structure of the solvent in different regions: intertube, intratube and the bulk solvent. By calculating the fluctuation of coarse-grained tube-solvent surfaces, we found that tube-water interfacial fluctuation exhibits the strongest temperature dependence. By taking ions to be a solvent-like medium in the absence of water, tube-anion interfacial fluctuation shows similar but weaker dependence on temperature, while tube-cation interfacial fluctuation shows no dependence in general. These characteristics are discussed via the malleability of their corresponding solvation shells relative to the nanotube surface. Hydrogen bonding profiles and tetrahedrality of water arrangement are also computed to compare the structure of solvent in the solvent bulk and intertube region. The hydrophobic confinement induces a relatively lower concentration environment in the intertube region, therefore causing different intertube solvent structures which depend on the tube separation. This study is relevant in the continuing discourse on hydrophobic interactions (as they impact generally a broad class of phenomena in biology, biochemistry, and materials science and soft condensed matter research), and

  16. Free Energetics of Carbon Nanotube Association in Aqueous Inorganic NaI Salt Solutions: Temperature Effects using All-Atom Molecular Dynamics Simulations

    PubMed Central

    Ou, Shu-Ching; Cui, Di; Wezowicz, Matthew; Taufer, Michela; Patel, Sandeep

    2015-01-01

    In this study we examine the temperature dependence of free energetics of nanotube association by using GPU-enabled all-atom molecular dynamics simulations (FEN ZI) with two (10,10) single-walled carbon nanotubes in 3 m NaI aqueous salt solution. Results suggest that the free energy, enthalpy and entropy changes for the association process are all reduced at the high temperature, in agreement with previous investigations using other hydrophobes. Via the decomposition of free energy into individual components, we found that solvent contribution (including water, anion and cation contributions) is correlated with the spatial distribution of the corresponding species and is influenced distinctly by the temperature. We studied the spatial distribution and the structure of the solvent in different regions: intertube, intra-tube and the bulk solvent. By calculating the fluctuation of coarse-grained tube-solvent surfaces, we found that tube-water interfacial fluctuation exhibits the strongest temperature dependence. By taking ions to be a solvent-like medium in the absence of water, tube-anion interfacial fluctuation also shows similar but weaker dependence on temperature, while tube-cation interfacial fluctuation shows no dependence in general. These characteristics are discussed via the malleability of their corresponding solvation shells relative to the nanotube surface. Hydrogen bonding profiles and tetrahedrality of water arrangement are also computed to compare the structure of solvent in the solvent bulk and intertube region. The hydrophobic confinement induces a relatively lower concentration environment in the intertube region, therefore causing different intertube solvent structures which depend on the tube separation. This study is relevant in the continuing discourse on hydrophobic interactions (as they impact generally a broad class of phenomena in biology, biochemistry, and materials science and soft condensed matter research), and interpretations of

  17. Balance Problems

    MedlinePlus

    ... it could be a sign of a balance problem. Balance problems can make you feel unsteady or as if ... related injuries, such as hip fracture. Some balance problems are due to problems in the inner ear. ...

  18. Balance Problems

    MedlinePlus

    ... often, it could be a sign of a balance problem. Balance problems can make you feel unsteady or as ... fall-related injuries, such as hip fracture. Some balance problems are due to problems in the inner ...

  19. Time-resolved SAXS study of the effect of a double hydrophilic block-copolymer on the formation of CaCO3 from a supersaturated salt solution.

    PubMed

    Bolze, J; Pontoni, D; Ballauff, M; Narayanan, T; Cölfen, H

    2004-09-01

    The effect of a double hydrophilic block-copolymer additive (made of polyaspartic acid and polyethyleneglycol, pAsp(10)-b-PEG(110)) on the initial formation of calcium carbonate from a supersaturated salt solution has been studied in situ by means of time-resolved synchrotron small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS). A stopped-flow cell was used for rapidly mixing the 20 mM aqueous reactant solutions of calcium chloride and sodium carbonate. In reference measurements without polymer additive the very rapid formation of primary, overall spherical CaCO(3) particles with a radius of ca. 19 nm and a size polydispersity of ca. 26% was observed within the first 10 ms after mixing. A subsequent, very rapid aggregation of these primary particles was evidenced by a distinct upturn of the SAXS intensity at smallest angles. During the aggregation process the size of the primary particles remained unchanged. From an analysis of the absolute scattering intensity the mass density of these particles was determined to 1.9 g/cm(3). From this rather low density it is concluded that those precursor particles are amorphous, which has been confirmed by simultaneous wide-angle X-ray diffraction measurements. Upon adding 200 pm of the block-copolymer no influence on the size, the size polydispersity and morphology of the primary particles, nor on the kinetics of their formation and growth, was found. On the other hand, the subsequent aggregation and precipitation process is considerably slowed down by the additive and smaller aggregates result. The crystalline morphology of the sediment was studied in situ by WAXS ca. 50 min after mixing the reactants. Several diffraction rings could be detected, which indicate that a transformation of the metastable, amorphous precursor particles to randomly oriented vaterite nanocrystallites has taken place. In addition, a few isolated Bragg spots of high intensity were detected, which are attributed to individual, oriented calcite microcrystals that

  20. Method for estimating road salt contamination of Norwegian lakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitterød, Nils-Otto; Wike Kronvall, Kjersti; Turtumøygaard, Stein; Haaland, Ståle

    2013-04-01

    Consumption of road salt in Norway, used to improve winter road conditions, has been tripled during the last two decades, and there is a need to quantify limits for optimal use of road salt to avoid further environmental harm. The purpose of this study was to implement methodology to estimate chloride concentration in any given water body in Norway. This goal is feasible to achieve if the complexity of solute transport in the landscape is simplified. The idea was to keep computations as simple as possible to be able to increase spatial resolution of input functions. The first simplification we made was to treat all roads exposed to regular salt application as steady state sources of sodium chloride. This is valid if new road salt is applied before previous contamination is removed through precipitation. The main reasons for this assumption are the significant retention capacity of vegetation; organic matter; and soil. The second simplification we made was that the groundwater table is close to the surface. This assumption is valid for major part of Norway, which means that topography is sufficient to delineate catchment area at any location in the landscape. Given these two assumptions, we applied spatial functions of mass load (mass NaCl pr. time unit) and conditional estimates of normal water balance (volume of water pr. time unit) to calculate steady state chloride concentration along the lake perimeter. Spatial resolution of mass load and estimated concentration along the lake perimeter was 25 m x 25 m while water balance had 1 km x 1 km resolution. The method was validated for a limited number of Norwegian lakes and estimation results have been compared to observations. Initial results indicate significant overlap between measurements and estimations, but only for lakes where the road salt is the major contribution for chloride contamination. For lakes in catchments with high subsurface transmissivity, the groundwater table is not necessarily following the

  1. Salts Are Mostly NOT Ionized.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hawkes, Stephen J.

    1996-01-01

    Discusses the misconception that salts are completely ionizing in solution, the presence of this error in textbooks, probable origins of the error, covalent bonding and ion pairs, and how to tell students the truth. (MKR)

  2. Multi-3,3'-Bicarbazole-Substituted Arylsilane Host Materials with Balanced Charge Transport for Highly Efficient Solution-Processed Blue Phosphorescent Organic Light-Emitting Diodes.

    PubMed

    Sun, Dianming; Zhou, Xiaokang; Li, Huihui; Sun, Xiaoli; Ren, Zhongjie; Ma, Dongge; Yan, Shouke

    2015-08-19

    A series of 3,3'-bicarbazole (mCP)-functionalized tetraphenylsilane derivatives (SimCPx), including bis(3,5-di(9H-carbazol-9-yl)phenyl)diphenylsilane (SimCP2), tris(3,5-di(9H-carbazol-9-yl)phenyl)methylsilane (SimCP3-CH3), tris(3,5-di(9H-carbazol-9-yl)phenyl)phenylsilane (SimCP3-Ph), and tetrakis(3,5-di(9H-carbazol-9-yl)phenyl)silane (SimCP4), serving as bipolar blue hosts for bis[2-(4,6-difluorophenyl)pyridyl-N,C2']iridium(III) (FIrpic), have been synthesized by incorporating different ratios of mCP subunits into a central silicon atom. All of the SimCPx derivatives have wide bandgaps and high triplet energies because of the indirect linkage by silicon between each mCP subunit. The good solubility and high thermal and morphological stability of SimCPx are beneficial for forming amorphous and homogeneous films through solution processing. Density functional theory simulations manifest the better bipolar characteristics for SimCPx using three and four mCP units rather than the represented bipolar host SimCP2. As a result, SimCP4 presents the best electron-transporting ability for charge balance. Consequently, the lowest driving voltage of 4.8 eV, and the favorable maximum efficiencies of 14.2% for external quantum efficiency (28.4 cd A(-1), 13.5 lm W(-1)), are achieved by solution-processed, SimCP4-based blue phosphorescent organic light-emitting diodes as the highest performance among SimCPx, in which 32% improved device efficiencies compared to that of SimCP2 are obtained. It is inspiring to develop efficient bipolar hosts for blue phosphors by just incorporating monopolar carbazole into arylsilanes in two steps. PMID:26252613

  3. The Salts of Mars: A Rich and Ubiquitous Natural Resource

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kargel, Jeff S.

    1998-01-01

    The Viking and Pathfinder Mars landers have shown that martian soil is highly enriched in Cl, S, P, and perhaps Br. which, in all likelihood, occur as salts (chlorides, sulfates, phosphates, and perhaps bromides). Carbonates also may be present Many martian salt minerals are believed to be hydrated. These water-soluble constituents of the soil will offer the first colonists a rich source of many industrial commodities needed to sustain and grow the colony. Being hydrous, martian salts hold a tremendous potential to supply water in regions of Mars where otherwise preferable ice may be absent or difficult to access A caliche-like form of concrete or adobe may be manufactured by the drying of briny mud. Sulfates and phosphates may be used as additives for the manufacture of soil prepared and balanced for agriculture. Sulfates and chlorides offer a raw material for the manufacture of sulfuric and hydrochloric acids. Electrolytic processes applied to magnesium sulfate solution may yield metallic Mg. In short, martian salts will offer colonists abroad industrial base of chemical substances potentially useful in development of indigenous construction, chemical, and agricultural industries. Best of all, such salty dust deposits are among the most widespread and chemically uniform (i.e., dependable) raw materials on Mars. A simple method of preprocessing martian soil to extract and isolate the major salt consituents and to obtain water will be presented, as will a more thorough presentation of possible industrial uses of these materials in a Mars base.

  4. Composition and stability of salts on the surface of Europa and their oceanic origin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zolotov, Mikhail Y.; Shock, Everett L.

    2001-12-01

    We present theoretical models of the composition, the relative abundances, and the stability of hydrated salts on the surface and in the icy shell of Jupiter's satellite Europa and discuss whether those salts have an oceanic origin. The evaluations were done with thermodynamic calculations of (1) salt dehydration equilibria at the conditions of the surface of Europa and its icy shell, (2) chemical equilibria involving solids and water vapor in the Na-K-Mg-Ca-S-Cl-H2O system at surface temperatures and variable partial pressures of water vapor, and (3) changes in aquatic chemistry and sequences of salt precipitation from freezing oceanic water, using cosmochemical, mass balance, and physical-chemical constraints on the elemental and ionic composition of the ocean. Mass balance calculations of total or partial extraction of elements into an ocean from a carbonaceous chondrite type mantle show that magnesium and sulfate rather than chloride and sodium could be the most abundant solutes in the ocean. Freezing oceanic water of this composition leads to brines that differ in composition from the original water and to deposition of ice and highly hydrated sulfates of Mg, Na, and Ca as well as alkali chlorides. After freezing is complete, highly hydrated salts remain stable in ice-bearing surface materials and throughout the icy shell. For hypothetical surface salt lag deposits, formed through sublimation/sputtering of ice and dehydration of salts, we predict hydration stratification with depth, approaching the highest hydration states in ice-bearing materials in the lowest parts of the deposits. We discuss the effects of fast disequilibrium freezing and variable dehydration rates of salts on the predicted mineral assemblages at the surface. All of our models, which are independent of observations, predict the predominance of Mg and Na sulfates in surface salts, in agreement with spectroscopic models for the nonicy surface material in the near infrared spectral region.

  5. The material flow of salt

    SciTech Connect

    Kostick, D.S. )

    1993-01-01

    Salt (NaCl) is a universal mineral commodity used by virtually every person in the world. Although a very common mineral today, at one time it was considered as precious as gold in certain cultures. This study traces the material flow of salt from its origin through the postconsumer phase of usage. The final disposition of salt in the estimated 14,000 different uses, grouped into several macrocategories, is traced from the dispersive loss of salt into the environment to the ultimate disposal of salt-base products into the waste stream after consumption. The base year for this study is 1990, in which an estimated 196 million short tons of municipal solid waste was discarded by the US population. Approximately three-fourths of domestic salt consumed is released to the environment and unrecovered while about one-fourth is discharged to landfills and incinerators as products derived from salt. Cumulative historical domestic production, trade, and consumption data have been compiled to illustrate the long-term trends within the US salt industry and the cumulative contribution that highway deicing salt has had on the environment. Salt is an important component of drilling fluids in well drilling. It is used to flocculate and to increase the density of the drilling fluid in order to overcome high down-well gas pressures. Whenever drilling activities encounter salt formations, salt is added to the drilling fluid to saturate the solution and minimize the dissolution within the salt strata. Salt is also used to increase the set rate of concrete in cemented casings. This subsector includes companies engaged in oil, gas, and crude petroleum exploration and in refining and compounding lubricating oil. It includes SIC major groups 13 and 29. 13 refs., 14 figs., 6 tabs.

  6. Silicon enhanced salt tolerance by improving the root water uptake and decreasing the ion toxicity in cucumber

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shiwen; Liu, Peng; Chen, Daoqian; Yin, Lina; Li, Hongbing; Deng, Xiping

    2015-01-01

    Although the effects of silicon application on enhancing plant salt tolerance have been widely investigated, the underlying mechanism has remained unclear. In this study, seedlings of cucumber, a medium silicon accumulator plant, grown in 0.83 mM silicon solution for 2 weeks were exposed to 65 mM NaCl solution for another 1 week. The dry weight and shoot/root ratio were reduced by salt stress, but silicon application significantly alleviated these decreases. The chlorophyll concentration, net photosynthetic rate, transpiration rate and leaf water content were higher in plants treated with silicon than in untreated plants under salt stress conditions. Further investigation showed that salt stress decreased root hydraulic conductance (Lp), but that silicon application moderated this salt-induced decrease in Lp. The higher Lp in silicon-treated plants may account for the superior plant water balance. Moreover, silicon application significantly decreased Na+ concentration in the leaves while increasing K+ concentration. Simultaneously, both free and conjugated types of polyamines were maintained at high levels in silicon-treated plants, suggesting that polyamines may be involved in the ion toxicity. Our results indicate that silicon enhances the salt tolerance of cucumber through improving plant water balance by increasing the Lp and reducing Na+ content by increasing polyamine accumulation. PMID:26442072

  7. The solution structure of the four-way DNA junction at low-salt conditions: a fluorescence resonance energy transfer analysis.

    PubMed Central

    Clegg, R M; Murchie, A I; Lilley, D M

    1994-01-01

    The four-way DNA (Holliday) junction is an important postulated intermediate in the process of genetic recombination. Earlier studies have suggested that the junction exists in two alternative conformations, depending upon the salt concentration present. At high salt concentrations the junction folds into a stacked X structure, while at low salt concentrations the data indicate an extended unstacked conformation. The stereochemical conformation of the four-way DNA junction at low salt (low alkali ion concentration and no alkaline earth ions) was established by comparing the efficiency of fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) between donor and acceptor molecules attached pairwise in three permutations to the 5' termini of the duplex arms. A new variation of FRET was implemented based upon a systematic variation of the fraction of donor labeled single strands. The FRET results indicate that the structure of the four-way DNA junction at low salt exists as an unstacked, extended, square arrangement of the four duplex arms. The donor titration measurements made in the presence of magnesium ions clearly show the folding of the junction into the X stacked structure. In addition, the FRET efficiency can be measured. The fluorescence anisotropy of the acceptor in the presence of Mg2+ during donor titrations was also measured; the FRET efficiency can be calculated from the anisotropy data and the results are consistent with the folded, stacked X structure. PMID:8130350

  8. The influence of the method of cooling liquid electrolyte cathode on the energy balance in the gas discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tazmeev, Kh K.; Arslanov, I. M.; Tazmeev, G. Kh

    2016-01-01

    Experimentally investigated the energy balance in a gas discharge between a flowing electrolyte cathode and a metal anode at an power of tens of kilowatts. The discharge was burning in the air in the electrode gap with a height of 10 cm. The electrolyte was a solution of salt in distilled water. The concentration of the solution by weight was 5.5 g/l. The regularities of the influence of electrolyte mass flow through the flowing cathode on the energy characteristics of the discharge were studied. The modes of the discharge, whereby the energy balance of the portion of heat losses for heating of the electrolyte reaches a minimum were identified.

  9. Effects of Fluid Resuscitation With 0.9% Saline Versus a Balanced Electrolyte Solution on Acute Kidney Injury in a Rat Model of Sepsis*

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Feihu; Peng, Zhi-Yong; Bishop, Jeffery V.; Cove, Matthew E.; Singbartl, Kai; Kellum, John A.

    2014-01-01

    Objective To compare the acute effects of 0.9% saline versus a balanced electrolyte solution on acute kidney injury in a rat model of sepsis. Design Controlled laboratory experiment. Setting University laboratory. Subjects Sixty adult, male Sprague-Dawley rats. Interventions We induced sepsis by cecal ligation and puncture and randomized animals to receive fluid resuscitation with either 0.9% saline or Plasma-Lyte solution for 4 hours after 18 hours of cecal ligation and puncture (10 mL/kg in the first hour and 5 mL/kg in the next 3 hr). Blood and urine specimens were obtained from baseline, 18 hours after cecal ligation and puncture, immediately after 4 hours fluid resuscitation, and 24 hours later. We measured blood gas, plasma electrolytes, creatinine, interleukin-6, cystatin C, and neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin concentrations. We also analyzed urine for cystatin C and neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin. We used Risk, Injury, Failure, Loss and End-stage criteria for creatinine to assess severity of acute kidney injury. We observed all animals for survival up to 1 day after resuscitation. Surviving animals were killed for kidney histology. Finally, we carried out an identical study in 12 healthy animals. Measurements and Main Results Compared with Plasma-Lyte, 0.9% saline resuscitation resulted in significantly greater blood chloride concentrations (p < 0.05) and significantly decreased pH and base excess. Acute kidney injury severity measured by RIFLE criteria was increased with 0.9% saline compared with Plasma-Lyte resuscitation (p < 0.05), and these results were consistent with kidney histology and biomarkers of acute kidney injury. Twenty-four-hour survival favored Plasma-Lyte resuscitation (76.6% vs 53.3%; p = 0.03). Finally, in healthy animals, we found no differences between fluids and no evidence of acute kidney injury. Conclusion Volume resuscitation with Plasma-Lyte resulted in less acidosis and less kidney injury and improved short

  10. Long term efficacy, safety, and tolerabilitity of low daily doses of isosmotic polyethylene glycol electrolyte balanced solution (PMF-100) in the treatment of functional chronic constipation

    PubMed Central

    Corazziari, E; Badiali, D; Bazzocchi, G; Bassotti, G; Roselli, P; Mastropaolo, G; Luca, M; Galeazzi, R; Peruzzi, E

    2000-01-01

    differ between groups.
CONCLUSIONS—Administration of small daily doses of isosmotic PEG electrolyte balanced solutions was effective over a six month period for the treatment of functional constipation. A mean daily dose of approximately 300 ml of PEG solution (PEG 17.52 g) appeared to be safe, well tolerated, and devoid of significant side effects.


Keywords: constipation; polyethylene glycol; safety; tolerability PMID:10716682

  11. Natural gas storage in bedded salt formations

    SciTech Connect

    Macha, G.

    1996-09-01

    In 1990 Western Resources Inc. (WRI) identified the need for additional natural gas storage capacity for its intrastate natural gas system operated in the state of Kansas. Western Resources primary need was identified as peak day deliverability with annual storage balancing a secondary objective. Consequently, an underground bedded salt storage facility, Yaggy Storage Field, was developed and placed in operation in November 1993. The current working capacity of the new field is 2.1 BCF. Seventy individual caverns are in service on the 300 acre site. The caverns vary in size from 310,000 CF to 2,600,000 CF. Additional capacity can be added on the existing acreage by increasing the size of some of the smaller existing caverns by further solution mining and by development of an additional 30 potential well sites on the property.

  12. Electromarking solution

    DOEpatents

    Bullock, Jonathan S.; Harper, William L.; Peck, Charles G.

    1976-06-22

    This invention is directed to an aqueous halogen-free electromarking solution which possesses the capacity for marking a broad spectrum of metals and alloys selected from different classes. The aqueous solution comprises basically the nitrate salt of an amphoteric metal, a chelating agent, and a corrosion-inhibiting agent.

  13. Fundamental Properties of Salts

    SciTech Connect

    Toni Y Gutknecht; Guy L Fredrickson

    2012-11-01

    Thermal properties of molten salt systems are of interest to electrorefining operations, pertaining to both the Fuel Cycle Research & Development Program (FCR&D) and Spent Fuel Treatment Mission, currently being pursued by the Department of Energy (DOE). The phase stability of molten salts in an electrorefiner may be adversely impacted by the build-up of fission products in the electrolyte. Potential situations that need to be avoided, during electrorefining operations, include (i) fissile elements build up in the salt that might approach the criticality limits specified for the vessel, (ii) electrolyte freezing at the operating temperature of the electrorefiner due to changes in the liquidus temperature, and (iii) phase separation (non-homogenous solution). The stability (and homogeneity) of the phases can be monitored by studying the thermal characteristics of the molten salts as a function of impurity concentration. Simulated salt compositions consisting of the selected rare earth and alkaline earth chlorides, with a eutectic mixture of LiCl-KCl as the carrier electrolyte, were studied to determine the melting points (thermal characteristics) using a Differential Scanning Calorimeter (DSC). The experimental data were used to model the liquidus temperature. On the basis of the this data, it became possible to predict a spent fuel treatment processing scenario under which electrorefining could no longer be performed as a result of increasing liquidus temperatures of the electrolyte.

  14. Effects of ambient temperature and relative humidity on the dynamics of salt distribution in porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norouzi Rad, M.; Shokri, N.

    2011-12-01

    Understanding the physics of salt distribution in drying porous media is of relevance to various environmental and hydrological applications such as the soil salinization, terrestrial ecosystem functioning, microbiological activities in the vadose zone and structural damage to buildings, and historical monuments. Early stage of the evaporation process from saturated porous media is supplied by the capillary-induced liquid flow hydraulically connecting a receding drying front to surface (the so-called stage 1 evaporation). During stage 1, dissolved salt is transported by the capillary flow toward the evaporating surface where it accumulates, whereas diffusion (Brownian motion) tends to spread the salt and homogenize the concentrations in space. Relative humidity and ambient temperature limit the stage-1 evaporation and consequently influence the dynamics of salt distribution in porous media. The resulting interplay between convective and diffusive transport during evaporation is commonly quantified by the dimensionless Peclet number which is proportional to the evaporation rate. We have applied the convection-diffusion equation to describe the dynamics of salt distribution in drying porous media under different Peclet numbers. The predicted salt profiles were evaluated by a complete series of laboratory evaporation experiments using an environmental chamber where the relative humidity and temperature were accurately controlled. We have used sand with average particle size of 0.48 mm saturated with NaCl solution (1.25 Molal). The sand column was mounted on a digital balance connected to a computer to record the evaporation rate automatically. We studied dynamics of salt concentration at 30°C under relative humidity of 30%, 45% and 60% and also under the constant relative humidity of 45% at 30°C and 35°C . The experimentally-determined salt profiles were in a good agreement with the analytical and numerical predictions. Results revealed the preferential salt

  15. Plutonium and americium separation from salts

    DOEpatents

    Hagan, Paul G.; Miner, Frend J.

    1976-01-01

    Salts or materials containing plutonium and americium are dissolved in hydrochloric acid, heated, and contacted with an alkali metal carbonate solution to precipitate plutonium and americium carbonates which are thereafter readily separable from the solution.

  16. Salt appetite in the elderly.

    PubMed

    Hendi, Khadeja; Leshem, Micah

    2014-11-28

    The present study investigated whether salt appetite in the elderly is impaired similar to thirst because of the commonality of their physiological substrates and whether alterations in salt appetite are related to mood. Elderly (65-85 years, n 30) and middle-aged (45-58 years, n 30) men and women were compared in two test sessions. Thirst, psychophysical ratings of taste solutions, dietary Na and energy intakes, seasoning with salt and sugar, number of salty and sweet snacks consumed, preferred amounts of salt in soup and sugar in tea, and an overall measure of salt appetite and its relationship with mood, nocturia and sleep were measured. Elderly participants were found to be less thirsty and respond less to thirst. In contrast, no impairment of salt appetite was found in them, and although they had a reduced dietary Na intake, it dissipated when corrected for their reduced dietary energy intake. Diet composition and Na intake were found to be similar in middle-aged and elderly participants, despite the lesser intake in elderly participants. There were no age-related differences in the intensity of taste or hedonic profile of Na, in salting habits, in tests of salting soup, or number of salty snacks consumed. No relationship of any measure of salt appetite with mood measured by the Positive and Negative Affect Schedule, frequency of nocturia, or sleep duration was observed. The age-related impairment of the physiology of mineralofluid regulation, while compromising thirst and fluid intake, spares salt appetite, suggesting that salt appetite in humans is not regulated physiologically. Intact salt appetite in the elderly might be utilised judiciously to prevent hyponatraemia, increase thirst and improve appetite. PMID:25287294

  17. Urinary neutral endopeptidase 24.11 activity: modulation by chronic salt loading.

    PubMed

    Aviv, R; Gurbanov, K; Hoffman, A; Blumberg, S; Winaver, J

    1995-03-01

    Neutral endopeptidase (NEP) 24.11 is a zinc-metallopeptidase involved in the metabolism of several biologically active peptides including enkephalin, atrial natriuretic peptide, bradykinin, and endothelin. The enzyme is found in abundant amounts in the brush border of renal proximal epithelial cells. A soluble form of NEP was previously identified in human urine with characteristics similar to the renal enzyme. The present study further characterized the excreted form of NEP activity in urine of normal rats using a sensitive two-stage enzymatic assay. The response of urinary NEP to known inhibitors such as phosphoramidon and thiorphan, and its dependence on pH and salt concentration was studied. In addition, we evaluated the effects of acute and chronic changes in salt balance, induced by i.v. saline infusion and drinking of saline solution, on urinary NEP and on the activity of the enzyme in isolated proximal tubules. Our findings demonstrated that abundant NEP activity was detected in the urine of normal rats. Furthermore, chronic salt loading, but not acute salt infusion, was associated with increased activity of NEP in urine and in isolated proximal tubules, suggesting that the enzyme may be regulated by salt balance. Finally, the data suggest that urinary NEP may be used as an index of enzyme activity in the kidney. PMID:7752584

  18. Results Of Routine Strip Effluent Hold Tank, Decontaminated Salt Solution Hold Tank, Caustic Wash Tank And Caustic Storage Tank Samples From Modular Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction Unit During Macrobatch 6 Operations

    SciTech Connect

    Peters, T. B.

    2014-01-02

    Strip Effluent Hold Tank (SEHT), Decontaminated Salt Solution Hold Tank (DSSHT), Caustic Wash Tank (CWT) and Caustic Storage Tank (CST) samples from the Interim Salt Disposition Project (ISDP) Salt Batch (“Macrobatch”) 6 have been analyzed for 238Pu, 90Sr, 137Cs, and by Inductively Coupled Plasma Emission Spectroscopy (ICPES). The Pu, Sr, and Cs results from the current Macrobatch 6 samples are similar to those from comparable samples in previous Macrobatch 5. In addition the SEHT and DSSHT heel samples (i.e. ‘preliminary’) have been analyzed and reported to meet NGS Demonstration Plan requirements. From a bulk chemical point of view, the ICPES results do not vary considerably between this and the previous samples. The titanium results in the DSSHT samples continue to indicate the presence of Ti, when the feed material does not have detectable levels. This most likely indicates that leaching of Ti from MST has increased in ARP at the higher free hydroxide concentrations in the current feed.

  19. Results Of Routine Strip Effluent Hold Tank, Decontaminated Salt Solution Hold Tank, Caustic Wash Tank And Caustic Storage Tank Samples From Modular Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction Unit During Macrobatch 6 Operations

    SciTech Connect

    Peters, T. B.

    2013-10-01

    Strip Effluent Hold Tank (SEHT), Decontaminated Salt Solution Hold Tank (DSSHT), Caustic Wash Tank (CWT) and Caustic Storage Tank (CST) samples from several of the ''microbatches'' of Integrated Salt Disposition Project (ISDP) Salt Batch (''Macrobatch'') 6 have been analyzed for {sup 238}Pu, {sup 90}Sr, {sup 137}Cs, and by Inductively Coupled Plasma Emission Spectroscopy (ICPES). The results from the current microbatch samples are similar to those from comparable samples in Macrobatch 5. From a bulk chemical point of view, the ICPES results do not vary considerably between this and the previous macrobatch. The titanium results in the DSSHT samples continue to indicate the presence of Ti, when the feed material does not have detectable levels. This most likely indicates that leaching of Ti from MST in ARP continues to occur. Both the CST and CWT samples indicate that the target Free OH value of 0.03 has been surpassed. While at this time there is no indication that this has caused an operational problem, the CST should be adjusted into specification. The {sup 137}Cs results from the SRNL as well as F/H lab data indicate a potential decline in cesium decontamination factor. Further samples will be carefully monitored to investigate this.

  20. Results Of Routine Strip Effluent Hold Tank, Decontaminated Salt Solution Hold Tank, And Caustic Wash Tank Samples From Modular Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction Unit During Macrobatch 4 Operations

    SciTech Connect

    Peters, T. B.; Fink, S. D.

    2012-10-25

    Strip Effluent Hold Tank (SEHT), Decontaminated Salt Solution Hold Tank (DSSHT), and Caustic Wash Tank (CWT) samples from several of the ?microbatches? of Integrated Salt Disposition Project (ISDP) Salt Batch (?Macrobatch?) 4 have been analyzed for {sup 238}Pu, {sup 90}Sr, {sup 137}Cs, and by inductively-coupled plasma emission spectroscopy (ICPES). Furthermore, samples from the CWT have been analyzed by a variety of methods to investigate a decline in the decontamination factor (DF) of the cesium observed at MCU. The results indicate good decontamination performance within process design expectations. While the data set is sparse, the results of this set and the previous set of results for Macrobatch 3 samples indicate generally consistent operations. There is no indication of a disruption in plutonium and strontium removal. The average cesium DF and concentration factor (CF) for samples obtained from Macrobatch 4 are slightly lower than for Macrobatch 3, but still well within operating parameters. The DSSHT samples show continued presence of titanium, likely from leaching of the monosodium titanate in Actinide Removal Process (ARP).

  1. CuInSe₂ thin-film solar cells with 7.72 % efficiency prepared via direct coating of a metal salts/alcohol-based precursor solution.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Sejin; Son, Tae Hwa; Cho, Ara; Gwak, Jihye; Yun, Jae Ho; Shin, Keeshik; Ahn, Seoung Kyu; Park, Sang Hyun; Yoon, Kyunghoon

    2012-09-01

    A simple direct solution coating process for forming CuInSe₂ (CIS) thin films was described, employing a low-cost and environmentally friendly precursor solution. The precursor solution was prepared by mixing metal acetates, ethanol, and ethanolamine. The facile formation of a precursor solution without the need to prefabricate nanoparticles enables a rapid and easy processing, and the high stability of the solution in air further ensures the precursor preparation and the film deposition in ambient conditions without a glove box. The thin film solar cell fabricated with the absorber film prepared by this route showed an initial conversion efficiency of as high as 7.72 %. PMID:22890958

  2. Molten salt spectroelectrochemistry: recent developments

    SciTech Connect

    Mamantov, G.; Chapman, D.M.; Harward, B.L.; Klatt, L.N.; Smith, G.P.

    1985-01-01

    Molten salt spectroelectrochemistry will be reviewed in this paper. UV-visible transmission, infrared reflectance, resonance and normal Raman, and electron spin resonance spectroelectrochemistry have been used for molten salt studies. Two recent applications of uv-visible transmission spectroelectrochemistry to studies of organic and inorganic solutes in molten SbCl/sub 3/-AlCl/sub 3/-N-(1-butyl)pyridinium chloride and AlCl/sub 3/-NaCl will be described.

  3. Phosphate salts

    MedlinePlus

    ... taken by mouth or used as enemas. Indigestion. Aluminum phosphate and calcium phosphate are FDA-permitted ingredients ... Phosphate salts containing sodium, potassium, aluminum, or calcium are LIKELY SAFE for most people when taken by mouth short-term, when sodium phosphate is inserted into the ...

  4. Mechanism for salt scaling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valenza, John J., II

    Salt scaling is superficial damage caused by freezing a saline solution on the surface of a cementitious body. The damage consists of the removal of small chips or flakes of binder. The discovery of this phenomenon in the early 1950's prompted hundreds of experimental studies, which clearly elucidated the characteristics of this damage. In particular it was shown that a pessimum salt concentration exists, where a moderate salt concentration (˜3%) results in the most damage. Despite the numerous studies, the mechanism responsible for salt scaling has not been identified. In this work it is shown that salt scaling is a result of the large thermal expansion mismatch between ice and the cementitious body, and that the mechanism responsible for damage is analogous to glue-spalling. When ice forms on a cementitious body a bi-material composite is formed. The thermal expansion coefficient of the ice is ˜5 times that of the underlying body, so when the temperature of the composite is lowered below the melting point, the ice goes into tension. Once this stress exceeds the strength of the ice, cracks initiate in the ice and propagate into the surface of the cementitious body, removing a flake of material. The glue-spall mechanism accounts for all of the characteristics of salt scaling. In particular, a theoretical analysis is presented which shows that the pessimum concentration is a consequence of the effect of brine pockets on the mechanical properties of ice, and that the damage morphology is accounted for by fracture mechanics. Finally, empirical evidence is presented that proves that the glue-small mechanism is the primary cause of salt scaling. The primary experimental tool used in this study is a novel warping experiment, where a pool of liquid is formed on top of a thin (˜3 mm) plate of cement paste. Stresses in the plate, including thermal expansion mismatch, result in warping of the plate, which is easily detected. This technique revealed the existence of

  5. Protection by Thermal and Chemical Activation with Cerium Salts of the Alloy AA2017 in Aqueous Solutions of NaCl

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bethencourt, Manuel; Botana, Francisco Javier; Cano, María José; González-Rovira, Leandro; Marcos, Mariano; Sánchez-Amaya, José María

    2012-01-01

    A wide variety of anticorrosive treatments for aluminum alloys that can be employed as "green" alternatives to those based on Cr(VI) are currently under development. This article reports a study of the morphological and anticorrosive characteristics of surface layers formed on the Al-Cu alloy AA2017 by immersion treatment in baths of cerium salt, accelerated by increased temperature and the employment of hydrogen peroxide. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM)/X-ray energy dispersive spectroscopy (XEDS) studies of the samples treated have demonstrated the existence of a heterogeneous layer formed by a film of aluminum oxide/hydroxide on the matrix, and a series of dispersed islands of cerium over the cathodic intermetallics. The protective efficacy has been evaluated using electrochemical techniques, linear polarizations (LP) and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS), and salt spray tests. The results obtained indicate that the layer provided good resistance to corrosion in media with chlorides, and the method gives a considerable reduction of the time required for the immersion treatments.

  6. Preferential interactions determine protein solubility in three-component solutions: the MgCl2 system.

    PubMed

    Arakawa, T; Bhat, R; Timasheff, S N

    1990-02-20

    The correlation between protein solubility and the preferential interactions of proteins with solvent components was critically examined with aqueous MgCl2 as the solvent system. Preferential interaction and solubility measurements with three proteins, beta-lactoglobulin, bovine serum albumin, and lysozyme, resulted in similar patterns of interaction. At acid pH (pH 2-3) and lower salt concentrations (less than 2 M), the proteins were preferentially hydrated, while at higher salt concentrations, the interaction was either that of preferential salt binding or low salt exclusion. At pH 4.5-5, all three proteins exhibited either very low preferential hydration or preferential binding of MgCl2. These results were analyzed in terms of the balance between salt binding and salt exclusion attributed to the increase in the surface tension of water by salts, which is invariant with conditions. It was shown that the increase in salt binding at high salt concentration is a reflection of mass action, while its decrease at acid pH is due to the electrostatic repulsion between Mg2+ ions and the high net positive charge on the protein. The preferential interaction pattern was paralleled by the variation of protein solubility with solvent conditions. Calculation of the transfer free energies from water to the salt solutions for proteins in solution and in the precipitate showed dependencies on salt concentration. This indicates that the nature of interactions between proteins and solvent components is the same in solution and in the solid state, which implies no change in protein structure during precipitation. Analysis of the transfer free energies and preferential interaction parameter in terms of the salting-in, salting-out, and weak ion binding contributions has led to the conclusions that, when the weak ion binding contribution is small, the predominant protein-salt interaction must be that of preferential salt exclusion most probably caused by the increase of the surface

  7. Deposition, Accumulation, and Alteration of Cl(-), NO3(-), ClO4(-) and ClO3(-) Salts in a Hyper-Arid Polar Environment: Mass Balance and Isotopic Constraints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, Andrew; Davila, Alfonso F.; Boehlke, J. K.; Sturchio, Neil C.; Sevanthi, Ritesh; Estrada, Nubia; Brundrette, Megan; Lacell, Denis; McKay, Christopher P.; Poghosyan, Armen; Pollard, Wayne; Zacny, Kris

    2016-01-01

    The salt fraction in permafrost soils/sediments of the McMurdo Dry Valleys (MDV) of Antarctica can be used as a proxy for cold desert geochemical processes and paleoclimate reconstruction. Previous analyses of the salt fraction in MDV permafrost soils have largely been conducted in coastal regions where permafrost soils are variably affected by aqueous processes and mixed inputs from marine and stratospheric sources. We expand upon this work by evaluating permafrost soil/sediments in University Valley, located in the ultraxerous zone where both liquid water transport and marine influences are minimal. We determined the abundances of Cl(-), NO3(-, ClO4(-)and ClO3(-)in dry and ice-cemented soil/sediments, snow and glacier ice, and also characterized Cl(-) and NO3(-) isotopically. The data are not consistent with salt deposition in a sublimation till, nor with nuclear weapon testing fall-out, and instead point to a dominantly stratospheric source and to varying degrees of post depositional transformation depending on the substrate, from minimal alteration in bare soils to significant alteration (photodegradation and/or volatilization) in snow and glacier ice. Ionic abundances in the dry permafrost layer indicate limited vertical transport under the current climate conditions, likely due to percolation of snowmelt. Subtle changes in ClO4(-)/NO3(-) ratios and NO3(-) isotopic composition with depth and location may reflect both transport related fractionation and depositional history. Low molar ratios of ClO3(-)/ClO4(-) in surface soils compared to deposition and other arid systems suggest significant post depositional loss of ClO3(-), possibly due to reduction by iron minerals, which may have important implications for oxy-chlorine species on Mars. Salt accumulation varies with distance along the valley and apparent accumulation times based on multiple methods range from approximately 10 to 30 kyr near the glacier to 70-200 kyr near the valley mouth. The relatively

  8. Deposition, accumulation, and alteration of Cl-, NO3-, ClO4- and ClO3- salts in a hyper-arid polar environment: Mass balance and isotopic constraints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackson, Andrew; Davila, Alfonso F.; Böhlke, John Karl; Sturchio, Neil C.; Sevanthi, Ritesh; Estrada, Nubia; Brundrett, Maeghan; Lacelle, Denis; McKay, Christopher P.; Poghosyan, Armen; Pollard, Wayne; Zacny, Kris

    2016-06-01

    The salt fraction in permafrost soils/sediments of the McMurdo Dry Valleys (MDV) of Antarctica can be used as a proxy for cold desert geochemical processes and paleoclimate reconstruction. Previous analyses of the salt fraction in MDV permafrost soils have largely been conducted in coastal regions where permafrost soils are variably affected by aqueous processes and mixed inputs from marine and stratospheric sources. We expand upon this work by evaluating permafrost soil/sediments in University Valley, located in the ultraxerous zone where both liquid water transport and marine influences are minimal. We determined the abundances of Cl-, NO3-, ClO4- and ClO3- in dry and ice-cemented soil/sediments, snow and glacier ice, and also characterized Cl- and NO3- isotopically. The data are not consistent with salt deposition in a sublimation till, nor with nuclear weapon testing fall-out, and instead point to a dominantly stratospheric source and to varying degrees of post depositional transformation depending on the substrate, from minimal alteration in bare soils to significant alteration (photodegradation and/or volatilization) in snow and glacier ice. Ionic abundances in the dry permafrost layer indicate limited vertical transport under the current climate conditions, likely due to percolation of snowmelt. Subtle changes in ClO4-/NO3- ratios and NO3- isotopic composition with depth and location may reflect both transport related fractionation and depositional history. Low molar ratios of ClO3-/ClO4- in surface soils compared to deposition and other arid systems suggest significant post depositional loss of ClO3-, possibly due to reduction by iron minerals, which may have important implications for oxy-chlorine species on Mars. Salt accumulation varies with distance along the valley and apparent accumulation times based on multiple methods range from ∼10 to 30 kyr near the glacier to 70-200 kyr near the valley mouth. The relatively young age of the salts and

  9. Will salt repositories be dry?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bredehoeft, John D.

    The National Academy of Science committee that considered geologic disposal of nuclear waste in the mid-1950s recommended salt as a repository medium, partly because of its high thermal conductivity and because it was believed to be “dry” (perhaps the appropriate thought is “impermeable”). Certainly, the fact that Paleozoic salt deposits exist in many parts of t h e world is evidence for very low rates of dissolution by moving groundwater. The fact that the dissolution rates were so small led many scientists to the conclusion that the salt beds were nearly impermeable. The major source of brine within the salt beds was thought to be fluid inclusions within salt crystals, which could migrate through differential solution toward a source of high heat. The idea that salt was uniformly “dry” was revised when exploratory drilling in the vicinity of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) in New Mexico encountered brines within the Castile Formation, an evaporite deposit below the Salado Formation. The brine reservoirs were thought to be isolated pockets of brine in an otherwise “impermeable” salt section.

  10. Balancing Acts

    MedlinePlus

    ... a new type of balance therapy using computerized, virtual reality. UPMC associate professor Susan Whitney, Ph.D., developed ... a virtual grocery store in the university's Medical Virtual Reality Center. Patients walk on a treadmill and safely ...

  11. Balancing Acts

    MedlinePlus

    ... Current Issue Past Issues Special Section: Focus on Communication Balancing Acts Past Issues / Fall 2008 Table of ... from the National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders (NIDCD). It involves simulated trips down the ...

  12. A novel non-vacuum process for the preparation of CuIn(Se,S)2 thin-film solar cells from air-stable, eco-friendly, metal salts based solution ink

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Paifeng; Liu, Zhaofan; Ding, Yuankui; Cheng, Jigui

    2015-01-01

    A facile solution-based non-vacuum process for deposition of CuIn(Se,S)2 (CISeS) absorber layers is presented in this work, which indicates a promising way for the low-cost applications in thin-film solar cells. Firstly, low-boiling-point solvents Monobutylamine C4H11N and Carbon disulfide CS2 are selected as the complexing and thickening agents and added into the Cu/In metal salts based solution. Thus the air-stable, eco-friendly solution ink is successfully synthesized through a simple solution synthesis route. The detailed chemical reaction mechanism and the influence of the composition of precursor solution have been discussed intensively as well. After sequential spin-coating, hot-treatment and selenization process, the high-quality CISeS films are obtained and then characterized by XRD, Raman, SEM, EDS, Metallographic microscope, Hall Effect measurement and UV-vis-NIR spectroscopy, respectively. It is found that the compact CISeS films with chalcopyrite α-phase possess a double-layer structure, and also incorporate with a little ordered vacancy compounds (OVCs) and Cu2-xSe impurities. The typical near stoichiometric CISeS films without Carbon residuals have superior photoelectric properties with carrier concentration of 3.46 × 1016 N cm-3 and band gap of 1.15 eV. Finally, the original first-made PV devices provide a power conversion efficiency (PCE) of 4.25%, which can be further improved by increasing the thickness of CISeS films and/or optimizing the selenization and sulfuration technologies.

  13. Estimation of Zn mobility and biological availability in sod-podzolic soil and leached chernozem based on results of soil extraction by various salt solutions and Zn accumulation in barley plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pivovarova, Y. A.

    2012-04-01

    Extraction of soils by chemical reagents is widely used as a basis for forecasting the stock of the metal in the soil available to the plants. There are some doubts about how heavy metals uptake from specific soil to certain plant species can be adequately modeled on the results of chemical extraction. Problems of regulation of heavy metals in natural objects and risk assessment of soil contamination must be solved as issues of unification and standardization of existing assessment methods and new methods developing for their use in studies of the mobility of metals in soils and their availability to plants. Zn is a priority pollutant of the soil. The availability of Zn compounds to plants in two soils of different genesis was compared on the basis of their extraction by neutral salt solutions Ca(NO3)2, MgCl2, and CH3COONH4 and a pot experiment. It was shown that not only the concentration of contaminant in the extractant, but also the proportion of extractable Zn in its total content in the soil increased with increasing contamination of soil. The difference between the estimates of exchangeable Zn obtained by these methods was ~2.5 times for soddy-podzolic soil and 3-6 times for leached chernozem. The relationship between the accumulation of Zn in 14-day-old barley seedlings and the content of its exchangeable form in the soil was near linear, but the parameters of regression equations for two soils differed significantly. Chemical extraction allowed the differentiation of the mobile Zn fraction, but its accumulation by plants from different soils could not be predicted from the extractability of the element by neutral salt solutions without consideration for other soil properties.

  14. Vapor pressure measurements on non-aqueous electrolyte solutions. Part 2. Tetraalkylammonium salts in methanol. Activity coefficients of various 1-1 electrolytes at high concentrations

    SciTech Connect

    Barthel, J.; Lauermann, G.; Neueder, R.

    1986-10-01

    Precise vapor pressure data for solutions of Et/sub 4/NBr, Bu/sub 4/NBr, Bu/sub 4/Nl, Bu/sub 4/NClO/sub 4/, and Am/sub 4/NBr in methanol at 25/sup 0/C in the concentration range 0.04 < m(mol-(kg of solvent)/sup -1/) < 1.6 are communicated and discussed. Polynomials in molalities are given which may be used for calculating precise vapor pressure depressions of these solutions. Osmotic coefficients are calculated by taking into account the second virial coefficient of methanol vapor. Discussion of the data at low concentrations is based on the chemical model of electrolyte solutions taking into account non-coulombic interactions; ion-pair association constants are compared to those of conductance measurements. Pitzer equations are used to reproduce osmotic and activity coefficient at high concentrations; the set of Pitzer parameters b = 3.2, ..cap alpha../sub 1/ = 2.0 and ..cap alpha../sub 2/ = 20.0 is proposed for methanol solutions.

  15. Effects of the addition of alcohols, cryoprotective agents, and salts on the photoionization yield of chlorophyll a in frozen vesicle solutions with and without electron acceptors

    SciTech Connect

    Hiff, T.; Kevan, L. )

    1989-04-20

    The photoionization yield of chlorophyll a (Chla) in rapidly frozen vesicles with and without potassium ferricyanide (FC) or tetrachloro-p-benzoquinone (TCBQ) has been studied versus several structural variations of phospholipid vesicles, including the addition of medium chain length alcohols, the effect of added salts (metal chlorides), the presence of a double bond in the alkyl tail of the surfactant, and the addition of dimethyl sulfoxide or glycerol which tend to enhance vesicular structure retention upon freezing. Variations in the photoionization yield versus these structural parameters are discussed in terms of distance variations between Chla and electron acceptors, loss of integrity of the vesicle structure, and differences in the degree of hydration of the headgroups of the surfactant molecules. Electron spin echo (ESE) deuterium modulation associated with a 5-doxylstearic acid spin probe interacting with deuterated water probes the degree of water interaction at the vesicle interface. The ESE data support a correlation between the degree of interface hydration and the photoionization yield for vesicles containing Chla and FC as an electron acceptor. Parallel ESE studies of 5-doxylstearic acid spin probes in anionic and cationic surfactant vesicles reveal changes in the interface hydration if the surfactant counterion is changed; this can be roughly correlated to the Chla photoionization yields.

  16. Salt splitting with ceramic membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Kurath, D.

    1996-10-01

    The purpose of this task is to develop ceramic membrane technologies for salt splitting of radioactively contaminated sodium salt solutions. This technology has the potential to reduce the low-level waste (LLW) disposal volume, the pH and sodium hydroxide content for subsequent processing steps, the sodium content of interstitial liquid in high-level waste (HLW) sludges, and provide sodium hydroxide free of aluminum for recycle within processing plants at the DOE complex. Potential deployment sites include Hanford, Savannah River, and Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). The technical approach consists of electrochemical separation of sodium ions from the salt solution using sodium (Na) Super Ion Conductors (NaSICON). As the name implies, sodium ions are transported rapidly through these ceramic crystals even at room temperatures.

  17. Impact of thiocyanate salts on zein properties

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A new class of zein plasticizer was investigated, thiocyanate salts. Ammonium (ATC), potassium (KTC), guanidine (GTC) and magnesium thiocyanate (MTC) salts were added to solutions of zein in 90% ethanol/10% water with various amounts of tri(ethylene glycol) (TEG), cast as films and then tested to de...

  18. Influence of Proton and Salt Concentration on the Chromonic Liquid Crystal Phase Diagram of Disodium Cromoglycate Solutions: Prospects and Limitations of a Host for DNA Nanostructures.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Bingru; Kitzerow, Heinz-S

    2016-03-31

    Lyotropic chromonic liquid crystals have recently been suggested for use as a self-organized host for dispersing and aligning self-organized DNA origami nanostructures. However, an appropriate pH value and a suitable cation concentration are necessary to stabilize such nanostructures and to avoid unfolding of the DNA. The present study shows that the nematic and columnar liquid crystal phases appearing in aqueous solutions of disodium cromoglycate are robust against the replacement of deionized water by a neutral or alkaline buffer solution. However, disodium cromoglycate precipitates when an acidic buffer is used or when the concentration of magnesium cations exceeds a critical concentration of about 0.6-0.7 mmol/L. PMID:26964003

  19. The Upside to Hg-DOM Associations for Water Quality: Removal of Hg from Solution Using Coagulaion with Metal-Based Salts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henneberry, Y.; Kraus, T. E.; Fleck, J.; Krabbenhoft, D. P.; Horwath, W. R.

    2011-12-01

    This study assessed the potential use of metal-based coagulants to remove dissolved mercury (Hg) from natural waters and provides information regarding the importance of Hg associations with the dissolved organic matter (DOM) fraction and metal hydroxides. Previous research indicated coagulants were not effective at removing Hg from solution; however those studies used high concentrations of Hg, which did not reflect naturally occurring concentrations of Hg. Filtered water collected from an agricultural drain in the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta (Delta) was treated with three industrial-grade coagulants (ferric chloride, ferric sulfate, and polyaluminum chloride) to determine their efficacy in removing both inroganic (IHg) and methylmercury (MeHg) from the water column. The Delta suffers from elevated surface water Hg concentrations and as a result is listed as an imparied water body. Coagulants removed up to 85% of DOM from solution. In the absence of DOM, all three coagulants released IHg into solution, however in the presence of DOM the coagulants removed up to 97% of IHg and 80% of MeHg. Results suggest that the removal of Hg is mediated by DOM-coagulant interactions. There was a preferential association of IHg with the more aromatic, higher molecular weight fraction of DOM but no such relationship was found for MeHg. This study offers new fundamental insights regarding large-scale removal of Hg at environmentally relevant concentrations. Research using isotopically labeled Hg is providing insight into whether coagulation can remove recently added Hg (e.g. atmospheric deposition) from solution and whether once formed, the floc can remove additional Hg from the water column.

  20. Temperature-dependent solubility transition of Na₂SO₄ in water and the effect of NaCl therein: solution structures and salt water dynamics.

    PubMed

    Bharmoria, Pankaj; Gehlot, Praveen Singh; Gupta, Hariom; Kumar, Arvind

    2014-11-01

    Dual, aqueous solubility behavior of Na2SO4 as a function of temperatures is still a natural enigma lying unresolved in the literature. The solubility of Na2SO4 increases up to 32.38 °C and decreases slightly thereafter at higher temperatures. We have thrown light on this phenomenon by analyzing the Na2SO4-water clusters (growth and stability) detected from temperature-dependent dynamic light scattering experiments, solution compressibility changes derived from the density and speed of sound measurements, and water structural changes/Na2SO4 (ion pair)-water interactions observed from the FT-IR and 2D DOSY (1)H NMR spectroscopic investigations. It has been observed that Na2SO4-water clusters grow with an increase in Na2SO4 concentration (until the solubility transition temperature) and then start decreasing afterward. An unusual decrease in cluster size and solution compressibility has been observed with the rise in temperature for the Na2SO4 saturated solutions below the solubility transition temperature, whereas an inverse pattern is followed thereafter. DOSY experiments have indicated different types of water cluster species in saturated solutions at different temperatures with varying self-diffusion coefficients. The effect of NaCl (5-15 wt %) on the solubility behavior of Na2SO4 at different temperatures has also been examined. The studies are important from both fundamental and industrial application points of view, for example, toward the clean separation of NaCl and Na2SO4 from the effluent streams of textile and tannery industries. PMID:25313635

  1. Impact of pulsed electric field on electrodialysis process performance and membrane fouling during consecutive demineralization of a model salt solution containing a high magnesium/calcium ratio.

    PubMed

    Cifuentes-Araya, Nicolás; Pourcelly, Gérald; Bazinet, Laurent

    2011-09-01

    Pulsed electric fields (PEFs), hashed modes of current consisting in the application of a constant current density during a fixed time (Ton) followed by a pause lapse (Toff), were recently demonstrated as an effective alternative for mineral fouling mitigation and process intensification during electrodialysis (ED) treatments. Recent ED studies have continuously reported a considerable mineral fouling formation on ion-exchange membranes, especially during the demineralization of solutions containing a high Mg/Ca ratio and a basified concentrate solution. The aim of this study was to evaluate the process performance under two different PEF conditions on a mineral solution containing a mineral mixture giving a high Mg(2+)/Ca(2+) ratio of 2/5. Two different pause-lapse durations (PEF ratio 1 (Ton/Toff 10s/10s); PEF ratio 0.3 (Ton/Toff 10s/33.3 s)) during consecutive ED treatments and their comparison with dc current were evaluated at a current density of 40 mA/cm(2). Our results showed that PEFs resulted in an intensification of ED process, enhancing the demineralization rates (DRs), reducing the system resistance (SR), and reducing the fouling and energy consumption (EC). PEF ratio 1 was the most optimal condition among the current regimes applied, leading to faster and higher demineralization rates due to a lower fouling and with low energy consumption during all consecutive runs. PMID:21676408

  2. Balance System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    TherEx Inc.'s AT-1 Computerized Ataxiameter precisely evaluates posture and balance disturbances that commonly accompany neurological and musculoskeletal disorders. Complete system includes two-strain gauged footplates, signal conditioning circuitry, a computer monitor, printer and a stand-alone tiltable balance platform. AT-1 serves as assessment tool, treatment monitor, and rehabilitation training device. It allows clinician to document quantitatively the outcome of treatment and analyze data over time to develop outcome standards for several classifications of patients. It can evaluate specifically the effects of surgery, drug treatment, physical therapy or prosthetic devices.

  3. How to be moderately halophilic with a broad salt tolerance: Cluesfrom the genome of chromohalobacter salexigens

    SciTech Connect

    Oren, Aharon; Larimer, Frank; Richardson, Paul; Lapidus, Alla; Csonka, Laszlo N.

    2004-07-01

    There are two strategies that enable microorganisms to grow at high salt concentrations. Some groups balance the high osmolality of their environment with high intracellular concentrations of KCl1-4. Adaptation of all intracellular proteins is then necessary, and this is reflected in a large excess of acidic over basic residues and a low content of hydrophobic amino acids 2,5-7. Other halophilic and halotolerant microorganisms keep their intracellular ion concentrations low and synthesize or accumulate organic osmotic solutes 8. While halotolerance enables organisms to colonize highly saline environments,the ecological advantage for a salt-requirement is less obvious. We analyzed the amino acid composition of different categories of proteins of the moderately halophilic bacterium Chromohalobacter salexigens, as deduced from its genome sequence. Comparison with non-halophilic bacteria shows only a slight excess of acidic residues in the cytoplasmic proteins, no significant differences in membrane-bound components, but a distinctive halophilic signature of predicted periplasmic proteins, such as the substrate binding proteins of ABC-type transport systems. The salt requirement of proteins located external to the cytoplasmic membrane may thus determine salt requirement and salt tolerance of prokaryotes.

  4. CHANGES IN THE ELECTRICAL SURFACE CHARGE AND TRANSPLANTATION PROPERTIES OF TA3 ASCITES TUMOR CELLS DURING SHORT-TERM MAINTENANCE IN AN ISOTONIC SALT SOLUTION

    SciTech Connect

    Tenforde, T. S.; Richards, W. R.; Kelly, L. S.

    1980-12-01

    TA3 ascites tumor cells maintained in vitro as a dilute suspension in 0.9% NaCl solution (physiological saline) were found to undergo time-dependent degenerative processes leading to alterations in both membrane characteristics and tumor transplantation properties. A 30% decrease in the negative cellular surface charge density occurred within 2 hr. when TA3 cells were incubated in a 0.9% NaCl solution at 23 °C. A similar reduction in negative surface charge density occurred within 0.5 hr. when the medium was maintained at 37 °C. This time-dependent reduction in surface charge was prevented when cellular metabolism was blocked either by maintaining the medium at 4 °C. or by adding 1 mM cyanide ion to a 23 °C medium. TA3 cells incubated as a dilute suspension in 0.9% NaCl solution at 23 °C also exhibited a large 9 time-dependent reduction in proliferative capacity in isogeneic LAF1/J hosts, as indicated by an increase in the tumor dose for 50% mortality (TD50). Lowering the temperature of the medium to 4 °C was observed to slow the onset of the degenerative processes that lead to a decreased transplantability of TA3 cells. The modification in growth properties of TA3 cells maintained in vitro was found to be attributable in part to an alteration in tumor histocompatibility. This effect was demonstrated by comparing the tumor growth kinetics and TD50 values in normal hosts versus hosts that had been immunosuppressed by whole-body irradiation. Following the in vitro maintenance of TA3 cells, nigrosin dye exclusion tests were performed as a means of assessing cell viability. Evidence obtained in this series of experiments indicated that vital staining is an inadequate criterion for judging either the extent of cell membrane damage or the loss of cellular proliferative capacity.

  5. Spectral features of guanidinium-carboxylate salt bridges. The combined ATR-IR and theoretical studies of aqueous solution of guanidinium acetate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levina, Elena O.; Lokshin, Boris V.; Mai, Bich D.; Vener, Mikhail V.

    2016-08-01

    The spectrum of guanidinium acetate in aqueous solution has been recorded by attenuated total reflectance infrared spectroscopy (ATR-IR). Assignments of the bands have been done using the polarizable continuum model (PCM). Three IR intensive bands at 1670, 1550, and 1410 cm-1 are associated with stretching and bending vibrations of the groups forming a ring of six heavy atoms of the bidentate configuration of guanidinium acetate. The relatively weak broad band near 2200 cm-1 is tentatively assigned to the stretching vibration of the Nsbnd H⋯O fragment of the hydrogen-bonded ion pairs.

  6. Salt Dependence of the Radius of Gyration and Flexibility of Single-stranded DNA in Solution probed by Small-angle X-ray Scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Sim, Adelene Y.L.; Lipfert, Jan; Herschlag, Daniel; Doniach, Sebastian

    2012-07-06

    Short single-stranded nucleic acids are ubiquitous in biological processes and understanding their physical properties provides insights to nucleic acid folding and dynamics. We used small angle x-ray scattering to study 8-100 residue homopolymeric single-stranded DNAs in solution, without external forces or labeling probes. Poly-T's structural ensemble changes with increasing ionic strength in a manner consistent with a polyelectrolyte persistence length theory that accounts for molecular flexibility. For any number of residues, poly-A is consistently more elongated than poly-T, likely due to the tendency of A residues to form stronger base-stacking interactions than T residues.

  7. Novel insights about salting-effects and reactivity of soluble molecules in aqueous aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volkamer, Rainer

    2014-05-01

    Organic carbon in the atmosphere modifies the lifetime of climate active gases such as O3, and CH4 (oxidative capacity), and forms aerosols that affect Earth's radiation balance. Water soluble organic carbon (WSOC) molecules are well established to form secondary organic aerosol (SOA) in cloud water. However, the chemistry and rate of SOA formation in aqueous aerosol is less well known, and is typically ignored in atmospheric models. Aqueous particles provide a very different chemical environment than clouds, i.e., they are the most concentrated aqueous salt solution that can be found on Earth. As a result of high ionic strength, phase separations of inorganic and organic phases, mass transfer limitations and viscosity effects affect the chemistry in aqueous particles, which proceeds via essentially different reaction pathways than in clouds. Of particular importance in this context is the Henry's law partitioning coefficient. Laboratory experiments show activity coefficients of 1/500 for Henry's law partitioning coefficients of glyoxal in concentrated aqueous aerosol- salt solutions. This salting-in mechanism is investigated in laboratory experiments, and shown to be a major driver in the rate of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation from the multiphase chemistry of soluble species like glyoxal. This solicited talk will summarize and discuss new experimental findings from simulation chamber experiments, and bulk reactor experiments to assess the Setschenow salting behavior of soluble molecules in different aqueous seed types, and study the effect of anthropogenic triggers such as sulfate and ammonium for the reactivity of multiphase reactions in the aerosol aqueous phase.

  8. Balancing Eggs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mills, Allan

    2014-01-01

    Theory predicts that an egg-shaped body should rest in stable equilibrium when on its side, balance vertically in metastable equilibrium on its broad end and be completely unstable on its narrow end. A homogeneous solid egg made from wood, clay or plastic behaves in this way, but a real egg will not stand on either end. It is shown that this…

  9. SEPARATION OF METAL SALTS BY ADSORPTION

    DOEpatents

    Gruen, D.M.

    1959-01-20

    It has been found that certain metal salts, particularly the halides of iron, cobalt, nickel, and the actinide metals, arc readily absorbed on aluminum oxide, while certain other salts, particularly rare earth metal halides, are not so absorbed. Use is made of this discovery to separate uranium from the rare earths. The metal salts are first dissolved in a molten mixture of alkali metal nitrates, e.g., the eutectic mixture of lithium nitrate and potassium nitrate, and then the molten salt solution is contacted with alumina, either by slurrying or by passing the salt solution through an absorption tower. The process is particularly valuable for the separation of actinides from lanthanum-group rare earths.

  10. Effects of salting-in interactions on macromolecule diffusiophoresis and salt osmotic diffusion.

    PubMed

    McAfee, Michele S; Annunziata, Onofrio

    2015-02-01

    Macromolecule diffusiophoresis (i.e., macromolecule migration induced by a salt concentration gradient) in water and salt osmotic diffusion (i.e., salt migration induced by a macromolecule concentration gradient) are two cross-diffusion mechanisms caused by macromolecule-salt interactions. We investigated the effect of salting-in interactions on the behavior of these two cross-diffusion mechanisms. Our results are distinct from those previously obtained in the case of salting-out interactions. Cross-diffusion was experimentally characterized by Rayleigh interferometry at 25 °C. Specifically, multicomponent diffusion coefficients were measured for a neutral polymer, polyethylene glycol (molar mass, 20 kg/mol), in aqueous solutions of three thiocyanate salts (NaSCN, KSCN, and NH₄SCN) as a function of salt concentration at low polymer concentration (0.5% w/w). Our results on salt osmotic diffusion, which were qualitatively different from those previously obtained for salting-out salts, were used to quantitatively characterize the strength of salting-in interactions. The behavior of polymer diffusiophoresis as a function of salt concentration and cation type reveals that polymer chains have an extrinsic negative charge, consistent with anion binding being the cause of salting-in interactions. To quantitatively examine the effect of anion binding on salt osmotic diffusion and polymer diffusiophoresis, we developed a theoretical model based on the linear laws of nonequilibrium thermodynamics for diffusion, the Scatchard binding model, and particle electrophoresis. This work contributes to the understanding of the multifaceted effects of molecular interactions on cross-diffusion mechanisms, salting-in interactions, and the Hofmeister series. PMID:25579202

  11. Balancing Patient Access to Fetoscopic Laser Photocoagulation for Twin-to-Twin Transfusion Syndrome With Maintaining Procedural Competence: Are Collaborative Services Part of the Solution?

    PubMed

    Edwards, Andrew G; Teoh, Mark; Hodges, Ryan J; Palma-Dias, Ricardo; Cole, Stephen A; Fung, Alison M; Walker, Susan P

    2016-06-01

    The benefits of fetoscopic laser photocoagulation (FLP) for treatment of twin-to-twin transfusion syndrome (TTTS) have been recognized for over a decade, yet access to FLP remains limited in many settings. This means at a population level, the potential benefits of FLP for TTTS are far from being fully realized. In part, this is because there are many centers where the case volume is relatively low. This creates an inevitable tension; on one hand, wanting FLP to be readily accessible to all women who may need it, yet on the other, needing to ensure that a high degree of procedural competence is maintained. Some of the solutions to these apparently competing priorities may be found in novel training solutions to achieve, and maintain, procedural proficiency, and with the increased utilization of 'competence based' assessment and credentialing frameworks. We suggest an under-utilized approach is the development of collaborative surgical services, where pooling of personnel and resources can improve timely access to surgery, improve standardized assessment and management of TTTS, minimize the impact of the surgical learning curve, and facilitate audit, education, and research. When deciding which centers should offer laser for TTTS and how we decide, we propose some solutions from a collaborative model. PMID:27087260

  12. Balance (or Vestibular) Rehabilitation

    MedlinePlus

    ... for the Public / Hearing and Balance Balance (or Vestibular) Rehabilitation Audiologic (hearing), balance, and medical diagnostic tests help indicate whether you are a candidate for vestibular (balance) rehabilitation. Vestibular rehabilitation is an individualized balance ...

  13. Balanced Can

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shakerin, Said

    2013-12-01

    The ordinary 12-oz beverage cans in the figures below are not held up with any props or glue. The bottom of such cans is stepped at its circumference for better stacking. When this kind of can is tilted, as shown in Fig. 1, the outside corners of the step touch the surface beneath, providing an effective contact about 1 cm wide. Because the contact is relatively wide and the geometry is symmetrical, it is easy to balance an empty can by simply adding an appropriate amount of water so that the overall center of mass is located directly above the contact. In fact, any amount of water between about 40 and 210 mL will work. A computational animation of this trick by Sijia Liang and Bruce Atwood that shows center of mass as a function of amount of added water is available at http://demonstrations.wolfram.com. Once there, search "balancing can."

  14. Airplane Balance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huguet, L

    1921-01-01

    The authors argue that the center of gravity has a preponderating influence on the longitudinal stability of an airplane in flight, but that manufacturers, although aware of this influence, are still content to apply empirical rules to the balancing of their airplanes instead of conducting wind tunnel tests. The author examines the following points: 1) longitudinal stability, in flight, of a glider with coinciding centers; 2) the influence exercised on the stability of flight by the position of the axis of thrust with respect to the center of gravity and the whole of the glider; 3) the stability on the ground before taking off, and the influence of the position of the landing gear. 4) the influence of the elements of the glider on the balance, the possibility of sometimes correcting defective balance, and the valuable information given on this point by wind tunnel tests; 5) and a brief examination of the equilibrium of power in horizontal flight, where the conditions of stability peculiar to this kind of flight are added to previously existing conditions of the stability of the glider, and interfere in fixing the safety limits of certain evolutions.

  15. Heterosides--compatible solutes occurring in prokaryotic and eukaryotic phototrophs.

    PubMed

    Hagemann, M; Pade, N

    2015-09-01

    The acclimation to osmotic and/or salt stress conditions induces an integrated response at different cellular levels. One acclimation strategy relies on the massive accumulation of low molecular mass compounds, so-called compatible solutes, to balance osmotic gradients and to directly protect critical macromolecules. Heterosides are compounds composed of a sugar and a polyol moiety that represent one chemical class of compatible solutes with interesting features. Well-investigated examples are glucosylglycerol, which is found in many cyanobacteria, and galactosylglycerols (floridoside and isofloridoside), which are accumulated by eukaryotic algae under salt stress conditions. Here, we review knowledge on physiology, biochemistry and genetics of heteroside accumulation in pro- and eukaryotic photoautotrophic organisms. PMID:25996303

  16. Electrolyte salts for power sources

    DOEpatents

    Doddapaneni, N.; Ingersoll, D.

    1995-11-28

    Electrolyte salts are disclosed for power sources comprising salts of phenyl polysulfonic acids and phenyl polyphosphonic acids. The preferred salts are alkali and alkaline earth metal salts, most preferably lithium salts. 2 figs.

  17. Comparison of Malated Ringer's with Two Other Balanced Crystalloid Solutions in Resuscitation of Both Severe and Moderate Hemorrhagic Shock in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Keitel, Judith; Lendemans, Sven; de Groot, Herbert; Rohrig, Ricarda

    2015-01-01

    In preclinical treatment of polytraumatized patients crystalloids are preferentially used. To avoid metabolic acidosis, metabolizable anions like lactate or acetate are used to replace chloride in these solutions. We here studied the effects of malated Ringer's in resuscitation of both shock severities in comparison to lactated and acetated Ringer's. Male Wistar rats underwent severe (mean arterial blood pressure (MAP) of 25–30 mmHg) or moderate (MAP 40–45 mmHg) hemorrhagic shock. Adjacent to the shock period animals were resuscitated with acetated (AR), lactated (LR), or malated Ringer's (MR) and observed for 150 min. MR improved survival compared with LR and AR in severe hemorrhagic shock whereas it was equally effective to LR and superior to AR in moderate hemorrhagic shock. In all other parameters tested, MR was also effective similar to the other solutions under these conditions. We conclude that MR is preferable to AR and LR in resuscitation of hemorrhagic shock independent of shock depth. The positive effects of MR may stem from the absence of any adverse impact on energy metabolism under both conditions. PMID:26106600

  18. Molecular properties and intermolecular forces--factors balancing the effect of carbon surface chemistry in adsorption of organics from dilute aqueous solutions.

    PubMed

    Terzyk, Artur P

    2004-07-01

    Presented paper recapitulates the results of 6 years' study concerning the effect of carbon surface chemical composition on adsorption of paracetamol, phenol, acetanilide, and aniline from dilute aqueous solutions on carbons. Adsorption-desorption isotherms, enthalpy, and kinetics of adsorption data are shown for the measurements performed at three temperatures (300, 310, and 320 K) at two pH levels (1.5 and 7) on commercial activated carbons. The data were obtained for four carbons: the initial carbon D43/1 and forms modified by applying concentrated HNO3, fuming H2SO4, and gaseous NH3. The modification procedures do not change the porosity in a drastic way, but lead to drastic changes of the composition of carbon surface layer. By applying MOPAC (a general-purpose semiempirical molecular orbital package), the physicochemical constants characterizing the molecules of adsorbates are calculated, including the distribution of the Mulliken charges, the dipole moments and ionization potentials, and the energies of interaction with the unique positive and negative charges. They are correlated with the parameters characterizing the adsorption (and kinetics) process of studied molecules on the mentioned above carbons. The mechanisms proposed in the literature for the description of adsorption from dilute aqueous solutions are verified, and a general mechanism of adsorption is proposed. PMID:15158374

  19. Rheological contrasts in salt and their effects on flow in salt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urai, Janos L.; Kukla, Peter A.

    2014-05-01

    The majority of numerical and analogue models of salt tectonics assume homogeneous rheological models, and consequently produce simple internal structures. This is in contrast to observations in salt mines and 3D seismic, showing complex folding at a wide range of scales, in combination with boudinage and fracturing, which point to large rheological contrasts in salt bodies. The rheology of rock salt during slow deformation can be both Newtonian and Power law. Dislocation creep and dissolution-precipitation processes, such as solution-precipitation creep and dynamic recrystallisation, both play a significant role and grain boundary healing in deforming salt may result in cyclic softening and hardening behaviour. The switch between these processes can cause major changes in rock salt rheology, at time scales both relevant to geologic evolution and subsurface operations. In the dislocation creep field, a compilation of laboratory data show that different rock salts can creep at four orders of magnitude different strain rates under otherwise the same conditions. Potassium - Magnesium salts are in turn much weaker, and Anhydrite much stronger than rock salt. Anhydrite - carbonate inclusions embedded in deforming salt bodies respond to the movements of the salt in a variety of ways including boudinage and folding. New methods of microstructure analysis integrated with paleorheology indicators observed in natural laboratories allows an integration of these data and the development of a unified model for salt creep for both underground cavities and natural deformation, including the effect of high fluid pressures in salt which lead to a dramatic increases in permeability. For example, modeling of anhydrite stringer sinking is an important way to obtain the long term rheology of the halite, indicating that the rheology of Zechstein salt during the Tertiary was dominated by dislocation creep. These form the basis of a new generation of mechanical models to predict the

  20. The Conductivity of Solutions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rayner-Canham, Geoff

    1993-01-01

    Presents historical background and modern explanations for the popular demonstration of showing conductivity of solutions through the insertion of a light-bulb conductivity tester into deionized water and water with salt in it. (PR)

  1. Erratum: "A new equation of state of a flexible-chain polyelectrolyte solution: Phase equilibria and osmotic pressure in the salt-free case" [J. Chem. Phys. 142, 174901 (2015)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Budkov, Yu. A.; Kolesnikov, A. L.; Georgi, N.; Nogovitsyn, E. A.; Kiselev, M. G.

    2015-11-01

    We develop a first-principle equation of state of salt-free polyelectrolyte solution in the limit of infinitely long flexible polymer chains in the framework of a field-theoretical formalism beyond the linear Debye-Hueckel theory and predict a liquid-liquid phase separation induced by a strong correlation attraction. As a reference system we choose a set of two subsystems - charged macromolecules immersed in a structureless oppositely charged background created by counterions (polymer one component plasma) and counterions immersed in oppositely charged background created by polymer chains (hard-core one component plasma). We calculate the excess free energy of polymer one component plasma in the framework of Modified Random Phase Approximation, whereas a contribution of charge densities fluctuations of neutralizing backgrounds we evaluate at the level of Gaussian approximation. We show that our theory is in a very good agreement with the results of Monte-Carlo and MD simulations for critical parameters of liquid-liquid phase separation and osmotic pressure in a wide range of monomer concentration above the critical point, respectively.

  2. Cd(1-x)Zn(x)O [0.05 ≤x≤ 0.26] synthesized by vapor-diffusion induced hydrolysis and co-nucleation from aqueous metal salt solutions.

    PubMed

    Schwenzer, Birgit; Neilson, James R; Jeffries, Stacie M; Morse, Daniel E

    2011-02-14

    Nanoparticulate Cd(1-x)Zn(x)O (x = 0, 0.05-0.26, 1) is synthesized in a simple two-step synthesis approach. Vapor-diffusion induced catalytic hydrolysis of two molecular precursors at low temperature induces co-nucleation and polycondensation to produce bimetallic layered hydroxide salts (M = Cd, Zn) as precursor materials which are subsequently converted to Cd(1-x)Zn(x)O at 400 °C. Unlike ternary materials prepared by standard co-precipitation procedures, all products presented here containing < 30 mol% Zn(2+) ions are homogeneous in elemental composition on the micrometre scale. This measured compositional homogeneity within the samples, as determined by energy dispersive spectroscopy and inductively coupled plasma spectroscopy, is a testimony to the kinetic control achieved by employing slow hydrolysis conditions. In agreement with this observation, the optical properties of the materials obey Vegard's Law for a homogeneous solid solution of Cd(1-x)Zn(x)O, where x corresponds to the values determined by inductively coupled plasma analysis, even though powder X-ray diffraction shows phase separation into a cubic mixed metal oxide phase and a hexagonal ZnO phase at all doping levels. PMID:21203643

  3. Phytotoxicity of salt and plant salt uptake: Modeling ecohydrological feedback mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauer-Gottwein, Peter; Rasmussen, Nikolaj F.; Feificova, Dagmar; Trapp, Stefan

    2008-04-01

    A new model of phytotoxicity of salt and plant salt uptake is presented and is coupled to an existing three-dimensional groundwater simulation model. The implementation of phytotoxicity and salt uptake relationships is based on experimental findings from willow trees grown in hydroponic solution. The data confirm an s-shaped phytotoxicity relationship as found in previous studies. Uptake data were explained assuming steady state salt concentration in plant roots, passive salt transport into the roots, and active enzymatic removal of salt from plant roots. On the one hand, transpiration strongly depends on groundwater salinity (phytotoxicity); on the other hand, transpiration significantly changes the groundwater salinity (uptake). This feedback loop generates interesting dynamic phenomena in hydrological systems that are dominated by transpiration and are influenced by significant salinity gradients. Generic simulations are performed for the Okavango island system and are shown to reproduce essential phenomena observed in nature.

  4. Sorption of water vapor, hydration, and viscosity of carboxymethylhydroxypropyl guar, diutan, and xanthan gums, and their molecular association with and without salts (NaCl, CaCl2, HCOOK, CH3COONa, (NH4)2SO4 and MgSO4) in aqueous solution.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Paltu; Mukherjee, Indrajyoti; Bhattacharya, Subhash; Datta, Sidhhartha; Moulik, Satya P; Sarkar, Diptabhas

    2009-10-01

    Gums are routinely used in food industry, pharmacy and oil recovery process. In these uses, the hydrocolloids very often encounter interactions with salts at moderate to high temperature. Since they are normally employed in the form of solution and gel, their viscous or fluidity properties need detailed investigation. In the present work, properties such as water vapor adsorption of finely powdered carboxymethylhydroxypropyl derivatized guar (CMHPG) as well as xanthan (Xn) and diutan (Dn) gums, their hydration in solution, their viscosity behaviors, and salt effects on fluidity have been studied. The concentration domains for the existence of free and associated molecules in the studied solutions have been assessed from the viscosity results. The gums have been found to bind a fair amount of water from the vapor phase with them. In solution, they can interact and arrest a large amount of water in their folded configuration. Intrinsic viscosities of the gums in aqueous medium declined in the presence of salts. The activation energies for their viscous flow were moderate and comparable, and were dependent on their concentrations. From the power law relation and viscosity master curve behavior mostly two critical association states of the macromolecular dispersions were envisaged. PMID:19715284

  5. Salt: a sacred substance.

    PubMed

    De Santo, N G; Bisaccia, C; De Santo, R M; De Santo, L S; Petrelli, L; Gallo, L; Cirillo, M; Capasso, G

    1997-11-01

    Salt is the last relic of the ocean where life was born. Its presence has influenced the whole gamut of history and its name is linked to hundred of geographical locations. Its importance for nutrition is supported by the discovery of Aeneolithic salt cellars. Salt cellars and pyramids of salt have been included in paintings and other works of art. In Japan where salt was and still is obtained from the sea, a salt culture has developed that can be traced in the rituals of everyday life, including meal preparation, sports, and Shinto ceremonies. PMID:9350697

  6. Shaft balancing

    DOEpatents

    Irwin, John A.

    1979-01-01

    A gas turbine engine has an internal drive shaft including one end connected to a driven load and an opposite end connected to a turbine wheel and wherein the shaft has an in situ adjustable balance system near the critical center of a bearing span for the shaft including two 360.degree. rings piloted on the outer diameter of the shaft at a point accessible through an internal engine panel; each of the rings has a small amount of material removed from its periphery whereby both of the rings are precisely unbalanced an equivalent amount; the rings are locked circumferentially together by radial serrations thereon; numbered tangs on the outside diameter of each ring identify the circumferential location of unbalance once the rings are locked together; an aft ring of the pair of rings has a spline on its inside diameter that mates with a like spline on the shaft to lock the entire assembly together.

  7. Salt Acclimation of Cyanobacteria and Their Application in Biotechnology

    PubMed Central

    Pade, Nadin; Hagemann, Martin

    2014-01-01

    The long evolutionary history and photo-autotrophic lifestyle of cyanobacteria has allowed them to colonize almost all photic habitats on Earth, including environments with high or fluctuating salinity. Their basal salt acclimation strategy includes two principal reactions, the active export of ions and the accumulation of compatible solutes. Cyanobacterial salt acclimation has been characterized in much detail using selected model cyanobacteria, but their salt sensing and regulatory mechanisms are less well understood. Here, we briefly review recent advances in the identification of salt acclimation processes and the essential genes/proteins involved in acclimation to high salt. This knowledge is of increasing importance because the necessary mass cultivation of cyanobacteria for future use in biotechnology will be performed in sea water. In addition, cyanobacterial salt resistance genes also can be applied to improve the salt tolerance of salt sensitive organisms, such as crop plants. PMID:25551682

  8. Salt tectonics on Venus

    SciTech Connect

    Wood, C.A.; Amsbury, D.

    1986-05-01

    The discovery of a surprisingly high deuterium/hydrogen ratio on Venus immediately led to the speculation that Venus may have once had a volume of surface water comparable to that of the terrestrial oceans. The authors propose that the evaporation of this putative ocean may have yielded residual salt deposits that formed various terrain features depicted in Venera 15 and 16 radar images. By analogy with models for the total evaporation of the terrestrial oceans, evaporite deposits on Venus should be at least tens to hundreds of meters thick. From photogeologic evidence and in-situ chemical analyses, it appears that the salt plains were later buried by lava flows. On Earth, salt diapirism leads to the formation of salt domes, anticlines, and elongated salt intrusions - features having dimensions of roughly 1 to 100 km. Due to the rapid erosion of salt by water, surface evaporite landforms are only common in dry regions such as the Zagros Mountains of Iran, where salt plugs and glaciers exist. Venus is far drier than Iran; extruded salt should be preserved, although the high surface temperature (470/sup 0/C) would probably stimulate rapid salt flow. Venus possesses a variety of circular landforms, tens to hundreds of kilometers wide, which could be either megasalt domes or salt intrusions colonizing impact craters. Additionally, arcurate bands seen in the Maxwell area of Venus could be salt intrusions formed in a region of tectonic stress. These large structures may not be salt features; nonetheless, salt features should exist on Venus.

  9. Lesson "Balance in Nature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chapanova, V.

    2012-04-01

    Lesson "Balance in Nature" This simulation game-lesson (Balance in Nature) gives an opportunity for the students to show creativity, work independently, and to create models and ideas. It creates future-oriented thought connected to their experience, allowing them to propose solutions for global problems and personal responsibility for their activities. The class is divided in two teams. Each team chooses questions. 1. Question: Pollution in the environment. 2. Question: Care for nature and climate. The teams work on the chosen tasks. They make drafts, notes and formulate their solutions on small pieces of paper, explaining the impact on nature and society. They express their points of view using many different opinions. This generates alternative thoughts and results in creative solutions. With the new knowledge and positive behaviour defined, everybody realizes that they can do something positive towards nature and climate problems and the importance of individuals for solving global problems is evident. Our main goal is to recover the ecological balance, and everybody explains his or her own well-grounded opinions. In this work process the students obtain knowledge, skills and more responsible behaviour. This process, based on his or her own experience, dialogue and teamwork, helps the participant's self-development. Making the model "human↔ nature" expresses how human activities impact the natural Earth and how these impacts in turn affect society. Taking personal responsibility, we can reduce global warming and help the Earth. By helping nature we help ourselves. Teacher: Veselina Boycheva-Chapanova " Saint Patriarch Evtimii" Scholl Str. "Ivan Vazov"-19 Plovdiv Bulgaria

  10. DNA nanosensor surface grafting and salt dependence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carvalho, B. G.; Fagundes, J.; Martin, A. A.; Raniero, L.; Favero, P. P.

    2013-02-01

    In this paper we investigated the Paracoccidoides brasiliensis fungus nanosensor by simulations of simple strand DNA grafting on gold nanoparticle. In order to improve the knowledge of nanoparticle environment, the addiction of salt solution was studied at the models proposed by us. Nanoparticle and DNA are represented by economic models validated by us in this paper. In addition, the DNA grafting and salt influences are evaluated by adsorption and bond energies calculations. This theoretical evaluation gives support to experimental diagnostics techniques of diseases.

  11. Anomalous water diffusion in salt solutions

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Yun; Hassanali, Ali A.; Parrinello, Michele

    2014-01-01

    The dynamics of water exhibits anomalous behavior in the presence of different electrolytes. Recent experiments [Kim JS, Wu Z, Morrow AR, Yethiraj A, Yethiraj A (2012) J Phys Chem B 116(39):12007–12013] have found that the self-diffusion of water can either be enhanced or suppressed around CsI and NaCl, respectively, relative to that of neat water. Here we show that unlike classical empirical potentials, ab initio molecular dynamics simulations successfully reproduce the qualitative trends observed experimentally. These types of phenomena have often been rationalized in terms of the “structure-making” or “structure-breaking” effects of different ions on the solvent, although the microscopic origins of these features have remained elusive. Rather than disrupting the network in a significant manner, the electrolytes studied here cause rather subtle changes in both structural and dynamical properties of water. In particular, we show that water in the ab initio molecular dynamics simulations is characterized by dynamic heterogeneity, which turns out to be critical in reproducing the experimental trends. PMID:24522111

  12. What Are Bath Salts?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Are bath salts becoming more popular? Marsha Lopez Hi, Lauren. Nope! Actually quite the opposite! This family ... and how dangerous for your body? Michelle Rankin Hi ParkerPanella - Bath salts are drugs known as synthetic ...

  13. Low-salt diet

    MedlinePlus

    ... seasonings. Pepper, garlic, herbs, and lemon are good choices. Avoid packaged spice blends. They often contain salt. Use garlic and onion powder, not garlic and onion salt. Do not eat foods with monosodium glutamate (MSG). When you go out ...

  14. Molten salt electrolyte separator

    DOEpatents

    Kaun, Thomas D.

    1996-01-01

    A molten salt electrolyte/separator for battery and related electrochemical systems including a molten electrolyte composition and an electrically insulating solid salt dispersed therein, to provide improved performance at higher current densities and alternate designs through ease of fabrication.

  15. Utah: Salt Lake Region

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2014-05-15

    article title:  Winter and Summer Views of the Salt Lake Region     View Larger Image Magnificent views of the region surrounding Salt Lake City, Utah are captured in these winter and summer images from the ...

  16. Swelling of phospholipids by monovalent salt

    PubMed Central

    Petrache, Horia I.; Tristram-Nagle, Stephanie; Harries, Daniel; Kučerka, Norbert; Nagle, John F.; Parsegian, V. Adrian

    2009-01-01

    Critical to biological processes such as membrane fusion and secretion, ion-lipid interactions at the membrane-water interface still raise many unanswered questions. Using reconstituted phosphatidylcholine membranes, we confirm here that multilamellar vesicles swell in salt solutions, a direct indication that salt modifies the interactions between neighboring membranes. By varying sample histories, and by comparing with data from ion carrier-containing bilayers, we eliminate the possibility that swelling is an equilibration artifact. Although both attractive and repulsive forces could be modified by salt, we show experimentally that swelling is driven primarily by weakening of the van der Waals attraction. To isolate the effect of salt on van der Waals interactions, we focus on high salt concentrations at which any possible electrostatic interactions are screened. By analysis of X-ray diffraction data, we show that salt does not alter membrane structure or bending rigidity, eliminating the possibility that repulsive fluctuation forces change with salt. By measuring changes in interbilayer separation with applied osmotic stress, we have determined, using the standard paradigm for bilayer interactions, that 1 M concentrations of KBr or KCl decrease the van der Waals strength by 50%. By weakening van der Waals attractions, salt increases energy barriers to membrane contact, possibly affecting cellular communication and biological signaling. PMID:16267342

  17. Disposal of nonhazardous oil field wastes into salt caverns

    SciTech Connect

    Veil, J.; Elcock, D.; Raivel, M.; Caudle, D.

    1996-12-31

    Bedded and domal salt deposits occur in many states. If salt deposits are thick enough, salt caverns can be formed through solution mining. These caverns are created either incidentally as a result of salt recovery or intentionally to create an underground chamber that can be used for storing hydrocarbon products or disposing of wastes. This paper evaluates the legality, feasibility, and suitability of disposing of nonhazardous oil and gas exploration, development, and production wastes (hereafter referred to as oil field wastes, unless otherwise noted) in salt caverns.

  18. Retrospective salt tectonics

    SciTech Connect

    Jackson, M.P.A.

    1996-12-31

    The conceptual breakthroughs in understanding salt tectonics can be recognized by reviewing the history of salt tectonics, which divides naturally into three parts: the pioneering era, the fluid era, and the brittle era. The pioneering era (1856-1933) featured the search for a general hypothesis of salt diapirism, initially dominated by bizarre, erroneous notions of igneous activity, residual islands, in situ crystallization, osmotic pressures, and expansive crystallization. Gradually data from oil exploration constrained speculation. The effects of buoyancy versus orogeny were debated, contact relations were characterized, salt glaciers were discovered, and the concepts of downbuilding and differential loading were proposed as diapiric mechanisms. The fluid era (1933-{approximately}1989) was dominated by the view that salt tectonics resulted from Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities in which a dense fluid overburden having negligible yield strength sinks into a less dense fluid salt layer, displacing it upward. Density contrasts, viscosity contrasts, and dominant wavelengths were emphasized, whereas strength and faulting of the overburden were ignored. During this era, palinspastic reconstructions were attempted; salt upwelling below thin overburdens was recognized; internal structures of mined diapirs were discovered; peripheral sinks, turtle structures, and diapir families were comprehended; flow laws for dry salt were formulated; and contractional belts on divergent margins and allochthonous salt sheets were recognized. The 1970s revealed the basic driving force of salt allochthons, intrasalt minibasins, finite strains in diapirs, the possibility of thermal convection in salt, direct measurement of salt glacial flow stimulated by rainfall, and the internal structure of convecting evaporites and salt glaciers. The 1980`s revealed salt rollers, subtle traps, flow laws for damp salt, salt canopies, and mushroom diapirs.

  19. Salt weathering on Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Malin, M. C.

    1974-01-01

    Mariner 9 photographs of Mars indicate that significant erosion has occurred on that planet. Although several possible erosion mechanisms have been proposed, most terrestrial weathering mechanisms cannot function in the present Martian environment. Salt weathering, believed to be active in the Antarctic dry valleys, is especially suited to Mars, given the presence of salts and small amounts of water. Volcanic salts are probably available, and the association of salts and water is likely from both thermodynamic and geologic considerations.

  20. Effects of aging on mineralocorticoid-induced salt appetite in rats.

    PubMed

    Thunhorst, Robert L; Beltz, Terry G; Johnson, Alan Kim

    2013-12-15

    This work examined the effects of age on salt appetite measured in the form of daily saline (i.e., 0.3 M NaCl) drinking in response to administration of deoxycorticosterone acetate (DOCA; 5 mg/kg body wt) using young (4 mo), "middle-aged" adult (12 mo), and old (30 mo) male Brown Norway rats. Water and sodium intakes, excretions, and balances were determined daily. The salt appetite response was age dependent with "middle-aged" rats ingesting the most saline solution followed in order by young and then old rats. While old rats drank the least saline solution, the amounts of saline ingested still were copious and comprise an unambiguous demonstration of salt appetite in old rats. Middle-aged rats had the highest saline preference ratios of the groups under baseline conditions and throughout testing consistent with an increased avidity for sodium taste. There were age differences in renal handling of water and sodium that were consistent with a renal contribution to the greater saline intakes by middle-aged rats. There was evidence of impaired renal function in old rats, but this did not account for the reduced saline intakes of the oldest rats. PMID:24133100

  1. Effects of aging on mineralocorticoid-induced salt appetite in rats

    PubMed Central

    Beltz, Terry G.; Johnson, Alan Kim

    2013-01-01

    This work examined the effects of age on salt appetite measured in the form of daily saline (i.e., 0.3 M NaCl) drinking in response to administration of deoxycorticosterone acetate (DOCA; 5 mg/kg body wt) using young (4 mo), “middle-aged” adult (12 mo), and old (30 mo) male Brown Norway rats. Water and sodium intakes, excretions, and balances were determined daily. The salt appetite response was age dependent with “middle-aged” rats ingesting the most saline solution followed in order by young and then old rats. While old rats drank the least saline solution, the amounts of saline ingested still were copious and comprise an unambiguous demonstration of salt appetite in old rats. Middle-aged rats had the highest saline preference ratios of the groups under baseline conditions and throughout testing consistent with an increased avidity for sodium taste. There were age differences in renal handling of water and sodium that were consistent with a renal contribution to the greater saline intakes by middle-aged rats. There was evidence of impaired renal function in old rats, but this did not account for the reduced saline intakes of the oldest rats. PMID:24133100

  2. Salt splitting using ceramic membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Kurath, D.E.

    1997-10-01

    Many radioactive aqueous wastes in the DOE complex have high concentrations of sodium that can negatively affect waste treatment and disposal operations. Sodium can decrease the durability of waste forms such as glass and is the primary contributor to large disposal volumes. Waste treatment processes such as cesium ion exchange, sludge washing, and calcination are made less efficient and more expensive because of the high sodium concentrations. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) and Ceramatec Inc. (Salt Lake City UT) are developing an electrochemical salt splitting process based on inorganic ceramic sodium (Na), super-ionic conductor (NaSICON) membranes that shows promise for mitigating the impact of sodium. In this process, the waste is added to the anode compartment, and an electrical potential is applied to the cell. This drives sodium ions through the membrane, but the membrane rejects most other cations (e.g., Sr{sup +2}, Cs{sup +}). The charge balance in the anode compartment is maintained by generating H{sup +} from the electrolysis of water. The charge balance in the cathode is maintained by generating OH{sup {minus}}, either from the electrolysis of water or from oxygen and water using an oxygen cathode. The normal gaseous products of the electrolysis of water are oxygen at the anode and hydrogen at the cathode. Potentially flammable gas mixtures can be prevented by providing adequate volumes of a sweep gas, using an alternative reductant or destruction of the hydrogen as it is generated. As H{sup +} is generated in the anode compartment, the pH drops. The process may be operated with either an alkaline (pH>12) or an acidic anolyte (pH <1). The benefits of salt splitting using ceramic membranes are (1) waste volume reduction and reduced chemical procurement costs by recycling of NaOH; and (2) direct reduction of sodium in process streams, which enhances subsequent operations such as cesium ion exchange, calcination, and vitrification.

  3. 21 CFR 100.155 - Salt and iodized salt.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Salt and iodized salt. 100.155 Section 100.155... FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION GENERAL Specific Administrative Rulings and Decisions § 100.155 Salt and iodized salt. (a) For the purposes of this section, the term iodized salt or iodized table salt is...

  4. 21 CFR 100.155 - Salt and iodized salt.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Salt and iodized salt. 100.155 Section 100.155... FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION GENERAL Specific Administrative Rulings and Decisions § 100.155 Salt and iodized salt. (a) For the purposes of this section, the term iodized salt or iodized table salt is...

  5. 21 CFR 100.155 - Salt and iodized salt.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Salt and iodized salt. 100.155 Section 100.155... FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION GENERAL Specific Administrative Rulings and Decisions § 100.155 Salt and iodized salt. (a) For the purposes of this section, the term iodized salt or iodized table salt is...

  6. 21 CFR 100.155 - Salt and iodized salt.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Salt and iodized salt. 100.155 Section 100.155... FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION GENERAL Specific Administrative Rulings and Decisions § 100.155 Salt and iodized salt. (a) For the purposes of this section, the term iodized salt or iodized table salt is...

  7. 21 CFR 100.155 - Salt and iodized salt.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Salt and iodized salt. 100.155 Section 100.155... FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION GENERAL Specific Administrative Rulings and Decisions § 100.155 Salt and iodized salt. (a) For the purposes of this section, the term iodized salt or iodized table salt is...

  8. Simple Cell Balance Circuit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Steven D.; Byers, Jerry W.; Martin, James A.

    2012-01-01

    A method has been developed for continuous cell voltage balancing for rechargeable batteries (e.g. lithium ion batteries). A resistor divider chain is provided that generates a set of voltages representing the ideal cell voltage (the voltage of each cell should be as if the cells were perfectly balanced). An operational amplifier circuit with an added current buffer stage generates the ideal voltage with a very high degree of accuracy, using the concept of negative feedback. The ideal voltages are each connected to the corresponding cell through a current- limiting resistance. Over time, having the cell connected to the ideal voltage provides a balancing current that moves the cell voltage very close to that ideal level. In effect, it adjusts the current of each cell during charging, discharging, and standby periods to force the cell voltages to be equal to the ideal voltages generated by the resistor divider. The device also includes solid-state switches that disconnect the circuit from the battery so that it will not discharge the battery during storage. This solution requires relatively few parts and is, therefore, of lower cost and of increased reliability due to the fewer failure modes. Additionally, this design uses very little power. A preliminary model predicts a power usage of 0.18 W for an 8-cell battery. This approach is applicable to a wide range of battery capacities and voltages.

  9. Energy balance climate models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    North, G. R.; Cahalan, R. F.; Coakley, J. A., Jr.

    1981-01-01

    An introductory survey of the global energy balance climate models is presented with an emphasis on analytical results. A sequence of increasingly complicated models involving ice cap and radiative feedback processes are solved, and the solutions and parameter sensitivities are studied. The model parameterizations are examined critically in light of many current uncertainties. A simple seasonal model is used to study the effects of changes in orbital elements on the temperature field. A linear stability theorem and a complete nonlinear stability analysis for the models are developed. Analytical solutions are also obtained for the linearized models driven by stochastic forcing elements. In this context the relation between natural fluctuation statistics and climate sensitivity is stressed.

  10. The Receptacle Model of Salting-In by Tetramethylammonium Ions

    PubMed Central

    Hribar–Lee, Barbara; Dill, Ken A.; Vlachy, Vojko

    2010-01-01

    Water is a poor solvent for nonpolar solutes. Water containing ions is an even poorer solvent. According to standard terminology, the tendency of salts to precipitate oils from water is called salting-out. However, interestingly, some salt ions, such as tetramethylammonium (TMA), cause instead the salting-in of hydrophobic solutes. Even more puzzling, there is a systematic dependence on solute size. TMA causes the salting-out of small hydrophobes and the salting-in of larger nonpolar solutes. We study these effects using NPT Monte Carlo simulations of the MB + dipole model of water, which was previously shown to account for hydrophobic effects and ion solubilities in water. The present model gives a structural interpretation for the thermodynamics of salting-in. The TMA structure allows deep penetration by a first shell of waters, the dipoles of which interact electrostatically with the ion. This first water shell sets up a second water shell that is shaped to act as a receptacle that binds the nonpolar solute. In this way, a nonpolar solute can actually bind more tightly to the TMA ion than to another hydrophobe, leading to the increased solubility and salting-in. Such structuring may also explain why molecular ions do not follow the same charge density series’ as atomic ions do. PMID:21028768

  11. Receptacle model of salting-in by tetramethylammonium ions.

    PubMed

    Hribar-Lee, Barbara; Dill, Ken A; Vlachy, Vojko

    2010-11-25

    Water is a poor solvent for nonpolar solutes. Water containing ions is an even poorer solvent. According to standard terminology, the tendency of salts to precipitate oils from water is called salting-out. However, interestingly, some salt ions, such as tetramethylammonium (TMA), cause instead the salting-in of hydrophobic solutes. Even more puzzling, there is a systematic dependence on solute size. TMA causes the salting-out of small hydrophobes and the salting-in of larger nonpolar solutes. We study these effects using NPT Monte Carlo simulations of the Mercedes-Benz (MB) + dipole model of water, which was previously shown to account for hydrophobic effects and ion solubilities in water. The present model gives a structural interpretation for the thermodynamics of salting-in. The TMA structure allows deep penetration by a first shell of waters, the dipoles of which interact electrostatically with the ion. This first water shell sets up a second water shell that is shaped to act as a receptacle that binds the nonpolar solute. In this way, a nonpolar solute can actually bind more tightly to the TMA ion than to another hydrophobe, leading to the increased solubility and salting-in. Such structuring may also explain why molecular ions do not follow the same charge density series as atomic ions do. PMID:21028768

  12. Ethylenediamine salt of 5-nitrotetrazole and preparation

    DOEpatents

    Lee, Kien-yin; Coburn, Michael D.

    1985-01-01

    Ethylenediamine salt of 5-nitrotetrazole and preparation. This salt has been found to be useful as an explosive alone and in eutectic mixtures with ammonium nitrate and/or other explosive compounds. Its eutectic with ammonium nitrate has been demonstrated to behave in a similar manner to a monomolecular explosive such as TNT, and is less sensitive than the pure salt. Moreover, this eutectic mixture, which contains 87.8 mol % of ammonium nitrate, is close to the CO.sub.2 -balanced composition of 90 mol %, and has a relatively low melting point of 110.5 C. making it readily castable. The ternary eutectic system containing the ethylenediamine salt of 5-nitrotetrazole, ammonium nitrate and ethylenediamine dinitrate has a eutectic temperature of 89.5 C. and gives a measured detonation pressure of 24.8 GPa, which is 97.6% of the calculated value. Both the pure ethylenediamine salt and its known eutectic compounds behave in substantially ideal manner. Methods for the preparation of the salt are described.

  13. Molten salts and nuclear energy production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Brun, Christian

    2007-01-01

    Molten salts (fluorides or chlorides) were considered near the beginning of research into nuclear energy production. This was initially due to their advantageous physical and chemical properties: good heat transfer capacity, radiation insensitivity, high boiling point, wide range solubility for actinides. In addition it was realised that molten salts could be used in numerous situations: high temperature heat transfer, core coolants with solid fuels, liquid fuel in a molten salt reactor, solvents for spent nuclear solid fuel in the case of pyro-reprocessing and coolant and tritium production in the case of fusion. Molten salt reactors, one of the six innovative concepts chosen by the Generation IV international forum, are particularly interesting for use as either waste incinerators or thorium cycle systems. As the neutron balance in the thorium cycle is very tight, the possibility to perform online extraction of some fission product poisons from the salt is very attractive. In this article the most important questions that must be addressed to demonstrate the feasibility of molten salt reactor will be reviewed.

  14. Salt Lake City, Utah

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    The 2002 Winter Olympics are hosted by Salt Lake City at several venues within the city, in nearby cities, and within the adjacent Wasatch Mountains. This simulated natural color image presents a late spring view of north central Utah that includes all of the Olympic sites. The image extends from Ogden in the north, to Provo in the south; and includes the snow-capped Wasatch Mountains and the eastern part of the Great Salt Lake.

    This image was acquired on May 28, 2000 by the Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) on NASA's Terra satellite. With its 14 spectral bands from the visible to the thermal infrared wavelength region, and its high spatial resolution of 15 to 90 meters (about 50 to 300 feet), ASTER will image Earth for the next 6 years to map and monitor the changing surface of our planet.

    ASTER is one of five Earth-observing instruments launched December 18,1999, on NASA's Terra satellite. The instrument was built by Japan's Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry. A joint U.S./Japan science team is responsible for validation and calibration of the instrument and the data products. Dr. Anne Kahle at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, California, is the U.S. Science team leader; Bjorn Eng of JPL is the project manager. ASTER is the only high resolution imaging sensor on Terra. The Terra mission is part of NASA's Earth Science Enterprise, a long-term research and technology program designed to examine Earth's land, oceans, atmosphere, ice and life as a total integrated system.

    The broad spectral coverage and high spectral resolution of ASTER will provide scientists in numerous disciplines with critical information for surface mapping, and monitoring dynamic conditions and temporal change. Example applications are: monitoring glacial advances and retreats; monitoring potentially active volcanoes; identifying crop stress; determining cloud morphology and physical properties; wetlands evaluation; thermal pollution

  15. Plant salt tolerance: adaptations in halophytes

    PubMed Central

    Flowers, Timothy J.; Colmer, Timothy D.

    2015-01-01

    Background Most of the water on Earth is seawater, each kilogram of which contains about 35 g of salts, and yet most plants cannot grow in this solution; less than 0·2 % of species can develop and reproduce with repeated exposure to seawater. These ‘extremophiles’ are called halophytes. Scope Improved knowledge of halophytes is of importance to understanding our natural world and to enable the use of some of these fascinating plants in land re-vegetation, as forages for livestock, and to develop salt-tolerant crops. In this Preface to a Special Issue on halophytes and saline adaptations, the evolution of salt tolerance in halophytes, their life-history traits and progress in understanding the molecular, biochemical and physiological mechanisms contributing to salt tolerance are summarized. In particular, cellular processes that underpin the ability of halophytes to tolerate high tissue concentrations of Na+ and Cl−, including regulation of membrane transport, their ability to synthesize compatible solutes and to deal with reactive oxygen species, are highlighted. Interacting stress factors in addition to salinity, such as heavy metals and flooding, are also topics gaining increased attention in the search to understand the biology of halophytes. Conclusions Halophytes will play increasingly important roles as models for understanding plant salt tolerance, as genetic resources contributing towards the goal of improvement of salt tolerance in some crops, for re-vegetation of saline lands, and as ‘niche crops’ in their own right for landscapes with saline soils. PMID:25844430

  16. Aqueous biphasic systems for metal separations : a microcalorimetric analysis of polymer/salt interactions.

    SciTech Connect

    Chaiko, D. J.; Hatton, T. A.; Zaslavsky, B.

    1999-05-03

    Certain radionuclide ions (e.g., TcO{sub 4}{sup 16}) exhibit unusually strong Affinities toward the polymer-rich phase in aqueous biphase systems generated by combinations of salt solutions with polymers such as poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) and poly(propylene glycol) (PPG). Thus, aqueous polymer phases could potentially be used to selectively extract these ions during pretreatment of radioactive tank wastes at Hanford. To help develop a fundamental understanding of the interactions between various ions and polymers in aqueous solution, interaction enthalpies between sodium perrhenate and a random copolymer of PEG and PPG (UCON-50) were measured by microcalorimetric titration. An entropy compensation effect was observed in this system in which changes in enthalpic interactions were balanced by entropy changes such that the interaction free energy remained constant and approximately equal to zero.

  17. A new scheme for the opening of the South Atlantic Ocean and the dissection of an Aptian salt basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torsvik, Trond H.; Rousse, Sonia; Labails, Cinthia; Smethurst, Mark A.

    2009-06-01

    We present a revised model for the opening of the South Atlantic Ocean founded on a remapping of the continent-ocean boundaries and Aptian salt basins, the chronology of magmatic activity in and around the ocean basin and on the timing and character of associated intraplate deformation in Africa and South America. The new plate tectonic model is internally consistent and consistent with globally balanced plate motion solutions. The model includes realistic scenarios for intraplate deformation, pre-drift extension and seafloor spreading. Within the model, Aptian salt basins preserved in the South American (Brazilian) and African (Angola, Congo, Gabon) continental shelves are reunited in their original positions as parts of a single syn-rift basin in near subtropical latitudes (10°S-27°S). The basin was dissected at around 112 Ma (Aptian-Albian boundary) when the model suggests that seafloor spreading commenced north of the Walvis Ridge-Rio Grande Rise.

  18. Role of salt sources in density-dependent flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hidalgo, Juan J.; Carrera, Jesús; Medina, AgustíN.

    2009-05-01

    Flow equation expresses mass conservation for a fluid phase. In density-dependent problems, fluid consists of at least two components, termed salt and water here. Salt sources are usually properly accounted for when salt is dissolved in water (i.e., as a solute) but are neglected otherwise. An analysis of the effect of neglecting pure salt sources on flow regime and concentration distribution is performed. Two test cases are used to illustrate the issue. The first one is the saltwater bucket problem, which consists of adding salt to an otherwise isolated domain. The second one is the Elder problem. Discrepancies in concentrations are moderate for reasonably small salt mass fractions. However, currently available codes yield head drops in response to the addition of salt because fluid mass is kept constant while its density increases. Such results contradict basic physical principles and lead to an inversion in the flow direction.

  19. SALT Science Conference 2015

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buckley, David; Schroeder, Anja

    The Southern African Large Telescope (SALT) has seen great changes in the last years following the beginning of full time science operations in 2011. The three first generation instruments, namely the SALTICAM imager, the Robert Stobie Spectrograph (RSS) and its multiple modes and finally in 2014, the new High Resolution Spectrograph (HRS), have commissioned it. The SALT community now eagerly anticipate the installation and commissioning of the near-infrared arm of RSS, likely to commence in 2016. The the third "Science with SALT" conference was held at the Stellenbosch Institute of Advanced Study from 1-5 June 2015. The goals of this conference were to: -Present and discuss recent results from SALT observations; -Anticipate scientific programs that will be carried out with new SALT instrumentation such as RSS-NIR; -Provide a scientific environment in which to foster inter-institutional and inter-facility collaborations between scientists at the different SALT partners; -Provide an opportunity for students and postdocs to become more engaged in SALT science and operations; -Encourage the scientific strategic planning that will be necessary to insure an important role for SALT in an era of large astronomical facilities in the southern hemisphere such as MeerKAT, the SKA, LSST, and ALMA; -Consider options for future instrumentation and technical development of SALT; and, -Present, discuss, and engage in the SALT Collateral Benefits program led by SAAO. Conference proceedings editors: David Buckley and Anja Schroeder

  20. Salt preferences of honey bee water foragers.

    PubMed

    Lau, Pierre W; Nieh, James C

    2016-03-01

    The importance of dietary salt may explain why bees are often observed collecting brackish water, a habit that may expose them to harmful xenobiotics. However, the individual salt preferences of water-collecting bees were not known. We measured the proboscis extension reflex (PER) response of Apis mellifera water foragers to 0-10% w/w solutions of Na, Mg and K, ions that provide essential nutrients. We also tested phosphate, which can deter foraging. Bees exhibited significant preferences, with the most PER responses for 1.5-3% Na and 1.5% Mg. However, K and phosphate were largely aversive and elicited PER responses only for the lowest concentrations, suggesting a way to deter bees from visiting contaminated water. We then analyzed the salt content of water sources that bees collected in urban and semi-urban environments. Bees collected water with a wide range of salt concentrations, but most collected water sources had relatively low salt concentrations, with the exception of seawater and swimming pools, which had >0.6% Na. The high levels of PER responsiveness elicited by 1.5-3% Na may explain why bees are willing to collect such salty water. Interestingly, bees exhibited high individual variation in salt preferences: individual identity accounted for 32% of variation in PER responses. Salt specialization may therefore occur in water foragers. PMID:26823100