Science.gov

Sample records for bandgap fiber laser

  1. Tunable Fabry-Perot filter using hollow-core photonic bandgap fiber and micro-fiber for a narrow-linewidth laser.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaozhen; Zhu, Tao; Chen, Liang; Bao, Xiaoyi

    2011-05-01

    A novel tunable fiber Fabry-Perot (FP) filter is proposed and demonstrated by using a hollow-core photonic bandgap fiber (HC-PBF) and a micro-fiber. The interference cavity is a hollow core of HC-PBF. One of the reflection mirrors is the splicing point between a section of HC-PBF and a single mode fiber. The other reflection mirror is a gold-coated end of micro-fiber that uses chemical etching process to obtain the similar diameter as the core of HC-PBF. Hence the movable mirror can be adjusted with long distance inside the hollow core of HC-PBF. Tunable FP filter is used as a mode selecting component in the reflection mode to implement stable single longitudinal mode (SLM) operation in a ring laser. With FP cavity length of 0.25 ± 0.14 mm, the wavelength of SLM laser can be tuned over 1554-1562 nm with a tuning step of 0.2-0.3 nm, a side-mode suppression ratio (SMSR) of 32-36 dB and a linewidth of 3.0-5.1 kHz. With FP cavity length of 2.37 ± 0.37 mm, the SLM laser can be tuned over 1557.3-1560.2 nm with a tuning step of 0.06-0.1 nm, a SMSR of 44-51 dB and a linewidth of 1.8-3.0 kHz. PMID:21643220

  2. High average power, high energy 1.55 μm ultra-short pulse laser beam delivery using large mode area hollow core photonic band-gap fiber.

    PubMed

    Peng, Xiang; Mielke, Michael; Booth, Timothy

    2011-01-17

    We demonstrate high average power, high energy 1.55 μm ultra-short pulse (<1 ps) laser delivery using helium-filled and argon-filled large mode area hollow core photonic band-gap fibers and compare relevant performance parameters. The ultra-short pulse laser beam-with pulse energy higher than 7 μJ and pulse train average power larger than 0.7 W-is output from a 2 m long hollow core fiber with diffraction limited beam quality. We introduce a pulse tuning mechanism of argon-filled hollow core photonic band-gap fiber. We assess the damage threshold of the hollow core photonic band-gap fiber and propose methods to further increase pulse energy and average power handling. PMID:21263632

  3. Experiment to Detect Accelerating Modes in a Photonic Bandgap Fiber

    SciTech Connect

    England, R.J.; Colby, E.R.; Ischebeck, R.; McGuinness, C.M.; Noble, R.; Plettner, T.; Sears, C.M.S.; Siemann, R.H.; Spencer, J.E.; Walz, D.; /SLAC

    2011-11-21

    An experimental effort is currently underway at the E-163 test beamline at Stanford Linear Accelerator Center to use a hollow-core photonic bandgap (PBG) fiber as a high-gradient laser-based accelerating structure for electron bunches. For the initial stage of this experiment, a 50pC, 60 MeV electron beam will be coupled into the fiber core and the excited modes will be detected using a spectrograph to resolve their frequency signatures in the wakefield radiation generated by the beam. They will describe the experimental plan and recent simulation studies of candidate fibers.

  4. Experiment to Detect Accelerating Modes in a Photonic Bandgap Fiber

    SciTech Connect

    England, R. J.; Colby, E. R.; McGuinness, C. M.; Noble, R.; Plettner, T.; Siemann, R. H.; Spencer, J. E.; Walz, D.; Ischebeck, R.; Sears, C. M. S.

    2009-01-22

    An experimental effort is currently underway at the E-163 test beamline at Stanford Linear Accelerator Center to use a hollow-core photonic bandgap (PBG) fiber as a high-gradient laser-based accelerating structure for electron bunches. For the initial stage of this experiment, a 50 pC, 60 MeV electron beam will be coupled into the fiber core and the excited modes will be detected using a spectrograph to resolve their frequency signatures in the wakefield radiation generated by the beam. We will describe the experimental plan and recent simulation studies of candidate fibers.

  5. Calculation of Coupling Efficiencies for Laser-Driven Photonic Bandgap Structures

    SciTech Connect

    England, R. J.; Ng, C.; Noble, R.; Spencer, J. E.

    2010-11-04

    We present a technique for calculating the power coupling efficiency for a laser-driven photonic bandgap structure using electromagnetic finite element simulations, and evaluate the efficiency of several coupling scenarios for the case of a hollow-core photonic bandgap fiber accelerator structure.

  6. Photonic bandgap narrowing in conical hollow core Bragg fibers

    SciTech Connect

    Ozturk, Fahri Emre; Yildirim, Adem; Kanik, Mehmet; Bayindir, Mehmet

    2014-08-18

    We report the photonic bandgap engineering of Bragg fibers by controlling the thickness profile of the fiber during the thermal drawing. Conical hollow core Bragg fibers were produced by thermal drawing under a rapidly alternating load, which was applied by introducing steep changes to the fiber drawing speed. In conventional cylindrical Bragg fibers, light is guided by omnidirectional reflections from interior dielectric mirrors with a single quarter wave stack period. In conical fibers, the diameter reduction introduced a gradient of the quarter wave stack period along the length of the fiber. Therefore, the light guided within the fiber encountered slightly smaller dielectric layer thicknesses at each reflection, resulting in a progressive blueshift of the reflectance spectrum. As the reflectance spectrum shifts, longer wavelengths of the initial bandgap cease to be omnidirectionally reflected and exit through the cladding, which narrows the photonic bandgap. A narrow transmission bandwidth is particularly desirable in hollow waveguide mid-infrared sensing schemes, where broadband light is coupled to the fiber and the analyte vapor is introduced into the hollow core to measure infrared absorption. We carried out sensing simulations using the absorption spectrum of isopropyl alcohol vapor to demonstrate the importance of narrow bandgap fibers in chemical sensing applications.

  7. Broadband optically controlled switching effect in a microfluid-filled photonic bandgap fiber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Junqi; Liu, Yan-ge; Wang, Zhi; Luo, Mingming; Huang, Wei; Han, Tingting; Liu, Xiaoqi

    2016-05-01

    Broadband optically controlled switching in a microfluid-filled photonic bandgap fiber (MF-PBGF) was observed and investigated. The MF-PBGF was formed by infusing a temperature-sensitive high-index fluid into all of the cladding holes of a microstructured optical fiber (MOF). The fiber was then side pumped with a 532 nm continuous wave laser. An extinction ratio of greater than 20 dB at most of the bandgap wavelengths (more than 200 nm) was obtained with a switching power of ∼147 mW. Theoretical and experimental investigations revealed that the effect originated from changes in the temperature gradient induced by heat absorption of the fiber coating with laser illumination. These investigations offer a new and simple approach to achieve wideband and flexible all-optical fiber switching devices without using any photosensitive materials.

  8. Transmission and Propagation of an Accelerating Mode in a Photonic Bandgap Fiber

    SciTech Connect

    Ng, C.-K.; England, R.J.; Lee, L.-Q.; Noble, R.; Rawat, V.; Spencer, J.; /SLAC

    2010-08-26

    A hollow core photonic bandgap (PBG) lattice in a dielectric fiber can provide high gradient acceleration in the optical regime, where the accelerating mode resulting from a defect in the PBG fiber can be excited by high-power lasers. Efficient methods of coupling laser power into the PBG fiber are an area of active research. In this paper, we develop a simulation method using the parallel finite-element electromagnetic suite ACE3P to study the propagation of the accelerating mode in the PBG fiber and determine the radiation pattern into free space at the end of the PBG fiber. The far-field radiation will be calculated and the mechanism of coupling power from an experimental laser setup will be discussed.

  9. Dual-bandgap hollow-core photonic crystal fibers for third harmonic generation.

    PubMed

    Montz, Z; Ishaaya, A A

    2015-01-01

    We present two novel hybrid photonic structures made of silica that possess two well-separated frequency bandgaps. The addition of interstitial air holes in a precise location and size allows these bandgaps to open with a ratio of ∼3 between their central frequencies at the air line ck(z)/w=1, thus fulfilling the basic guidance condition for third harmonic generation in hollow-core fibers. In addition, these designs may serve for high-power laser delivery of two well-separated wavelengths, such as visible and near infrared. PMID:25531607

  10. High-power narrow-linewidth large mode area photonic bandgap fiber amplifier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pulford, Benjamin; Dajani, Iyad; Ehrenreich, Thomas; Holten, Roger; Vergien, Christopher; Naderi, Nader; Mart, Cody; Gu, Guancheng; Kong, Fanting; Hawkins, Thomas; Dong, Liang

    2015-03-01

    Ytterbium-doped large mode area all-solid photonic bandgap fiber amplifiers were used to demonstrate <400 W of output power at 1064 nm. In an initial set of experiments, a fiber with a core diameter of ~50 μm, and a calculated effective area of 1450 μm2 in a straight fiber, was used to generate approximately 600 W. In this case, the input seed was modulated using a sinusoidal format at a frequency of 400 MHz. The output, however, was multimode as the fiber design did not allow for single-mode operation at this wavelength. A second fiber was then fabricated to operate predominantly in single mode at 1064 nm by having the seed closer to the short wavelength edge of the bandgap. This fiber was used to demonstrate 400 W of single-frequency output with excellent beam quality. As the signal power exceeded 450 W, there was significant degradation in the beam quality due to the modal instability. Nevertheless, to the best of our knowledge, the power scaling results obtained in this work far exceed results from prior state of the art all-solid photonic bandgap fiber lasers.

  11. Blue-phase liquid crystal cored optical fiber array with photonic bandgaps and nonlinear transmission properties.

    PubMed

    Khoo, Iam Choon; Hong, Kuan Lung; Zhao, Shuo; Ma, Ding; Lin, Tsung-Hsien

    2013-02-25

    Blue-phase liquid crystal (BPLC) is introduced into the pores of capillary arrays to fabricate fiber arrays. Owing to the photonic-crystals like properties of BPLC, these fiber arrays exhibit temperature dependent photonic bandgaps in the visible spectrum. With the cores maintained in isotropic as well as the Blue phases, the fiber arrays allow high quality image transmission when inserted in the focal plane of a 1x telescope. Nonlinear transmission and optical limiting action on a cw white-light continuum laser is also observed and is attributed to laser induced self-defocusing and propagation modes changing effects caused by some finite absorption of the broadband laser at the short wavelength regime. These nonlinear and other known electro-optical properties of BPLC, in conjunction with their fabrication ease make these fiber arrays highly promising for imaging, electro-optical or all-optical modulation, switching and passive optical limiting applications. PMID:23481965

  12. Thermal tunability of photonic bandgaps in liquid crystal filled polymer photonic crystal fiber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Doudou; Chen, Guoxiang; Wang, Lili

    2016-05-01

    A highly tunable bandgap-guiding polymer photonic crystal fiber is designed by infiltrating the cladding air holes with liquid crystal 5CB. Structural parameter dependence and thermal tunability of the photonic bandgaps, mode properties and confinement losses of the designed fiber are investigated. Bandgaps red shift as the temperature goes up. Average thermal tuning sensitivity of 30.9 nm/°C and 20.6 nm/°C is achieved around room temperature for the first and second photonic bandgap, respectively. Our results provide theoretical references for applications of polymer photonic crystal fiber in sensing and tunable fiber-optic devices.

  13. Polarization-maintaining fiber pulse compressor by birefringent hollow-core photonic bandgap fiber.

    PubMed

    Shirakawa, Akira; Tanisho, Motoyuki; Ueda, Ken-Ichi

    2006-12-11

    Structural birefringent properties of a hollow-core photonic-bandgap fiber were carefully investigated and applied to all-fiber chirped-pulse amplification as a compressor. The group birefringence of as high as 6.9x10(-4) and the dispersion splitting by as large as 149 ps/nm/km between the two principal polarization modes were observed at 1557 nm. By launching the amplifier output to one of the polarization modes a 17-dB polarization extinction ratio was obtained without any pulse degradation originating from polarization-mode dispersion. A hybrid fiber stretcher effectively compensates the peculiar dispersion of the photonic-bandgap fiber and pedestal-free 440-fs pulses with a 1-W average power and 21-nJ pulse energy were obtained. Polarization-maintaining fiber-pigtail output of high-power femtosecond pulses is useful for various applications. PMID:19529631

  14. Forward Brillouin scattering in hollow-core photonic bandgap fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Renninger, W. H.; Shin, H.; Behunin, R. O.; Kharel, P.; Kittlaus, E. A.; Rakich, P. T.

    2016-02-01

    We quantify the strength of stimulated forward Brillouin scattering in hollow-core photonic bandgap fiber through a combination of experiments and multi-physics simulations. Brillouin spectroscopy methods reveal a family of densely spaced Brillouin-active phonon modes below 100 MHz with coupling strengths that approach those of conventional silica fiber. The experimental results are corroborated by multi-physics simulations, revealing that relatively strong optomechanical coupling is mediated by a combination of electrostriction and radiation pressure within the nano-scale silica-air matrix; the nontrivial mechanical properties of this silica-air matrix facilitate the large optomechanical response produced by this system. Simulations also reveal an incredible sensitivity of the Brillouin spectrum to fiber critical dimensions, suggesting opportunity for enhancement or suppression of these interactions. Finally, we relate the measured and calculated couplings to the noise properties of the fiber as the foundation for phase- and polarization-noise estimates in hollow-core fiber. More generally, such Brillouin interactions are an important consideration in both the high and low optical intensity limits.

  15. Fiber distributed feedback laser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elachi, C.; Evans, G. A.; Yeh, C. (Inventor)

    1976-01-01

    Utilizing round optical fibers as communication channels in optical communication networks presents the problem of obtaining a high efficiency coupling between the optical fiber and the laser. A laser is made an integral part of the optical fiber channel by either diffusing active material into the optical fiber or surrounding the optical fiber with the active material. Oscillation within the active medium to produce lasing action is established by grating the optical fiber so that distributed feedback occurs.

  16. Fiber optic laser rod

    DOEpatents

    Erickson, G.F.

    1988-04-13

    A laser rod is formed from a plurality of optical fibers, each forming an individual laser. Synchronization of the individual fiber lasers is obtained by evanescent wave coupling between adjacent optical fiber cores. The fiber cores are dye-doped and spaced at a distance appropriate for evanescent wave coupling at the wavelength of the selected dye. An interstitial material having an index of refraction lower than that of the fiber core provides the optical isolation for effective lasing action while maintaining the cores at the appropriate coupling distance. 2 figs.

  17. Extending mode areas of single-mode all-solid photonic bandgap fibers.

    PubMed

    Gu, Guancheng; Kong, Fanting; Hawkins, Thomas W; Jones, Maxwell; Dong, Liang

    2015-04-01

    Mode area scaling of optical fiber is highly desirable for high power fiber laser applications. It is well known that incorporation of additional smaller cores in the cladding can be used to resonantly out-couple higher-order modes from a main core to suppress higher-order-mode propagation in the main core. Using a novel design with multiple coupled smaller cores in the cladding, we have successfully demonstrated a single-mode photonic bandgap fiber with record effective mode area of ~2650µm(2). Detailed numeric studies have been conducted for multiple cladding designs. For the optimal designs, the simulated minimum higher-order-mode losses are well over two orders of magnitudes higher than that of fundamental mode when expressed in dBs. To our knowledge, this is the best higher-order-mode suppression ever found in fibers with this large effective mode areas. We have also experimentally validated one of the designs. M(2)<1.08 across the transmission band was demonstrated. PMID:25968749

  18. Electrically pumped edge-emitting photonic bandgap semiconductor laser

    DOEpatents

    Lin, Shawn-Yu; Zubrzycki, Walter J.

    2004-01-06

    A highly efficient, electrically pumped edge-emitting semiconductor laser based on a one- or two-dimensional photonic bandgap (PBG) structure is described. The laser optical cavity is formed using a pair of PBG mirrors operating in the photonic band gap regime. Transverse confinement is achieved by surrounding an active semiconductor layer of high refractive index with lower-index cladding layers. The cladding layers can be electrically insulating in the passive PBG mirror and waveguide regions with a small conducting aperture for efficient channeling of the injection pump current into the active region. The active layer can comprise a quantum well structure. The quantum well structure can be relaxed in the passive regions to provide efficient extraction of laser light from the active region.

  19. Applications of Long Period Gratings in Solid Core Photonic Bandgap Fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuhlmey, Boris T.; Luan, Feng; Lazaro, Jose M.; Fu, Libin; Eggleton, Benjamin J.; Yeom, Dong-Il; Coen, Stephane; Wang, Aimin; Knight, Jonathan C.

    2008-10-01

    Solid core photonic bandgap fibres are photonic crystal fibres with a solid core surrounded by high index inclusions. The guidance properties of these fibers are very sensitive to the refractive index of the inclusions, making them widely tunable and making them very promising for sensing applications. Combining these fibers with long period gratings unleashes their full potential, enabling narrow band notch filters tunable over hundreds of nm, refractive index sensors with sensitivity comparable to that of surface plasmon resonance sensors, but also the extraction of the full band diagrams of these bandgap fibres.

  20. Photothermal effect in gas-filled hollow-core photonic bandgap fiber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Fan; Jin, Wei; Cao, Yingchun; Ho, Hoi Lut

    2015-09-01

    We exploit photothermal effect in gas-filled hollow-core photonic bandgap fibers, and demonstrate remarkably sensitive all-fiber (acetylene) gas sensors with noise equivalent concentration of 1-3 parts-per-billion and an unprecedented dynamic range of nearly six orders of magnitude. These results are two to three orders of magnitude better than previous direct absorption-based optical fiber gas sensors. The realization of photothermal spectroscopy in fiber-optic format will allow a new class of sensors with ultra-sensitivity and selectivity, compact size, remote and multiplexed multi-point detection capability.

  1. Thulium Fiber Laser lithotripsy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blackmon, Richard Leious, Jr.

    The Thulium Fiber Laser (TFL) has been studied as a potential alternative to the conventional Holmium:YAG laser (Ho:YAG) for the treatment of kidney stones. The TFL is more ideally suited for laser lithotripsy because of the higher absorption coefficient of the emitted wavelength in water, the superior Gaussian profile of the laser beam, and the ability to operate at arbitrary temporal pulse profiles. The higher absorption of the TFL by water helps translate into higher ablation of urinary stones using less energy. The Gaussian spatial beam profile allows the TFL to couple into fibers much smaller than those currently being used for Ho:YAG lithotripsy. Lastly, the ability of arbitrary pulse operation by the TFL allows energy to be delivered to the stone efficiently so as to avoid negative effects (such as burning or bouncing of the stone) while maximizing ablation. Along with these improvements, the unique properties of the TFL have led to more novel techniques that have currently not been used in the clinic, such as the ability to control the movement of stones based on the manner in which the laser energy is delivered. Lastly, the TFL has led to the development of novel fibers, such as the tapered fiber and removable tip fiber, to be used for lithotripsy which can lead to safer and less expensive treatment of urinary stones. Overall, the TFL has been demonstrated as a viable alternative to the conventional Ho:YAG laser and has the potential to advance methods and tools for treatment of kidney stones.

  2. Optical fiber laser

    SciTech Connect

    Snitzer, E.

    1988-10-25

    This patent describes an optical fiber laser comprising: a gain cavity including a single mode optical fiber of given length and index of refraction and a cladding surrounding the core and having an index of refraction lower than that of the core. The core comprising a host material having incorporated therein a predetermined concentration of just erbium oxide having a fluorescence spectrum with a peak emission line at 1.54 micrometers; filter means optically coupled to each end of the fiber gain cavity for providing feedback in the cavity at the peak emission line of the erbium oxide and for permitting energy to be introduced into the cavity at the absorption band of the erbium oxide in the region of 1.45 to 1.53 micrometers; and a laser diode optically coupled to one end of the core for pumping energy into the end of the gain cavity so that the gain cavity oscillates at just the peak emission line.

  3. Design of Topas photonic bandgap fiber with high birefringence and low confinement loss

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Doudou; Wang, Lili

    2010-09-01

    A highly birefringent hollow-core photonic bandgap fiber based on Topas cyclic olefin copolymer is designed. The rhombic hollow-core with rounded corners is formed by omitting four central air holes of the cladding structure. The guided modes, birefringence and confinement loss of the fiber are investigated by using the full-vector finite element method. A high phase birefringence of the order of 10 -3, a group birefringence of the order of 10 -2 and confinement loss less than 0.1 dB/km are obtained at the central wavelength (1.55 μm) range of the bandgap for fiber with seven rings of air holes in the cladding region.

  4. Semiconductor cylinder fiber laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sandupatla, Abhinay; Flattery, James; Kornreich, Philipp

    2015-12-01

    We fabricated a fiber laser that uses a thin semiconductor layer surrounding the glass core as the gain medium. This is a completely new type of laser. The In2Te3 semiconductor layer is about 15-nm thick. The fiber laser has a core diameter of 14.2 μm, an outside diameter of 126 μm, and it is 25-mm long. The laser mirrors consist of a thick vacuum-deposited aluminum layer at one end and a thin semitransparent aluminum layer deposited at the other end of the fiber. The laser is pumped from the side with either light from a halogen tungsten incandescent lamp or a blue light emitting diode flash light. Both the In2Te3 gain medium and the aluminum mirrors have a wide bandwidth. Therefore, the output spectrum consists of a pedestal from a wavelength of about 454 to 623 nm with several peaks. There is a main peak at 545 nm. The main peak has an amplitude of 16.5 dB above the noise level of -73 dB.

  5. Pulsed Single Frequency Fiber Lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Shibin

    2016-06-01

    Pulsed single frequency fiber lasers with mJ level near 1 micron, 1.55 micron and 2 micron wavelengths were demonstrated by using our proprietary highly doped fibers. These fiber lasers exhibit excellent long term stable operation with M2<1.2.

  6. Optical fiber laser

    SciTech Connect

    Hakimi, F.; Po, H.; Snitzer, E.

    1987-07-14

    An optical fiber laser is described comprising: a gain cavity including a single mode optical fiber of given length having a core with a given index of refraction and a cladding surrounding the core and having an index of refraction lower than that of the core. The core comprises a host glass having incorporated a laser gain material with a fluorescence spectrum having at least one broadband region in which there is at least one peak emission line; filter means optically coupled to one end of the gain cavity and reflective to radiation emitted from the gain material over a predetermined wavelength interval about the peak emission line to provide feedback in the gain cavity; an etalon filter section butt coupled to the remaining end of the gain cavity optical fiber, the etalon filter section comprising a pair of filters spaced apart in parallel by a predetermined length of material transparent to any radiation emitted from the gain cavity. The predetermined length of the transparent material is such that the etalon filter section is no longer than the distance over which the wave train energy from the fiber core remains substantially planar so that the etalon filter section is inside the divergent region to enhance feedback in the gain cavity; and means for pumping energy into the gain cavity to raise the interval energy level such that only a small part of the ion population, corresponding to a predetermined bandwidth about the peak emission line, is raised above laser threshold. The laser emits radiation only over narrow lines over a narrow wavelength interval centered about the peak emission line.

  7. Scattering loss analysis and structure optimization of hollow-core photonic bandgap fiber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Jingming; Wu, Rong; Sun, Kang; Xu, Xiaoliang

    2016-06-01

    Effects of core structure in 7 cell hollow-core photonic bandgap fibers (HC-PBGFs) on scattering loss are analyzed by means of investigating normalized interface field intensity. Fibers with different core wall thickness, core radius and rounding corner of air hole are simulated. Results show that with thick core wall and expanded core radius, scattering loss could be greatly reduced. The scattering loss of the HC-PBGFs in the wavelength range of 1.5-1.56 μm could be decreased by about 50 % of the present level with optimized core structure design.

  8. Fiber Laser Development for LISA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Numata, Kenji; Chen, Jeffrey R.

    2009-01-01

    We have developed a linearly-polarized Ytterbium-doped fiber ring laser with single longitudinal-mode output at 1064nm for LISA and other space applications. Single longitudinal-mode selection was achieved by using a fiber Bragg grating (FBG) and a fiber Fabry-Perot (FFP). The FFP also serves as a frequency-reference within our ring laser. Our laser exhibits comparable low frequency and intensity noise to Non-Planar Ring Oscillator (NPRO). By using a fiber-coupled phase modulator as a frequency actuator, the laser frequency can be electro-optically tuned at a rate of 100kHz. It appears that our fiber ring laser is promising for space applications where robustness of fiber optics is desirable.

  9. Investigation on single taper-based all-solid photonic bandgap fiber modal interferometers.

    PubMed

    Li, Jie; Geng, Mengmei; Sun, Li-Peng; Fan, Pengcheng; Liu, Bo; Guan, Bai-Ou

    2016-04-18

    We demonstrate a single taper-based all-solid photonic bandgap (AS-PBG) fiber modal interferometer that consists of a central tapered fiber region connected to the untapered via two abrupt transitions. Modal interference is given by superimposing the bandgap-guided fundamental core mode with a lower effective index and a specific index-guided cladding supermode with a higher effective index. A series of interferometers with taper diameter of 50μm ~60μm and device length of ~3mm are fabricated and studied in contrast to the conventional counterparts. The temperature coefficient of the interferometer is closely determined by the fraction of the cladding supermode energy localized within the index-raised regions of the fiber. The refractive index (RI) responsivities associated to fiber taper sizes are investigated. The measured maximal RI sensitivity is ~3512.36nm/RIU at the taper diameter of 50μm around RI = 1.423. This research gives a deep understanding to the modal-interferometric AS-PBG structure, which we believe to be valuable for the future application of the related device. PMID:27137292

  10. Freedom from band-gap slavery: from diode lasers to quantum cascade lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capasso, Federico

    2010-02-01

    Semiconductor heterostructure lasers, for which Alferov and Kromer received part of the Nobel Prize in Physics in 2000, are the workhorse of technologies such as optical communications, optical recording, supermarket scanners, laser printers and fax machines. They exhibit high performance in the visible and near infrared and rely for their operation on electrons and holes emitting photons across the semiconductor bandgap. This mechanism turns into a curse at longer wavelengths (mid-infrared) because as the bandgap, shrinks laser operation becomes much more sensitive to temperature, material defects and processing. Quantum Cascade Laser (QCL), invented in 1994, rely on a radically different process for light emission. QCLs are unipolar devices in which electrons undergo transitions between quantum well energy levels and are recycled through many stages emitting a cascade of photons. Thus by suitable tailoring of the layers' thickness, using the same heterostructure material, they can lase across the molecular fingerprint region from 3 to 25 microns and beyond into the far-infrared and submillimiter wave spectrum. High power cw room temperature QCLs and QCLs with large continuous single mode tuning range have found many applications (infrared countermeasures, spectroscopy, trace gas analysis and atmospheric chemistry) and are commercially available. )

  11. Broadband orbital angular momentum transmission using a hollow-core photonic bandgap fiber.

    PubMed

    Li, Haisu; Ren, Guobin; Lian, Yudong; Zhu, Bofeng; Tang, Min; Zhao, Yuanchu; Jian, Shuisheng

    2016-08-01

    We present the viability of exploiting a current hollow-core photonic bandgap fiber (HC-PBGF) to support orbital angular momentum (OAM) states. The photonic bandgap intrinsically provides a large refractive index spacing for guiding light, leading to OAM transmission with low crosstalk. From numerical simulations, a broad OAM±1 mode transmission window with satisfied effective index separations between vector modes (>10-4) and low confinement loss (<3  dB/km) covering 240 nm bandwidth is observed. The OAM purity (defined as normalized power weight for OAM mode) is found to be affected by the modal effective area. Simulation results also show HC-PBGF based OAM transmission is immune to fabrication inaccuracies near the hollow core. This work illustrates that HC-PBGF is a competitive candidate for high-capacity communication harnessing OAM multiplexing. PMID:27472626

  12. Fabrication and characterization of an all-solid tellurite-phosphate photonic bandgap fiber.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Tonglei; Sakai, Yukiko; Suzuki, Takenobu; Ohishi, Yasutake

    2015-05-01

    We present an all-solid tellurite-phosphate photonic bandgap fiber (PBGF) with two layers of high-index rods (TeO2-Li2O-WO3-MoO3-Nb2O5, TLWMN) in the cladding (TeO2-ZnO-Li2O-K2O-Al2O3-P2O5, TZLKAP). TLWMN and TZLKAP glasses have good compatibility for fabricating the all-solid PBGF. Photonic bandgap (PBG) properties are calculated by the plane wave expansion method (PWM), and the results agree well with the measured transmission spectrum. Furthermore, the modal field patterns are measured at ∼1300 and 1520 nm, respectively. The light is confined to the core at ∼1300  nm and lost in the cladding at ∼1520  nm, which match well with the calculated modal field intensities. PMID:25927791

  13. 400-W near diffraction-limited single-frequency all-solid photonic bandgap fiber amplifier.

    PubMed

    Pulford, Benjamin; Ehrenreich, Thomas; Holten, Roger; Kong, Fanting; Hawkins, Thomas W; Dong, Liang; Dajani, Iyad

    2015-05-15

    An ytterbium-doped large-mode area photonic bandgap fiber is used to demonstrate 400 W of single-frequency output at 1064 nm with excellent beam quality and minimal stimulated Brillouin scattering. The fiber possesses all-solid microstructures embedded in the cladding and a core composed of phosphosilicate with a diameter of ∼50  μm. As the signal power is pushed beyond 450 W, there is degradation in the beam quality due to the modal instability. We briefly discuss techniques to alleviate this problem in future designs. To the best of our knowledge, the 400-W single-frequency near diffraction-limited output far exceeds the current state-of-the-art from such type of fiber amplifier. PMID:26393723

  14. Novel fiber lasers and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zenteno, Luis A.; Walton, Donnell T.

    2003-07-01

    Glass fiber lasers were invented in the 60's by Elias Snitzer at Americal Optical, soon after the invention of the first solid-state glass laser. However, it was not until the 80's when these waveguide devices were deployed in industrial applications, driven largely by the technological success of the semiconductor laser diode, which provided practical and efficient pumps, and by the advent of low loss rare-earth-doped optical fiber.

  15. Continuous generation of rubidium vapor in hollow-core photonic bandgap fibers.

    PubMed

    Donvalkar, Prathamesh S; Ramelow, Sven; Clemmen, Stéphane; Gaeta, Alexander L

    2015-11-15

    We demonstrate high optical depths (50±5) that last for hours in rubidium-filled hollow-core photonic bandgap fibers, which represent a 1000× improvement over the operation times previously reported. We investigate the vapor generation mechanism using both a continuous wave and a pulsed light source, and find that the mechanism for generating the rubidium atoms is primarily due to thermal vaporization. The continuous generation of large vapor densities should enable measurements at the single-photon level by averaging over longer time scales. PMID:26565879

  16. Backward Secondary-Wave Coherence Errors in Photonic Bandgap Fiber Optic Gyroscopes.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xiaobin; Song, Ningfang; Zhang, Zuchen; Jin, Jing

    2016-01-01

    Photonic bandgap fiber optic gyroscope (PBFOG) is a novel fiber optic gyroscope (FOG) with excellent environment adaptability performance compared to a conventional FOG. In this work we find and investigate the backward secondary-wave coherence (BSC) error, which is a bias error unique to the PBFOG and caused by the interference between back-reflection-induced and backscatter-induced secondary waves. Our theoretical and experimental results show a maximum BSC error of ~4.7°/h for a 300-m PBF coil with a diameter of 10 cm. The BSC error is an important error source contributing to bias instability in the PBFOG and has to be addressed before practical applications of the PBFOG can be implemented. PMID:27338388

  17. Backward Secondary-Wave Coherence Errors in Photonic Bandgap Fiber Optic Gyroscopes

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Xiaobin; Song, Ningfang; Zhang, Zuchen; Jin, Jing

    2016-01-01

    Photonic bandgap fiber optic gyroscope (PBFOG) is a novel fiber optic gyroscope (FOG) with excellent environment adaptability performance compared to a conventional FOG. In this work we find and investigate the backward secondary-wave coherence (BSC) error, which is a bias error unique to the PBFOG and caused by the interference between back-reflection-induced and backscatter-induced secondary waves. Our theoretical and experimental results show a maximum BSC error of ~4.7°/h for a 300-m PBF coil with a diameter of 10 cm. The BSC error is an important error source contributing to bias instability in the PBFOG and has to be addressed before practical applications of the PBFOG can be implemented. PMID:27338388

  18. An investigation of polarization cross-coupling in air-core photonic bandgap fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Xiaobin; Song, Ningfang; Zhang, Zhihao; Zhang, Zuchen; Jin, Jing; Zhang, Chunxi

    2016-05-01

    Polarization cross-coupling is one of the most important problems in air-core photonic bandgap fibers (PBF). In this research, polarization cross-coupling is investigated for PBFs of different lengths. The analyzing and simulation results show that the orientation of the birefringent axes induced by residual core ellipticity fluctuates with an average period of ~2.5 cm and random angles uniformly distributed over approximately [-7.5°, 7.5°]. The birefringent orientation in PBF varies much more frequently and strongly than that in any conventional fiber because of the difference in drawing process, and this is the most important factor causing the strong polarization cross-coupling in PBFs.

  19. 503MHz repetition rate femtosecond Yb: fiber ring laser with an integrated WDM collimator.

    PubMed

    Wang, Aimin; Yang, Hongyu; Zhang, Zhigang

    2011-12-01

    We demonstrate 503MHz fundamental high repetition rate operation in a ring cavity passively mode-locked Yb:fiber laser incorporating a novel wavelength-division-multiplexing collimator and a piece of all-solid photonic bandgap fiber. The Yb doped fiber was directly fabricated as one fiber pigtail into the functional collimator, greatly shortening the cavity length and facilitating the splicing operation. A 5cm long photonic bandgap fiber with abnormal dispersion at the lasing wavelength (centered at 1030nm) decreases the net dispersion for shorter output pulses. The spectral bandwidth of the pulse was 34nm. The direct output pulse was measured to be 156fs and the dechirped pulse was about 76fs. With this innovative Yb:fiber pigtailed WDM collimator, the ring cavity laser has the potential to work at a repetition rate up to GHz. PMID:22273932

  20. Infrared detectors and lasers operating in the 3-12 μm range using band-gap engineered structures with type II band-gap alignment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swaminathan, Venkataraman; Little, John W.; Tober, Richard L.

    2006-02-01

    The Type II broken band-gap alignment in semiconductor structures wherein the conduction band minimum is in one semiconductor (e.g., InAs) and the valence band maximum is in another (e.g., GaInSb) offers certain unique advantages which can be utilized to realize band-gap engineered novel quantum electro-optic devices such as lasers and detectors. The advantages of the type II structures include reduced Auger recombination, extending the effective band-gap energy of materials wherein type I band-gap alignment would give rise to difficulties such as miscibility gap. In this paper we describe the work carried out at the Army Research Laboratory on type II semiconductor quantum electro-optic devices such as IR lasers and detectors operating in the 3-12 μm range. Specifically we will cover the progress made in GaSb based type II strained layer superlattice IR detectors and Interband Cascade IR Lasers. We will also present our recent work in self-assembled quantum dots which have type II band-gap alignment with the matrix material in which the dots are embedded.

  1. Detailed theoretical investigation of bending properties in solid-core photonic bandgap fibers.

    PubMed

    Murao, Tadashi; Saitoh, Kunimasa; Koshiba, Masanori

    2009-04-27

    In this paper, detailed properties of bent solid-core photonic bandgap fibers (SC-PBGFs) are investigated. We propose an approximate equivalent straight waveguide (ESW) formulation for photonic bandgap (PBG) edges, which is convenient to see qualitatively which radiation (centripetal or centrifugal radiation) mainly occurs and the impact of bend losses for an operating wavelength. In particular, we show that cladding modes induced by bending cause several complete or incomplete leaky mode couplings with the core mode and the resultant loss peaks. Moreover, we show that the field distributions of the cladding modes are characterized by three distinct types for blue-edge, mid-gap, and red-edge wavelengths in the PBG, which is explained by considering the cladding Bloch states or resonant conditions without bending. Next, we investigate the structural dependence of the bend losses. In particular, we demonstrate the bend-loss dependence on the number of the cladding rings. Finally, by investigating the impacts of the order of PBG and the core structure on the bend losses, we discuss a tight-bending structure. PMID:19399140

  2. Indium Telluride Cylinder Fiber Laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sandupatla, Abhinay

    A new type of fiber laser is described here. The laser consists of a 25 mm long fiber with an approximately 15 nm thick In2Te3 semiconductor layer at the glass core glass cladding boundary. The laser mirrors consist of a thick vacuum deposited aluminum layer at one end and a thin semitransparent aluminum layer deposited at the other end of the fiber. The laser is pumped from the side with either light from a Halogen Tungsten incandescent lamp or a blue, power LED. Since both, the gain of the In2Te3 semi-conductor and aluminum mirrors have a wide bandwidth the output consists of a pedestal from a wavelength of about 455 nm to about 650 nm with several peaks. There is a main peak at 545 nm. The main peak has an amplitude of 16.5 dB above the noise level of - 73 dB.

  3. Laser peening with fiber optic delivery

    DOEpatents

    Friedman, Herbert W.; Ault, Earl R.; Scheibner, Karl F.

    2004-11-16

    A system for processing a workpiece using a laser. The laser produces at least one laser pulse. A laser processing unit is used to process the workpiece using the at least one laser pulse. A fiber optic cable is used for transmitting the at least one laser pulse from the laser to the laser processing unit.

  4. A High Power Frequency Doubled Fiber Laser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, Rob; Tu, Meirong; Aveline, Dave; Lundblad, Nathan; Maleki, Lute

    2003-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the power frequencies for the doubled fiber laser. It includes information on the 780 nm laser, second harmonic generation in one crystal, cascading crystals, the tenability of laser systems, laser cooling, and directions for future work.

  5. 2 micron femtosecond fiber laser

    DOEpatents

    Liu, Jian; Wan, Peng; Yang, Lihmei

    2014-07-29

    Methods and systems for generating femtosecond fiber laser pulses are disclose, including generating a signal laser pulse from a seed laser oscillator; using a first amplifier stage comprising an input and an output, wherein the signal laser pulse is coupled into the input of the first stage amplifier and the output of the first amplifier stage emits an amplified and stretched signal laser pulse; using an amplifier chain comprising an input and an output, wherein the amplified and stretched signal laser pulse from the output of the first amplifier stage is coupled into the input of the amplifier chain and the output of the amplifier chain emits a further amplified, stretched signal laser pulse. Other embodiments are described and claimed.

  6. Wedged Fibers Suppress Feedback of Laser Beam

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ladany, I.

    1986-01-01

    When injected laser is coupled into optical fiber, emission instabilities arise because of optical feedback losses from fiber into laser. Coupling efficiencies as high as 80 percent, however, obtained by shaping end of multimode fiber into obtuse-angled wedge. Because slanted sides eliminate back reflection, such wedged fiber achieves high coupling efficiency.

  7. All fiber passively Q-switched laser

    DOEpatents

    Soh, Daniel B. S.; Bisson, Scott E

    2015-05-12

    Embodiments relate to an all fiber passively Q-switched laser. The laser includes a large core doped gain fiber having a first end. The large core doped gain fiber has a first core diameter. The laser includes a doped single mode fiber (saturable absorber) having a second core diameter that is smaller than the first core diameter. The laser includes a mode transformer positioned between a second end of the large core doped gain fiber and a first end of the single mode fiber. The mode transformer has a core diameter that transitions from the first core diameter to the second core diameter and filters out light modes not supported by the doped single mode fiber. The laser includes a laser cavity formed between a first reflector positioned adjacent the large core doped gain fiber and a second reflector positioned adjacent the doped single mode fiber.

  8. High-Power Fiber Lasers Using Photonic Band Gap Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DiDomenico, Leo; Dowling, Jonathan

    2005-01-01

    at undesirably low levels, and scattering of light from dopants. In designing a given fiber laser for reduced ASE, care must be taken to maintain a correct fiber structure for eventual scaling to an array of many such lasers such that the interactions among all the members of the array would cause them to operate in phase lock. Hence, the problems associated with improving a single-fiber laser are not entirely separate from the bundling problem, and some designs for individual fiber lasers may be better than others if the fibers are to be incorporated into bundles. Extensive calculations, expected to take about a year, must be performed in order to determine design parameters before construction of prototype individual and fiber lasers can begin. The design effort can be expected to include calculations to optimize overlaps between the electromagnetic modes and the gain media and calculations of responses of PBG materials to electromagnetic fields. Design alternatives and physical responses that may be considered include simple PBG fibers with no intensity-dependent responses, PBG fibers with intensity- dependent band-gap shifting (see figure), and broad-band pumping made possible by use of candidate broad-band pumping media in place of the air or vacuum gaps used in prior PBG fibers.

  9. Simultaneous high crystallinity and sub-bandgap optical absorptance in hyperdoped black silicon using nanosecond laser annealing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franta, Benjamin; Pastor, David; Gandhi, Hemi H.; Rekemeyer, Paul H.; Gradečak, Silvija; Aziz, Michael J.; Mazur, Eric

    2015-12-01

    Hyperdoped black silicon fabricated with femtosecond laser irradiation has attracted interest for applications in infrared photodetectors and intermediate band photovoltaics due to its sub-bandgap optical absorptance and light-trapping surface. However, hyperdoped black silicon typically has an amorphous and polyphasic polycrystalline surface that can interfere with carrier transport, electrical rectification, and intermediate band formation. Past studies have used thermal annealing to obtain high crystallinity in hyperdoped black silicon, but thermal annealing causes a deactivation of the sub-bandgap optical absorptance. In this study, nanosecond laser annealing is used to obtain high crystallinity and remove pressure-induced phases in hyperdoped black silicon while maintaining high sub-bandgap optical absorptance and a light-trapping surface morphology. Furthermore, it is shown that nanosecond laser annealing reactivates the sub-bandgap optical absorptance of hyperdoped black silicon after deactivation by thermal annealing. Thermal annealing and nanosecond laser annealing can be combined in sequence to fabricate hyperdoped black silicon that simultaneously shows high crystallinity, high above-bandgap and sub-bandgap absorptance, and a rectifying electrical homojunction. Such nanosecond laser annealing could potentially be applied to non-equilibrium material systems beyond hyperdoped black silicon.

  10. Simultaneous high crystallinity and sub-bandgap optical absorptance in hyperdoped black silicon using nanosecond laser annealing

    SciTech Connect

    Franta, Benjamin Pastor, David; Gandhi, Hemi H.; Aziz, Michael J.; Mazur, Eric; Rekemeyer, Paul H.; Gradečak, Silvija

    2015-12-14

    Hyperdoped black silicon fabricated with femtosecond laser irradiation has attracted interest for applications in infrared photodetectors and intermediate band photovoltaics due to its sub-bandgap optical absorptance and light-trapping surface. However, hyperdoped black silicon typically has an amorphous and polyphasic polycrystalline surface that can interfere with carrier transport, electrical rectification, and intermediate band formation. Past studies have used thermal annealing to obtain high crystallinity in hyperdoped black silicon, but thermal annealing causes a deactivation of the sub-bandgap optical absorptance. In this study, nanosecond laser annealing is used to obtain high crystallinity and remove pressure-induced phases in hyperdoped black silicon while maintaining high sub-bandgap optical absorptance and a light-trapping surface morphology. Furthermore, it is shown that nanosecond laser annealing reactivates the sub-bandgap optical absorptance of hyperdoped black silicon after deactivation by thermal annealing. Thermal annealing and nanosecond laser annealing can be combined in sequence to fabricate hyperdoped black silicon that simultaneously shows high crystallinity, high above-bandgap and sub-bandgap absorptance, and a rectifying electrical homojunction. Such nanosecond laser annealing could potentially be applied to non-equilibrium material systems beyond hyperdoped black silicon.

  11. Optical turbulence in fiber lasers.

    PubMed

    Wabnitz, Stefan

    2014-03-15

    We analyze the nonlinear stage of modulation instability in passively mode-locked fiber lasers leading to chaotic or noise-like emission. We present the phase-transition diagram among different regimes of chaotic emission in terms of the key cavity parameters: amplitude or phase turbulence, and spatio-temporal intermittency. PMID:24690788

  12. Plasma-Enhanced Pulsed Laser Deposition of Wide Bandgap Nitrides for Space Power Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Triplett, G. E., Jr.; Durbin, S. M.

    2004-01-01

    The need for a reliable, inexpensive technology for small-scale space power applications where photovoltaic or chemical battery approaches are not feasible has prompted renewed interest in radioisotope-based energy conversion devices. Although a number of devices have been developed using a variety of semiconductors, the single most limiting factor remains the overall lifetime of the radioisotope battery. Recent advances in growth techniques for ultra-wide bandgap III-nitride semiconductors provide the means to explore a new group of materials with the promise of significant radiation resistance. Additional benefits resulting from the use of ultra-wide bandgap materials include a reduction in leakage current and higher operating voltage without a loss of energy transfer efficiency. This paper describes the development of a novel plasma-enhanced pulsed laser deposition system for the growth of cubic boron nitride semiconducting thin films, which will be used to construct pn junction devices for alphavoltaic applications.

  13. Enhanced chemiluminescent detection scheme for trace vapor sensing in pneumatically-tuned hollow core photonic bandgap fibers.

    PubMed

    Stolyarov, Alexander M; Gumennik, Alexander; McDaniel, William; Shapira, Ofer; Schell, Brent; Sorin, Fabien; Kuriki, Ken; Benoit, Gilles; Rose, Aimee; Joannopoulos, John D; Fink, Yoel

    2012-05-21

    We demonstrate an in-fiber gas phase chemical detection architecture in which a chemiluminescent (CL) reaction is spatially and spectrally matched to the core modes of hollow photonic bandgap (PBG) fibers in order to enhance detection efficiency. A peroxide-sensitive CL material is annularly shaped and centered within the fiber's hollow core, thereby increasing the overlap between the emission intensity and the intensity distribution of the low-loss fiber modes. This configuration improves the sensitivity by 0.9 dB/cm compared to coating the material directly on the inner fiber surface, where coupling to both higher loss core modes and cladding modes is enhanced. By integrating the former configuration with a custom-built optofluidic system designed for concomitant controlled vapor delivery and emission measurement, we achieve a limit-of-detection of 100 parts per billion (ppb) for hydrogen peroxide vapor. The PBG fibers are produced by a new fabrication method whereby external gas pressure is used as a control knob to actively tune the transmission bandgaps through the entire visible range during the thermal drawing process. PMID:22714227

  14. 469nm Fiber Laser Source

    SciTech Connect

    Drobshoff, A; Dawson, J W; Pennington, D M; Payne, S A; Beach, R

    2005-01-20

    We have demonstrated 466mW of 469nm light from a frequency doubled continuous wave fiber laser. The system consisted of a 938nm single frequency laser diode master oscillator, which was amplified in two stages to 5 Watts using cladding pumped Nd{sup 3+} fiber amplifiers and then frequency doubled in a single pass through periodically poled KTP. The 3cm long PPKTP crystal was made by Raicol Crystals Ltd. with a period of 5.9 {micro}m and had a phase match temperature of 47 degrees Centigrade. The beam was focused to a 1/e{sup 2} diameter in the crystal of 29 {micro}m. Overall conversion efficiency was 11% and the results agreed well with standard models. Our 938nm fiber amplifier design minimizes amplified spontaneous emission at 1088nm by employing an optimized core to cladding size ratio. This design allows the 3-level transition to operate at high inversion, thus making it competitive with the 1088nm 4-level transition. We have also carefully chosen the fiber coil diameter to help suppress propagation of wavelengths longer than 938 nm. At 2 Watts, the 938nm laser had an M{sup 2} of 1.1 and good polarization (correctable with a quarter and half wave plate to >10:1).

  15. Controllable Dual-Wavelength Fiber Laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhen; Zhou, Jun; He, Bing; Liu, Hou-Kang; Liu, Chi; Wei, Yun-Rong; Dong, Jing-Xing; Lou, Qi-Hong

    2012-07-01

    We demonstrate a controllable dual-wavelength fiber laser which contains a master laser and a slave laser. The master laser is a kind of ring cavity laser which can be injected into by the slave laser. The output laser wavelength is controlled by injected power of the slave laser; both single- and dual-wavelength operation can be achieved. Under free running, the master laser generates 1064 nm laser output. Here the slave laser is a 1072 nm fiber laser. The 1064 nm and 1072 nm laser coexist in output spectrum for relatively low injected power. Dual-wavelength and power-ratio-tunable operation can be achieved. If the injected power of the slave laser is high enough, the 1064 nm laser is extinguished automatically and there is only 1072 nm laser output.

  16. Simultaneous monitoring the real and imaginary parts of the analyte refractive index using liquid-core photonic bandgap Bragg fibers.

    PubMed

    Li, Jingwen; Qu, Hang; Skorobogatiy, Maksim

    2015-09-01

    We demonstrate simultaneous monitoring of the real and imaginary parts of the liquid analyte refractive index by using a hollow-core Bragg fiber. We apply this two-channel fiber sensor to monitor concentrations of various commercial cooling oils. The sensor operates using spectral monitoring of the fiber bandgap center wavelength, as well as monitoring of the fiber transmission amplitude at mid-bandgap position. The sensitivity of the fiber sensor to changes in the real part of the core refractive index is found to be 1460nm/Refractive index unit (RIU). By using spectral modality and effective medium theory, we determine the concentrations of the two commercial fluids from the measured refractive indices with an accuracy of ~0.57% for both low- and high-loss oils. Moreover, using an amplitude-based detection modality allows determination of the oil concentration with accuracy of ~1.64% for low-loss oils and ~2.81% for the high-loss oils. PMID:26368402

  17. Multisoliton complexes in fiber lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korobko, D. A.; Gumenyuk, R.; Zolotovskii, I. O.; Okhotnikov, O. G.

    2014-12-01

    The formation of stationary and non-stationary pulse groups is regularly observed in multiple pulse soliton fiber lasers. The environment developed in this study for the flexible investigation of this phenomenon is based on the cavity comprising a semiconductor saturable absorber mirror (SESAM) with complex dynamics of absorption recovery and all-fiber dispersion management. The detailed experimental and theoretical considerations show that multiple pulsing in fiber systems offers numerous embodiments ranging from stationary bound states to chaotic bunches. The pulse interaction through the dispersive waves was found to produce a principal impact on the bound state formation. The stability and transformation of stationary bound states and bunch propagation have been also addressed.

  18. Fiber laser coupled optical spark delivery system

    DOEpatents

    Yalin, Azer; Willson, Bryan; Defoort, Morgan; Joshi, Sachin; Reynolds, Adam

    2008-03-04

    A spark delivery system for generating a spark using a laser beam is provided, and includes a laser light source and a laser delivery assembly. The laser delivery assembly includes a hollow fiber and a launch assembly comprising launch focusing optics to input the laser beam in the hollow fiber. The laser delivery assembly further includes exit focusing optics that demagnify an exit beam of laser light from the hollow fiber, thereby increasing the intensity of the laser beam and creating a spark. Other embodiments use a fiber laser to generate a spark. Embodiments of the present invention may be used to create a spark in an engine. Yet other embodiments include collecting light from the spark or a flame resulting from the spark and conveying the light for diagnostics. Methods of using the spark delivery systems and diagnostic systems are provided.

  19. Fiber lasers and their applications [Invited].

    PubMed

    Shi, Wei; Fang, Qiang; Zhu, Xiushan; Norwood, R A; Peyghambarian, N

    2014-10-01

    Fiber lasers have seen progressive developments in terms of spectral coverage and linewidth, output power, pulse energy, and ultrashort pulse width since the first demonstration of a glass fiber laser in 1964. Their applications have extended into a variety of fields accordingly. In this paper, the milestones of glass fiber laser development are briefly reviewed and recent advances of high-power continuous wave, Q-switched, mode-locked, and single-frequency fiber lasers in the 1, 1.5, 2, and 3 μm regions and their applications in such areas as industry, medicine, research, defense, and security are addressed in detail. PMID:25322245

  20. Photonic bandgap crystal resonator enhanced, laser controlled modulations of optical interconnects for photonic integrated circuits.

    PubMed

    Teo, Selin H G; Liu, A Q; Zhang, J B; Hong, M H; Singh, J; Yu, M B; Singh, N; Lo, G Q

    2008-05-26

    Ultrafast high-density photonic integrated circuit devices (PICDs) are not easily obtained using traditional index-guiding mechanisms. In this paper, photonic bandgap crystal resonator enhanced, laser-controlled modulations of optical interconnect PICDs were achieved in slab-type mix-guiding configuration - through developed CMOS-compatible processing technologies. The devices, with smallest critical dimensions of 90 nm have footprints of less than 5 x 5 microm(2). Quality-factors an order larger than previously realized was achieved. Through use of effective coupling structures; simultaneous alignment for probing and pumping laser beams, optical measurements of both instantaneous free carriers induced device modulations were obtained together with thermo-optical effects characterizations. PMID:18545494

  1. Fiber Laser Front Ends for High Energy, Short Pulse Lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Dawson, J; Messerly, M; Phan, H; Siders, C; Beach, R; Barty, C

    2007-06-21

    We are developing a fiber laser system for short pulse (1-10ps), high energy ({approx}1kJ) glass laser systems. Fiber lasers are ideal for these systems as they are highly reliable and enable long term stable operation.

  2. Optical fiber lasers and amplifiers

    SciTech Connect

    Snitzer, E.; Po, H.; Tumminelli, R.P.; Hakimi, F.

    1989-03-21

    An optical fiber is described, which comprises: a substantially single-mode core having an index of refraction n/sub 1/ comprised of laser material disposed within a multi-mode cladding having an index of refraction n/sub 2/; and a further cladding having an index of refraction n/sub 3/ surrounding the multi-mode cladding with substantially no space between the further cladding and the multi-mode cladding; wherein the single-mode core is disposed at an offset from the geometric center of the multi-mode cladding.

  3. Laser doping and metallization of wide bandgap materials: silicon carbide, gallium nitride, and aluminum nitride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salama, Islam Abdel Haleem

    A laser direct write and doping (LDWD) system is designed and utilized for direct metallization and selective area doping in different SiC polytypes, GaN and in dielectrics including AlN. Laser direct metallization in 4H- and 6H-SiC generates metal-like conductive phases that are produced as both rectifying and ohmic contacts without metal deposition. Nd:YAG (lambda = 532, 1064 nm) nanosecond pulsed laser irradiation in SiC induces carbon-rich conductive phases by thermal decomposition of SiC while UV excimer (lambda = 193 nm) laser irradiation produces a silicon-rich phase due to selective carbon photoablation. Linear transmission line method (TLM) pattern is directly fabricated in single crystals SiC by pulsed laser irradiation allowing characterization of the laser fabricated metal-like contacts. Activation of a self focusing effect at the frequency doubled Nd:YAG laser irradiation (lambda = 532 nm) allows to fabricate buried metal like contacts in SiC wafers while maintaining their device-ready surface condition. Gas immersion laser doping (GILD) and laser doping from a molten precursor are utilized to dope both GaN and SiC. Trimethylaluminum (TMAl) and nitrogen are the precursors used to produce p-type and n-type doped SiC; respectively. Nd:YAG and excimer laser nitrogen doping in SiC epilayer and single crystal substrates increases the dopant concentration by two orders of magnitude and produces both deep (500--600 nm) and shallow (50 nm) junctions, respectively. Laser assisted effusion/diffusion is introduced and utilized to dope Al in SiC wafers. Using this technique, a150 nm p-type doped junction is fabricated in semi-insulating 6H- and n-type doped 4H-SiC wafers. Laser-induced p-type doping of Mg in single crystal GaN is conducted using Bis-magnesium dihydrate [Mg(TMHD)2]. Mg concentration and penetration depth up to 10 20--1021 cm-3 and 5mum, respectively are achieved using various laser doping techniques. Laser direct writing and doping (LDWD) is a

  4. Ultraviolet laser quantum well intermixing based prototyping of bandgap tuned heterostructures for the fabrication of superluminescent diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beal, Romain; Moumanis, Khalid; Aimez, Vincent; Dubowski, Jan J.

    2016-04-01

    The ultraviolet laser induced quantum well intermixing process has been investigated for prototyping of multiple bandgap quantum well (QW) wafers designed for the fabrication of superluminescent diodes (SLDs). The process takes advantage of a krypton fluoride excimer laser (λ=248 nm) that by irradiating an InP layer capping GaInAs/GaInAsP QW heterostructure leads to the modification of its surface chemical composition and formation of point defects. A subsequent rapid thermal annealing step results in the selective area intermixing of the investigated heterostructures achieving a high quality bandgap tuned material for the fabrication of broad spectrum SLDs. The devices made from a 3-bandgap material are characterized by ~100 nm wide emission spectra with relatively flat profiles and emission exceeding 1 mW.

  5. Multiwavelength fiber laser for the fiber link monitoring system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Peng-Chun; Lee, Wei-Yun; Wu, Shin-Shian; Hu, Hsuan-Lun

    2013-10-01

    This work proposes a novel fiber link monitoring system that uses a multiwavelength fiber laser for wavelength-division-multiplexed (WDM) passive optical network (PON). The multiwavelength fiber laser is based on an erbium-doped fiber amplifier (EDFA) and a semiconductor optical amplifier (SOA). Experimental results show the feasibility using the system to monitor a fiber link with a high and stable signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of over 26 dB. The link quality of downstream signals as well as the fiber link on WDM channels can be monitored in real time. Favorable carrier-to-noise ratio (CNR), composite second-order (CSO), and composite triple beat (CTB) performance metrics were obtained for cable television (CATV) signals that were transported through 25 km of standard single-mode fiber (SMF).

  6. Fused fiber components for parallel coherent fiber lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zoubir, A.; Dupriez, P.

    2015-10-01

    The concept of massively parallel coherent fiber lasers holds great promise to generate enormous laser peak power in order to produce highly energetic particle beams. Such technology is expected to provide a route to practical particle colliders or to proton generation for medical applications. Such concept is based on the phasing of thousands of fiber amplifiers each emitting mJ level pulses, in which optical fibers are key components. In this paper, we present important technological building blocks based on optical fibers, which could pave the way for efficient, compact and cost-effective components to address the technological challenges ahead.

  7. Extreme electronic bandgap modification in laser-crystallized silicon optical fibres.

    PubMed

    Healy, Noel; Mailis, Sakellaris; Bulgakova, Nadezhda M; Sazio, Pier J A; Day, Todd D; Sparks, Justin R; Cheng, Hiu Y; Badding, John V; Peacock, Anna C

    2014-12-01

    For decades now, silicon has been the workhorse of the microelectronics revolution and a key enabler of the information age. Owing to its excellent optical properties in the near- and mid-infrared, silicon is now promising to have a similar impact on photonics. The ability to incorporate both optical and electronic functionality in a single material offers the tantalizing prospect of amplifying, modulating and detecting light within a monolithic platform. However, a direct consequence of silicon's transparency is that it cannot be used to detect light at telecommunications wavelengths. Here, we report on a laser processing technique developed for our silicon fibre technology through which we can modify the electronic band structure of the semiconductor material as it is crystallized. The unique fibre geometry in which the silicon core is confined within a silica cladding allows large anisotropic stresses to be set into the crystalline material so that the size of the bandgap can be engineered. We demonstrate extreme bandgap reductions from 1.11 eV down to 0.59 eV, enabling optical detection out to 2,100 nm. PMID:25262096

  8. Extreme electronic bandgap modification in laser-crystallized silicon optical fibres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Healy, Noel; Mailis, Sakellaris; Bulgakova, Nadezhda M.; Sazio, Pier J. A.; Day, Todd D.; Sparks, Justin R.; Cheng, Hiu Y.; Badding, John V.; Peacock, Anna C.

    2014-12-01

    For decades now, silicon has been the workhorse of the microelectronics revolution and a key enabler of the information age. Owing to its excellent optical properties in the near- and mid-infrared, silicon is now promising to have a similar impact on photonics. The ability to incorporate both optical and electronic functionality in a single material offers the tantalizing prospect of amplifying, modulating and detecting light within a monolithic platform. However, a direct consequence of silicon’s transparency is that it cannot be used to detect light at telecommunications wavelengths. Here, we report on a laser processing technique developed for our silicon fibre technology through which we can modify the electronic band structure of the semiconductor material as it is crystallized. The unique fibre geometry in which the silicon core is confined within a silica cladding allows large anisotropic stresses to be set into the crystalline material so that the size of the bandgap can be engineered. We demonstrate extreme bandgap reductions from 1.11 eV down to 0.59 eV, enabling optical detection out to 2,100 nm.

  9. Fiber optic applications for laser polarized targets

    SciTech Connect

    Cummings, W.J.; Kowalczyk, R.S.

    1997-10-01

    For the past two years, the laser polarized target group at Argonne has been used multi-mode fiber optic patch cords for a variety of applications. In this paper, the authors describe the design for transporting high power laser beams with optical fibers currently in use at IUCF.

  10. Microring embedded hollow polymer fiber laser

    SciTech Connect

    Linslal, C. L. Sebastian, S.; Mathew, S.; Radhakrishnan, P.; Nampoori, V. P. N.; Girijavallabhan, C. P.; Kailasnath, M.

    2015-03-30

    Strongly modulated laser emission has been observed from rhodamine B doped microring resonator embedded in a hollow polymer optical fiber by transverse optical pumping. The microring resonator is fabricated on the inner wall of a hollow polymer fiber. Highly sharp lasing lines, strong mode selection, and a collimated laser beam are observed from the fiber. Nearly single mode lasing with a side mode suppression ratio of up to 11.8 dB is obtained from the strongly modulated lasing spectrum. The microring embedded hollow polymer fiber laser has shown efficient lasing characteristics even at a propagation length of 1.5 m.

  11. Visible upconversion fiber lasers in ring configuration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caspary, Reinhard; Baraniecki, Tomasz P.; Kozak, Marcin M.; Kowalsky, Wolfgang

    2005-09-01

    Up-conversion fiber lasers based on Pr3+/Yb3+ doped fluoride fibers and pumped at 835 nm can operate on emission lines in the red, orange, green, and blue spectral region. Up to now only Fabry-Perot configurations with two mirrors butt-coupled to the fiber ends were investigated. In this paper we present the first visible Pr3+/Yb3+ fiber lasers in a ring configuration. In contrast to the usual Fabry-Perot configuration, the basic ring resonator setup contains no free-space optics and no parts which need to be adjusted. The main challenge for such a setup is the connection between the fluoride laser fiber and the remaining part of the ring resonator, which is made from silica fibers. Due to the very different melting temperatures of both glasses usual fusion splices are impossible. We use a special technique to couple the fibers with glue.

  12. Diode pumped alkali vapor fiber laser

    DOEpatents

    Payne, Stephen A.; Beach, Raymond J.; Dawson, Jay W.; Krupke, William F.

    2007-10-23

    A method and apparatus is provided for producing near-diffraction-limited laser light, or amplifying near-diffraction-limited light, in diode pumped alkali vapor photonic-band-gap fiber lasers or amplifiers. Laser light is both substantially generated and propagated in an alkali gas instead of a solid, allowing the nonlinear and damage limitations of conventional solid core fibers to be circumvented. Alkali vapor is introduced into the center hole of a photonic-band-gap fiber, which can then be pumped with light from a pump laser and operated as an oscillator with a seed beam, or can be configured as an amplifier.

  13. Diode pumped alkali vapor fiber laser

    DOEpatents

    Payne, Stephen A.; Beach, Raymond J.; Dawson, Jay W.; Krupke, William F.

    2006-07-26

    A method and apparatus is provided for producing near-diffraction-limited laser light, or amplifying near-diffraction-limited light, in diode pumped alkali vapor photonic-band-gap fiber lasers or amplifiers. Laser light is both substantially generated and propagated in an alkali gas instead of a solid, allowing the nonlinear and damage limitations of conventional solid core fibers to be circumvented. Alkali vapor is introduced into the center hole of a photonic-band-gap fiber, which can then be pumped with light from a pump laser and operated as an oscillator with a seed beam, or can be configured as an amplifier.

  14. Advances in drilling with fiber lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naeem, Mohammed

    2015-07-01

    High brightness quasi- continuous wave (QCW) and continuous wave (CW) fiber lasers are routinely being used for cutting and welding for a range of industrial applications. However, to date very little work has been carried out or has been reported on laser drilling with these laser sources. This work describes laser drilling ((trepan and percussion) of nickel based superalloys (thermal barrier coated and uncoated) with a high power QCW fiber laser. This presentation will highlight some of the most significant aspect of laser drilling, i.e. SmartPierceTM, deep hole drilling and small hole drilling. These advances in processing also demonstrate the potential for fiber laser processing when an advanced interface between laser and an open architecture controller are used.

  15. Pulsed laser damage to optical fibers

    SciTech Connect

    Allison, S.W.; Gillies, G.T.; Magnuson, D.W.; Pagano, T.S.

    1985-10-01

    This paper describes some observations of pulsed laser damage to optical fibers with emphasis on a damage mode characterized as a linear fracture along the outer core of a fiber. Damage threshold data are presented which illustrate the effects of the focusing lens, end-surface preparation, and type of fiber. An explanation based on fiber-beam misalignment is given and is illustrated by a simple experiment and ray trace.

  16. Measurement and suppression of secondary waves caused by high-order modes in a photonic bandgap fiber-optic gyroscope.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xiaobin; Gao, Fuyu; Song, Ningfang; Jin, Jing

    2016-05-16

    Air-core photonic bandgap fiber (PBF) is a good choice for fiber-optic gyroscopes (FOGs) owing to the fact that it can be adapted to a wide variety of environments. However, its multimode properties are disadvantageous for the application to FOGs. An interference-based method is proposed to precisely determine the secondary waves caused by the high-order modes and their coupling. Based on the method, two groups of secondary waves have been found, having optical path differences (OPDs) of ~1.859 m and ~0.85 m, respectively, relative to the primary waves in a PBFOG that consists of a 7-cell PBF coil, approximately 180 m in length. Multi-turn bends of the PBF at both ends of the PBF coil after the fusion splicing points are shown to suppress the intensity of these secondary waves by approximately 10 dB. PMID:27409849

  17. In-line Mach-Zehnder interferometer composed of microtaper and long-period grating in all-solid photonic bandgap fiber

    SciTech Connect

    Wu Zhifang; Liu Yange; Wang Zhi; Han Tingting; Li Shuo; Jiang Meng; Ping Shum, Perry

    2012-10-01

    We report a compact in-line Mach-Zehnder interferometer combining a microtaper with a long-period grating (LPG) in a section of all-solid photonic bandgap fiber. Theoretical and experimental investigations reveal that the interferometer works from the interference between the fundamental core mode and the LP{sub 01} cladding supermodes. The mechanism underlying the mode coupling caused by the microtaper can be attributed to a bandgap-shifting as the fiber diameter is abruptly scaled down. In addition, the interferometer designed to strengthen the coupling ratio of the long-period grating has a promising practical application in the simultaneous measurement of curvature and temperature.

  18. Self-tuning fiber lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brunton, Steven L.; Kutz, J. N.; Fu, Xing

    2016-03-01

    Advanced methods in data science are driving the characterization and control of nonlinear dynamical systems in optics. In this work, we investigate the use of machine learning, sparsity methods and adaptive control to develop a self-tuning fiber laser, which automatically learns and adapts to maintain high-energy ultrashort pulses. In particular, a two-stage procedure is introduced consisting of a machine learning algorithm to recognize different dynamical regimes with distinct behavior, followed by an adaptive control algorithm to reject disturbances and track optimal solutions despite stochastically varying system parameters. The machine learning algorithm, called sparse representation for classification, comes from machine vision and is typically used for image recognition. The adaptive control algorithm is extremum-seeking control, which has been applied to a wide range of systems in engineering; extremum-seeking is beneficial because of rigorous stability guarantees and ease of implementation.

  19. Dual polarization fiber grating laser hydrophone.

    PubMed

    Guan, Bai-Ou; Tan, Yan-Nan; Tam, Hwa-Yaw

    2009-10-26

    A novel fiber optic hydrophone based on the integration of a dual polarization fiber grating laser and an elastic diaphragm is proposed and experimentally demonstrated. The diaphragm transforms the acoustic pressure into transversal force acting on the laser cavity which changes the fiber birefringence and therefore the beat frequency between the two polarization lines. The proposed hydrophone has advantages of ease of interrogation, absolute frequency encoding, and capability to multiplex a number of sensors on a single fiber by use of frequency division multiplexing technique. PMID:19997174

  20. Multiplexed fiber-ring laser sensors for ultrasonic detection.

    PubMed

    Liu, Tongqing; Hu, Lingling; Han, Ming

    2013-12-16

    We propose and demonstrate a multiplexing method for ultrasonic sensors based on fiber Bragg gratings (FBGs) that are included inside the laser cavity of a fiber-ring laser. The multiplexing is achieved using add-drop filters to route the light signals, according to their wavelengths, into different optical paths, each of which contains a separate span of erbium-doped fiber (EDF) as the gain medium. Because a specific span of EDF only addresses a single wavelength channel, mode completion is avoided and the FBG ultrasonic sensors can be simultaneously demodulated. The proposed method is experimentally demonstrated using a two-channel system with two sensing FBGs in a single span of fiber. PMID:24514624

  1. Advances in fiber combined pump modules for fiber lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crum, Trevor; Romero, Oscar; Li, Hanxuan; Jin, Xu; Towe, Terry; Chyr, Irving; Truchan, Tom; Liu, Daming; Cutillas, Serge; Johnson, Kelly; Park, Sang-Ki; Wolak, Ed; Miller, Robert; Bullock, Robert; Mott, Jeff; Fidric, Bernard; Harrison, James

    2009-02-01

    Fiber combining multiple pump sources for fiber lasers has enabled the thermal and reliability advantages of distributed architectures. Recently, mini-bar based modules have been demonstrated which combine the advantages of independent emitter failures previously shown in single-stripe pumps with improved brightness retention yielding over 2 MW/cm2Sr in compact economic modules. In this work multiple fiber-coupled mini-bars are fiber combined to yield an output of over 400 W with a brightness exceeding 1 MW/cm2Sr in an economic, low loss architecture.

  2. Temperature dependence of beat-length and confinement loss in an air-core photonic band-gap fiber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Zhenlong; Li, Xuyou; Hong, Yong; Liu, Pan; Yang, Hanrui; Ling, Weiwei

    2016-05-01

    The temperature dependence of polarization-maintaining (PM) property and loss in a highly-birefringent air-core photonic band-gap fiber (PBF) is investigated. The effects of temperature variation on the effective index, beat-length and confinement loss are studied numerically by using the full-vector finite element method (FEM). It is found that, the PM property of this PBF is insensitive to the temperature, and the temperature-dependent beat-length coefficient can be as low as 2.86×10-8 m/°C, which is typically 200 times less than those of conventional panda fibers, the PBF has a stable confinement loss of 0.01 dB/m over the temperature range of -30 to 20 °C for the slow axis at the wavelength of 1.55 μm. The PBF with ultra-low temperature-dependent PM property and low loss can reduce the thermally induced polarization instability apparently in interferometric applications such as resonant fiber optic gyroscope (RFOG), optical fiber sensors, and so on.

  3. Progress in Cherenkov femtosecond fiber lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xiaomin; Svane, Ask S.; Lægsgaard, Jesper; Tu, Haohua; Boppart, Stephen A.; Turchinovich, Dmitry

    2016-01-01

    We review the recent developments in the field of ultrafast Cherenkov fiber lasers. Two essential properties of such laser systems—broad wavelength tunability and high efficiency of Cherenkov radiation wavelength conversion are discussed. The exceptional performance of the Cherenkov fiber laser systems are highlighted—dependent on the realization scheme, the Cherenkov lasers can generate the femtosecond output tunable across the entire visible and even the UV range, and for certain designs more than 40% conversion efficiency from the pump to Cherenkov signal can be achieved. The femtosecond Cherenkov laser with all-fiber architecture is presented and discussed. Operating in the visible range, it delivers 100-200 fs wavelength-tunable pulses with multimilliwatt output power and exceptionally low noise figure an order of magnitude lower than the traditional wavelength tunable supercontinuum-based femtosecond sources. The applications for Cherenkov laser systems in practical biophotonics and biomedical applications, such as bio-imaging and microscopy, are discussed.

  4. Thulium fiber laser lithotripsy using small spherical distal fiber tips

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, Christopher R.; Hardy, Luke A.; Kennedy, Joshua D.; Irby, Pierce B.; Fried, Nathaniel M.

    2016-02-01

    This study tests a 100-μm-core fiber with 300-μm-diameter ball tip during Thulium fiber laser (TFL) lithotripsy. The TFL was operated at 1908 nm wavelength with 35-mJ pulse energy, 500-μs pulse duration, and 300-Hz pulse rate. Calcium oxalate/phosphate stone samples were weighed, laser procedure times measured, and ablation rates calculated for ball tip fibers, with comparison to bare tip fibers. Photographs of ball tips were taken before and after each procedure to observe ball tip degradation and determine number of procedures completed before need to replace fiber. Saline irrigation rates and ureteroscope deflection were measured with and without TFL fiber present. There was no statistical difference (P > 0.05) between stone ablation rates for single-use ball tip fiber (1.3 +/- 0.4 mg/s) (n=10), multiple-use ball tip fiber (1.3 +/- 0.5 mg/s) (n=44), and conventional single-use bare tip fibers (1.3 +/- 0.2 mg/s) (n=10). Ball tip durability varied widely, but fibers averaged > 4 stone procedures before decline in stone ablation rates due to mechanical damage at front surface of ball tip. The small fiber diameter did not impact ureteroscope deflection or saline flow rates. The miniature ball tip fiber may provide a cost-effective design for safe fiber insertion through the ureteroscope working channel and the ureter without risk of scope damage or tissue perforation, and without compromising stone ablation efficiency during TFL ablation of kidney stones.

  5. Visible fiber lasers excited by GaN laser diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujimoto, Yasushi; Nakanishi, Jun; Yamada, Tsuyoshi; Ishii, Osamu; Yamazaki, Masaaki

    2013-07-01

    This paper describes and discusses visible fiber lasers that are excited by GaN laser diodes. One of the attractive points of visible light is that the human eye is sensitive to it between 400 and 700 nm, and therefore we can see applications in display technology. Of course, many other applications exist. First, we briefly review previously developed visible lasers in the gas, liquid, and solid-state phases and describe the history of primary solid-state visible laser research by focusing on rare-earth doped fluoride media, including glasses and crystals, to clarify the differences and the merits of primary solid-state visible lasers. We also demonstrate over 1 W operation of a Pr:WPFG fiber laser due to high-power GaN laser diodes and low-loss optical fibers (0.1 dB/m) made by waterproof fluoride glasses. This new optical fiber glass is based on an AlF3 system fluoride glass, and its waterproof property is much better than the well known fluoride glass of ZBLAN. The configuration of primary visible fiber lasers promises highly efficient, cost-effective, and simple laser systems and will realize visible lasers with photon beam quality and quantity, such as high-power CW or tunable laser systems, compact ultraviolet lasers, and low-cost ultra-short pulse laser systems. We believe that primary visible fiber lasers, especially those excited by GaN laser diodes, will be effective tools for creating the next generation of research and light sources.

  6. Flexible pulse-controlled fiber laser.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xueming; Cui, Yudong

    2015-01-01

    Controlled flexible pulses have widespread applications in the fields of fiber telecommunication, optical sensing, metrology, and microscopy. Here, we report a compact pulse-controlled all-fiber laser by exploiting an intracavity fiber Bragg grating (FBG) system as a flexible filter. The width and wavelength of pulses can be tuned independently by vertically and horizontally translating a cantilever beam, respectively. The pulse width of the laser can be tuned flexibly and accurately from ~7 to ~150 ps by controlling the bandwidth of FBG. The wavelength of pulse can be tuned precisely with the range of >20 nm. The flexible laser is precisely controlled and insensitive to environmental perturbations. This fiber-based laser is a simple, stable, and low-cost source for various applications where the width-tunable and/or wavelength-tunable pulses are necessary. PMID:25801546

  7. Flexible pulse-controlled fiber laser

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xueming; Cui, Yudong

    2015-01-01

    Controlled flexible pulses have widespread applications in the fields of fiber telecommunication, optical sensing, metrology, and microscopy. Here, we report a compact pulse-controlled all-fiber laser by exploiting an intracavity fiber Bragg grating (FBG) system as a flexible filter. The width and wavelength of pulses can be tuned independently by vertically and horizontally translating a cantilever beam, respectively. The pulse width of the laser can be tuned flexibly and accurately from ~7 to ~150 ps by controlling the bandwidth of FBG. The wavelength of pulse can be tuned precisely with the range of >20 nm. The flexible laser is precisely controlled and insensitive to environmental perturbations. This fiber-based laser is a simple, stable, and low-cost source for various applications where the width-tunable and/or wavelength-tunable pulses are necessary. PMID:25801546

  8. Amplifier/compressor fiber Raman lasers.

    PubMed

    Islam, M N; Mollenauer, L F; Stolen, R H; Simpson, J R; Shang, H T

    1987-10-01

    We show that the chirp from cross-phase modulation (XPM) dominates the operation of fiber Raman lasers (FRL's). Thus a FRL in the anomalous group-velocity regime is best described as a XPM-chirped Raman amplifier followed by a linear fiber compressor. While the output of such a laser is generally a narrow pulse with a broad pedestal, we show both experimentally and by computer simulation that negligible background is achievable. PMID:19741882

  9. 100 Gbit/s WDM transmission at 2 µm: transmission studies in both low-loss hollow core photonic bandgap fiber and solid core fiber.

    PubMed

    Zhang, H; Kavanagh, N; Li, Z; Zhao, J; Ye, N; Chen, Y; Wheeler, N V; Wooler, J P; Hayes, J R; Sandoghchi, S R; Poletti, F; Petrovich, M N; Alam, S U; Phelan, R; O'Carroll, J; Kelly, B; Grüner-Nielsen, L; Richardson, D J; Corbett, B; Garcia Gunning, F C

    2015-02-23

    We show for the first time 100 Gbit/s total capacity at 2 µm waveband, using 4 × 9.3 Gbit/s 4-ASK Fast-OFDM direct modulation and 4 × 15.7 Gbit/s NRZ-OOK external modulation, spanning a 36.3 nm wide wavelength range. WDM transmission was successfully demonstrated over 1.15 km of low-loss hollow core photonic bandgap fiber (HC-PBGF) and over 1 km of solid core fiber (SCF). We conclude that the OSNR penalty associated with the SCF is minimal, while a ~1-2 dB penalty was observed after the HC-PBGF probably due to mode coupling to higher-order modes. PMID:25836529

  10. Fiber-Optic Probe For Laser Velocimetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lynch, Dana H.; Mcalister, Kenneth W.; Gunter, William D., Jr.

    1992-01-01

    Size and weight of optics reduced considerably. Proposed fiber-optic probe in laser velocimeter smaller (and, therefore, lighter in weight and more maneuverable) than previous probe. Proposed configuration is product of calculations and experiments showing virtual waists serve same purpose. Laser-velocimeter lens brought close to transfer lenses to focus on virtual waists, thereby shortening probe head considerably.

  11. Excimer laser machining of optical fiber taps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coyle, Richard J.; Serafino, Anthony J.; Grimes, Gary J.; Bortolini, James R.

    1991-05-01

    Precision openings for construction of an optical backplane have been machined in an optical fiber using an excimer laser operating at a wavelength of 193 nm. The openings were made by imaging the laser beam onto the polymer fiber cladding with a telescope, then ablating the cladding with a sufficient number of pulses to expose the core. Circular openings measuring 250 and 625 microns and elliptical openings measuring 650 X 350 microns have been made in the cladding of a 1 mm polymer-clad silica fiber. Examination by scanning electron microscopy reveals that the best quality openings are obtained with either the smaller circular geometry or the elliptical geometry. For various reasons, elliptical openings, with the major axis oriented along the longitudinal axis of the fiber, appear more suitable for tap construction. Individual optical fiber taps have been constructed by attaching a tap fiber to a laser machined opening in a central fiber using an ultraviolet-curable acralate. Individual tap measurements were made on the elliptical and the 250 micron circular openings. In addition, a triple tap assembly was made using elliptical tap openings. These results indicate that the excimer laser machining technique may be applicable to the construction of a linear tapped bus for optical backplanes.

  12. Actively mode-locked Raman fiber laser.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xuezong; Zhang, Lei; Jiang, Huawei; Fan, Tingwei; Feng, Yan

    2015-07-27

    Active mode-locking of Raman fiber laser is experimentally investigated for the first time. An all fiber connected and polarization maintaining loop cavity of ~500 m long is pumped by a linearly polarized 1120 nm Yb fiber laser and modulated by an acousto-optic modulator. Stable 2 ns width pulse train at 1178 nm is obtained with modulator opening time of > 50 ns. At higher power, pulses become longer, and second order Raman Stokes could take place, which however can be suppressed by adjusting the open time and modulation frequency. Transient pulse evolution measurement confirms the absence of relaxation oscillation in Raman fiber laser. Tuning of repetition rate from 392 kHz to 31.37 MHz is obtained with harmonic mode locking. PMID:26367642

  13. Fiber optic mounted laser driven flyer plates

    SciTech Connect

    Paisley, D.L.

    1990-12-31

    This invention is comprised of a laser driven flyer plate where the flyer plate is deposited directly onto the squared end of an optical fiber. The plasma generated by a laser pulse drives the flyer plate toward a target. In another embodiment, a first metal layer is deposited onto the squared end of an optical fiber, followed by a layer of a dielectric material and a second metal layer. The laser pulse generates a plasma in the first metal layer, but the plasma is kept away from the second metal layer by the dielectric layer until the pressure reaches the point where shearing occurs. 2 figs.

  14. Bidirectional pumped high power Raman fiber laser.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Q; Yan, P; Li, D; Sun, J; Wang, X; Huang, Y; Gong, M

    2016-03-21

    This paper presents a 3.89 kW 1123 nm Raman all-fiber laser with an overall optical-to-optical efficiency of 70.9%. The system consists of a single-wavelength (1070nm) seed and one-stage bidirectional 976 nm non-wavelength-stabilized laser diodes (LDs) pumped Yb-doped fiber amplifier. The unique part of this system is the application of non-wavelength-stabilized LDs in high power bidirectional pumping configuration fiber amplifier via refractive index valley fiber combiners. This approach not only increases the pump power, but also shortens the length of fiber by avoiding the usage of multi-stage amplifier. Through both theoretical research and experiment, the bidirectional pumping configuration presented in this paper proves to be able to convert 976 nm pump laser to 1070 nm laser via Yb3+ transfer, which is then converted into 1123 nm Raman laser via the first-order Raman effect without the appearance of any higher-order Raman laser. PMID:27136862

  15. Multi-wavelength narrow linewidth fiber laser based on distributed feedback fiber lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lv, Jingsheng; Qi, Haifeng; Song, Zhiqiang; Guo, Jian; Ni, Jiasheng; Wang, Chang; Peng, Gangding

    2016-06-01

    A narrow linewidth laser configuration based on distributed feedback fiber lasers (DFB-FL) with eight wavelengths in the international telecommunication union (ITU) grid is presented and realized. In this laser configuration, eight phase-shifted gratings in series are bidirectionally pumped by two 980-nm laser diodes (LDs). The final laser output with over 10-mW power for each wavelength can be obtained, and the maximum power difference within eight wavelengths is 1.2 dB. The laser configuration with multiple wavelengths and uniform power outputs can be very useful in large scaled optical fiber hydrophone fields.

  16. Laser fiber optics ordnance initiation system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, L. C.

    1976-01-01

    Recent progress on system development in the laser initiation of explosive devices is summarized. The topics included are: development of compact free-running mode and Q-switched lasers, development of low-loss fiber optic bundles and connectors, study of nuclear radiation effects on the system, characterization of laser initiation sensitivities of insensitive high explosives, and the design methods used to achieve attractive system weight and cost savings. Direction for future work is discussed.

  17. Black anneal marking with pulsed fiber lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murphy, T.; Harrison, P.; Norman, S.

    2015-07-01

    High contrast marking of metals is used in a wide range of industries. Fiber laser marking of these metals provides non-contact marking with no consumables, offering many advantages over traditional methods of metal marking. The laser creates a permanent mark on the material surface combining heat and oxygen with no noticeable ablation. The focussed beam of the fiber laser in combination with precision control of the heat input is able to treat small areas of the material surface evenly and consistently, which is critical for producing black anneal marks. The marks are highly legible which is ideal for marking serial numbers or small data matrices where traceability is required. This paper reports the experimental study for producing black anneal marks on various grades of stainless steel using fiber lasers. The influence of metal surface finish, beam quality, spot size diameter and pulse duration are investigated for producing both smooth and decorative anneal marks.

  18. Fiber Delivery of mid-IR lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Kriesel, J.M.; Gat, N.; Bernacki, Bruce E.; Myers, Tanya L.; Bledt, Carlos M.; Harrington, James P.

    2011-08-24

    Fiber optics for the visible to near infrared (NIR) wavelength regimes (i.e. = 0.42 {mu}m) have proven to be extremely useful for a myriad of applications such as telecommunications, illumination, and sensors because they enable convenient, compact, and remote delivery of laser beams. Similarly, there is a need for fiber optics operating at longer wavelengths. For example, systems operating in the mid-IR regime (i.e., = 314 {mu}m) are being developed to detect trace molecular species with far-reaching applications, such as detecting explosives on surfaces, pollutants in the environment, and biomarkers in the breath of a patient. Furthermore, with the increasing availability of quantum cascade lasers (QCLs) which are semiconductor lasers that operate in the mid-IR regime additional uses are rapidly being developed. Here, we describe the development of hollow-core fibers for delivery of high-quality mid-IR laser beams across a broad spectral range.

  19. Laser jamming technique research based on combined fiber laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jie, Xu; Shanghong, Zhao; Rui, Hou; Shengbao, Zhan; Lei, Shi; Jili, Wu; Shaoqiang, Fang; Yongjun, Li

    2009-06-01

    A compact and light laser jamming source is needed to increase the flexibility of laser jamming technique. A novel laser jamming source based on combined fiber lasers is proposed. Preliminary experimental results show that power levels in excess of 10 kW could be achieved. An example of laser jamming used for an air-to-air missile is given. It shows that the tracking system could complete tracking in only 4 s and came into a steady state with its new tracking target being the laser jamming source.

  20. Low-light-level nonlinear optics with rubidium atoms in hollow-core photonic band-gap fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhagwat, Amar Ramdas

    Low-light-level optical nonlinearities are of significant interest for performing operations such as single-photon switching and quantum non-demolition measurements on single-photons. To evoke strong nonlinearities from single-photons, one can enhance the matter-photon interaction using strongly nonlinear materials such as alkali vapors in combination with an appropriate geometry such as a waveguide, which provides a long interaction length while maintaining a small light mode area. We demonstrate for the first time that such a system can be experimentally realized by loading rubidium vapor inside a hollow-core photonic band-gap fiber. Using the technique of light-induced atomic desorption in this geometry, we have generated optical depths greater than 1000. As a proof of principle, we demonstrate electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) with control powers 1000 times lower than those used for hot vapor cells in a focused beam geometry. Working with such a high aspect ratio geometry requires us to identify and measure the various sources of decoherence via spectroscopy of desorbed atoms in the fiber. Using such techniques, we also estimate the temperature of the desorbing atoms inside the fiber. The desorption mechanism is studied, and we show that pulsed desorption beams of the right amplitude and duration can be used for generating precisely controlled optical depths. Finally, we investigate the use of various buffer gas techniques for increasing the effective transverse path of the atoms as they move across the fiber in order to reduce their ground state decoherence and map this effect as a function of buffer gas pressure.

  1. Femtosecond fiber laser additive manufacturing of tungsten

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, Shuang; Liu, Jian; Yang, Pei; Zhai, Meiyu; Huang, Huan; Yang, Lih-Mei

    2016-04-01

    Additive manufacturing (AM) is promising to produce complex shaped components, including metals and alloys, to meet requirements from different industries such as aerospace, defense and biomedicines. Current laser AM uses CW lasers and very few publications have been reported for using pulsed lasers (esp. ultrafast lasers). In this paper, additive manufacturing of Tungsten materials is investigated by using femtosecond (fs) fiber lasers. Various processing conditions are studied, which leads to desired characteristics in terms of morphology, porosity, hardness, microstructural and mechanical properties of the processed components. Fully dense Tungsten part with refined grain and increased hardness was obtained and compared with parts made with different pulse widths and CW laser. The results are evidenced that the fs laser based AM provides more dimensions to modify mechanical properties with controlled heating, rapid melting and cooling rates compared with a CW or long pulsed laser. This can greatly benefit to the make of complicated structures and materials that could not be achieved before.

  2. Technology and applications of ultrafast fiber lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lang, Marion; Hellerer, Thomas; Stuhler, Juergen

    2011-11-01

    We briefly review the key technology of modern fiber based femtosecond laser sources summarizing advantages and disadvantages of different mode-locking solutions. A description of possible extensions of a FemtoFiber-type modelocked Er-doped fiber laser oscillator (1560 nm) reveals the flexibility with respect to wavelength coverage (488 nm .. 2200 nm) and pulse duration (10 fs .. 10 ps). The resulting FemtoFiber family and its versions for instrument integration allow one to use these state-of-the-art light sources in many important applications, e.g. THz spectroscopy and microscopy. We show that, depending on the fiber laser model and the THz emitter, THz radiation can be produced with 4-10 THz bandwidth and detected with up to 60 dB signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). Electronically controlled optical scanning (ECOPS) - a unique method for fast, precise and comfortable sampling of the THz pulse or other pump-probe experiments - is described and recommended for efficient data acquisition. As examples for modern microscopy with ultrafast fiber lasers we present results of two-photon fluorescence, coherent microscopy techniques (SHG/THG/CARS) and fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIM).

  3. Technology and applications of ultrafast fiber lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lang, Marion; Hellerer, Thomas; Stuhler, Juergen

    2012-03-01

    We briefly review the key technology of modern fiber based femtosecond laser sources summarizing advantages and disadvantages of different mode-locking solutions. A description of possible extensions of a FemtoFiber-type modelocked Er-doped fiber laser oscillator (1560 nm) reveals the flexibility with respect to wavelength coverage (488 nm .. 2200 nm) and pulse duration (10 fs .. 10 ps). The resulting FemtoFiber family and its versions for instrument integration allow one to use these state-of-the-art light sources in many important applications, e.g. THz spectroscopy and microscopy. We show that, depending on the fiber laser model and the THz emitter, THz radiation can be produced with 4-10 THz bandwidth and detected with up to 60 dB signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). Electronically controlled optical scanning (ECOPS) - a unique method for fast, precise and comfortable sampling of the THz pulse or other pump-probe experiments - is described and recommended for efficient data acquisition. As examples for modern microscopy with ultrafast fiber lasers we present results of two-photon fluorescence, coherent microscopy techniques (SHG/THG/CARS) and fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIM).

  4. The crucial fiber components and gain fiber for high power ytterbium-doped fiber laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, Lei; Liu, Peng; Xing, Ying-Bin; Wang, Yi-Bo; Dai, Neng-Li; Li, Jin-Yan; He, Bing; Zhou, Jun

    2015-08-01

    We have demonstrated a kW continuous-wave ytterbium-doped all-fiber laser oscillator with 7×1 fused fiber bundle combiner, fiber Bragg grating (FBG) and double-clad gain fiber fabricated by corresponding technologies. The results of experiment that the oscillator had operated at 1079.48nm with 80.94% slope efficiency without the influence of temperature and non-linear effects indicate that fiber components and gain fiber were suitable to high power environment. No evidence of the signal power roll-over showed that this oscillator possess the capacity to highest output with available pump power.

  5. Compact Fiber Laser for 589nm Laser Guide Star Generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pennington, D.; Drobshoff, D.; Mitchell, S.; Brown, A.

    Laser guide stars are crucial to the broad use of astronomical adaptive optics, because they facilitate access to a large fraction of possible locations on the sky. Lasers tuned to the 589 nm atomic sodium resonance can create an artificial beacon at altitudes of 95-105 km, thus coming close to reproducing the light path of starlight. The deployment of multiconjugate adaptive optics on large aperture telescopes world-wide will require the use of three to nine sodium laser guide stars in order to achieve uniform correction over the aperture with a high Strehl value. Current estimates place the minimum required laser power at > 10 W per laser for a continuous wave source, though a pulsed format, nominally 6?s in length at ~ 16.7 kHz, is currently preferred as it would enable tracking the laser through the Na layer to mitigate spot elongation. The lasers also need to be compact, efficient, robust and turnkey. We are developing an all-fiber laser system for generating a 589 nm source for laser-guided adaptive optics. Fiber lasers are more compact and insensitive to alignment than their bulk laser counterparts, and the heat-dissipation characteristics of fibers, coupled with the high efficiencies demonstrated and excellent spatial mode characteristics, make them a preferred candidate for many high power applications. Our design is based on sum-frequency mixing an Er/Yb:doped fiber laser operating at 1583 nm with a 938 nm Nd:silica fiber laser in a periodically poled crystal to generate 589 nm. We have demonstrated 14 W at 1583 nm with an Er/Yb:doped fiber laser, based on a Koheras single frequency fiber oscillator amplified in an IPG Photonics fiber amplifier. The Nd:silica fiber laser is a somewhat more novel device, since the Nd3+ ions must operate on the resonance transition (i.e. 4F3/2-4I9/2), while suppressing ASE losses at the more conventional 1088 nm transition. Optimization of the ratio of the fiber core and cladding permits operation of the laser at room

  6. Carbon Dioxide Laser Fiber Optics In Endoscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuller, Terry A.

    1982-12-01

    Carbon dioxide laser surgery has been limited to a great extent to surgical application on the integument and accessible cavities such as the cervix, vagina, oral cavities, etc. This limitation has been due to the rigid delivery systems available to all carbon dioxide lasers. Articulating arms (series of hollow tubes connected by articulating mirrors) have provided an effective means of delivery of laser energy to the patient as long as the lesion was within the direct line of sight. Even direct line-of-sight applications were restricted to physical dimension of the articulating arm or associated hand probes, manipulators and hollow tubes. The many attempts at providing straight endoscopic systems to the laser only stressed the need for a fiber optic capable of carrying the carbon dioxide laser wavelength. Rectangular and circular hollow metal waveguides, hollow dielectric waveguides have proven ineffective to the stringent requirements of a flexible surgical delivery system. One large diameter (1 cm) fiber optic delivery system, incorporates a toxic thalliumAbased fiber optic material. The device is an effective alternative to an articulating arm for external or conventional laser surgery, but is too large and stiff to use as a flexible endoscopic tool. The author describes the first highly flexible inexpensive series of fiber optic systems suitable for either conventional or endoscopic carbon dioxide laser surgery. One system (IRFLEX 3) has been manufactured by Medlase, Inc. for surgical uses capable of delivering 2000w, 100 mJ pulsed energy and 15w continuous wave. The system diameter is 0.035 inches in diameter. Surgically suitable fibers as small as 120 um have been manufactured. Other fibers (IRFLEX 142,447) have a variety of transmission characteristics, bend radii, etc.

  7. Bandgap engineering of InGaAsP/InP laser structure by photo-absorption-induced point defects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaleem, Mohammad; Nazir, Sajid; Saqib, Nazar Abbas

    2016-03-01

    Integration of photonic components on the same photonic wafer permits future optical communication systems to be dense and advanced performance. This enables very fast information handling between photonic active components interconnected through passive optical low loss channels. We demonstrate the UV-Laser based Quantum Well Intermixing (QWI) procedure to engineer the band-gap of compressively strained InGaAsP/InP Quantum Well (QW) laser material. We achieved around 135nm of blue-shift by simply applying excimer laser (λ= 248nm). The under observation laser processed material also exhibits higher photoluminescence (PL) intensity. Encouraging experimental results indicate that this simple technique has the potential to produce photonic integrated devices and circuits.

  8. Ho:YLF Laser Pumped by TM:Fiber Laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mizutani, Kohei; Ishii, Shoken; Itabe, Toshikazu; Asai, Kazuhiro; Sato, Atsushi

    2016-06-01

    A 2-micron Ho:YLF laser end-pumped by 1.94-micron Tm:fiber laser is described. A ring resonator of 3m length is adopted for the oscillator. The laser is a master oscillator and an amplifier system. It is operated at high repetition rate of 200-5000 Hz in room temperature. The laser outputs were about 9W in CW and more than 6W in Q-switched operation. This laser was developed to be used for wind and CO2 measurements.

  9. Cascade Raman soliton fiber ring laser

    SciTech Connect

    Gouveia-Neto, A.S.; Gomes, A.S.L.; Taylor, J.R.; Ainslie, B.J.; Craig, S.P.

    1987-11-01

    Pulses as short as 200 fsec at 1.5 ..mu..m and 230 fsec at 1.6 ..mu..m have been generated through a cascade Raman, solitonlike process in a fiber ring oscillator. A dispersion-shifted (lambda/sub 0/ = 1.46 ..mu..m) single-mode fiber was used as the gain medium, which was synchronously pumped by a cw mode-locked Nd:YAG laser operated at 1.32 ..mu..m.

  10. Fiber laser vector hydrophone: theory and experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Wentao; Zhang, Faxiang; Ma, Rui; He, Jun; Li, Fang; Liu, Yuliang

    2011-05-01

    A novel fiber laser vector hydrophone (FLVH) based on accelerometers is presented. Three fiber laser accelerometers (FLA), perpendicular to each other, are used to detect the acoustic induced particle acceleration. Theoretical analyses of the acoustic sensitivity and the natural frequency are given. Experiment shows a sensitivity of 0.1 pm/Pa@100 Hz is achieved, which results in a minimum detectable acoustic signal of 100 μPa/@Hz@100 Hz. Field demonstration shows that the proposed vector hydrophone has good directivity.

  11. Innovations in high power fiber laser applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beyer, Eckhard; Mahrle, Achim; Lütke, Matthias; Standfuss, Jens; Brückner, Frank

    2012-02-01

    Diffraction-limited high power lasers represent a new generation of lasers for materials processing, characteristic traits of which are: smaller, cost-effective and processing "on the fly". Of utmost importance is the high beam quality of fiber lasers which enables us to reduce the size of the focusing head incl. scanning mirrors. The excellent beam quality of the fiber laser offers a lot of new applications. In the field of remote cutting and welding the beam quality is the key parameter. By reducing the size of the focusing head including the scanning mirrors we can reach scanning frequencies up to 1.5 kHz and in special configurations up to 4 kHz. By using these frequencies very thin and deep welding seams can be generated experienced so far with electron beam welding only. The excellent beam quality of the fiber laser offers a high potential for developing new applications from deep penetration welding to high speed cutting. Highly dynamic cutting systems with maximum speeds up to 300 m/min and accelerations up to 4 g reduce the cutting time for cutting complex 2D parts. However, due to the inertia of such systems the effective cutting speed is reduced in real applications. This is especially true if complex shapes or contours are cut. With the introduction of scanner-based remote cutting systems in the kilowatt range, the effective cutting speed on the contour can be dramatically increased. The presentation explains remote cutting of metal foils and sheets using high brightness single mode fiber lasers. The presentation will also show the effect of optical feedback during cutting and welding with the fiber laser, how those feedbacks could be reduced and how they have to be used to optimize the cutting or welding process.

  12. All-fiber normal-dispersion femtosecond laser

    PubMed Central

    Kieu, K.; Wise, F. W.

    2011-01-01

    Spectral filtering of a chirped pulse can be a strong pulse-shaping mechanism in all-normal-dispersion femtosecond fiber lasers. We report an implementation of such a laser that employs only fiber-format components. The Yb-doped fiber laser includes a fiber filter, and a saturable absorber based on carbon nanotubes. The laser generates 1.5-ps, 3-nJ pulses that can be dechirped to 250 fs duration outside the cavity. PMID:18648465

  13. CO2-Laser Cutting Fiber Reinforced Polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mueller, R.; Nuss, Rudolf; Geiger, Manfred

    1989-10-01

    Guided by experimental investigations laser cutting of glass fiber reinforced reactive injection moulded (RRIM)-polyurethanes which are used e.g. in car industry for bumpers, spoilers, and further components is described. A Comparison with other cutting techniques as there are water jet cutting, milling, punching, sawing, cutting with conventional knife and with ultrasonic excited knife is given. Parameters which mainly influence cutting results e.g. laser power, cutting speed, gas nature and pressure will be discussed. The problematic nature in characterising micro and macro geometry of laser cut edges of fiber reinforced plastic (FRP) is explained. The topography of cut edges is described and several characteristic values are introduced to specify the obtained working quality. The surface roughness of laser cut edges is measured by both, an optical and a mechanical sensor and their reliabilities are compared.

  14. Modeling loss and backscattering in a photonic-bandgap fiber using strong perturbation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zamani Aghaie, Kiarash; Digonnet, Michel J. F.; Fan, Shanhui

    2013-02-01

    We use coupled-mode theory with strong perturbation to model the loss and backscattering coefficients of a commercial hollow-core fiber (NKT Photonics' HC-1550-02 fiber) induced by the frozen-in longitudinal perturbations of the fiber cross section. Strong perturbation is used, for the first time to the best of our knowledge, because the large difference between the refractive indices of the two fiber materials (silica and air) makes conventional weak-perturbation less accurate. We first study the loss and backscattering using the mathematical description of conventional surface-capillary waves (SCWs). This model implicitly assumes that the mechanical waves on the core wall of a PBF have the same power spectral density (PSD) as the waves that develop on an infinitely thick cylindrical tube with the same diameter as the PBF core. The loss and backscattering coefficients predicted with this thick-wall SCW roughness are 0.5 dB/km and 1.1×10-10 mm-1, respectively. These values are more than one order of magnitude smaller than the measured values (20-30 dB/km and ~1.5×10-9 mm-1, respectively). This result suggests that the thick-wall SCW PSD is not representative of the roughness of our fiber. We found that this discrepancy occurs at least in part because the effect of the finite thickness of the silica membranes (only ~120 nm) is neglected. We present a new expression for the PSD that takes into account this finite thickness and demonstrates that the finite thickness substantially increases the roughness. The predicted loss and backscattering coefficients predicted with this thin-film SCW PSD are 30 dB/km and 1.3×10-9 mm-1, which are both close to the measured values. We also show that the thin-film SCW PSD accurately predicts the roughness PSD measured by others in a solid-core photonic-crystal fiber.

  15. Coiled Fiber Pulsed Laser Simulator

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2009-01-29

    This suite of codes simulates the transient output pulse from an optically-pumped coiled fiber amplifier. The input pulse is assumed to have a Gaussian time dependence and a spatial dependence that may be Gaussian or an eigenmode of the straight of bent fiber computed using bend10 or bend20. Only one field component is used (semivectorial approximation). The fully-spatially-dependent fiber gain profile is specified is subroutines "inversion" and "interp_inversion" and is presently read from a datamore » file, although other means of specifying fiber gain could be reallized through modification of these subroutines. The input pulse is propagated through the fiber, including the following physical effects: spatial and temporal gain saturation, self-focusing, bend losses, and confinement from a user-defined fiber index profile. The user can follow the propagation progress with 3D graphics that show an intensity profile via user-modifiable cutting planes through the time space axes. A restart capability is also included. Approximate solutions in the frequency domain may be obtained much faster using the auxilliary codes bendbpm10 (full vector), bendbpm20 (semivectoral), and bendbpm21 (semivectoral with gain sheet spproximation for gain and self-focusing). These codes all include bend loss and spatial (but not temporal) gain saturation.« less

  16. Coiled Fiber Pulsed Laser Simulator

    SciTech Connect

    Hadley, G. Ronald

    2009-01-29

    This suite of codes simulates the transient output pulse from an optically-pumped coiled fiber amplifier. The input pulse is assumed to have a Gaussian time dependence and a spatial dependence that may be Gaussian or an eigenmode of the straight of bent fiber computed using bend10 or bend20. Only one field component is used (semivectorial approximation). The fully-spatially-dependent fiber gain profile is specified is subroutines "inversion" and "interp_inversion" and is presently read from a data file, although other means of specifying fiber gain could be reallized through modification of these subroutines. The input pulse is propagated through the fiber, including the following physical effects: spatial and temporal gain saturation, self-focusing, bend losses, and confinement from a user-defined fiber index profile. The user can follow the propagation progress with 3D graphics that show an intensity profile via user-modifiable cutting planes through the time space axes. A restart capability is also included. Approximate solutions in the frequency domain may be obtained much faster using the auxilliary codes bendbpm10 (full vector), bendbpm20 (semivectoral), and bendbpm21 (semivectoral with gain sheet spproximation for gain and self-focusing). These codes all include bend loss and spatial (but not temporal) gain saturation.

  17. AFIRE: fiber Raman laser for laser guide star adaptive optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonaccini Calia, D.; Hackenberg, W.; Chernikov, S.; Feng, Y.; Taylor, L.

    2006-06-01

    Future adaptive optics systems will benefit from multiple sodium laser guide stars in achieving satisfactory sky coverage in combination with uniform and high-Strehl correction over a large field of view. For this purpose ESO is developing with industry AFIRE, a turn-key, rack-mounted 589-nm laser source based on a fiber Raman laser. The fiber laser will deliver the beam directly at the projector telescope. The required output power is in the order of 10 W in air per sodium laser guide star, in a diffraction-limited beam and with a bandwidth of < 2 GHz. This paper presents the design and first demonstration results obtained with the AFIRE breadboard. 4.2W CW at 589nm have so far been achieved with a ~20% SHG conversion efficiency.

  18. Supercontinuum fiber lasers: new developments and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Devine, Adam; Hooper, Lucy; Clowes, John

    2016-05-01

    In this talk we give an overview of recent advances in the development of high power supercontinuum fiber lasers with powers exceeding 50W and spectral brightness of tens of mW/nm. We also discuss the fundamental limitations of power scaling and spectral broadening and review the existing and emerging applications of this unique light source which combines the broadband properties of a light bulb with the spatial properties of a laser.

  19. Hybrid fiber-rod laser

    SciTech Connect

    Beach, Raymond J.; Dawson, Jay W.; Messerly, Michael J.; Barty, Christopher P. J.

    2012-12-18

    Single, or near single transverse mode waveguide definition is produced using a single homogeneous medium to transport both the pump excitation light and generated laser light. By properly configuring the pump deposition and resulting thermal power generation in the waveguide device, a thermal focusing power is established that supports perturbation-stable guided wave propagation of an appropriately configured single or near single transverse mode laser beam and/or laser pulse.

  20. Fiber Optic Solutions for Short Pulse Lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Beach, R; Dawson, J; Liao, Z; Jovanovic, I; Wattellier, B; Payne, S; Barty, C P

    2003-01-29

    For applications requiring high beam quality radiation from efficient, compact and rugged sources, diffraction limited fiber lasers are ideal, and to date have been demonstrated at average CW power levels exceeding 100 W with near diffraction limited: output. For conventional single-core step-index single-mode fibers, this power level represents the sealing limit because of nonlinear and laser damage considerations. Higher average powers would exceed nonlinear process thresholds such as the Raman and stimulated Brillouin scattering limit, or else damage the fiber due to the high intensity level in the fiber's core. The obvious way to increase the average power capability of fibers is to increase the area of their core. Simply expanding the core dimensions of the fiber allows a straightforward power sealing due to enhanced nonlinear and power handling characteristics that scale directly with the core area. Femtosecond, chirped-pulse, fiber lasers with pulse energies greater than 1mJ have been demonstrated in the literature [2] using this technique. This output energy was still limited by the onset of stimulated Raman scattering. We have pursued an alternative and complimentary approach which is to reduce the intensity of light propagating in the core by distributing it more evenly across the core area via careful design of the refractive index profile [3]. We have also sought to address the primary issue that results from scaling the core. The enhanced power handling capability comes at the expense of beam quality, as increasing the core diameter in standard step index fibers permits multiple transverse modes to lase simultaneously. Although this problem of multimode operation can be mitigated to some extent by appropriately designing the fiber's waveguide structure, limitations such as bend radius loss, sensitivity to thermally induced perturbations of the waveguide structure, and refractive index control, all become more stringent as the core diameter grows

  1. Temperature assisted band-gap engineering in all-solid chalcogenide holey fiber for mid-IR application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barh, Ajanta; Varshney, R. K.; Pal, B. P.; Sanghera, J.; Shaw, L. B.

    2015-06-01

    Presence of photonic band-gap (PBG) in an all-solid microstructured optical fiber (MOF), made of two fabrication compatible chalcogenide (Ch) glasses is theoretically investigated for potential application in the functional mid-infrared (IR) wavelength range. Cross-section of the MOF is formed by assuming periodically arranged wavelength scale circular air holes in a hexagonal pattern embedded in a uniform matrix. One type of Ch-glass is considered as the background material whereas another type of Ch-glass is assumed to fill the air holes. The relative index contrast between these two Ch-glasses is ~ 24%, for which PBG appears only for a suitable range of non-zero longitudinal wave vector. We have studied the scalability of this PBG by varying the lattice parameter of MOF and optimized the cross-section to attain the PBG at ~ 2 μm wavelength. Then by utilizing the thermo-optic properties of the glasses, the effect of external temperature (T) on the PBG is studied, and finally we have proposed a T-tunable wavelength filter/sensor at mid-IR wavelength with tuning sensitivity as high as ~ 140 pm/°C.

  2. Ribbon Fiber Laser-Theory and Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Beach, R J; Feit, M D; Brasure, L D; Payne, S A

    2002-05-10

    A scalable fiber laser approach is described based on phase-locking multiple gain cores in an antiguided structure. The waveguide is comprised of periodic sequences of gain- and no-gain-loaded segments having uniform index, within the cladding region. Initial experimental results are presented.

  3. Graphene Q-switched, tunable fiber laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popa, D.; Sun, Z.; Hasan, T.; Torrisi, F.; Wang, F.; Ferrari, A. C.

    2011-02-01

    We demonstrate a wideband-tunable Q-switched fiber laser exploiting a graphene saturable absorber. We get ˜2 μs pulses, tunable between 1522 and 1555 nm with up to ˜40 nJ energy. This is a simple and low-cost light source for metrology, environmental sensing, and biomedical diagnostics.

  4. Dynamic pulsing of a MOPA fiber laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romero, Rosa; Guerreiro, Paulo T.; Hendow, Sami T.; Salcedo, José R.

    2011-05-01

    Dynamic Pulsing is demonstrated using a pulsed MOPA fiber laser at 1064nm. The output of the MOPA laser is a pulsed profile consisting of a burst of closely spaced pulses. Tests were performed under several materials with pulse bursts ranging from 10ns to 1μs and operating from 500kHz down to single shot. In particular, percussion drilling in stainless steel is demonstrated showing improvements in quality and speed of the process. These profiles allow high flexibility and optimization of the process addressing the specificity of the end application. Dynamic Pulsing allows the same MOPA fiber laser to be used in diverse materials as well as different processes such us marking, drilling, scribing and engraving. The pulsed fiber laser used in this study is a MOPA-DY by Multiwave Photonics. It is based on a modulated seed laser followed by a series of fiber amplifiers and ending with an optically isolated collimator. This pulsed laser model has an output in such a way that each trigger produces a fast burst of pulses, with a repetition frequency within the burst of the order of tens of MHz. Within the burst it is possible to change the number of pulses, the individual pulse profile, burst pulse period and even to generate non-periodic burst pulse separations. The laser allows full freedom for all these combinations. The study here reported compares the impact of pulse peak power, number of pulses within a burst and the pulse burst period, on process quality (heat affected zone, debris, hole uniformity) and drilling yield.

  5. Optical fiber laser of multifrequency emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beltrán-Pérez, Georgina; Jacobo Aispuro, Liliana; Lucian Rocha, Froylan; Castillo Mixcóatl, Juan; Múñoz Aguirre, Severino

    2007-03-01

    The wavelength division multiplexor (WDM) has a great importance in the technology of the communications by optical fiber, is an economic and efficient form, to increase the capacity of transmission by several orders of magnitude, reason why it is desirable to have laser sources of multiple wavelengths in a system WDM, which, according to reported works, have been obtained using diverse types of filters. In this work we presented a laser of multifrequency emission, of Erbium doped optical fiber, tuned with an optical fiber filter. The configuration of the optical filter, presents high stability and low lost by insertion, independence to the changes of polarization, low powers of light entrance, and has an useful spectral wide. It has the advantage to have a simple design and easy manufacture in addition to his low losses.

  6. Laser Cutting of Carbon Fiber Fabrics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuchs, A. N.; Schoeberl, M.; Tremmer, J.; Zaeh, M. F.

    Due to their high weight-specific mechanical stiffness and strength, parts made from carbon fiber reinforced polymers (CFRP) are increasingly used as structural components in the aircraft and automotive industry. However, the cutting of preforms, as with most automated manufacturing processes for CFRP components, has not yet been fully optimized. This paper discusses laser cutting, an alternative method to the mechanical cutting of preforms. Experiments with remote laser cutting and gas assisted laser cutting were carried out in order to identify achievable machining speeds. The advantages of the two different processes as well as their fitness for use in mass production are discussed.

  7. High sensitivity high temperature sensor based on SMS structure with large-core all-solid bandgap fiber as the multimode section

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franco, Marcos A. R.; Cruz, Alice L. S.; Serrão, Valdir A.; Barbosa, Carmem L.

    2014-05-01

    A fiber optic interferometric device based on a singlemode-multimode-singlemode (SMS) structure is proposed as a high sensitive high temperature sensor. The multimode section (MMF) consists of a large-core all-solid photonic bandgap fiber (AS-PBF) with silica as the background material and germanium-doped silica at the high index regions. The numerical analyses were carried out by beam propagation method. The numerical results indicate a constant high temperature sensitivity of ~-35 pm/°C over a large temperature range from 20oC to 930°C.

  8. High-power fiber laser studies at the Polaroid Corporation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muendel, Martin H.

    1998-06-01

    Current work on the Polaroid double-clad fiber laser is discussed. Experiments towards testing the upper power limits of fiber lasers are described. Models for the laser output in the rate-equation approximation, for the laser polarization state, and for the axial-mode-beating noise are presented and compared to experiment.

  9. Tapered fiber based high power random laser.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hanwei; Du, Xueyuan; Zhou, Pu; Wang, Xiaolin; Xu, Xiaojun

    2016-04-18

    We propose a novel high power random fiber laser (RFL) based on tapered fiber. It can overcome the power scaling limitation of RFL while maintaining good beam quality to a certain extent. An output power of 26.5 W has been achieved in a half-open cavity with one kilometer long tapered fiber whose core diameter gradually changes from 8 μm to 20 μm. The steady-state light propagation equations have been modified by taking into account the effective core area to demonstrate the tapered RFL through numerical calculations. The numerical model effectively describes the power characteristics of the tapered fiber based RFL, and both the calculating and experimental results show higher power exporting potential compared with the conventional single mode RFL. PMID:27137338

  10. Actively Q-switched Raman fiber laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuznetsov, A. G.; Podivilov, E. V.; Babin, S. A.

    2015-03-01

    A new scheme providing actively Q-switched operation of a Raman fiber laser (RFL) has been proposed and tested. The RFL consists of a 1 km single-mode fiber with a switchable loop mirror at one end and an angled cleaved output end. An 1080 nm pulse with microsecond duration is generated at the output by means of acousto-optic switching of the mirror at ~30 kHz in the presence of 6 W backward pumping at 1030 nm. In the proposed scheme, the generated pulse energy is defined by the pump energy distributed along the passive fiber, which amounts to 30 μJ in our case. The available pump energy may be increased by means of fiber lengthening. Pulse shortening is also expected.

  11. Use of hollow core fibers, fiber lasers, and photonic crystal fibers for spark delivery and laser ignition in gases

    SciTech Connect

    Joshi, Sachin; Yalin, Azer P.; Galvanauskas, Almantas

    2007-07-01

    The fiber-optic delivery of sparks in gases is challenging as the output beam must be refocused to high intensity ({approx}200 GW/cm2 for nanosecond pulses). Analysis suggests the use of coated hollow core fibers, fiber lasers, and photonic crystal fibers (PCFs). We study the effects of launch conditions and bending for 2 m long coated hollow fibers and find an optimum launch f of {approx}55 allowing spark formation with {approx}98% reliability for bends up to a radius of curvature of 1.5 m in atmospheric pressure air. Spark formation using the output of a pulsed fiber laser is described, and delivery of 0.55 mJ pulses through PCFs is shown.

  12. Fiber Coupled Laser Diodes with Even Illumination Pattern

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howard, Richard T. (Inventor)

    2007-01-01

    An optical fiber for evenly illuminating a target. The optical fiber is coupled to a laser emitting diode and receives laser light. The la ser light travels through the fiber optic and exits at an exit end. T he exit end has a diffractive optical pattern formed thereon via etch ing, molding or cutting, to reduce the Gaussian profile present in co nventional fiber optic cables The reduction of the Gaussian provides an even illumination from the fiber optic cable.

  13. Direct laser writing of three-dimensional narrow bandgap and high refractive-index PbSe structures in a solution.

    PubMed

    Gan, Zongsong; Cao, Yaoyu; Gu, Min

    2013-05-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) micro/nano structures made of narrow electronic bandgap semiconductor materials have important applications in a wide range of disciplines. Direct laser writing (DLW) provides the unparalleled advantage to fabricate 3D arbitrary geometric structures at the micro and nano meter scale. The fabrication of 3D structures within bulk narrow electronic bandgap semiconductor materials by DLW is challenged for the top-down strategy due to their narrow bandgap and high refractive index. Here, we report on the bottom-up strategy for the fabrication of 3D micro/nano structures made from PbSe with an electronic bandgap as narrow as 0.27 eV and a refractive index as high as 4.82 in a solution. PMID:23669977

  14. All-Fiber Configuration Laser Self-Mixing Doppler Velocimeter Based on Distributed Feedback Fiber Laser.

    PubMed

    Wu, Shuang; Wang, Dehui; Xiang, Rong; Zhou, Junfeng; Ma, Yangcheng; Gui, Huaqiao; Liu, Jianguo; Wang, Huanqin; Lu, Liang; Yu, Benli

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, a novel velocimeter based on laser self-mixing Doppler technology has been developed for speed measurement. The laser employed in our experiment is a distributed feedback (DFB) fiber laser, which is an all-fiber structure using only one Fiber Bragg Grating to realize optical feedback and wavelength selection. Self-mixing interference for optical velocity sensing is experimentally investigated in this novel system, and the experimental results show that the Doppler frequency is linearly proportional to the velocity of a moving target, which agrees with the theoretical analysis commendably. In our experimental system, the velocity measurement can be achieved in the range of 3.58 mm/s-2216 mm/s with a relative error under one percent, demonstrating that our novel all-fiber configuration velocimeter can implement wide-range velocity measurements with high accuracy. PMID:27472342

  15. All-fiber single-mode PM thulium fiber lasers using femtosecond laser written fiber Bragg gratings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Willis, Christina C. C.; Bradford, Joshua D.; Sims, R. Andrew; Shah, Lawrence; Richardson, Martin; Thomas, Jens; Becker, Ria G.; Voigtländer, Christian; Tünnermann, Andreas; Nolte, Stefan

    2011-02-01

    A polarization-maintaining (PM), narrow-linewidth, continuous wave, thulium fiber laser is demonstrated. The laser cavity is formed from two femtosecond-laser-written fiber Bragg gratings (FBGs) and operates at 2054 nm. The laser output possesses both narrow spectral width (78 pm) and a high polarization extinction ratio of ~18 dB at 5.24 W of output power. This laser is a unique demonstration of a PM thulium fiber system based on a two FBG cavity that produces high PER without any free-space elements. Such a narrow linewidth source will be useful for applications such as spectral beam combining which often employ polarization dependent combining elements.

  16. All fiber laser using a ring cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flores, Alberto Varguez; Pérez, Georgina Beltrán; Aguirre, Severino Muñoz; Mixcóatl, Juan Castillo

    2008-04-01

    Mode-locked laser have a number of potential applications, depending on the wavelength and pulse width. They could be used as sources in communications systems for time division multiplexing (TDM) or wavelength-division-multiplexing (WDM) as spectroscopic tools in the laboratory for time-resolved studies of fast nonlinear phenomena in semiconductors, or as seeds for solid-state amplifers such as Nd:Glass, color center alexandrite, or Ti:Sapphire. Short pulses also have potential use in electro-optic sampling systems, as a source for pulsed sensors, or as tunable seed pulses for lasers in medical applications. Applications such as optical coherent tomography could take advantage of the broad bandwidth of a mode-locked fiber laser rather that the temporal ultra-short pulse width. This work shows the characterization of active mode-locking all-fiber laser by using an acousto-optic frequency shifter to the ring cavity, an erbium doped fiber (EDF) and polarization controllers (PC). The results shows a highly stable mode-locked, low noise of pulse generation with repetition rate of 10 MHz and width of 1.6 ns

  17. Polarization-modulated random fiber laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Han; Wang, Zinan; He, Qiheng; Fan, Mengqiu; Li, Yunqi; Sun, Wei; Zhang, Li; Li, Yi; Rao, Yunjiang

    2016-05-01

    In this letter, we propose and experimentally demonstrate a polarization-modulated random fiber laser (RFL) for the first time. It is found that the output power of the half-opened RFL with polarized pumping is sensitive to the state of polarization (SOP) of the Stokes light in a fiber loop acting as a mirror. By inserting a polarization switch (PSW) in the loop mirror, the state of the random lasing can be switched between on/off states, thus such a polarization-modulated RFL can generate pulsed output with high extinction ratio.

  18. Novel optical fiber ultrasonic sensor based on fiber laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Qi; Okabe, Yoji; Sun, Junqiang

    2014-03-01

    Researching high-sensitivity flexible ultrasonic sensor is important in the field of structural health monitoring (SHM). In this research, a novel ultrasonic sensor based on fiber ring laser with an in-built phase shifted fiber Bragg grating (PSFBG) is proposed and demonstrated. The first function of the PS-FBG is to determine the wavelength of the laser. Thus, this sensing system is robust to temperature change and quasi-static strain change because the PS-FBG is always illuminated. The other function of the PS-FBG is a sensor with ultra-steep slope and short effective grating length. It is beneficial for achievement of high-sensitivity and broad-bandwidth ultrasonic detection. The experimental evaluated sensitivity was 58.5+/-3 dB, which is 7.5 dB higher than traditional PZT sensor. This may be the highest sensitivity obtained by optical fiber sensing system. Because of the advantages including robustness, simple structure and low cost in addition to the high sensitivity and broad bandwidth, this sensing system has potential practical applications in ultrasonic SHM.

  19. Multi-watt 589nm fiber laser source

    SciTech Connect

    DAWSON, J W; DROBSHOFF, A D; BEACH, R J; MESSERLY, M J; PAYNE, S A; BROWN, A; PENNINGTON, D M; BAMFORD, D J; SHARPE, S J; COOK, D J

    2006-01-19

    We have demonstrated 3.5W of 589nm light from a fiber laser using periodically poled stoichiometric Lithium Tantalate (PPSLT) as the frequency conversion crystal. The system employs 938nm and 1583nm fiber lasers, which were sum-frequency mixed in PPSLT to generate 589nm light. The 938nm fiber laser consists of a single frequency diode laser master oscillator (200mW), which was amplified in two stages to >15W using cladding pumped Nd{sup 3+} fiber amplifiers. The fiber amplifiers operate at 938nm and minimize amplified spontaneous emission at 1088nm by employing a specialty fiber design, which maximizes the core size relative to the cladding diameter. This design allows the 3-level laser system to operate at high inversion, thus making it competitive with the competing 1088nm 4-level laser transition. At 15W, the 938nm laser has an M{sup 2} of 1.1 and good polarization (correctable with a quarter and half wave plate to >15:1). The 1583nm fiber laser consists of a Koheras 1583nm fiber DFB laser that is pre-amplified to 100mW, phase modulated and then amplified to 14W in a commercial IPG fiber amplifier. As a part of our research efforts we are also investigating pulsed laser formats and power scaling of the 589nm system. We will discuss the fiber laser design and operation as well as our results in power scaling at 589nm.

  20. Precise balancing of viscous and radiation forces on a particle in liquid-filled photonic bandgap fiber.

    PubMed

    Euser, T G; Garbos, M K; Chen, J S Y; Russell, P St J

    2009-12-01

    A great challenge in microfluidics is the precise control of laser radiation forces acting on single particles or cells, while allowing monitoring of their optical and chemical properties. We show that, in the liquid-filled hollow core of a single-mode photonic crystal fiber, a micrometer-sized particle can be held stably against a fluidic counterflow using radiation pressure and can be moved to and fro (over tens of centimeters) by ramping the laser power up and down. Accurate studies of the microfluidic drag forces become possible, because the particle is trapped in the center of the single guided optical mode, resulting in highly reproducible radiation forces. The counterflowing liquid can be loaded with sequences of chemicals in precisely controlled concentrations and doses, making possible studies of single particles, vesicles, or cells. PMID:19953158

  1. Femtosecond Fiber Lasers Based on Dissipative Processes for Nonlinear Microscopy.

    PubMed

    Wise, Frank W

    2012-01-01

    Recent progress in the development of femtosecond-pulse fiber lasers with parameters appropriate for nonlinear microscopy is reviewed. Pulse-shaping in lasers with only normal-dispersion components is briefly described, and the performance of the resulting lasers is summarized. Fiber lasers based on the formation of dissipative solitons now offer performance competitive with that of solid-state lasers, but with the benefits of the fiber medium. Lasers based on self-similar pulse evolution in the gain section of a laser also offer a combination of short pulse duration and high pulse energy that will be attractive for applications in nonlinear bioimaging. PMID:23869163

  2. Femtosecond Fiber Lasers Based on Dissipative Processes for Nonlinear Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Wise, Frank W.

    2012-01-01

    Recent progress in the development of femtosecond-pulse fiber lasers with parameters appropriate for nonlinear microscopy is reviewed. Pulse-shaping in lasers with only normal-dispersion components is briefly described, and the performance of the resulting lasers is summarized. Fiber lasers based on the formation of dissipative solitons now offer performance competitive with that of solid-state lasers, but with the benefits of the fiber medium. Lasers based on self-similar pulse evolution in the gain section of a laser also offer a combination of short pulse duration and high pulse energy that will be attractive for applications in nonlinear bioimaging. PMID:23869163

  3. MOPA pulsed fiber laser for silicon scribing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Limei; Huang, Wei; Deng, Mengmeng; Li, Feng

    2016-06-01

    A 1064 nm master oscillator power amplifier (MOPA) pulsed fiber laser is developed with flexible control over the pulse width, repetition frequency and peak power, and it is used to investigate the dependence of mono-crystalline silicon scribe depth on the laser pulse width, scanning speed and repeat times. Experimental results indicate that long pulses with low peak powers lead to deep ablation depths. We also demonstrate that the ablation depth grows fast with the scanning repeat times at first and progressively tends to be saturated when the repeat times reach a certain level. A thermal model considering the laser pulse overlapping effect that predicts the silicon temperature variation and scribe depth is employed to verify the experimental conclusions with reasonably close agreement. These conclusions are of great benefits to the optimization of the laser material processing with high efficiency.

  4. Broad-Area Laser Diode With Fiber-Optic Injection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hazel, Geoffrey; Mead, Patricia; Davis, Christopher; Cornwell, Donald

    1992-01-01

    Fiber-optic injection-locked broad-area laser diode features single-mode output via fiber-optic injection and serves as compact, rugged, high-power near-infrared source. Useful in free-space and fiber-optic communication links, as communication-receiver preamplifier, and pump source for solid-state lasers.

  5. Fiber amplifiers and lasers in Yb:silica

    SciTech Connect

    Wilcox, R.B.; Browning, D.F.; Feit, M.D.; Nyman, B.

    1996-11-15

    We have measured gain and saturation in sing;e mode Yb:silica fiber, and developed fiber lasers and amplifiers at 1053 nm. The lasers are tunable over 10`s of nanometers, with amplifier gain flattened by fiber gratings or dielectric filters.

  6. Blackening of metals using femtosecond fiber laser.

    PubMed

    Huang, Huan; Yang, Lih-Mei; Bai, Shuang; Liu, Jian

    2015-01-10

    This study presents an unprecedented high throughput processing for super-blackening and superhydrophobic/hydrophilic surface on both planar and nonplanar metals surfaces. By using a high pulse repetition rate femtosecond (fs) fiber laser, a light trapping microstructure and nanostructure is generated to absorb light from UV, visible to long-wave infrared spectral region. Different types of surface structures are produced with varying laser scanning conditions (scanning speed and pitch). The modified surface morphologies are characterized using scanning electron microscope and the blackening effect is investigated through spectral measurements. Spectral measurements show that the reflectance of the processed materials decreases sharply in a wide wavelength range and the decrease occurs at different rates for different scanning pitches and speeds. Above 98% absorption over the entire visible wavelength region and above 95% absorption over the near-infrared, middle-wave infrared and long-wave infrared regions range has been demonstrated for the surface structures, and the absorption for specific wavelengths can go above 99%. Furthermore, the processing efficiency of this fs fiber laser blackening technique is 1 order of magnitude higher than that of solid-state fs laser and 4 times higher than that of picosecond (ps) laser. Further increasing of the throughput is expected by using higher repetition and higher scanning speed. This technology offers the great potential in applications such as constructing sensitive detectors and sensors, solar energy absorber, and biomedicine. PMID:25967633

  7. Laser cutting of carbon fiber reinforced thermo-plastics (CFRTP) by single-mode fiber laser irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niino, Hiroyuki; Kawaguchi, Yoshizo; Sato, Tadatake; Narazaki, Aiko; Kurosaki, Ryozo; Muramatsu, Mayu; Harada, Yoshihisa; Anzai, Kenji; Aoyama, Mitsuaki; Matsushita, Masafumi; Furukawa, Koichi; Nishino, Michiteru; Fujisaki, Akira; Miyato, Taizo; Kayahara, Takashi

    2014-03-01

    We report on the laser cutting of carbon fiber reinforced thermo-plastics (CFRTP) with a cw IR fiber laser (single-mode fiber laser, average power: 350 W). CFRTP is a high strength composite material with a lightweight, and is increasingly being used various applications. A well-defined cutting of CFRTP which were free of debris and thermal-damages around the grooves, were performed by the laser irradiation with a fast beam galvanometer scanning on a multiple-scanpass method.

  8. Drilling with fiber-transmitted, visible lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Kautz, D.D.; Berzins, L.V.; Dragon, E.P.; Werve, M.E.; Warner, B.E.

    1994-02-17

    High power and radiance copper-vapor laser technology developed at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory shows great promise for many materials processing tasks. The authors recently transmitted the visible light produced by these lasers through fiber optics to perform hole drilling experiments. They found the tolerances on the hole circulatory and cylindricity to be excellent when compared to that produced by conventional optics. This technique lends itself to many applications that are difficult to perform when using conventional optics, including robotic manipulation and hole drilling in non-symmetric parts.

  9. Mechanical reliability of double clad fibers in typical fiber laser deployment conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walorny, Michael; Abramczyk, Jaroslaw; Jacobson, Nick; Tankala, Kanishka

    2016-03-01

    With the rapid acceptance of fiber lasers and amplifiers for various materials processing and defense applications the long term optical and mechanical reliability of the fiber laser, and therefore the components that make up the laser, is of significant interest to the industrial and defense communities. The double clad fiber used in a fiber laser is a key component whose lifetime in typical deployment conditions needs to be understood. The optical reliability of double clad fiber has recently been studied and a predictive model of fiber lifetime has been published. In contrast, a rigorous model for the mechanical reliability of the fiber and an analysis of the variables affecting the lifetime of the fiber in typical deployment conditions has not been studied. This paper uses the COST-218 model which is widely used for analyzing the mechanical lifetime of fiber used in the telecom industry. The factors affecting lifetime are analyzed to make the reader aware of the design choices a laser manufacturer can make, and the information they must seek from fiber suppliers, to ensure excellent lifetime for double clad fiber and consequently for the fiber laser. It is shown that the fiber's stress corrosion susceptibility, its proof strength, the coil diameter and the length of fiber coiled to achieve good beam quality all have important implications on fiber lifetime.

  10. Theory of a random fiber laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolokolov, I. V.; Lebedev, V. V.; Podivilov, E. V.; Vergeles, S. S.

    2014-12-01

    We develop the theory explaining the role of nonlinearity in generation of radiation in a fiber laser that is pumped by external light. The pumping energy is converted into the generating signal due to the Raman scattering supplying an effective gain for the signal. The signal is generated with frequencies near the one corresponding to the maximum value of the gain. Generation conditions and spectral properties of the generated signal are examined. We focus mainly on the case of a random laser where reflection of the signal occurs on impurities of the fiber. From the theoretical standpoint, kinetics of a wave system close to an integrable one are investigated. We demonstrate that in this case, the perturbation expansion in the kinetic equation has to use the closeness to the integrable case.

  11. Theory of a random fiber laser

    SciTech Connect

    Kolokolov, I. V. Lebedev, V. V.; Podivilov, E. V.; Vergeles, S. S.

    2014-12-15

    We develop the theory explaining the role of nonlinearity in generation of radiation in a fiber laser that is pumped by external light. The pumping energy is converted into the generating signal due to the Raman scattering supplying an effective gain for the signal. The signal is generated with frequencies near the one corresponding to the maximum value of the gain. Generation conditions and spectral properties of the generated signal are examined. We focus mainly on the case of a random laser where reflection of the signal occurs on impurities of the fiber. From the theoretical standpoint, kinetics of a wave system close to an integrable one are investigated. We demonstrate that in this case, the perturbation expansion in the kinetic equation has to use the closeness to the integrable case.

  12. High Power Fiber Lasers and Applications to Manufacturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richardson, Martin; McComb, Timothy; Sudesh, Vikas

    2008-09-01

    We summarize recent developments in high power fiber laser technologies and discuss future trends, particularly in their current and future use in manufacturing technologies. We will also describe our current research programs in fiber laser development, ultra-fast and new lasers, and will mention the expectations in these areas for the new Townes Laser Institute. It will focus on new core laser technologies and their applications in medical technologies, advanced manufacturing technologies and defense applications. We will describe a program on large mode area fiber development that includes results with the new gain-guiding approach, as well as high power infra-red fiber lasers. We will review the opportunities for high power fiber lasers in various manufacturing technologies and illustrate this with applications we are pursuing in the areas of femtosecond laser applications, advanced lithographies, and mid-IR technologies.

  13. Yb- and Er-doped fiber laser Q-switched with an optically uniform, broadband WS2 saturable absorber

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, M.; Hu, Guohua; Hu, Guoqing; Howe, R. C. T.; Chen, L.; Zheng, Z.; Hasan, T.

    2015-01-01

    We demonstrate a ytterbium (Yb) and an erbium (Er)-doped fiber laser Q-switched by a solution processed, optically uniform, few-layer tungsten disulfide saturable absorber (WS2-SA). Nonlinear optical absorption of the WS2-SA in the sub-bandgap region, attributed to the edge-induced states, is characterized by 3.1% and 4.9% modulation depths with 1.38 and 3.83 MW/cm2 saturation intensities at 1030 and 1558 nm, respectively. By integrating the optically uniform WS2-SA in the Yb- and Er-doped laser cavities, we obtain self-starting Q-switched pulses with microsecond duration and kilohertz repetition rates at 1030 and 1558 nm. Our work demonstrates broadband sub-bandgap saturable absorption of a single, solution processed WS2-SA, providing new potential efficacy for WS2 in ultrafast photonic applications. PMID:26657601

  14. Optical pulse generation using fiber lasers and integrated optics

    SciTech Connect

    Wilcox, R.B.; Browning, D.F.; Burkhart, S.C.; VanWonterghem, B.W.

    1995-03-27

    We have demonstrated an optical pulse forming system using fiber and integrated optics, and have designed a multiple-output system for a proposed fusion laser facility. Our approach is an advancement over previous designs for fusion lasers, and an unusual application of fiber lasers and integrated optics.

  15. Fiber Bragg grating in large-mode-area fiber for high power fiber laser applications.

    PubMed

    Mohammed, Waleed; Gu, Xijia

    2010-10-01

    Fiber Bragg gratings (FBGs) are indispensable components in the design of monolithic high-power fiber lasers. As the laser power scales up, the adoption of larger-mode-area fibers with high V numbers poses new challenges for FBG design and fabrication. In this paper, we present the simulation, fabrication, and measurement of the FBGs inscribed on large-mode-area fibers. The simulation used the T-matrix approach to calculate the spectral response of the FBG that matched well with the measured spectra. The observed fringes in the reflection spectrum are explained by the interference between the low-order modes that were also confirmed with the simulation. Some unique features of the FBG and their potential applications are discussed. PMID:20885465

  16. Proximal fiber tip damage during Holmium:YAG and thulium fiber laser ablation of kidney stones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, Christopher R.; Hardy, Luke A.; Irby, Pierce B.; Fried, Nathaniel M.

    2016-02-01

    The Thulium fiber laser (TFL) is being studied as an alternative to Holmium:YAG laser for lithotripsy. TFL beam originates within an 18-μm-core thulium doped silica fiber, and its near single mode, Gaussian beam profile enables transmission of higher laser power through smaller fibers than possible during Holmium laser lithotripsy. This study examines whether TFL beam profile also reduces proximal fiber tip damage compared to Holmium laser multimodal beam. TFL beam at wavelength of 1908 nm was coupled into 105-μm-core silica fibers, with 35-mJ energy, 500-μs pulse duration, and pulse rates of 50-500 Hz. For each pulse rate, 500,000 pulses were delivered. Magnified images of proximal fiber surfaces were taken before and after each trial. For comparison, 20 single-use, 270-μm-core fibers were collected after clinical Holmium laser lithotripsy procedures using standard settings (600 mJ, 350 μs, 6 Hz). Total laser energy, number of laser pulses, and laser irradiation time were recorded, and fibers were rated for damage. For TFL studies, output power was stable, and no proximal fiber damage was observed after delivery of 500,000 pulses at settings up to 35 mJ, 500 Hz, and 17.5 W average power. In contrast, confocal microscopy images of fiber tips after Holmium lithotripsy showed proximal fiber tip degradation in all 20 fibers. The proximal fiber tip of a 105-μm-core fiber transmitted 17.5 W of TFL power without degradation, compared to degradation of 270-μm-core fibers after transmission of 3.6 W of Holmium laser power. The smaller and more uniform TFL beam profile may improve fiber lifetime, and potentially reduce costs for the surgical disposables as well.

  17. A random Q-switched fiber laser.

    PubMed

    Tang, Yulong; Xu, Jianqiu

    2015-01-01

    Extensive studies have been performed on random lasers in which multiple-scattering feedback is used to generate coherent emission. Q-switching and mode-locking are well-known routes for achieving high peak power output in conventional lasers. However, in random lasers, the ubiquitous random cavities that are formed by multiple scattering inhibit energy storage, making Q-switching impossible. In this paper, widespread Rayleigh scattering arising from the intrinsic micro-scale refractive-index irregularities of fiber cores is used to form random cavities along the fiber. The Q-factor of the cavity is rapidly increased by stimulated Brillouin scattering just after the spontaneous emission is enhanced by random cavity resonances, resulting in random Q-switched pulses with high brightness and high peak power. This report is the first observation of high-brightness random Q-switched laser emission and is expected to stimulate new areas of scientific research and applications, including encryption, remote three-dimensional random imaging and the simulation of stellar lasing. PMID:25797520

  18. Thulium fiber laser damage to the ureter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, Christopher R.; Hardy, Luke A.; Irby, Pierce B.; Fried, Nathaniel M.

    2015-07-01

    Our laboratory is studying experimental thulium fiber laser (TFL) as a potential alternative lithotripter to the clinical gold standard Holmium:YAG laser. Safety studies characterizing undesirable Holmium laser-induced damage to ureter tissue have been previously reported. Similarly, this study characterizes TFL induced ureter and stone basket damage. A TFL beam with pulse energy of 35 mJ, pulse duration of 500 μs, and pulse rates of 150-500 Hz was delivered through a 100-μm-core, low-OH, silica optical fiber to the porcine ureter wall, in vitro. Ureter perforation times were measured and gross, histological, and optical coherence tomography images of the ablation zone were acquired. TFL operation at 150, 300, and 500 Hz produced mean ureter perforation times of 7.9, 3.8, and 1.8 s, respectively. Collateral damage averaged 510, 370, and 310 μm. TFL mean perforation time exceeded 1 s at each setting, which is a greater safety margin than previously reported during Holmium laser ureter perforation studies.

  19. Development of Fiber-Based Laser Systems for LISA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Numata, Kenji; Camp, Jordan

    2010-01-01

    We present efforts on fiber-based laser systems for the LISA mission at the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center. A fiber-based system has the advantage of higher robustness against external disturbances and easier implementation of redundancies. For a master oscillator, we are developing a ring fiber laser and evaluating two commercial products, a DBR linear fiber laser and a planar-waveguide external cavity diode laser. They all have comparable performance to a traditional NPRO at LISA band. We are also performing reliability tests of a 2-W Yb fiber amplifier and radiation tests of fiber laser/amplifier components. We describe our progress to date and discuss the path to a working LISA laser system design.

  20. Tunable Q-switched fiber laser based on saturable edge-state absorption in few-layer molybdenum disulfide (MoS₂).

    PubMed

    Woodward, R I; Kelleher, E J R; Howe, R C T; Hu, G; Torrisi, F; Hasan, T; Popov, S V; Taylor, J R

    2014-12-15

    We fabricate a few-layer molybdenum disulfide (MoS₂) polymer composite saturable absorber by liquid-phase exfoliation, and use this to passively Q-switch an ytterbium-doped fiber laser, tunable from 1030 to 1070 nm. Self-starting Q-switching generates 2.88 μs pulses at 74 kHz repetition rate, with over 100 nJ pulse energy. We propose a mechanism, based on edge states within the bandgap, responsible for the wideband nonlinear optical absorption exhibited by our few-layer MoS₂ sample, despite operating at photon energies lower than the material bandgap. PMID:25607060

  1. Short pulse dynamics in a linear cavity fiber laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Razukov, Vadim A.; Melnikov, Leonid A.

    2016-04-01

    New suitable numerical scheme is proposed for simulation of dynamics of oppositely running pulses in a fiber laser with linear cavity. The proposed model allows to include various temporal and spatial effects which affect the laser dynamics. The pulse evolution in the fiber cavity with perfect reflectors at the fiber ends with accounting of fiber group velocity dispersion and self-phase modulation is demonstrated.

  2. Laser beam application with high power fiber lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beyer, Eckhard; Brenner, Berndt; Morgenthal, Lothar

    2007-05-01

    With the new industrial high power fiber lasers we have already stepped into a new generation of laser applications. These lasers are smaller, better, more cost-effective, and offer a processing "on the fly." Of utmost importance is their excellent beam quality which enables us to reduce the size of the focussing head including the scanning mirrors. With the reduced mass of the mirrors we can reach scanning frequencies up to 1.5 kHz and in special configurations up to 4 kHz. Using such mirrors with this high beam quality we can shape the key hole geometry, and thus it is possible to decrease the keyhole spiking, which always occur in the case of deep penetration welding. We can generate very thin and deep welding seams, which we have only experienced with electron beam welding. The excellent beam quality of the fiber lasers offers us a lot of new applications from deep penetration welding to high speed welding. By using beam scanning we are able to easily change the beam and the seam geometry. Furthermore, it is possible to work with this kind of laser from a distance of some meters between focussing/scanning head and the work piece. This technique is called remote processing or processing "on the fly." The excellent beam quality also enables us to cut very precisely, and due to the small cutting widths with a very high speed. In this case the main problem is that the roughness of the cutting edge increases a little bit. One reason for this is that we cannot blow out the mold as easily as we can do it with higher cutting widths. There are also polarized fiber lasers on the market where we can use the Brewster effect for different applications. The presentation will cover some physical basics including different industrial applications.

  3. Dispersion measurements of mode-locked fiber laser components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Louthain, James A.; Hayduk, Michael J.; Erdmann, Reinhard K.

    2000-07-01

    Precise control of the dispersion within mode-locked laser cavities can lead to optical pulse compression and reduced timing jitter of mode-locked lasers. Two simple measurement techniques are used to provide a complete picture of the dispersion within an erbium doped mode-locked fiber laser cavity. We measured the optical dispersion of erbium-doped fiber, standard single mode fiber, and chirped Bragg gratings. We built a Michelson interferometer with a wideband LED source to measure the dispersion of fiber lengths of less than 1 meter. Next, we measured the dispersion of chirped Bragg gratings using a network analyzer and a tunable laser in a differential phase measurement technique.

  4. Novel fiber optic tip designs and devices for laser surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hutchens, Thomas Clifton

    Fiber optic delivery of laser energy has been used for years in various types of surgical procedures in the human body. Optical energy provides several benefits over electrical or mechanical surgery, including the ability to selectively target specific tissue types while preserving others. Specialty fiber optic tips have also been introduced to further customize delivery of laser energy to the tissue. Recent evolution in lasers and miniaturization has opened up opportunities for many novel surgical techniques. Currently, ophthalmic surgeons use relatively invasive mechanical tools to dissect retinal deposits which occur in proliferative diabetic retinopathy. By using the tight focusing properties of microspheres combined with the short optical penetration depth of the Erbium:YAG laser and mid-IR fiber delivery, a precise laser scalpel can be constructed as an alternative, less invasive and more precise approach to this surgery. Chains of microspheres may allow for a self limiting ablation depth of approximately 10 microm based on the defocusing of paraxial rays. The microsphere laser scalpel may also be integrated with other surgical instruments to reduce the total number of handpieces for the surgeon. In current clinical laser lithotripsy procedures, poor input coupling of the Holmium:YAG laser energy frequently damages and requires discarding of the optical fiber. However, recent stone ablation studies with the Thulium fiber laser have provided comparable results to the Ho:YAG laser. The improved spatial beam profile of the Thulium fiber laser can also be efficiently coupled into a fiber approximately one third the diameter and reduces the risk of damaging the fiber input. For this reason, the trunk optical fiber minus the distal fiber tip can be preserved between procedures. The distal fiber tip, which degrades during stone ablation, could be made detachable and disposable. A novel, low-profile, twist-locking, detachable distal fiber tip interface was designed

  5. Powerful 2-μm all-fiber laser sources pumped by Raman fiber lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiong; Zhou, Pu; Zhang, Hanwei; Jin, Xiaoxi; Wang, Xiaolin; Xiao, Hu; Liu, Zejin

    2014-11-01

    We present novel and powerful pump schemes for fiber laser sources operating near 2 μm, which employing high power Raman fiber lasers (RFLs) to provide sufficient pump light. Firstly, we demonstrate a Tm-doped fiber laser (TDFL) pumped by two RFLs at 1173 nm. The output power of the TDFL reached 96 W with slope efficiency of 0.42, and the central wavelength located at 1943.3 nm. This is the first TDFL with 100 W-level output power pumped by RFLs around Tm3+ ions' ~1200 nm absorption band. Secondly, we demonstrate a Ho-doped fiber laser (HDFL) employing a 1150 nm RFL as pump source. The 1150 nm RFL provided 110 W pump power and the output power of the HDFL reached 42 W with slope efficiency of 0.37. The lasing wavelength covered from 2046.8 nm to 2049.5 nm with optical signal-to-noise ratio more than 30 dB. This is the first HDFL pumped by a 1150 nm RFL and the highest output power achieved at this pump band. In the last, we present a high power Ho-doped fiber (HDF) superfluorescent source (SS) pumped by a 1150 nm RFL. The SS's output power reached 1.5 W, and the full width at half maximum was about 30 nm. This is the highest output power achieved in HDF as far as we know. The results above indicate promising and powerful pump schemes to achieve higher power output in fiber lasers near 2 μm, which also can be further improved by optimizing the parameters of the sources.

  6. Evaluation of specialty fibers and waveguides for ultrashort laser pulse propagation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Michael N.

    Ultrashort pulse lasers have become invaluable tools in many areas of science and technology. Optical waveguide or fiber delivery of ultrashort pulses would benefit numerous applications that require remote location of the laser or for addressing areas of low accessibility such as minimally invasive surgical procedures, multiphoton excitation microscopy, laser micromachining and high bandwidth telecommunications. However, the extremely high peak power and bandwidth associated with ultrashort pulses are prohibitive for most conventional waveguides that guide light in solid dielectric cores, the main drawbacks being dispersion, nonlinear effects, and damage via optical breakdown. The purpose of this study is to investigate the significant obstacles involved with implementing optical waveguides or fibers capable of delivering ultrashort pulses. In recent years, specialty fibers such as large mode-area (LMA) photonic crystal and photonic bandgap fibers have been developed, which exhibit remarkable properties such as single-mode guidance that is independent of core size and guidance in an air core respectively. In this thesis, two early prototypes of each of these fibers are investigated for their ability to deliver ultrashort pulses. Another specialty fiber, silver coated hollow silica waveguide, which was originally developed for delivery of infrared light from CO2 and Er:YAG lasers is shown to be a good candidate for single-mode delivery of gigawatt peak power pulses with minimal pulse distortion. Another potential fiber is comprised of multiple evanescently-coupled single-mode cores. This so-called multi-core fiber has demonstrated increased power handling in fiber lasers and amplifiers and was selected as a candidate for delivery of ultrashort pulses due to its scalable large mode-area and increased nonlinear threshold. A design for multi-core fibers is proposed that allows tailoring of the supermode distribution to obtain equal power distribution among all cores

  7. Property and Shape Modulation of Carbon Fibers Using Lasers.

    PubMed

    Blaker, Jonny J; Anthony, David B; Tang, Guang; Shamsuddin, Siti-Ros; Kalinka, Gerhard; Weinrich, Malte; Abdolvand, Amin; Shaffer, Milo S P; Bismarck, Alexander

    2016-06-29

    An exciting challenge is to create unduloid-reinforcing fibers with tailored dimensions to produce synthetic composites with improved toughness and increased ductility. Continuous carbon fibers, the state-of-the-art reinforcement for structural composites, were modified via controlled laser irradiation to result in expanded outwardly tapered regions, as well as fibers with Q-tip (cotton-bud) end shapes. A pulsed laser treatment was used to introduce damage at the single carbon fiber level, creating expanded regions at predetermined points along the lengths of continuous carbon fibers, while maintaining much of their stiffness. The range of produced shapes was quantified and correlated to single fiber tensile properties. Mapped Raman spectroscopy was used to elucidate the local compositional and structural changes. Irradiation conditions were adjusted to create a swollen weakened region, such that fiber failure occurred in the laser treated region producing two fiber ends with outwardly tapered ends. Loading the tapered fibers allows for viscoelastic energy dissipation during fiber pull-out by enhanced friction as the fibers plough through a matrix. In these tapered fibers, diameters were locally increased up to 53%, forming outward taper angles of up to 1.8°. The tensile strength and strain to failure of the modified fibers were significantly reduced, by 75% and 55%, respectively, ensuring localization of the break in the expanded region; however, the fiber stiffness was only reduced by 17%. Using harsher irradiation conditions, carbon fibers were completely cut, resulting in cotton-bud fiber end shapes. Single fiber pull-out tests performed using these fibers revealed a 6.75-fold increase in work of pull-out compared to pristine carbon fibers. Controlled laser irradiation is a route to modify the shape of continuous carbon fibers along their lengths, as well as to cut them into controlled lengths leaving tapered or cotton-bud shapes. PMID:27227575

  8. Diode-Pumped Dye Laser Using a Tapered Optical Fiber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patterson, Brian; Stofel, James; Myers, Elliot; Knize, Randy

    2015-05-01

    We describe the construction of a simple dye laser based on a single-mode optical fiber. Light from a 120-mW laser diode (λ = 520 nm) is launched into the fiber. The fiber is tapered to a diameter of approximately 1 μm and placed in Rhodamine 6G laser dye. The pump light interacts with the gain medium through the evanescent field outside the fiber causing stimulated emission, which couples back into the fiber. Mirrors on each end of the fiber provide the necessary feedback for lasing, and a grating is used to narrow the spectral output. We characterize the lasing threshold and output spectrum of the laser. This has been a good project for undergraduate students to learn about lasers and optics.

  9. A review of Thulium fiber laser ablation of kidney stones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fried, Nathaniel M.; Blackmon, Richard L.; Irby, Pierce B.

    2011-02-01

    The clinical solid-state Holmium:YAG laser lithotripter (λ=2120 nm) is capable of operating at high pulse energies, but its efficient operation is limited to low pulse rates during lithotripsy. The diode-pumped experimental Thulium Fiber Laser (λ=1908 nm) is limited to low pulse energies, but can operate at high pulse rates. This review compares stone ablation threshold, ablation rate, and retropulsion effects for Ho:YAG and TFL. Laser lithotripsy complications also include optical fiber bending failure resulting in endoscope damage and low irrigation rates leading to poor visibility. Both problems are related to fiber diameter and limited by Ho:YAG laser multimode spatial beam profile. This study exploits TFL spatial beam profile for higher power transmission through smaller fibers. A short taper is also studied for expanding TFL beam at the distal tip of a small-core fiber. Stone mass loss, stone crater depths, fiber transmission losses, fiber burn-back, irrigation rates, and deflection through a flexible ureteroscope were measured for tapered fiber and compared with conventional fibers. The stone ablation threshold for TFL was four times lower than for Ho:YAG. Stone retropulsion with Ho:YAG increased linearly with pulse energy. Retropulsion with TFL was minimal at pulse rates < 150 Hz, then rapidly increased at higher pulse rates. TFL beam profile provides higher laser power through smaller fibers than Ho:YAG laser, potentially reducing fiber failure and endoscope damage and allowing greater irrigation rates for improved visibility and safety. Use of a short tapered distal fiber tip also allows expansion of the laser beam, resulting in decreased fiber tip damage compared to conventional fibers, without compromising fiber bending, stone ablation efficiency, or irrigation rates.

  10. Fiber laser front end for high energy petawatt laser systems

    SciTech Connect

    Dawson, J W; Messerly, M J; Phan, H; Mitchell, S; Drobshoff, A; Beach, R J; Siders, C; Lucianetti, A; Crane, J K; Barty, C J

    2006-06-15

    We are developing a fiber laser front end suitable for high energy petawatt laser systems on large glass lasers such as NIF. The front end includes generation of the pulses in a fiber mode-locked oscillator, amplification and pulse cleaning, stretching of the pulses to >3ns, dispersion trimming, timing, fiber transport of the pulses to the main laser bay and amplification of the pulses to an injection energy of 150 {micro}J. We will discuss current status of our work including data from packaged components. Design detail such as how the system addresses pulse contrast, dispersion trimming and pulse width adjustment and impact of B-integral on the pulse amplification will be discussed. A schematic of the fiber laser system we are constructing is shown in figure 1 below. A 40MHz packaged mode-locked fiber oscillator produces {approx}1nJ pulses which are phase locked to a 10MHz reference clock. These pulses are down selected to 100kHz and then amplified while still compressed. The amplified compressed pulses are sent through a non-linear polarization rotation based pulse cleaner to remove background amplified spontaneous emission (ASE). The pulses are then stretched by a chirped fiber Bragg grating (CFBG) and then sent through a splitter. The splitter splits the signal into two beams. (From this point we follow only one beam as the other follows an identical path.) The pulses are sent through a pulse tweaker that trims dispersion imbalances between the final large optics compressor and the CFBG. The pulse tweaker also permits the dispersion of the system to be adjusted for the purpose of controlling the final pulse width. Fine scale timing between the two beam lines can also be adjusted in the tweaker. A large mode area photonic crystal single polarization fiber is used to transport the pulses from the master oscillator room to the main laser bay. The pulses are then amplified a two stage fiber amplifier to 150mJ. These pulses are then launched into the main amplifier

  11. Ultra thin fiber laser vector hydrophone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Rui; Zhang, Wentao; He, Jun; Li, Fang; Liu, Yuliang

    2011-05-01

    This paper presents a two-axis fiber laser vector hydrophone which uses a V-shaped flexed beam to enhance the sensitivity and reduce the dimensions. Theoretical analyses of the sensitivity and frequent response are given. The key parameters that determine the sensitivity and resonant frequency are discussed. The experimental results show an acceleration sensitivity of 39.2 pm/g and 53.2 pm/g at the x, y axis respectively, a resonant frequency of about 310 Hz, and a directivity resolution larger than 20 dB.

  12. Hybrid femtosecond fiber laser outcrossing Er-doped fiber and Yb-doped fiber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Yunseok; Park, Sanguk; Kim, Seung-Woo

    2014-07-01

    A hybridized scheme of a fiber femtosecond pulse laser was devised with the aim of grafting the frequency comb of an Er-doped fiber oscillator, stabilized around a 1.550 μm center wavelength, onto the 1.0 μm emission range of an Yb-doped fiber amplifier. Test results showed that the frequency comb is successfully transferred to a new 1.034 μm center wavelength with a spectral bandwidth of 21 nm, upholding an original frequency stability of 3.71 × 10-13 at 10 s averaging. This work demonstrates the feasibility of outcrossing different kinds of fibers to shift the spectral range of the frequency comb over a large operating span without loss of stability.

  13. Femtosecond fiber laser welding of dissimilar metals.

    PubMed

    Huang, Huan; Yang, Lih-Mei; Bai, Shuang; Liu, Jian

    2014-10-01

    In this paper, welding of dissimilar metals was demonstrated for the first time, to the best of our knowledge, by using a high-energy high-repetition-rate femtosecond fiber laser. Metallurgical and mechanical properties were investigated and analyzed under various processing parameters (pulse energy, repetition rate, and welding speed). Results showed that the formation of intermetallic brittle phases and welding defects could be effectively reduced. Strong welding quality with more than 210 MPa tensile strength for stainless steel-aluminum and 175 MPa tensile strength for stainless steel-magnesium has been demonstrated. A minimal heat affected zone and uniform and homogenous phase transformation in the welding region have been demonstrated. This laser-welding technique can be extended for various applications in semiconductor, automobile, aerospace, and biomedical industries. PMID:25322246

  14. CW single transverse mode all-fiber Tm3+-doped silica fiber laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, E. Z.; Li, W. H.; You, L.

    2012-04-01

    The CW 25.6 W output power with a slope efficiency of 30.6% respected to the pump power from a CW single transverse mode all-fiber Tm3+-doped Silica Fiber Laser is reported. The all-fiber laser is made up by progressively splicing the pigtail fiber, matched FBG fiber and Tm fiber. The reflective FBG and Tm3+-doped fiber end Fresnel reflection build up the laser resonance cavity. Due to the multi-mode FBG as the reflective mirror, the output laser spectrum is multi-peaks at high output power, but the spectrum width is less than 2 nm at 1.94 μm. We estimate the beam quality to be M 2 = 2.39, clearly indicating nearly diffraction-limited beam propagation.

  15. Growing Crystaline Sapphire Fibers By Laser Heated Pedestal Techiques

    DOEpatents

    Phomsakha, Vongvilay; Chang, Robert S. F.; Djeu, Nicholas I.

    1997-03-04

    An improved system and process for growing crystal fibers comprising a means for creating a laser beam having a substantially constant intensity profile through its cross sectional area, means for directing the laser beam at a portion of solid feed material located within a fiber growth chamber to form molten feed material, means to support a seed fiber above the molten feed material, means to translate the seed fiber towards and away from the molten feed material so that the seed fiber can make contact with the molten feed material, fuse to the molten feed material and then be withdrawn away from the molten feed material whereby the molten feed material is drawn off in the form of a crystal fiber. The means for creating a laser beam having a substantially constant intensity profile through its cross sectional area includes transforming a previously generated laser beam having a conventional gaussian intensity profile through its cross sectional area into a laser beam having a substantially constant intensity profile through its cross sectional area by passing the previously generated laser beam through a graded reflectivity mirror. The means for directing the laser beam at a portion of solid feed material is configured to direct the laser beam at a target zone which contains the molten feed material and a portion of crystal fiber drawn off the molten feed material by the seed fiber. The means to support the seed fiber above the molten feed material is positioned at a predetermined height above the molten feed material. This predetermined height provides the seed fiber with sufficient length and sufficient resiliency so that surface tension in the molten feed material can move the seed fiber to the center of the molten feed material irrespective of where the seed fiber makes contact with the molten feed material. The internal atmosphere of the fiber growth chamber is composed substantially of Helium gas.

  16. Recent developments in polycrystalline oxide fiber laser materials: production of Yb-doped polycrystalline YAG fiber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, HeeDong; Keller, Kristin; Sirn, Brian; Parthasarathy, Triplicane; Cheng, Michael; Hopkins, Frank K.

    2011-09-01

    Laser quality, polycrystalline oxide fibers offer significant advantages over state-of-the-art silica fiber for high energy lasers. Advanced ceramic processing technology, along with a novel powder production process, has potential to produce oxide fibers with an outstanding optical quality for use in the fiber laser applications. The production of contaminant-free green fibers with a high packing density, as well as uniform packing distribution, is a key factor in obtaining laserquality fibers. High quality green fibers are dependent on the powder quality combined with the appropriate slurry formulation. These two fundamental technologies were successfully developed at UES, and used to produce Yb-doped yttrium aluminum garnet (YAG) fibers with high optical quality, high chemical purity, and suitable core diameters down to 20-30 microns.

  17. Disordered microstructure polymer optical fiber for stabilized coherent random fiber laser.

    PubMed

    Hu, Zhijia; Miao, Bo; Wang, Tongxin; Fu, Qiang; Zhang, Douguo; Ming, Hai; Zhang, Qijin

    2013-11-15

    We have demonstrated the realization of a random polymer fiber laser (RPFL) based on laser dye Pyrromethene 597-doped one-dimensional disordered polymer optical fiber (POF). The stabilized coherent laser action for the disordered POF has been obtained by the weak optical multiple scattering of the polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxanes nanoparticles in the core of the POF in situ formed during polymerization, which was enhanced by the waveguide confinement effect. Meanwhile, the threshold of our RPFL system is almost one order of magnitude lower than that of the liquid core random fiber laser reported previously, which promotes the development of random lasers. PMID:24322095

  18. 2μm single frequency fiber laser based on thulium-doped silica fiber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Shijie; Shi, Wei; Lin, Jichao; Fang, Qiang; Sheng, Quan; Zhang, Haiwei; Wen, Jinwei; Yao, Jianquan

    2016-03-01

    Single-frequency fiber laser operating at 1950 nm has been demonstrated in an all-fiber distributed Bragg reflection (DBR) laser cavity by using a 1.9-cm commercial available Thulium-doped silica fiber, for the first time. The laser was pumped by a 793-nm single-mode diode laser and had a threshold pump power of 75 mW. The maximum output power of the single longitudinal mode laser was 18 mW and the slope efficiency with respect to the launched pump power was 11%. Moreover, the linewidth and relative intensity noise (RIN) at different pump power has been measured and analyzed. The successful demonstration with the Thulium-doped silica fiber used here is considered to further promote the commercialization of single frequency fiber laser at 2 μm.

  19. Latest developments of ultrafast fiber laser and its material applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, G. C.; Liu, B.; Shah, L.; Liu, Z.; Che, Y.; Xu, J.

    2009-02-01

    We address recent fiber-based femtosecond laser technology. Specifically, fiber-chirped pulse amplifier is discussed for the enabling the concept of real-world applications. We review recent selected material applications demonstrating advantages of ultrafast dynamics of highly repetitive pulse train in nanoparticle generation in pulsed-laser deposition and reliable Si wafer singulation.

  20. Narrow-band generation in random distributed feedback fiber laser.

    PubMed

    Sugavanam, Srikanth; Tarasov, Nikita; Shu, Xuewen; Churkin, Dmitry V

    2013-07-15

    Narrow-band emission of spectral width down to ~0.05 nm line-width is achieved in the random distributed feedback fiber laser employing narrow-band fiber Bragg grating or fiber Fabry-Perot interferometer filters. The observed line-width is ~10 times less than line-width of other demonstrated up to date random distributed feedback fiber lasers. The random DFB laser with Fabry-Perot interferometer filter provides simultaneously multi-wavelength and narrow-band (within each line) generation with possibility of further wavelength tuning. PMID:23938497

  1. 150 W highly-efficient Raman fiber laser.

    PubMed

    Feng, Yan; Taylor, Luke R; Calia, Domenico Bonaccini

    2009-12-21

    We report a more than 150 W spectrally-clean continuous wave Raman fiber laser at 1120 nm with an optical efficiency of 85%. A approximately 30 m standard single mode silica fiber is used as Raman gain fiber to avoid second Stokes emission. A spectrally asymmetric resonator (in the sense of mirror reflection bandwidth) with usual fiber Bragg gratings is designed to minimize the laser power lost into the unwanted direction, even when the effective reflectivity of the rear fiber Bragg grating becomes as low as 81.5%. PMID:20052078

  2. Wide-Band Spatially Tunable Photonic Bandgap in Visible Spectral Range and Laser based on a Polymer Stabilized Blue Phase.

    PubMed

    Lin, Jia-De; Wang, Tsai-Yen; Mo, Ting-Shan; Huang, Shuan-Yu; Lee, Chia-Rong

    2016-01-01

    This work successfully develops a largely-gradient-pitched polymer-stabilized blue phase (PSBP) photonic bandgap (PBG) device with a wide-band spatial tunability in nearly entire visible region within a wide blue phase (BP) temperature range including room temperature. The device is fabricated based on the reverse diffusion of two injected BP-monomer mixtures with a low and a high chiral concentrations and afterwards through UV-curing. This gradient-pitched PSBP can show a rainbow-like reflection appearance in which the peak wavelength of the PBG can be spatially tuned from the blue to the red regions at room temperature. The total tuning spectral range for the cell is as broad as 165 nm and covers almost the entire visible region. Based on the gradient-pitched PSBP, a spatially tunable laser is also demonstrated in this work. The temperature sensitivity of the lasing wavelength for the laser is negatively linear and approximately -0.26 nm/°C. The two devices have a great potential for use in applications of photonic devices and displays because of their multiple advantages, such as wide-band tunability, wide operated temperature range, high stability and reliability, no issue of hysteresis, no need of external controlling sources, and not slow tuning speed (mechanically). PMID:27456475

  3. Wide-Band Spatially Tunable Photonic Bandgap in Visible Spectral Range and Laser based on a Polymer Stabilized Blue Phase

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Jia-De; Wang, Tsai-Yen; Mo, Ting-Shan; Huang, Shuan-Yu; Lee, Chia-Rong

    2016-01-01

    This work successfully develops a largely-gradient-pitched polymer-stabilized blue phase (PSBP) photonic bandgap (PBG) device with a wide-band spatial tunability in nearly entire visible region within a wide blue phase (BP) temperature range including room temperature. The device is fabricated based on the reverse diffusion of two injected BP-monomer mixtures with a low and a high chiral concentrations and afterwards through UV-curing. This gradient-pitched PSBP can show a rainbow-like reflection appearance in which the peak wavelength of the PBG can be spatially tuned from the blue to the red regions at room temperature. The total tuning spectral range for the cell is as broad as 165 nm and covers almost the entire visible region. Based on the gradient-pitched PSBP, a spatially tunable laser is also demonstrated in this work. The temperature sensitivity of the lasing wavelength for the laser is negatively linear and approximately −0.26 nm/°C. The two devices have a great potential for use in applications of photonic devices and displays because of their multiple advantages, such as wide-band tunability, wide operated temperature range, high stability and reliability, no issue of hysteresis, no need of external controlling sources, and not slow tuning speed (mechanically). PMID:27456475

  4. Wide-Band Spatially Tunable Photonic Bandgap in Visible Spectral Range and Laser based on a Polymer Stabilized Blue Phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Jia-De; Wang, Tsai-Yen; Mo, Ting-Shan; Huang, Shuan-Yu; Lee, Chia-Rong

    2016-07-01

    This work successfully develops a largely-gradient-pitched polymer-stabilized blue phase (PSBP) photonic bandgap (PBG) device with a wide-band spatial tunability in nearly entire visible region within a wide blue phase (BP) temperature range including room temperature. The device is fabricated based on the reverse diffusion of two injected BP-monomer mixtures with a low and a high chiral concentrations and afterwards through UV-curing. This gradient-pitched PSBP can show a rainbow-like reflection appearance in which the peak wavelength of the PBG can be spatially tuned from the blue to the red regions at room temperature. The total tuning spectral range for the cell is as broad as 165 nm and covers almost the entire visible region. Based on the gradient-pitched PSBP, a spatially tunable laser is also demonstrated in this work. The temperature sensitivity of the lasing wavelength for the laser is negatively linear and approximately ‑0.26 nm/°C. The two devices have a great potential for use in applications of photonic devices and displays because of their multiple advantages, such as wide-band tunability, wide operated temperature range, high stability and reliability, no issue of hysteresis, no need of external controlling sources, and not slow tuning speed (mechanically).

  5. A Compact 500 MHz Femtosecond All-Fiber Ring Laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Tong; Huang, Huichang; Yuan, Xiaozhi; Wei, Xiaoming; He, Xin; Mo, Shupei; Deng, Huaqiu; Yang, Zhongmin

    2013-05-01

    We demonstrate a fundamentally mode-locked all-fiber ring laser with the repetition rate up to 500 MHz and pulse duration of 250 fs at 1.5 µm. Only an optical integrated module, a 4.8 cm Er3+/Yb3+-codoped phosphate glass fiber, and a polarization controller are employed to construct the all-fiber ring cavity. Stable mode-locking laser is output by adjusting the polarization controller.

  6. Nanosecond square pulse generation in fiber lasers with normal dispersion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, L. M.; Tang, D. Y.; Cheng, T. H.; Lu, C.

    2007-04-01

    We report on the generation of nanosecond square pulses in a passively mode-locked fiber ring laser made of purely normal dispersive fibers. Different to the noise-like pulse operation of the laser, the generated square pulses are stable and have no internal structures. We show that the formation of the square pulse is due to the combined action of the pulse peak clamping effect caused by the cavity and the almost linear pulse propagation in the normal dispersive fibers.

  7. Fiber-optic Doppler velocimeter based on a dual-polarization fiber grating laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuang, Zeyuang; Cheng, Linghao; Liang, Yizhi; Liang, Hao; Guan, Bai-Ou

    2015-07-01

    A fiber-optic Doppler velocimeter based on a dual-polarization fiber grating laser is demonstrated. The fiber grating laser produces two orthogonally polarized laser outputs with their frequency difference proportional to the intra-cavity birefringence. When the laser outputs are reflected from a moving targets, the laser frequencies will be shifted due to the Doppler effect. It shows that the frequency difference between the beat note of the laser outputs and the beat note of the reflected lasers is proportional to the velocity. The proposed fiber-optic Doppler velocimeter shows a high sensitivity of 0.64 MHz/m/s and is capable of measurement of wide range of velocity.

  8. Dark pulse generation in fiber lasers incorporating carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Liu, H H; Chow, K K

    2014-12-01

    We demonstrate the generation of dark pulses from carbon nanotube (CNT) incorporated erbium-doped fiber ring lasers with net anomalous dispersion. A side-polished fiber coated with CNT layer by optically-driven deposition method is embedded into the laser in order to enhance the birefringence and nonlinearity of the laser cavity. The dual-wavelength domain-wall dark pulses are obtained from the developed CNT-incorporated fiber laser at a relatively low pump threshold of 50.6 mW. Dark pulses repeated at the fifth-order harmonic of the fundamental cavity frequency are observed by adjusting the intra-cavity polarization state. PMID:25606901

  9. 280  GHz dark soliton fiber laser.

    PubMed

    Song, Y F; Guo, J; Zhao, L M; Shen, D Y; Tang, D Y

    2014-06-15

    We report on an ultrahigh repetition rate dark soliton fiber laser. We show both numerically and experimentally that by taking advantage of the cavity self-induced modulation instability and the dark soliton formation in a net normal dispersion cavity fiber laser, stable ultrahigh repetition rate dark soliton trains can be formed in a dispersion-managed cavity fiber laser. Stable dark soliton trains with a repetition rate as high as ∼280  GHz have been generated in our experiment. Numerical simulations have shown that the effective gain bandwidth limitation plays an important role on the stabilization of the formed dark solitons in the laser. PMID:24978517

  10. Pulse-stretched Alexandrite laser for improved optical fiber reliability for laser lithotripsy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simons, David; Koschmann, Eric C.

    1992-06-01

    Clinical data shows that short pulse duration lasers used in laser induced shock wave lithotripsy severely damage optical fibers on both the proximal and distal ends which is unsuitable for clinical use. An Alexandrite laser system has been developed that uses dynamic pulse stretching of the Q-switched laser pulse and improved optical fiber coupling to eliminate the fiber damage. The method of pulse stretching presented controls the laser output pulse energy from 50 to 150 millijoules and temporal shape from 0.5 to 1.5 microseconds. This yields effective fragmentation of calculi without damage to the optical fiber.

  11. Characteristics research on self-amplified distributed feedback fiber laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Zhiqiang; Qi, Haifeng; Guo, Jian; Wang, Chang; Peng, Gangding

    2014-09-01

    A distributed feedback (DFB) fiber laser with a ratio of the backward to forward output power of 1:100 was composed by a 45-mm-length asymmetrical phase-shifted fiber grating fabricated on the 50-mm erbium-doped photosensitive fiber. Forward output laser was amplified using a certain length of Nufern EDFL-980-Hp erbium-doped fiber to absorb the surplus pump power after the active phase-shifted fiber grating and get population inversion. By using OptiSystem software, the best fiber length of the EDFL to get the highest gain was simulated. In order to keep the amplified laser with the narrow line-width and low noise, a narrow-band light filter consisting of a fiber Bragg grating (FBG) with the same Bragg wavelength as the laser and an optical circulator was used to filter the amplified spontaneous emission (ASE) noise of the out-cavity erbium-doped fiber. The designed laser structure sufficiently utilized the pump power, and a DFB fiber laser with the 32.5-mW output power, 11.5-kHz line width, and -87-dB/Hz relative intensity noise (RIN) at 300 mW of 980 nm pump power was brought out.

  12. High Average Power, High Energy Short Pulse Fiber Laser System

    SciTech Connect

    Messerly, M J

    2007-11-13

    Recently continuous wave fiber laser systems with output powers in excess of 500W with good beam quality have been demonstrated [1]. High energy, ultrafast, chirped pulsed fiber laser systems have achieved record output energies of 1mJ [2]. However, these high-energy systems have not been scaled beyond a few watts of average output power. Fiber laser systems are attractive for many applications because they offer the promise of high efficiency, compact, robust systems that are turn key. Applications such as cutting, drilling and materials processing, front end systems for high energy pulsed lasers (such as petawatts) and laser based sources of high spatial coherence, high flux x-rays all require high energy short pulses and two of the three of these applications also require high average power. The challenge in creating a high energy chirped pulse fiber laser system is to find a way to scale the output energy while avoiding nonlinear effects and maintaining good beam quality in the amplifier fiber. To this end, our 3-year LDRD program sought to demonstrate a high energy, high average power fiber laser system. This work included exploring designs of large mode area optical fiber amplifiers for high energy systems as well as understanding the issues associated chirped pulse amplification in optical fiber amplifier systems.

  13. Laser Processing of Carbon Fiber Reinforced Polymer Composite for Optical Fiber Guidelines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lima, M. S. F.; Sakamoto, J. M. S.; Simoes, J. G. A.; Riva, R.

    The replacement of copper wires by optical fibers for control and monitoring of aircraft systems are gaining more and more acceptance due to weight reductions and their intrinsic reliability. The present investigation proposes a new method for producing fiber optical guidelines in carbon fiber reinforced polymer (CFRP) composites using laser texturing and machining. Laser texturing was used to improve the adhesion bonding between the CFRP parts and laser machining is used to create a channel where the optical fiber will be placed and protected. The results show that using only 20 W of a Nd:YAG pulsed laser it is possible to enhance the joint resistance of CFRP composites and also protecting the optical fiber embedded in between two CFRP pieces. Using the proposed technology, the maximum load of a lap joint increased by 85% and the optical fiber remained integral even under severe bending conditions.

  14. Influence of the UV-induced fiber loss on the distributed feedback fiber lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Wei; Chen, Bai; Qiao, Qiquan; Chen, Jialing; Lin, Zunqi

    2003-06-01

    It was found that the output power of the distributed feedback fiber lasers would be improved after annealing or left unused for several days after the laser had been fabricated, and the output of the fundamental mode would not increase but be clamped while the ±1 order modes would be predominant with the enhancement of the coupling coefficient during the fabrication. The paper discussed the influence of UV-induced fiber loss on the fiber phase-shifted DFB lasers. Due to the gain saturation and fiber internal loss, which included the temperament loss and permanent loss, there was an optimum coupling coefficient for the DFB fiber lasers that the higher internal fiber loss corresponded to the lower optimum values of coupling coefficient.

  15. CO2 Laser Radiation Transmission Through Curved Hollow Fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dror, Jacob; Gannot, Israel; Morhaim, Orna; Mendlovic, David; Croitoru, Nathan I.

    1989-07-01

    Hollow plastic fibers were produced by depositing metallic and dielectric films on the internal surface of plastic tubes. These fibers can transmit high CO2 laser energy with low atten-uation even in curved trajectories. A mathematical model was developed to describe the energy transmission. The energy distribution at the outlet of the fiber was measured and found to be influenced by the existence of whispering gallery mode. These fibers are suitable for surgical uses.

  16. Microscopic analysis of laser-induced proximal fiber tip damage during holmium:YAG and thulium fiber laser lithotripsy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, Christopher R.; Hardy, Luke A.; Irby, Pierce B.; Fried, Nathaniel M.

    2016-04-01

    The thulium fiber laser (TFL) is being studied as an alternative to the standard holmium:YAG laser for lithotripsy. The TFL beam originates within an 18-μm-core thulium-doped silica fiber, and its near single mode, Gaussian beam profile enables transmission of higher laser power through smaller (e.g., 50- to 150-μm core) fibers than possible during holmium laser lithotripsy. This study examines whether the more uniform TFL beam profile also reduces proximal fiber tip damage compared with the holmium laser multimodal beam. Light and confocal microscopy images were taken of the proximal surface of each fiber to inspect for possible laser-induced damage. A TFL beam at a wavelength of 1908 nm was coupled into 105-μm-core silica fibers, with 35-mJ energy, and 500-μs pulse duration, and 100,000 pulses were delivered at each pulse rate setting of 50, 100, 200, 300, and 400 Hz. For comparison, single use, 270-μm-core fibers were collected after clinical holmium laser lithotripsy procedures performed with standard settings (600 mJ, 350 μs, 6 Hz). Total laser energy, number of laser pulses, and laser irradiation time were recorded, and fibers were rated for damage. For TFL studies, output pulse energy and average power were stable, and no proximal fiber damage was observed at settings up to 35 mJ, 400 Hz, and 14 W average power (n=5). In contrast, confocal microscopy images of fiber tips after holmium lithotripsy showed proximal fiber tip degradation, indicated by small ablation craters on the scale of several micrometers in all fibers (n=20). In summary, the proximal fiber tip of a 105-μm-core fiber transmitted up to 14 W of TFL power without degradation, compared to degradation of 270-μm-core fibers after transmission of 3.6 W of holmium laser power. The smaller and more uniform TFL beam profile may improve fiber lifetime, and potentially translate into lower costs for the surgical disposables as well.

  17. Simple design for singlemode high power CW fiber laser using multimode high NA fiber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morasse, Bertrand; Chatigny, Stéphane; Desrosiers, Cynthia; Gagnon, Éric; Lapointe, Marc-André; de Sandro, Jean-Philippe

    2009-02-01

    A large number of high power CW fiber lasers described in the literature use large mode area (LMA) double cladding fibers. These fibers have large core and low core numerical aperture (NA) to limit the number of supported modes and are typically operated under coiling to eliminate higher order modes. We describe here multimode (MM) high NA ytterbium doped fibers used in single mode output high power laser/amplifier configuration. Efficient single mode amplification is realized in the multimode doped fiber by matching the fundamental mode of the doped fiber to the LP01 mode of the fiber Bragg grating (FBG) and by selecting the upper V-number value that limits the overlap of the LP01 to the higher order modes. We show that negligible mode coupling is realized in the doped fiber, which ensures a stable power output over external perturbation without the use of tapers. Fundamental mode operation is maintained at all time without coiling through the use of FBG written in a single mode fiber. We show that such fiber is inherently more photosensitive and easier to splice than LMA fiber. We demonstrate an efficient 75W singlemode CW fiber laser using this configuration and predict that the power scaling to the kW level can be achieved, the design being more practical and resistant to photodarkening compared to conventional low NA LMA fiber.

  18. Design and refinement of rare earth doped multicore fiber lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prudenzano, F.; Mescia, L.; Di Tommaso, A.; Surico, M.; De Sario, M.

    2013-09-01

    A novel multicore ytterbium doped fiber laser is designed, with the target of maximizing both the effective mode area and the beam quality, by means of a complete home-made computer code. It can be employed to construct high power and Quasi-Gaussian beam lasers. The novel laser configuration exploits a single mode multicore fiber and does not need Talbot cavity or other in-phase mode selection mechanisms. This is an innovative solution, because to the best of our knowledge, for the first time, we have designed a truly single-mode multicore fiber laser. For comparison we have optimized two other laser configurations which are well known in literature, both employing a multimode multicore fiber and a Talbot cavity as a feedback for the in-phase supermode selection. All three multicore fibers, constituted by the same glass, are doped with the same ytterbium ion concentration and pumped with the same input power. Multimodal fiber lasers exhibit lower beam quality, i.e. a higher beam quality factor M2, with respect to the single mode one, even if suitable Talbot cavities are designed, but they are very competitive when a more compact laser cavity is required for the same output power. The novel single mode nineteen core laser exhibits a simulated effective mode area Aeff = 703 μm2 and a beam quality factor M2 = 1.05, showing better characteristics than the other two lasers.

  19. Endovenous laser ablation with TM-fiber laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Somunyudan, Meral Filiz; Topaloglu, Nermin; Ergenoglu, Mehmet Umit; Gulsoy, Murat

    2011-03-01

    Endovenous Laser Ablation (EVLA) has become a popular minimally invasive alternative to stripping in the treatment of saphenous vein reflux. Several wavelengths have been proposed; of which 810, 940 and 980- nm are the most commonly used. However, the most appropriate wavelength is still the subject of debate. Thermal shrinkage of collagenous tissue during EVLA plays a significant role in the early and late results of the treatment. The aim of this study is to compare the efficacy of 980 and 1940-nm laser wavelengths in the treatment of varicose veins. In this study, 980 and 1940-nm lasers at different power settings (8/10W for 980-nm, 2/3W for 1940-nm) were used to irradiate stripped human veins. The most prominent contraction and narrowing in outer and inner diameter were observed with the 1940-nm at 2W, following 980-nm at 8W, 1940-nm at 3W and finally 980-nm at 10W. The minimum carbonization was observed with the 1940-nm at 2W. As a conclusion, 1940-nm Tm-fiber laser which has a significant effect in the management of varicose veins due to more selective energy absorption in water and consequently in the vein is a promising method in the management of varicose veins.

  20. Resonant tandem pumping of Tm-doped fiber lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Creeden, Daniel; Johnson, Benjamin R.; Rines, Glen A.; Setzler, Scott D.

    2014-06-01

    We have demonstrated efficient lasing of a Tm-doped fiber when pumped with another Tm-doped fiber. In these experiments, we use a 1908 nm Tm-doped fiber laser as a pump source for another Tm-doped fiber laser, operating at a slightly longer wavelength (~2000 nm). Pumping in the 1900 nm region allows for very high optical efficiencies, low heat generation, and significant power scaling potential due to the use of fiber laser pumping. The trade-off is that the ground-state pump absorption at 1908 nm is ~37 times lower than at 795nm. However, the absorption cross-section is still sufficiently high enough to achieve effective pump absorption without exceedingly long fiber lengths. This may also be advantageous for distributing the thermal load in higher power applications.

  1. Ultrashort pulsed fiber laser welding and sealing of transparent materials.

    PubMed

    Huang, Huan; Yang, Lih-Mei; Liu, Jian

    2012-05-20

    In this paper, methods of welding and sealing optically transparent materials using an ultrashort pulsed (USP) fiber laser are demonstrated which overcome the limit of small area welding of optical materials. First, the interaction of USP fiber laser radiation inside glass was studied and single line welding results with different laser parameters were investigated. Then multiline scanning was used to obtain successful area bonding. Finally, complete four-edge sealing of fused silica substrates with a USP laser was demonstrated and the hermetic seal was confirmed by water immersion test. This laser microwelding technique can be extended to various applications in the semiconductor industry and precision optic manufacturing. PMID:22614601

  2. Hole drilling with fiber-optically delivered visible lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Kautz, D.D.; Berzins, L.V.; Dragon, E.P.

    1994-12-31

    The use of lasers for high-speed drilling of holes in materials is well documented. To allow easier use of lasers in manufacturing processes, fiber-optically delivered beams are preferable to the use of conventional optics. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) has adapted fiber-optic technology to its visible light, copper vapor lasers for use in hole drilling studies. Visible lasers afford better coupling of light to the workpiece and when fiber-optically delivered, allow high quality holes to be drilled in difficult accessibility areas and with easier setup. A fiber-optic delivery system was attached to the presently hard-optic copper vapor laser system. This system consisted of a 0.6 mm (0.024 in.) fiber that was then telescoped and refocused by a hard optics package at the workstation end of the fiber. The optics package produced a 0.2 mm (0.008 in.) focused spot size at the workpiece. This system was then run down to a 3-axis CNC machining table to allow part movement for these studies. The fiber-optically delivered light was found to work extremely well for drilling small diameter holes. In summary, it was found that fiber-optically delivered, visible laser beams have several advantages in drilling over those same beams delivered through conventional hard optics. These include much easier setup, reduced system maintenance, and typically higher hole quality.

  3. Characteristics research of self-amplified distributed feedback fiber laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Zhiqiang; Qi, Haifeng; Guo, Jian; Wang, Chang; Peng, Gangding

    2013-09-01

    A distributed feedback (DFB) fiber laser with a ratio of backward to forward output power of 1:100 was composed by a 45mm length asymmetrical phase-shifted fiber grating fabricated on 50mm erbium-doped photosensitive fiber. Forward output laser was amplified using a certain length of Nufern EDFL980-Hp erbium-doped fiber to absorb surplus pump power after the active phase-shifted fiber grating and get population inversion. Using OptiSystem software, the best fiber length of the EDFL to get the highest gain was simulated. In order to keep the amplified laser with narrow line-width and low noise, a narrow-band light filter consisted of a FBG with the same Bragg wavelength as the laser and an optical circulator was used to filter the ASE noise of the out-cavity erbium-doped fiber. The designed laser structure sufficiently utilized the pump power, a DFB fiber laser of 32.5mW output power, 11.5 kHz line width, and -87dB/Hz relative intensity noise (RIN) at 300mW of 980 nm pump power was brought out.

  4. Q-switched Tm-doped fiber lasers using dynamic microbends in oval-coating fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Araki, S.; Kimpara, K.; Tomiki, M.; Sakata, H.

    2013-06-01

    We present Q-switched pulse generation in a thulium-doped fiber laser by inducing a piezoelectric-driven microbend into an oval-coating fiber. The oval-coating fiber is made of a single-mode fiber in which an acrylic coating is flattened by thermal pressing. A pulse peak power of 1.45 W is obtained with a pump power of 139 mW.

  5. UV laser-surface interactions relevant to analytic spectroscopy of wide bandgap materials

    SciTech Connect

    Dickinson, J.T.

    1993-12-31

    Laer ablation has application in materials analysis, surface modification, and thin film deposition. Processes that lead to emission and formation of particles when wide band gap materials are irradiated with pulsed uv laser light. These materials are often difficult to transport into the gas phase for analysis. Such materials are alkali halides, MgO.

  6. High Power 938nm Cladding Pumped Fiber Laser

    SciTech Connect

    Dawson, J; Beach, R; Brobshoff, A; Liao, Z; Payne, S; Pennington, D; Taylor, L; Hackenberg, W; Bonaccini, D

    2002-12-26

    We have developed a Nd:doped cladding pumped fiber amplifier, which operates at 938nm with greater than 2W of output power. The core co-dopants were specifically chosen to enhance emission at 938nm. The fiber was liquid nitrogen cooled in order to achieve four-level laser operation on a laser transition that is normally three level at room temperature, thus permitting efficient cladding pumping of the amplifier. Wavelength selective attenuation was induced by bending the fiber around a mandrel, which permitted near complete suppression of amplified spontaneous emission at 1088nm. We are presently seeking to scale the output of this laser to 10W. We will discuss the fiber and laser design issues involved in scaling the laser to the 10W power level and present our most recent results.

  7. Biologically inspired band-edge laser action from semiconductor with dipole-forbidden band-gap transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Cih-Su; Liau, Chi-Shung; Sun, Tzu-Ming; Chen, Yu-Chia; Lin, Tai-Yuan; Chen, Yang-Fang

    2015-03-01

    A new approach is proposed to light up band-edge stimulated emission arising from a semiconductor with dipole-forbidden band-gap transition. To illustrate our working principle, here we demonstrate the feasibility on the composite of SnO2 nanowires (NWs) and chicken albumen. SnO2 NWs, which merely emit visible defect emission, are observed to generate a strong ultraviolet fluorescence centered at 387 nm assisted by chicken albumen at room temperature. In addition, a stunning laser action is further discovered in the albumen/SnO2 NWs composite system. The underlying mechanism is interpreted in terms of the fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) from the chicken albumen protein to SnO2 NWs. More importantly, the giant oscillator strength of shallow defect states, which is served orders of magnitude larger than that of the free exciton, plays a decisive role. Our approach therefore shows that bio-materials exhibit a great potential in applications for novel light emitters, which may open up a new avenue for the development of bio-inspired optoelectronic devices.

  8. Biologically inspired band-edge laser action from semiconductor with dipole-forbidden band-gap transition

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Cih-Su; Liau, Chi-Shung; Sun, Tzu-Ming; Chen, Yu-Chia; Lin, Tai-Yuan; Chen, Yang-Fang

    2015-01-01

    A new approach is proposed to light up band-edge stimulated emission arising from a semiconductor with dipole-forbidden band-gap transition. To illustrate our working principle, here we demonstrate the feasibility on the composite of SnO2 nanowires (NWs) and chicken albumen. SnO2 NWs, which merely emit visible defect emission, are observed to generate a strong ultraviolet fluorescence centered at 387 nm assisted by chicken albumen at room temperature. In addition, a stunning laser action is further discovered in the albumen/SnO2 NWs composite system. The underlying mechanism is interpreted in terms of the fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) from the chicken albumen protein to SnO2 NWs. More importantly, the giant oscillator strength of shallow defect states, which is served orders of magnitude larger than that of the free exciton, plays a decisive role. Our approach therefore shows that bio-materials exhibit a great potential in applications for novel light emitters, which may open up a new avenue for the development of bio-inspired optoelectronic devices. PMID:25758749

  9. Completely monolithic linearly polarized high-power fiber laser oscillator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belke, Steffen; Becker, Frank; Neumann, Benjamin; Ruppik, Stefan; Hefter, Ulrich

    2014-03-01

    We have demonstrated a linearly polarized cw all-in-fiber oscillator providing 1 kW of output power and a polarization extinction ratio (PER) of up to 21.7 dB. The design of the laser oscillator is simple and consists of an Ytterbium-doped polarization maintaining large mode area (PLMA) fiber and suitable fiber Bragg gratings (FBG) in matching PLMA fibers. The oscillator has nearly diffraction-limited beam quality (M² < 1.2). Pump power is delivered via a high power 6+1:1 pump coupler. The slope efficiency of the laser is 75 %. The electro/optical efficiency of the complete laser system is ~30 % and hence in the range of Rofin's cw non-polarized fiber lasers. Choosing an adequate bending diameter for the Yb-doped PLMA fiber, one polarization mode as well as higher order modes are sufficiently supressed1. Resulting in a compact and robust linearly polarized high power single mode laser without external polarizing components. Linearly polarized lasers are well established for one dimensional cutting or welding applications. Using beam shaping optics radially polarized laser light can be generated to be independent from the angle of incident to the processing surface. Furthermore, high power linearly polarized laser light is fundamental for nonlinear frequency conversion of nonlinear materials.

  10. High power 938 nanometer fiber laser and amplifier

    DOEpatents

    Dawson, Jay W.; Liao, Zhi Ming; Beach, Raymond J.; Drobshoff, Alexander D.; Payne, Stephen A.; Pennington, Deanna M.; Hackenberg, Wolfgang; Calia, Domenico Bonaccini; Taylor, Luke

    2006-05-02

    An optical fiber amplifier includes a length of silica optical fiber having a core doped with neodymium, a first cladding and a second cladding each with succeeding lower refractive indices, where the first cladding diameter is less than 10 times the diameter of the core. The doping concentration of the neodymium is chosen so that the small signal absorption for 816 nm light traveling within the core is less than 15 dB/m above the other fiber losses. The amplifier is optically pumped with one laser into the fiber core and with another laser into the first cladding.

  11. Multi-kW cw fiber oscillator pumped by wavelength stabilized fiber coupled diode lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becker, Frank; Neumann, Benjamin; Winkelmann, Lutz; Belke, Steffen; Ruppik, Stefan; Hefter, Ulrich; Köhler, Bernd; Wolf, Paul; Biesenbach, Jens

    2013-02-01

    High power Yb doped fiber laser sources are beside CO2- and disk lasers one of the working horses of industrial laser applications. Due to their inherently given robustness, scalability and high efficiency, fiber laser sources are best suited to fulfill the requirements of modern industrial laser applications in terms of power and beam quality. Pumping Yb doped single-mode fiber lasers at 976nm is very efficient. Thus, high power levels can be realized avoiding limiting nonlinear effects like SRS. However the absorption band of Yb doped glass around 976nm is very narrow. Therefore, one has to consider the wavelength shift of the diode lasers used for pumping. The output spectrum of passively cooled diode lasers is mainly defined by the applied current and by the heat sink temperature. Furthermore the overall emission line width of a high power pump source is dominated by the large number of needed diode laser emitters, each producing an individual spectrum. Even though it is possible to operate multi-kW cw single-mode fiber lasers with free running diode laser pumps, wavelength stabilizing techniques for diode lasers (e.g. volume holographic gratings, VHG) can be utilized in future fiber laser sources to increase the output power level while keeping the energy consumption constant. To clarify the benefits of wavelength stabilized diode lasers with integrated VHG for wavelength locking the performance of a dual side pumped fiber oscillator is discussed in this article. For comparison, different pumping configurations consisting of stabilized and free-running diode lasers are presented.

  12. High-power single-frequency fiber lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guan, Weihua

    Single frequency laser sources are desired in many applications. Various architectures for achieving high power single frequency fiber laser outputs have been investigated and demonstrated. Axial gain apodization can affect the lasing threshold and spectral modal discrimination of DFB lasers. Modeling results show that if properly tailored, the lasing threshold can be reduced by 21% without sacrificing modal discrimination, while simultaneously increasing the differential output power between both ends of the laser. A dual-frequency 2 cm silica fiber laser with a wavelength spacing of 0.3 nm was demonstrated using a polarization maintaining (PM) fiber Bragg grating (FBG) reflector. The output power reached 43 mW with the optical signal to noise ratio (OSNR) greater than 60 dB. By thermally tuning the overlap between the spectra of PM FBG and SM FBG, a single polarisation, single frequency fibre laser was also demonstrated with an output power of 35 mW. From the dual frequency fiber laser, dual frequency switching was achieved by tuning the pump power of the laser. The dual frequency switching was generated by the thermal effects of the absorbed pump in the ytterbium doped fiber. Suppression and elimination of self pulsing in a watt level, dual clad ytterbium doped fiber laser was demonstrated. Self pulsations are caused by the dynamic interaction between the photon population and the population inversion. The addition of a long section of passive fiber in the laser cavity makes the gain recovery faster than the self pulsation dynamics, allowing only stable continuous wave lasing. A single frequency, hybrid Brillouin/ytterbium fiber laser was demonstrated in a 12 m ring cavity The output power reached 40 mW with an OSNR greater than 50 dB. To scale up the output power, a dual clad hybrid Brillouin/ytterbium fiber laser was studied. A numerical model including third order SBS was used to calculate the laser power performance. Simulation shows that 5 W single

  13. Optical Fiber Multiplexer For Industrial Nd:YAG Lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goethals, Walther A.

    1989-03-01

    A lot of industrial Nd:YAG lasers are now being equipped with fiber optics for application in flexible manufacturing. One laser can be supplied with several fibers so different processing positions can receive laser power according to the time-and/or energy sharing principle. Most of the time-sharing devices (multiplexers) are based on a galvanometer mirror that couples a converging laser beam into different fibers respectively. From the industry several questions have risen to make these multiplexers faster, more reliable and suitable for smaller diameter fibers. The current designs are limited by the positioning accuracy of the galvanometer mirror and by their sensitiveness to variations in the parameters of the laser beam due to thermal lensing effects. In the patented design of the multiplexer presented here, based on a telescopic image relay and a precision fiber positioning unit, these problems were solved. A prototype has been built which addresses five fibers with 200 μm cores at a switching rate higher than 100 times per second. The fibers have special termination connectors and can be exchanged easily without losing the alignment of the optical system. For spot welding applications with pulsed Nd:YAG lasers this means that this type of multiplexer could be used to take advantage of the high laser pulse rates and the pulse shape and energy programming possibilities that manufacturers of these types of lasers offer nowadays. Another application that has been shown now is the use of several remote laser engraving units served by a single CW/Q-Switched Nd:YAG laser and a fiber multiplexer.

  14. FUNDAMENTAL AREAS OF PHENOMENOLOGY (INCLUDING APPLICATIONS): Ld-Clad-Pumped All-Fiber Tm3+-Doped Silica Fiber Laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yun-Jun; Song, Shi-Fei; Tian, Yi; Wang, Yue-Zhu

    2009-08-01

    The CW 39.4 W all-fiber LD-clad-pumped Tm3+-doped fiber laser output is reported with a slope efficiency of 34% in respect to the pump power. The all-fiber laser is made up by progressively splicing the pigtail fiber, matched FBG fiber and Tm-doped fiber. The reflective FBG and Tm-doped fiber end fresnel reflection build up the laser resonance cavity. Due to the multi-mode FBG as the reflective mirror, the output laser spectrum is multi-peaks at high power output, whereas the total spectrum width is less than 2nm at nearly 1.94 μm.

  15. Process observation in fiber laser-based selective laser melting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thombansen, Ulrich; Gatej, Alexander; Pereira, Milton

    2015-01-01

    The process observation in selective laser melting (SLM) focuses on observing the interaction point where the powder is processed. To provide process relevant information, signals have to be acquired that are resolved in both time and space. Especially in high-power SLM, where more than 1 kW of laser power is used, processing speeds of several meters per second are required for a high-quality processing results. Therefore, an implementation of a suitable process observation system has to acquire a large amount of spatially resolved data at low sampling speeds or it has to restrict the acquisition to a predefined area at a high sampling speed. In any case, it is vitally important to synchronously record the laser beam position and the acquired signal. This is a prerequisite that allows the recorded data become information. Today, most SLM systems employ f-theta lenses to focus the processing laser beam onto the powder bed. This report describes the drawbacks that result for process observation and suggests a variable retro-focus system which solves these issues. The beam quality of fiber lasers delivers the processing laser beam to the powder bed at relevant focus diameters, which is a key prerequisite for this solution to be viable. The optical train we present here couples the processing laser beam and the process observation coaxially, ensuring consistent alignment of interaction zone and observed area. With respect to signal processing, we have developed a solution that synchronously acquires signals from a pyrometer and the position of the laser beam by sampling the data with a field programmable gate array. The relevance of the acquired signals has been validated by the scanning of a sample filament. Experiments with grooved samples show a correlation between different powder thicknesses and the acquired signals at relevant processing parameters. This basic work takes a first step toward self-optimization of the manufacturing process in SLM. It enables the

  16. Single frequency fiber laser at 2.05 μm based on Ho-doped germanate glass fiber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Jianfeng; Yao, Zhidong; Zong, Jie; Chavez-Pirson, Arturo; Peyghambarian, Nasser; Yu, Jirong

    2009-02-01

    A single frequency fiber laser operating near 2 micron with over 50 mW output power has been demonstrated by using a short piece of newly developed single mode holmium-doped germanate glass fiber. Laser from 2004 nm to 2083 nm was demonstrated from a short Ho-doped fiber laser cavity. A heavily thulium-doped germanate fiber was used as an in-band pump source for the holmium-doped fiber laser. The single frequency fiber laser can be thermally tuned.

  17. Below band-gap laser ablation of diamond for transmission electron microscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    George, T.; Foote, M. C.; Vasquez, R. P.; Fortier, E. P.; Posthill, J. B.

    1993-01-01

    A 248 nm excimer laser was used to thin naturally occurring type 1a diamond substrates at normal and glancing (22 deg) incidence. Perforation of a 250-micron-thick substrate was achieved in about 15 min at normal incidence. While the substrate thinned at glancing incidence was found to have large electron-transparent areas, that thinned at normal incidence required additional argon-ion milling to achieve electron transparency. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy of the back surface of the diamond failed to detect any graphite or glassy carbon, confirming that damage due to laser ablation occurs only at the incident surface. Samples prepared using this technique imaged in the transmission electron microscope were observed to have retained the nitrogen platelets characteristic of such type 1a diamonds.

  18. Two-mode multiplexing at 2 × 10.7 Gbps over a 7-cell hollow-core photonic bandgap fiber.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jing; Peucheret, Christophe; Lyngsø, Jens Kristian; Leick, Lasse

    2012-05-21

    Current technologies are fast approaching the capacity limit of single mode fibers (SMFs). Hollow-core photonic bandgap fibers (HC-PBGFs) are expected to provide attractive long-term solutions in terms of ultra-low fiber nonlinearities associated with the possibility of mode scaling, thus enabling mode division multiplexing (MDM). In this work, we demonstrate MDM over a HC-PBGF for the first time. Two 10.7 Gbps channels are simultaneously transmitted over two modes of a 30-m long 7-cell HC-PBGF. Bit error ratio (BER) performances below the FEC threshold limit (3.3 × 10(-3)) are shown for both data channels when the two modes are transmitted simultaneously. No power penalty and up to 3 dB power penalty at a BER of 10(-9) are measured for single mode transmission using the fundamental and the LP(11) mode, respectively. The performance of this exploratory demonstration is expected to improve significantly if advanced mode launching and detection methods are used. PMID:22714232

  19. Reflectivity variation in asymmetric random distributed feedback Raman fiber laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abidin, N. H. Z.; Abu Bakar, M. H.; Tamchek, N.; Mahamd Adikan, F. R.; Mahdi, M. A.

    2016-01-01

    This paper demonstrates and discusses the effect of reflectivity on the intracavity power development and spectral profile of a 41.1 km asymmetric (half-opened cavity) random distributed feedback fiber laser with different pumping schemes. The laser cavity is confined by a fiber Bragg grating and the Rayleigh feedback amplified by Raman scattering effect that serves as virtual random distributed mirrors. The laser performance was observed by integrating a variety of power couplers while employing forward and backward pumping schemes. Forward pumping exhibits greater susceptibility to reflectivity variation compared to backward pumping. Meanwhile, higher reflectivity produced better threshold conditions but at the expense of lower saturation power. A power-saturated laser also manifested a broader spectrum than a laser conducted outside the saturation regime. These research findings will be beneficial in understanding the role of reflectivity and pumping configurations in enhancing asymmetric random distributed feedback fiber laser.

  20. Volume Bragg grating stabilized spectrally narrow Tm fiber laser.

    PubMed

    McComb, Timothy; Sudesh, Vikas; Richardson, Martin

    2008-04-15

    A Tm-doped large mode area (LMA) silica fiber laser has been locked to a stable wavelength of 2,053.9 nm using a volume Bragg grating (VBG). The measured spectral width of the laser output was <300 pm, limited by the spectrometer resolution. Although this laser had modest output (approximately 5W) and slope efficiency (41%), this new approach to spectrally limiting the output of LMA fiber lasers is inherently extendable to kilowatt powers, opening up several applications including high-power pulsed fiber lasers and spectral beam combining. Performance characteristics of the laser compared to one using a dielectric mirror as a high reflector are described, and the results imply low VBG losses. PMID:18414564

  1. Passive mode locking in erbium-ytterbium fiber lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thai, Serey; Hayduk, Michael J.

    1999-11-01

    A novel mode-locked erbium-ytterbium fiber laser operating at 1550 nm using multiple quantum well (MQW) saturable absorbers was developed. The laser was constructed in a Fabry-Perot configuration using a fiber Bragg grating as a front reflector and a fiber Bragg grating output as a back reflector of the laser cavity. The passive mode-locking element placed inside the laser cavity is a 75 period InGaAs/InAlAs MQW saturable absorber grown lattice matched on an InP substrate. The output of the laser was taken through the other available port of a wavelength-division demultiplexer. The laser produced mode-locked output pulse trains at 16.67-MHz repetition rate and 10 mW of average output power.

  2. High power, high efficiency diode pumped Raman fiber laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glick, Yaakov; Fromzel, Viktor; Zhang, Jun; Dahan, Asaf; Ter-Gabrielyan, Nikolay; Pattnaik, Radha K.; Dubinskii, Mark

    2016-06-01

    We demonstrate a high power high efficiency Raman fiber laser pumped directly by a laser diode module at 976 nm. 80 Watts of CW power were obtained at a wavelength of 1020 nm with an optical-to-optical efficiency of 53%. When working quasi-CW, at a duty cycle of 30%, 85 W of peak power was produced with an efficiency of 60%. A commercial graded-index (GRIN) core fiber acts as the Raman fiber in a power oscillator configuration, which includes spectral selection to prevent generation of the 2nd Stokes. In addition, significant brightness enhancement of the pump beam is attained due to the Raman gain distribution profile in the GRIN fiber. To the best of our knowledge, this is the highest power Raman fiber laser directly pumped by laser diodes, which also exhibits a record efficiency for such a laser. In addition, it is the highest power Raman fiber laser (regardless of pumping source) demonstrated based on a GRIN fiber.

  3. 40nm tunable multi-wavelength fiber laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, Qingsong; Wang, Tianshu; Zhang, Peng; Dong, Keyan; Jiang, Huilin

    2014-12-01

    A Brillouin-Erbium multi-wavelength tunable fiber laser at C-band is demostrated. A 10 km long singlemode fiber(SMF), a 6 m long Erbium-doped fiber, two couplers, a wavelength division multiplexer, a isolator, an optical circulator, a 980nm pump laser and a narrow linewidth tunable laser are included in the structure. A segment of 10 km-long single-mode fiber (SMF) between the two ports of a 1×2 coupler is used as Brillouin gain. Ebiumdoped fiber amplifier (EDFA) consists of a segment of 6m er-doped fiber pumped by 980nm laser dioder . A narrow linewidth tunable laser from 1527 to 1607 nm as Brillouin bump, At the Brillouin pump power of 8mW and the 980 nm pump power of 400 mw, 16 output channels with 0.08 nm spacing and tuning range of 40 nm from 1527 nm to 1567 nm are achieved. We realize the tunable output of wavelength by adjusting the 980 nm pump power and the Brillouin pump wavelength. Stability of the multiwavelength fiber laser is also observed.

  4. Laser transmission welding of long glass fiber reinforced thermoplastics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Straeten, Kira; Engelmann, Christoph; Olowinsky, Alexander; Gillner, Arnold

    2015-03-01

    Joining fiber reinforced polymers is an important topic for lightweight construction. Since classical laser transmission welding techniques for polymers have been studied and established in industry for many years joint-strengths within the range of the base material can be achieved. Until now these processes are only used for unfilled and short glass fiber-reinforced thermoplastics using laser absorbing and laser transparent matrices. This knowledge is now transferred to joining long glass fiber reinforced PA6 with high fiber contents without any adhesive additives. As the polymer matrix and glass fibers increase the scattering of the laser beam inside the material, their optical properties, changing with material thickness and fiber content, influence the welding process and require high power lasers. In this article the influence of these material properties (fiber content, material thickness) and the welding parameters like joining speed, laser power and clamping pressure are researched and discussed in detail. The process is also investigated regarding its limitations. Additionally the gap bridging ability of the process is shown in relation to material properties and joining speed.

  5. Switchable quadruple-wavelength Erbium-doped fiber laser based on a chirped fiber grating and polarization-maintaining fiber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Jianqun; Chen, Weicheng; Chen, Guojie

    2016-04-01

    A switchable quadruple-wavelength Erbium-doped fiber laser based on two Sagnac loops with a chirped fiber grating and polarization-maintaining fiber is proposed and demonstrated experimentally at room temperature. The two loops act as comb filters to excite multi-wavelength output. On the basis of the polarization hole burning effect, the laser can switch flexibly to output ten different modes from single-wavelength to quadruple-wavelength. All of the lasing lines with narrow linewidth have the optical signal-to-noise ratio of more than 35 dB. The laser with good power uniformity shows better stability with respect to the wavelength and peak power.

  6. Fiber Sensor Systems Based on Fiber Laser and Microwave Photonic Technologies

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Hongyan; Chen, Daru; Cai, Zhiping

    2012-01-01

    Fiber-optic sensors, especially fiber Bragg grating (FBG) sensors are very attractive due to their numerous advantages over traditional sensors, such as light weight, high sensitivity, cost-effectiveness, immunity to electromagnetic interference, ease of multiplexing and so on. Therefore, fiber-optic sensors have been intensively studied during the last several decades. Nowadays, with the development of novel fiber technology, more and more newly invented fiber technologies bring better and superior performance to fiber-optic sensing networks. In this paper, the applications of some advanced photonic technologies including fiber lasers and microwave photonic technologies for fiber sensing applications are reviewed. FBG interrogations based on several kinds of fiber lasers, especially the novel Fourier domain mode locking fiber laser, have been introduced; for the application of microwave photonic technology, examples of microwave photonic filtering utilized as a FBG sensing interrogator and microwave signal generation acting as a transversal loading sensor have been given. Both theoretical analysis and experimental demonstrations have been carried out. The comparison of these advanced photonic technologies for the applications of fiber sensing is carried out and important issues related to the applications have been addressed and the suitable and potential application examples have also been discussed in this paper. PMID:22778591

  7. Fiber sensor systems based on fiber laser and microwave photonic technologies.

    PubMed

    Fu, Hongyan; Chen, Daru; Cai, Zhiping

    2012-01-01

    Fiber-optic sensors, especially fiber Bragg grating (FBG) sensors are very attractive due to their numerous advantages over traditional sensors, such as light weight, high sensitivity, cost-effectiveness, immunity to electromagnetic interference, ease of multiplexing and so on. Therefore, fiber-optic sensors have been intensively studied during the last several decades. Nowadays, with the development of novel fiber technology, more and more newly invented fiber technologies bring better and superior performance to fiber-optic sensing networks. In this paper, the applications of some advanced photonic technologies including fiber lasers and microwave photonic technologies for fiber sensing applications are reviewed. FBG interrogations based on several kinds of fiber lasers, especially the novel Fourier domain mode locking fiber laser, have been introduced; for the application of microwave photonic technology, examples of microwave photonic filtering utilized as a FBG sensing interrogator and microwave signal generation acting as a transversal loading sensor have been given. Both theoretical analysis and experimental demonstrations have been carried out. The comparison of these advanced photonic technologies for the applications of fiber sensing is carried out and important issues related to the applications have been addressed and the suitable and potential application examples have also been discussed in this paper. PMID:22778591

  8. Optical Fiber Sensing Based on Reflection Laser Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Gagliardi, Gianluca; Salza, Mario; Ferraro, Pietro; Chehura, Edmond; Tatam, Ralph P.; Gangopadhyay, Tarun K.; Ballard, Nicholas; Paz-Soldan, Daniel; Barnes, Jack A.; Loock, Hans-Peter; Lam, Timothy T.-Y.; Chow, Jong H.; De Natale, Paolo

    2010-01-01

    An overview on high-resolution and fast interrogation of optical-fiber sensors relying on laser reflection spectroscopy is given. Fiber Bragg-gratings (FBGs) and FBG resonators built in fibers of different types are used for strain, temperature and acceleration measurements using heterodyne-detection and optical frequency-locking techniques. Silica fiber-ring cavities are used for chemical sensing based on evanescent-wave spectroscopy. Various arrangements for signal recovery and noise reduction, as an extension of most typical spectroscopic techniques, are illustrated and results on detection performances are presented. PMID:22294902

  9. Wavelength switchable graphene Q-switched fiber laser with cascaded fiber Bragg gratings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Man; Chen, Shuqing; Chen, Yu; Li, Ying

    2016-06-01

    We have demonstrated a wavelength switchable graphene Q-switched fiber laser with two cascaded fiber Bragg gratings. Stable Q-switching operation with central wavelength 1542.9 nm (1543.7 nm), repetition rate 28.4 kHz (22.58 kHz), and pulse duration 2.16 μs (2.65 μs) can be obtained by adjusting the intra-cavity birefringence. Moreover, stable dual-wavelength operation with wavelength spacing 0.8 nm can also be observed. The cascaded fiber gratings combined with the graphene saturable absorber provide a simple and feasible way to get versatile pulsed fiber laser.

  10. Efficient single-frequency fiber lasers with novel photosensitive Er/Yb optical fibers.

    PubMed

    Dong, L; Loh, W H; Caplen, J E; Minelly, J D; Hsu, K; Reekie, L

    1997-05-15

    Boron- and germanium-doped highly photosensitive cladding is used in a novel design to achieve photosensitive Er/Yb-doped fibers, permitting short, strong gratings (length approximately 1 cm, reflectivity >99%) to be written without hydrogenation. The high absorption at 980 nm in Er/Yb fibers permits efficient pump absorption over a short device length, which is ideal for achieving highly efficient single-frequency fiber lasers. Both single-frequency Bragg-grating reflector and distributed-feedback lasers with slope efficiencies of 25% with respect to launched pump power have been realized in such fibers. PMID:18185631

  11. Blue laser via IR resonant doubling with 71% fiber to fiber efficiency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Danekar, Koustubh; Khademian, Ali; Shiner, David

    2011-08-01

    We report on high efficiency resonant doubling to 486nm using periodically poled KTP. The IR laser source is an FBG stabilized semiconductor laser with a maximum polarization maintaining (PM) fiber coupled output of 840mW. An output power of 680mW at 486nm was obtained from our optimized cavity, giving net efficiency of 81%. Also, we report an 87.5% net efficiency in coupling of this blue light from the servo locked cavity into a single-mode PM fiber. This gives a total of 71% fiber to fiber efficiency. Furthermore, a wall plug efficiency of 21.4% was obtained.

  12. Blue laser via IR resonant doubling with 71% fiber to fiber efficiency.

    PubMed

    Danekar, Koustubh; Khademian, Ali; Shiner, David

    2011-08-01

    We report on high efficiency resonant doubling to 486 nm using periodically poled KTP. The IR laser source is an FBG stabilized semiconductor laser with a maximum polarization maintaining (PM) fiber coupled output of 840 mW. An output power of 680 mW at 486 nm was obtained from our optimized cavity, giving net efficiency of 81%. Also, we report an 87.5% net efficiency in coupling of this blue light from the servo locked cavity into a single-mode PM fiber. This gives a total of 71% fiber to fiber efficiency. Furthermore, a wall plug efficiency of 21.4% was obtained. PMID:21808365

  13. The development of novel Ytterbium fiber lasers and their applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nie, Bai

    The aim of my Ph.D. research is to push the fundamental limits holding back the development of novel Yb fiber lasers with high pulse energy and short pulse duration. The purpose of developing these lasers is to use them for important applications such as multiphoton microscopy and laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy. My first project was to develop a short-pulse high-energy ultrafast fiber laser for multiphoton microscopy. To achieve high multiphoton efficiency and depth resolved tissue imaging, ultrashort pulse duration and high pulse energy are required. In order to achieve this, an all-normal dispersion cavity design was adopted. Output performances of the built lasers were investigated by varying several cavity parameters, such as pump laser power, fiber length and intra-cavity spectral filter bandwidth. It was found that the length of the fiber preceding the gain fiber is critical to the laser performance. Generally, the shorter the fiber is, the broader the output spectrum is. The more interesting parameter is the intra-cavity spectral filter bandwidth. Counter intuitively, laser cavities using narrower bandwidth spectral filters generated much broader spectra. It was also found that fiber lasers with very narrow spectral filters produced laser pulses with parabolic profile, which are referred to as self-similar pulses or similaritons. This type of pulse can avoid wave-breaking and is an optimal approach to generate pulses with high pulse energy and ultrashort pulse duration. With a 3nm intra-cavity spectral filter, output pulses with about 20 nJ pulse energy were produced and compressed to about 41 fs full-width-at-half-maximum (FWHM) pulse duration. Due to the loss in the compression device, the peak power of the compressed pulses is about 250 kW. It was the highest peak power generated from a fiber oscillator when this work was published. This laser was used for multiphoton microscopy on living tissues like Drosophila larva and fruit fly wings. Several

  14. Hole drilling on glass optical fibers by a femtosecond laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamasaki, Masayuki; Gouya, Kenji; Watanabe, Kazuhiro

    2012-01-01

    A novel optical fiber sensor has been developed for gaseous material detection by means of a femto-second laser which has ultrashort pulse and ultrahigh peak power. This sensor has attractive sensor potion consisted of drilling holes array which is machined on the glass optical fiber. Additionally, the sensor potion is coated with thin gold film. This work expects that an interaction could be induced between transmitted light through fiber core and a bottom of the drilled holes which reaches the fiber core. The interaction could induce near-field optical phenomenon excited by transmitted light through the fiber core. This scheme could make it possible to detect gaseous-material phase substances around the optical fiber. In this study, we found that localized surface plasmon (LSP) was excited by the transmitted light through the fiber core. This paper shows experiment to obtain optimum irradiation conditions and investigation for sensor principle for the development of a novel fiber sensor.

  15. Small core fiber coupled 60-W laser diode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernie, Douglas P.; Mannonen, Ilkka; Raven, Anthony L.

    1995-05-01

    Semiconductor laser diodes are compact, efficient and reliable sources of laser light and 25 W fiber coupled systems developed by Diomed have been in clinical use for over three years. For certain applications, particularly in the treatment of benign prostatic hyperplasia and flexible endoscopy, higher powers are desirable. In these applications the use of flexible optical fibers of no more than 600 micrometers core diameter is essential for compatibility with most commercial delivery fibers and instrumentation. A high power 60 W diode laser system for driving these small core fibers has been developed. The design requirements for medical applications are analyzed and system performance and results of use in gastroenterology and urology with small core fibers will be presented.

  16. High-power synchronously pumped femtosecond Raman fiber laser.

    PubMed

    Churin, D; Olson, J; Norwood, R A; Peyghambarian, N; Kieu, K

    2015-06-01

    We report a high-power synchronously pumped femtosecond Raman fiber laser operating in the normal dispersion regime. The Raman laser is pumped by a picosecond Yb(3+)-doped fiber laser. It produces highly chirped pulses with energy up to 18 nJ, average power of 0.76 W and 88% efficiency. The pulse duration is measured to be 147 fs after external compression. We observed two different regimes of operation of the laser: coherent and noise-like regime. Both regimes were experimentally characterized. Numerical simulations are in a good agreement with experimental results. PMID:26030549

  17. SURFACE MORPHOLOGY OF CARBON FIBER POLYMER COMPOSITES AFTER LASER STRUCTURING

    SciTech Connect

    Sabau, Adrian S; Chen, Jian; Jones, Jonaaron F.; Alexandra, Hackett; Jellison Jr, Gerald Earle; Daniel, Claus; Warren, Charles David; Rehkopf, Jackie D.

    2015-01-01

    The increasing use of Carbon Fiber Polymer Composite (CFPC) as a lightweight material in automotive and aerospace industries requires the control of surface morphology. In this study, the composites surface was prepared by ablating the resin in the top fiber layer of the composite using an Nd:YAG laser. The CFPC specimens with T700S carbon fiber and Prepreg - T83 resin (epoxy) were supplied by Plasan Carbon Composites, Inc. as 4 ply thick, 0/90o plaques. The effect of laser fluence, scanning speed, and wavelength was investigated to remove resin without an excessive damage of the fibers. In addition, resin ablation due to the power variation created by a laser interference technique is presented. Optical property measurements, optical micrographs, 3D imaging, and high-resolution optical profiler images were used to study the effect of the laser processing on the surface morphology.

  18. Application of fiber laser for a Higgs factory

    SciTech Connect

    Chou, W.

    2014-06-04

    This paper proposes a medium size(~6km) circular Higgs factory based on a photon collider. The recent breakthrough in fiber laser technology by means of a coherent amplifier network makes such a collider feasible and probably also affordable.

  19. High performance FBG interrogation technology with scan fiber laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Yuanhong; Ma, Youchun; Yang, Minwei

    2010-11-01

    A Fiber Bragg gratings (FBG) Interrogation scheme with scan fiber laser was demonstrated. The ring cavity scan fiber laser was investigated and the scan fiber laser module was made and test, the 200Hz scan frequency, ~0.02nm line width, more than 40nm scan range and more than 1 mW output power were obtained. A 12 channels, 20 FBGs per channel FBG interrogator was made with this laser module and the high speed signal process circuit base on FPGA. The centroid finding method which has advantage on interrogation speed and accurate was taken for finding the peak of the return FBG spectrum. The FBG interrogator was test and less than 3pm standard deviation with 200Hz scan frequency were obtained.

  20. Theoretical and Experimental Investigations of Novel Fiber Lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walton, Donnell Thaddeus

    Ultrafast science has historically been concerned with the areas of spectroscopy and the study of dynamic processes in the sciences and engineering. With the recent advent of compact, economical sources of ultrashort optical pulses, many potential applications have emerged in the fields of communications, medicine, metrology, and industrial processing. In this thesis, fiber lasers are explored as compact sources of ultra short optical pulses. Several passive modelocking schemes in fiber lasers have been reported. Unfortunately, when implemented in the negative group velocity regime, modelocked fiber lasers are plagued with a multiple-pulsing instability which limits them to low output pulse energy. In this work, a modelocking scheme based on a nonlinear directional coupler is proposed and analyzed. This laser, when embodied as a dual-core fiber, is shown to be immune to the multiple-pulsing instability and produces sub-100-fs pulses in the negative group velocity regime. In the presence of gain saturation, the laser produces 100-fs pulses and can evolve to steady-state from initial noise input when operated under the right conditions. The dual-core fiber laser even produces nanojoule, picosecond when implemented in the regime of positive group velocity dispersion. These pulses are chirped which allows for further compression down to 160 fs. Using a similar model, the first theoretical analysis of passive modelocking in birefringent fiber is performed. The results of the model (45 fs) are in excellent agreement with experimental results (38 fs). Additional wavelengths are also needed if fiber lasers are to be considered viable as compact sources of ultrashort pulses. To this end, a diode-pumped thulium -doped fluorozirconate fiber laser which operates near 800 nm is examined. The upconversion process is shown to be due to avalanche absorption of the pump. By constructing a compact, diode-pumped laser from an unoptimized sample of this fiber, this technique is shown

  1. Even Illumination from Fiber-Optic-Coupled Laser Diodes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howard, Richard T.

    2006-01-01

    A method of equipping fiber-optic-coupled laser diodes to evenly illuminate specified fields of view has been proposed. The essence of the method is to shape the tips of the optical fibers into suitably designed diffractive optical elements. One of the main benefits afforded by the method would be more nearly complete utilization of the available light. Diffractive optics is a relatively new field of optics in which laser beams are shaped by use of diffraction instead of refraction.

  2. Self-Frequency-Doubling Glass-Fiber Laser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Selker, Mark D.; Dallas, Joseph L.

    1993-01-01

    Specially prepared germanium and phosphorous-doped glass optical fiber doped with neodymium shown to act as self-frequency-doubling laser. Self-frequency-doubling fiber laser with further refinements, eliminates need for expensive, easily damaged, nonlinear crystals currently used. Enables one to avoid loss and damage mechanisms associated with interfaces of nonlinear crystals as well as to eliminate angle/temperature phase-matching tuning.

  3. Photonic bandgap amorphous chalcogenide thin films with multilayered structure grown by pulsed laser deposition method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Shao-qian; Němec, Petre; Nazabal, Virginie; Jin, Yu-qi

    2016-05-01

    Amorphous chalcogenide thin films were fabricated by the pulsed laser deposition technique. Thereafter, the stacks of multilayered thin films for reflectors and microcavity were designed for telecommunication wavelength. The prepared multilayered thin films for reflectors show good compatibility. The microcavity structure consists of Ge25Ga5Sb10S65 (doped with Er3+) spacer layer surrounded by two 5-layer As40Se60/Ge25Sb5S70 reflectors. Scanning/transmission electron microscopy results show good periodicity, great adherence and smooth interfaces between the alternating dielectric layers, which confirms a suitable compatibility between different materials. The results demonstrate that the chalcogenides can be used for preparing vertical Bragg reflectors and microcavity with high quality.

  4. Laser-Pulse/Fiber-Optic Liquid-Leak Detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Padgett, M. E.

    1986-01-01

    Several potential leak sites monitored using single sensing fiber. Fluid systems monitored quickly for leaks in remote, hazardous, or inaccessible locations by system of compact, lightweight fiber-optic leak sensors presently undergoing development. Sensors installed at potential leak sites as joints, couplings, and fittings. Sensor read by sending laser pulse along fiber, then noting presence or relative amplitude of return pulse. Leak-monitoring technique applicable to wide range of fluid systems and minimizes human exposure to toxic or dangerous fluids.

  5. Phase generated carrier technique for fiber laser hydrophone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Rizhong; Wang, Xinbing; Huang, Junbin; Gu, Hongcan

    2013-08-01

    A distributed feedback (DFB) fiber laser is compact, and is very suitable for using as a hydrophone to sense acoustic pressure. A DFB fiber laser hydrophone was researched. In the fiber laser hydrophone signal demodulating system, an unbalanced Michelson fiber interferometer and a Phase Generated Carrier (PGC) method were used. The PGC method can be used to demodulating the acoustic signal from the interference signal. Comparing with the Naval Research Laboratory (NRL) method and Naval Postgraduate School (NPS) method, the digitized PGC method requires a greater amount of computation because of the high signal sampling, but it demands only one interference signal which makes the less fiber connections of the fiber laser hydrophone array. So the fiber laser hydrophone array based on the PGC method has lower complexity and higher reliability than that based on the NRL method or NPS method. The experimental results approve that the PGC method can demodulate acoustic signal between 20~2000 Hz frequency range with good signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) when the PZT driving frequency is 20 kHz.

  6. Fiber-optic interferometer using frequency-modulated laser diodes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beheim, G.

    1986-01-01

    This paper describes an electrically passive fiber-optic interferometer which uses dual frequency-modulated laser diodes. Experimental results show that this type of interferometer can attain a displacement range of 100 micron with subnanometer resolution. This technique can serve as the basis for a number of high-precision fiber-optic sensors.

  7. Visible continuum generation using a femtosecond erbium-doped fiber laser and a silica nonlinear fiber.

    PubMed

    Nicholson, J W; Bise, R; Alonzo, J; Stockert, T; Trevor, D J; Dimarcello, F; Monberg, E; Fini, J M; Westbrook, P S; Feder, K; Grüner-Nielsen, L

    2008-01-01

    Supercontinuum extending to visible wavelengths is generated in a hybrid silica nonlinear fiber pumped at 1560 nm by a femtosecond, erbium-doped fiber laser. The hybrid nonlinear fiber consists of a short length of highly nonlinear, germano-silicate fiber (HNLF) spliced to a length of photonic crystal fiber (PCF). A 2 cm length of HNLF provides an initial stage of continuum generation due to higher-order soliton compression and dispersive wave generation before launching into the PCF. The visible radiation is generated in the fundamental mode of the PCF. PMID:18157247

  8. High-brightness, fiber-coupled pump modules in fiber laser applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hemenway, Marty; Urbanek, Wolfram; Hoener, Kylan; Kennedy, Keith W.; Bao, Ling; Dawson, David; Cragerud, Emily S.; Balsley, David; Burkholder, Gary; Reynolds, Mitch; Price, Kirk; Haden, Jim; Kanskar, Manoj; Kliner, Dahv A.

    2014-03-01

    High-power, high-brightness, fiber-coupled pump modules enable high-performance industrial fiber lasers with simple system architectures, multi-kW output powers, excellent beam quality, unsurpassed reliability, and low initial and operating costs. We report commercially available (element™), single-emitter-based, 9xx nm pump sources with powers up to 130 W in a 105 μm fiber and 250 W in a 200 μm fiber. This combination of high power and high brightness translates into improved fiber laser performance, e.g., simultaneously achieving high nonlinear thresholds and excellent beam quality at kW power levels. Wavelength-stabilized, 976 nm versions of these pumps are available for applications requiring minimization of the gain-fiber length (e.g., generation of high-peak-power pulses). Recent prototypes have achieved output powers up to 300 W in a 200 μm fiber. Extensive environmental and life testing at both the chip and module level under accelerated and real-world operating conditions have demonstrated extremely high reliability, with innovative designs having eliminated package-induced-failure mechanisms. Finally, we report integrated Pump Modules that provide < 1.6 kW of fiber-coupled power conveniently formatted for fiber-laser pumping or direct-diode applications; these 19" rack-mountable, 2U units combine the outputs of up to 14 elements™ using fused-fiber combiners, and they include high-efficiency diode drivers and safety sensors.

  9. Application and the key technology on high power fiber-optic laser in laser weapon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qu, Zhou; Li, Qiushi; Meng, Haihong; Sui, Xin; Zhang, Hongtao; Zhai, Xuhua

    2014-12-01

    The soft-killing laser weapon plays an important role in photoelectric defense technology. It can be used for photoelectric detection, search, blinding of photoelectric sensor and other devices on fire control and guidance devices, therefore it draws more and more attentions by many scholars. High power fiber-optic laser has many virtues such as small volume, simple structure, nimble handling, high efficiency, qualified light beam, easy thermal management, leading to blinding. Consequently, it may be used as the key device of soft-killing laser weapon. The present study introduced the development of high power fiber-optic laser and its main features. Meanwhile the key technology of large mode area (LMA) optical fiber design, the beam combination technology, double-clad fiber technology and pumping optical coupling technology was stated. The present study is aimed to design high doping LMA fiber, ensure single mode output by increasing core diameter and decrease NA. By means of reducing the spontaneous emission particle absorbed by fiber core and Increasing the power density in the optical fiber, the threshold power of nonlinear effect can increase, and the power of single fiber will be improved. Meantime, high power will be obtained by the beam combination technology. Application prospect of high power fiber laser in photoelectric defense technology was also set forth. Lastly, the present study explored the advantages of high power fiber laser in photoelectric defense technology.

  10. A multi-wavelength fiber laser based on superimposed fiber grating and chirp fiber Bragg grating for wavelength selection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Feng; Bi, Wei-hong; Fu, Xing-hu; Jiang, Peng; Wu, Yang

    2015-11-01

    In this paper, a new type of multi-wavelength fiber laser is proposed and demonstrated experimentally. Superimposed fiber grating (SIFG) and chirp fiber Bragg grating (CFBG) are used for wavelength selection. Based on gain equalization technology, by finely adjusting the stress device in the cavity, the gain and loss are equal, so as to suppress the modal competition and achieve multi-wavelength lasing at room temperature. The experimental results show that the laser can output stable multi-wavelength lasers simultaneously. The laser coupling loss is small, the structure is simple, and it is convenient for integration, so it can be widely used in dense wavelength division multiplexing (DWDM) system and optical fiber sensors.